Citation
The good-natured giant

Material Information

Title:
The good-natured giant a story adapted to the capacities of children and old people
Alternate title:
Eireeneespaid'agathoontegigantaiosphilos
Creator:
Sheeres, Charles William ( Engraver )
Nicholson, Thomas Henry, d. 1870 ( Illustrator )
Hope and Co
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Hope and Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vi, <2>, 194 p., <3> leaves of plates : ill. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Giants -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Folk tales -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
Folk tales ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
"Eireeneestepaidagathoongigantaiosphilos, in plain English, signifying The Gigantic Lover of Peace and of Good Children"--P. 125.
General Note:
Ills. engraved and signed by C.W. Sheeres and T.H. Nicholson.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by one of the number ; with illustrations by C.W. Sheeres.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026678222 ( ALEPH )
46322633 ( OCLC )
ALG5995 ( NOTIS )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

UF00002134_00001.pdf

UF00002134_00001.txt

UF00002134_00001.log..txt

00006.txt

00206.txt

00026.txt

00047.txt

00080.txt

00058.txt

spine.txt

00105.txt

00060.txt

00054.txt

00092.txt

00051.txt

cover1.txt

UF00002134_00001_pdf.txt

00177.txt

00055.txt

00061.txt

00153.txt

00162.txt

00137.txt

00205.txt

00183.txt

00067.txt

00142.txt

00181.txt

00037.txt

00033.txt

00215.txt

00100.txt

00096.txt

00145.txt

00108.txt

00174.txt

00062.txt

00112.txt

00146.txt

00076.txt

00057.txt

00148.txt

00182.txt

00158.txt

00087.txt

00066.txt

00186.txt

00073.txt

00075.txt

00194.txt

00007.txt

00127.txt

back.txt

00027.txt

00063.txt

00114.txt

00071.txt

00120.txt

00059.txt

00136.txt

00150.txt

00042.txt

00012.txt

00156.txt

00125.txt

00023.txt

00167.txt

00039.txt

00122.txt

00163.txt

00133.txt

00210.txt

00072.txt

00081.txt

00020.txt

00038.txt

00213.txt

00188.txt

00179.txt

00193.txt

00151.txt

00101.txt

00011.txt

00190.txt

00160.txt

00034.txt

00010.txt

00083.txt

00157.txt

00143.txt

00024.txt

00110.txt

00117.txt

00152.txt

00184.txt

00022.txt

00204.txt

00119.txt

00189.txt

00111.txt

00154.txt

00207.txt

00019.txt

00203.txt

00126.txt

00135.txt

00172.txt

00191.txt

00170.txt

00070.txt

00032.txt

00138.txt

00068.txt

00107.txt

00128.txt

00140.txt

00212.txt

00064.txt

00008.txt

00035.txt

00095.txt

00200.txt

00196.txt

00016.txt

00116.txt

00118.txt

00005.txt

00103.txt

00208.txt

00166.txt

00197.txt

00017.txt

00139.txt

00178.txt

00097.txt

00050.txt

00121.txt

00085.txt

00195.txt

00018.txt

00098.txt

00209.txt

00113.txt

00052.txt

00144.txt

00084.txt

00069.txt

00134.txt

00004.txt

00088.txt

00187.txt

00029.txt

00175.txt

00074.txt

00132.txt

00077.txt

00041.txt

00053.txt

00164.txt

00104.txt

00185.txt

00115.txt

00078.txt

00149.txt

00141.txt

00131.txt

00021.txt

00028.txt

00216.txt

00031.txt

00009.txt

00046.txt

00147.txt

00044.txt

00013.txt

00001.txt

00109.txt

00099.txt

00102.txt

00180.txt

00040.txt

00129.txt

00094.txt

00159.txt

00014.txt

00086.txt

00130.txt

00049.txt

00079.txt

00048.txt

00165.txt

00211.txt

00123.txt

00065.txt

00106.txt

00214.txt

00015.txt

00056.txt

00192.txt

00045.txt

00161.txt

00176.txt

00173.txt

00202.txt

00030.txt

00089.txt

00082.txt

00155.txt

00036.txt

00124.txt

00043.txt

00025.txt


Full Text
—_—= See i



Le eee TS



mT

F
>

mill Hill

Le

=





gst NEATHOONEGI CANT 9 .
M

THE GOOD-NATURED GIANT.

A Story
ADAPTED TO THE CAPACITIES OF

CHILDREN AND OLD PEOPLE.
BY ONE OF THE NUMBER.

With Blnstrations
By C. W. SHEERES.

LONDON :
HOPE AND CO., PUBLISHERS,
16, GREAT MARLBOROUGH-STBEET.
1852.







INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER.



To be first read of all who do more highly
esteem a body that hath also a soul, than a body
without a soul; or a nut that, being cracked,
showeth a sound and wholesome kernel within,
than one that hath a goodly shell only, but within
which all is naught.

For though there be many, and great store of
pleasant-looking houses which shall be scanned
with delight of the passing traveller who surveys
the outside only; yet, let him knock and demand
admittance within, and, too often, his only reward
will be to walk through along range of empty
chambers, and hear only the hollow sound of his
own footsteps as he threads wearily the intricate
mazes of “ passages that lead to nothing.”

Now, though of Giants there be good store that
have terrified naughty men and women, as well as
boys and girls, from the earliest times down to the
present day; yet in ransacking the whole library
of good Mr. Newbury and his successors, rarely, if
anywhere, shall you meet with one who, par ea-



vi INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER.

cellence, may be styled the “ G'ood-natured” Giant;
and of whom it may with truth be said that, great
as was the height, the strength, the bulk of our
hero, and perfect as was the symmetry of his vast
proportions, they were as nothing when compared
with the expansive benevolence of his lofty yet
humble and child-loving mind; with his well-stored
intellect, with his naturally great yet lively, nay,
playful, genius, accustomed to play with the
abstrusest sciences as a child with a toy.

Let the deaf, toothless, crazed, and spectacled,
good old bodies, whether masculine, feminine, or
neuter, who shall pleasantly beguile an idle half:
hour over these strange pages, but condescend to
scratch away the seeming rubbish of superficial
fable; and, unless the intellect of such be shrunk
into “second childishness and mere oblivion,” surely
some barley-corns of wholesome moral will be
disinterred by them, which, although their own
crops be full, they may be pleased to offerto some of
the many broods of half-fledged Chickens around
them.



The modest Author modestly expresses his modest
lou bts

‘“Whether ’tis better, in a trunk to bury
The quirks and crotchets of outrageous fancy,
Or send a well-wrote copy to the press.”
Hamlet imitated by Mr. Jago.



PROLOGUE TO
THE GOOD-NATURED GIANT.

‘“‘ He comes, with Pleasure at his side,
To spread his genial spirit wide.
And bring, where’er he turns his eye,
Peace, plenty, love, and harmony,
Till ev’ry being share its part,
And heav’n and earth are glad at heart.”
Altered from West’s Ode to Gray.







A STORY OF A

GOOD-NATURED GIANT.



Once there was a good-natured Giant. He lived
at this time in a great deep cave under a great high
hill which was near a little village. In the village,
near the church, there was a school-house. All the
good little boys and girls in the village, and else-
where, liked to go to this school. But the naughty
boys and girls liked to stay away. However, the
good boys and girls were the happiest, as you will
presently see. For one fine morning, when all the
good little boys and girls were going to school, and
all the naughty little boys and girls were playing

B



2 A STORY OF A

about in the dirt, the good-natured Giant came out

of his cave, and when he saw the children playing
in the dirt, instead of going to school, he walked
along upon his hands and feet till he came to a hedge



near where the children were dabbling about close
to a muddy ditch on the other side. And then he
blew his nose so loud that the naughty children
were terribly frightened, and tumbled over onc



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 3

another into the middle of the dirty ditch. You
may depend upon it they all got a good whipping
when they went home. But there were four-and-
twenty good boys all walking together on their way
- to school; and as soon as the Giant saw them he
asked them whether they liked apples and pears,
and they all said, ‘“‘Oh yes, very much.” So the
Giant took them up and put them into his coat
pocket.

And the Giant went a little further, and saw
four-and-twenty good Girls going to school; and
when he asked them if they were fond of apples
and pears, they all said, “Oh yes, very much.” So he
put the little girls into his coat pocket on the other
side; and walking a little further along the road, he _
met a little boy and girl going to school, arm-in-
arm, and he took up the pretty little girl with the
big forefinger and thumb of his right hand, and
the little boy with the big finger and thumb of his
left hand, and put them both into his waistcoat
pocket, one on one side, and the other on the other
side: and away he went, oh so fast! striding along
with his great long legs. He cared nothing at all

B 2



4 A STORY OF A

for a great thick wall six feet high, nor yet for a
rough broad quick-set hedge, nor for allsorts of dirty,
deep, wide ditches: no, nor yet for the Grand
Junction Canal, for he stept clean over them all;
and so he did over the Great Western Railway
without touching any of the carriages, only he threw
some white sugar-plums into one of the first-class
carriages where some little children were sitting
with their mamma: and they thought at first it was
a hail storm. Presently he came to a beautiful
orchard full of ripe pears and apples. His head
was a great deal higher than the tops of the trees.

So he gathered plenty of apples and pears as he
went on, and threwthem into his coat pockets. Oh,
how the boys and girls did scramble for them!

And he gave a nice rosy-cheeked apple to the
pretty little girlin his waistcoat pocket, and a pear
to the little boy. And away went the Giant, up
the hills and down the hills, and over the hedges,
and over the ditches, and over the walls, till at
last he came to a great broad, deep river.

Splash, splash, splash; in goes the Giant. What
cares he for the deep, deep river? Splash, splash,



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 5

splash; deeper and deeper he goes into the bed of the
river: away fly the farmer’s ducks, quack, quack,
quack. The little children peep out of his coat
pocket ina terrible fright. ““O Mr. Giant, Mr. Giant,
the apples and pears are all swimming about, and
we are all as wet as muck. Oh, what shall we do?
what shall we do?” But the Giant did not stop:
only he took off his hat with one hand, and put the
fifty little children into his hat with the other hand,
and so he kept them out of the water, till he came
to the opposite bank of the river. And there he.
found a nice clean, dry, sunny bank covered with
grass, and primroses, and violets, and buttercups,
and cowslips, and bluebells, and wild thyme; all
smelling very sweet. So down he sits and takes out -
his clean white pocket-handkerchief, and wipes the
fifty children quite dry, and then they sit down and
munch away at their apples and pears—oh such fun!
while the good-natured Giant laid himself flat on
the ground and fell fast asleep.

When the little Pickles had done eating, they
scampered about in all directions. Some played
at hide and seek among the bushes; some gathered



6 A STORY OF A

nosegays of sweet flowers, and stuck them into the
button holes of the Giant’s coat without waking
him. Then they all ran off, arm-in-arm, to run up
and down a pretty little steep bank in the meadows.
Such hard work it was to get to the top! and such
tumbling and rolling over one another when they
_ tried to run down the bank. However, it only made
them laugh the merrier: so up they clambered again.
But just as they got to the top of the bank the second
time, they heard a great hallooing, and presently
whom should they see but the schoolmaster and the
schoolmistress abroad in search of their scholars.
“OQ you naughty little boys and girls, what
a whipping you will get when we catch you pre-
sently ! how dared you run away from school?” said
the schoolmaster. ‘A pretty business indeed,” said
the schoolmistress. “ Indeed, Sir,” said one of the
boys, “‘ we did not run away at all; only there came
along a good-natured Giant, and he put us all in his

pocket, and brought us all here.” “Put you all
in his pocket?” said the schoolmaster, “a very
wonderful story, upon my word!” « Impossible,”

said the schoolmistress. “Yes, Ma’am, but he



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 7

did,” said the pretty little girl; “ and he put Freddy
and me in his waistcoat pockets because his big
pockets were full; and he gave me a rosy-cheeked
apple, and little Freddy a pear.” “ And he gave us
all apples and pears,” said the rest of the children.

“What can it all mean?” said the schoolmaster
and schoolmistress. ‘ And what is that frightful
noise I hear?” said the schoolmistress. ‘‘ Surely
there must be at least fifty mad bulls broke loose
somewhere, and all of them roaring together.”

“Qh, no,” said little Freddy, “that is only our
good-natured Giant snoring away fast asleep; don’t
you see him out there on the violet bank?” ‘ Non-
sense, Frederick,” said the schoolmaster, “ that is
a great piece of oak timber.” At which little
Freddy could not help laughing heartily; and all
the rest of the children laughed too. “We will
teach you to laugh at us,” said the schoolmaster
and mistress, and off they ran to catch the children;
but the master was rather rheumatic, and the
mistress was very tired, and rather fat, so the
children ran down the steep bank and up to the
sleeping Giant before any of them could be caught,



8 A STORY OF A

and then little Freddy picked up a straw, and
clambered up with the help of another boy to the
Giant’s ear, and tickled it very gently.

Now the Giant was a very clever Giant, and
always slept with one eye open. It was a very
good plan, because by this means he was never
taken by surprise, as some foolish Giants are, who
are caught and carried about at fairs for foolish
people to stare at. But our friend the good-na-
tured Giant was too wise for any such nonsense.
He was, indeed, a great philosopher—that is to say,
a great lover of wisdom. So that it is not sur-
prising that he was very clever, and very wise, and
always slept with one eye open.

As soon as little Freddy had tickled his ear, the
Giant opened his eye, and sat up, with a pleasing
smile all over his face. It was very good-natured
of him only to sit up, and not to stand. For if he
had got up on his long legs at once, the poor school-
master and mistress would have been frightened
out of their wits. So he only sat up and smiled,
and then, making his voice as small as he could,
asked them very civilly to come and eat some mul-



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 9

berries; for there happened to be a fine mulberry
tree, full of ripe fruit, close to where the Giant
sat. But the fruit was all at the top of the tree;
and the Giant’s head, as he sat, just reached up to
the top of the tree.

So he gathered a handful of mulberries, and gave
them to the schoolmaster and mistress.

Very pleasant and refreshing to them, after their
long, hot walk, were those ripe, juicy mulberries.
The schoolmaster said they did his rheumatism a
vast deal of good. The mistress said she never
tasted any fruit half so good before. And little
Freddy and the forty-nine other children looked
at them, as much as to say, I should like to have
some too. But the schoolmaster and mistress were.
too busy to notice them.

When they had eaten up all that the Giant had
gathered, he very good-naturedly asked them
whether they would like a few more. And the
master thought that a few more would quite cure
his rheumatism, and the mistress wished to take a
few home to make into a pudding.

At which little Freddy, who was a very merry



10 A STORY OF A

fellow, could not help laughing, and that made the
pretty little girl, and the forty-eight other children
laugh too.

This made the master and mistress rather angry.
But the Giant, who was obliged, at first, to stuff
his pocket-handkerchief into his mouth, for fear
he should frighten them all with his loud laugh,
told the schoolmaster that he could see a beautiful
large bunch of ripe mulberries just out of his
_ Teach; and that if he would climb up on his hand
and take tight hold of his forefinger, he would raise
him up exactly to the spot where the bunch was;
and the master could easily cut it off with his pen-
knife.

The master was rather frightened, but was
ashamed to own that he was before all his scholars.
So he took out his penknife, and mounted up, as
boldly as he could, upon the Giant’s hand, and then
walked across it to the forefinger; all the boys and
girls clapping their hands and shouting out, “ Well
done, Master, take care you don’t fall. Take care
the Giant don’t squeeze the juice out of you, just as
you squeezed the juice out of the mulberries.”



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 11

‘‘ Ah! you little urchins,” cried the master, “ why
do you put such thoughts into the Giant’s head?

Why do you make such a noise? It quite disturbs
my brains. Be quiet, I tell you. Oh, whata whip-

ping you shall have when I get you home again! ”

All this time the Giant kept raising his arm
higher and higher, and the schoolmaster held tight
hold of the Giant’s finger, which was nearly as long
as his whole body.

At last the Giant said, ‘‘ Now Mr. Schoolmaster,
look out sharp for the bunch of mulberries.”

“ There they are. I see them, Mr. Giant, but I
can hardly reach them.”

‘And I can stretch my arm no further,” said the
Giant; “catch hold of that strong branch with one
hand, and cut off the bunch of fruit with the other,
and then get back upon my finger.”

But no sooner had the schoolmaster let: go of
the Giant’s finger, than the Giant took his arm
away, and left the poor schoolmaster hanging on
the top branch of the mulberry tree!

The schoolmistress screamed, and then nearly
fainted away. All the little boys and girls looked
very grave.



1YÂ¥ A STORY OF A

The schoolmaster, however, was in no great
danger; for he could rest his feet on the branches
of the tree, and now and then he gathered a mul-
berry and ate it, to cool his feverish anxiety, till the
Giant should put out his arm again to help him
out of the tree.

But the Giant seemed in no great hurry to do so .
for he sat still on the ground and began whistling
a tune. Unluckily he happened to turn his
head round where the fifty children were standing,
and the wind whistled out of his mouth so strong
that it blew down all the fifty children at once.
Down they tumbled, one over the other, till at last
they tumbled against the poor schoolmistress, and
down she tumbled among them too!

The good-natured Giant, who was a very gentle-
manly sort of fellow, and very polite, picked up
the schoolmistress, with great care, and begged
her to be seated upon a very soft sweet cushion
which he made for her of violets, primroses, and
cowslips, while he had a little chat with the gentle-
man up in the tree, meaning the schoolmaster,
who was now become very impatient to get down



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 13

again; and begged the Giant to lose no time in
lending him a hand for that purpose. “ Wait a
little, my good friend,” said the Giant, “there are
two words to that bargain, if you please. And
first of all, tell me how it will be about whipping

aN mn i



the children, if I help you out of the tree? For
you must understand that they were all going to
school like good children when I met with them
and brought them here; so that if anybody deserves
to be whipped, itis I. And I give you leave to whip
me to your heart’s content, as soon as you are out



14 A STORY OF A

of the tree. But unless you will promise not to
whip any one of my young friends here for not
going to school to-day, you may stay all night in
the tree, for anything that I care.”

“Sir Giant,” answered the pedagogue, “ ‘non
omnes arbusta juvant;’ that is to say, I have no
wish to spend the night in a mulberry tree.
Nevertheless, the mulberries are good mulberries,
and I flatter myself I am a better judge than most
people of what are really good. ‘ Pauci dignoscere
possunt vera bona.’” Here the learned master
paused a moment to recover his breath and his
balance; for in reaching somewhat too daringly to
clutch a very fine mulberry, he nearly lost his
equilibrium, ‘“‘ Ah!” he exclaimed,

' quid tam dextro pede concipis, ut te
Conatus non peniteat, votique peracti?’”





‘Very true, my good Sir,” said the _— who
was himself something of a satirist; “and you
—_— almost have added, when your foot es
‘sua mortifera est facundia.’ ”
‘‘Sir Giant,” said the schoolmaster, “I honour



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 15

you both as a wit and as a scholar. I submit.
Let it be a compact, I will neither punish you nor
my scholars; only help me down out of this high
tree; for my head begins to grow giddy, by reason
of so sudden an elevation, and, to say truth, my
stomach too feels somewhat disordered—

‘Orandum est, ut sit mens sana in corpore sano,’”

‘Is it even so, my worthy gentleman?” said the
Giant, laughing, and getting up on his legs. “ Well.
then, trusting to your promise as an honest man
and a scholar, I will set you on terra firma imme-
diately.”

So saying, he took the schoolmaster in his hand
and set him safely on the grass, with a great bunch
of mulberries in his pocket, which he carefully drew
forth and presented to the schoolmistress his wife.
Joy sparkled in her eyes as she thankfully received
the welcome present.

‘Now then,” said the good dame, taking courage
from the kind looks of the Giant, “I hope his
highness will not refuse me a petition.”



16 A STORY OF A

“Name it,” said the benevolent Giant, “and if
reasonable, it shall be granted.”

“ Will, then, his mightiness be pleased to instruct
us how we and all these children are to find our
way home again before nightfall?”

“That,” said the Giant, “‘ we shall easily manage.
In the first place, the children will go home in my
pockets justas they came. Andif you and your
learned husband will take a seat in the palm of my
hand or in a corner of my sandwich-box, I will
promise you a safe journey without any fatigue.
But,” continued the Giant, ‘“‘Iam surethat, after such
along and fatiguing walk, the master and you
must be very hungry, and so must the poor child-
ren. Now, as lam in the habit of taking long
walks by myself, and seldom dine at home, I
generally put my dinner in my pocket. And so I
have to-day, and I think the best thing we can do
is to sit down here all together on this nice dry, soft,
grassy bank, and have some dinner before we set
out.”

“So I think,” cried Freddy, clapping his hands.
“QO Mr. Giant, I thought I smelt some very nice
meat in one of your pockets.”



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 17

‘*¢ Well then,” said the Giant, “make haste, and
sit down all of you in a circle, while I get the
dinner ready. But we must lose no time, for the
sun is getting very low, and it will soon be night.
However, the sky looks very clear, so we shall do
very well with the light of the stars and the moon.”

As soon as the schoolmaster and mistress with
their scholars were all seated, the Giant put his hand
into one of his side-pockets, and took out a great
tin box. This box had three divisions, the two end
divisions held each a large meat pie, made of slices
of turkey and ham, with truffles and chestnuts re-
posing on a soft rich bed of Yorkshire pudding!

The middle compartment was filled with knives
and forks, and fifty-two plates of silver, all em-
bossed with beautiful figures of men, and horses, ”
and dogs, and wild beasts, and birds of all kinds.

It was quite wonderful how quickly he distributed
all the knives, forks, and plates: he dealt out the
plates as if he were dealing a pack of cards. They
absolutely seemed to fly all to their proper places
ina minute. And in each plate was a good-sized

piece of pie.



18 A STORY OF A

But before they began to eat, the Giant said very
gravely, “ I know you think I am very big; and yet,
if you do not think I am very little indeed, compared
to some things, you will think very foolishly.
And if you only look upas high as my head and
say, ‘Thank you, Mr. Giant, for what you are going
to give us,’ you will not please me at all. And so,
before you touch a morsel, you must look up a
great deal higher than my head, and thank GOD
for what is set before you. But this I know you
have all been taught to do by your good Christian
parents and teachers. If not, depend upon it, I
should not have given you this treat.”

And now they all fell to eating heartily: while the
Giant looked on delighted to see them so happy:
and, now and then, he took a little gold cup out of
his pocket, and a little silver flask full of something
very good to drink : and he stooped down and dipped
the cup in the clear stream of a little spring (which
was not fifty feet off), and poured a few drops out
of the flask into the water that was in the cup, and
handed it round to his little dinner-party of fifty-
two guests. Oh, how they all smacked their lips
when they tasted the delicious drink! I do not



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 19

believe that Queen Victoria, and Prince Albert, and
the Prince of Wales, and his brothers and sisters,
ever drank anything at all like it.

But now something happened that made the
merry party look rather grave. While they were
eating and drinking and chatting away, all at once
they heard a great rumbling noise in the air; and
presently there came a very bright flash of light-
ning, and then, immediately after, a great roar of
thunder. ‘Oh, ho,” says the Giant, “this is what I
expected; and just exactly what I wanted.”

“ Did you, indeed ?” said the schoolmaster; “ I am
sure | did neither expect nor want it.” Just as he
spoke, a sudden gust of wind blew off the poor peda-
gogue’s straw hat. ‘“Ingeminant Austri!” he ex-
claimed; “turbine nigro ferret hiems culmumque
levem stipulasque volantes!’*

But the tempestuous wind was no match for the
long legs of the Giant, who quickly snatched up
the flying roof of the master’s upper story, advising
him in future, when he ventured abroad, to be

* Virg. Geor. lib. i., 320—333.
c 2



20 A STORY OF A

more observant of the weather, and more careful
of his light straw hat.

“ And much I marvel,” he continued, laughing,
“that my learned guest can be so quick in quoting,
yet so slow in taking warning from the Mantuan
bard. Does he not well say, ‘Nunquam im-
prudentibus imber obfuit?’ And have you not
observed how low the swallows have been skimming
along the surface of the water? Ihave! And
have you not heard the frogs croaking in the mud?
Thave! And have you not seen how the ducks
have been waddling with great delight down to
the water, and tossing it over their oily backs
without the least chance of wetting them ? I have!

“¢ Studio incasstm videas gestire lavandi.’ ” (387)

“True,” replied the scholar, “and I opine that
you have rightly interpreted the adverb, ‘incassum.’
‘Quia plumarum compositio aquam minime ad
corpus admittit:’ as the learned Servius remarks.”

And now all was bustle among the young people
as well as the two elder ones. |

Most of them were busy tying their pocket-
handkerchiefs over their hats and bonnets; and



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 21

crowding together as close as they could under the
thick mulberry tree ; for it was now beginning to rain.

As for the Giant, he seemed to care very little
about the weather. He had packed up all his
plates, with the gold cup and the silver flask; and
contented himself with a little piece of pie that his
guests had left, and a large draught of fresh water.

In the meantime, the clouds collected thicker
and thicker, and the rain came pattering down,
and it grew darker and darker every minute.

“ This is just what I like,” said the Giant; ‘‘just
what I wanted to happen, my worthy good master
and mistress. You know that all these children
board and lodge at your house.”

“ Alas!” said the mistress, “why do you remind
me of my misfortunes? How shall we ever get
these poor children home to night ?”

“Tt can, and it cannot be done,” said the Giant ;
‘and that is just the very thing that pleases me so
much. You must pack yourselves up as fast as
you can, and then I will carry you all off for the
night to one of my caves. What think you of that?”

Little Freddy was the only one who was stout-



22 A STORY OF A

hearted enough to shout out, ‘‘Oh, a capital plan!
Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah!”

But the little fellow’s hallooing so merrily put
the rest of the boys and girls in good spirits, as
well as the master and mistress; so, with the help
of the good-natured Giant, they were soon all
stowed away safely in his huge pockets, except the
schoolmaster and his wife, whom the Giant ac-
commodated, each with a snug seat in the tin box,
in the two end compartments lately occupied by
the two meat pies. And by opening the lid, and
fastening the box by a cord passed over his neck,
they were conveyed along much in the same man-
ner as a Jew pedlar carries his box of trinkets
before him.

The night, however, was very dark; for the moon
was not yet up. The children heard the noise of
the Giant’s feet tramping along, but they could see
nothing at all when they peeped out of his pockets.
They expected every minute to hear the splashing
of the water; but it seems the Giant determined
not to go through the river in the dark, for fear of
frightening the little girls and the mistress.



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 23

At last, the moon began to appear, and the clouds
to disappear ; and when the little children looked out
from the pockets again, they saw the full moon
shining bright and clear over their heads, sur-
rounded by millions of twinkling stars.

Then, all at once, they heard some beautiful
music, like a very fine organ. But as there was
no church, nor any building near, the schoolmaster
and mistress could not imagine where the fine
sounds came from. At last they were satisfied that
it must be the Giant who was humming a tune to
himself. And so indeed it was. In fact the good
Giant was exceedingly fond of music; and having
a powerful and melodious voice, together with a
thorough knowledge of the science of music in the
abstract, he spent much of his spare time in musical
composition of the most elaborate and _ scientific
kind. |

One of the earliest efforts of his gigantic genius
was a piece of martial music composed, in a happy
moment, for the express amusement of his young
sister Attatattadatta.

If it were not that the deeply-interested reader



24 A STORY OF A

is at this moment, with feverish impatience, looking
forward to the arrival of our benighted travellers at
the mysterious cave of the Giant, this justly cele-
brated march would have been, without delay,
transcribed into these pages.

But we must proceed on our journey, with a
promise, however, if fickle fortune forsake us not,
of making the reader acquainted, at no distant
period, with this truly soul-stirring, not to add
toe-and-heel-stirring musical composition.

You may imagine that the speed at which the
Giant travelled was such as gave his party but
little time to observe much of the line of country
over which they passed.

On he went, tramping away over hill, over
dale; and still, as he went, his fine musical voice
was listened to with delight by the only two of the

party that were awake, little Freddy, and the
_ pretty little girl, whom they called Leila.

‘Freddy dear,” said Leila, in a whisper, “ will
you ask him to sing something with words to it?”

“No, you ask him yourself, little dear,” said

Freddy.



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 95

‘‘T am afraid,’’ whispered Leila.

‘You need not be afraid,” said the good-natured
Giant ; “good children need never be afraid; it is
only naughty people that need be afraid. But if
you really wish me to sing something with words
to it, I will do so. And I will sing you asong that
I like to sing at night when I am alone; and then
if Leila likes it, she can sing it herself when she is
alone. But I think we are now not very far from
the schoolmaster’s house; and as he and the mistress
and all the children, except you and F reddy, are
fast asleep, I will tell you what I am thinking of
doing, instead of taking them to my cave.”

“Something very funny, I dare say, Mr. Giant,”
‘said Freddy. |

‘Why, yes, Freddy,” said the Giant ; “I think it
will make you laugh; but then, you_know a little
matter makes you laugh. However, you must
promise me not to laugh at all, till I give you
leave. Now, when we get to the schoolmaster’s
house, I think I shall go to his bed-room window
and open it very quietly, and then without waking
him or the mistress, I shall take them both out of the



26 A STORY OF A

tin box, where they are asleep, and put them into
their bed. After that, I shall take the four-and-
twenty boys out of my pocket, without waking
them, and put them in at the window of the room
where they sleep, and lay them down in their beds.
And the little girls, all except you, Leila, I shall
put into their beds, through their bedroom
window.”

Little Leila had almost forgotten the Giant’s
instructions not to laugh, and had already begun
to clap her hands with delight, when Freddy
checked her; and it was well he did, for the noise
she made disturbed the schoolmaster, who was
snoring away, and he started up for a moment, in
his sleep, calling out, “Qui? que? quod?” but,
receiving no answer, he lay down again in his box,
snoring as loud as ever.

Who is there among the almost countless sc
titudes of good boys and girls who hereafter may
read this gigantic little book, who would hesitate
for a moment in believing that so clever a Giant
succeeded in putting his scheme into execution?
In truth, he managed everything so dexterously



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 27

that not one of the servants in the schoolmaster’s
large establishment knew anything of the matter.
They were all, like their master and mistress and the
forty-eight children, fast asleep. And indeed that was
not very wonderful, considering how late they had
all sat up, wondering why their master and mistress
and the children did not come home; and how
much toasted cheese and mulled beer they had
eaten and drunk to keep themselves awake.

Little Freddy was obliged to hold his hand quite
close over his mouth, to keep himself from laughing;
especially while the Giant was putting his school- _
fellows in at their bedroom window.

But when the Giant had finished all his labours
at the school-house, and was quite gone away again
into the open country, Freddy and Leila began to
wonder very much what he intended to do with
them; but before they could take courage to ask
him, the Giant said, “Now, Leila, if you wish, I
will sing you the song with words to it. And
when. I have sung it, if you and Freddy are
not tired of travelling so far alone with me, I will
take you to one of my caves, where I think you



28 A STORY OF A

will see many things to astonish and delight you.
In the meantime you may both of you make your-
selves quite easy about your master and mistress,
for when I put them in at the window of their
bedroom, I left a very civil note for them on the
mistress’s dressing-table, telling them that I would
take very good care of you both, and bring you
back safe. And now here we are upon the open
heath, and it is now nearly two o'clock in the
morning; but the moon and the stars continue
shining bright, and you are snug and warm—are
you not?—in my waistcoat pocket.”

“Very snug,” said Freddy. -

“Very warm,” said Leila.

On went the Giant, tramping along; and, as he
went, he murmured first a low soft tune, that
reminded the children of the gentle solemn notes
of the little organ in their parish church. Then
his voice swelled to a louder sound, and quicker
music. Yet, still, though the melody was grave
and solemn, it was cheerful, lively, and animating.

Leila whispered to Freddy, that it reminded her
of the tune of the Evening Hymn, though rather
different.



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 29

‘Perhaps he will sing the words to it presently,”
said Freddy.

And presently the Giant began indeed to sing
the words.

“The stars are shining bright and clear,
No evil spirit now is near ;
Oh, how I love this solemn hour !
And feel the great Creator’s power !
Not in the lightning’s livid flash,
Not in the thunder’s awful crash,
Not in the stormy rains and wind,
Thy presence, mighty Lord, I find ;
But in such silent hours as this,
I seem to taste of heavenly bliss.”
‘T like those words very much,” said Freddy.
‘‘ And so do I,” said Leila.
‘“ And do you understand them?” said the Giant.
“A little, I do,” said Freddy; “I think one
thing it means is, that you like better to be out at
night, when the stars are shining, as they do now,
than when it thunders, and lightens, and rains, as
it did when we were under the mulberry tree.”
“Well, that is true enough, Freddy,” said the
Giant, smiling.
‘And you like best to say your prayers when



30 A STORY OF A

you are quite still and quiet, and nobody is talking -
to you to interrupt you,” said Leila. ‘ And so
do I, because then I can think better about what I
am saying. I suppose some of the verses mean
that.”

“Very true,” said the Giant. “When you
grow up to be aman, Freddy, it will often happen
that you must be out in storms of thunder and
lightning, and when it rains harder and the wind
blows much stronger than it did this evening; and
when that happens, you must push your way
through it as well as you can. But I hope you
will always be very thankful when you have got
safe out of the storm, and be much happier when
the sun shines bright and pleasant over your head,
or the moon and stars, as they do now, than when
you were obliged to hear the rolling of thunder,
and be exposed to the violence of stormy winds
and tempests! ”

“That I am sure I shall,” said Freddy.

“ What I mean is,” continued the Giant, “ when
you are no longer a child, but a man, you will
often meet with stormy and tempestuous people.”



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 31

“I suppose,” said Leila, ‘‘ you mean people
that are always storming with anger, and always
cross, instead of being good-tempered, and smiling,
and quiet. [remember hearing our schoolmistress
say, ‘It is as silly as liking to be out in a wild
forest, in a storm, pelted with hail stones, and wet
through with the rain; rather than to walk about
a beautiful garden, full of very beautiful flowers,
on a fine summer's day, or a mild moonlight
evening.”

“Very well said, Leila,” replied the Giant;
“that is exactly what I think. Now, I very often,
at the mouth of my cave, sit and look at people
who are a long way off, perhaps in the middle of a
large town, perhaps in a little village; and when-
ever I see people quarrelling J always look at
something else. One day, I was looking into your
playground, and I saw some boys quarrelling;
and I saw a little boy walk out of the playground
as soon as he saw his schoolfellows begin to quarrel,
and he seemed to be quite unhappy about their
quarrelling. Then I looked into the girls’ play-
ground, and I am very sorry to say, Leila, that I



32 A STORY OF A

saw some very naughty girls there, beginning to
quarrel; but what pleased me very much, was to
see a little girl, very like you, walk away as soon
as she saw the quarrelling begin; and she, too,
seemed quite unhappy about the quarrelling. And
as soon as she got out of the playground, she met
the little boy, and they two walked arm-in-arm
together, into a field full of flowers, and there
stayed till the school-bell rang.”

“ Ah, Mr. Giant, I did not know you could see
so far,” said Freddy. ‘‘Do you know it was very
lucky that we went away both together from the
playground, for somebody told the master and
mistress that we had made the other boys and girls
quarrel; but they soon found out that we were not
there, and then they praised us both for going out
of the way.”

It was now about three o’clock in the morning,
and the Giant still kept walking on; the poor
children, however, had fallen asleep. And no
wonder, after so much travelling, and so many
wonderful adventures. But as the Giant had got
a great many more wonderful things for them to



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 33

. see, he was very careful not to disturb them. So
while they were sleeping, he continued his journey
without stopping, till he came to the sea-side. Now,
though the Giant’s legs were very long, and he
cared but little about scrambling through a mode-
rate-sized river, yet, as he often modestly con-
fessed, the British Channel was more than a match
for him, he never could “ tackle” it; he might
chance to set his foot upon a slippery porpoise; or
he might unintentionally intrude upon the private
apartments of a college of lobsters, and what would
be death to them, would be no joke to him.

Other little inconveniences he wisely foresaw
might occur, such as pricking his toes with the
sunken mast of some foundered vessel, or putting
his foot into an unpleasantly deep hole, or losing his
hat, if not his balance, in a squall.

But although these and other good reasons pre-
vented his striding through the sea in the frequent
visits to the Continent which his schemes required ;
yet our worthy and wide-awake Giant determined
not to be bafiled, but to invent some other new,
grand, and untried method of crossing the Channel.

D



34 A STORY OF A

And he succeeded. Asa sapper and miner he had -
long ago established his celebrity. He was the gi-
gantic genius who first suggested to old Brunel the
idea of tunnelling the Thames.

Soon after that time, it so happened that our
Giant, in one of his mining moods, was sitting, on a
fine moonlight night, in a cave of his own invention
under Shakspeare’s cliff. Suddenly a thought struck
him. “IJ have immortalized my friend by my
suggestion. I will now immortalize myself by
tunnelling the British Channel !” And he did so.
He afterwards gave to the genius of Watt its full
development. He made under-ground railroads to
assist him in his rapid journeys. With his own big
hands he laid down the sleepers, and constructed
the broad gauges. He built himself gigantics team
engines, and was his own stoker, and his own
passenger.

But the Giant always travelled with secrecy and
mystery.

He travelled over Europe. He traversed the
globe. He had “his exits and his entrances,” but
he permitted none to “ prate of his whereabouts.”



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 35

Not even the “ Duke,” who knew him intimately,
was ever known to ask him by what route he came,
or whither he was going; in other respects, that
great man enjoyed the Giant's full confidence, and
wisely took advantage of it. Never did he sit down
before a fortified town, without first consulting the
good-natured Giant; and if neither Gurwood, Gleig,
nor Napier have noticed this fact, it is but fair to
attribute their silence, not to ignorance, but to a
settled conviction that a fact so indisputable no
more required to be recorded than that of his Grace
having shaved, as usual, before the Battle of
Waterloo.

Freddy and Leila both rubbed their eyes, and
both awoke at the same time. Both, too, at once
uttered an exclamation of surprise and delight. |

And no wonder.

Hungry enough you may suppose they were,
after their travelling and sleeping; and now it was
about seven o'clock, and a beautiful sunny morning ;
and to their great surprise, they found themselves
sitting in a very pretty little arbour, covered with
roses and honeysuckles, and many other beautiful

D 2



36 A STORY OF A

flowers, all smelling so sweet, and sparkling with
dew. Close to the arbour was a cottage, and some
goats were feeding on some rocks near the cottage.
Above their heads were mountains covered with
snow, their irregular summits seeming to shoot up
among the clouds, and rising frequently above
them; at a short distance beneath them, a torrent
was heard rushing and foaming along the valley,
above which rose a majestic forest of pines. But
wonderful and beautiful as all these scenes appeared,
there was something placed immediately before their
eyes, and close within their reach, which just now
delighted them most of all. And this was a nice
little table covered with a clean white napkin, on
which was placed a large platter full of bread and
butter, with two cups full of milk, quite warm from
the goats.

“Kat away, Leila.”

“Eat away, Freddy,” said a voice which they
knew to be the Giant’s, though they could see
nothing of him.

“Dear Leila,” said Freddy, “depend upon it,
whenever the good-natured Giant says anything, it
is always the very best thing that can be said.”



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 37

‘“T think so, too,” said Leila, laughing; and they
fell to eating immediately.

Wonderful it was to see how quickly everything
eatable and drinkable disappeared. Indeed, when
the last slice of bread and butter, and the last drop
of goat’s milk, were gone, they still could not
help looking into the empty cups and platter, as
much as to say, “‘ After such a strange long journey,
we are still hungry.”

Who can describe their amazement when they sud-
denly saw the neat little table sinking gradually into
the ground, and presently disappear; leaving them
sitting on the bench of the summer-house staring at
one another, and wondering what would happen
next? And now, for the moment, something else
caught their attention, and made them both burst
out laughing. For when Freddy looked at Leila,
he saw that, instead of her usual plain English
school-dress, her tight little English straw bonnet,
her neat little checked frock, white stockings and
light walking shoes, she wore a most fantastic but
pretty little straw hat, stuck sovery much on one side
of her head that, had it not been tied under the chin,



38 A STORY OF A

it must have fallen off at once. She had a very
smart little red stuff petticoat, and over it a light
blue frock, the front of which was turned back and
pinned together behind. She had, besides, a pair
of bright yellow stockings, with long blue clogs
and clouted shoes tied with broad red ribbons.
As for Freddy, he laughed at himself as much as
he did at Leila, or Leila at him. He, too, had a hat
stuck very smartly on one side, but with a brim
three times as broad as Leila’s, of black felt, taper-
ing almost to a point at the top of the crown, and
covered with rows of ribbons of various colours.
His coat was of bright yellow, slashed behind, and
the buttons as big as a crown piece: he had a red
waistcoat with big pockets, and short, tight, black
plush breeches that hardly covered his knees, with
white stockings and thick walking shoes,

How they happened not to have observed before
how strangely they were dressed, is not so much to
be wondered at when we consider how very hungry
they were; and that if they were at first astonished
at their dress, they had no time to laugh at it till
they had had something to eat.



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 39

And now, while they were thus admiring each
other’s dresses, a trap-door opened at their feet,
and up comes the little table again, covered with
fruit, and biscuits, and cakes, and lemonade.

While these two good children were eating their
plateful of ripe Alpine strawberries, there came out
from the porch of a neat little cottage, or chalet,
close by, two children—a boy and a girl—who
seemed to be about the age of Leila and Freddy.
And they, too, were dressed in Swiss costume.
For by this time, no doubt, the sagacious reader,
whether young or old, will have comprehended,
how, during their sleep, the little travellers had
been conveyed, by the unwearying energies of their
Giant friend, by some secret subterranean passages
(already hinted at in this never-to-be- sufficiently-
admired story) to the sublime scenery of the
mountains of Switzerland.

And as they came out quietly arm-in-arm, these
two Swiss children, they patted the goats that were
feeding near them; and then bounding forward to
the little arbour, they gave to Leila and her com-
panion a nosegay of sweet violets. Then, retiring



40 A STORY OF A

outside the arbour, they took off their hats, and
began to sing. Oh, such a sweet harmony of child-
like voices and child-like looks! modestly timid,
yet not awkwardly shy; nothing artificial, nothing
strained; sober, solemn, devout.

“It must be their morning hymn!” whispered
Leila, as she and Freddy came out and stood at
the entrance of the arbour, to listen and to wonder.

“You are right, dear Leila,” said Freddy.
‘‘ See how they cross their hands upon their breast,
and look up into the clear blue sky. And now,
see, they are kneeling down.”

“Why should not we kneel down with them ?”
said Leila. “We can understand the language of
their music, though not their words.” And in-
stantly they too, as of one mind, knelt with the
peasant children.

It was a sight to draw down even angels from
their heavenly habitations.

‘To horse! to horse!” a loud voice was sud-
denly heard to exclaim. ‘“ Mount! mount! and
away!”

And then immediately the warlike notes of the



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 41

bugle were repeated in loud echoes among the
mountains.

Freddy and Leila started up hastily in terror,
_ trembling from head to foot. But the peasant
boy and girl took no more notice of these alarming
sounds than if they had not heard them. How-
ever, aS soon as they had finished their little
morning prayer, they too stood up, and taking
Leila and Freddy by the hand, led them to a pro-
jecting piece of rock that overlooked the valley and
the mountain-stream that has been already men-
tioned.

There they saw a sight, too, unlike anything
they had before witnessed.

Twenty or thirty horsemen, armed with swords.
and carabines, were drawn up in a narrow road on
the further side of the stream, and were on the
point of beginning their march.

War! what a consummate hypocrite thou art!

See, already with its deceitful blandishments it
is Winning its way even to the heart of an un-
offending child. The glittering sword, soon to be
sheathed in blood; the carabine, already charged



49 A STORY OF A

with death; the plumes of the soldiers, dyed in
colours of blood; and their horses champing the
bit, and pawing the ground, with eagerness to
begin the strife; all these attract and charm his
young mind, unsuspicious of evil.

Only the girl, Leila, now trembles, and with
instinctive feminine terror shrinks behind her com-
panion. But the boy, ashamed of his boyhood,
longs to be a man; and when the peasant boy waved
his hat in the air, as these horsemen galloped off,
and shouted out, “ Farewell!—may you be victo-
rious!” then Freddy also waved his hat, he knew
not why, and almost wished to follow them.

But they were soon out of sight; for, as they
wound up the hill from the banks of the stream,
they entered the thick forest of firs, which entirely
hid them from the children’s view.

Freddy stuck his hands into the big pockets of
his waistcoat, looking very thoughtful.

One thing very naturally occurred to him, and
turning to the companion of his strange adven-
tures, he said, “And what are we to do next,
Leila?”



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 43

But at the same instant, feeling something in
one of the pockets, he drew out a little note, beau-
tifully penned, and superscribed

“To my very dear young Friends and fellow-
Travellers,
‘“‘ FREDDY AND LEILA,
This, from the self-gratified inventor of mystical
morality to tickle the ear of the Infant and the
Aged; who, rejoicing in the flattering title of
“THE GOOD-NATURED GIANT,

begs most affectionately to inform Master Frederick
Gilbert and Miss Leila Fairford that they must put
themselves under the guidance of the two Swiss
children now with them; who will conduct them
safely to the foot of the Jura mountains, where to
their surprise and delight, they will find their
papas and mammas, who have been for some time
abroad in search of

‘“THE PICTURESQUE.”

Delighted indeed they were with this charming
little note. But how were they to obey its injunc-



44 A STORY OF A

tions? A question more quickly asked than an-
swered. But the Giant was teaching them prac-
tically what, at the school-desk, they had only been
taught theoretically, that “Necessity is the mo-
ther of Invention.”

“Had the Giant told us, Leila,” said Freddy,
“that he intended to take us into Switzerland, we
might have brought with us that little travelling
book of maps and views of this country which my
papa gave me, and that fat little book of dialogues
in English, French, and German, which your
mamma gave you. And by the help of them we
might have made these children understand where
we wish to go. But there is no use in thinking of
that now. The Giant means that we should set
our wits to work, and do the best we can.”

“Yes, and we have everything to encourage
us to do so,” said Leila, smiling. “ See what a
beautiful day it is; and how good-humoured these
children seem! I declare I think we might soon
understand one another. Let us try.”

And immediately they began by asking the names
of objects near them by signs, which the quick and



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 45

ready intelligence of the Swiss children soon appre-
hended.

“Let us go with them to their cottage,” said
Freddy. ‘It must have been there that we were
taken in oursleep. There our dresses were changed,
no doubt; and there, most likely, we shall find some
one who understands our language.”

But no sooner had they begun to move in the
direction of the cottage, than the peasant children
showed plainly the greatest unwillingness to allow
them to proceed. In fact, from the time when the
two travellers had been led by their new compa-
nions to the projecting rock, on which they were
still standing, these young mountaineers had never
turned their eyes towards the chalet, but had them
constantly fixed in the direction of the dark,
wide-extending forest, in which the horsemen had
disappeared, and they showed no disposition either
to move from that spot, or to turn their faces in
any other direction.

They now, however, seated themselves on the
rock. Leila and Freddy did the same.

‘‘T cannot help thinking,” said Freddy, “ that



46 A STORY OF A

these children are expecting some one to come
home to them, and that they are instructed to wait
here to be on the look out.”

Freddy was right.

Presently the peasant boy started upon his feet,
and said, “I hear them.” But the girl shook her

ee



cbhoy AINA
pee
SS

Ss.



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. “47

head. The boy looked at the sun, and said, “ Ist
zeit.” (It is time.)

‘‘T wonder what they are talking about,” said
Leila.

‘“T think, Leila, the boy’s ears are quicker than
ours, and he hears something which he expects to
hear about this time; and so he looked at the sun
to see what time of day it is.”

‘What is that jingling noise I hear, Fred.? It
sounds out in the wood yonder.”

‘“‘T hear it too, Leila. But do look at that little
silver horn the boy is taking out of his pocket. Is
it not quite beautiful?”

It was indeed a very beautiful little hunting
horn; and the boy showed at once that he knew
how to use it; for he put it to his mouth immedi-
ately, and gave a blast with it that was repeated a
thousand times in echoes amongst the rocks; and
quickly afterwards another and a louder horn
answered it, as if from the thick forest before
them.

The animated faces of the Swiss children showed
how welcome to them that answer was. And pre-



48 A STORY OF A

sently after the interest and attention of Leila and
Freddy were completely roused by seeing a party
suddenly emerge from the deep shades of the wood
into the open winding road below.

The party consisted merely of a man and a
woman, each mounted on a mule, and driving before
them four other mules. But the fanciful caparison
of these beasts, having large bells attached to the
throat-lash of each, and their picturesque effect, as





yf CN eet er

ti O37
St 8

f \\ WSs —~ Yn

. . SS a be, ;
em SE &










they wound their way cautiously down the hill,
greatly delighted the English children. To add to
the animation of the scene a huge dog, of the true
St. Bernard breed, attended them, playing all sorts



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 49

of gambols, in strange contrast with the sober,
dignified deportment of the mules, sometimes dis-
turbing their solemnity by jumping up and kissing
their noses, then dexterously retreating through
the labyrinth of their legs, not. without a sly but
cautious nudge at the heels of one or other of the
sleepiest of these beasts of burden; to resent which,
while it elevated their heels, certainly lowered
their dignity. Then, without waiting to be called
to account by master or mistress for his ridiculous
puerilities, the monstrous dog dashed down head-
long into the deepest eddies of the mountain stream,
and as suddenly emerging, shook off, among the
astonished mules, the surplus water from his over:
charged shaggy coat, making “ confusion worse
confounded.” '

All these pranks of the dog, and the picturesque
group of the muleteer and his wife, with the gaudy
_caparison of the mules, as they approached, were
watched by Freddy and Leila with ecstacies of
delight. But their delight was further increased,
as well as their surprise, on heariny the muleteer’s

E



50 A STORY OF A

wife, as she rode towards them, speak to them
in English.

“My dear young people,” said she, jumping
off her mule, and coming up with a face full of
good humour to Leila and Freddy, “how glad I
am to see you; and how very quickly you must
have travelled to have arrived here so soon. I
hardly thought you could possibly have got here
before next week. But I suppose you travelled by
- the mail-post all the way without stopping, and
that makes a great difference, only it must be very
fatiguing.”

“Yes,” said Freddy, laughing, “ we did certainly
come by the male, post haste, all the way. But whe-
ther we stopped at all on the road I cannot tell, nor
Leila either ; for we both fell fast asleep before we left
England, and never opened our eyestill we found our-
selves sitting in your beautiful arbour, with such a
very nice breakfast, which we thank you for very
much; for you may suppose how hungry we were,
nothaving had anything to eat since yesterday,when
the good-natured Giant gave us, and the schoolmaster
and mistress, and forty-eight more children, such



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 51

a charming treat, close by the big mulberry tree on
the banks of the river.”

“My dear child, what are you talking about?
The good-natured Giant? Why, surely you must be
telling some silly story, out of some silly story-
book, written by some silly, childish old body, to
amuse silly people.”

“Well,” said Leila, “I do not wonder at your
wondering. However, it is all quite true. And a
very easy journey we had, I can assure you; for
we sat in the Giant’s waistcoat pocket all the way,
as if we had been sitting in bed.”

‘‘ Sat in the Giant’s waistcoat pocket?” exclaimed
the woman, laughing heartily. “ Well, I declare
this is the best story [ever heard in all my life.
But come with us and our children into our chalet,
and we will soon get you something to eat before
you set out again; forl am sure you must both be
very hungry; for as to having had any breakfast
in our little summer-house that is quite impossible.
Our two children came only this morning from a
neighbour’s farm to meet us here, and I have the
key of the house in my pocket. But your

E 2



52 A STORY OF A

English nation has such funny ways of inventing
stories.”

Freddy and Leila were as much puzzled at what
the Swiss woman had said, as she was at what they
had told her.

“T cannot understand it,” said Freddy, as they
walked towards the cottage; “ but I know that I feel
as if I had just had a very good breakfast; for I
am not at all hungry now, though I was very
hungry when I awoke.”

“ And so was I,” said Leila, ‘and the nice warm
goat’s milk, and the bread and butter, were so
delicious! And then, when the table sank slowly
down into the ground, and then came up again
with the strawberries and cream, that was the best
fun of all.”

The good woman lifted up her eyes in astonish-
ment. ‘The table in my arbour sank down into
the ground, and then came up again with straw-
berries and cream! What can it all mean?”

Just then they passed by the arbour, and Freddy,
who was of avery inquiring mind, and knew that
every why must have a wherefore, could not help



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 53

running in to examine on his knees the mechanical
construction of the wonderful table. Leila’s very
natural curiosity led her to follow him; while the
kind-hearted housewife proceeded, with her heavy
bunch of keys dangling at her waist, to open her
cottage door, and prepare food for her young guests
and her family.

“© Leila, dear Leila, do pray look here,” said
Freddy, as he stooped down upon his hands and
feet; the table at which we breakfasted is not here
now. This is exactly the place where our table
stood; and sure enough here is a round mark in
the floor where the table moved up and down; and
I do really think that the good people of the house
here have never found it out.”

“But then,” said Leila, sitting down with Freddy
on the floor to think, “ where could the breakfast
come from ?”

“That’s a puzzler,’ said Freddy. And _ they
both sat looking at each other very much amused
as well as perplexed at the oddness of their ad-
ventures, yet by no means anxious that they should
terminate.



54> A STORY OF A

And, in truth, there was no immediate probability
of these pleasant adventures coming to an end:
for, wonderful to tell, they suddenly felt that the
floor was moving under them, and while they
caught hold of each other for support, the circle on
which they were sitting gradually sank with them,
and instantly they found themselves sitting in a
most beautiful carriage, splendidly lighted up with
lamps, and moving along a great deal faster than
the express train ever travelled on the Great Western
railway.

“My dear young friends,” said a voice which
they instantly knew to be the Giant’s, though they
could not see him, “I am glad you enjoyed your
breakfast in the arbour. I am sorry I cannot come
and sit with you just at present; but, as you know,
I am obliged to be my own stoker and my own
engineer. Besides, I am always making experi-
ments. An invention has just occurred to me
which will increase the velocity of the steam-engine
almost to an unlimited degree. I hope you do not
feel inconvenienced by the great speed at which we
are now travelling. But the truth is I have a little



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 55

business to transact at California; and as I hope to
arrive there in an hour and thirty seconds, and
shall not require to stay there above fifty minutes,
I think we shall get back again to the muleteer’s
chalet in about two hours; by which time the
muleteer and his family will have finished their
meal, and the poor mules will have eaten their corn
and rested, and be ready to take you to your papas
and mammas, at the foot of the Jura mountains.”

“ And have you been waiting here for us, Mr.
Giant,” said Leila, “all the time we were eating
our breakfast, and sitting on the rock, and talk-
ing to the children, and seeing the soldiers ride
away, and the muleteers arrive?”

“ Oh no, Leila, I have too much business to a
idle. As soon as I had brought you to Switzerland,
I turned back and went direct to the Menai Straits,
to make some observations on the tubular bridge.”

“Oh,” cried Freddy, “how I wish you had
taken us to see that wonderful bridge!”

“But then we should have lost the opportu-
nity of seeing the beautiful mountains of Switzer-
land this morning,” said Leila.



56. A STORY OF A

“Besides running a great risk of being
frightened to death with the stunning noise of
the experimental steam-engines as they passed
and repassed through the monstrous tube,” said
the Giant. “For, even to my giant ears, I can
assure you the sounds were tremendous.”

“T should hardly have thought,” said F reddy,
“that you would have heard any sound when you
were so far under ground yourself.”

“ Nevertheless,” said the Giant, “the great
depth at which I was placed below, was one great
cause of the loudness of the sounds: for, through
the winding opening which I had contrived
among the rocks, the sounds reverberated in
echoes, so oftentimes repeated, that an incredibly
vast body of sound was by degrees created (in the
same manner as by continued strokes on a gong),
until at last the noise was almost deafening. But
here we are, under one of the highest mountains of
California. Clamber through that opening in the
rock, and you will presently find yourselves in a
cave inaccessible to any one from without, but
from which you will easily be able, with the help



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 57

of those two little telescopes near you, to look
down upon a great number of very busy groups
of gold-finders.”

And greatly amused, indeed, were Leila and
Freddy with this novel and wonderful sight. So
ingeniously had the Giant contrived his Californian
cave, so gently, and almost imperceptibly did it
wind upwards from the deep bowels ot the earth to
the open light of day, that even these children in
their ascent felt no fatigue; while the vast variety
of material of which the several parts of the long
cavern were composed, excited in them the greatest
astonishment. Sometimes they walked along gal-
leries glittering with gems of every hue; then
suddenly the ground over which they passed, and
the walls, and the arched roof above, were of the
blackest polished ebony; presently they travelled
along passages white and transparent as alabaster ;
then every object had a bright metallic silvery hue.
At length they could perceive a small speck of
dazzling day-light at a distance, which gradually
increased as they proceeded, expanding, and be-
coming more defined as they approached the opening



58 A STORY OF A

of the cave. It is impossible to describe their
admiration, when they saw themselves surrounded
on all sides with great blocks of the purest gold,
on which they gladly sat down to rest themselves,
while they looked down from their inaccessible
golden cave on the busy multitudes toiling in their

pursoit of the precious metal in the plains below
them.

ia
BS 0 a
Rn

~ .
Si + >, or
> r » NN /* F i
WN SS

bs 'S GF >
my § . SJ =



_ om

The first object on which their eyes were more
particularly fixed, was a poor, tattered, haggard,
figure of a man, separated nearly a quarter of a



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 59

mile from the rest, and elevated above them, being
at work-on a rising piece of ground immédiately
below the Giant’s cave, though, indeed, some hun-
_ dreds of feet lower. His only companion was a
poor half-starved donkey. The only tools he had
to work with were a large clasp knife, a broken two-
pronged dinner-fork, and a small crow-bar. This
miserable man had only arrived on the spot the
day before. He had expended almost every farthing
on his journey. His sack, which was thrown over
the ass’s back, contained only a few dry, worm-eaten
pleces of sea-biscuit, and a small barrel of fresh
water.

Yet with these wretched materials the fire of
hope blazed up brightly within him, and stoutly he
set to work.

And truly that man would not have been called
a fool who had declared that the Star of his Des-
tiny had conducted him to a peculiarly fortunate
spot.

At the very first blow with his crow-bar, he
struck against some hard substance which he sup-
posed was a stone; but on examining the iron



60 A STORY OF A

point of the bar his delight was great on finding it
glittering with pieces of gold. His broken fork
and clasped knife were brought into action; and,
after a short space, and two or three hard tugs, he
succeeded in loosening and dragging to the surface
of the ground, a mass of gold far exceeding in
Size end weight all that his most sanguine imagina-
tion had suggested.

The children, Leila and Freddy, looked down
upon his labours from their lofty elevation with
the deepest interest. Mass after mass yielded to
his persevering toil.

And now, at length, in a shorter space of time
than the gold-diggers below him had found suffi-
cient for scraping together only a few ounces of the
precious metal, this poor solitary mortal had
crammed his sack full of gold; and, after incredi-
ble exertions, having placed it on his ass’s back,
was cautiously descending the hill, when suddenly
the poor over-burdened animal stumbled and fell,
The contents of the sack falling to the ground
were precipitated with great velocity down the
precipice, rolling onwards till they reached the very



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 61

spot where a mixed party of French and Italians
were digging.

“ Little good shall we any of us do here, I think,”
said a desponding young Neapolitan count, who,
having suddenly succeeded to a handsome property,
had as suddenly lost it all at the gambling table ;
and was now, with a party, as desperate as himself,
looking for “hidden treasure” in the bowels of
California.

“ Bah!” said a gruff voice, issuing from a forest
of unmitigated moustaches, the long and lanky-
legged owner of which was trying, without much
success, to make the broken blade of a sword do
duty as spade and pick-axe; “ bah! you idle Italian
dogs are only fit for sitting at home and eating
maccaroni.”

‘“Maccaroni in your teeth!” exclaimed the en-
raged Italian. “If the fat of Italy had not fed
your half-starved carcase when you came boasting
and blustering from bankrupt France, you would
not have had strength to crawl here.”

“Have a care, have a care,” cried out three or
four voices at once; ‘here are some heavy stones



62 A STORY OF A

rolling down at full speed uponus. That blunder’
ing old fool and his ass have stumbled, and dis-
turbed half the stones on the mountain, I think,
and we shall have them crushing our toes presently
unless we keep a sharp look out.”

However, a sharp look out they all kept instantly,
and soon discovered that something was rolling
towards them well worth scrambling for.

The glittering contents of the wretched man’s
sack, as they came bounding down over the rough
stones of the mountains, excited the cupidity of the
whole party to such a degree that they rushed like
madmen to clutch the precious spoil. Each indi-
vidual felt a burning, irresistible longing to possess
the whole himself. All the instruments which just
now had been used for delving in the earth, were
instantly, with much greater energy and rancorous
violence, turned against each other. Most deadly
but not prolonged, was the strife; and each of
these half-dozen combatants lay gasping on the
ground, pierced with mortal wounds inflicted by
the knife, the sword, or the stiletto, when suddenly
an enormous fragment of a rock of granite, as if



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 63

envious of the carnage committed by a few paltry
ingots of gold, came scampering from some tower-
ing height, overwhelming the whole party in its
way, and crushing them to atoms.

“O Freddy, what a frightful sight!” exclaimed
Leila, clinging to him.

‘“‘ Look at something else,” said Freddy. ‘‘ Look
at that poor wretched man and his miserable
donkey.”

“Oh, how I pity him!” said Leila.

‘Do not pity him. He is rightly served,” said
the Giant, who, though still busily engaged below
in his steam-carriage, yet, by the means of a self-
adjusting flexible telescope, about a hundred and
fifty yards long, had been able to observe all that
was passing; and having, moreover, excavated his
winding cavern upon the principle of the famous
Ear of Dionysius greatly improved, could not only
distinctly hear the lowest whisper, but could make
himself heard from one end of his cavern to the
other. “Do not waste your pity onhim. I will
tell you something of his history. He was once an
honest, hard-working English mechanic. He



64 A STORY OF A

earned enough to give himself, his wife, and chib-
dren, a decent subsistence, and, with a little
economy, was able to put a trifle into the savings-
bank. Unluckily he heard of the gold of Califor-
nia. From that moment he was an altered man.
He had naturally a too great fondness for hoarding
whatever he could collect, and thought too much
instead of too little about laying by his earnings.
Now he thought he had hit upon a way to make
himself rich without working. No arguments of
his wife or friends could make him change his plan.
To California he would go; and to California he
went. There he is. Look at him once more. A
picture of perfect wretchedness. His poor starved
donkey is just dead. The very heavy load and the
terrible fall were too much for it. It is quite dead.
And its master has thrown himself on the ground
in despair. He is thinking how happy he might be
at home now with his wife and children and his
earnings at his trade. But he has no strength left.
Your eyes are not so good as mine, little Leila ;
besides they are full of tears. You are crying
about this poor man and his dead ass. It is very



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 65

natural, and I do not blame you. But your eyes,
as I said, are not so good as mine, and I saw what
you and Freddy could not see. When the poor
beast fell, it rolled over the man, and broke his arm.
It is avery bad fracture, and there is no doctor, as
in merry England, to set it for him. So there he
is, hundreds and hundreds of miles from home,
surrounded with gold above his head and under
his feet, in agonies of pain and almost starved.
No wonder he looks despairing. But he does not
know all. His daughter is sick, his wife without
work. And so she and their children are almost
starved. Now there is one good thing about
the man, I can see.”

‘And so, I think, I can,” said Freddy. “He
looks to me as if he were saying his prayers. Is
that the one good thing you can see, Mr. Giant?”

“You are quite right, Freddy,” said the Giant,
‘‘that is just what I can see. He is praying to be
forgiven for having been so wicked as to run away
from his poor wife and children, for the sake of
gold, when he ought to have reflected that his
faithful wife, and his dutiful, affectionate children,

F



66 A STORY OF A

were worth more, a great deal more, than all the
gold in California.

“ And now, do you know, I am thinking whether
we cannot be of great use to this poor man, and
save him and his family from a great deal of
misery.”

“OQ Mr. Giant,” said the children, both toge-
ther, “how delightful it would be, if we could
help him!”

“And we will help him,” said the Giant.
“But we must be quick. There is no time to be
lost.”

The Giant had, at this time, by an invention pe-
culiarly his own, projected two strong grappling
irons to the mouth of his cave, with strong cords
attached, and was now hauling himself up, in an
easy recumbent posture, to the mouth of the cave,
where the children sat.

“ Now, friend Freddy,” said the Giant, “‘don’t be
faint-hearted. Tie this elastic cord, which I have
brought with me, round your body. You need
not be afraid of its breaking. I invented it myself.
It is composed of vulcanized Indian-rubber, gutta-



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 67

percha, and hemp, intimately combined; and,
though seemingly so very slight, will support an
immense weight without breaking. Take in your
hand this little cake, which I have carefully pre-
pared with a chloroformic drug of my own compo-
sition. Take also with you this little silken bag.
And now attend particularly to my instructions.
Your own safety depends on this. After I have
given you all your instructions, then stand on
your feet boldly, and run down this rough, steep
hill fearlessly, till you come to the man with the
broken arm. Immediately break off half the cake,
and offer it to him. He will eat it greedily, and
will immediately fall asleep. Then take the silk
bag; lay it down close to him, and roll him over
upon it. You will then find it gradually inflating,
as [ have in my hand a hair tube attached to it,
by means of which I shall fill it with wind. Be
very careful, all this time, to keep the remaining
half of the cake in your hand, for a reason which —
I will not at present explain. As soon as the bag
is filled with wind, it will form a hollow bed,
out of which the sleeper will not easily fall. Then
F 2



68 A STORY OF A

get astride yourself upon his body, hold fast by
the buttons of his coat, and I will drag you up
safely to my cave. Only, mind, don’t forget the
remaining half of the cake. You may have occa-
sion to use it.”

Freddy, who was as bold as a lion, especially
when he knew that he was doing what was right,
only just stooped down to give Leila a kiss, and then
got upon his legs immediately, and ran fearlessly
down the hill. His thick clouted Swiss shoes were
now very serviceable to him, as the rough hob-
nails kept his feet from slipping. Down he ran,
jumping over the great rough stones till he reached
the place where the wounded man was still kneel-
ing, with his hands clasped, and so earnest in his
prayer that he did not notice the boy till he came
close to him.

“ What can this mean?” said the man. “ Who
are you, and where do you come from? And
what do you want with a wretch who has but a
few hours to live?”

“J want to help you,” said Freddy, “ if I can.”

“Tt is too late, child. My arm is broken, and



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 69

my body bruised all over, and I am almost dead
with hunger.”

“Eat a piece of this cake, then,” said the boy;
and he gave him half his cake. The man swallowed
it greedily, and immediately closed his eyes, sank
on the ground, and remained motionless.

Freddy then threw the silk bag on the ground,
and with some difficulty rolled the man over till
he lay upon it. Immediately the bag began to be
inflated, forming itself gradually into a kind of bed,
hollow in the middle, into which the man’s body
sank.

And now, Freddy, delighted with his success,
was preparing to get astride on the body, when he
recollected that in his eagerness to roll the body on
thebag, and togive hishands more liberty, he had put
the remaining half of the cake by him on the ground.
As the piece of cake was but small, and much of
the same colour as the loose stones lying about, he
could not at first discover it. Presently, however,
he saw it lying near the poor dead ass; but as he
ran to pick it up he was greatly alarmed at hearing
a low growl, which seemed to issue from behind a



70 A STORY OF A

large piece of rock at a little distance off, and on
looking in that direction he could see the eyes of
some wild animal staring at him. |

At the first moment of his alarm he was think-
ing of bolting off up the hill as fast as he could.
But immediately he thought that, as he had done
one foolish thing in forgetting the Giant’s instruc-
tions, there was the less reason why he should do
another by running away, like a coward. So he
stood still, and looked boldly at the animal as it
came out from the rock, and then he saw that it
was very like the pictures he had seen of the wolf.
And, indeed, it was a wolf, and a very fine one, too.
Freddy, however, it must be owned, did not much
admire the beast, though he boldly stood his ground,
staring hard at his wild shaggy neighbour, in hopes
of putting him out of countenance. And to say
the truth, the wolf did not much like to be stared
at so steadily; and though he did not retreat, he
seemed afraid to advance. Freddy was a sharp
little fellow, and he began to suspect that, with all
his growling, the wolf was the greater coward of the
two. Indeed, he had heard it said that no wild



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 71

animal can bear to look a man in the face; and he
had a mind to try whether the wolf dared look a
child in the face.

He would gladly have picked up a stone, but he
must then take his eyes off the wolf. Suddenly, he
recollected his thick, nailed shoes. - He stooped
down, cautiously, with his eyes still watching his
enemy, and, in an instant, taking off one of his
shoes, he flung it vigorously right at the wolf’s head.

The beast was cowed. The brave spirit of the
boy triumphed. Off cantered the wolf. Freddy
lost not a moment in picking up his shoe and the
piece of cake; and jumping on the sleeping man’s
body, was delighted to find that the silken bed was
immediately in rapid motion up the hill.

But there was still another unexpected trouble
to be overcome.

As Freddy sat holding fast with one hand by
the buttons of the man’s coat, and keeping the piece
of cake with great care in the other, he felt some-
thing squeezing his leg. At first he thought it was
the man waking up; but on looking at his leg, he
was startled at seeing a large snake of the boa-con-



72 A STORY OF A

strictor family coiling round his leg. The colours
of the snake were certainly very brilliant and
beautiful, and the animal seemed to look up at
Freddy as if to say, “I enjoy my ride with you
very much.” Still Freddy could not help thinking



reeable to himself that
they should part company. But how was this to
be managed? Suddenly, he bethought him of the
half piece of cake, which he very civilly offered to

his new travelling companion.

that it would be more ag



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 73

The snake opened his big jaws, and F reddy
luckily dropped it down his throat, without getting
his fingers bitten; and no sooner had the snake
swallowed the cake, than it relaxed its hold of the
boy’s legs, and fell heavily on the ground, and was
soon left far behind.

And now, as he looked up the hill, he had the
very great satisfaction of seeing his dear Leila not
far off, and clapping her hands with great delight
as she watched him coming back to the golden
mouth of the Giant’s Californian cave.

Oh, what a joyful meeting it was!

No time was lost by the Giant, as soon as F reddy
and his load had reached the cave, in descending
with the whole party to his subterranean steam-
carriage.

To speak of the great Lireeneestepaidagathon-
gigantaiosphilos as a skilful chirurgeon only, would
be like describing the Atlantic as a large fish-pond.
The Atlantic, truly, is large, and contains fish also ;
good fish, very excellent good fish. But the Atlan-
tic has other things to boast of—many other things
—so many that we might almost say that its fishy





74 A STORY OF A

greatness 1s swallowed up in its other greatnesses.
So of our splendid Giant. To reduce a compound
fracture, to set a broken arm scientifically, beauti-
fully, elegantly, was with him what talking Latin
‘s with a late Professor of Poetry, J. K., mere
child’s play.

And beautifully did he set the arm of the still sleep-
ingstranger. Certainly he must have possessed some
secret as yet undivulged to the world of science;
some knowledge he must have acquired of the latent
powers of the wonder-working chloroform which has
not yet travelled down to our most laborious
philosophers. What do we talk of ? setting a limb,
drawing a back tooth, cutting off a leg of a man, or
firing the leg of a horse, and other fearful opera-
tions, while the patient is ina pleasing unconscious
trance? All very wonderful no doubt, but nothing
when compared with our Giant, who kept his
patient asleep till he had cured him, and then set
him on his legs as sound as a roach.

“ Freddy,” said the Giant, archly to his young
friend, as they steamed away from the deep caverns
of the Californian hills towards Switzerland, at the



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 75

rate of some hundreds of miles in a min ute, “Freddy,
my brave fellow, what are you about?”

‘Putting on my shoe, Sir.”

‘‘T thought so,” said the busily-engaged stoker.
“ What, picked up a stone, may be, in running down
the hill, or a little sand and gold dust in pushing
our sleeping friend here into his cradle?”

“No, Mr. Giant. It was all my own fault entirely.
I thoughtlessly, in the hurry of the moment, laid the
remainder of the cake, after I had given half to the
poor man, down on the ground. And then—”

“I know it all,” said the good-natured Giant. “I
saw it all. And ifI had not, I know you would
have told me. Now, you have learnt by experience,
that want of thought is cousin-german to want of
safety, and that what a child may drop carelessly, a
gant hardly may pick up again. Speedily as we
speed, no speed can recover time gone. The shoe was
a good afier-thought; gallantly was it flung, and it
did prompt execution. But fore-thought would
have beaten the wolf without the shoe; and he is
still dining on the dead donkey; while we, accord-
ing to the observations which I have just made,



76 A STORY OF A

have not yet passed the caverns of the Atlantic,
though it is nearly eight minutes thirty-two se-
conds and a quarter since my engine began to play.
However, you nobly retrieved your error, and will
soon find yourselves in the summer-house again.”

—



“JT wonder,” said the muleteer’s wife, ‘‘ what
those dear children can find to amuse themselves
so long in our summer-house; go and see for them,
Marie, and tell them we have something hot and
nice for them, whenever they like to come in.”

Poor Marie hesitated. “They cannot under-
stand me.”

“True, child, I had forgot. You must make
signs to them; pretend you are eating and drink-
ing, and point to our chalet ; they will be sure to
comprehend you.”

But the summons was not needed; for, just as
she spoke, in walked Freddy and Leila.

“ Well,” said the kind-hearted woman, “I am
glad to see you first, at last, as you were behind
before,” pleased to show off her intimate acquaint-
ance with the English language, by an old Irish



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 77

jeu de mots ; “please sit down and partake of our
homely fare.”

“Homely, do you call it?” said Leila, casting
her eyes on a neat, clean napkin, spread over a
little round table, and so exactly resembling that
at which they had sat in the arbour, and furnished
with the very same viands, that Leila and Freddy
looked at each other with a smile of astonishment.
‘‘Homely, indeed; we call it splendid: and very
hungry we are, too, I can tell you, after our long
journey to California and back again, since we last
saw you, about three-quarters of an hour ago;
notwithstanding the nice breakfast you gave us.”

‘‘ California, my dears! I think I know the names
of all the places for at least twenty English miles
round, and I can undertake to say that, whether on
the mountains or in the valleys, no such name as
that of California was ever heard of. Indeed, I do
not believe that there is any such place in all
Switzerland.”

“‘ Nor [neither,” said Freddy, laughing, “unless
your Switzerland extends beyond the Atlantic.
We travelled under the Atlantic Ocean to get to



73 A STORY OF A

California. Why,” continued Freddy, as he helped
himself to a large slice of bread and butter, “I
suppose it cannot be less than four thousand miles
from this place.”

The good woman of the house was completely
bewildered. ‘It is of no use,” she said to herself,
“ toargue with such strange, unaccountable children.”

So she wisely made no reply, while she busied
herself in making preparations for the journey.

«This, at all events, is very vood pay,” said she,
taking up a large leathern purse, and counting over
twenty old gold louis. “ And the letter is plain,
and easily understood. There can be no mistake
here.”

“ Ask no questions. Only have your husband
ready with his mules, within an hour after your
return home, and take charge of the two young
English people, whom you will find in company
with your own children, who are expecting you
near the summer-house. Take them to St. Croix,
near which place you will find their parents, whose
names are Fairford and Gilbert. Any one will



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 79

direct you to them, if you should not chance to
meet with them, for their faces are well known in
the neighbourhood. They are rambling about, from
morning till night, in search of the picturesque.
“Accept the accompanying trifle from your

‘‘ Unknown Frienp.”

“In search of the picturesque; what does that
mean? Looking for a picture, I suppose. Prob-
ably they have dropped one out of their portfolio.
But it is ten to one whether they will ever chance
to light upon it again. Perhaps we may have the
luck to pick it up for them, and then they will give
us a present, no doubt. Well, weare growing rich
very fast, I think. Twenty gold pieces! And,
then, what a strange rich gentleman this must be
to call it only a trifle. Who can he be?”

Her further meditations were here prevented by
the muleteer, who announced that his mules were
ready.

The first incident worthy of notice which occurred
to the travellers, was one that, indeed, astonished
the whole party.



80 A STORY OF A

After they had been about an hour on their route,
and Leila and Freddy had mutually expressed their
delight at the wild, romantic scenery through which
they passed, and thought it worth more than all the
golden caves or gold of California, suddenly, as they
reached the summit of a very steep, long hill, they
heard a confused murmuring sound as of many
voices. Looking down into the wide-extended
plains before them, they could distinctly see, at
about a league distant, a body of twenty or thirty
horsemen on a low, swampy tract of land, all closely
huddled together, and seemingly in some difficulty,
the nature of which, at that distance, could not
easily be ascertained. The muleteer, however, had
his own conjectures, and they proved to be correct.

The party whom Freddy and Leila had watched
with so much interest and curiosity in the early
part of the morning, in the dell below where they
stood with the peasant children, were a band of
mountaineers in the pay of France, and who had
received orders to march forthwith into that coun-
try, and join some other forces in quelling a disturb-
ance which had suddenly broken out in one of the

provinces.





yy



19/2

- ’
fe



h

>
yy

i

ee
UA

Pe

(/
ys

sd

SY / = —— )

N
i
4

\
| }

fy
fA ]
+
SS -
=I

==> ==
— SE

By = TS =
> Z
2 SSS c

ST ee Na

= if)
aad
5 ; SSN
2 : : AS ESA
as = ; = “
i= = = Ss AN I afd | 5S
= — => ; = SN
a Se! \ MX
: = __SSSSSSSSS— = ——
== = -

\S
\NS

N
SY

~,

mm

my

ZS

Ww nnn WMI

UY’ > A,
\





——— a =

\\ \
. .
\
= S Se XK ~ .

e/a. S

Pt




\
4
\





GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 81

They were heavily armed, and their horses and
appointments were none of the best, so they
travelled slowly. But as their rendezvous where
they were to receive further orders was at no great
distance, there was no need to distress their horses
by pressing them beyond their strength.

As they reconnoitred from the brow of the
same hill as that which the muleteer and his party
had ascended, their line of march which would lead
them to their destination by the shortest route,
they resolved on taking that which presently occa-
sioned an unexpected disaster.

Having descended into the plain, and proceeded
about a league and a-half among thick enclosures,
they suddenly opened upon what seemed an exten-
sive pasturage, which offering a more agreeable
footing for their beasts than the stony and dusty
roads, they pressed forward over it immediately,
urging their steeds into a gallop, who seemed to
enjoy the frolic and the soft turf almost as much as
their riders.

On they went, shouting and keeping their ranks
as if they were charging an enemy.

G



82 A STORY OF A

And so, indeed, they were, though they did not
know it; and a most formidable enemy it was.
Before they could check their horses’ speed, they
found themselves in an instant floundering in a
deep morass.

The foremost were up to their horses’ girths in a
moment, totally unable to move forward or wheel
round. Those who rushed last into the quagmire
were not better off; for the frightened animals,
struggling violently to extricate themselves, only
added to the general confusion and their own peril
by stumbling and staggering among the rest who
were already in a fiz.

Fearful was the scene which presented itself to
the travellers as they pushed forward, as fast as
their mules could carry them, to assist, if possible,
by any means in their power, in extricating the
soldiers.

The men had mostly dismounted by the time the
muleteer and his party had reached a little knoll
of trees about a hundred yards from the swamp.

They could hardly be said to be standing by their
horses, but they were clinging to them, as their only



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 83

chance of saving themselves ; while the poor beasts,
seeming instinctively to know that all their efforts
must be fruitless, resigned themselves quietly to
the death of suffocation which threatened them.
Despair was in the countenance of every one of
the men. They could not disguise it from them-
selves, that whatever attempts they made to move,
only sank them and their horses deeper in the
abyss; and that while they remained stationary
they were, by slow but perceptible degrees, de-
scending into their graves.

The certainty of a speedy death, the impossi-
bility of any rescue, seemed to impress them all.
And in this state of feeling they were when the
party reached the knoll already mentioned.
Among the soldiers not a sound was heard, and it
was curious to observe how, among these rough
mountaineers, the near approach of a most appal-
ling death acted. One feeling seemed to pervade
them all. It was useless to resist. But another
feeling also, and of the noblest, pervaded their
seemingly devoted ranks.

No sooner had they caught sight of the party on

G 2



$4 A STORY OF A

the knoll, instead of imploring assistance which
they knew must be impossible, they all with one
voice warned them not to approach; and then in-
stantly they all broke out into a chorus of singing.
It was one of their wildest mountain melodies
—a funeral dirge over their own graves. :

Whether it might be that our excellent friend,
the good-natured Giant, was roused from one of
his short slumbers after his mighty toils by the
sound of these poor fellows’ voices, it skills not to
inquire.

One fact is certain, and a very pleasing one it
was, though most surprising, not only to the
soldiers, who by this time had little left above
ground but their heads and shoulders, but also to
the muleteer and his party, who all saw too
plainly, and with an agony of distress, that it was
impossible to render the sufferers the least assist-
ance. One very pleasing fact is certain, that
Freddy and Leila, as they sat on their mules
mutually overwhelmed with grief at the sad fate of
the soldiers, suddenly heard a voice behind them,
which said, cheeringly, “ Never despair!” They



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 85

knew directly that it was the Giant’s voice; and
Freddy in the exuberance of his delight, immedi-
ately repeated the words, roaring out to the sink-
ing soldiers in the morass, at the top of his lungs,
““ Never despair ! ”

Whether it was the Giant’s voice they heard, or
Freddy’s, or both, is hard to say. But certainly
there was a movement of heads among them and
their beasts, the only part of their bodies, except
the men’s hands and arms, remaining in sight, which
indicated that, even at their last extremity, a faint
ray of hope had shone upon them all. Nor were
their hopes disappointed; for it chanced that the
Giant, in one of his numerous excavations, was
tunnelling under the exact spot where the soldiers
met with their disaster; and, at the very moment
of this accident, was resolving in his mind that a
better spot could not be found than this unpro-
fitable and dangerous morass, on which to cast an
accumulation of several thousand tons of rubble,
which began to impede his operations.

As he was not one of your every-day experi-
mentalists, whose motto is, ‘‘ Two words for self,



A STORY OF A

and one for others, if it can be spared,” he had an
eye, in all his experiments, to the benefit of society
at large. A citizen of the world, he, in his peculiar
way, threw out hints to men of all grades, in all
nations. Some stupid fellows we know, never
take a hint. Others are very slow at taking one.
Many sharp wits there are, however, on whom the
slightest hint is never thrown away. These not
only take it, but improve upon it, and go on im-
proving upon it, till they have worked it ont to
perfection.

He was now at this time only lately returned
from Strathfieldsaye, where he had been for several
hours closeted with the Duke. His fine sonorous
voice, which he could modulate to any degree of
strength he chose, from the softest accents of a
child to the loudest roar of artillery, was peculiarly
acceptable to his Grace, who listened with much
seeming attention to his eulogy of those landlords
who backed up their tenants liberally, and to some
encouraging hints on draining and chalking the
most impracticable soils.

Much astonishment was, of course, excited in



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 87

the muleteer, his wife, and children, at this sudden
exclamation, twice repeated, which they attributed
altogether to Freddy, as no one else of their party
was likely to have so called out. It is, however,
worthy of remark that, whereas the Giant called
out loudest in the Swiss dialect first, and then in
a lower tone in English for the benefit of Leila and
Freddy, who did not understand Swiss; so Freddy
shouted out, as nearly as he could in the tone of
the Giant, the words Never despair in the Swiss lan-
guage only, which astonished the muleteer and his
family the more as they thought him ignorant of
their language.

But now imagine how great was the admiration
of all when presently the bodies of men and horses
slowly but steadily were seen to rise higher and
higher out of the green morass, till at length they
all stood firm upon the surface ; the horses testify-
ing their delight by neighing to each other, and
pawing the ground with eagerness to quit the dread-
ful spot; the men by shouting and shaking of
hands. ‘They were all too much overjoyed at their
escape, and too anxious to be gone, to enter philo-



88 A STORY OF A

sophically into the latent cause of the wonderful
phenomenon. But they could not so far divest
themselves of some mistrust of the ground beneath
their feet as to think it prudent to remount till
they had led their horses some distance from the
spot, and felt quite satisfied that they were indeed
again on terra firma.

As they regained the hard beaten public road,
which, in truth, they ought never to have quitted,
they were joined by the muleteer’s party, all of
whom crowded round to express their hearty Joy
at their escape. Especially Leila and Freddy, not
at all daunted by the grim appearance of men
and horses, whose arms and accoutrements were,
as may be imagined, in the greatest possible dis-
order, would not be satisfied without shaking by
the hand as many as they could get within reach
of ; the muleteer’s wife telling the men that these
two were English children, and the most extraor-
dinary and wonderful ever heard of.

There was some truth in this, as every reader of
these their most romantic adventures will readily
acknowledge.



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 89

Nor were their adventures yet ended.

But to proceed. The soldiers having lost a
considerable time by this disaster, and being besides
ina most miserable state of disorder as to their
equipments, were for pressing forward with all
possible speed to the nearest village to repair the
mischief which their thoughtlessness had _ occa-
sioned, and then join their expectant comrades.

But an occurrence which now took place, en-
tirely altered their plans. Just as they had put
themselves in motion, a clattering of horses’ hoofs
was heard ata distance in the very direction which
_ they intended to take. The nature of the ground
prevented them at first from seeing the party from
whom the sounds proceeded; but they were cer-
tainly advancing, and ata quick pace, as the sounds
became louder and more distinct every minute.
Very soon a turn in the road gave them a view of
a party of horsemen like themselves, but fewer in
number, whom they recognised as their own coun-
trymen, and whom they had received orders to
join at an appointed rendezvous on the borders of
France.



90 A STORY OF A

Great was the surprise of these new comers at
the plight of their comrades in arms; and little
compassion did they bestow on them when told
their history.

On the contrary, loud bursts of laughter greeted
them on all sides.

Come on, my smart lads,” said one more witty
than the rest, “let us have a mock fight; it will be
good practice before going into action. It will
brighten us all up, and show what metal we are
made of. You out-number us by more than half.
But what of that? To prove we are not afraid of
you, we will draw the bullets of our carbines, and
you shall fire away at us point blank, bullets and
all, and these good people shall look on and see fair
play. And as soon as our sham fight is over, we
will troop away together to the nearest hostelry,
and moisten our clay.”

The poor clay-covered soldiers, with their be-
grimed visages and dripping accoutrements, were
yet much too gay of heart to take offence at any of
the gibes and jokes of their showy and well-
appointed comrades ; and, indeed, the news which



GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 91

these unexpected horsemen brought, and now mer-
rily communicated to them, left scarcely room for
regret at the accident which had befallen them.

It was shortly this. The order to advance had
been countermanded. The anticipated disturb-
ance in France had either been quelled, or had not
taken place. ‘Their services were not now needed.
They might return to their mountains.

There was one incident, or, to speak more cor-
rectly, lack of incident, which produced a lasting
and very unpleasant impression on the minds, the
simple and innocent minds, of Leila and Freddy.

‘‘ Leila,” said Freddy, as they jogged gently on
behind the muleteer and his family, “‘ what makes
you look so very grave ?”

‘Thinking about those soldiers. What a beau-
tiful hymn they sang, when they thought there was
no chance of their lives being saved.”

“Tt was very affecting, Leila; and it made you
cry, though you could not understand the words.
And Marguerite, the muleteer’s wife, tells me it is
the same as they sing up in the mountains, when
they are lost in the snow, or fall into the avalanches.



Full Text


—_—= See i



Le eee TS
mT

F
>

mill Hill

Le

=


gst NEATHOONEGI CANT 9 .
M

THE GOOD-NATURED GIANT.

A Story
ADAPTED TO THE CAPACITIES OF

CHILDREN AND OLD PEOPLE.
BY ONE OF THE NUMBER.

With Blnstrations
By C. W. SHEERES.

LONDON :
HOPE AND CO., PUBLISHERS,
16, GREAT MARLBOROUGH-STBEET.
1852.

INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER.



To be first read of all who do more highly
esteem a body that hath also a soul, than a body
without a soul; or a nut that, being cracked,
showeth a sound and wholesome kernel within,
than one that hath a goodly shell only, but within
which all is naught.

For though there be many, and great store of
pleasant-looking houses which shall be scanned
with delight of the passing traveller who surveys
the outside only; yet, let him knock and demand
admittance within, and, too often, his only reward
will be to walk through along range of empty
chambers, and hear only the hollow sound of his
own footsteps as he threads wearily the intricate
mazes of “ passages that lead to nothing.”

Now, though of Giants there be good store that
have terrified naughty men and women, as well as
boys and girls, from the earliest times down to the
present day; yet in ransacking the whole library
of good Mr. Newbury and his successors, rarely, if
anywhere, shall you meet with one who, par ea-
vi INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER.

cellence, may be styled the “ G'ood-natured” Giant;
and of whom it may with truth be said that, great
as was the height, the strength, the bulk of our
hero, and perfect as was the symmetry of his vast
proportions, they were as nothing when compared
with the expansive benevolence of his lofty yet
humble and child-loving mind; with his well-stored
intellect, with his naturally great yet lively, nay,
playful, genius, accustomed to play with the
abstrusest sciences as a child with a toy.

Let the deaf, toothless, crazed, and spectacled,
good old bodies, whether masculine, feminine, or
neuter, who shall pleasantly beguile an idle half:
hour over these strange pages, but condescend to
scratch away the seeming rubbish of superficial
fable; and, unless the intellect of such be shrunk
into “second childishness and mere oblivion,” surely
some barley-corns of wholesome moral will be
disinterred by them, which, although their own
crops be full, they may be pleased to offerto some of
the many broods of half-fledged Chickens around
them.
The modest Author modestly expresses his modest
lou bts

‘“Whether ’tis better, in a trunk to bury
The quirks and crotchets of outrageous fancy,
Or send a well-wrote copy to the press.”
Hamlet imitated by Mr. Jago.



PROLOGUE TO
THE GOOD-NATURED GIANT.

‘“‘ He comes, with Pleasure at his side,
To spread his genial spirit wide.
And bring, where’er he turns his eye,
Peace, plenty, love, and harmony,
Till ev’ry being share its part,
And heav’n and earth are glad at heart.”
Altered from West’s Ode to Gray.

A STORY OF A

GOOD-NATURED GIANT.



Once there was a good-natured Giant. He lived
at this time in a great deep cave under a great high
hill which was near a little village. In the village,
near the church, there was a school-house. All the
good little boys and girls in the village, and else-
where, liked to go to this school. But the naughty
boys and girls liked to stay away. However, the
good boys and girls were the happiest, as you will
presently see. For one fine morning, when all the
good little boys and girls were going to school, and
all the naughty little boys and girls were playing

B
2 A STORY OF A

about in the dirt, the good-natured Giant came out

of his cave, and when he saw the children playing
in the dirt, instead of going to school, he walked
along upon his hands and feet till he came to a hedge



near where the children were dabbling about close
to a muddy ditch on the other side. And then he
blew his nose so loud that the naughty children
were terribly frightened, and tumbled over onc
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 3

another into the middle of the dirty ditch. You
may depend upon it they all got a good whipping
when they went home. But there were four-and-
twenty good boys all walking together on their way
- to school; and as soon as the Giant saw them he
asked them whether they liked apples and pears,
and they all said, ‘“‘Oh yes, very much.” So the
Giant took them up and put them into his coat
pocket.

And the Giant went a little further, and saw
four-and-twenty good Girls going to school; and
when he asked them if they were fond of apples
and pears, they all said, “Oh yes, very much.” So he
put the little girls into his coat pocket on the other
side; and walking a little further along the road, he _
met a little boy and girl going to school, arm-in-
arm, and he took up the pretty little girl with the
big forefinger and thumb of his right hand, and
the little boy with the big finger and thumb of his
left hand, and put them both into his waistcoat
pocket, one on one side, and the other on the other
side: and away he went, oh so fast! striding along
with his great long legs. He cared nothing at all

B 2
4 A STORY OF A

for a great thick wall six feet high, nor yet for a
rough broad quick-set hedge, nor for allsorts of dirty,
deep, wide ditches: no, nor yet for the Grand
Junction Canal, for he stept clean over them all;
and so he did over the Great Western Railway
without touching any of the carriages, only he threw
some white sugar-plums into one of the first-class
carriages where some little children were sitting
with their mamma: and they thought at first it was
a hail storm. Presently he came to a beautiful
orchard full of ripe pears and apples. His head
was a great deal higher than the tops of the trees.

So he gathered plenty of apples and pears as he
went on, and threwthem into his coat pockets. Oh,
how the boys and girls did scramble for them!

And he gave a nice rosy-cheeked apple to the
pretty little girlin his waistcoat pocket, and a pear
to the little boy. And away went the Giant, up
the hills and down the hills, and over the hedges,
and over the ditches, and over the walls, till at
last he came to a great broad, deep river.

Splash, splash, splash; in goes the Giant. What
cares he for the deep, deep river? Splash, splash,
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 5

splash; deeper and deeper he goes into the bed of the
river: away fly the farmer’s ducks, quack, quack,
quack. The little children peep out of his coat
pocket ina terrible fright. ““O Mr. Giant, Mr. Giant,
the apples and pears are all swimming about, and
we are all as wet as muck. Oh, what shall we do?
what shall we do?” But the Giant did not stop:
only he took off his hat with one hand, and put the
fifty little children into his hat with the other hand,
and so he kept them out of the water, till he came
to the opposite bank of the river. And there he.
found a nice clean, dry, sunny bank covered with
grass, and primroses, and violets, and buttercups,
and cowslips, and bluebells, and wild thyme; all
smelling very sweet. So down he sits and takes out -
his clean white pocket-handkerchief, and wipes the
fifty children quite dry, and then they sit down and
munch away at their apples and pears—oh such fun!
while the good-natured Giant laid himself flat on
the ground and fell fast asleep.

When the little Pickles had done eating, they
scampered about in all directions. Some played
at hide and seek among the bushes; some gathered
6 A STORY OF A

nosegays of sweet flowers, and stuck them into the
button holes of the Giant’s coat without waking
him. Then they all ran off, arm-in-arm, to run up
and down a pretty little steep bank in the meadows.
Such hard work it was to get to the top! and such
tumbling and rolling over one another when they
_ tried to run down the bank. However, it only made
them laugh the merrier: so up they clambered again.
But just as they got to the top of the bank the second
time, they heard a great hallooing, and presently
whom should they see but the schoolmaster and the
schoolmistress abroad in search of their scholars.
“OQ you naughty little boys and girls, what
a whipping you will get when we catch you pre-
sently ! how dared you run away from school?” said
the schoolmaster. ‘A pretty business indeed,” said
the schoolmistress. “ Indeed, Sir,” said one of the
boys, “‘ we did not run away at all; only there came
along a good-natured Giant, and he put us all in his

pocket, and brought us all here.” “Put you all
in his pocket?” said the schoolmaster, “a very
wonderful story, upon my word!” « Impossible,”

said the schoolmistress. “Yes, Ma’am, but he
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 7

did,” said the pretty little girl; “ and he put Freddy
and me in his waistcoat pockets because his big
pockets were full; and he gave me a rosy-cheeked
apple, and little Freddy a pear.” “ And he gave us
all apples and pears,” said the rest of the children.

“What can it all mean?” said the schoolmaster
and schoolmistress. ‘ And what is that frightful
noise I hear?” said the schoolmistress. ‘‘ Surely
there must be at least fifty mad bulls broke loose
somewhere, and all of them roaring together.”

“Qh, no,” said little Freddy, “that is only our
good-natured Giant snoring away fast asleep; don’t
you see him out there on the violet bank?” ‘ Non-
sense, Frederick,” said the schoolmaster, “ that is
a great piece of oak timber.” At which little
Freddy could not help laughing heartily; and all
the rest of the children laughed too. “We will
teach you to laugh at us,” said the schoolmaster
and mistress, and off they ran to catch the children;
but the master was rather rheumatic, and the
mistress was very tired, and rather fat, so the
children ran down the steep bank and up to the
sleeping Giant before any of them could be caught,
8 A STORY OF A

and then little Freddy picked up a straw, and
clambered up with the help of another boy to the
Giant’s ear, and tickled it very gently.

Now the Giant was a very clever Giant, and
always slept with one eye open. It was a very
good plan, because by this means he was never
taken by surprise, as some foolish Giants are, who
are caught and carried about at fairs for foolish
people to stare at. But our friend the good-na-
tured Giant was too wise for any such nonsense.
He was, indeed, a great philosopher—that is to say,
a great lover of wisdom. So that it is not sur-
prising that he was very clever, and very wise, and
always slept with one eye open.

As soon as little Freddy had tickled his ear, the
Giant opened his eye, and sat up, with a pleasing
smile all over his face. It was very good-natured
of him only to sit up, and not to stand. For if he
had got up on his long legs at once, the poor school-
master and mistress would have been frightened
out of their wits. So he only sat up and smiled,
and then, making his voice as small as he could,
asked them very civilly to come and eat some mul-
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 9

berries; for there happened to be a fine mulberry
tree, full of ripe fruit, close to where the Giant
sat. But the fruit was all at the top of the tree;
and the Giant’s head, as he sat, just reached up to
the top of the tree.

So he gathered a handful of mulberries, and gave
them to the schoolmaster and mistress.

Very pleasant and refreshing to them, after their
long, hot walk, were those ripe, juicy mulberries.
The schoolmaster said they did his rheumatism a
vast deal of good. The mistress said she never
tasted any fruit half so good before. And little
Freddy and the forty-nine other children looked
at them, as much as to say, I should like to have
some too. But the schoolmaster and mistress were.
too busy to notice them.

When they had eaten up all that the Giant had
gathered, he very good-naturedly asked them
whether they would like a few more. And the
master thought that a few more would quite cure
his rheumatism, and the mistress wished to take a
few home to make into a pudding.

At which little Freddy, who was a very merry
10 A STORY OF A

fellow, could not help laughing, and that made the
pretty little girl, and the forty-eight other children
laugh too.

This made the master and mistress rather angry.
But the Giant, who was obliged, at first, to stuff
his pocket-handkerchief into his mouth, for fear
he should frighten them all with his loud laugh,
told the schoolmaster that he could see a beautiful
large bunch of ripe mulberries just out of his
_ Teach; and that if he would climb up on his hand
and take tight hold of his forefinger, he would raise
him up exactly to the spot where the bunch was;
and the master could easily cut it off with his pen-
knife.

The master was rather frightened, but was
ashamed to own that he was before all his scholars.
So he took out his penknife, and mounted up, as
boldly as he could, upon the Giant’s hand, and then
walked across it to the forefinger; all the boys and
girls clapping their hands and shouting out, “ Well
done, Master, take care you don’t fall. Take care
the Giant don’t squeeze the juice out of you, just as
you squeezed the juice out of the mulberries.”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 11

‘‘ Ah! you little urchins,” cried the master, “ why
do you put such thoughts into the Giant’s head?

Why do you make such a noise? It quite disturbs
my brains. Be quiet, I tell you. Oh, whata whip-

ping you shall have when I get you home again! ”

All this time the Giant kept raising his arm
higher and higher, and the schoolmaster held tight
hold of the Giant’s finger, which was nearly as long
as his whole body.

At last the Giant said, ‘‘ Now Mr. Schoolmaster,
look out sharp for the bunch of mulberries.”

“ There they are. I see them, Mr. Giant, but I
can hardly reach them.”

‘And I can stretch my arm no further,” said the
Giant; “catch hold of that strong branch with one
hand, and cut off the bunch of fruit with the other,
and then get back upon my finger.”

But no sooner had the schoolmaster let: go of
the Giant’s finger, than the Giant took his arm
away, and left the poor schoolmaster hanging on
the top branch of the mulberry tree!

The schoolmistress screamed, and then nearly
fainted away. All the little boys and girls looked
very grave.
1YÂ¥ A STORY OF A

The schoolmaster, however, was in no great
danger; for he could rest his feet on the branches
of the tree, and now and then he gathered a mul-
berry and ate it, to cool his feverish anxiety, till the
Giant should put out his arm again to help him
out of the tree.

But the Giant seemed in no great hurry to do so .
for he sat still on the ground and began whistling
a tune. Unluckily he happened to turn his
head round where the fifty children were standing,
and the wind whistled out of his mouth so strong
that it blew down all the fifty children at once.
Down they tumbled, one over the other, till at last
they tumbled against the poor schoolmistress, and
down she tumbled among them too!

The good-natured Giant, who was a very gentle-
manly sort of fellow, and very polite, picked up
the schoolmistress, with great care, and begged
her to be seated upon a very soft sweet cushion
which he made for her of violets, primroses, and
cowslips, while he had a little chat with the gentle-
man up in the tree, meaning the schoolmaster,
who was now become very impatient to get down
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 13

again; and begged the Giant to lose no time in
lending him a hand for that purpose. “ Wait a
little, my good friend,” said the Giant, “there are
two words to that bargain, if you please. And
first of all, tell me how it will be about whipping

aN mn i



the children, if I help you out of the tree? For
you must understand that they were all going to
school like good children when I met with them
and brought them here; so that if anybody deserves
to be whipped, itis I. And I give you leave to whip
me to your heart’s content, as soon as you are out
14 A STORY OF A

of the tree. But unless you will promise not to
whip any one of my young friends here for not
going to school to-day, you may stay all night in
the tree, for anything that I care.”

“Sir Giant,” answered the pedagogue, “ ‘non
omnes arbusta juvant;’ that is to say, I have no
wish to spend the night in a mulberry tree.
Nevertheless, the mulberries are good mulberries,
and I flatter myself I am a better judge than most
people of what are really good. ‘ Pauci dignoscere
possunt vera bona.’” Here the learned master
paused a moment to recover his breath and his
balance; for in reaching somewhat too daringly to
clutch a very fine mulberry, he nearly lost his
equilibrium, ‘“‘ Ah!” he exclaimed,

' quid tam dextro pede concipis, ut te
Conatus non peniteat, votique peracti?’”





‘Very true, my good Sir,” said the _— who
was himself something of a satirist; “and you
—_— almost have added, when your foot es
‘sua mortifera est facundia.’ ”
‘‘Sir Giant,” said the schoolmaster, “I honour
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 15

you both as a wit and as a scholar. I submit.
Let it be a compact, I will neither punish you nor
my scholars; only help me down out of this high
tree; for my head begins to grow giddy, by reason
of so sudden an elevation, and, to say truth, my
stomach too feels somewhat disordered—

‘Orandum est, ut sit mens sana in corpore sano,’”

‘Is it even so, my worthy gentleman?” said the
Giant, laughing, and getting up on his legs. “ Well.
then, trusting to your promise as an honest man
and a scholar, I will set you on terra firma imme-
diately.”

So saying, he took the schoolmaster in his hand
and set him safely on the grass, with a great bunch
of mulberries in his pocket, which he carefully drew
forth and presented to the schoolmistress his wife.
Joy sparkled in her eyes as she thankfully received
the welcome present.

‘Now then,” said the good dame, taking courage
from the kind looks of the Giant, “I hope his
highness will not refuse me a petition.”
16 A STORY OF A

“Name it,” said the benevolent Giant, “and if
reasonable, it shall be granted.”

“ Will, then, his mightiness be pleased to instruct
us how we and all these children are to find our
way home again before nightfall?”

“That,” said the Giant, “‘ we shall easily manage.
In the first place, the children will go home in my
pockets justas they came. Andif you and your
learned husband will take a seat in the palm of my
hand or in a corner of my sandwich-box, I will
promise you a safe journey without any fatigue.
But,” continued the Giant, ‘“‘Iam surethat, after such
along and fatiguing walk, the master and you
must be very hungry, and so must the poor child-
ren. Now, as lam in the habit of taking long
walks by myself, and seldom dine at home, I
generally put my dinner in my pocket. And so I
have to-day, and I think the best thing we can do
is to sit down here all together on this nice dry, soft,
grassy bank, and have some dinner before we set
out.”

“So I think,” cried Freddy, clapping his hands.
“QO Mr. Giant, I thought I smelt some very nice
meat in one of your pockets.”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 17

‘*¢ Well then,” said the Giant, “make haste, and
sit down all of you in a circle, while I get the
dinner ready. But we must lose no time, for the
sun is getting very low, and it will soon be night.
However, the sky looks very clear, so we shall do
very well with the light of the stars and the moon.”

As soon as the schoolmaster and mistress with
their scholars were all seated, the Giant put his hand
into one of his side-pockets, and took out a great
tin box. This box had three divisions, the two end
divisions held each a large meat pie, made of slices
of turkey and ham, with truffles and chestnuts re-
posing on a soft rich bed of Yorkshire pudding!

The middle compartment was filled with knives
and forks, and fifty-two plates of silver, all em-
bossed with beautiful figures of men, and horses, ”
and dogs, and wild beasts, and birds of all kinds.

It was quite wonderful how quickly he distributed
all the knives, forks, and plates: he dealt out the
plates as if he were dealing a pack of cards. They
absolutely seemed to fly all to their proper places
ina minute. And in each plate was a good-sized

piece of pie.
18 A STORY OF A

But before they began to eat, the Giant said very
gravely, “ I know you think I am very big; and yet,
if you do not think I am very little indeed, compared
to some things, you will think very foolishly.
And if you only look upas high as my head and
say, ‘Thank you, Mr. Giant, for what you are going
to give us,’ you will not please me at all. And so,
before you touch a morsel, you must look up a
great deal higher than my head, and thank GOD
for what is set before you. But this I know you
have all been taught to do by your good Christian
parents and teachers. If not, depend upon it, I
should not have given you this treat.”

And now they all fell to eating heartily: while the
Giant looked on delighted to see them so happy:
and, now and then, he took a little gold cup out of
his pocket, and a little silver flask full of something
very good to drink : and he stooped down and dipped
the cup in the clear stream of a little spring (which
was not fifty feet off), and poured a few drops out
of the flask into the water that was in the cup, and
handed it round to his little dinner-party of fifty-
two guests. Oh, how they all smacked their lips
when they tasted the delicious drink! I do not
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 19

believe that Queen Victoria, and Prince Albert, and
the Prince of Wales, and his brothers and sisters,
ever drank anything at all like it.

But now something happened that made the
merry party look rather grave. While they were
eating and drinking and chatting away, all at once
they heard a great rumbling noise in the air; and
presently there came a very bright flash of light-
ning, and then, immediately after, a great roar of
thunder. ‘Oh, ho,” says the Giant, “this is what I
expected; and just exactly what I wanted.”

“ Did you, indeed ?” said the schoolmaster; “ I am
sure | did neither expect nor want it.” Just as he
spoke, a sudden gust of wind blew off the poor peda-
gogue’s straw hat. ‘“Ingeminant Austri!” he ex-
claimed; “turbine nigro ferret hiems culmumque
levem stipulasque volantes!’*

But the tempestuous wind was no match for the
long legs of the Giant, who quickly snatched up
the flying roof of the master’s upper story, advising
him in future, when he ventured abroad, to be

* Virg. Geor. lib. i., 320—333.
c 2
20 A STORY OF A

more observant of the weather, and more careful
of his light straw hat.

“ And much I marvel,” he continued, laughing,
“that my learned guest can be so quick in quoting,
yet so slow in taking warning from the Mantuan
bard. Does he not well say, ‘Nunquam im-
prudentibus imber obfuit?’ And have you not
observed how low the swallows have been skimming
along the surface of the water? Ihave! And
have you not heard the frogs croaking in the mud?
Thave! And have you not seen how the ducks
have been waddling with great delight down to
the water, and tossing it over their oily backs
without the least chance of wetting them ? I have!

“¢ Studio incasstm videas gestire lavandi.’ ” (387)

“True,” replied the scholar, “and I opine that
you have rightly interpreted the adverb, ‘incassum.’
‘Quia plumarum compositio aquam minime ad
corpus admittit:’ as the learned Servius remarks.”

And now all was bustle among the young people
as well as the two elder ones. |

Most of them were busy tying their pocket-
handkerchiefs over their hats and bonnets; and
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 21

crowding together as close as they could under the
thick mulberry tree ; for it was now beginning to rain.

As for the Giant, he seemed to care very little
about the weather. He had packed up all his
plates, with the gold cup and the silver flask; and
contented himself with a little piece of pie that his
guests had left, and a large draught of fresh water.

In the meantime, the clouds collected thicker
and thicker, and the rain came pattering down,
and it grew darker and darker every minute.

“ This is just what I like,” said the Giant; ‘‘just
what I wanted to happen, my worthy good master
and mistress. You know that all these children
board and lodge at your house.”

“ Alas!” said the mistress, “why do you remind
me of my misfortunes? How shall we ever get
these poor children home to night ?”

“Tt can, and it cannot be done,” said the Giant ;
‘and that is just the very thing that pleases me so
much. You must pack yourselves up as fast as
you can, and then I will carry you all off for the
night to one of my caves. What think you of that?”

Little Freddy was the only one who was stout-
22 A STORY OF A

hearted enough to shout out, ‘‘Oh, a capital plan!
Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah!”

But the little fellow’s hallooing so merrily put
the rest of the boys and girls in good spirits, as
well as the master and mistress; so, with the help
of the good-natured Giant, they were soon all
stowed away safely in his huge pockets, except the
schoolmaster and his wife, whom the Giant ac-
commodated, each with a snug seat in the tin box,
in the two end compartments lately occupied by
the two meat pies. And by opening the lid, and
fastening the box by a cord passed over his neck,
they were conveyed along much in the same man-
ner as a Jew pedlar carries his box of trinkets
before him.

The night, however, was very dark; for the moon
was not yet up. The children heard the noise of
the Giant’s feet tramping along, but they could see
nothing at all when they peeped out of his pockets.
They expected every minute to hear the splashing
of the water; but it seems the Giant determined
not to go through the river in the dark, for fear of
frightening the little girls and the mistress.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 23

At last, the moon began to appear, and the clouds
to disappear ; and when the little children looked out
from the pockets again, they saw the full moon
shining bright and clear over their heads, sur-
rounded by millions of twinkling stars.

Then, all at once, they heard some beautiful
music, like a very fine organ. But as there was
no church, nor any building near, the schoolmaster
and mistress could not imagine where the fine
sounds came from. At last they were satisfied that
it must be the Giant who was humming a tune to
himself. And so indeed it was. In fact the good
Giant was exceedingly fond of music; and having
a powerful and melodious voice, together with a
thorough knowledge of the science of music in the
abstract, he spent much of his spare time in musical
composition of the most elaborate and _ scientific
kind. |

One of the earliest efforts of his gigantic genius
was a piece of martial music composed, in a happy
moment, for the express amusement of his young
sister Attatattadatta.

If it were not that the deeply-interested reader
24 A STORY OF A

is at this moment, with feverish impatience, looking
forward to the arrival of our benighted travellers at
the mysterious cave of the Giant, this justly cele-
brated march would have been, without delay,
transcribed into these pages.

But we must proceed on our journey, with a
promise, however, if fickle fortune forsake us not,
of making the reader acquainted, at no distant
period, with this truly soul-stirring, not to add
toe-and-heel-stirring musical composition.

You may imagine that the speed at which the
Giant travelled was such as gave his party but
little time to observe much of the line of country
over which they passed.

On he went, tramping away over hill, over
dale; and still, as he went, his fine musical voice
was listened to with delight by the only two of the

party that were awake, little Freddy, and the
_ pretty little girl, whom they called Leila.

‘Freddy dear,” said Leila, in a whisper, “ will
you ask him to sing something with words to it?”

“No, you ask him yourself, little dear,” said

Freddy.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 95

‘‘T am afraid,’’ whispered Leila.

‘You need not be afraid,” said the good-natured
Giant ; “good children need never be afraid; it is
only naughty people that need be afraid. But if
you really wish me to sing something with words
to it, I will do so. And I will sing you asong that
I like to sing at night when I am alone; and then
if Leila likes it, she can sing it herself when she is
alone. But I think we are now not very far from
the schoolmaster’s house; and as he and the mistress
and all the children, except you and F reddy, are
fast asleep, I will tell you what I am thinking of
doing, instead of taking them to my cave.”

“Something very funny, I dare say, Mr. Giant,”
‘said Freddy. |

‘Why, yes, Freddy,” said the Giant ; “I think it
will make you laugh; but then, you_know a little
matter makes you laugh. However, you must
promise me not to laugh at all, till I give you
leave. Now, when we get to the schoolmaster’s
house, I think I shall go to his bed-room window
and open it very quietly, and then without waking
him or the mistress, I shall take them both out of the
26 A STORY OF A

tin box, where they are asleep, and put them into
their bed. After that, I shall take the four-and-
twenty boys out of my pocket, without waking
them, and put them in at the window of the room
where they sleep, and lay them down in their beds.
And the little girls, all except you, Leila, I shall
put into their beds, through their bedroom
window.”

Little Leila had almost forgotten the Giant’s
instructions not to laugh, and had already begun
to clap her hands with delight, when Freddy
checked her; and it was well he did, for the noise
she made disturbed the schoolmaster, who was
snoring away, and he started up for a moment, in
his sleep, calling out, “Qui? que? quod?” but,
receiving no answer, he lay down again in his box,
snoring as loud as ever.

Who is there among the almost countless sc
titudes of good boys and girls who hereafter may
read this gigantic little book, who would hesitate
for a moment in believing that so clever a Giant
succeeded in putting his scheme into execution?
In truth, he managed everything so dexterously
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 27

that not one of the servants in the schoolmaster’s
large establishment knew anything of the matter.
They were all, like their master and mistress and the
forty-eight children, fast asleep. And indeed that was
not very wonderful, considering how late they had
all sat up, wondering why their master and mistress
and the children did not come home; and how
much toasted cheese and mulled beer they had
eaten and drunk to keep themselves awake.

Little Freddy was obliged to hold his hand quite
close over his mouth, to keep himself from laughing;
especially while the Giant was putting his school- _
fellows in at their bedroom window.

But when the Giant had finished all his labours
at the school-house, and was quite gone away again
into the open country, Freddy and Leila began to
wonder very much what he intended to do with
them; but before they could take courage to ask
him, the Giant said, “Now, Leila, if you wish, I
will sing you the song with words to it. And
when. I have sung it, if you and Freddy are
not tired of travelling so far alone with me, I will
take you to one of my caves, where I think you
28 A STORY OF A

will see many things to astonish and delight you.
In the meantime you may both of you make your-
selves quite easy about your master and mistress,
for when I put them in at the window of their
bedroom, I left a very civil note for them on the
mistress’s dressing-table, telling them that I would
take very good care of you both, and bring you
back safe. And now here we are upon the open
heath, and it is now nearly two o'clock in the
morning; but the moon and the stars continue
shining bright, and you are snug and warm—are
you not?—in my waistcoat pocket.”

“Very snug,” said Freddy. -

“Very warm,” said Leila.

On went the Giant, tramping along; and, as he
went, he murmured first a low soft tune, that
reminded the children of the gentle solemn notes
of the little organ in their parish church. Then
his voice swelled to a louder sound, and quicker
music. Yet, still, though the melody was grave
and solemn, it was cheerful, lively, and animating.

Leila whispered to Freddy, that it reminded her
of the tune of the Evening Hymn, though rather
different.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 29

‘Perhaps he will sing the words to it presently,”
said Freddy.

And presently the Giant began indeed to sing
the words.

“The stars are shining bright and clear,
No evil spirit now is near ;
Oh, how I love this solemn hour !
And feel the great Creator’s power !
Not in the lightning’s livid flash,
Not in the thunder’s awful crash,
Not in the stormy rains and wind,
Thy presence, mighty Lord, I find ;
But in such silent hours as this,
I seem to taste of heavenly bliss.”
‘T like those words very much,” said Freddy.
‘‘ And so do I,” said Leila.
‘“ And do you understand them?” said the Giant.
“A little, I do,” said Freddy; “I think one
thing it means is, that you like better to be out at
night, when the stars are shining, as they do now,
than when it thunders, and lightens, and rains, as
it did when we were under the mulberry tree.”
“Well, that is true enough, Freddy,” said the
Giant, smiling.
‘And you like best to say your prayers when
30 A STORY OF A

you are quite still and quiet, and nobody is talking -
to you to interrupt you,” said Leila. ‘ And so
do I, because then I can think better about what I
am saying. I suppose some of the verses mean
that.”

“Very true,” said the Giant. “When you
grow up to be aman, Freddy, it will often happen
that you must be out in storms of thunder and
lightning, and when it rains harder and the wind
blows much stronger than it did this evening; and
when that happens, you must push your way
through it as well as you can. But I hope you
will always be very thankful when you have got
safe out of the storm, and be much happier when
the sun shines bright and pleasant over your head,
or the moon and stars, as they do now, than when
you were obliged to hear the rolling of thunder,
and be exposed to the violence of stormy winds
and tempests! ”

“That I am sure I shall,” said Freddy.

“ What I mean is,” continued the Giant, “ when
you are no longer a child, but a man, you will
often meet with stormy and tempestuous people.”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 31

“I suppose,” said Leila, ‘‘ you mean people
that are always storming with anger, and always
cross, instead of being good-tempered, and smiling,
and quiet. [remember hearing our schoolmistress
say, ‘It is as silly as liking to be out in a wild
forest, in a storm, pelted with hail stones, and wet
through with the rain; rather than to walk about
a beautiful garden, full of very beautiful flowers,
on a fine summer's day, or a mild moonlight
evening.”

“Very well said, Leila,” replied the Giant;
“that is exactly what I think. Now, I very often,
at the mouth of my cave, sit and look at people
who are a long way off, perhaps in the middle of a
large town, perhaps in a little village; and when-
ever I see people quarrelling J always look at
something else. One day, I was looking into your
playground, and I saw some boys quarrelling;
and I saw a little boy walk out of the playground
as soon as he saw his schoolfellows begin to quarrel,
and he seemed to be quite unhappy about their
quarrelling. Then I looked into the girls’ play-
ground, and I am very sorry to say, Leila, that I
32 A STORY OF A

saw some very naughty girls there, beginning to
quarrel; but what pleased me very much, was to
see a little girl, very like you, walk away as soon
as she saw the quarrelling begin; and she, too,
seemed quite unhappy about the quarrelling. And
as soon as she got out of the playground, she met
the little boy, and they two walked arm-in-arm
together, into a field full of flowers, and there
stayed till the school-bell rang.”

“ Ah, Mr. Giant, I did not know you could see
so far,” said Freddy. ‘‘Do you know it was very
lucky that we went away both together from the
playground, for somebody told the master and
mistress that we had made the other boys and girls
quarrel; but they soon found out that we were not
there, and then they praised us both for going out
of the way.”

It was now about three o’clock in the morning,
and the Giant still kept walking on; the poor
children, however, had fallen asleep. And no
wonder, after so much travelling, and so many
wonderful adventures. But as the Giant had got
a great many more wonderful things for them to
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 33

. see, he was very careful not to disturb them. So
while they were sleeping, he continued his journey
without stopping, till he came to the sea-side. Now,
though the Giant’s legs were very long, and he
cared but little about scrambling through a mode-
rate-sized river, yet, as he often modestly con-
fessed, the British Channel was more than a match
for him, he never could “ tackle” it; he might
chance to set his foot upon a slippery porpoise; or
he might unintentionally intrude upon the private
apartments of a college of lobsters, and what would
be death to them, would be no joke to him.

Other little inconveniences he wisely foresaw
might occur, such as pricking his toes with the
sunken mast of some foundered vessel, or putting
his foot into an unpleasantly deep hole, or losing his
hat, if not his balance, in a squall.

But although these and other good reasons pre-
vented his striding through the sea in the frequent
visits to the Continent which his schemes required ;
yet our worthy and wide-awake Giant determined
not to be bafiled, but to invent some other new,
grand, and untried method of crossing the Channel.

D
34 A STORY OF A

And he succeeded. Asa sapper and miner he had -
long ago established his celebrity. He was the gi-
gantic genius who first suggested to old Brunel the
idea of tunnelling the Thames.

Soon after that time, it so happened that our
Giant, in one of his mining moods, was sitting, on a
fine moonlight night, in a cave of his own invention
under Shakspeare’s cliff. Suddenly a thought struck
him. “IJ have immortalized my friend by my
suggestion. I will now immortalize myself by
tunnelling the British Channel !” And he did so.
He afterwards gave to the genius of Watt its full
development. He made under-ground railroads to
assist him in his rapid journeys. With his own big
hands he laid down the sleepers, and constructed
the broad gauges. He built himself gigantics team
engines, and was his own stoker, and his own
passenger.

But the Giant always travelled with secrecy and
mystery.

He travelled over Europe. He traversed the
globe. He had “his exits and his entrances,” but
he permitted none to “ prate of his whereabouts.”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 35

Not even the “ Duke,” who knew him intimately,
was ever known to ask him by what route he came,
or whither he was going; in other respects, that
great man enjoyed the Giant's full confidence, and
wisely took advantage of it. Never did he sit down
before a fortified town, without first consulting the
good-natured Giant; and if neither Gurwood, Gleig,
nor Napier have noticed this fact, it is but fair to
attribute their silence, not to ignorance, but to a
settled conviction that a fact so indisputable no
more required to be recorded than that of his Grace
having shaved, as usual, before the Battle of
Waterloo.

Freddy and Leila both rubbed their eyes, and
both awoke at the same time. Both, too, at once
uttered an exclamation of surprise and delight. |

And no wonder.

Hungry enough you may suppose they were,
after their travelling and sleeping; and now it was
about seven o'clock, and a beautiful sunny morning ;
and to their great surprise, they found themselves
sitting in a very pretty little arbour, covered with
roses and honeysuckles, and many other beautiful

D 2
36 A STORY OF A

flowers, all smelling so sweet, and sparkling with
dew. Close to the arbour was a cottage, and some
goats were feeding on some rocks near the cottage.
Above their heads were mountains covered with
snow, their irregular summits seeming to shoot up
among the clouds, and rising frequently above
them; at a short distance beneath them, a torrent
was heard rushing and foaming along the valley,
above which rose a majestic forest of pines. But
wonderful and beautiful as all these scenes appeared,
there was something placed immediately before their
eyes, and close within their reach, which just now
delighted them most of all. And this was a nice
little table covered with a clean white napkin, on
which was placed a large platter full of bread and
butter, with two cups full of milk, quite warm from
the goats.

“Kat away, Leila.”

“Eat away, Freddy,” said a voice which they
knew to be the Giant’s, though they could see
nothing of him.

“Dear Leila,” said Freddy, “depend upon it,
whenever the good-natured Giant says anything, it
is always the very best thing that can be said.”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 37

‘“T think so, too,” said Leila, laughing; and they
fell to eating immediately.

Wonderful it was to see how quickly everything
eatable and drinkable disappeared. Indeed, when
the last slice of bread and butter, and the last drop
of goat’s milk, were gone, they still could not
help looking into the empty cups and platter, as
much as to say, “‘ After such a strange long journey,
we are still hungry.”

Who can describe their amazement when they sud-
denly saw the neat little table sinking gradually into
the ground, and presently disappear; leaving them
sitting on the bench of the summer-house staring at
one another, and wondering what would happen
next? And now, for the moment, something else
caught their attention, and made them both burst
out laughing. For when Freddy looked at Leila,
he saw that, instead of her usual plain English
school-dress, her tight little English straw bonnet,
her neat little checked frock, white stockings and
light walking shoes, she wore a most fantastic but
pretty little straw hat, stuck sovery much on one side
of her head that, had it not been tied under the chin,
38 A STORY OF A

it must have fallen off at once. She had a very
smart little red stuff petticoat, and over it a light
blue frock, the front of which was turned back and
pinned together behind. She had, besides, a pair
of bright yellow stockings, with long blue clogs
and clouted shoes tied with broad red ribbons.
As for Freddy, he laughed at himself as much as
he did at Leila, or Leila at him. He, too, had a hat
stuck very smartly on one side, but with a brim
three times as broad as Leila’s, of black felt, taper-
ing almost to a point at the top of the crown, and
covered with rows of ribbons of various colours.
His coat was of bright yellow, slashed behind, and
the buttons as big as a crown piece: he had a red
waistcoat with big pockets, and short, tight, black
plush breeches that hardly covered his knees, with
white stockings and thick walking shoes,

How they happened not to have observed before
how strangely they were dressed, is not so much to
be wondered at when we consider how very hungry
they were; and that if they were at first astonished
at their dress, they had no time to laugh at it till
they had had something to eat.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 39

And now, while they were thus admiring each
other’s dresses, a trap-door opened at their feet,
and up comes the little table again, covered with
fruit, and biscuits, and cakes, and lemonade.

While these two good children were eating their
plateful of ripe Alpine strawberries, there came out
from the porch of a neat little cottage, or chalet,
close by, two children—a boy and a girl—who
seemed to be about the age of Leila and Freddy.
And they, too, were dressed in Swiss costume.
For by this time, no doubt, the sagacious reader,
whether young or old, will have comprehended,
how, during their sleep, the little travellers had
been conveyed, by the unwearying energies of their
Giant friend, by some secret subterranean passages
(already hinted at in this never-to-be- sufficiently-
admired story) to the sublime scenery of the
mountains of Switzerland.

And as they came out quietly arm-in-arm, these
two Swiss children, they patted the goats that were
feeding near them; and then bounding forward to
the little arbour, they gave to Leila and her com-
panion a nosegay of sweet violets. Then, retiring
40 A STORY OF A

outside the arbour, they took off their hats, and
began to sing. Oh, such a sweet harmony of child-
like voices and child-like looks! modestly timid,
yet not awkwardly shy; nothing artificial, nothing
strained; sober, solemn, devout.

“It must be their morning hymn!” whispered
Leila, as she and Freddy came out and stood at
the entrance of the arbour, to listen and to wonder.

“You are right, dear Leila,” said Freddy.
‘‘ See how they cross their hands upon their breast,
and look up into the clear blue sky. And now,
see, they are kneeling down.”

“Why should not we kneel down with them ?”
said Leila. “We can understand the language of
their music, though not their words.” And in-
stantly they too, as of one mind, knelt with the
peasant children.

It was a sight to draw down even angels from
their heavenly habitations.

‘To horse! to horse!” a loud voice was sud-
denly heard to exclaim. ‘“ Mount! mount! and
away!”

And then immediately the warlike notes of the
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 41

bugle were repeated in loud echoes among the
mountains.

Freddy and Leila started up hastily in terror,
_ trembling from head to foot. But the peasant
boy and girl took no more notice of these alarming
sounds than if they had not heard them. How-
ever, aS soon as they had finished their little
morning prayer, they too stood up, and taking
Leila and Freddy by the hand, led them to a pro-
jecting piece of rock that overlooked the valley and
the mountain-stream that has been already men-
tioned.

There they saw a sight, too, unlike anything
they had before witnessed.

Twenty or thirty horsemen, armed with swords.
and carabines, were drawn up in a narrow road on
the further side of the stream, and were on the
point of beginning their march.

War! what a consummate hypocrite thou art!

See, already with its deceitful blandishments it
is Winning its way even to the heart of an un-
offending child. The glittering sword, soon to be
sheathed in blood; the carabine, already charged
49 A STORY OF A

with death; the plumes of the soldiers, dyed in
colours of blood; and their horses champing the
bit, and pawing the ground, with eagerness to
begin the strife; all these attract and charm his
young mind, unsuspicious of evil.

Only the girl, Leila, now trembles, and with
instinctive feminine terror shrinks behind her com-
panion. But the boy, ashamed of his boyhood,
longs to be a man; and when the peasant boy waved
his hat in the air, as these horsemen galloped off,
and shouted out, “ Farewell!—may you be victo-
rious!” then Freddy also waved his hat, he knew
not why, and almost wished to follow them.

But they were soon out of sight; for, as they
wound up the hill from the banks of the stream,
they entered the thick forest of firs, which entirely
hid them from the children’s view.

Freddy stuck his hands into the big pockets of
his waistcoat, looking very thoughtful.

One thing very naturally occurred to him, and
turning to the companion of his strange adven-
tures, he said, “And what are we to do next,
Leila?”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 43

But at the same instant, feeling something in
one of the pockets, he drew out a little note, beau-
tifully penned, and superscribed

“To my very dear young Friends and fellow-
Travellers,
‘“‘ FREDDY AND LEILA,
This, from the self-gratified inventor of mystical
morality to tickle the ear of the Infant and the
Aged; who, rejoicing in the flattering title of
“THE GOOD-NATURED GIANT,

begs most affectionately to inform Master Frederick
Gilbert and Miss Leila Fairford that they must put
themselves under the guidance of the two Swiss
children now with them; who will conduct them
safely to the foot of the Jura mountains, where to
their surprise and delight, they will find their
papas and mammas, who have been for some time
abroad in search of

‘“THE PICTURESQUE.”

Delighted indeed they were with this charming
little note. But how were they to obey its injunc-
44 A STORY OF A

tions? A question more quickly asked than an-
swered. But the Giant was teaching them prac-
tically what, at the school-desk, they had only been
taught theoretically, that “Necessity is the mo-
ther of Invention.”

“Had the Giant told us, Leila,” said Freddy,
“that he intended to take us into Switzerland, we
might have brought with us that little travelling
book of maps and views of this country which my
papa gave me, and that fat little book of dialogues
in English, French, and German, which your
mamma gave you. And by the help of them we
might have made these children understand where
we wish to go. But there is no use in thinking of
that now. The Giant means that we should set
our wits to work, and do the best we can.”

“Yes, and we have everything to encourage
us to do so,” said Leila, smiling. “ See what a
beautiful day it is; and how good-humoured these
children seem! I declare I think we might soon
understand one another. Let us try.”

And immediately they began by asking the names
of objects near them by signs, which the quick and
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 45

ready intelligence of the Swiss children soon appre-
hended.

“Let us go with them to their cottage,” said
Freddy. ‘It must have been there that we were
taken in oursleep. There our dresses were changed,
no doubt; and there, most likely, we shall find some
one who understands our language.”

But no sooner had they begun to move in the
direction of the cottage, than the peasant children
showed plainly the greatest unwillingness to allow
them to proceed. In fact, from the time when the
two travellers had been led by their new compa-
nions to the projecting rock, on which they were
still standing, these young mountaineers had never
turned their eyes towards the chalet, but had them
constantly fixed in the direction of the dark,
wide-extending forest, in which the horsemen had
disappeared, and they showed no disposition either
to move from that spot, or to turn their faces in
any other direction.

They now, however, seated themselves on the
rock. Leila and Freddy did the same.

‘‘T cannot help thinking,” said Freddy, “ that
46 A STORY OF A

these children are expecting some one to come
home to them, and that they are instructed to wait
here to be on the look out.”

Freddy was right.

Presently the peasant boy started upon his feet,
and said, “I hear them.” But the girl shook her

ee



cbhoy AINA
pee
SS

Ss.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. “47

head. The boy looked at the sun, and said, “ Ist
zeit.” (It is time.)

‘‘T wonder what they are talking about,” said
Leila.

‘“T think, Leila, the boy’s ears are quicker than
ours, and he hears something which he expects to
hear about this time; and so he looked at the sun
to see what time of day it is.”

‘What is that jingling noise I hear, Fred.? It
sounds out in the wood yonder.”

‘“‘T hear it too, Leila. But do look at that little
silver horn the boy is taking out of his pocket. Is
it not quite beautiful?”

It was indeed a very beautiful little hunting
horn; and the boy showed at once that he knew
how to use it; for he put it to his mouth immedi-
ately, and gave a blast with it that was repeated a
thousand times in echoes amongst the rocks; and
quickly afterwards another and a louder horn
answered it, as if from the thick forest before
them.

The animated faces of the Swiss children showed
how welcome to them that answer was. And pre-
48 A STORY OF A

sently after the interest and attention of Leila and
Freddy were completely roused by seeing a party
suddenly emerge from the deep shades of the wood
into the open winding road below.

The party consisted merely of a man and a
woman, each mounted on a mule, and driving before
them four other mules. But the fanciful caparison
of these beasts, having large bells attached to the
throat-lash of each, and their picturesque effect, as





yf CN eet er

ti O37
St 8

f \\ WSs —~ Yn

. . SS a be, ;
em SE &










they wound their way cautiously down the hill,
greatly delighted the English children. To add to
the animation of the scene a huge dog, of the true
St. Bernard breed, attended them, playing all sorts
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 49

of gambols, in strange contrast with the sober,
dignified deportment of the mules, sometimes dis-
turbing their solemnity by jumping up and kissing
their noses, then dexterously retreating through
the labyrinth of their legs, not. without a sly but
cautious nudge at the heels of one or other of the
sleepiest of these beasts of burden; to resent which,
while it elevated their heels, certainly lowered
their dignity. Then, without waiting to be called
to account by master or mistress for his ridiculous
puerilities, the monstrous dog dashed down head-
long into the deepest eddies of the mountain stream,
and as suddenly emerging, shook off, among the
astonished mules, the surplus water from his over:
charged shaggy coat, making “ confusion worse
confounded.” '

All these pranks of the dog, and the picturesque
group of the muleteer and his wife, with the gaudy
_caparison of the mules, as they approached, were
watched by Freddy and Leila with ecstacies of
delight. But their delight was further increased,
as well as their surprise, on heariny the muleteer’s

E
50 A STORY OF A

wife, as she rode towards them, speak to them
in English.

“My dear young people,” said she, jumping
off her mule, and coming up with a face full of
good humour to Leila and Freddy, “how glad I
am to see you; and how very quickly you must
have travelled to have arrived here so soon. I
hardly thought you could possibly have got here
before next week. But I suppose you travelled by
- the mail-post all the way without stopping, and
that makes a great difference, only it must be very
fatiguing.”

“Yes,” said Freddy, laughing, “ we did certainly
come by the male, post haste, all the way. But whe-
ther we stopped at all on the road I cannot tell, nor
Leila either ; for we both fell fast asleep before we left
England, and never opened our eyestill we found our-
selves sitting in your beautiful arbour, with such a
very nice breakfast, which we thank you for very
much; for you may suppose how hungry we were,
nothaving had anything to eat since yesterday,when
the good-natured Giant gave us, and the schoolmaster
and mistress, and forty-eight more children, such
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 51

a charming treat, close by the big mulberry tree on
the banks of the river.”

“My dear child, what are you talking about?
The good-natured Giant? Why, surely you must be
telling some silly story, out of some silly story-
book, written by some silly, childish old body, to
amuse silly people.”

“Well,” said Leila, “I do not wonder at your
wondering. However, it is all quite true. And a
very easy journey we had, I can assure you; for
we sat in the Giant’s waistcoat pocket all the way,
as if we had been sitting in bed.”

‘‘ Sat in the Giant’s waistcoat pocket?” exclaimed
the woman, laughing heartily. “ Well, I declare
this is the best story [ever heard in all my life.
But come with us and our children into our chalet,
and we will soon get you something to eat before
you set out again; forl am sure you must both be
very hungry; for as to having had any breakfast
in our little summer-house that is quite impossible.
Our two children came only this morning from a
neighbour’s farm to meet us here, and I have the
key of the house in my pocket. But your

E 2
52 A STORY OF A

English nation has such funny ways of inventing
stories.”

Freddy and Leila were as much puzzled at what
the Swiss woman had said, as she was at what they
had told her.

“T cannot understand it,” said Freddy, as they
walked towards the cottage; “ but I know that I feel
as if I had just had a very good breakfast; for I
am not at all hungry now, though I was very
hungry when I awoke.”

“ And so was I,” said Leila, ‘and the nice warm
goat’s milk, and the bread and butter, were so
delicious! And then, when the table sank slowly
down into the ground, and then came up again
with the strawberries and cream, that was the best
fun of all.”

The good woman lifted up her eyes in astonish-
ment. ‘The table in my arbour sank down into
the ground, and then came up again with straw-
berries and cream! What can it all mean?”

Just then they passed by the arbour, and Freddy,
who was of avery inquiring mind, and knew that
every why must have a wherefore, could not help
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 53

running in to examine on his knees the mechanical
construction of the wonderful table. Leila’s very
natural curiosity led her to follow him; while the
kind-hearted housewife proceeded, with her heavy
bunch of keys dangling at her waist, to open her
cottage door, and prepare food for her young guests
and her family.

“© Leila, dear Leila, do pray look here,” said
Freddy, as he stooped down upon his hands and
feet; the table at which we breakfasted is not here
now. This is exactly the place where our table
stood; and sure enough here is a round mark in
the floor where the table moved up and down; and
I do really think that the good people of the house
here have never found it out.”

“But then,” said Leila, sitting down with Freddy
on the floor to think, “ where could the breakfast
come from ?”

“That’s a puzzler,’ said Freddy. And _ they
both sat looking at each other very much amused
as well as perplexed at the oddness of their ad-
ventures, yet by no means anxious that they should
terminate.
54> A STORY OF A

And, in truth, there was no immediate probability
of these pleasant adventures coming to an end:
for, wonderful to tell, they suddenly felt that the
floor was moving under them, and while they
caught hold of each other for support, the circle on
which they were sitting gradually sank with them,
and instantly they found themselves sitting in a
most beautiful carriage, splendidly lighted up with
lamps, and moving along a great deal faster than
the express train ever travelled on the Great Western
railway.

“My dear young friends,” said a voice which
they instantly knew to be the Giant’s, though they
could not see him, “I am glad you enjoyed your
breakfast in the arbour. I am sorry I cannot come
and sit with you just at present; but, as you know,
I am obliged to be my own stoker and my own
engineer. Besides, I am always making experi-
ments. An invention has just occurred to me
which will increase the velocity of the steam-engine
almost to an unlimited degree. I hope you do not
feel inconvenienced by the great speed at which we
are now travelling. But the truth is I have a little
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 55

business to transact at California; and as I hope to
arrive there in an hour and thirty seconds, and
shall not require to stay there above fifty minutes,
I think we shall get back again to the muleteer’s
chalet in about two hours; by which time the
muleteer and his family will have finished their
meal, and the poor mules will have eaten their corn
and rested, and be ready to take you to your papas
and mammas, at the foot of the Jura mountains.”

“ And have you been waiting here for us, Mr.
Giant,” said Leila, “all the time we were eating
our breakfast, and sitting on the rock, and talk-
ing to the children, and seeing the soldiers ride
away, and the muleteers arrive?”

“ Oh no, Leila, I have too much business to a
idle. As soon as I had brought you to Switzerland,
I turned back and went direct to the Menai Straits,
to make some observations on the tubular bridge.”

“Oh,” cried Freddy, “how I wish you had
taken us to see that wonderful bridge!”

“But then we should have lost the opportu-
nity of seeing the beautiful mountains of Switzer-
land this morning,” said Leila.
56. A STORY OF A

“Besides running a great risk of being
frightened to death with the stunning noise of
the experimental steam-engines as they passed
and repassed through the monstrous tube,” said
the Giant. “For, even to my giant ears, I can
assure you the sounds were tremendous.”

“T should hardly have thought,” said F reddy,
“that you would have heard any sound when you
were so far under ground yourself.”

“ Nevertheless,” said the Giant, “the great
depth at which I was placed below, was one great
cause of the loudness of the sounds: for, through
the winding opening which I had contrived
among the rocks, the sounds reverberated in
echoes, so oftentimes repeated, that an incredibly
vast body of sound was by degrees created (in the
same manner as by continued strokes on a gong),
until at last the noise was almost deafening. But
here we are, under one of the highest mountains of
California. Clamber through that opening in the
rock, and you will presently find yourselves in a
cave inaccessible to any one from without, but
from which you will easily be able, with the help
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 57

of those two little telescopes near you, to look
down upon a great number of very busy groups
of gold-finders.”

And greatly amused, indeed, were Leila and
Freddy with this novel and wonderful sight. So
ingeniously had the Giant contrived his Californian
cave, so gently, and almost imperceptibly did it
wind upwards from the deep bowels ot the earth to
the open light of day, that even these children in
their ascent felt no fatigue; while the vast variety
of material of which the several parts of the long
cavern were composed, excited in them the greatest
astonishment. Sometimes they walked along gal-
leries glittering with gems of every hue; then
suddenly the ground over which they passed, and
the walls, and the arched roof above, were of the
blackest polished ebony; presently they travelled
along passages white and transparent as alabaster ;
then every object had a bright metallic silvery hue.
At length they could perceive a small speck of
dazzling day-light at a distance, which gradually
increased as they proceeded, expanding, and be-
coming more defined as they approached the opening
58 A STORY OF A

of the cave. It is impossible to describe their
admiration, when they saw themselves surrounded
on all sides with great blocks of the purest gold,
on which they gladly sat down to rest themselves,
while they looked down from their inaccessible
golden cave on the busy multitudes toiling in their

pursoit of the precious metal in the plains below
them.

ia
BS 0 a
Rn

~ .
Si + >, or
> r » NN /* F i
WN SS

bs 'S GF >
my § . SJ =



_ om

The first object on which their eyes were more
particularly fixed, was a poor, tattered, haggard,
figure of a man, separated nearly a quarter of a
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 59

mile from the rest, and elevated above them, being
at work-on a rising piece of ground immédiately
below the Giant’s cave, though, indeed, some hun-
_ dreds of feet lower. His only companion was a
poor half-starved donkey. The only tools he had
to work with were a large clasp knife, a broken two-
pronged dinner-fork, and a small crow-bar. This
miserable man had only arrived on the spot the
day before. He had expended almost every farthing
on his journey. His sack, which was thrown over
the ass’s back, contained only a few dry, worm-eaten
pleces of sea-biscuit, and a small barrel of fresh
water.

Yet with these wretched materials the fire of
hope blazed up brightly within him, and stoutly he
set to work.

And truly that man would not have been called
a fool who had declared that the Star of his Des-
tiny had conducted him to a peculiarly fortunate
spot.

At the very first blow with his crow-bar, he
struck against some hard substance which he sup-
posed was a stone; but on examining the iron
60 A STORY OF A

point of the bar his delight was great on finding it
glittering with pieces of gold. His broken fork
and clasped knife were brought into action; and,
after a short space, and two or three hard tugs, he
succeeded in loosening and dragging to the surface
of the ground, a mass of gold far exceeding in
Size end weight all that his most sanguine imagina-
tion had suggested.

The children, Leila and Freddy, looked down
upon his labours from their lofty elevation with
the deepest interest. Mass after mass yielded to
his persevering toil.

And now, at length, in a shorter space of time
than the gold-diggers below him had found suffi-
cient for scraping together only a few ounces of the
precious metal, this poor solitary mortal had
crammed his sack full of gold; and, after incredi-
ble exertions, having placed it on his ass’s back,
was cautiously descending the hill, when suddenly
the poor over-burdened animal stumbled and fell,
The contents of the sack falling to the ground
were precipitated with great velocity down the
precipice, rolling onwards till they reached the very
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 61

spot where a mixed party of French and Italians
were digging.

“ Little good shall we any of us do here, I think,”
said a desponding young Neapolitan count, who,
having suddenly succeeded to a handsome property,
had as suddenly lost it all at the gambling table ;
and was now, with a party, as desperate as himself,
looking for “hidden treasure” in the bowels of
California.

“ Bah!” said a gruff voice, issuing from a forest
of unmitigated moustaches, the long and lanky-
legged owner of which was trying, without much
success, to make the broken blade of a sword do
duty as spade and pick-axe; “ bah! you idle Italian
dogs are only fit for sitting at home and eating
maccaroni.”

‘“Maccaroni in your teeth!” exclaimed the en-
raged Italian. “If the fat of Italy had not fed
your half-starved carcase when you came boasting
and blustering from bankrupt France, you would
not have had strength to crawl here.”

“Have a care, have a care,” cried out three or
four voices at once; ‘here are some heavy stones
62 A STORY OF A

rolling down at full speed uponus. That blunder’
ing old fool and his ass have stumbled, and dis-
turbed half the stones on the mountain, I think,
and we shall have them crushing our toes presently
unless we keep a sharp look out.”

However, a sharp look out they all kept instantly,
and soon discovered that something was rolling
towards them well worth scrambling for.

The glittering contents of the wretched man’s
sack, as they came bounding down over the rough
stones of the mountains, excited the cupidity of the
whole party to such a degree that they rushed like
madmen to clutch the precious spoil. Each indi-
vidual felt a burning, irresistible longing to possess
the whole himself. All the instruments which just
now had been used for delving in the earth, were
instantly, with much greater energy and rancorous
violence, turned against each other. Most deadly
but not prolonged, was the strife; and each of
these half-dozen combatants lay gasping on the
ground, pierced with mortal wounds inflicted by
the knife, the sword, or the stiletto, when suddenly
an enormous fragment of a rock of granite, as if
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 63

envious of the carnage committed by a few paltry
ingots of gold, came scampering from some tower-
ing height, overwhelming the whole party in its
way, and crushing them to atoms.

“O Freddy, what a frightful sight!” exclaimed
Leila, clinging to him.

‘“‘ Look at something else,” said Freddy. ‘‘ Look
at that poor wretched man and his miserable
donkey.”

“Oh, how I pity him!” said Leila.

‘Do not pity him. He is rightly served,” said
the Giant, who, though still busily engaged below
in his steam-carriage, yet, by the means of a self-
adjusting flexible telescope, about a hundred and
fifty yards long, had been able to observe all that
was passing; and having, moreover, excavated his
winding cavern upon the principle of the famous
Ear of Dionysius greatly improved, could not only
distinctly hear the lowest whisper, but could make
himself heard from one end of his cavern to the
other. “Do not waste your pity onhim. I will
tell you something of his history. He was once an
honest, hard-working English mechanic. He
64 A STORY OF A

earned enough to give himself, his wife, and chib-
dren, a decent subsistence, and, with a little
economy, was able to put a trifle into the savings-
bank. Unluckily he heard of the gold of Califor-
nia. From that moment he was an altered man.
He had naturally a too great fondness for hoarding
whatever he could collect, and thought too much
instead of too little about laying by his earnings.
Now he thought he had hit upon a way to make
himself rich without working. No arguments of
his wife or friends could make him change his plan.
To California he would go; and to California he
went. There he is. Look at him once more. A
picture of perfect wretchedness. His poor starved
donkey is just dead. The very heavy load and the
terrible fall were too much for it. It is quite dead.
And its master has thrown himself on the ground
in despair. He is thinking how happy he might be
at home now with his wife and children and his
earnings at his trade. But he has no strength left.
Your eyes are not so good as mine, little Leila ;
besides they are full of tears. You are crying
about this poor man and his dead ass. It is very
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 65

natural, and I do not blame you. But your eyes,
as I said, are not so good as mine, and I saw what
you and Freddy could not see. When the poor
beast fell, it rolled over the man, and broke his arm.
It is avery bad fracture, and there is no doctor, as
in merry England, to set it for him. So there he
is, hundreds and hundreds of miles from home,
surrounded with gold above his head and under
his feet, in agonies of pain and almost starved.
No wonder he looks despairing. But he does not
know all. His daughter is sick, his wife without
work. And so she and their children are almost
starved. Now there is one good thing about
the man, I can see.”

‘And so, I think, I can,” said Freddy. “He
looks to me as if he were saying his prayers. Is
that the one good thing you can see, Mr. Giant?”

“You are quite right, Freddy,” said the Giant,
‘‘that is just what I can see. He is praying to be
forgiven for having been so wicked as to run away
from his poor wife and children, for the sake of
gold, when he ought to have reflected that his
faithful wife, and his dutiful, affectionate children,

F
66 A STORY OF A

were worth more, a great deal more, than all the
gold in California.

“ And now, do you know, I am thinking whether
we cannot be of great use to this poor man, and
save him and his family from a great deal of
misery.”

“OQ Mr. Giant,” said the children, both toge-
ther, “how delightful it would be, if we could
help him!”

“And we will help him,” said the Giant.
“But we must be quick. There is no time to be
lost.”

The Giant had, at this time, by an invention pe-
culiarly his own, projected two strong grappling
irons to the mouth of his cave, with strong cords
attached, and was now hauling himself up, in an
easy recumbent posture, to the mouth of the cave,
where the children sat.

“ Now, friend Freddy,” said the Giant, “‘don’t be
faint-hearted. Tie this elastic cord, which I have
brought with me, round your body. You need
not be afraid of its breaking. I invented it myself.
It is composed of vulcanized Indian-rubber, gutta-
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 67

percha, and hemp, intimately combined; and,
though seemingly so very slight, will support an
immense weight without breaking. Take in your
hand this little cake, which I have carefully pre-
pared with a chloroformic drug of my own compo-
sition. Take also with you this little silken bag.
And now attend particularly to my instructions.
Your own safety depends on this. After I have
given you all your instructions, then stand on
your feet boldly, and run down this rough, steep
hill fearlessly, till you come to the man with the
broken arm. Immediately break off half the cake,
and offer it to him. He will eat it greedily, and
will immediately fall asleep. Then take the silk
bag; lay it down close to him, and roll him over
upon it. You will then find it gradually inflating,
as [ have in my hand a hair tube attached to it,
by means of which I shall fill it with wind. Be
very careful, all this time, to keep the remaining
half of the cake in your hand, for a reason which —
I will not at present explain. As soon as the bag
is filled with wind, it will form a hollow bed,
out of which the sleeper will not easily fall. Then
F 2
68 A STORY OF A

get astride yourself upon his body, hold fast by
the buttons of his coat, and I will drag you up
safely to my cave. Only, mind, don’t forget the
remaining half of the cake. You may have occa-
sion to use it.”

Freddy, who was as bold as a lion, especially
when he knew that he was doing what was right,
only just stooped down to give Leila a kiss, and then
got upon his legs immediately, and ran fearlessly
down the hill. His thick clouted Swiss shoes were
now very serviceable to him, as the rough hob-
nails kept his feet from slipping. Down he ran,
jumping over the great rough stones till he reached
the place where the wounded man was still kneel-
ing, with his hands clasped, and so earnest in his
prayer that he did not notice the boy till he came
close to him.

“ What can this mean?” said the man. “ Who
are you, and where do you come from? And
what do you want with a wretch who has but a
few hours to live?”

“J want to help you,” said Freddy, “ if I can.”

“Tt is too late, child. My arm is broken, and
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 69

my body bruised all over, and I am almost dead
with hunger.”

“Eat a piece of this cake, then,” said the boy;
and he gave him half his cake. The man swallowed
it greedily, and immediately closed his eyes, sank
on the ground, and remained motionless.

Freddy then threw the silk bag on the ground,
and with some difficulty rolled the man over till
he lay upon it. Immediately the bag began to be
inflated, forming itself gradually into a kind of bed,
hollow in the middle, into which the man’s body
sank.

And now, Freddy, delighted with his success,
was preparing to get astride on the body, when he
recollected that in his eagerness to roll the body on
thebag, and togive hishands more liberty, he had put
the remaining half of the cake by him on the ground.
As the piece of cake was but small, and much of
the same colour as the loose stones lying about, he
could not at first discover it. Presently, however,
he saw it lying near the poor dead ass; but as he
ran to pick it up he was greatly alarmed at hearing
a low growl, which seemed to issue from behind a
70 A STORY OF A

large piece of rock at a little distance off, and on
looking in that direction he could see the eyes of
some wild animal staring at him. |

At the first moment of his alarm he was think-
ing of bolting off up the hill as fast as he could.
But immediately he thought that, as he had done
one foolish thing in forgetting the Giant’s instruc-
tions, there was the less reason why he should do
another by running away, like a coward. So he
stood still, and looked boldly at the animal as it
came out from the rock, and then he saw that it
was very like the pictures he had seen of the wolf.
And, indeed, it was a wolf, and a very fine one, too.
Freddy, however, it must be owned, did not much
admire the beast, though he boldly stood his ground,
staring hard at his wild shaggy neighbour, in hopes
of putting him out of countenance. And to say
the truth, the wolf did not much like to be stared
at so steadily; and though he did not retreat, he
seemed afraid to advance. Freddy was a sharp
little fellow, and he began to suspect that, with all
his growling, the wolf was the greater coward of the
two. Indeed, he had heard it said that no wild
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 71

animal can bear to look a man in the face; and he
had a mind to try whether the wolf dared look a
child in the face.

He would gladly have picked up a stone, but he
must then take his eyes off the wolf. Suddenly, he
recollected his thick, nailed shoes. - He stooped
down, cautiously, with his eyes still watching his
enemy, and, in an instant, taking off one of his
shoes, he flung it vigorously right at the wolf’s head.

The beast was cowed. The brave spirit of the
boy triumphed. Off cantered the wolf. Freddy
lost not a moment in picking up his shoe and the
piece of cake; and jumping on the sleeping man’s
body, was delighted to find that the silken bed was
immediately in rapid motion up the hill.

But there was still another unexpected trouble
to be overcome.

As Freddy sat holding fast with one hand by
the buttons of the man’s coat, and keeping the piece
of cake with great care in the other, he felt some-
thing squeezing his leg. At first he thought it was
the man waking up; but on looking at his leg, he
was startled at seeing a large snake of the boa-con-
72 A STORY OF A

strictor family coiling round his leg. The colours
of the snake were certainly very brilliant and
beautiful, and the animal seemed to look up at
Freddy as if to say, “I enjoy my ride with you
very much.” Still Freddy could not help thinking



reeable to himself that
they should part company. But how was this to
be managed? Suddenly, he bethought him of the
half piece of cake, which he very civilly offered to

his new travelling companion.

that it would be more ag
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 73

The snake opened his big jaws, and F reddy
luckily dropped it down his throat, without getting
his fingers bitten; and no sooner had the snake
swallowed the cake, than it relaxed its hold of the
boy’s legs, and fell heavily on the ground, and was
soon left far behind.

And now, as he looked up the hill, he had the
very great satisfaction of seeing his dear Leila not
far off, and clapping her hands with great delight
as she watched him coming back to the golden
mouth of the Giant’s Californian cave.

Oh, what a joyful meeting it was!

No time was lost by the Giant, as soon as F reddy
and his load had reached the cave, in descending
with the whole party to his subterranean steam-
carriage.

To speak of the great Lireeneestepaidagathon-
gigantaiosphilos as a skilful chirurgeon only, would
be like describing the Atlantic as a large fish-pond.
The Atlantic, truly, is large, and contains fish also ;
good fish, very excellent good fish. But the Atlan-
tic has other things to boast of—many other things
—so many that we might almost say that its fishy


74 A STORY OF A

greatness 1s swallowed up in its other greatnesses.
So of our splendid Giant. To reduce a compound
fracture, to set a broken arm scientifically, beauti-
fully, elegantly, was with him what talking Latin
‘s with a late Professor of Poetry, J. K., mere
child’s play.

And beautifully did he set the arm of the still sleep-
ingstranger. Certainly he must have possessed some
secret as yet undivulged to the world of science;
some knowledge he must have acquired of the latent
powers of the wonder-working chloroform which has
not yet travelled down to our most laborious
philosophers. What do we talk of ? setting a limb,
drawing a back tooth, cutting off a leg of a man, or
firing the leg of a horse, and other fearful opera-
tions, while the patient is ina pleasing unconscious
trance? All very wonderful no doubt, but nothing
when compared with our Giant, who kept his
patient asleep till he had cured him, and then set
him on his legs as sound as a roach.

“ Freddy,” said the Giant, archly to his young
friend, as they steamed away from the deep caverns
of the Californian hills towards Switzerland, at the
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 75

rate of some hundreds of miles in a min ute, “Freddy,
my brave fellow, what are you about?”

‘Putting on my shoe, Sir.”

‘‘T thought so,” said the busily-engaged stoker.
“ What, picked up a stone, may be, in running down
the hill, or a little sand and gold dust in pushing
our sleeping friend here into his cradle?”

“No, Mr. Giant. It was all my own fault entirely.
I thoughtlessly, in the hurry of the moment, laid the
remainder of the cake, after I had given half to the
poor man, down on the ground. And then—”

“I know it all,” said the good-natured Giant. “I
saw it all. And ifI had not, I know you would
have told me. Now, you have learnt by experience,
that want of thought is cousin-german to want of
safety, and that what a child may drop carelessly, a
gant hardly may pick up again. Speedily as we
speed, no speed can recover time gone. The shoe was
a good afier-thought; gallantly was it flung, and it
did prompt execution. But fore-thought would
have beaten the wolf without the shoe; and he is
still dining on the dead donkey; while we, accord-
ing to the observations which I have just made,
76 A STORY OF A

have not yet passed the caverns of the Atlantic,
though it is nearly eight minutes thirty-two se-
conds and a quarter since my engine began to play.
However, you nobly retrieved your error, and will
soon find yourselves in the summer-house again.”

—



“JT wonder,” said the muleteer’s wife, ‘‘ what
those dear children can find to amuse themselves
so long in our summer-house; go and see for them,
Marie, and tell them we have something hot and
nice for them, whenever they like to come in.”

Poor Marie hesitated. “They cannot under-
stand me.”

“True, child, I had forgot. You must make
signs to them; pretend you are eating and drink-
ing, and point to our chalet ; they will be sure to
comprehend you.”

But the summons was not needed; for, just as
she spoke, in walked Freddy and Leila.

“ Well,” said the kind-hearted woman, “I am
glad to see you first, at last, as you were behind
before,” pleased to show off her intimate acquaint-
ance with the English language, by an old Irish
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 77

jeu de mots ; “please sit down and partake of our
homely fare.”

“Homely, do you call it?” said Leila, casting
her eyes on a neat, clean napkin, spread over a
little round table, and so exactly resembling that
at which they had sat in the arbour, and furnished
with the very same viands, that Leila and Freddy
looked at each other with a smile of astonishment.
‘‘Homely, indeed; we call it splendid: and very
hungry we are, too, I can tell you, after our long
journey to California and back again, since we last
saw you, about three-quarters of an hour ago;
notwithstanding the nice breakfast you gave us.”

‘‘ California, my dears! I think I know the names
of all the places for at least twenty English miles
round, and I can undertake to say that, whether on
the mountains or in the valleys, no such name as
that of California was ever heard of. Indeed, I do
not believe that there is any such place in all
Switzerland.”

“‘ Nor [neither,” said Freddy, laughing, “unless
your Switzerland extends beyond the Atlantic.
We travelled under the Atlantic Ocean to get to
73 A STORY OF A

California. Why,” continued Freddy, as he helped
himself to a large slice of bread and butter, “I
suppose it cannot be less than four thousand miles
from this place.”

The good woman of the house was completely
bewildered. ‘It is of no use,” she said to herself,
“ toargue with such strange, unaccountable children.”

So she wisely made no reply, while she busied
herself in making preparations for the journey.

«This, at all events, is very vood pay,” said she,
taking up a large leathern purse, and counting over
twenty old gold louis. “ And the letter is plain,
and easily understood. There can be no mistake
here.”

“ Ask no questions. Only have your husband
ready with his mules, within an hour after your
return home, and take charge of the two young
English people, whom you will find in company
with your own children, who are expecting you
near the summer-house. Take them to St. Croix,
near which place you will find their parents, whose
names are Fairford and Gilbert. Any one will
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 79

direct you to them, if you should not chance to
meet with them, for their faces are well known in
the neighbourhood. They are rambling about, from
morning till night, in search of the picturesque.
“Accept the accompanying trifle from your

‘‘ Unknown Frienp.”

“In search of the picturesque; what does that
mean? Looking for a picture, I suppose. Prob-
ably they have dropped one out of their portfolio.
But it is ten to one whether they will ever chance
to light upon it again. Perhaps we may have the
luck to pick it up for them, and then they will give
us a present, no doubt. Well, weare growing rich
very fast, I think. Twenty gold pieces! And,
then, what a strange rich gentleman this must be
to call it only a trifle. Who can he be?”

Her further meditations were here prevented by
the muleteer, who announced that his mules were
ready.

The first incident worthy of notice which occurred
to the travellers, was one that, indeed, astonished
the whole party.
80 A STORY OF A

After they had been about an hour on their route,
and Leila and Freddy had mutually expressed their
delight at the wild, romantic scenery through which
they passed, and thought it worth more than all the
golden caves or gold of California, suddenly, as they
reached the summit of a very steep, long hill, they
heard a confused murmuring sound as of many
voices. Looking down into the wide-extended
plains before them, they could distinctly see, at
about a league distant, a body of twenty or thirty
horsemen on a low, swampy tract of land, all closely
huddled together, and seemingly in some difficulty,
the nature of which, at that distance, could not
easily be ascertained. The muleteer, however, had
his own conjectures, and they proved to be correct.

The party whom Freddy and Leila had watched
with so much interest and curiosity in the early
part of the morning, in the dell below where they
stood with the peasant children, were a band of
mountaineers in the pay of France, and who had
received orders to march forthwith into that coun-
try, and join some other forces in quelling a disturb-
ance which had suddenly broken out in one of the

provinces.


yy



19/2

- ’
fe



h

>
yy

i

ee
UA

Pe

(/
ys

sd

SY / = —— )

N
i
4

\
| }

fy
fA ]
+
SS -
=I

==> ==
— SE

By = TS =
> Z
2 SSS c

ST ee Na

= if)
aad
5 ; SSN
2 : : AS ESA
as = ; = “
i= = = Ss AN I afd | 5S
= — => ; = SN
a Se! \ MX
: = __SSSSSSSSS— = ——
== = -

\S
\NS

N
SY

~,

mm

my

ZS

Ww nnn WMI

UY’ > A,
\





——— a =

\\ \
. .
\
= S Se XK ~ .

e/a. S

Pt




\
4
\


GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 81

They were heavily armed, and their horses and
appointments were none of the best, so they
travelled slowly. But as their rendezvous where
they were to receive further orders was at no great
distance, there was no need to distress their horses
by pressing them beyond their strength.

As they reconnoitred from the brow of the
same hill as that which the muleteer and his party
had ascended, their line of march which would lead
them to their destination by the shortest route,
they resolved on taking that which presently occa-
sioned an unexpected disaster.

Having descended into the plain, and proceeded
about a league and a-half among thick enclosures,
they suddenly opened upon what seemed an exten-
sive pasturage, which offering a more agreeable
footing for their beasts than the stony and dusty
roads, they pressed forward over it immediately,
urging their steeds into a gallop, who seemed to
enjoy the frolic and the soft turf almost as much as
their riders.

On they went, shouting and keeping their ranks
as if they were charging an enemy.

G
82 A STORY OF A

And so, indeed, they were, though they did not
know it; and a most formidable enemy it was.
Before they could check their horses’ speed, they
found themselves in an instant floundering in a
deep morass.

The foremost were up to their horses’ girths in a
moment, totally unable to move forward or wheel
round. Those who rushed last into the quagmire
were not better off; for the frightened animals,
struggling violently to extricate themselves, only
added to the general confusion and their own peril
by stumbling and staggering among the rest who
were already in a fiz.

Fearful was the scene which presented itself to
the travellers as they pushed forward, as fast as
their mules could carry them, to assist, if possible,
by any means in their power, in extricating the
soldiers.

The men had mostly dismounted by the time the
muleteer and his party had reached a little knoll
of trees about a hundred yards from the swamp.

They could hardly be said to be standing by their
horses, but they were clinging to them, as their only
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 83

chance of saving themselves ; while the poor beasts,
seeming instinctively to know that all their efforts
must be fruitless, resigned themselves quietly to
the death of suffocation which threatened them.
Despair was in the countenance of every one of
the men. They could not disguise it from them-
selves, that whatever attempts they made to move,
only sank them and their horses deeper in the
abyss; and that while they remained stationary
they were, by slow but perceptible degrees, de-
scending into their graves.

The certainty of a speedy death, the impossi-
bility of any rescue, seemed to impress them all.
And in this state of feeling they were when the
party reached the knoll already mentioned.
Among the soldiers not a sound was heard, and it
was curious to observe how, among these rough
mountaineers, the near approach of a most appal-
ling death acted. One feeling seemed to pervade
them all. It was useless to resist. But another
feeling also, and of the noblest, pervaded their
seemingly devoted ranks.

No sooner had they caught sight of the party on

G 2
$4 A STORY OF A

the knoll, instead of imploring assistance which
they knew must be impossible, they all with one
voice warned them not to approach; and then in-
stantly they all broke out into a chorus of singing.
It was one of their wildest mountain melodies
—a funeral dirge over their own graves. :

Whether it might be that our excellent friend,
the good-natured Giant, was roused from one of
his short slumbers after his mighty toils by the
sound of these poor fellows’ voices, it skills not to
inquire.

One fact is certain, and a very pleasing one it
was, though most surprising, not only to the
soldiers, who by this time had little left above
ground but their heads and shoulders, but also to
the muleteer and his party, who all saw too
plainly, and with an agony of distress, that it was
impossible to render the sufferers the least assist-
ance. One very pleasing fact is certain, that
Freddy and Leila, as they sat on their mules
mutually overwhelmed with grief at the sad fate of
the soldiers, suddenly heard a voice behind them,
which said, cheeringly, “ Never despair!” They
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 85

knew directly that it was the Giant’s voice; and
Freddy in the exuberance of his delight, immedi-
ately repeated the words, roaring out to the sink-
ing soldiers in the morass, at the top of his lungs,
““ Never despair ! ”

Whether it was the Giant’s voice they heard, or
Freddy’s, or both, is hard to say. But certainly
there was a movement of heads among them and
their beasts, the only part of their bodies, except
the men’s hands and arms, remaining in sight, which
indicated that, even at their last extremity, a faint
ray of hope had shone upon them all. Nor were
their hopes disappointed; for it chanced that the
Giant, in one of his numerous excavations, was
tunnelling under the exact spot where the soldiers
met with their disaster; and, at the very moment
of this accident, was resolving in his mind that a
better spot could not be found than this unpro-
fitable and dangerous morass, on which to cast an
accumulation of several thousand tons of rubble,
which began to impede his operations.

As he was not one of your every-day experi-
mentalists, whose motto is, ‘‘ Two words for self,
A STORY OF A

and one for others, if it can be spared,” he had an
eye, in all his experiments, to the benefit of society
at large. A citizen of the world, he, in his peculiar
way, threw out hints to men of all grades, in all
nations. Some stupid fellows we know, never
take a hint. Others are very slow at taking one.
Many sharp wits there are, however, on whom the
slightest hint is never thrown away. These not
only take it, but improve upon it, and go on im-
proving upon it, till they have worked it ont to
perfection.

He was now at this time only lately returned
from Strathfieldsaye, where he had been for several
hours closeted with the Duke. His fine sonorous
voice, which he could modulate to any degree of
strength he chose, from the softest accents of a
child to the loudest roar of artillery, was peculiarly
acceptable to his Grace, who listened with much
seeming attention to his eulogy of those landlords
who backed up their tenants liberally, and to some
encouraging hints on draining and chalking the
most impracticable soils.

Much astonishment was, of course, excited in
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 87

the muleteer, his wife, and children, at this sudden
exclamation, twice repeated, which they attributed
altogether to Freddy, as no one else of their party
was likely to have so called out. It is, however,
worthy of remark that, whereas the Giant called
out loudest in the Swiss dialect first, and then in
a lower tone in English for the benefit of Leila and
Freddy, who did not understand Swiss; so Freddy
shouted out, as nearly as he could in the tone of
the Giant, the words Never despair in the Swiss lan-
guage only, which astonished the muleteer and his
family the more as they thought him ignorant of
their language.

But now imagine how great was the admiration
of all when presently the bodies of men and horses
slowly but steadily were seen to rise higher and
higher out of the green morass, till at length they
all stood firm upon the surface ; the horses testify-
ing their delight by neighing to each other, and
pawing the ground with eagerness to quit the dread-
ful spot; the men by shouting and shaking of
hands. ‘They were all too much overjoyed at their
escape, and too anxious to be gone, to enter philo-
88 A STORY OF A

sophically into the latent cause of the wonderful
phenomenon. But they could not so far divest
themselves of some mistrust of the ground beneath
their feet as to think it prudent to remount till
they had led their horses some distance from the
spot, and felt quite satisfied that they were indeed
again on terra firma.

As they regained the hard beaten public road,
which, in truth, they ought never to have quitted,
they were joined by the muleteer’s party, all of
whom crowded round to express their hearty Joy
at their escape. Especially Leila and Freddy, not
at all daunted by the grim appearance of men
and horses, whose arms and accoutrements were,
as may be imagined, in the greatest possible dis-
order, would not be satisfied without shaking by
the hand as many as they could get within reach
of ; the muleteer’s wife telling the men that these
two were English children, and the most extraor-
dinary and wonderful ever heard of.

There was some truth in this, as every reader of
these their most romantic adventures will readily
acknowledge.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 89

Nor were their adventures yet ended.

But to proceed. The soldiers having lost a
considerable time by this disaster, and being besides
ina most miserable state of disorder as to their
equipments, were for pressing forward with all
possible speed to the nearest village to repair the
mischief which their thoughtlessness had _ occa-
sioned, and then join their expectant comrades.

But an occurrence which now took place, en-
tirely altered their plans. Just as they had put
themselves in motion, a clattering of horses’ hoofs
was heard ata distance in the very direction which
_ they intended to take. The nature of the ground
prevented them at first from seeing the party from
whom the sounds proceeded; but they were cer-
tainly advancing, and ata quick pace, as the sounds
became louder and more distinct every minute.
Very soon a turn in the road gave them a view of
a party of horsemen like themselves, but fewer in
number, whom they recognised as their own coun-
trymen, and whom they had received orders to
join at an appointed rendezvous on the borders of
France.
90 A STORY OF A

Great was the surprise of these new comers at
the plight of their comrades in arms; and little
compassion did they bestow on them when told
their history.

On the contrary, loud bursts of laughter greeted
them on all sides.

Come on, my smart lads,” said one more witty
than the rest, “let us have a mock fight; it will be
good practice before going into action. It will
brighten us all up, and show what metal we are
made of. You out-number us by more than half.
But what of that? To prove we are not afraid of
you, we will draw the bullets of our carbines, and
you shall fire away at us point blank, bullets and
all, and these good people shall look on and see fair
play. And as soon as our sham fight is over, we
will troop away together to the nearest hostelry,
and moisten our clay.”

The poor clay-covered soldiers, with their be-
grimed visages and dripping accoutrements, were
yet much too gay of heart to take offence at any of
the gibes and jokes of their showy and well-
appointed comrades ; and, indeed, the news which
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 91

these unexpected horsemen brought, and now mer-
rily communicated to them, left scarcely room for
regret at the accident which had befallen them.

It was shortly this. The order to advance had
been countermanded. The anticipated disturb-
ance in France had either been quelled, or had not
taken place. ‘Their services were not now needed.
They might return to their mountains.

There was one incident, or, to speak more cor-
rectly, lack of incident, which produced a lasting
and very unpleasant impression on the minds, the
simple and innocent minds, of Leila and Freddy.

‘‘ Leila,” said Freddy, as they jogged gently on
behind the muleteer and his family, “‘ what makes
you look so very grave ?”

‘Thinking about those soldiers. What a beau-
tiful hymn they sang, when they thought there was
no chance of their lives being saved.”

“Tt was very affecting, Leila; and it made you
cry, though you could not understand the words.
And Marguerite, the muleteer’s wife, tells me it is
the same as they sing up in the mountains, when
they are lost in the snow, or fall into the avalanches.
92 A STORY OF A

The sound of these mournful songs is heard at a
great distance, and often leads to the saving their
lives. The dogs, too, that, we know, are trained
to the humane task of hunting in the snow, are
often led by the sounds, as well as the scent, to
hunt out the unhappy herdsman (so Marguerite
says) who may have fallen into some of the deep
clefts of ice in the mountains, and can only be
drawn out again with ropes.”

“But, Freddy, what I was just now thinking
about was that I did not see one, or certainly not
more than one, of those four-and-twenty men whose
lives were so unexpectedly saved, show, by their
manner, that they really and heartily thanked God
for their escape. They were all certainly very
happy and full of spirits, and so seemed their horses,
poor beasts! But I should have liked to have heard
all the men, with such fine voices as they have, sing
some joyful song of thankfulness before they left
us; and that I am sure would have made me cry

for joy, quite as much as, I own, I did for grief,
when I thought they were singing their funeral

song just before being buried alive.”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 93

“ Ah, Miss,” said Marguerite, who was attentively
listening to Leila’s and Freddy’s conversation, “ it is
too true what you have said about those young men.
But you must make some allowance for them. They
lead but an idle life, many of them up in our moun-
tains; and that is not the worst of the matter—they
get contaminated by their continual intercourse, as
soldiers, with the refuse often of other neighbouring
countries. Oh, what a many blessings you English
enjoy by living in an island! Yet your great folks—
not all, but some of them—seem to think themselves
shut up in an out-of-the-way nook when in England,
and are never so happy as when they think they
have a good excuse not merely for travelling on
the Continent, as they call us, but of living on the
Continent. |

‘‘Bless me! to see what terrible shifts your finest
ladies will sometimes condescend to! A nasty,
dirty, poking, little miserable dark puddle ofa hole,
I have often heard them declare to be quite en-
chanting. And all sorts of little inconveniences
and privations that would make them quite discon-
tented and peevish at home, they think nothing of
94 A STORY OF A

when they are travelling on the Continent or settled
for the winter in some small lodging house with-
out any regular fire-place, no carpets, no bed cur-
tains ; and the whole house not so big as their
own drawing-room.”

“Yes,” said Leila, “that is very likely ; because
everything is so new to them; and when they see
such very fine mountains and beautiful rivers and
valleys, as you have in this country, with all the
grand churches and palaces that I have read of, |
must say I do not wonder much, because I am
sure I should like it myself; and I do like riding
upon this quiet mule along this beautiful road, and
meeting the country people coming out of those
vineyards with baskets of grapes on their backs,
and all so prettily dressed and looking so cheerful;
I own I do like it all better than living at school;
don’t you, Freddy?”

Freddy honestly confessed that school was some-
times dull enough. “ Only,” he said, “ when I can
meet with you, Leila, after school hours, and we
get leave to have a ramble by ourselves among the
meadows, then I am too happy to care whether we
are in England, or Switzerland, or California.”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 95

“And so am I,” said the innocent Leila.

The history of these two children, so devotedly
attached to each other, is rather singular.

Messrs. Fairford and Gilbert—the former the
father of Leila, and the latter, of Freddy—married
two half-sisters.

They were left an extensive and profitable busi-
ness by their fathers, who were also partners before
them; but as the sons were in possession, at the
death of their parents, of a competent income, they
preferred the fresh air of the country to the smoke
of London, and as they had received what is called
a liberal education—that is, an education which
gave and encouraged a disposition to make others
useful to them rather than to make themselves use-
ful to others—they “threw up” their business, went
and married two beautiful young women, and
settled within a stone’s throw of each other in the
country.

But still, not their beautiful residences in a
beautiful country, nor their beautiful wives, nor
their two beautiful children, Leila and Freddy,
could keep them at home. Ramble they could, and
96 A STORY OF- A

ramble they would. They and their wives were
great admirers of the picturesque, or thought them-
selves so. But the grand difficulty was to jind the
picturesque. They read Gilpin on forest scenery:
there was no such scenery at home; nothing but
matter-of-fact ponds, with matter-of-fact ducks;
two or three acorn-loving pigs, sleek, and shining
with excess of fat; a decidedly vulgar old cock,
strutting about as proud of his three or four
dowdy, dingy-coloured wives, as Messrs. F. and G.
could possibly be of their elegant, gaily-dressed
ladies; plenty of square flat meadows, with plenty
of daisies and buttercups, neatly trimmed hedges,
interspersed with a few elms, oak, and ash, all
neatly trimmed also, except at their very apex; a
few very neat farm houses in substantial repair,
and all with very muddy and manury approaches.
These were some of the trials and self-denials to
which their romantic-scenery-loving minds had to
submit. Could they submit? They could not.
Would they submit? They would not. They had
read Gilpin. They crammed their carriages with
camera lucidas and paneidolons, sketch books,
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 97

colours moist and colours dry, of every hue, and
pencils of every variation of H. and B., from sim-
ple H. to HHB., and vice versa; till even Newman
himself (not, indeed, the venerable Jno. Henry)
wondered and admired to think how far from
home they must be wandering. They went. They
made Lyndhurst celebrated as their head quarters.
The good Mrs. Lowman, of the Crown Hotel, im-
mortalized herself by her assiduities, the elegance
of her repasts, the neatness and comfort of her
apartments. But these her guests were heroes and
heroines. They disdained hot buttered rolls.
Roast fowls reminded them of their old vulgar
enemy the coxcombical cock. Besides, though Lynd-
hurst they had condescended to make their head
quarters, yet they had come fully prepared to
bivouac in the Forest. The ladies had their air-
beds, which the gentlemen could stuff into. their
India-rubber knapsacks; and they themselves, for-
tified with “dreadnoughts,” oil-skin caps, and an
ardent devotion to their fascinating wives, were
prepared to face all dangers.

They had now but one wish left. The weather;

H
98 A STORY OF A

would it only be kind enough to “take up?” No,
it would not. Would it but only drizzle ? No, it
would not. Nothing less than downright hard
rain “ from morn till dewy eve,” would satisfy the
decidedly ill-tempered monster. To-morrow? Every
one may have a to-morrow, who will have patience
to wait for it.

The patiences of the Messrs. F. and G. could
hardly be said to have lasted till next day, which
was the full extent of their to-morrow. Oh, how
much might they have benefited themselves and
their wives, had they had access to, during thatvery
long rainy day, and would have read, only a few
pages of that Trur Story Book, which tells for how
many many next days some people have waited
patiently for ther to-morrow.

But Messrs. F. and G. were not very fond of
true stories. Of that particular Book just men-
tioned, they unhappily knew and thought but very
little. They had, indeed, heard talk of Job; and,
as far as their knowledge of him extended, they
verily believed that their patience had been tried a
great deal more than his.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 99

So, upon the first dawn of the second decidedly
wet day, the landlady’s barometer standing at
‘Much Rain, they ordered horses, paid their bill, and
set off for the lakes of Cumberland and Westmore-
land.

Still fortune and the clouds frowned upon them.
Ifit rained hard in Hampshire, it rained much
harder in Cumberland and Westmoreland. How-
ever, they saw one of the lakes; but none of the hills;
either because the clouds and mists concealed them,
or because they did not look high enough. From
the little they did see of one of the lakes, they
came unanimously to the conclusion either that the
“lake red,” sent down to them by Mr. Newman of
Soho Square, was not the right colour, or else that
the continued rains had so mudded the real lake,
which they had travelled so far to see, that its na-
turally beautiful pink colourhad been greatly injured,
if not destroyed.

One grand, I will not say good, result flowed
from their successless expedition. They were una-
nimous in their opinion that this small island
gave them no scope for the exercise of their vast

H 2
100 A STORY OF A

geniuses: that the climate was too ungenial: that
the scenery was too tame, too homely.

To the Continent! to the Continent! with one
voice they exclaimed. But how about Leila and
Freddy? That difficulty was soon disposed of.
Send them to school. They were sent to school.



“ What did you mean, Leila,” said Freddy, as
they travelled on with the muleteer and his family ;
“what did you mean when you said that certainly
not more than one of those four-and-twenty
soldiers seemed to think at all of thanking GOD
for their wonderful escape? Did you think you
observed any different behaviour in one from the
rest?”

“JT saw one young man talking to Marguerite,”
said Leila, ‘‘ and though I could not understand,
of course, what he said, I am sure, by the expres;
sion of his face, that he was much more thankful
than the others. His face looked so good.”

‘“T thought so too,” said Freddy. ~ “ Let us ask
Marguerite.” eet:

“You were quite right,” said Marguerite. “He
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 101

is a very good young man. And he is as brave as
he is good. I know but little of the others; and
nothing at all of those few that joined them. They
are but a motley mixed set of fellows, some French,
some Swiss, some Germans, some Italians. But
this lad I have known from his birth. He was
always a good-tempered, kind-hearted boy. And
now that he is grown up stout and strong, there is
nothing that he is not ready and willing to do to
assist a neighbour, whatever trouble it may cost
him. Often and often has he been out at nights in
the snow with his great dog, the brother of this great
dog that is following us, hunting after some poor
goat-herd who, he thinks, is buried in the snow.”

Their conversation was now interrupted by the
muleteer, who said that he was going to give
his mules some food at a little village which they
were just coming to; and after that, they had to
go a long way over the mountains before they came
to any other habitation. He said, if the young
lady and gentleman were tired, they-had better not
go any further that day. But if they wished to
go on, they must take some refreshment while he
102 A STORY OF A

was baiting the mules, and after that he hoped to
get to a good resting-place for the night over the
mountains; but he was afraid it would be late at
night before they could reach the furthest village,
as the road over the mountains was very rough
and very steep in some places.

Leila and Freddy declared they were not in the
least tired; and they thought they ought to make
all the haste they could to get to their parents.

Marguerite, who was very anxious for the safety
and welfare of these children, who were intrusted
to her care, thought it would be more prudent to
rest for the night at the little village close by, and
set out very early the next morning to cross the
mountain.

However, after they had taken some refreshment,
they were tempted by the fineness of the day to
continue their journey. So they remounted their
mules; and, in high spirits, began to ascend the
mountain.

They had not gone far before they overtook a
man trudging along on foot, and singing very
merrily to himselfas he went. He was very plainly
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 103

and coarsely dressed, but his clothes were in good
condition; he had on his feet a stout pair of shoes,
and he carried in his hand a thick knotted stick,



that might do him good service in case of danger.
But he"seemed to think very little of danger. At
the sound of the mules’ feet approaching he turned
round, and with hearty good humour wished the
party good day. }
104 A STORY OF A

“ Ah! Filippo is it you?” cried the muleteer and
his wife, and children, almost all in the same
breath. ‘And what have you done with your
horse and your soiled clothes? And where can
you be going?”

‘As for my horse and my soldier trappings,
Marguerite, I have left them at home. As to
where I am going, that depends upon time and
other matters. The truth is, tltere is a poor fellow
travelling along this road, as I have heard, whom
I want to overtake before night, for a good reason
of my own. I met with him this morning, and he
told me he had the misfortune to break his arm not
long ago; and I am sure he must be dead-tired by
this time, and I shall give him a lift upon my broad
back, if I cannot borrow a mule anywhere.”

“ He shall have mine,” cried Freddy.

“¢ And mine,” said Leila.

_ * And mine,” said the two Swiss children.

“ Heighty, tighty, upon my word,” said Filippo.
‘¢ Why you are going to make a fine gentleman of
him at a great rate. Four mules for one poor man
indeed! Well, it is very good-naturedly intended.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 105

But one mule ata time is enough for one man.
And I think I know whose mule he will choose
first. I think it will be the mule that the young
English gentleman is riding,” said Filippo, speak-
ing his sentences first in Swiss, and then in Eng-
lish, to the great amusement and surprise of
Freddy and Leila. “I think too, he is an Eng-
lishman himself,” continued the young man, whom
the reader will recognise as the same person whom
Marguerite had been praising.

“ The poor fellow,” he told them, “ seemed to have
escaped lately from some dreadful danger; almost
as bad as was nearly happening to me and my
comrades this morning. He did not explain to me
what it was, but he talked of having found a great
treasure, and then suddenly lost it all and broken
his arm; however, I suspect he broke his head, and
so he hardly knows what he says, for he talked
about being above four thousand miles off this very
morning!”

“Very true,” said Freddy

“+ All quite true,” said Leila. “We were both
106 A STORY OF A

there ourselves this morning near where the acci-
dent happened; and we saw him break his arm.”

“Well I declare,” said Marguerite, “ you are the
strangest children I ever met with.”

“ Very strange,” said Filippo. »

“Not more strange to you than to us,” said
Freddy, “I can assure you, is the whole history of
our adventures.”

This seemed a fine opportunity for Freddy and
Leila to recount to their kind friend Marguerite
and to Filippo, who could both understand English,
some of the very wonderful events which had
happened since they first met with the ‘‘ Good-
natured Giant.” For the mules were now toiling
very patiently at a slow pace upa very long and
steep ascent of the mountain, and the curiosity of
the muleteer’s wife and the young soldier was very
much excited by what had already been told
them.

But a strange circumstance, or rather a quick
succession of strange circumstances, which pre-
sently occurred, quite put all story-telling out of
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 107

the heads of Leila and Freddy, and all story-
hearing out of the thoughts of the rest of the party.

That part of the mountain where they were was
very rocky, and the road was so covered with great
rough loose pieces of stone that the mules were
obliged to pick their way with great care: as for
Filippo he pegged away alongside of the mules,
caring nothing at all about the steep hill and the
rough road. Sometimes he kicked away the big
stones to save the poor mules from stumbling over
them; sometimes he caught up Leila or Freddy on
his shoulders to show them some fine view upon
the mountains, laughing and talking, and singing
all sorts of amusing songs to please them; in hopes
that, as they became better acquainted, he should
persuade them to tell about their wonderful ad-
ventures.

The sun was now sinking low, but Michel, the
muleteer, said that in a quarter of an hour he
hoped to bring them to the highest point of their
ascent, and then it would be all easy travelling
down to the village where they were to pass the
night.
108 A STORY OF A

Presently they thought they heard a sound of
voices.

Filippo, who happened at that moment to have
got Leila on one shoulder and Freddy on the other,
immediately jumped up a high bank, and then
upon a huge piece of rock, to look about and listen:
but the ground was so steep before them that they
could see but toa short distance, and could dis-
tinguish no other sounds than those of the mules’
feet on the road below. Soon, however, as they
advanced further, they again heard voices; and no
sooner had they gained the highest eminence and
were able to look down upon the country before
them, than Freddy exclaimed, “1 see some mén
fighting ; and now they are dragging a man along
the ground.” Filippo, having hastily replaced Leila
and Freddy on their mules, pushed forwards as fast
as possible to the scene of disturbance.

The muleteer too, now that they were beginning
to descend the mountain, followed close at the heels
of the soldier, with his party, who were all eager to
give what help they could, if it were required.

But the winding of the road, and the masses of
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 109

rock rising up in all directions, again hid every-
thing from their view. When next they got a
clear sight of the road before them for some miles’
distance, they only saw Filippo standing still and
looking in vain for the objects they were in search
of.

“ This is very strange,” said Filippo, speaking out
of breath. “I plainly saw three fellows dragging
another man by the legs, and when I came up to
the spot, I could neither see nor hear anything.
And I have been hunting all among these rocks
without any success.”

“ Pray walk in, ladies and gentlemen; pray walk
‘in, Mr. and Mrs. Muleteer; pray walk in, Miss and
Master Muleteer; pray walk in, my hearty good
fellow, Captain Filippo. And, most particularly,
pray walk in, Miss Leila Fairford and Master
Frederick Gilbert. Pray walk in, ladies and gentle-
men, mules and all. Here you shall see three
half-tamed troublesome tigers with their teeth
drawn, and their claws clipped. Here you shall
see a poor half-starved miserable man, with a pair
of gold-spun breeches on, a beautiful gold-spun coat
110 A STORY OF A

and waistcoat, golden hob-nails in his shoes, and a
splendid stout walking-stick of solid gold. Here
you shall see all the wonders of my beautiful Jura-
mountain cave: my pretty little pet moose deer,
and my tiny eagle.

“Pray walk in, my good friends, I beg and entreat ;

For here’s nothing to pay, and plenty to eat.

Rare dainties of all sorts your stomachs to fill ;

Fine turbot, and cod-fish, and salmon, and brill.

With sauces in plenty to suit all your moods,

From the Beaufort-hunt sauce to the great King of

Oude’s.
Fine haunches of venison, now hot from the spit,
Awaiting your pleasures at table to sit.
[have fifty-five guests already come in,

Whose mouths are all wat’ring in haste to begin.

So no, ‘ shall I, shall 1?’ but come, mules and all,

The beasts will find plenty to eat in their stall.”

It was this last couplet that quite settled the
question in the muleteer’s mind. ‘It is all very true,”
said Michel, ‘that we cannot yet spy out where the
good gentleman is that talks so civil; but, depend
upon it, wherever he may be hid behind those big
stones, he has got a snug little grotto of his own
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. lll

not far off, and a kind heart for dumb creatures as
well as Christians; and, in my opinion, the sooner
we take shelter in his cottage, or cave, or whatever
it may be, from the storm that is blowing up so
briskly against the wind, the better.”

The storm, indeed, like most storms on the
mountains, was very decided and prompt in his
movements. ‘A word and a blow” is generally
the rule with them: and those who understand
them best take them at their “ word,” and get out
of the way before the “blow” comes.

So up scrambles Michel, who was an experienced
old mountaineer, and up scramble his mules after
him among the rocks, like a parcel of dogs, the
children and his wife leaning forward and clinging
to the necks of the beasts. |

“T am of opinion, Filippo,” said Michel, “that there
is a blind path among these thick scrubby bushes.”

“ And I think there is something stirring among
them,” said Filippo. “ Where is your dog?”

Presently the dog’s head appeared among the
bushes, but instead of coming forward, he looked
wistfully back as if intimating to his master that
112 A STORY OF A

there was something in the bushes worth looking
after.

Filippo now stept on first, clearing away the over-
hanging branches with his hands and stick, the
muleteer and the rest following close behind.
Suddenly they found themselves on a smooth
level surface, beneath the branches, which were
closing over their heads ; and before they had time
to look about them, the broad platform on which
they were placed, with their mules, and Filippo,
and the dog, sank down gradually, till daylight
entirely disappeared; and for awhile they were in
total darkness. Filippo began to think whether
his adventure in the morass was going to be re-
peated. But Leila and Freddy, who were reminded
by it of their moveable table in the Swiss arbour,
were now satisfied that their friend the good-natured
Giant was amusing himself with devising amuse-
ments for them and their party.

None of the party were left long in suspense.
A glimmer of light soon issued from below, which
rapidly increased in brightness; while at the same
time a most delicious soft air blew gently upon them,
-GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 113

full of fragrance, as if they were entering a grove of
oranges and citrons. And so, in fact, they were.
As the huge platform rested on the ground, the
surrounding light became intensely brilliant, and
discovered to their astonished and enchanted sight
a vast hall or vestibule, along the walls of which, on
all sides, were ranged the most magnificent orange ©
and citron trees, full of fruit and full of blossom.
In front of these were myrtles in full bloom; and
these again had a range of smaller sweet-scented
flowers in their front, of a thousand varieties of
colours and species, and all most scientifically
disposed, so as to set off their beauties to the great-
est advantage.

Here, as may be supposed, all the party dis-
mounted, and stood still for some moments in silent
wonder and admiration. The very mules seemed
to have caught the infection of astonishment. The
great’ shaggy-coated dog only sat himself down
with a self-satisfied air, much at his ease, and looking
up in his master’s face with a sort of patronizing
expression of countenance, as much as to say, you
may thank my sagacity for showing you the way

I
114 A STORY OF A

down; and when you have gaped and gazed enough
here, 1 will show you the way to the next room;
for itis possible that I know more about this place
than you are aware of.

I do not say that the dog spoke all this, or any
part of it, in the Swiss or English language; but
he looked it all as well as he could; and what he
could not express by looks he was prepared to make
intelligible by actions. For after the party had
carefully examined every part of this wonderful
hall, and could discover not the least trace of
entrance or of outlet, the dog, who had all the while
been lying down indolently in the middle of the
room, now, as if satisfied of their ignorance and
his own importance, roused himself with all the
grave dignity of some great lord’s house-porter, and
lounging along to a spot where a splendid azalia
stood covered with blossoms in a richly ornamented
china vase of vast dimensions, very deliberately
leaped into the vase. Here, seated on his haunches,
his bright eyes twinkling like glow-worms among
the rich blossoms of the azalia, he seemed to invite
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 115

the attention of the whole party, and to urge them
to the same spot. |

Michel, who knew from experience that the dog,
though but a dog, had more wit in his noddle than
many a man who: prided himself in his wisdom,
carefully noted the dog’s actions, standing close to
him with all his mules about him. Filippo, with
the rest, was endeavouring to find some outlet from
the room. As fast as any one approached the
muleteer, the dog gave evident signs of satisfaction.
If they moved away, he gavea whine of discontent.
Leila and Freddy perceiving this, beckoned to the
rest to come to them. ‘They now all stood close
together watching the dog, who still maintained his
position, wagging his splendid tail to the great
hazard of the azalia blossoms.

Suddenly, the pavement on which they stood
seemed tobe propelled forward towards the wall, and
the wall at that part to yield to some force applied;
while the whole party, men, mules, woman, children,
dog, flowers, orange trees, and wall, for a space of ten
or twelve feet wide, and fourteen or fifteen feet high,
moved pind onward, leaving behind the brilliant

12
116 A STORY OF A

light of the hall, and pursuing its course in perfect
darkness. The air however was still fragrant, fresh,
and pleasant, and a sound as of some distant music
caught the ear. The music became louder and
more distinct. A strange sort of martial music was
heard, which though grand was certainly grotesque.

The words, few, simple and majestic, were sung
by a fine, full, sonorous voice, sometimes in Swiss,
sometimes in English; and were highly animating.

It would be needless to give the words in the
Swiss dialect to the English reader; especially as the
English words, being equally original, are equally
full of vigour, pathos, and sublimity.

March! march ! rum, tum, tum, ti!
March! march! rum, tum, tum, ti!
Tiddle, liddle; liddle, liddle; liddle, liddle !

Lum, tum, tum, ti!

—=-_ -—-— «232 UO lle elle ee

Tum, ti!



March! march, rumtumtum ti! March, march, rum tum tum ti! Tiddle,
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 117



liddle liddle liddle. liddle liddle lum tum fun ti, Rum, tum, fi.

The reader, be he young or be he old, can
scarcely form a conception of the thrill of delight
occasioned by this most eloquent appeal to the best
feelings of the guests of the yet invisible host.

Although, as a composition, simple almost to a
fault (for the air is comprised: in six notes), its
terseness adds to its dignity. Andas to the words,
it is impossible to speak of them, seeing that there
is but one word to speak of, MARCH! The rest,
“rym,” and “tum,” and “wt,” and “ tiddle,” and
“Jum,” are but as common soldiers, acting under
the command of their leader, March !

“March ?”

There is no need to ask the question, wheré_are
we to march to? That question has already been
answered by the poetical invitation given; to the
banqueting-hall. And while the exhilarating
sounds of this simple march were repeated in
countless echoes along the vast vaulted corridor
through which the delighted party were so mys-
118 A STORY OF A

teriously conducted, the noses of every one, not
excepting that of the big sagacious dog, became
pleasantly sensible of a most delicious and inviting
fragrance, issuing from sundry hot and savory
meats, into whose near neighbourhood they were
fast approaching.

Their travelling carriage, of whatever description
it might be (for the darkness was too great to
enable them to form any idea of its construction),
having now proceeded a considerable distance in
a straight line, stopped; aud Michel (whose concern
was always as great for the well-being of his mules
as for himself and family) was casting in his mind
whereabouts the stalls full of provender, so poeti-
cally described, were likely to be situated, when a
certain munching, and chewing, and grinding of
jaws among his beasts led him to examine, by the
touch, the muzzles of his mules; when, to his great
gratification and astonishment, he found a bag of
corn appended to the head of each, into which they
had instinctively thrust their noses, and with the
contents of which they were very happily regaling
themselves. |
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 119

A light now flashed along the roof of the corri-
dor, which presently became stationary, and
appeared like a ball of fire fixed over head, giving
sufficient light to show partially what was passing
below. A partition was evidently rising up gra-
dually between the mules, and the muleteer with
his party.

No sooner was honest Michel aware of this than
he made a desperate effort to spring over the rising
partition to join his beloved mules, the companions
of his many weary travels. The attempt was
hopeless) The partition, of whatever material
composed, offered no projection on its smooth sur-
face on which he could fix either his hands or his
feet.

Freddy endeavoured to console him with the
assurance that the Giant would be as good as his
word, and that he would be sure to recover his
mules. Michel, however, was evidently uneasy in
his mind, notwithstanding these assurances, till a
sudden bright blaze from the globular lamp over
their heads showed, to the surprise and admiration
of all, as well as of the muleteer, the well-contented
120 A STORY OF A

beasts clearly visible through the transparent par-
tition, which now they all saw plainly enough was
formed of one enormous plate of glass.

Greatly relieved was the careful mind of the
muleteer by this satisfactory view of the comfort-
able condition of his mules; so much so that he
now could watch with great interest, as well as the
rest, the surprising events which were momentarily
taking place.

The bright blaze from the lamp still continued.
Still the carriage was stationary, and they had now
leisure and light to observe its internal structure
and appearance.

Its decorations were most superb. To describe
them minutely would detain us too long from the
far more splendid scenes to which the party was
invited.

Let it be sufficient to inform the eager inquirer
that, as the behind part was formed of one solid
piece of plate glass full three inches thick, eight
feet wide, and twelve feet six inches high, so was
the fore part also of the same material, and of the
very same dimensions. Top there was none, but
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 121

the sides were decorated with the richest silks and
satins alternating with each other, and reaching
from top to bottom in ample folds. On each side
was a range of couches of the same material as the

sides.
Soon was heard a great trampling of the feet as

of some huge animal approaching from the front,

LAY, Bm) == f}
fs Be ad a y 2
‘oo ES =
Ve SS ‘ =
/ AN ) Pr f / Aj Wii .
A ye Le ‘vay , A Wie , iy A} iy SS Nie i P 3 .
SAWANT CNR APU LW VAL Wl (yen
Ay y) Fa \ ASS He H NY } De Gao
] aS RR Cine

Y

A
iL



which attracted all attention. ‘There appeared now
a huge animal, indeed, of the Elk, or Moose Deer,
species, which measured to the shoulder about
twelve feet. As he advanced majestically towards
the car with head sometimes lowered as if to peer
122 A STORY OF A

into the carriage and make his observations on the
company, there appeared nothing ferocious or savage
in his look ; on the contrary a mild and pleased ex-
pression beamed in his bright eye, and his magni-
ficent antlers lost their terrors without any abate-
ment of their grandeur.

By what exquisitely nice and exact adjustment
of machinery the harness of this formidable animal
was linked to the enormous car, would be no more
difficult to explain than to give the reader a com-
petent idea of its perfect training and ready
obedience to the orders of its unseen master.

So it was, however, that having approached the
car till his muzzle almost touched the glass, he
suddenly turned round, stood still for an instant,
while the shaking of some chains indicated the
adjustment of the harness to the carriage, and then
dashed off with the speed of lightning; the car
following, with so easy and equable a motion, thatthe
party seated on the couches were scarcely conscious
that it was moving. To those who were standing,
as was the case with Michel and Filippo, the effect
of so suddenly rapid a motion was different. These
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 123

two men were in close and earnest conversation on
the comparative merits of their two dogs; each, of
course, maintaining that his own was the superior
of the two. Filippo was also explaining the reason
of his having now travelled without his own dog,
his usual companion. He had been with him, he
said, till their disaster in the morass, but since that
time he had not seen him. He concluded that the
dog very sagaciously perceived the danger, made
his escape in time, and would no doubt, on his
return home, be found there awaiting his master.
The old muleteer had some doubts on this point,
and was beginning, in the true old-fashioned style
of a button-holder, to give his reasons, when the
prodigious elk suddenly set the carriage in motion.
The very natural consequence was that the soldier
and the muleteer were instantly thrown on their
beam ends, rolling one over the other on the thick
soft carpet beneath, disturbing thereby the slumbers,
and treading on the tail, of the muleteer’s dog, who,
waking up and seeing the great heels of the moose
deer, as it were close to him, and deceived by the
transparency of the plate glass, imagined naturally
enough, that he had been attacked by the deer.
124 A STORY OF A

But the vain resentment of the dog, the confusion
of Michel and Filippo, and the general astonish-
ment of the whole party, were destined very soon
to be altogether diverted into another channel.

Soft music now was heard, such as might
delight the ear even of sleeping childhood, and
make an infant smile without rousing it from its
sweet slumber.

The fleet elk continued its speed. The bright
ball of light still was seen suspended above the car.
The sound of the soft music neither diminished nor
increased in strength, but the watchful and de-
lighted eyes of Leila and Freddy could now, at
intervals, distinguish, as they advanced, a seemingly
vast circular conservatory, with a fountain, or
jet deau, in the centre, throwing up columns of
water toa great height and assuming a thousand
varieties of fantastic forms.

At this spot they were now arrived. Their
giant steed again stood still. Again, by invisible
machinery, he was unharnessed. Instantly the
glass front of the car was lowered and lay flat on
the ground before them.

“Walk on, my children, walk on,” said a distant
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 125

but distinct voice. ‘Dinner, and your forty-eight
sleeping schoolfellows, and your still sleeping
schoolmaster and mistress, await you.”

Onward stepped Leila and Freddy, hand in hand,
followed by the wondering Swiss party. And
food enough they found for wonder. Greatly as
they were astonished at the magnitude and beauty
of the conservatory through which they were pass-
ing, their eyes were directed, with far greater
eagerness, to the banquet-room immediately beyond.

There, at the further extremity, leaning his head
upon his hand, and smiling as he smiled when he
gave his far-famed fete champetre near the mulberry
tree, reclined our worthy friend, the good-natured
Giant,

eupnnorerradayabovyryavraior Pinos.

Eireeneestepaidagath oongigantaiosphilos.
In plain English, signifying
The Gigantic Lover of Peace and of Good Chil-
dren.

“Welcome, welcome, welcome!” said the good-
natured Giant. fata
126

A STORY OF A

‘Thrice welcome all,
To this my hall,
Both great and small !

Good friend Filippo, sit you there.
Why, what’s the matter? why d’you stare !
Your dog’s asleep behind your chair.

Michel, your mules are safe and near,
So come and sit contented here ;
And without care enjoy your cheer.

Close at your side, good Marguerite,
Your children, too, shall have their treat.
Sit down, good children, there’s your seat.

And now, friend Philip, you must know,
Your dog, that makes you wonder so,
Came to my cave some hours ago.

In fact, when lately you slipp’d down,
Within an inch or two °f your crown,
Into that bog of great renown,

It so fell out, your dog fell in,
At the first step, up to his chin ;
At which, when he began to grin,

I took him very carefully
By ’s legs, and pulled him down to me:
(A sleight of hand you could not see.)
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 127

Miss Leila, I am more than half
Inclin’d to ask, what makes you laugh?
And yet, methinks, I guess the reason,
Which, truly, is not out of season ;

So many boys and girls to see

As sound asleep as they can be.

The schoolmaster still snoring, too,

As loud as when the sash we threw
Open, and in at window thrust him,
And in his bed securely truss’d him.

Pray sit you here, and Freddy by you,
And let your Giant friend be nigh you.
Among this goodly company

Tell me what other friends you see.”

“T see,” said Leila, with a smile,
‘The man of whom you spoke erewhile,
Dress’d out in clothes of golden hue.

I wonder how he came with you?”

‘Well may you wonder,” said the Giant ;
«Tis for his good I’m so compliant.
True, I’ve a method of my own,
When fools are fond of riches grown,

Of making what they chiefest prize,
Seem folly in all others’ eyes ;


128 A STORY OF A

Until, at last, their ardour cools,
For publishing themselves as fools.

Nay, go close to him, if you choose ;
Tis hard to rouse him from his snooze.
Poor, foolish fellow, well you know
He broke his arm not long ago.”

The good-natured Giant proceeded to acquaint
Leila and Freddy how, after he had quite cured
the poor man of his broken arm and other bruises
in California, he set him off on his journey home-
wards; how he also gave him a handsome present
of gold. But the foolish fellow was so overjoyed at
the sight of the gold, that he could not be content
without having it continually in his hand, counting
over the pieces, and grudging to spend enough of
it to buy even food on his journey.

Three of the soldiers, who were on their way
towards the party in the swamp, having caught
sight of this man with his money-bag in his hand,
as soon as they had delivered their message to their
comrades, turned back, and waylaid the traveller.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 129

Filippo, however, overheard them, when they were
settling their plan of plunder, and set off to give
the traveller timely warning. It has been already
seen how he and the muleteer’s party came up just
as the soldiers were dragging the poor man into
the bushes, where our friend the Giant, having, as
usual, both his “eyes open, and his trap-door quite
handy, pulled them all four together, by the legs,
down into his cave, and there dealt with them in
his own peculiar way.

‘‘ And now,” continued the Giant, ‘“‘ as so many
of our friends seem inclined to sleep on a little
longer, and you that are awake have so lately taken
some refreshment on the road, what say you to
postponing, for a short half-hour, our sitting down
to supper, while I take you up, through another
opening of my cave, to give you a view of a sun-set
on these mountains; when, if I mistake not, my
Leila and Freddy will see something besides the
sun-set to delight them.

“On our way too, I shall show you a curious maze,
or labyrinth, of my own invention.”

The Giant now rose from the rude moss-couch on

K
130 A STORY OF A

which he had been resting, and showed himself
to the astonished muleteer and family, as well as
Filippo, in all the grandeur of his full height.
Yet, incredible as to some it may appear, every
one was so fascinated with the smile of cheerful
benevolence which lighted up his countenance, that
even they who had never seen him before, seemed
scarcely aware that they were in the presence of a
man go immensely their superior in bulk and height.

It was the elevation of mind, not of the body,
that riveted all their attention.

The banquet-room, in which he stood, could not
be less than a hundred feet high. The ceiling was
of a deep purple, pierced with innumerable small
holes; and being lighted from above, gave the ap-
pearance of a clear starlight night. The sides of
the room, like the sides of the car already described,
were furnished with rich folds of satin and silk
alternately : and, like the entrance hall, or orangery,
no opening for ingress or egress was visible.

The Giant pressed his hand against the wall, and
part immediately gave way, moving as if on a pivot.
He invited the party to pass on through the opening.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 131

A verycuriousand novel scene then presented itself.

A large open square, some thirty or forty feet in
diameter, was intersected with high strong iron
palisades, in such a vast variety of ways, that the
whole seemed a perfect chaos of crooked paths.
Yet in fact, so perfect was the arrangement and
plan of the walks, that any three persons entering
at three different parts of the labyrinth at the
same time, and walking uninterruptedly onwards at
the rate of three miles an hour, would find their way
out of the labyrinth again at the end of three years!

The most inconvenient part of this arrangement
was, that the entrance closed immediately behind
any one who entered, and the iron palisades were
so strong, so lofty, and so severely spiked, that
escape, without assistance, was impossible.

At the moment when Leila and Freddy, and the
Swiss party, came in sight of this labyrinth, three
stout men, whom Filippo immediately knew to be
the-same men whom he had overheard plotting to
rob the Californian adventurer, were standing
within the labyrinth, in three separate compart-
ments, in anxious conference.

x 2
132 A STORY OF A

“ Well, at all events,” said one, “it is lucky we
did not break our necks. Such a long fall as that
without even a bruise, it is the strangest thing ever
heard. of.”

“ Not more strange,” said another, “than the
story told by our comrades of their adventure in the
bog.”

“What is this inscription on the spikes over my
head?” said the third.

“ One crooked path only leads to another.”

“7 like not that sentence over much,” said the
first man. ‘There is something personal in it.”

“ A mere trueism,” replied the other. “ Rather
witty, though,” rejoined the first, “ and a hard hit,
Master Jean.”

«“ Tf it hits one, ithits us all,” retorted Master Jean.

The ingenious Giant, having so placed his friends
that they could overhear this conversation, and see
without being seen, now beckoned them away to
another sight.

“ How will they ever get out? ” asked Leila.
«And should they get out, will they come out
wiser and better men?” asked Freddy.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 133

‘T intend they shall,” said the Giant. “ Do
you know what a poet of your country says
shrewdly ?

“© Time is the old justice, that examines all offenders.
Let Time try.’

But come all of you into this outer apartment,
and see my pretty little pet Eagle of the sun.”

They passed into a room so exceedingly lofty,
that they could see nothing of the roof or ceiling,
though the lower part was well lighted. There
was, however, a freshness in the air, like breezes in
the summer evenings on the borders of the
mountains.

‘Here are cloaks and wrappers of all sizes and de-
scriptions,” said the Giant. “ Choose for yourselves.
Though you want them not now, they may be
useful by andby. Only remember, that what you
take, I expect you to keep as a gift, to remind you
of your friend the Giant; especially you, good
Master Michel; and you, Filippo, when you have
to face the snow storms of winter on your moun-
134 A STORY OF A

tain heights, and you will all please me best, by
choosing each what suits each best.”

“ An uncommon civil gentleman, I consider him,”
said the muleteer, taking off the peg a magnificent
capote of peau de loup (wolf’s skin), and trying it
on immediately, at the same time giving friend
Filippo a nudge, and pointing to another capote of
the same material. His friend took the hint at
once, and both would have been equally voluble in
expressions of gratitude with the rest, had not the
Giant, when all were well wrapped up, cut short
all further compliment, by drawing their attention
to what appeared a dark spot high over their
heads. |

‘Here comes my pretty little pet,” saidhe. “ Now
all of you stand close together on this platform.”

The platform on which they stood appeared, on
examination, to be of highly-polished ebony, about
six feet square. Attached to each side, and extend-
ing about ten feet on the ground, were twelve stout
brass rods. These brass rods presently began to
raise themselves from the ground slowly, but all at
the same time, and with the same velocity. They
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 135

continued rising till they stood upright, and in this
manner entirely enclosed the party on the platform.

The dark spot which they had observed over
head, now rapidly increased in size, and appeared
plainly to be an enormous bird hovering in the air.
No sooner had the party been enclosed within the

Yi ‘7

SS

LTT ;
SS (If My

All i i Tl Tt

cf i 5 ,

fi i

—
SS

HY = Ss
Wily

Wiha



wires or rods of this great cage, than the eagle
descended and lighted on the shoulder of the Giant,
who was now busied in adjusting a brass band to
136 A STORY OF A

the top of the cage, crossed by two rods, in the
centre of which was a ring.

“T must now,” said the Giant, “ trust you to the
guidance of this intelligent winged messenger, who
has already placed your mules above ground,
and now will instantly convey you, safely and
speedily, to the surface of the earth.”



“() Mr. Fairford,” said Mrs. Gilbert, “ what do you
think your wife has just been saying to me? She
says that, after all the time, and trouble, and ex-
pense which it has cost us to travel over the Conti-
nent in search of the picturesque, she would gladly
exchange the finest views that she has ever seen for
a sight of her dear, dear daughter Leila. Is not
that really very provoking? -

« Very,” said Mr. Fairford, “ and, what you will
say is still more provoking, I think the very same
thing myself.”

“You do? Well, I declare I will go and call my
husband, and ask him whether he dares to say that
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 137

he would prefer a sight of our Freddy, to all the
lovely sights we have seen on the Continent. I can
only say, that if he dare to say anything of the
kind—”

“Pray don’t be angry with Mr Gilbert.”

“Angry?” repeated Mrs. G. “I tell you, Mr. F.,
that if Mr. G. dare to say anything of the kind, he
may rely upon it, I shall agree with him!”

In short, these now experienced travellers in
search of the picturesque, having at length, after
traversing half over Europe, opened their minds to
each other, discovered that each had long regretted
the folly of quitting home, with its chequered but
rational and substantial enjoyments, for a roving,
restless, useless life in foreign countries.

And having now happily confided to each other
this their unanimous opinion, no time was lost in
putting it into execution.

The sun was setting in golden splendour among
the mountains, as these four, having given orders
that their carriages should be ready early the next
morning to convey them towards their native land,
138 A STORY OF A

set out for a short walk from the hotel where they
lodged, to take a last view of Swiss scenery. |

Scarcely had they ascended the first eminence,
and were hoping for some “object of interest” to
fill up the foreground of the landscape, when @
group of figures appeared in the very spot and
attitudes that a painter would desire.

Foremost in the group of figures stood Leila and
Freddy, watching with delight the sun as he sank
cloudless towards the horizon. On one of the mules
sat Marguerite, with her children on the ground
beside her. Filippo and the muleteer, standing
among the mules, were discussing, with much per-
plexity, the strange adventures of the day.

“] declare,” said Mrs. Fairford, addressing her
sister, “if I could only metamorphose those two
picturesque children, that stand in front of the
group yonder, into our own dear Leila and Freddy,
I would confess at once that we had indeed found
the Picturesque that we have been so long
search of.”

“] would confess the same,” said Mrs. Gil-
bert.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 139

“ Ay, and so would we most readily,” cried
the Messrs F. and G.

“ Well then,” said a voice, that would have
startled them exceedingly, had it not been
so melodious and soft, “mount all four of you on
my shoulders, pencils and sketch-books in hand, and
take a nearer view of those two objects of wterest
in front of yonder group.” And with these
words, before either of the party had time to look
about them, the good-natured Giant, taking up Mr.
and Mrs. F. in one hand, and Mr. and Mrs. G. in
the other, placed them on either side of the broad
ridge of his shoulders.

“ Mercy on us,” cried Mrs. F., * where have we got
to? and who are these two running like madcaps
towards us?”

“ Why, Leila! my own dear Leila!” exclaimed
Mr. F.; and then began blubbering like a child.

“ Fred.! What, our own real Freddy, and no
mistake!” shouted out Mrs. G.; ‘ you glorious
fellow.”

It ig quite surprising how the most marvellous
events cease to be even noticed when something
140 A STORY OF A

clse that comes more home to our feelings takes
place at the same time.

It was certainly not an ordinary, every-day
occurrence that two men, with their wives, should
be planted on the shoulders of a Giant of such
ample dimensions, that the tallest, with out
stretched arm, could barely have touched the
summit of his low-crowned hat. Something giddy
too, the ladies at least might be supposed to have
felt themselves, in so high and unusual an eleva-
tion; yet the fact undoubtedly was that the un-
expected sight of their long-absent children run-
ning towards them, entirely absorbed all their
thoughts. We see a handsome, middle-aged man,
crying like a child, with joy at sight of his pretty
daughter. And there can be no doubt that if the
worthy Giant had not, according to his usual
custom, kept a sharp look out, the Messrs. F. and
G., wives and all, would, as unconsciously as any
somnambulist, have walked off the Giant's shoul-
ders, and have broken their necks to embrace their
children. 7
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 141

“You will excuse me, ladies and gentlemen,” said
the Giant; “ you will, Iam sure, excuse me, when
I tell you that I have taken the liberty, for reasons
best known to myself, but entirely with a view to
your advantage, to carry off your travelling car-
riages from your hotel, and put them on my rail-
road that leaves the Jura terminus at two o’clock
to-morrow morning precisely, and arrives, by its
usual submarine passage, at the actual base of the
Shakespeare cliff in twenty-two minutes and the
tenth of a second?”

“ Wonderfully expeditious,” remarked Mr. F.,
as he received from the hands of the careful Giant
his long-lost little Leila, and almost smothered her
with kisses.

“ And I will guarantee your safety,” said the
Giant, handing up at the same time, to his delighted
parents, their affectionate son Frederick. “ For,”
continued the Giant, “ you must understand that
I am my own engineer, and my own stoker.”

“Indeed!” said Mrs. G., looking down upon the
Giant with some contempt, and then at her new
Parisian promenade dress, in evident alarm lest the
142 A STORY OF A

big stoker’s fingers should have dimmed its gaudy
brightness.

“Pray, Sir,” said Mr. G., in a deprecating tone,
as somewhat ashamed of the surmises of his wife,
“ do you charge very high for insuring our lives to
Dover?”

“T make no distinctions,” said the Giant, mys-
teriously, “I charge every one alike. Those who
think my demands exorbitant, are not bound to
travel with me.”

“ What are your demands?” asked the Messrs.
F. and G., in some considerable alarm and with
becoming hauteur.

“ CONFIDENCE AND GRATITUDE,”
said the Giant, with a smile, which was so catching
that every one else smiled too.

“Well,” pursued the Giant, “smiling gives con-
sent. So now, as I see Mrs. F. has finished her
sketch on my shoulder, we will, if you please,
descend to the supper-room, as I doubt not this
mountain air has given you all keen appetites.”’

Poor Michel, the muleteer, who had been stand-
ing at the Giant's feet, and looking up with open-
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 143

mouthed astonishment at him and the select party
on his shoulders, smacked his lips with delight at this
proposal. Coupled, however, with the delight at
the prospect of a good supper, were some anxieties
again about his mules, of whose safe custody, should
they descend again into those deep caverns, he
could not altogether feel satisfied.

It would be difficult for an ordinary writer to
describe the astonishment of the whole party on
descending again to the banqueting-hall of the
Giant.

There, indeed, still sat in a deep sleep, the Cali-
fornian adventurer in his suit of gold: there too sat
the schoolmaster and his wife, and their forty-eight
scholars all sweetly slumbering. These were all
placed at the supper-table in admirable order and
regularity; and each one in an elbow chair so ex-
actly fitted as to size, that there was no need to fear
that they should lose their seats, or disturb each
others’ slumbers.

All this, it may be imagined, caused great won-
derment in the minds of the bewildered parents of
Leila and Freddy. To the rest, wonderful as it was,
144 A STORY OF A

‘+ had ceased to be a novelty. They had seen it all
before.

But a sight, which they had not before seen, pre
sented itself now on their return to the cave, which
was not only astonishing and unexpected, but so
amusing, and ‘ndeed laughable, that Freddy and
Leila could not help clapping their hands with
delight.

On the ample supper-table was already placed
in rich profusion, everything that might be re
quired when the supper should be served; and of
the most magnificent description ; except that to
none of the sleeping guests had there been, as
yet, given either plates or knives and forks.

The amusing sight which they now saw Was,
first, an extremely diminutive figure of a woman,
handsomely dressed, and with a very pleasing
countenance, walking about on the supper-table:
she was followed by 4 little dog, which carried in
sts mouth a basket beautifully made of silver wire;
the dog’s coat was of a rich cream colour, soft and
silky, and it hung down insuch long curls from his
long back that ‘¢ almost entirely covered his short
145

GOOD-NATURED GIANT.

On the little lady’s shoulder sat a

bandy legs.

As this

parrot, whose plumage was most brilliant.
lady (who was, in fact, no other than the Giant’s
Sister, Atta-tatta-datta) walked round the table



she stopped at each of the guests, and gently tapping
the table, there arose immediately a plate before the

guest, of embossed gold.

L
146 A STORY OF A

Poll Parrot then leaving its mistress’s shoulder,
looked knowingly into the dog’s basket, and select-
ing a knife and silver fork placed them, by the
joint operation of beak and claw, in due order by
the plate; saying very distinctly, ‘‘ There, that is
for you.” In this manner was the little lady, with
her two attendants, occupied, when the Giant
entered with his party.

He again seated himself on his rude stone couch
covered with moss, having first with great affection
kissed his sister, and ‘ntroduced her formally to the
company.

Atta-tatta-datta, in the most obliging manner,
with a long ivory wand tipt with gold, pointed out
to each one their proper seats, saying, “I must
pretend to be a little fairy as well as a little woman,
and make you all sit in your places at the touch
of my wand.”

And sure enough so she did; for Michel and
Filippo having settled it between themselves that
they would sit together, notwithstanding the little
lady’s hint that other seats were provided for them,
had no sooner sat down, than the fairy wand, tapping
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 147

the head of Filippo, stuck so tight to it that the
soldier could not rid himself of it; and F reddy and .
Leila beginning to titter, he was quite put out of
countenance. But what was the surprise of the
whole company when they saw the tiny woman,
without any apparent exertion, lift the soldier out
of his snug arm-chair by the golden tip of her
wand, and, raising him high above the supper-table,
set him down unresisting in the seat appointed for
him, next to the sleeping adventurer.

Loud was the laughter which this odd incident
occasioned.

Filippo, like a sensible man, not only took very
good-humouredly. the laugh against him, but
honestly confessed that he well deserved to be
laughed at, and was not punished half enough ‘for
his rudeness.

As for poor Michel he was ready to sink into the
very lowest bowels of the earth when he saw the
consequence of his thoughtlessness; he made a vain
attempt to rise from his seat and sneak away quietly
to his mules, if he could find them. But this he
could not do; for, with all his efforts, he could no

L 2
148 A STORY OF A

even disengage himself from his elbow chair. And
now, as the wonderful little lady had not yet
touched him with her wand, he began to hope she
would not notice him. However he was out in his
conjectures. But at this moment another mar-
vellous event taking place, the muleteer remained
for the present unnoticed.

All the company being seated, and the little lady
also having seated herself under an ample pyramid of
confectionary on the lowest step of a beautiful
miniature representation of a Swiss cottage, which
was also entirely composed of sweetmeats, the
Giant gave @ loud whistle, which startled every
one; and then called out, Moosey, come here. In-
stantly the drapery of the wall at the opposite end
of the room was pushed forcibly aside, and a pair
of enormous antlers appeared. The immense elk
bounded into the hall, and, at one spring, cleared
table, guests and all; and in another moment was
lying down, quiet as a lap-dog, at the feet of the
Giant, and licking his master’s hand.

Another whistle the Giant now gave, and said,
«“ Where is my pet eagle; my pretty bird, where
are you? Where?”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 149

Suddenly, high up in the lofty wall, near where
the Giant sat, issued a light, so intensely bright
and dazzling as seemingly to leave all the brilliantly
lighted lamps of the apartment in comparative
obscurity.

This light discovered a huge projecting rock of
granite, on which was seated the Giant’s mighty
pet, an Eagle of the Sun, of stupendous size and
extraordinary beauty and richness of plumage.
His piercing eyes were directed full and fearlessly
at the very centre of the dazzling light, till, at the
call of his master, he slowly, solemnly, and majes-
tically unfolded his vast pinions, and quitting his
eyrie on the rock, poised himself in the air, till, by
a gradual and almost imperceptible motion,
he hovered, with wings expanded to their
utmost length, right over the supper table; and
looked down with such a steady gaze upon the
assembled guests as might well have made them
suspect that he meditated, “at one fell swoop,” to
pounce upon them all, and eat them for his
supper.

But another whistle from his master set their
minds at ease.
150 A STORY OF A

The obedient bird gathered up his wings, and in
an instant was on the Giant's shoulder; and, with
the fondling familiarity of an established favourite,
was nestling his head and crest upon his master’s
face.

The Giant now took out of his bosom a book,
with which he appeared to be deeply engaged; but
having opened a page or two he shut up the book,
and said to his sister, ‘‘ Jt as tame, sister. Awake the
sleepers.” |

Freddy, whom the little lady had politely seated
next to Leila, whispered, “I think this will be the
best fun of all.”

“ [ think so too,” said Leila.

The Giant held in his hand a box, having a ring
on the top. His sister extended her wand towards
him, and he hung the box on the tip of the wand.
The box was of ivory, about the size of a swan’s
egg, and pierced full of holes, through which a
smoke issued that gave a delicious fragrance.

The pretty little Fairy passed the box very nimbly
round the table, close to the noses of all the
sleepers.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 151

They all began first to sneeze prodigiously, and
then to rouse from their slumbers and to stare
with astonishment. salted

But before they had time to wonder where they,
were, the tiny lady took up a small mandoline, and,
striking three notes, sang to her brother, in a sup-
plicating tone, yet with an arch look of pleasantry,
these few words, in the Treble Cleff:—



replied the Giant in two notes of great suavity,
dignity, and pathos, in the Bass Cleff.

And now indeed it might be said to be a very
merry hall. The sprightly little Fairy was here and
there and everywhere, as the saying is, in less than
no time. Wherever her golden-tipt wand touched
the table, immediately up came a dish full of some-
152 A STORY OF A

thing nice. It might be atureen of mulligatawny
soup, or white soup; or it might be a turbot with
lobster sauce, or a salmon with shrimp sauce, or &
cod with oyster sauce; or it might be a haunch of
venison, or it might be a delicate dish of Chamois,
or still more delicate chevreuil, or a boar’s head.
Entremets innumerable sprang up reeking hot, till

every mouth watered with eagerness to be a
them.
But now there was a sound over their heads.

All, attracted by the sound, looked up; and a glass
globe, or bell, of sufficient magnitude to cover the
whole of the supper table, was descending gradually,
till at last the whole of the smoking viands were
covered by it, and the expectant guests could only
look longingly at the tempting dishes through this
transparent but impenetrable medium.

It must be owned that a look of disappointment
and impatience was rather general among the
company.

“What, my friends?” said the Giant, rising
majestically from his couch, “shall we eat and
drink ‘like brute beasts that have no understand-
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 153

ing?’ Up, up, my merry guests ” and let us
first sing

‘¢ Non nobis, Domine.”

Delighted, enraptured, were the ears of all at the
solemn harmony. So long as the sound of the
music echoed through the hall, the thoughts of
every one seemed entirely occupied with it. It
was not till it ceased that every one began to ask
his neighbour, where did the sounds come from?
Where did the voices come from?

They looked at the Giant, and at his diminutive
sister. Noone ventured to ask the question of |
either; yet they all settled it in their own minds
that those two were the only musicians.

Grace having thus been sung, up flew the great
transparent impediment with wonderful quickness,
and every one found his plate already smoking
with a liberal supply of something good to eat.
As for Atta-tatta-datta, nothing could equal her
attentions to the guests.

“ Heyday! Master Jack Stripling, La you are
eating your salmon without any lobster sauce to it!”

“There, take that,” said Poll Parrot, as the little
eee CC nen ——

154 A STORY OF A

lady poured the sauce into Jack’s plate. “And
much good may it do you! :

“Well, Squire Spindleshanks, I suppose,” said
the Fairy, “you want a slice of venison.”

“There it is, then,” said Poll. “ Eat away.”

“ What, some more turbot, Dick Stumpy?” And
the good lady helped him to some of the fin, with
plenty of shrimp sauce.

« Take care of the bones, Dicky,” said the Parrot.

“Well, Miss Martha Merriface, a little more
white soup? or will you have some cod and oyster
sauce? ”

“Yes, if you please, Ma’am,” said Miss Martha,
“only I had rather not have any of the cod’s liver
and oil, if you please, Ma’am.”

“Ha, ha, ha,” laughed Poll Parrot, “very good,
very good.”

But poor Michel was all this time very uneasy.
And no wonder. For though he saw plenty of
eatables in other plates, there was nothing in his.

At last the little lady, as she bustled about the
table, cast her eyes on a plateful of soup with no
one to eat it.
17
=? 7m
‘i
. : a
if R
a.
=

I
EN

=
-

WZ i I
ee r NY | /

’

Dy Wy
aN Nal = A NY Bx

ih
i)

4
A
Lae

Py)

RNG)

—3 yp

* ZW MY
Se A


GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 155

“ Why, how is this?” cried she. “Has anybody
run away? Let me look at my list.” And she
opened a little memorandum book. “Oh, I see
how itis. This is the poor muleteer’s place. I
dare say he is gone to look after his mules. And
now he will quite lose his dinner if he does not
come back directly ; for we make it a rule, if people
go away, to tap the plate, and then down it goes
out of sight directly. }

“ Here I am,” cried Michel, with all his might..
“ But I can’t get out.”

“Can’t get out?” repeated Poll. ‘‘ Ha, ha, ha.”

“What can we do for you?” said the Fairy. “I
suppose I must carry you across the table, chair
and all, to your proper place.”

The expectation of such a funny sight, made all
the little boys and girls leave off eating, and clap
their hands. And the Giant’s sister, laying her
wand on the muleteer’s head, lifted him up, just as
he sat in his arm-chair, and set him down by his
basin of soup.

Poor Michel was too much ashamed to say any-
thing, and fell to eating his soup without daring to
156 A STORY OF A

look up. Only Poll Parrot waddled up to him, and
twisting its head round, looked up into the mule-
teer’s face, and said very pathetically, “Won't do
so any more.” ‘This comical scene would have
made the children laugh a great deal more, if they
had not been so busy with their supper. It would
be endless to tell of all the good things that the
good-humoured little lady gave them. The most
astonishing part of the entertainment was the
dessert.

“« Would you like to taste some of the chimney of
my cottage, Miss Leila? ” said the Fairy. “It is
very nice, and not at all smoky.” And then she
broke off one of the chimneys of the little Swiss
cottage, which was composed of delicious sweet-
meats, and gave it to Leila. To some she gave a
great part of the roof; to another, one of the win-
dows, shutters and all. One ate up a door, and
Master Stumpy nearly choked himself with trying
to cram a whole staircase, banisters and all, into
his mouth at once.

Then they had sherbet, and ices of all sorts, and
fruit and wine in abundance; while the good-
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 157

natured Giant sat looking on as pleased and happy
as any one.

“My brother is very much pleased to see you all
enjoy yourselves,” said Atta-tatta-datta. “ But one
thing I must tell you, that as soon as he says
ENOUGH, he expects every one to leave off eating |
and drinking immediately.”

And presently, sure enough, he did say so.
However, one or two little boys were so busy
helping themselves to fruit, and made so much
noise cracking walnuts, that either they did not
hear, or did not heed, the Giant.

The consequence was, that one boy who had
thought there would be time to eat one more peach,
found it stuck to his mouth; and when he tried to
pull it away with his hand, he could not take away
his hand from his mouth. The same thing hap-
pened to a boy who was cracking a walnut with
his teeth.

But neither the Giant nor his sister took any
notice of their distress; only it made the rest of
the boys laugh at them.

In fact they were both too busy, the Giant and
his sister, about other matters.
158 A STORY OF A

“ Now, my good friends,” said the Giant, ‘“ that
you have all had a good supper yourselves, I hope
you will kindly get out of your chairs, and wait
upon some other guests that I am expecting.”

Every one of course got up from table imme-
diately.

“You will very much oblige me,” said the Giant,
“if you will all stand behind your own chairs.
Leila and Freddy know very well that I have some
odd ways of my own. But I have always a reason
for what I do. I am not surprised that Messrs. F.
and G. should think it not altogether fashionable
and comme i faut, that all the dishes should remain
on the table during the whole of the repast.”

“ Mrs. F.,” whispered Mrs. G., “ what quick ears
the Giant has got!” ,

‘¢ But I have my reasons,” he continued; ‘ pre-
sently you will know them. Get up, Moosey. Go,
fetch my ragged regiment.”

The elk roused himself, and stood erect. He
stood but for a second, as if to display hismagnificent
figure, and as he dashed in, so he dashed out;
bounding over the astonished heads of every one,
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 159

and disappearing through an opening in the
opposite wall, which, by some secret contrivance,
was made for him.

He was not long absent. A confused hum of
voices was heard.

“When I give a dinner or a supper,” said the
Giant, “I like to have not only a great variety of
dishes, but a great variety of guests. The im-
provements I have made in sub-marine travelling
have enabled me, with the greatest celerity and
despatch, to collect together, as on the present
occasion, about fifty miserable half-starved wretches,
from the four quarters of the globe; and it will be
highly amusing to observe how they will all most
cordially unite in one common cause—enjoying a
good hearty meal. You shall presently see Euro-
peans, Asiatics, Africans, and Americans, all sitting
cheek by jowl, with a thorough good understand-
ing, and in complete good humour, though scarcely
one of them will understand one word of what his
neighbour is talking; some are cripples, some are
blind, some as deaf as a post; all are ragged, house-
less, penniless; and especially, all are as hungry as
160 A STORY OF A

wolves. Oh, what havock they will make among
these few haunches of venison which you have left,
but particularly upon some joints of fat beef and
mutton which I brought from merry England
expressly for these hungry gentlemen.

« What say you? Areyou all content, in return
for the good cheer I have given you, and as a bond
of future friendship between us, to admit these poor
outcasts into your seats, and to stand behind their
chairs? ”

« Willingly,” said a chorus of many voices.
« Thankfully,” said another chorus of voices.
« Joyfully,” said a third chorus of voices.

« What! all willingly, thankfully, and joyfully ?”

« All!” cried every one in the room that could
wag his tongue-

« That is what I like,” said the Giant. “ But
my ear is so acute that I can distinguish every
separate gound; and it certainly strikes me that I
ought to have heard two more voices Cry out ‘ All.’
What can this mean? Ah! I see! There are two
boys that have got their mouths stopped. Well, I
dare say they have had peaches and walnuts enough
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 161

by this time, and would gladly employ their hands
now in helping others instead of themselves. Touch
them with the tip of your wand, sister. And now
we can all of us hold up our hands together, and
bid these poor travellers welcome.”

The Giant as he spoke held up both his hands
above his head. Every one immediately did the
same. But now, to the surprise of all, they found
that they each grasped something in their hands ;
and, looking up, discovered that it was a wreath
of flowers, lighted up with innumerable little sparks
that shone like glow-worms among the flowers ;
and, as soon as they attempted to lower their arms,
the wreaths fell out of their hands, and formed a
brilliant circlet round their heads.

At this moment, when the vast hall was thus
illuminated with so many happy faces, the hang-
ings of the wall where the elk had disappeared, were
again seen to move. The antlers of the noble
animal were again in sight: but he did not, as
before, bound over the supper-table. He advanced
with slow and steady steps: not that he felt the
burden of the bright car to which he was attached;

M
162 - --. STORY OF A

but he had a task set hin, and he seemed to feel
proud of executing it properly- |

It was indeed a very motley group that the car
contained.

There was surprise in the countenance of each,
and their haggard faces expressed anaiety. But
hardly could it be said that any joy was felt on
their first entrance. They saw, indeed, a noble
feast prepared—their noses sniffed the savoury
smells. And they even asked themselves whether
it could be possible that such a feast was prepared
for them. ‘The answer, which returned into their
own bosom was, “No; it is impossible.”

But, when the active little Fairy, seemingly ere
they were aware, having thrown over each, as she
assisted them from the car, 4 light mantle of
cerulean blue, placed them in their proper places
round the supper-table, their eyes seemed to gather
brightness from the brilliancy which surrounded
them: and when once more the solemn music
sounded through the hall, and they saw the faces
of above fifty children, all expressive of devout
attention, their own thoughts seemed all to flow in
GOUD-NATURED GIANT. 163

‘the same direction; and the four quarters of the
globe seemed convoked to a unanimous feeling of
devotion. |

No sooner had the music ended than every one’s
plate was full; and every mouth at table busily
engaged.

A little incident now occurred, which must not
be overlooked. The Californian adventurer, who
had been in earnest conversation with Filippo
during their supper, watching his opportunity,
whispered a word in the ear of the little lady as she
passed by him.

“J hear him,” called out the Giant. ‘ Your re-
quest is granted. It does you credit. Those three
mén are released from the labyrinth; and I think
they will not abuse our kindness.”

‘“We will remember it with gratitude all our
lives,” said the men, as they entered the hall. In
fact, the Giant had so placed them in a part of the
labyrinth, that during the supper they could see all
the happiness that was going on in the hall, though
they could not then enter and partake of it.

“ By the bye, now I think of it, I have occasion

M 2
164 A sTORY OF A

‘for some of those gay golden garments that you
wear, Mr. Traveller, if you can spare me them.” —

« Ah, my good adviser, that I can most willingly.
I hate not only the sight but the very name of
gold!” } |

“Good!” said the Giant. “ Suffer my sister’s
parrot just to climb up on your back; the sagacious
pird knows all the fastenings of your gay but in-
convenient dress; for he assisted me, in your sleep,
to put them on; he will soon loosen your dress.”

Tt amused the children to se how cleverly the
awkward-looking pird clambered up the man’s
back, and how expeditiously he undid the fasten-
ings of the dress.

“All right,” said the Parrot, when he had reached
the man’s shoulders; “ shake away.”

The man shook himself very obediently, and
down fell all his golden coverings, leaving him in a
very decent sober dress of gray cloth.

“There, now,” said Poll, “' Richard’s himself
again!’”

« The bird is. a conjuror,” said the man. ‘* How
should he know that my name is Richard?”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 165

“Why,” said the schoolmaster, with great sim-
plicity, “‘he need be no conjuror to know that. Have
not we two been sitting together at supper, and
renewing old acquaintance, and talking over old
times when you and I were schoolboys like these
young urchins here?» And have not you been
telling your adventures, and I mine? And did
not I call you Richard? And did not you call me
John? He must bea one bird if he does not
know my name and yours.”

“ Stupid bird?” said Poll. “Stupid bird! John?
John! O fie! John!” and then the Parrot began to
sing the old song,

“ Fie, nay, prithee, John,
Pray don’t quarrel, man.”

While this was passing Atta-tatta-datta’s little dog
had been very busy about the legs of the school-
master’s old friend Richard.

John the schoolmaster at length, casting his eyes
on the ground, saw that the little dog had been
drawing together in a heap, with great labour and
assiduity, his friend Richard’s cast-off clothes, and
was dragging them away with his teeth, when Poll
166 - A STORY OF A

Parrot# mounting on the dog’s back, sang out in a
gruff nasal voice,
“ Clothes, clothes ¢
Any old clothes ?
Give money for your old clothes !”’
“(Q Richard,” said the admiring pedagogue, “what
a moral pantomime are that dog and bird acting!
Oh why will not the stern rules of prosody suffer
me to correct the Roman Satirist, and say

«© Nil habet infelix divetee durius in se,
Quam quod ridiculos homines facit.’ ”

“But then how about the grammar, Sir?” asked
Master Jack Stripling.

“In a case so singular,” said the schoolmaster,
“] think we must not be too particular. But what
are these strange noises that I hear, as if a thousand
mill-dams were bursting from their bounds and
rushing down upon us?”

« The noise that you hear,” said the Giant, “ is
only that of the waves of the sea rolling over our
heads; for we are now crossing the English Channel.
And sorry am I to add, that I must now, for the
present at least, bid my company farewell. Much
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 167

shall I rejoice, if, at no distant period, circum-
stances should bring me again in communication
with some at least of the happy faces which I see
around me. In the meantime I am sure that all
will with gratitude remember the humble efforts
made to blend amusement with instruction.

“By a peculiarly expeditious method of my own,
which, at present, it does not suit my purpose to
explain to any one, I shall now, in a very few
minutes, be able to put into a profound sleep, and
in that state to replace, all those about me in their
proper homes. The poorest will not complain
when, without expence and without fatigue, they
find themselves transported back to their own.
country, with an unexpected belly-full of victuals,
a good cloak on their backs, and a piece of real
Californian gold in their hands.

« And even my two young favourites, Leila and
Freddy, will not lose my esteem if I find. that, in
the enjoyment of a happy home with their now
contented parents, they should, for awhile at least,
forget their wonderful adventures with Eireeneeste-
paidagathoongigantaiosphilos, or,

THE Goop-NATURED GIANT.”
168 A STORY OF A

AN EPISODE WHICH CONCLUDES THE
CONCLUSION.

“ How very cold the wind blows on my bed, dear
mother!” said a little girl about ten years old, with
a pale and sickly countenance; ‘and I am shiver-
ing all over.”

“JT will put the baby in bed to you, my child,
as soon as he is asleep, and he will help to keep you
warm, till 1 have time to come to bed myself.”

“OQ mother, you are now SO tired, and look so
ill that I am sure you ought to be in bed.”

‘Indeed that is too true, Charlotte. But who,
then, will put the house in order for me for to-
morrow? and you know that to-morrow is Sunday,
and 1 must go out and buy a loaf of bread this even-
ing, for we have nothing in the house, you know.”

“Oh, how hungry I am '” cried a chubby-faced
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 169

boy, half waking up from sleep at the sound of
the words, loaf of bread.

“ Go to sleep, Jack,” said the mother, “and if
you are good I will go and buy a loaf.”

The infant had now fallen asleep in her arms.
So she laid him in the bed by the side of his sister
Charlotte. | |

“© mother,” she said, “ how I wish I was a little
older and a little stronger, that I might help you.”

“ Never mind, dear child; the Almighty will go
on helping us, if we go on praying to Him.
Heartily I thank Him for you, young as you are ;
for you have been, and are, a great comfort to me
in my trouble, and a great help, and a blessing too,
for you have kept my heart from breaking.” __

“You must not break your heart, mother; for
if you do, father will break his heart when he comes
home; and then we shall be all in a bad way.”

“ Ah, when will your father come back to us,
Charlotte? But hush! we are disturbing the baby;
and Jack will be waking up again. Go to sleep,
my child, and I will make all the haste I can, and
come to you in bed.” |
170 A STORY OF A

And then the poor wretched mother stole out in
the dusk of the evening to the nearest shop, to pro-
cure what little food her little means enabled her.

When she returned, she returned to a house of
sickness. The infant indeed was sleeping in his
sister’s arms, but that sister was sleepless, and a
burning fever was upon her.

The mother, exhausted with fatigue sna uncon-
scious of the state of her daughter, threw herself
on the bed, and quickly fell into a heavy slumber.

The daughter, her head wandering from the

effects of the fever raging in her veins, talked
rapidly and incoherently; sometimes in a low
whisper to herself, then in louder tones to the baby
as it slept, rocking it in her arms rapidly, then
singing to it, and laughing loudly in her delirium,
till at length the mother awoke from her short sleep
to a full consciousness of her daughter’s dangerous
sickness and her own helpless misery.
_ “Try and go to sleep, Charlotte,” said the dis-
tracted mother, taking the infant into her own arms.
“Do try, my child.” |

“Qh, no, mother. I shall get up and make
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 171

breakfast for you and father.” And then the
poor girl attempted to rise ; but giddy with sick-
ness, she presently fell back, helpless and moaning,
in the bed.

‘“God’s will be done!” cried the sad, afflicted
mother. ‘QO Richard, could you see us now, surely
you would grieve to have left me to fight alone
against such poverty and such sickness! But what
can I dare do for this poor child? It is now mid-
night. I dare not leave her to seek forhelp. The
Doctor who attended me and my babe lives two
streets off. How can I leave this sick delirious
child to go so far?” While these perplexing
thoughts passed in her mind, she recollected the
police. One might pass that way. Yet the street,
or rather lane, in which they lived was narrow and
not much frequented, and, except she watched with
the window open, she could hear no one pass, and
even then could not easily make herself heard.
Still, though it was a forlorn hope, she determined
to try. Some one might hear her and come to help
her. |

The difficulty, however, of even doing this was
172 A STORY OF A

great. Several times she laid down the infant to
go to the window, but was recalled by the urgent
cries of her suffering daughter. When at last she
snatched a moment to open the casement, the driv-
ing rain and wind forced it back with a violence
that threatened to demolish the panes of glass; and
a street lamp that glimmered faintly ata distance
served only to show the darkness of the night.
Once, as she crossed the room to fetch a cup of
water to cool the burning fever of her child, she
fancied she heard a sound of a voice. She listened.
She heard it again. But it was not in the direction
of the street. Presently she was convinced that it
proceeded from the adjoining house. This gave her
but little hope. She knew scarcely anything of the
inmates. For when Richard Mason, her husband,
had left her to seek his fortune in California (as
we have seen), the poor woman was obliged to seek
a cheaper lodging even than that cheap one in which
they had hitherto struggled on through their dif-
ficulties ; and she neither knew, nor was known
to, any one in her neighbourhood at this time. .
_ If she could have distinguished the conversation
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 173

that was passing in the adjoining house, she would
have been made much happier.

As it was, she could only hear the sound of voices.
She little knew that two good people were then
talking about her and her family.

These were Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis. They were
not very old, but they were very old-fashioned peo-
ple—I mean what the world calls old-fashioned
people. What they had all their lives been accus-
tomed to think right, they still continued to think
right. And what they thought right to say or do,
that they said or did, without caring a brass button
for the consequences. They had as few faults and
failings as most human beings. People that were
determined to find out something to blame (for,
strange as it may seem, there are people who spend
their time in little else than picking holes in the
conduct of their neighbours)—these people found
out that poor Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis were a great
deal too good-natured ; absurdly so; ridiculously
so; they had no patience with them; too easy by
half. The way in which they allowed themselves
to be imposed upon was really quite shameful,
174 A STORY OF A

quite disgraceful. They quite deserved to be cheated.
They had heard that they had lost a great deal of
money by stupidly submitting to the grossest im-
position. They did not pity them in the least.
Such sort of people are better without money than
with it.

Well, there might be some sort of truth in what
these “busy bodies in other men’s matters,’ chose
to say of old Jarvis and his wife.

Very true it was that this same couple, who were
now living with no other attendant than an old
female servant, pinching themselves in every way
‘, order fo make both ends meet, had, not five years
before, been living in ease and affluence.

They had then a snug little box of their own at
Tooting. They kept a smart active lad with a piece
of gold twist round his hat, who sat behind in the
low four-wheeled chay drawn by a fat lazy skew-
balled cob with a hog mane, whenever Mr. and Mrs.
Jarvis took an airing; if airing it could be called to
jog at asnail’s pace through all the narrowest and
dustiest bye streets in the hottest days of the dog
days. But Mr. J. had his reasons for what he did.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT

175
And so had Mrs. J. her reasons for

approving of
everything her husband did




) a ¥ \ i
Vi F Xp 7
if
A | |

f Te: i
i a ea

i 4 a :
i * |
oS a Pea i
ra YT .. ai

Hee < 4 bt

—
os

‘‘ What are you about, my dear?” said Mrs. Jar-
vis, waking up from her first sleep and adjusting

her meen “T thought you had been in bed an
hour ago.”

“So I was, my dear,” responded her husband.
“ But I thought I heard a noise, and—”

“What! housebreakers ? O dear Mr. Jarvis, pray
lock the door, and set the chest of drawers against it,
and get into bed, or we shall be all murdered.”
176 A STORY OF A

“ Do not alarm yourself, my dear, the door is locked,
but I have nearly dressed myself, and then am going
to unlock the door and to see what is the matter.”

“OQ Mr. Jarvis, let me entreat you. You are
sacrificing your life—your valuable life. Unlock not
the door. Come into bed, I implore you; and bring
the poker and the tongs and the fire-shovel, and the
hearth-brush, with you. How can you contend
alone with three stout men armed with blunder-
busses and black faces ?”

“Do not alarm yourself, my dear,” repeated Mr.
Jarvis. ‘There are no housebreakers on the
premises: nor do I hear any voices in our house.
But in the adjoining house, that poor lonely woman
seems to be in distress. I fear some one of her
children is taken ill.”

Mrs. J., being now relieved from her first alarm,
listened attentively, and confirmed the suspicions
of her husband. The moaning of the poor girl
she could distinctly hear.

“You are right, Mr. J., quite right, as you
always are,” said the good lady. ‘Do what you
think best, and that must be best. Only do pray
put your nightcap on under your hat, Mr. Jarvis,
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 177

for the night is cold; and take a piece of camphor
to keep off infection.”

The obedient Mr. J. did as he was bid; and
sallied forth.

Mr. J. was essentially what might be calleda puffy
man; indeed, most men who weigh from eighteen to
twenty stone, might safely be called puffy men.

What he did hastily could hardly be done
secretly.

If he tumbled out of bed with incautious haste,
not only his own house shook from its foundation,
but even the adjoining tenements were convulsed.

So forth he sallied in the dead of night. A most
portly and unromantic gentleman—little did he
covet adventures. Many and useful were the
lectures and the admonitions which he gave to the
giddy, restless, adventure-seeking youth of both
sexes in his neighbourhood who sought his acquaint-
ance; for his acquaintance (poor as he was, and
little as he had to give, except advice), was sought,
and eagerly sought, by all the young folks about
him.

It mattered little in his mind whether the party,

N
178 A STORY OF A

to whom advice seemed needful, were rich or poor,
high or low. He had a sort of abstractedness
from all minor matters that, like a long-legged
horse carrying his rider dry through a muddy
stream, kept him clean and dry shod as he travelled
along the bespattering roads of this dirty world.

He neither courted the favour, nor feared the
frowns of the rich, the powerful, or the learned, on
the one hand; nor did he despise the ignorance, the
coarse vulgarity of the unwashed and unlettered
multitude.

“Tom,” said he, one day bluntly, to the aspiring
eldest son of a rich tallow-chandler, “‘ Tom, you're
a fool.” Tom felt that he ought to be affronted,
and would have been (for he was the most self-
conceited coxcomb in the whole street), but for the
good-humoured smile of the good old gentleman,
who immediately added, ‘‘ However, Tom, come this
evening, and we will smoke a pipe over this affair
of yours; and, when you have told meall, you shall
have my best advice.”

Tom accepted the invitation; smoked the pipe;
washed down the old gentleman’s advice in a
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 179

tumbler of half-and-half, but went home resolved
to follow his own conceits, of which he lived to
repent bitterly.

“My good young lady,” said Mr. Jarvis, on
another occasion, “ you tell me that you have been
invited to become an inmate in this new establish-
ment of ‘Sisters of Mercy,’ as they ostentatiously
style themselves. ‘Take my advice. Refuse their
invitation. Il] chosen is the name they have given
to their habitation. [Il chosen the title they ex-
clusively claim for themselves. [ll chosen their
spiritual guides. Home! do they call the place
which they inhabit? Home should be the abode
of peace, and harmony, and concord. Alas! what
concord and harmony can there be where the
Master of the home deserts his home to which he
has invited these simple children, leaving them a
legacy of polemical theology with which to poison
their own minds and the minds of the ignorant
poor of whom they constitute themselves the
visitors? No, no, abide in thy calling, my good
child; abide in thy calling.” She did so abide, and
‘“‘with God,” as the story will tell anon.

N 2
180 A STORY OF A

And so, this puffy good man bustled out of his
house in the dead of night to do his deed, not of
darkness, but of true Christian charity.

Ina second or two he was ringing gently at, the
door of his next neighbour.

“Oh, you are an angel,” sobbed out the poor
woman, as she opened the door.

“ Not I indeed, Ma’am; Iam only your next-
door neighbour, come to know what’s the matter.
Somebody ill, eh?”

«“ Well then, you are one of the angels my
daughter saw in her dream, poor dying child.”

“Dying, dying! oh no, nonsense. We must
have no dying, my good woman, at least not yet.”
And up scrambled Mr. J. into the sick chamber.
With a little knowledge of fevers and such matters
which he possessed, he soon satisfied himself that
the case was not yet quite hopeless. ‘“‘ Where lives
a doctor?”

“ Ah, Sir, a good step from here, and I dare not
leave—”

“ Of course not, I shall find him. There,” taking
a little phial from his pocket, “mix a tea-spoonful

GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 181

of that in water, and give it to the poor girl. It
may help to check the fever a little till the doctor
comes. Which way did you say?”

“Qh, Sir, you must go straight up Puddle Street
and down Muddle Street, into Slip Slop Square,
and then just at your right-hand corner lives
Doctor Cutandecomeagain.”

‘“‘ No, no, we won't have him. Where does Doctor
Elcho live ?”

“In the very next street above; close to Airy
Place. But, bless me, Sir, he will be too grand for
the like of us.”

“We shall see, good woman, we shall see.”

And down rushed Jarvis out of the house, like
a shot.

“ My dear friend Jarvis, what on earth brings
you here at this time of night?” exclaimed Doctor
Elcho, putting his night-capped head out of his
bed-room door.

The good man’s mission was soon explained, and
the worthy doctor promised to be dressed and at
the house of sickness with all speed.

Jarvis departed in great mental delight at his
hopeful progress. |
182 A STORY OF A

“We'll cure this girl, please God; hang me if we
don’t,” he mumbled to himself as he picked his
way up Muddle Street in the dark.

Absorbed in his own thoughts, he struggled on
unconscious for a little while, though something or
other, everandanon, gave a nudgeatthecalf of hisleg.
The outward man at length gave the alarm. “¢ What
the dickens?” (it was an old expression of surprise
handed down from his ancestors, but without any
explanatory note or comment) “ what the dickens?”
He put his hand to his attacked calf; it was a fat
calf, a very fat calf, of course, Mr. Jarvis being a
very fat man. There was tangibly a sort of slimy
moisture on the surface, “‘ What the dickens? ”

Jarvis was a man of courage, he feared no mortal.
And no mortal had ever less cause than he to fear
anything ¢mmortal.

But there was a sort of human natural affection
of the nervous system for an instant only while he
stooped down to examine something very small and
very black that touched him, and had evidently
life init. “Ah! doggie, doggie,” at length he said
coaxingly, ‘‘what the dickens do you do here?”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 183

Now doggie every one knows signifies, in coaxing
language, little dog. And verily it was a little dog,
a very little dog; the most tiny dog imaginable,
but still it was a dog, and possessed a dog’s intellect.
I should like to meet with a man wise enough to
explain to me the precise nature of a dog’s intellect,
or will any one be hardy enough to deny him some
sort of zntellect?

** "Twixt that and reason, what a nice barrier !
For ever distant, yet for ever near.”

This dog like other dogs had his méter, and he
knew how to exercise it. He had made himself,
noticed. He had gained his first point, and now
he saw his way clearly before him; the worthy
Jarvis was for progressing. But “ something
stronger mastered him.”

“You must back to the Square,” said the dog,
or seemed to say, looking up at the lamp-post
which threw a light on his little bright eyes.
‘There, study my countenance, Mr. J., and follow
my advice.”

Jarvis was the best of linguists, he could read
and understand even dog language.
184 A STORY OF A

“T will go back,” he said; ‘“ there must be some
meaning in this dog’s entreaties.”

Following the dog back into the Square, he was
led to what seemed a mere black lump of clothes.
It had no perceptible motion, and was in no definite
shape. He touched it however, and at once knew
that a human being lay there, for the touch caused
a low long moan which could not be mistaken; it
was not a drunken man’s moan; it was the moan
of sober, undrunken misery. The dog poked his
nose under the chaos of rags, and gave a shove and
a push as much as to say, “Mr. Jarvis, J cannot
move him, but you can ; make him get up, if pos-
sible.”

Mr. Jarvis set to work accordingly, in his own
blunt way, as if he had known the wretch inti-
mately. ‘It's no use your trying to stand yet, you
can’t do it; youre too weak, you can only sit up.
There, that’s right. Now lean against my fat side,”
said he, fumbling in his coat for a small pocket
pistol containing some veritable eau de Cognac.
“ Not so bad, eh? old fellow 7

The recipient murmured, * Good!”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 185

“This is an oddadventure,” thought Jarvis; “‘what
can we donext ?” He made a desperate attempt to
raise the man on his feet, but it would not do. The
cordial, however, had brought him back to con-
sciousness. ‘ Let me rest a little longer,” he said,
“J think I can then get on a little further; [ want
to get home.” But the very attempt to utter the
word home, altogether overpowered him. He re-
peated the word in almost a yell of despair,
“home!” and again fell heavily on the ground. Jar-
vis was perplexed, even the diminutive dog seemed
puzzled. He looked up at Jarvis, and Jarvis looked
down on him, mentally ejaculating, “ You are a well-
meaning dog, but you have got me into an awkward
scrape.” The dog, as if aware that matters were
becoming critical, cocked up his tail, turned away,
and sniffed the wind, giving at the same time a
short nervous sort of cough or bark. It answered
its purpose; Jarvis looked round, and, in doing so,
observed a light moving across the Square. “ Holloa,
there, Police, help,” he cried; the call was obeyed—
not indeed by the policeman—(for he happened not
to be in the Square at that time) but by good
186 A STORY OF A

Doctor Elcho, who was plodding his way home-
wards with the scanty light of his hand-lantern
after he had safely and satisfactorily established
the fair young nurse by the bed-side of her sick
charge.

“ Why, Jarvis, my good friend Jarvis, what's the
matter now?”

But before we hear our friend Jarvis’s answer
to the doctor’s inquiry, we must return for a short
space to the house of the sick daughter.



“ Another ring at the door!” said the busy
mother, soon after Jarvis’s departure.

“ Perhaps another angel,” quietly whispered the
sick daughter.

“Ah, my child, already our good neighbour's
draught has done you good.”

“It has, indeed, mother: but keep me quiet, let
me sleep.”

The prudent mother obeyed, and with a lighter
heart went down to open the door to a fair young
creature, wrapped in a plain warm night cloak, who
said timidly, “ Will you let me in, good woman?”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 187

“ Ay, that I will, Madam; for you too are an
angel, though you will not own it.’’

“ Indeed, no; I will only own that I heard by an
unknown little messenger just now, as I was getting
to bed, that you have a sick child, and I am come
to offer you whatever help is in my power.” And
saying this, she too entered the sick chamber. But
she offered no advice, she proposed no remedies.
The sick daughter slept, and by her side, silently
this fair daughter of ease and affluence seated her-
self, to ‘‘ watch” and to “pray.” When the sick
girl opened her eyes, after a short slumber, she
opened them on this fair and pleasant vision. She
opened her eyes but for a few seconds only, but
the smile of benevolence, of Christian charity, of
heavenly love that her eyes encountered, was alone
a healing balm, beyond expression comforting, and
again she closed her eyes in quiet sleep.

Again the house bell rang, and now good Doctor
Elcho appeared.

‘¢ And who are you, young lady ?” whispered the
doctor, after he had cautiously felt the sleeping
patient’s pulse, and satisfied himself of the treat-
ment necessary to be pursued.
188 A STORY OF A

“ Tam the nurse, Doctor; tell me what to do, and
I will do it. ‘Tell me when to speak, and I will
speak; tell me when to be silent, and I will be
silent.” |

The doctor smiled, “ Will youso? Good. Take
this prescription to the chemist in the next street;
ring the night bell, and insist that they prepare it
instantly,” and he looked incredulously into the
fair creature’s face.

“May I name your name?” said the self-ap-
pointed nurse, rising.

“ Certainly you may, and more than that I will
myself attend you,” and they left the house to-
gether.

Never were two minds apparently more dis-
similar than the doctor’s and his new acquaintance ;
one, calm, quiet, deliberating, the other all enthu-
siasm, full of the ardour of enterprise, and yet
‘n that short walk which they took together, how
unexpectedly did their minds assimilate! ‘The one
was engaged in a duty, the very romance of which
‘n her enthusiastic mind greatly increased the
pleasure of performing it. The other in the
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 189

ordinary routine of his profession was merely per-
forming a daily and almost hourly duty. From
his friend Jarvis he had heard of this fair devotée.
He knew and applauded his friend’s advice to her,
and now was most eager to encourage her to carry
it out.

There was that in her language and her argu-
ments which showed him that she was not to be
diverted from her general principle of action, but
that by judicious reasoning she might be taught to
modify it and bring it into a sobriety of system
greatly to the benefit of herself and others. With
this view he not only in the present instance, but
whenever opportunity occurred, facilitated the
exercise of her benevolence.

Acting always under the sanction of the incum-
bent of the parish in which she resided, she daily
found new incentives to exertion. And in her own
person setting a bright example of self-devotion,
she by degrees enlisted with her in her holy duties
many others whose minds had before been occupied
with the idlest of worldly frivolities. And the
obscure district in which these unnoticed, and
190 A STORY OF A

unknown, and wnnamed Sisters of Charity, and of
Mercy, worked in their joint labour of love, issuing
forth each from their several homes as occasion
might require, and returning to their domestic
circle blessed with the sanction of parents or other
relatives, experienced a solid benefit, increasing
from year to year, and giving a promise of
blessings which time would never destroy.

‘A bad case, Doctor, a bad case,” said Mr. Jarvis,
and he briefly explained his canine adventure, and
his present difficulties.

“ Flere is indurated excrescence on left side,” said
the doctor, as he pinched the recumbent patient all
over, secundum artem. “ Suppose we examine this
more closely; hold the lamp, J arvis.

«“ Gold!” sighed out the sick man, “ pure gold!”

“A decided case of mental aberration,” said the
doctor.

The little dog howled.

“] doubt it,” said Jarvis.
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 191

“See, he sits up again, another cordial and per-
haps he will stand on his legs.”

Jarvis was right. This second application of the
eau veritable produced a marvellous effect ; he stood
erect.

“Gentlemen,” said the sick man, ‘‘mine is a
plain tale, and soon told. Three days ago I was a
gold-digger in California.”

“Demented,” whispered Dr. Elcho. “I told you
so, J.”

“Three days ago in California?” said J.
‘““ Nonsense.”

‘The last two days I have spent in travelling
from Shakspeare’s Cliff down to London, to return
to my wife and family, who live, I have reason to
suppose, somewhere in this neighbourhood.”

“Friend Jarvis,” said the doctor, slapping the
worthy gentleman smartly on the shoulder, “I see
daylight, the man is in his right mind; and, more
than that, my word for it, on his right road.
Friend, art thou not rightly called Richard ?”

’

“ Of course I am,” said the man; “but how

should you know it?”
192 A STORY OF A

“TJ will tell you. Not two hundred yards off, is
a poor sick child.”

‘Not my Caroline?”

“Yes, your own daughter; and her mother,
your wife, in a state approaching to desperation,
waits upon her.”

“© God!” groaned the man, “ this is dreadful ;
there is a daughter dying; wife distracted!” and
again he fell down as if ina fit; then suddenly
starting up, he cried out “False, false, the gold
cloth breeches I sent them, the gold jacket too. No,
wretch that I am; they know nothing of this. But
the Giant’s gift? the hundred ounces of gold? Ay,
ay, luave that. Sir, good Sir,” said he, “ I have
here, wrapped up in a bag, a hundred ounces of
pure gold; take me to my dying daughter, and my
distracted wife, and the gold is yours. Oh! quick,
quick, quick ?”

“ My good feilow, your daughter, I trust, 1s not
dying, and your wife, [ hope, is not quite dis-
tracted ; compose yourself, calm yourself, lean on
my arm and that gentleman’s, and we will take
you to your wife and family.”
GOOD-NATURED GIANT. 193

“ And the little dog?” asks the shooting young
idea, “I see all about the doctor and the good
Mr. Jarvis taking our old Californian acquaintance
and restoring him to his family; I apprehend how
some screamed, some cried, some fainted; and how
at last the daughter got well; and all were happy,
because the husband had been taught wisdom by
adversity. The moral is good, very excellent good,
and I understand it. But the little dog? where is
he, and where is the moral of the dog?” Alas!
reader, the dog is, and the moral is. But it is an
ungrateful, unpalatable, yet a very wholesome
moral. Except for the dog—the dog’s instinct as
we call it (for man is so self-conceited that he will
needs give a name to that of which he knows not
the nature)—except for the dog, and his despised
instinct, the dying Californian adventurer would, in
all human probability, have died in Slip Slop Square;
the wife would have died of grief and a broken
heart, and the sick daughter would have followed
her mother. The tiny brute, having performed its
allotted task, loitered about the neighbourhood,
unheeded by all—uncaressed — unfed—unhoused ;

Oo
194 A STORY OF A GOOD-NATURED GIANT.

humiliating emblem of human forgetfulness, at
least, of benefits conferred, if not of wilful ingrati-
tude: until after three days of watching and
fasting, it lay, feeble and exhausted, at the door of
Mr. Jarvis. ‘The attention of the good couple as
they issued forth for their morning’s walk was
irresistibly fixed on this poor dog.

“ Wife,” said Jarvis, “I know this dog; much
I have to reproach myself for my cruel neglect;
but let us retrieve the past,” and he took in and
fed and fondled the neglected little creature; they
became vehemently attached to it. But they
were not long permitted to retain it. A gentle tap
one evening, not at the door of the house, but at
the door of their sitting-room, was followed by the
entry of an extremely tiny woman, who with a
curtsey and a smile, saying only, “ This is my
dog,” was welcomed by a yelp of delight from the
little pet, and, ere Mr. Jarvis and his wife re-
covered from their surprise, the little dog had dis-
appeared with its long-lost mistress

ATTA-TATTA-DATTA.

Lonvon: Hope and Co., Printers, 16, Great Marlborough Street.


Seay

anes



aS











Package Processing Log















Package Processing Log







12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM Error Log for UF00002134_00001 processed at: 12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM cover1.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM cover1.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00001.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00001.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00004.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00004.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00005.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00005.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00006.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00006.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00007.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00007.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00008.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00008.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:05 PM 00013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00025.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00025.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00036.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00036.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:06 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:07 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:08 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00131.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00143.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00143.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00144.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00144.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00146.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00146.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00147.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00147.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00148.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00148.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00149.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00149.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00150.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00150.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00151.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00151.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00152.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00152.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00153.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00153.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00154.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00154.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00155.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00155.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00156.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00156.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00157.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00157.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00158.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00158.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:09 PM 00159.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00159.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00160.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00160.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00161.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00161.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00162.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00162.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00163.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00163.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00164.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00164.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00165.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00165.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00166.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00166.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00167.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00167.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00170.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00170.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00172.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00172.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00173.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00173.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00174.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00174.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00175.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00175.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00176.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00176.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00177.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00177.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00178.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00178.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00179.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00179.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00180.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00180.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00181.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00181.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00182.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00182.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00183.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00183.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00184.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00184.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00185.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00185.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:10 PM 00186.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00186.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00187.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00187.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00188.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00188.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00189.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00189.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00190.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00190.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00191.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00191.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00192.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00192.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00193.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00193.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00194.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00194.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00195.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00195.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00196.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00196.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00197.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00197.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00200.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00200.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00202.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00202.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00203.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00203.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00204.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00204.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00205.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00205.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00206.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00206.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00207.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00207.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00208.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00208.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00209.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00209.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00210.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00210.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00211.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:11 PM 00211.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM 00212.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM 00212.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM 00213.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM 00213.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM 00214.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM 00214.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM 00215.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM 00215.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM 00216.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM 00216.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM back.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM back.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM spine.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM spine.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:50:12 PM