Citation
Winter in Spitzbergen

Material Information

Title:
Winter in Spitzbergen a book for youth
Creator:
Hildebrandt, Johann Andreas Christoph, 1763-1846
Smith, E. Goodrich ( Elizur Goodrich ), 1802-1873 ( Translator )
Dodd, Moses Woodruff, 1813-1899 ( Publisher )
Craighead, Robert ( Printer )
Smith, Thomas B., 19th cent ( Stereotyper )
Felter, John D ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
M. W. Dodd
Manufacturer:
R. Craighead
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1851
Language:
English
Physical Description:
300, <12> p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Rescues -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Spitsbergen Island (Norway) ( lcsh )
Robinsonades -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
Robinsonades ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note:
Stereotyped by T.B. Smith.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved by (John D.?) Felter.
Statement of Responsibility:
From the German of C. Hildebrandt by E. Goodrich Smith.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA2294 ( LTQF )
ALH1876 ( NOTIS )
06783990 ( OCLC )
026810651 ( AlephBibNum )

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Full Text








WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

A Book for Youth.

FROM THE GERMAN OF

C. HILDEBRANDT,

FREACHER IN EILEDORF, HEAR BALBERSTADT,

EY

E. GOODRICH SMITH.

NEW YORK:
PUBLISHED BY M. W. DODD,

BRICE CHURCH CHAFEL, CITY HALL 89404RE.

=——



1852.



Ta a ag i ag gag a “Sa age a ee a ee, a Ta
Eniered eccording to Act of Congress, in the year 1851,
BY M. W. DODD,
In the Clerk*’s Office of the Bouthern District of New York.
ea



aa a Ha he RM





T. B. SMITH, STEREOTYFEL, BR. CRAIGHEAD, FRINTER,
218 Willam Sires, Mew York. 112 Folios Serer,



Cuntrats,

FIRST EVENING.

Preumivany conversation—Comfort of long winter eve-
nings—Subjects of conversation—Maps—The Northern
Ocean—The story of Osarow—Ivan and Gregory—A
restless spirit—Naval cadets—Archangel—The English
captain—The North-west paseafe—Evil advice—Filial
disobedience—The voyage begmm . ww we et

SECOND EVENING.

A. discussion—The two routes to India—The desirableness
' ofa shorter one—The departure—Order on shipboard—
A pleasant beginning—Nova Zembla—Reefi—A long
day—The explanation sought for—The northern and
eastern shores of Asia—A change of course—A storm .

THIRD EVENING.

An important commission— apparatus—Story of Ivan and Gregory continued—A
field of ice—Perilous ries discovered—A
party senttoexplreit. . 1... as eee

FOURTH EVENING.

Spitzbergen—The desolations of Winter—A cavern dis-

covered—Signal firee—A sad night—A great tempeat—
1*

rion

80



vi ConTents.

PAGE

The ehip disappears—The three friends alone on the
island—Courage under difficulties—A happy discovery—
A green valley—Drift-wood—Fishing in ehoal water—
A new cave—A good supper, anda warm lolging . . 67

FIFTH EVENING.

Curiosity aroused—A sudden affright—Attacked by a bear
—A successful conflict—Preparing for a long winter
night—Exploring the island—A hut—An unexpected
tenant—An unembalmed mummy—The lonely burial—

The last light of the sum—A bear-fight—Examining the
hut—Autobiography of the mummy—A Dutch whaler—
The sad effects of rashness and self-will—Description and
ee ee

SIXTH EVENING.

Childish imaginings—Sad forebodings of the three solitary
friends—Hope beams upon them again—
question in ethics—An unwelcome visitor—A new sup-
ply of provisions—A further exploration of the cavern
—Hopes of a more valuable supply—A sad catastrophe 131

SEVENTH EVENING.

A season of suspense—A great and desperate dilemma—
The old pilot in a fright—Light in darkness—Efforts to
eecape—The deeper recesses of the cavern—A fountain
of pure water—Gratitude for unexpected deliverance—
Tea drinking and amoking added to their comforta—A



ContTENts. Vii

ladder—A further ineffectual search—Anxious and dis-
turbed slumbers—Severe cold—A new supply of fuel—
A bear in the trench—The old pilot alone—His faith in
God, and his comfort in the Bible—Anxious waiting for
the return of his friends—A watch-fire on the cliff . . 150

EIGHTH EVENING.

The two friends return in a frozen condition—A snow bath
—They recover, and relate their adventures—Their am-
rmounition failing, they contrive weapons of defence—The
want of salt, and a substitute—A great calamity—The old
pilot supposed to be dead—The two disconsolate friends
—A trial of reindeer—A capture—Their return—Sorrow
turned to joy—Their kind attentions—Their success in
hunting—The “bake-oven"” . . . 1. 1 se « « » 180

NINTH EVENING.

What they found in the “bake-oven"—Strange discoveries
—Other adventures in the frozen seaa—Rare treasurea—
A cask of gunpowder—A crash—A rope-ladder—A cask
of flour—The old pilot turned mason and baker—A vein
of rock-salt—A cheerful supper—Further discoveries of
good things—An extensive “bill of fare”. . . . . . 211

TENTH EVENING.

Sabbath in the cave—Household occupations—The hat
besieged by bears—Squibe—The siege raised—A prison-
er taken—The bears reinforced, make anew and success-
ful onset—Are again repulsed—The hot repaired and
fortified—A terrible storm—Joy at the sight of the sun
—Kefraction explained—Returning summer, and retarn-
wes VOR Y ETS oe se ee 286



viii Contents.

ELEVENTH EVENING.
PAGE

Summer work; house cleaning; house repairing; fishing
— ing for a vessel—Despondency—Courage renewed by
trust in God—A journey round the island—A pleasant
spot—A audden surprise—English sailors make their
appearance—The good old captain—The hand of Provi-
dence in seeming accidents—The ship's company visit
the hut—Provisions for future adventurers—Departure
from the island—Ivan and Gregory's safe return to
Archangel 2 we ew te te tt te tt

TWELFTH EVENING.
Story of the escape of the ship from the perils of the ice . 290



WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN,

First Earning.

JULIA. Suppose, then, we were at a certain
time in our winter palace ?—now, farewell, trees
and flowers; in half a year I shall see you

again.

Marta. And welcome in the long winter
evenings, then, my dear spinning-wheel! and
thou, my knitting-needles, and you, too, my
books! We shall scarcely know how fast the
few winter months fly away !

Gustavus. I shall know well how to use
my winter quarters.

MARA. But itis to be hoped you will spare
us your eternal noisy drilling.

Gustavus. That cannot be certainly known
yet. I will be a soldier, and so I must exer-
cise.

Juti4. Here in this room?



10 Winter 1n SPITzBERGEN.

Gustavus. Now, I will so far yield that I will
not march and exercise for whole hours. The
ground does not suit it. Is it not so, brother?

Max. Right. It is not fitted, either, for long
marches,

Marra. Mother, too, would make many seri-
ous objections, if you begin here again what
you have left off in the yard and garden.

Gustavus. Don't trouble yourself. You shall
have no inconvenience from our quartering here.
I will use my time well.

Max. That is my determination too. You
girls shall see, to your full satisfaction, how it
is possible for us to employ our time, and shall
have opportunity to learn many things.

* JuLia. We thank you beforehand. You may
do as you please, if the spinning-wheel and the
needle does not disturb you.

Marta. But to speak seriously,—how we can
rightly employ the time, so as not to lose a mo-
ment, I do not know. Sir Winter has come in
so roughly, and in so unpleasant a mood, that,
if he goes on in this way—

Gustavus. Now we can meet the stern old
fellow. We have a warm reom, light, com-
pany, books—

JuLIA, And do not forget the main thing—
— with you soldiers, this is the main

ng.



Winter in SPIrzBeRGEN. 11

Gustavus. That is the main thing for fathedâ„¢
and mother. They have taken good care for the
supplies,

Max, And another important matter is, our
talks together—

Jutta. Which yot will certainly take charge
of, Sir Doctor?

Max. That is to be expected. I will wil-
lingly do it to the best of my powers. But you
would like to know what I—I know.

Maria, What is it?

Max. Yes, yes, you would be glad to know
what I know! to tell you the truth, I am re-
joiced that winter has come,

Gustavus. Do not be so long in making:
believe. Go ahead, and give us as well as you
can what you do know.

Max. Hear, then. You have often wondered
when father lately was more busy and active
than ever—when he went straight from the
table into his study ?

Gustavus. Yes, indeed! It occurred to me
that father did not take his usual walk—his
rounds in the garden. But what it’ the world
has that to do with our winter quarters, I
should like to know?

Max. A great deal. Father has many even-
ings in a week wholly at liberty this winter.

JuLia. Grand! that will allow him to relate



12 WINTER IN SPITZBERGENR.

something to us. He will go from the north
to the south,

Gustavus. From Leipzig to Waterloo.

Max. Now hear further. You have often
missed me, have you not?

Gustavus. Yes.

Jutta. How important the young man feels!

Max. I have always been with father. He
said to me that he would relate some story
during the long winter evenings, and so I have
examined and arranged all the maps, all the
sketches, engravings, and books—in short, every-
thing which is necessary for our instruction, so that
I may find every sheet of paper in the desk,

Gustavus. Thank you, dear Max. Nowthere
will be something to be heard; many famous men
to be paraded out; many celebrated names col
to light.

Max. And many things will be made plain
to us which we have not, heretofore, fully known.

Maria. Well, my spinning-wheel is at a
_ stand, It would give you fine yarn. But might
“ok not, tly advise both you young sirs, you
had bett@r*look around you betimes for some
work to do?

MAx. Do not be troubled; I shall gather

and bind books.
Gustavus. And I will trim them. My case

of instruments has everything necessary.



WiInTER IN SpPiTzBERGEN. 18

Junta. If I cannot go on with my spinning a
I will pick over the peas and beans. .,
Marta. That is well, dear Julia. You know

that father is never more cheerful than when all

with him are busy.

At this moment a maid-servant entered to
spread the table for supper. Soon came the
father and mother; both of them looked cheer-
fully on their children, and they also looked up,
full of expectation, to their father—" Now, chil-
dren, are you not troubled about the weather?”

he asked.

Marra. No! Winter must come, and the
sooner it begins the sooner it will go out.

Gustavus. Our winter quarters, too, are
good; provisions and company not less so; and
these make it very endurable. As for march-
ing and encamping, indeed, it is not very conve-

nent.

Jutta. And the weather keeps our company
so friendly together.

Moruer. The time will pass away the more.
agreeably when you know how to connegt use-
ful labors with pleasant conversations, ~~
Marita. That Julia and I have both of us
taken care of, dear mother. Here stands my
spinning-wheel, and there lies for each of us a
set of knitting-needles.

Faruer. And I will relate to you some

*



14 WiInTER 1n SPiTtzBERGEN.

Petory. Max has, perhaps, already told you about
it. Will our winter evenings then be long?

Au. No indeed! The watchman will warn us
of the hour of the night sooner than we shall wish.

Contented and cheerful, the family ate their
moderate supper. The children had -never
looked for its close with such a longing desire.
They knew what they might expect, for they
recollected the winter before, the long evenings
of which, notwithstanding all the storms and
unpleasant weather, had passed away so un-
noticed and so gaily. Now the table was cleared
away, and every child sought his place. All be-
gun their work, and the greatest silence reigned
throughout the room.

Farner. Now, children, what had you rather
hear?

Marta. Ah, dear Father, you know best.
You know how many beautiful voyages we have
made round the world together.

JULIA. You mean in thought,

MorHer. And you can learn more in this
way than many who travel in a coach,

Gustavug. That is very true, mother. I can
draw out the plans of all the most remarkable
battles and sieges.

Max. And I can trace the route of the voy-
ages and travels of Prince Maximilian and Kotze-
bue. ‘



WintER IN SPITZBERGEN. 15

Jui. “And Iknow Robinson Crasoe’s island”
and am well acquainted with his colony, as in
our little city. I can find my way all about.
I know where the hateful savages lived, and I
know, too, about Robinson Crusoe’s and Friday's
hut as well as our own house.

Fatuer. Then we shall begin a voyage, a
long voyage to-day. Will you readily follow and
not become tired ?

Gustavus. Lead us as far as you will, we
will follow you.

Fatuer. Very well—I shall hold you to
your word; but we must agree on something.
We can begin to-day one of two voyages, and
you may take your choice,

Marta. How so?

FaTHer. I can lead you into the coldest re-
gions of our earth, where eternal ice covers the
sea, where are perpetual snow, frost, and cold,.
into regions in which, for months, you see the
sun, and then you lose sight of it for as long a
period.

Or, I will go with you around Africa to the
Kast Indies, to the Island of Ceylon, but where
we must meet with tigers, and have to fight
with monstrous serpents. Now it is for you to
choose where we shall go.

JuLIa, Ah, dear mother, do you decide for
us. Our opinions may be different, and that,

-



16 Winter IN SPirzpeRGEN.

will bring on a dispute which will waste the
time.

MorHer. Shall I do so, father?

FatHer, Yes.

Moruer, Then take a voyage to the north,
The story will be so much the more impres-
sive when the snow beats against the windows,
and the weathercock creaks in the storm, You
can much the more vividly conceive of what is
frightful in these countries, if you only step to
the window.

JuLIA. You are right, mother; and we have
also this advantage—that we shall only freeze
in imagination.

Faruer. Max, bring them maps. Spread them
out here on the table. Gustavus, what map is
that?

Gustavus. Of Northern Russia. Here is Mo-
jaisk, there Smolenzko, where the great battles
were fought. Pultawa is not on it.

FatHEer. Because this map only includes
Northern Russia. Here we see, Max ?—

Max. Lapland, Nova Zembla, and between
the two the government of Archangel.

FatHer. Right; and these countries lie?—

Max. Between the sixtieth and seventieth
degrees of north latitude.

JULIA. Oh, how cold it must be!

, Fatuer. Yes, indeed—the elevation of the



Winter in SpirzBERGEN. 17

pole proves this; for, as you see, this whole re-
gion lies at the most northern point of the Bal-
tic Sea,—or, Gustavus /—

Gustavus. At the Gulf of Bothnia,

FaTHER. In the same latitude, Add to this
eold, too, the frozen sea and the vast marshy sur-
face which forms the soil of these countries.
There are few forests there, as the cold hinders
the growth of trees; we find there no mountains,
and the eye beholds nothing there but a dead,
almost uncultivated extent of country.

Jutta. How glad I am that I do not live
there |

MorHer. You have good reason to be so; but
had you been born and brought up in that re-
gion, you might, probably, have been as much
contented there as you now are here.

FatHer. Here, on the map, you farther see,
Maria ?—

Marta. The White Sea.

FATHER. Very true.
Ocean, which runs into the government of ei
angel, and receives the Dwina, one of
rivers of Russia, on the bank of which—lies
city, Max?

Max. Archangel; a city which is well bee
by its extended trade into the Northern Ocean.

FaTHeR. Very well. Here we will stop, and
will now go on with our story.

Q*



18 WiIstTER IN SpPIirzRERGEN.

JULIA. A good voyage !y

Gustavus. And a favorable wind, fur I sup-
pose we are to go by water.

FatHer. Not long since there lived in Arch-
angel a merchant in very good circumstances, by
the name of Osarow. He had only one son,
Ivan, an excellent boy, who was distinguished
by his desire for knowledge, and by his untiring
diligence in learning all things that might be use-
ful to him. To what profession or business he
should devote himself, he had not yet decided;
but he was satisfied to learn everything that ap-
peared to him he might possibly have occasion
to make use of hereafter. He knew that useful
knowledge would never do any harm, but that it
was always profitable, Osarow’s brother, also a
merchant, died, and Ivan's father took the son
left by his deceased brother into his own family.
The two brothers had been united and affection-
ate friends during their whole life; this love was
now transferred from the father to the son, and
Ivan's father regarded Gregory, for this was the
fatherless and motherless orphan’s name, as his
own son; and both boys, who were of about an
equal age, were almost inseparable from each
other. Gregory had great good-humor; he was
industrious, persevering, and decided,—in short,
he was a boy deserving of love, and so was Ivan;

but the latter too often allowed himself to be led



Winter 1n SprirzpERGeENX. 19

away by one fault. This consisted im a-certain
levity which frequently prevented him from act-
ing rationally and decidedly. Though at this
moment he was ever ge firmly convinced of the
importance of a thing, on the slightest occasion
the whole became ridiculous to him. Though he
might now promise something, with the most
serious intention of fulfilling it, at the next in-
stant all was forgotten. He regarded too little
the consequences of his actions.

Moruer. This is a great fault, and the source
of various misfortunes. Shun this course, and
be well convinced of its sad consequences. This
I would say to you, particularly, Gustavus.
You often act in your most impetuous violence,
without thinking of the consequences.

Gustavus. Do not be troubled, good mother.
I have already become much changed, and shall
always more and more lay aside this fault.

MorHer. God grant that it may be so.

FarHer, Gregory had also the fault of under-
taking many things, the consequences of which
he had not always thought of, but often repented
of having done them. Both of the young men
had been obliged to devote themselves to trade, ~
according to the wishes of the aged Osarow ; but
the sitting still behind account books, writing
many letters, and especially the waiting for the
eo in the shop, during their years of



20 Wister in SprrirzperGen.

learning,—all these things were particularly dis-
agreeable to Gregory's taste. The old Osarow
was a prudent man of good sense. He thought
how different the viewa and inclinations are,
which God has implanted in the hearts of men.
He had often experienced how children thus
became unhappy, while their parents forced
them into a kind of life to which they felt the
prompting of no inclination, As a prudent
father, anxious for the true welfare of his child,
he examined into their inclinations, and dis-
covered in both of them an all-overpowering
inclination to see the world, and make distant
voyages. He represented to them the happiness
of a quiet, peaceful domestic life, and he por-
trayed to them, in lively colors, the dangers and
inconveniences they must meet with—but all in
vain.

Maria. That does not please me in Ivan and
Gregory.

Gustavus. Now I do not know whether they
exactly deserve blame. What do you think,
father ?

FatHer. That you are not wholly wrong,
Gustavus. Both were quick, energetic, and
resolute youths; they deserved to be praised for
following out this preference of theirs, if they
felt that, in this way, they could be more useful
to the world than in any other.



Winter tn SPiTzBERGEN. 21

Moruer. Therefore God has wisely ordained
that the inclinations of men should be as various
as the features of their countenances, One
chooses this condition, and another that; only a
man should select a business adapted to his situa-
tion and powers, otherwise he occupies a false
position, and will be unhappy.

FatHer. Very true. A man is never more
unhappy than when he is not in his proper
place. You will often see that in the world.
God grant that you may not have to experience
it.—But to return to Ivan and Gregory. With
the greatest respect and confidence, Ivan dis-
closed to his father his predominant inclination,
and begged of him his consent, and promised to
do all honor to him. Osarow saw how much
his heart was in it, and yielded to his wishes,

Marta. What profession did they choose?

FaTHer. Both of them felt the strongest incli-
nation in general for voyaging ; “both of them
wished to be useful to their country as seamen,
and to acquire for themselves a celebrated name
in the history of voyages. With this in view,
they had already—especially Ivan had done so
—learned much which would be indispensable
to them in such a profession.

JuLia. Would so very much knowledge be
necessary ?

Max. Certainly; they must be at home in



23 Winter tn SprrzBEeRGeN.

mathematics, astronomy; in natural history and
geography; and that they should be also ac-
quainted with foreign languages, is self-evident.
Gustavus. Not to mention that they must
understand swimming, fencing, shooting, and all
kinds of bodily exercise, by all means,—if they
do not wish to be borne down by the first dan-

gers.

Farner. The aged Osarow had many friends,
and so it was easy for him to get his two beloved
children admitted at St. Petersburg, the capital
of the Russian Empire, as naval cadets into the
Imperial Academy of Cadets.

JuLIA. Cadets? naval cadets?

FatHer. This is the name given to those
young persons who are e(lucated particularly for
future officers in a public institution. The in-
stitution itself is called an Academy for Cadets,
and it is a very excellent institution, especially
for those who are in want of means to learn
what their future destination requires of them.
They are here taught everything at the expense
of the government; they are clothed, fed, and
like children are obliged to perform all the
services of a soldier in miniature. The naval
cadet is very naturally educated only for the
naval service, and for this object he is taught
everything which he ought to know as an officer
of a ship.



Winter in SPITZBERGER. 23

Ivan and Gregory were both admitted into
this academy ; they distinguished themselves by
their order and industry; and even many of the
little light-minded tricks which Gregory, and,
led on by him, Ivan too, were guilty of, were
overlooked, in consideration of their greater
excellencies of character.

The three years of learning whatever was
necessary, had passed away, and both of the
youths returned back to their native place.
Every one received them with joy, and more
especially so did Osarow. Both of the young
men were now waiting for their appointment in
the navy.

Jutta. Navy?

Faruer. By this expression is understood
whatever belongs to the management of the
ships, and the sea-service of a country or king-
dom, such as the number, manning, arming, and
the whole appointment of the ships. Therefore,
they have also regulations or laws for the navy.

Most commonly this expression is used re-
specting those ships which particularly belong
to the warlike service. To receive an appoint-
ment in the navy, is the same as to be placed in
the actual service on board of a ship of war.

Such a post were our young men expecting,
in order to practise whatever they had learned
in their profession,



O4 WiIntTER IN SPITZBERGENR.

Archangel, as is well known, is a city of con-
siderable trade, and is the only harbor in the
Northern Sea. Here are to be found ships and
seamen of all the commercial nations, but espe-
cially there are many English vessels, who, as
you know from other accounts of voyages, have
the most extensive commerce. I need not,
therefore, tell you that Ivan and Gregory sought
the intercourse of experienced seamen, in order
to enlarge their knowledge.

They became acquainted at a certain time
with a captain of an English ship which lay in
the harbor, and who was only waiting for a fair
wind to go on his voyage. This man was very
intelligent and agreeable in conversation. Be-
sides, he manifested a social and affable conduct,
by which he attached everybody to him who
became acquainted with him; and in short, he
won upon the two young men in such a degree,
that they expressed the wish to undertake a dis-
tant voyage in his company, and on an English
ship.

“This wish you can easily accomplish,” re-
plied the Englishman. “You need only deter-
mine upon it, and I will warrant you that a voy-
age in my ship will be of the greatest advantage
to you. Probably I may make a voyage of dis-
covery to the North Pole, Our Parliament
have offered a large reward to him who dis-



a

a ll li illic tg la a a CLEP AIT ay

WixntEs In SPITZBERGEN. O5

covers a north-west passage around Asia or
America to the East Indies. Very likely I shall
venture on such an experiment.” These words
excited to the utmost the desire of voyaging in
the young men. They saw before them a fine
field to satigfy their long-restrained wishes, and
doubtless the idea that they might make a voy-
age in an English ship, added new strength to
their inclination.

@arta. How so?

Farner. The English marine service has
attained to a very high degree of perfection, and
hardly any other seafaring nation has accom-
plished so much as the British, The English
ships are beautiful, their arrangement and arma-
ment well chosen, and their seamen capable.
Whoever, therefore, wished to learn correctly as
to service at sea, might do so on an English
ship.

The Englishman observed the disquietude of
the two young men; he spoke continually of the
voyage, and every word increased Ivan and

_ Gregory's inclination to share in the same.

aes

Gustavus. But ought they to do so without
permission of the government ?

Maria. Or if their father was not willing?

FaTtHER. I will tell you about that. They

thought of both of these things. But as they

were not in actual service, so the permission of



96 WiIntTeER 1n SPITZBERGER.

government might be obtained without diffi- —
eulty. The Admiralty, that is, the branch of —

the government which decides about naval
affairs, and which for the most part consists of
admirals, could have no objection, but, on the
contrary, would very gladly see two such prom-

ising young men desirous of being farther —

trained in so excellent a school for the benefit
of their country. They therefore consented to

their going. The old Osarow made far mere

objections. He was a strong adherent to his
country—more so than was consistent with a
friendly feeling towards foreign nations, He
desired that the youths should serve in no other
navy than the Russian, and decidedly forbade
them to go forward another step.

Marita. Now both will remain at home. I

am sure I should not like Ivan and Gregory, if
they should go a-voyaging with the Englishman,
against their father's wishes.

Farner. Alas! here Gregory's levity ren-—
dered useless every good influence, and, by all —

sorts of exaggerations, conquered Ivan’s feelings.

Sad at the serious refusal of their father, in the —



aaa

evening they came into the company of the cap- ©
tain; he naturally began to talk again of his

voyage, and as naturally ‘lea from Ivan and

Gregory that their father would not allow them —

7
iz

to go, ae?



O&O CC EE ee

WINTEE IN SPITZBERGEN. 2T

The Englishman—and it is disagreeable to
find such impropriety in a man whom we must
otherwise esteem—the Englishman advised them
to undertake the voyage without their father’s
knowledge. “ At the utmost, you can see your-
selves back here again in three months,” said
he; “and I am convinced that your father will
feel indebted to me for having set you upon so
useful a voyage. How often it is the case in my
country, that the sons of the richest fathers
secretly undertake such a voyage, and are again
received by their parents with open arms. I
have no bad purposes in the voyage. We shall
not fall in with pirates and corsairs. Our object
is a fine and noble one. It is authorized, and
the means to attain it are corresponding to it,”

Ivan wavered, and shrunk back; but then
Gregory interposed, with his usual fickleness,
and urged his friend. Ivan was weak enough
to yield. Both of them pledged themselves to
the Englishman to make arrangements in the
night, and at break of day to be on board of his
ship. ‘We are only waiting for a fair wind,”
said the Englishman; “it may, and must soon
happen. I must avail myself of it, and you
must s0 arrange your matters, that I can at any
moment weigh anchor, and get under sail,”’

JULIA. What is the meaning of that?



98 Winter 1n SPItzHERGER.

Max. To wind up the anchor, fixed in the
bottom of the sea, and holding the ship, because
otherwise the ship could not stir from its place,
They use the expression, “to weigh anchor,” as
well as “to get under sail,” when they wish to
mark the beginning of a voyage.

Farner. Some days passed in the constant
waiting for a favorable wind. Probably Ivan
would have acquainted his father with the
whole matter, and the voyage would then have
been properly relinquished; but Gregory knew
how to arouse Ivan’s pride and feeling of honor,
and this, joined to his own fickleness, were the
reasons that Ivan actually found himself under
sail at the break of the appointed day. He sent
back a letter to his father, in which he expressed
his whole heart. He excused the step he had
taken, from his overwhelming inclination, beg-
ged forgiveness for his disobedience, and be-
sought his father’s prayers and blessing. And
so we must pardon him, and accompany him on
his voyage.

MotHer. But, father, it is already late ; how
if we shall here make a pause?

Fatner. And enter on the voyage to-mor-
row evening, do you mean? What do you
think of it?

Gustavus. Because,-father, before a long



Winter In SPITZEERGEN. 29

travel we must be refreshed by some hours’
Test.

FatHer. Very well. Then to-morrow, about
this time—

Max. We shall be very considerably nearer
to the North Pole.

ad



Strout Evening.

TE children had sat for a long time at their
work; the daughters spun, while Max and Gus-
tavus looked over the map, in order to make
themselves well acquainted with the region into
which their father was going to conduct them.
While thus engaged, they disputed (of course
it was like well-educated children, with whom a
little dispute does not degenerate into a quarrel),
whether Ivan and Gregory deserved to be
blamed because they had secretly left their
father and benefactor. Maria and Julia were de-
cided in condemning them. Max was somewhat
doubtful; the desire of learning something new
and being useful to the world, he thought, might
excuse such a transgression. Gustavus proceeded
on the supposition, that Ivan and*Gregory, in so
great an object, must*indeed have ventured on it
—a view which brought on him many censures
from his sisters. Gustavus himself felt that he
had gone too far, but, as is often the case, he was



WintER IN SPITZBERGEN. a1

not willing to take back his opinion. He be-
longed to those who would not willingly do
wrong, and so defend their opinion as long as
they can find any ground on which they can sus-
tain themselves.

The arrival of their parents interrupted them,
and finished this little dispute, and they heartily
desired that none of their children might ever be
tempted to do anything against their parents’
will.

FaTHER, Now, are you agreed? We have a
distant voyage before us. Union is the first
‘thing.

Gustavus. We are all ready, and can enter
on the voyage whenever you like.

Fatuer. Where did we leave off last even-
ing, Maria?

Marra.” In Archangel.

FaTHer. At least in the harbor of Archangel,
on theship Juno. At that time there were many
voyages undertaken to the North Pole, in order
to find a passage to the East Indies across Asia
or America. In such a discovery no one had
more to gain than the merchant ships of Arch-
angel, because they then would have the shortest
course to China and the East Indies. Which of
you, without looking on’ the map, can describe
to me the course which they have to take from
_ Archangel to the East Indies?



32 ° Wuster in Spirzpercen.

Max. Ican. We must sail around Norway,
Denmark, Holland, between France and England,
then around a part of Spain, along Portugal and
the whole western coast of Africa.

FaTHer, Very well. Gustavus, how then?

Gustavus. Around Africa to the Cape of
Good Hope, then they take the direction on the
right, pass through the Indian Ocean to Ceylon,
or still farther to the right to Sumatra and almost
to China. ,

FaTHer. Right. Which of you knows of
any other way?

Maria, Another?

Jutta. I do not think there can be any other!

FatHer, No? What way, then, did your
friend Kotzebue take some years since?

Max. Ah, nowl knowit! Take the same
route as before till you reach Spain, and then go
straight to South America, along down the east
coast of this country, through the Straits of
Magellan, leaving Chili and Peru on the right,
and so directly through the Great Ocean to the
East Indies,

Farer, But both of these routes make a
wide circuit; for each of them is about four
thousand German miles. If any one could dis-
cover a way across Asia or America, this would
not be more than half the distance. Therefore,
for many years the English government have



Winter in SritzperGen. 83

proposed a large reward for any one who shall
find this nearer passage, and it was natural for
many to seek to obtain the premium. You can,
therefore, easily imagine with what eagerness
Ivan and Gregory must have determined on such
a voyage, 80 that they should secretly leave their
father and benefactor.

Now, then, behold our two friends on the ship,
the anchor of which was already weighed, A
fresh south-east wind swelled the sail, the ship
flew on more and more rapidly oyer the White
Sea, and now they are in the open Northern .
Ocean. It was the first sea voyage which they
two had made, and the whole mode of life in the
ship was new and unusual to them. They were
indeed already well taught as to all that they
saw here, for they had been educated in the
Academy for Cadets; but many things, and indeed
almost all appeared to them larger and new as
they here saw them in reality. The arrange-
ments on board of the English ships, are dis-
tinguished by the greatest order, and the crew
by the most minute performance of every duty.
This must have very greatly pleased them. The
ship itself was a beautiful, new, and firmly built
one, in which reigned the most exemplary order ,
and cleanliness. Every day it was washed and
scoured; not the least dust was allowed, and even

the most insignificant portion was carefully at-



a4 Winter in SpirzREERGEN.

tended to. To all this was added the kind con-
duct of the excellent captain, and the constant
respect of the whole crew. The captain knew
how to unite friendliness with seriousness, and
kindness with severity; he possessed that great-
est of all arts, to employ his crew—of which
there were forty—continually in the most useful
manner. He had already made several voyages
to America and the East Indies, and this fur-
nished him with matter for much interesting and
instructive conversation, So the two friends sat
and listened with increasing curiosity and the
most earnest wishes that they could themselves
have experienced all that the captain related,
They accompanied him in their thoughts on his
voyages, shared his perils, and were at his side
in many an adventure; with him they passed
through unknown seas, landed. on desolate
islands, saw many remarkable countries, and
cities of foreign portions of the globe. Both of
the young men were commissioned as volunteers
to lend a helping hand to two other officers of the
ship, These also, after the example of the captain,
were excellent men, scientifically educatéd, who
soon became friends of the two young men.

_ Gustavus. I can imagine how happily they
both must have felt in their intercourse with
such men. [should like much to have been in

their place.



Winter In SPitzBERGEN. 35

Morner. You can do as well here on the
firm land. If you conduct yourself. properly,
you may find everywhere good men who will be
to you what the captain and the two officers
were for the young men.

Farner. I hope and expect this from Gus-
tavus, But to goon. Every hour at which they
were at leisure from the service of the ship, Ivan
and Gregory were in the cabin, listened to the
descriptions by the captain, and read with him
the history of voyages, examined the maps,
practised drawing, and the higher mathematics,
and in this way such scholars in such a school
soon became able seamen.

The captain took. his course with the most
favorable weather, first northerly, so as to sail
around the great barren island of Nova Zembla.
He would not have been obliged, usually, to do
this, as he was only accustomed to pass through
the straits which separate Nova Zembla from
Siberia. But the passage through these straits
is dangerous, for we find there many shoals,
sand-banks, rocks, and reefs.

JULIA. Reefs?

FatHer. They are a succession or chains of
rocks, which extend along under the water, and
are very dangerous to vessels in sailing. Usually
we find them near to land, where they stretch



36 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

out far into the sea. But often, too, they are to
be met with in the midst of the ocean,

Maria. Can the sailors know and see where
these reefs are?

FATHER. If the sea is stormy they cannot.
It is only when the sea is calm that they are able
to do it, The waves indeed dash over such a
reef, and form a species of breakers, just as they
do on a coast. But seamen avoid, as much as
possible, such places. They choose to make a
considerable circuit rather than expose them-
selves to such dangers, especially in unknown
regions. *.

Our voyagers were on the north of Nova
Zembla, and now they turned to the east. Here
two capes run out, not far distant from each
other, Cape North-west and Cape North-east, or
Taimura, the most northern points of Asia, which
belong to the most northern portion of the earth.
Against all expectation their voyage had hitherto
been perfectly favorable, the sun appeared
warmer than they could have anticipated in this
latitude; they nowhere met with ice, and the
day which lasted above two months.—

Jutta. What did you say, father? the day
two months long?

FaTHER. Yes; the day at midsummer here
lasts about two months; but for this reason,
about Christmas, the night is as long. Then, for



WiInNTEER In SPITZBERGEN. ar

two months, the sun does not make its appear-
ance,

Jutta. That would be a nice thing for many
people for whom the sun always rises too early.

Gustavus. Look in the glass yourself, Julia;
you are not used to be the first up.

Jutta. We will not dispute about that. Sleep
is something very sweet; but you, Max and
Gustavus, can oblige us two, Maria and-myself,
very much, See here; I know well that the
length of the days and nights is different, ac-
cording to situation of countries—

Max, That, for example, under the line, or
the equator, the day, year in and out, is twelve
hours, and the night twelve hours; while under
the two poles the longest day lasts half a year.

Junta, True; but why is it so? and in what
degrees does it happen?

FarHer. Of this you have no really correct
idea,—that I can well believe. Max and Gus-
tavus, what if you should make this clear to
your sisters ?

Max. Very willingly, sir; but I must first
think oyer in what way to make it plain,

Fatuer, That must depend wholly on you
two, and it will give me pleasure if you find out
a new way. But let us now return to our ac-
count of the voyage. Here in the highest north-
ern point of Asia, the English captain had two

4



38 Winter 1n SPirzBERGEN.

courses before him, of which he might take his
choice. One way was to proceed further on his
voyage eastward, and sail through between Asia
and America. Gustavus, what countries would
he pass to reach the East Indies?
Gustavus. Along the northern coast of Asia,
to Cape Satatskoy, from thence to the North
Cape. 7
Marta. Ha! ha! That was the way years
before, with our friends Cook and Kotzebue.
Gustavus. So it was. On the way the
captain could make a visit to the Jakuts and
Tschutsches. From thence they might go through
Behring’s Straits, between Asia and America.
JuLia, Now I know the rest of the way.
Kamschatzka, the Aleutian Isles, Japan, China,
all these countries come one after another.
FaTHer. Right. The captain thought with
himself whether he should choose this course.
The summer would soon be over, and the winter
drew on at every hour. The whole of the north-
ern coast of Asia was little known, and therefore
threatened many dangers. Possibly the captain
had no particular desire to pass the winter at
Kamschatzka. The course to the East Indies re-
moved him too far from his country—from old
England. He concluded, therefore, to turn about
again, and to spend the winter in Archangel,
and in the beginning of the following summer to

6 “S|



WiInTER IN SPITZBERGEN. 39

try whether it might not be possible to discover
a new way through Baffin’s Bay.

Marta. Is not that the great bay between
Greenland and the yet wholly unknown parts of
North America?

FaTHEr. Yes. More than two hundred years
ago was this bay discovered, and many attempts
have since been made to find a passage through
it into the Pacific Ocean.

In this region the captain turned his ship to-
wards the North-west Cape, and for a second
time doubled the cape. The cold had already
set in, and the ice formed on the coasts, mist and
snow darkened the air, and the captain had need
of all his care if he wished to reach Archangel
with his ship uninjured, But often a single cir-
cumstance is a means of frustrating the best and
wisest plan; a fact which the captain and his
friends proved by experience, and which every
man often has occasion to learn.

Gustavus. Did it happen to them as it did
to Robinson Crusoe? Did they suffer shipwreck ?

Marta. I should doubly pity the unfortunate
men if such a fate had befallen them in that re-
gion.

FaTHER. I forgot to tell you that the captain
had taken with him from Archangel a Russian
as a pilot, a man who was perfectly trained for
his post. He soon became Ivan’s and Gregory's

.



40 Winter 1x SPITZBERGEN.

friend. He was of much value to the captain
and the whole crew on account of his knowl-
edge. Now the officers were sitting in the cabin,
talking of many things, when they perceived an
unusual noise and roaring; and plainly heard
the under pilot give orders to take in the sail,
and keep a redoubled lookout on every side.
All sprang up, and hastened to their posts.

“What's the matter?” asked the captain. “A
fearful storm is brewing at the south-east,” was
the answer. “ If we were only in the open seal”

The ship received the motion given it by the
waves; mounting higher and higher continually
at every moment, the storm became more violent,
the roaring more frightful, and the billows rose
to an incredible height. Sometimes the ship .
hung suspended on the top of the waves, and
sometimes she sunk down to the very depths,
The day had wholly disappeared. No one could
steer the ship with certainty, as the violent storm
broke upon the near land, took another direction,
and drove forward the ship as if it were a light
feather. ‘The captain, otherwise so adventurous
aseaman, was here more distressed than he would
have been in any other place,

Marta. Why so, dear father?

FatTuer. Because he was not acquainted with
this sea and the land adjoining» Had such a -
storm taken him on a wide open sea, well known

*
7 é



Winster in SPiTtzpERGEN. 41

to the sailor, then he would have been less af-
fected by it, because he would have felt certain
as to the rocks, shoals, and sand-banks: but
where he now found himself, all these were to be
dreaded. All suitable precautions were taken,
but it was now impossible to steer the ship; they
were obliged to leave it f the violent assaults of
the sea and the tempest. The darkness naturally
increased their terror, the glimmer of the day
hardly lasting for an hour, could not be per-
ceived on account of the thick clouds deeply
overhanging them even down to the water; and
the waves caught away with them the ship,
dashed about in a wholly unknown region. No
one could understand the others, so loud was the
roar of the wind and noise of the billows strik-
ing against the sides of the ship. Two days had
the poor men done all in their power, when the
mainmast, broken by the storm, came down with
a thundering crash across the ship, by which its
Tapid course became very greatly impeded. “Now
we can do nothing more,” said-the captain, with
a stern submission to his fate, ‘Now no steer-
ing, no direction, can help us.. If God does not
- us, we must find our grave in the billows

re,

How Ivan and Gregory must have felt at these
_ Words you can readily imagine. Never had they
-before made a voyage to any distance; never had

‘ 4*

: we



42 Winter 1N SrPirzBeRGeEN.

they experienced a storm.’ Whatever they had
learned of it, they had gathered from descriptions
and narratives, and I need not assure you how
far the best description falls short of the impres-
sion which the reality produces.

Shut up in the ship, pale and exhausted, with-
out being able to sleep, for a moment the unfor-
tunates sat in the cabin despairing of their safe-

. They saw nothing but approaching, certain
death before their eyes. Every howling, roaring
billow spoke to them this fearful doom, so that
they even finally wished that all might be soon
over, for the anguish of expecting death is more
torturing than death itself. No one spoke, no
one comforted and tranquillized the others. Like
an arrow shot forth, the ship flew on through the
waves, and the tempest grew continually strong-
er, the billows roared more dreadfully, and the
ship was dashed onward at a more fearful rate.

All at once she struck with so hard and shat-
tering a blow that all were thrown confusedly
together. Again once more the ship raised on
the top of the wave, then dashed down, and, on
asudden, stood as if it was fast walled in.

Jutta. Now I can imagine how it was, just
as in the case of Robinson Crusoe’s ship; to split
in pieces and go asunder must be the fate of the
poor Juno.

Marra. And all be drowned.



WiInTEER IN SPITZBEEGEN. 43

Gustavus. That could not have been the
ease; for who, then, would have told this story?

FaTHer. It is now too late; I will go on with
the story some other time. To-morrow evening
you may then expect the continuation.

ei



Chird Eurning.

I NEED not assure you that all the four chil-
dren, Max, Gustavus, Maria, and Julia, awaited
the progress of the story with the most anxious
curiosity. They talked the whole morning about
it, and inquired among themselves how it would
go with poor Ivan and his friends, when Max
recollected what an obligation he had taken on
himself to try and explain to his sisters what
causes the difference in the length of the days
and nights. He and Gustavus had promised
this. ‘The confidence of their father, as well as
the expectition of their sisters, were important
to both of them; they felt themselves dignified
by so honorable a commission.

Max was of a penetrating mind; what he
knew he knew thoroughly ; for it was a princi-
ple with him to learn everything accurately, and
never to stop in his views half-way. With Gus-
tavus this was not the case; he could indeed
comprehend anything much easier than the more



‘

WiINTEE IN SPrrzBERGEN. 45

tardy Max, but also on this account he. fgggot
again much sooner-what remained firmer in his
brother's memory. Both had made more than
common advances in geography; to examine
maps and study them, was for them no labor, but
a pleasure. They sat down to them with full as
much delight as other children have in sitting
down to enjoy pictures. But they knew not only
countries and seas, rivers and mountains, but also
the relation of the earth to the other heavenly
bodies and planets; they knew the circumference
of the earth, and its place in respect to the sun.
Their father, to whom this kind of knowledge
was most agreeable, had brought forward his
sons very far in this branch of human science.
He did not, therefore, ask too much when he re-
quested of both of them that they would explain
this subject to their sisters. He could, in this
way, best learn whether his two sons themselves
thoroughly understood what they were to make
plain to others. 7.

However great was the expectation of the
boys to know the fate of the unhappy voya-
gers, yet they felt still greater desire to fulfil
their promise. Max, especially, thought about
it the whole morning, how he should perform
his commission, and Gustavus went cordially
handin hand with him. Both of them thought
only of this one thing. The sisters, indeed, often

* s



46 Winter in SpitzBerGeEN.

laughed when they noticed their brothers’ un-
usual soberness. Julia made many a sportive
attack on them, and probably Max and Gustavus
would have erred in their purpose, if they had
not felt themselves too greatly flattered by their
father’s confidence in them,

Finally, after a long examination and consulta-
tion—for their father left them alone purposely,
without giving them the slightest aid—their
plans were ready for communicating the infor-
mation. Maria and Julia were called, and their
father himself came in to correct many things,
or to make them still clearer, which were proba-
bly not wholly clear to his sons.

Max and Gustavus had inclined the large
table on one side by means of a support under
it, so that the flat surface had the same direction
with the actual course of the earth, or, as Max
expressed himself in scientific language, parallel
with it.

In the middle on this table level, was fastened
a large gilt ball by a peg, on the projecting point
of which hung down a yard and a half of thread.
On the end of the thread, a parti-colored ball
was fastened, and a circle drawn on the table
with chalk, so large that it marked out the
course of the ball which hung on the thread. t.

Both of the girls, their pupils, looked at. this
apparatus; it was probable, in their view, that, .

‘



WINTER IN SPiITzBERGEN. 4T

the gilded ball might represent the sun, and the
parti-colored one the earth. It proved to them
that Max and Gustavus had thought it all over,
and drawn it out correctly.

With a somewhat important mien, Max came
forward to the table. “You know, Maria and
Julia," he began, “that the sun is fixed—that
the earth revolves around it, and completes its
course ina year. ‘The direction in which it goes
round the sun, I will now show you, and you will
yourselves wonder how clear and evident will
be made to you the difference of the length of
the days and nights. Look at this ball; it repre-
sents the sun, which is fixed in the central point
of this circle. This other ball denotes the earth,
and you observe on it in the middle a line.

Marta. Which no doubt represents the Equa-
tor on the line?

Gustavus. Yes. Here you see two letters,
N and 8, by which are designated the North and
South Poles. On the ball are, besides, some
parti-colored lines which I have drawn, and
which may represent the portions of the globe.

Max. Now look sharp. The earth stands

now as you see here, unequally lower than the
sun, which naturally stands as much above.
Maria, So it does!
Max. The North half of the earth is turned
to the sun, It is therefore longer shone on by



48 WINTER IN SpirzBERGEN.

the sun in this direction than the South half,
and the region about the North Pole has the
sun hardly out of sight, while the South Pole
scarcely receives anything of it,

JULIA. Very correct and clear.

Gustavus. Now, therefore, it is summer on
the North half of the earth; the sun stands at
its height, and the days are the longest. But
now look close. Now the earth begins its
course. It makes a circuit on this chalk line
around the sun, and turns like a ball, that is,
running on at the same time around itself once
in twenty-four hours,—a motion from whence,
as you see, day and night takes place. The
whole northern half, especially the North Pole,
is always yet longer shone on by the sun than
the South Pole.

Max. The earth continues to rise higher,
until it has the same direction with the sun, that
is, the same elevation or height. The northern
half, in this way, every day will be somewhat less
shone on by the sun. The days become shorter, the
nights longer, until the earth, about the 22d of Sep-
tember, comes in the same direction with the sun,
and the days and nights are of equal length.

Gustavus. And then we have the beginning
of autumn.

Max. Now the earth goes farther, continu-
ally rising higher, and naturally it must appear



WINTER IN SPITZBERGER. 49

to us as though the sun came to stand constantly
lower. The North Pole is hardly any longer
shone on by the sun, and the nearer the regions
of the northern half lie to the Pole, so much lon-
ger are the nights, and so much the shorter are
the days, while, on the other half of the earth,
exactly the opposite takes place. This portion
now is longer shone on by the sun, and, as you
see, the South Pole has the sun continually
upon it. If the earth now, about the 22d of
December, has reached the highest point, then
we have the shortest day, or the beginning of
the winter. From this time, the earth goes
deeper again, the sun appears to rise higher, the
days increase, and the earth, on the 21st or 22d
of March, comes again into the same direction
with the sun,—day and night are equal,—the
earth sinks deeper,—the sun comes up higher,
until we again reach the end of June, and, with
the longest day, we once more have the begin-
ning of summer.

FatHer. You have performed your commis-
sion very well. I hope your sisters have under-
stood you, .As soon as I have time, I will draw
a table on the globe there, by which you will
know accurately how long, in any region of the
earth, is the longest day and the longest night.

Jutta. Itisvery clear tome, I should hardly
have trusted the commission to my brothers.

5



50 WINTER IN SPITZBERGER.

Max. Hem! it is not so very hard. One
must only himself see rightly into the matter.

FatHer. Very true. But there is one thing
more—how great the distance is at which the
earth revolves around the sun, You can con-
clude from this that, at every beat of the pulse,
we move nearly four miles.

Jutta. That is what I call going ahead!

Faraer. Certainly; for the distance which
the earth passes around the sun, or its orbit, as
it is called, amounts to more than a hundred and
twenty millions of miles (or about two hun-
dred and ninety millions of English miles.)

And now to go back to our unfortunates,
whom we left yesterday in a situation of the
greatest possible danger. The dread shock, and
the violent leap, the sudden silence, and the then
ever-increasing howling and roaring of the waves
beating against the sides of the ship, threw all
of them into despair. Even the captain, other-
Wise 80 courageous and composed as a seaman,
in this horrible moment lost his presence of
mind. “God have mercy on us!” cried he, full
of despair; “we are cast on the rocks, and in a
few moments, we shall be a wreck.”

Junta. A wreck? :

Faruer. This is what it is called in seamen's
language, when a ship is either wholly swallowed
up, and driven about on the billows—or at least



Winter tn SrirzpEerGeEn. 61

80 affected by the tempest, that it cannot proceed
on its voyage,—when, for example, it has lost
its masts or rudder, as was the case with our
ship.

The wreck is about sinking!” With horror
they all heard this doom of death—in the great-
est distress every one was looking for the moment
when the wreck should go asunder, the sides be
parted, the water press in, and all be swallowed
up by the raging billows.

Marta. Poormen! I tremble at the thought
of their being so abandoned.

JuLiA. Who could not here save themselves
as Robinson Crusoe did himself, by swimming.

Gustavus, And if they did fortunately swim
through, where would they land? What means
of living would they have found, where there
was a desolate island? Robinson Crusoe was far
better off; he found fruits, and a warm climate,
where he could dry and warm himeelf. These
poor people had nothing but snow and ice to
look on, But, father—

FaTHEeR. Some anxious, dreadful moments
passed before the unfortunate men could again
recover their senses. The captain was the first
to whose heart courage and composure returned.
At the side of the calm pilot or steersman he left
the cabin and went with him into the hold, that
is; the lowest part of the ship, where they both



52 Winter tw SpPirzBERGEN. —

r

saw, to their great joy, that the ship was entirely
dry inside.

Marta. Howso? What good could this do?

FaTHerR. It proved thus much, that the body
or hull of the ship had not suffered. The sea
water, if it had been otherwise, would have come
through, and the whole space or hold would
have been filled with water. At the same time
they noticed that the waves no longer beat so
violently, and from this circumstance very justly
concluded that the storm, if it had not yet per-
fectly calmed, must have very considerably spent
its rage. Inspired by new hope, they both of
them hastened to their trembling associates, to
carry to them a piece of news which, for the mo-
ment, must have been the most joyful. Now
the calm pilot. proposed to open one of the port-
holes, which had been kept closed.

Maria. Port-holes?

FaTHER. Gustavus, that belongs to your de-

. partment.

Gustavus. Port-holes are, in a ship, what
joop-holes are in a wall or entrenchment, open-
ings through which the muzzles of the cannon
are run out. They are provided with doors that
they may be shut in a storm, so that the swelling
waves may not come into the ship.

FatHer. Now, the pilot opened such a port-
hole, and looked up to the starry heaven above



WINTER IN SPITZBERGER. 53

him: The feeble light which the stars gave was
sufficient to distinguish, around the ship, an in-
distinct calm surface, which was lost afar off in
the boundless distance. The pilot wondered at
the silence of the waters, which still roared and
raged continually and awfully on the other side
of the ship. He called out to his companions,
They all came together; then some one mounted
on the quarter-deck,

JuLIA. Is not that the highest part of the
ship?

FatHer. Yes. We might compare it to the
roof of a house, only that it is flat, The seamen
often call it the upper promenade of the ship,
Large ships have many decks, which, as in a
building, separate the different stories. You
may thus often read the expression “three-
decker,” which commonly means a large ship of
war.

They now mounted on the quarter-deck, The
cold fresh air was the more beneficial to all as
the unfortunate men had spent many days in the
confined space of the cabin. But how great was
their terror when they saw that the wide extent
Which the pilot took for a calm and quiet sea was
a monstrous field of ice.

JULIA. Was this so very frightful? I should
have thought it would be better than if the ~
had been on a rock.

i



54 WiInTeER In SPriTtzBERGEN.

Gustavus. One would be as dangerous as the
other, Would it not, father?

Farner. And probably the dashing on the
ice would be more dangerous than on a rock. A
cliff can easier be climbed; there is in it some
eleft, or gulley, or cavern, which might afford
protection or warmth; or perhaps a spring, a
beast, or some plant which might serve as food
for them when enfeebled. But of all this nothing
is found on an empty field of ice. At the mo-
ment when the unfortunates mounted the upper
deck it was clearer than in mid-day; the sun of
the short day had risen, a small portion of the
disk moved above the horizon, and diffused so
much light that the poor men could perceive the
horrors of their situation. The wreck lay in an
ieeberg bay, which was protected on three sides
against the pressure of the waves. On the
fourth, the sea was indeed open, but the current
drove in monstrous heaps of ice, which shut fast
the bay, so that it might be clearly seen how the
return was more and more destroyed by every
new mass of ice. Destruction seemed unavoid-
able, for only one great ice cake was necessary
to be driven against the wreck to crush and
shatter it to pieces,

Marta. If the passage now, at least, had re-
mained gpen !

FatHer. This would have been of little use,



Winter 1s Spirzpercen. 55

The ship was a wreck, without sail; they could
no longer steer and guide it; to undertake a long
voyage with it would be impossible, as the unfor-
tunates knew not in what region they were. If
the storm was indeed really over, yet, suppose
they could reach navigable water, it would be so
high up, and in so open a sea, that the wreck
could not long bear their shattering motion. In
a word, dear children, destruction seemed only
too certain,

JULIA. What, then, did the poor people do?

FATHER. You can easily imagine their situa-
tion. In the first moment, when they gained the
fearful conviction of the horrible certainty they
were driven almost to desperation, On all sides
they saw danger and death; nowhere did the
slightest ray of hope appear of their being able
to save themselves. In such a condition man
sees only misfortune; fear blinds him against
every possible means of deliverance. When the
unfortunate man in some degree composes him-
self will he first be more regardful of every
thing; he thinks of them more accurately, and
oftentimes it happens to him to discover a new
and hitherto unknown mode of relief—he begins
to hope, the new hope teaches him to know his
new powers, increases his activity to use them,
despair vanishes, and the unfortunate man is no
longer wholly miserable.



56 WiInTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

Gustavus, And it was so, was it not, with
our unfortunates?

FatHer. As you might expect from brave
persons, whom not their conduct but their pro-
fession had brought into misfortune.

After some hours the little glimmer of light
which in this zone at this time of the year they
call day, disappeared; the captain took an obser-
vation, and then found that they were in the
seventy-first degree of north latitude. Do you
understand this expression? I have heretofore
explained it to you. Do you recollect on what
occasion ?

Max. O yes, sir, When we were taking our
voyage round the world with Cook and Kotzebue.

Faruer. It was now September. Only a few
weeks remained and entire night would set in,
a circumstance which much increased the anxiety
of our unfortunates. They heard this news with
horror, The captain, a firm, composed man, who
had in numerous voyages contended with many
dangers, and had conquered, first recovered his
presence of mind and courage. He caused the
whole ship’s company to gather around him.
“Friends,” he began, “that I would gladly help
you all, even at the sacrifice of mine own life,
you may well believe; but you see that in thig
case I can do nothing. We are in the hands of
Almighty God, and must give up ourselves to



Winter In SPITZBERGEN. 5T

his will. Without his aid nothing will help us;
if he wills to save us he can do it, though this
iceberg may tower around us yet higher, and the
sea become more impetuous. He can save us
when and how he will. Only we must do our
duty. Faint heartedness and mute despair will
do us no good; they only injure us. We have
been almost three days without an ordinary meal,
and without a moment of sleep. We ought not
to neglect our bodies; we know not yet how
greatly we may need our powers to contend with
dangers of which we are not aware. If we keep
our bodies sound and powerful, our minds and
spirits too will be the more active and lively.” He
commanded them, therefore, to light up the ship's
lanterns; the cook must prepare a good nourish-
ing meal; all must eat and drink heartily, and
then they must lie down in their hammocks to
sleep. The captain did so, but it was in vain for
him to close his eyes; he could not get the de-
sired repose. He thought of his unfortunate
companions, who were under his command, and
whose fate was placed in his hands; he felt that
he must care for them, and a care of this sort,
joined to the most torturing anxiety for his own
life, would allow no one to obtain slumber.
‘Maria. The captain must certainly have been
a good man. Many others in his place would



+
58 WiInTER In SPITZBERGEX.

have been occupied with himself only, without
caring for others.

FatHer. Certainly; he was a brave man,
who indeed had deserved a better lot. But
especially the fate of Ivan and Gregory lay near
his heart. He recollected that he had advised
them to the voyage, and had induced them also
to undertake it contrary to their father’s will.
He read in their countenances the bitterest re-
pentance for their conduct towards their father;
and now reproached himself most severely for it,

Gustavus. But Ivan and Gregory had written
to their father?

Moruer. You think, then, that this was
enough? How now if their poor father had not
consented when he sorrowfully and in vain
stretched forth his hands to his dear Ivan?
How, if the pain of seeing himself forsaken by
his son, and having lost all the hopes founded on
him, had brought the old man upon a sick-bed
and tothe grave? Would allthis be repaired by
a letter? ;

FaTHer. Surely not! I hope Gustavus will
' feel this, and not do so that he will be obliged
to reproach himself. Especially the captain
pitied the good Ivan, It did not escape him how
east down and sorrowful the young man was,
He knew, too, that want of courage was not the
cause of his being so downcast, for Ivan was a



WiInTER IN SPITZBERGER. 59

young man of very resolute feelings; but he felt
firmly convinced that it was Ivan’s grief of hav-
ing made his father drink so deeply of sorrow
which lay heavy on his heart.

Gustavus. But, dear father, Ivan’s object
was, however, praiseworthy. He had under-
taken the voyage for his own improvement.

FatHer. This was indeed far better than ifa
blameworthy levity had determined him to do
so, but it does not excuse him. Ivan deeply felt
this. With the thought of his poor father, his
conscience was aroused, which is never the case
with any one except when he does wrong; and
so Ivan was obliged to suffer the reproaches of
his own heart without, alas, the consolation
which others had—that they had brought them-
selves into this misfortune in the pursuit of their
calling, and attending to their duty,

Maria. That reminds me of Robinson Crusoe,

JuLiA. It is true; and it was just so, too, he
thought of himself, when he was on the desolate
island.

Modruer. Ivan would have done better, if he
had reflected on all this beforehand, as he might
have done, and had conducted himself according
to this conviction. His own heart would have
been spared many sorrows, if he had thought
deeply of the consequence of his conduct. Never
act as he did, my dear children. Who of you



60 Winter 1N SrPirzBERGEN.

would wish yourself to be in Ivyan's or Robinson
Crusoe’s place, and to feel the reproaches which
they both made to themselves?

Maria. Certainly no one of us, mother dear. .

Farner. Ivan lay on his bed continually
awake, while others were sleeping. Finally, he
ceased to be conscious of his thoughta,—but it
was more the perfect exhaustion and wearisome-
ness, more a fainting away than slumber. How
long he lay in this state of unconsciousness, he
could not determine when the captain woke him,
“Tet the others sleep quietly,” he said. “They
are fortunate; we will not disturb them. It
tranquillizes me to know that they are happier
than I am.” “What shall I then do?” asked
Ivan, raising himself up. “ You must accom-
pany me.” “And whither?” “T have not been
able to shut my eyes from disquiet. I must
have certainty.” “As to what?” “As to our
fate. I have observed that in a short time now
it will be day. I saw it from the quarter-deck.
At the same time, I noticed that thie ice is piled
up continually higher about the wreck." We
must see whether there is no land to be dis-
covered,”

Still half-buried in his swooning slumber,
Ivan took his gun. With difficulty, they both
climbed up a high cake of ice frozen close to the
wreck. On their left hand the sun, although it



Winter tn Sprrzpercen. 61

was mid-day, appearing deep and bloody red
through the mist, stood at the horizon. The air
blew piercingly. .A vast boundless field of ice,
scattered over with sparkling flakes of snow, lay
like a mirror before the eyes of both of them,
With the most anxious observation, the captain,
by the help of a spy-glass which he carried along
with him, looked over the dead level, and who
can describe his joy, when he clearly saw land
afar off on the western horizon, and at the same
time could distinguish some rocks and moun-
tains!

Max. God be praised. It certainly was an
island.

Jutia. Iam right glad that the poor people
could see the land!

Marra. And with what joy could they carry
to the others this news!

MorHer. Well observed, Maria! The joy
of others is pleasant to the good man, and it
makes him happy when he can impart some-
thing comforting to others.

Fatuer. Both of them now went down to
the deeply lying wreck. Many of the crew were
awake, and sat thinking over their fate in deep
meditation. “In the north there is land!” cried
the captain, joyfully. “We have seen it; we
ean distinguish the particular mountains.” This
information enlivened them all with new hopes.

6



62 WiInNTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

Though the dangers were ever so great, the un-
certainty of their fate ever so torturing, this one
piece of tidings banished all their sorrows. The
prospect of saving their lives filled them all with
thankful joy, and confidence in the Divine aid
again strongly entered into their soul.

Max. But was the deliverance then already
so sure, that they could rejoice in it with cer-
tainty?

Fatuer. In the first moment of joy of the
unfortunate man enlivened by hope, he does not
think of this. It is enough for him for the first
only to be able to hope, and a little ray of hope
calms his heart in the greatest danger. Our
unfortunates were already satisfied, when they
heard the word land. Whether it was a waste
uncultivated island, or a ridge of barren, bare
rocks—whether they would find the means of
living—whether they would have ever the
opportunity to go back to their native country
—or what sorrowful future might await them in
the land discovered—of these things not one of
them thought in the first moment of joy. Enough
for them that they knew land to be near them.

Max. Now, did they go on it?

FatHer. That was not at once possible. All
must not together leave the wreck, in order not
to give up the means of living, and other sup-
plies which were there. Besides, they were not



Winter IN SPITzBERGEN. 63

yet acquainted with the country, and it was
therefore concluded that first some of the ship's
eompany should go there, and bring back tidings
to those who were left behind of what they found
there, The captain called for volunteers for this
enterprise, and at once Ivan and Gregory offered
themselves to undertake the commission. To
them was joined the Russian pilot, or steersman;
and so they three went forth with their fire-arms,
and a sufficient store of means of food, and of
the supply of other wants.

Max. How far off was the land?

FatHer. This could not be accurately deter-
mined. Between the wreck and the land dis-
covered, there was a field of ice smooth as glass,
on which no distance can be measured, because
no object could be distinguished, by means of its
form and color, for a standard. The sky was
somewhat clouded, and the air foggy; our three
travellers were therefore obliged to direct them-
selves by the regions of the sky in which the
mountains were observed. Among the packages
which they had taken with them were also some
torches of pitch, in order to be able to light up
and explore caverns and chasms which they
might at any time discover. Besides, it would
soon be night; and then it was possible that they
might meet with wild beasta, which, az is well
known, mostly fly before fire. They had, too,



64 WiInTER 1N SPITZBERGEN.

another object in view. Ivan and his com-
panions, if they found any cavern that could be
inhabited, or any dwelling, were to place a burn-
ing torch on the point of the rock, in order to
give to those whom they had left behind on the
wreck a signal. |

Gustavus. ‘That was like a signal-fire in
mountainous countries.

Fatuer. Very true. This signal-fire would
show that a dwelling or residence had been found,
and likewise serve as a guide to those who were
to come on after them.

Max. You speak of a dwelling. Could they
expect to find anything of that kind here?

FatHer, At least, this was not impossible.
They knew not in what region they were, and
could not determine whether the land discovered
was a part of Greenland, or perhaps of Norway,
where some dwellings are always found. But
supposing also that the land was the island of
Spitzbergen—as they afterwards found was really
the case—this precaution was not without use.

Marta. Are there any dwellings there? .

FarHer. All seamen are familiar with the
story, according to which several sailors had
passed a whole year on this barren island. The
poor men had left the ship, which was intlosed
by the ice, gone on Jand, and, on their return to
the coast, saw that the ice and ship had dis-



Winter 1x Srirznercen. 65

appeared. Previously some unfortunate persons
had wintered there, who had built a hut ina valley.

Max. Had this, then, really happened, or
was it only a mere saying—a story?

FaTHER. It was true, at least, as to the main
thing. The history of the unfortunate sailors
affords many particulars which confirm this
story. You recollect, surely, of a Hollander,
Heemsker, and of a Dane, Monke, whé both of
them had experienced the same fate, Yet sup-
posing that this could not be reckoned on, the
captain remembered to have heard, that the
whale fishers, who venture into this region, had
built huts in many places, in which the coopers
made barrels for the preservation of their oil.
It was, therefore, more than probable that three
such well-prepared enterprising persons, would
find one of these huts, to which afterwards the
shining torch might show the others the way.

From the wreck, they might easily take all
necessary supplies to their new abode. Then
could they brave the winter, and continually be
in expectation that the future summer would
discover to them a ship, and this would again
carry them back to their own land.

Max. O, this caution was rightly thought of!

JuniA. Thank Heaven, that the poor people
are safe, and well preserved under a roof, and

with the necessary supplies!
6*



66 Winter 1n Spitzpercen.

FatHer. But are they so?

Jutta. O, now I imagine they must have
left the wreck, did they not?

FatTHer. I would gladly sketch for you a
picture of the happy union again of those who
were so separated from each other, and their
return to their native land, but—

Moruer. Dear father, it is now late. You
have related to us longer this evening than
usual. To-morrow, my children, you may hear
how it fared with the poor people.

Jutta. I wish, father, that you had not spo-
ken that last sentence. Now I shall dream all
night of these poor people.

Gustavus. That would be better off than to
freeze and starve with them in Spitzbergen.



Fourth Earning.

Wirt a certain anxious doubt, the children
looked forward the next day to the continuation
of the history of the unfortunates. These poor
people had become of importance to them, on
account of the sorrowful lot that had befallen
them. They had expected that their fate would
be changed, that, united as true friends, they
would brave all the inconveniences of the long
winter in this rough country, and thus would
overcome all the circumstances and dangera
which were to befall them. They had hoped
that a ship coming to their deliverance would
carry back the forsaken ones to their native
country, and that Ivan, especially, would be
received by his father with joy.

And all these beautiful hopes, had that single
word “Sut” of their father destroyed !

“ How will it be with those unfortunate men?”
asked Julia. “I have actually dreamed of them,
how they died on the desolate island, were found,
and—"



68 Winter 1n SPitzBERGEN.

Gustavus. Strange! I, too, dreamed some-
thing like it. They must have had to fight with
bears and wolves,

Max. It is no worse, however, than if they
were under the torrid zone, and been killed by
lions and tigers, or were swallowed up by gigan-
tic serpents.

Marta, Very true, But what fine fruits
they would have found, too, under the torrid
zone! They could have laid out gardens and
fields, have built themselves houses, as the colo-
nists did on Robinson Crusoe’s island. And
what did they find on Spitzbergen ?—nothing
but ice and snow.

Gustavus. And they might also be poorly
enough provided with the means of living.

Max. We will not trouble ourselves on this
account. I hope it will be better than we feared.
One can endure much, and seamen especially can
do so.

So the children talked it over among them-
selves, until, after supper, their father seated
himself in his chair, collected around him the
young listeners, and, in the midst of their most
longing expectation, inquired, “ How far had we
gone yesterday evening?”

JuLia. Up to that horrible “but,” by which
you destroyed our rejoicing, dear father,

Moruer. And such a “but” will you often



Winter In SrirzperGen. 69

enough experience in your life. Hopes often
deceive, and not all the good which is antici-
pated takes place.

FaTHER. You are quite right, good mother.
But to go on with our story. With the best
wishes of those left behind, the pilot, Ivan, and
Gregory quitted the wreck. The cold was
severe, the air harsh and piercing. Only by
quick walking, by means of warm clothing, and
from the fact that they had much to bear, could
they resist the penetrating and sensible chill,

Gustavus. Why, then, did they burden
themselves with a large pack?

FaTHER. Because they needed many things,
and knew not what they might find there. They
had each a gun, a sword, a cartouch-box filled
with powder and ball, a bag with provisions,
bread, bacon, a bottle of brandy, tobacco, and
besides an axe, and every one of them a blanket,
Tt was still dark when they left the wreck. On
their left hand, they saw on the horizon a faint
glimmer, which announced the near approach of
the short day, lasting scarcely a few hours. In
the twilight of this glimmer, the friends went
forth in the direction they had once taken, and
at last, in four hours’ travel, reached the island,
so greatly had the mirror-like surface of the ice,
and the single-colored snow, deceived them in
respect to the distance.



70 Winter in SPITzZEERGEN.

Jutta. They must have felt thankful, when
they felt the dry ground under their feet.

Max. Just as did Robinson Crusoe, when he
‘rose on land out of his sea bath.

FaTHER. Whether they were as well satis-
fied as he was, is a question. Robinson Cru-
soe saw himself saved from certain death; he
found, under a mild climate, an island, from the
fruitfulness of which he might expect a suffi-
ciency of articles of food. Our three friends saw
before them a desolate land, a mass of rocks
thrown together. There was no tree, no shrub
was green, no bird sung in the tops of the trees,
No brook murmured there, over fields and mea-
dows; they saw nothing but those vast barren
heaps of rocks, which lay before them like gray
ruins, the natural color of which was yet more
heightened by the snow. The whole creation
appeared as if petrified. A stillness, as of the
grave, reigned in the desolation, in which not
even the dissonant cry and ill-omened screech of
a single raven broke in on the horrible silence,
There was no place for repose there; no cleft
or cavern was to be found, not a splinter of wood,
with which they could kindle a fire to warm
themselves,

Cautious and timidly, our unfortunate wan-
derers trod over the rough icy ground, covered
with rock. Caution was the more needful here,



WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN. 71

as neither of them were ignorant that the high
northern regions of the earth are inhabited by
certain kinds of wild beasts, especially bears and
wolves, Now the poor men went forward be-
neath a rocky ledge, in which some hollows
were to be seen, which appeared to become lost
in the clefts within. The first and nearest one
‘was chosen for their path. The surface was
slippery, and appeared to be ice; a fact which
led the pilot to the conclusion that they were
going on the top of a frozen brook, The short
day, hardly lasting for an hour, had broken,
but of the sun our travellers saw nothing in
the valley; only the highest points of the rocks
were brightened by it. In the valley itself,
there. lay a twilight that made them shudder.
The travellers saw nothing but a barren, wild
wall of rock, which took some other form at
every step, according as the windings of the val-
ley gave them diflerent views.

Ivan and Gregory advised a return: they
believed they would thus find a better path.
The pilot thought differently. “Useless search
aids us nothing,” said he. “It robs us of our
time and strength. According to my view, that
hut must lie near a brook. If we do not find it,
we shall probably discover some cavern, or a
sheltering cleft, and, what is as needful, a way
up on the rocky wall itself.” This latter dis-



72 WiInteER IN SpirzBERGENS.

covery was necessary, in order to place upon it
the pitch torch agreed on as a signal.

Junia, .And did they find what they sought?

Farner. Not indeed the hut. After half
an hour's walk, the rough points of the rocky
wall no longer appeared; the clifls were more
compact, and formed on both sides a smooth
wall, which gradually rose up from the valley,
that continually became wider. Suddenly, Ivan
espied above on the rock a cavern or opening in
the cliff, similar to the entrance of a cellar. It
was as if they had found a treasure, or the house
of a hospitable friend, so welcome was this dis-
covery.

Maria. But what particular use would this
discovery be to them?

Fatuer, Do you imagine that it was a small
one?

Gustavus, No, Maria, It was already im-
portant that they had come to a shelter, so that
they were not obliged to he under the open sky.

FatHer. Very true,my son. In this region,
encamping out on the bare ground, under the
open sky, would not answer. Now they had
found what they sought, a sheltering abode.
The cavern lay at the height of a house above
them. With some difficulty, they climbed up on
the rock. One helped the other, and thus they
reached the entrance of the cavern, which indeed



Winter tx Sprrzpere@en. 73

did not enter very deep into the rock, but was
quite clean, and large and roomy enough for
them to take up their quarters in. The floor
consisted of whitish gray sand, and the walls
were smooth and even. ‘“ Thank God,” said the
pilot, “who has thus far helped us, and He will
yet help us more. We. have, at least, a shelter
from the wind and weather.” “ Now must our
comrades come, and furnish up our quarters,”
added Ivan. ‘“ We will give them the signal,”
answered the pilot. It so happened, that the
cavern discovered lay under an abrupt, but
pretty high ledge of rocks. It was not yet quite
dark, and dangerous as the climbing up was to
them, yet they all three ventured on it. The
ledge was surmounted while the setting sun yet
shone a little. But what a prospect !

JULIA. A beautiful one?

Faruer. In a certain sense, yes. The friends
stood on one of the highest points. Around
them lay the rocks, strewed about like the ruins
of a palace that had fallen, only slightly illumi-
nated by the fast disappearing sun. Over these
masses, they now saw the great field of ice through
which they had wandered, and a fire, shining at
a distance, showed them the region in which
their companions still remained. By means of a
spy-glass which they had taken with them, they
clearly saw the pile of wood burning on the ice,

7



74 Winter in Sprrzpercen.

and also the wreck, projecting above the icy
mirror, illuminated by the flame. Now they
fastened the torch between some stones, and the
next moment set it on fire. Moreover, Gregory
sent up three fire-rockete, which mounted into
the pure, thin air, higher than usual, and diffused
a beautiful light.

Maria. Fire-rockets?

FaTHer. Yes, as they send them up in fire-
works. They go quite high, move some minutes
shining and bright in the air, and then burst,
They can be seen in a dark night for many miles
off, and they are used in war for signals, and to
give notice of an attack, or any such thing.—
But to proceed. “Well,” said the pilot, “ that
idea was a good one. We have now nothing to
do but to wait whether our brethren will
observe the signal.” And truly, there rose in
a moment from that direction three rockets.
“Grand |" said Ivan. “Our friends have under-
stood the sign. Now let us go back to our
quarters.” Carefully they descended; the con-
tinually burning torch shone on their toilsome
return, and they came back safely to their
cavern,

As long as they were in the valley, they had
experienced a piercing, moist, penetrating chill;
on the cliff, they found the reverse. A remark-
ably milder air blew around them, like that











Winter in SprirzperGes. 17

which is perceived in a thaw after cold weather.
A distant muttering noise was heard, and the
pilot concluded that there was going to be a
change of the weather.

Max. But the winter was near?

Fatuer, Yes, indeed! In these northern
regions, it is often the case that the summer
ends partly with unusual storms, and partly
these storms set in at the beginning of the win-
ter, when the ice and snow have everywhere
made their appearance. Then the sky is over-
east with black clouds, and the rocks are upheaved
by the violence of the tempest; but on the first
clearing up of the air, suddenly comes in the
most dreadful cold.

Sorrowfully sat the three friends there, eating
their supper, in which they were obliged to go
without a refreshing drink and a warming fire.
A pile of wood now would have been comforta-
ble to them. With it, they might have warmed
the cave, as well as lighted it, and could also
have secured themselves against the attack of
wild beasts. Little was said. Every one in
silence wished only that the morning would
come; for they imagined that then their friends
would leave the wreck, and bring with them
everything that was now wanting for them.

But yet a glance into the future showed them
nothing but what was frightful; and even the

7*



78 Winter 1n SpirzpEercen.

conviction, that in a few hours they should be
joined to their friends, did little in affording
them composure,

Oh, the unfortunates! They could not know
that on this last—this only hope—

Jutia. Now, father—it would not fail them?

FatHer. Alas! it did fail them—an expe-
rience which you will often enough undergo in
your life. The only hope often deludes. Well
is it ~ him who never, never counts on blind

ce

Maria. But yet those on the wreck had seen
and answered the signal |

FaTHer. And still—but only listen further.
Exhausted by the difficult journey over the ice
and the rocks, worn out by cold, and enfeebled
by their anxiety for the future, our three friends
slept, covered up in their blankets, and with
their loaded guns on their arms, until at last the
pilot was roused by a dreadful howling and
noise. He got up; the noise beeame more
frightful continually, and the howling more hor-
rible. He at once awaked the others, who
sprung up affrighted, and in imagination already
beheld a troop of wild bears before them. The
darkness was awful; not a star shone. They
stepped to the entrance of the cave—and what a
meeting! The tempest broke howling on the
rocks, and roared horribly through the valley.



Winter tn Spirzsercen. 70

Snow and rain drove in at the entrance of the
cavern in the face of these distressed men. All
nature was in the most dreadful uproar, and it
often seemed to our unfortunates as if they heard
the heavy roll of thunder,

Disturbed also as was the pilot, yet he con-
strained himself to appear calm. He feared the
worst, and yet would not willingly destroy the
hope of his less experienced friends, with which
they were continually flattering themselves.
Overwhelming and sorrowful news is always
soon enough.

“ How well it is for us,” he said, “ that we can
sit here in a dry place!" He spoke with a beat-
ing heart. The fate of his comrades presented
itself to him; the thought that they might now
be wandering about on the ice in this frightful
weather, in the impenetrable darkness, and the
conviction that the torch could no longer burn,
disquieted his heart; scarcely could he hide
from his friends what he feared. To examine
whether the torch was yet burning was impos-
sible; the storm would have dashed any one to
the chasm below who ventured to leave the
cavern. It was perfectly impossible, in the dark-
ness, to climb the ledge of rocks, as the ascent,
even by the glimmer of daylight, was dangerous
to life. “God Almighty only can grant that our
friends should not be lost!” he cried out almost



80 Winter 1n SPITZBERGEN.

against his will; “ may his angels direct them!”
A wish in which they all participated, although
the others felt not the same anxiety that he did.
They went back into the cavern, and notwith-
standing their disturbed thoughts, soon fell asleep
again. After a long while, the poor men awoke.
In the whole region there reigned a death-like
stillness; the storm was entirely laid—the air
was pure and clear, but exceedingly cold, and
our unfortunates almost felt ready to imagine
that they had only been dreaming. It was yet
dark, indeed, but they observed in the southern
part of the sky that always increasing arch of
light which indicated the rising of the sun, With
longing they waited for the day, and scarcely
had it broken than they clambered up the rocky
ledge, this time with still greater risk of life, as
it was rendered smooth by the ice and snow.
But what a view! what horror! That vast field
of ice over which they had come yesterday had
disappeared! High waves were rolling close in
to the shore, and broke foaming on the rocks;
only single cakes of ice were driven on the coast.
Of the wreck there was not the slightest trace to
be discovered,

Maris. I was just thinking about that. What,
then, had become of it?

Jutta, Where, then, were the poor men they
had left?



Winter in SPitzBERGEN. 81

FaTHer. Who could answer these questions?
Nothing could be more certain.than the destruc-
tion of the unfortunates, whether they had been
wandering on the ice or had remained on the
sinking wreck.

Max. But, father, was there not some piece
of the wreck or a corpse driven on the shore?

Faruer. Not the slightest trace of one.

Maria. But might not some of the unfortu-
nate crew have wandered somewhere on a field
of ice? Might they not have landed on some
other place on the coast?

Gustavus. ‘This last supposition was not very
likely, for they would keep looking towards the
burning torch.

FatHer. Alas! they had little benefit from
this. It lay overthrown, extinguished, and
hardly burnt down a few inches, on the rock.

Overwhelmed and almost annihilated, stood
the three friends on the spot. They reflected
not on their own sad lot, they felt nothing but
for the calamity of their comrades, and this the
more, the less they knew whether the unfortunate
men had been overwhelmed, or whether they
were still driven about, a sport for the ocean bil-
lows. No one of the three friends spoke a word,
Every one of them was tortured by the most
eorrowful thoughts, and every one took care not
to communicate his painful ideas to the others,



82 Winter IN SPITZBERGEN.

With their eyes filled with tears, they looked out
towards the place in which, a few hours before,
they saw the wreck. Their hearts were greatly
oppressed and ready to burst, and their bosoms
most deeply weighed down.

“ Might not, then, ourfriends have been saved?
It was not impossible. God may lead them tofind
us, probably wholly unexpectedly,” finally said
the pilot, more in order to raise Ivan and Gregory's
sunken spirits than from his own conviction.

“ And if we should not see them again,” re
plied Ivan, “if only they are saved! I should
be glad of it with all my soul. Our friends may
then take measures, in their own country, for our
rescue.” But he was well convinced, while ex-
pressing this wish, as well as was the pilot, that
it could not be so.

Maria. But, father, that does not quite please
me. Ivan and the pilot should not utterly de-
spair of the fulfilment of their desire. ~

MorHerR. This was owing to the feeling of
their hearts, produced by misfortune. The fates
of men have a great influence on their mode of
thinking. Whoever sees himself often favored
by providence becomes thereby more easily
assured, and not rarely too presumptuous. He
flatters himself that he will always be so favored.
But if he is visited by misfortune, he then be-
comes spiritless, he sees nothing but his own



Winter 1n Sprrzpercen. 83

wretchedness—hope forsakes him, and he is al-
ways timid.

FaTHer, At least, he acts thus at the first
moments, in which misfortune affects him the
more seriously, When he first comes to reflec-
tion then new hope is excited; the unhappy
man feels the benefits of the same, and then
clings to it the stronger the more innocent he is,
and the more reasons of calmness he can create
for himeelf out of religion,

Indeed the pilot and Ivan had little reason for
hope, If their friends had not landed on the
island—and how little probability there was of
this!—the miserable broken wreck could not
hold together long in the open sea, at least not
long enough for them to reach land. How could
the unfortunate men guide it without mast and
sail? They must look on quietly as the wreck
caught by the tempest and driven on by the
foaming billows, finally was dashed -to pieces on
the heaps of ice, or was swallowed up by the rag-
ing waves.

This hour of hopelessness was certainly hor-
rible for the three unfortunates. The poor
creatures over whose fate they lamented were
their friends, Could they have landed on the
island, and had they brought supplies for their
wants from the wreck, then it would have been
tolerable; were the country ever so desolate or



84 Winter In SPITZBERGEN.

barren, it would be great comfort to them that
there were so many of them together. Union

and friendship would have softened the horrors . |

of their solitude; their united strength would
have lightened every burden, and even the severe
toil would have been thus sweetened. But now
they were three unfortunates, and hardly provid-
ed with the necessary supply of their wants for
asingle day. How would it be with them in the
approaching winter, lasting for almost half a
year? How should the poor men withstand the
cold and hunger? Where should they find a
protecting shelter, and from whence could they
obtain for themselves warm clothing? °

Happy and hopeful as these sufferers had been
when, a few hours before, they left the cavern,
thus wretched, almost brought to despair, like
men who seemed to be abandoned by God, they
now returned back to this their retreat. There
lay the few remnants of the provisions they had
taken with them, their scanty meal; not one of
them touched it—not one of them felt hunger or
thirst; they had only one feeling, which must
have wrought horribly upon them, the thought
of their boundless misfortune.

Juuia. What a frightful situation! They
could not be more wretched |

FarHer, Do you think so?

Jutta. I cannot really conceive how there



WiInTER IN SpirzBERGEN. 85

could be anything in their situation that could
be called good fortune |

_ Faruer. I do not exactly blame your view;
at the first moment the unfortunate men them-
selves would not have thought differently. But
scarcely had the first storm been laid in their
breasts than calm reflection also again renewed
its sway, and then they soon found too that even
in the most doubtful situation there still remained
to them many good things. What do you think
there was, Max?

Max. I should think, father, it was a great
piece of good fortune that there were three of
them. Ifthere had been only one of them, this
solitary man would certainly have felt himself
very unhappy.

FATHER. Very true! But suppose the three
had not been friends ?

Maria, Yet here they would have become
so?

FatHer. But supposing they had not, could
they then have reasonably hoped that they could
have overcome all their obstacles ?

Maria. No! One would have wronged the
others, and thus everything would have been
ruined.

FaTHER. So the three were friends who lived
in unity and concord, and this was a great and
inestimable benefit. They could now therefore

8



BE Winter tn SpPiITzReERGEN.

count on every one helping the others, and
standing by them, and thus halfof their burdens
fell off, and the other became tolerable and light.
Gustavus, what advantage beside had they?

Gustavus. They were healthy, stout men
who could endure, able seamen, who knew how
to cut their way through in case of necessity.

FarHer. Very well! An essential benefit.
Now, Maria, do you know any other advantage?

Maria. ‘They were active, laboriousmen, who
had the best of dispositions.

FaTHer. This is also true. And now I will
tell you of yet another advantage. Had they
brought themselves into this situation by rash-
ness and folly?

Gustavus. No; they were in the discharge
of their duty and at their posts.

FatHer. Had they anything to reproach
themselves? I will except Ivan and Gregory,
who must always have felt painfully that they
had secretly left their father.

Gustavus. No, they had a quiet conscience.

FaTHerR. Right, and so you see then, that
they were not so wholly wretched. Friendship,
good-will, health, strength, and a good conscience
were left to them, and so long as a man possesses
these advantages so long he is not wretched or
forsaken. Besides this they were pious, religious
men, who did not put God and his commandment



Winter in SrPirznereGen. aT

out of their sight. Therefore faith waa ever in-
creasing in their heart, that God would not leave
them, and that his wisdom would find means
and ways for their sustenance. Besides, I may
tell you beforehand thus much, that their wretch-
edness was to rise yet higher, and almost to be-
come intolerable. I resume again, therefore,
the thread of their history. To the question
which every one of them made respecting the
fate of his companions, there was joined also
another and as important a one—which indeed
was easier put than angwered—I mean the in-
quiry, what they must now begin upon ?

The pilot, a worthy old sailor, who had made
many voyages, and lived through many adven-
tures, had encountered and triumphed over many
dangers, was, as it were, an angel of deliverance
for his friends. He was aman of a sound under-
standing, of a correct view, of a pious, firm
character, a man whom a peril might for a
moment render daring, but who did not lose his
head in the most desperate condition, but aroused
hjs courage and soon found means of aid, and
then did not allow himself to be diverted again
from his path once entered upon.

Gustavus. That is my man! He pleases
me! He would make an able general, like
Ziethen or old Blucher |

FatHer. The comparison is a good one; for



RS Winter 1x SPiTrzBERGEN.

it was by such a pious, firm feeling, by this un-
shaken courage in the greatest dangers, those two
heroes showed their character. For some hours
the three friends had lain there silent and in-
active. It wasnot yet dark, the moon’s crescent,
which was scarcely to be observed in the stormy
night, and the glimmering stars cast a feeble
twilight into the cavern, when the brave pilot at
once raised himself up. “ Friends!” said he,
“we cannot and must not remain as we now
are. We have sat here more than two hours
with our heads on our hands. That this does
us no good, you see; we must behave differently.
Soup and forward! Let us eat something. I
am hungry, and we ought not to injure our
stomachs if we wish to hold up our heads. We will
eat, and then we must go out to explore. The
night is not so very dark, we are armed, and
what is better yet, our hearts keep their right
places. Possibly we may find our comrades,
and probably not; or it may happen to us to
discover that hut or some other cavern; and
even if we do not accomplish all this, we shall
have done our duty.”

These words of the brave man and his exam-
ple operated on the two others; they felt them-
selves lightened; their courage returned again;
they were ashamed of their sluggishness and
their despairing distrust of God's government



Winter in SpirzBercen. 8D

and their own powers, The small remnants of
the food they had brought with them were eaten,
and when nothing more was left, the old pilot
led the way—“ Now in God’s name forward! I
have satisfied my appetite, and I feel new strength
in myself.”

Jutia. And they really went out? In the
night?

FaTHer. Which you must recollect was not
yet so very dark. The cold air is purer; the —
stars shine more brightly: even the snow diffu-
ges a certain light, and besides this, the moon
stood in her first Quarter. All this gave our
wanderers light enough to see the path, and
avoid the dangers in which a total darkness
would have precipitated them. They descended
from the height, and went again into the valley,
and now turned themselves to the opposite side.
But the way still led along between walls of rock,
in which certain forms and shapes stood forth
like statues. In the weak light these often ap-
peared terrific and fearful; the sight of them
produced even in these courageous men many dis-
turbed thoughts, to which was joined the over-
whelming idea that they had consumed the last
remnants of their food. This circumstance filled
the otherwise so firm and composed pilot with
distressing anxiety. In vain he related his
former voyages; recollections could as little ena-

*



90 Winter in SritzReRGeEN.

ble him to avoid disquietude as the solicitude of
his companions. He sought in every way to
keep up his friends’ courage; but the wilder the
country grew, so much the more he felt in him-
self how his former strong courage was shaken.
The rocks continually rougher, the overhanging
cliffs ever more frightful, and every moment
threatened to fall, while the entire region around
increased in horror. Our friends however still
_ kept on the way they had chosen, and soon they
perceived a clearer, milder air, as the high walls
of rock kept off the keen draught of the cold
wind. They saw that the points of the cliffs
became clearer and more illuminated, and justly
concluded that the short day had broken, and
the sun had risen. All at once they saw on the
side, a little ranning brook, which pure as silver,
gushed forth from a cliff, and lost itself behind
a distant rock, “'Thank God!” cried the pilot,
“one principal want is satisfied! Heaven will
help us yet further!"—All were now full of new
courage from this discovery. The water was
beautiful, and was of so much the greater benefit
for them, as the provisions taken from the wreck
consisted of biscuit and salted meat.
Gustavus. Yea, then a drink relishes,
FaTHer. A small piece of good fortune can
at once very much cheer the unfortunate. So it
was here. The three friends sat each on a stone



Winter in Sprrzpereen. fl

which lay on the margin of the fountain, and
drank to refresh themselves. The pilot who
carefully observed everything, now began: “I
know not whether I err, but it seems to me as
if we were here in the neighborhood of men.”
—With these words he pointed to some stones
regularly laid as if for a table and seate.—‘ That
is the work of men’s hands!" he added. “The
basin of the fountain too has been prepared with
art, and here are stairs made in the soft sand-
stone. Either persons have formerly inhabited
here, or we shall have the good fortune to-day,
to become acquainted with our new neighbors,”

Max. But did not the pilot deceive himself?
Possibly he only imagined that he saw something?

FaTtHer. The man was too well experienced
to be under such a deception, It is indeed true
that nature, especially in rocks and cliffs, often
produces forms and shapes of which a man at
the first sight, might believe that they were
fashioned by the hand of man: as for example,
we find towers, pyramids, wedges, and even fig-
ures of beasts and men. But this was not the
case here; they soon became convinced, that in
truth, the hand of man had been there employed.

They now, yet more eagerly, searched into
everything with anxious observation ; the whole
region was thoroughly examined, they went
further into a dark hollow, and all at once saw



92 WiIntTER IN SPITZBERGER.

themselves inclosed in a vast chasm of rock. It
was now fully day. The friends could not enough
look at the wild stones lying around them, and
the strange forms of the cliffs, “Men have in-
habited here, or they still do so,” said Ivan.
‘See here are foot-prints; here where no tree is
to be found, lie shavings. We must search
further |”

With these words he went round a cliff, and
a kind of stairs made of flat stones, rudely laid
on each other, led on behind the cliff on the wall
of rock, He called out to the two others; they
came, and all mounted some tolerably convenient
steps, and soon reached an ascending foot-path
which wound around spirally through some
stones lying about, and which they now fol-
lowed.

There, all at once, the three friends found them-
selves on the ridge of the mountain ledge ;—op-
posite stood the low sun in its most beautiful
splendor, and deep beneath them lay a fine val-
ley which was bounded on the opposite side by
mountains and rocks, In the midst of the valley
there ran up a narrow bay, or basin.

JuLiA. Do they not call it a bay when a part
' of the ocean runs up deep into the land?

FaTHER. Yes: they name it a gulf or a bay.
The soil of the valley from the hill to the bay
was of a beautiful meadow green, through which



Winter 1n SrirzBEercGes. 93

ran little brooks. The view was beautiful and
enlivening: the vale lay exactly opposite the
sun which shone into it. The air was without
mist, and pure, and the mingling of colors charm-
ing, which the green of the meadow ground,
the glassy surface of the bay, the dark cliffs,
the projecting distant points of snow and ice, of
the mountains and the clear blue heavens pro-
duced.

Marta. Who would have looked for this in
Spitzbergen ?

FarHer. And yet this was the case. That
vale was sheltered by the rocks from the cold
north and east winds, and as it lay open towards
the south the sun could warm it. In the sum-
mer therefore the heat in this valley was almost
intolerable.

To proceed, however, with our story. But
what caused the greatest joy to our friends, was
the sight of a vast collection of dry trees, which
lay on the shore of the bay.

Max. Trees?

FatHer. Large whole trees with branches
and roots.

Max. Then there must have been forests and
groves in a pretty good condition |

FatTHer. Forests and groves? On the whole °
island there did not grow a single tree, or shrub,
from which you could cut the smallest stick, «



94 Winter in SpirzeerGen.

Maria. But whence so much dry wood?

Farser. The providence of God had taken
care, that these regions without wood, should
yet not be wholly destitute of this necessary of
life, The great streams in North America lay
waste by their overflow large tracts of woodland;
their swelling waters tear up the strongest trees,
and bear them off into the sea, The storms and
winds then do the rest, to float these trees into
that uninhabited region, where they are driven
on the shore or left lying in the gulfs and bays,
—And now we ought not to stop halfway,”
said the pilot, interrupting the joyful expressions
of his friends, “If the history of the cooper’s
hut is not a mere fable, it must be found here’
in this vale. We have yet almost two hours left
us of day, and this we will use in the right
way!” They immediately went down into the
vale, towards which the way was more conveni-
ent than that which they had taken to climb the
height. They betook themselves to the shore
and found it grown over with spoon-wort, and
other planta of the cress kind; a discovery
which was of the greatest value to them,

Marta, Thus one perplexity was relieved
after another.

MorHerR. An observation which you will
often find confirmed, in the life of man,

Gustavus, Yes, they had wood and wates,



Winter tn Srirzeeraen. 05

but with regard to provisions and lodging, they
indeed do not appear to be very well off.

Juuia, And who knows whether a remedy
will not be found for this too?

FatHer. We will hope for it. Ivan, who
had observed some large fish in the bay, now
luckily thought of something. ‘“ We have,” said
he, ‘not much more day, On this account I
advise that two of us seach for the hut, or some
other lodging, while the third takes care and
secures the fish and collects a heap of dry wood,
When it becomes later we shall probably be
hungry.” This proposal met with approbation,
and they concluded they would carry it into
execution. Ivan offered himself to take charge
of the cooking, and the two others immediately
went along the wall of rock to search out a
lodging. The former, on the other hand, turned
towards the water. Scarvely had he advanced
some hundred steps than he noticed something
thick on the shore, which drew his whole obser-
vation on it.

Junta, And’thiswas?— .

FatHer. In a little pool left by the water
when it was higher, there was wallowing about
a large fish like a salmon, and was making all
possible efforts to get out of his prison inclosure
and to reach again the bay close by. Now as
Ivan approached him he was completly frighten-



6 Winter In SPITZBERGEN.

ed and distressed, beat around him with his tail,
sprang up high and moved the foaming water so
greatly that Ivan found it impossible to master
his prey. “Only wait a moment!” said he, “ you
shall soon be tame.” With these words he
drew his axe out of his girdle cut a stout piece of
wood into the shape of a spade, and now dug
into the light sand very soon, a narrow run by
which he conducted off the water of the pool
into the bay. The drain was perfectly accom-
plished ; the water ran off continually, and when
Ivan, who in the meantime had cut up some
wood, came back, it was already wholly drained
off, and the fish lay worn out and flapping on
the dry sand. A few smart strokes with the
head of the axe despatched him, and Ivan was
busy in dividing up the fish when the pilot and
Gregory returned. That long-sought hut had
not indeed been found; but instead of it they
had discovered a fine roomy cave, which was far
better suited for lodging than that in which they
had been yesterday, and which besides, as it
was now beginning to be darker, they might not
have found again. In this way every one had
something to tell of. Ivan showed his friends
the fine fish and the heap of fire wood he had
cut up small, while they described to him the
cave they had discovered, which happily lay
near, behind a projection of the rock.



Winter in SPITZBERGEN. 9T

They now went to work. They carried the
fish and a large quantity of the firewood to the
cave, and not till the sun had for a long time
gone down, did they take time to examine more
closely their new dwelling. A fire kindled in
the middle of it lighted it up perfectly, and to
the great astonishment of all of them, clearly
showed that the handywork of man had aided
nature, On the side were many stones cut out
for seats and tables; in the walls were to. be
seen places hollowed out, and they clearly per-
ceived, that the upper portion of it was blackened
by smoke. All proving that this cavern must
have formerly served for a dwelling.

Max. And did not they find farther traces?

FaTHer, At least not at once. But before
it was fully night Ivan and Gregory. had laid
together, before the entrance of the cavern, a
pile of heavy sticks of wood while, the pilot
roasted and baked at a little fire on a hard spit
of wood, several pieces of fish. This supper
seasoned with gunpowder tasted nicely. Now
Ivan and Gregory kindled up the pile of wood
before the cavern—

Maria. But why did they do that? They
would have done better to have spared the wood.

FatTHer. The loss could be easily replaced ;
wood lay in immense quantities not far from
their cavern. They kindled up the supply they

9



98 Winter in SPITZBERGEN.

had brought together, as a precaution. They
had observed in the light sand on the shore,
footprints or tracks of bears, and they musi,
therefore, have feared that some of them would
be pressing into the cavern during the night.
And hence their kindling up a blazing fire,
which was the best means to keep off the dreaded
guests. Now our friends lay down to sleep
covered in their blankets, having their loaded
guns near them. The kindly warmth which the
fire diffused in the cavern, the supper eaten,
and the firm conviction gained that they were
not forsaken, caused them soon to fall into a soft
slumber. Then all atonce they were aroused—

Moruer. The cry of the night watch, dear
father! It has struck eleven. To-morrow, chil-
dren, your father will tell you what then roused
them up.



Siffh Eurning.

Ir is unpleasant even to grown-up persons,
when a story of any interesting event is broken
off in a moment in which the curiosity has reach-
ed the highest point. Just so was it most natu-
rally with Max, Gustavus, Maria, and Julia,
Their expectation had been raised to the highest
pitch; they had not thought of sleep, and felt
not the least tired; the evening hours had
passed away to them like short minutes, and
they would gladly have spent the whole night,
when the voice of the watchman proclaimed the
near approach of midnight.

In the leisure hours of the next morning, they
thought of nothing but the conclusion of this
story. They spoke of it together, and exhaust-
ed themselves in suppositions, what it could
have been so extraordinary before the cavern
rouse up the wanderers, Especially did
vus and Julia busy themselves in trying to an-
swer this question; sometimes they supposed

that a part of the cavern had tumbled in; some-



100 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

times they believed that unexpectedly, strangers,
possibly friends left behind on the wreck, had
appeared; sometimes they feared an earthquake
or some other remarkable wonder of nature, un-
til at the end they saw that with all their imagi-
nations, they were not a hair’s breadth nearer to
the truth. Max and Maria had better employed
their time; they had a map of the island before
them, and were earnestly engaged in becoming
more closely acquainted with the scene of the
histo

_ Finally the hour of evening struck, in which
their father was used to relate the story; and
when he had seated himself in his wonted place,
in the circle of his children waiting full of ex-
pectation, he began to take up again the thread
of the history, broken off the day before. “We
left,” he said, “ our friends—"

Max. In the newly found cavern—

JULIA, Sleeping by the fire—

Maria. When all at once something arou-
sed them,

FatHER. What that was I will now tell you.
More calm and yielding to their fate, than they
had been the day before, the good men lay slum-
bering there, when the pilot lying close to the
entrance suddenly sprung up from a dream, and
ealled to both of his friends by a loud cry of
horror, that they were attacked from without.



Full Text
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'SHA-1' fd48ac339636bed1974872278f3c99c9470334c1
EVENT '2012-04-01T04:23:09-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
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e8230abb1d8ef63c30416415e7b3cef5
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'2012-04-01T04:18:42-04:00'
describe
'378' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADON' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_001.pro'
9d689aff6752f2b21e02db71cdc42928
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'2012-04-01T04:22:01-04:00'
describe
'18506' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_001.QC.jpg'
feb7aeccde14545f59da765220714bc1
4dfdc06b6151e963b5483456183eb40c62fd14ea
'2012-04-01T04:23:04-04:00'
describe
'14495454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_001.tif'
b870480eb2675864559d4da3f00f41fd
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'2012-04-01T04:21:15-04:00'
describe
'51' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_001.txt'
7ef0867174c1d09db2881a388c3120e9
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'2012-04-01T04:24:50-04:00'
describe
'4685' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_001thm.jpg'
d44769c31e778fd0916388e16c1ce8fb
bf2f4590fa4f1383f2f815b302d6ff786a7cd684
'2012-04-01T04:17:16-04:00'
describe
'525105' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_002.jp2'
940756f931f0bf6db125453f4e5a7453
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'2012-04-01T04:12:13-04:00'
describe
'78457' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_002.jpg'
cec182116643698b10b77af66380f721
e4499896f6558a75bc09c6cc9ec9200a9d812bfa
'2012-04-01T04:15:48-04:00'
describe
'23151' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_002.QC.jpg'
ce859a29323eac5448c7b5a8f29706c9
bcfbd83df4aec295831ecf4fd68d364ee509a3bd
'2012-04-01T04:23:38-04:00'
describe
'12621204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_002.tif'
567b40d17781a96cb3f06a77bc2bb94f
2de82c60c2395464a9eea658afdd2fa359a48d43
'2012-04-01T04:20:53-04:00'
describe
'7101' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_002thm.jpg'
269f53c0047a41da341fc43e5daac0a3
122c119121ab813f53797280b975ba8f1d8e9249
'2012-04-01T04:23:21-04:00'
describe
'368013' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_003.jp2'
f76eb5fef028fb5c999610aa78c471c6
9f6a50693857d9a732a1450c5127f7762f422d31
'2012-04-01T04:16:21-04:00'
describe
'34956' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_003.jpg'
53bb57892d0f0f8ae1ec2c4a4f3ae104
8fe87af67bcd0413ae26f4f55f2722de67479a2f
describe
'6169' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADOZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_003.pro'
5c6bb49e576db89102941dffe6065c3d
0ba97376bb8722f43d218ece7eed143e44da3c2a
'2012-04-01T04:15:54-04:00'
describe
'12528' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_003.QC.jpg'
04bfc53aeb280c53fd4222a08dc41150
9cd3a1a9ecc47cdcff2b5e88d5a43ea8d2ae361d
'2012-04-01T04:14:18-04:00'
describe
'12164454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_003.tif'
906ece56cae7f573f4eb9caad466ac03
d59f9375a03783c3258491c5f429f6b627ad279d
'2012-04-01T04:15:18-04:00'
describe
'333' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_003.txt'
86080e7caf0aff76c887a9f53069f715
a424595aca9ae18b7b8c85ebecefcfbde959c0ec
'2012-04-01T04:14:17-04:00'
describe
'4780' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_003thm.jpg'
11b93ea093d89cd4f9ca30c223c23ed1
d1210058dc8653875d3be5c71153c1364ca150d3
'2012-04-01T04:21:13-04:00'
describe
'236881' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_004.jp2'
2d58f8f73a437f4149d34d889a8734a0
6e288e66d15f6941634618b59201623d0d06806f
'2012-04-01T04:23:19-04:00'
describe
'23742' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_004.jpg'
7eb1ba6060721ee5c2e0b7050a99a0ce
fb058b7ab3fafa9fa41cbbffa198e5f3b03b207f
'2012-04-01T04:19:28-04:00'
describe
'6909' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_004.pro'
9b8adeedd0f4fa1961bf2a8eda7fb1dd
1a9918cb399adc1f9d3468c2faa9ee6510b9625c
'2012-04-01T04:19:29-04:00'
describe
'8100' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_004.QC.jpg'
b127886e16e1ec77c673c516954515cd
16c72c859c6cd78e89866951415a4c63465054c6
'2012-04-01T04:18:41-04:00'
describe
'11014704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_004.tif'
b534386e1cbbfb3063b44d35e7d080ce
fee85645ea4893ad61d209b14d0f37846eb80695
'2012-04-01T04:12:33-04:00'
describe
'373' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_004.txt'
6055d449a9630f8acd5b636d9ef1b6cf
c1ff71b793793ac87d4a6d6463bb085d61a0493b
'2012-04-01T04:18:02-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'3462' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_004thm.jpg'
cc1f994c4a22c4bfbddd4063cbfed153
68d3b66e309cf907a1a28804e4cfa3d51905732f
'2012-04-01T04:22:12-04:00'
describe
'506070' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_005.jp2'
de4c39daf791d1442c3bd84d06129bf6
cb849f060a52f599143aad9f9ed63adae59236db
'2012-04-01T04:21:08-04:00'
describe
'59332' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_005.jpg'
f2757f43ec6e88346332407db02e4be6
5976cda5b8eaae8df2fb3fb21c5548e856af4eca
'2012-04-01T04:17:27-04:00'
describe
'23832' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_005.pro'
a6b5969d16f0bd46c20b0933d36e6743
5152a099c4c0955e761ad8303facf646298f6dc7
'2012-04-01T04:19:50-04:00'
describe
'21050' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_005.QC.jpg'
e9f8ea61d58c1995699fd59ae1fdaef1
4998d5a3cdde8ce8d8633c18ab63416e0085db53
'2012-04-01T04:14:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_005.tif'
ab893b2ff3530fa53721bb8644e29cf4
eafa9e32f8e4d3d797a154da05ee228470e97c39
'2012-04-01T04:23:17-04:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_005.txt'
22998715136a99f6035c6ed60e193a96
285db2ad7da46a36a6f5b3cedb5c0caae853c296
'2012-04-01T04:15:20-04:00'
describe
'6843' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_005thm.jpg'
c7c855ea286d1676238eba337c9e5a64
a2acc62880386307f74c9de919505b0c5a894852
'2012-04-01T04:22:50-04:00'
describe
'514222' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_006.jp2'
ea3b0b2c08e60e99123d1be66bbc8b8a
9d5d34941b71e99e208e1d702cad23b46cc7496b
'2012-04-01T04:24:43-04:00'
describe
'62913' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_006.jpg'
6f99ffc29da956d9ae06e9c51cb4c9ad
78091cc54cde46c41bbe8b1c78e64ceefcc2bdc7
'2012-04-01T04:22:06-04:00'
describe
'34196' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_006.pro'
a2c03f14d9a6330b9f2d28685e8cfaad
488c07518fe5efde1fee531077822a6a38a9162c
'2012-04-01T04:22:43-04:00'
describe
'21047' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_006.QC.jpg'
bdcef64e22841eaf28b87b77b197ec2e
b97b94e9be6e34646fbdc1104a64c79371476ce5
'2012-04-01T04:22:16-04:00'
describe
'12361330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_006.tif'
00f446e72728f14d82890421ec8fa654
5b7bd1a855592cc3dcd8a95c8693a9d76c91f6a7
'2012-04-01T04:15:13-04:00'
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_006.txt'
444ada1b96a27f32ebeb73bd9df70d01
48a5530a35a59338a3d76fe78ec4660d0c96775c
'2012-04-01T04:23:47-04:00'
describe
'6576' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_006thm.jpg'
cd8027ab7ed2508ef93d458f7e920a40
e990f925011e47ac45eeb02d1e822107b80873d7
'2012-04-01T04:18:19-04:00'
describe
'502132' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADPZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_007.jp2'
dc25511fb8d5a9893bc49969903fe5e3
8c2c879b218b18196d7eaa389c616bd353293f5d
'2012-04-01T04:12:07-04:00'
describe
'73478' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_007.jpg'
9d05c66a5de195ac69f37dda445dbe72
4268c2324683ed5a42937fc26410b48699459d3f
'2012-04-01T04:14:24-04:00'
describe
'38118' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_007.pro'
35bc3cf8265b6568765c74ed188adad7
cd005ae3d7794df8675cb769044210a07d115573
'2012-04-01T04:22:52-04:00'
describe
'25198' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_007.QC.jpg'
7c8b48602694e20fb60ba59f3bf63820
6a8616f3d623313ae79473ff65b0b87d4725011c
'2012-04-01T04:21:12-04:00'
describe
'12069954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_007.tif'
5c20457bf8aeca962e307907f4004301
e83769cdd3ad982ad66dc39c9c8cb8a715e79a42
'2012-04-01T04:22:32-04:00'
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_007.txt'
6e01562b93353a6556c6058ca9dbb355
23d72504df2d6dbfc9559187c3293828e149608b
'2012-04-01T04:18:32-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8141' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_007thm.jpg'
74b32cd90e60727d4781079bb76ad0c6
8424329f349f5f92343c6a1c6bf19bf6ad039079
'2012-04-01T04:21:36-04:00'
describe
'391407' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_008.jp2'
bf01de6f64ae87697f6da411705604f6
e438dbf7d5ebd24ceed8296584dbc38340a5e30e
'2012-04-01T04:17:37-04:00'
describe
'40764' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_008.jpg'
1475510b8e767ace609f1ffd7edcd5a3
63be1189cdf95e6fe2119ae17c2d3ca4e3c4ca87
'2012-04-01T04:15:47-04:00'
describe
'17630' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_008.pro'
8ab4b8322991c9f290e3378aa8425c24
859d0ecc4dc825f25a77b00f28da6b30781221af
describe
'13866' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_008.QC.jpg'
108bac30de68ea8009440369c8658b8e
68693cc26a73e64c28e7fc9cf9628282a28ea1bc
'2012-04-01T04:14:03-04:00'
describe
'11211580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_008.tif'
aff7c35b9281ad9bd7c898ad216236f4
e76e231f2ea18fd5121a0930bcc2c4a72627b4f8
'2012-04-01T04:21:24-04:00'
describe
'703' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_008.txt'
0cd7277716dc95baef4c8e0eed345aaf
1e047d34b4acf9c83b4c9012ef83453138da9ca9
'2012-04-01T04:24:21-04:00'
describe
'5479' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_008thm.jpg'
1d82c13e42ac1eb503bb1a4102b6586e
e7cb94f2e82e8fecfcef800c55189dfe14c5cf15
'2012-04-01T04:15:06-04:00'
describe
'500361' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_009.jp2'
fff55dea0033814d3c30645c523eb9c3
f45b4c26b1ff37c5033166853bbba16c2d937d33
'2012-04-01T04:14:02-04:00'
describe
'59355' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_009.jpg'
65bf9142841ec1e5f2c928c22db02e46
61e805c358b1f697659c3029d6c3ebc092546821
'2012-04-01T04:21:19-04:00'
describe
'16633' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_009.pro'
72aaefde00162271412c0783840cf065
b3b4dd9f205f9028d64164fc422476254b32a6d9
describe
'20787' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_009.QC.jpg'
e40e31a931f38af603c4f2330be3da8e
fdd9822523464b631ce8ff58685c092a3ef29f6b
'2012-04-01T04:16:50-04:00'
describe
'12030580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_009.tif'
e6e08d984cafb96ca26fec8790e600c4
4d86e9c26bb8444674bb83a6bc834a5e2555eaf0
'2012-04-01T04:21:31-04:00'
describe
'704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_009.txt'
2a9b1eb9275cc7a5490a57c27e591389
3caa80e984809aad16ef6e1fe033f4ec5d910bf6
'2012-04-01T04:18:46-04:00'
describe
'7767' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_009thm.jpg'
762c6924a3e752cc05e855820eaafcc5
7a19a2f1d053e8b9c0bed6394f7bf989790c15ea
'2012-04-01T04:16:05-04:00'
describe
'467655' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_010.jp2'
73cd16728d4a32ea6e762bb689ad040c
4b8bbba0e46dee5c64dee3b178c1b38f6913f824
'2012-04-01T04:22:46-04:00'
describe
'84564' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_010.jpg'
f0319a748b55bea44c0035ea14bdfabe
b5cdf1b6c179fe3634a8097709d56b122446697d
'2012-04-01T04:20:48-04:00'
describe
'30568' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_010.pro'
448cd903fc767526d92f9fc9cc6bd561
483a462005d832cf4e1cb2a321879e79a15b5cc0
'2012-04-01T04:11:52-04:00'
describe
'29233' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_010.QC.jpg'
5dd026bcb6c54e3e9eee9aad4d3d4fbb
9dfdc42adea67095f4500f0b465a2898babeaede
'2012-04-01T04:21:30-04:00'
describe
'11243080' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_010.tif'
563a515b5545cdb6405e5455d7089db3
084195ab661d44d4b9c12b4adf77ad8f2c811a17
'2012-04-01T04:23:45-04:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADQZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_010.txt'
83a94487c8bf7c0c50cc0e9b0c5bf807
df28e0939dfa7e3555babc2233acb2a0e490a34f
'2012-04-01T04:18:51-04:00'
describe
'10897' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_010thm.jpg'
627278fe286028754f46b7287a2a35ff
ac8b8ccfb6522c8889fc0868b26559fa096f0521
'2012-04-01T04:13:07-04:00'
describe
'489654' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_011.jp2'
b746c787b3d314d8d87cd294169b9bd9
4c7ffbeafd566d3ff7e4927f6c4060fbce6e5fc2
'2012-04-01T04:12:03-04:00'
describe
'79182' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_011.jpg'
3cdb9efe69971c685d78c8069aaba9e8
f95bdc87398286fed51f7e2fc9ce3d2e5718c949
'2012-04-01T04:22:28-04:00'
describe
'28513' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_011.pro'
cdf06a0ca414e067fb8e4cbd1ab52c8a
720952c8eccff06e637a49d6f05611c3edc85c65
'2012-04-01T04:17:34-04:00'
describe
'28509' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_011.QC.jpg'
13f82493c5bd08ed3caae3974669539d
7c9eea989b9d538c3fafcb38e57a61b52ac71348
'2012-04-01T04:14:20-04:00'
describe
'11770704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_011.tif'
1f8ce4554c682089216e3cb931aefbf3
8902e5e98ae683a571a95aa367a0952391460a22
'2012-04-01T04:16:40-04:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_011.txt'
191001396b2ad07b92a4c1d3c159b2a9
db55ab043af0f1845c9867c017e4f891d909282d
'2012-04-01T04:13:15-04:00'
describe
'10098' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_011thm.jpg'
70b2fe31337ccf91f010046f237a0fbe
e1a0a9e375533868627c1bfe4ec258ef77f112b9
'2012-04-01T04:14:32-04:00'
describe
'473214' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_012.jp2'
fae26a612e468b2cafc843c8dc21d1f2
1cdcda0d846392cab6af2d719858d189155a71ab
'2012-04-01T04:15:24-04:00'
describe
'82015' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_012.jpg'
edec2f205d07ae1f1f7f82ce11512954
b3333dcf034f10d37c53a927531a850777150e09
'2012-04-01T04:19:58-04:00'
describe
'30336' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_012.pro'
e5b7cec2ff5e4a110af525cb7637dc2e
e6381aa44710725b02118666de62f590a435c7db
'2012-04-01T04:20:04-04:00'
describe
'28678' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_012.QC.jpg'
71a371d075778b08a50acbd28d5d4531
f2a9f31cb866500f53cb0897e054814201dfb4d1
'2012-04-01T04:19:30-04:00'
describe
'11376954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_012.tif'
640fbaf098a93418215771c914b7399b
bb7785455e06909260c48355c27c100745fc92f0
'2012-04-01T04:19:07-04:00'
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_012.txt'
420543897ef4cbf402502980b186a62a
c7e811987c431e503942ae46bc173d9fb25d0851
'2012-04-01T04:24:35-04:00'
describe
'10440' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_012thm.jpg'
89063893890d8324424ded9027664089
ca25e33aca790b4ddfcc47052b67fae5a06ff0fb
'2012-04-01T04:24:07-04:00'
describe
'500485' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_013.jp2'
df3091d20d187e85fbfc319cb94a1d46
85d48811002c0780faa026b07dd348243f0adee7
'2012-04-01T04:19:16-04:00'
describe
'83779' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_013.jpg'
9e9182823f1f56e69fb4a5368477a06d
39c6b51c03bd0136d86620eeac7db4ab00c8f5b7
'2012-04-01T04:15:10-04:00'
describe
'30305' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_013.pro'
1fdd767a5d3c2cc3143db5ba339b01a7
0086b5b2f7169475a096aad61f5b376b6bc8c9ab
'2012-04-01T04:21:53-04:00'
describe
'29200' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_013.QC.jpg'
a595700a38a841b0ac9d0784dec2cc40
b7fd45211fb7ae2f07527bb9c349baf800092d39
'2012-04-01T04:15:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_013.tif'
29e1bf1ea538faa06b1d57413c165f09
f601e1c8da2be772dec531675e7222da785c215d
'2012-04-01T04:22:07-04:00'
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_013.txt'
f472c235f9fe328df5f078af04d9f9a3
5ebd1f6a2cabcb89edfa1140438459365303739f
'2012-04-01T04:14:14-04:00'
describe
'9966' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_013thm.jpg'
eadd542dfa312913873abc4cb79bd4d2
cc1eb65efff4cbd1388f7d0c8b2b622976d92dfb
'2012-04-01T04:21:41-04:00'
describe
'495208' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_014.jp2'
170d4b47693050c75a6dc518b1a876f0
356b00d290713ace99aabb9aae503a8a5ff4d968
'2012-04-01T04:15:04-04:00'
describe
'87284' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_014.jpg'
9fbafbdb219def1814eef8ff506c2780
fc02a1d2c931d647684b7db4e6be3c738a355a4c
describe
'31042' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_014.pro'
e2117c1f173cbef4feb2d55446f078a8
8a7f557d67280c430208bd0f0c4ae2fb68f6fa16
'2012-04-01T04:13:42-04:00'
describe
'30845' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADRZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_014.QC.jpg'
71b834b98a7e8d5af7f6d03197e2cd85
8b0d9451a77f1fb5c95885228dfb091a01393b07
'2012-04-01T04:19:21-04:00'
describe
'11904580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_014.tif'
5647b8f43846253a36c1c64688430d6e
d8f42510b6faaed58db25845dc04ee4ad53205ba
'2012-04-01T04:19:22-04:00'
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_014.txt'
00d2c56fa63bb6d16bf063d9ff360520
e7bc5275964464fff947456a07c0a65ca1d797cd
'2012-04-01T04:18:25-04:00'
describe
'10694' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_014thm.jpg'
e617706e63da3c45ca42a80b52e72446
a21747fec3dacfb3a1c9dbbd7cc79247a176e2b0
'2012-04-01T04:18:57-04:00'
describe
'500459' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_015.jp2'
22aefeb948b91f120262b1e8103238ea
9c17ab9e3d26f8dc0f626c9045ae5b94e3c54560
'2012-04-01T04:21:47-04:00'
describe
'84473' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_015.jpg'
9e51780f8c7153252ff3c639d452a45c
1c90e5f97bb65a633f04f3dac11e2a86593dadcf
'2012-04-01T04:22:19-04:00'
describe
'30110' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_015.pro'
7450bfa0516d7f6a1b26f08756655e9e
d2443905ef4205c4c0aa1e8042ba87691ea70043
'2012-04-01T04:16:32-04:00'
describe
'30492' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_015.QC.jpg'
c10a6aa9777b6050aac281bb32f8c831
dd38bbf01a7c51dcd5cedd89c45f6b65a0200377
'2012-04-01T04:20:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_015.tif'
733e6141415f3ed4065d98ee5ffcb052
47443a78da7ee1ef47c3529edc6a645bd047a2b7
'2012-04-01T04:19:38-04:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_015.txt'
f7e7ec7761232c466a9a02a0b54ff7ee
2bc749d3ac1ca2f7aba53488651f284626cddc91
describe
'10299' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_015thm.jpg'
73fbac965c05ee15f725d0386dd34348
7353a76a04be171f63efd258959f531a6053a1ae
'2012-04-01T04:11:37-04:00'
describe
'495232' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_016.jp2'
f1c176456586d44accb336d4fa6c89a4
5ebf6b88e37945667917a0fb635c8dcef5d10b2a
'2012-04-01T04:21:20-04:00'
describe
'77810' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_016.jpg'
a4ecacfc4a52030ce4d1cc41a5078e39
9a66f7d9fb80ee1dfac822debe450b4f3c7a3177
'2012-04-01T04:13:40-04:00'
describe
'29213' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_016.pro'
28d7b5fe664582381a1bc11b916f7d0e
a578862802cccb514e8b5c18c1ad808708c933a2
'2012-04-01T04:23:48-04:00'
describe
'27828' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_016.QC.jpg'
47d05817634a39762257e0276fd78ab4
d2ea5e1439ac94e56e144a90dac1bcdb82c9492a
'2012-04-01T04:11:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_016.tif'
b42fae92deb003b6553416f486bf92fa
c64c6985857f18c68e5e04175c710a6133775200
'2012-04-01T04:21:34-04:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_016.txt'
d329946e8e06080bdffaec0f6a8d8d05
de2ebb2ff9a302676cd1b1c1013c1d5fbb6ac100
'2012-04-01T04:17:11-04:00'
describe
'9533' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_016thm.jpg'
3671fac5a322d8513b1a124c32b6619f
009e4069ab4b5e15f56d79cb2c7cab5bbdefeefd
'2012-04-01T04:25:03-04:00'
describe
'490983' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_017.jp2'
6dab66f2a8d84516e12346a11ea44da8
db086af909d18e08b493a9ed226bb66a079e2353
'2012-04-01T04:15:07-04:00'
describe
'87182' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_017.jpg'
eef9077eaf8133289a5d089175bbdfdc
2c72570455b24fd4edc90661b673fd4717767973
'2012-04-01T04:15:50-04:00'
describe
'30393' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADST' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_017.pro'
af78209333d39def1bc3f00d97ef13b5
292f4d20e5d8da8b88df282b05151c73f5c0c281
'2012-04-01T04:23:44-04:00'
describe
'31000' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_017.QC.jpg'
1962455128acf3f235b25be2929c7473
d786ab48c19c90ebfe6c798c946ff0eb0438c5e9
'2012-04-01T04:16:12-04:00'
describe
'11802204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_017.tif'
a3f6e8d267754102dc57301811be03fa
ac98121a2f5b78e8be28f54b2c95fd2a84a98359
'2012-04-01T04:22:47-04:00'
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_017.txt'
c963943b54f4ffa3e4a67cc0e798e0a3
3314a34de2a2f24e7527a08b6c6ad14af006322c
describe
'10685' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_017thm.jpg'
2f100b75348e1160245760e46497b757
dae06dc9d2af7eadc0448c31c9f236cd1884124b
'2012-04-01T04:23:43-04:00'
describe
'495233' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_018.jp2'
5745b7d921633d88435c27680f36a8b2
e82640c2cba0e3085aee311285b883b995c73a0b
'2012-04-01T04:17:50-04:00'
describe
'94837' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADSZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_018.jpg'
2601b57b2ab478c91c46da31a4297c6e
2d25dd464f0a0985d479ee9dcad14adf4fc73529
'2012-04-01T04:21:46-04:00'
describe
'37373' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_018.pro'
94721b48f7b647921dd1d2939d2a4091
b23962d2d76b2968f3edb43b8b07b83b12731356
'2012-04-01T04:14:37-04:00'
describe
'33075' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_018.QC.jpg'
ae8f2c347e1923e4dce94da7551660e1
bdc11ab71336b2430ea6f403a2fa6fff66420441
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_018.tif'
f0c74fbfcde107ca0c13dca23ae4ce61
c9c46bb3a24f4bd042e082f55f17320775aa9697
'2012-04-01T04:22:53-04:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_018.txt'
07aef8e9165c0495f2c467771348d32f
5b2969401e5209be9f8065fb9648180571327bb8
'2012-04-01T04:22:08-04:00'
describe
'10597' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_018thm.jpg'
bd808646cfbb809dd3f180128172980d
c299f61ff836c429b387aa8cf2b786233e8004af
'2012-04-01T04:20:22-04:00'
describe
'500358' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_019.jp2'
7f449bc735f0470954a453cd6210af26
c5ac5a548b6ea26b9e33f21797382bc5ac0af2f0
'2012-04-01T04:13:46-04:00'
describe
'90807' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_019.jpg'
a9d54b48310fe4debfc3d372baf152ee
67b60c6e08d000e2d6ed91bfe131a6977ae3dd6e
describe
'36452' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_019.pro'
98a13a65c55a8dd9bff4fc5e1a1423e1
05ae1582be69bc6e05398d7a1be10eb04dc7fdf9
describe
'31359' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_019.QC.jpg'
4ce4224c979bcd70e531c5614043208f
de267f147776e4a39df265aefca0e150a38edcb1
'2012-04-01T04:17:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_019.tif'
47853571d4be413c864a286a42180b49
4256ab48837b07602754a2fc188e972404cf0e7b
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_019.txt'
6404756a51c3778da9a30155bd3759af
74701c5ebbcefa44e8bf890955ca1c1531a7bcad
'2012-04-01T04:20:47-04:00'
describe
'10028' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_019thm.jpg'
11564db8adc78ec84a133d029f4c0245
93041069ff0902402e227ef14f2e64157e62e6dc
'2012-04-01T04:23:06-04:00'
describe
'495238' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_020.jp2'
0487919f07a1160e0a37513235a7f877
e782ef1f050853e4a2db2b14a5275b43c3fa74e9
'2012-04-01T04:18:26-04:00'
describe
'89808' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_020.jpg'
349459a5b05ad8ab43d0ce7439764568
7170efad23fdffc2da2609db2ca10c02b2e969af
'2012-04-01T04:25:04-04:00'
describe
'32305' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_020.pro'
e52ecd3970e4aa3f3128dab3693f5d4f
3e8315de2fee6ea685281aeb68348c53e5e3cc8d
'2012-04-01T04:13:38-04:00'
describe
'31232' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_020.QC.jpg'
1a2826e53b56338436c5e9f53a5a5ba5
0c006538370a1cf5d15e26dfdb3d3d64723fac45
'2012-04-01T04:24:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_020.tif'
cd2226cec210b9e5a22af8a5c530ed99
4d67920350b8f70431ae61a06e68115eeb6a91fb
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_020.txt'
eb4d09d3c73d8a78ea1f3a7e487fcc35
64f3fb776db1ef0244a547f493bf6c6570264530
'2012-04-01T04:17:47-04:00'
describe
'10890' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_020thm.jpg'
1fe6ac7704b0b0b7548f2ecac3f6420a
ec4283285a4c658857ebc31870f8ea67f6eb9508
'2012-04-01T04:25:07-04:00'
describe
'500447' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_021.jp2'
0049b8cecffa6be0cfb77a293c6a7b3a
515f1e76951a509defa231b3d39ac9167005a59b
'2012-04-01T04:22:23-04:00'
describe
'1380312' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTU' 'sip-filescover4.jp2'
ff23334e5da5bcea186515702ef3c390
cadcff4e732f9aa43f9c148deb5b39150682e44c
'2012-04-01T04:15:37-04:00'
describe
'87926' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_021.jpg'
9d6b723447b8128f0a03d071517bca22
01f1bc60a19c2e6ada1b0baf8e7ac87f28cf2d6d
'2012-04-01T04:18:09-04:00'
describe
'34400' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_021.pro'
6659062bf4397f524ce6328b65746d1f
ae4da8fe421461f921603740b4f4efe54190ec03
'2012-04-01T04:14:19-04:00'
describe
'30475' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_021.QC.jpg'
033e7eaaba4f2ba362464a439b105142
5b34fb22af5d8f05a1701e2e9f1ec0ecb0b96a01
'2012-04-01T04:14:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_021.tif'
603d5f0abd05b26d21eb66b8f7ac7004
12bf5cb6746b54efcf79be949edff40718d31cb8
'2012-04-01T04:16:41-04:00'
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADTZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_021.txt'
ca4426143d435590d3d45e5bc744e2ab
4e5ef534d9c173ed8555f592415a2ba8a9d420ba
'2012-04-01T04:17:53-04:00'
describe
'10003' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_021thm.jpg'
5be870b3e2035a450b949cd21b6301a9
848ce140a5e3bf8633913d7c700f57c918fac806
'2012-04-01T04:18:54-04:00'
describe
'495244' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_022.jp2'
80fb142e196d3e77a4e34b32f6c91174
fd85de74db5518e8fcd90bdf6144a7909135c115
'2012-04-01T04:24:45-04:00'
describe
'89774' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_022.jpg'
b7e1ea9f5296e394ccbba12bad5fc1ad
db5d9c2dd6cec18ad215d10d38f8f8c662922286
'2012-04-01T04:20:43-04:00'
describe
'33827' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_022.pro'
28b1483763f687ef0ff9ecde521426e1
c5d4ee56870cffc58764a0df6eef97e4d0cfa244
describe
'30859' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_022.QC.jpg'
b42b2faeda24f216b9065488a836f15e
3525208c6c4478425526e5a05edc655e4da7513d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_022.tif'
7f5edc07dd88877d6e6c526e2e731730
1b7a38bc08c55bbcb96263d9fc080c4e8e7ed194
'2012-04-01T04:16:49-04:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_022.txt'
29129944cd165b47ca1c644eeedcf636
083b6767d28f51e149185e2bb3f7c34cd7e4792e
'2012-04-01T04:18:35-04:00'
describe
'10492' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_022thm.jpg'
648a7690051c5b945b2712c8e1a365b5
d2831deda481559655889676fe62dd9299f7503c
describe
'500426' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_023.jp2'
6c8a025ca4f90ece19659b84190d4fb8
9bb7b86d6173016c600861d6e37592d797f11ee2
'2012-04-01T04:13:28-04:00'
describe
'88791' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_023.jpg'
07cc45e32aa658d8994f6345e5873a0c
399248c20acb2f5220b904ee00141e462158a203
'2012-04-01T04:13:14-04:00'
describe
'32072' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_023.pro'
215a25766e5bd0c945750df4631697da
fbfa2400adc2d7c3f2593d696cba4759f68a554d
'2012-04-01T04:21:16-04:00'
describe
'31125' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_023.QC.jpg'
55ad4a68c9f3295314613cdd36de92bb
e34765554a4cca9cb42d526dc1c4f9fcd329d5e1
'2012-04-01T04:22:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_023.tif'
583021c1e867b78efe7f9a1b351cccf4
3475b3bb0c2f54b76cb46d84f93fb601e544303f
'2012-04-01T04:21:22-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_023.txt'
5cb6a879f934481ceae48fed7245d6ed
e7c784cbca1ad85827b01fb3c0a418dff3560ab8
'2012-04-01T04:16:01-04:00'
describe
'10027' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_023thm.jpg'
ec9e2d28e8c8edee80660c8d0cfca7be
9342477f3c04af8e248b8b9746750184d74a1e22
'2012-04-01T04:16:34-04:00'
describe
'495215' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_024.jp2'
ac295d20230b68ff52304c07aef1dc1e
6a03056c8e2ca19e08c3c9bfd901fbdc6b63c8f0
'2012-04-01T04:18:29-04:00'
describe
'91941' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_024.jpg'
0ec0a1d7d970459f0f4e4b03f412f47e
863806192177cb0302be5d5c26b4ac785f8e2057
'2012-04-01T04:18:53-04:00'
describe
'34362' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_024.pro'
b29adac7432bfb0fc6041563db0f05ab
19a4a91131acd88b9e6a717fc7e7f5e54dec6919
'2012-04-01T04:20:15-04:00'
describe
'32130' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_024.QC.jpg'
10b6eea1d79a9eab65dbac513880a917
87a2df2f1dc3876a8cfd4781500f60fb3b154431
'2012-04-01T04:12:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_024.tif'
9d1ae4c82b09f3462711b27e2b003930
c1d41d7e6f6f6ee0bd91da652aedd9db2d79f9b5
'2012-04-01T04:23:32-04:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_024.txt'
19ba0c0ea7d796d8de720e1f6e5a3ec0
ac4ff9434a70e3f8840106afb5509ef57ecfe0c1
'2012-04-01T04:14:46-04:00'
describe
'10757' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_024thm.jpg'
8b6a78cb6a9aff7d0305fb9806c91208
49f6dc91d5626ebfa390b0e6bf2ebd2aa3124fd3
'2012-04-01T04:19:17-04:00'
describe
'489628' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_025.jp2'
f59e8c99f89e309b29f16fec8cfaef74
4454567fc37688ccf69511082bc3de54f9151bc1
'2012-04-01T04:15:32-04:00'
describe
'85495' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_025.jpg'
4d802716b73fdf8a49bc0de77324bea2
7eaa4f5b602da94767e7feead7de1be617c96c6b
'2012-04-01T04:23:52-04:00'
describe
'31944' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_025.pro'
fd695bef640f612c8a9ce1ff458e8534
5a8d14949ec88282c860e40f92aeaaa448ab530e
'2012-04-01T04:16:42-04:00'
describe
'30157' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADUZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_025.QC.jpg'
879ec17619d9ca2d6fe67434bf6c5fcb
110ac0771e24aab89bfea5b15eb9900a213773fb
'2012-04-01T04:24:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_025.tif'
64b9477af20644aa89459979e68e8656
f9574faef7df7c65742a6be01ce67f00ab218606
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_025.txt'
30b365f3bb8da27f001e0261fd165aad
6bddfef315d46c9250e77f0abca5df34ba7d8d83
'2012-04-01T04:12:32-04:00'
describe
'9993' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_025thm.jpg'
15d78607ef47f9dfe4a5388638e555f5
eef9a183041d8c12f1441197e3e9ccc6956fcfb9
'2012-04-01T04:20:30-04:00'
describe
'477493' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_026.jp2'
964c0b2730393d76cb1bfbedf759ffed
83faeccd0e24432fa2e5f5aa4c9775c43362a551
'2012-04-01T04:18:50-04:00'
describe
'88358' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_026.jpg'
312d31fd7f796aa6a16d5128f574ac54
15ec2b51b5e4e3a83b61ad57896626074c48a0b3
'2012-04-01T04:19:53-04:00'
describe
'34135' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_026.pro'
3bb6b54519c4d93f02eee285342dd14c
226bbec21da8887f82a04a9b0baec3e6a9cccee2
'2012-04-01T04:18:00-04:00'
describe
'30601' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_026.QC.jpg'
c360bf7b0705a6189a06230f22398c07
2c73c0ed5cb9f55627a95eadb9446b1172f0ac48
'2012-04-01T04:18:55-04:00'
describe
'11479330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_026.tif'
6c87c902a088687a82f6c0ece622b4bb
9b90f2f5fff22d31e632e36f61f3f56bf9d13bf0
'2012-04-01T04:17:10-04:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_026.txt'
536d487ad82ec0b09a6ba98d9cb1c0d5
f0668c433053b950d952e724ccc0d637b62f0ff8
'2012-04-01T04:20:58-04:00'
describe
'10523' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_026thm.jpg'
78dc3a5873e59ab6763724cd427ccdaf
1db4386b2e8432cb140a75ae49c2dd7b1acd9c5f
'2012-04-01T04:22:13-04:00'
describe
'486975' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_027.jp2'
db713d7efad1230278035b2ac8f50d2a
b4a7eec3d180a0d17db2bedf0c92714993799448
'2012-04-01T04:21:27-04:00'
describe
'89202' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_027.jpg'
9c267d6549d6d12b6ea303d35c6acae2
2090ea9077d01c86eab8db0c7bbcf1f94fd14cdb
'2012-04-01T04:22:48-04:00'
describe
'33797' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_027.pro'
477d8983376861b48fa73ad191c7a687
51e34d7b4734224e2adcfe7bca3de3dbb3c68332
describe
'31060' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_027.QC.jpg'
5a6fd2ac65475ff11ec9b874eb3fc999
13eb52d5307e98254b7eb815e29510398e8bc557
describe
'11707704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_027.tif'
a7facf8df18a21be7ffd539551587f05
be395cd7a903368378a4e5602528f1d840a4317d
'2012-04-01T04:17:03-04:00'
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_027.txt'
d95f3dea633a104ed7c60ee79d87fd9f
2a14350c2347936653f938d966ba1c5d6020da98
'2012-04-01T04:23:13-04:00'
describe
'10352' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_027thm.jpg'
825fe66ce9835edf511532d631133c33
e5b02b10b23d6173e8e470cce00b86f3f94ae025
'2012-04-01T04:24:00-04:00'
describe
'471952' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_028.jp2'
e3627b0d5105604c4babf403d9e5e4cf
c0e9f587e33409c06953f9ec9a39d8cf50001309
'2012-04-01T04:16:54-04:00'
describe
'86644' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_028.jpg'
340b1967e6e661d66f1092d1db539200
f5b379eb52ffc681f588863c6d98c8ed7f0a2af0
'2012-04-01T04:14:42-04:00'
describe
'31766' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_028.pro'
69f5289db026569b7c45a81e6899ca19
d9da4803af1bfa5602440e30dab2704157bc4762
'2012-04-01T04:17:29-04:00'
describe
'30412' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_028.QC.jpg'
b734eb31dd3d938800b065d2f761d683
c019322844cc4e6aefb6d36b274fd19b5e6a1980
'2012-04-01T04:22:02-04:00'
describe
'11345454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_028.tif'
52c38c774131eec56421e6a68e6c7814
568cfe4c54e46c72f1bd1a285ee0f3e8ef2a63df
'2012-04-01T04:14:49-04:00'
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_028.txt'
c57c45d6bfec45a76b5b6f0116ff65d4
8628f7dea4099bb92e042737b02f17ec8e0c0a34
'2012-04-01T04:16:55-04:00'
describe
'10962' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_028thm.jpg'
43796af8653ab93f8fe86667a1f9a055
f5d4f3ce21a1a89d2f69963bd1dbba6af3498c74
'2012-04-01T04:24:56-04:00'
describe
'367188' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_029.jp2'
0e934ad88b34f6313e82c08fc6ae2162
12607659c4173eae29621c41286789bb03af7d4d
'2012-04-01T04:18:15-04:00'
describe
'34597' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADVZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_029.jpg'
a149fc3d16ba359b6b1524f7b2395a86
b6a4ba4aa327c72e8bbb12014c534c739716ccf4
'2012-04-01T04:13:00-04:00'
describe
'5375' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_029.pro'
26d29561727197325932c3cc4b61dbf7
04c3f78816123ec17c4eb4b09538fb502aeabc17
'2012-04-01T04:18:07-04:00'
describe
'11729' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_029.QC.jpg'
6f39a2d9b7772024b5c966f87bbc94ee
65b2874e7d9f8ac28c463176881519cf3892043c
'2012-04-01T04:24:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_029.tif'
8f932e42405a993cb1470c488d9d4d5e
4f722f8a4e3bfe236595a2e96c1f1539b3e5fb42
'2012-04-01T04:24:53-04:00'
describe
'251' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_029.txt'
ff40aedbabfbec5104b1d7d319ddf704
737b78ddcab001299a9735ce8e6d15b7bc9153b3
'2012-04-01T04:18:36-04:00'
describe
'4513' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_029thm.jpg'
fac9ea56c552fe1f37c10011a87cc0bb
242bb23660a80474eb4bda5230fa849c248782b0
describe
'477292' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_030.jp2'
6e65b754530027d299417c28d7fd893d
69cb08bcdbfaef61f9fea9cf40324f4052b326da
'2012-04-01T04:11:47-04:00'
describe
'72626' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_030.jpg'
f8d57df8d546d32adca5de56b3eadfee
e0b28451baaa2f4e564bdaa9ba7333aa6dbb6d5a
'2012-04-01T04:24:55-04:00'
describe
'25172' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_030.pro'
1d2c3ca3533f5bd6bfe8691f0709134d
39afde1505b05d912b365ccf926ca5b2f95c5cc8
'2012-04-01T04:14:06-04:00'
describe
'25775' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_030.QC.jpg'
475a2e379af687e7e059e8ad0739e0e8
e63adfb01d28dc5a9996dbd447574827d625859e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_030.tif'
2f832e9869b2307b5471b6ea3af63fff
99c45f401e45ed0a5801be9afe2a0c247b54c99c
'2012-04-01T04:19:11-04:00'
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_030.txt'
c80aa0807eb08da2aedf40f3c73b0c91
0643cfbaef7c7fb516c2bb9b0780bdcf1ece6b08
'2012-04-01T04:20:54-04:00'
describe
'9112' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_030thm.jpg'
fa4b9d4072bc2ac00a2749430b4b6d2c
275fc45afb44e7597f59ce956eb4f4f4c907550b
'2012-04-01T04:24:01-04:00'
describe
'500463' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_031.jp2'
6b9ea68c736c7e740734478479cd86f0
6a0bf9e5bb0dcda2ddf18344f435964c75b0e8d2
describe
'86013' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_031.jpg'
353c2a05e536422a061843232d577f72
a08276caf3c73b4e1866674685f5be3394a93834
'2012-04-01T04:14:43-04:00'
describe
'30444' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_031.pro'
18765216b1b21613a30bbb6335fc1aec
593f9cad38b3384e76d9ee629349018c0bf35cf7
'2012-04-01T04:16:33-04:00'
describe
'29900' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_031.QC.jpg'
7ba0ce3fc6410c1309ce394e25f6b9fe
8ce002aa795bcee07f78f729687deef58d84256d
'2012-04-01T04:18:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_031.tif'
96fe2c81a9c51d38a78cf2fe37cdc254
1d8e6b84931ef940c5c5c4c9175e948d686fc808
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_031.txt'
c9fbbf40fccbbc4d80bc2f371bb2b61c
5a520aa9645b953eebf1620e85c40d211deabe4d
'2012-04-01T04:17:57-04:00'
describe
'9636' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_031thm.jpg'
5696fb0e1a7ccddf289163fb91b91fea
7b30d24f67043bdcca6d40b87c758aaa7c6dbcf8
'2012-04-01T04:17:31-04:00'
describe
'495211' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_032.jp2'
5dcb3a9b7fd00ed9000d0c8091b91ebf
5ba997b4f2850576e06809a13a0dabdee2ad920d
'2012-04-01T04:22:33-04:00'
describe
'89823' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_032.jpg'
b21ab8ff788749648d5af851a843c1b9
100a1029040c7460cff080c94849a394ebe5704c
'2012-04-01T04:12:36-04:00'
describe
'31038' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_032.pro'
233a4ba26dffa8a0a6e415abc6705f86
efe8532a7813170b61bef020a66aa04ec788cd4e
'2012-04-01T04:15:38-04:00'
describe
'31651' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_032.QC.jpg'
f4606b1eddfd3fefc9cbf964fc825a97
f8db950dc4dcfc23868de9cf0895c0df645d3c14
'2012-04-01T04:22:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_032.tif'
2f55455d00d79c532464f18976e53368
db48784793a6f382b929b9dd59ca3adfa523f1e5
'2012-04-01T04:15:41-04:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_032.txt'
ca908fb8904cefbd6d647dfc7b821109
a79ef1e89ae1816a9b89ae3993329f0345b150d9
describe
'10592' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADWZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_032thm.jpg'
3a2984f8a011a1bc3e00c6c8f395bf1c
e09bf2c9cf7d613ab56ce4fbc7c2d630e384794a
'2012-04-01T04:19:25-04:00'
describe
'500458' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_033.jp2'
c2eb3fec01ff0f17f138f0fbef431a3c
02be8f20fe0f6d79c56cc2f37f64cecff4422ce7
'2012-04-01T04:24:38-04:00'
describe
'94055' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_033.jpg'
47c3cdf8de57de68fdf497c797d4db99
041c0353e1a1eb46f715925f268ec33aa85c3692
'2012-04-01T04:17:45-04:00'
describe
'35401' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_033.pro'
8f408c941e108e2949fd1b94cb9086d4
16070cdd5bd04d138459abf71d8bb0cd67e2dad1
describe
'32397' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_033.QC.jpg'
95ea67d26a3101070411ddec13b991bb
c75b7925e0e9fa633412d8f1627354a09c84455b
'2012-04-01T04:16:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_033.tif'
8468afd7ffab64513988a424d033c18c
854e05b32287f8873de279d1d9de25e370e6868b
'2012-04-01T04:14:05-04:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_033.txt'
362c93c3849e74df06e274a05aa56665
40ed9596c008908521a36f312a6e5290de934010
describe
'10411' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_033thm.jpg'
b4e9a6507a4969298e28de06053ec040
6f0bedb69ba290c8269fa35f056ab7e868ea8522
'2012-04-01T04:12:35-04:00'
describe
'495231' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_034.jp2'
7cfb56ec5cc9132d02e11a20d1bc4f31
71dc5e7eb1740048acea325e349886027bf481c3
'2012-04-01T04:20:09-04:00'
describe
'94440' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_034.jpg'
e8435328950cfa735fbdca6726f401d5
69cbfa33cf10128189cabf34b879aa8c5acd0872
'2012-04-01T04:12:38-04:00'
describe
'35731' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_034.pro'
93becb5cc80f3ca4648a63514d78aa96
0c5559619e5acd15804b477db46f2779856da2f0
'2012-04-01T04:18:58-04:00'
describe
'32293' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_034.QC.jpg'
de8b1b25cdefd209cacc9de4683636cd
cb8eaefcc7263775de44b499891d8748c377c763
'2012-04-01T04:18:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_034.tif'
34169d598306d71c4f7ba126bc0c1177
ab0dc272ac71bb50529f4d631878d53ca6cd8447
'2012-04-01T04:19:52-04:00'
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_034.txt'
96b8fb504fd6e663efc05f6dd20bd892
54b46b71859121fc58e96e3c1c3d3b83042f40aa
'2012-04-01T04:18:16-04:00'
describe
'10743' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_034thm.jpg'
29a794ba248a8c2953c388a3699e3426
274e57dc7d3a87652a0b796273ef6965bf41f160
describe
'500494' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_035.jp2'
7470314a29d7981084b62c0371253739
882c327f5c76eaf2bdfcdec1d5b9523b734ecb42
describe
'86258' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_035.jpg'
aa98bafb3b9a53719769ec83f0a08677
d2dce3ac7f860c765d4228d1a497a59b016b0aae
'2012-04-01T04:17:15-04:00'
describe
'31759' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_035.pro'
c283eabb31ff7aae9eb73e2e703ca5b3
011eeebcab775e181586822718bba097d4d557fa
'2012-04-01T04:13:36-04:00'
describe
'30094' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_035.QC.jpg'
22404bacdddc5d3af4056066327facfc
5b6996d98f627d27317d421da6fe8f8e8d0d3ca4
'2012-04-01T04:14:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_035.tif'
2cbad28a688111d65e700b79582bf4a7
0377348e98959984cb9b586ce35c5da8fd525b98
'2012-04-01T04:21:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_035.txt'
5d2fc6f9a0a43bd2c20653b03d128cb7
aa0fd69baea7468490a603ccd9d6c0396cea3e32
describe
'9555' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_035thm.jpg'
fddb1c40d279135725d6da089e312d55
61f417c2d9f19f079ee07cd6b62404bcc670f004
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_036.jp2'
38548ca4bb909284242ebc03a270bd5d
02ff362b117dbbf0e11499c7bb3bc141e37762fc
describe
'89765' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_036.jpg'
a90812bf3faab01a2c56737193145bbc
a0223b12226d2257a6d2d4aa0c1258e77d9b6941
describe
'33267' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_036.pro'
33c461561e6e34846daba867acfd181e
c0ae743f6fd453bbc377e02a3c91ced55340c653
describe
'31306' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_036.QC.jpg'
155bb614a4b75684259efbcd5a0f701a
370d1585a9e613ac99ec8f66e41097bbd1cb5040
'2012-04-01T04:17:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADXZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_036.tif'
8e89a10281639df66f697cd068ef1a93
90ae20f0cafd7fe04726a2198a6931da02b30da5
'2012-04-01T04:17:36-04:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_036.txt'
3b249f1be0f03a2bdfdd6681fc1d1790
93a24ece8417596009a151a737326d890d0c5ad9
describe
'10438' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_036thm.jpg'
239c24748ec4a78c29b592b9604880a6
c22986747d94dfce25bf4a7b87e5a5a5f9874dac
describe
'500470' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_037.jp2'
024fcfc26e1b7adca9c9edf667196b14
20b6487939647ff3737f6d82ed3ef5dd4ad99f4c
'2012-04-01T04:20:57-04:00'
describe
'85941' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_037.jpg'
3cecfa4727f83b47aeb3916f953c5bbd
4991145ff9670103424beb94d3ff4759b3115656
'2012-04-01T04:13:51-04:00'
describe
'31830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_037.pro'
91e88ccbc8bcec46fc8473378154a895
0473ca11383dc4944388b6a02130a6fd1cc53161
'2012-04-01T04:13:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_037.QC.jpg'
47342d22d3a02cafcf4a7a9bd372f77f
d580daa7f04782099f0b226d574decea4cca556b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_037.tif'
7e18ef05223eb2aa45c7c2a7f34f1c1e
6f73a4d23683b9ed37948ec84f5a3c5d673d3c10
'2012-04-01T04:11:40-04:00'
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_037.txt'
591eac095c5208b3fabea5b69b19a835
b1b5462ce3e919b4840a3d32045ac0ddfedda32c
'2012-04-01T04:23:22-04:00'
describe
'9902' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_037thm.jpg'
186a0899922d8ab9a05ceca6b826e44b
5aba49b85be4246a3cb3fa945ef348d21c96c191
'2012-04-01T04:15:57-04:00'
describe
'495196' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_038.jp2'
ae74195ce53bbf0656cc5b338ac36183
d8e1280a1343be3004bb14aee09a9fbdaa02575b
'2012-04-01T04:15:16-04:00'
describe
'94102' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_038.jpg'
dda64ed7d4352cffc1780573b3e9b0ce
f84577072c5af7b9e74d042cfaf8e0447caee7f3
'2012-04-01T04:18:33-04:00'
describe
'33752' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_038.pro'
9ff631e247fd04830591e085ac11463a
5e3a3645bcea7212f694dd771f09cfcb1c4ec69f
'2012-04-01T04:15:43-04:00'
describe
'33014' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_038.QC.jpg'
cbec8453f30e3438f53612186c34f93c
9990852454d076a508edb4b0279b67a7285fe53c
'2012-04-01T04:24:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_038.tif'
b11871754fded186294e21a1bb4ca2b6
3b8c0fca16a1b53a158f1ec9c88fd5761fbee7cb
'2012-04-01T04:13:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_038.txt'
435ef465b9dd0d85c1bb587aee14cf92
145112afbceca3ffe45bd3e642ef8edff046a2dd
'2012-04-01T04:15:25-04:00'
describe
'11008' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_038thm.jpg'
c74a1760a3127b8307f95c6e95137490
bc9fc7e68d8cefab75c602e3c05d6b7a872e89e2
'2012-04-01T04:25:02-04:00'
describe
'500387' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_039.jp2'
a7cf13bd0d11434792197c0d1e796937
c5913787d934a446adae4ad83f1ec7e2dc0a6262
'2012-04-01T04:21:44-04:00'
describe
'89759' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_039.jpg'
fc9fad16eb68bc8454ccf0b8397e67ae
5c1ce5f9db21354b5d0c2130cc82c19e8f88350c
'2012-04-01T04:24:59-04:00'
describe
'32564' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_039.pro'
5294ce2e51d79daa02356b924b8f4a64
397f53e3b94776a08f7e57fb9eea317db00f08d7
'2012-04-01T04:18:45-04:00'
describe
'31384' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_039.QC.jpg'
b4d3d72dd9a9e33f1050b84807614381
a2ecbcf903e4030deadba8a6cef179beb9a67e1d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_039.tif'
63719d59ef9afdb42bdafbb9d27d0791
692c094f642f8c08951782df876a48aafa43cf9e
'2012-04-01T04:19:19-04:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_039.txt'
5568f4c9b8310c58afcf93a599a7346e
4cf828d727acae631c7a66066dc4c70f95ddd8a0
describe
'10040' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_039thm.jpg'
eea452d934dddaed75d71a93105af206
22a6b88386f4dd34f58af2f223ba530925d9fd8f
'2012-04-01T04:25:01-04:00'
describe
'495224' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_040.jp2'
eb07e446fdb2a5412f8ebcd65c900ad4
b0157b84e66569ca2266e729e45c5de80e30a620
describe
'92564' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_040.jpg'
86041514d2cd5aa6317f7335766c6b9d
027d0821b10ed3adfb589bdb8bea2a91809d831b
'2012-04-01T04:20:44-04:00'
describe
'35737' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADYZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_040.pro'
0495932af88a149f8ca5f3409fdd223a
4768452d6d897be501cf42cb6a43a48691eed972
'2012-04-01T04:11:48-04:00'
describe
'31980' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_040.QC.jpg'
dee4fa78637969cb990002587358adbb
c112b6178dff024d1f65b6c929fdff43d5933bb5
'2012-04-01T04:12:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_040.tif'
99e3d21327c67d83297af888035bbb68
498ae5bb9e8686511ed50118ecc8eb563d1366c7
'2012-04-01T04:23:36-04:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_040.txt'
27978d9cfa95c73be71147d4c121cc6d
148cc08c185c4eb57aec630469a07f1b8dddc3d0
describe
'10561' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_040thm.jpg'
ec4ae7c02461f93bbf4ad007f855ebeb
85062680302e5fd1c8c33007e6af1e50a6b46d6d
describe
'500489' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_041.jp2'
d2b9aa72942d16abff86a886ed25c2f8
0874168a1776e752804074b9c7a26fc1ae157569
'2012-04-01T04:12:14-04:00'
describe
'96567' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_041.jpg'
f4e6f3d7dad449a2d07184dd5ed54696
ff8692431a5159616262a3adac9d0a4df6ce9e6a
'2012-04-01T04:12:23-04:00'
describe
'35603' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_041.pro'
a7a316b57dade8115c3cf90b56b38271
fcb5b6b652fc1a926ab956f4e3dd378577df694b
'2012-04-01T04:20:03-04:00'
describe
'33431' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_041.QC.jpg'
baff75d9cb605ed7e41ee4cddce6c2d7
5688c60e316e84e3bb905670df4f79fc70f0a31c
'2012-04-01T04:20:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_041.tif'
49e289f63e24d42d6e12daaf8ba26aae
0490ba2b8800ee3d117df7787e2c05019cc866d4
'2012-04-01T04:15:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_041.txt'
9cf7b60a7eec1740d1b01b3976b90556
ea035e53f7b38cc05b35522a6a9d58d8df8c057c
'2012-04-01T04:17:56-04:00'
describe
'10498' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_041thm.jpg'
f3aeb8dda2f7f34d8c1ec5fac5e71c10
a24d02b2afcadedff62268450efd77404795f09c
'2012-04-01T04:12:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_042.jp2'
871f3cba3bd4e391cb5c6e6aa42f7d06
13eac16d21f7e11d0a96b0cef80bf2965faaf1e1
'2012-04-01T04:13:03-04:00'
describe
'92670' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_042.jpg'
dcc2eb1338948db07ca4a44c1284bc6c
b0ec3c67d480cc4b281b6749c206bf5128e2bf77
'2012-04-01T04:16:02-04:00'
describe
'35194' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_042.pro'
2d601e2850ec5c2a645f74f28a733467
b0972eca1af99643d2fc8a581ff34d25afd46fcb
'2012-04-01T04:17:19-04:00'
describe
'31707' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_042.QC.jpg'
f9aa70a31d86bf7554bf91d83dae8ce3
65828b405602b373c83f6d996d23501098aa78e2
'2012-04-01T04:15:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_042.tif'
799f552b41aabb785bb9c1e415525363
9b01c2c105d83eda0fe36dec4573e22edbe44832
'2012-04-01T04:20:14-04:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_042.txt'
8d0ba788518c602629120f73dcbf5bbd
ad20db476dc7258a50df4c5332e3ca02e180435a
'2012-04-01T04:16:30-04:00'
describe
'10332' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_042thm.jpg'
cf1805170683f78808b08bca369f6c4b
395a9feabd7c08bab2ac665bf4299798d2da3497
describe
'382589' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_043.jp2'
7ff7e772e7c7ad33f46f8020885f4c3b
05e6fe529ac34b41ef6503034fe6fdb19194426d
describe
'37077' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_043.jpg'
93e50860685959ae568ed086bfaf738d
6c23af660d69d0ed64fae44ec478196fb8338d25
'2012-04-01T04:13:01-04:00'
describe
'6833' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_043.pro'
7e2c58c5b4535f9e15089930a7222ea1
c7ba2132258f4c5ec26c4f35916c506d68e7bb6b
'2012-04-01T04:14:15-04:00'
describe
'12838' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_043.QC.jpg'
ddc079f706e5ddf872dc12bd2f0608a3
126641d92546edcbfdb4f12781600531133edcf1
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_043.tif'
b83f2113a0340dd551500b4ff24ddc51
2aee3eb7f57ca2d558550ffcdceddbdae99b448a
'2012-04-01T04:19:42-04:00'
describe
'330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_043.txt'
1b0ae64786098c90efe80a50c78dbb43
b9445966fbc4a800439ae4159cea3df238cf84f3
describe
'4591' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_043thm.jpg'
8060a4348d023cab7d62bea8f6469e21
37667ce496d5f5e04985e8cd0b6982d73f41ced6
'2012-04-01T04:13:44-04:00'
describe
'495191' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAADZZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_044.jp2'
4ad47bad680237ce63f1dcb0610aa6ba
214cbce58f87c94187e9bf03cf8f1a91c8c4af65
'2012-04-01T04:21:06-04:00'
describe
'71814' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_044.jpg'
094f75cc5094aa10b05c4bba49afad07
299dc1af5685cecb229207063a4a6f8befb1dca2
describe
'24494' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_044.pro'
74fc5d835e3273e0150c6deab8659e96
503d7122bc2e31ad256313c3f588a4229f43d680
'2012-04-01T04:20:10-04:00'
describe
'25059' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_044.QC.jpg'
37b76a15c5065746b2da3aaa68725c66
0431010b21b9b24d5d2749b3591770b5fcd23ac8
'2012-04-01T04:19:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_044.tif'
7bf9c471bf9c7db55b0c029a6bf0a913
08a102b2253f283a3e356a4e044c02f9f9432eda
'2012-04-01T04:23:20-04:00'
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_044.txt'
3c9446d65ca1176b44f8e9b80a210aa2
aa4fd2be8738ae5facebbef3277b39b8b0563c04
'2012-04-01T04:24:18-04:00'
describe
'8553' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_044thm.jpg'
85da86d4bcc92629fd37cf60331ad6bb
1103c5b29e4757200cd22a10ae48d96a96f32d5f
'2012-04-01T04:14:10-04:00'
describe
'500400' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_045.jp2'
8b1486a9f82f18879f09ddaecbc853d7
00ceb2cb79116c0d2f732e7ea68fdc2dd094bc92
describe
'93371' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_045.jpg'
3c5012748e183cc8222f67175c86542f
c3ad4c6e5881d7ef709e14633cdabfdb2d242b1f
'2012-04-01T04:21:37-04:00'
describe
'35372' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_045.pro'
f2789e0842786a3b580cf43375ab834f
fa3f1b4bf7a2f67e63af66fcd34e9365b646a3eb
'2012-04-01T04:22:54-04:00'
describe
'32307' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_045.QC.jpg'
b7987fd9cfd9841d36a2a0bd37331e04
3abc7957933eedd181b1eff00332ef8d4094f08e
'2012-04-01T04:19:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_045.tif'
8dd57c625c5079f8fd8a8b60a79dbda7
fd2d36872b8d17244d69f19a041a981c91fad7dc
'2012-04-01T04:19:57-04:00'
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_045.txt'
0328e864ad93990c07abcffc6104bccd
23cd753f21b7c272a6653ea41c75455961352c4d
'2012-04-01T04:12:04-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10272' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_045thm.jpg'
16161231c3d8cc1c536118643ba8dbaa
7c23f55fedceb696258667da28bdf7a5086cd08b
describe
'480128' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_046.jp2'
ab75919245caa9e42899e795e2a1426d
eb37ab4306eac6d8535e0f6a9453565df805fc46
'2012-04-01T04:19:46-04:00'
describe
'90507' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_046.jpg'
2db43ce9b04233bb587b288d9a06a131
8f6588f27dcb5ff82c14c7f5c5d3c30e07878333
describe
'35307' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_046.pro'
69e94f3131c04bb3330c2d68dc0582f3
271097b0caeba87e65a0ff532fd026c635ca8a47
'2012-04-01T04:23:28-04:00'
describe
'32168' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_046.QC.jpg'
82db407c8fee83ad4fc189d5dfaacfa0
08705b013dd7caedd71ea9f0142612035d3d6bed
'2012-04-01T04:11:53-04:00'
describe
'11542330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_046.tif'
f44c2ff61e6f1b0663aa1a5ec753d7e2
746a4d17bd35971c26e793ad69f11285b0c82fd9
'2012-04-01T04:21:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_046.txt'
81280980e7ed902737a00a026fe8f5f2
dea2f748762d95dc9c8abc3730057c7817d04d11
'2012-04-01T04:12:02-04:00'
describe
'11113' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_046thm.jpg'
ca4c3e2af4a63d864291dec157d78a76
20cb8636b8c3b2b0f9166244e6fe55619a4f6fae
'2012-04-01T04:24:28-04:00'
describe
'500471' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_047.jp2'
929bd56cee14502e7b7e7c0040e759e4
dd751f451f98c18cc561d3e960286f924d55d1fd
'2012-04-01T04:24:39-04:00'
describe
'89018' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_047.jpg'
2124b5b1a428937758bf02827781a82a
1908b1abe1d0cab5778269212d7721c0aaf8857c
'2012-04-01T04:13:48-04:00'
describe
'33687' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_047.pro'
c0010e7e66377838f294a2ab34c439f7
3b77a6bcb9487f72d5ba08b3e9a60de995ed8673
describe
'30824' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_047.QC.jpg'
f5434f5d84e69392f9ee3ba584f1df24
b099d72089d93aebc9058dcbb084598a2d3fa89c
'2012-04-01T04:19:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_047.tif'
0f08ed62f1ce0ca8bf5a6e43ec6ffde3
8d5d93772f316106a305ce0f784d721601969499
'2012-04-01T04:16:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEAZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_047.txt'
02f72f492dd16c70694ccb660ad38976
43355fa471b92e323f1f340e5f0579298dcdf90d
'2012-04-01T04:25:08-04:00'
describe
'10070' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_047thm.jpg'
1b78ad9f9cbc312cf71bf2a07d082c53
655d5c42da4effbf8fa3db0fc11d3249d97ec87e
'2012-04-01T04:19:56-04:00'
describe
'478826' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_048.jp2'
2ddf91e49c3f6532c34534ff2a3ccaef
314c80c39dad366d2002529dca3f97d788a7202c
'2012-04-01T04:12:26-04:00'
describe
'85169' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_048.jpg'
656e3b537146a332df0bc6cd5bc5333f
851c3a435e8896ea08cdec64209b06263db5962f
'2012-04-01T04:15:35-04:00'
describe
'36088' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_048.pro'
68fba872161833827f8fb887dce9e591
a5221cba38adb79612939ee386c931676c102cd3
'2012-04-01T04:18:21-04:00'
describe
'29834' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_048.QC.jpg'
04fa618cb0672a0bed6dc2d948b85f59
57d1af3b5c1c5777d555760da0988ff56b2b6733
'2012-04-01T04:24:19-04:00'
describe
'11510830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_048.tif'
ca3f70ba9ad337df021a8b890a49b9bc
63db1ad5a103101b5a7f30997f90b18449233f64
'2012-04-01T04:16:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_048.txt'
535412d83a05cc4efa825ba715bfa6d1
7e1329569a577037a25822f08b5852841864e695
'2012-04-01T04:23:12-04:00'
describe
'10477' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_048thm.jpg'
ab51391446877c2523bd05092924355c
6e00f82e715de1490e4ca515e4b2f7d0973bdb0a
'2012-04-01T04:17:12-04:00'
describe
'500413' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_049.jp2'
b3dcb12c93c24ae2438ab0cdec47ec58
212920ad2c767620b88b59a88c96a9517739ebd9
'2012-04-01T04:16:19-04:00'
describe
'90032' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_049.jpg'
d99a8fda7b878a6278d56495f131daaf
1d5e81b93573714a9a39c580855b6f61ad296e0e
describe
'35710' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_049.pro'
7b086950b83f917d8044db561708ee8a
1bc8e1354ce4274b430c9c46a1a7c3184642fb4e
'2012-04-01T04:19:03-04:00'
describe
'30864' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_049.QC.jpg'
abed8eaf7c2f284d5ce185111da995cc
b2de8cd429af369b605577dc44b96ee4ff2284bf
'2012-04-01T04:21:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_049.tif'
8be4c09b538f5a87e8d3ba6d84e20e3a
144d3e175dca9bfc2494e580cae964b8dc088683
'2012-04-01T04:14:44-04:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_049.txt'
503c7ce46bcb44f5fcf0150fa4d9ca30
c11efd79835d76a4dbc86d1cbc4b3f574e1b8a0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_049thm.jpg'
4b00464e2034bb0ea80191d1ef30900c
82b4c2075db09cd13c9f43f4461e1b88817da8ef
'2012-04-01T04:18:12-04:00'
describe
'480093' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_050.jp2'
e94ea9b6227f9fcdd2ec5da5ac438273
733add9d434822d1983463ab6debd2b1442b59be
'2012-04-01T04:20:31-04:00'
describe
'88215' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_050.jpg'
ca005c4243d59e1470877aca621d569a
8b3f11e239c2509d2d50bb3d8f5dc677671eda7d
describe
'34306' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_050.pro'
c2d39f7a7c95ede0797161149550765a
eb4a80cdb612f95f8d17f502b1827d6d67353591
'2012-04-01T04:12:42-04:00'
describe
'31529' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_050.QC.jpg'
92993e877b4eeb039df76ddeb11c9786
fe467f2425a6ebf99558ed662518a1001e5528fc
'2012-04-01T04:12:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_050.tif'
c8b118377ef0148a839f0d3e20f5c41c
78ade5c38b7a66f6f334f30a049cc67895c5a909
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_050.txt'
47fc5d4ffb574b1bbf7542793a5669f8
0c34d1e66a67ee518f62f81fc58f521338a24e41
describe
'10776' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_050thm.jpg'
f250b6eb3ae717299417c84037740451
a9a5c0899a15955306d54f1a0fb4fd7cdf8d78b3
'2012-04-01T04:19:34-04:00'
describe
'500500' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_051.jp2'
a2438ad78e6b3e13e6c2a61ddcaa46fa
f664d9e12dae4168cffb38265a5dddff381ccf49
describe
'88151' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_051.jpg'
45fd91718198edee3d5720d11d005bee
b75e7391a8123f956274020598359513b27165e1
'2012-04-01T04:15:08-04:00'
describe
'33534' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_051.pro'
20b8170efcc02a5c4b72eb5389ba530b
e151ab303bc516bc44bb7010e3055123d9d78282
'2012-04-01T04:19:27-04:00'
describe
'30390' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEBZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_051.QC.jpg'
78ab547a1d66aa07a240c6fd261b26fb
49eef2bbeb79a075696b79b6ebeba87fb0f82d43
'2012-04-01T04:14:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_051.tif'
306adbfee4b39fbefd96fc386d29acb4
dd89f11aca8c6902d9714b1033ede8c5ed4526d5
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_051.txt'
90b48e7c7098cdf67920e7958fa1f0db
c9b32e551e94b41a034106f8f2db2eb55205a690
'2012-04-01T04:18:14-04:00'
describe
'9936' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_051thm.jpg'
84b88d800e5384f5f05f8079e4dcc441
347f243c809e984fb7286b86d774e70b09e1d709
describe
'495217' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_052.jp2'
0bee2c884811fc5ad07efd35f960fc24
f2cc4d2f86fc338a3a4c388e7787b4cc3a9f9313
describe
'87273' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_052.jpg'
fcc639592a690cf078a4582359c721d3
175f7b0ce7848cf56b4da2f015142cd8f80a914d
'2012-04-01T04:11:51-04:00'
describe
'33212' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_052.pro'
9854efb122281a3e2e973dc4fba24aa6
eb040b0384486275146b14b6e9b9d87666195407
'2012-04-01T04:21:26-04:00'
describe
'30534' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_052.QC.jpg'
eedba3b370ef8ec317ab9e7f87dbe1bc
2fb8ea8c359396ca87f2e9ce0912d37aaae4bf93
'2012-04-01T04:21:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_052.tif'
b5f2e7b68f9a299641e58d429a564efa
9dd2266fcbe17b684b0fdecf9e005859d9c95bdb
'2012-04-01T04:15:28-04:00'
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_052.txt'
1b327b6f052dd2531416bd90abe94345
8c8b4f09e13238ff60dc3f7b47bc1eca7e25a123
'2012-04-01T04:23:10-04:00'
describe
'10203' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_052thm.jpg'
d478eae2f2116449e1abef052e3b5a7a
968697983dc829dd5853acc3336f57884d81d33c
'2012-04-01T04:14:04-04:00'
describe
'500414' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_053.jp2'
363ad163f8cad6dee01cfd0e7551ad32
941dcccd6a7d3b5c6ea96ce5986c814ff72363e9
describe
'85498' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_053.jpg'
a015eea328615f2cb6f51e4a52b34aaa
4a8dbd730b941980d6d99c0cf1b47d326c7f9ae3
'2012-04-01T04:12:28-04:00'
describe
'32562' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_053.pro'
dafae2882d4c6140f3405700449a0c5f
324242027cf0f5689df7b63e765c937528c43df3
'2012-04-01T04:22:22-04:00'
describe
'29686' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_053.QC.jpg'
a7ed5f8f0793f48780f91d5f1f2668de
045ee83a0621dbca811153b4a71f78c92354fb28
'2012-04-01T04:14:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_053.tif'
8bffb04b2b807e71d91bb328a1c99b6e
e72cb920814de560a79f6ffa32a0046156f38f0f
'2012-04-01T04:21:50-04:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_053.txt'
ddda9bf452bbddc49c08c26a7e6c10c9
83ef5e35ea295f30e8e158dc38bd2ffe7dbd734f
describe
'9662' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_053thm.jpg'
6f75cbace17d60ba0bbf5f309319b62f
284ff8c1e7be8041f183f4eefc56a807231fae5f
describe
'463723' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_054.jp2'
10c8d2d3ca67a1e749ce37b180f3fd42
1e4f63c4bfddf270e0dcf985d07108757f051e27
describe
'88779' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_054.jpg'
cc6984797a5a8f983afe56d930329437
1979c5bd5ec7cc56572a78af39061cccc0460d62
describe
'34037' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_054.pro'
6c721557d14ed7bfcd84d59314671a41
e0a6c3b16ce5a1360ea67b9003922c8f5df6ea62
describe
'31424' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_054.QC.jpg'
c5e1b0196551f1e9579f11f9982d4bb5
bd355c9a5c17567d5d3badc80dab74cee942b104
describe
'11148580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_054.tif'
9e7fde522e0091481b1401de8c888704
1b8f35934b54da17a9e6e7b477ba89e2446cb499
'2012-04-01T04:23:57-04:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_054.txt'
d3fd37958cef24a281127a50752abca7
58341275bd188f81bb34fefcf5bac0998713c333
'2012-04-01T04:23:23-04:00'
describe
'11461' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_054thm.jpg'
30a3cf5bc2815cfe19a83585cf104d39
6a08a0dd50efc4020b2dea603c196e46be11a5ec
describe
'500455' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_055.jp2'
beeade0f42777c437d3aac28c3a4ad2b
1ab403e6aa26a8a86afea6fab7f42144c0f88f61
'2012-04-01T04:13:50-04:00'
describe
'89284' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAECZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_055.jpg'
fec3695e30197514a3371bb98a5d6675
da6cd2c16264695559aade248b32e82ed083ce8d
'2012-04-01T04:24:46-04:00'
describe
'35112' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_055.pro'
abcf35c5c07e8b15bd942881428a7d0d
66f53fbaa145aaef8d97139d571a31a151020238
describe
'30967' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_055.QC.jpg'
27019ea84f74e246bcd8e82cc4502e7c
0726ab4f6e2c7080850e8d2a88e7a402c7ec0d62
'2012-04-01T04:17:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_055.tif'
80d14f446a866a233dca6b1c8cf12a6d
fa518ecc1173f2552b0d75847c7f0a2fdfc30792
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_055.txt'
efdb92098f9281efceef62c565f12a13
aa9db6a6d46ab1adae9c255c820c1cb1f0c84971
'2012-04-01T04:16:27-04:00'
describe
'9822' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_055thm.jpg'
9329c94a13420698423478247597abbf
faadf66ff70d347ef8237ce3dc45045b76021bf6
describe
'469302' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_056.jp2'
98fd25192e0e02c4280e6f9a8edade8c
3fbae2233c8e2d7ff613d21058e2aecffb864ded
'2012-04-01T04:17:52-04:00'
describe
'89667' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_056.jpg'
09d34547ce095b42bec1903c6ff8b236
18404685b5a6fa9960fbcab7eb1e2ff3eda2e5cb
'2012-04-01T04:13:13-04:00'
describe
'33718' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_056.pro'
18502b1427765a052340d54d4bcaae6f
e1923f30f2c3b142706155c674efea13f77453e7
describe
'31811' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_056.QC.jpg'
8bca2243242d6a93e4d9afec71a2a961
94673951e14ef7d34fc788288323b1fda4daafb1
describe
'11282454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_056.tif'
e098a727144c4985545f52928a16a53a
43d28b7c441391f133a22f8db502a44672452c85
'2012-04-01T04:22:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_056.txt'
f954d799a8f71c5774d1cfe3972b9203
d650ba5d7486a4e78096f64612764e9d343456c6
describe
'11234' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_056thm.jpg'
51d662885c48a844e7bb1c85cc921c5b
075186a860284250dc96a4a9ee2b4440a5b8d689
'2012-04-01T04:15:55-04:00'
describe
'500411' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_057.jp2'
cdca1645995a4cd23fb6075b9b15841a
7f52ca786ecbedf4fdbe3504d74d3bd5042fbb78
'2012-04-01T04:19:54-04:00'
describe
'89753' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_057.jpg'
1bcfaa972455aea9fd64329f1f267bca
de2698857a08e0f8036433b752e7ed2b6040c06f
describe
'35171' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_057.pro'
91e40c1d05c35ed0eb987ac560b49395
1f908d1500962587a0293d1426303e73888aeb7c
'2012-04-01T04:19:10-04:00'
describe
'31129' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_057.QC.jpg'
a615661ffb3dd9650c5ac606ac3dd095
b6fb07853f4a5db71d8ea30413da49631132f638
'2012-04-01T04:22:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_057.tif'
39196e4a0dea77edf92772291890ec51
85422806f64ad180779d31eae5cda3e147df374b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_057.txt'
3687390517fb3035dcd1fb4801a1eee3
30ec9fdf3bb3f44f43ceb89d45a9d42a6192f150
'2012-04-01T04:17:46-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9805' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_057thm.jpg'
395ec372cf12e54c1c732de82e877f34
273045605a42fc1dc04955c008c47ff9c4f7408e
'2012-04-01T04:12:17-04:00'
describe
'478797' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_058.jp2'
049408581600b0b6aaadfa1695a90e28
8714c66d446fd18972d2ee3d5c671ad51dbbc7f7
describe
'88403' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_058.jpg'
45ac83d7551780df98760aafab0175c5
832148b4edbe75dd0e38fa6a2b1bdd87de5b859b
describe
'33445' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_058.pro'
89bc645ff3f6ca80434375d9ded49c9b
0778ad5effc8536a294d91140ffecf31b69517e0
'2012-04-01T04:12:08-04:00'
describe
'30902' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_058.QC.jpg'
48d8fd23d9c563940baf50fd844733d5
37ee1ccb222893051e00bace21e56afe4db02cfd
'2012-04-01T04:22:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_058.tif'
35c485c861abf840e8256fb60506289f
fd850aa3f1ddab9e3054e7664ebd641a59df6b46
'2012-04-01T04:22:56-04:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_058.txt'
ff251b1b90c7101984604bf13be28ba4
7cad4130753fe16866d194b4a0e539caf4b94cf8
'2012-04-01T04:17:05-04:00'
describe
'10778' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEDZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_058thm.jpg'
566a74b7100dac8d47cf26c35f461c61
19b63569e9acc6d9cc9b5903c619f638d97bea88
'2012-04-01T04:22:00-04:00'
describe
'500286' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_059.jp2'
4720b32cdd5b746412bdb7dd94036563
3b06fc2e5d993066d5b6e8fe6f14b881a5352f3e
describe
'91263' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_059.jpg'
0ecf8d727c001dca567e329f75374c18
cd07582c9669eff03880ffefbe7552fc65fbe050
'2012-04-01T04:17:44-04:00'
describe
'34345' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_059.pro'
f5409ff238b884bb77e2fb379ae2ed75
1660daa1d9ebd9c2c9675c51f42d90d31d0abfad
'2012-04-01T04:18:06-04:00'
describe
'31218' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEED' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_059.QC.jpg'
5ca2434e4b0936efbf28a90ca854412c
38d173da77e50a5e1f16bc76b0b543ffa997cfec
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_059.tif'
991770a2857766b4b043ac27708dc8ef
ac7f469eaccf871e4eee63dad383bcb918b96b03
'2012-04-01T04:18:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_059.txt'
f452b691c31f718f8201aa71862ed8d9
0e9f486b6fc1de0c842599827ffce58af44ef02a
'2012-04-01T04:16:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9982' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_059thm.jpg'
9a4b926f6c5d0014fa4eae1e47ce1cf5
e9796bd2182ea1067242d77c4123a8693a711cf0
'2012-04-01T04:18:24-04:00'
describe
'482731' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_060.jp2'
e5c1ae54484770bbc47dc964e348112a
710491f5c0b4bf6e295bc13d7cd70011f96bef2e
describe
'87154' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_060.jpg'
b92e526d723fa9559f250764f9900856
e1865a65af4e329dbd5070f86ada3fd6e23fea9b
'2012-04-01T04:16:52-04:00'
describe
'35288' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_060.pro'
04fc3dd43356bf50ceff3725ff76e161
2f192b61dac42c0c77e7caf2ad0ddf8493fba15b
'2012-04-01T04:15:34-04:00'
describe
'30691' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_060.QC.jpg'
dba570b44a65a8b3006bcd09825bd93b
6659e5b21ff3cd3c7a1e84a8a765962a0d3fdc1f
describe
'11605330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_060.tif'
31c16ec1a8ded5e26d9ceff0e51c58fc
254aac30394916253a5394379d101833f384b21d
'2012-04-01T04:16:25-04:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_060.txt'
a0ceb620e2ff55a0277a81c070314e17
5a0f78b62a2db80749143b56adb78da92f8e2c78
'2012-04-01T04:19:08-04:00'
describe
'10390' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_060thm.jpg'
fccd019798a83a0d1bbd53ebb80d9786
ae35aad0fb1d1d6745de8e86c921994763c82351
'2012-04-01T04:12:57-04:00'
describe
'500453' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_061.jp2'
74a9773dab5ac0d32770db58cb4e3028
0633d49dc54dcfab87678db3c01ce76a281a31f2
'2012-04-01T04:19:14-04:00'
describe
'87009' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_061.jpg'
f07ab551ede94edb38251785fc7151cf
f9bd47ca2ae18c94cfe52ee40b2aa7208eb72051
'2012-04-01T04:11:44-04:00'
describe
'31870' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_061.pro'
3b2a4310c35a74acb09366e582783074
d0b07acdb810a56c3136a6226fd98e5f06a2d695
'2012-04-01T04:11:50-04:00'
describe
'30721' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEER' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_061.QC.jpg'
5df806f5693bf5e37102fbb83ed7a681
9048ccc60daa451759da60dd0289621e5af89de1
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEES' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_061.tif'
20080fb07eeb7ca42ce7a7624bfcf89e
67e84820e7f329eed54a5ff33f5beaebcbbe0e1f
'2012-04-01T04:12:30-04:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEET' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_061.txt'
5b15d8687fda0cc5432dd317a2e1770d
7e36bf546a56d4e685bfd929f456f2663b876db0
describe
'9887' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_061thm.jpg'
0b63e3848e060b50ccac0bf8179663d8
43609149d8d7bcac99500475f2bff35960a3c74b
'2012-04-01T04:13:10-04:00'
describe
'485698' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_062.jp2'
2db4204c58ca37e1ea8539b6490d6a6e
7351143ed6e0fcceba97d718974bef63d414b1d0
describe
'91948' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_062.jpg'
1f2ea1196846ff8910a4fdf11f59a8a9
81df5e3d10b34e7228e090350074499b77fb3438
'2012-04-01T04:22:58-04:00'
describe
'34674' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_062.pro'
4868059ddc6e85bdb9346cdccbcd2021
3ef74a6130c2a373c3ae632e2b3467fea1cfb3bc
'2012-04-01T04:20:28-04:00'
describe
'31930' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_062.QC.jpg'
12024939fc55fd3458577a1be719864c
ddf274bae24f5c1e6d44241777965d765f3c10f0
'2012-04-01T04:21:51-04:00'
describe
'11676204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEEZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_062.tif'
ef0d8016a899b283f17ce25177ca381e
0968b0ef5d8d4feb90407276b30401a036f4cda4
'2012-04-01T04:24:17-04:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_062.txt'
68b40208c63fbad1de11de9e1bff98af
34249e592b23bf86261b9535c53181a7a9eabbd4
'2012-04-01T04:16:36-04:00'
describe
'10678' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_062thm.jpg'
d49876fd5550301792b9dd742db44abf
9aab53a3fa62ee7da6f777fc5ffbda23003b345c
'2012-04-01T04:20:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_063.jp2'
61d82fa69e4d65e9a35dad5612b01323
c5e2a27ff4b73d6e96795fd5b8a982ef0a34c784
'2012-04-01T04:14:09-04:00'
describe
'92611' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_063.jpg'
9d998476513e3f8f343ff1388b81f639
57f16175bcf2e0c032737cb55ec931efee3e6b27
describe
'35744' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_063.pro'
8680d846a347962ae10e32abcdfd454d
7222fb8f79b3db2bc5194962b232afd09306664a
'2012-04-01T04:20:36-04:00'
describe
'31974' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_063.QC.jpg'
f59b79cbde6c2337604cda4b4c855b80
2f78cabde17c8c7f9c99ebe424e98ff92a669936
'2012-04-01T04:18:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_063.tif'
04826ad11f523b6ab78e4f74126f3c76
795246164ef3f040d2d1298b5777f9a0c216842e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_063.txt'
3f9122cdd651ef2476124ef4f02f1b57
70431c1f8e62dd55bb8d40de6ccc0188e0d1969b
describe
'9937' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_063thm.jpg'
8a78e31fa6e79e9e519437a86cdf454b
f1ff4cc8c5d8a7e3919f719255c4e967aa8e2d4e
'2012-04-01T04:12:20-04:00'
describe
'484030' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_064.jp2'
5c7180098e80ed8394bea77b3a903de1
96a42aa5d2298eb9231dc6ad669c6186268683cd
'2012-04-01T04:21:54-04:00'
describe
'89147' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_064.jpg'
48b446d6a002f025cad1e3da6924bb7c
39f181e14181e690f799e3310b88c6e3bdc631e9
'2012-04-01T04:13:18-04:00'
describe
'33408' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_064.pro'
9d06020d475b2622ee8dfee404797f5d
2ec5830c4613ea6aad0fb98e21354fc6770136a6
'2012-04-01T04:24:13-04:00'
describe
'30989' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_064.QC.jpg'
bb87286b4b651b3c573a1e6fc4a26e47
94a2f3b42798bf4a6fe5da941bb5c9e0188cbe15
'2012-04-01T04:23:41-04:00'
describe
'11636830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_064.tif'
2db2d7aea22eed23827887d6cb86b598
96592cfefde54d8d1cb0aec39f859ef8b758fb54
'2012-04-01T04:20:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_064.txt'
6261e438f3e0cc632aed31d5f9bcb89e
9e1733a11417abc464585769783536db1b0cdf22
describe
'10712' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_064thm.jpg'
3edc6f67f2e792151db10f1ceb5f697c
075dc96964f9f6f51138ee4ac36b5501d89f4ef1
describe
'500501' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_065.jp2'
97e988af32bc102976cf1192fdedb3b2
061bc75257d5a99a87b2faaf121d1689710f8a20
'2012-04-01T04:19:01-04:00'
describe
'92421' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_065.jpg'
e189e2264ceaf7e8185a7ffc59298168
7e6537e98ef5db2e95556133807938e8de45b701
describe
'35052' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_065.pro'
a47af1e21df05f32800677be19075648
e7b8df4228f44f81aedcef840b25de419db9042b
'2012-04-01T04:12:56-04:00'
describe
'32205' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_065.QC.jpg'
43270e874cb842f8193b8bfcce35d9d1
b939d0abaafaf4a25aa3c9231cf310c4ae5b7402
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_065.tif'
a3c6f8bdcb90fe18a9247da17bad1caf
622435f11dafa03d7836a9ab3e7d82d1aa409a46
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_065.txt'
eae278e306c8fa0e6f43db5c727a34e1
4fdc743c73e6f883aa42233216ea4725afb88cb3
'2012-04-01T04:21:48-04:00'
describe
'10215' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_065thm.jpg'
8eba935a9e743e5e5944e90ebe6a100c
0903cf44cbdb4321c8667e1dbef4ab6e44c7f8f2
describe
'481466' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_066.jp2'
51e9bb65c56954f2a87eff0e34b00e66
614748d3cedfb07fc47c3fe41509c4f843c2d25b
describe
'54254' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_066.jpg'
e75f88e4d03e37a661ac35aed2d13271
26abb6bf1fe0dd77a88603cc96aaba5707b1f325
'2012-04-01T04:18:03-04:00'
describe
'17356' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEFZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_066.pro'
5010adb119b8b743d63081f53b200ec4
551d60b07a58286dba7e803d8371d1e71a8616a8
'2012-04-01T04:17:51-04:00'
describe
'19200' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_066.QC.jpg'
7a5f1425d33194c7574e9187bf2fddb0
757400291a01c6a973ff5de229532701ab5c9be5
'2012-04-01T04:16:16-04:00'
describe
'11573830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_066.tif'
dc4f84cf0ae2588f98092eb1607dd332
65402fa707829be1044cfe99c071f1e5677eeda7
'2012-04-01T04:17:49-04:00'
describe
'698' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_066.txt'
c294ad123ef95dd266738315f3522634
dbb4da209729c6d1114085149ba279aa536c6d4c
'2012-04-01T04:13:37-04:00'
describe
'7002' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_066thm.jpg'
4f5263e8ff34ede373693cde51b8cf8c
16005311b923a3217480bdebf53d44e51c9271b4
'2012-04-01T04:23:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_067.jp2'
d6d7e872c8b09f5cef86b2fe93c4e721
4565bc365e29c62532a0cccd371ef952e9235577
'2012-04-01T04:16:57-04:00'
describe
'69819' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_067.jpg'
6513a53aef57b396feb757f69362ba8c
c1c2ca6f77a78e39344d49f668b4d0ff61bc5ad6
describe
'24344' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_067.pro'
d72dd8c9fbab7c1527497eac9e162423
874cb63ccb90fcbe755ce863ea3eea7ae7cc8ac0
describe
'23918' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_067.QC.jpg'
00c311e7246d13345e21042ed8e9f0e1
0d441d6bf2ffe47bebb5ee5447415abdf2d012da
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_067.tif'
3782b1931df7859dc50160deaf8cbcfe
131254b4d358cb1c2734684672a5b62d7ec1a443
'2012-04-01T04:21:01-04:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_067.txt'
0cea145557c81559130a2614a13dbd98
71434d8d885f35ee18166f0b94a93d8d99f3a31a
'2012-04-01T04:17:33-04:00'
describe
'8020' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_067thm.jpg'
254a76f4e201512144d9761ec2b0db6c
101f10cb33cf10fee999dca70a8ec6c1b879dd31
describe
'485693' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_068.jp2'
1f04f8cdaf39c57354efdf953f1b89cd
c295605fdd40f452fbb056a2e31a070561427dfb
'2012-04-01T04:23:11-04:00'
describe
'83269' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_068.jpg'
0dbba3610ce87b862fa6f305b489fb97
39a349273ab1dfb2f4d87b899853659eecba5874
describe
'31501' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_068.pro'
1f8cd4bdba4fb6d60a4952cbc60ad925
92b026e14bb00627c5eff8046c7579d0c3f70fdf
'2012-04-01T04:20:38-04:00'
describe
'29319' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_068.QC.jpg'
f4ecf5b2c86a5217e88b0f0a5ef82bd1
76f29628cc42b2804815eca932329a9d2c887191
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_068.tif'
4c66b76c68c43659365333d95e79d1ab
715795f6f8beb9f0146f7e0c5122dad7bf430c46
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_068.txt'
be0bfd9e8d37b1bd05b448564695b7cd
9290935afbaf920024da979da8daa2b854f5a9c0
'2012-04-01T04:20:17-04:00'
describe
'10258' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_068thm.jpg'
d9645d6bb1c8c4c04949820cc0e80724
adda7bb6c9de84f7b53948cf93da61a41648b194
'2012-04-01T04:19:24-04:00'
describe
'500493' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_069.jp2'
6639c5815fb8100e3c5b7d5e0ed87a1e
2e40f1f8f668e950eebdff8fb6ed1bcaab24d887
describe
'89960' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_069.jpg'
c24537f376488362be11ad441c235457
b52785776c064c8e5158f35d0872c210426f2e70
describe
'34274' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_069.pro'
10c2c6f6ccfd4164ac4a28fbc5d8510b
535f1844bf4059513a4dca40044ae1378ab58bb9
'2012-04-01T04:15:40-04:00'
describe
'31257' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_069.QC.jpg'
e4571261cc98386c9294a2b2b24c3b2c
959221a2d8cfd9c547163d748b2d6aadc14416a8
'2012-04-01T04:20:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_069.tif'
b05a34b90224316b4397132eb781a716
b4cb720a8d5a167ca4f1af2904d5769317f53cfc
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_069.txt'
0bf8b0967c04b26502548271dd098dbb
bcb62052175e79cbe5e656fcdec0b2b62c217731
describe
'9957' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_069thm.jpg'
911939e14130e8220b37991c4fef22fd
c62c90f91792ce805d224a9340de6cc4f56329f3
'2012-04-01T04:16:53-04:00'
describe
'495246' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEGZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_070.jp2'
62c3c3daee34a493247ae5ebd91d5845
d86580ccdd3452cec2c7b08642f5aa36dd7c72ee
describe
'88763' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_070.jpg'
3989e064aff1d2f97abe89d039655855
7a485eecfc0fb71b53330d44aeb8a8ab215456f4
'2012-04-01T04:21:07-04:00'
describe
'34825' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_070.pro'
839c7a9a6d6cc66c60808b46bc712f23
9d1fdb486a073c43e44c097c7835f1a4df557bbe
describe
'31453' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_070.QC.jpg'
fc9d792ddf4b9b41bba68dd8ec5d70f9
76663739f5651323f5b6d85edc9dc089d09df726
'2012-04-01T04:23:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_070.tif'
19d3443bdc2dd423c926a21ec8e01cb5
10da1f6fd79b4e4947ec91e76e03d5f7452e3eec
'2012-04-01T04:18:08-04:00'
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_070.txt'
3b85ccaf7317d0630f084321efda28af
370024311d097b3d596fa7e568c51745d03d5305
'2012-04-01T04:24:03-04:00'
describe
'10169' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_070thm.jpg'
374d9279ec5b40f5595cc34733153247
55e90323b63cc9f8cd38323b747968436a047306
describe
'500427' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_071.jp2'
fccb18d01d4d4852361dc77c1a2ccd38
eda3ceb36acf6502191bc675afadb801e7c36cf6
'2012-04-01T04:24:11-04:00'
describe
'90744' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_071.jpg'
8fc6946debef5c5a5fe36d8b5424ff13
91863a194f3215ca7768b146acb12d6745d70f93
'2012-04-01T04:12:54-04:00'
describe
'35555' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_071.pro'
16c7cd74b7ab1a36db5354745c8f04cc
0b830b56f23ee0e4b8745a9860dc2793a28cd645
describe
'31447' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_071.QC.jpg'
703fe9585222e2a2651aa3bd5fbbfbe3
f121388d3e6f7a7df3b98fae79ac431bfa92b6fb
'2012-04-01T04:24:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_071.tif'
b5ef4378af10d4ae6c657c596fbb0a67
e268c02786c8514bea1963a5034a8a0c9d4e706f
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_071.txt'
2bb131a8836134f8d598c82b37970f9b
66bdf8f98d4d6d743fe76405abc05abed19b1127
describe
'10032' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_071thm.jpg'
c3a2767ea3110b426ff650429c2b1484
ed58949b50dd041843636cf3e441e054e0d2bb39
describe
'495204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_072.jp2'
de7d0a559176769f0a5deea71184d406
35be77d6ba53f7bf6451c17d301a7995ad59cb2f
describe
'87055' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_072.jpg'
658338327340407930fc90a7a45269cc
2880c7fccf7370bd4280a816ba101fdf688df6e1
describe
'32595' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_072.pro'
9f2edc407263a5e090434e7cb5add982
0f9da6b59895052096ecf73c06cdb968ea4f30d7
describe
'30636' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_072.QC.jpg'
00ace205f707d85ef752f707ca7ab545
b6b6f6ebfd674568cc03340446513416ed4acaf8
'2012-04-01T04:16:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_072.tif'
b1bf8cd74a51bb17df5b2f4659ec5a7d
565016476bb3a01518ce4bc47f95ed7b6cff6782
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_072.txt'
71cf6899e464f1dff17aace754cd7348
588e23f75b2179a18d21fc91e17da252ff62d76e
describe
'10060' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_072thm.jpg'
15adf6771cc36ffc846b4ccf2ae70a3a
650e200d59efbb5804e55a0ca16d06e8df3745ab
describe
'500444' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_073.jp2'
bcc9384e612961eb35fd1ba2a3bb7e0d
6059f10d2f0175413bdc24e31d1cfc66af09be0b
'2012-04-01T04:17:23-04:00'
describe
'91852' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_073.jpg'
66f66c281cdf9d3c42b5b3ece6ebefe1
b0febe06e006d90b8d42c35568e7633b6d7d4704
'2012-04-01T04:17:13-04:00'
describe
'35291' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_073.pro'
47217d2a038f062d9cf294bde61ff909
57dc30802e28f5058009a1a120d68d1fa85da633
describe
'31727' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_073.QC.jpg'
8367d452d9b584cd6206bfededbdb19a
0ba74eb302210071d916d684e7f83157b8eb0b66
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_073.tif'
84aabeabc107023d0cb0cb11713cb46e
df647eaf3b3ae3e8f590a9673c02348806fd78de
'2012-04-01T04:13:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEHZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_073.txt'
b20ec0af03435e20a6fb00c12524d57a
eed662e7ee90fe2a2a29a37f0c1812193984bee9
'2012-04-01T04:13:31-04:00'
describe
'10082' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_073thm.jpg'
d3c62ffa00cf6c08d9331fd423ef660f
c2a02cd6c1ef51a9e3f23d8a2d0f4d0d1617eea1
describe
'495203' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_074.jp2'
f24a27a3715071afd19f51c08d27f1b0
8581a1763de60e60c1e5201cfb9e6bccd471cd54
'2012-04-01T04:22:37-04:00'
describe
'88124' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_074.jpg'
de03403c3553bf491e830e68f4fc4c22
6f8979688bdc24bdf789ffd784f771161e94eb65
describe
'33559' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEID' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_074.pro'
75f5612e3106b718b2514b004d5d4bf2
521ea9d9590ee4238e5b917c040fa67f42a69247
describe
'30901' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_074.QC.jpg'
52a9c5ca16c32e9d1fd3e90c18e0e83d
dd987116a9b87f1d9241d6bfde2c8dff1fe5beb2
'2012-04-01T04:13:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_074.tif'
8e0ea6911749514c4a6dc2462ab47ec8
6af813ca01923fbd1801ad9ab80e301ac1c1c399
'2012-04-01T04:12:34-04:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_074.txt'
85b2e1a2e0b0f966cc28ca0c7d191a7d
e02f9223aeffdddc95b22f8408346050bf50ac90
'2012-04-01T04:15:14-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10502' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_074thm.jpg'
085825919d8f83280282fb949dc6afab
0e7c82aebe87c81327fe8ae7024a80c690a11f7c
'2012-04-01T04:18:23-04:00'
describe
'500337' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEII' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_075.jp2'
5d083510f9a235346536eb83a076c38a
c9818b0a0d17662f28f1d5774e7b85ee996732fe
'2012-04-01T04:12:50-04:00'
describe
'58084' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_075.jpg'
0faf06d181ce1f302f508fe756584be8
a4a4ede60abed3d232bd0da16c6938f07e7a8ee3
describe
'18092' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_075.QC.jpg'
42dc332f59213bee1046891062b77ae7
751ef8d53cf2caa7821fc365343d6122e8c362bc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_075.tif'
4043b043ecf46f6398798701857f22e8
9442c2bba701b37938a721ae37c4db9dfccf2210
'2012-04-01T04:24:57-04:00'
describe
'6478' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_075thm.jpg'
db4c78f24789bd6492ebd99ca0bcd2fc
9987b8f5f4b0b5332b62badf510b595c4155ddb8
describe
'222490' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_076.jp2'
fd31fa741a4f0a805c69730c015f772e
ab9472f3ce2d7a744d1c6fa6697aaa0e4da8061d
'2012-04-01T04:19:45-04:00'
describe
'19164' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_076.jpg'
5ab7d05465adce177aba3f982a995672
f8557bd178a4b2177fee002c487f654a5b8d6057
describe
'6195' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_076.QC.jpg'
daea340120cecacfbdc5ce8a570ffb66
d8d230de92a84b752ecd2430fb1ae6de505003f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_076.tif'
70e71859192e499c07df62f47134311a
fac14bc781947abff79209ab85d9a189dc361cc9
'2012-04-01T04:15:05-04:00'
describe
'2643' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_076thm.jpg'
fb636e1e8fd2f25f780625f97af7d4ce
6c67039365e8dd5ee6e60615b55437846ff4882a
'2012-04-01T04:17:59-04:00'
describe
'500464' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_077.jp2'
3cc8e38c5496abd3de4fde80542b274e
b28b078f52bbff0b1710a0e193db7f3238b628bd
describe
'89040' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_077.jpg'
16b64e9a8251595112606a468780ec41
c94f9f066ab5050d9a39d3843504ccd6a1166121
'2012-04-01T04:15:56-04:00'
describe
'34073' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_077.pro'
326058b3fabdd85362bebfcad644141f
fa836df08dfa70c67bb297a0ab3b3146a4152135
describe
'31313' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_077.QC.jpg'
440864f5cb2dc5c96200d15a87e0b577
ba5e03e29b8c101832a24ecb0944862c7ae6e6bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_077.tif'
e509c575faa1c9e43e68d8258ec77dcd
9642a4a1f7550b93e742097ece3da54f1d1cccff
'2012-04-01T04:17:00-04:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_077.txt'
ba99492bdfbabf674efcf4055e81665b
31f9ef4d1eae19046078111ee6a05ec1e2e5e336
describe
'9944' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_077thm.jpg'
3a0f77249aadae6be990237897e4c151
029716b67ad2b7289291bb0096d8889c4953e8bd
describe
'495250' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEIZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_078.jp2'
8247dc28aa4239a009cb34a6349c7aa5
57ed78d0f5ee656302ac85b4628583220c1de550
'2012-04-01T04:13:05-04:00'
describe
'87336' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_078.jpg'
633030e6f33aaba3a29832cbedfcd5c8
f1d6e06d3cbc5de2db7b06b951cf60b967c4bcc7
'2012-04-01T04:23:01-04:00'
describe
'32926' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_078.pro'
c82f166fb9707ae68dd2683af6c78b52
97fcfe65ceed8eb75b1ec5052f8c164ae7c45b50
'2012-04-01T04:23:42-04:00'
describe
'30765' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_078.QC.jpg'
fc07f4ada8edcf85e0f90f7cd60ca16c
4fe0794f7628ecd4ef812428dab6e02331aeb864
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_078.tif'
fa5782a96c0becc4d66d0f506f335ad8
1717877666a5fc6c4a77d4a1b6b3dbd6b9114ca8
'2012-04-01T04:17:18-04:00'
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_078.txt'
a6a08c40650a280102160c943e447d9f
559e35db47ee61e1fca87560f66ef6a0108bf085
describe
'10343' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_078thm.jpg'
5f56ceeb363c6947926a37fb1924b4fe
b98922fb3f36ee00f228bfb670fb01d5b7b5c95c
'2012-04-01T04:19:06-04:00'
describe
'500448' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_079.jp2'
e00dd1041ced179dc7a821b744f0cf3f
2e8bf545babc88710fa9b6189aa636d481211af4
'2012-04-01T04:15:26-04:00'
describe
'89412' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_079.jpg'
cbc9b3c07daad66ed4eaa319b0d62c58
90d7b2fdf433e71115a4c0ee87db4736ba177c37
'2012-04-01T04:16:35-04:00'
describe
'35259' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_079.pro'
bba110c8e9585e4355268e2750582ee1
1b8b23765633f8789c03d16dc1254267948bfbd0
describe
'30746' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_079.QC.jpg'
af48cc2e1565b3d8ce33878906965035
4dc3562c3170e5b91f08b4a8fc68ab4e8d662ccd
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_079.tif'
0e0244c9a2fc1042de148b8052d58038
87dacd28232864fee5fbd1b7747fa3bfc82a47df
'2012-04-01T04:14:28-04:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_079.txt'
4eb11a852a1a2106a7061b7cfed8d1c1
589d2beed832d34d696e2dd4e2a1cede2fa5e18e
describe
Invalid character
'9912' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_079thm.jpg'
4298e0792bb5aa7e2301d6881d621032
ce8c3ccb5cb96cc8e1729101b8618838e6d7ced4
'2012-04-01T04:15:01-04:00'
describe
'495226' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_080.jp2'
823dfe39ef85f21fce3e9f548b7b44c2
5479c1450c442d941dbad84629dd270917d6f883
'2012-04-01T04:14:01-04:00'
describe
'89069' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_080.jpg'
2eed723b9596a5baeacc770b4795fdc8
d807e19ef8a737f7b31cebfdeee8329f7eef45ce
'2012-04-01T04:11:57-04:00'
describe
'34566' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_080.pro'
9f967a8facd9c9608330375f4a29dcbe
368f1591fc808ddab75cade0d06f3662d8e2989c
'2012-04-01T04:15:49-04:00'
describe
'30961' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_080.QC.jpg'
54acfc50975c2327fcfd09c65f45c06c
6b841df756ab1d0ef47c871aebd1222393fd5ac7
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_080.tif'
fc6f5c4404682c8a2b43b2ac59d07bf1
ca28aa04bfedd9461ca47aeb646b80d4763842b4
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_080.txt'
0c5f0dffd477d4a2e5444cc2d69b2f53
cac73986e0e0a22556d26698b481c3e9842cd205
'2012-04-01T04:24:23-04:00'
describe
'10450' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_080thm.jpg'
a0ebe445882881d9723a4166cbd50b1d
8d2729ebb8d870a0db3ed19c80ceb79477185d8d
'2012-04-01T04:23:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_081.jp2'
66a89f8ebc0b58f8cd1edbec5779b463
d9461c13f0a1da3b4719edd57264386e3e4dcb50
'2012-04-01T04:21:49-04:00'
describe
'86827' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_081.jpg'
29a34ead54b251d613364c53bcf77ad7
1dcb398930f0c747dbcb38914a20fe2bb112a02b
'2012-04-01T04:22:55-04:00'
describe
'33501' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_081.pro'
9d588dcda0862503f192d75c02b015f3
14e71cd6fdc1ae149c8e0075eee8bba91bf70522
describe
'30287' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_081.QC.jpg'
d0209ac1ba7eab390cd2f854de406b5e
24720c205c27a9b4dd421fdf0b8797bfdb75ff13
'2012-04-01T04:12:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_081.tif'
41a81deadfd24b2fac9a9ccf2bf75d73
9c59c52da8f60c1c45d65266a3c3a841e2a2ab3b
'2012-04-01T04:23:07-04:00'
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEJZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_081.txt'
d2abdce7ffc8e5c180afed277139878a
62fcc7000f65e86e8655931e90dcc58be21664c7
'2012-04-01T04:18:43-04:00'
describe
'9686' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_081thm.jpg'
9933668a8f1d0ce1063dc44321163c07
eeadfea7f7dd45b560c7ea29ef2336c70d1810b6
describe
'495178' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_082.jp2'
b246728cfca28639f0cfc64398aac66e
01613a8e38c52861dbc89660b2a7ac1ea413571f
'2012-04-01T04:23:16-04:00'
describe
'90790' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_082.jpg'
76498aabeda24919709dd7e03d1d7df3
1a0e14a5bffcd11ffa07f66fb52eae47df30eb86
describe
'35199' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_082.pro'
73490d9754d70c50f867668f850d94b0
4753e3fa0c1b81a0e041c82d7abd66af6ddbffb0
describe
'31780' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_082.QC.jpg'
f8c58b4cb36dd098038f4b2a7080cd80
ee511ff958b4bd36498acb08729e9a78fea45b78
'2012-04-01T04:21:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_082.tif'
7cd9bd1e69be8596d7eff809ad2a213e
cdc2e36063f64b0427d8db87d9194ddc28ae0139
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_082.txt'
24ba9fe30cf0c598df73282c890fe3c3
77ef2bd4c8fed4ac60353553c67e5f95c2a6f439
'2012-04-01T04:16:14-04:00'
describe
'10621' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_082thm.jpg'
c58181eac32fac32dea0493ebb62a083
2b98b6f14e108c64b96b5edcadf8df14a065bccb
describe
'500482' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_083.jp2'
c5dc095031ff518815eda88a5b9a7b6d
f240e7f6ad21affc3bfca0cd795bbf6107d0aaab
describe
'87452' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_083.jpg'
1a7f45747ed6f19f1150a6ecdc61560c
fbc0a03349d3ac5a85b3f0c074b00c63f075cf96
'2012-04-01T04:22:25-04:00'
describe
'33916' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_083.pro'
0b7257d16b7883731944826fb55b95b8
c88ac06377e6e0bb715043b48a705ac771f075f2
describe
'30787' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_083.QC.jpg'
977d33ea79af97c2a5b23384d08c5cc4
446252f16eaee2aa3fc5263fa25c7b3083b04a70
'2012-04-01T04:24:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_083.tif'
7e71f98daed39b8c6dd089037a8790b6
d7cc66e6e863cfcc97e84ba76335c546f2b870b3
'2012-04-01T04:24:40-04:00'
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_083.txt'
f2f4a72c271afe1da1f1de86a0aa9c24
6ba91d14afb870d5597a603e7671a5bfb61be4ef
describe
'10045' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_083thm.jpg'
4871c6d7f117a96be50e3ec2dde0fc77
922978c17db238f75225ec0009367da463768c17
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_084.jp2'
43ab0dc155206a899cb078399d80fd02
b762d225a69eb3a8f690b3a97f86ea40d8ea30fb
describe
'89225' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_084.jpg'
a27734d01dca4157ccd7efbd67da6ac6
da7709969ebd0cfdd465d720624ce69111874075
'2012-04-01T04:17:35-04:00'
describe
'35832' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_084.pro'
b937b9e12e7f0558daf5222bdf3a4abf
2993624cca3d50f8fe3af3d5fbd6396b899264da
'2012-04-01T04:11:42-04:00'
describe
'30889' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_084.QC.jpg'
cbfd6c98ee8eb255a791e9298f6cf35f
bb4073ce49d373cb3be3f8b8907bf51ca5e9fe7a
'2012-04-01T04:15:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_084.tif'
0c7daeb9a51e5201738c2e701012f137
bb67892966b7b79239f4ac0759999bc80485f544
'2012-04-01T04:12:41-04:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_084.txt'
218fc54a45224f48312fed106f350d4c
1f20dafb1c6d3cdd722376e5395cab0836051543
describe
'10209' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_084thm.jpg'
e1798cb9861a4d93bded60a60cf49979
b0a8d17902890156a0aaace924d5334a9587798d
describe
'500442' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_085.jp2'
be6c167bcdaec7d880e27cc3ffd5664e
cbcf225e5cff70def7658b79af6dd96e78095cf8
describe
'83667' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_085.jpg'
8438528fe3063703a20599fd5816136b
3f88b6d5946020f96828eced92bdb8c0e0b8d6f2
'2012-04-01T04:22:18-04:00'
describe
'30464' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_085.pro'
3b2a47c278b0d433e31c5aa212d4777a
5703dc39fab355c0f4a491cc074edd4303ecba85
describe
'28915' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEKZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_085.QC.jpg'
d2802ec01aadd3ae6821a2948ebaa137
bea633a418c9bc0bb39d4eba27783c71421f93e2
'2012-04-01T04:18:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_085.tif'
8d73e4415ef4efbeefe6d369706dbf49
efecfab5350283e13371e6d8fa0f9ec8bfd52e8e
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_085.txt'
5fe19aaa5641e1ed01a0817e9fe31018
073e477dc2c57a4327e0941157ef0bfa815a6cab
'2012-04-01T04:16:48-04:00'
describe
'9788' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_085thm.jpg'
c716e10c2d55859554759fe0f9733ae5
9a9f31f26f8793998bc5df4109e80c132a90e334
'2012-04-01T04:18:59-04:00'
describe
'495241' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_086.jp2'
4982d6f82ab79afd4c83cd77b7217d46
c005eb8c39728066bc96c87b3c83f93aaf5e1194
describe
'88932' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_086.jpg'
a4a21e817b75b20064e5efda6a5254f5
08d809a9fbdbfc16c9bb0b419de5e5e6c144e895
describe
'33289' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_086.pro'
dfb61be06539d64e063bb450d7dcf988
bada2c122220e77ff5db7a9f616868f8afa1e049
'2012-04-01T04:14:39-04:00'
describe
'30882' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_086.QC.jpg'
067dc6029654276ad0e80ff5887b0370
8ada22a14d4577670183898c177902e846855da0
'2012-04-01T04:18:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_086.tif'
aa9b1e2f2610a81837b6e72eafeeab12
abda50c482405c83ce10133645a71d103d124208
'2012-04-01T04:13:23-04:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_086.txt'
60f781bb576266d941b1c3b81d613653
f92d27b915b5e0b8761a507177a5e07654ef22fb
describe
'10193' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_086thm.jpg'
40866fd0f568ddefbc7acc0d106ebadd
b96afb5452a19723d669af5ec7a8b67aad2386f2
'2012-04-01T04:22:41-04:00'
describe
'500496' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_087.jp2'
f32c4cea20c22d05a42cc0886467d491
7c4a276c3d7e63b41ed3947544c6850ffd6db36a
'2012-04-01T04:21:25-04:00'
describe
'91666' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_087.jpg'
b604fdd80be307a44666b07815b6d51e
6668fb00047f875a2479df2e1672ff02e81eeeae
describe
'34385' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_087.pro'
7b64db517e1fc2bbc6c850513246c1b2
b9f67110d0580b5198bda84de00eb164b39a85df
'2012-04-01T04:20:13-04:00'
describe
'31832' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_087.QC.jpg'
9273bdeb1347ae0db19164f3f7889cbd
962cb4bd41c92923badad0be91545103c28d3070
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_087.tif'
adb7e3fb4207f4619d29339155325daf
a000ead5ceb1e602d36c8d879af2e90ae80f41f4
'2012-04-01T04:24:14-04:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_087.txt'
1da1fd4aef9dfef9b75e81bd7e703685
6049605a6162deab9b431017d123082783886591
'2012-04-01T04:11:49-04:00'
describe
'10446' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_087thm.jpg'
3d0f5f5ab5aec957f73564c9b0c82a12
ce4cba65fcaae7f1ac7e027c051824a4d9f65daa
describe
'495251' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_088.jp2'
ac9bb5b915117721e9f37e304d55ed7b
4762b519b4c159878fe52f52456d8c1778efaf04
describe
'94430' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_088.jpg'
cb2ad7f0904275e30642ee3bc0fbb21c
a1119d217b4426aa36635459526f0d27539deb98
'2012-04-01T04:14:25-04:00'
describe
'34866' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_088.pro'
ca5704ea9b87f41a1b3c0a00183ba344
cce73476a6c5aec2ad83bcc08e45389ab5128728
'2012-04-01T04:13:02-04:00'
describe
'33079' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_088.QC.jpg'
9530c07f0801bf2fe6692b441688c173
644c6569120ea710686ec2d41a6be1af464d0be5
'2012-04-01T04:14:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_088.tif'
e034906d5044cac3437a51818dde1ac3
7fafea83e893fc2cb327164e7057de2535667952
'2012-04-01T04:12:51-04:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_088.txt'
c5b6dfba2b850e695ac6153a3681daab
76b6eb37b46e0f8dc7ec0e8e145849e8d199683e
describe
'11162' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_088thm.jpg'
9c5968d9f5faa41174defd98f1f82746
bbcc5364961f6e3d122afce5436e97aa394306c2
'2012-04-01T04:14:00-04:00'
describe
'500335' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_089.jp2'
19226754dd665cc86cd468e09846bb5d
5460fe42286bc7e2e064b7fc1831a0d5f3f2e014
describe
'90468' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAELZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_089.jpg'
cd2fdce9eeaa099e4d98cb10b80581b0
96793df0c4746faa2241744387d837b72baf6803
describe
'34368' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_089.pro'
c37b2fe8cbcd0377fd320aec2925633f
040b76860c54c3894ffcd663da9608f698724ad0
'2012-04-01T04:12:40-04:00'
describe
'31461' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_089.QC.jpg'
7c162b48ba695d012fd71c84ffe7cd61
a2e7a78713ce9db0b6a9fa983183e2ca53143247
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_089.tif'
587cdd5bb83e33abf2a8fc83472e9501
da130ab7d03cf6437c569b6f5f0216797b9178e8
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_089.txt'
a473bae0a93867ffacdb40721627810d
82fb5e1214b5080f7e4358a7bf9854a2606a034f
'2012-04-01T04:12:49-04:00'
describe
'9907' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEME' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_089thm.jpg'
f001c14cd5323fc55c59d0dc23e7ae6a
d0e79a263c541e9f8845f0bd5714644e23516af2
'2012-04-01T04:23:49-04:00'
describe
'495212' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_090.jp2'
b989c5c7e391df8ebda1cf273add6d5d
5380d85219a39aaf7e46c69178191366b355a00b
describe
'94875' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_090.jpg'
99fda8d5afef4c318138ee565d00382c
1e08daa3f510ebe12ab817d6d1cb2614b8d68296
describe
'36240' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_090.pro'
7c354aec926b56620da6def927db3fd4
76fa3ceb0edf0bdb39c5cc5cd61fee3ae6f5b618
'2012-04-01T04:12:06-04:00'
describe
'33020' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_090.QC.jpg'
426657dedf702cde4755197c9c2ebf2d
648e7069c9f1680a683aa0ddd906f3bc243721f5
'2012-04-01T04:15:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_090.tif'
117aba8774e8e9a0f3f11aef5554338f
d2f21b06c3d1ea99c5042d3bb621dbfefd3aa36c
'2012-04-01T04:21:56-04:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_090.txt'
9c9328b11e317b0f9905c639e4e2bd81
fd7212fb26e8ce5c529a7f8bd397ee296bf32380
'2012-04-01T04:16:31-04:00'
describe
'10929' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEML' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_090thm.jpg'
93219c37fb2e20fb904780e005d84299
6e7cb4066212ccdd799fb063da944361f4d5a449
'2012-04-01T04:21:58-04:00'
describe
'500460' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_091.jp2'
cf23c1f1ead42357ebec0dcc85d824ec
a3f689a193c8404d31afb3c677f03f86b83c1eba
'2012-04-01T04:14:57-04:00'
describe
'93848' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_091.jpg'
18d81a49781fe4ff0303b0693d8fbd42
3b2d341a2973ad7c77a57acb80dbd2ad45f01221
describe
'35984' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_091.pro'
ae635727d126162cefec2b9d2fc4b6b2
a8ca997c5c3b50a5e6763439bc0e09cedc094f3c
'2012-04-01T04:18:17-04:00'
describe
'32624' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_091.QC.jpg'
0f683580127decca016ce1e085c0da7d
b1bebbaeda07eadc03f748c36b60c007aee65b6b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_091.tif'
a2192ef21f560262487d44e0708faffc
51ee6b3b7b6ba549674430f970ec9ad4318d76e3
'2012-04-01T04:11:46-04:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_091.txt'
1deceb317a98a01c00b1e9d78f89e4b9
0b6f3018628a6ddba7a93208a894c046f0ffe23b
'2012-04-01T04:20:42-04:00'
describe
'10345' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_091thm.jpg'
bcdaa8d8d87a2baa89339eb4a7f90a35
8b3e1cdd11e09c1eb6f71a8088c28ef0ac599db9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_092.jp2'
147fb159064371211781a9ac4fb41102
6a9a413da141611535967d7f9853d15141adc876
'2012-04-01T04:13:21-04:00'
describe
'91610' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_092.jpg'
7424d188d1b6a4076bfc96a3c09a6b02
c413098b59e057979cc5fae1a3b52781d55dee75
describe
'33773' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_092.pro'
662444b93953e25b8bf928ceb0db59f0
d9edc95f9b30fef9e22673fbd3d89ecff1e4689e
describe
'31658' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_092.QC.jpg'
54b8f40d9bb84a138cd60a84966b8316
d6a57c5977e83fc1205eb9caf68788a3f05f74ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_092.tif'
22a835d60aef30d74bbaaa9d36ce2056
e2228932851ccd1ea7a829fb81b1afcbad6c950a
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_092.txt'
f2c59fb0d9fe9a0dd4fd6d885e4391b7
73dad0399f04836b92600ec6956c1de5a2d20bee
'2012-04-01T04:12:37-04:00'
describe
'10444' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEMZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_092thm.jpg'
e42ecbd6ffbc391d85c401724e123ffb
ba331af7be7817abce0fcc4f49c8fe39985c785c
describe
'500481' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_093.jp2'
3f571e237332cb6326fdd701bde972fb
5b02ea76721c7d617d99705a46f1b6c75084b7f2
describe
'82072' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_093.jpg'
b3de3bd0ec86a73f7671f1877de16460
757a251fa73909e7d93438f2a54053d698b5b74c
describe
'30429' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_093.pro'
59c288479b7f2be24ca728dd50383aae
df1f47c54c3cd226948746b0c6fbc3208ef00607
'2012-04-01T04:22:26-04:00'
describe
'28912' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEND' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_093.QC.jpg'
fc50895d9fdbe1fb3b7c0b456018e467
166001cab12f837f6b86830b1b96219c44d5c5f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_093.tif'
5d076cf44ee09f6db6df201d71117cb4
40d53ebdf15df9276246030cbc9f8c42f258fe0c
'2012-04-01T04:20:40-04:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_093.txt'
40e77defd9bef7ab57f883884bfe4525
9a53662eded2b88a14c83029f47d0e6481a5ea29
describe
'9475' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_093thm.jpg'
cda2142386fb4d188a92422a8e72058f
cc2bd578fd64bc55115f4048e2e743823b01b1ba
'2012-04-01T04:17:24-04:00'
describe
'495247' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_094.jp2'
b34c1246ad94479a32bcb6546ebad73d
c7cdcb36313176a0db2d20388bd153104d943701
describe
'89226' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_094.jpg'
4cf72fdbc9089f030e026bde9e006e63
c45bda55ac5ee4560571eba7f64e6396c1feb799
'2012-04-01T04:17:01-04:00'
describe
'34757' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_094.pro'
a9db59d7516d5ed4ea9d4bebbb3e9630
d1600420cec8d980f4b37daf2f1f083102cc306b
describe
'31107' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_094.QC.jpg'
af4343c47b78b1f1e67cff80abacaf22
bfa6251274446a3bba2887b747c1c1871197c3a2
'2012-04-01T04:14:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_094.tif'
442156642a63fb96c9f9ef5bd5062f13
8772571adb96112d18ef6d636c70ff411e465f68
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_094.txt'
c390856e42651da4381823e7f2ae711d
749058d1955092b52db0f6718bc0845be16deeba
'2012-04-01T04:24:47-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10351' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_094thm.jpg'
313b5d9c1fb35c929060327d5756e234
870bda100b6e4d2e5551db6f0163f6682b597996
'2012-04-01T04:16:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_095.jp2'
0a32a4b401e86af8bc1513f5c45c7f29
d88922a2c974ef78be1cf65956b10edaeb57e201
'2012-04-01T04:15:03-04:00'
describe
'88445' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_095.jpg'
da8d893e2ebf6ffb027353b1451e6697
58a081049ccdabfd7c2028bc1d2a0ec47eae0581
'2012-04-01T04:17:43-04:00'
describe
'33838' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_095.pro'
2b44a4974497f0b4224c8950e0e6cc3c
afcd2d5ed2407317dcb0837126879c64b01ad8e3
describe
'30493' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_095.QC.jpg'
24d3ac9a2a84aff3fff759f9b883ee59
9ec5f51f1eead69f5668d5f3a98d5a911ddcfa9b
'2012-04-01T04:15:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_095.tif'
fa3739e8ece28f51e90bfa6d0629cdf3
49a04eea544835051b9a33e199bb31bc3d300b8b
'2012-04-01T04:20:41-04:00'
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_095.txt'
bbc2b0e28762aaf4dec02fffb264a1a3
1141aa88e6bc8be94e32602eacf2fb54a4aed389
'2012-04-01T04:22:36-04:00'
describe
'10057' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_095thm.jpg'
8d2fc305b669e66b036b02c3f4a04b34
03e7cf908f3d69d8399d1bbeb2e10f60f9b792fb
'2012-04-01T04:21:59-04:00'
describe
'495171' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_096.jp2'
c16380b5f666d2675065c7ec79c95a6a
429a272d88ab4add5be4e6fc032064b72c01cb34
describe
'93788' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_096.jpg'
e0507b1f8e6e7c7dd4ff5c71e321675f
720998517cea10ca227d93ef78a5b902647fce79
describe
'35673' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_096.pro'
196802c30a7a72b73224f8aaccd9c483
e5ac9c3a51bf303c6c47a03ce9a405de6bb46711
describe
'32931' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_096.QC.jpg'
0cc3dedff0ddd53184a31461b837660d
587911702fc27dc02774c173b0f00214f9069c58
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAENZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_096.tif'
4719c7eb8ff1c0ae5daf8db5bde13f2e
580100cf6c7a6515e60df3cc11082dcdba5e004f
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_096.txt'
0099af8e1e59c68de62402983a6ddad8
3af26b363e61cd9f10b0f0b608792f514f15fcaa
'2012-04-01T04:20:24-04:00'
describe
'10824' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_096thm.jpg'
40282d3644fcf4189e45cb04c1a3e3d3
b126d1a9a7cdb6864c4e9946b9a010cf71bc1251
'2012-04-01T04:12:22-04:00'
describe
'500469' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_097.jp2'
790878dd08db505b64f1c25f4d6d0853
5b021f1d9fb42c14fc71a67aca243d05c4eb657c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_097.jpg'
a61ca72b86bc8974a1756fefee79c753
d95ebdc759ba71c276fa4f4d5377d7cf8742399c
describe
'34914' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_097.pro'
79aef27f96994f6c4f7c1d0374051b9d
72962283bfd711715ec5b452b7ea1be393f597ca
describe
'31124' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_097.QC.jpg'
2ad830b865eb1f846fd7d36011f7e9f4
1639d2d11c332284133eed5314f26501c340b5b1
'2012-04-01T04:12:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_097.tif'
9719ef195348d4868b4f9569f8678f3e
7e945e2293bd0a2a7671e271a6423ace7b665415
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_097.txt'
77db3a7b435bb4b85464398119cd6add
2b62a939369bc98b73b7655c285c3d5ba104b99a
'2012-04-01T04:23:33-04:00'
describe
'9817' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_097thm.jpg'
9373ffab6898f850b9632959e41012d3
766c5adf2eaac760853dee3f6b5c41641eb1aeb7
describe
'518530' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_098.jp2'
8912e5a15dcd1dc668e691e824ee446c
2156ad38e3ecb0735056cf776b2a48f4d108d2f7
'2012-04-01T04:13:43-04:00'
describe
'67196' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_098.jpg'
41713e7bc807e02cc49b8e249adb4de7
e1829a5d929dad7e9ddedfcc7d2b15a5a16a21ec
'2012-04-01T04:11:45-04:00'
describe
'21611' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_098.pro'
12d649a0eaf574b3f8cc8653344aa008
4c15b7b7f95652a9bb5aea321f21bdf026ead43f
'2012-04-01T04:20:23-04:00'
describe
'23255' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_098.QC.jpg'
b188d2360f74e1d398a1d273fcd84206
4cda90c60487758721710920bef2991798f123c5
describe
'12463704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEON' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_098.tif'
a50ef2f270c1cf6b7bf6964ccc9f87d9
f20048647eed9a25f8e4c6ff7ea73af2476b85d3
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_098.txt'
757f4b2187f558f4bca664bac82218d7
258819b09411fdcc0b65d07e64aa7102b916f871
describe
'7233' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_098thm.jpg'
73d2d3e40d813702b61cadb61125bae9
dd96416d0d789ef86bad30d166447c3716e44be7
describe
'508605' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_099.jp2'
32763f841522881671652a2602d2f46b
af947b884f8150b1210d6dc671299685d6d19dab
describe
'73239' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_099.jpg'
df05dff42e92cbbadaaf3b300422e98a
c5e4276689866f64fe93257d5d421ff88100338e
'2012-04-01T04:23:30-04:00'
describe
'25539' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_099.pro'
f412b9e95994818da7387371e4a558fe
a1509c65c01d63a4da65c2964bebcda125c8934f
describe
'25622' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_099.QC.jpg'
6be7c49cd004f45ccfe801b8cdc625c0
4dc1f55d7501a5193b5088dd51a1a3925f52a857
describe
'12227454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_099.tif'
91e78deb89d71de388cbf8a8cec2803d
3157bad9d0701ccb4741ee736d515f670d5fda5e
'2012-04-01T04:21:38-04:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_099.txt'
acc8b58104b896e9d7b08cdec662a91f
0078e66cc17201a72a32043d62e9ea34f2023b33
describe
'8206' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_099thm.jpg'
2c8572fb5a1e7780deeb15c77055e762
248098140461ef1e69da2c5625949acde5f20cf2
'2012-04-01T04:21:55-04:00'
describe
'512959' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_100.jp2'
ce441fb8c5e879c239fa0bcf0b7c98ca
c7a8fa0325051c395d6729dd2aedae933c1ff552
describe
'89208' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_100.jpg'
b21f15ef7458ad753b2a5fb37d37ac65
0336b25e54a465176436b662672202abfb3f4a52
'2012-04-01T04:19:02-04:00'
describe
'34182' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEOZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_100.pro'
78bb41261d80f3389e74656cec9607f7
b2af8eef116f2e0894572295715a3b6a45dc1986
describe
'31590' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_100.QC.jpg'
b6587328259474319b57fe2daaa4b788
09b55bad74d79a7648f9c4307dbc9337fa34da60
describe
'12329830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_100.tif'
25b4be5a3be45eb1c678d35c35d967b0
332c459520f66e4cdbd2089f5d37403db1ff4a29
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_100.txt'
3e5ccb002b2ac9f5b16deb307d9eaa99
1d7ef57f1f82de779360b6ab0acbba5db263ff00
'2012-04-01T04:19:12-04:00'
describe
'9779' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_100thm.jpg'
2217e9d83d9927871b17db2eb679abfb
dd15930e99da10ff03aacd73ffaee272904ca402
describe
'500484' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_101.jp2'
18c02b186599bd1f8fecb97201eadf0b
ab166942b95a20806d2bce1f6be1bed1bf824906
describe
'92460' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_101.jpg'
d82b32c4d764387cd0e65582ae0e2a4d
f6916107c7a263fee149c07122cb231a2304df83
describe
'32877' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_101.pro'
e06bcbb08a81a0853ddc05a00df31267
fbe6634373d9f0923fb77cf2b209f2a619a7ced1
'2012-04-01T04:23:54-04:00'
describe
'32668' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_101.QC.jpg'
f0540921c8fb03534ee1e78d280c6556
82123fbcd01c2eaa297fa18ee1659fee41e1e143
'2012-04-01T04:13:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_101.tif'
f2fa0cb2bbecf026a52df33c1585bcb3
37b17272c48ef0d56d310a0317474126f15d2f73
'2012-04-01T04:19:55-04:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_101.txt'
53efeebd6b4da9012348a8f9d5f80990
8459be4b90415d645739995fa725d2b2b53c7b47
'2012-04-01T04:18:49-04:00'
describe
'10553' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_101thm.jpg'
7694f2d58384340bb0bd00481ff42ad1
f0317b2745986872b48c9315fdda93b521f51e1b
describe
'518472' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_102.jp2'
520c30e45d395609272f9c68c4fee921
b295d949080d0147380e9b28b42892ab6fa7e45d
describe
'90922' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_102.jpg'
f8f02fa4dbce7f14a062a0ff3340f52c
d3a70534e7b12ef17a415fa4cad570aafb68cac4
'2012-04-01T04:19:44-04:00'
describe
'34161' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_102.pro'
7305bb2e44c2b0fe1cb13762389462a8
ad017cf866ac3cf7b1101836af67b5b71c46e00b
describe
'31388' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_102.QC.jpg'
9df37fb233bb8e6beccce2e58aefbcfe
e29dd0223c27f3cea4e05284b7850da10db5154d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_102.tif'
ce50e8cfeca63b3ea7858cb22844df15
e8e6b4d4ca2cec19f195537b79ece63aa576c758
'2012-04-01T04:12:01-04:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_102.txt'
c3840451801a621e27c979953f200d13
df0adccd9af6453896b7689dcdc2b3fd8a84dfb9
'2012-04-01T04:18:44-04:00'
describe
'9507' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_102thm.jpg'
3d03dc0141ad84b4a5d8b2f18b1cb6d0
895ee59469a8ec3e31d1083cc2e01e6fe3246df1
'2012-04-01T04:12:48-04:00'
describe
'508669' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_103.jp2'
a31962f366839fd067ff6f33d95c2582
ac137a935b664e8d2a1c6c2b986d736244a3de3d
'2012-04-01T04:14:54-04:00'
describe
'86483' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_103.jpg'
1e4fdbac7117b1980be92a87d90aa3c6
10e9380faecfae5f14d747b8a2061d5b537f18c4
describe
'34039' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_103.pro'
73f87f064b458a1b1809d6156aea6091
cccc3ff0e0189f5920ab3bef7ab8276f05b9e6ed
'2012-04-01T04:14:13-04:00'
describe
'30291' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_103.QC.jpg'
43cbacb30b2b06c40dfdb6f04bd544e0
a39a3c86a01b84557e552bb7f83a1a53ece15a39
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_103.tif'
04734181fd8ff4756bb2d892383d844d
c97e4d32e07738a6027f4e284ddd74b1d7645caf
'2012-04-01T04:23:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_103.txt'
9908c2ffc6359d6baa3f75473b22df44
ad2fc5936dc9a1f85594a4d24788d3139dc5c2dd
describe
'9553' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_103thm.jpg'
324c4b40eb6be513fe80ad6007c20545
339856e456364c03c447e5d3046299d7299f26c3
describe
'514242' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEPZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_104.jp2'
cd1b625921191d82cd4007c4feb21e90
aae4b012cb79606a467810d06d4857ab7665e495
'2012-04-01T04:19:49-04:00'
describe
'94144' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_104.jpg'
b20a0c87bf556180aa7731d642bf25e8
eedf61e237665ccb9e7ec3b6d0457c370e3075fe
describe
'33628' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_104.pro'
5aaa762a67d99321530d62ab027ef6ff
c49ac3ad8045485d5c9e33d066ee7f6678f086dc
describe
'33452' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_104.QC.jpg'
424eeb83f64e4fffe8e9859c3f22d65b
5d7ef54537319283f40eafee47eb7eaa8fbd480b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_104.tif'
5652c773adbb834d49de6d78d448768e
372737daff0106c95a384e0c0d250bfbfff6e244
'2012-04-01T04:23:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_104.txt'
b97032f09884deec8b39f768a6b8b85c
530b664065a15dcb2246bbe019e561a38a71b1e0
'2012-04-01T04:23:46-04:00'
describe
'10295' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_104thm.jpg'
2b5f115dc3a0f522c846215a144d30f9
706d9815c79e320651e67698a58a4d7304530cc4
describe
'508704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_105.jp2'
a1ddb7bcfdff713967f2630bd1b038d1
56e052c8d73cd37360e2228a560595e0cbf732ec
describe
'87711' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_105.jpg'
13b2c1e94efb36afef4f8bf20cce7df5
297606870d53c2c90517e1f0d82c1ea641dbefbc
'2012-04-01T04:24:16-04:00'
describe
'34121' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_105.pro'
22523bdb0c825f579d82d2282e8f0037
23f192dd03dbd9de647c51be582d068144a0f6d7
describe
'30451' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_105.QC.jpg'
48e3163b66a80080b73d68d49283be0b
bb3c45f66f43499387f1337c26e454a7be7b28ac
'2012-04-01T04:24:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_105.tif'
78884e216c8cfe02e96a7c4487bfbabe
ae421f0337f3e05efd557743531c25764b37ed48
'2012-04-01T04:11:59-04:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_105.txt'
94cd47c55afbb0cea5e4b56715f4b671
23769c9788f47a4006d3a02fdb30dde0b11c9ff7
'2012-04-01T04:12:53-04:00'
describe
'9601' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_105thm.jpg'
de28acb08bcc6f8d92ab8ee60cb3bcc9
137a5fbaea3bd887211b250c84572fa1cd52be05
describe
'518500' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_106.jp2'
30c20563bf031109e47e4beea155ef07
ffd2a214db9bf85a9515ef6cbe2acd5b22b34449
describe
'93904' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_106.jpg'
13f458fa8d853a0f0189b3f412139c30
ed30d3870a037a2113a7cb5ed07a56dfa062d4a4
describe
'35086' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_106.pro'
243613a803d951226ab991af5031279c
d32363897a32ab205956e8182ab11deefb2f6f6d
describe
'32754' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_106.QC.jpg'
e885d2e18856370416b7e5748f7131bc
c963946becce318b2829447353bf48997f3cabeb
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_106.tif'
5fdd4686d00f402c59e4600206ae378e
f6da0f706dbba8bf75b8bc128c0fa2cb68e35aad
'2012-04-01T04:12:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_106.txt'
4ad9aa091c6bbe2ca6ddab4f810df51b
1b86bc3875df2ccc9ce3ef0d91599248c1e4b1d4
describe
'9651' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_106thm.jpg'
da9104af1cb5086e6e6e4a33c5ffd226
492af2b0e86085f6381f0ef9df654770a4645502
'2012-04-01T04:20:37-04:00'
describe
'508628' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_107.jp2'
ecd00c3e2d7d15440f8ac2580baec113
cfb6d629708127cc9b3669ed69a5295dc4e55272
describe
'89074' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_107.jpg'
37cfd76e679497e630635be19847f634
f9610d2906dca3a126bd3a0b2bfa52fa94910526
describe
'33646' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_107.pro'
9c06a1e13638a9b9ea8a1f0e1143d9ae
1f82e85c7860f99539bc61dd122078ed1925f31b
describe
'31073' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_107.QC.jpg'
2391d2eaab742478291037a54ebb2832
0873cc0a3a3ddd2d817c080148122db195180fdf
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_107.tif'
a78fe8817e6d85ef2510a3443a652336
df09e3fa6230d84e7485b9a9f057489bacaa0157
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEQZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_107.txt'
e5084f292e0f879a2b45c46b7f3d0925
a6a62fe34b601468dc7f4559ee05b87428c2fe2d
'2012-04-01T04:14:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_107thm.jpg'
6aa1aebe65797fd3fd641775fab47a51
ac125b5b4c7a1470e4027ae7d8ecd7053e858e3c
'2012-04-01T04:11:39-04:00'
describe
'518490' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_108.jp2'
1e8465ba10e84b7e7c19d93818b11d88
f9d0926b979105f7627b3befba474f2eb132986a
'2012-04-01T04:13:24-04:00'
describe
'94765' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_108.jpg'
72b13776fc86dff66547c9eb874a466b
8c2f11a33bae64033f93debe7d1bb7eed2f770a4
'2012-04-01T04:14:31-04:00'
describe
'34904' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_108.pro'
00637aa5fcbab86b959199ff0181515b
0c955a6280510c18c99910e29bba5fa6cdf54a50
describe
'32764' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_108.QC.jpg'
52d6592a40f75e863db5f8284a29acd6
f40904969500e34f314bd6e21d9d32377a984752
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_108.tif'
3f94683dbc1599f2ca834f2e33b3065a
dec175d8e93d90db94fdf115812f99fdc0aa17c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_108.txt'
fd787ec07af034863623a25350baeb9c
9366d7ce610c75a28f85374b7e4d16f4653fa976
describe
'9736' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_108thm.jpg'
a09eb1bdebb6b50fc0aec68da9fc8184
20201f27e3f1491dbf76218f32ac0c6e104ccdbc
describe
'508699' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_109.jp2'
f00aa833320d2f07fbf0493e4c21765a
08792ea2bbfe8511732d54f13b5717d4bf4bd179
describe
'88628' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_109.jpg'
0a57530500d9c09bfb15cd218d9b44dd
56193d2b701c16685779f2cb8d05a2135d07e38f
'2012-04-01T04:21:28-04:00'
describe
'33136' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_109.pro'
413138c0f1850d0b70499f803c7fcf29
76842e8479868a6f24c2c9d63c8c14284c0d30bf
'2012-04-01T04:23:05-04:00'
describe
'31251' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_109.QC.jpg'
7214d9c31629b8173f157bcba9405332
3c5dcbb8e0b3cfe3e763022358cfd4b574574d2a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_109.tif'
4a1d98fc23f3adb1108352403910e43d
f3f09f1f1a247501bbb6c30560b10694f741495a
'2012-04-01T04:24:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_109.txt'
aed494ac1748bfae5cc951d1319e9344
120351b705ae45a3c705b5cd3b69333ca62f4227
describe
'10154' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_109thm.jpg'
fcc4fcf97441a95b91c5e081df6fb0f7
04909bf853327c4b2c3cd42a8e934fc9877bd2a9
describe
'518498' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_110.jp2'
37818caebb973bf8941dd8a3bfb1d28b
974917cc1b5392ebbbff86348597ca19af48d4e5
'2012-04-01T04:19:23-04:00'
describe
'91270' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_110.jpg'
4dee432c77131cb491610c85e493a4d8
15c8858494beb3f690cf98d01868cd762be76798
'2012-04-01T04:24:26-04:00'
describe
'35028' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_110.pro'
6a84ac19bedb3463da3688412a2486cc
ccf13b9cb39dc77efa751b8e19364c02263a93cd
describe
'31967' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_110.QC.jpg'
66e12134dea94cb27fed84170b19d43c
03d8e1c99d60b17bf37dd70afeef496f63c5ce54
'2012-04-01T04:16:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_110.tif'
93ebb179c1fb66d825c4b0d513d7dbf7
3dbaba779020b04d70f48d5f350e14872d96bedc
'2012-04-01T04:13:39-04:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_110.txt'
871e68f61783b5fcb75d3f90c3660c9d
da02f1f9da849828bac31aa138ab6bb0fe49bd98
describe
'9529' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_110thm.jpg'
aafe5a7198e346f1fa59651b84a824e2
9de7397c833c17601d454397000c9edf25ae8c88
describe
'508640' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_111.jp2'
61aa5412e5f1669d926c2cc147dc5347
b275139e549911290df43ad892902732aab32952
describe
'88001' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_111.jpg'
28f269a6e775ee95aa3880e2bbc53a13
2357865c3dadf891f03e9cf21519b0d23a9e0ce7
describe
'33023' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_111.pro'
cf2b971cbbb2004abe35d12638687ee1
f29b0ae1ec28c03e15e0781947cb99b75f8c3b27
'2012-04-01T04:17:54-04:00'
describe
'30711' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAERZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_111.QC.jpg'
f725395bb60de5e5d4857da432576eeb
fd86db687183217b01d5bdb9f78354373150f98e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_111.tif'
2f1fe1c4eb9cff5f58d7b740478fc884
ca7cced1b0480d33ad37e35cdc07255e96746302
'2012-04-01T04:21:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_111.txt'
753da66a20267fa53bef9cd140967585
b9dc6ae4da497225e6c00872e8f0324c566eedda
'2012-04-01T04:13:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_111thm.jpg'
2fb8ec9acaa7ef31666d3aec516710b3
44960b0d475cfbd2be018670f3518195834ca880
describe
'518483' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_112.jp2'
4e7975b4ffd391360bd6ee6e7799e693
654f8315bb19b1442d761e66af38dd790c709e49
'2012-04-01T04:13:27-04:00'
describe
'87635' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_112.jpg'
c02d8b09bb6022ba5ad12ff8f08a03e7
56c9154444c9fd6586698d930c1a955fd9c0e93e
'2012-04-01T04:12:16-04:00'
describe
'31268' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_112.pro'
3a9c4a3e1e202d17f699584b3fb088e3
7e1c21aac848b391ece285756b2ba6e342361b35
describe
'31328' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_112.QC.jpg'
8f8a88ac92f1518ab26752b38175b01a
96993ae475c98bdb15d8db78296473b035a6418a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_112.tif'
64ed573d317e9e805ce3104b70178983
64b491f1e4fbc797d345bcc105af2dbd3689306a
'2012-04-01T04:18:34-04:00'
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_112.txt'
9e4562699e0c5d8986432983e3ec3e22
1ace55006cb77872981647c09ee7f0c0dea82b1b
'2012-04-01T04:13:52-04:00'
describe
'9640' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_112thm.jpg'
ffafd0487519cd57ac302aeaabc91f21
4bcffde9f7ccae73df0744985d255f6bba98e747
describe
'508694' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_113.jp2'
67b00bbc49ec8849b2e52eb2aaf84e31
8e64eadaed061b3080d22fbd86f6d285457bf7a7
'2012-04-01T04:16:10-04:00'
describe
'90633' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_113.jpg'
03d1269ea5df85aa34355a00186127cb
44e3b6230f780ff6edc70f0040d630f3bde0af96
describe
'33665' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_113.pro'
4a30ccf880b9d7d237dd768c3ee11eca
63453444f545e3a6dac71e6d26f41fdd623f2fe4
describe
'32195' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_113.QC.jpg'
c61cf19128920ece1fe1170d0864589f
cfbaf3a1d0b01ccb55a8b0b783e8f5e307d42b71
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_113.tif'
b88b9a659c22537ddb52dbf0dd83afd1
2448402ce5a3efc157c41aad063a5fb7c364b6ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_113.txt'
130941b5e7ad6271bc05e797064856df
cdf1af909339e734fdcad64c74fb504a80da7806
'2012-04-01T04:15:21-04:00'
describe
'10214' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_113thm.jpg'
5c3a9bc9054267a1a2da8db1bf3220d5
a2167fb978dde1085566323ade6e1215fd27da02
describe
'518484' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_114.jp2'
27b2baa7d581ad69dfbd053e3cdae9ee
2c91b09318fad30163be4a95d06665c70c723464
'2012-04-01T04:16:58-04:00'
describe
'91654' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_114.jpg'
bad8f6659e9d44f65e400abfc51e1b16
50f836461c4372ee27c4c69a1d4825e49b306642
'2012-04-01T04:12:27-04:00'
describe
'35549' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEST' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_114.pro'
808dac0d5af17f1261d2651a6ac4010b
61d7d669efe8c6442e3f555ab8fa38f05504a950
describe
'32302' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_114.QC.jpg'
7d8e7a422fa07fb69f8868731b8c258b
7045b896c6b54c1eaebd6ecb5ae97c0ab607afd2
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_114.tif'
5c60d7682786a2a3469711e9f8f8e3e8
4480b1c1aec5d4f4e124529bf00480a58835859c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_114.txt'
bf3d96824900e891df848e934be61b4f
e28d513d48285cb39d16a0945dd1d2ca3eb8ea80
'2012-04-01T04:19:37-04:00'
describe
'9478' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_114thm.jpg'
6e7d8d0a41690d08bd0de8243f2e04e1
5f5fbb8ecf416a031b387314e6267f378d66f66c
describe
'508627' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_115.jp2'
f0a2a8470350fb54a31047768a809573
54f32f6f4fed567e85fb9604d3ea479f63f6e8b4
describe
'91910' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAESZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_115.jpg'
a48db9de991d25fc4fcebf4b06f96fca
4d1a5b4fd83f7eee66b59ffb88e5db3fa6956f77
'2012-04-01T04:21:21-04:00'
describe
'36805' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_115.pro'
68bbadff1093ccf0981b3c35a7e28cdd
0b7435796366abf1c36ed72bfe959987c0a2183a
'2012-04-01T04:17:55-04:00'
describe
'32123' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_115.QC.jpg'
29d45a9b60cd693ab9ed3b007a5659ff
988e2ebaf972eebe0a1e58b9886d6f684d1e510f
'2012-04-01T04:23:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_115.tif'
0a6989fa218d438c7c9f0c05cc3e3360
e464bbbb12fc6dfa502fdc4564a3d2e69052f308
'2012-04-01T04:19:18-04:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_115.txt'
a00053ea6b0e7b6b8555ef8d8e70e4f8
c2e3159ce828b6da5d4944751a285b37f1976a80
describe
Invalid character
'10030' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_115thm.jpg'
e39624e44c77e5c816445fb646087dbd
92e5fb821ab7817e737c2a63fc130793d319c7e7
describe
'518545' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_116.jp2'
e778ebfa9410a3f625a1350693ebe6e6
bec4ece69e0abebbcd616cc30ba1d7d3c674e4ac
describe
'89311' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_116.jpg'
363e026e3180bb100db72cec92440da0
0d6e88f609138e183c33c01e7dcd278f8994bcdc
describe
'33244' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_116.pro'
7195a2c4655fa8d601f472adc494026a
1a35612602d4fbc28169f48e419ee0c23c96b99e
'2012-04-01T04:15:46-04:00'
describe
'31498' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_116.QC.jpg'
538bac2345c920ea6ac97ae823acb0a1
6371bdcbb68592c90124266cebf25f209d160727
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_116.tif'
f9673a01bb5a101afcd6645387d75f7d
cca622e0abce5647393e1705f506dbcf4a8358ab
'2012-04-01T04:25:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_116.txt'
0599be9e5f432f3eb27e51bff5e694e6
a1f6d67f9c0ce49e8f9bda686e3ff6b9e1a2e3ba
describe
'9412' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_116thm.jpg'
43642ac00309ae38536daca7169686b5
a12eca4a195a4b0c1462696884531da67769ef67
describe
'508664' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_117.jp2'
c08f344bf06205af9e001c9cac612a87
9560d9692b4e9bf21f542aa63ca135ba9b9d1185
'2012-04-01T04:24:22-04:00'
describe
'92488' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_117.jpg'
a625d3bd4d7b351bee3d1e7ff8387aed
b3e489360109a60643bb0c80258f5980f7cc43d1
describe
'36201' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_117.pro'
5452b8f43e89c940c8ac8e07a7dda264
91af69ec1d3447035018ce479e34d740968cd6d8
describe
'32375' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_117.QC.jpg'
0cb04ef427c852ea5b627034d9901d33
999b7075bc0d2dfce58221605e6ed863631c2f48
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_117.tif'
f54511e96bb3a52e5a17150ce87c5045
e8b93d0ccb123dd86b48cfed902c464db3527612
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_117.txt'
adcf2a439bd1f6246755f91ba6c05a4f
e7989f42b9eefe269a8c4614cb67d3f45d2dc4c3
describe
'10150' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_117thm.jpg'
082dcdbf2ab48add9229b238ecc77404
754d2e3bc3250b2b397cc66225107db057b694c1
describe
'518540' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_118.jp2'
a63030c8d7b30a268f67fac2b0311dd0
1cc6c7aaae76179cbbef233d01a7b497d17da387
describe
'90076' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_118.jpg'
6bb6644dc90b53f4d787ee663a195712
9be940f70600fb133a81a1a10ed25aa2f8cd2951
'2012-04-01T04:11:38-04:00'
describe
'34526' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_118.pro'
a9b07e69a8941afe49a01b6ff8a5be89
9b786d36d749f695e9efd4b85642a564ad12f7ca
describe
'31642' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_118.QC.jpg'
d4f3f661003b49fd3f880ada39b35ec3
4b84827216de6720beef02a361edaff7f3968ff8
'2012-04-01T04:18:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_118.tif'
daf15abc3593f870cdbdf0857bf4f002
fbb61df17cb5a07e45b3ba80240b6d71fd69f2fc
'2012-04-01T04:20:34-04:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_118.txt'
b2fc57b3bd382b2a28f777d564f2f0bd
3ad05bef41bf31ff8ae24b3410016f2c2a1c5fcd
describe
'9584' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAETZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_118thm.jpg'
103ff66915426028cd781d9574df7300
5f690a2dccf9c6174ced8d891d02d16273deac20
describe
'224092' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_119.jp2'
e00aaa8a3009727cbec4b3781f7f96ec
02c42aeab66b6b0232bd22d07da738ae907ae96b
describe
'17865' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_119.jpg'
a69265520e93cfa866f206e258af63f8
4fdba326eae108c1e114c0a3ae865488c33a2189
describe
'5633' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_119.QC.jpg'
165a7d685e02ac79e808e164b2c5f351
e83a65482658c2c33d5fa80861b8b08de378efa0
'2012-04-01T04:24:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_119.tif'
38c80f9a25eb16a155557bb2761b97da
74e95666b6600c17c63d227fdd28e2bf893cc38f
describe
'2224' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_119thm.jpg'
6ca1d66bc3267dc485d6d6a6b2378cf8
565c7c7855adab2a317a8e1d6f7b8551653049b5
describe
'518425' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_120.jp2'
81c97d7edbaccc7fac4bdf771bff90d4
9c204c79011483a0230bea4869e0e77b5ea5b841
describe
'83402' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_120.jpg'
ea00143b5a03d823c96a234f371ad075
e24e484620d1750f7165a7e029fe8194ba034356
'2012-04-01T04:16:39-04:00'
describe
'25162' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_120.QC.jpg'
048daab827cc1881488acf8969727746
3660bab652705b13609de0c0ef4497b2963ea937
'2012-04-01T04:11:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_120.tif'
2821547117bf4f97811260e78974d42c
d609562c673f78a58badadc0dd499a42c637a87d
'2012-04-01T04:20:05-04:00'
describe
'7789' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_120thm.jpg'
4704fcb60bbd817294c17cdbdda4be4d
4a429693d65a30f2c609db6c3fad52944a284c23
describe
'508702' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_121.jp2'
34548f7deb182c3103a4aa7c43a9c690
874597b052aa2952786b3336613734b1c49b2a1c
'2012-04-01T04:21:09-04:00'
describe
'96456' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_121.jpg'
186b1aa28eb3a5884c9c0e235196dd8e
cd401a9d193871e34ad3438e416f460574411b9e
describe
'36049' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_121.pro'
6564da094f65d98022c844f1aa65e878
e2d6627b998b7101d2e34e6151ead6f6101cf4f1
describe
'33262' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_121.QC.jpg'
3246f6db2466fc7257973bbd9793afcf
6a8dd8d616c1d4d351604dc8240eb62b104dbd8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_121.tif'
6e3114c77ae5e6411239aca21663cff0
a7e5b1164b8c246245d5f7b3691f4581e5d153f3
'2012-04-01T04:15:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_121.txt'
3b704d65f51767e269e0dc4ab4990f9f
28c4d9b3f613b3480d2b52e0bb4307848f7c9513
describe
'10375' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_121thm.jpg'
b811fdff37695484a4715c0666de8889
f81ee041b1c0d0594cc1f2c0f414f7ab1d326475
describe
'511621' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_122.jp2'
c354b09a3461b1130b69992252e321a8
e8aa00a01e6d2822f592191a82141c57b0d4714f
describe
'103931' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_122.jpg'
f95f70ffa3ca5b56bf26fa921dbe830f
4d37bbb05ebd58f1bfeac8ba0d5f126d8d744796
describe
'37341' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_122.pro'
48708178911b1d4d030a955e06cdd68a
5b3283a0361897c4e306886e6b702f7b8a412db4
'2012-04-01T04:18:30-04:00'
describe
'35996' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_122.QC.jpg'
bac7c66b62d774491da7a8ed7d203550
66e888caedaf37d545db2dcdce4ce31f2002f5d6
describe
'12298330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_122.tif'
1148ee6cac876e5bd5cc38f594c5cc04
6b439cf8ee3a2772016a1eb8d346912dbd112e55
'2012-04-01T04:13:04-04:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_122.txt'
6ac89eab34d09abed7912288b7aaff35
48925114ab1555276acf40fbc3f1273bb23a125c
describe
'11023' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_122thm.jpg'
cfad1519ad57ece570b0a0a06b48c622
95ef4708a602da9425c894e5303dad68a337fcef
'2012-04-01T04:17:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_123.jp2'
9df6ba3084a56d35d55ab922c38ac775
ba967774365c6e67f82de4f8a82632e0c78a5680
'2012-04-01T04:19:48-04:00'
describe
'90879' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEUZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_123.jpg'
ef8bb2a1df8b52ff20a4c24ab355da42
951bbd51782200beb581113df28e60bb3c899807
'2012-04-01T04:13:22-04:00'
describe
'34545' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_123.pro'
12377ea4e9cd43a82860fdce7eb830e5
97ccce2e346b1a57cd2bcbd05d7be3abacea5791
describe
'31839' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_123.QC.jpg'
f1db9354c915cd3bf92ce006bc72edaa
df45610ffe44d75fbdbda256da12f002c16e92a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_123.tif'
ea4693cdc1d7a05ed9d7c1245e290a34
d6947cc17b55d1dbc5bf3c3e322ae9477ec26b8b
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_123.txt'
ed2aceb963811253cfac2415c263bf78
3b95049628f51ad5d145d9ae060f2f799d801f13
describe
'9761' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_123thm.jpg'
aa878ed08215f470faf170f6919f0033
76e828fa25055683ed38a5d91000c4911fe93b77
describe
'518463' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_124.jp2'
ca60d47a66a9521733d44332d56a1d53
c357083da79c115d2e3643da97bdd137ee6a9ec3
describe
'94205' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_124.jpg'
47f4db25f4feddd563b853c032d54c73
52509f12dc4df430d15623bc8dc78191c360a180
'2012-04-01T04:13:16-04:00'
describe
'34470' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_124.pro'
5935c22e52ae36fe3cdf98e0b7b04d91
a4758cdaa52a6c418e29ae2a2b9b557b5332ede1
describe
'32818' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_124.QC.jpg'
d57c3378cb692520eb0d54b1a3e3a490
4d53c6aab8da95228adf7a35819c69ee598f64d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_124.tif'
632b0acfd2dd3718ea19ca649c9c4b67
f26709b545c203907d11454a2ad4bfebcdf54d2a
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_124.txt'
cd719cc3f30dd2f350ce10cf05301ced
c4f0d17e555d877798728ca4aadc8c0ca05cacb4
describe
'9854' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_124thm.jpg'
ab10fc687b5d2436ef31e4d4852994c0
f08aca94cb7cb5ff09105336b9b2e852e3c0e7ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_125.jp2'
2f36c4714be8e066c61d451b7c60cda0
762b4a6cb0ee4de618d1710532be7aa510368d28
'2012-04-01T04:20:20-04:00'
describe
'90801' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_125.jpg'
538566314fb6bfe147f2841f0864ea83
6039dec614e1c58b9a15a0740796576008a6aa11
'2012-04-01T04:13:11-04:00'
describe
'34644' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_125.pro'
ebe0a7de7e7383ac5878f6be493c081d
f14857b1c054e913abf37863158fb3bea25ed74a
'2012-04-01T04:20:29-04:00'
describe
'31901' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_125.QC.jpg'
56ef6a5523f6a933e168a131e063a79d
f2f38f44ade62aff15785718097b77ddf99406a0
'2012-04-01T04:22:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_125.tif'
3ba21a6cb7a2aa850c076c05ebeaa045
a074965a082e583dda5e343ca687b5a7859fdbea
'2012-04-01T04:13:25-04:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_125.txt'
97643a220815cd2b868f382f1969b7fc
5ede108280de55992b254db7d3164569ec0a9a6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_125thm.jpg'
40941130dbdb516b3e1e01c55888f6e7
adf320754eaaca9f257d72a60fda1e2abb9e616f
'2012-04-01T04:22:35-04:00'
describe
'518520' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_126.jp2'
65337bcbcaef1e02269db7a18ca05634
ca90fd9b9b1b0a809f4200ff6a5c02fb851d3ec2
'2012-04-01T04:16:23-04:00'
describe
'100141' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_126.jpg'
dda3e796367d20334290164285da745d
62d77fc65fc4d252dc9522318caa2835d2fd8377
'2012-04-01T04:24:44-04:00'
describe
'36324' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_126.pro'
d039f13794594e5798db882c8a8ca6cb
b26e906d706d5ea16f9b36d8611b7c70cd9f5045
describe
'34509' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_126.QC.jpg'
e403264c093f973c82e49bc6bf53f657
4e80376f9f0fe1e05de18f33a2cec9a7487b6bfb
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_126.tif'
e6afdadef54fb50f72ea0d1a91bccfdb
4e6ab78d14af3d52b007c74f2e579f81283791cd
'2012-04-01T04:13:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_126.txt'
809b66add70d505b4a5dcd3eb05b1f67
9997c33fe59fb725a656698daee9d97afecf5393
'2012-04-01T04:18:18-04:00'
describe
'10419' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEVZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_126thm.jpg'
b24577a8b303f9fb02387b5a01f8b0c5
c8074235799af2d18fece887a80e31d91b37fe6c
describe
'506047' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_127.jp2'
98e1fe124c0140cfa431f7d71df6901d
7667f27ca38c64c6c3485abe56500c65d9bebd30
describe
'96334' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_127.jpg'
b78e3a5f0739556b3eb37019b7f2173b
14d66f0d142e974555deeda29f597b10fde629a1
'2012-04-01T04:24:37-04:00'
describe
'35901' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_127.pro'
761c348fc056a90784a3ae322435e641
cb87ccf92cab4c5bd6bc6a9d2c28b0ea74b1e601
describe
'33360' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_127.QC.jpg'
30b9aa39bf11e24767f034a0607925e1
2ffd3eff2a94b1b868879e2df7e4b9481cb3ddc0
'2012-04-01T04:20:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_127.tif'
c5605de48ee0a81ea479e7652a2d965c
21df3466474449d435a212ecd4b5dc20f0707ae8
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_127.txt'
b0e30cb63a7e005728c40dd92fe9f153
28a95f5908a4b45da135c3b9ceb47de08a75318c
'2012-04-01T04:21:14-04:00'
describe
'10564' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_127thm.jpg'
9d2d9c65936b6c2fa8b6fa4352887bdb
73007384f32fd089de3e22b11d6c547d4bf37752
'2012-04-01T04:22:34-04:00'
describe
'518519' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_128.jp2'
5257ffd8050da53ac31b337badfe1e3c
072736b7e501736ed83e9aa8312728f1035373d0
'2012-04-01T04:16:06-04:00'
describe
'94087' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_128.jpg'
befefbc99a73dd9fcc4ac4bdbf204470
4cac7f4364ad66fd6df8f787b973ac7a42488767
describe
'33557' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_128.pro'
f597fa74bad255cd672add5f86fb2181
baf56568c37d5a4735d429fa31c0a9596bfaf6c5
describe
'33066' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_128.QC.jpg'
4590f3f16235f320e8184b2f67ab01c9
0b30e45a2a2dcb43442db34baed899c115c8df51
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_128.tif'
61e245b1f6df911dff292404036dae3f
ad33be387339a983552bedce2a7d1f2f6af674fd
'2012-04-01T04:21:11-04:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_128.txt'
11165109813a972100b2495ee5c50bfc
445cf20cba8a34293a5edec7ed7839753ae5bac6
describe
'9809' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_128thm.jpg'
47aaed137abe5b15cfb79626dd037fce
ead5e2638a6e5aa6664e7cee06116fc743a4329e
describe
'508697' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_129.jp2'
3392f4aa8f3f63a521eb240feb912d46
1f564e1d2b0456f8d2cae383f9d491fc307b4089
'2012-04-01T04:20:07-04:00'
describe
'84940' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_129.jpg'
42839bf2646fa5a4bf5388139356641a
4c38299f9ae8a0ca5c1ada1f9f2a647b50a05121
'2012-04-01T04:16:03-04:00'
describe
'32105' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_129.pro'
d707a5032c909e6f3b0cc5a620417fb7
f36767bfe377b6ab0dc299f1590e95a8bdcbea5b
describe
'29717' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_129.QC.jpg'
d197031b7c21b030e4b7c19dcd113504
7ef8e34eed8010a5c48a6a5eff2e627270010711
'2012-04-01T04:12:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_129.tif'
43a931c5e48854ac82bcfeccbfd44776
5fc4fe80971e92374e51626a6397270e029772ea
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_129.txt'
3d8aa702a6679825fc3a5d624635a616
c528729811aa26e2bab02e04822f226ee8baf958
describe
Invalid character
'9691' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_129thm.jpg'
e9737f14a2a09631b883ab8effed60df
a4c3501ad00390f42a983e706ed7941487e0d009
describe
'507388' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_130.jp2'
a085a8448459753b27d252e0f7a4e7cb
02d0d736dd3841aa51d168debb2321a7f830671f
describe
'93082' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_130.jpg'
4b8bddefc989cfee3d9351d61059918e
f15deb276a45225d0420919a51ed98246359c7bd
describe
'33304' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_130.pro'
55bdd5e2246add310611a29e4aad869e
a2fe33789528f73a31275089ce090c987b33afd0
'2012-04-01T04:24:58-04:00'
describe
'32414' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_130.QC.jpg'
3f0cd01269cb78afb072d28daa423810
b7b8d53fe68702cfc0cae768283ce563cdddb42e
describe
'12195954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEWZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_130.tif'
da1e7281dc014b42b0f185038fc2a208
1f74c381bfd8d41a50e3e02363f6a58a0cea210f
'2012-04-01T04:14:34-04:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_130.txt'
be6b7938048e91f68eacb70c86b817fc
09d94c60071e70f0910111c45ad97f4f77467ec1
'2012-04-01T04:22:15-04:00'
describe
'10280' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_130thm.jpg'
205553a6933b1d75cc64fe3bdeb17af2
589c74cb67d44afde0cf7c9a95688eac0defe82c
describe
'499072' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_131.jp2'
609b65fcb2c4574f106394ceb4f77aa3
86b3a147d87a790951decc64bff5153c8e8237b4
describe
'75682' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_131.jpg'
629581b55e2facbe9b2a81303912087d
378d6ca41e448507f88fc4a027a13cdcaef1257d
describe
'25866' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_131.pro'
54f92a6a6ba52f92dd2c550025d840c0
0ec9d0422e0e85098a4ac116a8948766ce4b1c29
describe
'26122' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_131.QC.jpg'
784a54af840fb4b6a969615e9ea816d7
33631578011609ecd8262c321f5cf349bb83cbc0
describe
'11999080' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_131.tif'
385321a244ee0b13fd4489fa2d1a23d0
02527276e11bcab056f6cdd26943982a2e8bc48a
'2012-04-01T04:24:12-04:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_131.txt'
abfc2782272875d747350a86e6dd8612
839acf407ffced0b4082b241bf354d64c75f0e5e
'2012-04-01T04:18:11-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8667' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_131thm.jpg'
e6006ed019fec9d729bbbf599e2cac09
05fa6f769b7e08594389d170311a10602081e4e4
'2012-04-01T04:20:21-04:00'
describe
'551235' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_132.jp2'
5de7f7332e513524b5432ad07df4b971
acc2d776510ceace257313d83f0e6dfa8a73c9de
'2012-04-01T04:17:22-04:00'
describe
'108594' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_132.jpg'
8b05c5c9a958ed2d3229b096013ea7a8
a05048259308a2af138488b87473d943b0c6e65c
describe
'37434' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_132.pro'
9375f4ae7600a099c6e396b0a2660a7e
c4aadd615a7817e90d934efa58052458f652742c
describe
'37819' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_132.QC.jpg'
6e9f8f8ef864a98367fd8aca41d8f079
dfd220e4dc4b92af5067bbb47da795e798b1dfb9
'2012-04-01T04:15:17-04:00'
describe
'13251204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_132.tif'
9ac6d7cdd27ab49f245e5657ce0eff75
d587e5dc16a5d01216e25126e7a7f829d69bdd4e
'2012-04-01T04:24:48-04:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_132.txt'
4d0dc17aecb55f7466ee2e8907f501be
090b815786375b606422824aeecbe2529dad27c7
'2012-04-01T04:16:08-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10421' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_132thm.jpg'
1672731fc660613e691eb88b04302c0a
b1d304d441b3b0ecd735187f319ea2a4323aa996
describe
'552658' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_133.jp2'
c3d97344a305b7226e61066b08374336
e7d88d22c1661b7cb22e93c9ec872f995683447f
describe
'95027' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_133.jpg'
c3d692ff239729cd1f4e54a42e500e69
93d133caf5492aa0ca095e2a2ec27832208fb667
'2012-04-01T04:14:51-04:00'
describe
'29608' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_133.pro'
c5a073e4719374ec443095b304113c98
fcd59ad455145e387ddbbbc7b0e2cd835061e2e1
'2012-04-01T04:15:51-04:00'
describe
'33662' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_133.QC.jpg'
78251d4e0a7353bc721815b964139cae
ff3410de3bd6b7559a3ca71c920ac3365c64575f
describe
'13282704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_133.tif'
2f857f9d3411fc48e646a259e8bc7514
bd57f18450b4cac7f3e8b0d4112918d16872d608
'2012-04-01T04:20:50-04:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_133.txt'
40f3ea7695a1e43ffcfcf1e7af67dddf
8b5022fa3d24a60a0e0fa28d645a94dc06bfcf74
describe
'9757' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_133thm.jpg'
301fb1c81324d5b88c1ad4c07775b453
183d23dead62631da4d1aff88109b3c1caa187b6
describe
'551317' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_134.jp2'
cbe96d1af6a31d3762b469e852e8459d
4928602215fc9803a65e5a103617f84aecfe91ab
describe
'105582' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_134.jpg'
dcac9881e3e68ef53ad2beda114973f6
d63b43cda9b08f1a538304c8e8b10cc81e38c151
describe
'35091' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEXZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_134.pro'
23809dd77df42bb062281e378c6633b6
2857a83f513acb7b1c999779287b2da47f849a0e
describe
'37192' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_134.QC.jpg'
949bb34120990ef71d0f5e971511cb24
d3456b414ae95643174f12545cff68dc6d7d3bee
'2012-04-01T04:22:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_134.tif'
ddda5c00aa1838aa36a0508518ba92e3
ec7bbce702198faadb77ea10730a7cde26aed408
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_134.txt'
de2d41c2ee419e1fa45e8882ee95f1e3
1a5f9bb9ae4fc950f4d81ba013076e1297219d9d
describe
'10745' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_134thm.jpg'
3a387adb9d2f7c097bcee6d79996f00b
f6a6a0c32ca673d0c976935c40d871293ff3fd29
'2012-04-01T04:19:59-04:00'
describe
'552609' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_135.jp2'
2c9897f2d1ed0802c2d6a987f5837a33
b1572efe8b8a087829b94314753684ec893516ba
describe
'102030' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_135.jpg'
143347b9a948e23d4f8b228986bd786d
b76ddb97884ab9895bb42ce7a99fcf0d0807572d
describe
'33430' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_135.pro'
29778e824e7bcbc98a15f968e744cb3f
c8c74a0f1cf7c282ac7ff993506385e78b4468ca
describe
'35425' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_135.QC.jpg'
5f4b5424d8fb1f55c9cbae0a2b736ca2
6ef967524cd006c9019f89aed1828f22ac931611
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_135.tif'
18a0320992713193eb2046a6ca0dbd60
5ae83697c7725ff69e24bd6a549a3acb9c5a3e9a
'2012-04-01T04:13:34-04:00'
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_135.txt'
2cd0faa60e6abfc7c901b62eef59f980
4d96bab02cf689e0d14777d757a0787ff5c6f300
describe
'10278' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_135thm.jpg'
bce4769140ce54cc00a65a3701b140ee
90cb0d100734463733808964e56b03ab8bba5167
'2012-04-01T04:15:39-04:00'
describe
'551314' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_136.jp2'
f9ec61b9af2f66cf1f7c5108a60e9991
9cdc1ad6a95d400083109a6995d92229987303f6
describe
'106884' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_136.jpg'
6cfd7f134ece4a493b4d40a6df1e9f73
710c998b61ef2025be14223b4fd7ef05bd29dca9
'2012-04-01T04:16:20-04:00'
describe
'36706' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_136.pro'
dc0190921c4475d8caacc1d25168e81e
fc1f6f2c109b025e32c2e376e4bdb84e251956d9
describe
'37262' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_136.QC.jpg'
fe9389722d528f16acf459dcfc88caa9
011a1b0f291e1b1a22e5a3766c98a93a9ad82128
'2012-04-01T04:18:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_136.tif'
46b072409552d9be723eb3caff788db7
ba231c904245c73b91dce31eeac56f22d328c0e9
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_136.txt'
1e1ffcfe1e0746b8a13df47ab8407db4
c045148cfc983788cd599b2e30e9f2c79ff4aefd
'2012-04-01T04:22:44-04:00'
describe
'10366' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_136thm.jpg'
05ad5631cb3c5f0573fc74c30270f466
ac12b50cc0215073450d12a92e01210160750a87
describe
'552636' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_137.jp2'
efe45011dec1ae7bc0f1f7620f4fc02e
526b07546d90e467d814cfcbd30764d298d2b48a
describe
'104363' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_137.jpg'
2b02a137d55f0e63508a5c67e5a85dc2
9f470676a47469786ca9ddfa0dc47e3869864ffe
describe
'34479' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_137.pro'
35e1383d968f39ac44102a641ae6b8ae
516e7b2594f29d04b256c17f5f60aeb58ed0f145
'2012-04-01T04:22:05-04:00'
describe
'36912' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_137.QC.jpg'
a27b50c6cf3eb7457e6e839f60425776
654f8296bbcf321a0ca36861aacc979eedb03d62
'2012-04-01T04:23:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_137.tif'
e5e91f8de32fe1a828f9d74d58643561
2ce5064fd18c4affa6e792d17ed2e8a2cf465ef5
'2012-04-01T04:23:59-04:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_137.txt'
116d50f79c101c08237f95de2863f95e
b2e17eb574c67cf9b73a8b8faec404fa646e90d6
describe
'10700' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_137thm.jpg'
6ddc033c619cc95933d7fcc485f5f99c
98dd62ae33b7ed72aff42ae9bdffc9ce28c16572
describe
'551342' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEYZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_138.jp2'
598bb1a751dacb8359ad7ec98cfc99d6
c345ce0fffd64f2ddf94f8a1ec1d5b0502d4a2e4
describe
'100950' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_138.jpg'
84b0eb2516e6b676dd37611de15f26c2
040273bd15bad3d21486ddac601c061d63de1ca2
'2012-04-01T04:15:42-04:00'
describe
'33147' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_138.pro'
ee8e49829e34cd085823db6032413213
1aec1712efc7bbd5e692ba89ca508d42313caa02
describe
'35107' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_138.QC.jpg'
4fe46745ddc58c363d21591169629f0d
fa8f18bfce3e7375811e850f0208ec6dae9d6e49
'2012-04-01T04:23:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_138.tif'
1b6b6314829cf5c7bb5b058a964cdaa1
20a319fadab9aa8b91cfe7a24013e90b34e95c5b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_138.txt'
b9cdc15bf236a9bb4483b6f0c6258de0
9ef664ba72b71bf6d26faa9c8e4bf2f3617f0cbf
'2012-04-01T04:12:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_138thm.jpg'
8be8b97b5c362a1433df859053487845
7548e96325f32949eed85b09f853a4519d41f203
'2012-04-01T04:20:08-04:00'
describe
'552647' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_139.jp2'
edf5a20a7767c4006dbc529f538d628c
1f0e4e8d66be3fc94f04f2629d8e90bc26d61661
describe
'103869' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_139.jpg'
5af84ef1d53d7d68192bfbdf8fff280f
cbb197c83f8cf2ab4e88a1d56739db2ebe454840
'2012-04-01T04:20:59-04:00'
describe
'34492' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_139.pro'
75804403549b453e15c5599229c0bf19
3882eb04a23d5ba6ee9390bfe20b160578b4c4ad
describe
'35998' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_139.QC.jpg'
3e48c0f274ead877e8e9345904f10e3c
bbf4ce8da15c711199c8457251ffb3325d6f2a83
'2012-04-01T04:12:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_139.tif'
91c2a4a835d5b1ca803cf1f17ff59b30
f48be8dbcb44bcd280ffe61507802f2a1fe9c80b
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_139.txt'
4028666c7d3149b6629d9d4b7549077a
abc1dda08222f97d97217d1b89846f50b635e06e
describe
'10670' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_139thm.jpg'
c370fd9ff7fed813f6386ab268b11f35
dc18a0038ccf8afaef0b573241a356377053e8e5
describe
'551189' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_140.jp2'
4eb54fdaacee43a9ab4086a584fd302d
7a9fe65c360698847d45e20218acd2271c00420c
describe
'105623' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_140.jpg'
d1a83d9782f9161f6d1ae77adc0e6f7b
bd80e2b11f7c4ca0c8813ca504a9182b3c28f4c6
'2012-04-01T04:13:29-04:00'
describe
'34748' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_140.pro'
4f15188714d97c2e1159057795b0892a
4151d4cb90d14cd65d64bac2715fac690be90792
'2012-04-01T04:22:20-04:00'
describe
'36400' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_140.QC.jpg'
bffe4520774b15e9fdde557325e70240
fd356d7819cbc9651fa689dc27dcd91094ffa423
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_140.tif'
bdd2bf6fff79bd612bf678329f4dc4b7
aaec78ef47538a3ae1f5319b5d3e8837cb76d0ee
'2012-04-01T04:20:49-04:00'
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_140.txt'
b7772253a5af7cf60ca6cc92d7b55d9d
3d478c9aad0b189c87b8c2982fbdcb85c4dfe4a2
describe
'10362' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_140thm.jpg'
0b917f9138ec6c7ace1f5d2b60509cf1
390ecc6df8950b54670bd9b86b7b53d3f14036f9
describe
'552661' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_141.jp2'
0b2dfd869134d705229bdae5ab4118fd
cb93249735aa7d92f79273be72dd0a96f2fb9fc0
'2012-04-01T04:17:40-04:00'
describe
'95889' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_141.jpg'
e5ee68adac7587f37c584a1291dc5271
354932b51f660a4ed67932faa1c02e2a4d155720
'2012-04-01T04:14:56-04:00'
describe
'31437' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_141.pro'
17883ea3531a6c8d25a1af8a457820c6
905a3832cf2477afb3744ad4e9276e55740a0db3
describe
'33805' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_141.QC.jpg'
acca141570f4dfd8222c439f5b5357dc
ea4308f28872d81c848e7eee4294b955cd9a2ead
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_141.tif'
0631f9b9a6c69e55e79ca495d1fb60c8
623fa9a86d1a0881ce4258c4eb8ff94b9b4ee0c8
'2012-04-01T04:12:44-04:00'
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAEZZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_141.txt'
61265b7356c1eeda5adaab7d1e6994ad
05f0c3495e7210163593f3d2871b75e5bfc3f29e
describe
'10017' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_141thm.jpg'
b241dfbe12b59a01c825c083dfa8f634
3525cd78981933af165818b53ddfab2130a4eb3b
'2012-04-01T04:15:11-04:00'
describe
'551343' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_142.jp2'
f7ae842938bb30f3ef20533f6de57a8f
4b9c94d5d9be1e75d04981fb924afc910068be49
describe
'104193' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_142.jpg'
306c576c09550c92afb5da6a41ea63b7
16f2bec76a916a163dc16d7ea1cae95520818641
describe
'35364' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_142.pro'
c8b4c4823710fa914b70423793f173a7
570879dd235037ed8e69af5791d49b4062c315a8
describe
'36462' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_142.QC.jpg'
59ac8a971a6ddd79c0766297323d38f2
57c8f5b4ceb2da2287a899d5d38e37290442fd0a
'2012-04-01T04:24:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_142.tif'
6c9b13f60e04ab55d80049da482efa68
0a5c3820d657f65fd5d5a7437a58d9f8c3077a49
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_142.txt'
a5ad05a3c2bdb4d1c53a33a56356cb06
fb21bc5121e1ced4b90a7c579597dd1af6733fe7
describe
'10308' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_142thm.jpg'
bc801b71271ed12f259be2439cedb928
c9a6b31d69b8a56f3ab31614658272d56bd68729
describe
'552643' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_143.jp2'
50c9f470af131e93a6606a356603c451
06a9d9aa741edb36d140b6b0d91f8e21721f1250
describe
'107061' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_143.jpg'
c7857281c21a8198e26a741ef93af341
278d97775e0bf674d42f6e312d24acebdad1c0b0
'2012-04-01T04:17:26-04:00'
describe
'35857' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_143.pro'
b6729647f020ff5f1ab93353fa9eef90
5fb4b67516df095c00f6084dd80097a07f3292a4
describe
'37952' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_143.QC.jpg'
3a5dda60ec97d7797caa342b43e02c02
f2d674a8547c96892327e52b1c6d94115d79a01c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_143.tif'
e937eacd59f4f055f7931f89ee17cab7
7b1879b2370b0e99ad3dca8c58fee18436557caf
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_143.txt'
634ccbb0e347781930f185c75715e160
ea48cdb3b53d8ec9c6abdfb06610a25e609c76d2
'2012-04-01T04:17:48-04:00'
describe
'10370' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_143thm.jpg'
e515ecce9d585c0b8748aecefe58cb7c
cc5ad6d238e00bc66659b24c2d1bf47f30b60a1b
describe
'551315' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_144.jp2'
8d4f531903de35acf741ab96a024c23b
ff853a1ebff76c07d4a7a527f8e61be2841a8ca9
describe
'102501' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_144.jpg'
2027b879a5b85b0ec11addc701986d6d
43e32e8f11937b910a0c9c740e838e3dcc3e20d3
'2012-04-01T04:20:19-04:00'
describe
'34095' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_144.pro'
8bcaafa3f992cb7a4d60d9e42bb6ca79
1a5740d2e960f3717899ee48a29573bf4ba90c06
describe
'35659' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_144.QC.jpg'
72bf163748e45eb53c4de9720cc6e177
218bd48a604f2def2a54014ac51ba63cb2c08812
'2012-04-01T04:16:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_144.tif'
937dd3c9e0bb3073516d0cd97a271a21
ba147c77e3d34a5c446637aa4bc4c3124961f1e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_144.txt'
91139ea38efab24b9d03abed19404e12
72eb1e56b7750d9e71635763c58792f54a9932c2
describe
'10335' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_144thm.jpg'
f9e96c525a79e5b76526ec57d498d72c
d436338fc1e77f2a8e07a5450ad534fbab3be855
describe
'552555' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_145.jp2'
f8ba4e385a3bbcd1c8a99897a6854ed1
16ef138ce5ed7fe1dea1fb4107513d99edaa0b74
describe
'97797' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_145.jpg'
99879718d3514b8b1cf453308af1cefb
853007ecc2ad7a2d09d3a5fa3cbaad9e4f219b54
describe
'33250' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_145.pro'
dbb7a73d3786c9c6c3efb9d59569918f
60995fb8b38ce64b11b67c97af23970396f627cd
describe
'34741' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFAZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_145.QC.jpg'
ce37ba4d1eedcee38a6804ecfa405679
63c3107a4d038c278471b8f0713aac55ac26b619
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_145.tif'
ccab4b09792ebce3bcb793c9d91879eb
5af8aefa92272ce028445f9b1838a0a67d715d5e
'2012-04-01T04:23:58-04:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_145.txt'
6ad14b0803a0fe5f19dc04d6bbd887a0
fd2901632c2433cc7439793f305a7be421065744
'2012-04-01T04:24:49-04:00'
describe
'9959' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_145thm.jpg'
ea100472ec0e0abb2cf6edc6340daa80
a49e7ae8565ef78be8a5b89b541d2b51509b2318
'2012-04-01T04:25:00-04:00'
describe
'516818' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_146.jp2'
a6d23c3c96a3531fbd131676e8b53358
ee76224430c6e824e0d2cedf64ee241b8d9a61d8
describe
'99910' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_146.jpg'
820ede57c1e51c117cdfcd3cb713121e
d885e6ef00e4415efbcaf9469b321a807ed71937
'2012-04-01T04:12:24-04:00'
describe
'35103' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_146.pro'
7a6f653ea8e35a3d92349911c86c0de9
7fab81268f4073d74f62befcdb072d015368efcc
describe
'34973' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_146.QC.jpg'
f1d90fad542c24a0137339dfa430474f
dfe14427e5656322507e9e641be5be3b89bcfd49
'2012-04-01T04:12:00-04:00'
describe
'12424330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_146.tif'
32075f31400a909eea1205a50e6be3d3
f4f841728b539cd89cb2463e85a1e41b56e9999b
'2012-04-01T04:12:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_146.txt'
e9e56d7511e7924aabea02217352e28d
818313324e7542b69814e299ede9531a81e87658
describe
'10525' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_146thm.jpg'
b207eb625bbac9cc1adf2267f59aad88
b9a7eee0c6c6578a5f372ac3be33860e98d37418
describe
'552613' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_147.jp2'
33507ae3269362616545094e10c2c36d
3518365d94dbd9caac6b9c79ed005c0b74bcf444
'2012-04-01T04:11:56-04:00'
describe
'95042' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_147.jpg'
afb62edeeec11de0dc5bd57047a25d3c
d5fc2161a9f61965c9d2def4a368a3935b5cb827
'2012-04-01T04:21:02-04:00'
describe
'32213' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_147.pro'
3504e8c0d66d1c079bc99b392300cc06
96aa4ab9e461c9a7c758b39bb8e458dfdc10c9e7
describe
'34034' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_147.QC.jpg'
2e73182949cc55d9f214170483518ca4
fad2cbfdd4386f87e3c6b8ce579ee5ec36319a02
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_147.tif'
cf43793b95018a2851bdd3f6f0f96a4b
e8559f709a97b266ec4d69ff68cfd1eb781c975d
'2012-04-01T04:21:45-04:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_147.txt'
283c483f85289dbaeb21cd0f681ce617
a52ad8ed9a9727a8f3eb8be3696446720db05def
describe
'9802' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_147thm.jpg'
83f1a7efb8215c7578d23777aa18b16e
d38fa43928fff4a3dc8d4982f9fcceaebabe2ef2
'2012-04-01T04:12:05-04:00'
describe
'551296' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_148.jp2'
3ddd973924bc42155c8d2727a5c4e711
b83dbf7a491a4df985652e4509ce5066eef61002
describe
'104143' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_148.jpg'
301b47e49a9a966b3c585f267f1ddab7
1c3c82489b1245eaaa59956d4b653d8f34bd61a9
'2012-04-01T04:17:06-04:00'
describe
'34876' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_148.pro'
383386cb3585b76ec6a5f1c653a52bbd
51b4a0ed0dc2b197321f9c00db5876491bd861b7
'2012-04-01T04:21:39-04:00'
describe
'38107' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_148.QC.jpg'
a48eef328acbdedb4484dc29ba7616e4
ac7275f0fda4ca7ca6df2ed5857592417c014920
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_148.tif'
4d31e55b89196a535443c4b4b063005a
ca89e626ab9016c6e7189afe7eb4797550f08f2d
'2012-04-01T04:14:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_148.txt'
452f1acfa9443ea030317cae6a278b78
8f0bafe60b8efda481bf73a78f6a879ee1ade1de
describe
'10511' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_148thm.jpg'
fe2cc9ce614c9ed89932db5751f1826d
4cea61366135519e2637c45bc43a744853b90adb
describe
'482232' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_149.jp2'
067482246134e7c82e31e6e981d06d4c
d56e4f2e166e0944b5875d1ebdead5fa0b150293
'2012-04-01T04:22:59-04:00'
describe
'47180' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFBZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_149.jpg'
9d5d78da7a509a8b8fd572f1005c27cb
a039e1d415d407d21e775760b3e4d34c3bb2aae5
'2012-04-01T04:14:35-04:00'
describe
'9472' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_149.pro'
4fdc4ccd4526ee1fb3caa2fb11099f4d
58760178e9c59d93996e8ca3dea4ddf5084d04eb
describe
'16234' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_149.QC.jpg'
2b674264b55335b2c4d742e03ef3585e
e4771f9bef50745dc88a98df276d32ce92356815
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_149.tif'
da2eb5fea3a0768d8cba4ceabdd59fea
e4fff1c6cdd18e51c35b08a3f50dd62f3ace94bc
describe
'405' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_149.txt'
6d9bf46608b04058b67f360a7620c763
3a1acfa56b832cbf2ce41ef902a2f48782ad8b24
describe
'5195' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_149thm.jpg'
632f1eeb63a139e74fcde137bc65869d
8afed18d7e2e3690534de881eff0269936e4fbbf
'2012-04-01T04:21:00-04:00'
describe
'533291' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_150.jp2'
89f1fc07238f174bb1e6adec7a8aebf9
9aa169587592930e7f04c43229d4b1b32a9b7f76
describe
'73785' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_150.jpg'
eec0943beb8aa936e4b30a618c62429d
2a4da8529fcd1a5405b7af7310ac41f31a27f890
describe
'20613' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_150.pro'
f79bd4fce08a7ec6d6ee400df5ae2147
31f1660f08003c680451bb3417a2dbb1bf3ac9c1
describe
'26308' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_150.QC.jpg'
d94401d6dd2bed05dc82e1e44fb97cd5
b562d2c28bab6033507f7cd9e7cfadfc96f717d4
describe
'12818080' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_150.tif'
1a8140db6fe89aaeab2ffefeff2fdd51
c19e9a2e4375b4a50d7a4a8813af6baca7671825
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_150.txt'
4986879a45eaf5e0f7343e86dc5658a9
6b8b50a0aa659ef16ab243ec62615a118d42d285
describe
'8052' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_150thm.jpg'
d5b8db21d9a3209512ef2748ec3b81f1
95acfd64bdf92e04a7ae4d0c1a7017a0b2af093a
describe
'552664' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_151.jp2'
983e5912f88d09e3c3ae1632672bec0e
99346561cae4abbc65105ad133aefc1899d475f7
describe
'97386' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_151.jpg'
1b0c0bed79e16bd88e835cdcb2d117e3
d59932aa2778bc154cd817ae67d070b0bcc5c540
'2012-04-01T04:19:40-04:00'
describe
'32077' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_151.pro'
db180b3c4614cad4f0eb96647b624615
3d11c8ba94b3404f8ea430225d77f5e84f3601e2
'2012-04-01T04:14:16-04:00'
describe
'34611' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_151.QC.jpg'
d9c6300ba5220f558d6a09cf304a29e2
db4f3ed8715ab6f3d295b8611248fd5a8a78abc3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_151.tif'
adda188fcc8203de805c0ceedf0b3005
eaf8bc537d941eacc591dbeaca9e997e10a7b6b9
'2012-04-01T04:14:33-04:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_151.txt'
0d019f3a953c61ba4659db3521522658
c31798bef436830cf302147d94c3905177ff560c
'2012-04-01T04:20:18-04:00'
describe
'9932' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_151thm.jpg'
f25c370af8da380f23bca25b747b9d42
23807480004ce51c182a1ba08f86aeed4c46f635
describe
'526646' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_152.jp2'
e5f4d9850a5223c41f2e0ae9f5481acc
b4cc0d997adb7689f5416b2b3eb8dbecccad2d10
describe
'103766' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_152.jpg'
d86f2e2a15d612639e982c2786df43aa
97f866ed5744891930df44d5f5b39c46d8d2f190
'2012-04-01T04:24:33-04:00'
describe
'32037' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_152.pro'
6e8708df960cf89f652505f5d83159de
8cee7fc330ff6384cf58a4006c8c3cc32bfcf62a
'2012-04-01T04:24:31-04:00'
describe
'37031' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_152.QC.jpg'
a9f84f0562511e4a54bded19d526be6a
83ed42858ab4ff9831d803820b0ac043423dbbd8
describe
'12660580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_152.tif'
314ced47f57427a5ba5c1277b6aa24d1
108237a1263cbf412f1370287187db995f9bb28a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_152.txt'
882bb966d3391a4d06ba00d1b723743f
e9d4676f4bef11d9e664093f20559692ef4a6a75
describe
'11713' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFCZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_152thm.jpg'
329b5121a504be273564dd9731274540
d45e9c8a40dea8072139bff6b7c8d8d81b8eceec
describe
'552633' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_153.jp2'
20f8a4a58f61691630424c557fdf3efa
9e5c0513c56356d6d42993ad0f683dd81c1bf885
describe
'97737' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_153.jpg'
01650cda1f4a66f16d1b0ef377bf5c11
2df7f58a750382b790068a7c758c7b71e7d4672d
describe
'32222' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_153.pro'
faa370af8d7f9d1d04c6f26f9c573555
edccb4c13464a2746a580b4894bb551b5779bdde
describe
'34646' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_153.QC.jpg'
97cdb46642f59cb61f1768c63cd071de
c155507a586f77f44c8b2ce6d1b5378b4b1e4d9a
'2012-04-01T04:13:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_153.tif'
4c968df9d6f8b4b4bb53f7c0acd1eac5
6ab57280f456ca9d303a0a7d1112b4c82858113a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_153.txt'
ec02a29a3754b41d9d20c34a72de56be
f2dda60500586813d8b2ba2ee6ebcef94dc3321f
'2012-04-01T04:15:31-04:00'
describe
'9837' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_153thm.jpg'
60409c7291936ba71d07877fb48f3aaa
ee3eceb86153cc4f56fab3116db39a3bffb39373
describe
'540158' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_154.jp2'
398fa4f1f48985f25b569b9f36acb14f
48d7b01ba2f3b8e90d3fc92c5ab9e907711dcb99
'2012-04-01T04:22:31-04:00'
describe
'107128' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_154.jpg'
af5c0c3b1e468d146c89d10f1969800b
3cbc15dbf7e7af370ff2ac662f3a9f0f653c4d02
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_154.pro'
524ca4269702325e8245d87251d1c9a8
324ce9b7b665aeda32b7a4cba7d1d30341e43336
'2012-04-01T04:15:36-04:00'
describe
'38434' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_154.QC.jpg'
442971feea9586a2d6fc3d650e288351
962c48a614b371cb583a01e7fc3b12b7f2985116
describe
'12983454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_154.tif'
4f9c82cd0fd4c031ae4c9a0e52595db3
f56d374340092e42ac5a47a6e9dfc0797b53d7b6
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_154.txt'
e4bba5c874d2ed48bcee7a33c49033a0
f32d9077c1e518da26fea9bb69b4e6ab7eab094a
describe
'11067' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_154thm.jpg'
e3492d226f6514460ccb7ecb0718a36c
5049f69c7b06f64c67d953a5f920fb24277f24c2
describe
'549668' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_155.jp2'
94dc54f820037decc99b19473fc40e4d
28a7a2dfa93d6213b7efd02b6aa109a4e91cf735
describe
'104879' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_155.jpg'
cc8ee96734a0059b1c2a8a8c01f2c8e8
cf4c5623c070beaa5aeb77b74221c418b1a7d6bc
describe
'33777' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_155.pro'
5e23c6e0099b02eb5c6b2e0f0d627b4f
c340faa00e45c0e72372db232b112ec2d90f1741
'2012-04-01T04:21:40-04:00'
describe
'36992' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_155.QC.jpg'
0d17c43500a661beadd31c0489b0a53b
e76fcaf44f288a3fe21594ee6d7a2c5af97c4081
describe
'13211830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_155.tif'
8607a7a023c3abc6e5ddaf08716b94e4
9c6f139cf498062bb39f7886a7c87f2a132277af
'2012-04-01T04:11:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_155.txt'
475242de29b53d4b5d9cc9ce8861bcb2
71a84c9cebbcc2d5cdcd0cd945d2da904104dd36
describe
'10356' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_155thm.jpg'
b9d854128b43df3216e92d2ff3b525db
fef9b860b970a09939294c644ea4791307299543
describe
'503445' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_156.jp2'
99ba01347cea96f7356f3a1738eeaf11
7a67e1932169670af77e031194fa16cf3bfc75b9
'2012-04-01T04:24:20-04:00'
describe
'96040' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_156.jpg'
452fa02ea62347fd31db688f7a60d994
8ee8795847e3554ae596c0664d2d6ef3111f7dcc
describe
'30530' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_156.pro'
513ca577e9607f48d39760e553354d22
1616352f4b2bf63be54996012c3351378e5e2aec
'2012-04-01T04:12:47-04:00'
describe
'33741' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_156.QC.jpg'
df42b4c8c4650a2f57f56c444c173aaf
9177103dc4361a7149a0f0700b900b1fc71a180b
describe
'12101454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFDZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_156.tif'
5b0771eecb21a5e47bd96ca30acd9597
3f9464264ec09ef39ae3b1adf5d0ce151a69877e
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_156.txt'
954101a719c741a6d4880c20ee26427a
0e0cbd7b38fb26acc9ac7e4bc45bd2d83b6c0ef9
describe
'11287' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_156thm.jpg'
0c1f876af732088aaa60ad4da1c52d4d
df4488100bfe079e1cc69e4266dbf1ad1c2c5983
describe
'549719' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_157.jp2'
18b2d6949f3cbff79751046b3a8eae38
46fe5aa401a46f0628aaac7c5879c438bd7f1b69
describe
'99366' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFED' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_157.jpg'
e6e81ab852bb774496d8eece22e63f68
6765b6ffa344bcb33781fa49b5c366be427c87d5
describe
'31602' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_157.pro'
4364a2a017b6fbffe9d41822b559754a
262e9b05fff6489ff4c5c8dbc2ece635b557e155
describe
'35014' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_157.QC.jpg'
260a7b987f22b87bc687dab0f3eb48d5
bf5138075882502603a0824c583b0c5df1351d6d
'2012-04-01T04:22:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_157.tif'
45ec63f66e9a477cee490645f1a05d00
87d5c54fd79f7430e06b8279a0bbdbf134cd7aec
'2012-04-01T04:20:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_157.txt'
54b25feb2b120ef643474d69f727c7b9
2edc1df02bb26089bd0377e0e99a543e5bcbfeb0
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_157thm.jpg'
6e5d623d01f9ed7074b51b6ea0a31289
ed80ee13795638654ef084501b3892ab433ce364
describe
'551277' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_158.jp2'
ceb4ea60016b717d93bb09899bd23570
107dab13feac3773c6592e4cf4b760985a6fa350
'2012-04-01T04:22:11-04:00'
describe
'102462' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_158.jpg'
c8423dd6a0d3ae43acc4535884242a6c
b9461207237a8f2580860eb3811add7378871dd9
'2012-04-01T04:14:38-04:00'
describe
'34508' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_158.pro'
7aaace40b61e38556acc77c2041b1fb8
7f858950f64bafa7993c37a790ad4b04a0e2731c
describe
'36151' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_158.QC.jpg'
f4b4569244ca5f8801e932d43229bb57
c3739fb7edcb893f49eaff018058911a887c58c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_158.tif'
7fdef8fb0f1e4a21facb767f0bbdf59e
e296bcd173467b565fd73cc596dbc7fc815abcfe
'2012-04-01T04:18:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_158.txt'
6db909137e2c5a74d663f556ebe09edd
d01081c4af7a2a30513797e853c919f883178183
'2012-04-01T04:23:08-04:00'
describe
'10324' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_158thm.jpg'
77dd041c9f67790a0c8dcd74289ef5c8
c96254168c3f623fd80490bdb8dae029e215d481
describe
'552659' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_159.jp2'
001d490ec03511484077f0f2174a1640
8d0e48d64fb842f09960890c806111201694e4e8
describe
'106819' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFER' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_159.jpg'
e39efc94dc1509d321c72eff364075b9
60f414e5eb0b31cfbef5654a9d0bf77a47908e0e
'2012-04-01T04:23:56-04:00'
describe
'37001' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFES' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_159.pro'
0bf4576c647c04aa11ab2caa8cdd88dc
70aaf18e7b6d6b9e0502164df0d901b8d8e9cf70
describe
'37665' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFET' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_159.QC.jpg'
e62e610c952dca5bd5eeeba3f633e824
5e6fb4903395d63849761047d6064881a26f5f4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_159.tif'
d39b662aac774026e4f8570bc178cb90
819e8dc27d2f060b2d7e2637d7646d0d08cb73dd
'2012-04-01T04:22:09-04:00'
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_159.txt'
d6d83adf3f2c43d3d25815006e61780f
f80c7e456c7bc1a8c72ae7ea0547aa31456db4f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_159thm.jpg'
112f5aa9584d072000e9df013d12888b
eb96c184f22224042d5d0b26edab8fcb8e032935
describe
'551292' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_160.jp2'
6d0f8817748706ae2b03b55b2c26cbe3
d2047219359cc382c2ce132fbe0890291f3bfacc
'2012-04-01T04:12:59-04:00'
describe
'102122' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_160.jpg'
1749b6a444c35899f2cfbb96476d1894
9ce88471aba09b6adba284e5e58b286f5891646e
describe
'34864' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFEZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_160.pro'
747143cde42693f1c04b9eb81da745ff
c34444db34438b4f4b3b1866fea8899f636c4888
describe
'35417' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_160.QC.jpg'
fa768e33f80e36796dd86f597de48438
cf738d5e51605ec72d5eef97a2e93b4660ce9ce2
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_160.tif'
084b626f5a743d1886c5e4052fe8f62a
55f9c266bbdbcb17225153d2a3a904ee7c28ea84
'2012-04-01T04:15:29-04:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_160.txt'
68fcfc8f9fd2db17fce91f0e2c0b0d46
05fa597121c6efe8ed45757db84d355b5a2cd285
describe
'10049' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_160thm.jpg'
cbb965f7bd7927cf5aa72b02a7747a87
dfed943cd83cd4e8e5ed7c64b4aa4cbaae75fa10
describe
'552590' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_161.jp2'
db37d0d986edb9b12024f360b2977346
7ae9115439b97ce6cbe2eaa1275dd673dcf0d686
'2012-04-01T04:16:07-04:00'
describe
'106011' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_161.jpg'
32c9655c8130d758b669d1a9e0819805
76e36e1245af8ad0323d7e0966332d6e38cd438e
describe
'35169' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_161.pro'
c5372a4bb3aa41061c1d6b88996c68a2
22c52c458737c7bf970e9013551bcd25a3647ea3
describe
'36750' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_161.QC.jpg'
7ed2a990143b29f2dd892b003384959f
1427b8d604b2f4b75359bc2ca2e2c739e6ee1434
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_161.tif'
b6c041dcd8985ddefa316bb48d1f1734
d866b647f378a98876fed5085d65af23f3b47d43
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_161.txt'
ecc6f0c8e8a4b8cf4814e4f9b0331f71
1e0afdba79dfa4dad4b5a8785d8e6d3bb1eb8c24
'2012-04-01T04:17:32-04:00'
describe
'10358' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_161thm.jpg'
12a0c9136f29d1af6e9e6dfcfbcc7399
2d6bc66d7904f9d117a92c4b5615ee5de1caa407
'2012-04-01T04:20:35-04:00'
describe
'551200' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_162.jp2'
c09a8c99a438ac89694a3528e4df248c
d0345d16c94fd8a3d96ddbc851e61e6577f8d0ff
describe
'108033' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_162.jpg'
b4fc7dbe1c0ae3822eef1c3471987a6d
93557b19d1e5efd84c9732f36671395e7aaba085
'2012-04-01T04:13:59-04:00'
describe
'36677' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_162.pro'
8b02f16d1e3417df4ecd8710546a1a54
eb0dd2207f5e51678b4ca719e22910db75fa3920
describe
'37863' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_162.QC.jpg'
3fe247170ab699f0a3ff4b04391c6cce
6dc4d7b0b5addc5c65030a8db8497894a13f6d77
'2012-04-01T04:17:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_162.tif'
a62dbaf30a4a8c1bc9ca332827587078
16f7af2a87849a18cbbf06fcb73cd89a69643bf8
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_162.txt'
48eee5a44bd369c20367a3a7366e65a3
5d78f519b0fe157f7fbcda9159cc457542e3e82c
describe
'10466' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_162thm.jpg'
d1cbfa6ebae96ac6ec15bdf27140f644
d9650065f139b45f290f6a007edf91f6c722512c
describe
'552617' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_163.jp2'
d260096cc923b7a0ae0fd10c2ed54231
b7c9982579a153abc66af910c819cd8b83fe1c26
describe
'103105' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_163.jpg'
0086c5f25c7ea452cb9cd2e63154f4a6
6500090fe5c6be8335086061143fa617f76641d3
describe
'34407' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_163.pro'
2bed5243a801542c39d61cd3bc7f2066
2704018e124f15a13eb2680761118326c52bf383
describe
'36002' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_163.QC.jpg'
81e1a3fe4dc3987c422acbd2d8e3bac4
86879447969ef0e7d97648d0f8a4e10a0e6eb922
'2012-04-01T04:17:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_163.tif'
c88492e692e473443d782f544d3c1855
102bf2a32abea29fcc8f9f7f58d45d8b7c9f3480
'2012-04-01T04:17:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_163.txt'
5cf426e465b76889ae69213f124bd2c2
4fedf4b7583761eb836191189e42b48fddb80c00
describe
'10142' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_163thm.jpg'
28d03c32687b2488a0be4862d6423a5d
9615c0df3f612d8143e5152d31345b314b764a33
describe
'551297' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFFZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_164.jp2'
b9f00e76b8f4936996650633b945c108
5623a2d2fcfc01b0442ad77297b4dbd39e5a5936
'2012-04-01T04:19:05-04:00'
describe
'103124' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_164.jpg'
8da1710f43081dbeff1859a588367a38
134799dcabbcd86b4bc109f203f9b613005087c4
'2012-04-01T04:20:16-04:00'
describe
'34740' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_164.pro'
f8a2190435a1ddfe005c765b6288aa0e
e70ce9467154347e7c5b480e0675a4de47d2330a
describe
'35990' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_164.QC.jpg'
f5d8f9733621eb078f24fe8e11879d4b
6fde796e5c16ee03e8afa34244a1b688648a3a64
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_164.tif'
5745ff073cc53f55c27fea30e8c8e110
7367414906eabd3ce7e2e40dcf56a472e5049a9b
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_164.txt'
5706ab0fa2be27d477b237e6c8dde2a2
3ca2dbe23cd75e9d9b4dec80b5a5e1fd62a8c3bf
describe
'10300' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_164thm.jpg'
11ca87a2be37398052edd2efc089f89b
887c95580ecdfc2036d1211e6d96b9e306f68bbe
describe
'552561' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_165.jp2'
104e51d7041ee9051d4e93d301c351dc
ff48c85750033ad308b898bae572af003ba0cde6
describe
'103702' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_165.jpg'
73b6a20389e320897cf14908b609f01e
aae15bd257849fad9b677ee7a739b049be930b9a
describe
'34725' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_165.pro'
fcfa08c773796f7cf9d73c2c09555846
2dc096bf5119c3ca032ee3e8f863af4196c186ba
'2012-04-01T04:20:33-04:00'
describe
'36069' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_165.QC.jpg'
a553153b15f018e2a7f66e869e74fc6c
013b8dccafe7bc9e52ae9234c5008a4d6e864cd7
'2012-04-01T04:16:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_165.tif'
5a5a0f64269cac257d5880e43b464552
2b4bfc36ed097bb7ac05866c4389ac21d7407ff8
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_165.txt'
2bb8f548d1e790753fb1bcf3a0274746
c364e04e2b346b182e7b01698837aea5caaf7d73
describe
'10433' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_165thm.jpg'
d32fecb132c20f91c624628c140480cc
e874b697b66e8342b53f0a0a14b3b0f8cbef4cb9
describe
'551351' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_166.jp2'
855bde6ad4b87d4e70ec250fd27cb857
239cc955dec49ce2f0f1dc8d2ac252187ab3fd77
describe
'103876' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_166.jpg'
88e6118157e466fa180b8048e598d136
db3748e297a16268506b94b17e45511bdf0a52f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_166.pro'
8e688da28cee0843238d39b0bc8d51f8
5699517e8ee6c35478f569bd8983faaa094e7b26
describe
'36741' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_166.QC.jpg'
97ec69c9bd2246fc3ae291d09cdb9c8b
09e66b9e6719c1c4b70a1ac7da192034c04930d8
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_166.tif'
bf58df15198562c1bcef3514afe8915d
8f77bc3541c9438eb1d8c52829e65ea6b7190eaa
'2012-04-01T04:17:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_166.txt'
815eacb283a31604a81b5c591f6d3184
e16bbb5502d36a44610e233bbbdddb2852b18a7f
describe
'10235' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_166thm.jpg'
8afc6a227b8a157108bb30e3b998a0af
d9e27b1c0d2b05c3aeb09b269490fab42ff57710
describe
'552589' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_167.jp2'
37c6501692ed0a7a014e7e39cea4ad5a
0718102b002a770d2811c458845059e0c369007b
'2012-04-01T04:13:47-04:00'
describe
'105879' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_167.jpg'
6062f378ef09bc8c54740edab5cb66b1
cdad5a25a2e8fa2b705b6d33ce41d3c3fed01af6
describe
'35851' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_167.pro'
bba256f58fac50b98fe1cb15fa13947a
cb4452ba69b7b781db8146d40235a43ef1f34d9c
describe
'37218' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_167.QC.jpg'
462a82bd7981db7f5024b435a1b659f1
1ecbc6780e3d8cefce0cbffe2caee1ab8c9a3866
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_167.tif'
e984fe4d981b9c273ab1250e55343982
2244793299b0f36c6239bf1eb399a15073b2bdb7
'2012-04-01T04:15:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFGZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_167.txt'
d3a4758b3507e0af3bf5a96d797a00c0
131b29ee5f7666bdc1578f04b95f6558f68b1cff
'2012-04-01T04:14:08-04:00'
describe
'10165' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_167thm.jpg'
b6a6dcdb5e00030803f00644ed0b7d84
f335572d9c597cf45902e2154458658e617537d0
describe
'531814' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_168.jp2'
cef8f6440afd8cb80b2a67e5100be22d
f3603e5bc1b46c717f42c3da56ad0c07dcb9ab78
describe
'105025' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_168.jpg'
bceb709e85a9f59a167fcc09bd37ee2f
572d35d89b16f07a9fcaf1d1499d8a249c0ad5ec
describe
'34116' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_168.pro'
f45d51342985ce623353f5b034586807
f4497a3ac83b18234a1c7c65637909d43abfd1c0
describe
'38430' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_168.QC.jpg'
cdef80939d607d9eae4f6dd41771c0d7
c2f7c1969fab736b8f05a589d207dd3c5130226b
describe
'12786580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_168.tif'
e5f7214757dc62c7be629e1cdaa8c8de
d43abaf80f7cb1bd56bf57adf85c8b762b1e773c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_168.txt'
c67419db23cf1695f7a0f773d0ffcb23
698c1949070e9ba9460204350757004998c50769
'2012-04-01T04:19:43-04:00'
describe
'11245' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_168thm.jpg'
df850fb8f3b809d3bdf318945d5d16b5
909c2c64550eca6ec2fa08f65894ccab1a020815
describe
'552529' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_169.jp2'
6b5a62ea41497e3fe1a38c96e061a2c4
88f3f1cddc8a1252be1e1780808594c48878df06
describe
'107844' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_169.jpg'
16b3925d1e486aaa298d54ab946d152d
aaf9b3e0fd77cadc109ce8b57b140937389a93cc
describe
'35065' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_169.pro'
d6d0ad54229b0f3cebcd6c21a087bb53
85944469ca0031fb6406e225af937a197d56aa59
describe
'37412' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_169.QC.jpg'
ff80b76dcb59461dab6622f24e9c856b
f6e4f0c87620698a4fecbd887be35cffffea079a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_169.tif'
491b0a431e8048ba9fedb96836b19ec7
723027c45e8d1d499433551bf748d98059a5f28b
'2012-04-01T04:12:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_169.txt'
cb7c2d0ff55d8c9b3c0557be716b629f
c6c6db6e86e45d8cb6b7a0c8a0b0cc384a547169
describe
'10484' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_169thm.jpg'
02db18136a43679c764453f7765adcc8
dfde868b3304803bfa70bb56edc173c06868cf7f
describe
'537569' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_170.jp2'
bf3a78944615d39b0c4d48bad51e12ca
3c872266cab62a7af8fefdf9cb4ce5ddec264653
describe
'112039' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_170.jpg'
5792c3c42b923fb65be0630bee06659f
738b77bb815273f608dc3fc71fa4684d305892f1
describe
'35703' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_170.pro'
013101098a8cc21911c013983f003bae
eaa53c0905259f002efc2ec91c5cb0d9e8a2a9c5
'2012-04-01T04:21:42-04:00'
describe
'40026' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_170.QC.jpg'
24b9d607da69586d847c21e1ee9f3571
2612c53a8a2ebf4dc1b4fde5a4ab78b15b1134a9
'2012-04-01T04:13:30-04:00'
describe
'12920454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_170.tif'
c666698eae411dd9e4b8e0d8343485c5
66f9a371fee96d924804476f7fda4de0f9367f85
'2012-04-01T04:13:20-04:00'
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_170.txt'
0d98182dc7becb1c593110836c6fc705
8dc19994edf3e19200e56d3dbfabc5267c745d5d
describe
Invalid character
'11690' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_170thm.jpg'
10176016e765f0d8f7fececdfddd42f9
185d9dad9fa4677545f138f8a285e6df8a797ac9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_171.jp2'
21c23c7cfd4af3b7191a5ebe7154e2de
a1df612f99085479fe32eb11f120c9de005c7c9f
describe
'107096' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_171.jpg'
7ec4e17a6a69116484e0282693086570
4464048bfd7096b310b71652169c13c6cc7dd9ad
describe
'36121' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_171.pro'
e05d50ad5fa496367ddfef0226e3e1a5
67346eee4f557570cdd37850f70e55500b95e23e
'2012-04-01T04:19:33-04:00'
describe
'37709' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFHZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_171.QC.jpg'
9f694ad5743366c2fefaf58350696d80
13fbf3984191b0b029c1d932c8acdcd5dd05efff
'2012-04-01T04:14:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_171.tif'
dec5cb15d97c9e4991a937ff6c4353b0
fd2e3763bc2f15f592ca4e13f9f9e7c4a31fc13a
'2012-04-01T04:11:54-04:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_171.txt'
fdcf6ba6f8c2a989a87488e009a30b92
0e627750ed1c1ddb4bb284df99dd18a082ef5435
describe
'10574' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_171thm.jpg'
6748b4280fbdea3a0bdaf8d1048f4d83
75db0fe294117950ef443c585d751c27aa39749e
'2012-04-01T04:19:35-04:00'
describe
'551345' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFID' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_172.jp2'
9f42de4a4cb60cf638de9363befe7916
37ebd22e57a1d28e74c875c76a23efe722165ae9
describe
'103235' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_172.jpg'
7868a2c16423626d4b6bf2b99b81ca21
c6b729b2cb2f45d629edb8763071a1b6aaad4fe5
describe
'34727' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_172.pro'
898323b953c1cb8cd4f2545a148fda42
93953eb3bf5bbfe6f9049b87b8e4a8d92508ef40
describe
'36390' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_172.QC.jpg'
cca4be604eea9f0f798aac4678dafbd8
9774987fb46f85bb9031d8d3fe6a0827f41f7832
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_172.tif'
3882f6375eaced9532947e591eb9bdde
d3029d2a4ec6512fca7b0fecbd8c9bb0ea940548
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFII' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_172.txt'
ce7526fbd72db537b8b742f22d3de9dd
0a953912074cfce2c8b2499e9d658ef88d0e04a8
'2012-04-01T04:24:10-04:00'
describe
'10409' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_172thm.jpg'
c6156cf1673d0a6bc82c474c6010c72d
6ea301aa9e6c5f912dce1b8627c2aceb6d774bca
describe
'552563' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_173.jp2'
c36d28c9a67b035b40ae089d8edd1179
5adb64ae90120485711399ec99f5e2c14288ee76
'2012-04-01T04:22:29-04:00'
describe
'106287' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_173.jpg'
072d6ba1ded31c8135069f4cc3fd9ee6
5a9e3f627e9df2deab14a9d36a9255ca2f77f12a
describe
'35790' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_173.pro'
89dace72245145614b6c896e05631c6f
2da4be189ff00b1aa1bc64a69800b2bdc2b71150
describe
'37347' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_173.QC.jpg'
01d1a28274125d28c686971c656b7a63
e8bbb5988a6fa5883f651738ee36335d4f308f2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_173.tif'
18c52f639b897c4af7be006346565f9a
fa27061f5529a1509f187d7ea868f1f0bf9ed8fc
'2012-04-01T04:13:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_173.txt'
95bfb3559ca1105e4cb6c8f6edcf4403
227ed973f61cb60c3aa8b51fd20f2eb888f2127e
describe
'10650' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_173thm.jpg'
9ebda4647c5cc1563a196b3753864043
61d9ee4d36d04320c4d59f13de850b8f767a5716
describe
'544453' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_174.jp2'
da331812b4d5bcc9cc82af38bf8c3bdc
f600d2738666e530a4883a52bc37ebd0c54730a2
describe
'107658' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_174.jpg'
b0ed00ac92d7455e7dccd8212e4f9614
c0f2c94097a6a7d589d798280515c7a178b4755a
describe
'34025' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_174.pro'
7280adbf80ce30f161651b49a282f483
c58df788ce357f0753bf988274a488a0cb914c45
describe
'38304' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_174.QC.jpg'
954df5adfceb4577c66c4ee993293d5e
0922338dac8b22ba129f62c1b3666b5bb06ea5bb
'2012-04-01T04:22:27-04:00'
describe
'13085830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_174.tif'
afdfe657bdbb9b8f73ed3375bae47e52
acde1a836a5bce010a3e188b8e27579873738343
'2012-04-01T04:24:08-04:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_174.txt'
18800d80316bdedb2e064268a313f9c2
b9b7bc67494a7df6675e320a3249929c2327f3bb
describe
'11293' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_174thm.jpg'
9f2e00378aff524cac3fe70e52cd658a
cc2fd5022a913b07b1951b045a1b294ce8168f4d
describe
'552627' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_175.jp2'
c0d74e1f872818cdf941f49ab0eb301e
415f6fada0a500c3737ba19629304f8de21d4663
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFIZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_175.jpg'
3754137b86e2b3398c080d15d461f99f
01ec913deae325fe09a92af940af7f8f02a177e2
describe
'34969' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_175.pro'
5ebf57a16e926b05eafd75a5ff402195
b4773615ecc6878f4e6ee525e306b3a4b9b2a7b7
describe
'36830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_175.QC.jpg'
f5ca90bf140c618e42d94fd0595aded2
c25c7aceaaaf56daaac0868180e57523268516b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_175.tif'
de813acd1764ed45dfdcbdbeb395b689
7f2a08256000fc01e1d81f9129e5942774c5810a
'2012-04-01T04:13:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_175.txt'
3eb8082820e2f0311364da1ea2fe8e66
712ade8fc965ead49314ab790650b219759607a9
describe
'10449' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_175thm.jpg'
68e587616d957f655e9e2dba20cfcfcb
e7a8f1040384bbeb44480f0f49845b3e76df86d5
describe
'551356' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_176.jp2'
0519b1275637ccbfad321673f498fb45
19cf77078efd990631d7530c8166b445ada1b9e6
'2012-04-01T04:16:17-04:00'
describe
'102310' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_176.jpg'
a0ea520627b193c8f66731a6f6b97c30
08d2e2ce0820726a64559900177e827cedfbbfc4
describe
'33111' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_176.pro'
5fd8c62a6fd784c0fc780f793eb6b613
49caab756cdc1d38ab56fb6419104414e2cfde82
describe
'35909' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_176.QC.jpg'
9cabee136c6b8e29e525bb33054d5625
337145bc035dfd83ee395dfde5a90ebdef83d1aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_176.tif'
6168ebde6b097309fba2eece2f67f9f0
817732ac198fdbb773194061cce0daa89b0cac15
'2012-04-01T04:15:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_176.txt'
9c8c4324bb1862baeab3f28d769db0fe
861e2cee59a02f2b932aec221ddc8e77f3ab0da2
describe
'10394' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_176thm.jpg'
f95c183d2c7f6cb05bcc6817a60cdbc1
7b04c9db5c5d6d63858b6ed7c461613890ea48d8
describe
'552649' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_177.jp2'
e6eab4a298e4f89f71d86bae53d087a7
1aff61fa43b1cc0c1c9d19c471739c53aedce0b8
describe
'104602' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_177.jpg'
eb5879ec61fc737e181a114f187aa9ef
43368ca8ebee2b564924caebda3178b2316e1fc8
'2012-04-01T04:20:06-04:00'
describe
'35159' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_177.pro'
df1ce7c35c04d7b02eb1f4621c0fc7e7
f4b5c6e49ebbe67dc7a5c76f4b1231dcaa13b024
describe
'36074' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_177.QC.jpg'
fa2e6304115bdbee1d18a906c1a0061b
a1522024b22db2d09bce9f0b46e1bfbfc20eadfc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_177.tif'
46b0c99d00d20707eccd26b71b896996
86a151104d8e872d07b205303999558077210a31
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_177.txt'
eb86f4a60216d7bad027b6ccc9e6d91c
0faad7484540ff376599c3027467d812dc46e14f
describe
'10254' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_177thm.jpg'
875bf3a82aa3d710bb65fbc734da2b23
50960284528ef7833b8ca36b3296c3defb076a87
'2012-04-01T04:14:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_178.jp2'
5b8345b87481425cdc4d4e883b3d8411
924bfe8846cc24733767f2746eee46601222eba0
describe
'102660' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_178.jpg'
87ebc7fcd9abf14990eca4887c0e5a98
e622b12eaedf027a087289823fb34394fc5e9e6f
describe
'34253' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_178.pro'
865169e23586fe8430d10e667fc31381
6e9d3b059190b2a6d48d370140064bb093049fa4
describe
'35925' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_178.QC.jpg'
0b2483f77b23852e07a494e41e695f87
70418d80995473573137fe4b6bb5bf7d7605fdcc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_178.tif'
bff7992a3d899dd4e57331d6c20f2e76
68e120b41b5e1f9e9a4031f543b496c13c489bc6
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_178.txt'
cd23ae1cda7e954955d6bb4e7fa4cbbc
a57305c9995dbeb570e9a665bbf4bbc78649af43
'2012-04-01T04:22:10-04:00'
describe
'10112' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFJZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_178thm.jpg'
77322d3f9f2bb7f3ea7a359319db7b8b
2056c0b603cd9813a1265a3867977ecf6ae15034
'2012-04-01T04:20:46-04:00'
describe
'552648' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_179.jp2'
618ecd14d0d11fe095726ffff83f7132
2ca049ad7d1ab3b288e6f674ea3dbeb019d965c7
describe
'97739' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_179.jpg'
2713536b0bfe35e9e72a68351a37ea7b
0a3d17792b505ff4450c37e2d6174e120710379e
describe
'31387' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_179.pro'
efebb3bd2ca6422ab037a08d4e1caa21
c50d4544c388580edf9f5c7db840a4993db2945b
describe
'33699' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_179.QC.jpg'
19e784adef7435878e8b1edeb654cd8e
7d5e37809cd8739eac76d29710d94bf550ebe20e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_179.tif'
e1be967c2be23000e058ea4f523cf4cd
54cbfe0d7dfeeddcbeab42314c974278cc33269b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_179.txt'
18f95967bcc02f1fb9c2779bc4c28ebc
1ffbb2186a55f4308134fd45f38e5bf297d662f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_179thm.jpg'
09db9cc0c0f81051b20bec06c3b04687
a3ada5fbf97b4e23d1960f5e12e3369c570f4653
describe
'551294' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_180.jp2'
35e178b1d8f725ebff38b5e8dbe7ef03
e2a88489b248abee7f806acae58c035f9e4ce119
'2012-04-01T04:23:39-04:00'
describe
'80522' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_180.jpg'
7cd8dc98bb70f6c0d2d966c873088eee
e3da78438c61799ed2910ecd2d68ef296cbc682a
describe
'23833' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_180.pro'
9980342bc1a2085dc869759d8df9d399
8c67991418d0162bc29580a0cf06285d270ad327
describe
'28162' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_180.QC.jpg'
77212a9a586f9ebf8dfb241dde62cb04
453c03986e98c852ffb3e174bfc074300d70775e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_180.tif'
edbb92ef80be7dc01e4a7d83e74db433
208e2b0fe3c4f7be5a7c0cfffeb5fd21dbbac1c6
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_180.txt'
2e4839b0a487592bc7a0ee6c3c8a3326
d4f98c6c0b3a11a00ec84fd10c98902213dff33e
describe
'8087' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_180thm.jpg'
ff31a1fe1e5b359ba1e87b62075d07fd
1c2d82ba4d542248a73c2efe9f11a1a942b4537b
describe
'540168' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_181.jp2'
b6704d75cb948788186a53df0cef5884
9b4df256e3622a2d3e2cc92d22e497683284b4b2
describe
'94784' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_181.jpg'
595ccd9b38486373860e79c27a741d7e
a6816d71b50d5dbae728abf5c40ce7f6bcb9ab01
describe
'28159' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_181.pro'
1f60fcde520f45e34bbb8167191ea58a
5a245e08e2d0f18eb00d37ab943b0936a6a2f951
describe
'34308' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_181.QC.jpg'
6572ed1c426c6a5ca582331b3c670f8b
ae0408b6a5be9b41b9ad4e89f43a04b04ec63570
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_181.tif'
34ab74f4b75f1cec53f8f48bd9a8e687
4cf9b293aa9dba286863c3c0be13add1bf3f4376
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_181.txt'
9c4d3b92f90f2a559f63cff473406598
59c57651c2311d273e9298240e3ac423dedd955d
'2012-04-01T04:18:04-04:00'
describe
'10412' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_181thm.jpg'
a84fc0b3d4a659619177df0507029423
d23f20374f84fb14b89a094285d29739d9e0a187
describe
'551112' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_182.jp2'
207ce06f9d2cb9232cd3458e86574f5c
0cf2f351db3fe714188dafccadf45fa05c00e7b1
describe
'109961' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_182.jpg'
fe9d65f5c17815958538387dc03ac18c
dbe1065a144c9f7cfb80baada80a4965695ffba2
describe
'36713' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_182.pro'
b0020252de23355146c5f44d681972ef
399ffe8a753dcd7a8046813e7b5fd26752f42160
describe
'38798' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_182.QC.jpg'
d0b3d73d13464177d36e224509feac0c
1d8d67685b897a14fbf70ade618fc45e5a38ea17
'2012-04-01T04:20:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFKZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_182.tif'
74897dd7e4bd449d4bed20332ce6d553
f84562dab5fdc3d4f7e40284df716017ac075ef6
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_182.txt'
4093d6552f84e77d5823794a6961d6fc
11d0d4eaecad379dfa041869790c37f4d7c92c35
describe
'10751' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_182thm.jpg'
11dff39afbdd2f9a6aabba19f62a1776
57f22dac9f5dd546f621b5062b388720acd2ca7e
describe
'536146' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_183.jp2'
6175f967e6343892a53813c829eecb26
43c53e0ae0b0e96fd705ab8aedf166e7af049d4f
describe
'110115' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_183.jpg'
ca97ffd8756f5f6439982547cacefcee
807e803faafae89c3aaaba1d66b260ea7f8cac56
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_183.pro'
a3dfd0dacaafbeae8d19cf577afd7166
d4cb321194491e9018e48afdefc6abb9ceb6639a
'2012-04-01T04:18:01-04:00'
describe
'38961' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_183.QC.jpg'
19bb946a703287b4370c5b52a5142779
2dfeb34d24099302ab617261e49890c2285e4843
describe
'12888954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_183.tif'
e301c82e75a549810839ed8a3058af00
ef383615ef521abf18a43d019c34c185f1062710
'2012-04-01T04:16:28-04:00'
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_183.txt'
6279729610946a46c2ce737025b30c2d
aa889e19567e569c21905d3e66a268728e69c923
describe
'11031' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_183thm.jpg'
002c40c06b2f1a5fcfc7bd1d631b06da
89543063a05e35af93cbf93fe93beb8b5dcc2eff
'2012-04-01T04:18:31-04:00'
describe
'551282' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_184.jp2'
5c175691f67d50963941f17c4c8bea8e
4ad844e0996e70d03e500b5ecf4d25dbc4a52608
describe
'104524' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_184.jpg'
3488802baf307b434ac56de6954e1e2d
6ce7e7047f6ee11ae548e9d268d04e28bc41141d
'2012-04-01T04:23:37-04:00'
describe
'35102' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_184.pro'
5956bd55a8921ffad3a0c86f73092972
81524f8a27701a895a2d3d9612bf73d9b492b8c5
describe
'36782' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_184.QC.jpg'
728c23a40c8b5ded8570ea609d5e617d
8a7867fbe20bbee745860876bd6923535f4ccb26
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_184.tif'
28e53b0f6ed7c06e4656b6e37a263dfc
96b571d3d3573cbb4a7b847355829b19ebb78da5
'2012-04-01T04:20:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_184.txt'
563eea9d90022ddc89442598ed65b8fa
44f389fd274d70019e453b076728fcf397dabca4
'2012-04-01T04:16:43-04:00'
describe
'10612' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_184thm.jpg'
9078924f8e675745f737f0710172e53b
e2b59604a5dbe3a376cc481a811b39df08457a93
describe
'552668' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_185.jp2'
034c855c4d112a62b6eb3967c3dc06b8
733277cd4d3fc437b409b1e3b75c9e0c72880eab
'2012-04-01T04:15:53-04:00'
describe
'105335' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_185.jpg'
deb473c22de5ce1f3f0b8c7579ef7e32
0aeef4909180733e3b3140588a47bfcf60496f34
'2012-04-01T04:13:19-04:00'
describe
'34652' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_185.pro'
e887c49a293f4992d29a5725001a3663
3ecc2ee1bee1a5c7e1a0a171bcd7817d086087e1
describe
'37110' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_185.QC.jpg'
0416b78d7ccf56b413b0e6a5b15b5bd9
275567423446a5df3e9e9eb731cd1acded5f047f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_185.tif'
881583f2a91314ffaeef6a4b9f48bc35
3b2461869d5ae980c584ed523b50cab0b0ff1a3b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_185.txt'
1797d19bb7c4b9457662536aa3bc0c87
de603f704b75ebd9f63696384af7808bc1bdb9ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_185thm.jpg'
a429a3022a79daa33a850505c481156d
9e13f872d0d0c81baf8703b75cf6504db35e121a
describe
'551318' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_186.jp2'
cab4f3e6e621a6f209d08b93f53e5277
ddde3da8e242e2671aab7a5c31eb96921e69df9c
describe
'109324' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_186.jpg'
44fb5eaddd13a5eb9343985b0535eb37
9fc993b1581d9305739dafc7d364c45968083409
describe
'36351' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFLZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_186.pro'
4836e084d89cdb77004e8a53de65ca84
b8cfb086567bb94e9a1d0857f4386e83d5749646
describe
'38716' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_186.QC.jpg'
04f594c41d2663bbbce9664f268840a3
92a1403d86351f49cbb352a1bd82e3b82e5be3f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_186.tif'
527f553a851e9fe585170ddf95d5fcf6
48cbb079de3290e8e6d2755479490bc285b0f646
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_186.txt'
549b9d69480868ec8be12c3f1049c63b
b514d44a1da277eddb73ba17295e636c530d969b
describe
'10992' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_186thm.jpg'
58c2f52e9ba615c70802d47fd8a08a86
299abe3f1599ad86d63d3f5d86420234a1716e74
describe
'552527' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFME' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_187.jp2'
463370693f8ee98005524d90aa2f777f
9ae4ba514a6f1cc515f8f297c18b2e840b6139df
describe
'106073' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_187.jpg'
24d588fc28782bc3020cb46fb427166e
0f451990026b2a0cc730a04a0a952821734d7d69
describe
'33255' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_187.pro'
6363f17eeb37053d017384e4e5f35440
643171155d7f44db92c5e9ae593b4d3910ae7324
describe
'36909' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_187.QC.jpg'
7eb00d7cc6fbdc4881a5ba750ba35f77
31cd5ba5dbf5d1089c6409cfd5dc6961ce34a54b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_187.tif'
8ba7637b36830408baa259b4d4875e88
0fb3ef8f8e8585539f27c339db309faf90ab1fa8
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_187.txt'
f1e5ca4168d5c3405cdc3370755e1ab8
9face41ff4a37b43604b24af1561530402773ce2
describe
'10589' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_187thm.jpg'
87205e0ed841805a10b4ccaa0abb5662
4140f386128028a82cfc7da2f865e1469b6b9abf
describe
'551263' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFML' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_188.jp2'
faf3f7a058e6dc344b973c6a9415db8f
8ce7f8c43cb7ba4ef791e4726b919d0f2574fd80
describe
'104135' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_188.jpg'
cca9a28262d422e7fec1111a56d46925
19b6a2ebde5555de92166605d46e968876e64f1e
describe
'35383' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_188.pro'
d9587357e3dea1de542c42812bf55199
c92459ed7c07b6e46f207c54f03880fa87228509
describe
'37106' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_188.QC.jpg'
28367ac4960b588dea9107da7c3ef4e7
35638b0162689752ff23c4c79e29d6e1ce9ba9bc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_188.tif'
b6036fddff23532cdd2754237a955d4c
a66b2eb045fa606cdf72a5ff60d77590f8c84a36
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_188.txt'
f606581aed5149980a5bcc98621024a8
d7571be279dd9bd8ae9f985806acccb6bab5e5c9
'2012-04-01T04:14:40-04:00'
describe
'10622' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_188thm.jpg'
89713c3b968975146e37e173f9fb5076
3bc29dc74303b3c130dfc25fac796c04b1c12b24
describe
'552614' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_189.jp2'
381c11bdfced2f37124611f156b50f9f
11cd994068fb8c5d1fa35b05e1f36bbf98ac6d3e
describe
'100495' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_189.jpg'
5c7560f83568493ef031addd4ebdadb0
3ac7e120205fa4420c8b93f8c952e30ab9565c73
describe
'32208' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_189.pro'
fb547558aa3c503f0425fa063828e8c6
2b9a0df91d03546cd88f9545e1ef43976030d2ad
'2012-04-01T04:21:57-04:00'
describe
'35445' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_189.QC.jpg'
7b473733f17b6605cb855be8ef99b696
c3e6271e39497bb5ed843caf2723655b47240bf0
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_189.tif'
fe06102691bb987754fe7e4fbbd54f2c
0be7e29a6194919d8ead9a86f7a383b4fd8c24f0
'2012-04-01T04:16:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_189.txt'
fc1e588bc0845a171bbd265921f313a2
e95ed3c6d9696898754d7e930ba8b08bd5e23495
'2012-04-01T04:16:09-04:00'
describe
'10113' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_189thm.jpg'
d504e02ac3f595447fa7005b18824d21
a661cbe7140852f396a9d9ffb365cdbe4aa2d45b
describe
'551330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFMZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_190.jp2'
0c25845babf8cd5c3c0e980d9e57caad
6963eb45d45c9ed8c6acd3328f98200b9b0b0243
describe
'109143' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_190.jpg'
7ab0e534de7cb36876980336a64166a8
ffcab527cfb41d998d4b9ce5d33a4506dc6f9fb6
describe
'36812' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_190.pro'
7fca72f219d1e728137fad18641c2334
91156de78cc6f1dcb2d3f26ba5e6f04fa9da223f
'2012-04-01T04:14:22-04:00'
describe
'38106' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_190.QC.jpg'
3d689e86dba25c985a49a8b9051d3ae4
ba99163aeb58c18e58ab5bed9c628ceaef5f4376
'2012-04-01T04:22:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFND' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_190.tif'
f5e309c19cdefa3ebeefd6f8439831c6
328b3e04a6ca42b2fb822a05be383e98b2c891be
'2012-04-01T04:23:53-04:00'
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_190.txt'
ff3064e8bea3eedf8a0f177e36884054
7722d67f0b995611770e91029e3c2a7b6e5d0203
describe
'10483' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_190thm.jpg'
eb35631ee1beab09045ff37b7b769a5b
a24369b8773f3654f89dbd1b0657d5c245235ae1
describe
'552494' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_191.jp2'
69ced322a2960f96a59af3661f98c56f
a9edadb2d2551ab3450e041b9b94e47f4c15b659
describe
'108032' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_191.jpg'
7b8a7855e39c215964292e6c6cd84e2b
ae2d92af7b7a14c446b2cc8060247c7f28962e35
describe
'36979' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_191.pro'
5aa95cf6432a4717cbd45fd9e35533d6
5359308418c0ec3040d3e67a750d6b480bb47f4a
describe
'37687' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_191.QC.jpg'
f740d392d353c132eed120f7a1147576
83e10495e5b1455e78469e401ba2e5ed56693a1f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_191.tif'
6e18a4c453c3e900f9083bda10c6c251
3acef4f756f701862ca922f7691312040019aa18
'2012-04-01T04:16:44-04:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_191.txt'
b365eaa9a09aa52a6fa3e154664dc223
4426dadadac643661c2e268e2533ad6f96f1584d
describe
'10404' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_191thm.jpg'
2527a8ea5bd625afde496fb3981bdfd7
d5712f873f0cf0bb2bf31aa11f36fd72638209c4
describe
'551135' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_192.jp2'
e551e89cabe12d7d88df15b1a427da58
3d16997bbc42de60924f737f28857fa301d0e314
describe
'106057' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_192.jpg'
af503ad240c9bf37f472449c05a00a1a
cf1ba6531d77c652d4a4566398881dbe62c9dc46
describe
'36331' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_192.pro'
bf34e51b3737ee9fff424d3f4f34f14b
1e5c946cf3ba20087876c45cb7dff50defb28924
describe
'37829' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_192.QC.jpg'
e28aba8651b1426fe15f9602ea8a8815
618c73b8686312e0753af2e4cc1b6870f334d247
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_192.tif'
1f4628702762846c506eb0d9b7860b65
ce13afd576f0cc3e3d0cc09f244603083aec7136
'2012-04-01T04:20:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_192.txt'
b50db981a329fa4c898f9978c2cf39ad
2be4b43416e621230db3988f96d132ae0289bd27
describe
'10728' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_192thm.jpg'
a222c956bfef713f53239a057bc23f51
592d160893a3e24600ccfa5e117af93d04f46575
'2012-04-01T04:19:31-04:00'
describe
'552547' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_193.jp2'
854782aee9dc72d2bbbdbaf3bc20f8da
ff3fe55db49527e829dd69522a647fad1fe1ba0b
describe
'106798' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_193.jpg'
e79b31377c129320d9ad393fbbdd96f4
3649d76ba04a0227016ac43080e03075849a034e
'2012-04-01T04:14:59-04:00'
describe
'35560' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_193.pro'
4c8c4fceeb6b75714244c2e6aaa01e67
751876d20144706c37bb3bcf83e18834aefbfa75
'2012-04-01T04:19:13-04:00'
describe
'36982' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_193.QC.jpg'
59984b09c5d54c76ddeb621476baa8cc
8264f3dd75141ef9d86966cfa3d2a81aa934489f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_193.tif'
2e61a4fcda0c15bf3a3d36ff65cf415e
c16f198eb6f5662b305099d2e2244f667d787cb4
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFNZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_193.txt'
fa4dfb783b6d3c63350431aeef0c07e2
9faedc55463dda77cdee6ebe1a76e6c1b8f6a178
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_193thm.jpg'
88b7cd755ff9afd66aea5e27273714cd
1a48a7a0345fb152c2c8b21934018676d315490c
describe
'522393' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_194.jp2'
0d9ba3e6f24045ae36970208c9fb195a
e9b51e66c503a0d4165ae571578fcc368861d1ef
describe
'103113' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_194.jpg'
b9635eba9c01766b9191e0c24bac0fac
9c59fc36bb4cd5d3c035665abb10cd0757d2fbd9
describe
'35033' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_194.pro'
2ad0aa30b9b653c39c54aedfa55db9c6
a21c4f47a5e5682be964506ca45f5b14d911e710
describe
'36042' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_194.QC.jpg'
d4579aca97aa235ab55ad2a12b94887d
102d625945a269a0a86b9fcee3b559ae66a2612b
describe
'12558204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_194.tif'
467c4908d612c39b73e7501bf6636dde
6be037004a892d519a2f4439892b0dd20058b838
'2012-04-01T04:21:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_194.txt'
b8059543e554895020408c4b2d4fe6e2
c7ab8fbddde64b6493c28201e7cf6e4c9240756d
describe
'10641' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_194thm.jpg'
266ab18e8b79aa858f60cfbd1b79ad11
3f3c8beb700f5ccb9fb69955f1837aaf221c9b1c
describe
'552594' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_195.jp2'
bdd2367e1adfe4be2f3ef363e9f2013c
2bfbc7341096e1cde354270596d1ea44393fa063
describe
'105170' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_195.jpg'
4e302d89d91f99f5eed87dba9915715c
d4bd6bbb4c3f073f4a7e7eb12daa71db8cb57f4a
describe
'34890' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_195.pro'
8a724878c3d7be9f372ee34af3ff6863
84bed97bb54cf2112457e2aba536577590aef2db
describe
'36907' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_195.QC.jpg'
dbf753f3c89d89bb4e34a4c55fd6523a
f423d731fac02c5ff21c7aa7da964b070c4c0ff0
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_195.tif'
0ec085330760b37c4ab20617644d59cc
4462b4015d4b1338f497336b3f78f350b8974ad7
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFON' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_195.txt'
cac3c9ef2e17242b6e70805877ce6052
882d36ec21a3217de1be8e6111710944446d726d
describe
'10312' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_195thm.jpg'
8781c335ae8c60215b1874c2ef47870f
5f61a6d63a82d8b773853c25747287d204f6ae1b
'2012-04-01T04:18:27-04:00'
describe
'551339' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_196.jp2'
a5f0f7177f52c019f885aa822877e383
e7ce2b21e30117143e217e59e95271d201876a7c
describe
'107019' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_196.jpg'
7a57d2ce0ebacd9ea071fbfb566a4769
f5325738151fc2d1d668102d8fd4188f8e9789e4
describe
'35531' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_196.pro'
38bdcd74b7bbb886d2eefe2f3f9fd890
e711cd709cf8174c5a705568a503da312c16a6b2
describe
'37552' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_196.QC.jpg'
44be6eaa6b12d7daea8d82ac89043197
931f7922c5b5b66f5aff375c1bd61424efb7d400
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_196.tif'
1a615d11ad1fd0fb489285de26e88c32
e053418dc5bae29eaa42b9f7a191ec68849b4810
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_196.txt'
11ad9cd35d2f76027e8a63de4a43e3b7
fa494c02977b5ea7613cad7b450f24178c65df1d
describe
'10516' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_196thm.jpg'
1bf6102ae14136c4ce4044812bdd968f
514923e5f22716cd46b46163ac7b0e69a588f57b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_197.jp2'
97c6db910c08c9d84f08c481e7e9a916
880b35c8178db7a1c8432f22286cb1ddc9364abc
describe
'105970' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_197.jpg'
7a31e0ed0f92442720141c0e2df31512
20a288f77f2aec8b03ddbcbc7c23e1df2d44e95b
describe
'35689' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_197.pro'
490097dc362367462d29ffaf9e9c5a1c
c66c60e9365b93e01077f9f0273af0968a57ea1d
describe
'36410' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFOZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_197.QC.jpg'
9d5548f0421b93c19c3ccbecc40dced5
85c9ae5c73d5ddabeee2164c7bd09a57706edbfb
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_197.tif'
c03dbee7015542fb7e79c29c297b5428
d42a86cc39ab152061a3b537d229d587d6fac28a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_197.txt'
1cd3c1bac0402926ebed2f8e11da1294
afe59955f904568a09bb008648aab91987c43913
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_197thm.jpg'
3271c30daaf47331f5082b5ebf88e919
6baa428bbb7301f1dd1186570f794343c196ef7c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_198.jp2'
7a970423ab4145aac95fd25840636d22
a1eed2ed68fd6458658eaf0014755361dc76da5a
describe
'109558' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_198.jpg'
049f66096a4d51f2d8b9eaee9282c673
4b6123243bfb92dff2649fa84a2292aeb31c10b6
describe
'36411' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_198.pro'
5bbd278c107be9fc461eb26c7fd23bca
621ac40a4e0436d81b4e1d267b21b3d12d6b3879
describe
'38252' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_198.QC.jpg'
27b8d1e51ba72ea0fc481c33165d50f8
cab12f2def5b094e11129bb471faa8dfdb73a061
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_198.tif'
52e4618447d07c23490f9d3410696fdc
f4b08aec45fe367084c475e32a60c05f268b1733
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_198.txt'
fd0d5171dcb1dc0d6694af4c28137f5d
22cc803e51219fecf0b18b8186598904cc151155
describe
'11006' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_198thm.jpg'
000bb6d0b6e3d52c063882fe4d9fd821
1f3347628ffe241ea0a460ae223df9d4951a1ada
describe
'552545' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_199.jp2'
4fc1f0c2429c18250cd9b0e15c248030
45e5fd07ef03b93a906fea7ac41970472790bb16
'2012-04-01T04:24:29-04:00'
describe
'101850' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_199.jpg'
8c0bab404d626b6a92fb272c5a55c629
19c30701d925fd42fc9c8bbd47c7b57676d17579
describe
'33453' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_199.pro'
b961808bdfd2463539f5b16b3f74820f
26e6a077f6f6aa6998de6829ed294c148a97f203
describe
'35915' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_199.QC.jpg'
02a8d342fc878cadedd99fa56c3ea033
19b2422516b121dbefaa06db7237b65a24433684
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_199.tif'
4fb7f6299a6d01b605a9d3378acec288
7c37cd71dbe176eb96f8c1f2019672b894c2bae9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_199.txt'
0c314cd59a088545bb4dd707e0887629
f24f7409ef65ce386b69702470eace334befef4a
describe
'10144' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_199thm.jpg'
de0d5fb37c77a9f82b74077b7cc8f65d
e91c9d2dda8d0a0721eb088489b750746ce9280b
'2012-04-01T04:18:37-04:00'
describe
'551157' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_200.jp2'
db62888669288ce3adae52e50b229f13
e9f5786955e954b642e245d9e56692ff0b940d5b
describe
'109212' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_200.jpg'
1ecf3353cb614e3785dce2d7b2cbe158
0a91251406bba563a9709e4cebea0d479408e77a
'2012-04-01T04:14:23-04:00'
describe
'35964' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_200.pro'
868e2015a0332e713ed20f5a76c33fbf
7afc6009e62d877332bd266c7bb7fa780fb271b2
describe
'38114' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_200.QC.jpg'
faf9e02b08fd53da12f947f046543ffd
9ebd190a5afd246362a5fc3d64661656c06d5ffa
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_200.tif'
c258a3920f2e7ef148e451485cda9429
dd444d94556139e97b1b49d8ed667f4858a039e2
'2012-04-01T04:24:41-04:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_200.txt'
eb3721aae1f8ee0c3986618731190ce4
3e8876e6c73a57161a73eb2f79aaf94e2b4cb842
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_200thm.jpg'
98a1fed5d8a97d58375c21adcea8932a
d57cd013eff63252dd439910fbb7a8a604b66be7
'2012-04-01T04:25:09-04:00'
describe
'552607' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_201.jp2'
e7eebfd4909a0e769f40c8253d9b5bb1
b3853c9950ad9633f003b0f09a22c233312cbbb4
describe
'101782' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFPZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_201.jpg'
4230f9255b9598e11f7bd0516c54e75a
ac598525853f7385bea15efa0eb10d3c88a61e19
describe
'33842' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_201.pro'
3c9efd3e1264a3dfa11e01e8e76af893
7472fa05be66d33e651499e97e380dffc4a8e10b
describe
'35733' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_201.QC.jpg'
8e30e7f9aaa02f8c2964bbeddaec2525
c23f500c161246f46e711e00fa16b79a405ee81b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_201.tif'
7cf3e60241e7f0f88d8abe1efea8da0d
64f18a5af2d4ea2196c72d0f071ee7801cee1a94
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_201.txt'
bc7009227f7fdd16333de28e0035ef0c
c84bc2c54df481a8d7df80eb78e79e51be4353e7
describe
'10152' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_201thm.jpg'
e279749a7b01bde31ab1a8d655927bbf
33e9e2b90297b6bc85f4e75584b1775cafe9dfd9
describe
'551308' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_202.jp2'
48cff63af5b88615f6d1dcc46109984e
cb35052629fc6be78eb31348f8bf878fc2c9633f
describe
'101485' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_202.jpg'
98f546904519fd98e605efb856fa9c7b
91c50e0ac678b979223984c6fdc7f42db4ac0ac7
describe
'33650' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_202.pro'
d53fd1dde9c7f5f8c412470c7dcd121e
ff739f41cecdd64932581506ce9e78f97ba48906
describe
'35970' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_202.QC.jpg'
eaa9650e8892c49bb45135a45dbb36b2
a5c21486fa2caa9af0a4e2d123434f799425258b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_202.tif'
65e1cbe49208c16d16cbb8dc9ed3b977
c0e3a816e020c90227809399573287e735c5d700
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_202.txt'
4e500d79a72ef066b646995b0054bb9d
61d07fc5422089455eb849c62902a0db7c1980b5
describe
'10079' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_202thm.jpg'
1fb5af6fc559bb43c3cc4dee5d5957ab
73b95495ba6706c38e69aac549382551316bd0ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_203.jp2'
30f627462f63475afd0d1272e37378cb
fa83e33a8e4ede05ba538028115254187d940328
describe
'101993' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_203.jpg'
c0957f6f459856911df5b9c2de5f7631
ac711be9fb77d7d8fce89e5db7878c9c8c03e383
describe
'33967' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_203.pro'
ab68cdca9cdb91379cc5ef962eeb4fde
b946b0a6fd015406ea4dd3b1fc575c2fd267bc9f
describe
'35337' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_203.QC.jpg'
7a975297bbad10fbfde72bd5b8af48a0
1a455e59ee304edea9bc25fe98f3f648ee7428a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_203.tif'
f840c5d03bd5787ff1625272f56e2466
3dc823fda340d08d03a5b886469b3614cbbe86af
'2012-04-01T04:15:59-04:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_203.txt'
2e6eab0063db457aec35b8490c355a5e
5550096ca7d57a31b0c12383d56946d3d7201dbb
describe
'10211' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_203thm.jpg'
7961be4746f318b10a9279acebd85d7c
9c618a9e308f7b0bb0a7b444a2a78a5cada8c1b0
describe
'551313' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_204.jp2'
59b84b03074919dfe7d85fd2ea58ac07
05bd1fb7d4d16d47ce5266fd3469991b189349a0
'2012-04-01T04:14:30-04:00'
describe
'104361' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_204.jpg'
6b96886d8c2527fb303abe6d50cf8e94
d4e5b463df52cdafb6a56de7ce593f4f6cd7e6f7
describe
'34589' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_204.pro'
60a8d33e7555487a80514cf780c306cb
145ba1d402e653ac66c0ec49036575425c667d1a
describe
'36313' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_204.QC.jpg'
cb50a0cebd9fa9b9957bd51e2e63204c
1ab521ebb348c11f61805d17aa75ee825970cb74
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_204.tif'
45fb0187a1be9a65b61b3d70c14908cf
0d98c8f8359f6a45f5d3f376b89d8d0da23092c7
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_204.txt'
0a00bc9ec68b53a8f217baa7da01a2d7
1e8c1228119df9c2142f341c7eaed6efa63c43a5
'2012-04-01T04:24:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFQZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_204thm.jpg'
905b73007bd9c9cb034499c0b6f2a599
36cfca5939dfa6a81856270f527c6751bcd6a15e
'2012-04-01T04:19:36-04:00'
describe
'552543' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_205.jp2'
f3444453173a2a44f4dc179552ffcab2
811773921818a39ed80a55154517aebd880502d4
describe
'109472' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_205.jpg'
80042fe5c9e97fa2a404e8664578c49f
3b7d75a726cb815e1fcefdb92cd03952525752ff
describe
'35672' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_205.pro'
5ca8a6fadd65ad96ff4daccc77d1622e
4361a3b07dfd9f77717e8f172cc9672038eff81c
describe
'38154' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_205.QC.jpg'
7c29c21cb3d05c138ed872d563029cb0
2c0141afe4f601084c7ef1014d3dd7e9df13d702
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_205.tif'
e29fe797a3bb4661bbf56ced06b94ebb
b478013a58884c3526d4fdabe1d49b95bedfc29c
'2012-04-01T04:20:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_205.txt'
d02a0afafc73cb4086b0de21e0e426c7
b89003e4434855e8f37bfde8de289200e21f4cf6
describe
'10732' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_205thm.jpg'
7e6356882b260fd28b1d3b9a7bb75055
dce761d705e85101bc68308cc8ffcf50d37a6697
'2012-04-01T04:20:11-04:00'
describe
'518400' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_206.jp2'
81fb76cbde4300824777deda2c6dd715
6b46bb1ac133f31279d322a269450dd381eb8b34
describe
'102577' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_206.jpg'
12210764364104ae04141f6c352dd980
15b585ada75910e9dc1ad32ff9d7e29fb3667cc9
describe
'34394' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_206.pro'
e6e4fd5c3d2bc0b33a57a6816f679468
e34a14463af935157a0a601d938745efba73774e
describe
'35476' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_206.QC.jpg'
474589f105948fd6eae76f1fd083475e
72eb03d15494d2b03037988e5eca234acb90e201
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_206.tif'
50fc57c24f86be6ccd0ed08cea378a6a
47cf1304cf95319365076ffc1eee907d415555bf
'2012-04-01T04:16:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_206.txt'
c88c49fe66c2533555f9cf25b3f190a0
ec8b8b8fbf7ed9b51d5375f4275a577569d18eeb
describe
'10835' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_206thm.jpg'
9b9384a4ab3a93aeb95bd15086d407e9
84c649f639334c33be2a88bf1d3c29e25b616f85
describe
'552642' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_207.jp2'
449ca68cedf9d083ab773082a13e9efc
82bc20675db2b8f2fe9520a365e1db227e506b68
describe
'86907' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_207.jpg'
521c8b7b3ac06fcf9fb7af3bff859f60
1d6529fe50cdcfe103eaca9af1a6529c682bc919
describe
'26429' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_207.QC.jpg'
3d8a7a43153549d9e4bfd9f969e0d100
15528db8af849f51a8c86ad50dd1f50d10ae5604
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_207.tif'
b7e30024d9b906f589ada66c0dd29a33
9d5cc0305a862d6324a4be3dcdaeab51d79ce9fe
describe
'7835' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_207thm.jpg'
9eaa14dfd8f17dd36c537cd14d3e0335
a3dc000d2270fed7a869129bd437d78ca9469a7d
describe
'313500' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_208.jp2'
2fa333764e08ad6adc9ebb14f3f753d3
7fa90e1c6e8297bf02d8fbfed7cf275e0c97ea8d
describe
'24440' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_208.jpg'
7b95c21f196adff4f6be346ad4126ce1
559846c02882f1bb7075500236816edbe88b854e
describe
'7697' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_208.QC.jpg'
fcbbe71c31f50a9d0871bb2d54f5a5df
338bfc3c29395e95cd841d71beb3fcdd9ea42720
describe
'13408704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_208.tif'
ef49022929370fc95f3d691f9870486c
babcb6a076e955f06cb0a977df9677bf17b8f6e9
'2012-04-01T04:19:09-04:00'
describe
'2743' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_208thm.jpg'
9b0daeb3539cd096a3506f06fd03008b
42d9dc51d128a93fb6ca313663e45642f6b4fe68
describe
'588053' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_209.jp2'
2be0020171d6c2a990585b4951f49468
ee3dc2703b9116ce3e536c409ed9e7fd2b170ad5
describe
'93366' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFRZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_209.jpg'
eda171b962fdafcec36143e8dfe908b4
28739d3b3b517df8e6e7911c917b026df4313b43
describe
'33555' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_209.pro'
2a92fe3b5255c789892c18d8f65beb28
c9536682b56f59ca431e4c487142ab4d1692db66
describe
'32715' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_209.QC.jpg'
37c031283e86759f376aa0225e615003
043cfa8e3a1797e402a5caa404d0813e4d3f55ad
'2012-04-01T04:16:11-04:00'
describe
'14133204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_209.tif'
f399162196ac171baa394898573af2f2
dd3ba7f26f4d637cde101e7462b6d1ace0b68d5d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_209.txt'
a79456fd2cc895ec741c4a91b5a5a565
9414a1d8c513ac81f10bcaa3d380d84cb90cee09
'2012-04-01T04:15:12-04:00'
describe
'9319' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_209thm.jpg'
70e71e500bb621d490b0686af92b65b3
4029fdbe401dcbeb3e3ee698c0532f593592e28b
describe
'404095' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_210.jp2'
9f1858c75e51cf4136115c272b60babf
945b2fb2ded9d571bda6806f56bb0f47f6d31e9b
describe
'36171' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_210.jpg'
128ce62587c593d4860629a8354a5dac
3268b0667f0bfcf090c821bbf314b5fd14bc4e7b
describe
'4751' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_210.pro'
557b28ff97192581ecf475090b89f87b
e115090b6f004b02eebddcdb4f5569dde687ef3a
describe
'12644' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_210.QC.jpg'
afd5fa328dc683da6e60b70333f1b0c1
9696848e1b68ddf91da1e44a8247da44d0827ad9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_210.tif'
0c414575780f477b47b2c576295070fc
25da99c6f07ac0bdcf7e81d085a85822e1d58c82
'2012-04-01T04:22:45-04:00'
describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_210.txt'
8f1e25cceca94ead4904b979ac71969a
93e89a7e1ecf19ebf39ff539a61654adb639117b
describe
'4179' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_210thm.jpg'
569dac2b23082666573a39360fbed5dc
5c6f78fd1af52710d071aa035744613d9580c114
describe
'588102' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_211.jp2'
b8839fa9ccc02026b0e8b52e31442a04
93170df5bd25babcdac0a3e2a684fd96632e1e97
describe
'82837' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_211.jpg'
fbd61313792c9da0915b646b38173535
32de7ca6abb99d8ae922d30395e17d8e808b68f6
describe
'26902' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_211.pro'
4d441acbc0850b92169bef478a80c728
e447547f5bd0ff64e12e42e0b10fb5e80ceabc53
'2012-04-01T04:23:14-04:00'
describe
'28271' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_211.QC.jpg'
fd263a8a16f809983d3445bb754b7b5c
5e561e4e9eaced352dad79e21fb4e4247965080c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_211.tif'
1685daa64c4d446adca62615327eb3ae
981479e59dfc36d136e6cc6ef3350e3b85469ddb
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_211.txt'
9eb9ef4d8892b831422ff18cfa82f456
98d17765084d64023c70298501d639fe51b888b5
describe
'7951' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_211thm.jpg'
c369c8296e0757da9c002d8d8b1dc2d9
eac4d81a03933d40216ecc2631fc9c1b4ab1f5f0
describe
'557887' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFST' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_212.jp2'
a6172a77de5ccb4f1839d06ccb29b2c8
23ce122a8eec54d087e5d8aa77b2bb501ef24d8f
describe
'98586' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_212.jpg'
85d105a434d23ec5f821cd82214e87fd
6a621daf977719545a7b9d1d03bb91974dad44ce
describe
'31779' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_212.pro'
6b47884e02d5579d119082d8b4175fea
a2a8cb0f18258ce865c685d9d752fc6b0a94584e
describe
'34331' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_212.QC.jpg'
6eb0848f18e9e204d85c6f11d85c512c
0b48afedccd01197daf78bbf186d09148296091d
'2012-04-01T04:17:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_212.tif'
f8662fabd1d97a1c6fb3c8cb6088ec58
85be9171b00b923791f44eed65c29138db1f995b
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_212.txt'
c9aee6f3e9ae3dd3cb6ae07cbf3891ec
a66e2bacec9caef62292164be9dc570e1ed4701f
describe
'9952' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFSZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_212thm.jpg'
235ac980b3544066b324ce1c2bed1b8f
74773a792db3ae86aa9c567ca999b4f24f12e0be
describe
'588111' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_213.jp2'
ad27a8de6d6f3107c69085e09e6667e7
31918414c820036a4b9de8d810bed22f7c24c85f
describe
'103400' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_213.jpg'
0f7ce4311bc615a2094676bd6b5ea473
ddd6142d07d8aaff3b10e0fc68bc79a3f0c50c8b
describe
'36872' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_213.pro'
701929278b16f751042e7976d625616e
427cf0c9b3d00f7ac1e0605ac22bbfcdc4846557
describe
'35348' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_213.QC.jpg'
9b083418f29dc141360da7d34f276ffe
c78347a9d45cef4da76b716b7a2732e2d9fca844
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_213.tif'
6695e80b28f4dc79b74b82499dc88721
a3380d9644ecfbd217b8b413e7d23ea5b7bc1d6b
'2012-04-01T04:25:06-04:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_213.txt'
d726a22fd478a76a56da2fdad3a9fb85
9848b5f305300130f61b966387ca6b530e2447ad
describe
'9831' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_213thm.jpg'
ac6b7dd2da2d5b81938dd26f4d949a19
0a4302c8af9d3e4eab8acb517ec074b85da1d870
describe
'557821' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_214.jp2'
0efb611cd26cd6e82bccfc804a5e11f7
ddca6275f98879ce37ccdf8664392ede9dc96e10
describe
'104398' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_214.jpg'
5b43d4dda806dbb1c94dd26f950ce47a
d246b87a95565f48f9a96e97abaa8da97d6a2714
'2012-04-01T04:18:22-04:00'
describe
'35120' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_214.pro'
7c7be1c1d3dd1faa7f3195cf06eb2ba3
baef6248cc61ee59721f934f4aaa7367c3c9f1a6
describe
'37003' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_214.QC.jpg'
29f772bf39e3c52e2efb712c05ff7991
193a36beb54616d385969f181e7ac9de862778ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_214.tif'
372d8d5ae9b3c6837f2c544777025cce
71084b6200a53aa655382ef0f249dc8f85450e4e
'2012-04-01T04:12:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_214.txt'
64762dff4aae7c49e3d90047a019eb75
20a00fac0a68c176f74d142b9ed4245d012b403d
describe
'10291' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_214thm.jpg'
d6df4bdf45f519de89332adbfd5bc8a8
59f04c7fcb6c591cfad31792c955c9643c2049eb
describe
'588100' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_215.jp2'
ed3d17777f70d28250189ed566ae2a13
346324758ada7f3f3fde21d10fee7dfcf0e7c53b
describe
'93105' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_215.jpg'
cf9132726482d9de6700f16f5708d470
3408f5133eb827ff5f047fc833fcf749155830a4
describe
'31917' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_215.pro'
075900efa860e816312143505b824405
e45e45b9d7b49eb1f131ebe06a81a51019230728
describe
'32626' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_215.QC.jpg'
8285f57402fe6363fbda3de91a3c488d
f7fc1e7dab1ae56da310adc93f02838166dce8db
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_215.tif'
d6095222fc9c226d05dda64accaa517a
b133588999869f670caab1e38e03748d510cbf63
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_215.txt'
6d3f4e50a620f032442369d769b675b4
3d67b9d87d8e80be28f91a66f7914cdef400a7cb
describe
'8894' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_215thm.jpg'
1c5f1d118dc61a42965e2ed421585afc
9665c298fbb0ed5872a0d9e4e02ca226aba60a40
describe
'557811' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_216.jp2'
f7e7da27adfc72b2ef6b2a57948f1f56
ea8610628f38c5f93ae4574a8922f362f38a51df
describe
'102673' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_216.jpg'
ca806b8b3877cfcf384aea4d567a71bd
35e60228ab8b485f38a1ae524d3f136ebe736c23
describe
'33695' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_216.pro'
3f9d2f7ac8498ebe519edcfc17037cd1
a4c37bfc43fa312f16656e62e60d30207ad1c005
describe
'36525' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_216.QC.jpg'
c2a684b9431084b48c71f3aacb074281
7027ef53d8e0742c54fa6a40441c90ad1425c65a
'2012-04-01T04:17:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFTZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_216.tif'
285823384ac8aaf65079c5c69630c00f
c67ae4010606fa26b001d7c14b32775b43381cd2
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_216.txt'
6d1b5c695f65c0d15a48492527dd7692
98495c8927be10b73e36e4a75bf2396fee55c44c
describe
'10522' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_216thm.jpg'
c36c6d06fa5fe7995fdd3ebb2021b7a3
2903661e1fe288cc8e6b17df80d53f91e1c65756
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_217.jp2'
06d8d08e106eac5c5601df1f8e6a981f
67b97f86c52df39f0e6f337a05ac51f915ef2424
describe
'98761' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_217.jpg'
be1f24fcad3c1c8bee841b8ef1e272c6
2e7fabc6ccf9873dc6f3c48e4e792e80556c1c30
describe
'35645' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_217.pro'
5c1c587a9ba8ce8f58ad7b804a7727ed
2ba5568ae0afafb40c9390c814f4a45067ce8949
describe
'34109' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_217.QC.jpg'
c1fbe93b2c30c34e7ee3264f7933af7d
b3ecfede9d4ff6bb7e25440fe7eeaf4e94dccd31
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_217.tif'
eec12443eb64ceff5cef7557ac370a49
d70cb1b11c6aa23af4ec4eea96e4ddb0dd775de5
'2012-04-01T04:21:17-04:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_217.txt'
f199292cf92a06ad799026f929f84df5
d18a2b1e9257574dd94ac91a5811bb604b33eb87
describe
'9464' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_217thm.jpg'
9a8033d726a05ebbdefa7dd3322e714e
949c8d136498c1f2ad9b832f4924b692c455fa7f
'2012-04-01T04:17:21-04:00'
describe
'557882' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_218.jp2'
de30524f9851ece9465a9b31cef7891e
7572e1c31ca7a5e041cb054c7eb53783615535f4
describe
'106845' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_218.jpg'
675e45994ab1753b1e330b5da21d53bb
4aa9c3257adf33cc8658715504d000ffb491c9f0
describe
'35442' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_218.pro'
7439d65b7f7b3194e05c022de2dac535
aab28d8458069001b49e7f43094a65794f9f7f37
describe
'37486' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_218.QC.jpg'
fbc2044f9a30b1d216034f944992cf99
0957c515cd6d60f4cac8bdbe222f407973dc0246
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_218.tif'
a9683b780720b9ae2b8e6cd6b1c9ecc7
7e37a2343f1dd19c907fdd26b0a5b5749bb604f2
'2012-04-01T04:19:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_218.txt'
c50c8b1497d08aa2130442b1fd1aabd2
7c01864a1931a045b3f97da6bacf13bb2fab8b9d
describe
'10545' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_218thm.jpg'
2663ddd03da29c38b074336f0d7a960c
a042bb315845a7307b2bbf44abb7f80d7ab2bb2d
describe
'588074' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_219.jp2'
fa8d3b0acc19b5779927452ed5d81801
f0a4194da0dfcdb427c3d4ea747da31170a2056f
describe
'97436' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_219.jpg'
a00490365827782d2f664718a8c694b9
f6cb1628bb7edbf33a577fecc001009d228d9a05
describe
'34789' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_219.pro'
cf7609c37a7d41a6a50ecb81c8ddd368
4d556697f4d5cd39e4fcd2e68a483998923a3c05
describe
'33788' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_219.QC.jpg'
351bcb71331d27ad4a39856829841b4e
a4bf5b5af267de12d8383dd602c338087fabb10d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_219.tif'
88b970737e6886f7f4181f8b8da3fd83
b0cdfe3a300c1173215db778c59d30b770492e49
'2012-04-01T04:22:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_219.txt'
73fa24bc2e7e0d62e98e28d645d2a20d
6165f5dd0ea48fb81cbcc71b79934fa27bb104d5
'2012-04-01T04:20:25-04:00'
describe
'9357' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_219thm.jpg'
3c9ae36b2c4bdde2d50d5a03235c48ee
8c72f31767e8f5120e9c67e8a4f05815d06c4cc3
describe
'557822' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_220.jp2'
26be2daf7f074fb57adb36f65a68baba
6bc55a2ad60483bcb1eeefca6d75805b3c6c5085
describe
'104268' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_220.jpg'
2594553a9bb6d2dd174ae8899eef5906
5d000bdc3e885ff9f4d05e241a1f9e6a33968f7d
describe
'35125' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFUZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_220.pro'
3d510b3d8b3fc0647b6ab211b84275d3
53109f971a316d7f44d3ba2d70d3391e6cf93c12
describe
'36905' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_220.QC.jpg'
79da0cc90da8ca2a91a49d25449b0a80
95349e7fdfacb8e19d899913f5fe036881f50049
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_220.tif'
d86f198bb597dad19e0e03175a1f0ff8
bb3a0d16d329f01151d4e5e7ea931c320ec906de
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_220.txt'
b6b6d3d3835651c8d8380c21b7453702
3140bac147a8debaa9e27fb89b10e1ae996dd931
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_220thm.jpg'
e511aa3d9135ed1e825f09a930ce30e5
d58e8ca065621bf25af2173e1429be0b3dfb2ef1
describe
'556594' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_221.jp2'
a9484cdbeba66b8587d9a7362e2b0679
c0094c36c4599e5c4eed0f8ee0449014dcdc38f1
describe
'105787' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_221.jpg'
c6605b88b7709415cbb23392f7e5baeb
2c6b6a14417b17454de844a592d7e56beecb4be2
describe
'34471' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_221.pro'
222fd2b923919b0303fa88dcf8bb8bb5
67a2e067fc3e94aecdb6637a89285f2d38f35d8f
describe
'37334' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_221.QC.jpg'
25933268d20d5649f3db2e1ecf163cef
ac455ad1cf152b9b174fa3513a98160a31161fa3
describe
'13377204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_221.tif'
ac5a265e86f071c7685296339d700217
254ee5ff58caff79babfbb821b8aa58b94fad598
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_221.txt'
c0a9d404e0eaabbe54a1a372ed6f8224
c1343f213268fea0085013a216ecee067b85cc69
describe
'10759' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_221thm.jpg'
5deaf53db17daaa3e9dbc65c9f4edaa2
0c6db06bb14da58c96d46b283dec7f1a95b660d4
describe
'557905' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_222.jp2'
fc266b38ae33226521d672bb7bf4d75f
5af86847617dfe66a0ae359bb342f23370262745
describe
'105029' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_222.jpg'
b4ef698ddce682afb0f899c7a35bcf97
b2e6a1477aa1030904b31a99889d990ebdc9e6f8
describe
'33925' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_222.pro'
de731135fa8c289dac5f60929f0968e3
7b45eeffca7dc4ff518e5f544c99bc5847a9978a
describe
'37176' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_222.QC.jpg'
52325d58d0226ba2735038d59cdac067
25aed130a60d69195e9129ebe04731378f6a06f8
'2012-04-01T04:22:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_222.tif'
b619792ba1eb2d01cf4387aa2486e20e
70513d34997c2a32502d14bbea485f3b7d785cea
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_222.txt'
614ceef3a3f047f51232b63cc8bf57ab
6926e0f66cd9211e344c59819da6fcbfabf20333
describe
'10722' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_222thm.jpg'
c877314ef07fbe7ac525823a505485b6
183ecde3f1abebd3d59c4fd075c1244b4ebc1ad3
describe
'534937' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_223.jp2'
76f1fb4931a69c9a8e8186dca8db28a0
5b864bc367828bf772986a9a5c4db5f207f00536
describe
'111436' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_223.jpg'
234c9c7df7dc9b03c629eac5e092fde4
c128de7cb6ccb27d8638a2411dcb57f9e2f6bb19
describe
'34853' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_223.pro'
08a4bd99887d8664e73fc582d0caa7d6
a3e9a22cc48f7e91d65487c64e368fe7b368e117
describe
'39039' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_223.QC.jpg'
76d3d4cf5620ea1e1e40cb3c148ec6e8
527b69326d32d9c18c6ab7d6ace60ec68503d5bb
describe
'12857454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_223.tif'
bf46e6a50c00b89ff0d3511518d66294
9413976f45123f69655287d71e77258e10b293a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_223.txt'
d962888b88f62511e0664e9af201519b
3afd1d30ce406c0000ddd170063f16fa8e5b8481
'2012-04-01T04:15:30-04:00'
describe
'11244' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_223thm.jpg'
cc4c3ad7bc5192609c9de8a9fb36c773
5c67faa4dee2f2a5dcc045c0ae737a01bf3c9d30
describe
'557918' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFVZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_224.jp2'
b9d441035fa21e4448fb314c70ab926d
2aab6020391ce5fb1622686fcec288c15f422408
describe
'109458' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_224.jpg'
7eed94ac275aca73af4036ce23ca7754
263ab9aef07d88829fa247a829012d886f5244fa
describe
'36099' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_224.pro'
ab0b58b5a79b27f09882bdb40391ebfd
613245dc26dcf82545aaf85510b7c2ed4f40b4b8
'2012-04-01T04:14:29-04:00'
describe
'38999' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_224.QC.jpg'
b9bb2417bfb013bbc363eb814c01380c
3bc7d9899be542bf9d346ff2e784a6313fae79a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_224.tif'
895448257a75c3121f830479e9781b5e
34ca0a053b78cd6f802065bac9d57b8c39a8fac2
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_224.txt'
217e1409305ad4f3fb6fd93548157fc2
3fc02e19d663a9339c07800438773e141d0ec508
describe
'11098' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_224thm.jpg'
e55b8ca0bcc570fe309eb8f1e0d25db5
9e9072217e73238c0f6664bf7d1f814527888bb9
describe
'588098' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_225.jp2'
f26bb0eac2c0c4d8cb846a181c144f91
29a4a813d3b0c35fe3d2a021bcb890b1debcd1fb
describe
'98438' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_225.jpg'
bbef8369102b84491db7db334692cf6d
674212f45b12a7fd66cd78a1c3c12d6f52e41b23
describe
'35276' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_225.pro'
2a529a1accef216206b15211472dc790
2f3b5647357ea96abd72841575f0ec7c27b3dff0
describe
'33753' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_225.QC.jpg'
ef2046db5f64ca98bc9c0171f1e9a7cb
cf6961d172b973d9fb0d2142e9b641898ee4b7b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_225.tif'
04732d056576622d058e9f40ad580a95
1d3b0e9aea865063c7f1697f45f5db099b7356ef
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_225.txt'
e38b90a2a1078ca3eb5749c1b995ffdc
a147f36edb3169e6f9860f6f3ca3d5790ae29010
describe
'9471' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_225thm.jpg'
df2a2ebb30852b9a56cf798dcc6f65f0
c6ce92bc02659f437670151aa74d7504b1707cb7
describe
'557849' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_226.jp2'
cbf7dcffe56bcc954bce2b3d9d9598bb
abbe9a0c4fc93f0901eddd1ea56df423ded6df6f
describe
'106686' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_226.jpg'
7f6ed8f22c57020ac44b8c0a1ef9e083
78e9dbceb250b37e3a2d6ad60a2a179a336ee600
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_226.pro'
0a16669e69f850856095375f4feb37b2
882e562e597ae6bcb827557fbf3114161c606ed0
describe
'37962' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_226.QC.jpg'
2b75dc7afd522153f15f26717d836bd3
0ea535beb3ddaf9a2499a26992a54d66bd6fd758
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_226.tif'
0877b633358b6c3f784f30de79b73bf7
f53b67f45fc7779cab697a2fdca4b97c7abf2e41
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_226.txt'
714bf3bc3a3a4814ea9b200875435acf
f1280e2ee11128788af337fb8afaba918b636544
'2012-04-01T04:21:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_226thm.jpg'
78644cbd51ae92c41be12c2452bf9594
70de1479b036b1bed2dfd1d86e8e33e582348d24
describe
'557899' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_227.jp2'
6448380a425892750a727d613b2047df
75738e3d564a5fcd478f8279abc98ab91af3764c
describe
'100885' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_227.jpg'
2388c04ac247ff8d691227ecc3f75d13
074defa0f999ad428e01e6693fb760ac44bb1a03
describe
'33583' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_227.pro'
7f8439d5a8b68b9b0437e4b98be8d0a2
591092387cdc7a958dd0e90a0962755abd21fe75
describe
'35264' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_227.QC.jpg'
a8a831d02511c33cfc6cfcdd3a40759d
54bfb4c08b51297768f8fa652110bd4195df3936
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_227.tif'
0973747577c961fe5d017a210b01d5c9
27da6e40d70105a5927e48da006cc86fc8e10f6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFWZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_227.txt'
feb29dda372d81b454dda6a53a6e6478
d991417d9ab89f4289a93f9365cdf4f7f5643500
describe
'10227' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_227thm.jpg'
bdabcced0df5a24e398552c1439ca45b
fc8b2386a1aa365a95cde832af2ad2d9175f88da
describe
'510298' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_228.jp2'
f47bb6ab20a48b22accc419bed50a995
0d166f13d5742cb90e022291a6e87b541ba11640
describe
'102432' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_228.jpg'
0230aa442a01c85ce592c8e8c132dbd7
7afed44acfcae40357b4cac641068d10d6e51726
describe
'36185' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_228.pro'
d19e963d22e1d243fb6231b3dfd7d222
3e480dff4b9e5916d864a145dc92fa6b4f24d4e6
describe
'36056' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_228.QC.jpg'
779c1e5f1a7b529a538fd4d4f660e047
b61d7fc2b6c58b9e12dc2ca82a8524b4b0740cca
describe
'12266830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_228.tif'
798807cc9b15292fc01f0728e6a99298
5b05679c41696950d7739b546ba80cd55876d60f
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_228.txt'
b6a1f4bc212c7b9184866ebb25c116d2
e8c2841b0c090917ab2ebe5657f6bb8cd85c9ad8
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_228thm.jpg'
fd6683a0f5488b9113f709ca254e7266
a3fcf07a0cb4d8f081846a9343639f7a9aeafd6e
describe
'533293' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_229.jp2'
781e6c48a5d05f31bdc11217e6c90868
db2a799ba660aec7552f9bcf4272d7e73d53b539
describe
'100544' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_229.jpg'
98e877db86d861b1b149b315cbf99ea7
e7c60813342a344bdaa3e3e1887e463fec01c18d
describe
'34145' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_229.pro'
700d5e0d6ab89a28c8ac023156b7b388
3956a3b9c82f73300abf42e8e5b85c71ee331e62
describe
'34917' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_229.QC.jpg'
772a617e2650eee69ee920fc1275ce96
93489ac672171b3408c60b80d9dd94bace609b4e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_229.tif'
e0971ee7f389c208c670720365435e71
03a753a0f41b0281a4396b663974c0d18906a904
'2012-04-01T04:24:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_229.txt'
54cdd7c7c76c4e137989e75be180cac2
26ab9ef266ba8b24bc0af969722c8e9a8a94ac0c
describe
'10151' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_229thm.jpg'
038c6cdcca5108017978962bd2c8769a
0a69583f6e15271085c95865b1215af4e8e3ed45
describe
'512970' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_230.jp2'
2089378db010f475ddba62b9b91e915f
220dd4c4afc9599dba0738b49c833cda5ca93fdd
describe
'101424' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_230.jpg'
f4493d64801fd3f796f604f21a14145c
3b05793f6574fec45947904e82364a574784fbde
describe
'35178' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_230.pro'
3f6f38790996fdd932902576a8d4edac
73c53b67ca11f061b089eea0d9e21414433a2d81
describe
'35586' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_230.QC.jpg'
b5edab5fb1b098528a3a900caedf69c8
8a6fa54ad5fdc8874956db3b40b48bca0470b266
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_230.tif'
254461484b39e60cf3b0d58d7f234e2b
9de132cc9ac4a6f02492b5ace5b130f02e7219a1
'2012-04-01T04:21:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_230.txt'
12867e70f1d4ec2d8cdb73640ba249d0
733fb75f2f45cb072ea0fa2308ee473fd3a0cf7f
describe
'10984' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_230thm.jpg'
80e5892bd1a4147cb29a5cef6d0b0abb
5cee6420e42e6810f0b2465e317bc73fdd6e7ea6
'2012-04-01T04:12:55-04:00'
describe
'543157' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_231.jp2'
d025310ae9a932762ba1b2a10339420d
dfc9564b40fd3954cb0646cb214392454af54d0b
'2012-04-01T04:16:04-04:00'
describe
'97374' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_231.jpg'
dfdafd1cf5c8282d170511cdecb4313a
39dad47a47734fec1f10e7a87263f51f3bb54721
describe
'32861' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_231.pro'
67c77989fbc1f2a532d118fd3df1fcce
86ac4cae38627290e387432d8005b4cdd742779f
describe
'34596' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFXZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_231.QC.jpg'
82c24340fff387e2702da5685413b333
04ab8b0d7a142adc732954f785cfaf83c8327fb2
describe
'13054330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_231.tif'
fe1ef7bd30f56217bb7a1621dba3c099
16fdfa309f8205aa41c8df0efff4c6682d821233
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_231.txt'
ba8c447dd1097a0ae35826a12f83b3e0
f9a351d7f95a87ab402e3fe5ade60f627ac45ed4
describe
'9847' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_231thm.jpg'
5fff6b86696b519bd53bb7ebc3324eed
2ca8916f2b2e4a4ed7b4cdc1d540b450feccc505
'2012-04-01T04:23:34-04:00'
describe
'493901' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_232.jp2'
8b539d77f81214aa474f62b05b4e27a4
1fe90baacfb32d779a558e39854fbdf960e539f1
describe
'101867' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_232.jpg'
85f25d6a4b8162721a17c1ceca51e4b6
8d5fb42619adb1f6f609acaabe6c2a1aea4ec7dd
describe
'36162' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_232.pro'
31a2b77887304c1fda9f75b21a6fb364
f6ddd0f624e2d4417a850af58ddf281835de6077
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_232.QC.jpg'
ef9b7c74419cde8ef122e4370f4a2684
7219cd8f008f82ec1a9feace1d7d9ca4a72741c0
describe
'11873080' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_232.tif'
41c37b9430b50fb5b89620524da69039
4a83618dc5a45191c1dd5a698b9d8bbc4fd633bf
'2012-04-01T04:14:55-04:00'
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_232.txt'
ed604c61ae6053b9a18ca18aa394de6f
06fb7f106087ec495015cea2e13937ce873e5131
describe
'11549' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_232thm.jpg'
3e58e61c918298d3213125d14d1b94ac
9e1974369a9f011971b8ca6284457b010f14b18a
describe
'534944' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_233.jp2'
a8b06291a7c9c4443f7fd382cd03a611
ca751bf7572aac30603162d473990cf342b6bba4
describe
'96576' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_233.jpg'
1dfba3bd7e55bba548fe38104587b1cf
86791826ebfea7e215c5bcfc20b854b0646e9b4f
describe
'29863' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_233.pro'
79fb9497d1ba681ff623e846b546343b
c4032c4cb86671b4fce07602e92447879502cd16
describe
'33873' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_233.QC.jpg'
10de5c1e40140ee3435becf0dfb594f3
ebc8942687817dc8b4c4a6716aea9ad90db289b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_233.tif'
72ca6f8ec212d2e3c2204621c3f0acc7
be9983e366d82d82d96e39903805f058438ebd83
'2012-04-01T04:11:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_233.txt'
036406dd81ed24097ee08882fedb3187
942d487be46d2e6acd5ad66826c016379326f82a
describe
'10557' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_233thm.jpg'
e0b0cf1b5e4a1e58ba89ae1531b19bea
18ec72be5eb4205f6a0acd6b5693828fa4c6ec02
describe
'507332' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_234.jp2'
c5b5db1d793f4a84f1e0c3b1881b61c7
91fc6eb183467dcd7560f18ee4bf418d243ac266
describe
'90462' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_234.jpg'
f41d225a8c14e2d7cc2af05d80983a39
5b50a4492499d6e5604af4a501a0d4d1da7de938
'2012-04-01T04:17:08-04:00'
describe
'29511' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_234.pro'
f10e73e09b51d72d4388f3daacf937ac
2cf23c3fc213f3fdbd0187be5151fcf5735dd371
describe
'32042' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_234.QC.jpg'
40107e96f842a428e674662159d3a7a4
4d9c632f10bfc731cc57826c0ad3cfea8f0039ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_234.tif'
092505ffe33ac9745e61f24f6ee2790f
d8a13b6fc821605e28968ad5ec198d3d3a3ad076
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_234.txt'
3173f978c6719f8e347dd0810ed218b9
69b38808cfdfc77611b62e2319005e62b05b95ad
describe
'10463' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_234thm.jpg'
5fd0389830af8822856560a450227896
14a8c1f051ad63ffa382c82953c1e250c4056247
describe
'422030' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_235.jp2'
1c29d48d512091091bd3e55f32650b40
203f1118ac2bd720cef91cf86b520185dc4a6696
describe
'39844' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFYZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_235.jpg'
8cea253eb4852f9c7cb64c0ea42bf255
0744ea1243a0d23d92a37ec9eb779f99bc9f6987
describe
'7547' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_235.pro'
5763b4e79d1c437e0da30aee0dcb01a4
24b7a0785a404d6dee6629fe57ec8169324c68a9
describe
'13829' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_235.QC.jpg'
837c290601ec1fba4dd78205489ee934
9fd3e3168d54f5e6abf49d35ba1a173bd89e8798
describe
'12392830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_235.tif'
e14351d68b3117681fe16b9cb155f752
bb36b2d914c37d389d2b61e0490af685ec5115bc
'2012-04-01T04:15:15-04:00'
describe
'328' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_235.txt'
f860dc73c068d084b9eded60f7cad3bf
6445c5ba4d2a2360b01aaf8249ddc2a412c560f6
'2012-04-01T04:15:52-04:00'
describe
'5000' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_235thm.jpg'
be811e3365d2d39fc965fecee83ce7ef
6cc96632a9eb9bda9b942b95c356d7a481582c51
describe
'514187' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_236.jp2'
1715bc120a50565ef6cefac4cb7b4b2b
d5fe866a15fa8b426439577fa6b16854eaad6ea6
describe
'74964' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_236.jpg'
c83691ff83f8cb361d62ac38090ba0fd
1c614c80e1912540f149dd44643983f07d9468a9
describe
'23336' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_236.pro'
d5e8ef84cf519c7a6c058a9682e3414b
3fb269a757e55f9412409fb4b84b78ebe22441f8
describe
'26023' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_236.QC.jpg'
b3cb19597b0a63e17d44fbe74fb930bd
db20db3e3c99e7055363558ecf1d82e75f9ff1fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_236.tif'
63363f6e00dd15bb6c895eb4f9ddb68a
293da838094f59595176d1e54c7c5cf4a2710f61
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_236.txt'
5d6d6a52f9264d1fc2714a7814371f53
59ed05f840fb14902f5d3a53873c6f67fd235d2a
'2012-04-01T04:16:26-04:00'
describe
'8074' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_236thm.jpg'
22efd097188a22bee1a4c4b9f227fe32
e037944cec0ef29c65587336dc11b18595a4dd50
describe
'519806' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_237.jp2'
74210d783bb75079aa61916adb8f3016
84e46e129402c065d11e1fa52d607401cc596da1
describe
'92394' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_237.jpg'
92ceff00ca7a1fe1e82716c5a0817754
93538d12c7462257cae68e2f3a146719bccbe8cb
describe
'30524' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_237.pro'
d47cf8839f6b2679b1479faa106deebc
36f163223c67d54af32c64daf8f0221191d4c8d8
describe
'32501' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_237.QC.jpg'
768477e20ff2520974f58da956a4eaaa
917444d70c27a8a7afe9b9b61234480d0be2f064
describe
'12495204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_237.tif'
c5449ac930c079599430dec4d1410dda
e76512574f16c4910a91f4b752d6ae8112decb10
'2012-04-01T04:12:39-04:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_237.txt'
d0b9bb79b3806ac9ea89c6a3eb4eb54a
c2e316311b10f882de8df84855917385630e3e02
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_237thm.jpg'
87186ede9bd5f07d778c49575d5d79fc
e82f5940f75e37b79244362271c333c64cb71e6e
describe
'497870' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_238.jp2'
15292e152a720677127428102346ae1d
b671a41291dc4f3aa3614961d80eea82f122f39a
describe
'104263' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_238.jpg'
9f9ffb6087d7a8c0ae16e84774c6fe38
5d0e781014aba888dfdcb3b08993606858fd15aa
describe
'36282' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_238.pro'
36ad3e2da33bb4d137380ccf0f0915f3
7bb0abefecf558f8f4e78193802da3d83188828d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_238.QC.jpg'
cbbd0900f6ef06ac8d809fce15280eee
117389f7ad76d64fa177d563e4232e8215b9e247
describe
'11967580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_238.tif'
15fc08f35e5da6150e6c396c6a2056b5
0790a62aa9377a4795cca0adddc1b44f4d2af8e2
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_238.txt'
e4a67c188f5cc4de51adb5d5ccbbb10f
6dc3d25b48a7892f1ee6c19fce21b11a0dd595fc
describe
'11464' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAFZZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_238thm.jpg'
37fb33093b86bcd994aa92b86a3c2773
b9b4449c9f6b4dc8a01714cc4ac16b744a24f916
describe
'516906' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_239.jp2'
7544efc4c5958ac9175133bb85a06811
ab2fedf5b473a2f26173a2f9e1673d846fb4184a
'2012-04-01T04:13:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_239.jpg'
d282cfeeccd90a8385c0e04144e966e8
e90294a86f85be36be7f79ef3bd516ca0c3cfef5
describe
'32762' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_239.pro'
455a747ee4eb34b6991b46c34bb0f878
e0f7870943982cd36cb046b5ba3a4d206aa3e71b
describe
'33707' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_239.QC.jpg'
04637ecc38f176245471bf95fdbf09de
89b7ef2a24518256a02e9c797822b1f0f5a46973
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_239.tif'
f391e900a75918c61e0db177c2e67ffc
f12d8cbb5cb40a7d7db198bca1cf3a7fc357d346
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_239.txt'
06f178a08d4ad259f656dedb81d5629f
73c6def7c8a05b5031c52a7edbe10fb8785a60c5
describe
'10168' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_239thm.jpg'
235b3e3c1f04557b9ec648342d656f0a
a9888f4887a1b5245967d14732c47783882abdb0
describe
'523585' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_240.jp2'
c6345708854d3b3984e7d87644ec33c2
a990749b2a762ae5b0e85780357d9b0153fe1be3
describe
'104485' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_240.jpg'
1217489ba7aaf31d60fdeaf62e2b62f9
db5a682298c9532183e1592f6b97868496f75cd8
'2012-04-01T04:25:10-04:00'
describe
'37007' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_240.pro'
6e9c490e5a48bd34c4619a333f575771
e8eef777f942b2a2630db10f917e552ece7ba336
describe
'36540' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_240.QC.jpg'
e041c36e1a2ac921e71cbe28475ce8d1
b2cfd690ef478fcd53e95a8e782ca5756ed70ea0
describe
'12589704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_240.tif'
2b4bf70bd5f64929451197bf36e21854
f4b6fc8711727ed551f8485955405c6fd3c28b1e
'2012-04-01T04:19:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_240.txt'
7851d0d043f84ba40aed17c917866d72
2175bf37cbebebb85d2f10cf9698f2177d8327c8
describe
'10723' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_240thm.jpg'
8a52246501158c4f9eb9371666d51c78
d84d0b97d6f55c2f0133698210b2629865d0f821
describe
'515560' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_241.jp2'
4a1169b474c3f17f0d5049384f90d706
79e3f533630f9c64a3589c02e04ce58305ad3953
describe
'98904' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_241.jpg'
f26beaebced0afda81c7d367b36e80fe
a5f69d3073835e39034dbd0750e8844dadc883f6
describe
'33406' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_241.pro'
65392533be0cc4ba3dd4f620dbd59a29
c89d7e07e78fb3a3d915005020af7ff8bd6909fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_241.QC.jpg'
cb1bf8efdf98ed7b19bb32a28c5d5a7b
7637d196ca3c88256dc49990df62d046687e11dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_241.tif'
5ff9ac112f90576f3719a9d390be09b1
040c945031b5a4ad7887c3b9617ec88636f0ffa4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_241.txt'
044b21ec5f757cb4ceb89244cb7019ca
9a806a6ed0e7f79002632c1525f57a6433645af8
describe
'10886' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_241thm.jpg'
bbdac0fd252abda3a40b97b1a531c4f8
e98c20f8f9e6c2803513b68e916c3810dcbef3f9
describe
'510317' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_242.jp2'
0de7f8f1f713176074aa9e79225a2996
c83a309a0fd256a4d10cadaf6e8f8a7972795b4d
describe
'98440' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_242.jpg'
3b16647648a87d98e0484a3e66e4645e
6c42ad9bc00bdcffc8895a727ec12a11682e55eb
describe
'32596' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_242.pro'
8d8a4b81fd4beec2a40e85b2e83eebb9
c978d9328bf8f156ccef419092af0e5755a99dba
describe
'34839' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_242.QC.jpg'
02364ec9cd3f8518f2da6d7ec43e60dc
20681101c3dd2a2cbe298f28fde03d101701716c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGAZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_242.tif'
fd050205bcbad2e1c36daa8d0a4b6ccb
e2cc7bda6c41f6accb77787984b13a502d74267f
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_242.txt'
5194bde4466b53ef1ea70390db9d979e
b86dd4a022bc4174384668752fc4a1d1e79c0b7c
describe
'11148' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_242thm.jpg'
15ad4b487867608c7ef6bdfc054f6fae
b5a8c68178e6fbe8826d3c0542217e58abb48f7b
describe
'526694' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_243.jp2'
6fe4cefabd6bcb869708f2a3a888e591
7a6f6720ff69ba1ee83986d35e700857f9e3d7d6
describe
'105287' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_243.jpg'
1ca15a92b6909da1591bb36879a13bd7
a985ed02e530ecb728cdec6ececa69d520b0a509
describe
'36427' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_243.pro'
34dd33c9adba09f7fb3bca55b58c8bbb
241e06fe8d68bf9d8b1019f24f1eaba3eb848ce6
describe
'36561' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_243.QC.jpg'
339fa4e3e3e978aebe19e8f22ae60deb
24e001c72a1f3c1257721dafcb4e9e3f42f3e714
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_243.tif'
bae98e8ff66cf7b3c9c5191079de8eb0
e1b24cede289b105667ea608e82f7edc277951e5
'2012-04-01T04:19:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_243.txt'
3bcb282e72cf8f0d17518d315165dbd0
97e987ec52f48037dffe273eef11e64ec47beef7
describe
'10626' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_243thm.jpg'
0cc4bfdf310d19c7d611b23e68e01165
72cbc4cd48110fa97d8e20feb5d6aed11eec1107
describe
'502069' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_244.jp2'
20815934ccad084e43f41839c1db154e
f30fb8d4b3c9c592a7ca1df3c9deb4ba4a949f0d
describe
'99841' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_244.jpg'
c57c89787d92e2ec2f4501f877fbf76e
aac0ee28ba73f2babbfeef05423a8058c4df1317
'2012-04-01T04:22:38-04:00'
describe
'34200' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_244.pro'
df95124c87047fb918469dcf6e6628c9
25b9df7492e5e2135f1524d8363b90024e0b936f
describe
'34160' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_244.QC.jpg'
bd9976b7e1adc9f47f4ac94599928ad3
4cf0f53a77eaf7af6784b51eaca863efd62d12de
'2012-04-01T04:23:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_244.tif'
1fefeea8b0264b2289ca094cecfc0673
53eee87b0fe7a15db7404a7ade114e6a05f7cd88
'2012-04-01T04:12:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_244.txt'
f40538899c04f69558f9b1f65e00f284
a9a62f9c99fbfa70def586cb78799333b1b34c5a
describe
'11250' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_244thm.jpg'
f85741f5ac3a2d4cdc0547299d7dd61f
8ad87c98a90d415b88a96309700a106ee01c95d3
describe
'541481' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_245.jp2'
e86297de441f634d3de4cab9fafb7e00
df88e3b8231a3b8856105baa2f1faa5d99d279bc
describe
'101372' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_245.jpg'
278917afee5e5b3d04b502bd9e3f1227
7a6ef6e113c3c89018e46e9dedf8ff6cc1e38c21
describe
'33763' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_245.pro'
fdb8268916be1a76a9dba24a13c3a586
f8a7e214becaa2639f907494281864508ed85848
describe
'35471' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_245.QC.jpg'
bda71ca0f19f52afe2e9fb92b1df897b
0a238691615b925adfebad4ff365bdf7034ca7fe
describe
'13014954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_245.tif'
f75d1b41071b7d88d0b6d6012a4c5e23
96d8ad9e36d16e53f8dbb3f4eda5003578dfc76b
'2012-04-01T04:17:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_245.txt'
3dd7eb6efa04906edb63cf70c79d98f1
1c1f5319c8b41fa787014a64f8b147284f14f15d
describe
'10423' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_245thm.jpg'
c2b6d4cd44193ada9389d6939f62001d
9e90d37eca6f1f7d5346159e41e2364a6b0c1483
describe
'544461' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_246.jp2'
53252097a01fb1b1f78c6169c263688b
1de06276bfb5d26a617d8e90d0f46ec4460d4606
describe
'102632' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_246.jpg'
30f8b334deef3d2ffb6e589f7e9e028a
66b78a98c892059f3a5b3c3ab6e60649bd3fcf71
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGBZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_246.pro'
f9bac13b6f0cf4615d7cb7a4c1cb3833
1b41d1daa3b291162b87c517d91ed4c5ac298bd3
describe
'36103' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_246.QC.jpg'
9d8800ea299c830f99af9d76e3dbf3b6
8dcffb35931a1aac62d1b2133490fd97a5b4b745
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_246.tif'
05a0518bd795d1fc3f27344623b8b172
9d32fce51be81eaf69c050c3cae11833ab0233a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_246.txt'
5a1b618c74cadd1f1191dfbe6ea4b548
4e9db877b66e412143969b5540f40e0bf7a56b85
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_246thm.jpg'
db2070f3574e7e13305f6af3bf165e19
3d849141ecd423de20e69a38290be32378612066
describe
'553916' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_247.jp2'
f54594dbda6810e0fa3490d6ab978e93
d63fc485ee55bb09bd229264af79da2a679f2602
'2012-04-01T04:14:27-04:00'
describe
'101629' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_247.jpg'
75f3cd79ffcc8da8640f28afc83c4eef
827bff6841152a4a1c4acac7e4e6b8c83cb502cc
describe
'36581' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_247.pro'
fea4522c57d9bb85aa77adaadc1370da
c05b4d0fabd862699214d63bb3c25ea189b3e09b
describe
'35146' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_247.QC.jpg'
bf8b00f4ef5ed229baab921a43849944
a275ab0607be60a8b21bbcecd62b260060785f49
describe
'13314204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_247.tif'
990c24b7102511d7652cad089eedd112
caab0663c4a5a9bf4bb724f7b98cc16313b6e7be
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_247.txt'
21d33da12b5709708f5999d3afa5c311
c3f119be9cb2266cf3ea8eee0ff2ea620b80b4fb
'2012-04-01T04:24:30-04:00'
describe
'9778' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_247thm.jpg'
391244b12eaa06b46c5d7d96ad0d57b4
c0cb4f4f2d68b84216c90dc2e027a5890d3a717f
describe
'541483' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_248.jp2'
9bdb542e122396bf3278d8af6066013f
b1251d3beea7ed76f2b6ed4a037ccbc9e745e9bc
describe
'102485' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_248.jpg'
505a9e48ecad4e5ba3734743e12c6d33
88270adcac503ad45e4547fba5a14ac0614e6f74
describe
'34522' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_248.pro'
96c10cdb04b352d0696d20fb705d02c6
3c85c2fa0be87f28ea4d272960fa0accc8985ae1
describe
'36470' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_248.QC.jpg'
42735ab0f9081a93b99c5a5614152d5a
e8c92bab407451a1e767cb8b5989a4a2ddff8409
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_248.tif'
5a4fcd9c1bfd4f60000a10d80b2c00d7
6a99957de0c544d0612db347d52bd23880e0623d
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_248.txt'
69790b45d830437f80c298ccb235d548
dd8e8fc4b57b3270c3391273461bb7eb53008c32
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_248thm.jpg'
57b8e3d5150a96f7738402bcb4df79ab
992e8ccc4c5030298167dcd44e1c80d46da74994
describe
'570335' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_249.jp2'
79bd28c097c76d66011281e3d9b814d5
036e0505ff8687b67bbe7623ee8a1900ddd40aaf
describe
'91690' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_249.jpg'
49efc9c96dfa168af90ecba2a84e6c14
7a2abb53cefa79046a349f5f7917f6fe76648cee
describe
'33274' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_249.pro'
ffa1b326244ec5154ed04b70ba1795a6
b8e1f247c2b57f2e238c5e751fda6d4313fa0472
describe
'31532' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_249.QC.jpg'
2e7beaadcef30cb9ded4dffe98860ebb
ac714983504aec8f57418ea2374506779a55c76e
describe
'13707954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_249.tif'
66f07717dbbe7a4d48560dbb2c761cd8
9e3ae2cbfe4f3920d30d72fcfc452579c8d2c9a9
'2012-04-01T04:22:03-04:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_249.txt'
1efa309cdbaa55a19958ca4147c7e2b8
c60faf9f9543b286ced6b25c5cd6cd780a8d79df
describe
'8824' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_249thm.jpg'
d5affea157d5656b33344b1762813aa9
e1748cf41c8a63f39568cc1db815a37adf991d19
describe
'546976' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGCZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_250.jp2'
e0a9b973a3057341955903ae0f5c8ec5
71237874e4201016f003a7034cfaa9ffea4002fc
describe
'104796' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_250.jpg'
4dad79bccb0652ae6a35a42c78219992
9d60b355d2128b82b924f86f66e437047eb33661
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_250.pro'
10de5dba710a00383b2f8391b18f65d0
6bc2d7108ced7d622e4fd6e673ac46bc774b95b3
describe
'36193' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_250.QC.jpg'
a8c704c131cfd5218ab05c300e511b38
1a4f54639f8055e58c068a5f41b810e365cfb534
describe
'13148830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_250.tif'
e3c5e09def845110dddb42c9d2e6013e
7ed78b76a66b979fa646de2c7555398df12e55db
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_250.txt'
176a0e71838f9b14055ac8d5a79b0bcd
d06f39f41ee7271508e102e60aea548fba8a3c62
describe
'10292' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_250thm.jpg'
af1fb700ac5e06ac6f3f08b763c0d0e6
0a33f07a616b2f39b229e35e9bfa7da89c28868a
describe
'563498' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_251.jp2'
31ece4f12def97ab67416b17be0abffd
b5b15bf9ed4e517b220c677a8712f988a5f2767c
describe
'100480' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_251.jpg'
c4143a2fecebc8321082ce2de3cba697
b280bcd48b6078a847934565ffea160276b017a7
describe
'35343' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_251.pro'
38ec028000099bd353c54a2a07bca810
7617fffc6a3cc485c960103f798e61b49e51ebf5
describe
'34961' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_251.QC.jpg'
719230659f0d293179bded0f30c71d93
b9a92840d106c8f6a8c35c3d753568ac48d66113
describe
'13542580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_251.tif'
7862597485300dc70a5bdd44d5da1482
b890d6a010c062795d4935d74454fbb99b64e5de
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_251.txt'
7c82c94fdbf3376f57f2a1df925b55b1
bfb8863be0435d49e13368561b3504d891f91a9a
describe
'9576' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_251thm.jpg'
bfdefda1fc0fa0ce9068e6b76f069139
9dbaa4c1e4e0506162b1b6b106b0e77388099255
'2012-04-01T04:21:23-04:00'
describe
'547036' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_252.jp2'
379794b5f980e945e4fb6733491480cb
24772fb08c9cc566ddd2529ad3ee099b24016742
describe
'98682' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_252.jpg'
464602deb4c01757b73846056c70f2ba
f9dcef8eaa8a928633649ea4574e66cc4982b5a3
describe
'35068' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_252.pro'
8489997dbf701dcccaf4e478c4de8a80
12e44c5f0887322522fdd0a8a49ba42e1aac5d66
describe
'34390' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_252.QC.jpg'
713ebc8e45d0be2188f557902b5217ed
6ba50adc7bb8ec9080bd8bf7fa133a659f99065f
'2012-04-01T04:12:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_252.tif'
c9ad4815796d014fb622dab2de57af02
86948029bd610ef7184aba746ed34998a0cb1d22
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_252.txt'
6df5e22e01e5b29b06c59c36770da660
13b77271fe33bfd1981e71398e6732e48aa0a374
describe
'9930' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_252thm.jpg'
92b1b62e2b7e3b1c8be2a81de6e654ad
ddd209e3514f123589e4359e5e0eee1a15401e95
describe
'551322' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_253.jp2'
2ad2283eec25c890e5e946daee8aebb3
d5dde9064e8da832c2dd46697f79a895ef224b30
describe
'103550' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_253.jpg'
dc356ea7c52ba3a58072224c51fd2052
3b5918c86295971965a33dc1ae78fa3b4ee21966
describe
'36246' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_253.pro'
f8f6dd35fcb7f41d3cdbedb188a2ddae
99d4e37b35816e15043d5075b3686f8e831cd638
'2012-04-01T04:20:12-04:00'
describe
'36175' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_253.QC.jpg'
3dc17769e783acff5d7f4a617e1b58ae
87247bce0fea62bf8e98a9808693830cc3a3924a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_253.tif'
7b8f8467eb89c37ea06880ae9526d149
926f6e060a1eda6e2f61c30b234107fda1d01137
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGDZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_253.txt'
342ae74cbb3dd9ad4a22a0febad5e320
8f483452baa895065098a6b2cf6fa101db51ea11
describe
'10077' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_253thm.jpg'
f7fa09a6cb666a7581819c7ca975ca79
4c027a22c35173de2db9c7b7fdf4645278711e23
describe
'521133' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_254.jp2'
ec1b6b7351ed2325b20bc0a06097f116
08a1b50e52e8232f12961514dc9cd8d2bb8546a4
describe
'105534' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_254.jpg'
a53dbaf1220edbb134abb630bc8e713b
6ba581e54b395979d37e8ce0263c2fc35ee0d947
describe
'35430' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGED' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_254.pro'
95c53d9d030eb56d8eae98ac86e6feed
b1488bf5dd0a1d035e5d58bad64fdc35b5735280
describe
'36932' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_254.QC.jpg'
92d62787a2ae4e338734115e691fafc3
a5f16d06537cd9c461941c3e314856da2b2ab07e
describe
'12526704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_254.tif'
3b3ef444469de826297b68e32626ea64
9dab3187bdd5bf52e6666c3f75ff6a1d087d3f38
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_254.txt'
c07a2fe84cdd44de615c7cf5cd8fde8b
567650494efea0eb4dd4e0cce1747a67231a7acc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_254thm.jpg'
26d50461c3f69cbdc6fd3cc9cc5f63d2
7431f72b215c500c3993b0ce40741660f204bcd0
describe
'541495' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_255.jp2'
161934b4c03b32688fbdb384436ebfb0
0b81e9c4752eff3ed8d19a20457fd0ea12b94eff
describe
'103069' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_255.jpg'
8eeae2428665ce00fc1cac833217606e
e9570455515d12a01e0021a330f61e8f08c0e60f
describe
'35075' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_255.pro'
406f0fdd99e63bf2a45a5ea455d94b16
0e286b5d9c8d8f754ac41aa96de8c180da17fb91
'2012-04-01T04:12:10-04:00'
describe
'35728' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_255.QC.jpg'
90c22064a90ab21bdfe4ca289e5de206
cefea5d21b9caf73d7d4572ad83696c518f41078
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_255.tif'
0b82010b4c4cb2f76a2f72713aaa1652
1528faf05ccd0d41cca0becc6d86823ea05f6afc
'2012-04-01T04:14:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_255.txt'
759ce81fe2443931451d3f7932f41b2a
549b70e385c4c95ae45bc4d972d5a699831d16c2
describe
'10213' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_255thm.jpg'
f1c61e0e67f483f99f3250f966dc1176
a88b90987cf33eaeea8fa6a5a92ca60b0fd77768
'2012-04-01T04:19:04-04:00'
describe
'522475' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_256.jp2'
f0d58b188eb615f9e5cb37817a56abf8
767d07da50bcec6a290314bb57c05e3e919d6ccd
describe
'87936' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_256.jpg'
0ca97bdf85a173b8031a86aaa0a56e78
f0b4af2731594dd36bf342ecd93817ceae13a41c
describe
'28720' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGER' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_256.pro'
285c17caf81bb135d9dca0fd4db1287c
a32cf3360928898278701cc62aa462b58a3d4334
describe
'30738' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGES' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_256.QC.jpg'
34b40957b585ba84dde7352bd3d5abdf
aaa5759f210de88d6fbce5de55d5663a379c0426
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGET' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_256.tif'
c2f33b1bb4dc7584e5265f38fdeddaa3
d88469bcc446c5c994d3ee4a87a35bdc3aec73c3
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_256.txt'
1673646714f0686ef58bfe50028b8d5d
641bf201b9c0efccf9ecfa121fe4c0f5205a3b15
describe
'9681' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_256thm.jpg'
3c2e12e2bbb400c67e7800beaea20519
5062d0627d553362dc86c07d9634a1c5b5767fb9
describe
'529324' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_257.jp2'
f358c9db246503d388b76e654311db5d
55ae8dff5e9631b06cf76f1ddfcafe673336fdad
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_257.jpg'
028732c9f4ace397ac37a62935250191
10341e926583025a4471ec89102116b8e25ba1d2
'2012-04-01T04:21:03-04:00'
describe
'31791' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_257.pro'
b0a46cbf6cc8ed2d4b15f99c9b4df5df
d6946aff812270605729891dd9312721a0606b7e
describe
'34604' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGEZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_257.QC.jpg'
fa9f51969d84eaf468b1bfb8eb22e4a4
b28f555eb6308078f68ef91bd5cb6cfe274b4ecf
describe
'12723580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_257.tif'
19caa671401d55635e7017accaaa9599
f8f68d979b417f090210b1a536e26d15fefc0cdd
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_257.txt'
b56bd221960aeeeb80068be141690c05
ec85349e6b5d4162931804a8702503a3208d6150
describe
'10527' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_257thm.jpg'
ea4e8c0afc060d347e4d71767d5ec7ee
0a8b8f25271ffa1e2ddcbfdfbce79b80fd8de59e
describe
'536222' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_258.jp2'
3fb37ceb8af85fd4914c6f6ff9ef1042
82ea5c13c73ce581d6bc13714d2b57ffdc4f23de
'2012-04-01T04:15:02-04:00'
describe
'99336' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_258.jpg'
8b1f1036b326337a1b5314cb26a5745c
8f6fa1163d2808efd1fe9c91bc80961f3344b6ba
describe
'34193' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_258.pro'
f38c70d8f4463cff6711dfd49260ea62
145bb4303122bfebb7c1fa03c6b070ca91c4da92
describe
'35222' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_258.QC.jpg'
09b21c9a8d7f302503c84fdb27c469d8
340a28c98eb5bb0acaaf15a122f24ffd8279da66
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_258.tif'
7ed0c7fa76398781ff6cbf099634bbb3
ef59ab3c6edd2630686e6b1717a09c6ce692944a
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_258.txt'
eded0790538095dddf7a11736cd4ff2f
f2a915cce001b12a71c375bc3d174d253a4ec65b
describe
'10304' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_258thm.jpg'
f3fba718630f4e614845712f0f39f335
5b48dae6bd74dbd4defc5b6238fb46d6a204ce5b
describe
'525001' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_259.jp2'
a8bc8fd4721a1b9a5365f7242055115d
ed81973eb57a3baae9475be32a7e68e33c4c6563
describe
'103916' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_259.jpg'
bceff96d0ccb2ef13e6fc8bcd3030013
1e42274be538dc2f85eefc429247f547ccc0ff1a
'2012-04-01T04:17:30-04:00'
describe
'36181' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_259.pro'
2f6b67b12b08769f03c97c7fe1138be2
4f2cc6cde256f88349f885a4815b169538d8805f
describe
'36319' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_259.QC.jpg'
7bbeddc376cde563222f26854db78512
a93d44921d60bb709a06870636521b10304fd73e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_259.tif'
cfb2c3e583a12eb313fd9cc42640af16
933725b7353997d0927a20dbe2b976bcd00dc4b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_259.txt'
0f8c24ac48c84ec9130234038112f825
33ed4afb886cbad18effc71df11c574fe98c894c
describe
'10391' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_259thm.jpg'
d411a00a034ae519d82871ac7eb7d267
201dc3cfe6ce626c4443b12dc45d3a678f5857c0
describe
'540199' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_260.jp2'
862d1c3f98f27c72e31b911e9289f232
40f296fd08a6c0026e12a296ae586100c0df4bac
describe
'104733' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_260.jpg'
98b073ed021c2efa7a63a1e263decb2e
265f2f94cc7121d2bc7fde5f0880833965f11790
describe
'34811' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_260.pro'
4179aff886e66031f112b3888c3700f7
1d1010bcf3b8d733f3000a982da27c5d0941b8c9
'2012-04-01T04:24:32-04:00'
describe
'36699' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_260.QC.jpg'
947aa07bb5e970d5c0bf41c75a714e99
6951a7031c2af0814e4c1044015ce45f4abe85ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_260.tif'
e07d00d52a31f8c811280395f3c33dde
eb7d45d75ae8b31111326c9b66159d6455e67f5e
'2012-04-01T04:15:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_260.txt'
c744107cbe3aab2b7921114be3b23896
f1d70102760a13bda7fb1169de00a6df8fc9932d
describe
'10333' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_260thm.jpg'
5c9228ff8cf66c8d9813b40b5596e927
b42b5df8c73a4ad93cc65e29fc613555c208ed8a
describe
'544464' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_261.jp2'
e7c1bb9960562e4f62fb65c4d708ef92
2b5d3f31349e6ec07e234f83df357f0a48aa81e5
describe
'103648' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGFZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_261.jpg'
76f6a65b273a574da6e0c0e4fb8e3ade
54c2fe57ed6102b95bd68f4300b827151012d3fd
describe
'35465' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_261.pro'
57c3fa7fac6b354f161e17d7d39f6434
abe486136884b88da49bc97f357070e2efe028e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_261.QC.jpg'
01368618660f25fc9fd8845b5cc86e38
4e95711edcec33263f5af6c226ea3acd66d97176
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_261.tif'
b487e116e67f6a2ddc26e8ac794b8de1
f131f2088d0a3853bc0f514d5830b50693b30270
'2012-04-01T04:23:03-04:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_261.txt'
5e7513b2a3dfdbbb180cfdb00bc841c3
6d9f9d559be9f813bab6d259b967ce5da4feebb7
describe
'10056' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_261thm.jpg'
c15dc626d3f74326539e11c652e411ac
bc0bf0848414b9bbb10b0cd7c89804ddb36f47b2
describe
'512892' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_262.jp2'
1dca7805ada6481d80031cec2ff9e718
398dd019e27ccec9e4c9e0582a9dd75360b56ff4
describe
'69895' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_262.jpg'
8e3b3970080743dc20e7caa2a583a7b5
84e05737faa685dfdd6756fd2f9c95ac7af9f1fa
describe
'20461' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_262.pro'
fd90ce949a764e3e3c1d4fffbf5fd841
a60d81eb833e8fbf630421e82876b0c03ed03e6b
describe
'23977' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_262.QC.jpg'
b21f04b2493c763c3b75b823b4d8f93e
73205959ca5f91f6dff4346fe098b079d83939a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_262.tif'
f73e119a5189dec9dea3e8420ce6250d
51723d7bc7749e50fdfc55bf931e685b52707382
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_262.txt'
71d9bcf45384c91131cca75499072770
fe2687e94dba1bdfe6e6adc0be72cd0c84f19ff0
describe
'7483' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_262thm.jpg'
c684c6cc82f88aaf74fb22c80df8cafb
9912cb2df30dc324d3fdb2c582caec6b97f2675f
describe
'523552' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_263.jp2'
77a36addf5a7c9f99cbff3bd7402f60c
538adf2002c798ec12ab6fa32707666efc513630
describe
'76458' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_263.jpg'
3b85ea9757b5a2e956877e30538cb469
21142af695d33beecab1630b14c4eaaad0d3cf5d
describe
'22916' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_263.pro'
55cac3703c1c93613c7bd4b4b4851c49
f2e17e77627f1b6c8dc5de2845c9bf46f86aec8e
describe
'26533' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_263.QC.jpg'
f23c008a7e716be670c92b27cae055fb
ad342844d0c0bdc23bba55db69e76bb8cdb5d950
'2012-04-01T04:14:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_263.tif'
0dfba8200bb78dce20507b6b716b9137
f911382f43dd5b7c623ec5480ced0d05e12f6ab5
describe
'936' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_263.txt'
85cd9f463c67926a377377c1a2c0d119
7018dccb283c8d9509a22e80b2b75548d7e28d47
describe
Invalid character
'8188' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_263thm.jpg'
752547fadd78b16bf25e885ff150aed3
adb7abb77667bb49f4f33dcd423c7f78802d1a7a
describe
'512933' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_264.jp2'
796cd1e5915df33db7ed325c375b8617
fd5f7e7060274f62dffb2fd44586ce63d721c0e5
describe
'92247' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_264.jpg'
0cde695086769039e17896a1a32484b1
58487b70474d7e355dba4b282efe922ae12c49f9
describe
'31953' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_264.pro'
9004af6a846586ac80dcf6095a8fada7
bba0306869c1cd37d1302bdf61736d13f8fc5d5c
describe
'32651' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_264.QC.jpg'
744622ffd2ddf191254f707584dd3e0e
520db2d3a63c7e56b4cebbf5b85e6746a5aa5ab1
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_264.tif'
8166af66188ad855d9fef3bc3011aa98
d2b505fe2eb28051f761df98795caaadb4ee7682
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_264.txt'
1e7d90bff7dac174118a7fa64ba51c71
400f87d91b5a1dd33bf8912ab779185792904839
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGGZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_264thm.jpg'
9bfd3293455af2c84dddce746517c174
07dbe7471d5f34582943b0e784d588021845448d
describe
'526653' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_265.jp2'
e0f3c5ec0873840c2ba94835a081b7bf
318c526a4a422aadad77d980eb3ed244bc4ebd5a
describe
'97536' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_265.jpg'
b3c4614193ca7ab6fd8c495ff5bb9bfe
0e122c1f2fd3b2646f5ab46acd64f2231815d99d
describe
'32102' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_265.pro'
93ed4276051f389f79a64e28f6248a41
08917a3032c7076ac28bab71f07a260b0a6bb206
describe
'34292' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_265.QC.jpg'
df834dd74211957807e542f70947b9f9
18878c53a0e78a67a2c4c3249756207f078a64b8
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_265.tif'
fbea19b66eb756cf685c276f4a108aec
4c285e68ddc9777bc01fe1f487d21f341ec87721
'2012-04-01T04:19:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_265.txt'
1a0228cbb00eecafb632a80785a34b74
5594aa187cd09b2da967d0630a2f5a2c4d7b94bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_265thm.jpg'
3451f8af025a41f88536a4862aef8f89
ed86b83f7db4c7b8395952501770880527cea35c
describe
'515582' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_266.jp2'
501a4f840b352fcd2588aec906d65d95
c74973a500c698d7b5903e6552f01ebbf37f5cf6
describe
'104448' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_266.jpg'
6e3a0cc85e885ae32b174b4638916186
51f76943338a9c7984eb6e714d0aea76a51c7f51
describe
'36954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_266.pro'
e9f270c59aea24a7a910f9ce91ee1aec
fe26893e2b39b42f675ae5b1913a92c4bb429c01
describe
'37109' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_266.QC.jpg'
05c53d2748d00dc2d0ac6c2184ac50ee
c44671c0aeb770415d36f28f41e0bb11820a5c2b
'2012-04-01T04:17:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_266.tif'
bde57c34a00372ee183082a5d8db2089
ab808902574f1bcdc722af47e6d080bd0fc8fd5c
'2012-04-01T04:19:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_266.txt'
16cd8bfb1e28fc8d13f760331d613dcf
62dd8d7f6dbcfd7d4255e4b39f2cdd32d603f429
describe
'11704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_266thm.jpg'
4f55ba681e7d6887425eb9bb1bccc330
72eb75765bda9f3aece79e6ae37ad3c6226c8316
describe
'544452' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_267.jp2'
23898873e05f5b855820718047ab6364
ca856fb23b9fbeda44a76682b7cbbc4837a3aff9
describe
'96849' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_267.jpg'
dc46b365bcca74395169bd6f2b3def84
3298012650bccabf537b93c2f7d868b0e7bdfb9b
describe
'31310' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_267.pro'
bd9f568c8008309ea28fd5a1a54198a1
8947cf461d484382b9c738d7e8fa80daa40715eb
describe
'34042' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_267.QC.jpg'
5cbd7b7b0844a5f782aeaa5f5e9f63ef
8243107ca7fbde959e6accc0c5893fdb6fe148a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_267.tif'
59e1b401ea6b896b67e52c904fb114d8
c8fdfede6e263e82796d0254651b9c86d7a96500
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_267.txt'
cea265d7ceb1a1395929acf6ddb797e5
1146fc9ee3bea817f741a26da35b91fd77bcde05
describe
'9829' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_267thm.jpg'
d4cf3f7451c42fe9be7af4b3fc984c35
a68d4af4823438653f5c840ded896dc48a465f9d
describe
'505840' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_268.jp2'
0353e2b65aa7df912ab33b533cbd8515
b798c02888f5d0efc8c6070f675aaf7f294e5e42
describe
'104008' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_268.jpg'
9f9944cec4082514b4d035625d785db0
d951cfb63addf372858247440acd1571408f23c9
describe
'36018' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_268.pro'
4bfc9a19d88dd38b8dda3b83e7a491a8
de7e38e14dafea21741584c471d892ff7637c57c
describe
'36045' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_268.QC.jpg'
aa0f08fa653a166b64afcec61c159199
2d92c1877ff6dcf09ea992b1ee23053870dfc649
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGHZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_268.tif'
54f0a42242e92d156eefec6c6126cb17
4f6460d0a7bcb391373d9f68ead7d07065ea4df9
'2012-04-01T04:18:20-04:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_268.txt'
c1edf2c98126554bbab70fed3aad0d49
f74f79ff320f7adb4b03aafbfb80ae5ca39a15ec
describe
'11252' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_268thm.jpg'
e8de7b49085704969be3eef017c8e389
6c7999dc56d7fd793bdfe3d2ee410304eaaec37a
describe
'534798' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_269.jp2'
9786ba5e0ad72e6f697b7954df8e285d
3dad3cb56c68764986900e28d955ec57101469f8
describe
'105812' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGID' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_269.jpg'
bca85660f06fe4dc03d6164bded1aa36
846863197fefd174c6d01294090f02bb25061985
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_269.pro'
eb971c2ed4ee17a9d2237d32c8bbedfc
8d0aba47d6ce9b927be8bcca4428a424e95b1535
describe
'36093' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_269.QC.jpg'
8e457f04d3649f87b02d15c96e1f6a04
0383a5887e3a9f72cee99e996d2fdf89e2130725
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_269.tif'
fcc697a11dc7cad3ef6bfccdccc87f41
38f36cfebb90c1de4c8ba1b130a4f7d54e4367d3
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_269.txt'
52590527394b00adc6f899c990383e32
4b47f38ee44991932eaf5a050e80d50a05b941cf
describe
'10481' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGII' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_269thm.jpg'
d502a28a423de9cf9a878ddffaa213ed
7a700337ced60f6560ceb2bbb5c67086a7c2a7b0
'2012-04-01T04:16:56-04:00'
describe
'508586' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_270.jp2'
5a121efb8a8e22ca7cecd264bff9b04d
4297242020daafb912d97e6fd74b76ff5f7a806e
describe
'99996' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_270.jpg'
ec7be2ce6303d7838c9c9c894bd4380a
74b5e6f8219a362a1a3a519614bf8bad243fa8e3
describe
'33313' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_270.pro'
6b9e14b999ad6fd911ffed029c9a392f
24181e5340d70b8456db7833fc6d29af770b074a
describe
'35523' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_270.QC.jpg'
3eb78afb35473db1464b2312aa12e9c0
47fd167c64060eae88d6015ee0cea4abe41dbda5
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_270.tif'
c53a01d5c66b370551339436d6efd253
b8b47c407e9116dadbcc7a4d696abde34fc79115
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_270.txt'
a1f0f1320852ca4d62563e96f6587682
ff2c077cff0f2b94f3cc6b15eff3ef74af95283e
describe
Invalid character
'11353' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_270thm.jpg'
56f3eee53c2b51aca3c48981a80d9058
c82d2f9e333ad6674e614afac8cbf34c3bc4cf8a
describe
'523619' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_271.jp2'
467747d9e51747ce1a87c7cfde00a5d8
3946a7416cb899bb537ff525924ccac0d5e69649
describe
'103524' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_271.jpg'
ebb0b4477a853bf545465685b820d4b6
5dc79089a47ceab9d30f70723c6b1891babf6a97
describe
'35044' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_271.pro'
c578b44681fc82b0b4cc3e85781b6813
24e4b4b2f4aedf5f89cc7b15a9fbbe08d66a38fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_271.QC.jpg'
f26b70500a066681cddd0afee2633d2b
7d36b21bb50e7df3ded805aa83c963a567e03275
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_271.tif'
cb7add8bf8ae2bb8681426539db5ac99
502ed66e0049c9d796fcb6d3f3eade326a82bb2d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_271.txt'
00b1b5a93277e3a87ca2a6aab44fa812
94431e00bed64d4561f82ff2eafcda31ce98c1a9
describe
'10602' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_271thm.jpg'
b256be0f116a6e5fcd541c5e2de99bfa
feee89b1707f919f7ef3d37e9de7b27d89ff061d
describe
'511588' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_272.jp2'
76a3358af627831e77415dd7065f4114
be289815cffdd119cb8e4c2ac7336e8ffef5bbc7
describe
'102839' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_272.jpg'
fea1cc56d0011b96e2dca6f6bfc81fc8
141347993308f8a4202fe5ccbd5fd7d7080963a5
describe
'34760' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGIZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_272.pro'
ea24b8f4c30e0523326c141eadabc0b5
b52039914691cfa158e6fe523973134a05afb92b
describe
'35073' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_272.QC.jpg'
ef92e6cf5b48a09b28a73fbc107e0ec2
6b453f93f82cea0e4a29524e3aa139b8ada55590
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_272.tif'
accdd2ac10a16f9a7d3d5e3209db4dd4
c3ba79f00dba47123a36ea372ce18602a46b5017
'2012-04-01T04:23:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_272.txt'
f09c261f2f4aee317e53218ec912bb48
f78fa7a7c3a0bb15de3a99602308e533dd1f8ae7
describe
'10927' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_272thm.jpg'
585606aff037dfec2638b9638fc681f2
8b1dd7363542dd72436d51e0261b68078aa2f555
describe
'537568' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_273.jp2'
36e143384f14ee7f80549f537ae470cb
60e2aa8bd6b3043841f9f3b9c8abb0ed597dc522
describe
'103356' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_273.jpg'
e9dd852b7f2d50aae0cd98904e1fa3d4
5637a7d7e74621368602b4220522ac9a7be2ec40
describe
'36340' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_273.pro'
54fbf9e9ed03f298ce94d2f2758fb415
640113353f55576920550b141547a141daa1c4f9
describe
'35449' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_273.QC.jpg'
be8c5ad43f9a966582d7110eda11dfb1
14a1082b524940a2e4b43025717e7a1a30a19521
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_273.tif'
5ea05f25bcfa01b14a715a60f92ac86b
11a74feb8cfad7d27d1c0acb2e3708e75a4901c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_273.txt'
514d61239af4b360b2e9b8d20bbf6130
8571da88022dce877ae402a44d2503dfafdcd5e4
describe
'10260' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_273thm.jpg'
16493196bf9627552dce358884a03db7
8dbfe582823dd027ac7bb3432d6248e7d0db0c0f
describe
'515533' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_274.jp2'
6b0f7e1974aba27fbd3c976950967e97
737fab0266b113a930d864491737f1057b48a137
describe
'98802' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_274.jpg'
7b130f3f456e9d09b28d826aaaf65b91
3afe1b0c86402de46c375cf533129cb36629c91e
describe
'33713' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_274.pro'
90ab48f524968155abdc1c13ebfc8cff
0d6f8a4e71a0a86e99cdae5417016981e7a20f9c
describe
'34753' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_274.QC.jpg'
6e526ffcf9447f5e7ba7f41bffa54d89
a75ea25aa2bb931d427709f16108c6b0c6f9005a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_274.tif'
2f1edd44b04b3432dc970102d8eb654b
b66d478b69858b7d8b1cd0781c8201dbe9d77801
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_274.txt'
b8ede774d4deccfc4412b3763cec53d5
8357cd2dfb557b9586529e98c8a4bc902cb208d2
describe
'11312' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_274thm.jpg'
34ad624b986a65c199acd170d7614f65
eb75e169ca2e6e47d2d106120e363f163c5b6285
describe
'516895' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_275.jp2'
2bf05c0e098d1e5d351e819606089ca3
32b3fba3a9660d1fa0a7bcd6512e8940f4fb93f9
describe
'104790' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_275.jpg'
aec987154ea91c2d65d2239df87bb16a
6d671a2ef81de11f21c343bf68650d5c5d602007
describe
'36492' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_275.pro'
99b1cb587b36365bbb3d4c20ecbb6fac
0647a74e90322efcac6a9b4575494b8a9abcb72c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_275.QC.jpg'
0d21ffdfa7d17b8d7d9f053c74782fc2
855a1267d3616bd47558f102a61566654eaa9270
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_275.tif'
e416be5c7e23b9493a91c434338e7032
2a823c14f3ad2ac948ddd749f087f1c1656ce0c6
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_275.txt'
54332d936fbd098adc8d863cf4f1f5f0
bd3ab18d8f8910b5301c47a49f6b0caa2adc81f6
describe
'10720' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_275thm.jpg'
dc65001044039d6dacd2ced985a82cad
c5a17abc09cf843c6758c45e0cb79db7300766a6
describe
'522479' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGJZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_276.jp2'
54d7a0d78a472d74dd9a836afd87bc8f
ad73cac31ed1061cb09710e2b650abb00a4f99da
describe
'100972' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_276.jpg'
979d259837dd0298569c30313a893c9f
0873dd5e25aba96e4df5ec5688cfca2475932007
describe
'35212' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_276.pro'
ae7cdeca8a5ddd4328bac311abe1da60
c3c94d8b6c40129e91d994928f11d3918991d968
describe
'35462' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_276.QC.jpg'
d4bef7be953f7b5f1b60246ad5b781df
b0cdb58582ec65cfc40d1318b5a00df08d955926
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_276.tif'
e1b713a64d5711b28a2b478f48d82bde
b2daa8bc342e546db1edf8499223d41e41fda64f
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_276.txt'
44ec5887d17994b471bb738776a1a8e1
075bf4cd6efe7de412ac8427bf9a8cb6bbb0526a
describe
'10583' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_276thm.jpg'
89b5a4380ccba470a398a7b748991459
82e23602c020a9622151cc2ed3cf9587cecc656c
describe
'536201' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_277.jp2'
2e0f804243d919f25a25a0edcc4c0932
1fc0aed7e04939ef1d7ff27bbf4d807c0d716c8b
describe
'105248' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_277.jpg'
c5dceb402f87cce7dd4dd8cfc7626159
b4778da6872d207e659b3ecf27ded0fe935ee411
describe
'34763' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_277.pro'
de9a1dc35a634343808af3c58f65b6c3
ea525a3e55c5ecfeae352b454a2bb0ec91a3c386
describe
'35827' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_277.QC.jpg'
31f8712e4712d09a0a15d95d215e292b
76fbd6e42cf7a64dcb33bcbd3edc20811d411e88
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_277.tif'
59831e51c832052281ed3429ce95eb49
dc2d2f0304524619055fb0ec420e1da8a024fb3e
'2012-04-01T04:13:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_277.txt'
29a0d10c4db9ea024af319953ac61ae8
87237b57c38be463c61f1c2b2eee3bd33fb50344
describe
'10396' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_277thm.jpg'
b3ceffdff84831c41b2095dc3b726d8e
49c95706a1949dc61cd43758b774b3b2a4a12569
describe
'508637' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_278.jp2'
73f2f4ca81f7521cbcc58bb9145ceb0f
6e580c43fa08b2da11d89cd7865a88938b4e12f1
describe
'98372' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_278.jpg'
c2ad6382be4d04dccdd746cd11659966
931a5e4bee2dade81bb16763975fb5e73f12d191
'2012-04-01T04:18:28-04:00'
describe
'33330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_278.pro'
30817e6fb1d90f597dd0867392931090
58654b974a6c0d0f46fd999e1a7f710ee76d43cd
describe
'34778' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_278.QC.jpg'
e3d76496288caab4268aaa596bd6d02b
0b6366d8b118cc782343123099d2946c4c04fb2a
'2012-04-01T04:23:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_278.tif'
59b2e3f020ac27f8bd30fe5bf3933f0f
29c8dcc46b92f4c9f0bbdd50807b49fbe4c59b67
'2012-04-01T04:19:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_278.txt'
4485fe1b73d297be188bbcd0a3877b10
84dfb44fa094a0994896aa491cd170af6048f15e
describe
'10862' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_278thm.jpg'
d8e36cb29a55d81d887695bc6ff48836
ac1555b86274f3ae6024f4167b48a38061d9740f
describe
'530660' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_279.jp2'
939d55d7415a96e567afd2c6ad574a17
fecd89e326f169c3c3cf3f9adb5e521e49cebad9
describe
'104527' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_279.jpg'
cf6d6e9fabcd19d38cb1218153df28b7
0885cba9e6edae537a0fda0d08ff94521a898be4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_279.pro'
34b143424ef6cf3179fcf48b2a34b5ed
135d3ba5c0ecaa819312760ab0621f20857eba27
describe
'36298' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_279.QC.jpg'
2872d16d9066c9938e323169e6c89290
b492f894f762858ff6a74957bb3d7eae65e550e0
describe
'12755080' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_279.tif'
0248d074b5ed4d4dfdf6f93476f92667
e9ac4e067d3021d94e620685bcad526ec0300967
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGKZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_279.txt'
b47fda4f998ee96558721b59f43a1997
a363d2ee169652cb557cde4e18ca80ca3f70c8a2
describe
'10569' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_279thm.jpg'
84cd157805cbae6b619778d10414f441
e19114922ba939119e09b15bbed2f202053e8a2e
describe
'500450' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_280.jp2'
686ee31f1c15f9e1a1090a0b2982378f
ddacde7d78b8e0dda17fe99996bd327b10a78253
describe
'98656' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_280.jpg'
76143c466c820382bae55fd6546b806d
5a3462101e3cd2df24c9ed2cb05aee92c516cdd0
describe
'33110' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_280.pro'
73bb2f465f02aea9438c096e0803a314
3c6cf65c0ee5126ee2ac03425ba6ce8632720ba0
describe
'34149' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_280.QC.jpg'
2acb4e6b2feb71ed2389ac179f830f53
d58a5ec44ddad48e79d865451803b0ad0d48c3e5
'2012-04-01T04:16:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_280.tif'
e34cd840e249140a65f84ba0ddf75a1d
db81c283d17a7c002063b75bcd95f1f1fd8a0432
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_280.txt'
94eca8fad93549be68fbcd1c908e6bd6
f476fca83aa11b0796912df8001c8b2b56a37307
describe
'10987' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_280thm.jpg'
9a5fd6d98f2c4f3897612ed4f2e7ae28
c8ddcb2367ba1087b978af1a04decd6e3ebb81f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_281.jp2'
9ce2f1a9cf06d2ec03cf491a9a66e854
9c9272e96f67ddb97ad47c5896cad909b2fa3adf
describe
'106406' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_281.jpg'
facf1184c3e827fb1a486a4e2894a3da
f16d0052f4e825a30d675ff04e5a7646bfab4d36
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_281.pro'
f06cdceeca375a9e4d054040e38cb2be
f23c0836ec448f2d6ef02bbee5a0825f5815eab7
'2012-04-01T04:18:13-04:00'
describe
'37360' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_281.QC.jpg'
ce82a4fd64f6194035f1a88930a888d8
996d2e7ca238f8e9326e3cb1c29add326f4c06c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_281.tif'
460ae8711e77bfd7753192944ba28e23
3b02727f2193a33c76272d95386bd1f9a024aebb
'2012-04-01T04:14:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_281.txt'
ed64f46cfd0a3771109a8a4378c67460
2f445500ebbeefc952f73ae7da293859687ad409
describe
'11238' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_281thm.jpg'
28403e396c5a3dbd12465a5dbaa84af0
674e2832cfae21a68208f69db35ed1f6f48ce18a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_282.jp2'
517051cb859867017aafd8b68234d4fa
f5ed4c0500c5e63830b5ecfb095d5799bb217037
'2012-04-01T04:23:26-04:00'
describe
'103578' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_282.jpg'
e977d1f1cd1ab6a0b2f61d07328fd83c
8a1edb8de1bb3bb144c5acd930a53cb6e85f45ec
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_282.pro'
99609f412eacb3e444c631354a0c2675
92394fbdf628d9a68672a0f8c1c575170f752fbe
describe
'36386' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_282.QC.jpg'
86798b1ee3fccda439bd21b5138a1615
f4d4387defcd5eacc8d628bfa73b176e8d1dd683
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_282.tif'
4c15d55d4aa7b016ad334fc70d7ccc2c
f076b74db27953a057296518ad44cadbee6bd114
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_282.txt'
49b11acbaabbbeba9a4f350005c91335
e5bd258ce84926e3df37d7c2412772ecc670b924
describe
'10301' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_282thm.jpg'
de55fc943c0619e2a1d1c500e1fbaae0
182ba3dcdba13a5f2fdacaf0c46435ec67499e32
describe
'549699' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_283.jp2'
b7d8ac8d8e561302749a2a3ffd6d0e60
b0f6a08d2293870f0c210f2d02dfb0db6869adf1
describe
'105681' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_283.jpg'
4d42883a52892dddfb84db7c8679468e
6971853715df2603074f2650a8bfc1f7dddcec07
describe
'35492' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_283.pro'
4c4c8923785d0068f29edec287f83bb5
a4652cd49485cd7c2660fd13134a551cf035c71d
describe
'36823' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGLZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_283.QC.jpg'
b50282d6bdb2fc0f596a5fa612afd7c7
bf9e95cc8a57f36dca3a52476886471136a9c23f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_283.tif'
4bcb344bc764dc776ba64543d3d6e87b
e9ebe3b443d96a246139a5ed69097f4f3222b156
'2012-04-01T04:23:00-04:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_283.txt'
81d786e00036a7cf472ce7cfe9e867bb
c6eab4f9371fb26a4fa7eab91bed5db19177e5fc
describe
'10355' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_283thm.jpg'
5b97fe0447dfdae5f4bebb2d586da077
30aaf023d14cb9528c5c179d8ea1d5179ce82813
'2012-04-01T04:13:58-04:00'
describe
'504717' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_284.jp2'
7455b0bef7d91733a60fa371ea671576
47ee3658cf55c8afc5e191b4386076c954a6f67b
describe
'105192' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGME' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_284.jpg'
499c18b8a88dc903047164753a47bfb9
66fb321136f2aef4534f3da9cceaaa4c9bcb9586
describe
'35675' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_284.pro'
c105183b1c3d0fd78054ace0ba4b4caf
b8d1267bd3cc5d9d5d32e2f4580f808511c397b9
describe
'36825' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_284.QC.jpg'
98024121e1636a5629802accc3bb3be6
8e4b043a4708b555d6b32cc2bb753f41cafbbc4f
describe
'12132954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_284.tif'
32cbd786882de5d6b28291c286d4e703
76c799d8e5dca7d1c3199890f83a790dc3243626
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_284.txt'
10567633e6bcb508f4f500ca76aa5348
5705930e17f0e0cab901474e0b2d419a62ffcbe8
describe
'11289' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_284thm.jpg'
0c5539d722919a9690a225574b44e36a
686e521e738364d933f59967443fec2e5af2fb8d
describe
'534811' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_285.jp2'
ea81afac4963b9fc13fcc7963fc64d5d
b7455c4031174d6f653d5e85fca413b99e2e70ae
describe
'104027' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGML' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_285.jpg'
5e3da5b89ebf1d00b9233c3e982a8c24
32a8f3c5c72548d0574f99aee92adb9855d64cce
describe
'35004' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_285.pro'
d8ef06ebea421b705f47417d26657cbe
54f5f1c5cb776a5d3645b0bbf93c5f0c12dbd3cb
describe
'35429' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_285.QC.jpg'
0a81a2a94621807ad8d6415ad2cf08b1
fffeea0519546a67f2155efeb9d793a0d958b67f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_285.tif'
afef3f1176908c070dcd774186baefac
dc6cfcc06424dd9a7886f0494accde0c42ec6617
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_285.txt'
2ca2ec7809099d37bcd22b6fbd251ebe
a65df05150f0051e18ceaf386e72e7bb03721b8b
describe
'10427' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_285thm.jpg'
246ea2f5c68d28f17150f06c2938d652
10d7bff141fa203611c68bdebe0b56040ce77578
describe
'524986' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_286.jp2'
8a2c9dfe0bf7410c594f8120c52cd325
e22571774e8372bf7526f0e74af0090ca12e2342
describe
'104552' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_286.jpg'
26e6d00ef86464e5f45b900c03672cb6
60469f63e3b855d29efa7e857e6907dc695c7146
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_286.pro'
978add5aa0265ee4d8a4a069d11a5702
ee55dafb4290112ea501fd31fad7d17b9403a454
describe
'36669' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_286.QC.jpg'
b7e35628bcbb6741e37d06d0f562b105
85d31ba404707af9f5b6305c80b11d7b0de9c9b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_286.tif'
0029e7ed26951771a834895a418cad8c
2fac65aeb1d96f54627bfcae6b70341356a47ad4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_286.txt'
86a1463a62d23a8aec609da1c699718f
6e1e5698d2933f0a86e5a2ed214fc518c058a4bf
describe
'10889' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_286thm.jpg'
e7154f697f4a727ff544e4a926a954e2
fc7eba3cf9472ed55ddb97f3e745d4a88de3f194
describe
'549681' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_287.jp2'
01ecb8a8410975e60879f27b68b4f230
45840a49103755de4c95198550f39a19853bdc9c
describe
'105493' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGMZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_287.jpg'
59517c7704824252660e5556f9439940
c3e071733e971faaf4ed99cb7854f7fdc803a1fd
describe
'35963' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_287.pro'
5ecfb30a7a1a7a806bf3eaf995e5fce4
ac3113878d4ae47f2be072a4166906c7e35a16b9
describe
'36375' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_287.QC.jpg'
179fec98838ed3c2b260a334bc1aad8e
6d96fd740e59d084e3262797b046e16357075a76
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_287.tif'
f4af1086af6c6c544afcefd363f0092e
cf8da8c646df852fa8e6108820ca14124fa67f8f
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGND' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_287.txt'
3c3c15a55867c8e0f7996aee36b5d500
83a2158ec18ddec6a007dd7c4fe8b3d43d69418f
describe
'10380' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_287thm.jpg'
2d0e5c390b34e6dd81793070bb356e80
168dd188864777895b5d447f520ee79c643bc0ab
describe
'506069' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_288.jp2'
722c3958f4694bf3fa2c975a6d010552
687ca56f4d5240b4b8438ed895361f53893e2b48
describe
'103481' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_288.jpg'
71fb8f897df7c7e63fa33f1b93d85fa0
2d40801b898c839e1c0ec774c24080a86d7ae539
describe
'36870' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_288.pro'
6e942c93a96be4e3df5f7dda930889a3
67109c20256294dc83f9156e06ec610f07aab5eb
describe
'35846' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_288.QC.jpg'
75a498001f1f55116935e5f6732a7a3c
b18991eb46dede3b5a5625b792ae0629b4242757
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_288.tif'
cd7a12b703e3dd21157a694693604ccb
9bf2449c57f9eefe124218a4bbc796d9bffabb1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_288.txt'
ec1d6eeaf8a79759ba4412b8434aedd1
669b8348de94674b3cfddcfea876eedec2c8b490
describe
'11258' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_288thm.jpg'
375180156fc135aed2f470e789b77300
c489d210e4f6dd65a30cd2fedded3d30be49afaf
describe
'564804' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_289.jp2'
a0bf16d79837cc2701a5c43d4e4df4b1
10b8692cdd78fa3ce7040e9d004ce4416466ab95
describe
'92776' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_289.jpg'
446434c172924984368a0d263567c75c
aab4bf5250fdf92c47aa6b05e8a37c1ebbb27c16
describe
'30231' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_289.pro'
fcf235808e6eea6dd10fb4aad4412558
affac7da1ed0828403ad0cd0084597a1fc1ecd77
'2012-04-01T04:24:09-04:00'
describe
'32045' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_289.QC.jpg'
7f00d65864d8d04f805dcb6e744eb800
0d421bf43c309c1e7e412989b9e6560d3d496b84
describe
'13574080' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_289.tif'
280dfc3467d5a14da8afa75f3301e3c1
34331d7db47e9b9538ea212e5cb83167075856a5
'2012-04-01T04:20:55-04:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_289.txt'
7855d9a0490347676bd6c30b9c7fbb6e
771d35b79c74273fe6c484218629f5344432f832
describe
'9170' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_289thm.jpg'
879cea862bc9d6b400eb257c99916e52
a80bfebc80e2dc240494d15053009e870f56035d
describe
'503150' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_290.jp2'
72d4b3572cc62572636a1661791e7a2a
56ce085968c26828ff0f6b4f03969e1e054173f0
describe
'77638' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_290.jpg'
3f3b4d40287f26b0d7a0312b91a1da02
59c48ab99a15ea65f4d44e8096d2be23206dc487
describe
'24172' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_290.pro'
114f342431a465b2778d590a405ae67e
0efd574d4f7199d81fa727b88d73b5fa020854e7
describe
'27066' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_290.QC.jpg'
63a267bc59d1b1351639ce5834c44632
68bb4b96cd314ea9a4d12bfabf44bb7928a30dce
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_290.tif'
065773bfa2a34ead0d5fd850b45c130c
6f05a56d847d326887941568cb53fe642262411c
'2012-04-01T04:21:32-04:00'
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_290.txt'
4078b19931f0c049bf73ab8bae1904cc
92feb0792e8b0239b3c2bb9644aca6eea493f870
describe
'8788' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGNZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_290thm.jpg'
f2ba302e37b2f2256d7c7cb5eabd0341
d116d2824a71b6adc6c6cad22d68e05619750d54
describe
'521159' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_291.jp2'
c1da0672112bef0eccfa6fb1991f9b83
4a7457e738b3f05df034136a358d61cbedf384e8
describe
'99803' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_291.jpg'
d58d707706ae8b8ddda6c94e034c0d64
64363896af8617fc3265eb8fd3dbb2a9b5b6e4d9
describe
'33564' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_291.pro'
e8fa3a25a6aa9ebca6ea9b14c17310bd
fdf6e70427dfc751d5c0c82fa2b95f1cc78d1329
describe
'33918' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_291.QC.jpg'
776f364e36b3cc1ff0949245aa0b0ec2
1b3739d06bdd935bbe9f5f68dcc33c83f56b0a84
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_291.tif'
82900d49e677f1e7658769cc5cc539bf
197f4c391935636c2ef8ace79f930cd648384899
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_291.txt'
2f4b71dde0f94b85394fd0053d50668a
215a32d41703765b7343d896375d9f44eff38022
describe
'10625' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_291thm.jpg'
9762e5ef7d2ecb4fda12f7fca40b1e53
80319c9f43fe9ce0d2fc01cd7109cc7ec539a553
describe
'516859' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_292.jp2'
baab2513fb9382a00216f264fc06e761
49c1d70983e0d0ea8a9cfd149299cab68175b6fc
describe
'95438' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_292.jpg'
4ceae9eaa01ab72ce6583bf55f946bf4
1876f7ad84a58e1a89d858fe2ed806ff20f72fac
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_292.pro'
bb6b2590ec51972068f39a92908b8907
22f26161670de1719e5fcac9dbff6539fb56d6bc
describe
'33974' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_292.QC.jpg'
63e0b1684013a0452adb831be017a28d
4c304cb1572eec6d0d698a3dbe13e719c47e8900
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_292.tif'
ee4008aabfae84918ea00b96097cc3fb
d60dfdbf25654dc60a066644200982bdb78c765a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_292.txt'
ee1e015b8b620d739cdb24d23239da81
d310b28deb104786bb85648a81456d666a1ce5c6
'2012-04-01T04:17:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGON' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_292thm.jpg'
c2bdc29ccc893fc63de82a9aefd5647c
e1dcc0a734318b02cf97e4509e9bafdd98647ab7
describe
'525107' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_293.jp2'
9a84f309f3bc27ceb707ce039dd2dba1
5e7d0fcff609a4b742402c5a3df1e733e9c14109
describe
'99915' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_293.jpg'
f5416c71253d0be8ae2914bd69a9ccde
7d54dc351714e4c8fb7952051e5982585ba43718
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_293.pro'
01addf294228bdaa9a955d5ac7617423
5a8ce85fe66a4a024a5d351700f646a37fcacf57
describe
'34546' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_293.QC.jpg'
01b613f2947d94e9f25eae4cf36a7c98
c5e7107a7e6139ea22cdfa19607197ef8d90c241
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_293.tif'
9faa9ebdbe4e1651d4af54f954aabcf2
9a3effb42d1585e6dbca0da15c0a9aa5c12c5e45
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_293.txt'
2f34c529f049a4e87d386916cb9b4736
2e40a524414dca9991004485642509a65216487c
describe
'10571' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_293thm.jpg'
a15b7b449489a2d2e03901dc072403e2
d14709e858009bbfa3e7fd815cb536531e729ae5
describe
'506067' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_294.jp2'
aa8d93b8e6d6a31ac8976ea99b0156f3
dbf258c27044df277b8ce0e5a70229219ece8b06
describe
'98985' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_294.jpg'
ec33f39af8a273c175c9d910ca9e4b37
8cb115a03ecd11a0cb81e4e35889fda13782c5bd
describe
'34014' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_294.pro'
ef38da112b52c477cdb205af663d67f3
121844f69ba8fa70a26994b5ec761f351b358b97
describe
'34966' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_294.QC.jpg'
3eb0ef5563a0dfb6f5830a33523e0125
1996d9398369dd65c888da85832b61f4fcb88125
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGOZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_294.tif'
565a97f9d6dfe023313bb5f1e830600e
fb0e29d39a2439e58f1e2ee328b73ac0e3834618
'2012-04-01T04:16:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_294.txt'
7da658330ea450203702270a7dda2d62
15ff5a275f127cd3665e12a85fdfced741254fb8
describe
'10880' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_294thm.jpg'
dbe7a214e5a7663e4b1744f655baeef5
8398d7d18146d4b212b4f979a02f4e023a4d4689
describe
'515583' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_295.jp2'
1aecf2472c453a13faeb072641be635b
edf8e914a91cc79b48912f7796b2e77d9db92eb5
describe
'96970' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_295.jpg'
7bfc4eefc697665679a8f385a6b93f2a
d80e7327fcb77e3f432ff52ed112b8ed15c5bfb1
describe
'33124' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_295.pro'
bbdbd9ab2eb7dcb8b16361d79cd72154
ad5f98f547a504b6de3fb5f5d38cb014c716285d
describe
'33417' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_295.QC.jpg'
601a1e91c97f00280b52f18ed65f1115
2ca2ebdd6b65eda9bc23163472a9759973427ad3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_295.tif'
9952b417f8c28f0b091e12f7d43eb1d8
05dc1097ba3b400264c7ea02a48d9270eb1598cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_295.txt'
c3b32ba72e6867a3fcac9a304c80bc7a
d0fcad3940bb742e9afb573675e9a4c2ca10fb32
describe
'10910' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_295thm.jpg'
4d0303944dea4692b0cfc4626314e8eb
47b266a9aaab987d09c1a1a0bfc00c30742c3cb1
describe
'516864' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_296.jp2'
ba1a2b104e9d42f088fd8521394c5be0
7bd82addaf90a96d8f5859d4cf1a7655698f2f37
describe
'98314' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_296.jpg'
f330198c53a85dc6a7706909c4ae091a
b460f277ae86388ef88066b392f3f631600a65e9
describe
'33575' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_296.pro'
907027710d09e98b28da86a8ae743355
948fe4dceccace760dcfb7109eca4207238ae749
describe
'34561' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_296.QC.jpg'
831a7093f19b5692ebea6053a9374d05
ea9a19056f701c1c08597505f990a7b7797179e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_296.tif'
ebf710084c17be5a4d00f71e165158ae
1c6ff6248f771010a6f5a12b55be8c27d4ee9f7d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_296.txt'
c68070c8b970baa03a3f75c572798f85
874b0c006b8e0010e082a424717ce772ec0d6e3b
describe
'10539' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_296thm.jpg'
f5f4eda91c3ef99319c9c91b313a5d58
b15e1edc6c9128ab9f88694291d7c77683a43c41
describe
'537524' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_297.jp2'
54a8e12d646e4068438e2070b7139443
70b97cbafc0f2c9297c10dcb61ab36cb0f20eb43
describe
'101731' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_297.jpg'
65ac1a90eb09269b0a43772de6065f8a
d2a344a2a2dae7b3d239801d0923bff2a55cc936
describe
'33627' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_297.pro'
ce49091268bcc480c3bf980ffbfcee53
9d1d7d6c5f624a0c801379ace72cae664ab30f6d
describe
'35522' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_297.QC.jpg'
504f689ab266a2217d25a29f22205e81
79801b75178d270e0eed9e10ce50a4cb9ec912f1
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_297.tif'
750077c6f01b89ccc8fe5b4e56f44874
c908df43c5d0059f0d5f4df20a33e5b3c617fb05
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_297.txt'
45f3d36851bbc6e6f9dfb310ed4a6c35
fecfe319cc7c9014a893dd7ae9593669aa7bf4de
describe
'10217' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_297thm.jpg'
3eadfe4fe6a417ab718c81a4b852de5a
c9ddec3d036149661e088f9476b1dda9d59515d4
describe
'518525' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_298.jp2'
3ff940724f03e225aaa9f4c45fe8cd26
00308d196ce57e470079ffa8008c9b8d42b76703
describe
'100436' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_298.jpg'
2006b5a91c3d2f2251fb106cb9f63b9c
fb57291c5a8ac7e508f57bc1ba93b65dda55ca31
describe
'35223' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGPZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_298.pro'
370a67c67269b1365a5cff383340ee6d
af903f26fed92b2b809dd1528a4de2246b68ee2f
describe
'35196' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_298.QC.jpg'
6a1da18c4f1ebf1d044552e239781732
fed32aa82eacefc9d87a265da992c509a443a71a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_298.tif'
1135b603a6c0077cfcf823d7375f6002
2af708c6eb14a9ca2aaa870cedbcc79f8beabb69
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_298.txt'
be43064455a64eb669bc0a966ce60c13
e80fa20621c58931e64995a1ea8cc4121e629aa7
describe
'10815' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_298thm.jpg'
ab1ddc5e4475bda5d7c07b548f04af1a
e161a3e14dbb91e0a780f0ce8f46bab6e63db6ab
describe
'533280' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_299.jp2'
9db2c4168de8b918cf6ba8e173521a4d
b84d5c54d29f3c31955ac47ac04e284b1e34f9b5
describe
'99380' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_299.jpg'
f66190c6709943c8d449c46245051098
959735f8ee5becdb561328ccd992b679302534e1
describe
'33469' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_299.pro'
c7e6593c8c29d4cc2dbfc61bbcd88a80
7f1a6875805805d823876568a5cd5acabc39a4be
describe
'34659' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_299.QC.jpg'
cc0f917229a39e9fbad08204a4da71de
157cb33318725a1742c4066f9a5ff798113737ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_299.tif'
388f72b2db2925d41788efa2bef27a1b
943b1e377b8aa18666080df45a9c666cf429f3e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_299.txt'
12851234ea356e6ebe09dd7be5058bd4
bcd990f4f981f96672a4989953e2cc358b3ebb97
describe
'10287' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_299thm.jpg'
f4a90733e7c6028626ae3f34ef069a91
f5a6b2cb1a2f3909edebc5a92011596770a9deb4
describe
'507335' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_300.jp2'
86a0ed871b3262c46771c7985244df0d
9a0eb2c8f1b8b521fc01097c1828286631fcfdf0
describe
'95799' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_300.jpg'
481d2b5d71ab852709a9fda1c60a0d0c
509975634497813e9b6e6c5399d94a78868925ee
describe
'31955' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_300.pro'
6bb73e06173cf0b2138dc4ef0e1a4821
0191260708b6078ee70e703767d27aaf94c99643
describe
'33585' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_300.QC.jpg'
3d4476103e5783b1a930c5a3d0e62240
58ea364248f87de6124ea5f5c9331002f798d6ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_300.tif'
1762a62d1edf5120667d2aeac844ce23
3860a0cd05f3e8b2638e157158371bfc0ebfcaea
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_300.txt'
1b49bcb34758351292b8909548bd00e1
c3085cc24a63afd285e8cdd80dd665f8b3231a36
describe
'10653' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_300thm.jpg'
4d41fb0bd6ffc3a7f8c6329f8851c84b
bd102b04e0a528b46474c08a0229ec11079a62da
describe
'536235' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_301.jp2'
fa527bf9b8629e2fc2a5b389729b551f
2dc658796cd5fc86f69e0652ec9f16fcd5704609
describe
'92916' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_301.jpg'
e248bc4d30c3bc31bd6370fc67e23a63
aaa4f6920a0eeff8ecd827ad344df6f9066977f8
describe
'41049' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_301.pro'
e5c1b5f1ff832cdb54e187883ae0f47f
73d629b654f6aa088dcab404ff50000a0b526532
describe
'31159' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_301.QC.jpg'
b574125e1537a8712fa02e63c63c30e8
619bf9056bcaa58511af00b4a2b92226dab06fd4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_301.tif'
5d48d812b6c63e604211e4b618399a67
b4d0bb550fd6bfa62ef9612aa20047442daebd8e
describe
'1708' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_301.txt'
2be386ec3a22626f901477d105602af2
2fba84d8b5a97bc533442c25ead15f10b54b371a
describe
Invalid character
'9340' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_301thm.jpg'
0bdf4522e18aa91f618b7bf78591c338
b69d2538ebe7ad95981b9d1d1abc712868be8969
describe
'519857' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGQZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_302.jp2'
fa77c52b088a57bad8d433a0e64d93dd
36c55f9da38d2fd51e3d00e1ac3b55beeb51ae1f
describe
'124759' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_302.jpg'
82302609cd9abb3dec8cb86fe9edbb53
9e2bfaceccddb23b2138cdb211f9c7222987c708
describe
'87253' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_302.pro'
003888a83b6e70589bebd6ee487453c9
23ac31f24b00e72e876fab82e4bf9bbf50c7cdbe
describe
'37976' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_302.QC.jpg'
aab548446d768b83e2b2c3b8856899b6
bf4e5c305b6cf602801ea251a7b5d4e715c25a88
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_302.tif'
38066ceeb61fd74fc9b919d6fabefa54
0244306396741b7706f5e4a0e73d006b5101370b
describe
'3425' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_302.txt'
7617701b24862d5f94764c7a8b1a9d79
5b7f0165a6966cd3ca4f9854a883793d67c509d1
describe
'10789' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_302thm.jpg'
416d2262d1eaefd50049fb20df943620
49b1ee26b6d65492198bdfbbafcfb13bebb48d12
'2012-04-01T04:22:51-04:00'
describe
'531960' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_303.jp2'
3056c3d64441bcb637efd8bf0686dc28
de23df3e5833a02096f69c693999ee035840499f
describe
'106825' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_303.jpg'
7163a5859d28d7db98c9bb45b289cf92
7b3ac852f6c0afe0017c5440f836ce30e95a702d
describe
'63033' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_303.pro'
feffc94d045f986c87a1f7a880f68e30
cfd719aaae5db7abf3209a5b344e643aa4dcf878
describe
'33383' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_303.QC.jpg'
b97440e90d07d7014cb4c1a61892d02a
33654048e87bb68af3202bea1164fe45402863f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_303.tif'
771ff4c447b7a3dfe4d29facc7c950f1
70c6b789ab1bf9064783024bbc8ed98bc8b0a937
describe
'2534' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_303.txt'
cf1cf37b915bfb19c93220d499b20aa6
58c8df4a9820ab866960f7e524948305492d6954
describe
'9702' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_303thm.jpg'
d76701af51c8397cafb87896ffb1c913
e2a925853c11c73f291d62d8068106e7c7175224
describe
'493854' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_304.jp2'
2039e0545ad7539895af8cb4138a02ce
23b2df9c4441aa7fcec51ae1aebad57974566ab2
describe
'117580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_304.jpg'
72301446158c1909728f9fcab05d3720
7a655d358bc2fff4ee66a777c3377ce5ea931298
describe
'83234' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_304.pro'
6ceabcf45de9e5f79f90339548b12a1e
23c1de96bd2f4046c2109364f2223f3d81e2d019
describe
'36028' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_304.QC.jpg'
1df12e1a159f038d9a88710e3cfceaf5
30822b9fbc20d3eb2bf0ab454becba4e3445d3e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_304.tif'
926e7300f218ee8f83cee9d72d50389f
a8ef1ee83b05ebd12d3bb39291b772f740ff525d
describe
'3368' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_304.txt'
2ce2c01e47ea3b42c193ac076bf53bcb
8612f3992bc069584c7bae7df85e36a2e72cb479
describe
'11247' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_304thm.jpg'
dc0edafb215161a0228ee1352d2e4e24
f28627f395a34b78d201ee9d699cf70d87115a42
describe
'516897' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_305.jp2'
8d9107715e157b12c1b4fa8558033bed
07e12e965aff30764b448cbb2eab1ca4be60487d
describe
'123964' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_305.jpg'
2ede7ae5520015f54b066c49b4e90a61
c99b9fd62a5187e67145057255555ecbc1db9714
describe
'73445' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_305.pro'
903727a02ea06a944818ea8ecf1e8cf3
415579ac16441d74aa8dbab99f8a7c6b1a4ab229
describe
'37921' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_305.QC.jpg'
118203b91afe6be5ee9b5073fc634a6f
dda9d662c87d415b7d48f9cb0f3701dec7126612
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_305.tif'
d26d183ff86a57647efa9795a7679e39
112fe2025d3700553c82faf28dd48daa6288c4cb
describe
'2939' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGRZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_305.txt'
89a67a61d6dedd612962fd7cab8eb631
7b18c57c98fbb0068d6bf7a7eb520deae32d2034
describe
Invalid character
'10934' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_305thm.jpg'
80a6b5f6cb67f2360718835135cdefbd
e4cdd1510c1943b1c94d09d7bbda80f4c6d09172
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_306.jp2'
7ea7b418ad755d08541068eb7b94b00f
4a57744d9288c2f07d55b334f5ed9e68e4641aa9
describe
'119677' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_306.jpg'
f9f3d08334270d6d49492eaeb17c5c0d
685f720ed38439bb6207954076f5bc3d3a3e724d
describe
'77126' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_306.pro'
69feece90f33bb02ff170f7adfb21b5a
be4afe14578c26a3d70bb515deb0bea3c4ec8cb2
describe
'37074' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_306.QC.jpg'
e0af473de8109ceb16ca436d3f1f29fe
367746ea529fd7b71f78215527f755447bebb81d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_306.tif'
862a49dfe1cd63e3235e5470fcf5e321
4409b16bf8db41d52c83eaa49d9bce43fe3abb33
describe
'3115' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_306.txt'
e8c20be9f98aba2ed4817f3e85476720
56d3fafa064753bee0534e196e14ea92f0590bfa
describe
'11248' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_306thm.jpg'
c545de6b2974da4f065ed055edfbead3
13e1777dc7265af642b1faad6dba225465ce47f1
describe
'497825' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_307.jp2'
c39b0bad4690139b9d163dfb87e37bbc
5ccd83dffe32c5b1e6ac5d0633d00dcf0ee3c5cc
describe
'117704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_307.jpg'
c72c3a3e941693ea25f99d6e94f6704c
00ed7e884ceb1d057fb2456afc4616e56cec667a
'2012-04-01T04:23:31-04:00'
describe
'85069' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_307.pro'
49bf7cfae4f4ca5e95f93200ce3d2588
4f4bd555acfd7a6a74b2e00341ad499a3eb3351c
'2012-04-01T04:23:35-04:00'
describe
'35776' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_307.QC.jpg'
d676fc0f7af59bbe31c6a35e7900fbca
fcf4001a3dd8cece49b13ff60d62f872f1597d3e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_307.tif'
36a7354eb559337e560eaeb8b22567c6
302225023eef870025ef4b3a911b81ab7dc7da77
describe
'3378' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_307.txt'
8ff39afe35e480b46edb9ed9296d0d9c
3ea612f2ef9258a8ad3253b2cbc0b41f4f153b40
describe
'11278' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_307thm.jpg'
cc91f8312832e6b34de3e6e61d18d355
cb7ff41ed64161c0478d8eeda95411d1f40ca266
describe
'490984' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_308.jp2'
6092d5e75b4ea92cac40ffedb0e55a4d
6408dd42ac7eb44d8931b39b9dc6b46d28811bd0
describe
'116553' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_308.jpg'
cfcc4dcaecb383ffb38c939127e9d317
79d88a202d8a9cb56bbe2af428038636576dab21
describe
'73770' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_308.pro'
620966683f37800f7015a166202db9e6
8d6c236f0087cda32ba1d75920a83ffb77a7d7b5
describe
'36635' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_308.QC.jpg'
1245e945c5d847a42a35acd5d8370635
5c80aa50eacd622efbbbe405016bcc3e0775fad4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGST' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_308.tif'
8487567c1ec39299879348aabce333d2
fa5f7f352e04b8ee6513b0a5b34de8ea3ae5c67f
describe
'3012' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_308.txt'
4b92b57dc5c1f1b03f2026a3f295b5bf
f27a683f5fdb31d38c712bc1df3769369f855df8
describe
Invalid character
'12016' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_308thm.jpg'
c4f6dd47c354dfa357f9f57a06e1fe24
c4050cb90b066ae97f1c7520ca561aa4af114a01
describe
'514226' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_309.jp2'
485b6640d57521a4a4ec0db80a55bf59
238251c8865508b61b523fbd0fab75ae2bad380d
describe
'113722' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_309.jpg'
a70d7fc11da60dd1441b068b7d91e908
5feafcdcfd27ff1ce64fbe0f67c15c0c31abd475
describe
'86054' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSY' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_309.pro'
64ac4945e021c810e6ca6dc5f2278857
0174b1f599f68010bb65db0ac1bef43614b41f7b
describe
'34877' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGSZ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_309.QC.jpg'
17f89d4ce0f71b02167bac3d4fa8778a
31ec33b691491722556255f8eeb2de503f0b8e84
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTA' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_309.tif'
502fe4b77be71dcc101fabe09702260b
d3d5e25e2836b37e8fdbf3622e69621fb0d8c9f7
describe
'3446' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTB' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_309.txt'
cdbe994fe0f834d2d35736dd25d5dffb
8fd7b09e38179ee7463af4af028f61c0ca935184
describe
Invalid character
'10148' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTC' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_309thm.jpg'
9dd5f3eedcb2f94ec5a700ba6416123c
9310f99997acb1914c1a1b46748119454e0d9b12
describe
'481425' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTD' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_310.jp2'
d29d04b202f7758033de55727ac8c339
1eded334637220d50690fbb90616fbf3ee9752ca
describe
'108547' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTE' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_310.jpg'
2775acd60c9d10a74e0819320136bacd
224287f7da0b5d8a2056a081f0c0f47970bcbf24
describe
'68920' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTF' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_310.pro'
1fd94fb13197d7420aa656116f8585fe
d3c098b11b989111cc1b9d023010902291be8905
describe
'33631' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTG' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_310.QC.jpg'
090427b457cf6302d13b2d4cd0870fb7
28227a48c7891b6e1d462167aac3d9ccf8f24b50
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTH' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_310.tif'
e69a74fc3d26492f21afc3d67af1f017
c797f6be64c7daeac07514b5c302b78bafda82f0
'2012-04-01T04:24:15-04:00'
describe
'2727' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTI' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_310.txt'
7c1e0ef5be3ba214c06ea77ec9eaa009
a899c51858025d4f064904304698d2f631355d50
describe
'11988' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTJ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_310thm.jpg'
5165ae819662401ea7c3ee368a25169a
4a679774c26a13634681dc46d65d6a75ccd2df2d
describe
'528061' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTK' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_311.jp2'
17929cebb4f9ea3e66f33be28317c5b0
3f6e1f298f91f9ffdb85aeab222c6d543e4e46ad
describe
'112808' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTL' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_311.jpg'
f99713c04f6ab9bc9257ae59f17d322e
0a352c96007412f8343717f502afe557a39bb35c
describe
'71896' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTM' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_311.pro'
80be048af113d122b4a855a9160547f4
232feeff34994f834d37b2b42ffc3a5b02454b67
describe
'35359' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTN' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_311.QC.jpg'
36a6ba046ee23396110b7d7d67337d75
cc9f043b0d9b507d37f02a7d071a3014c8d4ed4e
describe
'12692080' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTO' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_311.tif'
6ff090bbc4050be941182d764aad0600
00e1e62fd17be8e863d989a8abb5e090dc1a8808
describe
'2825' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTP' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_311.txt'
f0eaf877c985862879550e6e7dd2f07e
2e47b3f42852ca535e8a929d35e4815a93f05b64
describe
Invalid character
'10275' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTQ' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_311thm.jpg'
cc7ea79282ccb48f0a26029c8e526797
ea78e7bd1bf778a2b896d2cf8bbbade31f05bff3
describe
'514276' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTR' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_312.jp2'
9100d1925912eae9c3fc0e2e0a77421b
4a2c8c9e9a54803d35023b1d5b70dca216163c7f
describe
'66962' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTS' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_312.jpg'
d48ee78d58d91361e343149a2b7e9d6e
c690b7176ecc49d30d05b82b1e7ce5f94f42a443
describe
'10506' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTT' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_312.pro'
21e428bbf32be19cdbf5404bfe618e4e
5b9f16e386bbec5e4d037845c035aef6baee9081
describe
'23275' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTU' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_312.QC.jpg'
1443f61dcb894b7376cf3c799641377b
43fe2694c93891e4e547f98f40da7776b50ff701
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTV' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_312.tif'
ccbe25340f29d2c7b052dcd1953d15b2
9943587efc2122bde7cff652d142cc70e6887bde
describe
'474' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTW' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_312.txt'
088e349e597a6dea70efa9791f57e2b8
309e3f254daa02b224003e22ac30881c6abf7786
describe
'8343' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTX' 'sip-filesBinder3_Page_312thm.jpg'
c3786d8cdff0ea1c401d937a29ddd78c
3fea6b7e9969ea1bafdb6823142be463fd305c0d
describe
'135778' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAGfileF20090918_AAAGTY' 'sip-filescover4.jpg'
52c1883e68b272aeca082e64f436f50a
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WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

A Book for Youth.

FROM THE GERMAN OF

C. HILDEBRANDT,

FREACHER IN EILEDORF, HEAR BALBERSTADT,

EY

E. GOODRICH SMITH.

NEW YORK:
PUBLISHED BY M. W. DODD,

BRICE CHURCH CHAFEL, CITY HALL 89404RE.

=——



1852.
Ta a ag i ag gag a “Sa age a ee a ee, a Ta
Eniered eccording to Act of Congress, in the year 1851,
BY M. W. DODD,
In the Clerk*’s Office of the Bouthern District of New York.
ea



aa a Ha he RM





T. B. SMITH, STEREOTYFEL, BR. CRAIGHEAD, FRINTER,
218 Willam Sires, Mew York. 112 Folios Serer,
Cuntrats,

FIRST EVENING.

Preumivany conversation—Comfort of long winter eve-
nings—Subjects of conversation—Maps—The Northern
Ocean—The story of Osarow—Ivan and Gregory—A
restless spirit—Naval cadets—Archangel—The English
captain—The North-west paseafe—Evil advice—Filial
disobedience—The voyage begmm . ww we et

SECOND EVENING.

A. discussion—The two routes to India—The desirableness
' ofa shorter one—The departure—Order on shipboard—
A pleasant beginning—Nova Zembla—Reefi—A long
day—The explanation sought for—The northern and
eastern shores of Asia—A change of course—A storm .

THIRD EVENING.

An important commission— apparatus—Story of Ivan and Gregory continued—A
field of ice—Perilous ries discovered—A
party senttoexplreit. . 1... as eee

FOURTH EVENING.

Spitzbergen—The desolations of Winter—A cavern dis-

covered—Signal firee—A sad night—A great tempeat—
1*

rion

80
vi ConTents.

PAGE

The ehip disappears—The three friends alone on the
island—Courage under difficulties—A happy discovery—
A green valley—Drift-wood—Fishing in ehoal water—
A new cave—A good supper, anda warm lolging . . 67

FIFTH EVENING.

Curiosity aroused—A sudden affright—Attacked by a bear
—A successful conflict—Preparing for a long winter
night—Exploring the island—A hut—An unexpected
tenant—An unembalmed mummy—The lonely burial—

The last light of the sum—A bear-fight—Examining the
hut—Autobiography of the mummy—A Dutch whaler—
The sad effects of rashness and self-will—Description and
ee ee

SIXTH EVENING.

Childish imaginings—Sad forebodings of the three solitary
friends—Hope beams upon them again—
question in ethics—An unwelcome visitor—A new sup-
ply of provisions—A further exploration of the cavern
—Hopes of a more valuable supply—A sad catastrophe 131

SEVENTH EVENING.

A season of suspense—A great and desperate dilemma—
The old pilot in a fright—Light in darkness—Efforts to
eecape—The deeper recesses of the cavern—A fountain
of pure water—Gratitude for unexpected deliverance—
Tea drinking and amoking added to their comforta—A
ContTENts. Vii

ladder—A further ineffectual search—Anxious and dis-
turbed slumbers—Severe cold—A new supply of fuel—
A bear in the trench—The old pilot alone—His faith in
God, and his comfort in the Bible—Anxious waiting for
the return of his friends—A watch-fire on the cliff . . 150

EIGHTH EVENING.

The two friends return in a frozen condition—A snow bath
—They recover, and relate their adventures—Their am-
rmounition failing, they contrive weapons of defence—The
want of salt, and a substitute—A great calamity—The old
pilot supposed to be dead—The two disconsolate friends
—A trial of reindeer—A capture—Their return—Sorrow
turned to joy—Their kind attentions—Their success in
hunting—The “bake-oven"” . . . 1. 1 se « « » 180

NINTH EVENING.

What they found in the “bake-oven"—Strange discoveries
—Other adventures in the frozen seaa—Rare treasurea—
A cask of gunpowder—A crash—A rope-ladder—A cask
of flour—The old pilot turned mason and baker—A vein
of rock-salt—A cheerful supper—Further discoveries of
good things—An extensive “bill of fare”. . . . . . 211

TENTH EVENING.

Sabbath in the cave—Household occupations—The hat
besieged by bears—Squibe—The siege raised—A prison-
er taken—The bears reinforced, make anew and success-
ful onset—Are again repulsed—The hot repaired and
fortified—A terrible storm—Joy at the sight of the sun
—Kefraction explained—Returning summer, and retarn-
wes VOR Y ETS oe se ee 286
viii Contents.

ELEVENTH EVENING.
PAGE

Summer work; house cleaning; house repairing; fishing
— ing for a vessel—Despondency—Courage renewed by
trust in God—A journey round the island—A pleasant
spot—A audden surprise—English sailors make their
appearance—The good old captain—The hand of Provi-
dence in seeming accidents—The ship's company visit
the hut—Provisions for future adventurers—Departure
from the island—Ivan and Gregory's safe return to
Archangel 2 we ew te te tt te tt

TWELFTH EVENING.
Story of the escape of the ship from the perils of the ice . 290
WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN,

First Earning.

JULIA. Suppose, then, we were at a certain
time in our winter palace ?—now, farewell, trees
and flowers; in half a year I shall see you

again.

Marta. And welcome in the long winter
evenings, then, my dear spinning-wheel! and
thou, my knitting-needles, and you, too, my
books! We shall scarcely know how fast the
few winter months fly away !

Gustavus. I shall know well how to use
my winter quarters.

MARA. But itis to be hoped you will spare
us your eternal noisy drilling.

Gustavus. That cannot be certainly known
yet. I will be a soldier, and so I must exer-
cise.

Juti4. Here in this room?
10 Winter 1n SPITzBERGEN.

Gustavus. Now, I will so far yield that I will
not march and exercise for whole hours. The
ground does not suit it. Is it not so, brother?

Max. Right. It is not fitted, either, for long
marches,

Marra. Mother, too, would make many seri-
ous objections, if you begin here again what
you have left off in the yard and garden.

Gustavus. Don't trouble yourself. You shall
have no inconvenience from our quartering here.
I will use my time well.

Max. That is my determination too. You
girls shall see, to your full satisfaction, how it
is possible for us to employ our time, and shall
have opportunity to learn many things.

* JuLia. We thank you beforehand. You may
do as you please, if the spinning-wheel and the
needle does not disturb you.

Marta. But to speak seriously,—how we can
rightly employ the time, so as not to lose a mo-
ment, I do not know. Sir Winter has come in
so roughly, and in so unpleasant a mood, that,
if he goes on in this way—

Gustavus. Now we can meet the stern old
fellow. We have a warm reom, light, com-
pany, books—

JuLIA, And do not forget the main thing—
— with you soldiers, this is the main

ng.
Winter in SPIrzBeRGEN. 11

Gustavus. That is the main thing for fathedâ„¢
and mother. They have taken good care for the
supplies,

Max, And another important matter is, our
talks together—

Jutta. Which yot will certainly take charge
of, Sir Doctor?

Max. That is to be expected. I will wil-
lingly do it to the best of my powers. But you
would like to know what I—I know.

Maria, What is it?

Max. Yes, yes, you would be glad to know
what I know! to tell you the truth, I am re-
joiced that winter has come,

Gustavus. Do not be so long in making:
believe. Go ahead, and give us as well as you
can what you do know.

Max. Hear, then. You have often wondered
when father lately was more busy and active
than ever—when he went straight from the
table into his study ?

Gustavus. Yes, indeed! It occurred to me
that father did not take his usual walk—his
rounds in the garden. But what it’ the world
has that to do with our winter quarters, I
should like to know?

Max. A great deal. Father has many even-
ings in a week wholly at liberty this winter.

JuLia. Grand! that will allow him to relate
12 WINTER IN SPITZBERGENR.

something to us. He will go from the north
to the south,

Gustavus. From Leipzig to Waterloo.

Max. Now hear further. You have often
missed me, have you not?

Gustavus. Yes.

Jutta. How important the young man feels!

Max. I have always been with father. He
said to me that he would relate some story
during the long winter evenings, and so I have
examined and arranged all the maps, all the
sketches, engravings, and books—in short, every-
thing which is necessary for our instruction, so that
I may find every sheet of paper in the desk,

Gustavus. Thank you, dear Max. Nowthere
will be something to be heard; many famous men
to be paraded out; many celebrated names col
to light.

Max. And many things will be made plain
to us which we have not, heretofore, fully known.

Maria. Well, my spinning-wheel is at a
_ stand, It would give you fine yarn. But might
“ok not, tly advise both you young sirs, you
had bett@r*look around you betimes for some
work to do?

MAx. Do not be troubled; I shall gather

and bind books.
Gustavus. And I will trim them. My case

of instruments has everything necessary.
WiInTER IN SpPiTzBERGEN. 18

Junta. If I cannot go on with my spinning a
I will pick over the peas and beans. .,
Marta. That is well, dear Julia. You know

that father is never more cheerful than when all

with him are busy.

At this moment a maid-servant entered to
spread the table for supper. Soon came the
father and mother; both of them looked cheer-
fully on their children, and they also looked up,
full of expectation, to their father—" Now, chil-
dren, are you not troubled about the weather?”

he asked.

Marra. No! Winter must come, and the
sooner it begins the sooner it will go out.

Gustavus. Our winter quarters, too, are
good; provisions and company not less so; and
these make it very endurable. As for march-
ing and encamping, indeed, it is not very conve-

nent.

Jutta. And the weather keeps our company
so friendly together.

Moruer. The time will pass away the more.
agreeably when you know how to connegt use-
ful labors with pleasant conversations, ~~
Marita. That Julia and I have both of us
taken care of, dear mother. Here stands my
spinning-wheel, and there lies for each of us a
set of knitting-needles.

Faruer. And I will relate to you some

*
14 WiInTER 1n SPiTtzBERGEN.

Petory. Max has, perhaps, already told you about
it. Will our winter evenings then be long?

Au. No indeed! The watchman will warn us
of the hour of the night sooner than we shall wish.

Contented and cheerful, the family ate their
moderate supper. The children had -never
looked for its close with such a longing desire.
They knew what they might expect, for they
recollected the winter before, the long evenings
of which, notwithstanding all the storms and
unpleasant weather, had passed away so un-
noticed and so gaily. Now the table was cleared
away, and every child sought his place. All be-
gun their work, and the greatest silence reigned
throughout the room.

Farner. Now, children, what had you rather
hear?

Marta. Ah, dear Father, you know best.
You know how many beautiful voyages we have
made round the world together.

JULIA. You mean in thought,

MorHer. And you can learn more in this
way than many who travel in a coach,

Gustavug. That is very true, mother. I can
draw out the plans of all the most remarkable
battles and sieges.

Max. And I can trace the route of the voy-
ages and travels of Prince Maximilian and Kotze-
bue. ‘
WintER IN SPITZBERGEN. 15

Jui. “And Iknow Robinson Crasoe’s island”
and am well acquainted with his colony, as in
our little city. I can find my way all about.
I know where the hateful savages lived, and I
know, too, about Robinson Crusoe’s and Friday's
hut as well as our own house.

Fatuer. Then we shall begin a voyage, a
long voyage to-day. Will you readily follow and
not become tired ?

Gustavus. Lead us as far as you will, we
will follow you.

Fatuer. Very well—I shall hold you to
your word; but we must agree on something.
We can begin to-day one of two voyages, and
you may take your choice,

Marta. How so?

FaTHer. I can lead you into the coldest re-
gions of our earth, where eternal ice covers the
sea, where are perpetual snow, frost, and cold,.
into regions in which, for months, you see the
sun, and then you lose sight of it for as long a
period.

Or, I will go with you around Africa to the
Kast Indies, to the Island of Ceylon, but where
we must meet with tigers, and have to fight
with monstrous serpents. Now it is for you to
choose where we shall go.

JuLIa, Ah, dear mother, do you decide for
us. Our opinions may be different, and that,

-
16 Winter IN SPirzpeRGEN.

will bring on a dispute which will waste the
time.

MorHer. Shall I do so, father?

FatHer, Yes.

Moruer, Then take a voyage to the north,
The story will be so much the more impres-
sive when the snow beats against the windows,
and the weathercock creaks in the storm, You
can much the more vividly conceive of what is
frightful in these countries, if you only step to
the window.

JuLIA. You are right, mother; and we have
also this advantage—that we shall only freeze
in imagination.

Faruer. Max, bring them maps. Spread them
out here on the table. Gustavus, what map is
that?

Gustavus. Of Northern Russia. Here is Mo-
jaisk, there Smolenzko, where the great battles
were fought. Pultawa is not on it.

FatHEer. Because this map only includes
Northern Russia. Here we see, Max ?—

Max. Lapland, Nova Zembla, and between
the two the government of Archangel.

FatHer. Right; and these countries lie?—

Max. Between the sixtieth and seventieth
degrees of north latitude.

JULIA. Oh, how cold it must be!

, Fatuer. Yes, indeed—the elevation of the
Winter in SpirzBERGEN. 17

pole proves this; for, as you see, this whole re-
gion lies at the most northern point of the Bal-
tic Sea,—or, Gustavus /—

Gustavus. At the Gulf of Bothnia,

FaTHER. In the same latitude, Add to this
eold, too, the frozen sea and the vast marshy sur-
face which forms the soil of these countries.
There are few forests there, as the cold hinders
the growth of trees; we find there no mountains,
and the eye beholds nothing there but a dead,
almost uncultivated extent of country.

Jutta. How glad I am that I do not live
there |

MorHer. You have good reason to be so; but
had you been born and brought up in that re-
gion, you might, probably, have been as much
contented there as you now are here.

FatHer. Here, on the map, you farther see,
Maria ?—

Marta. The White Sea.

FATHER. Very true.
Ocean, which runs into the government of ei
angel, and receives the Dwina, one of
rivers of Russia, on the bank of which—lies
city, Max?

Max. Archangel; a city which is well bee
by its extended trade into the Northern Ocean.

FaTHeR. Very well. Here we will stop, and
will now go on with our story.

Q*
18 WiIstTER IN SpPIirzRERGEN.

JULIA. A good voyage !y

Gustavus. And a favorable wind, fur I sup-
pose we are to go by water.

FatHer. Not long since there lived in Arch-
angel a merchant in very good circumstances, by
the name of Osarow. He had only one son,
Ivan, an excellent boy, who was distinguished
by his desire for knowledge, and by his untiring
diligence in learning all things that might be use-
ful to him. To what profession or business he
should devote himself, he had not yet decided;
but he was satisfied to learn everything that ap-
peared to him he might possibly have occasion
to make use of hereafter. He knew that useful
knowledge would never do any harm, but that it
was always profitable, Osarow’s brother, also a
merchant, died, and Ivan's father took the son
left by his deceased brother into his own family.
The two brothers had been united and affection-
ate friends during their whole life; this love was
now transferred from the father to the son, and
Ivan's father regarded Gregory, for this was the
fatherless and motherless orphan’s name, as his
own son; and both boys, who were of about an
equal age, were almost inseparable from each
other. Gregory had great good-humor; he was
industrious, persevering, and decided,—in short,
he was a boy deserving of love, and so was Ivan;

but the latter too often allowed himself to be led
Winter 1n SprirzpERGeENX. 19

away by one fault. This consisted im a-certain
levity which frequently prevented him from act-
ing rationally and decidedly. Though at this
moment he was ever ge firmly convinced of the
importance of a thing, on the slightest occasion
the whole became ridiculous to him. Though he
might now promise something, with the most
serious intention of fulfilling it, at the next in-
stant all was forgotten. He regarded too little
the consequences of his actions.

Moruer. This is a great fault, and the source
of various misfortunes. Shun this course, and
be well convinced of its sad consequences. This
I would say to you, particularly, Gustavus.
You often act in your most impetuous violence,
without thinking of the consequences.

Gustavus. Do not be troubled, good mother.
I have already become much changed, and shall
always more and more lay aside this fault.

MorHer. God grant that it may be so.

FarHer, Gregory had also the fault of under-
taking many things, the consequences of which
he had not always thought of, but often repented
of having done them. Both of the young men
had been obliged to devote themselves to trade, ~
according to the wishes of the aged Osarow ; but
the sitting still behind account books, writing
many letters, and especially the waiting for the
eo in the shop, during their years of
20 Wister in SprrirzperGen.

learning,—all these things were particularly dis-
agreeable to Gregory's taste. The old Osarow
was a prudent man of good sense. He thought
how different the viewa and inclinations are,
which God has implanted in the hearts of men.
He had often experienced how children thus
became unhappy, while their parents forced
them into a kind of life to which they felt the
prompting of no inclination, As a prudent
father, anxious for the true welfare of his child,
he examined into their inclinations, and dis-
covered in both of them an all-overpowering
inclination to see the world, and make distant
voyages. He represented to them the happiness
of a quiet, peaceful domestic life, and he por-
trayed to them, in lively colors, the dangers and
inconveniences they must meet with—but all in
vain.

Maria. That does not please me in Ivan and
Gregory.

Gustavus. Now I do not know whether they
exactly deserve blame. What do you think,
father ?

FatHer. That you are not wholly wrong,
Gustavus. Both were quick, energetic, and
resolute youths; they deserved to be praised for
following out this preference of theirs, if they
felt that, in this way, they could be more useful
to the world than in any other.
Winter tn SPiTzBERGEN. 21

Moruer. Therefore God has wisely ordained
that the inclinations of men should be as various
as the features of their countenances, One
chooses this condition, and another that; only a
man should select a business adapted to his situa-
tion and powers, otherwise he occupies a false
position, and will be unhappy.

FatHer. Very true. A man is never more
unhappy than when he is not in his proper
place. You will often see that in the world.
God grant that you may not have to experience
it.—But to return to Ivan and Gregory. With
the greatest respect and confidence, Ivan dis-
closed to his father his predominant inclination,
and begged of him his consent, and promised to
do all honor to him. Osarow saw how much
his heart was in it, and yielded to his wishes,

Marta. What profession did they choose?

FaTHer. Both of them felt the strongest incli-
nation in general for voyaging ; “both of them
wished to be useful to their country as seamen,
and to acquire for themselves a celebrated name
in the history of voyages. With this in view,
they had already—especially Ivan had done so
—learned much which would be indispensable
to them in such a profession.

JuLia. Would so very much knowledge be
necessary ?

Max. Certainly; they must be at home in
23 Winter tn SprrzBEeRGeN.

mathematics, astronomy; in natural history and
geography; and that they should be also ac-
quainted with foreign languages, is self-evident.
Gustavus. Not to mention that they must
understand swimming, fencing, shooting, and all
kinds of bodily exercise, by all means,—if they
do not wish to be borne down by the first dan-

gers.

Farner. The aged Osarow had many friends,
and so it was easy for him to get his two beloved
children admitted at St. Petersburg, the capital
of the Russian Empire, as naval cadets into the
Imperial Academy of Cadets.

JuLIA. Cadets? naval cadets?

FatHer. This is the name given to those
young persons who are e(lucated particularly for
future officers in a public institution. The in-
stitution itself is called an Academy for Cadets,
and it is a very excellent institution, especially
for those who are in want of means to learn
what their future destination requires of them.
They are here taught everything at the expense
of the government; they are clothed, fed, and
like children are obliged to perform all the
services of a soldier in miniature. The naval
cadet is very naturally educated only for the
naval service, and for this object he is taught
everything which he ought to know as an officer
of a ship.
Winter in SPITZBERGER. 23

Ivan and Gregory were both admitted into
this academy ; they distinguished themselves by
their order and industry; and even many of the
little light-minded tricks which Gregory, and,
led on by him, Ivan too, were guilty of, were
overlooked, in consideration of their greater
excellencies of character.

The three years of learning whatever was
necessary, had passed away, and both of the
youths returned back to their native place.
Every one received them with joy, and more
especially so did Osarow. Both of the young
men were now waiting for their appointment in
the navy.

Jutta. Navy?

Faruer. By this expression is understood
whatever belongs to the management of the
ships, and the sea-service of a country or king-
dom, such as the number, manning, arming, and
the whole appointment of the ships. Therefore,
they have also regulations or laws for the navy.

Most commonly this expression is used re-
specting those ships which particularly belong
to the warlike service. To receive an appoint-
ment in the navy, is the same as to be placed in
the actual service on board of a ship of war.

Such a post were our young men expecting,
in order to practise whatever they had learned
in their profession,
O4 WiIntTER IN SPITZBERGENR.

Archangel, as is well known, is a city of con-
siderable trade, and is the only harbor in the
Northern Sea. Here are to be found ships and
seamen of all the commercial nations, but espe-
cially there are many English vessels, who, as
you know from other accounts of voyages, have
the most extensive commerce. I need not,
therefore, tell you that Ivan and Gregory sought
the intercourse of experienced seamen, in order
to enlarge their knowledge.

They became acquainted at a certain time
with a captain of an English ship which lay in
the harbor, and who was only waiting for a fair
wind to go on his voyage. This man was very
intelligent and agreeable in conversation. Be-
sides, he manifested a social and affable conduct,
by which he attached everybody to him who
became acquainted with him; and in short, he
won upon the two young men in such a degree,
that they expressed the wish to undertake a dis-
tant voyage in his company, and on an English
ship.

“This wish you can easily accomplish,” re-
plied the Englishman. “You need only deter-
mine upon it, and I will warrant you that a voy-
age in my ship will be of the greatest advantage
to you. Probably I may make a voyage of dis-
covery to the North Pole, Our Parliament
have offered a large reward to him who dis-
a

a ll li illic tg la a a CLEP AIT ay

WixntEs In SPITZBERGEN. O5

covers a north-west passage around Asia or
America to the East Indies. Very likely I shall
venture on such an experiment.” These words
excited to the utmost the desire of voyaging in
the young men. They saw before them a fine
field to satigfy their long-restrained wishes, and
doubtless the idea that they might make a voy-
age in an English ship, added new strength to
their inclination.

@arta. How so?

Farner. The English marine service has
attained to a very high degree of perfection, and
hardly any other seafaring nation has accom-
plished so much as the British, The English
ships are beautiful, their arrangement and arma-
ment well chosen, and their seamen capable.
Whoever, therefore, wished to learn correctly as
to service at sea, might do so on an English
ship.

The Englishman observed the disquietude of
the two young men; he spoke continually of the
voyage, and every word increased Ivan and

_ Gregory's inclination to share in the same.

aes

Gustavus. But ought they to do so without
permission of the government ?

Maria. Or if their father was not willing?

FaTtHER. I will tell you about that. They

thought of both of these things. But as they

were not in actual service, so the permission of
96 WiIntTeER 1n SPITZBERGER.

government might be obtained without diffi- —
eulty. The Admiralty, that is, the branch of —

the government which decides about naval
affairs, and which for the most part consists of
admirals, could have no objection, but, on the
contrary, would very gladly see two such prom-

ising young men desirous of being farther —

trained in so excellent a school for the benefit
of their country. They therefore consented to

their going. The old Osarow made far mere

objections. He was a strong adherent to his
country—more so than was consistent with a
friendly feeling towards foreign nations, He
desired that the youths should serve in no other
navy than the Russian, and decidedly forbade
them to go forward another step.

Marita. Now both will remain at home. I

am sure I should not like Ivan and Gregory, if
they should go a-voyaging with the Englishman,
against their father's wishes.

Farner. Alas! here Gregory's levity ren-—
dered useless every good influence, and, by all —

sorts of exaggerations, conquered Ivan’s feelings.

Sad at the serious refusal of their father, in the —



aaa

evening they came into the company of the cap- ©
tain; he naturally began to talk again of his

voyage, and as naturally ‘lea from Ivan and

Gregory that their father would not allow them —

7
iz

to go, ae?
O&O CC EE ee

WINTEE IN SPITZBERGEN. 2T

The Englishman—and it is disagreeable to
find such impropriety in a man whom we must
otherwise esteem—the Englishman advised them
to undertake the voyage without their father’s
knowledge. “ At the utmost, you can see your-
selves back here again in three months,” said
he; “and I am convinced that your father will
feel indebted to me for having set you upon so
useful a voyage. How often it is the case in my
country, that the sons of the richest fathers
secretly undertake such a voyage, and are again
received by their parents with open arms. I
have no bad purposes in the voyage. We shall
not fall in with pirates and corsairs. Our object
is a fine and noble one. It is authorized, and
the means to attain it are corresponding to it,”

Ivan wavered, and shrunk back; but then
Gregory interposed, with his usual fickleness,
and urged his friend. Ivan was weak enough
to yield. Both of them pledged themselves to
the Englishman to make arrangements in the
night, and at break of day to be on board of his
ship. ‘We are only waiting for a fair wind,”
said the Englishman; “it may, and must soon
happen. I must avail myself of it, and you
must s0 arrange your matters, that I can at any
moment weigh anchor, and get under sail,”’

JULIA. What is the meaning of that?
98 Winter 1n SPItzHERGER.

Max. To wind up the anchor, fixed in the
bottom of the sea, and holding the ship, because
otherwise the ship could not stir from its place,
They use the expression, “to weigh anchor,” as
well as “to get under sail,” when they wish to
mark the beginning of a voyage.

Farner. Some days passed in the constant
waiting for a favorable wind. Probably Ivan
would have acquainted his father with the
whole matter, and the voyage would then have
been properly relinquished; but Gregory knew
how to arouse Ivan’s pride and feeling of honor,
and this, joined to his own fickleness, were the
reasons that Ivan actually found himself under
sail at the break of the appointed day. He sent
back a letter to his father, in which he expressed
his whole heart. He excused the step he had
taken, from his overwhelming inclination, beg-
ged forgiveness for his disobedience, and be-
sought his father’s prayers and blessing. And
so we must pardon him, and accompany him on
his voyage.

MotHer. But, father, it is already late ; how
if we shall here make a pause?

Fatner. And enter on the voyage to-mor-
row evening, do you mean? What do you
think of it?

Gustavus. Because,-father, before a long
Winter In SPITZEERGEN. 29

travel we must be refreshed by some hours’
Test.

FatHer. Very well. Then to-morrow, about
this time—

Max. We shall be very considerably nearer
to the North Pole.

ad
Strout Evening.

TE children had sat for a long time at their
work; the daughters spun, while Max and Gus-
tavus looked over the map, in order to make
themselves well acquainted with the region into
which their father was going to conduct them.
While thus engaged, they disputed (of course
it was like well-educated children, with whom a
little dispute does not degenerate into a quarrel),
whether Ivan and Gregory deserved to be
blamed because they had secretly left their
father and benefactor. Maria and Julia were de-
cided in condemning them. Max was somewhat
doubtful; the desire of learning something new
and being useful to the world, he thought, might
excuse such a transgression. Gustavus proceeded
on the supposition, that Ivan and*Gregory, in so
great an object, must*indeed have ventured on it
—a view which brought on him many censures
from his sisters. Gustavus himself felt that he
had gone too far, but, as is often the case, he was
WintER IN SPITZBERGEN. a1

not willing to take back his opinion. He be-
longed to those who would not willingly do
wrong, and so defend their opinion as long as
they can find any ground on which they can sus-
tain themselves.

The arrival of their parents interrupted them,
and finished this little dispute, and they heartily
desired that none of their children might ever be
tempted to do anything against their parents’
will.

FaTHER, Now, are you agreed? We have a
distant voyage before us. Union is the first
‘thing.

Gustavus. We are all ready, and can enter
on the voyage whenever you like.

Fatuer. Where did we leave off last even-
ing, Maria?

Marra.” In Archangel.

FaTHer. At least in the harbor of Archangel,
on theship Juno. At that time there were many
voyages undertaken to the North Pole, in order
to find a passage to the East Indies across Asia
or America. In such a discovery no one had
more to gain than the merchant ships of Arch-
angel, because they then would have the shortest
course to China and the East Indies. Which of
you, without looking on’ the map, can describe
to me the course which they have to take from
_ Archangel to the East Indies?
32 ° Wuster in Spirzpercen.

Max. Ican. We must sail around Norway,
Denmark, Holland, between France and England,
then around a part of Spain, along Portugal and
the whole western coast of Africa.

FaTHer, Very well. Gustavus, how then?

Gustavus. Around Africa to the Cape of
Good Hope, then they take the direction on the
right, pass through the Indian Ocean to Ceylon,
or still farther to the right to Sumatra and almost
to China. ,

FaTHer. Right. Which of you knows of
any other way?

Maria, Another?

Jutta. I do not think there can be any other!

FatHer, No? What way, then, did your
friend Kotzebue take some years since?

Max. Ah, nowl knowit! Take the same
route as before till you reach Spain, and then go
straight to South America, along down the east
coast of this country, through the Straits of
Magellan, leaving Chili and Peru on the right,
and so directly through the Great Ocean to the
East Indies,

Farer, But both of these routes make a
wide circuit; for each of them is about four
thousand German miles. If any one could dis-
cover a way across Asia or America, this would
not be more than half the distance. Therefore,
for many years the English government have
Winter in SritzperGen. 83

proposed a large reward for any one who shall
find this nearer passage, and it was natural for
many to seek to obtain the premium. You can,
therefore, easily imagine with what eagerness
Ivan and Gregory must have determined on such
a voyage, 80 that they should secretly leave their
father and benefactor.

Now, then, behold our two friends on the ship,
the anchor of which was already weighed, A
fresh south-east wind swelled the sail, the ship
flew on more and more rapidly oyer the White
Sea, and now they are in the open Northern .
Ocean. It was the first sea voyage which they
two had made, and the whole mode of life in the
ship was new and unusual to them. They were
indeed already well taught as to all that they
saw here, for they had been educated in the
Academy for Cadets; but many things, and indeed
almost all appeared to them larger and new as
they here saw them in reality. The arrange-
ments on board of the English ships, are dis-
tinguished by the greatest order, and the crew
by the most minute performance of every duty.
This must have very greatly pleased them. The
ship itself was a beautiful, new, and firmly built
one, in which reigned the most exemplary order ,
and cleanliness. Every day it was washed and
scoured; not the least dust was allowed, and even

the most insignificant portion was carefully at-
a4 Winter in SpirzREERGEN.

tended to. To all this was added the kind con-
duct of the excellent captain, and the constant
respect of the whole crew. The captain knew
how to unite friendliness with seriousness, and
kindness with severity; he possessed that great-
est of all arts, to employ his crew—of which
there were forty—continually in the most useful
manner. He had already made several voyages
to America and the East Indies, and this fur-
nished him with matter for much interesting and
instructive conversation, So the two friends sat
and listened with increasing curiosity and the
most earnest wishes that they could themselves
have experienced all that the captain related,
They accompanied him in their thoughts on his
voyages, shared his perils, and were at his side
in many an adventure; with him they passed
through unknown seas, landed. on desolate
islands, saw many remarkable countries, and
cities of foreign portions of the globe. Both of
the young men were commissioned as volunteers
to lend a helping hand to two other officers of the
ship, These also, after the example of the captain,
were excellent men, scientifically educatéd, who
soon became friends of the two young men.

_ Gustavus. I can imagine how happily they
both must have felt in their intercourse with
such men. [should like much to have been in

their place.
Winter In SPitzBERGEN. 35

Morner. You can do as well here on the
firm land. If you conduct yourself. properly,
you may find everywhere good men who will be
to you what the captain and the two officers
were for the young men.

Farner. I hope and expect this from Gus-
tavus, But to goon. Every hour at which they
were at leisure from the service of the ship, Ivan
and Gregory were in the cabin, listened to the
descriptions by the captain, and read with him
the history of voyages, examined the maps,
practised drawing, and the higher mathematics,
and in this way such scholars in such a school
soon became able seamen.

The captain took. his course with the most
favorable weather, first northerly, so as to sail
around the great barren island of Nova Zembla.
He would not have been obliged, usually, to do
this, as he was only accustomed to pass through
the straits which separate Nova Zembla from
Siberia. But the passage through these straits
is dangerous, for we find there many shoals,
sand-banks, rocks, and reefs.

JULIA. Reefs?

FatHer. They are a succession or chains of
rocks, which extend along under the water, and
are very dangerous to vessels in sailing. Usually
we find them near to land, where they stretch
36 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

out far into the sea. But often, too, they are to
be met with in the midst of the ocean,

Maria. Can the sailors know and see where
these reefs are?

FATHER. If the sea is stormy they cannot.
It is only when the sea is calm that they are able
to do it, The waves indeed dash over such a
reef, and form a species of breakers, just as they
do on a coast. But seamen avoid, as much as
possible, such places. They choose to make a
considerable circuit rather than expose them-
selves to such dangers, especially in unknown
regions. *.

Our voyagers were on the north of Nova
Zembla, and now they turned to the east. Here
two capes run out, not far distant from each
other, Cape North-west and Cape North-east, or
Taimura, the most northern points of Asia, which
belong to the most northern portion of the earth.
Against all expectation their voyage had hitherto
been perfectly favorable, the sun appeared
warmer than they could have anticipated in this
latitude; they nowhere met with ice, and the
day which lasted above two months.—

Jutta. What did you say, father? the day
two months long?

FaTHER. Yes; the day at midsummer here
lasts about two months; but for this reason,
about Christmas, the night is as long. Then, for
WiInNTEER In SPITZBERGEN. ar

two months, the sun does not make its appear-
ance,

Jutta. That would be a nice thing for many
people for whom the sun always rises too early.

Gustavus. Look in the glass yourself, Julia;
you are not used to be the first up.

Jutta. We will not dispute about that. Sleep
is something very sweet; but you, Max and
Gustavus, can oblige us two, Maria and-myself,
very much, See here; I know well that the
length of the days and nights is different, ac-
cording to situation of countries—

Max, That, for example, under the line, or
the equator, the day, year in and out, is twelve
hours, and the night twelve hours; while under
the two poles the longest day lasts half a year.

Junta, True; but why is it so? and in what
degrees does it happen?

FarHer. Of this you have no really correct
idea,—that I can well believe. Max and Gus-
tavus, what if you should make this clear to
your sisters ?

Max. Very willingly, sir; but I must first
think oyer in what way to make it plain,

Fatuer, That must depend wholly on you
two, and it will give me pleasure if you find out
a new way. But let us now return to our ac-
count of the voyage. Here in the highest north-
ern point of Asia, the English captain had two

4
38 Winter 1n SPirzBERGEN.

courses before him, of which he might take his
choice. One way was to proceed further on his
voyage eastward, and sail through between Asia
and America. Gustavus, what countries would
he pass to reach the East Indies?
Gustavus. Along the northern coast of Asia,
to Cape Satatskoy, from thence to the North
Cape. 7
Marta. Ha! ha! That was the way years
before, with our friends Cook and Kotzebue.
Gustavus. So it was. On the way the
captain could make a visit to the Jakuts and
Tschutsches. From thence they might go through
Behring’s Straits, between Asia and America.
JuLia, Now I know the rest of the way.
Kamschatzka, the Aleutian Isles, Japan, China,
all these countries come one after another.
FaTHer. Right. The captain thought with
himself whether he should choose this course.
The summer would soon be over, and the winter
drew on at every hour. The whole of the north-
ern coast of Asia was little known, and therefore
threatened many dangers. Possibly the captain
had no particular desire to pass the winter at
Kamschatzka. The course to the East Indies re-
moved him too far from his country—from old
England. He concluded, therefore, to turn about
again, and to spend the winter in Archangel,
and in the beginning of the following summer to

6 “S|
WiInTER IN SPITZBERGEN. 39

try whether it might not be possible to discover
a new way through Baffin’s Bay.

Marta. Is not that the great bay between
Greenland and the yet wholly unknown parts of
North America?

FaTHEr. Yes. More than two hundred years
ago was this bay discovered, and many attempts
have since been made to find a passage through
it into the Pacific Ocean.

In this region the captain turned his ship to-
wards the North-west Cape, and for a second
time doubled the cape. The cold had already
set in, and the ice formed on the coasts, mist and
snow darkened the air, and the captain had need
of all his care if he wished to reach Archangel
with his ship uninjured, But often a single cir-
cumstance is a means of frustrating the best and
wisest plan; a fact which the captain and his
friends proved by experience, and which every
man often has occasion to learn.

Gustavus. Did it happen to them as it did
to Robinson Crusoe? Did they suffer shipwreck ?

Marta. I should doubly pity the unfortunate
men if such a fate had befallen them in that re-
gion.

FaTHER. I forgot to tell you that the captain
had taken with him from Archangel a Russian
as a pilot, a man who was perfectly trained for
his post. He soon became Ivan’s and Gregory's

.
40 Winter 1x SPITZBERGEN.

friend. He was of much value to the captain
and the whole crew on account of his knowl-
edge. Now the officers were sitting in the cabin,
talking of many things, when they perceived an
unusual noise and roaring; and plainly heard
the under pilot give orders to take in the sail,
and keep a redoubled lookout on every side.
All sprang up, and hastened to their posts.

“What's the matter?” asked the captain. “A
fearful storm is brewing at the south-east,” was
the answer. “ If we were only in the open seal”

The ship received the motion given it by the
waves; mounting higher and higher continually
at every moment, the storm became more violent,
the roaring more frightful, and the billows rose
to an incredible height. Sometimes the ship .
hung suspended on the top of the waves, and
sometimes she sunk down to the very depths,
The day had wholly disappeared. No one could
steer the ship with certainty, as the violent storm
broke upon the near land, took another direction,
and drove forward the ship as if it were a light
feather. ‘The captain, otherwise so adventurous
aseaman, was here more distressed than he would
have been in any other place,

Marta. Why so, dear father?

FatTuer. Because he was not acquainted with
this sea and the land adjoining» Had such a -
storm taken him on a wide open sea, well known

*
7 é
Winster in SPiTtzpERGEN. 41

to the sailor, then he would have been less af-
fected by it, because he would have felt certain
as to the rocks, shoals, and sand-banks: but
where he now found himself, all these were to be
dreaded. All suitable precautions were taken,
but it was now impossible to steer the ship; they
were obliged to leave it f the violent assaults of
the sea and the tempest. The darkness naturally
increased their terror, the glimmer of the day
hardly lasting for an hour, could not be per-
ceived on account of the thick clouds deeply
overhanging them even down to the water; and
the waves caught away with them the ship,
dashed about in a wholly unknown region. No
one could understand the others, so loud was the
roar of the wind and noise of the billows strik-
ing against the sides of the ship. Two days had
the poor men done all in their power, when the
mainmast, broken by the storm, came down with
a thundering crash across the ship, by which its
Tapid course became very greatly impeded. “Now
we can do nothing more,” said-the captain, with
a stern submission to his fate, ‘Now no steer-
ing, no direction, can help us.. If God does not
- us, we must find our grave in the billows

re,

How Ivan and Gregory must have felt at these
_ Words you can readily imagine. Never had they
-before made a voyage to any distance; never had

‘ 4*

: we
42 Winter 1N SrPirzBeRGeEN.

they experienced a storm.’ Whatever they had
learned of it, they had gathered from descriptions
and narratives, and I need not assure you how
far the best description falls short of the impres-
sion which the reality produces.

Shut up in the ship, pale and exhausted, with-
out being able to sleep, for a moment the unfor-
tunates sat in the cabin despairing of their safe-

. They saw nothing but approaching, certain
death before their eyes. Every howling, roaring
billow spoke to them this fearful doom, so that
they even finally wished that all might be soon
over, for the anguish of expecting death is more
torturing than death itself. No one spoke, no
one comforted and tranquillized the others. Like
an arrow shot forth, the ship flew on through the
waves, and the tempest grew continually strong-
er, the billows roared more dreadfully, and the
ship was dashed onward at a more fearful rate.

All at once she struck with so hard and shat-
tering a blow that all were thrown confusedly
together. Again once more the ship raised on
the top of the wave, then dashed down, and, on
asudden, stood as if it was fast walled in.

Jutta. Now I can imagine how it was, just
as in the case of Robinson Crusoe’s ship; to split
in pieces and go asunder must be the fate of the
poor Juno.

Marra. And all be drowned.
WiInTEER IN SPITZBEEGEN. 43

Gustavus. That could not have been the
ease; for who, then, would have told this story?

FaTHer. It is now too late; I will go on with
the story some other time. To-morrow evening
you may then expect the continuation.

ei
Chird Eurning.

I NEED not assure you that all the four chil-
dren, Max, Gustavus, Maria, and Julia, awaited
the progress of the story with the most anxious
curiosity. They talked the whole morning about
it, and inquired among themselves how it would
go with poor Ivan and his friends, when Max
recollected what an obligation he had taken on
himself to try and explain to his sisters what
causes the difference in the length of the days
and nights. He and Gustavus had promised
this. ‘The confidence of their father, as well as
the expectition of their sisters, were important
to both of them; they felt themselves dignified
by so honorable a commission.

Max was of a penetrating mind; what he
knew he knew thoroughly ; for it was a princi-
ple with him to learn everything accurately, and
never to stop in his views half-way. With Gus-
tavus this was not the case; he could indeed
comprehend anything much easier than the more
‘

WiINTEE IN SPrrzBERGEN. 45

tardy Max, but also on this account he. fgggot
again much sooner-what remained firmer in his
brother's memory. Both had made more than
common advances in geography; to examine
maps and study them, was for them no labor, but
a pleasure. They sat down to them with full as
much delight as other children have in sitting
down to enjoy pictures. But they knew not only
countries and seas, rivers and mountains, but also
the relation of the earth to the other heavenly
bodies and planets; they knew the circumference
of the earth, and its place in respect to the sun.
Their father, to whom this kind of knowledge
was most agreeable, had brought forward his
sons very far in this branch of human science.
He did not, therefore, ask too much when he re-
quested of both of them that they would explain
this subject to their sisters. He could, in this
way, best learn whether his two sons themselves
thoroughly understood what they were to make
plain to others. 7.

However great was the expectation of the
boys to know the fate of the unhappy voya-
gers, yet they felt still greater desire to fulfil
their promise. Max, especially, thought about
it the whole morning, how he should perform
his commission, and Gustavus went cordially
handin hand with him. Both of them thought
only of this one thing. The sisters, indeed, often

* s
46 Winter in SpitzBerGeEN.

laughed when they noticed their brothers’ un-
usual soberness. Julia made many a sportive
attack on them, and probably Max and Gustavus
would have erred in their purpose, if they had
not felt themselves too greatly flattered by their
father’s confidence in them,

Finally, after a long examination and consulta-
tion—for their father left them alone purposely,
without giving them the slightest aid—their
plans were ready for communicating the infor-
mation. Maria and Julia were called, and their
father himself came in to correct many things,
or to make them still clearer, which were proba-
bly not wholly clear to his sons.

Max and Gustavus had inclined the large
table on one side by means of a support under
it, so that the flat surface had the same direction
with the actual course of the earth, or, as Max
expressed himself in scientific language, parallel
with it.

In the middle on this table level, was fastened
a large gilt ball by a peg, on the projecting point
of which hung down a yard and a half of thread.
On the end of the thread, a parti-colored ball
was fastened, and a circle drawn on the table
with chalk, so large that it marked out the
course of the ball which hung on the thread. t.

Both of the girls, their pupils, looked at. this
apparatus; it was probable, in their view, that, .

‘
WINTER IN SPiITzBERGEN. 4T

the gilded ball might represent the sun, and the
parti-colored one the earth. It proved to them
that Max and Gustavus had thought it all over,
and drawn it out correctly.

With a somewhat important mien, Max came
forward to the table. “You know, Maria and
Julia," he began, “that the sun is fixed—that
the earth revolves around it, and completes its
course ina year. ‘The direction in which it goes
round the sun, I will now show you, and you will
yourselves wonder how clear and evident will
be made to you the difference of the length of
the days and nights. Look at this ball; it repre-
sents the sun, which is fixed in the central point
of this circle. This other ball denotes the earth,
and you observe on it in the middle a line.

Marta. Which no doubt represents the Equa-
tor on the line?

Gustavus. Yes. Here you see two letters,
N and 8, by which are designated the North and
South Poles. On the ball are, besides, some
parti-colored lines which I have drawn, and
which may represent the portions of the globe.

Max. Now look sharp. The earth stands

now as you see here, unequally lower than the
sun, which naturally stands as much above.
Maria, So it does!
Max. The North half of the earth is turned
to the sun, It is therefore longer shone on by
48 WINTER IN SpirzBERGEN.

the sun in this direction than the South half,
and the region about the North Pole has the
sun hardly out of sight, while the South Pole
scarcely receives anything of it,

JULIA. Very correct and clear.

Gustavus. Now, therefore, it is summer on
the North half of the earth; the sun stands at
its height, and the days are the longest. But
now look close. Now the earth begins its
course. It makes a circuit on this chalk line
around the sun, and turns like a ball, that is,
running on at the same time around itself once
in twenty-four hours,—a motion from whence,
as you see, day and night takes place. The
whole northern half, especially the North Pole,
is always yet longer shone on by the sun than
the South Pole.

Max. The earth continues to rise higher,
until it has the same direction with the sun, that
is, the same elevation or height. The northern
half, in this way, every day will be somewhat less
shone on by the sun. The days become shorter, the
nights longer, until the earth, about the 22d of Sep-
tember, comes in the same direction with the sun,
and the days and nights are of equal length.

Gustavus. And then we have the beginning
of autumn.

Max. Now the earth goes farther, continu-
ally rising higher, and naturally it must appear
WINTER IN SPITZBERGER. 49

to us as though the sun came to stand constantly
lower. The North Pole is hardly any longer
shone on by the sun, and the nearer the regions
of the northern half lie to the Pole, so much lon-
ger are the nights, and so much the shorter are
the days, while, on the other half of the earth,
exactly the opposite takes place. This portion
now is longer shone on by the sun, and, as you
see, the South Pole has the sun continually
upon it. If the earth now, about the 22d of
December, has reached the highest point, then
we have the shortest day, or the beginning of
the winter. From this time, the earth goes
deeper again, the sun appears to rise higher, the
days increase, and the earth, on the 21st or 22d
of March, comes again into the same direction
with the sun,—day and night are equal,—the
earth sinks deeper,—the sun comes up higher,
until we again reach the end of June, and, with
the longest day, we once more have the begin-
ning of summer.

FatHer. You have performed your commis-
sion very well. I hope your sisters have under-
stood you, .As soon as I have time, I will draw
a table on the globe there, by which you will
know accurately how long, in any region of the
earth, is the longest day and the longest night.

Jutta. Itisvery clear tome, I should hardly
have trusted the commission to my brothers.

5
50 WINTER IN SPITZBERGER.

Max. Hem! it is not so very hard. One
must only himself see rightly into the matter.

FatHer. Very true. But there is one thing
more—how great the distance is at which the
earth revolves around the sun, You can con-
clude from this that, at every beat of the pulse,
we move nearly four miles.

Jutta. That is what I call going ahead!

Faraer. Certainly; for the distance which
the earth passes around the sun, or its orbit, as
it is called, amounts to more than a hundred and
twenty millions of miles (or about two hun-
dred and ninety millions of English miles.)

And now to go back to our unfortunates,
whom we left yesterday in a situation of the
greatest possible danger. The dread shock, and
the violent leap, the sudden silence, and the then
ever-increasing howling and roaring of the waves
beating against the sides of the ship, threw all
of them into despair. Even the captain, other-
Wise 80 courageous and composed as a seaman,
in this horrible moment lost his presence of
mind. “God have mercy on us!” cried he, full
of despair; “we are cast on the rocks, and in a
few moments, we shall be a wreck.”

Junta. A wreck? :

Faruer. This is what it is called in seamen's
language, when a ship is either wholly swallowed
up, and driven about on the billows—or at least
Winter tn SrirzpEerGeEn. 61

80 affected by the tempest, that it cannot proceed
on its voyage,—when, for example, it has lost
its masts or rudder, as was the case with our
ship.

The wreck is about sinking!” With horror
they all heard this doom of death—in the great-
est distress every one was looking for the moment
when the wreck should go asunder, the sides be
parted, the water press in, and all be swallowed
up by the raging billows.

Marta. Poormen! I tremble at the thought
of their being so abandoned.

JuLiA. Who could not here save themselves
as Robinson Crusoe did himself, by swimming.

Gustavus, And if they did fortunately swim
through, where would they land? What means
of living would they have found, where there
was a desolate island? Robinson Crusoe was far
better off; he found fruits, and a warm climate,
where he could dry and warm himeelf. These
poor people had nothing but snow and ice to
look on, But, father—

FaTHEeR. Some anxious, dreadful moments
passed before the unfortunate men could again
recover their senses. The captain was the first
to whose heart courage and composure returned.
At the side of the calm pilot or steersman he left
the cabin and went with him into the hold, that
is; the lowest part of the ship, where they both
52 Winter tw SpPirzBERGEN. —

r

saw, to their great joy, that the ship was entirely
dry inside.

Marta. Howso? What good could this do?

FaTHerR. It proved thus much, that the body
or hull of the ship had not suffered. The sea
water, if it had been otherwise, would have come
through, and the whole space or hold would
have been filled with water. At the same time
they noticed that the waves no longer beat so
violently, and from this circumstance very justly
concluded that the storm, if it had not yet per-
fectly calmed, must have very considerably spent
its rage. Inspired by new hope, they both of
them hastened to their trembling associates, to
carry to them a piece of news which, for the mo-
ment, must have been the most joyful. Now
the calm pilot. proposed to open one of the port-
holes, which had been kept closed.

Maria. Port-holes?

FaTHER. Gustavus, that belongs to your de-

. partment.

Gustavus. Port-holes are, in a ship, what
joop-holes are in a wall or entrenchment, open-
ings through which the muzzles of the cannon
are run out. They are provided with doors that
they may be shut in a storm, so that the swelling
waves may not come into the ship.

FatHer. Now, the pilot opened such a port-
hole, and looked up to the starry heaven above
WINTER IN SPITZBERGER. 53

him: The feeble light which the stars gave was
sufficient to distinguish, around the ship, an in-
distinct calm surface, which was lost afar off in
the boundless distance. The pilot wondered at
the silence of the waters, which still roared and
raged continually and awfully on the other side
of the ship. He called out to his companions,
They all came together; then some one mounted
on the quarter-deck,

JuLIA. Is not that the highest part of the
ship?

FatHer. Yes. We might compare it to the
roof of a house, only that it is flat, The seamen
often call it the upper promenade of the ship,
Large ships have many decks, which, as in a
building, separate the different stories. You
may thus often read the expression “three-
decker,” which commonly means a large ship of
war.

They now mounted on the quarter-deck, The
cold fresh air was the more beneficial to all as
the unfortunate men had spent many days in the
confined space of the cabin. But how great was
their terror when they saw that the wide extent
Which the pilot took for a calm and quiet sea was
a monstrous field of ice.

JULIA. Was this so very frightful? I should
have thought it would be better than if the ~
had been on a rock.

i
54 WiInTeER In SPriTtzBERGEN.

Gustavus. One would be as dangerous as the
other, Would it not, father?

Farner. And probably the dashing on the
ice would be more dangerous than on a rock. A
cliff can easier be climbed; there is in it some
eleft, or gulley, or cavern, which might afford
protection or warmth; or perhaps a spring, a
beast, or some plant which might serve as food
for them when enfeebled. But of all this nothing
is found on an empty field of ice. At the mo-
ment when the unfortunates mounted the upper
deck it was clearer than in mid-day; the sun of
the short day had risen, a small portion of the
disk moved above the horizon, and diffused so
much light that the poor men could perceive the
horrors of their situation. The wreck lay in an
ieeberg bay, which was protected on three sides
against the pressure of the waves. On the
fourth, the sea was indeed open, but the current
drove in monstrous heaps of ice, which shut fast
the bay, so that it might be clearly seen how the
return was more and more destroyed by every
new mass of ice. Destruction seemed unavoid-
able, for only one great ice cake was necessary
to be driven against the wreck to crush and
shatter it to pieces,

Marta. If the passage now, at least, had re-
mained gpen !

FatHer. This would have been of little use,
Winter 1s Spirzpercen. 55

The ship was a wreck, without sail; they could
no longer steer and guide it; to undertake a long
voyage with it would be impossible, as the unfor-
tunates knew not in what region they were. If
the storm was indeed really over, yet, suppose
they could reach navigable water, it would be so
high up, and in so open a sea, that the wreck
could not long bear their shattering motion. In
a word, dear children, destruction seemed only
too certain,

JULIA. What, then, did the poor people do?

FATHER. You can easily imagine their situa-
tion. In the first moment, when they gained the
fearful conviction of the horrible certainty they
were driven almost to desperation, On all sides
they saw danger and death; nowhere did the
slightest ray of hope appear of their being able
to save themselves. In such a condition man
sees only misfortune; fear blinds him against
every possible means of deliverance. When the
unfortunate man in some degree composes him-
self will he first be more regardful of every
thing; he thinks of them more accurately, and
oftentimes it happens to him to discover a new
and hitherto unknown mode of relief—he begins
to hope, the new hope teaches him to know his
new powers, increases his activity to use them,
despair vanishes, and the unfortunate man is no
longer wholly miserable.
56 WiInTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

Gustavus, And it was so, was it not, with
our unfortunates?

FatHer. As you might expect from brave
persons, whom not their conduct but their pro-
fession had brought into misfortune.

After some hours the little glimmer of light
which in this zone at this time of the year they
call day, disappeared; the captain took an obser-
vation, and then found that they were in the
seventy-first degree of north latitude. Do you
understand this expression? I have heretofore
explained it to you. Do you recollect on what
occasion ?

Max. O yes, sir, When we were taking our
voyage round the world with Cook and Kotzebue.

Faruer. It was now September. Only a few
weeks remained and entire night would set in,
a circumstance which much increased the anxiety
of our unfortunates. They heard this news with
horror, The captain, a firm, composed man, who
had in numerous voyages contended with many
dangers, and had conquered, first recovered his
presence of mind and courage. He caused the
whole ship’s company to gather around him.
“Friends,” he began, “that I would gladly help
you all, even at the sacrifice of mine own life,
you may well believe; but you see that in thig
case I can do nothing. We are in the hands of
Almighty God, and must give up ourselves to
Winter In SPITZBERGEN. 5T

his will. Without his aid nothing will help us;
if he wills to save us he can do it, though this
iceberg may tower around us yet higher, and the
sea become more impetuous. He can save us
when and how he will. Only we must do our
duty. Faint heartedness and mute despair will
do us no good; they only injure us. We have
been almost three days without an ordinary meal,
and without a moment of sleep. We ought not
to neglect our bodies; we know not yet how
greatly we may need our powers to contend with
dangers of which we are not aware. If we keep
our bodies sound and powerful, our minds and
spirits too will be the more active and lively.” He
commanded them, therefore, to light up the ship's
lanterns; the cook must prepare a good nourish-
ing meal; all must eat and drink heartily, and
then they must lie down in their hammocks to
sleep. The captain did so, but it was in vain for
him to close his eyes; he could not get the de-
sired repose. He thought of his unfortunate
companions, who were under his command, and
whose fate was placed in his hands; he felt that
he must care for them, and a care of this sort,
joined to the most torturing anxiety for his own
life, would allow no one to obtain slumber.
‘Maria. The captain must certainly have been
a good man. Many others in his place would
+
58 WiInTER In SPITZBERGEX.

have been occupied with himself only, without
caring for others.

FatHer. Certainly; he was a brave man,
who indeed had deserved a better lot. But
especially the fate of Ivan and Gregory lay near
his heart. He recollected that he had advised
them to the voyage, and had induced them also
to undertake it contrary to their father’s will.
He read in their countenances the bitterest re-
pentance for their conduct towards their father;
and now reproached himself most severely for it,

Gustavus. But Ivan and Gregory had written
to their father?

Moruer. You think, then, that this was
enough? How now if their poor father had not
consented when he sorrowfully and in vain
stretched forth his hands to his dear Ivan?
How, if the pain of seeing himself forsaken by
his son, and having lost all the hopes founded on
him, had brought the old man upon a sick-bed
and tothe grave? Would allthis be repaired by
a letter? ;

FaTHer. Surely not! I hope Gustavus will
' feel this, and not do so that he will be obliged
to reproach himself. Especially the captain
pitied the good Ivan, It did not escape him how
east down and sorrowful the young man was,
He knew, too, that want of courage was not the
cause of his being so downcast, for Ivan was a
WiInTER IN SPITZBERGER. 59

young man of very resolute feelings; but he felt
firmly convinced that it was Ivan’s grief of hav-
ing made his father drink so deeply of sorrow
which lay heavy on his heart.

Gustavus. But, dear father, Ivan’s object
was, however, praiseworthy. He had under-
taken the voyage for his own improvement.

FatHer. This was indeed far better than ifa
blameworthy levity had determined him to do
so, but it does not excuse him. Ivan deeply felt
this. With the thought of his poor father, his
conscience was aroused, which is never the case
with any one except when he does wrong; and
so Ivan was obliged to suffer the reproaches of
his own heart without, alas, the consolation
which others had—that they had brought them-
selves into this misfortune in the pursuit of their
calling, and attending to their duty,

Maria. That reminds me of Robinson Crusoe,

JuLiA. It is true; and it was just so, too, he
thought of himself, when he was on the desolate
island.

Modruer. Ivan would have done better, if he
had reflected on all this beforehand, as he might
have done, and had conducted himself according
to this conviction. His own heart would have
been spared many sorrows, if he had thought
deeply of the consequence of his conduct. Never
act as he did, my dear children. Who of you
60 Winter 1N SrPirzBERGEN.

would wish yourself to be in Ivyan's or Robinson
Crusoe’s place, and to feel the reproaches which
they both made to themselves?

Maria. Certainly no one of us, mother dear. .

Farner. Ivan lay on his bed continually
awake, while others were sleeping. Finally, he
ceased to be conscious of his thoughta,—but it
was more the perfect exhaustion and wearisome-
ness, more a fainting away than slumber. How
long he lay in this state of unconsciousness, he
could not determine when the captain woke him,
“Tet the others sleep quietly,” he said. “They
are fortunate; we will not disturb them. It
tranquillizes me to know that they are happier
than I am.” “What shall I then do?” asked
Ivan, raising himself up. “ You must accom-
pany me.” “And whither?” “T have not been
able to shut my eyes from disquiet. I must
have certainty.” “As to what?” “As to our
fate. I have observed that in a short time now
it will be day. I saw it from the quarter-deck.
At the same time, I noticed that thie ice is piled
up continually higher about the wreck." We
must see whether there is no land to be dis-
covered,”

Still half-buried in his swooning slumber,
Ivan took his gun. With difficulty, they both
climbed up a high cake of ice frozen close to the
wreck. On their left hand the sun, although it
Winter tn Sprrzpercen. 61

was mid-day, appearing deep and bloody red
through the mist, stood at the horizon. The air
blew piercingly. .A vast boundless field of ice,
scattered over with sparkling flakes of snow, lay
like a mirror before the eyes of both of them,
With the most anxious observation, the captain,
by the help of a spy-glass which he carried along
with him, looked over the dead level, and who
can describe his joy, when he clearly saw land
afar off on the western horizon, and at the same
time could distinguish some rocks and moun-
tains!

Max. God be praised. It certainly was an
island.

Jutia. Iam right glad that the poor people
could see the land!

Marra. And with what joy could they carry
to the others this news!

MorHer. Well observed, Maria! The joy
of others is pleasant to the good man, and it
makes him happy when he can impart some-
thing comforting to others.

Fatuer. Both of them now went down to
the deeply lying wreck. Many of the crew were
awake, and sat thinking over their fate in deep
meditation. “In the north there is land!” cried
the captain, joyfully. “We have seen it; we
ean distinguish the particular mountains.” This
information enlivened them all with new hopes.

6
62 WiInNTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

Though the dangers were ever so great, the un-
certainty of their fate ever so torturing, this one
piece of tidings banished all their sorrows. The
prospect of saving their lives filled them all with
thankful joy, and confidence in the Divine aid
again strongly entered into their soul.

Max. But was the deliverance then already
so sure, that they could rejoice in it with cer-
tainty?

Fatuer. In the first moment of joy of the
unfortunate man enlivened by hope, he does not
think of this. It is enough for him for the first
only to be able to hope, and a little ray of hope
calms his heart in the greatest danger. Our
unfortunates were already satisfied, when they
heard the word land. Whether it was a waste
uncultivated island, or a ridge of barren, bare
rocks—whether they would find the means of
living—whether they would have ever the
opportunity to go back to their native country
—or what sorrowful future might await them in
the land discovered—of these things not one of
them thought in the first moment of joy. Enough
for them that they knew land to be near them.

Max. Now, did they go on it?

FatHer. That was not at once possible. All
must not together leave the wreck, in order not
to give up the means of living, and other sup-
plies which were there. Besides, they were not
Winter IN SPITzBERGEN. 63

yet acquainted with the country, and it was
therefore concluded that first some of the ship's
eompany should go there, and bring back tidings
to those who were left behind of what they found
there, The captain called for volunteers for this
enterprise, and at once Ivan and Gregory offered
themselves to undertake the commission. To
them was joined the Russian pilot, or steersman;
and so they three went forth with their fire-arms,
and a sufficient store of means of food, and of
the supply of other wants.

Max. How far off was the land?

FatHer. This could not be accurately deter-
mined. Between the wreck and the land dis-
covered, there was a field of ice smooth as glass,
on which no distance can be measured, because
no object could be distinguished, by means of its
form and color, for a standard. The sky was
somewhat clouded, and the air foggy; our three
travellers were therefore obliged to direct them-
selves by the regions of the sky in which the
mountains were observed. Among the packages
which they had taken with them were also some
torches of pitch, in order to be able to light up
and explore caverns and chasms which they
might at any time discover. Besides, it would
soon be night; and then it was possible that they
might meet with wild beasta, which, az is well
known, mostly fly before fire. They had, too,
64 WiInTER 1N SPITZBERGEN.

another object in view. Ivan and his com-
panions, if they found any cavern that could be
inhabited, or any dwelling, were to place a burn-
ing torch on the point of the rock, in order to
give to those whom they had left behind on the
wreck a signal. |

Gustavus. ‘That was like a signal-fire in
mountainous countries.

Fatuer. Very true. This signal-fire would
show that a dwelling or residence had been found,
and likewise serve as a guide to those who were
to come on after them.

Max. You speak of a dwelling. Could they
expect to find anything of that kind here?

FatHer, At least, this was not impossible.
They knew not in what region they were, and
could not determine whether the land discovered
was a part of Greenland, or perhaps of Norway,
where some dwellings are always found. But
supposing also that the land was the island of
Spitzbergen—as they afterwards found was really
the case—this precaution was not without use.

Marta. Are there any dwellings there? .

FarHer. All seamen are familiar with the
story, according to which several sailors had
passed a whole year on this barren island. The
poor men had left the ship, which was intlosed
by the ice, gone on Jand, and, on their return to
the coast, saw that the ice and ship had dis-
Winter 1x Srirznercen. 65

appeared. Previously some unfortunate persons
had wintered there, who had built a hut ina valley.

Max. Had this, then, really happened, or
was it only a mere saying—a story?

FaTHER. It was true, at least, as to the main
thing. The history of the unfortunate sailors
affords many particulars which confirm this
story. You recollect, surely, of a Hollander,
Heemsker, and of a Dane, Monke, whé both of
them had experienced the same fate, Yet sup-
posing that this could not be reckoned on, the
captain remembered to have heard, that the
whale fishers, who venture into this region, had
built huts in many places, in which the coopers
made barrels for the preservation of their oil.
It was, therefore, more than probable that three
such well-prepared enterprising persons, would
find one of these huts, to which afterwards the
shining torch might show the others the way.

From the wreck, they might easily take all
necessary supplies to their new abode. Then
could they brave the winter, and continually be
in expectation that the future summer would
discover to them a ship, and this would again
carry them back to their own land.

Max. O, this caution was rightly thought of!

JuniA. Thank Heaven, that the poor people
are safe, and well preserved under a roof, and

with the necessary supplies!
6*
66 Winter 1n Spitzpercen.

FatHer. But are they so?

Jutta. O, now I imagine they must have
left the wreck, did they not?

FatTHer. I would gladly sketch for you a
picture of the happy union again of those who
were so separated from each other, and their
return to their native land, but—

Moruer. Dear father, it is now late. You
have related to us longer this evening than
usual. To-morrow, my children, you may hear
how it fared with the poor people.

Jutta. I wish, father, that you had not spo-
ken that last sentence. Now I shall dream all
night of these poor people.

Gustavus. That would be better off than to
freeze and starve with them in Spitzbergen.
Fourth Earning.

Wirt a certain anxious doubt, the children
looked forward the next day to the continuation
of the history of the unfortunates. These poor
people had become of importance to them, on
account of the sorrowful lot that had befallen
them. They had expected that their fate would
be changed, that, united as true friends, they
would brave all the inconveniences of the long
winter in this rough country, and thus would
overcome all the circumstances and dangera
which were to befall them. They had hoped
that a ship coming to their deliverance would
carry back the forsaken ones to their native
country, and that Ivan, especially, would be
received by his father with joy.

And all these beautiful hopes, had that single
word “Sut” of their father destroyed !

“ How will it be with those unfortunate men?”
asked Julia. “I have actually dreamed of them,
how they died on the desolate island, were found,
and—"
68 Winter 1n SPitzBERGEN.

Gustavus. Strange! I, too, dreamed some-
thing like it. They must have had to fight with
bears and wolves,

Max. It is no worse, however, than if they
were under the torrid zone, and been killed by
lions and tigers, or were swallowed up by gigan-
tic serpents.

Marta, Very true, But what fine fruits
they would have found, too, under the torrid
zone! They could have laid out gardens and
fields, have built themselves houses, as the colo-
nists did on Robinson Crusoe’s island. And
what did they find on Spitzbergen ?—nothing
but ice and snow.

Gustavus. And they might also be poorly
enough provided with the means of living.

Max. We will not trouble ourselves on this
account. I hope it will be better than we feared.
One can endure much, and seamen especially can
do so.

So the children talked it over among them-
selves, until, after supper, their father seated
himself in his chair, collected around him the
young listeners, and, in the midst of their most
longing expectation, inquired, “ How far had we
gone yesterday evening?”

JuLia. Up to that horrible “but,” by which
you destroyed our rejoicing, dear father,

Moruer. And such a “but” will you often
Winter In SrirzperGen. 69

enough experience in your life. Hopes often
deceive, and not all the good which is antici-
pated takes place.

FaTHER. You are quite right, good mother.
But to go on with our story. With the best
wishes of those left behind, the pilot, Ivan, and
Gregory quitted the wreck. The cold was
severe, the air harsh and piercing. Only by
quick walking, by means of warm clothing, and
from the fact that they had much to bear, could
they resist the penetrating and sensible chill,

Gustavus. Why, then, did they burden
themselves with a large pack?

FaTHER. Because they needed many things,
and knew not what they might find there. They
had each a gun, a sword, a cartouch-box filled
with powder and ball, a bag with provisions,
bread, bacon, a bottle of brandy, tobacco, and
besides an axe, and every one of them a blanket,
Tt was still dark when they left the wreck. On
their left hand, they saw on the horizon a faint
glimmer, which announced the near approach of
the short day, lasting scarcely a few hours. In
the twilight of this glimmer, the friends went
forth in the direction they had once taken, and
at last, in four hours’ travel, reached the island,
so greatly had the mirror-like surface of the ice,
and the single-colored snow, deceived them in
respect to the distance.
70 Winter in SPITzZEERGEN.

Jutta. They must have felt thankful, when
they felt the dry ground under their feet.

Max. Just as did Robinson Crusoe, when he
‘rose on land out of his sea bath.

FaTHER. Whether they were as well satis-
fied as he was, is a question. Robinson Cru-
soe saw himself saved from certain death; he
found, under a mild climate, an island, from the
fruitfulness of which he might expect a suffi-
ciency of articles of food. Our three friends saw
before them a desolate land, a mass of rocks
thrown together. There was no tree, no shrub
was green, no bird sung in the tops of the trees,
No brook murmured there, over fields and mea-
dows; they saw nothing but those vast barren
heaps of rocks, which lay before them like gray
ruins, the natural color of which was yet more
heightened by the snow. The whole creation
appeared as if petrified. A stillness, as of the
grave, reigned in the desolation, in which not
even the dissonant cry and ill-omened screech of
a single raven broke in on the horrible silence,
There was no place for repose there; no cleft
or cavern was to be found, not a splinter of wood,
with which they could kindle a fire to warm
themselves,

Cautious and timidly, our unfortunate wan-
derers trod over the rough icy ground, covered
with rock. Caution was the more needful here,
WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN. 71

as neither of them were ignorant that the high
northern regions of the earth are inhabited by
certain kinds of wild beasts, especially bears and
wolves, Now the poor men went forward be-
neath a rocky ledge, in which some hollows
were to be seen, which appeared to become lost
in the clefts within. The first and nearest one
‘was chosen for their path. The surface was
slippery, and appeared to be ice; a fact which
led the pilot to the conclusion that they were
going on the top of a frozen brook, The short
day, hardly lasting for an hour, had broken,
but of the sun our travellers saw nothing in
the valley; only the highest points of the rocks
were brightened by it. In the valley itself,
there. lay a twilight that made them shudder.
The travellers saw nothing but a barren, wild
wall of rock, which took some other form at
every step, according as the windings of the val-
ley gave them diflerent views.

Ivan and Gregory advised a return: they
believed they would thus find a better path.
The pilot thought differently. “Useless search
aids us nothing,” said he. “It robs us of our
time and strength. According to my view, that
hut must lie near a brook. If we do not find it,
we shall probably discover some cavern, or a
sheltering cleft, and, what is as needful, a way
up on the rocky wall itself.” This latter dis-
72 WiInteER IN SpirzBERGENS.

covery was necessary, in order to place upon it
the pitch torch agreed on as a signal.

Junia, .And did they find what they sought?

Farner. Not indeed the hut. After half
an hour's walk, the rough points of the rocky
wall no longer appeared; the clifls were more
compact, and formed on both sides a smooth
wall, which gradually rose up from the valley,
that continually became wider. Suddenly, Ivan
espied above on the rock a cavern or opening in
the cliff, similar to the entrance of a cellar. It
was as if they had found a treasure, or the house
of a hospitable friend, so welcome was this dis-
covery.

Maria. But what particular use would this
discovery be to them?

Fatuer, Do you imagine that it was a small
one?

Gustavus, No, Maria, It was already im-
portant that they had come to a shelter, so that
they were not obliged to he under the open sky.

FatHer. Very true,my son. In this region,
encamping out on the bare ground, under the
open sky, would not answer. Now they had
found what they sought, a sheltering abode.
The cavern lay at the height of a house above
them. With some difficulty, they climbed up on
the rock. One helped the other, and thus they
reached the entrance of the cavern, which indeed
Winter tx Sprrzpere@en. 73

did not enter very deep into the rock, but was
quite clean, and large and roomy enough for
them to take up their quarters in. The floor
consisted of whitish gray sand, and the walls
were smooth and even. ‘“ Thank God,” said the
pilot, “who has thus far helped us, and He will
yet help us more. We. have, at least, a shelter
from the wind and weather.” “ Now must our
comrades come, and furnish up our quarters,”
added Ivan. ‘“ We will give them the signal,”
answered the pilot. It so happened, that the
cavern discovered lay under an abrupt, but
pretty high ledge of rocks. It was not yet quite
dark, and dangerous as the climbing up was to
them, yet they all three ventured on it. The
ledge was surmounted while the setting sun yet
shone a little. But what a prospect !

JULIA. A beautiful one?

Faruer. In a certain sense, yes. The friends
stood on one of the highest points. Around
them lay the rocks, strewed about like the ruins
of a palace that had fallen, only slightly illumi-
nated by the fast disappearing sun. Over these
masses, they now saw the great field of ice through
which they had wandered, and a fire, shining at
a distance, showed them the region in which
their companions still remained. By means of a
spy-glass which they had taken with them, they
clearly saw the pile of wood burning on the ice,

7
74 Winter in Sprrzpercen.

and also the wreck, projecting above the icy
mirror, illuminated by the flame. Now they
fastened the torch between some stones, and the
next moment set it on fire. Moreover, Gregory
sent up three fire-rockete, which mounted into
the pure, thin air, higher than usual, and diffused
a beautiful light.

Maria. Fire-rockets?

FaTHer. Yes, as they send them up in fire-
works. They go quite high, move some minutes
shining and bright in the air, and then burst,
They can be seen in a dark night for many miles
off, and they are used in war for signals, and to
give notice of an attack, or any such thing.—
But to proceed. “Well,” said the pilot, “ that
idea was a good one. We have now nothing to
do but to wait whether our brethren will
observe the signal.” And truly, there rose in
a moment from that direction three rockets.
“Grand |" said Ivan. “Our friends have under-
stood the sign. Now let us go back to our
quarters.” Carefully they descended; the con-
tinually burning torch shone on their toilsome
return, and they came back safely to their
cavern,

As long as they were in the valley, they had
experienced a piercing, moist, penetrating chill;
on the cliff, they found the reverse. A remark-
ably milder air blew around them, like that


Winter in SprirzperGes. 17

which is perceived in a thaw after cold weather.
A distant muttering noise was heard, and the
pilot concluded that there was going to be a
change of the weather.

Max. But the winter was near?

Fatuer, Yes, indeed! In these northern
regions, it is often the case that the summer
ends partly with unusual storms, and partly
these storms set in at the beginning of the win-
ter, when the ice and snow have everywhere
made their appearance. Then the sky is over-
east with black clouds, and the rocks are upheaved
by the violence of the tempest; but on the first
clearing up of the air, suddenly comes in the
most dreadful cold.

Sorrowfully sat the three friends there, eating
their supper, in which they were obliged to go
without a refreshing drink and a warming fire.
A pile of wood now would have been comforta-
ble to them. With it, they might have warmed
the cave, as well as lighted it, and could also
have secured themselves against the attack of
wild beasts. Little was said. Every one in
silence wished only that the morning would
come; for they imagined that then their friends
would leave the wreck, and bring with them
everything that was now wanting for them.

But yet a glance into the future showed them
nothing but what was frightful; and even the

7*
78 Winter 1n SpirzpEercen.

conviction, that in a few hours they should be
joined to their friends, did little in affording
them composure,

Oh, the unfortunates! They could not know
that on this last—this only hope—

Jutia. Now, father—it would not fail them?

FatHer. Alas! it did fail them—an expe-
rience which you will often enough undergo in
your life. The only hope often deludes. Well
is it ~ him who never, never counts on blind

ce

Maria. But yet those on the wreck had seen
and answered the signal |

FaTHer. And still—but only listen further.
Exhausted by the difficult journey over the ice
and the rocks, worn out by cold, and enfeebled
by their anxiety for the future, our three friends
slept, covered up in their blankets, and with
their loaded guns on their arms, until at last the
pilot was roused by a dreadful howling and
noise. He got up; the noise beeame more
frightful continually, and the howling more hor-
rible. He at once awaked the others, who
sprung up affrighted, and in imagination already
beheld a troop of wild bears before them. The
darkness was awful; not a star shone. They
stepped to the entrance of the cave—and what a
meeting! The tempest broke howling on the
rocks, and roared horribly through the valley.
Winter tn Spirzsercen. 70

Snow and rain drove in at the entrance of the
cavern in the face of these distressed men. All
nature was in the most dreadful uproar, and it
often seemed to our unfortunates as if they heard
the heavy roll of thunder,

Disturbed also as was the pilot, yet he con-
strained himself to appear calm. He feared the
worst, and yet would not willingly destroy the
hope of his less experienced friends, with which
they were continually flattering themselves.
Overwhelming and sorrowful news is always
soon enough.

“ How well it is for us,” he said, “ that we can
sit here in a dry place!" He spoke with a beat-
ing heart. The fate of his comrades presented
itself to him; the thought that they might now
be wandering about on the ice in this frightful
weather, in the impenetrable darkness, and the
conviction that the torch could no longer burn,
disquieted his heart; scarcely could he hide
from his friends what he feared. To examine
whether the torch was yet burning was impos-
sible; the storm would have dashed any one to
the chasm below who ventured to leave the
cavern. It was perfectly impossible, in the dark-
ness, to climb the ledge of rocks, as the ascent,
even by the glimmer of daylight, was dangerous
to life. “God Almighty only can grant that our
friends should not be lost!” he cried out almost
80 Winter 1n SPITZBERGEN.

against his will; “ may his angels direct them!”
A wish in which they all participated, although
the others felt not the same anxiety that he did.
They went back into the cavern, and notwith-
standing their disturbed thoughts, soon fell asleep
again. After a long while, the poor men awoke.
In the whole region there reigned a death-like
stillness; the storm was entirely laid—the air
was pure and clear, but exceedingly cold, and
our unfortunates almost felt ready to imagine
that they had only been dreaming. It was yet
dark, indeed, but they observed in the southern
part of the sky that always increasing arch of
light which indicated the rising of the sun, With
longing they waited for the day, and scarcely
had it broken than they clambered up the rocky
ledge, this time with still greater risk of life, as
it was rendered smooth by the ice and snow.
But what a view! what horror! That vast field
of ice over which they had come yesterday had
disappeared! High waves were rolling close in
to the shore, and broke foaming on the rocks;
only single cakes of ice were driven on the coast.
Of the wreck there was not the slightest trace to
be discovered,

Maris. I was just thinking about that. What,
then, had become of it?

Jutta, Where, then, were the poor men they
had left?
Winter in SPitzBERGEN. 81

FaTHer. Who could answer these questions?
Nothing could be more certain.than the destruc-
tion of the unfortunates, whether they had been
wandering on the ice or had remained on the
sinking wreck.

Max. But, father, was there not some piece
of the wreck or a corpse driven on the shore?

Faruer. Not the slightest trace of one.

Maria. But might not some of the unfortu-
nate crew have wandered somewhere on a field
of ice? Might they not have landed on some
other place on the coast?

Gustavus. ‘This last supposition was not very
likely, for they would keep looking towards the
burning torch.

FatHer. Alas! they had little benefit from
this. It lay overthrown, extinguished, and
hardly burnt down a few inches, on the rock.

Overwhelmed and almost annihilated, stood
the three friends on the spot. They reflected
not on their own sad lot, they felt nothing but
for the calamity of their comrades, and this the
more, the less they knew whether the unfortunate
men had been overwhelmed, or whether they
were still driven about, a sport for the ocean bil-
lows. No one of the three friends spoke a word,
Every one of them was tortured by the most
eorrowful thoughts, and every one took care not
to communicate his painful ideas to the others,
82 Winter IN SPITZBERGEN.

With their eyes filled with tears, they looked out
towards the place in which, a few hours before,
they saw the wreck. Their hearts were greatly
oppressed and ready to burst, and their bosoms
most deeply weighed down.

“ Might not, then, ourfriends have been saved?
It was not impossible. God may lead them tofind
us, probably wholly unexpectedly,” finally said
the pilot, more in order to raise Ivan and Gregory's
sunken spirits than from his own conviction.

“ And if we should not see them again,” re
plied Ivan, “if only they are saved! I should
be glad of it with all my soul. Our friends may
then take measures, in their own country, for our
rescue.” But he was well convinced, while ex-
pressing this wish, as well as was the pilot, that
it could not be so.

Maria. But, father, that does not quite please
me. Ivan and the pilot should not utterly de-
spair of the fulfilment of their desire. ~

MorHerR. This was owing to the feeling of
their hearts, produced by misfortune. The fates
of men have a great influence on their mode of
thinking. Whoever sees himself often favored
by providence becomes thereby more easily
assured, and not rarely too presumptuous. He
flatters himself that he will always be so favored.
But if he is visited by misfortune, he then be-
comes spiritless, he sees nothing but his own
Winter 1n Sprrzpercen. 83

wretchedness—hope forsakes him, and he is al-
ways timid.

FaTHer, At least, he acts thus at the first
moments, in which misfortune affects him the
more seriously, When he first comes to reflec-
tion then new hope is excited; the unhappy
man feels the benefits of the same, and then
clings to it the stronger the more innocent he is,
and the more reasons of calmness he can create
for himeelf out of religion,

Indeed the pilot and Ivan had little reason for
hope, If their friends had not landed on the
island—and how little probability there was of
this!—the miserable broken wreck could not
hold together long in the open sea, at least not
long enough for them to reach land. How could
the unfortunate men guide it without mast and
sail? They must look on quietly as the wreck
caught by the tempest and driven on by the
foaming billows, finally was dashed -to pieces on
the heaps of ice, or was swallowed up by the rag-
ing waves.

This hour of hopelessness was certainly hor-
rible for the three unfortunates. The poor
creatures over whose fate they lamented were
their friends, Could they have landed on the
island, and had they brought supplies for their
wants from the wreck, then it would have been
tolerable; were the country ever so desolate or
84 Winter In SPITZBERGEN.

barren, it would be great comfort to them that
there were so many of them together. Union

and friendship would have softened the horrors . |

of their solitude; their united strength would
have lightened every burden, and even the severe
toil would have been thus sweetened. But now
they were three unfortunates, and hardly provid-
ed with the necessary supply of their wants for
asingle day. How would it be with them in the
approaching winter, lasting for almost half a
year? How should the poor men withstand the
cold and hunger? Where should they find a
protecting shelter, and from whence could they
obtain for themselves warm clothing? °

Happy and hopeful as these sufferers had been
when, a few hours before, they left the cavern,
thus wretched, almost brought to despair, like
men who seemed to be abandoned by God, they
now returned back to this their retreat. There
lay the few remnants of the provisions they had
taken with them, their scanty meal; not one of
them touched it—not one of them felt hunger or
thirst; they had only one feeling, which must
have wrought horribly upon them, the thought
of their boundless misfortune.

Juuia. What a frightful situation! They
could not be more wretched |

FarHer, Do you think so?

Jutta. I cannot really conceive how there
WiInTER IN SpirzBERGEN. 85

could be anything in their situation that could
be called good fortune |

_ Faruer. I do not exactly blame your view;
at the first moment the unfortunate men them-
selves would not have thought differently. But
scarcely had the first storm been laid in their
breasts than calm reflection also again renewed
its sway, and then they soon found too that even
in the most doubtful situation there still remained
to them many good things. What do you think
there was, Max?

Max. I should think, father, it was a great
piece of good fortune that there were three of
them. Ifthere had been only one of them, this
solitary man would certainly have felt himself
very unhappy.

FATHER. Very true! But suppose the three
had not been friends ?

Maria, Yet here they would have become
so?

FatHer. But supposing they had not, could
they then have reasonably hoped that they could
have overcome all their obstacles ?

Maria. No! One would have wronged the
others, and thus everything would have been
ruined.

FaTHER. So the three were friends who lived
in unity and concord, and this was a great and
inestimable benefit. They could now therefore

8
BE Winter tn SpPiITzReERGEN.

count on every one helping the others, and
standing by them, and thus halfof their burdens
fell off, and the other became tolerable and light.
Gustavus, what advantage beside had they?

Gustavus. They were healthy, stout men
who could endure, able seamen, who knew how
to cut their way through in case of necessity.

FarHer. Very well! An essential benefit.
Now, Maria, do you know any other advantage?

Maria. ‘They were active, laboriousmen, who
had the best of dispositions.

FaTHer. This is also true. And now I will
tell you of yet another advantage. Had they
brought themselves into this situation by rash-
ness and folly?

Gustavus. No; they were in the discharge
of their duty and at their posts.

FatHer. Had they anything to reproach
themselves? I will except Ivan and Gregory,
who must always have felt painfully that they
had secretly left their father.

Gustavus. No, they had a quiet conscience.

FaTHerR. Right, and so you see then, that
they were not so wholly wretched. Friendship,
good-will, health, strength, and a good conscience
were left to them, and so long as a man possesses
these advantages so long he is not wretched or
forsaken. Besides this they were pious, religious
men, who did not put God and his commandment
Winter in SrPirznereGen. aT

out of their sight. Therefore faith waa ever in-
creasing in their heart, that God would not leave
them, and that his wisdom would find means
and ways for their sustenance. Besides, I may
tell you beforehand thus much, that their wretch-
edness was to rise yet higher, and almost to be-
come intolerable. I resume again, therefore,
the thread of their history. To the question
which every one of them made respecting the
fate of his companions, there was joined also
another and as important a one—which indeed
was easier put than angwered—I mean the in-
quiry, what they must now begin upon ?

The pilot, a worthy old sailor, who had made
many voyages, and lived through many adven-
tures, had encountered and triumphed over many
dangers, was, as it were, an angel of deliverance
for his friends. He was aman of a sound under-
standing, of a correct view, of a pious, firm
character, a man whom a peril might for a
moment render daring, but who did not lose his
head in the most desperate condition, but aroused
hjs courage and soon found means of aid, and
then did not allow himself to be diverted again
from his path once entered upon.

Gustavus. That is my man! He pleases
me! He would make an able general, like
Ziethen or old Blucher |

FatHer. The comparison is a good one; for
RS Winter 1x SPiTrzBERGEN.

it was by such a pious, firm feeling, by this un-
shaken courage in the greatest dangers, those two
heroes showed their character. For some hours
the three friends had lain there silent and in-
active. It wasnot yet dark, the moon’s crescent,
which was scarcely to be observed in the stormy
night, and the glimmering stars cast a feeble
twilight into the cavern, when the brave pilot at
once raised himself up. “ Friends!” said he,
“we cannot and must not remain as we now
are. We have sat here more than two hours
with our heads on our hands. That this does
us no good, you see; we must behave differently.
Soup and forward! Let us eat something. I
am hungry, and we ought not to injure our
stomachs if we wish to hold up our heads. We will
eat, and then we must go out to explore. The
night is not so very dark, we are armed, and
what is better yet, our hearts keep their right
places. Possibly we may find our comrades,
and probably not; or it may happen to us to
discover that hut or some other cavern; and
even if we do not accomplish all this, we shall
have done our duty.”

These words of the brave man and his exam-
ple operated on the two others; they felt them-
selves lightened; their courage returned again;
they were ashamed of their sluggishness and
their despairing distrust of God's government
Winter in SpirzBercen. 8D

and their own powers, The small remnants of
the food they had brought with them were eaten,
and when nothing more was left, the old pilot
led the way—“ Now in God’s name forward! I
have satisfied my appetite, and I feel new strength
in myself.”

Jutia. And they really went out? In the
night?

FaTHer. Which you must recollect was not
yet so very dark. The cold air is purer; the —
stars shine more brightly: even the snow diffu-
ges a certain light, and besides this, the moon
stood in her first Quarter. All this gave our
wanderers light enough to see the path, and
avoid the dangers in which a total darkness
would have precipitated them. They descended
from the height, and went again into the valley,
and now turned themselves to the opposite side.
But the way still led along between walls of rock,
in which certain forms and shapes stood forth
like statues. In the weak light these often ap-
peared terrific and fearful; the sight of them
produced even in these courageous men many dis-
turbed thoughts, to which was joined the over-
whelming idea that they had consumed the last
remnants of their food. This circumstance filled
the otherwise so firm and composed pilot with
distressing anxiety. In vain he related his
former voyages; recollections could as little ena-

*
90 Winter in SritzReRGeEN.

ble him to avoid disquietude as the solicitude of
his companions. He sought in every way to
keep up his friends’ courage; but the wilder the
country grew, so much the more he felt in him-
self how his former strong courage was shaken.
The rocks continually rougher, the overhanging
cliffs ever more frightful, and every moment
threatened to fall, while the entire region around
increased in horror. Our friends however still
_ kept on the way they had chosen, and soon they
perceived a clearer, milder air, as the high walls
of rock kept off the keen draught of the cold
wind. They saw that the points of the cliffs
became clearer and more illuminated, and justly
concluded that the short day had broken, and
the sun had risen. All at once they saw on the
side, a little ranning brook, which pure as silver,
gushed forth from a cliff, and lost itself behind
a distant rock, “'Thank God!” cried the pilot,
“one principal want is satisfied! Heaven will
help us yet further!"—All were now full of new
courage from this discovery. The water was
beautiful, and was of so much the greater benefit
for them, as the provisions taken from the wreck
consisted of biscuit and salted meat.
Gustavus. Yea, then a drink relishes,
FaTHer. A small piece of good fortune can
at once very much cheer the unfortunate. So it
was here. The three friends sat each on a stone
Winter in Sprrzpereen. fl

which lay on the margin of the fountain, and
drank to refresh themselves. The pilot who
carefully observed everything, now began: “I
know not whether I err, but it seems to me as
if we were here in the neighborhood of men.”
—With these words he pointed to some stones
regularly laid as if for a table and seate.—‘ That
is the work of men’s hands!" he added. “The
basin of the fountain too has been prepared with
art, and here are stairs made in the soft sand-
stone. Either persons have formerly inhabited
here, or we shall have the good fortune to-day,
to become acquainted with our new neighbors,”

Max. But did not the pilot deceive himself?
Possibly he only imagined that he saw something?

FaTtHer. The man was too well experienced
to be under such a deception, It is indeed true
that nature, especially in rocks and cliffs, often
produces forms and shapes of which a man at
the first sight, might believe that they were
fashioned by the hand of man: as for example,
we find towers, pyramids, wedges, and even fig-
ures of beasts and men. But this was not the
case here; they soon became convinced, that in
truth, the hand of man had been there employed.

They now, yet more eagerly, searched into
everything with anxious observation ; the whole
region was thoroughly examined, they went
further into a dark hollow, and all at once saw
92 WiIntTER IN SPITZBERGER.

themselves inclosed in a vast chasm of rock. It
was now fully day. The friends could not enough
look at the wild stones lying around them, and
the strange forms of the cliffs, “Men have in-
habited here, or they still do so,” said Ivan.
‘See here are foot-prints; here where no tree is
to be found, lie shavings. We must search
further |”

With these words he went round a cliff, and
a kind of stairs made of flat stones, rudely laid
on each other, led on behind the cliff on the wall
of rock, He called out to the two others; they
came, and all mounted some tolerably convenient
steps, and soon reached an ascending foot-path
which wound around spirally through some
stones lying about, and which they now fol-
lowed.

There, all at once, the three friends found them-
selves on the ridge of the mountain ledge ;—op-
posite stood the low sun in its most beautiful
splendor, and deep beneath them lay a fine val-
ley which was bounded on the opposite side by
mountains and rocks, In the midst of the valley
there ran up a narrow bay, or basin.

JuLiA. Do they not call it a bay when a part
' of the ocean runs up deep into the land?

FaTHER. Yes: they name it a gulf or a bay.
The soil of the valley from the hill to the bay
was of a beautiful meadow green, through which
Winter 1n SrirzBEercGes. 93

ran little brooks. The view was beautiful and
enlivening: the vale lay exactly opposite the
sun which shone into it. The air was without
mist, and pure, and the mingling of colors charm-
ing, which the green of the meadow ground,
the glassy surface of the bay, the dark cliffs,
the projecting distant points of snow and ice, of
the mountains and the clear blue heavens pro-
duced.

Marta. Who would have looked for this in
Spitzbergen ?

FarHer. And yet this was the case. That
vale was sheltered by the rocks from the cold
north and east winds, and as it lay open towards
the south the sun could warm it. In the sum-
mer therefore the heat in this valley was almost
intolerable.

To proceed, however, with our story. But
what caused the greatest joy to our friends, was
the sight of a vast collection of dry trees, which
lay on the shore of the bay.

Max. Trees?

FatHer. Large whole trees with branches
and roots.

Max. Then there must have been forests and
groves in a pretty good condition |

FatTHer. Forests and groves? On the whole °
island there did not grow a single tree, or shrub,
from which you could cut the smallest stick, «
94 Winter in SpirzeerGen.

Maria. But whence so much dry wood?

Farser. The providence of God had taken
care, that these regions without wood, should
yet not be wholly destitute of this necessary of
life, The great streams in North America lay
waste by their overflow large tracts of woodland;
their swelling waters tear up the strongest trees,
and bear them off into the sea, The storms and
winds then do the rest, to float these trees into
that uninhabited region, where they are driven
on the shore or left lying in the gulfs and bays,
—And now we ought not to stop halfway,”
said the pilot, interrupting the joyful expressions
of his friends, “If the history of the cooper’s
hut is not a mere fable, it must be found here’
in this vale. We have yet almost two hours left
us of day, and this we will use in the right
way!” They immediately went down into the
vale, towards which the way was more conveni-
ent than that which they had taken to climb the
height. They betook themselves to the shore
and found it grown over with spoon-wort, and
other planta of the cress kind; a discovery
which was of the greatest value to them,

Marta, Thus one perplexity was relieved
after another.

MorHerR. An observation which you will
often find confirmed, in the life of man,

Gustavus, Yes, they had wood and wates,
Winter tn Srirzeeraen. 05

but with regard to provisions and lodging, they
indeed do not appear to be very well off.

Juuia, And who knows whether a remedy
will not be found for this too?

FatHer. We will hope for it. Ivan, who
had observed some large fish in the bay, now
luckily thought of something. ‘“ We have,” said
he, ‘not much more day, On this account I
advise that two of us seach for the hut, or some
other lodging, while the third takes care and
secures the fish and collects a heap of dry wood,
When it becomes later we shall probably be
hungry.” This proposal met with approbation,
and they concluded they would carry it into
execution. Ivan offered himself to take charge
of the cooking, and the two others immediately
went along the wall of rock to search out a
lodging. The former, on the other hand, turned
towards the water. Scarvely had he advanced
some hundred steps than he noticed something
thick on the shore, which drew his whole obser-
vation on it.

Junta, And’thiswas?— .

FatHer. In a little pool left by the water
when it was higher, there was wallowing about
a large fish like a salmon, and was making all
possible efforts to get out of his prison inclosure
and to reach again the bay close by. Now as
Ivan approached him he was completly frighten-
6 Winter In SPITZBERGEN.

ed and distressed, beat around him with his tail,
sprang up high and moved the foaming water so
greatly that Ivan found it impossible to master
his prey. “Only wait a moment!” said he, “ you
shall soon be tame.” With these words he
drew his axe out of his girdle cut a stout piece of
wood into the shape of a spade, and now dug
into the light sand very soon, a narrow run by
which he conducted off the water of the pool
into the bay. The drain was perfectly accom-
plished ; the water ran off continually, and when
Ivan, who in the meantime had cut up some
wood, came back, it was already wholly drained
off, and the fish lay worn out and flapping on
the dry sand. A few smart strokes with the
head of the axe despatched him, and Ivan was
busy in dividing up the fish when the pilot and
Gregory returned. That long-sought hut had
not indeed been found; but instead of it they
had discovered a fine roomy cave, which was far
better suited for lodging than that in which they
had been yesterday, and which besides, as it
was now beginning to be darker, they might not
have found again. In this way every one had
something to tell of. Ivan showed his friends
the fine fish and the heap of fire wood he had
cut up small, while they described to him the
cave they had discovered, which happily lay
near, behind a projection of the rock.
Winter in SPITZBERGEN. 9T

They now went to work. They carried the
fish and a large quantity of the firewood to the
cave, and not till the sun had for a long time
gone down, did they take time to examine more
closely their new dwelling. A fire kindled in
the middle of it lighted it up perfectly, and to
the great astonishment of all of them, clearly
showed that the handywork of man had aided
nature, On the side were many stones cut out
for seats and tables; in the walls were to. be
seen places hollowed out, and they clearly per-
ceived, that the upper portion of it was blackened
by smoke. All proving that this cavern must
have formerly served for a dwelling.

Max. And did not they find farther traces?

FaTHer, At least not at once. But before
it was fully night Ivan and Gregory. had laid
together, before the entrance of the cavern, a
pile of heavy sticks of wood while, the pilot
roasted and baked at a little fire on a hard spit
of wood, several pieces of fish. This supper
seasoned with gunpowder tasted nicely. Now
Ivan and Gregory kindled up the pile of wood
before the cavern—

Maria. But why did they do that? They
would have done better to have spared the wood.

FatTHer. The loss could be easily replaced ;
wood lay in immense quantities not far from
their cavern. They kindled up the supply they

9
98 Winter in SPITZBERGEN.

had brought together, as a precaution. They
had observed in the light sand on the shore,
footprints or tracks of bears, and they musi,
therefore, have feared that some of them would
be pressing into the cavern during the night.
And hence their kindling up a blazing fire,
which was the best means to keep off the dreaded
guests. Now our friends lay down to sleep
covered in their blankets, having their loaded
guns near them. The kindly warmth which the
fire diffused in the cavern, the supper eaten,
and the firm conviction gained that they were
not forsaken, caused them soon to fall into a soft
slumber. Then all atonce they were aroused—

Moruer. The cry of the night watch, dear
father! It has struck eleven. To-morrow, chil-
dren, your father will tell you what then roused
them up.
Siffh Eurning.

Ir is unpleasant even to grown-up persons,
when a story of any interesting event is broken
off in a moment in which the curiosity has reach-
ed the highest point. Just so was it most natu-
rally with Max, Gustavus, Maria, and Julia,
Their expectation had been raised to the highest
pitch; they had not thought of sleep, and felt
not the least tired; the evening hours had
passed away to them like short minutes, and
they would gladly have spent the whole night,
when the voice of the watchman proclaimed the
near approach of midnight.

In the leisure hours of the next morning, they
thought of nothing but the conclusion of this
story. They spoke of it together, and exhaust-
ed themselves in suppositions, what it could
have been so extraordinary before the cavern
rouse up the wanderers, Especially did
vus and Julia busy themselves in trying to an-
swer this question; sometimes they supposed

that a part of the cavern had tumbled in; some-
100 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

times they believed that unexpectedly, strangers,
possibly friends left behind on the wreck, had
appeared; sometimes they feared an earthquake
or some other remarkable wonder of nature, un-
til at the end they saw that with all their imagi-
nations, they were not a hair’s breadth nearer to
the truth. Max and Maria had better employed
their time; they had a map of the island before
them, and were earnestly engaged in becoming
more closely acquainted with the scene of the
histo

_ Finally the hour of evening struck, in which
their father was used to relate the story; and
when he had seated himself in his wonted place,
in the circle of his children waiting full of ex-
pectation, he began to take up again the thread
of the history, broken off the day before. “We
left,” he said, “ our friends—"

Max. In the newly found cavern—

JULIA, Sleeping by the fire—

Maria. When all at once something arou-
sed them,

FatHER. What that was I will now tell you.
More calm and yielding to their fate, than they
had been the day before, the good men lay slum-
bering there, when the pilot lying close to the
entrance suddenly sprung up from a dream, and
ealled to both of his friends by a loud cry of
horror, that they were attacked from without.
Winter in Spitzsercex. 101

They sprung up, seized on their arms, and ina
moment were ready to face any danger.

JULIA. Was there any danger then?

Faruer. They had slept some time probably,
for the fire burning before the cavern was almost
extinguished, and only a few flames flickered
over the heap of burning coals. Gregory wish-
ed to kindle up the fire anew, and went towards
the mouth of the cavern to lay together several
sticks of wood.

Suddenly the other two heard him crying
loudly for help. They hastened immediately
out, and saw to their affright, that a huge polar
bear had attacked Gregory, who was defending
himself against the monster only with his hatch-
et. He had indeed dealt him with it a mighty-
blow on the head, but the beast thereby only
made the more raging, rushed with redoubled
fury on Gregory and struck him with his fore-
paws so violently in his face, that he sank faint
to the ground.

JuLIA. But, father, did no one come to his
aid ?

FaTHER. How can you doubt that they did?
Ivan was nearest; he sprang forward and fired
off his gun. The ball hit the side of the bear,
on which he turned with rage at Ivan, who was
hardly in-a condition to withstand the assault
of the beast, until the old pilot hurried forward

o*
102 Winter In SpPmirzeerces.

and struck his sword into the body of the bear,
standing on his hind feet, clean up to the hilt.
Growling, the beast sank down and then tried
to raise himself again, but his wounds from
which the blood gushed out in a stream, hinder-
ed him. Then the resolute pilot came up nearer,
held the muzzle of his gun to the ear of the
bear, and with this shot levelled his foe to the
ground. Ivan too, brought back to life again
his friend Gregory, whom the fright and the
hard blows with the paws had left senseless, while
the pilot kindled up the fire anew. This appear-
ed the more necessary as they heard at a distance
the howling, and roaring of similar beasts.
Then exhausted, he entered the cavern. “A fine
joke,” said he laughing. “We might have come
off bad enough !”

Max. Certainly, if there had not been three
of them.

Marta. Or if they had had no fire.

Gustavus. And no gun, Or if they had
been fast asleep.

FaTHER. You are right! It was very well
that the friends had thought of accidents; the
least negligence might have cost the life of one
if not of the whole three of them. Ivan a
Gregory were still continually frightened, as is
wont to be the case with men after a fright they
have received, since it is in the remembrance
Wixter in Spirzeercen. 108

that the danger often first presents itself in its
real magnitude. The pilot sought to weaken
this impression. “The thing has its good re-
sults,’ said he laughing. “ We shall not have
much more sleep this night, but that will do us
no harm; we shall not be troubled with weari-
ness. We have a work to do; the skin is good
for use, and the meat is not to be slighted; I be-
lieve and hope that we may become acquainted
with other guests of the same kind.”

Gregory had fully recovered; with him and
Ivan, the pilot went out in front of the cavern,
where the bear lay out-stretched. By the light
of the fire our friends laid hold of the beast, and
in a few hours’ work, the skin was drawn off.
The hide was of unusual size, and beneath it lay
the fat several fingers thick. “Indeed a fine
piece of game,” said the pilot, “and that we
should meet with it too, on the first day of our
residence here! If it goes on so, and we have
for every fortnight a piece of roasted meat like
this, we shall have nothing to say against our
winter quarters |”

JuLia. But to eat bear’s flesh? No one
would have me for a guest.

FaTuer. And why not? In the northern
regions, bear’s flesh is often eaten; the bear in
spite of his growling and wildness is a very clean
104 Winster 1n SpirzperGen. ©

Maria. And if he were not, hunger is the
best cook.

FaTHER. The pilot cut up the beast, and
threw away the entrails and all the useless por-
tions down into the valley. The rest divided
into pieces was brought into the cavern, and
some of the most juicy parts roasted on the
glowing coals, gave them a fine breakfast. It
had become somewhat clear, though with the
rising of the sun a slight mist rose in the valley.

To-day the sun went up lower, and the round
was much smaller which it described above the
earth; it appeared to move over the horizon and
the ocean like a glowing ball, without rising far
above them. The old pilot looked thoughtfully
on this appearance. ‘TI fear,"’ said he, “that in
a few days we shall wholly lose sight of the sun.
‘We must use the short time which remains to
us with all the activity of which we are capable,
if we do not wish to suffer the greatest want
during the whole of the long winter.” “We
shall not fail to do it,” said Ivan in reply.
“Only tell us what we must do.”

Maria. Ah, there was plenty of work to be
done! To bring together wood.—

Gustavus. To provide food.—

FaTHer, Ivan and Gregory became anxious
from the thoughtful appearance of the pilot,
“First of all,” said he, “we must make an at
P

” Winter tn SpiTzBEeRGeEN. 105

tempt to find thathut. If we do not succeed is this,

we must look out at least fora warmer, safer, ang
more convenient abode than this open cavern.
We must also provide means of living and wood,

But do not be spiritless. The winter here is not

so dark as in other countries. The moon, the

i

stars, the snow and the northern lights will ei

us so much light that we can carry on many 0
our operations without very greatly missing the
sun.”

With a bag, a pack, and well armed, the friends
went forth during the short day from the cavern,
and turning towards the south side, where the
wall of the rock was higher, the cliffs more
abrupt, and minutely observed everything which
they met. Every fissure or opening in the rock
was examined attentively. Everywhere they
found traces that men must have inhabited here,
Sometimes a piece of hewn timber was seen,
sometimes portions of a broken tool, but no-
where could they find the trace of a dwelling.

“The story as to the hut is certainly false,
invented by some idle brains,” said the pilot
“We must make up our mind to spend our
winter within a casemate,”

JuLIA. Casemate?

FatHer, Casemates are arched bomb proof
cellars under the main wall of a fortress. The
pilot here used this expression by way of joke,
106 Winter in SPirzpeRGeEN. ~

The nearer our friends came to the mouth or
passage out of the bay into the open sea, the
higher, wilder, and the more frightful were the
rocks, It appeared as if here nature had placed
firm and insurmountable bounds to the ocean.
“What if we should try to climb one of these

iffs?” said Ivan. “Possibly we may discover

m thence what we are so greatly longing to
find.” The pilot gave him liberty, for according
to his view the hut they were seeking must stand
as near as possible to the sea.

Marra, Why 0, sir.

FatHer. Partly on account of their being the
easier able to supply their wants from time to
time, and partly because they might as soon as
possible notice the arrival of a ship, which farther
into the land was attended with numerous diffi-
culties,

Courageously and collectedly they clambered
yp one of the nearest and highest cliffs. It was
still day, and the view was fine; they looked far,
far out into the ocean, but it was already covered
even to the entrance of the gulf with monstrous
cakes of ice which towered up before the mouth
of the bay. They stood crowded on one another
like huge blocks of rock, and formed into a mul-
titude of points and shapes, which lay beneath
each other in the most parti-colored mixture, and
in any other circumstances would have been to
Winter in Sprirzeerces. 107

our friends a fine sight. But on them now, in
their present circumstances, the view had little
effect ; the thought of their lost friends and the
idea of their own sad condition, banished every
otherwise agreeable impression, Now the sun
went down, and cold air blowing, took away
their breath and strength from our friends»
neither of them spoke a word; sorrowful and
full of the most disturbed thoughts, they wished
to go down again, when Gregory looked around
him and—who could conceive of the joy of the
good man—below, in a valley lying at a short
distance off, he saw a tolerably large and firmly
built hut.

Jutta. Thank God! It seems to me almost
as if I had found the hut!

Marra. I was afraid, indeed, the unfortunate
men would have searched here too in vain!

FatHer. With delight they looked into the
valley sufficiently enlightened by the last rays
of the setting sun, and saw that the hut was
built against a wall of rock, and enclosed by a
pretty wide and deep trench laid on the upper
margin by large stones, in the inside space of
which lay a sort of broken bridge.

That they now, inspirited anew, quickly and
hurriedly left the cliff, and every one wished to
be the first to enter the so long desired refuge, L
need not assure you.
108 WiInTEE IN SPITZBERGEN.

Marra. And that was really the hut which
the cooper had erected?

Fatuer. That our friends could not deter-
mine. Perhaps they did not at first inquire about
it, as they were so glad as to have found the hut.
Gregory descended into the trench, clambered
up on the other side with much trouble, and now
reached out a piece of rotten board, which served @
for a bridge, to his friends, in order to give thema

* more convenient way across than he himself had
enjoyed. With the mo&t anxious observation
eer looked around on everything. The inside
‘of the trench was made with a sort of masonry
work, which was set with large flat stones, and
bound together with moss and earth. The hut
itself was of tolerable size; its sides as well as
the wall were of flat stones, the roof consisted
of sea-weed, but was wholly covered over with
moss. On one side of the ridge, an opening
served for a chimney, and a wooden shutter
appeared to represent a window frame. The
door as well as this shutter was closed.

Junia. And did no one dwell here?

FaTHer. At least no answer followed the
repeated callsand knockings. While our friends
went around the hut, they observed a hollow
leading through the rock from which a person
might clearly look out on the surface of the
ocean; a circumstance which gave them the.
Winter in Srirznercen. 109

most certain proof of the wisdom of the builder.
Both were here united—a warmer valley pro-
tected against the storms, and likewise a view of
the ocean, from whence only they could expect
deliverance.
Gustavus. So they took up their quarters
here?
® Farner. As was most natural! Gregory
pulled open the shutter, mounted into the hut,
and opened the door which was bolted on the
inside, A heavy musty smell met those who
were entering, and this was the best proof that
the hut for a long time had no inhabitants, The
feeble light, which fell through the door and
every opening was not sufficient to render the
objects perfectly clear; the pilot therefore kindled
one with the torches they had brought with them.

Thus they had the double advan t the
torch gave light and its flame consw ick
heavy air.

Maria. How did they then find it furnished?
FATHER. Just as you may suppose. They
found @othing but an old table, a pair of bench-
es, and some sort of an utensil, nearly eaten up
by rust. In the wall there were some holes,
probably designed for clamps of the wall.
JuLiA, And did they find nothing further?
FaTHEer. No. In fact all three were greatly
deceived in their expectations, by this scantiness
10
110 WINTER in SprrzBERGEN.

which came under their view. Here they had
hoped to find everything which they needed for
their support, and now they saw their hopes so
little satisfied. There they stood sorrowful; they
felt nothing but the pain of seeing themselves
disappointed in their expectations. To this was
added the prospect of a sorrowful future, and
thus we cannot wonder if they, in these circum-@
stances, felt in the highest degree unfortunate.

Gustavus, And was the pilot also sad?

Farner. And why should he not be so? But
I can say to you, that he too was the first, in
whom courage again revived. “The hut seems
to me to be larger on the outside,” said he,
and looked carefully around him. Then he per-
ceived a large board that was leaning behind a
bench against the wall; it was a piece of a part
of a er, but it was so deeply pressed into
the at it could only be moved away with
the greatest trouble.

Gustavus. And there they found?—I can
imagine what it was,

FaTHer. An entrance in which they perceived
at the first sight, that the hands of man had
cut it out, or at least had widened it. So heavy,
oppressive, almost suffocating, an atmosphere
met the curious explorers, that they drew back,
as if they were stunned. “I must know what
is in that cellar !’’ said the pilot, while he drew
Winter in Spirzpercen. 111

the charge vf shot from his gun, and loaded it
only with powder. He advanced some steps
further within the entrance, and fired off the
gun. The deadened report echoed through the
vault, the flash of the powder at the same time
took away from the otherwise deadly air its suf-
focating quality, and with the clearer, shining
® torch, they could now go deeper into the cavern.
But what an affright suddenly seized upon the
three friends!|—A gray-headed old man with a
long snow-white beard, and covered in a skin,

JULIA. Aman? Father, a real man?

FaTHER. Sat sleeping behind a table, whose
head like a person slumbering, leaned back on
the railing of his stool.

Maria. Was he then only asleep? Was he
really alive?

FatHer. That, our affrighted friends could
not know; such an examination their terror did
not at the first moment permit. They stood sev-
eral minutes at a distance, regarding the sleeper,
before they ventured to approach nearer and ad-
dress him.

JuLIA. And what did he answer?

FarHer. Nothing. He sat like astatue. Fi-
nally, the -steersman went up closer, held the
light of his torch under the gray-beard’s eyes,
and now found that it was a corpse, probably of
the last inhabitant of the cavern, who had died
112 Winter 1n SPITZBERGEN.

sitting on his stool. When they had recovered
themselves from their first affright, they were
now in a situation to consider everything more
closely, which presented itself to their view.
The corpse itself was like a mummy, hard and
dry.

Max. How was that possible, as every corpse
elsewhere becomes putrefied unless it is anointed ~
with balsam ?

Fatuer. Probably it arose from the condi-
tion of the place. We find many vaults and
caves, in which corpses do not decay, but become
hard, firm mummies; and this cavern certainly
had this peculiarity. The dead man wore a
skin which, by the length of the time, had be-
come wholly brittle. Before him, on the table,
stood an empty drinking cup, a tin plate, and an
ink-stand in which were some pens, and a pamph-
let lay there of about twenty leaves written
out.—What, my dear children, would you have
first done?

Max. I would have read the pamphlet.

Gustavus. I would have buried the corpse
in the earth.

Marta. So would I, and then searched
through the whole cave.

FaTHer. I believe Gustavus is right. Our
friends did the same, The sight of the corpse
was to them only painful and revolting. They
Winter 1x SprirzeEercen. 113

found too at the first sight many woollen and
hairy coverings; in the largest of them they
wrapped the corpse, bore it out in front of the
hut, and with the united activity of the three
friends, it was not difficult, by the aid of an axe
and their hands, to make a grave in the light

sand, near the hut. Strange as it may seem, they
performed this duty with perfect calmness and
in the midat of conversation such as is usual in
general labor, But now when they went in to
take up the corpse, suddenly they were seized
by a serious melancholy, such as they had never
before experienced. Tears ran from their eyes;
they stood therg with folded hands and down-
cast eyes—no one spoke.

JULIA. Why was that?

FarHer, The whole made too deep an im-
pression on the pious, good men. They now
buried a person wholly unknown to them, who
certainly had not expected to have his grave
here, and who never imagined that these three
friends would pay the last services to his re-
mains,

“Who will perform this last duty for us?
Who of us will be the first, and who the last?”
Every one asked himself; and questions of this
kind often shake even the most wicked, how
much more must they affect the pious heart!

' Amid tears their work was completed; they
10*
114 Winter rn SprrzBEerGen.

heaped up by the clear moonlight the grave,
which the friends covered with a flat stone.
The pilot prayed at the grave, then dried his
tears and said, “Now we must shed no more
tears! The slumberer is at rest. He has passed
through all.—We will leave him to his repose!”

With moistened eyes they looked on the grave
of the unknown ; the picture of their own dark
future pressed upon them, and in sorrowful, mel-
ancholy mood, they returned back to the hut.
“Friends,” began the pilot, “we can do nothing
here to-day. Let us keep out in the open air.” -
He looked at his watch. “It is almost eleven
o'clock ; the sun must rise before long.”

JULIA. So early?

FarHer. Yes, indeed. On account of the
approaching winter, the sun here soon became
wholly invisible, and the last day before its dis-
appearance it rose only a little distance above the
horizon. “TI consider it, therefore, thé most
suitable time,” added the pilot, “ now to go out
for wood and food.’ This he proposed not so
much on account of the object mentioned, as
rather to divert the minds of his friends, and
drive off their troublous thoughts. He knew,
doubtless from his own experience, that a man
injures himself in nothing as much as by exces-
sive sorrow and immoderate anxiety, since he
thus becomes unfit for all business and labor,
Winter tn SrirzBercen. 115

and renders himself doubly wretched and unfor-
tunate, This, therefore, he wished to prevent in
his friends, without allowing himself precisely to
point out his object. He himself went back into
the hut, to extinguish the burning torch, brought
forth the arms of his friends and their knapsacks,
together with an axe, and thus they went out in
the fresh cold air, through the hollow of the valley
to that bay, from whence, as you know, they
could see directly over the ocean even to the
rising sun. The frost covered the ground as yet
without snow ; on the shore of the bay there was
a thin coat of ice, and the air was extremely
cold. At the horizon it was clearer; there was
formed that red, fiery circle, which portends the
rising of the sun, and soon he made his appear-
ance in majestic splendor, but gradually disap-
peared again, after he had raised half of his disk
above the icebergs.

The pilot cast a melancholy look towards it.
“We have then seen thee for the last time this
year!” said he seriously ; for as he had already
often voyaged in the northern regions of the
earth, so he knew that the sun, in this zone,
disappeared for at least four or five months at a
time. It was, therefore, to him at this moment
as if an old, tried, and intimate friend was taking
farewell of him. The thought on what he must
encounter and undergo, probably, before he saw
116 Winter 1x Srirzpercen.

him again, must also have so greatly affected his
heart as he was yet so full of the impression
which the burial of the unknown had left be-
hind it.

Almost without knowing what they did and
why they chose that path, the friends, silent, and
full of serious thoughts, went to that cavern in
which they had passed the night before, and
were disturbed by the attack of the Polar bear.
And here they were all at once awaked out of
their heavy melancholy mood.

JuLia. Now, it was not by misfortune, was
it ?

FatHer. You will recollect that they had
thrown down into the valley from the cavern the
useless parts and entrails of the bear they killed.
This act had now invited some guests, which
here held open table in good companionship—
There were two powerful bears and many foxes,
who were satisfying their hunger on these re-
mains, and were so busy at their work that they
did not even observe the approach of our three
friends.

“Now, what think you?” asked the pilot.
‘Shall we venture on an attack, or shall we get
out of the scrape?” Ivan and Gregory left the
decision of this question to the more experienced
pilot, but promised to hold out and support him
with all their might to the last drop of their blood.
Winter tx SpirzBERGen. 117

“The contest must almost of necessity be
ventured,” added the pilot; “besides, we not the
leas need skins and food ; if we are once terrified
the beasts will become so much the more daring,
and we the more timid. We must venture on
it; the booty is worth the pains.” Cautiously
they went behind a projecting piece of rock,
in order to consult as to the plan of attack,
and enter on the most suitable arrangements.
“ Hunting the bear is not so strange and unknown
to me, that I cannot teach you the necessary pre-
cautions,” said the old pilot. “The bear, espe-
cially the large white bear, is a wholly peculiar
sort of fellow, who must be handled in a particu-
lar way. He never springs, like the wolf or the
tiger, on his prey, but comes forward to meet
you, asclad witha certain and an important com-
mission, We must go towards him daringly,
and eomposedly, and if he approaches us look
him boldly in the eyes. When he is distant
some paces from his assailant he rears himself up
growling, and sits on his hind paws; in this
posture he gradually advances, raises his fore-
paws, and spreads them out, in order to clasp
his adversary and crush him, or to smash him
down at one blow. This moment a man must
make use of to thrust the beast in the breast with
his bayonet, while the charge in the gun can thus
be spared for the last necessity.”
118 Winter in SpirzBerGen.

In this manner the pilot made his two friends
acquainted with the mode of attack; and as
they had bayonets on the end of their guns,
it might be expected that all would result hap-
pily. Composed, yet not without some beating
of the heart, Ivan and Gregory accompanied by
the pilot, advanced forward. They had reached
a distance of not more than forty paces from
the enemy, when one of the foxes noticed their
approach, and gave his comrades warning, on
which they made off with incredible swiftness.
“The thing has begun well!” said the pilot.
“The volunteers have already taken to their
heels |”

Gustavus. But the bears, the heavy-armed
troops, the grenadiers ?—

FaTHer. “Stand firm.—Hallo! Hallo!” now
cried the pilot. Seriously and gravely uprose
the two bears, began to growl, and with» their
forepaws wipe off their bloody snouts. Yet they
stood still, with their glaring eyes directed to the
three friends. ‘“ Hallo! Hallo,” again cried the
pilot repeating his hunter's cry, and thereupon
rolled a stone in among them. This roused
them, they became furious and first attacked the
stone, rolled growling on the sand, and put them-
selves in motion, The pilot approached some
steps nearer, and Ivan and Gregory with him.
Now they were only a few feet distant from each


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Winter tn Srirznercen. 121

other, when the strongest of the bears raised
himself up to a fearful height, and growling all
the while, came on his hind paws toward the
pilot. When only two paces off he reached
forth his right forepaw to smite him down ata
single blow. But the pilot, who had already
placed his gun, seemed only to have waited for

this moment; for he now advanced a quick long
step forward, and ran his bayonet into the foe,
even up to the mouth of the gun, between the

forepaws. At the same time he fired off the
gun. The sound frightened the other bear, and
caused him to stand still; but hardly had he seen
that his companion had fallen down with a dread-
ful roaring, and his white skin was stained with
blood, than he came up closer, more furiously to
revenge the bloody death of his mate. Now
Ivan sprang forward; the bear, though some-
what smaller, yet was more raging, and did ex-
actly as had the one before him. But Ivan had
not observed the pilot's manoeuvre in vain; for

searcely had the bear held out his paws, than he

too felt the deadly steel in his breast, The con-
test, however, was not very easy. The bear,
which Ivan had not probably struck as well as
the pilot did his opponent, became continually
more furious, and pressed on Ivan, and hardly
could he withstand the force of the beast.

Then Gregory sprang forward, and availing

«ee
139 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

himself skilfully of an exposed place of the foe,
drove his bayonet with tremendous force be-
tween the ribs. The bear turned round fearfully,
reeled, tumbled down, and rolled about exactly .
as did the first bear, which lay, to all appearance,
in the last struggles of death, Then he strength-
ened himself anew, and both beasts fell on each
other with a dreadful and indescribable fury.
Covered with blood and growling, they thrashed
around on the bloody earth, and tore themselves
with their teeth, and so exhausted their strength,
that the three friends had nothing more of fight
to engage in. They left the beasts to kill
themselves entirely, and removed themselves
from the place of fight, but they were so ex-
hausted and fatigued, that they hardly were able
to get to the cavern, in order to obtain the bear's
hide which they had left there the day before.
After some hours they found the bears dead, and
now they began, notwithstanding the cold, at
ofice to skin the animals, and to cut up the flesh,

a work which lasted several hours, but likewise
was a good diversion to their minds. Loaded
with the skins and the best pieces of the meat,
they went to their hut. More than once they
were obliged to go over the ground, which was
not very distant, for the things to be carried
were many, and yet they went out several times
in order to carry a considerable quantity of wood
WiInTEE IN SPITZBERGEN. 123

from the bay to the hut. Now they justly be-
lieved their day's work was evidently done; they
therefore seated themselves in the hut, around
a good warm fire, and eat their supper, talking
over their adventure with the two bears.

“Now we will go about a very necessary
business,” said the pilot, “now we are best fitted
for it, for we have toiled bravely.” To Ivan's
and Gregory's question, as to what he meant, he.
added: “We must acquaint ourselves more
thoroughly with our household affairs, and for.
this purpose, I will first of all, prepare a light.”

JuLIA. But where could the pilot get this?

FaTHerR, You have forgot that on the table
before the dead man, stood a lamp, This the
pilot caught up; a strip of cotton cloth which
he tore from his pocket handkerchief was twisted
up for a wick, with the fat of the bear in place
of oil, and thus the lamp soon burned clear and
bright. They could now look over the whole
space of the cavern, which reached farintotherock.

Maria, Then I would have searched every-
thing carefully through.

Fatuer. Certainly our friends would not
have left this behind, yet they had something
to do more necessafy. And what was this, Max?

Max. The examination of that paper. They
might expect to find in it some pert and
pleasant news.
194 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

FaTHer. They truly found important infor-
mation, but whether agreeable, this may be
learned from the account itself. With the great-
est care, Ivan unfolded the paper, which was
written in the Dutch language. The letters
were beautiful, clear, and legible, and fortunately
Ivan and Gregory well understood this language.

MorTHEr. A proof again, that men cannot
learn too much.

FatHer. The proof of this is yet further to
be found in this history! Ivan read over the
paper and translated it to the pilot, who slightly
or scarcely at all understood that language. It
contained the sorrowful account of the unfortu-
nate man whom our three friends had buried, as
well as the fates of his ten companions in mis-
fortune.

. Marta, Companions in misfortune? But
they found only a single corpse?

FaTHer. You will understand this when I
have communicated to you the substance of the
contents of that paper. It was to this effect :—

Twenty-five years before a Dutch ship, named
the Good Hope, sailed with a number of others
on a whale-fishing, and with its company reach-
ed the sixtieth degree of north latitude, The
captain was of the opinion that the fishery here
would not prove so successful, and therefore con-
cluded, against the advice of the pilot and the
Winter 1n SpPirzperRGen. 135

experienced sailors, to proceed on his way as far
as possible northward, in the firm conviction,
that it would there be more favorable to success,
In vain were all their warnings; the captain
decided upon it, and ventured himself into the
greatest dangers.

Gustavus. Is it then so dangerous?

FarHer. Not always. The Northern Ocean
is sometimes more, and sometimes less covered
with fields of ice. In the first case it is to be
feared that great cakes would break off from the
masses of ice, and woe then to the poor ship
which is caught between them! It will be
erushed together like a nutshell, and in the true
sense of the word shattered to pieces. There is
then no hope for the rescue of the unfortunate
crew.

To all these representations the captain paid
no attention. He secretly left the squadron’ in
the night, I mean the other ships in the company
of which he had hitherto been, and sailed far-
ther towards the north. But what those who
understood the matter had foretold to him actually
came to pass. For two days he had advanced
with a favorable wind between the firm fields of
ice, when the weather changed, the wind veered
round, many cakes of ice were broken off from
the monstrous mass, and before they had per-
ceived it shut up the return for the ship.

1”
126 Winter th Spirzneraen.

Jutia. And so the heaps of ice dashed the
ship in pieces ?
FaTHer. No! this was not the case. It was
a special favor of divine Providence that these
masses of ice did not press close together, but
rather kept an open space between them, and so
formed, as it were, a little sea in which the ‘ship
sailed about an in an inclosed basin. Thus the
poor men were now shut up as ina prison, For
miles the inclosing dam extended itself’; the ice
continued to increase, the inner space was ever
growing smaller, and a return was not to be
thought of. To add to their desperation a thick
fog extended itself over the whole region, in
which they could hardly see the length of the
ship. Now the captain repented of his folly.
Now, first, he felt how unjustly he had treated
himself and those under him, but it was now too
late, After many days the fog dispersed, the air
was clear, the sky was serene, and they observed
that the space in which the ship moved had again
considerably decreased. Then the ship’s company
concluded to send some out to explore whether
they could not discover some land near, or find
even a place in which they could reach the open
sea over the ice, and at least be able to convey
a boat thither. Two men armed and furnished
‘ith food, left the ship. Fortunately they chan-
d to take the course in which, after the march
Winter tn Sprrzperces. 137

of some miles, they actually reached land, and
found in a hollow a hut fallen away. Joyfully
they hastened back to the ship, and brought to
the crew the glad news, that they were distant
only a few miles either from the northern coast
of Norway, or from Nova Zembla. If this was
really the case they could easily reach land in
well-known regions, and from hence without
great trouble get back to their native country.
The shipgwas now fastened in the still basin, and,
provided with many necessaries, the crew betook
themselves for the landnear by. The first thing
which the captain did was to take the height
and breadth of the land, and then he found to his
great horror, that here was no“Norway, or Nova
Zembla; but that they were on the wild and
inhospitable island of Spitzbergen.. This discov-
ery threw the whole ship's company into the
deepest consternation ; they felt that the cause of
their misfortune was owing solely and alone to
the captain’s proud self‘will, and, therefore, they
loaded him with the bitterest reproaches. .

Marra. But what good could that do?

FaTHER, So they soon thought, especially
when they saw how much the captain suffered,
They felt that it would be far better to aid each
other in their hard fate,

Max. But were they then really so unhappy?
For did notsometimes aship come into that region?
128 Winter 1n Srirzpercen.

FatHer. It now frequently happens, but at
that time scarcely ever, and those northern re-
gions were more unknown than the interior of
Africa. But to proceed :—

They willingly pardoned the captain, promised
him a new obedience, and concluded to remain
here and to make the best arrangements they
could. They therefore began to unload the
whale-ship; even the hull itself, the stern, the
quarter-deck, mast and sail, were taken off and
brought on a sled over the smooth ice to the
land. The before-discovered hut waz put into a
better state, and this, together with the cavern
close by it was enlarged into a cellar, and thus
now the poor men were obliged to spend their
days in this zone so near the North Pole.

Jutta. And they were not rescued—not
taken off?

Farner. No! The unfortunates here ended
their lives, and none of them knew in what
place or corner of the earth their ashes rested.
There were eleven men, who died one after
another, without again seeing their friends. The
last of them, even he whom our three friends had
buried, was the captain himself, who had the sad
but certainly not undeserved, fate to be obliged
to survive all his crew, who had been rendered
so unfortunate through his folly, and to bury
them.
WiInwtER In SprITzBERGEN. 129

Maria. How could he have managed with
regard to the last corpse?

Morner. Who can decide?

FatHer. These unfortunate men spent five
years here: the journal concluded with the ac-
count of the captain's own sickness. Probably
he soon fell into a dangerous illness, and doubtless
hunger, thirst, or want of care hastened the
death of the unhappy man. Besides, the deceas-
ed, with the exception of his self-will, must have
been a good, brave, and especially a pious man.
Many expressions in his paper prove this, as
well as that all had spent their days in great
good feeling, and particularly in the greatest in-
dustry.

Gustavus. That is well. I would do so in
such a situation |

MorHer, You are not under the necessity of
waiting for such a fate, as you find opportunity
everywhere to subdue your selfishness and be
complaisant and affable.

Max. I wish I had the papers. They con-
tain certainly the best information respecting the
state of the country.

FaTHER. Yes, indeed. The captain himself
was a very well-educated and informed man,
who observed everything accurately, and had
pointed out every peculiarity of the country in
which he was compelled to live, for hisown and
130 Winter IN SpirzBEeRGeEN.

for the instruction of others, by which means
he became extremely useful to our three friends,
Ivan, Gregory, and the pilot. Nothing there
was wanting with respect to the situation and
condition of the country; not only the small
plants growing there were carefully described, but
also he accurately distinguished the place where
they were to be found, and the time in which
they were to be sought. They found, too, ac-
counts of the beasts, and the best instructions
how to master them. Every cave, and every
fountain was marked out, and even a map of the
district beautifully drawn lay among the papers.
The man had employed his time excellently.

Still further! For any unfortunates who
might after him be cast in this waste, desolate
region, he had also set forth rules in respect to
their health and subsistence,

MorHER. Was there not arule among these,
that they should take rest at the proper time,

FATHER. Certainly.

MorHER. For, dear father, you are not the
first to set aside this rule. It is near midnight;
to-morrow evening we can find ourselves again
in Spitzbergen, Then we will examine every-
thing accurately.

Gustavus. I should be glad to do it now.

MorHER. It is a good thing to have a recess,
Good night.
Girth Earning.

Ir is a very pleasant: business for active and
industrious children to place themselves, in their
thoughts, in those situations in which they can
show their industry, and use their activity.
They imagine themselves in the situation of the
person of whom they have heard or read, they
arrange busily everything which seems to them
needful, and they feel in their imagining, as hap-
py and joyous as if they had really arranged,
what they have only done so in their thoughts.
Tt was precisely thus with the four children, in
respect to the story thus far, of Ivan's and his
friends’ misfortunes. They knew not that these
unfortunate people were in possession of many
things to supply their wants, and now they
made a comparison of them with Robinson Cru-
soe and Friday, as these latter, by means of the
vessel which stranded near their shore, came
into possession of almost everything which they
had before needed.

Every one of the children advised, according
182 Winter tn SPitzpeRGenN.

to his view and inclination, what appeared to him
the most important and necessary. Max held
to it that it would be best first of all to become
accurately acquainted with the island, to exam-
ine it with the paper and the map, in order to
discover the most remarkable things.—Gustavus
maintained it to be more suitable to take a gun
and sword, and by means of these first to secure
for themselves quiet from the wild beasts, before
they thought of anything else-—Maria was of the
opinion, that they should enlarge the whole dwell-
ing, and place themselves in such a situation,
that they could at any time receive a visit with-
out being put to the blush.—‘ All that is fine,
and very well!” said Julia, “but I would first
have taken care of the kitchen and cellar: first
of all provide the means of living; the other
would afterwards have been attended to.” Gus-
tavus soon came to her opinion, for the subject
of food was one of the most important things in
his view. Every one of the children, had his
reasons by which he proved his opinion, They
painted everything in such fair colors, that our
friends could no more be regarded as unfortu-
nate, and it almost seemed, as if they were them-
selves desirous of going to Spitzbergen. One
sought to outvie the other in the enumeration of
the advantages of this residence, and every one
believed the three friends would be the most
WIntrR In SpITzBERGER. 138

happy if they followed his advice. The whole
discussion was managed, and the contest connect-
ed therewith was carried on most pleasantly and
kindly, as is the case always with children well-
brought up.

Now the clock struck the hour in which their
father was wont to go on with the story, and as
he now entered the room, accompanied by their
mother, he found the children in the most glad-
some humor.

FatHER. Now then! You are right merry
and happy |!

Maria. Yes, we have to-day special reasons
for being so.

FaTHer. And why to-day in particular? I
thought you always had reasons for joy.

Marta. We have been thinking how our
friends at Spitzbergen had begun to be truly for-
tunate. So we have, according to our best knowl-
edge, been setting in order their whole house-
hold affairs.

JULIA. And this makes us so merry.

FatHer. Very well. But I must tell you,
your friends were anything but merry; on the
contrary, they were so sad that they were cast
down to despair as they never had been.

Gustavus. But why was this?

_ Marta, Probably they found fewer comforts
than they had expected ?
12
134 WINTER IN SPITzBERGEN.

FaTHer. No, that was not the matter, they
found more than they looked for, a great many
things which might be very useful to them. It
was an entirely different thing which drove all
their peace from their heart.

Jutta. I should like to know what it could
be! You said, dear father, that they found
more than they looked for.

FatHer, I hoped you would yourself dis-
cover it. The history of those eleven unfortu-
nate Hollanders must naturally have had a very
painful effect on the feelings of their hearts, and
the quiet of their minds. The question would
force itself on them, “ Will it be better or other-
wise with us than with those unfortunates?
Shall not we, as well as they, be forsaken and
forgotten by all the world, and be obliged to end
our sorrowful days here?” “

To this serious question the thought was added,
“What might not that unfortunate man, whose
corpse we buried, have undergone and suffered
in his loneliness before friendly death freed him
from his woes? Who of us will be the last?
What sufferings shall we first have to endure?
Who will give him a helping hand in sickness,
and share with him in his last struggle of death ?”
You see, my dear children, these were questions
which might make the stoutest heart to tremble.

Even the old pilot became disquieted ; peace
Winter 1n SPITZBERGEN. 135

fled from his heart, and that calm composure
with which he had hitherto borne all his unex-
pected misfortune, vanished from his mind. Sadly
sat the brave man, together with his sorrowful
and downcast companions in calamity. None
of them cast a look further on the paper; no
one troubled himself further as to its contents.
They looked with indifference on the newly-dis-
covered supply of household stores, and with
contempt onthe hut and cavern. They called
their friends happy who had perished in the
waves, or on the wreck in the ice. They had
escaped and now were over with their sufferings ;
they probably had a dreadful moment of dying,
but it was only a moment, while to themselves,
as it seemed, there yet remained years of suffer-
ing to be endured. Every prospect of deliver-
ance had vanished, for they could not count on
a miracle.

Maria. But, dear father, they did wrong in
this conduct.

Moruer. And so much the more wrongly, as
they must have known that persons had already
begun to undertake longer voyages into the
region of the North Pole. How easy it was for
a ship to come hither.

FaTHEerR. Very true, our friends did wrong :
but they areexcusable. You must take men only
as they are, and not as they should be. Misfor-
136 Winter In SprrzBERGEN.

tune and sorrow affect every one, and especially
at the first moment. Man then sees nothing but
his misfortune, and the picture of a sorrowful
future banishes all hope, and drives all peace
from his heart.

But soon the unfortunate collects himself again,
and new hope springs up in his soul. Instead of
distressful fear there enters enlivening confidence
in the help of Almighty God, and the more
innocent and the better a man is the sooner he
recovers his courage. The pilot was the first to
come out of his despondency. He had more ex-
perience in the world than both of his younger
friends. .A long course of years had taught him,
that no misfortune is so great as fear makes the
same appear to usin the first moment; he had in
his varied life, full of danger, often enough ex-
perienced that God's compassion never leaves the
unhappy wholly without means of aid, and that
the man acts in the wisest manner, and provides
for his peace, when he carefully notices the good
left to him, and leaves its result, which lies not
in his power, to the guidance of his Creator.

In the midst of his deep anguish, the pilot
recollected the comforting words of the Bible,
“T will not leave thee nor forsake thee.” These
beautiful, tranquillizing words a friend had once
uttered to him as he stood beside the grave of his
parents ; and as he at that time had experienced
Winter 1x Sritzrerreex. 187

their consoling power, so they were not want-
ing now in their beneficial effect upon him. In-
spirited by new courage he roused up.

“ Friends!” he began, “it is not our fault that
we are here in this barren spot of the earth; the —
prosecution of our business has brought us here.
But we have sinned against God and ourselves,
when we lost confidence in God, and allowed our
spirits to sink. Up to the work! We must
thus think of rendering our lot as tolerable as
possible. We will labor; this is the surest
means to conquer our disagreeable feelings.”

“You are right,” replied Gregory; “ but what
shall we do first ?”

“We will search through the whole cavern.

This is indeed in itself a business which will
divert us, and certainly we shall discover many
things which are of great value.”
_ With these words the pilot took the lamp, and -
scarcely had he advanced a few steps before he
cried out, “Did I not tell you we should find
many useful things ?”

Maria. And what did he then discover?

FatHerR.
which, although it had not been used for a long
time, yet was in the best condition. “A beau-
tiful article,” said the old pilot, examining the
lantern, “we will put it into a stand, and it will
give us essentialservice!” Some handful of dried

12*
138 Winter In SpiTzRERGEN.

moss and leaves, that they found in the cavern,
cleaned and soon polished the lantern. The
pilot's handkerchief furnished a wick, bear's fat
supplied the place of oil; and in a few minutes
the beautiful ship's lantern, clear as crystal, hung
at the entrance, giving light to the hut and
cavern,

“Our former inhabitants here must have been
industrious and active men,” said the pilot, look-
ing around him; “ they have labored and en-
larged the place here finely.” “ And if I do not
err,” Ivan interrupted him, “there are some
chests yonder, which probably contain many
things that may be useful to us!” In fact they
found three chests, which, furnished with pad-
locks, stood ona platform, and were soon opened
by the aid of an axe.

Maria, And what did they find in them?

FaTHER. One of these chests must have be-
longed to the captain or some other voyager of
eonsequence, ‘hey found a considerable store
of fine shirts, linen cloth, and articles of dress.

Gustavus. A valuable booty !

Maria. But had they a right to take posses-
sion without anything further?

Gustavus, Why, whataquestion! Was not
our friend in need of them?

Marta. Whether this, however, gave him a
right, I do not know; nor whether Ivan and
Winter tn SprirzBERGEN. 139

his friends generally had the right to look on
everything which they found there as their prop:

sili Here indeed they hada right. But
not because they needed the articles—for other-
wise any one who finds anything could retain it
under such a pretence—but for other reasons.
Max, what do you think they were?

Max. I believe, they ought to consider them-
selves as the lawful possessors of the articles
found, because they belonged to no one. If
they remained here they were of no use to any
one; and in time they would have been destroyed.

JULIA. It was here as in the case of the ship
from which Robinson Crusoe took possession of
everything he wanted. The ship was wrecked,
no man was to be found on it, the next storm
would have split it in pieces, and the things would
have been lost.

FaTHER. This view is correct. As for our
friends there was no obligation further, than that
if they ever came among other men, they should
seek out the captain's heirs and repay the value
of what they had found and used. From our
friends’ honest mode of thinking, it may be sup-
posed that they did not think of doing otherwise.

Besides, they found many pieces of money,
and solid gold, which as it was, in their present

state of circumstances, utterly useless, they allowed
140 WINTER IN BPITZBERGEN.

to lie untouched. For this reason, they were
yet more rejoiced at the contents of another
chest. There they found mathematical and
other instruments, a number of books, and among
these two, the sight of which filled the old pilot
with the greatest delight. With tears of the
most thankful joy, he pressed these books—a
Russian bible, and a Russian hymn-book—to his
heart. How they should have come into the cap-
tain’s chest (as he was a Hollander) they could
none of them conceive. But the good pilot saw
in this a proof, that God would not forsake him,
but by his word, would maintain confidence in
his heart, and fix it deeper there.

MorHer. And in this faith, the honest man
was right. Here no one could say that blind
chance governed events.

FatHeR. The little business of unpacking the
chests, which wore away some hours, had this
advantage, that our friends were thereby divert-
ed from their troubled thoughts, and became
much more cheerful. Indeed, Gregory, whose
more lively spirit a slight circumstance would
immediately put into a joyful mood, brought his
friend Ivan so far, that he with him, put on the
Captain's uniform, and even the pilot himself
was obliged to admit that it fitted, and became
them both very well.

Besides these things, they found still another
Winter 1n Srirzpercren. 141

chest, which was filled with tea and sugar, as
also a little keg of tobacco.

JuLiA. But, father, the owner must, in that
ease, have been a very good economist, to have
left, after so many years, such a supply.

FaTHER. Certainly. Besides, we may sup-
pose that the stores brought, must have been
very considerable, and several of the unfortu-
nates may have died soon after their arrival.
Further, the pilot found many cups, and cans,
and kettle.

Jutra, Then a tea-drinking was not long
wanting |

FaTHER. So too thought the merry Gregory.
A cup of tea, a darling drink with sailors, appear-
ed to him too agreeable a thing, and he was not
long in reminding his friends of it. There was
wanting only one indispensable thing, namely,
water. Gregory offered to go to the fountain,
which, as you know, gushed out of the rock in
the valley. So he hastened there, but he came
back, quickly and completely troubled.

Max, Now?—What was the matter once
more?

.FarHer, Gregory had scarcely opened the
door of the hut, than he observed the most
dreadful storm which he had ever known. The
snow came down in thick masses; the trench
which surrounded the hut, was already entirely
143 WiInTER IN SpPirzBERGEN.

filled with snow heaps, and the snow continually
fell in such immense quantities, that it seemed
as if the whole valley would be covered, and the
hut itself, with the inhabitants, would be buried
under the mass. Fearfully howled the tempest
over the valley, and the masses of snow were
hurled, roaring and dashing together, from the
neighboring rocks.

Max. How came this frightful storm to burst

,out so all at once?

FatHer. It is commonly connected in those
regions with the entrance of the half-year’s night ;
and it was exactly on this day, that the sun for
the first time in the year, did not rise above the
horizon. That night had now begun, and it
began the more gloomy, as the thick, and full
snow clouds hindered the faint twilight of the
heaven from being seen. In these circumstances,
Gregory could not think of carrying into execu-
tion his plan; he had by his rashness exposed
himself to the greatest danger of his life. Had
he gone to that valley, how could be have found
his way back again? The storm would have
blown him off from the ridge of the mountain,
or he would have pitched inf@an abyss, and been
lost without any rescue. This consideration,
however, frightened him less; but how must he
have felt at the moment, when in the feeble
twilight he saw, only a few steps off from him,
‘WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN. 148

a& monstrous black bear, which, roaring and
growling, was making his way through the trench
to the side on which the hut stood !

Gustavus. He wished to find some tea, or
perhaps, would invite some of his fellows to it.
But did not Gregory boldly attack him?

FaTHer. What! unarmed as he was? This
would have been the utmost madness, and have
placed his life evidently in the greatest danger.
Who then could accuse him of cowardice, when
he, already startled greatly by the frightful
weather, was utterly discomposed by the appear-
ance of the beast? His friends were not much
less affrighted when with troubled countenance
he returned back to the hut, and told of the un-
bidden guest. As usually was the case, the old
pilot was the first to recover himself. “ We can-
not alter the weather,” said he, ‘we must take
that as it comes; as for Sir Shaggy-coat, the bear,
we must set ourselves to work to put an end to
him, if we do not wish to have more guests of the
same sort.” Without saying anything further, he
took his gun standing in the hut, opened the
door, and came out at the right moment to see
how the bear had almost clambered up on the
margin of the trench, and his body was already
half over it. A single spring and the guest
would have reached the door. Then the resolute
pilot approached, fired, and the next moment the
144 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

beast, struck by the ball, sunk bleeding to the
ground,

Max. Was he dead?

FatTuer. That the brave marksman could
not know, and it would have been most unpar-
donable for him to have taken it for granted.
In order to be certain in the matter, he drew out
his long pocket knife, and cut the monster's throat
as he now lay in the trench.

Besides this shot, the report of which rung
through the open door of the hut, and penetra-
ted even to the inmost portions of the cavern,
gave occasion to an important discovery. Ivan,
who was loading his gun, and stood at the en-
trance, heard how the report like a rolling peal
of thunder, struck on the walls of the cavern,
and for a considerable time reverberated, and
then died away gradually at some distance. He
justly concluded, therefore, that the cavern, be-
fore the entrance of which stood the hut, must
run far under the rocky mountain. This view
he imparted to his friends, who were naturally
of the same opinion. From this opinion they
drew another conclusion. It might be supposed
that the former inhabitants, accurately acquaint-
ed with this cavern, had arranged and used it,
and hence too it was to be expected that
many things would be found here, by the pos-
session of which the condition of our friends
WinTER In SPITZBERGEN. 145

would be considerably bettered. They there-
fore concluded to undertake a close investiga-
tion of the cavern, as, besides, the weather
made every sort of business in the open air
impossible,

“But once more!” said the pilot, “we must
first bring in our prey into safety; otherwise
there might be a guest to take charge of him |”
So they all three of them went out to the
trench, in which lay the bear covered up by
the snow, without piving a sign of life. It cost
them indeed much trouble to heave up the beast
over the margin of the trench; but they work-
ed with united strength, and finally accom-
plished it, and carried the bear into the hut,
where they skinned him, and cut up the flesh.
“Now,” said the pilot, after they had ended this
work, “our booty will last us for some weeks;
and Heaven will further take care of us. We
shall not die of hunger!” .

Gustavus. This man pleases me more and
more on account of his courageous spirit.

MorHer. And me still more, because he is
constant in his feelings, so active, and yet joins
to it so unbounded a confidence in God, It is
a noble thing when a man so thinks and acta!

FaTHer. And in this situation precisely,
the poor men needed most this confidence in
God,

13
146 Winter tn SpirzpeRGeEn.

After they were somewhat rested from the
severe labor, they went about that other busi-
ness, of which they promised themselves such ,
great success—to search through the cavern. -
Every one of them took with him a burning
lamp—they had found many articles of this
kind, among the things left by the former in-
habitants—-his tinder-box, and an axe; for their
guns they did not need in this business.

Like a large desolate church or hall, the cav-
ern extended before them; high stout pillars,
formed naturally from the rock, projected into
the cavern, which bore up the roof of the broad
vault, almost out of the reach of sight. The
floor was smooth and covered with sand, and
many footprints showed that the former inhabi-
itants must have been very busy in this cavern.

The rock itself consisted of the hardest gran-
ite, some places in it shone glittering, others
were covered by a dark obscurity, and the shad-
ows of our friends showed themselves in pecu-
liar shapes and forms, on the bare stone of the
walls. But what attracted the special notice of
the explorérs, was the sight of many remains of
reindeer, which lay gathered up in a corner.

Maria. Why! was this so very remarkable?
These remains were certainly thrown there by
the former inhabitants.

Fatner. True. But even this made the
Winter tn SpPirzBerGen. 147

matter worth their attention. The reindeer is
the greatest blessing, for the inhabitants of those
higher northern regions, It is used, as the horse
is with us, for drawing burdens and for travel;
its flesh is an extremely nutritious food, its milk
yields butter and cheese, its hide and even its
entrails are of use. All these things occurred
especially to the pilot. He concluded, and very
justly, that the former inhabitants must have had
many of these beasts,—and now arose—Julia,
what wish was it?”

Junta, ‘To have a stable full of these, as
tame animals.

FaTHer. Good. This would have given
many fine pieces of meat, many pans of milk,
and many pieces of butter.

Maria. And then these beasts would afford
(what yet must be considered) much labor and
work,

FaTHER. Very well observed. In short,
there were so many things, which the pilot rec-
ollected. But there was always wanting the
principal thing, and this was?—

JuLia. The reindeer itself. “

Faruer, Yet they at least had the advantage
of being able to speak and hope about it, that
they would, in time, come into the possession
of some such useful beasts, They had still
one hope further, and this is worth much for an
148 Winter in SpirzperGen.

unfortunate person. He then becomes more
cheerful, and goes with more lively industry to
his work.

Our friends were now at the end of the cav-
ern, where it showed no further way out of it;
but Gregory observed a cleft, which run dark
and obscure into the rock. Small stones lay at
the entrance, and it seemed as if this hollow
had never been entered, for the stones lay so
wildly on each other, that they could only
mount them with trouble. “We must know
what there is here!” said Gregory, while he
clambered up the stones, and both of the others
followed him. The cellar went down steep, into
which our friends were obliged to descend as
into a mountain, some rolling stones became
loose at every step, carmed away with them a
quantity of smaller stones; and with a dreadful
noise rolled into the depth, made caution doubly
necessary, especially as they did not know how
deep the bottom, which run on at one side, might
be. The prudent pilot recommended the great-
est vare. But they had only advanced a few
steps, when all at onee a new hollow showed
itself; with the greatest caution they wound
themselves under the overhanging parts of the
rock, when suddenly Gregory going ahead made
a false step, and Ivan in his desire to save his
friend got on a stone lying loose, went down
WINTER In SPitzBERGEN. 149

with it and pulled after him the pilot, to whom
he reached out his hand, in order by his aid
to gain a firm footing. At this moment there
arose a dreadful crash, That loosened stone
was the foundation of a large piece of rock; it
tumbled after them, shut up.the entrance of the
hollow, and covered up our friends,
13*
Senenth Euruing.

Tue children had not expected so lamenta-
ble a conclusion of the history of their friends.

“Nol” said Gustavus, the next morning, “I
had not thought of that. The most I was afraid
of was, that the poor men in the cavern would
have been thoroughly affrighted by finding a
corpse, or perhaps might meet with a bear and
her family, with which they came into a bloody
fight,

JuLIA. Or that some other adventure might
have come upon them, which would have great-
ly tried their courage.

Maria. I too, never once feared any such
thing. I believed that they would make a re-
markable discovery, perhaps find a cavern, like
those we read of, which would be worth some
exertion and pains,

Jutta. But that the poor men should be
killed in such a way.—

Max. That is not yet certain.
Winter tn SrPirzBERGEN. 151

JuLia. I hope that they may yet come to see
the daylight once more,

Max. Certainly they will. Or whence could
father know about their story? No one but
they were present when they were searching —
into the cavern.

JuLIA. You are right, dear Max. Do you
not remember how father told us about Robinson
Crusoe ? How he was once so sick on the island,
that he lost all sense, and yet was all at once
cured and restored in mind?

Max. Yes, I recollect it, and this makes me
hope that we shall see our three friends again in
good condition. But some days must pass be-
fore we know, Father rode away to-day, for
several days.

Gustavus. O what aloss tous? I should
be so glad just now to know the end of this ad-
venture.

Max had spoken correctly. Circumstances
and business had rendered it necessary for. their
father to take this journey, which he set out
upon the same day. But that during his ab-
sence, the children scarcely thought of anything
else, or spoke of anything else, than their unfor-
tunate friends, need scarcely be said. They
dreamed the whole night of them, and in sym-
pathy felt all the tortures of the unhappy men,
because they took the liveliest interest in their
152 Winter tn Spirzeercen.

dreadful fate. “If only one of them had re-
mained behind,” said Maria, “then could he
have taken means to rescue his friends.”

Gustavus. It must have been the old pilot,
then.

JuLiA. He would have met with difficulties.

Max. To be sure he would. How could he
remove the flat rock, where could he have got a
tree, a ladder, or a rope?

Gustavus. That, I do not indeed know, but
the pilot would have set his wits to work for it.
How did our neighbor do, when a year since, his
house was on fire below him? He let himself
down by his contrivance made of linen cloth.

Marta. Yes, but where could the pilot get this?

Gustavus. I think there were some lying in
the Captain’s chest.

Maria. If the poor men who had tumbled
down, only had a light!

Gustavus. And something to keep them
alive. But why do we puzzle our heads about
the matter! Our father will take good care that
the three poor men will come to light again.

Finally, after four long days, their father so
much desired, came back. With pleasant greet-
ings, the children hastened to meet him; they
were the more confident as they could give him
proof, that they had been obedient and industri-
ous while he was gone.
WantTer In Srirzpercen. 153

With the greatest longing, they looked for-
ward to the time, in which their father accord-
ing to his custom took his seat with them, and
by his stories, was used to shorten the long
winterevenings. To-day, the children were even
comparatively indifferent for a description of his
journey, important as at other times even so
. little an event as such a journey was to them.
The account of the three friends was more im-
portant to them than anything else.

The supper was taken, and at the usual place
already stood their father’s chair. Maria and
Julia sat with their knitting, near their mother,
while Max and Gustavus were occupied in cover-
ing their books. All were silent, and waited
earnestly, for their father to begin his story.
Finally the time appeared to the quick Gustavus,
dgomewhat too long.

“We have very often thought of Spitzbergen,”
he began.

JuLia. And the three poor imprisoned men !

Marta. I have dreamed of them, and in my.
dream have suffered with them their deathlike
anguish, )

Max. We have also contended whether the
poor men were saved, and how?

FatTuer, And all this is to help me keep in
mind of it? Is it not so, you wish the continu-
ation of this story ?
154.0 Winter 1n SPirzBERGEN.

ALL. Oh yes, father, pray do tell us more!

That the father willingly yielded to the wish
of his good children, no assurance can be needed.
“Very well then, let us go on. We left our
three friends in our story—"

Gustavus. Thrown down, and shut up in
the vault.

FaTHER. True. Now we will go on, and
relate further how it fared with them. The
situation of these unfortunate men, was the
most frightful which can be conceived. The
perils which they had undergone in shipwreck,
or the fight with the wild bears, was nothing in
comparison toit. Surrounded by the veriest dark-
ness of night, they lay in a swoon, resembling
death. The pains which the pilot felt, and his
bruised body, from his fall on the pointed and
hard stones, brought him back to life, and con-
vinced him that he was not dreaming. Now he
recovered himself; he remembered the horrible
occurrence, and called loudly the name of his
friends. The echo of his voice sounded in the
empty vault, but no human voice answered.
He called yet once more,—all remained still as
inthe grave. The poor man heard nothing but
the rolling out of a stone into the bottomless
depth. “ Almighty God!” prayed he, in this
dreadful moment, “have pity on me, and my
unfortunate friends! W cannot help ourselye~!”
Winter in Srirznpercen. 155

Then he heard, not far from himself, a groan-
ing, and gasping, as if it was the last sigh of a
dying man. He called out once more, but re-
ceived no answer. Tis distress rose with every
beating of his pulse, but his courage, his trust
in God, did not wholly forsake him. With the
greatest caution, he crept along on the rugged
surface, over the sharp pointed stones, at every
step fecling before him with his hands, and ex-
amining the dangerous bottom, on which he had
carefully crept forth. Then all at once, his hand
touched a fearful monster grown over with strong
bristles and hair, which moved itself under his
trembling hand.

Juu1a, Why father, how you frighten us!
Do tell us what it could be.

FaTrHer. The old pilot—and you know that he
did not belong to the fearful sort—was so greatly
frightened, that he trembled, and the hair rose
upon his head; a cold sweat of anguish stood on
his brow, and some minutes passed before he
could recover himself again.

Maria. And now ?—

FaTHER. His courage returned again; yet
once more he cautiously laid hold of the un-
known monster, in order to know what it was.
But think of the horror of the poor man, when
he caught on the ice-cold hand of a dead man.
Horrified heshrunk back, for the frightful thought

«
156 WINTER IN SriTzBERGEN.

came upon him, that this monster had torn in
pieces, and eaten up a man, and the hand merely,
was left of the dreadful and horrible meal.

Maria. Oh no! father, that is too horrible!
We could almost wish—

Gustavus. Father has not said it was so.
It was not true, was it?

FatHer. Now his own death seemed certain,
and this belief inspired him with courage, which
a desperate man often feels when misfortune can
go no further. With firm composure he seized
upon it, and—

Gustavus. Now?

FatHer, And seized upon Ivan’s knapsack,
which was made of a badger’s skin.

Gustavus. But how inthe world came Ivan's
knapsack there? .

FatHer. In the most natural manner possi-
ble, as Ivan, by a fortunate accident, had taken
with him his knapsack well furnished with pro-
visions, when setting out on this exploring ex-
pedition. Ivan was still more stunned by the
fall than the old pilot, who the moment that he
stumbled on the companion of his misfortune,
did not think of the knapsack, Now the young
man was recovered; it was to him, as if he
had awaked from a heavy dream, and could with
difficulty collect his thoughts. The pilot's first
WINTER In SpPiTzBERGeEN, 157

question was after Gregory, but Ivan knew
nothing respecting him.

“Tf we only had a light!” said the pilot. “I
have a tinder box,” was Ivan’s answer. “ But
what good will that do, as the lamp has fallen
out of my hand?” Only give me the tinder
box,” answered the pilot, “I will strike a light,
probably it will help us to see to find the lamp
again,”

The spark gave merely a momentary and a
more blinding, than a brightened light; but it
was still clear enough for the quick-sighted Ivan
to notice the lamp lying close by him. It was
a still more fortunate circumstance, that it was
not broken, and that the bear’s fat used instead
of oil had not fallen out with the wick.

Jutta. Thank God! What could the poor
creatures have done, caught there in that pitch-
dark hole |! ;

FaTHEerR. Certainly, they must have all three
miserably perished. Now they kindled the lamp;
a great part of their terror left them, the hearts
of the unfortunates became lighter, and new
hopes rose up in their souls, They could now
avoid many dangers, which they had not observed
in the darkness,

Maria. But, father, where then was Greg-
ory?

FaTHER. There was no trace to be discovered

14
158 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

of this unfortunate man, and in vain Ivan called
out his name. To seek for him, both of them
went down by the glimmer of the lamp, burning
more obscurely in the heavy air, and finally
found the missing one, stunned by affright and his
fall, sitting with a bloody face behind a piece of
rock. Withaloudcry of joy, but also of horror,
Ivan caught hold of his unfortunate friend, who
could not for a long time recover himself. The
care of the pilot, who washed the wounded man’s
face with the contents of the bottle of brandy,
finally brought him back to life. He had heard
nothing of the conversation of his two friends,
and even the kindling of the lamp had not been
noticed by him, so much had he been stunned
by the hard fall. Now he came to himeelf.

JULIA. But the two others, I suppose, re-
proached him severely? He had at least de-
served it. ;

FATHER. Yes, he had indeed. But of what
use would this have been?

MorHer. And would you have reproached
him in that dreadful condition? Gregory was,
it is true, to blame for this misfortune; but had
he done it with the purpose of making himself
and his friends so unhappy? The joy of find-
ing him again would not allow of reproaches.

FaTHEeR. Very true. In such times, a man
easily forgets and forgives. Now when Gregory
WiIntTER tn SpirzBERGEN. 159

was fully restored, they immediately thought of
what was the most necessary of all—to find a
way out of the hole. All three of them were
rejoiced that not one of them had received any
peculiar injury; for the little punishment which
Gregory had met with, a bruise on his forehead,
and a slight bleeding at the nose, did not amount
to much, and might also be a warning to him for
the future. Instead of any reproaches which
would here have been useless, they therefore
only thought of deliverance, heartily glad that
not one of them had broken an arm or a leg.
What would they have done in the case of such
‘a misfortune? Now they looked on their fright-
ful abode in its full terrors. Think of a rugged,
rocky declivity covered with loose rolling stones,
and separated from an abyss, the depth of which
could not be measured by the feeble glimmer
of the light; think of all this, being surrounded
by the thickest, blackest darkness, in which the
three poor wanderers, helplessly sought deliver-
ance from the dangers of this place, of which
they had not the slightest knowledge, and you
have a picture of the situation of our unfortunate
friends, The first things which they now did,
was to mount up again on the height in order
to make an effort to raise up the flat stone which
shut up the entrance of the hole: but this was
labor in vain. The ground on which they stood,
160 Winter In SpirzBERGEX.

was too loose, they could not plant so firm a
footstep on the stones lying loose, as was required
in order to lift up such a load.

Now when all their attempts were useless their
distress rose to the highest degree: they sawa
certain death before them. The heavy air of the
vault, and its mouldy smell, rendered it hard for
them to breathe, and increased their death-like
anguish, Noone spokea word, But once more
they tried to lift that piece of rock weighing many
hundred weight. It was all in vain!

“We cannot stir the stone from its place,” said
the pilot, with a distressed and broken voice.
“Tf we find no other way out, this hole must be
our grave.” Neither Ivan nor Gregory replied.
Both were the more in doubt of their deliverance
as they observed the pilot’s trouble, and from
long acquaintance with him they knew, that when
he despaired, every one else must lose his cou-
rage.

Gustavus. But the brave pilot will become
restored to himself again ?

Farner, That this was the case, you may
expect from such a tried man; but that his spirit
must have been heavy, a single glance at the
horrors which might be seen, clearly showed.

* But,” continued the good pilot, “ we will not
allow our courage wholly to fail; let us go on
and do what lies in our power, God, who sees
Winter tn Sprrzpercen. 161

us, will help us. If we can only find a trace
that this dreadful hole was well known to our
predecessors, then must we somewhere be able to
find our way out,”

Maria. Was he right in the matter?

FaTHER. Strictly speaking, he was not. Some
person might have happened here and have per-
ished without finding a way out. The pilot also
was, probably, himself not fully convinced, and he
said it only in order to keep up in the hearts of his
friends, hope and presence of mind, or he wished
to render them the more observing of everything.

By a fortunate accident the pilot also found
his lamp again. So that they had two lights
burning, the flame of which was kept up by the
bear’s grease taken by Ivan. “ And now let us
go forward in God's name,” said the pilot; upon
which all three of them slowly and carefully went
forward on the rough slope beneath the frightful
overhanging cliffs.

They might have gone on some hundred paces
in this way, sometimes with more and sometimes
with less danger, when they noticed that the
bottom or floor changed to a smooth even sur-
face, and that instead of the deep subterranean
abyss, rocks and cliffs showed themselves, which
were formed on both sides into wondrous shapes.
The bottom was sandy, and in this sand could
clearly be seen the prints of human footsteps,

14*
162 Winter tn SpirzeerGen.

The observing pilot first noticed this. A treas-
ure of millions of money would not have caused
him so much joy as here did the print of a man’s
footstep in the sand. All three of them felt the
value of this new hope, and with brighter hearts
they proceeded into the passage, which led direct-
ly through the rocks, when all at once they heard
the rippling of water dropping down, and at the
same time felt a hardly perceptible draught of
air on their faces.

Gustavus. Was this then ofany consequence?

Faruer. It was everything in the situation in
which the poor men were placed. Already the
fact that, instead of the heavy damp air of the
vault, which only increased their pain, an enli-
vening fresh air blew on them, was of great
value to them; but still more the hope which it
raised in them that here they would find a way
out, must have been most quickening to the poor
men. They went on more composedly in the
path, and to their inexpressible joy the footprints
became more and more easily to be recognized
and plainer. Then they came all at once toa
spring of water clear as crystal, which fell plash-
ing over the margin of the basin, and lost itself
in a fissure in the rock, “Thanks to thee,
Almighty, for this blessing,” cried out the pilot.
“We have now indeed found what was the most
needful of all to us, fresh spring water!" In full
Winter 1x SPmITzBERGEN. 163

draughts the thirsty wanderers refreshed them-
selves with the precious drink; they felt them-
selves pervaded by a new power, and the way out
of this hole became the more certain to them, as
they clearly saw, that the hand of man had dam-
med in the spring with stones and moss, and had
cut out for the water which ran over a channel
in the rocky bottom, Thus they proceeded on
their way revived, and all at once they came up
to a coarsely wrought-out wooden door. It ap-
peared to be fast bolted, and it was with the
greatest exertion only that they succeeded in open-
ing it, A high heap of sand which lay on the
opposite side before the door had rendered the
opening of it so difficult. But how astonished
were our friends!

Gustavus. Did they see another gray-headed
man who put them in such terror?

FaTHER. No! their astonishment was of a
more joyful kind. The place in which they found
themselves had a well-known look tothem. They
must already. have been here, and finally—who
can portray their delight !—they recognized that
they were in one of the divisions of their hut, at
first hastily examined. Tears of joy burst from
their eyes; they fell into each other's arms, and
felicitated each other in seeing themselves thus
rescued, Their safety appeared to them like a
164 Winter 1n SPirzBERGEN.

miracle, and they could only ascribe it to the com-
passion of God. |

MorHer. And justly too. Without God's
extraordinary protection their recovery would
have been impossible. You, my dear children,
in your riper years will find many speaking proofs
of this divine favor.

Faraer. Noman felt this more than our good
pilot. He stood there with clasped hands, and
tears of the most thankful joy. ‘It seems to me
like a frightful dream to have been so near to the
grave,” said he. “Ihave often in storms and
sea-fichts looked death in the face; but I -have
never felt the anguish which I have ex
there under the earth.”

' Marra, How, dear father? Would not then
his distress be greater in a storm or in a sea-fight
when a man looks death full in the face?

FaTHer. Probably these dangers appeared
the more unimportant to the pilot, the more fa-
miliar and acquainted he was with them. Prob-
ably, too, on this account, becauge in a storm
or in an engagement by sea he had so much oc-
eupation and labor that he had not time to think
of the danger. Here in the cavern it was wholly
different. The perfect stillness of death, which
reigned all around, the distress of his two com-
panions, the thick darkness which covered every-
thing, the entire ignorance of the dangers which
Winter 1n Sritzpercem,



were here found, and which were by
fear, the complete want of means of Welp for his
deliverance, and, too, the heavy air—all these
must have contributed to raise his anguish to an
intolerable degree.

In his thankful joy the pilot brought out the
hymn-book and Bible, which, as you know, he
found in the chest of the Dutch captain.

“Friends!” said he to Ivan and Gregory, “ you
are both young persons, who have experienced as
yet few sufferings and trials; you have been edu-
cated and have grown up rather in comfort and
superfluity. I have borne more and lived longer
than you have, and my experience has taught me
that a person can only with a pious heart be com-
posed and comforted in any misfortune. We
have been nigh a horrible death; God has saved
us. Let us not belong to the class of the un-
thankful, who forget his blessings.”

Maria. That was not to be feared from Ivan
and Gregory ?

FatHer. No, certainly. Their parents were
pious and upright persons, who had educated their
children to every good work, and could not have
failed in giving them warnings and examples. So it
was very natural that Ivan and Gregory too, not-
withstanding his levity of character, should have
been thoroughly imbued with the best principles.
They, therefore, received with joy the proposition
166 Winter tn SPiITzBERGEN.

of the pilot, that this day every week should be
set apart as their Sunday, by laying aside all
work in it, and they should engage in some mode
of worshipping God. They were on this day to
sing one or two of the most enlivening hymns,
read some of the most beautiful chapters of the
Bible, and always with thankful hearts call to
remembrance their wondrous preservation.
Manta, And did they really do this?
Faruer, Certainly! How could we expect
any else from so thankful good men? Besides,
the storm and the tempestuous weather continu-
ally raged without. In the cavern itself, they
had perceived nothing of it; but so much did
they the more in the hut, which had become
somewhat decayed, and the walls of which could
not keep out the cold draught of the air. Ivan
opened the single window. The wind howled
fearfully, immense masses of snow fell and
threatened to cover over the whole valley: im-
penetrable darkness encompassed everything.
Affrighted the young man came down—" Why
should we not go,’’ said he, “into one of the
caverns? There we shall find shelter from the
storm and weather. Here no one can stay in
the cutting blast of air!” All three of them
went into the cavern, after they had bolted the
door of the hut—‘ And why should we not do
now, what we before intended?” said Gregory,
Winter In SPITzZBERGEN. 167

interrupting the silence of his companions. “TI
* think that a cup of tea would excellently re-
fresh us.” With these words he caught up a
lamp, went to the cavern, and soon brought a
kettle of the most beautifully clear water, while
Ivan took charge of the fire. Satisfied and
cheerful, they sat with their burning pipes around
the smoking teapot, a comfort which was this
day the more grateful to them, as, since their
arrival at Spitzbergen, they had enjoyed no
warm drink. Especially the good old pilot felt
the deepest joy, respecting the discovery of that
spring, and certainly it was for the unfortunate,
a treasure of inestimable value. For whence
during the long winter could they get water?
They could not reach the spring which lay on
the other side of the rock in the valley; and if
this also were the case, they would have found
but ice. Nothing else remained to them than
to help themselves to water from melted snow.
Therefore they must the more thankfully have
acknowledged the blessing. When the tea was
drunk the pilot said, “I am not yet tired: the
recollection of the distress we have undergone,
may well indeed have driven off slumber. I am
therefore of the opinion, that we cannot better
employ our time, than by undertaking a search
through the house, and examine all the caverns
which are connected with it.”
168 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

Ivan and Gregory also were yet too much ex-
cited by the events of the day, and so readily
agreed to the proposal of their older friend.
Refreshed and cheered up by the enjoyment of
the tea, they took their lamps and went earnest-
ly to work. In the hut itself they sought no-
thing further, although they had likewise ob-
served over it under the roof-tree a boarded
ceiling,

Maria. Did they make any new discoveries?

FarHer. Gregory noticed in a cleft of the
rock a ladder. “This must be useful for some-
thing,’’ said he considering it, and in a moment
Ivan pointed out to his friends a darker place
almost up as high as the roof of the cavern.
“We must examine that more closely!” cried
he, “it seems to be an entrance!” The ladder
was brought and placed, but it reached scarcely
half-way up. Wherefore our friends had such
expectations of this newly-discovered entrance,
they themselves knew not. So much the more
painful was it to them, to see themselves disap-
pointed in this hope, In vain they searched
over the rocky wall, whether there was not a
projection, or hollow to be found, by means of
which they could reach up to the height re-
quired. But the wall was rough and smooth; as
to the possibility of climbing up, it was not to
be thought of.
WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN. 169

They had spent many hours in this business,
when fatigue compelled them to seek their
place of rest. They threw themselves down on
their blankets near the bright warm flame of a
burning fire, but no beneficial slumber closed
their eyes. A succession of troubled thoughts
came before their minds, and rendered all their
attempts to give them up to sleep fruitless.
One was evermore disturbing the other. The
fearfully severe winter, the night continuing so
long, the diminution of their scanty supply of
food, the loss of which they believed they Would
not be able to replace, and even the want of
wood to burn, and the idea of the great, almost
insuperable difficulties, of gathering new stores
of it through hollows of the roc vered with
snow—all -these things disquieted them, this
day more than usual. To this was added the
recollection of the sorrowful fate of the unhappy

>

Hollander, the thought of possible sickness, and ~

the pitiable lot of him, who should have the mis-
fortune to be the last of their number. Sadly
they lay there; no one spake; every one felt
only the frightfulness of his situation. The hours
of severer trial appeared to be about beginning.

Marra. Now had they not been tried enough
already ? ,

FatuHer. No, their sufferings were to rise far
higher. You have already pitied our giends;

15

~~.
170 WINTER IN SpPirzBEeRGEN.

but I foresee that you will discover them to be
yet more wretched and unfortunate; for they
really continually became so.

As long as the storm lasted—and it was for
many days—they hardly ventured into the hut,
because they feared it would be driven in by the
heavy gusts of wind. Finally the storm geased,
the air was pure and clear; but now also the
eold rose to a fearful height. In their cavern
they indeed felt little of it; but now came want,
theirfire-wood continually grew less, and also
theif supply of food, which consisted merely of
bear's flesh, was umed, and nothing remain-
ed to them, eemaiiied and spring-water. What
should they begin to do?—The answer to the
‘question waggnot indeed difficult, for no one of
them was in doubt that above all things they
must provide new supplies—but could they
reckon on any sure success to their efforts?—
Our brave friends, however, did not despond, and
put a firm hand to the work.

It was a clear night,/but cold beyond concep-
tion—although it was now the day-time for
them—when they, y clothed and well
armed, left their cavern. ‘The moon, the twink-
ling stars, and a bright northera light illumina-
ted their way over the crackling snow; the air
was 86 cold and piercing, that they could scarce-
ly*breghe ; the frost hung on their hair and the

an
Winter in Spirzrercen. 171

rough clothes of the wanderers. The whole re-
gion was desolate and silent, no living creature
showed itself, and the dark rocks rose up in
frightful shapes, above the covering of snow,
when our friends at the hazard of life mounted
over the cliffs smooth as glass, and descended
into the valley, where lay the trees beside the
basin covered with ice, which was to furnish them
with fuel. With incredible labor they cut up
some of them which were almost as hard as iron
from the frost, into pieces, and with still more
toil they dragged them over and across the rocks,
More than once they sank down powerless, and
only the dread of freezing, in the bitter cold,
could have moved them to exert stheir last
strength to reach with their store’ to their dwell-
ing. Finally however, after the most excessive
efforts, and wholly exhausted, they came with
their burden to the last hollow of the rocks,
from which they could see the hut. But what
was their horror—when they perceived that their
bridge across the trench was broken down and
gone! This sight quickened their steps, and in
a few minutes, spite of their exhaustion, they
were close up to the hut. Carefully they ap-
proached the trench, in which the snow had sunk
very deep. There they saw the cause of the ap-
pearance which had so unexpectedly thrown
them into affright. There had been a visymade.
172 Winter in SrirzperGen.

to them in their absence—but a visit of not a
very joyful kind. A huge bear which probably
had wished to go over the board, and had tum-
bled down with it, stood straight up in the
trench, and was trying vainly, to climb up its
smooth edge.

Gustavus. Then they had all at once an ex-
cellent roast for their kitchen!

FaTHer. It was not-this time so easily ob-
tained. Our friends were stiff with the cold,
and almost wholly exhausted by their extreme
exertion. The animal aroused by his fruitless
efforts to climb up from the trench, became far
more raging when he saw the men. His eyes
shone likedirebrands; growling and grating his
teeth, he rolled about in the snow. For a time,
the friends stood undetermined on the margin
of the trench, and consulted what was to be
done. Finally, the old pilot cried out resolutely,
“ Here is no time for long reflection! The beast
must die!” With these words, he fired off his
gun, and shot the bear in the head.

But the ball had merely grazed the animal;
he became the more and more furious, and they
justly feared lest rage should give him strength
enough to reach the margin, and then he might
easily do some injury to one of our friends.

“ Wait, I will hit him better!” said Ivan, who
was mage practised in shooting, His shot, indeed,
Winter in SpPIrzeERGeEN. 173

struck more surely, and the bear sunk growling
back. “Now will I give you the finishing
stroke!” said Gregory, and sprang, in spite of.
all warnings, into the pit. Then the bear reared
himself up again, placed himself on his hind
paws, and grasped hold of Gregory. Scarcely
had Ivan noticed this, than without stopping to
load, he sprang into the trench to the help of his
friend, and run his bayonet deep into the enemy's
body. The twafriends now soon mastered the
animal, and ki him, but all three were too
much exha w, to bring their prey into
the hut. Hardly had they strength enough to
lay again the plank of which the bridge consisted
across the trench, and it was not till after some
hours of rest, that they returned back to their
game, which had become stiff with the cold.
They brought the bear into the hut, where they
cut it up, and thankfully beheld their newly
acquired stores.

“ When we again go out to procure supplies,”
said the pilot, “it will be necessary that one of
us should remain at home, to draw up the bridge,
and take care in the meantime, that those coming
back, shall find a warm dinner.” The propriety
of this proposal was so evident, that Ivan and
Gregory at once agreed to it. Both were deter-
mined to volunteer to undertake the more diffi-
cult expedition, while on the other handythe old

15*
' 174 Winter In SrirzBeERGeEN.

pilot in their absence, should take care of the
household affairs and cooking. With grateful
acknowledgments, he consented, as in his ad-
vanced age, his strength gradually declined for
the undertaking of going out for wood and
supplies. ‘But once for all,” added the pilot,
“you must not wait till the last moment for
procuring our supplies. The more stores we
have, the better.” This advice, too, was ap-
proved of. Ivan and Gregory ill more valued
the experienced man, the gh they became -
acquainted with his friendly and how wise
his opinions were.

Thus it was, that both of them, after they had
eaten and rested, set out anew to procure sup-
plies. Armed as usual, and each of them fur-
nished with a stout piece of roasted bear's meat,
they left the hut, accompanied by the admonition
of their older friend to avoid every unnecessary
danger. The pilot drew up the bridge after
them, bolted the door of the hut, and was now
alone. It had for a long time been his wish to
be alone for some hours.

Maria. Why did he desire this?

FaTHER. He felt himself unhappy, and did
not wish to show this state of his feeling, so as
not to trouble his friends. He was sad, and the
saddened man often gladly longs for a time,
when he can indulge his troubled thoughts un-
Winter tn SritznperGen. 176

disturbed ; it is then frequently easier for him to
collect his thoughts, and look up the necessary
aids. Thus it was with our good pilot. He
took his Bible and hymn-book, in order to draw
eomfort from that source, in which never yet
an unfortunate man has sought it in vain—from
God's word, Like acrust of ice before the warm
breath of the sun, melted away the grief of his
heart; his spirit was lightened, his trust in God's
fatherly love increased, and with every tear
which he wept, he felt how rest and peace re-
turned to his soul. “ Your heavenly Father knows
what you need.” ‘These words met his eye.
“ Yea!” cried he aloud, “‘O God, thou knowest
what we need; thou wilt help us, and give what
is needful to us.”

MorHer.

FatHer. Solitude is beneficial to a man,
when he understands how to use it, This did
the pious pilot. He now felt himself pre-
pared for labor, and hastened to use the hours
of his friends’ absence as well as possible. First
he took care about the cooking, and soon a stout
piece of bear’s flesh stood in fresh spring water,
in a kettle over the fire,

While the cooking was going on, it occurred
to the pilot, that no one had examined the ceil-
ing over the hut. By the help of the ladder he
mounted up there: the trap-door in the ceil-
176 Winter In SPITZBERGEN.

ing was soon opened, and there he found a great
heap of dry moss, a considerable quantity of
spoon-wort, and many well-prepared bear’s and
reindeer'’s skins.

Gustavus. That store could not be of any
special value.

FaTHerR. Do you think so? The old pilot
thought wholly different; the skins and the moss
furnished a warm and soft bed. “Grand!’’ he
eried out, ‘my friends will rejoice, when they
find better beds!”

JULIA. On the bear-skin? Now if they only
were not obliged to lie on the dirty bear-skin!

MotTHER. To what want and hunger might
not well bring them.

FatHer. And his desire was for work. The
beds were prepared. A heap of moss—for the
pilot had brought the whole supply into the cay-
ern—formed the bed, a soft skin of a reindeer
supplied the place of a sheet, and a stout bear's
skin that of a bed-quilt. With inward satisfaction,
and pleased looks, the pilot beheld the beds
which he had prepared for his friends, and thought
of the joy which they would feel on account of
it, when the kettle with the bear's flesh began
to boil, “Ah; nowif we had only potatoes, peas
or beans!” sighed he, with a sort of despondency.

“But am I not a fool!” cried he, on further
- thought, “I have such a beautiful vegetable |”
Winter in SpPrrzperGen. 17T

Marta. Vegetable! Where then could he
get it?

FatHer. The pilot remembered to have heard
that the inhabitants of Greenland and Nova Zem-
bla dry the spoon-wort, and after some time cook
it. Immediately now he took the boiling kettle
from the fire, and threw into the broth of bear's
flesh a good parcel of spoon-wort, taken from
the floor and washed in fresh water. Soon
the faded leaves swelled up, took a green, lively
eolor, and diffused a smell, which was not unlike
boiled sour crout. The. pilot tried his dish, and
found that it tasted finely.

With what longing he now awaited the re-
turn of his friends. He was almost displeased
that his guests were not in at the moment, and
became the more so, the longer they stayed.
But he did not spend his time in useless expres-
sions of regret, for he knew how to employ it
still better. Many little matters were yet to be
taken care of; for example, splitting up of the
wood which they had lately brought in, a labor
which occupied several hours. But when he
had finished this, the two friends were not yet
returned. Finally after sixteen hours’ waiting in
vain, the pilot became uneasy. He felt heavy-
hearted, lest the young men might have lost
their path, and that they in a helpless state could -
not find their way back, but were wandering about
178 Winter in SpirzBErRGeEn.

perhaps almost frozen, or had met with some in-
jury of another kind.

His disquiet increased every moment, and be-
came more torturing and dreadful. The idea of
living alone in this solitude, stiffened with frost
and cold, and terminating his last days without
a friend, was terrible to him. Had he often be-
fore been discontented with his situation, now
the time when he had his friends around him,
appeared to him a happy one an comparison of
that which was coming. Every few moments
he walked out in front of the hut and listened,
whether he could hear any steps in the distance.
He called aloud the names of his friends—but
no answer followed; all remained still and deso-
late. In the greatest anxiety he gathered to-
gether a heap of dry wood, and at the risk of his
life mounted a rock, and kindled here a clear
burning fire.

JuLtia, What was that for?

FATHER. It might be possible, that his two
friends had wandered off, and could not find
their way again; so a fire shining off at a dis-
tance, was the best lighthouse towards which the
wanderers could direct their steps.

For nearly*twelve long hours, the good old
pilot had been waiting in vain, calling, and keep-
ing up the fire. Then his distress reached to the
highest point. He reproached himself most bit

a
WINTER IN SpPmirzpERGeEn. 179

terly, for having accepted their proposal that he
should remain at home. He knew that his ab-
sent friends were indeed excellent men deserving
his affection, but also, they fell into the faults of
youthful rashness and indiscretion. With lacer-
ated hands, and despairing, he went back and
forth, sometimes into the cavern and sometimes
on the rock, regarding neither cold nor danger,
“ Almighty God,” he cried, “ where are the poor
men? Shall I pitiably sorrow away my last
days here in this desolate wild ?”—Then he wish-
ed to hasten towards them, to search them out,
and only the anxiety lest he might miss them kept
him back. Finally, after eight-and-forty hours,
he climbed up, worn down and half-frozen; once
more on the rock, to kindle up the extinguishing
flame anew.—T hen he heard at a distance—

MorHEeR. Not surely, what we hear—the
clock striking eleven.

FaTHerR. How? is it really already so late?

MotuER. Yes! And to-morrow we will hear
more accurately, what it was the pilot heard at
a distance. Are you satisfied with this?

Gustavus, Now—Yes—But I should be glad
to know what the pilot heard.

MorHer, It will be equally pl@isant to-mor-
row.
Cighth Eurning.

How great was the sympathy which the
children felt in the fates of the unfortunate men
in Spitzbergen, must be evident to you, my young
friends, from all that you have hitherto read
about them. This sympathy increased the fur-
ther the story proceeded, and particularly the
conclusion of yesterday evening must have made
them the more eager to learn the result of thia
dangerous and adventurous expedition. They
eould the more vividly imagine to themselves
the condition of the old pilot, so worthy of pity,
and the yet more sad fate of the two who were
wandering about, when exactly at this very time
the cold of winter had risén to an unusual height.
Scarcely did they dare to go out of their own
sheltered dwelling, or leave their warm room;
and there were many examples of luckless tray-
ellers who were half-frozen, or even frozen to
death, on their way.

“How nice it is, that we can sit in a warm

op?
WINTER IN SpPiTrzBERGEN. 181

room!” said Julia, when some laborers with
frosty hair and blue frozen visages, passed under
the windows over the creaking snow.

MorHer. Thank God for this blessing! many
poor children must be without it, and many a
poor traveller is compelled by his business to be
now on his way.

Gustavus. How would it be now if we could
look at Spitzbergen ?

Maria, What could the two unfortunate
wanderers do, who could never finda warm room?

JULIA. I am very much in fear for them.
If they were to perish in the dreadful cold!

Marta. And the poor pilot were to find only
their dead bodies!

Jutta. I have indeed imagined’ to myself
the very worst. You know well, how father
said we should have to pity the poor men still
more ?

GusTAVUS. Well, I do not yet fear the worst.
A man can bear much, and I hope we may see
our friends again.

Max. The question will soon be decided,
Our father is coming.

FATHER (entering). What will soon be de-
cided ?

ALL. Whathad become of Ivamand —
whether they were so happy as again to find
their way back.

16

‘a
182 WiInTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

.FarHer. And for that I am come.—In spite
of the ever-increasing cold, we will take our way to-
wards Spitzbergen. We yesterday evening left
the brave pilot, sometimes keeping up the shining
fire on his rock, sometimes walking back and
forth uneasily, in and before the hut, and anxious-
ly waiting for his friends, Now at this moment,
he had, at the risk of his life, mounted the rock;
the air was pure and clear, the stars twinkled,
the moon shone clear and bright, and the snow-
covered vale, lay all white before him. Then
he heard in the desolate silence on the crackling
snow, the footsteps of some one going forward
slowly. He soon perceived how these bent
round the wall of rock, and recognized them asthe
two missing ones. He cried out; but he received
no answer. Already this frightened him; yet
he was more disquieted by their slow, creeping
progress. He hastened to meet them; but, in
what a state he found the unfortunates! Both
of them had contended for eight-and-forty hours
long, with the most dreadful cold, without having
had the comfort of a warm fire. They had
really lost themselves, had taken an entirely dif:
ferent direction, and they would never have re-
turned, had they not observed the flame kindled
on the rock. Now they came forward; but
scarcely could they raise an arm, and it was with
extreme effort, they kept themselves on their
Winter in SprrirzeerGen. 183

feet, their faces and hands were swollen with
cold; already they could not speak any more,
and they sank down before the hut.

JuLiaA. How pleasant and good to them,
must have been the warm fire in the cave!

FaTHER. This would have been precisely their
misfortune; they would have been obliged to re-
pent of this imprudence, with the loss of most of
their limbs. The pilot managed more wisely.
Close to the hut, lay snow many feet deep.
With incredible labor, he raised the hard frozen
top crust, undressed his friends, who were uncon-
scious and wholly involuntary, and buried them
up in the snow. Here he let them lie almost
halfan hour. Then the poor men felt as if new
life ran though their limbs, consciousness return-
ed, and they again recovered their speech. “ Lie
there only a few minutes more,” said the pilot, .
who went into the cave, laid their dry clothing
ready, set the tea on the fire, and then returned
back with a woollen blanket. He first took Ivan
out of his snow bath, led him into the cavern,
dried him, clothed him with clean linen, and laid
him in the newly-prepared bed. In afew minutes,
Gregory was treated in the same way: both felt
themselves more strengthened and enlivened,
the longer they had both been deprived of it,
Soon all three of them sank into a sound sleep,
which lasted several hours, and this beneficial
184 Winter tn Spitzpercen.

rest soon restored again their strength to the
invalids. But now the pilot reproached them
for their rashness.

Gustavus. This they had aot properly de-
served. They had acted with the best design.

FarHer. This could not excuse them. Ivan
and Gregory were to blame for exposing them-
selves to dangers, for which they were not suited,
and that they had ventured into regions which
were wholly unknown to them. But I ought
first to assure you, that these rebukes were
spoken in the mild tone of a father, and were re-
ceived with modesty and docility. “But where
then have you been ?” asked the good pilot. “ Ac-
cording to your description you have come from
the opposite side.”” Both of them told him, that
they had noticed at a distance a herd of animals
of the deer kind, such as they had never before
seen; on closer consideration they were convin-
ced that they were reindeer, but they had not
been able to getup near enough to shoot one of
them. In the heat of their pursuit, they had
lost their course, and had only been guided again
to the right direction by the fire burning on the
top of the rock.

* Reindeer?” said the pilot. “These animals
are not wont to go but rarely far from their
place of rest. Their food, the small moss, which
they scratch out from under the snow, they find all
Winter 1n SpirzREeRrGeEn. 185

around. They, therefore, must have their bed in
some near inaccessible cavern of this region.”
Ivan assured him, that where they had seen the
animals, there was a ridge of frightful rocks.
“There then is their bed, we will soon go there
to search for them. But we will all three of us
go: I will not let you go alone again |”

The pilot related to his two friends that in
their absence he had made many new discove-
ries,

Marta. Ha, ha! the new dish of spoon-wort!

Fatoer. An important discovery for our
friends. He told them how he had found, on the
upper floor of the hut, the store of dry moss, and
the skins, from which he had prepared*the beau-
tiful soft beds on which they lay. “ But,” he
added, “Ih azade a very sad discovery.”

GUSTAVUS.” what was this?

FatHer. He had examined the supply of
powder, and found that only six round of car-
tridges with balls, and hardly two charges of pow-
der, remained, He knew that his friends had yet
less, and this discovery must naturally have made
him very sorrowful. For if their supply of pow-
der failed, their beautiful fire-arms were worth
no more than a stout, strong cudgel. What
should they defend themselves with? With what
kill the animals necessary for their subsistence ?
This necessity must put them in the greatest

16*
>

‘

186 Winter tn SpirzperGen.

trouble. Ivan and Gregory also examined their
supply of powder, and found that it was still
smaller, Thus they saw themselves necessitated
to think of some other means, and provide some
new weapons. “Give me your supply of pow-
der and ball,” said the pilot, ‘‘ we must carefully
preserve it against the greatest need. The guns
we will polish up nicely and lay them aside ;
they are now of no use tous.” Necessity is the
mother of invention. The truth of this proverb
proved itself most clearly in the case of our
friends. You remember that on their arrival
in the cavern they found many articles of tools,
the value of which they now knew for the first
time. Etery piece of iron was carefully ex-
amined, each by itself, and properly considered,
and get apart for some possi A hard
stone served for an anvil;
tongs, which they had found, the bayonets were
wrought over and fastened to stout poles. Thus
they had a lance, with which a person.in case of
necessity could pierce the body ofa bear, The pilot,
who in his former voyages had many Nor-
thern nations, recollected their bows and arrows,

The best na the purpose was sought for,





the bow cut out, and the arrows made, but, alas,

there. was wanting the rest of it, the string, which

was todespatch the arrow on its swift way. -
Juuia. You know how Robinson Crusoe

Rammer and |
WINTER IN SPrrzBeRrGEn.

managed to help himself in such a case of neces-
sity? He took the fibres of some plants like fit
and twisted them into a cord.

Max. The only difficulty here was that these
did not grow in Spitzbergen.

Fatuer. No, they did me
grow only in warmregions. Bu
happens that a man finds out so
himself, when he uses. his reason ae The ;
entrails of the last bear they had killed, lay like ©
lumps of ice frozen together in the trench before
the hut. The pilot seized hold of them, thawed
them with hot water, cleansed them, and by means
of some wooden pins they twisted them into a
firm strong cord. The experiment succeeded
beyond all their expectation, in using this cord



a




as a bow-string. For arrows they ch the
hardest wood; and our friends soon m 80
' wellin the working of iron, that they ed

themselves with many of them headed with
little sharp iron points, Instead of feathers, they
took finally split wood, and this kind of weapon
at last became so perfect, that the three archers
could shoot through a board at a
tance,

Thus they were now provid
but soon another p
as important. And thi
salt, which they maa enpeally for the




188 Winter in Srirzpercen.

fat hard bear’s flesh. Until now they had used
gunpowder for this purpose ; but henceforth they
must use it most sparingly,

Max. Had no one then been able to find
anything like salt ?

FarHer. Not only something resembling salt
but salt itself, if the season of the year had only
been favorable. On the shore of the sea there
is often water thrown on the land in a storm, and
which remains. In the air, and by the heat of
the sun, the water evaporates, leaving behind its
saline (or salt) particles. Still more are these
found in the clefts or hollows of the rocks. But
how should our poor friends find this salt on the
ground covered with snow a yard thick, espe-
cially in the night? The old pilot well knew
this; but the insuperable difficulties were too
clearly before his mind, for him even to make the
attempt. It was, therefore, a fortunate circum-
stance that the spoon-wort was found, the sour
taste of which, in some degree, made up for the
want of salt. It was extremely necessary for
health, and prevented many diseases which other-
wise must have existed. Their daily exercise
andgindustrysin their toil, and the fine, pure
spring-wate tributed also to keep the three
friends in go although they had to con-
tend with more than common difficulties.

Severe as thus far had been the cold in the









WiInTER IN SPITZBERGER. 189

months of January and February, it reached a
height of which we can scarcely have any idea,
and thus the wretchedness of these three brave
men rose to the highest pitch. Hardly could the
unfortunates, who certainly were not effeminate,
remain in the open air long enough to bring the
wood they needed, although this now lay only
about a thousand feet from them. Of further ex-
cursions to search for the means of living, they
could hardly think, even in the warm bear-skins
in which they were clothed.

Maria. But what were they to do when their
supplies in the meat chamber gave out?

FatHer. They would, in the true sense of the
word, have been starved, if Providence, which
never leaves men wholly helpless, had not taken
eare for them in an extraordinary way. In the
valley in which lay the hut, there were often

* ‘¥Yisitors.

Gustavus. Certainly, bears.

Fatuer. Yes. These guests—whether they
were driven here by the weather from unknown
parts, or were attracted by the greater warmth
of the valley—caused our friends many a fright
when the growling and roari these ae on
before the hut waked them ou sleep, or
broke in on their labor,.

Marra. But if now they should press intothe
hut?—

“

-
»,@

190 Winter in SritzBERGEN.

Farxer. This could not be done so easily, as
the trench was too broad and deep, its slope was
too smooth, and the bridge was drawn off on the
inside. Commonly the bears fell into the trench,
and then our friends immediately hastened thither
armed with long, sharp spears, and in this way
killed many, without using a single charge of
powder.

Until now all three, wretchedly as they were
obliged to live, had enjoyed firm health and ap-
parently such as would continue unimpaired ; but
now they -underwent one of the hardest of their
trials—their beautiful bond of friendship must be
broken. The good old pilot, who was much the
eldest of them, was suddenly taken sick. His
great age, and his excessive exertions, his really
miserable means of food, his fruitless longing to
see again his wife and children, with his anxiety
for the future—all these together had operated
very injuriously on his health. Sick and near to
death he lay there, unable to undertake even the
least business. You may imagine the feelings of
his two friends, as they looked at the deathly-
pale face of the sick man, listened to his painful
breathing, and yet could not help him! With
wounded hands, with hearts ready to burst, with
tears in their eyes, they stood at the bedside of
anguish of the man so dear to them, who was more
thana friend, and indeed wasa father to them, The
WiIntTER IN SPITZBERGEN. 191

best of children could not more feelingly minister
all the relief they could to their sick father, or take
more anxious care of him, than Ivan and Gregory
now did to him, They sat beside the bedside of
the good man, who was continually growing
weaker, read to him from the Bible and the hymn-
book the choicest passages, attended to every
wish which the sufferer expressed with unwearied
readiness, felt no fatigue, no hunger, no thirst, and
would gladly have borne for him his pains, if
they could thus have restored him to breath and
life; but it seemed as though Providence was
bringing the worst suffering on the two young
men—their prayer must be in vain,

Ivan, who had watched many hours beside the
bed of his friend, overcome with exhaustion, had
fallen into a little slumber, while Gregory had
gone to the spring to get some water. Ivan had
not observed that he had gone away, when a
loud and distressing groaning and rattling of the
throat awaked him. He looked towards the
sick man, who at this moment sank back lifeless,
and now with glazed eyes, but with a peaceful
countenance of one softly fallen asleep, lay there
likeaslumberer. At Ivan’s cry of anguish, Greg-
ory hastened thither ; and there hestood shock
at the sight. They both had been prepared ia
long time for this moment, but yet they were 80
overcome that they could not command their ©
192 Winter IN SPITZBERGEN.

words or thoughts. When they had first given
vent to their oppressed hearts in a flood of tears,
they sank down upon the body of the noble man,
holding it together in their arms, vowing to each
other eternal fidelity and friendship. The spirit
of their friend that had fled must have been wit-
ness to this covenant. “ And now let us leave
the noble man to his rest,” said Ivan, in deep
emotion. ‘He is better off than we are. He
has passed away from all—all that yet awaits
us!” With these words he kissed the cold lips
of the lifeless one. “ Let us now go out into the
open air,’ said Gregory. “ We have spenta long
time in this closecavern. The sight of that body
affects me too much,”

They covered the corpse with many skins,
took each a spear and bow, bolted the hut,
climbed out of the window, and when they had
passed over the trench, drew up the bridge after
them, For a long time they went forward si-
léntly; they spoke of the dead, lamented their
loss, and with anxious care waited for the coming
day. Thus they wandered on without any cer-
tain object, and indeed without feeling at all the
severe cold. Their way led them to a ledge of
rocks, into which they had not yet been; they
lay on the other side of that frozen bay or basin,
on the shore of which there was a large quanti-
ty of drift-wood. A ravine almost like a beaten
Winter 1n SPiITZBERGEN. 193

hollow way, lay open before them. The snow
was trodden down like the track or (as the hun-
ters say) the trail, of animals of the deer-kind.
Wondering at this appearance, they both of them
ascended the hollow way, and found in the slope
a little hole, where they rested for some hours,
in order to warm themselves by a fire which
they had concluded to kindle. There was dry
wood and brush enough, there. They brought a
heap together, and were thinking of setting them
on fire, when a noisé re-echoing from a distance,
and continually approaching, was heard—
JuLia. A visit of bears, certainly ?—
FaTHer. No, not this time!—It was a visit
indeed, but not of so unwelcome a kind. A
large flock of reindeer came there over the plain,
and turned exactly towards the hollow way,
Searcely had they gone on, than they noticed
the heaps of wood, and made a sudden halt. It
was only with the greatest caution, that they set
themselves once more in motion, and gradually
approached nearer, till finally one of them ven-
tured on a daring leap, close to the heap of wood,
upon which immediately the others followed, and
swift as an arrow, Mim up the hollow way. They
soon disappeared frgm sight of the two friends,

who lay hidden in the cave. "yg
“Strange!” said Ivan. “The bed of the ail
mals must be t here, and the hollow way

17
194 Winter in SprirzperGen.

probably leads thither.” “ We shall know bet-
ter if we follow their track,” answered Gregory.
“Let us goafterthem. Perhaps we may succeed
in taking one of them.”

Forgetting the cold and their fire, they follow-

.) ed the trail. All at once they came to a rocky

basin, the lofty wall of which rose high up on
all sides in crags; on the narrow and inclosed
spot, the obscurity became greater, and nowhere
was there to be seen any other outlet than the
hollow way. The reindeer had vanished. Our
two hunters indeed followed their track as long
as they could discern it in the snow, but soon
they came to the bold foot of a rock, where of
course every vestige disappeared, It seemed
inconceivable to both of them whither the animals
had gone,

Maria. And so they went back from a sleeve-
less errand ?—their object wnaccomplished ?

FatHer. No! they were more fortunate.
The impetuous Gregory examined and climbed
at the risk of his life, some cliffs and dark clefts.
Suddenly he called out to his friend, that the
animals were hid in a cave. He had found their
trail, and clearly heard the rustling and crowding
together of the timid creatures. “Take care,”
cried Ivan’ to him, “the startled animals may
rush out of their hole, dash you from the rocks,
and you are lost.” “Don’t be afraid,” was Greg-
WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN. 195

ory’s answer. “Only go back to the hollow

way, and bring as much dry wood as you can
carry.” Ivan went, and when he had returned

back with what was wished, they both of them
kindled a large fire before the entrance of the

hole, and soon they could hear plainly, how the, _
distressed animals continually crowded closer’

into the back portion of the cave. é

Marta. What good did the fire do? ’

FarHerR. Very much. It troubled still more
the shy animals, and so they could be the easier
caught, Besides, the fire shone into the cavern,
and our two friends dared therefore the more to
goin. The nearer they came to the animals, the
further these crowded back and pressed on close
up to the wall. The young men followed cau-
tiously, when Gregory suddenly seized hold of
the foot of one of these animals. It did not stir,
and Gregory, to whom it at once occurred not to
kill the creature, but to take it alive, tied the
hind feet together with his sword-belt. Ivan on
his part was equally fortunate; and he too had
fejtered an animal.

“Now let us go!” said Gregory. “The others
must have free passage out: we will not hinder
them.”” Both of them left the cave—they went
into a place aside, and watched the outlet. A
long time passed, but they saw no animal.
Finally, one of them came to the entrance, look-
196 Winter 1n SPITZRERGEN.

ed round carefully and as if in trouble; advanced
forward some steps, looked around him again,
and quick as lightning sprung down the hill,
and the whole herd followed with a rush.

Gustavus. But those they had bound?

Fatuer, For these Ivan and Gregory waited
in vain; they did not come out. Our friends
then went back to the cave, and there at the en-
trance lay the two bound ones; near them stood
a third, which was much smaller, and was just
beginning to have its short horns. The fettered
ones remained quiet, and looked so wistfully and
troubled at Ivan and Gregory, that they fully
determined to take them home with them alive.
They raised the animals up—with some effort,
however—tied the horn to one of the fore feet,
untied the fetters of the hind legs, and willing and
tame the two old ones followed, accompanied
by the young one leaping on,

That Ivan and Gregory had been occupied in
their return back, which took some hours, and
with the animals, and thought little or nothing
of their slumbering friend, you must not logk
on as a proof of their want of feeling, or that
they had no true regard and friendship. They
were engaged, and this business had driven every
other thought out of their mind. But now, as
they reached the hut, they keenly thought what
joy they would have caused their friend with
Winter in Srirzpercen. 197

their reindeer, and this idea excited their an-
guish anew. With indifference they led the
animals into the hut, threw them some dry moss,
and hardly seemed to notice how fearlessly they
took this food out of the hand of their masters.
As they entered the hut, the image of the corpse
of their friend drove out every other impression.
Gregory had before proposed to tie the two
old reindeer in front of the hut, and then look
out and provide some better arrangement for
them. Ivan went sadly and seriously into the
cave, in which lay the body of his friend. Then
all at once he heard a hollow, mournful ery,
“Tvan! Gregory! Is neither of you here?”
JULIA. Now father, dear, what was that?
Max. How can you ask such a question?
Ivan imagined that he heard these words.
FaTHEeR. No, it was no play of his imagina-
tion. Ivan heard these words, because they were
really spoken. The young man did not belong
to the superstitious class, ayd he was wholly
without the fear of ghosts; but this hollow tone
as though coming from a grave, these distressing
words calling for help, affrighted him so, that he
stood still like a lifeless statue. When he heard
the voice calling him again, Ivan collected all
his remaining sense and courage, and cast a look
towards the body of the old pilot.
The skins, with which the two friends had
iT?
198 Winter In SpirzBERGER.

covered the dead on their going away, moved
and were raised up. Trembling with affright,
Ivan drew, nearer and firmly raised the covering
a little. Then he saw by the light of the ship's
lantern, which was burning, how the pilot lay
there bathed in a warm but salutary sweat—and
O! he could no longer doubt—heard too his voice
as he softly begged a cup of tea. “ Almighty
God! is it possible?” cried Ivan, and rushed,
overcome with joy, into the arms of the newly
awaked man. ‘Is it possible that you are alive,
that I see my friend again?”

More affrighted than Ivan, Gregory sprang
into the cavern. He had heard his friend’s cry
of joy, and knew not what it meant. Now he
saw how Ivan lay over the supposed corpse of
the old pilot, and kissed him amid loud expres-
sions of joy. “In the name of God and our
Saviour, what is it?” cried he, and stood still
in affright. “O see here!” called out Ivan, trem-
bling beyond measure for joy. “Look at our
friend | he is alive! he is awaked again!” With the
soft smile of returning health the good pilot look-
ed at both of them, without being able to explain
the great rejoicing of his friends. “ Set the water
quickly over the fire ; our friend wishes for some
tea!’ said Ivan, and without replying a word,
Gregory astonished with joy, ran to do as he was
desired. “ But where have you been?” asked the
WiInTER 1n SPITZBERGEN. 199

pilot with a feeble voice. “I have been very
anxious to see you. I was never so thirsty as
Iam now.” “ We have been hunting, and have
brought home three reindeer, which we have
caught.” Smiling the pilot said, ‘ O that is fine.
I must have slept a long, very long time; but a
dreadful anguish seized me in my dreams; and
now I feel myself so light and well!" He wished
to get up, but Ivan prevented him, “ Lie still,
a little longer |’’ said he, “I will first warm you
some clean linen.”—“ And I will give you milk
with your tea!” cried Gregory, as be set the tea-
kettle over the fire, “We must take good care
of you that you may get syour strength again!”
With this he took a bowl, and soon brought it
back filled with most excellent healthy milk of
oneofthe reindeer. Now, Ivan warmed his own
bed, which was pearer to the fire, then he dressed
the old pilot, and brought him, feeble and totter-
ing, into it.

Maria. I should like to have seen them in
their joy ! :

MorHER. You would have seen two happy,
good men,

FaTHer. 'The feeling of returning good health
is the best thing for a person who is recovering.
The pious old pilot found this to be the case.
He sat raised up in Ivan’s bed, attended on,
and taken care of by the two friends, to whose
200 Winter 1n SprirzpEercen.

hearts he was so dear. With looks bright with
joy, they both gazed on their friend given to
them again, ‘and amid their warm gushing tears
they gave him a picture of that fearful hour,
when they watched without hope beside his bed,
and finally wept over him as they supposed dead.
But much the greater was now their joy, to see
their lost friend restored to them again.
MorHer. You, my dear children, have not
known what it is to see any one who is most be-
loved, saved from certain death. Thank God,
neither your father, nor I, have ever been so
sick. But we both have experienced it. You,
‘Maria, was once so -near to death, that your
grave-clothes were already prepared; and you
too, Gustavus, when a little child, was at the
point of death, when your glazed eyes were all
but closed. God in pity restared you; praise
him. Never shall I forget the happy moment,
when for the first time, you again asked for your
playthings, and rolled your toy-horse back and
forth with trembling hands on the bed cover.
FaTHer. With ever-increasing astonishment,
the pilot listened to all that his friends told him
of his sickness, and their pain and distress. He
believed that he had lain in a long and deep
sleep, and thought that what was a sorrowful
reality, was only the effect of a delusive dream,
But how thankful and joyful he now was, that
Winter In SPirzpeRGen. 201

his strength had returned. How delicious to his
lips, was the cup of tea, with nutritious milk,
and how nicely to the old sailor, tasted the pipe
of tobacco of which he had been so long de-
prived. Now he begged his friends to read to
him, some of the most beautiful hymns and
psalms. How devoutly the good man listened
to every word. How his tears flowed, when
any particular passage or expression seized on
his noble heart more than usual,

JuLIA. But, father, his young friend sought
not to have left the sick man |

Faruer. Why not? In their view and
opinion, the pilot was no longer a sick man, but
was a corpse. They ought on their own account
to have left their close dwelling, in which they
had been kept so long by his continued sickness.
Frequently, the view of a corpse has something
affecting and heart-rending for the best of men, .
and no doubt, Gregory and Ivan found it so,
They did not deserve any reproach; we ought
the less to blame them, as probably the way in
which they treated the supposed corpse, was the
cause of his being restored to life.

Manta. How so?

FaTHER. You may remember, that on their
going away, they covered the body of their friend
with warm skins of animals, It is possible, that
these awakened and kept up in the man who
202 WINTER IN SPITZBERGER.

had fainted, and was to appearance dead, by the
excitement of a beneficial sweat, the little spark
of life. The old pilot’s sickness was caused by
achill, You remember that dreadful eight-and-
forty hours, in which he had waited in vain,
sometimes on the rock, and sometimes in the
cavern, for the return of his friends, in the midst
of indescribable anxiety, and exertion of all his
strength. Efforts of this kind might have less
injured the younger Ivan or Gregory, than, must
have been the case with an older man like the
pilot.

Sickness which proceeds from chills, is cured
most certainly by means of sweats. That this
sickness of the pilot rose to such a height made
no difference. The distress was only so much
the greater and more torturing before the re-
storing sweat broke out on the sick man.

From this time, it was Gregory's and Ivan’s
special task to devote their most faithful and
careful attention to their friend, who was so
weak, and who had been so wondrously rescued
from death, and each of them seemed to wish to
exceed the other in his efforts for this purpose.
In order to provide a nourishing broth for the
sick man, they immediately killed the young
reindeer, ;

Jutta. O the poor creature! I would not
have done that!
Winter in Sritzpercer. 208

Fatuer. Why not? It was above all things
important to aid the recovering mah to regain
his strength. The health and comfort of a man,
and especially of a friend, depended on it; and
who could not sacrifice everything in such a
case? How easily too they might catch another
reindeer.

Max. You know how, in Cook’s voyage to
the South Pole, Professor Foster readily, and
willingly killed his Otaheitan dog, the first which
was to be brought to Europe, in order to make
a meat broth for Captain Cook when he was
sick? And the dog was certainly of extraordi-
nary value.

FaTHER. Very true. In such case, every-
thing would be sacrificed to save the captain,
and here too everything in order to restore again
completely a sick friend. Besides, they now
might have the milk of the old reindeer, which
otherwise would belong to the young one,

The nutritious broth, and the easily-digested
flesh of the young animal, evidently recruited
the old pilot's strength. Soon he could leave
his bed for hours, and it was not long before he
was again in a state to undertake light work,
adapted to his strength. And so then, we see
again the three friends sitting close around the
warm fire, and hear their talk, or their pious,
devout prayers and songs. Especially we see
204 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

the brave pilot, as he was in his solitude, when
Ivan and Gregory had gone out to hunt, or for
wood, active and busily employing his hours;
how he sometimes arranged this and sometimes
that domestic work, and frequently in loud prayer,
thanked his heavenly Father for the compassion
he had shown him. If such hours often benefit
even the light-minded, what effect must they
leave in the pious heart of so excellent a man!

Gustavus. Were Ivan and Gregory lucky
in their hunting?

FatHer. They were so; for they brought
home many reindeer, partly live ones, and partly
killed with their arrows or spears. By constant
practice, they leafned the art of surprising these
animals; and indeed they understood as well as
Robinson Crusoe, how to kill them with bow and
arrow, and rarely did they fail in securing their
game if they could once get within shooting dis-
tance. Thus they hardly ever were in want of
fresh meat to roast or boil.

Gustavus. But what then became of the two
first reindeer ?

FatuHer. These stood tied up in the hut,
were fed with moss, and soon became accustomed
to their masters, and especially to the old pilot,
who undertook to feed and have charge of them,
He had become so thoroughly acquainted with
the two animals, that he often spent whole hours
Winter 1n SprirzBEerRGeEN. 205

with them, caressed them, and made them eat
out of his hand. One of them was a female rein-
deer, the mother of the young one they had
killed, which repaid for its care by rich milk.
The other they fed for the purpose, in case of
necessity, of having one to kill in the house,

The three friends were really not so unhappy
as they might have believed at the first moment,
Being wonted to it contributed, too, to soften their
hard lot: activity and industry allowed them
rarely to dwell upon any sad thought; and if,
at any time, a darker view came over them, one
reminded the other, how happy they were that
the pilot was still with them, and how sorrowful
their lot would be onthe other hand, if he really
had been taken from them.

Then they went about their work, with united
powers, which made them wholly forget every-
thing unpleasant. This activity kept our friends
in good health; besides, they had a more con-
tented, hopeful, and cheerful feeling, and thus
it might be easily explained, that they who had
been so hardly tried, who seemed to have been
almost forsaken of God, and left to their fate,
were often satisfied with their condition.

There were indeed many things wanting, and
certainly many most important and very needful,
They felt the want of these frequently, and most
-preseingly, but they took their condition into
18
06 Winter tn SprirzReRGen.

view, a8 it once was, and not as it might be, or they
would have it. It seemed to them, folly to waste
their time with useless, vain wishes; but they
hoped in God and his overruling Providence, and
sought to render themselves more deserving
of a better lot by friendship, and activity, patience,
and submission to the unsearchable ways of
their Creator. And thus it could not be, but
that they should be more contented with their
condition.

Once Gregory and Ivan went hunting during
the continually increasing cold. As usual, the
pilot sat in the cave, and cut out arrows. Near
him lay the two reindeer—which had been left
for some time to go about at*liberty—and chewed
the shavings which fell from the pilot's work,
when one of them raised up his head, pricked up
his ears, and began to snuff,

Maria. To snuff?

FaTHER. As they call, in the language of
hunters, the action of an animal when he diseoy-
ers anything uncommon by the sense of smell.
The reindeer made a whining noise, sprang up
and reached up on the side of the wall of rock,
over which was the opening, which they had not
been able to gain with the ladder. The pilot
noticed it; he became more watchful, and was
fearful lest a bear might, in some inconceivable
mode, have found his way into that cave, and


Winter in SritzperGen. 909

had chosen it for his abode. But this fear was
soon dissipated, when the animal showed a kind
of wish to mount up to the place. His own de-
sire was now awakened to examine the cavern.
With longing he waited the return of his friends,
and as soon as this took place, he told them what
he had noticed in the reindeer.

“Tam very curious to learn,” said he, “ what
that hole contains. It seems to have been gone
up to; for the mark ofa ladder laid there is clearly
to be seen.” Ivan and Gregory felt the same
desire. They wished also to be able to examine
that hole. “To climb up is impossible,” said
Gregory. “ But that must not hinder us We
can find two trees, out of which we can make a
ladder. In four-and-twenty hours I will supply
this want.”

He kept his word. After some hours’ rest, he
betook himself, notwithstanding the dreadful cold,
to the basin, and, when he had been absent for
some time, returned with two trees of a kind of
fir, which the united labor of the three friends
formed into a ladder, somewhat rude indeed, but
yet very strong and firm.

“Now we shall soon see what the bake-oven
contains,”

JULIA.: Bake-oven ?

FatHEer. Gregory so called the opening in
sport, as it really had the appearance of a bake-

18*
210 Wintrr in SpirzpEerGcen.

oven. The ladder was long enough—Gregory
mounted up—

Gustavus. Now—and he found—

FarHer. Many things—but you shall hear
to-morrow evening,
Hinth Euruing.

WIr# anxious curiosity, the children awaited
the continuation of the story. That there must
be something extraordinary in that portion of
the cave, they settled as certain without being
able definitely to say why they expected it to be.
Maria, who was somewhat more economical and
more of a housewife, than the others, thought of a
gold mine, or a place where diamonds were to be
found ; she had read in the accounts of travels,
that in Peru, and the other South American prov-
inces, they often found large pieces of solid gold,
and could not conceive why it was they might not
find the same in Spitzbergen, as metals and pre-
cious stones needed not the warmth of the sun
and a milder climate for their growth, much |
than plants. Max and Gustavus Bajotaet
rather of rarities of nature and petrifactjons.
Julia, on the contrary, had always the old dead
Hollander sea captain in her mind. She feared
that Gregory would see the whole dead crew
bodily as mummies, or like statues. On Max’s
9123 WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

recollecting that, according to the account of the
journal, they had been buried, she comforted her-
self with the thought that the cave might be to
Ivan and his friends what the stranded ship was
for Robinson Crusoe and his Friday—a well-filled
magazine, provided with all sorts of things which
the three friends were in need of.

But the children disputed about it, while every
one sought to defend his own view, and tried to
render it as probable as he could, when their
father appeared—and the whole dispute was at
an end.

Gustavus. Now, father? Are we going to
the bake-oven ?

FaTHER. Yes, immediately. Gregory put up
the ladder, the old pilot cautioned him to be care-
ful, and begged Ivan to accompany his friend.
He himself sat down, while his friends mounted
up, on the bottom of that cavern. From there he
observed how the light above in the hole gradual-
ly became more feeble, and finally wholly disap-
peared,

Marta. I should then have been somewhat
troubled.

FaTHer. Why should he be so? He had
given to the daring Gregory, a more prudent
director in Ivan; besides, he might hope that
Gregory would be more careful after the former
adventure in the cavern.
Winter 16 SPITZBERGEN. 218

The pilot had passed almost an hour in his
cave, only feebly lighted by the fire which was
burning, and all continually grew more and more
still, and he heard nothing. He was in fact be-
coming somewhat anxious. He called out; but
no answer followed. He called again, but all in
vain. He listened with the most intense obser-
vation. Everything was still, and so it con-
tinued. Then all at once, on the opposite side
of the high dark roof of the hole, he saw a bright
ray of light, which sometimes took the shape of
a sword, and sometimes of a cross or point, and
sometimes of a circle, Now it flitted about, now
it again stood still; then it vanished all at once,
and came into view again suddenly. The more
intently the old pilot gazed at it, and the more
he thought it over, the darker the matter became
to him. But it was beyond conception when he
heard loud voices wholly unknown to him, and
soon after a strong wild laugh answered on every
side. While he was seeking to explain to him-
self these stfange appearances, and puzzling his
head with all sorts of thoughts, all at once there
fell from every side, a large quantity of little stones
rattling down on the floor. Even this was not
all. Suddenly the light formed itself into a great
round circle, and—think of the awful sight !—in
the midst of this fiery circle, all at once came to

view, a coal-black shaggy head, with glowing,
914 Winter 1n SpirzpeRGen.

flaming eyes, which called out the old pilot's
name so loud, that it resounded through the
whole cavern, and the call was answered on every
side.
Maria. I cannot imagine what it was!
Junta. Oh, it is horrible. I would not have
been in the old pilot's place for anything.
Farner. I believe it, truly. But your fright
will be over, when [ tell you that the dreadful
head belonged to no one but our friend Gregory.
Maria, Gregory? How came he there?
FaTHerR, In the most natural manner possi-
ble. The division of the cavern, or rather the
new cavern, wondrously led close to, and over
the great principal cavern, We often find those
passages winding about and caverns near by, as
for example, in the woodman’s hole. Ivan and
Gregory had gone on into it, some little chinks
of the wall had let through the shining of their
light on the dark roof, and this shining showed
itself in different shapes according as the openings
through which it fell were formed. Many parts
of the newly-discovered caves were large and
roomy, and of course the echo of the sound of
the voice was greatly increased, when Gregory
or Iyan spoke. In the extreme corner of the
cave, there was a round opening which naturally
formed the round, shining circle. Through this
opening, Gregory looked, and as the light was
WiInTER In SPITZEERGER. 215

behind him, so his face must appear black. In
the high rocky vault of the cave, there was
naturally an echo on every side when he called
out to the old pilot, whom he saw far below
him. The stones which rolled down, had either
accidentally fallen through the chinks, while Ivan
and, Gregory pressed on them, or they had thrown
them down purposely, in order to ascertain how
deep the chinks reached.

“OQ you cobolds (black spirits),” cried out the
old pilot, laughing over the adventure, “how
came you there? You have almost frightened
me ”

“Tf you wish to rejoice in many important
and valuable things,” was Gregory’s answer,
“then come up here. Here we have found
stores with which we could fit out a man of war.”

The pilot followed the call. Curious as to
what he might find, he mounted the ladder, and
indeed found that Gregory had not fibbed as to
the main thing.

The whole portion of the wide-extended cave,
might be compared to the upper story of a
house. The wall and floor consisted of smooth
rock, which formed many crooked and winding

assages.
Marta. And how was it with the stores with
which one could fit out a ship?
Fatuer. In this matter Gregory had some-
216 Winter 1n SpirzperGen.

what overstrained the thing. But our good
pilot found here many things which must be
valuable to him. Thus for example, there lay
close by the entrance, a large supply of dry fire-
wood, while on the opposite side, there was a
considerable quantity of moss, and yet further,
some heaps of spoon-wort were piled up.

JuLIA. And so there were vegetables!

FaTHER. Many bear and reindeer skins Jay
in one corner.

Jutta. And so there were beds, and in case
of necessity, warm articles of clothing.

FaTHEerR. But now Ivan and Gregory called
out to the pilot, that he should no longer stay
by those trifles, as here where they were, vastly
more important things were to beseen. The old
pilot hastened thither. The young men came
to meet him, and gladly showed him the newly
covered magazine. There stood little casks and
barrels, the weight of which proved, that they
were not empty; here lay tools of all kinds,
there some well-filled bags, the contents of which
appeared never to have been used. With joy-
ful feelings, the friends stood there, and with
hearty satisfaction they considered this new
property, although they knew not the contents
of the barrels and casks.

Max. But how then did they come here?

FaTHer. This wasinconceivable to our friends.
Winter In SPITZBERGER. 217

There was nothing of it in the paper they had
found. Whether thesesupplies had been brought
together by the eleven Hollanders, or were they
indebted for them to some other person’s care,
there was no means of ascertaining.

“Gustavus. Did any one know of more per-
sons having wintered on the island?

FatHer. Yes, not only here, but also in
other northern regions of the earth, have different
navigators made experiments of this sort. More
than two hundred years since, the Danish Captain
Monk passed the winter on one of the well-
known northern coasts of America. He was on
a voyage of discovery, but ventured too far; his
ship froze in, and with the strong crew of sixty:
four persons, saw himself compelled to leave his
ship and seek the land, They found it, built
themselves huts, brought in their supplies, and
led a most scanty and wretched life, in an in-
tensely cold clime. In three quarters of a year,
only three men were left, who, after undergoing
incredible sufferings and dangers, finally again
reached their fatherland.

Some years afterwards the Hollanders made
two attempts to erect for their fisheries winter
abodes, in Greenland and Spitzbergen. They
left in each place, seven sailors, who were pro-
vided with all things their necessities required.
The journals which both companies kept, are

19
918 Winter tn SpPiTzBERGEN.

still in existence, and furnish proof of what men
are often obliged to endure. The Greenland
journal relates, that already on the eighteenth
of September, the portion of brandy which each
one had dealt out to him, was spent. From the
ninth of October, they were obliged to keep up
a constant fire, so as not to freeze, and their only
meal consisted of bear's meat. - In March they
were all seized with the scurvy.

Maria. The scurvy?

FaTHer. So they call one of the most veiehe
ful of diseases, which is extremely dangerous to
the crews of ships in the northern parts of the
ocean. It attacks both body and mind; all the
feelings of the soul of such a sick man become
gloomy and sad, the body is emaciated, the
breath becomes difficult, the gums swell up, the
teeth loosen and finally fall out. The bodies are
covered with rusty-colored spots, out of which run
streams of bad-smelling blood; the breathing
becomes continually more and more difficult, the
distress greater, until death puts an end to the
sufferings of such an unhappy man. This disease
seized on allof them, and only.oneof the unfortu-
nates could keep up the journal till the last of
April. They were all dead.

Alike sad was the ' those who were left
in Spitzbergen. A wg to their day-book
they were obliged, just ag were our three friends,






Winter 1n SPITZBERGEN. 919

to content themselves with bear’s flesh, and were
also attacked by the scurvy. The first of them
died in January, and the journal goes on to the
end of February. All of them too were found
dead.

Yet later, eight Englishmen were in many
respects more fortunate. In the same region in
which we know our friends to have been, either
from negligence or misunderstanding a boat's
crew were once left behind, which had been sent
ashore to shoot reindeer, and the poor men, de-
prived of the necessaries of life, saw themselves
compelled to spend their winter here, Fortu-
nately they were landed in a place in which they
found a wooden hut, partly in ruins,

Jutta. Probably the same which Ivan lived
in with his friends?

Farner, I believe not, they would otherwise.
have mentioned the cavern in their journal and
the simple narration which they published after
their return. This hut which they discovered
they put not only in a better state, but also built
inside of it, a smaller one, and. filled the space
between the two with moss. They had firewood
more than they wanted; they laid up many rein-
deer, and gathered before the entrance of winter,
a quantity of spoon-wort and other plants, and
caught many fish, whieh they smoked together
with the reindeer. A short time before the be-
220 Winter in SpirzBERGEN.

ginning of winter, they were so fortunate as to
catch a young whale, the flesh of which they cut
info strips and roasted hard, at the fire for their
winter food. Water from melted ice was their
only drink. Thus they were obliged for one
half of the year to undergo sufferings, and depri-
vations, which no description could portray. It
was a great piece of good fortune for the poor
men, that they remained healthy, Finally in the
month of June, of the next year, a ship on which
they had before served, came again to this region,
and happily carried them back to their own
country. So there are many examples that men
have been compelled to spend a winter on this
barren coast. And it is likewise probable that
many persons of whom we have no knowledge
have | with, such a fate. Ruins have often
béen found of ships wrecked on the coast and in
the bays of this island, and it is possible, that
these stores were brought into the cave from
such an unfortunate ship; it is possible that their
possessors rescued in some way, left the stores in
order to help thereby, some other unfortunate
persons,

Gustavus. Our friends must have been very
thankful for them |

Fatuer. They were indeed, even before they
knew what those casks and barrels contained.
To ascertain this, was now their most important
Winter 1n SPITZBERGEN. 291

task. The first cask was opened. What joy they
felt, when they saw that it was filled with gun-
powder! This was exactly the most useful th
for the question always had been whether the
furious bears would be afraid of their arrows and
lances only. Now they opened a second cask.—
But there was in the cave below them a dread-
ful crash; the whole floor seemed about to tum-
ble, a thundering noise rolled around the rocks,
and the distressing cry of some one calling for
help, resounded even to the spot on which our
astonished friends were standing, who were
unable to explain this most unexpected phe-
nomenon,
Jutta. But what was it, dear father?
Gustavus. What could it be? Why certain-
ly the heedless Gregory had come too near the
powder cask with his lamp.
FatTHer. If this had been the case, the history
of our three friends would have ended with this
moment. But this matter was not so bad, and
was explained, as you shall immediately hear, in
a perfectly natural manner. Ad three of them
went with their lamps back to the entrance, and
there they found the cause of the dreadful noise,
The ladder on which they had mounted into the
hole, was thrown down and lay across the rein- _
deer, who uttered the most piteous moans under
its weight. Probably the creature, which had
19* ,
999 Winter in SritzaERGen.

been accustomed to his kind guardian, had wish-
ed_to follow him up the ladder; or perhaps he

left merely tied by the horns to one of the
rounds, and so had pulled down the heavy lad-
der on himself. The noise of this in falling,
must have caused a very loud and powerful echo
in the empty rocky cavern, in which the distress-
ing cry of the animal had a great resemblance
to the voice of an unfortunate man, and thus
our friends as well as ourselves, saw the whole

strange matter explained.
Max. But now, how were. they to get down
again ? :

FaTHER. That was the most difficult thing.
To climb down the smooth rock was impossible,
and to jump down, would be a folly not to be
thought of. They were compelled, therefore, to
devise some other means, and this they did.
Among the stores, they had found many ropes,
these they tied together. Gregory soon let him-
self down on it, raised up the ladder, mounted
again, and to prevent any similar accident, fas-
tened the ladder tight.

And now they went to work again to examine
the stores. The three were never more re-
joiced, than now, when they saw one want after
. another supplied. They called out by turns to
each other, as any one found something long
wished for, or most needed. But greater still

Â¥
Winter tn SpitzRERGEN. 993

was their joy, when Gregory uncovered a cask
full of the best well-preserved flour.

Marra. This must indeed have been mést
pleasant. The poor men may now bake some
bread, and make themselves more good soup !

JULIA. Now they ought to find potatoes too,
just as Robinson Crusoe did.

FaTHEer. Yes, if Spitzbergen only lay as near
the Equator as it did to the North Pole! But
they were already helped to many things, and
they could now more contentedly look forward
to the future, to the end of the winter, and the
half year’s night. Then the day would dawn,
which in this zone lasts almost half a year, and
they might reasonably hope that in the milder
season of the year they would be able to provide
for their future subsistence.

Now our friends went down and found the
poor reindeer in such a poor plight they could not
think of being able to cure him. The ladder had
broken his backbone, and painful as it was to the
old pilot, he was compelled to kill the animal.

If by the discovery of the new chamber, or cave,
and the large stores it contained, many neces-
saries of life were supplied, there was also joined
with it the important advantage, that the things
found afforded our friends occasion and material
for new occupation. The first work which they
undertook was to bring the most necessary arti-

e
994 Wister in Spirzeercen.

cles, except the gunpowderand the flour, into their
cave. Both of these they left above in a safer
place. It would have been dangerous to have
had the powder in their dwelling; an unlucky
spark might easily have set it on fire, and thus
the whole cavern would have been blown up.
The fiour they left above because it was drier
there, and more airy, than in the lower cavern,
where it was more easily exposed to sour, or be-
come otherwise unfit.

Now they must begin to bake, a business which
fell to the pilot, who was not wholly inexperi-
enced in it, as in his earlier years he had been
assistant to the cook on board of aship. To try an
experiment, he determined to make use of the
absence of his friends, who to-day, notwithstand-
ing the extreme cold, had decided on going out to
hunt, as they being now furnished with powder
and ball, might reckon on sure success. But the
first thing which was required to have such
an experiment succeed, wasa bake-oven. The
building of one was indeed attended with many
difficulties and hard labor, but the pilot would
not shrink from it on this account—he went
quickly and courageously to work—and his ac-
tivity was not unrewarded, as is almost always
the case with man, when he begins with reflec-
tion and goes forward with continued industry,

The walls of the cavern had many clefts, and
Winter tn SrirzperGen. 925

one of these the pilot chose for his oven ; it was
smooth and straight below, about twé yards
broad, and went into the rock the same depth.
Three sides of the oven were, therefbre, already
found. Now the pilot sought in the deeper cleft
of the rock for loose stones, placed them upright
on some flat ones, kneaded the earth which he
found in the hollow into a paste, built up mason-
work therewith, and thus there was a bake-oven
prepared even to the door. This was formed by
means of a board, and in order to give a firm hold
and hinder it from falling down, when it was to
close the well-heated oven, he made, with mason-
work, an addition before the opening, by which
the door could be fastened. Probably he after-
wards gave it many little changes in the structure,
as experience had no doubt suggested to his
notice various things which he might employ for
the improvement of his work.

But as accident often causes the most import-
ant and useful discoveries, of this the account of
the pilot furnisheasa striking proof. He was oc-
cupied in hammering a large stone for a plate of
his bake-oven, when he noticed in the stone many
broad shining veins.

Maria. It was, no doubt, solid gold?

FaTHer. Something more useful to him.

JuLia. Then it was certainly diamonds ?

FaTuer. It was something which the pilot

*
296 Winter tn SprirzBERGEN.

valued more than gold and diamonds, at least its
prosessibn was more important in his situation.
Every one of the veins was full of the finest rock-
salt, which appeared in little bright cubes or
blocks, and were here inserted. No discovery
eould have yielded the honest man greater joy
than this; for now by the help of God again was
furnished the supply for a long felt and most
pressing want, With longing he waited the re-
turn of his friends, in order that he might impart
to them the joyful news.

The bake-oven was now finished, and the build-
er immediately made a fire in it todry it. The
oven*had a sufficient draught, the fire burned
finely, and in halfan-hour the mason-work was
dry. The old pilot caused the oven to be cooled
off—and thus he heated it for baking.

He had already kneaded flour and hot water
in a kettle to a paste, or dough, and when this
was sufficiently firm he let it stand for an hour,
then laid it on a smooth clean board, formed cakes
of it, rubbed them with bear’s grease, and strewed
sugar over them. Then he took out the coals
from the thoroughly heated oven, cleansed it by
means of a bundle of spoon-wort, put in his bak-
ing, and shut up the opening with a board.
Already the strong smell of the baking enliven-
ed the old pilot, but far more yet did the sight of
it rejoice him, when, of a shining brown color
Winter In SPITzZBERGEN. 227

and well done, it stood on the table, and filled the
cavern with its savor.

Now, the sign agreed on sounded outside, and
the pilot hastened thither, in order to place the
bridge over the trench. The two hunters return-
ed home with a stout buck reindeer, which they
had shot.

“What is that fine and strong smell?” cried
Ivan, as he entered the cave. “It is just as if we
were in a bakery of Archangel!” “ Yes, indeed
Thave been baking,” answered the pilot, and with
self-pleased look showed the astonished friends the
products of his baking. He had already set on tea,

Junta, And so the tea-drinking was as merry
and joyous among them, as any one could be.

FaTHer. They certainly were good men, and
we rejoice that they were.

“In your absence I have made a discovery,”
said the old pilot, “ which is of invaluable worth.”
With these words he held out to them the rock-
salt. “See here, this is the most beautiful rock-
salt, of the purest taste.” Then he told his friends
how he came to make the discovery, and they
thanked God, and their friend, for the newly-
received blessing.

Marta. And yet there was still wanting so
much to their happiness !

FarHer. That is true; but the wise man
looks not always at what is wanting to him, but

y
928 Winter in SriTzpERGEN.

at what he Aas, Our friends at Spitzbergen had
found themselves in such a situation; they knew
that it was not by their own fault that they were
in this solitude, but that their business and phi- |
lanthropy had prepared this destiny for them.

Besides, they were healthy, had their necessary

subsistence, were friendly affected towards one

another, active, and industrious: the hope of

being, sooner or later, freed from this sorrowful

abode, enlivened their spirit, and thus they could

be more tranquil and ¢heerful, than might have

been supposed at first view.

Manta. That is indeed true! But they ought
not to compare themselves with other men of
whom they knew, that they were more fortu-
nate, if they did not wish to become disquieted.

MorHEeR. That was not necessary; it would
have been hurtful to their contentment. You
ean, my children, best understand that in your
own case. You would not deny that you pos-
sess a great many good things; you have your
parents; you have clothing, food, a dwelling to
shelter you. You are healthy, and receive in-
struction in what it is necessary for you to know.

But many thousand children have all this, and

are far better off than you are; they have all
that they wish, not a pleasure is denied them;
they have for their instruction the most costly
books, wear the finest clothes,—in a word, they
WiInTER IN SPiTzBERGEN. 229

have in this aspect all imaginable advantages.
If you now should compare your situation with
that of these more fortunate children, how would
your lot appear to them?

Gustavus. That I have never done, and will
never do!

MorHeErR. But suppose that you should make
such a comparison, the result would be you would
become discontented with your situation; you
would imagine yourself to be unhappy, not be-
cause you really were so, but because you saw
others who, according to your opinion, were hap-
pier than you; you would look on them with
envy, and would really become what you feared
yourself to be—unhappy.

But now on the other side—how many thou-
sands there are to whom God has denied your
happiness! Poor children who now probably
have not even a warm room, a bed, warm food
or necessary clothing, for whose instruction no
one cares, the fatherless and motherless orphans,
who are compelled thus early to feel all the
wretchedness of mankind—If now you wish to
obtain a clear view of your good fortune, compare
yourself with these who are so deserving to be
pitied. Ask yourself, why you are happier than
they are ?—Ask yourself, whether the poor unfor-
tunates are more to blame for their wretchedness—
whether you are better than they are?

20
930 Winter tn SrirzBeERGenN.

Gustavus. Mother, you cannot but believe
that we are very, very well contented with our
situation.

FarHerR. You have reason to be so, and you
can the better see this, always the more you look
at the more unfortunate below you, than at the
more fortunate who are above you.

And now to return to our friends, who were
the more tranquil and contented, because they
were rational and wise in looking at the bright
side of their condition. Frequently they talked
together of their blessings, which God had grant-
ed them in their sorrowful destiny, and if at any
time a trifling uneasiness crept in, they struck
up a hymn or read some passage in God's word.

Then Ivan and Gregory took their guns and
axes, to drive away every moody feeling by hunt-
ing or chopping wood: the pilot also seized on
some work to be done, made some necessary
utensil or household implement still needed,
baked up a supply of bread, or went out to make
some new discovery in the cavern. Then when
they came together again, their anxiety and un-
pleasant feeling was gone, and with pleasure they
enjoyed their frugal meal; sleep brought a bene-
ficial strength, and with new powers, after a few
hours’ rest, they went again to their work.

On a certain time the old pilot was all alone,
He had finished his usual labors and as he was
Winter in SPITZ BERGER. 231

not wont to let his hands lie idle in his lap, it
occurred to him, to examine the stores in that
upper cavern, with all of which they had not yet
become acquainted.

Morner. Observe that, Maria and Julia.
Many useful things are often found, that would
otherwise have remained unnoticed or forgotten.

FaTHer. And you, Max and Gustavus, there
is a rule about this which applies to many things.
I have always been accustomed in my leisure
hours, to look through my books, and have there-
by gained many a new view, or at least recalled
again many things, which I had forgotten. It is
a kind of locking over one’s stores.

But to go on with our story. The five or six
little casks which stood above were all alike, and
our friend believed nothing to be more certain,
than that they all contained flour. The pilot
opened the last barrel, and found—

Maria, Certainly, gold—was it not, father?

FaTHer. No, my child, a store of beautiful
white beans. Still more eagerly he struck on
the cask standing next, and was surprised by
the sight of fine yellow peas, The third one
afforded him not leas joy, for it was wholly full
of lentils.

Jutta. Grand! grand! Now he went to
cooking them |

FaToér, As the old pilot knew that his
939 WINTER IN SPITZBERGERN.

friends were wont to return after having been
absent some hours, and usually with an excellent
appetite, he immediately concluded to prepare
for them a domestic comfort, and surprise them
with a new dish, This consisted of a good por-
tion of peas, which he immediately carried
down into the lower cave, and after he had care- .
fully cleaned and washed them, put on the fire
with a smoked bear's ham.

Of all dishes this must have been best under-
stood by him, for except the bear's ham, it was a
common dish among sailors. The pilot had
often cooked it on board of the ship. In the
most cheerful mood, he awaited the return of his
friends, who he knew after their laborious exer-
cise in the pure cold air would wish for nothing
so much as a well-covered table; and the time
seemed to him almost too long, before he heard
their call before the hut. Finally, they returned
home, and as soon as he had let them in, Gregory's
first words were, ‘ To-day we have been hard at
work, and are very hungry; we have been a great
distance; but for it, we have brought home a
large fat reindeer buck.” “ And I,” said the |
good pilot, interrupting him, “ will treat you to-
day, to a new dish!’ With that he went to the
hearth and brought to them, waiting full of ex-
pectation and wonder, the peas smelling most
deliciously. How the dish so pleasant, especially
Winter in SPITzBERGEN. 233

to sailors,'and of which they had been so long
deprived, was relished! While they were eating,
the pilot told his friends how he had found the
peas, and raised still more their joy, by inform-
ing them that they had in store a considerable
quantity of beans and lentils,

Marra. Now then, they had more than many
families can boast of. If I had been in the pilot's
place, I would have arranged a regular bill of
fare for the whole week.

Max. My little sister, that could not have
been done.

Maria. Why not?

Max. What, do you not nt How
would you have determined the days? There
was neither sunrise nor sunset: it was only one
long night.

Maria. That is true. But then I would
have reckoned the time by the watch, and every
twenty-four hours, prepared the regular dinner.
First on Sunday, a fine fat haunch of reindeer,
with which spoon-wort should supply the place
of salad. The first course of soup—

Jutia. Soup with flour and bear's grease!

Maria. And why not?

Gustavus. Could you not make a broth with
milk ?

Maria. Certainly, I did not think of the
reindeer's milk.—On Monday peas with—

20*
934 Winter tn SrirzeErceyn.

Max. Bear's meat.

Maria. Tuesday, peas soup.

Gustavus. With bear's snouts, and bear's
ears,

Maria. On Wednesday, a dish of spoon-
wort, and dripping with a roast of reindeer.
Thursday, lentils, with salted meat.

Gustavus. You mean of bear's flesh,

Marisa. Friday, beans with thesame. Satur-
day, pieces of meat warmed up, and such like,
See, Max, in this way there would be a table set
for the whole week, and thus I would have
arranged it.

_ Max. It is a great pity that you had not
been there at Spitzbergen, how many cares you
might have saved the old pilot!

Jutta. The dear guests would not have
thought so with their over-salted soup, and their
burnt bread.

Gustavus. Now who knows, Max, where we
may be yet. If we should chance to geton such
an island as Spitzbergen, we will send after you,
Maria. I would then hunt the game, and you
should cook and bake.

Farrer. (smiling). Have you finished your
arrangements about cooking? I must tell you
that the pilot arranged everything usually, as
Maria has said, although they had not consulted
together. The guests were satisfied with his
Winter iw SrirzeerceEn. 235

cooking, the clear spring gave them the healthiest
drink, and they relished their pipes and tea, till
the time came to go to sleep.

MoTHer. And then they probably did as we
shall: they slept quietly, in the firm trust of
the divine protection.
Crnth Eurning.

Poor Maria, the whole of the next day, was
obliged to hear how her two brothers made them-
selves merry about her bill of fare. In vain Julia,
who otherwise knew how to contest a matter well,
came to her sister's aid. The grave Max, with
his usually dry wit, and the more volatile, wild
Gustavus would not cease referring everything
which gave any opportunity to Maria's bill of
fare.

These little jokes, however, had nothing wicked
or injurious in them; they loved their sister too
much for that, They did only what is often
done among grown-up, well-educated persons,—
if one makes a blunder at any time, the others
lay hold of it at his expense, who made it, to
create more merry talk. When this is done ina
right manner, all harm is kept off, and it is
brought to an end at the right time; then these
little jokes surely cannot be blamed by any
rational person.
WintTER IN SPITZEERGEN. 287

Maria knew beforehand that both of her broth-
ers would also sometime make a blunder; she
therefore comforted herself with the idea, that
she would soon find an opportunity to pay them
back with heavy interest for what her brothers
had joked her. Quietly, and with her usual good
nature, she bore all that she was obliged to hear
from them.

Now the time for supper approached; their
father came in, and at the table there was often
heard some little playful allusion to Maria’s bill
of fare.

“ Now forward,” said their father. “We are
going again to Spitzbergen.”

Gustavus. We shall not be wanting, we are
all ready for the march.

FatHEer. Where did we last see our friends,
Max?

Max. Gregory and Ivan had gone hunting,
and the old pilot was cooking in the kitchen.

Fatuer. Right. And now we will go on.
It was now about the middle of January.

Max. But, father, how could they determine
this? or how could any one know generally the
day?

FatHer, They could not indeed reckon ac-
cording to the rising and setting of the sun, as no
sun was to be seen in the constant night. But,
happily, the pilot possessed a journal with a cal-
938 WiIntTER In SPITZBERGER.

endar. He had also at the outset marked the
day in which they had left the ship; and now they
reckoned twenty-four hours for day and night, a
period which they could the easier determine, as
every one of them carried a watch. The seventh
day they regularly kept sacred as the Sabbath day,
in which they rested from their work. They sang
geome pious devotional hymns, which kept up
their spirits and quickened their confidence in
God, they read some chapters in the Bible, and
spent the day in religious conversation, enliven-
ing their hearts, and in this way strengthened
themselves for their certainly not easy labora of
the following day. Calm, and with a peaceful
conscience, relying on the fatherly assistance of
God, they then gave themselves up to slumber,
and came forth after this invigorating sleep new-
ly fitted for their occupations.

The winter of this year was distinguished by
its extremely severe, and long-continued cold.
The oldest gray-haired person did not recollect
such a winter, and even in our country the cold
rose toan uncommon height. How dreadful then
it must have been at Spitzbergen! Scarcely the
hardiest wild animals, accustomed to a cold cli-
mate, were in a condition to bear this cold, and
how much less then could men!

Ivan and Gregory wished once, as usual, to go
out a hunting and for wood; but scarcely had
Winter in SPiITzBERGER. 950

they opened the door of the hut, than the cold
air meeting them took away their breath, and as
it came out of their mouth it became changed
into frost, and remained hanging on their clothes,
while they felt the most violent pains in their
eyes, and the skin seemed about to burst off from
their face and hands.

“To-day it is impossible to go out into the open
air,” said Gregory. “ We could not take a hun-
dred steps but at the risk of our lives!” Ivan
found this declaration only too well founded.
Both of them went back and described to their
friend the dreadful cold, “Then you must stay
at home," answered the pilot. “ To risk your lives
so would be foolhardiness.”

Gustavus. How long then did their staying
at home continue ?

Father. More than a month.

Gustavus. The time must have been long
enough to them |

FaTHeR, Then I should pity our friends!
No man is more to be pitied than he who
knows not how to employ his time. .As for our
friends they had work enough. You can easily
imagine that in their hard journeys through the
snow and ice, over rocks and cliffs, and by the
dragging in of wood and game, their clothes must
have been much injured. They had indeed taken
clothes with them from the ship, but not more
940 WiInTeER In SpPITZBERGEN.

than they wore; and they had also found many
necessary articles in the chest of the Holland cap-
tain, but the various labors, which required many
long journeys, had much impaired them. As they
always cherished still the hope of going back, in
some vessel by which they might be rescued, to
their country, it was very naturally their wish
not to appear like Greenlanders or Jakuts, and
they must therefore keep their clothes as good as
possible. But now the want was too evident,
and particularly they had greatly suffered in their
shoes. How were they to begin to help them-
selves as to this want? Happily there was a
supply of bears’ and reindeer’s skins, These
were indeed, especially the former, hard as a
board, and as unbending; but they struck, beat,
and pressed them until they were soft enough to
allow them to be worked. From this bear-skin
they now cut pieces which they fitted over their
feet, and fastened stout straps on the corners.
Mania. How did they fasten them on ?
Farner. With finercutstrings. By the help
ofa sharp-pointed nail they bored holes in the
leather, and in the stout strips designed for bind-
ing them together, and in this way the covering
for their feet was prepared. From the more soft
reindeer’s skins they made long wide clothes for
their legs, coats and cloaks, with large capes
which they could draw over their heads.
#
WINTER In SPITzZBERGEN. 241

Marra. All sewed in the same manner?

FaTHer. Yes, in the same manner.

Jui. They must have cut a fine figure?

FaTter. Who would have regarded that?
This did not come into consideration.

The chief object was the preservation of their
health, to protect themselves against the cold,
and to spare their otherclothes, As to linen they
were yet well provided; for this they were in-
debted to the supply left by the Holland captain.
Every one of them had nearly half-a-dozen shirta,
which were often washed.

Maria. Their washing must have been a
pretty business. Without soap or starch !

JULIA. Without ironing and plaiting!

FatHer, Thus their clothing engaged the at-
tention of our friends; but there was yet more
for them to do, as a man always, whois glad to be
active, will everywhere find labor and occupation.
Many little household implements were newly
made, while others were put into a better and
more useful condition; many things even which
belonged to conveniences were made, while they
constructed stool, tables, benches, and from soft
wood made trays, baking trough, and plates. The
polishing of their guns and swords too was not
neglected. And thus our brave fellows never ex-
perienced the torment of being without anything
to do. )

21
o49 WiInTER Ix SPITSBERGEN.

Maria, But once more, dear father! How
did they get along with respect to means of liv-
ing, especially as to fresh meat ?

FaTHER. Very well. Our friends were good
economists, to whom the proverb might be ap-
plied, “‘Be sparing in time, and you shall have
when you need!” Gregory and Ivan had already
shot many fine reindeer, the flesh of which kept
well in cold weather; besides, there were also the
stores which they had found, and here again they
had striking proof how the providence of God
lends its helping hand, when human powers fail.

Max. How so?

FaTHer. The intense cold and the snow which
lay so deep, was too hard even for the bears, and
as they no longer found any food, so they now
came driven by raging hunger into the valley,
where our friends lived.

_ Max. They were after the victuals that smelt
so nice when cooked |

FatHer. In a certain sense perhaps so, only
with this difference, that they wished also to make
a meal out of the cooks,

_ Jutta. That would not have been very agree-
able to me.

- Faruer. ‘To our friends, too, the visit was not
over pleasing. They were resting, tired of work,
on their beds, when Ivan heard an unusual noise
and growling, mingled with yells. He rose up
WintER IN SPITZBERGEN. 243

and he believed he had been dreaming, when he

heard it anew and more plainly than before.

Immediately he waked up the others. “I believe
we are going to have another change of weather,”
said he. “Only listen to the storm.” “A fine
storm!” said the old pilot, “get up and take your
guns: it is the bears which are trying to break
in!" They quickly sprung up, seized their load-
ed guns, and hurried from the cave into the hut.
Gregory carefully opened the little window.
The air was as cold as possible; but clear and
shining from the fiery northern lights, lay the

valley covered with the dazzling snow, before:

him. But what a sight! what horror! Five
great white bears that had become ravenous from
hunger, snuffling and howling, were trying to
break into the door of the hut, which happily
was fast bolted. Perhaps in a few moments the
decayed timber might have been crushed in by
their pressure, and our friends would have been
lost, without rescue, if they had awaked a few
minutes later. Ivan immediately shot at the near-
est bear, and hit him so well that he staggered.
The shot re-echoed through the rocky wall ;

wolves which were lurking in the distance, to see"

if they might not also obtain their prey, raised
a frightful yelland ran off. But the beara, become
the more furious, stood their ground all the more
firmly. They were indeed at first somewhat star-

——
O44 Winter in SPiTrzBEERGEN.

tled at the flash of the powder, and the report
‘of the gun resounding through the rocks, but
soon they fell into a still greater rage, which they
at once vented on their brother that had sunk
under the shot, and pitched upon him furious-
ly and tore him dreadfully. From the pain of
this tearing and rending the almost lifeless ani-
mal was roused again, and now his rage being
excited by the wound from the ball, and the
mode of cure his friends had adopted with him,
was raised to the highest degree. He fell furi-
ously on the nearest of his neighbors, and in a
short time they were all biting and tearing each
other,

Maria. That was fine sport to our friends.

FaTHer. You think so, do you, Maria?—How-
ever great was the noise of the tearing and biting,
however they might have looked on it when they
were no more troubled by their enemies about
the besieged hut, yet they were in continual fear
lest the four might again muster and venture on
a new attack, and very probably a more succegs-
ful one, against their door,

Ivan and Gregory, in the meantime, were no
idle spectators of the dreadful fight; they kept
up a firing among them, but nota single bear fell.

Gustavus. Ha! Ido not understand about
that. They had at other times been such good
marksmen !
Winter in SpPirzperGen. 245

Farner. Probably in the confusion in which
the bears all were, they could get no sure aim.*
It is possible also, that the bears in their fury,
did not regard wounds, which else would have
been severe and painful.

“The fray is becoming doubtful !” said the pi-
lot: “this noise may call here more of them, and
thus add to the strength of the besieging force.”
“We must resort to another method!” ne added
after a short reflection. “Keep at your posts
till I come back!” With these words he hasten-
ed to the cavern, and caught up a package of
squibs,

Junta. What did he catch up?—Squibs?

FaTHEer. Gustavus, explain the meaning of
the word to your sisters. It belongs in some
measure to warlike preparations. °

Gustavus, Squibs are a kind of cartridges
filled with powder and other burning matters,
which are used in sport, im fire-works, and seri-
ously to frighten horses. They differ from rock-
ets that are thrown up, as in their course they
jump about in wide spaces on the ground, and
therefore they are also often called frogs or
snakes, At every jump they give a loud report
and sprinkle fire 4nd sparks around them.

Farner. Very well explained! The pilot
set fire to one of these squibs and threw it among
the bears, and it was fine sport to see how the

21*
946 Winter 1x Srirzeercen.

thing jumped about on the hard frozen snow,
like a will-of-a-wisp, scattering sparks; and how
with every report it made a side jump, and some-
times lighted on a bear’s head, and then —
on another's shaggy aoat.

dunia. How did the bears take these fire-
works, let off in honor of them?

FaTHER, You ean easily conceive. They
had never experienced such an honor. They
were startled, put their paws growling up to their
heads when the squib struck their face, or they
wallowed in the snow when it came into closer
intercourse with their thick furs.

Not to let it all go off in a joke, Gregory and
Ivan shot continually at them, while the old pilot
threw some more squibs, and the enemy at last
drew off growling and limping and greatly dis-
pleased, leaving one of their dead behind them. Af-
ter the besieging force had withdrawn, our friends
took possession of the enemy left, a monstrous
white bear. With the greatest exertions, they
succeeded in bringing him at first only into the
hut, and bolted the door. They could not now
think of trying to skin him, and cut up his flesh.
There was something else to be done.

Affrighted by the dreadful cold, our friends
had spent almost a whole month in the close,
heavy cavern, without going out into the open air,
Now, as during the fight they had felt the bene-
: Winter 1n Sritzpercen. 247

ficial effect of an almost intolerable, yet enliven-
ing fresh air, they concluded to open the window
of the hut, in order to give free access to the
pure air, The walls were at once coated with
ice and frost, and the vapor of the cavern and
hut was changed into snow, yet this was nothing
in comparison to the benefit which our friends
experienced from the pure air.

“But we must have a sentinel stationed here,
a sentinel with a light and a gun!” said the old
pilot, “I fear that our foe will be ashamed of |
their having been beaten off from their attack,
and will come upon us before we have expected.”

Ivan and Gregory volunteered for this duty;
the latter, clothed in his bear-skin, and setting
his gun close by him, immediately took his post.
Ivanand the pilot wentintothecavern. Gregory
had been there almost an hour without a bear
showing himeelf, and he was already beginning
to think that he might give up all care on ac-
count of the return of the enemy, when he heard
adistant growling, continually approaching nearer
and nearer. He immediately mentioned what
he heard. The friends hurried out, and looked
through the opening,« but perceived as yet no
enemy on the clear shiningsnow. You remember
that not far from the hut, there was an opening
in the rock, which formed an entrance into the
valley. The enemy could approach only on this
248 WiIntTER In SPITZBERGEN.

side. And in truth, soon a huge white bear
showed himself at the corner of the rock, accom-
panied by half a dozen others, which under his
lead, made directly for the hut. The trench was
no hindrance to them; it was full of snow, and
this was covered with a thick crust of ice.

Gustavus. Our friends ought long since to
have cleared it out again.

-FaTHER. Very true: but who knows what
difficulties might have prevented them! They
certainly were not wanting in determination and
readiness to work, Enough that the besieging
army came right forward, and probably the blood,
or as it is termed in the language of hunters, the
sweat of their dead comrade, was the reason why
the bears were yet more furious and violent,
than in their first attack. But one of them dis-
tinguished himself by his savage efforts, No
glowing, hissing, and fire-sprinkling squibs fright-
ened him; whenever such a firebrand struck him
he became so much the more furious; growling
and grating his teeth he put up his paws over
his snout, and renewed his assault with jncreased
rage. In vain Ivan and Gregory shot at him,
he minded no ball; his attacks were the more
violent and continually harder to resist; he
smelt his dead comrade in the hut, and put to
all the strength at his command anew, and
WiInTER IN SPITZBEERGEN. 249

erash |—he all at once dashed in the door, and
the unwelcome guest was inside.

Max. He truly fell with the door into the
house |

Juuta. But, dear father, what did they now do?

Farner. You can easily imagine that our
friends were not very well pleased, It wasnow a
fight for life or death, With bayonets, they re-
ceived the guest which had crowded” himself in
upon them, and which reared himself up wrath-
fully, and spread out Wide his great shaggy paws
to grasp one of our friends, or possibly all three
of them, but suddenly stumbled over his dead
comrade. Before he ¢ould get up again, the
watchful old pilot placed the muzzle of his gun
at his ear, fired, and the furious monster lay
wallowing in his own blood. At the same
moment Ivan's and Gregory's bayonets were
buried in the enemy's breast until they became
convinced that he was dead. The others stood
at a distance to wait the result. Some squibs
launched among them, showed them the back-
track, which they indeed took unwillingly, but
in great haste, and it was a matter of much joy
to our friends to be so rid of them.

Max. It would have been fine doings if the
other bears had pressed into the cavern !

JuLIA, How could the poor men have saved
themselves ?
950 WiINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

Max. Why, if they lived, they could retreat
by means of the ladder into the upper cavern.

Gustavus. Yes, forthey had provisions there.

Maria. But what would they have done for
water, or for cooking utensils, and a bake-oven?
And how too, if their guests with shaggy paws,
in the cavern, had happened to go up?

Gustavys. That would have been better: the
_ garrison would have conducted themselves brave-
ly, and driven back all eee

FatHer. Besides, this®short visit had given
occasion to much necessary work. The first
thing which required the attention of our friends,
if they wished in future‘to remain free of such
visits, was, to make a new door to their house, as
the old one was wholly broken to pieces. But
this work, in their great exhaustion after the
bloody fight, did not belong to the easy kind,
and they labored many hours before the new
and strong door was finished. Now they took
hold of the bears, which were both of monstrous
size, and yet according to the pilot's opinion
were young. But finally they got through too
with this work, although it was none of the
easiest either. The skins alone were so heavy,
that they could scarcely carry them up the ladder,

But as in general, an unexpected affright has
its benefits, so it was the case here, Our friends
became more cautious to avoid any similar oceur-
Winter tn SrirzBpERGeEN. 251

rence. Though this caused them many hard
labors, and to pass many heavy hours, yet they
did not trouble themselves on account of this.
They made all possible preparations for defence,
that they might not in this respect have to re-
proach themselves.

Maria. But how could the good men do
more than they had done?

FaTHer. Something else was needed. The
trench which was dug around their fortress, had
been filled up by the drifted snow, and its top
was covered with so firm a crust of ice, that it
might have borne up a loaded wagon, without its
sinking in. The bears could, therefore, come to
the hut without being prevented ; they were then
obliged, in order to protect their dwelling, toclear
out the trench. This was indeed hard work, and
the more severe on account of the piercing cold;
but it was necessary, and when once they were
convinced of this, any work became more easy.

With their axes they first cut through the crust
of ice, then they threw out all the snow on the
inside edge of the trengh. And thus, after forty-
eight hours’ hard labor, they had formed a kind
of wall, the firmness of which they considerably
increased by pouring water over it. This, too,
froze into a smooth crust of ice, and thus the wall
stood there as if made of polished steel. Now
they might hope to be safe from their before dread-
953 WINTER In SPITZBERGEN.

ed guests. They often indeed made their appear-
ance, but the view of the deep trench, with its
sides smooth as glass, and still more the high wall
of ice with its rough slope, frightened them away.
Therefore, when the bears, growling and snuffling
drew near the hut, on the other side of the trench,
our friends looked out at them quietly, and saw
them go away, and seek in vain a way to get
over it. ;

Gustavus. I would have given them another
greeting |

Fatuer. Do you suppose that our friends
were wanting in such civility? Sometimes a ball
from a gun struck one of the boldest of them, or
a squib of sprinkling fire was thrown on his skin,
and it caused many a hearty laugh when it made
any one of them, thus welcomed, cut up his antics,
or with his burnt nose seek a greater distance and
leave his place to some other. Finally they all
kept away, and our friends were relieved from
their troublesome visits.

Now the good men had also the advantage of
being able to stay a longer time in the open air,
The air was indeed yet cold enough, but it no
longer produced the sharpness and cuéting feel-
ing, and was not so painful to the eyes, and the
skin was no more affected as before with frost blis-
ters. It was a great comfort when they could
again, for the first time, spend an hour in the
WINTER IN SPITZBERGEN. 953

open air, after they had lived a month in a cav-
ern. Though this was large and roomy, yet it
was always a cavern; the air was heavy and un-
healthy, notwithstanding they sought to remedy
the evil by frequent flashing of loose gunpowder.
Its inhabitants also felt, froma certain bodily las-
situde, and from being more frequently affected
with melancholy, that constant living in the cay-
ern was very injurious to their health, How
happy they now felt as they passed over on the
walled entrance to their fortress, mounted on a
rock, and could breathe in new powers and new
life in God's pure air.

Once on a time, our friends sat at their work
in the cavern, when they were affrighted by a ter-
rific howl, which resounded’ fearfully through
the valley. They had not heard anything like
it for a long time; it seemed as if all the bears
and wolves in Spitzbergen had got together
to destroy them, “Load the guns and get
some squibs,” cried the old pilot, not without
some anxiety, “I am afraid the enemy are
coming with great force against us.” Gregory
and Ivan loaded the guns; then they all three
went to the hut, to look aboutgjirst what arrange-
ments were best to drive off the enemy. Grego-
ry carefully opened the window, but, how aston-
ished he was, when he saw not a single bear, but
perceived that the horrible howling in the valley

22
.
954 Winter In SPITZBERGER.

was caused by a frightful storm, which drove the
thick black clouds, swift as an arrow, across the
starless heavens, and blew the snow in great flakes
mixed with rain in his face! This tempest be-
came continually more dreadful, howling and roar-
ing asit passed through the valley, so that the wall
of the hut shook, and the whole building seemed
threatening to tumble down. With anxious
amazement, Ivan and Gregory listened to the
horrors of this frightful event in nature, which
neither of them had ever known in such a degree.

The pilot remained more firm. He had before
made frequent voyages into the northern regions
of the earth, and knew that here the change from
winter to summer was connected with extraordi-
nary occurrences, “God is almighty!” said he,
devoutly, ‘‘ his compassion will protect us in this
uproar of nature !’’

They returned back into the cavern, and the
old pilot quieted his friends on this account, as
he proved to them how the day would now soon
break, and the sun, of the sight of which they
had been so long deprived, would again become
visible. ‘ Perhaps then the Almighty will bring
to us a ship to sqye us," he added. “ We will
trust him. He knows best what we have to bear
here |”

This hope was not indeed so entirely rock-fast
in the heart of the brave man. Sometimes he
Winter in SpirTzREeRcen. 255

felt more enlivened, and tranquil, and sometimes
too the last ray vanished. He knew that it was
very seldom a ship lost herself in these northern
latitudes ; and he also quieted his younger
friends, yet, earnestly as he did so, he often did it
even without himself feeling the comfort which
his lips imparted.

When, after raging for six days, the storm
ceased, Ivan and Gregory made use of the repose
of nature to go out again to hunt; an occupation
which had so long been denied them, but which
was most needful for their health, as also for the
cheerfulness of their spirits. It was in the be-
ginning of the month of March, when one day
they came back to the cavern, unusually joy-
ful and cheerful in their appearance. “ Now?”
asked the pilot. “What good and joyful thing
have you totellof?” “We have to-day again seen
our God's splendid sun, for the first time,” was
the exulting answer. “ Friends, that is a mis-
take. To-day is the fourth of March, and in the
latitude in which we are, the sun first makes its
appearance on the ninth of March ; so that there
are yet wanting five days.” “But, friend, we
have certainly and truly seen the sun!” “ And
you have been mistaken, as I will soon prove to
you.”
Max. Strange! The two maintained that
they had seen the sun with their own eyes, and
256 Winter in SPITzZBERGER.

the third contradicts them, and tells them it was
impossible, what the others assured him was true
and right!

Maris. One of them must have been wrong
in the case.

Fatruer. But how, if I should now tell you
that both of the parties were right? Ivan and
Gregory had seen the sun, though it was some
degrees below the horizon, and yet they might
justly say, that they had seen the sun. The old
pilot had reckoned, that the sun on this day must
have been still deep below the circle of vision.

JuuiA. And had misreckoned ?

Fatuer, No. He had reckoned correctly,
and so he could justly say, that the sun would
first rise in five days.

Marra. Father, will you explain that more
clearly to us?

FaTHER. You will soon see into it.

He laid a piece of money in an empty basin.
“ Now look here, Maria: do you see this piece of
money ?”

Maria. Yes.

Farner. (Then he placed Maria some paces
back.) Do you still see it now?

Maria. No. Theedge of the basin hinders it.

FATHER, (Pouring out a pitcher of clear wa-
ter into the basin.) Do you now see the piece
of money?
Winter in Srirzpercen. 5T

Marra. Yes, perfectly well. It appears as if
it was swimming on the top of the water. I see
it plain enough.

FatHer. And yet you are mistaken when
you believe that you see the piece of money
itself. You see only the picture of the money
on the surface of the water, merely ita image.

Marra. Really, father!—Step forward the
rest of you in my place, and say whether you do
not see it as I do.

They all did so, They indeed found that the
piece of money continually lay in the place in
which they could not see it on account of the
edge of the basin—and—yet they saw it. It
scarcely need be mentioned that this appearance,
of which every one of you, my young readers,
can convince himself, much surprised them, and
seemed in the highest degree inexplicable.

Fatuer. Is it not true, my children, you might
maintain that you had seen the piece of money
from the place on which you stood?

Gustavus. I cannot deny it.

‘FarHer. And so must you generally think
of that appearance. Ivan and Gregory saw the
picture of the sun, by means of the refraction of
the rays of light in the vapors of the horizon,
though the sun in reality could not yet be seen.

Marta. But how was it in this particular
ease ?

99%
958 WINTER In SPirzRERGEN.

FatHer, This explanation would lead us too
far. Be satisfied for the present with the experi-
ment, which you have just made. -A similar ex-
ample you see, when you hold a small straight
stick in a glass of water. As far as the stick is
under the water, it will appear in another direc-
tion, and you would maintain that the stick is
bent, though it is really straight. Try it with a
knitting-needle, Julia; here is a glass of water.

JuLia, Why, so it is: the needle appears to
bend in,

Max. Is it so then with the sun at Spitzber-
gen when it has set?

FaTHER. Just so. The sun that has gone
down, is really already some degrees below the
horizon and yet it always appears to the inhabi-
tants of the Polar countries, to be above the ho-
rizon. In the region of which we know that our
friends were, this apparent light of the sun lasts
every time for five days.

Max. According to this reckoning, the long
night would therefore be ten days shorter. This
would be an advantage for the poor men in that
desolate region.

FATHER. Very true. But to proceed. It is
evident that this would not likely escape the no-
tice of the old pilot who had voyaged go far. It
is possible that he had not thought of this ex-
periment, and it is also possible that it had escaped
WiIstTER In SPITZBERGER. 959

his memory. But he knew his two friends, and
as he knew that he might rely on their word, so he
delayed the decision till the next morning. Then
he himself went with them, across on to the rock
which projected above the cavern—and here he
saw with his own eyes what he had before doubt-
ed. The sun so long absent, rose. It gave him
courage, as to an unfortunate man who had been
half a year robbed of the use of his eyes, and
who now, after so long a period, and anxiously
spent, for the first time enjoyed again his newly-
acquired sight. With thankful tears he blessed
God, and with this pious prayer, new and strong
hopes of the further aid of divine Providence,
and of being some time rescued, arose from this
solitude in his heart. It was to him as pleasant
as if he saw again an old friend, from whom he
had long been separated. His two younger friends
shared with him in these pious joys. They were
also pious, good men, and hearts of this kind can
enjoy no delights, without thinking of him who
bestows them. But now to return to our story.
The sun at first indeed remained only a few hours
above the horizon, but every day it lengthened
its stay, and finally in the first half of April, it
no more went down below the horizon. It kept
on its course above the circle of vision, without

disappearing, in a circuit constantly increasing.
260 Winter 1n SritzBerGen.

Marta. And now the weather changed great
ly ?—

FatHer. As you may readily imagine.—
Every hour and every moment, everything be-
came different. In the beginning, in the first
days of the actual sunshine it was still cold; but
it was no longer that stiffening cold which took
away the breath, and made it impossible for our
friends to go out; it was an agreeable, beneficial
freshness, that pleasant coldness, which is invig-
orating both to the body and spirits. It soon
changed into a mild thawing air; a light fog arose
and turned to a warm rain; the snow gradually
melted away, and soon the valleys shone with
new fresh green, and moss and other plants
of this otherwise desolate land, grew up as in a
hot-house, the higher the sun mounted, Only
the distant icebergs, the bases of which probably
rested in the ocean, stood there immovable,
and picturesquely beautiful was the sight of the
variegated mixture formed by the dusky black
rocks, the silver-colored ice, the green ocean, and
the blue heavens, when our friends from the sum-
mit of the rock, looked over this sublime pano-
rama of the creation.

Marra. It must have been a grand view! I
should like to have seen it once at least !

Max. I know of a sight which would have
been still dearer to our friends. If on the green
Winter In SrirzBERGEN. 261

sea there had appeared at a distance, a ship
which was coming continually nearer; if they
first saw the sail and masts, then the ship itself;
and if finally the Russian double eagle had been
seen on the yellow flag, and they had at last heard
the huzzahs of the sailors.—W ould it not, father?
FaTHeR. Certainly, they would rather have
seen and heard all this; but the fulfilment of
this wish so longed for, was yet far off Gregory
mentioned it, and his recollection somewhat re-
pressed the joyful mood with which the magnifi-
cent view had inspired our friends. But they
were not on this account dispirited, as the good
man generally never is, and can least be when
the view of the grand and majestic in nature
awakens anew in his heart confidence and firm
trust in God. Thus it was with our friends, who
now went about their work with so much the
more composure. :
Maria. And did they succeed in doing much?
FaTHer. A great deal. Our brave friends
knew not whether they were to remain on this
island, or would be so happy as to see again their
homes, The future was unknown tothem; they
only hoped. But these fair hopes, how. easily
might they all be frustrated! Therefore, they
acted very wisely, in conducting their arrange-
ments as if the worst really awaited them,—as
though they might and would never leave the
9623 Winter 1n SpirzBperGen.

island, If they then must really meet this hard
lot, they would be collected, and prepared be-
forehand. It did not thus appear to them half
so frightful as it would otherwise have done.
But if they were to be favored by Providence
with a happier lot, their joy would be the greater
the less they had counted onit. They continued
therefore, the more tranquil, and with the more
diligence engaged in the labors which their situa-
tion demanded. And in fact, the occupations
which the household economy, the cooking, the
bake-oven, hunting, fishing, and hundred other
things rendered necessary, were so many that—

Moruer. We shall find it hard to hear about
them all this evening. To-morrow evening, we
shall I hope go the quicker to the work,
Eleuruth Eurning.

As usual the children were busily employed
the next day. They knew from their own ex-
perience, that a cheerful, joyous evening always
follows from a well and usefully spent day.
They collected in the leisure hours around the
stove, and soon the talk turned on Spitzbergen
and their friends staying here.

Gustavus. I am very curious to know all
that Ivan and the company were busy about
there. What they began with?

Maria. That may be easily imagined. See,
Gustavus, it was now beautiful weather; and
then a master of a house is used to attend to the
building and repair his dwelling. See now if
our friends did not begin with this.

Gustavus. Well, I do not know. What
building was needed? The cavern stood firm.
Or do you imagine that they would do there as
you do here? They would then have to white-
wash, paint, “—_ windows, and set out
ag4 Winter tx SprirzBERGEN. ~

the garden, as is the fashion, alas! here, so that
we can hardly find a corner to stay in.

Max. Now, Gustavus, though the cavern yet
stood, yet certainly the efforts of the bears ren-
dered many repairs of the hut necessary.

Gustavus. You are right, Max; I did not
think of that. ‘This must indeed be first under-
taken. But something else was also needful.

Maria. What?

Gustavus. They must have done as did
Robinson Crusoe and his man Friday.

Maria. How was that?

Gustavus. ‘They had found in the cavern a
fine supply of peas, beans, lentils, and barley, had
they not? So I would have dug up a large
piece of ground, and guarded it by a thick fence ;
T would have divided off the whole field into the
usual beds, andsowed a partof all the stores. In
the heat of the sun these would certainly have
prospered well,

Maria. To be sure. Especially the barley
would have yieldeda most rich harvest, would it
not?

Gustavus. Most undoubtedly. See, Maria,
these things might go on as they would, they
would be safe. Ifthey were once more obliged
to take up with winter-quarters on Spitzbergen,
they would have had a well-filled magazine.

Marta. Especially @ newly gathered
Winter In SPITZBERGEN. 265

barley. What a rich product this would give!
Almost as much as if they had sown their gun-
powder. Really, Gustavus, I should not have
entrusted such great agricultural prospects to
you |

During the laughter at Gustavus for planting
barley, their father came in. Even he was
obliged to smile when the other children made
him acquainted with Gustavus's plan for con-
ducting the husbandry. “ Writedown the newly
gathered barley ‘with the bill of fare,” whispered
Maria with a little yet here permitted pleasure
at his expense, in the ear of her brother Gustavus.
It was an innocent retort for the ridicule with
which Gustavus had joked his sister on account
of her bill of fare. Naturally, this joking was
kept within bounds, and it instantly ceased as
soon as their father made arrangements to go on
with his story.

FaTHER. We left our friends yesterday—

JutiaA. On the rock from which they had
such a grand view, and busied with their plan
of conducting household affairs.

Max. And we have already talked of it,
what would be the first and most needful of
anything.

FaTHER. This you shall at once learn. First
our friends thought of their dwelling.

Marta. Now, Gustavus? Who was right?
266 WiINTER IN SPITZBERGEN.

FatuErr. They had spent a half-year in the
close unhealthy cavern, and for almost twomonths
in the unparalleled cold, they could not leave this
abode, which must certainly be extremely injuri-
ous to their health. Now it was their first care
to air the cavern; and to clean it, to free every-
thing they had, articles of clothing, linen, beds,
and provisions, from the heavy and mouldy
smell, it was necessary that they should be brought
out into the hot, shining and beneficial sun,
They therefore carried everything out on the
open place before the hut, which as you know
was protected by the trench. Even the casks
of gunpowder, the flour, and the house utensils
were here included. Afterwards they opened all
thesbarrels, beat the bear’s and reindeer’s skins,
the sacks of moss serving for beds, and put them
in the heat of the sun, which was continually be-
coming more glowing. Then they went into the
cavern, where a fire was made in many places to
drive out the heavy thick air, for which purpose
they often fashed gunpowder. At last they did
the same in the hut itself, which age and the
weather made so ruinous, that almost a com-
pletely new building was necessary.

Finally, all three of them went to their place’
for getting wood, sought out the handsomest
and straightest trunks, and then laboriously form-
ed them into pillars, rafters, beams, and other
Winter 1n SrirzBERGEN. 267

necessary tintbers, Thus we see our friends at
work as joiners and cabinet-makers, and so
in the first eight times four-and-twenty hours, for
as the sun did not go down they could not deter-
mine the time according to the usual mode of
days, the hut was made almost new. They also
made a new door, some new benches and tables,
and thus their summer-house was soon in a
habitable condition. Most of this sort of work
fell to the old pilot, who, while Gregory and
Ivan got out the wood, or went a-hunting or
fishing, was thus busy at home.

Max. So they caught fishes too, now?

Gustavus. Maria, one addition more to the
bill of fare !

Marra. I know not yet how I could dress
fish right with barley!

FatHes. That the labors multiplied, that the
building of the hut especially caused much exer-
tion, you may see.

Gustavus. Bat, father, I would not have
done the work.

FaTHer. And why not?

Gustavus. Ivan and his friends might hope
to be taken off from the island, and why then the
hard, useless work of building? To cultivate
the field would be much more needfual.

FatHer. Whether you are in the right, and
our friends ought to have acted according to
268 WiIntTER In SPITZBERGEN.

your views, you will soon see, I, believe they
did well when they undertook the building that
seems so useless to you. If they had the hope
that they would be rescued from the island, yet
it was not certainty. Hope might easily deceive,
and it usually most deludes us when we reckon
too strongly upon it. That ship on which our
friends had come hither, according to all proba-
bility, was foundered, and of the crew none had
got back to their country; and hence there could
be no news of the residence of our unfortunates.
It was improbable that another ship would lose
itself in this region. Our friends therefore did
right when they made preparations for a longer
abode. Again: if the work had been ever so
unnecessary, yet it had this benefit, that they
were kept busy, protected from tedium, and
rendered more cheerful,—for a man forgets his
anxiety while at work. So too, there was a
third reason which did honor to their hearts.
How possible it was, that if they even should be
delivered, some other unfortunates might be cast
on this inhospitable island! How happy our
friends had been, how well had they got along,
when they found a sheltering hut, a cavern pro-
vided with stores! And it would be as good for
others too, after them. They wished to deserve
the thanks of the unfortunate, Would you have
done otherwise, Gustavus ?
Winter in Sprirzpercen. 969

Gusravus.* No. I would also‘have deserved ~
their thanks. But I would also have done as
Robinson Crusoe and Friday. I would have dug
the ground, sowed and planted seeds.

Fataer. That our friends thought of this,
active men as they were, you may regard as
certain, But why they did not carry it into ex-
ecution, you may soon clearly perceive. It was
inconceivable to them, that notwithstanding the
glowing sunshine, the soil always remained cold,
never became dry, and yielded nothing but
spoon-wort and some low stinted shrubs, as
according to the degree of temperature, they
might have expected to see mapy kinds of plants,
and even useful fruits, The valleys too, in which
the sun sent down its glowing rays, and which
were protected by the surrounding rocks from the
fresh sea breeze, remained moist and their soil cold.

The cause of this remarkable phenomenon was
inexplicable’ to our friends, even to the expe-
rienced pilot. They indeed made an attempt in
the valley in which the hut stood; for in the
side most exposed to the sun, they dug up @
piece of land, and laid out gover beds, sowing
some of them with peas, hers with beans;
but the first came up very ¥ and soon died,
while the latter scarcely appeared at all; and
after a long time they found them rotted i in the

.,. Sround.
mal

270 Winter In SPirzBEeRGeEn.

Gustavus. That was indeed no good prospect
for gardening !

JULIA (asue to Gustavus), They ought to
have made one trial with barley,

FaTHer. Once Gregory went out with Ivan,
to catch fish, of which there were very many,
among them some peculiarly fine and well-tasted
kinds, They chose the region bordering on
the basin, where lay their store of wood, and
their fishing was very successful, The weather
was beautiful. The two friends went further
than they would otherwise have probably gone,
and came to a far projecting height, which in this
respect was different from others, that it did not
appear to arise out of the rock, but from the
earth. Besides, it was overgrown with moss and
scanty grass, but what struck them much, it was
marshy and wet. Some shrubs of a low kind
which bore little black berries, attracted the no-
tice of the two friends. They went*yet farther,
and finally came to a place where Xi part of the
hill wascaved in. They went down on the other
side and saw, to their great astonishment, that
the inside of the whole mountain consisted of

Ure 106,
MAX. Of ice? Al
Farner. Yes, of ice. Think of arock, which
instead of stone, consists of clear, pure ice.
The wall of this ice, clear as crystal, rose above
Winter 1n SpitzperGen. 271

sixty yards perpendicular in height, and on it lay
a thin crust of loamy earth, covered with moss.
The place caved in lay exactly so, that the sun
shone on the vast mirror, and thus produced a
most beautiful sight. By the warmth the ice
became melted, and ran in countless little streams
of water into the basin. Filled with amazement,
the two frends remained standing some minutes
to enjoy this dazzling sight, this beautiful mix-
ture of colors blending together; and while they
thought further of the appearance, they at last
found in it the cause of the cold, and perpetually
moist soil of the island.

JULIA. I do not see any connection with it.

FatHer. The island, at least the part where
they now were, consisted, where there were no
rocks, of ice, which was as old as the world itself,
On this ice, firmly fixed by rocks, and between
them was a thin layer of earth, which was formed
from deca ts and drifted wood, destroyed
by the weatMtr.

Max. Was the soil everywhere so?

FaTHER, At least in the region where our
friends lived. Ivan and Gregory imparted their
discovery to the old pilot. . They tried an exper-
iment in the valley, which was so warm with
pits, and hardly had they dug in a few yards
deep, than they came to a firm crustgof ice. In
the trench which surrounded the hut, thitre were
279 WINTER In SPITZBERGEN.

hardly a few inches of earth, the rest was solid ice,
This discovery made the good pilot very anxious
and sorrowful, He had counted on certainly in-
creasing, by industry, in the cultivation of many
plants for their supply, and now he saw this hope
utterly disappointed. Their stores had conside-
rably fallen off during the winter, and they must
be replaced; but whence? From the productions
of the land they could expect nothing but spoon-
wort and some other meagre plants. There re-
mained, therefore, to our friends nothing but
hunting and fishing. For the summer this was
a tolerable prospect. But how would it be in the
winter? How when the supplies of the magazine
should be consumed? Whence were they to be
arain filled ?

Gustavus. But was it unquestionably cer-
tain that they would be obliged to continue on
the island?

FatHEr. I might, too, ask on thebther hand,
was their deliverance so certain that they ought
to lay aside all provisions for the winter?

Gustavus. No indeed, sir.

FaTHEer. Our friends would, therefore, have
been very much to blame if they had yielded
themselves up to a hope that was always uncer-
tain. It was far wiser to fear the worst, to look
forward to the worst as certain, and then to make
all their arrangements to render it as little pain-

a

-
Winter tx Sprrzpercen. 973

ful as possible. In the first place, they erected
on the highest cliff of the rocks, a lofty tree, as a
signal for any ship that might be passing, that
men were living here who needed the help of
others. As socomas a ship notices such a signal,
a boat is put out, and sails to the region in order
to ascertain the cause of this evident token of ne-
cessity. The tree which our friends erected, was
of such a height that it could be seen in the far
distance, and on the top of it they fastened some
reindeer’s and bear's skins. Still more. Not far
from the tree they gathered together a large heap
of wood, which could be set on a blaze in a few.
minutes. Smoke and vapor can be seen at a
great distance, and our friends might reasonably
hope that this blazing pile would not “sage the
view of any ship, which, though miles distant,
should sail past the island, Every hour the old
pilot mounted the cliff, from whence he had an
uninterrupted view of the ocean, and with each
hour his longing, his hope of seeing a ship to de-
liver them, increased. But often as he mounted
the rock, no sail showed itself to his searching
look,

Gustavus. Then I would not have gone up
again, and so spared myself the troublesome.way.

FatHer, And you would have done very
wrong. One must honestly perform his duty,
though he may not reap any special benefit from it,

a
974 Wisxtrer tn SprrzBERGEN.

Marta. Besides, it might be exactly that hour
of the ship’s passing, when the pilot was not at

FaTHER. Very possibly it might be so. He
would then have made himselfthe bitterest re-
proaches.

It was now the hot days of June. The sun,
which had not gone down for months, now
mounted continually higher and higher, and had
almost reached the highest point, without any ship
to deliver them having made its appearance. It
was now the twenty-first day of June, the longest
day in the year, and the anxious doubts of our
friends had risen to the highest pitch. For, from
this time, the sun would descend lower again;
it appgeached its complete disappearance, and
when it began to sink so much deeper no ship
would vefiture into this region. All vessels,
which went a-whaling—and these generally the
only ones which came hither—after the longest
day has passed, return back home, because later
navigation in this region, which lies so far north,
is joined with the greatest hazards, It is only
extremely rarely that a venturous ship dares to
remain there longer.

The old pilot—and you know how calm and
courageous he had usually been—became more
anxious and sorrowful, with every fruitless visit
to the cliff. The thought of his wife and chil-

®
Winter in SPITZBERGEN. 276

dren, who knew not of his fate, disquieted him.
He thought keenly ofthe grief of those whom
he had left behind, whom he could not com-
fort and relieve, and to whom he was as it were
dead. Sorrowful and downcast, he came back
once more from his post to his friends. “You
see,” said he, “how vain are our hopes of deliv-
erance. The sea on the south side is open, but
soon it will be closed with ice, and then no de-
liverance will be possible. A miracle must save
us, else we shall be forced to spend another win-
ter, and possibly our whole life-time between these
barren cliffs. Our lot is frightful!” Ivan and
Gregory too were deeply cast down and discour-
aged. They were young men, who wished to
make their entrance on the theatre of thegyorld,
and who had so much to expect from the
They had sketched for themselves the finest plana,
thought of themselves as already in bigh places
of distinction, respected and honored in their
country, acting effectively for the glory of the
realm, and—now all these smiling dreams had
vanished—their beautiful pictures of the future
had been dissipated. They saw themselves shut
up like prisoners, and nowhere was there to be
seen a prospect of deliverance. Feelings of this
kind might rob the most composed heart of peace,
But man raises himself again, as soon as he
will be serious, Even in the most frightful situ-

se
276 Winter 1n Spirzeera@en.

ation of his life there remain means to tranquil-
lize him. Here with our fiends necessity effected
itj—the unavoidable thought, “It is not and
cannot be otherwise.” They saw that they were
driven to it, and so they formed the courageous
determination to do everything which lay in their
power, to render their abode on this desolate
island as tolerable as possible. They pledged
themselves to each other for a new, firm and un-
broken friendship, and vowed to bear truly and
honestly together what God has appointed to
them, “No one has any reproach to make to
himself,” said the pilot. “Our business led us
hither, and God forsakes no one who does his
duty.”

In this firm pious belief, they felt themselves
‘strengthened. Calmly they went to their work,
wrought as joiners, as blacksmiths, and like bees
gathered for themselves stores for the winter be-
fore them, and forgot not also to go every hour
to their watch-post, to discover any ship that
might be in sight.

Once when all their labors which they had un-
dertaken were finished, “I have nowno inclination
to begin anything anew,” said the old pilot, “and
yet I cannot sit wholly idle; else I should become
sad, What if we should take a short journey
this fine weather? We yet know very little of
our country here.” Ivan and Gregory were well
_,

Winrar in Sritzsszorm) 977
*

satisfied with the proposition. They could not
propose-any definite object for their journey ; for
they could scarcely hope that they would discover
a better and more convenient spot, or a finer re-
gion for a dwelling; they merely wished to be-
come acquainted with the country, in order in
this way to drive off their anxious feelings.

Armed and furnished with provisions, they
went along on the eastern side of the island be-
tween the rocks and steep cliffs, observing every-
thing, and talking about everything that appeared
remarkable, They had gone on thus some miles
on the desolate strand, when they came to a little
valley surrounded by low rocks. It ran deep
into the inclosure of the rocks; a small brook,
the banks of which were beset with lowghrubs,
rippled through it; a beautiful meadow spread
out on both sides, and many water-fowls flew
about screaming on its smiling banks.

Our friends stood delighted. At the sight of
this hospitable region, and the earth covered with
fresh green, they thought themselves transported
into another part of the world, and several plants
which they saw here brought them to the con-
clusion, that they had here found a better soil on
which they could produce many things for their
subsistence, |

Marra. If they but had their hut and their
cavern here |

24
278 Winter in SPITZBERGEN.

»
FatHer. The same thought occurred to Greg-
. “JT will examine this region more ¢losely,”
said he. “If I find a safe cavern, then we will at
once take up our quarters here. And if not, yet
we will at least spend the summer here.”

The old pilot, too, agreed to the proposal. One
thing only was not so pleasant to him, that from
this region and these low rocks, they could not
look over the sea, from whence only could they
expect deliverance.

As Gregory and Ivan then wished to go fur-
ther into the valley—the pilot, having become
wearied, sat down,—when all at once they heard
a loud ery, to which followed the report of a gun,
and at the same moment, they saw a reindeer,
with the swiftness of an arrow, come bounding
over the low rocks.* The hunted beast looked
around in distress, and then dashed straight to-
wards our friends, as it seemed, to seek their
protection. Amazed they now looked at it closer;
it was one of their own reindeer that they had
tamed, and which had followed them without
their knowing it.

Maria. But that report of the gun, father,
what was it?

Farner. Our friends, too, observedit. They
looked all around : who can describe their amaze-
ment, their joyous surprise, when they saw some

* See frontispiece.
Winter in Spirzpercen. 279

English sailors in their blue jackets come over the
rocks in pursuit of the reindeer they had been
chasing.

Hardly knowing whether it was a delusive
dream, or whether what they saw was reality,
they stood trembling, and almost annihilated by
the unexpected appearance; for sudden over-
whelming joy has the same effect which a violent

fright has; a man at the first moment cannes -

collect himself and think clearly. The hour of 4

their rescue was come, all their anxieties, all
their fears were dispelled. This idea had such
an effect on them, that they could not utter a
single word. Tears only, tears of heartfelt joy
and thankfulness only could express what their
souls felt in this happy moment. But their sur-
prise was to be yet greater. Imagine what the
good men must have felt when one of the strangers
descended from the rock, who called on them,
yet speechless for joy, by name, and asked them
whether they were the unfortunate men, who a
year before were left behind by the captain of
an English ship on the island of Spitzbergen.

Marta. It is inconceivable! How could the
stranger have known this?

FaTHer. In the most natural way in the
world. .As soon as our friends had replied yes,
the stranger sprang towards them with a loud
ery of joy,—and how can I describe to you what

=

We
980 Winter in SpirzBERGER.

the three happy men felt when the captain of
the English ship stood before them and pressed
them in his arms!

Max. But father, I think you have forgotten
that the ship was swallowed up in the ice.

FatHer. This our unfortunates only had sup-
posed to be the case; they could not know, that
the compassion of God had saved their friends in
so remarkable manner from an almost certain
death. But of this preservation we will speak
more by and by.

Marta. It must have been then joyful news,
and question on question ?

Faruer. As youcan easily imagine! “ And
now friends,” said the captain, “come to my
ship, she lies here behind the rocks!" In com-
pany with the other sailors, the three rescued men
betook themselves to the ship, at thesight of which
the warm tears of joy gushed forth anew. The
thought of all that they had experienced since
the last time they were on a ship, was too much
for their hearts. It was indeed only a year—
but it embraced the most remarkable events of
their lives.

Now they went to the table, the rare well-
tasting food, and excellent wines refreshed our
friends; a gratification of which they had been
80 long deprived, I leave you to imagine what
they felt at this repast in the circle of their
Winter tn SpiTzperceEN. 981

friends ; that can he only feel who like them has
been preserved as if by a miracle from certain
death, and whose despair has been suddenly
changed into joy. ‘The captain, too, was heartily
gratified to have found again so happily and so
soon, his friends whom he had believed to be
lost.

Max. Had he made this voyage on account
of our three friends?

Farrer. Not precisely, although their fate

was an additional motive to this voyage. The
captain was well known in the English marine
service as a bold, skilful and experienced sea
officer, and as, just at this time, the Parliament
had decided on sending out several ships on dis-
covery tothe North Pole, so he with many others
was put in requisition to take part in the expe-
dition. The hope of making new and remarka-
ble discoveries, and probably at the same time
of being celebrated among famous navigators,
made this call on him welcome to him in the
highest degree, and the more so, as he at once
thought of our three friends, who had, in fact, sac-
rificed themselves in his service. He there-
fore determined to take the course of Spitzber-
gen, and if he could not save them, yet he
would do all on his part to relieve himself from
every reproach. No danger or hardship should
be too much for him, to fulfil his duty of a
a4"
289 WINTER tn SprrzperGeyn.

grateful friend. A fine new ship, an excellent
sailer, was intrusted to his command. He left
England and sailed between Norway and Iceland,
along the eastern coast of Greenland, and favored
by wind and weather, went onward till he was
in the same latitude as Spitzbergen.

Max. And then the fields of ice hindered his
passage, did they not?

FatHer. No, The weather, thissummer, was
s0 favorable, that the captain nowhere met with
fields of ice which might have interrupted his
voyage. The small ones which he fell in with,
were of that kind which could be easily avoided
by skilful steering of the ship.

Now he sailed along past Spitzbergen. He
indeed landed on the other and opposite side
from that on which he supposed his friends to
be, who, as you know, had gone ashore on the
eastern coast of this island. But it was,partly
because it was his firm purpose to do all in hia
power to find his friends, and partly because
divine Providence, as is so often the case, knew
how to use two apparently trifling circumstances
that a greater object, the deliverance of three
brave men, in a short time—hardly two hours—
was accomplished.

JULIA. Two trifling circumstances?

FATHER. Yes, two circumstances on which

nothing, scarcely anything at least, appeared to
Winter in SrPITzRERGEX. 983

depend, and yet they were most important. Look

on this map.—Here in this region north-west
from the South Cape, the Captain landed in a
beautiful bay. Accident,—as men call it, but
really God’s Providence, caused that our friends

had not taken away the bridge over the trench.

The space inclosed within the trench, was too

confined for the tame reindeer, which our friends
always kept there—and he sought the open

ground, and followed his masters, who as you
know had made an excursion of some miles.

But soon the animal, that would else have been

of their company, lost the track: he leaped about
frolicsome and happy, cropping the plants some-

times here, and sometimes there, and thus he

came into the region, in which the Englishman
had landed. This was a new sight to him. Fresh.
meat was too welcome a thing to him not imme-

diately to set out in chase of the animal; he cried

out, and shot, but the reindeer rendered more shy,

was too quick for him, and bounded over the low

rocks, followed by some sailors with whom was

the Captain himself.

The second circumstance was, that our friends
should have undertaken this little excursion pre-
cisely on this day, and in dws very part of
the island. Had they remained in their cave,
who knows whether the Captain would have
eome to this place? Who knows whether he
984 ‘Winter in SPiITzEERGEN.

might not have taken a wholly different direction,
which would have removed him further and fur-
ther from our friend? And what surety was
there that he would have noticed the signal on
the rock?

Our friends at the table now related the histo-
ry of the remarkable winter through which they
had lived, and described their abode, their whole
situation and the domestic arrangements so mi-
nutely, that the whole ship's company listened
with the greatest attention, and all were curious
to see the cavern and hut. After dinner, Ivan
and Gregory went thither on foot with the Cap-
tain; but the old pilot remained on the ship,
weighed anchor, and brought the ship round the
SeouthCape to that bay, which was not far from
the dwelling of our friends., This he did so safely
and quickly, that the Captain with his compan-
ions did not reach the hut sooner than the crew
of the ship. The whole company were conduct-
ed around through the cavern ; for every one was
eager to see the residence in which the three
friends had lived nearly a whole year. All the
stores were looked at, and the Captain also or-
dered them to be increased with some necessary
supplies, especially with tools of all kinds.

Jutia. That was very useless. Ivan and his
friends did not wish to remain on the island.

FaTHER. It was not done for them, but for
#
WiInTEE In SPITZEERGEN. 985

the sake of others. The humane Captain thought
of the possible case, that other seamen might be
wrecked here and come hither in great straits,
and be obliged to spend the winter in this soli-
tary spot; to lighten the sad condition of such
unfortunates, he caused many indispensable arti-
eles to be brought hither. The pilot also had to
prepare an accurate description of the cavern,
a list of all the stores,and an extended guide
how a person might supply himself in the winter
with many articles of food. This paper the Cap-
tain caused to be translated into English and
Dutch, and placed it in a well-preserved little
chest, on the table in the cavern.

Marra. Did our friends remain long on Spitz-
bergen?

FarHEer. No, What should they stay longer
for? Besides, the time was dear and valuable to
the brave English captain. He was obliged: to
profit by it as thoroughly as possible.

After some hours all were in readiness for
their departure, Our friends took nothing with
them but their clothing, and the dress they had
made of the bear-skins. It was to be kept asa
perpetual memorial. Besides they put into the
Captain's hands the money which the Hollander
had left. He promised to use all his endeavors
to find out the relations of the unfortunate man,
and he assuredly kept his word: The old pilot

-
286 Winter in SpPITzBERGEN.

took with him the Bible and the hymn-book;
both of them were precious to him, But before
they left the island he went once more alone, in
order with warm tears of joy, to render thanks
to divine Providence for the goodness which he
enjoyed on this desolate island, for every assist-
ance in many dangers, and for final deliverance.
Ivan and Gregory were moved to tears, Every-
thing which they saw, became more important
in the moment of separation, for they all remem-
bered vividly what they had gone through. Every
place, every article, made a much stronger im-
pression on their hearts. They stood there silent
and solemn, when the sound of the firing of the
cannon rolled through the rocks; the signal to
eall them on board. Now they cast a look on
everything, and the tears gushed from their eyes
as they silently bid farewell to a place which had
been so full of events to them, Long they stood
on the quarter-deck of the ship, and looked back
to the island, the lower part of which soon dis-
appeared from their eyes. ‘The rocks continually
sunk lower and lower, and only the highest cliffs
stood up as mere points from out of the bound-
less ocean. Finally they too sank, and disap-
peared in the sea.

The Englishman now steered his ship in a
wholly different direction. He had before deter-
mined to sail into Baflin’s Bay, between Greenland
me

Winter 1n SpPitzeereen. 28T

and North A