Citation
Frank Netherton, or, The talisman

Material Information

Title:
Frank Netherton, or, The talisman
Portion of title:
Talisman
Creator:
Baker, William Jay ( Engraver )
American Sunday-School Union ( Publisher )
American Sunday-School Union -- Committee of Publication
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publisher:
American Sunday-School Union
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
196 p., <4> leaves of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Truthfulness and falsehood -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Forgiveness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
School stories -- 1852 ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
School stories ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Written for the American Sunday-School Union.
General Note:
Added title page: engraved by W.J. Baker.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
revised by the Committee of Publication.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026774436 ( ALEPH )
02533381 ( OCLC )
ALH0284 ( NOTIS )

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BEVISED BY THE COMMITTEE OF PUBLICATI &

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PHILADELPHIA:
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION

1122 CuestNuT Srreet.



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Entered according 10 act of Congress in the year 1852, by the
AMERICAN SUNDA Y-SCHOOL UNION,
én the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of
Pennsyivunia.
mi A ——

Bap No books are published by the AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION
without the sanction of the Committee of Publication, sonsisting of
fourteen members, from the following denominations of Christians,
viz. Baptist, Methodist, Congregationalist, Episcopal, Presbyterian, Lu-
theran and Reformed Dutch. Not more than three of the members
san be of the same denomination, and no book can be published te
whieh any member of the Committee shall object.



CONTENTS

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BRIGHTER DAYS... ..+00+ tte enececsen ene oa ee
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FRANK LEAVES HOME... ...ccscccccscocccccces cccccccccccecece §6 SB
I Taian scnieienieienntinnicennivailitinia aceseccecces 89
BLESSED ARE THE PEACEMAKERS .....00ssesseseee es cccccce 46
A SABBATH-DAY AT SCHOOL.......eeeeeee scvcccccccccccccce 88
LOVE TOUR WRB siicasncnnasreidicsccsciene sescccscscccece | OD
A. Baw HOsaWay, ocoscsssccscicescs ctnciibeentialiocs cosets cteves 68
Good RESOLUTIONS 22.06. seecee eee © cece coccccccccoscccces cocces 74
Sa, Ta iiss tenis vo doiiinenjiatltinbeiaaiaiaias tania oo OF
THERE IS NO PLACE LIKE HoME....... cote odeosoece coosee 88
AARON s crsiansrivceciinmieiienviaiii seis pipet 95
THE CHAMBER OF ANGER. ...00sccscesecs socsee cose cos cocsce 102
SAME BRI, ccccinnccnesnens 00 coscesces concccess cvnceces ccoccccee 100

VUss10NARY THOUGHTS....... «+s. bibtyeenen asaiuiies emanate 118



& CONTENTS

Gop Knows EvERY THING. .ocssseessocesesseeeneseree seers 125
A Time OF TRIAL.. cossossee sosese crosses senvestorensare coeeee ees 133
THE CONFESSION...+++sseee cesses cosees seers saretes eaeene scence 14@
SUNSHINE AFTER STORM... scssssoes sveseoes coreneeee seers — 2
RETRIBUTION «.seseeeceeeeeseerencoeeres covccecs ‘ccneniien ae"
THE MYSTERY EXPLAINED. soeesseee eoooeeees eoeeereee voeee: 164
BETTER THAN A PRIZE. ..+0++ cesses veeces seeeeevveees sececeers 174
Home FOR THE HOLIDAYS... eoncecses covseceee ccececes sees 181

THE ERD. cocccccce coccccces coccce cocccs 00000 0eee: © +» Ceeece o: cece 191





FRANK NETHERTON,



CHAPTER I.
FRANK NETHERTON.

Tue mother of Frank Netherton died at his
birth, and from that time his father would
scarcely suffer him to be out of his sight. No
one thought that the infant would have lived ;
but God, who tempers the- wind to the shorn
lamb, took care of the little, motherless one,
and raised him up to be a comfort to his sur-
viving parent. Frank was never so happy as
when seated on his little stool at his father’s
feet, learning “something new,” as he termed
it; or listening to the wonderful histories of
foreign lands which he used to tell him.

When Frank was six years old he knew more
than most boys of ten or twelve, and was so
quick and diligent that it was a pleasure to
teach him. Many people rernarked, and with
truth, that he understood almost too much for
his age; and that he often sat poring over his
book when he ought to have keen plv ying about

9



10 FRANK NETHERTON.

in the green fields. That might have been
partly the reason why he was not strong and
healthy like other children, but used often to
come and rest his weary head against his fa
ther’s knee, and ask him to repeat the story of
the child who went out to his father among the
reapers, and said to him all on a sudden, ‘“‘ My
head! my head!” and was borne home to his
mother and died, and was raised again by the
power of God. Frank liked all the Old Testa-
ment histories, but this was his favourite at
suck times, and he never grew tired of hear-

he

+, Netherton was a man of studious and
retired habits. After the death of his wife,
whom he tenderly loved, he cared less than
ever for society, and wholly devoted himself to
his books and the education of his little son.
But his health rapidly declined; so rapidly of
late, that the old housekeeper, who had lived
in the family for many years, and was much
attached to her master, thought it her duty to
write to his sister, (the only relative he had in
the world,) and confide to her the fears she felt
for the result.

Mrs. Mortimer set off immediately on receiv-
ing the letter, and arrived quite unexpectedly,
and much to the surprise of every one but the
faithful domestic before mentioned. The bro-
ther and sister had not met since the death of
his wife. She had been opposed to their mar-
riage; but all unkind feeling on both sides was



FRANK NETHERTON. 11

ouriel in the grave, and Mrs. Mortimer em
braced her little nephew with almost maternas
affection.

“Le is very like you, William,” said she,
looking at her brother with the tears in her
eyes. “ But how short for his age! Why, my
Frederick, who is only a year older, is more
than head and shoulders taller. And how pale
he is! I am afraid that he does not take exer-
cise enough. William, you are killing this boy
by inches.”

“My dear sister!” exclaimed Mr. Nether-
ton. “But he is not ill. You are not ill,
Frank, are you?” and he trembled as he took
the boy’s little thin hand in his.

“No, father; my head does not ache to-
day.”

«Go away, child,” said Mrs. Mortimer.
“Go into the garden and amuse yourself.”

Frank immediately obeyedsher; but he took
his book with him, and sat down under the trees
to read it.

“You are killing the boy, I tell you,” re.
peated Mrs. Mortimer, when he was gone, “and
yourself too. The air of this close room is ab-
solutely poisonous. No wonder the poor child
looks so pale and miserable. You must get him
a pony the first thing.”

“He shall have one to-morrow,” said Mr.
Netherton.

“And you must ride and walk with him
every day,”



12 FRANK NETHERTON.

«JT do not think that I could walk very fur,”
said her brother, with a sigh—thus uncon
sciously admitting his own weakness.

“ Not just at first perhaps; and yet how you
and I used to walk, William! Do you re-
member ?”’

“Yes; we were children at that time.’’

“ About the age of our children now. Do
you imagine that Frank could walk as you did
then ?”’

“T am afraid not.

“Well, well, I will not say (as I have heard
some people) that what is done cannot be un-
done, but will try and help you to undo it aa
fast as possible. Look at the boy now. In-
stead of playing about like other children, there
he is, lying under the trees, reading. William,

ou will be very sorry for all this if you should
ose your child.”

«{ am sorry now,” replied the sick man,
meekly. ‘ You are right, dear sister. I am
afraid that I have been very thoughtless and
selfish. God forgive me. You will stay here
a little while, will you not, and help me to
amend the past 2”

Mrs. Mortimer was touched by his gentle
ness .and forbearance, and with much kindness
of manner promised not to leave the Grange
until they were both better.

Mrs. Mortimer was by several years older than
her brother, and had always exercised upon
him that influence which a strong mind invari-

99

~~



FRANK NETHERTON. 13



abty possesses over a weak one, until his mar
riage, which, as before stated, she had opposed.
It matters little now what her reasons were for
this opposition. She thought herself right at
the time, but was very sorry for it afterwards,
and when, alas! it was toolate. She wrote and
told her brother this; but, with his loss stil]
fresh upon his mind, his reply to her letter was
such as prevented all intercourse between them
for some years.

Beneath a somewhat rough exterior, Mrs.
Mortimer possessed a kind heart, and much
practical good sense, which only required at
tunes to be exercised in a gentler spirit. At
the period of which we are speaking she was a
widow, with one son, Frederick, and a little
girl, whom she called Helen, after her sister-in-
law. Mr. Netherton was pleased when she told
him of this mark of attention, and beggeil
earnestly that the child might be sent for, anid
that Frederick might also be permitted to spend
his holidays at the Grange ; to all of which Mrs,
Mortimer willingly agreed.

“Tam so glad that you are come,”’ said he.
“Tt was very kind in you, after that cruel letter.
I have often thought of sending to ask you, but
I put it off from time to time, and should have
done so, I believe, until it was too late. I used
to think, when I am dying she will not refuse
to forgive and come to me again.”

if We were both to blame,” answered Mrs.

ortimer, with tears in her eyes: “I the most



14 FRANK NETHERTON.

eo; but my little Helen must plead for me.
Now do not let us say any thing more about
added she, observing that her brother looked
pale and exhausted; ‘and I will write at once
and make arrangements for her coming.”

But before Mrs. Mortimer began to write, she
went into the garden and took Frank’s book
away, bidding him run about, and not lie there
on the damp grass.

«“ Have you a hoop ?” she asked.

“Yes, aunt, I believe 0.”

“Well, we must look for it; and when your
cousin Frederick comes, he will teach you all
sorts of games. Shall you not like to have some
one to play with?”

“Yes, very much,” answered Frank; “but
I like being with my father.”

“ Are any of these flower-beds your's?” in-
quired his aunt.

“No, the gardener takes care of them.”

“We must ask your father to give you one
to dig and plant, and do what you please with—
shall we? And a little rake, and a hoe, and a
watering-pot 2”

Frank’s eyes glistened with pleasure.

«That would be delightful !” exclaimed he.
And then slipping his hand into Mrs. Morti-
mer’s, he added, in a confidential tone, “It is
very strange, but I was just reading about
fowers when you came into the garden; and
bow some bloom till December, while others
perish in May. I think that if I were a flower,

ee



FRANK NETHERTON. 15



dear aunt, I would rather die in May, when
every thing looks so bright.”’

‘“‘ But as you are not a flower, Frank, but a
little boy, I do not see any use in thinking
about it.”

‘“‘ One cannot help thinking,” said Frank.

““What a little, old-fashioned thing he is,’
murmured his aunt. ‘But then Frederick
might have been the same if he had had no
mother ;” and passing her hand carelessly over
his long hair, which she inwardly determined
should be cut off the first opportunity, and
cautioning him not to remain after the dew
began to fall, she went into the house to write
her letters.





it FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER Il.

BRIGHTER DAYS.

Wuen Frank returned to the study, he four.¢ ©
his father still sitting where he had left him,
with his face bent down and buried in his
hands.
«Are you ill?” he asked, gently. Mr.
Netherton started, and drawing Frank towards
him, embraced him in silence.
“Father,” exclaimed Frank, after a pause,
‘vou are thinking of what my aunt said just
now about me ; but indeed I do not want to live
after you are gone.
_ Mr. Netherten aroused himself at the voice
of his child, and, struggling against his own
weakness, both of mind and body, answered
cheerfully.

“You must not say that, Frank. I hope,
‘f it is God’s will, that you may live to be a
reat and good man, and do good to others.”

“Like Howard, for instance, who went about
visiting all the prisons. How much good he
flid !” se
“Yes; you must study hard while you are
a boy—‘that is, not too hard; and when you
are a man, there is no fear but what God will
give you something to do for himself aud others.



%

FRANK NETHERTON. 17



*‘Y should like to be a missionary, such as
Henry Martyn was, whose life you were reading
the other morning.”

‘‘ There is time enough to think what you wil!
be ten years hence. And now I will tell you
something that I think will give you pleasure.
You remember the pretty bay pony which you
admired so much the other day ?”’

‘Oh yes, to be sure I do.” |

“Well, it is your’s; and to-morrow you shall
begin to learn to ride.”

Frank clapped his hands for joy.

“ But will you not ride too, father ?”’

‘Yes, as soon as ever you are able to accom-
pany me.”

“* Flow delightful that will be! How kind in
you to think of it!”

“It was your aunt who first thought of it,
Frank; so you must thank her. I need not
tell you to be very obedient to her, and to do
all that she bids you, for I am sure that it will
be for your good.”

Frank promised that he would. And then
he related to his father what she had said
about the garden, and obtained his willing con-
sent that a small portion of it should be allotted
to Frank’s exclusive use.

“T will see the gardener about ‘t the first
thing to-morrow morning,” said Mr. Netherton,
“and order him to procure tools suited to your
size and strength, and whatever seeds or cuttings
you may require.”

ae



&

18 FRANK NETHERTON.



“T must ask my aunt about that,” said
Frank.

At that moment Mrs. Mortimer entered the
study, and smilingly inquired what he was
going to ask her with-that radiant countenance.

“T declare the boy has quite a colour,” said
she, pinching his flushed cheek. ‘“‘ But come
to tea now, and then to bed. I never allow my
children to sit up late. You know the old
_ William,” added she, turning to her

rother,

«s¢Early to bed, and early to rise,
Makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.’ ”

“JT knew a great many things once that I
have forgotten,” replied Mr. Netherton, as he
offered her his arm. ‘“ You must remind me
of them, my dearest sister.”

«To be sure I will. Come along, Frank.”
And her cheerful voice sounded pleasantly in
the long silent halls of the old Grange, where
no female, except the domestics, had ever come
since the death of its gentle mistress.

“But about the seeds, aunt,” said Frank,
as soon as they were seated at the table.
«“ What sort had I better have ?”’

“Come to me to-morrow morning, and we
will talk it over. You will find me in the gar-
den by six o'clock.”

«“ Six o'clock !”” repeated Frank.

“Well, is that tor early? Do you not think



FRANK NETHERTON. 19



that you are as capable of getting up early as
[ am ?”

“‘Why, I suppose you are used to it, aunt.”

Mrs. Mortimer could not help smiling.

“And you must get used to it, too, Frank,
Do you understand any thing of arithmetic ?”

“Yes, aunt.”

“Well, then, to-morrow you shall calculate
for yourself how many years are wasted in
an average lifetime by lying in bed in the
morning.”

“And the shorter the life is,” said Frank,
thoughtfully, ‘the less we can spare them. I
will begin to-morrow morning. I am deter-
mined.”

“Do so, my dear boy, and you will soén
reap the benefit of it every way. And in order
that you may be the better able to keep your
good resolutions, I would advise your going to
hed at once.” | : ,

Frank was very obedient; and hastily swal-
lowing his tea, he arose from his chair, and
went away without another word,—having first
kissed his father, and held up his face to his
aunt with an affectionate confidence that come
pletely won her heart. |
_ “God bless you, my child!” said Mrs. Mor-
timer; and then turning to his father she
added, “IT need not ask whether you have
taught him to pray. Whatever you may have
neglected, Williaw Iam sure that you have not
forgotten that.”

t



20 FRANK NETHERTON.

After Frank was gone, Mr. Nethertcn and
nis sister had a long and earnest conversation
together, in which he admitted the justice and
good sense of all her plans, and promised his
assistance in carrying them into practice. And
then they both kneeled down and asked God's
blessing upon the future, without which they
could never hope to succeed, leaving the result
to Him who orders all things for the best, and
who, as Mr. Netherton said, had sent her to
save his child.

From that time Mr. Netherton ceased to
talk to Frank of the past, but spoke cheerfully
and hopefully of the present and of the future.
And when -he did allude (as he could not help
occasionally doing) to her who was never long
absent from his thoughts, he spoke of the joy
that it would give her—if angels are permitted
to behold what passes upon earth—to see her
beloved child good and happy.

Since Mrs. Mortimer’s arrival, a change
seemed to have come over the whole establish-
ment at the Grange. Some of the servants were
sent away, and no one missed them; while the
others were obliged to do their duty, and, above
all, to attend public worship regularly on the
Sabbath, besides being ready for family worship,
which Mr. Netherton conducted with his hcuse-
hold morning and evening. At such times, or
when she listened to the merry voices of Frank
and his cousin Helen, and saw her master
smilingly regarding their childish sports, the



FRANK NETHERTON. 21



faithful housekeeper blessed the hour when God
had put it into her heart to write zhe letter
which had brought back Mrs. Mortimer to the
home of her childhood, and made them all
friends again.

Helen was a quiet, good-tempered little girl,
and Frank soon became very fond of her, and
used to give ner all his prettiest flowers, and
was never weary of playing with her, and re-
lating stories, the greater part of which she did
not half understand.

‘‘ How much cousin Frank knows!’ said He.
Jen one day to her mother. |

“Yes, I dare say it appears so to you, Helen,
who are only a little girl.”

Frank coloured.

“I do not believe that Frederick knows half
as many wonderful things,” persisted Helen.
‘“‘Tell mother about the nasturtiums, cousin.
Only think, dear mother, on summer nights they
actually—what was it, cousin ?”

‘‘Kmit,” interrupted Frank.

“Emit sparks of fire. Who was it that first
saw them, Frank ?”’

“The daughter of Linnzus, the great bota-
nist.”

“T forget what you told me botany meant.”

“The natural history of plants and vegeta-
bles,”’ replied her mother ; “in which Linneus,
by great perseverance and application, was well
skilled. It has been said of him, that he never
took « thing in hand which he did not resolutely



-

22 FRANK NETHER1 DN.



accomplish and bring to an end; and therein
lies the secret of his success. Application and
ebservation are two very desirable ualifica-
tions. It was doubtless by means of the latter
that his daughter made the discovery about the
nasturtiums. We may all make discoveries, if
we will only learn to use our eyes.”

« «Byes and no eyes,’ Helen. You remem-
ber that story?” said her cousin. “ How I
should like it if you and I could make some
wonderful discovery !”

«“ But we are only children,” answered Helen,
meekly.

“[ have heard my father say,” continued
Frank, ‘‘that it was two little children who
first invented, or led to the invention of the
telescope. ‘They were playing one day in their
father’s shop at Middleburg—we will look for
Middleburg on the map when we go in—and
chanced to set up two pieces of glass, such as
are used in making spectacles, at a little dis-
tance from each other, when, to their great sur-
prise, they saw the church steeple, which was
in reality a long way off, nearer than they had
ever seen it before, and every thing else as near
in comparison. Did you ever look through a
telescope, Helen ?”’

“Yes, once when we were by the seaside ;
and.it seemed to bring the ships close to the
shore, so that we could see what some of the
men were doing on board.” ,

“Well, I suppose the children could not see



FRANK NETHERTON. 4



quite 30 plainly as that; but they were ver
much astonished, and ran to tell their father
what they had discovered, who immediately
procured some pieces of glass of the same size,
which he fixed in tubes; and so the telescope
was first invented.”

“How strange, was it not, mother?” gaid

elen.

“Not strange, my dear, but very interesting.
It was observation led tothe invention of the tele-
Scope, and application which finally brought it
to its present perfection. Iam glad, my dear
Frank, to find how well you remember what
you read and hear. After dinner I will have
the great telescope fixed up on the balcony, an¢
you shall both look through it as long as yo:
please.”

-—
ul ita
e MiNi
A

es |
hw" |) QQ

.

i} tt | \ vr ny
Ha Wi \
Hi 3 \ KY =i





24 FRANK NETUERTON.



CHAPTER Il.

THE COUSINS.

In was a hippy day for Helen when het
brother arrived to spend his holidays at the
Grange ; for she was very fond of him, notwith-
standing he used to tease her a great deal.
Frederick, as his mother had observed, although
only a year older than his cousin Frank, was
at least a head and shoulders taller. He was
a, fine, active, high-spirited boy, somewhat wilful
and overbearing, but good-natured and warl-
hearted.

Nothing could be more unlike in appearance
and disposition than the two cousins. re-
derick was cheerful and talkative, and often
said a great many things which were better
left unsaid; and for which, (although he was
too proud to acknowledge it,) he was sorry
afterwards. Frank was_ Iso cheerful, but
quieter. When he did speak, it was generally
to the purpose. Frederick was so restless that
+t was with difficulty he could sit still, or fix his
attention. upon any subject for more than a
few moments at a time. Frank sat and studied
too much, and seldom cared to take that exer-
cise and relaxation which is 80 necessary, as
well as natural, for the young. The one wante
application, the other activity.



Frank Netherton.





Coa

FRANK NETHERTON. 2



Frederick was proud and sensitive: the fear
of ridicule, or the laughter of his companions,
would turn him away even from what he knew
to be right. He was not physically, but morally,
a coward. He was afraid to think for himself.
Frank was singularly fearless both in mind and
body. He always said what he thought, with-
out caring what others thought of him. Mr.
Netherton had been very anxious to encourage
this feeling ; but he also never failed to remind
him, that although the truth must be spoken at
all times, it should be spoken in love; that we
may be perfectly sincere, without being hersh
orunkind. To be sure, Frank had yet to arn
whether he could bear being ridiculéd for his
opinions.

It is strange how the fear of God casts out
the fear of man. If we can feel quite ture
that God approves of our tho ughts and actions,
how trifling, in comparison, appears the approval
of others! 2 ee |

The cousins had been talking together a few
weeks after Frederick’s arrival, at

“I dare say,” observed he, “that I am just
as good as you, only I do not make such a fuss
about it. If I did, I should be well laughed at
at school, I can tell you.”

“I do not pretend to be good,” answered
Frank; “but I do not see why I should be
ashamed of trying to be bet ter, or of talking
about that which can alone make me so.”

“It is all very well here, with my uncle



26 FRANK NETHERTON,
and little Helen; but we have no saints at
school.”

«T have heard my father say,” replied Frank,
“that the word saint is often used in the same
gense as believer. Are there no believers at
your school - ,

«“ Pghaw !”” exclaimed Frederick, impatiently.
“Do ane take us for heathens 7

«hen if Christians, why be ashamed of
Christ ?”’

“Jt is all very well at present,” said Frede-
rick, “but I should like to see what you would
do at school: and it is not improbable that 1
may, from what I overheard mother say yester-
day to my uncle. ; :

« Why, what could that be? But do not tell
me. If my father wishes me to know, he will
tell me himself.” :

“Should you like to g0 back. with me,
Frank ?”’

“JT do not know; I never thought about it.
I think I should; only I should be sorry to
leave my dear father. Wordsworth, I remem-
ber, calls his school-days ‘ the golden time.’ ”’

“Ah! that was when he was a man. But
can tell you that it is a great bore, having to
study so many hours, and being obliged to learn,
whether you like it or not. To be sure, the
play-time is pleasant enough; and the half-
holidays, when it does not rain. Dut I do not
know rhat you would do in play-time. Why,

ycu do not know a sin gle game.



FRANK NETHERION. 27



‘“‘T suppose I could learn.” ;

“T do not know,” replied Frede:ick, gazing
tather contemptuously at his cousin’s slight,
delicate form. ‘“‘ We call such fellows as you,
girls, at school.”

“Never mind, Frank,” said little Helen,
kindly. “I do not mind being called a girl.”

Neither of the cousins could help laughing.

“‘That is because you are a girl. But you
would mind being called a Tom-boy,”’ said her
brother.

“She need not,” interrupted Frank, “ be-
cause it would not be the truth. It does not
signify what any one says of us, if we know that
it is untrue.”

“Very well, Mr. Philosopher,” said Frede-
rick, shaking his head; “we shall see.”

Frederick was right in supposing that, in all
probability, his cousin would accompany him
back to school. When Mrs. Mortimer first
spoke of it to her brother, he instantly and
decidedly refused to part with him; but she
gradually succeeded in convincing him how
much it would be for Frank’s advantage in
every way, and a reluctant consent was at
length obtained.

“Be it so,” said Mr. Netherton. “Let him
go and form fresh connections and associations
that may be needful for him, should it please
God to take me away. As it is, I fear that such
an event would break the poor child’s heart.”

“Let us hope better things,” replied his



98 FRANZ NETHERTON.



sister, gently. “You are already considerably
stronger; and Frank is quite a different boy
from what he was a month ago.”

“Thanks to you.”

“Thanks to God! my dear brother. I trust,
if it be his will, you may be spared many years
to see your son become all that you could wish.
Frank is a noble little fellow; but as yet he is
only a dreamer. It will be good both for his
mind and body to associate for a time with other
boys, and learn to act as well as to think for
himself; and to join not only in their studies,
but their sports. It is not enough to be wise
and learned ; we must also be useful and active
—men and boys more especially.”

Mr. Netherton admitted that she was right,
with a sigh for his own helplessness. — Sorrow,
and a lingering, although painless disease, had
made him what he was: but‘it had not been so
in past days, and he could still anticipate a
brighter future for his child.

Frank could not help feeling sad at the

thought of leaving home, and, above all, his.

kind and indulgent parent, from whom he had
never before been separated, even for a single
day; but Mrs. Mortimer had warned him, for
that parent’s sake, to try and control his emo-
tion. The little fellow obeyed her as well as
he was able: but it was a hard trial for his for-
titude—almost his first trial. Even the bay
pony and the flower-garden came in for a share
of his regrets, although little Helen promised



FRANK NETHERTON. 81



to take the latter under her cwn .are; Mrs
Mortimer having consented to continue to re-
side at the Grange, at least for the present.

Frederick did very little towards encouraging
his young companion, for he warned him he
must not look to him for every thing, but fight .
his own battles, as he himself had been obliged
to do when he first went to school. To which
Frank replied, that he did not want any one to
fight his battles, and that he had no doubt but
what he should do very well, although, in his
heart, he could not help thinking his cousin
somewhat unkind.

It was not ill-nature, but the fear of being
laughed at, which made Frederick determine to
hold back until he had seen how Frank was
likely to be received. He felt half ashamed
that a cousin of his should be so profoundly
ignorant of all that he thought it necessary for
a school-boy to know.

‘What is the use of his Greek and Latin,”
argued. Frederick, ‘“‘when he understands no-
thing of cricket, and cannot even play at foot
ball? And then he is such a little fellow—
though, to be sure, he cannot help that—and
has such old-fashioned notions. He is sure to
be quizzed.”



382 FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER IV.
FRANK LEAVES HOME.

_ THE ev»ning before Frank left home, he went
into the study to have what he called “a last
look.” ‘There stood his father’s easy chair, and
his own little stool on which he had so often sat
at his feet, and listened to his conversation, in
which amusement, instruction, and something
higher still, were ever carefully blended to-
gether; where he had so often heard his fayour-
_ ite story of the child and the reapers. And
now he was going away for months, and he
might never hear that dear father’s voice again.
Child as he was, Frank knew the sad meanin
of the word death. His little heart was full to
bursting ; and kneeling down before the chair,.
he buried his head in its cushions, and wept.

Mr. Netherton entered unperceived, and
thinking that he was praying, stood a moment
unwilling to.interrupt him, while his own heart
ascended in earnest supplication to the throne
of grace; until aroused by a passionate sob.

“My son, my dear son!” exclaimed Mr
Netherton, bending over him. The sight of his
pale face recalled to Frank his aunt’s warning,
and he hastily arose.



FRANK NETHERTON. 38



“Forgive me,” said he. “TI could not help
weeping just for a moment when I thought of
all the happy hours we have spent there together. -
But I dare say that I shall be very happy at
school after a time.”

“T hope so, Frank. You must write to me.
My chief pleasure when you are uway, will be to
hear of your well-doing. It is pleasant to think
shat your cousin Frederick will be with you.”

Frank was too truthful to say yes; so he
said nothing. Mr. Netherton sat down in his
easy-chair, and Frank placed himself once again
at his feet.

“Tell me a story, father,” said he, after a
pause: “one more story, as you used to do
before my aunt came.”’

“There is no time for a story now, Frank;
or we shall keep that kind aunt waiting tea for
us. But I will tell you a little anecdote I read
the other day, and which I believe to be a
fact.”

“‘ A negro woman, in one of the West Indian
Islands, was once forbidden by her master to
attend public worship, and threatened with se-
vere punishment if she ventured to go. Although
a slave, the poor woman was a sincere and hum-
ble follower of Him who, when he was reviled,
reviled notagain. The greatest pleasure which
she had was in going to the house of God to
hear about the Lord Jesus Christ, and that
better land where there shall be no more sorrow
nor sighing, and which he had purchased for her



84 ¥YRANK NETHERTON.



with nis precious blood. Her disappow.tment
was great; but she only lifted up her hands and
eyes to heaven, and answered meekly, ‘I must
tell de Lord dat.’ It is said that this touching
reply,—this quiet appeal to a higher tribunal,—
so affected her owner that he no longer refused
the desired permission. God softened the heart
of the master, for the sake of his poor, oppressed
servant.”

“‘T like that!” said Frank.

“And will you endeavour to remember it,
my dear boy; and bring all your little trials
and troubles to the Lord, to your heavenly
Father—in full assurance of his love and tender
compassion for Jesus’ sake? Commit your way
unto the Lord, and he will bring it ‘to pass.
Tell your difficulties and disappointments to
him. Leave every thing in his hands. He
knoweth best, and will do for us above all that we
can desire or deserve. You believe this, Frank ?”

“Tam sure of it,” replied the boy, raising
his bright, trustful glance to his father’s face.

“Tt is well, And now I have a present for
you, my dear boy, which I think you will like,”
said Mr. Netherton, placing a small clasped
Bible in the hands of his son. “I need not tell
you to value it.”

“Oh, thank you, dear father. I do like it
very much indeed,” replied Frank, with glis-
tening eyes.

“You will read a chapter, as usual, morning
and evening,” said Mr. Netherton. “And you



FRANK NETHERTON. 85



must not neglect to pray at the same time. 1
know that you will have a great deal to do and
to think of at school, and very little time to
yourself; but, as the good Mr. Cecil observes,
‘a Christian will find his parenthesis for prayer
even through his busiest hours.’ ”

‘I suppose he meant that he would make it,”
said Frank.

“It is not improbable that such was his mean-
ing. But I have one more thing to say. Iam
not afraid of your being idle, Frank, so much
as I am that you will study too hard. Remem-
ber that I would rather see a little colour in

our cheeks, than the first prize in your hand.”
He could not trust himself to add more; but
Frank knew by the faltering voice, and the
trembling of the hand which rested upon his
shoulder, how tenderly he was beloved, and pro-
mised faithfully to recollect and obey his injune-
tions; after which they went into the drawing-
room to tea. .

Notwithstanding all Mrs. Mortimer’s efforts to
the contrary, in which she was warmly seconded
by her son, the evening passed gloomily away.
Little Helen wept at the thought of parting
with her “two brothers,” as she called them ;
and Frank, but for shame, would fain have sat
down and mingled his tears with hers. Al-
thcugh he endeavoured to exert himself to ap-
poe cheerful, his heart was sad whenever he

ooked up and met his father’s gaze fixed ear-
nestly upor him. |



86 FRANK NETILERTON.



Tt had been arranged that the boys were te
start by an early coach on the following murn-
ing, accompanied by a trustworthy domestic;
and Mr. Netherton had promised not to attempt
to rise at so unusual an hour: the parting,
therefore, was to take place at night. Frank
bore it bravely for his father’s sake.

“What if I should never see him again!”
exclaimed Mr. Netherton, as the door closed.

‘Let us hope better things,” said his sister ;
“but endeavour, nevertheless, to say, ‘God's
will be done.’ ”’

Mr. Netherton bent down his head, and his
whispered “Amen” spoke of a meek and chas-
tened spirit.

Mrs. Mortimer came into Frank’s room after
he was in bed. The pillow was wet with his
tears, and he turned away his head, that she
might not see how freely he had wept.

“Never mind, Frank,” said his aunt,—ten-
derly embracing him. “It is natural that you
should grieve at leaving home for the first time.
You have shown a great deal of self-control
before your poor father, and I am much pleased
with you.”

“Do you think my father so very ill?” asked
Frank, earnestly.

“He requires great care ; but there is nothing
at present that need render you uneasy. Ineed
not tell you that he will be taken good care of
in your absence.”

“ And if he should be worse ?”—



FRANK NETHERTON. 87



‘1 will send for you at once :—not that you ~
could do any good, but because it would be a
comfort to you.”

“My dear, dear aunt, how kind you are!”
exclaimed Frank, throwing his arms round her
neck. ‘ How much I love you!”

“T am glad of that. I want you to love me,
and to look upon me as a mother.”

A pang of sorrow went through Mrs. Morti-
mer’s heart as she pronounced the last word ;
but Frank’s affectionate caresses soothed her
again.

“Now go to sleep,” said she, (after a pause,
and laying him gently back on the pillow,)
“that you may be able to rise early to-morrow
morning. I hope that you and Frederick will
be good friends. I give you the same advice I
have always given him. Let nothing induce you
to deviate from the truth, or to tell tales of your
companions. The liar and the talebearer are
despised. Study in school, and play out of it.
The more exercise you take, the better. Be
neither a tyrant nor a slave; but kind, and ever
ready to oblige. Do your duty; and always
endeavour to act rightly, without caring about
the consequences. Have no fear but the fear
of God. May he bless and watch over you, my
dear child, for Jesus’ sake !”

Again Mrs. Mortimer kissed his cheek, and
Wrank felt a tear there that was not his own;
but before he could speak, she was gone.

Frank did not see his father again hefore he



88 FRANK NETHERTON.



started; but when he bent forward to catch a
last glimpse of the old Grange, he noticed that
the blind in Mr. Netherton’s room was drawn
slightly aside, and felt that he watched and
blessed him.

“Do not cry, Frank,” said his cousin, at
length. “ After all, you will not find a school-
life so bad, when once you are used to it. I
rather like going back now. But to be sure, I
felt as you do at first.”

“Tt is not that. I should not so much mind
going to school,” said Frank, “if I were quite
sure of finding all right on my return.”

“You are thinking of your father. He will
get better.” :

“Oh, I hope so!” ,

“Tam sure of it,” repeated Frederick, en-
couragingly. ‘‘ My mother is a capital nurse.”

Frank did not reply; but after a few mo-
ments he wiped away his tears, and spoke cheer-
fully. He had placed the matter in God’s
hands, and asked him to take care of his dear
father for bim until he came back again.





FRANK NETHERTON. ag



CHAPTER V.
SCHOOL TRIALS.

Nea LY all the boys had returned, and were
assembled in the school-room when the cousins .
arrived. Mr. Campbell received them kindly,
and having shaken hands and exchanged a few
words with his new pupil, he introduced him to
his school-fellows, and consigning him more
especially to the care of his cbusin, left them
together.

Frederick had a thousand things to tell his
companion$ ; a thousand questions to ask and
answer as to where they had been, and what
they had done during the holidays; and Frank
meanwhile stood by, unnoticed and alone, and
feeling almost ready to cry. When at length
they did begin to notice him, he was not much
better off, for they only smiled and whispered
to one another ; and he observed that Frederick
appeared to be as much amused as the rest.
Frank began to look as well as feel very sad
and dismal in that room full of strange faces,
and a tear stole down his flushed cheek.

“What is the matter?’ asked one of the
boys. ‘Are you mother-sick already ?”

‘That cannot be,” answered Frank, “for I

have no mother.”’
‘



40 FRANK NETHERTON.



“Pvor little fellow! Leave him alone,” said
an authoritative voice. The boys drew back
and continued to whisper; all but one, whe
went up to where Frank stood, and holding out
his hand said in a low voice—

“J have no mother either. Let us be
friends.”

‘With all my heart,” replied Frank.

““{ did not hear what Mr. Campbell said your
name was ?”’

“Frank Netherton.”

‘Mine is Howard.”

“Have you been long at school?” asked
Frank. —

“Yes, nearly a twelvemonth; but I do not
like it better than the first day I came.”

“Mr. Campbell appears to be very kind.”

“So he is, when we do right. But the worst
of it is, I never can do right for a long time
together; and then he is very stern, and I get
so frightened that I do not know what I am
about.” .

‘‘Have you a father?” asked Frank.

“No, Taman orphan. My aunt is very kind
to me; only of course she does not love me as
well as her own children.”

“T, too, have an aunt,” said Frank; “anda
father also.”

“You are very young to come to school, are
you not ?”

“Only a rear younger than my cousin Fre-
derick.”’





FRANK NETHERTON. 41



“Then you are very little fcr your age.’

“That was what you were all laughing at, 1
suppose,” said Frank; “but I did not make
myself, you know.”

“Why, Philip Doyle did call you an odd
looking, old-fashioned little thing; and then
Mertimer said that you were as old as you
looked, and they would find it out by-and-by.”

“Tt was very unkind in Frederick to say
that,” observed Frank, colouring.

“JT do not think he meant it unkindly; but
he always laughs when the rest do.”

‘And who is Philip Doyle ?”

‘“‘One of the smartest boys, and one of the
greatest tyrants in the school. I would do any
thing rather than offend him. When once he
works himself into a passion, it is quite terrible
to see him, and a very little will do it.”

‘Who is it now talking to my cousin, and
looking at us ?”’

“Claude Hamilton. He is very bright too.
Every one loves Claude Hamilton. It was he
who interfered just now, when they were going
to tease. you for crying. Iam sure it is only
natural to cry when one comes to school for the
first time.”

“Tt may be natural, but I am afraid that it
was very foolish,” said Frank; “and I do not
mean to cry again if I can help it.”

There were no lessons that evening. It
seemed a very long evening to Frank. Frede-
rick never once approached him until just before



42 FRANK NETHERTON.
bed-time, when he came to warn him not to be
too intimate with young Howard.

“He is the greatest dunce in the school,”
said he, “and a coward as well: the less you
have to do with him the better.”

‘He was very kind to me,” answered Frank,
a little bitterly, “‘when no one else came near
me.”

Frederick coloured.

“YT warned you beforehand,” said he, “ that
you must fight your own battles.”’

“And so I will. But even if you are not on
my side, surely you need not be against me.”

“Who said I was against you? Did Howard
say so?”

‘¢ Never mind,” answered Frank. ‘I donot
want to quarrel with you, nor you to quarrel
with any one else on my account. But I did
think it hard, when your dear mother said that
we should be like brothers.”

“ Well, well,” said Frederick, holding out his
hand, “I did not mean to be unkind. But you
must not expect too much. ‘Every one fcr
himself,’ you know, is the old proverb.”

“Yes,” replied Frank, “I have heard it, but
I never felt it before.”

Mr. Campbell was surprised upon question-
ing Frank, the following morning, to find how
much he knew, and how carefully and thoroughly
he had been taught ; and said a great deal that
was highly gratifying to his feelings cu the
gsuvject.







FRANK NETHERTON. 42



,

“Contrary to my usual custom,’ observed
he, “I shall place you immediately in one of
the upper classes; and it must be your care to
prove that { am justified in so doing.’

Frank thanked him gratefully, and promised
to be very diligent. As soon as he had returned
to his seat, Frederick congratulated him in a
whisper upon his “good fortune,” and spoke so
kindly that he quite forgot the past.

Frank was very happy in attending to his
studies, until the play-hour arrived; and then, ©
when all the other boys rushed forth with glad
shoutings, the old melancholy feeling stole over
him again, as he stood, forgotten and alone.
His new friend Howard was not permitted to
leave the school-room. He was often in dis-
grace. Frederick never thought of him. Frank
listened to his merry laugh, and tried not to
feel sad.

“ Halloo, my little fellow!’ exclaimed Philip
Doyle, shaking him roughly by the shoulder.
“Are you going to cry again ?”’ ’

“No,” replied Frank, “I am not. As to
being little, I cannot help that; it is no disgrace.
‘ Magnus Alexander corpore parvus erat—The
great Alexander was in stature small.’ ”’

** Do you think that I could not have trans-
lated your Latin doggerel for myself, badly a
it was pronounced ?”’

“JT do not know.”

“‘ What do you mean by saying that you de
not knov?”

4%



44 FRANK NETHERTON.



“I mean what I said,” replied Frank fear-
lessly.””

“For shame, Doyle!” interrupted Claude
Hamilton, stepping between them. « Surely
you would not strike such a child.”

‘He is old enough to be impertinent, and
had better keep out of my way,” muttered
Doyle, as he passed on.

“As for you, Alexander the Great,” said
Claude Hamilton, with a smile, “I would advise
you in future not to rouse the slumbering lion,
or quote Latin out of school-hours.”

“He began,” said Frank.

“Well, never mind. Are you not going to
play at something? I will introduce you?”

“ But I do not know any games,” said Frank,
shrinking back. “TI never played before in my
life.”

“Why, where in the world have you been
brought up ?” .

“My father was always ill,” pleaded Frank;
“and I never left him until now.”

“Ah, I see; that is what makes you look so
reg and sickly. But you can learn, can’t
you?”

“To be sure I can, if any one will teach and
have patience with me.”

“Come along then. But you must not mind
being laughed at.”

“T will not,—if I can help it.”

But Frank could not always help it, although
he persevered notwithstanding. When they





MO SO Ne i LM. HEF PAT WP BED 5 hts sg Vpn ay Rte

FRANK NETHERTON. 45



told him that he held the bat like a girl, he tried
again and again until he had succeeded in doing
better. In all his little trials, Frederick's
laugh seemed the hardest to bear; but Claude

. Hamilton stood his friend, and he tried not to

care for it.

Poor Frank was not strong, and soon grew
weary, especially just at first ; and used to fling
himself down upon the ground with a beating
heart and throbbing temples. Oh! how he
wished himself back in his father’s quiet study
at such times. But he forbore to complain, and
few guessed how much he suffered.

He wrote home in a cheerful spirit, merely
mentioning that he was learning to play cricket.
His father little dreamed of the fatigue and mor-
tifications which he cheerfully endured. The
same unselfish affection marked that father’s
reply ; in which he dwelt largely on the slight
improvement visible in his own health, and said
nothing of the, long hours of weariness and de-
pression, in which his little companion was so
sadly misse 1.



4é FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER VI.
BLESSED ARE THE PEACEMAK ERS.

Brrore long, Frank had other and harder
trials than learning to play cricket: such trials
as all must expect to endure, more or less, whe
would live godly in Christ Jesus. The days of
martyrdom are past; but even a school-boy may
bear his faithful and unflinching testimony to
his Master’s cause, and fearlessly take to him-
self the sweet consolation of Scripture, “If ye
suffer for righteousness’ sake, happy are ye:
and be not afraid of their terror, neither be
troubled.”

“Did I not warn you of all this?” said
Frederick, upon one occasion, when Frank could
not help feeling a little “troubled’’ for the
moment, but it was only fora moment. “ Did
I not tell you how you would be laughed at ?”

“Yes, you warned me, and that was all that
you did do. You never helped me; but, please
God, I will help myself.”

‘That is right, Netherton,” exclaimed Claude
Hamilton, encouragingly. “Rome was not
built ina day. I prophesy that the time will
comé when no one will venture to laugh at
you.”

‘Thank you,” said Frank, “I can bear being
laughed at in a good cause.”’



FRANK NETHERTON. 47



“ And what is the good cause at present in
dispute ?”’

Frank was silent; but Howard answered for
him.

“The boys call him a Methodist, because he
reads his Bible every morning and evening, and
says long prayers—longer, that is, than any of
the rest of us.”

“The latter may easily be, I should imagine.
But what harm is there in Netherton’s reading
his Bible ?”

“IT do not know; unless it is because none
of the other boys do the same.”

‘The more is the pity. But you must not
be too sure of that, Howard; only they may
not read it so openly as your friend Nether-
ton.”

*¢ When I was at home,” said Frank, “I had
a little room to myself; but it is not so now.
And after all, there is nothing to be ashamed
of. We need only be ashamed when we do
wrong.”

Claude Hamilton coloured slightly.

“Shake hands, Netherton,” exclaimed he,
‘for I am as bad as you are. I also read my
Bible every morning and night; and I hope to
do so as long as [ live.”

“Tam so glad,” said Frank; and the tears
came into his eyes. ‘TI wish you slept in our
room.

“So do I,” answered Hamilton. “We may
be together some day, perhaps.”



45 FRANK NETHERTON.



‘Ther you are a Methodist, too,” exclaimed
Howard.

“Yes, as much as Netherton is,” replied
Hamilton, looking fearlessly round. “ So laugh
away, all of you.’’ But no one ventured te
laugh at Claude Hamilton.

From that time Frank’s heart yearned to-
wards him, and he longed to deserve and gain
his friendship; although he scarcely dared ti
hope that one so much his superior would ever
be brought to regard him as a friend.

Frederick was partly right in warning his
cousin against being too intimate with Howard.
But Frank could not forget that he had been
the first to be kind to him, nor be unmindful of
his evident affection. He was not a boy whom
he could love, or make a friend of, because he
did not respect him; but he could not avoid
pitying him very much, and was always ready
to help him out of his difficulties as far as it lay
in his power.

The time came, however, when even Frank
was tempted to desert him. Howard had no
punishment to bear; no hard lesson to learn.
He was not obliged to remain in the school-
room alone, when all the rest were enjoying
themselves without; but he was afraid to go
among them, for he knew that no one would
speak to or play with him. To screen himself,
he had told tales of one of his school-fellows,
and the resthad hooted him out of their society.
Frank alone lingered, and looked back.



FRANK NETHERTON. 49



“Tf you show yourself his friend now,’ said
Frederick, “everybody will think you just as
bad as he is.”

“As for that, I do not mucn sare what
‘everybody’ thinks, and I do not think myself
that I ought to leave him, now he is alone and
in trouble. He is not my friend, but he was
kind to me when no one else was.”

“Let him go,” said Doyle, laying hold of
Frederick’s arm, and pulling him away. ‘“ You
know the old adage—‘ Birds of a feather flock
together.’ ’

His mocking laugh rang in Frank’s ears as
he rejoined Howard.

‘¢ How kind in you to stay, Frank! But are
you not afraid of being seen with me ?”’

“YT am not afraid of any thing.”

“JT wish I was not, for then I should not
have told as I did about poor Rushton. I sup-
pose they will never forget it.”’

“Never is a long time. It was a wrong and
cowardly action. You must tell Rushton how
sorry you are; and you must never do it again,
come what may.”

“‘Never, never—that is, I hope that I shall
aot. But I am always doing wrong; and it is.
f no use trying to do otherwise. And after
all, there is no one who cares for me. I have
no father, no mother, no friend in the world.”

“You must not say that,” replied Frank.
“ Have Ft forgotten One who has promised to
be the Father of the fathe~less—who has said,



50 FRANK NETHERTON.



‘As one whom his mother comforteth, so will 1
comfort you —who is the Friend of the friend-
less, the Saviour of sinners, the good Shepherd,
seeking after the lost sheep; and, not content
with bidding them follow him, bearing them in
his arms, and upon his bosom ?”

“TI know very little of these things,” said
Howard; “I wish that I knew more.”

“You will not learn by wishing,” replied
Frank. “You must read your Bible, and ask
God to help you to understand it. You havea
Bible, I suppose ?”

“‘T believe so.”

‘You only believe so! Oh, Howard! But
we will look to-night when we go to bed, and
if not, I can lend you mine.”

“You are very kind,” said his companion,
hopelessly. ‘And will you be my friend, and
help me?”

“J cannot promise to be your friend; but I
will help you willingly, whenever I can be of
any assistance, because you were kind to me the
first day I came to school.”

“That was a happy day for me,” said Howard.
“T never liked any one as I do you. But I
deserve that you should despise me.”

“T have too many faults of my own to dare
to despise any one,” answered Frank.

“But what do you advise me to do ?”

“Go at once to Mr. Campbell. Tell him
how sorry you are for what has occurred; and
ask him to forgive Rushton, or else permit you



Taber ‘ ~
eS RO 5 ee ae







FRANK NETHERTON. 51



to share his punishment. You would not mind
a hard lesson, would you?”

“No, it is not that; but I am afraid of speak-
ing to Mr. Campbell. ’ |

“Nonsense! Think how pleasant it would
be if you could carry Rushton his pardon,
and ask him to be friends with you. If not,
you can tell him how sorry you are for what
you have done. Rushton is a warm-hearted
fellow, notwithstanding his provoking ways and
speeches.”

“T have a great mind to try,” said Howard.

“Come at once, then, before the rest return.”

Frank went with him, and even knocked at
the study door; and when they heard Mr.
Campbell’s voice bidding them come in, there
was nothing left for Howard but to enter.

When Frank returned to the play-ground,
many a mocking voice inquired where his friend
Howard was.

“We must take care what we do,” said Doyle,
“ or Netherton will be turning tale-bearer next.”

“Not I,” exclaimed Frank, “if I died for
it. But I must say that I do not think it fair
the way you all treat Howard. He has done
wrong, ar.d he is very sorry: what more would
you have ?” |

“Hear him !” exclaimed Doyle, with a laugh

At that moment Rushton ‘and Howard en«
tered the play-ground hand in hand, and it was
soon whispered about how thelatter had gone to
Mr. Campbell to beg Rushton off; and even



5? FRANK NETHERTON.



offered to share his punishment. Many of the
boys went up and shook hands with him.

“Tt was well done,” said one. “I did not
think that it had been in him.”

‘Little Netherton was right,’’ observed an-
other. ‘ Let us say ne more abcut it. He has
had his lesson.”

Frederick Mortimer sided, as usual, with the
multitude ; while his cousin kept apart, for fear
Howard, in his gratitude, should betray him.
The sight of his radiant-looking face was hap-
piness enough. As soon as he could, he stole
away and re-entered the house. Claude Hamil-
ton was leaning against the door, and, as he
moved aside to let Frank pass, he said in a low,
sweet vice, ‘ ‘Blessed are the peacemakers.’ ”









&

' FRANK NETHERTCN.



CHAPTER VII.
A SABBATH DAY AT SCHOOL.

A.tnouen Frank, (thanks to the pains which
his father had taken with him,)knew more than
most boys of his age, he was totally unaccus-
tomed to the regular mode of instruction to
which he was now obliged to submit; and it cost
him no little pains to maintain his position in
the class in which Mr. Campbell, (misled by his
ready and correct answers to his questions,) had
first placed him. His present systematic course
of study was neither so easy nor so pleasant as
it had been to listen to the eloquent and in-
structive conversation of Mr. Netherton, and
turn with him to maps, globes, pictures, and
books of reference. Frank’s memory had be-
come a kind of treasure-house, but it - sadly
wanted method and arrangement. |

Mr. Campbell was not long in discovering the
error which he had committed. He said little
upon the subject, but kirdly and patiently
assisted Frank to correct it; and the more cheer-
fully when he saw how willing he was to assist
himself, and how hard he worked in order to
maintain his present position. Mindful of his
aunt's injunctions, Frank took all the exercise
he could out of school-hours; and his health,
sc far from suffering from his severe application



54 FRANK NETHERTON.



at other times, seemed to be slightly improved ;
and he dwelt with pleasure upon the delight
which it would give his father to see h'm so
changed. His cousin found him, one day, look-
ing intently at himself in the glass.- He wanted
to see if there were any traces of colour on his
pale cheeks; but he found none as yet.

It was a rule in Mr. Campbell’s house to lay
aside all tasks on the Lord’s day, making it, as
it ought and was intended to be, (a day of rest.)
Outwardly at least, no books were read but
those of a religious tendency; but the absence
of Mr. Campbell generally proved a signal for
the production of others of a totally different
character. What shocked Frank more than
any thing else was, to observe that many of the
boys concealed these stolen volumes within the
covers of their Bibles, which they thus appeared
to be diligently perusing. Notwithstanding his
horror of such duplicity, the books were a great
temptation ; and it cost him many a struggle to
refuse to read them when they were offered to
bim.

“Tf you would only lend it to me to-morrow,”
said he, upon one occasion—

‘Now or never!” replied Rushton.

‘“Then it must be never,” said Frank.

“Yt is such a beautiful story,” observed
Howard, “about two Indian children, who
were accidentally carried out to sea in the boat
in which they were playing, and cast upon 4
desert ‘slanl. I am sure tha* you would like it.”





FRANK NETHERLON. 55



“Ydare say I should,” said Frank, turning
resolutely away. But he could not help won-
dering to himself what the children did on the
desert island; and was glad when Mr. Camp-
bell came in, after his usual custom on the Sab-
bath evening, to read and talk with them. And
when he laid his hand upon his shoulder, and
spoke kindly to him as he passed, Frank felv
pleased that he had done nothing to deceive
him; and thought how he should have winced at
his touch, and shrunk away from his glance, had
it been otherwise.

They read that evening the eighteenth chap-
ter of the Acts of the Apostles. The twenty-
eighth verse came to Frank; but he paused, and
remained silent.

“Well?” exclaimed Mr. Campbell, inquir-
ingly.

“I was just thinking, sir, how far the eunuch
came to worship.”

The boys looked at one another and smiled ;
but Mr. Campbell answered gravely,

“ Yes, Frank, it is worth observing. African
Ethiopia lies below Egypt; he must therefore
have come some hundreds of miles to worship
at the temple.”

‘“* But he had his reward, sir.”

“Yes, he had indeed. Now let us finish the
chapter, and afterwards I will show you a pic-
ture which I have of what is Supposed to have
been the eunuch’s well.”

The cuapter was concluded, and the picture
5%



56 FRANK NETHERTON.



produced. It was beautifully finished from a
drawing made on the spot, and Frank bent over
it in silent admiration.

Claude Hamilton inquired what the old ruins
were supposed to represent, which were visible
in the vicinity of the well.

“They are imagined to be those of some
ancient church, or convent, which formerly
stood on this spot,” replied Mr. Campbell; “but
nothing certain is known on the subject. I have
heard it maintained that it could not have been
here that the eunuch was baptized, because he
is represented to have come in a chariot from
Jerusalem, whereas this road is not passable for
carriages. Chariots of old, however, were very
different from our present coaches, the wheels
being lower and much broader and stronger, and
the vestiges of an ancient carriage-road are yet
to be perceived all the way from Jerusalem to
Hebron. Still it is very uncertain whether this
was the place where the eunuch was baptized.
I have several other views taken in the Holy
Land, which I will show you at some future
opportunity.”

“TI suppose it was called the Holy Land be-
cause the Holy One lived and walked there,”
said Frank, thoughtfully. ‘ How I should like,
when I am old enough, to go to Jerusalem, and
tread, as it were, in the footsteps of the Saviour !”’

“You may endeavour to do that without
going to Jerusalem, or waiting until you are

older,” said Mr Campbell.





FRANK NETHERTON. 57



>

“Yes, sir, I know,” replied Frank, ecclour-
ing; ‘but I did not exactly mean that.” |

‘“‘Never mind. It is better to act than te
dream. With God’s help, you may begin at
once practically to follow in the footsteps of the
blessed Redeemer when he walked on earth; to
take up your cross and learn of him, and be
meek and lowly in heart; while it must neces-
sarily be many years, if ever, before you visit the
Holy Land. What I say to you, I say to all.”

After a pause, Mr. Campbell asked Howard
which was the oldest book in the world.

‘“¢ Homer, sir.”’ }

Mr. Campbell shook his head.

Rushton, in a whisper to his companions,
suggested ‘‘ Robinson Crusoe.”

“Well, Mortimer, can you tell?”

“The Bible, sir.’’

“Right. Herodotus and Thucydides, the
oldest profane historians whose writings have
reached our times, were contemporary with
Ezra and Nehemiah, the last of the historians
of the Old Testament. It was nearly six hun-
dred years after Moses before the poems of
Homer appeared. The preservation of the
Bible is very remarkable. At one time, during
the captivity of the Jews in Babylon, not only
their temple was burned, but the very ark in
which the original copy of the law was kept ;
and their city laid waste for more than a hun-
dred years. We read, also, that Antiochus
Epiphanes, when he took Jerusalem, murdered



58 FRANK NETHERTC(X.



about 40,000 of its inhabitants, sold as many
more to be slaves, and ordered that whoever was
found with the book of the law should be put
to death; and every book that could be dis-
covered was burned. Under these circumstances,
is it not remarkable that this book of the Jews
should have been preserved, and that not a sin-
gle book of the Egyptians, the Chaldeans, or
the Pheenicians, (the most flourishing and civil-
ized nations which lived at that time,) should
have reached us?”

‘“‘Tt is indeed remarkable,” said Claude Ha-
inilton.

‘God took care of the Bible,” said Frank.

“That is the right and only way of account-
ing for it,”’ said Mr. Campbell.

“Ts it true,” asked Philip Doyle, “that a Bible
in the reign of King James cost seventy pounds ?”"

“Perfectly true. We are also told by Top-
lady, that the time was when the word of the
Lord was so precious in the land, that a farmer
in the reign of Henry VIII. gave a cart-load
of hay for one leaf of the Epistle of St. James
in English!”

“Ts it possible?” exclaimed Howard.

“Yes; it appears strange now, when Bibles
are so cheap that few, we should think, need be
“aa one in their homes. But it is time for

ed.”

“Now for black Monday, and hard lessons,”
said Howard to Frank, as they went up-stairs
to their room.



FRANK NETHERTON. 59



“JT have often thought,” replied Frank,
“how nice it would be to have no Monday
morning. But we must wait till we get to
heaven for that.”

“How do you know you will ever get to
heaven ?”’ asked one of the boys, jestingly.

“How do | know? O Herbert! do you not
believe in the Lord Jesus Christ? But you only
pay this to tease me.”

“You are a strange fellow, Netherton,” ex-
claimed Herbert, touched by the earnestness
with which he had spoken. “ Good-night.””

“Good night,” replied Frank. His little
heart was full. “How do I know?” thought
he, as he kneeled down beside the bed, forget
ting that he was not alone. “Blessed Lord
Jesus! because I believe and trust in thee.
Oh, how sweet it is to believe and trust !””

:
“ZT
Wy 'hk
f ; 1 La ae i
t yt We bof (ye y
aA wr BT
our 1 ie f
Am

. rs %

Oo OY pM.
: SLL
Yan





60 FRANK NEIHERTON.

CHAPTER VIII.
LOVE YOUR ENEMIES.

Tux following morning, when Frank entered
the play-ground, Claude Hamilton came to meet
him with a smile on his countenance.

“See!” exclaimed he, “I have brought you
the book which you refused yesterday. I
thought you would like to read it.”

«© And so I shall,” said Frank. ‘“ How kind
in you to think of it! But how came you to
know what happened yesterday? I looked at
you once or twice, and you appeared to be com-
pletely absorbed in ‘ Keith's Prophecies.’ ”’

“So I was; but I heard all that passed, not-
withstanding, and was glad that you were able
to resist the temptation. I determined to pro-
cure the book for you if possible to-day, and
here it is. But you must read it quickly. You
will find it very interesting.”

Frank thanked him gratefully, and ran off
with his prize to a large tree which stood at the
farther end of the play-ground, and in the
branches of which he loved to sit and read,
swinging himself to and fro all the while with
a pleasant motion. It was not often that he
permitted himself to indulge in this quiet lux-
ury, and he consequently enjoyed it all the
more upon the present occasion. Frank was ir



FRANK NETHERTON. 61



the very middle of the story, when he was eud-
denly interrupted by the loud voice of Philip
Doyle, desiring him to come down directly, as
he wanted to take his place.

“At any rate I must finish my book first,”
said Frank calmly. “I shall not be very
long.”

“Just as if I should wait while you finish
your book! Come down at orce, or I will make
you. You have no business there.”

“I did not know that the tree was your’s,”
said Frank.

“Never mind whose it is, but come down
directly.” And he gave one of the branches a
violent shake as he spoke.

“Thank you,” exclaimed Frank, laughing,
and swinging backwards and forwards. “It is
very pleasant.”

“You had better come down,” said Howard,
who, together with several other boys, had been
attracted to the spot. ‘There is another tree,
almost as good.”

“I will come down when I have finished
what I am about,” replied Frank, “and not
before.”

“Take care, Doyle!” exclaimed Herbert, as
he again shook the tree with violence. “Take
ng Netherton! He might break a limb if he

@ ae

“Then why does he not come down quietly,
when I bil him ?”

‘““Why should he ?”



62 FRANK NETHERTON.



“Tel\ us a story, Netherton,’ called out
several of the boys, out of fun.

“With all my heart,” replied Frank, as a
sudden thought came into his mind. -“ Once
upon a time’ — 3

“Will you come down?” shouted Doyle
—hoarse with passion.

“ Keep off! Wait until he has told his story.
He shall not be interrupted till then,” exclaimed
the boys, laughing, as they gathered around the
tree. “Go on, Netherton.”

“During the war with France,” said Frank,
¢¢ previous to the Revolution, an English drum-
mer-boy having wandered from his camp too
near the French lines, was taken prisoner, and
brought before the commander. On being
asked who he was, he answered that he was a
drummer in the English service. It appears
that they took him for a spy. A drum was
sent for, and he was desired to beat a couple
of marches, which he immediately did. The
Frenchman’s suspicions, however, not being
entirely removed, he commanded the drummer
to beat a retreat. ‘A retreat, sir ?’ replied the
boy; ‘I do not know what that is.’ ”’

“Bravo, Netherton !’ exclaimed his school-
fellows. ‘You deserve your seat, and shall’
keep it. You shall not ° beat a retreat’ for any
one.”

‘hey bore off the struggling Doyle in triumph,
and Frank was left alone; but somehow their
praise did not make him happy-





FRANK NETHERTON. 63



“ After all,” murmured he, “I could have
finished my book just as well anywhere else. I
wish now that I had given up; and so I would,
if he had asked me kindly.’

He tried to go on with his reading, but the
story seemed to have lost all its interest; and
a few moments afterwards he slipped quietly
down from the tree, and went to seek. Philip
Doyle. He found him, as he had expected, all
alone. He was leaning against the ate, carv-
ing the top of a walking-stick into a lion’s head.
He looked up at Frank’s approach, and his face
was white with passion.

“T am come to tell you that = can Have
the seat now, if you wish it. I would have
given it up at once, if you had only asked me
properly; but I do not like being ordered to do
a thing.”

Doyle made no reply; but, carried away by
the violence of his passion, he lifted up the
heavy stick he was carving, and hit Frank a
blow with it upon the temple, which felled him
to the ground. Doyle walked away without
perceiving the effects of his cowardly attack.
He did not think how heavy the stick was, nor
did he intend to have hurt Frank as much as
he did. When he was in one of his passionate
fits, he never thought of any thing, and was
like a mad person.

For several moments Frank lay completely
stunned. When he came to himself, he arose
with difficulty ; and gaining the house, without

6



64 FRANK NETHERTON.



meeting any of his companions, went up-stairs
ito his room, and kneeling down by the bed,
rested his aching head against it. He tried to
pray, but his thoughts were too confused. Pre-
sently he called to mind the passage in the fiftk
chapter of St. Matthew: “I say unto you, love
your enemies, bless them that curse you—and
pray for them which despitefully use you, and
persecute you; that ye may be the children of
your Father which is in heaven.” ,

“Tt is a hard lesson,” murmured Frank.
“Blessed Lord Jesus! help me to learn it by
heart.”

He was aroused, after a few moments, by the
voice of the housekeeper. ‘Master Nether-
ton !” exclaimed she; “ you are breaking rules.
You have no business up here at this time of
the day.”

“T ‘wanted to bathe my forehead,” said
Frank, turning round.

“Poor child! you have hurt yourself indeed.
Why, how did this happen ?”

Frank did not reply.

“Well, never mind; come with me, and I
will see what I can do for you?”

Frank followed her, scarcely knowing where
he went. His head ached terribly; but, after
a time, the cold applizations, tenderly applied
by the rough but kind hearted housekeeper, 80
far relieved him as to enable him to rejoin his
companicne in the sch ol-room.

Philip T)syle, who was standing near the



“

FRANK NETHEKTON. 65



door, started, and changed countunance when
he looked at him.

“Why, Netherton, what is the matter?”
exclaimed Claude Hamilton, coming hastily
forward.

“It is my head,” said Frank, trying to smile;
and then stopping suddenly, and with difficulty
repressing a cry of pain, he added, “It hurts
me a little when I speak.”’ :

“How did you do it?”

“He looks as if he had been fighting,” said
Rushton. Frank shook his head.

“Did you fall off the tree, or did he do it ?”
asked Howard, pointing to Doyle.

‘Never mind,” answered Frank. “It is
done, and it cannot be undone. Ido not mean
to tell you any more; and I wish you would not
tease me.”

‘Leave him alone,” said Claude Hamilton,
** Does your head pain you very much, Frank ?”

“Yes, very much; but I dare say it will be
better presently, if I could only be quiet.”
And Frank sat down before his desk, and buried
his flushed face in his hands.

He did not sleep, but the hum of the school-
room seemed to go a long way off; and the usher
had to call to him two or three times before
he could be aroused to reply. Claude Hamil-
ton went immediately and asked Mr. Campbell
to excuse Frank for the remainder of his lessons,
as he did not seem to be very well, and he was
cuce mor¢ leit to himself.



~

66 FRANK NETHERTON.



When Frank again looked up, aroused by the
unusually kind voice of his cousin, all the a
had gone except Frederick, and Doyle, who
stood with his back towards them, drumming
against the window-pane.

‘* Will you not come to tea?” said Frederick.
“Tt may do your head good.”

“Thank you, yes. I will follow yeu in a
moment. I would rather you would not wait
for me.”

“But you will come?” said Frederick, lin-
pering a moment; while Frank passed his

and across his burning brow, as if to recollect
himself.

“Yes, I promise you.”

en his cousin left him, Frank arose with
difficulty, and crossing over to where Doyle
stood, said in a low voice, “ Philip, the sun
is almost down.”

“Well, what of that?” asked his companion,
without moving.

“Does not God say in his holy word—I
forget where now—‘ Let not the sun go down
upon your wrath?’ See, it has nearly dis
appeared. Let us be friends.”

Philip Doyle turned round, and the tears
started into his eyes as he grasped the little,
feverish hand so eagerly extended to him.
“Forgive me, Netherton,” murmured he. “ It
was cowardly in me to strike you; but I did
act mean to hurt you thus, indeed I did not ;
and I am very sorry for it.”



FRANK NETIHYRTON. 67



“Tet us go in together,” said Frank, “ and
then no one will suspect that you did it. I
will promise not to tell.”

There was a sudden silence when they
entered the room. ‘The boys looked at one
another in astonishment.

“Then it was not Doyle after all,”—whis-
pered Howard to Rushton. “I dare say that
he really did fall off the tree.”

“Do you feel better Frank ?” asked Clavde
Hamilton.

“Yes, much better, thank you. I shall be
quite well to-morrow, I hope.”

Philip Dovle hoped so too. He was really
sorry for what had happened; but he dared
not express too great an interest in Frenuk,
for fear of exciting suspicion. He shrank
from’ the exposure of his own cowardly «nd
brutal conduct to one so much younger and
weaker than himself; and felt grateful to
Frank for not betraying him to his schel-
fellows





68 FkANK NETHERTON.



CHAPIER IX.
A SAD IIOLIDAY.

THosz who slept in the same room with
Frark, heard him, as they said, talking and
telling stories all night long. The next morn-
ing he was in a high fever. The wound on
his temple appeared to be much inflamed;
and Mr. Campbell, who had been unavoidably
absent from the school-room on the previous
day, was angry because he had not been sooner
informed of it. The best medical advice was
immediately procured, and towards evening
the fever appeared tu be somewhat abated.

“What is the matter?” exclaimed Frank,
opening his eyes and seeing Mr. Campbell
standing by the bedside. “Where am I ?”

“You have not been very well,” replied his
preceptor, soothingly. ‘“ But you are better
again—only you must keep very quiet.”

“I remember now,” continued Frank, rais-
ing his hand feebly to his head. “TI hope i
have not said any thing wrong.

“No, no; lie down and try to sleep.”

“Tam afraid my mind wanders sometimes,”
eaid Frank, looking eagerly into Mr. Campbell's
face ; ‘‘and I do not know what I say then. J
bope I have not betrayed any one.”

“ Never fea ; your-secret is sufe.”



FRANK NETHERTON. 69



“Thank God,” said Frank. “ I may tell him,
but I must not tell any one else, you know.”

Mr. Campbell abstained from questions or
even replying to Frank’s words.

“Tt is, then, as I suspected,” thought he.
*¢ Who can have done this ?”’

Presently Frank spoke again. “Have you
written to my father, sir?”

“Not yet. I shall await Dr. Ewart’s opinion
when he comes this evening.”’

“You do not think me likely to die, sir ?”’

“God forbid, my dear boy.”’

“Then do not write at all, if you please.
I can bear a great deal of pain; but I cannot
bear to think of my father’s uneasiness. He
loves me so much. Perhaps he would insist
upon coming; and the journey might kill Kim.”

“T will not write if you do not wish it; and
if you will try and be still, in order that you
may get better the sooner.”

“Yes, I will be very still,” said Frank,
closing his eyes. ‘I will do any thing you
bid me—-only do not write.to my father.”

He soon afterwards fell into a quiet sleep;
and Mr. Campbell, leaving him in charge of
the nurse, returned to the school-room. Every
voice was hushed as he entered. Philip Doyle
longed to speak, but dared not.

“‘T hope poor little Netherton is not worse,
sir, ’ said Claude Hamilton, at length, observin
that Mr. Campbell looked unusually grave an
agitated. |



70 FRANK NETHERTON.



“T hope not. He has just fallen asleep. It
may restore him, Dr. Ewart says, or he may
awake an idiot! If Netherton dies, God help
and forgive him who struck that cruel blow.’

Philip Doyle shuddered and turned pale;
but so did many others at those solemn words.

‘Then you think, sir, that the wound could
not have been occasioned by a mere fall ?”’ said
Claude Hamilton.

‘*T am sure of it—and with reason.”

‘“‘Has my cousin told who did it?” asked
Frederick.

‘No; he never will tell. And he must not
be questioned.”

Philip Doyle drew a long breath, and the
tears gushed forth.

* Never mind, Doyle,”’ continued Mr. Camp-
bell, laying his hand kindly on his shoulder,
‘“‘there is nothing in your tears to be ashamed
of. Your little school-fellow is worthy of your
tears. I could almost have wept myself, to hear
him talk just now.”

‘What did he say? Did he ask for me?”
inquired Frederick, under the privilege of rela-
tionship.

‘““No, he never mentioned your name.” And
Mr. Campbell briefly related what had passed.

‘Poor little fellow!” said Claude Hamilton.
** Who could have the heart to injure him ?”’

Hamilton knew nothing about the dispute
between Frank and Doyle; and the rest
shrank from mentioning it: it seemed such a



FRANK NETHERTON. 71



terrible accusation to bring against him, and
was contradicted by the friendly behaviour of
Frank towards him on the previous evening.
The whole affair seemed to be wrapt in mys
tery. Whoever the guilty person might be,
every one felt that he was sufficiently punished
in the anxious interval that would elapse before
Frank awoke.

Mr. Campbell had given the boys a holiday
—it was asad holiday. A profound stillness
reigned in the school-room, broken only by an
occasional whisper: but thought was busy.
We will not attempt to describe the feelings
of Philip Doyle. Their impression remained
until his dying day. Recollections of unkind
words and acts came back to many a heart,
and made it wish them again unsaid and
undone; bringing sorrow and repentance,
when both, perhaps, were unavailing. Frede-
rick recalled to mind his mother’s often re-
peated injunctions to be kind to his cousin,
with a pang of self-upbraiding. He remem-
bered how the frail life of Mr. Netherton was
bound up in that of his son; and he thought
how differently he would behave to him in
future, if Frank were only to get well again.
Claude Hamilton had no self-accusations; but
he loved and was sorry for the boy, and prayed
inwardly that, if it were God’s will, he might
be restored to them.

As they sat together thus, the sinking sun
peeped into that silent room, as if to inquire



72 FRANK NETHERTON.



what made them all so strangely quict. Phiip
Doyle could not help thinking of Frank’s words.

“The sun is going down,” murmured he,
“and may never rise again for him. God be
merciful to us both!” And he leaned his
head against the window-sill, and sobbed aloud.

‘¢ Come, come,” said Claude Hamilton, en-
couragingly ; “let us hope for the best. If not”
—and his voice faltered slightly ; “ if not, Frank
is ready to be taken, trusting in his Redeemer.”

‘“‘T did not think that Doyle would have felt
it so deeply,” whispered Howard to Rushton.
“He is sorry, I suppose, for what passed
between them yesterday.”

“ Hush !” exclaimed Claude Hamilton : “ was
not that a bell rung? He must be awake.”

A few moments afterwards, Dr. Ewart
kindly looked in to tell them that Frank
was awake and was much better, and that
he hoped all danger was past. “Thank God !”
exclaimed Claude Hamilton; and many a voice
was heard to say, “Amen.” Philip Doyle
uttered not a word. He felt as if a heavy
weight was lifted off his heart, and it was
filled, instead, with joy and gratitude.

“You have not written, sir, have you?”
were Frank’s first words, when he again
opened his eyes, and fixed them upon the
snxious countenance of his preceptor. 3

“No; I promised that I would not, if you
were better. And you are better. You teel
better, do you rot?’



FRANK NETHERTON.



“Yes,” said Frank, “my head is much
easier. Will you tell my cousin Frederick
go, and”—he was going to say Philip Doyle;
but he checked himself, adding instead, ‘and
the rest of my school-fellows. 1 suppose Imay
see some of them to-morrow, sir ?”

“T do not know,” replied. Mr. Campbell ;
“we must wait until to-morrow comes. Dr.
Ewart does not wish you to talk or think more
than you can help for the next few days.”

“It seems hard not to be allowed to think,”
observed Frank, with a sigh. “But I must
try and bear it as patiently as I can. Do
not let me keep you, sir,” added he, after a
pause, during which Mr. Campbell was busy
arranging his pillows, in order that he might
lie more comfortably. ‘I promise to be very
quiet. How kind you are to me!” And he
put his little hand into that of his preceptor.

Mr. Campbell waited until he again slept,
and then returned to the school-room, where
the boys, by his desire, still remained.

“ Let us return thanks to the Lord,” said
he, “that one among us has been this day
preserved from the commission of a great |
crime. I never mean to ask any questions
on the subject. The name of the offender is
known only to God and that poor child who
has refused to betray it. To his God I leave
him. Let us pray.” The boys kneeled down
in silence; and that solemn day was long
remembered by all of them.



74 FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER X.
GOOD RESOLUTIONS.

SEevERAL days past before Frank was allowed
to see any of his school-fellows. His cousin
was first permitted to enter the sick-chamber ;
and, although he made no apology for the past,
or promises for the future, Frank felt that he
was changed, and that they should be more
like cousins and friends for the time to come.

All Claude Hamilton’s spare moments were
spent by the bedside of the little invalid, to
Frank’s great comfort and delight ; for there
was no boy in the school whom he liked so
well, or whose friendship and good opinion
he was so anxious to gain. Howard was also
a constant visitor; but Philip Doyle came not!
At first, Frank was glad.

“Tt is best so,” thought he. “They would
only have suspected something.” But, by-and-
by, he began to feel hurt; and in the long,
weary hours, when he lay suffering and alone,
it seemed unkind and unnatural that he who
was the cause of all should keep away thus,
and make no effort to see and be with him.

“J would not have acted so,” murmured
Frank, on one occasion half aloud. “ I would
lave run any risk, had I been in his place.”

“Forgive me,” exclaimed a low voice by his



aa

FRANK NETHERTON. id



side- “I shall never forgive myself. But I
have not forgotten you, Frank. [ have
watched and listened at your door for hours,
when all the rest were asleep; and every groan
that you uttered went to my heart.”

“T would not have groaned, if I could have
helped it, had I known that you were there,
Philip.” |

“© Frark!” continued Doyle, “if suffering
can atons for doing wrong, you have been
amply revenged.” “

“But it cannot; nothing but the blood of
our Lord Jesus Christ can do that—‘ the
Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of
the world.’ Besides, I do not want to be
revenged.”’

“T wish I could feel like you, Netherton,”
said the once proud Doyle. |

“You would not if you knew all. Even
when you entered, my heart was full of hard
and murmuring thoughts.” .

“Yes, I know; you thought me a brute,
and no wonder. It was not so much the fear
lest the other boys should suspect something
which kept me away; but because I ested
to look upon what I had done. But this
evening, when I heard you talking to your-
self, all alone, I could not help creeping in.”

“Tt was very wrong in me to talk,” said
Frank. ‘Others might have crept in also.
I have got into the habit of talking to myself.

of late.”
'



74 FRANK NETHERTON.



“Does your head pain you very much %”
asked Doyle, anxiously.

“No; scarcely at all now.”

“ Q Netherton, if you had died !”

“JT am glad that I did not,” said Frank,
“for my father’s sake, and for your's, Philip.
God has been very good to us all.”’

“He has indeed. It will be a lesson to me
for my life.”

At this moment Claude Hamilton entered the
room. He was glad to see Doyle there, and
told him so.

“You cannot think how anxious he was
about you,” said he, turning to Frank.

“Was he?” replied Frank, without looking

up.

Me If you had been his own brother he could
not have taken it more to heart. But then we
were all sorry for you.”

“ You are all very kind,” said Frank.

«“ He is better than you expected to find him,
eh, Doyle? It was a narrow escape. You
are quite a hero, Netherton, and have behaved
like one. Do you remember, Doyle, when you
all called him a talebearer, because he took
Howard’s part in that affair of his about
Rashton? No one will ever call you a tale-
bearer again, Frank.”

“No, never again. But do you not think
that the guilty person ought to be known
and punished!” inquired Philip Doyle sud-
denly.



FRANK NETHERTON. 77



“ Certainly not. What good would it do Ne-
therton, or any one else? He has been suf-
ficiently punished: as Mr. Campbell says, 1
us leave him to God.”

Being anxious to change the conversation,
Frank now inquired after Howard, and asked
the reason why he had not been to see him as
usual.

“ The old reason,” replied Claude Hamilton.
“He is in disgrace again. I never knew such
a fellow ; he is always getting into some scrape.
He told me that he was afraid you would miss
him, and guess the cause.”

‘T did miss him,” said Frank. “It has
been a very long day.”’

“Tt appears so to you, lying there; but I
assure you that I have found it short enough
for all 1 have had to do.”

‘“¢ Even when I am able to get up,” continued
Frank, with a sigh, “Mr. Campbell says that I
must not be in a hurry to go on with my studies.
I shall be sadly behindhand. No prize, and no
healthy colour in my cheeks, to make amends
for it, as my father said. Do I look very ill,
Hamilton ?”

‘No, not very.”

Frank sighed again; and as he did so he
felt a tear fall on his hand.

“ How dark it is!’ said Claude Hamilton.
“Suppose [ ask for a light, and read to you a
little ?”

“Thank you, I should. like it very much.



78 FRANK NETHERTON.



Forgive me,” added Frank, as he quitted the
room; “pray forgive me, Doyle. I had for-
gotten that you were by. I shall soon be well
again, and make up for lost time. Whc knows |
but what I may carry off a prize after all? It
is only working a little harder. And now that
we are friends, you will help me, will you not ?”’

‘J will do any thing in the world for you,
Netherton.”

‘Then try and cure yourself of those ter-
rible fits of passion, dear Philip. Do try for
my sake ;’ and he put his little, thin arms
around the neck of his school-fellow, as he bent
over him. “And ask God to help you, will
“you, Philip ?”’

“Oh, if I could!” answered Doyle, whose
heart wascompletely subdued.

‘‘T have heard,” continued Frank, “ that,
among the superior classes of the Hindoos, it
is customary to have, in their dwellings, a par-
ticular apartment, which is called ‘ knodha-
gara,’ or ‘the chamber of anger,’ and into
which any member of the household, who feels
himself to be out of temper, immediately retires,
remaining there until solitude has calmed and
tranquillized him. We read, also, that Plato
retired to his cave to be wise. Could not you
manage to go away when you feel the fit coming
on-—somewhere where you can be alone, and
think, and pray ?”’

“T am not much used to praying,” said
Doyle.



FRANK NETHERTON. 79



«“ But if you only repeated the Lerd’s pray-
er, it would keep away bitter thoughts. You
remember that part where it says, ‘ Forgive us
our trespasses, aS We forgive them that trespass
against us ?”’

“JT am not like you, Netherton. I could not
some and hold out my hand to one who had
injured me.”

“Yes, you could, after a time. It was dif-
ficult at first,” said Frank, thoughtfully. “ Ci-
cero’s rule, not to injure any one unless pre-
viously injured, is easier to follow than that of
Christ, who bids us love our enemies. It would
be easier to forgive others if we could only re-
member how much need we have of forgivendss
ourselves.” ,

“You remind me of Archbishop Cranmer,”
said Doyle; ‘of whom it is recorded, that the
way to have him for a friend was to do him an
unkindness.”’

“Hark !’’ interrupted Frank ; “ Hamilton is
returning. You will do what I asked you, will
you not Philip ?”” .

‘Yes, I promise.”

“With God’s help.”

“ With God’s help,” repeated Doyle, solemn-
ly. ‘ Good-night, Frank.”

“ Good-night,” answered Frank, as Hamil-
ton entered; “and thank you for staying with
me so long. You will come again .

“ Certainly, if you wish it.”

“What a strange fellow Doyle is!” said



80 FRANK NETHERTON.



Claude Hamilton. ‘I did not think he had so
much feeling. It is wrong in us to judge one
another. I shall like him better in future for
his kindness to you. And now, if you are
quite comfortable, I will read you the conclu-
sion of the history of the two children who
were cast away on the desert island.”

“TY forget where I was,” murmured Frank.
“How long ago it appears since I began it!
How much has happened since then! I do not
seem to care about it now; for, you know, it is
not true. I would rather hear you read a
chapter in the Bible, if you please.”

** Would you prefer any particular chapter ?”
asked Claude Hamilton, good-naturedly.

“No, thank you. It is all truth there.”

His companion turned to the twelfth chapter
of the Epistle to the Hebrews; and Frank lis-
tened, and was happy.

It is a happy thing to believe, as he did, that
the Scriptures are all truth; to be able to
“‘look unto Jesus, the author and finisher of
our faith,” and feel ourselves accepted and for-
given for his name’s sake. Thus only can we
“serve God acceptably, with reverence ard
godly fear.”” Out of Christ he is “a ccnsum-
ang fire.”



FRANK NETHERTON. 81

CHAPTER XI
THE TALISMAN.

Tur next day, Howard came as usual to see
Frank, but he looked sad and dejected. ‘You
heard, I suppose,” said he, “what kept me
away yesterday ?”

‘T did not hear the particulars.”

“Tt does not signify. It was the old story.
I am always doing wrong, and it is of no use
trying to do otherwise.’

“Oh, Howard, you must not say that so
often.”

“Why not? It is the truth.”

“ But have you really tried e

«Mo be sure I have, again and again.”

“ And in the way you promised, Howard ?”’

“T forget now what it was that I did promise.
{ only know that 1 am weary of trying. Every
thing goes against me. How do you manage,
Frank, never to be in disgrace ”

“ Because I have a talisman, said Frank.

“A talisman! What, areal talisman, such as
we read of in fairy tales? I thought there
was no truth in those things.”

Frank smiled mysteriously.



82 FRANK NETHERTON.



‘“‘ How I should love to see it: What is it
like? Is it a ring that pricks you whenevei
you are about to do wrong ?”

“No; it is a lamp.”

Howard had read of Aladdin and the won:
derful lamp; and he remembered something
about a lamp invented by Sir Humphry Davy;
but Frank told him that it did not resemble
either of those, but was called David’s lamp.

‘‘ Was that the name of the inventor ?” asked
Howard.

‘“‘No; the lamp existed, although in an in-
complete state, before David’s time, but it was
he who gave it that name.”

“ And what do you do? Do you rub it?” in-
quired Howard, still thinking of Aladdin.

“No; I read it.”

“TY understand now,” exclaimed Howard,
with asslight accent of disappointment. ‘“ You
have been talking of the Bible all this time.”

“Yes,” replied Fiank, “the word of God is
my talisman; as David says, ‘a lamp unto my
feet, and a light unto my path.’ And yet Da-
vid’s Bible was very short, compared with ours;
for he had neither the Gospels nor the Epistles,
nor a great part of the Old Testament. But
a lamp cannot give light if we shut it up and
never look at it.”

**] have no time.”

‘We are told by some one,” replied Frank,
“that when time is devoted to God, we are sure
+o have enough for all other uses.”



FRANK NETHERTON. 83



“ But I never can get up the moment I wake.
And afterwards it is as much as I can do to
dress before the breakfast-bell rings.”

«And why cannot you get up e

“TJ do not know. I never could.”

“Neither could I once; but it is easy
enough now. As some one says, “You lose
an hour in the morning, and are all day trying
in vain to catch it.’ ”’ |

“That is true enough,” observed Howard,
with a sigh. “But how does your talisman
keep you from doing wrong, Frank?”

“By teaching me to do right, and warn-
ing me against the snares’ and temptations
‘nto which I might otherwise fall; and 80
proving ‘a lamp unto my path,’ without
which I should be continually stumbling.
In trouble and perplexity, it has always an
answer ready for those who seek it in prayer
and faith.”

“JT wonder what it would say to me r
exclaimed Howard. |

Frank opened his little Bible at the twelfth
chapter of the Epistle to the Romans, begin-
ning at the ninth verse. “Listen,” replied
he, “to what it says to all: ‘Let love be
without dissimulation. Abhor that which is
evil; cleave to that which is good. Be kindly
affectioned one to another with brotherly love ;
in honour preferring one another; not slothful
in business; fervent in spirit; serving the
Lord; rejoicing in hope; patient in tribula-



8+ FRANK NETHERTON.



tion: continuing instant in prayer; distribut
ing to the necessity of saints; given te
hospitality. Bless them which persecute you;
bless, and curse not. Rejoice with them that
do rejoice, and weep with them that weep.
Be of the same mind one toward anothe-.
Mind not high things, but condescend to men
of low estate. Be not wise in your ows
conceits. Recompense to no man evil for
evil. Provide things honest in the sight of
allmen. If it be possible, as much as lieth
in you, live peaceably with all men. Dearly
beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give
place unto wrath § for it is written, Vengeance
is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord. There-
fore, if thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he
thirst, give him drink: for in so doing thou
shalt heap coals of fire on his head. Be not
overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good.’ ”

Frank ceased reading, and for several mo-
ments neither of them spoke. .

“T will begin from this day,” exclaimed
Howard, at length, “I am determined; and
read the Bible every morning and evening.
I see now what made you, or rather helped
you, to be so patient and forgiving; and why
you would not tell who it was that had hurt
~ I will try and make it my talisman also.

am sure I want a lamp, for every thing seems
dark enough sometimes: but it is my own fault.
Oh that I could ‘cleave to that which 1s

good !"”



FRANK NETHERTON. . 85



“My talisman likewise says,” continued
Frank, “and the words are those of our
Saviour himself, ‘Come unto me, all ye that
labour and are heavy laden, and I will give
ou rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn
of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart:
and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For
my yoke is easy, and my burden is “—- K:

«“T should like to find rest,” said oward,
wearily. ‘I have never found it yet.”

“And you never will out of Christ. He
‘; not a hard taskmaster. I am sure I may
say so,” exclaimed Frank, with tears in his
eyes. “What would have become of me if
it had been otherwise 2”

Frank might well say that. What would
become of any of us?

That day Howard made a great many good
resolutions. It was pity that he forgot them
again so soon.

A modern writer has truly observed—“ It
‘s with our faults as with horse-radish : it is
terribly difficult to extirpate it from the earth
in which it has once taken root; and nothing
is more discouraging to him who would banish
this weed from his ground than to find it, so
lately plucked up, shooting forth again and
again from the old root which yet remains
Yuried in the earth.” Yes, it is difficult
certainly, and discouraging; but let us take

heart, and remember that nothing is impossible
with God.



86 FRANK NETHERTON.



As soon as Frank was able to leave hist oom,
Mr. Campbell had him carried into his own
study, where he could remain quiet; and
Frank was very careful not to disturb him
when he came in to read, or write letters.
It was a pleasant room, with a low window
opening upon the lawn, and commanding a
view of the play-ground beyond. As Frank
sat there, he could hear the merry voices of
his school-fellows: and yet he did not feel sad,
or wish to be with them. He was in a very
peaceful frame of mind, for he knew that
every thing happens for the best. He wished
that he could always feel as he did then; but
the lamp, as we all know from experience,
does not always seem bright. Every now and
then a shadow comes across it, the shadow of
our own sin and unbelief; and God appears, as
it were, to hide his face from us. But let us
wait and pray, and, by and by, the darkness
passes away, and it is light again.

It was a sunny day; the boys had worked
hard, and enjoyed their play afterwards.
Philip Doyle alone remembered the little
invalid; and he only knew whose fault it was
that he was prevented from coming among
them. As he crossed the lawn, he saw Frank
sitting by the open window, and called to him.
“ Are you alone, Netherton?” saidhe. “ What
are you doing ?”

“Nothing,” replied Frank, “but enjoying
myself, as Mrs. Fry says, and giving thanks.



FRANK NELHERTON. 87



What a beautiful day ; and how merry you all

seem !””

«Not all, Frank; I cannot be merry while
ou are alone, and suffering.”

“JT am not suffering now; and I do not mind
being alone.”

« But cannot I do something for you?

“Yes, go away ; and let me hear you laugh-
ing and playing with the rest. Ido not say
this because I want to get rid of you,” added
Frank, as Doyle turned sorrowfully back to
his companions, “but because I want to see
you happy:

«hen I shall stay with you,” said Doyle.
and he entered the study with a bounding
step.

When Mr. Campbell came in some time
afterwards, and found him there, he praised
him for his kindness to his little school-fellow.
Doyle received his commendations with a
flushed cheek and downcast eye. He longea
to tell him all. There is nothing more humi-
liating than to listen to the praises which we
feel conscious we have not deserved.

99



BS FRANK NETHERTON. |



CHAPTER XII.
THERE IS NO PLACE LIKE HOME.

Freprertck Mortimer gained one of the
prizes, and his cousin tried not to feel envious.

“Never mind,” said Howard; “it is not
your fault. Every one pities you. You are
not laughed at, and called a dunce, as I am.
And a dunce I shall be all my life, I suppose.
It is a good thing for me that my aunt would
never dream of my bringing home a prize; sc
she will not be disappointed.”

“We must see what we can do next year,”
replied Frank, cheerfully. ‘Your aunt may
be agreeably surprised some day yet.”

Howard shook his head despondingly. “1
know I am a dunce,” repeated he; “and I
cannot help it.”’

“But Mr. Campbell says you are not a
lunce, and that it is your own fault that you
do not get on better; you are only careless
and indolent.”

‘Did he say that ?”

“Yes; Hamilton heard him as well as my-
self. Suppose we both try and begin a new
year when we come back, haved —shall we?
—-and see what we can do.” -

“T have tried sc often.”

‘Never mind; try again But you must



FRANK NETHURTON. 89



not forget the talisman. You will never get on
without that.”

“ You are right,” exclaimed Howard, as the
remembrance of his former resolutions came
across him. “I will try again, and in right
good earnest. I will turn over a new leaf, as
the saying is, and see if I cannot make fewer
blots.”

Frank warmly encouraged him in this de-
termination. Rushton, to whom Howard
made a point of telling every thing that
passed, and with whom, since their recon-
ciliation, he had become very intimate, said
that it was a wise resolution, and he hoped
that Howard would be able to keep it; but he
was afraid. And as for the talisman, it was
all stuff; and he should be sorry to see him
converted into a Methodist, like his friend
Netherton.

‘As the school was to break up -80 shortly,
‘+ was not thought worth while for Frank to
re-commence his studies; and the time hung
heavily on his hands until the holidays arrived.
Of the wound on his forehead nothing now
remained but a slight scar; but its weakening
effects were but too plainly evident in his pale
cheek and heavy eyes, and were severely felt
by Frank in his inability to fix his mind steadil
on any object, and the intense headache whic
was the inevitable result of such an attempt.
It was partly this feeling of incapacity which
gave him a childlike longing to be home aga" Dy



50 FRANK NETHEhTON.



and seated once more at his father’s fect in that
little, quiet study, listening to the old story of
the child and the reapers.

It was all over at length; the distribution
of prizes, the cheerful and somewhat boister-
ous “ breaking up,” and the joyous parting of
the school-fellows—joyous, because they were
going home, and because they should meet
again so soon. But all were not happy. At
the distribution of prizes, Frank, as we have
said, had a hard struggle with himself not to
feel envious. Philip Doyle won the first prize,
but it gave him little satisfaction. Howard
looked on in despair. At the breaking up,
Frank stood apart from their noisy mirth,
and leaned his aching head upon his hands.
He did not know that Doyle was watching him,
and that the sight took away all his pleasure.

Their parting, notwithstanding all Frank’s
assumed cheerfulness, was a sad one. ‘“ What
if he should never return!’ thought Doyle,
as he gazed upon his slight form, and pale,
smiling face. ‘Take care of yourself,” whis-
yes be, as they shook hands; “for my sake,

etherton, try and get well.”

‘Never fear,” replied Frank, gayly. .

Claude Hamilton also mingled cautions with
his farewell ; and was so kind and friendly that
Frank felt quite happy.

The cousins enjoyed their drive home.
Frederick was very cheerful and talkative;
he said a great deal about his prize, which



FRANK NETHERTON. 91



was the first that he had ever gained, and of
which he was very proud, and longed to
exhibit it to his mother and sister. Frank
was soon able to enter into his feelings with-
out a single remaining shadow of self-regret.
But not before he had, more than once, re-
sorted in memory to his talisman, and recalled
to mind that it is written therein, ‘ The spirit
that dwelleth in us lusteth to envy. But he
giveth more grace. * And again, “ Charity suf-
fereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not.’’}

After a time Frank’s thoughts wandered ;
and he could not help wondering how he
should find his father. Just before the coach
entered the village, he turned to ask Frederick
whether he really looked so very ill, and if the
scar showed much. —

“No, scarcely at all when you brush your
hair over it; and the air has given you quite &
colour.”

“JT am so glad,” exclaimed Frank.

The first person they saw was little Helen,
evidently looking out for them; for as soon
as she perceived the carriage approaching,
she clapped her hands and ran away tO Prom
claim the welcome intelligence.

Mrs. Mortimer met them on the hall-steps.
“Your father is better,” whispered she tc
Frank, as she gave him a hasty kiss. ‘He is
waiting for you in the study. But, bless the
boy! what has he been doing to himself ?”

#* James iv. 5, 6. + 1 Cor. xiii. 4,
8*



-_—___-



ae FRANK NETHERTON.



“Tt is nothing,” replied Frank; and in
another moment he was in his father’s arms.

“God be thanked! God be thanked!”
murmured Mr. Netherton, as he embraced:
him. And then, pushing him a little way
from him, and trying to smile, he added,
“What a fuss I am making about a few
months’ absence. Let me look at you, my
dear boy. You have been ill!”

‘It was only an accident,” replied Frank,
carelessly; “it is all over now.” But Mr.
Netherton was not satisfied.

Mrs. Mortimer did not leave them long
together. She kissed Frank again when she
entered, with much affection, parting back the
hair from his forehead as she did so; and then
dismissed him to wash his hands, and get ready
for dinner. ‘It is quite ready for you,”’ said
she. “I knew you would be hungry after
your drive.”

Frank forbore to assure his aunt that he
was not at all hungry, and would rather re-
main where he was, for he knew that it would
be of no use, and therefore went and did as
she desired him.

“Tt 1s nothing,’ exclaimed Mrs. Mortimer,
meeting her brother’s anxious glance ;—“a
mere scratch.”

“But do you not think Frank looks very
pale and thin ?”

“He is tired, and shall go to bed early.
He will be al right to-morrow.”



FRANK NETHERTON. ’ ia



Frank was not sorry to go to bed early ;
and the next morning, as his aunt had pro-
phesied, he seemed to be quite himself —
He was always pale, and therefore, as Mrs.
Mortimer said, it was no sign of ill health.
Nevertheless she nursed him in her own quiet
and judicious manner; and Frank was soon all
the better for her management.

Frederick’s prize received its due share of
notice and commendation, especially from his
sister, who was never weary of looking at it,
and admiring the handsome binding, and the
beautiful handwriting upon the title-page,
showing it to be the reward of merit. But
it might have been observed that Helen never
asked to look at it when Frank was by, or
spoke of it in his presence. Her own kind,
thoughtful heart taught her to act thus.
Helen had become quite a favourite with Mr.
Netherton; so much so that Frank told her
he had a great mind to be jealous; and then
ended by thanking her for her loving care.

It was settled that the two families should
continue to reside together, and the arrange-
ment seemed to give satisfaction to all parties.
As Mr. Netherton said, he did not know what
he should do now without his sister to manage
every thing for him; neither could he bear te
be separated from the little, golden-haired
child who had so wound herself around his
heart, and whose very name was linked with
fond memories of the past.



—.; FRANK NETHERTON.



Frank was pleased to think that his father
would have some one to cheer and amuse him
when he should have gone back to school. And
Helen, with her low, sweet voice, her win-
ning and playful ways, and gentle countenance,
always busy and helpful, and yet quict and
unobtrusive, was no unwelcome addition tc
that dear old study, which he so enjoyed when
at Lome, and thought about when away.





FRANK NETHERTON. . 3b

—————

CHAPTER XIII.
MISSICNARiES.

Freperick related the history of his cousin’s
iIIness, as far as he knew it; and the mystery
which still hung over its author; hinting that,
now Frank was at home, and among his own
family, there could be no impropriety in his
disclosing, in confidence, the real name of the
offender. “Not but what I have my suspicions,”
said Frederick; “‘ but I should so like to know
for certain.”

«There are several things that I should like
to know for certain,” replied Frank, laughing.
“ T want to know who the man with the iron
mask was. And what made the famous tower
at Pisa lean.”

“Some people say,” answered his father,
“with regard to the latter, that the ancient
builders, aiming at eccentricity, erected it as
‘t now stands; while others conceive its re-
clining position to be occasioned by a sinking
of the earth. The conjectures concerning the
ident:ty of the man with the iron mask are
endless.’

“ But seriously, Frank,” continued his cou-
sin, “I should like to know who hurt you.”

“ Seriously, Frederick, you never will know
from me.”



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'2011-11-17T03:25:57-05:00'
describe
'2011-11-17T03:24:33-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfile4' 'sip-filescover1.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
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'2011-11-17T03:28:08-05:00'
describe
'2011-11-17T03:24:36-05:00'
redup
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'2011-11-17T03:27:57-05:00'
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9c4ae864644f6fa83b88042c10cd6d6a
26c1921e4a02edead276f76cf030d5c48e7d25ec
'2011-11-17T03:29:32-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'3861' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPAI' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
bcd2ab27035a728adb00ad4491778c75
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'2011-11-17T03:29:34-05:00'
describe
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'2011-11-17T03:27:41-05:00'
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'2011-11-17T03:25:20-05:00'
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'2011-11-17T03:24:48-05:00'
describe
'3864' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPAM' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
7130e0fd0cd96b3e6fb90f37a305abd6
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'2011-11-17T03:27:58-05:00'
describe
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5cb40bd7d41a0a45f8281965da81e9a7
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'2011-11-17T03:25:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPAO' 'sip-files00003.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-11-17T03:27:23-05:00'
describe
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3a5be51184a4d439d2196bb974b7dbec
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'2011-11-17T03:28:26-05:00'
describe
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f2fed75b8de42fe19d25ee0991ce60e6
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'2011-11-17T03:26:03-05:00'
describe
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aaf3a24f36b33695b00fee77ce9ba3ea
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'2011-11-17T03:29:03-05:00'
describe
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'2011-11-17T03:25:15-05:00'
describe
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'2011-11-17T03:27:59-05:00'
describe
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'2011-11-17T03:25:39-05:00'
describe
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17dc44a18c7d60f6948daf2cc471ac37
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'2011-11-17T03:25:43-05:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-11-17T03:30:00-05:00'
describe
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'2011-11-17T03:25:52-05:00'
describe
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'2011-11-17T03:24:43-05:00'
describe
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'2011-11-17T03:28:32-05:00'
describe
'7769183' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBB' 'sip-files00005.tif'
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'2011-11-17T03:27:27-05:00'
describe
'120' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBC' 'sip-files00005.txt'
d8627dd136ff2e579c51888637a49cc2
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'2011-11-17T03:28:49-05:00'
describe
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'2011-11-17T03:29:33-05:00'
describe
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'2011-11-17T03:25:24-05:00'
describe
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'2011-11-17T03:28:54-05:00'
describe
'4120' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBG' 'sip-files00006.pro'
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'2011-11-17T03:29:12-05:00'
describe
'21046' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBH' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
0de10d6a4246f043f8562f582ed3fb37
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'2011-11-17T03:26:40-05:00'
describe
'8262625' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBI' 'sip-files00006.tif'
394b3269f854cac836f2673b4bdcf98b
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'2011-11-17T03:29:11-05:00'
describe
'241' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBJ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
81ef2c52012c744c479f99945f2e252a
a17a9bc39fe48f3307985a8bd0c55f76dbbb424e
'2011-11-17T03:28:17-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7094' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBK' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
3bbe7704592265accc4804f0c9ff9e1b
6e869e52ebf7b880234c6dcc5cc1ba1196c5d70b
'2011-11-17T03:26:48-05:00'
describe
'946980' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBL' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
4d460c1b8fcf25a4f416c381bf2b6e2f
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'2011-11-17T03:26:14-05:00'
describe
'54171' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBM' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
a420658a268e37e58497eeca20b17c42
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'2011-11-17T03:28:10-05:00'
describe
'2055' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBN' 'sip-files00007.pro'
edbe99969faaf5fb4801da1fc343ffc0
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'2011-11-17T03:27:08-05:00'
describe
'15507' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBO' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
585d49ac34c988a1d1c5ed66d0d41d23
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'2011-11-17T03:26:16-05:00'
describe
'7583807' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBP' 'sip-files00007.tif'
1faf04df91037bf3315d40ff84a2942c
a6aedf5fa63e7e1e3db20feb2024e4a914f8ddde
'2011-11-17T03:24:40-05:00'
describe
'121' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBQ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
969c677e1a58442e8d85f6912f4db648
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'2011-11-17T03:26:05-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5441' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBR' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
794006456a5c579d40dfc67a388f1645
006f5f9c5c654eddba53d8e433654ca301134a28
describe
'995257' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBS' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
894f1b797ca7edb4c12e12392b8abab2
80f9c3dd044df76ef90e2f9666024e991d899c80
'2011-11-17T03:28:47-05:00'
describe
'93468' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBT' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
1ba08ee84a67236a7bfdf4b704bdb495
8ebf5e426ae5bb0a8bdba5d8c6eb72c970c0286e
'2011-11-17T03:26:09-05:00'
describe
'2323' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBU' 'sip-files00008.pro'
147051aea885e6070445bc5af57118af
7913a225837037575d4daa59ca196694d69b855e
'2011-11-17T03:27:54-05:00'
describe
'30030' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBV' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
cf9037977d8e3e3e4dfd4323ef43633d
6202ceec8f1098af4d39556f7008464249c58c28
'2011-11-17T03:27:21-05:00'
describe
'7974277' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBW' 'sip-files00008.tif'
0f1ae2cad8b17528f1eb2ce2f8191e77
c95586a58a9efcc4f5e5eafda4b1f602282a22dd
'2011-11-17T03:26:46-05:00'
describe
'184' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBX' 'sip-files00008.txt'
6b9b04b4766144c9db597bd5e7dd16c9
d3dc8e35c575ff9fd5f30d0784d5da9a9138d42b
'2011-11-17T03:28:24-05:00'
describe
'10376' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBY' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
af4c03b28bef2a13e895f47b05a96456
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'2011-11-17T03:30:13-05:00'
describe
'483978' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPBZ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
8c5aacb0a8ee0fc44b962f020a87458f
7e63e2cd414e70c481db482f509a8ff9a80294c5
'2011-11-17T03:26:01-05:00'
describe
'12679' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
61b2dd430a1a063c4e1351180458524a
29ff8ce7eb0c40746ccdcf46510d4d728603ee0b
'2011-11-17T03:28:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCB' 'sip-files00009.pro'
3729409a1a19f3b83ae406cd638423ff
8e2f6c2619cbf20453dda7a96d3207a19d1b1b22
'2011-11-17T03:26:17-05:00'
describe
'3740' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCC' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
eb005edc671b99314735b860dd7f2538
d3f774b339107d585873ab5fbbda0318d5e6baa9
'2011-11-17T03:26:58-05:00'
describe
'7743275' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCD' 'sip-files00009.tif'
6f7e9270c8fd0f797c264cac49ebf3d9
0cc79c2593c33252f043ac4208fc498eccdeebab
'2011-11-17T03:29:37-05:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCE' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
974049524201c7f79a58f68bab6c2048
59bf336547e8505449f317b560908b59f3a9fa82
'2011-11-17T03:24:50-05:00'
describe
'832363' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCF' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
1b8994032dd088b648b72fa7e451cc34
6a3de4b6c3ac80c5ab4cdda3211212fd72be1351
'2011-11-17T03:25:00-05:00'
describe
'27657' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCG' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
1b04b4be457827a1800c80aee842712c
ebf75ef57fc33b22875c103340c2488a3a0cc0f1
'2011-11-17T03:26:45-05:00'
describe
'3710' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCH' 'sip-files00010.pro'
f5ab7f6a90fa659b2920b8736522ce82
e9111326699a41588902d2471baae685a4a14586
'2011-11-17T03:28:43-05:00'
describe
'9604' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCI' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
842226181d8c69292e7b88b09bcc0ff2
60e1ebd4f8a46fb65888b142637c30e8cb524ee5
'2011-11-17T03:29:42-05:00'
describe
'7690307' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCJ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
165da8cfe7b410a2096d472f5efad8db
f1d5e9cf73efed721829b68e3f9fa3082e506a14
describe
'227' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCK' 'sip-files00010.txt'
1f22f8f7e7318704fc068a666206016c
69e14008385b34b60ccb60891547b8bb6c518bf6
'2011-11-17T03:25:51-05:00'
describe
'3574' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCL' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
0dcb9d05c015ed4e8f13fb43686774b6
22be2c615de7e8ac6bcf7a692674e6d7d555a178
describe
'897948' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCM' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
448a8d4b94a6b003b207eb629ed8116c
05fb925fb4dbbd83e71dff2caf832f0c82167c89
describe
'39110' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCN' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
c3f384fb7e77c9d3dc3e328ddf1ffee2
4455bd8515f6bf50a21ec3b22b00f1e9c053df37
'2011-11-17T03:25:19-05:00'
describe
'15168' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCO' 'sip-files00011.pro'
f1fe1eed527559f720c52dfcc9e7e07d
00f3fc3ddd7ba901c507bada9c53bba6cd896617
'2011-11-17T03:24:51-05:00'
describe
'12950' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCP' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
1bd9b0a035d6209266eba03254e0d752
14fd662f4782c5dadf5931b5a7e875184dfb4713
'2011-11-17T03:29:57-05:00'
describe
'7541003' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCQ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
d853e3f494f2f35f6c0aad72e5264034
6120c322fa8fea175ee0e7f206472850e270f905
'2011-11-17T03:28:01-05:00'
describe
'689' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCR' 'sip-files00011.txt'
cc59160c45c535708c2086abdf466fa9
2ddd195a719322c3e7b1ebbd83508d8ce60177ca
'2011-11-17T03:27:11-05:00'
describe
'4567' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCS' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
7c19286cfabfdcb5715daf99e9aa3ae0
d17de476bbafbaf02ba5b8a9a3be8c2b359cd523
'2011-11-17T03:27:46-05:00'
describe
'949008' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCT' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
cdec4a8bbe7a6aa3ecf2917531445649
e4297d96f2fd272faa50fc8258810bd22b978c05
describe
'49532' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCU' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
091ec536efed9311c5288c2cfb092c08
fcc058bbf1259cdcec2d50fd4c7344d35ff037d2
describe
'26639' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCV' 'sip-files00012.pro'
d6da6c6803515c566be376012f02090c
3202ae67de00001ccc0be1d02ee2bf01e543ae8f
describe
'18767' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCW' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
ac87c7dcbee4fa41be9e0b11f4ddd217
fc48b5ec5f1983ee47770d6c689cda0c08184a01
describe
'7847555' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCX' 'sip-files00012.tif'
64973f1fc9182d131e9fc5d01a316d8c
c11b82b4f3bb98ea9872f22b8caf7a0badc5efa5
'2011-11-17T03:25:55-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCY' 'sip-files00012.txt'
d0aa457a8122e32a98360399998115c6
ae6eb10f1a8121cda842555eac73b76bff79d46d
'2011-11-17T03:27:35-05:00'
describe
'6886' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPCZ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
e6f5fe12b8abbc1ba5d944e9877dbffc
6f659dc83fec6ab5bc7ed6a5c1bd856ad4fb4ac2
'2011-11-17T03:28:42-05:00'
describe
'892513' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDA' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7442b2f8fea36d41deb57025eb8a316a
9c20dac8d91a824685e2e990f4ab638ed064c09f
'2011-11-17T03:25:25-05:00'
describe
'43008' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDB' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
0f20d7bf834c2e0011f92f65c2c824df
d4e1d98d8887ad37731b8d24679a2a0e6b2ac88e
'2011-11-17T03:28:16-05:00'
describe
'14941' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDC' 'sip-files00013.pro'
757092421b6952543b3960a6ef58f460
cd19cdc1cccbb9b535d880edd2fa8a3e3d17b677
describe
'14920' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDD' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
acc2ebaa69e04790a8d20a682c9beeb0
e1e15f95679b1dc17b373454c65d17467eb6c2c6
'2011-11-17T03:26:15-05:00'
describe
'7529347' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDE' 'sip-files00013.tif'
403a953b9345c977c16468f692a41397
8572e1c75a88ba8ac774fe42c796cb4ce5603d8d
'2011-11-17T03:30:01-05:00'
describe
'667' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDF' 'sip-files00013.txt'
1012916eba1ab36bd4e0e0d62e87580f
3614cdb3b1d7e7c7a77ad47b66e8f1c0338002bf
'2011-11-17T03:25:50-05:00'
describe
'5462' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDG' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
99a32126179405aa7de08778073f5e16
45e9b4d5af8af2d0f339a6aeaaff45e53f545111
'2011-11-17T03:29:06-05:00'
describe
'952163' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDH' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
a4eb9ef28a99452dae3adb244f0f3877
07d14199c8b480528109f9b289bb2fda28058744
describe
'77380' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
8793be3fa9b210428872d71ff66df29a
04e8e2bd8d86ec7930dc7556cc2aaddef2bac578
'2011-11-17T03:24:44-05:00'
describe
'23538' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a622caa42ba86103396ecc355745c4f8
3a6fc47cb69a4c5af101de953ba7ad94fdfbdd51
describe
'27006' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
c6d4e1cbc022825eeb23ae0a8a23f14e
361a71b4c82e720e475a07a6c135db33de1f0b03
'2011-11-17T03:26:32-05:00'
describe
'7624739' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
ecc9df3dc3e08c1635ef766091ba4ea5
ddd3402ef3c36e5bc2a5b8ea1778f3ccfabbb112
'2011-11-17T03:25:22-05:00'
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
812e96b4cedc4cba5f04d1fd599b16ee
b75d458450ab711bcb015de1655372cd04affb1f
describe
'9170' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDN' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
90815a50aea1d0c3344b8dda682a6de9
2332af8151fb68c560f748dae11ce0c029d408bf
'2011-11-17T03:25:48-05:00'
describe
'973505' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDO' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
3da75cc690d59140d5d8354510f3f96c
a81788352a72b9e5bc69dcb7473d6f94c9ee6fcd
'2011-11-17T03:25:06-05:00'
describe
'106860' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDP' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
7d5ded3d8be9781d09fc2c66801e681e
098d8ccda531e7c918f17996b3c37d6fdd57eccf
'2011-11-17T03:27:33-05:00'
describe
'37025' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDQ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
7f70676a4f8ac19eb538e75564c9fa4b
05acdf8c702812416a89c1c0e42fdd1b8e3bba79
'2011-11-17T03:27:49-05:00'
describe
'38645' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDR' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
3b8d6b04be088bb53a031cd3cd758c70
3e8aeee73ce72dacf77381d951b79437ba274783
'2011-11-17T03:30:03-05:00'
describe
'7797723' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDS' 'sip-files00015.tif'
c5d5cefa2a378b2eb13243d27e749b93
547767a29c226fe3f0e9bf390f452f46ed7af5d5
'2011-11-17T03:28:18-05:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDT' 'sip-files00015.txt'
19c9ca87b1e239104dc9b127dfb8885b
7053669c0bcb0e9ac3b96c8b45b73548884974e3
'2011-11-17T03:24:57-05:00'
describe
'11873' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDU' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
546e081967af873f8afd3bd4e08442cc
37edf4b7e8d95187bc9f995e6988985ff08f313f
'2011-11-17T03:27:02-05:00'
describe
'973544' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDV' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
5c2985bfabdfc2e9dd1dc7d08a7a7fcf
ffe746ed3a6f2f78d75220ad3cbf0198929258c2
'2011-11-17T03:28:58-05:00'
describe
'93324' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDW' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
8a40fae985adc073b346adf31305924a
a8af57c06edc6a25af8385920a207375a4b3eee5
'2011-11-17T03:29:41-05:00'
describe
'31099' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
eb8e3872ee0eb008fb17117e3e2244e1
1a4c860480a778cc1fa5b0a4bf8c3a116f34bf8c
'2011-11-17T03:24:58-05:00'
describe
'34171' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDY' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
50bf0f6293ea5ac078fe116eb43f7982
a805d784e2e8c7ae42d5cadb0e8de9752035b19c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPDZ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f61f65374e5e9301b1ea0b94668f65a0
bc10f2971499dd93a6eec0d2b2c83a9a3145b8a1
'2011-11-17T03:27:18-05:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEA' 'sip-files00016.txt'
66011ce6e393740987b8ff2101778880
f0037f2d038e4045fc970aaf5dc59ddffbe889d0
'2011-11-17T03:28:13-05:00'
describe
'11074' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEB' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
8158187a691488eed8ad7767921475cf
9e62b87849605debc02c912c1dd3691866759da5
'2011-11-17T03:27:17-05:00'
describe
'955501' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEC' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
cd83f434faaf7d67dcff7eb63e09a5f2
14a2d973999f2aa18c3e25dd168ddcb25a6ccc77
'2011-11-17T03:27:48-05:00'
describe
'98451' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPED' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
68eb228f50a2e69c5c8c41d86b0b4eb7
7ad6e2eaba4b0aeeb6d1ce705cf1a7faadd8ea1b
'2011-11-17T03:29:45-05:00'
describe
'32813' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEE' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e5fb5e0e7229eeb79084e6d3bee85a9f
3cde9eaa845a6b52e542a70ee8957b410e8f9b93
'2011-11-17T03:27:43-05:00'
describe
'35454' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEF' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4248b894a3478568584fdcec86929d97
61e0f19ebb8eaadc3d470b203a40d3538ddf9784
'2011-11-17T03:27:31-05:00'
describe
'7653285' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEG' 'sip-files00017.tif'
f429e1d7d39b2e16395e79b6fa80d99f
f59b575d99c77db736b6315bbd14ff683c1ddab8
'2011-11-17T03:25:56-05:00'
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEH' 'sip-files00017.txt'
5734605a274409a01cfefe9c4aab58cb
5cca7f34172caf80523385101f240d628b31ccc6
describe
'11405' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEI' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
cbd65b3bf6738ed33ae590874e20ee5b
82b9161a2f5e2e869795e43522c5ec61bebe3029
'2011-11-17T03:30:09-05:00'
describe
'972159' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
b22753aea88658c5f9932074219d3c47
18787f2bfaf8fe7b5190c8e065402eb3eda9f293
describe
'106731' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEK' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
93de0f865b29f501bd31e05fe47b1ee3
adec341e246e4df6b0d2c27abf61b3bd4eec9953
'2011-11-17T03:30:11-05:00'
describe
'37662' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEL' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c8515a9e89f89f83a14070dd7b02a3e2
a0a631d40af60914857430aa3e67effa9b3fd8fa
'2011-11-17T03:29:18-05:00'
describe
'37538' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEM' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
5c74e54ca63ac2cd3d33bfebd1e303f2
5774756189fb8786cbda6f44f8981c7cba121b7b
describe
'7787221' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
0bda119cc483779e01a995da768747d2
21ba063c32a30c037c3add68439f04725415534c
'2011-11-17T03:29:43-05:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
fed6a11e8b22874a210224bdec42e50b
3692c793280f09f8001a88fd3ac980114e197700
'2011-11-17T03:28:19-05:00'
describe
'11648' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEP' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
fa4e551e03ad3964ef546ac0e094fd93
1b0c143368c137a146995fc49a9665ba0490fba1
describe
'967991' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEQ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
838bf82055e5588992f2a009146ec707
88ae4e83d04df64a7ceb1323b6b71b7de5f74cab
'2011-11-17T03:26:34-05:00'
describe
'101609' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPER' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ee24476362779449a1af8630f5cce904
c7791a1cdc1e49aa91c2a86ab6e18c324661e37c
'2011-11-17T03:27:47-05:00'
describe
'33597' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPES' 'sip-files00019.pro'
e0ed8bd7a3648564e2c8c624128ae677
2ac6340edc6b480f0f7b71c04acb990d3aeec07a
describe
'37033' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPET' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
cad91c5092f71a5bed3c0db7d38c06ca
56eaa9752bd3319b542dcd632f646f406b631db5
'2011-11-17T03:28:23-05:00'
describe
'7753335' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEU' 'sip-files00019.tif'
7611401d33996ed8d38c1a7d682f6d5d
25883a2e0c133056b8ebfa5a55822811f82127d7
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEV' 'sip-files00019.txt'
028af36f7699a0acca6a5f4fced29f0f
79594be8017640cde132fa4477727b2cc90143fa
'2011-11-17T03:26:31-05:00'
describe
'11833' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
eb82ee8978ca4735aa10a432053c6570
d4f1ea8b46649e98a2ae02f04630e6218c499000
describe
'966593' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEX' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
155870ecac71a0626929b986519b57c5
9611cddb79ac82fd618205f2ab1d8a743588b065
'2011-11-17T03:30:21-05:00'
describe
'86171' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
16ef9a1095be036a2638a3aff71e718c
a364586b6c32343f98a31d4f0c55555aab0ce979
'2011-11-17T03:28:46-05:00'
describe
'15759' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPEZ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
847c97a18f848e5d15301770e8c2703d
353102e7af7c5c9b7a0bc8aedf4a0e208fd715c1
describe
'28741' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFA' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
748830b055539d4930fec88e4d6ed074
ca0651250f6db3dfd7afea33e3291c9939c76583
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFB' 'sip-files00020.tif'
4b2f805531c6f941009dabd396ae3a9f
01adefad14beceff05e233b3e54de8ff83547cfe
'2011-11-17T03:26:28-05:00'
describe
'660' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFC' 'sip-files00020.txt'
6c9a67809385b8d9b565f8e15633ee35
f8923a28febdfd3e1f5ba8974b0758f6553540a8
'2011-11-17T03:28:05-05:00'
describe
'9433' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFD' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
041291336cb292affa09a15dc03ea3ac
aef700a70931b57813b03a33dcb789e0bbee1010
'2011-11-17T03:25:02-05:00'
describe
'955492' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFE' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
befbe2a3963abb0d4a08c303ef42ba9a
1e85d3d4daa79305b6626a1b37fbc2600b266917
'2011-11-17T03:29:51-05:00'
describe
'84357' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFF' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
dffeac53c8ac4e40cf96e155ef3ea6a2
ab407000a5207d45b6dda3b0abeba0e4cce47167
describe
'26215' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFG' 'sip-files00021.pro'
21e2237ef815ef61357087c1f98bee85
bfc44a78c73e138dc0e393603e208f95e4790dd1
'2011-11-17T03:25:16-05:00'
describe
'30294' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
901a693bc556124ae81268b65b31473e
935896f7e1f4e041226905ca3e4515362d0417a9
'2011-11-17T03:26:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
29dc8a8e7398bf5a6931f290de406373
00667660ad04f33d4810f6b3c813555fa1476308
'2011-11-17T03:26:43-05:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFJ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
54856f7389fab5513d77db4aea2a4ba0
fff58dc6e1baa4de9f51054518bed3ed6a6cac1f
describe
'9820' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
7b3b7b564f4b34d8f61043c929803409
c8e0f470c137e77f427169fcf49ebbfce3b460fb
describe
'961137' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFL' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
93beb6e7eeee4d28d1fd1ab8a02779dd
0342431d1a264a41c20f152c80c5689231b1a27b
'2011-11-17T03:24:45-05:00'
describe
'95848' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFM' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
8c891a1f352a87554e0e5b9abfcdd1f2
08a625c0aa7557662f026765776359d909ad85c5
describe
'32407' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFN' 'sip-files00022.pro'
d2cb3be07f242b1d03ba38335c33d1de
41b86a86cad2dbc3d0e7032289da85b98b0d514d
'2011-11-17T03:28:09-05:00'
describe
'35560' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
0f66a0f4cd1f5ee7e681d96570995791
095e14b19b7299a35e304aead215ad77ad5effc7
describe
'7699329' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
9fa57b3767cff855b14b5a30741a49e0
66db6ab70d81a490761afca674b85ff9e3ff845e
'2011-11-17T03:25:13-05:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
b0217a3c1ee697a3294482df00bef2c8
32610ea927d39a6e452dc6640680c209b8c4ab30
describe
'11175' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFR' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
f69b4f87d72e2a0e1671d5ddfd3e4d10
8a53894ba68fdcf8934432f7a50a89bcdb19ca4b
describe
'913682' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFS' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
a9c889c7b26a32e7c3cbd5468a4e56f7
959a17baf1ffd71c68a37b8023d99bd09c095270
describe
'92063' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFT' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
691fa284192fdbe07e53a45ef89fca07
1c3668aad45023906ed4d22e919f0cba01f014e1
'2011-11-17T03:29:13-05:00'
describe
'30765' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
3844358c93f438c1286cc198bfedccc5
2904e6b0c470f0a9df645e13c646b52a0e1950b0
describe
'33981' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFV' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
552a37257897b8c5df205dfa3000b3bd
877139f6e60376d492860efe9eceb95d9e321385
describe
'7316287' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFW' 'sip-files00023.tif'
fe16a3db757814cb724a49f0b5a943b7
8499fff32cf1bb37e1364f8775fc5cdca0548ff3
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFX' 'sip-files00023.txt'
bc61e16024e1d0ec4b8a835b3bb2d435
78203f5176feddb335907d41d21254714cf4573f
describe
'11693' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFY' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
73cebdf57dac1873b45c83577471e5e4
b645498dcd4a25960e63b7cc6157f2159b2a87e7
'2011-11-17T03:26:44-05:00'
describe
'946494' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPFZ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
7903b50dce75b7e8c83482f8132efb20
58eb9c360e516b9b581835ebd696fcc98056505a
'2011-11-17T03:27:12-05:00'
describe
'94212' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGA' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
ca94c378351d988e3ff81c2346d2135f
474eb90bebf6923eff9b21b0e7de8bbe78f17a27
'2011-11-17T03:25:49-05:00'
describe
'31428' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGB' 'sip-files00024.pro'
91b3d42b87a67149b3bf63b88997d2e8
6f8f73d467727508431cb08989582d7c74d7d087
'2011-11-17T03:28:03-05:00'
describe
'34907' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGC' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
ed85b8afd179319de138099e8b889c17
99e25c15d2b71d6c1b577213c2194999a061a3cb
describe
'7581601' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
e0ba487f9dd2e99a9737f185a287a3b0
be84726b98a8cc895c71690b18c4969222aae600
'2011-11-17T03:29:16-05:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGE' 'sip-files00024.txt'
8d3c702299511a78cb656da1c375327a
0d48db27462c2cad5b5d32797fcadf04323ed588
'2011-11-17T03:29:25-05:00'
describe
'11543' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
64c685b8fd6269801c46e1746677ddad
f0d5e00e412a43a8af350d8d20c4ace149dd29a5
describe
'951087' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
99bde95d1b1ad66a2c647c298c72273e
e66b97995f78b12513f243265ce799a841c05fd2
describe
'109631' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
1e2f80244796f54b764dbf91189c8285
b0a6ce16e5d9fd1f65be2f529113e68ab46d5949
'2011-11-17T03:26:49-05:00'
describe
'37414' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
c4fcb643f2093101a1ae29841db6e441
b2bb25b41f05606b7d7d03f3d9d32b99088e160d
'2011-11-17T03:29:50-05:00'
describe
'39985' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
0039ee731395a4df562a5d7c3d2219ac
17a362c7d2f33503d6a06902c113fb516bd0b3c1
describe
'7618391' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGK' 'sip-files00025.tif'
b00fb583bee98c6cd143fb315a2c996e
dbae17272b9d41ebe2ce10c62eec721e439be733
'2011-11-17T03:28:53-05:00'
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGL' 'sip-files00025.txt'
528dfb873a560782efac82dd1b0e15f6
b49d29381f65671cae6f81a4e9c0a3bf30ba96f4
'2011-11-17T03:29:29-05:00'
describe
'12501' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGM' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
6956396b15fa4dd05f1d0fdaa01e7f8b
94c5a38c80d37f72a3fddd2eed3abab30e837649
'2011-11-17T03:28:36-05:00'
describe
'974247' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGN' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
b640615ace25ee77b02689c6a4419c40
c103df7ecd954f4e061b1902672a532613beeab0
'2011-11-17T03:30:22-05:00'
describe
'96366' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGO' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
fc28b53d4941d4a3409fcdeaeb5d0182
140cea91dabab48f3dfa46e5b687fae77b426cc4
'2011-11-17T03:27:56-05:00'
describe
'32835' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGP' 'sip-files00026.pro'
51ef00e85b5527c2d094977184937af4
2373877d3bb1f23751a0dfe1d12ffc97f3c08088
'2011-11-17T03:26:24-05:00'
describe
'35152' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
4cbda42791ef8c860bf7295817e82dfd
02896716753c3841162fbcd88ec4685ffb4feaf9
'2011-11-17T03:27:38-05:00'
describe
'7803399' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGR' 'sip-files00026.tif'
3dee42b08868f9ed1ba14b7497187e84
fa5c0d602689ea388a109b32e236bb330857e70a
'2011-11-17T03:25:03-05:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGS' 'sip-files00026.txt'
676951f5d3c77009e93a4062ff5f642b
863083f396359a88ed1332c55e8b15e8529c7fbd
describe
'11454' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGT' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
039ab9387feb61fa4961d94cddbae15a
6d2eb30b08f9a399eb23157bb59fb180d879652b
describe
'943934' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGU' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
2105865032171d507d5ed28bffe6d3ec
3fc9f9701e9405aa365470a33a8fc8480bb4b2c8
describe
'102128' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGV' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
c754501a9649d1cb150ee22c6c96ad83
474a1021b61843078fdf7c96de71a5fc5d8bbe42
'2011-11-17T03:29:17-05:00'
describe
'35044' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGW' 'sip-files00027.pro'
bb45f60a80dab8e50c362c508dcdfabc
250b56b168cbef98057cd00089fce4a280382ab9
'2011-11-17T03:29:04-05:00'
describe
'37255' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
1a38d8179a9eeb18df162ca77dcaaabd
ec2c7251a080309faf549c2c1732b9a7683a97ab
describe
'7559171' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGY' 'sip-files00027.tif'
39bf65b397a1fd3f951b9e5d113eea93
2f419326af3525a5e85394e2a9adde274e0a395a
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPGZ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
a3466910e211ff4937bf085c35db930b
e968a85745964dd2dc7c9a18b1f8ce519814bc51
'2011-11-17T03:30:05-05:00'
describe
'12250' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHA' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c25491e569d118bc4d148565ab18c006
1e287563809e37156ee3a3b1626f664de6989794
describe
'961550' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHB' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
70ca1eb7600aa455471aec44a28b4b1d
ddc234548108e685e6daad5c76fd7eab9059ccf5
'2011-11-17T03:27:26-05:00'
describe
'85328' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHC' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
1e75fcc6de973106d57286996f05b28d
0e30fbe0ed620fe61df9ac13193f27354fb52672
'2011-11-17T03:28:00-05:00'
describe
'18346' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHD' 'sip-files00028.pro'
5bd74e43e51b4339aacf123057b8afe5
c9a6c969acbad6a852b054686b7dd80648c2b7b5
'2011-11-17T03:29:52-05:00'
describe
'28992' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHE' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
26f41090e555987c7a6f06c9c057eeff
574725f3ee77b1196a7dc53d1fca11cd2d2ec6f1
'2011-11-17T03:27:15-05:00'
describe
'7702575' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHF' 'sip-files00028.tif'
d8a126f6d6207d5c97a81b0e98404458
de4c46c42dbd537c7a8b362ce0e12b0c24f8db11
describe
'761' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHG' 'sip-files00028.txt'
fad8cb1bb6458fdf2a6b237e38e894ba
08549d9b71341d201564f87ea15d1323dd6bda5b
'2011-11-17T03:24:55-05:00'
describe
'9705' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHH' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
571e0b135492ec6fb866824fc2ae1027
2b570cac46dd055e9a857e35cf8fcbe698ea847a
describe
'930285' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHI' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
7723e1713926b88e5c977e4280b43a62
d4dac0de283d3f7f62db234a2a00eac70dd7a3c9
'2011-11-17T03:29:54-05:00'
describe
'93485' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHJ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
1c56f78ca74e0b85d2d856cace2b49a0
5313381fd79a2a63701c4a7d30534cd5ac84516b
'2011-11-17T03:29:01-05:00'
describe
'30712' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHK' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9865cac2be5914117a26d7f6f922ccb4
d7aa6f4ee0bba420346084e148c07420ed068b53
'2011-11-17T03:29:56-05:00'
describe
'33650' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHL' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
0922c9065e3d1d5aade92cd24d34e3c9
4867a054d82c290a36f7c936a3870ce636cd5aec
'2011-11-17T03:27:10-05:00'
describe
'7450567' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHM' 'sip-files00029.tif'
c635aec27b0cd908beaa396337556929
2a49799c51764e988cfcc5bea1773ac0ba9dcc7d
'2011-11-17T03:28:55-05:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHN' 'sip-files00029.txt'
a82e424e4446afdf69a1a7d75f5eab9c
b0d28735a53ad93012d4a8f6dd19bbfdf4c1b6df
describe
'10692' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHO' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
f936e6fbbb5f171ca5d65589186069ce
391c0d3ceeda499d8eb63a6489ed560bb3a29276
'2011-11-17T03:27:20-05:00'
describe
'917246' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHP' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
efdf87765e0386dab7cec57c7fdf074c
02ccc40aa0c2059bf62ea3aa98b4addc2e154e9e
'2011-11-17T03:30:23-05:00'
describe
'67787' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHQ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
37fd87e6fb05ad8c0221060513419cfd
902ebe50babd0dbae3694417472357579b276c8a
describe
'1828' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHR' 'sip-files00031.pro'
af007e30b37e88b7019b6342faef5f86
8f20b9b147a28cc6911666426fb0a9488f194575
describe
'19986' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHS' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
fd502449db984a08b280da1b4cffda29
3d9de53035b530e5e6099d5abec6fdc2863e4c00
'2011-11-17T03:30:10-05:00'
describe
'7344903' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHT' 'sip-files00031.tif'
bbf11c440f9bbe7f05325e85b36e144f
2fae4276f7a0f07281790e0c3444b0710a5f0f23
'2011-11-17T03:29:53-05:00'
describe
'83' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHU' 'sip-files00031.txt'
a8210736cd538e5ee8fc8fbd36472f35
e5de4154490c491fb7055c42abcb5e217f72506c
'2011-11-17T03:26:27-05:00'
describe
'7023' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHV' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
77dfa8717dfc563243c19ba1bb998a94
f0775cad67b150e114b15eaf27f09cadcb8214db
describe
'964799' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHW' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a3bed175c7f296f856cbbcbdc5620991
a146a0e23a2cd41c98d02cca487faeda5d5565b1
describe
'106279' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHX' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
fd4d15a367e1e52a89b42887127907d4
f1a92f97bbb0c9cdcafb36fd6eeb09ef4dbfa04e
'2011-11-17T03:29:40-05:00'
describe
'35694' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHY' 'sip-files00032.pro'
481b57dd149d5bf1bc8b5dad4e42ba3a
4475b587444321e6ba588f6b5d94914151330e57
describe
'37336' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPHZ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
c3adf9253854e1298492d20a84fcbc7f
ebc0427bbd8693e3fba87c1dc666955efa605dcb
'2011-11-17T03:26:41-05:00'
describe
'7728131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIA' 'sip-files00032.tif'
3553917aaf6703b2a46be54a76c90e93
cd8f80d8800277710a28d1328bf344201719be7b
'2011-11-17T03:29:28-05:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIB' 'sip-files00032.txt'
9f2b67016e1cd2681f77ea5e4caa5095
d9342774cc3111db06f3bb2643c508971ec4b3e7
describe
'12021' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIC' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
a252891f53695e147cc8fba4fb83491f
09fc3c188181058a37fd4c11b8bcabc4e66abbe7
'2011-11-17T03:27:28-05:00'
describe
'938298' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPID' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
71e3d8cab556f577510b04777e260519
d5916d36c21df03a7291e82beb68332206e070a3
describe
'98788' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIE' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
9e666e575e4a2d61828b5bc7cb3ac11b
a3d649f907801c428693adeac6ea02d7b401358a
describe
'32091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIF' 'sip-files00033.pro'
5bb699f8c0ad48704c73a3195c7747ce
125d6bfb5a2bc8b59e141dd6cb4d30807897484b
describe
'36589' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIG' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
aa2dc6023731078838f133d42bd8422d
a2d6974ee50107c5f151123a9839eae3913245dc
describe
'7515657' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIH' 'sip-files00033.tif'
34d3307bbb7eb6a92ce664135adf115f
435c88c72a66988e76cd343e8d49577f018e219f
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPII' 'sip-files00033.txt'
6b774cf904e812d2cc15bcb61ad9825a
cf124a90e38dde41aa9d5b0fe8b727b87e77b164
'2011-11-17T03:30:02-05:00'
describe
'12297' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIJ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
9ae2a292691aa3fa2b226771e112e6a4
0769c94a116458f59d2e16e1cc6ae294ee805539
'2011-11-17T03:29:00-05:00'
describe
'949556' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIK' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0de0d0d24810fe9a87f8681885a2a9c7
5017a174c327d4834faa8538eb0b822fd6a13f6f
'2011-11-17T03:26:52-05:00'
describe
'100422' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIL' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
328fdc8b998049d68807d435a229d5ad
561ab69c485544024215d7504e19d1840c30d549
'2011-11-17T03:28:52-05:00'
describe
'33710' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIM' 'sip-files00034.pro'
3467a179bb3d11e3c0d281ed531792e1
0d046a9a2e60f2215ebaa90f7d5b4418651165a3
'2011-11-17T03:25:35-05:00'
describe
'36202' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIN' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
8fd40cf66f09fa4f23ecc87adbbfd228
8a455bef4e7ac8e610fb0a06fbe360cca08865bd
describe
'7604245' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIO' 'sip-files00034.tif'
5a24b8dedc69f8cb8479907562bb87f2
0ccdd312ed9e1dd6f4f133947b53b2656df17ebc
'2011-11-17T03:30:20-05:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIP' 'sip-files00034.txt'
76173e13ea7ccd19ebcfe9254acad9c3
5fb9ec00b8a1afb02d842d39129eec301ba391e1
describe
'11831' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIQ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
70988265803141f3d4b70f8f0ef588d5
71e20477eccd6f08e0318207e24985aafc85bf5d
'2011-11-17T03:27:01-05:00'
describe
'927703' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIR' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
6c899c60e84f6fab1be175eef245fb2b
555089909acc6617063b54484f42a88186c7275e
'2011-11-17T03:25:42-05:00'
describe
'109800' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIS' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
36f5d761bbb209132b4b4b33f5c4a054
3b2eef7e314c91f15b4fc680ffcc5337ed8c0cb7
'2011-11-17T03:27:45-05:00'
describe
'36952' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIT' 'sip-files00035.pro'
584b6e7d182573148560421c0850f72c
a23111b0fd9ad3c84f135ce44f158b99061cebe0
'2011-11-17T03:26:23-05:00'
describe
'39563' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIU' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
412e787aca7e30ff39b1ab20a3e52f16
de92d2bb9845fa98e3ad97ec67e98b4fafc52ed1
'2011-11-17T03:28:40-05:00'
describe
'7428487' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIV' 'sip-files00035.tif'
c764667b33900fe6edef94a7a79451ec
9c8ffd6bbd43ecd59ba5e17fc8faf0dbf829b60f
'2011-11-17T03:29:31-05:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIW' 'sip-files00035.txt'
83dc317fbb87515133e9343643e24307
ee45ad135a01822448ebb2cdca36c2d9c6b325c1
describe
'12588' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIX' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
f311c1e6ac848c88be0d30eeb0798258
6996190955fb691069278ccf3feff8d1c94cc3db
'2011-11-17T03:26:39-05:00'
describe
'985281' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIY' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
4b4bff9b2d9daefb5dd8dc20a74a753a
c4fac1a6b8adc9a17b4329658a08fbfc68e46173
'2011-11-17T03:28:06-05:00'
describe
'96021' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPIZ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
e825237cb0bf4539528dbd6f5599a1cf
849131ff85d12c9430b6b584e35e88295f4ea6ff
'2011-11-17T03:27:22-05:00'
describe
'30401' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJA' 'sip-files00036.pro'
4b9cfd2bb361e2b443d9e93ff0ab6347
8a2e2890753cf18fca3cc568bcfe38182dfa0245
describe
'34009' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJB' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
639d25864f4e717cdae71aca021409c7
dcb56d672c0c3d1198bef134943f072459640a0f
'2011-11-17T03:29:46-05:00'
describe
'7892065' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJC' 'sip-files00036.tif'
90a9f9974f77f1bb5ab73623bb8fe3bf
7e5751a10451abadb506b0b25bc0718e9720a354
'2011-11-17T03:29:48-05:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJD' 'sip-files00036.txt'
dfd407ce9d425bccc8a31692b3b8c457
41af7e6a3436e01b6f27d62cd4fcb49ad883a2d5
'2011-11-17T03:26:42-05:00'
describe
'10294' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJE' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
7198ed563cfd4c859569b13d09d106fa
ef15781e703d614ae91f16f5049db2b621abe003
'2011-11-17T03:30:18-05:00'
describe
'931814' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJF' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
5c13315ee65b73f0aa82545603788662
5934631b2b00bd810b462f7ba3406dcdc143b5fd
'2011-11-17T03:28:57-05:00'
describe
'92371' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJG' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
aea4bbd50f5c9ccda1cf4034adbc5f2c
1db95b6269a15774e612056b930d17fe2715ac1f
describe
'29334' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJH' 'sip-files00037.pro'
6facca1472e133ae682e30135ad50776
3722a7b2ce236d3d51bc3b421a3a5defc3761db7
describe
'32872' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJI' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
8eb0581bdd045bb5e54129386cacd825
fd79b122685d804ac689ab0734c05cbfc0e8314d
'2011-11-17T03:27:06-05:00'
describe
'7461517' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJJ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
0bd2258aeaf831f575aa9a38271d557d
73abca1d156577e511900d9096c153364c713517
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJK' 'sip-files00037.txt'
0b6b6c662b0a63292e227cae91a58096
b1dd95b1594320442660657a94e6921d3bf7e734
'2011-11-17T03:25:21-05:00'
describe
'10697' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJL' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
e8f8d5b00e0b7b5901179330ce1a01fb
39e2d07a1a4284c8404c9f823c91c6dfd47839cc
'2011-11-17T03:28:25-05:00'
describe
'985335' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJM' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
4db249aa4a53cef64090a4d96dfe150c
756740f12199ac9ef41ad4bfd828898c9c3013d4
'2011-11-17T03:25:10-05:00'
describe
'106601' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJN' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
de66e8cb4cb40a831096b4453de9a95d
d5e01ea44a9aa2fc59ce57572d0a5ffc7cba81c2
describe
'35372' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJO' 'sip-files00038.pro'
869680ef12f85535079df7facb1d5976
ce8f10cfcb7e86849a9b2ff550a443c73b5966be
describe
'38105' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJP' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
030f80ae2c56d28419ea75b15fbbe3c4
f305e353b9256c0a42a7fea37ee7d888f06d4603
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJQ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
b6a5e93a6a61404a72036c8e21ecbd83
8d553aa1ebb3b0003f1563fe203ffa89d85fc909
'2011-11-17T03:28:07-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJR' 'sip-files00038.txt'
c354546b70d93b1f1824e68ee2fb3033
3103fa7af81f1a004af18e691297320ae9cf96c7
'2011-11-17T03:29:26-05:00'
describe
'11233' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJS' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
f4e859d9a93d166b9606a228b30fa6dc
786905ee5f07885d6c66ce99d2f65604cdae39f4
describe
'946018' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJT' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
177fe1ea3f9d85d7fa60446d888ea3d4
0855cd8182cbc9857ee4aa020237eb5d825c9678
describe
'105411' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJU' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
07e833a8b81c10543fdc4de2d854d71d
0950726e0dc6fcce59e6ec6882163cfb5b0ead47
'2011-11-17T03:27:50-05:00'
describe
'35665' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJV' 'sip-files00039.pro'
b1fca80455b7abedd88061c35d356e8e
84f3ad469b33ee98ecb9d636dfbeb5489cf8dbe5
'2011-11-17T03:24:41-05:00'
describe
'38185' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJW' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9658671eaa493a9ce346f56f8f191f51
73b353fe07d89509cb4f20adb1206eec13df3623
describe
'7577581' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJX' 'sip-files00039.tif'
fee5a3d07e92952b2c73f901334a9ac7
ed9b02d54e7580e6949540f19bd1b645378a602e
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJY' 'sip-files00039.txt'
b0fb14f5613ff8a5135c60f9bbf6f768
8e3fcb9801e739d53c4d07603cd81434feffc964
'2011-11-17T03:29:55-05:00'
describe
'12148' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPJZ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
97bfb53caa07e740c32c8093492f5b55
47c699d6030cb311c1fe4b3f5c8e28c68fdeac16
'2011-11-17T03:27:25-05:00'
describe
'985260' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKA' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
ca5edf4c9774168ae37296e1df0db089
08fd305fcce103a721e18422f1d990b15af9217c
describe
'107315' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKB' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
e8b294ef3cec889d39ed3644bcac5cf6
737dc3c1d1ed7963f1e6f3ae7dfac24c0242aec0
'2011-11-17T03:27:04-05:00'
describe
'36156' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKC' 'sip-files00040.pro'
80eec9f0768503f402f5f4deeea9f3a2
fa04d21bcaef4d94a25296fac17a462e7b4b4085
describe
'38154' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKD' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
1e821666de497245a93404150713b22f
3aab1a5291d320eb94531064fd43629c6cbb3006
'2011-11-17T03:29:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKE' 'sip-files00040.tif'
5aa330553e9b9be43ce92b000595122d
3bfac4a51924853609932f396738e9b183dab737
'2011-11-17T03:25:27-05:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKF' 'sip-files00040.txt'
8f752ec7c2f04d04cf617c3a78e0ea26
5a8768742bf8ec340d4e0bdaced7e391aba666b2
'2011-11-17T03:29:30-05:00'
describe
'11378' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKG' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
0f697bb667aca1d0193067570837439c
7f3c1df7f8b59aa4eb53cb6f4b636e6598ef28a2
describe
'940757' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKH' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
afceb90d3e26bba0ad4a1fcb3ff3a8e9
90dba0ee84c62027240e819535038005fbea40c0
describe
'99853' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKI' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
ce9f1e4180ccb244cb25fea268f0511b
172560bfa6abad8e19a13f51a0d1d5c612ca03df
'2011-11-17T03:25:09-05:00'
describe
'33432' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKJ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f45c025540fb1ebe667d7f8782d60afa
f366d84ee24433d944fc94f3d35adb6710e1074f
describe
'35771' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKK' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1ee8b8e54d7b6644c18153b362e529cd
22395e9a35c932bc2f3b555bf4c9476171109b38
describe
'7535581' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKL' 'sip-files00041.tif'
471fb4484a5edced580edb5f7d50ed4f
9dc5d1620874c882b1e32a0a0c8bdcc7d4bca291
'2011-11-17T03:25:08-05:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKM' 'sip-files00041.txt'
9d71560bbbf3522c3fefac2ab9ef21ed
0078d60d7dccf8ed50ae598a768822ce3b162049
describe
'11945' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKN' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
6e557eb7fee1e9059f86a87c9147626c
9180ad54b0fa8664f9135fc7a48c82d81df9abea
describe
'985346' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKO' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
10476eb93dd06e2db57c4171cb434fe3
dc6fcaa96d2a0abf77480db0eedf856abc821e1b
describe
'105001' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKP' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
13a9e5b3cb93566a942d4994b3d7f8d7
63b1fef64a03be8cd521f246486d1c948474a4b9
describe
'34982' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKQ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
f790f34a167b6f7280361f9425957a60
272c030b1207d7f54cbfbcb85113815d91a09c44
'2011-11-17T03:28:34-05:00'
describe
'38611' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKR' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
168176b6c24c2af162c1bfe9338a6e13
ec9b30d7a348514736a7da9fca432e7ce5bc8efe
'2011-11-17T03:25:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKS' 'sip-files00042.tif'
74a081615b3d69cf5f29ec93e7c735d7
9f151139584774c043cbfbfb65c7c30c0a2f6388
'2011-11-17T03:29:02-05:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKT' 'sip-files00042.txt'
5876e576faa8485d6880e4f3961aca18
f6da4905f7554c7442e7a43632765dc7c23397fa
describe
'11967' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKU' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
b3156ee726aca753514ced874ac9e46a
66d1ba04d942d8423f25c5d8805f7e633e7cb0d5
describe
'959555' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKV' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
c2195e00a6a8980733b3963a6a577cb3
81be85914c474d08aa02ae613177e6d6f5bab533
describe
'83175' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKW' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
fdb1c44e0f6d5a456a16a3be60f9e6e1
d63b47095df031dfe78ad6e6a9ea61cbf8e90e26
'2011-11-17T03:26:06-05:00'
describe
'24404' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKX' 'sip-files00043.pro'
9c2b51b8e023590e3072b45fcced6a76
e2b17c950090780e131e28252cfeb5577aba1d83
describe
'28891' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKY' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
6bca8f7292ef204f449404d3aaa33756
e679f021735b329963533a3cd51cdd088bec181b
'2011-11-17T03:29:49-05:00'
describe
'7685723' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPKZ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f5134851ef87b62cc148590b4f4ac058
6deaaec67cf7a89394d43fa6403f2a80961462ed
'2011-11-17T03:29:35-05:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLA' 'sip-files00043.txt'
dd9127a35edb52ebf8e3e9f33e8d9be6
a188225b9db10111a7f10ccefcef16626d15a7b7
'2011-11-17T03:27:30-05:00'
describe
'9204' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLB' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
c5e1885d8d70b752760b9bc52f1c192b
b0b5658c85d123358aa2988730d1914bd1318ed3
'2011-11-17T03:28:20-05:00'
describe
'985337' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLC' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
754267b9053c3bb603e9022d27200ef7
5516e40255b22c1a9e260dde19de54dd7f2790fd
describe
'90577' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLD' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
9ba6475de15a08b8c4224fa685401690
3ed36a2229978fcde136e272aa051f7136dca3a7
'2011-11-17T03:25:32-05:00'
describe
'28607' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLE' 'sip-files00044.pro'
742ffa65e73721b1e199747c5b6c1a82
125c674d8a20b296e1612711e68945ab7719ce0f
describe
'32050' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLF' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
3c9afe6a6761995854973670ff565643
5970b87269097abeb8655e8fbc3ebaa079835b4a
'2011-11-17T03:24:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLG' 'sip-files00044.tif'
ad7a5700ac3bc8ce4b268555b6e6e47a
dcb9ef2be03cc76b874f91be0dc62943f5f85b1e
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLH' 'sip-files00044.txt'
e367c6e2ebaa73b65f88bbaba5b52491
583bfa293903466dddc6a26e00e9847c698a38b1
describe
'9849' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLI' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
fe11e420ef59e5576c7741a993120553
3d7cdc40b0d95b599692f85245632f1469d63b04
'2011-11-17T03:27:53-05:00'
describe
'966863' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLJ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
5e102f0ad10695e42aa934ff3523e17f
e9070dfa16b6ba1249ec4cf171d2afb52a68a722
describe
'86246' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLK' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
69d3d7debe6c3818f3b038cb282b431d
f0fcef0893d266c2a5eca3a82bdd8b12296cc89e
describe
'28235' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLL' 'sip-files00045.pro'
bd5cf209f8c9eb766faba1020435a986
919eb044c1bb782a90941bc71cbab99fafdda17e
'2011-11-17T03:25:18-05:00'
describe
'31784' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLM' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
b26fc0b666d62f4ae10330d6b8e999ab
75183ebdad42045457c87e6dd2dc323c4d3b0faf
describe
'7744315' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLN' 'sip-files00045.tif'
46e53cebec851d879be72bfa5e44ec61
51fd6d4cc701a5f4008e23fe2a652d09c61fe89b
'2011-11-17T03:27:32-05:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLO' 'sip-files00045.txt'
7c858715a4156e82cfcf945aff3ff393
915954685115a761d1f0e681de14ba87a3318085
describe
'10320' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLP' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
fad1a9473c24d350ead8a908a65d69f4
6963d52e820c3665974fe4506bf1c8318c05e5f5
describe
'985334' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLQ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
e82156f4a1c03d146e9866c2a8d4ddb9
b1e0fc506d80143b8dbee25ac66036534f1098a6
describe
'101684' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLR' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
4f0f494302696a3614c4b0cc3d686f6b
ab78b0caeb2a6bb94f05b88e6e5790437d7996e3
describe
'33814' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLS' 'sip-files00046.pro'
4f3f1371b0532add0241f8678e1a9444
395088dda7ab7bee63c4757686020efa4c6d31c9
describe
'36940' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLT' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
24db796930acdbe2c814fedcb591a198
cfb5a345adb06c83955da8803cbd65da8397161f
'2011-11-17T03:25:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLU' 'sip-files00046.tif'
8007c6bbec7dcc08837e208ebd96398b
138188c8abe5034dc7150d6027436f3bc32030ed
'2011-11-17T03:29:15-05:00'
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLV' 'sip-files00046.txt'
fe3ef0c2eb22d0bbe1bd690d605d1ef2
8a0de5e2680aa4c1b8ce0d18dc28717be6da1c99
'2011-11-17T03:26:08-05:00'
describe
'11285' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLW' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
70f07d90457d94eecd8d313177f0db4e
3f7e97d5e60d809e40a90a37972c443e5503a885
describe
'968970' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLX' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
1800179e8a2ad3b67b90b7457c1ab072
9087e4a530cc26ab813fa8f4d5c84417b8415cfe
describe
'95160' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLY' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
f42ab2c272b40e3be20018503f381d41
a36e8ccb1dc15c30e13fc33cddfca8920cb60663
describe
'32228' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPLZ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
a628833ba8fc3cd9e2438bfe321d334a
e74f935df244840ce44e6c1cdd4697981ca7aef4
'2011-11-17T03:24:56-05:00'
describe
'34122' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMA' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
2e47854a975dfa47fd1aaf25a82ba6fb
5b72d9bf40ca2b45538b83552e60b6fe5b0150c5
describe
'7761235' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMB' 'sip-files00047.tif'
ce8ebb7646ef13f919ff447ede9f54f9
98fdbb0d104daf729a674a3049098d1209da87b3
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMC' 'sip-files00047.txt'
afcb63cae89fe2145d3784dadc87a281
de985898c11faa4a79c21b88c6703a330b83095c
describe
'10720' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMD' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
29bd40c06c8c5a1dc2cdbfb502c417ec
5a7bcc2fff7920d14789b1cc14bfaee5e8353b7e
describe
'985342' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPME' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
4faaf6efbcbdad9f94a5e7e47fe6b292
5c1281ae5779f7d17a61eab559812d71276f7fda
describe
'102397' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMF' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
daebfe04695b16949fd106d33eee7459
b3e3175d53b2f61d80fa5f668b8b719d0581abbf
describe
'34019' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMG' 'sip-files00048.pro'
191e595262177e0093c33e88d80519d7
44cbbe7c916ba74a9fd2ff043cd47433d8c49d7e
'2011-11-17T03:24:49-05:00'
describe
'36305' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMH' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
940d2678ead9cc48f6cb2f6843cf95ef
7d096df0c817a95dc1f3ef7db311e1051873bc09
'2011-11-17T03:27:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMI' 'sip-files00048.tif'
c4cfe6c681b6139da5a7fcd338f46576
608a62fd15fbf569c6360f3fe22a8dd46384f277
'2011-11-17T03:30:07-05:00'
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMJ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
5c414b3df52ccabd8c9b6d1fd74ab79b
8207c88c8b47293d69328dccdac28e5178b33e11
describe
'10899' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMK' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
ec0af39f6d285f26a3979764e8780995
d91b5467dc1614ef0803ba22346babfa667d2ff1
'2011-11-17T03:28:45-05:00'
describe
'966875' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPML' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
bbc5ae3dc5ae852f1289763503777670
05dbdd75075c1e3daaa3864d632c109d6a91bcc7
describe
'91306' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMM' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
df7430494dfc525559e9b4b21737e29f
f8518740dacb8fefe110221808ea4df6bcb3496e
describe
'29987' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMN' 'sip-files00049.pro'
a7ad317b2e5cefdac6de57300532cd3d
0a6612002c4ca2c421a9baf74282d173b018e2d9
'2011-11-17T03:24:59-05:00'
describe
'33543' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMO' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
51e70972e36407854debaf679e36d7c0
deb7f39d6f272a8310767b574290331443c6c087
'2011-11-17T03:26:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMP' 'sip-files00049.tif'
24a03a8e663669a4504b402742444a6c
ef230dbb41ef54e52841274dd985ff9c24ee89e0
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMQ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5595fda0273055340648caf9c93b8a14
4b98015ef864d3ef1c4e35afe67c220b375153ed
describe
'10467' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMR' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
657ef83c97da711339a3e734133646a8
9e8c6c1259cf59b4bc605fcbf4836dff33512314
'2011-11-17T03:26:22-05:00'
describe
'985326' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMS' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
80eed82da8c451ec79d8b483160fce0f
3a3e58511306f333a2a5288eaf9b2be49413ed6c
describe
'82930' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMT' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
9489ffeaa7d49114034eb192211d0101
3fcdbc1056dedfacaa9037d55133ab112344e38d
describe
'26460' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMU' 'sip-files00050.pro'
400d8441dcf70d26bfef352c48e3b340
1fb8d13dd750c50b458d9012c4ddd70044c7be77
'2011-11-17T03:28:14-05:00'
describe
'28783' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMV' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
72fb0d629cf52b2f24fa4c423d57d89f
05b9e1d3c390b765e0fd949cd9af0d1b86f44274
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMW' 'sip-files00050.tif'
12a0da2d8ddbf016cf3318ee9e18a94a
1bc264d418e619ad068f6c8db552e57797d6b9f0
'2011-11-17T03:28:56-05:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMX' 'sip-files00050.txt'
7c67e7efe6845949adde6eea9af160db
55b585ffaec68432f145be5db250774f4c84e06c
describe
'8524' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMY' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
6cc9066eb0d64f3fab91188f1eb5f560
e5c8bd4ac05c03c5159cd9343ae34195de6b9e87
describe
'962647' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPMZ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
14b0a4432074c8cd108381eb6414b99b
522102b5efbffdcd5080682c83e103194762dbdd
describe
'89852' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNA' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
18afcbf9fbbe6ff0367ed82dd6caada7
b2333564e79de6cddd49b73d08a1b1f9627e8f09
describe
'29688' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNB' 'sip-files00051.pro'
4e25d8deb27f057d74d11d53fed45807
78f0c9cf7998230c1bd8af6dadd134b1fe8ca184
describe
'31711' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNC' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d5ba377b18a70586ac70d9265d704257
e8d05efd6b3afb77f2e771c7ef62ff67d12f946a
describe
'7710483' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPND' 'sip-files00051.tif'
243859325c3fb61cfcb4f73ed71d972a
2cb4b0c190e84fdc9f265241c3cad1251c2bdd27
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNE' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c8026bff56e628b68fe6954e471b5a54
7b9e8cb1cb01a4ad7054a72ab6dc16f1a1c10bed
describe
'9808' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNF' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
9262efb65ed344f9e1e417c79000ea9c
14bf1551bc82ed26d8f8423d6d314dfe7e1b655b
describe
'948963' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNG' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
d2083f3385d9e5b2c3598fa5f9736104
e618f017ea2a4376746585d204875e0b3cd643aa
'2011-11-17T03:25:11-05:00'
describe
'89535' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNH' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
1a0ae8537fadc8709aa80ae588e66dd0
c5dc5f540f2721608b983434184b7a29642e4531
'2011-11-17T03:30:19-05:00'
describe
'29395' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNI' 'sip-files00052.pro'
38f7fcdf18287c1d74928471dc1a13e9
5ef3f0b6cb1cd05acc35fc04aa9775017b7a5d61
'2011-11-17T03:25:37-05:00'
describe
'32676' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNJ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
3e6d28e73236d210037b8fea58bb1538
d688edb164f4bd4dbe833375e4433207b8b88380
describe
'7601081' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNK' 'sip-files00052.tif'
5083bb8a8fad32b3e8b1078a57a04f56
00b44957db4e93e240688b116443b13b88999fcc
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNL' 'sip-files00052.txt'
79b7890da8d1aad45ae7ea21b75a715a
c918b02c0f50a39ea97243152849d5c4aa0913a0
'2011-11-17T03:26:53-05:00'
describe
'10921' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNM' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
7d5bcd36ac384ddeca7c6115e1202bfb
7c200fd1e8881c4a633c3728d30058d3f1928a0d
'2011-11-17T03:26:07-05:00'
describe
'957459' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNN' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e0778f5174ff5d910e2281acc0575cb7
8ee0a39d1517ef87bf60eb8182a7b2cbb3a4fd72
describe
'104454' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNO' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
cad59ecd468e9ed8805431cf5d427353
be7c5abaf26154c4e596b6516adbc1af00da8e61
'2011-11-17T03:26:37-05:00'
describe
'35559' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNP' 'sip-files00053.pro'
b7e35380b7b12f3f146efa7f4b3de6fe
763df9300e216ef65c732d0f3210583177f67375
describe
'38073' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNQ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
c25b3900bccd89c6932016b1218399cb
3df2b59820616564e39d663434c6907cd4d5f1a4
describe
'7668931' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNR' 'sip-files00053.tif'
afae30c4af810fd931a3247f043cf4ae
163536116801592aefea51c872b852a14e15ac1f
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNS' 'sip-files00053.txt'
e8df38bc78eb5f6412967be444f1ec48
57dd72ff778d219f0c5a46066f45392851dd1c57
'2011-11-17T03:26:04-05:00'
describe
'11506' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNT' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
f3ab3215dfaa85a06016cdf502c4c347
d9e36ad654549637affb5aae0e7888bb1cf5b10d
describe
'935960' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNU' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
59dd673913a084f7b9a3dbfe8c541d58
3058b71166962a1c1740bea737b51e28f377abae
'2011-11-17T03:25:04-05:00'
describe
'98039' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNV' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
29719d3759c19a5dbf4354827420cdad
54d5f74ad72528666b181c52358f054269007252
'2011-11-17T03:28:22-05:00'
describe
'33247' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNW' 'sip-files00054.pro'
8396c4f59c633dc27625fcb6b14a99ab
1cb5ac6d2106802570ba7a72f81660932060f915
describe
'36671' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNX' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
fcab4928c8e66b16bef0e140e7a65d32
2bb7fc0eee2b1e87d743d93c6016647035d22497
describe
'7496953' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNY' 'sip-files00054.tif'
707df1d32548a137e09a6c5b6da2ebc1
502163c685ce043fe883f9d56197800206462405
'2011-11-17T03:25:44-05:00'
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPNZ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
02844f7dbc866d585d1771969f74cf1b
fe78a9d377ba0c9f55e6a50d77f44d4fb745bdb4
describe
'11692' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOA' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
dc66170b4f54cabe835ae2b9369f02d7
18a21196339855370361d33ff88e52e29ac77d9e
'2011-11-17T03:27:44-05:00'
describe
'1006489' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOB' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
ae2dc0f3334218edbb54515535ff17a8
3edc46acf23c61c90799cd0c4985b326add5caf6
describe
'100924' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOC' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
98beea4f4f00641bf7322520c7b041a4
d5e2af71739d327a9cf4d4196b4e831ff54bb2c6
describe
'33448' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOD' 'sip-files00055.pro'
d3954b4177ec07cc58e23a80eeeb4ddc
85b1d2f67f71d72f8c5783c75bd88c58b198beec
'2011-11-17T03:27:03-05:00'
describe
'36179' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOE' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
799d6c5d2d3b857171572e9c334c14f1
ee2f40f50bb4da69b14e76882e4ad98d62977ddb
describe
'8061251' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOF' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b451fd525321304f5dc95db0db797870
58b358011cbe26d7a4c5df0e96ee1ee63764060d
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOG' 'sip-files00055.txt'
aa919ba8c9dd53ecf342f18d152bb536
e21d3b0392fba1f889583545a4274588b50f05d7
describe
'10803' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOH' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
789eacc0aadc4617dfc70aaa8ab0de38
999ea288ce597be23441f5e87deb066258d9d331
'2011-11-17T03:26:25-05:00'
describe
'985333' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOI' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ee5ca624633952d00617ffa034a45bbc
d606584ba43e00dad30b152d166b46f9dc8497d1
describe
'98612' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOJ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
093e956d7e07521f6b09c17f06343065
4a0d1fa3fb9e36095d9ba4420f2774e39f6ceecc
describe
'33689' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOK' 'sip-files00056.pro'
71949d5f56d30e94962edc0a88dbc659
3cb62c42747536c74350d43d2217ff4644f4c39e
describe
'34964' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOL' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
c04c7c2a3ae97d48cf731d7334c94fdd
c07caf9d379e9a59cb4a914914f5d4b4a80ed994
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOM' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f75809b8e992aad19c374890f646468e
76e215a2c9785a906463d04bd9bee9d094539efe
'2011-11-17T03:27:19-05:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPON' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d9b892d87436c62f034018a1e7d70424
25646911da1939e0e4cc34e32630c93c4be95ba1
describe
'10602' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOO' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
5a86f3da3b37f621ef35816d82b3ae37
403561dc736180fa1886bc55fb268d089dc5124c
'2011-11-17T03:26:18-05:00'
describe
'1006455' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOP' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
9a1d57c6b9350de7b340ed8bed410403
eaa33987ea17bb3d806426326b96cca54c402543
'2011-11-17T03:27:51-05:00'
describe
'86418' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOQ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
d926e44bec7542952320a6b1ac8e6cad
5288d05bd9f123adba20793b3f371ab206b9a94f
describe
'18433' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOR' 'sip-files00057.pro'
edf6103e8a74b16fd5eabcd49d5e546e
dfb8b7966037cd9c2fe43aa7c5faabdab345e77f
describe
'29000' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOS' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
efe747a8de0c1c269f1f448d65e96f96
4f09f1ac65807be7ef6aa916fd536c8adbcfaf26
'2011-11-17T03:25:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOT' 'sip-files00057.tif'
15e4bfbeb72a17bfa09acd74123aa649
11cb65590bdb7530122b6e9304da5593511b8308
describe
'741' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOU' 'sip-files00057.txt'
e17843688fa23bd09785f0d357efc6d5
cac7148426d3a8a27a0966e710703e3741416305
'2011-11-17T03:27:42-05:00'
describe
'8843' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOV' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
a69d18aaae478cd4e3be2337450db8ae
1146cae1d2f241d333d6bd01a3fd9487e00efe99
'2011-11-17T03:28:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOW' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
c74d9e5a40f4b8330ca29a2e72a45e8a
6d7e1e51920c8170c03865e1826c9205153c1b19
'2011-11-17T03:26:21-05:00'
describe
'97708' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOX' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
32b9295df0b65c1c15b6f7097736aceb
46a3d499f83013d5d49aead2b4ae3a9c39a4f49c
'2011-11-17T03:25:23-05:00'
describe
'32564' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOY' 'sip-files00058.pro'
34344102b8bcb784291af8392c495749
5ba83328d168d17f91927f0aba2ab78de28374d7
describe
'34854' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPOZ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
1c3b21317040787b33fce23d590951ac
a0e6fe59bb5bba3a07c5b151104623768b424c83
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPA' 'sip-files00058.tif'
338425b7927dc5aab64057b2dfd07ff9
e765ba45be77273d159ee93955b111079a3d8c5a
'2011-11-17T03:28:48-05:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPB' 'sip-files00058.txt'
7fa503a07f028dfb5e537d3ebd23649a
48532bdbcede6baa56dbd18573c9a08ee8b0063c
describe
'10238' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPC' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
69c196e649bceda98be59eed29c7f620
40ef137855353f2c9b81e7e1c008dd1e4910d018
'2011-11-17T03:27:09-05:00'
describe
'1006473' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPD' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
a3fdc9ba2ed69b1b074ee1b886a58e64
9f248aaa08f64776628ae003465a217117d0d495
describe
'103432' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPE' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
333cecd96b96471361402bf992b6878c
868d4381ee787092dab29ea7393bb98f77212bf5
describe
'37061' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPF' 'sip-files00059.pro'
321b167a0bc3f7aea41f97d24e73b2a0
03f86d16d2192f1064f84dfd4ccc36b63c2b7b33
describe
'36310' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPG' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
9e20ab4693b431eb167e97ac67b033cb
536c34a7c75c2e9b832f6ac6e27d2d8f94309904
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPH' 'sip-files00059.tif'
0358a564b0ad1339711f0ccced1b4d17
5dbeda6f48a60f253003504a97cbb1ae510f4140
'2011-11-17T03:27:34-05:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPI' 'sip-files00059.txt'
4e90e2cda488cb9314003b3d7d7cde56
c27b838857610dcfb7dbb99d7b707b936bb327ea
'2011-11-17T03:29:21-05:00'
describe
'10094' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPJ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
36c5a037d3b8435f541f0eba4293a1fd
90449a05eb65f4600692ce02f3c2876e8878eede
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPK' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
102df57c07777245b3e619d4081b92ed
ddde640d332774add43583770d3f0b7a93f7cfb2
describe
'99907' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPL' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
257ce3c91d37df99efccc0f4ecbf14b4
8e4d1c12cb886abdb4054d2e6a505b5fc5b38fd8
describe
'33009' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPM' 'sip-files00060.pro'
0ce6d2f63b48b25a83c5b89e59288450
24f0c0b5b05e44d3a64f27dd5151315cd3fb6eff
'2011-11-17T03:25:01-05:00'
describe
'36061' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPN' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
d524d4cb441119dfe4f4b2439edc6caa
6dcd07171ee1541d0ed32916267803eaf0761c17
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPO' 'sip-files00060.tif'
e50f3e9335476ab0f09cc45eecf14fa9
f0c0c8b7a7badf764b98161c667d462fe3e56fb6
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPP' 'sip-files00060.txt'
a64f34cec55cd8dc07b24c308d587f51
fbcd6cc3189a1d2e737bd68a667ae99055b2c3c5
describe
'10990' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPQ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
62cf054939fd8d0516d97f1ca20e6cd8
c17e75a032c70427256dbc110dc071add35fe840
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPR' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
24d998ca2a4ac2d0f67ef88a20540036
1f32811bdc3f2c7b3b05f338e14b836890a94cac
describe
'105540' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPS' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
49ef4af23b02ddd64c646c72a54e4711
7185f000b639b13b1283f9307aad9d800a648651
'2011-11-17T03:26:29-05:00'
describe
'36553' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPT' 'sip-files00061.pro'
b2a694e8e528d9ea8e6f15ce65ef5a68
27ddba08504b840f3dbc872c48c98afa0621d58a
describe
'37267' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPU' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
b44dd2c6f310c124d59e1ac1cd6a9a28
dad4d4d0dc5767933da2dbcb327fa10464a48fd3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPV' 'sip-files00061.tif'
df5a588132e488e609fc9f24224198d6
2633122dd7c8da945e045e06b3f6e5e661995604
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPW' 'sip-files00061.txt'
0bbac068787dd5b95f40fd77d4187e5e
b99def6058b3fa519ea9f219f571276054e101fd
'2011-11-17T03:26:35-05:00'
describe
'10868' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPX' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
9c1028b6c9fc3bd4334a6badfb4c265c
a868b60b74a027dedcaf3032de1fbf56fa401c11
describe
'985151' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPY' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
250e4ca984bdf603866bd3ebc678b2f8
f25b50bdef6ca42643c87c1c6deae3903816be7f
'2011-11-17T03:29:07-05:00'
describe
'101668' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPPZ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
da24de131538825782e23c2199c45e8f
de6939cc42a2e65292a354a3f51dff1286e6372d
describe
'34830' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQA' 'sip-files00062.pro'
976fd5819a23739b6a0f21dd2e312ca2
235b3785063c31c04de92771a8b81b3360a3fa4f
describe
'36428' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQB' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
05343bed7b4b396193b2839749779e3d
d12ee95576e32e808e24056bc7527919f7df22d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQC' 'sip-files00062.tif'
c58ba8d9cb357c657a10bb53903605c4
14fd0a52005a82e318b34f8ba1ac738044001d04
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQD' 'sip-files00062.txt'
ab739c43d7e8115bb77d5771689a9701
e81ffe792ea06690f2a62befeb9df33538ff1f98
describe
'10742' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQE' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
e59103c7163e7f6e72fade4db9c60cdf
8908f40331601549a159b2f296c9c2ac9ded2cd3
describe
'965515' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQF' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
0892541dbe930053829ea0bf8283b69d
3536a0585fc8fa29d403d47f5ab589255093face
describe
'101375' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQG' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
ab93a4191aa25ac76ac62db24aea81ef
87b22ab597ebe23cc84ce16bbbce3d2812d47dfb
describe
'33730' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQH' 'sip-files00063.pro'
3b73ee3522baff1943643790dd263a35
69317f6dc00e7f6c4e8424952e682be991555a1d
'2011-11-17T03:28:11-05:00'
describe
'36586' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQI' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
3245dda0e21f528fbe380984cd320bbe
170864eabe21cac4d1d022524ba71d8b118a4770
'2011-11-17T03:26:11-05:00'
describe
'7733465' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQJ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
c341a85d8acbaf5a52a189d819954a86
89c6d1cc4d08df33ca9df31564115f184618cdbd
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQK' 'sip-files00063.txt'
847da16dec14b04e4a8750028d7f57ea
13a97c4fdaccac95598c946391e12eb9defd80e5
describe
'11377' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQL' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
938b6c564555881bfb9b8831faba07d0
5d87a11a0a1a9e4777a72063c50b2a4ec50e977b
describe
'942423' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQM' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
ce63527953535c481c1fe93ba6df41b8
e024dd2189250557f915389ba1251f1a0edd367c
describe
'83954' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQN' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
71eb3f57f06da781fc992cef2be6908f
6f99d281970b947d51f5719f5771aad0485cdafa
'2011-11-17T03:27:00-05:00'
describe
'19286' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQO' 'sip-files00064.pro'
e7bed6731080d7afc92492c662e629db
3cfa4b027a54c89944b37672f0c138f52e84935b
describe
'28273' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQP' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
bee3bc204a7182633513770f95cd1960
45b235d19c481bff476afbcb9f83bdba489af96e
describe
'7550793' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQQ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
786eab91fbb6076df358f15a7f95fb75
1042015f0484f6de21449bf6108e61d9a5fd2f6d
'2011-11-17T03:29:23-05:00'
describe
'796' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQR' 'sip-files00064.txt'
a23bbc550ba654f06a747cdb530f448f
203af74e580246d835a04b359ad3b1e325305b2a
describe
'8797' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQS' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
7ca4d00027d57ce02c3d9ffb397d4528
64cecab5459443c80a436148dbd3b92a4b7ed12d
describe
'965391' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQT' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
8d572afbe78171366bef3c49d3f437d0
a22c23d026c87c8858e2ee34d587b795da696748
describe
'95705' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQU' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
37f1ee36e48c61560d157e5b057a7369
a1a56d377994d7b203315855cf75fc61dc798f4b
describe
'31096' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQV' 'sip-files00065.pro'
d5b994713916736b70cefed5655f0eba
917b285f26f33150dbd5f6a7f3c983bdc9b07382
describe
'33911' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQW' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
5d037463fcf110537e9b8d1a9e109185
af895885a6ffc11033aee8a30e701627a2070dea
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQX' 'sip-files00065.tif'
ecdd6d76def01489da89dbe3f9c6a1df
e6fb0af2fec21611f8403337b269d0a7d832323a
'2011-11-17T03:30:14-05:00'
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQY' 'sip-files00065.txt'
a264b8aa84c0e92420c5622d797c49a9
945aedaff684ac73119588957d15c1bc15782734
describe
'10775' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPQZ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
3a65511de792c3fe311b2da67dd6eee2
4bd109bef0a079db0a5f5e7f887ab46fefac8631
describe
'942697' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRA' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
0ae094669385f12152f9ddee22fe6526
aec2d9f0ae148a0454ad1eaf088cc15ccc480126
describe
'94354' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRB' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1dd4723916d0a0766b5d27f4c10d0880
8cd9f6596e5e469f07a30b3b6ee6866f8e351bf1
describe
'29478' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRC' 'sip-files00066.pro'
19518d98a3642a39d537585c67131a7c
3707e5eeb2f08ef86aa10a3d32e69df307bd5c2f
'2011-11-17T03:29:09-05:00'
describe
'34193' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRD' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
4c55c139000098a1638e1034c6ff1ec8
788664ddbe084e8789b878a3379c7c6326bcb05c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRE' 'sip-files00066.tif'
fd75d68f52af45062a1e09ef817840ef
20cb1879e494a3f0ae0282d234eef3d1236154a5
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRF' 'sip-files00066.txt'
4125d4da6b097c1f4fd6386c8520d90a
51f0367380b0d64b38a2af7aa5a2b39917628275
'2011-11-17T03:26:59-05:00'
describe
'11046' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRG' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
fa1a3fcfe0517a1f8c3d62ff77100d8c
5d530fda16b450dd1f75468312c7fa1d03e4f847
describe
'965511' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRH' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
ed59f077ecf4a7eaf828b528d7b74d02
d7d3c13c852ae842448618dba9f6c39c9cd1199a
'2011-11-17T03:26:54-05:00'
describe
'98905' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRI' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
a89721529312d97ca50a65f8321fa961
2e1add881231162f811f9f598abdc2d63a2b9792
'2011-11-17T03:26:57-05:00'
describe
'33633' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRJ' 'sip-files00067.pro'
32e6c280fbc35affc6e2558490159017
ca1def7cc973553d041305b93136ea713a5ea80b
describe
'35165' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRK' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
99a56d5e9d6a112b28ef813ba34afe44
477a1ebf256ba4eef11173f4b5e834d835bbda29
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRL' 'sip-files00067.tif'
8d3dd361d990dea9341c381b18bf261e
e0dd9339d6f2b67e6d36d7a7504a3337d0996fd1
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRM' 'sip-files00067.txt'
33cd6be856ecde398264d84c869b6ee5
50627a829cea8a1937fe7e3bda9b2c8b013f1381
describe
'11063' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRN' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
25da0f4753514e451a1d9c57a19165ba
f9d8a214c0eeb270acd3ba0a7cfbcc2989f7bb9e
describe
'942618' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRO' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
94de840352dae7db0e133df0eaecb08e
0c67fe534a1588ec7bd35d1ccaf09067d572c444
describe
'108429' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRP' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
d82462b2fc240bbf639143938c824fca
df2ec9a38f8d47a32a1af4fba34dccb25a7941f0
describe
'35318' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRQ' 'sip-files00068.pro'
770fae3bafa095ac51fbba700aa0c115
3e6a0755cd9e3a731dd2e14c395c252e57c5ab01
describe
'39497' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRR' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
bf7178014f6bda93c56182af90f72833
9387a6026130800cc58624053c572e69ab525239
'2011-11-17T03:26:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRS' 'sip-files00068.tif'
36e104f515af989dbc82b42e1e566b44
560869d3eb52631d741d57dab4d4a9bf8f0b66a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRT' 'sip-files00068.txt'
ce641b23114430a6894fe19106556708
fca94edbb21b679b16c2ee3ed3ff7bf61ddac7ae
describe
'12187' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRU' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
1460333bd2b88efe5a0e39702bcf2460
f49e7b09a4e0e41cacea4d65c941d10546870425
describe
'965501' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRV' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ebf82bb1c9bfb2b13995be2b96406bfc
3763549eb400f2c13795e35e0d5f275087f6952f
describe
'101146' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRW' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
dc205c4190061db3b9df263e4d82ff27
7cc8e6e6400c1d690a4bdc2ba378c7b34badc83a
'2011-11-17T03:26:10-05:00'
describe
'33524' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRX' 'sip-files00069.pro'
dfed19ed32ea7206ca835012960395f4
24845595460107602d98f77de8fa902e2c3d050a
describe
'37166' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRY' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
f8de39631c1bb4d6dd46e738169f714c
ef21b78bb7dfe10909e1e2b552907c4713482134
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPRZ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
087d1fc0e7b537f63ec4a3b35c330b13
9a3054715a393bcb91d5764bbeedb901da910182
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSA' 'sip-files00069.txt'
740d05bb806e5945d97126a3580d1172
3d71415830ff0d9ad36cfb224f6760755e5e775e
describe
'11672' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSB' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
21d73bdc4804db918304c68634bd5331
e4c7081c2ae474fef1cfba4583fef1ba8b82b754
describe
'942707' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSC' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
27ff2b4e45d9e942d52dcae49b887bc9
61595f947e022d71de34875bdbbceed3765106f8
describe
'100976' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSD' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
659442a77a1d8120541b909f2ad4f87a
92d1644f643a4d2d84243ac6d4822497f24c52f7
describe
'32782' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSE' 'sip-files00070.pro'
a5960deedf181c258dd8fda82a8e89d4
5fc31f2d4b0ef657ae0aeac535c237a7c291a209
'2011-11-17T03:27:13-05:00'
describe
'36260' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSF' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
86fcae58a1885cad0cb2343f6347c7b8
f201a1651ea09cf23de55ea378b07b8c31a192ba
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSG' 'sip-files00070.tif'
3b93f569570e99183e16e1c630cd755d
e26bbf07d4e57f8866f7e3043cc836c1daecb011
'2011-11-17T03:27:29-05:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSH' 'sip-files00070.txt'
c85b1fdb9a9e67e3431ace5680ba1b95
1d18fcb36031e492597d6b649198a9689740fbd0
describe
'11404' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSI' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
ecade14feb16fcc87b881956e84fd900
e3ff4aaf161a2dffd72003bb9dd8e08f56da267d
describe
'965516' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSJ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
cef84b2f54c8b37bd711f08f880d58cb
6e14346f0f7ded34d8cecb32c4230e8b88d7a0b2
describe
'97000' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSK' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
317b3938d750c80e4e15b48a19a674e2
ac9cfcc8a9f54417f070ef5e98ec705a80bdbe77
describe
'31132' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSL' 'sip-files00071.pro'
7128f95a9b3669cb19a22a1b5f7d2a76
d9b428811b86a29f882e218f87cced7504903fa5
'2011-11-17T03:28:28-05:00'
describe
'35919' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSM' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
8a971f0577aaf719708a0634592bbf18
d1cd3f9cde551922f7937ca4e83cae144b9ec382
'2011-11-17T03:28:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSN' 'sip-files00071.tif'
36582c131460a92da41aa6371abe8f97
ae8d5e378ca96193f682e159f23903058d4b9c2c
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSO' 'sip-files00071.txt'
7f871a008f3724e183cb61a205180d01
6fa03bb8783ed421ccf09b1083a4bc5b16531212
'2011-11-17T03:26:50-05:00'
describe
'12096' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSP' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
e1699a7c4edcb3022efef786fbe2ab56
b614c6a5c77cb58b034a1a2c714774dee891119e
describe
'942628' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSQ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
eadca72de8e8a1814df15a2d7645c348
58a50f088e84c434a29b94a4c8a57f3b402ed6bc
describe
'89654' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSR' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
a477b294119bfb77d27582af50913791
6e2645e98a7ba59490d83a9dc126fa0856151f78
'2011-11-17T03:25:12-05:00'
describe
'21793' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSS' 'sip-files00072.pro'
2dc09ef81ee30b141e159ce39c2ff587
048b1e6194d2d1395f48333ab192650759abb8d2
describe
'31147' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPST' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
2938a53f30f00f702aa9840a421251a5
1f85ecf00c1356cd656a519b9eb48d9bef8dceb3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSU' 'sip-files00072.tif'
35a94718e027e9ce2413dae4528935b1
a90b2a2e498864feec4d1a8f4b3c3e60ac33685f
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSV' 'sip-files00072.txt'
e8c92b5210bed7e4ed49c96163abc718
0c49aae79105a815071d2737e01565bbccbcace1
describe
'9724' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSW' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
dadb4ca6acd4b443f0d135802ba03f75
fed8f4cad96901f9c141ed6a7914f3c8b3617069
describe
'965481' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSX' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
0d5f817b33099ab7a2d682696d6cbc26
e1166f4806df7915a08e22b985d6257d5de4763c
describe
'92497' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSY' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
427f61a6737ee56d9b9c1bd4269e9c57
b8c087135aecd0c308acf65ac02b3c3f8379ca1b
'2011-11-17T03:28:51-05:00'
describe
'29351' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPSZ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
7b9d0c9cdcd13bceb7d5c8aec21f3d83
7ecca68005d1aa00a104dcc7d28614807797554a
'2011-11-17T03:29:39-05:00'
describe
'33495' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTA' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
bce68114ba6e550f457f409a3f7a5ca0
b2c072fb7ac8448cb46b74d0ee1e037c9336c7b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTB' 'sip-files00073.tif'
e69f6dcd2edab5d9e848d9cfcfcb6ada
6194372041ae6bd78c960455582bda493e54003a
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTC' 'sip-files00073.txt'
c927a2e6d405c0de1539a0fc8d0b02ea
f9d54984714cfa57ccd3c4cc8b9a9fcae1b32fda
describe
'10827' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTD' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6efddbda54dfe6fbba6ff39e67679e42
f4538a594c74bed6df1fc8d894b3f458ace8a931
describe
'942712' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTE' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
acba8eaaefa4bca5d7a9d279b526ce8f
9b770e5669b3e005cdd24eb37f72a44a0aad5f86
describe
'101964' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTF' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
cf4dbeef2d99cca09b9aae4ac4af264a
2fd46fe63ea0b5db3e9bb09bb614e1d432b754d2
describe
'33709' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTG' 'sip-files00074.pro'
b304b2c6ebecabfdaeb6b3a6f172eca8
a40c6cef95097a233c187702e2e7887df100d253
'2011-11-17T03:25:47-05:00'
describe
'37582' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTH' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
3f41e88e5ad5c3fc2f22c1d0c080df69
c4519a74ebe472a99bf5a97635ddc6ef1737c67a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTI' 'sip-files00074.tif'
228f32b8a2432ab10b6992c59c39db52
61ea260ca3c0d5e5eea71d7391ffe4bcb974a410
'2011-11-17T03:27:14-05:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTJ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
7094b0d022e35cb670728df2befd3ebc
7b34918fa5da5ed758c5104bee5a0c58c0c660cd
'2011-11-17T03:25:34-05:00'
describe
'11528' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTK' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
363d3e6227424833a1aca52fda793a15
1118838a55f1e3fd54cfb2376090373ee9af004a
describe
'965517' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTL' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
87ecc8e6f34f1a83f73c5b5cb46f0643
aeb6d2e8a56be1f8eb05b6cfcb18927a70859533
describe
'97987' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTM' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
dc34e7f028f27fb2034e4bf8c43676fd
d8ca5d08bdd79d119b13f97ed31d5ded3686d923
describe
'32061' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTN' 'sip-files00075.pro'
ba17d0fb2538b67ebc229b4d62eb64cc
edff616c48c242301985a52f16eba6ed76daba70
describe
'35540' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTO' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
c28b04ebb9802253b120cc6f6127d776
722e7012c762a7d30fd3c27ef56dc46797d1f091
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTP' 'sip-files00075.tif'
baed5e5c5711d73b01c3618020bf31d1
18e42665059be62712fe3d8a8ed1462c8958575e
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTQ' 'sip-files00075.txt'
ac675bc10fdb3e351dbcc9403081914a
e473b733f8e24133c733bf1a279e5e1992e6221f
describe
'11480' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTR' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
83442c8fec5fc3b781b91006e1e9286e
3723575c5c631e65bc8dec98a86b3b0687a9ea77
describe
'942681' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTS' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
60735f783ab4dd7b5e1782ff50cc2a90
ce28bb294af679fb16c04d7aa191ebd042abbb15
describe
'111494' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTT' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b872a18470b40569312f3f76a127df07
ff63a99af51bd2bb910324c46a98571c7779ba9f
'2011-11-17T03:26:00-05:00'
describe
'35978' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTU' 'sip-files00076.pro'
929ddd52c61d19173e5fb5cdbeb8b720
79548b92daca2ed8893d5277561342b59a8fac17
describe
'40445' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTV' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
4e0a15ee422fd3e741fc74a0d2b7bb1d
781d135015e2d672e042acf768e8ddfe6ae54c0d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTW' 'sip-files00076.tif'
4286558aa4a4b8af173b3277da3c29e6
3871764a2d5b57febaa27090bd2228475715db02
'2011-11-17T03:27:52-05:00'
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTX' 'sip-files00076.txt'
0a728fbd72658d6f0bd59bf01e4ad82b
f59782ee1e49615e12079de542c45aee37b65fe7
describe
'12549' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTY' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
3f9945728fa0e9df9655ab71a691c572
a6cce26daf617a08ea1ebbb6b42e11dd49391f0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPTZ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
fe7c4774e9d0be9840ca4c192dc1fbb7
9ccc4dc9d79d2bcd803074eb2af5cb672903cb0e
describe
'106320' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUA' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
c5c10e328046c01f735258c6bfc69471
aa6337a8ddce2aecfd9815b4e679452f9de261e5
'2011-11-17T03:30:16-05:00'
describe
'35137' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUB' 'sip-files00077.pro'
91a8a971219cc7793e9d8d3f7e845482
1e8900869d3bc8806b41a6fa0c42c9621698b4c3
describe
'38544' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUC' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
e39e8b7ee72f38206071ac4612af2893
2cad3e3913564e73f6faba23597b7d07ba56af88
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUD' 'sip-files00077.tif'
a27f24597f104e3ccbb44daa7b22892d
f3817b93715535eeafa45bf598cd5340b302dbba
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUE' 'sip-files00077.txt'
c129bb52fb47ebc716c39fe5972001c9
0db862c09ca2a845a410d6cb406f6b673b8f1505
describe
'11957' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUF' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
90cee968c8bf5e290f38f665d2d5f34a
063f33fca4641ec6123f1428895d278f2e2bf9d6
describe
'942653' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUG' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
4e07d80a888bb3702d12f0756b8449c1
ca8626c21e8dded85eb2b3a99477655962354184
describe
'107908' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUH' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b0941bfe3afdff5a4f1b656cf09b1e31
d31cb36ba2a8cabd8b162d9d1e02f3b40399628a
describe
'35475' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUI' 'sip-files00078.pro'
1bbdc4a814a25132d180bb7bd319679d
4c2a0e43079854d9407bd5c6559f9c33618a0e89
'2011-11-17T03:27:55-05:00'
describe
'39646' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUJ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
61880e9f1c8ec78e5527bf75e7b65b3c
1416ebe92b54de000715b1e3a6fed237effdd880
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUK' 'sip-files00078.tif'
10cf06778e1509b0effa61a6b338b089
e93be1a63602105a24ac7267cab7e9eea7d06b52
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUL' 'sip-files00078.txt'
33db6b02b3f78b94afc3469e486c84ab
02672ec033b51b1d5c4670633ea46e324f2ce820
'2011-11-17T03:29:22-05:00'
describe
'12128' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUM' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
4b0936cdf39f551a3f506b77181a99d0
84758feca540fb446ba8f7502b72b79a41cd671e
describe
'965502' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUN' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
3ede7835b9f860204133197c94810c56
a9d91d36f899766f5bc78d292fa922f8fb3132f5
describe
'95604' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUO' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
41ac280e46c0cc107a3e1a4357207a79
b6a5a1c34f9cf20ccd31c941664916b86f5e66f8
describe
'31051' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUP' 'sip-files00079.pro'
293b34124b9dc5fed55a64a42056dafc
97502deab0f46b0ff84369941d2fefe738855647
describe
'34652' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUQ' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
2e5e4d0cc2794f40011f72176129e224
26f2d3f2e2868e0fd9dd5d8372f4bba30b322855
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUR' 'sip-files00079.tif'
35bbb8f7e0f208c89ef26a3f1242af2b
3eebb19142f0bbb545c73e26d432171b67f9b9ff
'2011-11-17T03:27:40-05:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUS' 'sip-files00079.txt'
2b46de254a492cfbbd0b8b36ab3cbe0b
b7dcbdd3f4ee362463ceb334dea360c9de34faab
describe
'11052' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUT' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
5dde4668390a7f5b5394cfcaba9d1951
9f47cc24714d11aedeba93ac797365e7e2c6f617
describe
'942626' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUU' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
c58f609404c0812ee049d9941c25dbdb
f29be4d794c8fd31eb87812c0514b471d98b974f
'2011-11-17T03:26:51-05:00'
describe
'99270' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUV' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
c870430eb731ec22673413699863cdd6
0763fd55d5117bd316420740061e9d2c3e11b537
describe
'31640' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUW' 'sip-files00080.pro'
c2d0f7da5fd7d064e73b152728248da4
c11e2911f44ee304e7aeb1eebbee03ec7ffb96cf
describe
'36975' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUX' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
572f89d7e027a4ad0f01b0abc79141e6
e6b56204a9d399f6b5f89c144eec3a1f2f48298e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUY' 'sip-files00080.tif'
fb2d273b7fd70b4fbf8ca92288c91c55
9c337951050a12d272c6f9ca2c2f1aae90be0394
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPUZ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
bbf2d2bca1d74b75f0ddab04ecf861d4
e809f4f7fee91056021523853527bbd64bb2698a
describe
'11425' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVA' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
d05fc178bc8346cb5d213c8affdba56d
26071f710ba744015b51d1584dfe02f3254523c1
describe
'965480' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVB' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
5d00768b1e4866b2d5c79f68aaaabe25
1910f561184891b848685305ac8ec34a7859042a
describe
'91846' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVC' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
f0165c7bd656a9052bce2b0770ccb109
56476843d8912dd9b6095241745473a9888631b5
describe
'30057' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVD' 'sip-files00081.pro'
5f23ecdd9ec05579b5a334247f1e150b
cf3c8cd9a5842f1726424071277bbb1faadd38fc
describe
'33729' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVE' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
4cf203308b8dfb276d7475b748d51e9c
67b785911d9be895085232ba82a96e3d1bdad5bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVF' 'sip-files00081.tif'
37304d9fce5d1c20b6171233eba650c2
ccfb3be4eae2fbfe98a312a2f13cf358eda739f0
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVG' 'sip-files00081.txt'
f6cb8479c1c3ebf8f69032a45262d213
08a77fd75209b96185279894145cefa0e2503543
describe
'11336' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVH' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
59be7fe65fa0c790a6a9e12457d093e4
9b733a36be858214d5c814e1433ffb3c6dba3a61
describe
'942711' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVI' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
3c8fee0ec0fbdd8f77a80637d32b574b
2d6be891bcdb65beaa7afe1663e2e49583c77b5f
describe
'98171' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVJ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
efc1c55e71cef53b485dd3357e8d915c
229f6febce9e1b4a90f66826fe1bf49add9e6446
describe
'31187' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVK' 'sip-files00082.pro'
428da871a546eb47277d6e6c2e761816
7f73ef21cca33e3a2dc2bfa61d7fb08acafc034a
describe
'36200' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVL' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
5d2edcd58a8091e9a7ef5fffbd3ddeb4
7b690a9e95fae19406f15e17a053a4d3248341e4
'2011-11-17T03:24:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVM' 'sip-files00082.tif'
6e3b9fcfd716bfebb42f2187fa72bdc8
06f47225e0ac1e95a931a2437f3a4556e7dbe96b
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVN' 'sip-files00082.txt'
f0d5f07bd3a589c7e32a41c41394a0f2
4afffe8bbc0747bca62b27ea394cebcf4a71bb8f
describe
'11499' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVO' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
193eb4998680efff9f10fe6815a31591
eabae84164b9edac5186cba2c723f2e36921d1fa
describe
'965504' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVP' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
6b97b33c4a936b1d484968bf603b7a7f
aaac9b4d2d94966317e11a08b78815fcb763a011
describe
'101344' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVQ' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
591a2a7fa043b4a1e886c94a8363873e
5a75b150e3445a278e8cffb3a3cf886594f2d3aa
'2011-11-17T03:30:06-05:00'
describe
'34113' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVR' 'sip-files00083.pro'
867c0d0e6f4da546d7d5f9e95dd15ad3
1b7b2911ea873da612fbd489e3fa9a05e0262a33
describe
'37415' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVS' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
48f43c69e4c37b449eb44fc3516f7c53
74e950dedc8cccadd916136dc8a18596366d218f
'2011-11-17T03:28:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVT' 'sip-files00083.tif'
42afeb2c4c7570c93128287d12a41f81
649e8d47f14371ad78d59ad6214413943e80194d
'2011-11-17T03:29:58-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVU' 'sip-files00083.txt'
e7e95cdfe571d1356132c1b2fcfc7457
a02abb73e551768a4cfa444d8a86a4e6a01af810
describe
'11689' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVV' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
74c4094d608850b86e5ac1bb71e6e884
554901a1f2b6735e258d01b436709c89e71aaf97
describe
'942645' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVW' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
e5890988a7c40f39f867e6ac2ea1fb23
57c9537faba9979c1e01eb32a3beabb42f9527ab
describe
'97668' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVX' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
eb98ba75bceb0f6a4fb283f86539e392
cc882227b124125b254f85886326d8652169eb86
describe
'31382' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVY' 'sip-files00084.pro'
475f263d4d1cbfdbc8bbb86f2c48fb64
1e2f6687bea80ccde1fb588a25ee696ba26ba227
describe
'35624' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPVZ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
767f9ca79183e009897a54f15f0bafb2
6ea1d17dbe504064bcb33e47ae094548b4413bd5
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWA' 'sip-files00084.tif'
3b4e780495f97db1ba37e85ba509b684
92631176fbfd4f195f9934aedefa600d88d114a9
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWB' 'sip-files00084.txt'
5643ce8afbf943c7ecda483c80a7fd90
872e49d556f6d75dacc3fb4794d4a1cbe095d96a
'2011-11-17T03:26:13-05:00'
describe
'11251' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWC' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
05e3d9d211f0637a2ea3b8d3c445c8db
917ae71baacc576cb1423699059bd0a8204f799e
describe
'965495' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWD' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
678d1a10e0b4a0b606459cbdede22b0f
314706c5ead05c882211e52ecfc4c8943e653d48
'2011-11-17T03:28:04-05:00'
describe
'91360' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWE' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
f864b2df7932178a29805a473d09ff39
f0a22dd6f56e1f99033833fcb4d048109781df68
describe
'29757' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWF' 'sip-files00085.pro'
c4008a4ab03bb7deef9d532d89c8a6cf
fd98467dd3867d8eafe6fa920d99545117ea21c3
describe
'33354' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWG' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
1fc50531bd2d3b17ed1071b23de21fe6
b1d44302ae0f003e630fab58882d9a1beccf4333
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWH' 'sip-files00085.tif'
abc2fdd484ff8c740d0716e33c441c6d
e33db98a798c44b2e86d34a7fff5b9e2cd4e7344
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWI' 'sip-files00085.txt'
9e5c8ed14e97553110ecaccdd26b54fd
e4966f2a5f92bf7db0f4d38a563e6cd9e4e2b557
describe
'10615' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWJ' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
bbadc6cef6e5741cf3fcd0e92a1e682c
5f3973dd72450efedde5f1fdc11b50888cee33e1
describe
'942602' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWK' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
ee2ee66ddf06e3347eb3ccb77fd7bae3
b67918b84f43f21f8b130c191f7f90896a431fa9
describe
'77391' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWL' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
5bbda7ad239deb3543ee9fe6f5a393ef
3bfba454d1925c9016b3fed65f3331f7db8b8d79
'2011-11-17T03:28:02-05:00'
describe
'23221' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWM' 'sip-files00086.pro'
b6e11e29bb8bc1528166a56f03b8f381
b44aae487b2ecc9230289b71e58b0ac0c404d6cc
describe
'27762' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWN' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
21055f964ef03bd21200baf3a7211895
220f38deaf04af9bbfc00713180393f9aeb5a47e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWO' 'sip-files00086.tif'
e5e8bd20146aedbe04903645ad240ee7
470933dcf4866ee5af0bfe38e40b9c93deb9e27b
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWP' 'sip-files00086.txt'
e7386fe61f657f5506bd3884f9137cee
72741431527afeda287341f52da6453596781473
describe
'8862' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWQ' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
95a4ecf73e819a7ba3bcad85be9ae920
aa28e5208bfae431951fad3fb679e2211d0c5d31
'2011-11-17T03:25:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWR' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
dcb4035fd6e627ddecb2f321040a29ed
fcbf1aa9b1fb07389c3c9db4cbc5e32b0a425070
describe
'98135' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWS' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
04de8fc6902704c747205029fae28a83
4053ec08a80cf76845a988f2ef2d463092a022c0
describe
'32677' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWT' 'sip-files00087.pro'
619f79668d9ae2a8157530b409e876b9
503af9a3110864193f1485210f55d99f013d3d6d
describe
'35872' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWU' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
afae59213fbbe2db212acfa083dc92ba
01c0fcf2451324952554ddecbf8161124bc17a50
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWV' 'sip-files00087.tif'
c721a23d48ebd5c1bbc9263fe72de723
0117feba361419ca4701c4ceea7b4b43124f9ecd
'2011-11-17T03:26:36-05:00'
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWW' 'sip-files00087.txt'
94a23f437b97fe48a8d44817742eeb63
f38ec52ea9d5bba8ae75411d6d7ed47d3df9476a
describe
'11705' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWX' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
466ffd981065643b8b6e8df42c3747b3
30f278fdee1c7bf690ce9431adf26e8bc5859e71
'2011-11-17T03:25:41-05:00'
describe
'942609' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWY' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
b6e94e84ff62bf28806b11515899fb7c
98d7735f74900982cd380ed5e5711a73cce75465
'2011-11-17T03:29:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPWZ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
171c10cef03705b2b7b4b56a7b6789b3
0a244252ccb4f8e2f6858652fcb38cfb760dc980
'2011-11-17T03:28:44-05:00'
describe
'33374' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXA' 'sip-files00088.pro'
57b74bd30e372874d4f92d8be9c8accb
a0ede0d43b136cffb7228636d587fc20924a1cd8
describe
'37248' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXB' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
dd9225b0629009cf1e39f3f3e19948d2
05121ba57dee5c1191ce33e99dfa59942a8ee388
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXC' 'sip-files00088.tif'
cd34652802bff4e3d18946efa1d4fd7b
58aaa918ab65ca1371ace6f88557d97e741367ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXD' 'sip-files00088.txt'
31ad46fddaef0fa5e8a1481a7fcc080c
53a3aaa1c1182620834d72bfef4e32a2db80cfa1
describe
'11481' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXE' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
606d789b9a722f21c7b1091e243c9112
8811aef34b2298cba2b3b0d2e4e88ff572f6e6a6
'2011-11-17T03:28:27-05:00'
describe
'965440' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXF' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
222162921c24f10387f923255935a866
905c73a6ae67e3fb5e47cf0330094363360a6b52
describe
'104419' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXG' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
87be34a178a50d9c6640142431741c2e
dc5146360f9399092d6d861b28c84a3b63c62018
describe
'35961' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXH' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7d1d1e114b2e4ce6e97c3309f7650eac
26a3facd9cf3a856bc954aa9a8f51134ab09330b
describe
'38677' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXI' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
bbc98156e4177098146858b257c8fdf7
3780a23501d80df651089acf14ff7ac15f6616e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXJ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
4c7a97dd9554e6baa5c2ed2deab7708f
1cc2b9ab8488a7c07c5581ff2d294343f571f481
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXK' 'sip-files00089.txt'
70168d352d696ee8bf2485a2cad5f8b5
dd0a520c6c823fd93054a4ef351514849b5e930f
'2011-11-17T03:29:38-05:00'
describe
'12247' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXL' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
4886cb04e666fb9bb8f7de73fdb44d7a
07e8654db12887b5b6f63f028bf53cc0f328327f
'2011-11-17T03:29:08-05:00'
describe
'942687' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXM' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
d007667fb6e6af57999db9b5ce5a0bbc
df78d33b5630f1e43721df820e3a9735136de220
describe
'103174' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXN' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
a8611442abf831d3863689be655d7177
377fec4e5016a5bf871b96283642db2d7495f0bc
describe
'33583' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXO' 'sip-files00090.pro'
d1cfbd9aaf1a6134817544ebfb0e327f
0a5735cd0b3cf29f9d523b1aa17e1debb2e57f81
describe
'38271' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXP' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d009664d7835bf85362728aa42bfb3c5
2d03ef802466eba06de72cd6b60452081516ca7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXQ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
5d8a76ca94d34f61f7dc748566d3f086
2765f9d7838a0b87f4664a3823223688f1a7ae6c
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXR' 'sip-files00090.txt'
6e67a849619bd94f4a8e02647e1826d5
a50e1d594b19a7eb77f6f5784b06ea714193340e
describe
'12054' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXS' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
2101077e8fba7460321db06d98a8a7a7
6aa52d471f32ed5177119289969aaa7ad0d32352
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXT' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
f18fa9329e1ed8be486f6fae9f953f5f
a1c67d9e00c84f04a75bd7c31871ca013589348c
describe
'104921' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXU' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
837fe3251672ed143453025055620085
7337dcbb91097c88175a4824fc618acbb18b15fc
describe
'35868' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXV' 'sip-files00091.pro'
673e5a72353ffa08bd58877b695f960c
5d7e558871e749e546cb8a2d7f891cc2e4becd5b
describe
'38054' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXW' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
253df7ba997c83f74f495122f0d41150
ccb6a6e3a52da3bf2be4b016549a71c863dc0591
'2011-11-17T03:28:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXX' 'sip-files00091.tif'
0b7fda6ea4ad9acca619d039ee4793a9
613061060a89e75c0168b1d540f6aad191477249
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXY' 'sip-files00091.txt'
1b540612cfae6478149b4a5a173b741a
a58b1bf3326a3e0ca72313eeff015ba9307078a2
describe
'11919' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPXZ' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
58c5c04a7f957b246ceb0a72acb2e877
9c91c6e81c6a2ca8bc46c24a41d300981ca19074
describe
'942710' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYA' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
30c2c6f52a4c00ecb1d36efbb6a94716
dc1186986b7a469cd2403322498b1fe240ad94c7
describe
'77955' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYB' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
c4c3ec481fdf9c3407b72276097cc371
4d13cc00599b6b17fe788668d0b6691440996c0a
describe
'23583' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYC' 'sip-files00092.pro'
207f8719094a50f8e96fa7bd56533b82
4c91a58a10c482607131d941adc0e4a1c2cd4225
describe
'28570' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYD' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a51b7d707bc79a1b650b1a270117961c
38edf159b080fc289f3de7c7042703910027c663
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYE' 'sip-files00092.tif'
3d671aefcd192a4463ca9bee25e0696f
689f3392c203da56e6a34367387c595c3f8e8bab
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYF' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b3fccaad4d80a32d6761236e8d7408d7
9fef4f64a59d98123d701b7609dee989482bb883
describe
'8953' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYG' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
c0b4cbe977831ab1a789a6809c422c3b
186e3423721f416b2b8413068c853500de3ee97d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYH' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
2d4163a1b6c11e23b25e818d1361882a
f18d8398962d779a15912e09c3a01eb003730dee
describe
'85594' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYI' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
02e16af5762c6be2f9fb3b22185a6aed
a06c1b713bb427766ac9241a6267eab3cd2ff72b
describe
'27293' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYJ' 'sip-files00093.pro'
ff438023d828ec0097aac42ed58ccf13
96dc13f2dac87f9aefafd22ea0cafe0390208816
describe
'31574' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYK' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
222f9028618faa73b40f37ab851ea957
6b17950d217965f38dac7acac1ee4224bbb2776d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYL' 'sip-files00093.tif'
9224da735e97778ef7621cab1e6bff58
915244e39a64a232d30066d6aafd68c92b8e4402
'2011-11-17T03:28:59-05:00'
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYM' 'sip-files00093.txt'
bcac39555ab72341895e866f061c3286
d510ae56115d57fa07f18e4d1f7138fff8e260f3
describe
'10237' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYN' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
a758d9c4d698d092df986ef698fdb359
e4c8dc4e525e50e1be753e8f0e946ba8485a3aec
describe
'942640' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYO' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
9e666fe6e6991749af32f764a6415d99
1e47f11e814a415b54be212e773eac1c34b552db
describe
'105813' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYP' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
463f450f5ca23c3b1b6dbbca4e3b93d3
c5672db60b740a9b6636014b13c05fc676852944
describe
'35144' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYQ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
5f60205062c9a502dd47790c05f5e935
3bafedbb162b21a4d99d68e8550bd710c179683a
describe
'38794' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYR' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
e6ac90af25b39c611d0a6a9e8ce04c07
53397284eaf56954426e9a7a9664d759540445fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYS' 'sip-files00094.tif'
652be2d075dedef9002135454bc3d604
cbd304d71eefd637d2945224ddcb620e9a76cb96
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYT' 'sip-files00094.txt'
885cc6a4045fb9e7731b77cd34807924
53a960c1ddd49f420bbfb151aa239772790bc215
describe
'12027' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYU' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
021b052ce06a1d90db9cfbfdd80090a7
53fd24576986e65f3210d8aa9b4822690a8d125e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYV' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
572360ea8d5583efec49b2e289d1e5c0
8a8c69a09ed3178513f8d4d8d7ff46d49e001d16
describe
'106668' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYW' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
217f89fe44e4390b22df3f3260ac91f4
1f32c377f58df7832ab2734b7be00dd8703f8941
describe
'36113' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYX' 'sip-files00095.pro'
7476c3309a1ce20ce533ac72590b4b25
e4941d7dcf8d18d92ba240552dcf911760ea16a9
describe
'38447' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYY' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
fc3ef14d5fdc7faf185b5a2c6e893169
c17ecafc2307d8f8143e2ea638b8c388400a954b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPYZ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
faab2b637f53a2224b72e96491e73a3e
1247c5bdf9f9426b3928f32b662c630a73daaae9
'2011-11-17T03:25:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZA' 'sip-files00095.txt'
7926c33e9ced670af00ed416e38041ae
03c13e5ac6c20431790a93b6d6275fbde05b8de8
describe
'12420' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZB' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
2d97592c5daab7aabd795fbbefe1986d
3fab755153f84db8cb79d27b628ce98be6bcdf00
'2011-11-17T03:24:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZC' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
99963e37cb982f8912cec904462e3b45
dfde972eba8b96a225afd4e77b80ccae1b94a2f1
describe
'105522' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZD' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
36837d4ecfba644bc55fe2d551e7d825
f3a5299582c3c26caed452891f185cb3c229e14c
describe
'35373' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZE' 'sip-files00096.pro'
8a7cff32ceef5f60c9ae08333b84f970
37e66930325bfdd8bd6729e78bed941344897c1d
'2011-11-17T03:25:26-05:00'
describe
'38774' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZF' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
9cc23d8736a602c894753187e9fbbe49
c3874394fbae3edbce835a4073ec2622a1e65214
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZG' 'sip-files00096.tif'
3fcd20366205e1686854ca5a26c99286
8e79af2e568ed808e76112862e94dea1ba50c9b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZH' 'sip-files00096.txt'
cb70dfa1799b7a536e2793bff5af83f1
542f2bfb83823096c667a1da58bcbdd29214cce8
describe
'11773' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZI' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
91374e925b667364d3b77e7a11d53f4f
1d62009d59d30f3e42e89dcea2bbdebac1dc0509
'2011-11-17T03:27:16-05:00'
describe
'965472' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZJ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
c8fca997e3366ccd52bcb644c9f1860d
d9e9379507f97112abe5ca99b57cd0bc2f4d870b
describe
'97624' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZK' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
c06b99d42d60f3d0d53a72f7db88a053
1759127d2b042b90c2e96dfe78b56faba80ba20a
describe
'31832' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZL' 'sip-files00097.pro'
54479160942b875c1b1518ce08a7ed10
a78dd531e43bba5071f0364ab3dcf0bfe0b41d79
describe
'35492' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZM' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
a1a060a1766acb99f609a950f5475060
68575fdae3e40bb544d7abb58f8299d679645b6a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZN' 'sip-files00097.tif'
7192dd6966afb8cc3beeace3d866e81a
5cd84038694e20d042e2224f7df7ecaea6734ca3
'2011-11-17T03:29:05-05:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZO' 'sip-files00097.txt'
8a26da994a02743d0ba73e2fc0ba2a6d
5bb46124193d6f2e9972e3ab812006f93870af90
describe
'11720' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZP' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
d7a8ee188f0c41e2efd06d0c97c9b21b
54e38b61553983284433e42a0b5e1a27bd5f3f50
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZQ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
72c6811046276cf320bb1a8d20b910c6
60aebb14de8ed621d1766c1abe49817a3b46e3da
describe
'108119' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZR' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
226c293b2ce3c1291592e7b67ad1b444
6f8a972bdfc0082e72e2f6c51c664effc0bf0b05
describe
'36213' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZS' 'sip-files00098.pro'
87fbe25afced39005bb114df743ee082
395673b4eb9af697e139abd2f5cc61a186c018a2
describe
'39610' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZT' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
6b24b5c0ce3964d05cf141c0da3e1f29
dede718db3a57db91bb7123249b54a9d24e7096e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZU' 'sip-files00098.tif'
fd4cd06a72c4a3789dfd0c0dbc48f949
aacb3a4339d84f9bf3ad2cce3d7bdfc2ef852e1b
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZV' 'sip-files00098.txt'
6df958c5ac3b2315211146a1048847e2
6a515bef5ccfa64b2dd84502ecec134567f30e17
describe
'11851' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZW' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
a91967115668e1b3fceacf4a46a9a2f6
261ee7de1987a151069e40446d8b6cfece21a396
describe
'965458' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZX' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
0aca2a809de5216c71417fb4c135e195
3cd781219b7ff70992699ac07b2eace57ab7fce1
'2011-11-17T03:29:47-05:00'
describe
'59290' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZY' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
acf2f6fabfca13ece0ab147233efe6ad
0258d0e0abf61808c31b4456ffa5213cfc48cc7d
describe
'10832' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAPZZ' 'sip-files00099.pro'
3c445cf14acce315bdab26e5e521c738
de0ce194dd8829782786f7ca8959fc4ec2650878
describe
'20026' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAA' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
397e845e75d6981078ea72e954006301
5c7b7b9caf87827f92a2f5cd41fb9721d4d0c254
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAB' 'sip-files00099.tif'
dd39b4d220abe1f559863d0519238e10
33218fffe2bd6d751ca034d546396d3339b6809f
describe
'440' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAC' 'sip-files00099.txt'
2d4f1b4900f80ba260717420da0b4a25
06d017a11805e42f36613682de108950fb372fef
describe
'6584' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAD' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
b8dcb7e3eacbaca1256f20614b72a1cf
8fd387508006174033683cd05327542db5ef11e6
describe
'942708' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAE' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
19fd2419b567bef37b7c165b84ff3651
fea5bc76014c755c129b7783626d01f7742125d5
describe
'89397' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAF' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
8816e17aa311c7ea6eb89c0fc08e4fae
c89313b2ef86b49e19d956342eb0fd3ca1c55185
'2011-11-17T03:28:38-05:00'
describe
'28428' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAG' 'sip-files00100.pro'
2e2eb849779566d6e4ad6b4219ab0e2a
a6b668fa486dac9c1cb6cea898cee21484dde3d2
describe
'32211' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAH' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
effe5815cd730ea1924697caaf3b0a5d
287f60d55962a9359873dca81e35e8b1f21d797e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAI' 'sip-files00100.tif'
09a383b5f206252a8cfff915fc95b9ac
e294aece8cb9806973c63cf31452eeca9f309d48
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAJ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
c87a8f8f72a18cc0b63129b5e0536aa9
034ade2ca0ec8dd2ef0c79701e5b8c875143abde
describe
'9891' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAK' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
c9c653a2cf98c8596826fdd21d38f955
bb41f6ebf4238938530f6594c7a4d2d8917b17e2
describe
'965367' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAL' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
520db136c5125e392a5a72d648f229d0
dcb32057cfcabc94006c0bafde5e4815dd1f1a6b
describe
'102750' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAM' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
e8c81f362f6d1b4605e22e0ecf95ac37
497ce3b97560243efff35abd95c5ffb65d7ae5bb
describe
'34333' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAN' 'sip-files00101.pro'
e37a1128af101f6e3f735359e295f0a7
c6b41353940dad5b66139c9a6d25031999124c3e
describe
'37345' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAO' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
dca118067c4a65b09f2da0d353a702f1
8615a5dec10c2750d9e02bb20c7a347cc5fd65a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAP' 'sip-files00101.tif'
80e8d1c5a9628f7a18c43c4873addeaf
e23c90cbed637cbf2d9000f548f1f5773ac412d3
'2011-11-17T03:25:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAQ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
85db1b981b71c40c8804a5e2f9b4ef04
5d8ee795b0ec717a9f1e73e2cc8ebd754c7f8227
describe
'11603' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAR' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
6d7dd0c41bc3d95df12ac81d1faaa7cc
f5176ae59d5ec6ede3597fd824f981ace4484989
describe
'942674' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAS' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
f3aec118800960859b5132b697d56ab4
bd2218504642e5099750759c27e0240df44ea19d
describe
'108539' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAT' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
d6315298382ad5e46e5e672bb13bdd80
ea46b39b1fccf67e513c8564c1f183dc001b90cc
describe
'35407' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAU' 'sip-files00102.pro'
14b9752a2880a627fba33508f55bd11a
9913e111bf021186b1490a68a76766f61883ca48
describe
'39569' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAV' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
c96ae514e6955b4956ac83578321b526
3a8785c493d3fddaf5ec7782e0daa47040944721
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAW' 'sip-files00102.tif'
da40ba6c1aba21aefb9fd832dad52254
ed867e41f89f119e0d89dd2df1d791fc725cc1c7
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAX' 'sip-files00102.txt'
12616c3d880412417478d30b7dc0bdb6
79793929a9e5fae311f1a28bc45d65dc214d5e00
describe
'12331' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAY' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
5f10be6946cbb792f0de8f31e31bcd0e
c2e432071108c0f7386b7c6397de73c85658b168
describe
'959375' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQAZ' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e9bfa6cf3b5b855e5996bedf45443afc
0f329733f4378119d8af7a00ac7fdf8e1c7d0fec
describe
'105817' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBA' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
e2982d6fda938afb4094c4af1315c6e0
1091d739b763fc14920617f6fb277f2bf6f71e43
'2011-11-17T03:26:12-05:00'
describe
'35428' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBB' 'sip-files00103.pro'
1a5d1c5ecd852646264104e6ce63b3f1
92e25672dc26ab6813cb9010ca6034fd1726ce3d
describe
'38591' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBC' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
3add07873a092f02a38860721c049845
d71a94e08d70fdc8f64c1e24b274827176571009
describe
'7684647' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBD' 'sip-files00103.tif'
e92dbe4ac1b6c01d7db88682831cb920
a9371713ad895601180c38dd0f2518e99ed492f8
'2011-11-17T03:26:30-05:00'
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBE' 'sip-files00103.txt'
71b9297b9d6110ab15ea4813343767b5
65163ccdb698abc5e5ad4a61b4f7f9d53a0407dc
describe
'12421' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBF' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
f0677cb9f47f592b709bdb8bc1c41c5e
969bf9f86b2aa011ead5b8cee10e89b345fd1e6d
describe
'916688' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBG' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
020520d6ae9c2d1baede099eadae5671
f93245947ea1086c580dcf6a4111467915111ce0
describe
'109960' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBH' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
f7e5b043254f445cfc82f33d8287130a
1902fa97d766917688b85b42192be6bef351d48b
describe
'36742' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBI' 'sip-files00104.pro'
6b754a3ee7f41eb5b7e4d2eddb41dafd
c748a8609798734df10f69125494747887e8b94c
describe
'39768' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBJ' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
b6142a9caee77e93988d707b521fe616
cb860d13c530112dab1d4988c4b60639107accf9
describe
'7340435' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBK' 'sip-files00104.tif'
7b73d5e1fb820ea1e98335c2d514948e
f15d6e02875008859e89ea2dc4a3adccf292eba8
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBL' 'sip-files00104.txt'
8752e83eed07545958ae81ce90dff52a
c623109b52a78519221f380b8b643337eecfc6f5
describe
'12258' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBM' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
a1c62b406c91fac95cb0e19c2cc9639f
54044f62f8d99993b2f8248baeb4fc05bae8df8f
describe
'965446' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBN' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
ba3e8d094a535544bf482225d21dd653
43f244eac66b791a08396acce505b7bc1ee2f4dc
describe
'108581' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBO' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
637e7576dd9e471f732190590fb74a86
050e15bc067c99b3f56b36bcd1962818d6c08be1
describe
'37111' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBP' 'sip-files00105.pro'
8f9e1b41aa6844a3b7f2af17d5964ffb
4c4554c104593247901d243036fad56a54221332
describe
'39523' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBQ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
a0210e9d8a6bc8cba6c5e0f583e6c041
72d1306f3c3c58e5835bd36e0a1987a7af98093f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBR' 'sip-files00105.tif'
d7fa38e2750ab9a7e4eda4b70d677779
cdc394ee5088b2a05f83314085005794f7fda8be
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBS' 'sip-files00105.txt'
82f255c5788cbf65342ff287c2cf9448
99718b9a7981721eeb4af91910d484d47275ed55
describe
'11990' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBT' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
82395f2ad2cd2ad23fc11492c62cfc35
1ed09039001a8e3e1230cbe28eaed802508e2537
describe
'937210' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBU' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
6f5d1cb293030d9379ca02fbc0df8f17
f20195b73e75f7fb8e2b4a52deb958746c1f2d77
describe
'52184' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBV' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
4c14aa3e832ca91028d2e1b0614da75d
4d0ecdef3ff9a3743f10fbf1b5f21d560c50c585
describe
'7941' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBW' 'sip-files00106.pro'
16d1a415e84b0345cfe35e76696faccc
f24d244390452c670b7e083b177fa87b06ca0337
describe
'17286' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBX' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
7244da13d0d1783d58e9da47c3638cb9
2b1815ca29a2894eb0a31e1cec5ef0be3fb6fa44
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBY' 'sip-files00106.tif'
f66051ffece3a30e1574b034af5fbbf5
71f12afcffc97cb94379de29137ca4f60552856f
describe
'342' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQBZ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
fd6e0ee84c53de7523b3f02bec7df957
73eed3e29155f23e2b78d35b986c288c36835dfc
describe
'5493' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCA' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
7e550aed4a7cc2fe744ff164376b62c2
fde587634e2ffedd7757ebd1d47985bb41186ce9
describe
'965513' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCB' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
73e76861a6d943c7889116ae850ea340
815e55c87a5c2666a3154b7af8f979f0eae2225c
describe
'89780' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCC' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
1fc7b7be1ca943150e73ff96537d9d29
5feced02ad8bc9bf0d09686f361081b603b90fc6
describe
'29570' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCD' 'sip-files00107.pro'
3bb66a915624aba60a296d0a2a705863
87861410ab2055d5402b0a180bd00218628919dc
describe
'32420' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCE' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
6bb9be6dc2cbf9b610db20378586b0b7
d21d24f5ef8db218d729ac3134f1addbd947ea62
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCF' 'sip-files00107.tif'
8f23c085dc8cb3e135d6b4e3b7d364db
a383eff0622263b6904e816d16bf90e146d38f41
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCG' 'sip-files00107.txt'
57fcdcd3648d6f829d4e1cc3de1e1cb3
5a7481c83c8cd042c78cb5cd43ccec42ea73aead
describe
'10427' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCH' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
ee1305c6c196167e61a457060d2dffc6
7940df455b0d796f4fbd6dd6a0fbca9b0ddd4274
'2011-11-17T03:26:26-05:00'
describe
'942700' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCI' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
f4c65adf8f2314365c1a9f973c675279
e04b23af4a59f05f2905f51df8cb4c9994216219
'2011-11-17T03:25:29-05:00'
describe
'102297' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCJ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
e577fa2b05469cc10476b5621e38742a
0da4f291b7095eed497ffd99885bb90895e40203
describe
'32928' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCK' 'sip-files00108.pro'
21f8599b867934ec37ae44464732c990
5c0d09f1a54580727ce52a901c933b7db259069e
'2011-11-17T03:27:37-05:00'
describe
'37291' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCL' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
5d2bca29378419ac5b1f4c3d5122f72f
80dadf07e7faba09e784512e137b948cd3902fb4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCM' 'sip-files00108.tif'
a35f94504d5574b68957d445ab8a7f5d
1f1ecfd3177d4ac2d6d888445a4eb0a629bddab6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCN' 'sip-files00108.txt'
03ec3f1758a3ba40411594a9e7462a81
461d0898167b8e900ce2b0ebbf25cc28049dc32a
describe
'11508' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCO' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
43fcb8d3c93efcbb9aaad1471a91dbae
daf259eee2499ce0d072e2452da6dad0e41e30e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCP' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
5cdcd5420a762e07ce7627e33c92442a
2ec74363a595823e46b00c84dc703cee0e1ffde3
describe
'108124' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCQ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
4f1d5dcc51a6fda07f403afaf9e10b3b
f88ecb7387ce3bd72ab671e4d2cc09190501110d
describe
'37164' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCR' 'sip-files00109.pro'
68a075ccbf4b7b3ab59ea7f62ca36136
a8d0919c46e95850650cbd78d590bdd65deaada8
describe
'39263' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCS' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
0f21d1e754ca68a9dce149b19b0221ee
eac2e63ee4f06ac58dbd5f75dfb5263d6e94859e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCT' 'sip-files00109.tif'
d5002d73ce13dec67e6c9477fabe8695
d75c4e4eab6bb8323328c3b8b3bc3c1e8f2854bf
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCU' 'sip-files00109.txt'
465532c4617efd79f25d5af89ff1e023
44515b93496549051b982b24db8fe31c4ea053ba
describe
'12345' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCV' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
1300ef285751b31c23831b0f109cd654
43716d9475d3215498aa819a20cc695a7215fbd8
describe
'942668' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCW' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
0b6a84f9422398de4e0a39e256f739bb
22a82f1d06ab69a118523642ecef246f5ee59fb9
describe
'107271' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCX' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
9d623adda327d63fb234ef96e67a2af3
6b9577e5f6daaf5034e9aafe175c2059380ae28a
describe
'36068' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCY' 'sip-files00110.pro'
0e8215d71cdb74815cdd69718c2b397c
8f6fb42b3f0bf2b43ba0abce1c1b77f047e65355
describe
'38923' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQCZ' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
9bb6d4b7a54644cd5de8ccbcd11584dc
ac1e6f65cd17e905402d95babb9493a9457e8e13
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDA' 'sip-files00110.tif'
5b8c6fcdc4448f988c1a552944abef94
9fc80a3cc532fd6116e7de51d940a786872fc344
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDB' 'sip-files00110.txt'
fa17a83c257ed980d8debe060a855adb
e5d68e051d6a3a09b70c2f306c5613d79beea672
describe
'11818' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDC' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
5a656b386815451abf0cb32711091ef8
e5c4edef0537a30c2f35aceffc92c383337accea
'2011-11-17T03:25:58-05:00'
describe
'965443' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDD' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
3d4cee828beb56fbd185186725d11c6c
2522115472f191427880b6506ac3201c9cb3094b
describe
'98299' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDE' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
8cc3c20763b75ae7944935e33b41e155
ede74667a2d7f37ea75cdd2b4d7144ac99dad007
describe
'33084' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDF' 'sip-files00111.pro'
eea730e6cfda42e96219146eece09b11
94ffc57e8730cfd02e86556f372673d32adee360
describe
'35775' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDG' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
bb8eb655855571a86a22bf286a004ea2
9a8436aa40281c06305aa24c420ea27905066c8d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDH' 'sip-files00111.tif'
7b4a8f096864ed3e1c4cd5f5e2f24d2d
cfa8a35acd283717eab62acc419a9c37e53b50d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDI' 'sip-files00111.txt'
c0c45dcf40391becd5260461a86bfc5f
02dd25572e2af8d30a1300179fc09e4a9cb9b8d9
describe
'11625' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDJ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
5fcf31285d597e94f3642c8ed2722300
1cf2d9723fa0fe284e42b3119b7e44d9d712b173
describe
'942694' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDK' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
8b8abb9dd0434519f123b8b6e55a5747
c61d6e0303579336481cac3dd4e2f88e582fe002
describe
'97487' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDL' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3aa012641cd64813c8beda073ca077e9
dc207d7dd2dcf91cfcf1f579def3ef8a579729b3
describe
'31673' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDM' 'sip-files00112.pro'
eb93723745332670e62119b65ff7ff77
ad4edd8ae928af5a2d426a71fecd22f6696cfd88
describe
'35939' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDN' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
09cf27da771310ab19abfabf44cb4247
d2dd487fb58d18334023c9586f40caa9cf23a8e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDO' 'sip-files00112.tif'
30cc7fc3f79538dcefbddd262a5849ea
e85be880ca1b743f09b2fe0e3fb6722572611d27
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDP' 'sip-files00112.txt'
848374253baca72c25d77243b212bee2
8ef960b823ac32fdddf1c4858cfbbfd52227e19b
'2011-11-17T03:25:54-05:00'
describe
'11389' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDQ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
93cafd582ffac5ccccf14db55f94ac09
5ca07d5ffc8793af38da80875b0a65152893885d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDR' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
f80930978e13ed8b2d2d789f1f3ecd7c
b665051f22dd551461adac194744a06eb40d8595
describe
'88824' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDS' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
b4bd9d1927b291fb579a9a5d233e0c28
1e871d0f3f2cd024cf4a3c17e216a5728a5a2d86
describe
'29701' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDT' 'sip-files00113.pro'
6f40769a4657fdbe5a43c23502f83864
61b8a26747b85b84fa4016e16b82ecc3c9190ea9
describe
'32817' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDU' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
c961740bff6a70d3c8596f44e1758f40
0fbeac34854a5640e5b21b71a1e8fb306c277588
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDV' 'sip-files00113.tif'
d9e8cd1472e537855ec0c6b937888a01
47351219f34b6a58fbd50b0216fce95950571d3f
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDW' 'sip-files00113.txt'
fb241d5023bfd0ca7a2608ab6a909e17
2135ecc590d7ccd5e958685efc29b23e139e0147
describe
'10659' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDX' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
fe5486369487fea90b9015efde7bf42d
3c6e4a47453c82dd8d59977957d4e3dd3ea4cbdb
describe
'942665' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDY' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
4d8b9777aac0341bca2060b4481a92ed
b6014f1cbc70416efcef005c1ba21f0f01a267d1
describe
'81548' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQDZ' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
7b0d14340c2867e345564fab58a495f4
0dde69ff3e3433a5d21e1b2a7b988b1ebf4fc84c
describe
'25225' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEA' 'sip-files00114.pro'
0d2a5c82930d0692d962c2c01f78547c
d7b2b7e2e6fb5728ab27a72942a73a7a7bb2cba5
describe
'29962' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEB' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
d53c5c2f456a13e0051d172521ba375f
e981e97cbfc914ef2222e3ec4279faf33cd638cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEC' 'sip-files00114.tif'
49068bdba4714a1b37e257ba202141ee
f55a536004201fe5d321f7cc02f091b94e9e04e6
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQED' 'sip-files00114.txt'
c9417ea532077c6c617b8645547c59d6
3ad501bb422237263593dafc3fa439e3baee28c1
describe
'9775' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEE' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
7d9d18787cbe021adda61dc5cc390131
e4405451aa41a465c3259b9556b1283de0bc6a82
describe
'965498' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEF' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
a8675cb75f5f46e79c26ef683f8b663f
2692b2f9db444b9f124d9decd2f342e872077570
describe
'98606' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEG' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
24066b796b1fcb0435a624b3293e645c
dd8ae7a83dfc9eb7dbf4e00d8e68cc8a9234a823
describe
'32250' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEH' 'sip-files00115.pro'
0d3aa75242ce47de8c0da3a2f8919715
244a7da5c12da8de5790a2fcaf437fc716150980
describe
'35651' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEI' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
0cc6e844a47ed71426c8741208adcdbf
01a92fdc9f4ce4d65aeee7a829f769da2262d99f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEJ' 'sip-files00115.tif'
c56914673667d14ab627113ec455682e
85d0fea61987597d47ebd053a6cc39fed2fd5ecf
'2011-11-17T03:29:10-05:00'
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEK' 'sip-files00115.txt'
2824fd12d34b142b6f6a528248da6bb2
b81e239c5a0c4d74ab05862a5c4f893494795890
describe
'11623' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEL' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
14c009419ef109c1c4429f4631ff28b4
dea847b6eb01748e762f8fda22e7e1f212d74895
describe
'942671' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEM' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
f75098a2ef131a2768959420ee9db0f2
4524dd7dbe6493b0e51f4d40454502ce3901c1a4
describe
'76097' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEN' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
9862e414b0589be5cf57d2a028a5e5ad
a7e389633128371e18c3a87ac6b625926979c939
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEO' 'sip-files00116.pro'
c4a12f9547c4877196e2796cafbc4606
5d310dc1b0adec2b24906d48ac66bb735b900bc7
describe
'22245' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEP' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
91d0adcc2a92567db06252a81f5565fe
01e4802a02ed1a48d453806154f6794a2aaadc2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEQ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
a8627b1a429c7075b109cf3b4928bd12
b38861c5fcc75e8651f9d6da3e1b546f8f724c29
describe
'65' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQER' 'sip-files00116.txt'
240db450a9462e1d90ec76878385cdd2
2f0259ecb9aef23d47cfcf05eb094afee69d5905
describe
'7039' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQES' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
edb785b8a812c3a50ca75afcb91f4169
92dd901b7113e3ab665b245356d0890297d83c24
describe
'965581' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQET' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
66a37b4ca2c142c1ae3743eb44212592
181e152949947f9b4c5fd8f0c5600447e87595be
describe
'108156' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEU' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
dff264fdc7dc2dc0591b9b780b3133b6
fdd31fa22c30d6b6795dc6c5f544db3fe38c47aa
describe
'37349' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEV' 'sip-files00117.pro'
4184094e21fdd91c0fef173c23682b7f
95e99addfb295592ca90e01522817d4208fc38c9
describe
'39626' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEW' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
9d7d6fcb3e25a117b2228c6dea72d1d5
caaa00e4d7646d22afced7d7f3e7e4ab039a5a64
describe
'7734011' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEX' 'sip-files00117.tif'
f28fda251ed0e6c0d56deb9026666bdd
92b0d5dfdc49e0868bc6511395d3080ad908be3d
'2011-11-17T03:27:24-05:00'
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEY' 'sip-files00117.txt'
496b3767658be2209bcb6e2cc71e1ee2
4d90f8982882f2c5e16420067996429fba243f80
describe
'12166' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQEZ' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
2dd529c5ed692addaa24dceacc1f544c
48ff0b4c299f9339ffe61ebfcde08f28f134cff6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFA' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
254a6c0f43da37ea96ddd627916868b5
f438e162d19d657b0c9e05933847e4254192009f
describe
'105444' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFB' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
d88586efcfd9fea0c17d84bbabce8d51
e4f7bd150727119919343560b6c437e55b58fa8d
describe
'35661' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFC' 'sip-files00118.pro'
2b802668d09259ca5e3dd3487ebe0a67
c956820339ddc474f90bfbca9d414d2c7ed578bf
describe
'39163' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFD' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
5338e3b352a02979dbefb93e65b36f66
2fb652f12207b5ce6a6ac43dc5ad74c80e4beba4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFE' 'sip-files00118.tif'
e537b72c9633daa57a3ff02630e0ea2a
ea9314678f3da2c39425860ed4c6fe7fa4807798
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFF' 'sip-files00118.txt'
5cc613ab159f55e48542509b7cd6496a
4b7ff067b3252d8c16733623e4d7e86744ba3435
describe
'12086' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFG' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
c7f14b3d15507ac0ba47aa799ae49a72
4180c4b75d7ea395e98e6f20f7bbadd3a3f8c54c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFH' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
559c60d06f8c7a014613b669f2e86297
b008c331261f12fc7455a9b11b8d3ae17a1b02e5
describe
'105564' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFI' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
baa20118cfe1c26ab24f7643616dc695
5539023b1e4e9cf201b23818f4e207be2a2cf7af
'2011-11-17T03:24:47-05:00'
describe
'35522' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFJ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
3a9191412279d5ed1191011d325e52ca
baa18d1a4f98ee4e180f9afe342de76172d5b4b4
describe
'38026' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFK' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
323b97458edd0e75df64a32522891502
50691828a6e6219abd02e97e2a551c0ae5b0487d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFL' 'sip-files00119.tif'
79ab0e82bbfff568d0c69a09abf78d78
ce2bff5a73a516410e55f43ae9d18e46a0e3df51
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFM' 'sip-files00119.txt'
6c6368946ae3dafb71936f624dfbcd5e
9b74cec9a3cbbdc356191c14ede480510bcf7e74
describe
'11824' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFN' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
c572938dc014504742e59f18f0d5eee8
04db23e628905fa0e26c19fc6178fb7e9e9a2021
describe
'942709' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFO' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
7045c0ce2a46df1024489837bb9d9854
aaaaddbc411dc75c3af081f71f9c11a3716fd4bf
describe
'100106' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFP' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
a09d19c4120dd380ac414c2a9485d599
22e7a1460d5091bb57afce4ece04de395d467219
describe
'33522' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFQ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
81e028d28202e29e19c9f335af2d6a3b
6d26e692faba00fd77338b017d4e1b9ab3ed34cb
describe
'36897' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFR' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
1ca3b8cd66467ce303d74ddc3fa81c83
23e469efd8ba3b3ea0fd61e3e726f1b7fbdc7329
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFS' 'sip-files00120.tif'
bbd2fe8d82bb888676bb0f2adc3f47bc
c455eff7ce6f2b194269ce2b72c7f9ca9dbe9072
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFT' 'sip-files00120.txt'
1afd2ca761ec95495c02cfc5cf2a636b
19801ab77891f5100cbd0bed582c9a01a8ea63b5
describe
'11060' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFU' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
38dd9d41eee5f61abc11bee86334fb70
068ffa1e0647f379f4f182284a5b0f15193f9c7c
'2011-11-17T03:25:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFV' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
a51c4aa2286cce28ad01e8665db6a345
9c732041b86c5be80174073ff65dfd6303448342
describe
'91324' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFW' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
441482c1f848f51d0294f599f729e9db
d672fed1021e928b55d36bf07cbd6fe5b3953af9
describe
'29888' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFX' 'sip-files00121.pro'
b2c38c5617409dc72e138e62a82c5eae
b70eb3d55f16d96b9e02232dfde876f77317a88c
describe
'33303' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFY' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
b5b60505c3cfeed06b333b992bc69af3
ff0a670686722c81ef846a9c6ea5ba93df244ebd
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQFZ' 'sip-files00121.tif'
cc05eed518a6c7d07c4ca1323dd38e36
d59a7822b0293873cfd79984dff7553371cadb21
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGA' 'sip-files00121.txt'
180d498e2faddbef33bfd86fae05f027
1c0c662256fc6a6a9596a3911f10de6275cafb69
describe
'10684' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGB' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
6bf89e14094fb867aee5ca2c03cb73e9
1edbcbaf00fcf0308fffd0833d79118f71505629
describe
'942696' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGC' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
4fa1e4278afbd0f4dd82accd32d5d692
17acb144a1fa2dc5f1808aa2d17d3899ed320861
'2011-11-17T03:29:59-05:00'
describe
'102250' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGD' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
150ea37e768cf97f847a35fb8a3e056c
311582da7a002501bb8d160d64be735245390acc
describe
'33667' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGE' 'sip-files00122.pro'
f2e877d360597d5f2440dc9c6f448ef1
787b08ac543e67c497c515d3df0d53c2dce21f5e
describe
'38497' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGF' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
08a4511b5a9ffe6c2336722cf75e3304
8b99dbd7447d83a422166e4323ec52b9709061e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGG' 'sip-files00122.tif'
c63f03c6c40c07d1cc3716e6076194bb
0771298fd61beb1e49c28e69bc05a4f22b450903
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGH' 'sip-files00122.txt'
ddd747830fffcddf40710e910c4de29a
b18e9e3967a51d5210f0f012e9b576d9668381f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGI' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
2575a6c0a5a1bb139f1430d99f6e14db
6eebfd0212426188ec2fc8b54236a7408c9cc87d
describe
'965470' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGJ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
63ee0a877c6f065c4c8845ab79d616d6
a2382950e79fad5139203d104b9e974c7597b5d0
describe
'94877' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGK' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
604068cd4fc19c855239b3546356c5e4
43f16459be81e60dc7c41a1dc4f76c78358f4568
describe
'31921' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGL' 'sip-files00123.pro'
40a998693af218c30739dfec7d20ee0b
ce505ca2440b594b4333af98543b265c6ab56b70
describe
'35368' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGM' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
0f3e1dce7c85d1f65e9acd4a86303396
077f3444c71b8358dcd23841f70ec02dbc55fb7e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGN' 'sip-files00123.tif'
e6b276f6c94a53dbd8a06d82c4e5464f
c15234d1dbcd29d7a354eb77547ae29054b59de3
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGO' 'sip-files00123.txt'
7a2d61adfbd7c75a623272dfd9ff1c03
920aeb1899365006a9cb187c7a39fdf0b1c29778
describe
'11169' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGP' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
19bf0e617016ba73db9838b528a2bb10
60430956c4faf68081241bf056cd94323e28266c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGQ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
48e6fd0b647ece79d92d21dedc5fcd3f
969e19f5bda964895d55c6275cf9a39e88fc4f69
'2011-11-17T03:28:21-05:00'
describe
'104930' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGR' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
3b593d23ebd14f5b1c9c9804ce0f8614
61e0e5a1057fc00a99cb51b8d83ca8f3ce5d1c8e
describe
'35351' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGS' 'sip-files00124.pro'
7a295e422ded71fffdad83ea3620927c
3262e07cf41c5a61e41ad33b563e775723ec9f88
describe
'38451' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGT' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
4d4cb8627bec5b0121fe22538bf23601
bd3a707a356157a709c2d0c39fb901a08319b8ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGU' 'sip-files00124.tif'
d3e80b50ce64b420a2460fe2ebe17c14
b77650189a711586abbba2ab1d546b4b0715c2cd
'2011-11-17T03:29:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGV' 'sip-files00124.txt'
f49069d11d33373fab506b2de1560064
ef88ede0a969bc84d31bae9d465625f5be81df20
describe
'11710' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGW' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
241af4832e7799a5ef8c18022138cdcd
89f7d65d693536a15ead0c5ef5bcea46772504af
describe
'965494' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGX' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
ac7f8adca597f7bd1e4ca8bfe64b5fe4
723564c2720b5a123a333f75430b008850c15c63
describe
'99444' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGY' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
bec11689209a7a44cc4704539bbefa06
d859d9530d8c9571613a96ebf596169def41ebff
describe
'33488' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQGZ' 'sip-files00125.pro'
593eee5f006d49302d9f6a9b51872e92
9b9bc1854d6720349520e52a7cf070ed26f39873
describe
'36639' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHA' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
571c3d85d8ed129c0ebd808520e70027
6dab929037ab325b806373b83bdef079614f4622
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHB' 'sip-files00125.tif'
d79c6c72083b143ab2c23d697b7acc5b
de9a64c529e92e4f6be6f5ff5cd92ec328bb8289
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHC' 'sip-files00125.txt'
8674b05f2594a6482d20ddb97eca68a3
880f1bc3111ed9f7dcfe418f7f121fe43247691e
describe
'11611' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHD' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
170976ad2f3353a93cb97620b7c1786d
006e7841e913ba680676ef83d48ed541481acdab
'2011-11-17T03:28:30-05:00'
describe
'942560' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHE' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
df814b6b415bdb725da44d1882ee2714
a1b44f361d206ec4136125c91f0ea2ace8f87c8b
describe
'101379' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHF' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
ad2e2388a6be42df8b04608d95015673
30e809ca87bb31e6fe0d36498d5e86fde99e63f9
describe
'33986' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHG' 'sip-files00126.pro'
8a29ac7e3e363387f69e20dc76170a13
51dce7ab23500abd14b554785b146a2184012a30
describe
'37991' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHH' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
f98827a6cb64acca07545996d5f14603
f30796ef6e6b7554a887c09f7f32fd18554ec8bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHI' 'sip-files00126.tif'
098323ae3cc50accffab2992b904e249
d2b586834d8d669f32ed6c4da8ce59c605b52bc5
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHJ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
5ae55f1538317636131777da8e6e3df7
ef1ea168fc94971cc3cebd901767255256b2d1bc
describe
'11711' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHK' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
ba992362fb0a11ec56b188de39608d39
0a8842e9036a8a88a06fdf38aef7d45a3688ab64
describe
'965488' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHL' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
8a5fef9f44b6c15e5a6b452755ced045
04515433faf507b3e7fae6d39dc7bb1d6fbff383
describe
'73786' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHM' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
7be1d20b28b8e26ebadf9e6e0315883d
030c8bb6b9e08836726cf2fd4fa004e43df36f08
describe
'16124' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHN' 'sip-files00127.pro'
03d006bb20124d03b282ad8c7fac5e6a
d6e2cb660787d3526c86d7f0baff8f01b6fca77f
describe
'25568' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHO' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
57593916e2fb1466f614c1932dce96ec
68bb45fcbcf57a2517004b69fe64679ca0314504
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHP' 'sip-files00127.tif'
b7bb23788e1a471641b5bb16966cc7e8
4f8b44102cb3181abfe68fb6bf9ce05da949de73
describe
'663' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHQ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
94d1d25dc117490929af7391a3025a10
ee075dcf84f6d66ec003a67ff70d1989d716ab82
describe
'8609' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHR' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
37a0174e549dee2ffa190dc0356cfb0c
fea05b3af5d0cbc30a749e7e89f546da0bc5ff4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHS' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
167ab87615ac5f40b7bcf47686d8dddb
f225d05162d619de35423d7bfebdf986f4f00da9
describe
'92282' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHT' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
a1682b663dd3edc8b6bcfa49518428a0
6808a7ce893ba4ed1c52bf904ebc1f057c92f313
describe
'29378' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHU' 'sip-files00128.pro'
b4fa258d6a911e710c559feb658fc612
500a03b8b8672066eb97cf44564d1203407994ce
describe
'33804' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHV' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
d034ae912bc4603607202a155e63e58c
101341788f9015264b680c76e3fca7fbd9fa7bfb
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHW' 'sip-files00128.tif'
cf7f554f8b33e0c0f3bfb0836c898ef9
7c9754235d6f121fcd31d3abb1fda7cdb148d064
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHX' 'sip-files00128.txt'
300b9737d29a2b886581a3ea3767761b
59e6b6196b6fe34fe5e776cb7755d9ef5724dd70
describe
'10354' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHY' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
294b982cb7907ad3a6c18972d0802446
ec769dfae915c32a86da7931f71de9fd043684ba
describe
'965356' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQHZ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
69017d1a6ef02da3f98677b5ca4b8171
e34eb4de7edf34c853f4cd81c4a8d17ab5251791
describe
'101907' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIA' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
6f224962a03ba9956c51beec2e1279b8
386da5a86f68c78d83ba424a7e5bbbe1e278e530
describe
'34573' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIB' 'sip-files00129.pro'
916cc3da7f6276975343864a15dd64d2
8556696dc62aac2c6f63ca8f8ea336f55e01c8ce
describe
'37651' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIC' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
0ea1df33a7baa37da9855dc4cd74974c
464162b2c4b222e0e4b9ec5cce4b93fe7e9345bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQID' 'sip-files00129.tif'
3714383c93dacbfc2a29f7874e7d8be3
3de80f16df304bdd60831da7c64f83ccb6891ceb
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIE' 'sip-files00129.txt'
7599668222043d0253677b496df8aa1b
f100bf5c8c05b38dcbdc053f48c29aebdd1994e1
describe
'11320' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIF' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
c86a23c8cedb7f83ca45e1aabaf5dd72
7b8d0ddc7312279af02deeba7140ec3a99f9f325
describe
'942704' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIG' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
eb9c309cc57dab99ea3f7886ac7683b6
eae6dd1cbb1eced5fa11a382174ee139dcac93ec
describe
'96130' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIH' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
5fbc9f8e33dfc6869dc257a23615638b
fb28a1f6b23b20afbf8680298ab11a5039172734
describe
'31186' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQII' 'sip-files00130.pro'
e0759267dc31cac22d818a63dac8cf51
76f95e9987eb36551445e8db1a9b212050043c0c
describe
'35515' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIJ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
562ba997380d399933c22215693391dc
c93a0c024a57bf8427d16ad800d9299e0ff0fd58
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIK' 'sip-files00130.tif'
2ec33123c7cbd0f6c707c501dc68763a
69e96bd60423c5472693b684c37afaa9dca622bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIL' 'sip-files00130.txt'
cedaae4a3851342ec421cf07dc80db86
ff1d7a5caec52c376732fde12626b6744f17ec1d
describe
'11192' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIM' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
e4d2bb99628fd2f203d850c9b40fb84d
f72d002d854b787f6246916dc2a7e72f305a6301
describe
'965435' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIN' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
1c12f591c3a6d52d6256d07e307d61ad
ddce7e9abc66470847fb511003599bc9ec196242
describe
'101405' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIO' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
9466285ebccf41dc56fec7209d4bf83d
15ba9a983a6cce159a59f03117fd152d71f1a739
describe
'33706' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIP' 'sip-files00131.pro'
df8246b7152253c8e3e5ea14a1ca41dd
3e7f933d71f32fbbceff1a4410c3a8f203ead87f
describe
'36842' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIQ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
fd60591f1ce04fae4f9be9342ef31d8c
514d01285fd65a474941ffbe53e64052928c457f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIR' 'sip-files00131.tif'
73849c6da35e68f33d0559aaf9016d26
9f8980721795ea0f5478c9bb826ab5fd2aa9881a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIS' 'sip-files00131.txt'
43b0b9bc98483e6362a7ff37f3d2fe36
63ce127e04691badaa8a0956a7f1ed39f186c8da
describe
'11972' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIT' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
64c6c0f9731469b13b80b9832e04be83
1f16ebf753f4418d8a4d887305e0226c163b0b97
describe
'942675' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIU' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
fdf00aa84f7c588edc41bf3a441026a9
95cb49af65749dec182d167d29405aa86f1bc0d2
describe
'91848' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIV' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
c0c3da41057a5ceac2687c6654b197bb
adbf3a8f5fd87e946992df628dc2cff56f4a96b2
'2011-11-17T03:27:07-05:00'
describe
'29495' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIW' 'sip-files00132.pro'
d5a140e2bf918ead8d4d75cd1774d9ad
68f753dee42376e508aefcb421c437667b350d3d
describe
'34390' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIX' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
2b42f27d842aa6a39e2564248dfc42c1
2db45bba9b13b2aefa470509d133c77b07276291
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIY' 'sip-files00132.tif'
6013129c8ebc7fdbf69bec97763e432c
e016d4cb3b8d5ed8165f2fe7346b674a233bf0f5
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQIZ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
ebecea37a77bf76a675ad9f7db18b886
96063fa904a8d1c6661c8f564cc8d1e66cb7a18f
describe
'10988' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJA' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
cfa6ea1dd5d0be33d3d5c925c68ee1be
552244974a6fc25e3727004462b55edfc2876bfb
describe
'965364' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJB' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
83710c23c0b850fae0427cc823b45d6d
636ffdbb821b6057b75532939ab0560662e2a25b
describe
'96238' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJC' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
daf98868a5620c2dde053bf1e8491f42
b62a9768b7a62ce51fb911863d386ab102bf22d5
describe
'31639' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJD' 'sip-files00133.pro'
e58c0743dfa5f0e52fa8fc7119eae1bc
4f997320b47ef1b1f013fd8c9860737caf25c767
describe
'35069' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJE' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
9f398f400f106635a70364753d766259
b757d85300583e1987144bc3d7ed480fefb92f25
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJF' 'sip-files00133.tif'
ad4cd16011f4e157fba8bca56a774eff
46f9ab6d3a427bc4d19954af872813c9fd80910c
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJG' 'sip-files00133.txt'
0087c5e27a4d5543efbde7224b039af4
a1f9960631e0669d9fbbde942672dd71ae0dea72
describe
'11607' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJH' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
9cae8dee1718f242078f53d93599512b
82b945faabca46dcec313e262122b5749d0fdf5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJI' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
2387dab5ab930c09bb346e4cb6a86139
345ead8bf14e2fc8362449df17a1a57a3e99f87f
describe
'96211' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJJ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
cb8a0bcf05e0015ddf1df76e2f9b4d9f
0ea962dc48dd3b058ba0f79b331eebd9c4b9a1d1
describe
'31872' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJK' 'sip-files00134.pro'
ff4b224053f9503792555fdb38a2f96d
26e36d26b59d9af97bf9e92ba4ff524974fff1be
describe
'36183' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJL' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
70f0e04ea073b510eb7f87788e35b4fa
f4a2537e168bbbc5c52242b358899fb053e178d5
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJM' 'sip-files00134.tif'
211594bd562e36af7121600ebd46862a
1ac1a674c74627e1fa913887a374ed1f6b0dab6d
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJN' 'sip-files00134.txt'
555766a459f702c22b24a92c1cbade00
08d450f2b2a61bc98e2ee9f38c8ce95e65c2ed87
describe
'11317' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJO' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
1270c133424ac5e11dd94057a0638bd7
0c5080d02c6bee3986c9064ca1581691b3853d3f
describe
'965309' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJP' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
1d58bf97e60ed4ca0928316c53905d79
7f58f35049a4f758173fa34749a9d3b44137d743
describe
'79390' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJQ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
f09f51a9033586c469fdf719e2053c87
6ad3348c62ffa23037502cf4b299f82df21bbf12
describe
'14707' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJR' 'sip-files00135.pro'
5514dc51882b716f1787f7030fdb9a9d
5410eb2521327965f895710e7794cf2bdaebbe45
'2011-11-17T03:26:55-05:00'
describe
'25851' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJS' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
c9cf7c7abc9bb69ec4b82dc7c6df9e55
3dbc195e8bcb5cc1e162c56f2609a22d39ed1ccd
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJT' 'sip-files00135.tif'
bbecf9c4e35639ee84c48de6f346cb96
9d05a4086a8b87b75f5286515601d2cb18d115a9
describe
'598' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJU' 'sip-files00135.txt'
6faa7abb8c7ce921c1036968ce7c2322
f306d0a0d75f5b0e7822d027bde1036bdb2ff9b1
describe
'8305' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJV' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
8814aaa1385e65e12dbaab87aaaf97c2
4a30ffc65edcd55355a4e385bb56c7140f39b68a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJW' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
7ac66ebca46c063f003c49812a6d488c
656797be75eb0e8ad1e7e317519064b90fb70e73
'2011-11-17T03:24:54-05:00'
describe
'90657' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJX' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
e7ee4cfe5d171129999341c4a7f45648
cc96391ae9c6e35427852bdad1f927928c9a07f2
describe
'28985' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJY' 'sip-files00136.pro'
6f9cb1436df056f7e8768a5be8952cf3
25df1055a50884201403d65575ebfa9ae2510952
describe
'33352' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQJZ' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
fc66afb288bf10d9ec24ef866d9fe2d2
b176d7e9ce08a093e4409ef686dee5e55672f6c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKA' 'sip-files00136.tif'
515cef9ed5b8eefd0d0443b3d92b1cbf
099a1e03a1d26f16b30c4c69c9d37a416ea773f1
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKB' 'sip-files00136.txt'
6de28e656a2ae687f21e88e664668545
ca335239cfb816c6e274bc9568291814baa1f08e
describe
'10438' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKC' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
b7c841b49309311e5224f80ae6a58b44
f09899c247555f64f34b44465ce65cd7dbe5a451
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKD' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
134ae45fea1e60a6599769cdf7a1784c
51e39c18d11545bf9c1eb0fd29dd7de0c5e3e70b
describe
'97896' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKE' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
13ad257581f10c061b6e99edc039a042
7b62378359521cbe7ebd7cbe591c59c89930eded
describe
'32738' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKF' 'sip-files00137.pro'
fa9f8f9d5ee2ea19b5324f3e03858fb4
1d12f7ed65fdfdb22815d5942d73c06c8b52b2b6
describe
'35600' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKG' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
097ab262787c29521b7cac0c549e6c5b
1bf5670fb5a5619c7a9d7ba1a62327900bb69d3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKH' 'sip-files00137.tif'
b25a92b8b7b529429233a45ec39dd879
a4d2e4d1a1826b7c7f75dd7c6d3e9edb9bf488ee
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKI' 'sip-files00137.txt'
5950d91353fb29ac2793a07bbb95d02f
f99f25a33288419e5344e7d4c6c089d7fec1981e
describe
'11315' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKJ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
b2ccd8bf31b9411244c98b0b0ba119d7
6ab39b1fbf1172c6f408bb10c93bf29ebfc7530a
describe
'942692' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
edeb69b04eb885f1dae15fbe250cd0be
7feb92cd980c3de404a9b2fd27c646c3533a9eb9
describe
'101651' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKL' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
c6ffab7552f0af0a88259fa321fd8342
ddf097852ebbb7fe8e89cf6ddd861fdf0bf4c519
describe
'33947' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKM' 'sip-files00138.pro'
52799c07c14ca153e2b26a0409b9a5d4
dfd821b601b17d1fa85ab04fcd177226706ca7ee
describe
'38062' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKN' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
f16d26f157eb87ec9668d9231926027d
fca1b0a2c6aac36941e2e3fb54eb931cd6142b5f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKO' 'sip-files00138.tif'
904c6df2cc01a0a41629e9353639feb0
e48dbd64602a5758f942c7cbe078cda28e975cac
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKP' 'sip-files00138.txt'
2bdd71079c7bc3cd95ad5475f75bda62
bd4052f14a9ffc832558b20e9d93bb271bfb7cbe
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKQ' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
167a70c901ea6edaba232d93637802e1
9dd0836f94473285030e6761a6a4ce525febcc3c
describe
'987941' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKR' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
ef60b3cf9b01c9219a7272c1c7de921a
93aaa6f41de747c1997da33cf32fa0480fb417ab
describe
'104165' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKS' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
d0ad24c2a2d32c300cebbffd64bfe625
805b293fe6cb7b30e214749081c09ba5c9674a7e
describe
'35781' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKT' 'sip-files00139.pro'
1ac8a132a167c8f0919834bc76b1a69d
7ed9ce18697b382e32bdbe1475652aca6675a8f4
describe
'37696' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKU' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
193a478cc1b93f06de918553e05ae2a7
c3853a7ec1dfb88c31674d54367a2936b04c3dcf
describe
'7913049' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKV' 'sip-files00139.tif'
b5b75de2de456b982109de99debdd639
eb7286db6e66ea3bcb53618a0a69cf2b2b2f5833
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKW' 'sip-files00139.txt'
190c4167cb15bf571bbb19c67662f5cc
f24e10e3787bcb174793078260507ff3d9751975
describe
'11609' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKX' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
2b835304bc8341f07762152531c4663f
bef7147a34f7d0993437010605f599f599cc0d4f
describe
'880341' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKY' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
b55971097de69f0b5bd6b463e636163b
ec04b1174c351f2f2e648ce3e00dc641e21999e6
describe
'99185' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQKZ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
9e340aa173b856cee5749ba62c3e8391
0c7025f115e654c509da152f0ce330e24c2b885a
describe
'32413' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLA' 'sip-files00140.pro'
3f0ded983a56923197c9825e56a8f95b
c71cb042ae47e88399dd9c8e861ec2cc4a4676ef
describe
'36017' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLB' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
3d0c5be48bcb0006926ccf8fcaa68210
cd6b50e043af0a8f01ecb6b5a95f8265a8c1dab8
describe
'7049423' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLC' 'sip-files00140.tif'
e4860ef983dce0242fc57480e0b96c7a
e7ad3f005a10a6afa3d50843a96e679760fe36e2
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLD' 'sip-files00140.txt'
3a9db00e27e00b54135b6f868badc048
ac1f6813000cc626c78063223905d42313877e10
describe
'12904' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLE' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
351f06b532396b3e835c07c90024f474
51e03f33b72739168e4eae8019d240064705f88b
describe
'969319' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLF' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
9c48aac44c78be03bc32ca387eecee1c
169fd636449f147bc6cc25970f28814a0d89cead
describe
'93328' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLG' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
715ff0174c60a49943bed521e601079f
1389c44aa13ea9e6215e3b2adac9486828b0480c
describe
'30578' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLH' 'sip-files00141.pro'
7a23c481e77ff76958f473fcb8fc5a7d
d84f3422eb7e9b886b3a8a72f8e0ec765efef224
describe
'34439' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLI' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
fe3eb7d72063b19dd29c6e4a8c863df6
ee90d45ebb96542ed65a494e77f654f2c0ccc3d0
describe
'7763907' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLJ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
785b0df1da1a00b4a4c6f5862b46ee10
c0cb04644d755267cbf086c445d118396a9a681c
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLK' 'sip-files00141.txt'
c20b3fde2707222691280b3cc44fb3e2
f67cd4df87d660ffaadf80e25a45fdf7a5974cfa
describe
'11204' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLL' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
7aa92538420fa0783920e3b9cc0f276c
32eaac479995f9b7b982b69d89ffaa7247fa339f
describe
'882521' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLM' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
7fa9dcc57861cb443be5eeddf52e4341
59ac30926bea57951383a42bbf047b6b9bf65527
'2011-11-17T03:30:04-05:00'
describe
'91576' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLN' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
0a08361a1f28bd414e773844be40f5ac
80117d94987f5e5c2f00fb1634835a3f5bbdbcab
describe
'29700' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLO' 'sip-files00142.pro'
8f982fb53340f85593a32f3bc383fded
a5cc2fe446ed5a2c1f3b0ebf33bccf8855212fe9
describe
'33976' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLP' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
d0844d05791d6fd180ae8b1b5325521a
309a3077c9981b7cb8aa4bcdd6278562891a0dc7
describe
'7067003' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLQ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e490358e59709e3f910ebb936d7e5b0c
45119201339f261e48e10c10a59d2fcb3d8e4f74
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLR' 'sip-files00142.txt'
383cb9d9a9b999e87b76d5f11a0bf50b
5945fc4c8e9e3741534397ea35b634b602f4264d
describe
'11228' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLS' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
915be09653851a14531baec3d04fe83f
21d2c549caa43e8837227bff5e6599c8f43ba1e6
describe
'945802' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLT' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
6dd1f1c182d17298864d435e352b3155
c97b41a4a63994df20c907bd8886b584e658c6a7
describe
'82306' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLU' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
eab6369bac36b24306c5b0da04544c0c
792763fd0eaa40ccff690c3f44ab7b11286aa4bd
describe
'26289' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLV' 'sip-files00143.pro'
ff0f2cca521f9487c16ae04984e23fd6
e5f6a93ad8e4dd1bc8e9026c1b01bb5b2f4e63a6
describe
'29592' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLW' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
d3c788163561369da208a0b71a257780
10d60fcb1849ade1c67ab60edfa57048c74b61ff
describe
'7573611' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLX' 'sip-files00143.tif'
e0d307d5617ac5f6d0a83216ee922f4e
0c17dbc4a4d9c0056e1ddb1693c87295cbac9aa3
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLY' 'sip-files00143.txt'
1dacd43afc2bf5daef6ef715f97725e1
7b044097054393a425f4e79e38151e347a629a3c
describe
'10584' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQLZ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
944eb67b6a717972f4257db835ad0ec8
1d40b0fde1e7af2b9f2842164de5ccff57261073
describe
'883272' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMA' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
a4156f18a0b7509fbf82a0d3c94e094f
c78f3261681960dfecdaf5fceb1ad3fcfb021466
describe
'93977' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMB' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
c4cfdd2ccc5ba8854fdb5d0d8859890b
f8be3cd15b9562702b2222b1c8470ca3b19b9400
describe
'32101' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMC' 'sip-files00144.pro'
2f73fa783a2bdca408d2a7542aaf97cd
ed9001c7bebbcb607c29666ccf26b8a1e1b88489
describe
'35408' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMD' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
3d9e099c2c2a2242cf3f1afdecd83598
d513128acd04ec5b6c7370c6f7b048e28c093cb1
describe
'7073051' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQME' 'sip-files00144.tif'
3bcc3f786475fd7a553d9734331fb2f7
f9c6fbf22740d752c00a34a101fc434788bc3e38
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMF' 'sip-files00144.txt'
a3bb710c56a0ede5ed303b25b687846b
67277d7e12a26fbbfb218ef95936e10a0a1532f4
describe
'12062' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMG' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
44d1ec727c4df47a813393b9773f513f
9f9c2bc683630e0ef2f54b40503b4c32d7546bf0
describe
'923475' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMH' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
2f7d23ed8d9cadee8a6e95957fa03c02
77468882011a6925f7e8c02be7935531fbc9a63d
describe
'92315' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMI' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
fd9e6d15d31d33b5bd77bc64374afc97
869d0136c168cafb44f711a486d79b97673587cb
describe
'31106' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMJ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
97ff81aee320381f43dc38e146920966
61c1a107f490cd15669748d01738de2d479957d4
describe
'33619' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMK' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
8daf20fc74e5078ca9d126142c15bb72
eb9ce11502543e8339290012362f38ce46967798
describe
'7394773' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQML' 'sip-files00145.tif'
412477566d18f89136ea86192d53d32a
b059ceddf7ae3a855416b6a3988b6d9f9575eb3a
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMM' 'sip-files00145.txt'
f8ea27b81ef936b445ba7b20331b1855
d83b504f8b96dc963508a6848858296c59355334
describe
'12349' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMN' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
0793b8d0c3a884b0dfafaa454dcca3d3
d891bf3c1443845b83e6c850ca8072c6f2f93470
describe
'870248' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMO' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
610afa0b5b6f369c2f83c763444e91c4
b91b5cdfd42a5d98eb02568339ca0d17135f0d65
describe
'96825' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMP' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
4534ea9e37a54267b08a4be907fa6c3b
e935753fbb9d695f1c97ef77d58fab371701c137
describe
'31097' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMQ' 'sip-files00146.pro'
88b4ddf8adca97fee2931a6e6c3d3437
c3b32be6d407301921b8ca4d23e58bb92ee5d47b
describe
'36505' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMR' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
aa232c9fdbfecc2e838340308de19365
f14e9e836cb6ac0b7cd810eac34adbb30a8123c3
describe
'6968707' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMS' 'sip-files00146.tif'
020c98415c89f907beffdc58c83e0b58
48cb3bb9ea4954636fd30bfae39504ec6821a8c4
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMT' 'sip-files00146.txt'
613c935eadc4dce532863c6f4b0a0916
5477800096d70fba47b610639bb82c319e797042
describe
'12742' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMU' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
ae994c98e5520d4d184b5202e495b83a
cb6409f5d5d9ed22b02a445a3a0b4b86bdad4d59
describe
'959787' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMV' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
c81a349e36e34efb207259538ab38745
fa3bd00fe72f50880f930fec660033fb95feca1c
describe
'103569' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMW' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
cf649893f7fbb4de1767053163bef9ce
4f65fdc0b9c8def3b27062b34dab9650b308cdef
describe
'33530' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMX' 'sip-files00147.pro'
b4e07eaff96f2a9f8c17fb7e9e880d42
78f6509d3dba92c4abb29c06d8075c2eba963979
describe
'38656' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMY' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
413b35ba2c5bf6501949b7425d0a85de
a7227dc078634b4cc50870080be1da12bfcac891
'2011-11-17T03:29:20-05:00'
describe
'7687519' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQMZ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
0f56ad35612dcd5d21d45bab0d70761d
5767db08af873bf8163753b61af15bedfb380ceb
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNA' 'sip-files00147.txt'
c407f21277863219aff4a326bb74456e
c1ab5c7eabf239d3bf9b3072dc3c740f1ec9fce3
describe
'11732' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNB' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
1d60466e9a94e2f7c04541d6ac2025e1
46d5b2236354c2b026efca2b25ca60c6b859c8aa
'2011-11-17T03:27:36-05:00'
describe
'964093' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNC' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
984e54fc6ec86e2935a874d409e8ed8c
0e0016fe22651b95d69a1ef5d44925d34b764012
describe
'100396' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQND' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
922bf3db8c771c20c64d1dd4e4608b1f
95710ab0c434ae68edb57e898b0168db0d363ab0
describe
'32915' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNE' 'sip-files00148.pro'
a1a678b64ed652b3b004261bee0aa645
6e403644ba616e51d95317025faac738d6177beb
describe
'36840' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNF' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
383a8b990f3f4d5e33c08e668cf47b54
42cf844d82731cdee3b5ec5199e8035fdbdcf36a
describe
'7721989' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNG' 'sip-files00148.tif'
f8a3b9d7ea4200664189f40daf00f6cb
e75aac716fb50f24f64638b378c91aa249fcc30d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNH' 'sip-files00148.txt'
ed942f21d0473c35aeb83940d528fa7e
be97a041d2666f4b31f1eb6ce636806a567c1a42
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNI' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
85b4720654bfaf837966ed9ba817b232
512bde53a15c6f21e0d6914c9703d450aaa8a6cd
describe
'895577' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNJ' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
cc3dbec9bc178117734bf74f0ca5f83f
43866a1700f4d671fe07ba7d4edb4e20280c6832
describe
'105392' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNK' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
03759558bacdb45b6916f3e5591eea57
e1b09cff2264d97458a02e249957f211941ecf47
describe
'35162' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNL' 'sip-files00149.pro'
fdbb5020c034260965ab60684842c64b
5e7ff6f97f5d3bf39e69152195eae1e2703e319f
describe
'38898' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNM' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
46e36164395bdfd043240da071bb5627
2cca2d886418337c7a8357832c07cdda0933be9f
describe
'7171493' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNN' 'sip-files00149.tif'
c9db87a2cbf5ab0f97255feca17d0255
2c6cc04252ecd2545ea8164133c569a62b1df950
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNO' 'sip-files00149.txt'
98b66d6a4ffe6a834602d68cc6525c0c
cbf3a6d2533d92908e23369d6843df66faf2d672
describe
'12938' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNP' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a0662e5436c99f0bbbe8450b3c57c188
ea2acdc4ce83c3ca7c7b825048108fe47fa73b9e
describe
'964064' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNQ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
0bd90c086ff0d91c4f8aa2afbf5f9d9d
dfe28b75d4fbae8e0d8f43167cd33046baf73f16
describe
'47248' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNR' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
9c88b26925ede19e182eebf3dcd8547b
40f7d325652ff42a05ce00d5213d7d73c395f106
describe
'5025' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNS' 'sip-files00150.pro'
17631ee864d4eb2fdd7fb9693bdf2187
af31cf29bb9b7ddbf8395a676c08897b5a5cc280
describe
'15026' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNT' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
da7d7cbf84277ca0c4a58733817fcbe0
636e5b1bc8780e910a8a62ef6791a7726da46606
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNU' 'sip-files00150.tif'
56fae1644fb2f16770f47c254646c54f
134666cda00ffe39fc6d9967fd3be925c44e3149
describe
'226' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNV' 'sip-files00150.txt'
39d8376a7263567206744af4887fe769
a01ba9d53106853952af844a9a4afd01690e6192
describe
'4961' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNW' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
faf7ace9f2d87e7ba9b1d8cb706d9196
b0017f5bf3269a6f98437733bb6bd11e25eba746
describe
'923350' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNX' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
8dd0693a9dd8f31d9a35871435ae8a96
8dd1c86be56da8b9d29ced7df3c32c70f2b4b592
describe
'90963' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNY' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
41df7a27eea13cbefbdd95701b7c9b70
deff20cfbd477268573729831dceb809ccb8948b
describe
'28123' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQNZ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
9f6aca03bd607a80c42b2e0e1c1a3f06
e40582a33642c5639bdf002c943ac0185df20c00
describe
'32998' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOA' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
b2b8ed8f8e9f5ba73418945bf65eae43
e001bf342c225033c950c3ac992ccdceb051a7b2
describe
'7393557' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOB' 'sip-files00151.tif'
eb57c9bee6393a60f3a8f057d0994dae
a0cac9f82fe80e5f561acd85b488171bce1f7fea
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOC' 'sip-files00151.txt'
f2210fffd9849b42ae2b58c96b065d80
c23f7df9e2c5de297ba0b05f44716d9d392f974f
describe
'10783' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOD' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
5928215395ca7c0c05852508d9904cab
37f65f097f9374120c8f736f9680c1b486becad4
describe
'964018' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOE' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
ac11e25c19f1abe7f8f86a3de76006d9
ecfe2100b419286f11f05f0f200d26d573c35cb0
describe
'99924' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOF' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
e4296b038ece6eec512ba38667de8725
b2d04162da74a3200f7b79ed57222b452d181fa4
describe
'32967' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOG' 'sip-files00152.pro'
6cfb2ce4ad4e41dd39fdb810873f222d
ff3f2f77309d67ee8ceea842450cd7f06f2adbcc
describe
'36809' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOH' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
a9571f1b90f6a79d14b0cc0012d7f710
7e262e64f2733fd580be56d3adcccf167db556f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOI' 'sip-files00152.tif'
d0ad7bb52f0ba22c0990b414c4fecf15
4037eff444b127bdcdae013084137740977428c7
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOJ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
b1eeedfeeb891f3acc6a1fb78a441fe5
4b95b5a06ff3f5b42c7142cc9b4cb98ae74cc82f
describe
'11130' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOK' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
6abf11db0edfa07eccbf172a465736fd
779b5d1b795712ef3e7af7b8b55cf89d30a7ccf8
describe
'899553' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOL' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
2fd09a038be6c92a77c639d4a7f25728
c60473a0c87297a46163606faf25dee6b464cac6
describe
'98240' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOM' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
2cf0e35320a10fa016402e362147524b
1625850e2456ef2a21a5987e70bf2ead1ef07fa0
describe
'32009' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQON' 'sip-files00153.pro'
1c614cb36d3a9ec192b3749fcd610c4c
16879e5381f65ef8cd4bb4a8122eb5483836040e
describe
'36590' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOO' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
bae2d855f96a7adcdbb73fb44a0d9807
0dbb3b9c4f4ae5bb9a6c5313c0bcb9bd6c726cba
describe
'7203285' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOP' 'sip-files00153.tif'
50e1f4183dd126aa307a47e96afd94aa
c710a3975786ef2c882527aaa56b0fde6f75a56c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOQ' 'sip-files00153.txt'
37347c51777b478b2e4785881ac1a6ff
3e58106b592878330a11ac67cec161cf06ccaaba
describe
'12441' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOR' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
435cdea38f8136486e4519755915739b
fc9c43398c2c84e8ed2ed4d67b38a1b4205abcfa
describe
'964082' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOS' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
22f7bea1473b0488e8d2d767f4d881c6
42d47841a6b89a7db78c8402a727ba8e254cec63
describe
'98723' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOT' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
02662275a89457ebd9cc32e035e9b5c0
fa48085e407f44bfe67df95428a35018854fb057
describe
'33272' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOU' 'sip-files00154.pro'
d69108231dfb5c9b851760364c58c588
273dc83837de02e3954f1cbc55f673922652f32e
describe
'36619' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOV' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
413d9b9f04076ab3f11b28a1bb2bc8ec
f0008712d07bcbf4a7555cad762242eab3c846c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOW' 'sip-files00154.tif'
5b62580c16b6aa1fce18ad3b71de6c10
aacfee7a92dc2acdfb2a7a90f8134ba43fbabd3a
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOX' 'sip-files00154.txt'
435e82deb2abb82c0e66147f385fdda5
db141e83d6304b8ff03a197c7a2ffad957c3d13d
describe
Invalid character
'11340' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOY' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
13bba47465ea291f07ad614f9f5b2ff2
b89673c2b130dee204776ee451082096a9cea860
describe
'930582' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQOZ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
17614b576c958290ffaed8d11894a57f
b71d514314fbbe70a5ecac1672a1bda7f8e862c6
describe
'95829' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPA' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
9baca4ad3e631673f2125ba0ebf204d8
b48409c2a4fa3231c4d958e036533c378e08d600
describe
'30132' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPB' 'sip-files00155.pro'
bc4f0f8568aa4ef537a410d15ca0b042
48e9f390b7ad7e151cdc2c7dd8671a984d0ce877
describe
'35294' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPC' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
28139b630de6cba96314a52a6434727c
afd3c9c88a2313a9038e19581d97a0577018651c
describe
'7453837' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPD' 'sip-files00155.tif'
c494a5bcfa3e9d38d1942c59ad0c3935
44513743b17ec315a87e8eba294eec6217a6ae25
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPE' 'sip-files00155.txt'
6808e7282d15d21536a35a77264bd1ca
d49bc9118fd64d58eb62e488014605bbc5ca952a
describe
'11347' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPF' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
ba33c4ff07ce8e627f57932a1a12abdc
cc564c69baaf92b467f6bb986f5ddf45e1bf1423
describe
'964090' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPG' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
e4e42ef19821b2745dc6c7fc607052e3
0b36a42ef9d6ad3ebe44f5325adf462564f75106
describe
'97651' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPH' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
3acd65b4287db0c12360c9beca8461c7
90da05b3edd2c141fdb857cb6e8194a29ccb0882
describe
'31940' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPI' 'sip-files00156.pro'
e135034bb9c81c521b48bc32fac78c05
06e883ee5d7b24096ec8f334efea1056943f900d
describe
'35931' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPJ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
144f7a66e8e73b70388e4be663f455b1
391f7b3bad6d406f621b5fe5ad64e72b5621959e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPK' 'sip-files00156.tif'
bb49fc16489382b20fdca66a85c26556
86af7e39e4d26cc3f7de199a6751cdf5c907637c
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPL' 'sip-files00156.txt'
a2f4e830f04cd97899c97c94be32b5e3
5929f3d0f14029701bc6a1aea631cf17ff7d6c3d
describe
'11455' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPM' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
9f8ed1bc677a4a4b6ec6591f6cf8444b
af10d1d3a50b9c3496e9c6f33a828aec6c7ee73d
describe
'916109' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPN' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
d5c4db7a5260a84eb4d36da63cb62622
a75bf27a03fbe67366ad277b4229f93a2c82e534
describe
'102885' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPO' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
7a2f33bdc312c57ecfc81e38ab981d03
79e16ee9c239472db2071587f1c0f338059f9879
describe
'33540' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPP' 'sip-files00157.pro'
9cc6c021633595f6e2070b741e1b3d49
b740a3cd746ae86662748a6397c3a063c9d964fe
describe
'37886' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPQ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
96c2e639d3c5c7aa1203274ff1affcbc
64eb1ea4d0c7810f2be29309cd86a4afe72cf29e
describe
'7335685' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPR' 'sip-files00157.tif'
4d359084e061c00961c2a507035837e8
2defae55c7749dd467f46c18ebd28a2a55b70668
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPS' 'sip-files00157.txt'
319c56f3371939eda6875b93b37d528c
d4d14520837a9734a90963345b2ad721b1d5211c
describe
'12341' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPT' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
fc9d62a83808119441ebb57db99bec32
9efec86514e4e73d8bc8b42bfab522f067ddd032
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPU' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
d15791fd1999b97c63d733950f244e49
b4647059af5f84e729ff0400ee6a857f120399e7
describe
'62382' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPV' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
646f10b6a7cfec9dfaab16a7e0995726
da03d3e03e7b6499242d9050030543c412825d7c
describe
'5799' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPW' 'sip-files00158.pro'
a07c7e7ec612d5325c9db1fe1fdc2a46
e083627f687a43291c27a5b0d7fe7e2f0c4e2cb7
describe
'19601' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPX' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
87cacce5d1b73b7286030d9a5ed75912
968636fde90170729ea23e98352aa68d33db7d7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPY' 'sip-files00158.tif'
870821e48ec001d2b451eb1d7d492bf4
8008abd1ce3eedec033f1dadd93d5181e234b9d1
describe
'254' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQPZ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
70393521c10366d6363902855c5d582a
8d2494d5a01e4ffd5df067628636fc15a3016973
describe
'6156' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQA' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
01ca4a9b40e7df67fa962bbb94082d64
1078395dacacc1cc0a9544b3f00800b6488d05f3
describe
'915973' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQB' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
a43fff5f934034d56097181b89f82aaa
8561e8926597517214addac8f0fceb629a797622
describe
'89822' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQC' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
e06074ac6fbcba44da43e2dd76efd094
02f735c4113425f013b8b1557378cf1e4a474449
describe
'28766' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQD' 'sip-files00159.pro'
081ea42fa51178eb3e11955db7d9e34b
68c13d02fe97097b1307000f63a74134a85eac87
describe
'32646' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQE' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
4202ad9584b8233d33f931a939038913
51d05f075240606f7b1c5c40d0d7194ffe8b13f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQF' 'sip-files00159.tif'
b488fdb3f0cac66bd0af940e2b98b2f6
2955b998c009036699f408ea6a8ae30ef78e0032
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQG' 'sip-files00159.txt'
2c16b0631139f0b6b9c882b5e8e88991
56fcac383dc231db77cfc5378135bc7ee21c4667
describe
'10822' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQH' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
327c6a827fe884e0708f04d8899987c5
f8ab445d203fa7d23252b1c03c763f3fc26ad1e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQI' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
7c669aa091149e37675c764d2647e1aa
19174cbec24ab2e0fbe21df4affda0d03315f0a5
describe
'104542' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQJ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
7ccd5017b2d3298cd3964b0267dba67b
329db19c949117b4895ea2acbcbf12b0a49082ab
describe
'35206' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQK' 'sip-files00160.pro'
821d581762672880ebe02f33dc47e098
723e95e71576ee95ebf7d71b71399f628e860fb3
describe
'38444' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQL' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
0f52e1f6ca3a3b7d28c6463c7b51c038
a823e15a52eb4c8ea01716fa090702fa6e62b489
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQM' 'sip-files00160.tif'
555ebb679c6f18567468e687168afb29
732cd588533e7b0f138e9e5dfe8b464ba51fe990
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQN' 'sip-files00160.txt'
85504b88a74b99c4dc55f864b2324896
fc9102040c59fa781c514d2dcc7138b827ad61e6
describe
'11632' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQO' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
c0f8d37f1074882aed7481b603b5748e
991e9d2baf64c2fb637711e133a9705025ff8a09
describe
'959711' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQP' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
17bef847fb6d3ca97e8e68031875b4a7
98d2546d877901a823202c76b92107b4cdd6b6ab
describe
'104619' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
6a1d22cc96bf88056b19d1c04b41fef1
3064be23a6e273b3120b0b8eb93c9b1e8fcb5d46
describe
'33616' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQR' 'sip-files00161.pro'
a9c5a7aa75a61e58fb04ab1fec860db1
a2b47f54234e2527cc659d24b199e156d4eb8e44
describe
'38779' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQS' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
7aff3a787fb79d2343bee112e5bf626a
f663830ab108b439b2c07d608f735dc1aafa75d4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQT' 'sip-files00161.tif'
71cebde115377db04e64562027f40965
89cd3ad90b33b29d053f7184a7d7efad0b3774c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQU' 'sip-files00161.txt'
46cb0b0fc3eb050580205aaa8783269c
9c0f08e0b88ab6d6a1e1bfa60ed92acaf9efb482
describe
'12019' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQV' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
4544d8d7c3114e018390da5097f1c520
76ef2c724f31d24980369cf497a7fc8eaf80037c
describe
'964094' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQW' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
23f71e2bbb243e6e552f961a331a7b7c
0dcc24a9e3f710d599b26d3f7bbd6df43370330b
describe
'94970' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQX' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
5e40039ee2a9bab3b1711f55455fb0c9
6567237a25ec9e7daa4a4a3304a0386c9cefafde
describe
'31543' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQY' 'sip-files00162.pro'
74207213a6f88f85ce65c58afad279a9
84675669864219fbe64b03ab57c7bb70ad799a6c
describe
'35102' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
2e233b7541544a5d69a070ea7da19f55
845a3b312d3b59463fb4e495ecf2e1605d2eb304
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRA' 'sip-files00162.tif'
c5f30f0deefbb9f49f312fe12845934b
b583b65341d39c8bcba84152a16c01ddfa490af3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRB' 'sip-files00162.txt'
b9d5c637aa04d2dfd33016412bed42a5
0b0a762218c3e05f226e7030644af9ad51abe0f6
describe
'11246' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRC' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
2a08c6b49a85f5ac7bb2e886dc619d0e
c090b9d519ecfc94c483eea9248843f9411c976b
describe
'959763' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRD' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
a6066e425320c04ee824467249b29b95
bedb48b0bc5e419fc22284713964b441725c2e54
describe
'92592' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRE' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
5d44abdaafe2773fe595f6968db4c631
49b6b8e60009e5487c3b665247a051eb68dbd77d
describe
'29674' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRF' 'sip-files00163.pro'
f5fdadc4a8a84cca67524713b9a99110
8d16b25c20463092f761e38b400da243263e011f
describe
'34722' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRG' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
3c476ec92583b7d38a28c6efcf578141
d0ff6a4f2fa9284ef15df88c7daf68070b2bef62
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRH' 'sip-files00163.tif'
0e939577c1811e98aefe380cfffeb8b6
4690f100aca3148f35ad7a996dc2658e4b343d17
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRI' 'sip-files00163.txt'
da63f714ddb9c4bbb04c724c1da0b681
02ccc070dbd9a3f2da5ce8d8fe24296a7f3389c7
describe
'11208' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
7f96fdfdbfc324b87ee7ee0db887fd8d
906896a194eb44de8b1b80c8767a38c3ff3e987a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRK' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
fc632e2e6db675bb079578f81e4ea026
92c10be54e2e115ee24ebc218fbd2c791b9cc177
describe
'93097' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRL' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
29da7396e2d0cc9b0eebd0a8711ef9c8
ae64e88be6a327b25c237953120ef6a696c3febb
describe
'30403' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRM' 'sip-files00164.pro'
b571a16efdd196faf165d3d825e92299
4d78e67e1a8baa0a3b6c610c3817a9a047268596
describe
'35082' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRN' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
45f01dafc27e483db3d6945cb84a8b79
04c9de16f9f260372cd8a91884f1f37061d9fdd9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRO' 'sip-files00164.tif'
45ba190124f0cacf12afd5b90cdc7ff6
6629400ac60b82b7eaab57324796ba1ff9f35358
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRP' 'sip-files00164.txt'
adf4b40b1b96e36af1f3cad90327d54f
bbfb2a4d15769e90b9980ad9f804120e21219c48
describe
'11102' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
ea795d90631c50f8ea80462acb03c83e
ff26aa3618592e35579bea39f950d174c263b356
describe
'959640' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRR' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
54589934a3fb9258b51cc18d4ac06cf0
8a0a59f0ac990ce08484c602e4ec1b017ae69d42
describe
'100849' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRS' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
ec9f3603434eab415f6e00544519c6a0
61a4806efc7f58fa182ef611aee8944663697cb9
describe
'33498' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRT' 'sip-files00165.pro'
edfd67b6a6a819fe5fdb0f2ab0bbb587
af560fae6d5ac5608828f89a1fd2524b7da7d1b7
describe
'37404' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRU' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
b30219b06c22b76affd2e0a4157515f9
111f8e36e21f8f407ff71f72f2d7805c07b1a135
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRV' 'sip-files00165.tif'
b46899969416ad7843d79195d48e0b36
a7118c8412f519a65a1526bc7589b23a2ffcf0de
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRW' 'sip-files00165.txt'
c0665d0a2b653772a409e597b5135c33
4b89e1e58a630e0b7d9b955ff517f61515a54759
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRX' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
b2f7411f904f646ab70108d7d73301ee
deccbc1bdc1f10189ff317d6c7eda6571317b88c
describe
'964074' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRY' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
833de00ec0d4f7e25bd05d0976c8b25c
82f747ec0f96914f887929c3a54e8498b7f34581
describe
'85409' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
ba8ef97b5aa17e3cadbf8dcbd5a0fe62
a0343dbcd48e470a1b0c636f77cfab70b26aa8ae
describe
'23688' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSA' 'sip-files00166.pro'
c1eea3edec6ba3d99efcbcdfc3c3b4f7
fcab08d223d98609b1e814f0a2563fd4bae5922b
describe
'30918' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSB' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
e4c3f401652bb0757c4846923c092a3f
36027bffe3e8137d0e5448325bd3bf498a4fd202
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSC' 'sip-files00166.tif'
0ff5dab55991b79599657327f3b6ee24
e031b381da37e77ffda93e8689e0c45cad29028a
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSD' 'sip-files00166.txt'
1e4399979097aa3cfd1d0aa911775eef
cf5f0e87630c1b02125ba00281c500c05f7897a4
describe
'9795' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSE' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
dacc1a366469f4de51eb8d4fe5521b0d
a7964ae71ba08a69719850fa628b659d3bd8e015
describe
'959788' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSF' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
8ac835afa3ea2c24bc50ad2a0ba2ddfb
e1e3ab8d60060becb68be8f5a833b5aea3a7381f
describe
'94168' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSG' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
a362de46c7e4c9bd52ed29ef7fce44db
9af2d6e1bed6a6564661ff2fab7d4754d68ed749
describe
'29525' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSH' 'sip-files00167.pro'
b68bb30bcd084c955ec195a924cc5dfc
5c6fe29797db32d1033ec424abaa93111e6d07a8
describe
'34905' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSI' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
d2ebd29cf73bb483003c248e516709be
e1aae4647c4c2806395c6d4c8944a31e1f325e16
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files00167.tif'
9bd832ac7d95f73e1ec68ce4929e558a
49ea1f367519516dad8cca366d8412e898f5c709
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSK' 'sip-files00167.txt'
80649aeaf40a90f297e86e338e3c9593
e1cf8ea1428bfd17434f5f4c9044c71f86e0e590
'2011-11-17T03:25:40-05:00'
describe
'10732' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSL' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
380f3312e24bec562337bf8b7429193d
77997f85fc81991d88738464704d4131b4f350bb
'2011-11-17T03:25:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSM' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
02fe7b763c36d48386a8366690d5100c
791852a7f76cc798ea4e37efdfa20d5aa90826f1
describe
'98689' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSN' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
7aee21a3b97e6257b69f6974987e76cf
7053896f338fe2d5beca8da98cfa633a684a9e5e
describe
'33267' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSO' 'sip-files00168.pro'
f65aa1ab90b6b17b2f7d8a5e8d222d8b
012059ee2e54bb2ec8a33be3d25bb2159c3bdf61
describe
'36281' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSP' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
6162e23345565f0ff0614105c8675c95
a38bb3f9b4f66b53e1fdcf1fdc95394ede521fb7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSQ' 'sip-files00168.tif'
1d0d833e9456b0f2756c3cd13ce7632e
117b74657c2c979ce2efb3be3e0ec84fd35ae4ac
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSR' 'sip-files00168.txt'
e0af9b5473b1611e01aae69adb3593ad
2f2a0ea2c22177f811e7a254846ca01f9b43537d
describe
'11437' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSS' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
f453be7427f6fbfeeaaf9de9112f3034
7d4407db1274143c2c774549ab44e4d2fe945208
describe
'959779' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQST' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
75a2b4b0dc1378b4fda7669be5395c9d
6c2a8113e4dd30edf346063005918771b3e8e7c4
describe
'94356' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSU' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
50544a395ebe73faf7a04a79f4efa198
108802f8ad7e60cadc2b770f7c06d059ed671607
describe
'29686' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSV' 'sip-files00169.pro'
dff0c64bcd2c0b8a79cef9aa5a57b812
69dfcd9d7abfd46387d9ce5a1e6d0f905c3c5aff
describe
'35532' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSW' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
aa8de4e8a7c6988dbd565f04c983e093
32731b145bd06a723843583285a359ac67a30e4f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSX' 'sip-files00169.tif'
073010de4d89ba64947c8484e540ce7f
d2270422c260029cdd2292d3a8a3b664316cfea9
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSY' 'sip-files00169.txt'
a69917559bae848d219ac957d0241481
d07b829301fe7cbfb7fbe15937d8bc5516353d85
describe
'11700' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQSZ' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
aacae474123297c4bc8ac665b808cfed
4cf4415719a58cbba2a43f936e15aa04f946adc5
describe
'964091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTA' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
d427f8ff5e8653ce5b7a87a7773644dd
3992e7c8b3f4c4d2d14a5e180f86c4c05e47b5ba
describe
'97169' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTB' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
cf83b223c80c43fc5b61f952d656db55
a7deffc3a1b44b4a7af88e7d3080be8bfdf92615
describe
'32354' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTC' 'sip-files00170.pro'
506b06ace1cf970571d3059ea581c191
af9acc026be445041e2a085fbe03fe2f95f7f34d
describe
'36278' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTD' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
54e2f4762bef2b461ea5b4982ef01fb0
ed0a11a823f028c50c269d0890766a14b4544562
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTE' 'sip-files00170.tif'
f8a808936ba8ff2b2575b767884fc4ef
f2ab9aefe5a954812f5d8af9fad8ee1437fb62ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTF' 'sip-files00170.txt'
49b17d926f6fb41a8749edebc786685a
9c96f0b62d2c4c90a6ba48297dc972b166c1269c
describe
'11413' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTG' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
b85ffe05bcc2884accb414c36a3a3a05
75214cc1e9deb29b05f975862b79dde347d9dc14
describe
'959782' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTH' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
4033a9181470c68287fa8ff4eb3d9482
f19ca693fc7b979d855272ce48f9229023169306
describe
'95161' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTI' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
13a042f9eb10e9d70290f79970bd3b7f
a14f95a774e0224542d4afb1e147e40e52e32d46
describe
'30703' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTJ' 'sip-files00171.pro'
5eb85b943aabb8430b260b471f27a222
b0fad7573f7d74e05a4edd8318437b4826f8461c
describe
'35997' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTK' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
f25a325fd6d201022e9f48cf185e4ca8
085a4f5dfa1816b65cba05b7f91430a4cd1cca99
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTL' 'sip-files00171.tif'
c5c955a5d84ddba9311333b085d6ef15
0756b2a3ef92678cca6e9db74ac5f785337248a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTM' 'sip-files00171.txt'
db1442a4635b6a76f91db7c7ca64327e
e639c143b7157ed8f6b31463996cd2c229cd901e
describe
'11535' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTN' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
c9669200c6a548c0a25d3378bb4d55d4
687d5c72d2cbda7a80e19eca3d62de4486f78947
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTO' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
2b9dd0062ae10ebf743a6e80fae52cf1
3150116c72a97fd87bb30d7d218072a827337475
describe
'93767' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTP' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
7388c96086759cffeb191537ebeae632
8b9dd11fcf9f657b308638c735e4318ba075676a
describe
'31095' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTQ' 'sip-files00172.pro'
a69c6c36a3d57116dfc4e57f2df46f8b
67140b18bad2d4a7ab0f94e49573da5fe490a7a9
describe
'34832' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTR' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
485e21a174d788889a55575f8ff99e35
0b66707cd7a4f67e0a6b416e7a20f92126ac416d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTS' 'sip-files00172.tif'
02082df28ecafe42a6a16b7c7723a84e
4f9ec20b5161cb8abddd227241d13d16786ac7dc
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTT' 'sip-files00172.txt'
26ddd5fdad45365e9f6facdcae9cf1a3
01446bf9933a8fec9fa1d5a32126d4ea46f5e711
describe
'11457' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTU' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
536bf8265f165ba99297780ddc498efe
16ce1976547c5e354d4d6ec662cd268d9583e3c7
describe
'959790' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTV' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
dbf722f20b1989e54c24e9e43c0d8ba0
3bfaff681ab2d67e6c122b6e40e10fdc1aedabec
describe
'101856' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTW' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
305f6fed726033cbc04f74509236c304
886121911e64bc455f470a91734651668a731ccf
describe
'32803' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTX' 'sip-files00173.pro'
0040e4b5a4e3bbaf84d79ddf6ac79f39
d7f590ec3651a52d13edccc3c5703233a0985919
describe
'37148' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTY' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
fe8dc95eaace146363e7fe0b63d9baef
cc4256be6ca3dc7fd3a47237a74088c1f6e4416e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQTZ' 'sip-files00173.tif'
5f2ef399cf95f78da4e34184b4f8d6cb
a60e56ebebd6390dfb79e892392ca9803dfd2197
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUA' 'sip-files00173.txt'
ad7f06fa7ca89407cbd2d01518d43db7
da359a5a06d65a7ac243790011a44ff55e4be7d2
describe
'11584' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUB' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
af9e7b1c9f3ec7b372a7bb7394b18345
18e7fa8210a217e2d2a4a58f14eb24dab585321d
describe
'964032' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUC' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
3aeb43acbcd50f324eff1a055b9ed89d
3a8697e57584ac00ef0d03cf010ca831a32453e8
describe
'67918' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUD' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
ed46e0775a6dac1dba940dbbecc735c0
081f8f81e76e1320e03378ec6b5851d88d8435e8
describe
'2419' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUE' 'sip-files00174.pro'
7866cfd909dfd7f0490bf58c46ed19f3
510025d778eda0a5f316fb5c8b82aa6c37e253dc
describe
'19603' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUF' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
317ab452056c9a7de3ef8290903b2938
ccf11424d330fbe34c0807d7c6d863f5988c49dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUG' 'sip-files00174.tif'
8192d35047c8c2ecaefe7dfb8f6e6e24
a7d4c90381e153c64a6a3d1052ffa32f0688f62b
describe
'103' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUH' 'sip-files00174.txt'
9e771249b9067e878dac3195586965e0
ec9abd4b971d9f7fa72822b8a60a35d8b4ada6b3
describe
'6260' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUI' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
090c39ec4f098b3b91c1e488948987c4
b3b3b1f2a836297007229ebed921355330c6d5df
describe
'505148' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUJ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
a2ef9277a8624c7dc896094cfa7468dc
992eb40da5ec98b6324f650eae743bdf1cdae362
describe
'15060' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUK' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
d9fc23962642a336646d5fe31e0cfb7d
d6da3e88573262d0ca7d2c44bc4fe39e18cb393a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUL' 'sip-files00175.pro'
d2c170020badb518cabc71391f6b7bf3
8b78068b09f1dfbd5dd8dfa907d0f94bf20091d3
describe
'4459' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUM' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
3f3e520d8bfae811e152879b102e834e
bb34a2562fcdf65b7c66f62feda57e73be7cbf1a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUN' 'sip-files00175.tif'
f8865e450d2e4264e07997c94ca943aa
f4e85cdeae1071b48dc5880596a817f4b700a963
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUO' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
ee3b42e192f24fcf15fca6680267ee0b
9963235798340bff0c5c7884572553934ab00077
describe
'964087' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUP' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
bbc9d9d6a931dbc311639103f993144a
339bb712b65fffcc50ff5d31ba05fd02abdf4aa9
describe
'76880' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
8bb5e8ed2542474a334e30ec50b77754
a8848ab572dec6af6af0b6e1895547a4b9018415
describe
'17543' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUR' 'sip-files00176.pro'
5dd122a5d35bdc15b3ceee5c5bba2e29
5c78608390419d257b12207cda15827c774d9d59
describe
'26517' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUS' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
3cb26ba9642d0abc1ea037a3ca5f4295
a9a1b84dde685e5e497b537ab8e56bf400eba987
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUT' 'sip-files00176.tif'
709576c9a7bcf9a55ec517ea401d67ca
098c6a40a5d94701fe0d7b796672c5db570a1d7d
describe
'730' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUU' 'sip-files00176.txt'
c9249c31c02c43770c877abfb9da8f96
b6a4b363b11900ecdf9c2f13361d360676d21141
describe
'8465' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUV' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
45014ad3cb2229a5100ed986f888674c
80c78dee5060be55000ca9557e5e66894e5d8775
describe
'959707' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUW' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
61f74c5a2474c58fd867b5b0ec90113c
9c156858322b65dfb854c10ccbbd4d71d2e3cc81
describe
'83675' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUX' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
dfa6f30ac691a8b49f215d5359928684
8300701cb1c7b181c954c35a3c98dbffd3ab19ea
describe
'25536' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUY' 'sip-files00177.pro'
245f7fdf6262ef2cea5ef3dd70072aeb
11ff270d478960f076415e16a8c3418c7a583c59
describe
'30956' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
a48484fab8e9929e9c023d540a5c0c7d
1a78d897370374e2c7705af40e7612afe2cfe7cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVA' 'sip-files00177.tif'
f25c2d1b8f56809e1e51db52d2da4ed0
e8482522d94ebce16531c14605454b37d0a909af
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVB' 'sip-files00177.txt'
707d082c1f79438183610cea4f48a72a
ee8d2379efe462e72cb7cf9d1b2cbaa4c109786a
describe
'9947' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVC' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
284da0f8165e755381f7748ec0811ac3
b149cc864c3d4fae44f42d1f26d53ed8a918ba85
describe
'964083' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVD' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
f6f939f47a3e791575f808e2f65b0180
305383e030f0fa6f63f39f92f96be3da158bac97
describe
'95165' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVE' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
ee7706a8a081d9bc6ec4fbfd7afac9af
5e4ab408f63e249cc2e513e1aa37766873ccf7cd
describe
'31511' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVF' 'sip-files00178.pro'
c2e0d3b72e3764b0606327d7ec5ae208
008ce4fb81e36491b01b2c63809fa53c84f14649
describe
'35498' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVG' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
56bff8e188e34eb41881c41a3c224725
c6c8fec338486ac5c4d97ae5e1c6965b64d40a1b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVH' 'sip-files00178.tif'
5cee4c5707e42e378f23fe81657517f8
2c39ca25756f80b6798def2eb9eec84444513fe6
'2011-11-17T03:28:29-05:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVI' 'sip-files00178.txt'
b381966fdb4be77e22cf95c2acdaa474
9966074689e191e376d6cd2ef6a3228ad43cd497
describe
'11109' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
41a431e3909b7508e4f9646fa09d748b
f7ffb2b99fe965df89ba16223f117c6ffcbb0d05
describe
'959644' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVK' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
f93186be6f15e1ea41fadfaebfe896d0
fc6ed38aac5392f4d53453f03bdd81245b5e80b2
describe
'107051' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVL' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
19f95dfa9e9109c75a0616e4d355c0ba
2dae5308f7bc37e52d68d8ae717a9ab8a54a944d
describe
'35734' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVM' 'sip-files00179.pro'
87217eb1ae2fe7ce66d2c6c751374775
c288c808f6f43331a988f18d6df155e37857c346
describe
'40371' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVN' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
3627b18aeb1df92d74680ec2b9543aa2
731b362fa619456de88768a2c90d1b3ba547d06e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVO' 'sip-files00179.tif'
1608cea5979a699a76e97640c0946860
792dd1712515f7d5aebc44687da5ed12c8308566
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVP' 'sip-files00179.txt'
14ec1f92fa73accfe071aff5a1b0ef41
d5602b85a1b63cac148c3169c964ac480a8e073f
describe
'12358' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
2e76a14123ef2dae5b63ccd764414861
d997f8bd2ff7b617b3c96cb4022b784976c23ccf
describe
'964078' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVR' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
4a92718df54f4301a58c41e31b9aa45b
e18eeab08c8fcd377d73b65ceb75216c5640ffce
describe
'95764' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVS' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
4e9c1d69ae2de3cb40bf6afb59b4a5c5
80ce718d4e0e830f53f79ec6f6637b9cfdc44ec6
describe
'31624' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVT' 'sip-files00180.pro'
fab6ee17c27cee2e7c53412ab2713ea6
6657cfa3f21fe123b759d56e29f9a39660b34f39
describe
'35110' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVU' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
27b63a32f5af4bb2e1632b11f37012b9
a555c84f9eff41aecd69fc0f3166597974a20fe4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVV' 'sip-files00180.tif'
e7c16fd01b66bc92c856929bbb3a009c
1a7ddd9dc7535f2569d90b62d54a9a606820a848
'2011-11-17T03:26:38-05:00'
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVW' 'sip-files00180.txt'
51fe4a9299c1827921a6bed0c5e037b9
a9ff42e0a9afc45dd4636c9a1a031519c75649d7
describe
'11249' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVX' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
505d9a2ab5506227013e80ea4ec1799d
726bc3cd192d1ab4990b6e684d91b6f6f95e01ac
describe
'959715' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVY' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
65c0e9a5517c66bef73439e45f88f9cc
b57f9a57689c0fb8a2c951a263dc2456f54c4814
describe
'99728' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
4c401357b86df776e194689bf0c82b93
64d64a7f9be552a775672f4ab8c10dfc10ed744f
describe
'32507' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWA' 'sip-files00181.pro'
299d448563bc302690835985ccb336f4
a72e4918c10c80d2cae39578519e995eae9e6efb
describe
'37120' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWB' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
7451e9cf8ddc87e22e5c63b6b52ac82f
7d531f18213f606241927c8a64081d523a2178c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWC' 'sip-files00181.tif'
e4e986b25949996fe25d9dce0b4e23cd
1f0048ff4becc4aeb3c1da10a8ac83a876db8888
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWD' 'sip-files00181.txt'
b28e709c03db624869da378834868f64
bfed8a494220f5dfb0788655c6ab0ac766595ba2
describe
'11787' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWE' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
b5b0f4a61333161f86dafc57f31bf24b
dad1995645348580c8cef10040bc89d335294753
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWF' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
ad4326ecac8063d615ca5b315677aac6
73cf342d978171d1634a918fc792e0e9526d839b
describe
'93156' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWG' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
f5407c7f2d6329afa85eab4821091374
55de921a7e879c11b4b3b252b1925828d30f271b
describe
'31625' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWH' 'sip-files00182.pro'
16a206f3a9a389e20a7b1b08ad61f07a
df76abf61bf691da24530f8611a35a164baac747
describe
'34520' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWI' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
2924948df49b72f98678326a71c12827
494ec09e05f783df47b8e9faaab4a712688ee21e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
0ffe378f804bbc23913213c51d22076c
932098bd97ea6f21f618b9d7375f4b348d6dcf25
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWK' 'sip-files00182.txt'
b1eaf79d4bdfec0c99a337ca3cf65664
c139b5ea290d4d31e07e2d4b2d564e0f9b3dfa30
describe
'10928' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWL' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
0f3a33c581101e457b6b24c1915542f6
219a882e055594558efb170f601a2b5f606b353c
describe
'959762' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWM' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
316cf6561579a0c9e22cbe8004fd375d
134a2dcb76ddc6e2227e2a9664f9d8747b7a4a7a
describe
'75944' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWN' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
bb4be9f674efb098f70ae4f3132911e0
9d89ebb052f0c239ba0248990a8d0460b116e3d6
describe
'22816' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWO' 'sip-files00183.pro'
6b33fbe639b33494c0897f80ed1da4a3
1100ef8cbc6045bbd4c118fe4618e7ad17ed52fb
describe
'27690' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWP' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
57bfd6019457c05a6ddfba171e03fc9b
7d9fd7c3012892f3c47809937693f7f4846cb51d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files00183.tif'
8ce60981fd4211f28cf6af8e336d7677
fb7bbc915f5d23ad9996882c079bbb5deeec684c
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWR' 'sip-files00183.txt'
33752104ae86792143a2156a83ac9643
ca9b2b43af6290997fa5fb02755b32d5c2147260
describe
'9032' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWS' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
7369dfc618789a089aa02e84ad9e9b90
f9f0e5dcd390ddad06157f3eb99e1468e2154106
describe
'941598' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWT' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
524511f4fab1c852e63ab22c3332a4bb
8b5985cf16bb6e9353bd8ec7a474baa665ab0f8d
describe
'85507' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWU' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
981c6b50617bd11fc52e6dd822e99666
0c6b4ee79046c0b729685b7eb25b43633749d0d5
describe
'27726' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWV' 'sip-files00184.pro'
c41d6b8fc9ab421173598ee8116c88b5
da7c396565d9c39b831f34d7d23b58f847e742c1
describe
'31441' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWW' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
7cf422daa0e2a8b30357b4612b98942a
083854d764a7f5e75df7a4ef677aeb6548953e00
'2011-11-17T03:30:17-05:00'
describe
'7542671' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWX' 'sip-files00184.tif'
932ec81570c2b0f61e1e88e4068bd237
bc71680bb1ef6edf926b2f02b80e2e9fe8b475db
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWY' 'sip-files00184.txt'
803e3e6a8c0179517f6d6f498d2bdbe9
add48095ad0885e251b74feb3639b27e6674439e
describe
'9702' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
b8c8fbaa55a26942d268909dafa8140c
096334b5b681f6bd32784ebd7ca8a57a2f5e5732
describe
'920279' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXA' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
e0218790a28b64a84ab60c130a7d293f
4b1b457a722a270fc553f2b15e54aa76ef0ef181
describe
'97542' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXB' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
f17853f49ca7c256132cd957e07f07e0
78b5bb266abadf5435110db461d3fcc00c0bb941
describe
'31454' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXC' 'sip-files00185.pro'
0cf31d15253c2b92afe7a98e53227f1a
d6e32e641b2a2ebb76d78a4c635029bc14565c46
describe
'35541' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXD' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
3296cec1cfc2bb7c8ea96a8e8525985b
e1d0c38706c2eca249380f58610a989b327821b7
describe
'7371413' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXE' 'sip-files00185.tif'
d97dc6266aaac3708ed797b9620cd2aa
92ff6946e2bda9c46d57199b77794c31132e7d94
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXF' 'sip-files00185.txt'
d457be3681224ca8c617f1693639b01f
c7d8ee6186d906074b24fcab98b1a7caf36adeea
describe
'11657' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXG' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
c2346e414df623f73b75c3045753a493
b7a40ac0a19b6fab1e6707f4a5796685d4a7c78a
describe
'929742' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXH' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
1c333a976e87050ba102c0340e56facc
fecab43aca95180fd21006694b968aa03b9e6783
describe
'96917' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXI' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
c9bfa3e8123306f5da8bff584a99df52
895d9155f64f35b1153ba53248c8034ef8aad143
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files00186.pro'
5e7242d6b90f2b5648652e43c4d2a750
82bc53cf4b471c5efa7a5fcce163233bcdac29b8
describe
'36401' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXK' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
6952d60517201050672903584aa75e47
794feb76af8d7ff74db4b5344b30b51eaf99c53d
describe
'7446943' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXL' 'sip-files00186.tif'
cdfec211ea0e4b65acb98f8938953c2a
9484e1d2195f3600cc6c90fd6e7d34d36c5f00ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXM' 'sip-files00186.txt'
3d88c8a79a89227b94371d6ee43154d5
0065063cd83b8d8817e6f542dd65f8ec0be4ca42
describe
'11252' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXN' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
58dedd15a69c5506612228aea9117901
3ed8ab7db99d7904e182589af5f76fc02170af4c
describe
'915175' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXO' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
cbaa5a044f8a39d4ac6de73353366c16
a33493fcee39fdfe935e931d69aaa9294f96d89d
describe
'100776' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXP' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
b30828a77c2b9dc6be24049931889913
d2d76f4323883dd314a8cd872b6e96faa4701db7
describe
'33025' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files00187.pro'
7829829674d3b06d0fbb794e5dd1657e
442509affaa796ae90b6255e4a2562380bcad80f
describe
'37645' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXR' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
0e99f14e24ac270dac834d89343f23a3
d9d4c284c8c124c3a018c39b152913a419502c37
describe
'7328149' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXS' 'sip-files00187.tif'
598b854af1c44bcfa0830cc076a4e433
0f901de01c5681dcc3362403582f5048e9b34871
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXT' 'sip-files00187.txt'
2529fd009069087f6bb44ec50958ba8b
a86e910f044483d15887ec67c49755f97e752e2b
'2011-11-17T03:27:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXU' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
89d7f524243a0a92d9ff89d302701a7d
c972891b7a6577670a5443ed69a200970e5a3f59
describe
'935881' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXV' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
d90f2b29d6c559a8c5ec2a823adb5967
f32ef8e003271797aa669e1d013ab4f154e7fe2e
describe
'96520' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXW' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
33945d4f22af1b08e8c47083b69ac93f
0dec400452ec166d951edc66c4750e351d08ec11
describe
'31462' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXX' 'sip-files00188.pro'
d42a9b3e5a27a5202f82325a429a95cb
3bf2e22f215e36cc304d64ca080e92007681d0cf
describe
'35361' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXY' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
d46fa30c550102a76f77b4711005328e
5946e3db664a6eca4d05cd1bbf67038ee0f0c33b
describe
'7497215' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
8992723299f0d5639aade85299d240d0
7897eeb43b6634a8fb3093aeb0f51db438a35a79
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00188.txt'
c602df1f9e5a7a2826e9aa68648cb914
55e52c427d2bf531f66bc354705a043682f6e1f2
describe
'11627' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
206751b3c64d5955682793835afcd0d1
cf7319c261e9766afc6885a3b5fd3435726d5eb5
describe
'937270' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
42eee8bbcc99f0ac0f5070e2cf5b208a
64a306c479ba18dc65e64f0750ac32458257a07b
describe
'104655' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
91902846420467165476ccddbefc2221
43ca0adcbfe20c1c77bfbfd026791d9485389fc0
describe
'34327' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00189.pro'
46d33032bce241d950fa3d18cb4c7e49
7c3243af64edc9fa31d14f0c93e980d61b42127b
describe
'38146' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
5a192f21d03aa8232188310644a08906
1d6dbc6daa003943ab5b86449eb997fe6a5c22bc
describe
'7507293' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00189.tif'
229d02a4b792990da364777f83a60ecd
158af04b0cb401bf1a81e64178fc1e516b86ea8b
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00189.txt'
45124e7c1fd7cb80aa101c3d28f762a8
f7503eb0171509559d083aecf4eac9bdd1412b87
describe
'11998' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
1d2dab0f35c87a1afe97a91370b645f0
14523bcb3b68de694087f5ef2caa5ce64e3732e7
describe
'931741' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
4cd396cbc1dbca80fd6c2881dd50ae37
8e8aef41a0a6ea27dcfe7207b871fade7dabc786
describe
'106301' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
414b6fb616c58ff2a24636b34fdbbf5b
78348a2b88f3e77779137dd105e28f58159fb29b
describe
'34002' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00190.pro'
f372d1ef797e30e30aa86beddf2d0831
2d2c65fa91cf62916bfba62fb4042e1f3075e96a
describe
'39512' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
9ad7e7d2e8830bdb6c31a58cb15734e4
589836c2df4850524c308d41e3ad3724f9442314
describe
'7463703' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00190.tif'
fd140284d342c6825532ad7434abeeee
6f36a0115a51527725d32e33a00a47b6b3c35c89
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00190.txt'
500d8c1e5abe7bc5da08a7f866319f5d
e0c13afe0c82712be49f1a8cd11e69a4ef4cc91a
describe
'11912' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
144c98641a5fa3e74f553b94d3daf527
e6576a5315f41c093eb834bc31d7f65c481082fd
describe
'922852' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
d0a44bf5e5c2d6312e6c2c52dd007187
0c0e73796225c3649369cc739e97837acbd95cb9
describe
'106988' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
2f3f9cdf3c970b4157706ee8a1675468
6f63578a936ce3874b90011f2e9606ededf347d9
describe
'35773' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00191.pro'
fe10daf9642598cfc4a295d44d4210ff
92ae2c179d550176169462c353122115fbd204f5
describe
'40224' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
a165385f5a4982dd40a6033728e22deb
3de55ed59c87e3f838c3f1342d21e5b9d2e57439
describe
'7392061' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00191.tif'
1ee2c0b9272c04c1a693ede412f67e84
cd564da6f63dd2572efb191f011c8b1262e6bc43
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00191.txt'
783d3d21aff7fc5e0ed3b7330987c2dc
120532f396710b2363b92378fd1b8be0411efbe4
describe
'12859' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
873e1206d23f06dffaa58772e64e52d9
3d5fb3de0d33ad73cc2b936be3d38f236fea9edd
describe
'933783' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
2a660786373e57469fd55ceacbfb1e08
d91c0e2796afdfab938f40755ecf433f51e11136
describe
'95587' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
0359d8d662e31ecf88892fbcf232089b
16a076c270c8729b92563895b7147f8896333f39
describe
'30812' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00192.pro'
a27b55b0106062d3e11fa668cb7ce0a5
bed491e968f3db44274e27cac41a1d86a9286da7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
b79a2a813e3be910cc6bbbfd99f0cf28
8ee3a4f69e2bde9bf77ae514deb89d62cb1361c7
describe
'7480463' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00192.tif'
eb56f59a8b8c22d5ba6561edd15ac4b1
b77f5032f8609a73031b822b22e19c8d1efb7a4f
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00192.txt'
30c627ce771b14fcf4b7e766e6e2a56a
a1ee0579383c122517d9eadbd90eefa12cf37edf
describe
'10828' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
2d91209697dc80e8bbf58f02ebbb6e74
13983e73d582d92f16a6ead59b029edd70d80e15
describe
'929513' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
967a97d126feaefc66af2410e20ec290
8b52df858cfdf24a3a9c2f1cd45802e7b430bdbc
describe
'70759' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
04bc4f96593b92607a1d82d6d8e065e6
e04266d25782ce6a27e68e026d809f0d58a981c5
describe
'15787' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00193.pro'
c16a54bf94cec9735f2858740d54a2d5
1ee91848f39665d79676eb5956c2da66050f4b1f
describe
'24897' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
8ff62e332791d195b0b22ea6fb11236c
35889eb345d186db12d2c910522099484865ba10
describe
'7445253' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00193.tif'
0d7e81711121bcf40c807e14d9b68c26
52554727eae3ff1a68dcd3fcf8310b407e47a6bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00193.txt'
3caad12cf7f311f321a8f096b272aa38
12892a584218aaac453c1de42c949ae54a6efb1e
describe
'8255' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
b71304ed682592b6695fcfef435cbebb
1d623170b06943f69b8f76e541ee94f613bd3019
describe
'931833' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZL' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
ed5bd1d156ca7322c39ffddbf7ad014a
1f616b0598c973f4446dc8653a3b3e3dc66e99f7
describe
'93079' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZM' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
7da64926630784154e9f8fb8d20dbcdc
37b2ed4e16a53557940fc47881702e80751a6dc2
'2011-11-17T03:25:30-05:00'
describe
'30074' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZN' 'sip-files00194.pro'
604954fb1347765d3a260d84eb128bab
ca0e55d124abf7710cea05b4a9f6f6c1f7831079
describe
'33964' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZO' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
b431989bdcfaed733e1ea82d95eb9a51
4f289580656453c77ed725939985b51f513ebea9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZP' 'sip-files00194.tif'
722cd3b358f9b8f3c815f6ff6a4c8b88
149fab029a90d70dd123722b22d2c296550a7c8f
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files00194.txt'
bd0224a86195412c9a167c4c3c3504cb
4d5695020b1ff02b10f0de254946426aa9ca5e12
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZR' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
ccbaa1945ddfc039d99f529615a4c6ab
eb740e817be852e99f8a3ac7f18e352fcb4124b9
describe
'920289' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZS' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
630a10e0171ab22bd862f8b95c553bd6
f9b4e398d6ff6101acb7b2cb6e1ebb561486cc6a
describe
'99942' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZT' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
d1bde44e980a0dbb645d1a53429280f9
5795006cac4cff9c54ff3eb1e95359e08f739592
describe
'33572' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZU' 'sip-files00195.pro'
a40d469e2be8a835db502497a1194086
0783b7a66f5d9fd7c4bc01e305a34f92d1e7098b
describe
'37579' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZV' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
629e126fb0a10818f9af1e7a6e1b9bc8
6f3145dba46f887a3b4ef5ac91dde267a6a1f3c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZW' 'sip-files00195.tif'
965e6f7be42d40736d0d34725f5089c6
c6d412eb307a4cca5de7ad2014a54c8560088a9c
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZX' 'sip-files00195.txt'
7bde42a904781abcd33e3e3019d3b7a7
45368588c7e5cd07bffe66e2a100baeb2956dc47
describe
'11738' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZY' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
3c87eb38a07d7d014fb0bee6989b4489
ce6a2f58ac79842adaae0938fc0a993487e75e62
describe
'929711' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
d77c7172410cc740a971e38449844ce6
c42f766d4e6fdd3cdccce54e631689fe38239b80
describe
'103409' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAA' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
ee8f05ec7d224b6d8a4482b8d94e5717
93e3029d2ea3830aaf174ede6a896c246c364e03
describe
'33542' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAB' 'sip-files00196.pro'
6231e4a89211597bd9d9eddd36d54a89
cd727308ecd08f08dccb45705ba7ad688145ef16
describe
'38973' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAC' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
d1465dc4ac6f580c2269451efe6a7675
76a827e5cfc9679a0058ffd877be6f976f28e797
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAD' 'sip-files00196.tif'
d63f464f61f566ef967e3a7875d4fb3f
b62987856f24427bfc722442ff8656ad7f464329
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAE' 'sip-files00196.txt'
574921511d628534aa8af82dd6bad569
7d317153bf68cfd9c931b2859c32adcde0e1da36
describe
'11798' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAF' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
73de96c9744711277865f76f5a64d0e4
0ed52fde8837f8025601966ed460bbffe9ac98f6
describe
'911590' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAG' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
dee4dfdc96da2462501a1236ec3ffd26
8152e5a504e2547f356f97faadae3adb89c982b2
describe
'97621' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAH' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
44cc15d8991e75cf475d835e4b197f00
f11a8a14c5c641fac8b509edcd2b40a8c89489c9
describe
'31112' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAI' 'sip-files00197.pro'
54d8eaeff7af01c27bab8830173e8020
6abfbb44c91974fda0623f6f6b9c6a6e1cfdf1ed
describe
'36154' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAJ' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
e775b41a98b8c6bf1ca349b5e9770d59
c8c006bcdb8caba1a5d7db8ac3802a361db52cef
describe
'7299469' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAK' 'sip-files00197.tif'
265c177090dafc2aa406db0fc30a9441
5fdfbece399d43bf800da322c200a94a7106a201
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAL' 'sip-files00197.txt'
98182e5891a13bf0e33f0b0ba30477c1
4eaaee352b77ed531c33dc94c7e3c75de19ac78c
describe
'12318' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAM' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
be13234f4c2d816fbebfbb2aef522949
1c3f11b0d4172c5c7e781c40c34f0eac010f26f7
describe
'937473' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAN' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
7a910cd92f8975bdaa0ab58911936a69
df92fd680e892e218f8d49f31ee6db276db9006a
describe
'104400' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAO' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
23462fda9b94bdcb0f20ff92d2c76fe2
a8a7085cbcbd79df0df2c5ece17949cd6699aed0
describe
'34831' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAP' 'sip-files00198.pro'
31cdd60df1e138b3170f5eafba883e32
ab6552d4bfac3965df565b5b55df1c4291b2278e
describe
'39508' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAQ' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
121b23481712468da7fbabca8025d87c
4c0a0c99047f35e867b4b49e0432e941790105e8
describe
'7509031' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAR' 'sip-files00198.tif'
5fef4f116346a3425ae5e2484c65dd94
2bd21b3906e5b8b0799312aa76a4d8ea102c8124
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEPfileF20080923_AAARAS' 'sip-files00198.txt'
3583867fdd53c50eec3940262e85d85d
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describe
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Frank and his father. p. 9.
NETHERTON:

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AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,

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FRANK NETHERTON:

THE TALISMAN,



BEVISED BY THE COMMITTEE OF PUBLICATI &

rT TT TT TT TS

PHILADELPHIA:
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION

1122 CuestNuT Srreet.
cn ALL ID



Entered according 10 act of Congress in the year 1852, by the
AMERICAN SUNDA Y-SCHOOL UNION,
én the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of
Pennsyivunia.
mi A ——

Bap No books are published by the AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION
without the sanction of the Committee of Publication, sonsisting of
fourteen members, from the following denominations of Christians,
viz. Baptist, Methodist, Congregationalist, Episcopal, Presbyterian, Lu-
theran and Reformed Dutch. Not more than three of the members
san be of the same denomination, and no book can be published te
whieh any member of the Committee shall object.
CONTENTS

bac
FRAME WORM wince decsnrsnesncien vidiuilinnimeniiined: ae
BRIGHTER DAYS... ..+00+ tte enececsen ene oa ee
BD Sic cstentcne vintitinencinninn crccecsce coveccccncccese | A
FRANK LEAVES HOME... ...ccscccccscocccccces cccccccccccecece §6 SB
I Taian scnieienieienntinnicennivailitinia aceseccecces 89
BLESSED ARE THE PEACEMAKERS .....00ssesseseee es cccccce 46
A SABBATH-DAY AT SCHOOL.......eeeeeee scvcccccccccccccce 88
LOVE TOUR WRB siicasncnnasreidicsccsciene sescccscscccece | OD
A. Baw HOsaWay, ocoscsssccscicescs ctnciibeentialiocs cosets cteves 68
Good RESOLUTIONS 22.06. seecee eee © cece coccccccccoscccces cocces 74
Sa, Ta iiss tenis vo doiiinenjiatltinbeiaaiaiaias tania oo OF
THERE IS NO PLACE LIKE HoME....... cote odeosoece coosee 88
AARON s crsiansrivceciinmieiienviaiii seis pipet 95
THE CHAMBER OF ANGER. ...00sccscesecs socsee cose cos cocsce 102
SAME BRI, ccccinnccnesnens 00 coscesces concccess cvnceces ccoccccee 100

VUss10NARY THOUGHTS....... «+s. bibtyeenen asaiuiies emanate 118
& CONTENTS

Gop Knows EvERY THING. .ocssseessocesesseeeneseree seers 125
A Time OF TRIAL.. cossossee sosese crosses senvestorensare coeeee ees 133
THE CONFESSION...+++sseee cesses cosees seers saretes eaeene scence 14@
SUNSHINE AFTER STORM... scssssoes sveseoes coreneeee seers — 2
RETRIBUTION «.seseeeceeeeeseerencoeeres covccecs ‘ccneniien ae"
THE MYSTERY EXPLAINED. soeesseee eoooeeees eoeeereee voeee: 164
BETTER THAN A PRIZE. ..+0++ cesses veeces seeeeevveees sececeers 174
Home FOR THE HOLIDAYS... eoncecses covseceee ccececes sees 181

THE ERD. cocccccce coccccces coccce cocccs 00000 0eee: © +» Ceeece o: cece 191


FRANK NETHERTON,



CHAPTER I.
FRANK NETHERTON.

Tue mother of Frank Netherton died at his
birth, and from that time his father would
scarcely suffer him to be out of his sight. No
one thought that the infant would have lived ;
but God, who tempers the- wind to the shorn
lamb, took care of the little, motherless one,
and raised him up to be a comfort to his sur-
viving parent. Frank was never so happy as
when seated on his little stool at his father’s
feet, learning “something new,” as he termed
it; or listening to the wonderful histories of
foreign lands which he used to tell him.

When Frank was six years old he knew more
than most boys of ten or twelve, and was so
quick and diligent that it was a pleasure to
teach him. Many people rernarked, and with
truth, that he understood almost too much for
his age; and that he often sat poring over his
book when he ought to have keen plv ying about

9
10 FRANK NETHERTON.

in the green fields. That might have been
partly the reason why he was not strong and
healthy like other children, but used often to
come and rest his weary head against his fa
ther’s knee, and ask him to repeat the story of
the child who went out to his father among the
reapers, and said to him all on a sudden, ‘“‘ My
head! my head!” and was borne home to his
mother and died, and was raised again by the
power of God. Frank liked all the Old Testa-
ment histories, but this was his favourite at
suck times, and he never grew tired of hear-

he

+, Netherton was a man of studious and
retired habits. After the death of his wife,
whom he tenderly loved, he cared less than
ever for society, and wholly devoted himself to
his books and the education of his little son.
But his health rapidly declined; so rapidly of
late, that the old housekeeper, who had lived
in the family for many years, and was much
attached to her master, thought it her duty to
write to his sister, (the only relative he had in
the world,) and confide to her the fears she felt
for the result.

Mrs. Mortimer set off immediately on receiv-
ing the letter, and arrived quite unexpectedly,
and much to the surprise of every one but the
faithful domestic before mentioned. The bro-
ther and sister had not met since the death of
his wife. She had been opposed to their mar-
riage; but all unkind feeling on both sides was
FRANK NETHERTON. 11

ouriel in the grave, and Mrs. Mortimer em
braced her little nephew with almost maternas
affection.

“Le is very like you, William,” said she,
looking at her brother with the tears in her
eyes. “ But how short for his age! Why, my
Frederick, who is only a year older, is more
than head and shoulders taller. And how pale
he is! I am afraid that he does not take exer-
cise enough. William, you are killing this boy
by inches.”

“My dear sister!” exclaimed Mr. Nether-
ton. “But he is not ill. You are not ill,
Frank, are you?” and he trembled as he took
the boy’s little thin hand in his.

“No, father; my head does not ache to-
day.”

«Go away, child,” said Mrs. Mortimer.
“Go into the garden and amuse yourself.”

Frank immediately obeyedsher; but he took
his book with him, and sat down under the trees
to read it.

“You are killing the boy, I tell you,” re.
peated Mrs. Mortimer, when he was gone, “and
yourself too. The air of this close room is ab-
solutely poisonous. No wonder the poor child
looks so pale and miserable. You must get him
a pony the first thing.”

“He shall have one to-morrow,” said Mr.
Netherton.

“And you must ride and walk with him
every day,”
12 FRANK NETHERTON.

«JT do not think that I could walk very fur,”
said her brother, with a sigh—thus uncon
sciously admitting his own weakness.

“ Not just at first perhaps; and yet how you
and I used to walk, William! Do you re-
member ?”’

“Yes; we were children at that time.’’

“ About the age of our children now. Do
you imagine that Frank could walk as you did
then ?”’

“T am afraid not.

“Well, well, I will not say (as I have heard
some people) that what is done cannot be un-
done, but will try and help you to undo it aa
fast as possible. Look at the boy now. In-
stead of playing about like other children, there
he is, lying under the trees, reading. William,

ou will be very sorry for all this if you should
ose your child.”

«{ am sorry now,” replied the sick man,
meekly. ‘ You are right, dear sister. I am
afraid that I have been very thoughtless and
selfish. God forgive me. You will stay here
a little while, will you not, and help me to
amend the past 2”

Mrs. Mortimer was touched by his gentle
ness .and forbearance, and with much kindness
of manner promised not to leave the Grange
until they were both better.

Mrs. Mortimer was by several years older than
her brother, and had always exercised upon
him that influence which a strong mind invari-

99

~~
FRANK NETHERTON. 13



abty possesses over a weak one, until his mar
riage, which, as before stated, she had opposed.
It matters little now what her reasons were for
this opposition. She thought herself right at
the time, but was very sorry for it afterwards,
and when, alas! it was toolate. She wrote and
told her brother this; but, with his loss stil]
fresh upon his mind, his reply to her letter was
such as prevented all intercourse between them
for some years.

Beneath a somewhat rough exterior, Mrs.
Mortimer possessed a kind heart, and much
practical good sense, which only required at
tunes to be exercised in a gentler spirit. At
the period of which we are speaking she was a
widow, with one son, Frederick, and a little
girl, whom she called Helen, after her sister-in-
law. Mr. Netherton was pleased when she told
him of this mark of attention, and beggeil
earnestly that the child might be sent for, anid
that Frederick might also be permitted to spend
his holidays at the Grange ; to all of which Mrs,
Mortimer willingly agreed.

“Tam so glad that you are come,”’ said he.
“Tt was very kind in you, after that cruel letter.
I have often thought of sending to ask you, but
I put it off from time to time, and should have
done so, I believe, until it was too late. I used
to think, when I am dying she will not refuse
to forgive and come to me again.”

if We were both to blame,” answered Mrs.

ortimer, with tears in her eyes: “I the most
14 FRANK NETHERTON.

eo; but my little Helen must plead for me.
Now do not let us say any thing more about
added she, observing that her brother looked
pale and exhausted; ‘and I will write at once
and make arrangements for her coming.”

But before Mrs. Mortimer began to write, she
went into the garden and took Frank’s book
away, bidding him run about, and not lie there
on the damp grass.

«“ Have you a hoop ?” she asked.

“Yes, aunt, I believe 0.”

“Well, we must look for it; and when your
cousin Frederick comes, he will teach you all
sorts of games. Shall you not like to have some
one to play with?”

“Yes, very much,” answered Frank; “but
I like being with my father.”

“ Are any of these flower-beds your's?” in-
quired his aunt.

“No, the gardener takes care of them.”

“We must ask your father to give you one
to dig and plant, and do what you please with—
shall we? And a little rake, and a hoe, and a
watering-pot 2”

Frank’s eyes glistened with pleasure.

«That would be delightful !” exclaimed he.
And then slipping his hand into Mrs. Morti-
mer’s, he added, in a confidential tone, “It is
very strange, but I was just reading about
fowers when you came into the garden; and
bow some bloom till December, while others
perish in May. I think that if I were a flower,

ee
FRANK NETHERTON. 15



dear aunt, I would rather die in May, when
every thing looks so bright.”’

‘“‘ But as you are not a flower, Frank, but a
little boy, I do not see any use in thinking
about it.”

‘“‘ One cannot help thinking,” said Frank.

““What a little, old-fashioned thing he is,’
murmured his aunt. ‘But then Frederick
might have been the same if he had had no
mother ;” and passing her hand carelessly over
his long hair, which she inwardly determined
should be cut off the first opportunity, and
cautioning him not to remain after the dew
began to fall, she went into the house to write
her letters.


it FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER Il.

BRIGHTER DAYS.

Wuen Frank returned to the study, he four.¢ ©
his father still sitting where he had left him,
with his face bent down and buried in his
hands.
«Are you ill?” he asked, gently. Mr.
Netherton started, and drawing Frank towards
him, embraced him in silence.
“Father,” exclaimed Frank, after a pause,
‘vou are thinking of what my aunt said just
now about me ; but indeed I do not want to live
after you are gone.
_ Mr. Netherten aroused himself at the voice
of his child, and, struggling against his own
weakness, both of mind and body, answered
cheerfully.

“You must not say that, Frank. I hope,
‘f it is God’s will, that you may live to be a
reat and good man, and do good to others.”

“Like Howard, for instance, who went about
visiting all the prisons. How much good he
flid !” se
“Yes; you must study hard while you are
a boy—‘that is, not too hard; and when you
are a man, there is no fear but what God will
give you something to do for himself aud others.
%

FRANK NETHERTON. 17



*‘Y should like to be a missionary, such as
Henry Martyn was, whose life you were reading
the other morning.”

‘‘ There is time enough to think what you wil!
be ten years hence. And now I will tell you
something that I think will give you pleasure.
You remember the pretty bay pony which you
admired so much the other day ?”’

‘Oh yes, to be sure I do.” |

“Well, it is your’s; and to-morrow you shall
begin to learn to ride.”

Frank clapped his hands for joy.

“ But will you not ride too, father ?”’

‘Yes, as soon as ever you are able to accom-
pany me.”

“* Flow delightful that will be! How kind in
you to think of it!”

“It was your aunt who first thought of it,
Frank; so you must thank her. I need not
tell you to be very obedient to her, and to do
all that she bids you, for I am sure that it will
be for your good.”

Frank promised that he would. And then
he related to his father what she had said
about the garden, and obtained his willing con-
sent that a small portion of it should be allotted
to Frank’s exclusive use.

“T will see the gardener about ‘t the first
thing to-morrow morning,” said Mr. Netherton,
“and order him to procure tools suited to your
size and strength, and whatever seeds or cuttings
you may require.”

ae
&

18 FRANK NETHERTON.



“T must ask my aunt about that,” said
Frank.

At that moment Mrs. Mortimer entered the
study, and smilingly inquired what he was
going to ask her with-that radiant countenance.

“T declare the boy has quite a colour,” said
she, pinching his flushed cheek. ‘“‘ But come
to tea now, and then to bed. I never allow my
children to sit up late. You know the old
_ William,” added she, turning to her

rother,

«s¢Early to bed, and early to rise,
Makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.’ ”

“JT knew a great many things once that I
have forgotten,” replied Mr. Netherton, as he
offered her his arm. ‘“ You must remind me
of them, my dearest sister.”

«To be sure I will. Come along, Frank.”
And her cheerful voice sounded pleasantly in
the long silent halls of the old Grange, where
no female, except the domestics, had ever come
since the death of its gentle mistress.

“But about the seeds, aunt,” said Frank,
as soon as they were seated at the table.
«“ What sort had I better have ?”’

“Come to me to-morrow morning, and we
will talk it over. You will find me in the gar-
den by six o'clock.”

«“ Six o'clock !”” repeated Frank.

“Well, is that tor early? Do you not think
FRANK NETHERTON. 19



that you are as capable of getting up early as
[ am ?”

“‘Why, I suppose you are used to it, aunt.”

Mrs. Mortimer could not help smiling.

“And you must get used to it, too, Frank,
Do you understand any thing of arithmetic ?”

“Yes, aunt.”

“Well, then, to-morrow you shall calculate
for yourself how many years are wasted in
an average lifetime by lying in bed in the
morning.”

“And the shorter the life is,” said Frank,
thoughtfully, ‘the less we can spare them. I
will begin to-morrow morning. I am deter-
mined.”

“Do so, my dear boy, and you will soén
reap the benefit of it every way. And in order
that you may be the better able to keep your
good resolutions, I would advise your going to
hed at once.” | : ,

Frank was very obedient; and hastily swal-
lowing his tea, he arose from his chair, and
went away without another word,—having first
kissed his father, and held up his face to his
aunt with an affectionate confidence that come
pletely won her heart. |
_ “God bless you, my child!” said Mrs. Mor-
timer; and then turning to his father she
added, “IT need not ask whether you have
taught him to pray. Whatever you may have
neglected, Williaw Iam sure that you have not
forgotten that.”

t
20 FRANK NETHERTON.

After Frank was gone, Mr. Nethertcn and
nis sister had a long and earnest conversation
together, in which he admitted the justice and
good sense of all her plans, and promised his
assistance in carrying them into practice. And
then they both kneeled down and asked God's
blessing upon the future, without which they
could never hope to succeed, leaving the result
to Him who orders all things for the best, and
who, as Mr. Netherton said, had sent her to
save his child.

From that time Mr. Netherton ceased to
talk to Frank of the past, but spoke cheerfully
and hopefully of the present and of the future.
And when -he did allude (as he could not help
occasionally doing) to her who was never long
absent from his thoughts, he spoke of the joy
that it would give her—if angels are permitted
to behold what passes upon earth—to see her
beloved child good and happy.

Since Mrs. Mortimer’s arrival, a change
seemed to have come over the whole establish-
ment at the Grange. Some of the servants were
sent away, and no one missed them; while the
others were obliged to do their duty, and, above
all, to attend public worship regularly on the
Sabbath, besides being ready for family worship,
which Mr. Netherton conducted with his hcuse-
hold morning and evening. At such times, or
when she listened to the merry voices of Frank
and his cousin Helen, and saw her master
smilingly regarding their childish sports, the
FRANK NETHERTON. 21



faithful housekeeper blessed the hour when God
had put it into her heart to write zhe letter
which had brought back Mrs. Mortimer to the
home of her childhood, and made them all
friends again.

Helen was a quiet, good-tempered little girl,
and Frank soon became very fond of her, and
used to give ner all his prettiest flowers, and
was never weary of playing with her, and re-
lating stories, the greater part of which she did
not half understand.

‘‘ How much cousin Frank knows!’ said He.
Jen one day to her mother. |

“Yes, I dare say it appears so to you, Helen,
who are only a little girl.”

Frank coloured.

“I do not believe that Frederick knows half
as many wonderful things,” persisted Helen.
‘“‘Tell mother about the nasturtiums, cousin.
Only think, dear mother, on summer nights they
actually—what was it, cousin ?”

‘‘Kmit,” interrupted Frank.

“Emit sparks of fire. Who was it that first
saw them, Frank ?”’

“The daughter of Linnzus, the great bota-
nist.”

“T forget what you told me botany meant.”

“The natural history of plants and vegeta-
bles,”’ replied her mother ; “in which Linneus,
by great perseverance and application, was well
skilled. It has been said of him, that he never
took « thing in hand which he did not resolutely
-

22 FRANK NETHER1 DN.



accomplish and bring to an end; and therein
lies the secret of his success. Application and
ebservation are two very desirable ualifica-
tions. It was doubtless by means of the latter
that his daughter made the discovery about the
nasturtiums. We may all make discoveries, if
we will only learn to use our eyes.”

« «Byes and no eyes,’ Helen. You remem-
ber that story?” said her cousin. “ How I
should like it if you and I could make some
wonderful discovery !”

«“ But we are only children,” answered Helen,
meekly.

“[ have heard my father say,” continued
Frank, ‘‘that it was two little children who
first invented, or led to the invention of the
telescope. ‘They were playing one day in their
father’s shop at Middleburg—we will look for
Middleburg on the map when we go in—and
chanced to set up two pieces of glass, such as
are used in making spectacles, at a little dis-
tance from each other, when, to their great sur-
prise, they saw the church steeple, which was
in reality a long way off, nearer than they had
ever seen it before, and every thing else as near
in comparison. Did you ever look through a
telescope, Helen ?”’

“Yes, once when we were by the seaside ;
and.it seemed to bring the ships close to the
shore, so that we could see what some of the
men were doing on board.” ,

“Well, I suppose the children could not see
FRANK NETHERTON. 4



quite 30 plainly as that; but they were ver
much astonished, and ran to tell their father
what they had discovered, who immediately
procured some pieces of glass of the same size,
which he fixed in tubes; and so the telescope
was first invented.”

“How strange, was it not, mother?” gaid

elen.

“Not strange, my dear, but very interesting.
It was observation led tothe invention of the tele-
Scope, and application which finally brought it
to its present perfection. Iam glad, my dear
Frank, to find how well you remember what
you read and hear. After dinner I will have
the great telescope fixed up on the balcony, an¢
you shall both look through it as long as yo:
please.”

-—
ul ita
e MiNi
A

es |
hw" |) QQ

.

i} tt | \ vr ny
Ha Wi \
Hi 3 \ KY =i


24 FRANK NETUERTON.



CHAPTER Il.

THE COUSINS.

In was a hippy day for Helen when het
brother arrived to spend his holidays at the
Grange ; for she was very fond of him, notwith-
standing he used to tease her a great deal.
Frederick, as his mother had observed, although
only a year older than his cousin Frank, was
at least a head and shoulders taller. He was
a, fine, active, high-spirited boy, somewhat wilful
and overbearing, but good-natured and warl-
hearted.

Nothing could be more unlike in appearance
and disposition than the two cousins. re-
derick was cheerful and talkative, and often
said a great many things which were better
left unsaid; and for which, (although he was
too proud to acknowledge it,) he was sorry
afterwards. Frank was_ Iso cheerful, but
quieter. When he did speak, it was generally
to the purpose. Frederick was so restless that
+t was with difficulty he could sit still, or fix his
attention. upon any subject for more than a
few moments at a time. Frank sat and studied
too much, and seldom cared to take that exer-
cise and relaxation which is 80 necessary, as
well as natural, for the young. The one wante
application, the other activity.
Frank Netherton.


Coa

FRANK NETHERTON. 2



Frederick was proud and sensitive: the fear
of ridicule, or the laughter of his companions,
would turn him away even from what he knew
to be right. He was not physically, but morally,
a coward. He was afraid to think for himself.
Frank was singularly fearless both in mind and
body. He always said what he thought, with-
out caring what others thought of him. Mr.
Netherton had been very anxious to encourage
this feeling ; but he also never failed to remind
him, that although the truth must be spoken at
all times, it should be spoken in love; that we
may be perfectly sincere, without being hersh
orunkind. To be sure, Frank had yet to arn
whether he could bear being ridiculéd for his
opinions.

It is strange how the fear of God casts out
the fear of man. If we can feel quite ture
that God approves of our tho ughts and actions,
how trifling, in comparison, appears the approval
of others! 2 ee |

The cousins had been talking together a few
weeks after Frederick’s arrival, at

“I dare say,” observed he, “that I am just
as good as you, only I do not make such a fuss
about it. If I did, I should be well laughed at
at school, I can tell you.”

“I do not pretend to be good,” answered
Frank; “but I do not see why I should be
ashamed of trying to be bet ter, or of talking
about that which can alone make me so.”

“It is all very well here, with my uncle
26 FRANK NETHERTON,
and little Helen; but we have no saints at
school.”

«T have heard my father say,” replied Frank,
“that the word saint is often used in the same
gense as believer. Are there no believers at
your school - ,

«“ Pghaw !”” exclaimed Frederick, impatiently.
“Do ane take us for heathens 7

«hen if Christians, why be ashamed of
Christ ?”’

“Jt is all very well at present,” said Frede-
rick, “but I should like to see what you would
do at school: and it is not improbable that 1
may, from what I overheard mother say yester-
day to my uncle. ; :

« Why, what could that be? But do not tell
me. If my father wishes me to know, he will
tell me himself.” :

“Should you like to g0 back. with me,
Frank ?”’

“JT do not know; I never thought about it.
I think I should; only I should be sorry to
leave my dear father. Wordsworth, I remem-
ber, calls his school-days ‘ the golden time.’ ”’

“Ah! that was when he was a man. But
can tell you that it is a great bore, having to
study so many hours, and being obliged to learn,
whether you like it or not. To be sure, the
play-time is pleasant enough; and the half-
holidays, when it does not rain. Dut I do not
know rhat you would do in play-time. Why,

ycu do not know a sin gle game.
FRANK NETHERION. 27



‘“‘T suppose I could learn.” ;

“T do not know,” replied Frede:ick, gazing
tather contemptuously at his cousin’s slight,
delicate form. ‘“‘ We call such fellows as you,
girls, at school.”

“Never mind, Frank,” said little Helen,
kindly. “I do not mind being called a girl.”

Neither of the cousins could help laughing.

“‘That is because you are a girl. But you
would mind being called a Tom-boy,”’ said her
brother.

“She need not,” interrupted Frank, “ be-
cause it would not be the truth. It does not
signify what any one says of us, if we know that
it is untrue.”

“Very well, Mr. Philosopher,” said Frede-
rick, shaking his head; “we shall see.”

Frederick was right in supposing that, in all
probability, his cousin would accompany him
back to school. When Mrs. Mortimer first
spoke of it to her brother, he instantly and
decidedly refused to part with him; but she
gradually succeeded in convincing him how
much it would be for Frank’s advantage in
every way, and a reluctant consent was at
length obtained.

“Be it so,” said Mr. Netherton. “Let him
go and form fresh connections and associations
that may be needful for him, should it please
God to take me away. As it is, I fear that such
an event would break the poor child’s heart.”

“Let us hope better things,” replied his
98 FRANZ NETHERTON.



sister, gently. “You are already considerably
stronger; and Frank is quite a different boy
from what he was a month ago.”

“Thanks to you.”

“Thanks to God! my dear brother. I trust,
if it be his will, you may be spared many years
to see your son become all that you could wish.
Frank is a noble little fellow; but as yet he is
only a dreamer. It will be good both for his
mind and body to associate for a time with other
boys, and learn to act as well as to think for
himself; and to join not only in their studies,
but their sports. It is not enough to be wise
and learned ; we must also be useful and active
—men and boys more especially.”

Mr. Netherton admitted that she was right,
with a sigh for his own helplessness. — Sorrow,
and a lingering, although painless disease, had
made him what he was: but‘it had not been so
in past days, and he could still anticipate a
brighter future for his child.

Frank could not help feeling sad at the

thought of leaving home, and, above all, his.

kind and indulgent parent, from whom he had
never before been separated, even for a single
day; but Mrs. Mortimer had warned him, for
that parent’s sake, to try and control his emo-
tion. The little fellow obeyed her as well as
he was able: but it was a hard trial for his for-
titude—almost his first trial. Even the bay
pony and the flower-garden came in for a share
of his regrets, although little Helen promised
FRANK NETHERTON. 81



to take the latter under her cwn .are; Mrs
Mortimer having consented to continue to re-
side at the Grange, at least for the present.

Frederick did very little towards encouraging
his young companion, for he warned him he
must not look to him for every thing, but fight .
his own battles, as he himself had been obliged
to do when he first went to school. To which
Frank replied, that he did not want any one to
fight his battles, and that he had no doubt but
what he should do very well, although, in his
heart, he could not help thinking his cousin
somewhat unkind.

It was not ill-nature, but the fear of being
laughed at, which made Frederick determine to
hold back until he had seen how Frank was
likely to be received. He felt half ashamed
that a cousin of his should be so profoundly
ignorant of all that he thought it necessary for
a school-boy to know.

‘What is the use of his Greek and Latin,”
argued. Frederick, ‘“‘when he understands no-
thing of cricket, and cannot even play at foot
ball? And then he is such a little fellow—
though, to be sure, he cannot help that—and
has such old-fashioned notions. He is sure to
be quizzed.”
382 FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER IV.
FRANK LEAVES HOME.

_ THE ev»ning before Frank left home, he went
into the study to have what he called “a last
look.” ‘There stood his father’s easy chair, and
his own little stool on which he had so often sat
at his feet, and listened to his conversation, in
which amusement, instruction, and something
higher still, were ever carefully blended to-
gether; where he had so often heard his fayour-
_ ite story of the child and the reapers. And
now he was going away for months, and he
might never hear that dear father’s voice again.
Child as he was, Frank knew the sad meanin
of the word death. His little heart was full to
bursting ; and kneeling down before the chair,.
he buried his head in its cushions, and wept.

Mr. Netherton entered unperceived, and
thinking that he was praying, stood a moment
unwilling to.interrupt him, while his own heart
ascended in earnest supplication to the throne
of grace; until aroused by a passionate sob.

“My son, my dear son!” exclaimed Mr
Netherton, bending over him. The sight of his
pale face recalled to Frank his aunt’s warning,
and he hastily arose.
FRANK NETHERTON. 38



“Forgive me,” said he. “TI could not help
weeping just for a moment when I thought of
all the happy hours we have spent there together. -
But I dare say that I shall be very happy at
school after a time.”

“T hope so, Frank. You must write to me.
My chief pleasure when you are uway, will be to
hear of your well-doing. It is pleasant to think
shat your cousin Frederick will be with you.”

Frank was too truthful to say yes; so he
said nothing. Mr. Netherton sat down in his
easy-chair, and Frank placed himself once again
at his feet.

“Tell me a story, father,” said he, after a
pause: “one more story, as you used to do
before my aunt came.”’

“There is no time for a story now, Frank;
or we shall keep that kind aunt waiting tea for
us. But I will tell you a little anecdote I read
the other day, and which I believe to be a
fact.”

“‘ A negro woman, in one of the West Indian
Islands, was once forbidden by her master to
attend public worship, and threatened with se-
vere punishment if she ventured to go. Although
a slave, the poor woman was a sincere and hum-
ble follower of Him who, when he was reviled,
reviled notagain. The greatest pleasure which
she had was in going to the house of God to
hear about the Lord Jesus Christ, and that
better land where there shall be no more sorrow
nor sighing, and which he had purchased for her
84 ¥YRANK NETHERTON.



with nis precious blood. Her disappow.tment
was great; but she only lifted up her hands and
eyes to heaven, and answered meekly, ‘I must
tell de Lord dat.’ It is said that this touching
reply,—this quiet appeal to a higher tribunal,—
so affected her owner that he no longer refused
the desired permission. God softened the heart
of the master, for the sake of his poor, oppressed
servant.”

“‘T like that!” said Frank.

“And will you endeavour to remember it,
my dear boy; and bring all your little trials
and troubles to the Lord, to your heavenly
Father—in full assurance of his love and tender
compassion for Jesus’ sake? Commit your way
unto the Lord, and he will bring it ‘to pass.
Tell your difficulties and disappointments to
him. Leave every thing in his hands. He
knoweth best, and will do for us above all that we
can desire or deserve. You believe this, Frank ?”

“Tam sure of it,” replied the boy, raising
his bright, trustful glance to his father’s face.

“Tt is well, And now I have a present for
you, my dear boy, which I think you will like,”
said Mr. Netherton, placing a small clasped
Bible in the hands of his son. “I need not tell
you to value it.”

“Oh, thank you, dear father. I do like it
very much indeed,” replied Frank, with glis-
tening eyes.

“You will read a chapter, as usual, morning
and evening,” said Mr. Netherton. “And you
FRANK NETHERTON. 85



must not neglect to pray at the same time. 1
know that you will have a great deal to do and
to think of at school, and very little time to
yourself; but, as the good Mr. Cecil observes,
‘a Christian will find his parenthesis for prayer
even through his busiest hours.’ ”

‘I suppose he meant that he would make it,”
said Frank.

“It is not improbable that such was his mean-
ing. But I have one more thing to say. Iam
not afraid of your being idle, Frank, so much
as I am that you will study too hard. Remem-
ber that I would rather see a little colour in

our cheeks, than the first prize in your hand.”
He could not trust himself to add more; but
Frank knew by the faltering voice, and the
trembling of the hand which rested upon his
shoulder, how tenderly he was beloved, and pro-
mised faithfully to recollect and obey his injune-
tions; after which they went into the drawing-
room to tea. .

Notwithstanding all Mrs. Mortimer’s efforts to
the contrary, in which she was warmly seconded
by her son, the evening passed gloomily away.
Little Helen wept at the thought of parting
with her “two brothers,” as she called them ;
and Frank, but for shame, would fain have sat
down and mingled his tears with hers. Al-
thcugh he endeavoured to exert himself to ap-
poe cheerful, his heart was sad whenever he

ooked up and met his father’s gaze fixed ear-
nestly upor him. |
86 FRANK NETILERTON.



Tt had been arranged that the boys were te
start by an early coach on the following murn-
ing, accompanied by a trustworthy domestic;
and Mr. Netherton had promised not to attempt
to rise at so unusual an hour: the parting,
therefore, was to take place at night. Frank
bore it bravely for his father’s sake.

“What if I should never see him again!”
exclaimed Mr. Netherton, as the door closed.

‘Let us hope better things,” said his sister ;
“but endeavour, nevertheless, to say, ‘God's
will be done.’ ”’

Mr. Netherton bent down his head, and his
whispered “Amen” spoke of a meek and chas-
tened spirit.

Mrs. Mortimer came into Frank’s room after
he was in bed. The pillow was wet with his
tears, and he turned away his head, that she
might not see how freely he had wept.

“Never mind, Frank,” said his aunt,—ten-
derly embracing him. “It is natural that you
should grieve at leaving home for the first time.
You have shown a great deal of self-control
before your poor father, and I am much pleased
with you.”

“Do you think my father so very ill?” asked
Frank, earnestly.

“He requires great care ; but there is nothing
at present that need render you uneasy. Ineed
not tell you that he will be taken good care of
in your absence.”

“ And if he should be worse ?”—
FRANK NETHERTON. 87



‘1 will send for you at once :—not that you ~
could do any good, but because it would be a
comfort to you.”

“My dear, dear aunt, how kind you are!”
exclaimed Frank, throwing his arms round her
neck. ‘ How much I love you!”

“T am glad of that. I want you to love me,
and to look upon me as a mother.”

A pang of sorrow went through Mrs. Morti-
mer’s heart as she pronounced the last word ;
but Frank’s affectionate caresses soothed her
again.

“Now go to sleep,” said she, (after a pause,
and laying him gently back on the pillow,)
“that you may be able to rise early to-morrow
morning. I hope that you and Frederick will
be good friends. I give you the same advice I
have always given him. Let nothing induce you
to deviate from the truth, or to tell tales of your
companions. The liar and the talebearer are
despised. Study in school, and play out of it.
The more exercise you take, the better. Be
neither a tyrant nor a slave; but kind, and ever
ready to oblige. Do your duty; and always
endeavour to act rightly, without caring about
the consequences. Have no fear but the fear
of God. May he bless and watch over you, my
dear child, for Jesus’ sake !”

Again Mrs. Mortimer kissed his cheek, and
Wrank felt a tear there that was not his own;
but before he could speak, she was gone.

Frank did not see his father again hefore he
88 FRANK NETHERTON.



started; but when he bent forward to catch a
last glimpse of the old Grange, he noticed that
the blind in Mr. Netherton’s room was drawn
slightly aside, and felt that he watched and
blessed him.

“Do not cry, Frank,” said his cousin, at
length. “ After all, you will not find a school-
life so bad, when once you are used to it. I
rather like going back now. But to be sure, I
felt as you do at first.”

“Tt is not that. I should not so much mind
going to school,” said Frank, “if I were quite
sure of finding all right on my return.”

“You are thinking of your father. He will
get better.” :

“Oh, I hope so!” ,

“Tam sure of it,” repeated Frederick, en-
couragingly. ‘‘ My mother is a capital nurse.”

Frank did not reply; but after a few mo-
ments he wiped away his tears, and spoke cheer-
fully. He had placed the matter in God’s
hands, and asked him to take care of his dear
father for bim until he came back again.


FRANK NETHERTON. ag



CHAPTER V.
SCHOOL TRIALS.

Nea LY all the boys had returned, and were
assembled in the school-room when the cousins .
arrived. Mr. Campbell received them kindly,
and having shaken hands and exchanged a few
words with his new pupil, he introduced him to
his school-fellows, and consigning him more
especially to the care of his cbusin, left them
together.

Frederick had a thousand things to tell his
companion$ ; a thousand questions to ask and
answer as to where they had been, and what
they had done during the holidays; and Frank
meanwhile stood by, unnoticed and alone, and
feeling almost ready to cry. When at length
they did begin to notice him, he was not much
better off, for they only smiled and whispered
to one another ; and he observed that Frederick
appeared to be as much amused as the rest.
Frank began to look as well as feel very sad
and dismal in that room full of strange faces,
and a tear stole down his flushed cheek.

“What is the matter?’ asked one of the
boys. ‘Are you mother-sick already ?”

‘That cannot be,” answered Frank, “for I

have no mother.”’
‘
40 FRANK NETHERTON.



“Pvor little fellow! Leave him alone,” said
an authoritative voice. The boys drew back
and continued to whisper; all but one, whe
went up to where Frank stood, and holding out
his hand said in a low voice—

“J have no mother either. Let us be
friends.”

‘With all my heart,” replied Frank.

““{ did not hear what Mr. Campbell said your
name was ?”’

“Frank Netherton.”

‘Mine is Howard.”

“Have you been long at school?” asked
Frank. —

“Yes, nearly a twelvemonth; but I do not
like it better than the first day I came.”

“Mr. Campbell appears to be very kind.”

“So he is, when we do right. But the worst
of it is, I never can do right for a long time
together; and then he is very stern, and I get
so frightened that I do not know what I am
about.” .

‘‘Have you a father?” asked Frank.

“No, Taman orphan. My aunt is very kind
to me; only of course she does not love me as
well as her own children.”

“T, too, have an aunt,” said Frank; “anda
father also.”

“You are very young to come to school, are
you not ?”

“Only a rear younger than my cousin Fre-
derick.”’


FRANK NETHERTON. 41



“Then you are very little fcr your age.’

“That was what you were all laughing at, 1
suppose,” said Frank; “but I did not make
myself, you know.”

“Why, Philip Doyle did call you an odd
looking, old-fashioned little thing; and then
Mertimer said that you were as old as you
looked, and they would find it out by-and-by.”

“Tt was very unkind in Frederick to say
that,” observed Frank, colouring.

“JT do not think he meant it unkindly; but
he always laughs when the rest do.”

‘And who is Philip Doyle ?”

‘“‘One of the smartest boys, and one of the
greatest tyrants in the school. I would do any
thing rather than offend him. When once he
works himself into a passion, it is quite terrible
to see him, and a very little will do it.”

‘Who is it now talking to my cousin, and
looking at us ?”’

“Claude Hamilton. He is very bright too.
Every one loves Claude Hamilton. It was he
who interfered just now, when they were going
to tease. you for crying. Iam sure it is only
natural to cry when one comes to school for the
first time.”

“Tt may be natural, but I am afraid that it
was very foolish,” said Frank; “and I do not
mean to cry again if I can help it.”

There were no lessons that evening. It
seemed a very long evening to Frank. Frede-
rick never once approached him until just before
42 FRANK NETHERTON.
bed-time, when he came to warn him not to be
too intimate with young Howard.

“He is the greatest dunce in the school,”
said he, “and a coward as well: the less you
have to do with him the better.”

‘He was very kind to me,” answered Frank,
a little bitterly, “‘when no one else came near
me.”

Frederick coloured.

“YT warned you beforehand,” said he, “ that
you must fight your own battles.”’

“And so I will. But even if you are not on
my side, surely you need not be against me.”

“Who said I was against you? Did Howard
say so?”

‘¢ Never mind,” answered Frank. ‘I donot
want to quarrel with you, nor you to quarrel
with any one else on my account. But I did
think it hard, when your dear mother said that
we should be like brothers.”

“ Well, well,” said Frederick, holding out his
hand, “I did not mean to be unkind. But you
must not expect too much. ‘Every one fcr
himself,’ you know, is the old proverb.”

“Yes,” replied Frank, “I have heard it, but
I never felt it before.”

Mr. Campbell was surprised upon question-
ing Frank, the following morning, to find how
much he knew, and how carefully and thoroughly
he had been taught ; and said a great deal that
was highly gratifying to his feelings cu the
gsuvject.




FRANK NETHERTON. 42



,

“Contrary to my usual custom,’ observed
he, “I shall place you immediately in one of
the upper classes; and it must be your care to
prove that { am justified in so doing.’

Frank thanked him gratefully, and promised
to be very diligent. As soon as he had returned
to his seat, Frederick congratulated him in a
whisper upon his “good fortune,” and spoke so
kindly that he quite forgot the past.

Frank was very happy in attending to his
studies, until the play-hour arrived; and then, ©
when all the other boys rushed forth with glad
shoutings, the old melancholy feeling stole over
him again, as he stood, forgotten and alone.
His new friend Howard was not permitted to
leave the school-room. He was often in dis-
grace. Frederick never thought of him. Frank
listened to his merry laugh, and tried not to
feel sad.

“ Halloo, my little fellow!’ exclaimed Philip
Doyle, shaking him roughly by the shoulder.
“Are you going to cry again ?”’ ’

“No,” replied Frank, “I am not. As to
being little, I cannot help that; it is no disgrace.
‘ Magnus Alexander corpore parvus erat—The
great Alexander was in stature small.’ ”’

** Do you think that I could not have trans-
lated your Latin doggerel for myself, badly a
it was pronounced ?”’

“JT do not know.”

“‘ What do you mean by saying that you de
not knov?”

4%
44 FRANK NETHERTON.



“I mean what I said,” replied Frank fear-
lessly.””

“For shame, Doyle!” interrupted Claude
Hamilton, stepping between them. « Surely
you would not strike such a child.”

‘He is old enough to be impertinent, and
had better keep out of my way,” muttered
Doyle, as he passed on.

“As for you, Alexander the Great,” said
Claude Hamilton, with a smile, “I would advise
you in future not to rouse the slumbering lion,
or quote Latin out of school-hours.”

“He began,” said Frank.

“Well, never mind. Are you not going to
play at something? I will introduce you?”

“ But I do not know any games,” said Frank,
shrinking back. “TI never played before in my
life.”

“Why, where in the world have you been
brought up ?” .

“My father was always ill,” pleaded Frank;
“and I never left him until now.”

“Ah, I see; that is what makes you look so
reg and sickly. But you can learn, can’t
you?”

“To be sure I can, if any one will teach and
have patience with me.”

“Come along then. But you must not mind
being laughed at.”

“T will not,—if I can help it.”

But Frank could not always help it, although
he persevered notwithstanding. When they


MO SO Ne i LM. HEF PAT WP BED 5 hts sg Vpn ay Rte

FRANK NETHERTON. 45



told him that he held the bat like a girl, he tried
again and again until he had succeeded in doing
better. In all his little trials, Frederick's
laugh seemed the hardest to bear; but Claude

. Hamilton stood his friend, and he tried not to

care for it.

Poor Frank was not strong, and soon grew
weary, especially just at first ; and used to fling
himself down upon the ground with a beating
heart and throbbing temples. Oh! how he
wished himself back in his father’s quiet study
at such times. But he forbore to complain, and
few guessed how much he suffered.

He wrote home in a cheerful spirit, merely
mentioning that he was learning to play cricket.
His father little dreamed of the fatigue and mor-
tifications which he cheerfully endured. The
same unselfish affection marked that father’s
reply ; in which he dwelt largely on the slight
improvement visible in his own health, and said
nothing of the, long hours of weariness and de-
pression, in which his little companion was so
sadly misse 1.
4é FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER VI.
BLESSED ARE THE PEACEMAK ERS.

Brrore long, Frank had other and harder
trials than learning to play cricket: such trials
as all must expect to endure, more or less, whe
would live godly in Christ Jesus. The days of
martyrdom are past; but even a school-boy may
bear his faithful and unflinching testimony to
his Master’s cause, and fearlessly take to him-
self the sweet consolation of Scripture, “If ye
suffer for righteousness’ sake, happy are ye:
and be not afraid of their terror, neither be
troubled.”

“Did I not warn you of all this?” said
Frederick, upon one occasion, when Frank could
not help feeling a little “troubled’’ for the
moment, but it was only fora moment. “ Did
I not tell you how you would be laughed at ?”

“Yes, you warned me, and that was all that
you did do. You never helped me; but, please
God, I will help myself.”

‘That is right, Netherton,” exclaimed Claude
Hamilton, encouragingly. “Rome was not
built ina day. I prophesy that the time will
comé when no one will venture to laugh at
you.”

‘Thank you,” said Frank, “I can bear being
laughed at in a good cause.”’
FRANK NETHERTON. 47



“ And what is the good cause at present in
dispute ?”’

Frank was silent; but Howard answered for
him.

“The boys call him a Methodist, because he
reads his Bible every morning and evening, and
says long prayers—longer, that is, than any of
the rest of us.”

“The latter may easily be, I should imagine.
But what harm is there in Netherton’s reading
his Bible ?”

“IT do not know; unless it is because none
of the other boys do the same.”

‘The more is the pity. But you must not
be too sure of that, Howard; only they may
not read it so openly as your friend Nether-
ton.”

*¢ When I was at home,” said Frank, “I had
a little room to myself; but it is not so now.
And after all, there is nothing to be ashamed
of. We need only be ashamed when we do
wrong.”

Claude Hamilton coloured slightly.

“Shake hands, Netherton,” exclaimed he,
‘for I am as bad as you are. I also read my
Bible every morning and night; and I hope to
do so as long as [ live.”

“Tam so glad,” said Frank; and the tears
came into his eyes. ‘TI wish you slept in our
room.

“So do I,” answered Hamilton. “We may
be together some day, perhaps.”
45 FRANK NETHERTON.



‘Ther you are a Methodist, too,” exclaimed
Howard.

“Yes, as much as Netherton is,” replied
Hamilton, looking fearlessly round. “ So laugh
away, all of you.’’ But no one ventured te
laugh at Claude Hamilton.

From that time Frank’s heart yearned to-
wards him, and he longed to deserve and gain
his friendship; although he scarcely dared ti
hope that one so much his superior would ever
be brought to regard him as a friend.

Frederick was partly right in warning his
cousin against being too intimate with Howard.
But Frank could not forget that he had been
the first to be kind to him, nor be unmindful of
his evident affection. He was not a boy whom
he could love, or make a friend of, because he
did not respect him; but he could not avoid
pitying him very much, and was always ready
to help him out of his difficulties as far as it lay
in his power.

The time came, however, when even Frank
was tempted to desert him. Howard had no
punishment to bear; no hard lesson to learn.
He was not obliged to remain in the school-
room alone, when all the rest were enjoying
themselves without; but he was afraid to go
among them, for he knew that no one would
speak to or play with him. To screen himself,
he had told tales of one of his school-fellows,
and the resthad hooted him out of their society.
Frank alone lingered, and looked back.
FRANK NETHERTON. 49



“Tf you show yourself his friend now,’ said
Frederick, “everybody will think you just as
bad as he is.”

“As for that, I do not mucn sare what
‘everybody’ thinks, and I do not think myself
that I ought to leave him, now he is alone and
in trouble. He is not my friend, but he was
kind to me when no one else was.”

“Let him go,” said Doyle, laying hold of
Frederick’s arm, and pulling him away. ‘“ You
know the old adage—‘ Birds of a feather flock
together.’ ’

His mocking laugh rang in Frank’s ears as
he rejoined Howard.

‘¢ How kind in you to stay, Frank! But are
you not afraid of being seen with me ?”’

“YT am not afraid of any thing.”

“JT wish I was not, for then I should not
have told as I did about poor Rushton. I sup-
pose they will never forget it.”’

“Never is a long time. It was a wrong and
cowardly action. You must tell Rushton how
sorry you are; and you must never do it again,
come what may.”

“‘Never, never—that is, I hope that I shall
aot. But I am always doing wrong; and it is.
f no use trying to do otherwise. And after
all, there is no one who cares for me. I have
no father, no mother, no friend in the world.”

“You must not say that,” replied Frank.
“ Have Ft forgotten One who has promised to
be the Father of the fathe~less—who has said,
50 FRANK NETHERTON.



‘As one whom his mother comforteth, so will 1
comfort you —who is the Friend of the friend-
less, the Saviour of sinners, the good Shepherd,
seeking after the lost sheep; and, not content
with bidding them follow him, bearing them in
his arms, and upon his bosom ?”

“TI know very little of these things,” said
Howard; “I wish that I knew more.”

“You will not learn by wishing,” replied
Frank. “You must read your Bible, and ask
God to help you to understand it. You havea
Bible, I suppose ?”

“‘T believe so.”

‘You only believe so! Oh, Howard! But
we will look to-night when we go to bed, and
if not, I can lend you mine.”

“You are very kind,” said his companion,
hopelessly. ‘And will you be my friend, and
help me?”

“J cannot promise to be your friend; but I
will help you willingly, whenever I can be of
any assistance, because you were kind to me the
first day I came to school.”

“That was a happy day for me,” said Howard.
“T never liked any one as I do you. But I
deserve that you should despise me.”

“T have too many faults of my own to dare
to despise any one,” answered Frank.

“But what do you advise me to do ?”

“Go at once to Mr. Campbell. Tell him
how sorry you are for what has occurred; and
ask him to forgive Rushton, or else permit you



Taber ‘ ~
eS RO 5 ee ae




FRANK NETHERTON. 51



to share his punishment. You would not mind
a hard lesson, would you?”

“No, it is not that; but I am afraid of speak-
ing to Mr. Campbell. ’ |

“Nonsense! Think how pleasant it would
be if you could carry Rushton his pardon,
and ask him to be friends with you. If not,
you can tell him how sorry you are for what
you have done. Rushton is a warm-hearted
fellow, notwithstanding his provoking ways and
speeches.”

“T have a great mind to try,” said Howard.

“Come at once, then, before the rest return.”

Frank went with him, and even knocked at
the study door; and when they heard Mr.
Campbell’s voice bidding them come in, there
was nothing left for Howard but to enter.

When Frank returned to the play-ground,
many a mocking voice inquired where his friend
Howard was.

“We must take care what we do,” said Doyle,
“ or Netherton will be turning tale-bearer next.”

“Not I,” exclaimed Frank, “if I died for
it. But I must say that I do not think it fair
the way you all treat Howard. He has done
wrong, ar.d he is very sorry: what more would
you have ?” |

“Hear him !” exclaimed Doyle, with a laugh

At that moment Rushton ‘and Howard en«
tered the play-ground hand in hand, and it was
soon whispered about how thelatter had gone to
Mr. Campbell to beg Rushton off; and even
5? FRANK NETHERTON.



offered to share his punishment. Many of the
boys went up and shook hands with him.

“Tt was well done,” said one. “I did not
think that it had been in him.”

‘Little Netherton was right,’’ observed an-
other. ‘ Let us say ne more abcut it. He has
had his lesson.”

Frederick Mortimer sided, as usual, with the
multitude ; while his cousin kept apart, for fear
Howard, in his gratitude, should betray him.
The sight of his radiant-looking face was hap-
piness enough. As soon as he could, he stole
away and re-entered the house. Claude Hamil-
ton was leaning against the door, and, as he
moved aside to let Frank pass, he said in a low,
sweet vice, ‘ ‘Blessed are the peacemakers.’ ”






&

' FRANK NETHERTCN.



CHAPTER VII.
A SABBATH DAY AT SCHOOL.

A.tnouen Frank, (thanks to the pains which
his father had taken with him,)knew more than
most boys of his age, he was totally unaccus-
tomed to the regular mode of instruction to
which he was now obliged to submit; and it cost
him no little pains to maintain his position in
the class in which Mr. Campbell, (misled by his
ready and correct answers to his questions,) had
first placed him. His present systematic course
of study was neither so easy nor so pleasant as
it had been to listen to the eloquent and in-
structive conversation of Mr. Netherton, and
turn with him to maps, globes, pictures, and
books of reference. Frank’s memory had be-
come a kind of treasure-house, but it - sadly
wanted method and arrangement. |

Mr. Campbell was not long in discovering the
error which he had committed. He said little
upon the subject, but kirdly and patiently
assisted Frank to correct it; and the more cheer-
fully when he saw how willing he was to assist
himself, and how hard he worked in order to
maintain his present position. Mindful of his
aunt's injunctions, Frank took all the exercise
he could out of school-hours; and his health,
sc far from suffering from his severe application
54 FRANK NETHERTON.



at other times, seemed to be slightly improved ;
and he dwelt with pleasure upon the delight
which it would give his father to see h'm so
changed. His cousin found him, one day, look-
ing intently at himself in the glass.- He wanted
to see if there were any traces of colour on his
pale cheeks; but he found none as yet.

It was a rule in Mr. Campbell’s house to lay
aside all tasks on the Lord’s day, making it, as
it ought and was intended to be, (a day of rest.)
Outwardly at least, no books were read but
those of a religious tendency; but the absence
of Mr. Campbell generally proved a signal for
the production of others of a totally different
character. What shocked Frank more than
any thing else was, to observe that many of the
boys concealed these stolen volumes within the
covers of their Bibles, which they thus appeared
to be diligently perusing. Notwithstanding his
horror of such duplicity, the books were a great
temptation ; and it cost him many a struggle to
refuse to read them when they were offered to
bim.

“Tf you would only lend it to me to-morrow,”
said he, upon one occasion—

‘Now or never!” replied Rushton.

‘“Then it must be never,” said Frank.

“Yt is such a beautiful story,” observed
Howard, “about two Indian children, who
were accidentally carried out to sea in the boat
in which they were playing, and cast upon 4
desert ‘slanl. I am sure tha* you would like it.”


FRANK NETHERLON. 55



“Ydare say I should,” said Frank, turning
resolutely away. But he could not help won-
dering to himself what the children did on the
desert island; and was glad when Mr. Camp-
bell came in, after his usual custom on the Sab-
bath evening, to read and talk with them. And
when he laid his hand upon his shoulder, and
spoke kindly to him as he passed, Frank felv
pleased that he had done nothing to deceive
him; and thought how he should have winced at
his touch, and shrunk away from his glance, had
it been otherwise.

They read that evening the eighteenth chap-
ter of the Acts of the Apostles. The twenty-
eighth verse came to Frank; but he paused, and
remained silent.

“Well?” exclaimed Mr. Campbell, inquir-
ingly.

“I was just thinking, sir, how far the eunuch
came to worship.”

The boys looked at one another and smiled ;
but Mr. Campbell answered gravely,

“ Yes, Frank, it is worth observing. African
Ethiopia lies below Egypt; he must therefore
have come some hundreds of miles to worship
at the temple.”

‘“* But he had his reward, sir.”

“Yes, he had indeed. Now let us finish the
chapter, and afterwards I will show you a pic-
ture which I have of what is Supposed to have
been the eunuch’s well.”

The cuapter was concluded, and the picture
5%
56 FRANK NETHERTON.



produced. It was beautifully finished from a
drawing made on the spot, and Frank bent over
it in silent admiration.

Claude Hamilton inquired what the old ruins
were supposed to represent, which were visible
in the vicinity of the well.

“They are imagined to be those of some
ancient church, or convent, which formerly
stood on this spot,” replied Mr. Campbell; “but
nothing certain is known on the subject. I have
heard it maintained that it could not have been
here that the eunuch was baptized, because he
is represented to have come in a chariot from
Jerusalem, whereas this road is not passable for
carriages. Chariots of old, however, were very
different from our present coaches, the wheels
being lower and much broader and stronger, and
the vestiges of an ancient carriage-road are yet
to be perceived all the way from Jerusalem to
Hebron. Still it is very uncertain whether this
was the place where the eunuch was baptized.
I have several other views taken in the Holy
Land, which I will show you at some future
opportunity.”

“TI suppose it was called the Holy Land be-
cause the Holy One lived and walked there,”
said Frank, thoughtfully. ‘ How I should like,
when I am old enough, to go to Jerusalem, and
tread, as it were, in the footsteps of the Saviour !”’

“You may endeavour to do that without
going to Jerusalem, or waiting until you are

older,” said Mr Campbell.


FRANK NETHERTON. 57



>

“Yes, sir, I know,” replied Frank, ecclour-
ing; ‘but I did not exactly mean that.” |

‘“‘Never mind. It is better to act than te
dream. With God’s help, you may begin at
once practically to follow in the footsteps of the
blessed Redeemer when he walked on earth; to
take up your cross and learn of him, and be
meek and lowly in heart; while it must neces-
sarily be many years, if ever, before you visit the
Holy Land. What I say to you, I say to all.”

After a pause, Mr. Campbell asked Howard
which was the oldest book in the world.

‘“¢ Homer, sir.”’ }

Mr. Campbell shook his head.

Rushton, in a whisper to his companions,
suggested ‘‘ Robinson Crusoe.”

“Well, Mortimer, can you tell?”

“The Bible, sir.’’

“Right. Herodotus and Thucydides, the
oldest profane historians whose writings have
reached our times, were contemporary with
Ezra and Nehemiah, the last of the historians
of the Old Testament. It was nearly six hun-
dred years after Moses before the poems of
Homer appeared. The preservation of the
Bible is very remarkable. At one time, during
the captivity of the Jews in Babylon, not only
their temple was burned, but the very ark in
which the original copy of the law was kept ;
and their city laid waste for more than a hun-
dred years. We read, also, that Antiochus
Epiphanes, when he took Jerusalem, murdered
58 FRANK NETHERTC(X.



about 40,000 of its inhabitants, sold as many
more to be slaves, and ordered that whoever was
found with the book of the law should be put
to death; and every book that could be dis-
covered was burned. Under these circumstances,
is it not remarkable that this book of the Jews
should have been preserved, and that not a sin-
gle book of the Egyptians, the Chaldeans, or
the Pheenicians, (the most flourishing and civil-
ized nations which lived at that time,) should
have reached us?”

‘“‘Tt is indeed remarkable,” said Claude Ha-
inilton.

‘God took care of the Bible,” said Frank.

“That is the right and only way of account-
ing for it,”’ said Mr. Campbell.

“Ts it true,” asked Philip Doyle, “that a Bible
in the reign of King James cost seventy pounds ?”"

“Perfectly true. We are also told by Top-
lady, that the time was when the word of the
Lord was so precious in the land, that a farmer
in the reign of Henry VIII. gave a cart-load
of hay for one leaf of the Epistle of St. James
in English!”

“Ts it possible?” exclaimed Howard.

“Yes; it appears strange now, when Bibles
are so cheap that few, we should think, need be
“aa one in their homes. But it is time for

ed.”

“Now for black Monday, and hard lessons,”
said Howard to Frank, as they went up-stairs
to their room.
FRANK NETHERTON. 59



“JT have often thought,” replied Frank,
“how nice it would be to have no Monday
morning. But we must wait till we get to
heaven for that.”

“How do you know you will ever get to
heaven ?”’ asked one of the boys, jestingly.

“How do | know? O Herbert! do you not
believe in the Lord Jesus Christ? But you only
pay this to tease me.”

“You are a strange fellow, Netherton,” ex-
claimed Herbert, touched by the earnestness
with which he had spoken. “ Good-night.””

“Good night,” replied Frank. His little
heart was full. “How do I know?” thought
he, as he kneeled down beside the bed, forget
ting that he was not alone. “Blessed Lord
Jesus! because I believe and trust in thee.
Oh, how sweet it is to believe and trust !””

:
“ZT
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Yan


60 FRANK NEIHERTON.

CHAPTER VIII.
LOVE YOUR ENEMIES.

Tux following morning, when Frank entered
the play-ground, Claude Hamilton came to meet
him with a smile on his countenance.

“See!” exclaimed he, “I have brought you
the book which you refused yesterday. I
thought you would like to read it.”

«© And so I shall,” said Frank. ‘“ How kind
in you to think of it! But how came you to
know what happened yesterday? I looked at
you once or twice, and you appeared to be com-
pletely absorbed in ‘ Keith's Prophecies.’ ”’

“So I was; but I heard all that passed, not-
withstanding, and was glad that you were able
to resist the temptation. I determined to pro-
cure the book for you if possible to-day, and
here it is. But you must read it quickly. You
will find it very interesting.”

Frank thanked him gratefully, and ran off
with his prize to a large tree which stood at the
farther end of the play-ground, and in the
branches of which he loved to sit and read,
swinging himself to and fro all the while with
a pleasant motion. It was not often that he
permitted himself to indulge in this quiet lux-
ury, and he consequently enjoyed it all the
more upon the present occasion. Frank was ir
FRANK NETHERTON. 61



the very middle of the story, when he was eud-
denly interrupted by the loud voice of Philip
Doyle, desiring him to come down directly, as
he wanted to take his place.

“At any rate I must finish my book first,”
said Frank calmly. “I shall not be very
long.”

“Just as if I should wait while you finish
your book! Come down at orce, or I will make
you. You have no business there.”

“I did not know that the tree was your’s,”
said Frank.

“Never mind whose it is, but come down
directly.” And he gave one of the branches a
violent shake as he spoke.

“Thank you,” exclaimed Frank, laughing,
and swinging backwards and forwards. “It is
very pleasant.”

“You had better come down,” said Howard,
who, together with several other boys, had been
attracted to the spot. ‘There is another tree,
almost as good.”

“I will come down when I have finished
what I am about,” replied Frank, “and not
before.”

“Take care, Doyle!” exclaimed Herbert, as
he again shook the tree with violence. “Take
ng Netherton! He might break a limb if he

@ ae

“Then why does he not come down quietly,
when I bil him ?”

‘““Why should he ?”
62 FRANK NETHERTON.



“Tel\ us a story, Netherton,’ called out
several of the boys, out of fun.

“With all my heart,” replied Frank, as a
sudden thought came into his mind. -“ Once
upon a time’ — 3

“Will you come down?” shouted Doyle
—hoarse with passion.

“ Keep off! Wait until he has told his story.
He shall not be interrupted till then,” exclaimed
the boys, laughing, as they gathered around the
tree. “Go on, Netherton.”

“During the war with France,” said Frank,
¢¢ previous to the Revolution, an English drum-
mer-boy having wandered from his camp too
near the French lines, was taken prisoner, and
brought before the commander. On being
asked who he was, he answered that he was a
drummer in the English service. It appears
that they took him for a spy. A drum was
sent for, and he was desired to beat a couple
of marches, which he immediately did. The
Frenchman’s suspicions, however, not being
entirely removed, he commanded the drummer
to beat a retreat. ‘A retreat, sir ?’ replied the
boy; ‘I do not know what that is.’ ”’

“Bravo, Netherton !’ exclaimed his school-
fellows. ‘You deserve your seat, and shall’
keep it. You shall not ° beat a retreat’ for any
one.”

‘hey bore off the struggling Doyle in triumph,
and Frank was left alone; but somehow their
praise did not make him happy-


FRANK NETHERTON. 63



“ After all,” murmured he, “I could have
finished my book just as well anywhere else. I
wish now that I had given up; and so I would,
if he had asked me kindly.’

He tried to go on with his reading, but the
story seemed to have lost all its interest; and
a few moments afterwards he slipped quietly
down from the tree, and went to seek. Philip
Doyle. He found him, as he had expected, all
alone. He was leaning against the ate, carv-
ing the top of a walking-stick into a lion’s head.
He looked up at Frank’s approach, and his face
was white with passion.

“T am come to tell you that = can Have
the seat now, if you wish it. I would have
given it up at once, if you had only asked me
properly; but I do not like being ordered to do
a thing.”

Doyle made no reply; but, carried away by
the violence of his passion, he lifted up the
heavy stick he was carving, and hit Frank a
blow with it upon the temple, which felled him
to the ground. Doyle walked away without
perceiving the effects of his cowardly attack.
He did not think how heavy the stick was, nor
did he intend to have hurt Frank as much as
he did. When he was in one of his passionate
fits, he never thought of any thing, and was
like a mad person.

For several moments Frank lay completely
stunned. When he came to himself, he arose
with difficulty ; and gaining the house, without

6
64 FRANK NETHERTON.



meeting any of his companions, went up-stairs
ito his room, and kneeling down by the bed,
rested his aching head against it. He tried to
pray, but his thoughts were too confused. Pre-
sently he called to mind the passage in the fiftk
chapter of St. Matthew: “I say unto you, love
your enemies, bless them that curse you—and
pray for them which despitefully use you, and
persecute you; that ye may be the children of
your Father which is in heaven.” ,

“Tt is a hard lesson,” murmured Frank.
“Blessed Lord Jesus! help me to learn it by
heart.”

He was aroused, after a few moments, by the
voice of the housekeeper. ‘Master Nether-
ton !” exclaimed she; “ you are breaking rules.
You have no business up here at this time of
the day.”

“T ‘wanted to bathe my forehead,” said
Frank, turning round.

“Poor child! you have hurt yourself indeed.
Why, how did this happen ?”

Frank did not reply.

“Well, never mind; come with me, and I
will see what I can do for you?”

Frank followed her, scarcely knowing where
he went. His head ached terribly; but, after
a time, the cold applizations, tenderly applied
by the rough but kind hearted housekeeper, 80
far relieved him as to enable him to rejoin his
companicne in the sch ol-room.

Philip T)syle, who was standing near the
“

FRANK NETHEKTON. 65



door, started, and changed countunance when
he looked at him.

“Why, Netherton, what is the matter?”
exclaimed Claude Hamilton, coming hastily
forward.

“It is my head,” said Frank, trying to smile;
and then stopping suddenly, and with difficulty
repressing a cry of pain, he added, “It hurts
me a little when I speak.”’ :

“How did you do it?”

“He looks as if he had been fighting,” said
Rushton. Frank shook his head.

“Did you fall off the tree, or did he do it ?”
asked Howard, pointing to Doyle.

‘Never mind,” answered Frank. “It is
done, and it cannot be undone. Ido not mean
to tell you any more; and I wish you would not
tease me.”

‘Leave him alone,” said Claude Hamilton,
** Does your head pain you very much, Frank ?”

“Yes, very much; but I dare say it will be
better presently, if I could only be quiet.”
And Frank sat down before his desk, and buried
his flushed face in his hands.

He did not sleep, but the hum of the school-
room seemed to go a long way off; and the usher
had to call to him two or three times before
he could be aroused to reply. Claude Hamil-
ton went immediately and asked Mr. Campbell
to excuse Frank for the remainder of his lessons,
as he did not seem to be very well, and he was
cuce mor¢ leit to himself.
~

66 FRANK NETHERTON.



When Frank again looked up, aroused by the
unusually kind voice of his cousin, all the a
had gone except Frederick, and Doyle, who
stood with his back towards them, drumming
against the window-pane.

‘* Will you not come to tea?” said Frederick.
“Tt may do your head good.”

“Thank you, yes. I will follow yeu in a
moment. I would rather you would not wait
for me.”

“But you will come?” said Frederick, lin-
pering a moment; while Frank passed his

and across his burning brow, as if to recollect
himself.

“Yes, I promise you.”

en his cousin left him, Frank arose with
difficulty, and crossing over to where Doyle
stood, said in a low voice, “ Philip, the sun
is almost down.”

“Well, what of that?” asked his companion,
without moving.

“Does not God say in his holy word—I
forget where now—‘ Let not the sun go down
upon your wrath?’ See, it has nearly dis
appeared. Let us be friends.”

Philip Doyle turned round, and the tears
started into his eyes as he grasped the little,
feverish hand so eagerly extended to him.
“Forgive me, Netherton,” murmured he. “ It
was cowardly in me to strike you; but I did
act mean to hurt you thus, indeed I did not ;
and I am very sorry for it.”
FRANK NETIHYRTON. 67



“Tet us go in together,” said Frank, “ and
then no one will suspect that you did it. I
will promise not to tell.”

There was a sudden silence when they
entered the room. ‘The boys looked at one
another in astonishment.

“Then it was not Doyle after all,”—whis-
pered Howard to Rushton. “I dare say that
he really did fall off the tree.”

“Do you feel better Frank ?” asked Clavde
Hamilton.

“Yes, much better, thank you. I shall be
quite well to-morrow, I hope.”

Philip Dovle hoped so too. He was really
sorry for what had happened; but he dared
not express too great an interest in Frenuk,
for fear of exciting suspicion. He shrank
from’ the exposure of his own cowardly «nd
brutal conduct to one so much younger and
weaker than himself; and felt grateful to
Frank for not betraying him to his schel-
fellows


68 FkANK NETHERTON.



CHAPIER IX.
A SAD IIOLIDAY.

THosz who slept in the same room with
Frark, heard him, as they said, talking and
telling stories all night long. The next morn-
ing he was in a high fever. The wound on
his temple appeared to be much inflamed;
and Mr. Campbell, who had been unavoidably
absent from the school-room on the previous
day, was angry because he had not been sooner
informed of it. The best medical advice was
immediately procured, and towards evening
the fever appeared tu be somewhat abated.

“What is the matter?” exclaimed Frank,
opening his eyes and seeing Mr. Campbell
standing by the bedside. “Where am I ?”

“You have not been very well,” replied his
preceptor, soothingly. ‘“ But you are better
again—only you must keep very quiet.”

“I remember now,” continued Frank, rais-
ing his hand feebly to his head. “TI hope i
have not said any thing wrong.

“No, no; lie down and try to sleep.”

“Tam afraid my mind wanders sometimes,”
eaid Frank, looking eagerly into Mr. Campbell's
face ; ‘‘and I do not know what I say then. J
bope I have not betrayed any one.”

“ Never fea ; your-secret is sufe.”
FRANK NETHERTON. 69



“Thank God,” said Frank. “ I may tell him,
but I must not tell any one else, you know.”

Mr. Campbell abstained from questions or
even replying to Frank’s words.

“Tt is, then, as I suspected,” thought he.
*¢ Who can have done this ?”’

Presently Frank spoke again. “Have you
written to my father, sir?”

“Not yet. I shall await Dr. Ewart’s opinion
when he comes this evening.”’

“You do not think me likely to die, sir ?”’

“God forbid, my dear boy.”’

“Then do not write at all, if you please.
I can bear a great deal of pain; but I cannot
bear to think of my father’s uneasiness. He
loves me so much. Perhaps he would insist
upon coming; and the journey might kill Kim.”

“T will not write if you do not wish it; and
if you will try and be still, in order that you
may get better the sooner.”

“Yes, I will be very still,” said Frank,
closing his eyes. ‘I will do any thing you
bid me—-only do not write.to my father.”

He soon afterwards fell into a quiet sleep;
and Mr. Campbell, leaving him in charge of
the nurse, returned to the school-room. Every
voice was hushed as he entered. Philip Doyle
longed to speak, but dared not.

“‘T hope poor little Netherton is not worse,
sir, ’ said Claude Hamilton, at length, observin
that Mr. Campbell looked unusually grave an
agitated. |
70 FRANK NETHERTON.



“T hope not. He has just fallen asleep. It
may restore him, Dr. Ewart says, or he may
awake an idiot! If Netherton dies, God help
and forgive him who struck that cruel blow.’

Philip Doyle shuddered and turned pale;
but so did many others at those solemn words.

‘Then you think, sir, that the wound could
not have been occasioned by a mere fall ?”’ said
Claude Hamilton.

‘*T am sure of it—and with reason.”

‘“‘Has my cousin told who did it?” asked
Frederick.

‘No; he never will tell. And he must not
be questioned.”

Philip Doyle drew a long breath, and the
tears gushed forth.

* Never mind, Doyle,”’ continued Mr. Camp-
bell, laying his hand kindly on his shoulder,
‘“‘there is nothing in your tears to be ashamed
of. Your little school-fellow is worthy of your
tears. I could almost have wept myself, to hear
him talk just now.”

‘What did he say? Did he ask for me?”
inquired Frederick, under the privilege of rela-
tionship.

‘““No, he never mentioned your name.” And
Mr. Campbell briefly related what had passed.

‘Poor little fellow!” said Claude Hamilton.
** Who could have the heart to injure him ?”’

Hamilton knew nothing about the dispute
between Frank and Doyle; and the rest
shrank from mentioning it: it seemed such a
FRANK NETHERTON. 71



terrible accusation to bring against him, and
was contradicted by the friendly behaviour of
Frank towards him on the previous evening.
The whole affair seemed to be wrapt in mys
tery. Whoever the guilty person might be,
every one felt that he was sufficiently punished
in the anxious interval that would elapse before
Frank awoke.

Mr. Campbell had given the boys a holiday
—it was asad holiday. A profound stillness
reigned in the school-room, broken only by an
occasional whisper: but thought was busy.
We will not attempt to describe the feelings
of Philip Doyle. Their impression remained
until his dying day. Recollections of unkind
words and acts came back to many a heart,
and made it wish them again unsaid and
undone; bringing sorrow and repentance,
when both, perhaps, were unavailing. Frede-
rick recalled to mind his mother’s often re-
peated injunctions to be kind to his cousin,
with a pang of self-upbraiding. He remem-
bered how the frail life of Mr. Netherton was
bound up in that of his son; and he thought
how differently he would behave to him in
future, if Frank were only to get well again.
Claude Hamilton had no self-accusations; but
he loved and was sorry for the boy, and prayed
inwardly that, if it were God’s will, he might
be restored to them.

As they sat together thus, the sinking sun
peeped into that silent room, as if to inquire
72 FRANK NETHERTON.



what made them all so strangely quict. Phiip
Doyle could not help thinking of Frank’s words.

“The sun is going down,” murmured he,
“and may never rise again for him. God be
merciful to us both!” And he leaned his
head against the window-sill, and sobbed aloud.

‘¢ Come, come,” said Claude Hamilton, en-
couragingly ; “let us hope for the best. If not”
—and his voice faltered slightly ; “ if not, Frank
is ready to be taken, trusting in his Redeemer.”

‘“‘T did not think that Doyle would have felt
it so deeply,” whispered Howard to Rushton.
“He is sorry, I suppose, for what passed
between them yesterday.”

“ Hush !” exclaimed Claude Hamilton : “ was
not that a bell rung? He must be awake.”

A few moments afterwards, Dr. Ewart
kindly looked in to tell them that Frank
was awake and was much better, and that
he hoped all danger was past. “Thank God !”
exclaimed Claude Hamilton; and many a voice
was heard to say, “Amen.” Philip Doyle
uttered not a word. He felt as if a heavy
weight was lifted off his heart, and it was
filled, instead, with joy and gratitude.

“You have not written, sir, have you?”
were Frank’s first words, when he again
opened his eyes, and fixed them upon the
snxious countenance of his preceptor. 3

“No; I promised that I would not, if you
were better. And you are better. You teel
better, do you rot?’
FRANK NETHERTON.



“Yes,” said Frank, “my head is much
easier. Will you tell my cousin Frederick
go, and”—he was going to say Philip Doyle;
but he checked himself, adding instead, ‘and
the rest of my school-fellows. 1 suppose Imay
see some of them to-morrow, sir ?”

“T do not know,” replied. Mr. Campbell ;
“we must wait until to-morrow comes. Dr.
Ewart does not wish you to talk or think more
than you can help for the next few days.”

“It seems hard not to be allowed to think,”
observed Frank, with a sigh. “But I must
try and bear it as patiently as I can. Do
not let me keep you, sir,” added he, after a
pause, during which Mr. Campbell was busy
arranging his pillows, in order that he might
lie more comfortably. ‘I promise to be very
quiet. How kind you are to me!” And he
put his little hand into that of his preceptor.

Mr. Campbell waited until he again slept,
and then returned to the school-room, where
the boys, by his desire, still remained.

“ Let us return thanks to the Lord,” said
he, “that one among us has been this day
preserved from the commission of a great |
crime. I never mean to ask any questions
on the subject. The name of the offender is
known only to God and that poor child who
has refused to betray it. To his God I leave
him. Let us pray.” The boys kneeled down
in silence; and that solemn day was long
remembered by all of them.
74 FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER X.
GOOD RESOLUTIONS.

SEevERAL days past before Frank was allowed
to see any of his school-fellows. His cousin
was first permitted to enter the sick-chamber ;
and, although he made no apology for the past,
or promises for the future, Frank felt that he
was changed, and that they should be more
like cousins and friends for the time to come.

All Claude Hamilton’s spare moments were
spent by the bedside of the little invalid, to
Frank’s great comfort and delight ; for there
was no boy in the school whom he liked so
well, or whose friendship and good opinion
he was so anxious to gain. Howard was also
a constant visitor; but Philip Doyle came not!
At first, Frank was glad.

“Tt is best so,” thought he. “They would
only have suspected something.” But, by-and-
by, he began to feel hurt; and in the long,
weary hours, when he lay suffering and alone,
it seemed unkind and unnatural that he who
was the cause of all should keep away thus,
and make no effort to see and be with him.

“J would not have acted so,” murmured
Frank, on one occasion half aloud. “ I would
lave run any risk, had I been in his place.”

“Forgive me,” exclaimed a low voice by his
aa

FRANK NETHERTON. id



side- “I shall never forgive myself. But I
have not forgotten you, Frank. [ have
watched and listened at your door for hours,
when all the rest were asleep; and every groan
that you uttered went to my heart.”

“T would not have groaned, if I could have
helped it, had I known that you were there,
Philip.” |

“© Frark!” continued Doyle, “if suffering
can atons for doing wrong, you have been
amply revenged.” “

“But it cannot; nothing but the blood of
our Lord Jesus Christ can do that—‘ the
Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of
the world.’ Besides, I do not want to be
revenged.”’

“T wish I could feel like you, Netherton,”
said the once proud Doyle. |

“You would not if you knew all. Even
when you entered, my heart was full of hard
and murmuring thoughts.” .

“Yes, I know; you thought me a brute,
and no wonder. It was not so much the fear
lest the other boys should suspect something
which kept me away; but because I ested
to look upon what I had done. But this
evening, when I heard you talking to your-
self, all alone, I could not help creeping in.”

“Tt was very wrong in me to talk,” said
Frank. ‘Others might have crept in also.
I have got into the habit of talking to myself.

of late.”
'
74 FRANK NETHERTON.



“Does your head pain you very much %”
asked Doyle, anxiously.

“No; scarcely at all now.”

“ Q Netherton, if you had died !”

“JT am glad that I did not,” said Frank,
“for my father’s sake, and for your's, Philip.
God has been very good to us all.”’

“He has indeed. It will be a lesson to me
for my life.”

At this moment Claude Hamilton entered the
room. He was glad to see Doyle there, and
told him so.

“You cannot think how anxious he was
about you,” said he, turning to Frank.

“Was he?” replied Frank, without looking

up.

Me If you had been his own brother he could
not have taken it more to heart. But then we
were all sorry for you.”

“ You are all very kind,” said Frank.

«“ He is better than you expected to find him,
eh, Doyle? It was a narrow escape. You
are quite a hero, Netherton, and have behaved
like one. Do you remember, Doyle, when you
all called him a talebearer, because he took
Howard’s part in that affair of his about
Rashton? No one will ever call you a tale-
bearer again, Frank.”

“No, never again. But do you not think
that the guilty person ought to be known
and punished!” inquired Philip Doyle sud-
denly.
FRANK NETHERTON. 77



“ Certainly not. What good would it do Ne-
therton, or any one else? He has been suf-
ficiently punished: as Mr. Campbell says, 1
us leave him to God.”

Being anxious to change the conversation,
Frank now inquired after Howard, and asked
the reason why he had not been to see him as
usual.

“ The old reason,” replied Claude Hamilton.
“He is in disgrace again. I never knew such
a fellow ; he is always getting into some scrape.
He told me that he was afraid you would miss
him, and guess the cause.”

‘T did miss him,” said Frank. “It has
been a very long day.”’

“Tt appears so to you, lying there; but I
assure you that I have found it short enough
for all 1 have had to do.”

‘“¢ Even when I am able to get up,” continued
Frank, with a sigh, “Mr. Campbell says that I
must not be in a hurry to go on with my studies.
I shall be sadly behindhand. No prize, and no
healthy colour in my cheeks, to make amends
for it, as my father said. Do I look very ill,
Hamilton ?”

‘No, not very.”

Frank sighed again; and as he did so he
felt a tear fall on his hand.

“ How dark it is!’ said Claude Hamilton.
“Suppose [ ask for a light, and read to you a
little ?”

“Thank you, I should. like it very much.
78 FRANK NETHERTON.



Forgive me,” added Frank, as he quitted the
room; “pray forgive me, Doyle. I had for-
gotten that you were by. I shall soon be well
again, and make up for lost time. Whc knows |
but what I may carry off a prize after all? It
is only working a little harder. And now that
we are friends, you will help me, will you not ?”’

‘J will do any thing in the world for you,
Netherton.”

‘Then try and cure yourself of those ter-
rible fits of passion, dear Philip. Do try for
my sake ;’ and he put his little, thin arms
around the neck of his school-fellow, as he bent
over him. “And ask God to help you, will
“you, Philip ?”’

“Oh, if I could!” answered Doyle, whose
heart wascompletely subdued.

‘‘T have heard,” continued Frank, “ that,
among the superior classes of the Hindoos, it
is customary to have, in their dwellings, a par-
ticular apartment, which is called ‘ knodha-
gara,’ or ‘the chamber of anger,’ and into
which any member of the household, who feels
himself to be out of temper, immediately retires,
remaining there until solitude has calmed and
tranquillized him. We read, also, that Plato
retired to his cave to be wise. Could not you
manage to go away when you feel the fit coming
on-—somewhere where you can be alone, and
think, and pray ?”’

“T am not much used to praying,” said
Doyle.
FRANK NETHERTON. 79



«“ But if you only repeated the Lerd’s pray-
er, it would keep away bitter thoughts. You
remember that part where it says, ‘ Forgive us
our trespasses, aS We forgive them that trespass
against us ?”’

“JT am not like you, Netherton. I could not
some and hold out my hand to one who had
injured me.”

“Yes, you could, after a time. It was dif-
ficult at first,” said Frank, thoughtfully. “ Ci-
cero’s rule, not to injure any one unless pre-
viously injured, is easier to follow than that of
Christ, who bids us love our enemies. It would
be easier to forgive others if we could only re-
member how much need we have of forgivendss
ourselves.” ,

“You remind me of Archbishop Cranmer,”
said Doyle; ‘of whom it is recorded, that the
way to have him for a friend was to do him an
unkindness.”’

“Hark !’’ interrupted Frank ; “ Hamilton is
returning. You will do what I asked you, will
you not Philip ?”” .

‘Yes, I promise.”

“With God’s help.”

“ With God’s help,” repeated Doyle, solemn-
ly. ‘ Good-night, Frank.”

“ Good-night,” answered Frank, as Hamil-
ton entered; “and thank you for staying with
me so long. You will come again .

“ Certainly, if you wish it.”

“What a strange fellow Doyle is!” said
80 FRANK NETHERTON.



Claude Hamilton. ‘I did not think he had so
much feeling. It is wrong in us to judge one
another. I shall like him better in future for
his kindness to you. And now, if you are
quite comfortable, I will read you the conclu-
sion of the history of the two children who
were cast away on the desert island.”

“TY forget where I was,” murmured Frank.
“How long ago it appears since I began it!
How much has happened since then! I do not
seem to care about it now; for, you know, it is
not true. I would rather hear you read a
chapter in the Bible, if you please.”

** Would you prefer any particular chapter ?”
asked Claude Hamilton, good-naturedly.

“No, thank you. It is all truth there.”

His companion turned to the twelfth chapter
of the Epistle to the Hebrews; and Frank lis-
tened, and was happy.

It is a happy thing to believe, as he did, that
the Scriptures are all truth; to be able to
“‘look unto Jesus, the author and finisher of
our faith,” and feel ourselves accepted and for-
given for his name’s sake. Thus only can we
“serve God acceptably, with reverence ard
godly fear.”” Out of Christ he is “a ccnsum-
ang fire.”
FRANK NETHERTON. 81

CHAPTER XI
THE TALISMAN.

Tur next day, Howard came as usual to see
Frank, but he looked sad and dejected. ‘You
heard, I suppose,” said he, “what kept me
away yesterday ?”

‘T did not hear the particulars.”

“Tt does not signify. It was the old story.
I am always doing wrong, and it is of no use
trying to do otherwise.’

“Oh, Howard, you must not say that so
often.”

“Why not? It is the truth.”

“ But have you really tried e

«Mo be sure I have, again and again.”

“ And in the way you promised, Howard ?”’

“T forget now what it was that I did promise.
{ only know that 1 am weary of trying. Every
thing goes against me. How do you manage,
Frank, never to be in disgrace ”

“ Because I have a talisman, said Frank.

“A talisman! What, areal talisman, such as
we read of in fairy tales? I thought there
was no truth in those things.”

Frank smiled mysteriously.
82 FRANK NETHERTON.



‘“‘ How I should love to see it: What is it
like? Is it a ring that pricks you whenevei
you are about to do wrong ?”

“No; it is a lamp.”

Howard had read of Aladdin and the won:
derful lamp; and he remembered something
about a lamp invented by Sir Humphry Davy;
but Frank told him that it did not resemble
either of those, but was called David’s lamp.

‘‘ Was that the name of the inventor ?” asked
Howard.

‘“‘No; the lamp existed, although in an in-
complete state, before David’s time, but it was
he who gave it that name.”

“ And what do you do? Do you rub it?” in-
quired Howard, still thinking of Aladdin.

“No; I read it.”

“TY understand now,” exclaimed Howard,
with asslight accent of disappointment. ‘“ You
have been talking of the Bible all this time.”

“Yes,” replied Fiank, “the word of God is
my talisman; as David says, ‘a lamp unto my
feet, and a light unto my path.’ And yet Da-
vid’s Bible was very short, compared with ours;
for he had neither the Gospels nor the Epistles,
nor a great part of the Old Testament. But
a lamp cannot give light if we shut it up and
never look at it.”

**] have no time.”

‘We are told by some one,” replied Frank,
“that when time is devoted to God, we are sure
+o have enough for all other uses.”
FRANK NETHERTON. 83



“ But I never can get up the moment I wake.
And afterwards it is as much as I can do to
dress before the breakfast-bell rings.”

«And why cannot you get up e

“TJ do not know. I never could.”

“Neither could I once; but it is easy
enough now. As some one says, “You lose
an hour in the morning, and are all day trying
in vain to catch it.’ ”’ |

“That is true enough,” observed Howard,
with a sigh. “But how does your talisman
keep you from doing wrong, Frank?”

“By teaching me to do right, and warn-
ing me against the snares’ and temptations
‘nto which I might otherwise fall; and 80
proving ‘a lamp unto my path,’ without
which I should be continually stumbling.
In trouble and perplexity, it has always an
answer ready for those who seek it in prayer
and faith.”

“JT wonder what it would say to me r
exclaimed Howard. |

Frank opened his little Bible at the twelfth
chapter of the Epistle to the Romans, begin-
ning at the ninth verse. “Listen,” replied
he, “to what it says to all: ‘Let love be
without dissimulation. Abhor that which is
evil; cleave to that which is good. Be kindly
affectioned one to another with brotherly love ;
in honour preferring one another; not slothful
in business; fervent in spirit; serving the
Lord; rejoicing in hope; patient in tribula-
8+ FRANK NETHERTON.



tion: continuing instant in prayer; distribut
ing to the necessity of saints; given te
hospitality. Bless them which persecute you;
bless, and curse not. Rejoice with them that
do rejoice, and weep with them that weep.
Be of the same mind one toward anothe-.
Mind not high things, but condescend to men
of low estate. Be not wise in your ows
conceits. Recompense to no man evil for
evil. Provide things honest in the sight of
allmen. If it be possible, as much as lieth
in you, live peaceably with all men. Dearly
beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give
place unto wrath § for it is written, Vengeance
is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord. There-
fore, if thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he
thirst, give him drink: for in so doing thou
shalt heap coals of fire on his head. Be not
overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good.’ ”

Frank ceased reading, and for several mo-
ments neither of them spoke. .

“T will begin from this day,” exclaimed
Howard, at length, “I am determined; and
read the Bible every morning and evening.
I see now what made you, or rather helped
you, to be so patient and forgiving; and why
you would not tell who it was that had hurt
~ I will try and make it my talisman also.

am sure I want a lamp, for every thing seems
dark enough sometimes: but it is my own fault.
Oh that I could ‘cleave to that which 1s

good !"”
FRANK NETHERTON. . 85



“My talisman likewise says,” continued
Frank, “and the words are those of our
Saviour himself, ‘Come unto me, all ye that
labour and are heavy laden, and I will give
ou rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn
of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart:
and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For
my yoke is easy, and my burden is “—- K:

«“T should like to find rest,” said oward,
wearily. ‘I have never found it yet.”

“And you never will out of Christ. He
‘; not a hard taskmaster. I am sure I may
say so,” exclaimed Frank, with tears in his
eyes. “What would have become of me if
it had been otherwise 2”

Frank might well say that. What would
become of any of us?

That day Howard made a great many good
resolutions. It was pity that he forgot them
again so soon.

A modern writer has truly observed—“ It
‘s with our faults as with horse-radish : it is
terribly difficult to extirpate it from the earth
in which it has once taken root; and nothing
is more discouraging to him who would banish
this weed from his ground than to find it, so
lately plucked up, shooting forth again and
again from the old root which yet remains
Yuried in the earth.” Yes, it is difficult
certainly, and discouraging; but let us take

heart, and remember that nothing is impossible
with God.
86 FRANK NETHERTON.



As soon as Frank was able to leave hist oom,
Mr. Campbell had him carried into his own
study, where he could remain quiet; and
Frank was very careful not to disturb him
when he came in to read, or write letters.
It was a pleasant room, with a low window
opening upon the lawn, and commanding a
view of the play-ground beyond. As Frank
sat there, he could hear the merry voices of
his school-fellows: and yet he did not feel sad,
or wish to be with them. He was in a very
peaceful frame of mind, for he knew that
every thing happens for the best. He wished
that he could always feel as he did then; but
the lamp, as we all know from experience,
does not always seem bright. Every now and
then a shadow comes across it, the shadow of
our own sin and unbelief; and God appears, as
it were, to hide his face from us. But let us
wait and pray, and, by and by, the darkness
passes away, and it is light again.

It was a sunny day; the boys had worked
hard, and enjoyed their play afterwards.
Philip Doyle alone remembered the little
invalid; and he only knew whose fault it was
that he was prevented from coming among
them. As he crossed the lawn, he saw Frank
sitting by the open window, and called to him.
“ Are you alone, Netherton?” saidhe. “ What
are you doing ?”

“Nothing,” replied Frank, “but enjoying
myself, as Mrs. Fry says, and giving thanks.
FRANK NELHERTON. 87



What a beautiful day ; and how merry you all

seem !””

«Not all, Frank; I cannot be merry while
ou are alone, and suffering.”

“JT am not suffering now; and I do not mind
being alone.”

« But cannot I do something for you?

“Yes, go away ; and let me hear you laugh-
ing and playing with the rest. Ido not say
this because I want to get rid of you,” added
Frank, as Doyle turned sorrowfully back to
his companions, “but because I want to see
you happy:

«hen I shall stay with you,” said Doyle.
and he entered the study with a bounding
step.

When Mr. Campbell came in some time
afterwards, and found him there, he praised
him for his kindness to his little school-fellow.
Doyle received his commendations with a
flushed cheek and downcast eye. He longea
to tell him all. There is nothing more humi-
liating than to listen to the praises which we
feel conscious we have not deserved.

99
BS FRANK NETHERTON. |



CHAPTER XII.
THERE IS NO PLACE LIKE HOME.

Freprertck Mortimer gained one of the
prizes, and his cousin tried not to feel envious.

“Never mind,” said Howard; “it is not
your fault. Every one pities you. You are
not laughed at, and called a dunce, as I am.
And a dunce I shall be all my life, I suppose.
It is a good thing for me that my aunt would
never dream of my bringing home a prize; sc
she will not be disappointed.”

“We must see what we can do next year,”
replied Frank, cheerfully. ‘Your aunt may
be agreeably surprised some day yet.”

Howard shook his head despondingly. “1
know I am a dunce,” repeated he; “and I
cannot help it.”’

“But Mr. Campbell says you are not a
lunce, and that it is your own fault that you
do not get on better; you are only careless
and indolent.”

‘Did he say that ?”

“Yes; Hamilton heard him as well as my-
self. Suppose we both try and begin a new
year when we come back, haved —shall we?
—-and see what we can do.” -

“T have tried sc often.”

‘Never mind; try again But you must
FRANK NETHURTON. 89



not forget the talisman. You will never get on
without that.”

“ You are right,” exclaimed Howard, as the
remembrance of his former resolutions came
across him. “I will try again, and in right
good earnest. I will turn over a new leaf, as
the saying is, and see if I cannot make fewer
blots.”

Frank warmly encouraged him in this de-
termination. Rushton, to whom Howard
made a point of telling every thing that
passed, and with whom, since their recon-
ciliation, he had become very intimate, said
that it was a wise resolution, and he hoped
that Howard would be able to keep it; but he
was afraid. And as for the talisman, it was
all stuff; and he should be sorry to see him
converted into a Methodist, like his friend
Netherton.

‘As the school was to break up -80 shortly,
‘+ was not thought worth while for Frank to
re-commence his studies; and the time hung
heavily on his hands until the holidays arrived.
Of the wound on his forehead nothing now
remained but a slight scar; but its weakening
effects were but too plainly evident in his pale
cheek and heavy eyes, and were severely felt
by Frank in his inability to fix his mind steadil
on any object, and the intense headache whic
was the inevitable result of such an attempt.
It was partly this feeling of incapacity which
gave him a childlike longing to be home aga" Dy
50 FRANK NETHEhTON.



and seated once more at his father’s fect in that
little, quiet study, listening to the old story of
the child and the reapers.

It was all over at length; the distribution
of prizes, the cheerful and somewhat boister-
ous “ breaking up,” and the joyous parting of
the school-fellows—joyous, because they were
going home, and because they should meet
again so soon. But all were not happy. At
the distribution of prizes, Frank, as we have
said, had a hard struggle with himself not to
feel envious. Philip Doyle won the first prize,
but it gave him little satisfaction. Howard
looked on in despair. At the breaking up,
Frank stood apart from their noisy mirth,
and leaned his aching head upon his hands.
He did not know that Doyle was watching him,
and that the sight took away all his pleasure.

Their parting, notwithstanding all Frank’s
assumed cheerfulness, was a sad one. ‘“ What
if he should never return!’ thought Doyle,
as he gazed upon his slight form, and pale,
smiling face. ‘Take care of yourself,” whis-
yes be, as they shook hands; “for my sake,

etherton, try and get well.”

‘Never fear,” replied Frank, gayly. .

Claude Hamilton also mingled cautions with
his farewell ; and was so kind and friendly that
Frank felt quite happy.

The cousins enjoyed their drive home.
Frederick was very cheerful and talkative;
he said a great deal about his prize, which
FRANK NETHERTON. 91



was the first that he had ever gained, and of
which he was very proud, and longed to
exhibit it to his mother and sister. Frank
was soon able to enter into his feelings with-
out a single remaining shadow of self-regret.
But not before he had, more than once, re-
sorted in memory to his talisman, and recalled
to mind that it is written therein, ‘ The spirit
that dwelleth in us lusteth to envy. But he
giveth more grace. * And again, “ Charity suf-
fereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not.’’}

After a time Frank’s thoughts wandered ;
and he could not help wondering how he
should find his father. Just before the coach
entered the village, he turned to ask Frederick
whether he really looked so very ill, and if the
scar showed much. —

“No, scarcely at all when you brush your
hair over it; and the air has given you quite &
colour.”

“JT am so glad,” exclaimed Frank.

The first person they saw was little Helen,
evidently looking out for them; for as soon
as she perceived the carriage approaching,
she clapped her hands and ran away tO Prom
claim the welcome intelligence.

Mrs. Mortimer met them on the hall-steps.
“Your father is better,” whispered she tc
Frank, as she gave him a hasty kiss. ‘He is
waiting for you in the study. But, bless the
boy! what has he been doing to himself ?”

#* James iv. 5, 6. + 1 Cor. xiii. 4,
8*



-_—___-
ae FRANK NETHERTON.



“Tt is nothing,” replied Frank; and in
another moment he was in his father’s arms.

“God be thanked! God be thanked!”
murmured Mr. Netherton, as he embraced:
him. And then, pushing him a little way
from him, and trying to smile, he added,
“What a fuss I am making about a few
months’ absence. Let me look at you, my
dear boy. You have been ill!”

‘It was only an accident,” replied Frank,
carelessly; “it is all over now.” But Mr.
Netherton was not satisfied.

Mrs. Mortimer did not leave them long
together. She kissed Frank again when she
entered, with much affection, parting back the
hair from his forehead as she did so; and then
dismissed him to wash his hands, and get ready
for dinner. ‘It is quite ready for you,”’ said
she. “I knew you would be hungry after
your drive.”

Frank forbore to assure his aunt that he
was not at all hungry, and would rather re-
main where he was, for he knew that it would
be of no use, and therefore went and did as
she desired him.

“Tt 1s nothing,’ exclaimed Mrs. Mortimer,
meeting her brother’s anxious glance ;—“a
mere scratch.”

“But do you not think Frank looks very
pale and thin ?”

“He is tired, and shall go to bed early.
He will be al right to-morrow.”
FRANK NETHERTON. ’ ia



Frank was not sorry to go to bed early ;
and the next morning, as his aunt had pro-
phesied, he seemed to be quite himself —
He was always pale, and therefore, as Mrs.
Mortimer said, it was no sign of ill health.
Nevertheless she nursed him in her own quiet
and judicious manner; and Frank was soon all
the better for her management.

Frederick’s prize received its due share of
notice and commendation, especially from his
sister, who was never weary of looking at it,
and admiring the handsome binding, and the
beautiful handwriting upon the title-page,
showing it to be the reward of merit. But
it might have been observed that Helen never
asked to look at it when Frank was by, or
spoke of it in his presence. Her own kind,
thoughtful heart taught her to act thus.
Helen had become quite a favourite with Mr.
Netherton; so much so that Frank told her
he had a great mind to be jealous; and then
ended by thanking her for her loving care.

It was settled that the two families should
continue to reside together, and the arrange-
ment seemed to give satisfaction to all parties.
As Mr. Netherton said, he did not know what
he should do now without his sister to manage
every thing for him; neither could he bear te
be separated from the little, golden-haired
child who had so wound herself around his
heart, and whose very name was linked with
fond memories of the past.
—.; FRANK NETHERTON.



Frank was pleased to think that his father
would have some one to cheer and amuse him
when he should have gone back to school. And
Helen, with her low, sweet voice, her win-
ning and playful ways, and gentle countenance,
always busy and helpful, and yet quict and
unobtrusive, was no unwelcome addition tc
that dear old study, which he so enjoyed when
at Lome, and thought about when away.


FRANK NETHERTON. . 3b

—————

CHAPTER XIII.
MISSICNARiES.

Freperick related the history of his cousin’s
iIIness, as far as he knew it; and the mystery
which still hung over its author; hinting that,
now Frank was at home, and among his own
family, there could be no impropriety in his
disclosing, in confidence, the real name of the
offender. “Not but what I have my suspicions,”
said Frederick; “‘ but I should so like to know
for certain.”

«There are several things that I should like
to know for certain,” replied Frank, laughing.
“ T want to know who the man with the iron
mask was. And what made the famous tower
at Pisa lean.”

“Some people say,” answered his father,
“with regard to the latter, that the ancient
builders, aiming at eccentricity, erected it as
‘t now stands; while others conceive its re-
clining position to be occasioned by a sinking
of the earth. The conjectures concerning the
ident:ty of the man with the iron mask are
endless.’

“ But seriously, Frank,” continued his cou-
sin, “I should like to know who hurt you.”

“ Seriously, Frederick, you never will know
from me.”
96 FHANK NETHERTON,



“T think that you might trust us, Frank ”

* You do not know how difficult it is to xeep
a secret,” replied his cousin. ‘I can scarcely
trust myself sometimes. Besides, it could do
no good, and it might do harm.”

“Frederick,”’ said his little sister, archly,
‘“‘T thought only women were curious.”

Mr. Netherton told Frank that he was quite
right; and so did his aunt. She then changed
the conversation by asking him whether he
had learned to play cricket yet.

Frank smiled, and referred her to his cousin
for an answer.

“He understands the game,” replied Fre-
derick ; “but to say the truth, I do not think
Frank will ever become a first-rate player.”

*‘ Never mind,” said Mr. Netherton, “ one
may do something better than play cricket ;
not but that it is a fine healthful game for
boys. I remember being very fond of it when
I was a boy. I suppose you found it rather
dull at school, just at first, Frank, before you
knew any of the boys? What a comfort and
support it must have been to have your cousin
with you!” .

Frank did not know what to say, so he
remained silent; while Frederick coloured
deeply, and muttered something about not
having yet scen the little gray pony; upon
which Helen offered to show it to him, and
they quitted the room together.

“Stay a moment, Frank,” said his aunt, ag


FRANK NETHERTON. 97
he arose to follow them; “I want to ask you
one question. Was Frederick kind to you at
school ?”’

“He meant kindly, dear aunt. It would do
me good, he said, to fight my own battles.
And go it did; it made me feel independent.”

« Brederick was right,” said Mr. Netherton.

“Yes, right if he really consulted Frank's

ood, and not his own selfish love of ease.”

“ By fighting my own battles,” added Frank,
“J do not mean quarrelling with any one; but
making my own friends, and maintaining my
own right to act and think for myself, let who
would laugh.”

“ But such battles are not fought without a
great many hard knocks,”’ said his aunt.

“Yes,” answered Frank, “ they are painful
to bear at the time, but one is all the better
for them afterwards. You must not be angry
with Frederick, dear aunt; he did not intend
to be ill-natured; and he was very kind to me
in my illness.” Mr. Netherton joined in plead-
ing his nephew's cause ; and Mrs. Mortimer
promised to say nothing to him on the subject.

Every day, when the weather permitted, the
cousins took long walks and rides together.
Sometimes Mr. Netherton went with them, but
they were oftener intrusted to the care of a
faithful domestic. Frederick, from a child,
had been accustomed to ride, while Frank's
natural fearlessness rendered him almost as
geod a horseman as his cousin. How th:
98 FRANK NETHERTON.



boys enjoyed those country rides and rambles
together! And how grateful Mr. Netherten
always felt to see Frank come in with his face
glowing with exercise, and looking as animated
and happy as he felt! But Frank’s favourite
place was still in his father’s study, listening
to his earnest conversation, and treasuring up
every look and word with filial affection.

“‘Pather,” said Frank, upon one occasion, as
they sat together, “ do you remember my
telling you that I should like, when I grew up,
to be a missionary? Well, I have thought a
great deal about it since, and am still of the
same opinion. The idea haunts me, and gives
an interest to all my studies.”

«There is time enough, my dear Frank,
as I told you before, to think what you
will be.”

“ But there is no harm in my wishing to be
a missionary years hence, if I live—is there?
One of the boys has an uncle who is a mission-
ary somewhere in India; and he writes him
such beautiful letters. A few years ag0, 4
fover broke out where he was, and many died
of it; but he continued to go from house to
house just the same, and was not in the least
afraid. He knew that God would take care
of him, he said, as long as he had any work
for him to do. You cannot think what a
brave, good man he is.”

“Yes, I can; thanks be to God, we have
many such fearless and devoted followers of
FRANK NETHENTON. Ov



the Lord Jesus Christ. But there are several
requisites which a missionary must possess.”

“ Yes,’ said Frank, “he must have a
thorough knowledge of the Bible to begin with :
what you call heart knowledge, as well as a
head knowledge. Then he must understand
geography ; and know a good many languages ;
and make up his mind to endure great hard-
ships, and run great risks, if need be, for the

lorious cause which he has undertaken.”

“J did not mean any of these requisitions,
Frank; although all, 1 admit, are necessary.
A missionary must be gentle, that he may win
souls to Christ; watchful and consistent, lest
his actions should contradict his words ; zealous
and persevering, amidst discouragement and
persecution. He must be patient with himself
and others; and content to cast his bread upon
the waters, in full assurance that he will find
it after many days. We may never know on
earth what good has been done by a single
sentence uttered in prayer and faith; a single
action performed in the name and for the sake
of Jesus Christ. But you may become a mis-
sionary without going to India, or waiting un‘il
you are older. There are home missionaries,
and I do not see why there should not be school
misssionaries. Should you not like to be aschool
missionary, Frank ?”

“Oh, I never thought of that.”

“TI dare say not; we are all too apt to over-
ook the way of duty which lies nearest home,
(09 FRANK NETHERTON.



and to be marking out new paths for ourselves
which we may never be permitted to tread.
Do you vot think that some of your school-
fellows sre as ignorant of, and far more
opposed to the religion of Christ, than those
poor heathens of whom we read; and that by
taking every opportunity of recommending the
gospel by word, precept and example, you
may, with God’s blessing on your humble
endeavours, do almost as much good as if you
went to India? I can guess what is passing
through your mind,” continued Mr. Netherton,
as Frank bowed down his head, and rested it
against his father’s knees. ‘‘ You are thinking,
‘WhatamI? Butremember who it is that has
said, ‘ My strength is made perfect in weakness.’
A little child, before now, has become, by God’s
grace, a home manny Will you try and
be a school missionary, Frank ?”

“Yes, father,” said he, “I will try.”

“Tf you try earnestly and powerfully, never
fear but that God wiJl give you something to
do for him, although you are but a school-boy.
And what a privilege to be permitted to work
for God! TI repeat it, you must be zealous in
seeking for opportunities, and watchful to
improve them. You must be gentle, meek-
spirited, and forbearing. Above all, you must
be consistent and patient. Even if you should
not succeed in benefiting others, the trial will
scarcely fail to benefit yourself.” |

The entrance of Mre. Mortimer put an end
FRANK NETHERTON, 01



to the conversation ; and Frank was dismissed
to play with his cousins. He would much
rather have remained where he was, and his
hesitating and appealing glance was not los.
upon his aunt; but she only shook her head,
and smiled as she told him that the fresh aD
would do him good.


102 FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER XIV.
"HE CHAMBER OF ANGER.

Tux more Frank thought of being a school
missionary, the more humble he became. Few
true Christians, we should think, ever set about
teaching others without experiencing this feel-
ing of unworthiness and self-abasement ; and it
is well if it lead them to depend less on them-
selves, and more entirely on Christ. Mr.
Netherton had several conversations with
Frank on the subject, in which he earnestly
endeavoured to divert his missionary enthusiasm
into home channels. It may be that he was
somewhat selfish in this, and dreaded the
thought of their separation hereafter. Even
if it had been so, it was but natural. His
conduct was, however, influenced by a higher
motive.

Frank was careful to say nothing to his
cousin, as he was well aware that he would
only make it a subject of ridicule. Not that
he minded being laughed at; but he feared lest
it might appear presumptuous on his part.

Every one was sorry when the holidays were
over.

“Tt is so delightful,” said Frederick, “ to
have nothing to do but amuse one’s self.
wish that there was no such place as school.”
FRANK NETHERTON. 103



“But you would not like to gruw Jp in
ignorance,” said Frank.

“Certainly not. I should like to be very
knowing without any trouble.”

«“ Tmpossible!” exclaimed Frank. ‘ What
can be the good of talking so foolishly ?”’

“ And where can be the harm, Mr. Cavity ..

“J have heard my father say, that the une
great harm there 1s in wishing is when. it
hinders working.”

“Well, Helen, have you no wishes ?”’ asked
her brother, turning towards her.

“Oh yes, a thousand.”

“ Go and tell Frank.”

“May 1?” asked the child, looking up
timidly into his face. And then, encouraged
by his smile, she whispered only two—“ that
God would restore my dear uncle to health,
and make me a better girl.” Upon which
Frank bid her try and turn them into prayers.

Frank did not feel the separation nearly so
much as he had upon the first occasion of his
leaving home. He was less uneasy about his
father ; and knew better what he had to expect
for himself; besides this, he was anxious to
sommence his missionary labours, as they were
termed.

The cousins spoke but little during the first
part of their journey, until Frederick, arousing
himself at length, declared that it was of no use
making one’s self miserable about what could
not be helped; and unpacking a huge plum-

b*
nt FRANK NETHERTON.



cnke whien Mrs. Mortimer had given them at
starting. began to eat and talk with great anima-
tion. It was well that his prudent mother had
taken care not to make it too rich.

How different was Frank’s reception upon
his second arrival at school! It was the re-
collection of this difference which made him
(after exchanging a hasty and cordial gre€ting
with Philip Doyle, who was delighted to find
him looking so well,) walk straight up to
Howard, without even waiting to shake hands
with his favourite Claude Hamilton.

There were several new boys and a new
usher. The late usher was a good-natured,
easy man, whom every one liked. The truth
is, he was too easy, and that was the reason
Mr. Campbell was obliged to part with him.
His successor, Mr. Barlow, seemed likely to
fall into the opposite extreme; and treated the
younger boys, as Doyle said, like the ground-
ash, which is supposed to flourish the better the
more it is cut and beaten.

After the first few days, every thing seemed
to go on as usual. Philip Doyle, on the slight-
est provocation, gave way to the violence of his
temper, almost as much as ever; but never to
Frank. Howard was continually making good
resolutions, and breaking them again; but he
persevered nevertheless, and really seemed, af
times, in spite of Rushton’s sneers, to be mak-
ing progress. Frederick continued to side op
all occas‘ons with the majority, without con-
FRANK NETHERTON. 105



sidering whether’ they were right or wrong,
and as it very often proved to be the latter, he
was punished in consequence. Frank. played,
or rather tried to play cricket, but was far
more successful in relating all sorts of wonder-
ful histories; suffered a great deal with head-
ache; and quietly pursued his missionary
labours, without any visible result. Hamilton
studied hard, and talked a great deal to Frank
about going to India, where his uncle had pro-
mised to send him as soon as he should be
qualified to do business. !

Poor Howard terribly tried Mr. Barlow's
patience, of which that gentleman did not
appear to possess a very large share. Upon
one occasion, when he had been even more
than usually dull and stupid, Mr. Barlow gave,
or rather tossed him back the book, and desired
him not to quit his place until he knew the
whole passage by heart. “I have told you .
that one thing a dozen times,”’ said he; “but it
‘3 of no use—a more incorrigible dunce never
existed.”

“Please, Mr. Barlow, did you ever hear the
anecdote Mr. Montgomery tells of the Wes-
leys?” asked Frank, looking up from his desk.

“Eh, what ?” exclaimed Mr. Barlow. “ I have
no time for anecdotes ; attend to your exercise.”

“ T have finished it, sir.’ Mr. Barlow looked
it over, and found it to be correct.

“Well, let us hear what you and Mr.
-Mautgomery have to say about the Wesleys.”’
106 FRANK NETHERTON.



“When they were quite children,” said
Frank, “their mother was teaching ore of
them a simple lesson, which he was slow to
learn: even bright children are sometimes
slow. She was very patient, but not so their
father. ‘My dear,’ exclaimed he, at length,
‘how can you tell that dull boy the same thing
twenty times over ” Because,’ replied the
mother, gently,’ nineteen will not do.’”

‘“ Well?” said Mr. Barlow, as Frank paused.

“Well, sir, you have only told Howard a
dozen times yet.”

Mr. Barlow could scarcely forbear smiling ;
and when the boys were dismissed shortly
afterwards to their play, Howard was permitted
to accompany them.

“JT do not think that Mr. Barlow much
relished your story, Frank,” observed his
friend Hamilton, with a laugh. “I would
not advise you to play that game too often.”

“Tt came into my head,” replied Frank,
go I repeated it. After all, I do not think
that he is really so very formidable ; it is only
his manner.”

“He frightens me out of my wits,
Iioward.

“ Query,” whispered Rushton to one, “ whe-
ther he has any wits to be frightened out of.”

“Jt is a pity,” said Frank, “because it
makes you blunder so dreadfully.”

“Mr. Barlow always reminds nie of the
Greek poet Aischylus,” said Philip Doyle,

99

gaid


FRANK NETHERTON. 107



of whom it is told that an eagle, mistaking
his bald head for a stone, let fall a tortoise on
it, and killed him—the poet, not the tortoise—
on the spot. I thought of it all yesterday
morning in church.”

“Tt is to be regretted that you had not
something better to think of,” said Claude
Hamilton. “The poor man cannot help hav-
ing a bald head.”

«Perhaps not; but he can help being ill-
tempered and disagreeable.”

‘Tr that case, 1 wonder that other people
do not try.”

“Do you mean me?” asked Philip Doyle,
turning pale with anger.

“Yes, I was thinking of you certainly ; and
what a pity it was that those who live in glass
houses should ever throw stones.”

“Or tortoises !” suggested Rushton.

“Do not provoke him,” whispered Frank.

“They had better not,” exclaimed Doyle,
fiercely, “or it will be the worse for them.”

«“ What will he do?” asked one of the boys,
with a mischievous glance at his companions.
“Will he knock us on the head, as the eagle
did Auschylus ?”’

“Come with me,” said Frank, laying his
hand upon Doyle’s, which trembled with pas-
sion, but yielded, nevertheless, to that gentle
touch; “I wish to speak to you a moment.”

Doyle followed him mechanically a few
Bteps apart
108 ¥RANK NETHEKTON.



“Well,” said he, “‘ what do you want tT

“Dear Philip,” whispered Frank, “do you
not remember what you said—what you pro-
mised? I know it is difficult; but God will help
you, if you ask him.”

‘‘ You do not know any thing about it, Nether-
ton,” answered Doyle, but not unkindly. “ You
do not know what it is to feel as I do.”

“Tt must be very bad,” observed Frank,
simply.

“Yes, it is very bad; but I will take your
advice, Frank. I have not forgotten the
‘knodhagara.’”’

Frank pressed his hand in silence, with the
tears in his eyes, and they walked together
towards the house.

Doyle paused suddenly as he was about to
enter. “They will not think me a coward,
Netherton, will they? And that I went away
because I was afraid of them ?”’

“If they knew all,” answered Frank, “they
would love and admire you as much as I do.”

“ Let them think what they will,” exclaimed
Doyle, after a moment’s pause. “It does not
signyy does it ?””

‘Not when we are doing nght,” said Frank.

“My brave little friend!” said Doyle,
laying his hand affectionately upon Frank’s
shoulder. “But go back now, for 1 want te
be alone.” :
140 FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER XIX.
THE CONFESSION.

Huwary and Philip Doyle sat together in
the deserted school-room, waiting Frank’s
return. The rest of the boys were in the
play-ground, and the sound of their merry
voices came, at intervals, through the open
windows. ‘Do you think that Mr. Campbell
has heard any thing,” asked the former ; “any
thing, I mean, to exculpate Frank ?”’

a am afraid not. I suppose he will be
punished. It is very hard.”

Howard sighed, or rather groaned an af-
firmative.

‘Hark!’ exclaimed Doyle. ‘I heard the
study-door shut. Yes, he is coming. Now
we shall know all.”

Howard crouched down behind a desk, and
Frank passed without perceiving him.

“Well,” exclaimed Doyle, cheerfully, as he
advanced to meet him, “so it is over at last.
But how pale you look! You are not to ve
beaten, are you, Frank ?”

Frank shook his head.

“Come, you must not give way in this
manner. Never mind a hard lesson. I pro-
tise to help you all I can.”’

“You will not be permitted,” said Frank:
FRANK NETHERTON. 141



“henceforth I am to study, and even take
my meals, alone. But it is not that. They
might have beaten me to a mummy, and |
would not have cried out. Mr. Campbell is
going to write to my father;—not that he
will believe a word—he knows and loves me
too well—but the least excitement makes him
ll: it may kill him. O Philip! what shall I
do? What will become of me?”

“My dear Frank, this is sad indeed. I
scarcely know what to advise. We had better
talk to Hamilton about it.”’

‘No; there is but one person who can help
me. Where is Howard ?”’

“He was here a moment ago,” said Doyle,
looking round the room. ‘“ But I do not see
what good he can do you. No one ever thinks
of consulting Howard.”

“T must see him immediately, nevertheless,”
exclaimed Frank, rising up.

‘In that case I will send him to you, for you
are not fit to move.”

‘Thank you,” said Frank; “you are very
kind.”

Several of the boys now entered the school-
room. Frederick, and one or two others,
went up to Frank, while the rest stood apart
and whispered among themselves.

‘What will be done to him?” asked one.

“T do not know. Mr. Campbell is going
to write to Mr. Netherton. That is what
Frank feels so much. o They say that his
142 FRANK NETHERTON.



‘ther is in bad health, and the shock may
iauke him worse. Frank is his only son.”

“T cannot help pitying him,” exclaimed
another.

“T should think that he would never have
the face to preach to us again,” observed one.

“Surely, surely Mr. Campbell will not
write,” exclaimed Rushton. “He only says
so to frighten Frank.”’

“Mr. Campbell seldom says what he does
not mean.

Several of the boys whispered earnestly
together.

“The only thing to be done,” exclaimed
Claude Hamilton, whose keen glance watched
every movement, “‘is for the guilty to come
forward and clear the innocent. Sooner or
later their sin will be sure to find them out;
it may be when it is too late to atone for it.”

“Who volunteers to take Netherton's
place ?” inquired a mocking voice.

Rushton was about to speak, when he was
interrupted by the entrance of Philip Doyle.

“You cannot see Howard this moment.”
said he to Frank. “He is with Mr. Campbeil
in his study, where he went, it appears, of his
= accord, almost immediately after you
eft.”

Frank laid his head upon his cousin’s
shoulder, and burst into tears —- but aT
were tuars of jcy and hope; while Frederic
wept tao, without knowing why.
FRANK NETHERTON. 142



“Even now,” said Claude Hamilton, ‘my
suggestion is perhaps in the act of being ac-
coroplished.”’

‘“ But what can Howard know? What can
he have to tell? No one thinks that he took
the peaches.”

‘God knows every thing,” answered Claude
Hamilton, loud enough for Frank to hear: and
he did hear, and looked up and smiled.

“¢<¢Though he slay me,’”’ repeated Herbert,
—from the chapter which they had been read-
ing together that morning; “ ‘Though he slay
me, yet will I trust in him.’”’

Rushton hid his face in his hands, and sobbed
aloud.

“Never mind,” said Frank, soothingly ;
“it will all end well now. Do not grieve
for me.”

Rushton started and shook off the hand
that rested upon his shoulder, with a quick,
impatient gesture. :

‘Leave him alone,” whispered Doyle. “ He
is a strange fellow. I do not know what to
make of him of late. But I really think that
he has a good heart.” |

‘“‘Tt is worth while being in trouble,” said
Frank, “to see how kind every one is.” He
forgot at that moment all their hard speeches
against him. The trials of the past week
faded away from his memory like a dream.

Howard had overheard poor Frank’s pas-
sionate lamentation, as he crouched behind
144 FRANK NETHERTON.



the desk, and his heart smote him fcr his
selfishness. He rose up softly; and having
succeeded in leaving the school-room unob. .
served, ran along the passage, and xnocked
hastily at the door of Mr. Campbell’s study,
who half hoped that it might be Frank re
turned. ‘¢ Come in,” said he.

Howard’s heart beat, and his knees knocked
together as he entered ; but he knew that he
was doing right at last, and that gave him
courage. In a few moments he had told
Mr. Campbell every thing he knew; how he
had borrowed the pencil-case of Frank, and
lost it; and how in his fear lest he should
be accused of stealing the peaches, he had
won from him a promise not to betray him.
His reasons were given almost in the same
words which he had before used. ‘‘T knew,”
said he, “that mo one would believe me;
but I thought—I hoped that every one
would believe Frank Netherton. 1 am sure
they would, if they knew him as well as
I do.”

Encouraged by Mr. Campbell’s manner,
Toward went on to tell him of all Frank’s
kindness to him; of his own good resolutions
so often broken; and even about the talisman.
“Tf I had consulted it as he bid me.” added
Howard, “all this would not have happened ;
but, for the last week, I have not dared to
open “*

«] will venture to promise,” said Mr


FRANK NETHERTON. 145



Campbell, “that its answer to-night will be
one of peace.”

“And yet,” exclaimed Howard, despond-
ingly, “I have only done what I ought to
have done long since.”

“The best of us,” replied Mr. Campbell,
“are but unprofitable servants. We shall
never find peace by looking at ourselves. We
must look to Christ. He is our peace. You
believe this, [loward ?”’

“I do not know what I should do if I
did not believe it, sir: only 1 am apt to
forget it sometimes, and then I feel very
niserable.”’

“Like Peter, the moment we take our eyes
off the Saviour, we begin to sink.”

That evening, Howard opened his whole
heart—with all its struggles and weakness ;
its fears and yearnings; its faint hope and
trembling faith; its utter helplessness—to his
kind preceptor. It was an era in his life, and
he was wont to affirm that from that day every
thing went better with him. Mr. Campbell
understood and helped him more than he
had ever been able to do before. And we
may be sure that God helped him, because he
has promised to help all those who come to
him in the name of Jesus Christ. And we
know that all God’s promises are true.

It seemed a long time to the curious and
anxious g*oup assembied in the school-room.

“Poor Howard!” exclaimed one; “I can
146 FRANK NETHERTON.

fancy him wishing that the ground would ope:
and swallow him up. What can Mr. Campbell
be saying to him ?”’

‘¢What can he be saying to Mr. Camphell
for it was he who sought the interview,” ob-
served another.

Even Mr. Barlow appeared to be interested
in the result of the conference, and spoke
kindly to Frank on the subject.

Every voice was hushed when Mr. Campbell
at length entered. Howard had hold of his
hand; he was pale, and looked as if he had
heen crying, but he did not seem frightened.
Mr. Campbell explained every thing in a few
words, expressing his entire conviction that
Frank had been unjustly accused, and his
sorrow for what he had suffered rather than
betray his school-fellow. Howard, he said,
had only now done what he ought to have
done at first; but, nevertheless, he should
abstain from inflicting any punishment on
him, as he believed, from what he had con-
fessed to him, that he had been sufficiently
punished, and that he would be braver, and
wiser, and better, for the time to come. .

“One thing is certain,” added Mr. Camp-
bell, ‘that the real offender has not yet been
(iseovered. It is probable that he never will
be now. As I said once before, in an affair
almost as mysterious, and in which poor Nether-
ton was also the sufferer, let us leave him to God.”

Mr. Campbell then gave the boys a aalf
FRANK NETILERTON. 117



holiday, in honour of Frank’s acquittal; and
having shaken hands with and congratulated
him in the kindest manner, withdrew to_ his
own study, taking Mr. Barlow with him.


118 FRANK NETHERTON



CHAPTER XX.
SUNSHINE AFTER STORM.

Most of the boys were sorry now for what
they had said against Frank, and a few told
him so with tears in their eyes. They called
to remembrance their good resolutions at the
time of his illness; and how well he had acted
then, and since, in innumerable instances
which came crowding back upon their me-
mories—instances of moral courage, and
truthfulness, and forbearance, and _loving-
kindness, even towards those who had sought
to injure him. And now, in a changed spirit,
they said, “ After all, there must be something
in religion.” Hereafter, perhaps, by God's
grace, they may be led to confess that there
is every thing in religion.

Frederick was glad that he had stood by
his cousin through good and evil report; and
eould look round and say to his companions,
“T told you from the first that he was inno
cent.”

Hamilton and Doyle also rejoiced with
Frank, even as they had sorrowed with him
Herbert, who had been kind to him all
along, requested to be aumbered among his
friends. Frank had » great many friends
now.
FRANK NETHERTON. {49



Howard, 6 use his own language, felt as if
he kad wings to his feet. He jumped, he
laughed, he danced; he was a different crea-
ture. “Oh, if I could always do right!”
thought he. “All is so easy, so delightful,
and one never need be afraid then.”

Frank thanked Rushton for the way in
which he had behaved during the ‘past
week. “I do not remember your saying a
single unkind or mocking word,” said he;
‘which, to confess the truth, I rather won-
dered at.”

“Yes, it was a wonder,” replied Rushton.
‘‘But you have nothing to be grateful for.
I suppose I must have been thinking of some-
thing else.”

“Whatever the cause was,” said Frank,
“J am grateful for your forbearance, and
shall not easily forget it.”

‘“Pshaw!” exclaimed Rushton. “Tow do
you know but what I may be going to reform,
like our friend Howard, and one or two others,
whom I could name ?”

“O Rushton, are you serious?”

“Did you ever know me serious for above
five minutes?” asked his companion, starting
up with a loud laugh that had more of bitter-
ness than mirth in it. “Not another word,
Netherton, if you would not have me forfeit
the good opinion which you have so errone-
ously formed of me. I hate every thing seri-
ous; and never could endure being preached

13
150 FRANK NETHERTON.



to. Leave me alone, and I shall do very
well.”

“So said the half-frozen traveller,” replied
Frank, gently, “when he sank wearily down
in the cold snow to rest. Had they taken
him at his word—had they left him alone—
he would have perished. But I do not want
to preach; only I dislike to hear you talk in
that manner.”

‘Now for the anecdotes again!” exclaimed
Rushton, turning to the rest, and still laugh-
ing. “We have had a week’s rest. Tell us
a story, Netherton.”’

‘Not at present,” said Frank. ‘‘ My heart
is too full, and cdn only give thanks.”

The boys now dispersed about the grounds,
and began to make the most of their holiday;
but not before they had given, at Howard’s
suggestion, three cheers for Frank Netherton.
Mr. Campbell heard them as he sat in his
study, and was glad; and even the hard fea-
tures of the usher relaxed into a smile at the
sound.

“Q Frank!” exclaimed Doyle, as they
walked together, “ you cannot think what I
felt this morning when Mr. Campbell repeated
those well-remembered words, ‘ Let us leave
him to God.’ It was thus he said of me once.
Whoever the guilty person may be, I can
only hope that God may deal with him as
mercifully as he has dealt with me since
then.”
FRANK NETIIERTON. 15]



I hope so too, Philip,” replied Frank,
affectionately. “‘ Whoever they may be, I pity
them very much.”

“So do I; for they will most likely be ex
pelled from the school if they are discovered.
It must be bad enough to be suspected with-
out cause. I cannot think how you could
bear it so long. After all, your telling would
not have hurt Howard.”

“‘ But [ had promised him not to tell.”

“A cowardly fellow! And yet he behaved
very well at last.”

“Poor Howard!” said Frank, “I cannot
help liking him, notwithstanding his weakness
of character. We all have our faults, only we
do not see our own so plainly as we do those
of others. Did you ever hear of the two
wallets, Philip ?”

“Not that I remember.”

“‘ Every person, it is said,” continued Frank,
“carries two wallets, one hung before ang the
other behind him. Into the first he puts the
faults of others, but slips his own into the
second, by which means we never see our own
failings, while those of our neighbours are
continually before our eyes.”

* That is true enough,” said Doyle, laughing.

“If the wallets could only change places,”
continued Frank, “how different every thing
would appear! If we could only peep in
and see our own faults, how we should
hate ourselves, and wonder that every one
15% FRANK NETHER 'ro¥



Jid not hate us! How humble we should
feel; how pitiful and forbearing towards
others !”

‘¢ We should indeed,” replied Doyle.

Several of the boys joining them at that
moment, they began to speak of other
things.

. “JT cannot think what is come to them all,”
exclaimed Rushton, peevishly, as the merry
laughter of his school-fellows echoed through
the play-ground; and the merriest of all was
Frank Netherton’s. “How happy they seem
to be. What a noise they make! - I wish they
would not laugh so.” |

“Ts any thing the matter?” asked Howard,
good-naturedly, as he stopped before him, out
of breath with his exertions.

‘What should be the matter ?”

“TI do not know; but I thought you looked
ill, or ill-tempered.” And he laughed again,
as he would not have ventured to have done
a short time since.

“My head aches,” said Rushton.

“That is bad, but the heart-ache.is worse.
Never mind, so long as you have not the heart-
ache.”

‘Pshaw!” interrupted his companion; “‘ what
do you know about such things ?”’

“Nothing now,” replied Howard, clapping
his hands, and dancing round him. ‘“ ‘My
neart is as light as a feather.’ ”’

“ Do stand still, can't you 2”
FRANK NETHERTON. 153



“JT beg your pardon. I forgot that you
nad a head-ache. Come and play with us,
and perhaps you will forget it too.”

*T am in no humour for play.”

‘“ Rushton,” said Howard, with a sudder
thoughtfulness, “‘something is the matter
Will you not tell me what it is? You used
to like me, and tell me every thing.”

“And you used to like me befcre Frank
Netherton came between us.”

‘‘Q Rushton! he never came between us.
[ like you now, next to him.”

“Go away,’ said his companion, impa-
tiently. “Go to your favourite. I want to
be alone.”

Howard went away sorrowfully; but his
sorrow was soon forgotten. It was a happy
evening. The stars came out, one by one,
before the boys thought of returning to the
house. Frank remembered how his father
had often spoken to him of the stars preach-
ing their nightly sermon to mankind, and he
asked his companions if they could guess
what the text was.

“{ think I know,” exclaimed Howard,
eagerly quoting the beginning of the nine-
teenth Psalm: ‘“‘The heavens declare the
glory of God; and the firmament showeth
his handywork. Day unto day uttereth
speech, and night unto night showeth knows
ledge. There is no speech nor language,
where their voice is not heard.’ ”’
- 154 FRANK NETHERTON.



Yes, that is right,” said Frank.

“Only think of Howard’s guessing!’ ex-
tlaimed one of the boys. “I should not
wonder if he were to turn out a genius after
all.”

“No, I shall never be a genius,” replied
Howard, smiling, and colouring with pleasure.
“But I do hope that I shall get on better
than I have done, with God’s help,” added
he, after a pause. —

“Yes, I think you will,” said Claude Ha-
milton, kindly. He held out his hand, and
Howard took it, scarcely knowing, (as he after-
wards confessed,) whether he stood upon his
head or his heels, but inwardly determined to
try and deserve the good opinion thus openly
expressed.

They had plum-cake for tea, which the kind
house-keeper sent up to celebrate the acquittal
of her favourite; for she had always liked
Frank, ever since she helped to nurse him in
his long illness, and would never believe in
his guilt.

The evening prayers that night were (some-
thing more than usual) beyond a mere form.
They were the outpourings of earnest, grate-
ful, loving, and penitent hearts, whose secret
joys and sorrows were known only to God.

here is a comfort in prayer, especially when,
like Frank’s, our prayers are graciously turned
into praises; or when, as in Howard’s case,
“the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.”
FRANK NETHERTON. 155



We fear that many of the boys did not expe-
rience this comfort, and Rushton among the
number; for he arose pale and gloomy, as he
had kneeled down, and went away without
bidding any one good-night.


FRANK NETHERTON. 409



CHAPTER XV.
HEART SINS.

“J gay, Netherton, what did you give Cer-
berus to quiet him ?” asked Rushton, in a mock-
ing tone, as Frank returned. “It would be
worth knowing.”

‘¢ How awful he looks when he is in a pas-
sion!” said Howard. “I declare he quite
frightens me. I am always afraid that he
will break a blood-vessel.”

“He is more likely to break some one’s
head,” said Rushton. —

“T am sorry now that I said what I did,”
observed Claude Hamilton.

: “Yes,” said Frank; “I knew you would
a"

“ But he is so easily provoked; a mere word
will put him out of temper.”

Re, Knowing this, we should be the more care-
Tul.”

“ Hear him!” exclaimed Rushton.

“You may laugh, if you like,” continued
Frank; “but I do think Philip Doyle very
much to be pitied. Instead of teasing and
provoking him, we ought to try and help him
to be better-tempered, especially when we see
lum trying to help himself.”

‘Go on, sir orator!” exclaimed Rushton, in
110 FRANK NETHERTON.



the same mocking strain. “Can you not
tell usa story on the subject 2”

“Yes,” said Frank ; “T can tell you an
anecdote of a good and learned man, the cele-
brated John Bradford, who was 80° much in
the habit of acknowledging that it is only by
Divine help we are kept from sin and evil,
that upon one occasion, on seeing a criminal
conveyed past his house to prison, he is said
to have exclaimed, in deep humility, ‘ There
goes John Bradford—but for the grace of
God.’”’

Several of the boys appeared to be struck by
what Frank had said; but the incorrigible
Rushton continued to jest. “I propose a
general thanksgiving,” exclaimed he, ‘that
we are not so passionate as Philip Doyle.”

“Tf we are not as passionate, we have other
faults.”

“ Speak for yourself, little one.”

“T may speak for all,” continued Frank ;
“for the Bible says that ‘ all have sinned, and
come short of the glory of God.’”

«“ How can you make yourself so ridiculous,
Frank ?” whispered his cousin. .

“ What is there ridiculous in speaking the
truth ?”’

“ Yes, it is true enough, ” murmured Howard.
“We have all our faults; at least, I am sure
that I have mine.”

“No one would dream of doubting such av
obvious fact,” said Rushton with a laugh.
Frank Netherton.

y)
Te



—
Wy yy
C24

Le



CHIT
Wf

L G Tl)
Vy’ r

ip

6S —*
Fe, FWY
—— , ‘



WAY
»* .¥:
WN





Frank and Rushton.

p. 110
114 FRANK NETHERTON.



“Hang Netherton!” exclaimed Rushton,
turning impatiently away.

Frank was gratified by observing how often
Howard, in his little trials and troubles, re-
sorted to his talisman, (as he still continued
to call the Bible,) from the study of which he
seldom returned without an answer of peace.
Another boy, named Herbert, who slept in
the same room, and had been among the first
to laugh at Frank for so doing, also began to
follow his example. In a letter to his mother,
he stated his reasons for this change: “‘ You
do not know how difficult it is to act religiously
at school. Had I commenced from the first,
as I promised you I would, it might have been
easier; but I wanted courage, and put it off
from time to time, until at last I began to join
in the laugh against those who did. But there
is a boy here now who has taught me, less by
precept than example, how wrong it is to be
ashamed of the gospel of Christ. When he
first came, and kneeled down fearlessly to his
accustomed devotions, I secretly admired and
envied, even while I teased him. Many a time
have 1 suddenly extinguished the light in the
middle of his reading ; but Frank Netherton is
not easily provoked. He calls the Bible his
talisman; and I mean, with God’s assistance,
to make it mine henceforth. ‘Ashamed
of Jesus!’ exclaimed the little fellow upon
one occasion, when we had been laughing
e¢ him; what if Jesus should hereatter be
FRANK NETHERTOY. 114



ashamed of us?’ What indeed, dear mo-
ther ?””

Frank never saw this letter. Mr. Netherton
was right when he said that we shall not know
until we get to the kingdom of heaven, what
good, or, alas! what evil consequences have
been the result of our influence and example
upon others. God forbid that it should prove
the latter! It is a solemn thought, and should
make us very careful.

It is far from our intention to describe
Frank as faultless. It would not be natural:
there never existed a boy who was. As he him-
self often said, ‘All have sinned.” *Brought
up beneath the eye of a tender and indulgent
parent; taught, as it were, to be in love with
learning from his very childhood, and of a
naturally quick and intelligent disposition, he
had neither the temptations of Philip Doyle,
nor the discouragements of Howard to struggle
against. The former was the son of a West-
Indian planter, and had been sent abroad
for his education: the latter an orphan, neg-
lected, uncared for, and, as he had once said,
alone in the world. The one had been spoiled
by a weak but affectionate mother, and accus-
tomed to play the tyrant over all who came
in his way; the other had been cowed and
laughed at by his more fortunate cousins,
until he had become spirit-broken.

The same reasoning will hold good with
regard to many other of his school-fellows,
116 FRANK NETHERTON.



from whose peculiar failings Frank was em-
paratively free. But for God's blessing on the
religious instruction which he had received, he
might have been.as they were, “ without Christ,
being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel,
and strangers from the covenants of promise,
having no hope, and without God in the world.’’*

If Frank was neither passionate nor easily
provoked ; if, instead of being dull, he was
quick as well as diligent in his studies—for
quickness without industry is of little worth ;
‘f he was no liar, but dared to speak the truth
fearlessly upon all occasions ; if he never told
tales, and seldom got into disgrace; if he was
not ashamed of the religion of Christ; if he
had fewer obvious failings than some others,
Frank had many, many faults known only to
God and to himself, and against which he
prayed, and wept, and struggled, not altogether
in vain.

Few guessed how difficult it was for Frank
to restrain the hasty, and perhaps unkind
retort ; to keep back the witty, but ill-natured
sarcasm which came so readily to his lips. If
he was tempted to utter them, he was always
sorry for it afterwards; but that sorrow could
not always heal the wound which his words
had inflicted. Sometimes, when he had suc-
seeded in his studies, and Mr. Campbell had
praised him, Frank’s heart swelled with pride,

Se eee ee



—— ee

Â¥ Eph ti. 12.
FRANK NETHERTON. Tz



and he was too apt to look down, (at: least in
one sense of the word,) upon those who were
less bright or less fortunate. Very often he
remembered to speak the truth, but forgot to
speak it “in love.” And while he refrained
from transgressing the rules of the school
himself, was a little too hard upon those who
were less strong to resist temptation. His
zeal for God was not always “according to
knowledge ;” and he often feared lest he
should have done more harm than good; and
might have been heard to pray with tears,
‘(() God, thou knowest my foolishness; and
my sins are not hid from thee. Let not them
that wait on thee, O Lord God of hosts, be
ashamed for my sake; let not those that seek
thee be confounded for my sake, O God of
Israel.’’*

Truly has it been said, that “‘ the heart only
knoweth its own bitterness” —the bitterness
of sin. We cannot hide ourselves from our-
selves. But it is likewise said, that “a stranger
intermeddleth not with its joys’—the joy of
peace and reconciliation through Jesus Christ
our Lord. Frequently would Frank exclaim
in deep humility, “ What am I, that I should
set up as a school-missionary, as a teacher of
others, who have so much to learn? Lord, be
merciful to me a sinner, for Jesus’ sake.





Ps. Ixix. 5,6.
10*
FRANK NETHERTON. re

unr



CHAPTER XVII.
GOD KNOWS EVERY THING

Tury found the boys assembled in ‘he school-
room when they entered, and Mr. Campbell
standing in the midst of them, and looking
unusually pale and stern. “Are all here .
asked he.

“ All, sir,” replied Mr. Barlow, running his
eyes over them.

“You are most of you aware why you have
been summoned,” said Mr. Campbell. “‘ Last
evening the peaches were quite safe, for T saw
them myself, and anticipated the pleasure of
sending them to my sister. I believe I openly
mentioned my intention of so doing, and gave
it as a reason for not touching them myself,
or offering them to others. This morning at
nine o’clock they were gone. It is impossible
for me to tell how many of you were concerned
in this robbery—for I can call it by no lighter
name—nor have I any means of finding out;
but I have reason to know that only one stood
upon the border and gathered the peaches from
the wall, handing them most probably from
thence to his companions; ani I must require
that one to come forward instantly and con-
fess his crime.”

The boys exchanged glances, but no one

1
126 FRANK NETHERTON.



moved. Quriosity rather than guilt was the
prevailing expression of their countenances
Howard did not tremble or look more fright-
ened than usual; and Rushton half smiled,
as if he thought it highly improbable that the
mandate would be obeyed.

Mr. Campbell repeated his command, but
still no one moved. THe then called them up
and interrogated them separately. Doyle
answered briefly and proudly, as if he thought
that no one had a right to suspect or question
him. Claude Hamilton knew that he was
not suspeeted, and his replies were frank and
cheerful. Rushton advanced, still smiling ;
it might have been observed, however, that
his lips quivered with emotion. Howard
trembled so violently as to be searcely able
to speak; but then every one knew what a
coward he was. Several of the boys stam-
mered, and appeared confused, but were per-
mitted to retire to their places, until at length
no one remained but Frank. His denial was
prompt and fearless ; and the boys looked at
one another, wondering what would be done
next.

“Stay a moment, if you please,” said Mr.
Campbell, as Frank was about to return to
his seat. ‘It is possible that you may be
able to give some information on this subject.
I understand that you were seen walking in
the garcen this morning before any one elsa
Was up.”
FRANK NETHERTON. 127



“T had a headache,” replied Frank, “and
could not sleep. I thought the fresh air
might do it good.”

“Did you ever try this remedy before ?”

“No, sir; but I was not aware that it was
against the rules.”

“That is not the subject at present in dis-
pute. Were the peaches gone when you were
there ?”’ |

“JT do not know,:sir. I never looked, or
thought about them.”

“May I ask if you lost any thing during
your walk ?”’

“ Not that I am aware of,” replied Frank.

Mr. Campbell took from his pocket a small
gold pencil-case, and holding it up, inquired
to whom it belonged.

“Tt is mine,” exclaimed Frank, eagerly. .
“T lent”—at that momeut he met Howard’s
imploring glance, and added, somewhat con-
fusedly, “it was lost above a week ago.”

“ And found this morning,” said Mr. Camp-
bell, “lying on the ground, immediately under
the wall from whence the peaches were ga-
thered. It caught my eye in a moment, and
it is not likely that it should have remained
there so long unnoticed.”

“Impossible, sir,” exclaimed Frank; “for
I looked everywhere for it.”

Mr. Barlow corroborated his account, by
mentioning his having wished to borrow the
pencil-case of Frank; and several of the boys
128 FRANK NETHERTON.

remembered assisting him in searching for it,
and the sorrow which he had oman at the
loss of his father’s present. Howard longed
to speak, but dared not.

Mr. Campbell remained for some moments
silent, and apparently lost in thought; until
rising up at length, he said, that after what
he had just heard, he should forbear to inflict
any punishment on the suspected person, until
the subject had been thoroughly investigated.
“ Tt will give me the sincerest pleasure,” added
he, turning to Frank, who gazed on him with a
bewildered air, “to find that these suspicions
are without foundation.”

“Gir! Mr. Campbell! Do you—does any
one think that I took the peaches?” asked
Frank, suddenly.

‘Tt must be owned that appearances are
strongly against you,” replied his preceptor.
“But if you are really innoceat, you have no
cause for fear.”

Frank did not reply. His head grew giddy,
and he would have fallen but for the supporting
arm of Philip Doyle. Mr. Campbell quitted
the room without having perceived the cause
of his silence.

“Never mind,” whispered Doyle, kindly.
“Not one here believes that you did it.”

“No,” said Claude Hamilton; “ I will
answer for that. Come, be a man, Netherton.
It is only a passing cloud.”

Several of the boys gathered round them
RS me ee ln

FRANK NETHSRTON 123



with expressions of sympathy and encourage-
ment. Frederick was among the number;
but Rushton and Howard stood apart.

“What do you think?’ whispered the
former.

“T do not know,” replied Howard, pale and
trembling. “I dare not think.”

Rushton looked earnestly at him, but said
no more.

After a few moments, Frank roused him-
self, and thanked them, with a faint smile,
for their kindness. ‘ What a comfort it is,”
murmured he, as if he were thinking aloud
rather than actually speaking ;—“‘ what a
comfort it is to remember that God knows
every thing !”’

“Yes, it is a great comfort,” replied Ha-
milton. ‘He not only knows the truth, but
will make it manifest in his own good time
and way. |

“Tt was a pity you happened to go out
this morning, Frank,” said his cousin, after
a pause.

“Yes, it was a pity. I do not know what
made me think of it. It came into my head
all of a sudden.”

“I wonder how Mr. Campbell knew that
only one person stool on the border,” said
Dovle.

“Most probably from the impression of
the foot-marks on the mould,” replied Claude

‘Hamilton. “ He was right in supposing that
1* ,
130 FRANK NETHERTON.



one person could not have eaten all the
peaches.

‘¢Whoever stole them,” exclaimed Howard,
with sudden and unusual bitterness, “I hope
the peaches may choke them.”

“That is going rather too far,” said Her-
bert, laughing; “although I confess it would
serve them right. One would think that the
knowledge of their being intended for the
sick and suffering would have insured their
safety.”

some fancy,” said Frank, “the thief look-
ing every way, and forgetting to look up.”

‘Or to look down either,” added Rushton.
“Tf he had, he would not have left his pencil-
case behind him.”

“Tt was my pencil-case,” said Frank, boldly ;
‘and he had no more business with that than
he had with the peaches.”

“Never mind,” observed Claude Hamilton ;
‘God looked down and saw every thing.”

“Rushton,” said Howard, (drawing him aside, )
“you must not say what you did just now.
Frank is innocent; I could swear it.”

“‘T do not remember saying any thing to the
contrary. But what makes you so earnest?
Perhaps you know who took the peaches ?”’

: : No,” said Howard sorrowfully; ‘I wish

i” |

“What a fuss you make,” exclaimed Rush-
ton. “Do you think that Netherton would
care if you were accused ?”
FRANK NETHERTON. 181

“Yes, Iam sure he would. He has stood
my friend a hundred times: and then I was
guilty, and he is innocent.”

“That remains to be proved. As Mr.
Campbell said, appearances are strongly
against him.”

“Mr. Campbell did not know all.”

“T shall begin to think that you had a
hand in it yourself, Howard, if you are so
mysterious.”

“T am not afraid of that. If you really
thought me capable of such a mean and
cowardly action, I am quite sure, Rushton,
that you would never speak to or look at me
again. And yet I am mean and cowardly
enough as it is.”’

“T should like to understand you,” said
Rushton, earnestly. ‘‘ You used to trust me
and tell me every thing before little Netherton
set you against me.”’

“Frank never set me against you. He
always took your part; and does not believe

that you mean half what you say.”

' "hat is taking my part with a vengeance.
Then he thinks that I am a liar?”

“Nothing of the kind. But you know,
Rushton, that you often do say very strange
and really wicked things; but then it is =
in jest. Vo you not remember that Fran
mentioned it to you unce; and observed that
it was a pity, as it made you enemies? And
1 recollect his saying at the same time, that
132 FRANK NETHERTON.

we have nc more right to wound azother a
feelings, than we have to throw a stone and
break their windows. And something more
he said about our giving an account of every
idle word in the day of judgment; and the
Bible says the same thing too.”

‘“As your memory appears to be so good,
perhaps you recollect my reply.”

‘““No,” replied Howard; “I never remem-
ber unpleasant things, if I can help it; nox
Frank either. But indeed you misjudge him.”

“* Pshaw !”” exclaimed Rushton, turning im-
“shoot away. “I hate the very sound of

is name ”




118 FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER XVI.
MISSIONARY THOUGHTS.

Mr. Netnerron’s parting gift, on his son’s
leaving home the second time, was a small gold
pencil-case, of which Frank was not a little
proud, and which he much valued. One morn-
ing, Mr. Barlow asked if he would mind lend-
ing it to him for a few moments, to mark some
passages in the book he was reading, as he had
mislaid his own.

“ Certainly not,” said Frank ; “I shall have
great pleasure.” But when he came to look
for it, the pencil-case was nowhere to be found.
Frank was very sorry, and searched for it in
every place he could think of.

“What can have become of it ?”’ said he.

“Never mind,” observed Mr. Barlow. “ I
dare say you will find it by-and-by. Perhaps
you have lent it to some one else.”

“JT do not remember having done s0,”
answered Frank. But as he was turning
over the contents of his desk, it occurred to
‘sim that he had lent it a day or two before to
Howard, and that it had never been returned to
him. When he reminded Howard of this, he
acknowledged it at once, and that he had lost it.

“JT have been going to tell you several
FRANK NETHERTON. 119



times, but I was afraid,” said Howard, ‘‘ know-
mg how much you valued it. I intended to
buy you another with the first money my
aunt sent me, for indeed I am very sorry.”

«And I am very sorry too,” said Frank.
“J do not want another pencil-case, for it
would not be my father’s gift, you know,
and it was for that I valued it. Can you not
think what you did with it, and where you
had it last ?”

“No; I have tried, and searched every-
where. I was afraid that you would never
forgive my carelessness.”

“T forgive you freely,” said Frank; “ only
I cannot help being sorry. But perhaps we
may find it yet.”

“Oh, I hope so,” exclaimed Howard, more
cheerfully. ‘I will look again in every place
that I can think of. How kind you are to
me, Frank!” Howard looked again and again,
but the pencil-case was not to be found; and,
after a time, Frank forgot all about it. He
was working hard for a prize—too hard. So
his cousin thought, as he found’ him one day,
with his elbows on the desk, and the hair
oushed back from his contracted brow, wholly
“bsorbed in his studies. On hearing his name
pronounced, Frank started like one awakened
from a dream.

“Well, what do you want?” said he,
shaking off the hand that rested upon his

shoulder, somewhat impatiently. “ 1 am busy.”
120 FRANK NETHERTON.



“So i perceive; but you must not work
so hard. It is not good for you.”

“<¢Tt is better to wear out than to rust out,’
as Bishop Cumberland says,” replied Frank,
without looking up.

“But what would your father say ?”

“You are right, Frederick. Thank you for
reminding me. I will only ust finish what I
am about.”

“Only just,” repeated his cousin, laughing.
“Come, we want you to play cricket.”

Frank laughed too, somewhat incredulously.
“T will be with you in five minutes,” said he,
‘but I must master this first.”

Frederick went away, and in five minutes
the difficulty was mastered. Frank rose up
quickly ; and tossing aside the book with a
triumphant smile, met the eyes of Doyle fixed
sadly upon him and full of tears.

‘Ts any thing the matter?” asked Frank.

‘Nothing new, only the scar on your fore
head shows so plainly to-day.”

‘Does it?” said Frank, drawing his hair
forward in order to conceal it. ‘“‘ Never mind,
Philip; but for that scar we might never have
been friends. And we are friends now, are
we not ?”

‘Yes, friends for life, I hope.”

“Do you think that I shall gain a prize?”

“Yes, I hope so; but you must not be too
sanguine, nor work too hard, as your cousin
Mortimer says.”
FRANK NETHEKTON. 121



“Tt was kind in Frederick to think of me,”
gnid Frank. ‘‘ Every one seems kind to me
now. God is very good.”

Frank’s heart was full of thankfulness. It
is easy to be thankful, and to say that God
is good, when all things go well with us,
although few, alas! remember to do so; but
the difficulty is, when clouds arise, and trouble
comes, to see Him sitting, as it were, above
the water-flood. ‘To know, then, that “ God
doth not willingly afflict ;” to feel that he
doeth all things well, and to be able to say
meekly, ‘‘ Even so, Father, thy will, not mine,
be done,’’—this is true faith.

Frank was gratified by observing that Claude
Hamilton, so far from thinking it a condescen-
sion, frequently appeared to seek his society.
Much as he liked Doyle, he liked Hamilton
much better still; and it was the height of his
boyish ambition to be worthy of his friendship.
Many were the long conversations which they had
together about India, and the good missionary of
whom Frank was never weary of hearing. One
day he confided to Hamilton his earnest desire
to be a missionary himself, when he grew older.

“My dear Frank! what could such a little
fellow as you do? Why, the savages would
eat you up at a mouthful.”

“But I shall grow taller and stronger every
day, if I live.”

“T hope so—the latter especially. Forgive
my laughing, Frank.”
122 FRANK NETHERTON.



“What sort of man is your uncle—.n ap-
pearance, I mean?” asked Frank.

“I can scarcely tell you, it is so long since
we met. My childish remembrance of him
is, that he was tall and slight, and somewhat
bent; and that even then his constitution
was much broken by toil and hardship. At
that time he had to encounter great opposi-
tion from the natives; and many influential
people held back from assisting him until
they saw how things were likely to turn out:
but God helped him.”’

‘“‘ How cowardly to hold back!” said Frank.

“It was cowardly ; but they were very kind
afterwards, and subscribed a great deal of
money towards the schools.”

“1 would not have taken their money.”

“Yes you would, Frank, for the sake of
the poor little ignorant children, who must
otherwise have gone without the means of
regular instruction. Besides, they were sorry
for the way they had acted, and some of them
told my uncle so, and begged that he would
accept their offerings in token of forgiveness ;
upon which he replied that he had nothing to
forgive, and that they must ask pardon of God,
and not of him.”’

“That was right,” said Frank, “and 1
was wrong. Ilow I should like to meet
him !”

“It is not improbable that your: wish may
be gratified,” replied Hamilton, “as he talks
FRANK NETHERTON. 123



of coming to England in a few years, if he is
spared, to see his relatives for the last time.
I shall most likely return with him to India.”

Frank’s anticipations of seeing the good
missionary were somewhat clouded by the
prospect of losing his friend. ‘Shall you
live near one another ?” asked he after a
pause.

“Not very near, I believe ; but it is uncer-
tain. My uncle is 80 attached to his people
_his children, as he calls them—that he
scldom cares to be absent for a long time
together; but I hope to find time to pay him
frequent visits.”

«“ Should you not like to be a missionary ?””

“No,” answered his companion, “ I cannot
say that I should. I do not think that it is at
all my vocation. In the first place, 1 am too
indolent; and in the second, I do not think
myself good enough.”

“Not good enough ?” said Frank. ‘“O
Hamilton! what am I compared to you?
And yet I have dared to think of being a
missionary !’

Claude Hamilton was touched. “ After all,”
said he, encouragingly, “‘ there is no one in the
world good enough to be a missionary in their
own righteousness and strength. And you never
did think this, Frank. It is your favourite
Leighton, I believe, who says, ‘How can J,
who am so vile, speak of God? Yet he hath
shown me mercy ; how, then, can I be silent ?’”’
124 FRANK NETHERTON.



“Yes,” replied Frank, “that is just what
I feel.”

“Then dream on, my dear Frank: who
knows but what you may one day have your
wish ?”

‘“Who knows?” repeated Frank, looking
up, and smiling through his tears.

They were interrupted by the entrance of
Herbert. “You must come directly,” said
he; “Mr. Campbell is in the school-room, and
has sent for us. Some one has stolen all the
peaches which he was so proud of, and which
were to have been sent to-day to his sick
sister.”

“What a shame!” exclaimed Claude Ha-
milton. ‘Who can it be? I hope they mil
be found out.”’

“So do I,” said Frank.


————————_——ltltttt
- TT

FRANK NETHERTON. 133



CHAPTER XVIII
A TIME OF TRIAL.

Howarp took the first opportunity of bein
alone with Frank, to thank him for his kin
forbearance, and assure him of his utter igno-
rance of the whole transaction beyond the fact
of his having borrowed and lost the unfortunate
pencil-case.

“Then why were you so anxious that your
name should not be mentioned?” asked Frank.

“ Because —because’— replied Howard,
bursting into tears, “no one believes what I
say—not even you now; but indeed, indeed I
am innocent this time.”

“TI do believe that you are,” said Frank,
holding out his hand, “and I am glad frora
my very heart. But you must allow that it
did seem strange.”

“Not at all strange. No one really sus-
pects you—not even Mr. Campbell himself;
I am sure of that. Whereas, had you men-
tioned having lent the pencil-case to me, it
would have been useless for me to have denied
the theft, or uttered a single word. I should
not have been believed. They know me to be
a liar; and that I am always in disgrace, and
deing something wrong, and they wo uld only
have laughed at and despised me.”
134 FRANK NETHERSON.

“But you have not been in disgrace, or told
an untruth for a long time, have you, Howard ?”
asked Frank, kindly.

“No; thanks to you.”

“Thanks to God, rather.”

“Yes, I mean that of course; but I must
thank you also. I did begin to think I was
getting on better.”

“And I do think and hope that you are.”

“OQ Frank! none but a coward would have
acted as I have done. I deserve that you
should hate me.”

“On the contrary, I pity you very much,
and am willing to stand your friend. After
all, it does not signify, as Hamilton says, the
tiuth is sure to be found out before long.”

“T would give any thing to know who took
the peaches,’ said Howard; “and how the
pencil-case came to be dropped just there.”

‘We shall know all in good time,” replied
Frank, cheerfully. _

Time, however, wore on without any further
discovery being made. It was evident that
the majority of Frank’s school-fellows, what-
ever they might have thought at first, began
to regard him with mistrust and suspicion.
They no longer sought his society, »r cared
for him to join in their amusements.

“If it had been any one else,” said they
among themselves—and somehow every word
was sure to reach Frank’s ear—“if it had
been any one alse, he would have been punished
FRANK NETHERTON. 135



long since; but Mr. Campbell’s eyes will be
opened at last. I am glad that he is found
out, and all such canting, hypocritical fellows.
I told you from the first how it would end.
Those who preach most generally practise
least.”

It is recorded in history, that when Ca-
therine de Medici was told of an author who
hud written a violent attack upon her, she
exclaimed, with tears—“ Ah! if he did but
know of me all that I know against myself!”
It was with something of this’ feeling that
Frank listened to the reproaches of his school-
fellows. But when they came to attack,
through him, the religion which, amid all
his faults and short-comings, he so loved and
reverenced, it was a bitter trial indeed, and
hard to bear.

“Tf this is all the good that reading the
Bible does,” said one, “he had better leave
it alone.”

“Those who talk so much about religion
are sure to be the worst,” added another.

“The greater saint, the greater sinner!”
observed a third, with a laugh, in which there
were several found to join.

For once, Frederick Mortimer refused to
side with the majority; and his affectionate
sympathy was a great comfort to poor Frank.
Doyle and Claude Hamilton also continued
unchanged. Howard pitied Frank, and des-
vised himself; but he wanted courage to do
136 FRANK NETHERTON.



what was right. He kept apart and wat
miserable. His Bible—his talisman, as he
called it—remained untouched. He dared
not openit. Things might have been dif-
ferent if he had. It is often thus; sin and
sorrow, instead of driving us to, appear for a
season to keep us from, the only true source
of comfort. We feel unworthy to open our
Bibles—unworthy to pray, to take the name
of God upon our lips. We forget that Christ
is worthy; that he died for us. We forget
that even if we sin, we have an advocate with
the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous, who
came into the world to save sinners. We
put away the lamp—David’s lamp, as Frank
once called the Bible—and sit in darkness.
Prayer, so sweetly termed by the good Lady
Warwick “hearts-ease,” is abstained from, and
we are miserable. Feeling ourselves to be
sinners, we reject, through our unbelief, the
all-forgiving Saviour. No wonder if we
stumble in the darkness, and go wrong; no
wonder if our hearts ache; no wonder if we
are unhappy.

Frank deeply felt the change in Mr.
Campbell’s manner towards him: a change
in part assumed to hide his real feelings.
He had seen a great deal of Frank during
his long illness, and he could not believe him
guilty; but he felt, nevertheless, that it was
necessary something should be done, although
he put it off from day to day, in the hope of
FRANK NETHERTON. 137



finding some clue to this mysterious affair,
but without success. The boys exchanged
glances when the summons came at length
for Frank to join him in his study immedi-
ately after school. Howard trembled, and
turned pale.

‘‘What is the matter?’ whispered Rushton,
who was watching him narrowly. “I cannot
help thinking, Howard, that you know more
of this than you care to mention. Perhaps
you suspect some one else?”

“No,” answered Howard, “TI have told you
that I know nothing. I wish I did. I only
know that Frank Netherton is innocent.”

‘“‘T hope he will not be punished,” murmured
Rushton, in a low voice.

“Thank you—thank you, for those words !’’
exclaimed Howard, seizing his hand. ‘I hope
not. Frank was right. He always said that
you had a good heart.”

‘He had little cause to think so,” replied
Rushton, turning away.

Frank entered Mr. Campbell’s study with
a cheerful countenance. ‘“ Has any thing been
found out, sir?” asked he, after a pause.

“Nothing.”

Frank sighed. “I am sorry for that,”
thought he, “but I must bear it as well as I
can. God’s time is not come yet; but it
will come; no one ever trusted Him in vain.
Sooner or later every thing will be discovered,
and then Mr. Campbell will regret having

i2
138 FRANK NETHERTON.

pumshed me. After all, I do not mind a few
hard lessons; it is nothing to the hard words
I have had to bear of late.”

“Well, Netherton,” exclaimed Mr. Camp-
bell, at length, “have you nothing to say for
yourself ?”’

“No, sir, nothing but what I have already
said, that I am innocent.”

“You still maintain that the pencil-case
was lost some days previous to the peaches
being taken ?”’

‘Yes, sir.”

“So far some of your school-fellows seem to
corroborate your account by mentioning their
having assisted you in looking for it. Have
you any idea where you lost it ?”’

Frank hesitated and coloured, and the
consciousness that he did so added to the
embarrassment which the searching glance
of his preceptor was not calculated to remove.
“I have no idea where it was lost,” stammered
he, at length. ,

“Ts this the truth?’ asked Mr. Campbell,
sternly. E

“Tt is, sir; but not the whole truth.”

“And why not the whole truth? Take
care, Netherton.”

“ Because—because I am not at liberty to
tell you more, whatever you may think of me,”
replied Frank, in a faltering voice.

“There is but one conclusion left,” replied
Mr. Campbell, coldly, “ard I am sorry for
FRANK NETHERTON. 13%



it. 1 shall write by to-day’s post to your
father.”

«“'o my father!’ repeated Frank, clasping
his hands wildly together. ‘“O Mr. Campbell!
any thing but that. I will bear the heaviest
punishment you like to inflict upon me—any
thing but that. Spare my father \”

“On one condition only,” said Mr. Camp-
pell, after a pause, “that you immediately
confess every thing.”

«“ There is nothing to confess,” replied Frank.
‘‘T am innocent, indeed I am!’

Mr. Campbell regarded him with a stern,
and yet sorrowful glance. “ Netherton,” said
he, “I am deeply grieved and disappointed
in you—grieved above all for your good
father. It will, indeed, be a shock to him.
You may retire now until I can think what is
best to be done. In future you will study and
take your meals alone.”

“TJ will do any thing—bear any thing,” ex-
claimed Frank, “if you will not write to my
father.”

“You have heard the conditions.”

For a moment Frank was sorely tempted to
break his word with Howard, and tell Mr.
Campbell all; but it was only for a moment,
after which, not trusting himself to reply, he
bowed in silence, and went sorrowful’y away
156 FRANK NETHERTON.

CHAPTER XXI.
RETRIBUTION.

Many of the boys, as we have before men
tioned, were sorry for the way in which they
had behaved to Frank, and came and told
him so with tears. One or two appeared to
long to say something more, but stammered,
and remained silent. ‘* We dare not confess,”
argued they, among themselves, “but we
may atone.”

Frank was careful to seize the moment
when their hearts were softened towards him,
to urge upon them the importance of the
religion of Christ. Some wept; all listened.
The little missionary forgot the prize for which
he had been working so hard. He forgot
every thing in his zeal for the cause of God.
' Claude Hamilton smiled at his enthusiasm,
and wondered at his occasionn! eloquence.

“You are right, Netherton,” said he, “in
wishing to be a missionary; and I hope to
gee you one yet, if we both live.”

“T hope so!” exclaimed Frank.

By and by, however, the sorrow, or 1*pent-
ance, or whatever the impression was, wore
off. The boys returned to their sports and
occupations, and Frank’s hearers dwindled
gradually away, until none remaived but

é
FRANK NETHERTON. 157



Doyle, Herbert, and Howard, and another
boy, named Donaldson, who seemed to think
that he could never do enough for Frank,
and was always following him about, to the
evident annoyance of Rushton. Who can
tell what good seed may have been sown in
those few days ?

It may be that some of our readers will
feel inclined to smile at our little missionary,
and say, What good can a mere school-
boy like Frank Netherton ever hope to do?
If there be any such, we will answer them
in the words of Dr. Chalmers: ‘ Little things,
and little people, have often brought great
things to pass. ‘The large world in which we
exist is made up of little particles, as small
as the sands on the sea-shore. The vast
sea is composed of small drops of water.
The little, busy bees, how much honey they
gather! Do not be discouraged because
you are little. A little star shines brightly
in the sky, in a dark night, and may be
the means of saving many a poor sailor from
shipwreck ; and a little Christian may do a
con deal of good, if he or she will try.

here is nothing like trying.”

Every Saturday the boys had a half holiday,
which was eagerly looked forward to through
the week. When the weather permitted, they
generally took a long country walk, under
the superintendence of Mr. Barlow, who, it
must be confessed, had enough to do to look
158 FRANK NETHERTON.



after them. Sometimes Mr. Campbell him
self accompanied them, and his presence was
never felt as a restraint. He never played
the school-master out of school, but was the
kind friend and intelligent companion of his
pupils. Mr. Barlow had no influence over
them, because he had no sympathy with
them. He felt this without understanding
the cause, and it made him still more harsh
and unbending. He had a habit, however,
of falling into what the boys called ‘a brown
study,” in which he seemed to forget them
and every thing else in the world. At these
times they did pretty much as they pleased,
buying fruit and pastry, which was contrary
to the rules, and eating it under his very
eyes.

«“ T wonder what he can be thinking about,”
said Frank, during one of their walks, and
glancing as he spoke from his noisy com-
panions, into the stern, thoughtful countenance
of the usher.

“JT wonder that he can think at all,” ex-
claimed Doyle, who was walking along with
a book in his hand, which he had closed at
length in despair.

“That is right,” said Frank, “ do not read
any more; it seems @ shame this glorious
day. How blue the sky is! And do look at
ans cherry-tree, with its scarlet and yellow

eaves, and the elder-berries.’’

“Elder wine is a nice thing,” said Doyle.
FRANK NETHERTON. 159



“JT wish I had some now!” exclaimed a
boy who was swinging his arms to and fro in
order to keep himself. warm; for it was a
chill autumn day, notwithstanding the bright-
ness of the sun.

‘“¢T wish I had some of those delicious look-
ing apples!” said Rushton, directing the atten-
tion of his school-fellows to a neighbouring
orchard, where a few had been suffered to
remain thus late in the season, and shone
out temptingly above the high wall.

“They do indeed look delicious,” repeated
Howard.

“T dare say they are sour,” observed Claude
Hamilton, turning away with a smile.

“‘ They do not look so, at any rate.”

‘¢ Nonsense,” said Howard; ‘‘ Hamilton was
only alluding to the fable of the fox and the
grapes.”

“As if every dunce did not know that,”
replied Rushton. “But, at any rate, I am
letermined to try.”

“Why, you would not steal them, surely!
said Howard, turning pale.

“ Pshaw! Lord Nelson himself, when he
was a school-boy, did just the same thing.
Ask* Netherton, and he will tell you the
story.”

“But he did not do it for the sake of the
apples, (or pears, I believe, they were,)” replied
Frank. ‘He did it because the others were
afraid, and at considerable personal risk, in
160 FRANK AETHHuUTON.



order to show his own courage. But, as my
father says, it was neither true courage nor
a just action.”

‘‘ Nelson was a hero,” said Rushton, ‘ and
worth a dozen milksops. I will be bound, if
the truth were known, half of you at the pre-
sent moment are afraid to mount that high
wall.”’

‘‘We are more afraid of duing wrong,” said
Claude Hamilton, gently. ‘‘ Come, Rushton,
you cannot be serious.”

‘‘ Indeed I am,” said Rushton, shaking off
his hand.

‘“‘T declare,” exclaimed Howard, “it is just
as bad as stealing the peaches.”

‘What do you mean by that?’ asked
Rushton, turning fiercely towards him.

‘“T mean to say that if you take those
apples, you are just as bad as the person
who stole Mr. Campbell’s peaches.”

Rushton gazed keenly into his flushed
countenance, and was not a little astonished
to receive so fearless a reply.

‘Bravo, Howard!” exclaimed he, after a
pause; “I did not think that you had so
much spirit. You will do yet.”

The tears came into Howard’s eyes. “O
Rushton !” said he, “do not take those apples;
please do not!”

“ And why not?”

** Because it is wrong.”

“Nonsense; old Hickson is as rich as a

?
FRANK NETHERIvUN. 161



Jew, and has plenty more. Besides, I have
set my heart upon them.” |

“Let us buy some,” whispered Howard,
showing a bright shilling which he had been
hoarding up. ‘I saw some almost as fine, as
we came along.” | |

““No, I have set my heart upon these.
Will any one join me in getting them ?”

There was no reply.

“Will any one catch them, if I climb the
wall, and throw them down ?”’

Several of the boys drew nearer, and began
to cast longing looks toward the tree.

Little Donaldson crept forward, and said
something to Rushton, in a low voice, which
made him change colour and hesitate for a
moment, but it was only for a moment; and
then he laughed, and bid him mind his own
business, and be a good boy, and he would
give him one of the apples when he got
them. |

Donaldson stamped his feet passionately ;
but he drew back, and said no more.

“Leave him alone,” exclaimed Doyle; “ it
is of no use speaking to him. Let him
steal the apples, and break his neck, if he
likes.”’

“I said that you were all afraid,” observed

ushton. :

“¢ Afraid !’”? repeated Philip Doyle.

Hamilton laid his hand upon his arm and

ew him away. Most of the boys followed-—

14
162 FRANK NETHERTON.



Howard among the number: but Frank still
lingered.

“Come Rushton,” said he, gently, “it is
never too late to do right. I know that you
do not care about the fruit, any more than
Nelson did. You only do it out of bravado,
You will be sorry for it to-morrow. Come,
will you?”

“No,” answered Rushton, “I will not. So
say no more about it.”’

“ Remember,” added Frank, to the remain-
ing boys, as he turned away; “remember that
the receiver is as bad as the thief.”

Their laughter rang in his ears as he
hastened to overtake his companions. When
he had gone a little distance, Frank could
not help looking back. Rushton was almost
half-way up the wall. Owing to some loose
bricks, the ascent was not so difficult as it
appeared. A few more steps, and he would
be able to bend down the tempting and
heavily laden bough, and gather what he
pleased. In his eagerness he grew less care-
ful; and one of the bricks giving way, he fell
‘suddenly and violently on the ground.

His sharp, uncontrollable burst of agony
awakened the dreaming usher, and brought
the boys crowding back. Frank was the first
to reach him, forathe partners of his crime had
shrunk away the moment he fell, and mingled
with the rest, leaving him alone.

Rushton opened his eyes, and fixed them
FRANK NETHERTON. 1638
upon the face of Frank Netherton, who was
bending tenderly over him, and then closed
them again with a heavy groan.

Herbert ran and brought some water in his
cap, which Frank sprinkled gently over the
pale face of the sufferer. ,

Again Rushton unclosed his eyes. ‘ What,
are you here still?” said he, making a feeble .
effort to push him away. ‘Where are the
rest; where is Howard? I wish you would
not hold my hand; you make it worse: any
one but you.”

“Here I am,” said Howard, as Frank
moved away, feeling somewhat hurt by Rush-
ton’s evident aversion to his presence. ‘“ What
can I do for you? I am so sorry. Where
are you hurt ?”

“It is my leg,” replied Rushton. “I
believe I have broken it:” and he once more
fainted with the pain.

Assisted by Mr. Barlow, the boys hastened
to make a litter of green bough’s, upon which
Rushton was carefully laid, and conveyed
back to the house.


144 FRANK NETHERTUN.



CHAPTER XXII. .
THE .MYSTERY EXPLAINED.

Rusuton had not broken his leg, but his
ankle was found to be severely sprained; and
although the surgeon succevded in alleviating
the intense pain from which he was suffer-
ing, he warned Rushton that it would, in all
probability, be many weeks before he would
be able to move. It was not until the good
doctor departed, and Mr. Campbell had him-
self seen that all his directions were obeyed,
and Rushton seemed easier and more com-
posed, although still suffering greatly, that
he found time to inquire into the particulars
of the accident. |

Mr. Barlow could tell him nothing. He
had no idea how it happened. He thought
every thing was going on right, and was walk-
ing along as quietly as possible, when Rush-
ton’s piercing cry fell on his ears, and he
turned back and found him lying under the
high wall by farmer Hickson’s orchard. He
supposed Rushton must have tried to climb it.
He did not know whether there was any fruit
there, but imagined not, as it was so late in
the season.

Mr. Campbell turned to Howard, who
happened tu be standing near him. “ Perhaps
FRANK NETHERTON. 165



you can tell me something more of this mys
terious affair ?’”’ said he.

Howard blushed and hesitated ; but just then
a favourite sentiment of Frank Netherton’s
darted into his mind: “If you cannot speak
the truth, say nothing.”

“Yes, sir, I could tell you,” answered he,
after a pause; “but I would rather not, if
you please.”’

“Very well,” said Mr. Campbell, smiling,
and patting him on the shoulder; “then |
must not ask any questions, I suppose.
Whatever poor Rushton might have been
doing, or going to do, he is sufficiently
punished.”

Mr. Campbell said no more; but he made
up his mind that very day to get a new tutor,
which he succeeded in doing in the course of
time, much to his own satisfaction and the
comfort and improvement of his pupils.

The old housekeeper did not like having
Rushton for a patient as well as Frank.
Unaccustomed to confinement, he fretted and
grumbled all day long, thereby retarding
his own recovery, and tiring out those who
had to wait upon him. Howard frequently
went to sit with him, for he really liked
Rushton, and was sorry to see him suf-
fer. Several of the other boys paid him a ~
brief visit now and then, more out of pity
than from any affection they had for him.
Rushton had no real friends. Those who

14"
166 FRANK NETITERTON.



were the first to laugh with him were also the
first to laugh at him, and kept away from his
sick-chamber as if they had forgotten his very
existence.

“ How is it that Frank Netherton never
comes to see me?” asked Rushton one day
of Howard. “He is generally so fond of
playing the good Samaritan. There is no
fear of my running away now, let him preach
as he will.”

“Frank has not forgotten you. He always
inquires about you most kindly, and would
have come to you long since, only he did
not like—that is, he did not know whether
you would like it, after what you said. But
perhaps it was the pain that made you speak
so crossly.”

“Frank Netherton is not the boy I imagine
him to be, if he stays away for a cross word,”
said Rushton.

“Then he may come? He will be so glad;
and I am glad too.”

“Why ?”

“ Perhaps I had better not tell you.”

“ Nonsense; why should you not tell me ?”

“ You will be vexed.”

“That is no new thing.”

“Well, then, I am glad because I hope
that he will do you good, as he did me. I
do not mean that he will make the pain less,
but teach you, perhaps, to bear it better. Do
you urderstand 2”
FRANK NETHERTON. 167



“Yes, I understand well enough.”

“T wish you would try and like Frank
Netherton,” continued Howard, encouraged
by Rushton’s manner.

“We seldom like those whom we have
injured,’ said Rushton, in a low voice, as if
he were speaking to himself.

Howard looked surprised, but he did not
reply; he did not know what to say.

“Well, go along now,” continued Rushton,
after a pause. ‘‘] dare say you have a thou-
sand things to do, and it takes you as long
again to do any thing as it does other people.
You are very kind to come to me so often.
Go away, and send Netherton.”

“T will ask him to come when he is able.”

“Ay! you are so busy working for the
prize, I suppose, while I am obliged to lie
here doing nothing. But it serves me right :”
and he buried his face in the clothes, and
wept.

Frank laid aside what he was about, and
went as soon as Howard asked him. Rushton
was still weeping, and did not notice his
entrance until he stood by the bedside, in-
quiring kindly and gently how he felt. “I
am afraid you are in great pain,” said he.

“Yes, Iam in pain, but I do not care so
much about that. I can bear my punish-
ment. Why do you not begin to moralize,
Netherton? You cannot possibly have a
better subject.’
168 FRANK NETHERTON.



“Time enough when you are well,” said
Frank. “I would rather pity and sympathize
with you now, if you will let me.”

Rushton turned away his head. “I did
not send for you in order to gain your pity,”
said he, after a pause, “but to tell you
something that has long lain heavily on my
heart. -Perhaps you did not think I had a
heart.” ,

“Yes, I did,” replied Frank, soothingly ;
“and a kind one, too, if you would only follow
its better feelings. But you must not excite

ourself.” | |

“Very well; I will be calm. You will
judge me differently when I have told
all. You remember the peaches which Mr.
Campbell lost ?”’ .

“To be sure I do. I have reason to re-
member them.”

“ Should you like to know who stole them ?”

“Yes, I should very much,” exclaimed
Frank, eagerly; and then checking himself
all of a sudden, as his glance rested on the
crimson brow of his companion, he added,
“but it does not signify now; it is all past
and gone.” |

“‘T stole those peaches,” said Rushton.

“You?”

“Yes. It was a bright moonlight night ;
we crept into the garden after every one had
gone to rest, and I stood under the wall and
gathered them, handing them to my coxt-
FRANK NETHERTON. 169



panions. After we had eaten them, we buried
the stones in the ground. There were six of
us. Of course, I do not mean to betray them,
for we promised not to tell of one another;
out I may inform against myself. They were
all sorry for it afterwards, and wanted to
confess every thing, but I would not consent.
It was my fault that you suffered as long as
you did.”

‘But the pencil-case,” said Frank: “I want
to know how the pencil-case came to be found
where it was ?”’

‘That is the worst part of the story; but
{ have made up my mind to tell you every
thing. I had found it on the previous day,
and put it in my waistcoat pocket, imtend-
ing to return it to you at the first opportunity ;
but somehow I forgot to do so, and while I
was reaching up to gather the peaches it fell
out.” |

‘‘T understand it all now,” said Frank.
“Of course, you did not notice it in the
dark.”

“Tt was a bright moonlight night, I tell
you; so bright that one might have seen to
pick up a pin. I did notice it.”

“Then you forgot it again, I suppose, in
your hurry.”

“No; I went away and left it there pur-
posely.”

% 6 Rushton! how could you do that ?”
“Because I disliked and was jealous of
170 FRANK NEIHERTON,



you. It gave me pleasure to think that the
voy who was always preaching to others, and
whom everybody praised, would be suspected
at least, of a theft which others had committed
and enjoyed—although we did not enjoy it
very much, for we were obliged to eat them
in such a hurry. It seemed a capital joke;
but I never thought,—I never meant that it
should end so seriously; and I wanted cou-
rage to undo what I had done. I could not
rest any longer without telling you this. But
I do not want—I do not expect you to for-
give me.”

‘“‘ Rushton,” said Frank, in a low voice, “ if
I did not forgive you with my whole heart,
I could not pray to my Father to-night. I
could not say, ‘Forgive us our trespasses, as
we forgive them that trespass against us.’
Shake hands, Rushton.”

The boys shook hands in silence.

“Frank,” said Rushton, after a pause,
during which he had: been weeping bitterly,
“it is not the pain in my foot, it is your
kindness that makes me weep. You have not
sald a single harsh word to me.”

“And I will not if I can help it; but I
have a great many words that I should like
to say to you when you are stronger, and
better able to hear them.”

“Say them now, Frank.”

“No, you must rest. I will come up again
presently.”
Frank Netherton.

iT

ern



p. 170.

The boys shook hands in silence.
FRANK NETIIERTON. 172



“T never came to see you when you were
ill,”’ said Rushton.

“Never mind; neither should I, perhaps,
if you had not sent for me.”

Frank returned to the school-room, with
his mind too bewildered to attend to any
thing properly. Donaldson was there, and
seemed to be watching for him.

‘You have been to see Rushton,’ said he,
eagerly. ‘ What did he want with you? Did
he tell you any thing ?”’

“What should he tell me ?”

“T do not know ; only I thought—I hoped” —~
and Donaldson paused, and looked so confused
that Frank at once suspected, (what was in fact
the truth,) that he was one of the six who stole
the peaches, and had repented of it afterwards.


174 FRANK NETHERTON.



CHAPTER XXIII.
BETTER THAN A PRIZE.

Many were the hours which* Frank and
Rushton spent together. The latter, sub-
dued by illness, and grateful for the unde-
served kindness of his companion, grew
strangely patient; and when it occasionally
happened otherwise, Frank remembered how
much he suffered, and bore with him as well
as he could.

“J wonder,” said Philip Doyle (somewhat
impatiently) to Frank, “ how you can spend
so much time with that disagreeable Rushton,
especially when every moment is precious,
and you ought to be working hard for a

rize.”’

“Rushton is not disagreeable now,” re-
plied Frank. ‘Iam really beginning to like
him.”’

“ So it is natural, is it, to like those to whom
we are kind ?”

“But the prizes,” continued Doyle: “ I
thought that you wanted to gain one .

‘© So I did; and so I do.”

“You never will, if you idle away your time
in the way you have been doing of late.”

“TJ suppose not; but Rushton looks 60 for
my coming.”
FRANK NETIIERTON. 175



“Whvr cannot his friend Howard sit with
~ him ?” .

“Because Howard is working hard too;
harder than any of us. It would do him
good to get a prize.”

“Yes, I hope he will,” said Doyle; “he
deserves it for his industry and perseverance.
But I want you to gain one also.”

“Thank you,” answered Frank, “I should
like it very much; and I think I could if I
were to try.” |

“Then try by all means. Remember how
pleased your father would be.”

“And Helen,’—continued Frank. “Yes,
I will try. I will go and tell Rushton the
reason why I cannot be with him so much,
and I am sure that he will let me off.”

“Let you off!” repeated Doyle. ‘Why,
what possible claim can he have upon you?”

“The claim of sickness and suffering,” re-
plied Frank, gently.

“You are right,” said Doyle. “Now run
along, and join us in the school-room as soon
as you can.”

Frank ran a few steps, and then hesitated ;
and instead of going up stairs to visit his sick
friend, went (as it was play-time) into the
garden, where he walked up and down, apart
from the rest, and full of thought.

“It is late, to be sure,” argued he; “ but I
think—I have no doubt,—that, by working
hard, and making up for lost time, I might

15
{76 FRANK NETHERTON.



still gain a prize. I want to show Helen
that L can win a prize. My dear father, too,
how pleased he would be! It is almost cer-
tain te be a book, and then I would leave it
in his study, where he could see it every day
Rushton is not a selfish boy ; and if I were 1
tell him this, he would be the first to urg |
my staying away. But then how lonely he
would be, for no one else thinks of going to
see him. And perhaps he might give over
reading the Bible, just as he has begun to
take an interest in it. I should not be afraid
if he had gone on for some time, for then he
would not be able to do without it. I wish I
knew what was right.”

After a few more turns up and down the
garden walk, Frank went on communing,
as it were with his own heart. “ After all,
my dear father does not care about my getting
a prize. He would rather see me well an
happy, and doing what was right. Neither
does he need a book, or anything else to
remind him of me; nor Helen either. She
would not love me any better, nor 80 well,
‘¢ she knew all. I do think I will give
¢ up. Yes, 1 am determined. Whatever
Doyle says, I will not desert poor Rushton,
especially now that my prgsence seems t0
render him so happy, and now that I am
beginning to hope that God will make him
» different boy for the time to come.

I am permitted to say & single word that
Â¥RANK NETHERTON. Ti



may be useful, it is better than gaining a thou-
sand prizes.”

Having come to this determination, Frank
entered Rushton’s chamber with a light heart,
and his countenance so full of animation that
Rushton involuntarily exclaimed, “‘ Has any
thing happened? How happy you look!”

“Dol? Ihave been walking in the garden,
and the air is so fresh and cool.”

“When shall I be able to walk again?
But it serves me right. Iam justly punished.
Mr. Campbell did well to leave me to God.
How perfectly I remember those words! But
are you come to stay? Will you read a little
to me ?”’

Frank was glad that he could say yes,
cheerfully.

“That is right,” said Rushton, as Frank
opened his little Bible; “Jet it be your fa-
vourite book—your talisman! I had no idea
how many beautiful stories it contained, until
you pointed them out to me.”

“T have heard my father,” said Frank,
“compare the Scriptures to a mine, in which
an abundance of precious things are always
to be obtained if we will only take the trouble |
of digging for them. Above all; there is.‘ the
Pearl of great price.’ You know what that
signifies 2” ,

“No,” answered Rushton, shaking his
head.

“Well, neither should I if it had not bven
178 FRANK NETHERTON.

explained to me. Our Lord Jesus Christ iz
‘the Pearl of great price.’ You will find it
mentioned in the thirteenth chapter of Mat-
thew’s gospel.”

“What does it mean about the merchant
selling all that he had, and buying it ?” asked
Rushton. |

“JT do not know exactly,” replied Frank,
thoughtfully. “I suppose it means, that
when once he had found the Lord, he was
ready to give up every thing else in the world
for his sake.”

Frank went on reading: “ ‘Again, the
kingdom of heaven is like unto a net, that
was cast into the sea, and gathered of every
kind: which, when it was full, they drew to
shore, and sat down, and gathered the good
into vessels, but cast the bad away. So shall
it be at the end of the world: the angels shall
come forth, and sever the wicked from among
the just, and shall cast them into the furnace
of fire: there shall be wailing and gnashing
of teeth.’”

“TJ cannot help understanding that,” said
Rushton, bitterly. “Thus it will be with
me.’’ :

Frank did not know what to say, so he
had recourse to his talisman; and turning to
the fifteenth chapter of the Gospel by Luke,
read aloud to his companion the beautiful
parables of the lost sheep, the piece of silver,
and the prodigal son. Rushton wevt as he
FLANK NETHERTON 173



listened. He was much struck with tkat
sentence in the twentieth verse—-‘‘ When he
was yet a great way off, his father saw him,
and had compassion, and ran, and fell on his
neck, and kissed him.”

“JT am a long way off now,” thought the
penitent boy; ‘ but it may be that God sees,
und will have compassion upon meé.”’

Frank wept with him; but his heart was
full, and he could not utter a word. Ile
could. only point with his finger to the
twenty-ninth verse of the first chapter of
John— Behold the Lamb of God, which
taketh away the sin of the world’””—and pray,
in his child-like faith, that God would open
the heart of Rushton to understand it, and to
be comforted. He knew that nothing was
impossible with God.

Both the boys were sorry when the bell rang,
and Frank was obliged to go.

“You will come again soon ?” said Rushton,
eagerly.

“Yes, very soon.” And Frank went away
with that happy feeling which can only arise
from the consciousness of a duty performed
at some little self: sacrifice.

But we must not forget, in these seasons of
exultation, that even when we have done all
we are but unprofitable servants, and have
oly done that which it was our duty to do.*



* Luke xvii. 10.
15*
180 FRANK NETHERTON



‘‘T suppose you have given up all thoughts
of a prize,” said Philip Doyle, somewhat im-
patiently, as he entered.

‘¢ Yes,” answered Frank, smiling; ‘I have
given it up.”

‘Tt appears so indeed. But you are not
serious ?”

“Tam quite serious; so do not let us say
any more about it.”

‘¢T should not have expected it from you of
all others,” said Doyle, evidently vexed.

‘‘TLeave him alone,” exclaimed Claude Ha-
milton, laying his hand kindly upon Frank’s
shoulder. ‘None of us will like him the less
for not gaining a prize; and I for one,” added
he, in a low voice, “shall love him all the
more.”

Frank looked up with the tears in his eyes.
He felt that Hamilton both understood and
approved of his motives, and was grateful for
his sympathy and encouragement. And so,
day by day, a friendship grew between them
which was only to terminate with their lives,
FRANK NETHERTON. 181



CHAPTER XXIV.
HOME FOR THE HOLIDAY#.

RusHTON was brought down-stairs for the
first time the day that the prizes were dis:
tributed, and the school broke up. He still
moved with pain and difficulty; and one of
the boys overheard the surgeon tell Mr.
Campbell that he was afraid Rushton would
feel it as long as he lived.

Philip Doyle again carried off the first
prize; and he was not a little proud of his
success. Howard also gained a prize, much
to his own astonishment. He could not be-
lieve it possible, and actually wept for joy.
Most of the boys rejoiced with him, especially
Frank and Rushton.

“Who would have thought it?” exclaimed
the delighted Howard, as he danced about
with his treasure. ‘“‘ What will my aunt and
cousins say? They will never believe it. I
can scarcely believe it myself.” :

“T always told you,” said Frank, “that
all you wanted was a little more _perse-
verance.”’

“Tf it had not been for you, Frank,’ re-
plied Howard, gratefully, ‘“‘I should never
have gained a prize, or done any thing else
that was right.”
182 FRANK NETLEKTON.



“
‘You know what I mean,” said Howard
You led me to the talisman.”

Philip Doyle now approached to congratu
late Howard, and shake hands with Rushton
on his once more coming among them.

“Do you not feel very happy?” whispered
Howard, 'pointing to the beautiful books which
Doyle held in his hand.

“Yes, but for one thing—I am disap-
pointed that Frank Netherton has not a
prize also.”

‘Never think of me,” said Frank. ‘I am
happier without one.”

‘© Happier ?”’

‘Well, just as happy. Pray do not think
of me.”

Even Mr. Campbell appeared surprised
that Frank had given up contending for the
prize, but he said -nothing on the subject.
His school-fellows thought less highly of his
talents than they had hitherto done; but a
few, (among whom was Claude Hamilton and
Donaldson,) loved him all the better for his
kindness. Rushton seemed to have no idea
of the sacrifice that had been made on his
account. Notwithstanding which, he was very
grateful to Frank; and parted from him,
when the carriage came to convey him home,
with many thanks for all that he had done:
but Frank noticed that he had appeared to
be agitated and undecided, as if he would
FRANK NETHERTON, 183



fain have said something more, but wanted
courage.

‘“ Poor Rushton !” exclaimed Howard, as he
stood by the window and saw the servants lift
him into the carriage, and place him carefully
upon the cushions prepared for him.

‘“‘ How altered he is!” said Herbert. “I do
not mean in appearance only; but have you
not observed how gentle and good-natured
he has been of late ?”’

‘“‘ Yes,” answered Howard. “He never
laughs at me now, nor at any one else.”

‘“‘God’s ways are not our ways,” said Claude
Hamilton. ‘‘ He doeth all things well: and
what seems at first to be painful and hard
to bear, turns out, not unfrequently, a bless-
ing in disguise. But here is Rushton come
back again. How white he looks! What
can have happened ?”

“May I speak to you a moment, sir,” said
Rushton, as Mr. Campbell went himself to
the carriage, in order to save him the pain of
getting out. .

“Certainly. But what is the matter, Rush-
ee I am afraid you are suffering a great

eal.”

“Not more than I deserve, sir. I sould
not go away without telling you—without—
but I would rather, if you please—that is, I
think I had better say what I have to say
before my school-fellows.”

Mr. Campbell forbore to express the
184 FRANK NETHERTON.



surprise which he could not help feeling, and
desired that his pupil might be carried into
the school-room.

‘Rushton has come back,” said he, turn:
ing to the boys, who gathered round with
eager curiosity, “because he has something
on his mind which he will feel easier when
he has disclosed. Is it not so?”

“Yes, sir,” replied Rushton, who was pale
and trembling. Donaldson went up to him
and took hold of his hand, but he did not
utter a word

“Sit down, Rushton, and take your time,”
said Mr. Campbell, observing how much he
suffered.

“Oh, sir!’ exclaimed the penitent boy,
‘do not speak so kindly to me—pray do not.
I do not deserve it. You have no idea how
wicked I have been.”’

With many sobs and _ self-upbraidings,
Rushton proceeded to confess every thing;
how he had stolen the peaches, and purposely
left the pencil-case where it was found, in
order that Frank might be suspected. He
‘lid not attempt to excuse himself, but ap-
peared to be deeply conscious of his own
sinfulness, and anxious that no suspicion
should rest upon others in consequence.
When he had finished speaking, Donaldon
let go of his hand, and, in the profound silence
thet intervened, went up to Mr. Campbell, and
said in a firm voice, “I also helped to steal —
FRANK NETHERTON. 185



your peaches, sir; and I am very sorry for
it now.”

There was not a youthful heart present
that did not honour little Donaldson at that
moment: and yet more than one wanted
courage to follow his example.

After a few moments, Mr. Campbell took
Rushton into his own study, and Donaldson
followed them. Howard was the first to
break the silence that ensued.

“Who would have thought it?” said he,
with a sigh. “Poor Rushton, how much he
must have suffered!”

“T had almost said, he deserves it all,”
exclaimed Doyle; “only one cannot help
pitying him now that he is so ill, and sorry
for what he has done.”

“T hope that Donaldson will not be
punished,” observed one of the boys.

“So do I,” said Herbert; “and there was
something in the expression of Mr. Campbell’s
face which makes me think that his punishment
will not be very great.’

“Tt shows that Rushton was truly penitent,
xr he would not have come back again,”
observed Howard.

Frank proposed that they should all agree,
upon their return to school, never in any way
to allude to the affair of the peaches before
Rushton or Donaldson, to which his com-
panivns readily asser ced.

Rushton did not »eturn to the scnool-rosm
186 FRANK NETHERTON.



Frank could not help watching him as he was
again lifted into the carriage. Just as it was
driving away, Rushton looked up, and, per-
ceiving him, nodded and smiled as he had
not smiled before for many weeks.

Donaldson also departed without bidding
his school-fellows farewell. He need not
have been afraid of meeting them, for they
were all prepared, (as he afterwards found,)
to think kindly of him.

Hamilton was the next to leave. Frank
and he promised to write to each other.
They were real friends now. Never had
Frank felt so happy; he would have liked to
have made friends with the whole world.
Philip Doyle could not understand it; but
he was pleased to see him so well and cheer-
ful. Frank promised that he would try and
gain a prize next year for his sake.

The cousins had a pleasant journey back
again to the dear home, and had also the
satisfaction of finding all well when they got
there. Little Helen was too much delighted at
seeing them to think of any thing else. And
Frank’s bright and animated countenance
pleased his father better than if he had
brought home many prizes.

““T never saw a boy so altered in my life,”
exclaimed Mrs. Mortimer. “Why, he is a
half a head taller at least, and has almost as
much colour as my Frederick.”

Mr. Netherton did not reply. His thin
FRANK NETHERTON. 187



hands were folded together, and his eyes
meekly raised to the Giver of all good.

It was not long before Frederick told them
the story of the peaches; and how well Frank
had behaved in keeping MHoward’s secret;
while Helen listened with the. tears in her
eyes. And then Frank added how his cousin
had stood his friend throughout, in good re-
port and evil report, and what a comfort it
had been to him; upon which his mother
and sister kissed Frederick fondly, while Mr.
Netherton thanked him for his kindness.
Frederick never forgot that day, nor the
impression it made upon him; and from that
time Frank always found a firm friend and
supporter in his cousin.

Claude Hamilton kept his promise of writ-
ing to Frank; and a regular correspondence
commenced between them, which was con-
tinued, whenever they were separated, as
long as they lived.

Mr. Netherton congratulated his son upon
having found, or rather made, such a friend.
But he forbore to add, that he hoped he
would be a comfort to him when he himself
should be no more He could not bear to
throw a shadow over the bright future which
Frank anticipated when Hamilton should
be able to come and stay with them at the
Grange. |

Just before the holidays terminated, Frank
received a letter from ; Rushton, in which he
188 FRANK NETHERTON.
told him that he should not be permitted
to return to school, but was going abroad
with his parents. ‘My foot,’ he wrote.
“is still painful; it is thought that I may
feel the effects of it a long while. I hope
I shail—I do not mean the pain, but the
recollections which it brings with it. 0
Frank! I shall never forget your kind-
ness to me, when I deserved nothing but
reproaches. There are other things, too,
which I hope never to forget as long as I
live. I read the Bible every morning and
evening, a8 I promised you I would. My
mother has given me one just like your's.
She smiled when I told her about the talis-
man, and said that it was a good name for it.
If I had attended to its warnings before, it
would have kept me from doing what I did
Remember me to Howard, and tell him to
continue to persevere. And also to Donald-
son, and as many of the others as ask after
or care for me, and they are few indeed.
But I have deserved that it should be so.”

Frank showed the letter to his father; but
he did not tell all that he knew about, all that
he had done, all that he hoped for Rushton.
It was one of those innocent secrets which
we are the happier for keeping locked up
in our own hearts. But the languaye of
those hearts must ever be, “Not unto us,
O Lord, but unto thy name give glory.

“Well, Frank,” said Mr. Netherton to his
FRANK NETHERTON. 189



son, as they sat together on the last of the holi-
days, the boy being in his old place upon the
little stool at his feet; “and do you still
desire as much as ever to be a missionary ?”

“It is my one wish, replied Frank.

“Then be it so,” said his father. “God’s
will be done.”

‘““My dear father,” continued Frank, who
guessed the struggle that was going on in
the heart of that affectionate parent, “I will
never leave you.”

“No, my child, never while I live.”

“T will be a home missionary,” said Frank.

“T thought that you were so anxious to
visit foreign countries,” added Mr. Nether-
ton, after a pause; during which he had suc-
ceeded in controlling his almost overpowering
emotion.

“Yes, Iam afraid I have thought of that
more than I ought,” said Frank. “I half
envied Rushton, when I received his letter,
to think that he was going abroad. But
then his parents will be with him. You are
not strong enough to travel, and I do not
Want to go anywhere without you.”

“You must learn to do without me some
day, Frank.”
is Frank answered ouly by pressing closer to
im.

“God knows how soon,” continued Mr.
Netherton. “Let us try and say, His will
be done.”
190 FRANK NETHERTON.



“It is a hard lesson,” replied Frank, weeping.

“© We will learn it by degrees, my child.” .

“ You are not worse, dear father, are you?”
asked Frank, looking anxiously into his pale
face.

‘No; I am better.”

«Then why do you talk thus ?”

“T know not. But you will not forget what
I have said ?”

‘‘No,” replied Frank, smiling through his
tears, “I shall not easily forget it. I was
afraid that you were ill.”

Mr. Netherton sighed; but a few moments
afterwards he smiled also, in order to cheer
and comfort the still anxious Frank. “God
will comfyrt him,” thought he, “when J am


FRANK NETHERTON, 191

CHAPTER XXyV.
THE END.

We will dwell no longer upon the schocl-
days of Frank Netherton. Enough has been
said, we trust, to excite an interest for him in
the hearts of our youthful readers; and in the
hearts of school-boys especially, so that they wil
be able to enter the more readily into all his
little trials and difficulties, having perhaps
experienced similar ones themselves.

Towards the conclusion of the year in which
it had been finally arranged that Frank should
leave school, he was summoned home in great
haste, where he arrived only just in time to
receive his father’s blessing, and hear and
treasure up his last words. “Do not grieve
for me overmuch,” said he. ‘I should like
to have remained here a little longer ; but to
die, and be with Christ, is far better. My son,
‘be useful, be happy. Serve God, and your
fellow-creatures; and in a few years, through
the merits of the dear Redeemer, we shall meet
again in the kingdom of heaven.”

A little while before he died, Mr. Netherton
asked Frank if he remembered a pleasing anec-
dote of the good Richard Cecil; but Frank
could not remember any thing then. ‘As

Low
192 FRANK NETHERTON.



he was lying on his death-bed,” continued
his father, ‘he requested one of the members
of his family to write down for him in a book
the following sentence: ‘None but Christ!
None but Christ! said Lambert, dying at a
stake: the same in dying circumstances, with
his whole heart, saith Richard Cecil.’ So
also,” added the expiring Christian, “saith
William Netherton: None but Christ! None
but Christ! He is all-sufficient.”’

After giving this testimony, he uttered not
another word, but fell asleep with his head
resting upon Frank’s shoulder.

«‘ Asleep in Jesus—oh! how bless’d,
How sweet their slumbers are!
From sufferings and from sin released,
And freed from every snare.

‘¢ Far from this world of toil and strife,
They’re present with the Lord ;
The labours of their mortal life
End in a large reward.”

For a long time Frank was inconsolable.
{t was natural that he should lament for so
kind a parent. Our blessed Saviour himself
wept at the tomb of Lazarus. But when
Frank said that he should never be happy
again, his aunt rebuked him gently, very
gently, and with the tears in her own eyes.
She reminded him of his father’s last wishes,
tiat he should rouse himself, and endeavour
to become an active and useful member of
society. Then it was that Frank remember ed
FRANK NETHERTON. 198



the lesson learned so long before, and tried to
say, “ Not my will, O God, but thine, be done.”

About this time Frank received a letter
from his friend Claude Hamilton, inviting
him to come and stay with him for a few
weeks previous to his departure for India.
“It will do you good; besides which, I think
you will be glad to meet my ‘ missionary uncle,’
as we used to call him, who is here on a visit.

I can take no denial.”

Frank showed the letter to his aunt, who
advised him by all means to go. And at his
earnest request, she consented to continue to
make the came her home.

“What should I do without you,” said
Frank, “‘and dear Helen, and Frederick?” ©. —

“Take care,” said his cousin, “or I shall |
be jealous at your putting Helen’s name be- «
fore mine.” =

‘He loved her so!” answered Frank. “I
shall never forget Helen’s kindness to my
father. It would not seem like home if you
were all to go away and leave me.”

“‘But we will not leave you,” said Helen,
in a lo-y voice.

“‘T am so glad.”

Frank passed several happy weeks with his
friend. He was quite as much pleased with
the “missionary uncle” as -he had expected
to be; while Mr. Hamilton on his part took
quite a fancy to Frank, and loved to draw
him cut, and hear him relate some of the many


194 FRANK NETHSERION.



quaint stories and anecdotes with which his
memory was stored. But what won the good
man’s heart more than any thing else, was his
simple and earnest zeal for the cause of his
Divine Redeemer.

As the time drew near for Claude Hamil-
ton’s departure, the two friends became sad
and thoughtful, for they loved one another
very much.

One day, when Frank and Mr. Hamilton
were alone, the latter said, “Claude tells me
that _ would like to be a missionary. Is
it so?’

“ Yes,” answered Frank, “I should like it
above every thing else in the world.”

“And your friends ?” |

“ My best friend, my dear father, approved
of and encouraged the wish. We used often
to talk it over together.”

“Do you think yourself qualified for a
missionary.”

“T am young,” answered Frank, modestly;
“but there is nothing I would not do and
bear, with God’s help, in his glorious cause.
Had you asked me if I thought myself worthy
of such an honour, [ must have answered in
the negative.”

‘We none of us are,” replied Mr. Hamil-
ton; “but God has promised to accept our
imperfect services for Jesus Christ’s sake,
our blessed Lord and Saviour. Years hence,
when your education is finished, if you still
YANK NETHERTON, 195
vontinue in the same mind, I shall be happy
to assist, as far as lies in my power, in
furthering your wishes. But remember, my
dear Frank, we are all too apt to forget
that there are home duties as well as homes
missionaries.”

‘‘So my father used to tell me,” said Frank.
“Yes, I will try to remember ; | will try to do
what is right, indeed I will.”

‘“‘T believe it, my dear boy,” replied Mr.
Hamilton; ‘and can only pray that you may
be led clearly to perceive, and resolutely follow,
the path of duty and providence.

A few weeks after this conversation, Claude
Hamilton and his uncle left England. The
hope that they might hereafter meet again
in India, dim and undefined as it was, some-
what lessened Frank’s grief at parting with his
friend ; but the great source of consolation was
the firm conviction in both their minds that
God ordereth every thing for the best, and
that he was leading them forth—as he Jeads
all who trust in him as they did—by the right
way to “a city of habitation.”

Our readers will be glad to hear that
Howard continued to persevere; and what
was better still, he continued to consult his
talisman upon all occasions, and so grew up
to be an active and useful member of society,
and a faithful and humble follower of the
Lord Jesus Christ.

God grant that this little history may not
196 FRANK NETHERTON.

have been written m vain. Ar. it will not,
if, by his blessing, it should be the humble
instrument of drawing one youthful heart near
to himseli, It has been our purpose to set forth
in it the beauty as well as the comfort of the re-
ligion of Christ, showing how it supports, and
cheers, and can alone make us happy. We would
also encourage the very humblest of our
readers to try and do something for God;
and to remember that there are school mis-
sionaries, and home missionaries, as well as
foreign missionaries. Frank Netherton was
only a little school-boy, and yet he did a great
dealof good. We may all do something if we
try. As Dr. Chalmers says, ‘ there 1s nothing
like trying’”—only we must not forget our
TALISMAN.





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12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00008.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00008.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00025.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00025.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:14 PM 00028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00036.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00036.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:15 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:16 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00143.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00143.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00144.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00144.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00146.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00146.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00147.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00147.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00148.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00148.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00149.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00149.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00150.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00150.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00151.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00151.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00152.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00152.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00153.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00153.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00154.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00154.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00155.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00155.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00156.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00156.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00157.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00157.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00158.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00158.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00131.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:17 PM 00141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00159.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00159.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00160.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00160.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00161.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00161.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00162.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00162.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00163.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00163.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00164.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00164.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00165.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00165.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00166.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00166.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00167.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00167.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00168.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00168.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00169.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00169.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:18 PM 00170.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00170.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00171.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00171.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00172.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00172.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00173.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00173.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00174.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00174.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00175.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00175.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00176.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00176.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00177.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00177.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00178.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00178.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00179.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00179.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00180.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00180.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00181.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00181.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00182.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00182.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00183.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00183.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00184.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00184.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00185.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00185.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00186.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00186.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00187.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00187.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00188.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00188.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00189.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00189.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00190.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00190.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00191.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00191.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00192.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00192.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00193.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00193.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00194.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00194.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00195.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00195.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00196.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00196.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00197.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00197.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00198.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00198.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00199.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00199.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00200.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM 00200.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM back3.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM back3.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM back4.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM back4.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM spine.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM spine.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:19 PM