Citation
The book of sports

Material Information

Title:
The book of sports containing out-door sports, amusements and recreations, including gymnastics, gardening & carpentering, for boys and girls
Series Title:
Darton's holiday library
Spine title:
Outdoor sports
Creator:
Martin, William, 1801-1867
J. Wertheimer and Co ( Printer )
Darton & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Darton and Co.
Manufacturer:
J. Wertheimer and Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
2nd ed.
Physical Description:
144, 35 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Sports -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
"Reviews and literary notices, with the opinions of the London & Provincial Press on the Rev. T. Wilson's popular school Catechisms." follows text.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by William Martin.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026867374 ( ALEPH )
45758958 ( OCLC )
ALH4350 ( NOTIS )

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THE

BOOK OF SPORTS:

CONTAINING

OUT-DOOR SPORTS,

AMUSEMENTS AND RECREATIONS,

INCLUDING

GYMNASTICS, GARDENING & CARPENTERING,

For Boys aud Girls.

BY

WILLIAM MARTIN,

AUTHOR OF “ FIRESIDE PHILOSOPHY,” “‘ THE PARLOUR BOOK,”

‘6 INTELLECTUAL CALCULATOR,” ETC. ETC, ETC.



SECOND EDITION.



LONDON :
DARTON AND CO., HOLBORN HILL.

———

M.DCCC.LII.



nme eeeerenenetypasenlsieenausasssesnesenientinnanpetnessninnsndasten nye:
J, WERTHEIMER AND CO., PRINTERS, FINSBURY CIRCUS,



CONTENTS.

NT

PREFACE . ‘
I. GAMES WITH MARBLES.
Ring Taw
Lag Out or Knock Out
Three Holes . ‘
Arches . ° ‘

Bonce-Eye .
Sun and Planet Taw
Pyramid

Il Games ror CoLp WEATHER.

Prisoners’ Base .
Stag Out ‘ ;
Warning

Mouse in the Corner
King of the Castle .
Hippas . ° ‘
Thread the Needle .
Touch . ° ‘
Bowls . ° °
Quoits . ‘
Why and Because :

Bombardment of a Snow Cast

Bandy Ball or Golf
Foot Ball . .-
Trussing ;
Follow my Shiliel:
Blindman’s Buff.
Tip-Cat . + °
Jingling
Fieeh and English
Ill, Dancrerovus GAMES.
Heap the Bushel .
Drawing the Oven

Hop-Scotch . .

Basting the Bear .

Buck, Buck . °
AS

te

a os



IV,

VL

VIL

VIII.

CONTENTS.

ee gf? ck er a
Walking $ ‘ ; ° d °
Running eat.) ae “hee
Leaping ,. ce ee :

» Climbing . . ° ae 6 se
Rope Ladder ; ‘>< i jon
Slant Board , e . ‘ :
Vaulting ‘ 4 . ‘ ‘
Balancing. “4 . °

CricKer , : ; ‘ ‘ ,

. Laws of the Game of Double Wicket
The Bowler . : ‘ ‘ :

_ The Striker . , ‘ ,

The Wicket-Keeper . : °

Laws for Single Wicket _—, :

Bets , . ° ; °
Sw1MMING eM tk ees Sa

Preliminary Exercises in Swimming

Bernardi’s System . ; ee
GARDENING,

How to keep a Garden all the year round, with

directions for each month . ‘ '
CaRPENTERING .

Uses of the various Tools:—Plane, Chisel Gim-

let, Mallet, Hammer, Files and Nails .
Stuff and Labour . . ‘ ; ‘
Kerring Pouttry . ‘ ‘ ‘ :
Nature and Situation of Fowl-House
TheVarious Breeds of Fowl . . .

. Choice of Stock . . ;
Food and Feeding ‘

te eg :
Preservation of Eggs.

_ Hatching Chickens ,

ae ey ‘ ‘ ;
Queen Bee.—Drone,—Construction of Nests.

How to get a Stock of Bees.—Hiving

39
44
45
46
49
50
50
50
51
55
59
61
62
64
65
67
69
78
83,
89

105
115

116

121
123
124
126
128
128
129
129.
130
131

134



PREFACE.

THE prime object of this book is to induce and to
teach boys and girls to spend their hours out of
school in such a manner, as to gain innocent
enjoyment while they promote their own health
and bodily strength. The Author has never lost
sight of this object, considering it to be what
properly belongs to a Book of Sports.

He has, however, in many instances, had in
view, in a subordinate degree, the intellectual im-
provement of his young readers. He hopes that
several of the games, now described in print for
the first time, will be found, if not ‘royal roads,”

at least delightful ones, to the knowledge of many



Vili PREFACE.

scientific facts. There seems to be no good
reason why the utile (considered intellectually as_
well as bodily) should not find its place in the
sports of young people, if it be so skilfully com-
bined with the dulce as not to convert pleasure
into toil.

To those who assent to what has been stated,
the introduction of a chapter on gardening will

need no apology.



THE

BOOK OF SPORTS.

—_—o—

OUT-DOOR GAMES.

—_——@——

FARs i,
GAMES WITH MARBLES.



* Ons of the best games with marbles is

RING TAW.



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ny. cecuitt SSS

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This is played in the following manner :—A circle should
be drawn about four feet in diameter, and an inner
circle of about six inches being also marked out in its
centre, into this each boy puts a marble. ‘* Now then,



10 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

boys, knuckle down at the offing, which is in any part
of the outer circle. Now, whoever shoots a marble out
of the ring is entitled to go on again: so mind your
shots ; a good shot may clear the ring. After the first
shot, the players do not shoot from the offing, but from
the place where the marble Stops after it has been shot
from the knuckle. Every marble struck out of the ring
belongs to the party who hits it; but if the taw remains
in the inner ring, either after it has struck a marble or
not, the player is out, and must put in all the marbles
he has won. If one player strike another player’s taw,
the player to whom the taw belongs is out; and he must
give up all the marbles he has won to the player whose
taw struck his,”



LAG OUT OR KNOCK OUT.

Tuts game is played by throwing a marble against the
wall, which rebounds to a distance. Others then follow ;
and the boy whose marble strikes against any of the
others is the winner. Some boys play the game in a
random manner; but the boy who plays with skill
judges nicely of the law of forces, that is, he calculates
exactly the force of the rebound, and the direction of it.

The first law of motion is, that everything preserves
a@ state of rest, or of uniform rectilineal (that is, straight,
motion), unless affected by some moving force,

Second law.—Every change of motion is always pro-
portioned to the degree of the moving force by which
it is produced, and it is made in the line of direction in
which that force is impressed.



GAMES WITH MARBLES. ll

Third law.—Action and reaction are always equal and
contrary, or the mutual action of two bodies upon each
other are always equal and directed to contrary parts.

To illustrate the first of these laws,—a marble will
never move from the ground of itself, and once put in
motion, it will preserve that motion until some other
power operates upon it in a contrary direction.

With regard to playing Lag Out so as to win, you
must further understand the principle of reflected mo-
tion. If you throw your marble in a straight line against
the wall, you find that it comes back to you nearly in a
straight line again. If you throw it ever so slightly on
one side, or obliquely, it will fly off obliquely on the
opposite side. If you throw the marble from the point
c to the point 8, it will fly off in the direction of the
- point a, and if a marble lay there it would hit it; but
if you threw it from the point pv, you would stand no
chance.

WALL.

B

Cc D A

In science, the angle c, s, p, is called the angle of
incidence, and p, B, A, is called the angle of reflection. —



12 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

THREE HOLES.



Ture Horss is not a bad game. To play it, you must
make three small holes about four feet apart: then the
first shot tries to shoot a marble into the first hole. If
he gets in, he goes from that to the second, and then
to the third hole, after which he returns, and having
passed up and down three times, he thus wins the game.
If he cannot get in the first hole, the second player
tries ; and when he stops short at a hole, the third, and
so on. After any player has shot his marble into a
hole, he may fire at any adversary’s marble to drive him
away, and, if he hits him, he has a right to shoot again,
either for the hole or any other player. The game is
won by the player who gets first into the last hole and
works his way back again to the first, when he takes all
his adversaries’ marbles, i



GAMES WITH MARBLES, 13

ARCHES.



To play arches, the players must be provided with a
board of the following shape, with arches cut therein;
each arch being a little more than the diameter of a
marble, and each space between the arches the same?



ARCH BOARD.
65:2 A.A SPR
NANNANNANA

The boy to whom the bridge belongs receives a marble
from each boy who shoots, and gives to each the number

of marbles over the arches should they pass through
them.



BONCE-EYE.

Boncs-Eve is played by each player putting down a
marble within a small ring, and dropping from the eye
B



14 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

another marble upon them so as to drive them out,
those driven out being the property of the Boncer.

The law of falling bodies may be well illustrated by
this game. It is one of the laws of motion, that the
velocities of falling bodies are in proportion to the space
passed over ; and the space passed over in each instant
increases in arithmetical progression, or as the numbers
1, 3, 5, 7, 9.

By the annexed dia-
gram it will be seen,
that if a marble fall
from the hand at A,
when it reaches B it
has only the quantity
of velocity or force ex-
pressed in the angle 1;
butewhen it passes to
C, it has the quantity
expressed in the three
angles3; when it pas-
ses to D, it has the
quantity expressed in
the angle 5; when it passes to E, it has the quantity
expressed by the seven angles marked 7, Thus we
may understand why a tall boy has a better chance at
Bonce-Eye than a short one.

It is found by experiment, that a body falling from a
height moves at the rate of 16-1, feet in the first second ;
and acquires a velocity of twice that, or 324 feet, in a
second. At the end of the next second, it will have
fallen 644 feet; the space being as the square of the
time. The square of 2 is 4; and 4 times 1675 is 64};





GAMES WITH MARBLES. 15

by the same rule, #t will be found, that in the third
second it will fall 144% feet; in the fourth second, 2574;
and so on. ‘This is to be understood, however, as re-
ferring to bodies falling where there is no air. The air
has a considerable effect in diminishing their velocity of
descent.



SUN AND PLANET TAW.



Tuts is an entirely new game, and consists of the Sun
in the centre, which may be represented by a bullet,
because the sun is the most ponderous body of the



16 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

system, and will in this game be required to move
slowly. The planets moving round him, with their
satellites, I represent by marbles. Now, each boy must
take the place of a planet; and having taken it, he is
required to put down as many marbles as there are
satellites belonging to it. The boy who plays Mercury,
puts down only one for his planet; the boy who plays
Venus does the same; he who plays the Earth, has to
put down one for the Earth, and one for the Moon, its
satellite ; the boy who plays Mars puts down Mars and
the four satellites that lie between the orbits of Mars
and Jupiter ; the boy who plays Saturn puts down one
for the planet, and draws a ring round it, outside of
which he puts the seven satellites in any position he
chooses ; the boy who plays the planet Herschel, puts
down one for the planet, and six for the satellites,
Each boy, having taken his place in this manner, lays
down his taw on any part of the orbit of his planet
he pleases, being the point from which he must make
his first shot,

The rules of the game are very easy; but it is
necessary to be perfectly acquainted with them, as it
saves much trouble, and prevents disputes ; and no one
ought to play till he understands them tolerably well.

1. The players must each put his marble into a hat,
and turn down the hat over the sun; then, as the mar-
bles fall near or far from the sun, the planets are taken.

2. The player who puts in Mercury has the first shot.

3. No planet can be taken till the Sun has been
struck beyond the orbit of Mercury. |

4. The player who strikes the Sun beyond the orbit
of Mercury, receives from the person who holds the



GAMES WITH MARBLES. 17

orbit, as many marbles as there are planets or satellites
in the orbit in which it stops.

8. The orbits are,—for Mercury, all the space be-
tween the Sun and him ; for Venus, the space between
Venus and Mercury ; for the Earth, the space between
the Earth and Venus; for Mars, the space between Mars
and the Earth; for Jupiter, the space between Jupiter
and Mars; for Saturn, the space between Saturn and
Jupiter ; for Herschel, the space between Herschel and
Saturn.

6. If a player succeeds in knocking the Sun on the
line of his own orbit, he receives one from every shooter
so long as it remains there.

7. If the Sun is knocked against a planet, the player
doing so has to pay two to the owner of the planet.

8. If the Sun be struck within the orbit of a planet,
the player striking it receives one if for Herschel, two
for Saturn, three for Jupiter, four for Mars, five for
the earth, six for Venus, and seven for Mercury. |

9. The player who succeeds in knocking the Sun
beyond the orbit of Herschel, wins the game ; that is,
he receives one from each player, and all the marbles
on the stake in the inner circle.

MOTIONS OF THE PLANETS AND THEIR SATELLITES.

10. When a planet is knocked out of the outer ring
(the orbit of Herschel), it belongs to him who strikes it
out: the loser must replace it by putting a marble down
in its original place.

11. When a planet is struck within the orbit of any
other planet, the player striking it there has to pay him

B 3



18 | THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

to whom the orbit belongs, as many marbles as there
are satellites. , |
12. Should a player’s taw, after it has struck another
taw, a planet, or a satellite, fall into its own orbit, he
has to put one in the inner ring as stakes for the winner
of the game.
_ 13. If a player gets his taw within the inner ring, it,
must remain there for the winner, and he cannot play.
any more. |
14. If a player has all his satellites taken, he then
becomes a Comet, and can shoot from any part of any
of the orbits every time the Sun is struck. ,
15. No player can shoot at his own planet or satellite.
16. Any player who strikes a planet or satellite
within Saturn’s ring, forfeits three to the inner circle:
If he strikes the Sun, then he may take up Saturn and
all his satellites remaining within his orbit.
17. After the first shot, every player must shoot from
the place at which his taw rests.

. Such are the laws of Sun and Planet Taw, and it will
be found that in playing the game, some degree of
thought is requisite, and.a little calculation respecting,
the moves. It may be judicious for a good shooter to
keep the Sun within the orbits as long as possible; or
till such time as the inner ring gets fat with the for-
feitures, or he may drive him from orbit to orbit where
the forfeitures are large. He will endeavour to place him
on the line of his own orbit. He may also strive to
place his adversaries’ taws within the inner ring, and to
be careful in striking planets that they fall into the
orbits where the forfeitures are small. By thus thinking



GAMES WITH MARBLES. 19

of what he is about and exercising forethought and
prudence, he will soon become expert, and by paying
attention to the game he will make it his own.



PYRAMID.

To play Pyramid, a small circle of about two feet in
diameter should be made on the ground, in the centre
of which is a pyramid formed by several marbles,—nine
being placed as the base, then a layer of four, and one
on the top; and the Pyramid keeper asks his playmates
to shoot. Each player gives the keeper one for leave
to shoot at the Pyramid, and all that he can strike out
of the circle belong to him.









PART II.
GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER.



One of the best of these is called

“ PRISONERS’ BASE,”

To play this, there must be a number of boys, not
less than eight or ten, and as many more as can be got
together. To commence it, two semicircles are drawn
against a wall or hedge at the opposite sides of the
playground. These are called the Bounps.

Two other spaces are then marked out a little away



92 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

from these to the right or to the left. These places
are called the Prisons.

The game is commenced by player from one side
running out midway between the bounds or prisons, a
player from the other side immediately following to
capture him ; one from the other side follows after the
second to capture him, and so on, both parties sending
out as many as they think fit. The object of each player
is to intercept and touch any player of the opposite side
who has left his bounds before him, but he is not at liberty
to touch any that have started after him ; it being their
privilege, if they can, to touch him before he gets back
to his own bounds. A player must touch only one
person each time he leaves bounds, and cannot be
touched by another after he has taken a prisoner. Every
player who is touched, must go to the prison belonging
to his adversaries, where he must remain until one of
his own side can touch him; and prisoners can neither
touch nor be touched in their return to their own bounds
again. The game is won by that side which has taken
all the other party prisoners.



STAG OUT.

In this game, one boy personates the Stag, and with
his hands closed together, starts from his bounds after
the other players. When he succeeds in touching one
who is called the Ass, the first who gets to him rides
him back to the bounds. The two then go out in the
same manner, then three, and so on, till the whole are
caught.



GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 23

WARNING.

Tu1s game is something similar to another very good
game called “WARNING,” which may be played by any
number of players. One begins the game in the same
manner as in “Stag Out,” repeating the following
words, —‘* Warning once, warning twice, warning thrice
A bushel of wheat, and a bushel of rye, when the
cock crows, out jump [—Cock a doodle doo.” He then
runs out and touches the first he can overtake, who
returns to bounds with him. The two then join hands
and sally forth, and touch a third, who joins hands with
the other two: again they sally hand-in-hand, the two
outside ones touching as many as they can. Immedi-
ately a player is touched, they must break hands and
run back to the bounds. If any of the out-players can
catch any of those who held hands, they may ride them
back to their bounds. When three are touched, he who
first begins the game has the privilege of joining the
out-players, whose object is always to break the line.



MOUSE IN THE CORNER.

In this game, one of the players takes the part of Puss,
and places himself in the centre, and the others playing
take up their positions in the four corners of the play-
ground. Each of the players calls out, “ Puss, puss,
puss, pretty puss, —how do you do pussy,” and en-
deavour to pass from corner to corner. The players are
at liberty to change corners in all directions, and if Puss
can touch one when he is away from his corner, the one



24 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

so touched, after giving Puss a ride round the ground,
becomes Puss, or if Puss can take a vacant corner, the
player without a corner must do the same,—give Puss
a ride round and become Puss.



KING OF THE CASTLE.

Tus is not a bad game. One player, called King of
the Castle, places himsrlf on a little rising mound; the
other players endeavour to push or pull him from his
elevation, and whoever succeeds in this, takes his place.



HIPPAS,

Tus game is something like the
preceding, only that one boy
mounts on the back of another,
who is called his Horse, another
boy does the same, and the two
mounted boys endeavour to pull
each other from the saddle. This
play is harmless when a soft piece
=} of turf is chosen, but dangerous
# | — on the stones or hard ground.





THREAD THE NEEDLE.

Tus is a good game,—any number of boys may play
it. It is begun by joining hands; and the two outside
players at each end commence the game by the following
dialogue: —



GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 25.

How many miles to Babylon?
Three score and ten.
Can I get there by candle-light?
Yes, and back again.
Then open the gates without more ado,
And let the king and his men go through.

The player who stands at the opposite end of the
line, now elevates his hand, joined in that of the player
next him, to form the needle’s eye, and the other outside
player approaches running, and the whole line follow
him through, if possible, without breaking. This is
continued, each end holding up their hands successively,
till the players are tired of the sport.



TOUCH.

Turs is a game of speed. One volunteers to be Touch,
and he pursues the other players till he comes up with
one of them and touches him; unless the player so
touched can say, ‘‘ I touch iron,” or, “I touch wood,”
before he is touched, he becomes Touch, and must give
the player who touched him a ride home. A player is
liable to be touched only when running from one piece
of wood or iron to another.

There is another and a better game of Touch, called
«Cross Touch,” which is played thus :—One volunteers
to be Touch, and sallies forth from his bounds. While
he is pursuing one of the players, a third player runs
between him and the player pursued, and touch must
then follow the one who crosses till another crosses
them, and so on, till at length the whole playground
will become a scene of activity and sport.

c



26 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

BOWLS.

“J will play at Bowls with the sun and moon.”—Byron.

“ He who plays Bowls must expect rubbers.” —Bowles,
Tuts is one of the best of games for hot or cold weather,
for it is excellent exercise, and requires skill and judg-
ment. Few requisites are required for it, but a level
lawn, or tolerably level field, is indispensable, as are the
bowls, the Jack, and the players.

If playing bowls, partners may be chosen, if there
are many players, or the game may be played by two
persons. When, however, there are three or four of a
side, there is more interest attached to the game. The
best player of my time was the good old schoolmaster,
Mr. Fenn, from whom I obtained all the particulars
concerning Bowls.

The bowls used at this game are of wood, loaded
with lead, or biassed, as it is called, namely, there is
one side thicker than the other, which is marked, and
this may be held either near or away from the thumb
as it may be required to lay the ball. No writer in a
book can teach this, as it depends upon the nature of the
ground, and the situation of the balls already bowled.

Before commencing the game, the first player leads
out a small white ball, called a Jack; he then lays his
own balls as near to it as possible ; the players then
follow in succession, but no partners follow each other
till the whole balls are delivered, and those who obtain
the nearest points to the Jack score one for each ball.

The number making the game is arbitrary, but eleven
is generally fixed upon. Of course it would be more
were there a great number of bowlers. The sport of
{he game consists in driving your opponent’s ball from



GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 27

the Jack, and putting your own near it. When one
side scores eleven before their opponents get five, it is
called a lurch. The players at Bowls change the Jack
from one side of the green to the other after the whole
of each side have bowled once.



QUOITS.
“ Quoit me down, Bardolph.”— Shakspeare.

Tuz game of Quoits resembles Bowls. It is played
with flat rings of iron of various weights. Ata certain
number of paces apart (to be agreed upon), two circular
pins of iron are driven into the ground. The players
beginning the game stand at one of these pins, called
the Hob, and pitch the quoits to the other, each person
having two. When all the quoits are cast from one
Hob, the players walk to the other and pitch to the
first, and so on in succession.

Those who get nearest to the Hob, are, of course,
nearest to the game, and each pair of quoits counts two,
—each single quoit, one ; but ifa quoit belonging to A
lies nearest to the Hob, and a quoit belonging to B the
second, A can claim but one towards the game, although
all his other quoits may be nearer to. the Hob than all
those of B, as the quoit of B is said, technically, to have
cut them out.



WHY AND BECAUSE.

Tuts is also a new game, and one of those that combine
amusement and instruction. To play it, a king must
be chosen, who is called ‘‘ King of the Shy,” who sets
up a brick on its end and puts a stone upon it, as @
mark for the players to bowl their stones at, which they



98 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.







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=

a

do successively. When a player has bowled, if he knocks
the stone off the brick, he may take up his own stone
and run back to his bounds, if he can do so before the
king sets his brick and stone up again ; but if the King
can touch the player after having set his brick up, he is
obliged to answer a ‘“‘Why,” or be King instead of him.
The “Why” must be proposed by the King, and it
may either be a conundrum, or it may contain the
reason of any thing, as, ‘‘Why does a stone fall to the
ground ?”’ ‘‘What makes the smoke go up the chimney?”
If the player cannot answer the “‘ Why,” he is obliged
to mind the shy and let the others bowl. Sometimes
it will happen, that of all the boys who have bowled at
the shy, not one has thrown it down; the King then
looks sharply at each one who tries to take up his stone,
to touch him. It generally happens, that whilst the
King is pursuing one, who has taken up his stone, to
touch him, all the rest take to their stones, and make
off home. But it should have been said, that by the
place from which they bowl, a string is stretched for a
leap, over which a player running from the King is
obliged to jump before he is considered home.

(Some good Conundrum Questions for this game will be
found in the “ Boox or Srorts,” on In-Door Amusements. ).





=





GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 29

BOMBARDMENT OF A SNOW CASTLE,

TuErE is no game like this for promoting warmth and
exercising the ingenuity. To play this, a Snow Castle,
Tower, and Fort must be constructed, and a Bombard-
ment got up.

When the snow is on the ground, let a party go into
a meadow and divide themselves into two companies,
and appoint a general to each. Each company then
takes up its respective position, and proceeds to build a
fort and castle, for defence, on each side ; the dexterity
with which the work is performed, and the celerity with
which it is accomplished, being much in favour of those
who play. During the building of the castle, some
must be employed as sharp-shooters, who must annoy
the builders on each side with snow balls, and some
must be employed in making a store of snow balls for
the magazine. When the castle is commenced, the first
the first thing to be done is, for several of the builders
to make a roll of snow about eighteen inches in length,
and as thick as his arm, and to roll this on the snow,
which will attach itself to it till it forms a large ball as
high as the builders’s shoulders. This must be turned
over on its flat side, and as many more as can be arranged
in the following manner, for a fort (supposing the other
side to be erecting a castle). The foundation thus being
laid, other balls not quite so large must be rolled up and
laid on the former, so as to make the rampart about
four feet high. Behind this, a single line of snow balls
must be placed, about one foot in height, on which the
attacking party may mount to discharge their balls to
the castle opposite. On elevated parts of the forts,

: c 3



30 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

long sticks with pocket-handkerchiefs, as flags, must be
raised, and in the centre, a larger flag should be placed,
and it must be the object of the opposite party to de-
molish them with their balls. When a player wishes to
throw a ball, he mounts upon one of the inner partings
of snow, discharges his shot, and jumps down behind
the parapet for more shot. The party on the opposite
side may build their castle as they please; but each:
party should watch each other’s movements, and build
their different places of defence or annoyance in such a
manner as to defend themselves and annoy the enemy in
the most effective manner. It may be observed, that
the fort must be so constructed with reference to the
castle, that it is brought to bear on every point of it. The
two ends are towers, which should be a foot higher than
the ramparts, and should be made by three snow balls
laid one upon the other, —the last one being turreted,
with room for one boy to mount to the top, if necessary,
to discharge his shots. The highest place of all, is the
keep, and should be at least six feet high, with room
and steps behind for two boys to mount. Convenient
places should be left behind, where the ammunition
should be piled up.

When the fort or castle is built, each party uses its
best efforts for the demolition of the other, but no one
is allowed to make use of his hands in the demolition of
either castle or fort ; battering-rams may alone be em-
ployed. In ancient times, battering-rams were large
beams, hooped and shod with iron ; but the moderns do
things better, and the way in which it may be done is as
follows :—A boy who volunteers to be batterig-ram has
his legs tied and then two other boys take him up, and,



GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 31

swinging him by the-arms and legs, force his feet against
the walls of the castle or fort to batter it down, the op-
posite party pouring on them, all the while, snow balls
heated to a white heat from the ramparts above. Parties
also may go out from one side to the other, as in playing
« Hippas,” mounted, and may meet in the open space
and endeavour to pull each other from their horses. If
a player on either side can break over the fort and cap-
ture one of the flags without being touched, he may.
bring it off and place it on his own ramparts as a trophy,
and the party from whom the flag is captured must not
replace it ; but if in this act he is touched, he becomes,
a prisoner, and must make snow-balls for his adversaries.
Every one who is thrown down, either from his horse
or by any other means, is considered a dead man, and
can donothing but make snow-balls for the opposite party.
When the flags are all struck on either side by being
shot away, or when the men are all taken prisoners or
slain, or when the ramparts are demolished, the victors
may sing, ‘‘ Old Rose and burn the Bellows.”



BANDY BALL OR GOLF.

Tuis game is played with a bat and a small ball; and
the game consists in driving the ball into certain holes
made in the ground. Sometimes these holes from first to
last, are at the distance of half a mile or even more from
each other. There are many intervening holes. Those
who drive the ball into the greatest number of holes, of
course win the game; but the ball must never be driven
beyond a hole without first going into it. If the ball
passes in the way beyond a hole, the player is aut.



s

32 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

FOOT BALL.

Foor Batt is a very simple game. A large soft ball is
procured (which is now made of Gutta Percha), and the
players having assembled and taken sides, a line is
drawn across the playground, and the play commences.
The object of the play is, for each party to kick the ball
across the goal of the other, and to prevent it from
passing their own. The party into whose bounds the
ball is kicked, loses the game.



TRUSSING,

Tuts is an excellent game. In some places it is called
“Cock Fighting.” To play it, two players must be
matched against each other, and one is sometimes
called ‘‘ Black Cock,” and the other ‘‘ White Cock.”
They are seated on a carpet, or, what is better, the
floor of the play-room, and undergo the operation
of ‘‘trussing.” This is performed as follows :—The
hands are first tied with a handkerchief at the wrists.
The ancles are tied in the same manner. The Cock
then has his hands brought to his instep, while his
knees pass between his arms, and a short stick is thrust
in under the knees and over the joints of the elbow, and
secured in this situation. The fight now begins by each
Cock advancing towards his enemy, and when they
come close to each other, each endeavours, by inserting
his toes under the other’s feet, to capsize him and
throw him over on the side; and whoever does this, is
entitled to crow, and is winner of the game. There is
often a good deal of fun in this game, and the players
can rarely hurt each other.



GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 33

FOLLOW MY LEADER.





Fottow my Lxapkr is a very good game; and when
the Leader is a droll boy, causes much fun and laughter.
The leader starts off at a moderate pace, and all the
other boys, in a line, one after the other, follow him.
They are not only bound to follow him, but do exactly
what he does. If he hops on one leg, or crawls on the
ground, or coughs, or sneezes, or jumps, or rolls, or
laughs, all must do the same. If any boy fail to follow
his Leader, he is called the “ Ass,” and must be ridden
by the boy next him. Sometimes the Leader will leap
a ditch, climb a tree, or run into a river. But boys
should be careful of very mad pranks in this sport.





BLINDMAN’S BUFF.

In this game, a person is blindfolded, and endeavours
to catch any one of the players, who, if caught, is blind-
folded and takes his place. |

There is another Game something resembling it,





34 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

called Suavow Burr. A piece of white linen is thrown
over a line across the room ; between this screen and
close to the wall on one side, a candle is placed, and
on the other side, Buffy is obliged to stand, while the
players moving between the candle and linen show
their shadows through it, and Buffy has to distinguish
each person by his shadow. When he does this, the
player so found out becomes Buffy and takes his place.



TIP-CAT.

For this game a piece of wood must be procured about
six inches in length and two inches thick, of the follow-
ing shape :—

that is, of a double curve. It will be seen by the shap
of this, that it will fly up as easily as a ball when it is
laid in the trap, for the striker has only to tap one end
of it, and up it flies, making many a summerset as it
rises; while it is performing this turn-over motion,
which philosophers call the rotatory, the striker makes
a blow at it and sends it whither he pleases.

The proper way to play the game, is as follows :—A
large ring is made on the ground, in the middle of
which the striker takes his station; he then tips the cat
and endeavours to strike it out of the ring; if he fail in
this, he is out, and another player takes his place. If
he strike the Cat out of the ring, he judges with his
eye the distance the Cat is driven from the centre



GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 35

the ring, and calls for a number, at pleasure, to be
scored towards the game. The place is now measured
by the stick with which the Cat is struck, and if the
number called be found to exceed the same number of
lengths of the cudgel, he is out, but if it does not, he
obtains his call. Another method of playing, is to make
four, six, or eight holes in the ground in a circular
direction, at equal distances from each other, and at
every hole is placed a player with his cudgel. One of
the party who stands in the field, tosses the Cat to the
batsman who is nearest to him, and every time the Cat
is struck, the players must change their situations and
run over from one hole to another in succession. If
the Cat be driven to any great distance, they continue
to run in the same order, and claim a score towards
their game every time they quit one hole and run to
another. But if the Cat be stopped by their opponents,
and thrown across between any two of the holes. before
the player who has quitted one of ‘them can reach the
other, he is out.



JINGLING.

Tus game is common to the West of England, and is
called a “‘ Jingling Match.” It is played by a number
of players being blindfolded within a ring formed for the
game, and one or two others, termed the “ Jinglers,”
not blindfolded, with a bell fastened to their elbow, also
enter the ring. The blinded players have to ‘catch the
Jingler, who moves about rapidly from place to place.
He who catches the Jingler wins the game; but if after
a certain time, agreed upon previously by the players
the Jingler is not caught, he is declared the victor.



36 THE BOOK OF SPORTS,

FRENCH AND ENGLISH.

Frencn AND Encuisu is another good game. A rope
being provided, two players stand out, and after having
cleeped for first choice, select the partners. After an
equal number has been selected for each side, one party
attaches itself to one end of the rope, and the other
party lays hold of the other: a line is then made on
the ground, and each party endeavours to pull the other
over this line. The party succeeding in this, wins the
game,



PART III.
DANGEROUS GAMES.

eer ceenieee

Anp now that we have given a description of some
good games, it may be as well to warn our readers of
some bad or foolish ones, which are either calculated to
spoil their clothes, make them very dirty, or are dan-
gerous to their limbs,



HEAP THE BUSHEL.

Tus is a very dangerous game, if it can be called a
game. Should one boy happen to fall, it is the practice
of other boys to fall upon him and to “ Heap the
Bushel,” as it is called, all the other boys leaping on
the one already down. It sometimes happens, that
those underneath are seriously injured; and the sport
is seldom engaged in without quarrelling among the
- players, and sometimes it leads to a fight.



DRAWING THE OVEN.

_ Tuts is another dangerous game. It consists of several
players being seated on the ground in a line, clasped by
each other round the waist: when all are thus united,
two others take the foremost one, and endeavour by
pulling and tugging to break him off from the rest. Thus
the united strength of several boys before, and as many
behind, is made to act upon the one in front, and an
arm may be dislocated by a sudden jerk, not to say any-
thing about a broken neck. |
D



88 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

HOP-SCOTCH.

Turs is a silly game. It is calculated to wear out the
shoes. |



BASTING THE BEAR.

Tuts is another silly game. A boy, who is called the
Bear,” kneels down on the ground in a ring marked
out, to let the other boys beat him with their twisted or
knotted handkerchiefs. The master of the Bear, who
holds him by the rope, endeavours to touch one of the
assailants; if he succeeds in doing this, without pulling
the Bear out of his circle, or letting go the rope, the
player touched becomes Bear in his turn. But it is
calculated to spoil the clothes of the Bear, and some-
times, should he kneel on a sharp stone, may do him
much injury.



BUCK, BUCK.

«« Buck, Buck, how many horns do I hold up?” is also
a stupid game. It neither requires speed, nor agility,
nor wit. The game is played by one boy resting his
head against a wall and making a back, upon which the
other jumps, who, when seated, holds up as many of
his fingers as he pleases, and cries, *‘ Buck, Buck, how
many horns do I hold up?” The player who is leaped
upon, now makes a guess; if he guesses correctly, it is
his turn to leap, if not, the leaper leaps again. But
there is little good in all this, and it-ought not to be
encouraged. ; ;



| PART IV.
GYMNASTICS.



*,

Aut boys, and girls too, ought to train themselves to
habits of agility, and nothing is more calculated to do
this than Gymnastics, which may be rendered a source
of health and amusement.

In all playgrounds, a piece of ground should be laid
out; and there should be erected thereon, a couple of
posts, about twenty feet apart, and sixteen feet high,
which should support a plank, about a foot wide, and
six inches thick; on the underside of this might be
affixed a hook, from which a triangle might be swung,
—this is capable of being used in a variety of ways.
Two more hooks, about a foot apart; might be used for
two ropes, so that the more advanced pupils could climb
to the top by means of grasping a rope in each hand,
and without the assistance of the feet. A pole may
rise from the ground to the cross piece about midway :
the pupils will be able to climb up this without the
assistance of the feet. A wood ladder and rope ladder
may occasionally be fastened to the beam, but may,
when necessary, be taken down. A board about a foot
broad may also be set up against the beam, inclining
four feet from the perpendicular: the climber will grasp
the sides with his hands, and placing his feet ‘almost
flat against the board, will proceed to the top: this is
an advanced exercise. Another board may be set u,



40 THE BOOK OF SPORTS,

which should be three feet broad, at least, and should
slant more than the other: the pupil will run up this
to the top of the beam easily, and down again. The
middle of this, up to the top, should be perforated with
holes about four inches apart, in which a peg may be
placed: this may be in the first hole to begin with
The pupil will run up and bring this down, and then
run up and put it in the second, and so on, till he has
arrived at the top: then two or more pegs may be
used, and it may be varied in many ways. A pole,
twenty-five or thirty feet high should be erected, rather
thin towards the top: at distant intervals of this, three
or four pegs, as resting places, should be fastened ;
another pole, thicker, from about sixteen to twenty feet
high, should be erected; on the top of which should be
placed four projecting hooks turning on a pivot: to
these hooks four ropes should be attached, reaching to
within two feet from the ground. This is called the
“ Flying Course,” from an individual taking hold of the
peg at the end of each rope.

One person may cross a rope under the one in pos-
session of another, and by pulling round hard, make the
other fly over his head. Care should be taken to make
the hooks at the top quite secure, for otherwise many
dangerous accidents might ensue. A cross pole might
also be set up, but most of the exercises for which this
is used, may be performed by the triangle. On the
parallel bars, several beneficial exercises may be done,
and also on the bridge. This is a pole thick at one end,
thin at the other, and supported at three or four feet from
the ground bya post at one end and another in the middle,
so that the thin end vibrates with the least touch. This, it



GYMNASTICS. 4]

will be evident, is an exercise for the organ of equilibrium,
and exercises the muscles of the calf, of the neck, and
anterior part of the neck, and those of the back, very
gently. On this bridge a sort of combat may be instituted,
—two persons meeting each other, giving and parrying
strokes with the open hands, The string -for leaping is —
also another very pleasing exercise. It is supported by
a couple of pegs on two posts fastened in the ground.
The string may be heightened and lowered at pleasure,
—it may be raised as high as the leaper’s head when a
leaping-pole is used. Besides these arrangements, a
trench about a foot and a half deep should be dug, and
widening gradually from one foot to seven, for the
purpose of exercising the long leap either with or with-
out the aid of the pole. Such are the general arrange-
ments of a gymnasium, but before the youth enters
upon regular exercises, he may commence with a few
preliminary ones.



FIRST COURSE.

Exercise 1. The pupil should hold out his hand at
arm’s length, until he can hold it out no longer, and
repeat it until he has power in the muscles, to continue
it, without fatigue, for a considerable length of time.

2. Stand on one foot till he is tired, and repeat this
for a similar period.

3. Hold out both arms parallel with his chin, letting
the thumbs and fingers touch each other.

4. Hold the hands behind the back in a similar
manner, the arms being stretched as far backward as
‘possible, and hold the hands high.

D3



42 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

5. Hold up the right foot by the
nght hand, extending the leg and arm
by degrees.

6. Hold up the left foot in the
game manner.

7. Stand with the knees bent, and
exercise them towards the ground,
until he can kneel on both knees at
once without supporting himself as 24
he drops. >

8. Raise himself from this position without the aid of
his hands, by springing back on his toes.

9. Endeavour to touch both his toes, with the back
straight, the legs close together, and the head down,

10. Take a piece of wood, three inches broad, and
twenty long, that will not bend, and hold it across the
back, the three first fingers touching the wood.

| Z 11. Endeavour to sit, but not

= ‘e, us touch the ground, nor let any

part of his body touch his heels,

with his arms stretched out in
a line with his chin.

12. Stand with his arms and
legs extended, so as to form
the letter X.







SECOND COURSE.

Let the pupil :—

13. Lie down on his back, and raise his body from
an horizontal to a vertical position, without any assistance
from the hands or elbows.



GYMNASTICS. 43

14. Draw up the legs close to the posterior part of
the thighs, and rise without other assistance. a foun

15. Extend himself on is
his back again, and walk !
-- backwards with the palms {yi |
of his hands and his feet. ‘°

16. Sustain the weight
of the whole body upon the = |
palms and the toes, the face being towards the ground.

17. Lie on his back, and take
hold of each foot in his hands,
and throw himself on his face by
rolling over.

18. Lie with the face down,
and take hold of his toes while in
that position.

19. With his chest down-
wards, drag his body along
by walking only with ‘his
“hands.

90. Place himself on his back, and endeavour to
advance by means of the propulsion of the feet.

21. Place his body on his hands and feet, with the breast
upwards, and:endeavour to bring the lips to the ground.

22, Lean on the breast and palms of the hands, and

throw the legs over towards the back of the head.
- 983. Stretch himself on the back, and extending the
hands beyond the head, at the utmost stretch, touch
the ground, and, if possible, bring up a piece of money,
previously to be placed there.

94. In the same manner, endeavour to seize & ball
by the toes at full length. ;

*











44 ) THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

WALKING.

Taxus preliminary exercises having been practised,
‘the young pupil will commence a course of more ad-
vanced exercises, such as walking, running, leaping,
balancing, vaulting, and climbing. Walking is common
to all, but few persons have a good walk, and nothing
exhibits the person to so much disadvantage as a
slovenly bad gait. It is true, that the walk of a person
will indicate much of his character. ° Nervous people
walk hurriedly, sometimes quick, sometimes slow, with
a tripping and sometimes a running step; phlegmatic
people have a heavy, solid, and loitering step; the san-
guine man walks rapidly, treads somewhat briskly and
firmly ; while the melancholic wanders, and seems almost
unconscious of touching the ground which he seems to
slide over. But the qualities of the mind itself manifest
themselves in the gait. The man of high moral. prin-
ciple and virtuous integrity, walks with a very different
step to the low sensualist, or the cunning and unprin-
cipled knave; therefore the young pupil will be sure
that even the art of walking, which seems to be an
exertion purely physical, will not be acquired properly
if his mind has taken a vicious and unprincipled bias:
it will either indicate his pride or his dastardly humility,
his haughty self-sufficiency, or his mean truckling to
the opinion of others, his honest independence, or his
cringing servility. But he who has been blessed with
the full use of his muscular powers, in proportion as he
is virtuous, will, with a very little attention, indicate by
his bearing, step, and carriage, the nobility of his mind

In walking, the arms should move freely by the side

.



GYMNASTICS, 45.

—they act like the fly-wheel of an engine, to equalise
the motion of the body, and to balance it One hand
in the breeches pocket, or both, indicates the sot, and
has a very bad appearance. ‘The head should be up-
right, without, however, any particular call being made
upon the muscles of the neck to support it in that posi-
tion, so that it may move freely in all directions. The
body should be upright, and the shoulders thrown
moderately backwards, displaying a graceful fall. When
the foot reaches the ground, it should support the body,
not on the toe or heel, but on the ball of the foot.
This manner of walking should be practised daily,
sometimes in a slow, sometimes in a moderate walk,
and sometimes in a quick pace, until each is performed
with elegance and ease. -



RUNNING.

IN RUNNING, as the swiftness of the motion steadies
the body in its course, without the aid of the oscilla-
tions of the arms, they are naturally drawn up towards
the sides, and, bent at the elbows, form a right angle.
Their motion is almost suspended in very swift running.
In moderate running, a gentle oscillation is observed,
increasing in proportion as the body approaches to the.
walking pace. The knees are now more bent,—the
same part of the foot does not touch the ground, the
the body being carried forward more by the toes. The
degree of velocity is acquired in proportion to the
length and quickness of the steps. The person should
therefore endeavour to ascertain whether long or short
steps suit his muscular powers best; generally speaking



46 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

a moderately short step, quickly repeated, accelerates
motion most. In learning to run, the pupil should
first endeavour to improve his breath by degrees: he
must try his speed first in short distances, to be gradu-
ally increased: the distance will vary according to the
age and strength of the runner. The first exercises in,
running should commence at a gentle trot over a dis-
tance of a hundred and fifty yards, at the rate of about
six feet to a second: this should be varied up to eight
feet in a second, for the first three or four days, and the
distance increased from one hundred and fifty to two
hundred and fifty yards. On following days, the dis-
tance may be increased to five hundred yards, and
afterwards gradually, until a mile can be performed in
ten minutes, which is tolerably good running. After-
wards, six miles may be tried in an hour, which will be
easily accomplished.

As regards rapid running, from one hundred feet to
one hundred yards may be attempted at full speed, and
when the constitution is good, the body not too fat, the
muscular developments fine, and the lungs sound, a
quarter of a mile a minute may be accomplished, and a
mile in five minutes, which is seldom done even in very
good running. Ten miles an hour, which is the average
speed of the mail, may, however, be easily performed
with judicious and proper training.



LEAPING.

In Leapine, that with the run, is the most common
and the most useful. The object of the run is to impart

s



GYMNASTICS. 47

to the nerves of the body a certain quantity of motion .
which may carry it onwards after the propelling power
has ceased to act when the body leaves the ground.
The run need not exceed twelve or fifteen paces: in
this the steps are small and rapid. When the body
leaves the ground, the legs are drawn up, one foot
generally a little more than the other; and a great thing
to be avoided, is coming to the ground on the heels.
When springing, the height of the leap must be calcu-
lated, the breath held, the body pressed forward, and
the fall should be upon the toes and the ball of the foot,
although in an extended leap this is impossible. Leaping
must, like running, be practised gradually ; in the high
leap, a person may easily accomplish the height of his
own body, and should practise with the bar, which may
be made of two upright posts bored, through which
ropes should be placed according to the height required
for the leap: on these should be hung a string with
weights attached to each end to keep it straight.
Should the leaper touch it with his feet as he takes his
leap, it will be thrown off the pegs, thus showing that
he did not make a clean leap.

The deep leap may be acquired from the top of a
bank into a hollow, and is useful in leaping from the top
of a house or wall in a moment of danger. It may be
practised from a flight of steps, ascending a step at a
time to increase the height, till the limbs can bear the
shocks, to break which, the body must be kept in a
bent position, so that its gravity has to pass through
many angles. The leaper should always take advantage
of any rivulet that has one bank higher than the other,
to practise himself.



48 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

In the long leap, a person ought to be able to clear
with a run, three times the length of his body.

The high leap, the deep leap, and the long leap, may
-be all practised with the pole. For the high leap, the
pole should be taken with the right hand, about the
height of the head, and with the left hand, about the
height of the hips; when put to the ground, the leaper
should spring with the right foot, and pass by the left of
the pole, and swing round as he alights, so as to face
the place he leaped from. In the deep leap, the pole



being placed the depth you have to leap, the body
should be lowered forward, and then, the feet being
cast off, swing round the pole in the descent. The



GYMNASTICS. 49

long leap, with the pole, is performed much in the same
manner.

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CLIMBING.

In climbing the rope, the hands are to be
moved one above the other alternately ; the
feet should be crossed, and the rope held
firmly by their pressure: sometimes the
rope may be made to pass along the right
thigh just above the knee, and wind round
the thigh under the knee.
In climbing the upright pole, the feet,
legs, knees, and hands touch the pole.
| Taking a high grasp of the pole, the climber
raises himself by bending his body, drawing up and
holding fast by the legs, and so on alternately.
K





50 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

THE ROPE LADDER.

Tue climber must keep the body stretched out, and
upright, so as to prevent the steps, which are loose,
from being bent forward.

The oblique rope must be climbed with the back
turned towards the ground, the legs crossed and thrown
over, so that the rope passes under the calf, and thus
he must work himself up by raising his hands one above
the other alternately.

The exercises on the ladder are :—1. To ascend and
descend rapidly. 2. To ascend and descend with one
hand. 3. Without using the hand. 4. Passing another
person on the ladder, or swinging to the back to let
another pass.





THE SLANT BOARD.

Tuis should be seized with both
hands, the feet being placed in the
middle. The board should be con-
siderably aslant when first attempted,
and gradually brought towards the
perpendicular.



VAULTING.

Tus exercise may be practised on that part of the
balancing bar between the posts. It may be performed
with or without running: it should, however, be com-
menced with a short run. The height should be, to
commence, about the pit of the stomach, which should
be increased to the height of the individual,



GYMNASTICS. 51

BALANCING.

THERE are two kinds of balancing to which we shall
allude ; namely, the balancing of other bodies, and the
balancing of our own.

All feats of balancing depend upon the centre of
gravity being uniformly preserved in one position. The
centre of gravity is that point, about which all the other
parts exactly balance each other. If a body be freely
suspended upon this point, it will rest with security,
and as:long as this point is supported, it will never
fall, while in every other position it will endeavour
to descend to the lowest place at which it can arrive.
If a perpendicular line were drawn from the centre of
gravity of a body to the centre of the earth, such a line
would be termed the line of direction, along which
every body supported endeavours to fall.’ If this dine
fall within the base of a body, such a body will be sure
to stand.

When the line of direction is thrown beyond its
centre, unless the base be enlarged to counterbalance
it, the person or body will fall. A person in stooping
to look over a deep hole, will bend his trunk forward;
the line of direction being altered, he must extend his
base to compensate for it, which he does by putting his
foot a step forward. A porter stoops forward to prevent
his burthen from throwing the line of direction out of
the base behind, and a girl does the same thing in car-
rying a pail of water, by stretching out her opposite
arm, for the weight of the pail throws the centre of
gravity on one side, and the stretching out of the oppo-
site arm brings it back again, and thus the two are



52 THE BOOK OF SPORTS,

balanced. The art of balancing, therefore, simply con-
sists in dexterously altering the centre of gravity upon
every new position of the body, so as constantly to pre-
serve the line of direction within the base. Rope-dan-
cers effect this by means of a
long pole, held across the rope;
and when the balancing-rail
is mounted, it will be found
necessary to hold out both the
arms for the same purpose;
nay, even when we slip or
stumble with one foot, we in
a moment extend the opposite
arm, making the same use of
it as the dancer does of his
pole.
A balancer finds that a body to be balanced, is the
best for his purpose if it have a loaded head, and a
slender or pointed base, for although the higher the
weight is placed above the point of support, the more







GYMNASTICS. 53

readily will the line of direction be thrown beyond the
base, yet he can more easily restore it by the motion of
his hand,—narrowly watching with his eyes its deviations.
Now the same watchfulness must be displayed by the
gymnastic balancer : he first uses the balancing pole,—
he then mounts the balancing bar without it. On
mounting the bar, the body should be held erect, and
the hands must be extended. He must then learn to
walk firmly and steadily along the bar, so as to be able
to turn round, and then he should practise going back-
wards. Two balancers should then endeavour to pass
each other on the bar; afterwards, to carry each other,
and bodies of various weights, in various positions.

Walking on stilts is connected with balancing. A
person can walk with greater security upon high than
on low stilts. In some parts of France, the peasantry,
in looking after their sheep, walk generally on stilts,
and it only requires practise to make this as easy as
common walking. Some few years ago, several of these
stilt-walkers were to be seen in London, and they could
run, jump, stoop, and walk with ease and security, their
legs seeming quite as natural to them as those of the
Stork.









PART YV.

CRICKET.

—— p
Ro al RR ce



AM

—T7_CO.

Cricket is the king of games. Every boy in England
should learn it. The young prince of Wales is learning
it, and will some day be the prince of cricket-players,
as I trust he will some day, a long while hence,. how-
ever, let us hope, be king of merry England. I shall,
therefore, be very particular concerning this noble game.
It is played by a bat and ball, and consists of double
and single wicket. The wicket was formerly two straight
thin batons, called stumps, twenty-two inches high,
which were fixed in the ground perpendicularly, six



56 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

inches apart, and over the top of both was laid a small
round piecé of wood, called the bail, but so placed as to
fall off readily if the stumps were touched by the ball.
Of late years the wicket consists of three stumps and
two bails; the middle stump is added to prevent the
ball from passing through the wicket without beating it
down; the external stumps are now seven inches apart,
and all of them three feet two inches high. Single
wicket requires five players on, each side, and double
wicket eleven; but the number in both instances may
be varied at the pleasure of the two parties. At single
wicket the striker with his bat is the protector of the
wicket ; the opponent party stands in the field to catch
or stop the ball; and the bowler, who is one of them,
takes his place by the side of a small baton or stump,
set up for that purpose, twenty-two yards from the
wicket, and thence delivers the ball with the intention
of beating it down. It is now usual to set up two
stumps with a bail across, which the batsman, when he
runs, must beat off before he returns home. If the
bowler prove successful, the batsman retires from. the
play and another of his party succeeds ; if, on the ¢on-
trary, the ball is struck by the bat, and driven into the
field beyond the reach of those who'stand out to stop
it, the striker runs to the stump at the bowler’s station,
which he touches with his bat, and then returns to his
wicket. If this be performed before the ball is thrown
back, it is called a run, and a notch or score is made
upon the tally towards the game; if, on the contrary,
the ball be thrown up and the wicket beaten down by
the opponent party before the striker is home or can
ground his bat within three feet ten inches of the



CRICKET. 57

wicket (at which distance a mark is made in the ground,
called the popping crease), he is declared to be out, and
the run is not reckoned. He is also out if he strike the
ball into the air and it is caught by any of his antago-
nists before it reaches the ground, and retained long
enough to be thrown up again. When double wicket is
played, two batsmen go in at the same time,—one at
each wicket: there are also two bowlers, who usually
bowl four balls in succession alternately. The batsmen
are said to be in as long as they remain at their wickets.
and their party is called the in-party; on the contrary,
those who stand in the field with the bowlers, are called
the out-party. Both parties have two innings, and the
side that obtains the most runs in the double contest,
claims the victory. These are the general outlines. of
this noble pastime, but there are many particular rilles
and regulations by which it is governed, and these rules
are subject to frequent variations.



SINGLE WICKET

Sinatz wicket may be played with any number of
players, and is better than double wicket for any num-
ber of players under seven. At double wicket, a small
number of players would get so fatigued with running
after the ball, that when it came to the last player's
turn, he would find himself too tired, without resting a
while. The first innings in single wicket must be deter-
mined by chance. The bowler should pitch the wickets,
and the striker measure the distance for the bowling-
stump. Measure a distance of the length of the bat,
and then one of the striker’s feet, from the middle



58 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

stump in a direction towards the bowling stump: there
make a mark, which is the same as the popping-crease,
and this will show when you are on the ground; place
your bat upright on the mark at the place where the
measure came to, and ask the bowler whether your bat
is before the middle of your wicket; here make a mark
on the ground, which is generally called the blocking-
hole.

The bowler now begins to bowl, and the striker
should endeavour to hit any ball which comes within his
compass, or if the ball given be not favourable for that
purpose, he may block it; but in blocking he must be
careful never to let the tip of the bat come before the
handle, as the ball in such a case will probably rise in
the air towards the bowler, and he will be caught out.
In*running, the striker must touch the bowling-stump
with his bat or person, or it is no run, and he may be
put out if he do no put his bat or some part of his
person on his ground before the ball touches his wicket.

With three players, the bowler and striker will be
the same as when two are at play; the second player
will be fieldsman, who, when the ball be hit nearer to
him than to the bowler, will pick it up, or catch it if he
can, and return it to the bowler. If the striker should
attempt to run, the bowler should immediately run to
the wicket, and the fieldsman should throw the ball to
him, so that he may catch it, and touch the wicket with
it to get the striker out. When the first striker is out,
the fieldsman will take his place, the striker will bowl,
and the bowler will take the field. When four players
are engaged, the fourth should stand behind the wicket;
and when five or more play, the additional players



CRICKET, 59

should take the field. The rule in such a case is simply,
that as soon as a striker is out he becomes bowler, then
he becomes wicket-keeper, and then he takes his place
in the field on the left of the bowler, and afterwards
the other places in regular progression, until it is his
turn to have a new innings.



LAWS OF THE GAME OF DOUBLE WICKET.

“Law, is law,” said Evergreen ; ‘‘ laws must be rigidly
obeyed, and, therefore, 1 will read the articles of war
for your edification. The first article of war is said to
be, ‘ That it shall be death t@ stop a cannon-ball with
your head.’” Cricketers must be cautious also how
they stop cricket-balls with this part of the body : but

Imprimis, the BALL must be in weight between five
ounces and a half and five ounces and three quarters,
and must be between nine inches and nine inches and
- one-eighth in circumference. |

2. The sat must ng, be more than thirty-eight inches
in length, nor exceed four inches and a quarter in its
widest part. . i

3. The stumps, which are three to each wicket, must
be twenty-seven inches out of the ground, and placed
so closely as not to allow the ball to pass through. The
bails must be eight inches in length.

4, The BowLING-crEASE must be in.a line with the
stumps, and six feet eight inches in length, the stumps
in the centre, with a return-crease at each end towards
the bowler at right angles.

5. The poppina crease must be three feet ten inches _



60 _ THE BOOK OF SPORTS.
,

from the wicket, and parallel to it, unlimited in length,
but not shorter than the bowling-crease.

6. They must be opposite to each other, twenty-two
yards apart. |

. It is not lawful for either party, during a match,
without the other party gives consent, to make any
alteration in the ground by rolling, watering, covering,
mowing, or beating.

This rule is not meant to prevent the striker from
beating the ground with his bat near to the spot where
he stands during the innings, nor to prevent the bowler
from filling up holes with sawdust, &c., when the ground
is wet.

g. After rain, the wickets may be changed with the
consent of both parties.



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CRICKET. 61

Tur Bow er.

9. The bowler must deliver the ball with one foot
behind the bowling-crease, and bowl four bowls before
he changes wickets, which he is permitted to do, once
only, in the same innings.

10. The ball must be bowled; if it be thrown or
jerked, or if the hand be above the shoulder in the de-
livery, the umpire must call “no ball” (this being
reckoned as one of the four balls).

11. In some matches, the bowler may give six balls
where the parties are agreed. The bowler may order the
striker at the wicket from whick he bowls, to stand on
which side of it he pleases.

12. Should the bowler toss the ball over the striker’s
head, or bowl it so wide that it shall be out of distance
to be played at, the umpire, although the striker attempt
it, shall adjudge one run to the parties receiving the
innings, either with or without an appeal from them,
which shall be put down to the score of wide balls, and
such balls shill not be reckoned as any of the four balls.
When the umpire shall have called#‘wide ball,” one
run only shall be reckoned, and the ball shall be con-
sidered dead.

13. If “no ball” be called by the umpire, the hitter
may strike at it, and is allowed all the runs he can
make, and is not be considered out except by running
out. Should no run be obtained by any other means,
then one run shall be scored.

14. When a fresh bowler takes the ball, only two
balls shall be allowed for practice; he must, however,

F



62 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

continue the next four in the game before he can change
for another better approved. If six balls are agreed to
be bowled, then he must continue the six instead of four.
15. No substitute in the field shall be allowed to
bowl, keep wicket, sTAND AT THE POINT Or MIDDLE
wickET, except by mutual agreement of the parties.

Tur STRIKER

Is ovr, if either of the bails be struck off by the ball,
or either of the stumps struck out of the ground.

He is ovr, if the ball, from a stroke of the bat or
hand below the wrist, be held by his adversary before
it touches the ground, although hugged or caught be-
tween the arms and breast of the catcher.
| He is ovt, if in striking, or at any other time while

the ball is in play, both his feet be over the popping-
crease, and his wicket put down, except his bat be
grounded within it.

He is ovr, if in striking at the ball, he either with
his bat, clothes, or person, hits down his wicket.

He is out, if under pretence of roe notch, or
otherwise, either@of the strikers prevent a ball from
being caught, or if the ball be struck up and he wilfully
strikes it again.

He is out, if in running a notch the wicket be struck
down by a throw, or with the hand or arm with ball in
hand, before his bat is grounded over the popping-crease.
If the bails should happen to be off, a stump must be
struck out of the ground.

He is ovr, should he take up or touch the ball while
in play, unless at the request of the opposite party.



CRICKET. ; 63

He is ovr, if with a part of his person he stop the
ball, which the bowler, in the opinion of the umpire at
the bowler’s wicket, has pitched in a straight line with
the wicket, |

If the players have crossed each other, he that runs
for the wicket that is put down, is out; and if they have
not crossed, he that has left the wicket which is put
down, is out.

When a ball is caught, no run is to be reckoned.

When a striker is run out, the notch they were run-
ning for is not to be reckoned.

If “lost ball” shall be called, the striker is allowed
the runs; but if more than six shall have been run
before ‘lost ball” shall have been called, then the
striker shall have all that have been run.

When the ball has been lodged in the wicket-keeper’s
or bowler’s hands, it is considered dead, that is, no
longer in play, and the striker need not keep within
ground, till the umpire has called ‘ play;”’ but if the
player goes off his ground, with intent to run, the
bowler may put him out. | '

Should the striker be hurt, he may retire from his
wicket and return to it any time during that innings.
Some other person may stand out for him, but not go in.

If any person stop the ball with his bat, the ball is to
be considered as DEAD, and the opposite party to add
five notches to their score.

If the ball be struck up, the striker may guard his
wicket with his bat or any part of his body except his
hand.

If the striker hit the ball against his partner’s wicket
when he is off his ground, he is out, should it previously



64 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

have touched the bowler or any of the fieldmen’s hands,
but not otherwise.

’
Tue Wicket-KxeEpPeEr.

The wicket-keeper should not take the ball for the
purpose of stumping, until it have passed the wicket.
He shall stand at a proper distance behind the wicket,
and shall not move till the ball be out of the bowler’s
hand. He shall not by any noise, incommode the striker,
and if any part of his person be over or before the wicket,
although the ball hit it, he shall not be out.

Tue Umpires.

The umpires are the sole judges of fair and unfair
play, and all disputes are determined by them, each at
his own wicket. They shall not stand more than six
yards from the wicket. In case of a catch, which the
umpire at the wicket cannot see sufficiently to decide
upon, he may apply to the other umpire, whose opinion
is conclusive.

The umpires shall pitch fair wickets, and the parties
shall toss up for the choice of innings.

They shall allow two minutes for the striker to come
in, and fifteen minutes between each innings. When
the umpires shall call “play,” the party who refuses
shall lose the match.

They are not to order a player out unless assented to
by the adversaries.

If the bowler’s foot be not behind the bowling-crease
and within the return crease when he delivers the ball,



CRICKET. 65

they must, unasked, call ‘‘no ball;” if the striker run
a short run, the umpire must call ‘‘no run.”

If in running either of the strikers shall fail to ground
his bat, in hand, or some part of his person, over the
popping crease, the umpire, for every such failure, shall
deduct two runs from the,number intended to have
been run, because such striker, not having run in the
first instance, cannot have started in the: second from
the proper goal.

No umpire is allowed to bet.

No umpire to be changed during a match, unless with
the consent of both parties, except in case.of a violation
of the last law, then either party may dismiss the trans-
gressor.

After fhe delivery of four balls, the umpire should
call “‘ over,” but not until the ball shall be lodged and
definitely settled in the wicket-keeper’s or bowler’s
hand; the ball shall then be considered dead. Never-
theless, if an idea be entertained that either of the
strikers is out, a question may be put previously to, but
not after the delivery of the next ball.

The umpire must take especial care to call ‘no ball”
instantly upon delivery, and ‘‘ wide ball,”’ as soon as
ever it shall pass the striker.

LAWS FOR SINGLE WICKET.

1. When there shall be less than four players on a
side, bounds shall be placed, twenty-two yards each, in
‘ a line from the off and leg stump.

F 3



66 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

2. The ball must be hit before the bounds to entitle

. the striker to a run, which run cannot be obtained un-

less he touch the bowling-stump or crease, in a line with
it, with his bat or person, or go beyond them, returning
to the popping-crease, as in double wicket, according to
the law.

3. When the striker shall hit the ball, one of his feet
must be on the ground behind the popping-crease, other-
wise the umpire shall call ‘‘no hit.”

4. When there shall be less than five players of a side,
neither byes nor overthrows shall be allowed, nor shall
the striker be caught out behind the wicket, nor stumped
out.

5. The fieldsman must return the ball so that it shall
cross the space between the wicket and the bowling
stump, or between the bowling stumps and the bounds ;
the striker may run till the ball be so returned.

6. After the striker has made one run, he must touch
the bowling stump, and run before the ball shall cross
the play, to entitle him to another.

”. The striker shall be entitled to three runs for lost
ball, and the same number for ball stopped with bat.

8. When there shall be more than four players to a
side, there shall be no bounds; all hits, byes, and over-
throws, will then be allowed.

9, The bowler is subject to the same laws as at
‘double wicket.

10. No more than one minute shall be allowed be-
tween each ball.



CRICKET. 67

BETS.

1. No bet is payable in any match unless it be played
out or given up.

2. If the runs of one player be betted against those
of another, the bet depends on the first innings, unless
otherwise specified.

3. If the bet be made upon both innings, and one
party beats the other in one innings, the runs in the
first innings shall determine it.

4. If the other party go ina second time, then the
bet must be determined by the number in the second.



OBSERVATIONS.

Cricket is played by twenty-two persons, eleven on
each side, and two umpires, with two persons to score
and count the innings. Thirteen players play at one time,
viz., two strikers, one bowler, one wicket-keeper, long-
stop, short-stop, point, cover, middle-wicket, long-field,
off-side, on-side, and leg ; of these the two strikers are —
the inside, or have their innings. The object of the
game is to get the greatest number of runs, and this
is to be done by the strikers. Each side having been
in once and out once, the first innings is concluded,
and, we might say, a complete game has been played,
but in most matches another innings is played. The
scorers keep the account of runs to each striker sepa-~
rately for each innings. The side that has obtained the

'



68 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

greatest number of runs, wins the game. The arrange-
ment of the players in the field is as follows :—

OFF-SIDE.

8
%



ON SIDE.

ORDER OF THE PLAYERS.

1. Striker. 7. Point.
2. Bowler. 8. Cover.
3. Wicket-keeper. 9. Middle-wicket.
4, Long-stop. 10. Long-field. off-side.
5. Short-stop. 11. Long-field, on-side.
6. Long-slip. 12. Leg.



PART VI.
SWIMMING

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No boy should be unable to swim, because it is essential
to the preservation of life; but the attainment of the
art has been held to be difficult, and the number of good
swimmers is very small. The whole science of swimming
consists in multiplying the surface of the body by ex-
tensive motions, so as to displace a greater quantity of
liquid. As the first requisite of oratory was said to be
action; the second, action; and the third, action; so the



70 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

first, second, and the third requisite in learning to swim,
is couracr. Now there is a vast difference between
courage and temerity ; courage proceeds from confidence,
temerity ,from carelessness; courage is calm and collected,
temerity is headstrong and rash ; courage ventures into
the water carefully, and throws himself off with a firm
and vigorous lounge forward, and a slow and equable
stroke ; temerity begins to dive before he knows whether
he can swim or sink, and after floundering about for a
minute or two, finds that he can swim farthest where it
is deepest. Therefore, let the young swimmer mark
the distinction between courage and temerity, and he
will speedily become a swimmer.

Before, however, we proceed to offer any remarks on
swimming as an art, we cannot refrain from calling the
attention of our young friends to the observations of a

‘celebrated medical doctor who has thought profoundly
on the subject. ‘Immersion in cold water,” says he,
‘is a custom which lays claim to the most remote an-
tiquity ; indeed it must be coeval with man himself,
The necessity of water for the purpose of cleanliness,
and the pleasure arising from its application in hot
countries, must have very early recommended it to the
human species; even the example of other animals was
sufficient to give the hint to man; by instinct many of
them are led to apply cold water in this manner, and
some, when deprived of its use, have been known to
languish, and even to die.”

The cold bath recommends itself in a variety of cases,
and is peculiarly beneficial to the inhabitants of populous
cities who indulge in idleness and lead sedentary lives :
it accelerates the motion of the blood, promotes the



SWIMMING. 71

different secretions, and gives permanency to the solids.
But all these important purposes will be more easily
answered by the application of salt water ; this also
ought not only to be preferred on account of its superior
gravity, but also, “for its greater power of stimulating
the skin, which prevents the patient from catching cold.”

It is necessary, however, to observe, that cold bathing
is more likely to prevent than to remove obstructions
of the glandular or lymphatic system ; indeed, when
these have arrived at a certain height, they are not to
be removed by any means ; in this case, the cold bath
will only aggravate the symptoms, and hurry the un-
happy patient into an untimely grave. It is, therefore,
of the utmost importance, previously to the patient en-
tering upon the use of the cold bath, to determine
whether or not he labours under any obstinate obstruc-
tion of the lungs or other viscera, and when this is the
case, cold bathing ought strictly to be prohibited.

In what is called a plethoric state, or too great fulness
of the body, it is likewise dangerous to use the cold bath
witnout due preparation. In this case, there is danger
of bursting a blood-vessel, or occasioning an inflammation.

The ancient Romans and Greeks, we are told, when
covered with sweat and dust, used to plunge into rivers
without receiving the smallest injury. Though they
might escape danger from this imprudent conduct, yet
it was certainly contrary to sound reason ; many robust
men have thrown away their lives by such an attempt.
We would not, however, advise patients to go in the
cold water when the body is chilled; as much exercise
at least ought to be taken as may excite a gentle glow
all over the body, but by no means so as to overheat it.



72 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

To young people, and particularly to children, cold
bathing is of the utmost importance; it promotes their
growth, increases their strength, and prevents a variety
of diseases incident to childhood.

It is necessary here to caution young men against too
frequent bathing, as many fatal consequences have re-
sulted from the daily practice of plunging into rivers,
and continuing there too long.

The most proper time of the day for using the cold
bath is, no doubt, the morning, or at least before dinner,
and the best mode, that of quick immersion. As cold
bathing has a tendency to propel the blood to the head,
it ought always to be a rule to wet that part as soon as
possible. By due attention to this circumstance, there
is reason to believe that violent head-aches, and other
complaints which frequently proceed from cold bathing,
might be often prevented. ;

The cold bath, when too long ponitinusd, not only
occasions an excessive flux towards the head, but chills
the blood, cramps the muscles, relaxes the nerves, and
wholly defeats the intention of bathing; hence expert
swimmers are often injured, and sometimes lose their
lives. All the beneficial purposes of cold bathing are
answered by one immersion at a time, and the patient
ought to be rubbed dry the moment he comes out of
the water, and should continue to take exercise some
time after.

Doctor Franklin, who was almost always a practical
man, says, “‘ that the only obstacle to improvement in
this necessary and life-preserving art, is fear; and it is
only by overcoming this timidity, that you can expect to
become a master of the following acquirements, It is



SWIMMING. 73

very common for novices in the art of swimming, to
make use of corks or bladders to assist in keeping the
body above the water; some have utterly condemned
the use of them. However, they may be of service for
supporting the body while one is learning what is called
the stroke, or that manner of drawing in and striking
out the hands and feet that is necessary to produce pro-
eressive motion; but you will be no swimmer till you
can place confidence in the power of the water to support
you. I would therefore advise the acquiring that con-
fidence in the first place, as I have known several who,
by a little practice necessary for that purpose, have in-
sensibly acquired the stroke, taught as if it were by
nature. The practice I mean, is this—choosing a place
where the water deepens gradually, walk coolly in it
until it is up to your breast, then turn your face towards
the shore and throw an egg into the water between you
and the shore, it will sink to the bottom and will easily
be seen there if the water is clear; it must lie in the
water so deep that you cannot reach to take it up with-
out diving for it. To encourage yourself to do this,
reflect that*your progress will be from deep to shallow
water, and that at any time you may, by bringing your
legs under you and standing on the bottom, raise your
head far above the water; plunge under it with your
eyes open, which must be kept open before going under,
as you cannot open your eyelids from the weight of
water above you, throw yourself towards the egg and
endeavour by the action of your feet and hands against
the water, to get forward till within reach of it. In this
attempt you will find that the water buoys you up against
your inclination, and that it is not so easy to sink as
G



74 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

you imagine, and that you cannot, but by active force,
get down to the egg. Thus you feel the power of water
to support you, and learn to confide in that power, while
your endeavours to overcome it and to reach the egg,
teach you the manner of acting on the water with your
feet and hands, which action is afterwards used in swim-
ming to support your head higher above the water, or
to go forward through it.

“T would the more earnestly press upon you the trial
of this method, because, though I think I shall satisfy
you that your body is lighter than water, and that you
might float for a long time with your mouth free for
breathing, if you would put yourself into a proper pos-
ture, and would be still and forbear struggling, yet till
you have obtained this experimental confidence in the
water, I cannot depend upon your having the necessary
presence of mind to recollect the posture and the direc-
tions I gave you relating to it; the’ surprise may put
all out of your mind.

«“ Though the legs, arms, and head of a human body,
being solid parts, are specifically somewhat heavier than
fresh water, yet the trunk, particularly the upper part,
from its hollowness, is so much lighter than water, as
that the whole of the body, taken altogether, is too light
to sink wholly under water, but that some parts will
remain above until the lungs become filled with water,
which happens from drawing water to them instead of
air, when a person in the fright attempts breathing while
the mouth and nostrils are under water. |

The legs and arms are specifically lighter than salt
water, and will be supported by it, so that a human body
cannot sink in salt water, though the lungs were filled



SWIMMING. 75

as above, but for the greater specific gravity of the head.
‘Therefore, a person throwing himself on his back in salt
water, and extending his arms, may easily lie so as to
keep his mouth and nostrils free for breathing, and by
a small motion of the hand may prevent turning if he
should perceive any tendency to it.

« In fresh water, if a man throw himself on his back
near the surface, he cannot continue in that situation but
by proper action of his hands in the water; if he have
no such action, the legs and lower part of the body will
gradually sink till he comes into an upright position, in
which he will continue suspended, the hollow of his
breast keeping the head uppermost.

«But if in this erect position, the head be kept upright
above the shoulders, as when we stand on the ground,
the immersion will, by the weight of that part of the
head that is out of the water, reach above the mouth and
nostrils, perhaps a little above the eyes, so that a man
cannot long remain suspended in the water with his head
in that position.

“'The body continuing suspended, as before, and up-
right, if the head be leaned quite back, so that the face
look upward, all the back part of the head being under
water, and its weight consequently being in a great
measure supported by it, the face will remain above
water quite free for breathing, will rise an inch higher
at every inspiration, and sink as much at every expira-
tion, but never so low that the water may come over the
mouth.

If, therefore, a person unacquainted with swimming,
falling into the water, could have presence of mind suf-
ficient to avoid struggling and plunging, and to let the



76 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

body take this natural position, he might continue long
safe from drowning, till, perhaps, help should come; for
as to the clothes, their additional weight, when immersed,
is very inconsiderable, the water supporting them, though
when he comes out of the water he would find them very
heavy indeed.

“ But, as I said before, I would not advise you or any
one to depend on having this presence of mind on such
an occasion, but learn fairly to swim, as I wish all men
were taught to do in their youth: they would on many
occasions be the safer for having that skill, and on many
more, the happier, as being free from painful apprehen-
sions of danger, to say nothing of the enjoyment in so
delightful and wholesome an exercise. Soldiers, par-
ticularly, should all be taught to swim; it might
be of particular use either in surprising an enemy or
saving themselves, and if I had any boys to educate, I
would prefer those schools in which an opportunity was
afforded for acquiring so advantageous an art, which
when once learned, is never forgotten.

“T know by experience, that it is a great comfort to
a swimmer who has a great distance to go, to turn him-
self sometimes on his back, and to vary in other respects
the means of procuring a progressive motion.

“When he is seized with the cramp in the leg, the
method to drive it away, is to give the parts affected a
sudden, vigorous and violent shock, which he may do in
the air as he swims on his back.

‘During the great heats in summer, there is no danger
in bathing, however warm he may be, in rivers which
have been thoroughly warmed by the sun; but to throw
one’s-self into cold spring water when the body has been



SWIMMING. 77

heated by exercise in the sun, is an imprudence which
may prove fatal. I once knew an instance of four young
men, who, having worked at harvest in the heat of the
day, with a view of refreshing themselves, plunged into
a spring of cold water ; two died upon the spot, a third
next morning, and the fourth recovered with great dif-
ficulty. A copious draught of cold water, in similar
circumstances, is frequently attended with the same effect
in North America.

« When I was a boy, I amused myself one day with
flying a paper kite, and approaching the bank of a lake
which was near a mile broad, I tied the string to a stake,
and the kite ascended to a very considerable height
above the pond while,I was bathing. In a little while,
being desirous of amusing myself with my kite and en-
joying at the same time the pleasure of swimming, I
returned, and loosening from the stake the string with
the little stick which was fastened to it, went again into
the water, where I found, that by lying on my back
and holding the stick in my hand, I was drawn along
the surface of the water in a very agreeable manner.
Having thus engaged another boy to carry my clothes
round the pond to a place which I pointed out to him
on the other side, I began to cross the pond with my
kite, which carried me quite over without the least fa-
tigue and with the greatest pleasure imaginable. I was
only obliged occasionally to halt a little in my course
and resist its progress, when it appeared that by following
too quick I lowered the kite too much; by doing thus
occasionally, I made it rise again. I have never since
that time practised this singular mode of swimming,
though I think it not impossible to cross in this manner

ac 3



78 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

from Dover to Calais. The packet boat is, however,
preferable.”

PRELIMINARY EXERCISES IN SWIMMING.

We have shown that much of the art of swimming de-
pends upon having confidence, and that that confidence
is speedily dissipated upon the swimmer coming in con-
tact with the water. Besides this, a great deal in the
art of swimming depends upon the degree of ease with
which the swimmer can use his hands and feet. Now
this sort of exercise may in part be acquired on land,
and it would be of great usefulness to the learner were
he to enter upon some preliminaryypractice which would
give him the use of his hands and feet, in the manner
required in swimming. ‘To do this, he should provide ~
himself with two ropes, which should be fastened up in
the manner of two swings, at about sixteen inches apart
from each other, and one a little higher than the other ;
these should be joined together with two or three cords
passing from the one to the other, and on the rack thus
made, a pillow or cushion should be placed; upon this,
the learner will throw himself on his breast, as upon the
water, and supporting himself in this position, and having
his hands and feet perfectly at liberty, he will move them
to and fro in the same manner as in swimming; this he
should repeat several times a day, until he finds that he
has got a complete mastery over the action required.
The head must be drawn back, the chin raised, the fin-
gers must be kept close, and the hands slightly concave
on the inside,—they must be struck out in a line with
the breast ; the legs must then be drawn up and struck



SWIMMING. 79

out, not downwards, however, but defind, in such a man-
ner, that they may have a good hold upon the water.
These directions being followed for a few days, will give
the learner so much assistance, that when he enters. the
water he will find little more requisite than calmness
and confidence in striking out.

In proceeding to take water, the first thing the youth
should do, is to make himself thoroughly convinced that
the spot is safe, that there are no holes in it, that no
weeds are at the bottom, that it does not contain any
stones likely to cut the feet. He must also be cautious
that he does not enter a stream whose eddy sweeps round
a projecting point, or hollow ; the bank should slope off
gradually, so that he may proceed for ten or twelve yards
from the shore, before the water rises to the level of his
armpits. With regard to the use of bladders and corks,
although it may perhaps be better to learn to keep our-
selves afloat without their aid, yet they may be used with
advantage, if used sparingly. The pupil, in using them,
places his breast across the rope ‘®
which unites them, so that when ,
he lays himself over them in the
water, they float above him, and thus
assist in buoying him up; thus sus-



tained, he strikes out and propels SS
himself with his hands and feet. =>

In striking out when in the water, the fingers are to be
perfectly straight, and the thumb kept close to the hand;
the hands are then to be brought forward, palm to palm,
and to be thrust out in a direction on a level with the
chin ; when at their fullest reach, they are to be parted
and swept slowly and regularly with the palms in a



80 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

horizontal position, the full stretch of the arms backwards,
they are then brought up from the hips and struck out
forward, as before. While the hands are near the hips,
is the time for the legs to perform their part; they are
to be drawn up as near to the body as possible, and the
soles of the feet struck against the water with moderate
force, immediately the hands are again thrust forward.
Now all this is very easily performed with a little prac-
tice, but will be very difficult if the learner have not
coolness and self-possession. A slow long stroke, the
hand thrust forward with energy, and the legs brought
up and struck out with a regular and even stroke, is the
whole art of simple swimming. The swimmer must,
however, be careful to draw his breath at the time when
his hands are descending towards his hips; if he attempt
it when he strikes out his legs, his head will partially
sink, and his mouth will fill with water. The breath
should accordingly be expired while the body is sent
forward by the action of the legs.
The young swimmer will find
much use in having a plank, ten
feet long, two inches thick, and a
foot broad, which he may take
hold of at one of its ends, and his
body being thus supported he will
perfect himself in the action of the =a
legs, and will, by striking them out, drive the plank
before him: he must, however, take care to hold it fast,
for if he should let go his hold, he will find himself
sinking over head and ears in the water. A rope may >
also be so fixed as to reach over the water, by which
the swimmer may support himself while learning to





SWIMMING. 8]

strike out with his legs; but he should be careful always
in performing this exercise, to keep his legs near the
surface, as, if the legs drop down, he will make very little
way in the water. One of the best kinds of assistance, how-
ever, the young swimmer can have, is the hand of some
one who is willing to teach him, and is superior to any
other methods for very young swimmers. If a grown
person will take the trouble to take the little learner out
with him till he is breast high in the water, and sustain
him with one hand under the breast, and occasionally
hold him up by the chin, at the same time directing and
encouraging him, and occasionally letting him loose that
he may support himself by striking out, the little learner
will soon reach that triumphant period when he floats
alone on the water.

After this triumph, however, the young swimmer must
be exceedingly cautious, though he may feel conscious of
his own power, he must venture only a few strokes out
of his depth: should he be in a broad river, he must be
careful not to do so where there is a strong curling eddy
or flood: in a small river, the breadth of which is only
a few yards, he may venture across with a few bold and
regular strokes; but should he become flurried and lose his
time, he will most assuredly be in danger of sinking. Let
him then obtain such perfect command over his limbs,
and also over himself, that when he ventures out of his
depth, he may be able to keep afloat in the water, plea-
santly to himself, and without hazard. .

A most important branch in
art of swimming, is floating, as
the swimmer may frequently Se
rest himself when fatigued, and i
otherwise engage himself in the aS oS





82 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

water. To do this, he must turn himself as gently as
possible on the back, put his head back, so that his eyes,
mouth, and chin, only, are above the water, elevate his
breast, and inflate his chest as much as possible: the
arms may be brought towards the hips, and the hands
should be paddled in a horizontal kind of sweep, which
will sustain the body. Should the learner wish to swim,
he must strike out with his legs, taking care not to lift
his legs too high; in this position the arms may occa-
sionally be folded across the breast.

To tread water, the legs must be suf-
fered to drop in the water till the swim-
mer finds himself upright, he then treads
downwards with his feet, occasionally =
paddling with the palms of his hands.
‘The swimmer, when long in the water,
will soon find himself tired, changes of
action are therefore necessary ; there are
many which are highly advantageous
to learn, such as swimming like a dog,
porpoise, etc. To swim like a dog, he must strike with
each hand and foot alternately, beginning with the right
hand and foot, he must draw the hand towards the chin.
and the foot towards the body, at the same time; he then
must kick backwards with the foot, and strike out in a
right line with the hand, and the same with the left hand
and foot: the palms of the hands must be hollow, and
the water pulled towards the swimmer. In swimming
like a porpoise, the right arm is lifted entirely out of the
water, the shoulder is thrust forward, and while the
swimmer is striking out with his legs, he reaches for-
ward with his hand as far as he can; his hand then falls,





SWIMMING. 83

a little hollowed, in the water, which it grasps or pulls
towards him in a transverse direction towards the other
armpit. While this is going on, the legs are drawn up
for another effort, and the left arm and shoulder are raised
and thrust forward, as the right had previously been.
When the swimmer feels tired, he may change these
positions for swimming on the side. To do this, he must
lower his left side and elevate his right, striking forward
with his left hand, and sideways with his right, the back
of the hand being in front instead of upward, the thumb
side of the hand being downward so as to serve as an
oar. Should the swimmer wish to turn on his back, he
must keep one leg still, and embrace the water beside
him with the other, and he will turn to that side. To
shew the feet, he must turn himself on his back, and bend
the small of it downwards, supporting himself by his
hands to and fro immediately above his breast, and hold
his feet above the water. Swimming under water is per-
formed by the usual stroke, the head being kept a little
downwards, and the feet struck out a little higher than
when swimming on the surface.

Bernarpis System.

Upright swimming.—This is a new mode of swimming,
introduced by Bernardi, a Neapolitan, and consists in
adopting the accustomed motion of the limbs in walking.
It gives great freedom to the hands and arms, affords a
greater facility of breathing and of sight. It is true, that
@ person swimming in an upright position, advances more
slowly, but as the method is more natural, the person is



84 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

able to continue his course longer, and can remain with
greater safety in the water.

The first object with Bernardi, is to enable the pupil
to float in an upright position, and in this the head is
made the great regulator of all the motions. After having
been by practice familiarised to keep his equilibrium, a
variety of motions are gradually practised, until the
swimmer is enabled at every stroke to urge himself for-
ward a distance equal to the length of his body, and to
travel, without fatigue, at least three miles an hour, and
to continue this without great fatigue for many hours.
Bernardi, speaking of the success of his practice, says,
«“ Having been appointed to instruct the youths of the
Royal Naval Academy at Naples in the art of swimming,
a trial of the pupils took place in the presence of a num-
ber of persons assembled on the shore, and under the
inspection of authorities appointed to witness and report
upon the experiment. A twelve-oared boat attended the
progress of the pupils, from motives of precaution. They
swam go far out in the bay, that at length the heads of
the young men could with difficulty be discerned with
the naked eye ; and the Major-General of Marine, Fort-
guerri, for whose inspection the exhibition was attended,
expressed serious apprehensions for their safety. Upon
their return to the shore, the young men, however, as-
sured him that they felt so little exhausted, as to be
willing immediately to repeat the exertion.”

After devoting a month to the investigation of Ber-
nardi’s plan, the Neapolitan government state in their
official report—

“That it has been established by the experience of
more than a hundred persons of different bodily consti-





SWIMMING. 85

tutions, that the human body is lighter than water, and,
consequently, will float by nature, and that the art of
swimming must be acquired to render that privilege
useful,

“That Bernardi’s system is new, in.so far as it is
founded on the principle of husbanding the strength,
and rendering the power of recruiting it easy.”

The speed, according to the new method, is no doubt
diminished, but security is much more important than
speed, and the new plan is not exclusive of the old when
occasions require great effort.

Little more need be said on the subject of swimming,
except giving a few directions in diving and plunging,
which require to be performed with caution and elegance.
When the swimmer prepares to dive, he must take a full
inspiration of air, the eyes must be kept open, the back
made round, and the head bent forwards on the breast;
the legs must be thrown out with force, and the arms
and hands, instead of being struck forward as in swim-
ming, must move backward. When the swimmer would
ascend, the chin must be held up, the back bent inwards,
the hands struck out high and brought sharply down,
and the body will immediately rise to the surface of the
water.

Plunging.— There are two different
modes of plunging to be acquired, name-
ly, the flat plunge, which is necessary in
shallow water, and the deep plunge, which
is used where there is considerable depth
of water. For the latter, the arms must
be outstretched, the knees bent, and the _ &
body leant forward till the head descends





86 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

nearly to the feet when the spine and knees are extended.
In the fat plunge, the swimmer must fling himself for-
ward in an inclined direction, according to the depth
or shallowness of the water; when he touches the
bottom, he must rise in the same manner as after
diving.



After all these necessary motions and movements have
been acquired in the water, there is one thing of which
the swimmer must beware, and against which art and
precaution can do but little—this is the Cramp. When
this seizes the swimmer, he must endeavour, as much as
possible, to avoid being alarmed, as he will reflect, that
as the body is lighter than water, a very little exertion
in it will keep his body afloat. Of course his first thoughts
will be towards the shore, but he must not forget, that
the cramp being only a muscular contraction, may be
thrown off by proper muscular exertion. He must strike
out the limb violently, and bringing the toes towards the
shin-bone, thrust his feet out, which will probably restore
the muscles to their proper exercise ; but if the cramp
still continue, he can easily keep himself afloat with his
hands, and paddle towards the shore, till some assistance
comes to him. If one leg is only attacked, he may drive
- himself forward with the other, and for this purpose, in



SWIMMING. 87

an emergency, the swimmer should frequently try to
swim with one hand, or one leg and one hand, or by two
hands alone, which will be easily acquired.

Should a companion be in danger of drowning, it is
our duty to use every exertion to save his life; and, in-.
deed, not to use the utmost exertion is a high degree of
moral guilt, but in doing this, we must not rashly hazard
our own life, nor put ourselves into a position in which
the swimmer can cling to us or grasp any part of our
body, or the loss of both will be inevitable. It will be
better in all cases where bathing is practised, that there
should be ropes and planks at hand, and young swimmers
should never venture far into the water without such
means of rescue are available. In conclusion, we would
caution all who go into the water, against remaining in
it too long, as nothing can be more dangerous; and we
would further advise that the practice of bathing and
swimming be not only common to boyhood, but be
continued in after life, as few things tend more to the
preservation of HEALTH. —





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PART VII.
GARDENING.



We read in the sacred records, that when man was
created, he was placed in a “ Garden,”—the Garden of
Eden, to dress it and to keep it; and we may infer
therefrom, first, that the occupation of gardening was
one. pre-eminently fitted for the happiness of man, and
secondly, that industry, and even labour, was also a
part of man’s duty, even in a state of innocence.

There is not a more innocent amusement than gar-
dening. Nothing can be more lovely than to be among
buds and fruits and flowers ; nothing is more conducive
to health and peace of mind, and few things are better
calculated to inspire religious feelings than gardening.

Every little boy or girl should have a garden, and
should be shown how to manage it. There is a great
deal in management and in method at all times, but es-
pecially in gardening. Much attention is also necessary,
—great care and much forethought; all of which qualities
of the mind it is in the highest degree proper to train
and exercise. Whoever, therefore, begins gardening,
must not look upon it as an idle sport, to be taken up
and thrown aside with the whim of the moment, but
as an occupation for leisure hours, that the mind must
be brought to bear upon, and which must engage him
from day to day, from month to month, from spring to
summer, from autumn to winter, and so through all the
changes of the varied year.

H 3



90 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.



LAYING OUT THE GROUND.

To begin gardening,

a little boy must have some ground,

which is quite indispensable ; and a boy of from ten to

fourteen years old 0

enough for him to
with neatness and
order. A piece of
about forty yards
long by thirty wide
will belargeenough
to commence with,
and this should be
set out in the
subjoined manner.
This will allow of a
path three feet wide
in the centre, and
of one two feet six
nches round the
ides, leaving the
peds twenty-two

ught to have, at least, a piece large

divide and subdivide, and arrange





GARDENING. 91

and a half feet wide. The paths should be gravelled with
a good red binding gravel, and to look nice, the borders
should be edged with box or edging tiles. At each corner
of the two parallelograms, might be planted a tree, say,
one apple, one pear, one plum, and one cherry, that is, eight
in all; and at distances of about a yard, might be planted,
all round, a foot from the paths, alternately, gooseberry-
bushes, currant-trees, and raspberry-trees, and between
them, various kinds of flowers, to come into blossom at
different seasons. At one end, the south end if possible,
should be erected a small arbour, with a couple of seats
in it, and at the two opposite corners should be two
small manure pits,—one for the reception of well-rotted
manure, to be quickly used, and the other for the
reception of all weeds, leaves, and rubbish, which will
make manure, and which should be mixed up from time
to time with the spade. These pits should be used
alternately. As soon as one has its contents well rotted,
it should be emptied from time to time on the land,
while the other pit should be used to hold the fresh
matter. newly collected. By the time this is full, the
other will be empty, and then that may be used as a
collector and the other as a decomposer, and so on,
alternately.



MANURE.

Ir is of no use whatever to think of getting things to
grow without manure. This is the life and soul of all
garden operations. Almost everything can be con-
verted into manure. The grass from lawns, fallen leaves,’
weeds, and all vegetable matter, afford good light



92 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

manure. Strong manures are prepared from horse, cow,
sheep, and goat dung. The dung of fowls and rabbits
is also most excellent ; and where fowls or rabbits are
kept, their dung should be preserved with great care,
and put by itself into a rotting-pit, or into a tank, and
kept wet. The juicy part can then be used as a liquid
- manure, and will be found of a highly fertilizmg pro-
perty, and the more solid may be spread over the land.
The best time for putting manure on the land is in dry
or frosty weather, and it should be dug in as soon as
spread. It is a very unwise plan to spread manure on
the land and let it lie, as in such cases, much of the
strength of the manure is lost. Young gardeners should
be very careful in preparing and collecting manure, and
also when they are moving it from the pits to the
ground, they should take care and not soil their paths.



GARDENING TOOLS.

Ir is quite necessary that a young gardener should have
proper tools. He should have a small but strong spade,
a small but strong rake, a digging fork, a hoe, a trowel,
a good pruning-knife, a box for seeds, a little wheelbarrow,
a line, and above all, a little gardener’s apron, and a
straw hat with a broad brim. Thus equipped, he may
commence his gardening operations with great comfort
to himself and some chance of success. '



DIGGING.

TuE young gardener should practise digging, with a
view to digging well. In beginning to dig a piece of



GARDENING. 93

ground, he should first clear it of all sticks, stalks, or
stones, that might impede his labor. He should then
commence at one end of the ground, with his back to
the sun, if possible, and, beginning from the left-hand
corner, dig one line all the way to the right-hand corner,
either one or two spades deep, as may be required.
The ground should be turned over, evenly laid up at
the top, nice and level, and the weeds completely buried.
The operator should dig carefully when near the roots
of gooseberry, currant, raspberry, or fruit trees, and
more carefully still, among flowers. If digging early in
the season, he must mind he does not dig into his bulbs;
such as lilies, tulips, snow-drops, crocuses, or daffodils,
and cut them to pieces.

In the latter part of the year, in November and
December, it is a good plan to dig up any unoccupied
ground into ridges, and leave it in that state during the
winter, that the frost may act upon it. The effect of
frost upon the ground so prepared is very beneficial, as
it breaks the clods aad pulverizes the more cloggy por-
tions, which fall down in a thaw as a fine soft mould.
When manure is dug into the ground, it should not be
dug in too deeply, about four or five inches being quite
sufficient in most cases.



WEEDING.

GARDENS will always produce a great deal more than is
wished for, in the shape of various herbs, shrubs, and
plants, called weeds; such as dandelions, couch-grass,
cow-parsley, chick-weed, and many other plants, which
go by the general name of weeds. These, if left to



94 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

their own natural growth, would soon cover the ground,
and take away from the garden plants the nutriment
in the soil designed for them, besides entangling their
roots, stems, and leaves; therefore, weeding is as in-
dispensable as digging. The young gardener should
make up his mind before he sets foot in his garden to
have no weeds in it; for however assiduous he may have
been in other respects, however he may have planted,
watered, dug, or attended to his garden, if it show a
crop of weeds, he is a bad gardener, and will be sure to
get laughed at. Weeds may either be pulled up by the
hand or cut up by the hoe. In both cases, the roots
iaust be cradicated. They must not be plucked from
the stem, or cut from the level ground by the edge of
the hoe, but hoed or plucked up, root and all; and
after they are got up, they are not be left about in
the ridges to take root and grow again, -but must be
cleared away and safely put into the pit, never again to
rise, but in the chemistry of good manure.



PLANTING AND SOWING.

VERYTHING in a garden must be planted in some way
or other, and there are many ways of planting and
sowing. Sowing relates more particularly to seeds, and
planting to the setting of plants that have been raised
from seed in the first instance. The sowing of seeds is a
very important work, and before seeds can be sown with
a prospect of their springing up properly, the prepara-
tion of the soil, the time of the year, and even the time
of day, must be taken into consideration. Some seeds
‘ perish in particular kinds of soil, while others thrive



GARDENING. 95

Juxuriantly in them. Onions like a rich soil, as do
cauliflowers and asparagus. Carrots and parsnips like
a loose or sandy soil, as do sea-kale and many other
plants. Some plants will only grow in bog earth; and
some thrive, such as strawberries, best in a clayey loam.
Attention to such matters must be given by the young
gardener, if he wish to have his garden what it ought
to be, ®



HOT-BEDS AND FRAMES.

Brrore we can sow many kinds of seeds in this country
in the open ground, it is necessary to raise them first in
a hot-bed, and for this reason,—many flowers common
in our gardens are not natives of our cold and variable
climate, but of one much warmer; and if we delay to
sow the seed of such plants and flowers till the warm
‘days of summer are fully set in, the plant has scarcely
time to grow into perfection before the chills of autumn
come on, and they perish before their blossoms, fruit,
or seeds come to perfection. But this may be obviated
by means of a frame and hot-bed, which every young
gardener ought to have, however
small it may be. One of the
simplest is the common garden or
cucumber frame, which may be
bought for a few shillings. This,
if about a yard square, should be
set upon alow framework of bricks,
within which a pit is dug, and filled with good manure»
over which some fine mould is placed, to the depth of
about six inches. Upon this mould the more delicate
F





96 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

kinds of flower-seeds may be sown at an early period of
the year,—varieties of all those found in the gardening
books under the head of tender annuals,—balsams,
French marigolds, tobacco, stocks, marigolds, gourds,
and sun-flowers. The seed must be sown carefully,—
not too thick, and occasionally looked at. In mild, open
weather, the glass should be raised a little, but in cold
weather kept down. The giving of water should be
managed with care, and the plants as they appear should
not be suffered to grow too rapidly, but be kept under,
or they will not bear to be transplanted when the time
comes for doing so.

In transplanting,’ care should always be taken not to
transplant too early, or in improper weather ; for if the
weather happens to be cold or wet, the tanden plants
will suffer very much, and probably fail. This would
be the case, not only with flowers, but with all the tender
kinds of plants, such as cauliflowers, and, therefore, the”
young gardener must keep his ‘‘weather eye”’ open, as
the sailors say, and not be too much in a hurry, as
young gardeners generally are.



OPEN CROPS.

In the sowing of open crops, care should also be taken
to sow at the proper time. Very early sowing is gene-
rally hazardous, but yet, if you would have your crops
come in soon, a little risk must be run. When seed is
sown in the open ground, it requires watching, and this
particularly applies to such crops as early potatoes or
beans. Sometimes potatoes are sown in February, with
the view to an early crop; and in April the young tender



GARDENING. | 97

sprouts appear above the ground. One night’s frost,
however, settles them,—down they go, black and jelly-
like to the earth; but if the weather be doubtful, the
thoughtful young gardener takes care to cover up the
tender shoots with dry leaves or straw, to break the icy
tooth of the frost, and save his crop. The same care
should be also bestowed upon any other vegetable of a
tender kind, and without this care, gardening would
come to nothing.

After seeds are sown, they have many natural ene-
mies. The slug, the snail, the wire-worm, the impudent
sparrow, and the most impudent and insolent chaffinch,
who all seem to have an idea that the seed is put mto
the ground entirely for their benefit. As soon as the
pea-shoot comes above the earth, the slug has a mouthful
in its tenderest moments ; after the shoot has in part
recovered from the gentle nibble, Master Sparrow swoops
down and picks off, as quick as he can, all the delicate
little sprouts by mouthfuls: to make a fit ending to
what-is so well begun, the chaffinch descends in the
most impudent manner, close to your face, and pulls up
stalk and pea both together, and flies away as uncon-
cerned as can be. Now it is of no use to stand with a
gun or a pair of clappers in your hand all the day after
these intruders, and the only protection is by a net, or
rows of twine strung with feathers, stretched over the
bed in rows, and a few other pieces of white twine cross-
wise in their immediate vicinity. Birds do not like the
look of any threads drawn across the ground, and they
will rarely fly where there appears danger of entangle-
ment; and this method is the best that can be adopted
for seed-beds. A (uy is also good; and there are few

I



98 THE BOOK OF SPORTS,

boys who do not know how to construct one. A Guy
is also particularly appropriate for the early Warwick
peas. As to slugs and caterpillars, they must be hunted
for and picked off; and if they abound in a garden, the
line of shooting peas, beans, or other seed, must be
dredged with a little slacked lime, which is an infalli-
able mode of protection. But mind the lime does not
blow into your eyes ; for, if it does, you will be worse
off than the caterpillars.



RAKING.

Wuen seeds are sown, the beds should be nicely raked.
Some seeds, such as carrot and parsnip seeds, should
be beaten down with the flat part of the spade, and
laid very evenly and nicely, The edges of the little
cross-paths should be sharp and straight, and the whole
put into a ship-shape order. The stones should be
raked off into the cross-paths, and may remain there
until the land is dug up in the autumn or winter,, when
they may be removed. There is a good deal to be done
with the rake in many ways, besides the raking of beds.
It is a very useful tool to job over a bed when some
kinds of seeds are sown: it also makes a very good
drill, and is especially useful in getting leaves from the
paths and borders; but it should be used with a light
hand, and care taken not to scratch the ground into

holes with it, as many young gardeners do.



HOEING.

Tux hoe is of very great use, both to hoe up weeds and
to form drills. We have spoken about its former use,



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'74421' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAYQ' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
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d77f8e8d6827c9e46bf3e607183468bbe42bdbd3
'2011-11-16T07:20:58-05:00'
describe
'38350' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAYR' 'sip-files00007.pro'
927fe33f764a8722189d16888c8916da
c4a19aa22dde336053f95a1c13ebe75f2c1ff488
'2011-11-16T07:21:19-05:00'
describe
'27396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAYS' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
0fa2944d8bd30787a890582ffe00c995
649710e25f3af3de962a2e5f455dc905e67770fd
'2011-11-16T07:23:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAYT' 'sip-files00007.tif'
bb3d8cd61c511c16bfa81b4d82ea377c
673b70dbab229c6e825d57099a8736fd1b014a37
'2011-11-16T07:21:07-05:00'
describe
'2121' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAYU' 'sip-files00007.txt'
703aecf90fc2f41a3cdaabcb33f382d3
3803848f1bd2a540a1fb6fcdce5845dc78ad3e5e
describe
'8553' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAYV' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
0e994f96b4778755d748167f25c5bfa2
6c2b7b4399e431257b99309e6373853996161f23
'2011-11-16T07:22:17-05:00'
describe
'988823' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAYW' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
3ade1352c6a0564cd0de001b1f83251d
40410f628d2881b7d89f3a4a32deeced7e11f527
describe
'68790' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAYX' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
4e3b1cf9142c332932b70fe5eb8429b7
ebc5b0d145404c3f7d0f7a7f0633ca701076033c
'2011-11-16T07:22:41-05:00'
describe
'16635' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAYY' 'sip-files00008.pro'
860c9077eda479199cd09d1225f8b9dd
a5c1fa4517b254bbf9dfd361e8a44fa6537f9a69
'2011-11-16T07:22:38-05:00'
describe
'24679' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAYZ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
171c1043a26b32c6ba4921ca1c8e7c6a
b410946470057ef1d01ce0d0be7f19acc16b7e21
'2011-11-16T07:23:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZA' 'sip-files00008.tif'
feb326a5c3730e31edca4cd97704a078
4d0db65360b3965ebad726d1921887c97b3106de
'2011-11-16T07:22:02-05:00'
describe
'685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZB' 'sip-files00008.txt'
bee95da9cd3f6edb1462da22937617e9
674b93513c074a317a53bad24c615f4f1810c1b9
'2011-11-16T07:21:03-05:00'
describe
'7600' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZC' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
b1bf770bfef636476331431c98d1edc1
64471568405956b04812e3db463795cc71eadac2
'2011-11-16T07:23:37-05:00'
describe
'955111' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZD' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
7977e8fdbf2f0a76648a965aee275899
695c9927000eb4db38e2fd7f1e4899f3d1c56bb1
'2011-11-16T07:21:27-05:00'
describe
'46707' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZE' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
3574749c37db9ebdb7d7eec284c156ad
2fb4e1d19ee98b602349cc2a036040f87e2336a3
'2011-11-16T07:21:46-05:00'
describe
'10089' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZF' 'sip-files00009.pro'
62628644c5db3dd6483d4c85e50fd64d
7e648b90152a2be508dc644838089f833907ce76
'2011-11-16T07:24:13-05:00'
describe
'16190' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZG' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
2fd7ab400f406b6db8e792588d6fcc8c
236b87be1d86f8adfe4d0f1117a6b09f46bcd120
'2011-11-16T07:24:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZH' 'sip-files00009.tif'
f94be93d7e2b9e3c8c3f6822fad7c7f9
cca77c4856cb7179680c54c215778c74c665f3fe
describe
'414' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZI' 'sip-files00009.txt'
e97e1a16f95eb7bee2ce860c786e8fc7
0a0cee7019ad9cc47f822bd84b57df4b230faad1
describe
'5377' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZJ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
f9da6bb8af3e86d76ed9f7e484977298
d1fe41684ae676abc12cf1a2cfd24ff9cce9d8d8
describe
'988866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZK' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
34b3ef1e59474ab1dfccdd9338807633
c3c90d2d23acdbd18ff032c10e39ce690b8ef180
'2011-11-16T07:23:39-05:00'
describe
'64737' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZL' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
2d30d90b49a376cfa73ba82b158075e7
043cec07e4467d26776e675c14e3d150da5cd588
'2011-11-16T07:24:31-05:00'
describe
'9139' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZM' 'sip-files00010.pro'
3e3c315a210ba0a2b96b1264ce1e87a7
0e473e1fe4edb077d6cfb2845c3490edd203e813
describe
'21956' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZN' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
1879ec7c128dbbc328abbc104149676a
bbd199c285f63faa4ac1de277973565455a362f0
'2011-11-16T07:23:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZO' 'sip-files00010.tif'
9edb9895732e0a6ca5e24073f8991d26
6762b83677951ec86fe1758a02b2438907e58426
describe
'429' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZP' 'sip-files00010.txt'
c78bedb1e4cc7fc99945439d7653de5b
1df2a1dbce3b28c5c34aebb92312b08a5dcbf0a1
'2011-11-16T07:24:18-05:00'
describe
'6725' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZQ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
661341b0fcbe1ffd8e07ea3debfb538a
3449a4a395383fe57116a0e02f0864e4bfbe0664
describe
'969074' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
907807496232f1675f1e7ccd618ba6cf
148d51bda0dc80fa798d58e34f6a37b91caff095
describe
'115209' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZS' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
aa65a6be30d0502b73a1b6451a74a4f5
0b0c38ce161e207b31751de9679b09538e4286d9
describe
'39279' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZT' 'sip-files00011.pro'
eb81eb188a63007828ccf1d5d1ab2ea2
24df8844945a5fff61ab847c2046588f0d71da64
'2011-11-16T07:22:36-05:00'
describe
'40909' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZU' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
74222fcdecdc50956866216166217999
94e6b49362593a45581a7acb0f2528c05ce497a7
'2011-11-16T07:21:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZV' 'sip-files00011.tif'
be6afa68778ecbc0a234a940ce57301a
14da2aea19567a5e78e7e6f86240e772549cce04
'2011-11-16T07:20:34-05:00'
describe
'1610' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZW' 'sip-files00011.txt'
7345e10ddcb04f87f88ced816f6002c7
13c520c4d417fbea48e4da2869e3037741e87ef7
'2011-11-16T07:21:10-05:00'
describe
'11038' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZX' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
995c5a54a7c5ab7431883a713ec65018
52571572bd7c91037a0237f060987a94e01e430b
'2011-11-16T07:24:12-05:00'
describe
'988767' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZY' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
5fef018a01301294fe1b220945f8fdbf
0e8c860c85ea398eca6abb3a82ac58d8df06a63f
'2011-11-16T07:21:39-05:00'
describe
'91495' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABAZZ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
90e2666929d6432a1fc513a6c1355159
6a395ed88e7affbd910d86d6d88a68e99071b272
describe
'28483' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAA' 'sip-files00012.pro'
4fdd8e4466a733febcd388150314d32f
2f9cbd75b30e12bff6d86352b70085d91d4bf159
'2011-11-16T07:21:15-05:00'
describe
'31421' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAB' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
2a6bb79b5aab921f76790e8416b1cde8
deba2eab567f88acdebffea82c27145175e762d8
'2011-11-16T07:22:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAC' 'sip-files00012.tif'
e1c68364fb51e143fa4674214f8895ac
6c267f8db97deb4740acdda4dfd1d8460c9ad2ee
'2011-11-16T07:21:05-05:00'
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAD' 'sip-files00012.txt'
3a0e8b59a2e5b94bf651838fdebd600d
18f709419630ae27337d7d68484a37f9fb6707ce
'2011-11-16T07:24:05-05:00'
describe
'8706' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAE' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
f374c98ed7f388435e7d9cd28cd3eeb1
21674d0f065625d06ff4e11682f41184b02b8122
'2011-11-16T07:24:32-05:00'
describe
'969052' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAF' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
1da00d804d00751d7588877b473807fb
7f020a1337ef0ea1a849bcac3c4c2d88c0a8981a
'2011-11-16T07:21:20-05:00'
describe
'101717' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAG' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
2ee104514ab9ae7473ac0a4eb3216319
402249e234d3f3c80de5f64df774b2bddcfb7029
describe
'21886' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAH' 'sip-files00013.pro'
2d70396dd7ad07a7738e5ccfa9978c57
5fcca7ef759e5c4b744459ed5411db5dc44cdb78
describe
'34857' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
f789e5b55f928a8a7481bca30b132df4
b99113f8f428429b52bfcc89347008811c3f2d6a
'2011-11-16T07:20:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAJ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
8f10c8a461b24c8c9a6683358d9c3e91
1a0533cff5dd7c13d2619ca5c17a759ddf66a3e8
'2011-11-16T07:22:44-05:00'
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAK' 'sip-files00013.txt'
291f607585b723dbc903096bd5765a14
aa5a306bf664df6a9e9ae8c439f45e1ba4fce080
'2011-11-16T07:23:41-05:00'
describe
'9800' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAL' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
e42c540cc2658549b0f322b37b0fe4a4
f0eb26ca3cb93a467c3e1d5bf1721bcdc85e3639
'2011-11-16T07:21:49-05:00'
describe
'988690' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAM' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
5f008999f251a41af46f100128e90032
ebb7bd9c95ddb699ebe0a3aab9bec7528bc1abdf
'2011-11-16T07:21:51-05:00'
describe
'80482' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAN' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
c5177213d489b24cebed00c8559c1344
62f7c319389a0de01e4abcfa712cfd9c22de9c2a
describe
'15127' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAO' 'sip-files00014.pro'
2a9a486ab355db4ef91755b58e131438
0362217a06ee7bb7c72bf6b7f6f0c22c1b04f2a4
'2011-11-16T07:23:34-05:00'
describe
'26582' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAP' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
58bb753c4c7a291bf6f559bc82fe2211
b84b86ebccdb81e81f0b99388ee2516a85846eae
'2011-11-16T07:23:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAQ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
036a77590d508d69156c1fa5228ba690
b02ab986819e5e363429ae6b1ab9627883303b7b
'2011-11-16T07:23:42-05:00'
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAR' 'sip-files00014.txt'
15f7fc779232944866619d9f25fee9a2
593c968768f7146f6c64dc527d013540ce319b60
'2011-11-16T07:22:03-05:00'
describe
'8028' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAS' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
c434b739bf0eac39f1578fb630745be9
1e3606b24d40b99f1cbcf6ed07c35f1faa5497d6
describe
'969082' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAT' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
25f2cb1af2c76205d0b77a166db4718a
a70a0c304fe283787ddbdd502855b890f763beba
'2011-11-16T07:23:45-05:00'
describe
'104833' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAU' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
da72025f316edc20c81f33854954b185
fb6148f687629a1f0108eb6ba39b65de7a70f064
'2011-11-16T07:19:52-05:00'
describe
'34426' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAV' 'sip-files00015.pro'
cf0d655d254e64b694c1ce211e864f23
0ee97d4ff56d8b349a26315de59e7601d8623797
'2011-11-16T07:20:03-05:00'
describe
'38243' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAW' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
5e0530bb48861f8b8bb00bf257dd74dd
e05a7dfb60f5b6633813dea81955c16d20ca4505
'2011-11-16T07:23:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAX' 'sip-files00015.tif'
059131445919a1940fa757ee9acb8a21
355fb16a28352fb0f2dd8941b89258a039a4ab56
'2011-11-16T07:23:36-05:00'
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAY' 'sip-files00015.txt'
9c28c15e900221b5f77ffa04a59ac88a
3823c4ab4176279c7fe246326e7d491d34a66cbf
'2011-11-16T07:21:52-05:00'
describe
'10366' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBAZ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4b79d617e9025655e55bee4f74cf612a
291b94cc4ec371463254ca2650f711f653a9f406
'2011-11-16T07:24:16-05:00'
describe
'988890' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBA' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
674f4cd10f5c6227f5571e6146094878
02f25a9865a43feb2b098684f4cedc1ae444d381
'2011-11-16T07:21:45-05:00'
describe
'73839' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBB' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
0ab08afd8ce3a8ae724507170a9ea03d
d7e5ca76d94bae338b83bb31f653f549eab590d4
'2011-11-16T07:22:45-05:00'
describe
'12754' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBC' 'sip-files00016.pro'
80e8da5e32af0ab19f2d5ec3b4f9e870
034a5c642e15fe36a06cc028d42985f2481da46a
'2011-11-16T07:23:51-05:00'
describe
'26872' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBD' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
4d61deaca14e3e594e0f1f76ed6a052e
74bccff18e3d92bf9d9efe1bcaf87c2516a1d4af
'2011-11-16T07:21:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBE' 'sip-files00016.tif'
b937f4fd3c155809ddd962483f5e0a12
c7848e4c66ec22de50bc1c0777d1cf4e3388978c
describe
'531' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBF' 'sip-files00016.txt'
a4fa14cb400f5efd69f13ae7aa66ce80
9928cf80836ea8a4dd466844750099047bf5a150
'2011-11-16T07:21:08-05:00'
describe
'8085' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBG' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
d93550c7d59ad49407d123125fead4d4
0fbb7ada95d296fe78907316345f0e19d43ed6e5
describe
'969084' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBH' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
b45a3993f4c39a980446004502aa540b
bc0b2b03a67e2cd9d5b0c627cf4d9ca0607f63ff
describe
'122800' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBI' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
09383b6b7e7f049777a693d208dbb8f8
50830c3d1df74d850ac4a432075ecf1b14225265
'2011-11-16T07:23:01-05:00'
describe
'43025' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBJ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
f17f8a97317f4179bcd8873ad4aff104
4887c2f5c72415c1326718b5cd228114f65c05fd
'2011-11-16T07:21:55-05:00'
describe
'44331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBK' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
f17d94be2aff049f924e79836879da82
681c6e68c4414d14a2d302bc5e67ddc2dc652053
'2011-11-16T07:23:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBL' 'sip-files00017.tif'
41879ff70f03243ea17fb0a00961a6ec
907cd07df823b176a1eb65dae04e889009d81914
'2011-11-16T07:22:42-05:00'
describe
'1716' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBM' 'sip-files00017.txt'
c9ca647c47ad07bfb23795b9bce87494
e97f7e4a24956a538f76de09b85121eb83df3120
'2011-11-16T07:19:34-05:00'
describe
'11765' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBN' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
751d8aefebb022bcff6d789255a51604
fcb05385f4a0d65c46bb2efece257011d2aa64ef
'2011-11-16T07:23:18-05:00'
describe
'988882' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBO' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
33bf869c1e03c76d95c795cea35f35aa
a573227a0b7660e2a37dcd89adbb9e0a67f51442
'2011-11-16T07:24:09-05:00'
describe
'115332' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBP' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
a419915d67c42f24563867e081501524
651353bbcf7a09a071d1aad826872e0eabce584c
'2011-11-16T07:22:49-05:00'
describe
'38652' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBQ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
619d090c9f367fa484f2064a995ce389
264687d4eb310304ef33308166a8ad701e0832d5
describe
'40928' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBR' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
2296e24c554ee8a487a2b208674cfe1e
aa5fa4d095cf6f7cdc2e35a918fa7af4339f3ab2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBS' 'sip-files00018.tif'
6e44fd0696e734e02fdc81ca7ef214ab
c8ec8eb957e7b128e0b906f3c98051c69933c460
'2011-11-16T07:21:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBT' 'sip-files00018.txt'
2f25d8508827ea279cddb5431b767e7d
f045ef4b0b78bb23b489586a881db02c8ca15ee7
'2011-11-16T07:21:58-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11467' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBU' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
64601f3e738f62411cabe2b7ba610ee8
10880dd728adb689ffc3d6bc5ed1a4d402dd4407
'2011-11-16T07:20:50-05:00'
describe
'969088' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
294ed337c11a1e2a58fc979ff4cfc336
c54a54c6f4d8694c0f06de679e883b742e45c73d
'2011-11-16T07:19:35-05:00'
describe
'112916' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBW' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f50d52ffa439d86b601ffbe20c868ca9
8fc7e9cb0582741730c8bba932f75a6704ca7d97
describe
'40470' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBX' 'sip-files00019.pro'
95e7e0391f8703cbe9c5edcbca819e71
e9fc823e35d1eace47c742a7868ae628553bc596
'2011-11-16T07:20:53-05:00'
describe
'40913' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
50bd4511c5e8b5925fc34ab61ed6a5c6
6e7679620320982d23d489acb3983da2b5c4f1ab
'2011-11-16T07:22:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBBZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
ef2f17c2cb0c84f88288a45799c023ad
ecd2bdf323b0c7bf8249838d7ffc867cab9ffc70
'2011-11-16T07:21:00-05:00'
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
14939b7344e21948700a559b0cd337ed
dcf99f5735be2bf24c135ba1675390706490f08c
'2011-11-16T07:22:13-05:00'
describe
'10979' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCB' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
68230edaaf1adbd212737e4fbc389d75
b83d455efd339f42810c00497db8000524ad588a
'2011-11-16T07:24:23-05:00'
describe
'988829' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f86715c0789a38cd7af3c35888523e8c
f98f4cf99463a379e6a02e8afd61bdfc156bc18f
'2011-11-16T07:23:35-05:00'
describe
'63857' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
40ea0515822ef6c560d5780573366e10
d9ec0045b515a9f7656aa1fd9c860de7fcb56804
describe
'15790' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCE' 'sip-files00020.pro'
4eab9ed6303f732347ea398dfe976d5d
c778b41f67967b8f44a32446fec48e4cb95193c3
'2011-11-16T07:23:12-05:00'
describe
'21445' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCF' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
1e5e7ea8700e0665edfe945eea32ecaa
d66e35351fd681148aa8ce52dbaa5de2cf6afcc6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCG' 'sip-files00020.tif'
95f721781bda28d138d0bf05cb385cc0
eebe7421f03c724c677670573e9777b0dc7a19f4
'2011-11-16T07:21:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCH' 'sip-files00020.txt'
4778197b588e25ac0349c7f8d53f0c99
456698a1b2687f8a87b53ad53ff7db8b76c4d324
'2011-11-16T07:20:32-05:00'
describe
'5994' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCI' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
e4cb4a761edc0294221dab5e27073071
fa133d390cb268fec73c99f688bf2073e17460e4
'2011-11-16T07:22:20-05:00'
describe
'791944' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCJ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
af15afe60ae9e4f922115a8238b23509
e54b01e252af2424cc8c122e1b8e52e9a9fc39c9
'2011-11-16T07:20:46-05:00'
describe
'20925' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
6c0ad4c30f1ba0aaf777f51afd6326fa
35c766a1b961f7226437ee2748420831633140a6
'2011-11-16T07:24:21-05:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCL' 'sip-files00021.pro'
549f4fd3a76a6ff14244fdda47f2ee06
06eddb6d0f540cff6990c2b1f57ae7fb8f95cdbc
describe
'5025' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCM' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
4b433ba81bbe7fdfd5da0decac552ad1
1b2699ea0a4ea0c485096117bed850b0219ff266
'2011-11-16T07:22:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCN' 'sip-files00021.tif'
a554cbca47fd88349a3968c656c863e4
6b85ffb54c84d5defab3660d51df6a483708b477
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCO' 'sip-files00021.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCP' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
968ddecb301afae1b7ad0c691cca679c
2b02eb8a20d03aa74d81fb37303e971307a3d4ff
'2011-11-16T07:21:24-05:00'
describe
'988804' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCQ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d1922f64a5d2744ac0f919c8d10b8fd0
fbb49ee7ddcd5d7eb7a8c009991b8a8222ed647a
'2011-11-16T07:22:48-05:00'
describe
'92514' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCR' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
54665977f06a94453208c831c2eacd39
37b8b315cd590e714ed4a8299f58e5d418121cb4
describe
'10498' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCS' 'sip-files00022.pro'
70847ca4742a2748f10dbe3434ff61fb
7e51c1013051f514e116ab4654b5d71fe564dc0b
'2011-11-16T07:20:37-05:00'
describe
'28136' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCT' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
a8b3dbf8a8072582f46064589c7667d9
dc4c417cdc39217f9c38351ff436d77b1459182d
'2011-11-16T07:24:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCU' 'sip-files00022.tif'
776ce8b854843cc566762fb49448f0a8
15a3a4313e182f648c60febf9419826ef706c24e
'2011-11-16T07:23:13-05:00'
describe
'453' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCV' 'sip-files00022.txt'
87d78c1b26162868fa89037651f7dbe2
b0bd068fa428273d6d6d33708d6ba7bf6ba530b1
'2011-11-16T07:20:56-05:00'
describe
'7571' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCW' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
aa38b39e7c520cbfed998bdf153349d0
cd2e31ce8faab2176eecfa77f4d0fcc9d9e1de09
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCX' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
ad1153c2aa1986534f7d37485c0e5e78
5ec22f345334372d9ed9f1f767efefc8306b2c1f
describe
'111989' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCY' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
e1d528b58ef5cf2ce667483325ffc6c3
2225b1d14a393685a8d681233fc4d4af5410d7f9
'2011-11-16T07:20:14-05:00'
describe
'37730' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBCZ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
9c7cf3d558dc33d188faf23bfdc5385f
67d6b1de81795f8067613a8a24b049191b471497
describe
'39605' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDA' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
a5a76b6f442a3e4890533b54a823fe46
18eb8cde006ac0f27df201573dd6f1a18ddccf5b
'2011-11-16T07:22:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDB' 'sip-files00023.tif'
fefe7316fd83c29a9131cd2abf464637
ff572f8de2b49e95f1efe9dfcaa175ee9918c141
'2011-11-16T07:21:50-05:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDC' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ec1efebf69b5803da41ec9a75805e490
527f4017186df3c12c5baadf448d55e3d47e0f74
'2011-11-16T07:23:08-05:00'
describe
'10682' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDD' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
b7d65e1b88e2bb55560d9ce89e4338dd
2742b56c46ea2ebb2dc7b3ba3a0372f40fdc5bbb
describe
'988796' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDE' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e0b453cd439d0ade7f780b84cb59c9b2
c564ef8fa2e228285942f264bf392b540bcdb393
'2011-11-16T07:19:48-05:00'
describe
'113442' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDF' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
880f78a2ec6fc0f281c7ca87c29a3efb
e676a67be3c3978c9fa207026d233b848980eb1a
'2011-11-16T07:21:26-05:00'
describe
'37799' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDG' 'sip-files00024.pro'
ed41ee44f035eb3b02ad71b946a3e7fb
ab79979f5a79076bf97812ae0bffd0830feac0fb
describe
'39578' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
249deea6cb7230e30d2ebb4d4656eb5f
27f0b037aeabfcfa365f9df7eb5ffd2f1c261bed
'2011-11-16T07:20:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDI' 'sip-files00024.tif'
9df140d519a19f38a2af7f52e21a1acb
8de42fe286323c4855d4ba33f7dc0efbb0afd895
'2011-11-16T07:22:04-05:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDJ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
e887117c47f7422e93744883982a3739
66e9d31ad62ae1ed353aa4cb0348f1dcbae629f5
'2011-11-16T07:21:30-05:00'
describe
'10528' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDK' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
a1207675cfcefacd67032fd13a126f30
0bf10037798b651207931ee5dada36d97bd1abf4
'2011-11-16T07:20:06-05:00'
describe
'969086' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDL' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
3d6710ab3dba74e1077cb93a24e8a192
f95ca9033558eeae575da1e20319bdc6b2d00b56
describe
'93454' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDM' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
d7be7c9101456acf37baad23c6c2a017
b43d8023079e3f5ab081e261115b8837d2624104
describe
'25627' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDN' 'sip-files00025.pro'
d6ecde103d9a8d150f34558511ce15a6
483648a7cf653a08cf7ca504f77d0a1ace13223a
describe
'32902' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
c3b3a729776492d368aacfa545084b0b
35fa8e76d14e0c47b0e6fbcd65cdfd99312968db
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDP' 'sip-files00025.tif'
f003873518a14fa49a1fd0e7ff8c149c
84cb4a15f121ea3676a85ac8bed5ddd041056116
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDQ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
a391a73753fbc690cb92eca653cc9a8a
aa7b0d429efac77b56c26a31fb29f9025a152496
'2011-11-16T07:20:16-05:00'
describe
'9502' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDR' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
9029fa234c8a143488f9d7fc5256cb26
ca579871a572f1e7ac2ea7e078d19c36a22f0b37
'2011-11-16T07:22:09-05:00'
describe
'988740' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDS' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
56521464677b661e05866cb5185be5fb
b762c0454e9f192f581a5ee098c9578b31c8ddd9
'2011-11-16T07:20:33-05:00'
describe
'104343' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDT' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
2a564658673b8ac4d477c99e78818264
6a677de8a4f6d935487428d0d3ef434e74590d55
'2011-11-16T07:23:22-05:00'
describe
'36069' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
612632d1f7d9e8e8ae126646f7aafbf7
00e92499231ff51b59605865ee08d75737c1dafe
'2011-11-16T07:23:25-05:00'
describe
'36915' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
35fde5c9d6881cef4276acbb403f58bc
28e43fa4164b6d18298bfb9c3c63cbd94291bc70
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDW' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f45473c5b3ade77f1b30304e408af49d
9b2ebfca09ab687b6960ad838405b2120752abdb
'2011-11-16T07:19:53-05:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDX' 'sip-files00026.txt'
f2b99e136f70534a328ab3bd2050edd7
c6738664c224a6d39de76e0788d95ff1d3701ed3
'2011-11-16T07:21:47-05:00'
describe
'9862' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDY' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
8cb4106296663ddd1fd1aadeadcd2f34
76f6c1a290a0cbbf7cacd454d1463ab7903019f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBDZ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
9325f44fbfc915fc19cf30d6338a5e56
41d45fe4ebd4b3ca5c7a3dccdaaabf32550ccc4a
describe
'119778' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEA' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
d0f7086c55b98781c1c195c8d886f0a4
766ff7dbacbcf08adabc00dc14151320a39229e9
describe
'42934' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEB' 'sip-files00027.pro'
5e2bab1643c3efc4c67bd68fefad21d5
ff67c23b55df9cc593f4fc7972392c6a89cfbf26
describe
'42519' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEC' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
094743f044848a23d075947240c721fb
532c3585512b1ab021aa2a8b9f9147d76d246055
'2011-11-16T07:23:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBED' 'sip-files00027.tif'
30a0a35d29bc74364618651a632f1d4c
79a217345abcf5686626d901ff239cc5c39eb6e8
'2011-11-16T07:22:33-05:00'
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEE' 'sip-files00027.txt'
667396879648faac10f7b77ff20f5a4a
5f5aeb1ced5ef094042302a17bba0e45fde82062
describe
'11232' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEF' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
dd17e2a411037681f5414ef9a065ee5a
fbad5c998511e625fe20dcbe91d7ee8877292332
'2011-11-16T07:19:55-05:00'
describe
'988861' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEG' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
0a2b412c80c8125520d95b8daa005a5f
524e25f0bd7e2ec0b2174960f66f4ad6e3f6ec85
describe
'112422' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEH' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
f23c1ca07cb74ea36e6869b7b1f302f5
03f504b5bc968d75461e6d2b647d14c39a0aea9d
'2011-11-16T07:22:22-05:00'
describe
'38268' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEI' 'sip-files00028.pro'
ce0210d11002b68610249fdd50a430ec
6dc1701b5ad08d64bdb197c87d1d449c4f31e5e8
'2011-11-16T07:20:26-05:00'
describe
'40080' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEJ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
5897053daa148aecac7934fc536019f5
5c8783fdeeb7099b14997e03e02aedba3a393f61
'2011-11-16T07:22:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEK' 'sip-files00028.tif'
9a72b7919866240d0bcd1c97fca5a242
903b882b98d818151a2fb8b7f3ff395e0a7349b0
'2011-11-16T07:22:35-05:00'
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEL' 'sip-files00028.txt'
e1f1531d2b75947ab3d11a44bae2ca9b
aed162326881d19a9d03a21791e6c1ab22dc061b
'2011-11-16T07:22:54-05:00'
describe
'10706' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEM' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
5f5658e6f34246899c2dda6fb3781115
c6c5481fe73ac92f08ca17618c1e5b062a821b55
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEN' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
5387d6e19af6ea9af8cbd6a465f18f38
3e14cf3aedd39073b4101064dd3fad6373a5621c
'2011-11-16T07:21:37-05:00'
describe
'116844' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEO' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
602ae564a5bb8643b6a6c9f85e8d7d87
3f037a56813d48e7684a2d0ddf02d30e853a0bb0
'2011-11-16T07:20:05-05:00'
describe
'33851' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEP' 'sip-files00029.pro'
8fbe6fd02c18bdf37d24661ee35d982e
a8c65dfef1d077d43a2ea88f77b061e3705fc658
'2011-11-16T07:22:10-05:00'
describe
'41427' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEQ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
d5a51de7a5e141df2a447b77d98be0d9
44e57cb345f928a1fe42fb2263573b54a25c57f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBER' 'sip-files00029.tif'
c7622bf65c30762da9107ea954f6fbda
00c5b9026189ba480f393ff257dfbf5a6b48d851
'2011-11-16T07:19:27-05:00'
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBES' 'sip-files00029.txt'
1d3a66983c157f47e276b612e2c594dc
efc08d8aa5566e048080aa6207936805860dd382
'2011-11-16T07:22:00-05:00'
describe
'11153' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBET' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
13a2741ac9df1194f3fd41c2e8c31e2a
d58e7444167fdb7ec24e84fd7aacfdadb77bd837
'2011-11-16T07:23:16-05:00'
describe
'988889' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEU' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
e596444046b26e959c0816dc1bab5cf4
4e10ff44fd33bc2244ee95b21abea49dde853c78
describe
'126382' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEV' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
b89f38d38810f3b70e21a488f605639e
2a9698cf4a5664c1a4613805462520362e7ef86a
describe
'43232' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEW' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b66c8e4756bdc7fc2d9d6298f60a57d5
b5e336ba51dc1cc4109dabcf4729c43a76372292
'2011-11-16T07:23:47-05:00'
describe
'44731' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEX' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
2dc2433987f2f8150f8832a81f080463
933cbfc0d89217e73a0fc41a51a6456073559b80
'2011-11-16T07:22:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEY' 'sip-files00030.tif'
ab7fd4766da7fc6015d883dfd5e4af91
82be4c9017e398c80c8298b0af6385cec2ef61fd
describe
'1745' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBEZ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
e4d69dde21ca55e4ea70603782d6d36c
32fed5d959f21228cc40dc07c7e348cb07f3b710
'2011-11-16T07:22:11-05:00'
describe
'11241' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFA' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
7aa4200d79758df92a01a23e24b1cbee
007b849970dc0ed2ceeb8ce1af77be85721935d2
describe
'968991' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFB' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
c73b1d6f0e6bdd831f095f57739bfeda
6483afab4ba7bcd9eb9c9b8c482698e6f76f01af
describe
'126058' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
f78e75e36d59c1ead3d3109235e1c223
cfa41777390c5bad88b92c46e219085b452b8bd6
'2011-11-16T07:21:12-05:00'
describe
'45139' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFD' 'sip-files00031.pro'
2fbf209637f62eb61f6afb973f83bbdc
2f8e1bf7a25269678ed5e6d45eb022e2b0e4456e
describe
'44681' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFE' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
4ee03ecfa2db98e1b20f1bccc64371af
f7dc2efb0117bffcbe3100517240434f8bec1435
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFF' 'sip-files00031.tif'
825693ba88d218dfd6607c08aeaa9b5a
6a3b7e06045c2af351020f08994b04357a75c554
describe
'1796' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFG' 'sip-files00031.txt'
d5f8fefb0f3d4450ff6229329c5a52fa
27a05df6795f22d1bc82e4cffe69431992899972
'2011-11-16T07:22:37-05:00'
describe
'11521' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFH' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
c377a96ee4d1140acfecf984266c8f0f
58ac4ccac5e306f824c232ddecea3b480a693e0c
'2011-11-16T07:22:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
551ac5040609e792986ba5f205c124e0
38ef9055df8465c9f4ad7b1473c4470cb1b717e4
'2011-11-16T07:22:57-05:00'
describe
'122139' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
94bbb44b9e812bc5e097fe9ba4416bbe
81b3beebe277e9449644d6134526a6aecc6aec0b
'2011-11-16T07:19:43-05:00'
describe
'42602' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFK' 'sip-files00032.pro'
22596cbe09c198588ae06ea42d958d17
4a144f6da9af93d458cdaadeb780601eba9e7363
describe
'42457' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFL' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
16c1b56037bfa12f2f9373e394705949
387e547bc03f7e440f1f79643f9c9bd87b826221
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFM' 'sip-files00032.tif'
29b5fe0419fbc5ee048038f6305044eb
cc23cc6f370b80d66085f8183161d6531f971b25
describe
'1708' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFN' 'sip-files00032.txt'
dd01b6a66ab99e2583ea4fac238e4749
7792246fc2793aef79ab971afb0e20b7f4980a9e
describe
'11029' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFO' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
39f233362084f8e9d63ed2836022e683
1800e82e6524e19f2d5fdf5fe69c8e1aa6440c3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c6ade0d51e787af7e6557626f869c7b1
e0a44c2f14a441e624d872ae3749a0e47e13f277
describe
'113809' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
855958031423b9cb1bf9c79e0c3dd3a0
43b793242501dfc98cd364f9c77787de082f7674
describe
'38606' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
fcd98a44d3046c0ade4c53b8a4ff5c9f
6a9fda2268173adde965574beab620680ebb332c
describe
'40356' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFS' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
eaaabd964d9828ba4c226e4da85857c7
0b048f981e33d9f426ca98e7b76e2d32b737a232
'2011-11-16T07:20:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFT' 'sip-files00033.tif'
dddd9d61b989d2a09b3bc3b6ba795b34
8a30f093216e249db995fd64996491cb647a7e73
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFU' 'sip-files00033.txt'
79aeb7a00e2cd67b6d63ec40c9922809
64044f3eddf2cbf05a8738272b372343fc533eb7
'2011-11-16T07:22:58-05:00'
describe
'10606' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFV' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
dab4961e1dfbfa25af2d30a039ed1123
96c19144bced359c4c4b4b5ee000050721551fa4
describe
'988847' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFW' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
f8d64f18b2bf09723387711c85dfd51f
17fb5dc03fe810a39a8cad40a3e3ca5f7cc54bf6
'2011-11-16T07:21:56-05:00'
describe
'112266' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFX' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
8cdf72adf9f8eb286ef401f54f3c69d9
9d3a6f0b14d55b1de1bcd56e1e8d6d946f5bca04
describe
'23487' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFY' 'sip-files00034.pro'
823b505234cb23e5b6138cca04ab8c12
65c9fb8dbc0e527007ae81d95650f0b9fff515bb
'2011-11-16T07:19:49-05:00'
describe
'38564' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBFZ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
1b6482f8fe375a387c1aa6d34ab0e012
84e6bf3e64a00134fffe90d5677b139630f3e0f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGA' 'sip-files00034.tif'
2c376f09ff52d84af15a6bbeb7579415
b0960a1bd466be424790c81a65c157158ecab510
'2011-11-16T07:22:32-05:00'
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGB' 'sip-files00034.txt'
93ee5555f421c4228f7fb2431d6f2f1f
2242b872c2a8e62b20cac0e253695cb35e14bb54
'2011-11-16T07:24:28-05:00'
describe
'10510' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGC' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
379dc986d2bc40da937517ebcd521683
4702ee44f1deef1a097916dbed84127b04fd53b8
'2011-11-16T07:23:09-05:00'
describe
'969078' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGD' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
5ddf4befdd0b705749cc334f70a17a04
2e74238271bb733f22f85383331b5db4011181ab
describe
'103697' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGE' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
1d8d419974f504e6e6ff33ff4467f8d9
3181b9fddbda10489dca12b87e51651d8838854f
'2011-11-16T07:19:24-05:00'
describe
'34884' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGF' 'sip-files00035.pro'
1d5dc77b8e245c1bb819c4bc48aa5f41
bcb2dba5ea527e3c51b141cfb1c2998de2d5db67
describe
'37431' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGG' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
205bd15aceaae205f3c63cbe72671091
1e06136ac44e8678b814b2a97ef7524c5b9f02ef
'2011-11-16T07:24:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGH' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d3a7a626ba2212c76a00e242df82f858
0f9c29cd1ba362a79dee7742b8872d6a2c4d0fd1
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGI' 'sip-files00035.txt'
7f9d5b6b61da3a1f58a56b1446ff7eeb
ff57053182920602d4abb908539e770ffbbf7899
'2011-11-16T07:23:40-05:00'
describe
'10033' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
67f5bd98b48139b6f19637b365990d56
42dc57e643a113e89551dd4f1c7db3a2b3cbff95
'2011-11-16T07:24:25-05:00'
describe
'988886' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGK' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
5d241fa213d65073500ec98f32d35ebd
f879de4311fe82bc4531b4f455c47ba1fd768c0a
'2011-11-16T07:20:28-05:00'
describe
'122076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGL' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
a5ab3834c1be34a615b6d0bd0f86140f
d196474ca029e71aad28e90cc5679a0147b2765b
'2011-11-16T07:20:20-05:00'
describe
'42224' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGM' 'sip-files00036.pro'
15f9699d2a187a62be013ed6bcb1af48
3513d066c8bdd4ba3e0623809db329d279c68048
'2011-11-16T07:23:30-05:00'
describe
'43258' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGN' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
e4adf11589cba91a9a48554e34cae2f8
1bce066672e896b74dcaa644a51bbead1e47cfe2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
edda29c2af53ed0726f40c718fbe0e44
671889deae24f83a1a1b78f76c492d9611bf1f6f
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
3fd094b5bf27b398183c977a02162ed9
03ea21b804ca493bf2da0ad62e6eb40c7100f826
describe
'10921' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGQ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
9071c4f7196183ecc5e166d666d37251
89f01d10b2d1449c1e68d6f188392bc383767437
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGR' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
5652f0cd8133433c3a5485d29318ffea
42d20e7ed70cb816dc93629d82ee131f90e5f399
'2011-11-16T07:20:07-05:00'
describe
'55786' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGS' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
06e906489e14070f17a1e5e9369c0f83
183ca26978129d79d0761b786e5b8375cbdf6ce0
describe
'12782' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGT' 'sip-files00037.pro'
72a468b74ed83efaee546835289ff010
eac09e1945a467f28398a1d41ef8deea7d957eed
'2011-11-16T07:23:04-05:00'
describe
'18421' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGU' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
710bea77bdc31968436408a829f0df5f
84f1bb9757b179fbb3946db4a09f29748d0b44d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGV' 'sip-files00037.tif'
24beddfaa5ae3f96b8a4e7927fa039c8
035c422011a174c24925c546dd2c0644f4eb8fca
'2011-11-16T07:23:57-05:00'
describe
'524' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGW' 'sip-files00037.txt'
a9a2915b63e7eed2c3d5deb3c4cf35d4
da1d65f6a0ace333841e1aa344d7ba11b30d0aff
describe
'5198' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGX' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
4af99c3af4fb7f5201cbf23e11e73594
66846cdae3145e987f266a3eaad75bf608374552
describe
'988871' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGY' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
d8a3f4023481d966e3370d7a1195815c
7deb8352e88d8357d825f2a60c3254905e31896f
describe
'108705' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBGZ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
9eec4882155832db3e5ea10c0fb889c8
7ffd8ca257595c388024055ae430d26465d9d576
describe
'30771' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHA' 'sip-files00038.pro'
4e6d2cda18f9c6cec9edbec4b81a63fc
e7d72e2a87033658c83c5d79d6f4de1842506f3d
'2011-11-16T07:20:31-05:00'
describe
'36986' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHB' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
196fd878399770db1f4629d777f1561a
a6c2eee0fb9bbea0f466bf000b7ba33bbc972f0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
64cf44a301e2a69083f3e36b89f28cc6
d7bb0f826e13d46f9c2612ed5f14ccc40e926bb5
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHD' 'sip-files00038.txt'
e2e9459c4560a4864b0a433f2a62588b
cd7e0f8369f8834c828efd491c7ea1160687fc39
'2011-11-16T07:21:57-05:00'
describe
'9477' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
b1b6228354ccaa231df362258893ce9b
8deb8a04706eed4798a636fb67a12d3d31806c24
'2011-11-16T07:19:25-05:00'
describe
'969066' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHF' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
5da44319e1978165295981aab7b17871
07ffb0afa79ecd1079e03681d59731d7b587f371
describe
'106742' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
339effe6aaad801a6180c2ee73a5d20b
0ab92ee9e21c9cbe4c1a671111e3d255fb7c2156
describe
'32310' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHH' 'sip-files00039.pro'
2c45c6d08b6abaee0d12c1c2a3e2907e
fee7f1a341df036c645b3a3be627c01fc553bfea
describe
'36796' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
c32878d02c0725449f54c96b9031a4ff
e4a4b864f5e247f0a251c2ee6a8ad47911ec5b49
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHJ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
40fa1df086231d0e9b477f533aebeedb
49f269c3edd4906894335334145c9710b720cb21
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHK' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f8f27907469c615ced4e44fb9831f86f
c92d3eee01183de3a8430b016e51a5a1916406cd
'2011-11-16T07:21:29-05:00'
describe
'10027' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHL' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
38e92dd5ac4619b4e096c0e1064a2c2a
3eedb0db69a639f33106cb0bdf1c3fc6818d9804
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHM' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
02f137c1e5b86224781993270c3402cf
92b265281377f0d10dfc2c8a1393f834b1799ce2
describe
'118706' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHN' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
c516e6c3c19c5c391e80a1471575834d
45e78dba248658bf9965e6bb76a1d8f9f163c808
'2011-11-16T07:24:15-05:00'
describe
'35079' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHO' 'sip-files00040.pro'
37923177324b68b0d7c39549ab2be3f9
ef00ed7ee03159e7c4d06d7ddd9c8953e5812308
'2011-11-16T07:22:25-05:00'
describe
'39980' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHP' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
75443b5c65200b96168ff14d63d470f9
53b04426d7a7f3c3577aa93e47efbb003bde1046
'2011-11-16T07:20:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHQ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d8c98d627fd8c99f4bf710f5243a185b
817447a76444a092446d7d5614e320b9a7b970e7
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHR' 'sip-files00040.txt'
53fb4c176a450d46e1506c4e8a6dc3cc
7ad928150694e22df722c149de4f1d9fa488a89c
describe
'10615' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHS' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
ac8cd2d7898873cc2eca15d9aab9c023
7c701c1f28341724a94e59f9ad1d554d38965bbc
'2011-11-16T07:21:02-05:00'
describe
'969039' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHT' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
6624f6bdf1ba84d51408ed1d4bb5421e
240ae4c4fe64e2619ffc59c8f3038246ed347271
describe
'134708' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHU' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
b9b9011e7b7c95d301dc584ae9eace02
142a608a564384b49494d7fdf67f3d4c4d158de0
describe
'45308' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHV' 'sip-files00041.pro'
2a4d19df92abc8c0bc93d48b9e81a804
b44bdf1bf727aaacf01a7fdd5265901b37181d84
'2011-11-16T07:23:44-05:00'
describe
'46365' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHW' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
6f62d0117a4c5fe31a19601ce6dbf111
93322144d1b4c72ade7623675b4ed4ebba92cb5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHX' 'sip-files00041.tif'
2909fc6aaebce199229762b5512fe453
4cc1c7f3b38ce5060227eb1bfb54d27fdace6dc2
'2011-11-16T07:23:10-05:00'
describe
'1801' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHY' 'sip-files00041.txt'
fc43b75829ac2becb801164078697b60
ee1ed66879847e69018679d33bf97fda613a9c2e
'2011-11-16T07:21:22-05:00'
describe
'12358' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBHZ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
69f311b7bff70b4147fd9648dfcdde81
7905691b72e37e7bc5f7dfac845ad3add44ddfa8
describe
'988773' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIA' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
1883bd998bac26725921515c3ed117e9
d1d96ddbd1554b838b92072c75a9daf6699990ab
describe
'125355' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIB' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
cd1808863b196df07b5e99bd11c7d44f
e7ee6094cf275514c4276bc9f70b78f632a7acc1
describe
'39303' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIC' 'sip-files00042.pro'
0830e241bdc448e250f885ac1e3b1e8b
698fc591a10726d9df2416966f7be4106df8ad26
describe
'42494' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBID' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
b9ff5e6dab666d43c7ef76d5428b5220
38e7ad865b7722b73f4471ee9a543713ac205512
'2011-11-16T07:22:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIE' 'sip-files00042.tif'
d5896792b735c1b8494cd577a58e0058
8318eace7f79a443a7d532370b100b388ba77c13
'2011-11-16T07:23:56-05:00'
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIF' 'sip-files00042.txt'
997bb885aea18972d6279a66115937b7
f033b9973668e9adbf008602835ec4dee3f42b19
'2011-11-16T07:24:20-05:00'
describe
'11057' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIG' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
fc4b3bbfe2ca55b8eb2cc09d8f25fe4e
3f5c5967de536d0cc8c237a1ef90ee42a2a18e2b
describe
'969067' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIH' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
a559482dbb2e091b7d373d0170604d25
a97c4c65cc423ea03ee4c83ef5ee93940364864c
describe
'108714' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBII' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
edd182347fa0c32e5c58482e61d0a4f4
bbcd18623e9f4b1b9037f0819838917b7f4f8278
describe
'27375' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIJ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
94e41e6c699bbb771761f9ead7d3bc99
7fc2396119cb3d477dafdc2bd74c4ac872c4f78a
describe
'37012' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIK' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a0d4bf80e7590366325b0e99e2182934
cfb10df926ae219bf21f10376a69c24aa29e7824
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
2bf078d121f963f6624fd9e3805b3c09
63269917b532d55662a332a49481a02f280540f3
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
12332a42743d0e364a0ebc782e00f919
2f7303f37e92eeb97a4c3e1a53935eeefdeb634a
'2011-11-16T07:23:06-05:00'
describe
'10502' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIN' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
a2a23b2358e1bec29f52181e3870bc45
3922b52efb7f85f515ab36639578a167dad1110d
describe
'988838' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
cda89124d78a0246afc657c1f0f7bad8
28ff06986f68f03a7b640011bb77a5e4aa845aac
describe
'117746' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
316b03c5aeec6ad1d52b15891ca95652
2bda6c3ba68c2c4a59ef039fbf993817c8b26c90
describe
'31006' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
f71f3ca0888cbe2ca76046858fb9a76e
806dc623a98886bd0f3ae2d5fcee5045337dfa3a
describe
'39743' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIR' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
16833561ff62b48301485b77a6b1de0a
382c7475527ef6070e7ecdf7aea29f0af8f85bba
'2011-11-16T07:22:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
02f088f3fd1c2d338689311ef9566393
0ed18c4651707c7ee6ca00e7670d9559d6e16d53
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIT' 'sip-files00044.txt'
651072120b05c360ed934ac26746c744
2fa97588bec672a49eebc6e830681dea040879b2
'2011-11-16T07:23:33-05:00'
describe
'10842' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
60b51a5ddca068477c508f8b32090e98
bdb3fb131ae899cd01f0391fd14866587affd8e0
'2011-11-16T07:20:57-05:00'
describe
'969085' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
e212d56498ba910cd3d2bb049725df04
9b688c6dafb145ecdb9c56cf220281d4fa851fb5
describe
'128408' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIW' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
f3f5e57a89efdd65cce05b866cb1fde8
b6917df34fb562bfb666bc4a50516609e36bc24c
describe
'43535' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIX' 'sip-files00045.pro'
6b59b690e2cc3ad880a4aacff521f0bd
bb79ff0b6489aff87086cba8653d9a1cc6d6003c
describe
'43570' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIY' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
5d9046101074a1cefd495d8e4d8a90bd
9de5f2a15541b7dfb58839b6ee54d3f7025d8d6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBIZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
1c0685db7f995b66e21e4b517fb55ccc
5c7fd9c9062bfa9b34dfdf1d2fb81d9fb40094d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
c908437f1af494ac4c5b4277cbc93ceb
4cc27ec341a3d7a2459e64e87839d73b4562b09b
describe
'11393' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
aa6c445262d0847af0d747ed55099937
155c45f498838bc74a960d5926a18c781826b3a3
'2011-11-16T07:23:52-05:00'
describe
'988877' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
637e83aefeafc345f57a9677fd2d0658
39ac744d330f58a9de3c144225719c1aa3878c4d
describe
'123880' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJD' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
6d292efd45d83c0ea0d5e41d58d7c0a5
0248873c6dc4feb3403ff718723ca34ce2974b7b
describe
'40514' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJE' 'sip-files00046.pro'
1c3b6467ac14859dc9deb947ffaa2397
3ccc7a5d3c0e53e0ce4a1a32034577efdccfd9e7
'2011-11-16T07:21:21-05:00'
describe
'42363' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
f2fa5e4ce34768aee5681a38b5f4704c
26178b00e1a2bfb97c7d7f55e304172ba80dbd1b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
402911c4a4b1a417482c19f872b1a1c8
cdf2e8e406f1062bd528e20dc41e2b20f395d409
describe
'1660' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
250a625c27f17b10a7295ad80c8907b4
7f394507a52fc9a01a617e69ddc4244d2d7a8d17
describe
'10674' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJI' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
e1c3913951f32eb77d4bdd1a1590933f
0061f8ed2af0a53cfadc593416ee249400e39a71
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJJ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
d3a3abcc03d38b66bb5991ec781d537e
9b0352bd3639c24609988814f3eafd29ed6d999c
describe
'117715' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJK' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
aa45838f8a0948cdbfc1778bc6e0beb8
0636e7eebc877e9bd853f410e1458ed9c1ba9a31
'2011-11-16T07:23:14-05:00'
describe
'38840' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
7458733ddde13e5c5f5ce7db06c249aa
7327d0ba33c3db8377c78274f6c2871a629db599
describe
'40868' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJM' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
78c6fe54753d4207aa3e28db1b81fa31
928f384ede5eb2eec1c3da0113315db24c5fc57c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJN' 'sip-files00047.tif'
8f8ec6177f40f4fc2a9b16de1507575b
89870c53a4eaf007815a63f2305f5695156cefce
'2011-11-16T07:21:18-05:00'
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJO' 'sip-files00047.txt'
09d840651bd6e3bfaff79c4c42fbe283
fea8782d32210b3f2d65771f8665783d5e7d55c7
describe
'10667' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJP' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
62aaf3fc38153cb2340a4dcc960d4f06
2c91c8a0407d40aa504534ca16b473a61aeb100f
'2011-11-16T07:22:05-05:00'
describe
'988868' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJQ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
cb60ff84bc9b1a975fe438b6d5218e7e
63b1f82fcfd38b2721539e8d544e23eb5568eea7
describe
'128401' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
4c4c3ef57bf81ddff54c70f4585a224b
7fd6ddad68c53a3c2576b5b246e5bc2ae742112d
describe
'43846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
a83f9d8ca7c08812a028459cefd50a8d
2b97a8cdf435a55944125d6919a056d616e8d3b9
describe
'43877' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJT' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f58234a97b755418205cd6afbf58ce79
4eda53218f033929946759ac82edbcc8193ee2a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJU' 'sip-files00048.tif'
529fcd95184b6c71c620145e313da8a7
218c132fbf2abb3167b024613e76f7ec755aa83a
describe
'1749' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
c8833c02bd2b92b21114e485f2e74ad6
52ff427f3f5b0d3a65506007fb5cfb112acaade4
describe
'10912' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJW' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
9c40f2d1bcad7d83d55da6a117b04e36
de87bb8cd1e57f7ee188b08ae3fe9e9b95d61371
describe
'969089' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
2c57e71d5bf5493ad05ddc2ab424cd56
3b1ce35a32865fb650f688a00dbceadc31b81e91
describe
'116982' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJY' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
3bbcd90ed5f5c39fad285a19169203bc
c0e6b631668f8858b854ad8a5fd458f6ac247c5a
describe
'18522' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBJZ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
5f857313ec839787c868ac45aad27937
27cdf28ca5cc18a7e9dbcef779bba269d35ceabf
describe
'36995' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKA' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
56faf497ec28e954cf4d4efc7a93d524
afbdf6e2038d8d21df2fb539be0a26a1b23c5f2a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
e6bd7ffa2313174c21faef0088e5b0d5
5eb0e1dfc3de89305088aa515bf28556da59ad5d
'2011-11-16T07:24:26-05:00'
describe
'744' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
7929d01e8359fa20a56cb680e370dfc6
6091a821c58756168239da25859e4c12816b707c
describe
'9922' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKD' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
840ee2d248843ec7f9197abe64ae1955
d1b12daee944d3dfa2b38e220a34792007845794
describe
'988876' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKE' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
477f602085177dfbd7cda6558f5c2e88
0d8c3d4020ac5df0fa174fc8b572fbcdc958afa6
'2011-11-16T07:22:47-05:00'
describe
'117106' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKF' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
0c0f99eba6157cfdf57355396b42afc2
8d9aab35e1d4a1090054e0728c8af3944ad5d43a
describe
'15747' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKG' 'sip-files00050.pro'
523f99b8af37147367f6492d4465c5ec
da665d27b29e1a920bf6f05835e3ca338862faaf
describe
'35779' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
08850dd649ddd1ec2c5b763ddbf20903
6c9fee1caf7caf5a14c0d3653b7caf3bd2c521c0
'2011-11-16T07:19:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKI' 'sip-files00050.tif'
bb44e2d5ecd16bd1b3c4be7d4569901b
20137e7ac6966270f3c6978ffc7f2f17431977fa
'2011-11-16T07:24:11-05:00'
describe
'763' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKJ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
56d36a816b496676f61095b30ef3ac3d
3ba613858adc7a39afe1bc533e8aba54e209917b
describe
'9682' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKK' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
423e8737ff43627b246d0c7ee36b7910
485f76601bf4921151c2391942f08b2146181532
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKL' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
faca8f61709258eeeb739555ad8f6c73
3b254d630928d42ebb56b56721579ed771fc97e5
describe
'105555' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
5a364bba007de4b7524df71d5868535b
d4302680d3e4df9efec5a08e3e0085d320d358fb
describe
'29870' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKN' 'sip-files00051.pro'
750203310e0cd65373c8b12018233937
15da194b8db3cab786148186f10ffc6155ff3ae4
describe
'36653' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
989a11ee01293192b0e4d0c2ede65886
169cc01225546f0ab050468fc6358b9fadde960c
'2011-11-16T07:22:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
f1864a5cc3090505d2d0f8e06d2deca6
5e26cdafa2834dc3b2375ab42bc2b6e889829c2c
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKQ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
e763be9bd58306a08eb8c92d537ddc91
98334aa73c56b8fff70438e20b11b4f9357c8b04
describe
'10412' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKR' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
1442285071b25977fc16795bf06b35d3
85bba9e6e89a0627c73e4325a387cc9a91d74810
describe
'988891' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKS' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
f4da4601e5c7ef20f9f77cd1afb680aa
cd657da915bfd476ce2c04a41868325c2a0a8b1c
describe
'122328' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKT' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
cfb85adfd941bf771490d78f6dc1af25
82b2502b17ab888b66eca12971b7aadc5ea8a7fa
describe
'41281' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKU' 'sip-files00052.pro'
b2e4016e2b66f5d9185d93360b9f5619
aac78c2512ea2e316c45ebf13084dd15bd084fbb
describe
'42330' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
fccb2c1e953d5633695fb380fa3b6b4d
340764eca1009ce7dc4af46ba529425962d8c569
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKW' 'sip-files00052.tif'
18fe8a6da71237518bf2840d77fd36c0
6998d1b076021548d5a508a4df001d2e1ec66165
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKX' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8ba4cd362d5e50fd9dd9afa9dee76415
e5874241794f2bfca9eb4c6575bcb309b6f02325
describe
'10746' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKY' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
515674742cdd4ba978fcd5f437a9e10e
5414a3688ebed8afec9a2223a7a2d71e54f7157c
describe
'969062' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBKZ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
aa22fe22cf3e9caed871ad15343e0491
4b4de79586deb4c1867095c992b2d037d1ebf72d
describe
'106226' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLA' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
cecff727e927e27009d73a7ec40ec55e
376a81c7c0403c19b07f259111125f2d34d09eff
describe
'20387' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLB' 'sip-files00053.pro'
05d56e5d700febaf43fb06f2b2048186
fc4bde6f9e02ddfe811f627963d3ef36316e4cc3
describe
'35646' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLC' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
af8c252a5deb92c4c431847956ef87b1
7918aa8e2417ffe6f30172b97be49f32e9f58141
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLD' 'sip-files00053.tif'
634c786331750a0c6e6c604d8e339536
a6fa30fd405635879c5b3dc17014e8b654f5cf93
'2011-11-16T07:19:58-05:00'
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLE' 'sip-files00053.txt'
ce51840e9704eb882f66a01443f7f595
428207bfe9245f6df8d1acc6ac1d621c78afde2e
describe
'10045' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLF' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
92dd97c0af081ecce4f4623717718dfd
960c64d0717b1c8b0db5b15144b14a096d53f698
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLG' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
34545cc6861a5167336ae3f5910d5a64
7ae57b47cb72e751730919f247ef7603bced6638
describe
'108374' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLH' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
006ed7d7fe1beb17cbc3c91361ef0ce0
46095318430f8a74b254fdbad8d53eeb350fcf2a
describe
'31771' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLI' 'sip-files00054.pro'
d542a88f4765f879b283eec6e8cecce0
2408a019630f3dbf0576bbce1e7d948a7be1cf58
describe
'35895' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLJ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
56260902f69224875e5c64707b474c17
747d890575a9232c10ef4769af49c5ff2c21cf15
'2011-11-16T07:23:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLK' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c04fbf8e4a61912b7ed5c84038d0900e
c3da04591335e4915bce487067d3743e501b15de
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLL' 'sip-files00054.txt'
aa93699cdbe14ee716b2f0ca2bfe64e2
fb2e07554faa9bd889c0edb72c6c1253a5db7ee8
describe
'9106' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLM' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
0e2dab96aa22065580ba61040d536ba0
8ff7303dea51704bc9ed44c55d0deae800447518
'2011-11-16T07:23:00-05:00'
describe
'956260' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLN' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
0963648c4ef40f88f303e0054fcff669
3f172025e15c6d4ecabe3be84fbcaaee9c7901db
describe
'36564' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLO' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
212d003ae2fc00ccb6436d1593be4cb0
7024c656004d38c3198a46b47d0f3f41c1681810
'2011-11-16T07:21:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLP' 'sip-files00055.pro'
8ab9dc186835ddf01657de10ffa3c143
d0ad66bebce96e0f99407efc1f5a1e9f6f435e72
'2011-11-16T07:20:19-05:00'
describe
'9048' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
285ba8706e692bdeca23fdce5403620c
3f2c8df49f4d985da08792ea1a9650c894776302
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLR' 'sip-files00055.tif'
dac9c920db3be9aaede9d9c09b8a5b67
09961cb92ed82b6d07a8b512146ecd7105d02d74
describe
'2331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLS' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
6ec155acfb0724cdadb4e4b1e4491337
8f89594294fe0aa8ac8539b18e14cd0c8e6767f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLT' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
1aa62276315ef4ddce3227b930ca4737
fee456d0757c9303081f0c0f761c528a6356462b
describe
'111279' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLU' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
d1297d52d8d2da95f022f122754cd4ca
9cc565753d092203794c2887a275a7810a25c53f
'2011-11-16T07:23:29-05:00'
describe
'14911' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLV' 'sip-files00056.pro'
e65c16ba059206959e49c55dd2dde710
bb345a78b90e62f189f9d6f3a420986e60f7ffab
describe
'33578' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLW' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f1fe31b6d0c425788227c258522e4f32
bd711e3be0aa628f5dd9cf04011866c8dff893e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLX' 'sip-files00056.tif'
05cf4ff3de858e99976dd932e9f23a1d
efba2e4498b7f81ed19ddade1425b991597549cc
describe
'594' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLY' 'sip-files00056.txt'
96e11fbff9c8c80819db0e85c225652e
b002b5533fdaafb9f52e9c4b60aa37bef6f17554
'2011-11-16T07:21:31-05:00'
describe
'8970' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBLZ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
42dead0890465f26a9782cba45594904
9814c8a077b97d59f078e7128307fbf7295c79c1
'2011-11-16T07:20:45-05:00'
describe
'969079' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMA' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
ead01cfd39e467baa5efbc9bb53fc18f
076eb53de1fa5b02dcdab89f56790c25d4b5221c
describe
'131271' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMB' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
15c71e833733635a6e70d9d7d34da87c
d1e7f0f7e5c0460de048fb8c050930e1d7070f35
'2011-11-16T07:21:14-05:00'
describe
'45779' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMC' 'sip-files00057.pro'
d7df6d5a015902c7f6147032d8ca39ea
884433a4c544851f5a5d9d484972ab53e5aff84d
'2011-11-16T07:20:52-05:00'
describe
'45560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMD' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
d4de6b62c8c01be38adde036d0ed4434
9213514b80f25db22a4bbdec27d2359abf5ec5e9
'2011-11-16T07:19:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBME' 'sip-files00057.tif'
e1c39a924cc2d70ca4b7b4d8c81081d3
6313a7aaf512dc9d4c0850f9bca9673780c73187
describe
'1811' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMF' 'sip-files00057.txt'
a8641119836941fc93af3bac91e22030
3e32b983238f31693fc92b54e6147c93ea9929dd
'2011-11-16T07:21:01-05:00'
describe
'11723' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMG' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
0f66ab0da9c095ab31bb280161ff199c
be1222285ceb6e8e77c7148fc4d83d647cc00d97
describe
'988888' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMH' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
4ea31fdce95f2288f1b2a27682ddf040
ee5a84d4a3e2919f2922a8773636ed34ad929449
describe
'126359' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMI' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
2c2efca09987ebce6001ee920a765f7f
d9b180a316de957d5cedc9947929cea1c60ffc83
describe
'41453' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMJ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
4978bf65409b3bbb5cc600f141813acb
da686498738d57c4c9f69331e19f2ed085c0b461
'2011-11-16T07:22:51-05:00'
describe
'43656' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMK' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
588ad91487eb529ba64f0b50372da2bb
74dc016c368aa397a04a06a88c3f20a780bb52a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBML' 'sip-files00058.tif'
4ac2a95d2fbea5f4714de9179ae0e7bf
547a28043b98f67faca941713e3b3c97d72bafda
'2011-11-16T07:23:46-05:00'
describe
'1674' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMM' 'sip-files00058.txt'
703efd8df314c468c209dde7b7c57a17
b271d6874de8e7b376c2110656bf4daf68ae3af1
'2011-11-16T07:22:46-05:00'
describe
'11252' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMN' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
97be35c1a0fccdb6bb19ed4253b783ec
7775dfa64129e8d24c283e6964774e01dce64ea5
describe
'969002' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMO' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
8740d35da96afce86f6d37cb1f626763
2b20d1a11aef907385daef72f4c26011eb5d0ef9
describe
'873257' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMP' 'sip-filesBack.jp2'
0d4d5b875ecb4ca46b08d17e77c0ff43
e567f34c6ab7f566d1edcf120a39fb8782d78429
describe
'127234' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
7ace6b4c85a4cbf1ee23b5d9c06ba9ba
501e7cb752483cd0fbb520818aab2158acb7d7b2
describe
'44595' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMR' 'sip-files00059.pro'
277f2ada126ab04b41441129dc6c6def
8c7eb2a6fb56673823cdf0b785b8cb2bf13b7af8
describe
'44289' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMS' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
338f54218b5fb68fdb2faabcf416ceb6
0d030a304be3af9af02039f4a9338cd1b1fb4838
'2011-11-16T07:23:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
823d62ad433daf033eda8c1dcae7111d
e8465012ff8c75685ce7be333c0b8faeae2c58cb
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
8828985d21f052e38f0a619b605c5265
be515f9d06b79839397a6957f730caed002db0d4
describe
'11493' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMV' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
288b4de31c8453528be10e51cdd42d6a
de72c7ba3a3b4c7e620b97479d13d43f20a2d362
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMW' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
d0203360b189cdd93866285b759b3c39
8d9d14256d9dbfa770b2244769d7d547d703bcf1
describe
'115175' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMX' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
993308ea5b164d39d36ba967fa948ed7
b6d194d146a64c6c9f0efd32e4246500089e63a7
'2011-11-16T07:23:31-05:00'
describe
'37087' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
12f1e829a184d70ad470d1ad2935cacf
627837451f4cd796e735d73983ca6cdcee4e2e99
describe
'39878' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBMZ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
fe7fae7433656b3ff41842a195fde34f
d2d614149a7f1c22a0462576db2348b3615e39be
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNA' 'sip-files00060.tif'
b648d9462bce6b296d2cfc1252a2a5e5
1cdc2faf2c140de20fc71e2a4dfc4050e13e47a6
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
e20f16b480430ff6aae13fc19841acd5
146560e794fb721cd204e7511e8e363b46181bcc
'2011-11-16T07:21:40-05:00'
describe
'10611' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNC' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
68909360df7cc2f7e18db89c74bfec64
df23db3a88c8929f2459cf97043956933b899bcd
describe
'969016' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBND' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
6fd46f2214c9d1b6e39ac9ae9a82fdf6
bb2c730ad99e181b79d73c88762c5724a536f576
'2011-11-16T07:21:59-05:00'
describe
'113518' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNE' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
668840a9f6f372f4ec431dab10a2ef05
856bf57c8d0199955aed6ada645835e28113bd3d
describe
'17634' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNF' 'sip-files00061.pro'
f93ed1c5f1548a26e7fab4aaa382b2b7
a788090c4ef4ec73d59b9893e11f40e90153ff39
describe
'36046' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNG' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
2559c6bdf47936a80b6a8c09626c6c18
f086484307c1c52acb2c5bee1315542335c48631
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNH' 'sip-files00061.tif'
4e3e3a0bb75ecfbe4b7ad651d7f44d27
4cf3be3c9fd4f2258685b930dd9177b902ee3224
describe
'730' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNI' 'sip-files00061.txt'
0becba1f5344452bf02b1741b8b567dd
0abd85531e7e73fc6c38923aed8e9eda312511c1
describe
'10059' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
939fb4bd5d45ccc504f68004b70cfc77
374b7fc958cc00c9aebb8a31524d102520a4ec55
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNK' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
69d40f28a9ef52dc262e018616cb4044
52df9bb34b1ec1869a6990ec13378554e7f9cafd
'2011-11-16T07:24:33-05:00'
describe
'116858' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
84608d264abbaeb4112eb49537caa75f
c35ef62cd6fc122fae623a94f0ec74ce01abae08
describe
'37595' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNM' 'sip-files00062.pro'
0b71d1a6f8f3f13c65176b463c156a5d
b0781864db373d2b47c3e712b74de4d90d0cb1a7
describe
'39909' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNN' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
873b93910cee80e3cfe94cbc57af3623
e48d1a511e46f3e85e9802d87c3f9f1bda23cd5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNO' 'sip-files00062.tif'
d96a8cf56040526a3db451b12329422e
a2265e8b9f70c4429f7f48d5f5cf6a2ac08f0bba
'2011-11-16T07:21:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
9d26bcd131a80100130a47330e137fdc
98a961f6ec112e5fb1ca4d6ab63d1c4badcde7e7
describe
'10590' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNQ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
38789078a246eae04846b6a88d934d19
78746009c20c8d44e1e7d23c7e62da20cef3c0d4
describe
'969060' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNR' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
84c65009aab64cc5474531e86134ab18
ab4f086aeec7e456933b75896a3f5aa45025b8cf
describe
'114495' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNS' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
1aaa336a25209df30568e6d43e194c09
b383200343be86aed71ba2aaa5378571000b864d
'2011-11-16T07:20:12-05:00'
describe
'38490' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNT' 'sip-files00063.pro'
ddfeaa39a11a7ada43be9be4b9dc1c1e
1812a8db9fda3bdc2ad9c518784b519bef2eb9c1
describe
'39903' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNU' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
5b613533a84478bbe050a547108c2f4f
1c885782268d055a7ba4be840c79d34ee8bea46c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNV' 'sip-files00063.tif'
7a6d123e6bbdb4d1e492ee3b3163ceec
b98265763c54096ecea06e3457d26b400079e143
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNW' 'sip-files00063.txt'
a54b4f1a83e388a6c4ec14f340000316
5e8b7f7651194af911d3d74a932891e7a3806057
'2011-11-16T07:19:38-05:00'
describe
'10686' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNX' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
8b9d7849a92d188f1e150bd2b3b8f131
5bd09aac7baa0788828d4e08d3ccf191a6c88df6
describe
'988885' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNY' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
50a89c9ce2178f20bf025c3a1fd4ea42
0ef7efd497afe9911ace12f80d9ddac80ac65d4b
'2011-11-16T07:24:07-05:00'
describe
'116297' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBNZ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
a2ef60226b273bd2a89d7c2ef9156a07
a1cb25cc8ad041030be867cabd764761300b4829
'2011-11-16T07:22:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOA' 'sip-files00064.pro'
ea3ac1d66498b693e5298bd3eb410e02
8e0d60375eb0c71b77087eba8fadf8543d701a45
describe
'39630' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOB' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
639690b9ec5c468e51623599b599bffb
150de0abd4c015c8a0c64cea7f78e71ec30f776a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
ff377f730a4fcfaeb63721bb2247ea24
ced55913c8b3f289f3a549e29a91f25b2c9d46e3
'2011-11-16T07:20:41-05:00'
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOD' 'sip-files00064.txt'
ce6fcdadead68f84931590859b82a7e5
e7ec0688da08727fa9577a50c03da23cded7f833
describe
'10728' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOE' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
026d0b1650c7d8e09fdf97950c87dde5
f42c889ca3fe94d00400f903fb2b47cbc562b17e
describe
'969011' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOF' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
4df5054a33d95df57a8c07f528517f3a
8844b951186a9ec61a6668b916a12619e9bdc4ee
'2011-11-16T07:20:48-05:00'
describe
'108814' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOG' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
35180b7d09dffa4ff011ad65a46f10a2
eda6f6698f1b8d732bde5df6024d577f3ad6e999
describe
'33827' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOH' 'sip-files00065.pro'
73cf62f31cdbf44644abf19de22c34e2
057d05b3cb7e468ac2921d97438843e08d7d455f
describe
'38052' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOI' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
df06a9e395ad79d7b4aba9d3175574df
71ec2d5a12a7c1da5766f8375d51d5d67f5376e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOJ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
2467b96cae1db64410ec79404deb15f4
23f226a3e9da6f59d5919226208a9966e00e050f
'2011-11-16T07:23:50-05:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOK' 'sip-files00065.txt'
027323b38fe9eba231959dfc49645d65
45d59c5ccfb82e39da858f74e73b7c822040832b
'2011-11-16T07:23:53-05:00'
describe
'10447' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOL' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
195525d7b4ceb0b28e152ee7d1059408
bbff99e7bc95601ff7b08c5e9e4d09e37aaf2a2f
'2011-11-16T07:20:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOM' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
0b308b5bf0410f59c900a799ca0a2b19
4ca0153c573835b327a1e9dc47b95f0faee017e1
describe
'111330' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBON' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
a40056a5a95db69f855f8123a80c9328
04c0938ecaaf0805b146ecd43ac52db25d85a7c3
describe
'35084' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOO' 'sip-files00066.pro'
198cafef2bdf01abb4bad59402d0610c
90f49738e661259035e876b2f9c33051f478c3f7
describe
'38019' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOP' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
533029775c7a49877b66c41538f54d49
96a0c321f3e508280f77cb995033983742170e78
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
4dd141d00b5b59745a18d368973d7ec1
db56fe11affb5e33cdc6d0c3e776979ad7797763
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOR' 'sip-files00066.txt'
d50e4f02cf42c3d23cb03a67708ce86b
651e9a8fa835fd50ae6543d8de20abed63539fd2
describe
'10162' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOS' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
3f96a4eab626ad43f88125f1dace0e16
88466857f3ce5dda556253a0d1b491445c0f3d56
describe
'969050' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOT' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
796078bd0633f70cebe1069d8924cdbb
5a1c708b5b16034043dd19afdd2afb09d794ce04
describe
'113391' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOU' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
b1d1df3de6b82d5257b930b533c7d356
fbe7a916077315665dce3778d689eec1e3a62028
'2011-11-16T07:24:02-05:00'
describe
'35714' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOV' 'sip-files00067.pro'
afd38111d14bd2bfe114d0d8f2f484a2
68821b6de0aa2d3da95349bc604861dde72c13d8
describe
'39545' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOW' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
39a7b1cad1d04b26c34ad86f45c24841
f4134c58ae17e045e76edd75cd8b46e1bb24580f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOX' 'sip-files00067.tif'
6c81a94db1c174c0aa312c0d225c16f4
4a33e970a05d9f5df014f41d4be418c09929bde3
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOY' 'sip-files00067.txt'
01e08380cb8460876fa2338e9d749309
b9ce94915c0f17a58e99ba13c9b078eeedc374ae
describe
'10557' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBOZ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
f03b5f3543b0a2c6296e53f7499e6229
0a68140a5dbc8132ef604862996714b81bcc0991
describe
'988825' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPA' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
2d315568a102bbf0ac1f55885df0a2a8
d3ab82033c4f1fbafaf12f132df95409d778df0a
'2011-11-16T07:21:36-05:00'
describe
'109237' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPB' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ef0c00ac59de926397dca2916803dcdb
294aacb4fe2a66cb75cdd0e389d865b0f722459a
'2011-11-16T07:19:30-05:00'
describe
'32479' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPC' 'sip-files00068.pro'
e73dc61baeb8957ffeb69e1a2ef20a42
276fc31cde477406a9eaaf98800c5c89548cd7fc
describe
'36803' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPD' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
540b05fe1d74a3fff15a926937584681
bda59221d9decd5387d9fc93c3958b575a637331
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPE' 'sip-files00068.tif'
c474428b4caafc48fe0518f1595d2fdd
f78c9041412b677cbc25249df44fabec575b1906
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPF' 'sip-files00068.txt'
f57a1c3815c2e8534499948d130999b6
29305350a1995420152e4e26c82094c9fd6ab3e3
describe
'9718' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPG' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
b4d15e9e1c11ef38d9783ab45b10b5ad
6f30953075c6abe3a988c155212d0615e7a07edf
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPH' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e8b237e30c1da528eb82592f4bf213c4
66f2951a9f02eda95ead01885681eca5d6e46129
describe
'61825' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPI' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
e53148af7aa516d52d1e374a570dccc6
b0a4e3b41195b2f70c46a7cbba1cc078328cd6fb
'2011-11-16T07:22:24-05:00'
describe
'9570' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPJ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
5562d47011e513e41fa234bee3465857
54447407ebdf00eb0e78452680d04833d2e1527e
'2011-11-16T07:20:27-05:00'
describe
'19392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPK' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
6c8b034f9eb00152e20d9735586169db
4a090bfc8745de28b81dd5de73c9a65bd7f0aca5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPL' 'sip-files00069.tif'
bd93dc053400f4beaad8f7b4a1a9ae52
edbc93107ea3d854ec26fd1a3209e554417b7c1e
describe
'427' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPM' 'sip-files00069.txt'
443924fa6763a44d558de7cec5a1746f
27aaea69b5fc1a21d8840a39dbf3326089766eb4
describe
'5792' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPN' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
5a6b35baf6105eb5cd7f55acc0e32721
459238ec1e6482fb07a29702e28df4162d583575
describe
'988835' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPO' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
bfb272a53b4a8e3b4aaae517e6426626
d839452434284fc624548ac678b0b86a234c4714
describe
'103790' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPP' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
8f9c0e65919ed790c8a6764b0590d640
ee87b4a7c243a6db26a1aee0fadf658b1341cc27
describe
'12608' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPQ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
8d05bb3a415d29f691dcebe28c382912
bdc8b455c6acfcff1353db7ce6d0b7e15f863023
'2011-11-16T07:20:11-05:00'
describe
'31024' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPR' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
e46534d230dd35f4a82a1d0628263646
447951335cc9f6832433ac57b07f135ba3adc57c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPS' 'sip-files00070.tif'
e0e64c7a3036d4288a45f24be6f818e8
4d2cccaf32def566a431580df8dba736f1aab96f
'2011-11-16T07:20:38-05:00'
describe
'504' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPT' 'sip-files00070.txt'
79a6ad4639d2286c1795d0c74d8da8c8
7b0459751306e628e6d785b86d84bfdf333977a5
'2011-11-16T07:20:59-05:00'
describe
'8431' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPU' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
50b23a07448c87a77a774c18d7eebb33
8acbd8de0aadd6fa6bd34fb3960295c72fe18624
describe
'969072' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPV' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
b2f5f96e5ed74c840bb42f4cd38dc1a8
98bef901e476b64aaa7de1338ea30cd97894c74b
describe
'129361' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPW' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
44c81b51af0ff0746e5063cacdbeeb9a
6e588533e1935b1daf26b29f4348def9623f42f6
'2011-11-16T07:19:31-05:00'
describe
'44605' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPX' 'sip-files00071.pro'
88af6ddfea7c335e30d3c6d726c19cae
f56c6a2e838ef6676dd6722b3a496a80a1a37b8a
describe
'44374' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPY' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
33d61d6ca3df35ccad44f938a5598081
9ea5e0c304eb9e87023ad699bd7bd51dc1b98b61
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBPZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
25bcec718976ddb68c15c63922a06ed8
12cf0d7f355ca7ad49d76044c4caf27bd8fa754c
'2011-11-16T07:21:09-05:00'
describe
'1792' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQA' 'sip-files00071.txt'
6c6d77b3742a07816a73e04c704608c2
ae12abacbd55ad32aad3f5709f35960c4138b48a
'2011-11-16T07:20:22-05:00'
describe
'11514' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQB' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2dd5fcdf3f7cabcfb152db33e9d03ec3
22a6f0b2a50cb5ed990a4c92e7aa828944ed484c
describe
'988881' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQC' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
16a9bbd4ef7c4f040a903f086c926fe0
52b9f262498f67a7ce652f4a8f2751582d4cfe90
describe
'132274' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQD' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
0ff414413cc551644b140bcce2e4cce8
cbf90a38d803f1fa6faa35d4fe96e3881240acd7
describe
'45853' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQE' 'sip-files00072.pro'
b5d855984610cfb44f0c238e39a82064
d1f91e42f0a91e85a1903522b1fc6d9b40d39261
'2011-11-16T07:20:09-05:00'
describe
'45198' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQF' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
221cbdd24a790644862364c9eb0fe6ca
86491f51845d6dc714f61c81e4b81f7141323d97
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQG' 'sip-files00072.tif'
163eb9ae56a5e8be224e446e8b8464d0
87721ef5993c139ef034b2dd64716ccdf5248c05
'2011-11-16T07:22:23-05:00'
describe
'1831' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQH' 'sip-files00072.txt'
3754b769440e0be84a4df82dfba9d1a0
617a683c82ca138949edd2643ab1e8a209fda340
describe
'11382' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQI' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
a7022c8cf27a83661b8455833d4b67ba
72830e173f86ad2ffae39573e3161a3fd81deccf
describe
'968938' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQJ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
f5d8d4e45b65d6af4de74f0edc2e3a85
fe072ef9822ae1f3ef66923d19a19df08bf192ba
describe
'126464' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQK' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
797121763899f31073c483cbdb19a1a8
604fc5a9685b3271db7d860c8ffc4f76f9579ddf
describe
'42864' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQL' 'sip-files00073.pro'
bcff2e4cceaf4979fbd6a9dad0df0e72
e9a64a1cfa78ac84b92917ca6fda5132fe7aa0b6
describe
'43688' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQM' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
84eacd8b8ce63a01cd0e50be064b3663
efd37194415e773b717159294b3b0c036b747e41
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQN' 'sip-files00073.tif'
26a732c1bce9396cb9362169c575c998
9a6b3900ed006536dedbb90c68925323168d555e
describe
'1762' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQO' 'sip-files00073.txt'
75cd4d3fd9c89c809075983154d2f3c1
1da83a8dea639eeacaf4357afe5dafc07017001d
describe
'11441' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQP' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
345a8a8d48b8ac6887eb3b33d7c8e7d9
3a0a3853155639b6ba52774b00fc05a77d6e0856
describe
'988852' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQQ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
4cd2538ecc6fabdb4b013bbb0052834e
98e5bc90782e48ad9aa48df1e61c689c02da0cce
describe
'130590' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQR' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
285a04f0f0947987c30015dae9e6d7a9
68cb82dd1f12fc0b67d1fa583e1cb2ce0ad6dbc8
describe
'45854' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQS' 'sip-files00074.pro'
277fdd7e67cb0425f7ea1c22aaaff1aa
50887ebfd042b158f2c5f4cff203836f6a3989d4
'2011-11-16T07:20:39-05:00'
describe
'45951' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQT' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
08f805b64ac5cb8395acb6f6915385ee
0b7ca43f5ca7fb91e2f4419e15109bc121214754
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQU' 'sip-files00074.tif'
0054eb96d02a44c44b4b61e2bdb3e426
6627701793475cdf203cd3c4634b1ae5aa9e23f9
'2011-11-16T07:22:39-05:00'
describe
'1810' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQV' 'sip-files00074.txt'
620136c85b697323abc40c1c28a7d538
5e3d9eda3a2d6a302d2bcca59a632c264e7498f4
describe
'11574' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQW' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
ea24d653977b8bc9fdbb138677222d61
dcb1b8f5ce668d128a203bf890e412a9261b7f6c
describe
'969087' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQX' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
333fcbcccfa770cfff3c577e6bf25f97
a4853cd3e5ef655601a8249dab0738fa3a0f3da7
'2011-11-16T07:20:35-05:00'
describe
'124532' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQY' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
e79df57c5ac2bc6c3734048d3870eff4
2eeabc371604d9666a1074ba430f89f81f158db5
describe
'44299' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBQZ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
fa1b3f642b7171880ade71732c76c9d7
0a5b34b65c7c6f6a6a09010f8f6c2ce0ecbe590e
describe
'43396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRA' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
2b67c69620e2fe3c6b65baf7352c96aa
9121ac802422366290d1c41e176a615b8c13ad2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRB' 'sip-files00075.tif'
52bf72f25cde27a32d6c84d12237f612
73217efbd050700c0a324668ca8809d2ac667a4a
describe
'1773' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRC' 'sip-files00075.txt'
ecfc0660a96fc25690a95e427c89d38a
5f4671cfac7a5020bdd4e858a98e97ed153d7498
describe
'11181' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRD' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
e7434b7967d34441b2a10d25152db8e0
7a8d326f498ff33f1516e8e0e2f0c15897c39d31
describe
'988863' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRE' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
a739356f481a006fbe335868b7b1187d
1fddf9c1d095f11e372581f54d16f48afefac3b2
describe
'122846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRF' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
4a1676910f83160dd6227735e731bfc0
cc4afc676b467ad3de9ac97022b64cc4c45c87a4
describe
'42917' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRG' 'sip-files00076.pro'
c629d4330fb535e73cc008a566175083
24e498e98d66744005096f929be2d87af4183c77
'2011-11-16T07:20:49-05:00'
describe
'42269' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRH' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
868e1192eb50873b9e1556ae1e3b6672
4d80891127e98f19a3784306e86319e3cfdc0a32
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRI' 'sip-files00076.tif'
c110327224a22f840b6a4623b6aa9d07
cff66817daaa052ae5ea87e92ce60236546f0911
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRJ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
cbbafa60a96336279899a1ad1d90b7cc
fe710680f9adb64c167ff6b1c7203c1c7dfd29dc
describe
'10977' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRK' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
02133a66b3f16de482eeef58603ffa81
b32530e99a07ae2399b81f2f9594ccee28caf428
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRL' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
9b93ad79ef58bbe5dfd69ce9780a4caf
adf4399724bcf68683ccc6bffc0d6b50dba544d9
'2011-11-16T07:19:39-05:00'
describe
'127408' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRM' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
448eb5338cadee49bdf15f8c8cc06acf
50cc0833cd9040534f3fda43ea1fe9777528ac1c
describe
'43895' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRN' 'sip-files00077.pro'
8e3ee9d6cc3e1e4a66f846294e418fe4
66cf56cc6b1514a5ee9bcbd4a5247bf13221a6d3
'2011-11-16T07:19:57-05:00'
describe
'44188' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRO' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b66ef6ba0a03e8d69c4b497107393f91
616902e551d13e114459cff677db962d1f511dec
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRP' 'sip-files00077.tif'
4b3367d819f5ad3f30bfe7a749b19e25
fb08214d798ac21309d041c95a3c2a3ab97e7f94
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRQ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
b99ebbf09f71491086c9d4d2564cfd16
85890fe0bc6b646e7356349f47408196307553e5
describe
'11449' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRR' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
687d23d10a1350fca3b8b6a6a72e2a5c
348695b4f1c2f71d58f5a8306f60bbacbb20424c
'2011-11-16T07:19:33-05:00'
describe
'988865' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRS' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1b437220a5b0561045e15b1f25b66636
545e3f8f75bcdf3a9e4ebefb8b5946325648e0df
describe
'127922' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRT' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
891f356d5ee9839a7137844ca15cbd54
b8df98ee8b3395a92d2ae97eca0f4f81579ddfd2
describe
'44776' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRU' 'sip-files00078.pro'
f07ee9d4fac43f79864ead45929e484f
c22dbe00e18efcb1bd3f40df5c9948f19bc3a2a3
'2011-11-16T07:20:13-05:00'
describe
'43460' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
63b830500437f8ed6bde85597cc4c6af
95c17e7a15dcbe69886e7ba209b8f806d7c4f7b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRW' 'sip-files00078.tif'
6f67c5960fbc0cf31866bbdb780512f3
61a3dc4443e2195b3355a3a84ceb03a904566551
'2011-11-16T07:20:30-05:00'
describe
'1795' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
7670dc32535143f439e2695f97a951c3
8fe083492974dfb42ed9a5c2963a47140d999146
describe
'11089' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRY' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
2b382dc29d32e45c1ce3081674432963
e143ac978baaa9585d16262fb2f48f6043c1a512
'2011-11-16T07:23:07-05:00'
describe
'969061' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBRZ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
a0985b5f101c2c8cb89ba7d74cca3b9f
1f6c1aff695cf66f644fffc434962847061a7547
describe
'122366' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSA' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
93f79ff10c5482768fb64e8f81e75011
09ccd4eedef5a52a5d6f6622657a200e9d6ff7f9
describe
'41849' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSB' 'sip-files00079.pro'
ec1db82449ffae9d93d397abc0232aa9
788997cc57271d517102736b33fc05a02349ff71
describe
'41929' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSC' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
8ca73badba6863dbd2a96cfd09ef3cb6
12e0f6e7662dff3b4ca19d4eb5584a92110a7919
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSD' 'sip-files00079.tif'
13683f6bffe4d42b19e985946ac1cb43
535d3311172fba6a83c30b8f44f12a9bcf6e25ae
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSE' 'sip-files00079.txt'
3d769297ac77ed742e260bc2e1a3c8fd
61123064ffc80a8a1b1d7e711b64f11fd1142b8c
describe
'10782' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSF' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
4576118dd9aee419064305ffb5110d44
da2b3d70bdf30f53f89a05103ecb94a4c92d5441
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSG' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
7acdf75e0117e0ab9bdea7c3c6ff16bd
b2e40cbb56bfbdc6532a7336533ac621920cab3d
describe
'125560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSH' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
a8176af983071a414be578debcda13a1
17a428c5eaca305900a7628d7f4260aa0d866248
'2011-11-16T07:19:29-05:00'
describe
'42759' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSI' 'sip-files00080.pro'
7f1ce076fb1b57e10acd33e468b59387
0e4cf059f834906b45704c3f0d17f8f726c0de74
describe
'42355' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSJ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
df93b043b6b61f6597f9cec9fe1e8ab7
295d068f91db39d85a1c433f627d28fbefa70268
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSK' 'sip-files00080.tif'
612606fe0f7d63d1c38b1191f4fbeacb
e14fefa4406d41fa0491997e9a3dec4b2a6dc876
'2011-11-16T07:23:24-05:00'
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSL' 'sip-files00080.txt'
c2b8069b9ca6e3355efdd86545d4d315
5d2243b5217dbd087522e474fd6d04d0aefff104
describe
'10630' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSM' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
226dee9ebc96b2e77b9c6fe4b170f612
e1858381902469b0df895b08acf065d5b6414707
describe
'968998' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSN' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
406b994e2680b2faed7513be9c522ee7
cd25b9e0d2b73b8865d9ddbe8132bc8af5f83a66
'2011-11-16T07:22:18-05:00'
describe
'124191' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSO' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
164472566a539cb970a73c8751a03a26
9e413e6131b77a8e32668b765a59850daceed303
describe
'41886' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSP' 'sip-files00081.pro'
de8b7f71181926050daf29feb27dd4cd
6abacc2e568e3d9f2fa22766d39a7f98bc0e6100
describe
'42595' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
0efb0af3ed57b6a8d262f1d9cf54c538
2b1ec41232c4bed5927de46b1c894c889823f65d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSR' 'sip-files00081.tif'
7228a00925613e934e0728052a91de48
dda3a7c9e980138df9bd3e15f069def7eb221a61
describe
'1676' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSS' 'sip-files00081.txt'
9315e9a60b8204c2738836b80fb5fc98
977d695d7a157b52b0e27e915bd020f657ee7864
describe
'11214' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBST' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
494e4e4dee1a6c2b43d3a516fd915332
0248199bcbeb9959d0d15637c88feeaf7d8a126f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSU' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
3cafe3c0cabd2d2291e7c18c64baf5bb
6b3b178577634d72fbb3acfec16638d699a17a08
describe
'130695' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSV' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
4e919ae0c790494433ca587b5de1e968
0b9e4b09942832a2f940cc71649da4b5734fdbce
describe
'43661' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSW' 'sip-files00082.pro'
8caa02ac80d4444c5d8b2df6c90ca2d5
ba18b4177971721ffbe0ff7fda0e6fe57fc8ec9a
describe
'44396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
89a026b821116d45c49667130b0caac5
4b7a430ede4116b1ef9d804c73726462a0f0c40a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSY' 'sip-files00082.tif'
4e78d9419f8444b8cc4241c610726f6b
be72f4c91e556260acf4a7aaa0d17e4a4a761f23
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBSZ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
70e69158fd637faac5300b206451f6fc
ee2035eadfcb0623078a5cee0179bf940caef5aa
'2011-11-16T07:19:44-05:00'
describe
'11244' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTA' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
8e93fa4a86625c09b7e399590e245e98
93832b1d3145b1eb269a816c0408b5093c54b771
describe
'987262' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
eb2189cad611e79720bf129a847266fe
8bd2dd268e0badcd7d9d93c1b75e002d462d29f2
describe
'119716' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTC' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
4500d458d4fdf9d23eafd9cbd3603745
1239636af51fb323e49597670f5d70f44d897158
'2011-11-16T07:19:37-05:00'
describe
'42031' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTD' 'sip-files00083.pro'
429d3e3cb6bbef15405b8ac35019b11c
1c6651a85c757a701d3046dd83a528fc398447a5
describe
'42117' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTE' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
a0c9f65b83ff0fcfb017163386beba88
28a2b85b1d93d03d850dc412c9f18c4d6ac75cb8
describe
'7907387' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTF' 'sip-files00083.tif'
77add366065da48bd47622762673e17d
20576a964fc52b737a38b4088ebfa5dc7473e907
describe
'1693' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
f892af439355f2b1999a6afd04f00b31
aaaba3264c66355cf34d4cccbddf828c82caa373
describe
'11028' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTH' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
3237c3bad32fd8a82eb44c2d89fcafc2
db70692c997cbe6c094266499b26270c44981f8d
describe
'989324' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
48f77a33a1eea50f254243a06bb9d73a
d27880b35b0b7f29d9a32aafb733fa95dde1abb0
describe
'111916' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTJ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
61a6fa98ca6a0f5daef338f8111dd698
d570526edcd266e5b74ee5027d0734ff74bcce6e
describe
'40595' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTK' 'sip-files00084.pro'
38abf6000f58aa6b682d9037f2c057cd
f06ddd5856f68bb10965cc3ed29548115248f82e
describe
'38669' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
da0cdb28795cdfb79b4681e86e3e2e1a
e4d857db6f58161345899981a9897472260dc186
describe
'7923733' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTM' 'sip-files00084.tif'
0585fc969b99ab7231c9f25ece3370b1
00298fe0322f823b4d7ea9245be3f1eea87af715
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTN' 'sip-files00084.txt'
39a8d84ca8f0b4689e9e50535fd9dbf5
95675ad8cf875588b491d01c1e10dc1c3e9e3bb9
describe
'9846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTO' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
f3ca9a02df5a05d6cd572577405efe20
51b99baf83c83346b4c2b41a400b9b243c122342
describe
'987276' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTP' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
66c5ad6005936e2c30f97b730a9adc30
8ccb034a7de07ebaad4113f0ad559cbf3935776f
'2011-11-16T07:20:04-05:00'
describe
'125778' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTQ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
dea37d63ceb65f14af6cb810211144b2
43439c46a411ce0eaf1592fe084f324adf101486
describe
'44755' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTR' 'sip-files00085.pro'
b9459317be7ed95d479742dde68120c7
81f798c9f15dab794088e3f56c0a8d646a313d97
describe
'43559' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTS' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
2e773d1e10d746ebba67d7c1cb2d5dce
2402d1e7db78bbd97e3d94516e23fdd1a0623179
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTT' 'sip-files00085.tif'
d63ca6b493936270ff3896e8acd79030
858736f8dcb90a628dc2137cb359b066a819e8c7
describe
'1802' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
b3c82a0a17f9da9afd6564d17a1828c6
56fb80dd1e6884f610aa5bf75a259752887b07e7
describe
'11403' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTV' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
fe929ad99ae898ae4190eb424495e76b
c920d63bac73a1d87ede0a0aef5dd15971c7cc55
describe
'989321' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTW' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
37dd8a6accd64b79f478b2a844a717ca
d7b16787a05ede4a9b69e415dcbc7d27461377b0
describe
'121542' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTX' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
7f0290458a372b92264b7ee4613c2c0d
c32667eff796fb7175bfb82cf2b2caff19484f45
describe
'39319' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
d70816f477ec62a0ab7a3b247cbb6210
5a24ed5a68db7644b3c2e498b81bdd817436443d
describe
'42188' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBTZ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
8ceee2d07c1b66062e2a17c88d91ebe6
51c0c68195fb00276239ce1f3e1e6abd8a98300b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUA' 'sip-files00086.tif'
1e7d61302ab0a55326ee63f2568100ef
d21dbe9856a295957795fbb1ad69152bf364564f
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUB' 'sip-files00086.txt'
d3573d296775fad367d05658e9271215
834117ddaf48ba04c1384081d611d726db5b89b0
describe
'10785' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
055512772254b93567cbf9614bbaf258
44a7a6d809f40a48129b02875605ab7ca36e1e0c
describe
'987267' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUD' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
f22bf9f67c74c2543725bc0f82bd7eaa
28ee16317fd90061b671466defbbaac55baf69fb
describe
'104459' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUE' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9432baeb433f61daa62922aab3321921
147fb74216554d6e166b70dcf91fd5dce3a9c014
describe
'33951' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUF' 'sip-files00087.pro'
a2edc8b7fdcd0de9f6da83d6a7af21c7
656dd37de4d13e310d59f74021321a073f665cdd
describe
'36455' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUG' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
848edbf4c503e5044a3d6a1e9dc330ab
3ed60d87fb95e026e9307a9faa6e0821a8db08bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUH' 'sip-files00087.tif'
964b7a0f4548c620fd64ad26a9cbb5b0
6a1ccd905505b58af8986a780d495c5a84c4e0cf
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUI' 'sip-files00087.txt'
96a0457a054d3b67291a9d72c3b03847
5fe2542025e58c3284a39c8e0fc079f71cc323a6
describe
'9647' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUJ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
3130939e3a5725900d2218990afc9b61
be4be7c26b4ebee192093ad4835f167794836a07
describe
'989291' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUK' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
d19de40011f33e95da79cb4b843fa034
80cd1b07a0a478f62eb9c7d1f04a63e763421699
'2011-11-16T07:20:21-05:00'
describe
'87397' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUL' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
469f5d87ba623040b954579cfdd63047
ec9f3832918e858e95edb081e955293ab383cc29
describe
'182119' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUM' 'sip-filesBack.jpg'
ce9e33bd2b278875a5dbddc16d810a3b
b05e221243f0f622fced12f360a8797ae7e61de6
describe
'27786' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUN' 'sip-files00088.pro'
7c270512613b437f342030fea5622566
41b260f962707f1efb35ec8a667d9eae5f920501
describe
'29586' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUO' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
218ef02e10e9c7d2bc655ff0445f109f
0e42574a1bdfc8eaf6638c2596c58f7f3d60d0fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
58765918cda671f82d9ef76894694d69
ab05217811bb2df517412048578575ed841b6cd0
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUQ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
6c717ed268708e81758c8e88424f797d
2f1a80cd1c850e52b2250b5e0368e4f8b97e85cf
describe
'7504' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUR' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
7b57de99b5f9f8d56a3cac5eda45bdd1
a88869383a4396a55e8c2f7c232612bdfa94a396
'2011-11-16T07:20:40-05:00'
describe
'680399' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUS' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
81038edd72bd8884baa21e9f142d72eb
ae96c86d61c1849b1c700fec9f50fc76a6abae54
describe
'14356' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUT' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
b117a5bb1e8d535960d189612eb91366
d5f3a4d2e9b6a5b028aa47a7410aa9c49c81f103
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUU' 'sip-files00089.pro'
89948c64656b250ad08d122cd9f50fb4
4e39c05b0e8e362cbb351fd7b4474979cdc9378c
describe
'3906' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUV' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
2ff0f04ca03a546c9e86d2f72e5ae62e
164d82c19b7ce124b88119c789f422a749654c4c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUW' 'sip-files00089.tif'
36fa68158e88788ff42833d4e83d31a4
bffaba9becf882efbc2fe6829e769fa02ab082a5
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUX' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
783adb4a7f14ead13b4c1dfeab981607
c7bf023b5cf342763efa785f36605a26175eebd9
describe
'989331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUY' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
600af0322b79d1fb077e516d10c7ecc7
6ac7eea431a46c0db8f99089fc87ca40d67ed20d
describe
'105871' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBUZ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
2961bf1e15cee233069522adf1528196
eb265e4a0715c528b2030e35bf95ac5f722f0526
describe
'35985' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVA' 'sip-files00090.pro'
56d4a684cde21aafeb34b82f7c45cf41
ffd6f80fab25023cbad186792a76a2d2eb9460c8
describe
'37131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVB' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
020bb51f1866a35655d8f167d8681246
30f6d4e2b8ac0acea8aad2b5a507d397a57e9939
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
c94a2b1629cce7eef35f96653622a908
0e70e1d56eab6bf3bf772dc2b708301ae0be44fc
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVD' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c3245c8720d9a78571789d371979a3a3
e49d3c70b5815da5becf06563c190a52cc60cce2
describe
'9692' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVE' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
853391c2cbb19d7f5f02d2a7d74ec033
b8f4fe91a0f91fb133a2593ee2a90e1c2e4dcee1
'2011-11-16T07:24:01-05:00'
describe
'987287' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
e2d51baf34990f820f21b91dc9e60040
adf66517673093d9285df957cb9a94e8089124cb
describe
'89287' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVG' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
03ef9bc7aaf142f9e315bf98575511fd
d87f91e28a38d01ce3ad63a5f946bc9736cb7fe9
describe
'19919' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVH' 'sip-files00091.pro'
12fc52057dacfd025ff4ae3b2ed21a6c
00eecb18e549a0bc3b990fe7311c868cf86acd3f
'2011-11-16T07:23:38-05:00'
describe
'30674' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVI' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
d51ff03152243a6d31663d281468c747
c0a2ce1cdb9db510fef10fef1415863eb756e326
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
b570f0097150b4cc95f5703fd3ebfd5a
06bfd60011676ef7ae05958d02cf90e45ad26cf3
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
26dbe38c1bd03d0fa11e8a4d235bf14e
a1a0907bd8b6f073ee612950bd2acd8323a30c65
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVL' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
7b32873e5ebd16cd20d1d68a2964d36c
8a276fcb990b475cb0e8a7e401dcaa107a2fc731
describe
'989308' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVM' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
72f4c21043c9c3cb3ca92e46a12561f6
988cd9178a88b0755f64884c022d01e4a5b2c52d
'2011-11-16T07:24:24-05:00'
describe
'117288' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVN' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
aaccb5217e90a0cc46c40a627a5dab1e
4434f0a686d1c6fbb06c5b86880ecfaead1bf68d
describe
'40722' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVO' 'sip-files00092.pro'
3fb0034add50722daa996ae8bf111682
ed4c484dd9f79a236ad716ac21054eea2cc2f816
describe
'41415' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
aee42e94f46c196cfeda47e90688e3f1
6bc90bec32857555fd14f89560fad88642556e89
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
482cf5ef87bdc418d4373da174e12602
e97d3e9abc7739da7f6dee3a8f5d26fb12f9ba70
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVR' 'sip-files00092.txt'
82eb8bd1b40144285119bf66ebeee03b
1a71ea7928444d300d610df057d9de6576d4d24b
describe
'10556' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVS' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
6c8986d492977db6a524d28f23e3380c
731bbeabe924fdc4fa5bb19380bc781bc25a0d7f
describe
'987286' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVT' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
d53c92d02a0af403b8ae8cc81f11d3ea
2446f0269cd6f471b0a2c9722d281fd8cd304663
describe
'108160' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
7475f0e2a3b978b8da71e33a9174bccb
077d63fa1ddc921a0c9f308072d6bb611c846da6
describe
'37558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVV' 'sip-files00093.pro'
43ba08e9d6fa2969477b6b370e36c174
3e446d9aa69786f3a4476fd52fbf8e4b51d588ea
describe
'38199' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
b1f79eab990b57d2378d802264f47565
a73966ab307dbd91e9683288704446fa47358364
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
71db87120e20fcf630787bf53f8f1013
98b7d58af00049fe97e0873893d558148945b05b
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVY' 'sip-files00093.txt'
e90830e5e02584f4daf4f89703e571ac
b51837bcab3197d348519f13b75d33569b3c0ab4
describe
'10328' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBVZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
6669e1ed3c36975ad2368673527e28ba
630dfc5731a3d6b5f41360a6daa022e590ea60e3
describe
'989336' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
3c34adfc199c2e38a2ae0d3886edc911
ef92bbe7dde59c350e816816afdc37d798a06a0e
describe
'117343' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWB' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
a6aab6d3f15e9b00885949ea3cfca98c
dcbf9fab38434745363e2cb1cb31fef767b6c57c
describe
'40309' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWC' 'sip-files00094.pro'
e54b74f267ee29592e2087adb36206af
fe9c637a8b221de1043105fd6bfc242278fc5c2c
describe
'41379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWD' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f114008e58d09654e035d3b37ed74527
557a21a0d3556883ae7996cda66706d927631817
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWE' 'sip-files00094.tif'
4debe22cd611ec2eb07dcaf53cec3602
7937a8a63b08dac9f345f645d0cd2a90fc51deb8
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWF' 'sip-files00094.txt'
4387f979ad3f7dc22bb8fd6614a18325
6834bec63bacb08a4bb732dc8387b0a4c878071c
describe
'10526' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWG' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
24c65a1d343bc1e9e06d86fdc8651652
0077f4291775ae241023976746089c495d20be52
describe
'987255' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWH' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
5a2a2c5a1bbac4db3db3500c63ae3b79
197e79eab43bae0741ec0a68161a453a9e944506
describe
'116882' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
f113075994aa09ccc35d5543a50ac59c
1eb9e697d7cfe0719b64d2f26c194983eb0a527c
describe
'41358' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
abaa574d2e53147b9e906dff6c1f85f9
47714c9dd14fcb5eb09bf84a8693b090f284e220
describe
'41328' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
106f7cbc8003b5ffa08159514738ad99
63fe8d2a615dab36879fe5d7de09dc2f6579fc75
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWL' 'sip-files00095.tif'
a66b57cdfef112dbdb9dd36bc5840729
01165f916f530941ee51e3469eb9508fabaf664d
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
c87a69bf3d468b65174e044d86d84b6f
113cb7a93da57351de0678d26eb9880d5cea7ebd
'2011-11-16T07:22:52-05:00'
describe
'10871' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
0a9527062b047937f49ec5c1df096d94
d7165278ca11d39b0db038400f5b83099b184735
describe
'989197' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
232bffb83fabab2dcb6003726a4dee88
5921bded497aed0e9b6d135969aa57b208ca3502
describe
'111482' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWP' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a3423f2c04b40ed8f6f393e9eceb7046
068056c68f6cdfd00ae1187121ee1d2f9cf0ca55
'2011-11-16T07:19:50-05:00'
describe
'36574' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWQ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
68e23d652bdbb782e1b11cb89d330062
87dc8afd9680238b07f4758eba5b4f74d617509c
describe
'39289' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWR' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
752f011804887a17a00520084146e2b8
c234d10e93117f4294574f4614c57ef88ca917fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWS' 'sip-files00096.tif'
e6d6acdb81cb0c2ac8edd9b380f40823
b6d1d165d5e8462ea5853464de2909e7e6315fbb
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWT' 'sip-files00096.txt'
5bd4a94d534b7c5d8958562c6d9dcf76
597599bfefc0162780176d7bc3e3817051a7dc56
describe
'10123' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWU' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
0b44995a588d46def2fb16a6eb87c7a9
6af72cff2cb2e902e6a78329525a65edfc44e00d
describe
'987281' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
f6df3cc36865ff5206264a97926ee62c
06c473af29ee262c1f448a37df237e75b24cd938
describe
'114123' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWW' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
14eb849dd46752b1541c7820bb3f7597
434671b773d445b7c2147618ed70dae9ea93057c
describe
'40804' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWX' 'sip-files00097.pro'
d238af1da74374c76a717f83b7011af3
26ad76cc5e3eccfc8272c811fe04663895fc82d1
describe
'40594' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWY' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
a35af7a02cde4c197cc5bf41a88a4bdd
18c5cacb37bbafdc9d3211ef2385cb9ea1c3f24c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBWZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
0d93f0d8934516925169e58ed96f112c
eb05c63c861c13ba847379a06ba0afa0ba83f07e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
4ce18cf42417b7ecb4611568fb8530d5
9d39700c0846800be33db2ee11f2aabd2899a04c
describe
'11042' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
00f2a1c409e3a410a32fa1ef6e2f9ef5
495cbf1dbb1ad25c198a060a0bfabc6ebb21ac62
describe
'989302' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
fe50fdc3d51cd61be2e74bc8007fe0ef
7b86fa0d1001b16d6ebb821f8642710c6b0ffe43
describe
'126803' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXD' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
65b5832bf1053a913ebe07dfd7f7c790
973a2ac81a17c38fa549fca9916bd6290b4974af
describe
'44713' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXE' 'sip-files00098.pro'
825b67d2addefada8ff2bcf5380b64f7
f5c6c4f3ca3ee1992035b4cf016de2eace8af5a1
describe
'44833' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
a84523c865ba06e95926c7df4bae3c09
b765673d649f1ee2808143f8de80b43e75e60b8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
ce03a9a0608ad5f5106708310fc0b9b1
ee8886019fbf1a3e0e45738beb94109c6f38055f
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
78e1056b9bd7e5d04614b0fa1a3d1642
bd319ad9aa94e877bccfe95b04e0cddd5dbdea25
describe
'11311' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
13f141cc065bd7f62e099d695b6ca204
1cba5f4d88f29d9c95950a2ecaf48e5641498322
describe
'1008734' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXJ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
bd8a41d90883454d96a7a7ef86648906
441b561105d8a9696a99cfab969b4e9ccceeb15a
describe
'109572' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
e0c941db01b1dcda35977ebd330b010d
9fd327abd8c8ea3d81e0872b6735eb697d5749a2
describe
'37996' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
f35a419a4bb792e81af9d9c8508afd1e
4dddae3a96ed06722f112791ff72902902f3e413
describe
'38770' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
cc39b36272d12f9d530a7ccdbe234733
bc2675a4e2353667286185a43079b42e3e558f73
describe
'8079325' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXN' 'sip-files00099.tif'
11366c09249162ed873e2a13cd81f86b
1f5f6e3ba0cca71eb554b21d9d93e8179300cd2b
'2011-11-16T07:22:55-05:00'
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
fe8b4bb2867072a2c5fde7bb85684b08
b7a7840255c175742b53acd27e0ec4405ad73dca
describe
'10156' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
f0411d313156d8d4fc1107e2c2dd8ccd
6b43999c56215a4ded44493a0af5ac66d6c7efdb
describe
'989296' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXQ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
8d2ad353d845f6c384a3dbeaa1ad401f
02e7ee1ad580f014ffd2c0c80a396e08bcfc8c82
describe
'118370' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
ba3928e8aadde77939cac9ffa526a808
376ba0a1ce1d8ff6561d42782f6ec28e104e82e2
describe
'41103' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXS' 'sip-files00100.pro'
0ccff20b15fee09e4e43e3dc2ab2500b
9a848c498631c499d5101b96b80a48b57944aeb5
describe
'41898' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXT' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
5b0d791a24b6ef755c007f7f03f0d68f
4a5bd953709c50d97c6e4d25f6d9b4de411f4e9a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
5f5719ff0cf768c934c595f0ebb12a6f
f9015ca8cc1a5336bbe381278cf8682e24a4d716
describe
'1664' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXV' 'sip-files00100.txt'
d7e8de8e4165f014b535ca6e887f7575
aa4ae247c1f08413f9861deb919ec4f07477101c
describe
'10572' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXW' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
ed0fbfd2405f51702b66015f4bddf2f1
d48bcd7a5c4f90d1cccc02d1afcab3f1aaee009d
describe
'987248' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXX' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
907659350d5cfeaf143956a4b25e11ec
125a537122ea0f5b63519f4896999da85bcc0efb
describe
'123145' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXY' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
4fa225eb3f1798f0cf298c451067a8db
bda6f103fd6cbe6c22c61de1d3638b884602a5b3
describe
'43702' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBXZ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
ff5ee8e2c049f003a423f3be1f28b7c1
666eff8af19cdd9e8fbc076a3d2d0237d0df95a1
describe
'43622' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYA' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
ce5fd9b7f3c4066c64cace38422e5f70
c32494610da4c3818942aea2bf31456fe3fe4935
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYB' 'sip-files00101.tif'
2b8e517397d14b1b3d80f0eb82240b59
b69bf58292b4c5f47222b605627afb4f8743d21d
describe
'1763' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYC' 'sip-files00101.txt'
58b360f27e4bbc5a60c1e41b6ff11772
f6fc0312f12acceaa88d2f68f2d215be2123535f
describe
'11470' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYD' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
36f3e38b45e349d54b73eb7bcef5122e
7d39be74925530a2d9e20bc0d1d39bc14bff946c
describe
'989330' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYE' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
3b94d1b49faef07e2a0e3da65d9d3e4d
2b4342b81d2caf196e3e543c23a238c6973f17ae
describe
'118034' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYF' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
4601b5f2b56ee379c46c0911575ae95d
87d6f803c781bbfb3672799d6edaeacc6ac27685
describe
'41171' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYG' 'sip-files00102.pro'
23e79a1e9a568553ad914b56d97e3b2f
8f2226f8c118e67101350b53f1f95604e736a7c8
describe
'41724' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
6386053723f85721cde14bf2d3a231c4
194a6c067676739fac403da48a5807a7d8c6ed54
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYI' 'sip-files00102.tif'
b4f9a89c77ac444769f9ed4fbb5d85f1
84c6b0d3afcd884bbae130bae9fa0f335e60619f
'2011-11-16T07:19:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYJ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
818ba913192d118eaff3c0a7b8ccbbd0
c3f300e14f5179d176eab8af3b85d3f22dba3a24
describe
'10618' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYK' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
1c56f86162c10d3ae1f8ce29b183488f
15473bdf31a10ffb8b93f74e47ee1d87301fe17b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYL' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
b4c4e2d807fd1d9cbaa21206f9543219
36580cb915524d29c58749083081284e8756d29c
describe
'116914' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYM' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
7e9ff677ef4924196e6938daec2fd5a1
9fa7b7ae575c81a621438fa2eed024bf4a0b4c45
describe
'42265' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYN' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ec4b1af04b7b658bc18f4531d074d699
f68261942202dfd43b08a1d4aa52cb4336b072ea
describe
'41381' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
9cd2a41913ebb7ed9e027d0f69e0dc1b
cdb0ff9682ddaa2a4e2368843fe9ccf8c7fd2e39
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
7bf98e72f382607f017690ed997bdc6e
10a02a4da0b72461a9b0c1f5a1aedc77acf81eda
'2011-11-16T07:20:18-05:00'
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYQ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
4225e2437b4f5d2d3bc829a477908b59
9d16e4183159671717ca3d3c02e71c55ee2edaff
describe
'10855' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYR' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
aa743d0e6b46643d7dba48941bf4e7c3
2b1d885c9790a6455de5a4ec10d5371544b79d30
describe
'989338' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
1dc229651451edc1534a9555b3519eaf
b94dc3402b5c94ca6060bb762683d5e8bd86b626
describe
'109674' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYT' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
780de3d4e9b2f2b61cbb48f810e2b53c
794ab360108e5e55fbe08d322fa434db6e267b48
describe
'34303' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYU' 'sip-files00104.pro'
2fb57c4be69ccb85e82c6fc12ab7c917
1ed43b14d2120d955a6bf47719079a467ab75b09
describe
'38846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYV' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
411f9acacb0bc15a35b31c7a163f3b66
08ad465bd8e7ac52adf6dd3381ecd93d748aa148
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYW' 'sip-files00104.tif'
7824471745a69a2e97008397f8903e1f
f9c972ef98fb8660755fb490590c23d406e97e31
'2011-11-16T07:20:24-05:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYX' 'sip-files00104.txt'
46938856022f3d3b64aa713c054a9427
d292ce5add1e4207adb2d95d74dc26fb3bc96e95
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYY' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
c95b2b39219d03551449bd22a61f14b7
098d5c55420992c6d8083b48d9b72c509ce651ec
describe
'987190' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBYZ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
3d0fe79557b480c3ee24aeeed4c870ef
b2c162c910506a64940e3be11b0f2ac035e1b215
describe
'97931' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZA' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
951b0fc82c8b767fa2e171388fc1643d
a6ba29de876a0e7a446d2eb0bfb591c13bc1d0f9
describe
'33302' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZB' 'sip-files00105.pro'
2e3bb1fe06b008d7ac849fefe4c23f87
c4ea5fc455b847b0dd928ff58e3e9c5974d872ef
describe
'34272' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZC' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
08070a6844bedb9d27914207804f3ccb
6ef0f396e9d4451faf3e2373ce42ede6b0022e5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZD' 'sip-files00105.tif'
ef51f5568d058c732b6de36862764a66
6b85c5ce4c36058963adf1848d7f324d629c3a21
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZE' 'sip-files00105.txt'
c0effaaaf6ef9429161760882af452d7
7f14f4282d1e43a10d638a217d6a049d8057eace
describe
'9066' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZF' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
a42d74c4fe5f0807ebc18d612dd04828
3b63d7d4d241645676b4b5e8d4b14586a1a8d1b9
describe
'989314' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZG' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
939a16484e2e420c4601a64935c283b4
5be4ac231aca4b471b07c04c06f8c48d8ab9797e
describe
'115465' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
57488e758a4ac6bcaa983ca54926600f
2a040ceca7c97b2bc829a93d59c5e8ab88f87cfa
describe
'38699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZI' 'sip-files00106.pro'
1b71b968b0058ecb11c17cdd9b09d387
043413f73c2a93e8678821dee4d44f00e0d2f8fa
describe
'41205' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZJ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
befd6c02e1eb1562b7837de2445b1aba
643fc10f064a1a535d35d6ed96cae92b109b5952
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZK' 'sip-files00106.tif'
c33a5f04ccb2ec87e8537957d4b65b54
e23b7c06f192e779fdb4b3621cd9bb4cca5e485d
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZL' 'sip-files00106.txt'
393612da607d14bdc7e1066d19d78c79
99f7a7e1c4cf9b4cb3bb9cffe21ced15f281a11d
describe
'10585' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZM' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
8d453182a533c8222964349ca9979785
d950eef11023c3a002dd2acc76a18e329e6cece9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
959976089cd80a95451e78ad7bb47fd0
43d2f251c6e20b1675fcf7609bbbd6d8eaaee1ef
describe
'107099' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZO' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
79fc5813c937e78bf228d99179d576d6
4dc8acceb22542e97cca87239314a2dee2752b1e
describe
'38130' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
c951b25619c21d050a1d89dc7ae404dd
7958b18dfcaa2e6a81e5c512bf74c0a8a94ee16a
describe
'37418' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZQ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
da61343a511b1cc9e129ea913f5a849a
f041189d2a268f00c2dd6dba5a7c8bdae9b8e185
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
088945592d253787f0e3489b83584a7e
75fcb716cf356ace70d21acb9c6bd75e033e662b
'2011-11-16T07:21:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZS' 'sip-files00107.txt'
9fee31b3a5d079b8c66d24e2bd521ada
121d5ad316f79ccbc6f9c6955f53c71e71644faf
describe
'10111' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZT' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
72fa5033b4ab7a45eb42d77110eb9bb0
9847e4e2ee0ba9baaf482c5b0d7e7be507e741ae
describe
'989309' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZU' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
9001e3f93e62515554e74cbdc66a69d2
48535f7d6cfb7cdf34df78d1bc1a8a6517e1f03e
describe
'116172' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZV' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
396003a1dbed692c00b24797307c02f7
6075f51ccb90431efe3eedcd9d081e09af14c3d4
describe
'39958' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZW' 'sip-files00108.pro'
6138440a9a47d61969854e0d74294b9f
7dce79602ca49d09acb1ad6ad2da69e47d06afb1
'2011-11-16T07:19:45-05:00'
describe
'40943' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZX' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
766eeea258abf870a11b8b69f805de19
667fb783dc1b0ffb9514d1b636a4542cdb7eeb1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZY' 'sip-files00108.tif'
45ad7950c60dcc2378c65d38977e80c3
1642736a3eb7eaec47355635bc8d56a9faa74d63
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABBZZ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
e133b09591deed77d48cf2b26d5ed170
7a35d11121cbf3d577a6bf25b5a552d1f624f3f4
describe
'10699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAA' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
0687ad51faf8e02e4d4558b6dfdaa4a1
b968bda15bee74963c9c73b0cc31fd05f430e7fb
describe
'987285' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAB' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
10bcfbcbda0630f5abf298a5dad6e716
bd041f42a5f52e8c75fa670fec50962da77d59eb
'2011-11-16T07:23:54-05:00'
describe
'117846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAC' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
5d796462cb7ecbff58bd0a77fd99479b
82239b62946babe16647d52c70e4cf7161e6536e
describe
'41629' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAD' 'sip-files00109.pro'
4034af1c01803fe8ee0c0bee001211d1
8f82e5c905f012fc15481fd49ef745efae27a35c
describe
'41684' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAE' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
8114fbd3b54f238f50cb39c4022f8efb
0b74bb17da0efa48ada6841b217133bdb549a4f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
6cf7aa0118019685157c40e099b835a7
7430ffbeaaea8a43414cefd3d6eff90e16d60e65
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAG' 'sip-files00109.txt'
d9ad37f53eccef7f8c404d5dc9c40e7f
d9b072ff0a2231165575d297894ecd6b0fd7a671
describe
'10934' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAH' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
21ddef48b18c0f8fc9da96b923d1c5d3
d2aca86b359e22fa1721a81fbc3a0d3b32532354
describe
'989289' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
35afa1a7c3088b74babd6a525d6c38ac
6bf75b1ae1b28a269b171516ae68459075324acf
describe
'111264' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAJ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
95a2e3ff953197d1d184bd819d7000aa
8308dba098398fab1630953f6ca94caa25629b07
describe
'37993' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAK' 'sip-files00110.pro'
d9fa0fdbfa16573cd716687c6430f74e
7d46e031fd4414070984ff5c06a185a204dec50f
'2011-11-16T07:21:16-05:00'
describe
'39322' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAL' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
dd479ce1d63735f4fdfefea4bb487a43
ba4068f039b963368fcc0a3e1319ca83eb55e14f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAM' 'sip-files00110.tif'
a6521774f41d5973ffa802c9ebd0c2d2
a717ac391f802629112f78dd234d619780ea1578
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAN' 'sip-files00110.txt'
82d0f3148ebed5f69df86009d170f37c
c82a16b43cf2a8150626663277e146a6d1c32ea6
describe
'10296' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAO' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f1cdb41118039647a5d3e10f608caf08
9f141d1c92e4e8437df8561ba2320e3fb1a0e5aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAP' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
1215ea9500c2eb0087ab4c5b2b713cdd
a5e4f0b792099493efedccafefb5632d1b22ee50
describe
'117416' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAQ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
53838fe5f3da18a70a2dccee42b39823
a034f33bac58964bbb5c1220daf2bc04b05aac72
describe
'41476' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAR' 'sip-files00111.pro'
7b23d0634db39aadee8f8a5e8f6230e8
1edf7473883c044e09ab22f13ca71dc64706dcdf
'2011-11-16T07:19:32-05:00'
describe
'41558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAS' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
33e5ad06c3e78ab51a6249a1f6508c31
12408e13759356c0ab8221d1d0e6cdd636831afa
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAT' 'sip-files00111.tif'
5b4f31eeca238e8835b80191418298b1
58db1307eda330526385f5a9b112d447ea29e5e6
describe
'1665' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAU' 'sip-files00111.txt'
369158a25a787488674b17a7818a2e19
bf660805a6ecea1bb8dd759276f78c530a98f1c5
describe
'10920' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAV' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
bb14ce3bcbaa42384af3e61a94a759ca
3b7b3936a6d9c5f5e8055b4b56b63c8e94d03aa2
'2011-11-16T07:19:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAW' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
0e43357f2c6a975bf242bb97248d67e6
7aca1bf3f829fe086aee9a1d74721f4264cdc03e
describe
'117492' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAX' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
37529650750249cf3704c29263c6c360
0f349ff7e9629885e5509f61c273aa9d275f3d8e
describe
'40642' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAY' 'sip-files00112.pro'
598d674f9fa12fc4ffa092f0706a29e1
3713e9bbb52650a6d8dd4d36f4c5f8851ba54c35
describe
'41036' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCAZ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
cfc46980df3522677b6fdb3a3d4c741d
4e192f665a6584662551a5a79ac54a85e92960c6
'2011-11-16T07:19:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBA' 'sip-files00112.tif'
0a43457e6f71f0bb7e2bf4544afbad8a
4a97c2b1b88b8a3459c3f1ce52f43030ae696c00
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBB' 'sip-files00112.txt'
e41532eadff690d69718c7a5c2662840
e1cb44be9e43fdcf38cc8b86de8f039246935fee
describe
'10608' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBC' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
4a5e1866fd4a8cad2e58d819e431813b
87030a50a1bec627b472a3c2b5dc1b015949bfce
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBD' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
f4fa2c2a5fd459929c91dbcfb5e1d816
ccc1c94016dcfda1034962b9ed20f0be5d319a4e
describe
'112421' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBE' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
3ed7e1d6a149a6dcdfafed860876f824
a85ebeed44e53606c1801c13797b27fc6a1013bd
describe
'39735' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBF' 'sip-files00113.pro'
f5e33dd712b40e7630f8c767da103c56
1eb7ef6fb23f7401346568922b6cb150217cfdfb
describe
'39885' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBG' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
59ce919b15aa9573b8d3525edbdd63b0
54cd84fca448d9dae426152ca1910d9716334c67
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBH' 'sip-files00113.tif'
896bf483d0b037e45eae3904b3bef046
91581eeae3b8b600b1c59d2321409b6effff247d
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBI' 'sip-files00113.txt'
b09f6e5040460e4c0c1c397335fb214b
d5f6b4c21df12fb7b3c88a886af87c9f19b70d26
describe
'10643' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBJ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
cbf44a38e3b2a1b17aa8a94bdf240367
33091547752f4d57507123d7c0c74a1e6bf2bc49
describe
'989144' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBK' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
5fea70040226839e4470503fe0aeb649
7fc30ef97b88f6b7427acc44754b4f8a54b278de
describe
'70488' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBL' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
e99b50eaf1c5d316c94922e3ec629b84
f722e2fd0242e2d7fba2a04b1c0e3832306153a6
'2011-11-16T07:19:36-05:00'
describe
'21563' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBM' 'sip-files00114.pro'
fa5d4bb920b25944b1ec867a8e845c59
8878f5d3a116f007a4b722553002876b9739ea9b
describe
'24590' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBN' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
c94a226d94ca60f0a6e5af414b75679c
4ae151a1a8c23f2c8bb688229d342eb618206423
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBO' 'sip-files00114.tif'
071bcfe0ef4b7d25bf1032250acf16dd
ff860dd6265e35e5cfa22c3dac472ab314224d10
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBP' 'sip-files00114.txt'
1ec570aa778c6da75ce6adbeb437be06
694e4f9bbaf6f431b63dfe3cd97051dcafce99dc
describe
'6542' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBQ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
d4e752205acf9ef44f1bad78e68b93b7
d033b94bd32fb75850e2fbcc5a40b0a0bc3c6a81
describe
'674963' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBR' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
f5f3407bc63eaab3a95167acaac6b831
01514a7f851073807eea70949fdf54cc3764e0cb
describe
'14429' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBS' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
3284accd2b49aa514335e87effd455b1
411bf597ad913c6e14485bcc5b02fe03a2786b02
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBT' 'sip-files00115.pro'
75491b4ea86b91e0dacc6a7f603b816a
8f804a11d4f2eb9cc2044226bb226c1f659a3ced
describe
'3742' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBU' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
0839bce4fc9947cd4c83f627fa24e852
a5052a2f5bad36f5572cb8aac03c684f3421223b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBV' 'sip-files00115.tif'
74a1c3dcc53a4d41f4b7f82f95c5c28e
db36d6135efcf93f53d972668144cb1cc9d6a5c5
'2011-11-16T07:21:25-05:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBW' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
307f65436f968462608f21930d039507
ae5f33b5745cf9da85f37f7c43e16257cf720122
describe
'989282' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBX' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
89ec9b54e43e608a9d461fc5ef2bee31
69e691550b0531bee9d74be1e9c000f07253f805
describe
'89755' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBY' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
1032551b77d2f8122cdad05b5cdd4914
c8dce3fbb69fe3f0c20be3905c5832a27e0e3c88
describe
'20500' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCBZ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
55f48ca8a19c933cdcd1a22e32de01a3
239324a8b306fbdcd39280e88c8b4a36d66a4438
describe
'30404' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCA' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
990ca30ae917a27f63b57537f76222d4
120c489baaffc7dc1e5e43e026dd7618d389fc59
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCB' 'sip-files00116.tif'
f54c608d67f1e1fec35346fb3453cb33
703e9215d2df0fc5d25d896b19c02fd95050def5
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCC' 'sip-files00116.txt'
dc3924f337f23a667b44e4eaaf216ecf
3eedbc713c0dc313ad27200c0b8b0f9dbc590b95
describe
'8227' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCD' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
bbce300355a1bd5c2ab4fa86c0cfef03
243beb5801f1589151d522b6524ed9d392cb5411
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCE' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
60dadae81bd19300d3d51d9c0d112b17
f1fa619ee1079f6e96b47f83a4e4f7327fc794fc
describe
'81938' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCF' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
e502e0532fd0f7000f56c4cd6ae59ca7
9c37fd39dae60d75b63cd72135c04e0b0032dfd5
describe
'27236' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCG' 'sip-files00117.pro'
2cd641c443717b04607a8c5185fd65be
75e72132ddac2c07d6110a33165121045bace04e
describe
'684828' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCH' 'sip-filesBack.pro'
be718c54d849e5e9976a9e7e8a2a4395
bd8fe4eb1c635ef1569f8b3c188950537001ccb5
describe
'29387' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCI' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
fb02094f433905830cb57d546eea17b3
548e6b17c2a090d008659de7e5fd9b425a258008
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCJ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
fe15d70273f9ce4e9d097bb20e860173
bf5255893494b93b3c54034a075ba99765a87ac8
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCK' 'sip-files00117.txt'
24129f93452966ae73fa2392a82a85f2
44414f0361bebb2f49b7e2a8cf1ff3e91cec6c03
describe
'8650' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCL' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
34276f1bcb2ee22d6b2589de435486f9
f1bf5f0f4397ae689d675537d3977f30fffc9897
describe
'989305' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCM' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
7cdf82b69f8bb243201045f43a244663
a3fdbefc56add0f7a949acfe5b22b4f5335c8891
describe
'114425' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCN' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
9d655ecf586da3b2b7a73207e8f50aa0
803a01e5dbd1fead8224bbcfbb53664cfe73a85e
describe
'40131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCO' 'sip-files00118.pro'
8f18dedf2283788eac11591c34058fcc
e6ca7179ab19d508de750dddd8c128d317ea24f4
describe
'40340' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCP' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
82816e496f0c0ea428b76593de2cb5c4
516304331a1607b02819d5bcd26f49ad8aabfef7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCQ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
0d01048ec77da86ce2bcff2293311154
e409d9593b6f80f68d2ac5faa251d7ff67c2dbdc
describe
'1617' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCR' 'sip-files00118.txt'
43dec5015c4bbe0c50d9c38ebed22f5a
9bfc4e28267ede9310c4af16af48b9c739c8204a
describe
'10204' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCS' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
521f491028a8c63dc91909173493dbd2
aa68bd373c81c756c05ee05092d856fe579b7c44
describe
'987283' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCT' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
cd2436d1984a507aabffac08dc87c82d
8883d3045396aa761a18673fc3c2bddf1d7484f4
describe
'104076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCU' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
c05508d28baa236de4974f3ac918e572
fdb7b8ec5d74a2613b1ef1497cf3368d27c2faf7
describe
'35972' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCV' 'sip-files00119.pro'
1332edc057901b653ad3171fef5fc9b4
1f446c10ada4775cd82e6d3434846e3d8c2f1f34
describe
'37446' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCW' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
1769fff52196a2c170afcfa9f1b1074d
0d8b5622c365855ace3ed3dc618ec16ce77299bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCX' 'sip-files00119.tif'
4d0751666a7947651d4311d65732fc7b
70dc926228c9e5167e69329bd748146fa563d79a
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCY' 'sip-files00119.txt'
52c4f1b5376b74c46ff5997cf7e45486
bdf340f36e68e91cb3d3f83f5d3c9c9c706f3900
describe
'10363' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCCZ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
50b072506cd827787fc98c82d35bfa5d
c88022613bdbefe840478d21009409492067eb45
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDA' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
dfbd79bd9a6311617ee7be1ecd309083
eec5177b9137500b36f6e35189dacdcc1b81ecb2
describe
'106466' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDB' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
2413941e70e41799d36267121fa51530
7466f2cb99ff115cece068c75da77f0fb02860b8
describe
'35952' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDC' 'sip-files00120.pro'
adf9785771c6e72dffa3e0fd871dcc5e
260968f8c8bd3cac82a52673a5a56b200aa0c546
describe
'37377' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDD' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
17ed860b9688307d4c777c5f464a5512
2c75d8a68bd39ff68cecf2dc5fd839e27b8af6fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDE' 'sip-files00120.tif'
23742a87cd35b0fa057a857397da510c
0b8b0f6fd4fb299c334721a5121e2812ef4c29d0
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDF' 'sip-files00120.txt'
6988d264bd8d7ec1e04374febb9df7f0
43a1dca264c704c3d471c5c2e571c5a658c93182
describe
'10028' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDG' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
3bba2c3325af003d8e1c038a24508229
9655e3d887f3c6ea475d141e67193dba7a97af9d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDH' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
fde02bc1afa96207a57e3962a7ee7a7a
3a6df0d73c3db46d9f9079f1aacdaead532f2561
describe
'109492' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDI' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
ce61ac8b96baa6de15527e712e4ea1ee
76cb274ac2a82d627478d719478d4b46f4730911
describe
'38928' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDJ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
d154cdf290944391c13268f78a12c5ad
cca8c9be7b437a4578b558733f601921cad88ba7
describe
'39275' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDK' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
0f089c791f38abc72fdaef55fca324a7
f4047e0b0028b18d401c7ebe9a7b3b621072c8fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDL' 'sip-files00121.tif'
fdb17770a7afd34776ecb4828a754d1c
1f1925afb6a29f9ab8cd845f60cfdeec58dda375
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDM' 'sip-files00121.txt'
a2b0a75e68b2473d710931b22a98b8a6
2aae535c45a341191f0e33c68ccc4000b0a82ac1
describe
'10312' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDN' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
f6e290ae12e9bd6b25e455b57a1c587c
c9c19419ab51f7ba19c92233a3fc7a964ddfde68
describe
'989243' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDO' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
30872a3d9126802e83882a8e37c98cd7
009f8dcc5d34d0157b9a84b4127b7cb10d7e7b8d
describe
'106789' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDP' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
b7beeb12bda55881e059575e5c09d41c
c9b4fac310d6b79a2e01bc13ca44f66341937db2
describe
'37242' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDQ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
ded3edc96a427543738ee3953626e877
492654f792a35a728e3c4411e7e4bedb2fae3d25
describe
'38108' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDR' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
e43174a806cd74d39ea801f61f22b7d0
7de7ecf8791950b901a4ecac626a11a9eb437a94
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDS' 'sip-files00122.tif'
1174db4faf5ee3754c7b10f021168a18
0ff0b14dea8f3dac2fd53b85558b3e85f80bcd10
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDT' 'sip-files00122.txt'
a1f6f8aeb590068b1de2f496f82ae8b3
fe3e14277a8f249adf3d0e137634ac6cacc6f1d5
describe
'9866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDU' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
9e96045ba8a0b8fa2ac5b180b5df9859
39b752e508a82b058ca5ebd0634491673b04ffa1
describe
'701450' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDV' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
bd6ab9fd7b275adb0d26c352813a8579
224155027ff15f747ee3581d8456542fa89bf008
describe
'14870' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDW' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
3a0eb806809a084d6fd02fa725148cb4
0543136f72f1895af86cd38b0266cd9bb8c6f5a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDX' 'sip-files00123.pro'
8a85a01a1e0aa3c83952a87211151034
b068eaa86f46bed0ea6913345dd8b3adfa196607
describe
'3834' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDY' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
e01fdc04abd167d3e26453af81d7f30f
156f3a08c3185f44bdc881caffbf155a0d9274b0
'2011-11-16T07:20:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCDZ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
e68b919a5a56af2a07fb871adc41e7f9
42c75fa5cc6757ff8fd10d707f502dfa40bf8bb0
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEA' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
a22adb0676d88ad363fc172111474421
37e1fcc938232aac8210d2f519f5bdadf7ecd0a3
describe
'989337' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEB' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
c2e5385ca1c34d7ecff491708394ed33
9f41a3484376a09928422c81c6c2f034f3f36118
describe
'92819' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEC' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
1a16205403983066caf185542bd55b95
400274f947c34ec062a80741e691962c1f10e663
describe
'29764' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCED' 'sip-files00124.pro'
ed7cb39144b41bc5d6b7c96ec34dd4ab
1b9512ecccdb1ea05ecc3b63b157f438fb6c9d15
describe
'32379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEE' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
2cebb8b72b4f9b6cfe4eb1671f226a60
5724bec155553d7a8da56b2e0b3ef8b0dbb1f39d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEF' 'sip-files00124.tif'
ec3edd17788973c208aa220863482fa5
3425765c01a5bccd1c363e9f1dc90caee26812e2
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
ae93e56e6d96f446e56fdf9d139cba59
9b3d94ddb77ee1b4cc627b8c54fcbc0a0f2f47e6
describe
'8365' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEH' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
3f3a0e83c2fbffcfb24c8c8e82b189ea
a4f380357ae5d8d4e7f35c9bfafd0d347364bb5d
describe
'1034385' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEI' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
6b6ee7478a61820899c8c81ff300a8bf
f71f0cef7968e9e9b3878d1538bca098aa069db9
describe
'89603' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEJ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
732e69fddb759543b8a126d56bf67f7b
3bdeda2700a6b2713c4bca446f4b8044a3ad1b5c
describe
'16951' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEK' 'sip-files00125.pro'
2abdff1f5927e503a9fe2eddd1cb3478
7d40d9d03aef65279dfa036702c7cd2bafa45565
describe
'30379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEL' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
3933f0063e3416190176d66aa4fdcfe3
36bca180082cb35e432baea7e66cd6d118f6fc18
describe
'8284491' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEM' 'sip-files00125.tif'
59a68cc7691ed9fbb43de038bb84edb9
10b828a705befaff96fb49467bf4600b93f834b1
'2011-11-16T07:22:07-05:00'
describe
'742' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEN' 'sip-files00125.txt'
c3b9f14d75d21a0e2dd21ecbab8b645d
633a145bb51538eb92f9d113e33ddcec43e0e32a
describe
'8945' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEO' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
97c90a7fb6da92a6fa7b1524f243a7d1
50c7f326395b617783f1fa14593f55f8c23b620b
describe
'989297' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEP' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
32ca0ed08197fda6bd872a2a39ff553a
a2fe6c215f76aaf68db9d7488085af5ec55335fd
describe
'86965' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEQ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
d2492d3431a644f53758c1553461552e
b97468b64be8e1e34768bdff98c65e2bc9d5e563
describe
'19079' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCER' 'sip-files00126.pro'
6f25ca9224a0352599f90ea1bfc7c424
bc7ee0c519885d38027a6e5e8d9d1378a2f0d061
describe
'29513' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCES' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
7e725d0afe18c2acd4ee152813e70a1f
b3f69bec199cfad610b981ea11f4ecb63c085d02
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCET' 'sip-files00126.tif'
e279ff50ee0b6c4680c163201c0123f3
10ff874421091b073c8bc319b530990378b7f61b
'2011-11-16T07:22:53-05:00'
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEU' 'sip-files00126.txt'
c1b88b4088776c65abe8a23a9b4cbbff
edb2724178ee02d6596c0fb21ef20fd7eb1df2e6
describe
'8443' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEV' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
fd92354b84ef6d19c7998f9535e3d44f
1a33bc4f91d9e144ae2151febc452069f9d87d12
describe
'987067' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEW' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
1515e5c05f7310ef9328f1276c4ef794
ca2757489d065f80824a26c91b886e2958a9298a
describe
'103201' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEX' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
e5a6de7ed0ece1b7f507ea32f81b4327
469c384645c07a8e8a1241b1011dcb0d56ebb4a1
describe
'34971' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEY' 'sip-files00127.pro'
474cdaa0df9ef1c1387d8a27489beb0b
25652722a586fe1585a0d9fc625f1f516e149d87
describe
'37181' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCEZ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
40f6ae5da6a0b1a66eba3afcd153bbd8
bef7ceaaaaabc2376b02289911f26ed46fb30d8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFA' 'sip-files00127.tif'
4950dd09d3984e6ec22457bcd02143a7
bae416ee160ed121376661914e4db214743f775d
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFB' 'sip-files00127.txt'
402b0a7c59dee200a6369fb059b4d721
52718fa1a3c53b8abbf915e1b101d3f0438d9713
describe
'9852' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFC' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
29c601cdc03edaf76aabfe3039d35800
bce8bafd08669981c301e30ed2be801634829fb8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFD' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
2b53f4945c2af402ef7ebb6f2e7adfb2
351f4d26d37ffe082b865c458ed9dd31b677baf7
describe
'106755' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFE' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
75954cfa86bdb28930902153eb9366d3
9e8861da10fc36c8c09feda570a4a678a316471e
describe
'34929' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFF' 'sip-files00128.pro'
e202a2f965d2c0a3f115cedeeeb2a701
f32c1eade6ea408e5aece60d8123174c188f0699
describe
'37796' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFG' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
fbb0f0838451f61b6da04e281e5a07f1
cd11da37727cb514a64cf2283a4f87c2011881c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFH' 'sip-files00128.tif'
01e1ea9091c27b184443417d60c5dedd
ad99984a3a89dc70e93c0f3bdb22ecab39975a3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFI' 'sip-files00128.txt'
993782910d04e95faca53d5e295fbc59
d7b1621bdbe08ac005e117a72f15f4b548b3fa3e
describe
'9967' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFJ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
554bc9705b1cf0879220f2d5c3cccffc
1abc7c444893558b6b251500256f6961610cf510
describe
'987278' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFK' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
6a48eeccb18845b73190410065589d92
2985df7ecaeb063bd1ba1d2a52b4b5650b250496
describe
'106487' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFL' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
13aa2ab8dc2ba8edb2363347dff7ce77
662d4354993a8c06e8d712179a36dc1e3e264adf
describe
'36183' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFM' 'sip-files00129.pro'
13d550b880483f7106ca1d9fa485b4ca
1900a06da7738c8299be19f8a445d3971bfe568f
'2011-11-16T07:20:51-05:00'
describe
'37614' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFN' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
691e3151e6d144dc8e626f55ec7745e5
9158da341934166524926fd9bb3be8234b6a660a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFO' 'sip-files00129.tif'
696d489c36f0e709ad28ced1428613cd
703f033fd1c383064a50d35f46fb18f467652037
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFP' 'sip-files00129.txt'
e01f48a9677f64085272a225eeb1e7a7
1c8d8da2da700bdddc4b994c2e58d0b08183305c
describe
'10073' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFQ' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
08463836705fb5abc20227bb71122b10
2cfbc2d3559bd30a7a0692c7521bd9048a8b2f05
describe
'989313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFR' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
b55b516fcf1db50245f5ca8226cbb288
298aeb169307a79b1ea7bb9050ccaad78eb79d1e
describe
'111417' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFS' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
32485b931090eb1725bebc5efaf5848b
6e8297e46b848d04715f69554127172f6f56c744
describe
'38720' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFT' 'sip-files00130.pro'
8c4e62a483abc12fbb789fe8c844ff78
2aadbb73a349ed3dc0efd42b37172f531d808c0a
describe
'38694' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFU' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
37ce83e6d917f457adfb110b2504b0db
b37dd306722c3562a67440c0991fb39905259c7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFV' 'sip-files00130.tif'
279c6b70636a02af86acd3c4914648a4
049a0b60af377ca6e607fcb5862ff1fd7e753098
'2011-11-16T07:22:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFW' 'sip-files00130.txt'
96f56c7329e5f97325316303475b27cf
c1eeb55f49dc4acd17950c910027e8bb98604fe0
describe
'10245' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFX' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
1e9638beda602302e4d94e8f8c828d75
4ba1060a312f0fa896f31e0794d683277868d7c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFY' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
2edd233a36071680b1dc09b4da18ee99
8ea03d008c4f7f812cfd7f8d21732c29bff1f6f5
describe
'107275' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCFZ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
b7aef053dbd3d480e50534e33b2fa94a
47a764c20625baa2f4326f6fd3bf769825e8de89
describe
'36792' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGA' 'sip-files00131.pro'
9f9622f1244a31c95b82fa73f587862d
2774e3334739356f2322f8ad181bd6300113148d
describe
'37534' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGB' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
404f4b84e7f072e43b35d9d1ed72234c
67f494c940d2630b918dc67eb22237f451ad53af
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGC' 'sip-files00131.tif'
50a2badb5bd582b02d7af4d40f217092
f0be87c340cf98f9c9c4fa405a19bf568eb6a941
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGD' 'sip-files00131.txt'
c861b99710d749cc688ecfe565ca74b8
926f35ed08a49ee24e7d366589e98f87a7f4ad71
describe
'10248' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGE' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
b62a7d96e0f788ea24bff662e9440193
b09a13c330a1cc91e6debab5c9ad860e79cd9d12
describe
'989317' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGF' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
dbff9401aa311024efa95971beb68be7
f43f4209ab7b52b262016d7dd5c8000322a4cf1d
describe
'73588' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGG' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
cf3f14a22f154d7a33c91d36a28e9dc1
9898c385ace747b57d3ec86e2b62028d128f81e0
describe
'20166' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGH' 'sip-files00132.pro'
7389b8f2dfc4a628b4f243e81348964e
cc06f5dd878c2f65dfb8d5d1cc9293e6267ed8e5
describe
'25362' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGI' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
028155a18f29d64163882c4c49c3ce30
268ecd43bdd2b96ed9aafb3fc999f6150b99ef24
'2011-11-16T07:20:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGJ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
fff4540102b6a78dfcff8bfd97d92f29
69c651524cacd4c3e890281b320a5372a586634d
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGK' 'sip-files00132.txt'
1cfc17c0ceffb2f5382fa37976d8176a
deb0f6b123cdb41bb5d71c163144758ecb3371ce
describe
Invalid character
'6931' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGL' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
1f4fbe20b79eca7a9a01d57d02ef5d8a
742e4b3f275a8537cbaab363c35aba3ed5617198
describe
'702070' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGM' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
9a8ba756fdefc358dbca520d7b50f607
9d62f5df445d3b810987b55d570868b3bcecd9d9
describe
'14893' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGN' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
15223fc19b219a2b3a6405f56ea526db
d9005d13f22a61be5f97e7e2e82620cc81bf9b4d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGO' 'sip-files00133.pro'
4eebabbed888b05409e361d91c01f69f
bfbdd28bc0ca8d1b49577acc5fd671eb01672f77
describe
'3854' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGP' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
1a28d1b9f4b1ecad829f31a16420b8e6
c85dc0e8e4ff1d3d5a696ca4285bb2c18b5ab36c
'2011-11-16T07:20:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGQ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
faa7dbbff816d12bbc1f6dc0645c9b13
40cb4b42cff9d1a19727725fd6d2e92345c5093e
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGR' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
1df031f88364d0bcc7fca9dde961ab64
3145ad78f0b1c342075df1ec7eb35df0f11022c7
describe
'947486' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGS' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
c9c4a0d2d8d09a83546767f8e035bd56
21335f627b9b8a5d8551aec598c8d4f914fda0e6
describe
'94274' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGT' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
ec12c0e7eb43e54190cc52314aea9f7a
b5b723a3588425962ee25b35b0568a740084ad28
describe
'17837' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGU' 'sip-files00134.pro'
68693e4185e437b8cd8a04a5e4539b88
bcc3235e9b337d5fc97d793bac48f8709cb99a4d
describe
'31439' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGV' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
95287d874bdf6ca483a8681a5dff57c8
fd6aa84533858aa18b22acb3606a1f43db884d84
describe
'7588983' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGW' 'sip-files00134.tif'
51a96469b09eeaebea48e41f41dae130
f7b23aa815ef74e66e18584f871c53a86486d717
describe
'738' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGX' 'sip-files00134.txt'
c1fda527f937db1ea62823a254f955f0
3b45a86a900e66eace5364c899adcdd645458e81
describe
'8622' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGY' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
f180b7d03cde1cad43be394d13bd1b43
f0832f7d4947628dc858a8ffa8e74d6203ee0ab0
describe
'1004200' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCGZ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
ea3c026ea76e3595c33ffe7d9bac221c
40143f79fd576ad086751534264e254cdc575f3f
describe
'126890' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHA' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
c86b59ec6da4251dab27dced2b90a7f2
87d19a181578e60766e8bd526b354e5fc8de0e61
describe
'45232' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHB' 'sip-files00135.pro'
10a71dcaa252f30a4d4b5a56b8afb84e
b649e16f573d6fb88fcd1a64cf1de7af8a352d0e
describe
'44736' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHC' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
5bdcf2c730f7e7376fb3781357202f3a
89eeb2600f52f9e9c9d3bd6d336c5cbe0582b821
describe
'8043075' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHD' 'sip-files00135.tif'
ebaae17ff892c939e74b0593431d0baf
6aa8bd1ac19330023e1c5b9a3b4cc3daff274155
describe
'1820' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHE' 'sip-files00135.txt'
c5a61c5674a303427bb0c85dd2da1e8a
7b76f793af77ee909fd5fa34590c5e482fbc0b77
describe
'11842' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHF' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
ea45225114999b6721f3a1a79a1a4c20
c30b55d9ccfb4fb90dc90647edd385a39994f8ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHG' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
dbe819e2da33725298758de981263d86
78f8145104fa5381513a1e52a3ec81d12a4b1299
describe
'126858' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHH' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
5288395354c824159d96bc6c5defb8e0
512fd8ddaebff725e144ddb5918dca09746d3875
describe
'44045' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHI' 'sip-files00136.pro'
5450c6657b65a79a25b7bef439f70895
a920675d04d6ba542f4d2c0df51e961ba946486b
describe
'44250' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHJ' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
aa3a0e07a0371cd5f4d3dab7859495ae
81b702a48c51cbc43a3c3fa838029a8a2fc0437f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHK' 'sip-files00136.tif'
8945f8b3682ce3443b422ab948cbdb03
6f053fbfbbfa665b693b468cb479de5947965cfb
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHL' 'sip-files00136.txt'
b578833bfb90b24435562e92b176a404
e35698559cabf3386384923a3d3606cbdfa84ba4
describe
'11358' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHM' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
5233c24a78624018100f6ef34bb98046
12ea0faaf73c178e6b86ad0f19834048744ebb2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHN' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
62876d3fe6e55b67cb4495e4d9f02e00
2a0a2c624221fa86b03ec63c4e00043467a26bc1
describe
'110736' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHO' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
3634d4c9224c7668091518cf95bdcc48
7b5806649f00c849c7d9fb040df72285128c53e4
'2011-11-16T07:19:40-05:00'
describe
'35588' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHP' 'sip-files00137.pro'
b95c5aee27d07ae762562000d6055937
d9efbd866cd6c954d21d5ae5764394514e11f150
describe
'37904' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHQ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
970f40dfd1c6f0831a03a65dbc057363
b55308adc68628d2540c35733ad53ac9a3b08e22
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHR' 'sip-files00137.tif'
1fac2793f36432d95a7ba0e2a8766b20
41a09e14bf090b63055c61f3ba57aff8d5c718ce
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHS' 'sip-files00137.txt'
a16178f3a59dd377795f421dfafde268
22825896347f2d4e0b48a17bfb1dba052e3a72fa
describe
'9965' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHT' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
d5c496d3aa91212eb3ec830f3ee0dfb1
cf09c80d59f669b0066c499555b76f99075750e3
describe
'989283' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHU' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
39f5e19ea7af2e2f507eb5ad01b68d7c
972d497a64d53b0aaf2ac8761244de14abf10743
describe
'120499' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHV' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
4a9c38b4fe6771ced0054dce00581bd4
92f45fe2242c272e356b401af19be2381fbd3ab6
describe
'41571' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHW' 'sip-files00138.pro'
733da3e071a844812b4c44fec1a71599
c16de2d07354e55d732eb1fba22dd9cd7904ce24
describe
'42042' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHX' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
8dfdf0ff58dc97cd276c4f8d9be685bd
1047d7a1d46ceac4a3735ea98a759a0a657fe535
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHY' 'sip-files00138.tif'
b6dc2a85a0bf52c1685950283b7d6370
2295a760c9e6868b572a3caf9a5f58df2b96330b
'2011-11-16T07:24:30-05:00'
describe
'1706' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCHZ' 'sip-files00138.txt'
774500c3bea97ff09d15d37a7f751035
d319690eda8316d0774f51a046e6c772b3853284
describe
'10829' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIA' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
5fad64bafdd94b9bdab963d1fce3f39d
64da921b38544ba8d952937d97e71bb9c552b952
describe
'1017778' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIB' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
267b4a37b212f3ee253e2b4c0a0dc307
d6a959e5e36139c84190f0c57db2c4c578c46f66
describe
'127287' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIC' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
98286227b90c3ade9b270925388bef78
6fdda7f6cfef74d2e7b31c25ee51db60e7dca5ea
describe
'46128' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCID' 'sip-files00139.pro'
fc3945d7ed0edf7f3ad5e516460775f3
1d396d41dcd08b63281dd7e86ecc76b670782e47
describe
'44060' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIE' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
3bc66440aa168bc5ea704c66b9488639
03b087ab1e6b1f9d3a69a304874d1aab006d589e
describe
'8151825' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIF' 'sip-files00139.tif'
e6a5fd3500c4e7cc93bf4dc042e87060
205c22cce7921dd2e8f0c0895a714e390359753c
describe
'1826' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIG' 'sip-files00139.txt'
f3fa14603c4bea97b8d51dc68c97620b
af12f11a102863dc2a2a31316294d0461cc08998
describe
'11104' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIH' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
9d6f4cb8747261f6eeed0847cf566601
a8dfbb0df13116ff7482c19b183663784bda376e
describe
'989326' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCII' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
a78de250bdf63c8dcf79d94b1cfc1f5e
f1489baa85967ecd7ea0cf5338dd63b6174790a8
describe
'129065' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIJ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
6015a5302d4caa7b856539348b20f80b
1584f3211ae8fccf8bfc8be3f7c97a01dda8dfef
'2011-11-16T07:20:10-05:00'
describe
'45230' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIK' 'sip-files00140.pro'
6ae6de59c7bda1616abf18a0f0afc94f
5a4d77a3a2b2cc8d9470098b46542a7e482076a7
describe
'44752' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIL' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
ea49fa4ed06bc4b6e1845bc6b5850418
01bfe3b96ac421a61564ddef2d0c59dc19edbc3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIM' 'sip-files00140.tif'
c58a61172fd8823ae017df86b54187cb
cdcfbfee8258c62bf3c28a9b546170ba46c7a588
'2011-11-16T07:19:42-05:00'
describe
'1813' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIN' 'sip-files00140.txt'
1041c82de3fe78a2c9fcf70c15f24a40
5650e63da73bc6146cc03b645f767c0206256134
describe
'11337' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIO' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
2e7d87674c088134c1641a45f8b95477
92886c60c9b6500686c31e788faa536a0b9bbeaa
describe
'987280' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIP' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
c5b33303758ae82028e832cb2a945767
f0e0c4f972eca40875424992fbd6d6877b4d5a48
describe
'120068' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIQ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
17711123b395acf5881eb073d87392ea
c0aa6248892a5da1c1a030858e076ac5947a7cef
describe
'42304' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIR' 'sip-files00141.pro'
b652cc42597bfaec598f21178b5a2b8a
42c08e99fb7993bd82929315ddd2e7055862b07a
describe
'42569' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIS' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
b7e091f47249796f66c31db4405fac75
491774550692b8d857c2cd00704924708bc66497
'2011-11-16T07:20:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIT' 'sip-files00141.tif'
824518aee7bd7f8eb6098c35fb6fec3a
df44263b12f971b98a7056c3e568afe5882fdb9d
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIU' 'sip-files00141.txt'
d6b2b94eb1544f9c1f53273173ce4916
fbe721a5bb40bec0aa8f3bf05a67245746261bf0
describe
'11308' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIV' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
30860cd8125c161d95ea5f4eef287604
76ab58490ad35968407a9ac9bb199852d88fb497
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIW' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
ca2e56022964c4deda8299d57ddcaef7
c29c9532437cc2247030ab9c5f8b509b709e76a1
describe
'109093' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIX' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
72d5c0b46efb7eedd36cdc4d13076cc2
5aea0d1381c95c9c329dc6328270b113cdc0ead6
describe
'37258' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIY' 'sip-files00142.pro'
be79a850d01af7271175c4bd3f851c11
181e1f267ffce4449a7ea03a1b4c45f41fbe7949
describe
'38491' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCIZ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
792c22a427060179e8d4447034d9eac8
8c187a773c67a47aab8049453b148b1219a022db
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJA' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e77ba0bde0f66dc3f77e2dca14acfa9a
2cea421fd8bc1211ec72575d21f1adb006029f74
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJB' 'sip-files00142.txt'
d2f5d0ee97183549a116e2f3cbd98b7f
40ce6d50df574d64757a02895c134ce5f5ab568d
describe
'10340' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJC' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
e169f9bf6de9108b9ae90e489703d0a0
ba3b5dad6b7c16b173899c1a3bb4cf8787e6967d
describe
'987282' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJD' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
a9c62b7b756971cb356c7f2e75c26714
c9ac6c4bba2df43a02ef1a7e2990cbab072a2ce0
describe
'121099' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJE' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
f47ea0f7999f5a9a799061915dee0bd5
ead1f9ad19458362d512d8f1bd4dc216ce713f10
describe
'43335' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJF' 'sip-files00143.pro'
d44e7fad9f3a7d26d9b8beca7e2f7b00
90042f54211625f4b557b650557193fe77cb8332
describe
'42742' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJG' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
1277478be6bd53109ef04b20903277fa
b772f123f9a2d3f7d28a817d67e40b66ef4a8b77
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJH' 'sip-files00143.tif'
862a6080800d01f61b43bd3f058b55d7
6c993435d99807beb537f7040778a3c6e2f276ed
describe
'1741' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJI' 'sip-files00143.txt'
66e6ce4d8d6a4f3f174e2c24ee6ebadc
90ab50152758c8dfce9165a2e0c1ef86baa39daf
describe
'11442' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJJ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
9cc19b15baeed49f99b9eab80b0c0837
6170821e2bc94acdfd63e2dcf82a5e62f1d7330f
describe
'989316' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJK' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
fbbd9fff6ebc1a35d6f07b6296d037c3
6a50cb3c27888f5533bf5fd77009d34b1aed921f
describe
'127736' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJL' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
c2465670706812b470e8e624a1effeb7
0ac200fe9cb4cba6bb4153bba10a41b3d8ef50d1
describe
'45003' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJM' 'sip-files00144.pro'
60ccd74742804f62f07d27aa38189d58
758d80dc6770be9e81c6e8fd14336f7d84f86a3b
'2011-11-16T07:20:08-05:00'
describe
'45555' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJN' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
11959052ce6faafd2e130f872a379b9e
2bd3ef3b2ddedfe562be7cb25a3d85b9617ad701
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJO' 'sip-files00144.tif'
e2173cbd12bdde456448e78d218c9c76
25e26860d90a3fd6b1742a36c91e2734139c2bc7
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJP' 'sip-files00144.txt'
9fae1b5ffe8feff9b48139fe650ae789
87f4b845597a634734288d25371e1b7dd0fd381b
describe
'11699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJQ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
b6362f96e81ff45bb39214a52f29b20c
3df36767f244b48c93a2a8dd1128ada9f9fdf974
describe
'987274' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJR' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
432ece239b8f12fd635adb162839c9c1
0489f3bb04386d7e1494b0700a0ba2e7041dd375
describe
'92498' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJS' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
7aed18c6a59ec3d2bf710379ade5c84b
fcc1800fcf32cd1ee91ba0a31f0a8fcaf25eadb4
describe
'33063' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJT' 'sip-files00145.pro'
b835a8de58f6fbcfe4b796dcac455a0f
1b3cab67c817bc70b2f5380a144e1b44718060d2
describe
'32865' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJU' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
1017ba09d4842dec2d774b7d7fb83aba
e7365a210aea1cdb7ec6e594e72cf02452e3fd6c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJV' 'sip-files00145.tif'
0f367af1e3114b486b6a555cf4f4a687
f0187c76b3cb72d2691e8d36bc3766667342d4d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJW' 'sip-files00145.txt'
639241f66125652f72ec7bb010ed7d2f
bf456d43e7e904966cac4483e1135fe3185557a9
describe
'8811' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJX' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
3da3da6f4b96562b4653ba4d6fea9a94
b5549d2d02c25c4974de9f8ab419d18834dc7dd6
describe
'525146' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJY' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
201e26efd5148b65819eec1c485cd4de
93f7757f5b87097ed9748ed7596a126d604823ce
describe
'29625' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCJZ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
fea241579b35202034d3cd7a04f57460
faa527148cfbbac955bcb3ce81d06f386b366695
describe
'5239' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKA' 'sip-files00146.pro'
5387ee0348b7595d9219a7ee93cada20
69cadcbc43c12a35c4bca8083e9eecdd011c284e
describe
'10819' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKB' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
e9ded4c561da92588701952aa0bbeb48
1ccead0a672e6562dee345176d476f61932fdfc3
describe
'20960920' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKC' 'sip-filesBack.tif'
476dfd2f963e9360893035c8787dcab8
7933106994896e713472b4e12053b767c543b6a3
'2011-11-16T07:24:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKD' 'sip-files00146.tif'
6dfee315290e15eb1d60194fa87845f3
3471f09f1acdf511e03b606c36a9b9fd0eefd56b
describe
'285' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKE' 'sip-files00146.txt'
d5f028f273de54d8cd2812fcb88be9b5
f0e05258c93b2a845f27330ec77e9b1744418fdf
describe
'3660' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKF' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
68021f80c53a351d9408541ca039cc1a
fc101508d3cfa9a6336b260f93f21dbfc2a8518f
describe
'973876' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKG' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
61f952f14bce4aa9f191ea9183794e3f
52b475349317a2832610f15b994ba7aa87418d1a
describe
'94052' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKH' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
875671a194da9924e160fbde44e7339e
36010bab87c0a732e77511147eb72300e99d31ab
describe
'32871' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKI' 'sip-files00147.pro'
602d59d5718188fc8e4095acda9657e9
f027994e22b778501b69ba24c272b076893cf884
describe
'33228' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKJ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
a130b8c35284b4497cce8b856f2b8e63
ecc0380b029ad9459ac4256ab48edd1cef93a674
describe
'7800631' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKK' 'sip-files00147.tif'
da812bbdb40d487177a635cb1df54bbc
f15b3c1b11f3bfbc379bcfe33d9fa065709ef822
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKL' 'sip-files00147.txt'
b3cb1a4aefea796af0762654d8089c40
90ee8feb9fd32acfd410c9500ba0a64adc55bc5a
describe
'8766' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKM' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
93c948940d549ef138e63477f5ea2b32
92e2e5e6cd9a82f9b3681ddf6cf1ac5e0793f72e
describe
'980634' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKN' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
8ea5d159938b83c563c7124101b6bc73
f1071507e60b80cc66020e1b574392b44425525a
describe
'98218' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKO' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
9af7eaa4a7f32691dfcc0fb9848aa4ac
c9fdc15763f122dec92f74c3b5ed76ff4a69217e
describe
'33439' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKP' 'sip-files00148.pro'
803f8532a846976df11f3c7b0a843d3d
c7c496d1b2cf4079cc0b9a859ec0d2894ab58049
describe
'34400' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKQ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
1ae3aaec28d64b384fa621b4c3b9f7b3
31015d52737b5139deb005fd1284f546ffcc48e9
describe
'7855367' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKR' 'sip-files00148.tif'
5a903033ecb5f87963acb6e31304eea8
3cf761dcf828b9928bddbb913dc8ef789daf3543
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKS' 'sip-files00148.txt'
19a67a8dd732ed1616c54cfc80b766f9
b3117611c9ce2eb045d57f23de54b86eed7c25a6
describe
'9124' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKT' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
a717b3368ef46ab9bec0ae5c043a8359
52cffdbd5114646e895915eb60cbd43220d2d791
describe
'973969' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKU' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
617e6184e2724bfb781182971845d6e4
0f5c0c0dac56078b124e2a158d74d705d2c40582
describe
'97258' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKV' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
04912d451b2eae11d083a8916bdb646c
94e7a64ed0975f890ab90bd54b57930838b1cba3
describe
'32280' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKW' 'sip-files00149.pro'
8a7045982dde1cddcf23cec0a050b162
dcab175a575f90e3c47352355753d63e5125db74
describe
'33571' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKX' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
154cff3d636e975a0780fdcafea8e366
a276f4e675d04848fc2997074783c9fb19499142
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKY' 'sip-files00149.tif'
f9889f82398b7700d09dcd5286a680fb
91230880f0c713f678e2527aaf59a74b8bcf9c13
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCKZ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
003874dd52c7d3611da80f7f9ddeffa0
6b6df5487b7ae3b6a182fbd8026d13a75a1faf6e
describe
'8900' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLA' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
7f4870901a72898a7f2e082c123b3cd0
976fefe2fb9678e8c5aa3e25ec1997c67e6e9a0f
describe
'980777' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLB' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
bf3e2fedf0edea33d664afeb416d1d12
19aba7f7d54c83f62aeffae109ca63f8c2e8c038
describe
'96763' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLC' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
6470d2c0b85f07d00c1a088fceb0e5df
ed533995c29b08915376841ca40fbf322f07684e
describe
'32121' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLD' 'sip-files00150.pro'
be633d356b299da5dd703cc995f5d72e
2e206c5f4cce7367c72054d6241904371db11c8f
describe
'33705' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
5710d2e71e70fc8724c789528d44a68f
0f14e1f1f9237daef85a4b4277504750c63c9b18
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLF' 'sip-files00150.tif'
d15e382af8edae8e1e07e4c602b4cace
87eedf8546ef065f84e41aedda8aa33cba2f57f3
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLG' 'sip-files00150.txt'
4594a410639595d8ecdff01df200c84d
0849d3431b1bbb70767fe96ee8002a70411ba1cd
describe
'9000' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLH' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
6c25a4b7d511ae98fbb35fcb5435e102
cefe27733c0afbe75b730d3cf5512dfcfb216d89
describe
'973974' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLI' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
f65edf12daf05c956015d923867e2c7f
40d99509a08d436d9307fe51abcdbbbe446a741b
describe
'98407' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLJ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
1f985533f2e18185836e5a1d16abdccc
228e0ac0ea96e5738dd7d34fd035af0e0012a74b
describe
'33652' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLK' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f69ab296f92751617f1b2b2354ac2260
b07c2cebacedfb654e363bfac9f186f0f391a84c
describe
'35185' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLL' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
f0f463c832c7e31377226551ce4e37be
0be0723ff71833a3e07f7bbd91929dba4cd18be0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLM' 'sip-files00151.tif'
2b390a382d1c7ea2da6659bcc466b0f5
d77a0ba803c9e91ec222dac1b494e2dae274660a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLN' 'sip-files00151.txt'
eb8ac7a28ea97d9edfcfaccb10b8171a
afbc855516a5566b4cb5d79edaf93cd29fc382a1
describe
'9406' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLO' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
750ca5973b736bfde5120f126d59e478
394c0a32a82e1b2088a3b592c2b20a3c3396a5c8
describe
'980738' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLP' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
b0d7ef50c52634884f2797f88ab416a9
f84d7c1c7e49f253bafc32946c2cc1f619b7faf3
describe
'95797' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLQ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
9d019bcdf063a465ef6e64c0d4f16b67
fccbf236255c0ca98d9811d527b05a8a0be4ebb3
describe
'32653' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLR' 'sip-files00152.pro'
729535b98a7db0250af6497a4332ab3a
221ebe4ef29a0c103dcb52e87bae9162f0f0d31b
describe
'33356' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLS' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
2625c52abe70962c6a5ece27062a73c8
b7127baed6df6ed535022587557a8a1dbc0a5bad
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLT' 'sip-files00152.tif'
c6061059997aa2a46c1dac81645d425a
1f3ea77a476e96e2168a7d2d63c4196988b396a9
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLU' 'sip-files00152.txt'
6c3facd79efc2c2fb87f5e3b8704be92
441a742f11b7a11186c982a14359de0352df7a97
describe
'9078' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLV' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
64279dcce8d97b9dc7e3d8c79db0426b
277e0596e81b8f9c3de188b1bd34974d90e65565
describe
'973976' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLW' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
e1b4795512fc36199166a3bbcbefd6de
2527e47d73c5aa040be6fe228bfcdc26e97d9097
describe
'99350' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLX' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
c450c3492bc99a0d61ddf3168c9910b6
2b056c04f549e78ceca0c0a9ec832fdc05b9a8b7
describe
'31644' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLY' 'sip-files00153.pro'
5094d17e85ca740c4f51213158fb7983
daa99e480ea6cfb8e6e9cfa9df558abcd8bc4302
describe
'33876' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCLZ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
a485299cdee9dc2601dc1f010d021879
a85c7e245145b0ebcd5fc8519d9b38240b01c849
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMA' 'sip-files00153.tif'
50c63cf289a9f0d8f588af8651209fe0
faa4a6b5c9acdda5567c43542eb0e06aec46664a
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMB' 'sip-files00153.txt'
133f71cb3048b32ecc6048b4c9e934af
fa68fe4b0ddc2162beff74b49461686f4e13b191
describe
'8870' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMC' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
a347cfdedba09af0767adf9a018017ed
e98f6f8915d73b4bb825bce36aa4fd195af2316e
describe
'980745' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMD' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
35b0c35750efbf0fe5e64aab71a25d3c
68681c3706b6c5d5f09dc04bfe99ebc6b7faf905
describe
'96573' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCME' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
6a8dab2d788de75ad0d3310296790191
f172af402ad5db0c0c2ec1d30efc77d8a5696bdf
describe
'31148' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMF' 'sip-files00154.pro'
56b25fb5af5d8004fac9dbe8bb8739b4
3b026e0a5099dd3cf526b91069947952ceaec14f
describe
'33491' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMG' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
069e17fa6f46f9426928dcc68a9dce96
1f0b957075e37703299add949e670e303416eebc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMH' 'sip-files00154.tif'
8bf2b106bdf72bf9e0711a40d629a540
7f9683e3890f1e65b9b1388c0fa3c3d8f7525806
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMI' 'sip-files00154.txt'
2d22b80077ffdfc3bad701721d664cda
a5e527dbe10b3ab62d0a52127efa153447203632
describe
Invalid character
'9006' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMJ' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
d0cddd5d57d51344283424365d081f3f
b61bc803615af0f3c8441d65c2be06e45b54220c
'2011-11-16T07:19:47-05:00'
describe
'973919' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMK' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
5d52a6a4b2893f303883608b45d8dccd
299ad0fb419f051f7eae83baa0c84e21e46d0fdb
describe
'97314' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCML' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
4d7fa194efc06752272683cf47014f9f
c83526e9aa2ff57070be8a59742738240a098fbb
describe
'32937' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMM' 'sip-files00155.pro'
e662e6504e1289aa34baba90255b5705
964d24b513ca63195eecf2c8af58b7c4ded0e846
describe
'35277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMN' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
5ed959b7b9ead558327450ef204375c6
4151081fed5e981129ba58eda677e19c25a5db12
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMO' 'sip-files00155.tif'
49de6b87313f77114a16dc424ed5ccf6
91379effcfb31ab57417053fd92468f358c48ff6
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
eaeea3c1fc9b86a5558a720e47997b40
f76350d13779b8f322888cd737f25ed4d138f702
'2011-11-16T07:19:28-05:00'
describe
'9711' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMQ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
30f768c3582acefd06b400be35da9490
a848dff2819cfdf0168e7fe6b38585bdb8e1d894
describe
'980713' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMR' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
ffc43a7c051ef0f12b3c1af635c4f2e1
9f56b578d9bb98b89440ae27b7694b127ee0d85a
describe
'99219' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMS' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
27fdcf71c6f6f5d30f3e6a78083aaff7
00fa8543d8fa510e6eae3e7cb4d6a4925e0bd3bf
describe
'33881' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMT' 'sip-files00156.pro'
b0c57227f2461a49977ed4e3f2ef76c5
3bef474059b53c07a06bb10197ed97969b6ba928
describe
'35391' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMU' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
418bc00cdf221401f53d5538058b254c
e2012e5e84e48f86177d3cf492af62bcd0eb03de
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMV' 'sip-files00156.tif'
558c02428ed539016bef9c1b4b39c625
6afa4a91e8048569d1b00f92b459f633a8272d3b
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMW' 'sip-files00156.txt'
44dbfaa95be01a90a479b1ce0b80a6ca
6bd8a4ce205a107db21d4a9821ee1f2f572b282c
describe
'9598' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMX' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
49dd25a46d87729337e448dc679bde85
dc4741e5ed809b84681c27048f883aeed53dbf89
describe
'973827' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMY' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
6fc692dce739e2a9b5e2f952c2358a64
b44ceda384f66adc3f200267abe73b109e8f5656
describe
'100883' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCMZ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
51c71696e831451fa9592404d5102c54
2e3fe538ff33348f32af7dc887c8568feb3a1f38
describe
'32015' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNA' 'sip-files00157.pro'
e40101bbf83f1d322a2fb5e2371e8b24
2fc65f99ab603c6010bd9ccc8525075e043501b5
describe
'35295' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNB' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
a14aeeafdb97be8a49ff00d734a66ec4
66ae5ac98393cbb9d05dae5bd483e171d0bc67c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNC' 'sip-files00157.tif'
96c732d0e0612f708b6727125fe5983c
2c7b30e0e88b3710d92880684d810b8192f4fd8e
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCND' 'sip-files00157.txt'
5d2a2cf238cdbfe85f65e9fc4fac7103
7ed3653ebebfb190ef63cb9fbbfe2319b3567e50
describe
Invalid character
'9353' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNE' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
bba17f01d9bb194120b22e9473081853
3bef7d1e3adbbaf46cf0d6541a0cfccf68e0d6a2
describe
'980550' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNF' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
d17e9aaaf12517225d1e1fbb5e7c7903
17b2fafdc788e541289db0bf62386593d3487759
describe
'99624' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNG' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
0852f5f61e670bf46285c48058e36487
1eab62a9e46a5b769b8e37b102ec14c8c7e37506
describe
'32185' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNH' 'sip-files00158.pro'
ac233e9555fd477c6bb66d165edb9b28
12f5cec3dc567fb4ff1967b3cb8500397c5ba2a4
describe
'34543' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNI' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
7520b795b81b9e14bf5fbb0d05008abb
3ed4988a4719ca911f28e3b8fab5156ec3dcd9a4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNJ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
efc4281356d341bf7e8b4b542a4efa96
2157bda36bb1058961bacc2bdf245641c509004d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNK' 'sip-files00158.txt'
bf45a5f0e436afc678b7c0d76a1dab17
d3fe3c7304ea96c433e886cdf051e2c6d66a7224
'2011-11-16T07:20:42-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9263' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNL' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
423089ff1697d213306cf0824a062c2a
4cd1b1bf43cdf4cff73e78efca32cc6a85eeca97
describe
'973978' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNM' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
2d18d9e78394215ab900df1ed84c66ba
6d27e58c90b53dd263af5c0b6842ce83a4866ca5
describe
'97996' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNN' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
9c0f64fcf73c503cadb66ee6bd7cbbd9
71ec0ac1aa03dee60193f0dc940e731d8ab5027a
describe
'33556' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNO' 'sip-files00159.pro'
9d843a173c5a2022f9f7be3be12e9435
eef14880d14c992b132eb2820dd1cf9791ccd1f4
describe
'34779' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNP' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
cfe12dc52e1ec40976addeb9a82d94a6
698debfe9041f71e7b0e7106ff74312ec5732b52
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNQ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
fce8217e8ff329e985722a33d2f72ba0
ec898803790bbf493a5e835ebdb53bc644df2085
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNR' 'sip-files00159.txt'
5948bdcd62a82788cb80d1e2570d12cb
931eace6b73d9ea3135ed15a5883f70b3936ef9b
describe
'9377' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
b32d9bb44d947fd1632a4cc436dc370e
f92a486760745c6df076aa293c5af82fccbc7eed
describe
'980769' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNT' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
be6881dd57a4874cc0d6a217160d2412
43d94a2adc8fd5d159b0ce557387e7d85cc360cd
describe
'94919' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNU' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
7432a7f2d8e5fbba038a927b0def621f
9929804f2de3e838451aa486732fd13980c08866
describe
'31654' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNV' 'sip-files00160.pro'
b62b2996bbfa358548436964a20bd6dc
681b862ad53ac9d21f5f4520fc85e05d6a40d3ad
describe
'33265' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNW' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
82520e90db7593760be9a3d8b341ee8f
42e942bd1e3e3128b0b33aee96a477769dc15091
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNX' 'sip-files00160.tif'
342a71679447650dcc6a2336ca120165
dbcd16e7e232caa1510d0c90bfa56f1df13ae1c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNY' 'sip-files00160.txt'
e79ac718ae643265e76c889f55c15a1f
cf821813ec04852f49113a5616a01fdb739a429e
describe
Invalid character
'9195' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCNZ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
9714b5f037b1f886afde27e571b64fc3
b208605d771fc6fbf0607c9eecc24beef8b5da3a
describe
'924091' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOA' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
2dffd4f6fe766ecb448cd5b453322da3
3f6cae5aaa73ad9d45a8ba5289b6f07ab8bbbba2
describe
'102699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOB' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
34751dad6d4dbc89927b85a50cf55215
d2e9882cc7e43ee54e1651dd21fdb805bab3dbf3
describe
'33474' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOC' 'sip-files00161.pro'
d47a2731ba418dd96212f81a67b7d8e6
9f19c0d1858fbdcaa90709fa99c06570e42dffec
'2011-11-16T07:19:26-05:00'
describe
'35956' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOD' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
29ac89f93a6cf52f671b8b85eaacebb1
e04ed609058c546313afee64fdc7ba3c213a3494
describe
'7401469' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOE' 'sip-files00161.tif'
7c6ce6359ec98f257f6fad89c6b61e1e
a7f0fe5100d73f3fc4afd35301ee681f6daf206e
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOF' 'sip-files00161.txt'
cd34e241f592f208ef3d102c4d3a6277
5e5b370934e80ea5c09213c7902646a5dc432075
describe
'9326' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOG' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
ce7d84cdaa215d715cec2fd42d706e2b
934d760826217459e373a0c65ad42213ab1634ab
describe
'980798' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOH' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
807120cd7d4da4939ab4b0b226ae26b6
20203d43e42d50647a8c6b4af623fb17c28e51af
describe
'99416' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOI' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
b59863e60384637c62e192d058ca870b
919832911367803cc61f0227c56d102ad33983b2
describe
'31868' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOJ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
43599a9578d918de77bf0e24d4a1af9f
fded9866b9ee03229180a8d185cc915f98a04357
describe
'34560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOK' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
37926293f74138ed618a5af6bf76b9c4
4169220351c0e22c74fc5ccc4a93f0b59582f53c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOL' 'sip-files00162.tif'
0872e1fdd5f23c609034bdfc739f18d5
912c68754dd44b316220e325b6a070e55d7fd415
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOM' 'sip-files00162.txt'
0b2601d952502233b0963d01c346a15f
cd9e81471d9467f382a3b79f89b84042d4ea52f0
describe
Invalid character
'9424' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCON' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
d4b31979f5d0733398ba561d6d70c81a
79dcf8be641c1105e6c89f72586d42a2ae70391a
describe
'929345' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOO' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
bb55e6e2c3d4899ea6a09ca62acf14bc
e4aa7f1494ab8129af4b220452f8237731a867c2
describe
'101346' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOP' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
1430ab7d7817405bf82aa6a066a28913
5702a79f241d6689f8d47419c1cb83a428369275
describe
'34128' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOQ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
9b14b18e762176b0b4546c3fc16f1399
bcf1c63fa1797ae38b3072a59db407265a159297
describe
'35912' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOR' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
15a30c83130d661bed8f6783163a1ff4
11cd1d7e332e4b944ba9eb66a717acb23f04eace
describe
'7443363' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOS' 'sip-files00163.tif'
c1dfc221b5a140d76933dc020313811d
8128d493cf8ec0ed1f1ad5fbac239475ea8f9b75
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOT' 'sip-files00163.txt'
4a9850ca77e6ecc7bd50f96f8ef7941c
ae696abb1c95124d922eac4e9e9ff3759055b1e9
describe
'9459' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOU' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
8ecd70b1a3d0e8d0325ad989cb9ede06
0c883d53459e4dc813eb69dce32b648a5539814b
describe
'980586' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOV' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
6d08e440d9e0ded7a570655f135b70ef
add3ba8e1e616c7d9991d6aed73dbd389124dce0
describe
'96660' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOW' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
4cc970cbd228590dc87f4826ded31cc8
0bb9db38aa548d0c22082700d2650056cddcf07e
describe
'33202' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOX' 'sip-files00164.pro'
1a9b9d6103308fc1b86b0070de5fd0e1
1454a3af16a0b11436a98892163a074490d0f8d2
describe
'33944' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOY' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
826e7defcc1cf5bdc346eeefd3ee55c5
a116b650ded5454d7862f28d11fb0fd2e11dbd39
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCOZ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
146351542af778e0b01c9f07a6273490
6ce3aa8ec8f69060d703f7baa27802ccff43cb64
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPA' 'sip-files00164.txt'
29c8899a3627d576e7e4e6fcfdee6325
5c6bff9b207432931170ca8ac4c589212a5ecc2c
describe
Invalid character
'8985' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPB' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
f5abd655a4d87c4d0e81354e1504089c
3d409b729f66e5f8648d3c71b7eaa752537e60e2
describe
'924048' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPC' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
30ccef16481d2a9bc9d6bae6204a8d1d
cba022c6b2e1f096373a4c18f737d85cd3426aa3
describe
'98522' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPD' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
3091257893875beae1e7716847538391
6209df6739e8263909c2445d836a5b78dc38b428
describe
'32231' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPE' 'sip-files00165.pro'
f751d3ad7646294a3e329060d925a754
ff6a23a3ea00319db4838cc3234e0254875c0df2
describe
'35080' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPF' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
350e664feddc614bcef4299f0a72467f
780cfb67f6cf1a332b52c6efa89e01aa549f75f8
describe
'7400973' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPG' 'sip-files00165.tif'
dd7af995c51d6d703bb69b255f90f507
6e910696eac57e5a200107d67eac1f06c5e57133
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPH' 'sip-files00165.txt'
aee59207c3b9ae28095c6e3f097ea149
d5cffc812e0e4b9c40cfb0acf178eb780fd5c458
describe
'9229' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPI' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
00a907433eaa275d822bf057e78f7e51
7c2aa820e7be7434ce4559b04d6b972bd265fa0a
describe
'948351' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPJ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
6dfbd61bce72c9d872d16b3599e92024
c4270ba1f521d415a2c6092f2ac3de682783337b
describe
'104148' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPK' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
935ec914b91e579980c1ab57f5612e81
df49d6b641358fc175df1c28f077b2c14b51314e
describe
'27560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPL' 'sip-files00166.pro'
594e0f4a1c30ce336a5090a6aeaff06f
4e05c771294d461339d7e80dce137584db64ea3f
describe
'35574' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPM' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
24ecfd779e48e0737a7790ac57f6dcc2
1d3642e1c1759632ab5b387284ecfe4b47ee7278
describe
'7595659' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPN' 'sip-files00166.tif'
586ec5dd2fd98f6a864eaac8047fdf7d
736a5061d74313bc9755fb53f87f68c238c8f3c0
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPO' 'sip-files00166.txt'
50169956ee7ef441c90b0fc20eb881fd
e5b1aa40f0aaf85915a25248d336d324431fd47b
describe
Invalid character
'9755' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPP' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
6bd2fd4eeedc383060a3276d94100bb4
39c9818cfec26672643c17d51f347bfcdc9be376
describe
'942261' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPQ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
6afd7fb49e2c78af7429149fe74ef0d9
60995efca3072f16478edc6e7a08f560b8667be4
describe
'104287' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPR' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
23236b45d715dfc57cfa5faaa81a3b7a
16a3ae02a42133ce7266c8986512db51d8d10b46
describe
'34164' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPS' 'sip-files00167.pro'
fbbc8c77949f6a92220cb0473fbe29c3
49034714d197e4979e42095efaed2fe613083588
describe
'37061' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPT' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
d5bdf83707a8e8e6454be4666d1edba8
eecd272b4b8e91e6a81c421e06fa1a2e5e2e9a58
describe
'7546977' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPU' 'sip-files00167.tif'
0af95cb06256af258bd239e42dea543d
9799bf9d7eca52dc25aeac372cf3dfd7e8a2eea4
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPV' 'sip-files00167.txt'
f40d2c4306b29d11bd6cd0684a42e793
25a4015f331c6e5ef8fb4d4005a92c74fe64dc85
describe
'9823' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPW' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
5101a2c5dee508f880b07c2654c952e8
1566c1f18dd77b160e9dc55f199352a78be9216e
describe
'980794' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPX' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
cd4e88a68c8ab397161ef0542db76f29
b73ebc5258e750b3768f88e9d983df079755f4a5
describe
'95502' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPY' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
54042c12810c3fa14387016620cb89b3
e0cc81a650e07d57eb730fdc60d28361cca355c0
describe
'31831' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCPZ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
0f382ff629c58b752cd624aa9ae53c68
a44326d10f9793ab7267e5aab122507c8b4996de
describe
'33729' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQA' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
0342b1aa04e69061f2e0c73f9dcce766
7626d03185f86ba854f1c3dace1a4b6efbac09bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQB' 'sip-files00168.tif'
404ae4f8ca03667e83fc57ea4145b07d
575fa7f439226b4766877457d2cc5ba977dae525
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQC' 'sip-files00168.txt'
df527ddca5841437bdf1471792758579
17d973c6a901a263d1e4ba41ce8a3b26d6485d53
describe
'9338' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQD' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
916155f41540aca5768ab0e5626a5acf
07c73f89698d25af06add0e56c2fa4957017f0d8
describe
'942821' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQE' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
c4e866002f1eb0c5a94849b5db671f88
a7612cec6d858ae730bd281568c95eb1257e7aa7
describe
'104199' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQF' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
cfa927e9f140a442038c206e69a72809
37c1f680177530090a9bed8007d26a74569d1e0b
describe
'33123' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQG' 'sip-files00169.pro'
311429471d188a1a68d6a765be360063
f40dbc61e4dc7399f7b960112f04ed54d734c84a
describe
'35960' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQH' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
83b1ec6a8e806510408de03e009de163
74f4ff992448d1ee60a4d9492137bb478a130389
describe
'7552543' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQI' 'sip-files00169.tif'
7193ade13fb156f92c249c20efb93864
50d0c50658c9488acd5880a0650ad07aaf4d08aa
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQJ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
fc5c75c86e34d65e177d60311e0ea805
0a7841b2dd7bbbf416c8aafea3e555fea2a6b1dd
describe
'9359' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQK' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
e3293a1a79ddb29b272049dff0f811b6
48e940474ed934b40a15a3fb6de71acf56d238d1
describe
'980667' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQL' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
30f8f614110f78d51c073aad8ec26894
918e5c41988ed4650e273269abd6950e59e54479
describe
'98281' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQM' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
5c501e1523043251d0c8900b20efb88a
8b5da44d5c8e46c170912f6441357076662104fb
describe
'32631' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQN' 'sip-files00170.pro'
06d8adcbf838f8de65f513df33a27145
7698ba38858658cf6cac84f452cb5d2e97826e4d
describe
'33082' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQO' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
aa8a1702502222b632376552e361ac20
5451f1f4bc60264c5715b7f16747b58166d6266b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQP' 'sip-files00170.tif'
b1d8bcf83f6a462bf5e01b71dee21574
ba6d858ab9c5f44f5f20b9945e9eb551858c8129
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQQ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
b6d5e11f1988bbfb67f24b815633f514
1bb9b885b04bf77a736b114bb41a3b0d9b28f0b6
describe
'8705' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQR' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
8afc90c00b1610ef63ac6862c611244a
85e91009d2e24e11898476ccf00d4181f230a0de
describe
'940087' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQS' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
022ad7d5f43ed00518d3761af33a53a3
e222ab5a8f082d99e88a500d4bec34e5fad8855f
describe
'97922' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQT' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
0a0e4a340a59d8ab4e9202a2e0dde63b
1e1b728f3d17df9e4983d3ccc54181a9d58c9145
describe
'32501' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQU' 'sip-files00171.pro'
ee33469e2682a683386b5123adb68de1
321176c0e825ec58c2bda057b531548f30759834
describe
'34946' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQV' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
97ec8c91594160e47a5b58fc8c913b9e
982cd674efda6bbf09e2fd89141e2f8ec38f6a39
describe
'7529345' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQW' 'sip-files00171.tif'
bdca429cf6184ef72834a0c3cfc9734a
a1cb76e11cc9c4566886e0cb66167526d4eef8c2
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQX' 'sip-files00171.txt'
1561a04fbd0c248de882147d5cb814d5
5199db37903ff052c2fb5158445c1b02cb955288
describe
'9410' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQY' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
7a5a541bf7f3aa042fb3d9c23749a0e5
f1a9e371ab923b14dafed7e4b66106cc0fba81e1
describe
'980670' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCQZ' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
19bd866dc2af04c83f2de6f78b0d6709
91ec3b0c2f3a0bfd3bd3817c25f7ee01a95edb73
describe
'97352' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRA' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
1eb1ed46f428361e9a65d602470b853a
73df239c02c8136f3b6e363a9a7bfc3ce1406a81
describe
'32584' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRB' 'sip-files00172.pro'
64388cdd2c6a044160d0915264b1398e
c2f15d019d07325238c887155e1471d059f6f854
describe
'34371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRC' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
e2173e9033e5fda48d94ff580b934357
df00cea2a6b8c51c558a2c23c21592e6840b36d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRD' 'sip-files00172.tif'
62e3172c58d78c54059da8d8a5d97d9d
3ecaf36ba026baa63f7cb33342af1df75f6138db
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRE' 'sip-files00172.txt'
34016723cb89a6030c3dce2969f6f428
d1c9c6795249f686f8a4da613c7a47d03b2a6b39
describe
'9362' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRF' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
91b525cc9fe583f0414577eb68ed2233
d343e73766d9440c643d749e5efa4c7372f576c1
describe
'973913' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRG' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
75c18d2972be88cb4e7adce4c93fb611
9574759cbbd9e3362f9ecd0a9498d51f327379bb
describe
'102799' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRH' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
31eba706f4a60de8f8e3719bf3b6a1d4
064bcfd8ca52b11724d1fe36bb7311b18c62695a
describe
'33874' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRI' 'sip-files00173.pro'
36259ac51b3fbaa8e9bb106fb2576fbf
ea5d43b62c0b79994534da0e08bf15418bce1620
describe
'35467' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRJ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
76227bb9f9c46a087e0a652d4b4f0d1b
f31eeee2126decc037f4342205284817efda0cc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRK' 'sip-files00173.tif'
0f783b0e26889f47d991f27d5987fa39
14ff1662b642a3f0cddd13a622c21fedf08a365b
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRL' 'sip-files00173.txt'
e4ba820b2fcb0f3bd59d3db7dae1a115
5c033c994a46a3f2629b2ca741a265b6f753353c
describe
'9323' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRM' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
a9d68d58aed9fef30517a347775259cd
b3b3032ee2523a15e58144bab147490f3b51c654
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRN' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
2677d7be6252adf3d8032fe04885eed5
abadeef715f9ee8b6491d1462bdededffd4f0da0
describe
'95636' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRO' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
f8d311af9c42385d7c41f1edb27e9ae9
a27875807a1b6452e8947d8162a5d767173a7c22
describe
'29392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRP' 'sip-files00174.pro'
45394085a9a3685b857269caef3f2506
2a3f9a9392501b6cf23d27551351a7d65c549ae3
describe
'32984' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRQ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
f360948b699008b224e58ad9afefbc03
1b65e69c5d014f30ddb5b2b97238b90896b6265f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRR' 'sip-files00174.tif'
adb203a28d01788409d3388f618a72cc
ca432adbfd6df83adbb1b60be2e3a97534b0d9d4
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRS' 'sip-files00174.txt'
f1f60ec4da57b0ffd4435f8a077f7b27
109de6854b8f9b5baf982e06fd86f7fe88fea699
describe
'9004' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRT' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
bfe371281694ea1f0da426e30e670841
cfdda818f6e435135a89db69b706acb8e81b0609
describe
'973920' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRU' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
4059f32ba1f56c97e703f97d3f4cde15
45f32fcd1deb894ec72cb5c1d8dc083340463a3e
describe
'97820' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRV' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
99d0f0acaf5b288a43968826805910fe
8d446b45c4ad6f11dad8626e96d22cd463ae8445
describe
'32681' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRW' 'sip-files00175.pro'
9ffd3f37e10bbbc124789bc860275524
560f51d73eea142e121bb0961cb133dd408b3bbb
describe
'34664' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRX' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
a7c53c2f3a8531822311236026fbc3a9
8000aa1c480b9cce0ddbc221d557632e7c04878c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRY' 'sip-files00175.tif'
bc0146f07580d245110606c7e25aeb98
ced2e15edd5b346a694c59ac979c313e30079687
describe
'27327' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCRZ' 'sip-filesBack.txt'
85f65cfaf2ce2ade7cce1d3f71719c2a
dd0d7c2dbce9c50e706bfecb37f7f8dd3c6a971b
describe
Invalid character
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSA' 'sip-files00175.txt'
437dfc5e3df7a50cbb2e410d7e3ce2f2
92bb52030d0430691d56184239f4465959b4ed0a
describe
'9379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSB' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
e920bac816e48798957f85cb852ede73
b54a68a18933b88aefabc7d5a253af620f6b24d6
describe
'980767' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSC' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
ab721eb2f9c5d5fd21fe0b28ef9e105c
ef9e5affc8ca2e4530165026f73bd61016fc6a30
describe
'91236' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSD' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
172709dfb7f771fbd5a3a31e4bbd0656
c66dd0eb84521968b862bb9001db6a6034391c0f
describe
'31175' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSE' 'sip-files00176.pro'
a512cbba4e867dcf4048a62b2dd88132
a2ca1614e9f4a38eb18cf847b86311c0b858a881
describe
'32292' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSF' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
cff78bd8e13653c5b561d659576c59a9
119222bbae422422cf3f48a313ebab80e51298a4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSG' 'sip-files00176.tif'
89491c819142b9baaa56403bf7a1c7f2
7d906c669fb293adea32f9675064ba814876f851
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSH' 'sip-files00176.txt'
76cfb36474fbe00a4dbe61ea5bb6eab4
1c3ba203557511163397a89dc85e41cfe06907b4
describe
'8691' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSI' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
745bdbec65ecbba91bf7432831a61596
485c7bfc6020bf3faf7cbad57f14cc4815ba95c4
describe
'973826' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSJ' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
0e6c6f93e41762b3a14290fd9ff4fcda
18baced639191811ed105e8d7f2c5ce12c5700d3
describe
'96949' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSK' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
bf24a6c72126ae384b6b506f01700f04
cfa8daa1a36e47fe8d94dcbf00a7a71d463f8ee8
describe
'32876' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSL' 'sip-files00177.pro'
992c7000e61b8a7247f0c1a74fe1eb0b
af56b9ab5d9ebb0bcff30b261c5eccaee52620ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSM' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
ae5775b7d7c1a00d0cb0c75fcf6e88a7
12a56a001d3ca9333649b150c19180502ee615c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSN' 'sip-files00177.tif'
ccf4cbfa7c94bbf43572baa9ad02b473
0943f27c3dc1e4e864b62bc9c8add0af7d84c3fe
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSO' 'sip-files00177.txt'
b3fa90ca676790bd27562c0e7f78c890
09c143b957ac72223ce0ffad7cb76a1b1f9a461b
describe
'8974' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSP' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
99c7e5d53440867e7456f8c562772770
db38ff4267167372808716b4b5443e529113a355
describe
'980720' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSQ' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
49585a399e80578459db272bfccf2e48
fd10169b99525fe34b27d2a2922a7959f46d831f
describe
'70623' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSR' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
9f33261bc96bfa94bf2aac3354821b5e
0329c67fef268d7978d95df7393b098f1d175db5
describe
'19770' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSS' 'sip-files00178.pro'
a0440bdb91d7b9a29ac37ab417373613
8b16c410fba6bfd7c3edabd0e6aa1fb67b591df2
describe
'23908' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCST' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
4b0200df5f34035e820947449891716b
715e0b3e3b1e961ed9a647f62eb3757bbbcd8724
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSU' 'sip-files00178.tif'
66b7e213d6376e9cbe762bb48d9e6d5a
8ec44ef21f746347a36c4bf62d70b3e6454b1760
describe
'798' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSV' 'sip-files00178.txt'
8025ef0babba5fb9b3b2d23bc32405ef
38739e8c7ead8a47c695f957b1e2e02a159111bc
describe
'6539' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSW' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
643f4290f3dcaf0e8cf11c30ab0410b4
ac8fb6b60fba93ddedf38384b27d5fd621c7e593
describe
'973888' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSX' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
65509c0b6b3e2f51816345ab1360727c
a378710c5350b15cb1f995341a4fdc1bfc89803d
describe
'86512' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSY' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
09cfac9cf218599c9a4d5be2d6b7bf05
6d02e6f2637390de2c95f18db78dfdd2a01d96a3
describe
'32436' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCSZ' 'sip-files00179.pro'
377d1e53325140641087480ee827055e
a8dcbab937cb65da86e0e152cf3d909b77cf0659
describe
'30469' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTA' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
e45cb4d702ba7e968e2c7fa90dcc5fc7
344fc2cc47750cecf9d8579bc8ed0fde14da9c01
describe
'7800361' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTB' 'sip-files00179.tif'
bfa1270496109917cd7bae9b5e18691d
08c0744632fb9ee0c818d64b7308c3aa75ee91b4
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTC' 'sip-files00179.txt'
1248006cfba12d8ac88458d6149cc590
f25e0ae4e850c66d82450b005d5c5b608249015b
describe
'8992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTD' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
1e25dce4b078a0ae0875914b83a9bde1
d0727ec5536a4302d997cb9691dbe1b5e68d7324
describe
'834791' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTE' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
78a1a30b2d447ca16815b9bf325385ed
87d55251e6033533b5e52774a8b2a989352e23af
describe
'20473' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTF' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
356d2655da648f67a886dae13c731dcb
31f1354753c0402a53b4f766eae973bcd20fb351
describe
'273' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTG' 'sip-files00180.pro'
2d101fa2b0748a02c1a9475b1a76ff97
bd2822b40adf9a20278f246583e6b2c79a5166c7
describe
'5332' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTH' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
1ef0d9ca68075b76f1e9cf970a75ab64
b4b6ba412ea6892838118bbaccf90962cc01333d
describe
'7830651' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTI' 'sip-files00180.tif'
d78d044a7aaefdfedc3888b482a11492
eeda6391b94111abf2c394f7b5fa70aafed404f4
describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTJ' 'sip-files00180.txt'
fbb3253e0ed002401780d259170c598b
710027f97cce7fb840a5ba7e200e748ab213abd1
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTK' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
ee673f252986f3451a511894683a7ebd
db550b7edf2d785eaef64a7a2bcb4896551eb5ac
describe
'39201' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTL' 'sip-filesBack.QC.jpg'
331a10c2a78c70a10556e3597ddd0dd8
31a833b50c1ea066e050900acc252071214200d2
describe
'9314' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTM' 'sip-filesBackthm.jpg'
5f09af793f0bc3dd52383a7c4a5346ab
c77dad6dde81deeb3fa7f8ee8ed61aa41f4e16ca
describe
'1070451' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTN' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
f384d381b50d4d9bb10329d2e7693107
413cf11f28f66af17132043b78b7b6e013eaaf2d
describe
'137246' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTO' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
0801fec339ea3a1b7f5e7a89735cfa75
d8e4bf71e9e071dbbaac2b4237b4442ea3494c06
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTP' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
bc946b9251b8c0d19c99c26698e5748e
12643e3fd25b8348c99166ddbf1cf07a06fa8bcf
describe
'29173' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTQ' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
cf9d4c2d1cc81050b289e19eeaee92e4
2496e6c19b5a24fd17aa971b9d08b2fe80629a19
describe
'25693834' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTR' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
2feedf468c755bb68be4f8c06c989cf5
5febb754da830bd7a3b128136894e82834811dc3
describe
'6773' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTS' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
47004e11af956658db7208f154518fa1
8c5118ec93b406753fb8e078263d973f31e13ff0
describe
'168603' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTT' 'sip-filesSpine.jp2'
f55de6dcfcf9f10cf2a3ea4d82301e01
e4d8876a3f6a7c4d9516a2b664f54d0a3b3f9ae2
describe
'36552' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTU' 'sip-filesSpine.jpg'
0f1740c14d46d2e9ab46a889d3bd862b
78b92f207add574d772f585f8c08fede2dd543f1
describe
'521' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVMfileF20080920_AABCTV' 'sip-filesSpine.pro'
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THE

BOOK OF SPORTS:

CONTAINING

OUT-DOOR SPORTS,

AMUSEMENTS AND RECREATIONS,

INCLUDING

GYMNASTICS, GARDENING & CARPENTERING,

For Boys aud Girls.

BY

WILLIAM MARTIN,

AUTHOR OF “ FIRESIDE PHILOSOPHY,” “‘ THE PARLOUR BOOK,”

‘6 INTELLECTUAL CALCULATOR,” ETC. ETC, ETC.



SECOND EDITION.



LONDON :
DARTON AND CO., HOLBORN HILL.

———

M.DCCC.LII.
nme eeeerenenetypasenlsieenausasssesnesenientinnanpetnessninnsndasten nye:
J, WERTHEIMER AND CO., PRINTERS, FINSBURY CIRCUS,
CONTENTS.

NT

PREFACE . ‘
I. GAMES WITH MARBLES.
Ring Taw
Lag Out or Knock Out
Three Holes . ‘
Arches . ° ‘

Bonce-Eye .
Sun and Planet Taw
Pyramid

Il Games ror CoLp WEATHER.

Prisoners’ Base .
Stag Out ‘ ;
Warning

Mouse in the Corner
King of the Castle .
Hippas . ° ‘
Thread the Needle .
Touch . ° ‘
Bowls . ° °
Quoits . ‘
Why and Because :

Bombardment of a Snow Cast

Bandy Ball or Golf
Foot Ball . .-
Trussing ;
Follow my Shiliel:
Blindman’s Buff.
Tip-Cat . + °
Jingling
Fieeh and English
Ill, Dancrerovus GAMES.
Heap the Bushel .
Drawing the Oven

Hop-Scotch . .

Basting the Bear .

Buck, Buck . °
AS

te

a os
IV,

VL

VIL

VIII.

CONTENTS.

ee gf? ck er a
Walking $ ‘ ; ° d °
Running eat.) ae “hee
Leaping ,. ce ee :

» Climbing . . ° ae 6 se
Rope Ladder ; ‘>< i jon
Slant Board , e . ‘ :
Vaulting ‘ 4 . ‘ ‘
Balancing. “4 . °

CricKer , : ; ‘ ‘ ,

. Laws of the Game of Double Wicket
The Bowler . : ‘ ‘ :

_ The Striker . , ‘ ,

The Wicket-Keeper . : °

Laws for Single Wicket _—, :

Bets , . ° ; °
Sw1MMING eM tk ees Sa

Preliminary Exercises in Swimming

Bernardi’s System . ; ee
GARDENING,

How to keep a Garden all the year round, with

directions for each month . ‘ '
CaRPENTERING .

Uses of the various Tools:—Plane, Chisel Gim-

let, Mallet, Hammer, Files and Nails .
Stuff and Labour . . ‘ ; ‘
Kerring Pouttry . ‘ ‘ ‘ :
Nature and Situation of Fowl-House
TheVarious Breeds of Fowl . . .

. Choice of Stock . . ;
Food and Feeding ‘

te eg :
Preservation of Eggs.

_ Hatching Chickens ,

ae ey ‘ ‘ ;
Queen Bee.—Drone,—Construction of Nests.

How to get a Stock of Bees.—Hiving

39
44
45
46
49
50
50
50
51
55
59
61
62
64
65
67
69
78
83,
89

105
115

116

121
123
124
126
128
128
129
129.
130
131

134
PREFACE.

THE prime object of this book is to induce and to
teach boys and girls to spend their hours out of
school in such a manner, as to gain innocent
enjoyment while they promote their own health
and bodily strength. The Author has never lost
sight of this object, considering it to be what
properly belongs to a Book of Sports.

He has, however, in many instances, had in
view, in a subordinate degree, the intellectual im-
provement of his young readers. He hopes that
several of the games, now described in print for
the first time, will be found, if not ‘royal roads,”

at least delightful ones, to the knowledge of many
Vili PREFACE.

scientific facts. There seems to be no good
reason why the utile (considered intellectually as_
well as bodily) should not find its place in the
sports of young people, if it be so skilfully com-
bined with the dulce as not to convert pleasure
into toil.

To those who assent to what has been stated,
the introduction of a chapter on gardening will

need no apology.
THE

BOOK OF SPORTS.

—_—o—

OUT-DOOR GAMES.

—_——@——

FARs i,
GAMES WITH MARBLES.



* Ons of the best games with marbles is

RING TAW.



\ . iy “ . = iS
ny. cecuitt SSS

vo

\

This is played in the following manner :—A circle should
be drawn about four feet in diameter, and an inner
circle of about six inches being also marked out in its
centre, into this each boy puts a marble. ‘* Now then,
10 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

boys, knuckle down at the offing, which is in any part
of the outer circle. Now, whoever shoots a marble out
of the ring is entitled to go on again: so mind your
shots ; a good shot may clear the ring. After the first
shot, the players do not shoot from the offing, but from
the place where the marble Stops after it has been shot
from the knuckle. Every marble struck out of the ring
belongs to the party who hits it; but if the taw remains
in the inner ring, either after it has struck a marble or
not, the player is out, and must put in all the marbles
he has won. If one player strike another player’s taw,
the player to whom the taw belongs is out; and he must
give up all the marbles he has won to the player whose
taw struck his,”



LAG OUT OR KNOCK OUT.

Tuts game is played by throwing a marble against the
wall, which rebounds to a distance. Others then follow ;
and the boy whose marble strikes against any of the
others is the winner. Some boys play the game in a
random manner; but the boy who plays with skill
judges nicely of the law of forces, that is, he calculates
exactly the force of the rebound, and the direction of it.

The first law of motion is, that everything preserves
a@ state of rest, or of uniform rectilineal (that is, straight,
motion), unless affected by some moving force,

Second law.—Every change of motion is always pro-
portioned to the degree of the moving force by which
it is produced, and it is made in the line of direction in
which that force is impressed.
GAMES WITH MARBLES. ll

Third law.—Action and reaction are always equal and
contrary, or the mutual action of two bodies upon each
other are always equal and directed to contrary parts.

To illustrate the first of these laws,—a marble will
never move from the ground of itself, and once put in
motion, it will preserve that motion until some other
power operates upon it in a contrary direction.

With regard to playing Lag Out so as to win, you
must further understand the principle of reflected mo-
tion. If you throw your marble in a straight line against
the wall, you find that it comes back to you nearly in a
straight line again. If you throw it ever so slightly on
one side, or obliquely, it will fly off obliquely on the
opposite side. If you throw the marble from the point
c to the point 8, it will fly off in the direction of the
- point a, and if a marble lay there it would hit it; but
if you threw it from the point pv, you would stand no
chance.

WALL.

B

Cc D A

In science, the angle c, s, p, is called the angle of
incidence, and p, B, A, is called the angle of reflection. —
12 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

THREE HOLES.



Ture Horss is not a bad game. To play it, you must
make three small holes about four feet apart: then the
first shot tries to shoot a marble into the first hole. If
he gets in, he goes from that to the second, and then
to the third hole, after which he returns, and having
passed up and down three times, he thus wins the game.
If he cannot get in the first hole, the second player
tries ; and when he stops short at a hole, the third, and
so on. After any player has shot his marble into a
hole, he may fire at any adversary’s marble to drive him
away, and, if he hits him, he has a right to shoot again,
either for the hole or any other player. The game is
won by the player who gets first into the last hole and
works his way back again to the first, when he takes all
his adversaries’ marbles, i
GAMES WITH MARBLES, 13

ARCHES.



To play arches, the players must be provided with a
board of the following shape, with arches cut therein;
each arch being a little more than the diameter of a
marble, and each space between the arches the same?



ARCH BOARD.
65:2 A.A SPR
NANNANNANA

The boy to whom the bridge belongs receives a marble
from each boy who shoots, and gives to each the number

of marbles over the arches should they pass through
them.



BONCE-EYE.

Boncs-Eve is played by each player putting down a
marble within a small ring, and dropping from the eye
B
14 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

another marble upon them so as to drive them out,
those driven out being the property of the Boncer.

The law of falling bodies may be well illustrated by
this game. It is one of the laws of motion, that the
velocities of falling bodies are in proportion to the space
passed over ; and the space passed over in each instant
increases in arithmetical progression, or as the numbers
1, 3, 5, 7, 9.

By the annexed dia-
gram it will be seen,
that if a marble fall
from the hand at A,
when it reaches B it
has only the quantity
of velocity or force ex-
pressed in the angle 1;
butewhen it passes to
C, it has the quantity
expressed in the three
angles3; when it pas-
ses to D, it has the
quantity expressed in
the angle 5; when it passes to E, it has the quantity
expressed by the seven angles marked 7, Thus we
may understand why a tall boy has a better chance at
Bonce-Eye than a short one.

It is found by experiment, that a body falling from a
height moves at the rate of 16-1, feet in the first second ;
and acquires a velocity of twice that, or 324 feet, in a
second. At the end of the next second, it will have
fallen 644 feet; the space being as the square of the
time. The square of 2 is 4; and 4 times 1675 is 64};


GAMES WITH MARBLES. 15

by the same rule, #t will be found, that in the third
second it will fall 144% feet; in the fourth second, 2574;
and so on. ‘This is to be understood, however, as re-
ferring to bodies falling where there is no air. The air
has a considerable effect in diminishing their velocity of
descent.



SUN AND PLANET TAW.



Tuts is an entirely new game, and consists of the Sun
in the centre, which may be represented by a bullet,
because the sun is the most ponderous body of the
16 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

system, and will in this game be required to move
slowly. The planets moving round him, with their
satellites, I represent by marbles. Now, each boy must
take the place of a planet; and having taken it, he is
required to put down as many marbles as there are
satellites belonging to it. The boy who plays Mercury,
puts down only one for his planet; the boy who plays
Venus does the same; he who plays the Earth, has to
put down one for the Earth, and one for the Moon, its
satellite ; the boy who plays Mars puts down Mars and
the four satellites that lie between the orbits of Mars
and Jupiter ; the boy who plays Saturn puts down one
for the planet, and draws a ring round it, outside of
which he puts the seven satellites in any position he
chooses ; the boy who plays the planet Herschel, puts
down one for the planet, and six for the satellites,
Each boy, having taken his place in this manner, lays
down his taw on any part of the orbit of his planet
he pleases, being the point from which he must make
his first shot,

The rules of the game are very easy; but it is
necessary to be perfectly acquainted with them, as it
saves much trouble, and prevents disputes ; and no one
ought to play till he understands them tolerably well.

1. The players must each put his marble into a hat,
and turn down the hat over the sun; then, as the mar-
bles fall near or far from the sun, the planets are taken.

2. The player who puts in Mercury has the first shot.

3. No planet can be taken till the Sun has been
struck beyond the orbit of Mercury. |

4. The player who strikes the Sun beyond the orbit
of Mercury, receives from the person who holds the
GAMES WITH MARBLES. 17

orbit, as many marbles as there are planets or satellites
in the orbit in which it stops.

8. The orbits are,—for Mercury, all the space be-
tween the Sun and him ; for Venus, the space between
Venus and Mercury ; for the Earth, the space between
the Earth and Venus; for Mars, the space between Mars
and the Earth; for Jupiter, the space between Jupiter
and Mars; for Saturn, the space between Saturn and
Jupiter ; for Herschel, the space between Herschel and
Saturn.

6. If a player succeeds in knocking the Sun on the
line of his own orbit, he receives one from every shooter
so long as it remains there.

7. If the Sun is knocked against a planet, the player
doing so has to pay two to the owner of the planet.

8. If the Sun be struck within the orbit of a planet,
the player striking it receives one if for Herschel, two
for Saturn, three for Jupiter, four for Mars, five for
the earth, six for Venus, and seven for Mercury. |

9. The player who succeeds in knocking the Sun
beyond the orbit of Herschel, wins the game ; that is,
he receives one from each player, and all the marbles
on the stake in the inner circle.

MOTIONS OF THE PLANETS AND THEIR SATELLITES.

10. When a planet is knocked out of the outer ring
(the orbit of Herschel), it belongs to him who strikes it
out: the loser must replace it by putting a marble down
in its original place.

11. When a planet is struck within the orbit of any
other planet, the player striking it there has to pay him

B 3
18 | THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

to whom the orbit belongs, as many marbles as there
are satellites. , |
12. Should a player’s taw, after it has struck another
taw, a planet, or a satellite, fall into its own orbit, he
has to put one in the inner ring as stakes for the winner
of the game.
_ 13. If a player gets his taw within the inner ring, it,
must remain there for the winner, and he cannot play.
any more. |
14. If a player has all his satellites taken, he then
becomes a Comet, and can shoot from any part of any
of the orbits every time the Sun is struck. ,
15. No player can shoot at his own planet or satellite.
16. Any player who strikes a planet or satellite
within Saturn’s ring, forfeits three to the inner circle:
If he strikes the Sun, then he may take up Saturn and
all his satellites remaining within his orbit.
17. After the first shot, every player must shoot from
the place at which his taw rests.

. Such are the laws of Sun and Planet Taw, and it will
be found that in playing the game, some degree of
thought is requisite, and.a little calculation respecting,
the moves. It may be judicious for a good shooter to
keep the Sun within the orbits as long as possible; or
till such time as the inner ring gets fat with the for-
feitures, or he may drive him from orbit to orbit where
the forfeitures are large. He will endeavour to place him
on the line of his own orbit. He may also strive to
place his adversaries’ taws within the inner ring, and to
be careful in striking planets that they fall into the
orbits where the forfeitures are small. By thus thinking
GAMES WITH MARBLES. 19

of what he is about and exercising forethought and
prudence, he will soon become expert, and by paying
attention to the game he will make it his own.



PYRAMID.

To play Pyramid, a small circle of about two feet in
diameter should be made on the ground, in the centre
of which is a pyramid formed by several marbles,—nine
being placed as the base, then a layer of four, and one
on the top; and the Pyramid keeper asks his playmates
to shoot. Each player gives the keeper one for leave
to shoot at the Pyramid, and all that he can strike out
of the circle belong to him.



PART II.
GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER.



One of the best of these is called

“ PRISONERS’ BASE,”

To play this, there must be a number of boys, not
less than eight or ten, and as many more as can be got
together. To commence it, two semicircles are drawn
against a wall or hedge at the opposite sides of the
playground. These are called the Bounps.

Two other spaces are then marked out a little away
92 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

from these to the right or to the left. These places
are called the Prisons.

The game is commenced by player from one side
running out midway between the bounds or prisons, a
player from the other side immediately following to
capture him ; one from the other side follows after the
second to capture him, and so on, both parties sending
out as many as they think fit. The object of each player
is to intercept and touch any player of the opposite side
who has left his bounds before him, but he is not at liberty
to touch any that have started after him ; it being their
privilege, if they can, to touch him before he gets back
to his own bounds. A player must touch only one
person each time he leaves bounds, and cannot be
touched by another after he has taken a prisoner. Every
player who is touched, must go to the prison belonging
to his adversaries, where he must remain until one of
his own side can touch him; and prisoners can neither
touch nor be touched in their return to their own bounds
again. The game is won by that side which has taken
all the other party prisoners.



STAG OUT.

In this game, one boy personates the Stag, and with
his hands closed together, starts from his bounds after
the other players. When he succeeds in touching one
who is called the Ass, the first who gets to him rides
him back to the bounds. The two then go out in the
same manner, then three, and so on, till the whole are
caught.
GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 23

WARNING.

Tu1s game is something similar to another very good
game called “WARNING,” which may be played by any
number of players. One begins the game in the same
manner as in “Stag Out,” repeating the following
words, —‘* Warning once, warning twice, warning thrice
A bushel of wheat, and a bushel of rye, when the
cock crows, out jump [—Cock a doodle doo.” He then
runs out and touches the first he can overtake, who
returns to bounds with him. The two then join hands
and sally forth, and touch a third, who joins hands with
the other two: again they sally hand-in-hand, the two
outside ones touching as many as they can. Immedi-
ately a player is touched, they must break hands and
run back to the bounds. If any of the out-players can
catch any of those who held hands, they may ride them
back to their bounds. When three are touched, he who
first begins the game has the privilege of joining the
out-players, whose object is always to break the line.



MOUSE IN THE CORNER.

In this game, one of the players takes the part of Puss,
and places himself in the centre, and the others playing
take up their positions in the four corners of the play-
ground. Each of the players calls out, “ Puss, puss,
puss, pretty puss, —how do you do pussy,” and en-
deavour to pass from corner to corner. The players are
at liberty to change corners in all directions, and if Puss
can touch one when he is away from his corner, the one
24 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

so touched, after giving Puss a ride round the ground,
becomes Puss, or if Puss can take a vacant corner, the
player without a corner must do the same,—give Puss
a ride round and become Puss.



KING OF THE CASTLE.

Tus is not a bad game. One player, called King of
the Castle, places himsrlf on a little rising mound; the
other players endeavour to push or pull him from his
elevation, and whoever succeeds in this, takes his place.



HIPPAS,

Tus game is something like the
preceding, only that one boy
mounts on the back of another,
who is called his Horse, another
boy does the same, and the two
mounted boys endeavour to pull
each other from the saddle. This
play is harmless when a soft piece
=} of turf is chosen, but dangerous
# | — on the stones or hard ground.





THREAD THE NEEDLE.

Tus is a good game,—any number of boys may play
it. It is begun by joining hands; and the two outside
players at each end commence the game by the following
dialogue: —
GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 25.

How many miles to Babylon?
Three score and ten.
Can I get there by candle-light?
Yes, and back again.
Then open the gates without more ado,
And let the king and his men go through.

The player who stands at the opposite end of the
line, now elevates his hand, joined in that of the player
next him, to form the needle’s eye, and the other outside
player approaches running, and the whole line follow
him through, if possible, without breaking. This is
continued, each end holding up their hands successively,
till the players are tired of the sport.



TOUCH.

Turs is a game of speed. One volunteers to be Touch,
and he pursues the other players till he comes up with
one of them and touches him; unless the player so
touched can say, ‘‘ I touch iron,” or, “I touch wood,”
before he is touched, he becomes Touch, and must give
the player who touched him a ride home. A player is
liable to be touched only when running from one piece
of wood or iron to another.

There is another and a better game of Touch, called
«Cross Touch,” which is played thus :—One volunteers
to be Touch, and sallies forth from his bounds. While
he is pursuing one of the players, a third player runs
between him and the player pursued, and touch must
then follow the one who crosses till another crosses
them, and so on, till at length the whole playground
will become a scene of activity and sport.

c
26 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

BOWLS.

“J will play at Bowls with the sun and moon.”—Byron.

“ He who plays Bowls must expect rubbers.” —Bowles,
Tuts is one of the best of games for hot or cold weather,
for it is excellent exercise, and requires skill and judg-
ment. Few requisites are required for it, but a level
lawn, or tolerably level field, is indispensable, as are the
bowls, the Jack, and the players.

If playing bowls, partners may be chosen, if there
are many players, or the game may be played by two
persons. When, however, there are three or four of a
side, there is more interest attached to the game. The
best player of my time was the good old schoolmaster,
Mr. Fenn, from whom I obtained all the particulars
concerning Bowls.

The bowls used at this game are of wood, loaded
with lead, or biassed, as it is called, namely, there is
one side thicker than the other, which is marked, and
this may be held either near or away from the thumb
as it may be required to lay the ball. No writer in a
book can teach this, as it depends upon the nature of the
ground, and the situation of the balls already bowled.

Before commencing the game, the first player leads
out a small white ball, called a Jack; he then lays his
own balls as near to it as possible ; the players then
follow in succession, but no partners follow each other
till the whole balls are delivered, and those who obtain
the nearest points to the Jack score one for each ball.

The number making the game is arbitrary, but eleven
is generally fixed upon. Of course it would be more
were there a great number of bowlers. The sport of
{he game consists in driving your opponent’s ball from
GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 27

the Jack, and putting your own near it. When one
side scores eleven before their opponents get five, it is
called a lurch. The players at Bowls change the Jack
from one side of the green to the other after the whole
of each side have bowled once.



QUOITS.
“ Quoit me down, Bardolph.”— Shakspeare.

Tuz game of Quoits resembles Bowls. It is played
with flat rings of iron of various weights. Ata certain
number of paces apart (to be agreed upon), two circular
pins of iron are driven into the ground. The players
beginning the game stand at one of these pins, called
the Hob, and pitch the quoits to the other, each person
having two. When all the quoits are cast from one
Hob, the players walk to the other and pitch to the
first, and so on in succession.

Those who get nearest to the Hob, are, of course,
nearest to the game, and each pair of quoits counts two,
—each single quoit, one ; but ifa quoit belonging to A
lies nearest to the Hob, and a quoit belonging to B the
second, A can claim but one towards the game, although
all his other quoits may be nearer to. the Hob than all
those of B, as the quoit of B is said, technically, to have
cut them out.



WHY AND BECAUSE.

Tuts is also a new game, and one of those that combine
amusement and instruction. To play it, a king must
be chosen, who is called ‘‘ King of the Shy,” who sets
up a brick on its end and puts a stone upon it, as @
mark for the players to bowl their stones at, which they
98 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.







My, =

| h r, mw Whip
NN (ee
=

a

do successively. When a player has bowled, if he knocks
the stone off the brick, he may take up his own stone
and run back to his bounds, if he can do so before the
king sets his brick and stone up again ; but if the King
can touch the player after having set his brick up, he is
obliged to answer a ‘“‘Why,” or be King instead of him.
The “Why” must be proposed by the King, and it
may either be a conundrum, or it may contain the
reason of any thing, as, ‘‘Why does a stone fall to the
ground ?”’ ‘‘What makes the smoke go up the chimney?”
If the player cannot answer the “‘ Why,” he is obliged
to mind the shy and let the others bowl. Sometimes
it will happen, that of all the boys who have bowled at
the shy, not one has thrown it down; the King then
looks sharply at each one who tries to take up his stone,
to touch him. It generally happens, that whilst the
King is pursuing one, who has taken up his stone, to
touch him, all the rest take to their stones, and make
off home. But it should have been said, that by the
place from which they bowl, a string is stretched for a
leap, over which a player running from the King is
obliged to jump before he is considered home.

(Some good Conundrum Questions for this game will be
found in the “ Boox or Srorts,” on In-Door Amusements. ).





=


GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 29

BOMBARDMENT OF A SNOW CASTLE,

TuErE is no game like this for promoting warmth and
exercising the ingenuity. To play this, a Snow Castle,
Tower, and Fort must be constructed, and a Bombard-
ment got up.

When the snow is on the ground, let a party go into
a meadow and divide themselves into two companies,
and appoint a general to each. Each company then
takes up its respective position, and proceeds to build a
fort and castle, for defence, on each side ; the dexterity
with which the work is performed, and the celerity with
which it is accomplished, being much in favour of those
who play. During the building of the castle, some
must be employed as sharp-shooters, who must annoy
the builders on each side with snow balls, and some
must be employed in making a store of snow balls for
the magazine. When the castle is commenced, the first
the first thing to be done is, for several of the builders
to make a roll of snow about eighteen inches in length,
and as thick as his arm, and to roll this on the snow,
which will attach itself to it till it forms a large ball as
high as the builders’s shoulders. This must be turned
over on its flat side, and as many more as can be arranged
in the following manner, for a fort (supposing the other
side to be erecting a castle). The foundation thus being
laid, other balls not quite so large must be rolled up and
laid on the former, so as to make the rampart about
four feet high. Behind this, a single line of snow balls
must be placed, about one foot in height, on which the
attacking party may mount to discharge their balls to
the castle opposite. On elevated parts of the forts,

: c 3
30 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

long sticks with pocket-handkerchiefs, as flags, must be
raised, and in the centre, a larger flag should be placed,
and it must be the object of the opposite party to de-
molish them with their balls. When a player wishes to
throw a ball, he mounts upon one of the inner partings
of snow, discharges his shot, and jumps down behind
the parapet for more shot. The party on the opposite
side may build their castle as they please; but each:
party should watch each other’s movements, and build
their different places of defence or annoyance in such a
manner as to defend themselves and annoy the enemy in
the most effective manner. It may be observed, that
the fort must be so constructed with reference to the
castle, that it is brought to bear on every point of it. The
two ends are towers, which should be a foot higher than
the ramparts, and should be made by three snow balls
laid one upon the other, —the last one being turreted,
with room for one boy to mount to the top, if necessary,
to discharge his shots. The highest place of all, is the
keep, and should be at least six feet high, with room
and steps behind for two boys to mount. Convenient
places should be left behind, where the ammunition
should be piled up.

When the fort or castle is built, each party uses its
best efforts for the demolition of the other, but no one
is allowed to make use of his hands in the demolition of
either castle or fort ; battering-rams may alone be em-
ployed. In ancient times, battering-rams were large
beams, hooped and shod with iron ; but the moderns do
things better, and the way in which it may be done is as
follows :—A boy who volunteers to be batterig-ram has
his legs tied and then two other boys take him up, and,
GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 31

swinging him by the-arms and legs, force his feet against
the walls of the castle or fort to batter it down, the op-
posite party pouring on them, all the while, snow balls
heated to a white heat from the ramparts above. Parties
also may go out from one side to the other, as in playing
« Hippas,” mounted, and may meet in the open space
and endeavour to pull each other from their horses. If
a player on either side can break over the fort and cap-
ture one of the flags without being touched, he may.
bring it off and place it on his own ramparts as a trophy,
and the party from whom the flag is captured must not
replace it ; but if in this act he is touched, he becomes,
a prisoner, and must make snow-balls for his adversaries.
Every one who is thrown down, either from his horse
or by any other means, is considered a dead man, and
can donothing but make snow-balls for the opposite party.
When the flags are all struck on either side by being
shot away, or when the men are all taken prisoners or
slain, or when the ramparts are demolished, the victors
may sing, ‘‘ Old Rose and burn the Bellows.”



BANDY BALL OR GOLF.

Tuis game is played with a bat and a small ball; and
the game consists in driving the ball into certain holes
made in the ground. Sometimes these holes from first to
last, are at the distance of half a mile or even more from
each other. There are many intervening holes. Those
who drive the ball into the greatest number of holes, of
course win the game; but the ball must never be driven
beyond a hole without first going into it. If the ball
passes in the way beyond a hole, the player is aut.
s

32 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

FOOT BALL.

Foor Batt is a very simple game. A large soft ball is
procured (which is now made of Gutta Percha), and the
players having assembled and taken sides, a line is
drawn across the playground, and the play commences.
The object of the play is, for each party to kick the ball
across the goal of the other, and to prevent it from
passing their own. The party into whose bounds the
ball is kicked, loses the game.



TRUSSING,

Tuts is an excellent game. In some places it is called
“Cock Fighting.” To play it, two players must be
matched against each other, and one is sometimes
called ‘‘ Black Cock,” and the other ‘‘ White Cock.”
They are seated on a carpet, or, what is better, the
floor of the play-room, and undergo the operation
of ‘‘trussing.” This is performed as follows :—The
hands are first tied with a handkerchief at the wrists.
The ancles are tied in the same manner. The Cock
then has his hands brought to his instep, while his
knees pass between his arms, and a short stick is thrust
in under the knees and over the joints of the elbow, and
secured in this situation. The fight now begins by each
Cock advancing towards his enemy, and when they
come close to each other, each endeavours, by inserting
his toes under the other’s feet, to capsize him and
throw him over on the side; and whoever does this, is
entitled to crow, and is winner of the game. There is
often a good deal of fun in this game, and the players
can rarely hurt each other.
GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 33

FOLLOW MY LEADER.





Fottow my Lxapkr is a very good game; and when
the Leader is a droll boy, causes much fun and laughter.
The leader starts off at a moderate pace, and all the
other boys, in a line, one after the other, follow him.
They are not only bound to follow him, but do exactly
what he does. If he hops on one leg, or crawls on the
ground, or coughs, or sneezes, or jumps, or rolls, or
laughs, all must do the same. If any boy fail to follow
his Leader, he is called the “ Ass,” and must be ridden
by the boy next him. Sometimes the Leader will leap
a ditch, climb a tree, or run into a river. But boys
should be careful of very mad pranks in this sport.





BLINDMAN’S BUFF.

In this game, a person is blindfolded, and endeavours
to catch any one of the players, who, if caught, is blind-
folded and takes his place. |

There is another Game something resembling it,


34 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

called Suavow Burr. A piece of white linen is thrown
over a line across the room ; between this screen and
close to the wall on one side, a candle is placed, and
on the other side, Buffy is obliged to stand, while the
players moving between the candle and linen show
their shadows through it, and Buffy has to distinguish
each person by his shadow. When he does this, the
player so found out becomes Buffy and takes his place.



TIP-CAT.

For this game a piece of wood must be procured about
six inches in length and two inches thick, of the follow-
ing shape :—

that is, of a double curve. It will be seen by the shap
of this, that it will fly up as easily as a ball when it is
laid in the trap, for the striker has only to tap one end
of it, and up it flies, making many a summerset as it
rises; while it is performing this turn-over motion,
which philosophers call the rotatory, the striker makes
a blow at it and sends it whither he pleases.

The proper way to play the game, is as follows :—A
large ring is made on the ground, in the middle of
which the striker takes his station; he then tips the cat
and endeavours to strike it out of the ring; if he fail in
this, he is out, and another player takes his place. If
he strike the Cat out of the ring, he judges with his
eye the distance the Cat is driven from the centre
GAMES FOR COLD WEATHER. 35

the ring, and calls for a number, at pleasure, to be
scored towards the game. The place is now measured
by the stick with which the Cat is struck, and if the
number called be found to exceed the same number of
lengths of the cudgel, he is out, but if it does not, he
obtains his call. Another method of playing, is to make
four, six, or eight holes in the ground in a circular
direction, at equal distances from each other, and at
every hole is placed a player with his cudgel. One of
the party who stands in the field, tosses the Cat to the
batsman who is nearest to him, and every time the Cat
is struck, the players must change their situations and
run over from one hole to another in succession. If
the Cat be driven to any great distance, they continue
to run in the same order, and claim a score towards
their game every time they quit one hole and run to
another. But if the Cat be stopped by their opponents,
and thrown across between any two of the holes. before
the player who has quitted one of ‘them can reach the
other, he is out.



JINGLING.

Tus game is common to the West of England, and is
called a “‘ Jingling Match.” It is played by a number
of players being blindfolded within a ring formed for the
game, and one or two others, termed the “ Jinglers,”
not blindfolded, with a bell fastened to their elbow, also
enter the ring. The blinded players have to ‘catch the
Jingler, who moves about rapidly from place to place.
He who catches the Jingler wins the game; but if after
a certain time, agreed upon previously by the players
the Jingler is not caught, he is declared the victor.
36 THE BOOK OF SPORTS,

FRENCH AND ENGLISH.

Frencn AND Encuisu is another good game. A rope
being provided, two players stand out, and after having
cleeped for first choice, select the partners. After an
equal number has been selected for each side, one party
attaches itself to one end of the rope, and the other
party lays hold of the other: a line is then made on
the ground, and each party endeavours to pull the other
over this line. The party succeeding in this, wins the
game,
PART III.
DANGEROUS GAMES.

eer ceenieee

Anp now that we have given a description of some
good games, it may be as well to warn our readers of
some bad or foolish ones, which are either calculated to
spoil their clothes, make them very dirty, or are dan-
gerous to their limbs,



HEAP THE BUSHEL.

Tus is a very dangerous game, if it can be called a
game. Should one boy happen to fall, it is the practice
of other boys to fall upon him and to “ Heap the
Bushel,” as it is called, all the other boys leaping on
the one already down. It sometimes happens, that
those underneath are seriously injured; and the sport
is seldom engaged in without quarrelling among the
- players, and sometimes it leads to a fight.



DRAWING THE OVEN.

_ Tuts is another dangerous game. It consists of several
players being seated on the ground in a line, clasped by
each other round the waist: when all are thus united,
two others take the foremost one, and endeavour by
pulling and tugging to break him off from the rest. Thus
the united strength of several boys before, and as many
behind, is made to act upon the one in front, and an
arm may be dislocated by a sudden jerk, not to say any-
thing about a broken neck. |
D
88 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

HOP-SCOTCH.

Turs is a silly game. It is calculated to wear out the
shoes. |



BASTING THE BEAR.

Tuts is another silly game. A boy, who is called the
Bear,” kneels down on the ground in a ring marked
out, to let the other boys beat him with their twisted or
knotted handkerchiefs. The master of the Bear, who
holds him by the rope, endeavours to touch one of the
assailants; if he succeeds in doing this, without pulling
the Bear out of his circle, or letting go the rope, the
player touched becomes Bear in his turn. But it is
calculated to spoil the clothes of the Bear, and some-
times, should he kneel on a sharp stone, may do him
much injury.



BUCK, BUCK.

«« Buck, Buck, how many horns do I hold up?” is also
a stupid game. It neither requires speed, nor agility,
nor wit. The game is played by one boy resting his
head against a wall and making a back, upon which the
other jumps, who, when seated, holds up as many of
his fingers as he pleases, and cries, *‘ Buck, Buck, how
many horns do I hold up?” The player who is leaped
upon, now makes a guess; if he guesses correctly, it is
his turn to leap, if not, the leaper leaps again. But
there is little good in all this, and it-ought not to be
encouraged. ; ;
| PART IV.
GYMNASTICS.



*,

Aut boys, and girls too, ought to train themselves to
habits of agility, and nothing is more calculated to do
this than Gymnastics, which may be rendered a source
of health and amusement.

In all playgrounds, a piece of ground should be laid
out; and there should be erected thereon, a couple of
posts, about twenty feet apart, and sixteen feet high,
which should support a plank, about a foot wide, and
six inches thick; on the underside of this might be
affixed a hook, from which a triangle might be swung,
—this is capable of being used in a variety of ways.
Two more hooks, about a foot apart; might be used for
two ropes, so that the more advanced pupils could climb
to the top by means of grasping a rope in each hand,
and without the assistance of the feet. A pole may
rise from the ground to the cross piece about midway :
the pupils will be able to climb up this without the
assistance of the feet. A wood ladder and rope ladder
may occasionally be fastened to the beam, but may,
when necessary, be taken down. A board about a foot
broad may also be set up against the beam, inclining
four feet from the perpendicular: the climber will grasp
the sides with his hands, and placing his feet ‘almost
flat against the board, will proceed to the top: this is
an advanced exercise. Another board may be set u,
40 THE BOOK OF SPORTS,

which should be three feet broad, at least, and should
slant more than the other: the pupil will run up this
to the top of the beam easily, and down again. The
middle of this, up to the top, should be perforated with
holes about four inches apart, in which a peg may be
placed: this may be in the first hole to begin with
The pupil will run up and bring this down, and then
run up and put it in the second, and so on, till he has
arrived at the top: then two or more pegs may be
used, and it may be varied in many ways. A pole,
twenty-five or thirty feet high should be erected, rather
thin towards the top: at distant intervals of this, three
or four pegs, as resting places, should be fastened ;
another pole, thicker, from about sixteen to twenty feet
high, should be erected; on the top of which should be
placed four projecting hooks turning on a pivot: to
these hooks four ropes should be attached, reaching to
within two feet from the ground. This is called the
“ Flying Course,” from an individual taking hold of the
peg at the end of each rope.

One person may cross a rope under the one in pos-
session of another, and by pulling round hard, make the
other fly over his head. Care should be taken to make
the hooks at the top quite secure, for otherwise many
dangerous accidents might ensue. A cross pole might
also be set up, but most of the exercises for which this
is used, may be performed by the triangle. On the
parallel bars, several beneficial exercises may be done,
and also on the bridge. This is a pole thick at one end,
thin at the other, and supported at three or four feet from
the ground bya post at one end and another in the middle,
so that the thin end vibrates with the least touch. This, it
GYMNASTICS. 4]

will be evident, is an exercise for the organ of equilibrium,
and exercises the muscles of the calf, of the neck, and
anterior part of the neck, and those of the back, very
gently. On this bridge a sort of combat may be instituted,
—two persons meeting each other, giving and parrying
strokes with the open hands, The string -for leaping is —
also another very pleasing exercise. It is supported by
a couple of pegs on two posts fastened in the ground.
The string may be heightened and lowered at pleasure,
—it may be raised as high as the leaper’s head when a
leaping-pole is used. Besides these arrangements, a
trench about a foot and a half deep should be dug, and
widening gradually from one foot to seven, for the
purpose of exercising the long leap either with or with-
out the aid of the pole. Such are the general arrange-
ments of a gymnasium, but before the youth enters
upon regular exercises, he may commence with a few
preliminary ones.



FIRST COURSE.

Exercise 1. The pupil should hold out his hand at
arm’s length, until he can hold it out no longer, and
repeat it until he has power in the muscles, to continue
it, without fatigue, for a considerable length of time.

2. Stand on one foot till he is tired, and repeat this
for a similar period.

3. Hold out both arms parallel with his chin, letting
the thumbs and fingers touch each other.

4. Hold the hands behind the back in a similar
manner, the arms being stretched as far backward as
‘possible, and hold the hands high.

D3
42 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

5. Hold up the right foot by the
nght hand, extending the leg and arm
by degrees.

6. Hold up the left foot in the
game manner.

7. Stand with the knees bent, and
exercise them towards the ground,
until he can kneel on both knees at
once without supporting himself as 24
he drops. >

8. Raise himself from this position without the aid of
his hands, by springing back on his toes.

9. Endeavour to touch both his toes, with the back
straight, the legs close together, and the head down,

10. Take a piece of wood, three inches broad, and
twenty long, that will not bend, and hold it across the
back, the three first fingers touching the wood.

| Z 11. Endeavour to sit, but not

= ‘e, us touch the ground, nor let any

part of his body touch his heels,

with his arms stretched out in
a line with his chin.

12. Stand with his arms and
legs extended, so as to form
the letter X.







SECOND COURSE.

Let the pupil :—

13. Lie down on his back, and raise his body from
an horizontal to a vertical position, without any assistance
from the hands or elbows.
GYMNASTICS. 43

14. Draw up the legs close to the posterior part of
the thighs, and rise without other assistance. a foun

15. Extend himself on is
his back again, and walk !
-- backwards with the palms {yi |
of his hands and his feet. ‘°

16. Sustain the weight
of the whole body upon the = |
palms and the toes, the face being towards the ground.

17. Lie on his back, and take
hold of each foot in his hands,
and throw himself on his face by
rolling over.

18. Lie with the face down,
and take hold of his toes while in
that position.

19. With his chest down-
wards, drag his body along
by walking only with ‘his
“hands.

90. Place himself on his back, and endeavour to
advance by means of the propulsion of the feet.

21. Place his body on his hands and feet, with the breast
upwards, and:endeavour to bring the lips to the ground.

22, Lean on the breast and palms of the hands, and

throw the legs over towards the back of the head.
- 983. Stretch himself on the back, and extending the
hands beyond the head, at the utmost stretch, touch
the ground, and, if possible, bring up a piece of money,
previously to be placed there.

94. In the same manner, endeavour to seize & ball
by the toes at full length. ;

*








44 ) THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

WALKING.

Taxus preliminary exercises having been practised,
‘the young pupil will commence a course of more ad-
vanced exercises, such as walking, running, leaping,
balancing, vaulting, and climbing. Walking is common
to all, but few persons have a good walk, and nothing
exhibits the person to so much disadvantage as a
slovenly bad gait. It is true, that the walk of a person
will indicate much of his character. ° Nervous people
walk hurriedly, sometimes quick, sometimes slow, with
a tripping and sometimes a running step; phlegmatic
people have a heavy, solid, and loitering step; the san-
guine man walks rapidly, treads somewhat briskly and
firmly ; while the melancholic wanders, and seems almost
unconscious of touching the ground which he seems to
slide over. But the qualities of the mind itself manifest
themselves in the gait. The man of high moral. prin-
ciple and virtuous integrity, walks with a very different
step to the low sensualist, or the cunning and unprin-
cipled knave; therefore the young pupil will be sure
that even the art of walking, which seems to be an
exertion purely physical, will not be acquired properly
if his mind has taken a vicious and unprincipled bias:
it will either indicate his pride or his dastardly humility,
his haughty self-sufficiency, or his mean truckling to
the opinion of others, his honest independence, or his
cringing servility. But he who has been blessed with
the full use of his muscular powers, in proportion as he
is virtuous, will, with a very little attention, indicate by
his bearing, step, and carriage, the nobility of his mind

In walking, the arms should move freely by the side

.
GYMNASTICS, 45.

—they act like the fly-wheel of an engine, to equalise
the motion of the body, and to balance it One hand
in the breeches pocket, or both, indicates the sot, and
has a very bad appearance. ‘The head should be up-
right, without, however, any particular call being made
upon the muscles of the neck to support it in that posi-
tion, so that it may move freely in all directions. The
body should be upright, and the shoulders thrown
moderately backwards, displaying a graceful fall. When
the foot reaches the ground, it should support the body,
not on the toe or heel, but on the ball of the foot.
This manner of walking should be practised daily,
sometimes in a slow, sometimes in a moderate walk,
and sometimes in a quick pace, until each is performed
with elegance and ease. -



RUNNING.

IN RUNNING, as the swiftness of the motion steadies
the body in its course, without the aid of the oscilla-
tions of the arms, they are naturally drawn up towards
the sides, and, bent at the elbows, form a right angle.
Their motion is almost suspended in very swift running.
In moderate running, a gentle oscillation is observed,
increasing in proportion as the body approaches to the.
walking pace. The knees are now more bent,—the
same part of the foot does not touch the ground, the
the body being carried forward more by the toes. The
degree of velocity is acquired in proportion to the
length and quickness of the steps. The person should
therefore endeavour to ascertain whether long or short
steps suit his muscular powers best; generally speaking
46 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

a moderately short step, quickly repeated, accelerates
motion most. In learning to run, the pupil should
first endeavour to improve his breath by degrees: he
must try his speed first in short distances, to be gradu-
ally increased: the distance will vary according to the
age and strength of the runner. The first exercises in,
running should commence at a gentle trot over a dis-
tance of a hundred and fifty yards, at the rate of about
six feet to a second: this should be varied up to eight
feet in a second, for the first three or four days, and the
distance increased from one hundred and fifty to two
hundred and fifty yards. On following days, the dis-
tance may be increased to five hundred yards, and
afterwards gradually, until a mile can be performed in
ten minutes, which is tolerably good running. After-
wards, six miles may be tried in an hour, which will be
easily accomplished.

As regards rapid running, from one hundred feet to
one hundred yards may be attempted at full speed, and
when the constitution is good, the body not too fat, the
muscular developments fine, and the lungs sound, a
quarter of a mile a minute may be accomplished, and a
mile in five minutes, which is seldom done even in very
good running. Ten miles an hour, which is the average
speed of the mail, may, however, be easily performed
with judicious and proper training.



LEAPING.

In Leapine, that with the run, is the most common
and the most useful. The object of the run is to impart

s
GYMNASTICS. 47

to the nerves of the body a certain quantity of motion .
which may carry it onwards after the propelling power
has ceased to act when the body leaves the ground.
The run need not exceed twelve or fifteen paces: in
this the steps are small and rapid. When the body
leaves the ground, the legs are drawn up, one foot
generally a little more than the other; and a great thing
to be avoided, is coming to the ground on the heels.
When springing, the height of the leap must be calcu-
lated, the breath held, the body pressed forward, and
the fall should be upon the toes and the ball of the foot,
although in an extended leap this is impossible. Leaping
must, like running, be practised gradually ; in the high
leap, a person may easily accomplish the height of his
own body, and should practise with the bar, which may
be made of two upright posts bored, through which
ropes should be placed according to the height required
for the leap: on these should be hung a string with
weights attached to each end to keep it straight.
Should the leaper touch it with his feet as he takes his
leap, it will be thrown off the pegs, thus showing that
he did not make a clean leap.

The deep leap may be acquired from the top of a
bank into a hollow, and is useful in leaping from the top
of a house or wall in a moment of danger. It may be
practised from a flight of steps, ascending a step at a
time to increase the height, till the limbs can bear the
shocks, to break which, the body must be kept in a
bent position, so that its gravity has to pass through
many angles. The leaper should always take advantage
of any rivulet that has one bank higher than the other,
to practise himself.
48 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

In the long leap, a person ought to be able to clear
with a run, three times the length of his body.

The high leap, the deep leap, and the long leap, may
-be all practised with the pole. For the high leap, the
pole should be taken with the right hand, about the
height of the head, and with the left hand, about the
height of the hips; when put to the ground, the leaper
should spring with the right foot, and pass by the left of
the pole, and swing round as he alights, so as to face
the place he leaped from. In the deep leap, the pole



being placed the depth you have to leap, the body
should be lowered forward, and then, the feet being
cast off, swing round the pole in the descent. The
GYMNASTICS. 49

long leap, with the pole, is performed much in the same
manner.

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CLIMBING.

In climbing the rope, the hands are to be
moved one above the other alternately ; the
feet should be crossed, and the rope held
firmly by their pressure: sometimes the
rope may be made to pass along the right
thigh just above the knee, and wind round
the thigh under the knee.
In climbing the upright pole, the feet,
legs, knees, and hands touch the pole.
| Taking a high grasp of the pole, the climber
raises himself by bending his body, drawing up and
holding fast by the legs, and so on alternately.
K


50 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

THE ROPE LADDER.

Tue climber must keep the body stretched out, and
upright, so as to prevent the steps, which are loose,
from being bent forward.

The oblique rope must be climbed with the back
turned towards the ground, the legs crossed and thrown
over, so that the rope passes under the calf, and thus
he must work himself up by raising his hands one above
the other alternately.

The exercises on the ladder are :—1. To ascend and
descend rapidly. 2. To ascend and descend with one
hand. 3. Without using the hand. 4. Passing another
person on the ladder, or swinging to the back to let
another pass.





THE SLANT BOARD.

Tuis should be seized with both
hands, the feet being placed in the
middle. The board should be con-
siderably aslant when first attempted,
and gradually brought towards the
perpendicular.



VAULTING.

Tus exercise may be practised on that part of the
balancing bar between the posts. It may be performed
with or without running: it should, however, be com-
menced with a short run. The height should be, to
commence, about the pit of the stomach, which should
be increased to the height of the individual,
GYMNASTICS. 51

BALANCING.

THERE are two kinds of balancing to which we shall
allude ; namely, the balancing of other bodies, and the
balancing of our own.

All feats of balancing depend upon the centre of
gravity being uniformly preserved in one position. The
centre of gravity is that point, about which all the other
parts exactly balance each other. If a body be freely
suspended upon this point, it will rest with security,
and as:long as this point is supported, it will never
fall, while in every other position it will endeavour
to descend to the lowest place at which it can arrive.
If a perpendicular line were drawn from the centre of
gravity of a body to the centre of the earth, such a line
would be termed the line of direction, along which
every body supported endeavours to fall.’ If this dine
fall within the base of a body, such a body will be sure
to stand.

When the line of direction is thrown beyond its
centre, unless the base be enlarged to counterbalance
it, the person or body will fall. A person in stooping
to look over a deep hole, will bend his trunk forward;
the line of direction being altered, he must extend his
base to compensate for it, which he does by putting his
foot a step forward. A porter stoops forward to prevent
his burthen from throwing the line of direction out of
the base behind, and a girl does the same thing in car-
rying a pail of water, by stretching out her opposite
arm, for the weight of the pail throws the centre of
gravity on one side, and the stretching out of the oppo-
site arm brings it back again, and thus the two are
52 THE BOOK OF SPORTS,

balanced. The art of balancing, therefore, simply con-
sists in dexterously altering the centre of gravity upon
every new position of the body, so as constantly to pre-
serve the line of direction within the base. Rope-dan-
cers effect this by means of a
long pole, held across the rope;
and when the balancing-rail
is mounted, it will be found
necessary to hold out both the
arms for the same purpose;
nay, even when we slip or
stumble with one foot, we in
a moment extend the opposite
arm, making the same use of
it as the dancer does of his
pole.
A balancer finds that a body to be balanced, is the
best for his purpose if it have a loaded head, and a
slender or pointed base, for although the higher the
weight is placed above the point of support, the more




GYMNASTICS. 53

readily will the line of direction be thrown beyond the
base, yet he can more easily restore it by the motion of
his hand,—narrowly watching with his eyes its deviations.
Now the same watchfulness must be displayed by the
gymnastic balancer : he first uses the balancing pole,—
he then mounts the balancing bar without it. On
mounting the bar, the body should be held erect, and
the hands must be extended. He must then learn to
walk firmly and steadily along the bar, so as to be able
to turn round, and then he should practise going back-
wards. Two balancers should then endeavour to pass
each other on the bar; afterwards, to carry each other,
and bodies of various weights, in various positions.

Walking on stilts is connected with balancing. A
person can walk with greater security upon high than
on low stilts. In some parts of France, the peasantry,
in looking after their sheep, walk generally on stilts,
and it only requires practise to make this as easy as
common walking. Some few years ago, several of these
stilt-walkers were to be seen in London, and they could
run, jump, stoop, and walk with ease and security, their
legs seeming quite as natural to them as those of the
Stork.



PART YV.

CRICKET.

—— p
Ro al RR ce



AM

—T7_CO.

Cricket is the king of games. Every boy in England
should learn it. The young prince of Wales is learning
it, and will some day be the prince of cricket-players,
as I trust he will some day, a long while hence,. how-
ever, let us hope, be king of merry England. I shall,
therefore, be very particular concerning this noble game.
It is played by a bat and ball, and consists of double
and single wicket. The wicket was formerly two straight
thin batons, called stumps, twenty-two inches high,
which were fixed in the ground perpendicularly, six
56 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

inches apart, and over the top of both was laid a small
round piecé of wood, called the bail, but so placed as to
fall off readily if the stumps were touched by the ball.
Of late years the wicket consists of three stumps and
two bails; the middle stump is added to prevent the
ball from passing through the wicket without beating it
down; the external stumps are now seven inches apart,
and all of them three feet two inches high. Single
wicket requires five players on, each side, and double
wicket eleven; but the number in both instances may
be varied at the pleasure of the two parties. At single
wicket the striker with his bat is the protector of the
wicket ; the opponent party stands in the field to catch
or stop the ball; and the bowler, who is one of them,
takes his place by the side of a small baton or stump,
set up for that purpose, twenty-two yards from the
wicket, and thence delivers the ball with the intention
of beating it down. It is now usual to set up two
stumps with a bail across, which the batsman, when he
runs, must beat off before he returns home. If the
bowler prove successful, the batsman retires from. the
play and another of his party succeeds ; if, on the ¢on-
trary, the ball is struck by the bat, and driven into the
field beyond the reach of those who'stand out to stop
it, the striker runs to the stump at the bowler’s station,
which he touches with his bat, and then returns to his
wicket. If this be performed before the ball is thrown
back, it is called a run, and a notch or score is made
upon the tally towards the game; if, on the contrary,
the ball be thrown up and the wicket beaten down by
the opponent party before the striker is home or can
ground his bat within three feet ten inches of the
CRICKET. 57

wicket (at which distance a mark is made in the ground,
called the popping crease), he is declared to be out, and
the run is not reckoned. He is also out if he strike the
ball into the air and it is caught by any of his antago-
nists before it reaches the ground, and retained long
enough to be thrown up again. When double wicket is
played, two batsmen go in at the same time,—one at
each wicket: there are also two bowlers, who usually
bowl four balls in succession alternately. The batsmen
are said to be in as long as they remain at their wickets.
and their party is called the in-party; on the contrary,
those who stand in the field with the bowlers, are called
the out-party. Both parties have two innings, and the
side that obtains the most runs in the double contest,
claims the victory. These are the general outlines. of
this noble pastime, but there are many particular rilles
and regulations by which it is governed, and these rules
are subject to frequent variations.



SINGLE WICKET

Sinatz wicket may be played with any number of
players, and is better than double wicket for any num-
ber of players under seven. At double wicket, a small
number of players would get so fatigued with running
after the ball, that when it came to the last player's
turn, he would find himself too tired, without resting a
while. The first innings in single wicket must be deter-
mined by chance. The bowler should pitch the wickets,
and the striker measure the distance for the bowling-
stump. Measure a distance of the length of the bat,
and then one of the striker’s feet, from the middle
58 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

stump in a direction towards the bowling stump: there
make a mark, which is the same as the popping-crease,
and this will show when you are on the ground; place
your bat upright on the mark at the place where the
measure came to, and ask the bowler whether your bat
is before the middle of your wicket; here make a mark
on the ground, which is generally called the blocking-
hole.

The bowler now begins to bowl, and the striker
should endeavour to hit any ball which comes within his
compass, or if the ball given be not favourable for that
purpose, he may block it; but in blocking he must be
careful never to let the tip of the bat come before the
handle, as the ball in such a case will probably rise in
the air towards the bowler, and he will be caught out.
In*running, the striker must touch the bowling-stump
with his bat or person, or it is no run, and he may be
put out if he do no put his bat or some part of his
person on his ground before the ball touches his wicket.

With three players, the bowler and striker will be
the same as when two are at play; the second player
will be fieldsman, who, when the ball be hit nearer to
him than to the bowler, will pick it up, or catch it if he
can, and return it to the bowler. If the striker should
attempt to run, the bowler should immediately run to
the wicket, and the fieldsman should throw the ball to
him, so that he may catch it, and touch the wicket with
it to get the striker out. When the first striker is out,
the fieldsman will take his place, the striker will bowl,
and the bowler will take the field. When four players
are engaged, the fourth should stand behind the wicket;
and when five or more play, the additional players
CRICKET, 59

should take the field. The rule in such a case is simply,
that as soon as a striker is out he becomes bowler, then
he becomes wicket-keeper, and then he takes his place
in the field on the left of the bowler, and afterwards
the other places in regular progression, until it is his
turn to have a new innings.



LAWS OF THE GAME OF DOUBLE WICKET.

“Law, is law,” said Evergreen ; ‘‘ laws must be rigidly
obeyed, and, therefore, 1 will read the articles of war
for your edification. The first article of war is said to
be, ‘ That it shall be death t@ stop a cannon-ball with
your head.’” Cricketers must be cautious also how
they stop cricket-balls with this part of the body : but

Imprimis, the BALL must be in weight between five
ounces and a half and five ounces and three quarters,
and must be between nine inches and nine inches and
- one-eighth in circumference. |

2. The sat must ng, be more than thirty-eight inches
in length, nor exceed four inches and a quarter in its
widest part. . i

3. The stumps, which are three to each wicket, must
be twenty-seven inches out of the ground, and placed
so closely as not to allow the ball to pass through. The
bails must be eight inches in length.

4, The BowLING-crEASE must be in.a line with the
stumps, and six feet eight inches in length, the stumps
in the centre, with a return-crease at each end towards
the bowler at right angles.

5. The poppina crease must be three feet ten inches _
60 _ THE BOOK OF SPORTS.
,

from the wicket, and parallel to it, unlimited in length,
but not shorter than the bowling-crease.

6. They must be opposite to each other, twenty-two
yards apart. |

. It is not lawful for either party, during a match,
without the other party gives consent, to make any
alteration in the ground by rolling, watering, covering,
mowing, or beating.

This rule is not meant to prevent the striker from
beating the ground with his bat near to the spot where
he stands during the innings, nor to prevent the bowler
from filling up holes with sawdust, &c., when the ground
is wet.

g. After rain, the wickets may be changed with the
consent of both parties.



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CRICKET. 61

Tur Bow er.

9. The bowler must deliver the ball with one foot
behind the bowling-crease, and bowl four bowls before
he changes wickets, which he is permitted to do, once
only, in the same innings.

10. The ball must be bowled; if it be thrown or
jerked, or if the hand be above the shoulder in the de-
livery, the umpire must call “no ball” (this being
reckoned as one of the four balls).

11. In some matches, the bowler may give six balls
where the parties are agreed. The bowler may order the
striker at the wicket from whick he bowls, to stand on
which side of it he pleases.

12. Should the bowler toss the ball over the striker’s
head, or bowl it so wide that it shall be out of distance
to be played at, the umpire, although the striker attempt
it, shall adjudge one run to the parties receiving the
innings, either with or without an appeal from them,
which shall be put down to the score of wide balls, and
such balls shill not be reckoned as any of the four balls.
When the umpire shall have called#‘wide ball,” one
run only shall be reckoned, and the ball shall be con-
sidered dead.

13. If “no ball” be called by the umpire, the hitter
may strike at it, and is allowed all the runs he can
make, and is not be considered out except by running
out. Should no run be obtained by any other means,
then one run shall be scored.

14. When a fresh bowler takes the ball, only two
balls shall be allowed for practice; he must, however,

F
62 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

continue the next four in the game before he can change
for another better approved. If six balls are agreed to
be bowled, then he must continue the six instead of four.
15. No substitute in the field shall be allowed to
bowl, keep wicket, sTAND AT THE POINT Or MIDDLE
wickET, except by mutual agreement of the parties.

Tur STRIKER

Is ovr, if either of the bails be struck off by the ball,
or either of the stumps struck out of the ground.

He is ovr, if the ball, from a stroke of the bat or
hand below the wrist, be held by his adversary before
it touches the ground, although hugged or caught be-
tween the arms and breast of the catcher.
| He is ovt, if in striking, or at any other time while

the ball is in play, both his feet be over the popping-
crease, and his wicket put down, except his bat be
grounded within it.

He is ovr, if in striking at the ball, he either with
his bat, clothes, or person, hits down his wicket.

He is out, if under pretence of roe notch, or
otherwise, either@of the strikers prevent a ball from
being caught, or if the ball be struck up and he wilfully
strikes it again.

He is out, if in running a notch the wicket be struck
down by a throw, or with the hand or arm with ball in
hand, before his bat is grounded over the popping-crease.
If the bails should happen to be off, a stump must be
struck out of the ground.

He is ovr, should he take up or touch the ball while
in play, unless at the request of the opposite party.
CRICKET. ; 63

He is ovr, if with a part of his person he stop the
ball, which the bowler, in the opinion of the umpire at
the bowler’s wicket, has pitched in a straight line with
the wicket, |

If the players have crossed each other, he that runs
for the wicket that is put down, is out; and if they have
not crossed, he that has left the wicket which is put
down, is out.

When a ball is caught, no run is to be reckoned.

When a striker is run out, the notch they were run-
ning for is not to be reckoned.

If “lost ball” shall be called, the striker is allowed
the runs; but if more than six shall have been run
before ‘lost ball” shall have been called, then the
striker shall have all that have been run.

When the ball has been lodged in the wicket-keeper’s
or bowler’s hands, it is considered dead, that is, no
longer in play, and the striker need not keep within
ground, till the umpire has called ‘ play;”’ but if the
player goes off his ground, with intent to run, the
bowler may put him out. | '

Should the striker be hurt, he may retire from his
wicket and return to it any time during that innings.
Some other person may stand out for him, but not go in.

If any person stop the ball with his bat, the ball is to
be considered as DEAD, and the opposite party to add
five notches to their score.

If the ball be struck up, the striker may guard his
wicket with his bat or any part of his body except his
hand.

If the striker hit the ball against his partner’s wicket
when he is off his ground, he is out, should it previously
64 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

have touched the bowler or any of the fieldmen’s hands,
but not otherwise.

’
Tue Wicket-KxeEpPeEr.

The wicket-keeper should not take the ball for the
purpose of stumping, until it have passed the wicket.
He shall stand at a proper distance behind the wicket,
and shall not move till the ball be out of the bowler’s
hand. He shall not by any noise, incommode the striker,
and if any part of his person be over or before the wicket,
although the ball hit it, he shall not be out.

Tue Umpires.

The umpires are the sole judges of fair and unfair
play, and all disputes are determined by them, each at
his own wicket. They shall not stand more than six
yards from the wicket. In case of a catch, which the
umpire at the wicket cannot see sufficiently to decide
upon, he may apply to the other umpire, whose opinion
is conclusive.

The umpires shall pitch fair wickets, and the parties
shall toss up for the choice of innings.

They shall allow two minutes for the striker to come
in, and fifteen minutes between each innings. When
the umpires shall call “play,” the party who refuses
shall lose the match.

They are not to order a player out unless assented to
by the adversaries.

If the bowler’s foot be not behind the bowling-crease
and within the return crease when he delivers the ball,
CRICKET. 65

they must, unasked, call ‘‘no ball;” if the striker run
a short run, the umpire must call ‘‘no run.”

If in running either of the strikers shall fail to ground
his bat, in hand, or some part of his person, over the
popping crease, the umpire, for every such failure, shall
deduct two runs from the,number intended to have
been run, because such striker, not having run in the
first instance, cannot have started in the: second from
the proper goal.

No umpire is allowed to bet.

No umpire to be changed during a match, unless with
the consent of both parties, except in case.of a violation
of the last law, then either party may dismiss the trans-
gressor.

After fhe delivery of four balls, the umpire should
call “‘ over,” but not until the ball shall be lodged and
definitely settled in the wicket-keeper’s or bowler’s
hand; the ball shall then be considered dead. Never-
theless, if an idea be entertained that either of the
strikers is out, a question may be put previously to, but
not after the delivery of the next ball.

The umpire must take especial care to call ‘no ball”
instantly upon delivery, and ‘‘ wide ball,”’ as soon as
ever it shall pass the striker.

LAWS FOR SINGLE WICKET.

1. When there shall be less than four players on a
side, bounds shall be placed, twenty-two yards each, in
‘ a line from the off and leg stump.

F 3
66 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

2. The ball must be hit before the bounds to entitle

. the striker to a run, which run cannot be obtained un-

less he touch the bowling-stump or crease, in a line with
it, with his bat or person, or go beyond them, returning
to the popping-crease, as in double wicket, according to
the law.

3. When the striker shall hit the ball, one of his feet
must be on the ground behind the popping-crease, other-
wise the umpire shall call ‘‘no hit.”

4. When there shall be less than five players of a side,
neither byes nor overthrows shall be allowed, nor shall
the striker be caught out behind the wicket, nor stumped
out.

5. The fieldsman must return the ball so that it shall
cross the space between the wicket and the bowling
stump, or between the bowling stumps and the bounds ;
the striker may run till the ball be so returned.

6. After the striker has made one run, he must touch
the bowling stump, and run before the ball shall cross
the play, to entitle him to another.

”. The striker shall be entitled to three runs for lost
ball, and the same number for ball stopped with bat.

8. When there shall be more than four players to a
side, there shall be no bounds; all hits, byes, and over-
throws, will then be allowed.

9, The bowler is subject to the same laws as at
‘double wicket.

10. No more than one minute shall be allowed be-
tween each ball.
CRICKET. 67

BETS.

1. No bet is payable in any match unless it be played
out or given up.

2. If the runs of one player be betted against those
of another, the bet depends on the first innings, unless
otherwise specified.

3. If the bet be made upon both innings, and one
party beats the other in one innings, the runs in the
first innings shall determine it.

4. If the other party go ina second time, then the
bet must be determined by the number in the second.



OBSERVATIONS.

Cricket is played by twenty-two persons, eleven on
each side, and two umpires, with two persons to score
and count the innings. Thirteen players play at one time,
viz., two strikers, one bowler, one wicket-keeper, long-
stop, short-stop, point, cover, middle-wicket, long-field,
off-side, on-side, and leg ; of these the two strikers are —
the inside, or have their innings. The object of the
game is to get the greatest number of runs, and this
is to be done by the strikers. Each side having been
in once and out once, the first innings is concluded,
and, we might say, a complete game has been played,
but in most matches another innings is played. The
scorers keep the account of runs to each striker sepa-~
rately for each innings. The side that has obtained the

'
68 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

greatest number of runs, wins the game. The arrange-
ment of the players in the field is as follows :—

OFF-SIDE.

8
%



ON SIDE.

ORDER OF THE PLAYERS.

1. Striker. 7. Point.
2. Bowler. 8. Cover.
3. Wicket-keeper. 9. Middle-wicket.
4, Long-stop. 10. Long-field. off-side.
5. Short-stop. 11. Long-field, on-side.
6. Long-slip. 12. Leg.
PART VI.
SWIMMING

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No boy should be unable to swim, because it is essential
to the preservation of life; but the attainment of the
art has been held to be difficult, and the number of good
swimmers is very small. The whole science of swimming
consists in multiplying the surface of the body by ex-
tensive motions, so as to displace a greater quantity of
liquid. As the first requisite of oratory was said to be
action; the second, action; and the third, action; so the
70 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

first, second, and the third requisite in learning to swim,
is couracr. Now there is a vast difference between
courage and temerity ; courage proceeds from confidence,
temerity ,from carelessness; courage is calm and collected,
temerity is headstrong and rash ; courage ventures into
the water carefully, and throws himself off with a firm
and vigorous lounge forward, and a slow and equable
stroke ; temerity begins to dive before he knows whether
he can swim or sink, and after floundering about for a
minute or two, finds that he can swim farthest where it
is deepest. Therefore, let the young swimmer mark
the distinction between courage and temerity, and he
will speedily become a swimmer.

Before, however, we proceed to offer any remarks on
swimming as an art, we cannot refrain from calling the
attention of our young friends to the observations of a

‘celebrated medical doctor who has thought profoundly
on the subject. ‘Immersion in cold water,” says he,
‘is a custom which lays claim to the most remote an-
tiquity ; indeed it must be coeval with man himself,
The necessity of water for the purpose of cleanliness,
and the pleasure arising from its application in hot
countries, must have very early recommended it to the
human species; even the example of other animals was
sufficient to give the hint to man; by instinct many of
them are led to apply cold water in this manner, and
some, when deprived of its use, have been known to
languish, and even to die.”

The cold bath recommends itself in a variety of cases,
and is peculiarly beneficial to the inhabitants of populous
cities who indulge in idleness and lead sedentary lives :
it accelerates the motion of the blood, promotes the
SWIMMING. 71

different secretions, and gives permanency to the solids.
But all these important purposes will be more easily
answered by the application of salt water ; this also
ought not only to be preferred on account of its superior
gravity, but also, “for its greater power of stimulating
the skin, which prevents the patient from catching cold.”

It is necessary, however, to observe, that cold bathing
is more likely to prevent than to remove obstructions
of the glandular or lymphatic system ; indeed, when
these have arrived at a certain height, they are not to
be removed by any means ; in this case, the cold bath
will only aggravate the symptoms, and hurry the un-
happy patient into an untimely grave. It is, therefore,
of the utmost importance, previously to the patient en-
tering upon the use of the cold bath, to determine
whether or not he labours under any obstinate obstruc-
tion of the lungs or other viscera, and when this is the
case, cold bathing ought strictly to be prohibited.

In what is called a plethoric state, or too great fulness
of the body, it is likewise dangerous to use the cold bath
witnout due preparation. In this case, there is danger
of bursting a blood-vessel, or occasioning an inflammation.

The ancient Romans and Greeks, we are told, when
covered with sweat and dust, used to plunge into rivers
without receiving the smallest injury. Though they
might escape danger from this imprudent conduct, yet
it was certainly contrary to sound reason ; many robust
men have thrown away their lives by such an attempt.
We would not, however, advise patients to go in the
cold water when the body is chilled; as much exercise
at least ought to be taken as may excite a gentle glow
all over the body, but by no means so as to overheat it.
72 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

To young people, and particularly to children, cold
bathing is of the utmost importance; it promotes their
growth, increases their strength, and prevents a variety
of diseases incident to childhood.

It is necessary here to caution young men against too
frequent bathing, as many fatal consequences have re-
sulted from the daily practice of plunging into rivers,
and continuing there too long.

The most proper time of the day for using the cold
bath is, no doubt, the morning, or at least before dinner,
and the best mode, that of quick immersion. As cold
bathing has a tendency to propel the blood to the head,
it ought always to be a rule to wet that part as soon as
possible. By due attention to this circumstance, there
is reason to believe that violent head-aches, and other
complaints which frequently proceed from cold bathing,
might be often prevented. ;

The cold bath, when too long ponitinusd, not only
occasions an excessive flux towards the head, but chills
the blood, cramps the muscles, relaxes the nerves, and
wholly defeats the intention of bathing; hence expert
swimmers are often injured, and sometimes lose their
lives. All the beneficial purposes of cold bathing are
answered by one immersion at a time, and the patient
ought to be rubbed dry the moment he comes out of
the water, and should continue to take exercise some
time after.

Doctor Franklin, who was almost always a practical
man, says, “‘ that the only obstacle to improvement in
this necessary and life-preserving art, is fear; and it is
only by overcoming this timidity, that you can expect to
become a master of the following acquirements, It is
SWIMMING. 73

very common for novices in the art of swimming, to
make use of corks or bladders to assist in keeping the
body above the water; some have utterly condemned
the use of them. However, they may be of service for
supporting the body while one is learning what is called
the stroke, or that manner of drawing in and striking
out the hands and feet that is necessary to produce pro-
eressive motion; but you will be no swimmer till you
can place confidence in the power of the water to support
you. I would therefore advise the acquiring that con-
fidence in the first place, as I have known several who,
by a little practice necessary for that purpose, have in-
sensibly acquired the stroke, taught as if it were by
nature. The practice I mean, is this—choosing a place
where the water deepens gradually, walk coolly in it
until it is up to your breast, then turn your face towards
the shore and throw an egg into the water between you
and the shore, it will sink to the bottom and will easily
be seen there if the water is clear; it must lie in the
water so deep that you cannot reach to take it up with-
out diving for it. To encourage yourself to do this,
reflect that*your progress will be from deep to shallow
water, and that at any time you may, by bringing your
legs under you and standing on the bottom, raise your
head far above the water; plunge under it with your
eyes open, which must be kept open before going under,
as you cannot open your eyelids from the weight of
water above you, throw yourself towards the egg and
endeavour by the action of your feet and hands against
the water, to get forward till within reach of it. In this
attempt you will find that the water buoys you up against
your inclination, and that it is not so easy to sink as
G
74 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

you imagine, and that you cannot, but by active force,
get down to the egg. Thus you feel the power of water
to support you, and learn to confide in that power, while
your endeavours to overcome it and to reach the egg,
teach you the manner of acting on the water with your
feet and hands, which action is afterwards used in swim-
ming to support your head higher above the water, or
to go forward through it.

“T would the more earnestly press upon you the trial
of this method, because, though I think I shall satisfy
you that your body is lighter than water, and that you
might float for a long time with your mouth free for
breathing, if you would put yourself into a proper pos-
ture, and would be still and forbear struggling, yet till
you have obtained this experimental confidence in the
water, I cannot depend upon your having the necessary
presence of mind to recollect the posture and the direc-
tions I gave you relating to it; the’ surprise may put
all out of your mind.

«“ Though the legs, arms, and head of a human body,
being solid parts, are specifically somewhat heavier than
fresh water, yet the trunk, particularly the upper part,
from its hollowness, is so much lighter than water, as
that the whole of the body, taken altogether, is too light
to sink wholly under water, but that some parts will
remain above until the lungs become filled with water,
which happens from drawing water to them instead of
air, when a person in the fright attempts breathing while
the mouth and nostrils are under water. |

The legs and arms are specifically lighter than salt
water, and will be supported by it, so that a human body
cannot sink in salt water, though the lungs were filled
SWIMMING. 75

as above, but for the greater specific gravity of the head.
‘Therefore, a person throwing himself on his back in salt
water, and extending his arms, may easily lie so as to
keep his mouth and nostrils free for breathing, and by
a small motion of the hand may prevent turning if he
should perceive any tendency to it.

« In fresh water, if a man throw himself on his back
near the surface, he cannot continue in that situation but
by proper action of his hands in the water; if he have
no such action, the legs and lower part of the body will
gradually sink till he comes into an upright position, in
which he will continue suspended, the hollow of his
breast keeping the head uppermost.

«But if in this erect position, the head be kept upright
above the shoulders, as when we stand on the ground,
the immersion will, by the weight of that part of the
head that is out of the water, reach above the mouth and
nostrils, perhaps a little above the eyes, so that a man
cannot long remain suspended in the water with his head
in that position.

“'The body continuing suspended, as before, and up-
right, if the head be leaned quite back, so that the face
look upward, all the back part of the head being under
water, and its weight consequently being in a great
measure supported by it, the face will remain above
water quite free for breathing, will rise an inch higher
at every inspiration, and sink as much at every expira-
tion, but never so low that the water may come over the
mouth.

If, therefore, a person unacquainted with swimming,
falling into the water, could have presence of mind suf-
ficient to avoid struggling and plunging, and to let the
76 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

body take this natural position, he might continue long
safe from drowning, till, perhaps, help should come; for
as to the clothes, their additional weight, when immersed,
is very inconsiderable, the water supporting them, though
when he comes out of the water he would find them very
heavy indeed.

“ But, as I said before, I would not advise you or any
one to depend on having this presence of mind on such
an occasion, but learn fairly to swim, as I wish all men
were taught to do in their youth: they would on many
occasions be the safer for having that skill, and on many
more, the happier, as being free from painful apprehen-
sions of danger, to say nothing of the enjoyment in so
delightful and wholesome an exercise. Soldiers, par-
ticularly, should all be taught to swim; it might
be of particular use either in surprising an enemy or
saving themselves, and if I had any boys to educate, I
would prefer those schools in which an opportunity was
afforded for acquiring so advantageous an art, which
when once learned, is never forgotten.

“T know by experience, that it is a great comfort to
a swimmer who has a great distance to go, to turn him-
self sometimes on his back, and to vary in other respects
the means of procuring a progressive motion.

“When he is seized with the cramp in the leg, the
method to drive it away, is to give the parts affected a
sudden, vigorous and violent shock, which he may do in
the air as he swims on his back.

‘During the great heats in summer, there is no danger
in bathing, however warm he may be, in rivers which
have been thoroughly warmed by the sun; but to throw
one’s-self into cold spring water when the body has been
SWIMMING. 77

heated by exercise in the sun, is an imprudence which
may prove fatal. I once knew an instance of four young
men, who, having worked at harvest in the heat of the
day, with a view of refreshing themselves, plunged into
a spring of cold water ; two died upon the spot, a third
next morning, and the fourth recovered with great dif-
ficulty. A copious draught of cold water, in similar
circumstances, is frequently attended with the same effect
in North America.

« When I was a boy, I amused myself one day with
flying a paper kite, and approaching the bank of a lake
which was near a mile broad, I tied the string to a stake,
and the kite ascended to a very considerable height
above the pond while,I was bathing. In a little while,
being desirous of amusing myself with my kite and en-
joying at the same time the pleasure of swimming, I
returned, and loosening from the stake the string with
the little stick which was fastened to it, went again into
the water, where I found, that by lying on my back
and holding the stick in my hand, I was drawn along
the surface of the water in a very agreeable manner.
Having thus engaged another boy to carry my clothes
round the pond to a place which I pointed out to him
on the other side, I began to cross the pond with my
kite, which carried me quite over without the least fa-
tigue and with the greatest pleasure imaginable. I was
only obliged occasionally to halt a little in my course
and resist its progress, when it appeared that by following
too quick I lowered the kite too much; by doing thus
occasionally, I made it rise again. I have never since
that time practised this singular mode of swimming,
though I think it not impossible to cross in this manner

ac 3
78 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

from Dover to Calais. The packet boat is, however,
preferable.”

PRELIMINARY EXERCISES IN SWIMMING.

We have shown that much of the art of swimming de-
pends upon having confidence, and that that confidence
is speedily dissipated upon the swimmer coming in con-
tact with the water. Besides this, a great deal in the
art of swimming depends upon the degree of ease with
which the swimmer can use his hands and feet. Now
this sort of exercise may in part be acquired on land,
and it would be of great usefulness to the learner were
he to enter upon some preliminaryypractice which would
give him the use of his hands and feet, in the manner
required in swimming. ‘To do this, he should provide ~
himself with two ropes, which should be fastened up in
the manner of two swings, at about sixteen inches apart
from each other, and one a little higher than the other ;
these should be joined together with two or three cords
passing from the one to the other, and on the rack thus
made, a pillow or cushion should be placed; upon this,
the learner will throw himself on his breast, as upon the
water, and supporting himself in this position, and having
his hands and feet perfectly at liberty, he will move them
to and fro in the same manner as in swimming; this he
should repeat several times a day, until he finds that he
has got a complete mastery over the action required.
The head must be drawn back, the chin raised, the fin-
gers must be kept close, and the hands slightly concave
on the inside,—they must be struck out in a line with
the breast ; the legs must then be drawn up and struck
SWIMMING. 79

out, not downwards, however, but defind, in such a man-
ner, that they may have a good hold upon the water.
These directions being followed for a few days, will give
the learner so much assistance, that when he enters. the
water he will find little more requisite than calmness
and confidence in striking out.

In proceeding to take water, the first thing the youth
should do, is to make himself thoroughly convinced that
the spot is safe, that there are no holes in it, that no
weeds are at the bottom, that it does not contain any
stones likely to cut the feet. He must also be cautious
that he does not enter a stream whose eddy sweeps round
a projecting point, or hollow ; the bank should slope off
gradually, so that he may proceed for ten or twelve yards
from the shore, before the water rises to the level of his
armpits. With regard to the use of bladders and corks,
although it may perhaps be better to learn to keep our-
selves afloat without their aid, yet they may be used with
advantage, if used sparingly. The pupil, in using them,
places his breast across the rope ‘®
which unites them, so that when ,
he lays himself over them in the
water, they float above him, and thus
assist in buoying him up; thus sus-



tained, he strikes out and propels SS
himself with his hands and feet. =>

In striking out when in the water, the fingers are to be
perfectly straight, and the thumb kept close to the hand;
the hands are then to be brought forward, palm to palm,
and to be thrust out in a direction on a level with the
chin ; when at their fullest reach, they are to be parted
and swept slowly and regularly with the palms in a
80 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

horizontal position, the full stretch of the arms backwards,
they are then brought up from the hips and struck out
forward, as before. While the hands are near the hips,
is the time for the legs to perform their part; they are
to be drawn up as near to the body as possible, and the
soles of the feet struck against the water with moderate
force, immediately the hands are again thrust forward.
Now all this is very easily performed with a little prac-
tice, but will be very difficult if the learner have not
coolness and self-possession. A slow long stroke, the
hand thrust forward with energy, and the legs brought
up and struck out with a regular and even stroke, is the
whole art of simple swimming. The swimmer must,
however, be careful to draw his breath at the time when
his hands are descending towards his hips; if he attempt
it when he strikes out his legs, his head will partially
sink, and his mouth will fill with water. The breath
should accordingly be expired while the body is sent
forward by the action of the legs.
The young swimmer will find
much use in having a plank, ten
feet long, two inches thick, and a
foot broad, which he may take
hold of at one of its ends, and his
body being thus supported he will
perfect himself in the action of the =a
legs, and will, by striking them out, drive the plank
before him: he must, however, take care to hold it fast,
for if he should let go his hold, he will find himself
sinking over head and ears in the water. A rope may >
also be so fixed as to reach over the water, by which
the swimmer may support himself while learning to


SWIMMING. 8]

strike out with his legs; but he should be careful always
in performing this exercise, to keep his legs near the
surface, as, if the legs drop down, he will make very little
way in the water. One of the best kinds of assistance, how-
ever, the young swimmer can have, is the hand of some
one who is willing to teach him, and is superior to any
other methods for very young swimmers. If a grown
person will take the trouble to take the little learner out
with him till he is breast high in the water, and sustain
him with one hand under the breast, and occasionally
hold him up by the chin, at the same time directing and
encouraging him, and occasionally letting him loose that
he may support himself by striking out, the little learner
will soon reach that triumphant period when he floats
alone on the water.

After this triumph, however, the young swimmer must
be exceedingly cautious, though he may feel conscious of
his own power, he must venture only a few strokes out
of his depth: should he be in a broad river, he must be
careful not to do so where there is a strong curling eddy
or flood: in a small river, the breadth of which is only
a few yards, he may venture across with a few bold and
regular strokes; but should he become flurried and lose his
time, he will most assuredly be in danger of sinking. Let
him then obtain such perfect command over his limbs,
and also over himself, that when he ventures out of his
depth, he may be able to keep afloat in the water, plea-
santly to himself, and without hazard. .

A most important branch in
art of swimming, is floating, as
the swimmer may frequently Se
rest himself when fatigued, and i
otherwise engage himself in the aS oS


82 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

water. To do this, he must turn himself as gently as
possible on the back, put his head back, so that his eyes,
mouth, and chin, only, are above the water, elevate his
breast, and inflate his chest as much as possible: the
arms may be brought towards the hips, and the hands
should be paddled in a horizontal kind of sweep, which
will sustain the body. Should the learner wish to swim,
he must strike out with his legs, taking care not to lift
his legs too high; in this position the arms may occa-
sionally be folded across the breast.

To tread water, the legs must be suf-
fered to drop in the water till the swim-
mer finds himself upright, he then treads
downwards with his feet, occasionally =
paddling with the palms of his hands.
‘The swimmer, when long in the water,
will soon find himself tired, changes of
action are therefore necessary ; there are
many which are highly advantageous
to learn, such as swimming like a dog,
porpoise, etc. To swim like a dog, he must strike with
each hand and foot alternately, beginning with the right
hand and foot, he must draw the hand towards the chin.
and the foot towards the body, at the same time; he then
must kick backwards with the foot, and strike out in a
right line with the hand, and the same with the left hand
and foot: the palms of the hands must be hollow, and
the water pulled towards the swimmer. In swimming
like a porpoise, the right arm is lifted entirely out of the
water, the shoulder is thrust forward, and while the
swimmer is striking out with his legs, he reaches for-
ward with his hand as far as he can; his hand then falls,


SWIMMING. 83

a little hollowed, in the water, which it grasps or pulls
towards him in a transverse direction towards the other
armpit. While this is going on, the legs are drawn up
for another effort, and the left arm and shoulder are raised
and thrust forward, as the right had previously been.
When the swimmer feels tired, he may change these
positions for swimming on the side. To do this, he must
lower his left side and elevate his right, striking forward
with his left hand, and sideways with his right, the back
of the hand being in front instead of upward, the thumb
side of the hand being downward so as to serve as an
oar. Should the swimmer wish to turn on his back, he
must keep one leg still, and embrace the water beside
him with the other, and he will turn to that side. To
shew the feet, he must turn himself on his back, and bend
the small of it downwards, supporting himself by his
hands to and fro immediately above his breast, and hold
his feet above the water. Swimming under water is per-
formed by the usual stroke, the head being kept a little
downwards, and the feet struck out a little higher than
when swimming on the surface.

Bernarpis System.

Upright swimming.—This is a new mode of swimming,
introduced by Bernardi, a Neapolitan, and consists in
adopting the accustomed motion of the limbs in walking.
It gives great freedom to the hands and arms, affords a
greater facility of breathing and of sight. It is true, that
@ person swimming in an upright position, advances more
slowly, but as the method is more natural, the person is
84 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

able to continue his course longer, and can remain with
greater safety in the water.

The first object with Bernardi, is to enable the pupil
to float in an upright position, and in this the head is
made the great regulator of all the motions. After having
been by practice familiarised to keep his equilibrium, a
variety of motions are gradually practised, until the
swimmer is enabled at every stroke to urge himself for-
ward a distance equal to the length of his body, and to
travel, without fatigue, at least three miles an hour, and
to continue this without great fatigue for many hours.
Bernardi, speaking of the success of his practice, says,
«“ Having been appointed to instruct the youths of the
Royal Naval Academy at Naples in the art of swimming,
a trial of the pupils took place in the presence of a num-
ber of persons assembled on the shore, and under the
inspection of authorities appointed to witness and report
upon the experiment. A twelve-oared boat attended the
progress of the pupils, from motives of precaution. They
swam go far out in the bay, that at length the heads of
the young men could with difficulty be discerned with
the naked eye ; and the Major-General of Marine, Fort-
guerri, for whose inspection the exhibition was attended,
expressed serious apprehensions for their safety. Upon
their return to the shore, the young men, however, as-
sured him that they felt so little exhausted, as to be
willing immediately to repeat the exertion.”

After devoting a month to the investigation of Ber-
nardi’s plan, the Neapolitan government state in their
official report—

“That it has been established by the experience of
more than a hundred persons of different bodily consti-


SWIMMING. 85

tutions, that the human body is lighter than water, and,
consequently, will float by nature, and that the art of
swimming must be acquired to render that privilege
useful,

“That Bernardi’s system is new, in.so far as it is
founded on the principle of husbanding the strength,
and rendering the power of recruiting it easy.”

The speed, according to the new method, is no doubt
diminished, but security is much more important than
speed, and the new plan is not exclusive of the old when
occasions require great effort.

Little more need be said on the subject of swimming,
except giving a few directions in diving and plunging,
which require to be performed with caution and elegance.
When the swimmer prepares to dive, he must take a full
inspiration of air, the eyes must be kept open, the back
made round, and the head bent forwards on the breast;
the legs must be thrown out with force, and the arms
and hands, instead of being struck forward as in swim-
ming, must move backward. When the swimmer would
ascend, the chin must be held up, the back bent inwards,
the hands struck out high and brought sharply down,
and the body will immediately rise to the surface of the
water.

Plunging.— There are two different
modes of plunging to be acquired, name-
ly, the flat plunge, which is necessary in
shallow water, and the deep plunge, which
is used where there is considerable depth
of water. For the latter, the arms must
be outstretched, the knees bent, and the _ &
body leant forward till the head descends


86 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

nearly to the feet when the spine and knees are extended.
In the fat plunge, the swimmer must fling himself for-
ward in an inclined direction, according to the depth
or shallowness of the water; when he touches the
bottom, he must rise in the same manner as after
diving.



After all these necessary motions and movements have
been acquired in the water, there is one thing of which
the swimmer must beware, and against which art and
precaution can do but little—this is the Cramp. When
this seizes the swimmer, he must endeavour, as much as
possible, to avoid being alarmed, as he will reflect, that
as the body is lighter than water, a very little exertion
in it will keep his body afloat. Of course his first thoughts
will be towards the shore, but he must not forget, that
the cramp being only a muscular contraction, may be
thrown off by proper muscular exertion. He must strike
out the limb violently, and bringing the toes towards the
shin-bone, thrust his feet out, which will probably restore
the muscles to their proper exercise ; but if the cramp
still continue, he can easily keep himself afloat with his
hands, and paddle towards the shore, till some assistance
comes to him. If one leg is only attacked, he may drive
- himself forward with the other, and for this purpose, in
SWIMMING. 87

an emergency, the swimmer should frequently try to
swim with one hand, or one leg and one hand, or by two
hands alone, which will be easily acquired.

Should a companion be in danger of drowning, it is
our duty to use every exertion to save his life; and, in-.
deed, not to use the utmost exertion is a high degree of
moral guilt, but in doing this, we must not rashly hazard
our own life, nor put ourselves into a position in which
the swimmer can cling to us or grasp any part of our
body, or the loss of both will be inevitable. It will be
better in all cases where bathing is practised, that there
should be ropes and planks at hand, and young swimmers
should never venture far into the water without such
means of rescue are available. In conclusion, we would
caution all who go into the water, against remaining in
it too long, as nothing can be more dangerous; and we
would further advise that the practice of bathing and
swimming be not only common to boyhood, but be
continued in after life, as few things tend more to the
preservation of HEALTH. —


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PART VII.
GARDENING.



We read in the sacred records, that when man was
created, he was placed in a “ Garden,”—the Garden of
Eden, to dress it and to keep it; and we may infer
therefrom, first, that the occupation of gardening was
one. pre-eminently fitted for the happiness of man, and
secondly, that industry, and even labour, was also a
part of man’s duty, even in a state of innocence.

There is not a more innocent amusement than gar-
dening. Nothing can be more lovely than to be among
buds and fruits and flowers ; nothing is more conducive
to health and peace of mind, and few things are better
calculated to inspire religious feelings than gardening.

Every little boy or girl should have a garden, and
should be shown how to manage it. There is a great
deal in management and in method at all times, but es-
pecially in gardening. Much attention is also necessary,
—great care and much forethought; all of which qualities
of the mind it is in the highest degree proper to train
and exercise. Whoever, therefore, begins gardening,
must not look upon it as an idle sport, to be taken up
and thrown aside with the whim of the moment, but
as an occupation for leisure hours, that the mind must
be brought to bear upon, and which must engage him
from day to day, from month to month, from spring to
summer, from autumn to winter, and so through all the
changes of the varied year.

H 3
90 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.



LAYING OUT THE GROUND.

To begin gardening,

a little boy must have some ground,

which is quite indispensable ; and a boy of from ten to

fourteen years old 0

enough for him to
with neatness and
order. A piece of
about forty yards
long by thirty wide
will belargeenough
to commence with,
and this should be
set out in the
subjoined manner.
This will allow of a
path three feet wide
in the centre, and
of one two feet six
nches round the
ides, leaving the
peds twenty-two

ught to have, at least, a piece large

divide and subdivide, and arrange


GARDENING. 91

and a half feet wide. The paths should be gravelled with
a good red binding gravel, and to look nice, the borders
should be edged with box or edging tiles. At each corner
of the two parallelograms, might be planted a tree, say,
one apple, one pear, one plum, and one cherry, that is, eight
in all; and at distances of about a yard, might be planted,
all round, a foot from the paths, alternately, gooseberry-
bushes, currant-trees, and raspberry-trees, and between
them, various kinds of flowers, to come into blossom at
different seasons. At one end, the south end if possible,
should be erected a small arbour, with a couple of seats
in it, and at the two opposite corners should be two
small manure pits,—one for the reception of well-rotted
manure, to be quickly used, and the other for the
reception of all weeds, leaves, and rubbish, which will
make manure, and which should be mixed up from time
to time with the spade. These pits should be used
alternately. As soon as one has its contents well rotted,
it should be emptied from time to time on the land,
while the other pit should be used to hold the fresh
matter. newly collected. By the time this is full, the
other will be empty, and then that may be used as a
collector and the other as a decomposer, and so on,
alternately.



MANURE.

Ir is of no use whatever to think of getting things to
grow without manure. This is the life and soul of all
garden operations. Almost everything can be con-
verted into manure. The grass from lawns, fallen leaves,’
weeds, and all vegetable matter, afford good light
92 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

manure. Strong manures are prepared from horse, cow,
sheep, and goat dung. The dung of fowls and rabbits
is also most excellent ; and where fowls or rabbits are
kept, their dung should be preserved with great care,
and put by itself into a rotting-pit, or into a tank, and
kept wet. The juicy part can then be used as a liquid
- manure, and will be found of a highly fertilizmg pro-
perty, and the more solid may be spread over the land.
The best time for putting manure on the land is in dry
or frosty weather, and it should be dug in as soon as
spread. It is a very unwise plan to spread manure on
the land and let it lie, as in such cases, much of the
strength of the manure is lost. Young gardeners should
be very careful in preparing and collecting manure, and
also when they are moving it from the pits to the
ground, they should take care and not soil their paths.



GARDENING TOOLS.

Ir is quite necessary that a young gardener should have
proper tools. He should have a small but strong spade,
a small but strong rake, a digging fork, a hoe, a trowel,
a good pruning-knife, a box for seeds, a little wheelbarrow,
a line, and above all, a little gardener’s apron, and a
straw hat with a broad brim. Thus equipped, he may
commence his gardening operations with great comfort
to himself and some chance of success. '



DIGGING.

TuE young gardener should practise digging, with a
view to digging well. In beginning to dig a piece of
GARDENING. 93

ground, he should first clear it of all sticks, stalks, or
stones, that might impede his labor. He should then
commence at one end of the ground, with his back to
the sun, if possible, and, beginning from the left-hand
corner, dig one line all the way to the right-hand corner,
either one or two spades deep, as may be required.
The ground should be turned over, evenly laid up at
the top, nice and level, and the weeds completely buried.
The operator should dig carefully when near the roots
of gooseberry, currant, raspberry, or fruit trees, and
more carefully still, among flowers. If digging early in
the season, he must mind he does not dig into his bulbs;
such as lilies, tulips, snow-drops, crocuses, or daffodils,
and cut them to pieces.

In the latter part of the year, in November and
December, it is a good plan to dig up any unoccupied
ground into ridges, and leave it in that state during the
winter, that the frost may act upon it. The effect of
frost upon the ground so prepared is very beneficial, as
it breaks the clods aad pulverizes the more cloggy por-
tions, which fall down in a thaw as a fine soft mould.
When manure is dug into the ground, it should not be
dug in too deeply, about four or five inches being quite
sufficient in most cases.



WEEDING.

GARDENS will always produce a great deal more than is
wished for, in the shape of various herbs, shrubs, and
plants, called weeds; such as dandelions, couch-grass,
cow-parsley, chick-weed, and many other plants, which
go by the general name of weeds. These, if left to
94 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

their own natural growth, would soon cover the ground,
and take away from the garden plants the nutriment
in the soil designed for them, besides entangling their
roots, stems, and leaves; therefore, weeding is as in-
dispensable as digging. The young gardener should
make up his mind before he sets foot in his garden to
have no weeds in it; for however assiduous he may have
been in other respects, however he may have planted,
watered, dug, or attended to his garden, if it show a
crop of weeds, he is a bad gardener, and will be sure to
get laughed at. Weeds may either be pulled up by the
hand or cut up by the hoe. In both cases, the roots
iaust be cradicated. They must not be plucked from
the stem, or cut from the level ground by the edge of
the hoe, but hoed or plucked up, root and all; and
after they are got up, they are not be left about in
the ridges to take root and grow again, -but must be
cleared away and safely put into the pit, never again to
rise, but in the chemistry of good manure.



PLANTING AND SOWING.

VERYTHING in a garden must be planted in some way
or other, and there are many ways of planting and
sowing. Sowing relates more particularly to seeds, and
planting to the setting of plants that have been raised
from seed in the first instance. The sowing of seeds is a
very important work, and before seeds can be sown with
a prospect of their springing up properly, the prepara-
tion of the soil, the time of the year, and even the time
of day, must be taken into consideration. Some seeds
‘ perish in particular kinds of soil, while others thrive
GARDENING. 95

Juxuriantly in them. Onions like a rich soil, as do
cauliflowers and asparagus. Carrots and parsnips like
a loose or sandy soil, as do sea-kale and many other
plants. Some plants will only grow in bog earth; and
some thrive, such as strawberries, best in a clayey loam.
Attention to such matters must be given by the young
gardener, if he wish to have his garden what it ought
to be, ®



HOT-BEDS AND FRAMES.

Brrore we can sow many kinds of seeds in this country
in the open ground, it is necessary to raise them first in
a hot-bed, and for this reason,—many flowers common
in our gardens are not natives of our cold and variable
climate, but of one much warmer; and if we delay to
sow the seed of such plants and flowers till the warm
‘days of summer are fully set in, the plant has scarcely
time to grow into perfection before the chills of autumn
come on, and they perish before their blossoms, fruit,
or seeds come to perfection. But this may be obviated
by means of a frame and hot-bed, which every young
gardener ought to have, however
small it may be. One of the
simplest is the common garden or
cucumber frame, which may be
bought for a few shillings. This,
if about a yard square, should be
set upon alow framework of bricks,
within which a pit is dug, and filled with good manure»
over which some fine mould is placed, to the depth of
about six inches. Upon this mould the more delicate
F


96 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

kinds of flower-seeds may be sown at an early period of
the year,—varieties of all those found in the gardening
books under the head of tender annuals,—balsams,
French marigolds, tobacco, stocks, marigolds, gourds,
and sun-flowers. The seed must be sown carefully,—
not too thick, and occasionally looked at. In mild, open
weather, the glass should be raised a little, but in cold
weather kept down. The giving of water should be
managed with care, and the plants as they appear should
not be suffered to grow too rapidly, but be kept under,
or they will not bear to be transplanted when the time
comes for doing so.

In transplanting,’ care should always be taken not to
transplant too early, or in improper weather ; for if the
weather happens to be cold or wet, the tanden plants
will suffer very much, and probably fail. This would
be the case, not only with flowers, but with all the tender
kinds of plants, such as cauliflowers, and, therefore, the”
young gardener must keep his ‘‘weather eye”’ open, as
the sailors say, and not be too much in a hurry, as
young gardeners generally are.



OPEN CROPS.

In the sowing of open crops, care should also be taken
to sow at the proper time. Very early sowing is gene-
rally hazardous, but yet, if you would have your crops
come in soon, a little risk must be run. When seed is
sown in the open ground, it requires watching, and this
particularly applies to such crops as early potatoes or
beans. Sometimes potatoes are sown in February, with
the view to an early crop; and in April the young tender
GARDENING. | 97

sprouts appear above the ground. One night’s frost,
however, settles them,—down they go, black and jelly-
like to the earth; but if the weather be doubtful, the
thoughtful young gardener takes care to cover up the
tender shoots with dry leaves or straw, to break the icy
tooth of the frost, and save his crop. The same care
should be also bestowed upon any other vegetable of a
tender kind, and without this care, gardening would
come to nothing.

After seeds are sown, they have many natural ene-
mies. The slug, the snail, the wire-worm, the impudent
sparrow, and the most impudent and insolent chaffinch,
who all seem to have an idea that the seed is put mto
the ground entirely for their benefit. As soon as the
pea-shoot comes above the earth, the slug has a mouthful
in its tenderest moments ; after the shoot has in part
recovered from the gentle nibble, Master Sparrow swoops
down and picks off, as quick as he can, all the delicate
little sprouts by mouthfuls: to make a fit ending to
what-is so well begun, the chaffinch descends in the
most impudent manner, close to your face, and pulls up
stalk and pea both together, and flies away as uncon-
cerned as can be. Now it is of no use to stand with a
gun or a pair of clappers in your hand all the day after
these intruders, and the only protection is by a net, or
rows of twine strung with feathers, stretched over the
bed in rows, and a few other pieces of white twine cross-
wise in their immediate vicinity. Birds do not like the
look of any threads drawn across the ground, and they
will rarely fly where there appears danger of entangle-
ment; and this method is the best that can be adopted
for seed-beds. A (uy is also good; and there are few

I
98 THE BOOK OF SPORTS,

boys who do not know how to construct one. A Guy
is also particularly appropriate for the early Warwick
peas. As to slugs and caterpillars, they must be hunted
for and picked off; and if they abound in a garden, the
line of shooting peas, beans, or other seed, must be
dredged with a little slacked lime, which is an infalli-
able mode of protection. But mind the lime does not
blow into your eyes ; for, if it does, you will be worse
off than the caterpillars.



RAKING.

Wuen seeds are sown, the beds should be nicely raked.
Some seeds, such as carrot and parsnip seeds, should
be beaten down with the flat part of the spade, and
laid very evenly and nicely, The edges of the little
cross-paths should be sharp and straight, and the whole
put into a ship-shape order. The stones should be
raked off into the cross-paths, and may remain there
until the land is dug up in the autumn or winter,, when
they may be removed. There is a good deal to be done
with the rake in many ways, besides the raking of beds.
It is a very useful tool to job over a bed when some
kinds of seeds are sown: it also makes a very good
drill, and is especially useful in getting leaves from the
paths and borders; but it should be used with a light
hand, and care taken not to scratch the ground into

holes with it, as many young gardeners do.



HOEING.

Tux hoe is of very great use, both to hoe up weeds and
to form drills. We have spoken about its former use,
GARDENING. 99

and shall now say a word or two about the latter. In
forming a drill for peas, beans, or other seed, one thing
- is above all things requisite, namely, that it should be
straight. A drill resembling a dog’s hinder leg, never |
looks well in a garden, and therefore the little gardener
must have recourse to his line. This ought to be long
enough to stretch quite across his ground, and when he
wants to strike a drill, he should stretch it across from
path to path, and, taking his hoe im his hand, cut or
scrape a little furrow, about three or four inches deep,
by the side of his line. In sowing peas and beans, the
drills are generally a yard apart, and between them
other crops are sometimes sown. Very often a crop of
spring-spinach or of radishes is sown between lines of
peas, and so on of other intermediate crops.

The line is very useful in all kinds of planting. In
planting broad-beans, they are put into the ground by
a dibber, which is a piece of wood with a
pointed end and a handle. The holes are to
be dibbed along the side of the line. The same
tool is used in a similar way in planting pota-
toes, strawberries, cabbage-plants, and a variety
of other roots, which require to be planted in
straight and equidistant lines.





TRANSPLANTING.

Tuere are a great many vegetables which require to be
transplanted,—some from the hot-bed, and some from
the open ground, where they have sprung from seeds,
to their destination in the garden. All transplanting
should be done with care. Some plants, such as cabbage
plants, do not require so much care as others, but every
100 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

plant to do well should be well planted. Young gardeners
are liable to many mistakes in transplanting ; one is,
that they often put the root of the plant into the ground
bundled together ; another is, that they make the hole
too large with the dibber, and are not careful in pressing
the mould to the root at the bottom of the hole, so that
the root of the plant has nothing to feed upon. All
this the thoughtful little gardener will avoid; and when
he puts a plant into the ground, he will reflect that if
it be not well planted it will not grow. The young
plants of the more delicate flowers should be moved
with the greatest care into spots congenial with their
natures. Some plants require a warm, some a cool
situation, some a moist, some a dry one, and these will
be ascertained by studying the nature of the plant.



WATERING.

Boys generally fancy there is nothing like watering,
and they are very pleased when they get the watering-
pot in their hands. They always like to be watering, —
no doubt thinking that the more the seeds and plants
are watered the better they thrive; but this is a mistake,
moderation in all things should be the motto. When
a plant wants watering artificially, it in general shows
its wants by very unequivocal signs, namely, by a
drooping of its pretty head and leaves; and then, if too
much water be given to it, it soon springs up with great
luxuriance; and the first burning day of sunshine is likely
to kill it, or to do it great injury. The rule should be,
to water as little as possible, and to wait as long as pos-
‘sible for nature’s heavenly rain, which is better than
any artificial watering. Plants should never be watered
GARDENING. 101

during the middle of the day, but early in the morning,
or when the sun is descending in the evening. Pump-
water should never be used if rain or pond-water can be
obtained. Much good often results to plants and seed-
beds from the use of liquid manure. This can be easily
prepared by getting an old beer-cask and knocking out
the head. The bottom should then be fixed in a hole
dug to receive it, and the earth allowed to reach to the
brim. Some of the best manure to be had should then
be put into this, with a pound or two of guano, and
pour upon it three pails of water. It should then be
allowed to stand for a week or two, and used as required.
The effects will scon show themselves in the increased
growth and vigour of the plants.



ON THE PROPAGATION OF VARIOUS KINDS
OF SHRUBS AND PLANTS.

Brsipes sowing seed and rearing plants from them by
transplanting, there are many other ways of propagating
plants, namely, by off-sets, suckers, layers, divided-roots,
cuttings, and pipings. If tulips and hyacinths be ex-
amined, it will be found, that besides shedding seed,
the bulb of the plant very often makes a smaller bulb
on the larger one, and this, if taken off and planted by
itself, becomes a new plant: many plants may be propa-
gated in this way. The strawberry also, will be found
to send off a long shoot, and, at about a foot distant
from the parent root, a little knob appears, having a
bud to spring into the air and a root to work into the
ground: this is called a runner. These may be cut
away from the parent and planted separately, and will
13
102 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

become a new plant. Many other plants, such as roses,
raspberries, and lilacs, send from their roots little thin
stems: these are called suckers, and may be removed
from the parent shrub and planted by themselves, when
they will become separate plants. Many plants can
be propagated by what are termed layers. To do this,
nothing more is necessary than to select a shoot, as
near the root as possible, and having partially divided
it with a knife, make an upward slit in it, and then
placing a bit of twig between the divided parts, press
it down to the ground, burying the joint beneath
the surface of the soil. To plant from cuttings, some
care is necessary as regards green-house plants, but
nothing is easier than to rear fresh stocks of roses,
currants and gooseberries from cuttings, as it is only
necessary to cut the shoots cleanly off, and, after re-
ducing them to about six inches in length, to place
them in the ground with the shooting end upwards.
They should be planted about six inches apart, and after
the first year be removed to their proper situation; and
they will bear fruit in the following year. To plant from
pipings, such as pinks and carnations, it is only necessary
to pull off one of the tubular stems, and dividing it at
or near the joint, pull off the surrounding leaves, and
insert the end or jointed part in some fine sand-mould,
placing a glass over them till they have ‘‘struck,” that is,
formed roots, when they can afterwards be transplanted.



PRUNING.

LittLe gardeners ought to know something of pruning
trees. ‘To cut or prune gooseberry and currant-trees is
GARDENING. 103°

very simple. Gooseberry-trees should be cut differently
from currant-trees. In eooseberry-trees, much of the
fruit grows on wood of the last year’s growth, but on
currant-trees, the fruit is, for the most part, found near
the knob or joint between the old wood and the new.
To prune gooseberry trees, all the old dead wood should
be cut out, and every branch that trails on the ground
should be cut away, all branches in the centre of the
tree that intersect each other, and all ugly branches,
should be removed,—all suckers should be taken from
the root, and the stem of the tree VY,

left straight and free to about ten

or twelve inches from the ground,

and the tree trained to throw its NAS
branches into the kind of form in . >

the margin. The branches should

then be cut, i. e., about half of the

white or new wood should be cut

cleanly off with a sharp knife, and

the cuttings carefully gathered up.

In cutting currant-trees, nearly all
the white wood should be cut away,
leaving only head shoots to some one
single or middle shoot of a main
branch. ‘The under-wood, old wood,
and irregular and ugly wood, should
also be cut away, as recommended at
the cutting of gooseberries. In pruning
or cutting raspberries, the old wood
should be cut quite away, and the
stems of the last year shortened about
one third.


104 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

GRAFTING AND BUDDING.

Grartine is the transferring of a shoot of one tree into
the stem of another, called the stock. Into this a slit is
made; and then the scion or shoot is cut into the form
of a tongue aud inserted into it. The head of the stock
is then cut off in a slanting direction, and the two are
then tied together, or closely wrapped together, in moss,
covered with grafting clay. No book can give directions
so clear for grafting, as to enable the young gardener
to perform it successfully. He must see it done, try it
afterwards, and then ask if he has done it correctly ;
and to Icarn grafting and budding well, it is only
necessary to get on the right side of the gardener.
The same may be said as regards the pruning of vines,
fruit and wall trees. ‘Ten minutes’ experience with the

gardener will teach more than twenty volumes on the
subject.



SHIFTING, OF CROPS,

Crops must not be grown twice in rotation on the
Same ground. Peas and beans should he the crop after
any of the roots, such as potatoes, carrots, and parsnips.
Cabbages, and plants of that kind, ‘may be sown and
grown intermediately, The best rotation of crops will
be found in any gardening book on the subject, and

this the young gardener should make a subject of some
Study.
GARDENING. 105

HOW TO MANAGE A LITTLE GARDEN ALL
THE YEAR ROUND.

JANUARY.

Tux chief wish of the little gardener this month is to
to take advantage of the hard frosts, and during their
prevalence, to wheel upon his ground such manure as
may be necessary. It should be wheeled in at this
time, because, while the frost is hard, the wheelbarrow
can pass over the paths and beds without doing much
injury, nor will the dung and rubbish in its moving
make more dirt than can be easily swept up. The
manure should be left in heaps, and not spread till the
time comes for digging it in.

In the middle or latter end of the month, should the
weather be fine and open, attention should be given to
the cutting of the gooseberry, currant, and raspberry-
trees, and to the planting of off-sets from each, or of
cuttings, as directed. A crop of peas might be sown,
as well as mustard and cress, and a few broad-beans
for coming in early. ‘The peas and beans should be
sown in rows, about a yard apart, and a little spinach
might be-sown in a broad drill, made by the hoe between
them. The gravel-walks should be turned up in the
first thaw and left in a ridge, ready for turning down
and rolling when the weather becomes fine and dry.

Radishes may also now be sown in beds prepared by
digging and freshly turned up. The seed should be
thrown in, not too thickly, and raked over. Straw should
then be placed upon it to keep off the birds, or a Guy
and feathers. The straw must be kept over the beds
106 THE BOOK OF sports.

in the frosty weather and during the night, and taken
off in the morning. |
Now is the time to plant bulbous roots, such as
snow-drops, crocuses, tulips, hyacinths, Jonquils, daffo-
dils, and fags; and off-sets of bulbous roots may be
planted in beds, Anemones and ranunculuses may also
be planted in dry weather, and some of the most hardy
of the perennial and biennial shrubs, as asters, Can-
terbury-bells, and campanulas, may be planted.

Fesrvary.

In February, the young gardener will find much to do.
In the flower-garden, he may finish planting the re-
mainder of the bulbous roots, such as the stap of Beth-
lehem, fritillarias, narcissuses, and gladioluses, in beds or
borders, all for flowering the same year. Some may be
planted in pots to flower in the house, or they may be
placed in the het. bed for carly flowering. Some of the
hardy annual ilower-seeds may now be sown.

In the kitchen-garden, if we may so call it, a little
crop of turnips may be sown to come in early, Cabbage-
plants may be set in rows; and a little lettuce-seed may
be sown under the frame in the hot-bed. This frame
should be well covered at night, and slightly raised in
the day time, wnen the weather is mild, to give the
plants within it light and air.

Marcu.

In the flower-garden, the gardener may begin to sow in

beds, borders and pots, larkspurs, candy-tuft, lupines,

Sweet-peas, Venus’s looking-glass, pansies, stocks, sweet-
scabius, and many others.
GARDENING. 107

In the culinary department, now is the time to sow a
little bed of onions in a well-manured bed. A bed for
carrots may also be prepared, and the seed sown and
well trodden down. A bed of parsnips should also be
prepared in the same way ; and another crop of peas of
the marrow-fat kind may be planted in drills in the
the same manner as the former. And now, perhaps,
the cabbages will require the earth to be drawn to their
stems; and, if the little gardener has room, he may
plant three or four rows of early potatoes. They should
be the cuttings of large ones, with not more than two
eyes in each piece, and should be planted with manure
in rows, about two feet and a half apart and about a
foot distant from each other.

APRIL.

Now is the time to begin sowing the more tender
annual flower sceds. Some should be sown in the hot-
bed; such as African and French marigolds, Indian
pinks, China-asters, yellow-sultanas; and many others
of the hardy kind, wall-flowers, Canterbury-bells, French
honey-suckles, mignonette, pinks, and daises may be
planted.

In the kitchen department, kidney-beans may be sown,
and at the latter end of the month scarlet-runners and
French-beans may be planted. It is not a bad plan to
raise a few scarlet-runners in the hot-bed, and to plant
them out when they have formed roots, and two or three
leaves at the head. But as these kinds of beans are
very tender, they should be carefully watched, and
covered with straw on the sudden appearance of frost,
which often takes place in this month. .
108 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

May.
*

Now may be sown the tenderest of the annuals in the
hot-beds, as cock’s-combs, tricolors, balsams, egg-plants,
ice-plants, and others of that kind. Dahlias may also be
placed in the bed in this or the former month, and suf-
fered to sprout, previous to planting in the open ground.
Bulbous roots of every flower now out of bloom, and
the leaves decayed, may be taken up and the off-sets
separated dry, and housed for future planting.
_ Now is the time to plant melons, gourds, and pump-
kins. The seeds of these should be sown in April in
the hot-bed, and the plants should be transplanted into
good ground in a warm spot, about the latter end of the
month. They will grow freely and produce ripe fruit
in August. Common pumpkins may be sown on one
of the dunghills. The gourds, such as the orange-
gourd, may be planted near an arbour, and be trained
up the principal parts. French-beans and scarlet-run-
ners may also be planted, if not done before; and should
the young gardener have raised any tomatoes or cap-
sicums in his hot-bed, now is the time to plant them
out, as well as the slips of geraniums and tobacco-plants.
The young gardener will now find employment in
sticking peas and beans, weeding and transplanting.
And such broad-beans as are now in blossom, should
have their tops nipped off, to promote the setting of
the pods. But let him be very careful to look after the
weeds, which now grow in great abundance; and let
him rake nicely all his borders and keep everything
clean and neat, as this is the most: brilliant time of a
garden’s beauty.
‘GARDENING. 109

JUNE.

Loox well to the strawberries, and see that they are
well watered, which operation should be performed in
dry weather every other day. These plants will by this
time have made their runners, and these should be
cleared away, except those that may be required for
making fresh beds, which may now be planted. Trim
the roots a little, and cut off the strays or runners from
each plant.

Look well at this period, morning and evening, for
snails and other insects, and after showers of rain in
particular. If there should be any small cherry trees
or other fruit trees, they ought be netted or well
watched, or the birds will eat them.

All sorts of flowers may now be planted out into the
borders. Some may also be put in pots, such as bal-
salms. Take care, however, that they are removed in
damp or showery weather. In dry weather, take up
tulips, crown-imperials, and jonquils, such as are past
flowering, and pluck away the off-sets: let them be
well cleaned and dried in the shade from the mid-day
sun; then put each sort into separate bags or boxes,
and keep them in some dry apartment till September,
October or November, at which time they will have to
be planted again. Most other bulbs may also be now
taken up and put away for future planting. June is
also the proper time to propagate pinks and carnations
by pipings.

JULY.
Tuis is the time to plant out savoys and cabbages for
winter use. Brocoli may also be planted, and some
K
110 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

seed sown for a late spring crop. The plants raised
from this seed will be ready to put out, finally, in the
middle and towards the latter end of August and the
beginning of September, and will produce small heads
in April and in the beginning of May. Lettuces may
be now planted out, and other seed sown for future
use. Spinach for winter may also be now sown; for
this, that part of the garden should be chosen that has
the most of the winter’s sun upon it. Now is the very
best time in the whole year to sow the large black
turnip-rooted radish for autumn and winter. The young
gardener must at this period be on the watch for such
seeds, both of flowers and garden vegetables, as are ripe.
This should always be done in dry weather,—cutting or
pulling up the stems with the seeds in. They should
then be spread in an airy place where the sun and wind
_ will dry them thoroughly.

The various herbs, such as balm, penny-royal, sweet-
marjorum, sage, Javender, marigolds, should also be
gathered up for winter use. Slips may now be planted
from any of these. Take the side shoots of the branches
four or five inches in length, and plant them in a shady
border, and do not forget to give them water.

The ground should be kept clear at this period from
refuse leaves, stumps of cabbages, haulm of peas and
beans, and from all decaying rubbish and litter. Cut
box-edgings also; and ifthe operation of budding is to
be performed, now is the time to do it.

AUGUST.

Loox over the flowers in borders from day to day, to
see what they require. When the shoots of rambling
GARDENING. 11!

flowers interpose with each other, they should be short-
ened, so that every plant may stand singly, as they
always appear to best advantage when they stand clear
of each other.

In this month, we must still continue to look out for
ripe flower-seeds; also, there are several kinds of
autumnal flower-bulbs, which may be planted, such as
the autumnal crocus and Guernsey-lily.

Now weed and water seedlings, and shift such pot-
flowers as require it into larger pots. In doing this,
rub off the moulds and matted fibres from the roots,
and throw away part of the outward, loose old earth.
Then, having put a little fresh earth into the old pots,
with a piece of broken tile over the hole in the bottom,
put in your plant, and fill all the sides round with nice
soft mould.

SEPTEMBER.

In the third or fourth week of this month, it will be
proper to begin to plant the choice hyacinth and tulip
roots for an early spring blossom. The bed should be
dug at least one full spade deep, breaking the earth fine
and laying the bed even by raking, and then plant the
bulbs about six inches apart. Ranunculus beds or borders
may be prepared in the same way, and the plants planted
similarly, about two inches deep. Take care of the new
carnation and pink pipings or layers, and let them be
transplanted as soon as convenient. Perennial plants,
such as carnations, pinks, and sweet-williams, may now
be transplanted. Now may be sown the seeds of bulbous
flower roots, as tulips, crown-imperials, hyacinths, and
most other bulbs. Evergreens may now be transplanted,
112 THE BOOK OF SFORTS.

and much work be done in the preparation of manure,
and gathering in crops of various kinds.

OcToBER.

Tuts month again ushers in planting in various ways.
In the kitchen department, beans may be planted for
an early crop in the succeeding spring; that is, if the
frost does not nip them. A warm border, under a south
wall is the best place for them. A few peas may be
be sown also, to try the chance of the winter. Sow
lettuce and small salad and radishes; also transplant
lettuces to situations to stand till the sprmg. A few
rows of cabbages for the winter and spring should now
be planted, and winter spinach sown. Now is a good
time to begin to dig up parsnips and carrots to store
away for winter ; and now all ground not in use should
be well dug up and trenched, to lie ready for the win-
ter’s frost to act upon it. Now gather various fruits as
they are fully ripe, and choose dry days for so doing. ~

NoOvEMBER.

THE season is now closing, yet a good deal is to be
done by those who love a garden,—a vast deal of
planting and transplanting of every variety of flowers.
Roots of many may be separated, and fresh sorts planted.
Nearly every kind of bulbous roots, if not previously

planted, may now be put in the earth. The cuttings of
“gooseberry and currant trees may also be planted, and
‘young trees raised in the spring be transplanted to
their proper situation. It is also a good time to plaut
filberts, hazel-nuts, and barberries. Strawberry plants
should have a dressing of good manure.
GARDENING, 113

DECEMBER,

Makz neat the borders, dig all loose ground, turn the
manure, plant suckers from old roots, roll green and
gravel walks, gather seeds on fine days, cut away old —
wood, nail fruit trees, prepare hot-beds, get matting

to put over tender plants during the frost, look ove
seeds, and see that they are dry and properly put awayr
and make all clean, nice, and neat for the coming spring.

Such is an outline of what a boy may be expected to
do with his little garden. A great deal more is to be
learned than can be learned from a book; but if the
young gardener will keep his eyes open, reflect on the
reasons for doing things, and pay attention to the voice
of experience, he will probably reap more real delight
from his few yards of ground than from all the toys and
playthings he ever possessed.

PART VIII.
CARPENTERING.



oe —

TuerE is not a more useful and pleasant amusement
than that of ‘‘Carpentering.” Every boy should be able
to do little jobs with the plane and chisel; for whether
he may turn out a gentleman or a poor man, it will be
of great use to him. If a gentleman, he can amuse
himself with it, and if a poor man, it will be of essential
service to be able to put up a row of palings in his
garden, to make a gate, to build a pig-stye, to make
and fix up shelves, build out-houses, and perform sundry
odd jobs about the house for his comfort and convenience.

Every boy should have a box of tools, and a bench
to work at, also a little room or loft for a workshop.
He ought to obtain good tools, and by no means buy
the boxes of rubbish sold to boys for their amusement.
116 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

He should go the ironmonger’s and purchase the fol-
lowing tools; of course, out of his own savings,—his
own pocket-money,—and not apply to his parents for it.

Two saws, one small and one hand-saw.
Four gimlets of different sizes.

One pair of pincers.

One pair of plyers.

Four chisels of different sizes.

One gouge.

Two hammers, large and small.

One mallet.

Two bradawls.

Two planes, long and short.

Two files, large and small.

One level.

One square.

One screw-driver.

Nails, screws, rings, glue-pot, hone, oil, etc.

He must also manage to obtain a carpenter’s-bench,
which he cannot very well do without, and then he
may begin carpentering with expedition. ¢



USES OF THE VARIOUS TOOLS.

Tuz Saw.—Before a saw can be used after it is pur-
chased, it generally has to be ‘‘sct,” as it is termed;
that is, its teeth are to be sharpened and placed a little
outwards from the plane of its length. There are several
. kinds of saws, namely, the common hand-saw, the key-
hole saw, and the small-toothed saw. The first is to
CARPENTERING. 117-"

cut planks and thick pieces of wood ; the second is
to cut holes in planks or boards; the third is to cut
small pieces of wood, or those that require to be very
nicely divided.

Tue Prane.—The plane is used to smooth boards
with. There are several kinds of planes. The long
plane and the short plane are the principal ones. Within
the plane is the knife, which is fastened in by a knock
of the hammer on the wedge inside, which is made so
as to fix the edged knife at any distance from the bottom
of the plane, either for thin or thick shaving. A very
little direction from the carpenter will enable the young
carpenter to fix his knife properly ; and a knock on the
end of the plane with a hammer will loosen it in a
moment. ‘The knife should be sharpened from time to
time on the stone or hgne. This should be done with
great care, so as to preserve a proper angle at the edge
and great evenness in every part, otherwise, the planing
will be very imperfect.

In planing, the wood to be planed is either laid flat
on the bench, with its end against the little pin, to pre-
vent its moving, or fixed in the screw of the bench, and
the plane being brought upon the top or edge of the
wood, is pushed carefully, but somewhat sharply along.
The shaving comes through the hole in the plane, and
must be cleared away, from time time, out of the way
of the knife. Everything planed should be planed per-
fectly level, smooth, and even.

Tue CuiseL.—The use of the chisel is to cut square
or sharp-cornered holes in wood, especially mortices.
118 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

A mortice is the hole
cut ina post or other
piece of wood, in which
another piece of wood
cut to fit it, called a
tenon, is put. The tenon
and mortice should both be cut exactly, and so that they
fit at right angles, firmly and securely. Tenons and mor-
tices are of perpetual use in carpentering, and the young
carpenter should learn as quickly as possible tomake them.

Tur Matter is to be used instead of the hammer
for a variety of purposes. In cutting mortices, it is the
mallet and not the hammer that is used, and in almost
all cases where the chisel is employed, the mallet should
be used. Were we to use a hammer to knock the end
of the chisel, we should soon split its handle, or so
bruise it, as to make it unservicable. .

Tus Gimiet anp Brapawi.—The gimlet is used to
bore awls with, so that nails when they are driven in
may not split the wood. Bradawls are used for the
same purpose, before smaller nails, called brads, are put
in. A bradawl is sometimes called a nail-piercer. There
is a thread gimlet now come into use, but this requires
much care in handling: it must be very gently put in,
and very gently taken out, or it will snap like a piece
of glass; but it is a very useful tool, and is a great
improvement upon the old gimlet.

Pincers AND Pryers.—Pinters are used to take
loose nails out of wood, to wrench off staples, or other
CARPENTERING. 119

things that have been attached to wood. Plyers are a
smaller kind of pincers, and are used for small work in
the same way. They are very useful tools, and it is
impossible to do without them.

Tur Hammrer.— Almost everybody knows how a
hammer is used: it is used to drive nails with, and also
to take them out. The
hammer used to take out
nails, is called a claw- o° 8
hammer, from its having
a claw at one part. The
claw is placed under the head of the nail, when the
handle of the hammer becomes a lever, and the head
the fulcrum; and, placed in this position, the hand
acquires great power,—sometimes amounting to at least
a hundred-weight. In using a hammer, we should
always be careful to use the kind of hammer necessary
for the work to be done.

Fitrzs.—Files are of various uses, and we cannot do
very well without them in carpentering. ‘There are
several kinds of files: one kind flat on one side and
rounded at the other; another is flat on both sides, and
another kind has three edges and three flat sides. The
first is used for rasping wood or other things down to
« level; and the others are used to file things into a
point, or to cut them in pieces.

"Tne Screw-priver is used to drive in and take out
screws. It ought to have a very hard tough edge and
along handle. When placed in the head of the screw,
to drive in, it should be turned from left to right, and
120 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

in taking out, from right to left. There is a particular
way of getting out a screw, which is only to be learned
by a little practice. The knack consists in combining
with nicety the pressure on the screw-head and the
turning of the driver. The young carpenter will now
and then find a very stubborn screw and fancy it quite
impossible to get it out; but by a little perseverance,
he soon finds out the knack of doing it; and what
seemed immoveable yields to his skill and strength.
There is one thing young carpenters frequently do, and
that is, to use their chisels for screw-drivers; the con-
sequence of this is, the spoiling of the chisel, for the
edges are sure to break away.

Tue Leven —Every piece of work should be square
and level, except when it is of a curved form, and then
it should be reduced to the principles of the circle or
ellipse. The level is used in putting up posts, palings,
or work of any kind in an upright position. It
consists of a board of wood,
upon which a string is sus-
pended, having a plummet at
the end of it, which fells along
a straight line at a right angle
with the bottom of the level.

To obtain a perfect perpen-
dicular and perfect horizontal,
the level is placed on the
the work till the line falls exactly over the nick at the
top of the hole. The square is principally applied to
things made at the bench, and is used to bring every-
thing made to a right angle, so that a true level and
perpendicular is thus secured.
CARPENTERING. 121

STUFF.

Tue young carpenter will find it very difficult, to work
without stuff. He ought, therefore, to purchase a deal
sawed into planks or boards, consisting of one three
quarters of an inch thick, another one inch thick, and
another half an inch thick. He ought, also, to obtain a
slab not sawed at all, to cut out as occasion may require.
He will then be provided with wood. He must also
lay in a stock of various kinds of nails, screws, rings,
hasps, hinges, etc., and, above all, a good substantial
box to keep his tools and other mattersin. This should ,
be divided into compartments, and everything should
be arranged in it with neatness and order.



LABOUR.

THE young carpenter ought to be fond of work; and to
feel a pleasure in it. Should this be the case, there is
scarcely an end to his labours. He may make his
hen-houses, his rabbit-hutches, his summer-houses, his
boxes, seats, rustic-chairs, lattice-work and palings for
his garden, build out-houses, and make book-shelves ;
in short, amuse himself with the manufacture of a great
variety of things, both for use and ornament, and of
which he may justly be a little proud.

Such an amusement is infinitely superior to feats of
conjuring and legerdemain, tricks with cards, and im-
positions of various kinds, which are put in some books
for the amusement of young people, and which are
highly pernicious both to their mental and moral pro-
egress.

L

PART IX.
KEEPING POULTRY.



Kerxpine poultry is an innocent amusement both for
boys and girls. Domesticated animals, unlike the free
inhabitants of the country, do not suffer from the loss
of liberty, and when they are well housed, fed, and at-
tended to, they are as happy in their state of domesti-
cation as they would be in their wild state of liberty ;
perhaps, more so, and therefore it is quite right to
keep them.

There is something very pleasant in watching the old
hen as she sits so patiently on her nest, and to see the
little birds issue from the eggs, with the proud but
careful mother strutting by them, and scratching and
toiling to obtain them food; and nothing is more touching
to a sensitive mind than to behold her at the least chill
of air, or overcasting of the clouds, calling her young
brood under her wings for warmth, shelter, and security.
There are many lessons of good to be learned in fowl-
keeping.

In proceeding to keep poultry, the young poultry-
keeper should first secure a proper place to keep them
in. He ought to be able to build, if not the whole, a
great portion of his poultry-house, which need not be
124 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

on a very extensive plan; but there are a certain num-
of little requisites belonging to it which ought not to
be forgotten.

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NATURE AND SITUATION OF FOWL-HOUSE.

Tue situation of afowl-house should be such as to afford
sun and warmth in winter and spring, and shade in
summer. It should be well
covered in at the top, free
from damp, have good ven-
tilation and light, with win-
dows of lattice-work, with
boards behind to open and
shut. It should be placed
against a wall with a slanting
roof. The side should con-
tain one latticed window (4);
the front, also, alatticed win- ES
dow (s), with a hatch-door, SIDE VIEW. '


KEEPING POULTRY. 125

—

O

aS

Re
|

FRONT VIEW.

partly latticed and partly boarded at the side. A little
door for the fowls should communicate with a fowl-
yard, as seen below.



ins

The above is a sketch of the ground-plan of the house
and fowl-yard. His the fowl house. No.1 is a small
pit filled with dry sand and ashes, in which the fowls
may roll to free themselves from vermin. No. 2 is
another small trench or pit, containing horse-dung and
rubbish of various kinds, to be frequently renewed, in
which they may amuse themselves in scraping for corn
and worms. No. 3 is a square of turf, on which they
may pasture and amuse themselves. Two or three
trees ought to be planted in the middle of the run, and
L 3
126 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

these might be cherry or mulberry trees, as they are
very fond of the fruit. Nos. 4 & 5 are two little stone
tanks for water, and No. 6 is a pond for the ducks, in’
case it should be thought advisable to keep such, which
I should strongly recommend to be done.

Within the fowl-house there must be perches put up
for the fowls to roost on. These should be placed one
above another at the corner, and so disposed, that one
range of birds does not sit quite under the other, for
reasons which need not be explained. At the bottom
of the fowl-house, but not under the perches, should be
placed the nest boxes, from four to six, as may be re-
quired, in which straw should be placed for the hens
to make their nests with. The fowl-house and every-
thing about it should be kept scrupulously clean, and
be frequently white-washed ; and it is good, occasionally,
to fumigate the house by burning herbs, and juniper
and cedar woods.



THE VARIOUS BREEDS OF FOWLS.

THESE are very numerous, and are becoming more so
every day. Among them are the following :—

Tue DorxinG BREED.

So named from the town of Dorking in Surrey. It
is one of the largest of our fowls. It is of an entire
white colour, and has five claws upon each foot, gene-
rally, for some have not. They are good layers, and
their flesh is plump. They make excellent capons.
KEEPING ‘POUETRY. 127

PoLaNp BREED.

The Poland fowls are greatly esteemed, but they are
seldom to be met with pure in this country. They were
originally imported from Holland. Their colour is
shining black, with white tufts on the head of both
cock and hen, springing from a fleshy protuberance or
‘‘ King David’s crown,” the celestial in heraldry. This
breed lay a great quantity of eggs, and are sometimes
called ‘‘ everlasting layers.” They quickly fatten, and
are good eating.

SPANISH BREED.

The Spanish fowl, with the Hamburg and Chittagong, |
is a very large fowl, laying large eggs, and all seem
more or less allied to the Polish family. They are well
adapted for capons, and produce eggs nearly equal in
size to those of the Malay hens. This breed is now
common, particularly in London.

BAaNTAMS.

Tuts breed is small, but very beautiful. It came origi-
nally from India. They are frequently feathered to the
toes; but booted legs are not exclusively peculiar to
Bantams, for Bantam fanciers, with Sir John Sebright
at their head, prefer those which have clean bright
legs without any feathers. The full-bred Bantam-cock
should not weigh more than a pound. He should have
a rose comb, a well-feathered tail, and a proud lively
carriage. The Nankeen coloured and the black are the
eveatest favourites. The Nankeen bird should have his
128 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

feathers edged with black, his wings bordered with pur-
ple, his tail-feathers black, his hackles slightly studded
with purple, and his breast black, with white edges to
the feathers. The hen should be small, clean-legged, and
match in plumage with the cock, For young persons,
Bantams are the best kinds of fowls to be kept, as they
make but little dirt, and are very gentle and pretty.



CHOICE OF STOCK,

In commencing fowl-keeping, it is important to choose
young and healthy sorts. There should be a two year
old cock, and pullets in their first year. In choosing
them, we should note that the comb is red and healthy,
the eyes bright and dry, and the nostrils free from
any moisture. ‘The indications of old age or sickness
are paleness of the comb and gills, dulness of colour, a
sort of stiffness in the down and feathers, increased
length of talons, loose and prominent scales on the legs.

There should be from four to six hens to one cock,
the latter being the extreme number; and the conduct
of the cock towards the hens should be watched, for if
he should be of a sulky, selfish, persecuting and domi-
neering disposition, the hens will be unhappy, and he
ought to have his neck wrung, as a just reward for sel-
fishness and tyranny.



FOOD AND FEEDING.

Fowzs must be well fed, but they should not have too
much. Over-feeding is as bad for fowls as for men.
KEEPING POULTRY. 129

They ought not to be fed with stale or bad corn, but of
the best, and now and then with a little buck-wheat ;
with cabbage, mangold-wurzel leaves, and parsley, which
should be chopped fine. Where they are likely to be
stinted for insect food, small pieces of meat chopped up
should occasionally be added to their food.

On the floor of the fowl-house, a little sand should
be occasionally spread, and sandy gravel should be placed
in the corners. The small sharp stones found in gravel
are absolutely necessary to fowls, as they are picked up
by the birds and find their way into the gizzard, where
they perform the part of mill-stones in grinding the corn.



LAYING.

Tue early period of spring, and after a cessation at the
end of summer, are the two periods at which fowls
begin to lay. When the period of laying approaches, it
is known by the redness of the comb in the hen, the
brightness of her eyes, and her frequent clucking. She
appears restless, and scratches and arranges the straw
in her laying place, and at last begins to lay. She
generally prefers to lay in a nest where there is one or
more eggs ; hence it is of use to put a chalk egg into
the nest you wish her to settle on.

The eggs ought to be taken from the nest every after-
noon, when no more are expected to be laid, for if left
in the nest, the heat of the hens when laying each day
will tend to corrupt them. Some hens will lay only one
egg in three days, some every other day, and some
every day.
130 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

To promote laying, good food in moderate quantities
should be given to the hens, and also clean water. A
hen well fed and attended to, will produce upwards of
one hundred and fifty eggs in a year, besides two broods
of chickens. Some half-bred game hens begin to lay
as soon as their chickens are three weeks old.



PRESERVATION OF EGGS.

To preserve eggs fresh for a length of time, it is only
necessary to rub each egg with a small piece of butter,
which need not be larger than a pea, or the tip of the
finger may be dipped in a saucer of oil and passed over
the shell in the same way. Eggs may be thus preserved
for nine months.



HATCHING CHICKENS.

Tuer eggs given to the hen to hatch must be perfectly
fresh ; they should be large in size, the produce of the
- most beautiful birds, well shaped, and the number put
under the hen should vary according to her size, and
may be from nine to thirteen eggs; odd numbers, old
housewives say, are the luckiest.

When a hen wants to sit, she makes a particular kind
of clucking, and goes to her nest. Here she fixes herself
for a period of three weeks, at the end of which time, the
young chickens break the eggs and come out perfect
beings. They run about as soon almost as they are out
of the egg, and in twenty-four hours will take food.

On the first day of their birth, chickens require
nothing but warmth, and they must be kept under the
KEEFING POULTRY. 131

mother in the nest. The next day, they may be put
nuder a coop and fed with crumbs of bread soaked in
milk, a few chicken’s groats being added, and the yolks
of eggs boiled hard. After being kept warm under the
coop with the mother for five or six days, they may
then be turned a little in the sun, towards the middle of
the day, and fed with boiled barley mixed with curds,
and a few pot-herbs chopped up. At the end of a
fortnight, they may be left entirely to the care of the
mother, who will be sure to perform her duty.

Such are the principal particulars regarding the keep-
ing of fowls. There are many books written on the
subject: one of the best of them is called the « Poultry-
yard,” which may be consulted for further information.



Tame &,
BEES.

PSH bY od
5 1 A “Be





ati

S Wi | /
SSeS
INSEE SE SSS
NSS) REST)
Ss ul »





Any humane person must be unwilling to keep what
may be termed “pets,” when, as is very often the case,
they are taken from the freedom which nature has given
them, to be pent up in cages, hutches, and round-about
boxes. It is not a part of good moral training to en-
courage children to deprivé anything of liberty, and the
keeping of rabbits, guinea-pigs, birds, gold and silver.
fish, white mice, pigeons and squirrels, is not only at-
tended with a vast deal of trouble and expense, but
with a great many bad smells, filth, and dirt. Such
matters, have, therefore, been excluded from this volume,
as being by no means calculated to improve either the
M
134 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

minds or morals of young persons, but rather to have a
contrary tendency.

These objections do not, however, lie against the
keeping of bees, which afford at all times lessons of in-
dustry, of order, of contrivance, of perseverance, and of
many other virtues, which are great ornaments to little
boys and girls, as well as to grown men and women.
We shall, therefore, give as copious an account of this
interesting insect as we Can, and, at the same time,
show the best methods of managing it with advantage
to its possessor.

Bee is the English name for an: extensive genera of
insects,—apis or the section anthophla or mellifera of
modern classification. The common domestic bee, of
which it is now our business to treat, is the apis mellifica —
of Linnwus; and it may be as well to: state, for the
guidance of the young reader, that the Hive-bee is dis-
tinguished from all other species of bees,—by having the
shanks of the hind legs furnished with a smooth and
concave pollen-plate on the outer surface, and destitute of —
spines at the extremity,— by the basal joint of the torse
in the working bees, of an oblong form, with its inner
surface clothed with fine hairs, disposed in transverse
layers,—by the oblong shape of its body,—and by the
feelers at the sheath of the tongue being almost obsolete
and formed of a single point.

The Hive-bee may be regarded as one of the most
perfectly social species of insects, and one whose economy
is regulated by the possession of a more remarkable
degree of instinct than is perhaps possessed by any other
insect. Another peculiarity regarding bees is, that there
are not simply males and females among them, but
mules or workers, or female non-breeders, as they have
BEES. 135

been termed, which constitute the great mass of the
population of a hive. They are smaller, as regards size,
than the males or the female bees, and it is to them that
the internal economy of the hive is committed, and upon
them the whole labour of the community devolves.
Moreover, it is their duty to guard and protect the hive
and the queen, to feed the young, and to kill the drones
at the appointed time.

In a single hive there are sometimes not fewer than
thirty thousand of these individuals. They are distin-
guished from the breeding females by having a longer
lip, the jaws not notched at the tip, and the sting
straight. The male bees, of which there are several
hundreds, sometimes even two thousand in a full hive,
are idle creatures, doing no work. They are generally
termed drones, and they are of a more bulky size than
the other bees, and+they are not armed with a sting.

Such are the inhabitants of the hive; the chief pro-
ducts of which are bees-wax and hgney. ‘The former is
secreted by the worker-bees, by a peculiar apparatus
on the under side of the belly, as occasion requires,
and is employed for constructing the combs in which
the family provision and the young brood are deposited.

Honey is obtained by bees from the nectaries of flowers,
which, it is well known, are constantly secreting a sweet
thick fluid. This is sucked up by the tongue of the
insect, and a portion of it is consumed at once for its
support, but the greater part of the supply, although
taken into the stomach of the bee, is again brought up
(regurgitated, to use a hard word), and poured into the
cells of the hives for the food of the grubs and the use
of the community through the winter.
i126 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.



QUEEN BEE. DRONE.

The cells into which the honey is poured for store are
placed in the most inaccessible parts of the hive, and are
fitted with waxen lids, but the honey destined for the use
of the nurses, workers, and drones, is deposited in unclosed
cells. In each honey-cell there is a cream-like layer or
covering of a thicker consistency than the honey itself.
This layer is perforated by the bee with its fore-legs,
and is closed before the bee flies away.

Having thus noticed the inhabitants of the hive, we
will now turn our attention to the hive itself. The
most profound philosepher, as well as the most incurious
observer, is struck with astonishment on inspecting the
interior of a bee-hive. He beholds a city in miniature.
He sees this city divided into regular streets; and these
streets composed of houses constructed on the most
exact geometrical principles and the most symmetrical
plan; some serving as store-houses for food, others for
the habitations of the citizens, and a few, much more
extensive than the rest, destined for the palace of their
sovereign. He perceives that the substance of which
the city is built, is one which man with all his skill is
unable to fabricate, and that the edifices in which it is
employed are such as the most expert architect would
find himself incompetent to erect.
BEES. 137

The nest, as constructed by the insects, consists of a
continued series of combs, arranged vertically, each of
which consists of a vast number of cells, forming two
ranges backed against each other, and, consequently,
placed in a horizontal position. A sufficient space is
left between each of these double layers of cells to allow
a couple of bees, engaged upon the opposite cells, to
work without incommoding each other. In addition to
these spaces, the combs are perforated in various places,
so as to allow the bees a passage from one street to
another, thus saving them much time. But it is in the
construction of the cells themselves that the most ad-
mirable instinct is displayed. Geometricians are aware,
that in order to occupy a given space with solid objects
of equal size and similar form, without any useless inter-
sfices, three figures only can be adopted, namely, the

equilateral triangle / \? the square or cube | and

the regular hexagon ¢ >» Of these three geometrical
/
figures, the hexagon most completely unites.

It is a remarkable circumstance, that in a new colony
the design of every comb is sketched out, and the first
rudiments laid, by a single bee, which having disengaged
itself from the swarm, commences the building of cells,
which is then taken up by the other wax-makers, and,
subsequently, by the nurse bees, which give the finishing
stroke to the cells; and so quick are the bees at their
work, that a comb, twenty-seven inches long, by seven
or eight inches wide, is built in four and twenty hours,
_ and in five or six days they will fill the hive. The combs
M 3
138 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

are attached to the roof and sides of the dwelling,—the
hives or boxes to the floors and roofs.

There are three sorts of cells: the first one for the
larvee of workers, and for containing the honey,—these
are of the ordinary form ; the second are for the grubs
of the males or drones, being considerably larger and
more substantial,—they usually appear near the bottom
of the combs; the third are the cells for the females, of
which there are usually three or four, and these are
generally attached to the ceiling part of the comb,
having very little wax in their composition. One of
these cells considerably exceeds in height the ordinary
ones, and they are not interwoven with them, but sus-
pended perpendicularly, their sizes being nearly parallel
to the mouths of the common cells, several of which are
sacrificed to support them. After the queen bee has
quitted her cell, it is destroyed by the workers, and its
place occupied by a range of common cells. ‘The queen
bee deposits her eggs separately at the bottom of each
cell: the egg is of a lengthened oval shape, with a slight
curve, and of a bluish colour. The worker’s eggs, which
are the only ones laid by the queen during the first
eleven months, hatch in a few days, and become little
white maggots. Each is now fed with bee bread by
the workers, very assiduously, and, at the expiration of
six days, having attained its full size, it is roofed in by
the workers, spins a silken cocoon, which occupies it for
thirty-six hours, and then becomes a nymph or pupa,
and, eleven days after this, quits its case, eats through the
roof of the cell, and comes forth a perfect working bee.

For nearly twelve months, the queen bee deposits
only workers’ eggs; after which period, however, she
BEES. 139

commences laying those of drones. As soon as this
change takes place, the workers begin to construct the
royal cells, in which, without discontinuing to lay male
eggs, she deposits now and then, about once in three days,
an egg destined to produce a future queen. The food
of the royal grubs has been termed ‘royal jelly.” It is
a pungent food prepared by the workers for the express
purpose of feeding the grubs that are to be future queens,
and is more stimulating than the food given to the com-
mon grubs.

Should it happen, as is sometimes the case, that the
queen bee be killed, or the hive in any manner be de-
prived during the first eleven months of her existence, and
before she has deposited any royal eggs, the most extra-
ordinary circumstances occur. After a little while, a hubbub
commences, work is abandoned, the whole hive is in an
uproar, every bee traverses the hive at random, with the
most evident want of purpose. This state of confusion
sometimes continues for several days, then the bees gather
in knots and clusters of a dozen or so, as though engaged
in consultation ; shortly after which, a resolution appears
to have been taken by the whole population. Some of
of the workers select one of the worker-eggs, which had
been previously deposited by tke lost sovereign. Three
cells are thrown into one for its reception,—the eggs in
the two other cells being destroyed. The grub when
hatched is fed with the royal jelly, and a queen is pro-
duced. Even if the grub had been hatched and partly
fed as a worker, and had only received two or three
days’ allowance of the royal food, the result would be
the same,—they emerge from the pupa perfect queens
whereas, had they remained in the cells which they
140 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

originally inhabited, they would have turned out
workers.

We now come to that period of the year when the queen
insects, having undergone the change to the pupa state,
are nearly ready to burst into life. It is now that the old
queen mother, losing all her parental feelings, becomes
infuriated : she rushes to the cells wherein are deposited
the future queens, and instantly begins to tear them
open. The guards which surround the cells make way
for her approach, and suffer her to act as she pleases,
whereupon she slaughters the inmates with her sting,
without remorse, and, after a short time, a great portion
of the working bees accompanying her, rushes out of
the hive, and seeks another dwelling. This is called
“‘ swarming.”

Something very like concerted action and foresight
seems to belong to these proceedings. It is always m
calm weather, when the sky is serene, between nine in
the morning and four in the afternoon, when they quit
thejr habitation. After flying about for some time in
a cluster, by degrees they fix themselves on a branch,
form a group there by hooking themselves one to an-
other with their feet, and remain perfectly tranquil.
Then it is that the proprietor may secure them, and
form a new colony.

In this manner several swarmings take place in the
course of the summer between the months of April and
August. A good stock of bees usually produces three
swarms in a favourable season: each swarm containing
not only the young bees recently hatched, but also a
portion of the old inhabitants. The duration of life of
the different individuals is various: the male bees only
BEES. 141,

live a few months, the workers only one or two years,
and the queen only four or five. Such is, in brief, the
birth, parentage, education, life, character, and behaviour
of the honey-bee, and it will be only necessary now to
say a few words regarding the management of these
insects, with a view to instruction, amusement, and
profit.



HOW TO GET A STOCK OF BEES.

Tuy must be purchased, and the purchaser must take
care and procure them of some one upon whom he may
depend. This will save a great deal of trouble. The
hive should be weighed before and after a swarm is
placed in it, and a note kept of its weight, a judgment
may then be formed of the quantity of honey it contains
in the autumn.

The hives should be sheltered by a wall, a hedge, or
a tuft of trees, in order that the bees may get to the
door of the hives with ease. This they cannot do if
there are gusts of air sweeping round it, in which case,
numbers of them will fall to the ground about the hive,
from which, perhaps, they will not be able to rise before
the chill and damp of the evening comes on and destroys
them.

There must be water near the hives, as the working
bees drink a great deal in the spring, and they are very
fond of walking along straws which float in the water
and sipping as much as they want. The door of the
hive should look towards the forenoon sun, and the hive
should not be raised above eighteen inches from the
ground,
142 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

We will now suppose that your bees have laid up
their winter store, and that you wish to share it with
them. We say share it, because we do not suppose
you are so cruel and foolish as to wish to kill your bees.
You might as well kill a cow for the purpose of getting
milk. ‘The more bees you have, the more honey,—that
is certain.

About the latter end of September, the flowering
season is over, and few flowers remain for the bees to
get honey from. This is the best time to ascertain
what honey they can spare; therefore, weigh every
hive, and deduct from it the weight of the hive and the
bees, as ascertained when the swarm entered it at first,
as above directed.

To live through the winter, a hive must have at least
sixteen pounds of honey, and if you wish it to swarm
early, it ought to have twenty-five or even thirty pounds.

When you determine on taking away the honey from
a hive, either for your own use or for distributing it to
other hives, proceed as follows :—

The first fine calm morning after the honey season is
over, go to your hive provided with a tobacco-pipe in
your mouth, a large dish for the honey in one hand,
and a long knife with the point bent, and a goose or
turkey feather in your other. Blow two or three full
puffs of smoke in at the door, then turn the hive upside
down on the ground, so as to stand steadily, and imme-
diately give the bees, who will collect on the edge of
the comb to see what is going on, a little more smoke.
This will stupify them so completely, that not above one
or two will be able to fly out, and they will be so sick, that
they will not dream of stinging you. Begin at one side
BEES, 143

of the hive, and cut out a comb, having first sent down
a puff of smoke to make the bees go away to the middle
and the other side. Proceed thus,— sweeping the bees
off every comb back into the hive with the feather,
till you come to the centre comb. The only nicety
consists in blowing away the bees to’ prevent any of
them being crushed. If the operation be neatly done,
scarcely any bees will be killed. Take the hive now
and replace it on its stand as before.

The next thing to be done is to join the bees, from
which the honey has been so taken, to another hive in
which you wish them to be accommodated, which may
be done as follows :—In the evening, if you look into
the hive which has been deprived of its honey, you will
find all the bees hanging in the centre, just like a new
swarm. Bring the hive near the one to which they are
to be jomed,—get about a table spoonful of raw honey
or syrup, so thin as to pour easily, and have it in a jug
beside the hive which is to receive the strangers,—blow
a few whiffs of tobacco smoke in the door of the hive,
then turn it up and give them an additional puff or two,
and pour the honey or syrup from the jug all over the
bees between the combs, so that they may be quite
smeared over. Then spread a clean linen cloth on the
ground in front of the hive, with one edge of it placed
on the floor of the hive and secured there by two stones,
to prevent its falling, and which will also serve to keep
the hive a little raised from its floor on that side; now
replace the hive so that the edge of the cloth may be
under it while the two stones keep it raised about an
inch ; next take the hive containing the bees, hold it
steadily over the cloth, and by one sudden blow, knock
4144 THE BOOK OF SPORTS.

out all the bees upon the cloth in a lump. They will
immediately begin to climb up and enter the new hive.
If they were to be united without previously smearing
one of them with honey or syrup, the chance is, that
half of both hives would be killed by fighting.

Hives may be either of straw or wood. Bees thrive
equally well in either. In winter the hives should be
placed in a northern exposure, or, at any rate, the sun
should not be allowed to shine too much on them, as it
entices the bees out, who often perish by sudden cold.

You ought to keep at least three hives: Nos. I, 2& 3.
No. 1 is the first or old one, say, of last year; Nos. 2&3
of this year’s swarming, and these must be so managed
as to supply you with honey and the bees with food.
This is well explained in a little book called the
“Farmer,” which those who wish to keep bees ought
to study.

Such are the most important facts regarding the bee
and its management. ‘There are many little works on
the subject to be obtained, but the few directions in the
work above named will be ample information for the
young bee-breeder, and ensuring him lots of honcy, lots
of lessons of economy, and lots of amusement.

THE END.

J. WERTHEIMER AND CO., CIRCUS PLACE, FINSBURY CIRCUS.
Aebieus und Literary otices,

WITH THE

OPINIONS OF THE LONDON & PROVINCIAL PRESS

REV. T. WILSON’S

Popular Sehool Catechesms,

LINDON

- DARTON AND CO,. HOLBORN HILL.
Opinions of the London § Provincial Press

Third Catechism of Common Things, a8 con:
ferring a vast quantity of useful information in
a small space, while the Catechisms of Bible
History and of Astronomy leave nothing to be

desired in this species of composition.”

“There is a vast fund of information, well
adapted to the purposes of clementary in-
struction in the set of Catechisms brought
under our natice by the Rev. T. Wiurson. As
the organ of the scholastic body in the county,
we cannot refrain from confidently recom-
mending them to our numerous friends, espe-
cially to the College of Preceptors, as being
peculiarly adapted to aid them in their new
theories of education.’”

“The Rev. T. Wizsoy, so long engaged in
the preparation of elementary works for the
young, has prepared a series of Catechisms for
the use of teachers, which will save them a
great deal of trouble in their arduous work.
In the central schools of our institution they
have been adopted with signal success, either
as lesson books for the children themselves, or
as text books for the teacher. To infant schools
they will be particularly acceptable, and in
the training of ‘masters and mistresses W1
afford facilities that cannot be too highly
estimated.”
On the Rev. T. Wileon’s Catechism @.

“Tt is not customary with us, being the re-
presentative of a great educational section in this
county, to step out of our way to recommend
works proceeding from every publisher, who
may happen to fancy he can improve education.
and who too often endeavours to foist tho
veriest trash on the public—but the series of
Catechisms, under the name of the Rev. T.
Wuson, present so many features of intrinsic
excellence, that we cannot refrain from strongly
recommending them to the schools upon our
system, as they accord with the comprehensive
character of our course of instruction. To
pupil teachers they will be highly serviceable,

and. to the monitors invaluable.”

“Many works written for educational pur-
poses have great defects—either defects of
method, or defects of subject. In these little
works we have exactly the sort of food suited
to young minds. The little books are very
simple in their arrangement, and are drawn up
with great accuracy—for the purposes of family
teaching they will be extremely valuable.

« Education is a part of domestic economy,
and as such we take notice of educatio
books. Those under our notice by the Rav. T-
Wriison possess many household recommenda
tions. They are economical, for they will save
6 Opinions of the London § Provineval Press

much time to those who teach, and those who
learn from them. They are also valuable for
the great amount of useful—really useful-—
knowledge they contain. The Catechisms on
Common Things embrace a mass of informa-
tion quite unique.”

«We sometimes wish ourselves young again,
so excellent are now the modes of teaching.
Fase now takes the place of hardship, simpli-
city of pedantry, usefulness of inutility ; and
here we have about a dozen little books, em-
bracing every subject of interest, and couched
‘n familiar language so as to be understood by
the meanest capacity, and at a price—great as
‘s the cheapness of book literature—perfectly
astonishing. We strongly recommend Mr.
Wuson’s books to all engaged in teaching the
young.” 7

“Teaching and training are said by the true
disciples of education to be very different.
Teaching referring to the intellectual, and
training to the moral faculties. It is fortunate
for education that they have the means of cor-
rection on both of these important processes ;
for while the Bible and Gospel Catechisms are
well adapted to moral training, the manuals of

Geography, Science and History.
jorge useful in ‘the work of intellectual
On the Rev. T. Wilson's Catechisms. 7

developement. . The Rev.’ T. Wiisor is a name
‘well. known, andthe present series of books
will add greatly to his literary reputation.”

& Those little works, although they mi y not,
be considered of much importance by many,
are by us considered of a great deal. It is the
silent operations of a little worm that forms:
the dangerous reef often fatal to the proudest
armaments, and i is in like manner that often
seemingly unimportant pooks perform @ very
great work in our social progress. The set of
books’ placed before us’ possess many recom-
mendations, not the least important of which
are the very copious mass of facts brought
before the mind, and the very excellent way m
which they are elaborated for the purposes of
instruction, by_ one who shows to have had
great practical experience in the art of
tuition.” .

«Po Infant Schools and to those on the
British and Foreign system, this series of
educational class books wilk be extremely:
useful. They form in themselves @ compre-
hensive set of books. Manuals on every sub-
ject concerning which all children ought to
knw something. » We particularly recommend:
them to the schools under Government auspices,
whether of the British and Foreign, Infant, or
8 Opinions of the London & Provincial Press

National systems. And as regards the pro-
prietor of the private academy we can only say,
purchase them, if you wish to make your
schools on a level with the best educational in-
stitutions of the age.”

‘¢ Few things are more agreeable to us than
to observe the progressive improvement made
in works prepared for educational purposes,
and these hand-books of instruction are such
an advance upon others of a similar character
as to enable us confidently to recommend them
to both private and public teachers. They
embrace every variety of instraction, and will
be the most important helps to the parent in
the very delicate work of home education, to
us one of the most important of all matters.”

« There is we opine a vast difference between
what is commonly called catechetical instruc-
tion and the principle of interrogation. One is
mere parrot work, consisting of set questions
to set answers, addressed simply to the memory
and lingual organs, the other has a reference
to a thinking mind. For this reason we are
led to look upon all question and answer modes
of instruction with great suspicion, but in
glancing over the Catechisms of the Rev. T
Wuson we find so much to recommend, both
in the subjects themselves and the way im
On the Rev. T. sVilson’s Catochisms. 2%

which they aro treated, that we gladly afford
our meed of praise to the excellent pu ications
before us.”

“Nothing is more striking than the great
advances made by education in the present day,
which has at last begun to burst the trammels
pedagogues had thrown aro dit, And it is
one of the signs of improvement to observe
men of high attainments turning their atten-
tion to the preparation of books for children.
Among the many which fall under our notice,
there are few that will bear comparison with
the excellent manuals of elementary instruction
by the Rev. T. Witsor.”

«When knowledge is made the handmaid to
religion, and education is placed on the only
- golid foundation of our English Church, we
have every desire to foster its growth and to
accelerate its progress; but it pehoves us to be
careful what food, intellectual or moral, we put
before the young mind. We see nothing to
object to in these publications, and very much
sndeed to recommend them for adoption in our
achools. They are simple, and at the same
time sufficiently comprehensive for all practical
: , and embrace a round of education,
auch asin the present day seems to be ulmost
necessary, if not indispensable.” “
10 Opinions of the London § Prowmoial Press

“The Catechisms of the Rev. T., WILSON
comprehend many branches of knowledge, and.
all of them useful ; they are well drawn Upy.
and the answers to the questions not of that
umwieldy length usually apperided to them.
We have seldom seen little manuals so nicely
got wp, 0 far as the printing 18 concerned, and
fheir cheapness’ will recommend them above
many others.” | |

«‘ Neyer have we seen 5° much information
in. so small.a space as in these, Catechisms.
They. are multum in parvo, terse, short, clear-,
worded, and clear-headed “ expositionsin little.”
Many persons of mature years would ,

eat advantage sn conning over these works
as refresheners. They are adapted for young
and old, for poor and rich, and have a straight-
forwardness of expression about themthoroughly —
English.”

«Tf we were asked what is the first recom-..
mendation to & school book, we should reply—
accuracy: . Af. we were asked what is the
second recommendation, we should reply —
accuracy; and if we were asked what is the
third, we should still reply—accuracy, Accu-,
racy ; of data—of, facts. These little books
seem. fle truths, and important ones, which
ts to us their most prominent recommendation,”
On the Reb. T. Wileon’s Cateohioms 11

“Jt is dificult to’ believe that so: auch
sterling information can ‘be put into so smalla
space, and itis more dificult still to imagine
that works of such great cheapness could bese
well got up. ‘We are not much in the habitof
passing ¢ritical remarks upon school books, but
we cannot refrain from saying a word in behalf
of publications 80 extremely useful as. these
appear to be.” ate ar
\ 4eQyeat tact, extensive tutorial kmowledge,
«nuch information, a pure taste, a sound judg-
ment roe noticed in these Oatechisms-of
Messrs. Darton “and Co. ‘The editor, Mr.
Wrison, is quite equal to his task, which: he
carries out very effectively.”

«Here we have a number of Catechisms on
Flistory, Geography, Grammar, Botany, Draw-
ing, Music, and many other subjects. ‘They
are not at all like the old sets of Catechisms,
which have afforded so much disgust to. the
‘earner, but they appear to possess @ kind of
iterary or educational vitality, which will re-
‘commend them ‘+o that class'of teachers who are
teaching real instead of fictitious knowledge.”

« «There is a good ‘time coming,’ we may

“safely aver, When ‘we observe. the excellent
‘pooks which are now prought forth from. the
“press for ‘e@ucational purposes. These books


are particularly to he recommended to Model
Schools.’ They are quite on the constructive
method; and the Privy Council cannot 100
strongly recommend them. They will be found
useful from the college to the pauper school,
and amply repay those who adopt them.”

“Catechisms for ing dogmatically we
object to in toto, but when we 8° the great
facts of the outward and visible world brought
before our senses, DY means of interrogation
on the true Socratic method, we are always
ready 10 record the fact, and to offer our
humble meed of praise, a8 We confidently
can do in this instance.” >

children, but for schools of & better class ex-
cellent. ‘The other parts are well worthy the
attention of Sunday schools.”

«The Congregational schools, who very Pro- -
perly are making their stand against Govern-
ment encroachment on the rights of education,
have, we understand, it im contemplation to

»
On the Rev. 2. Wilson's Catechiame: 18

ror a set of books for their schools; we
would recommend these Catechisms as infi-
nitely superior to any yet before the public,
whether we regard them in relation to the

‘Methods are innumerable, both theoretic
and practical, in every branch of education,

in their application ; others starting from dif-
ferent posts in their outset, yet few possessing
concentration and uniformity. When we meet
with this uniformity we always rejoice; and
it is not too much to say that the Catechisms
under the editorship of the Rev. T. W11s0n

quite realize our views in these particulars.”

‘Between a mind taught at random and a
mind educated there is vast difference. As
much as there is between & lumber room and a
store room—book manufactory and a library.
One is disorder and confusion, the other is order
and discipline. To teach the mind thoroughly
‘3 the business of modern education, and we
have never seen a set of works so admirably
adapted for this important work as the ad-
-qirable little manuals of the Rev. T. W1is0x,


1A Owinioneofthe Landon $ Provincial Press

swhich present features of great, excellence in. all
‘heir various departments of instruction.” ,
«Tn theso ‘little works there is more philo-
hy than strikes the eye on & perusal,
and we were by no means sensible of their
‘merits till we gave them a trial ‘in iour school
room: "We ‘have ‘tried them in the wpper class
with great, success, ‘and have no doubt of their
becoming very. popular among our teachers,”

Among ‘the many enterprising efforts of
spirited publishers, few have been attended
with more success than those of the publishers
of the little books of instruction mow’ before
us. ‘Infant schools «in particular have been
much indebted to the name and exertions of
Mr. Darton for very great improvements in the
pictures, lessons, and materials of the school
room. | Nor shave private schools been less
‘under obligation to the same source. We there-
“fore hail the Rev. T Wauson’s series of Cate-
chisms as @ boon conferred not only on ‘the
rising generation but upon the mass of teachers
jn this great empire.”

_ Our attention has been called to a Cate-
chetical series of . elementary books, having
for ‘their objects the storing of the youth-
fal, minds ;with , practical information on,
great variety of matters, including History,
On the Rev. T. Wilson's Catechisms. — 15°

Botany, Astronomy, Natural Philosophy; Music,
Drawing, and Morals of life, and we can bear
testimony to the excellent way im which they’
are drawn up.’ They are both synthetic and
analytic, and embrace the constructive methods
of Dr. Kay Shuttleworth, in a manner which
must be highly agreeable,to that strenuous
supporter of educational freedom.”’ ,

«A! great authority averred that ‘ knowledge
was power.’ If this be true, children: of»
the present day ought to be more ‘powerful than
thei» grandfathers ever were: Of all the works
written for the information of the young, none’
are better ealculated than those: before us to’
implant leading principles and important faets
on the mind. ‘They are to be recommended:
not:more for their comprehensiveness than for’
their not more for their: cheapness
thaw for'their utility.” Hust 97st

“ We have often heard it cherished by the -
modern educationists, some of whom have gone
to France; Holland, and Germany for informa-
tion which they overlooked at their own doors,
that’ Exigland was far behind other: countries in
her educational ar ee but we think that
foreign countries would fail to sent to the
scholastic teacher such a mass well-digested
facts and principles as are to be found in these:
16 Opinions of the Lindon § Provincial Press

catechetical books, which exhibit features of
~ excellence seldom seen in any of the continental
manuals. Short, concise, pithy, and compre-
hensive, they are well adapted to fix leading
sdeas in the mind, to serve as pegs on which
other matters may be conveniently hung.”

«Jn Economic Magazines such as ours,
devoted as we are to the store-room, the
kitchen, the laundry, the brewery, and the
garden, We cannot be expected to say much of
mere book learning, yet we cannot refrain from
affording our meed of praise to the very intelli-
gent set of books presented to us by the Rev.
'T, WILSON, 80 convinced have we been of their
admirable adaptation to all the wants of child-
hood, that we have sent them into the nursery
and school room, and we can re most
favourably upon the important services they
= rendered our governess in her arduous

uties.”” ,

«“ We have seldom been called upon to notice
a more excellent series of works than those
transmitted to us by the enterprising publishers.
It behoves all who have to do with the
culture of the youthful mind, to be careful
what kind of books they put before their young
charge ; for, under the plausible name of educa-
tion, w vast mass of deleterious matter is

‘
On the Rev. T. Wilson's Catechisms. | 17

abroad, but in these works a degree of excel-
lence is attained, rarely to be found in simi
publications.”

.

“This series of ‘elementary works places
religious, moral, historical, and scientific know-
ledge 80 emphatically before the young reader,
that we think no parent or teacher into whose
nands the books may fall, would be performing
justice to himself or his pupils, if he did not
adopt them as one of the best modes of juvenile
instruction.”

« The works under the name of the Rev. T.-
Wusox, although simple and brief in their
character, possess features of excellence not
common to many of the works of this character,
viz., a simplicity of arrangement, an accuracy
of expression, and a strictness. of definition,
which render them well worthy the attention
of the scholastic teacher, who will find them
valuable auxiliaries in the work of instruction.”

« These works are not the mere parrot ques-
tion and answer system of Pinnock and his
imitators, but truly interrogative, and are cal-
culated not so much to teach children to learn
things by heart, as to make them understand
what they learn, by a series of inductive ques-
ronsappealing to the reason and the judgment, a6
18 Opinions of the London § Provincial Press
well as to the memory, which render them.

admirable vehicles of instruction.”

«< The series of works submitted to our notice
in the catechetical form, under the editorship
of the Rev. T. W1sor, have required from ‘us,
owing to their comprehensive nature, a much’
larger amount of critical acumen than ‘we are
able to afford at all times to similar issues from
the But taking the series as a whole,
and having compared them with other kinds in.
vogue among schools, we have no hesitation in
pronouncing them in every Way supetior |
great number of similar works palmed upon the
public as interrogative lessons.”

«The instruction of the young im whole-)
* gome truths and sound facts of i
information, has ever peen held by all thi
men 08 the true pasis for educational develop-
ment. ‘The authors of the Catechisms under
the editorial name of the Rev. T. Winson,,
have we think performed an jal service
to the rising generation by the lucid arrange-
ment, the very copious collection of facts, and
the clever treatment of them which distinguish
the series, and which we cannot but recommen:
to all interested in the work of instruction.”

“There is perhaps n° circumstance that more
favorably distinguishes the modern from the
On the Rev. T. Wilson's Catechisms. 19

ancient subject of education, than. the. sub-
stitution of historical and scientific fact for
flimsy fable. And the success of the teacher
‘3 to be measured not by the number of words
with which he loads the memory of his pu i,
but by the number of facts and princi stab
established in his mind. On these ore
the works of the Rzv. T. Wuson, have been
prepared, and it is not too much to say that
they in every way realize the expectation
formed by a perusal of the intelligent pro-
spectus attached to them.” |

«The importance and advantage of establish-
ing in the minds of the rising generation the
ereat mass of facts with which the eae
day abounds are now no longer controve ible,
and we therefore hail the appearance of a
set of books, simple in their character, yet
powerful as means in the work of education.
These works contain not such questions as are
usually. appended to school books—a mere.
mechanical contrivance to save the teacher the.
labour of thought, but lively interrogations,
springing spontaneously from the subjects under
consideration. Of such a kind are the series
of Catechisms which we have stepped a little
out of our way to notice.”

«The enterprising publishers of these Works
20 Opinions of the London & Provinetal Press

are entitled to great praise for 80 creditable an
undertaking; and one sf very likely to be
useful to society. If extensively circulated,
such a series of books cannot fail to assist very
materially in forming g° and clever men and
women. ‘They are oth moral and scientific,
as well as Historical, and we ar glad
observe that while the facts appertaining to
the latter branches of study are remarkably
correct, the great truths of Bible and Gospel
history are set forth in a manner to comma
our highest commendation.”

«« Books relating to education are now-a-day
so numerous, that our editorial shelves groaD
with them, few ‘ndeed are worthy of muc
consideration, but amons those that occasionally
geem to call for our rematks are the series 0
the Rev. T. Wisox. They comprehend

religious, scientific, and historical. They.
appear to us to be compiled with distinguished
ability, and to leave nothing wanting in the
snstruction of the young. We regret not to
have noticed this series at an earlier period.”

« This series of little pooks for the instruction
of children and young persons, is likely to be
extremely serviceabic, both in the school an
fursery: ‘They are not mere dry facts string
On the Rot. 1. Wilsdn's Cutechisms. 21

together without ordor or arrangement, but a
well considered and -properly graduated course
of instruction, comprehending almost every
subject that ought to come within the scope
of the juvenile mind. They are clear and
picuous, and we confidently recommend
them to the parent and the governess, the old
schoolmaster and the young teacher.”

‘Half the labour, to speak within bounds,
of every educator of our race, from the mother
and teacher to the professor at the college, is
lost in consequence of a want of attention to
fundamental principles and correct data in
early years. Those who use Wirson’s Cate-
chisms will certainly not make this mistake.
Tt is not to be supposed that every teacher 1s
to be a Haller, a Richardson, @ Newton, a
Locke, or a Bacon, but he may be as great as
either by becoming a good educator, and nothing
+s more likely to aid him in this noble attempt
than the use of the series of books at present
under our notice.”

“The arrangement of this series of books
for the young is truly excellent. It is not
desultory as is usually the case, put systematic,
embracing within reasonable limits the elements
of the vast field of human culture, and if
simplicity and exactitude, clear and pointed
92 Opinions of the London § Provinotal Press

examples, and apt and cogent applications of
them be meritorious in a school book, every
little compendium in this series may be truly
said to embrace these merits. They would be
exceedingly useful in Sunday Schools if freely
adopted, and would very much reduce the
labour of teachers.”

“There is no subject more curious in its
nature, or than can possibly be more interesting
than the manner in which nature operates in the
developement of the natural faculties. The:
slowness of the process is apt to excite our
impatience, and the blunders of the bungler in
education and of educational books our abhor-
rence... We only wish that works of the
description above alluded to were more nu-
merous. The Government edueational board
would do well to ayail themselves: of the
assistance of Mr. Wusoy, who: has in this
series of little books, conferred a boon upon
schools and. schoolmasters.”’ |

“The name of the Rev. T. Wrtsow is
already familiar to most of our readers a8 an
indefatigable labourer in the work of | in-
struction. His works generally display the
soundest orthodoxy atid the most correct: prm-
ciples in morals.. We need fear no ill effects
from.any publication proceeding from his
‘Ou the Rov. I, Walson’s. Catechiams,. 28

active, free, and fertile mind, if any, proof
‘were wanting of the skilful application of has
powers to elementary instructions, this set ,of
books, compiled on a, mew principle, would

supply it, and we heartily wish wish them. the
success they deserve.”

“The training of the young mind to ‘habits
of reflection and the speech, toa proper selection
of words, together -with the Storing of the
understanding with substantial, knowledge, are
the most important undertakings either, f ‘the
parent.or.schoolmaster. It was Jong a reproach
to the English that there were but few book:
really, caleulated to subserve ‘the .purpasts"¢
ie. trainer. This series of elementary work

to fill a hiatus in this department of
‘hon, and really leaves little to be wished
for in the way of simple interrogation. We
hope the Reverend Author will continue his
labours in .a field so admirably suited to his |
talents and attainments.”

“(A vast deal has been done for the improve-
mentof elementary instruction of late . years.
Education is, not only becoming more general,
. but, more systematic, ‘knowledge once
to.the memory only is now incorporated with
the understanding, and in the new order, of
things the concise and intelligent series by



$4 Opinions of the London 5 Provincial Press

the Rav. Dx. Wrx1s0%, stands in the first piace.
We have examined these works and tested
them in the gchool-room, and we can col-
scientiously bear witness to their excellence
and fitness for juvenile instruction.”

«T'o bring the outh of our Coun to just
principles and correct notions of things in the

notice the ‘series W now ¢ n
give judgment on 3° one that we can confidently
yecommend, ¢ more irom the judicious

¢ "These are not * dry’ books, #8 gchool-books
usually are, but have @ vivacity and life about

the teacher.
| Happy are the young minds that can be
roughly ; mbued with the principles of universal
On the Rov. T. Wilson’s Catechisme, 26

knowledge from such excellent compem
diums.”

Plain and simple expositions of a vast
number of elementary subjects drawn u wi
great skill on the interrogative or ca etical

stem. Weare not advocates for the cramming
of children at an early age, but when the
various branches of education are 80 happily ~
treated as they are in this series of books,
we cannot but consider their introduction to
gchools of considerable advantage poth to the
teacher and the pupil.”

“The great charms of the Catechisms under
the editorship of the Rev. T. Wurson, a veteran
in Educational instruction, are clearness and
perspicuity. Every question propounded is the
symbol of an idea. We have no accumulation
of ‘ Words without things,’ but the embodying
of mental perceptions clearly propounded ; and
hence these little books possess & character far
superior to that which is usually found in
similar publications.”

« Superficial knowledge is attended with
many inconveniences, and did we consider the
little works before us a8 merely the dressing up
of short phrases on Scientific and other subjects,
to be committed to memory and then eo
wé should discard xem from our school-library

=
26 Opinions of the London § Provinoial Prose

entirely ; but we look’ upon them as of @ far
higher character, and feel that, they recommend
themselves by the intellectual turn which is
given to the subjects by the peculiar talent
with which the author or authors have treated
them for the purposes of juvenile instruction.”

« The eduestion usually afforded even in, our
‘st boarding schools has been far from practical.

3
It:therefore gives us pleasure to find that books
for the young are Now written which, combine
good. practical information and useful know-

edge. Of the best of these are the. works
before us, which are not only well designed but
ndmirably executed, and do great credit both to
author and publisher.” ame
A mass of highly useful information put
together in. a very clever manner. The author
has completely seized upon the way of treating
the human intellect ; he grapples with it in its
best modes and forms, teaches ab it were without
teaching, communicating knowledge in a manner
highly commendable. These works are not
merely questions and answers loosely strung
together, but present foatures of great order
and arrangement.” . f
Really useful. knowledge well communi-
On the Rev. T. Wilson's Catechisms...\ 27.

cated. Plain facts clearly stated. Information
of both a general and a specific nature empha-
tically enunciated, , We have not observed in
the whole.circle.of school. literature a class of;
works so well deserving public and private,
patronage. ‘The Rev, T. Wuson has added to
his popularity greatly by their publication,”
“ Catechisms. of .the Ruy. T. Waitson stand far
before all others, they; will be alike useful to
the parent and the school-master. Our public
schools. would also do well to incorporate. these
methods into their.own. establishments.” . |
“The Rev. T: Wirson is an adept in writing
practical works for the young. These are some
of his best productions, and present in, a very
succinct form a vast amount. of useful know-
ledge—knowledge which should be acquired by
every child. We have always held that the.
elements of History, Science, and Philosophy,
ought to form.a leading branch in) school
instruction.” |
“* The works of a juvenile character, under
the editorship of the Rev. T. Witson are nu-
merous and justly celebrated; they generally
relate to the subject matter of instruction, ‘and
rry withthemmany powerfulrecommendations
to the youthful sindent. In.the series before

’ ‘
28 Opinions of the London § Provincial Press.

us the peculiar happiness of this author in
communicating useful knowledge in a pleasant
manner has not been departed from, while the
subjects {hemselves are in every way inte-
resting.”

, _« The scries of Catechetieal Books under the
Sditorship of Mr. Wusor, the well known
author of elementary works for the young,
appears to be written with very great care.
The more Scientific portions have been it ap-
pears confided to the pens of gentlemen well
nown in scientific matters, while the historical
and religious’ portions are compiled with the
strictest regard to well ascertained facts, and to
the records of Divine Truth.”

« The series of elementary pooks similar to
those of Sir Richard Phillips and Pinnock, but
presenting im ortant features of improvement,
and illustrated in a superior style, comprehend
history, both sacred and secular, Natural Philo-
sophy, Botany, and useful knowledge, with
arts, manufactures, and commerce. They are
well worthy the attention of all engaged in the
important work of education, and can be recom
mended for their simplicity as well as for thei
accuracy.”

«The set of interrogative works for the
young were preceded by some very clever
On the Rev. T. Wilson's Catechisms. 29

compilations by the Rev. Dr. Blair, which
comprise the simplest elementary knowledge
which a mother might communicate to her
children. These little works take up the same
system, and carry it out with great effectiveness,
through the more advanced subjects of History,
Philosophy, Geography, Music, and Grammar.
We can only say that they add greatly to the
deserved celebrity of the works already pub-
lished by the celebrated author.”

‘¢ Among the numerous helps ‘to a compre-
hensive education which the present age pre-
sents to the Parent and Teacher, few present so
many advantages as the comiprehensive and
elaborately compiled Catechisms which have
been forwarded to us by the well known pub-
lishers, Messrs. Darton and Co. We believe
this firm to be the oldest of our juvenile Book
Houses, but these works have all the qualities
of youthfulness and adaptation to the forward
spirit of the age. They are exceedingly well
written, judiciously selected, and clear in their
arrangement, while the illustrations are very
superior to those found in other publications of
the kind.”

“In glancing over a set of books for young
ree from the prolific press of Darton and
.. we have been much struck with # number
80. Opinions of the London §* Prowinolal Press

of elementary books designed for family: and
schoal.inatruction, under the name of the Rev.
T, ‘Watson, they comprise every branch of
knowledge likely to be required even in this
advanced age of literature, and the author or
authors, seem to have bestowed the utmost care
upon the composition. The little manuals of
Botany, History, and Geography, are models in
their way of elegant composition.” »

“We hearagreat deal about useful knowledge,
but, avast quantity of what is called such might
better bear the application'of Useless Knowledge.

are so crammed now-a-days: with all
kinds of ‘stuff’ that the little creatures hardly
know what, to learn; and it really gives us
pleasure to see a set of juvenile volumes fit for
the teaching of Children. ‘There is nothing in
those before us, but, what is absolutely essential
in school. or family teaching, and we may con
poth author. ani reader upon the
suceess, with which the compilations have been
drawn up for the purposes of instruction.”

“Yn the Catechisms presented to, our notice
for Bditorial remark we may say ith a strict
regard to truth, that they are at once the simplest
and the most comprehensive books we have
been, called upon to notice. They include all
those, subjects: usually forming a part of schoo)
On the Rev. T. Wilson’s Catechiomess 81

instruction, and placed in the hands of «ah in-
telligent teacher will admirably assist him m
his efforts.” |

‘¢ We hold all education to be useless unless
it, has for its aim the development of the facul-
ties both intellectual and moral; and we think
that. the works of Mr. Wison are of » cha;
racter well calculated to promote that. desirable
end, and to add force, precision, and intelligence
to the youthful mind.” , . ‘a

‘“We cannot too strongly recommend Wi1-
son’s. set of Catechisms to our _ scholastic
readers. They embody a vast fund of infor-
mation in every department of Literature,
Science, and History. Adopting the, interro-
gative system, the author has succeeded in pre-
senting to the people a mass of: interest
facts and cogitive reasoning not to be found in
any other books with which we are acquainted.”

‘Tt has been said by a great writer, that we
should pour in knowledge gently,--and ‘we
may add, systematically. There ‘is mutch: of
simplicity, method, accuracy, and’ information
in these books. They are strictly. inductive
and Se ee ee tenes .
mind with great facts stre mm.
powers eid enlarge the abe of its adtivity.”
32 Opinions of the London § Provincial Press

“To train the young mind to habits of re-
flection, to induce it to think,—to compare,-—
to reason, and to decide, is the great aim 0
true Educator. Any ‘vorks that will aid in
this important task, will ever have our meed
of praise. We think the works before us com-
piled under the superintendence of the Rev.
Mr. Wuisox, conducive to this important end,
and we are therefore under no hesitation in re-
commending them to all interested in the ad-
vancement of education.”

«The works of the Rev. T. Wuiison are
marvels in their way, for they bring such a
quantity of facts before us, and 80 elaborately
treat those facts with a view to their ready
comprehension, that they take precedence of
all similar publications with which we are
acquainted.”

«Phe Catechisms under the editorship of
the Rev. TI. WILSON are, we believe, written by
various individuals, distinguished in the parti-
cular branches of History, Science, and Art, of
which they respectively treat. ‘The work on
Botany, although merely elementary, gives
evidence of a master hand, while those on
Grammar, Drawing, and Music are evidently
written by professors in those branches of
knowledge. ‘The revisions of the Editor have
On the Rev. 7. Wilson's Caiechisms. 38

been most judicious, and as a whole they may
be confidently recommended as the best set of
Elementary books extant.”

“These works are well prepared in their
most important features, and will save the
teacher a vast deal of trouble while engaged in
the ill-paid drudgery of scholastic teaching.
They are so simple that the meanest capacity
may understand them, so general in their sub-
jects as to embrace all the requisites of school
tuition. They have a sterling character and
durability about them, which argues well for

the authors and publishers.”

«There are from twelve to fifteen admirable
little treatises on general, historical, and
scientific subjects adapted to children of all
ages. They are worthy successors of Blair’s
Catechisms, of which they form an extended
series. They place before the young mind a
vast quantity of information in a pleasing
manner, and may be safely recommended for
general adoption by parents, governesses, and
teachers.”

«The great aim of modern education should
be, in the words of a great writer on education,
not to teach words, but things, by a process of
moral and intellectual training and develop-
34. Opinions of the London & Provincial Press

ment, in which all the powers of the mind are
duly excited and exercised; and of all the
juvenile works before the public intended for
this important end, there are none 5° well cal-
culated to énsure success as the series of Cate-
chisms of the Rev. T. Wuson, to which we
have so often adverted, and which we would
most cordially recommend to the notice of our
numerous scholastic readers.”

« Ag serials for children, and well adapted to
woo the infant mind to the acquaintance of
knowledge, we can confidently recommend
these Catechisms, which, for perspicuity of
style, and accuracy of information, have not
been equalled.”

“Mr. Wrrson’s Catechisms, which have
superseded those of Prxxocx, appear to have
avoided the defects of the ancient pedagogue.
They are written by different eminent indi-
viduals, each subject having been wisely
intrusted to a person peculiarly conversant
with it; but all have worked together in
harmony with the common design, and the
vesult is a series of Catechisms for schools and
families, which not only pring down the in-
formation to the present state of knowledge in
ry ar but convey it in a form adapted
to comprehension of those who have to
On the Rev. T. Wilson’s Catechisms. 35

perform the double task of learning both the
meanings of words, and the things those words
are intended to describe. With such recom-
mendations, Witson’s Catechisms have de-
servedly taken the place of Prxocx’s, and we
can confidently recommend them wherever
they may be yet unknown.”

“The treatise on Common Things is a
familiar exposition, in simple, intelligible lan-
guage, adapted to thecomprehension of children,
of every day matters that come before us in
the shape of Aliment, Apparel. Trade, Chro-
nology, &c.”

“The compendium of the leading events in
English History, Mz. Wrson has ably given
in his Catechism, and his Analysis of the Holy
Scriptures, reflects equal credit upon his
judgment.”
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12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00025.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00025.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:51 PM 00034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00036.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00036.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:52 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:53 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00131.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00143.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00143.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00144.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00144.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00146.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00146.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00147.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00147.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00148.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00148.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00149.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00149.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00150.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00150.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00151.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00151.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00152.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00152.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00153.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00153.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00154.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00154.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00155.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00155.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00156.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00156.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00157.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00157.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00158.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00158.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00159.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00159.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00160.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00160.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00161.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00161.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00162.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00162.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00163.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00163.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00164.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00164.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00165.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00165.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00166.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00166.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00167.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00167.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00168.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:54 PM 00168.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00169.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00169.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00170.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00170.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00171.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00171.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00172.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00172.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00173.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00173.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00174.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00174.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00175.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00175.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00176.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00176.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00177.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00177.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00178.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00178.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00179.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00179.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00180.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM 00180.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM Back.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM Back.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM Spine.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM Spine.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:55 PM