Citation
Fanny, the flower-girl, or, Honesty rewarded

Material Information

Title:
Fanny, the flower-girl, or, Honesty rewarded
Portion of title:
Honesty rewarded
Creator:
Kidder, Daniel P ( Daniel Parish ), 1815-1891
Longking, Joseph ( Printer )
Lane & Scott ( Publisher )
Methodist Episcopal Church -- Sunday School Union
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Lane & Scott
Manufacturer:
Joseph Longking.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
54, <2> p. : ill. ; 14 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Faith -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Honesty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Chapbooks -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Chapbooks ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisement: <2> p. following text and p. <4> of paper wrapper.
General Note:
"Published...for the Sunday-School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church."
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
revised by D.P. Kidder.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027263946 ( ALEPH )
45586368 ( OCLC )
ALK2397 ( NOTIS )

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FANNY,

THE FLOWER-GIRL:

OR,

HONESTY REWARDED.

REVISED BY D. P. KIDDER

New-Vork:
PUBLISHED BY LANE & SCOTT,

FOR THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 200 MULBERRY-STREET.

JOSEPH LONGKING, PRINTER
1851,







CONTENTS.

Chap. Page
TL ANNIZCAT MAREE Dy.) 0+, tus) te te oem
IJ. Fanny WHEN AN INFANT 5 5 15

Ill. Mrs. Newron’s AFFLICTIONS. . . .. . 21
IV. Lessons FROM FLOWERS. . . .:. «© . . 27
V. AN UNLOOKED-FOR VISITOR... . . . 383
Vie. ANEW HOMD . Geeaceeremene

Wil. Harry ResuLTs =e eee oe endo







FANNY,
THE FLOWER-GIRL.

CHAPTER I.

FANNY AT MARKET.

“ Come, buy my flowers; flowers fresh
and fair. Come, buy my flowers. Please,
ma’am, buy a nice bunch of flowers ; very
pretty ones, ma’am. Please, sir, to have
some flowers; nice fresh ones, miss ; only
just gathered; please look.”

Thus spoke, or sometimes sung, a little
girl of perhaps eight years old, holding in.
her hand a neat small basket, on the top
of which lay a clean white cloth, to shade
from the sun the flowers which she praised
so highly, and a little bunch of which she
presented to almost every passer-by, in the
hope of finding purchasers; while, after
one had passed rudely on, another had
looked at her young face and smiled, an-



8 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

other said, “ What a nice child!” but not
one had taken the flowers, and left the pen-
ny or the halfpenny that was to pay for
them, the little girl, as if accustomed to all
this, only arranged again the pretty nose-
gays that had beer disarranged in the vain
hope of selling them, and commenced anew,
in her pretty singing tone, “ Come, buy my
flowers ; flowers fresh and fair.”

“ Your flowers are sadly withered, my*
little maid,” said a kind country-looking
gentleman, who was buying some vege-
tables at a stall near her.

“Q, sir! I have fresh ones here, sir;
please look ;” and the child lifted up the
cover of her basket, and drew from the
very bottom a bunch of blossoms on which
the dew of morning still rested.

“Please to see, sir; a pretty rose, sir;
and these pinks and mignonette, and a
bunch of jessamine, sir, and all for one
penny.”

“Bless thee, pretty dear!” said the old
lame vegetable-seller, “thou ’lt make a good
market-woman one of these days. Your
honor would do well to buy her flowers,



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 9

’ sir; she has got no mother or father, God

help her, and works for a sick grandmo-
ther.”
“Poor child!” said the old gentleman.
“ Here, then, little one, give me three nice
nosegays, and there is sixpence for you.”
With delight sparkling in every feature
of her face, and her color changed to

crimson with joy, the little flower-girl re-

ceived in one hand the unusual piece of
money; and setting her basket on the
ground, began hastily and tremblingly to
pick out nearly half its contents as the
price of the sixpence; but the gentleman
stooped down, and taking up at random
three bunches of the flowers, which were
not the freshest, said, .

“ Here, these will do; keep the rest for
a more difficult customer. Be a good
child; pray to God, and serve him, and
you will find heisa Father of the fatherless.”

And so he went away; and the flower-
girl, without waiting to put her basket in
order, turned to the old vegetable-seller,
and cried, “ Sixpence! a whole sixpence,
and all at once. What will grandmother



10 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

say now? See!’ and opening her hand,
she displayed its shining contents before
her neighbor’s eyes.

“Eh!” exclaimed the old man, as he
approached his eyes nearer to it. “Eh!
what is this? why thou hast twenty six-
pences there; this is a half-sovereign !”

“Twenty sixpences! why the gentle-
man said, There is sixpence for thee,” said
the child.

“ Because he did’nt know his mistake,”
replied the other; “I saw him take the
piece out of his waistcoat pocket without
looking.”

“O dear! what shall I do?” cried the
little girl.

“ Why, thou must keep it, to be sure,”
replied the old man; “give it to thy
grandmother; she will know what to do
with it, I warrant thee.”

“ But I must first try to find the good
gentleman, and tell him of his mistake,”
said the child. “I know what grandmo-
ther would say else; and he cannot be far
off, I think, because he was so fat; he will
go slow, I am sure, this hot morning.



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 11

Here, Mr. Williams, take care of my bas-
ket, please, till I come back.”

And without a word more, the flower-
girl put down her little basket at the foot
of the vegetable-stall, and ran away as fast
as she could go.

When she turned out of the market-place,

she found, early as it was, that the street
before her was pretty full; but, as from the
passage the gentleman had taken to leave
the market-place, she knew he could only
have gone in one direction, she had still
hopes of finding him; and she ran on and
on, until she actually thought she saw the
very person before her; he had just taken
off his hat, and was wiping his forehead
with his handkerchief.

“ That is him,” said the little flower-girl,
“T am certain;” but just as she spoke
some persons came between her and the
gentleman, and she could not see him.
Still she kept running on; now passing off
the foot-path into the street, and then see-
ing the fat gentleman still before her; and
then again getting on the foot-path, and
losing sight of him, until at last she came



12 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

up quite close to him, as he was walking
slowly, and wiping the drops of heat from
his forehead.

The poor child was then quite out of
breath ; and when got up to him she could
~ not call out to him to stop, nor say one
word; so she caught hold of the skirt of
his coat, and gave it a strong pull.

The gentleman started, and clapped one
hand on his coat pocket, and raised up
his cane in the other, for he was quite sure
it was a pickpocket at his coat. But when
he turned, he saw the breathless little flow-
er-girl, and he looked rather sternly at her,
and said,

“ Well, what do you want? what are
you about, eh?”

“O, sir!” said the girl; and then she be-
gan to cough, for her breath was quite
spent. “ See, sir; you said you gave me
sixpence, and Mr. Williams says there
are twenty sixpences in this little bit of
money.”

“Dear me!” said the gentleman; “ isit pos-
sible? could I have done such a thing?” and
he began to fumble in his waistcoat pocket.



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 13

“ Well, really itis true enough,” he add-
ed, as he drew outa sixpence. “ See what
itis to put gold and silver together.”

“JT wish he would give it to me,”
thought the little flower-girl ; “how happy
it would make poor granny: and perhaps
he has got a good many more of these
pretty gold pieces.”

But the old gentleman put out his hand,
and took it, and turned it over and over,
and seemed to think a little: and then he
put his hand into his pocket again, and
took out his purse; and he put the half-
sovereign into the purse, and took out of
it another sixpence.

“ Well,” he said, “ there is the sixpence
I owe you for the flowers ; you have done
right to bring me back this piece of gold;
and there is another sixpence for your
race; it is not a reward, mind, for honesty
is only our duty, and you only did what
is right; but you are tired, and have left
your employment, and perhaps lost a cus-
tomer, so I give you the other sixpence
to make you amends.”

“Thank you, sir,” said the flower-girl,



14 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

courtesying ; and, taking the two sixpencey
into her hand with a delighted smile, was
going to run back again, when the old
gentleman pulling out a pocket-book, said,
“Stay a moment; you are an orphan, they
tell me; what is your name 2?”

“ Fanny, sir.”

“ Panny what?” |

“ Please I don’t know, sir; grandmother
is Mrs. Newton, sir; but she says she is
not my grandmother either, sir.”

“Well, tell me where Mrs. Newton
lives,” said the gentleman, after looking at
her a minute or so, as if trying to make
out what she meant.

So Fanny told him, and he wrote it
down in his pocket-book, and then read
over what he had written to her, and she
said it was right.

“ Now, then, run away back,” said he,
“and sell all your flowers, if you can, be-
fore they wither, for they will not last long
this warm day : flowers are like youth and
beauty—do you ever think of that? even
the rose withereth afore it groweth up.”
And this fat gentleman looked very sad;



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL, 15

for he had lost all his children in their
youth.

“ O yes, sir; I know a verse which says
that,” replied Fanny. “ All flesh is grass,
and all the goodliness thereof is as the flow-
er of grass—but good morning, and thank
you, sir”’ and away Fanny ran.

CHAPTER II.
FANNY WHEN AN INFANT.

Anp now, before going on with my sto-
ry, I must go back to tell who and what
Fanny, the flower-girl, was.

Mrs. Newton, whom she called her
grandmother, was now a poor old woman,
confined to her bed by a long and trying
illness, that had nearly deprived her of the
use of her limbs. But she had not been
always thus afflicted. ‘Some years before,
Mrs. Newton lived in a neat cottage near
the road-side, two or three miles from one
of the great seaport towns of England.
Her husband had good employment, and
they were both comfortable and happy.



16 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.
|

Just eight years from this time, it hap-
pened that one warm summer’s day Mrs,
Newton went to look out from her cottage
door down the road, and she saw a young]
woman standing there leaning against al
tree, and looking very faint and weak.

She was touched with pity, and asked
the poor traveler to walk into her house
and rest. The young woman thankfully |
consented, for she said she was very ill;)
but she added, that her husband was com-|
ing after her, having been obliged to turn |
back for a parcel that was left behind at the
house where they had halted some time be-
fore, and therefore she would sit near the
door and watch for him.

Before, however, the husband came, the
poor woman was taken dreadfully ill; and
when he did arrive, good Mrs. Newton
could not bear to put the poor creature
out of the house in such a state: she be-
came worse and worse. In short, that
poor young woman was Fanny’s mother,
and when little Fanny was born, that poor
sick mother died, and Fanny never saw a
mother’s smile.



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 17

The day after the young woman’s death,
kind Mrs. Newton came into the room
where her cold body was laid out on the
bed; and there was her husband, a young,
strong-looking man, sitting beside it; his
elbows were on his knees, and his face was
hid in his open hands,

Mrs. Newton had the baby in her arms,
and she spoke to its father as she came in:
he looked up to her; his own face was as
pale as death, and he looked at her with-
out saying a word. She saw he was in
too much grief either to speak or weep.
So she went over silently to him, and put
the little baby into his arms, and then said,
“May the Lord look down with pity on
you both.”

As soon as the unhappy young man
heard these compassionate words, and saw
the face of his pretty, peaceful babe, he
burst into tears; they rolled in large drops
down on the infant’s head.

Then in a short time he was able to
speak, and he told Mrs. Newton his sad
little history ; how he had no one in the

whole world to look with pity on him, or
2

a



18 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

his motherless child; and how God alone
was his hope in this day of calamity. His
father had been displeased with him because
hehad married that young woman, whom
he dearly loved; and he had given him some
money that was his portion, and would do
nothing else for him. The young man had
taken some land and a house, but as the
rent was too high, he could not make
enough from the land to pay it; so he had
been obliged to sell all his goods, and he
had only as much money left as would,
with great saving, carry him to America,
where he had a brother who advised him
to come out there.

“ And now,” said he, looking over at
the pale face of his dear wife, “what shall
I do with the little creature she has left
me? how shall I carry it over the wide
ocean without a mother to care for it, and
nurse it?”

“ You cannot do so,” said Mrs. New-
ton, wiping her eyes; “leave it with me;
Thave no children of my own, my hus-
band would like to have one; this babe
shall lie in my bosom, and be unto me as



|

FANNY, THE FLOWER-GRIL. 19

. daughter. I will nurse it for you until

you are settled in America, and send or
come for it.”

The young man wept with gratitude;
he wanted to know how he was to repay
Mrs, Newton, but she said for the present
she did not want payment, that it would be
a pleasure to her to have the baby; and it
‘would be time enough to talk about pay-
ment when the father was able to claim it,
and take it to a home.

So the next day they buried the poor
young woman, and, soon after, the young
man went away and sailed off to Ameri-
ca, and from that day to this Mrs. Newton
had never heard anything of him.

_ As she had said, that poor little mother-
Isss babe lay in her bosom, and was unto
her as a daughter; she loved it; she loved
it when it was a little helpless thing, weak
and sickly; she loved it when it grew a
pretty lively baby, and would set its little
feat on her knees, and crow and caper be-
fore her face; she loved it when it began
to play around her as she sat at work, to
lisp out the word Ganny, for she taught it



20 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

to call her grandmother ; she loved it when |
it would follow her into her nice garden,
and pick a flower, and carry it to her, as
she satin the little arbor; and she, hold-
ing the flower, would talk to it of God
who made the flower, and: made the bee
that drew honey from the flower, and
made the sun that caused the flower to
grow, and the light that gave the flower
its colors, and the rain that watered it,
and the earth that nourished it. And she
loved that child when it came back from
the infant school, and climbed up on her
lap, or stood with its hands behind its back,
to repeat some pretty. verses about flowers,
or about the God who made them. ‘That
child was Fanny, the flower-girl; and ah!
how little did good Mrs. Newton think she
would at length be selling flowers in the
streets to help to support her!



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 21

CHAPTER III.

MRS. NEWTON'S AFFLICTIONS.

Bur it came to pass, that when Fanny
was nearly six years old, Mrs. Newton’s
husband became very ill; it was a very
bad and very expensive illness: for poor
Mrs. Newton was so uneasy, she would
sometimes have two doctors to see him.
But all would not do: he died; and Mrs.
Newton was left very poorly off.

In a short time she found she could not
remain in her pretty cottage ; and she was
obliged to leave it; and the church where
she had gone every Sunday for so many
years ; and the church-yard where her hus-
band was buried, and little Fanny’s mo-
ther; and the infant school where Fanny
learned so much; and the dear little gar-
den, and the flowers that were Fanny’s
teachers and favorites. O how sorry was
poor Mrs. Newton! But even a little child
can give comfort; and so little Fanny, per-
haps without thinking to do so, did; for



22 FANNY, THE PFLOWER-GIRL.

when Mrs. Newton for the last time |
sat out in her garden, and saw the setting
sun go down, and told Fanny she was
going to leave that pretty garden, where
she had from infancy been taught to know
God’s works, the child looked very sad
and thoughtful indeed, for some time;
but afterward, coming up to her, said,

“ But, grandmother, we shall not leave —
God, shall we ? for you say God is every-
where, and he will be in London too.”

And O how that thought consoled
poor Mrs. Newton! She did not leave —
God,—God did not leave her.

So she left the abode of her younger
years—the scene of her widowhood; and
she went away to hire a poor lodging in
the outlets of London: but her God was
with her; and the child she had nursed in
her prosperity was her comfort in adversity.

Matters, however, went no better when
she lived with little Fanny in a poor lodg-
ing. She had only one friend in London,
and she lived at a distance from her. Mrs.
Newton became ill; there was no one to
nurse her but Fanny ; she could no longer



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 23

pay for her schooling, and sometimes she
was not able to teach her herself.

All this seemed very hard and very try-
ing, and one would have been tempted
to think that God was no longer with poor
Mrs. Newton; that when she had left her
cottage she had left the God who had been
so good to her.

Butthis would have been a mistake: God
was with Mrs. Newton; he saw fit to try
and afflict her; but he gave her strength and
patience to bear her trials and afflictions.

One afternoon her friend came to pay
her a visit: she was going out a little way
into the country to see a relation who had
a very fine nursery-garden, and she beg-
ged Mrs. Newton tolet little Fanny go with
her own daughter. Mrs. Newton was very
glad to do so, for she thought it would be
a nice amusement for Fanny.

The nurseryman was very kind to her;
and when she was going away gave hera
fine bunch of flowers. Fanny was in
great delight; for she loved flowers, and
knew her dear grandmother loved them
too. But as she was coming back, and





24 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

just as she was entering the streets, she |
met a lady and a little boy of about three
years old, who directly held out his hands,
and began to beg for the flowers. His
mamma stopped, and, as Fanny was very
poorly dressed, she thought it probable that
she would sell her nosegay, and so she
said,

« Will you give that bunch of flowers
to my little boy ? I will pay you for it.”

“ Please, ma’am, they are for grand-
mother,” said Fanny, blushing, and think-
ing she ought to give the flowers directly,
and without money, to any one who wish-
ed for them.

“ But perhaps your grandmother would
rather have this sixpence ?” said the lady.
And Mrs. Newton’s friend, who had just
come up, said,

“Well, my dear, take the lady’s six-
pence, and let her have the flowers, if she
wishes for them.”

So Fanny held the flowers to the lady,
who took them, and: put the sixpence in
her hand. Fanny wished much to ask for
one rose, but she thought it would not be



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 25

right to do so, when the lady had bought
them all: and she looked at them so very
longingly that the lady asked if she were
sorry to part with them.

“O no, ma’am!” cried her friend, “she
is not at all sorry: come now, don’t be a
fool, child,” she whispered, and led Fan-
ny on.

“That is a good bargain for you,” she
added, as she went on: “that little spoiled
child has his own way, I think. It would
be well for you, and your grandmother
too, if you could sell sixpennyworth of
flowers every day.”

“Do you think I could, ma’am 2?” said
Fanny, opening her hand, and looking at
her sixpence; “this will buy something at
do poor grandma good: do you think Mr.
Simpson would give me a nosegay every
day ?”

«“ Tf you were to pay him forit, he would,”
said her friend. “ Suppose you were to go
every morning about five o’clock, as many
others do, and buy some flowers, and then
sell them at the market; you might earn
something, and that would be better than



26 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

being idle, when poor Mrs. Newton is not
able to do for herself and you.”

So when Fanny got back, she gave her
dear grandmother the sixpence.

“ The Lord be praised!” said Mrs. New:
ton; “for I scarcely knew how I was to
geta ze of bread for thee or myself to-
morrow.”

And then Fanny told her the plan she
had formed about the flowers. -

Mrs. Newton was very sorry to think
her dear child should be obliged to stand
in a market place, or in the public streets,
to offer anything for sale; but she said,
“ Surely it is Providence has opened this
means of gaining a little bread, while Iam
laid here unable to do anything ; and shall
I not trust that Providence with the care
of my darling child?”

So from this time forth little Fanny set
off every morning before five o’clock, to
the nursery-garden; and the nurseryman
was very kind to her, and always gave her
the nicest flowers. Instead of sitting down
with the great girls, who went there also for
flowers or vegetables, and tying them up









FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 27

in bunches, Fanny put them altogether in
her little basket, and went away to her
grandmother’s room, and spread them out
on the little table that poor Mrs. Newton
might see them, while the sweet dew was
yet sparkling on their bright leaves.

Then she would tell how beautiful the
garden looked at that sweet early hour;
and Mrs. Newton would listen with plea-
sure, for she loved a garden. She used
tosay, that God placed man in a garden
when he was happy and holy; and when
he was sinful and sorrowful, it was ina
garden that the blessed Saviour wept and
prayed for the sin of the world; and when
his death had made atonement for that
sin, it was in a garden his blessed body
was laid.

CHAPTER IV.

LESSONS FROM FLOWERS.

Mrs. Newton taught Fanny many
things from flowers; she was nota bad teach-
er, in her ow nsimple way: but Jesus Christ,
who was the best teacher the world ever







28 FANNY THE FLOWER-GIRL.

had, instructed his disciples from vines)
and lilies, corn and fruits, and birds, and
all natural things around them.

And while Fanny tied up her bunches
of flowers, she would repeat some verses
from the Holy Scriptures, such as this: “O
Lord, how manifold are thy works! in
wisdom hast thou made them all: the
earth is full of thy riches.” And after-
ward she would repeat such pretty lines |
as these :—

“Not worlds on worlds in varied form
Need we to tell a God is here ;
The daisy, saved from winter’s storm,
Speaks of his hand in lines as clear.

“ For who but He who form’d the skies,
And pour’d the dayspring’s living flood,
Wondrous alike in all he tries,
Could rear the daisy’s simple bud ?

“Mold its green cup, its wiry stem,
Its fringed border nicely spin;
And cut the gold-embossed gem,
That, shrined in silver, shines within ;

“ And fling it, unrestrain’d and free,
O’er hill, and dale, and desert sod,
That man, where’er he walks, may see
In every step the trace of God ?”



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 29

« And I too have had my daisy given
to me,” poor Mrs. Newton would say,
with tearful eyes, as she gazed on her
little flower-girl, “I too have my daisy,
and though it may be little cared for in the
world, or trodden under foot of men, yet
will it ever bear, I trust, the trace of God.”

But it happened, the very morning that

Fthe gentleman had given Fanny the half
sovereign in mistake, Mrs. Newton’s mo-
ney was quite spent; and she was much
troubled, thinking the child must go the
next morning to the garden without money
to pay for her flowers, for she did not think
it likely she would sell enough to buy
what they required, and pay for them also;
go she told Fanny she must ask Mr. Simp-
son to let her owe him for a day or two
until she got a little money she expected.
Fanny went therefore and said this to
the kind man at the garden; andhe put his
“hand on her head, and said, “ My pretty
little girl, you may owe me as long as you
please, for you are a good child, and God
will prosper you.”
So Fanny went back in great delight,

ed



30 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

and told this to Mrs. Newton; and to
cheer her still more, she chose for her
morning verse the advice that our Lord |
gave to all those who were careful and
troubled about things of this life: “ Con-
sider the lilies of the field, how they grow;
they toil not, neither do they spin; and yet
I say unto you, that Solomon in all his
glory was not arrayed like one of these.
Wherefore, if God so clothe the grass of
the field, which to-day is, and to-morrow
is cast into the oven, shall he not much
more clothe you, O ye of little faith ?”

And then she repeated some verses
which both she and Mrs. Newton liked
very much:—

“Lo! the lilies of the field,
How their leaves instruction yield !
Hark to nature’s lesson, given
By the blessed birds of heaven.

“ Say, with richer crimson glows
The kingly mantle than the rose?
Say, are kings more richly dress’d
Than the lily’s glowing vest ?”

“ Grandmother, I forget the next verse,”
said Fanny, interrupting herself; “ T know



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 3l

itis something about lilies not spinning;
but then comes this verse,—

‘Barns, nor hoarded store have we’-—

“Ttis not the lilies, grandmother, but the
‘blessed birds,’ that are speaking now,—
‘Barns, nor hoarded store, have we,
Yet we carol joyously ;

Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow.’”

Poor Mrs. Newton clasped her. thin
hands, and looked up, and prayed like the
disciples, “ Lord, increase our faith!”

“Eh!” said she afterward, “is it not
strange that we can trust our Lord and
Saviour with the care of our souls for eter-
nity, and we cannot trust him with that
of our bodies for a day?”

Well! this was poor Mrs. Newton’s
state on that day, when the gentleman gave

Fanny the half sovereign, instead of six-
pence, for her flowers.

When the little flower-girl came back
from her race with her two. sixpences, she
found the old vegetable-seller had got her
three or four pennies more, by merely



32 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

showing her basket, and telling why it was
left at his stall; and so every one left a
penny for the honest child, and hoped the
gentleman would reward her well. The
old man at the stall said it was very shab-
by of him only to give her sixpence; but
when she went home with three sixpences,
and told Mrs. Newton this story, she kiss-
ed her little girl very fondly, but said the
gentleman was good to give her sixpence,
for he was not obliged to give her any-
thing; she had only done her duty.

“But, grandmother,’ said Fanny,
“when I saw that pretty half sovereign
dropping down into his purse, I could not
help wishing he would give it to me.”

“And what commandment did you
break then, my child ?”

“ Not the eighth—if I had kept the half-
sovereign I should have broken it,” said
Fanny; “for that says, ‘Thoushall not steal.
What commandment did I break, grand-
mother; for I did not steal?”

“ ‘When we desire to have what is not
ours, Fanny, what do we do? we covet,
do we not?’



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 33

“ O! yes—thou shalt not covet thy
neighbor’s goods,” cried Fanny, “that is
the tenth commandment; and that half
sovereign was my neighbor’s goods, and
that fat gentleman was my neighbor. But,
srandmother, it is very easy to break the
tenth commandment.”

“Very easy indeed, my dear,” said Mrs.
Newton, with first a faint smile, and then
a deep sigh; “ therefore,” she added, “ we
ought always to pray like David, ‘'Turn

away mine eyes from beholding vanity.’ ”

CHAPTER V.
AN UNLOOKED-FOR VISITOR.

‘THERE iS a Very common saying, that
when things are at the worst theymend. It
is hard to say when matters are at the worst.
Poor Mrs. Newton knew they might yet be
worse with her; but certainly they were
very bad; anda few days after this, as Fan-
ny was tying up her flowers as usual, she
lay on her bed thinking what she was to do,
and praying that God would direct her to

3



34 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

some way of providing for the poor child.
‘While she was thinking and praying, tears
stole down her face; Fanny saw them,
and stopped her work, and looked sorrow-
fully at her.

“ Now you are crying again, grandmo-
ther,” she said, “and that’s what makes me
break the tenth commandment; for I can’t
help wishing the gentleman had given me
that half sovereign. But I will say the verses
again to-day about the lilies and birds; for
you know I said that morning,—

‘Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow’
And when I came back with my three six-
pences, you said God had provided for
the morrow, for you had only two or three
pennies in the house when I went out.”

“ And how many pennies, pray, have
you in the house to-day?” said a rather
eruff voice at the door.

Mrs. Newton and Fanny started; but
there, standing at the door, Fanny saw the
fat gentleman who had given her the half
sovereign.

“So you have been wishing for my

‘eer



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 30

) gold, you little rogue,” he said, looking as
if he meant to frighten her. ‘ Never mind,”
he added, smiling, “ you are a good child,
and did what was right; and I always
meant to bring it back to you, but I have
been kept rather busy these few days past.
There it is for you, and try not to break
the tenth commandment again.” ‘Then,
turning to Mrs. Newton, he said, “ We
should not expect rewards, ma’am, for do-
ing our duty; but if children do not
meet with approbation when they do right,
they may be discouraged, and perhaps
think there is no use in being good: for
they are silly little creatures, you know, -
and do not always recollect that God will
reward the just one day if men do not.”

“ O, sir!” said poor Mrs. Newton; but
the tears streamed down, and she could
not say a word more. And there Fanny
sat gazing at the half sovereign, as if she
were half stupefied.

« Well, take up that bit of gold, and do
what you like with it,’ said the fat gentle-
man; “and then run off to sell your flow-
ers, for we must not be idle because we



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

have got enough for to-day. But do what
you like with that money.”

Fanny rose up from her seat, and look-
ing very much as if she were moving in
her sleep, with her wondering eyes fixed
on the shining piece that lay in her hand,
she walked slowly over to Mrs. Newton,
and, putting it into hers, said,—

“ May I go to the grocer’s now, grand-
mother, and get you the tea for your break-
fast?”

“Yes, my love,’ said Mrs. Newton,
kissing her; “and take care of this, and
bring back the change carefully.” ‘Then,
turning to the gentleman, she said, “ I am
not young, sir, and [am very, very poorly ;
I find it hard to go without my tea, but it
is a luxury I have been obliged latterly to
forego.”

“ But could you not get tea on credit
from the grocer?” said the gentleman.

“O yes, I believe so; but there would
be no use in getting credit,’ said Mrs.
Newton; “for Iam not certain of being
better able to pay next week than I am
this week; and when I have not the mo-

ee a



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 37

) ney to pay for what I wish to get, it is bet-

-

ter to do without it, than to add to one’s
anxieties by running in debt. Do you not
think so, sir ?”

“ Ma’am,” said the old gentleman, sit-
ting down, and resting his large silver-
topped stick between his knees, “it is of
very little consequence what I think; but
if you wish to know this, I will tell you
that I think very well both of you and
your little girl, who, as I have heard, for I
have made inquiries about you both, is a
dependent on your bounty. You have
trained her up well, though I wouldn’t
praise the child to her face; and so take as
much tea as you like till you hear from me
again, and your grocer need be in no trou-
ble about his bill.”

So after the fat gentleman had made this
rather bluff, but honest-hearted speech, and
poor Mrs. Newton had wept, and thanked
him in language that sounded more polite,
the good old gentleman told her his whole
history.

He began the world very poor, and with-
out relations able to assist him; he was at



—

38 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

last taken into the employment of a young
merchant in the city; he had a turn for
business, and, having been able to render
some important services to this young man,
he was finally, to his own surprise, and
that of every one else, taken into partnership.

“ During all this time,” said he, “ I was
attached from my boyhood to the daugh-
ter of the poor schoolmaster who first taught
me to read. I would not marry her while
I was poor, for J thought that would be to
make her wretched instead of happy: but
when I was taken into partnership I
thought my way was clear; I went off to
Bethnal Green, and told Mary, and our
wedding-day was settled at once. Well,
we were glad enough, to be sure; but a
very few days after, my partner called me
into the private room, saying that he want-
ed to consult me. He seemed in high
spirits, and he told me he had just heard
of a famous speculation, by which we
could both make our fortunes at once, He
explained what it was, and I saw, with
shame and regret, that no really honest
man could join in it: I told him so, J told







» him plainly I would have nothing to do
with it, You may think what followed;
the deeds of partnership were not yet
signed, and, in short, in two or three days
more I found myself poor Jack Walton
again—indeed, poorer than I was before
I was made one of the firm of Charters
and Walton, for I had lost my employ-
ment.

“ Often and often I used to think that
David said, he had never seen the righteous
forsaken ; yet I was suffering while the un-
righteous were prospering. It was a sin-
ful anda self-righteous thought, and I was
obliged to renounce it when, after some
time of trial, a gentleman sent for me—a
man of wealth—and told me his son was
going into business on his own account;
that he had heard of my character, and of
the cause of my leaving Mr. Charters ; that
he thought I would be just such a steady

person as he wished his son to be with.
In short, I began with him on a handsome
salary; was soon made his partner; mar-
ried Mary, and had my snug house in the
country. Mr. Charters succeeded in that

FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. og



40 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

speculation, entered into several others,
some of which were of a more fraudulent
nature, failed, and was ruined. He ran
off to America, and no one knows what be-
came of him. I have left business some
years. 1 purchased a nice property in the
country, built a church upon it, and have
ever thanked God, who never forsakes
those who wish to act righteously.

“It pleased God to take all my sweet
children from me—every state has its trials
—the youngest was just like your little
flower-girl.”

Mrs. Newton was much pleased with
‘his Story; she then told her own, and lit-
le Fanny’s. The fat gentleman’s eyes
were full of tears when she ended: when
he was going away he put another half
sovereign into her hand, and saying, “ The
first was for the child,” walked out of the
house.



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 41

CHAPTER VI.
A NEW HOME.

A sHort time afterward, a clergyman
came to see Mrs. Newton—she was sur-
prised; he sat and talked with her some
time, and seemed greatly pleased with her
sentiments, and all she told him of herself
and Fanny. He then told her that he was
the clergyman whom Mr. Walton, on the
recommendation of the bishop of the dio-
cese, had appointed to the church he had
built; that Mr. Walton had sent him to
see ql and had told him, if he was satis-
fied with all he saw and heard, to invite
Mrs. Newton and the little flower-girl to
leave London, and go and live in one of
the nice widows’ houses, which good Mr.
Walton had built, near the pretty village
where he lived.

Then there was great joy in poor Mrs.
Newton’s humble abode; Mrs. Newton
was glad for Fanny’s sake, and Fanny
was glad for Mrs. Newton’s sake; so both
were glad, and both said,—



49 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

“ Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow.”

But the only difference was, that Mrs.
Newton said it with watery eyes and
clasped hands, lying on her bed and look-
ing up to heaven; and Fanny—merry lit-
tle thing!—said it frisking and jumping
about the room, clapping her hands to-
gether, and laughing her joy aloud.

Well, there was an inside place taken
in the B coach, for Mrs. Newton and
Fanny; and not only that, but kind Mrs.
Walton sent up her own maid to London,
to see that everything was carefully done,
as the poor woman was ill, and help to
pack up all her little goods; and, with her,
she sent an entire new suit of clothes for
the little flower-girl.

They set off, and when they got near to
the village the coachman stopped, and
called out to know if it were the first or
the last of the red cottages he was to
stop at; and Mrs. Walton’s maid said,
“The last—the cottage in the garden.”
So they stopped at such a pretty cottage,
with a little garden before and behind it.





FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 43

Mr. Walton had known what it was to be:
poor, and so, when he grew rich, he had
built these neat houses for those who had
been rich and become poor. ‘They were
intended chiefly for the widows of men of
business, whose characters had been good,
but who had died without being able to
provide for their families. He had made
an exception in Mrs. Newton’s case, and
gave her one of the best houses, because
it had a pretty garden, which he thought
others might not care for so much.

They went inside, and there was such a
neat kitchen, with tiles as red as tiles could
be; a little dresser, with all sorts of useful
things; a nice clock sticking opposite the
fire-place, and a grate as bright as black-
lead could make it. And then there was
such a pretty little room atone side, with a
yose-tree against the window; and a little
shelf for books against the wall; and a
round table, and some chairs, and an easy
couch, And there were two nice bed-
rooms overhead ; and, better than all these,
was a pretty garden. O how happy was
the little flower-girl ; and how thankful was





44 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

poor Mrs. Newton! The first thing she
did was to go down on her knees and
thank God.

Then Fanny was to go to the school,
for Mrs. Walton had her own school, as
well as the national school; but Fanny did
not know enough to go to it, so she was
sent to the national school first, and after-
ward she went to the other, where about
a dozen girls were instructed in all things
that would be useful to them through life
—whether they were to earn their bread
at service, or to live in their own homes as
daughters, or wives, or mothers.

But every morning, before she went out,
she did everything for her dear, good
grandmother. She made her breakfast;
she arranged her room; and she gathered
some fresh flowers in the garden, and put
them on the table in the little parlor.
O how happy was Fanny when she
looked back, and saw how nice everything
looked, and then went out singing to her
school,—

“ Barns, nor hoarded store, have we,
Yet we carol joyously ;



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 45

Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow.”

But God will not provide for the mor-
row, where people will do nothing to pro-
vide for themselves; and so Fanny, the
flower-girl, knew, for surely God had
blessed the labor of her childish hands.

Thus passed time away; and Fanny,
under the instruction that she had at church,
at school, and at home, “grew in grace, and
in the knowledge and love of God, and of
Jesus Christ our Lord.”

Good Mrs. Newton was much better in
health, and used to walk about sometimes
without any support but Fanny’s arm, and
so time went on till Fanny came to be
about fifteen ; and then Mrs. Newton, who
was not always free from “ doubt and sor-
row,” began to think what would become
of her if she were to die.

So one day, when kind Mr. Walton,
whom Fanny used once to call the fat
gentleman, came in to see her, Mrs. New-
ton told him that she was beginning to
feel anxious that Fanny should be putin



46 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

a way of earning her own bread, in case
she should be taken from her.

Mr. Walton listened to her, and then he
said,—

“ You are very right and prudent, Mrs.
Newton, but never mind that; I have not
forgotten my little flower-girl, and her race
after me that hot morning: if you were
dead, I would take care of her; and if we
both were dead, Mrs. Walton would take
care of her; andif Mrs. Walton were dead,
God would take care of her. I see you
cannot yet learn the little lines she is so
fond of,—

‘Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow.”

CHAPTER VII.
HAPPY RESULTS.

Nor very long after this conversation
came a very warm day, and in all the heat
of the sun came Mr. Walton, scarcely able
to breathe, into Mrs. Newton’s cottage; he
was carrying his hat in one hand anda



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 47

newspaper in the other, and his face was
very red and hot.

“ Well, Mrs. Newton,” said he, “what
is all this about? I can’t make it out;
here is your name in the paper!”

“My name, sir!’ said. Mrs. Newton,
staring at the paper.

“ Ay, indeed is it,” said Mr. Walton,
putting on his spectacles, and opening the
paper at the advertisement side,— see
here !”

And he began to read,—

“Tf Mrs. Newton, who lived about fif-
teen years ago near the turnpike on the
P road, will apply to Messrs. Long
and Black, she will hear of something to
her advantage. Or should she be dead,
any person who can give information re-
specting her and her family will be re-
warded.”

Mrs. Newton sat without the power of
speech—so much was she surprised; at
last she said, “It is Fanny’s father! I
know, I am sure it can be no one else!”

Mr. Walton looked surprised, for he
had never thought of this; he was almost





48 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

sorry to think his little flower-girl should
have another protector. At length he said
it must be as Mrs. Newton thought, and
he would go up to London himself next
day, and see Mr. Long and Mr. Black.
So he went; and two days afterward, when
Fanny had returned from Mrs. Walton’s
school, and was sitting with Mrs. Newton
in the little shady arbor they had made in the
garden, and talking over early days, when
they used to sit in another arbor, and Fan-
ny used to learn her first lessons from flow-
ers, then came Mr. Walton walking up the
path toward them, and with him was a
fine-looking man of about forty-five years
of age.

Mrs. Newton trembled, for when she
looked in his face she remembered the fea-
tures; and she said to herself, “ Now if he
takes my Fanny from me?—and if he
should be a bad man?” But when this
man came nearer, he stepped hastily be-
yond Mr. Walton, and, catching Mrs. New-
ton’s hands, he was just going to drop on
his knees before her, when he saw Fanny
staring at him; and a father’s feelings

/

|



| FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 49

overcame every other, and with a ery of joy
he extended hisarms, and exclaiming, “ My
child! my child!” caught her to his breast.

Then there followed so much talk, while
no one knew scarcely what was saying ;
and it was Mr. Walton, chiefly, that told.
how Fanny’s father had had so much to
struggle against, and so much hardship to
‘* go through, but how he had succeeded at
last, and got on very well; how he had
tried then to find out Mrs. Newton and his
dear little Fanny, but could not, because
Mrs. Newton had changed her abode; how,
at last, he had met with a good opportu-
nity to sell] his land, and had now come
over, with the money he had earned, to find
his child and repay her kind benefactor.

O what a happy evening was that in
the widow’s cottage! The widow’s heart
sung for joy. ‘The widow, and she that had
always thought herself an orphan, were
ready to sing together,—

“Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow.”

Mrs. Newton found that Mr. Marsden—
that was the name of Fanny’s father—was

.



50 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

all that she could desire Fanny’s father to
be; a Christian in deed and in truth; one
thankful to God and to her, for the preser-
vation and care of his child; and who
would not willingly separate Fanny from
her, or let her leave Fanny.

As he found Mrs. Newton did not wish
to leave kind Mr. Walton’s neighborhood,
and that his daughter was attached to it
also, Mr.. Marsden took some land and a
nice farm-house not far from the manor
house where Mr. Walton lived. He had
heard all about the half sovereign, and
loved his little flower-girl before he saw her.

So Mrs. Newton had to leave her
widow’s house; and she shed tears of joy,
and. regret, and thankfulness, as she did
so: she had been happy there, and had had
God’s blessing upon her and her dear girl.

But Fanny was glad to receive her dear,
dear grandmother, into her own father’s
house; her own house too: and she threw
her arms round the old lady’s neck, when
they got there, and kissed her over and
over again, and said, “ Ah! grandmother,
you recollect when I was a little girl



FANNY, THE FLOWER-GRIL. 51

tying up my flowers while you lay sick in
bed, I used to say so often,—

‘Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,

God provideth for the morrow.”

They had a large garden at the farm-
house, and Fanny and Mrs. Newton im-
proved it; and Mrs. Newton would walk
out, leaning on Fanny’s arm, and look at
the lilies and roses, and jessamine and
mignonette, and talk of past times, and of
their first garden and their first flowers,
and their first knowledge of the God who
made them; who watches the opening bud,
and the infant head; who sends his rain
upon the plant, and the dew of his bless-
ing upon the child who is taught to know
andlove him. And Fanny’s father, when
he joined them, talked over his trials and
dangers from the day that his poor wife
lay dead, and his helpless baby lay in his
arms, and then he blessed the God who
had led him all his life long, and crowned
him with loving kindness.

Three years passed, and Fanny the lit-
tle flower-girl was a fine young woman.
A farmer’s son in the neighborhood wish-



52 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

ed her to become his wife; but her father
was very sorry to think of her leaving him
so soon for another home.

He spoke to Fanny about it, and said,
“ My dear girl, I have no right to expect
you should wish to stay with me, for I
never was able to watch over your child-
hood, or to act a father’s part by you.”

And Fanny answered, with a blush and
smile, “ And I, father, was never able to
act a daughter’s part by you until now,
and therefore I think you have every right
to expect I should do so for some time
longer. I have no objection to become
Charles Brierley’s wife, and I have told him
so; but we are both young, and at all events
T will not leave you.”

“ Now,” said Mrs. Newton, who was sit-
ting by, “instead of that young man taking
more land, which is very dear about here,
would it not be a good plan if he were to
come and live with you, Mr. Marsden, and
help you with the farm ?”

And Mr. Marsden said, “That is the
very thing; I will go and speak to him
about it: and Fanny and her husband can



|
| FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL, 53
have the house and farm, and all, as much
pa they please now, and entirely at my
death.”

So it was all settled; and Fanny was
married at the village church, and Mr. and
Mrs. Walton were at the wedding. Good
Mrs. Newton lived on at the farm-house,
and when Fanny’s first child was born, it
} was put into her arms. Then she thought

of the time when Fanny herself was laid
in the same arms; and she blessed God
in her heart, who had enabled her to be of
use to one human creature, and to one im-
mortal soul and mind, while she passed
through this life to the life everlasting.
Joy and sorrow are always mingled on
this earth; so it came to pass that before
Fanny’s first child could walk alone, good,
kind Mrs. Newton, died, and was buried.
As a shock of corn cometh in its season,
so she sunk to rest, and was gathered into
the garner of her Lord. But,—

“The memory of the just
Is bless’d, though they sleep in dust.”



And Fanny’s children, and children’s chil-
dren, will learn to love that memory.



54 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

Many a day, sitting at work in her gar-
den with her little ones around her, Fan-
ny let them gather some flowers, and talk
to her about them; and then they would
beg, as a reward for good conduct, that
she would tell them about her dear grand-
mother and her own childish days; and
much as children love to hear. stories,
never did any more delight in a story,’
than did these children in the story of
Fanny, the flower-girl.

THE END.



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Full Text


xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080328_AAAAGX' PACKAGE 'UF00002164_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-03-29T03:00:24-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:06:51-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297994; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-19T05:09:20-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '124217' DFID 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHHY' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesUF00002164_00001.xml'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 6cde90f957d3f58e03ceab9540845ab4
'SHA-1' 02615f066febfec4f5019e2cb5cf8a5ea01e3a51
EVENT '2011-10-12T19:17:08-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2013-12-19T05:06:46-05:00'
xml resolution
'106' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIA' 'sip-files00002.txt'
1a9cbd1d9e86ad55e42ae7a5eefeedd3
954f019f69e261ca7ad4d493710fca6bc8948b38
'2011-10-12T19:17:21-04:00'
describe
'359' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIB' 'sip-files00003.txt'
d0480edfe23fb496cd191857cbff3478
30aa2583f5b255dc2de0e586000ad0ae7e2fbcfe
'2011-10-12T19:16:32-04:00'
describe
'402' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIC' 'sip-files00005.txt'
1bfaa849fedb1048953a78fc73c5b8cc
8c073257daff28109259c383af46bba5c836e2d9
describe
'786' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHID' 'sip-files00007.txt'
30111470da50cb12569b7f28603a950e
a23f56695d2e17720839dd691b2442ea89a14965
'2011-10-12T19:17:10-04:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIE' 'sip-files00008.txt'
db028bf5f9658ace6ad04ccebd9c99b5
84626df0f993145a77949c374f1ee50c924111b8
'2011-10-12T19:16:35-04:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIF' 'sip-files00009.txt'
1304b80fa074ed7b0e83979397bf7a5d
676bec8a78110ce2beb4c27f1e5734de1c44515b
'2011-10-12T19:16:52-04:00'
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIG' 'sip-files00010.txt'
b37d2b1e9ec4c2795c4078ea3c49ecac
b6400b283c6a5b94e3851f5c9646f223aaa7c3a3
'2011-10-12T19:16:59-04:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIH' 'sip-files00011.txt'
38cfc1c28ed3d02538ce7a25aed13c76
1083bde5c8abfdb6a0745002e01c16226d171505
'2011-10-12T19:17:04-04:00'
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHII' 'sip-files00012.txt'
d4191b95a0b76afad0a1bd0b5d11164f
39c5d959bb07f2645a4b97f18221c87ec16e4a60
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIJ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ff7f333f48f5e9c72c704891a9b54aec
0498991766737dc42d90bf5a880b541eb9d95c06
'2011-10-12T19:17:11-04:00'
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
b15f2d97b27d3989c5e86a18994198e2
2cd6f55d378a3c82be8bd7d15b31fcedb2077829
'2011-10-12T19:17:17-04:00'
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIL' 'sip-files00015.txt'
80ee74e45657f0217059e982c99457e6
11ffbcb3f53a988c58702b02e5d2c7993edc7758
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIM' 'sip-files00016.txt'
cd6e0a11d5e4379a65d65ee531d083cf
ba7dd3654f57af53a66b47718f3096a30c182916
'2011-10-12T19:17:24-04:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIN' 'sip-files00017.txt'
abed6811b53bcf26d8d15c332f4454b2
cf76a2d525a9b013c16156364f85a92c2d9eaa38
'2011-10-12T19:17:05-04:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
0bb9e00d7005f177575acf1e45fcc814
464de24cf3f0f71ecf8f94792f63e95860906bc4
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIP' 'sip-files00019.txt'
7946e663d0e24d6877eca7327e423c73
5f39453f8164fcc74f8082027c42d17556b86f1a
'2011-10-12T19:16:53-04:00'
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIQ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
ba4ee921caccea326542579b9e5889f4
d938601ad1b0e5b943ed745c58a478871a5f22a4
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIR' 'sip-files00021.txt'
2572ff566e11ec6425dd869383178d64
c172d1707bd0c2195ef4db3b069eaabad562a5a1
'2011-10-12T19:16:50-04:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
e0701b294e705e6316db7cd4ab36c1d8
904eb1204ab1445e6df5077b674b84d31ba9023a
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIT' 'sip-files00023.txt'
1d95f8fc113c6f5895aea10620d8ca59
a03030f7fd83a33db82dc44edf46557f654c9b5d
'2011-10-12T19:16:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIU' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f468eb58910de283263ad3159a54fd4a
eb47c9771ffc2b4a6ba74b778456f0caa17d63f2
'2011-10-12T19:16:34-04:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIV' 'sip-files00025.txt'
e3c9afd37158626c149fd50e0a733616
3a0531e7c9c7208435ad1b6234c5a6c0f72238a6
'2011-10-12T19:16:56-04:00'
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIW' 'sip-files00026.txt'
f39762c04debe83f32d2b8483837006a
ee7e9c761c2211517bfade90e1c2527664d9e801
'2011-10-12T19:16:58-04:00'
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIX' 'sip-files00027.txt'
913251366d03ed59dbddc7d7595ec78d
625b207d9a6e6248d46ce6e3dab4084ec6ff5be7
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIY' 'sip-files00028.txt'
c0522cf78ffdd18ba97e93d1e4546ec1
13f07e6222a86743dfbab5a0ef9b82a08c666ffa
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHIZ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
c3cc279b75cfaac3658293e406dc8331
01d547eb727a3d524bd428ef69fc8cfacc0a1d6b
'2011-10-12T19:17:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJA' 'sip-files00030.txt'
1d393a74edef5ecd0bba47ab2fcaf1ce
746153a823e44ef65d70668b2a259d642bcb3aa9
'2011-10-12T19:16:41-04:00'
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJB' 'sip-files00031.txt'
c8d218d9e08a41f9052f960de7cf17c8
cff8af2c383216c5f6fe24c486362df700d65f66
'2011-10-12T19:16:40-04:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJC' 'sip-files00032.txt'
b501e0c75eb18d9ee2a1e5773bf8d3bb
5dfccccbc52e28c18312f2551b1e84714b2befaa
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJD' 'sip-files00033.txt'
b7083cd8dd2105f47c7265a18ccad8bc
fd4a1ddf17b52564504771ae6f64f15b9653e51c
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJE' 'sip-files00034.txt'
c7b70a32bceb00c7a1cd9683669db23c
842929e3076d5fb1c58b4af12e1c7d5ad0bf1ac8
'2011-10-12T19:17:19-04:00'
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJF' 'sip-files00035.txt'
13403b8682b2af2ce7978f12ababdb14
442c68e7ca5c887f9ab9a82760e8d907e86a37ef
'2011-10-12T19:17:29-04:00'
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJG' 'sip-files00036.txt'
423b05a6bcb9b34852baf58c66cabd8d
139a2b758b57437b046fdca301fc6d0eb561a8ad
'2011-10-12T19:17:06-04:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJH' 'sip-files00037.txt'
59e336e16fb8d6b218f432865614e012
984de8160865f409c8991b57d68170d36776d19e
'2011-10-12T19:17:02-04:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJI' 'sip-files00038.txt'
64b120f4cd6076cddf37065d4b92ac22
6005bb68870d8f53c755cfafd1dddf4bd34d930e
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJJ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5f895915017e1f97a1d8a448d6ed175e
d3f60a43a71f293e8f795d8dd7282be710e77f4d
'2011-10-12T19:16:33-04:00'
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
5e9e8b25f5739c7a915c1ac6ffe2a7b5
7c61cb43647d4fec1fdd813c72d86a6f6d431d32
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJL' 'sip-files00041.txt'
6c689b079164ae9d01b6930812f387e2
15558202c294c5863db7effd21f3e5ca39dc9c7a
'2011-10-12T19:16:55-04:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJM' 'sip-files00042.txt'
5ebc67db849fd0788f8892b3b77c5dba
b07d0bee33cc129f0c79332c62f84b1f0118c12f
'2011-10-12T19:17:01-04:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJN' 'sip-files00043.txt'
14ce84a0ce2036078488b14c6d3ea18e
3105d0b26a8fb8494e27befe1766472db4658e3b
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJO' 'sip-files00044.txt'
4ca77263f75ece9f6dddbbc2c36b425d
a414937270facaa3cd5201e72aaa81b605367b90
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJP' 'sip-files00045.txt'
971a1d02beb47adb65621fcc6d4e09fa
0005ab6e0fdf92aaf78a3cbf9109965b1192de9a
'2011-10-12T19:16:37-04:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
56f990f7f0a4d284b9780e39202c7d3e
8c3dcf1b7bf9f0f79031e481a027fc71b50d5945
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJR' 'sip-files00047.txt'
eef69f338c62de83d2494f287abbd358
f6df422bf5aa20f55424296f4af23c310feed609
'2011-10-12T19:17:25-04:00'
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJS' 'sip-files00048.txt'
2792c99655d3ca6cc149cff00ef896f1
c3c21dec15b7296f0673743f4f3db9ec044d9f1d
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJT' 'sip-files00049.txt'
a1ac113394433ca9c4c856ae08563963
812571fa01c39cd56b77e0e40c9803d7c5acdaca
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJU' 'sip-files00050.txt'
f7340f8caaaf7f6f9b16f54b905226dd
61340b5a9432f6a83401c75764e7920e204a6826
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJV' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a457ddc55e99f4504feae6a999412a75
8c460b8322e2999fdb20fc0f1120281ed1fc27fd
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJW' 'sip-files00052.txt'
ab1446b9333052036f1dc45f0c22237c
b52d14f29b975ae33c6f8df9ad6cea8703387a43
'2011-10-12T19:16:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
970fa5f1e535c62c548080ac16341117
a5a77e881358de6cb3459ed467f58a927442f63f
describe
'515' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
d7877d2e11fc7bb6c239760968b94562
668dadff457a21fc56482842d94298da9f47246a
'2011-10-12T19:16:57-04:00'
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHJZ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
c3f9bbe0b7c9989f8dd6071489990816
e85bfce0f14ac739b52828f8ff400ba87ace4bab
'2011-10-12T19:16:30-04:00'
describe
'536' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKA' 'sip-files00002.pro'
e7ba3a9aa9d9ea5af019c18756bf3713
3621626003c419b5f8382acb5cfc89509ca3fd6a
'2011-10-12T19:17:13-04:00'
describe
'6034' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKB' 'sip-files00003.pro'
e467043de3e164d7c83d2d4efcf82e2e
1dbdc32d845d3fd2258ec08d0182e3e853393d50
'2011-10-12T19:16:38-04:00'
describe
'8508' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKC' 'sip-files00005.pro'
ee04a725c0d1b1245c0c36c9c67cdd86
b0287f552af81866594d953a61a7d5c143953e96
'2011-10-12T19:17:16-04:00'
describe
'17635' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKD' 'sip-files00007.pro'
644afd12b86eb81e59a184cfab8a9a13
757f2cfaaa7e135f4c896c15316845656549a1ce
'2011-10-12T19:16:51-04:00'
describe
'25988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKE' 'sip-files00008.pro'
ee182e6bdc5bafc03017582bfe0823a3
30f1864985ab7867acfb46df6447bacdbd180fd1
describe
'26806' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKF' 'sip-files00009.pro'
59427726b2ac7ad3e3df8a41c788ee32
08189d10fe1438b0c0a2a66ef7c700fc833424ab
describe
'23781' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKG' 'sip-files00010.pro'
ec99f15aa0978700138e60712a5daec9
0bf8b6df0f3f8ee97fd00f1f94cb586ce3ecf3ab
'2011-10-12T19:16:46-04:00'
describe
'26353' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKH' 'sip-files00011.pro'
4466a44a7f7e826bfff381b883270593
6c2d5c27f6b3c9d938398264bdb5e3ec288dd099
'2011-10-12T19:17:28-04:00'
describe
'24501' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKI' 'sip-files00012.pro'
baad6bffbf3e323835c52c2ab845214d
a6f349183346dbcf887c0464e16842a0f70b267f
describe
'26273' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKJ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
9d5fbd9921393bd31215cabd907a5263
c11b9703717dc214858c91e57e61256c36e5c8df
'2011-10-12T19:17:18-04:00'
describe
'24139' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKK' 'sip-files00014.pro'
f3eaebf7d00a591fbbf41f6c200faa53
103fcbd68eb80303733ac13a5dfea8823b5bf425
describe
'21895' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKL' 'sip-files00015.pro'
cd55534a7e80eab86c8614785b7d9bdd
2bd6b5f8fa7bbdaf2196ede651baa37f71a4f52a
describe
'25777' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKM' 'sip-files00016.pro'
42e91ed3d27ceb7d5b0b892d49ad26f3
a24029b54413bf6a6e0f629c8713f5138ede06b3
describe
'26143' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKN' 'sip-files00017.pro'
b7bc8d0d49abba8d92c6cdfe0de3d7dc
94a97349d777e6b8d2329447b157b50bc7f0fe66
describe
'26518' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKO' 'sip-files00018.pro'
e7fbebbce175e6025b808d44c5d0af5e
fd9d8a861f58ac5837d06c6e4478815fc6df2b8d
describe
'26830' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKP' 'sip-files00019.pro'
9fc064a019140038d3f77f2901f24ddf
0056658ab2a59f74e33f98da2d8abcd871295918
'2011-10-12T19:17:00-04:00'
describe
'21068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKQ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
0151f3d1d70597024cbe6da25d4e1b47
6bd72526ebb5a160fe7b57d784bda2957f3c2e3c
describe
'22501' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKR' 'sip-files00021.pro'
aa029dd8c3b6a655dc2a176bd45d54f9
b2241a7ee1339a221528551fb34d7c58bdffff29
'2011-10-12T19:17:07-04:00'
describe
'27042' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKS' 'sip-files00022.pro'
9985982cb3dc7f55b5ff4b037cbfa602
4774dc8e70a704166416852c5394ea6157bc4b83
'2011-10-12T19:17:03-04:00'
describe
'26611' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKT' 'sip-files00023.pro'
6ffb1ba4773d48d6dff2d6c99375619b
1303d1841b3c6e9e95e3c552a6e612ac2cdedc1c
'2011-10-12T19:16:45-04:00'
describe
'24417' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKU' 'sip-files00024.pro'
11b567535dbc1aa4445f414edeed84cf
79c9cde617773e3734f221ced6b770906caa704f
describe
'25289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKV' 'sip-files00025.pro'
288fd87c249dc255912722563d7efe2f
1c456a23a16dd74fd788724621015c86c3202f38
describe
'25517' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKW' 'sip-files00026.pro'
6f2263f211cd3fd3d3f9c28376673741
2558492f577a18d86790f941c304f85bf7ee1de5
describe
'23229' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKX' 'sip-files00027.pro'
38438df8c03a6af83914fb09879a146f
5fd5b51eff9df7abaf4dcbe9b382f68355fefdc6
'2011-10-12T19:17:20-04:00'
describe
'25529' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKY' 'sip-files00028.pro'
98c0ee0b144877db4504da51d03ca0dc
5fb0eb33adaa9e48108ae712104a234c54d301f1
describe
'26423' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHKZ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e062f38da5c98a36f9df634cd6e92624
a6efc5c20c92da5f9eb2c3dc8834f2b594b708be
describe
'24902' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLA' 'sip-files00030.pro'
17aa10245b27a3df0fc1f848813e5363
45da33d21a93307f874edbe58278dcfa57a1b7e8
describe
'24411' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLB' 'sip-files00031.pro'
b572640563535f6d0986be19813fb1dc
8aaaf5bae588d0d91c3efa379b0fe65fa88ac3cf
'2011-10-12T19:16:31-04:00'
describe
'26209' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLC' 'sip-files00032.pro'
2f9c33e01035ce980bacf30cc4c5e79f
61799b8679ad30f6d5c4eaf13afd764cf2564869
describe
'23135' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLD' 'sip-files00033.pro'
61af49f714483867b6e770431d391d8a
be7d156ccee7e88fc195e30630fa0f4073c78e52
describe
'24700' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLE' 'sip-files00034.pro'
01e1ebef9343f54e2d2d9b6f9dfcc92b
538a6ea3ed758eade75c67471b5c5cfe751d0384
'2011-10-12T19:16:39-04:00'
describe
'26670' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLF' 'sip-files00035.pro'
862d202fc1afec51dc5119a6c0ab65a7
3cd80cd780c65f2c63417bbb1d399a94aaf55771
'2011-10-12T19:16:44-04:00'
describe
'25073' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLG' 'sip-files00036.pro'
df8db8e0ae4023f1663037df6a44bbb7
a0af82339fb416b9d8107707d2bda5bc1caf00b3
'2011-10-12T19:17:15-04:00'
describe
'26661' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLH' 'sip-files00037.pro'
b02a62176d56bf4ec09fcef375130a1e
14c6d313e2b0175cdba66c63f96628a35ede4757
'2011-10-12T19:17:22-04:00'
describe
'27414' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLI' 'sip-files00038.pro'
627ab1af7dac223e90bf41ee34913f1d
bbd53e9a44c92c50ce53aec90cc8dd9d35eb504e
describe
'26964' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLJ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
57b19f9c4cd7cc9bd4da9815291ca122
b62e57bb7bcef20936d03d71b773580b9934b431
describe
'20149' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLK' 'sip-files00040.pro'
cc503ea268db401916b00f1432ee44e0
ed552d6affc62e6a72c4c0d88876044837135596
describe
'22160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLL' 'sip-files00041.pro'
cad044afd5a51710d6f48fbd998bbb12
ee31335347eff1c7b52aa1b0ba5070270a88e048
describe
'26894' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLM' 'sip-files00042.pro'
db90514969b29e031a481c90083bd849
d63138eaca93ecb75b3d5274694eef9a54cfaf70
describe
'28081' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLN' 'sip-files00043.pro'
24d0d7d6a761cf3be166b717e99e2d11
bf84b1d2ea909a05863e3c9749d47cc1b130415f
'2011-10-12T19:16:54-04:00'
describe
'24492' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLO' 'sip-files00044.pro'
7bfdf6212a4e8a4d7347ea8a9e026f59
76917ac3facc02ca688260679818cdd9ed36924c
describe
'24262' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLP' 'sip-files00045.pro'
dfc8f5936fa9ec8abc3f366bd1fbe5fe
b14f2ba3cf02774ec17f4615446035c350ce4158
'2011-10-12T19:17:09-04:00'
describe
'20783' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLQ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
9e985c4ded812e97ada7b4c49842662a
d443f82008243d9fc620913e8e0946e0f8ef9c89
describe
'22644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLR' 'sip-files00047.pro'
305f983b2470a99f15537e75666fe1d9
1409c3af0d373c8cca6ba177629d39833e34f56e
describe
'27244' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
487d1f3c822af7f2713588898a5e4922
51c670c1b57ac7c4b16dd8efddd9a19d0674a508
'2011-10-12T19:16:49-04:00'
describe
'26966' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLT' 'sip-files00049.pro'
78099522c111a8bd9493475f13a1bedf
fcc6e5aa9f08b2b6ee578a690d490a69cb322c99
describe
'27720' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLU' 'sip-files00050.pro'
aff4a40210e4d78ea8c8211c26007639
7959c5f6dd11e6d2352f0065292c8dc44480adcf
describe
'26728' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLV' 'sip-files00051.pro'
656fdff992ae0d1539c2d6cf580086b6
619279bcbd7cfc257e881e2ed30a4df6eac45683
describe
'26968' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLW' 'sip-files00052.pro'
e4a886e9d2be28d6fe5cf65e75245159
46e053440b1a4fa6d36c6bc03060c78af5d00a18
describe
'26170' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLX' 'sip-files00053.pro'
8d20818d53b0312b1df581f72ccc4b20
3cad1e27c89c58a4e4f4165b7fc14810662e45ce
describe
'11568' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLY' 'sip-files00054.pro'
0ff24cf054a78bf3cb077b7cecc80051
c11f44afd8af8a5fb3625426830c472de31fffbe
describe
'19114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHLZ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
a0351d521900cf11efef0937dc0f35b5
53a54ada8cbf787f4d3f95f2753848fe4e829217
describe
'194630' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMA' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
af6aa492b7b63a9332d3683e97734c87
7b8aa49a6800678188acfc9117eb89a1594ba09d
describe
'156355' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMB' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
762dbd3585660ca10c23a33f96d169e4
2748020600f79b8274301f491d8c5c8ab52d7eff
describe
'158220' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMC' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
c8b898881f765e9deae766de26108f7d
fbfb2a96de8d7a9bef6adb7a8d67f956ca8fcc02
'2011-10-12T19:17:27-04:00'
describe
'160534' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMD' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
976464492f13c3b93480d8da9d608c16
7057cb58f6e7f001eb9d7adc31736f124c8e8e99
describe
'162458' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHME' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
e0e6a7532a633c026e55637040c51f06
211b6cf4c73026d9d6e39e17a7295fd3c3efd586
describe
'169570' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMF' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
0fd970ab40225cf49ded67bdb4c6561b
d1be3c28d580126826cb4741b4492b6197c3b252
describe
'155613' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMG' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
7cde77742358d1d6ee323c63c9023b30
4039445c2112c0ecc450e727d8159de2bf53f14a
describe
'184069' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMH' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
80941fe418f7874451c149342f324da7
7d6ba1ebc937cd71f036f2dd5ef1092dd0148eaf
describe
'190305' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMI' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
15547a325623a4e263eb062dff365a8d
17f2f4bc362920f46ede497ef6081c65b5f3f39e
describe
'160099' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMJ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
e00555c03d112bb0307784b162da141b
d4bf864ea5e45541a7ef31bbbe3851b08fe9d349
describe
'162801' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMK' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
e4ad14880bd0d38f5be3b3e174c5d979
477997d1d9360f6f7f271905470eecafb9db792d
describe
'157240' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHML' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
98d30fbf361b7a5bdff2b1800f020322
23cb54cb15f8e19ba0a75f70f10d72bc8b28e788
describe
'156552' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMM' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
0b536abe0d9077601475b078f772e8d4
388416301dee689f44bbb7324bd16522f7f5893c
describe
'159343' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMN' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
fe843a0a83cb6fd3d6fa26c381c491ec
4d8a3f45b7e4ee04ce656b342d88141ea8583762
'2011-10-12T19:16:29-04:00'
describe
'147606' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMO' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
9108e33945d5f5aaf5ee7a1a72df329b
5af0ed716178be0573e746822e463e92635343b9
describe
'166467' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMP' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
6c82d34b6bd1e87cb57547a8abbd61a5
80b100f451b8c29fc6bef4245caae2e07b8eb790
describe
'151624' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMQ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
859de2806b8a5cb952363816f6155ff8
433f8f6de2e0ecab679e15722144e500604bdfb7
describe
'160376' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
d6b00f7cca5efd1b16e9be3710f98444
a739e771b58d875b27c687d43ff6e928e4e3fb85
describe
'159975' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMS' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
7908fa43ff09db80ef6e88e3361454f3
a59dfa3444dcca51ec8d5c148329c14bf83f52a4
describe
'168510' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMT' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
cd64fde2b91eb394546727f3e5fad066
4921059daf73647870fbd27065947c84ac129b48
describe
'152071' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMU' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
cf3c7ee0addffc66355b1cde36cbd812
81007560eae91ae6c436f0c75d2edd1edad8be93
describe
'171712' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMV' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
c48a1d2d1f6a22b5bc0471fb6b9c1443
282b54bd5afad74705d4cd63b17994d4f5031666
describe
'164454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMW' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
1d4a5b60b4c31b271399c5b3940d2767
a7f8c90f2e643ebd6af546fea641fbc084c7db8d
describe
'173854' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMX' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
fb989e633c6490b7023c991d639fee5d
e0c98d5858518cbcb90035d030b3951ec35e36a7
describe
'151034' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMY' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
555d24b0c6b783712b752f348a268935
e6c7e35ff05d1d22cb3c1c53d4b60eccc5d43cb0
describe
'169250' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHMZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
a9c50b057491557268a68f0be8217a42
a4830c0cf223b030b61e252ddc3422ffb05df870
describe
'155366' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNA' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
1f69a48f90854a8f87cc9f0b34780fd3
080aba68af6766039f90c9c44cde43a47544f0fc
describe
'167409' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNB' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
096fc84ae0cd2de9820e610af607d269
eac3712a5c0fe55da7d70b8cc136db1e1e1c93b9
describe
'156756' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
b52c2d5b2f22f4ba631d7fc3c325cfa5
a47591d354678eb440c84df979e825d5e9567edd
describe
'168703' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHND' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
c0168510b9551b1a8fd9de2d3ac74dee
abd2ab16a51b91ee315bff6c3e3d70896e71745f
describe
'157885' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNE' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
9c369552338569148159bc1fd5ac3dd7
0555cddb74a4adebc9f21008890fc77c8119e1bd
describe
'168992' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNF' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
2894a92f64231a281ef931565f451ba4
8cb42896b248406a0272e120c9d7ec1ce5b27030
describe
'167275' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNG' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
8b127b16df07a486be89ba4edca0243d
a0c2441c077ca0a8d151e410429715857ac0b780
describe
'185585' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNH' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
56afaffacd009e96d5e702642f5ffec4
93fdf8567a0bb6f7b77224582c49c1fa8ed98a41
describe
'186137' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNI' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
9b903c240fab39bb8da096954dd3b3f7
fae230d0ba346e0e90428448ec194ad6a25858a2
describe
'188794' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNJ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
356aebd44feb19fd110c9d413b46aeb6
4d041149d2bbdb9f42bb5add43cb015a50086c5c
describe
'190059' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNK' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
9121af8ed6ff0266e8b2d370912c2033
08c5e31deede11c0231750a18b21da62d4361f0d
describe
'187228' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNL' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
8d957797f6a03b3d62d2f5470bc145fa
0171585c2e01c1e8fa01a57c008748658b84f0cd
describe
'189605' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
fd4a7f163cf3f646299155d9fdf56c1a
39097af2abecdbf6aae9e67007711bdfb472bd56
describe
'148275' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNN' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
301fd6de4766d0b7d9f385d36571c35f
3ca5e67185ac79b0bb3578d6588feb4eae79a2d4
describe
'149629' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNO' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
8121d554dc2cf77ba6b6a41e3bb6e5f9
24c3381a7daced9c579b8dc53bb4bdff2a696272
describe
'168560' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
e0f16248424e18afca09d22bd981d2e6
1a669637dea734dfdd1f8badbcab7f3fbab4fae2
describe
'149815' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNQ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
a1454d3a2425081bc408a21b8773c2e9
4eb299839e397e0dc0d9ab9150851612790ed284
describe
'161487' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
5f206e6af9d070e8cb9b8cc268e2a2aa
cb2166025e680eeacf2528fddd00f9391962faea
describe
'149036' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNS' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
50b510ce3a8ba4c9022b1933230fdec3
e7765d78d12ba79a3fe5487b151f37c5278dab68
describe
'172858' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNT' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
ddc0ff08516b04505dbb8e0e4523cbc6
3ecccad51759c4ca0d85e28c2b353c37fa9db522
describe
'145223' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNU' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
5dcd002b0176d901cfc032f16beba83b
ba3994b7413f9c9c48e3e2df86d209f6a8700137
describe
'170392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNV' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
f30671f69b93d3ebe0c10e5ff78f3765
9bd8379a192e8388317b674a354cb3c2423d5782
describe
'164414' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNW' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
24cbd6461feec20a8eac8ca8182cfda8
6742f6a260a91fbb2898b184ee455a453ec3a2da
describe
'187196' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNX' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
01f9659f321143ebf85e9817001b991c
d0f2af132c95b82d1032d2b088405eb9cfbd733e
describe
'147889' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNY' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9b1e2386124f4942773e6c19d33a9f77
aec117fc7fabf1ed2950f43aeb4d37f8c0602a82
describe
'167156' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHNZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
f13f0ff6a8ff77ed745451f12b8fd7e2
f1691697d0d13c865f10e4280a256e728b620365
describe
'154926' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOA' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
fafce485c1eee69677208eafa1046afc
9f6cd837b827c8527edeb97dc452fc738faa49a8
describe
'163588' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOB' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
55be9626b4762141435b4c54f584ac68
62d77ca2d0c53d7733fd5ee2393a0ffdf004c338
describe
'210835' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOC' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
978a82a551b905cfb3c12eb8624124bb
7350dbe3bd258768ab5bac0e9aa99c004ad67917
describe
'4679820' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOD' 'sip-files00001.tif'
49ddbf585c9fcf6baf69aa8312a825bd
8a5e4291c041f7fc096472ae33c3e59f597ff3d7
describe
'1262204' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOE' 'sip-files00002.tif'
d5e38cdf07b26b4ad4c553c73b2856c1
4fd023b9bf310f57272a66a30d1adb5c0ac35c39
describe
'1276528' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOF' 'sip-files00003.tif'
d1696e4e45836da3c267e3f5648ad539
7c8cf49788cf9fbccbb8f3ee090e6dba83708317
describe
'1292448' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOG' 'sip-files00004.tif'
91b4bd8ea8655018d9f31ca3e44bab72
fe91036175ac70bb40e84ea4d147d8a974a37fa5
describe
'1309852' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOH' 'sip-files00005.tif'
6cf670f3b525abf85f13c7c10dde1f2a
5102ef69f875ed1c141484d948bf8df407e619b0
describe
'1365612' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOI' 'sip-files00006.tif'
15e0f866e84b8aa877c8ddc8ceb419e0
58cf4316b298dc88e7b5ff8043f4ed4fe5e5cfd8
describe
'1257704' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOJ' 'sip-files00007.tif'
eeb9345fe3c4679b3fab30221a244edb
352da82c658494d6edd40990bf2f91f2b2a6c364
describe
'1485844' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOK' 'sip-files00008.tif'
1f50f86463eaed07537b3d3c71fee944
10d0b5fd818efeebc317b7e024e8a5ef73350976
describe
'1537108' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOL' 'sip-files00009.tif'
5f2ee0d6df3ecf244ebe1a3cfecc8fed
3525bc15e76c18a23e7770385ccedd56371a3d3b
describe
'1294780' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOM' 'sip-files00010.tif'
a664301ed45924f0d2dd86bb303ea2cb
cd8f8860d8947c0c4e6fb8dcd156caaa9dce0e1c
describe
'1316324' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHON' 'sip-files00011.tif'
1c3c8a7846c561f3216b4e469172ab91
2e6ecb09d134fc5a623d52e0629a6ae90cff0cee
describe
'1271956' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOO' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a88e63ed0f3fd6f38ba1b63088e940ce
7c429aea2cb17e65ce6d3f13af9542a3c6b91dbd
describe
'1266640' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOP' 'sip-files00013.tif'
f65064315f266c8e9c80cbcc4501b09b
98cefa6f7076122a41aeb07c092129c31df9d80f
describe
'1288900' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOQ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
040a2568e390da2b5388021319ef6593
d6f20d09e7480cec23f8a69fe9067bca5189cd8a
describe
'1194292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOR' 'sip-files00015.tif'
a8740326ecb44a7b22ff96566e2db37d
e635cb7f49e33b146498dea4eb6a46337cf875f9
describe
'1345224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOS' 'sip-files00016.tif'
8f1f3e578660cc4b52b1386ad8915c53
dccafd67d69953b0e01526f04aff3f4856940a70
'2011-10-12T19:17:23-04:00'
describe
'1227420' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOT' 'sip-files00017.tif'
e235177981ba4aaf21f875830c719422
1c7876423c736b16dded54c26f33c3f8d554f9f1
describe
'1297384' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOU' 'sip-files00018.tif'
624f56f273ac66eb6605c40c809da2fc
9d9b87fb5ccdce3e8a91d960fa041668ae6f1f98
describe
'1293644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOV' 'sip-files00019.tif'
603bec36b2cb8b5eece3998297ebb068
35ed3b6b88a4f8dfb38a2bd8bfd4786dea70ccf5
'2011-10-12T19:16:42-04:00'
describe
'1360960' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOW' 'sip-files00020.tif'
ec4c61b9dd4d8475b57b36f2c86e9f43
7ebff88912df3ff01495937316dc462be0fc94ba
describe
'1229688' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
1dc55f41d30f205fd09ff5c9712527a3
1888563fac79eeaa66700af803ed1aa9bfc72dd3
describe
'1388028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOY' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e0ec3d610f0fc5c2201b19e3827f2e6d
391fd329b6f771c16b6747367bf99363f5693477
describe
'1329392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHOZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
02154e4de278b5c04fd5bd65e750a5c5
ecbe73a31cad0a159e9fea82d8d5b41e51d6b113
describe
'1404196' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPA' 'sip-files00024.tif'
fec286681c1b34f56c6f11a8aa51ee21
956817bad883d54ba6526d6a6e43ec246f030940
describe
'1222812' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPB' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e6fe413d16b7fcc4a697ac507237f8df
86cdc116773119aec65429ca8fe4c09425ea2981
describe
'1367520' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPC' 'sip-files00026.tif'
66f9cec1e4e415e9b379880c09130f68
8c89c913e2dc8f5a01c8ef8aeee1c87ec5a9764f
describe
'1256776' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPD' 'sip-files00027.tif'
7de6e1f61e3bc70105b644193a74b019
80727d7bec5dcc6a93e6a05d9e3b27627e70e588
describe
'1352400' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPE' 'sip-files00028.tif'
92dafcbd8a8e19e18eada32284722572
a6fa86f29ae62a1b14d82850aa7eeaef51a787c3
describe
'1267884' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPF' 'sip-files00029.tif'
7d8c891871647d1a78a768b0bd484972
44b9579dbacffe12841598fd63c6e36ed19108de
describe
'1361592' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPG' 'sip-files00030.tif'
ce03ebdf77cba7e841dda1a7ed0d0cba
c08014cefc39502ed342dc92d3612b10edd26949
describe
'1276928' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPH' 'sip-files00031.tif'
9f1eb7da4c659b3942ead4fa56761ece
86ce65685298d510cb1a947abca77529d84e2a77
describe
'1364864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPI' 'sip-files00032.tif'
5d45c4688ce8e3844d2838bbd17e23b4
d9f8520d49b75d9a4700e7d08eba4590537e42c3
describe
'1350924' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPJ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
deaa3526559f9a5783feb928353dfcbe
b2a87acb276ad7ef209a67a7073775573ec822b0
describe
'1498404' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
f068057c92682ac486153c0cd7b416ed
8820181eeb989e86cf9d3a2fe4cb583e473996af
describe
'1502512' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPL' 'sip-files00035.tif'
bb1b0874cd1f04ebebc257153d9b0573
aa2d6680077a5bb96efbc86c24723fc24af68ec0
describe
'1523760' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPM' 'sip-files00036.tif'
9afb8c1eb2c8dbece36c45d239912814
b9f358b134d1c08a7734279edb10d6a10300a665
describe
'1533276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPN' 'sip-files00037.tif'
f30837094985a6bbad7075bb3a2f96dd
e9f7f49bcc07973b38bfb25a8c46fd5160b18e73
describe
'1511868' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPO' 'sip-files00038.tif'
3044d7ec6cb3a3bd4a52960efc4604e8
fc14693959a59ef8fa41f019abc04e6ba00cf4dd
describe
'1530760' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPP' 'sip-files00039.tif'
08314b8276aac774b1d68bfce09e7607
32f5227aa2f65986546df3b23ed840be23451327
describe
'1199620' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPQ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
39aecc292b072ffc2caae2f39cd8b131
1e8dbff908613da0266487ce1a4f2140c6c6f429
describe
'1211416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPR' 'sip-files00041.tif'
ef300eac871f2cc352541a829f30fc46
d1371c365ec55bb84d1516d476c32d83bca83709
describe
'1361604' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPS' 'sip-files00042.tif'
3cbfd19c57b0336d77eea4cf35f81ae4
74f9374968751db442d0d46bf77c21fd0f47a4de
describe
'1212900' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPT' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d3153ca1ead4f27b6d6fc58f28e850cf
aaffb57f6780dd8d58b9f2c8893b3762c58f10d4
describe
'1305656' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPU' 'sip-files00044.tif'
7f6e766a6de5da6b53a6b46477664b6d
50651d6c9c48133ef2a26cf635bce801b0c31760
describe
'1205888' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPV' 'sip-files00045.tif'
de361382307bdc53ab3713b21e5bd50b
14b0a3dc1478164403ec0ece0c25384e3444b20a
describe
'1396572' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPW' 'sip-files00046.tif'
ce905fe18fe14f7e50a8c1c2f44c8073
279f6fcc4ad1ff9c4ba1af0ccc9dd04ec8ae293f
describe
'1175480' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPX' 'sip-files00047.tif'
3b36913f8935bf348a2ecd5905a5b2a5
b5fc0cc22cd4f77dacff7f0586c0df1189819404
describe
'1377236' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPY' 'sip-files00048.tif'
54fd5450291609730733f04eab56ad44
24f4b039f767b5106408904dea85f3974f4ae4e5
describe
'1328960' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHPZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
ba344cebd9adbcdda0a979332f57c556
d30f21088b3079970e6897d5e60bda04aef820f9
describe
'1511556' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQA' 'sip-files00050.tif'
afe90622a666506a849d4f0231c42161
db01bbfdf2235160df31bff7fbe05b1b0f4e7b9f
describe
'1197416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQB' 'sip-files00051.tif'
e4b8da1eeb98ff2803b8f69b897e0026
41fa8b678d7a068e04f90251455f627ebd28681a
describe
'1351496' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQC' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ee73b84e0b0066e0dcbdf2c094c40c09
912c3795e76df02b0f24084dee60cae621b49d7e
describe
'1253684' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQD' 'sip-files00053.tif'
3c7e4f791f337cfba427526f736a5591
8267cd2a44c51d22fe5e82fa210f715956430930
describe
'1319592' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQE' 'sip-files00054.tif'
57aa23b3c0228bf4995a6f8ff8cca5d4
4849ceccf1c7858a585066eaf39e06e7a042609f
describe
'5069096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQF' 'sip-files00055.tif'
28621ed2e7d598c2278a4a0956ec85a5
ee98e5e48d387b9be120df87762361e13da06863
'2011-10-12T19:16:48-04:00'
describe
'123236' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQG' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
fb6016bf8e3892f940319bd2145f7c72
8a214502a49678a8d3feec9792712136f3c584aa
describe
'191781' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQH' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
57deb824647ec04ed7c80028881f5c5a
a0612031e4cd7455f9930a2cdd3d5ee8f41c124f
describe
'95162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQI' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
597c8e03472af934e44eefcd3aadd8fe
5f42b20edc74f6888655813376331836d0a38cd8
describe
'36030' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQJ' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
53aaf97cc226c1f8b1ab8f0a31cc9990
96f7b17865e25d4bde45f4b486d0e0d3adbfe9e1
describe
'68188' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQK' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
b3ad633ab6d2dba222f28199fbf4c159
d22845f18066337a30f719581210ed29bb004cd6
describe
'44339' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQL' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
b8a9f1a757e4a0e18db821a6e6623a41
f9e5f78d7b1408ff328a8d2af38fc9847121d1db
describe
'130657' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQM' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
e98bbcc902e9962f1be088d59d72fc26
558bdda2b67bcd082868f22674ec6675efa6829d
describe
'168585' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQN' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
1d95628f5c3f163e5a2f3dd6c061df50
47d6a8d65cce7edcbcda9e03ea3015dfa6eff002
describe
'178592' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQO' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
d50356cc6ff3400ed4c3f027025f00cb
7548884c1b33189d71e18aca770032a6e07db55f
describe
'170709' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQP' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
b8b0519855120356def9cddba1235709
2890061a7dcc89a191d942d3b0f5084adb87e18f
describe
'182929' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQQ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
057bfd51fd64eb29b3ae81fdb370655b
cf907cb7b48935c9de8c8aa4a8ed069686ddf924
describe
'180682' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQR' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
cd0c26f74fa67bfb91d1c97a438141af
696a8fd4d8aabf74662f179aef3f9368e67ca541
describe
'183159' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQS' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
45e9fc5e5316da7c3ab59cdb79f28867
97a7cf996c6b5172e61bea41ed16b1de793f8187
describe
'186731' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQT' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
3a319d9d9cb1e6faf6567ff064c31ebf
a4260922353aeb5fe62790e6d0d2b0ae8414858e
describe
'153212' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQU' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
713686249c3c14f72559b8b482b2e383
0da9ea3f47d5c0964624cbea456226e439da7cc2
describe
'184151' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQV' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
03593f50bb7b73a7578466e4ebabeeb5
7db87c865f626a9f8f6e29dd59cceaed8da18de0
describe
'176536' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQW' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7785d6bee8bcf0d346a4ffbc89b4f6e0
6f3fcccbc6796458569cd4969c4c83e28634c66b
describe
'177820' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQX' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
68c09a890eec0e72bccd269ada10dae5
ca251bce99fcdd2d2685ea43a271494bd823d8ef
describe
'176067' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQY' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
195476875f48fc934757e97df60668a8
1f723733a7cf2047c4edc2a71459254cd7a0560e
describe
'149583' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHQZ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
7ded49d48c947d55657ffbda17d8b615
48778a783c15e0ed254b4f1ca639d8aea7431948
describe
'147422' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRA' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
99a30bfd60098537e71b517f00a57e73
59ab9d77e083c522e4beb02efb23eaa0e88c9df6
describe
'183234' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
a472e8654aae35cb99ff17040a28a294
e329fd25ab4641e4412b5cd74eb44344dc71ed1a
describe
'171569' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRC' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
7d3dfe650895a25bb6315c97204e145c
65d48910c4892e1744fe229c5221cc27a8eb1998
describe
'161721' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
83edecc761e7ce6d6a93a49be876e79c
df1f3ae02c26fb5df203fe97874e909c0d1f7f43
describe
'171649' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRE' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
7724833fda906a294ff76cf8d4dd9b9b
bf0fd73e988fa51e774fb0e09f19e76ba9c7ab9f
describe
'170131' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRF' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8a07ebf1f247a07b31914b013cc28ebd
36fb688a0ecf3fc99696e09a614fe03c296b9543
describe
'166568' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
9870a77596f44fb407a1b01158e82849
7d569de96a41c9bcfbbb63be7c47ba22536516c6
'2011-10-12T19:16:36-04:00'
describe
'158104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRH' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
9194a12f3e4e44c526fd482b3901ee4d
e3bebbd4305e3baa1b419805d18dafa675194181
describe
'168621' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRI' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
a7a39e723ea4cf9604e15a775e79da0a
2a1271d0048b28f54cb28fa058c927e74f6525f6
describe
'168562' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRJ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
eb2e535781dc522658129a3827a54a65
d50cbe1640dec9c33744a8a56815f68672277de4
describe
'158644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRK' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
9aa11035aa29589e95293803bdaf6563
10a4a4861cab438cd5a234463ab32c94db5b80b8
describe
'161156' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRL' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
20460b9e20ca5a4a20f0ee80683d5dba
934aab4e1fd6f28771b8ad3dd7287d7f0ecbc816
describe
'149452' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRM' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2cce571ad2fd6321db821827e32ba415
e7e1c9e94883d3fc6893ae78b43564746d983b5e
describe
'161731' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRN' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
85177498b230644c39bbbaaf3aeeb9e4
bb80fdef2ff178e5b52f4584b0437a9c4c4f7f1a
describe
'175145' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
78cfdb50fff34d2e6a1879f185c75a5f
f0f09a072acef6f5eda519f8e629a347fd6b9050
describe
'164346' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRP' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
2defe57cca15099f8ce9665b8357fd19
5b7e08a7b2c530ac34cf43145e94ce3e993968bd
describe
'167516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRQ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
f942f344f2ed67a015a01dc9f3b1d7cf
5a1ef202362ae1a804e84f45fb8443711339dcc9
describe
'176808' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRR' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
ab78bed0ee86f62e9cdf1d98c11a91d4
445a7e362d400976760ef4371c5defaab8f7066d
describe
'174443' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRS' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
aa4434831ebdeba1ea1edc9e959df30b
98e9d362635cea08b43edb2ae41d3840078ed61e
describe
'154927' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRT' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
69a71ee8f49c6ca5684f40ea9e68bcd7
e7b263febed9159f7081e848d66a990228b1d9c1
describe
'165190' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRU' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
b7a1b82ae926db01a3ec505cedde0b81
885b185a1f0290feb26a4d0591166e963697c54c
describe
'187289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRV' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
976af71c708d527a96ae03ec6f5a3965
eaa9f7d4e2c7149e958a359e4e2cc1e75e65e072
describe
'171793' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRW' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
05faa5ff805597672cefaf1952b8b02f
5f95f7de5c351fab4aa0c0d32b244280b2fa0e10
describe
'175554' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRX' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
1180e483736afdb99562fd4af9571549
9cf359ff71d336e076a284313f1a3b5c0fffe2e9
describe
'155472' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRY' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
a40e0415eec5752ddabd018e49648317
48ce66430e7bf2298f2f2f208640143fa6c6149f
describe
'153468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHRZ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
c9423172d82608bfdb6a9da7638a5a63
fdf8c5996993f21b4f6bdf1df9b9ff3b62a96948
describe
'149768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSA' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
c46e467fff8343142fe5bc8e7f388955
83fe7e6a26f0a39ff52d562cd845e2f1fe3d9cb5
describe
'184869' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSB' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
66860d304fb20873b7246a51750b775e
b61a7b6926c316beeb77a92884dd742ada5f9d7c
describe
'178253' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSC' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
58aaced7f1390fcbd9b71a5284d3b05d
4ef0d8510c408e3a9d8602d64907332fbc83bfd2
describe
'178325' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSD' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
2e4bd7473dc3bc55c2e829267d829737
5d92eaad1337b0ec17f8f6c44ba2b6255a924fbd
describe
'180219' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSE' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
4fd41ff75548b8561e17df0ba24305d1
fdabd660ec619395acce7e379ddd95f6de3dd900
describe
'189078' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSF' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
1de3c7e39d7bac3fe1702f872ae4122d
6129eed2c29a23afa23c6d90d79e8327cf8fddfb
describe
'183072' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSG' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c19c2c55d66ef3df9e06e4f483a4ada5
74f07c6196caea219de690724337ba6ec95e85d9
describe
'103541' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSH' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
c541ea2f98ab45d4fa2df2a389b12fd4
f3c658edb3c3a584ff06c14f3a8404fdf0ba3687
describe
'139664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSI' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
bd5c2d8bce6d13c7458c5d6b50021540
c5fc96ba8aed45ce964e0408510f86d178e0ecb7
describe
'29207' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSJ' 'sip-files00000thm.jpg'
1c8db184fc680d81bcd12bcdec9de646
20a915f03c0948744d531a30d016ed7d144c5dcb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSK' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
4f40a571d0060e2f3175df0c1282f59d
959c881f0b2a72b0a4ce52992641c0ee5cf98e46
describe
'18381' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSL' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
918ec30b1649c1ad057b33853e762b11
e52f7dec381642895181ea2af8c267857269066f
describe
'53623' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSM' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
eaa9365ae8f3257f301e8908a49d6ed6
680344e559febefb1f6b17914ecb2c42df177078
describe
'22647' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSN' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
6bec7c24ed31304dafa4d50fbb095e59
bd05bea694b18b9c3af178554d6e09868e7404a7
describe
'35884' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSO' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
23ed740ead24c46501f7d04a199d8878
2cd557a387f800c90a1ae60592f5fe83ae96fe97
describe
'18467' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSP' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
3cba4f1c1284a131ee373d5fd07d6726
a497d9172c91437c18f9ed4ccaad366bec1fb79a
describe
'14084' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSQ' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
8e10349d34cd16a83633b7e82643f6e0
c638883079c49a51f5e8870d3a447a3bc4a90433
describe
'9978' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSR' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
ca9ab35d57e9a5e7d9e625e5e1346e5c
3dc9a2658a95699b275490df2a6f549cc1e91454
describe
'30601' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSS' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
ee77a0623fad06158daaed91b58c742e
3eb96c2f1d5a32280ad0c23805619b5a35ed3c63
describe
'17124' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHST' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
fa13a663d3fc56042a67c7f3b0e77f3a
e1147d9d1e2d23148ef00996268e49e6c6144993
describe
'17809' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSU' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
2911e2091866a580cb778e5720105aec
495521d8bbe25e0b96baac39b89b2f02668574e4
describe
'11578' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSV' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
bf62dafb59728ade65839cc9fce8145f
204de15d7efa40a7f99ad23ffd218a132675519b
describe
'57573' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSW' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
db29a86de4abeca2cd1299eeed8f4b6d
6f85c1123ae4e951a9a199dae121ed2c09949e1a
describe
'27234' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSX' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
8e8ec5e12ba5ea30d2803619d39621ab
9d834e31c7e0866cfd6b9ab92f7d01593088f129
describe
'68833' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSY' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
31092f0a791544bbaf56bb8f9dfdc13c
6be5bb8bac1d434860ef2400899c442de2f55529
describe
'28408' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHSZ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
f00f761b9a83f3300ae0e02427406e59
d93dae7d37b61fba0666d267a84554971c3add6a
describe
'74347' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTA' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
6a7a149e24a750ea5151a73904f5b776
cf304421edffca6ceb397d5e4d260505fe2eabfc
describe
'28668' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTB' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
a2070200d856c913c2663ddcdd23ed3b
6afc9d2ea1db5483774fc328cc56b9d6ce949d9e
'2011-10-12T19:17:14-04:00'
describe
'69133' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTC' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
d5bcaa9fb688559ec169d79db0de8f37
cf1d18bc3aa8c715503ca544d673eb224c9864fc
describe
'31216' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTD' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
e93fa309000b82ade296845ee9e8858a
6d2f3ebcd278b1dd9936e2b47ba99dad934fce71
describe
'72339' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
9d449e433b72b8af5c7c97aa1f4388c2
1ed79f17cfd86a39afdcbbef13adb90853ca35df
describe
'31281' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTF' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
9eb401d9228035c2a4ecad9583bd16b5
935e0888b17d224da6e46ec30b251ac843291aeb
describe
'71030' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTG' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
2c2a723f337de698c41f5864e286768e
55a5e05c38feeadde31183517f09e8ff36d5e08f
describe
'31183' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTH' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
acb4ed509fdf914c1026effff8f4b3e0
4ca96c96396e4476d04f09ef81d2140821fb30ca
describe
'73570' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8afc3559848398b9076e277e7c985909
31709abb3833a7580642a18b4ffea9767d80443f
describe
'33472' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTJ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
9e386b638503bd67eec6e48b0f25a313
1a43d4102a5970d33d704c5b8fee34fd344d66f5
describe
'71927' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
f98361316ef2cc4c61d2156fef3bb932
5e755d75b064b2b3a5392bafdbfbd479206b3549
describe
'31661' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTL' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
2305339512f225a32bef17267ada48f0
0a363d26233352e73733320869b472b64eb16c2e
describe
'63276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTM' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
2f06b03fa6c1a5de8c67142975833f36
26718078f766685c4992b08e74381a8056ef65de
describe
'31298' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTN' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
761c60d5ab05f65383a06c434cda6d17
c749812b972c8bd4293f10e6d5321a6bda96ad50
describe
'71846' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTO' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
06d4faffb2f24d602857d357348b595a
d6c6d635eff4d7e56f8e2ee9f2b153037215fa90
describe
'30364' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTP' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
461f7a82696e5e7b168b03d0da3bb9de
2ea7db7bdd26f4b5fce3f9146fc923ccf6d34be4
describe
'73123' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTQ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
57ad88fbea3f487d0ad7737b34e5265f
bcb61a8978cb1453841579de4e9fc7a204bd4260
describe
'33249' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTR' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
8e173ecd91e648274cb99f4ea2a8d361
e402270aef09718beac5555df8f577b660771013
describe
'72248' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTS' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
7f0aa9481ba86e5f732be83a21840850
8d7053cb8dcf90a4d10e6f3d360b52feb6d3ec3f
describe
'31798' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTT' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
91a95b49c7e9a7fb261aac3691ba132d
8a1452fb9193712e8df89eeff107cd6554544d6a
describe
'69627' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTU' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
a009e431cef387f79b75fa41de3fe41a
423aadc9117c431bce118de74b960b493ecff783
describe
'31530' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTV' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
a530372e67259306db3a62f1e02fdc93
17fbc0bc1e78e2282949cf5854cddd2d4f2680bd
describe
'61326' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTW' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
c0921702b7364a96d68d6767d8ee2dc4
67d23362db3955a427635fc42814955c9b6f3756
describe
'26487' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTX' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
2923afe74cddac8c93c7e821a27ad4ab
22d6c1bc2b64203144583815a2863d7958789be5
describe
'63792' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTY' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
ed057f11d0ff94b67a2075e91c660772
006f11ae60e0ac66157c3f3b714abed6c173cdde
describe
'30540' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHTZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
58be4dfeba0af3d70a88e2bab79d9908
6e85f970609404d7e961f618aa26e3f06e9e1324
describe
'75110' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
cb39201151c62165d6f2e2292a9f698f
e8febc7e7cb32844fb0081d092ef078dfdce48e9
describe
'31880' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUB' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
a806b928a85ad0f62643212ae0059ced
6c2a4668293c115e134872dd747857ce91fc1ec1
describe
'70043' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUC' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
e87a7641fe5f5026131dbfbace36d477
5c489aeb777e6316b4da7991ff07ab557f874025
describe
'32110' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUD' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
84ca3bb4ae06b704438388efef9d570f
2ccbaef66d47bbe1c38d3879f62ab6e58e674363
describe
'68420' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUE' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
82da63b052eb6add711828cc01fc6049
25409f293c5dbc1528238e10a6bcdf3fdfe0a099
describe
'28870' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
80bbb4900c90b3b3d4bb9fe7dc5ae357
1de817922c5f912be1b08a7fed65beda31dff38a
describe
'70441' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUG' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
ffee56d90d774320de4b9ed8337a1142
ba6b1b2cfa39642affff7eb4afcc7f04f8d3cdea
describe
'32672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUH' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
1a7a7c27006bc4a5430fb1dd6847e579
48c69c2dfe94b52988d0c58fdc86cb4d4bc95119
describe
'64359' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUI' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
435dc8677f1e355b0fec9a5353682920
da9fe578b3a337d533d6c9454af1ac931d135934
describe
'30093' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUJ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
8f6316d5551af8e50a6249ed23e7ae8b
278a298e74460c1866a7af697337aa4940fc559c
describe
'68660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUK' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
1e8b3c40150d37b14813e08290e3451c
eaff65d6d938de72845c33ee2810b5ab413cfe8a
describe
'33090' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUL' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
6bd17ce0e4bad1b7b3cf1ea0587197c5
556db073c32916cfde98252d34bc28a16d1f5af6
describe
'60234' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUM' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
6794ae6e52bffaf1cfaed29754ea6865
4229149a33f7cca346048a12ebc1324f41c09058
describe
'27480' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUN' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
0934b18511bf7ec4bf2ab002b0c8f6b1
d4583ce720cdb588e4be57d274a5e2a9f096a1ff
describe
'71051' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
45a2ff74682a781641fcebf7f3575127
0bff9688f52052faee09b9f891108b432aacb2ea
describe
'32767' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUP' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
23ca744f4b1e0a06984f4b757f020335
853c755c1b29a51322bea9f4e752df0dd1f32a12
describe
'58477' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUQ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
72c73c6cc3a1b0a3aa4b0e4edf712a29
cf43cc38399dcbf6623fae38c84a34862222d0c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUR' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
e78b4b227b4346ce5c20c0591eec993e
c9edab5f824675022ed73a030e11ab3c43f788f7
describe
'63998' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUS' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
ef7871a2b93352c0008e790705c0668d
e4076d3a4749c0b2c941025fb3310a2ba05bb338
describe
'31082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUT' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
8193136cc92803885700e355ef11d25f
7615c1cb4492b56f3549a14a0344f594f63cd756
describe
'65519' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUU' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
1d3a80dbae9adb8e4d54bdcc87500c66
84c2d404722b78d06211210f5db715edb17b98dc
describe
'30006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUV' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
b5d3b9072abee155a167b415741f7353
f70af213266d60157a69cf050e1c805bef3aec43
describe
'61509' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUW' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7c312f42e2b53c8c5233e5f865b90c84
296e62583f7d6fe376fa0bdad9682b1a75fe6402
describe
'29497' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUX' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
e78602d1f423e9a70ab4b67a9be57604
296ded5ee4f89366658ac058396fb9bfcfc67583
describe
'63470' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUY' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
41df2bc8927c530e0717192767f76024
a7fcb28ef50fbc13eb439bd4c9670630087f21c7
describe
'27613' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHUZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
9acbe1c5eddac388360e4a948adb485d
bf6ae13b43e5b7c3c5a0ee0765bfb263885973cf
describe
'73323' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVA' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
b00a1dd74f3ad484e15b272293cc91e2
9a2b0225616b3c8afc1a318ea9699e46b55f597b
describe
'27360' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVB' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
2827669cc5bf52e512daa4f4c46181a4
b99115d5e575fde0604b2483cf39868a01519717
describe
'62876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
80332e06436c45f2f0c382b46b464288
69a3219c80fe6b4ee91f577cec5f0ae92c8f83ab
describe
'26972' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVD' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
d84d8499189b94bf914107f01adecdf1
8800ec9900837b263c11fe21ef93f9d6c1eae72c
describe
'65183' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
bf8b5b7877293c84654ef8c09e4d16dd
519f64fdb0be35a8eb4629d424f1f2966cbf0709
describe
'27307' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVF' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
cba0a898ef79b6b26bf7c2c503803de4
518bf6c13760632ec56f43f8ad5c4a2ff068d206
describe
'70786' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
0ce2fdedcf503d59c7fa04576fd84b7a
22fc3bcc6aa1d61929c72a593dd3c002da4740e3
describe
'29703' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVH' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
02f369188ef91c1f5150f86cc6feb9cc
8708277807eb21daaae0e080454d4fdd74fa3588
describe
'69090' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
ddbd84ff8d2b6e92ce5d5d91718839d0
8a9ffb0d369b81f7ecb6ef6e1c6ad7d3f8471a13
describe
'28692' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVJ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
5ed8f44dcfe06ca0841f08b8667f2017
c33018e83a30ebf82a1c5fbd94516debd31a8148
'2011-10-12T19:17:12-04:00'
describe
'66136' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
cb4fd5d57e9239a7c10553ac80ab415c
eb14f0300650106ef0c1d63b6591253e3d06096a
describe
'28076' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVL' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
2aa7f750392028b78f409970252252e5
cea2155a28e9d0bd58c4efef14cbb455950acff7
describe
'68968' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
0389aa500e40e6e6d466f978be8fb40c
977e3d69799994c98e61a09adce1a118f7d716da
describe
'31660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVN' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
684c0a7e6c05c38c268789af3dc74354
08fe904e54cd2d05446ae243208a0c7b1e22c5d6
describe
'69552' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVO' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
8c3ccb5d71e9c6620feec8133b1858d6
d45ae2eac6fcaec06ff6ae64715d262db473ec28
describe
'29156' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVP' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
95947ec4b450bef5984ef8e18f57db47
2f0c21e44a49fb6d4a8dc2c37abd5302c6d19747
describe
'75185' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVQ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
df6261533e80bfa27ea9b765b85129a9
efdd8cec65aa370556c4dbbe878aa92088900342
describe
'35068' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVR' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
f9ee7d4677b0e7b762c510aa38c5904d
6bef73a0bb01b353c95410fb4b9dbe3309632b2b
describe
'69938' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
7ad0254da2abb42b1ae65bd8c2ebb612
d8d97624d58e8df993eacbc247a779396fdceedc
describe
'29067' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVT' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
eaaff3fa685d7cbc53f382874d2bd429
9191a3a6a7097bc09d42678f7d05f1ba71367a0a
describe
'67750' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVU' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
036f5f68b230e92f6479b7e91e465e9d
fa8b905554c5589463160f4d04a663e7fb9f854b
describe
'32876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVV' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
a5b191cfedb598e2a30f2225025c9e11
705d3b54c85323f5090ca6b931ca0924f4737bc3
describe
'62799' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVW' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
c1460335a46a9d2e6dc843b281aae2b3
77c1d07b229012713605f14dd8d2237d4077e24e
describe
'26665' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVX' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
cc456bc1a911003d10b54266c259510c
3f7cbaa112769ebaf68d3c4ad40be707954b908b
describe
'66481' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVY' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4f9a403b52930644848761f1818ce6f3
40045812921b0decf2787605b07fcd08d5f46ecf
describe
'31142' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHVZ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
d53e1b36e8cdbc2914d3865708af90e5
a09700ed62947ef4a69735007d7b8a258b738b60
describe
'72482' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWA' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
9e2e8cbfb32a3064d86aa8d1e8781e10
0a6146ad5cd67254936d11fb802fef6b5c2f2154
describe
'30492' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWB' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
033bef01246732b0591e7f0ce660136f
a07d90b1d621734caa0e76797b06186a9ada193b
'2011-10-12T19:16:28-04:00'
describe
'70353' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWC' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
7a3637e9d5c230d96d8af65b817b7a92
770ab3103e71303b294118908998af5e2b8c96f7
describe
'30931' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWD' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
aa028ec597fb555af57ebd316ff624b7
f764dafb5f6483d3583987481ed06f601f64df88
describe
'63686' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWE' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
2b81a3e72f57a2f618fde63d41337507
7e2ccc63f57081b7b15296e5072779b3455d6882
describe
'28370' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWF' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
3d698adae85e34b90038708b0956133c
b06ea6474d35b7d2a16081c56f51213e0dcfa770
describe
'75569' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWG' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
34c8a7a23f831fb1e8753f4904283821
d3fa459b50decc8c9829808573dad833aabab597
describe
'32685' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWH' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
a302eaac862f4670c4936bb11156c3d7
75dd142d5a16d8acdf9aab4b8866d3d9d19f730f
describe
'74428' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
35afea119a6abb5a9f7fc35c349af16a
fbcd1f7c48c2ba475a5eadcdda5868e2ec5bccd2
describe
'31390' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWJ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
d0840292fe0c56710f6456122b10fda7
8b03a5ddfac8e58eccf876651a8d7f7d2d1c6273
describe
'73264' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWK' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
e5047ea364d261ad6d72b7a9da72511c
b2b88d08bec50280df67f4272b287ac89d03fa82
describe
'33156' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWL' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
d77b6a6aabcd61dbfd8d47d31f7f5910
b8c79fc4876010aac2ea7148b1f6d12f7e87fe35
describe
'40868' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
366cec3a42f2ac8a4b46d3821fc9d7ee
32f15b1300f4d36e4398e15101af6d8416acefd9
describe
'20865' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWN' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d9490817ade0cea77a389eb649970991
fe01dd9a959355f00b54f26c8e6c9e2d59d27d4d
describe
'46144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWO' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
9d2914dea2d409959c1a575cb2f105bb
a4793ff177b693f13f09a7fd9a9724221606b2f2
describe
'19397' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWP' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
ad1ad518fcaf633f00b5f548a6247298
a77bd456d62c4d60d2da0c213477ab450be11ab4
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWQ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
9d42a109e9b5db46ca22eee6ed0e4ab1
0c2e399abe0cfcb7cbdf65355292caaa5c54e2ce
describe
'98433' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAGXfileF20080329_AABHWR' 'sip-filesUF00002164_00001.mets'
a1000ad92217931533cff6f77bd2159a
ccb9882d0a856b6b94cc9ebde076ac6aef0c5c02
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T05:06:45-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.










Package Processing Log















Package Processing Log







12/15/2014 12:52:20 PM Error Log for UF00002164_00001 processed at: 12/15/2014 12:52:20 PM

12/15/2014 12:52:20 PM

12/15/2014 12:52:20 PM 00000.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:20 PM 00000.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:20 PM 00001.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00001.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00002.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00002.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00003.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00003.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00004.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00004.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00005.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00005.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00006.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00006.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00007.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00007.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00008.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00008.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00025.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00025.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00036.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00036.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:21 PM 00042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:52:22 PM












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FANNY,

THE FLOWER-GIRL:

OR,

HONESTY REWARDED.

REVISED BY D. P. KIDDER

New-Vork:
PUBLISHED BY LANE & SCOTT,

FOR THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 200 MULBERRY-STREET.

JOSEPH LONGKING, PRINTER
1851,

CONTENTS.

Chap. Page
TL ANNIZCAT MAREE Dy.) 0+, tus) te te oem
IJ. Fanny WHEN AN INFANT 5 5 15

Ill. Mrs. Newron’s AFFLICTIONS. . . .. . 21
IV. Lessons FROM FLOWERS. . . .:. «© . . 27
V. AN UNLOOKED-FOR VISITOR... . . . 383
Vie. ANEW HOMD . Geeaceeremene

Wil. Harry ResuLTs =e eee oe endo

FANNY,
THE FLOWER-GIRL.

CHAPTER I.

FANNY AT MARKET.

“ Come, buy my flowers; flowers fresh
and fair. Come, buy my flowers. Please,
ma’am, buy a nice bunch of flowers ; very
pretty ones, ma’am. Please, sir, to have
some flowers; nice fresh ones, miss ; only
just gathered; please look.”

Thus spoke, or sometimes sung, a little
girl of perhaps eight years old, holding in.
her hand a neat small basket, on the top
of which lay a clean white cloth, to shade
from the sun the flowers which she praised
so highly, and a little bunch of which she
presented to almost every passer-by, in the
hope of finding purchasers; while, after
one had passed rudely on, another had
looked at her young face and smiled, an-
8 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

other said, “ What a nice child!” but not
one had taken the flowers, and left the pen-
ny or the halfpenny that was to pay for
them, the little girl, as if accustomed to all
this, only arranged again the pretty nose-
gays that had beer disarranged in the vain
hope of selling them, and commenced anew,
in her pretty singing tone, “ Come, buy my
flowers ; flowers fresh and fair.”

“ Your flowers are sadly withered, my*
little maid,” said a kind country-looking
gentleman, who was buying some vege-
tables at a stall near her.

“Q, sir! I have fresh ones here, sir;
please look ;” and the child lifted up the
cover of her basket, and drew from the
very bottom a bunch of blossoms on which
the dew of morning still rested.

“Please to see, sir; a pretty rose, sir;
and these pinks and mignonette, and a
bunch of jessamine, sir, and all for one
penny.”

“Bless thee, pretty dear!” said the old
lame vegetable-seller, “thou ’lt make a good
market-woman one of these days. Your
honor would do well to buy her flowers,
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 9

’ sir; she has got no mother or father, God

help her, and works for a sick grandmo-
ther.”
“Poor child!” said the old gentleman.
“ Here, then, little one, give me three nice
nosegays, and there is sixpence for you.”
With delight sparkling in every feature
of her face, and her color changed to

crimson with joy, the little flower-girl re-

ceived in one hand the unusual piece of
money; and setting her basket on the
ground, began hastily and tremblingly to
pick out nearly half its contents as the
price of the sixpence; but the gentleman
stooped down, and taking up at random
three bunches of the flowers, which were
not the freshest, said, .

“ Here, these will do; keep the rest for
a more difficult customer. Be a good
child; pray to God, and serve him, and
you will find heisa Father of the fatherless.”

And so he went away; and the flower-
girl, without waiting to put her basket in
order, turned to the old vegetable-seller,
and cried, “ Sixpence! a whole sixpence,
and all at once. What will grandmother
10 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

say now? See!’ and opening her hand,
she displayed its shining contents before
her neighbor’s eyes.

“Eh!” exclaimed the old man, as he
approached his eyes nearer to it. “Eh!
what is this? why thou hast twenty six-
pences there; this is a half-sovereign !”

“Twenty sixpences! why the gentle-
man said, There is sixpence for thee,” said
the child.

“ Because he did’nt know his mistake,”
replied the other; “I saw him take the
piece out of his waistcoat pocket without
looking.”

“O dear! what shall I do?” cried the
little girl.

“ Why, thou must keep it, to be sure,”
replied the old man; “give it to thy
grandmother; she will know what to do
with it, I warrant thee.”

“ But I must first try to find the good
gentleman, and tell him of his mistake,”
said the child. “I know what grandmo-
ther would say else; and he cannot be far
off, I think, because he was so fat; he will
go slow, I am sure, this hot morning.
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 11

Here, Mr. Williams, take care of my bas-
ket, please, till I come back.”

And without a word more, the flower-
girl put down her little basket at the foot
of the vegetable-stall, and ran away as fast
as she could go.

When she turned out of the market-place,

she found, early as it was, that the street
before her was pretty full; but, as from the
passage the gentleman had taken to leave
the market-place, she knew he could only
have gone in one direction, she had still
hopes of finding him; and she ran on and
on, until she actually thought she saw the
very person before her; he had just taken
off his hat, and was wiping his forehead
with his handkerchief.

“ That is him,” said the little flower-girl,
“T am certain;” but just as she spoke
some persons came between her and the
gentleman, and she could not see him.
Still she kept running on; now passing off
the foot-path into the street, and then see-
ing the fat gentleman still before her; and
then again getting on the foot-path, and
losing sight of him, until at last she came
12 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

up quite close to him, as he was walking
slowly, and wiping the drops of heat from
his forehead.

The poor child was then quite out of
breath ; and when got up to him she could
~ not call out to him to stop, nor say one
word; so she caught hold of the skirt of
his coat, and gave it a strong pull.

The gentleman started, and clapped one
hand on his coat pocket, and raised up
his cane in the other, for he was quite sure
it was a pickpocket at his coat. But when
he turned, he saw the breathless little flow-
er-girl, and he looked rather sternly at her,
and said,

“ Well, what do you want? what are
you about, eh?”

“O, sir!” said the girl; and then she be-
gan to cough, for her breath was quite
spent. “ See, sir; you said you gave me
sixpence, and Mr. Williams says there
are twenty sixpences in this little bit of
money.”

“Dear me!” said the gentleman; “ isit pos-
sible? could I have done such a thing?” and
he began to fumble in his waistcoat pocket.
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 13

“ Well, really itis true enough,” he add-
ed, as he drew outa sixpence. “ See what
itis to put gold and silver together.”

“JT wish he would give it to me,”
thought the little flower-girl ; “how happy
it would make poor granny: and perhaps
he has got a good many more of these
pretty gold pieces.”

But the old gentleman put out his hand,
and took it, and turned it over and over,
and seemed to think a little: and then he
put his hand into his pocket again, and
took out his purse; and he put the half-
sovereign into the purse, and took out of
it another sixpence.

“ Well,” he said, “ there is the sixpence
I owe you for the flowers ; you have done
right to bring me back this piece of gold;
and there is another sixpence for your
race; it is not a reward, mind, for honesty
is only our duty, and you only did what
is right; but you are tired, and have left
your employment, and perhaps lost a cus-
tomer, so I give you the other sixpence
to make you amends.”

“Thank you, sir,” said the flower-girl,
14 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

courtesying ; and, taking the two sixpencey
into her hand with a delighted smile, was
going to run back again, when the old
gentleman pulling out a pocket-book, said,
“Stay a moment; you are an orphan, they
tell me; what is your name 2?”

“ Fanny, sir.”

“ Panny what?” |

“ Please I don’t know, sir; grandmother
is Mrs. Newton, sir; but she says she is
not my grandmother either, sir.”

“Well, tell me where Mrs. Newton
lives,” said the gentleman, after looking at
her a minute or so, as if trying to make
out what she meant.

So Fanny told him, and he wrote it
down in his pocket-book, and then read
over what he had written to her, and she
said it was right.

“ Now, then, run away back,” said he,
“and sell all your flowers, if you can, be-
fore they wither, for they will not last long
this warm day : flowers are like youth and
beauty—do you ever think of that? even
the rose withereth afore it groweth up.”
And this fat gentleman looked very sad;
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL, 15

for he had lost all his children in their
youth.

“ O yes, sir; I know a verse which says
that,” replied Fanny. “ All flesh is grass,
and all the goodliness thereof is as the flow-
er of grass—but good morning, and thank
you, sir”’ and away Fanny ran.

CHAPTER II.
FANNY WHEN AN INFANT.

Anp now, before going on with my sto-
ry, I must go back to tell who and what
Fanny, the flower-girl, was.

Mrs. Newton, whom she called her
grandmother, was now a poor old woman,
confined to her bed by a long and trying
illness, that had nearly deprived her of the
use of her limbs. But she had not been
always thus afflicted. ‘Some years before,
Mrs. Newton lived in a neat cottage near
the road-side, two or three miles from one
of the great seaport towns of England.
Her husband had good employment, and
they were both comfortable and happy.
16 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.
|

Just eight years from this time, it hap-
pened that one warm summer’s day Mrs,
Newton went to look out from her cottage
door down the road, and she saw a young]
woman standing there leaning against al
tree, and looking very faint and weak.

She was touched with pity, and asked
the poor traveler to walk into her house
and rest. The young woman thankfully |
consented, for she said she was very ill;)
but she added, that her husband was com-|
ing after her, having been obliged to turn |
back for a parcel that was left behind at the
house where they had halted some time be-
fore, and therefore she would sit near the
door and watch for him.

Before, however, the husband came, the
poor woman was taken dreadfully ill; and
when he did arrive, good Mrs. Newton
could not bear to put the poor creature
out of the house in such a state: she be-
came worse and worse. In short, that
poor young woman was Fanny’s mother,
and when little Fanny was born, that poor
sick mother died, and Fanny never saw a
mother’s smile.
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 17

The day after the young woman’s death,
kind Mrs. Newton came into the room
where her cold body was laid out on the
bed; and there was her husband, a young,
strong-looking man, sitting beside it; his
elbows were on his knees, and his face was
hid in his open hands,

Mrs. Newton had the baby in her arms,
and she spoke to its father as she came in:
he looked up to her; his own face was as
pale as death, and he looked at her with-
out saying a word. She saw he was in
too much grief either to speak or weep.
So she went over silently to him, and put
the little baby into his arms, and then said,
“May the Lord look down with pity on
you both.”

As soon as the unhappy young man
heard these compassionate words, and saw
the face of his pretty, peaceful babe, he
burst into tears; they rolled in large drops
down on the infant’s head.

Then in a short time he was able to
speak, and he told Mrs. Newton his sad
little history ; how he had no one in the

whole world to look with pity on him, or
2

a
18 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

his motherless child; and how God alone
was his hope in this day of calamity. His
father had been displeased with him because
hehad married that young woman, whom
he dearly loved; and he had given him some
money that was his portion, and would do
nothing else for him. The young man had
taken some land and a house, but as the
rent was too high, he could not make
enough from the land to pay it; so he had
been obliged to sell all his goods, and he
had only as much money left as would,
with great saving, carry him to America,
where he had a brother who advised him
to come out there.

“ And now,” said he, looking over at
the pale face of his dear wife, “what shall
I do with the little creature she has left
me? how shall I carry it over the wide
ocean without a mother to care for it, and
nurse it?”

“ You cannot do so,” said Mrs. New-
ton, wiping her eyes; “leave it with me;
Thave no children of my own, my hus-
band would like to have one; this babe
shall lie in my bosom, and be unto me as
|

FANNY, THE FLOWER-GRIL. 19

. daughter. I will nurse it for you until

you are settled in America, and send or
come for it.”

The young man wept with gratitude;
he wanted to know how he was to repay
Mrs, Newton, but she said for the present
she did not want payment, that it would be
a pleasure to her to have the baby; and it
‘would be time enough to talk about pay-
ment when the father was able to claim it,
and take it to a home.

So the next day they buried the poor
young woman, and, soon after, the young
man went away and sailed off to Ameri-
ca, and from that day to this Mrs. Newton
had never heard anything of him.

_ As she had said, that poor little mother-
Isss babe lay in her bosom, and was unto
her as a daughter; she loved it; she loved
it when it was a little helpless thing, weak
and sickly; she loved it when it grew a
pretty lively baby, and would set its little
feat on her knees, and crow and caper be-
fore her face; she loved it when it began
to play around her as she sat at work, to
lisp out the word Ganny, for she taught it
20 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

to call her grandmother ; she loved it when |
it would follow her into her nice garden,
and pick a flower, and carry it to her, as
she satin the little arbor; and she, hold-
ing the flower, would talk to it of God
who made the flower, and: made the bee
that drew honey from the flower, and
made the sun that caused the flower to
grow, and the light that gave the flower
its colors, and the rain that watered it,
and the earth that nourished it. And she
loved that child when it came back from
the infant school, and climbed up on her
lap, or stood with its hands behind its back,
to repeat some pretty. verses about flowers,
or about the God who made them. ‘That
child was Fanny, the flower-girl; and ah!
how little did good Mrs. Newton think she
would at length be selling flowers in the
streets to help to support her!
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 21

CHAPTER III.

MRS. NEWTON'S AFFLICTIONS.

Bur it came to pass, that when Fanny
was nearly six years old, Mrs. Newton’s
husband became very ill; it was a very
bad and very expensive illness: for poor
Mrs. Newton was so uneasy, she would
sometimes have two doctors to see him.
But all would not do: he died; and Mrs.
Newton was left very poorly off.

In a short time she found she could not
remain in her pretty cottage ; and she was
obliged to leave it; and the church where
she had gone every Sunday for so many
years ; and the church-yard where her hus-
band was buried, and little Fanny’s mo-
ther; and the infant school where Fanny
learned so much; and the dear little gar-
den, and the flowers that were Fanny’s
teachers and favorites. O how sorry was
poor Mrs. Newton! But even a little child
can give comfort; and so little Fanny, per-
haps without thinking to do so, did; for
22 FANNY, THE PFLOWER-GIRL.

when Mrs. Newton for the last time |
sat out in her garden, and saw the setting
sun go down, and told Fanny she was
going to leave that pretty garden, where
she had from infancy been taught to know
God’s works, the child looked very sad
and thoughtful indeed, for some time;
but afterward, coming up to her, said,

“ But, grandmother, we shall not leave —
God, shall we ? for you say God is every-
where, and he will be in London too.”

And O how that thought consoled
poor Mrs. Newton! She did not leave —
God,—God did not leave her.

So she left the abode of her younger
years—the scene of her widowhood; and
she went away to hire a poor lodging in
the outlets of London: but her God was
with her; and the child she had nursed in
her prosperity was her comfort in adversity.

Matters, however, went no better when
she lived with little Fanny in a poor lodg-
ing. She had only one friend in London,
and she lived at a distance from her. Mrs.
Newton became ill; there was no one to
nurse her but Fanny ; she could no longer
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 23

pay for her schooling, and sometimes she
was not able to teach her herself.

All this seemed very hard and very try-
ing, and one would have been tempted
to think that God was no longer with poor
Mrs. Newton; that when she had left her
cottage she had left the God who had been
so good to her.

Butthis would have been a mistake: God
was with Mrs. Newton; he saw fit to try
and afflict her; but he gave her strength and
patience to bear her trials and afflictions.

One afternoon her friend came to pay
her a visit: she was going out a little way
into the country to see a relation who had
a very fine nursery-garden, and she beg-
ged Mrs. Newton tolet little Fanny go with
her own daughter. Mrs. Newton was very
glad to do so, for she thought it would be
a nice amusement for Fanny.

The nurseryman was very kind to her;
and when she was going away gave hera
fine bunch of flowers. Fanny was in
great delight; for she loved flowers, and
knew her dear grandmother loved them
too. But as she was coming back, and


24 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

just as she was entering the streets, she |
met a lady and a little boy of about three
years old, who directly held out his hands,
and began to beg for the flowers. His
mamma stopped, and, as Fanny was very
poorly dressed, she thought it probable that
she would sell her nosegay, and so she
said,

« Will you give that bunch of flowers
to my little boy ? I will pay you for it.”

“ Please, ma’am, they are for grand-
mother,” said Fanny, blushing, and think-
ing she ought to give the flowers directly,
and without money, to any one who wish-
ed for them.

“ But perhaps your grandmother would
rather have this sixpence ?” said the lady.
And Mrs. Newton’s friend, who had just
come up, said,

“Well, my dear, take the lady’s six-
pence, and let her have the flowers, if she
wishes for them.”

So Fanny held the flowers to the lady,
who took them, and: put the sixpence in
her hand. Fanny wished much to ask for
one rose, but she thought it would not be
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 25

right to do so, when the lady had bought
them all: and she looked at them so very
longingly that the lady asked if she were
sorry to part with them.

“O no, ma’am!” cried her friend, “she
is not at all sorry: come now, don’t be a
fool, child,” she whispered, and led Fan-
ny on.

“That is a good bargain for you,” she
added, as she went on: “that little spoiled
child has his own way, I think. It would
be well for you, and your grandmother
too, if you could sell sixpennyworth of
flowers every day.”

“Do you think I could, ma’am 2?” said
Fanny, opening her hand, and looking at
her sixpence; “this will buy something at
do poor grandma good: do you think Mr.
Simpson would give me a nosegay every
day ?”

«“ Tf you were to pay him forit, he would,”
said her friend. “ Suppose you were to go
every morning about five o’clock, as many
others do, and buy some flowers, and then
sell them at the market; you might earn
something, and that would be better than
26 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

being idle, when poor Mrs. Newton is not
able to do for herself and you.”

So when Fanny got back, she gave her
dear grandmother the sixpence.

“ The Lord be praised!” said Mrs. New:
ton; “for I scarcely knew how I was to
geta ze of bread for thee or myself to-
morrow.”

And then Fanny told her the plan she
had formed about the flowers. -

Mrs. Newton was very sorry to think
her dear child should be obliged to stand
in a market place, or in the public streets,
to offer anything for sale; but she said,
“ Surely it is Providence has opened this
means of gaining a little bread, while Iam
laid here unable to do anything ; and shall
I not trust that Providence with the care
of my darling child?”

So from this time forth little Fanny set
off every morning before five o’clock, to
the nursery-garden; and the nurseryman
was very kind to her, and always gave her
the nicest flowers. Instead of sitting down
with the great girls, who went there also for
flowers or vegetables, and tying them up






FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 27

in bunches, Fanny put them altogether in
her little basket, and went away to her
grandmother’s room, and spread them out
on the little table that poor Mrs. Newton
might see them, while the sweet dew was
yet sparkling on their bright leaves.

Then she would tell how beautiful the
garden looked at that sweet early hour;
and Mrs. Newton would listen with plea-
sure, for she loved a garden. She used
tosay, that God placed man in a garden
when he was happy and holy; and when
he was sinful and sorrowful, it was ina
garden that the blessed Saviour wept and
prayed for the sin of the world; and when
his death had made atonement for that
sin, it was in a garden his blessed body
was laid.

CHAPTER IV.

LESSONS FROM FLOWERS.

Mrs. Newton taught Fanny many
things from flowers; she was nota bad teach-
er, in her ow nsimple way: but Jesus Christ,
who was the best teacher the world ever




28 FANNY THE FLOWER-GIRL.

had, instructed his disciples from vines)
and lilies, corn and fruits, and birds, and
all natural things around them.

And while Fanny tied up her bunches
of flowers, she would repeat some verses
from the Holy Scriptures, such as this: “O
Lord, how manifold are thy works! in
wisdom hast thou made them all: the
earth is full of thy riches.” And after-
ward she would repeat such pretty lines |
as these :—

“Not worlds on worlds in varied form
Need we to tell a God is here ;
The daisy, saved from winter’s storm,
Speaks of his hand in lines as clear.

“ For who but He who form’d the skies,
And pour’d the dayspring’s living flood,
Wondrous alike in all he tries,
Could rear the daisy’s simple bud ?

“Mold its green cup, its wiry stem,
Its fringed border nicely spin;
And cut the gold-embossed gem,
That, shrined in silver, shines within ;

“ And fling it, unrestrain’d and free,
O’er hill, and dale, and desert sod,
That man, where’er he walks, may see
In every step the trace of God ?”
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 29

« And I too have had my daisy given
to me,” poor Mrs. Newton would say,
with tearful eyes, as she gazed on her
little flower-girl, “I too have my daisy,
and though it may be little cared for in the
world, or trodden under foot of men, yet
will it ever bear, I trust, the trace of God.”

But it happened, the very morning that

Fthe gentleman had given Fanny the half
sovereign in mistake, Mrs. Newton’s mo-
ney was quite spent; and she was much
troubled, thinking the child must go the
next morning to the garden without money
to pay for her flowers, for she did not think
it likely she would sell enough to buy
what they required, and pay for them also;
go she told Fanny she must ask Mr. Simp-
son to let her owe him for a day or two
until she got a little money she expected.
Fanny went therefore and said this to
the kind man at the garden; andhe put his
“hand on her head, and said, “ My pretty
little girl, you may owe me as long as you
please, for you are a good child, and God
will prosper you.”
So Fanny went back in great delight,

ed
30 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

and told this to Mrs. Newton; and to
cheer her still more, she chose for her
morning verse the advice that our Lord |
gave to all those who were careful and
troubled about things of this life: “ Con-
sider the lilies of the field, how they grow;
they toil not, neither do they spin; and yet
I say unto you, that Solomon in all his
glory was not arrayed like one of these.
Wherefore, if God so clothe the grass of
the field, which to-day is, and to-morrow
is cast into the oven, shall he not much
more clothe you, O ye of little faith ?”

And then she repeated some verses
which both she and Mrs. Newton liked
very much:—

“Lo! the lilies of the field,
How their leaves instruction yield !
Hark to nature’s lesson, given
By the blessed birds of heaven.

“ Say, with richer crimson glows
The kingly mantle than the rose?
Say, are kings more richly dress’d
Than the lily’s glowing vest ?”

“ Grandmother, I forget the next verse,”
said Fanny, interrupting herself; “ T know
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 3l

itis something about lilies not spinning;
but then comes this verse,—

‘Barns, nor hoarded store have we’-—

“Ttis not the lilies, grandmother, but the
‘blessed birds,’ that are speaking now,—
‘Barns, nor hoarded store, have we,
Yet we carol joyously ;

Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow.’”

Poor Mrs. Newton clasped her. thin
hands, and looked up, and prayed like the
disciples, “ Lord, increase our faith!”

“Eh!” said she afterward, “is it not
strange that we can trust our Lord and
Saviour with the care of our souls for eter-
nity, and we cannot trust him with that
of our bodies for a day?”

Well! this was poor Mrs. Newton’s
state on that day, when the gentleman gave

Fanny the half sovereign, instead of six-
pence, for her flowers.

When the little flower-girl came back
from her race with her two. sixpences, she
found the old vegetable-seller had got her
three or four pennies more, by merely
32 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

showing her basket, and telling why it was
left at his stall; and so every one left a
penny for the honest child, and hoped the
gentleman would reward her well. The
old man at the stall said it was very shab-
by of him only to give her sixpence; but
when she went home with three sixpences,
and told Mrs. Newton this story, she kiss-
ed her little girl very fondly, but said the
gentleman was good to give her sixpence,
for he was not obliged to give her any-
thing; she had only done her duty.

“But, grandmother,’ said Fanny,
“when I saw that pretty half sovereign
dropping down into his purse, I could not
help wishing he would give it to me.”

“And what commandment did you
break then, my child ?”

“ Not the eighth—if I had kept the half-
sovereign I should have broken it,” said
Fanny; “for that says, ‘Thoushall not steal.
What commandment did I break, grand-
mother; for I did not steal?”

“ ‘When we desire to have what is not
ours, Fanny, what do we do? we covet,
do we not?’
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 33

“ O! yes—thou shalt not covet thy
neighbor’s goods,” cried Fanny, “that is
the tenth commandment; and that half
sovereign was my neighbor’s goods, and
that fat gentleman was my neighbor. But,
srandmother, it is very easy to break the
tenth commandment.”

“Very easy indeed, my dear,” said Mrs.
Newton, with first a faint smile, and then
a deep sigh; “ therefore,” she added, “ we
ought always to pray like David, ‘'Turn

away mine eyes from beholding vanity.’ ”

CHAPTER V.
AN UNLOOKED-FOR VISITOR.

‘THERE iS a Very common saying, that
when things are at the worst theymend. It
is hard to say when matters are at the worst.
Poor Mrs. Newton knew they might yet be
worse with her; but certainly they were
very bad; anda few days after this, as Fan-
ny was tying up her flowers as usual, she
lay on her bed thinking what she was to do,
and praying that God would direct her to

3
34 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

some way of providing for the poor child.
‘While she was thinking and praying, tears
stole down her face; Fanny saw them,
and stopped her work, and looked sorrow-
fully at her.

“ Now you are crying again, grandmo-
ther,” she said, “and that’s what makes me
break the tenth commandment; for I can’t
help wishing the gentleman had given me
that half sovereign. But I will say the verses
again to-day about the lilies and birds; for
you know I said that morning,—

‘Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow’
And when I came back with my three six-
pences, you said God had provided for
the morrow, for you had only two or three
pennies in the house when I went out.”

“ And how many pennies, pray, have
you in the house to-day?” said a rather
eruff voice at the door.

Mrs. Newton and Fanny started; but
there, standing at the door, Fanny saw the
fat gentleman who had given her the half
sovereign.

“So you have been wishing for my

‘eer
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 30

) gold, you little rogue,” he said, looking as
if he meant to frighten her. ‘ Never mind,”
he added, smiling, “ you are a good child,
and did what was right; and I always
meant to bring it back to you, but I have
been kept rather busy these few days past.
There it is for you, and try not to break
the tenth commandment again.” ‘Then,
turning to Mrs. Newton, he said, “ We
should not expect rewards, ma’am, for do-
ing our duty; but if children do not
meet with approbation when they do right,
they may be discouraged, and perhaps
think there is no use in being good: for
they are silly little creatures, you know, -
and do not always recollect that God will
reward the just one day if men do not.”

“ O, sir!” said poor Mrs. Newton; but
the tears streamed down, and she could
not say a word more. And there Fanny
sat gazing at the half sovereign, as if she
were half stupefied.

« Well, take up that bit of gold, and do
what you like with it,’ said the fat gentle-
man; “and then run off to sell your flow-
ers, for we must not be idle because we
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

have got enough for to-day. But do what
you like with that money.”

Fanny rose up from her seat, and look-
ing very much as if she were moving in
her sleep, with her wondering eyes fixed
on the shining piece that lay in her hand,
she walked slowly over to Mrs. Newton,
and, putting it into hers, said,—

“ May I go to the grocer’s now, grand-
mother, and get you the tea for your break-
fast?”

“Yes, my love,’ said Mrs. Newton,
kissing her; “and take care of this, and
bring back the change carefully.” ‘Then,
turning to the gentleman, she said, “ I am
not young, sir, and [am very, very poorly ;
I find it hard to go without my tea, but it
is a luxury I have been obliged latterly to
forego.”

“ But could you not get tea on credit
from the grocer?” said the gentleman.

“O yes, I believe so; but there would
be no use in getting credit,’ said Mrs.
Newton; “for Iam not certain of being
better able to pay next week than I am
this week; and when I have not the mo-

ee a
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 37

) ney to pay for what I wish to get, it is bet-

-

ter to do without it, than to add to one’s
anxieties by running in debt. Do you not
think so, sir ?”

“ Ma’am,” said the old gentleman, sit-
ting down, and resting his large silver-
topped stick between his knees, “it is of
very little consequence what I think; but
if you wish to know this, I will tell you
that I think very well both of you and
your little girl, who, as I have heard, for I
have made inquiries about you both, is a
dependent on your bounty. You have
trained her up well, though I wouldn’t
praise the child to her face; and so take as
much tea as you like till you hear from me
again, and your grocer need be in no trou-
ble about his bill.”

So after the fat gentleman had made this
rather bluff, but honest-hearted speech, and
poor Mrs. Newton had wept, and thanked
him in language that sounded more polite,
the good old gentleman told her his whole
history.

He began the world very poor, and with-
out relations able to assist him; he was at
—

38 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

last taken into the employment of a young
merchant in the city; he had a turn for
business, and, having been able to render
some important services to this young man,
he was finally, to his own surprise, and
that of every one else, taken into partnership.

“ During all this time,” said he, “ I was
attached from my boyhood to the daugh-
ter of the poor schoolmaster who first taught
me to read. I would not marry her while
I was poor, for J thought that would be to
make her wretched instead of happy: but
when I was taken into partnership I
thought my way was clear; I went off to
Bethnal Green, and told Mary, and our
wedding-day was settled at once. Well,
we were glad enough, to be sure; but a
very few days after, my partner called me
into the private room, saying that he want-
ed to consult me. He seemed in high
spirits, and he told me he had just heard
of a famous speculation, by which we
could both make our fortunes at once, He
explained what it was, and I saw, with
shame and regret, that no really honest
man could join in it: I told him so, J told




» him plainly I would have nothing to do
with it, You may think what followed;
the deeds of partnership were not yet
signed, and, in short, in two or three days
more I found myself poor Jack Walton
again—indeed, poorer than I was before
I was made one of the firm of Charters
and Walton, for I had lost my employ-
ment.

“ Often and often I used to think that
David said, he had never seen the righteous
forsaken ; yet I was suffering while the un-
righteous were prospering. It was a sin-
ful anda self-righteous thought, and I was
obliged to renounce it when, after some
time of trial, a gentleman sent for me—a
man of wealth—and told me his son was
going into business on his own account;
that he had heard of my character, and of
the cause of my leaving Mr. Charters ; that
he thought I would be just such a steady

person as he wished his son to be with.
In short, I began with him on a handsome
salary; was soon made his partner; mar-
ried Mary, and had my snug house in the
country. Mr. Charters succeeded in that

FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. og
40 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

speculation, entered into several others,
some of which were of a more fraudulent
nature, failed, and was ruined. He ran
off to America, and no one knows what be-
came of him. I have left business some
years. 1 purchased a nice property in the
country, built a church upon it, and have
ever thanked God, who never forsakes
those who wish to act righteously.

“It pleased God to take all my sweet
children from me—every state has its trials
—the youngest was just like your little
flower-girl.”

Mrs. Newton was much pleased with
‘his Story; she then told her own, and lit-
le Fanny’s. The fat gentleman’s eyes
were full of tears when she ended: when
he was going away he put another half
sovereign into her hand, and saying, “ The
first was for the child,” walked out of the
house.
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 41

CHAPTER VI.
A NEW HOME.

A sHort time afterward, a clergyman
came to see Mrs. Newton—she was sur-
prised; he sat and talked with her some
time, and seemed greatly pleased with her
sentiments, and all she told him of herself
and Fanny. He then told her that he was
the clergyman whom Mr. Walton, on the
recommendation of the bishop of the dio-
cese, had appointed to the church he had
built; that Mr. Walton had sent him to
see ql and had told him, if he was satis-
fied with all he saw and heard, to invite
Mrs. Newton and the little flower-girl to
leave London, and go and live in one of
the nice widows’ houses, which good Mr.
Walton had built, near the pretty village
where he lived.

Then there was great joy in poor Mrs.
Newton’s humble abode; Mrs. Newton
was glad for Fanny’s sake, and Fanny
was glad for Mrs. Newton’s sake; so both
were glad, and both said,—
49 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

“ Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow.”

But the only difference was, that Mrs.
Newton said it with watery eyes and
clasped hands, lying on her bed and look-
ing up to heaven; and Fanny—merry lit-
tle thing!—said it frisking and jumping
about the room, clapping her hands to-
gether, and laughing her joy aloud.

Well, there was an inside place taken
in the B coach, for Mrs. Newton and
Fanny; and not only that, but kind Mrs.
Walton sent up her own maid to London,
to see that everything was carefully done,
as the poor woman was ill, and help to
pack up all her little goods; and, with her,
she sent an entire new suit of clothes for
the little flower-girl.

They set off, and when they got near to
the village the coachman stopped, and
called out to know if it were the first or
the last of the red cottages he was to
stop at; and Mrs. Walton’s maid said,
“The last—the cottage in the garden.”
So they stopped at such a pretty cottage,
with a little garden before and behind it.


FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 43

Mr. Walton had known what it was to be:
poor, and so, when he grew rich, he had
built these neat houses for those who had
been rich and become poor. ‘They were
intended chiefly for the widows of men of
business, whose characters had been good,
but who had died without being able to
provide for their families. He had made
an exception in Mrs. Newton’s case, and
gave her one of the best houses, because
it had a pretty garden, which he thought
others might not care for so much.

They went inside, and there was such a
neat kitchen, with tiles as red as tiles could
be; a little dresser, with all sorts of useful
things; a nice clock sticking opposite the
fire-place, and a grate as bright as black-
lead could make it. And then there was
such a pretty little room atone side, with a
yose-tree against the window; and a little
shelf for books against the wall; and a
round table, and some chairs, and an easy
couch, And there were two nice bed-
rooms overhead ; and, better than all these,
was a pretty garden. O how happy was
the little flower-girl ; and how thankful was


44 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

poor Mrs. Newton! The first thing she
did was to go down on her knees and
thank God.

Then Fanny was to go to the school,
for Mrs. Walton had her own school, as
well as the national school; but Fanny did
not know enough to go to it, so she was
sent to the national school first, and after-
ward she went to the other, where about
a dozen girls were instructed in all things
that would be useful to them through life
—whether they were to earn their bread
at service, or to live in their own homes as
daughters, or wives, or mothers.

But every morning, before she went out,
she did everything for her dear, good
grandmother. She made her breakfast;
she arranged her room; and she gathered
some fresh flowers in the garden, and put
them on the table in the little parlor.
O how happy was Fanny when she
looked back, and saw how nice everything
looked, and then went out singing to her
school,—

“ Barns, nor hoarded store, have we,
Yet we carol joyously ;
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 45

Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow.”

But God will not provide for the mor-
row, where people will do nothing to pro-
vide for themselves; and so Fanny, the
flower-girl, knew, for surely God had
blessed the labor of her childish hands.

Thus passed time away; and Fanny,
under the instruction that she had at church,
at school, and at home, “grew in grace, and
in the knowledge and love of God, and of
Jesus Christ our Lord.”

Good Mrs. Newton was much better in
health, and used to walk about sometimes
without any support but Fanny’s arm, and
so time went on till Fanny came to be
about fifteen ; and then Mrs. Newton, who
was not always free from “ doubt and sor-
row,” began to think what would become
of her if she were to die.

So one day, when kind Mr. Walton,
whom Fanny used once to call the fat
gentleman, came in to see her, Mrs. New-
ton told him that she was beginning to
feel anxious that Fanny should be putin
46 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

a way of earning her own bread, in case
she should be taken from her.

Mr. Walton listened to her, and then he
said,—

“ You are very right and prudent, Mrs.
Newton, but never mind that; I have not
forgotten my little flower-girl, and her race
after me that hot morning: if you were
dead, I would take care of her; and if we
both were dead, Mrs. Walton would take
care of her; andif Mrs. Walton were dead,
God would take care of her. I see you
cannot yet learn the little lines she is so
fond of,—

‘Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow.”

CHAPTER VII.
HAPPY RESULTS.

Nor very long after this conversation
came a very warm day, and in all the heat
of the sun came Mr. Walton, scarcely able
to breathe, into Mrs. Newton’s cottage; he
was carrying his hat in one hand anda
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 47

newspaper in the other, and his face was
very red and hot.

“ Well, Mrs. Newton,” said he, “what
is all this about? I can’t make it out;
here is your name in the paper!”

“My name, sir!’ said. Mrs. Newton,
staring at the paper.

“ Ay, indeed is it,” said Mr. Walton,
putting on his spectacles, and opening the
paper at the advertisement side,— see
here !”

And he began to read,—

“Tf Mrs. Newton, who lived about fif-
teen years ago near the turnpike on the
P road, will apply to Messrs. Long
and Black, she will hear of something to
her advantage. Or should she be dead,
any person who can give information re-
specting her and her family will be re-
warded.”

Mrs. Newton sat without the power of
speech—so much was she surprised; at
last she said, “It is Fanny’s father! I
know, I am sure it can be no one else!”

Mr. Walton looked surprised, for he
had never thought of this; he was almost


48 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

sorry to think his little flower-girl should
have another protector. At length he said
it must be as Mrs. Newton thought, and
he would go up to London himself next
day, and see Mr. Long and Mr. Black.
So he went; and two days afterward, when
Fanny had returned from Mrs. Walton’s
school, and was sitting with Mrs. Newton
in the little shady arbor they had made in the
garden, and talking over early days, when
they used to sit in another arbor, and Fan-
ny used to learn her first lessons from flow-
ers, then came Mr. Walton walking up the
path toward them, and with him was a
fine-looking man of about forty-five years
of age.

Mrs. Newton trembled, for when she
looked in his face she remembered the fea-
tures; and she said to herself, “ Now if he
takes my Fanny from me?—and if he
should be a bad man?” But when this
man came nearer, he stepped hastily be-
yond Mr. Walton, and, catching Mrs. New-
ton’s hands, he was just going to drop on
his knees before her, when he saw Fanny
staring at him; and a father’s feelings

/

|
| FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL. 49

overcame every other, and with a ery of joy
he extended hisarms, and exclaiming, “ My
child! my child!” caught her to his breast.

Then there followed so much talk, while
no one knew scarcely what was saying ;
and it was Mr. Walton, chiefly, that told.
how Fanny’s father had had so much to
struggle against, and so much hardship to
‘* go through, but how he had succeeded at
last, and got on very well; how he had
tried then to find out Mrs. Newton and his
dear little Fanny, but could not, because
Mrs. Newton had changed her abode; how,
at last, he had met with a good opportu-
nity to sell] his land, and had now come
over, with the money he had earned, to find
his child and repay her kind benefactor.

O what a happy evening was that in
the widow’s cottage! The widow’s heart
sung for joy. ‘The widow, and she that had
always thought herself an orphan, were
ready to sing together,—

“Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,
God provideth for the morrow.”

Mrs. Newton found that Mr. Marsden—
that was the name of Fanny’s father—was

.
50 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

all that she could desire Fanny’s father to
be; a Christian in deed and in truth; one
thankful to God and to her, for the preser-
vation and care of his child; and who
would not willingly separate Fanny from
her, or let her leave Fanny.

As he found Mrs. Newton did not wish
to leave kind Mr. Walton’s neighborhood,
and that his daughter was attached to it
also, Mr.. Marsden took some land and a
nice farm-house not far from the manor
house where Mr. Walton lived. He had
heard all about the half sovereign, and
loved his little flower-girl before he saw her.

So Mrs. Newton had to leave her
widow’s house; and she shed tears of joy,
and. regret, and thankfulness, as she did
so: she had been happy there, and had had
God’s blessing upon her and her dear girl.

But Fanny was glad to receive her dear,
dear grandmother, into her own father’s
house; her own house too: and she threw
her arms round the old lady’s neck, when
they got there, and kissed her over and
over again, and said, “ Ah! grandmother,
you recollect when I was a little girl
FANNY, THE FLOWER-GRIL. 51

tying up my flowers while you lay sick in
bed, I used to say so often,—

‘Mortals, flee from doubt and sorrow,

God provideth for the morrow.”

They had a large garden at the farm-
house, and Fanny and Mrs. Newton im-
proved it; and Mrs. Newton would walk
out, leaning on Fanny’s arm, and look at
the lilies and roses, and jessamine and
mignonette, and talk of past times, and of
their first garden and their first flowers,
and their first knowledge of the God who
made them; who watches the opening bud,
and the infant head; who sends his rain
upon the plant, and the dew of his bless-
ing upon the child who is taught to know
andlove him. And Fanny’s father, when
he joined them, talked over his trials and
dangers from the day that his poor wife
lay dead, and his helpless baby lay in his
arms, and then he blessed the God who
had led him all his life long, and crowned
him with loving kindness.

Three years passed, and Fanny the lit-
tle flower-girl was a fine young woman.
A farmer’s son in the neighborhood wish-
52 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

ed her to become his wife; but her father
was very sorry to think of her leaving him
so soon for another home.

He spoke to Fanny about it, and said,
“ My dear girl, I have no right to expect
you should wish to stay with me, for I
never was able to watch over your child-
hood, or to act a father’s part by you.”

And Fanny answered, with a blush and
smile, “ And I, father, was never able to
act a daughter’s part by you until now,
and therefore I think you have every right
to expect I should do so for some time
longer. I have no objection to become
Charles Brierley’s wife, and I have told him
so; but we are both young, and at all events
T will not leave you.”

“ Now,” said Mrs. Newton, who was sit-
ting by, “instead of that young man taking
more land, which is very dear about here,
would it not be a good plan if he were to
come and live with you, Mr. Marsden, and
help you with the farm ?”

And Mr. Marsden said, “That is the
very thing; I will go and speak to him
about it: and Fanny and her husband can
|
| FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL, 53
have the house and farm, and all, as much
pa they please now, and entirely at my
death.”

So it was all settled; and Fanny was
married at the village church, and Mr. and
Mrs. Walton were at the wedding. Good
Mrs. Newton lived on at the farm-house,
and when Fanny’s first child was born, it
} was put into her arms. Then she thought

of the time when Fanny herself was laid
in the same arms; and she blessed God
in her heart, who had enabled her to be of
use to one human creature, and to one im-
mortal soul and mind, while she passed
through this life to the life everlasting.
Joy and sorrow are always mingled on
this earth; so it came to pass that before
Fanny’s first child could walk alone, good,
kind Mrs. Newton, died, and was buried.
As a shock of corn cometh in its season,
so she sunk to rest, and was gathered into
the garner of her Lord. But,—

“The memory of the just
Is bless’d, though they sleep in dust.”



And Fanny’s children, and children’s chil-
dren, will learn to love that memory.
54 FANNY, THE FLOWER-GIRL.

Many a day, sitting at work in her gar-
den with her little ones around her, Fan-
ny let them gather some flowers, and talk
to her about them; and then they would
beg, as a reward for good conduct, that
she would tell them about her dear grand-
mother and her own childish days; and
much as children love to hear. stories,
never did any more delight in a story,’
than did these children in the story of
Fanny, the flower-girl.

THE END.
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