Citation
Little Henry's holiday at the Great Exhibition

Material Information

Title:
Little Henry's holiday at the Great Exhibition
Creator:
Newcombe, S. Prout ( Samuel Prout ) ( Author, Primary )
Whimper, E. ( Engraver )
Dickes, William, 1815-1892 ( Illustrator )
Houlston & Stoneman ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Houlston & Stoneman
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
168, 2, 8 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. ; 14 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Didactic fiction ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Baldwin -- 1851 ( local )
Great World Exhibition -- London, England) -- Juvenile fiction -- 1851 ( lcsh )
Genre:
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Some illustrations signed E. Whimper.
General Note:
One illustration signed W. Dickes, i.e., William Dickes.
General Note:
Date from inscription.
General Note:
Engraved t.p. counted as plate.
General Note:
Publisher's ads [2], 8 p. at end, called: Supplement. Pleasant pages on "Pleasant pages."
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by the editor of "Pleasant pages."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026890492 ( ALEPH )
13573354 ( OCLC )
ALH5348 ( NOTIS )

Related Items

Related Item:
PALMM Version

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








4 ae
: P 4 ; “ es re at
a
te Sasi + deter Sat)
i Af As
as s 2 . s
3 ie Lee Ps a re S
é : fp i es ot 5
/ i : si
7 . b » ; ;
: 5 F
Rs ‘
~ 4 °
Ms é 7 - i
Rte & eae y
7 5. a
E a4 ae ”
~ »- e P,
: : me |
oa *
fee Fé 'p. . t
0 “ site a |
f \
bai a : a .
c 5 A
6) Ae:
| ca fo
bf Ss
Ly a :
‘
P es : S |
, | ;
ad j a . | ,
Pe F pats : = :
re g
Ci
¢ Bg nN
;
A > o
tr 4 Pe . ay ys
* a ss
~ ih pie PY
mt ry x ? s
i pce eee re cat * etait) 5 zi
: hy r 5 er Me ‘ ~ ty
A F a i8
H , Se tte sti Pet ae E
A eS : ie
ay Ii of ee came
€ ce eo ‘
\ iar i







t , , 7
PPro ane Te en ob ere













The Baldwin Library

University
KRaiD s
Florida










Su an ee 5 5aliaiiatea

J (AZetu¥ee/ Pw

Pr wf
/ & | 7

is



‘5 ARR

Mr

ee Se









BY THE EDITOR OF “PLEASANT PAGES.”

LONDON: HOULSTON & STONEMAN,

ice 238



te le

~k

er ae

— e

Se te ee a



LITTLE HENRY’S i OLIDAY

AT THE

GREAT EXHIBITION.

By the Editor of ‘*‘ PLeasant PaGgs.’’



CONTENTS.

PART I—GOING THERE.

Chap. 1. How the Idea Arose.

2. How the Money was raised.
How the Idea of the Palace arose.
How the Crystal Palace arose.
How the Idea was realized.
How it brought fourth Fruit.

PART II—WALKING THROUGH.

Chap. 1. The Plan of the Exhibition.
2. The Lions of the Exhibition.
Tone Goods from England.
he Goods from the Colonies.
The Goods from Europe.
The Goods from Asia.
I'he Goods from Africa.
The Goods from America-

PART III.—GOING HOME.

Chap. !. Theusat» about the Exhibition.
% Lhonghts adout London.
3 Lhougnts aoout PEACK and Brotnerncod.

Ao ww

SPRIAM PSP &





LS: a RN 7 <
aiteesane OR f° « i I eg

LITTLE HENRY’S HOLIDAY

AT THE

GREAT EXHIBITION.
Dart the First.

GOING THERE.

Antrodurtion.

, HAT, Papa,” said little Henry,—“ what zs the
{ Exhibition ? Really, Rose and I have been try-
= ing to imagine what it is. Every day after you
\"'Y/ fee have done reading the TIMES, we have looked
f= over it by ourselves; we have read that there is
a great building made of iron and glass, that it
~~ is 1851 feet long, and—something broad, I for-
get ;—and that there is a nave and a transept. But we can’t
imagine it. How can we get the idea of such a large place into
our heads !—unless—we
“ Unless we see it,” added Rose, “then we might. Don’t you
think, papa, that we had better go and see it? I should like to
know what the people mean by a ¢ransept.”
“ Well,” replied papa, “I can tell you a great deal about









x AS ‘
Ae
i AEA)

Yes 2
fi =

\ a Yi if
sj










4 THE IDEA,

that Exhibition—if you .ike. You shall go there this ver

morning. We will send James for a cab, and on our way ri

give you a long history.”
* * * * *

Here comes the cab, Rose,—it has an old white horse,—see !
That is because he is going to the Crystal Palace, I suppose.
Only, crystal is transparent. Ah, I’d rather not have a crystal
horse! Here comes papa.

P. Now take your seats in the cab.

Henry. Please papa, may I hold this string which is hanging
down in the front.

Rose. What is that for, Henry ?

Henry. Ill show you. It is called the check-string. The
driver has the other end fastened round his fin er; so when we
want to stop him, and tell him where to go, I shall give this
string a good sharp pull, and then he'll know. I shall pull him
up, and he’ll pull up the horse.

Papa. But, now listen to my story of the Exhibition. I
shall divide my tale into several chapters.

Chanter Firat,
HOW THE IDEA AROSE.

enry. What does that mean ?

Rose. Why, J can understand that.

Henry. It means—that the idea—got up !
Yes, that is the meaning. Let us see how the idea of the
Exhibition got up, or grew. An idea sometimes grows like a
flower ; it lies hid in some dark corner of the mind, just as the
flower lies under the earth until it ix strong, and breaks
through to the light. Then it grows until it is very large, and
in the course of the year, you see a great sunflower. So the
idea of the Exhibition came to the Highe=-before the public.





THE SOCIETY OF ARTS. §

Henry. And grew in the Newspapers.

P. And then in Hyde Park,—until it brought forth—

Rose. Ah! a great Crystal Palace.

FP. Or, rather, the Exhibition in the Palace: but some ideas
grow more quickly—they spring up instantly, like the mush-
rooms. We shall see soon.

The idea of the Great Exhibition has been growing ever since
the year 1756.

H. (whispering). Then it has been growing like an oak,
Rose.

In the year 1756, a “ Society’ in London, called THE
SocteTy OF ARTS thought of something. The men of that
Society had once been to school, perhaps, and they remem-
bered that their master had said to the boys “ I want to teach
you to write and draw much better. So, if each boy will try
and make a better drawing than he has ever made before, the
drawings shall all be shown to me, and he who has made the
best shall have a prize!” The boys at school would therefore
strive more to make good drawings ; and, when they were all
shown to the master that he might give the prize, they formed
quite an Exhibition—this was the first Exhibition! Do you
know what we call the act of striving with one another ?

H. Yes, Ihave heard the word, it is called ‘ competition.’
The boys were having a competition.

Rose. And it was a good thing even for those who did not
get prizes, because they learned to make better drawings.

Ff. True. And that was the secret of the sly old master,—
he warted to improve the boys—to do them good. Now, the
Lonpon Soctety or Arts thought, t'iat after boys had left
school, and had become men, and had learned to make other
things besides drawings, they might i prove more quickly by
competition, and by “ Exhibition.” Therefore, in the year
1756, they said that they would give prizes to those who could
make the best carpets, or those who could make the best por-



6 EARLY EXHIBITIONS.

celain, or tapestry ; and some people did get prizes. Soon after
a Royal Academy was also formed formed for exhibiting pic-
tures.

In the course of time, the people found that it was a good
thing to make Exhibitions. So, in the year 1798 the French
made one; and have continued to make exhibitions every now
and then, from that time until this, while there have been similar
exhibitions in other countries: in Belgium, and even in Spain.
The English people have also had small exhibitions in the dif-
ferent large towns. In 1849, the year before last, a much larger
exhibition than any of the others was held at Birmingham.

Hf. Then I suppose that that made Prince Albert think of
having one in London.

P, It was not that exactly. I told you that there is in
England a Society called the Society of Arts, and His Roya.
HIGHNESS THE PRINCE ALBERT is the President. This Society
began a series of Exhibitions of Manufactures, and the first
was held in the year 1847. Everybody liked that Exhibition.
So in the year 1848 the Society had another. This was liked.
even better than the first; so, in the year 1849 they held an
Exhibition which was the best of all. “The manufactures were
rincipally ornantents in gold and silver, and other metals; and
some of them were graciously sent by the QUEEN herself!

And now THE IDEA, which had been growing for some time,
arose. ‘The Prince and other members of the society began to
see that if it was a good thing for the manufacturers in England
to make a competition with one another, it would be a good
thing for the manufacturers of all the world to do so!

Rose. But what a number of prizes they would have to give
papa! perhaps they did’nt think of that.

P. Yes they did. The Society knew that there must be a
great number of manufacturers if they came from all parts of
the world, and that a great many of den would deserve prizes.
But it was worth while to pay a very great sum of money to do



PRIZES. 7

good to the manufactures of all the world! So, the Society de-
termined to give away prizes worth TWENTY THOUSAND POUNDS.
And, when they thought of all the manufacturers who would
try to get prizes, and of the wonderful things they would send,
they began to see that such things would make a truly GREAT
ExHipiTion. Thus the idea arose—gradually.

H. Well, I think that they were going to give away a great
deal of money... But were the Society really going to give all
that money of themselves? Where did they get it from? Please
tell me.

P. That question brings me to another chapter. They
were going to give £20,000, but they had not £20,000 to give.
So, you shall hear, secondly, How the money was raised.



Chapter Secaud.
HOW THE MONEY WAS RAISED.

QYAME are to give away £20,000,” thought the Society, “ but
we havn't got it”; and although they had the Sovereign
Prince at their head they found great difficulties.

tiose. Why couldn’t they a the Queen? If I had been
Prince Albert that is what J should have done.

P. Ah, you do not know anything about it. The Queen
has not so much money to spare as you think,—the proper
parties to ask were the government,—that is, the gentlemen
who govern the nation. But then, the money which the govern-
ment has belongs to the people, and the government would have
no right to spend it in any way they pleased.

H. Then, how did they get the money papa? I do want to
know very much.

P. You shall know if you have patience, for it is a rather
long story. ‘They asked the government that some gentlemen



S THE ROYAL COMMISSION.

from the Society, and others might be formed into “« A Royal
Commission.” They would then have the Authority of the
Quen to promise the manufacturers prizes worth £20,000
which they would collect by Public Subscription.

Rose. I know what that is. I have seen “Lists of Subscri-
bers” in the TrmMEs. The people give away their money.

P. But, the Society could not obtain their request. No one
would advise the Queen to forma “Royal Commission,”—it
was said that the money ought to be collected first.

H. Of course.

P. And then there might easily be a Royal Commission to
give it away. They were now much puzzled. Every one saw
that the answer from the government was a just one. “We
must not” they thought, “have a ‘ Royal Commission’ to give
away money that is up in the clouds! and, it would not be
right to have a Royal Commission merely to collect subscrip-
tions. And, unless we have a Royal Commission no one will
give us any subscription. Yet we shall want £20,000 for prizes,
and £30,000 or £40,000 for the building, and a great many
more thousands for the great expenses in letting the world know
all about it. What shall we do ?”

Hf. That is just what I want to know. When are you going
to us tell papa ?

P. Now, England isa very rich country. It is full of rich mer- ’
chants, and manufacturers, and builders. ° I’ll tell you of several
soon. ‘Two very rich builders, whose names were Munday,
heard what THE PRINCE and the Society wanted to do,—and,
they thought “ We'll help them!” So, they found a gentlemen of
the Society, named Fuller, and they said to him “We think
that your plan of making an Exhibition from all nations is a
— good one; and, if you can carry it out, thousands of people
will pay to come and see it, so you'll be suze to succeed and get
plenty of money. And this is what we willdo. We will lend you
£20,000 and besides that, we will spend £50,000 to make a fine



DIF FICULTIES.—HELP. 9

pbuilding for you, and lend youa great many more thousands for
the expenses,—altogether about one hundred thousand pounds!

H. Well done Mister Mundays! They were

P. They were noble men certainly; but listen! Then Mr.
Fuller made haste at once to take the good news to the Prince.
He hastened to His Highness’s country seat at Balmoral, in
Scotland, and on the 3rd September 1850, at the very moment
when the Prince was going out to hunt the stag, His Highness
was informed of this noble offer.

H. Well, that shows how the money was raised.

P. Not quite. It would not have been right for the Society
to have let Messrs Munday spend all this money for them, before
they knew whether they would be able to pay it back,—besides,
they found that they would want nearly 7'wo hundred thousand
= The ‘ Royal Commission’ was now granted ; and the

rince and gentlemen who formed THE Royal CoMMISSION
FOR THE PROMOTION OF THE INDUSTRY OF ALL NATIONS,
began to collect subscriptions.

Rose. There Henry ! Then that is how the money was
raised.

P. No indeed it is not. The people would not subscribe
aed ‘The appeal to the public was almost a failure.’

ine speeches about this Exhibition were made in London and
other parts of the ‘country; but the people had never heard of
such a thing before, and some who wanted to show how wise
they were laughed at the thought, and the money ‘ dribbled in
slowly.’ Thus the prince, nobles, and gentlemen of the Royal
Commission who were going to collect the money began to
think “we shall not be able to do it,” when another gentleman,
Mr. Samuel Peto, came to their help. He said I will be security
for £50,000; the Prince said he would be security for more
money ; and other wealthy men followed, until security was
raised for Two HuNDRED THOUSAND Pounps. And thus the
money was raised— laboriously.





io IDEAS.— PLANS.

Hf. Thank you, Papa. What is next?

P. You have heard 1st, How the idea of the Exhibition arose,
and 2ndly, How the means arose. You shall hear 3rdly, How
the idea of the Palace arose.*

Chanter Chird.

HOW THE IDEA OF THE PALACE AROSE.




2ES. When any one struggles through difficulties it does
W) him good. He feels himself strong, and greater; and has
» greater ideas. So the ideas of the « Royal Commission”

began to enlarge. ‘There came grand thoughts of teach-
ing other things to men by means of the Great Exhibition ;
and there also came the thought “ We will have a splendid house
for our friends, when they come over to see us. So, architects were
wanted now,—men to draw plans of the building ; and the
architects came. 245 Plans were made ; 188 were made in Brit-
ain; 27 came from France, and a few came from Belgium, Hol-
land, and other parts; and with them there came new difficulties
for the Royal Commission,

The plans were all examined, and none of them suited. So
the Commissioners sent for other architects and engineers, to
make a new plan for the purpose. But when the eople saw the
idea of a great brick and mortar building whieh was to cost
£200,000, they asked “ where are you going to put it?” They
were told that it was to be placed in Hyde-park, but thousands
of people said “no!” Aad the newspapers made a noise ; and

* It may be as well to acknowledge that the materials for parts of this ac-
count are taken from the ILLUSTRATED LONDON News, and the PoruLtar
‘GUIDE TO THE ExuHIBITIION. The Editor has, in fact, made free with every
source of information that he could obtain.

—



MR. PAXTON. 11

angry men made speeches ; and many said ’twas a shame their
park should be spoiled by a large brick and mortar building.
And the Commissioners—

H. Ishould think they were puzzled.

P. Perhaps they were; but somebody was always sent to
help them. Mr. PAXTON came this time.

Rose. What was the gentleman’s name Henry ?

H. Mr. Paxton. Let us hear about him.

P. Mr. Paxton thought about the building. This gentle-
man is a landscape gardener, and he is very clever in writin
books,—and in making houses, it seems. e made a beautifu
gardea for the Duke of Devonshire, and as the Duke had a new
and enormous water-lily, Mr. Paxton made an immense con-
servatory of iron and glass for itto growin. And, when he heard
that the building of the Exhibition did not please the public,
he thought to himself, perhaps, ‘“ Why should’nt a glass
house be as good for an Exhibition as fora house of plants? If
I were to make them one, like that of the Duke of Devonshire
I’m sure they would like it. They could have a house higher
than the trees, and the large tree scould grow inside it.” So, on
the 18th January, 1850, when Mr. Paxton was engaged on a Rail-
way Committee, he hastily sketched his idea of the building on a
sheet of blotting-paper, which happened to be near him. He
then went home, and from his Saud he formed a finished
drawing, working all that night, and working on still at all the
plans and particulars for ten days, when he set out for London by
train to see the Commissioners. He thought that his plan had
been made too late to be of any use, but he happened to meet
in the railway-carriage, a gentleman named Stephenson, an
engineer, who was one of the ‘ Royal Commissioners.’

This gentleman looked at the drawings very closely, and at
last he said “ Wonderful!” but he thought it was a pity they
had not been prepared before. However, he said he would show
them to the commissioners.



12 A CRYSTAL PALACE,

You know, I dare say, whether the Commission used Mr.
Paxton’s plans.or not. At first it was said they were too late,
and then, that it was not usual to build with iron and glass.
Some of the architects who had made the plans for the sg
missioners said it was impossible for such a building to answer,
—that it would be blown down b the wind,—that hail-stones
would break the glass,— that the giass would get loose, and fall
in, and the people of “all nations” would be bruised or killed.
Others said, it would be too hot inside, and the unhappy visitors
would be grilled. The public, however, soon heard of it and began
to speak for themselves, They saw the plans, and read about
them in the ‘Illustrated London News. They read, and
talked, and were pleased. The mighty ‘ million’ shouted out
their opinions again: “It will be a famous place ! a transparent
palace like crystal. Let us have A CrysTaz PALACE!

‘The Royal Commissioners said so too, They said, we can
put it up in Hyde Park, and what is more we can take it down
again,—and that will be a very good thing. Then it was all
— to. Thus, the idea of" the Crystul Palace arose—sud-
denly.

HT. Well done Mr. Paxton, this time!

P. That is what I say my boy! But let us goon. We
have nothing raised yet but ideas. I shall have hard work this
time, for I have to tell you of the raising of the Palace.





















Ne

> “
PENS
NY

Wn

zm

oa, ELA)

iM ole
Ad

eo LTT
SY

gn 14 /

Fm

AH pee TT rae
fe} ateaiiaanneniiautamaian Se COTM me
A ts Annan _ Audit a! Tae

re 34



THE SOUTH-WEST VIEW OF THE EXTERIOR,



15

Chapter Fourth,
HOW THE CRYSTAL PALACE AROSE.

H, how diditarise ? I wishI were a poet, Henry, that I
might make some fine comparison to show you how it
Laity) /5( was done.

How? Swiftly and silently, almost like some fairy scene; and
yet, with labour, as all therest had been done.‘ ndustry’ has
made many a fairy scene, and her secret is,—work ! work ! work!

But how ? how did the great building so suddenly rise ? As the
dry bones that were shaken by the wind came eee ‘ bone
to his bone, so came the columns of this Crystal Palace! They
came from afar: an exceeding great army of iron and wooden-
bones. By waggon loads they came,—girders and trusses,
columns and ribs, of iron and wood. Then, they fitted one to
another, forming a framework fairy-like and fine for the trans-
parent glass. No unsightly heaps of brick! no smoking heaps
of lime! no click of noisy trowel! no great unsightly scaffol d-
ing! All the parts were ready prepared: and as they came
from distant places, they quickly joined together, like brethren,
who knew each other. ‘Thus ranging in square companies
and in long rows, they helped and supported one another until
they were tall and strong. Then were they able to bear up
their curved-shape friends, the giant ribs, who gratefully formed
a roof over their heads, and covered them in from the rain.

H. Well done Mr. ! But who did it ?

P. Well done Messrs. Fox AND HENDERSON you may say
now.

R. Then tell us please, papa, who were Messrs. Fox and
Henderson. I want to hear some more ‘particulars.’ Will
you describe to us, a little bit P

P. Very well, Lam not at all tired: but before telling you





16 TOTAL LENGTH AND BREADTH.

ae the building was made, you shall hear what there was to
make.

Messrs. Fox and Henderson are two of the great builders (or
contractors) who as I told you abound in our wealthy country
you shall now see what gigantic undertakings two Englishmen
can carry on. At the time when Messrs. Fox and Henderson
began the great palace, they had other extensive works in hand,
in all parts of the British Empire. These I will mention
directly. Let us first speak of their work in Hyde Park.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PALACE.

Look at the picture. This Crystal Palace is 1851 feet long.

H. I cannot understand exactly how much that is.

P. Youcan if you try. Do you know the street where your
aunt lives, and where each house contains eight rooms ?

Rose. I know it papa, there are 50 houses on each side of
the road.

P. ‘Then just imagine that, instead of 50 there were 116
houses—then you get an idea of the length of the Crystal
Palace. Itis as long as 116 eight-roomed houses placed in a
row !

H. Then how broad is it ?

P. About as abroad asa street of 28 such houses,—that is
456 feet ; and in the arched part, called “the transept,” which
crosses the building it is68 feet high. There! put it away in
your memory Rose. “ The Crystat Palace is 1851 feet long, 564
Jeet round, and 68 feet high.”

H. But how high is it in the large part papa?

P. Inthe ‘long part’ which is called ‘ the nave’ its height
is 64 feet. ‘lhe whole building covers almost eighteen acres of
= a space about six times as large as that of St. Paul’s.

ou know what a square foot is ?

H. Yes. A square piece of board, which measured a foot



TOTALS OF SURFACE, SPACE, AND MATERIAL, 17

on each side would be the size of a square foot. I will cut out
a piece of the proper size when we are at home.

P. Andif you wished to cut out enough pieces to cover the
whole space of the Exhibition, you would have to make NINE
HUNDRED AND EIGHTY NINE THOUSAND, EIGHT HUNDRED
AND EIGHTY FouR of them, for that is the number of square
feet in the Exhibition. The floors of the galleries measure
217,100 square feet, and the ground floor measures 777,284
square feet. Let us add them together :

Galleries ..........+.217,100 square feet.
Ground Floor........777,284 square feet.

Total .......... 994,384 square feet.

Would you like to know what space is continued in the
building ?

Rose. Yes, please, papa.

P. ‘Then suppose that you made Fig. 1.
a solid block thus; and that each of eI





the six sides was a perfect square foot, a
such a block is called a cubic foot. Ah

Rose. And, how many cubic feet il i
could we put in the space of the Exhi- au
bition ? a thousand? XN

P. More. Cubic Foot.

H. Nota hundred thousand ?

P. Yes, Three hundred and thirty times as much. The
space of the Exhibition is no less than three hundred and thirty
hundred thousand cubic feet, or 33,000,000, as we say. The
surface of the glass measures 896,000 square feet. The quantity
of the woud is 600,000 cubic feet, and the quantity of the glass
is 896,000 lbs. ‘The weight of all the iron is 9,072,000 Ibs. and
the cost of the building about £150,000. These, then are the
“totals.” You must write them down on a piece of paper.



18 MESSRS, FOX AND HENDERSON,

H. Iwill, papa.

The CrystTauL PaAtace, which Messrs. Fox and Henderson built is
six times as large as St. Paul’s. Its length is 1851 feet, (the number
of the year in which it is built), it is 456 feet broad, 64 feet high, in
the nave, and 68 feet high in the transept. The total surface of the
flooring measures 994,384 square feet; and the total space of the
building is 333,000,000 cubic feet. The total surface of the glass
measures 896,000 square feet. The total quantity of the wood is
600,000 cubic feet. The total weight of the glass is 896,000lbs., (or
400 tons). The total weight of the wrought-iron and cast-iron is
9,072,00Ulbs. (or 4,050 tons), and the total cost of the building is not
much more than £150,000.

Now the completion of all this work was undertaken by two
men. ‘They began it at the end of July, 1850, and it was ready
for receiving the goods to be exhibited by about the end of
January, 1851. In how many months did they do it?

H. Ihave been counting,—in only six months, papa.

P. This you will say then is a great undertaking for two
men: but as I told you, they had at the same time extensive
works in all parts of the kingdom. ‘They were making a whole
railway in Ireland: an immense enatiidinn bridge over the
river Shannon: another over the Medway, at Rochester: a
truly immense station for passengers at the end of the Great
Western Railway: a large station at Liverpool for another
Railway: a Railway-station at Bletchley: another at Oxford of
iron and glass, like the palace itself: and several other large
works which I cannot at present remember. ‘Think of that
dear Henry. ‘Think what two men can perform, and when you
have plenty of work to do, never sit down and say “I cant!”

H. WellI won't again. But now, will you let us hear how
it was all done ?

P. Yes; let us leave the totals, and attend to the parts.
We will imagine that we are sitting on the ground, in Hyde
Park, and then we shall see the parts coming.



THE HOARDING. 19

First came the men with theodolites. Surveyors they
were called, for they took a “ survey” of the ground. ‘Then
came the hoarding.

Rose. What is that ?

H. I will tell you, the great boards which they stick up,
all round the place.

P. Here isa picture of the hoarding. Fig. 2.

It pleases me very much; for
those who built this work of art
wisely copied the Works of Na- =
ture, where nothing is wasted. [| |__———=azz a |]
The boards of the hoarding were t- Ca aisle
all used afterwards for the floor = [Vr

of the buildingitself. You may [|| a
see by the picture that it was ee a

not necessary to nail them together. The two upright posts
were fixed in the ground and the boards were lip ed in
between them. ‘The posts were then tied together at the top,
so that the boards were held tight, and could not fall out.

Rose. But, I suppose that there was some waste. What was
the use of all those great posts afterwards?

P. They formed joists,——the thick pieces of wood which are
laid on the earth to nail the floor upon.

H. Tobesure. Don’t you see, Rose, that they couldn’t
nail the boards to the ground? it would be too soft.

Rose. Ah!

P. When the hoarding had been fixed, and the ground was
enclosed, the surveyors once more came with their theodolites,
and measured the places for the jron-columns; and then came
the columns themselves.

The columns were followed by all manner of parts--by “girders,”
“trusses,” ‘ braces,” “ Paxton gutters,” “ sash-bars,” ventilat-
ing bars,” and a great many more things. I have drawn some
of these parts for you on the opposite page.












cc , RA
PT e\\>, .





20

Wy

ij)

=| i

I



)
4

/;

fall

F
eps



Fig. 3.



THE IRON COLUMNS. 21

Let us examine them :

The beautiful COLUMNS are interesting objects. There are
three rows,—the columns from the floor to the gallery, which
are 18 feet 5} inches high,—-the second row rise from the gallery,
they are 16 feet 71inches long,—and the third row, which are as
long as the second, rise above them up to the roof. Thus, the
columns are placed on top of each other, only having small
columns between them, to which the girders are fastened. Letus
find out the good qualities of these columns. Suppose that all

16ft. 7 }in.
three columns had been joined in one, thus 16ft. 7}in.
18ft. 5$in.



H. The great column would have been 51ft. 8in.
too long. It would have measured 51ft. 8in.

F's Yes ; besides the length of the smaller columns between;
and, if they had been made thus long—

Rose. 1 can see: they would have been more likely to bend.

P. True; then another good quality is, that they are
hollow.

H. Then they cannot be very firm. If you havea hollow
friend, you never say he is a firm one.

P. The same law does not apply to iron-columns. Hollow-
ness gives firmness and strength. You know that straws are
hollow; so also are quills. Proheee Cowper was talking in a
lecture about the beauties of these columns, and wanted to
show their strength, —so he cut two quills of equal length, and
placed them upright. On these small quills he managed to
— 100lbs. weight, and then another 100lbs., but they id not

reak until 2241bs. was placed upon them. The quills possessed
this strength, just because they were hollow. ‘This hollowness
is a beautiful quality. It not only gives strength, but gives
them another use—like the hoarding, they are made to serve two

purposes.









92 THE TRUSSES.

Rose. What else are they fit for, I wonder ?

P. Ifyou look at the picture below, which shows the form
of the roof, you will see that, when it rains the water might
settle in all nse ridges, therefore the water must be conveyed
from the top of the building to the bottom. May it come down
through the roof on the heads of the people. ?

Rose. Tobe sure not. Ah! there would be a good plan,—
it might pour down through the columns.

#. And so itis does,—the columns are water-spouts. They
not only hold up the roof, but carry down the water.

Hf. So we may = three good things of the columns:

ist. Their short lengtk gives them strength ;

2nd. Their hollowness gives strength; and

3rd. Their hollowness make them useful as water-spouts.
P. While you may add

4th. Their hollowness also gives lightness.

The columns are kept apart by the cross-pieces called girders,
which are drawn on the same page with the columns—but, let
us ascend at once to the immense girders which extend across
from the columns on one side of the nave to the columns on the
other side,a distance of 72 feet. These immense girders are
called TRUSSES, and as you may observe, contain nine girders.

Fig. 4.



Truss (for the roof cf the Nave )



THE RIDGE AND FURROW ROOF. 93

H. Yes, and on each girder a little roof is raised—they are
like little hills.

Rose. Or Arab’s tents, that is the way you draw tents
Henry! You make lines up and down.

P. They are called ridges, and the valleys between them are
called furrows; thus they form what the architects called a
‘ridge and furrow’ roof.

Rose. And I suppose that in the furrows there are gutters,
or something, that the water may run away to the columns.

H. But you see Rose that the water would run ‘long-ways,’
it could not reach the poles on each side.

P. Ah! How can it reach the columns ?

Rose. Well that would be very easy ; there might be a gutter
on the top of each large truss. The gutters in the ridges would
lead to the gutters in the trusses. (See Fig. 6, page 25.)

H. Yes the gutters on the trusses are placed crossways,—
of course. Then, they lead to the tops of the columns, and the
water flows down them. |

P. That is right; at the base of each column, is a pipe
through which the water is conveyed, as Mr. Dickens says
‘into the jurisdiction of their honours the Commissioners of
Sewers.” I will show you two more interesting points concerning
the roof and the gutters, and then we will conclude our descrip-
tion. You know that, when any vapour rises and reaches a
cold surface, as there is no heat to keep the particles of the
vapour apart, they unite again, or condense, as we Say.

‘Rose. Yes, and form drops. I noticed that yesterday ;
mamma poured some hot-water into the slop-basin and put the
plate of toast on the top; then the steam arose up to the flat
plate, and when we lifted it up a number of little drops fell off.

P. And so it might be in the Crystal Palace; the vapour
which we call ‘ breath’ arises from the crowds of people
below—and if the glass roof were flat, thus ——, or like
the bottom of the plate, then ?







24 PAXTON GUTTER.--TRANSVERSE GUTTER,

H. ‘Then the vapour from the people’s breath would form
drops, and make a shower-bath on the people’s faces. It would
return to those it came from.

P. But by placing the panes in an oblique (or slanting)

direction so _.-———— and so —~——___ tthe drops
formed by the vapour do not fall thus, but trickle along the
glass, slowly.

H. And, when they reach the end of the glass, don’t they
fall off ?

P. No: there is a gutter to receive them, a very ingenious
affair, which was invented by Mr. Paxton, and is called the

Fig. 5. ‘Paxton gutter.” This you will see
is really three gutters. ‘There isa
— one with a smaller one on each
side.

H. And I can see what they are
for,—the drops from the vapour in
the inside of the glass trickle down
the panes, and the side of the wood,
into the small gutters; and the rain
outside the glass pours into the large gutter.

P. Justso; and again, the gutter is a good firm solid rafter,
and is therefore useful as part of the frame-work for the glass.
Here is a piece of the outside of the roof,—you may see the
ridge and furrow,—the Paxton-gutters,—and the “ crossway” (or
trensverse) gutters on the tops of the trusses. (vide next page.)

a Well, then, they are very good gutters. They do three
things :




x

‘s

Paxton Gutter.

lst They support the glass ;
2nd They receive the rain outside the glass ;
3rd They reccive the breath inside the glass.
Rose. They are almost as good as their relations the
columns, One isacolumn and a spout,—the other is a rafter and

a gutter.



THE NUMBER OF THE PARTS. . 5

P. And now if we jump down from the roof to the floor, we
shall find that it also serves three purposes. When we reach
the Exhibition, we shall find that the boards which were once a

Fig. 6.



FA

Transverse Gutter, &c.

hoarding, are now used as a floor, a dust-trap, and a ventilator.
But we have had too long an account. Let us add up ‘the
quantities,’ and proceed.

H. As you say them, papa, I will write them on the same
piece of paper with the totals, if you will please speak slowly.

P. Very well, then, write down

Of the columns there are 3,300. There are 8,300 girders made of
cast-iron, and 358 of the long ¢russes made of wrought-iron. The
Paxton-gutiers would measure altogether no less than 20 miles—the
panes of glass are joined to thin slips of wood which are called ‘ sash
bars’ a total length of these is not less than Two HUNDRED
MILES



26 BEGINNING TO BUILD.

There ! what do you say to that ?
H. Now papa, please to tell us how it was all put together,
if you are not tired.
Oh, J am not tired. When the hoarding was fixed, and
the foundations were prepared, the columns began to arrive.

It was some time before the different parts came, for they had
all to be cast at places near Birmingham, which are a long way
off. A month and twenty days had past away; the 20th of
September had arrived, and only 77 columns had been fixed
out of 3,300. But, during all this time every thing had been
made ready, and hundreds after hundreds of columns had been
cast. Everybody had learned his duties, and was prepared to
proceed, and then came the columns in abundance. Ah, it was
a truly busy scene! if you had only been outside that hoarding
you would have liked to watch the waggons! Every day you
would have cried out ‘‘ Here they come!” and, asthey un-
loaded you would have seen columns, girders, trusses, and other
pieces in abundance.

From the immense and mighty furnaces of the casting works
were brought, in one week, 316 girders ; and also every week, at
least 200 columns. Each casting, as soon as it was delivered,
was very carefully weighed aud examined. It was made to
bear very heavy weights, to see if it were of the proper strength,
it was next painted, and was then carried off to its proper place
to be fixed. All this was done with the greatest dexterity.
“ Each heavy article could be lifted from the waggon, weighed,
placed in the ‘ proving machine,’ lifted out again, and taken to
its place in less than four minutes.”

The scene became more busy every week. As more columns
were brought in, more men were hired to work, and in the
course of a month, (by the end of October) hundreds of columns
_ were rising, and nearly 1500 men were at work. ;

H. But, papa, if the columns were three or four times as
tall as the men, how could the men lift them ?



PREPARING FOR THE GLASS. 27

P. Very easily, by means of ‘ shear-legs.’
Rose. What are ‘ shear-legs’? not their own Fig. 7-
legs I suppose, are they stilts ?

No, nor wooden legs, although they are
made of wood, They are two wooden poles, which
are placed together so : What shape do they form,
with the line of the ground ?

Rose. A triangle, papa.
Fig. 8-



P. Here is a picture of a
column being hoisted by means
of the shear-legs. You may
notice that there is a long rope
on each side to keep them steaay.
At the apex of the triangle (you
have learned what that means,
in Pleasant Pages,) there are
pulleys with ropes passing over
them,—thus you see how the
men pulled them up.

With 1500 men at work, not
only were great numbers of the
eee, columns and girders soon raised,

es but the smaller parts of the
frame-work for the glass. During all this time the glass-blowers
had not been idle. They had lenty to do; they had to make
large and thick panes of glass almost a yard and a-half long and
ten inches broad. ‘They soon found that as they had to make so
many thousand panes, they had really too much todo. ENGLAND
could not supply workmen enough to make such an immense
quantity in so short a time; it was a therefore, to bring
workmen from foreign countries to help. Each pane was made
*n a manner different from the old system, which you will under-
stand better when you have an “ Object Lesson” on glass.










28 GLAZING THE KOOF.

A few weeks, and the scene in Hyde Park was more exciting
still. The increasing numbers of men had worked on through
November to the beginning of December, when the bustle was
at its height. The columns, girders, and heavy castings were
still being brought; with an enormous number of smaller castings
which were erected with amazing rapidity. Other pieecs of
framework, and sash-bars, for the glass were next prepared—
then came the glass, and with it came more men still, to fix it.

H. Yes, Glaziers, I suppose.

P. The most trying undertaking of all was next begun,
namely, the hoisting of the great curved ribs for the roof of the
transept, (see frontispiece) these ribs we shall be able to see when
we reach the Palace. I cannot give you an idea of the great
‘crabs’ and tall “shear-legs” which were used. This most
dangerous work was completed in one week ; sixteen great ribs
were erected, and fortunately without any accident. Then the
glaziers were mounted high up to their work, and soon they were
dotted over the roof, looking in the distance es e the
flies on the ceiling. | When these glaziers worked on the ‘ridge
and furrow’ roof, they worked in new and ingenious machines
with wheels which travelled in the Paxton gutters. The men
soon learned to work quickly, and 80 of them, in one week,
put in 18,000 “goa of glass. One man, in one day, inserted
108 panes which covered 367 feet of the roof.

Thus all kinds of labour were being executed at the same
time, and all varieties of people were seen. There were not only
the glaziers attending to the glass, but carman unloading the
waggons, and workmen raising the roof,—workmen raising
the columns, painters painting them, carpenters attending to
the works of wood, carmen unpacking the glass—crowds of
porters performing odd jobs, while the scene was made gayer
still by the numerous red coats of the sappers and miners which
sparkled here and there amidst the crowd. ‘ Useful men these”
you would have said---“ they have done all the surveying and



THE STEAM-ENGINE AND HIS MACHINES. 29

penne Besides these were the higher orders of workmen,
is Royal Highness the Prince, Mr. Wyatt, Mr. Fuller, the
architect Mr. Paxton, the contractors, the decorator Owen Jones,
numbers of draughtsmen and clerks, with a great sprinkling of
visitors, whose principal labour was, in trying to understand how
all was done so quickly.

But even with so large a supply of men there were not enough
hands to complete the great work; and a new power had been
added—a great steam-engine with the power of six horses might
have been seen—setting in motion several machines, and causing
them all to help.

Let us talk of these machines: the steam was turned on, and
this was the signal for them to work. They were obliged to
obey---evidently they knew this, and had been accustomed
to steam, for immediately they began punching, and drilling, and
cutting bars of iron into their proper lengths. Another machine
had been preparing the ‘Paxton gutters another cut the wood
into sashes for the glass, preparing them by mile lengths; another
actually painted them; while another,—a still more knowing
machine—received logs of wood, and sent them out again in
the shape of long spouts for drainage, with even the holes
for the nails bored through them. Ah! those machines, how
well they obeyed the steam, and how the steam kept them at
work! No machine took the slightest interest in the work of
his neighbour, or even offered to assisthim. The spout-machine
kept entirely to his spouts, and not a single gutter or sash-bar
did he make. Indeed he had no time to try; he was so intent
on his work that he scarcely seemed conscious of having a
neighbour at all.

Rose. Perhaps he had’nt any “ consciousness.”

P. He was none the worse for that. Certainly, every
machine kept to his own business, and so did each workman,
and that is one reason why the building was finished in time.

The conscious workmen, indeed, seemed as active as the



30 WORKING STEADILY.—THE GOODS.

machines ; all worked on steadily, and the great giant---the
dumb, unconscious palace,—rose silently over thcir heads.
“ Wonderful !” they thought as they saw what they were doing
—all wondered at the work of their own hands! still guided
by greater minds than their own, their hands worked on, while
the building seemed to look down from its height, and wonder
how large it was going to be.

H. Perhaps, he wondered what he was being made for /

Rose. And he would have wondered what those impertinent
steam-engines had to do with it, and why their wheels went
round and round without seeming to mind him at all.

P. True. And as through all December the machines and
the crowds of men worked on (for now there were nearly T'wEenty-
FIVE HUNDRED MEN) the great giant of iron and glass must have
stared more still. Yes, indeed! for his masters were working
all through the night, and had lit him up by torchlight! He
must have felt it to be awful and grand when the bright lights
danced through the dim shades, and the men and machines
moved on. What did the machines care for the night ? why
should they go to sleep? ‘They “never tired nor stopped to
rest.” No! each machine still worked and “ pursued the even
tenor of his way.”

H. Poor Crystal Palace! I dare say he felt that he must be
built, and must grow up as large as they chose to make him ; he
could’nt help himself.

P. Yes, and as time rolled on, strange things rolled in.
While the Palace had been thus preparing, beautiful goods to
exhibit had been prepared by thousands of men in aJl parts of
the world. Gentlemen from England had been sent all over
Europe ; and messages had been delivered to ‘ all nations’ say-
ing that this Palace was built for them to exhibit in. Like the
school boys whom we talked of, they were invited to a ‘compe-
tition’ for prizes. Soon they began to try who could make the
finest and best of goods; and, when they had done their best,



ARRIVALS.—COMPLETION. 31

they sent their works over the land and the seas to Hyde Park.
If you had had the proper ears, you might have gone to the top
of the Palace one windy night, and have heard that they were
coming. Great wheels were buffeting the ocean waves, and
bearing ships from the east—great sails were driven along by
the wind from the countries of the west, north, and south; and
the whistling wind, which had crossed thc .cean for thousands of
miles, and had reached the Palace before them, whispered in all
its corners “they come!” Great packages were soon made
ready ; and by railway from the cities of Europe, by canal and
rail from the counties of England, they were sent off, directed
to the Great Exhibition. After that, they came,---and with.
them came a scene of bustle and business, which I could not
reasonably attempt to describe. There were workmen from
Austria and France; men from the Zollverein and Bavaria ;
from all parts of Germany, from Russia, from Switzerland and
Italy, from Spain, Belgium, and Holland. From the far-west.
came Americans; and from the east the men of Egypt, all
attending to their goods ; and, amidst the confusion of tongues,
a work mightier than Babel’s still went on, and by its appointed
day, the 1st of May, the Crystal Palace was finished.

On the 30th April, the night before the Palace was born,
I stood outside and asked him “ how came you here?” soon
I imagined that the answer came back in these words : “ We,
the Crystal Palace, are so bewildered at ourselves, that we
scarcely know how we came here. We know where we came
from. We came from the bottom of the sea, and from the tops of
the mountains, from dark caves, and from mines in the bowels:
of the earth. Then we were called by different names, such as
sand, soda, galena, ironstone, and pine. But some of us were.
melted in hot furnaces, and were cast, and are now called ‘ iron,’
and ‘glass;’ and some have been hammered, cut, sawn, and
drilled. But it has been done so quickly that all we can tell you
is, we are now called “THs Crystan Paxacs.” Thus, the
Crystal Palace arose,—rapidly.



32
Chapter Fifth.
HOW THE IDEA WAS REALIZED.

‘3 I suppose you remember the 1st of May, Henry?
H. Yes, very well, papa.
¢ P. On the Ist of May, 1851, the people rose up
~~ early ; at five o'clock on the first of May the people were
getting up; at four o’clock on the first of May, there were peo-
ple getting up; at three o’clock in the morning there were
people getting up; a few people rose at two, and many were
rising all night long, for some never slept at all. When the
morning came, there were clouds over head, but beneath there
was light-hearted joy. Tens of thousands of men and women
hurried down the streets. Cabs and carriages filled the road,
and all moved onward to the west. From north, and south,
and east, and west ; by steamers and rail, by omnibus and cab,
by carriage or gig, came the myriads of people, and stood round
the Great ExuIBITION.

Rose. Yes, we heard about that papa; the Exhibition was
ready to be opened.

FP. But I think you do not know of all that gave the people
joy. As I was waiting with the crowd, I saw an old man with
an eager face, and a very glad sparkling eye. His head was bald
and his beard was grey ; ‘“ What is it” I said “ that makes you
glad? Is it that you see the Crystal Palace sparkling in the
light of the sun?” ‘not only that,” he said; “ Is it that you
expect to see the Queen, and intend to say ‘God bless her’ ;”
“not only that,” he said; “Is it that you see men of all climates,
and of all colours meeting together with friendly looks ?” not
only that.” “It is all these together that make me glad. Dont
you notice, he whispered, that ell these men have one feeling
toward that building? Dont you hear the Frenchmen say to
their encmies ‘the perfidious English’ “ Brothers! we helped to






THE TALE FROM “ OLD TIME.”’ 33

make it!” Listen how they say “we all have an interest
there!”

H. I should like to have seen that old man; he had some
kind thoughts.

P. Yes, you shall hear more about him soon. On that day
there was a brotherly feeling beaming from the faces of all, and
Pil tell you why. This Exhibition was showing them the
marvellous good works of each others hands, which they had
never seen before, but now it was beginning to teach them
more.—This Exhibition had brought them together, and was
showing them marvellous good-will in each others hearts, which
they had never seen before. For the first time since the world
was made, men of all nations were working together in one great
act of peace.

Now hear what the old man related to me. “ Not forty years
ago,” he said, “I saw the fathers of these men meet on the
battle-field. I saw their forefathers meet, hundred of years
ago. ‘The Franks and the Goths, the Celts and the Moors,
met only to show their hate to eachother. Do you know why ?”
he said.

** No,” I replied.

“Then Vl tell you—it was because they did not know
each other.” “Ah!” he cried, I have seen all history! I’ve
seen it all myself. { remember the first great gathering of
Christian nations, seven hundred years ago.

Rose. What anold man papa! How could he have lived for
seven hundred years ?

P. You will hear. He has lived six thousand years. But
listen to his story. :

“That mighty gathering of the nations! Like the people
around us now, they were brought together by an idea. How
that idea arose and grew! ‘lhe ‘Industry of All Nations,’
was aroused, and was making swords and spears. They met
and heard the idea from the sacred lips of their priests. ‘ Go



34 INSIDE THE PALACE.—~-IST MAY.

dip your swords in blood! Go wage fierce war! Go kill, for
the sake of Christ, the Prince of Peace! Hundreds of thou-
sands are to follow hundreds of thousands; and meet around
Jerusalem, the former city of God, to destroy their fellow men.’
Europe answered with the cry, ‘ It’s the willof God! It’s the
will of God!"* Then, as they promised to go, and to jight
round the Holy City, the blessing of the Almighty was asked
by the Archbishop of Roms, on the first and fearful gathering
of the nations. But the high days of chivalry are passed away,
and those of the sword and spear are passing away too. Come
come with me,” said the old man suddenly; ‘‘ Come to the
Crystal Palace! ye shall see a very different gathering of the
nations of the earth. Come!” he cried, as he moved along
faster, (for he had been moving on all the while), I never
stop! and, with his hour-glass in his hand, he bore me on his
wings over the people in the midst the Great Exhibition.

H. (Whispering.) Rose, the old man had wings! Who
was he?

P. LIknow not how it all happened, but when we reached
the palace, the people inside had seen the sight. The splendid
carriages, and the pomp and show had gone away, and [I found
inside, the Queen and the Prince of the greatest nation of the
earth. There were other princes, nobles, and mighty lords, the
old warrior of the world, with his sword put up for ever—and
the great men of all degrees who had come from thousands of
miles. As I gazed through the bright and beautiful building,
and saw the long lines of faces, the many strangers in character
and in.dress, it seemed. that men from all countries of the earth
hadmet. Had met—not with fierce rage, or flaming sounds—
not diseased and dying with hunger and fatigue—not expiring

under a burning sun outside the gates of the city—but near

a




* Deus id vult, Deus id vult.



THE ADDRESS AND THE REPLY. 30

where the cool crystal fountain played, and murmured a sweet
soothing sound ; near the quiet shade of a noble tree ; under the
high arch of the transparent transept. There, surrounded by the
brilliant trophies of the arts of peace, more beautiful and plea-
sing than the trappings of war, there the second gathering of
the nations began.

The sound of a thousand voices had just ceased to breathe
their melody through the air, to the hymn of ‘ God save the
Queen,’ when the President of the Society of Arts, His Royar
Hicunass THE Prince Arsert, whose first difficulties you may
well remember, arose and read along address to Her Majesty.
It would take too long for me to tell you all of it, but I will
read to you the last and most striking parts :—

Having thus briefly laid before Your Majesty the results of our
labours, it now only remains for us to convey to Your Majesty our
dutiful and loyal acknowledgements of the support and encouragement
which we have derived throughout this extensive and laborious task,
from the gracious favour and countenance of Your Majesty. It is
our hearfelt prayer that this undertaking, which has Sor its end the
promotion of all branches of human industry, and the strengthening of
the bonds of peace and friendship among all nations of the earth, may,
by the blessing of Divine Providence, conduce to the welfare of Your
Majesty’s people, and be long remembered among the brightest cir-
cumstances of Your Majesty’s peaceful and happy reign,

Her Majesty then arose, and replied. Here are some of Her
Majesty’s cheering words.

I cordially concur with you in the prayer, that by God’s blessing
this undertaking may conduce to the welfare of my people and to the
common interests of the human race, by encouraging the arts of peace
and industry, strengthening the bonds of union among the nations of
the earth, and promoting a friendly and honourable rivalry in the
useful exercise of those faculties which have been conferred by a bene-
ficent Providence for the good and the happiness of mankind.

There, dear Henry! Does not your heart feel glad?. The ec
which rose in Christendom more than 700 years azo might we



386 THE PRAYER.

have been uttered again for the cause of Peace—‘ It is the will
of God’—‘ It is the will of God.’

Henry. Peace ts God’s will, always.

P. trae, and so said the Archbishop of Canterbury, for the
eee part of the service had yet to come. None forgot that
GOD was there; and after the reply of Her Majesty, there stood
up—not the Archbishop of Rome, but the Archbishop of Eng-
land. He arose to ask the divine blessing on this noble work.
He asked that it might be blessed to teach all nations more of
love, brotherhood, and peace. Hear some of his words.

* * * * *

Prayer.

And now, O Lord, we beseech Thee to bless thy work which Thou hast
enabled us to begin, and to regard with Thy favour our PuRPosE of knitting
together in the bonds of peace and concord the different nations of the earth ; for
avith Thee, O Lord, is the preparation of the heart in man. Of Thee it cometh
that violence is not heard in our land, wasting nor destruction within its
borders. It isof Thee, O Lord, that nations do not lift up the sword against
each other, nor learn war any more it is of Thee, that peace is within our
walls, and plenteousness within our palaces. Therefore, O Lord, not unto us,
not unto us, but unto Thy name be all the praise.

* * * * * * *

Both riches and honour come of Thee, and thou reignest over all. In thine
hand it is to make great and to give strength unto all. Now, therefore, O
God, we thank Thee ; we praise Thee, and entreat Thee so to overrule this
assembly of many nations, that it may tend to the advancement of Thy glory,
to the diffusion of Thy holy word, to the increase of general prosperity, by
promoting peace and good will among the different races of mankind.*



* This is only a part of the prayer which is too beautiful to be for-
gotten. It is so simple that a child may understand it, and it is there-
fore printed entire, that the children may read it often, and long
remember it.

Aumionty and everlasting God, who dost govern all things both in Heaven
and in earth, without whom nothing is strong, nothing is holy, accept,
we beseech Thee, the sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving, and receive
these our prayers, which we offer up unto Thee this day, on behalf of the
kingdom and people of this land. We acknowledge O Lord, that thou hast
multiplied on us blessings which thou mightest most justly have withheld. We



THE OPENING. 37

Then once more came the sound of the Organ. The thousand
voices again were heard, and the song of ‘Hallelujah’ ran
through the building, while the Queen and nobles walke
through the aisles of the palace, from one end to the other, until
they again reached the transept from whence they started. The
Queen then declared.

THE EXHIBITION OPENED.

P. Just at that moment, I missed my friend Time who had
brought me thither on his wings, and rubbing my eyes, I found





acknowledge that it is not because of works of righteousness which we have
done, but of Thy great mercy that we are permitted to come before Thee with
the voice of thanksgiving, and that instead of humbling us for our offences,
Thou hast given us cause to thank Thee for Thine abundant goodness. And
now O Lord, we beseech Thee to bless thy work which Thou hast enabled us
to begin, and to regard with Thy favour our purpose of knitting together in
the bonds of peace and concord the different nations of the earth ; for with
Thee, O Lord, is the preparation of the heartin man. Of Thee it cometh that
violence is not heard in our land, wasting nor destruction within its borders.
It is of Thee, O Lord, that nations do not lift up the sword against each
other, nor learn war any more, it is of Thee that peaceis within our walls, and
plenteousness within our palaces; itis of Thee that knowledge is increased
throughout the world, tor the spirit of man is from Thee, and the inspiratio n of
the Almighty giveth him understanding. Therefore, O Lord not unto us, not
unto us, but unto Thy name be all the praise. While we survey the works of
art and industry which surround us, let not our hearts be lifted up that we forget
the Lord our God, as if our own power and the might of our hands had gotten
in this wealth. Teach us ever to remember that all this store which we
have prepared cometh of ‘Ihine hand and is all thine own. Both riches and
honour come of Thee, and thou reignest over all. In thine hand it is to make
great and to give strength unto all. Now, therefore, O God, we thank Thee ;
we praise Thee, and entreat Thee so to overrule this assembly of many nations,
that it may tend to the advancmentof Thy glory, to the diffusion of Thy holy
word, to theincrease of general prosperity, by promoting peace and good-will
among the different races of mankind. Let the many mercies which we receive
from ‘Thee dispose our hearts to serve Thee more faithfully, who art the author
and giver of them all. And, finally, O Lord, teach us so to use those earthly
blessings which Thou givest us richly to enjoy, that they may not withdraw our
affections from those heavenly things which Thou hast prepared for those that
love and serve Thee, through the merits and mediation of thy Son Jesus Christ
our Lord, to whom, with Thee and the Holy Ghost, be all honour and glory.





38 BUCKINGHAM PALACE.

myself in the place where I had first met him in the Park; but
how I returned I cannot tell.

H. I think that you had been dreaming, pape.

P. Very likely--however, I remembere all that my spirit
had seen, and I also looked back on the past. I ought
how the idea of the Exhibition arose, and how the idea of the
palace arose, and now I had seen it made real. It was, as we
say ‘realized’—‘ Why’ I asked ‘ was it magnificent ?? Not be-
cause of the glitter and gold, but because God was there! the
God of heaven, where angels sing of peace on earth and of good
will towards men, deigned to smile on that day. He is the
source of high magnificence.

So, when we look back on the Exhibition of the Industry of all
Nations, we may truly think, how the idea was realized,—
magnificently !

Just then, I thought I heard a flapping of wings, and I
imagined that my friend ‘Time’ was flying over-head. I could
not see him, but I heard him singing contentedly to himself:
«“T have seen a grand day to day.” Yes,I cried to him—you
have seen one of the grandest days since the beginning of the
world, it tells us that there are even better days to come yet.

* * *

H. Papa. Here isa park! and I can see a pond. I think
that we must be near the Exhibition now. Shall I pull the
string, and ask the cabman ?

P. No, you need not do this—this place is called Piccadil'y.

Rose. And, what Papa, is that building in the distance
across the park ?

P. That is Buckingham Palace, where Her MAJESTY THE
QUEEN lives. This park is called the ‘Green Park;’ we shall
soon reach Hyde Park. Here is alittle drawing for you by
which “aa may see where we are, and what is the exact position
of the building.—See next page.



THE GOLDEN FRUIT. 39



Fig. 8.

ay.

Ppnererretne CB pepenn pase
nan hiram Anh ita A

ryt

Bitiiannaniin wn



-nnsemionitiniiinilaeitindasmsnnnt ftilisannshnaaiacigiithinii le aces

H. Yes, we have to pass Hyde Park Corner; and go up the
road to Knightsbridge. Have you finished your story, Papa ?
P. Not quite. Listen—

Chapter Stith. —
HOW IT BROUGHT FORTH FRUIT.

OME plants bring forth finer fruit than others. Just as
a sun-flower is like a golden flower—there are fruits called
= ‘ golden fruits.’

Rose. Yes. I have often read about golden fruits.

P. And such are some of the fruits of the Exhibition. It
has begun by bringing forth golden fruit in aremarkable degree.
Round medals of gold, called sovereigns, have rolled in every
day, in amazing numbers. They have been gathered from the
great crowds of people who have come to see it.

Here is a correct account of the large sums of money which
have been taken since the Exhibition was opened.—(See next
page.)



40

For ‘Season Tickets,’ to June 7th ......

DAILY RECEIPTS, ETC.

oa oe

Thursday 1
Friday .....-22 » 2
Saturday .....- », 3
Monday ...-.- 5, 9
TUE .cccccs pp §
Wednesday .... ,, 7
Thursday ..-- » 8
| a
Saturday ..... ,, 10
Monday .....- », 12
BOOOERY cccsee pp 13
Wednesday .... ,, 14
WMROEOT occsns gy 88
DE se snsvse op 16
Saturday ...... 5, 17
Monday ve
Teeedey ....00.00 99: 20
Wednesday .... ,, 21
Thursday ...... 5, 22
Priday ccscccce 9, 28
Saturday ...... ,, 24
Monday ...... ,, 26
RMOOERT: 66 ic doc 5) 27
Wednesday .... ,, 28
Thursday ....--. 5, 29
Friday ....c00+ 5, 30
‘Saturday .....- ,, 31
Monday ......June 2
Tuesday .:.... os oe
Wednesday. .. ,, 4
Thursday......-,, 5
BO ose cond HE
| PP FO me



Season Tickets only adraitted.

ll. £560 0 0
ll. 482 0 0
58. 1,362 0 0
58. 1458 0 0
5s. 1,790 0 0
5s, 2,018 0 0
55. 1,824 10 0
58. 1,843 15 0
5s. 1,597 10 O
58. 2,229 10 0
58. 2,064 15 O
5s. 2,426 0 0
58. 2.556 10 0
58. 2472 8 0
58. 2,345 0 0
58. 3,512 5 O
5s. 3,797 11 0
5s. 4,095 10 0
5s. 5,078 0 0
Is. 926 2 0
1s. 1,347 17 0
Is. 1,859 4 0
Is. 2,375 18 O
ged tee ee
1s. 2,129 1 O
1s. 2.415 2 0
Is 2,500 16 0
ls. 2,566 17 O
2s. 6d. | 2,558 11 0
5s. 1,506 10 0

65,976 13 0



£137,697 13 0

is



—-—-—e



TOTAL RECEIPTS TO JUNE 7th. 4]

Besides all this money, the subscriptions which you may re-
member, were collected by the Royal Commission, amounted
to £64,344. The Commissioners also received £3,200 from
Messrs Spicer, and Clowes, for the privilege of printing and
selling the Catalogues; also, for the privilege of supplying the
refreshments, £5,500 was paid. Suppose we add these accounts
to the larger one.

£137,697 13 0
64,344 0 0
33200 0 0
5,500 0 0
£210,741 13 0

H. What, papa, are the season tickets,’ for which so mucn
money was paid ? :

P. A ‘season ticket’ is a ticket which will admit the owner
to see the Exhibition on any day during the season in which it
is open. They cost £3 3s. each; I may as well tell you, also,
that only those people who possessed ‘Season Tickets,’ were admit-
ted on the 1st of May. All who went there on the 2nd and 3ra
May, paid £1 ; and all who went during the next three
weeks, paid 5s. each for admission. On what day of the month
would the three weeks after the 8rd May end?

H. ‘Twenty-one days after, that would be the 24th May.

P. True; and, since the 24th May, the rule has been that
all who go to the Exhibition on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,
or Thursday, shall pay 1s. each; those who go on a Friday, are to
pay 2s. 6d. and those who goon a Saturday, must pay 5s. each.

Now, by this list of the monies paid, you can easily tell how
many people have visited the Exhibition. How will you do so?

A. We will multiply the money received on the shilling
days by twenty, because every pound admitted — people ;
for the number on the half-crown days, we will multiply the
pounds by eight, because each pound paid for eight people; and
the money received on the 5s. days, we will multiply by four,
andsoon. Then we will add up all the numbers.



42 CIVILIZATION.—THE CRUSADES.

P. You may do so to-morrow; and the exercise shall form
your arithmetic lesson.

But this golden fruit, is not the best fruit of the Exhibi-
tion. Do you remember, what old Trme said of the first gath-
ering of the nations—of the Crusades ?

Rose. I, do, papa.

P. Now, when men write the History of Europe, and speak
of the Crusades, they show that out of evil came good, that na-
tions gained new ideas, they learned much of each other, and
much from each other. Thus, they became more ‘civilized.’
—‘ Civilization!’ that is a long word.

HT. Yes, it is, rather.

P. But suppose that you find out its meaning. And you
will understand what, in future days men will say, when they
write the History of Civilization. If from the gathering of men
for war, there came forth new ideas, how many new and bright
thoughts must be gained from this gathering for Peace. They
are its best fruits, and are now being gathered to be scattered
amongst ‘all nations.’ Ah! these fruits will last longer than
the golden ‘fruit.’ They will reach the very corners of the
earth, and will make refreshing gladness for weary spirits. So,
the bright gold coins, and still brighter thoughts from the Great
Exhibition, will show how it brought forth fruit—abundantly.

H. Papa, I think we are near the Palace. Look at the
number of empty cabs; here they come! two—four—seven—
ten; I think I could count a hundred in five minutes, and they
are all coming from the Exibition !

Rose. And the omnibuses which are coming from there.
Look! they are all empty. And how slowly we are moving
now! the horse cannot go on because of another cab in front.

H. Yes, I heard a policeman tell the driver to keep in the line.

P. Then we had better walk the rest of the way. You may
pull the ‘check string’ now Henry, and we will get out.





SS AEA y ISL AME
soe Eisele 268 gan =
ut the Secant.

WALKING THROUGH.

Chater Seventh.
THE TRANSEPT.
se A 5 7A, O CHANGE GIVEN. Read that,
ea) 62 Rose!” said Henry. “I suppose that
ec ( that is because it would take too
ce S much time, and we should have to wait.
4 \2 Keep close to me, I have taken hold of
w Papa’s coat. Now we are inside!
he \29 Rose. Oh!
: iS 7* % P. What do you say to it Henry ?
Henry. Oh! (Vide Frontispiece.)
P. Well what do you think of it ?
Henry. ve not begun to think, Papa. Iam looking. What
a large place it is! Is the roof really as high up as that P
P. Ido not know what height you mean by ‘that.’ It is
about as high as it seems to be !
' Rose. But, papa, there do not seem to be many people. I

cannot see a crowd.
P. There are I believe more than thirty thousand people











SS AEA y ISL AME
soe Eisele 268 gan =
ut the Secant.

WALKING THROUGH.

Chater Seventh.
THE TRANSEPT.
se A 5 7A, O CHANGE GIVEN. Read that,
ea) 62 Rose!” said Henry. “I suppose that
ec ( that is because it would take too
ce S much time, and we should have to wait.
4 \2 Keep close to me, I have taken hold of
w Papa’s coat. Now we are inside!
he \29 Rose. Oh!
: iS 7* % P. What do you say to it Henry ?
Henry. Oh! (Vide Frontispiece.)
P. Well what do you think of it ?
Henry. ve not begun to think, Papa. Iam looking. What
a large place it is! Is the roof really as high up as that P
P. Ido not know what height you mean by ‘that.’ It is
about as high as it seems to be !
' Rose. But, papa, there do not seem to be many people. I

cannot see a crowd.
P. There are I believe more than thirty thousand people









44 LOOKING AT THE NAVE.

here, which number you know is three hundred hundred; but
there is plenty of room for them, because the building is so
large. Come and see what a large place it is.

H. Don’t you remember the description, Rose? “33,000,000
cubic feet ?”

Rose. Ah, but then we only heard the number, it is so
very different now that we see the place—wait! I feel rather
‘nervous.’

P. But you have not seen it yet. Let us walk a little further
—to yonder glass fountain—then you will see the nave, which
will give you some idea of the length of the building.

Now, Rose!—from this fountain, you can see one of the
1ong aisles—how beautiful it is!

Rose. And how very long!

P. But that is only half the length of the building. That
is the eastern side of the nave—turn round and look in the
opposite direction. ‘This aisle which is of equal length, is the
western nave. You thus see what is meant by 1851 feet.

Before we begin our walk, you may iook at this little drawing
which will shew you the two principal aisles.




Fig. 9.
NORTH
ne
a
hal
”

NAVE ° NAVE
- 3
<
a
kK



SOUTH



THE ARRANGEMENT OF THE SPACE. 45

The side, at which we entered from the Knightsbridge Road,
is the south side, This opposite end of the transept is of course—

H. The north side. So the TRANSEPT extends from South
to North.

P. And the NAvE, Henry, extends you may see from east to
west. The western half of the nave, contains the objects sent
from different parts of Britain, and from her colonies. The
eastern half of the nave, contains the objects sent from different
parts of the WoRLD—from Foreign Countries.

H. And who does the transept belong to Papa?

P. Its two sides are divided between the British Exhibi-
tors and the Foreigners. On this, the western side are goods,
principally from India, a colony of Great Britain. On the
eastern side are goods from Tunis, Persia, and other Foreign parts.

Hf. Yes. There is the name PERSIA, hanging on that long
piece of red cloth; and INDIA, is printed on the opposite side.

FP. When the Royal Commissioners wanted to arrange the
divisions of the building, they decided that the middle of this
transept, should represent the middle of the world; and that
the western side should represent England and her colonies,
while the eastern side should represent the remainder of the
world. 7

Hf. J understand the arrangement very well Papa. Do you
Rose ?

Rose. Which do you mean ?

P. Why Rose, you have been looking at the foungain all the
time. I don’t think you have heard a word.



46 THE FOUNTAIN AND TREES.

Rose. Is it not pretty? See how the water dances !

H. Beautiful! And look at the statue of the Queen, on
horseback. The other statue is Prince Albert’s, I suppose.

P. These statues are those made by Mr. Wyatt. ‘The
Illustrated London News,’ says that they are not such good
statues as Mr. Wyatt can make, and he should have kept them
at home.

H. Well. JZ do’nt think so. I think that he was a good
man to make statues of the Queen and the Prince. It shows
that he thought more about them than of any one else.

Rose. Oh, but is it not all beautiful papa? I feel so glad!
Look, Henry, at the fine broad old tree. How fresh the green
leaves look! They make nice quiet shadows. And here are
some foreign trees, nearer.

And there !—there is a very pretty fountain, making a round
sheet of water, just the shape of the glass-case on our mantel-
piece, and Rose! peep through those iron-gates ?—there is some-
body selling cakes!

P. Refreshments, we call them Henry, that is ‘the Refresh-
ment department.’ Let us begin our walk.

Rose. Oh wait one minute, papa, please! I---I see some-
thing. What is that great shawl, hanging up in the gallery?

P. That, Rose, is nota shawl. Itis alarge carpet. It was
designed by agentlemen named Papworth; and it is 30 feet long
and 20 feet broad. When the designer had made the pattern
for the whole carpet, he divided it into about 150 squares.
These square pieces of pattern, were then sent to about 150



THE QUEEN'S CARPET. 47

different ladies ; and each lady worked the pattern of her square
in Berlin wool. As soon as the pieces were returned, they
were all united, and formed the large carpet you see hanging
up there.

f. Henry, I wonder how much the ladies were paid for
their trouble!

P. Not anything.

H, Oh, I suppose then, they are to be paid when it is sold.

P. No they did not work for money, but for love. The
carpet was made, as a present for the Queen. They made it
because they loved the Queen. They felt it an honour to be
able to please Her Majesty. Ladies will always work more for
love than for money,

Rose. And so will little girls, papa. Ido. But there are
plenty more carpets hanging up. Look all the way down there,
Henry! See, there is something covered with gold ornaments,
how the sun-light sparkles on it; my eyes are so dazzled—there,
I cannot see!

P. You are like the gentleman who passed me just now.
I heard him declare that he could not see anything

HT. Then, he was blind.

P. No; he meant that as soon as he began to look at one
object, his attention was drawn to another; and that before he
could look well at that, his eye saw something else more
beautiful; so he had not seen anything—properly.

Hf. Well, I can see plenty of things. Look at the ships
and boats, under the word Inpra. See what a number of



9

48 NO ‘f KICKING UP A DuUsT!

statues there are! There is a curious statue---the man has a
sword! what is he going to do to that little boy? Look at the
beautiful silk curtains (or shawls) in India! And, what can
that thing be--- over there!

P. You may well ask strange questions, Henry. Before we
walk down the nave, you may just look at the parts, mentioned
in my description. The large arches over your head, are the
great transept ribs which I spoke of. You can see now the
three iron columns, above one another, and the cross-pieces or
‘ girders.’

Rose. And you said papa, that you would tell us something
about the floor.

P. Yes. Look atit. You observe the planks are not close
together. There are large spaces between them, and through
these spaces the dust falls.

H. Ah! So that no one can ‘kick up a dust’—in this
palace!

P. No—it is all kicked down. And these same spaces also
serve to admit fresh air into the building: thus as I told
you, the planks have been useful in four ways—as hoarding,
flooring, dust-traps, and ventilators. Mr. Paxton, I believe,
remarked that the fine machines he had prepared for sweep-
ing the floors are not necessary, as the floors are kept clean
by the long dresses of the ladies. Look at that lady in a
blue silk gown, walking across the nave.

Hl. Well, you see what a beautiful place it is, to have
such fine ladies for its crossing sweepers,



THE ROYAL PORTRAITS, 49

Rose. And now you understand, Henry, why no one may
‘kick up a dust’ in the Palace of Peace. The ladies won't let
them do it.

P. Come, Rose, I see you are not nervous now, we will
walk down the long aisle, and take a general view.

Chapter Gighth.
THE ‘LIONS’ OF THE WESTERN NAVE.
$a14!4 shall notice only the most striking objects at first, the

e y lions of the Exhibition as they are called,
0) ys, HI. That is to show that they are the fincst I
suppose.

P. We will first travel eastward. Here are





I. Tue Porrrarrs or HER MAJESTY AND THE PRINCE.

Rose. Ah! here is the Queen !

P. No, it is only Her Majesty’s portrait—but it is a very
pretty painting. The companion picture of THE PRINCE ALBERT
is on the other side. Both portraits are painted on china.
These portraits are exhibited by Her Majesty—but the next
object is attracting more attention.

Rose. Do you mean, papa, this cage looking like our
parrot’s brass cage? I do not see anything in it.

FP. Indeed, there is something inside, which, if it could be
sold for the value set upon it, would pay for the whole Crystal
Palace; and for twélve more Crystal Palaces besides. Here is



50 THE KOH-I-NOOR'S ‘“‘ PROPERTIES.”

the inside’ for you to look at. Three diamonds! The large
middle one is called—the ‘ Koh-i-noor.’

Il. Tue Kou-1-Noor DIAMOND.

Rose. Papa; you are joking. How can you squeeze so
much value into such a little thing? Howcan it hold the worth
of 896,000 lbs. of bright glass in that little space ?

H. Besides the worth of the Zron, how much is a Crystal
Palace worth ?

P. About a hundred and fifty thousand pounds. Now
multiply that by thirteen.

H. Answer. Nineteen hundred and fifty thousand pounds.

P. And the Kon-1-Noor, is said to be worth TWENTY
HuNDRED THOUSAND Pounps, or £2,000,000, as we say. But
such a value is not a real one; itis the value set on it by men—
an artificial value we call it.

H. Itis a very remarkable thing, papa; what makes it so
valuable ? |

P. Five qualities which it possesses.

Ist. ‘Its brightness. 4th. Its scarceness.
2nd. Its hardness. 5th. Its size.
3rd. Its transparency.

The lustre of a diamond is its chief beauty, the second quality
the hardness renders it useful, for it is harder than any other
substance. The hardness assists to preserve its beauty,—if it
were soft it would more easily become tarnished. Its beauty is
increased by its third quality transparency, and its clearness from





KOH-I-NOOR.







THE KOH-I-NOOR’S VALUE AND HISTORY. 53

colour. Its beauty and use, however, would not give it this
great value. Suppose that diamonds were as plentiful as glass ?

H. No. It is the fourth quality, scarcity, which gives it
value. -

P. True, and the fifth one increases it. A diamond’s value
grows with its size.

You have, I dare say, seen an ounce weight; a penny often
weighs an ounce. If an ounce were divided into 150 parts, we
should call each part a carat. And it is by these little weights
that diamonds are measured. A diamond weighing 3 carats, is
worth £72—weighing a 100 carats, it is worth £80,000.

Hard as the diamond is, it may be acted upon by fire. Diamonds
have been burnt—burnt to ashes—or rather, to a black powder
—called charcoal. Think of that beautiful diamond, being
changed by fire into charcoal! It is composed of the same
substance, called ‘ carbon.’

Rose. But papa, how can it —_— so P—the particles of
charcoal are black !

P. And so are the particles of many a transparent thing.
The diamond is really only black particles of carbon, arranged
in such a manner that the light can pass through them—and
arranged so close-together, that the diamond is very hard. By
burning it, the arrangement of its particles is altered, and thus it
is transparent no longer.

HH, Where did the Queen find it papa?

P. It was givento Her Majesty. I almost forget its history,
but it would be too long for me to relate now. I, believe it



54 THE PRINCE OF WALES'S SHIELD.

belonged to some Persian Monarch—and was taken from him
by one of the GREAT MoGuLs who ruled India. 1t was then
stolen, or taken by force, from the great town of Delhi, by other
Hindoos; and in the last war, between the British and the
Sikhs, it was taken from Runjeet Singh, and presented to Her
Majesty. You know, I suppose, that Koh-i-noor means ‘Moun.
tain of Light.’ There are other diamonds in the Exhibition,
which we will talk of one day.

H. Here papa, is a beautiful circular shaped thing made
of whitish metal.

P. Yes, thatis exhibited by the Prince of Wales. It is

III. Prince or WALES’s SHIELD.

This shield was the gift of the King of Prussia, who was the
Prince’s godfather, when he was baptized. Look at the centre!
Here is a cross, and a beautiful head of our Saviour in the
middle.

Rose. And, who papa, are these four men? there is one at
each end of the cross.

P. They represent the four Evangelists, Matthew, Mark,
Luke, and John, who are supposed to be writing the gospels, or
accounts of what they have seen and heard of our Saviour.
We have not time to examine the shield now. You may ob-
serve the engravings of the twelve apostles, and the pictures to
teach Faith, Hope and Charity; it is a beautiful shield. Let
us pass on.

| IV. Spanish WINE JAR.
P. Here is a great Jar!



a















is *
. - ite
me =~

=
ne =
4 .

ke









ees





SPAIN. —INDUSTRY. 57

H. But you do not call this ugly thing one of the ‘Lions,’
papa P |

P. Yes I do—because it teaches me something. It makes
me think. This great jar is a wine-cooler, and is sent from
Spain. That country being at the very south of Europe, and
opposite to Africa, has a very warm climate. When the wine
has been made it must be kept cool, therefore it is poured into
jars like these, which are put down in the earth.

Rose. But what were you thinking about it, papa ?

P. I was thinking that it might teach us a sad truth:—
Riches may lead to poverty.

The Spaniards, with the gold they once procured from
America, were the richest nation in Europe. They were so
rich that many found they need not work to live—they became
» gentlemen’ and ‘grandees.’ But too many, when they thus
gained gold, lost the habit of industry.

Hf. Which is worth more.

P. Certainly. The people have never been very industrious
since; and this jar reminded me of the fact. The wine-manu-
facture is perhaps the principal one in Spain. Living under a
beautiful climate, if the people worked hard, and cultivated the
soil, it would yield them great riches, but no, that would cost great
labour! and the grapes grow there without trouble. Again,
the processes of pressing the grapes, and fermenting their juice,
are so simple, that the wine-manufacture is very easy. Another
source of riches in Spain, is tobacco, which is also easily culti-
vated, and manufactured; but, the manufactures which require
great industry, and attention, are not flourishing.



58 MANUFACTURES OF SPAIN.

Their merino sheep yield a fine and peculiar wool but the
greater part is exportedas ‘raw material.’ The metals of Spain
ought to yield much wealth. Long before America was dis-
covered, the Romans used to speak of this country, and of
the household articles made of silver. The Phoenicians when
they visited Spain, are said to have left their bronze anchors
here, and to have supplied their places with silver, loading their
ships with it,—but now, very few mines in the country are
worked. The great quicksilver mine is the most important.

Rose. "What are the manufactures of Spain ?

P. Not such as please me. In Toledo, the town from which,
I believe, this jar was sent, the hardest and sharpest of sword-
blades are made. ‘The Government of the country carry on this
manufacture, and that of tobacco, and gunpowder.

Think, Henry—wine, tobacco, gunpowder and swords! Men
may one day learn to discard them all! The wine manufac-
ture is no better than the other three, for wine may lead to
drunkeness ; and “ drunkeness kills more than the sword.”

Oh, when we talk of the fruits of this Exhibition, well may
we be glad! Many a Spaniard may learn in this building, from
the works of other nations, what industry is worth,—so, should
there be another Exhibition in 1951, perhaps, Spain may be
represented by far more noble things than this great wine-cooler!

Beautiful Spain! Thou ancient land of sunny clime, and fruit-
ful soil! may thy people gather new thoughts from here, and
may they learn how to shine forth once more, with higher, truer
glories then those of the Moor, and the ‘ olden time’! Let us
pass on again.






— ===



SS ee nee

E:WHIMPER.S¢.



H
Palit i
i U, OR = ,
ij / Sas TMT i
fe / /, Y} a = J. y , ma lk i
thf //, S62") . Le re
Vi Yy yD eT PA | | as (Li IAA) | a uf i
| In aa ae VUE V7 SL aly lp haf Lad ig, mien — $1) 5, we
a o = ath

. - ”%, GA #2 J >
a a ay ae, : -
AGL ‘ fi ¥ (J Sof 478
\h SG 4 ‘ 4 ' :
. tas Fae
ewe apes JM

Ss iD tI
d ty
yrs x oe p ;
. a —A! ‘ 4 j
Lf Ulan WEE, AA
\ = ;= ye SS | ‘
‘

; Xs A
=





Re -



= "S
ee -- > =
Sy nah = a. 5 sz
ia = 2 =i t
ACE geet rms a 3)
Byes Bs =) n
. . =
a yy

<= , Sse VW A
‘n S Ht ne’ ) ‘
ee BOS gli er i ieereertoc
NS SSS} Ae =~

THE MASS OF ROCK CRYSTAL,



THE QUEEN OF SPAIN’S JEWELS. 61

Rose. Will you just come over here for one minute papa ?
Here is a glass case full of diamonds—all twinkling! They do
twinkle so!

P. Ah these will shew you more of the character of Spain.
These are |

fe
V. THE QUEEN or SPAIN’s JEWELS.

They are sent from France by a great jeweller there, who made
them for the Queen of Spain three or four years ago. He went,
I believe, to that country, and borrowed them, that they might
be exhibited here. These jewels tell you that Spain, with all
her poverty, loves the pomp of her former riches. All true
Spaniards would I am sure rather have empty pockets, than
know that the Queen of ancient Spain was not ‘ properly’
decked with jewels.

ose. Will you wait one minute papa please ? Here is some-
thing, which I want you to see. We did not notice it.

Hf, Do you mean that ugly piece of Ah, what is it?

P, That is—



VI. THe Mass or Rock Crystat.

It is principally famous for its size, I believe. The other day
I saw a ‘Chinaman’ wondering at this object. He had a
a catalogue in his hand, but as it was not printed in Chinese he
could not use it. I therefore explained to him what Rock
Crystal zs.

Rose. Then tell us too, papa, please !





62 ROCK CRYSTAL.—THE ALPS.

P. Very well. It is a Hydrate of Silica.

Rose. Oh, papa I could never learn such a long name as that
—especially, in the Exhibition !

P. Then I may just say that rock-crystal—Look at it!
What do you think it is like?

H. Itis like a great transparent flint.

P. That ts it—exactly. It consists of the hard substance
which forms flint, and is called Silica ; and of a transparent
colourless substance called water. These are united so as to form
the half-transparent rock-crystal which is therefore called
‘Hydrate of Silica.’ When I was talking to the Chinaman
I taught him some Geography and History from this block.

H. ‘Then please let us hear that also, papa.

P. I told him to look on his map of Europe for a range of
mountains called the Alps ; and to see how the people who live
at the north of Europe must cross these Alps, to reach the
South. I next told him to read in his history book of a man
called Bonaparte. This great general once came to the Alps,
and finding that those high mountains must be crossed, he
caused a great road to be made through them, which we call the
Simplon.

Rose. But what has that to do with the rock-crystal papa ?

FP, The Simplon is the place from which this large mass
was procured. It belongs I believe, to the Duke of Devonshire.
Read the paper on the pedestal, and see.

Rose. Look papa, where Henry is!

P. Yes. He is noticing






Pages
64-65
Missing
From
Original



66 GODFREY DE BOUILLON.

Some of the pipes are very iong. One, the c ¢ c, measures 16
feet.

Rose. I wish papa, that the gentleman who is sitting there
would play—may I ask him ?

P. No, You will hear the organ before we leave, I dare say,
as this gentleman is here all day long.—Let us proceed.

Henry. Come here Rose, and look at this giant. I think it
is Goliath.

Rose. Or perhaps, it is Alfred the Great.

P. Itis an enormous statue, but it is not great’ enough for
Alfred the Great. It is a representation of

TV. GopFREY DE BOvILLON.

Look at him Rose! He has a bold determined countenance.
What a heavy looking war-horse he strides! What a strong
arm he must have had to have reined in so powerful an aniraal !
With what energy he is holding up the standard, and calling to
his companions in arms, ‘ Ho, to the crusades!’

H. Was he a crusader papa?

P. Yes, he was one of the leaders of the second crusade,
Here is a leader of the ancient gathering for war, come forward
in the midst of the gathering for peace.

H. That isnot right. Ho! Goprrey DE BovILLon! Go
home again! You are out of your place.

P. No. Heis better here. His days of glory are not yet
gone by, and never will be.

Henry. Why papa?



. \ me S oS Sk S = ae Ss
Te TE
eC aa

i
ai
|

Wen Lh

i ~ —* Zug — —
fi,
lidivs,

i



= <
a. ae






ON “‘ MIGHTY’ MEN. 69

P. Because he not only represents war but chivalry. He de-
clares, as he holds up his standard, “I will stand firm and will
fight, for all that is good and right.” That is ‘ chivalry.’

Rose. Well, and he deserves ‘ glory’ when he is so good as
that, and is anxious that every one should have what is right.

P. So he does! But, although the glories of his chivalry
will never pass away, they are being dimmed.

Henry. Why papa?

FP. Look at him!—Say to him, “ Why you are a mighty
man? Where is your might?” And he will tell you that it is
in his right arm. He will say that he is mighty because he
has the strength ot his horse, and the courage of a lion.

Rose. But he has a very determined spirit papa; that is a
fine thing!

H. And akind spirit too.

P. And, there you have the foundation of his glory! Fle
will always have glory because he had these two things; but,
now see why it is being dimmed. There are coming forth in
the present day—and they are begining to multiply—great
Heroes or Peace!

Rose. Have they a determined spirit papa ?

P. Yes, very; and if you ask one of these men of peace
“where is your might?” he will not shew you his right arm,
he'll tell you my might is not that of the brute! I believe in
the greater power of the human mind, and in the still greater
power of rove. Love, and reason! these are my strength; |
have more faith in these than I have in my right arm!



70 CAIN.— ST. MICHAEL AND THER DRAGON.

H. Thank youpapa. Hear now what I will say to Godfrey!
Sir Godfrey! we will always call you a great man, for you were
great in your time, but,—what shall I say papa? ©

P. Say that better days are now dawning; and in these
modern days we will say ‘ mighty man,’ not to him who ruleth
a horse, or taketh a city, but to him who ruleth his own spirit ! *
Pass on to the next. This is a statue of

X. Cain.

Cain with his innocent wife and children. Oh! it is a truly
beautiful piece! How often have I looked with sad feelings on
this poor man. He could not rule his own spirit ; and he was
the first murderer. Murdered hisinnocent brother, and brought
deep misery down on his offspring. Look at him!

tose. Ah, how he hides his face! I feel very sorry for him.

H. Papa! please come here! only look at this tall angel in
armour! I never knew before, that angels wore armour.

P. They wear no armour but the armour of righteousnesss.
These figures are the high archangel, St. Michael, and his
enemy.

XI. St. Micwarx anp THE Dragon.

In his hand the angel holds the sword of truth. ‘This two-
edged sword destroys evil, and no bad spirit can bear the
wounds it makes. ‘The old dragon, the father of sin, has fallen

down before it.
KK Ny
* He that ruleth his spirit is better than he that taketh a city.
Prov. XVI. 32.



i



Mi ’ 7 Z y yy Yy 4 , y /), yf hp tf .
iii) TU V4 Vy Li YJ Le L by YY

G
Wf d

iia

8ST. MICHAEL AND THE DRAGON.







MAZEPPA.—ACHILLES.—THE AMAZON. 73

Rose. So he has Henry! look at his sharp finger-nails. He
has lost his hold of the rock.

P. And how peaceful and firm the angel looks! with what
majesty does he hold up his arm! he seems to say co! Let sin
and sorrow fall, and leave this world for ever!

We have passed two beautiful little sculptures of a Boy anp
A Serpent, and his deliverer Tusk Doc, but these we will
examine another day.

Here is a statue of Mazepra, another of the ancient hero
AcuILLEs, wounded in his heel.

Rose. Look at the crowd of people around that curtain!

P. Yes, they are examining a beautiful sTarnED GLAss
wInpow, but we will leave it, and pass on to something which
will interest you more.

H. Do you mean, papa, this great bronze horse, rearing up
on his hind legs. Why look Rose! no wonder he starts! a lion
or some strange animal has rushed upon him!

Rose. And, who is that sitting on the horse, holding up a
spear ? it looks like a woman.

P., Come round to the front of the statue, and you will see

XII. THe Amazon.

HT, Wook Rose at that great fierce beast! how savagely he
has seized upon the noble horse!

Rose. Ah, I can’t look at that; I am looking at the woman.
Now, does not she look steadily at the lion? see! she is not at
all afraid.

Henry. But look at the horse’s eye, and his nostril !





74 PHYSICAL FORCE.—MORAL FORCE,

Rose. No, I would rather not; oh no, no! I cannot look at
anything but this woman. How firmly she sits upon the horse.
She is not afraid of falling, and she seems to be thinking of the
lion as she looks at him.

P, Let me tell you something about that statue. Professor
Kiss, who formed it, is I am sure, a good man; and this fine
statue of his, seems made to prove all we said of Godfrey de
Bouillon ; and to teach the same lesson as that of St. Michael

Did I not tell you that moral force is greater than physical
force ?

fose. I don’t understand those words, papa.

P. Imean that the power of the mind is greater than any
power of body. What do you think will make that lion fear ?

Rose. The javelin that she is holding up to him.

P. No—not that. What can a javelin do against the
strength of a lion? It is that those eyes of the Amazon can
speak, and the rude brute can read their language. They shew
him a calm, fearless expression, saying “ Lion! my spirit is greater
than thine. Be gone! and do not show thy savageness to me.’

Rose. And do you think that he will mind?

P. Yes. That very look of the Amazon will make him
forget his own strength of body—her nobleness has so awed
him that he can only feel his own baseness.

Henry. He has a rather skulking look Rose,

P. And yet a look of the fiercest savageness. Look at all
three once more! There is in the fierce wild-beast the lowest
and basest kind of expression ;—in the tame animal, the com-











HISTORY OF AMAZONS, 77

panion of man, there is a nobler countenance ;—but in the
woman, the highest created being, there is high dignity, which
shews that she was made ‘in God’s image,’

Let us go on again—

H. What papa is meant by an Amazon ?

P. The Amazons are a fabulous race of female warriors. It
is said that in ancient times there was a great battle, in which
nearly all the men of a certain city, who went out to fight, were
slain. The women of the city therefore resolved to defend it,
and taking up arms, were more successful than their husbands,
for they defeated their enemies. They then determined to live
without men in future and accordingly they put to death all
who remained, and elected two queens,

Rose. And did they fight any more ?

P. Unfortunately, history says they did. The women becameso
fond of fighting, that while one queen governed at home, the
other was always out on the battle field. Itis said that they
founded the cities of Ephesus, and Smyrna, in Asia Minor. They
themselves lived on the borders of the Caspian Sea. There is
great uncertainty in all that is recorded of them. Some do not
believe that such a race of women ever existed. It is said that
they were also found in Africa ; and in the present day, I believe,
one of the black kings of Africa, the king of Dahomey, has an
army of female warriors.

H. But did the Amazons ride on horseback, papa ?

P. Yes, it is said that they were the first who fought on
norses ; but, the African Amazons rode on horseback !



78 BAVARIAN LION.—GREEK SLAVE,

Rose. Here is an enormous lion papa!—

P. This statue is
XIII. ‘Tue Bavartan Lion.
An account of whichI read to you from the newspapers. It isa

striking object, not only as an imitation of nature, but because
ofits size. It is a wonderful specimen of metal casting. What
4 mass of metal it is! and yet, how perfect is each small part!
It stands now just as it was taken from the mould; no file or
other tool has touched it since it was cast. The city of
Monticu in Bavaria, from which it was sent, is very famous for

casting bells and statues—
H. Look, Rose, at the two horses !
P. We will not examine them to day—there are several

other interesting objects—statues of Adam and Eve—a model
of the Falls of Niagara—a block of Zinc, weighing 164,000lbs,

troy. Here is something more interesting than any---this is a

statue of }
XIV. Tue Greek SLAVE.

It tells a dreadful tale, for you to remember. We often hear
of the slave-trade, but few of us feel enough horror and shame
at so wicked a business. How would you like your mamma to
be taken away, and to be chained, and thus held up for sale ?*

Rose. Oh, that would be a horrible thing, papa !

P. Not more horrible than the case of this young Greek,
The cruel Turks, in former times, conquered Greece; and the
female prisoners, it is said, were taken to the bazaar in Con-
stantinople for sale. See with what scorn, and yet with what
same and sorrow she looks on the men who wish to purchase her {



LACE FROM BELGIUM. 79

You may look very long at this statue and think of it very
often; and learn from it to feel ashamed, and ever lift up your












voice against such wicked traffic as the slave-trade.
We will not return through the nave, but we will go back
to the transept by the north gallery.
THE NORTH GALLERY.
3 ie APA. We must not stop to day, to examine the articles
¢ I LS * in the Austrian department are some curious specimens
of pictures.

Rose. How are they made papa? The trees are raised

P. That is the question I asked myself, when I first saw
them. But in examining them very closely, I found that they
consisted of hair.

P. Yes—we are passing through BELGIUM.

In these cases are three wax figures of the Pope, Arch-
bishop Fenelon, and another. Belgium is a country which has
of the Pope! I should think that you have never before seen
anything so delicately or so beautifully worked.

Rose. But papa, will you read this paper—it says that one

Chapter inth.
above the paper, and seem like real trees.
H. What a crowd there is round these glass cases, papa!
long been famous for its lace. Look at the beautiful vestments
person worked on this piece of lace for five years.



80 WAX-DOLLS, AND RAG-DOLLS.

Henry. Come here Rose ! just round the corner, there is a
large wax figure of a lady—covered with lace.

P. Yes we will go and look at it. The lace on this figure
surpasses that on the pope, I think.

Rose. The Lady looks as though she were covered with dew
drops.

P. If you come forward a little nearer to the transept,
you will see something particularly suited to your taste, Rose.

Rose. Isee what you mean, papa. Here Henry, is a case
full of wax dolls, Oh papa, I should like to stop here for an
hour, I never saw such a number of dolls together before—
they are just like a public meeting.

H. And look at that dear little black doll, Rose. The
word ‘ Arrica,’ is written under it.

P. Yes. You may observe that there is one doll from each
large division of the globe—one from Europe; another from
Africa; and another from America ; each doll well represents
the character of the race it belongs to. Here is also a small
case of rag dolls.

Rose. They are very beautiful too, papa, they look like wax
exactly. Oh, papa, we can never examine all the beautiful
things in this building!

P. Do not say ‘never,’ Rose. You would certainly have
to visit the Exhibition a great many times--more than a
hundred, perhaps, You may now come with me to examine
some cases full of wax flowers.

Here they are! but I cannot Jet you look at them very long,



PROPER WORDS. 81

you would stand round them all the day, and say “ beautiful,”
“beautiful,” until you could not say it any longer.

Rose. So they are beautiful, papa; lovely! delicious!

P. Do not use such a word as that Rose---‘ delicious’ is not
used to express any qualities which please the eye.

H. No. We say—‘delicious taste.’

P. Soif you want to express the feelings you have in looking
at the Exhibition, you had better keep to the words ‘ wonder-
ful!’ ‘beautiful,’ ‘most beautiful !"—‘magnificent,’ ‘splendid,’ ‘most
magnificent,’ ‘most extraordinary’—‘astonishing’—and so on.

H. Well, I should like to make some new words; I think
that, the things must be tired of hearing those old words said
to them so often.

P. True; perhaps they have been uttered some millions of
times, they are dropping from the lips of tens of thousands of
people all day long.

Rose. Well, papa.—I must say ‘beautiful’ again, here is a
beautiful camelia, I will say ‘a magnificent one,’ because it is so
large. 3

P. The truth is, Rose, it is not a camelia at all. It isa new
water lily of gigantic size, and is truly one of the ‘lions’ of
the Exhibition. You will, I think, say so when you hear its
history. It is called

XV. Tue VicTorIA REGIA.

You may examine it. Notice its immense leaves, how broad,
mooth, and flat they are! The Victoria-Regia has become



82 THE VICTORIA REGIA,

celebrated not only because of its size, but because it may al-
most be said to be the parent of the Exhibition.

H. How can that be, papa, will you please to tell us ?

P. Yes, I have in my pocket a copy of Houssnotp Worps,
in which there is an account of this lily. Let us go a little
further to yonder red seats, in the corner of the gallery, we can
then look down into the transept.

Rose. So we can, Henry; and we have come all the way back
again to our friend the glass fountain.

P. Now, while you sit here and rest, you shall hear a few
words concerning the Victoria-Regia :—

‘*‘ On New Year’s Day in the year 1837, a traveller was proceeding,
in a native boat, up the river Berbice in Demerara, when, on arriving
at a point where the river expanded, his attention was attracted by an
extraordinary object. He caused his crew to paddle quickly towards
it. The nearer he approached, the higher his curiosity was raised.
Though an accomplished botanist, and especially familiar with the
‘Flora’ of South America, he had never seen anything like it before.
It was a Titanic water-plant, in size and shape unlike any other known
plant.

‘*¢T felt as a botanist,’ says Sir Robert Schomburgh ‘ and felt
myself rewarded! All calamities were forgotten. A gigantic leaf,
from five to six feet in diameter, salver-shaped, with a broad rim, of a
light-green above, and a vivid crimson below, rested upon the water !
Quite in character with the wonderful leaf was the luxuriant flower,
consisting of an immense number of petals, passing in alternate tints
from pure white to rose and pink’ [and, in some instances, measuring



CLL PTE y
CLs. ial

Ke
bes
SSS

= Ahi Lia

TIT TUT LLL



THE VICTORIA REGIA.






THE VICTORIA REGIA-HOUSE. 85

fifteen inches across], ‘ The smooth water was covered with blossoms ;
and, as I rowed from one to the other, I always observed something
new to admire.’

‘« But, Sir Robert Schomburgh, not content with mere flowers, dug
up whole plants ; and sent first them, and, afterwards seeds, to Eng-
land, where the magnificent lily was named the ‘ Victoria Regia.”’
After some unsuccessful attempts, the task of forcing it to blossom in
an artificial climate, was confided to Mr. Paxton. When the Victoria
Regia was to be flowered, Mr. Paxton determined to imitate Nature
and make the flower fancy itself back again in the broad waters and
under the burning heats of British Guiana. He deceived the roots by
imbedding them in a hillock of burned loam and peat ; he deluded
the great lubberly leaves by letting them float in a tank, to which he
communicated, by means of a little wheel, the gentle ripple of their
own tranquil river ; and he coaxed the flower into bloom by manu-
facturing a Berbician climate in a tiny South America, under a glass
case.

‘‘ With that glass case our history properly commences.”’

Mr. Dickens then goes on to say that, under this glass case,
the lily grew rapidly. So successful was the plan of its culti-
vation, that in little more than a month it out-grew its home,
and Mr. Paxton was obliged to set to work, and make a very
large green-house for it. As this building was for a most per-
severing and assiduous plant, which grew at the rate of six
hundred and forty seven square inches per day, Mr. Paxton
found it necessary that the new conservatory should be sixty
feet long, and forty broad.



86 THE GLASS PALACE.

This pretty building, called the Vicroria Rec1a Howse, saw
built of iron and glass, and it was from this, that Mr. Paxton
derived the idea of the Crystal Palace.

H. Which we may call ‘The Atsert House.’

Rose. Sothat the Victoria Regia might, almost, be called the
Parent of the Palace. If there had been no Victoria Regia
there would have been no “ Victoria Regia-house ;” and if
there had been no Victoria Regia-house, there would not per-
haps have been a Crystal Palace.

H. No, because even if Mr. Paxton had thought of it, he
would not have liked to make such a large building of iron and
glass; if he had never made one before, he would have been
afraid that it might not answer.

Rose. And, so would every one else have been. But, papa,
do look at the fountain again! see, there is the sun shining upor
the water as it rises and falls. Really, there are some little mugs
near it, and some of the people are drinking the water— I feel
very thirsty.

P. Then, you shall soon go to the refreshment room. I will
only, therefore, add one or two words on .

XVI. THe CrysTAL FOUNTAIN.

P. Ineed not tell you that the fountain is very beautiful.

H. No we can see it.

P. And it isan object rather to be seen, than to be described,
if you wish to gain an idea of its beauties. It has been called
‘Crystal’ because of its transparency. I do not think that by



We
s

Lega

anaes

ee
4

ae
Se ad ;
a <









ss + CT ee Tl

THE CRYSTAL FOUNTAIN. 89

any words we could give an exact idea of itselegant shape. It
contains altogether about 40 ton of flint-glass, and is 27 feet
high. Let us go down stairs and examine it more closely,

* * * * *

Now that we are nearer, can you see the water as it rises
upward through the tubes ?

Hf. I cannot, papa. ;

P. That is because the tube inside the glass, through which
the water flows upward, is silvered. ‘The glass pillar is also so
cut outside, and arranged, that this tube cannot be seen. The
whole fountain has been made by Messrs. Osler of Birmingham,
who have now become very famous as glass manufacturers. Let
us now go to the north of the transept —beyond ‘the iron
gates—

Rose. Where the refreshments are.

* * * * *

Chapter Centh.
THE WESTERN NAVE.
RZEAVING now rested, and refreshed ourselves, let us
(AWAG look at the ‘Lions’ in the western nave.
peek iH. I call that high framework, with so many beauti-
ful silks on it, a ‘ lion.’
P. Soitis. It is called
XVII. Tue Sik Tropny.
Do you know where Spitalfields is 2






90 THE SILK TROPHY.

H. Yes, it is near Bishopgate Street.

P. It is the principal place in London for the silk manu-
facture. The other silk towns in England are, Macclesfield,
Derby, Coventry, and Manchester. This trophy is arranged in
three ‘tiers-—and in the lower tier you may observe large
mirrors.

Rose. Yes, and I have been observing myself in one.

H. But, I observe the colours the most, papa. What a
beautiful red that is, and what a rich green! The crimson,—
the blue,—the brown figured silk—the bright golden coloured
silk, all these are very beautiful. Who sent it to the Exhibition,
papa ?

P. It was sent from Spitalfields by Messrs. Keith and Co.
It must have cost them very much money, for all this silk was
sent from their house alone.

Rose. Look, Papa, at these fancy silks with the pretty
patterns upon them.

P. Yes, these may teach you what men can do when they
try. {ae French people have more imagination than the Eng-
lish—and they therefore imagine (or design) patterns for silks,
&c., which are much more elegant than ours. So, we find that
the English people have been more famous for plain, than for
fancy silks; and, instead of trying to find English artists to
make silk-patterns, they have used patterns from France.

H. 1 should think, papa, that if the English would only
study how to make patterns, they might design some as good as
the French ones !



THE PEOPLE OF NANTES. 91

P. Yes, and the Exhibition has taught them this. The
men of Spitalfields, when they heard of the Exhibition, were
at first afraid to enter into ‘ competition’ with the French.
However, these silks which Messrs. Keith exhibit, prove that
the English manufacturers would in time (if they studied as you
say) become quite as good designers as the French.

H. And perhaps they might have been so before, if they had
tried. But, if the English and French compete with one another,
that will be rivalry. ‘Then they will become enemies !

P. No, that need not be. By such rivalry men may teach
each other, and become better friends. When men become
very busy with such rivalry as this, they will not have time for
the dreadful rivalry of war.

H. And the unprofitable rivalry too !—because the more the
people gain by peaceful rivalry, the more they will see what they
lose by war.

P. Let us go to the next ‘lion.’ I might as well tell you, by
the way, that the manufactures in Spitalfields were begun by
French people, 165 years ago. France, you know, is a Toman
Catholic country, but there is a town in France called NANTES
which was inhabited by Protestants. The Roman Catholic
priests were so angry with these people for being Protestants,
that they would have killed them, if they had dared. But this
they could not do, as a law (or edict as it was called) had been
made to protect them. In the course of time, however, there
came to the throne a king called Louis XIV. This king de-
clared that he liked ‘uniformity’ all through his kingdom ; and



92 SPITALFIELDS.

that all his people should be of the same religion; and that all
the Protestants must become Catholics. So, he was easily
persuaded by the priests to destroy the edict which protected the
Protestants, or to revoke it as we say. You may read in the
History of France of “ THE REVOCATION OF THE EDICT OF
NANTES.”

Rose. What happened next, papa ?

P. Next happened most horrible deeds. When it was found
that the people of Nantes would not become Catholics, their town
was attacked by the people, and the agents of the government. It
is supposed that about 25,000 people were either shot, drowned,
or died in prison. Thousands of citizens, however, escaped,—
being some of the most skilful and industrious manufacturers of
France-—some fled to Switzerland, others to Germany, and
Holland; and others to England, where they settled, and es-
tablished the manufactures which we now find in Spitalfields.

Rose. Was this the beginning of the silk manufacture in
England ?

P. Almost. The manufacture was of very little importance
before then—you see what it is now.

H. Are you going to stop at this place, papa ?

P. Yes, what do you say to this object ?

H. That it isa great ugly pile of all manner of things.

P. It may not appear so beautiful as some other objects,
but is very interesting. It contains numerous useful materials.
Have you never heard of Canada’s ancient forests? of the fine
patriarchal trees, which have existed for thousands of years ?



CANADIAN TIMBER.—WHALE’S JAW. 93

They are said to have lived before the Deluge. This pile
represents the

XVIII. CANADIAN, AND VAN Dreman’s LAND TIMBER.

Around it, you see specimens of many useful and ornamental
woods, which render the colonies of Canada and Van Dieman’s
Land so very valuable to England. Here is a fine piece of
wood—it is a slab of Canadian black walnut. Itisas hard, and
can be brought to as fine a polish as the French or Italian Walnut;
and it has, I think, amore beautiful grain. The tree from which
this was cut, yielded, I believe, 27,000 feet of timber.

Rose. But how many different sorts of wood there are! I
should like to count them. '

P. Iwould rather that you should understand them. This
pile of woods might afford you many a day’s study—you shall
hear more of them when we begin our ‘ Object Lessons.’—Let
us go round and look at something which is leaning against the
back of it.

H. This looks like a jaw.

P. It is the jaw-bone of a whale. Look at the number
of teeth it has. Its molars (grinding teeth) have a curiously
flattened surface.

Rose. Yes—they look just like pieces of a tree, which have
been sawn off straight. I have been counting the teeth—there
are twenty-three on each side ; but I thought papa, that whales.
had no teeth, I have read ina Natural History book, that whales
have whalebone in their mouths, instead of teeth.



94 SPERMACETI.

P. Those are the whalebone whales, found in icy Greenland;
but the whale from which this jaw was taken, lives in the South
Seas. The south sea whales have teeth—and they yield a very
valuable substance, called SPERMACETI.

H. And, if you read this paper which is hanging to the jaw,
Rose, you will see that it says, “ THE JAW OF A SPERM-WHALE.”

Rose. Yes, I will read the rest. “ This whale yielded 10 tuns
of oil, or 2,520 gallons, valued at £850 :—it was captured by the
PRINCE REGENT whaler, on : but where is papa? There
he is!’ He has gone away, and Henry too,—You are peeping
into a little box, papa!

P. Ican see a great number of ‘ boxes’ inside this one. It
is a model of the celebrated OPERA Hovsk, called ‘ Her
Majesty’s Theatre ;’ it is here that Jenny Lind used to sing—and
here, that the wonderful singers from Italy, and France, still
astonish the English people.

H. Here is a very fine looking-glass papa !

P. Yes, we cannot stop to examine many more objects to day.
There is, just beyond the looking-glass, the statue of one of
England’s most celebrated Queens. She lived in the age of
chivalry and war. While her husband, Edward the Third, was
in France, she met David the king of Scotland at Neville’s-cross,
near Durham, and defeated him. He had come to England,
thinking that, as the king was away, he could easily conquer a
woman,—but he was mistaken. He was taken prisoner, at nearly
the same time when the king of France was brought in captivity
to England.





MONUMENT OF QUEEN PHILIPPA. 95

I like this Queen, however, not only for her dauntless spirit,
but for her love of mercy. You have, I dare say, read of the six
citizens of Calais, who, when the city was surrended to Edward
after a siege, were to be hung.

Rose. ¥es, papa, and she saved their lives. She asked her
husband, Edward IIL, to spare them. What was the Queen’s
name ?

P. Her name was Queen Philippa. Her monument in
Westminster Abbey had decayed, and this is a restoration of it.
{t is executed in English alabaster.

H. Then, as it is a nice monument, we will put it amongst
the ‘ lions.’

XIX. MoNUMENT OF PHILIPPA, QUEEN OF Epwarp III.

P. Here are many more nice objects: several GOTHIC ORNA-
MENTS, a beautiful FoUNTAIN, and so forth. But—

H. Were is some pretty work, papa. I think that it is
CARVING work.

P. Yes, this is worth remembering. It is a specimen of

XX. MACHINE CARVING.

P. This may well be called a ‘trophy,’ as, I see, it is named
in the Catalogue.

H. What does that mean, papa?

P. A trophy is generally understood as a sign of victory,
Many of the objects are I find called ‘trophies,’—they speak
certainly of peaceful victories. A French writer (Jules Janin)



96 MACHINE-CARVING.

speaks of certain ‘warriors of industry’ whom he heard talking
over their victories, when on his passage to England—I will read
to you—

As the conversation proceeded I inwardly admired the zeal and ardour
of these workmen artists. There were seated about that table dyers,
who explained to us, with the enthusiasm of a warrior at Marengo or
Austerlitz, their recent conquests over indigo, their battles, their
triumphs, their defeats, in their conflict with the purple of the East or
the blue of Prussia.

There were cotton and flax spinners, fanatics in their craft, who
detailed to us, with all the forms of an epic, the transformations of
cotton and wool; this man excelled in giving form to the tissue of the
other ; that man, with the steel of his neighbour, produced inimitable
neatness and delicacy ; and all together, on the eve of the great struggle
about to commence, were seized with trembling and emotion.

In this passage of the French writer, Henry, is one of the
ideas which you and all boys will do well to learn. Here is an
idea which is being spoken, not only by writers of France, but
by men of Germany, of Austria, of Belgium, and even of Russia.

H. What is the idea papa?

P. Iwill tell it to you; and will teach it to you, over and
over again, from the objects in this Exhibition. You heard of
the victory which belongs to ‘ mighty men’—the victory over
one’s own spirit. Now, even the victories of which those dyers
talked, the victories in useful arts, are better than those of war.
The steam-engine is a victory. Itisa victory of man’s mind and



Full Text








4 ae
: P 4 ; “ es re at
a
te Sasi + deter Sat)
i Af As
as s 2 . s
3 ie Lee Ps a re S
é : fp i es ot 5
/ i : si
7 . b » ; ;
: 5 F
Rs ‘
~ 4 °
Ms é 7 - i
Rte & eae y
7 5. a
E a4 ae ”
~ »- e P,
: : me |
oa *
fee Fé 'p. . t
0 “ site a |
f \
bai a : a .
c 5 A
6) Ae:
| ca fo
bf Ss
Ly a :
‘
P es : S |
, | ;
ad j a . | ,
Pe F pats : = :
re g
Ci
¢ Bg nN
;
A > o
tr 4 Pe . ay ys
* a ss
~ ih pie PY
mt ry x ? s
i pce eee re cat * etait) 5 zi
: hy r 5 er Me ‘ ~ ty
A F a i8
H , Se tte sti Pet ae E
A eS : ie
ay Ii of ee came
€ ce eo ‘
\ iar i







t , , 7
PPro ane Te en ob ere










The Baldwin Library

University
KRaiD s
Florida







Su an ee 5 5aliaiiatea

J (AZetu¥ee/ Pw

Pr wf
/ & | 7

is
‘5 ARR

Mr

ee Se






BY THE EDITOR OF “PLEASANT PAGES.”

LONDON: HOULSTON & STONEMAN,

ice 238



te le

~k

er ae

— e

Se te ee a
LITTLE HENRY’S i OLIDAY

AT THE

GREAT EXHIBITION.

By the Editor of ‘*‘ PLeasant PaGgs.’’



CONTENTS.

PART I—GOING THERE.

Chap. 1. How the Idea Arose.

2. How the Money was raised.
How the Idea of the Palace arose.
How the Crystal Palace arose.
How the Idea was realized.
How it brought fourth Fruit.

PART II—WALKING THROUGH.

Chap. 1. The Plan of the Exhibition.
2. The Lions of the Exhibition.
Tone Goods from England.
he Goods from the Colonies.
The Goods from Europe.
The Goods from Asia.
I'he Goods from Africa.
The Goods from America-

PART III.—GOING HOME.

Chap. !. Theusat» about the Exhibition.
% Lhonghts adout London.
3 Lhougnts aoout PEACK and Brotnerncod.

Ao ww

SPRIAM PSP &


LS: a RN 7 <
aiteesane OR f° « i I eg

LITTLE HENRY’S HOLIDAY

AT THE

GREAT EXHIBITION.
Dart the First.

GOING THERE.

Antrodurtion.

, HAT, Papa,” said little Henry,—“ what zs the
{ Exhibition ? Really, Rose and I have been try-
= ing to imagine what it is. Every day after you
\"'Y/ fee have done reading the TIMES, we have looked
f= over it by ourselves; we have read that there is
a great building made of iron and glass, that it
~~ is 1851 feet long, and—something broad, I for-
get ;—and that there is a nave and a transept. But we can’t
imagine it. How can we get the idea of such a large place into
our heads !—unless—we
“ Unless we see it,” added Rose, “then we might. Don’t you
think, papa, that we had better go and see it? I should like to
know what the people mean by a ¢ransept.”
“ Well,” replied papa, “I can tell you a great deal about









x AS ‘
Ae
i AEA)

Yes 2
fi =

\ a Yi if
sj







4 THE IDEA,

that Exhibition—if you .ike. You shall go there this ver

morning. We will send James for a cab, and on our way ri

give you a long history.”
* * * * *

Here comes the cab, Rose,—it has an old white horse,—see !
That is because he is going to the Crystal Palace, I suppose.
Only, crystal is transparent. Ah, I’d rather not have a crystal
horse! Here comes papa.

P. Now take your seats in the cab.

Henry. Please papa, may I hold this string which is hanging
down in the front.

Rose. What is that for, Henry ?

Henry. Ill show you. It is called the check-string. The
driver has the other end fastened round his fin er; so when we
want to stop him, and tell him where to go, I shall give this
string a good sharp pull, and then he'll know. I shall pull him
up, and he’ll pull up the horse.

Papa. But, now listen to my story of the Exhibition. I
shall divide my tale into several chapters.

Chanter Firat,
HOW THE IDEA AROSE.

enry. What does that mean ?

Rose. Why, J can understand that.

Henry. It means—that the idea—got up !
Yes, that is the meaning. Let us see how the idea of the
Exhibition got up, or grew. An idea sometimes grows like a
flower ; it lies hid in some dark corner of the mind, just as the
flower lies under the earth until it ix strong, and breaks
through to the light. Then it grows until it is very large, and
in the course of the year, you see a great sunflower. So the
idea of the Exhibition came to the Highe=-before the public.


THE SOCIETY OF ARTS. §

Henry. And grew in the Newspapers.

P. And then in Hyde Park,—until it brought forth—

Rose. Ah! a great Crystal Palace.

FP. Or, rather, the Exhibition in the Palace: but some ideas
grow more quickly—they spring up instantly, like the mush-
rooms. We shall see soon.

The idea of the Great Exhibition has been growing ever since
the year 1756.

H. (whispering). Then it has been growing like an oak,
Rose.

In the year 1756, a “ Society’ in London, called THE
SocteTy OF ARTS thought of something. The men of that
Society had once been to school, perhaps, and they remem-
bered that their master had said to the boys “ I want to teach
you to write and draw much better. So, if each boy will try
and make a better drawing than he has ever made before, the
drawings shall all be shown to me, and he who has made the
best shall have a prize!” The boys at school would therefore
strive more to make good drawings ; and, when they were all
shown to the master that he might give the prize, they formed
quite an Exhibition—this was the first Exhibition! Do you
know what we call the act of striving with one another ?

H. Yes, Ihave heard the word, it is called ‘ competition.’
The boys were having a competition.

Rose. And it was a good thing even for those who did not
get prizes, because they learned to make better drawings.

Ff. True. And that was the secret of the sly old master,—
he warted to improve the boys—to do them good. Now, the
Lonpon Soctety or Arts thought, t'iat after boys had left
school, and had become men, and had learned to make other
things besides drawings, they might i prove more quickly by
competition, and by “ Exhibition.” Therefore, in the year
1756, they said that they would give prizes to those who could
make the best carpets, or those who could make the best por-
6 EARLY EXHIBITIONS.

celain, or tapestry ; and some people did get prizes. Soon after
a Royal Academy was also formed formed for exhibiting pic-
tures.

In the course of time, the people found that it was a good
thing to make Exhibitions. So, in the year 1798 the French
made one; and have continued to make exhibitions every now
and then, from that time until this, while there have been similar
exhibitions in other countries: in Belgium, and even in Spain.
The English people have also had small exhibitions in the dif-
ferent large towns. In 1849, the year before last, a much larger
exhibition than any of the others was held at Birmingham.

Hf. Then I suppose that that made Prince Albert think of
having one in London.

P, It was not that exactly. I told you that there is in
England a Society called the Society of Arts, and His Roya.
HIGHNESS THE PRINCE ALBERT is the President. This Society
began a series of Exhibitions of Manufactures, and the first
was held in the year 1847. Everybody liked that Exhibition.
So in the year 1848 the Society had another. This was liked.
even better than the first; so, in the year 1849 they held an
Exhibition which was the best of all. “The manufactures were
rincipally ornantents in gold and silver, and other metals; and
some of them were graciously sent by the QUEEN herself!

And now THE IDEA, which had been growing for some time,
arose. ‘The Prince and other members of the society began to
see that if it was a good thing for the manufacturers in England
to make a competition with one another, it would be a good
thing for the manufacturers of all the world to do so!

Rose. But what a number of prizes they would have to give
papa! perhaps they did’nt think of that.

P. Yes they did. The Society knew that there must be a
great number of manufacturers if they came from all parts of
the world, and that a great many of den would deserve prizes.
But it was worth while to pay a very great sum of money to do
PRIZES. 7

good to the manufactures of all the world! So, the Society de-
termined to give away prizes worth TWENTY THOUSAND POUNDS.
And, when they thought of all the manufacturers who would
try to get prizes, and of the wonderful things they would send,
they began to see that such things would make a truly GREAT
ExHipiTion. Thus the idea arose—gradually.

H. Well, I think that they were going to give away a great
deal of money... But were the Society really going to give all
that money of themselves? Where did they get it from? Please
tell me.

P. That question brings me to another chapter. They
were going to give £20,000, but they had not £20,000 to give.
So, you shall hear, secondly, How the money was raised.



Chapter Secaud.
HOW THE MONEY WAS RAISED.

QYAME are to give away £20,000,” thought the Society, “ but
we havn't got it”; and although they had the Sovereign
Prince at their head they found great difficulties.

tiose. Why couldn’t they a the Queen? If I had been
Prince Albert that is what J should have done.

P. Ah, you do not know anything about it. The Queen
has not so much money to spare as you think,—the proper
parties to ask were the government,—that is, the gentlemen
who govern the nation. But then, the money which the govern-
ment has belongs to the people, and the government would have
no right to spend it in any way they pleased.

H. Then, how did they get the money papa? I do want to
know very much.

P. You shall know if you have patience, for it is a rather
long story. ‘They asked the government that some gentlemen
S THE ROYAL COMMISSION.

from the Society, and others might be formed into “« A Royal
Commission.” They would then have the Authority of the
Quen to promise the manufacturers prizes worth £20,000
which they would collect by Public Subscription.

Rose. I know what that is. I have seen “Lists of Subscri-
bers” in the TrmMEs. The people give away their money.

P. But, the Society could not obtain their request. No one
would advise the Queen to forma “Royal Commission,”—it
was said that the money ought to be collected first.

H. Of course.

P. And then there might easily be a Royal Commission to
give it away. They were now much puzzled. Every one saw
that the answer from the government was a just one. “We
must not” they thought, “have a ‘ Royal Commission’ to give
away money that is up in the clouds! and, it would not be
right to have a Royal Commission merely to collect subscrip-
tions. And, unless we have a Royal Commission no one will
give us any subscription. Yet we shall want £20,000 for prizes,
and £30,000 or £40,000 for the building, and a great many
more thousands for the great expenses in letting the world know
all about it. What shall we do ?”

Hf. That is just what I want to know. When are you going
to us tell papa ?

P. Now, England isa very rich country. It is full of rich mer- ’
chants, and manufacturers, and builders. ° I’ll tell you of several
soon. ‘Two very rich builders, whose names were Munday,
heard what THE PRINCE and the Society wanted to do,—and,
they thought “ We'll help them!” So, they found a gentlemen of
the Society, named Fuller, and they said to him “We think
that your plan of making an Exhibition from all nations is a
— good one; and, if you can carry it out, thousands of people
will pay to come and see it, so you'll be suze to succeed and get
plenty of money. And this is what we willdo. We will lend you
£20,000 and besides that, we will spend £50,000 to make a fine
DIF FICULTIES.—HELP. 9

pbuilding for you, and lend youa great many more thousands for
the expenses,—altogether about one hundred thousand pounds!

H. Well done Mister Mundays! They were

P. They were noble men certainly; but listen! Then Mr.
Fuller made haste at once to take the good news to the Prince.
He hastened to His Highness’s country seat at Balmoral, in
Scotland, and on the 3rd September 1850, at the very moment
when the Prince was going out to hunt the stag, His Highness
was informed of this noble offer.

H. Well, that shows how the money was raised.

P. Not quite. It would not have been right for the Society
to have let Messrs Munday spend all this money for them, before
they knew whether they would be able to pay it back,—besides,
they found that they would want nearly 7'wo hundred thousand
= The ‘ Royal Commission’ was now granted ; and the

rince and gentlemen who formed THE Royal CoMMISSION
FOR THE PROMOTION OF THE INDUSTRY OF ALL NATIONS,
began to collect subscriptions.

Rose. There Henry ! Then that is how the money was
raised.

P. No indeed it is not. The people would not subscribe
aed ‘The appeal to the public was almost a failure.’

ine speeches about this Exhibition were made in London and
other parts of the ‘country; but the people had never heard of
such a thing before, and some who wanted to show how wise
they were laughed at the thought, and the money ‘ dribbled in
slowly.’ Thus the prince, nobles, and gentlemen of the Royal
Commission who were going to collect the money began to
think “we shall not be able to do it,” when another gentleman,
Mr. Samuel Peto, came to their help. He said I will be security
for £50,000; the Prince said he would be security for more
money ; and other wealthy men followed, until security was
raised for Two HuNDRED THOUSAND Pounps. And thus the
money was raised— laboriously.


io IDEAS.— PLANS.

Hf. Thank you, Papa. What is next?

P. You have heard 1st, How the idea of the Exhibition arose,
and 2ndly, How the means arose. You shall hear 3rdly, How
the idea of the Palace arose.*

Chanter Chird.

HOW THE IDEA OF THE PALACE AROSE.




2ES. When any one struggles through difficulties it does
W) him good. He feels himself strong, and greater; and has
» greater ideas. So the ideas of the « Royal Commission”

began to enlarge. ‘There came grand thoughts of teach-
ing other things to men by means of the Great Exhibition ;
and there also came the thought “ We will have a splendid house
for our friends, when they come over to see us. So, architects were
wanted now,—men to draw plans of the building ; and the
architects came. 245 Plans were made ; 188 were made in Brit-
ain; 27 came from France, and a few came from Belgium, Hol-
land, and other parts; and with them there came new difficulties
for the Royal Commission,

The plans were all examined, and none of them suited. So
the Commissioners sent for other architects and engineers, to
make a new plan for the purpose. But when the eople saw the
idea of a great brick and mortar building whieh was to cost
£200,000, they asked “ where are you going to put it?” They
were told that it was to be placed in Hyde-park, but thousands
of people said “no!” Aad the newspapers made a noise ; and

* It may be as well to acknowledge that the materials for parts of this ac-
count are taken from the ILLUSTRATED LONDON News, and the PoruLtar
‘GUIDE TO THE ExuHIBITIION. The Editor has, in fact, made free with every
source of information that he could obtain.

—
MR. PAXTON. 11

angry men made speeches ; and many said ’twas a shame their
park should be spoiled by a large brick and mortar building.
And the Commissioners—

H. Ishould think they were puzzled.

P. Perhaps they were; but somebody was always sent to
help them. Mr. PAXTON came this time.

Rose. What was the gentleman’s name Henry ?

H. Mr. Paxton. Let us hear about him.

P. Mr. Paxton thought about the building. This gentle-
man is a landscape gardener, and he is very clever in writin
books,—and in making houses, it seems. e made a beautifu
gardea for the Duke of Devonshire, and as the Duke had a new
and enormous water-lily, Mr. Paxton made an immense con-
servatory of iron and glass for itto growin. And, when he heard
that the building of the Exhibition did not please the public,
he thought to himself, perhaps, ‘“ Why should’nt a glass
house be as good for an Exhibition as fora house of plants? If
I were to make them one, like that of the Duke of Devonshire
I’m sure they would like it. They could have a house higher
than the trees, and the large tree scould grow inside it.” So, on
the 18th January, 1850, when Mr. Paxton was engaged on a Rail-
way Committee, he hastily sketched his idea of the building on a
sheet of blotting-paper, which happened to be near him. He
then went home, and from his Saud he formed a finished
drawing, working all that night, and working on still at all the
plans and particulars for ten days, when he set out for London by
train to see the Commissioners. He thought that his plan had
been made too late to be of any use, but he happened to meet
in the railway-carriage, a gentleman named Stephenson, an
engineer, who was one of the ‘ Royal Commissioners.’

This gentleman looked at the drawings very closely, and at
last he said “ Wonderful!” but he thought it was a pity they
had not been prepared before. However, he said he would show
them to the commissioners.
12 A CRYSTAL PALACE,

You know, I dare say, whether the Commission used Mr.
Paxton’s plans.or not. At first it was said they were too late,
and then, that it was not usual to build with iron and glass.
Some of the architects who had made the plans for the sg
missioners said it was impossible for such a building to answer,
—that it would be blown down b the wind,—that hail-stones
would break the glass,— that the giass would get loose, and fall
in, and the people of “all nations” would be bruised or killed.
Others said, it would be too hot inside, and the unhappy visitors
would be grilled. The public, however, soon heard of it and began
to speak for themselves, They saw the plans, and read about
them in the ‘Illustrated London News. They read, and
talked, and were pleased. The mighty ‘ million’ shouted out
their opinions again: “It will be a famous place ! a transparent
palace like crystal. Let us have A CrysTaz PALACE!

‘The Royal Commissioners said so too, They said, we can
put it up in Hyde Park, and what is more we can take it down
again,—and that will be a very good thing. Then it was all
— to. Thus, the idea of" the Crystul Palace arose—sud-
denly.

HT. Well done Mr. Paxton, this time!

P. That is what I say my boy! But let us goon. We
have nothing raised yet but ideas. I shall have hard work this
time, for I have to tell you of the raising of the Palace.















Ne

> “
PENS
NY

Wn

zm

oa, ELA)

iM ole
Ad

eo LTT
SY

gn 14 /

Fm

AH pee TT rae
fe} ateaiiaanneniiautamaian Se COTM me
A ts Annan _ Audit a! Tae

re 34



THE SOUTH-WEST VIEW OF THE EXTERIOR,
15

Chapter Fourth,
HOW THE CRYSTAL PALACE AROSE.

H, how diditarise ? I wishI were a poet, Henry, that I
might make some fine comparison to show you how it
Laity) /5( was done.

How? Swiftly and silently, almost like some fairy scene; and
yet, with labour, as all therest had been done.‘ ndustry’ has
made many a fairy scene, and her secret is,—work ! work ! work!

But how ? how did the great building so suddenly rise ? As the
dry bones that were shaken by the wind came eee ‘ bone
to his bone, so came the columns of this Crystal Palace! They
came from afar: an exceeding great army of iron and wooden-
bones. By waggon loads they came,—girders and trusses,
columns and ribs, of iron and wood. Then, they fitted one to
another, forming a framework fairy-like and fine for the trans-
parent glass. No unsightly heaps of brick! no smoking heaps
of lime! no click of noisy trowel! no great unsightly scaffol d-
ing! All the parts were ready prepared: and as they came
from distant places, they quickly joined together, like brethren,
who knew each other. ‘Thus ranging in square companies
and in long rows, they helped and supported one another until
they were tall and strong. Then were they able to bear up
their curved-shape friends, the giant ribs, who gratefully formed
a roof over their heads, and covered them in from the rain.

H. Well done Mr. ! But who did it ?

P. Well done Messrs. Fox AND HENDERSON you may say
now.

R. Then tell us please, papa, who were Messrs. Fox and
Henderson. I want to hear some more ‘particulars.’ Will
you describe to us, a little bit P

P. Very well, Lam not at all tired: but before telling you


16 TOTAL LENGTH AND BREADTH.

ae the building was made, you shall hear what there was to
make.

Messrs. Fox and Henderson are two of the great builders (or
contractors) who as I told you abound in our wealthy country
you shall now see what gigantic undertakings two Englishmen
can carry on. At the time when Messrs. Fox and Henderson
began the great palace, they had other extensive works in hand,
in all parts of the British Empire. These I will mention
directly. Let us first speak of their work in Hyde Park.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PALACE.

Look at the picture. This Crystal Palace is 1851 feet long.

H. I cannot understand exactly how much that is.

P. Youcan if you try. Do you know the street where your
aunt lives, and where each house contains eight rooms ?

Rose. I know it papa, there are 50 houses on each side of
the road.

P. ‘Then just imagine that, instead of 50 there were 116
houses—then you get an idea of the length of the Crystal
Palace. Itis as long as 116 eight-roomed houses placed in a
row !

H. Then how broad is it ?

P. About as abroad asa street of 28 such houses,—that is
456 feet ; and in the arched part, called “the transept,” which
crosses the building it is68 feet high. There! put it away in
your memory Rose. “ The Crystat Palace is 1851 feet long, 564
Jeet round, and 68 feet high.”

H. But how high is it in the large part papa?

P. Inthe ‘long part’ which is called ‘ the nave’ its height
is 64 feet. ‘lhe whole building covers almost eighteen acres of
= a space about six times as large as that of St. Paul’s.

ou know what a square foot is ?

H. Yes. A square piece of board, which measured a foot
TOTALS OF SURFACE, SPACE, AND MATERIAL, 17

on each side would be the size of a square foot. I will cut out
a piece of the proper size when we are at home.

P. Andif you wished to cut out enough pieces to cover the
whole space of the Exhibition, you would have to make NINE
HUNDRED AND EIGHTY NINE THOUSAND, EIGHT HUNDRED
AND EIGHTY FouR of them, for that is the number of square
feet in the Exhibition. The floors of the galleries measure
217,100 square feet, and the ground floor measures 777,284
square feet. Let us add them together :

Galleries ..........+.217,100 square feet.
Ground Floor........777,284 square feet.

Total .......... 994,384 square feet.

Would you like to know what space is continued in the
building ?

Rose. Yes, please, papa.

P. ‘Then suppose that you made Fig. 1.
a solid block thus; and that each of eI





the six sides was a perfect square foot, a
such a block is called a cubic foot. Ah

Rose. And, how many cubic feet il i
could we put in the space of the Exhi- au
bition ? a thousand? XN

P. More. Cubic Foot.

H. Nota hundred thousand ?

P. Yes, Three hundred and thirty times as much. The
space of the Exhibition is no less than three hundred and thirty
hundred thousand cubic feet, or 33,000,000, as we say. The
surface of the glass measures 896,000 square feet. The quantity
of the woud is 600,000 cubic feet, and the quantity of the glass
is 896,000 lbs. ‘The weight of all the iron is 9,072,000 Ibs. and
the cost of the building about £150,000. These, then are the
“totals.” You must write them down on a piece of paper.
18 MESSRS, FOX AND HENDERSON,

H. Iwill, papa.

The CrystTauL PaAtace, which Messrs. Fox and Henderson built is
six times as large as St. Paul’s. Its length is 1851 feet, (the number
of the year in which it is built), it is 456 feet broad, 64 feet high, in
the nave, and 68 feet high in the transept. The total surface of the
flooring measures 994,384 square feet; and the total space of the
building is 333,000,000 cubic feet. The total surface of the glass
measures 896,000 square feet. The total quantity of the wood is
600,000 cubic feet. The total weight of the glass is 896,000lbs., (or
400 tons). The total weight of the wrought-iron and cast-iron is
9,072,00Ulbs. (or 4,050 tons), and the total cost of the building is not
much more than £150,000.

Now the completion of all this work was undertaken by two
men. ‘They began it at the end of July, 1850, and it was ready
for receiving the goods to be exhibited by about the end of
January, 1851. In how many months did they do it?

H. Ihave been counting,—in only six months, papa.

P. This you will say then is a great undertaking for two
men: but as I told you, they had at the same time extensive
works in all parts of the kingdom. ‘They were making a whole
railway in Ireland: an immense enatiidinn bridge over the
river Shannon: another over the Medway, at Rochester: a
truly immense station for passengers at the end of the Great
Western Railway: a large station at Liverpool for another
Railway: a Railway-station at Bletchley: another at Oxford of
iron and glass, like the palace itself: and several other large
works which I cannot at present remember. ‘Think of that
dear Henry. ‘Think what two men can perform, and when you
have plenty of work to do, never sit down and say “I cant!”

H. WellI won't again. But now, will you let us hear how
it was all done ?

P. Yes; let us leave the totals, and attend to the parts.
We will imagine that we are sitting on the ground, in Hyde
Park, and then we shall see the parts coming.
THE HOARDING. 19

First came the men with theodolites. Surveyors they
were called, for they took a “ survey” of the ground. ‘Then
came the hoarding.

Rose. What is that ?

H. I will tell you, the great boards which they stick up,
all round the place.

P. Here isa picture of the hoarding. Fig. 2.

It pleases me very much; for
those who built this work of art
wisely copied the Works of Na- =
ture, where nothing is wasted. [| |__———=azz a |]
The boards of the hoarding were t- Ca aisle
all used afterwards for the floor = [Vr

of the buildingitself. You may [|| a
see by the picture that it was ee a

not necessary to nail them together. The two upright posts
were fixed in the ground and the boards were lip ed in
between them. ‘The posts were then tied together at the top,
so that the boards were held tight, and could not fall out.

Rose. But, I suppose that there was some waste. What was
the use of all those great posts afterwards?

P. They formed joists,——the thick pieces of wood which are
laid on the earth to nail the floor upon.

H. Tobesure. Don’t you see, Rose, that they couldn’t
nail the boards to the ground? it would be too soft.

Rose. Ah!

P. When the hoarding had been fixed, and the ground was
enclosed, the surveyors once more came with their theodolites,
and measured the places for the jron-columns; and then came
the columns themselves.

The columns were followed by all manner of parts--by “girders,”
“trusses,” ‘ braces,” “ Paxton gutters,” “ sash-bars,” ventilat-
ing bars,” and a great many more things. I have drawn some
of these parts for you on the opposite page.












cc , RA
PT e\\>, .


20

Wy

ij)

=| i

I



)
4

/;

fall

F
eps



Fig. 3.
THE IRON COLUMNS. 21

Let us examine them :

The beautiful COLUMNS are interesting objects. There are
three rows,—the columns from the floor to the gallery, which
are 18 feet 5} inches high,—-the second row rise from the gallery,
they are 16 feet 71inches long,—and the third row, which are as
long as the second, rise above them up to the roof. Thus, the
columns are placed on top of each other, only having small
columns between them, to which the girders are fastened. Letus
find out the good qualities of these columns. Suppose that all

16ft. 7 }in.
three columns had been joined in one, thus 16ft. 7}in.
18ft. 5$in.



H. The great column would have been 51ft. 8in.
too long. It would have measured 51ft. 8in.

F's Yes ; besides the length of the smaller columns between;
and, if they had been made thus long—

Rose. 1 can see: they would have been more likely to bend.

P. True; then another good quality is, that they are
hollow.

H. Then they cannot be very firm. If you havea hollow
friend, you never say he is a firm one.

P. The same law does not apply to iron-columns. Hollow-
ness gives firmness and strength. You know that straws are
hollow; so also are quills. Proheee Cowper was talking in a
lecture about the beauties of these columns, and wanted to
show their strength, —so he cut two quills of equal length, and
placed them upright. On these small quills he managed to
— 100lbs. weight, and then another 100lbs., but they id not

reak until 2241bs. was placed upon them. The quills possessed
this strength, just because they were hollow. ‘This hollowness
is a beautiful quality. It not only gives strength, but gives
them another use—like the hoarding, they are made to serve two

purposes.






92 THE TRUSSES.

Rose. What else are they fit for, I wonder ?

P. Ifyou look at the picture below, which shows the form
of the roof, you will see that, when it rains the water might
settle in all nse ridges, therefore the water must be conveyed
from the top of the building to the bottom. May it come down
through the roof on the heads of the people. ?

Rose. Tobe sure not. Ah! there would be a good plan,—
it might pour down through the columns.

#. And so itis does,—the columns are water-spouts. They
not only hold up the roof, but carry down the water.

Hf. So we may = three good things of the columns:

ist. Their short lengtk gives them strength ;

2nd. Their hollowness gives strength; and

3rd. Their hollowness make them useful as water-spouts.
P. While you may add

4th. Their hollowness also gives lightness.

The columns are kept apart by the cross-pieces called girders,
which are drawn on the same page with the columns—but, let
us ascend at once to the immense girders which extend across
from the columns on one side of the nave to the columns on the
other side,a distance of 72 feet. These immense girders are
called TRUSSES, and as you may observe, contain nine girders.

Fig. 4.



Truss (for the roof cf the Nave )
THE RIDGE AND FURROW ROOF. 93

H. Yes, and on each girder a little roof is raised—they are
like little hills.

Rose. Or Arab’s tents, that is the way you draw tents
Henry! You make lines up and down.

P. They are called ridges, and the valleys between them are
called furrows; thus they form what the architects called a
‘ridge and furrow’ roof.

Rose. And I suppose that in the furrows there are gutters,
or something, that the water may run away to the columns.

H. But you see Rose that the water would run ‘long-ways,’
it could not reach the poles on each side.

P. Ah! How can it reach the columns ?

Rose. Well that would be very easy ; there might be a gutter
on the top of each large truss. The gutters in the ridges would
lead to the gutters in the trusses. (See Fig. 6, page 25.)

H. Yes the gutters on the trusses are placed crossways,—
of course. Then, they lead to the tops of the columns, and the
water flows down them. |

P. That is right; at the base of each column, is a pipe
through which the water is conveyed, as Mr. Dickens says
‘into the jurisdiction of their honours the Commissioners of
Sewers.” I will show you two more interesting points concerning
the roof and the gutters, and then we will conclude our descrip-
tion. You know that, when any vapour rises and reaches a
cold surface, as there is no heat to keep the particles of the
vapour apart, they unite again, or condense, as we Say.

‘Rose. Yes, and form drops. I noticed that yesterday ;
mamma poured some hot-water into the slop-basin and put the
plate of toast on the top; then the steam arose up to the flat
plate, and when we lifted it up a number of little drops fell off.

P. And so it might be in the Crystal Palace; the vapour
which we call ‘ breath’ arises from the crowds of people
below—and if the glass roof were flat, thus ——, or like
the bottom of the plate, then ?




24 PAXTON GUTTER.--TRANSVERSE GUTTER,

H. ‘Then the vapour from the people’s breath would form
drops, and make a shower-bath on the people’s faces. It would
return to those it came from.

P. But by placing the panes in an oblique (or slanting)

direction so _.-———— and so —~——___ tthe drops
formed by the vapour do not fall thus, but trickle along the
glass, slowly.

H. And, when they reach the end of the glass, don’t they
fall off ?

P. No: there is a gutter to receive them, a very ingenious
affair, which was invented by Mr. Paxton, and is called the

Fig. 5. ‘Paxton gutter.” This you will see
is really three gutters. ‘There isa
— one with a smaller one on each
side.

H. And I can see what they are
for,—the drops from the vapour in
the inside of the glass trickle down
the panes, and the side of the wood,
into the small gutters; and the rain
outside the glass pours into the large gutter.

P. Justso; and again, the gutter is a good firm solid rafter,
and is therefore useful as part of the frame-work for the glass.
Here is a piece of the outside of the roof,—you may see the
ridge and furrow,—the Paxton-gutters,—and the “ crossway” (or
trensverse) gutters on the tops of the trusses. (vide next page.)

a Well, then, they are very good gutters. They do three
things :




x

‘s

Paxton Gutter.

lst They support the glass ;
2nd They receive the rain outside the glass ;
3rd They reccive the breath inside the glass.
Rose. They are almost as good as their relations the
columns, One isacolumn and a spout,—the other is a rafter and

a gutter.
THE NUMBER OF THE PARTS. . 5

P. And now if we jump down from the roof to the floor, we
shall find that it also serves three purposes. When we reach
the Exhibition, we shall find that the boards which were once a

Fig. 6.



FA

Transverse Gutter, &c.

hoarding, are now used as a floor, a dust-trap, and a ventilator.
But we have had too long an account. Let us add up ‘the
quantities,’ and proceed.

H. As you say them, papa, I will write them on the same
piece of paper with the totals, if you will please speak slowly.

P. Very well, then, write down

Of the columns there are 3,300. There are 8,300 girders made of
cast-iron, and 358 of the long ¢russes made of wrought-iron. The
Paxton-gutiers would measure altogether no less than 20 miles—the
panes of glass are joined to thin slips of wood which are called ‘ sash
bars’ a total length of these is not less than Two HUNDRED
MILES
26 BEGINNING TO BUILD.

There ! what do you say to that ?
H. Now papa, please to tell us how it was all put together,
if you are not tired.
Oh, J am not tired. When the hoarding was fixed, and
the foundations were prepared, the columns began to arrive.

It was some time before the different parts came, for they had
all to be cast at places near Birmingham, which are a long way
off. A month and twenty days had past away; the 20th of
September had arrived, and only 77 columns had been fixed
out of 3,300. But, during all this time every thing had been
made ready, and hundreds after hundreds of columns had been
cast. Everybody had learned his duties, and was prepared to
proceed, and then came the columns in abundance. Ah, it was
a truly busy scene! if you had only been outside that hoarding
you would have liked to watch the waggons! Every day you
would have cried out ‘‘ Here they come!” and, asthey un-
loaded you would have seen columns, girders, trusses, and other
pieces in abundance.

From the immense and mighty furnaces of the casting works
were brought, in one week, 316 girders ; and also every week, at
least 200 columns. Each casting, as soon as it was delivered,
was very carefully weighed aud examined. It was made to
bear very heavy weights, to see if it were of the proper strength,
it was next painted, and was then carried off to its proper place
to be fixed. All this was done with the greatest dexterity.
“ Each heavy article could be lifted from the waggon, weighed,
placed in the ‘ proving machine,’ lifted out again, and taken to
its place in less than four minutes.”

The scene became more busy every week. As more columns
were brought in, more men were hired to work, and in the
course of a month, (by the end of October) hundreds of columns
_ were rising, and nearly 1500 men were at work. ;

H. But, papa, if the columns were three or four times as
tall as the men, how could the men lift them ?
PREPARING FOR THE GLASS. 27

P. Very easily, by means of ‘ shear-legs.’
Rose. What are ‘ shear-legs’? not their own Fig. 7-
legs I suppose, are they stilts ?

No, nor wooden legs, although they are
made of wood, They are two wooden poles, which
are placed together so : What shape do they form,
with the line of the ground ?

Rose. A triangle, papa.
Fig. 8-



P. Here is a picture of a
column being hoisted by means
of the shear-legs. You may
notice that there is a long rope
on each side to keep them steaay.
At the apex of the triangle (you
have learned what that means,
in Pleasant Pages,) there are
pulleys with ropes passing over
them,—thus you see how the
men pulled them up.

With 1500 men at work, not
only were great numbers of the
eee, columns and girders soon raised,

es but the smaller parts of the
frame-work for the glass. During all this time the glass-blowers
had not been idle. They had lenty to do; they had to make
large and thick panes of glass almost a yard and a-half long and
ten inches broad. ‘They soon found that as they had to make so
many thousand panes, they had really too much todo. ENGLAND
could not supply workmen enough to make such an immense
quantity in so short a time; it was a therefore, to bring
workmen from foreign countries to help. Each pane was made
*n a manner different from the old system, which you will under-
stand better when you have an “ Object Lesson” on glass.







28 GLAZING THE KOOF.

A few weeks, and the scene in Hyde Park was more exciting
still. The increasing numbers of men had worked on through
November to the beginning of December, when the bustle was
at its height. The columns, girders, and heavy castings were
still being brought; with an enormous number of smaller castings
which were erected with amazing rapidity. Other pieecs of
framework, and sash-bars, for the glass were next prepared—
then came the glass, and with it came more men still, to fix it.

H. Yes, Glaziers, I suppose.

P. The most trying undertaking of all was next begun,
namely, the hoisting of the great curved ribs for the roof of the
transept, (see frontispiece) these ribs we shall be able to see when
we reach the Palace. I cannot give you an idea of the great
‘crabs’ and tall “shear-legs” which were used. This most
dangerous work was completed in one week ; sixteen great ribs
were erected, and fortunately without any accident. Then the
glaziers were mounted high up to their work, and soon they were
dotted over the roof, looking in the distance es e the
flies on the ceiling. | When these glaziers worked on the ‘ridge
and furrow’ roof, they worked in new and ingenious machines
with wheels which travelled in the Paxton gutters. The men
soon learned to work quickly, and 80 of them, in one week,
put in 18,000 “goa of glass. One man, in one day, inserted
108 panes which covered 367 feet of the roof.

Thus all kinds of labour were being executed at the same
time, and all varieties of people were seen. There were not only
the glaziers attending to the glass, but carman unloading the
waggons, and workmen raising the roof,—workmen raising
the columns, painters painting them, carpenters attending to
the works of wood, carmen unpacking the glass—crowds of
porters performing odd jobs, while the scene was made gayer
still by the numerous red coats of the sappers and miners which
sparkled here and there amidst the crowd. ‘ Useful men these”
you would have said---“ they have done all the surveying and
THE STEAM-ENGINE AND HIS MACHINES. 29

penne Besides these were the higher orders of workmen,
is Royal Highness the Prince, Mr. Wyatt, Mr. Fuller, the
architect Mr. Paxton, the contractors, the decorator Owen Jones,
numbers of draughtsmen and clerks, with a great sprinkling of
visitors, whose principal labour was, in trying to understand how
all was done so quickly.

But even with so large a supply of men there were not enough
hands to complete the great work; and a new power had been
added—a great steam-engine with the power of six horses might
have been seen—setting in motion several machines, and causing
them all to help.

Let us talk of these machines: the steam was turned on, and
this was the signal for them to work. They were obliged to
obey---evidently they knew this, and had been accustomed
to steam, for immediately they began punching, and drilling, and
cutting bars of iron into their proper lengths. Another machine
had been preparing the ‘Paxton gutters another cut the wood
into sashes for the glass, preparing them by mile lengths; another
actually painted them; while another,—a still more knowing
machine—received logs of wood, and sent them out again in
the shape of long spouts for drainage, with even the holes
for the nails bored through them. Ah! those machines, how
well they obeyed the steam, and how the steam kept them at
work! No machine took the slightest interest in the work of
his neighbour, or even offered to assisthim. The spout-machine
kept entirely to his spouts, and not a single gutter or sash-bar
did he make. Indeed he had no time to try; he was so intent
on his work that he scarcely seemed conscious of having a
neighbour at all.

Rose. Perhaps he had’nt any “ consciousness.”

P. He was none the worse for that. Certainly, every
machine kept to his own business, and so did each workman,
and that is one reason why the building was finished in time.

The conscious workmen, indeed, seemed as active as the
30 WORKING STEADILY.—THE GOODS.

machines ; all worked on steadily, and the great giant---the
dumb, unconscious palace,—rose silently over thcir heads.
“ Wonderful !” they thought as they saw what they were doing
—all wondered at the work of their own hands! still guided
by greater minds than their own, their hands worked on, while
the building seemed to look down from its height, and wonder
how large it was going to be.

H. Perhaps, he wondered what he was being made for /

Rose. And he would have wondered what those impertinent
steam-engines had to do with it, and why their wheels went
round and round without seeming to mind him at all.

P. True. And as through all December the machines and
the crowds of men worked on (for now there were nearly T'wEenty-
FIVE HUNDRED MEN) the great giant of iron and glass must have
stared more still. Yes, indeed! for his masters were working
all through the night, and had lit him up by torchlight! He
must have felt it to be awful and grand when the bright lights
danced through the dim shades, and the men and machines
moved on. What did the machines care for the night ? why
should they go to sleep? ‘They “never tired nor stopped to
rest.” No! each machine still worked and “ pursued the even
tenor of his way.”

H. Poor Crystal Palace! I dare say he felt that he must be
built, and must grow up as large as they chose to make him ; he
could’nt help himself.

P. Yes, and as time rolled on, strange things rolled in.
While the Palace had been thus preparing, beautiful goods to
exhibit had been prepared by thousands of men in aJl parts of
the world. Gentlemen from England had been sent all over
Europe ; and messages had been delivered to ‘ all nations’ say-
ing that this Palace was built for them to exhibit in. Like the
school boys whom we talked of, they were invited to a ‘compe-
tition’ for prizes. Soon they began to try who could make the
finest and best of goods; and, when they had done their best,
ARRIVALS.—COMPLETION. 31

they sent their works over the land and the seas to Hyde Park.
If you had had the proper ears, you might have gone to the top
of the Palace one windy night, and have heard that they were
coming. Great wheels were buffeting the ocean waves, and
bearing ships from the east—great sails were driven along by
the wind from the countries of the west, north, and south; and
the whistling wind, which had crossed thc .cean for thousands of
miles, and had reached the Palace before them, whispered in all
its corners “they come!” Great packages were soon made
ready ; and by railway from the cities of Europe, by canal and
rail from the counties of England, they were sent off, directed
to the Great Exhibition. After that, they came,---and with.
them came a scene of bustle and business, which I could not
reasonably attempt to describe. There were workmen from
Austria and France; men from the Zollverein and Bavaria ;
from all parts of Germany, from Russia, from Switzerland and
Italy, from Spain, Belgium, and Holland. From the far-west.
came Americans; and from the east the men of Egypt, all
attending to their goods ; and, amidst the confusion of tongues,
a work mightier than Babel’s still went on, and by its appointed
day, the 1st of May, the Crystal Palace was finished.

On the 30th April, the night before the Palace was born,
I stood outside and asked him “ how came you here?” soon
I imagined that the answer came back in these words : “ We,
the Crystal Palace, are so bewildered at ourselves, that we
scarcely know how we came here. We know where we came
from. We came from the bottom of the sea, and from the tops of
the mountains, from dark caves, and from mines in the bowels:
of the earth. Then we were called by different names, such as
sand, soda, galena, ironstone, and pine. But some of us were.
melted in hot furnaces, and were cast, and are now called ‘ iron,’
and ‘glass;’ and some have been hammered, cut, sawn, and
drilled. But it has been done so quickly that all we can tell you
is, we are now called “THs Crystan Paxacs.” Thus, the
Crystal Palace arose,—rapidly.
32
Chapter Fifth.
HOW THE IDEA WAS REALIZED.

‘3 I suppose you remember the 1st of May, Henry?
H. Yes, very well, papa.
¢ P. On the Ist of May, 1851, the people rose up
~~ early ; at five o'clock on the first of May the people were
getting up; at four o’clock on the first of May, there were peo-
ple getting up; at three o’clock in the morning there were
people getting up; a few people rose at two, and many were
rising all night long, for some never slept at all. When the
morning came, there were clouds over head, but beneath there
was light-hearted joy. Tens of thousands of men and women
hurried down the streets. Cabs and carriages filled the road,
and all moved onward to the west. From north, and south,
and east, and west ; by steamers and rail, by omnibus and cab,
by carriage or gig, came the myriads of people, and stood round
the Great ExuIBITION.

Rose. Yes, we heard about that papa; the Exhibition was
ready to be opened.

FP. But I think you do not know of all that gave the people
joy. As I was waiting with the crowd, I saw an old man with
an eager face, and a very glad sparkling eye. His head was bald
and his beard was grey ; ‘“ What is it” I said “ that makes you
glad? Is it that you see the Crystal Palace sparkling in the
light of the sun?” ‘not only that,” he said; “ Is it that you
expect to see the Queen, and intend to say ‘God bless her’ ;”
“not only that,” he said; “Is it that you see men of all climates,
and of all colours meeting together with friendly looks ?” not
only that.” “It is all these together that make me glad. Dont
you notice, he whispered, that ell these men have one feeling
toward that building? Dont you hear the Frenchmen say to
their encmies ‘the perfidious English’ “ Brothers! we helped to



THE TALE FROM “ OLD TIME.”’ 33

make it!” Listen how they say “we all have an interest
there!”

H. I should like to have seen that old man; he had some
kind thoughts.

P. Yes, you shall hear more about him soon. On that day
there was a brotherly feeling beaming from the faces of all, and
Pil tell you why. This Exhibition was showing them the
marvellous good works of each others hands, which they had
never seen before, but now it was beginning to teach them
more.—This Exhibition had brought them together, and was
showing them marvellous good-will in each others hearts, which
they had never seen before. For the first time since the world
was made, men of all nations were working together in one great
act of peace.

Now hear what the old man related to me. “ Not forty years
ago,” he said, “I saw the fathers of these men meet on the
battle-field. I saw their forefathers meet, hundred of years
ago. ‘The Franks and the Goths, the Celts and the Moors,
met only to show their hate to eachother. Do you know why ?”
he said.

** No,” I replied.

“Then Vl tell you—it was because they did not know
each other.” “Ah!” he cried, I have seen all history! I’ve
seen it all myself. { remember the first great gathering of
Christian nations, seven hundred years ago.

Rose. What anold man papa! How could he have lived for
seven hundred years ?

P. You will hear. He has lived six thousand years. But
listen to his story. :

“That mighty gathering of the nations! Like the people
around us now, they were brought together by an idea. How
that idea arose and grew! ‘lhe ‘Industry of All Nations,’
was aroused, and was making swords and spears. They met
and heard the idea from the sacred lips of their priests. ‘ Go
34 INSIDE THE PALACE.—~-IST MAY.

dip your swords in blood! Go wage fierce war! Go kill, for
the sake of Christ, the Prince of Peace! Hundreds of thou-
sands are to follow hundreds of thousands; and meet around
Jerusalem, the former city of God, to destroy their fellow men.’
Europe answered with the cry, ‘ It’s the willof God! It’s the
will of God!"* Then, as they promised to go, and to jight
round the Holy City, the blessing of the Almighty was asked
by the Archbishop of Roms, on the first and fearful gathering
of the nations. But the high days of chivalry are passed away,
and those of the sword and spear are passing away too. Come
come with me,” said the old man suddenly; ‘‘ Come to the
Crystal Palace! ye shall see a very different gathering of the
nations of the earth. Come!” he cried, as he moved along
faster, (for he had been moving on all the while), I never
stop! and, with his hour-glass in his hand, he bore me on his
wings over the people in the midst the Great Exhibition.

H. (Whispering.) Rose, the old man had wings! Who
was he?

P. LIknow not how it all happened, but when we reached
the palace, the people inside had seen the sight. The splendid
carriages, and the pomp and show had gone away, and [I found
inside, the Queen and the Prince of the greatest nation of the
earth. There were other princes, nobles, and mighty lords, the
old warrior of the world, with his sword put up for ever—and
the great men of all degrees who had come from thousands of
miles. As I gazed through the bright and beautiful building,
and saw the long lines of faces, the many strangers in character
and in.dress, it seemed. that men from all countries of the earth
hadmet. Had met—not with fierce rage, or flaming sounds—
not diseased and dying with hunger and fatigue—not expiring

under a burning sun outside the gates of the city—but near

a




* Deus id vult, Deus id vult.
THE ADDRESS AND THE REPLY. 30

where the cool crystal fountain played, and murmured a sweet
soothing sound ; near the quiet shade of a noble tree ; under the
high arch of the transparent transept. There, surrounded by the
brilliant trophies of the arts of peace, more beautiful and plea-
sing than the trappings of war, there the second gathering of
the nations began.

The sound of a thousand voices had just ceased to breathe
their melody through the air, to the hymn of ‘ God save the
Queen,’ when the President of the Society of Arts, His Royar
Hicunass THE Prince Arsert, whose first difficulties you may
well remember, arose and read along address to Her Majesty.
It would take too long for me to tell you all of it, but I will
read to you the last and most striking parts :—

Having thus briefly laid before Your Majesty the results of our
labours, it now only remains for us to convey to Your Majesty our
dutiful and loyal acknowledgements of the support and encouragement
which we have derived throughout this extensive and laborious task,
from the gracious favour and countenance of Your Majesty. It is
our hearfelt prayer that this undertaking, which has Sor its end the
promotion of all branches of human industry, and the strengthening of
the bonds of peace and friendship among all nations of the earth, may,
by the blessing of Divine Providence, conduce to the welfare of Your
Majesty’s people, and be long remembered among the brightest cir-
cumstances of Your Majesty’s peaceful and happy reign,

Her Majesty then arose, and replied. Here are some of Her
Majesty’s cheering words.

I cordially concur with you in the prayer, that by God’s blessing
this undertaking may conduce to the welfare of my people and to the
common interests of the human race, by encouraging the arts of peace
and industry, strengthening the bonds of union among the nations of
the earth, and promoting a friendly and honourable rivalry in the
useful exercise of those faculties which have been conferred by a bene-
ficent Providence for the good and the happiness of mankind.

There, dear Henry! Does not your heart feel glad?. The ec
which rose in Christendom more than 700 years azo might we
386 THE PRAYER.

have been uttered again for the cause of Peace—‘ It is the will
of God’—‘ It is the will of God.’

Henry. Peace ts God’s will, always.

P. trae, and so said the Archbishop of Canterbury, for the
eee part of the service had yet to come. None forgot that
GOD was there; and after the reply of Her Majesty, there stood
up—not the Archbishop of Rome, but the Archbishop of Eng-
land. He arose to ask the divine blessing on this noble work.
He asked that it might be blessed to teach all nations more of
love, brotherhood, and peace. Hear some of his words.

* * * * *

Prayer.

And now, O Lord, we beseech Thee to bless thy work which Thou hast
enabled us to begin, and to regard with Thy favour our PuRPosE of knitting
together in the bonds of peace and concord the different nations of the earth ; for
avith Thee, O Lord, is the preparation of the heart in man. Of Thee it cometh
that violence is not heard in our land, wasting nor destruction within its
borders. It isof Thee, O Lord, that nations do not lift up the sword against
each other, nor learn war any more it is of Thee, that peace is within our
walls, and plenteousness within our palaces. Therefore, O Lord, not unto us,
not unto us, but unto Thy name be all the praise.

* * * * * * *

Both riches and honour come of Thee, and thou reignest over all. In thine
hand it is to make great and to give strength unto all. Now, therefore, O
God, we thank Thee ; we praise Thee, and entreat Thee so to overrule this
assembly of many nations, that it may tend to the advancement of Thy glory,
to the diffusion of Thy holy word, to the increase of general prosperity, by
promoting peace and good will among the different races of mankind.*



* This is only a part of the prayer which is too beautiful to be for-
gotten. It is so simple that a child may understand it, and it is there-
fore printed entire, that the children may read it often, and long
remember it.

Aumionty and everlasting God, who dost govern all things both in Heaven
and in earth, without whom nothing is strong, nothing is holy, accept,
we beseech Thee, the sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving, and receive
these our prayers, which we offer up unto Thee this day, on behalf of the
kingdom and people of this land. We acknowledge O Lord, that thou hast
multiplied on us blessings which thou mightest most justly have withheld. We
THE OPENING. 37

Then once more came the sound of the Organ. The thousand
voices again were heard, and the song of ‘Hallelujah’ ran
through the building, while the Queen and nobles walke
through the aisles of the palace, from one end to the other, until
they again reached the transept from whence they started. The
Queen then declared.

THE EXHIBITION OPENED.

P. Just at that moment, I missed my friend Time who had
brought me thither on his wings, and rubbing my eyes, I found





acknowledge that it is not because of works of righteousness which we have
done, but of Thy great mercy that we are permitted to come before Thee with
the voice of thanksgiving, and that instead of humbling us for our offences,
Thou hast given us cause to thank Thee for Thine abundant goodness. And
now O Lord, we beseech Thee to bless thy work which Thou hast enabled us
to begin, and to regard with Thy favour our purpose of knitting together in
the bonds of peace and concord the different nations of the earth ; for with
Thee, O Lord, is the preparation of the heartin man. Of Thee it cometh that
violence is not heard in our land, wasting nor destruction within its borders.
It is of Thee, O Lord, that nations do not lift up the sword against each
other, nor learn war any more, it is of Thee that peaceis within our walls, and
plenteousness within our palaces; itis of Thee that knowledge is increased
throughout the world, tor the spirit of man is from Thee, and the inspiratio n of
the Almighty giveth him understanding. Therefore, O Lord not unto us, not
unto us, but unto Thy name be all the praise. While we survey the works of
art and industry which surround us, let not our hearts be lifted up that we forget
the Lord our God, as if our own power and the might of our hands had gotten
in this wealth. Teach us ever to remember that all this store which we
have prepared cometh of ‘Ihine hand and is all thine own. Both riches and
honour come of Thee, and thou reignest over all. In thine hand it is to make
great and to give strength unto all. Now, therefore, O God, we thank Thee ;
we praise Thee, and entreat Thee so to overrule this assembly of many nations,
that it may tend to the advancmentof Thy glory, to the diffusion of Thy holy
word, to theincrease of general prosperity, by promoting peace and good-will
among the different races of mankind. Let the many mercies which we receive
from ‘Thee dispose our hearts to serve Thee more faithfully, who art the author
and giver of them all. And, finally, O Lord, teach us so to use those earthly
blessings which Thou givest us richly to enjoy, that they may not withdraw our
affections from those heavenly things which Thou hast prepared for those that
love and serve Thee, through the merits and mediation of thy Son Jesus Christ
our Lord, to whom, with Thee and the Holy Ghost, be all honour and glory.


38 BUCKINGHAM PALACE.

myself in the place where I had first met him in the Park; but
how I returned I cannot tell.

H. I think that you had been dreaming, pape.

P. Very likely--however, I remembere all that my spirit
had seen, and I also looked back on the past. I ought
how the idea of the Exhibition arose, and how the idea of the
palace arose, and now I had seen it made real. It was, as we
say ‘realized’—‘ Why’ I asked ‘ was it magnificent ?? Not be-
cause of the glitter and gold, but because God was there! the
God of heaven, where angels sing of peace on earth and of good
will towards men, deigned to smile on that day. He is the
source of high magnificence.

So, when we look back on the Exhibition of the Industry of all
Nations, we may truly think, how the idea was realized,—
magnificently !

Just then, I thought I heard a flapping of wings, and I
imagined that my friend ‘Time’ was flying over-head. I could
not see him, but I heard him singing contentedly to himself:
«“T have seen a grand day to day.” Yes,I cried to him—you
have seen one of the grandest days since the beginning of the
world, it tells us that there are even better days to come yet.

* * *

H. Papa. Here isa park! and I can see a pond. I think
that we must be near the Exhibition now. Shall I pull the
string, and ask the cabman ?

P. No, you need not do this—this place is called Piccadil'y.

Rose. And, what Papa, is that building in the distance
across the park ?

P. That is Buckingham Palace, where Her MAJESTY THE
QUEEN lives. This park is called the ‘Green Park;’ we shall
soon reach Hyde Park. Here is alittle drawing for you by
which “aa may see where we are, and what is the exact position
of the building.—See next page.
THE GOLDEN FRUIT. 39



Fig. 8.

ay.

Ppnererretne CB pepenn pase
nan hiram Anh ita A

ryt

Bitiiannaniin wn



-nnsemionitiniiinilaeitindasmsnnnt ftilisannshnaaiacigiithinii le aces

H. Yes, we have to pass Hyde Park Corner; and go up the
road to Knightsbridge. Have you finished your story, Papa ?
P. Not quite. Listen—

Chapter Stith. —
HOW IT BROUGHT FORTH FRUIT.

OME plants bring forth finer fruit than others. Just as
a sun-flower is like a golden flower—there are fruits called
= ‘ golden fruits.’

Rose. Yes. I have often read about golden fruits.

P. And such are some of the fruits of the Exhibition. It
has begun by bringing forth golden fruit in aremarkable degree.
Round medals of gold, called sovereigns, have rolled in every
day, in amazing numbers. They have been gathered from the
great crowds of people who have come to see it.

Here is a correct account of the large sums of money which
have been taken since the Exhibition was opened.—(See next
page.)
40

For ‘Season Tickets,’ to June 7th ......

DAILY RECEIPTS, ETC.

oa oe

Thursday 1
Friday .....-22 » 2
Saturday .....- », 3
Monday ...-.- 5, 9
TUE .cccccs pp §
Wednesday .... ,, 7
Thursday ..-- » 8
| a
Saturday ..... ,, 10
Monday .....- », 12
BOOOERY cccsee pp 13
Wednesday .... ,, 14
WMROEOT occsns gy 88
DE se snsvse op 16
Saturday ...... 5, 17
Monday ve
Teeedey ....00.00 99: 20
Wednesday .... ,, 21
Thursday ...... 5, 22
Priday ccscccce 9, 28
Saturday ...... ,, 24
Monday ...... ,, 26
RMOOERT: 66 ic doc 5) 27
Wednesday .... ,, 28
Thursday ....--. 5, 29
Friday ....c00+ 5, 30
‘Saturday .....- ,, 31
Monday ......June 2
Tuesday .:.... os oe
Wednesday. .. ,, 4
Thursday......-,, 5
BO ose cond HE
| PP FO me



Season Tickets only adraitted.

ll. £560 0 0
ll. 482 0 0
58. 1,362 0 0
58. 1458 0 0
5s. 1,790 0 0
5s, 2,018 0 0
55. 1,824 10 0
58. 1,843 15 0
5s. 1,597 10 O
58. 2,229 10 0
58. 2,064 15 O
5s. 2,426 0 0
58. 2.556 10 0
58. 2472 8 0
58. 2,345 0 0
58. 3,512 5 O
5s. 3,797 11 0
5s. 4,095 10 0
5s. 5,078 0 0
Is. 926 2 0
1s. 1,347 17 0
Is. 1,859 4 0
Is. 2,375 18 O
ged tee ee
1s. 2,129 1 O
1s. 2.415 2 0
Is 2,500 16 0
ls. 2,566 17 O
2s. 6d. | 2,558 11 0
5s. 1,506 10 0

65,976 13 0



£137,697 13 0

is



—-—-—e
TOTAL RECEIPTS TO JUNE 7th. 4]

Besides all this money, the subscriptions which you may re-
member, were collected by the Royal Commission, amounted
to £64,344. The Commissioners also received £3,200 from
Messrs Spicer, and Clowes, for the privilege of printing and
selling the Catalogues; also, for the privilege of supplying the
refreshments, £5,500 was paid. Suppose we add these accounts
to the larger one.

£137,697 13 0
64,344 0 0
33200 0 0
5,500 0 0
£210,741 13 0

H. What, papa, are the season tickets,’ for which so mucn
money was paid ? :

P. A ‘season ticket’ is a ticket which will admit the owner
to see the Exhibition on any day during the season in which it
is open. They cost £3 3s. each; I may as well tell you, also,
that only those people who possessed ‘Season Tickets,’ were admit-
ted on the 1st of May. All who went there on the 2nd and 3ra
May, paid £1 ; and all who went during the next three
weeks, paid 5s. each for admission. On what day of the month
would the three weeks after the 8rd May end?

H. ‘Twenty-one days after, that would be the 24th May.

P. True; and, since the 24th May, the rule has been that
all who go to the Exhibition on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,
or Thursday, shall pay 1s. each; those who go on a Friday, are to
pay 2s. 6d. and those who goon a Saturday, must pay 5s. each.

Now, by this list of the monies paid, you can easily tell how
many people have visited the Exhibition. How will you do so?

A. We will multiply the money received on the shilling
days by twenty, because every pound admitted — people ;
for the number on the half-crown days, we will multiply the
pounds by eight, because each pound paid for eight people; and
the money received on the 5s. days, we will multiply by four,
andsoon. Then we will add up all the numbers.
42 CIVILIZATION.—THE CRUSADES.

P. You may do so to-morrow; and the exercise shall form
your arithmetic lesson.

But this golden fruit, is not the best fruit of the Exhibi-
tion. Do you remember, what old Trme said of the first gath-
ering of the nations—of the Crusades ?

Rose. I, do, papa.

P. Now, when men write the History of Europe, and speak
of the Crusades, they show that out of evil came good, that na-
tions gained new ideas, they learned much of each other, and
much from each other. Thus, they became more ‘civilized.’
—‘ Civilization!’ that is a long word.

HT. Yes, it is, rather.

P. But suppose that you find out its meaning. And you
will understand what, in future days men will say, when they
write the History of Civilization. If from the gathering of men
for war, there came forth new ideas, how many new and bright
thoughts must be gained from this gathering for Peace. They
are its best fruits, and are now being gathered to be scattered
amongst ‘all nations.’ Ah! these fruits will last longer than
the golden ‘fruit.’ They will reach the very corners of the
earth, and will make refreshing gladness for weary spirits. So,
the bright gold coins, and still brighter thoughts from the Great
Exhibition, will show how it brought forth fruit—abundantly.

H. Papa, I think we are near the Palace. Look at the
number of empty cabs; here they come! two—four—seven—
ten; I think I could count a hundred in five minutes, and they
are all coming from the Exibition !

Rose. And the omnibuses which are coming from there.
Look! they are all empty. And how slowly we are moving
now! the horse cannot go on because of another cab in front.

H. Yes, I heard a policeman tell the driver to keep in the line.

P. Then we had better walk the rest of the way. You may
pull the ‘check string’ now Henry, and we will get out.


SS AEA y ISL AME
soe Eisele 268 gan =
ut the Secant.

WALKING THROUGH.

Chater Seventh.
THE TRANSEPT.
se A 5 7A, O CHANGE GIVEN. Read that,
ea) 62 Rose!” said Henry. “I suppose that
ec ( that is because it would take too
ce S much time, and we should have to wait.
4 \2 Keep close to me, I have taken hold of
w Papa’s coat. Now we are inside!
he \29 Rose. Oh!
: iS 7* % P. What do you say to it Henry ?
Henry. Oh! (Vide Frontispiece.)
P. Well what do you think of it ?
Henry. ve not begun to think, Papa. Iam looking. What
a large place it is! Is the roof really as high up as that P
P. Ido not know what height you mean by ‘that.’ It is
about as high as it seems to be !
' Rose. But, papa, there do not seem to be many people. I

cannot see a crowd.
P. There are I believe more than thirty thousand people






44 LOOKING AT THE NAVE.

here, which number you know is three hundred hundred; but
there is plenty of room for them, because the building is so
large. Come and see what a large place it is.

H. Don’t you remember the description, Rose? “33,000,000
cubic feet ?”

Rose. Ah, but then we only heard the number, it is so
very different now that we see the place—wait! I feel rather
‘nervous.’

P. But you have not seen it yet. Let us walk a little further
—to yonder glass fountain—then you will see the nave, which
will give you some idea of the length of the building.

Now, Rose!—from this fountain, you can see one of the
1ong aisles—how beautiful it is!

Rose. And how very long!

P. But that is only half the length of the building. That
is the eastern side of the nave—turn round and look in the
opposite direction. ‘This aisle which is of equal length, is the
western nave. You thus see what is meant by 1851 feet.

Before we begin our walk, you may iook at this little drawing
which will shew you the two principal aisles.




Fig. 9.
NORTH
ne
a
hal
”

NAVE ° NAVE
- 3
<
a
kK



SOUTH
THE ARRANGEMENT OF THE SPACE. 45

The side, at which we entered from the Knightsbridge Road,
is the south side, This opposite end of the transept is of course—

H. The north side. So the TRANSEPT extends from South
to North.

P. And the NAvE, Henry, extends you may see from east to
west. The western half of the nave, contains the objects sent
from different parts of Britain, and from her colonies. The
eastern half of the nave, contains the objects sent from different
parts of the WoRLD—from Foreign Countries.

H. And who does the transept belong to Papa?

P. Its two sides are divided between the British Exhibi-
tors and the Foreigners. On this, the western side are goods,
principally from India, a colony of Great Britain. On the
eastern side are goods from Tunis, Persia, and other Foreign parts.

Hf. Yes. There is the name PERSIA, hanging on that long
piece of red cloth; and INDIA, is printed on the opposite side.

FP. When the Royal Commissioners wanted to arrange the
divisions of the building, they decided that the middle of this
transept, should represent the middle of the world; and that
the western side should represent England and her colonies,
while the eastern side should represent the remainder of the
world. 7

Hf. J understand the arrangement very well Papa. Do you
Rose ?

Rose. Which do you mean ?

P. Why Rose, you have been looking at the foungain all the
time. I don’t think you have heard a word.
46 THE FOUNTAIN AND TREES.

Rose. Is it not pretty? See how the water dances !

H. Beautiful! And look at the statue of the Queen, on
horseback. The other statue is Prince Albert’s, I suppose.

P. These statues are those made by Mr. Wyatt. ‘The
Illustrated London News,’ says that they are not such good
statues as Mr. Wyatt can make, and he should have kept them
at home.

H. Well. JZ do’nt think so. I think that he was a good
man to make statues of the Queen and the Prince. It shows
that he thought more about them than of any one else.

Rose. Oh, but is it not all beautiful papa? I feel so glad!
Look, Henry, at the fine broad old tree. How fresh the green
leaves look! They make nice quiet shadows. And here are
some foreign trees, nearer.

And there !—there is a very pretty fountain, making a round
sheet of water, just the shape of the glass-case on our mantel-
piece, and Rose! peep through those iron-gates ?—there is some-
body selling cakes!

P. Refreshments, we call them Henry, that is ‘the Refresh-
ment department.’ Let us begin our walk.

Rose. Oh wait one minute, papa, please! I---I see some-
thing. What is that great shawl, hanging up in the gallery?

P. That, Rose, is nota shawl. Itis alarge carpet. It was
designed by agentlemen named Papworth; and it is 30 feet long
and 20 feet broad. When the designer had made the pattern
for the whole carpet, he divided it into about 150 squares.
These square pieces of pattern, were then sent to about 150
THE QUEEN'S CARPET. 47

different ladies ; and each lady worked the pattern of her square
in Berlin wool. As soon as the pieces were returned, they
were all united, and formed the large carpet you see hanging
up there.

f. Henry, I wonder how much the ladies were paid for
their trouble!

P. Not anything.

H, Oh, I suppose then, they are to be paid when it is sold.

P. No they did not work for money, but for love. The
carpet was made, as a present for the Queen. They made it
because they loved the Queen. They felt it an honour to be
able to please Her Majesty. Ladies will always work more for
love than for money,

Rose. And so will little girls, papa. Ido. But there are
plenty more carpets hanging up. Look all the way down there,
Henry! See, there is something covered with gold ornaments,
how the sun-light sparkles on it; my eyes are so dazzled—there,
I cannot see!

P. You are like the gentleman who passed me just now.
I heard him declare that he could not see anything

HT. Then, he was blind.

P. No; he meant that as soon as he began to look at one
object, his attention was drawn to another; and that before he
could look well at that, his eye saw something else more
beautiful; so he had not seen anything—properly.

Hf. Well, I can see plenty of things. Look at the ships
and boats, under the word Inpra. See what a number of
9

48 NO ‘f KICKING UP A DuUsT!

statues there are! There is a curious statue---the man has a
sword! what is he going to do to that little boy? Look at the
beautiful silk curtains (or shawls) in India! And, what can
that thing be--- over there!

P. You may well ask strange questions, Henry. Before we
walk down the nave, you may just look at the parts, mentioned
in my description. The large arches over your head, are the
great transept ribs which I spoke of. You can see now the
three iron columns, above one another, and the cross-pieces or
‘ girders.’

Rose. And you said papa, that you would tell us something
about the floor.

P. Yes. Look atit. You observe the planks are not close
together. There are large spaces between them, and through
these spaces the dust falls.

H. Ah! So that no one can ‘kick up a dust’—in this
palace!

P. No—it is all kicked down. And these same spaces also
serve to admit fresh air into the building: thus as I told
you, the planks have been useful in four ways—as hoarding,
flooring, dust-traps, and ventilators. Mr. Paxton, I believe,
remarked that the fine machines he had prepared for sweep-
ing the floors are not necessary, as the floors are kept clean
by the long dresses of the ladies. Look at that lady in a
blue silk gown, walking across the nave.

Hl. Well, you see what a beautiful place it is, to have
such fine ladies for its crossing sweepers,
THE ROYAL PORTRAITS, 49

Rose. And now you understand, Henry, why no one may
‘kick up a dust’ in the Palace of Peace. The ladies won't let
them do it.

P. Come, Rose, I see you are not nervous now, we will
walk down the long aisle, and take a general view.

Chapter Gighth.
THE ‘LIONS’ OF THE WESTERN NAVE.
$a14!4 shall notice only the most striking objects at first, the

e y lions of the Exhibition as they are called,
0) ys, HI. That is to show that they are the fincst I
suppose.

P. We will first travel eastward. Here are





I. Tue Porrrarrs or HER MAJESTY AND THE PRINCE.

Rose. Ah! here is the Queen !

P. No, it is only Her Majesty’s portrait—but it is a very
pretty painting. The companion picture of THE PRINCE ALBERT
is on the other side. Both portraits are painted on china.
These portraits are exhibited by Her Majesty—but the next
object is attracting more attention.

Rose. Do you mean, papa, this cage looking like our
parrot’s brass cage? I do not see anything in it.

FP. Indeed, there is something inside, which, if it could be
sold for the value set upon it, would pay for the whole Crystal
Palace; and for twélve more Crystal Palaces besides. Here is
50 THE KOH-I-NOOR'S ‘“‘ PROPERTIES.”

the inside’ for you to look at. Three diamonds! The large
middle one is called—the ‘ Koh-i-noor.’

Il. Tue Kou-1-Noor DIAMOND.

Rose. Papa; you are joking. How can you squeeze so
much value into such a little thing? Howcan it hold the worth
of 896,000 lbs. of bright glass in that little space ?

H. Besides the worth of the Zron, how much is a Crystal
Palace worth ?

P. About a hundred and fifty thousand pounds. Now
multiply that by thirteen.

H. Answer. Nineteen hundred and fifty thousand pounds.

P. And the Kon-1-Noor, is said to be worth TWENTY
HuNDRED THOUSAND Pounps, or £2,000,000, as we say. But
such a value is not a real one; itis the value set on it by men—
an artificial value we call it.

H. Itis a very remarkable thing, papa; what makes it so
valuable ? |

P. Five qualities which it possesses.

Ist. ‘Its brightness. 4th. Its scarceness.
2nd. Its hardness. 5th. Its size.
3rd. Its transparency.

The lustre of a diamond is its chief beauty, the second quality
the hardness renders it useful, for it is harder than any other
substance. The hardness assists to preserve its beauty,—if it
were soft it would more easily become tarnished. Its beauty is
increased by its third quality transparency, and its clearness from


KOH-I-NOOR.

THE KOH-I-NOOR’S VALUE AND HISTORY. 53

colour. Its beauty and use, however, would not give it this
great value. Suppose that diamonds were as plentiful as glass ?

H. No. It is the fourth quality, scarcity, which gives it
value. -

P. True, and the fifth one increases it. A diamond’s value
grows with its size.

You have, I dare say, seen an ounce weight; a penny often
weighs an ounce. If an ounce were divided into 150 parts, we
should call each part a carat. And it is by these little weights
that diamonds are measured. A diamond weighing 3 carats, is
worth £72—weighing a 100 carats, it is worth £80,000.

Hard as the diamond is, it may be acted upon by fire. Diamonds
have been burnt—burnt to ashes—or rather, to a black powder
—called charcoal. Think of that beautiful diamond, being
changed by fire into charcoal! It is composed of the same
substance, called ‘ carbon.’

Rose. But papa, how can it —_— so P—the particles of
charcoal are black !

P. And so are the particles of many a transparent thing.
The diamond is really only black particles of carbon, arranged
in such a manner that the light can pass through them—and
arranged so close-together, that the diamond is very hard. By
burning it, the arrangement of its particles is altered, and thus it
is transparent no longer.

HH, Where did the Queen find it papa?

P. It was givento Her Majesty. I almost forget its history,
but it would be too long for me to relate now. I, believe it
54 THE PRINCE OF WALES'S SHIELD.

belonged to some Persian Monarch—and was taken from him
by one of the GREAT MoGuLs who ruled India. 1t was then
stolen, or taken by force, from the great town of Delhi, by other
Hindoos; and in the last war, between the British and the
Sikhs, it was taken from Runjeet Singh, and presented to Her
Majesty. You know, I suppose, that Koh-i-noor means ‘Moun.
tain of Light.’ There are other diamonds in the Exhibition,
which we will talk of one day.

H. Here papa, is a beautiful circular shaped thing made
of whitish metal.

P. Yes, thatis exhibited by the Prince of Wales. It is

III. Prince or WALES’s SHIELD.

This shield was the gift of the King of Prussia, who was the
Prince’s godfather, when he was baptized. Look at the centre!
Here is a cross, and a beautiful head of our Saviour in the
middle.

Rose. And, who papa, are these four men? there is one at
each end of the cross.

P. They represent the four Evangelists, Matthew, Mark,
Luke, and John, who are supposed to be writing the gospels, or
accounts of what they have seen and heard of our Saviour.
We have not time to examine the shield now. You may ob-
serve the engravings of the twelve apostles, and the pictures to
teach Faith, Hope and Charity; it is a beautiful shield. Let
us pass on.

| IV. Spanish WINE JAR.
P. Here is a great Jar!
a















is *
. - ite
me =~

=
ne =
4 .

ke






ees


SPAIN. —INDUSTRY. 57

H. But you do not call this ugly thing one of the ‘Lions,’
papa P |

P. Yes I do—because it teaches me something. It makes
me think. This great jar is a wine-cooler, and is sent from
Spain. That country being at the very south of Europe, and
opposite to Africa, has a very warm climate. When the wine
has been made it must be kept cool, therefore it is poured into
jars like these, which are put down in the earth.

Rose. But what were you thinking about it, papa ?

P. I was thinking that it might teach us a sad truth:—
Riches may lead to poverty.

The Spaniards, with the gold they once procured from
America, were the richest nation in Europe. They were so
rich that many found they need not work to live—they became
» gentlemen’ and ‘grandees.’ But too many, when they thus
gained gold, lost the habit of industry.

Hf. Which is worth more.

P. Certainly. The people have never been very industrious
since; and this jar reminded me of the fact. The wine-manu-
facture is perhaps the principal one in Spain. Living under a
beautiful climate, if the people worked hard, and cultivated the
soil, it would yield them great riches, but no, that would cost great
labour! and the grapes grow there without trouble. Again,
the processes of pressing the grapes, and fermenting their juice,
are so simple, that the wine-manufacture is very easy. Another
source of riches in Spain, is tobacco, which is also easily culti-
vated, and manufactured; but, the manufactures which require
great industry, and attention, are not flourishing.
58 MANUFACTURES OF SPAIN.

Their merino sheep yield a fine and peculiar wool but the
greater part is exportedas ‘raw material.’ The metals of Spain
ought to yield much wealth. Long before America was dis-
covered, the Romans used to speak of this country, and of
the household articles made of silver. The Phoenicians when
they visited Spain, are said to have left their bronze anchors
here, and to have supplied their places with silver, loading their
ships with it,—but now, very few mines in the country are
worked. The great quicksilver mine is the most important.

Rose. "What are the manufactures of Spain ?

P. Not such as please me. In Toledo, the town from which,
I believe, this jar was sent, the hardest and sharpest of sword-
blades are made. ‘The Government of the country carry on this
manufacture, and that of tobacco, and gunpowder.

Think, Henry—wine, tobacco, gunpowder and swords! Men
may one day learn to discard them all! The wine manufac-
ture is no better than the other three, for wine may lead to
drunkeness ; and “ drunkeness kills more than the sword.”

Oh, when we talk of the fruits of this Exhibition, well may
we be glad! Many a Spaniard may learn in this building, from
the works of other nations, what industry is worth,—so, should
there be another Exhibition in 1951, perhaps, Spain may be
represented by far more noble things than this great wine-cooler!

Beautiful Spain! Thou ancient land of sunny clime, and fruit-
ful soil! may thy people gather new thoughts from here, and
may they learn how to shine forth once more, with higher, truer
glories then those of the Moor, and the ‘ olden time’! Let us
pass on again.
— ===



SS ee nee

E:WHIMPER.S¢.



H
Palit i
i U, OR = ,
ij / Sas TMT i
fe / /, Y} a = J. y , ma lk i
thf //, S62") . Le re
Vi Yy yD eT PA | | as (Li IAA) | a uf i
| In aa ae VUE V7 SL aly lp haf Lad ig, mien — $1) 5, we
a o = ath

. - ”%, GA #2 J >
a a ay ae, : -
AGL ‘ fi ¥ (J Sof 478
\h SG 4 ‘ 4 ' :
. tas Fae
ewe apes JM

Ss iD tI
d ty
yrs x oe p ;
. a —A! ‘ 4 j
Lf Ulan WEE, AA
\ = ;= ye SS | ‘
‘

; Xs A
=





Re -



= "S
ee -- > =
Sy nah = a. 5 sz
ia = 2 =i t
ACE geet rms a 3)
Byes Bs =) n
. . =
a yy

<= , Sse VW A
‘n S Ht ne’ ) ‘
ee BOS gli er i ieereertoc
NS SSS} Ae =~

THE MASS OF ROCK CRYSTAL,
THE QUEEN OF SPAIN’S JEWELS. 61

Rose. Will you just come over here for one minute papa ?
Here is a glass case full of diamonds—all twinkling! They do
twinkle so!

P. Ah these will shew you more of the character of Spain.
These are |

fe
V. THE QUEEN or SPAIN’s JEWELS.

They are sent from France by a great jeweller there, who made
them for the Queen of Spain three or four years ago. He went,
I believe, to that country, and borrowed them, that they might
be exhibited here. These jewels tell you that Spain, with all
her poverty, loves the pomp of her former riches. All true
Spaniards would I am sure rather have empty pockets, than
know that the Queen of ancient Spain was not ‘ properly’
decked with jewels.

ose. Will you wait one minute papa please ? Here is some-
thing, which I want you to see. We did not notice it.

Hf, Do you mean that ugly piece of Ah, what is it?

P, That is—



VI. THe Mass or Rock Crystat.

It is principally famous for its size, I believe. The other day
I saw a ‘Chinaman’ wondering at this object. He had a
a catalogue in his hand, but as it was not printed in Chinese he
could not use it. I therefore explained to him what Rock
Crystal zs.

Rose. Then tell us too, papa, please !


62 ROCK CRYSTAL.—THE ALPS.

P. Very well. It is a Hydrate of Silica.

Rose. Oh, papa I could never learn such a long name as that
—especially, in the Exhibition !

P. Then I may just say that rock-crystal—Look at it!
What do you think it is like?

H. Itis like a great transparent flint.

P. That ts it—exactly. It consists of the hard substance
which forms flint, and is called Silica ; and of a transparent
colourless substance called water. These are united so as to form
the half-transparent rock-crystal which is therefore called
‘Hydrate of Silica.’ When I was talking to the Chinaman
I taught him some Geography and History from this block.

H. ‘Then please let us hear that also, papa.

P. I told him to look on his map of Europe for a range of
mountains called the Alps ; and to see how the people who live
at the north of Europe must cross these Alps, to reach the
South. I next told him to read in his history book of a man
called Bonaparte. This great general once came to the Alps,
and finding that those high mountains must be crossed, he
caused a great road to be made through them, which we call the
Simplon.

Rose. But what has that to do with the rock-crystal papa ?

FP, The Simplon is the place from which this large mass
was procured. It belongs I believe, to the Duke of Devonshire.
Read the paper on the pedestal, and see.

Rose. Look papa, where Henry is!

P. Yes. He is noticing
Pages
64-65
Missing
From
Original
66 GODFREY DE BOUILLON.

Some of the pipes are very iong. One, the c ¢ c, measures 16
feet.

Rose. I wish papa, that the gentleman who is sitting there
would play—may I ask him ?

P. No, You will hear the organ before we leave, I dare say,
as this gentleman is here all day long.—Let us proceed.

Henry. Come here Rose, and look at this giant. I think it
is Goliath.

Rose. Or perhaps, it is Alfred the Great.

P. Itis an enormous statue, but it is not great’ enough for
Alfred the Great. It is a representation of

TV. GopFREY DE BOvILLON.

Look at him Rose! He has a bold determined countenance.
What a heavy looking war-horse he strides! What a strong
arm he must have had to have reined in so powerful an aniraal !
With what energy he is holding up the standard, and calling to
his companions in arms, ‘ Ho, to the crusades!’

H. Was he a crusader papa?

P. Yes, he was one of the leaders of the second crusade,
Here is a leader of the ancient gathering for war, come forward
in the midst of the gathering for peace.

H. That isnot right. Ho! Goprrey DE BovILLon! Go
home again! You are out of your place.

P. No. Heis better here. His days of glory are not yet
gone by, and never will be.

Henry. Why papa?
. \ me S oS Sk S = ae Ss
Te TE
eC aa

i
ai
|

Wen Lh

i ~ —* Zug — —
fi,
lidivs,

i



= <
a. ae
ON “‘ MIGHTY’ MEN. 69

P. Because he not only represents war but chivalry. He de-
clares, as he holds up his standard, “I will stand firm and will
fight, for all that is good and right.” That is ‘ chivalry.’

Rose. Well, and he deserves ‘ glory’ when he is so good as
that, and is anxious that every one should have what is right.

P. So he does! But, although the glories of his chivalry
will never pass away, they are being dimmed.

Henry. Why papa?

FP. Look at him!—Say to him, “ Why you are a mighty
man? Where is your might?” And he will tell you that it is
in his right arm. He will say that he is mighty because he
has the strength ot his horse, and the courage of a lion.

Rose. But he has a very determined spirit papa; that is a
fine thing!

H. And akind spirit too.

P. And, there you have the foundation of his glory! Fle
will always have glory because he had these two things; but,
now see why it is being dimmed. There are coming forth in
the present day—and they are begining to multiply—great
Heroes or Peace!

Rose. Have they a determined spirit papa ?

P. Yes, very; and if you ask one of these men of peace
“where is your might?” he will not shew you his right arm,
he'll tell you my might is not that of the brute! I believe in
the greater power of the human mind, and in the still greater
power of rove. Love, and reason! these are my strength; |
have more faith in these than I have in my right arm!
70 CAIN.— ST. MICHAEL AND THER DRAGON.

H. Thank youpapa. Hear now what I will say to Godfrey!
Sir Godfrey! we will always call you a great man, for you were
great in your time, but,—what shall I say papa? ©

P. Say that better days are now dawning; and in these
modern days we will say ‘ mighty man,’ not to him who ruleth
a horse, or taketh a city, but to him who ruleth his own spirit ! *
Pass on to the next. This is a statue of

X. Cain.

Cain with his innocent wife and children. Oh! it is a truly
beautiful piece! How often have I looked with sad feelings on
this poor man. He could not rule his own spirit ; and he was
the first murderer. Murdered hisinnocent brother, and brought
deep misery down on his offspring. Look at him!

tose. Ah, how he hides his face! I feel very sorry for him.

H. Papa! please come here! only look at this tall angel in
armour! I never knew before, that angels wore armour.

P. They wear no armour but the armour of righteousnesss.
These figures are the high archangel, St. Michael, and his
enemy.

XI. St. Micwarx anp THE Dragon.

In his hand the angel holds the sword of truth. ‘This two-
edged sword destroys evil, and no bad spirit can bear the
wounds it makes. ‘The old dragon, the father of sin, has fallen

down before it.
KK Ny
* He that ruleth his spirit is better than he that taketh a city.
Prov. XVI. 32.
i



Mi ’ 7 Z y yy Yy 4 , y /), yf hp tf .
iii) TU V4 Vy Li YJ Le L by YY

G
Wf d

iia

8ST. MICHAEL AND THE DRAGON.

MAZEPPA.—ACHILLES.—THE AMAZON. 73

Rose. So he has Henry! look at his sharp finger-nails. He
has lost his hold of the rock.

P. And how peaceful and firm the angel looks! with what
majesty does he hold up his arm! he seems to say co! Let sin
and sorrow fall, and leave this world for ever!

We have passed two beautiful little sculptures of a Boy anp
A Serpent, and his deliverer Tusk Doc, but these we will
examine another day.

Here is a statue of Mazepra, another of the ancient hero
AcuILLEs, wounded in his heel.

Rose. Look at the crowd of people around that curtain!

P. Yes, they are examining a beautiful sTarnED GLAss
wInpow, but we will leave it, and pass on to something which
will interest you more.

H. Do you mean, papa, this great bronze horse, rearing up
on his hind legs. Why look Rose! no wonder he starts! a lion
or some strange animal has rushed upon him!

Rose. And, who is that sitting on the horse, holding up a
spear ? it looks like a woman.

P., Come round to the front of the statue, and you will see

XII. THe Amazon.

HT, Wook Rose at that great fierce beast! how savagely he
has seized upon the noble horse!

Rose. Ah, I can’t look at that; I am looking at the woman.
Now, does not she look steadily at the lion? see! she is not at
all afraid.

Henry. But look at the horse’s eye, and his nostril !


74 PHYSICAL FORCE.—MORAL FORCE,

Rose. No, I would rather not; oh no, no! I cannot look at
anything but this woman. How firmly she sits upon the horse.
She is not afraid of falling, and she seems to be thinking of the
lion as she looks at him.

P, Let me tell you something about that statue. Professor
Kiss, who formed it, is I am sure, a good man; and this fine
statue of his, seems made to prove all we said of Godfrey de
Bouillon ; and to teach the same lesson as that of St. Michael

Did I not tell you that moral force is greater than physical
force ?

fose. I don’t understand those words, papa.

P. Imean that the power of the mind is greater than any
power of body. What do you think will make that lion fear ?

Rose. The javelin that she is holding up to him.

P. No—not that. What can a javelin do against the
strength of a lion? It is that those eyes of the Amazon can
speak, and the rude brute can read their language. They shew
him a calm, fearless expression, saying “ Lion! my spirit is greater
than thine. Be gone! and do not show thy savageness to me.’

Rose. And do you think that he will mind?

P. Yes. That very look of the Amazon will make him
forget his own strength of body—her nobleness has so awed
him that he can only feel his own baseness.

Henry. He has a rather skulking look Rose,

P. And yet a look of the fiercest savageness. Look at all
three once more! There is in the fierce wild-beast the lowest
and basest kind of expression ;—in the tame animal, the com-


HISTORY OF AMAZONS, 77

panion of man, there is a nobler countenance ;—but in the
woman, the highest created being, there is high dignity, which
shews that she was made ‘in God’s image,’

Let us go on again—

H. What papa is meant by an Amazon ?

P. The Amazons are a fabulous race of female warriors. It
is said that in ancient times there was a great battle, in which
nearly all the men of a certain city, who went out to fight, were
slain. The women of the city therefore resolved to defend it,
and taking up arms, were more successful than their husbands,
for they defeated their enemies. They then determined to live
without men in future and accordingly they put to death all
who remained, and elected two queens,

Rose. And did they fight any more ?

P. Unfortunately, history says they did. The women becameso
fond of fighting, that while one queen governed at home, the
other was always out on the battle field. Itis said that they
founded the cities of Ephesus, and Smyrna, in Asia Minor. They
themselves lived on the borders of the Caspian Sea. There is
great uncertainty in all that is recorded of them. Some do not
believe that such a race of women ever existed. It is said that
they were also found in Africa ; and in the present day, I believe,
one of the black kings of Africa, the king of Dahomey, has an
army of female warriors.

H. But did the Amazons ride on horseback, papa ?

P. Yes, it is said that they were the first who fought on
norses ; but, the African Amazons rode on horseback !
78 BAVARIAN LION.—GREEK SLAVE,

Rose. Here is an enormous lion papa!—

P. This statue is
XIII. ‘Tue Bavartan Lion.
An account of whichI read to you from the newspapers. It isa

striking object, not only as an imitation of nature, but because
ofits size. It is a wonderful specimen of metal casting. What
4 mass of metal it is! and yet, how perfect is each small part!
It stands now just as it was taken from the mould; no file or
other tool has touched it since it was cast. The city of
Monticu in Bavaria, from which it was sent, is very famous for

casting bells and statues—
H. Look, Rose, at the two horses !
P. We will not examine them to day—there are several

other interesting objects—statues of Adam and Eve—a model
of the Falls of Niagara—a block of Zinc, weighing 164,000lbs,

troy. Here is something more interesting than any---this is a

statue of }
XIV. Tue Greek SLAVE.

It tells a dreadful tale, for you to remember. We often hear
of the slave-trade, but few of us feel enough horror and shame
at so wicked a business. How would you like your mamma to
be taken away, and to be chained, and thus held up for sale ?*

Rose. Oh, that would be a horrible thing, papa !

P. Not more horrible than the case of this young Greek,
The cruel Turks, in former times, conquered Greece; and the
female prisoners, it is said, were taken to the bazaar in Con-
stantinople for sale. See with what scorn, and yet with what
same and sorrow she looks on the men who wish to purchase her {
LACE FROM BELGIUM. 79

You may look very long at this statue and think of it very
often; and learn from it to feel ashamed, and ever lift up your












voice against such wicked traffic as the slave-trade.
We will not return through the nave, but we will go back
to the transept by the north gallery.
THE NORTH GALLERY.
3 ie APA. We must not stop to day, to examine the articles
¢ I LS * in the Austrian department are some curious specimens
of pictures.

Rose. How are they made papa? The trees are raised

P. That is the question I asked myself, when I first saw
them. But in examining them very closely, I found that they
consisted of hair.

P. Yes—we are passing through BELGIUM.

In these cases are three wax figures of the Pope, Arch-
bishop Fenelon, and another. Belgium is a country which has
of the Pope! I should think that you have never before seen
anything so delicately or so beautifully worked.

Rose. But papa, will you read this paper—it says that one

Chapter inth.
above the paper, and seem like real trees.
H. What a crowd there is round these glass cases, papa!
long been famous for its lace. Look at the beautiful vestments
person worked on this piece of lace for five years.
80 WAX-DOLLS, AND RAG-DOLLS.

Henry. Come here Rose ! just round the corner, there is a
large wax figure of a lady—covered with lace.

P. Yes we will go and look at it. The lace on this figure
surpasses that on the pope, I think.

Rose. The Lady looks as though she were covered with dew
drops.

P. If you come forward a little nearer to the transept,
you will see something particularly suited to your taste, Rose.

Rose. Isee what you mean, papa. Here Henry, is a case
full of wax dolls, Oh papa, I should like to stop here for an
hour, I never saw such a number of dolls together before—
they are just like a public meeting.

H. And look at that dear little black doll, Rose. The
word ‘ Arrica,’ is written under it.

P. Yes. You may observe that there is one doll from each
large division of the globe—one from Europe; another from
Africa; and another from America ; each doll well represents
the character of the race it belongs to. Here is also a small
case of rag dolls.

Rose. They are very beautiful too, papa, they look like wax
exactly. Oh, papa, we can never examine all the beautiful
things in this building!

P. Do not say ‘never,’ Rose. You would certainly have
to visit the Exhibition a great many times--more than a
hundred, perhaps, You may now come with me to examine
some cases full of wax flowers.

Here they are! but I cannot Jet you look at them very long,
PROPER WORDS. 81

you would stand round them all the day, and say “ beautiful,”
“beautiful,” until you could not say it any longer.

Rose. So they are beautiful, papa; lovely! delicious!

P. Do not use such a word as that Rose---‘ delicious’ is not
used to express any qualities which please the eye.

H. No. We say—‘delicious taste.’

P. Soif you want to express the feelings you have in looking
at the Exhibition, you had better keep to the words ‘ wonder-
ful!’ ‘beautiful,’ ‘most beautiful !"—‘magnificent,’ ‘splendid,’ ‘most
magnificent,’ ‘most extraordinary’—‘astonishing’—and so on.

H. Well, I should like to make some new words; I think
that, the things must be tired of hearing those old words said
to them so often.

P. True; perhaps they have been uttered some millions of
times, they are dropping from the lips of tens of thousands of
people all day long.

Rose. Well, papa.—I must say ‘beautiful’ again, here is a
beautiful camelia, I will say ‘a magnificent one,’ because it is so
large. 3

P. The truth is, Rose, it is not a camelia at all. It isa new
water lily of gigantic size, and is truly one of the ‘lions’ of
the Exhibition. You will, I think, say so when you hear its
history. It is called

XV. Tue VicTorIA REGIA.

You may examine it. Notice its immense leaves, how broad,
mooth, and flat they are! The Victoria-Regia has become
82 THE VICTORIA REGIA,

celebrated not only because of its size, but because it may al-
most be said to be the parent of the Exhibition.

H. How can that be, papa, will you please to tell us ?

P. Yes, I have in my pocket a copy of Houssnotp Worps,
in which there is an account of this lily. Let us go a little
further to yonder red seats, in the corner of the gallery, we can
then look down into the transept.

Rose. So we can, Henry; and we have come all the way back
again to our friend the glass fountain.

P. Now, while you sit here and rest, you shall hear a few
words concerning the Victoria-Regia :—

‘*‘ On New Year’s Day in the year 1837, a traveller was proceeding,
in a native boat, up the river Berbice in Demerara, when, on arriving
at a point where the river expanded, his attention was attracted by an
extraordinary object. He caused his crew to paddle quickly towards
it. The nearer he approached, the higher his curiosity was raised.
Though an accomplished botanist, and especially familiar with the
‘Flora’ of South America, he had never seen anything like it before.
It was a Titanic water-plant, in size and shape unlike any other known
plant.

‘*¢T felt as a botanist,’ says Sir Robert Schomburgh ‘ and felt
myself rewarded! All calamities were forgotten. A gigantic leaf,
from five to six feet in diameter, salver-shaped, with a broad rim, of a
light-green above, and a vivid crimson below, rested upon the water !
Quite in character with the wonderful leaf was the luxuriant flower,
consisting of an immense number of petals, passing in alternate tints
from pure white to rose and pink’ [and, in some instances, measuring
CLL PTE y
CLs. ial

Ke
bes
SSS

= Ahi Lia

TIT TUT LLL



THE VICTORIA REGIA.
THE VICTORIA REGIA-HOUSE. 85

fifteen inches across], ‘ The smooth water was covered with blossoms ;
and, as I rowed from one to the other, I always observed something
new to admire.’

‘« But, Sir Robert Schomburgh, not content with mere flowers, dug
up whole plants ; and sent first them, and, afterwards seeds, to Eng-
land, where the magnificent lily was named the ‘ Victoria Regia.”’
After some unsuccessful attempts, the task of forcing it to blossom in
an artificial climate, was confided to Mr. Paxton. When the Victoria
Regia was to be flowered, Mr. Paxton determined to imitate Nature
and make the flower fancy itself back again in the broad waters and
under the burning heats of British Guiana. He deceived the roots by
imbedding them in a hillock of burned loam and peat ; he deluded
the great lubberly leaves by letting them float in a tank, to which he
communicated, by means of a little wheel, the gentle ripple of their
own tranquil river ; and he coaxed the flower into bloom by manu-
facturing a Berbician climate in a tiny South America, under a glass
case.

‘‘ With that glass case our history properly commences.”’

Mr. Dickens then goes on to say that, under this glass case,
the lily grew rapidly. So successful was the plan of its culti-
vation, that in little more than a month it out-grew its home,
and Mr. Paxton was obliged to set to work, and make a very
large green-house for it. As this building was for a most per-
severing and assiduous plant, which grew at the rate of six
hundred and forty seven square inches per day, Mr. Paxton
found it necessary that the new conservatory should be sixty
feet long, and forty broad.
86 THE GLASS PALACE.

This pretty building, called the Vicroria Rec1a Howse, saw
built of iron and glass, and it was from this, that Mr. Paxton
derived the idea of the Crystal Palace.

H. Which we may call ‘The Atsert House.’

Rose. Sothat the Victoria Regia might, almost, be called the
Parent of the Palace. If there had been no Victoria Regia
there would have been no “ Victoria Regia-house ;” and if
there had been no Victoria Regia-house, there would not per-
haps have been a Crystal Palace.

H. No, because even if Mr. Paxton had thought of it, he
would not have liked to make such a large building of iron and
glass; if he had never made one before, he would have been
afraid that it might not answer.

Rose. And, so would every one else have been. But, papa,
do look at the fountain again! see, there is the sun shining upor
the water as it rises and falls. Really, there are some little mugs
near it, and some of the people are drinking the water— I feel
very thirsty.

P. Then, you shall soon go to the refreshment room. I will
only, therefore, add one or two words on .

XVI. THe CrysTAL FOUNTAIN.

P. Ineed not tell you that the fountain is very beautiful.

H. No we can see it.

P. And it isan object rather to be seen, than to be described,
if you wish to gain an idea of its beauties. It has been called
‘Crystal’ because of its transparency. I do not think that by
We
s

Lega

anaes

ee
4

ae
Se ad ;
a <



ss + CT ee Tl

THE CRYSTAL FOUNTAIN. 89

any words we could give an exact idea of itselegant shape. It
contains altogether about 40 ton of flint-glass, and is 27 feet
high. Let us go down stairs and examine it more closely,

* * * * *

Now that we are nearer, can you see the water as it rises
upward through the tubes ?

Hf. I cannot, papa. ;

P. That is because the tube inside the glass, through which
the water flows upward, is silvered. ‘The glass pillar is also so
cut outside, and arranged, that this tube cannot be seen. The
whole fountain has been made by Messrs. Osler of Birmingham,
who have now become very famous as glass manufacturers. Let
us now go to the north of the transept —beyond ‘the iron
gates—

Rose. Where the refreshments are.

* * * * *

Chapter Centh.
THE WESTERN NAVE.
RZEAVING now rested, and refreshed ourselves, let us
(AWAG look at the ‘Lions’ in the western nave.
peek iH. I call that high framework, with so many beauti-
ful silks on it, a ‘ lion.’
P. Soitis. It is called
XVII. Tue Sik Tropny.
Do you know where Spitalfields is 2



90 THE SILK TROPHY.

H. Yes, it is near Bishopgate Street.

P. It is the principal place in London for the silk manu-
facture. The other silk towns in England are, Macclesfield,
Derby, Coventry, and Manchester. This trophy is arranged in
three ‘tiers-—and in the lower tier you may observe large
mirrors.

Rose. Yes, and I have been observing myself in one.

H. But, I observe the colours the most, papa. What a
beautiful red that is, and what a rich green! The crimson,—
the blue,—the brown figured silk—the bright golden coloured
silk, all these are very beautiful. Who sent it to the Exhibition,
papa ?

P. It was sent from Spitalfields by Messrs. Keith and Co.
It must have cost them very much money, for all this silk was
sent from their house alone.

Rose. Look, Papa, at these fancy silks with the pretty
patterns upon them.

P. Yes, these may teach you what men can do when they
try. {ae French people have more imagination than the Eng-
lish—and they therefore imagine (or design) patterns for silks,
&c., which are much more elegant than ours. So, we find that
the English people have been more famous for plain, than for
fancy silks; and, instead of trying to find English artists to
make silk-patterns, they have used patterns from France.

H. 1 should think, papa, that if the English would only
study how to make patterns, they might design some as good as
the French ones !
THE PEOPLE OF NANTES. 91

P. Yes, and the Exhibition has taught them this. The
men of Spitalfields, when they heard of the Exhibition, were
at first afraid to enter into ‘ competition’ with the French.
However, these silks which Messrs. Keith exhibit, prove that
the English manufacturers would in time (if they studied as you
say) become quite as good designers as the French.

H. And perhaps they might have been so before, if they had
tried. But, if the English and French compete with one another,
that will be rivalry. ‘Then they will become enemies !

P. No, that need not be. By such rivalry men may teach
each other, and become better friends. When men become
very busy with such rivalry as this, they will not have time for
the dreadful rivalry of war.

H. And the unprofitable rivalry too !—because the more the
people gain by peaceful rivalry, the more they will see what they
lose by war.

P. Let us go to the next ‘lion.’ I might as well tell you, by
the way, that the manufactures in Spitalfields were begun by
French people, 165 years ago. France, you know, is a Toman
Catholic country, but there is a town in France called NANTES
which was inhabited by Protestants. The Roman Catholic
priests were so angry with these people for being Protestants,
that they would have killed them, if they had dared. But this
they could not do, as a law (or edict as it was called) had been
made to protect them. In the course of time, however, there
came to the throne a king called Louis XIV. This king de-
clared that he liked ‘uniformity’ all through his kingdom ; and
92 SPITALFIELDS.

that all his people should be of the same religion; and that all
the Protestants must become Catholics. So, he was easily
persuaded by the priests to destroy the edict which protected the
Protestants, or to revoke it as we say. You may read in the
History of France of “ THE REVOCATION OF THE EDICT OF
NANTES.”

Rose. What happened next, papa ?

P. Next happened most horrible deeds. When it was found
that the people of Nantes would not become Catholics, their town
was attacked by the people, and the agents of the government. It
is supposed that about 25,000 people were either shot, drowned,
or died in prison. Thousands of citizens, however, escaped,—
being some of the most skilful and industrious manufacturers of
France-—some fled to Switzerland, others to Germany, and
Holland; and others to England, where they settled, and es-
tablished the manufactures which we now find in Spitalfields.

Rose. Was this the beginning of the silk manufacture in
England ?

P. Almost. The manufacture was of very little importance
before then—you see what it is now.

H. Are you going to stop at this place, papa ?

P. Yes, what do you say to this object ?

H. That it isa great ugly pile of all manner of things.

P. It may not appear so beautiful as some other objects,
but is very interesting. It contains numerous useful materials.
Have you never heard of Canada’s ancient forests? of the fine
patriarchal trees, which have existed for thousands of years ?
CANADIAN TIMBER.—WHALE’S JAW. 93

They are said to have lived before the Deluge. This pile
represents the

XVIII. CANADIAN, AND VAN Dreman’s LAND TIMBER.

Around it, you see specimens of many useful and ornamental
woods, which render the colonies of Canada and Van Dieman’s
Land so very valuable to England. Here is a fine piece of
wood—it is a slab of Canadian black walnut. Itisas hard, and
can be brought to as fine a polish as the French or Italian Walnut;
and it has, I think, amore beautiful grain. The tree from which
this was cut, yielded, I believe, 27,000 feet of timber.

Rose. But how many different sorts of wood there are! I
should like to count them. '

P. Iwould rather that you should understand them. This
pile of woods might afford you many a day’s study—you shall
hear more of them when we begin our ‘ Object Lessons.’—Let
us go round and look at something which is leaning against the
back of it.

H. This looks like a jaw.

P. It is the jaw-bone of a whale. Look at the number
of teeth it has. Its molars (grinding teeth) have a curiously
flattened surface.

Rose. Yes—they look just like pieces of a tree, which have
been sawn off straight. I have been counting the teeth—there
are twenty-three on each side ; but I thought papa, that whales.
had no teeth, I have read ina Natural History book, that whales
have whalebone in their mouths, instead of teeth.
94 SPERMACETI.

P. Those are the whalebone whales, found in icy Greenland;
but the whale from which this jaw was taken, lives in the South
Seas. The south sea whales have teeth—and they yield a very
valuable substance, called SPERMACETI.

H. And, if you read this paper which is hanging to the jaw,
Rose, you will see that it says, “ THE JAW OF A SPERM-WHALE.”

Rose. Yes, I will read the rest. “ This whale yielded 10 tuns
of oil, or 2,520 gallons, valued at £850 :—it was captured by the
PRINCE REGENT whaler, on : but where is papa? There
he is!’ He has gone away, and Henry too,—You are peeping
into a little box, papa!

P. Ican see a great number of ‘ boxes’ inside this one. It
is a model of the celebrated OPERA Hovsk, called ‘ Her
Majesty’s Theatre ;’ it is here that Jenny Lind used to sing—and
here, that the wonderful singers from Italy, and France, still
astonish the English people.

H. Here is a very fine looking-glass papa !

P. Yes, we cannot stop to examine many more objects to day.
There is, just beyond the looking-glass, the statue of one of
England’s most celebrated Queens. She lived in the age of
chivalry and war. While her husband, Edward the Third, was
in France, she met David the king of Scotland at Neville’s-cross,
near Durham, and defeated him. He had come to England,
thinking that, as the king was away, he could easily conquer a
woman,—but he was mistaken. He was taken prisoner, at nearly
the same time when the king of France was brought in captivity
to England.


MONUMENT OF QUEEN PHILIPPA. 95

I like this Queen, however, not only for her dauntless spirit,
but for her love of mercy. You have, I dare say, read of the six
citizens of Calais, who, when the city was surrended to Edward
after a siege, were to be hung.

Rose. ¥es, papa, and she saved their lives. She asked her
husband, Edward IIL, to spare them. What was the Queen’s
name ?

P. Her name was Queen Philippa. Her monument in
Westminster Abbey had decayed, and this is a restoration of it.
{t is executed in English alabaster.

H. Then, as it is a nice monument, we will put it amongst
the ‘ lions.’

XIX. MoNUMENT OF PHILIPPA, QUEEN OF Epwarp III.

P. Here are many more nice objects: several GOTHIC ORNA-
MENTS, a beautiful FoUNTAIN, and so forth. But—

H. Were is some pretty work, papa. I think that it is
CARVING work.

P. Yes, this is worth remembering. It is a specimen of

XX. MACHINE CARVING.

P. This may well be called a ‘trophy,’ as, I see, it is named
in the Catalogue.

H. What does that mean, papa?

P. A trophy is generally understood as a sign of victory,
Many of the objects are I find called ‘trophies,’—they speak
certainly of peaceful victories. A French writer (Jules Janin)
96 MACHINE-CARVING.

speaks of certain ‘warriors of industry’ whom he heard talking
over their victories, when on his passage to England—I will read
to you—

As the conversation proceeded I inwardly admired the zeal and ardour
of these workmen artists. There were seated about that table dyers,
who explained to us, with the enthusiasm of a warrior at Marengo or
Austerlitz, their recent conquests over indigo, their battles, their
triumphs, their defeats, in their conflict with the purple of the East or
the blue of Prussia.

There were cotton and flax spinners, fanatics in their craft, who
detailed to us, with all the forms of an epic, the transformations of
cotton and wool; this man excelled in giving form to the tissue of the
other ; that man, with the steel of his neighbour, produced inimitable
neatness and delicacy ; and all together, on the eve of the great struggle
about to commence, were seized with trembling and emotion.

In this passage of the French writer, Henry, is one of the
ideas which you and all boys will do well to learn. Here is an
idea which is being spoken, not only by writers of France, but
by men of Germany, of Austria, of Belgium, and even of Russia.

H. What is the idea papa?

P. Iwill tell it to you; and will teach it to you, over and
over again, from the objects in this Exhibition. You heard of
the victory which belongs to ‘ mighty men’—the victory over
one’s own spirit. Now, even the victories of which those dyers
talked, the victories in useful arts, are better than those of war.
The steam-engine is a victory. Itisa victory of man’s mind and




a

mo
ao =

Se
—_—

we
a

oo

SS

Sea
er ~ sey \
\

\\ \ yn

rx





Ro

=







|
Ee eS =
bie

jee

——_—_—— ice

—

MP"





nah

INUTTDPYVOUO Ee eesee=——

ee

—_—_—_—

THE MASS OF CRYSTALLIZED ALUM.
THE STEAM-ENGINE, A VICTORY.. 99

skill over the elements, making them his servants. What
victories there were to be gained before that ‘silk trophy’ could
be produced! Even in a few inches of cotton, there are tales of
conquests requiring more skill than Napoleon’s greatest battle.
Such skilful victories cost no tears—they are for the good of
man !

Rose. And why, papa, do they call this carving a trophy ?

P. Not only because of its beauty. You would if you
knew the man who made the carving, have said, ‘ What efforts
you must have made to carve such beautiful birds, flowers, and
leaves! How carefully you must have cut such delicate
tracery,—how did you cut so deeply underneath each object ?”

H. I should like to know how he did it.

P. But these carvings show greater skill than if they. had
been the work of man’s hand. The man who made them did not
carve them, directly, of himself, but he made certain machines
do his work for him. Think what care must have been required,
to make machines do work like-this! What. a true trophy it is
—carving by machine !

Rose. Here papa, is another curious. object,—it looks like
rock-crystal.

P. You may put your tongue to it, and taste it..

H. Iwill, papa. Ah, the taste is very sharp! - It tastes like:
Alum.

P. Itis Alum. Let us talk of

XX. THE Mass oF CRYSTALLIZED ALUM.

Rose. Are you going to tell us how it is made, papa ?-
100 CRYSTALLIZED ALUM.

P. Yes, if you like—if you can understand. It is composed
of ‘ Sulphate of Alumina, united with ‘Sulphate of Potash?

H. I think that that will be very hard to understand, papa,
will it not ?

P. Not very—it is possible to understand almost anything,
if you pay attention. We will take a little bit at a time, and
you will see—Ist. Sulphate of Alumina. Alumina consists
of a white shining metal called Aluminum, united with the gas
Oxygen, forming a rust or oxide.

Rose. So Alumina is Oxide of Aluminum—ust’ we may call
it.

H. And we read in ‘Pleasant Pages,’ that Alumina is com-
mon clay or Argil.

P. Well, Sulphate of Alumina is Alumina or common clay
mixed with Sulphuric Acid. There is a certain clay which is
obtained near Whitby, in Yorkshire, called Alum-clay, or
Alum Slate, which contains Sulphate of Alumina mixed with
various impurities. If you go there you will find a great
stratum of this clay.

H. Astratum, I know, means a slice of earth. How large
is this slice of Alumc-lay ?

P. Itisa very good sized slice—for it is about 28 miles long,
and extends 18 miles north of Whitby. It is a very thick slice
also ; it goes down very deep in the earth, and rises up to a great
height—there are cliffs of alum-clay 100 feet high, and more—
even as high as 750 feet, and all this stratum contains ‘Sulphate
of Alumina’ for the English people to make their alum with.
ALUM CLAY. 101

H. - How do they get out the ‘Sulphate of Alumina? Do
they pick out little bits with their fingers ?

P. No. That would be impossible—its very minute particles
could not be distinguished from the other substances in the
‘Alum-clay,’ No !—heat is necessary to separate them. When
alum-clay is put on a fire, the heat causes all its particles to
separate, and arrange themselves differently.

Rose. Ah, I have often heard of the particles being separated
by heat; and I suppose that, when the Alum-clay is heated, all
the particles of ‘ Sulphate of Alumina,’ and all other particles
which are alike, arrange themselves together—in classes as we
might say.

P. Yes. Now, if you understand that clearly, you may at
once see how this mass of alum was made.

To form a piece of alum of such a weight, the men of Whitby
require about 130 times as much ‘ Alum-clay.’ So they set to
work—they make a large flat bed of brush-wood and small coal,
for a fire, and pile pieces of the Alum-clay upon it. The fireis
lit, and the whole mass burns slowly—sometimes the men wish
to make a great quantity of alum—so they make an enormous
burning mass of fire and clay—Two Hundred feet square! And
this great mass they pile up higher and higher, until it is 100 feet
high.

Rose. Why, that is higher than, yonder transept, papa!

P. True. Try and think what a vast heap it must be! It
continues to burn for months.

By this fierce process, the particles of ‘ Sulphate of Alumina’
102 HOW ALUM IS MADE.

are separated from the mass. They are next dissolved in water;
and whilst thus dissolved, Sulphate of Potash is thrown into the
water, and it is all stirred up together. ‘hus, the alum is made.
‘Sulphate of Alumina,’ Sulphate of Potash, and water, mixed
together. Only, it is then in a liguid’state,—how do you think
it became solid again ?

H. Just as salt does. If you throw a lump of salt into a
glass of water, and dissolve it, you can get all the salt out
of the glass again. The water will evaporate; and leave the salt
at the bottom. Is that the way, papa ?

P. Yes, the waterin which the alum is dissolved evaporates;
and the alum, in drying, forms the crystals you now see. Both
Wuirpy and Grascow are famous for their alum.

Rose. I wonder what is the use of alum.

P. It is used as a medicine, and in various arts. In dyeing
it is also useful to fix, or bite in, the colours used.

‘ Rose. So, that they may not wash out.

P. And, therefore, the dyers call it a mordant—a word
derived from the Latin, mordere to bite. This use in dyeing
is its principal use.

H. Before we leave the alum, papa, will you come and look
at these crystals ? Here are some beautiful red ones. The red
is very bright. :

Rose. And: here is one quite yellow. Here are some of a
bright green colour, and there is a beautiful blue one a little way
off.

P- Yes, most of these are formed by combining an acid


SLAB OF HONDURAS MAHOGANY. 105

with Potash, or some metal. You shall know more about them
soon. Let us look at this large slab of mahogany.
XXII. Stas or HonpurAs MAHOGANY.

This is brought from Honpuras, a place situated in the land
between North and South America— Central America it is called.
This slab does not interest many of the visitors,—but one day I
noticed several men passing down the aisle, when one who wore
a flannel jacket, stopped, and cried out to his companion.
‘Here ! this is the thing for us!’ and they all clustered around it
as busy as bees, while one took a rule out of his pocket and
measured it. Even when the others had passed on, he stopped
to talk about it to a gentleman who was with him.

H. How large is it, papa? !

P. Ihave forgotten its dimensions, and I have not a rule
with me; we will measure it the next time we come. The
largest log of mahogany I ever heard of, measured 57 inches
across, and 64 inches from top to bottom. When we measure
the one before us, we will see whether it is as large, or larger.

lose. What fine looking trees the mahogany trees must be!
for their great trunks to be as broad as this slab, all the way up;
it would take me some time to walk round such a tree.

P. There are higher trees than the mahogany tree, but few
have a nobler appearance. It grows for two centuries, and is
then an imposing sight, not only from its gigantic trunk, but
from its massive branches, and its rich green shining leaves. Its
thick branches and leaves extend over such a surface, that the
proudest old English oak is insignificant compared with it.
106 THE MAHOGANY TRADE.

Rose. Ah, I suppose that Honduras is a hot country, for you
once told us that animals and vegetables of warm climates are
larger than those of cold countries.

P. Yes; and because of the heat of the climate, the task of
carrying away the heavy logs of mahogany is generally per-
formed by night. An account of a search for mahogany trees
would make an interesting tale for you; but a finer scene might
be drawn of the trucking of mahogany, by night. You would
hear of the men cutting roads through the woods for the pur-
pose; of the hard-working oxen dragging their heavy load over
the fresh cut brambles; of the drivers leading them, and show-
ing the way with torches made of pine-wood, until the morning
light ; then, if they have reached the river side, the water finishes
their labours for them, for the mahogany logs are tied together
in rafts and fluated along.

Let us examine some other object.

H. But will you tell me, papa, where mahogany was first
used in England ?

P. It was very scarce in this country, about the beginning of
this century ; and was scarcely seen, except in the houses of the
rich, but it was first used in England, about 130 years ago—in
the year 1724. There is a tale of a clergyman of London,
whose brother was a captain; this captain, when at the West
Indies, sent home to his brother some mahogany wood.

The clergyman happened at the time to be building himself a
house; and accordingly he asked one of the carpenters to use
up this new wood. The carpenter, however, found that it blunted
THE IRON DOME FROM COLE-BROOK DALE. 107

the edges of his tools, and that none of them were hard enough
for the purpose. So, the wood was laid aside as too hard, until
the clergyman’s lady required a candle-box, and then a piece of
mahogany was tried once more. The making of that candle-
box cost much trouble, but it was the beginning of the maho-
gany trade—the box was seen and admired. The clergyman
caused an article of furniture to be made of the wood, and
polished. This was still more admired,—then the rage for
mahogany began, and has continued ever since.

Rose. Yes. And men are very careful with it—they use it
in little thin slices, called veneers.

P. Isee an object, not far off, which will interest you.

H. Do you mean that tall iron thing ?

P. Yes, here it is, you may get underneath it. This is

XXIII. THe Iron DoME FROM COLE-BROOK DALE.

Cole-brook Dale is in Shropshire. It is a beautiful valley,
with the river Severn flowing through it; and is, perhaps, the
principal place in England for large iron-castings.

Rose. Is all this ornamental iron-work cast, papa?

P. Yes, just as fenders and stoves are cast; only it is such
a very large casting. Have you noticed this large figure in the
middle? ‘This man with his arrows and bow? How bold, and
beautiful is the position of his body !

Rose. And, look up, papa! I was wondering where his
arrow was. You see that there is a great eagle at the top of the
dome, and the man has shot it. Here, too, is a nice easy-chair ;
108 SIGNAL FOR LIGHTHOUSE.

how nicely it rocks backwards and forwards! I suppose it is
put here that people may enjoy themselves under the dome.
You would like to sit on this, Henry!

P. No doubt, but we will leave the Eagle-slayer, and the
dome, and look at the next object. Here is a very striking

XXIV. SIGNAL FOR THE Top oF A LIGHTHOUSE.

You have seen a prism ?

H. Yes, papa, we have one at home.

P. And this signal is composed of a number of prisms, which
are beautifully arranged so as to refract, and reflect the light.

H. But they do not surprise me, papa, so much as this
TELESCOPE does. What a very large telescope it is! Is it put
there that we may get a view of the further end of the building ?

P. No. This is for the purpose of studying astromony. It
has all the latest improvements, and has the most perfect
machinery for ‘adjusting’ it. We will have an Object Lesson
on it soon.

H. Here is something worth looking at, Rose. Just stroke
this !

P. These are the famous

XXV. COLLECTION OF SKINS AND FURS.

Rose. How nice and soft they are! This one is beautiful—
but look, papa! Now that I have stroked this skin, it is not so
black as it was.

P. It does not appear so, Rose—but you have been pressing
COLLECTION OF SKINS AND FURS. 109

the hair down with your hand. Now, draw your hand over it in
an upward direction,—from the bottom to the top.

Rose. Ah, now itis very black again—there is a straight mark
all the way up the fur, where my hand has been.

P. When you reach home, suppose that you sit down and
think why that is so,—why the hair, when standing upright,
should appear blacker than when it is pressed down.

H. There are a great many different sorts, papa. Here is the
skin of a red fox—the skin of a black fox—and is this a white
fox, papa? I never heard of one before.

P. Yes. This fox is found in the Arctic Regions. In the
summer its fur is of a grey, leaden colour, but as the intensely
cold weather approaches, it becomes white.

Rose. Here is an animal, papa, which looks like a white
weasel—is it a ferret ?

P. No, this is another instance of the skin of an animal
becoming white in the frozen regions. This little animal lives
in the chilly land of Siberia. In the winter it becomes perfectly
white on all parts except the tip of its tail, which is quite black.
It is called the Stoat, and sometimes

H. The Ermine, papa. I have seen Ermine-fur before—
kings and queens wear it—it is very expensive. And I can tell
you why those animals of the cold countries have white skins.

P. Yes, you learned from the History of the White-Bear,
in ‘Pleasant Pages’—but there is no time to talk over that
question now, nor to make a lesson on furs. We will proceed.

Rose. But I was noticing, papa, how many thick furs are


110 SKINS AND FURS,

brought from the cold countries. The animals have them to
keep them warm. I suppose these are the skins of the Black,
Grey, White, and Red Fox—the Black Bear,—the Brown Bear,
—the White Bear,—the Beaver—the

What skins are these, papa?

P. Seal-skins,—proceed, ‘the Fur Seal, the Grey Seal, the
Common Seal,’
Rose. And here are some of smaller animals—the Weasel.

P. The Marten.

Rose. The Stoat, (or Ermine). The Sable, (from which
mamma’s boa is made). The Brown Squirrel; the Grey
Squirrel; the Marmot; the Badger.

P. And here is the skin of a Lynx.

H. But look, papa, at the gallery! There are other great
skins hanging from the gallery besides the Bears!

Rose. Yes, there are the skins of ‘Tigers, Leopards, Jaguars,
Cheetahs, Lions; and they all have the word NICHOLAY upon
them.

P. That is because they are sent by the furrier, Nicholay,
of Regent Street. This is a most interesting collection : but,
we must pass on.

Hf. Here are several things in glass-cases, papa—they seem
to be models.

P. Wewill look at the large ones first—which are not in
glass-cases. You have I daresay, often heard of the

XXVI. Britannia TuBULAR BRIDGE.
If when we reach home you will look at your map, you will




BRITANNIA TUBULAR BRIDGE. Itt

see at the West of Wales, an island called ‘ The Isle of Anglesea,’
separated from the main-land by a narrow strait. Across this
strait has been built the famous iron-bridge, in the shape of a
tube, through which the railway passes.

Here is a model of another bridge.

Rose. This is a suspension-bridge, papa, is it not ? It seems
to be hanging by chains.

P. Yes. It is made of wrought-iron, and is being placed
over the river Dnieper, in Russia. This is the largest bridge
of the kind that has ever yet been constructed. The Emperor
of Russia is, I believe, very much pleased with it.

Rose. What model is this, papa, in the glass-ease ?

P. This is a model of part of England. It includes Leices-
tershire, Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Cheshire, and
Lancashire. Here is another model which is still more beautiful.
It is

A MoDEL OF THE UNDERCLIFF, ISLE OF WIGHT.

H. And here is another model! A rather ugly one, I think.

P. Iwish you had been to the place it represents. I have
seen it, and have seen what a useful work it is. Do you see this
long line of stone in the middle of the water ?

Rose. Yes, papa.

P. This has been formed in the midst of the sea, as a ili
against the waves. It serves to break them as they dash against
it ; and is, therefore, called a Breakwater.

It is situated near Plymouth.
112 MODEL OF THE PLYMOUTH BREAKWATER.
Rose. Yes, I can read the description, papa.

XXVIII. LiwesTonE MopeEL OF THE PLYMOUTH
BREAKWATER.

With silver lighthouse, and beacon; made for the Exhibition
under the direction of the Lords of the A--d, ad; m-i, mi;
r--a--l, ral; t--y, ty; Admiralty. What do they

There! I declare that papa has gone away again; he never
will stop for me to read the ‘ descriptions.’

H. Come here, Rose, I will make room for you. We are
looking at such a large model, with hundreds of houses, streets,
churches, people, docks, water, ships, and every thing!
Come and see ! ;

Rose. It looks like some very great town. What place isit,
papa ?

P. This is the famous town of Liverpool,





XXIX. MOopEL oF THE TowN OF LIVERPOOL.

Which bids fair to be as large as London, one day. On
account of its good situation on the river Mersey, its trade and
population is always increasing. What will be its size a hun-
dred years hence, no one can say.

H. In which county is it, papa?

P. In Lancashire; and the Lancashire people are a very
active race. They are said to be the ‘go-a-head’ men of
England.
MODEL OF THE TOWN OF LIVERPOOL. 113

Rose. Go-a-head! That is what the boy in the steamer
said to the engines, when he wanted them to go on.

H. Perhaps, the Lancashire people have a great many steam-
engines in their part, so that they have learned to be active
from them.

P. Yes, that is the case. Not only in Liverpool, but in the
great cotton towns, Manchester, Bolton, Rochdale, &c., the
people are very active. They have vast factories filled with
steam-engines and machinery ; and, perhaps, from saying ‘ go-a-
head’ so often to their machinery, they have been excited to go
faster themselves.

H. Ah, I shouldn’t wonder. I should be more active if I
kept company with a steam-engine. I could not stand still very
long.

Rose. Henry, let us go on. See what a distance we have to
walk yet. Look all the way down there, what immense distance !
I can see the I see myse/f. Oh,—it is a looking-glass!

H. Yes, look up!

XXX. Tue LARGEST SHEET OF PLATE GLASS IN THE
WORLD.



P. See, what an immense glass it is, Henry. What care
must have been given, to form a plate of glass of this size so
perfectly level and smooth. It was made by the — Plate
Glass Company, at their works at Blackwall.

H. Then, we can’t go through that, papa. I suppose we
have reached the end?
114 END OF THE WESTERN NAVB.

P. Yes. This is the end of the Western Nave. Sit dowm.

* * * *

H. How pleasant it is to rest! My eyes are very tired
with looking, I do not want to see much more.

P. You cannot expect to see very much on your first visit.
Every one feels that the building itself is as much as he can.
well see in one day. There are many more interesting things,
which, as yet, I have only heard of. I have heard that there is.
a bundle of nails, three thousand in number—yet, they are so.
small, that they only weigh three grains! One thousand are
made of gold, another thousand of silver, and another thousand
of iron. There is a piece of oil-cloth from Manchester, worth,
I believe, 500 guineas; and there is a beautiful: little steam-
engine, which, it is said, may be wrapped up in paper, and put
inside a walnut-shell :—the plate on which it. stands is not.
larger than a sixpence. There is a German bed, with clock-
work, which can be ‘wound up,—it can be set to any hour ;
and, when the time arrives, the lazy sleeper is thrown out of
bed! There is the portrait of the Queen in needle-work, which.
is so fine that it looks like a pencil-drawing; and a German
lady has sent a table-napkin which has been torn.

H. Well. Jcould tear one of our table-napkins, and send
it.

P. True; but the fact that this napkin has been torn, is not
the only interesting thing about it. It has also been mended:
. THE GOODS FROM ENGLAND,.~ 115

and it is darned with such neatness and skill that’ you cannot
discover where.

LI. I could soon tell where she took up the. stitches—I
think.

P. Well, we shall see. There will be time enough another
day to Lodi at these things. Suppose that, while we rest here,
I tell you of some of the Goons rrom Suexsmet

W. Yes; do, papa, please! and we will go and see didi
afterwards,

P, Very well; I will.

Chapter Elenenth.

THE GOODS FROM ENGLAND.

Z OU must know that not all the articles exhibited by each
country are specimens of man’s skill. The piece of
$ rock crystal which we looked at is not.

There are four classes of objects to be found in the
Exhibition. You must have noticed that the different objects
are not all made of the same material—they are not all brass.

W. Certainly not; the alum is not, neither is the Koh-i-
noor,

PLN either is the statue of Godfrey de Bouillon, nor the
Prince of Wales’ shield,. The varied objects are made of all
kinds of material—brass, iron, gold,- plaster of Paris, precious

I
116 THE FOUR CLASSES OF OBJECTS.

stones, wood, gutta percha, ivory, &c.—these form the first class
of objects in the Exhibition, consisting simply .of THE WORKS
or naruRE. They are the different substances which_the other
objects are made of ; and are exhibited in the exact. state
in which they are found in nature—in .a raw state, as we say.
Therefore they are called Raw Margriars, See if you can
make a list of raw materials.

The next class are the worKs or MAN; the different kinds ot
tools, and all the wonderful machines which men use. in making
other articles. These forma class called MAcHINERY,. Men-
tion some machinery that you know of.

The third set of objects are the effect of the first and second
class. They show what has been done by the second class to
the first class. They are the substances formed by the ma-
chinery from the raw materials, and are called MANUFACTURES,
Tell me any manufactures that you know.

The fourth class are another kind of manufacture. They are
ornamental manufactures, which require much imagination and
taste, such as carving, sculpture, pictures, models, statues,
mosaic work, &c., &c. The men who make such objects we
call artists, and all such works we call Works oF Art, You
may mention some of the works of art which we have just
seen. + el

There are, therefore, four classes of objects in the goods sent
from England, :

H. I will say them papa—Raw Marsrrars, MacHINERY
ManvuFractuReEs, and Finz Arts,
ENGLISH RAW MATERIALS. 117

_ P. I can only undertake now to mention the principal objects
sent of each class. | |

1. Amongst.the RAW MATERIALS of England, the princi-
pal minerals are Iron, Coppsr, Leap, Tin, Coat, Suarg;
and Sarr, :

These are England’s most valuable minerals. You will see
them all beautifully arranged in the mineral gallery.

The Iron from Wales, Staffordshire, and Shropshire. The
Copper from Cornwall. Lead ores from the Peak in Derby-
shire, the Mendip Hills in Somersetshire, and Cornwall. Tin
principally from Cornwall. Coal from Northumberland and
Lancashire. Slate from Westmoreland and Wales, Sali from
Cheshire and Worcestershire. a

The principal vegetable and animal raw materials are Corton,
which, though not produced in England, is the great source of
England’s wealth; Corn and Porarors for food; Bariey
and Hops for beer; and Frax for the linen manufacture ;
Sarrron for its yellow dye; Tiwser for ship-building, &c.,
from the Elm, Ash, Beech, and particularly the old English
Oak, The animals yield Wax and Tatztow for candles ;
Frarners for beds, &c. ; Horse-1arr for furniture ; Woox for
the cloth-manufacturer; Learner for shoes, harness, &c.

2. The MACHINERY of our country I will not attempt to
describe. The machinery department is 800 feet in length,
and contains every description of machines for spinning’ and
weaving, printing, &c. These are constantly kept in motion
by large steam-engines which have a separate department:

12
118 ENGLISH MACHINERY.

Amongst the newest machines is a printing-machine, invented
by Mr. Applegath, which is used for printing the Times
newspaper, and the J llustrated London News. You know
what a cylinder is. In printing-machines it has been the
custom for the types to be placed with their faces upward, and
(after the paper has been laid upon them) for the cylinder to
roll over them just as the garden-roller rolls over the stones.
In this new printing-machine, however, the cylinder is placed
upright just like a drum when it stands on its end, and the
type is placed all round it. When we visit the machinery
department you will be able to see the advantages of this
arrangement, and one of the printers there will explain it to
you.

There is another famous machine in which sheets of paper
are cut, folded, gummed, and formed into envelopes. It
belongs to Messrs. Dz La Ruz, the great fancy card makers, and
has attracted very much attention.

There is a machine for making hollow bricks — needle-
making machines—weighing-machines—model steam-engines,
&e., &e., &c. In another room are all the new machines and
implements used in agriculture—such as threshing machines,
dibbling machines ; hoewng machines ; harrows; ploughs of all
kinds ; winnowing machines ; cutting and clod-crushing ma-
chines; pumps; digging machines ; carts—and many other
wonderful things, which will astonish and alarm many of the
country people. Besides these there are smaller ‘ machines,’
which we call tools or instruments—such as watchmakers’
ENGLISH MANUFACTURES. 119

tools and instruments ; surgical instruments; philosophical in-
struments, and tools for every description of trades.

3. The MANUFACTURES of England you will expect to
be very numerous—why °?

H. Because there is such a multitude of machines. If the
English did not make some good manufactures with them, they
might as well be burnt.

L. Or melted, you should say; for they are made of iron—
then the war people would get hold of them, and would beat the
ploughshares into swords.

P. And the pruning-hooks into spears.

H, And the steam-engines into cannon.

P. There is little fear of such a perversion now-a-days.
Men have learned once for all the proper use of iron and steel.
They know now what God sent it for. Let us next see what
they do with their beautiful machines.

The principal manufactures of England are, the Manurac-
TURES OF CLOTHING from Corron, Woot, S1ik, Linen, LEATHER,
Gurra Percus, Harr, Srraw-pxait, &c.—including calicoes,
muslins, lace, and net,—broadcloth, flannels, baizes, worsted,
worsted stockings, shawls, bombazines, merinoes, mousseline-de-
laines, tapestry and carpets, —velvets, satins, silk waistcoatings,.
crape, ribbons, fringe, gimp, sewing silks, silk buttons, um-
brellas, hats, silk gloves and silk stockings, silk handkerchiefs
and neckerchiefs ;—in linen, there are shirtings and sheetings,
table-cloths, diapers, sail cloth, &c.;—in leather, you will see
shoes, saddlery, bookbinding, driving bands for machinery, and
120 HOUSEHOLD UTENSILS.—BUILDING MANUFACTURES.

all kinds of straps. From gutta percha they have made every
thing! From hair and bristles they have made horse-hair
cloth, clothes and hair brushes, wigs, watch-guards, ear-rings,
and other ornaments. From straw we have hats, bonnets, mats,
palliasses, chaff and provender for horses. ;

Henry. And suckers for “sherry cobbler.” What other
manufactures are there? ,

P. Many more. There are manufactures without number, and
if you should ever understand half of them I shall be very glad.

From the porcelain, pottery, and. hardware manufactures,

and from the metals and glass, we get a fine group :—the
manufactures of HovssHotp Urensixs; such as lamps, candle-
sticks, decanters, jugs, tumblers, and other cut glass.
_ Again we have another important group—BUILDING AND
ARCHITECTURAL MANUFACTURES, such as bricks, tiles, chimney-
pots, cornices, brackets, and exterior ornaments, iron railings
and gates, singular fancy knockers, locks, stoves, paper-hang-
ings, stove-copings and mantel-pieces, panneling, window
frames, sashes, window glass, and other appurtenances of
houses and palaces.

There are also objects which form the class inkwman manu=
fuctures ; such as cannon, revolving pistols and rifles, swords,
daggers, spears, bayonets, and others which, thank God! are
doomed to pass away, and be crushed under the influence of
those never tiring, never stopping, indomitable inhabitants of
the machine department.

Besides these there are elegant specimens of the FURNITURE
FURNITURE, CARRIAGE, AND PAPER MANUFACTURES. 121

ManuFacturE—from the plain and useful, to'the exquisitely
beautiful, so good that it seems a pity that it should ever be
worn out. We have the same character of goods in the Car-
RIAGE MANUFACTURE—carriages so beautiful that their useful-
ness is lost in the abundance of ornament. In contrast with
these there are truly good railway carriages, which ‘ are both
ornamental and serviceable at the same time.

H. Papa, I have been waiting. You have forgotten a very
important manufacture. we

P. What is it?

H, The Paper ManuFacturgs.

P. To be sure. From paper we get books, cards, and a sheet
of paper, made by Mr. Joynson, of St. Mary Cray, 46 inches
wide and 2,500 yards long, which is four times the length of
the Exhibition.

H. I hope that is brown paper, because it can be used for
wrapping up the Exhibition when it has to be removed.

P. Unfortunately the paper is white. From paper we also
get tea-trays. ;

Rose. You said ‘ tea-trays,’ papa !

P. Yes. From the pulp used in making paper, a palettes
called papier-maché is formed, and this is made into a great
variety of articles.

Rose. Are there any other manufactures, papa ?

P, Yes; far too many for us to talk about now—manufac-
tures of bone, ivory, horn, turnery, and so forth. We will
learn much more about each, in our Object Lessons,
122 , THE FINE ARTS.

H. I will just count up these manufactures, papa.

. CLrorHInG MANUFACTURES.

. HovsEHotp UTenstn MANUFACTURES.

_ Burtprne AnD ARCHITECTURAL MANUFACTURES.
. ‘InnuMAN MANvuUFACTURES.’

. FurNITURE MANUFACTURES,

. CARRIAGE MANUFACTURES.

. Parer-Goops MANUFACTURES.

Now, papa, we are ready for the FINE ARTS.

P. The ‘ Fine Arts’ of the. Exhibition, Henry, are as diffi-
cult to describe as the machinery. We shall soon visit the
Sculpture Room, the Medizval Court, and the Fine Arts Court,
when I will try and make you understand the beauties of some
of the objects there. We have not yet said anything of the
goods from Scotland, or Ireland; but they will not need a dis-
tinct description.

You may remember Scotland by her raw material, oatmeal ;
and her manufactures in Scotch cambric, sewed muslins, &c.
You may remember Ireland by her raw material, flaw, potatoes,
and pigs, and her manufactures, linen, poplins, &c.

_ Friend. How art thee, friend ?

Rose (whispering to Henry). Who is that Quaker gentleman,
Henry? That is the twenty-first gentleman papa has spoken
to, since he has been in the Exhibition.

Friend. I saw thee just as I came in at the western door; I
am bound for CANADA,

AARP WY We
COLONIAL GOODS.—CANADA. 123

P. So are we. We want to gain some information concern-
ing the colonies of Britain.

——>——.

Chapter Cuelfth.

THE GOODS FROM THE COLONIES.
CANADA.

‘ YRIEND. Thou knowest, little Henry, that the colony of
Canada is at the northern part of America.
HI, Yes. We have been looking at this timber
trophy before.
Friend, Thou wilt see here a beautiful specimen of maple-
wood—a light yellow wood. Here it is! I will read thee
something concerning the maple, from a paper which I have in
my pocket.

“The soft maple is but rarely cut down, as it supplies sugar
abundantly. In spring, before the snow has left the ground,
and there is still a morning frost, the farmer bores a hole two
or three inches deep in the tree. and sticks a little cane spout in
it. Ina few hours he has in his wooden trough below, from
twotothree gallons of syrup; and every morning, for a fortnight,
as the sap rises with the sun, the tree pours forth its sweetness
until twenty or thirty gallons are collected. In a spring with-
out frosts, the supply of sugar fails, and its collection is a work

\
124 CANADA—WOODS, SLEDGES.

of hardship. The sugar maple grows from forty to fifty feet
high, and about six feet in circumference.”

We have also the walnut tree, with a very hard, deanqpealiaul
wood,and here, the beech tree, which is used for common furniture.
The bark of this tree is used to make canoes, such as thou see’st on
the top of the trophy, andin the Canada department. We have
white and red oak, bass wood, rock-elm, which grows thirty
to sixty feet from the dry rock, and tron wood, which, I have
read, is so obstinate and unmanageable that it is of no earthly
use whatever.

- P. Let us go into the Gast department. _ Look, Rose, at
these beautiful sledges! These are used in Canada, in the
winter time, for travelling on the ice. They are dragged by
horses. Accidents sometimes happen when travelling thus ; the
ice breaks, and the horse and sledge fall in together. .

Rose. And the poor traveller is drowned?

- P. Thetraveller saves his own life and that of his horse by
strangling him. The horse has a kind of slip-knot fastened
round his neck; this the traveller pulls very tight, until the
horse cannot breathe, and floats on the water’s surface ; he then
jumps on the animal’s back—or to the surface of the ice, and
drags the horse out of the water.

Rose. But what is the use of strangling the horse, papa? I
should think that would kill him, instead of saving his life.

PP. No. The strangling causes the horse to ‘Tie perfectly
still; otherwise he would plunge and kick, and could not be
dram out. When he is on the ice again, the rope is loosened,
CANADA—AXES, RAFTS. 125

and in about half an hour the horse breathes freely again, and
proceeds onthe journey. I have heard that travellers have had
such accidents four or five times in one journey. <
Rose. See, papa, Henry is walking with the Quaker gentle-
man. They are looking at some axes.
Friend, Didst thou ever observe the shape of thése axes’?
Look at this one! Thou mayest see that the blade has a convex



shape ; it is made so, that it may not stick in the wood, when
used for fellmg trees. Here are more than a dozen different
shaped axes; each has. a particular use. The emigrants
may learn from these Exhibition axes that they can procure
better and cheaper axes in Canada, than in England. I have
known them bring over axes, and find them to be quite useless ;
they are obliged to buy new ones.

HI, Will you tell us about the timber-rafts of Canada?

Friend. I wish I had time to describe them to thee.. On
the Ottawa, or Grand River, there are from eight to ten thou-
sand men employed in attacking the forest trees with.axes such
as these ; the great trunks are lopped, squared, and carried to the
water’s edge by horses, where they are thrown into the river,
126 .AUSTRALIA—PARROTS.

and tied together in immense rafts—rafts which are sometimes
as large as a field of three acres.
P. We will walk unto the next department. Here we are in

AUSTRALIA,

A very different part of the world, but still one of England’s
colonies.

Friend. Here are specimens of ores sent from Burra-Burra,
by the AustRatian Minina Company. |

P. Yes. This company is becoming very prosperous—look
at this beautiful specimen of carbonate of copper.

Rose. What a bright green it is, papa.

P. True. It is from this carbonate of copper that the precious
stone of the Russians—the malachite, is procured; you will
hear more of this soon.

Rose. And here is a piece of magnetic iron ore. You once
taught us, papa, about ‘magnetic’ iron. _

Friend. And a friend of mine—a mineralogist— once
informed me that wherever you find magnetic iron, there is
very likely to be gold near it.

Rose. Well, I was just looking at a piece of gold ore which
is placed close by —— | ,

H. Come here, Rose, to the other side of the room. Here is
a glass-case full of parrots. 3

Friend. Ah, thou seest here a very nice collection ; I have
seen them in Australia by hundreds. This little one, the
Roselle, is almost as common in that country as the sparrow
AUSTRALIA—SHELL NECKLACES, 127

is in England. gave one of his men a flail, and set him thrashing, and to
another man he gave a thick stick, telling him to knock down
all the Roselles that flew in for the corn. In the course of the
day he had killed a barrow-full of them. |

H. How pretty this one is; look at the gold colour at the
top of its wings, and they shine in one part like silver !

Friend. Yes, this is supposed to be the bird referred to in
Scripture. In the Psalms you read, “ Ye shall be as the wings
of a dove, with silver wings, and her feathers like gold” (Psalm
Ixviii. 13).. Thou canst see how golden they look at the edges.
Let us look at the next object.

Rose. What are these dear little shells? See what a number
there are! and how much they are like pearl! for they reflect
the light—now they are purple, now they look green, and now
they are white. |

Friend, Yes, I can tell thee about those shells. The native
women make them into necklaces. The shells are not like
these when found, but are prepared by the women in this way :
they make a fire of sticks, on which they burn a quantity of fresh
green grass, The shells are held over the fire, and the vegetable-
acid from the fresh grass, which rises with the smoke, destroys
the outer coating of each shell, The Indians use almost. the
same process in making their leather, for mocassins, &e, They
set light to a heap of green brushwood, and hold the skin of
the animal over the fire, the smoke from which serves to dry
and preserve. the skin, although it does not exactly tan it,
128 . THE INDIAN DEPARTMENT.

P. We will not stop longer in Australia. Let us cross the
nave, and look at the Indian department.

INDIA.

The most striking feature in this department is the room
furnished in the style of an Indian Palace. Here is a most
gorgeous display of the luxury of the East. We have, also,
several most interesting models to show the different. castes of
Indians. There is a model of an Indian farm in which the
collector is collecting the rates due; a model of a native court
of justice ; and another of a British court of justice.. In ano-
ther model are seen two or three poor Indians doing ‘ penance’—
according to their barbarous religious customs, they have iron
hooks run through their flesh, and with these they are drawn
up to a great height, and swung round in the air.

Here are also two ivory chairs, with shawls, carpets, and
matting. In another part are models of the mills, &c., used
in the manufactures from the cotton plant ; also several clumsy
mills used in grinding sugar, distilling spirits, &c.; a beautiful
model of a Hindoo temple may also be seen; while the first
Indian compartment is filled with weapons of war, suits of
armour, &c., very tastefully arranged ; the shields and saddles for
war horses, with red and gold embroidery, make a good show.
A brass gun, with a tiger’s mouth, made by the natives, is a
very striking object.

One of the most remarkable objects in the Indian dlepaitenani
is the self-feeding Peacock lamp, made of brass. From the
CEYLON, JERSEY AND GUERNSEY, ETc. 129

breasts of’ several peacocks oil is supplied to the lamp burners,
whenever it is required. This lamp, although it reminds us of
the idolatry of the Hindoos, speaks at the same time of their
humble and confiding spirit, for although it was held sacred, it
was readily lent by them to the English, to be shown at the
Exhibition, |

The most valuable, however, of the Indian contributions, is
the rare and costly collection of jewels. The crowds of spark-
ling diamonds arranged in one glass case, speak in a striking
manner of the wondrous riches of the East.

After papa had finished his remarks on the Indian depart-
ment, their “ friend” was compelled to leave, Henry and Rose
then accompanied their papa through other departments of the
Colonies, which they noticed in a very hurried manner. In
CryLon they saw specimens of cinnamon and coffee, carvings
in tortoiseshell and ivory, with fine specimens of rubies.

In Jersey and Gusrnsry, the Islands of the English
Channel, they saw specimens of arrow-root, which the inhabi-
tants of those islands have lately begun to cultivate. They
also saw a clock sent from Jersey, which will go 500 days
without winding up. ,

In Maura they saw beautiful specimens of carving; Rose
could not get away from the exquisite imitations of birds and
flowers,—even papa was a long time before he could persuade
himself to look at anything else,

Other wonderful things were seen by Rose and Henry.
Specimens from Nova Scorra, the Bermvpas, BarBADogEs, the
130 VIEW FROM THE END GALLERY.

Banamas, DemeRARA, and other colonies of Great Britain.
They then wandered through many strange places until they
found themselves again at the eastern end of the nave.

“Look, papa!” said Rose, “look at the number of people
sitting on the seats in the gallery; I should like to go up
there!”

“Well!” said papa, “you shall—we will go and sit on
one of the seats, and take one look at the nave before we leave—
I think that you will be surprised.”

On reaching the gallery, Rose and Henry were indeed sur-
prised,—the view of the crowded aisle was a most extraordinary
one. |

“Oh, papa!” cried Henry, as the sight first caught his eye—
“ what an immense crowd of people. I did not suppose that there
was such a number! How they all move and shift about!
I cannot look at them very long—they dazzle my eyes.” |

“‘ Nor can any one else,” said papa; “they shift about, as Punch
says, ‘like a crowd of Jack-o’-lanterns.’ See what an immense
length is the building. Now you have an idea of 1,851 feet |”

“ And what a number of things I can see, papa!” cried
Rose. “Look at the red curtains, and. the crimson flags.
Look at the white marble statutes, the bronze images, the
golden vases, and the sparkling fountains! How light and
fairy-like the building is! how pretty the stripes of blue on the
columns, and what brilliant colours there are on the tapestries !
Then, look at the crowds of black hats, and the bright yellow
bonnets moving about, Two men with red hats are coming
NATIONAL ANTHEM.—DEPARTURE, 131

down the aisle in the midst of the black ones—there is a Turk °
with his white turban—a Frenchman wearing a cap—and there
is another patch of red, made by four soldiers. How they move.
on ina thick stream near the Transept, and pass the crystal
fountain! See how some are loitering and looking—some are
sitting—others standing—and others lounging about doing” ——

“Stop, Rose,” said Henry—“listen! here is some one
playing the Freneh organ! He is playing ‘Gop savE THE
QUEEN.’ ”’

P. Ah, how beautiful that sound is! and how pleasant the
thought, that “God save the Queen” is being played by a
Frenchman ! |

“Yes,” said Henry, “and he begins by saying ‘God bless
our gracious Queen.’ ”

P. And all those people from many nations, whom you see
mingled together in one crowd—may they be able to sing with
him! Let them sing the new words of the National Anthem,
which were made to ‘be sung in better days :—

‘*And not this land alone,
But be thy mercies known
_ From shore to shore!
Lord, make the nations see
That men should brothers be,
And form one family,
The wide world o’er.”

Rose. Ah, I wish that they would all sing that !
P Pekase they will one day. But it is now getting rather
late ; we must return home.
J


Port the Chir.

GOING HOME.

——————

Chapter Chirteentl.

THE GOODS FROM EUROPE.

be able to go home. Papa has gone to meet the driver,
and is holding up his fingers to him.”

“ Engaged, six!’ replied the cabman, with an independent
air; and as papa, and Henry, and Rose walked up to a long
row of cabs, “‘ Engaged!” “ Engaged P” “ Engaged !” was the
answer from each driver. Indeed, it was easy to tell that the
cabs were engaged ; for the horses had bags tied to their noses
in an engaging manner, from which they were peaceably feed-
ing,—being ‘ engaged’ in another sense.

“You see how it is, Henry,” said his papa; “the visitors
who came in these cabs have agreed to pay the cabmen so

es is a cab!” said Rose to Henry. ‘ Now we shall
FINDING A CAB. 133

much for the day. That is the plan we should have acted
upon !”

H. Here is a policeman, papa; will you ask him what we
shall do?

P. Can you tell us how we shall geta cab? We have been
waiting here three-quarters of an hour !

Policeman. Yes, sir; and I have seen people a-waiting here
for three hours, and more. . You may wait four hours, perhaps,
unless you are very sharp; and this, sir, is the case every day.
This is the way the people have to get home from the Exhibi-
tion—40,000 or 50,000 people a-day, sir! It’s no joke for such
a load to be carried home. We want anew railway on purpose.

Rose. Here comes an omnibus with “ Exursrrion” on it,
papa !

Omnibus Conductor (calling to papa). Room outside, sir !

“That,” said papa, “ will not do. We must walk, Henry,
towards Hyde Park Corner, and meet one of the cabs or omni-
buses which are coming.”

“Tm so tired,” said Rose; “ but I can see an omnibus now !”

No sooner, however, had the omnibus stopped than a crowd
of people of all kinds surrounded it, and shocked Rose by the
rude manner in which they pushed each other, and struggled’
to enter.

“Come,” said papa, “ we must walk towards home until we
find a cab ;”—but they did not meet with one until they had
reached Hyde Park Corner.

For a long time after they had taken their seats, little Henry

J2
134 THE PEOPLE OF EUROPE.

and Rosé were very quiet, with their heads leaning against the
corner of the cab; but as soon as they were rested Rose begged
her papa to tell them another. tale on their way home.

Papa just at that moment was looking rather sleepy, but he.
quickly woke up again. Fee f

“Well, Rose,” he said, “I had almost forgotten something ;
but I had intended to describe some of the goods which have
been sent from the different nations. Would you like to hear
such an account?” ,

H. I should be very glad, papa ; because next time we go we
shall know where to look for each article.
_ P. I thought before we left home this morning that you
would like, as I speak of the countries, to see them on the map ;
so I have brought you my pocket-map of the world, which we
will pin up in the cab.

I intend to speak first of the goods sent from Europe; but
before doing so, I purpose telling you something of the people
of Europe. The European race may be divided into three
principal families. At present, I will only mention two. You
may have noticed, even in England, how different are the com-
plexions of many people ; some have round, fair faces, with red
cheeks, and light hair, and blue eyes.

H. Yes; I have seen many, papa.

P. While others have more sallow faces, of a longer shape ;
their foreheads are not always so broad, but they are longer and
higher than those of the other race; their hair is more often
black than brown, and the eyes are sometimes very dark.
GERMANIC AND CELTIC FAMILIES, 135

Rose, I have seen them, But what has that to do with the
goods at the Exhibition ?

P. A great deal. I cannot go into the particulars of the idea
which I wish to teach you; but these two kinds of people may
be said to represent two of the principal families of the Euro-
pean race. Those with broad foreheads, fair complexions, blue
eyes, light hair, &c., may be said to represent the Germanic
family ; while those with the dark complexion, with longer
face, and with dark hair and eyes, may well represent the
Celtic family, Try and remember the names of these two
families.

H. I willsay them, papa: “ Germanic family—Celtic family.”

P. Now, it has been found that just as these two races differ
in physical appearance (or appearance of body), so also there is
a marked difference in their mental distinctions.

Rose. Which means a difference in their minds,

_ HI, Ah, Rose, I see something !—and then there will be a dif-
ference in their manufactures. Their different kinds of minds
will think different thoughts, then of course they will make
different things, and send different things to the Exhibition!
That is what papa wants to show us, I think.

~ P. We shall see. The Germanic family are well known for
their industrial virtues, if you know what is meant by that :—~
they are a persevering and thinking people. Their minds seem
to be ever engaged on the things around them; to be attending
to those things which they are quite sure are ‘real’ —the
matters which they can handle, feel, see, and hear, Such solid
186 THE ‘MATTER OF FACT’ FAMILY.

matters seem to engage their minds more than any beautiful
objects which are matters of fancy,—therefore we call them a.
‘matter of fact’ people.

Now, the people living in the country called HoLanp are a
‘Germanic’ people—they are called Dutch. Suppose that you
were to show a Dutchman a solid round cheese, and a beautiful
diamond brooch with fancy ornaments of gold. Which do you
think he would admire ?

Rose. The Cunese, papa. He would say that the round
cheese was ‘a matter of fact’—a solid, real thing.

Henry. And he would say that the brooch was only a matter
of fancy—that it had no real value.

P. And this ‘matter of fact? Dutchman is a good repre-
sentative of the Germanic family ; for he is one of the unmixed
German breed.

But, the other family—the Celtic nations—have different
mental qualities. We do not find that they are the same slow
reflecting people as the matter-of-fact Germanic race ; but they
have acute active minds, ever thinking new thoughts of new
things. We do not hear much talk of their understanding, but
more of what we call imagination——

H. I have learnt what that means: it is the power which
makes ‘ images’ in our minds.

P. True; so these Celts love to make images in their minds
of beautiful things—of things which we do not always call real ;
they are famous for beautiful ornaments and all matters of
taste and fancy,
THE ‘IMAGINATIVE’ FAMILY. 137

So, if you were to call on a dark-haired, long-faced French-
man, and say, “Which do you love best, this cheese or this
diamond brooch ?” he would say

H. “Give me the diamond brooch,” he would say. “Give
the lumpy Dutchman that lumpy cheese. I value beautiful
things.”

Rose. Because they please his imagination. 3

P. And this imaginative Frenchman is one of the Crtrié
family—almost a pure Celt. But he would not say “lumpy ”
Dutchman, he would be too polite.

Ztose. And politeness is “ ornamental behaviour !””

P. True. Now, bear these two points in mind when we
speak of the produce of each nation. We may call the reflec-
tive Germanic race —— !

Rose. The people for ‘ matters of fact,’

P. And the imaginative Celtic race ——

H. The men for ‘matters of fancy.’ Did you not tell us,
papa, when you talked of the silk trophy, that the French
people beat the English people in fancy silks? That is because
they are Celts, and I suppose that we are not.

P. Only partly so.

Rose. And silk is a fancy article. You told us, papa, that
the silk manufactures of England did not flourish here until
the poor I'renchmen from Nantes settled in Spitalfields.



P. Now, you may look at the map. Suppose that you went
from the Exhibition to Dover, and then crossed the English
138 THE FRENCH DEPARTMENT.

Channel to the land on the opposite side—in what country
would you find yourself? | .
H. In France, papa.
P. Then, let us see what France has sent to the Exhibition.

FRANCE.

The French, you know, are a Celtic race. Before I had been
to see the Exhibition, I was reading an account of the “ French
Department.” The first sentence showed that it related to
France. |

«“ The space is occupied with articles tastefully arranged, showing
the peculiarities of French industry. A great variety of objects
known as ‘fancy articles,’, with beautiful specimens of tapestry.
Articles of jewellery, and ornamental articles in fancy woods, pearl,
&c.” i ee

These are placed in the front of the department. On entering
are found— |

“ Beautiful bronzes and ornamental workings in the precious
metals, decorative furniture, brilliant mirrors (in the polish of which
the French have hitherto surpassed the English), sofas, splendid
shawls, silks, merinoes, and carpets.

*. Beyond these, in the farthest space, aré articles of apparel, boots,
shoes, gloves, hats, &c.; designs for paper-hangings and chimney-
pieces.” |

H. Ah, that is rather curious. The ornamental things are
placed in the front, and the useful things at the back.

P, But, when we examine the French department, you will
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS.—JEWELLERY. 139

find that even the useful things are made in the most elegant
manner. The French shoes are made of ——

H. Shiny leather.

Rose. Say polished leather, Madey? French polished.’

P. While the gloves of French kid are equally fine.

H. I wonder, papa, which are the most striking objects of
the French Department ?

P. Two monuments of their wonderful ingenuity. One is
the most beautiful case of artificial flowers that ever man saw.
The flowers are all made of French cambric, yet I have known
people, who have examined them, declare that they must be
real. One gentleman would not for three or four minutes be-
lieve that they were artificial ; not until he had read the inscrip-
tion which was fastened to the case. There is a blighted wither-
ing rose, with the shrivelled leaves falling off, and the very
maggot, with its web, may be seen on it. An old fading sun-
flower in the distance is the very oe of sorrow; its yellow
petals are turned grey, and—but it’s useless to rr you
must see it.

The other representative of France is the case containing the
jewels of the Queen of Spain, exhibited, as I told you before, by
the Queen of Spain’s jeweller at’ Paris. For their beautiful
jewellery, the French have long«been as famous as for their
workings in the ‘ precious’ metals, gold and silver.

H, I will now count up the productions of FRANCE :—

1, Jewetitery, ARTIFICIAL FLoweERS, and many ORNAMENTAL
ARTICLES in fancy woods, pearls, &c..
140 THE BELGIAN DEPARTMENT.

2. Workings in the Precious Merats ; Splendid Saawis, SILKS,
Merrnoes, Camprics, Mustins, and Carpets.

3. Boots, and Suoxrs, Hats, Guoves, and other wearing apparel.
And that is a proper sort of list for an imaginative and ingenious
nation !

P. I shall not have time to give you so long an account of
each nation. You know that we are to have a course of
“Onyect Lessons FROM THE GREAT Exursirion,” and in that
course the most interesting ‘lions’ of each nation will be de-
s¢ribed.

Look at the map and you will see a country at the north of
Trance.

Rose. Yes,—BELGIUM, papa.

BELGIUM.

P. The department of this country is properly placed next to
that of the French in the Exhibition.

Rose. Are the Belgian people Celtic, papa?

P. You shall judge for yourself.

They exhibit not only the magnificent Lack which you saw
on the Archbishops Fenelon, A’ Becket, and the Pope, but beau-
tiful Musica INSTRUMENTS.

H. (whispering.) Think, Rose !—Musie.

P. Also, numerous magnificent specimens of carpets, for which
Brussels, the capital of Belgium, has so long been famous.

. There are other specimens of woollen manufactures from
Brussels, Antwerp, Louvain, and Ghent: the weavers of the
CELTIC AND GERMANIC BELGIANS.—FLANDERS, 141

latter city had once upwards of 30,000 looms. But Belgium,
poor country! has been the scene of many a dreadful war; and
it exhibits goods which painfully remind us of the fact.

tose. What are those, papa ?

P. A most formidable collection of arms, of bright barrelled
muskets, and bayonets, from a town called Liege. Liege is the
Birmingham of Belgium, and can supply guns, and many other
metal manufactures, as cheaply as we get them from that
famous town. Now, tell me what think you of Belgium? Is
it the country of a Celtic or of a Germanic nation ?

Hf, Let us count up its products :—

BELGIUM has sent to the Exhibition, Lack, Mustcan In-
STRUMENTS, CARPETS, WOoLLEN Goons, Musxerts, and other
Merat Manvuracturss: some are fancy articles, and some are
not. What do you say, Rose?

Rose. I can’t tell. I should think that the people are both
Germanic and Celtic.

P. That ¢s the state of things. Belgium is a curious country.
It is situated vetween France, a Celtic nation, and Holland, a
Germanic nation. It has more than once changed masters,—
belonging at one time to France, and at another time to Hol-
land. The towns near France, such as Liege and Namur, are
mostly Celtic: in fact, they are of French origin, and their
language is similar to the French. Again, in the northern part,
called Flanders, where we find the great woollen manufactures,
the people are more Germanic, resembling their neighbours, the
Hollanders, while their language (called Flemish) is a dialect of
142, CONNECTION OF SOIL, PRODUCE, AND MANUFACTURES.

the Dutch. There is thus a very great distinction between the
two parts of the nation—a distinction which is kept up by the
inhabitants of the towns. |

H. Then we will say that the goods sent to the Exhibition
from Belgium, show that they are a mixed nation—half Celtic
and half Germanic.

Hotianp is the next country, papa. You said that the
Dutcu were a ‘matter of fact’ Germanic people. I suppose
that they have sent plenty of butter and cheese? .

P. Wait a minute, we are going on a little too fast. Before
we go any further, I must tell you that we cannot judge
what will be the object of a nation’s industry (much less what
they will send to the Exhibition) merely by knowing the race to
which they belong. The manufactures of a country depend
also upon its soil, and the vegetables and minerals it yields...

H. Ah, I had forgotten that. There would not be so many
metal manufactures in a country if its soil did not contain
‘metals.

P. And then, again, the character of a people (and even their
industry) will much depend on the climate of.their country.

Take Holland, for instance. The land is lower than the sea;
the soil is therefore very marshy, exactly suited for Cows—
‘even more than for sheep ; therefore ?

Rose. Plenty of milk—plenty of butter and cheese. I see,
papa, the butter and cheese making does not grow entirely from
the character of the people.

P. No. We find, too, that Holland sends beautiful linen to




THE DANISH DEPARTMENT.» 143

the Exhibition; for large tracts of the soil are well suited for
growing the linen plant, called ‘flax.’ The character of the.
people may, therefore, help us a little to remember their produc-.
tions, but may not always serve as a guide.

When you look in the Exhibition for the goods sent from
HOLLAND, you may look for Linzns and Woven Goons,
Meta Manvuracturres; good specimens. of Macuinzry,
Basket Worx, Dutcu Cxocks, and almost every variety of
‘manufacture.

- Rose. We shall soon be home, now, papa.

P. Yes; and I have told you very little, as yet, of the goods
sent from Europe, We will pass through the other countries
hastily. If you cross the North Sea, from Holland, you will
tind a country at the north-east, called

DENMARK.

P. When I visited the Denmark department I was much.
pleased with a piece of sculpture there. It represents a hunter,
who has taken possession of the cub of a lioness ; and its mother
following him. The position of the lioness is very interesting.
She has not attacked the hunter, but has grasped him with her
claws; and is looking up intreatingly in his face. The hunter
has banked the sleepy-looking cub under his arm; while with
his right hand he holds up a lance, with which he ‘threatens to
defend himself. The countenance of the lioness is a beautiful
representation. It expresses the earnest anxiety which even a
dumb animal can feel for its little one,
144 THE SWEDISH DEPARTMENT.

In Denmark, you may see the usual produce of the fields ;
also knitted articles, leather and boots, with decorated vases,
musical instruments, &c.

H, What comes from SwEDEN, papa?

P. From

SWEDEN AND NORWAY,

where, as well as in Denmark, the people are more Germanic
than Celtic, we have the produce of their famous iron mines.
The iron of Sweden ‘is, you are aware, that which is so useful
for making into steel ; so they have not only sent iron ores, but
all kinds of steel tools, such as files, iron tubes, iron plates, iron
pots, and cooking utensils, sabres, and swords, to show the beau-
tiful quality of their steel. Swedish iron is not only of superior
quality, but its quantity is ammense.

Very fine specimens of two metals called Coparr and NIcKEL
are also exhibited, with specimens of Maeneric Inoy, for it is
from Sweden that we obtain our principal supply of these metals.
Sweden has also sent Corron Goons, made in the houses of the
peasants, with hand-looms, as it used to be made in England,
before steam power was introduced. Besides all these things
there are specimens of Fax, and of Linen.

If from Sweden you cross over the Baltic Sea, you arrive ata
very large country called

RUSSIA.

This is truly an enormous country. It contains one-seventh


THE RUSSIAN DEPARTMENT, 145

of the whole land of the earth. It therefore yields the Emperor
immense riches ; it will even yield more yet, when more of the
soil is cultivated, for not one-sixth at present yields fruit. There
is one large tract of land in Russia with a soil composed of
decayed vegetable matter, in some parts three feet, and in other
parts six feet deep. This fertile tract of land is as large as the
countries of Austria and France together; and upon it, immense
quantities of wheat are grown, which afford a supply for
Europe, and increase the riches of Russia.

The soil also yields riches in another way—from the timber,
which is cut down in the immense forests. Mineral substances,
again, areabundant. There are large mines of copper and salt ;
there are quarries of marble, and abundant supplies of gold,
platina, and, in some parts, precious stones.

You may therefore expect that in the Exhibition Russra has
shown signs of her riches,—and this you will find to be the case.
On my first visit to the Exhibition, the Russian department was
not opened, but was surrounded by a hoarding, for one of the
ships containing the goods sent was blocked up by the ice of the
Baltic Sea. ,

The department is, however, now opened with the most gor-
geous and dazzling display. They have in Russia a green stone
called malachite, which one of the Russian porters told me was
worth its weight in gold.

Rose. I never heard of that stone before, papa !

P. No, it is not well known ; it is, in fact, a sort of copper ore,
consisting of copper united with carbonic acid, or ‘ carbonate of
146 RUSSIAN RICHES—MALACHITE.

copper.’ This stone has also been found, but in smaller quan-
tities, in the copper mines of Burra Burra, in Australia.

But I was going to tell you of the extravagant quantities of
this precious stone which Russia has sent to the Exhibition.
People had been accustomed to see it used for brooches, jewel
boxes, and other small articles; but how was every one sur-
prised to find it worked up into a pair of drawing-room doors !;
These doors are a beautiful and astonishing sight. They are to
be sold if any one will buy them. Their value is said to be
£6,000. Will you have them, Henry?

H. Yes, if you will lend me the money to buy them, papa.
No, I don’t think that I would buy them, then,—because with
the £6,000 I could build a dozen houses as large as the one aunt
lives in. |

Rose. Ah, papa, Henry is a ‘matter-of-fact’ man. He is
one of the ‘ Germanic race.’ Look at his blue eyes!

P. Not only is there a pair of doors made of malachite, but
a beautiful mantel-piece, with a table and chair on each side of
*t. The chairs are worth £120 a-piece, and the prices of the
tables are £400 each. :

In the front of the department, there are three large hand-
some vases, made of a precious stone called jasper, which have
excited the wonder and admiration of many people—almost as
much as the malachite has. Those who understand the work-
manship of vases, have been very much struck with one of
them. They have been wondering how, in such a hard stone,
the beautiful border of leaves could be cut. It is supposed that
ARTIFICIAL FRUITS. 147

a diamond was used for the purpose. The vase is valued at
£2,000. All three of these vases are the property of the
Emperor, and were made at his own manufactory.

In the very centre of the front is another great vase, of por-
celain. This also was made at the Emperor’s manufactory—it
is valued at £2,500.

But these things form only a small part of the riches sent
from Russia. There are quantities of SILVER-PLATE ; gold-plate
also; and jewels worth £40,000.

There is an artificial branch of currants, made of a precious
stone called white cornelian, in which even the very stones are
seen inside the fruit. These look so natural, so juicy, and
tempting, that the young Prince of Wales said,—‘* He should
really like to eat them.”

There are even more specimens of fine J ewellery.—There are

Bunches of cherries in red cornelian, —
Pears in agate stone,
Plums in onyx.

tose. Are there any more articles, papa ?

P. Yes. In the background there is a curious carpet made
of squares of squirrel-skin. Medallions made of porcelain, and
vases of beautiful azure and gold.

Hl, Has Russia sent any raw material, papa?

P. I cannot say, as I have not examined the whole of the
department yet; but I expect that when we go there we shall
see specimens of tallow, timber, wheat, flax, hemp, linseed, wool,
hides, and so forth.

K
148 THE GERMAN DEPARTMENT.

H. Which family, papa, do the Russians belong to?

_ P. They are neither Celtic nor Germanic, but belong to a
family formed by the union of the Germans with the Mongolian
race.

The people of this family are called the Sclavonic race. The
chief distinction in their character is, perhaps, a love of brute
force; many of them are in a rather savage state, and their
favourite occupation is plunder, and war. If you travel to the
south of Russia, you will reach a famous country called GER-
MANY.

You have heard, I dare say, that this country is divided into
several small states. Those states situated around the River
Rhine have, together with Prussia, formed a union, so that the
taxes paid as “customs” may be more easily collected. This
union, from the German words zoll, a tax, and verein, a union,

is called
THE ZOLLVEREIN.

H. Are the people a Germanic race, papa?

PR. Let me see if you can judge. Would a ‘matter of fact’
people be more likely to send useful or ornamental articles ?

Rose. Useful articles, J should think.

P. Then listen to the first account I read of the Zollverein.

“The general character of the articles sent by these states is
utilitarian (useful).”

Here is a list of some of their goods. There are models of their
fine apparatus used in MINING OPERATIONS—Tare minerals—


GERMAN PRODUCE. 151

fine preparations of colours, such as the beautiful blues, smalt
and ultramarine.

There are also woven goods in abundance—all useful things.
The principal article of commerce in Saxony—the Saxony
BROAD CLOTH — hosiery—worsted, and woollen stuffs — the
celebrated Berlin wool work, and paper patterns for ladies to
copy—with specimens of calico, are sent. Carpets, silks, oil-
cloths, and a very large display of useful ‘raw material.’

Hf. Then such a list of goods as that, seems to belong to a
Germanic nation.

P. That is correct. But, although the Germans are a hard-
working, matter-of-fact nation, they have sent us ornamental
goods. In the department of the kingdom of WurremBurG
there are some extraordinary specimens of stuffed animals.
There is a scene of hunting the wild boar, and another of stag
hunting, I think. Opposite those fwo scenes there are collec-
tions of animals, which have been prepared to illustrate some of
the fables published for children. There is the whole history of
REINEKE, the Fox, in which are many diverting scenes. These
you may see on our next visit. I have drawn some of them
for your amusement.

In another part of the Zollverein there is a very pretty model
of the castle in which H1s Royan HiaHness THE Prince ALBERT
was born. Although it is pretty, it does not display any of the
remarkable ingenuity which we see in the works of the French.

If you look again at your map, you will see, at the south-
east of Germany, a country called
152 THE AUSTRIAN DEPARTMENT.

AUSTRIA.

_ Here we have a strange empire, a curious mixture of the

Germanic, the Celtic, and the Sclavonic races. The people of
Austria have sent us many fine things. There are fine speci-
mens of raw material.

From Bourn, the northern part of Austria, the most beau-
tiful objects in stained glass aresent. There are lucifer matches,
for which Bohemia is also famous, producing enormous quan-
tities. |

The most striking of the useful articles are the articles of
Austrian Furniturg. These articles are ornamented with the
most perfect carvings. Iam afraid that when you visit the
furniture room, and notice its style, you will wonder what it
was really made for. The great bed in particular will surprise
you.

In the statuary room of Austria you will find a statue, called
“The Veiled Vestal.” It represents a female, whose face appears
to be covered with a veil. You know that it would be almost
impossible to cut a thin veil in marble, and the artist has, there-
fore, only carved the folds of the veil on the face, and has in-
dented the parts of the face between the folds, so that ata
distance you feel sure that the figure has on a real veil. Every
one is deceived at its appearance, until he has examined it closely.

Which country would you like to hear of next? |

Rose, Here is a country, papa, at the west of Austria. It is

alled SwiTzERLAND.


THE SWISS DEPARTMENT. 1538

SWITZERLAND.

P. This country is the most mountainous in Europe. Just
as there are two kinds of Belgians, so there are two families of
Swiss—the French Swiss (of Celtic origin), and the Germanic
Swiss. 7

The Celtic division is famous for its JEwELLERY, and its beau-
tiful Genznva Warcuss. The other division is more famous for
its agriculture—its dairies, butter, &c.

The ingenuity of the Celtic family in Switzerland is as great
as in any other country. They have sent to the Exhibition
watches for the deaf and blind—a watch which only requires
winding once a year, or not so often, indeed, as it runs 374 days
—a watch smaller than a fourpenny piece, to hang in a brooch
—a still smaller watch, made on the top of a pencil-case. This
beautiful little thing not only tells the hour, but the day of the
meek and the month. Next to the watches there are valuable
eases of jewellery work, also many curious and valuable philo-
sophical instruments. There are very beautiful and delicate
carvings in wood, and straw-plait of wonderful fineness, to-
gether with a number of “ingenious trifles,” which, it is said,
show how the people in that mountainous country occupy them-
selves during the winter months.

They also send specimens of ornamental ribbons, embroidered
curtains, velvet, “Swiss muslins,” and “cambrics” in abun-
dance, with many varieties of cotton goods.

It is said that in nearly every branch of manufacture—either
154 CHARACTER OF THE SWISS.

of pottery work, or of woven goods, or of metal work—the
Swiss have sent good specimens.

H. They seem very industrious for a Celtic race, papa!

P. You must not suppose that the Celts cannot be industrious.
They are not generally disposed to work hard when tilling the
soil, but most Celtic people have great patience as well as in-
genuity.

You may learn from the Swiss how much a nation may owe
to the climate and country it lives in. The Swiss of Geneva
and the neighbourhood are not very different in their origin
from the Spanish or Portuguese, or from the people of Trance
and Italy, which countries surround Switzerland; but they are
by far the most active. What do you suppose has helped to
make them so?

H. The wind, papa, which blows across the snowy moun-
tains. I should think that the mountain breezes would always
keep the Swiss from going to sleep.

P. There is no question that both the Celtic and the Ger-
manic Swiss owe much of their activity to such a cause. If
you were to ask a Swiss, ‘ Why is it that you are so much more
active than the Celts of Spain?” he would say, perhaps, “ Be-
cause I do not live in so warm a climate—because I breathe the
mountain air—because, ever since I have been a little child, I
have been accustomed to climb the mountain side, and walk
over the steep hills.”

There is very much that is interesting in the history of a
Geneva watch. You may one day hear how the different parts
GENEVA WATCHES.—SPAIN, 155

of each watch are divided amongst different hands in the vil-
Jages, and are put together and finished in the towns. Watches
are made in the same way in CLERKENWELL, near London, ex-
cept that the workmen live in dark back streets, and closely-
packed houses, breathing a very different air from that of their
fellow-workmen in Geneva.

Jose. And not having such pleasant cottages, I dare say.

P. We will now pass westward to

SPAIN,

Here is a strongly Celtic race of people. Their principal
manufactures, wine, sword-blades, tobacco, &c. One of the
swords sent to the exhibition from TotEpo, has a blade which
is beautifully ‘tempered.’ It is so elastic that it may be bent
so as to form a circle, and in this shape it is put away in its
sheath. When taken out it immediately becomes straight
again.

H. The Spaniards ought to have sent plenty of ‘ fancy-work,’
as they are Celts.

P. So they have done, I have read that the fancy work in
embroidery, and the black lace of Spain, is truly exquisite—so
beautiful that “the English ladies who work crochet and
Berlin wool may throw away their needles and hooks in
despair.” Spain has also sent a shrine in gilt metal, and in
precious stones. ‘There is a wonderful table, ornamented with
smosaie work. It proves how patient, as well as ingenious, are
156 SPANISH INGENUITY—RAW MATERIAL AND ROADS.

many of the Celts. It must have cost immense labour, and
have taken an immense time—for it is said to contain three
million pieces of wood!

There are, from Spain, beautiful specimens of raw material,
to show what wealth there still is in their soil. There is in the
iron mines abundance of iron as fit for making fine steel as that
of Sweden, but not much is sold, for want of good roads to
convey it to the ships on the coast. |

I read about the Spanish roads, papa, in “ Uncle’s Richard’s ”
letter in Pueasant Pacgs. I remember how he was bumped
about in the diligence. How strange, papa, that there should
not be good roads; but making roads is not ‘ fancy work.’

Rose. Do the Spaniards make much woollen cloth or cotton
goods, as the English and the German people do?

P. I think not. Most of their fine merino wool is exported
as ‘raw material.’ They have woollen manufactories; but I
have read that the manufactures are mere shams. It is said that
all sorts of woollens, cottons, hardware (or iron utensils), are
smuggled into the country.

The next country to Spain is

PORTUGAL.

The Celtic people of this country are very similar to the
Spaniards. Formerly the two nations were one. The Portuguese
have sent us beautiful artificial flowers formed of feathers—
exquisite carving in ivory—-fine marble—barrels of snuff’ (of
which any one may take a pinch). There are specimens of
PORTUGAL AND ITALY. 157

woollen and cotton cloths. I have not noticed these cloths,

but I have read concerning them :—“ Of these, the less said the

better.” .
H, Now let us cross the Mediterranean, papa, to

ITALY.

P. Here is a truly Celtic race. Like the Spanish and Portu-
guese, they have sent us everything that is beautiful. Poor
Italians! They live in ‘the garden of Europe,’ with a rich soil,
and a most luxurious climate, and yet they are not a happy
people.

Rose. Why not?

P. Because they want perseverance and industry. They
know very little of the enjoyment of ‘ working hard!’ They
are famous for their music, their dancing, and their painting.
The marble statues and splendid architecture show how rich is
the imagination of this Celtic nation. 7

From the northern parts of Italy,—Tuscany and LueHory,
we have beautiful specimens of straw-plait.

Rose. I once wore a Tuscan straw hat, and mamma wears a
Leghorn bonnet.

P. None but Italians could, I should think, make such emit
tiful work in straw. You do not set much vile on a straw ;
yet, see how this value can be changed by industry! There
are in the Exhibition specimens of Tuscan plait which are
worth their weight in gold. Beside the statues, the Italians have
sent mosaic tables, and other ornamental furniture ; but the most
158 THE TURKISH DEPARTMENT.

striking objects are their ingenious models, showing the beautiful
anatomy of different animals. I will show them to you the
next time we go to the Exhibition.

At the east of Italy is a country called

TURKEY.

The most noticeable article in the Turkish department is a
huge brass machine, of elegant shape, looking something like a
large tea-urn. It is really a large brazier for charcoal, called a
mangal. 'The charcoal is burned inside the mangal, which, in a
Turkish house, is placed in the centre of the room ; the Turkish
ladies sit round it to warm themselves.

H. I think I would rather look at a blazing fire, than a brass
mangal.

The Turks have also sent us beautiful specimens of coffee-
_ cups, and other household utensils. There are specimens of the
famous Turkey carpets, Turkish beads—of which you shall
one day hear more—silks embroidered with gold, musical
instruments, and many more of the kind of articles which
people call ‘beautiful.’ There are, too, specimens of the Turkey
sponge from the shores of the ARCHIPELAGO ; there is one piece
just as it was taken from the rock, with an oyster still sticking
to it.

Rose. What is the name of that little country at the south of
Turkey ?

P. That is
GREECE—MARBLE AND STATUES, 159

GREECE.

Greece was formerly the first country of the world; but,
alas! the fates go round like the world itself, and Greece, in
the midst of the World’s Industry, is an unimportant place.

Amongst her raw materials there is a piece of the beautiful
marble which was used for the great Parthenon, and for the
statues, in the days of Greece’s glory. There are many other
fine specimens of marble, like that which was used for building
many an ancient temple. You may see a blackish marble—
variegated marble—marble with reddish and ‘sky-blue green’
spots—grey marble—marble with grey spots, like clouds—
marble with yellow veins—green marble—greentsh marble—
flesh-coloured marble—transparent marble, and marble which
is perfectly black.

There is also ‘marble alabaster.’ There are other raw
materials from Greece, but few manufactures.

H. Now, I think, papa, that you have mentioned all the
countries of Europe. I will count them up, that I may remem-
ber them:—Gruat Brirarn, Francs, Betatum, Hottanp,
Denmark, SwepEen and Norway, Russta, the ZoLLvEREIN,
AustRiA, SwiTzERLAND, Spain, Porrucart, Turkey, and
GREECE.

There is one thing I notice, papa,—that the Celtic nations are
found at the south of Europe, and at the west, and most of the
Germanic nations live northward.

P, That is the case. The most westward of the Celtic
160 THE AFRICAN GOODS.—BGYPT.

nations are the people of Ireland, which country is, you know,
at the west of England. These people have all the failings of
the Celts, and all their good qualities, also. These good qualities
might be better known if the Irish had better opportunities of
showing them.

Let us now mention the principal Goops FRoM AFRICA.

a en

Chapter Fourteenth.

THE GOODS FROM AFRICA.
Sow is the least civilized part of the world. We

> shall not, therefore, find many of her productions. In-

~&A\ deed, the history of the goods from the remainder of

the globe will not occupy much time. The principal African
contributions have been sent from Egypt and Tunis.

EGYPT.

Egypt is on the northern side of the eastern nave, opposite to
the Koh-i-noor. In the front of its department it protrudes
long matchlocks, sabres, and very large saddles, richly em~
broidered with gold, similar to those exhibited by other Eastern
countries. One of the walls of the department is covered with
drapery of violet, crimson, green, and blue silk garments, with
crimson and green shawls, all embroidered with gold.
THE CHARACTER OF EASTERN MANUFACTURES, 161

H. J think that the people of Africa and Asia seem very fond
of gold embroidery. I wonder whether they are Celts?

P. No; they belong to a different race, which you may
hear of one day. It is said that the goods from Turkey and the
Eastern countries convey an instructive lesson to the mind. The
Kast is the land of despotism, where power belongs only to the
wealthy rulers. So, itis found, that in splendid dress, jewellery,
and armour, and in all that belongs to the rich, the Eastern
nations excel the Europeans; but that in common comforts—in
those articles which all classes need—they do not equal the
more civilized nations.

On the southern side of the nave, opposite to Turkey, is the
department of

TUNIS.

Here we have nearly the same kind of goods as in Egypt.
The tools of husbandry, hay-forks, &c., are very rude, while
there is “ extremely fine door-matting, and a magnificent collec-
tion of gold-embroidered dresses.”

You may see, on the map, that Tunis is in the northern part
of Africa—in the part inhabited by the Moors and Arabs; so
we find in the Tunis department a real Arab’s tent of black
camel’s hair. This tent is adorned with such ornaments as the
Arabs find in Africa—skins of lions, leopards, antelopes, and
wild goats. There are Arab musical instruments—a fiddle with
two strings, a guitar, and an African banjo. There are hats
hanging up, as large round the brim as a coach-wheel, very
suitable for wear under an African sun, no doubt.
162 THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.—ASIA.

From
THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE,

which, you can see, is at the very south of Africa, are sent
skins of wild animals, buffaloes’ horns, rhinoceros’ horns, and
oil from the sheeps’ tails, which I will one day describe to you.
The sheep of the Cape, and of Africa, have enormous tails,
which are sometimes carried on wheels. There is an elephant’s
tusk weighing 103 Ibs. Amongst the manufactures is the head-
dress of a Kaffir warrior, and a beautiful tippet made of the fea-
thers of various Cape birds.

There are also goods from the western coast of Africa—
broad-brimmed straw hats again, calabashes, poisoned ar-
rows, &c., &c.

——_@—_—_

Chapter Fifteenth.

THE GOODS FROM ASIA.

HE principal Asiatic goods are sent from India, Ceylon,
Persia, China, and the islands of the Indian seas.

The two former countries have been mentioned.

PERSIA,

like the other Eastern countries, sends many ‘ fine’ things.
The Persian carpets and rugs are beautiful. There are silk and
THE CHINESE DEPARTMENT, 168

cotton dresses, and numerous articles embroid ered in silk and
gold. There are silk and gold scarfs, silk and gold cushions,
suk and gold bags for ladies, silk and gold slippers for gentle-
men, silk and gold caps for gentlemen, silk girdles, embroidered
purses and sashes, scented woods, mother-o’-pearl beads, &c.

CHINA

sends many singular things. Itisa country noted for its por-
celain, silk, tea, &c. You must remind me that, when we go
again, we particularly examine one collection of goods. Itisa
complete collection of the various materials employed in
THE GREAT PORCELAIN WORKS OF KIAING-TIHT’-CHIN.

There are Chinese gongs, lamps, edible birds’ nests, which
you will like to see; ivory chessmen, all kinds of woods inlaid
with mother-o’-pearl, japanned goods, the dyes used for making
green tea, Chinese shoes, model of a Chinese junk, and other
articles, such as you may have seen in the Chinese Exhibition.

At the south of China you may observe a large group of
islands in the Indian Ocean, such as Sumatra, Bornuo, J AVA,
&c. From thence are sent the extraordinary gum which has
lately become so extensively useful, viz., Gurra Prrcna.
Indian-rubber is also sent, with collections of spices ; for some of
these islands so abound in spices, that they are called ‘the Spice
Islands’ Sago, another important produce of these parts, has
been sent, with gamboge, tortoise-shell, shellac, isinglass, ana
specimens of the fine rattans, bamboos, and other canes of the
tropical countries.

L
164 AUSTRALIA.—NEW ZEALAND.

THE GOODS FROM AUSTRALIA.

By proceeding south-eastward from the Spice Islands you ©
arrive at Australia. This department, you may remember, we
visited in the Exhibition. There is, in one part, a piece of
‘fibrous malachite, with specimens of ‘ stream-gold,’ and
polished stones. One of the most important products of Aus-
tralia is its wool; of this specimens are sent, with patent and
enamelled kangaroo-skins. From Van Dirman’s Lanp—
the large island at the south of Australia—are sent all varieties
of wood,—black wood, velvet wood, musk wood, myrtle, sassa-
fras, and blue-gum timber, rosewood, and many others. There
are all kinds of earths, gums, skins, with other most varied
animal and vegetable productions. Honey and bees’-wax is
sent; for, it is said, that in no place in the world do bees thrive
better then in Van Dieman’s Land.

en

Chapter Sixteenth.

THE GOODS FROM AMERICA.

; F, when in Van Dieman’s Land, you take a ship and
proceed eastward, you will arrive at two large islands

called New ZEALAND.
~ The people here have begun to manufacture ; and have sent
THE UNITED STATES. 165

specimens of cloth and soap,—of leather, and bags made from
flax ; for flax and corn grow beautifully in the fine climate of
these islands.

From New Zealand continue eastward, and you reach the
great continent of the New Wor.p.

In South America, the principal countries are under a tropical
climate ; their produce, therefore, is not unlike that of the East
Indies ona the Spice Islands. From Curr, Perv, and Brazr1,
there are gold and silver ores—raw hides from the numerous
herds of bullocks in the neighbourhood of Brazil; and artificial
flowers, and butterflies, formed of feathers and beetles’ wings.
From British Guiana and the West Inprxs are not only
spices, but the produce of the splendid trees and vegetables,—
such as the mahogany, banyan, nutmeg, cocoa, coffee, sugar,
rice, almonds, raisins, &c.

In North America we have products from Mexico, California,
and principally from

THE UNITED STATES.

Mexico sends little else besides a collection of woods, and
“designs of fruit and reptiles in wax.”

From Carirornta is 100 lbs. of quicksilver, and, I believe, a
small lump of gold ore; but a much larger quantity was ex-
pected.

From the Unirep Srates we have fine collections of raw
produce, and are to have many more articles. Most of them
are useful rather than ornamental. There are some punching

x 9
166 THE AMERICAN GOODS.

machines, which are striking objects ; stoves and grates, ploughs,
and a large iron safe, which, it is said, no one can open except
the man who made it. America is famous for its india-rubber,
and has, therefore, sent a model of an india-rubber life-boat,
which, it is said, can be made to be put in one’s pocket ; yet,
when opened, it is two yards long and one yard wide.

The most important products of America, however, are its
Corron and Corn—of these, there are all kinds of specimens—
and Inpran Corn, or Marz. A new kind of oil has also been
sent, called Lard Oil: great quantities of it are made in Ame-
rica from lard, the fat of the pig. It is much used for machi-
nery. In the north gallery there is a ‘ great exhibition’ of
Soap—all kinds of plain soap and fancy soaps made into fancy
shapes. There are busts in fancy colours of celebrated persons
done in soap. If I remember rightly, Her Majesty’s counte-
nance has been modelled in this way.

The least agreeable articles from America are the peculiar
rifles and pistols called ‘revolvers,’ which are constructed so
as to fire off several balls without the trouble of reloading. The
most agreeable and beautiful object is the statue of the Greek
slave, which we saw and talked about when noticing the ‘lions’
of the Exhibition.

H. There was another agreeable thing, papa—I mean that
great picture of an eagle, hanging up at the end of the nave,
It was an enormous eagle, you may remember.

P. Yes; I had forgotten it. If you look at our map once
more, you will see that at the north of the United States are
THE NORTH AMERICAN COLONIES. a

several British colonies—Canapa, New Brunswick, Nova
Scotia, Newrotunpianp, &c.; but as we have visited the de-
partment of Canada, which is the most important, I will leave.
you to look for the productions of the smaller colonies another °
day.

Hf. I should like, now, to count up all the countries we have.
heard of, papa; but I don’t think that there will be time, for,
see, the cabman is turning round the corner! Weare nearly
home.

P. I had intended to talk to you about our great city, Lon-
don, but there will certainly not be time now.

HH. No; the cabman has reached the beginning of our terrace.
Iam very glad we are so near home; and I am very glad that
we have been—— |

P. You may be very glad, too, that there is so great an Ex-
hibition. Let us always think of it as the Tempe oF Pxacr,
for such it is. There, men are now learning to love the peaceful
arts; they are learning, too, how their neighbours, as well as
themselves, take delight in such works.

H. So, they learn that they are like each other.

P. True; they learn, too, that God, their Father, has given
to all the same kind of feelings and tastes; and that He can ~
make them all work together for good. When they have thus
learned that they are brethren, men will learn that they may
work together for even a greater good. God has made all men
to admire that which is fair and right—all men can see that
truth and justice are more beautiful than anything in the
168 HE GOOD TIME COMING.” —HOME.

Exhibition. Thus, Henry, we may hope that a ‘ good time’ will
goon come. In that time, men of all nations will often meet.
Then, they will strive together that, under God’s blessing, “ all
things may be settled upon the best and surest foundations ;
that peace and happiness, truth and justice, religion and piety,
may be established among us for all generations.”

_H. Why, papa, I think that men mean to do so very soon,—
at least, there is somebody who wants to teach them to do so,
for, see what somebody has printed on the cover of the Cata-
logue !—I will read it to you.

THE PROGRESS OF THE HUMAN RACE,
RESULTING FROM THE COMMON LABOUR OF ALL MEN,
OUGHT TO BE THE FINAL OBJECT OF THE EXERTION OF EACH INDIVIDUAL.
IN PROMOTING THIS END,
WE ARE CARRYING OUT THE WILL OF THE GREAT AND BLESSED GOD.

Ah! that is rather too hard a sentence for me; I cannot
understand it yet.

P. Then I will explain it to you fully another day ; but we
have reached home again. Come, Rose.

H. Why, Rosz! Poor Rose, she is so tired, papa, that she
has fallen fast asleep!


SUPPLEMENT.

ance

PLEASANT PAGES

“PLEASANT PAGES.” |


CONTENTS OF SUPPLEMENT.

Tur ‘Opsect LESSONS’ FROM THE GREAT EXHIBITION, IN
“Papsagawe PaGws” . « 6 «© « te ew et ew et ee
Gratuirous Corres oF “ PLEASANT PAGES” .... -

Opinions oF PuBiic JOURNALS, AND SUBSCRIBERS OF

A Sr ek ag Go eee ee
Ditto . ° . 7. - . + - 2 7 o . + . . . . . ©
Ditto oe - oe ° 7 © e f + . +. * . . Le 7 s .

ConTENTS OF 1st Votumm or “ PLEASANT PAGES” . . .
Dirro - - . . . . . - - . . . . . . . 7 . o

“¢PrREASANT PAGES” FOR SABBATH Hours ..... .~

PAGE

ao bo

ao nsx o&
PLEASANT PAGES

Is published on the First and Fifteenth of each Month, in
Numbers, Price 2d.



From the Ist July, 1851, until Christmas, Doustze NuMBERS
WILL BE PUBLISHED (Price 4d.), containing, with many Illustrations,
an entirely Original Series of

OBJECF LESSONS

FROM THE

GREAT EXHIBITION.



The course on Raw Marerrats will convey to the young a
comprehensive view of the produce of THE WORLD.

_ The qualities, uses, and varieties of the articles of food, clothing,
furniture, &c., peculiar to each country, will be developed in a con-
tinuous series. Thus, the History of VeGeTaBLE Propuctions will
include the different gums, resins, turpentines, oils, barks, roots, fruits,
leaves, berries, seeds, fibres, piths, pulps, &c., useful to man; such
as gutta percha, India rubber, tar, camphor, sugar, tan, nutgalls,
cork, cinnamon, various dye woods, cocoa-nut, bread-fruit, ginger,
arrow-root, cassava or tapioca, sago, tea, tobacco, cotton, corn, rice,
maize, linseed, flax, &c., with the various vegetable acids.

The History of ANtmmAL Propuctions will include that of skins,
furs, wool, shells, horn, ivory, bone, silk, &c. In the History of
MrxerAL Propuctions will be found the principal stones, metals,
earth, and salts, of the different countries.

Of the courses on Macutnery and Manuractures, of which
the Exhibition affords singularly curious and interesting examples,
particulars will in due time be given.

These courses, with a short History of the Frye Arrs and
Scuurrure, will form A HISTORY OF THE INDUSTRIAL
ARTS OF THE WORLD IN THE YEAR 1851.

L


PLEASANT PAGES.
A Fournal of Enstruction

FOR

THE FAMILY AND THE SCHOOL.



GRATUITOUS COPIES.



PLEASANT PAGES has been a candidate for public favour for
twelve months. The demand for the work has steadily increased
from the beginning, until it has reached its present extensive sale.
It has now almost reached the climax of prosperity, and is largely
realizing the idea for which it was established—viz., the promotion -
of AN IMPROVED SYSTEM OF EDUCATION FOR THE MIDDLE
AND UPPER CLASSES.

In order to this end, the objects of “ PLEASANT PAGES ” are—

Ist, To exemplify the PRACTICE of a system of instruction
founded on the principles of Locke, Pestalozzi, and others.

Qndly, 7'o provide a stock of SIMPLIFIED MATERIAL for the
use of parents and teachers.

Srdly, At the same time, to afford AMUSING AND, INSTRUCTIVE
DAILY READING for the young, and persons of limited attain-
ments—the lessons being arranged in consecutive courses.

These objects being undoubtedly very desirable, the Proprietors
have resolved still further to extend the circulation of the work, in
the hope that it may be read in every family in Britain, and exert a
powerful influence on the character of the rising generation.

For this purpose 20,000 CorizEs of No. I. are being issued
GRATIS, for distribution by the friends of education. Copies may
be obtained through any Bookseller, or single copies may be had by
letter, enclosing a postage stamp, to the Publishers, Messrs. HOUL-
STON and STONEMAN, 65, Paternoster Row.

2
«

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS, AND SUBSCRIBERS OF
“PLEASANT PAGES.”
————

‘THE degree of enthusiasm with which PLEASANT PaGes has
hitherto been welcomed has not often been surpassed. This feeling
is indicated by the following testimonials of the public journals and

* subscribers :—

“This work has now obtained an enormous circulation, and its pages
teem with knowledge. The lessons upon every subject are masterly, and
while peculiarly fitted by their simplicity and entertaining form for the
very young, the man of mature years may read them with profit, and
cannot fail of being a wiser, and probably a better man for the perusal.
The secular instruction is full of moral beauty, and while the mind drinks in
knowledge, the heart is taught the high and pure lessons of Christian charity
andlove. * * * ‘Pleasant Pages’ are worth more than their weight
in gold—for gold cannot give what they impart.’—Portsmouth Guardian.

‘Such a work has long been a desideratum, and before we had half
finished the first part, we could not help exclaiming, audibly, ‘We have
found it! we have found it!’ ”—Mother’s Magazine.

We never saw an educational periodical of this kind so good, so cheap,
and so truly delightful.”—Bradford Observer.

‘These ‘Pleasant Pages’ please us more and more as each successive
part comes before us.” —Bridgewater Times.

‘One cannot help feeling regret when he gets to the last of them.’”’—
Somerset Gazette.

“‘What can we say of this charming little work more than we have
already said in its praise ?””—Liverpool Chronicle.

‘¢ “Pleasant Pages’ should be in every homestead of the land.’””—Aber-
deen Banner. 3

‘‘ We say again that it ought to be found in every household where there
are children.”—Bradford Observer. 3

‘This book could not be used in any family without realizing some
good.”— Bedford Times. :

‘‘ Wherever it comes, parents and children must hail its approach with
equal pleasure.” — Portsmouth Guardian (second notice). ;

‘6 We think the family will prove singularly defective who shall continue
strange to the teachings of ‘ Pleasant Pages.” ’—Herald of Peace.

‘The best periodical for the young we ever saw OF heard of. It should
be purchased by every mother, and read by every child in the kingdom.” —
The Publie Good.

3
‘This ‘ Journal of Home Education’ is unquestionably one of the most
valuable publications for the improvement {of the young, which has ever
fallen into our hands. We have a very vivid recollection of the impression
made upon the public mind by the first appearance of ‘EvENINGs AT Homz,’
from the pens of Dr. Aikin, and his highly gifted faughter, Mrs. Barbauld,
and have even since our childhood perused the pages of that valuable work
with great pleasure; but we have no hesitation in st that, in our
humble opinion, these ‘ Pleasant Pages’ are superior to that long celebrated
performance as a vehicle for the instruction of the expanding mind of
children. Never was valuable knowledge conveyed in a more simple or
fascinating form than in this ‘Journal of Home Education.’ ’’— Nottingham
Mercury, Oct. 23.

‘¢ Than these ‘ Pleasant Pages,’ we know of no modern work that more
imperatively demands the support of an English public. A glance at the
list of contents of the May number now lying before us will at once pro-
claim the inappreciable value of such a publication in a family. Ka. gr.—
On Mondays—a course of Moral Lessons. On Tuesdays—a course of
Natural History. On Wednesdays—an original course of English History.
On Thursdays—a complete course of English Geography : being an Amusin
Account of Travels in the Forty Counties. On Fridays—a course of Genera
Geography: being an Amusing History of Travels abroad. On Saturdays
—a course of Physical Geography, alternating with Poetry and occasional
Music. Isit necessary tosay a word more in commendation of a work which,
with such unanswerable claims to admittance, so loudly knocks at the door
of every Englishman’s house?’’—Lancaster Gazette.

‘*Tt brings down the loftiest subjects to the comprehension of children,
and gives its lessons so that sages may be wiser from their study.”’—Glas~
gow Examiner.

‘‘ Enabling parents to teach their children, and learn themselves. It
deserves an IMMENSE sale.”’—Birmingham Mercury.

‘¢ Everything it contains will be found good. Itis
Good in its subjects, which are both useful and scientific ;

Good in its arrangement, having a lesson for every day in the week ;

Good in its principles, teaching strict morality ;

Good in its plainness, handling the most abstruse questions in an easy
manner; and

Good in its simplicity, being on the Infant-School System.”— Cambridge

Advertiser.

‘The moral lessons on ‘ Honesty’ are particularly good, and the lessons
on perspective drawing we have not seen equalled.” — Dundee Cowrier.:

‘ lessons under the head of ‘ Honesty.’”— Hereford Journal.

4
The following are some of the spontaneous testimonials of the
subscribers to ‘* PLEASANT PAGES: ”—

** * * “T hear much of ‘Pleasant Pages’ from my little son and
daughter ; it is now used in both the schools they attend. To hear them speak
of it makes me wish myself a child again that I might solearn. It seems to
instil feelings of love for what is lovely, and a distaste for that which should not
be loved. It induces them to think and to gather knowledge for themselves.’’

** * * “T have recommended ‘ Pleasant Pages’ to many; all are
delighted with it. A lady who conducts » juvenile academy at Crediton, says she
finds the work all that you described it ti. ve, and exactly the aid she had long
desired to have. Another lady of great experience in tuition says: ‘ The highest
recommendation I can give is, that the dear children are so much delighted with
their lessons that the daily cry is: Ob, may we have a chapter from “ Pleasant
Pages ?”’ and the promise of such a treat is sufficient inducement to make them
industrious all the morning.’ ”’

* * * * “Tam so much delighted with ‘Pleasant Pages’ that were any-
thing to interfere with the publication of the work I should feel quite at a loss
how to proceed. The regular use of the lessons has certainly invested teaching
with a charm it never possessed for me before, and I believe that my pupils have
derived much benefit. The history lessons are so much encored, that I often wish
Prout Newcombe could see the young faces beaming with interest as we proceed.’

**DEAR S1rR,—I am one amongst many English mothers deeply indebted to
you for assistance constantly derived from your periodical visit to us in the form
of ‘Pleasant Pages.’ I must not trespass on your time to tell you how manyo
your ‘ thoughts that make thoughts’ have filled my mind with bright hopes for the
future. A holier and purer mode of instruction than any I have ever yet seen, must
surely have a tendency to make purer and holier men and women than the world
has ever yet known, and have an influence in promoting that ‘kingdom of right-
eousness, peace, and joy,’ soon,I trust, to be established upon the earth. * *

** With many other mothers, and dear children too, who are rising up to call you
blessed, and thank you, I trust, by holy and useful lives, for your kind exertions,

** Notting Hill.” **T am, dear Sir, yours very truly, M. B,

** DEAR Sir, —I feel I owe you so large a debt, that I must at least acknow-
ledge it. Your ‘Pleasant Pages’ are the delight of my flock. I have five little
boys and one little girl, whom I teach at home. Though I have long endeavoured
to imitate the teachings of Pestalozzi and Dr. Mayo, your book gives all that I
wanted, reducing all to a system of order and regularity. If your work con-
tained nothing but the History lessons, I should feel called upon to recommend
it far and wide. It is so rare a thing to find the Gospel principle of peace
instilled in a lesson on history. Your moral lessons are so simple and attractive
that even my youngest, of three years old, listens and replies most aptly.. Your
‘Pleasant Pages’ not only teach my children to think, but to use proper words
and expressions to convey their thoughts. I have had great pleasure in intro-
ducing your work to families around me, and I shall consider it a duty to send
your advertisements as numerously as possible.

** Upper Norwood, Surrey.” “C. M. F.

5


PLEASANT PAGES

Is not only published in Fortnightly Parts, but in Half-yearly

Each Volume supplies daily readin
400 pages, with numerous illustrations,

gilt, Price 3s. 6d.

Volumes.



g for half-a-year, containing
bound in elegant green cloth,

PART OF THE CONTENTS OF VOL. I,

MORAL LESSONS.

Introduction—The Plea-
sures of Learning.

Truth—Reginald’s Draw-
ing Copy.

Truth—The Errand Boy.

Truth— The Watercress
Man.

Truth—Mr. Ganeall’s Bar-
gain.

Truth—The Wager.

Truth—John Huss.

Truth—Martin Luther.

Proverb—A fool uttereth
ali his mind.

Proverb — Deep _ rivers
move with silence.

Proverb — Empty vessels

make the most sound.

Proverb —He that runs
fast will not run long.

Honesty — Introductory
Lesson.

Honesty — The
‘Window.

Honesty—James Walters.

Honesty — Benjamin’s
Bookstall.

Honesty—The Two Men
of Business.

Proverb— Write injuries
in dust, and kindnesses
in marble.

On Singing Praises.

6

Broken

NATURAL HISTORY.

Vertebrated Animals.

Articulated Animals.

Molluscous Animals.

Radiated Animals.

Recapitulation.

The Three Kingdoms of
Nature.

Organic Bodies.

How we know an Animal
from a Vegetable.

The Four Sub-kingdoms.

The Bones of Animals.

Vertebrated Animals.
Wiilie’s Framework.

Willie’s Framework. The
Head.

Willie’s Framework. The,
Bones of the Face.

Willie’s Frameworks. The
Limbs.

Vertebrated Animals. Di-
vision into Classes.

The Class Mammals. Prin-
ciples of Classification.

The Class Mammals. Order
1. Bimana.

HISTORY.

Ancient Britons.

The Romans. JuliusCesar.
Ditto. Caractacus.

Ditto. Conquest of Britain.

The Northern Barbarians.

The Saxon Invasion.

The Saxon Heptarchy.
Allodial System.

The Introduction of Chris-
tianity.

Invasion of the Danes.

Alfred the Great.

Edward, Athelstane, and
Edmund.

Edred, Edwy, and Edgar.

Edward the Martyr, Ethel-
red, Edmund Ironside.

The Three Danish Kings.

Edward the Confessor.
Harold.

The Norman Kings. The
Conquest.

The Feudal System.

William the Conqueror.

OBJECT LESSONS.

The Tablecloth.
Bread.

Butter.

Sugar.

Milk.

An Egg.

Salt.

Cottfee.

Cocoa.

Water.
Boiling Water.
PART OF CONTENTS OF YOL. I. “PLEASANT PAGES.”

Questions for Examina-
tion.

The Rasher of Bacon.

The Knife and Fork.

The Plate and Breakfast-
cup.

TRAVELLER THROUGH
ENGLAND.

English Traveller. Intro-
duction,

Berwick.

Northumberland.

Visit to a Coal Mine.

How to make Geography
Lessons.

Cumberland.

Carlisle.

Westmoreland Lakes —
Ullswater.

Ditto— Windermere.

Westmoreland,

Questions for Examina-
tion on Northumber-
land, Cumberland, and
Westmoreland, and
Durham.

Darham.

Yorkshire.

Hull, York.

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.

Solids, Liquids, and
Fluids.

Fluids (Caloric).

The Crust of the Earth
(Lime).

Ditto. Argil or Clay.

Ditto. Silica or Flint.
Ditto. Vegetable Soil,
Boulders.

Ditto. Sketch of Geology.

DRAWING LESSONS.
Lines.
Angles.
Triangles.

Quadrilateral Figures,
Drawing Copies.
Perspective— .
The Horizontal Line.
Vanishing Point.
Point of Sight and
Point of Station.
Recapitulation.
Practical Exercises.

HYMNS AND POETRY.

A garland ! a garland!

All the flashing, gleaming
glory.

Alas for men! that they
should be so blind.

And now another day is
gone.

A rosy child went forth to
play.

Awake, little girl,
time to arise.

Be you to others kind and
true.

Can you catch the flying
shadows.

Epitaph on an Infant.

Fair befal the _ cotton
tree!

Father of all! we bow to
thee.

it is

From day to day we
humbly own.
God’s presence shineth
everywhere.

God bless our native land.

God might have made the
earth bring forth.

Hark ! amid the “ shivery
leaf sounds,’”’

Harvest Home.

He is the wisest, and the
happiest man.

Higher, higher will we
climb.

How oft enchanted have I
stood.

How lovely shines the
liquid pearl.

liow fast those pretty
blossoms fall.

Hurrah! hurrah! for Eng-
land.

I have a little sister.

I sing the almighty power
of God.

** Let there be light,”’ the
Eternal spoke.

Little brother, darling boy.

My home, my own dear
home.

Mother, how still the baby
lies!

Now I lay me down to
sleep.

Old England for ever !

Reader, whosoe’er thou art.

Sing a sweet melodious
measure.

Spring is coming, Spring
is coming.

The bird that soars on
highest wing.

The stars are bright.

There is a flower, a little
flower.

Time speeds away—away,
away.

To a bee.

Up! up, let us a voyage
take.

When all thy mecries, O
my God.

Work while you work.

MUSIC.

Songs for the Seasons—
Spring Song, Summer
Song, Autumn Song,
Winter Song.

Morn amid the Mountains

Little Travellers Zion-
ward,

Children of Jerusalem.

God save the Queen,

7


« pLEASANT PAGES” FOR SABBATH HOURS:



THE FAMILY SUNDAY-BOOK

Is intended to afford interesting reading for the Young during
the leisure hours of the Sabbath, and at the same
time to supply a course of

INFANT-SCHOOL LESSONS FOR SUNDAY
‘SCHOOL CLASSES,

(From Five to Ten Years of Age.)



The First Volume of the FAMILY Sunpay Boox is now ready. It con-
tains Ten large Illustrations, with Twenty-four highly interesting Scripture

Lessons, Which have been pronounced as “ differing in style from any
Scriptural instruction that has yet been produced.”

Price, in elegant cloth binding, gilt edges, 1s, 6d.

London: Houston and SronEMAN, 65, Paternoster Row.
Edinburgh: MENZIES. Dublin; J. Ropertson. And all Booksellers.

ae

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

“Then we have the lovely FAMILY SuNDAY Boox—lovely, because all its
graces are reserved for application on the Sabbath-day. As we aye said, we
honestly admit our inability to do anything like justice to the surpassing useful-
ness of these unpretending periodicals.””—Lancaster Gazette.

«¢ A nobler work than to sow the seeds of immortal life in the plastic infant
mind cannot be imagined, and this glorious mission seems to be that for which
THE AUTHOR is peculiarly adapted. The lessons hitherto given are founded
upon the incidents connected with the creation, fall, flood, and other portions of
early Scripture history, and appeal in the sweetest manner to the sympathies of
opening minds. The Scripture training thus early commenced, is the most potent
means of shutting out Romanism, or any other ism which pollutes the pure
fountain of Christian a © 0. as Truth had never a more attrac-
tive expositor for the young, every family ought to have in its possession THE
Famity SuNDAY Book.’’— Portsmouth Guardian.

8












aie



eae

&














Ry as ae Ne ge ed “a aah ; , : gen Pte, tt i arian — Z “3
z, + en che gy 5 . Z q : ; eS Zam i Se NE 3 i; a Male: 5 foms

=





xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080919_AAAAVK' PACKAGE 'UF00002167_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-09-20T07:16:32-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:26:17-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298795; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-16T08:02:45-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '923648' DFID 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCO' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00002.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' d4f7f2240966dbcb809433aa44cf9c29
'SHA-1' a69b7c75bb0efccd2c20180e0f9fbf9fdefb9919
EVENT '2011-11-16T12:31:32-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'29287' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCP' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
35f2c96bc4e939efc0b6c7ae6bf2be6a
11d692312f110f9cf009a9e024ca09bc1dddec6f
'2011-11-16T12:33:08-05:00'
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCQ' 'sip-files00002.pro'
a5ed5baaa6bd9e145b424128474a7bca
1ac8bca1acea8e3ed0cce2bacf59c9bd072681c6
'2011-11-16T12:35:11-05:00'
describe
'8436' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCR' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
79df39ceba89b14e00b280b1fbf7f434
40a6340282575686c320f7ecbbf46606c501f933
'2011-11-16T12:31:25-05:00'
describe
'7397825' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCS' 'sip-files00002.tif'
8ecadff40516891bfada38fe459175df
1520ad0c1acc736e44864f5f0eeec3399a88bf9d
'2011-11-16T12:31:53-05:00'
describe
'73' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCT' 'sip-files00002.txt'
87abcbb638feadfbf3d544dbb180f71a
a32c92e4644b24e4f93ab997e48c56c8acb8e59d
'2011-11-16T12:36:06-05:00'
describe
'2569' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCU' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
ea2638d499a52e40cbff90e6f743e31a
41fcee10061b1a5c90ed29a224a7e026c9e861ba
'2011-11-16T12:33:49-05:00'
describe
'877880' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCV' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
4d765a43c118030533c633293be00ce7
505deb73251addf74ec0e0c7024802299807cdaa
'2011-11-16T12:34:05-05:00'
describe
'95500' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCW' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
5275454725b30fbbf3d99203dc855cd6
0499e7cbb8355cf28070ccb087e6f6fe364e2005
'2011-11-16T12:36:34-05:00'
describe
'26830' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCX' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
5b4b657cebfac3a3dd23586db8829eef
d62a3c6ffdc0ecd52bb1e035ea3ce34ec195f86a
'2011-11-16T12:34:34-05:00'
describe
'7032019' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCY' 'sip-files00004.tif'
a3d4b995792d0fb52ba6cf341281bc6d
ec86d96cad7e58ebaa383c0c6f028dc95ac77b84
'2011-11-16T12:32:54-05:00'
describe
'6866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXCZ' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
5a06e810884a21764da39ef67d4a6c57
30aeb0f7a3dda32d20dd532570c87948f8cc3bb0
'2011-11-16T12:37:33-05:00'
describe
'897327' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDA' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
08da40c0bce70ff0238c9a6d455837ad
96f118c1663295cbcb65970c285ca08efc1b2103
'2011-11-16T12:34:44-05:00'
describe
'94582' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDB' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
ccd8535ef56d2d14c42dc0b3962e049d
9429a019ddc0867f940208f696af03bb55c6a1fa
'2011-11-16T12:33:54-05:00'
describe
'2177' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDC' 'sip-files00005.pro'
225cac513397ba2b3e39c5076268cc38
9623105e1efff66e9210b7efd332a027ac13da0b
'2011-11-16T12:35:00-05:00'
describe
'27262' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDD' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
df9898e3dc819d200e6494abd0469700
0f0fa24498d95dc9a87bbc12edc092dfe4e8372c
'2011-11-16T12:31:39-05:00'
describe
'7186621' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDE' 'sip-files00005.tif'
25eaf9ea851c128cd0a5b69d9fd12585
91e4fc6439760b036aebe6caf7f1d33a86e713a9
'2011-11-16T12:35:35-05:00'
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDF' 'sip-files00005.txt'
8c5a58591c4942abd2839ab0f438f284
8cf0fd8109627de2a944e5f4b8eed72299b0b65c
'2011-11-16T12:36:56-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'7321' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDG' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
206b1aa697f41be2a9b87db67e3d8ac1
9d0ab6cba34ca6451a2cd8ca970a129a23636b5c
'2011-11-16T12:33:03-05:00'
describe
'824042' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDH' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
65e26fb26e8fbeb47ac794f9fae891c0
41634b9487f7a9a7d6d22023a7527a1fa25bed1c
'2011-11-16T12:35:33-05:00'
describe
'54584' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDI' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
72c178a067508da17f873fb2e6386e34
652970d69b26b3755c4692599cf03578c74f1782
'2011-11-16T12:33:53-05:00'
describe
'18032' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDJ' 'sip-files00007.pro'
eb849e972b21bbf44a50df9b4b567b00
4dfb839202690b78a5adb0eb9c5c18a77528e041
'2011-11-16T12:31:18-05:00'
describe
'18554' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDK' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
a52adde66c2ff9642454f1b2b9cccd46
55dc84e221ede870584536837a0032703eda2682
'2011-11-16T12:35:29-05:00'
describe
'6601655' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDL' 'sip-files00007.tif'
f7887f8e5bdf0d40da8c8a1a6a3f63e9
de9eab743bf6229b493bcdf8756374c9c54c6379
'2011-11-16T12:35:01-05:00'
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDM' 'sip-files00007.txt'
31696cd5ae7566df0d5a694f11d6707e
6dfce7bbdd7996f8c358c4e60943c71ff3dff1a9
'2011-11-16T12:31:09-05:00'
describe
'5328' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDN' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
5e1c446e84a6d485c9c0caaa316b8463
916e66d4c9f760f307dfe81e50d551b79f06b168
'2011-11-16T12:33:27-05:00'
describe
'824267' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDO' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
34abbf8b0cfb8296e3e5642c801c3e54
cefe5e58698fe915829c1f39e2d721c8d2434953
'2011-11-16T12:33:19-05:00'
describe
'72475' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDP' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
cfc345c172d0581082c3f4deb48a22be
d49129ece7e88951ede22ec80feb544d28fe488a
'2011-11-16T12:32:56-05:00'
describe
'19945' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDQ' 'sip-files00009.pro'
b97418daed16943c071bb93297acf2b4
2ab58b07a02f22466375c2668e62201350ee3367
'2011-11-16T12:35:40-05:00'
describe
'24599' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDR' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
e80f246954fb3a2a43d45bc19964fb3c
48dd86b43c2eb9669d069e95b9520ee995d2238f
'2011-11-16T12:31:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDS' 'sip-files00009.tif'
e0084e1b1a4b19cb55b13a306453b32d
7e471e12dd12a40ebd58c37a63149742a77ce0ef
'2011-11-16T12:36:03-05:00'
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDT' 'sip-files00009.txt'
75e1ade35a645ccdb29a4d6073b7783c
45136c4897621615905aa32cf8485dfe4d7dc55f
'2011-11-16T12:34:09-05:00'
describe
'6958' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDU' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
eee71c60555cb8eae67145c90302c990
6d64a0d5e6302d58286bc86d32d3b31aa3f93f65
'2011-11-16T12:35:03-05:00'
describe
'843554' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDV' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
723325645b34d72e5694a28735ad794d
bf308f3c362ff849c2c2a9a683878101e418796b
'2011-11-16T12:38:20-05:00'
describe
'84730' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDW' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
2062f75e68cd11bbaae20ec253f4a111
3895dbf1f0e755af9053247eef17c8469fccb7ea
'2011-11-16T12:36:07-05:00'
describe
'36642' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDX' 'sip-files00010.pro'
4b42ed2b442b629ae7339456a2d44c04
fd2059e1d331c6367b3a74bd306570ade129e204
'2011-11-16T12:35:58-05:00'
describe
'28843' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDY' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
2673f85acd7be8c9d670002f16dc5d39
66e1ee471ac37e47951be24aabbf98ae8cbff03a
'2011-11-16T12:32:11-05:00'
describe
'6755987' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXDZ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
5eb61a47ed891e4192471f20cd8b85e5
65591edee46456f70565d43a3d6e8e13586734ad
'2011-11-16T12:34:59-05:00'
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEA' 'sip-files00010.txt'
b8be39b837b09e568aaf5b5a6f69862b
54aef6539bb628be5b80b27a61183a9f17df6df7
'2011-11-16T12:31:40-05:00'
describe
'7630' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEB' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
1b244e8bcc4ff52ab16e3b0e81296141
0adc87b1b079c443fef83979df7964f0b75ed0d5
'2011-11-16T12:31:11-05:00'
describe
'824247' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEC' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
fa5a08ee990475dc0768a0d672081968
836b996885aefb1c842db646035165c90d48006c
describe
'97889' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXED' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
c3dff63f2b81b2775b5eaa4f5af51627
0aa73dcdc6f02f13eca6427d95124ad4d5fecd56
'2011-11-16T12:36:26-05:00'
describe
'45211' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEE' 'sip-files00011.pro'
d938bf56eb2b4f4b63ce26468e4e367d
5d09cd24d26f39add55eb900b72e98a1c2d2ee5c
describe
'32498' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEF' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
20b9e4e41aba4f33967d8769bb26b9d5
7076b8caceaad78862b1d7cb4602cc2eca036489
'2011-11-16T12:33:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEG' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b1a81fa0766ef2e7dbae0d591ae5d1b2
648c5f01dd1df4b80d627ac1028c8587fe423707
'2011-11-16T12:35:47-05:00'
describe
'1887' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEH' 'sip-files00011.txt'
3c68f96ad8b670e1d5418613e1fda7e4
4acd1e94659290c7adf98ec1e525f40b51256402
'2011-11-16T12:37:27-05:00'
describe
'8223' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEI' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
1b7478b4b8160533342fa451bcc12861
29a49c7ab445468c8174a2d2a834ce4de9e624e3
'2011-11-16T12:32:57-05:00'
describe
'843450' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEJ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
24f6ef5cf5a5efa7e93e13d7d0163c40
0d8ff68c67eac051e9bd9dec8fba8c8f65b80766
'2011-11-16T12:31:28-05:00'
describe
'104447' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEK' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
a5c7c51de606e8c993ae201c60f5ac45
7b5de8d110063bc8da86d23ae691e2882b44afd0
'2011-11-16T12:32:29-05:00'
describe
'49093' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEL' 'sip-files00012.pro'
000f6d51278772fc03c351fa81821d26
02ed606cc7273a029a5dc40a7b22efb45d842733
'2011-11-16T12:32:26-05:00'
describe
'34029' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEM' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
9ed385b48f09e5b8fbca684b38d0b870
8108d7f1224dca3ea5bb8dc38482f60c45684122
'2011-11-16T12:35:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEN' 'sip-files00012.tif'
b09001e8066423a6e3982a701d067635
63edbbebfa046cf1499f6912a8eddf2e1c87c962
'2011-11-16T12:31:24-05:00'
describe
'2041' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEO' 'sip-files00012.txt'
687ec514c54a17050c500d959b54507c
d5d42c80715da8a749194083ccffc8a4d5945496
'2011-11-16T12:36:28-05:00'
describe
'8484' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEP' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
560dfef66c9f8920f8588cc29ba9beb0
0056c083bffcbd598dc4f52803ee8892bdaf0ebf
'2011-11-16T12:31:27-05:00'
describe
'824249' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEQ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7383eea42693fa7807e87de437e6d324
33093097dfc1a766cf1575aabf9065daa62f4b3d
'2011-11-16T12:32:04-05:00'
describe
'91477' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXER' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
a8f29e3e8e0a80d04bd4b5e246c24798
2ace4784b8db228279a1af4aafa4dbe4557c246d
'2011-11-16T12:31:31-05:00'
describe
'38546' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXES' 'sip-files00013.pro'
b063c01d2d0563f293edf8d1e840e13a
6f3a5064f5af8698c2e3812bcae40546a79d00f7
'2011-11-16T12:31:47-05:00'
describe
'30508' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXET' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
96793d70a1b7ac33231e04459cf1cf6e
a974284b69815352619ea2798eff25233de4de94
'2011-11-16T12:31:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEU' 'sip-files00013.tif'
087e03d410e4475981a31d8e8e1465b7
bf302ea5f1d9c4f4ee5cb7e707fb5b0eb3d93c70
'2011-11-16T12:35:39-05:00'
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEV' 'sip-files00013.txt'
518c9a72a0762d7627e16badd65a6513
7f46ed4ba21a4ffff6c71419ab597f3f4e2345c3
'2011-11-16T12:38:21-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7804' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEW' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
aa70bf830b4af7325dc67bd31c0dae72
b64c967e7d3b79408c780639d4fde9e5d42b2aeb
'2011-11-16T12:37:28-05:00'
describe
'843493' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEX' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
6629bfbceaeb0aef987bb36e480294a6
e11a0151ede0f7f52aa5a68c6331946a2b551360
'2011-11-16T12:31:29-05:00'
describe
'97641' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEY' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
4a142d3f16141abec874f01833eb4024
b63452370c1046e9119a8be58ed8a5dd16ea52bb
'2011-11-16T12:37:59-05:00'
describe
'47988' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXEZ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
fc2f5d080398e541b864efaa50580737
15feddf1a6297b5977824f5bbb86450b4ffde1e4
'2011-11-16T12:33:05-05:00'
describe
'31817' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFA' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
0f7b2e847c0f7cad57fcab9c6f943930
3a709f082b39d435352c0627c16fac5fc57ad73a
'2011-11-16T12:37:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFB' 'sip-files00014.tif'
4698333740057aef0cda68c2dee5c6ff
3c45337aeb518e8f6ad75e2714affd1faca019e8
'2011-11-16T12:34:00-05:00'
describe
'2008' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFC' 'sip-files00014.txt'
0bbe1e74f480aaf1ba06cf5c8a684e69
607904b80b602dc37d498777484b27c63efd3ad1
'2011-11-16T12:32:36-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7864' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFD' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
cd56eda13e09635959a1a35bb2b3f547
47eb95a7360597c67d5c8ad676e0e10b2fd1c9fa
'2011-11-16T12:31:48-05:00'
describe
'824223' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFE' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
beff703caf2fd815357713dcab0f5bb8
5fae77115bf01f473287589929e8b2f81cdfa53c
'2011-11-16T12:35:26-05:00'
describe
'100558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFF' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
39af3d6ffe4b26772fcc389aa3ba6524
fce229879e84d60468286976d54cde594ed6031f
'2011-11-16T12:34:56-05:00'
describe
'46588' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFG' 'sip-files00015.pro'
04c515589f2e09926308d915506eaef9
819f7c45f0f60e518761481b6523248c3cee631a
'2011-11-16T12:33:36-05:00'
describe
'33086' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFH' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
4ed5d96fb80148fcbf0fc5361a81bdd1
bf41e9775a01a87115688de0b5c6b05735acb7db
'2011-11-16T12:34:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFI' 'sip-files00015.tif'
8ec393880d6b4cdca8d4786426825680
98133016451641b2038d14162cf95a9fcf6079b1
'2011-11-16T12:35:12-05:00'
describe
'1996' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFJ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
8100b672ffc5cc753c33657a5a74a0aa
f7a2d285271edd6c21b38c8c34b5a9ec04629029
'2011-11-16T12:38:27-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8174' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFK' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
6c21bc62edfd4ed4c06dcaf42fb2cc36
f4e33010d95610c1992abe481e90b561a0de2d67
'2011-11-16T12:36:53-05:00'
describe
'843555' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFL' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
86ad7c44b06ecd5fcfd9a5356afdf1bb
6b3a34c957b2bfa54c173d59aa4b2ef941f5bfd8
'2011-11-16T12:35:13-05:00'
describe
'87596' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFM' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
80ad1ffa2ff2022744b26503f1dd4ac8
a1e616cfbeedee70676d9b73f9858f1d74085208
describe
'40358' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFN' 'sip-files00016.pro'
5242befd06d6e95e69015d0cb7fed5fd
6397b1e795ce69e5e6f9056900ef146ed96c5be5
'2011-11-16T12:33:24-05:00'
describe
'28403' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFO' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
39d16178103d96ba137d9b72505e1259
b970a2bb4be1acba42edc8f6390f0edbf85ea272
'2011-11-16T12:31:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFP' 'sip-files00016.tif'
56958f6a856c29ae1ba9708c40bc129e
9e87d8324c884c273618caa9f43e498196d631d8
'2011-11-16T12:31:57-05:00'
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFQ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
a830438327a913cc78ae2cedb08f08f3
5a85bbae73efc8761bffed2a13af22dcb989e314
'2011-11-16T12:33:07-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7250' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFR' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
01d9e8bc9719d1a9afb31ffb4df1dba4
be9ba93c8f3daa506a2ed47bb2c2c26cc2b3c927
describe
'824265' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFS' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
1ff36f243155822ff47e0e7d518b5c7d
1e1153f6b681f7102d0eda765dc64c5716a32d10
describe
'102228' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFT' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
c0c713d06ebaa1fc01747f9079c90cc5
12c19fc7701c4bea090eb5a7c334a870e63e7dc2
'2011-11-16T12:31:52-05:00'
describe
'47939' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
ae0a4a8acd8d2564ed65bee28601884f
b200a3b00516c3822b195507d91a85c25aca1e75
describe
'32887' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFV' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4c287fbdd32d6dfce06a6837c2f104c3
ce0d92ad8e606a2adba98ad560aab754055bbe37
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFW' 'sip-files00017.tif'
224cd8a108e8530bba6bf34ea007cc70
58505b0ba709d7a4db9447cba4d71414b4a64f24
describe
'2017' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFX' 'sip-files00017.txt'
35e5882097892646050028bec79ecdfe
33b8a2435d7f476dc74e65dcdf6ad75b226d6bf5
'2011-11-16T12:35:23-05:00'
describe
'8102' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFY' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
fa9038fa698f7f939b5044e51ba33f4c
5fdfd65d5a85ff059e0907df3ed0de5fe80bafb6
'2011-11-16T12:35:07-05:00'
describe
'843562' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXFZ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
fae6581a66338960242d8e916e28f7cb
04d24255efe661a8cde400d0c2e277623c0ac996
'2011-11-16T12:38:22-05:00'
describe
'74086' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGA' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
147e22e7d32fdc1188893a7a635d3639
7a30912d829b0aaf501cc9ba8f64d6e17cda3ac3
'2011-11-16T12:35:32-05:00'
describe
'34680' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGB' 'sip-files00018.pro'
d030385f576499c47200d39c24d928b6
33b8eeaf65b42a72f73cddaac26dd7710ae8ee26
'2011-11-16T12:37:32-05:00'
describe
'24325' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
4a731b58d4975ba52ff17779a61f463f
256fddf4037c876fcdbe82e694804035732bc720
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGD' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3be40d0615d2f76eb0f87e6b4ef2f35a
0f6ebca2e8731e79b2e4823b576459e4a78a82f0
'2011-11-16T12:34:03-05:00'
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGE' 'sip-files00018.txt'
a97863a0ce6e33cdebb9af5676fbcc09
0adc4b8000600304c976caf2e661ac206846c72e
'2011-11-16T12:32:09-05:00'
describe
'6175' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGF' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
df530076e42ac0746ca6f95145c483c1
5c073ec7106a5dbf7816ac65367df8c22590460c
'2011-11-16T12:31:35-05:00'
describe
'536420' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGG' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
66e213c53e0dae059450a1d663c84942
6086cd9d622baaa740f703f35373c8ed5f5a0d17
'2011-11-16T12:34:04-05:00'
describe
'12235' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGH' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
1207a44682a76e45cdd2b11e48cdfb39
f1fc48e16d18ad5602bf3adb2002e406c158643b
describe
'3320' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
0cc3954808f0812ff74616dd574a4ecd
54666b167abcdb935254172f143c4b790bc83769
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
fd4998dd7c93bafb20df3e32200dd718
db485b0bada22bd92db43dc79c0f2b47e5323ba7
'2011-11-16T12:33:33-05:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGK' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
fed73e8dd7397ddeaa34c7d83ebfc6b2
c017abb6eb28b4550abe2b41f1b1bbfcd6cb8a1b
describe
'908414' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGL' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
11826ee69cde666936f76b83fec3d331
1ecc3a5bf63b288e3ef6f84c0a70d6285dc1ebb8
'2011-11-16T12:35:14-05:00'
describe
'96107' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGM' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
c0e99e7dc8c04c9dcaac85fcfd8c4675
d5de1de8c1ca239ac2a231eed0e96f169b4097f3
'2011-11-16T12:37:43-05:00'
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGN' 'sip-files00020.pro'
7b3ca078d37a245611e9caafd75a59aa
28ae5266dd1d484a4d2debbcffc8ad652e1eb5f7
'2011-11-16T12:31:37-05:00'
describe
'41461' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
914a6b69b87a8392da9e6dc9a644c3eb
488d8251f328404cec4bc50288fbb1648c01a61f
'2011-11-16T12:32:13-05:00'
describe
'7290076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGP' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c439f140b38bb28784be854f0b9759f2
2c993dd799b0bf352cf01b8d95f7a091daa40f55
describe
'115' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGQ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0173ed6dd3f2d628628c8d10b94f2318
33a0daaf6e4dd8ba9383b03c86e485f4c1ece2b1
'2011-11-16T12:34:08-05:00'
describe
'27117' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGR' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
83e08eec2c0ecb838af7acb337c16595
a51327bc45ae4a3032d872d9368668a8cbfab31e
'2011-11-16T12:33:55-05:00'
describe
'824240' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGS' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
2ba17975f732c893216660d2c53d5281
047cc729d8fe40e47b867d37984bff964429a4cb
describe
'97940' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGT' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
6dff45eaa228248d727d10a90582f5e8
c026b62884ef69fad6926f56147fa04fcc488d5f
'2011-11-16T12:33:14-05:00'
describe
'41176' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGU' 'sip-files00021.pro'
8315409be766026f49e8ec6d7b6f0305
b71e174d051c73ae92f79353e7895558edd6c0f8
'2011-11-16T12:31:58-05:00'
describe
'31726' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGV' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
b49415743ed6d7d3e922699f7861f027
9e91973768ffdbb3b0c0a3e335254aa99173c5ae
'2011-11-16T12:34:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGW' 'sip-files00021.tif'
50e1b31104c0ea56e6988443e42ca72e
9ecc3a735c49ebe0da70fddf3c4c00a187806dbe
describe
'1779' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGX' 'sip-files00021.txt'
da4cb7bc6172f37f5fa26744c88cba81
c98dd7415540d133692f85e5c422f1eeb0b9d821
'2011-11-16T12:37:55-05:00'
describe
'7986' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGY' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
73084ceb52f77aebb07201f1e8eeb2ea
3677d44b4ac3654b4d83673cfb745d17648f3bc9
'2011-11-16T12:37:14-05:00'
describe
'843550' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXGZ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
21377ff6b30cc2a882cfbf43dab9e94b
d228154eb19d56965c8d8c1006e96de17ff7224f
describe
'89832' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHA' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
aa5b23f056c2aef0feaa275e7206a564
9f7d1daebe72d8dbe0041b2e73d862ad8ab78b9e
'2011-11-16T12:36:37-05:00'
describe
'41174' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHB' 'sip-files00022.pro'
8f9ed5b9aac8a049d47e0c365f2f7739
b11199bee2d12915599ac25b713bd8b9ea5d9b24
'2011-11-16T12:33:23-05:00'
describe
'30828' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHC' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
b5561b7adcad70c1cdefe393cf1df2f8
8f6e97dcef98bc83290b889ce07a7680d6c81461
'2011-11-16T12:34:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHD' 'sip-files00022.tif'
21582f71cb19d5a68dfdd04d29b2c329
41cf876a9118f1b7e2244d4bfdb34f4bc266f3ca
'2011-11-16T12:33:43-05:00'
describe
'1744' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHE' 'sip-files00022.txt'
673f1a3b640926f2ef25423668dda8c3
b7f105a3cdd39e32b4e253035d0ee6ead34f1396
describe
'7951' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHF' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
669606def1685b8d3f9fdc28db3bb0b6
c32683c91be01c8f8e6bea1048b063712f8e00e9
'2011-11-16T12:33:09-05:00'
describe
'824256' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHG' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
3fbe051ae4659fddd12f3b092250fc18
b4cf21822cf8ab2f75323ef3ccb82de1506b082e
'2011-11-16T12:31:59-05:00'
describe
'90841' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHH' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
e4cc74197b265f6652b747d0754a4236
20b3a1c9b7f7d39d6026420056f3bd306bc672f8
'2011-11-16T12:32:49-05:00'
describe
'38756' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHI' 'sip-files00023.pro'
a7985216bfb63b9aa9d804ac3f2667e4
01637e0a8461d825f7f804c77060b1ca1fa13e31
'2011-11-16T12:34:29-05:00'
describe
'31355' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHJ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
db4528752f01587426f6fd351771e55a
3ec40c03e6a61cbeee9eee0e0f9f00abc439c9ab
'2011-11-16T12:36:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHK' 'sip-files00023.tif'
a745c26c60b3cd8b883751a57de88103
0beccf88c0f3645b84efb6a7de8b660f0d077e2f
describe
'1697' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHL' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ff9d7b62361d3844b97232cf581691a2
46c38192fdd65d4b48e18fc782811171be4d10a1
'2011-11-16T12:31:49-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8172' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHM' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
e265ec68345fb5e7924675ebba8e1f91
8acc1a43a7105f1ea451c51d5509f7f60c2c429e
'2011-11-16T12:32:52-05:00'
describe
'843480' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHN' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
cbea52a9a478ca8d6cd07df9b511837a
b383f4433a5d945672aee05a93414e5e33759ec7
'2011-11-16T12:35:02-05:00'
describe
'103236' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHO' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
47a3f7aaf44fb74468151bfb68f3b03e
58433d734811739432d0014ff1520b93ee9ece03
describe
'49767' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHP' 'sip-files00024.pro'
7bdd008b9ef958e24ada2f0734e5b019
b715bd040b60181c7ad50d19dc1adbb5318d007f
'2011-11-16T12:31:50-05:00'
describe
'33601' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHQ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
73725b8f2dec802f695ed24d1dcc0e93
a9f557bb7255d6a52a2f125c104d9dd6f83f0445
'2011-11-16T12:34:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHR' 'sip-files00024.tif'
84af3581f91a9fc0c15338158fbb9e96
e2bb2bd56fa3a267dbbd729cb64df79ce08c5da5
'2011-11-16T12:32:05-05:00'
describe
'2053' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHS' 'sip-files00024.txt'
170480685b5b512af513797bcdc2e1ab
e84345b4d949b88b7bcd994733ba1c771600fd63
'2011-11-16T12:34:01-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8342' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHT' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
19f034476596f8da2ae745359900f0ef
b2d669b2ce4996f4a5c6b7829cf6f0900a52b232
'2011-11-16T12:37:15-05:00'
describe
'824216' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHU' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
4dc55f9633aee2b24e4037d44bc24f76
48073d1749f3c4df47e63403c8950d562929a751
'2011-11-16T12:32:27-05:00'
describe
'93350' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHV' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
532ac103448621f3eceeb1848ab68f03
5a04223489ad3c4d6d07241e24763c937d80c21a
'2011-11-16T12:33:26-05:00'
describe
'38858' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHW' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e5385a7fea2a7ada5cc44d2d35f6e053
6a0548b9fe590dc4044f1b07d732011a08dde0d1
describe
'31557' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHX' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
0d6fd9b6fc8ea9213bc9125076e0ec73
80277b070c197de59c5ef8d170824261f0b0e70b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHY' 'sip-files00025.tif'
3426d6a1148f3a387874dc0ed95eae08
214df46a13d77e16f7986f338f1766cd6482cdbc
'2011-11-16T12:36:36-05:00'
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXHZ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
eda5f1b20f8f8fab440a74f014a89050
8791a0b2b4dfd85634ba9770fd7e5f2235f268ed
'2011-11-16T12:33:11-05:00'
describe
'8156' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIA' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
a244ed8854f4822da2588472edd5a2dc
c9ea1eae4d4fb07b32c6ba1585fb5c59ac55a6b9
'2011-11-16T12:35:38-05:00'
describe
'843560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIB' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
ddb78e19dd4deb2a0bb01da2d352688d
1c33f763759f27bd70bb0d3d862045b05f8e21c7
'2011-11-16T12:33:25-05:00'
describe
'46416' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIC' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
c7eb7f3d1932b4a25f05ba7cd208185c
d3163f823e9589b929d6da517adcabbdb55dff30
'2011-11-16T12:36:10-05:00'
describe
'597' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXID' 'sip-files00026.pro'
0cced8ce8a70fd7d2463ef0d0aaf81d6
45aceed04a5b00f848f84fae41b9365480fa10ba
'2011-11-16T12:32:18-05:00'
describe
'14402' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIE' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
622f574d8abba813f6f4e439c1bbef4d
c94b647ad978fba81874f2bbe44ce38371fff8bb
'2011-11-16T12:36:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIF' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e68eb33c904223a5196e4599c37e384d
98666e45b56d4b891095aa06e8ad213e15823849
'2011-11-16T12:31:45-05:00'
describe
'30' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIG' 'sip-files00026.txt'
8effd5c9cb0090f74f9bf96a897e71d2
808e52a6aaded48cafd67091cb09bfe6ee531e74
describe
'4514' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIH' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
dc06e6ca7b2de9b3311ffead598eeb13
77aaf2901b016ec7f4318e30df3c4e1ee5d0f93c
'2011-11-16T12:31:51-05:00'
describe
'824257' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXII' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
2d6a295a85a3e5bde01fd3992d665943
aa3116d666f0703f3861b8d4188c79570dd6bb48
describe
'96791' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIJ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
406a3b4c40df14aa0445a68eba1af0a3
e79598f3c16c1dba71e1e7fd1938ab80d6130ef4
describe
'42919' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIK' 'sip-files00027.pro'
049c2f2a8bec27064c69ebde6bb4c2b4
37197b79ebdf9e2ce41cc90945dc458a856520e2
'2011-11-16T12:35:36-05:00'
describe
'32604' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIL' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
40c496f04320932b9aea9087133d0d4b
37860d9b041a60db22b01007a1844f3725d69e94
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIM' 'sip-files00027.tif'
aad28f495fe0e8149bff7c78a244c60d
36dfc67616e8bfa0ae8651275397105b264b40ba
'2011-11-16T12:37:02-05:00'
describe
'1904' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIN' 'sip-files00027.txt'
0a506cac3912623d23dd07bcc5d96121
e0e05aaa2ea2519be83c20b268c39d444ea99fb3
describe
'8371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIO' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
4cb91f203b64166612d1093c6234b64c
524f5829599573d493f4efa6fd911aff9f3c7e69
'2011-11-16T12:32:42-05:00'
describe
'843527' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIP' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
2e63049ba93a8420286c820cd8ef9e69
714ea6eac6469ef11fb7e8b8f3d3c077a028e00e
'2011-11-16T12:34:11-05:00'
describe
'79124' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIQ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
77b207c5b4cb802e761dfd26325e36be
be954b3ed30a6da1b07afcd61ec948d3b1aed127
'2011-11-16T12:37:48-05:00'
describe
'31113' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIR' 'sip-files00028.pro'
6ae245bffd1d6d4e0be53ee4193e8ebc
ac7b3a7f12928c8dcb47ce93b6e0dd466833e276
'2011-11-16T12:34:52-05:00'
describe
'26303' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIS' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
e4211fad5490423ffd149f903cdfb6df
d03a237e1c95a8e9b3779688ebd1d870eb0d8dcb
'2011-11-16T12:31:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIT' 'sip-files00028.tif'
59200b2276b071016483862e0ae546ea
4a24646cea40c70cc51411c46da0a743c356e10f
'2011-11-16T12:37:36-05:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIU' 'sip-files00028.txt'
533939bf787f3e5cc0aac7b8dcfeac78
5ac86dbc333e83a099e489cadd2a7cb72cacbdd3
'2011-11-16T12:33:32-05:00'
describe
'6943' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIV' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
5c916ee293be632ab527ffecfce219c0
7cec16deef9ee14a7c9873e397108746c5a1f7aa
describe
'824225' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIW' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d2b2b20d82f553264b509687c30e31c4
83c6a9728360129f0c7e8825843e040cb4411d69
'2011-11-16T12:37:26-05:00'
describe
'100317' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIX' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
3fff0f010360924bd0be971ffa58621f
df280023da2fe3c2a2aa2ab3a03d1e2c1871fa7a
'2011-11-16T12:37:58-05:00'
describe
'46594' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIY' 'sip-files00029.pro'
c8a493e4d3e4cbaa9a4d2a65a6d57d6d
80264ecc332ba442fbf70249cd5707306de77b96
'2011-11-16T12:32:17-05:00'
describe
'33948' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXIZ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
2c56d7ee5b90145b568868e6da1f291e
cd7cfd475b65412a59a432755f44a194e2cdd13f
'2011-11-16T12:38:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJA' 'sip-files00029.tif'
0ac5bdaf9a2cc8435535fbdccb0e636a
6dfb000862beb62b53f71dca6308256989f780d5
'2011-11-16T12:33:02-05:00'
describe
'1984' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJB' 'sip-files00029.txt'
4b0d6f074f29be2ecd97aa2dbb91f880
98f0b9034071fd654a4fc09d718c679b6933d8ba
describe
'8692' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJC' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
1758b33bc7ea49fc8c71efbd4e319af1
416b9f34e8c29354c992500a63fc9c3543c8f4e7
'2011-11-16T12:33:22-05:00'
describe
'843521' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJD' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
b333f3cdda8481f29797751cba2b7862
163e138c853db46d6799b94a12caed033a74b723
'2011-11-16T12:38:14-05:00'
describe
'91604' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJE' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
8d7cad2e6bd634e4864d0e394125f90f
3966a71ed33d4688ca2a05011612b5adf92bf569
'2011-11-16T12:33:21-05:00'
describe
'38920' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJF' 'sip-files00030.pro'
469e4216393849c7c7c566fb48fbb195
10af65a03f161f82e9524c0f44fef2cf5723d6db
describe
'31864' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJG' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
7987ebe2aaf5912a1fcb4cbd113532b2
13a342b94bf24e4fcbe2a5660af2cc6931da72de
'2011-11-16T12:36:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJH' 'sip-files00030.tif'
fccf964cd546dcc4c34e98a0dbcb662c
86a2a4bec070c9cba78a379033dfcb1ea8ad0c01
describe
'1883' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJI' 'sip-files00030.txt'
35cd7eff063d39e4f44a459b55cff298
279b66b62e574a7e6c6e87c9b00140ccd82bb309
'2011-11-16T12:34:24-05:00'
describe
'8248' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJJ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
cbe58a82770cc6ca21107180a52f4756
606fc075b3c9cbce7be0f1f68e9a27f0eb313e6f
describe
'824258' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJK' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
df4aac6c3b7f215f29792ec7f2389819
21d3aa927ef7b15cfcd5f07b6fdbc04e0d563c24
describe
'80495' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJL' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
42ef614c935fa09e907ed17c407a8e3b
4d9c0f0d4c7e37c37f52142e2fa3cefbe23bc497
describe
'22211' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJM' 'sip-files00031.pro'
8378a48544cb1c091c14341511569107
e8150bd24e75560d7a5005123c8e421228cdb2ad
'2011-11-16T12:32:53-05:00'
describe
'27027' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJN' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
efeaba7b79090f2e0f62d760a09cafe9
b37a4255572001cb5b34065b505663a3596976c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJO' 'sip-files00031.tif'
9ac1eb4be8c0cab920f4f5de7b467857
8bb85be6baa04825c10496632d48ee7a66fd0768
'2011-11-16T12:34:47-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJP' 'sip-files00031.txt'
30a02e11ba2af42fce2551c890c26dc5
4edd601d96d242655018960e320d930f691da16f
'2011-11-16T12:34:02-05:00'
describe
'7400' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJQ' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d7d19b28abf3ce4a41f76fef1801378c
d6c1ab523e252660390c451b8b582f3ddb9a6e56
'2011-11-16T12:35:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJR' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
bd3db45d6cef0bc59cd2174e1e131b27
ee25f11cb94536815ac2fd96cb7e865bc5e81c6d
'2011-11-16T12:35:10-05:00'
describe
'105236' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJS' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
92e4aefb9dcd95e8d592b5439ac16631
95312aca922420603ca12e02d26500a8d7de16d8
describe
'48423' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJT' 'sip-files00032.pro'
4919315c5f444c69fa9690aa2933ffc0
9afd8cce5be017ac7e7ad6d6cfe0a1d814ea5b11
describe
'35137' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJU' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
ef4ef2fa7b3200fae085723e05ac4af8
1af7aef06da69cbf0451fa58c6af202f9b200584
'2011-11-16T12:38:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJV' 'sip-files00032.tif'
6c4152a2e0b7842bd01546d91ed72b19
5fef3be4570b7292ccb6cf59534a330f3e2499ea
'2011-11-16T12:33:40-05:00'
describe
'2002' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJW' 'sip-files00032.txt'
9d01338d90b7ec10be190266712fd4a0
0675d9ebc6757c208db1c16cd9a08d4a09b7e62c
'2011-11-16T12:34:19-05:00'
describe
'8952' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJX' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
f0c82bea0732138125ca9912d00c7d82
843bc4c79f5acefa6e14b96ef077f4ffa5a065e1
'2011-11-16T12:35:50-05:00'
describe
'824279' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJY' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
7ea6e03e65f0400e07d0f28d756d4334
c3fb7de408958e483d29bb88f795eb3f22d144cb
'2011-11-16T12:36:11-05:00'
describe
'96971' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXJZ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
a071f87deb8ee2ca50e8c18ee52f69cc
099de802d94b6a94ed288cfd0bb9c3b16f5d3d57
'2011-11-16T12:35:55-05:00'
describe
'36199' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKA' 'sip-files00033.pro'
9fbbb51e8c5510cbf5e87db92114c5ab
de7dc2a73d4003e0a7f73c4045d7efc3ff156a37
describe
'32079' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKB' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
c1cc45271abaf0cd4e29199b1c0a89b3
159670351e885befd3e05fd12f3b83817dc88904
'2011-11-16T12:32:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKC' 'sip-files00033.tif'
9416cdf89ee30ceae168d869fe1fa5d3
c17f1e5e1e12a8027c62c59c6a4e397fb425d39e
'2011-11-16T12:35:31-05:00'
describe
'1925' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKD' 'sip-files00033.txt'
a2d0fe58260e863af960e64ec3e01585
bae214f158e4fe28a3360c83df58b492b531e31d
'2011-11-16T12:33:13-05:00'
describe
'8406' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKE' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
72d4d43d728fbfe4b040f39af9e8a425
9c4f533dbeaee152655af56ed8517decb1ad5ee0
describe
'843520' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKF' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
9e8b184fc6bd42ffdd4141807ea8fad8
ebe040ad8d515b190eab5f2e9c09059e1e9ae13e
describe
'113955' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKG' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
370463b3bf3adb8de13b62f61342fdf7
f8f88daf75a01a18734b9c585582e6417cb001b6
'2011-11-16T12:38:15-05:00'
describe
'51392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKH' 'sip-files00034.pro'
3a419c2ad6181605c883e957ef3a0dc7
584374be1a44c630dd12c23a25c820e8b899a883
'2011-11-16T12:35:34-05:00'
describe
'37168' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKI' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
1f0fb728e9be374cb103e1fed2a467cd
0c9a996d9cb52a28583bfc9460e8b0358802039d
'2011-11-16T12:32:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKJ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
7d6635bb430147304a3745fa5ed63ccc
42114b8b5254771ec1b4b337f8c6120418532e5c
describe
'2119' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKK' 'sip-files00034.txt'
93d2a1817bf3038a67c172053dd1b14a
ecef555fad25eb20f9767be0c1c8ebdcebd6487a
'2011-11-16T12:37:31-05:00'
describe
'9232' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKL' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
f32b02bd982ecf9447d37b02a64c8302
159832ce37a9daa40795c03851760c54543bbeee
'2011-11-16T12:31:38-05:00'
describe
'824111' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKM' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
9b845e03c11970e4f427c0482b0d0421
57e2bea18fe2ad9e4e7091558c96116e608f6057
describe
'110739' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKN' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
27a35b36c1aa182aff72582e18bfdce2
258e42003d832a62c50fb31440237226184b29d3
describe
'49119' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKO' 'sip-files00035.pro'
430da5f37fbc24dbcc1d56a4ee00c0fb
c7f2b7e0de32f115fc6b21eb554c8d10e49b55cd
'2011-11-16T12:38:04-05:00'
describe
'36542' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKP' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
f9afadade0c5a617532d7b416ae887a6
14384c8a5e247f4f209b2191d1500fa5d8fb5972
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKQ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
8c52e4972a365aa357313a037e0f0d87
07545a08beb94edc6ca06a3477d209aa489e20d6
describe
'2067' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKR' 'sip-files00035.txt'
d9114493dd709a305bb3f14cf1fa8c57
eea51eba46bf9bf2f4d6bc001c5fb2ed3f158eff
'2011-11-16T12:33:45-05:00'
describe
'9065' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKS' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
57b0109e718315e8f7bafa8a55167525
88c70974c5febd6105dbbb8c0cdc6e2ed61faff7
describe
'843463' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKT' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
ebf64344a40266f927c7572510027859
649515d76fd57714d34c95a72cee0ec4cb498d23
'2011-11-16T12:36:47-05:00'
describe
'104851' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKU' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
efd9ec344f4453ea5fbb0c025d0d3ea8
6e6a8b1f32c222bb6b7b86a7eee07407962db3f6
'2011-11-16T12:37:25-05:00'
describe
'48932' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKV' 'sip-files00036.pro'
512d2484f0e33c195cf18618a73bd4ee
b5c1ab35e71069402692fc9608106ce37872671c
'2011-11-16T12:33:34-05:00'
describe
'34757' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKW' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
890cc32fc55ee3b159bd66291d53f434
3330c070b783cf75433425d7727692bdc033a3d7
'2011-11-16T12:33:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKX' 'sip-files00036.tif'
ee4d0b7ecc9369056a6d79642945567c
e5816437bdafdb7618ce1dd6988423ecd2ab4938
describe
'2031' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKY' 'sip-files00036.txt'
1c74bb7de09b4a22cb0cdbf14e0195e2
b333dc8eab8362cfe1dbb7f818ff00e549fe6ef8
describe
'8685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXKZ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
dd7ad91bfe7ea927662769823eba6b28
054f420c68bb2161ce7b4fd6f7146a5c20c8ba77
'2011-11-16T12:33:52-05:00'
describe
'824157' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLA' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
3c4648765484178a9da816ef4ed0c6c3
2b21fe0c98152e037d3c01c58f99938cac5b89c8
'2011-11-16T12:33:30-05:00'
describe
'114178' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLB' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
8370709b7aa704403b129a270434a174
d2e45a104f903e10a2eb3d67f5d74adb53c01691
'2011-11-16T12:37:42-05:00'
describe
'52360' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLC' 'sip-files00037.pro'
cde3dff141e699fd38d8814c3f08a68a
d3642cedb5a3f70a266ad4772878cb83e6f33de8
describe
'37844' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLD' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
7b24cd85189f7c5240feaf369b0dd1cc
e2cb453665a81126ab52ab30d5659ca04d9dc397
'2011-11-16T12:33:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLE' 'sip-files00037.tif'
59ceac533c4ad0053d530fbf3bcef2b3
ec2a7c8de1f121e0145976e38453b4fb8f364232
'2011-11-16T12:32:47-05:00'
describe
'2176' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLF' 'sip-files00037.txt'
2ff0206a3740b689b306e7099c5a3780
ab06833c6c2e0e0e9e175c01e83ae16c6e4a0828
describe
'9103' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLG' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
9e270906fb9efa05539db2de5ee29c3e
13c4b5d155ea6fd05767fbbe0fac909cca2cbc1d
'2011-11-16T12:38:25-05:00'
describe
'843535' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLH' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
872db9f6902c647fe7f9f2a6bbaadb5c
3d9506fee235b7d69bcdb030aa3fc10c856e53dc
describe
'99789' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLI' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
c8dff481f837021ba08639ccc5dfcfb9
eb7a5b168b7074bb7539502bf70768180b72b1bf
describe
'43939' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLJ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
b0f05fdacf1472ef3526b5c1ddb0e398
edf5d2e298c8aaaf386222d73434697401894117
describe
'33802' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLK' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
3c521765ff16e53ca6a870a65d1f6436
cfc970a1de0538a7bf169a4cde6cbb6301d3b2c6
'2011-11-16T12:31:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLL' 'sip-files00038.tif'
07538b5bf4c669324b5c2c64da7a783f
da5a7b565a60f3b555cb66ae57120a4ca7916ed9
'2011-11-16T12:36:45-05:00'
describe
'1892' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLM' 'sip-files00038.txt'
162ca6c9631aeb85d3db42c554e63d97
4268f54de9f7d3f75d4ff2987ead9c3de4b316e3
describe
'8600' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLN' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
9b13b66b43187fc2315a79e0fc735327
8e30a649d8747900727997d609417ce434534ed0
'2011-11-16T12:36:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLO' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
65d401360fcb286c77a94756da3bcda7
7a9b0dc65fe49bb06036da419da1cb579e36952e
describe
'96919' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLP' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
15b29b98734f2cc08b17ac30e603c4a7
5228b7af4d07b1da353dd722cc3e6520f81d460e
describe
'42884' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLQ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
2cf52dc8519747daef94013d908b85a9
e557dcdd9d94e2cfe1bbd2363be8e111b55d6fd5
'2011-11-16T12:32:51-05:00'
describe
'32644' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLR' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
52b2d285257e32e92a740825476b5bfa
33c62e6c278a22da9dd6f82e6293507623bd2302
'2011-11-16T12:36:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLS' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c8c247c1b552d2ea45ac867da606b076
876f5e7d35c3c8709ae55a088e36c7e6e6581f98
'2011-11-16T12:32:08-05:00'
describe
'1808' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLT' 'sip-files00039.txt'
76ef977f6066cc5444d552e60293755e
ac926a10ff8da0cecf529592e53788d6fca81d06
'2011-11-16T12:32:58-05:00'
describe
'8729' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLU' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
90b4fe6748d4218bcb13b07e63db5adb
10c893c8fbfc22d70d07798f923f98e7c2809ff9
describe
'843486' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLV' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
908cc3022e8b00de17ce6d7dac1034ce
583158c2563d6a4b81e02e4befd5bc857c26f341
'2011-11-16T12:33:31-05:00'
describe
'104094' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLW' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
75d2863feddbd72fd983b637f02d9e04
efe831a2409f675ae114b90a7cd5b474f123b7a4
'2011-11-16T12:37:05-05:00'
describe
'47019' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLX' 'sip-files00040.pro'
95602db72157071394729c29c5626ab2
1eec4098430d68fc75b68c9e0abee91cb7fa9f19
'2011-11-16T12:34:18-05:00'
describe
'33882' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLY' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
a247f72060a4873cb1699ea572a4967d
2c3f22faa5aeecc9b81a13b9b619dcd2a0788456
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXLZ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
f2059501baac27a7c79f5f105fa1d4dd
4712b73ee7417b0adacdc4b44c0d2f130ca22d06
'2011-11-16T12:32:23-05:00'
describe
'1972' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMA' 'sip-files00040.txt'
e8373a0a952eeb1897742fd8ce3114d4
d67780125649c34296c671d583b764f5b4216fc8
'2011-11-16T12:32:39-05:00'
describe
'8431' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMB' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
83a4c0e289acd5f9ceb0dd0bcc9660eb
41fc28b5931523b142615a487407036f37e963b8
describe
'824264' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMC' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
39df6c7dd7c897833b56d3b4a83bdb69
b9967a8596427b1b6b2b115f9ed746286729b112
describe
'108216' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMD' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
020822d63b195dcac5e5672a0185427e
ee47b163791294db2163ed43ee3aa800a3085106
describe
'54528' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXME' 'sip-files00041.pro'
631a00591de00bf0744c9313ad9c4928
83517e5cbe261e5b5d2a3391d60fae267c8b58ca
describe
'34827' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMF' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
e838d44e3b1b5dc7821fe176191453bd
5f32a6a018799c8b8fc026515a9602826cb2ec29
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMG' 'sip-files00041.tif'
5d306906da88eb411a6ee824d3be8deb
fd4ebe960e1ad606385c2e803807972e093b722c
describe
'2257' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMH' 'sip-files00041.txt'
54062d27e65ed5ccf3c4441c92986c94
bae8378d8c814e271cb074bfbc50726e01d635f1
describe
'8551' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMI' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
b78cfd47175492c186b7c7791a07fe5c
52034a7571fbfc4422852d747651d3375aa94f0e
'2011-11-16T12:32:48-05:00'
describe
'843564' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMJ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
858374d4f5cb7b2e69f0450a18d82891
7288facd7b57cea3def28bfaba01132d7254bc93
describe
'104033' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMK' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
6dea6d81fa598f58b21f35b69201ae0a
b14745354928385785e34fc496847236663de552
'2011-11-16T12:34:20-05:00'
describe
'59353' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXML' 'sip-files00042.pro'
36a63239d7caa9f010bf2879e0a61cc2
ab967c596796166386e53ff566f2f2d983a99272
'2011-11-16T12:36:00-05:00'
describe
'32285' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMM' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
2bc9b28ad345e08e5b5b2b3f850c87c1
090890b68c2d8d442dbb259195e2959e523820fb
'2011-11-16T12:38:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMN' 'sip-files00042.tif'
a6cc927229647392fd8ede83e87befa7
983a9f34a25661f432118de0ce01d99453b674dd
describe
'2527' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMO' 'sip-files00042.txt'
31a92bb273749e42d144c211245affa6
f3f4d72b924b3d45642bdce3b3d5a48c067b854a
'2011-11-16T12:36:41-05:00'
describe
'8314' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMP' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
8f4e0f66273b9e1bf2cef16f478e34e6
b2220dc15cfa0ef80324c018d35cb94a9de39733
describe
'824278' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMQ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
0a8f536766683d0a72b453881c713001
78b46d237fcfde3c903d5136be07de01e53629fb
'2011-11-16T12:36:04-05:00'
describe
'113403' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMR' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
3c44c173416e5b9955114ac08a4c3de7
a84beb16a871605e209e4c14cc9dedbc70364909
'2011-11-16T12:36:32-05:00'
describe
'71646' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMS' 'sip-files00043.pro'
e2275237256684e13a5c1149ddb96a85
cb23f0b0363e1c731da4c591e81c0d6e7e02f21c
describe
'34670' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMT' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
37f056e1d4173b5e29391d14b3722615
4e52dd520d0f3e42e740d96ff1316fffe52c3f53
'2011-11-16T12:32:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMU' 'sip-files00043.tif'
54129a2614d411000237b5802584e72b
2acb83780646dd3d0d683a725229848d687dfd5d
'2011-11-16T12:36:51-05:00'
describe
'2997' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMV' 'sip-files00043.txt'
bdf0795e14ad93569ca78c698a4fc111
c4b39faf724b3d2d798203c89abcb8d65309cab4
'2011-11-16T12:37:49-05:00'
describe
'8129' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMW' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
e1230431a346c854de5f7b3c15235bae
ff8ceba0acea6e212c1cfa0dd430a1e31a0d154e
'2011-11-16T12:32:14-05:00'
describe
'843464' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMX' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
218f1aef34d755a7e2bec80b18ac2a50
935d6794c8ee99bf499ee85114c389f253dd9b52
'2011-11-16T12:32:25-05:00'
describe
'90134' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMY' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
26c8ced65b586f4e732b1d8e69bc4c1e
62db258ed7cd92cff446966fd88ad03a46c3b933
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXMZ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
b1afb25a9f46c3abdcdf34e42b386bd9
1f97923bfe9cf473143dcfc281fdd66b575e693c
describe
'29430' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
e2aa142c2c70b3d755a5b38ca58d344c
4a06276312ba6a573951836e7af5ce66c67a386d
'2011-11-16T12:32:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNB' 'sip-files00044.tif'
a4d4d90d541fe273b9b43aba80e75c91
3c71aa14ec8ac7aa505beb7b3c314992324b089e
'2011-11-16T12:34:38-05:00'
describe
'1803' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNC' 'sip-files00044.txt'
ae334eccbee2979f2d3a52ba079a37c7
bf8ff38ad2ff923c4f0f58f3d1889107b8f6a17f
'2011-11-16T12:34:06-05:00'
describe
'7497' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXND' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
76b57fee4b7763ed7573c1c9491fa78e
bf8e3ef87ef01d1c6a42b96a175eda3b168e5b64
'2011-11-16T12:37:23-05:00'
describe
'824260' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNE' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
b063f3ded179cb62ad4f38f1a0162619
adbe78e9a995fc8dead8d4e90dc93736f0d3bd41
'2011-11-16T12:33:59-05:00'
describe
'74906' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNF' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
998d65e0bf0884da716cae4e65c8f55a
f8ebeb59b2029d4641689056dbca4676280ab7e5
describe
'20214' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNG' 'sip-files00045.pro'
aa559dd750b6d82b9c87351b77c84b90
366d15a22174221b8490df5764bbd23d512b5ced
'2011-11-16T12:37:45-05:00'
describe
'24861' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNH' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
792242d6c6a3488e9792654e308783ba
e697646f69133e20ea875d8e86bc56ec020d4375
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNI' 'sip-files00045.tif'
ec02e05607bdb66d5720374a1a19ca1d
9616d60f677523942e8730e49827654321af826d
'2011-11-16T12:32:50-05:00'
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNJ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
36e249f72c3b79746296eff90d22bee0
450667d2b82f125daa06b44d404503a3c54facc1
'2011-11-16T12:36:33-05:00'
describe
'6722' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNK' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
464007dc2c5ed172a35bdd60fd84bc65
e1a0f6af90f3788eb432e7ebf6e086d6e553b96d
'2011-11-16T12:31:22-05:00'
describe
'843342' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
30a1053133d7338a3e3371473ac868ed
ff5012e7f897bc64a47696cd2b8ecadefa4bb4a2
'2011-11-16T12:34:49-05:00'
describe
'67420' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
4b78341cc085d3886a7f78a0aa98676f
b4f81017f36698b1e5e6b0236b407702e735378b
'2011-11-16T12:31:55-05:00'
describe
'34688' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
3659e21853c466f0ac763871686e1994
752eb1f2df8f89f67a2194953f403f83e09ddec8
describe
'23800' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNO' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
69375464463b6069b40b3f1ea3b0c51b
a30e05c6afb302d99aac8e678147577a6efaaea2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
fc549dc113e5ebc47477a2d8a2f83045
276cb02211b47c443b417854eeb63c50395aadef
'2011-11-16T12:34:14-05:00'
describe
'1823' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
63de01e14d73846e3b5ae0c071cb1871
3a20b898b4877730cae72ee134dfba988a538db2
'2011-11-16T12:32:00-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6266' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNR' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
90a776121ffc538b2b3412b66828fe69
c84f6e9911d97c4035a99f7fe44fc77b7a485a4e
'2011-11-16T12:35:27-05:00'
describe
'824239' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNS' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
fc5375c2418ed33d13f82e6dc1f574f1
ed6410549cfcf12217c4de017d0dc3d664be6b64
describe
'99887' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNT' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
9a3125e1e45f46cbaff07a8fbd6541c0
582f687419409db9e551b54fbf7a4199068a92ea
describe
'44960' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNU' 'sip-files00047.pro'
d6df7db90ae3b603d0443b0821482587
3fce9ed9606dd3a4d3e5c948c39b03126e3c7158
'2011-11-16T12:32:30-05:00'
describe
'32317' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNV' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
210487c2f3cc891165d5165854d8c71f
d9ee4f56ea9eba63637f0ad6e09043effdfe8193
'2011-11-16T12:33:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNW' 'sip-files00047.tif'
2c03075fc2a0d1c5d3536b0705cbb279
cae394ba7a7db054bfc0fef742f7a338bd8ecc88
describe
'2003' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNX' 'sip-files00047.txt'
d7795ffa596204ce578fc15cc1aebf7a
706144d1dc3cad805507943b90cd0de9aaa7ad6a
'2011-11-16T12:34:10-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8205' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNY' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
9e2fea6a664514462739079369849a27
8ba026b3b527f909e1fbda57e0fa26d14fa572c0
describe
'843556' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXNZ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
fea26cf100e64ba4c7d366f62173a01e
365d209e4d8eaaa0e1a0490af364fc37d2c0e7c4
'2011-11-16T12:33:44-05:00'
describe
'97572' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOA' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b92109234ff7821e6a7ed6ac85d3be91
80e43d191ad7be6f410d22d100352ffab2e604a5
'2011-11-16T12:36:08-05:00'
describe
'45714' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOB' 'sip-files00048.pro'
4ba3a97b1a4437a18f80876660fbb3a4
be6bbfad78d94bae0a3f49cafa00a888af55ebf0
describe
'31276' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOC' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
94a9dde5ec76ab4daa5af509a35d3a67
97599d35c381d3050db37e79ddc25c4c2a7dd151
'2011-11-16T12:36:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOD' 'sip-files00048.tif'
37a692cc3a004ffd495f07f19843430d
741944fe263f04c5098d1b8bac6f5a6a3c8f2b6f
describe
'1900' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOE' 'sip-files00048.txt'
6786bc4c4e5541f51b33cda5c9f5ba1e
2151ccfb876524d2eedbddb975865157407089b4
'2011-11-16T12:32:44-05:00'
describe
'7869' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOF' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
8d33e9e3dc03f85eaf9a815fc6149f2f
34bb1a669710cefc40e3ea2450bfd1a8801a17b4
'2011-11-16T12:36:31-05:00'
describe
'824252' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOG' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
1d046978e86e8b5259ae85bd2b5f4331
4547d9c037bc5c9f433b88879671daf2df4fa883
'2011-11-16T12:33:16-05:00'
describe
'77271' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOH' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
f12b01bad30616aaa01dc0dc313348f8
cf947420bdfe478a764afa88978ef82134bb81e0
describe
'18976' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOI' 'sip-files00049.pro'
f1130f3d0a487740a12df8599e67b037
2281697a605b1277b57437949cf7cb6dd0aeb6d1
describe
'25532' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOJ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
906a73884c2aae29b046c2a047c8a5b5
26881344ffa03d511f2339ae56aba83be6c3e5c0
'2011-11-16T12:33:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOK' 'sip-files00049.tif'
329b68e92740db473aaacc8deba862a8
fc88d590825318587c9d66be1e7b5f1ee4c2c81a
'2011-11-16T12:37:35-05:00'
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOL' 'sip-files00049.txt'
85d131d16df4eb41162fc1a97dccc3c9
728216f9a5ad03ad9752755546e0ccac9f0ce8fc
describe
'6984' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOM' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
79e0e2e7432be9bc032781f4fa67d1b6
9b7c2d81f195bc28d521eb79e596d2fd62bc2906
describe
'843505' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXON' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
4edd03fd4a151a0988a4ead39f0f50a0
e3cb42755018975cde38edd1d2c1f6840344dbb9
'2011-11-16T12:34:53-05:00'
describe
'69844' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOO' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
7622b506a6fb294a68f9a60623c212a4
5ff4d98ad78a3d42dd06cee17b7e2254c5162135
'2011-11-16T12:31:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOP' 'sip-files00050.pro'
c5fdc3bb2997103bf36d87deceeb721f
64ccd148131cd5e6a69568b3fa180fefcc15f588
describe
'24507' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOQ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
64d91043c5c43cff71177e922f81f18f
b0ddac834c14e7347b4323bf0738f93e612cf1b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOR' 'sip-files00050.tif'
000b155ebe05e469006691518d385777
65b6cb10d9386395959f0b70442e4fcf7f6b9b4c
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOS' 'sip-files00050.txt'
94b5e42564b572bc2e42e48b454b28b6
2e0ea8f330991e7faaa9c925d71c15a0cc369bcb
describe
'6483' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOT' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
03b04a97eae8bac6cbbe8502618d4595
29a6ff011bb3045e10a598c4d1265c0f2146d55d
describe
'824272' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOU' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
c523b622ccc41ace58ec3763104c2227
b4420d0bf9986db264b9f86df1740c1f6cb66e2c
'2011-11-16T12:32:24-05:00'
describe
'86627' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOV' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
9718f9bf7c530af5d91cd655fae4aee4
7c9984a4e63fc0723e0f590e750a04c11e4b5d03
describe
'35560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOW' 'sip-files00051.pro'
99ac5e15889528269f1f4018518aa144
4fbcd532a1b35e3623a2accaa2bf5d6c7e6d30f8
describe
'29916' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOX' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
a61a6b818d9c4934080b5fe1c119b2c5
30cb1b513f23f0f9ab599eea529bf23733672819
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOY' 'sip-files00051.tif'
9b823759739adafb07e09d6dbf828dce
c7a62df865ae279d166a197669318a5279f6349d
'2011-11-16T12:32:41-05:00'
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXOZ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
50aa7a7a77b48769de1073f0ef63c013
a8662093f17efb1b2e90565278128878d4ef0697
'2011-11-16T12:33:39-05:00'
describe
'7885' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPA' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
1764966f61f01c2f8700fa6bd34cda5a
e2bbc9bd7903f26cebab92d4550278d50d4e5d4b
describe
'843558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPB' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
7c3c0ab6372bde5dcc6ef0d6c1c5ac2b
bc2a14a78d803c4b9be5b2ffddb432c0f70a22dc
describe
'83014' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPC' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
ad3b4b6c9422598b884fbc5d6c76877e
87aac69fe31549abd398beccb0425f56618ab11c
describe
'36999' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPD' 'sip-files00052.pro'
140ab535686c7424853872783e7ce647
fb1d367abee35f34936a48dbc3b88dbb5bf34ddd
describe
'29088' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPE' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
55e478ed7074673581be15dd0b8119c1
c18ac6c6d5a300909c21d2c9978626ae2f2ff459
'2011-11-16T12:36:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPF' 'sip-files00052.tif'
8a6acb0ac0eb52e4f8904e33d4a84fc1
163082d1bcc0d58cfc21cd3645e172de1e887efc
'2011-11-16T12:31:30-05:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPG' 'sip-files00052.txt'
213d52aa2cba9884de8b76944cacbd22
4a903455726883b81ce838f46dc5c350d05905b4
describe
'7534' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPH' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
22c50a68bbfb0a7ee87cf0681647aadc
19a9b6f5b936c11cb027244d5b5a6059edaa2d27
describe
'824263' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPI' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
8b65e32a8fc8ca94321458ff87e1aab7
f7580d53fed8001e1b2453e2e4f4f1419c7281c5
'2011-11-16T12:32:01-05:00'
describe
'79650' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPJ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
688399b29874b1b4bf9801ae89432138
9a0e45d7b68d4a72bc01b7a2d79bd4c8353e8599
describe
'33346' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPK' 'sip-files00053.pro'
5ee0d2a1f234ea8c092b9d97266ab15b
b1e478653bd13f9149082430b4f7f832eb0ef8d5
describe
'28254' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPL' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
831610a8648e53f5e956c8a6f0643191
d7e888e979f43175ae9005a0ec82a25066f92bed
'2011-11-16T12:32:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPM' 'sip-files00053.tif'
d5417344705c5f088601ae8364e7e2c9
2527375f88942ac3937c872b25839d1a71d38284
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPN' 'sip-files00053.txt'
0886e87edab32e243140f1a43f6c3cb8
9a0a575f3799f91c8af951fa3adba9b82d03030c
'2011-11-16T12:32:06-05:00'
describe
'7627' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPO' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
6ea0654275900633897812ea31634993
a29a75a4b22caf4ae9e213b6064c757c38fcec10
describe
'843503' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPP' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
df625695b6811a7a2c96684631e34326
a126eb8aedf110992d4914a0680b08beb4263df2
describe
'80709' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPQ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
4c44d3a213698a482d28b3b7520902bb
78eace6f904c3ea4aeebf5406413a76306c1fdd4
describe
'34937' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPR' 'sip-files00054.pro'
0dcd59a3999392e34fa7b5aebcb7d934
64a226eccb5bbfd03e30c373b2a10a1c55c372b8
describe
'27767' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPS' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
a7ae2505888c586e15febffb811bc63e
f1257ea403121e02542c31a0b06203139e890454
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPT' 'sip-files00054.tif'
f82f8e449ae4e9bb2f86c92bce111fc6
d10353da4f21250c0456f1e241f1c88e46115850
'2011-11-16T12:32:03-05:00'
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPU' 'sip-files00054.txt'
1d38245fbdb7536457bcc3fd96644533
25a7bea4b518324c1104b5d1f58b4c6970006ae2
describe
'7529' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPV' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
90fc1a980309887d811886b9abdc59bc
9ef638fabea89f93b317f9092227c73728d7f5ea
describe
'824277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPW' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
26e5d65625ed6e8325073061b074db51
e8080067e3e672fb38beccbcbd79048643322493
describe
'75134' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPX' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
5ead1e682eded41cc742770f23298a04
243ca12bba2672fc942d8c51ee14a1afb8710c22
'2011-11-16T12:35:37-05:00'
describe
'28339' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPY' 'sip-files00055.pro'
4328aa3280e0f780d7ab849d4f2e5fd1
50292f02af373275869d152126effeec7f5f860d
describe
'26653' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXPZ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
7431e28b8669adec5882afecb6921265
5134e0c7c83e855f6b7f96783a19fc0571b5b460
'2011-11-16T12:37:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQA' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b8ca97a44e0a47f728ba1183ae49ca8b
b2f3e3c00706623be43eb11582bc275bed50cfac
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQB' 'sip-files00055.txt'
a5203ac526b62862b7d64b0f15832518
30824d98c579d698ba7bcfcf2121762df434b2c7
'2011-11-16T12:31:20-05:00'
describe
'7338' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQC' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
bfd9e2402f1a89779aa991365dede463
d683e57b30369a47b0b2e9d3966b2c7b6167356f
describe
'843472' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQD' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ba28f8ecbd5048e1e3aed122f1d3aa31
08911470508429cf3b41711c16bfcf4fbab63d99
'2011-11-16T12:32:07-05:00'
describe
'71731' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQE' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
64494bb722261342d44c4e1b0348a252
7c61b3984f3255616bec154529838a9d0b67ae02
'2011-11-16T12:34:36-05:00'
describe
'32240' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQF' 'sip-files00056.pro'
52f9ee8c48b818bf8ceec10822ff8144
5ca8169e74a752afe084618631bef71ef41a3108
describe
'25312' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQG' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
edfa727190d16f1601a5fa5b309c5cbc
0e84cc13eb6df0da21d2da3932403d2178a13bff
'2011-11-16T12:34:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQH' 'sip-files00056.tif'
6c669553b57bddc17e69322205475def
487dd2094ece46962b36e2f8b563a186db99d2f8
'2011-11-16T12:38:05-05:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQI' 'sip-files00056.txt'
982d25062374b342226b99c16ec34e69
11e85e2f673cc3987a89fa0355bfad341984fe49
'2011-11-16T12:33:41-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6787' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQJ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
7909f22a501fb2765ee7b4d2abd5955e
dd8440774e2baeb2f836545ce0bb4e94d631e82c
'2011-11-16T12:35:46-05:00'
describe
'824167' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQK' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
1c411567fe5b85f12dbd5d9f0540cc2e
cb2fdc41911eaaa40fed4ca5c68250459fed57b4
'2011-11-16T12:31:36-05:00'
describe
'30545' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQL' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
cb810a160f67029ee3776c8d31f7cd4e
26e01e490873afa95ee04417c9a9b9e8bdb1b4d9
describe
'773' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQM' 'sip-files00057.pro'
0c6d70fb008d7b737b3750fa4cf651b4
e60c11f0916d952bba42d88987aeec304832262e
'2011-11-16T12:35:49-05:00'
describe
'7904' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQN' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
33ac6a427b5981556434fb6aec7642d4
9eaa1bd22324bd9d48fec586302679220d1c2c49
'2011-11-16T12:34:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQO' 'sip-files00057.tif'
d905f8e37e652bf81021af08bc0f4a24
1f132016c99004fdf21caa136b199d4e1572f70c
'2011-11-16T12:36:54-05:00'
describe
'53' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQP' 'sip-files00057.txt'
586b31c79a0f384e19910268dcf2354a
cf6e2e91750c848e19b2dbe85d8bdf5fbe79a05c
'2011-11-16T12:37:30-05:00'
describe
'2370' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQQ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
99ac37cfc4c3cd839c9a19d8743db342
c70c03fa9837161a4e5d1f470f76b8904e7ca74e
describe
'607478' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQR' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
936d99ea1579514f39807d10bfad37e3
2795447bf0112398afaddbd13cc1266593d21f03
'2011-11-16T12:35:16-05:00'
describe
'12385' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQS' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
18065b32664af6801e8fdeece597cb29
6a5ad7e3226e535bc384e7a30eac8d88b56fa287
describe
'3331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQT' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
5144b57cc667c237be2c1b9758f161bc
0826f7ba7ff7fb45d4b3df57fba4dad50dc17ac0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQU' 'sip-files00058.tif'
f74b1147ffeb19a30810e53dfb3825bb
b725d6edd5888ffc24e7a9217b3ec4e6d55fe7ba
'2011-11-16T12:38:19-05:00'
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQV' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
43b6bbd5852d35e777c87e9cf4488a0b
6d1609665b078dc4cf13f670da40a4267764d608
'2011-11-16T12:34:26-05:00'
describe
'824177' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQW' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
6d0861478e5e10c4e1028a8476fb7bc7
a4b8df090f079876cdf18a380727d9481ecbf19f
describe
'84377' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQX' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
e2de092c02127d1cc5bb5797075e36a8
76d63aea539123350b04e3f9d5a37180a90dff44
describe
'35923' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQY' 'sip-files00059.pro'
94c0742ea426bef72a790a2a90daf54f
8db9a9a503271ba0b0ef37f6ca897e41048316d1
describe
'29997' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXQZ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
055a66212f2a062bc5fc1ea1c13e3b8b
b3e7d4a9752e41bb7fe45f68cad8d4d3f99f5407
'2011-11-16T12:32:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRA' 'sip-files00059.tif'
0c7e61e1954967c28f11adeb6132e43c
102879411eafb444053b50606105dac30da18318
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRB' 'sip-files00059.txt'
3202c4263ea46283f93a84a12f409f5f
f854e3e9d73d515b0c29c56d02f094e0c8ebacdc
describe
Invalid character
'7640' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRC' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
496cb8cc1d1d683bff207f6ba26a782c
b3c724765f6f431b56594f97e8c3f7e8fdffbc7a
'2011-11-16T12:37:38-05:00'
describe
'843438' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRD' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
224b41021654dbb6a71ed0e8e0d59ad8
b4fdfc311648e479252675ae2f4a7e5656436b45
'2011-11-16T12:37:34-05:00'
describe
'78364' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRE' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
10df03a77334408fd0b5f221431035c1
a1cf665fdbe325facf50a82c6ea4e860a532a3ff
describe
'33351' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRF' 'sip-files00060.pro'
317be1baf3ac9e1a963baa387b446329
1f291d2d8138dbce5e24c189aadc33b8be608335
describe
'27474' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRG' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
b9be830e476512b71fa117a2c5ad7a24
30e0ec80dc673435f9594b9516d1532263f56a53
'2011-11-16T12:31:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRH' 'sip-files00060.tif'
412b98748f1a6ffa20d40da997fccede
2fbeed940d54295783b788ad77f7ec411f8654fd
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRI' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d84d0ba6342e6a3055a8fa9967f114f7
5e88d34016a36c1f143d0fdca586c8a0157e324c
describe
'7227' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRJ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
55b240ef7f33c09a947a049b5fbfd995
842db74e66453392fec6486758a5a18ee0d28b75
'2011-11-16T12:34:32-05:00'
describe
'658810' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRK' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
53584d5c9e32f862360c53caf219944c
b8f76631f6d4e41aff0a634de62b8f4bdeaf3ea5
'2011-11-16T12:38:12-05:00'
describe
'15957' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRL' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
939474ea484225093183646a6303713c
e003582eb4108b9804d2f5effe0f6dd6818c164b
describe
'4283' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRM' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
a7b97728c3cdfedc057dbca5714d4aa2
576b89583fb62c4c4a41e78d40e2a3e6ee709744
'2011-11-16T12:35:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRN' 'sip-files00061.tif'
fe4bce72b76a7f951bd063e94909853e
a5fd93054c57521879e33064a35adf0a676b15a3
'2011-11-16T12:35:45-05:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRO' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
4bb394074b59512f64e48751e3a80913
f9710cee84b622dff5dafaab93a6d6029aabd8de
describe
'843528' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRP' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
01781ab1bd6172dfd5d4224f9f8f2fce
b5ce93c95dfce0f546853a62bff5d8fc9ea2d715
describe
'85366' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRQ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
6b29bb7c8c8220673bb76088b7f3675f
2473b0a01b5b95307ec4067e36cc1f865a50f506
'2011-11-16T12:38:16-05:00'
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRR' 'sip-files00062.pro'
9c606113af84b883d5cd429d9d553493
a673b76f4520d8e7e57ff1686e44880cc2ddf3e2
describe
'23280' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRS' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
9a03b99defd2d69c823cb7dda78d929d
483e222d6255f2d313c2451d99f44c9cd320b185
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRT' 'sip-files00062.tif'
43df58869fba530c526307b2602e0ee2
4fccff04d7d2e9478fd0d776eee091e4bde620e7
'2011-11-16T12:37:56-05:00'
describe
'137' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRU' 'sip-files00062.txt'
e4f4fcda24e2ca6fe871591deef95c97
ae45ac1dbcafd5a14aa14410e911e29f74abe87b
'2011-11-16T12:37:50-05:00'
describe
'6290' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRV' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
183d12040bf7bbfd60e196a8455bfbcd
11c2a9f70d282e830abab90952fdf94e6c35bb40
describe
'824169' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRW' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
36285425af334cb8e5bff5b2bd43c068
3615f4fe370ed5368c22f7eea2d4fd7fea375e67
'2011-11-16T12:35:53-05:00'
describe
'91125' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRX' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
d08b4973fbe2a95d354bacbb077532c3
392eba92227f876778050e5a026177c1b99c8032
describe
'38629' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRY' 'sip-files00063.pro'
ea73f3afbfe7f9a52d2a06d45d3f0b93
e78323411a342a60e30bee5213e846fcbfe11d0b
'2011-11-16T12:35:22-05:00'
describe
'32258' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXRZ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
c54ffb13ab0dbb00bb9cb4547acb1405
b545fd40b843214a06672a4453358e68a65a0e21
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSA' 'sip-files00063.tif'
9280762f07e914fa19b489444928f7aa
afd212832d10570b6990bb4bd49f4b4efa84b51a
'2011-11-16T12:31:21-05:00'
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSB' 'sip-files00063.txt'
f55a447a73c2b3773106c5fb0a7f20c1
015db4819809daa2057375439c23b756e0434434
describe
'7998' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSC' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
dd418ceeaeebe986b6245351fb7260aa
901df19fe83627e1470c2c231fee7e840783d7c4
'2011-11-16T12:33:38-05:00'
describe
'843496' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSD' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
1f192cb16e0b6e298e67e7735fd0ec12
e10bb061bf33c51463931a458ad0d8a0fec6e006
'2011-11-16T12:38:00-05:00'
describe
'93193' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSE' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
98373dacb440175206cfe9f46bb02df5
67a92f1d289ff1e9f30a0b5f3733ce8dd848a114
'2011-11-16T12:31:56-05:00'
describe
'41315' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSF' 'sip-files00064.pro'
c31f8a15f6459636fbd27b8d7fb72f00
427bb1db0d7b57ed8d4dd79b4a564031b42e41d1
'2011-11-16T12:37:29-05:00'
describe
'32699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSG' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
d03aed1ca76cd2c4f1f38c1c4534de27
4a0eb1a3e7188d73861884b891e183bf7e990f1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSH' 'sip-files00064.tif'
e8defc5c052fb09318a853edcb05a463
5b875fd422b6a1c353a914d93719e9cb4b7f0a7d
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSI' 'sip-files00064.txt'
8132a301f80243ed794f616053219483
99baff465aef569555d91f6a8b4cf3bf21a83c1a
describe
'8084' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSJ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
991577cbcfa0e1511b00739586e6f00f
ab5d1b635467821abbfdb3e4ac6d18e5b19e1299
describe
'640674' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
dadbdabe18d3b5f1ca6ae9cd24eced28
2d8e695c41af78eb35bbddd09ab9eeed5e68c8f5
describe
'14647' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSL' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
49300fd5a71e7ab25aa83720ef6a0088
3822fc270a26241bdd2aa84d1ea5fc78fdc562a8
'2011-11-16T12:37:24-05:00'
describe
'3913' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSM' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
4880f7b3d549433788e420e8cde34f7a
c9a9127d40061902e5669a79e330eb5d9809bc80
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSN' 'sip-files00065.tif'
b005769e480eb778cf79e6321d3ce8dc
ac9710c68d7bea03c1ba54b46428e370741aa90d
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSO' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
69a7eae169c11b9a6321dba1921152e8
99f23a3bbadaeb307409f16ab49332554f188be6
describe
'843403' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSP' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e64ca4e8d9b53ea48974d167e1a00e22
602497ed05947807613eddc62ac5ce2e4de4e31d
describe
'86445' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSQ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1a518c6aab8ad614cf2de5a793850c0f
436ae6099b045e99cfe91d40548d23483cc1412b
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSR' 'sip-files00066.pro'
4cc6ecf101ae144295827e670a8ef704
13ad881fde7bd1cda7cdbf3d295e0739f2d7b305
describe
'23345' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
0c06f31833c2c0fecad19ea70fec534c
abb59a5d967e16c3ae6413205143f68506e0e39b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXST' 'sip-files00066.tif'
098fa674e2292d5543b517318f9683ce
eac0e673dd9368bc014e7f3737d50fdcf52751bb
'2011-11-16T12:36:49-05:00'
describe
'227' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSU' 'sip-files00066.txt'
e2009d12474783c7f823e82b85f15b0e
14c882432699ba16a0652aaa3d978a0ac6a58ccc
'2011-11-16T12:31:17-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5997' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
0a991bcf25985900e63f030c5b732d73
006fbdb37d354cbd1969f556b14efb19105b69e2
describe
'824283' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
2d2b0f52b139199bf2e29d4a9f8d3140
2903fba584356d5be3b455f6942879787ae94910
'2011-11-16T12:33:46-05:00'
describe
'75063' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
204e58a622f3735f76ce4608b0a0f3bc
87b39266526cb0068db96247f11d8a6540360a7c
'2011-11-16T12:38:24-05:00'
describe
'30056' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSY' 'sip-files00067.pro'
97c0f69f479605d807cefe203442ace0
2e7db46f729b01317a808f4beeaad9ac2f9c6e39
describe
'27041' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXSZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1b55bd002dd6c970704317450f3f848d
edff974f8ba77a29ed022f72e73fc3c1464665ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
308b7e42b8b4538ba5ca2aad6958d917
d69e4ada56b9a345d112c857624ec7ae436ceb68
'2011-11-16T12:32:59-05:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTB' 'sip-files00067.txt'
fe543f2722519c7e00b4de502d89faed
7bc3f9b85c2fd0fdb3926fd3746d8bdd06403dca
describe
'7395' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
374dbacd962047f6c4e4671149377670
12ad0f58f2d62710ec8f19ede127df24476b6c1f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTD' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
46f5ddd8edc49134ee3789bf80e78be4
2802781c6c439b95e00a4f5c69d0045179208f61
describe
'78281' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
24f0b30fb47c669f9a6ca4ba575519df
e115cdd90ea1ab44eee519405e7e31417a94ad38
describe
'35468' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTF' 'sip-files00068.pro'
74deb02d4bb1698bba6f307b4d76073e
dfebebfd26a1a35e1c9754a3c69b0572388b7fbe
describe
'27533' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTG' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
14ef628ba9631713cdd33574e2146ebd
f16288c6f7b33bc3a7eccd96a5f5b8cfa6cf7e5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTH' 'sip-files00068.tif'
f6d0cbc4f355a8b36a835af6e15a8bd3
0036a2796dbf9fff42cc19432c861ed3c7d23e84
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTI' 'sip-files00068.txt'
33741379276f4c93f73b2c4ef2911cb7
b3ea45b064d0f1795fc3e1cb34340bbfccd70159
describe
Invalid character
'7134' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTJ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
9bd281a0adbb95977521f44767979205
f7d759607ef3c1ce4d333348b1c5204c7e5d7c25
'2011-11-16T12:36:52-05:00'
describe
'607185' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
eb57e341515d098b87ddc798e4b1aa08
0f07966890c4c2e334eb1614d5fe328dc555f621
'2011-11-16T12:33:56-05:00'
describe
'13577' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTL' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
1e709b0462ec300c6cdcda791f5a3aef
770ed789e322e1ab8799426942d71cea64b1776e
describe
'3702' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTM' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
ba8538cbc2ed448635f6fc7f144c1a1e
771b6d937fbf9ab5f6de36f20ec4ed907de58930
'2011-11-16T12:32:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTN' 'sip-files00069.tif'
a68f26d55cd7eef2939da84075b9556e
0c185a13c53b4c8faa194211364d0401f6ca3f02
'2011-11-16T12:33:57-05:00'
describe
'198507' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTO' 'sip-files00069a.jp2'
f49c9e6d1b638d4c45309c60a76e7da1
34d92ae7368361f02fe363458d6f5d2ce7e216ca
'2011-11-16T12:32:02-05:00'
describe
'49632' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTP' 'sip-files00069a.jpg'
581c6920d772be2aab3e4b8cfd554366
fdbebbf206eea45707edcad33eae6a09f98e0758
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTQ' 'sip-files00069a.pro'
acf1194b8db4af2d8c85e9d95722844b
964c029f0357ff99ef6f5d525c7ccf3d7edc905c
describe
'31930' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTR' 'sip-files00069a.QC.jpg'
c77381b5b648acbc9ad3afdcfbefd125
49e96d00113ecda65257f4d61c89a85c26edf844
describe
'6717236' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTS' 'sip-files00069a.tif'
3ef0ac1d16b594c8b43ea8604cdff79c
8962178939b538408945c0a05ebfe85a3b76f750
describe
'46' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTT' 'sip-files00069a.txt'
46732654caaa0b1b426962deb85ca993
59b55e29f6cced40a8b63fa9040dcbbe1f820bde
'2011-11-16T12:33:10-05:00'
describe
'24965' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTU' 'sip-files00069athm.jpg'
79b34e6ae3b0e5f08f6582e6842eff17
d555d4052109b94fd7a41361e72589e9e3e83bca
'2011-11-16T12:33:01-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTV' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
830bf89672b4ada654d1cf5f126d9e6b
f9ebcd9fcf1274e42d9021281c01e7ca5ab8dcce
'2011-11-16T12:34:17-05:00'
describe
'843565' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTW' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
1302b5ec68e17aa63e7141561466a991
f1b88a9d502f146c32383f0e790faaa9fe84bef0
describe
'71765' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTX' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
118626ab7f5fa8b9002246b7ae268026
e7cb961e6ceda231652cc3ae6b15346f5c772690
describe
'30226' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTY' 'sip-files00070.pro'
566baab02729d9988a1251cb03f1a11d
40cf0510bc3b171f6ea637eaf68c4c7afff20e7c
'2011-11-16T12:31:15-05:00'
describe
'26193' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXTZ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
e6990561ff470a91a7d3e54f4bdec05f
2d8ff0fab9219b5d1f1c9115eeed308d81d96fb5
'2011-11-16T12:31:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUA' 'sip-files00070.tif'
f5b30f1ad2b947c111abefecf62ae622
8f61a0999f51e5cb25f94908365fd07085f5c5ca
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUB' 'sip-files00070.txt'
9c75773f79ccc198589cfda26c177e49
33e3774ce05b1774e621ab5d2d5c9c46a63b8f55
describe
'7409' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUC' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
ff68504aadbedf3c8d31fae90b507658
4461962f60027c73a03140823675c4dfdf202387
'2011-11-16T12:32:45-05:00'
describe
'920594' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUD' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
f7ab3d167835ae28c924679085be5ab6
e614282ef01994df01f2ee8643ff499fc7cf991b
describe
'77376' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUE' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
76d73ed50134a3a7178c0d4f3b41186f
06b64fa2864bfbce804a646ede7d3a9ab662a76d
describe
'21530' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUF' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
5ada27c8b2a549a9ce2ccfc32f512274
74a22f522eb5cec1e476be2c06a487feb9a2605d
describe
'7369615' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUG' 'sip-files00071.tif'
535f9521f9826886b5e58ec19f20c127
afd30f243649968657b8d27940f50d29362c6e83
describe
'5892' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUH' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
d00e85c599233051fb4b682423bb85bf
d841d435335c0f35b95f840af7b1f972b4e5df02
describe
'480010' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUI' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
26133564c73b15987356b9c38a61c6f2
472757b28bbcc963916d2abce448034ff4189e83
'2011-11-16T12:31:12-05:00'
describe
'12772' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUJ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
9d04659f43463e79ee303f9290dc81c8
4a73cd85a84920b8892290002ba47c76b9a3837c
describe
'3646' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUK' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
807fa8c21e695fa585ef8673c6cd261c
c2a756883993b4989ec7d13a48fc3ae884a6278f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUL' 'sip-files00072.tif'
8b6a9c93a5674ca710e3a70ea7f270fb
d41ace3a402fc1c435fd1d0c4d6ba12fa0f1c7e7
'2011-11-16T12:33:29-05:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUM' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
6557aeec888237dba7cf1e764040effe
78d9ff289cdbc18bcc4f31756cfb1ba4c4e5e58b
describe
'824262' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUN' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
858da82e4b7cd3f772e6eccc3f737b3e
e469aefd8a88fa94ff345c03ad465d882f6df20a
describe
'80421' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUO' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
9277aa091a21a1ebf41e13bf057f0d5c
e87d7aa45b64899810049d2d782f456e0946561a
describe
'35447' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUP' 'sip-files00073.pro'
bcc9799a8fb54c267ad364d1d39b869f
ab0b91df6484829a44a7f45c53c672239bd94ecc
describe
'29182' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUQ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
c0ef0901e372f994a89f7de22dd798f8
b9df39defdd4de3c2604eca15d74033613300dc7
'2011-11-16T12:35:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUR' 'sip-files00073.tif'
829730e29eb0a9c6c838961486c4c3ad
521fc7dae0c0085ac6a563e0dd47154af8bd0e0f
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUS' 'sip-files00073.txt'
cd9ebeff3dfe32abddfbdb13700c7249
1287fed3adeb913808a76e29a680889f12123f43
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUT' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
a844abf0f73cefeacc86a520f73d0332
6ebf555f35c8a15b964a4056c6690689192d400c
'2011-11-16T12:36:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUU' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
114702da312c65be4e9456d61a1f5de9
0ee5a3396484bf1126443f86189babf3d5c85a42
'2011-11-16T12:32:20-05:00'
describe
'78614' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUV' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
3d77ccea77b11517996442ff874e0806
b559171bec69d7f4b6070088a3a126d49e6102eb
'2011-11-16T12:34:13-05:00'
describe
'33509' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUW' 'sip-files00074.pro'
494bfae66ff73f098dd159db2927091d
d463db14ee3aeef82867746dac71542b357213f7
'2011-11-16T12:35:57-05:00'
describe
'28169' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUX' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
c21ec128c2f34833f095698c2fe08a5b
9302d38877a380dcd1c10bd88d2e429fff50b538
'2011-11-16T12:35:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUY' 'sip-files00074.tif'
5f2223f39a247a96c0357cc6689606d9
de55a17e62ef4b86b6798e054ba5991f148bcf4d
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXUZ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
c79ef962ca8bf0c098604d904c3f8c8f
4793826d0bf488edcc2bf3ef3607c80049d74f26
describe
'7547' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVA' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
9c7f54ee7bc1955d7862013d6ae42fe4
fa1abc41eb148c3fd6c1fa16c171b8440b005545
'2011-11-16T12:35:48-05:00'
describe
'824276' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVB' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
24409eaa8673ce7a599cbb52bea5b93a
de7e7f243950abfd938476c758b636207b5907a7
describe
'62326' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVC' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
07911c56fc2fffd4d02cd5eb65bd856b
1680d002d643a23e7e0f9658a63eadcc29e9ec87
'2011-11-16T12:34:07-05:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVD' 'sip-files00075.pro'
41f26ac549d0806072173ed03842c75c
f2c5d4f4b1cd46a5e35577b6df342b46e53ea887
'2011-11-16T12:32:33-05:00'
describe
'17929' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVE' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
99b9a61fa3ae9b7cafe03267c8bbe42c
1be8bdec9abbdbd6e76cc94d4521d4404af5649c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVF' 'sip-files00075.tif'
66a32802d0d26998cbab90b8a5c1bdf6
cd968d8ab1d3cadf228d19b58ba7c94aee8fba47
describe
'60' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVG' 'sip-files00075.txt'
de066c14a96b10e863b743552aad0125
5f7d33907af0ae28c0ca9a6d71cc24bfb708c39c
describe
'5048' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVH' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
03ebf994388f708f413d87e40030f579
2ca4a6044d03c638ee2d217102e5aa6e78f6cc67
describe
'473436' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVI' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
b318c502240d244bee80616ddbac885f
e02d93e4203ecf578152b0fd7c91dfcbcd8ab009
describe
'10960' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVJ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
a25529de6187fa518cbc4167475b7da0
ca9c1fa9561ad69916f736f7edf1641226891132
describe
'3145' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVK' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
f6ed4ba337be08b4da8e2b70740fa87a
5042b1eafadc678e60585e8a7a4596d8de472c7f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVL' 'sip-files00076.tif'
dd717bf3716d5d8cf7b9cf76fe5474b2
74c2e792a7c9a7dbdab984b8fd30e3788b6e73bf
'2011-11-16T12:38:26-05:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVM' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
c2308cd3f8c508b4f9ba9b6851af69f1
44cb29651d235e009aeed42fcb14013e4438dccd
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVN' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
5080aa3dac00cdc3322b88dd3f6407b9
c73878112e7ab97e3468014964f5fe9f7fbdbedb
'2011-11-16T12:34:16-05:00'
describe
'78148' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVO' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
585de99caa3da3df29d0ade9850ebb04
5e53efcf76c8f9af9ce4540449b9b95554eb8caf
describe
'33067' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVP' 'sip-files00077.pro'
d36ebe635636793b8ed4d791dd7af97d
bf1191604e5ccf04b26dfd5e80526baa619dfe50
describe
'28349' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVQ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
ca6497673e9c89415880fc81a5a69cc4
0fb2160600cc76f5ad763050af899ae5e85b2c72
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVR' 'sip-files00077.tif'
e11ec7960cf4d3fc642110fc10da1c93
a08f07a959dd83acb84117e97e587830f338b13b
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVS' 'sip-files00077.txt'
c3801f45061f0cfe8b1648cc6a266a14
877cd58a3792b8ba779591d8165991788917c328
describe
'7554' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVT' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
cd5da0f41fe07b28ddda7474640a00da
322b34d23e41d9bb2774078e0f1ad8f5498c88b4
describe
'843478' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVU' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
c07c9b23991e64f92afd8036839842c4
74aac06a141b097fc1946313a116ed50d8b848fc
'2011-11-16T12:31:33-05:00'
describe
'87649' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVV' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b356da1dc7b6d42ecd54a12d30e07cd9
b3b5ef0be33273fbc82a5ecee3f598f16d4d78fb
'2011-11-16T12:35:06-05:00'
describe
'37178' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVW' 'sip-files00078.pro'
db415f811f23ec00bd823dfad75ed51e
14e7f6a07570bef4d66f39168627936cd9851053
describe
'31167' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVX' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
f2b1c9473bfc5e1324b31150865bbc18
24bb39b30fb31989974e4043fe26a01008462b8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVY' 'sip-files00078.tif'
9beea8d3a5f983c6ac33c37cdc58046f
58043673ee48ddd635364c6a3a2a0779da9e3c38
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXVZ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
210835accf0e2853e31fff65207edd9a
ec7a45f6df5c7c183712d289323a85c810fbab1d
describe
'8154' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWA' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
6bc8c82f6beb2e52ef89ba4a3e79f97a
87ab4a0644058bf8b2de5a8092f8bc19639bf7da
describe
'824273' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWB' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
8e3944c5695ab4d43c2d94c4272eaf81
65503315526f837c3baf9618fb604fa7a8b61cae
describe
'83238' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWC' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
bbe752717e2595859a09c2d6c08be486
e12f8e7f546a627714de3cff8492ae59d95f00d7
describe
'22920' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWD' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
5fb788a623e11ff2ab58cec446b39af2
60a19cd26f6e0dbaa76a32167cbdab368bcd71a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWE' 'sip-files00079.tif'
42e0c39d574e44304058e9dd0fba354d
3e4ed5fb39cfd3983e8fccc29f7be5578db82779
'2011-11-16T12:33:15-05:00'
describe
'6305' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWF' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
64159f1fa747c83fc454f69211ac5aa0
2b1fddb808633572bff2908ad5fd9de489d78041
describe
'756202' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWG' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
700689adf9cb86ba52cbbd438fce9fd5
dd8cbaab58e6c6ca1073a431adfbe3df2945b0f0
'2011-11-16T12:33:42-05:00'
describe
'17599' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWH' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
f9e63f6ce4c52719e49283c07fd74bbb
6709291970041294b6cfa05c3d615e5517aaf76c
describe
'4268' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWI' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
a46b1c78cae0953e7a79ffa21087a822
89a092fe398e5f1886b03783669cf3fdc086d308
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWJ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
a841c208cf8e3140374d66923f8f6de1
f890f216981dd4b25359a8895f1275ceeb14bd24
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWK' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
2efa306c48fa563ab36aabfda5fe1168
d68a1755a655fbd838494450ebddc1fa1efe4b96
'2011-11-16T12:38:06-05:00'
describe
'824250' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWL' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
e5484b068023b80320f6dd208f8edb9c
3aa271e7c764bbc513fa58db9b8bcd1769de55fa
'2011-11-16T12:35:19-05:00'
describe
'87355' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWM' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
afb0b7b1781a67ea5099b6d0d90ee3aa
a206b99193d522e5ae59eee4a6523fcc5c8cc52b
describe
'37536' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWN' 'sip-files00081.pro'
30da2613ca57ba953f15e088d1d28c74
68af04106f134e278aedfb54f8696928664ff08e
describe
'30404' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWO' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
9c2feb3055d1143d1b7037cad4e9bad8
f32a07b05d53cc7acc029f0d63111caf92cadb80
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWP' 'sip-files00081.tif'
12ebb903335e21f63f38009e0856251e
86afed52b6c241d49ba87c4dc313b640d3058ae6
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWQ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
cee154e9499d532a090916f863bfa63c
0727592d06aff62d69c7488f45d14a89eaf414cd
describe
'7632' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWR' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
f3c6a4a2aa0de23dd233c8b2522d7bd2
56d96a2f243111779c182ca3e2d1656c3f3ef5f6
describe
'843548' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWS' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
572480e29feb89eeea8c0e6b8f912f1e
51f8a3bd0202a513eeee673ba5828cb177fef968
'2011-11-16T12:37:00-05:00'
describe
'84909' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWT' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
a6a94dde426f077812ba28cf0d95209f
2829ba7ba4944d20e74c44381f7fc36ef43846e5
'2011-11-16T12:38:18-05:00'
describe
'37785' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
f56e9f22208148bd0b01a54ed6f60c24
311aec865e5bf78680f17e0b0cf7f0e188fec0ef
describe
'30991' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWV' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
07eb0be3241dcfd53ed15ca78c94598d
33dd88af8fb8f8c319e7c85baae6201416668106
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWW' 'sip-files00082.tif'
f152c5a4be6fc579e7c6c94cfc356113
9501733161fd037b73236860dd65c213ff2bc12d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWX' 'sip-files00082.txt'
80f460be1569c723fd2784055a26a994
41e190cc61cc4546a24b5d6d227ba7b1cf1688a8
describe
'7984' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWY' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
8bf198549fc889fc9ad1e691d3854b8b
0c4ef9e1a206eb6dd6f55dc588ec76ee31e926b4
'2011-11-16T12:32:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXWZ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
f2d49ee7d52a25a3def58030674beaf1
14c829d4bc0f8c365744ef2be119b4bbc03b5087
'2011-11-16T12:36:12-05:00'
describe
'76380' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXA' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
413e891b9b3c08399f6c5868d2c979f0
b92aee97f6e52c08cfd8fcd0a1351a4c98a78204
describe
'30829' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXB' 'sip-files00083.pro'
ae32fc8258a010da45ce9dee8f3de360
178a54d67751c5b3cdd58c436c66e75992f49517
describe
'28271' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXC' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
f08ce092184206345813d0fbac9dbd4a
7ddbc612857eeee08c21320fc12a6d312f2e131f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXD' 'sip-files00083.tif'
d2ca2416697a5d1d3753250b1120d131
7f8ec9565c4f8ffc70cb9cb6f69aa21454067adb
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXE' 'sip-files00083.txt'
e4ef6300abba1c4ec2a591989e1319b6
3361a8fab33b91acb787bd9d99e0fb641a4361d3
'2011-11-16T12:34:57-05:00'
describe
'7701' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXF' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
650abc763c08185f856240fd23804d2e
408e94560651ef2f84fe9740d21d606524853840
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXG' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
7697464708b04ce30dc3e1a61df627f4
ff53d0b06b23ba5f376a607d55ff1fa143b66c3d
describe
'79302' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXH' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
417e121918d8cb7314ee2d69042688cc
e321ff848dcd799c542d571dd48bc23236dde18c
describe
'35012' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXI' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a80ce5b4dc2d08978a563c872c8d27ae
887b9e8349d66d47e72cb8ffc5ef8bca06035198
describe
'28758' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXJ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
f06852b5bf6762fd78f7eed821e80aac
11807048e4b1cca86ca60a5ca399f5c2e4de0481
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXK' 'sip-files00084.tif'
93347d3f32df23895c9d88fda1d7a2af
37d6eb70619728d0c35a10f1350e6558bc9658b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
10c9d317226d8699e02ec8b4ad8c34f6
e54c5b72028e772a29f2b08466b033e505fd1bdf
describe
'7857' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXM' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
ba3d103a59c1483f81da3410445a8bd9
48ec36b9803690c8fb0d9b3eb34be0b6ed919759
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXN' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
ba7dabb0f6dc2229f3959d751c2c957b
0c62131f659299195cd6478c696ddea8c7a3e7a8
describe
'82334' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXO' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9e297507243c418f35f984fd8b0cf163
7ebb83a607320157b297b99b6d97678e37c21b96
describe
'33668' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXP' 'sip-files00085.pro'
aff3f765763a170e2433b0f779fa1b3e
a230d15dfedf80e4da9efe54d3bf648997114873
describe
'29511' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXQ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
28311eb844245a040b197d8252b0db6d
9d7d95378d98493fb23d5ff6326d8e39776a187c
'2011-11-16T12:35:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXR' 'sip-files00085.tif'
bfa466b0f0a2ae1f42231861310eab8b
9831ec5c299fa86b2d6139eeb02393a89c92f1fb
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXS' 'sip-files00085.txt'
e5eeb347dfb9fc2817522856e29683f9
634f82c9c33dce38a20bf2f608c125887e407cff
describe
'7649' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXT' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
02d502987eb0e0b88508f0581a652876
b438b23433f45ee863b13b0528104190737f38d0
describe
'843509' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXU' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
baa251a53eda5328e0ce725bf111516f
2c48e2d3e2e7ac045d30e5b2d1c58ace0b1d5ffb
describe
'88546' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXV' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
d98208e71aa79657f737c1a35976658c
604682e7605281374b4543e21aa32bb2b47e3027
describe
'41126' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXW' 'sip-files00086.pro'
c51d24ef3a31bb1159f4db2598d63a55
bbd7ff0b55a5b8d854f41cf8e4b97ff2b3b7e9a8
describe
'31827' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXX' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
63b7715115fdc748e9c5c8faf3166f40
220c69dda5916bb001a8c2b70b79a7eb0e4b82e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXY' 'sip-files00086.tif'
ebdf6add1fc17256fe69530148937a55
54b4261ee7468232d80c3b8166a98458f8abda6e
'2011-11-16T12:37:57-05:00'
describe
'1713' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXXZ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
a13575d654bf00ac8bc7817915e5254e
0eb854f1e00b1cb0786fc07e5fb6a2f5de9e42e3
describe
'8198' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYA' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
fddfc9b6d2985534b7da03a0de75341b
e18acea67d63879fd93871042c0b4da0fb2290d4
describe
'824114' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
a54f7b60173abce225e1eeb20ab6372e
7c659302a0f8a5b420481abdeb8bc2783dd1d349
describe
'72784' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYC' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
0fed5f17e36c5d82c06dff6d1366d170
e16dc108b052848efffdb396622d17af41f1ab99
'2011-11-16T12:38:23-05:00'
describe
'742' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYD' 'sip-files00087.pro'
a9fc034143cab50b29fd120d310c7620
0bf5f595a56d090493a6c0f4822835c5b77b5bfe
describe
'34205' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYE' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
d4eb49e5ff3135738d8953ac65a82529
139a8a9e98dc90a81db5d9adc39bdad4fe62021b
'2011-11-16T12:35:52-05:00'
describe
'6614824' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYF' 'sip-files00087.tif'
9e48e98d377a843b16193363754c8bc0
f939b01597155df1e168de4f10c3847d4dd9970d
'2011-11-16T12:37:44-05:00'
describe
'90' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYG' 'sip-files00087.txt'
01b104892c8a0d6909f7f2d8e32e4b1a
e9a0f54c71b273d127213890cc83a22af1f18e4f
describe
'24508' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYH' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
94df5966ab71124c9418fc1c04c7a3ee
2db38e5c87093c2d12eb89209b296dfd53f93090
describe
'667267' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYI' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
7ec27f92a229fc0e9ecac072f59b1909
a713f273a135617125debeffebec5091a350a054
describe
'16277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYJ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
9e7e43bba56694c29a71ca290d692aa5
1fddeeea0c40bc8de23a71363017c9e24151204f
describe
'4331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYK' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
dcf09a7853f88c8affa545b158888ad5
07ace9f43e077b01e826fede37fc07441d50e273
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYL' 'sip-files00088.tif'
903e47b111a1952b44c5b115f4295e14
592f621d76e637efdf96bd595212ebde77b2a5f4
'2011-11-16T12:37:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYM' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
6dbc8dc3f154d6fcd7595e413103dea0
9370f79778f466e73c4617ec5670832546a99365
describe
'824237' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
d683eaa2aba3e4573eb9d4614a449719
6b78351ee3f55376fb78554357d4d595d3e707b6
describe
'90542' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYO' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
ffd17a29711f0ee35cd951377f42a1c1
c2f420ea8f9eaf343d9d24eab2b7a84dc2d9ba99
describe
'40870' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYP' 'sip-files00089.pro'
70c40fceda5aa5b0059d0dbf09e679a0
f4f5f569e7d259d08c989c46d3483e0ba576d931
'2011-11-16T12:34:27-05:00'
describe
'32765' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYQ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
824c533cc2b1b6491e80175a9579537b
c56266a4f15d8342afd6a5a8eaee05d295950d2b
'2011-11-16T12:34:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYR' 'sip-files00089.tif'
11601d3d030415fb35c9bca2131ba290
5f4d40472135613e1be3380c67e0c633e90cd850
'2011-11-16T12:32:12-05:00'
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYS' 'sip-files00089.txt'
fd1c78cd316e749c6020f005f9972a28
389ca1a33eba7268ad41408022090d0693c98c3a
'2011-11-16T12:33:35-05:00'
describe
'8388' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYT' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
8fe5546e9093d74275a42e40e54284c6
eac3051b6308d6bd7e2d257784806060ab124f10
describe
'843421' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYU' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
02981e4827e429c220de8d347d9e9e6e
31d0de20260a830aaa0bdf4d515b9a2ed3384911
describe
'85399' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYV' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
5d27fbb123b16a980cbf92120ed629da
24f3237a447f0cf0a23a3076eb3b4499f2040928
describe
'34403' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYW' 'sip-files00090.pro'
42aed563b849437f0860ce7ff34080a4
610833d35042e4ad72471e0324019090c4dca4d7
describe
'29882' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYX' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
cca2845e8621e54c8c966bf4ffb389dd
1a698b713cfb47cabd9832209c666aa921df4163
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYY' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f048e2216567fef149dc9c42571a5aa9
073b63c2c5eb97da03d6a23340a9ba892ebda96b
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXYZ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
d67bb04347ddf50c1050f6dd243a7353
0e33685d7459776a1c7ed7f77f4190efaed46471
describe
'7977' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZA' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
8eab770086e13083bdfce33882b4413d
20d5652f350f934a2d0336b0e0d1937a502019f8
'2011-11-16T12:35:20-05:00'
describe
'824196' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZB' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
ac00070e34f93be7dab8f07f8c514944
0091509bb807d985d98911035adc700112d9c9cd
describe
'93830' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZC' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
d3f9daa3d9cf850eb7a87192d2f15702
c76e4850b0435203b8f9e444869cba9719b84cfb
describe
'25825' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZD' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
e867c55d14aeb8d3b49be20b8564efe8
aacab4db7ee74e402d4a7e71d55ab3643b974026
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZE' 'sip-files00091.tif'
cba40e15e3a8d55c1b993adb3d1f9a68
5750a9bc22f7219253678f6bc0d794f4a1e4cc80
describe
'6796' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZF' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
1bb25647b7c271573d72478a09fab93b
5843eca38a1a42d907e9aa1540a5c362c491f866
describe
'843537' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZG' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
05ff98839c1890e2202f6195d9d43634
2569cd7e1247625e81cd1c37b927cbdb6f1d7836
'2011-11-16T12:33:00-05:00'
describe
'22384' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZH' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
421ae3c5984e501ed2de32ca4ce91d36
65949a5c71ece10d91ae29e230e389ad8aeb1ade
describe
'5260' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZI' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
2778d35c888a442d9094aefcea02f7e6
1ba913b08a1cd6d9776713f9d9816d6b5bd2a0c7
'2011-11-16T12:37:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZJ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
aebd782fe06e035c39b6f8245f16f566
7ed47065f25dec60b200b772bbd51931ea9c224e
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZK' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
ff5db4403761af3537ec35ded8ed1f79
1b813cfa38ba847da354e333fc7b84f236775108
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
295f38ff4f683acd0e3f051ae2520c34
dcf436b4712e468e010a475f930390b1e552b4a0
describe
'73088' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZM' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
1fdc3e66900b16a32055cd0935795839
cab25c790c51f57cc49e6750f3bf92ec9eb9b908
describe
'25155' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZN' 'sip-files00093.pro'
9f431909e5b325b621c0b1984e201b8a
d6bd311adb8ea321ed375102b7702c2c03209284
describe
'25325' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZO' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
8378aab3b9f2c250fcc2b3a021a35fae
f9a3ef329519f961e9a8141017637ff0ff3223f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZP' 'sip-files00093.tif'
d36d25644ee6d89ffc0098ea3296261e
909db9b5cb6baf37d7267ab60627face933d861b
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZQ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
af9f5373a82c43a2938208d4afc89962
4d94ad2f5ae4899c0adc56a34adb215cb4c00ba4
describe
'7054' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZR' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
a383851d3ae06b9a70c840d056bbb7bd
8d3e33cd22b99790550260abc684b085440eac71
describe
'843502' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
b4f8e75d02df19044dfc94c21da70ffe
018b2bc5151cf53a5e4292f2a0fb08ff4647fc17
'2011-11-16T12:35:04-05:00'
describe
'83886' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZT' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
31870c6dce34af8c2013bf9353d4a25b
75830db8a0a5384d0f7cb8c2252d8846f73ebb07
'2011-11-16T12:37:54-05:00'
describe
'34844' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZU' 'sip-files00094.pro'
bef9aaf115fc380e4a43a1256ec9a419
6e832452f809ede9967fda2a3e7e7c4275c7a6e1
describe
'29309' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZV' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
70a391a0f30909f6e05af0e47915f32e
014c7c444d1df2d0fd80460200c2830fa01631c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZW' 'sip-files00094.tif'
c93ba1db3b9ad0538b102c46f3c9c3c1
7923cb4badb158aed4b9a75d71a42c8c6b30c053
'2011-11-16T12:37:12-05:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZX' 'sip-files00094.txt'
ff95e6cff20ff982c996e0ca196e6243
0b031d6fef8b1c457acd5e4c6d3841e7b7073f32
describe
'7876' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZY' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
546faec078e35be1e924c98cc61cd579
d81b2031d6056ed9a0df717707589275435dce9e
describe
'824269' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAXZZ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
32aa18d2932ea01c1543af91294cd38c
5f21d1cb3eeca2ca04db45ac25b5874c7071d898
describe
'94521' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAA' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
f6a94f6023376c5b5b657e91ebbbf601
aa9a79e4d9eec0f37fdeea3bf885349b142a4f5b
describe
'39140' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAB' 'sip-files00095.pro'
b195fc5cd7d53146a0e3c30c124ff8c5
887afadba83f95c10bf667d6b9d6e2adb008a6ae
describe
'33221' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAC' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
735894055e27605bd10eae698a3139f2
7e99e2db0c95e0160acaf36d016dbf339140fdf7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAD' 'sip-files00095.tif'
c0f22ab16177efa778109cf67ed9c24d
26c9d86d39d879bac41333c8466a0ec91ff2da76
'2011-11-16T12:32:16-05:00'
describe
'1643' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAE' 'sip-files00095.txt'
93f656f4264cb5355c8f0a5e0745e43c
d217b9ffa75869180d7e6bc8d5a8380d40be92b8
describe
'8503' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAF' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
84408c1c4780b4ab533e8cfc8ed71762
2e5c57f9fe6633ede6591fe1e39ba46c1727a6f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAG' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
e8ae43076bf51684e02204add2ad4f0d
b056693a519ae8615471ac435d8de7ac7c37ed70
'2011-11-16T12:35:44-05:00'
describe
'88898' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAH' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
03c532379f11fd0935f01d8005d5897c
bbff194a68462a7ff1b45edfe07321afb92cb1dd
'2011-11-16T12:34:48-05:00'
describe
'36866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAI' 'sip-files00096.pro'
98c6a99c2503bb21bbddf8a20b6816a4
86cbd77ac471e1039a147acda758765163638408
'2011-11-16T12:37:16-05:00'
describe
'30973' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAJ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
4cbe7af819af3bfeb71e2248c9765115
8634ebbde62e33876a053ac709326094aa0cbf5e
'2011-11-16T12:34:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAK' 'sip-files00096.tif'
5e2027507b154a0f896bb89fd0d9bb59
8a8971470057babee0648413aec84a5db68323f1
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAL' 'sip-files00096.txt'
5f3a30e43f2628af56d88c94b8e54252
629643a5cb0cb5dddc54cf740213b694fac257dd
'2011-11-16T12:33:51-05:00'
describe
'8235' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAM' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
e2c7d011a79bfd94b1441df2ca093a0e
0e437d4203ae06110cf023967bac019985db1e94
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAN' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
bac87c8399b4fc8c9b1b4245493d44f7
57861ca6cb71ab53593ffef3ccb5ffdf199fb7bc
describe
'84864' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAO' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
c370d8e67b13446ccbc251f4236d6528
6fb257d6ee821a962069992b7cb37e53318ff409
'2011-11-16T12:32:31-05:00'
describe
'34392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAP' 'sip-files00097.pro'
cfa24cdf858dfea4ade06a329f78aa4f
58d1a8705d3274efbf9d58fbcec19d5cfcad2e78
describe
'30196' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAQ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
b190198fb0fe431399d6be7387e8ed18
f52258ebabfd448bfba6d003abc23a3adab00ae1
'2011-11-16T12:38:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAR' 'sip-files00097.tif'
174f3929cbf2321f79379c86bc614c89
c3b0f35fe06e2d2f7275f3aac6029bc6ce8f9a35
'2011-11-16T12:34:28-05:00'
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAS' 'sip-files00097.txt'
414d3df569446eab0c9b466bc3e33af3
44d4538f72762b7cfcd7a8abe9f9bee304ad7822
describe
'8059' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAT' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
5992241a308c50fb9c25331f608ae801
e152eba1dbc61b3c640a5ed207226e861cb1cdf1
describe
'825323' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAU' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
a5660b4dd77bfaddceb96053d8612bea
0f0799fd557d1dd136731d2a6a9dca6bfb3e6d27
describe
'90412' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAV' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
07c0fc04131a728fe89fac667a87f478
5e41bf510b0e431e173cc8afcbc26f3f7ba35c3b
describe
'37354' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAW' 'sip-files00098.pro'
b0d74e5480a6b246ae05e4b3f15439a5
4d10c8bd892fb748a36e13ebca6c34a28cfc13a1
describe
'31597' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAX' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
baa2b40c927464525696c322c775b262
569e189f827ca801264059b8223abb3c7b67122e
describe
'6610081' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAY' 'sip-files00098.tif'
8bac64d427ce4c120d11e7f6b1837899
04628cf57165857dac8f95c7055403132d84eab9
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYAZ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
5d1285e1da4d681c0ebe3dfa98712d91
cb3a99f85d3c178cff1b8335c46dededfe2227fb
'2011-11-16T12:38:11-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8036' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBA' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
4a44550fa2b4c26c57240009a9bdc953
d56881e70aa622abd83eb920103db0c2b882e9aa
describe
'810131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBB' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
406c0e330ab858f8c544ba71d6d64732
68aa8d794f421803f17738229756e76401f3f28d
describe
'74172' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBC' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
0e84a7228723c3e27fd61ed9109490d8
3f861ed56fad9b9838f4fb91aa66458eff3763a9
describe
'29522' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBD' 'sip-files00099.pro'
5c4dd29d60ff87631e1e5520a8b89bda
a3d3f67ed4ad9046216a176984587f6a56aeb1c6
'2011-11-16T12:36:59-05:00'
describe
'26671' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBE' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
58648f85fe59b2de96b18cccc852a575
1fd4e0239a19ab81a60f499a43e7ba58151ddd79
describe
'6488571' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBF' 'sip-files00099.tif'
26a5703999aeb26ad6afc67792c81333
e2e532b5da1ffdd5f3f4db3dc074d1bbf92217d6
'2011-11-16T12:37:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBG' 'sip-files00099.txt'
0187c58d64f5f20df26315738be616b1
f3a052ab1632450e0d271fcad5e606c07257d82e
describe
'7897' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBH' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
4fd1d79715b80d910ca4de0651f34a49
5ce1a8c1af452ca340280288aef782f1f829c134
describe
'825325' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBI' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
6d2eb35a352cf6d4607e8e4b6f0c190b
0245c57367f056e54bd5b84a228e549fcba570bf
'2011-11-16T12:31:13-05:00'
describe
'86443' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBJ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
452a0b91c7186a879baae4382ec33b01
ac17cbda91abdf4ea502eff400b4ec67faf4746a
describe
'39776' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBK' 'sip-files00100.pro'
903535d1843eeeec92b1c11258bd0373
0259312a45b4e45c6039c945b35328e2947e310a
describe
'30374' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBL' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
753242cb8dc877643a7dd8cb4c9dbeb3
73c07fa3e1a1fa27bf7c22c3044e9d6c2f4bb5cc
'2011-11-16T12:37:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBM' 'sip-files00100.tif'
f36626a0d0afad74a8bc4fec7d145a4c
4056d7bdc7d2a9582a14d9811528677b5c1250fb
'2011-11-16T12:33:17-05:00'
describe
'1672' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBN' 'sip-files00100.txt'
69495451e8c60b7a3bbec1977bdc08cd
c0f77366812b03f67a419bf5fdcff10b727ee372
describe
'7770' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBO' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
6ef4faf3ba5fdec3b95e3c55da274092
c33803cdde3ed428c0aa36d9cc370d3b4e86f74b
describe
'670937' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBP' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
6f476eddf2fbfa897130aaaaa7f564a0
efa70cae2807d0b3aa758c039e21177ca90425db
describe
'16808' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBQ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
199216526fecdb407188c7441e820392
1148d4862de767a00baab12f2806bc1b06dfce2e
describe
'4328' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBR' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
98ce092fdf4f208b4b73225ecf6c5949
383622f477e6d945ab84fae9311fe839330b3398
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBS' 'sip-files00101.tif'
5f7c6c9d8fa917c24162dfff71323905
099170777206e82a90dfa7013789516dd258e535
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBT' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
12020e2d84a55d1f8f43af59a9358f03
f225700344b2a41c5823d571d6c0234d015e4f55
describe
'825326' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBU' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
e6863a02af5a4c1ba3f2fab1d492e1d4
01162b498b0d450adda4a20454a7a5f77ed6a312
describe
'83009' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBV' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
bae580be26e03e138e00c552db259576
4102f3ebe1dac150606e365501d8ceae785b6b8e
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBW' 'sip-files00102.pro'
47fc59c128033fab9a04511a8d34b9fc
ade4b4ff999223fbbffd808470c57e8ceb81b4e5
describe
'23978' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBX' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
7945f61968c1dacd50876e9eacb380d7
7ec44749d4b55f97fb54349bb3c7fc675eadde31
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBY' 'sip-files00102.tif'
d9351d19c11555fdd982efd1b260250e
b49d637e3534927ec24af45d442ac58efee2b3cd
describe
'157' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYBZ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
000efef5cc94e6673d601df0dff711f8
31b0b61f1dbc56c0681dbc87fa5e9e5f093e99ec
describe
'6503' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCA' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
9d459da5a6ac835b51ace6a9379e5c7f
3a098f488fdb45bfa581d0cbc835c51bf40b33fb
describe
'810073' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
678b6689bf0008b7f61c9a2684281cf1
9e626951cc0752c6d56b124fff157082135f1f07
describe
'86245' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCC' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
155c7c1d6e3bd61761c90ea8f7d25906
bf8606cd7ce64a3afe347467d1b7527496c7b58c
'2011-11-16T12:34:31-05:00'
describe
'34435' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCD' 'sip-files00103.pro'
3c82367f0bf01cb6bb93231d3aaf70b4
d107c9a7c3b58bd3a52d5af11c3b13eded55a26f
'2011-11-16T12:31:44-05:00'
describe
'30084' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCE' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
d4739705828289f226f15e989874a0c0
cdec5767525f88644ac943ab21e200bd5cdce309
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCF' 'sip-files00103.tif'
ef1726ef58dbf65a53b8c275720aede4
2c1c62da30c1de931cb31d351b91821153728187
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCG' 'sip-files00103.txt'
97a3eba3a1d573158da40157fd5bd75b
34f91729d0efecb25721079f5d1b14443cc24b48
'2011-11-16T12:38:28-05:00'
describe
'7753' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCH' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
378455fd4afe64d1fe9017d6d09d5b13
0ae3f635461d5693e0b671234490f70a358d923a
describe
'825305' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCI' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
096abb9e3eee5330d763c2dd999af5e4
a7268997a9eb075cdc899484f8aac7478ad352ca
'2011-11-16T12:31:10-05:00'
describe
'84321' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCJ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
fa23d8fc1dae71d46352036940b7a4f8
c1debb0d73c7c91fa3e2b440e29acd939171323e
'2011-11-16T12:37:18-05:00'
describe
'35328' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCK' 'sip-files00104.pro'
384b0cba4c36a0683141bd1b9e6c5226
ed86659750a1cc9033a4b6dd5f47d5fc0c87d4ae
describe
'30269' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
60c7896378bf7aa0e43556f5e378d1b1
1e2f0f2bd399313425f7bc27496fdd58f5899bae
'2011-11-16T12:37:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCM' 'sip-files00104.tif'
d446d8c85791f840beef7c5b9998f0e3
5efb083bfd64a19371618f0375707cd9427f9749
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCN' 'sip-files00104.txt'
ce9c4194ffc58c0fea9ffdc3478a171e
b52534b35d6452a64e48bf3ca2a38d51473e8c0b
describe
'7699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCO' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
f7f9e76342bd770c25835d4cdb5c0247
dfc39ea02b7ca21b14b29be2f31e676a14a359f5
describe
'810114' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCP' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
72b3f12d8928b9a93f965da9ce5373b1
249e97dd53deb4ce8b7f1caad0e220533ba873ae
'2011-11-16T12:34:58-05:00'
describe
'90262' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCQ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
30a1108635c94eb6c8c5356dc49c7704
884419fb97fe9d9a8b28fd63eb31931a69a9261f
describe
'36812' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCR' 'sip-files00105.pro'
f6d082588193021c05c6d174716b6bfc
a5845385e8ab7d644e01f30b07dc39f803147018
describe
'32389' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCS' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
1fbb705d2a51e4f2d470c669374773ed
70ef37fc81f440da0c46d9706a161d04194939ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCT' 'sip-files00105.tif'
c510bb81385046dec867cde217ceb2ed
4ee309e239d8c4518e53bf22ce6cf8046265a975
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCU' 'sip-files00105.txt'
945394566ec4dd987155135a6e532501
b3cd013ae37c11aa75aeeca80cf2b669e3fe620a
'2011-11-16T12:32:28-05:00'
describe
'8525' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCV' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
9e9af62f25c83f688075fc32f4388cad
736c3dcb04650c6ed1cbb0412f4e8c9cecc6c4ce
describe
'825338' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCW' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
451554a8fbf5ac5d92abb67fdd7bd51c
ec2529aa8641e04a125868c09bed04d3ca266210
describe
'83506' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCX' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
5ac56bdf68ea6f1d2f88fb845a55cdbe
664ca333b79ca9e9d65c956c438aa95af74ba3cb
describe
'35284' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCY' 'sip-files00106.pro'
4b66ef0a68d3b230c7ea7b4cefb391a2
d29f8c89a6d2ba61c35a99d2638c384fc861322d
describe
'29302' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYCZ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
f617b797b4b4a966ca41bccd226aec8d
73f326e97d13b0cc1ed0439f3f3f371315243df5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDA' 'sip-files00106.tif'
d45388353ff0679482075654c0b168a2
78b40f89aa6e5719040787116ebfb2930a3d43aa
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDB' 'sip-files00106.txt'
d1e30bb2b955d3d0adf77b75014766eb
3220fc63330f6968a9fc1227eea941d7831d8685
describe
'7631' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDC' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
82bafb9af17a1620271506a9929e358d
9104c06573b3b123160da6120bd4d91155c7d64c
describe
'756699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDD' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
2380b9b1ca19637dfe92f27df7be47b6
33ffc3d2c0bc5491ca355cced4c4053d456f5f4c
describe
'20906' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDE' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
f3828135c6d421a25674775b74fac4e2
042a701a57b10fe2876bb079df315eb248ecfd66
describe
'5087' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDF' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
f7564416a64e4824e40bd825defc9479
ad7c154e0e1d4955823b9b8abd847835ae6dfe14
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDG' 'sip-files00107.tif'
a6857abc6f3807a3f32657141012f5f1
ba50ecc7dbe5b86fcef9239471a0c4ef11f6a4d2
'2011-11-16T12:33:58-05:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDH' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c8d5e2525f4f335f5786594d72c9dd2e
ff382ee598d3868ef925cb4969cbbf9cd06ce65e
describe
'825238' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDI' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
9994b0560b09ff58285be51051268358
dfde2780802a53e364b029a7bd707f5bd6defd1f
describe
'113060' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDJ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
2ebdeb9d140296ae8de9dc43603c4fa8
9aba77178095e013d413228880ca3e23d835b4b7
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDK' 'sip-files00108.pro'
7fd49b40fce1367cb5d75ccf88ec1fe5
01f821c87f4dea5c5a3f7922264d191fb1fbe62f
describe
'30323' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDL' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
d6e604242c43a176b659776b70335e49
0e7c164c3adde32c008d6cba5b6765cd3ba59ee3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDM' 'sip-files00108.tif'
7db33e58fcc87e5d1142698f61aa0c5a
fe1081ab6fbdc6c34eaa49889ded031b7f23a90b
describe
'125' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDN' 'sip-files00108.txt'
ff5e886732305259e8be486c66303c17
9c4730adcb57e693a8b2b2f93c65569b1ffee39b
describe
'7353' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDO' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
7dbfc83757abf93249d30483d0a4e791
c85ff71cb1485607004b97dbed24a1f64dc3e338
'2011-11-16T12:33:20-05:00'
describe
'810076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDP' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
89290046abda4bb5a78556b1b775959e
e1333b78ee274020849fa9d8c2ec44cebd73d818
describe
'97620' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDQ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
85829493ff3d5f3f0afc47fc9ffddbd8
2f7ba57b2614c64768daf7607a9e3235f01acb47
describe
'39962' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDR' 'sip-files00109.pro'
74fb6146c9ff630b334a67cc3f815082
0db61b8e3bcdc4849886f5c769fd01a9a4ecbe09
describe
'33517' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDS' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
a07005a300b4dd757489ab8993b682d9
f3d05e852becf972d8eb3bf7c7e3042a9c9ffda7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDT' 'sip-files00109.tif'
83958fb498c36b034caeba23d1c88f15
8d2abf4309190b04dc4787e6dfd0a219a326fac9
'2011-11-16T12:35:05-05:00'
describe
'1664' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDU' 'sip-files00109.txt'
5b932c7b4409907be76565feb4bed976
342bb9a5b2b2871adaf86dfbbc87e8d8ed422c65
describe
'8243' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDV' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
2cafdd0d5ef718f9b9cd9ccb43fceaa5
25d98cc9b009c2005f8e9b1232a703ee61b48ecf
describe
'825293' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDW' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
88a7a9fd75b6c07ffb78ec7a45620e20
884ba54110d16124768a186c23e469b21318ca5c
describe
'89092' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDX' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
753cd908b6ecb1ba760c2cf7c1bb1f36
b899038c899075bcf0465b70f66c816de78c6a58
'2011-11-16T12:37:10-05:00'
describe
'38728' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDY' 'sip-files00110.pro'
2dce3a107da9d03abb3e32422cfe148b
5b94ad3c8eb8d723f23721fa79135ca6a4724898
describe
'31315' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYDZ' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
351be5e0633983afe7659e04c177806f
163cc7329194e17abf11ddb00a18612868c00f09
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEA' 'sip-files00110.tif'
bfdd09ec328ba1158f1b0b049a849002
6531d6384ff747a196169bc9c17f4a492bc3aa5c
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEB' 'sip-files00110.txt'
f8a1c8743e7f7cbcaab4b2bd17662d34
d63a5581d25d1a2b3ec942985e7a7b05ae67a876
describe
'7556' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEC' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
879fa3593cd0db9a6385e1392127a0e8
a1b0c5a35b5795df8ab8f5eea0f9bcb231771e76
describe
'810153' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYED' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
9e5826d515a6cad1d8cef3bce13f0c9e
0ef0f6c762f70bbc4c214c0ee5215e9454e8bb3d
describe
'87991' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEE' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
7d3b0b02eca8cce5bf69302368bb15a5
28e552ce557cc33393f8aa2df789c5ac62366e3a
describe
'37143' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEF' 'sip-files00111.pro'
c9695ddbcab5268508068dcc56b0508b
ed26bf6487902f2c993ec8cec5856b438bae4110
describe
'31588' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEG' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
7e8bea508286646436be17bed2eddf75
4e5b5733d7a925e45b1d4e61d611c3fa3ef2b235
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEH' 'sip-files00111.tif'
4f5b38dadf7be2cffb9ab75dd00e09b5
2c0846bea67b968a040173abea044db02573f7db
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEI' 'sip-files00111.txt'
0e69f98d13b8695e4a1667092e17bd4c
c1db7d2d407d453b09cbb92ce2806644919c9c5e
describe
'8009' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEJ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
69c17538fcf80918d4cad6a19f1db01f
a3ec1ccbd77179fea246d084ecb466cc0ddba473
describe
'800748' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEK' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
587b6051c88826360b6ff91a272a6780
5cc33029ad0d05a98fef2e8753b0cdfc2bb5a0a8
describe
'76516' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEL' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
7d23eba04da7d13286724eef10da2d53
b7d1c8bd916ca55a3fedd4713528d8b1ba44997b
describe
'30318' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEM' 'sip-files00112.pro'
ce33ce834d47928d98a23b48a0462418
581c913cc163a29d3fa6449d2c3a3c7edd8b831b
describe
'27959' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEN' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
6ec29d9ab9953f85aee92f02cb56a3bc
3092382397d5aa78bdddaaab2471026f5f49da3a
describe
'6413841' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEO' 'sip-files00112.tif'
6bf1466c713675c199b2eff62ca19108
c98eead06193e758a13dd82b7b7b0f1ebf5d7c7d
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEP' 'sip-files00112.txt'
429248b22b3dd2f476b2bb99a45c5ab1
a98485a026e25bb70c8cacb1092e6ab5f9a0e294
describe
'7606' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEQ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
41796e8c47820c123bd9e47a43e31729
fa9cbfc6baa8873c2094f0286c36da9a79342a61
describe
'799380' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYER' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
507f7f3519cd18920e7c2feef3beeb53
88cd487de08e4872f0830782cc5759bab0fb5013
describe
'91468' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYES' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
b7ace32cb3c7161785f35f9c1a8021b6
451cf25c79413819fa6e55387253bf072d7dcb0d
describe
'38104' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYET' 'sip-files00113.pro'
3b067f7b95955910b70f30a0afad4f1b
4d350bb583ca46ccb586e43e7c85c9ce963dec52
describe
'32814' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEU' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
6f150d0073d00e81228431e449c3aaa7
bd869999c19c0f1cc217ba0030b3276e973e8c30
describe
'6402945' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEV' 'sip-files00113.tif'
cc6651a852c6577bfd32ba6f480a931f
85169736e2a9dd81db4cd81ac8eb865ee1226c91
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEW' 'sip-files00113.txt'
f42372acbd8c94445fe7995896bcdbe9
c25dcf3f1768a3b9ce5bcf3012b914c5f2cd44a2
'2011-11-16T12:35:59-05:00'
describe
'8247' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEX' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
303e22779d0166eb92e55f8ba2f17831
32e54ff372d5101c6d8060155144534cacd29d2c
describe
'800813' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEY' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
ed4545c9fce8a860cb202179d91c80b1
c6983e011eb66be4cdf7357abf9e0c9cf0ef810f
describe
'77191' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYEZ' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
71676de7130c89c97cde77c8657d92a3
ef7c6046038fca9f73c387031cdf5e290ee6e7d9
describe
'30610' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFA' 'sip-files00114.pro'
d6e535ef1c2a1599abbc69d123ad43e0
8753039733693e8cda7e432bca9f5fb317a56fe5
describe
'27905' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFB' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
658a5508edb313fa4587ef6ea16ccb1f
437a574b954f105c1a341bd691ac4098f6174128
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFC' 'sip-files00114.tif'
67b7b7767d8e52a313ccf427f097c2ad
65fe35b96e37b82b06241f40a9c3381ded89d032
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFD' 'sip-files00114.txt'
1ca3b309dbdb4739e311d9eb9eb4c9aa
d93ac08ad7abff6c551ac10488123bae200c6ab9
describe
'7845' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFE' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
6bf52d4bfe76f50ab30a58089eefb363
7f6cb309a2f96d00cdac82c3cebf3d006a8bc70d
describe
'799431' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFF' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
daa53f10ae1d41499af1f943b588e7f1
f1d667a6e4d559feea88dfb4952cfe254cdc27db
describe
'83649' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFG' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
59086ff98be5929094f27c0ce305a0d8
0676797c9e1e96e32c02a1ecd43ee47ea114d8fa
describe
'33514' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFH' 'sip-files00115.pro'
58d756e4075745520e0161038307daa2
612e371abcca51389c53b9856b2ce4888d53126a
describe
'29588' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFI' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
97ccd7d47e668a8b9e84ab8a87ac2c89
f2ae4b4da2be0a430e791aa4647226f93a5d88ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFJ' 'sip-files00115.tif'
f62c37f8e0adb387703aeacb5ee583c2
5a54bad6a4fb5c1c1c61d6c3f09bf5c8b6822864
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFK' 'sip-files00115.txt'
99c748c7941eb391cb066678cef013d2
90a12914814f6866066b0b4c73fac65337a76a87
describe
'7875' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFL' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
826b8647f15410bda9ea87317702092a
19ebe8cf7f97fddb02a8759c3cc735e5287a7717
'2011-11-16T12:35:25-05:00'
describe
'800810' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFM' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
4769c2c184641bdc95d3db9f939ef892
da4666d99dc5bbd01ac619136743e83b63e82809
describe
'72790' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFN' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f089088622ce8c8ad51b8d3d0b36ad8f
30d91e39d1ba4b5b8e2df31cf8d0bb6bfc73044e
describe
'27742' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFO' 'sip-files00116.pro'
7818ba192663391cda3235ed09b3aa37
84cc78236fe03f88d94ed5116321714e64c8a35e
describe
'26244' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFP' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
9257c96e6dc4e54547285212ef766074
26bab36dc53627d3c46394b161e0eb95a976a502
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFQ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
e6fe70a300e55354902deb4f0ce19885
87f4ca2b36630a0b8716c4d57545785e7fef3386
'2011-11-16T12:37:37-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFR' 'sip-files00116.txt'
2b76fe25abbd4464b477d9db20e13b57
d9391288ee25f57b9d0488406bb0672b6a6f5d98
describe
'7502' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFS' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
5fc5d35ad0f05ccec5b8806eab9f9278
cb7726ea5dbf02def029b3388e84d5d119a970c1
describe
'799429' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFT' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
c9aeb7bd05bb01119668881ea2efdebd
cd0ee5446accea45932ce50c9fbbe7f7fea1c51a
describe
'80862' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFU' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
70c40aeed9d134f8450908dfbbaf933e
54f8607131b3b047f7801dc088d4de51fe930a3f
describe
'31579' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFV' 'sip-files00117.pro'
61c7b9be00f294e49953460f8b2ef01b
3ec7381d5b6c2393f192b3b9422284bcf2f344f7
describe
'29789' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFW' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
40f25628c8ed773c9f1d6fdd557976c3
eba5d4115d1b99e06b9b35678ddfb7dadde93a54
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFX' 'sip-files00117.tif'
b9dad7d27198cc789fc586651eb8a152
f0b93d3900186c73fc20d58542c730d520473351
'2011-11-16T12:38:08-05:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFY' 'sip-files00117.txt'
d6e46a035f42dd46f5ca07a94c869bfd
a58a5cf874491cd319b08b622e7b543059bcc206
'2011-11-16T12:34:43-05:00'
describe
'7955' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYFZ' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
adead3bafea633bef04d40a88bdfed53
72aff26d8bd4ea3ddf8ff2c8e4e0d384fc8b7146
'2011-11-16T12:36:35-05:00'
describe
'800812' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGA' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
56350efdbbc4a1374274e6f0a2d045ac
c5e2be3802ca927b5507c28a44c3a999c2f11761
'2011-11-16T12:32:19-05:00'
describe
'84789' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGB' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
2b610be390d0b65aa2de1294d63f5573
08485ef948ba3e2b208d526a4b0c4970d552a5ca
describe
'35890' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGC' 'sip-files00118.pro'
34c8699d3e7bfe37a719b22ac5ea3ab7
5ee19e78b48ae1b5d4b202a9a5733f9c5a79e8bc
describe
'29929' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGD' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
070f8806289401ccc19a556dc4a0bfd8
c1c7b3a42643c3530b2da62b3030b1fbb3fd593e
'2011-11-16T12:38:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGE' 'sip-files00118.tif'
7ca7264ffbf4aeb8f83de3586d573b44
8f57c0b11e0a39ceb644cc5809bc7a68fdac5c20
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGF' 'sip-files00118.txt'
36596dafc05362c5ff51f69e800c33b3
8c1d8e6a4b0f9d799877a1337d0f0f10246e24a5
describe
'8017' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGG' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
5559d56d4c0488b4a70414cdba2065a3
f8d729a2b0498772a1c38c9fdae40ae386a82af9
describe
'799399' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGH' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
9dea59a27b80e0cfaf91463c94135a86
2c326787e2466e8c4f9c597de456706b72cb2ecb
describe
'73782' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGI' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
584e703c913c46cedd53c6e06dfa8b63
95e43bce100b9ef48920f500c0b1c3470bf4ed3d
describe
'25832' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGJ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
3a153b1be65b296a5ac7129fa4d100c4
e6949d74e216cdfadb1e01ce112e0a6d42811fbb
'2011-11-16T12:35:08-05:00'
describe
'26913' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGK' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
f54708354fb5705fe16ac4c89c928cb0
e16df5539d6f8e581b51a8cb2f0ca41a435b7c8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGL' 'sip-files00119.tif'
78ca466f152cfcd4c53f98386edd3b3f
7206796274222ed0ad0318cc03e5051892100438
'2011-11-16T12:36:42-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGM' 'sip-files00119.txt'
9d8691393c6cc9e3f151711981ea44a5
0730f5e88a6c1ea386e54a9554d85aec89d5747d
describe
'7317' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGN' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
03dcf1253b76f0fe242bed2f4c86c492
ddd618210140ddb0da9b6627765f5e4dc5efe731
describe
'800742' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGO' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
ef0f9b1499f72d1791b683dbb841bdd0
3993495ff61fa3e855caa83588eff9973e87f03b
describe
'90035' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGP' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
ee793fd0d202698e994c56725260c660
ecf7d29f365ea45bfb58ea69ce4e85db11ae4d1d
describe
'36187' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGQ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
0f36a3644528c10b2abb02de7859d19e
2c484cdfde3d38ca8c3ce4e5c3e701bc49fa3f36
describe
'31719' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGR' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
2aefe322941616609211a40ba6291ab8
c4f360e6b9b19298fb183f9b03f1de66ce1efbd0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGS' 'sip-files00120.tif'
463500093d3d1b841d84b590f124e240
18fedd2f45f0e3cd9729265beb144e6b9e127546
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGT' 'sip-files00120.txt'
96fdb175002239b8985dcd33768dc050
a8c04e75b3c18554b873a56a4b5e7d7f73956c8b
describe
'8263' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGU' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
f24bff7bd2eeb19ccf36d39ab2c643cc
cb350109eb734a2733923903f994ecb367c3d4b0
describe
'799415' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGV' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
f8c9a2f62b701e774c4d80f52fab7bed
10e3d51fdd7b6785a64949faea7b2a44670a5c23
describe
'94326' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGW' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
a523c84e7378f8fccbf7f89af597567b
28ef2309793b7bbf46dc3d5cfb99d9e7270684b2
describe
'36398' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGX' 'sip-files00121.pro'
1ae652c2274269ba7418ae0fcb4340d0
8413fe279ec1448ffc83085162b829c01feaab57
describe
'33157' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGY' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
324ae0befdf9577fef10b4e5b517b51b
b26c0f7e1c1262495c9c6847774df90ed5be0046
'2011-11-16T12:35:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYGZ' 'sip-files00121.tif'
4f6f0b254bb7a44d940bebe6a40222a0
619ee7839925d92a10b7ec6c30ae2ca86e641b78
'2011-11-16T12:31:14-05:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHA' 'sip-files00121.txt'
66ba17009dde75e94f07dd02e2f868b8
38ce9b5652b090bd090cb0e2a47c94613e8bdfb3
describe
'8605' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHB' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
916bf0d3af08ceb8055c10615704d7c1
49ab5964ad4cbd4ea5c4718537aeb2254bfcc6ca
describe
'800766' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHC' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
860ac5e8df16a4dff65b3c7ba0e8ada4
3a66fe1ce05295767fef9767a79870160890ef3b
describe
'93429' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHD' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
473a5a783fdb9b8bfb6bfb7a4cd7cbca
fc85c4f80c1881185ae097b9a7a99df6f5922ca8
describe
'38299' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHE' 'sip-files00122.pro'
eaee16e224aa9369d193b8fecd836f64
acf2e60c34cc5a2e204d1821fee2fcc148dc72e7
describe
'33819' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHF' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
3a19650b8579b37c4858925b075db7ff
6d11203d39be0f8cc885abdd5a414ce45ad4a50c
'2011-11-16T12:33:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHG' 'sip-files00122.tif'
a5743d5327f1f46f50c2ce5476499ce6
c6e45f0b0a5b126311655c9384ca89f03246612b
'2011-11-16T12:34:45-05:00'
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHH' 'sip-files00122.txt'
c9e603a76d1e2d60d296932a32571e21
febc9ff4357863f4eb761164d994be25dbb55f8a
describe
'8300' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHI' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
50db793b4139893fb7fd5895a026aedc
9536059cb261c48cbb2e8e281a096074321b2df7
describe
'799347' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHJ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e71794e9aef39106c64ec7e7b721f706
42aa819ded4cc9a446ad0093896b53360615f8e0
describe
'91558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHK' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
cd7b094ce3635fd13f4e6bbd588a5b75
8fae1db60fd1bafd46d301b77f58365270ad9d2f
'2011-11-16T12:36:57-05:00'
describe
'36931' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHL' 'sip-files00123.pro'
78094b812e11cb8f3f6d7e9ea486c2ea
66ecd62f7f13e1b193af9a695c1e38fd9d3d4728
describe
'32157' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHM' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
fbebef30a963cb8596b932c94f639ee6
01711ffeb3b0431edd27544cc910bf9e1f42a531
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHN' 'sip-files00123.tif'
604d15e7336a345a3320453978ac64c8
7e13e35469b4c73873e3f1ae0248c66d96a32a6c
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHO' 'sip-files00123.txt'
52d88db9f42c4cf8fbf594bf901c44dd
9b03c101c74549db71ad4b6e711006fba4dcfe17
describe
'8233' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHP' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
f62cf435b88d9e0904d5c505afc8224d
a061879382d9e1693ee69812a06009e272e783b9
describe
'800794' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHQ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
2312bdfbfbbf74d584e625ac1fda5509
5645d7a5e0f43514b6b5ff41666b893d8c6274ab
describe
'93038' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHR' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
c375e17b54475b9807e2ba7a8e74f95f
227c2f89189c06a4c001701759c81b82ee9d8df1
describe
'37943' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHS' 'sip-files00124.pro'
583a4a72dc0f6b0dc374642cf0f65472
dc48c6effd35c66eb137abe6fd608ab25e1c0b0f
describe
'32309' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHT' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
4e792d23e8dd3708c01c0ed177caa67f
9a580f01b866578a39b191b5fa98e08400d2b7e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHU' 'sip-files00124.tif'
5821713c85cb93800e191c71b1262b0e
593031780a335c295d57498b421096e20bb5201e
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHV' 'sip-files00124.txt'
ad4fea66005df9d88f663a374be4aa98
b60a19e87072900657a949a4f760a45acf9c2402
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHW' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
1e0d8903b235aa2c12ced547b1f16b17
fe769e5e3c433160a544ecabd97569e38239b768
describe
'799397' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHX' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
fed3a4819125bc508bf5128972d67fc2
93ad99e73c61e22599d20ef9b515c02a90a2cf34
describe
'86908' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHY' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
f5f9cc407cb5333f3ba6f7c5cf7e4dcf
da5f15e6ae769951932c8f64d3f98df8a2b96388
describe
'33235' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYHZ' 'sip-files00125.pro'
f8dc7b03d135d36739fbcf5b09a61dee
ba7e1cfb72c36f94033b3b4a6360ea73fd11383e
describe
'30441' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIA' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
a3d9156797fdc0c9f80131fae9467043
cd3eb5774a3a04ab8116994d6a1d32303b1c873d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIB' 'sip-files00125.tif'
2026bbe2233dd4d9eedffb25b12b3089
81e41c6f60d3965f4d9e5aa29b88a677c0eba795
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIC' 'sip-files00125.txt'
0d7be60fdbef5dc884639b29f563c34c
23a5e9908160a32b3a7a4dd01228b85ac08080e4
describe
'8095' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYID' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
c35182329674f500d82510e8bc2caa94
fbe910062093606869cf44e43bb9457f17120510
describe
'800805' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIE' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
907731d018aeaf64c70036042e5553e7
3fae76567e541290258b3c703e07c135429504be
describe
'79592' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIF' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e6ffcbc0dcc4637058591b0c41083b37
fe19bb885b580f90f797d4f8cfdcbce419832c6b
describe
'30322' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIG' 'sip-files00126.pro'
b255e8a212903447a3f5fe4b475b90d9
36b6cff37a45e77b0c55d06cc45c52d2a3965a3e
describe
'28154' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIH' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
0ee9c8047cb2850d29b86c6ed858cf46
d5c1f04e38db92466ef1c749a2f3633f790681cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYII' 'sip-files00126.tif'
27ed5b5faf0c79ba601991d9b1b9bb1a
1099c74bcdd09ecd9b554a1b7da3593041dfcb6a
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIJ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
ff71dac6eaf9c82dcbb3273ca9dedd23
b8ea5cba993cd3997fa0be19abd2379971fde539
'2011-11-16T12:34:51-05:00'
describe
'7431' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIK' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
7320f9338facb8d3f252e5b18d169efc
15264a2e4c2d6200016f56be003985a1599c006e
describe
'799451' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIL' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
375234dfa925e4bc812d576c39d76573
d30d773967a16645692fcaa0123e939952160610
describe
'74335' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIM' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
94f5e362fe69b7fdf3b3bca260e3eb39
555bd66cbb19b0c6fb67313a4f4f4e42ca0736cc
describe
'27328' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIN' 'sip-files00127.pro'
3f1d018129aa8e8e99adace29765b65f
943b51eda38ae8f29481e6550df1bfdab6e8e186
describe
'26015' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIO' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
4e08e915270f1b90479c2f4463515adc
5884ef89d9ad54d2d4104123e8489457d3723d50
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIP' 'sip-files00127.tif'
23221e65b4589f2cd6b16cefa6c4d23d
5ce166a271d1028e1919b588efff5192a5d36ac9
'2011-11-16T12:36:40-05:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIQ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
e9dbca3aa2ff14ba01702559a50559a8
99b053d568d48c01c4964f648d8890b85ad741c0
'2011-11-16T12:32:34-05:00'
describe
'7357' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIR' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
02e4b263ebf0f014b891da334df57b51
c0ead09c43a3bbeadfea9370ea25e10fa8bb875f
describe
'800780' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIS' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
f630fac19977b302847fee243d1806f4
22009e807d601c89b12dc1e968aa5921c3ca3161
describe
'94668' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIT' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
cf3ea5df4a22a23628cb2f9cac4edf71
119a9be4fa3ca3bf2ad1b9e8cfe49b087087d3b1
describe
'39229' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIU' 'sip-files00128.pro'
9b06edc7b426b620c4e0eca4c91703d3
b884e3ad052b133022c0478d52ad7b4992690ea1
describe
'33234' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIV' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
869ed44af0448a85fc3b473352a25dd8
b3d9814cbf5b62199f75116c5bc5fd8283f588f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIW' 'sip-files00128.tif'
cbbcf8edfe80ac60881bdedc425fb4d0
d6880afec4d90aef54f93c3cc287869c32aab08e
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIX' 'sip-files00128.txt'
def6253c9781b8bde4e7f88be175b943
ac619929a2f1da1a1f73ae231cb7e7be153f44bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIY' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
280ea03c8722fa7dec06d546a8ec79ec
7bf9a3f299d129a2273f5e7e1883c0e9a8647496
describe
'799411' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYIZ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
ce98a121f8cb29ac119ae198e145f5c9
a1ccbe93fb6f6b1d72954f12c47b19b055e19107
describe
'83472' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJA' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
2a8e1fa203fe264a7e780ef850349f5d
02ddf17940bf56db6f914d698529fd9e0def3cc7
describe
'29223' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJB' 'sip-files00129.pro'
e2dbdd5601bbbdafe2df1184d310066d
42723f0485bb89500ef588e4d8e5b9f6e89da9b5
describe
'29209' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJC' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
a4b678f34cae967a56f958f3a0217fb3
618418e45915c90f91653e47d44c84b231ee52b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJD' 'sip-files00129.tif'
930ce956d3ed1a27cc5a07bae9ad6e38
54d3b790726aef72bb769b3e1fb73d2650d89ba1
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJE' 'sip-files00129.txt'
b7141690bf6f7b3604b44e138545ce91
fff118741878c67a0bfebb0134e8c451724a07a0
describe
'7748' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJF' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
d4e9c01e70c8d25ff5208bbe5e0d2d86
ccffc16622372b8d8a5bd3abb1d9e4176a106613
describe
'800799' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJG' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
8eb1ffb2756a0941819a9a4fda8d2a8f
4b198e2029f590c0afac7bfd46c95a6e23e11112
describe
'76854' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJH' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
346ccb502828e8f1415de643df52d9ab
9872d9380e3dbdd637171f72b74a46723e0fe866
describe
'30668' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJI' 'sip-files00130.pro'
0c6198965cbde5f4743b58141ce952ff
61bd45b368888be4a29a0b256949759ba49c085a
describe
'27962' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJJ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
74192860a66150ef4f44e7db9ce27614
4a35ad18bef83780744a8ff5b8e81f7042900aa6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJK' 'sip-files00130.tif'
6a6d88ea41d06a636b4614bb7816083e
549a8726e0840b4cde480828c76136e8cdeef206
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJL' 'sip-files00130.txt'
448691838ee01acd16301d298f3af49a
7610900b3f06fc55b347462172e8fb8d0c8306d4
describe
'7585' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJM' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
bea65cf19bfed2c6789e63b910680ab0
36c1a026663bd912918bdc97b60e186ed9d17ac1
describe
'799436' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJN' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
ab642864d3e86a9bb21b0e71e966abd8
8a4a184ffcb5da3e796555f9c7b3afa1cc66841d
describe
'95626' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJO' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
8890493ab64544650eb95c4992809352
9d172087e906d928885831d460a9851ee82eb67e
describe
'39595' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJP' 'sip-files00131.pro'
5d028980ee762e4a5c2b501b2ddc3f0c
4e91f27358c52403553de52a02b930346ed6f8c8
describe
'33898' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJQ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
7b2b689b1d0eaac02c3a54cf3c9c180d
11c7a08930efe183d419038003c8f8ab9d555542
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJR' 'sip-files00131.tif'
8445b46eefc93aa97bcf7b3a395fed06
dbd4dd15a630f5d227f57d5ed74881dd8a1fe384
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJS' 'sip-files00131.txt'
e5134fb8cd61ef605df0f8a85e490190
58475743f108da476754dc3b5935025c7ddcb405
describe
'8554' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJT' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
751535d2b2a7b883bc6989941622d7f8
e460f85b9d4acbe191e00383c4f5b7a090decdc1
describe
'800722' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJU' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
f798c0eca95d83abaf8f1c6c661a1b57
126aa96c65032316108139bce5a3878f5593427c
describe
'90992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJV' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
bf2ce17be6de9f198fd53d93adcad78f
2fcfd6b632104b32729f4ff8a5f63b6eaaef2c33
describe
'37423' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJW' 'sip-files00132.pro'
51c923f20747163a47d81aa794308d42
88fd6a88d6cb6dc0856816b8ce9ca754a1f9abaa
describe
'31940' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJX' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
e1e11eae8e09e4109c340fd743f3d568
0706f71a888a9fd1aa81eeef149f31da27b68848
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJY' 'sip-files00132.tif'
aa0129c545f03454926836f5e235cce7
3fb1321814fb705f67cf923f551a48f11e56c3f6
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYJZ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
afc9e7a750663f9db41652fe47c80606
219dac7917668608b86f463c66c25c8b24d668d0
describe
'8283' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKA' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
a5fe6a92ce8cf830618fb80b8b752b25
5af0875f9665c54cfdc83dff9dfaccdc4862283f
describe
'799384' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKB' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
e469d88b7b263b9c2d2bc27092e7774a
6147585ff5a61e4a255c1292470012417048c861
describe
'96460' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKC' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
8edd96bd5e0f87b5c722337283d15ca4
9a434d88390e129c077854b1028f211ecb7164b6
describe
'37715' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKD' 'sip-files00133.pro'
cd85d259918825a56b67446544be6abd
b29daee82f88b7cf6a6dcd678a612d4e2a30b5da
describe
'34024' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKE' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
2673387dfec8ca584959ea9a0ec00091
f5555053c7b5d09d16e6296a3b1f81e421665768
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKF' 'sip-files00133.tif'
6dcd0071195151936bf08c3f22891258
cf2b45bd347f7509a9ac18861dd2c85c8d74507f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKG' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d2b9627299c658cb596c740e9292044b
9a0eabf2672f8269c558e74ed5731d375d95cb6a
describe
'8421' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKH' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
ae1cfbaf3b39c232e3b77c050ef1a1e4
f5ff9c585242a4626118750356f1dd5171c4be97
describe
'800821' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKI' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
25197dd3b1f9602cf7536931f1f6a35c
801f05811e8f03f230157405bf16b69e479aa86b
describe
'91848' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKJ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
2379a1ef46164620ceca2def31ec9685
7304ffd412ffe691eebc080bb210db99c7f775bc
describe
'37347' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKK' 'sip-files00134.pro'
ae1d9b0b7c5202c7e2f201a65b305b3b
f36a761873be6e3556f046cb13b1c6e2f12873b4
describe
'33419' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKL' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
82725cf536979c79cfcd4be6aab58cbe
9d50ca3aa557dc22540105f78f697d48925d17d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKM' 'sip-files00134.tif'
03426a516aaea8bd6f0e5b64d416c964
8b79ebe8b8b989d3779fa12a1d24952711dcf873
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKN' 'sip-files00134.txt'
362c56abcfe832b79a09789ac8609f9a
9b117911023c44cf3be533092ec8e457cca03c01
describe
'8463' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKO' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
e5cfc3e6e1cfba86a847b817cb913188
eb35e9832f33454807158a1859b759713458af5b
'2011-11-16T12:35:18-05:00'
describe
'799433' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKP' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
dd99d6b1ac3c5c85c0c50ccab2271701
24f41ba63742ee682e5e5a7abb73492d889e93bc
'2011-11-16T12:36:24-05:00'
describe
'80489' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKQ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
76071cfe6002f409bf6a4008c2840d3c
dbbcd5304d41ade0823579030d0ea7edd48a072b
describe
'30992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKR' 'sip-files00135.pro'
6a90625729462267729226a1de257a5a
fc89e347ce44224c535f85730943b83dd848f831
describe
'28317' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKS' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
4cf8aecf6517755f67ad028dabdf80e3
8587e035024cfdc1456ee0f77d86e503c13b3f26
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKT' 'sip-files00135.tif'
22eac3113456c1b9063b40be968506c0
f387dd1b8c13e98d82b9f3d31956ede0d220c880
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKU' 'sip-files00135.txt'
ca0625350a03e9b8109e4d3127bc960d
708b63fe7a7fd49d439cfd31927849f981843a6d
describe
'7440' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKV' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
bd8438427384481fb40946b30ca00347
9de2c7be92e6a40e40951ac2a8f7391739921b52
describe
'800713' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKW' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
c8597c9fe27a5c91e09f1bbb0210f7fc
27b3cf6458b664138abbc2b7d5504a9204c982b2
describe
'80170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKX' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b72bb2d792763965a883d0eb6ccce324
72ad8933adc53ed4d08c30fe8706f45d0f12c349
describe
'18130' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKY' 'sip-files00136.pro'
e43734b0d850b1dafed717fe953f5a62
022a4ce908ecb459aba134f051eb4f0a099e9f1f
describe
'27495' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYKZ' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
7650aacf6667b7b30adf4ac24f0da386
af63bde2cb6300dc1b51218556b6388836568864
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLA' 'sip-files00136.tif'
88678fd1dea27c8a258422b75e97692f
c1c941052dc4c8203b05e52a98f1687677a5318a
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLB' 'sip-files00136.txt'
90725d40d7e45728922f3bab815c1b37
7c0faabddb26fe071be0d1881a4e8153d005e43a
describe
'7493' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLC' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
b196304f562959ddb998076fb2e3789a
d279c82e34c764adebf9dcd45cf17252fd296d6d
'2011-11-16T12:31:41-05:00'
describe
'799379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLD' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
cb50173c7f6f1ac81e0b1a2eba69c22b
ab2d693304fb72490c5cb7f683aeb7baa74e40d1
describe
'85520' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLE' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
8d821f27ba017734d4af5c7012c0b636
9d2b25c46b45938e0f19385d756427cd8d13dd87
describe
'33165' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLF' 'sip-files00137.pro'
cfbf120091c38c0cab96ca160937a16d
44e8b4a67b36473d953e85ed0e802a0d565f794f
describe
'30289' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLG' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
da1eb111ef08f4c1fa0587a300654209
d7c760a18961bfc096a474140145b8cd75ef71f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLH' 'sip-files00137.tif'
d9b91cd99fc9437a69f2284691e5b83c
6fad12e931c462a70ea6cb2a80acf8845c96530e
'2011-11-16T12:37:47-05:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLI' 'sip-files00137.txt'
5b80bc3b79e8b3f8ee64e8edfe75a22d
90e32323217738f730b85aa5f21ed50db2c53bee
describe
'8141' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLJ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
ff54f3ee97ec57e6f14bf8d348eadd3c
276f2eb5f574c82fd737ad85909fc5e7e7955295
describe
'800737' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
e7e772df44e3d5453deb2ead316528d8
cfc5f8fac227de0b03c4c7fa82290b3b6df07a98
describe
'89474' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLL' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
77c49689d9b1e24be9da9d121a8bdd88
68f1a76adfb494482708c6bb6f30c94d037baa3b
describe
'36637' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLM' 'sip-files00138.pro'
d85cc1de85a7fe0953e27bc47b34d149
1d8f7544054d5eba5a8433167640d23da80e53c3
describe
'31433' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLN' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
ec05b3512b8e49ffa44669a2b8e60b1c
83e74d5e3aeebea3ddb5681cc15d1058807cc479
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLO' 'sip-files00138.tif'
62bd1bf47b02785bde6407802f3ec8f0
1d455603bcf0b62583a047ebbdff2dbc83b3df79
'2011-11-16T12:37:39-05:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLP' 'sip-files00138.txt'
d4a4af11db8ae2fa065a80650a2c3e87
8a3a36eb06dd524b210f99a414ef7ea072f0545b
describe
'8210' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLQ' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
96c64beeafb573750f8e8957249bcc68
3637aea51cd1c068d1819edf44763840ec25a709
describe
'799406' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLR' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
612d72480b5a5f291045abfb4eed34db
e14a28a7284cb93459fba20f86450d807aedf42f
describe
'94550' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLS' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
011e61fdd8e8bd8dba23f51e21af9840
d54155c46c3a12a26c7d9a702a14d2a698397894
describe
'38746' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLT' 'sip-files00139.pro'
88eceb27678e46d46354d48be7823c0b
2cbace56131acaf6b8eefbbcd73c033aa40b3978
describe
'33239' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLU' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
3f5239bb192f6d309ebd573318cf31ca
8b6a72de6787a05bf3fae6a35a3be97b5c5f4bbb
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLV' 'sip-files00139.tif'
da2fe57379a533c950fafd690b7424b7
b7e587f88663d0461daa29c69ec648a5ce3cc0bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLW' 'sip-files00139.txt'
7c219bfad5f179a0d9a841fe94468af5
e1ac449beb793a58add51c37b5256a7c29602d18
describe
'8295' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLX' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
66fe9305dc4bd128146b98fd2d07b95e
eb3f16fa60575aafe7050a09cf1528f1a6957771
describe
'800808' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLY' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
2efd6b32473cbeab5620a4dea10fab79
e7cf6bbc067d0c46fc09c91620fd63f11187e342
describe
'90794' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYLZ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
ee42f54df0413d0361a9b3a5d2bc66a7
216205ff64917283cdb19d59be42abb8ff7e971e
describe
'34468' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMA' 'sip-files00140.pro'
21f46548723ec16c62ae0eff4c62daa6
daf3483f59781b60628d44ac6d8e7f8d591c29fa
describe
'32897' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMB' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
827fbb4bf2af0dfc3abb638d16e01351
a85191e21aa9f9dffde90bac0755ddc3c579d1df
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMC' 'sip-files00140.tif'
be0f6fb0c47f447cdca0a2b6c0c52b76
87e7d54d2a54e395c97dcde0ce6d5613b6e63f8e
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMD' 'sip-files00140.txt'
f4534533397b45699a89ad716bc22bce
3f04a9bd0cd7226c5caca23ecc183883e65a5355
describe
'8629' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYME' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
3515cb8457fd54edf621738b8a590db3
8c0f4db06cfb95e70082c130a09e07df12c0d77a
describe
'799420' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMF' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
f88373040af5c3351b8e5721fe208330
9ba815d58998b1629a89d18e2d6a2f80912672b9
describe
'85009' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMG' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
6702afecf6c6aa5ae7bd86df1a2fe97c
ac65ad3f970b78002e571e586745fc61842c3764
describe
'31929' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMH' 'sip-files00141.pro'
5c526af06f760e99f95bad5fce6743f2
63ace7b0d640194752ecb0ba93f60caba70c992b
describe
'30909' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMI' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
a963a3e0c9a30efadfb7ab8cb32235be
1f84dd4fc245a46e38be6460d55a9eef8bd5b256
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMJ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
1dad0e63001bf0a73ebdf80c971289ed
cb85ed154d665d085e0282fd664f0c2bf25f62b0
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMK' 'sip-files00141.txt'
918825b7fba63c95a25c5d27b817a676
46cd0a769d6545902fe184ccc05af8dfb855c709
describe
'8191' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYML' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
a46dc6adfc7d4638c57420f9a4149823
08cdef1467e28a4206dee51ac4bbb5ec9915fb84
describe
'800806' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMM' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
e35a2cb64442bf51a8a405afda2e1275
2218a3a06d375e83a52f7b5c0b2b098c61283f06
describe
'78525' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMN' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
7f549b5c2925aee276ec546502bf03e0
83e5210bd252a65d9c10537ae3e7a83a018aed79
describe
'32097' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMO' 'sip-files00142.pro'
4639a50d003c622a4dcb92edbd29a2b1
97776148106619f26094934b42ed6fa01fb5b3e7
'2011-11-16T12:37:51-05:00'
describe
'28059' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMP' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
56bfe0698133a11d0515500696fa9f69
0dacc48d898570a558322d4087dbc97b6b42e495
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMQ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e47b6e451506866d9c2e6b97a7ccb403
7ba768494b19c52afe35e87569e042a61334d85d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMR' 'sip-files00142.txt'
88e3fd81d1636fba69593ca428bb725e
656118943ea7f2994bd9860f1312b735028f904e
describe
'7379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMS' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
724ed560bdbd8dc5e3a010e97c39e400
60e3a93fe6535ca42709f7f1873dda2e63660467
describe
'799343' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMT' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
1fa76fa92cab071868ca80538d139818
1864b26230fcf9e81adee2a54ac1345d3e46ce16
describe
'90541' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMU' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
8ccee588c329bda57c5f8408f9929b60
aba10dcd442cd481a1270fac0955bc11c0ee9cf7
describe
'36649' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMV' 'sip-files00143.pro'
0d8a5a7ed253a14780ab6a62c1367d61
159495b7cc4e21f8680dcdf0ffab506ed01b0704
describe
'31893' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMW' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
ff5de10250de0ce1a207f1f896a12434
d7b0bca33d87c2fbe8c639384e0cc3b52382fe83
'2011-11-16T12:34:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMX' 'sip-files00143.tif'
ae977ecc7d1c2fd07a8fe6f799d68c89
639b0e633e695b0a30899321aea41e8bc91bcda6
'2011-11-16T12:33:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMY' 'sip-files00143.txt'
f5071e8d73d4c179a24ec73dfdd6ac4c
d0ef855278738a43170ae1ed182381db30f8102e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYMZ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
6db85b973e3bd87bbfe08c444bd3e728
b70083d0c4a7acdc3d141d168f6756321a476247
describe
'800795' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNA' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
d52e3a539cd3ae20d40628c2e101da9e
76800c382695dd1a40d95e652a0be13905b9ad19
describe
'75992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNB' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
e274935eee4ebca9d804e20aa82aae96
6584a491c37f62845d9a412b8a6d08fd2454f98f
describe
'29957' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNC' 'sip-files00144.pro'
c0deaf2d9223d2bdd86038dff3c73a2b
ae7fbbf4d729c95b65c5eae2cf40c2bc705594b2
describe
'28303' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYND' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
c49ac218938783500feea68249eff498
8b9ad8ebd60537ce0cd579148d54beedb5561ad1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNE' 'sip-files00144.tif'
02ab2313ae8907dafbab5930bfc5aa85
b36465e2d0972c4b92c3d2e633285a8d7a2977ef
'2011-11-16T12:32:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNF' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ffd805e5d04dc43a91d469f68b0f1329
376ce05c78d1fd17664a53dc16af70e339b39dc8
'2011-11-16T12:33:28-05:00'
describe
'7837' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNG' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
b6c9c87b1de366934f52241adb83dc04
75ea51383a662a32ee8fc58f5af3a26d0c98009b
describe
'799419' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNH' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
168d68309f1c08dd8e38b09088b4caef
aa37ae1118df0c2c904b999645e3bb1e067ed511
describe
'95568' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNI' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
65ec13b9542868f10b9b72faa3af8040
9e0b3c3797489b6805fbad77938859d5f504426a
describe
'37963' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNJ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
0169ed9385144381d6979e8b32a7de20
d97e15618e60f123e1c170240bc97fe9b20a697b
describe
'34121' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNK' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
962dfd296d68868eabac5f6dee0b23fc
773f6082e5bb50180d0cd6c3d72ab497f3940107
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNL' 'sip-files00145.tif'
337afaf0d3fcc1d7f7f2779edd877513
133016aadda7ccbd5da75afb9e368e3fdef7cb95
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNM' 'sip-files00145.txt'
52b925481e1a9a7966491edc87df7d08
cfddc3a327d14f7dc387dc3f80eaa9f0640ab599
describe
'8885' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNN' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
d617b82f9f86c404e17821ba9752bd28
9f889fde282b1cb4687829ea6b415276c793c879
describe
'800774' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNO' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
bc8a9f2fda0e3728bb29821181a0d4ed
dcb2a86d4b57acfa110d314a0a646552bbd05816
describe
'89985' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNP' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
a426785fc300f8c861aa4e4deb18fef4
7ccf7d0be451c6610c272f168d5c6933f04cd8b6
describe
'36691' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNQ' 'sip-files00146.pro'
125703321021cdc3269e74ad11d85f2f
dd407df57f092ae064381aae728dffca1416d7a8
describe
'32342' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNR' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
1bdb5024ed7443547389e9ab3f74df2d
dc30a11d1a5b97f6d03f5c0a101b4bfce80db396
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNS' 'sip-files00146.tif'
12b8a52b77b2f657db3a99bdef2eb839
244fc06755dbd52007f25ba7285c840b7f5af20f
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNT' 'sip-files00146.txt'
f0f5a3750f63674ac849511f684d3673
30d8288beafdd2658a1d3817ce8878f209248281
describe
'8396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNU' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
87fc27521c3e6cf582602391315c05a5
fa5ebffb8084b997bb6e4f1d71bbfb90aa27f250
describe
'799370' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNV' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
b50715c573410ddee3ffbb6ccd038425
fe6931a1e161d9397b3f8c07853c9efc5b8260a1
describe
'88235' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNW' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
69b24c3677bf56c6aefe787621cc0525
111418bb0213521c5eddaaacb9eb26f6e168d538
describe
'35301' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNX' 'sip-files00147.pro'
3f1b5496ffed1e6b77f8964ff51bb4d3
fb84a91431a804f56fbc363200e769ac8f0eb388
'2011-11-16T12:34:33-05:00'
describe
'31211' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNY' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
802adb4974055b02dfac21e24f0065e3
2ee4d9630f8e0eabefc6875b4ec3ec8412f5c377
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYNZ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
9703574a0855d09bf0b84eb1161860ed
beeca7aef81b6ed5511ac70c212817391dacff0a
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOA' 'sip-files00147.txt'
84d3d9d1d49a87c3f10b7009ece99c90
eae27681a1afd013ebb7dc87ddc93a7ddcdd4bc9
describe
'8001' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOB' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
1a4cb0367eef58241823b7b9bbe6b017
4d242c52f0609551f06f0914c7b88cc15be65d39
'2011-11-16T12:36:14-05:00'
describe
'800803' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOC' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
873146fde2b9299cdb6a7837714762fa
b417ba02db4f9f4777407b4b87e6fbdb193a388b
describe
'83056' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOD' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
ed90844f8a05a1721d17b45085cbe0c0
50d3f3c8be04938122b6b16a17ad2228eb052584
describe
'32034' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOE' 'sip-files00148.pro'
8ca7d60d1217db23ec86f4da54db21d0
a0f35dca741026b788d2ac14b63085008f15ea57
describe
'29070' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOF' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
f931810a1806de1235902886d8bf1160
9a3b7c909c2d78005d80e5367fae3556dfee1c7f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOG' 'sip-files00148.tif'
750c7961c76616524a62421e4f1246a9
63994cb15ad28c6e1eb65a26eeb53f37dbdc054d
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOH' 'sip-files00148.txt'
729cf7a854f9f8e5498fb4bc7ff177b6
ab891f6cd926d63ff1e4dcfa01a3c75d73ad9cd0
describe
'7853' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOI' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
2b0f410ff63b452cc2253603ba660893
647e89c697c8fc50f7f51ec80d14e1a025fc702f
describe
'799423' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOJ' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
b839361a9cdfe604bb5f508ed5322510
9ce6df58587db51ca34fa5abadadfd17d82b9509
describe
'95904' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOK' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
2d48690f9dcfa6f30ce0150fa3e978d3
982b2ce898f527438a902dfcdf392783ad4c1651
describe
'39524' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOL' 'sip-files00149.pro'
ccc7f6f04c1416d6df820c503effcedb
457ca68d4353d51082e4933bb952d6f075c87815
describe
'34419' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOM' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
c122b8c69ecd818c05ba4af70864d886
1bbf71e54efb39bbca83e593d5c1c26480ffdbd7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYON' 'sip-files00149.tif'
04b09a3f47f8b2752de2b34b7a16baa9
1da534d5682fb5a3e0802d52c024aacf7b6d85cd
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOO' 'sip-files00149.txt'
126d381db6028889143841c013e50e77
c1be64c90b5a295cc240f28ed80c314f1c455413
describe
'8596' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOP' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
8c7aa0b784374a441495be15303cf554
4e9ea42993bd5e3ab324c81fc0e80c91fc2713c6
describe
'800817' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOQ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
56b3d4f05f537e799d3269f2bf8f1e6f
9e476c96e13f9fb5542493e3e0173d95a95bdd53
describe
'92708' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOR' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
d1b87a112c1ec01936da3bb6162d179b
b4db43a4520e6342d78574b19c312e09ea19c1d4
'2011-11-16T12:35:15-05:00'
describe
'38608' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOS' 'sip-files00150.pro'
7128289f792c38a6724ff2ffc186ea30
1bd5e611d320af8c37afd7d16b7632aad6732315
describe
'33273' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOT' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
b43da22444ea2d5580a2cc365b024681
3ce15124f54a86a578a87d616693819e3a4906d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOU' 'sip-files00150.tif'
7887ccad14ac5473eea2d9c536e5b5b9
ea27cf5f1ea9057803e29eed90e3fa32ea8456b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOV' 'sip-files00150.txt'
cfd21e940ae4233cc175c45223a88371
e4e8b401989cdca6c885597d836a0fee063049e9
describe
Invalid character
'8508' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOW' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
fc9ee8f593c8d10771238fcf73d0775d
fdb04e51c300a79f2b5b48f7cc5cb94440873e1b
describe
'799452' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOX' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
0ffe87182a5157406d35efeb7bbebb99
365a97e3012fdb912ff9773e146fff7c716089ce
describe
'84318' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOY' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
0a4d0b0a234ccb1c86971573d927f600
91e4d2a551f3a4420f9249ba802b11fc3301846e
describe
'33339' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYOZ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
9293b454c47f24b733179e3b67ac58b2
735f818182015ada084592e802dd5cbb665624bb
describe
'30268' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPA' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
f49f770e47d565562fad8a1c6fbedd04
85d55822420188d6fd3142fb0ca33a06f64ee117
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPB' 'sip-files00151.tif'
d5c0942af04c8808e3d19bbeceb05499
d3374b1355109bcd67c1e517046f6774b2f06861
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPC' 'sip-files00151.txt'
015560fd428a213bcc4d47dc14d192fc
9e98a4897ef0448b02473b4091b6205432d2f5f7
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPD' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
bc6df851fdec85f2e81a61c2f9036c91
6bb010dcf298b36d4c3985d562b139699b385ebf
describe
'800818' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPE' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
59469daecabbea93f7d427d67f3b56f0
6c6200d86d0e863e7f0b8e03f1552b3ef259f6d4
'2011-11-16T12:34:42-05:00'
describe
'76610' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPF' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
32d901e75a965e771b208d34edd46b68
f223159afa58874ac80dfa3bbe60255feef8c30a
describe
'33053' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPG' 'sip-files00152.pro'
a421e09dfb0d942553b7103e869a2d19
082f83a5a7a9a9ad165c8f5be189c418a69d8eb3
describe
'27102' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPH' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
abc18b6973ced6d6323be7c2072750a2
a069c12f262ab3ee5bb8554904788b29468345cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPI' 'sip-files00152.tif'
defc3c7bf886d2273dcd7a49a1bb280b
da740238f21fb3928e76cea474d63be2bed82110
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPJ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
33e0ebcc612357cc92c2a023f19d1e86
c6f635e620bbced30e2046e7735cb6c350d35ce0
'2011-11-16T12:37:07-05:00'
describe
'7234' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPK' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
17695e384b6f84e532c4af8079134ba0
2741efffedf226d5b4c408b65a783687289eee96
describe
'594625' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPL' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
eddc1af55b8061b64acb9b74c3f8fbe1
8df664115bd91e3d9f1fea03fc9f158480675dbf
describe
'14992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPM' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
421e10a344fdc60f158d713e8859599a
86c81cc7a88cc9272fe5985438a98df62df29eb6
describe
'4178' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPN' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
b9115966d7aae949edee7656ef222ed9
b1cb40fa9b869c77c4b675a59c7aff75cbb495a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPO' 'sip-files00153.tif'
907542d89a168f4df72776243b5be673
b1b9d6d4d99194312176160ec758aadab86734e5
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPP' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
3fc51df9124da8a5a686281b93ede90b
0002e47c5b3334cfe6df77929c82b18570fba1cb
describe
'800701' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPQ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
19e9d5021bc037309923180a28d4318b
3aaa0fc184fe5ad1617da8bbeeea1475328ea9d0
describe
'86712' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPR' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
bb8ff8ee33279a54e90d0c8df29d093c
6d681ffb968b4d7941063891d24a1c94c84fb466
describe
'25777' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPS' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
115f55683b26a33a6103f38c0a1c5acd
90352a8b42698b648f3cd53980f52da3d2422ced
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPT' 'sip-files00154.tif'
a6b3ff3d78ad13e30bdae57ace5f25ca
41f3a5ffcc2e9a0292bb88b952daaf3b25374da2
'2011-11-16T12:35:17-05:00'
describe
'7184' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPU' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
0f37b1b1a9c7f1ba18e8b9d454b4824d
cd1d31e2af3a44f4df06ea7b2260c9bca11568c4
describe
'799443' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPV' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
4a827cd97aebb141e5f9931e97f16f1a
933f6b05408f3e9dd474241081af4b5f8d917521
describe
'94556' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPW' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
3d178e18a662e8781bbda812e3c0a4f7
2c6009116b7378708b6e90d95ba31bc60fa2a254
describe
'37496' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPX' 'sip-files00155.pro'
7f128a3a84caf92d5a7dbf6f507901e9
2fd54cc2be65fffc882f583301dcd9f5fb62447f
describe
'33208' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPY' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
dc2a6e11e2dde00e2b75c42b7630632d
a9710911099f3ca747a7343d061dd52a481efac3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYPZ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
a06125ed912f0160cf9a2c12664ffb51
02387ca25ef69210b5b00820dd6c20d77bfcc721
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQA' 'sip-files00155.txt'
0819d393fb0faf411b34a90790144385
ef1329b8293536fc6fe4014e7b5bb78d1fd1243e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQB' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
86753cfd301c4c49429f18dcda987a6e
3770bd18dc391c3c3c26f7addee9ccaa53f712d5
describe
'800801' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQC' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
5ec1e59f63937ddc3a3c923292b72be7
bef8cdbb8f12721b942b1565b81358385fd90a99
'2011-11-16T12:35:28-05:00'
describe
'85417' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQD' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
087cd8b6873bcffc2070582d40fcb012
157f907f360adbe92456a4b01602b0bb790a2995
describe
'34555' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQE' 'sip-files00156.pro'
e4671be269537d3507ff9e2ab62f52b8
c4cc8ca0bf58968c8c3ea55c0c0f47c8fa8c849f
'2011-11-16T12:34:39-05:00'
describe
'31042' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQF' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
c7acf19b8bffa7b8cc09bd8b179c0bb8
2963a934e21e575dea01dbf3e995bf1c22426943
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQG' 'sip-files00156.tif'
e8bdfe2e148aecb12051ee9fe5f33c8b
f7c5e9325f915861e0b5b1cd32816261ffd6325f
'2011-11-16T12:37:46-05:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQH' 'sip-files00156.txt'
64bb1df3e7dd6cb2cc00aba12ec0ad7e
39de98630e9e8a59c69d8be89a45adef23fed8b5
describe
'8245' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQI' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
4453dc0898f78a60006c9bc4ffae8efe
42f82a0e88257e91d5b2588e5a036df46666af31
describe
'799395' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQJ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
e1e8d3ffb1e1559161c863b6162185cb
0edd0833843e64a7e8fc2254b394d5d9a3d5be5f
describe
'87708' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQK' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
b010ca87b912a1821050990f23a5a358
9bc1b436f24ea622db3cbf48251f75065af624ef
describe
'36502' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQL' 'sip-files00157.pro'
3273f590b2a9767da6c1281e3a025f34
dbe61e20c961faccdede8576399e56ea451c7f34
describe
'30516' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQM' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
6576a28745e26abe443ce7705633d78e
343033dd6af01ee00e4cf772d1520d8af2ea8ad0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQN' 'sip-files00157.tif'
43811ed6c2739f8a0bb49e5e42629110
e80b66d350131166ca581ed3d3a79ea02d42c337
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQO' 'sip-files00157.txt'
59ae5d6fb09cdc15d024cfc2ad227e93
e252c0c147db2eaee8a3ea234407c630d694d8af
describe
'7843' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQP' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
729d6d82b4ed5402e7d3a2a9bd6755f1
c5e1861ff7eab9cf0a882cf240f711bc81c2e5a8
describe
'800809' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQQ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
087cda2dc71ad84a05679c8079041527
92c0f585c66f4bc60bf9bb402a36c1b5e8a00b4e
describe
'88887' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQR' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
bc566fa4819fbf591e9052077f45d4f1
057cf25119a4234ed65f507486f998beccfb4467
describe
'36162' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQS' 'sip-files00158.pro'
d3305da79a987205cea23e14daa7ca0c
b35f5dfd32f576225966ae9451f5d3212e406627
describe
'31615' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQT' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
9f7d5ccb65f7ee790772cb1d2de30395
d6bab7cabd3817b9736747064bba2fa9989ebac3
'2011-11-16T12:34:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQU' 'sip-files00158.tif'
a9cd2c5314348033d6d09adc85b5bfcc
6d18d06b6618dfe09be5c304ef8a1d0b316b93ee
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQV' 'sip-files00158.txt'
4de508826702ccee3d938ba48d814f82
2e1576b4b4aefd89f0d9ca5f81305c9a471cb763
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQW' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
9f61fad4b69cfaed9e83ba840865ddab
f45c8d5f11dd29993fe4536b5dbf67a6a476cb77
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQX' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
2e0eaff7c2048b92012769fbdb30d89c
7a18b2c6acdbe653783abb3e1ba249155c62226a
describe
'81487' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQY' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
b87a017c8169c28a8b8ac09d22617184
7fe75c0fb2d2682c0e6000b78d4584586b92e671
describe
'32982' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYQZ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
ce6728c00732bac962d3da749af19830
9b5b7007bb154635041a7c95a7a7a66c657cb768
describe
'28597' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRA' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
e41d9f8f4530cf9fa5fa91aaf8662994
7a0112366179c10abb824fd794d251c1858b90c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRB' 'sip-files00159.tif'
798c989aad6076e3341453eb814cd1ce
7bd3ed5024875743a44bab84798c34adcb6af014
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRC' 'sip-files00159.txt'
57e77b24b5b454818aa96cc5dfa366fe
3fa50b792b63971bc84337619329a69293d6cea0
'2011-11-16T12:34:37-05:00'
describe
'7668' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRD' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
6fa313216473d333da6ef607199556a1
e6f073cb9dc553402dfc8a186deceba8c664bce3
describe
'801958' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRE' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
b40c58f32e7f1cac9bd489dddcb594ec
c4fe66a7feb61149fa2a9eeb18932bb079f71ad8
describe
'82525' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRF' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
8f52079fdd58fc53be22181c0e70a7d1
48884cf776cb876c7e760a25fa23b3a8126638ba
describe
'35487' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRG' 'sip-files00160.pro'
e2b787165128f765476455965e8f7381
e7aaddc4cccc20f4ecab530a51f2cc6c55fb8bdf
describe
'29613' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRH' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
c2674d4155a67157935b7248fcceaefc
ac6c28cd5e5d1ca178dff4d43bb60b0319b81451
describe
'6424285' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRI' 'sip-files00160.tif'
300b1bb9fe14f0640b65bebf83657995
880fdfbf09f7e0318db9b48d788ca6e2846bc449
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRJ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
c15072ee021e7c835a0e84f1b41af066
d8d900fc8bd7e47edc597cb976e100a5d68b015f
describe
'7600' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRK' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
357979ec0f0f5c2faa42ccd842ffada5
5442c020d096933b114a389207d7edaaa24a6f77
describe
'830844' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRL' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
194efa4db865e8256e5d37f91c277a0c
3cd825d57ca6fdac7727e6251b908ec83eb5f56a
describe
'76615' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRM' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
ba7f33309af2d79ac2d46529711ad239
30dcfc545b88e6c65c471ecf8f73587c4e637529
describe
'32575' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRN' 'sip-files00161.pro'
f9654d71211cb969b234684f2c61974c
144868d7a055a708494becd8d02d01f0def06d12
describe
'26689' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRO' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
6a7e2550a9729b6758acef6850fd1fe7
d86b9e69f72e04c30bdab63532c529a6ddea1e83
describe
'6654211' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRP' 'sip-files00161.tif'
acc0b32c538c2ed33d50a6f321dd86d6
5e610983d0153590bc281fa10a407834ac970591
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRQ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
23edaa496dee6185548f1a3305c0294d
3cb9b39b64a5f220b1862197a55880afe14493c5
describe
'6951' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRR' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
eb05a1ac6756018babb57388183bb95e
bfa5559d5c1af2ddeda370b5be5546f4b3743d4b
describe
'802097' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRS' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
b828f8961e971cf06aebbaf4521a6fad
4f166d4dab45aa8c8d0566a11fea69faf86e6a32
describe
'75937' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRT' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
b87e3d13de9bc6ebb8eee50ab251d858
929c79685de67d3d82d073471783414b68fd7bac
describe
'30961' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRU' 'sip-files00162.pro'
25dac58fe1e8905359c1abba533145f8
91ccf830d0dd3f64f5b5194641b2152ddfcaa657
describe
'26722' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRV' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
50345cf3808392122c3c8327f473ab9c
db763fba2e78933e827347b1823416b88541cf2a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
23497ac265c8701dbb6a121792f7c9b5
c85655c3a7340ab42acf5303bc9b07d16e835cc3
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRX' 'sip-files00162.txt'
dd570edd9c5c45d07450c6416c013a92
602e17747c79ec1bd2cd6654ee38a115384a4513
describe
'7129' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
34b380b9aebc54407759a48be087616b
f393d28ee473081de526c4a85ca020e4fa5bcfc9
describe
'830764' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYRZ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
3fa842bde64722b29a8c3e3cb04e0485
457aa964e5f670812efc88cd7007f1999065e445
describe
'82962' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSA' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
ad1a7c30fa02ea94d1957649932010d8
267522006f05bf2a5f7187267aba02cb842de21c
'2011-11-16T12:34:50-05:00'
describe
'34109' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSB' 'sip-files00163.pro'
3eacdc8a04b209613051e5b16a0d0585
3d6c03b8f9d7d149dcb7c038802719e57c9b12c1
describe
'29579' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSC' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
23176dbfaf30b6a73eea0971d858077d
9cd71689d51a538315d88ff0c18ce01a9529cd7c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSD' 'sip-files00163.tif'
916a1d6ae736f5241964a90b0424e852
277d8261b656ec608eb8497af4ce1a36540716fd
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSE' 'sip-files00163.txt'
abd9efb46f71f7d5f5021c2cd939264b
477e53bed16385a06743d690f9d3909e67718761
describe
'7472' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSF' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
f5aa6d343286359a226a7f2a0ffa1eb4
9010f80d1bba299c836daa28acd66aefe5434095
describe
'802130' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSG' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
c1a440c0d3beec81ca8df01241e642da
4ceb46d1edf7f8435e7d706c3fae36bd634dbc2f
describe
'70198' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSH' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
84e32889ee6c35f1942d40beb7715e22
8de4e0140cb21ce0d952134735a1756317858af6
describe
'28070' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSI' 'sip-files00164.pro'
fd270b519440a6b717e23cb1d5ae79e2
12bf45f2f69902ac0cdc3b7bdc212f1111919108
describe
'24988' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSJ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
10f7158ee0457825c76571793fbdefea
0b7b7feee2713e896897f9f534c77c0e59799bf9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSK' 'sip-files00164.tif'
91ac8694f420a60de4fcd9199f896849
0a39185bd269caa9e8370c4c0fc7478485a44751
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSL' 'sip-files00164.txt'
e4c0eae5d41f736454e02371c40e99c3
0d982d22df66aac91d1094fb509df884c0c3b38d
describe
'6371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSM' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
1a24e1f7007c432379e87b2b9e63fe85
6e7cd595ad6c7a0eb31658994748dccc05123d3e
describe
'830708' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSN' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
93d0a81093eabc8291696a4bc51542b2
37141445cb6fc5accaf8f4de112de40b7b54f125
describe
'83731' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSO' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
1725c84cfef606d6fb487d7002df6a2a
7a3112855bf088a98c3558b7052d79d0ff62d932
describe
'37614' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSP' 'sip-files00165.pro'
92a80af2d91cab8dccbe36ead39d0223
bf360d7e1519dc38ca895d749e29365a59447acd
describe
'29652' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSQ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
37c944e416f7517d3b6b26210896d8a3
7668989446608e64386aa91ee16de3bb8166c813
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSR' 'sip-files00165.tif'
ae928915d778cbbdf83d792852e6aec1
6156c896b958df5226c0ca26d049f188b0ed47a6
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSS' 'sip-files00165.txt'
a200395fbbadeb269323522459425f13
4c2ca174354828f0d6edd4d6f0313ca1931a3c4b
describe
'7243' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYST' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
be3baf168926e2953c382016a043599a
20e5abf1f29bbc0e8acd8179749329b2e87327ae
describe
'802129' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSU' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
6d174e87b066ec0182ca4c2eca61beea
33ecd8624bbe703997ada154d38db79619ad9233
describe
'66667' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSV' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
49b32d3a608e4bce7d78e61e5fd4b51d
b9c439b64b194575b161c10bc86ece97d325d2cb
describe
'25079' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSW' 'sip-files00166.pro'
cb3446ede9d224d8877f3d0eb5160385
53a113bcd2cdaf1a98705ec47016161bc422f575
describe
'23430' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSX' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
822cd1e6e6f1c2ce4adad2a6dd728f5d
a4b698ff5817a933ff95ac27fb5ab965c041d829
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSY' 'sip-files00166.tif'
876a67f0566ff6fb6f49bb04c501cac9
b1c10a2bd35ff12038d55115525c3c07b0cab4b6
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYSZ' 'sip-files00166.txt'
7c8faf86ac196935917cc3456fba2860
3ddaa1fd78b0a85ff7c4d79b60a7cf3ab01e5a69
describe
'6455' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTA' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
d769d825bc879f49d5a2c311f5d5f959
27de8f578bc9cdfe1ab2a0e706405dff8c3f2965
describe
'830802' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTB' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
b99a53932b6062b7c99bde56d9442f46
c5053ae828c05e79d1205a64e5531696150c2fc8
describe
'87704' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTC' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
700c7b84af9066f2b8164ad4164a4994
a5ddb4be285bacc5a90b9c5717e8d1923f9ebacc
describe
'37936' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTD' 'sip-files00167.pro'
a6d886969905af8905cc1e2cb0148f95
fb77ba7f73333644448710bebd0b40914f221b55
describe
'30405' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTE' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
940cee92d3893f71bf02361c99da2fa6
a05c728a42957bd2b0814ed7a66718397b8a19d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTF' 'sip-files00167.tif'
446e167f9fd89bba4d5af4c6dfeef02a
620c02f31f354b6224603d024418719efcb1ccdb
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTG' 'sip-files00167.txt'
17e195a8a2e5ae2c37f1576fce9db050
cdaf4cd2d3ff47cbd3966e8454c0f222d9461848
describe
'7609' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTH' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
74e3cb849f9d350ddbe92c711c18b88e
ae45a643f7900a9c9a12b91c4daa20d5418d48b7
describe
'802103' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTI' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
2369f07072f83e071c33a8dfbca266dd
75347fa824e37c63063edfa8d644d3cd63988a60
describe
'75000' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTJ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
558372d1b3bf82b4e54e6b330a88e8da
30f7e83305658a372ab552a49fcf3fdf53a0a800
describe
'27834' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTK' 'sip-files00168.pro'
4e7a1aed3672e4902815c2b5c7261834
1133001a73810201cdb74864a890527b8ab0837d
describe
'26279' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTL' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
1fa09c385e93be15f1f512824702740c
b4a48f481f7704e40a711274460272e2db21cdb2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTM' 'sip-files00168.tif'
c785a7193542a9474aa1e852a11d2121
bc9820d25fe58bbf5b318832a194e0802bd08a48
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTN' 'sip-files00168.txt'
b630b3b36741fb97225b19d053e74323
81ead911b96948aa20908ba5c7c5070209ee1e32
describe
'6883' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTO' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
f27b488994c5515b4c3b103731673f7d
26d48d9389c25eec845213aa062e4863a0ca524a
describe
'830850' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTP' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
73e69ef13e839c61b7c25069bb727d38
c33abd720d9e5173f419a9110e109f4a1a08026f
describe
'83029' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTQ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
c059352207dd6927e0937370078e040e
eeef93e11223abe52499a0c92f783559b4b5d333
describe
'33535' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTR' 'sip-files00169.pro'
95b4ca9c95360a70d5acdf563f47e5cb
9c71549d5538b1088a70af40880edcea45e89b15
describe
'28652' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTS' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
927c2ccb7cfa8bd51ba4051f320eadc2
f71ffd19b9543e994dee9bbb43e1697ade1fd5e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTT' 'sip-files00169.tif'
5c561f26b76f566cb7e657eba0b37c27
02f8f16d37dd6e03b4b79c17851e99b8f532bcf2
'2011-11-16T12:37:21-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTU' 'sip-files00169.txt'
4cb41e6996a1faac0c2f355507327d4c
f87ed04622cdc5ef38fd9148cf255343b014aa62
describe
'7438' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTV' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
3a36143721fb5783b57f6386b2f660b4
46c1190af02dc81ee6d1a45526203d3043239e59
describe
'802081' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTW' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
243e7425d269021ed9394327f4495992
fa658c96144a2e8595d22d249072fe88a6eb5a19
describe
'93136' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTX' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
5743d2c7cbd46315dece9c94ce5be3f4
41b8383f33c8ec0b776d7e1a929cd9dd614bcd7a
describe
'39421' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTY' 'sip-files00170.pro'
ab9a5fdf2fcf47d53388dd9cc4d4bdd8
e4b9d3c7fa3b0eb8b0367b3ed4bcf13171b02168
describe
'33148' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYTZ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
0c2ea4c86836057c7f711b0f306ff88b
9d99ffc235ab4d347577a9a41341308cd1157b0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUA' 'sip-files00170.tif'
aefd5809c053992d84a9157f51a76cf9
7d4ff13a78e4f72f6fe6ce99c61ab71584a363b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUB' 'sip-files00170.txt'
b41b1099e236a44aa19d1aee9399ae3c
a5e1f163eef447b207a2aec6cf07c5df9b19090c
describe
'8231' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUC' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
74535289410539402631477e73a00c8f
e331e1abd14fea8d4552d60ffa401556184842b1
describe
'830794' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUD' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
ead500b2727548b2b5e3cf2b89206cb9
975893901dd50256fe86144e8646580187d066e9
describe
'86864' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUE' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
91a396359b079217c62e24d495194615
dffadc0b98cf705aa57c518dd335a0e0911bc9b9
describe
'36732' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUF' 'sip-files00171.pro'
2e8d628c31eaede78ed5cca4048897cf
2aacb3146df41a33baf3bc3e224651d207575292
describe
'30386' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUG' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
c67f4b6ef7b0fc7deb33f76cf30f4dbe
fb940648d7a0eb860b461ffa344eb1a76170fc77
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUH' 'sip-files00171.tif'
9bcfde0dcb6e656596ed8bd00f2850d6
4d055e034b50930bc6230dae0353ccf40a348342
'2011-11-16T12:32:15-05:00'
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUI' 'sip-files00171.txt'
dc7d89000ee26a6e6cbf5425aec1e70d
a29285cac381fe409242063ba3db8c4f161b4356
describe
'8058' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUJ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
9cea1c256f5814361f62c13f7ce5ce3f
7aadb406547efc1317ca23e75bfd574183544f67
describe
'847294' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUK' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
03c9ec77998bd476e855b28cc26e44c6
d78eb86087ce35ba9ca54caad9524e7578283200
describe
'71797' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUL' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
4072bbe92f6c47afb5dce6e9a391f2a9
36b79be8509643b7479a9ee2ba7c089832b9d72d
'2011-11-16T12:34:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUM' 'sip-files00172.pro'
c8fd65b7e0e9b529280aa8ddfeae2789
bd4c8b10531e958e20df3d73c6ad8390caec0db5
describe
'24711' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUN' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
075a95002edf5ef28c97361f379999c5
a8a6697c90a73a0891068319eed041c29e1b0c4f
describe
'6782711' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUO' 'sip-files00172.tif'
f0b7b863e22959c888f8da68cb127a60
934b6547f9b7d56f0529539405c846db727965e0
'2011-11-16T12:36:05-05:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUP' 'sip-files00172.txt'
21e2acbb7ddb4e2ebdeef9cd04661c43
cb2eaa0a3e1e6ff75496f6ae8cd0a3dd2ad29c1c
describe
'6635' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUQ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
c776c1734a2f4d52dc045c0a14e42880
272f122a1c876d156783851387ffff95135e2141
describe
'794056' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUR' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
20fb5858fe86490101fa8f687d8f1d6b
9c9d061d37940d0f70b04396390f566135b86c4b
describe
'35605' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUS' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
854776582d95d77c04050664f5bc9f48
5420446871bcded19b7949d463c5ca2a442d78e7
describe
'2153' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUT' 'sip-files00173.pro'
a1c26085511faf6f43a0b97db5b6ee7e
a0957230325c869fdbe79243bff66cfbdda8b8d2
describe
'11779' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUU' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
e711f5c5c683f007eb28a8a5dd9ec896
a069b74d5456095e26ec5d6b3f4d19a67701a8f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUV' 'sip-files00173.tif'
0ae06b21a7e575aaf667b5f69c365870
fa178bcd7a28831324219f20912f36de794a6c25
describe
'102' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUW' 'sip-files00173.txt'
cb4ae54df87238546f10e602a1960dc8
b05ef1b53cc545a054088933587be9072110754a
describe
'3690' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUX' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
e1d289ead872a05ae91d3aab90f2835e
f88b8e32b3463645a505139cb7c788a202f19ada
describe
'687979' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUY' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
8f9f0734a885c077a056ce12305b55a2
2cd46d28e4074f3e8d345289f36f4ad8f9eb572d
describe
'34522' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYUZ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
b10b992151b5d6cbb2b1eb48a2390b86
0b6305d8610fbacf93d01f213bc577df119ec1e9
'2011-11-16T12:35:43-05:00'
describe
'12509' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVA' 'sip-files00174.pro'
38a9af09444fb14a98c54612793223a8
24eed12379348ee97869fb5a183515f5404f7bfc
describe
'14118' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVB' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
da588c0e0d0340df421aaef4429b5ff6
40a31db62f34c5701e3152aed2d99ff42115a690
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVC' 'sip-files00174.tif'
2fe744d10cbdfb5946d5c54dcda6da00
7240bd0632703aa67a54cc1286add60a49e9bbc2
describe
'615' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVD' 'sip-files00174.txt'
2a01b9d9b34fbcd7a9820bc327490246
931ca9b59dddbde622996d5023109791382bd4b7
describe
'4027' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVE' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
aa622e38c7905b080cec977822200860
c90c51f47b2d7371b50aa3d670d2ae152a9734d2
describe
'830841' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVF' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
3d1f5725dc42c0425749a3f34b0cd886
a69ab6c98452e8918301adb657eabec388f499d8
describe
'87511' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVG' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
1f76471eb3125ab7e5e8828a3224416e
fdce3a2c9b5e5bf8f66e77470a58e6e702e81202
describe
'39326' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVH' 'sip-files00175.pro'
23c5530ddbfd19aa4c45305bca3563f5
d7fc8e0cd0d082fc81c94ce2803301fa4e87f358
describe
'28767' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVI' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
ece292d3e2378f62ee5a775ff231be51
5e29feec14d47bdc5c9346817fbe2215a962060f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVJ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
f8e1e0acf75a0ae58a9e7b161deab0f0
a907da3bf32a8251a3d3e5a1a2b0cb6a4f2b8631
describe
'1726' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVK' 'sip-files00175.txt'
09883660f380512dd38ae58ebb121cf1
ce518908500871afea755abf7db2e2ec45cc0e8d
describe
Invalid character
'7284' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVL' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
a59cf26f31c37445b2b631db65c4b301
36ad6102e3cefc6f6af104e3541785dd4ac44e7f
'2011-11-16T12:35:51-05:00'
describe
'802098' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVM' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
50277fe98405394d9cba05c7e62166bb
a99b2820dc677054e5d76ac49889533d7d81ddd9
describe
'87943' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVN' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
d2064271d7a499920bb88e4a75ebbf10
04fcd1f069735e83fb7fec0891723e600d117422
describe
'37239' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVO' 'sip-files00176.pro'
57a90872dfeccd256143f8ee6cb1e188
6826d8a65d87e3c26cb37f9086f86553c36ec755
describe
'30649' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVP' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
5fde52aa150d449fd9f0f6c5d0560694
98d4ad935d9c01f5777bf42deec8c51d11ac4142
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVQ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
fb261c3b4feb04094d216e98f121ae40
57c55643f7d4b7c2733ca742dca3afa599d0cacf
describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVR' 'sip-files00176.txt'
655dcbcb48f7afccfb2a31e81e3e01ae
ea23284ca28662c1b47490007e33f91f39a78a95
describe
'8099' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVS' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
00177bd6f3dcfecc76d41c27d077f6e4
ddfb24956d6da8c18db973fabacebaa0335f63a3
describe
'830711' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVT' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
05e6633622d382e7c4e5c7d7d45b8235
7cf84a02acb54f5665e4c78988187a58e2f41909
describe
'105487' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVU' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
1d790523c62a2b4571b403a4066624a8
e739989a4ae883bbbe5d5542b938869998b81766
describe
'55385' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVV' 'sip-files00177.pro'
ad45cbd9a29c6720e014386c4e186ef0
8c438cf3e62252868775fe2d7432b594eb6b1afc
describe
'33084' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVW' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
4016346919251fa046a7c923a78aeb02
16b93c0df4bef428f72eb3b524fc847234300061
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVX' 'sip-files00177.tif'
6bd7bd3e770b021a297b238325f40377
8f4bb86783f337e51f9544903e05b08b2b609c28
describe
'2381' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVY' 'sip-files00177.txt'
a20a2edf4aef8c1de07b62cac5d5e0b4
8c42771b87b798022f3643a8c1b3dc46c4e5bbbf
describe
'8427' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYVZ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
d8decb80eb975b3bf1a329c9f025a309
286b41058b355d63b2f8115d0198060c76e8c00f
describe
'802052' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWA' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
b5ca96a06079900a8a24c6ec476ac3c8
de47000896d9afd5f3c2db49fe4010e2721353fa
describe
'118036' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWB' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
16c58b0e3c318c98012dbd7473e910a0
7b25c16076364be66b59605991e130562029badf
describe
'65176' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWC' 'sip-files00178.pro'
80e26ddc668bab7768446dedfd58ceb2
a9b3569e91bb3a0b05cc0726b2521051f5c594b5
describe
'36358' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWD' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
6dc0b2c9ade44f5b821166ea87607c15
ca9dcf8f4973164ba70e9a969be04fd687e03257
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWE' 'sip-files00178.tif'
7fa0648e8d69b4c4a63d50fc44ea6cd5
6654f5c7d17d63df3ff78838aad5bff1e79ff431
describe
'2748' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWF' 'sip-files00178.txt'
9ff7bcdb0b044a92a648ae9c0ba083ae
8d9bb758a9ff6339abd9e3de777d49ea361decfb
describe
'9100' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWG' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
a81f57afd31013edd2571780a7cb75db
7a370e5eb88f0fb5438043fb775dfb56355da72a
describe
'830830' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWH' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
d3ad70173148e6016129a0340625a578
673c1aab2d5c74502750c6339b8c9019a9d2317a
describe
'116986' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWI' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
3b3494942088095f04d0712b8a95df92
e734ab9662bf770459bc000ee7ca29a60c241b39
describe
'84664' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWJ' 'sip-files00179.pro'
fbf913bec50d1fe49e2c4b7d0a03d3bf
09e6221b712bb04dd96212c61d9b17bb0c3fc1f1
describe
'35433' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWK' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
74237e6215e06d110b5e9d2c6138a2eb
cb72846761ee232afb2487b2d1b7c79b7ae0c010
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWL' 'sip-files00179.tif'
a40d9a39c2c93dd25f5a94b9411b59c8
438fed72b0d13bba4161c17e9696f9179c01ed69
describe
'3555' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWM' 'sip-files00179.txt'
642d4e887ee0e01ca18600a1e16491dd
d4b6f18921eba2c91fe02946df4d6f0c515c79af
describe
'8254' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWN' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
43d9914d22de2ce63f926aa9254a02ec
b23d0edcc70c256bc643b78b7859c7d6981b47f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWO' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
dc954e5774bdba593e3acff796baf61c
3edb180022d5b4fe345d899e11eea256ad12daaa
describe
'90615' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWP' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
570f508e2209058cbe6d36035e7e0459
e280665a4c4e7f48872021762cdf4cf762e57727
describe
'51367' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWQ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
17c7f3ef57712f1f5b65684a8c17bd05
f6ba0e44a6cbc3416bc90daf8bc921e75265ca93
describe
'29484' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWR' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
cd1c3dcbe3ce26570748007630078020
bee910fc9dc16455d9644dee8905229b550f2d9b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWS' 'sip-files00180.tif'
098b88dc910db6bdfb7ac64ab906989c
9ee05b165a0c0cf24c28bc12c2e6da665f2c3482
describe
'2371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWT' 'sip-files00180.txt'
149bfe937a0ef75210184118b19c7817
06e0a19d1e988eafc1d327388ff49a2f4518fea1
describe
'7766' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWU' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
512b0c4cba0d1bb48b07a85c3cea68a8
5aafd491f431b2aee8f93069736ae44700647910
describe
'830845' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWV' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
f36122795bae6ee1629f5efad1c3850a
a8ca361998438dcd6250b24fc122d40d06a08c89
describe
'96259' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWW' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
39ae52a9e76e4b498fd10b6f250572ce
e414c36dd29a17b306e3d7d8f33e943aa3fdfaef
describe
'68510' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWX' 'sip-files00181.pro'
d522c495494cf62466978c4866f922f0
f41b460119c34683dfa12cba7eaa2fc1319c9dc1
describe
'31221' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWY' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
48b3e082053e5b58dc1a0e64291a5774
4d33da18e47410aabfb2fe85decb1e2bbd54bf9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYWZ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
02055be814e20c994e8d6f076d85ac9d
8d785b9fc6ad5bc0cbe185afc6e240b44ef48e18
describe
'3493' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXA' 'sip-files00181.txt'
0ada87742fd91fd1a61c2d043960c85a
124030c09414340ccb8e72bac15fdb0d49970213
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXB' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
661c018e198383b91213f99b0c459fd9
033f80acf6a69ec3956e16178fb6fd511fb32f2a
describe
'802034' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXC' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
ec6186ad6d6ad16e4601087dc0176d02
5285b61d75efc44c87160e1435e984a10dedb15e
describe
'90898' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXD' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
5e462e70f3148191a988201f2c381cf9
1ae22641fd40cba0aa4ff3cdd15ec1b24c2d5e63
describe
'44257' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXE' 'sip-files00182.pro'
ef838f52781f71d60e27df24710c3073
eb25ae11ba2a7ecc289317467a2a094945b02340
describe
'29704' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXF' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
0cbdb3ab144e41be59b44442b5536f1a
98e3e1851547cc71e5d15e42cf3925ae53a82ac3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXG' 'sip-files00182.tif'
1d50d87d35b34cda0e1164b34307a9bb
dcb86e55f206790d06f185f45a9c312df05a0ea0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXH' 'sip-files00182.txt'
07debf806d8ad792eeb90f1e4d207c61
aa4108e75f0552298f3bae6c49efcd69a842d878
describe
'7847' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXI' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
496dc75617fe9a9a79cc36fa82aba8c0
46c054c7bc35b07e12fd026fa5f3dda6e5415e5f
describe
'1041052' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXJ' 'sip-filesback3.jp2'
482d2840368ed616f3f7264f22bbaa09
3c137a4bf36bcce5d789bf652b3dfc75d9e5be4c
describe
'44771' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXK' 'sip-filesback3.jpg'
ca61829296a854a47d0869fbbe90c319
e38448170b0820bf41806d08ee0d1a0dca08562d
describe
'11473' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXL' 'sip-filesback3.QC.jpg'
8de50f365056aaeffa6d19188839005e
e86046353b2c16e2b3024c86d800c6ada4c30f0a
describe
'24990940' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXM' 'sip-filesback3.tif'
03788007d65b248ea1def17142ce70b7
aa3a889c6f0a6e09d967e43164abd5b06c8f828e
describe
'3349' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXN' 'sip-filesback3thm.jpg'
7127301c666fb020d7a5e65cca8483ed
37a289f00349a6178ec37bfdfa9c95009ea71ecf
describe
'1056218' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXO' 'sip-filesback4.jp2'
8a58ac6e6d309aa168619f919d6b1351
c03f2b898ab3b091647ffce5dec2994d628a40ed
describe
'136363' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXP' 'sip-filesback4.jpg'
e3b7c3354085c2031347a9a9ebf3c9bd
1960475643b2703fb8ec365e1c14d18b6b70b80f
describe
'371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXQ' 'sip-filesback4.pro'
cb6889097e4d8564b42a9ae628a7adf7
f389ebe21f839a1bcb534b575632c4e886c62413
describe
'27012' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXR' 'sip-filesback4.QC.jpg'
ca6c29463115eafa6c4e75779e70efc9
061f9a7d5b660e4adfe388e596738ee2477f14be
describe
'25351254' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXS' 'sip-filesback4.tif'
b09ac50398321c3cd0cf9a7c7d2813b5
5bf495a35888846fb43f9a136641bfc0c8f7ac4a
describe
'31' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXT' 'sip-filesback4.txt'
e16f8af35f6e26da0946ed1140526eab
1097b69266ab1def6933bb6a67468a369166b6e6
describe
'6182' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXU' 'sip-filesback4thm.jpg'
b9bc656488176b00c6b3c419cde4b7d1
0ac6ba139598c16409555cd8609e8fcbcca6f7f9
describe
'1056253' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXV' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
7f55758419ada8abf08c0cf217611fd3
ba8609a62902b6d960ebc09ffae694e4562cbf75
describe
'127283' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXW' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
01b46cd156a4bd9aea7287ee13515d37
f826751dc040ee461a2daf2e178a2b8640c6eef1
describe
'706' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXX' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
4c376fec2de71ee5527d44cec7bc90ec
63dcec34db182b7306c4b8b5c988ee5a50a5d106
describe
'25352' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXY' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
3aa559e0cf674262fa39dbd552536cac
abe94435bf57af842568c7cc428ce3314ab9b933
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYXZ' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
c024b01dc29e6ad0a590d9f6a3056dc9
e5f4d83072c6460501eab5ab65e1b440c627475d
'2011-11-16T12:36:13-05:00'
describe
'47' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYA' 'sip-filescover1.txt'
6d7ed4469d86473495f856d3152bad2a
8bb3f7255c22f0faacc2b2f24a0363012b7a4d20
describe
'5870' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYB' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
e06fa5f78d06bac6ea6c991fb03bbfbe
d2ca44468a2553abaf8fd94962da701b94de5189
describe
'1078709' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYC' 'sip-filescover2.jp2'
cbacc1a115641a6337dca4119773062b
42bb85357c441c7948ccff74eb65090c8802207f
describe
'49311' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYD' 'sip-filescover2.jpg'
3aab0815e23e48fee1439e84ccbf68a4
64ae240ce3349bf597c1bd04a184b139f0168290
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYE' 'sip-filescover2.pro'
b4564e6968631d13d2d770e9aaa43ab0
704a1aa8ce16aef71e136019876f0dfbf3d6684b
describe
'12342' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYF' 'sip-filescover2.QC.jpg'
23d29f486796060054f90c897729bcd9
0db95360198688062e8436799609d6e5b4c24aca
describe
'25890776' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYG' 'sip-filescover2.tif'
c06daf4270a60bf7957068eb5c28fcba
28221923b2527aa416a98ca3bdf9738720e6f91f
describe
'156' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYH' 'sip-filescover2.txt'
4263b0c5c1a63db5931b2c07e937b8d3
d002666a973636d4ca913002e4ac59323f2983a0
describe
'3416' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYI' 'sip-filescover2thm.jpg'
5ad67bae12905e7a80b24eee845f95a9
f89cc43cef9055874167d46fdaeb9ba26f4a7470
describe
'152' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYJ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
5ce0112fc1718699068f9184c2f67f9e
15f25e1d9eaa2ba063f2f0cdf4e541ed56c096a0
'2011-11-16T12:31:23-05:00'
describe
'146534' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYK' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
40bde420576e20ad4e6585abc3340a63
c27dfdeaf0f68a7d49cf2995dbf047fe2dfb193f
describe
'36673' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYL' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
a9a045c51e34bf0ea727f3762932db79
e5626fa0526aa59ef5afbc5b4ad18ab4e7c99959
describe
'213' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYM' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
4010090f673709cd3c1ce4704f32e751
705f86c5afa7d7f565cb2426ae8abd775e6bcfa9
describe
'10176' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYN' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
bd57abbb23d72c988f0b1a894d44e9fc
0430e19825b3aa99aa7814c30a867a2ac28be2d2
describe
'3517820' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYO' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
74d0d1354e8b1e2556424532ec6df23e
0441c5d4f7067e03fc75d086fe4b2e5a320bf852
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYP' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'4070' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYQ' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
bfe663f2bb054782fd2cc9cad3ebd07d
7c0e6816d2d0b82979363b087a10f913fcd6567e
describe
'303995' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYR' 'sip-filesUF00002167_00001.mets'
f2784078ef78b873df254ba4986ecb8c
5859e800f05531638cacb1978051975e7ab3b058
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T07:52:36-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'393333' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVKfileF20080920_AAAYYU' 'sip-filesUF00002167_00001.xml'
9f4f14a2f161463306fa37321c586db3
09e4c81bfccfb34097c9be96db0d1803f7b0dce7
'2011-11-16T12:32:38-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-16T07:52:34-05:00'
xml resolution