Citation
Little Kitty Brown and her Bible verses

Material Information

Title:
Little Kitty Brown and her Bible verses
Creator:
Trusta, H., 1815-1852
American Sunday-School Union ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia ;
New York
Publisher:
American Sunday-School Union
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
94 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Family -- Religious life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
School Stories -- 1851 ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Baldwin -- 1851 ( local )
Genre:
school stories ( aat )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Attributed to H. Trusta (real name, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps).
Statement of Responsibility:
written for the American Sunday-School Union.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026917503 ( ALEPH )
23373869 ( OCLC )
ALH6445 ( NOTIS )

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Kitty’s House.—p. 6.



LITTLE KITTY BROWN

BIBLE VERSES.





WRITTEN FOR THE AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION.



PHILADELPHIA :
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,
No. 146 CuestnuT STREET.

New York, No. 147 Nassau Street.....Boston, Wo, 9 Cornhill
Lovisviniz, Vo. 103 Fourth Street.





Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1851, by the
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,

in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of
Pennsylvania.



Aap No books are published by the American Sunpay-scn00L Union
without the sanction of the Committee of Publication, consisting of
fourteen members, from the following denominations of Christians, vis.
Baptist, Methodist, Congregationalist, Episcopal, Presbyterian, and Re-
formed Dutch. Not more than three of the members can be of the
same denomination, and no book can be published to which any mem
ber of the Committee shall object.



LITTLE KITTY BROWN

AND HER

BIBLE VERSES.

CHAPTER I.

“ A whip for the horse, a bridle for the
ass, and a-rod for the fools back,” said
little Kitty Brown.

Mr. arown, Kitty s father, smiled and
said, *.)..

. Did you select that verse yourself, my
little daughter?”

“No, sir,” said Kitty: “mother found
it for me, and I learned it. I thought it
was a very pretty verse.”

‘So it is,” said her father.

Kitty was a little girl only about six
years old. She had just learned to ready
Her father told her it would aa? him be

:
>







6 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

she would commit one verse from the
Bible to repeat perfectly every morning
at prayers, and this (with her mother’s
assistance) was her first selection.

Kitty lived in the country in a white
house, which had a large yard in front
of it. This yard was full of cherry-trees,
and there was a path through the middle
of it which led down to the gate. The
gate opened on the road, and the road
ran along the side of the common, and
just across the common, where the road
turned, stood a little red school-house.*
It was there Kitty went to school. On
the week-days she went there to learn to
read and spell, and on the Sabbath she
went there to Sunday-school.

It was Monday morning when Kitty
repeated this verse about “A whip for
the horse,” &c., and soon after family
prayers she made ready for school as
usual. She put on her warm coat and
comforter, and her nice-little hood and

* See Frontispiece. &



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 7

mittens; then she took “ Snow-bird,” (for
that was the name of her little sled,)
kissed her mother a pleasant good-by,
and started off.

She ran down the path in the yard,
and across the common, and Snow-bird
flew along behind her. Soon she was in
the school-house entry. There were a
great many little boys and girls there,
but there were none with rosier cheeks
or a happier heart than Kitty Brown.

Kitty found her own nail, and hung
up, first her sled and then her other
things, and then went right in. Her
mother did not like that she should be
late, so she would not stop to talk. She
took her seat like a good little girl, and
she thought Miss Preston (the teacher)
looked pleased that she was so punctual.

And indeed Miss Preston was pleased.
The other children, who stopped to talk
about their sleds in the entry, did not get
seated before the bell rang for the open-
ing prayer. So any could not bow orn



8 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

to worship God reverently, as Kitty did,
but they were standing up, some in the
passage-ways of the room, and some in
the middle of the floor. These late-
comers looked uneasy and ashamed.
They did not hear the prayer either.
Miss Preston seemed to be very sincere
in her prayer. She thanked God that
he had taken such kind care of all these
little children; that none of them had
died; that none of them were sick ; that .
they all met again well and happy on
that beautiful winter morning. She
prayed that they might love God with
all their hearts, and that they might
begin a new week determined to be obe-
dient and faithful in all their studies, so
that they might please him.

There was one boy who did not hear
one word of this prayer. He stood out
by the door. He was the last of all. He
had gone away to slide instead of coming
directly to school, as his mother told him
to do. He loved play better than study.



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. Gg

His name was Frank Hastings. He was
the largest boy in school. Disobedience
and tardiness! This was a poor beginning,
Frank, of a new week !

When Miss Preston saw how late he
was, she reproved him. This made him
sulky, and he shuffled along to his seat,
opened his desk, threw out his books, and
then slammed the cover down so as to
make a great noise.

Miss Preston spoke to him again. This
seemed to make him still more angry.
He did not try to learn his lessons. He
spilled ink all over his copy-book, and
was glad of it. He got down to the foot
of his class in spellmg. He had not one
of his sums right. He paid no atten-
tion to his reading. He was so naughty,
that Miss Preston would not let him
go out at the time of recess. But this
only seemed to make him still more
angry.

When recess was over and the children
came in, little George Smith was passing



10 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

him, and he put out his foot and tripped
him up. George fell against the bench
and cut his lip. It hurt him badly, and
he cried. Miss Preston then thought
Frank had been a naughty boy long
enough, and she determined that she
would have no more of his ill-humour;
so she called him out into the middle of
the floor.

“Frank,” said she, “ you have been a
very naughty boy. You have been dis-
obedient and angry, and I am going to
punish you.”

Frank turned very red in the face, and
hung down his head. He knew that
Miss Preston made a business of it when |
she did punish. Miss Preston opened
her desk and took out a broad flat ruler.
Little Kitty began to tremble all over,
and her heart beat fast.

“ Hold out your hand, Frank.”

Frank did not mind. Miss Preston
took his hand, and struck it two or three
times hard, with the ruler. Frank’s



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 11

face grew redder and redder, but he would
not cry. Little Kitty was crying.

“Now,” said Miss Preston, “ you may
go and stay alone in the entry until I
call you in.”

Frank held up his head, and marched
stiffly and proudly to the door. He was
still very angry. |

“Come back, Frank,” said Miss Pres-
ton.

Frank hesitated.

“ Come back,” said Miss Preston, again.

Frank had to come.

“ Hold out your hand.”

Frank held out his right hand, the one
which had not been struck.

“T want the other,” said Miss Preston.

Now the other was still smarting with
pain, but Frank had to give it, and the
very first blow from the ruler hurt him
so much, that he cried aloud, and held
down his head to protect his hand, and
the second blow of the ruler struck his
forehead and made a slight cut in itt A



12 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

little blood dropped on his cheek, though
he was not much hurt.

Kitty thought he was almost killed,
and she sobbed aloud. Her little heart
was broken. She felt as if she never
should love Miss Preston again in the
world. She was very glad when school
was out. She did not stop to slide with
the children, but ran home and Snow-
bird after her as fast as both could go.

She ran into the parlour. Her eyes
were red with weeping, and she told her
father and mother the whole story as well
as she was able, and how she had made
up her mind that she never could love
Miss Preston any more.

“JT am sorry,” said her mother, “ that
Frank was such a naughty boy.”

“So am I,” said Mr. Brown, “and I
think Miss Preston did right to punish
him.”

Kitty looked up “ astonished.
“Why, father ?”

“ Yes,” said he, “that is Bible doctrine,



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 13

that is the way Solomon told us to do,
and he ‘was avery wise man. What was
your verse this morning, Kitty ?”

« A whip for the horse, a bridle for the
ass, and a rod for the fool's bac ng

“Yes, a rod for the fool,’ said Mr.
Brown. “A fool means here, Kitty, one
who is naughty and wicked, as Frank
was this morning. It means that such —
an one must be punished and made to
do better. Miss Preston tried hard to
persuade Frank to be a good boy by
speaking to him, but he would not mind,
and it was her duty to make him obey,
and she had to punish. him. Now you
watch, and see if Frank does not behave
himself this afternoon; and, if he does, —
you may be sure his whipping did him
good, and you may like Miss Preston
again as well as ever.” :

Kitty watched, and found Frank did
behave himself very well. He had been
quite subdued. He was obedient to
Miss Preston, and Miss Preston was very



14 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

kind to him. So Kitty felt quite happy
again. .

When she was warming her feet that
night, before she went to bed, she thought
it all over, and concluded that Solomon.
was a very wise man indeed, to know so
long beforehand what was best for Frank
Hastings.





AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 15

CHAPTER II.

“Moruer,” said Kitty, one Saturday
afternoon, “may I go and slide on the
pond, back of the school-house A great
many little girls are going there.”

“T do not know,” replied Mrs. Brown.
“] think you are almost too small, Kitty.
I am afraid you will get hurt.”

“No, I will not, mother. Rosa Day
is going. She will take care of me.”

“ Well, if Rosa is going, and will look
after you, you may go.”

Kitty jumped up and down and clapped
her hands. Then she hurried and put
on her things so fast, that she was quite
oft of breath. I do not know but she
thought the pond would run away if she
was not quick. She took Snow-bird, and
away she went across the common, in the
little foot-path, to Rosa’s house. Rosa
saw her coming and opened the door for

. 2





16 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

her, and helped her and her sled over
the steps. Rosa was three or four years
older than Kitty. She was very sweet-
tempered and obliging, and everybody
loved her. .

Rosa made ready at once, when she
saw Kitty was in a hurry, and went right
out with her.

“Tet me lead you, Kitty,” said she.
“Tt is slippery.”

Kitty put her hand in her’s and looked
up in her face. Rosa had a sweet smile,
and Kitty thought her beautiful. Her
words and tones of voice, too, were so
pleasant, that Kitty always felt quiet and
happy by her.

It was not far from Rosa’s house to
the school-house, and directly back of the
school-house was the pond, and behind
the pond was a little hill. From one
point of this hill there was quite a de-
scent, so that the children starting from
there on their sleds could be carried quite
across the pond. Only one sled, how-



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 17

ever, could go at a time. When Rosa
and her little friend reached the pond,
it was already covered with children.
Frank Hastings was there at the top of
the hill. He was determined to have
the first slide, and he had just pushed
Henry Niles into the snow. Henry was
angry, and was making up snow-balls as
large as his little hands could grasp, to
throw at him. Some of the children said,
“That's right, Henry, give it to him !”
and others said, “Never mind; go it,
Frank!” and there was a great uproar.
But as soon as the children caught’ a
sight of Rosa Day, and looked up into her
pleasant face, there was a division in the
camp. They crowded around her and
forgot all about the quarrel. They seized —
her other hand, two or three of them,
and one little girl came up and tried to
pull Kitty away. “You have had your
share of Rosa,” said she, “and now it is
my turn.” |
“No,” replied Kitty, “ Rosa is to take



18 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

care of me all this afternoon. My mother
said so.”

“Tl tell you what we will do,” said
Rosa. “ You and Kitty each take hold of
Snow-bird’s bridle, and then hold on to
my cloak, and the rest all follow with
their sleds, and we will go. up the hill
and form a lineof soldiers, single file, ac-
cording to our height, and then we can
all slide in turn. Frank has had his
ride.” Frank, by this time, was quite
across the pond, and no one seemed to
notice him excepting Henry Niles, who
was still throwing snow-balls after him,
but he was glad to give it up and become

“one of Rosa Day’s soldiers. She arranged
all her company, and a pretty line it was
“too, each standing by a sled, with,
‘¢ Hearts light and faces bright,”
waiting, in perfect good-humour, his or
her turn to slide. They were all there
but Frank. He was sliding rather sul-
lenly on the pond.
“Come, Frank,” said Rosa, “here is



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 19

your place next to me. I am alittle taller
than you, you know.”

If anybody in the world but Rosa
Day had called him, he would not have
gone, but there was no resisting her sweet
voice and pleasant words. So he came
and took his place, and there was no
more quarrelling. *

The afternoon passed very quickly and
very pleasantly. The old school-house
began to throw its shadow on the pond,
and then the little ones knew that it was
time to go home. They followed in
Rosa’s wake, as flowers turn to the sun,
so long as they could, and then separated.
Kitty was telling her mother at the tea-
table what a pleasant time they had on
the pond. ’

“Tt was all because Rosa went, mother,”
said she. “We should not have hada good
time at all if it had not been for Rosa,
for Frank was there, and he would have
wanted the place all the time.”

“ Does Rosa keep you from quarrelling %”

2%



20 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“TI do not know, mother, but the
children are always happy with Rosa,
she is so pleasant, and when they are
happy they do not quarrel.” |

“ Pleasant words are as an honeycomb,
sweet to the soul,” said Mr. Brown.

“Why, that is my verse,” said Kitty.

“Yes,” said her father, “ and you have
seen this afternoon what it means, Kitty.
The children all enjoy Rosa’s company
because she has such pleasant words and
pleasant ways about her. They enjoy
her as much as you did your honey in the
honeycomb the other night.”

“I do believe they do,” said Kitty,
laughing. “She always makes us have
a good time.”

“T hope,” said Mrs. Brown, “ my little
girl will remember how sweet ‘ pleasant
words’ are to her little companions.”

“Yes, mother, I think I shall,” said

.Kitty with a very grave face, which

almost made her mother smile. “I think

I must say my verse to Miss Preston, and
\ tell her it means Rosa Day.”





AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 21

CHAPTER III.

One Sabbath morning Kitty Brown
woke up and reached out her hand to
open the shutter which was near her bed,
that she might let in a little ight; but
no light came. The window was all
blocked up with snow. |

“Why, Eliza!” said she to the nara
girl, “ what is the matter ?”

“ Matter enough,” said Eliza, “we have
had a great snow-storm. It has snowed
all night long, and it’s snowing now, and -
it is burying us all up. Old Jane, under
the hill, is all buried up. You can’t see
any thing of her house but the chimney.”

“Why, dear me!” said many, “how
can I go to church ?”

“T guess you cannot go,” said Eliza,
“nor any of the rest of us, either. I

© think it’s a chance if the minister gets
there.”



92 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“Oh, he will go,” said Kitty. “ Minis-
ters always go. They must go, you
know.”

“But if he can’t he can't,” said Eliza
sharply.

Kitty made haste and went down into
the breakfast-room. Her father and
mother and Aunt Russell were there.
Aunt Russell was sitting before the stove
reading the Bible. She looked quiet and
happy.

“Only think,” said Kitty, after she had
bidden them all good morning, “ Eliza
says Jane is buried up, and the minister
cannot get to church.”

“Come here and look,” said her father.

Kitty looked across what seemed a sea
of snow. Fences and’walls had all dis-
appeared, and in the distance, where
Jane’s cottage used to be, there was only
a chimney sticking out of a snow-bank,
and no smoke came from it.

“Why! why!” said Kitty, “will she
not smother ?”



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 23

“No,” said her father, “but she can
get neither vood nor water. The farmers
must come out with their teams and dig
her out, and then they will break a path
for the minister and some of the rest of
us as far as the church.”

“Shall you go, father ?”

“No, not this morning.”

“T think it would be pleasant,” said
Mrs. Brown, “to have ‘meeting’ at home
to-day. The girls will soon be through
their necessary work, and then we*will
call them all in.” .

“Yes, it would be very pleasant,” said
Aunt Russell.

“A meeting for worship at home!” said
Kitty ; “but then who would preach ?”

“Your father,” said her aunt, “and °
you can help sing. You can be one of
the choir.”

“J. should like that,” said Kitty.
“When shall we begin ?”

“ When the bell rings we will assemble
in the parlour,” said her mother. »



94 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“Shall we put on our things?” said
Kitty. | ’

“No,” said her mother, smiling, “ the
house is warm. We shall not need to
have our things on.”

“ And what shall I do till meeting
time ?” said Kitty.

“Study your Sunday-school lesson,”
said her mother, “and we will have Sun-
day-school at noon.”

Kitty began to think they should have
a very pleasant day of it, notwithstand-
ing the storm: She imagined that she
should like her father’s preaching.

After breakfast she sat down by the
window to learn her lesson, and pretty
soon one team, and another, and another,
‘ came ploughing along, through the snow,
to Janes house. Then the farmers
pulled off their coats, and went to work
in right good earnest, to dig the poor old
woman out. The drift was very deep,
but they soon made a hole in it. By-
and-by, an end of the house, then a win-



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 25

dow, was visible; and soon, the door
and steps were uncovered, and a path
dug to the well and to the wood-pile.

“Many hands make light work.” It
did not. take the farmers long. By the
time old Jane’s house was fairly in sight
it had stopped snowing, and the sun
shone out brightly. The teams on their
way home broke a path up to the meeting-
house, so that a few neighbours could get
there, and all this was accomplished by
the time the first bell had rung for wor-
ship. Kitty watched them, and forgot
to study her lesson. |

“TY am afraid you will not be ready
for Sunday-school,” said her Aunt Rus-
sell.

“Qh, yes, I will,” said Kitty. “Iam
going to study now, very hard, and you
must not talk, aunty.”

She studied with a great noise a few
minutes, and perhaps she thought that
was studying hard. Then her book
dropped, and she began to look out of



26 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

the window again, and to drum on the
chair with her feet.

“Aunt Russell, how long will it be
before our meeting-time comes ?” said she
at length.

“T thought I must not talk,” said Aunt
Russell.

“Oh, yes, you may tell me that,” said
Kitty.

“ Well, in just half an hour.”

Kitty took up her book and began to
study hard again, still looking out of
the window, as before. Pretty soon she
jumped down, and exclaimed,—

“ Aunt Russell! Aunt Russell! There
is the stage, and it has stopped at Mr.
Johnson’s, and it will stop for us, I do be-
lieve.”

Aunt Russell got up and looked out
of the window. Kitty's father and
mother came in just at this time, and
seemed in a hurry.

“ Pettingill has got his stage out, I see,”
said Mr. Brown; “so I think we can go



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 27

to church, after all. We must hurry, for
they will be here in a minute.”

“ And I too?” said Kitty, clapping her
hands. She thought it would be a very
fine thing to ride to church in Pettingill’s
stage.

“Yes,” said Mrs. Brown, “if you can
dress yourself.”

Kitty was ready as soon as the rest.
Indeed, they were all ready when the
stage stopped for them.

“[ will take you in my arms,” said
Kitty’s father to her, “ and the rest must
step in my tracks as well as they can,
down to the gate.” |

As they were going out of the door,
Kitty looked over her shoulder at Aunt
Russell. Something in Aunt Russell’s
face attracted her attention. There was
a very happy, peaceful, glad expression
on her countenance. She wondered with-
‘n herself if it waswbecause her aunt was
going to ride in a stage. The wind blew
back her cloak as she tried to shut the

3



28. . LITTLE KITTY BROWN

eens td

door after her, and Kitty saw that in her
hurry she had forgotten to také off her
apron. |

“ Aunty,” said she, “ you are going to
meeting with your apron on!”

Her aunt smiled, took it off, and threw
it back into the entry. That pleasant
smile seemed to stay about her lips.
Kitty looked at her several times while
they were riding to church. She knew
that Aunt Russell felt happy about some-
thing.

Frank Hastings and Charles Smith
were in the stage, and they next stopped
for Rosa Day. Pettingill’s stage seemed
to be made of India-rubber. It held all
the neighbourhood. The last one who
got in was the minister. He looked
pleased when he saw so many people,
and especially so many little folks out.

They got to the church without any
trouble. The minister preached a good
sermon. His people had an idea that he
always did his best on a stormy Sabbath.



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 29

Perhaps he did. People that make an
effort to go to church through difficulties
are generally paid for it. This day his
sermon was a very comforting one. Aunt
Russell seemed to enjoy every word of
it. The hymns which he gave out, too,
were such as the children understood,
and could sing, and they seemed to enjoy
it. It was, on the whole, a delightful
Sabbath.

Just before evening prayers that night,
Kitty sat by the breakfast-room fire,
thinking about it. Aunt Russell came
in and sat down by her. It seemed as
if she still had the very same smile on
her face, which she had when Kitty told
her about her apron.

“Aunt Russell,” said Kitty, “what
made you look so pleased this morning
when you saw the stage coming ?”

“I was glad,” said she, “when they
said unto me, Let us go into the house of
the Lord.”

Kitty was still for a moment.



30 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“Aunty,” said she then, “is that a
Bible verse ?”

“Yes, my dear.”

“T think it is a very pretty one,” said
Kitty.

“So do I,” said her aunt.

“T wish you would teach it to me, and
let me say it at prayers to-morrow morn-
ing. Father will like it, I know.”

“ Well, I will,” said her aunt.

Kitty soon learned it, and she did
repeat it the next morning at prayers
very correctly, and her father was much
pleased.





AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 31

CHAPTER IV.

Not long after this great snow-storm,
there came a change in the weather.
The sun did not shine. It was foggy
and warm. The snow did not melt and
run off in streams of water, but seemed
to be sinking silently into the earth. It
was in just the right state for children
to work with. Quite a fortification had
been thrown up around the pond, back
of the school-house. This was pierced at
regular distances, so that the children
might look through.

Some of the younger boys, among whom
was Henry Niles and George Smith,
thought they should get along better by
themselves; so they left the fort and came
round into the little yard, in front of the
school-house. They decided to build a
snow-man, and were quite ambitious to

have him as tall as Miss Preston. They
gi |



82 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

worked away all the play-time they had
during a whole day, and had him built
about up to his knees at the close of the
afternoon recess. It was their intention
to remain after school and finish him.
Now the days were beginning to
lengthen a very little. It was lighter
through those western windows, when
the first bell rang for the children to lay
aside their books, and take their Bibles,
and they could find their places more
readily. There was something cheerful
about the hour of evening prayer. The
children felt quiet. Their day’s work
was done, and at this season of the year
there was generally a glorious sunset to
be seen through those old windows. So
it was often the case, that when they
were dismissed they were all in good
humour. It was so this evening, though
there was quite a rush for hats and cloaks.
Henry and George, being among the
smaller boys, had their nails at the end
of the long passage, which ran along by



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 83

the wood-closet, and the passage was so’
narrow, and there were so many in it,
they could not get out as soon as they
wanted to. Frank Hastings hung his
cap near the door; so he was off almost
as soon as school was dismissed.

When Henry and George were fairly
out, they ran immediately to finish their
- gnow-man. How astonished they were
to find Frank Hastings there before them,
working away like a beaver!

“It’s just like him,” said George, stop-
ping short, “he must have his finger in
everybody's pie. We may as well give
it up.”

“J shall not, either,” replied Henry
Niles,—his face reddening very much.
“It’s none of his business, and he shall
let it alone, or I'll give it to him!”

Henry cleared the steps at one leap,
and ran through the snow. He was very
angry. He would have been, glad could
he have struck Frank Hastings, and hurt
aim. As soon as he reached him he



84 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

caught him by his coat, and began to
kick him. “Let that man alone,” said
he: “ He’s mine.”

Frank turned round, but the beauty
of those western clouds, or, probably, the
beauty and peacefulness of that evening
prayer had subdued him, and the spell
was on him yet. With perfect good
humour, he twisted himself out of
Henry’s hands, and said, pleasantly,

“T thought you would like my help
to finish him. You can’t get him done
before dark, and the snow may be all
gone to-morrow; but if you don’t want
any help, that’s another affair.”

As water puts out fire, this reply put
out all Henry’s anger in a moment. He
stood, ashamed and silent, before Frank
Hastings. : |

“Yes, we do want help,” said George.
“Do help us, Frank. We are not tall
enough to put his hat on.”

“Henry does not want me to,” said
Frank.



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 85

“ You may,” said Henry, “if you won't
call him your's.”

“T don’t care whose you call him,”
said Frank, and the three boys went good-
naturedly to work.

Rosa Day was standing in the path,
and Kitty Brown on the other side of
Miss Preston. They were both listening
to the boys, and so was Miss Preston,
though she seemed to be trying to lock”
the school-room door. |

“A soft answer turneth away wrath,”
said Miss Preston, as she finished locking
the door, and put the key in her basket.
“ How true that is!”

“Yes, ma'am,” said Kitty, thinking
Miss Preston spoke to her. “I know it.
That is one of my verses. Sometimes I
say it at prayers; pretty often I do, be-
cause it is a short one, and I can think
of it easily.”

Miss Preston and Rosa smiled. Then
they stood a few minutes to see the
snow-man go up, but they left before





36 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

he had his head on, as it was growing —
chilly.

The next morning they found him
standing there, large as life; taller even
than Miss Preston, cocked hat and all
on, and a very grand looking snow-man
he was; but it is quite certain he never
would have been finished, had it not
been for that “soft answer” which “ turned
away” that little boy’s wrath.





AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 37

CHAPTER V.

Tue thaw which I spoke about in the
last chapter continued for some time.
The snow-man fainted away and disap-
peared. The fog thickened, until one
afternoon, when the children were dis-
missed, it turned to rain.

“What shall we do?” said they. “ We
shall get wet through and through, walk-
ing in this ‘ slush.’ ”

“ Let us wait a few minutes,” said Miss
Preston. “ Perhaps some one will come
for you.” |
- Miss Preston was right in this conjec-
ture, for soon Mr. Brown’s well-known
old covered sleigh was seen coming
across the common. ‘Tom (Mr. Brown’s
boy) whipped up his horse and came to
the door on the full gallop. The children
laughed and shouted, for both Tom and



88 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

his establishment were great favourites
with them. |

‘You cannot all ride,” said Miss Preston '
to the eager little group. |

“Pretty much all, ma’am, I guess,” |
said Tom. “If you will please get in
first yourself and take Kitty, we will |
manage the rest.”

“T am afraid we shall like it better
than your horse,” said Miss Preston.

“Oh, never mind him. He’s used to
it,” said Tom. Miss Preston laughed and
stepped in with Kitty.

“Rosa Day must come next,” said
Kitty; so Rosa got m, and then a great
many other little girls.

“Now, boys,” said Tom, “cling on the
runners.”

I do not know where Tom stood. I
know he was not in the sleigh, and that
he looked round on his load with great
satisfaction as he started off, and with
the same good humour and the most
untiring patience, he dropped them at






AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 39

the different houses where they be-
longed. | |

Just as he was driving up to Mr. Niles
to leave Henry and his little sister, there
was a great laughing among the boys
who were standing on the runners. The
reason of it was this. Sarah Niles had
stayed at noon. She had a very little
coffee-pot, full of milk, with her dinner.
There was some left, and, fearing she
might spill it when getting out, she found
a little hole in the canvas covering of the
sleigh, and, putting the nose of the coffee-
pot through it, she poured it out, and it
had run down into a boy’s neck! This
made the children laugh so much, that
they did not mind the rain at all. At
last, all got home safe and happy.

This was the end of the thaw. It
grew colder that night after sun-down;
the rain turned into a glazing storm, and .
in the morning the fog had all disap-
peared, and the sun shone out brightly

on a world of icicles. Tall trees and
4



40 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

tender shrubs, branch and twig and gos-
samer grass, were all cased in ice, and
shining like diamonds.

Kitty Brown could scarcely eat her
breakfast. She was running every minute
er two to the window. She could think
of nothing but a fairy land she read about
once.

“T don’t know how you will get
to school to-day, Kitty,” said her mo-
ther.

“Cannot Tom carry me?” said Kitty.

“T do not dare to let him take the
horse out,” said her father. “It is so
slippery. He is not very well shod for
ice. Besides, the branches of the trees are
constantly breaking, the ice is so heavy
on them, and the horse might get fright-
ened. I think I will walk over with you
myself.”

Kitty was pleased with this. She liked
to go with her father anywhere. He
always made it pleasant for her.

“You had better let the fairy land go,



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 41

and eat your breakfast,” said Aunt Rus-
sell, “or you will not be ready.”

So Kitty hurried and was quite through
by the time the prayer-bell rang. Her
father read in the Bible; but Kitty did
not pay very good attention, for she was
looking out of the window. Her father
closed the Bible, and waited for her to
repeat her verse. She was thinking
about the diamond trees, and did not
know even that he had stopped reading.

“Repeat your verse, my daughter,”
said her mother.

Kitty started and blushed. She was
quite confused, and could not immediately
recall one. After hesitating a while,
she said rapidly: “ God 1s a spirit, and
they that worship him must worship him
‘in spirit and in truth.”

No remark was made on her hurried
manner. Soon after prayer, her father —
called her, and told her he must go with
her then, as he was obliged to go down
street. It was me early, but Kitty



42 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

knew the school-room would be warm,
and thought perhaps Rosa Day would be
there. She was soon ready. Aunt Rus-
sell helped her. Then she kissed them
all good-by, and, taking her dinner-basket
in her hand, went out with her father.

She found the walking very slippery ;
indeed, she could scarcely stand in their
own path, but the path across the common
was better. On each side of this path
were magnificent elm trees, which com-
pletely shaded it in summer, but in winter
they were upright and bare. They were,
however, neither upright nor bare on this
morning, when Kitty Brown walked there
with her father, but cased in thousands
of glittering icicles. Bending beneath the
weight of their shining armour, branch
bore down upon branch, forming what
seemed a solid roof of diamonds over the
path. As the wind swayed them to and
fro, they groaned and creaked, and now
and then came tearing and crashing
down.



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 43

————

Kitty was bewildered and a little terri-
fied. All thoughts of fairy land merged
into thoughts of heaven. To her awe-
struck mind, it seemed as if God dwelt in
that shining roof above her, that she could
see him and hear him. She clung closer
to her father, and almost trembled at
the sigh of the wind among those icy
trees.

She was not afraid to talk to her father;
so she tried to tell him how she felt.

“Tt seems to me,” said she, “as if God
was up there. Does not he live in such
a place? If it was not so bright I do not
know but I might almost see him.”

“You cannot see him,” replied her
father. “God is a spirit, and they that
worship him must worship him m spirit
and in truth.”

“Then he is not a shining light?” said
Kitty, “and I cannot see him or hear
him; but don’t I feel him ?”

“ You feel that there is a God, my little
Kitty. You know there must be a God

4%

'



44 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

to make such a beautiful world as this.
Just look back through that path.”

“T cannot,” said Kitty, “it puts my
eyes out.” |

“Glorious! glorious, indeed !” said her
father.

Kitty was silent until they had nearly
reached the school-house.

“Father,” said she then, in a gentle
tone, “I don’t know but I said that verse
too fast this morning, about ‘God is a
spirit. I was not thinking much about it.”

“T saw you were not, my little daugh-
ter,’said her father. “There is a great deal
of meaning in every verse in the Bible,
and we ought to think about them when
we repeat them, Kitty. The Bible is
God’s book, and God is a great God.
Though we cannot see him, he sees us.”

“Yes, sir, I know it,” said Kitty.

They were now on the school-house
steps. Rosa Day was there, early as it
was, and she came, with her pleasant good
morning, to meet Kitty.



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 45

CHAPTER VI.

Nor long after this glazing storm, there
came a very “cold snap.” The children
crowded around the old Franklin stove
in the school-room, with aching fingers
and blue noses. There was more con-
fusion than warmth there.

Miss Preston came late that morning,
and the children observed, almost as soon
as she entered, that she looked quite sober.

‘“‘ What is the matter ?” said she, almost
immediately, and not in a very gentle
tone. “Stand back, children. Do you see
_ how you make it smoke ?”

The children pushed back. Frank
looked over his shoulder at another boy,
and winked. This was as much as to say,
“She’s cross to-day !”

Miss Preston tried to fix the fire, but
she found the wood had been sawed too



46 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

long for the stove, and there was no way
to prevent its smoking.

“What shall we do?” said she, in a
despairing tone, to Rosa Day. “It will
not burn, and the room is as cold as a
barn.”

“Perhaps some of the boys might saw
the sticks in two,” replied Rosa. “The
man has left his saw and horse here.”

¢T will! I will! I will!” was heard
from half a dozen.

«Frank and Henry may go,” said Miss
Preston, “and the rest of you may put
on your over-coats and take your seats.
There is nothing gained by standing here.
We will open the school.”

Miss Preston’s prayer was short, and
her voice seemed sad. Some of the
children observed that she frequently put
her hand to her head.

Frank brought in his arms full of wood,
and Miss Preston asked Rosa Day if she
would attexd to the fire, which the child-
ren also noticed, as it was unusual. Then



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 47

she attempted to hear the class in spell-
ing, and the little spellers soon found out
it made no difference whether they
spelled right or wrong. All at once,
Miss Preston turned very pale, and laid
her hand down upon her desk. The
school-room was very still. In a minute
or two, Rosa Day stepped softly up to
her and spoke to her.

“Yes, thank you!” said Miss Pres-
ton. Dad

Rosa got her a cup of water, and she
revived a little. Soon, she felt able to
hold her head up again. She talked
a few minutes with Rosa, keeping her
eyes half-closed, and then spoke to the
children.

“T have a very violent head-ache,”
said she, “and I find that I shall not be
able to stay. Lam going to leave you in
charge of Rosa. I trust you will do the
best you can to make it easy and pleasant
for her. I shall take it as a great kind-
ness to me if you behave well.”



48 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

The children looked as if they meant
to do their best, and Miss Preston went
home.

They did behave very well, indeed,
through the morning; but, at the noon
recess, they became rude and noisy.
Frank addressed Rosa as “School-
ma'am Day,” which made the younger
ones laugh, and set them a bad example.
Then he began running over the tops
of the desks, and, as he had heavy boots
on, he made a great deal of noise.
Soon, other heavily-booted boys chased
him. Rosa was seriously afraid that
some of the neighbours would come in to
see what the disturbance was. She sat
in Miss Preston’s chair, thinking what
she should do. Finally a bright thought
seemed to enter her mind. She opened
Miss Preston’s desk, and took out half a
sheet of foolscap paper. She ruled two
parallel lines, about an inch apart, and,
placing the sheet on the desk, with pen
and ink by it, she wrote something in



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 49

pencil on a scrap of paper, and laid it on
top of the sheet of paper.

This done, she looked up at Frank
Hastings, who was just then trying to
wrench out some iron spikes from the wall.

“Frank,” said she, “will you come
here a minute ?”

“ Certainly, school-ma’am Day.”

“Don’t call me so, Frank. Call me
Rosa.”

Frank ran across the desks, and jumped.
down, making a great noise.

“ What do you want?” said he.

“JT want you to do some printing for
me if you will. You print so much
better than I do.”

“Print! I don’t want to print.”

“Qh! it is only four words ; do, please,
Frank. Here is the paper, and here is
the copy.” .

“Ts that all?” said Frank.

“Yes, that is all.”

“I must do it with a pencil, first,” said

Frank.
5



50 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“ Well, I'll sharpen one for you!”

“Now, how large do you want the
letters ?”

“ Why, as wide as between those lines.”

Frank went to work, and the school-.
room was comparatively still.

“ Shall I ink it?” said he.

“Yes,” said Rosa.

Frank inked it.

“Now, what is to be done?” said he.

“T will dry it first,” said Rosa, “and
then I shall want you to help me some
more.”

Rosa dried it.

‘Now, Frank, won't you get a couple
of nails, and nail it up there over the
fire-place, as high as you can reach? I
will hold the lower side.”

Frank was quite willing to do this.
The printing was nailed up, and then the
children began all at once to read, “ Studi
to be qui-it.”

“Srupy TO BE QUIET,’ said Frank.
“Can’t you read straight ?”



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 51

“That is some of Rosa Day’s composi-
tions,” said the children, “to make us be
still.”

“The spelling might be mended,” said
some one.

“No, it is not Rosa Day’s,” said Kitty
Brown. “It is in the Bible, I know, for
it is one of my verses.”

“No, it is not in the Bible,” said some.

“But I know it is,” persisted little
Kitty. “Is it not, Rosa?”

“Yes,” said Rosa, “and I will show it
to you in Miss Preston’s Bible. Here it
is, Frank. Hold it so they can all see
it.”

The children were all satisfied that it
was in the Bible. !

“ Now, believe Kitty Brown, next time,
will you ?” said Frank. “She knows more
Bible verses than any of you.”

“Or you either, Frank,” said Henry.

“ Well, did I say she didn’t?”

“What does it mean, Rosa?” asked

some one.
0



52 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“ Study to be quiet :” it means don’t dis-
turb other people. Make a business of
*t to see how little you need to disturb
other people,” said Rosa, hesitating a little
how to express her thought. “ I suppose
it means, wherever we are, we must make
a real study of it, to see how we can help
disturbing others.”

“Yes, that is what it means,” said
Kitty Brown. “My father explained it
to me, but I do not remember his words.”

“Tf we study to be quiet,” said one little
girl, “then we must not run any more
on the tops of the desks, because that
disturbs others. Must we, Rosa?”

“{ think not,” said Rosa, smiling.

Frank began to whistle.

“ Let us all sit down around the stove,
and eat our apples, and tell stories,” said
Rosa. “The youngest must begin, and
everybody must tell something.”

This plan pleased them all very much,
and the was no more noise of any conse-
quence. If there came an outbreak, some



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 53

little finger pointed up to Frank’s print-
ing, and the noise soon stopped. The
children really seemed, after this, to
“study to be quiet.” They all of them
respected Bible verses.

Miss Preston did not return, so Rosa
took her place in the afternoon. She
was gentle and pleasant, and the children
were obedient and studious, and they got
along harmoniously together.

At length, golden light began to stream
in through those western windows. The
sun was going down, and it was time to
dismiss school. Rosa asked the children
to read in the Bible as usual. Her heart
was beating fast, for Miss Preston had
left her a prayer to read aloud. She was
timid about it. She was afraid the great
boys would laugh at her. But when
Rosa felt it was her duty to do any par-
ticular thing, she always did it, cost
what it might. So she read the prayer,
though her voice trembled and tears stood
in her eyes. The great boys did not



54 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

laugh, and Rosa felt happy that she had
done it. This is the way we all feel,
when we make’ a proper effort to do
right.

hay
ZIONS
A \YXS

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AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 55

CHAPTER VII.

“Herre, Kitty,” said Eliza, one day.
“Your mother says you must have on
your other frock, and a white apron, be-
fore you go to school.”

“Why? What for?” said Kitty.

“ Because you are going to some meet-
ing or other.” |

“Meeting! What meeting?”

“T don’t know. You must ask her or
Aunt Russell.” ,

“ What is it? Do tell me, aunty.”

“Tt is a meeting of the maternal asso-
ciation, Kitty.”

“ Shall I come out of school ?”

“School is to be dismissed at three
o'clock.”

Kitty jumped up and down. It was
her favourite way of expressing pleasure.

“Oh, I am so glad! Ishall like that,”

said she.
5x



56 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

Kitty hurried off to school and told the
children about it, and Miss Preston found
them in very earnest conversation on the
subject.

“Are we going to be dismissed early,
to go to the maternal meeting?” Rosa Day
asked her.

“Yes,” said Miss Preston, smiling, “and
we will spend what little time we have
in making preparations for it. You may,
each of you, select a hymn to say, and
study it, and I will hear you repeat it.”

The children hurried to their seats,
and soon, buzz, buzz, went many little
lips. Miss Preston heard their hymns
as fast as they were learned, and three
o'clock soon came. Then she dismissed the
school, and the children were soon ready,
and she was ready, and they all went out.
The children waited in the yard, while
she locked the school-room door, and
then followed close behind her. She took
the path which ran on the south side of
the common, and walked along until she














———_
—————

They were both ‘listening to the boys, and so was Miss
Preston though she seemed to be trying to lock the
school-room door.—p. 35.






AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 59

came to a sudden turn. She followed
the turn, went a short distance, and then
struck off into a broad path which led
directly up to the door of a large white
house. Here she stopped and rang the
bell. Her little flock quite covered the
steps,—as they looked up at her with
bright and smiling faces.

“Knock off all the snow from your
feet,” said Miss Preston.

There was a great stamping. The
children were in earnest about it, and
the servant who opened the door stood
and laughed. |

“That will do,” said Miss,Preston ;
“ now we will go in.” |

“ Walk in here, first, if you please,”
said the servant.

They followed her into a large dining-
room, and took off their coats and hats.
Then she opened the parlour door, and
they went in there. Miss Preston spoke
to the lady, but the children stood still



60 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

and said nothing. They did not know
what to do. |

“Tet the children take seats on these
benches,” said the lady. The benches
had been arranged around the room,
but there were not quite seats enough
for all of them. Kitty Brown and one
or two other little girls were left stand-
ing.
“The little girls can sit on these
crickets,” said the lady. So she placed
two or three crickets right before the
fire. Kitty sat down on one. There
was a bright wood-fire. The hearth was
swept clean, the andirons shone like gold,
and the fender before the fire (made of
green wire and mounted with shining
brass) Kitty thought was very beautiful.
Kitty warmed her feet, and then ven-
tured to look around the room. The
walls were hung with pictures in little
_ black frames. Kitty thought these very
handsome too. As she was looking, she
saw her Aunt Russell and her mother, and



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 61

she smiled and looked very happy. When
the room was full, the lady of the house
opened the meeting with reading and
prayer. She then asked Miss Preston
if the children were prepared to repeat
any thing. Miss Preston said they had,
most of them, learned hymns expressly
for the occasion.

“ Frank Hastings,” said she, “ will you
come and say your hymn ®”

Frank came out rather awkwardly.

“Go and stand by the lady, and make
a bow before you begin,” whispered Miss
Preston.

Frank did so, but he repeated his hymn
very rapidly. He did not say it near so
well as he had done in the school-room.
He was a little frightened. After he had
taken his seat, other boys and girls came
up.. Some did well and some did not.
Rosa Day repeated a long piece of poetry,
about the blind man whose sight was
restored. Bie

“That is beautiful,” said the lady,



62 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

smiling, “and you have said it very cor-
rectly, Rosa.” |

Rosa blushed a little at being praised.
After Rosa, a very little girl went up to
the lady. She stood twisting up the cor-
ner of her white, apron, for she had for-
gotten every word of her verse.

“Can you say any thing?” said the
lady, taking her kindly by the hand.

“ Yes,” said the little girl:

“Now I lay me down to sleep,

I pay the Lord my soul to keep ;
If I should die before I wake,

I pay the Lord my soul to take.”

The children laughed at this, but the
lady kissed the little girl, and told her
she had done very well. So she went
to her seat quite comforted.

After her, Kitty Brown went up.
Now Kitty had learned two verses of,

« Am I a soldier of the cross ?”

and repeated them to Miss Preston, but
after she got into the middle of the floor
she could not call them to mind. She



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 63

began to twist her apron as busily as tne
other little girl had done, and the tears
came into her eyes. |

Her mother spoke to her.

“Can’t you think of your hymn, Kitty?”
said she.

“No, mother,’ said Kitty, “I forget
how it begins.”

“Well, repeat the verse you said at
prayers this morning,” said her mother.
“That will do just as well.”

“ T love them that love me, and those that
seek me early shall find me.”

“That is a precious verse,” said the
lady. “I hope all the children hear it,
and will remember it. Do you know who
is meant by J, there, Kitty ?”

“Yes, ma’am,” said Kitty, “J means
God, our heavenly Father.”

“Yes,” replied the lady, “and God
promises to love all the children who love
him. How kind this is in him, when
he has so many people to take care of;
is it not, Kitty ?”



64 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“Yes, ma’am,” said Kitty, “and he
promises, too, that if we try to be Chris-
tians when we are little, he will cer-

tainly help us. That is what father told
- me.”

The lady put her hand on Kitty's
head, who seemed to have forgotten her
fear, and now looked pleasantly round the
room.

“T hope all the children will think
of this when they go away,” said she.
“Remember how much God loves them,
and how ready he is to do all for them
that they need in order to become Chris-
tians, and how he promises to give them
a new heart, if they seek one early. I
wish you would repeat this verse together.”

The children repeated it promptly:
“T love them that love me, and those that
seek me early shall find me.”

After some reading and conversation,
the lady gave out a hymn, and the child-
ren joined in the singing, and the meet-
ing was over.



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 65

ee

Then they followed Miss Preston quiet-
ly into the dining-room, and got ready
to go home. They did not seem to wish
to make a noise. Many of them were
wishing in their hearts that they were
Christians, so that God might love them.
They made no noise after they were in
the-street—they did not seem inclined to
play. They separated soon ; joined their
mothers and friends, and went, many
of them, thoughtfully to their homes.

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66 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

CHAPTER VIII.

Miss Preston’s scholars were very much
impressed by what they saw and heard at
the Maternal Association. Children are
sreat imitators: they like to act over
what impresses them ; and this was soon
shown in the school-room. Miss Preston
observed that the Bibles were in great
use. That many of the children, when
not studying, seemed to be reading chap-
ter after chapter. The Bibles were filled
with bright-coloured paper marks. For
every chapter read, a mark seemed to
be put in, and she . judged from appear-
ances that the strife was, to see who would
get the most marks. She thought it best,
however, to let it pass unnoticed, as the
children were serious about it.

One stormy day Miss Preston and the
school, generally, stayed during the recess.
The children, after amusing themselves



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 67

quietly in the school-room awhile, went,
many of them, into the entry. All at
once, the noise there ceased. Miss Pres-
ton could not imagine what was going on.
The truth was this: some of the children
had proposed that they should go into the
wood-closet and have a meeting. The
proposal was instantly acceded to, and
they crowded in there, as many as could
stand, and shut the door.. One girl said
“she would open the meeting, and then
the rest might pray according to their
ages.” So she closed her eyes and folded
her hands, and began to repeat: “Our
Father who art in heaven.” She did not
know what else to say. The one who
followed her began to repeat Bible verses,
and some of Miss Preston’s usual expres-
sions in prayer.

During all this time, the children
were by no means very quiet. There
was a great deal of nestling and fidget-
ing, for they were crowded. Sarah Niles
had climbed up on the wood, and Kitty



68 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

Brown stood by her. Kitty tried to be
very serious, and keep her eyes closed,
but the light twinkled so curiously,
like stars, through the holes in the closet-
door, that she could not help looking at it.
Then Sarah was very uneasy. She was
afraid that spiders and mice were there,
and every time she moved, a stick of
wood rolled down. This made Kitty
laugh, though she did not wish to laugh.
At last, Sarah was very sure she felt a
mouse on her, and she tried to jump, when,
over went the wood-pile, and she with it,
tearing and crashing down on the other
children! Some cried and some laughed,
and all called out, “Open the door!” Miss ©
Preston and Rosa Day came to see what
was the matter.

“Children, what are you doing?” said
Miss Preston. |

“We were having a prayer-meeting,”
said Kitty, “and Sarah Niles felt a mouse
on her, and knocked down the wood-pile.” .

Miss Preston could not repress a smile.



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 69

“You had better not go in there any
more,” said she. “Come back now, into
the school-room.”

The children did not exactly know
whether they had been doing right or
wrong. They were conscious of a little feel-
ing of shame which they could not explain.

That night, after the usual reading,
Miss Preston said to the children, “ You
have read one verse, which I wish to have
you particularly notice ; itis this: “Let sat
THINGS BE DONE DECENTLY AND IN ORDER.

Kitty, with a very intelligent smile,
looked round at Rosa Day, who sat in
the first seat under the window.

Rosa understood that smile. It said,
“That is one of my verses, Rosa.” So Rosa
bowed, which meant, “I know it, Kitty.”

“ Now,” continued Miss Preston, “ this
means that there is a certain propriety
in choosing the right time and place in
which to do a thing. It is proper and
right for you all to pray; is it not?”

“ Yes, ma'am.”



70 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“God loves to hear children pray, but
does it not seem more ‘decent and in
order’ for you to pray at your mother’s
knee, or in your own room alone, or with a
little friend by your side there, than to be
crowded into a dark, narrow, dirty closet,
where you make prayer half a play ?”

Some of the children smiled and some
hung their heads, and looked under their
eyebrows at their next neighbours.

“You may all repeat the verse,” said
Miss Preston. “I think you will find it
a very useful verse to remember.”

“ Let all things be done decently and in
order,” said the children together.

Miss Preston dismissed the school.
The next day she observed that most
of the bright paper marks had disap-
peared from the Bibles. Some of the
children thought that reading the Bible
‘merely for the sake of putting in a bright
bit of paper, was not exactly a order;
so they took their marks out, and thei
example was soon followed by others



AND HER’ BIBLE VERSES. T1

CHAPTER IX.

Miss Preston’s school was a select one,
and the children were very much on
an equality, so far as wealth and stand-
ing were concerned. There was one poor
boy, however, at school. Miss Preston
gave him his tuition. His name was Ben
Taylor, and he lived down in a lane,
which led off from the turnpike.

His mother was a widow. She had
been left with two children; but the eldest,
(a daughter,) had died the winter before.
Ben was all the child she had now. To
support him and pay the rent of the little
shop she lived in, she worked hard from
morning to night. She was a worthy
woman and much respected. Ben was
going on to be seven years old. He was
stout, but not tall. He helped his mother
all he could. He cut her wood, (little
as he was,) and brought in her water,



72 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

and went on her errands, and made paths
in the snow. He was a bright boy too,
and he learned his lessons as well as any
of them, and Miss Preston took a great
deal of pains with him. But although he
was almost seven, he still wore girls’
clothes. The truth was, his mother was
too poor to buy him clothes, while she
had any on hand, and she thought he
must wear out all which his sister had
left. The boys very often laughed at
him, and Ben would sometimes laugh too,
but sometimes, I dare say, his feelings
were wounded, and he suffered pain.

One morning the children were drying
their feet around the stove. Rosa was
trying to make the fire burn better for
them. Ben came in shivering, and, step-
ping up behind her, held out his hands
over her head to warm them.

“Took at Ben’s hands,” said Henry,
laughing boisterously. “When did you
wash them last, Ben? Is soap dear down
at your house ?”

we



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 73

. “T washed them when I got up,” said
Ben, “but I’ve had to bring in wood and
peat since, and my hands are chapped.
It’s chap. It aint dirt. It won't come
off,—mother says so.” |

“So it is, Benny,” said Rosa, “ and you ’
are a good boy to help your mother.
Here, stand by me and warm your hands.
Do they ache ?”

“Yes, they do,” said Ben.

“Tll warm them,” said Rosa.

So she took those little, chapped, black
hands in her’s and warmed them. Ben
leoked happy.

“Have you no mittens?” said Rosa.

“Thad some,” said Ben, “but mother
is going to mend them.”

“‘ Why, in the name of common sense,”
said a great rough boy, “don’t your
mother dress you decent? Is she going
to keep you in petticoats till you're twen-
ty-one? She'd better call you Peg, and.
have done with it. I declare!” said he,
“that is a good name for him; let's call



74 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

him Peg Taylor. Hurrah for Peg Tay-
lor !” .

George Smith and Henry Niles hur-
rah’d for Peg Taylor, and stamped their
feet.

The tears came in Ben’s eyes. He
looked up imploringly to Rosa.

“ Mother says I must wear out sister's
clothes,”. said he. “She says she has
not any money to buy me any more.”

“Your mother does just right,” said
Rosa, putting her arm around him. “ She
keeps you clean and nice, and it is no
matter what those rude boys say. We all
love you just as well as if you wore boys’
clothes.” —

“ So we do,” said Kitty Brown, coming
up on the other side. “ You dress very
well, Benny. Now, boys,” said Kitty, look-
ing very gravely, “if you had learned my
verse this morning, you would not do so.”

“Let us have it, Kitty,” said Frank
Hastings. “You are great on Bible
verses.” |



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 15

“The rich and the poor meet together ;
the Lord is the maker of them all,” said
Kitty, shaking her head a little to give
emphasis to the words.

The boys laughed more at Kitty's
manner than at her verse, but they
were suddenly checked by the sound of
Miss Preston’s voice.

“That was very well said, Kitty. I
am sorry that any of my children have
the heart to laugh at a little boy because
he is poor. Come here, Benny. Now
you need not feel troubled; you are just
as much of a boy as any of them, if you
do'wear girls’ clothes.”

Benny’s face began to clear. up; and
when Miss Preston dropped a fine rosy ~
apple into the pocket of his frock, the
smiles fairly chased away the tears. He
took his seat, feeling happy, while the
rude boys, who laughed at him, hung
their heads and felt ashamed.

When Kitty was at dinner that day,
she told her father and mother what had



76 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

occurred in the morning, and how she
had given the children her verse, to
make them behave better. Her parents
looked at each other and smiled, as if
they were pleased. Her father put his
hand on her head and smoothed down
her hair lovingly, and there was much
affection lighting up her mother’s eye, as
it rested upon her.

_ J think Kitty applied her verse ex-
ceedingly well,” said Aunt Russell. “‘A
word fitly spoken is like apples of gold m
pictures of silver’”” hope she will always
have the Bible at her tongue’s end.”

“That is my verse, too,” said Kitty.
“1 know that about the ‘apples of gold.’”

“I don’t know,” continued Aunt Rus-
sell, “but widow Taylor ought to be
helped a little.”

That afternoon Aunt Russell went out.
For a week after this, she was much
occupied in her own room. No one
knew what she was doing. At last, one
morning, who should come into school



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. "7

but little Benny Taylor, all dressed up
in a new suit of boys’ clothes. His little
jacket was trimmed with buttons, and
his trousers had pockets in them. There
was not a happier boy in the world than
Benny was that morning. He stood still
at the school-room door, laughing, because
he did not know what else to do, and
then, in a minute or two, he walked
away to his seat, as if he were a little
prince. Miss Preston was glad, and Rosa
Day was glad, and Kitty Brown jumped
up and clapped her hands. Now this
was what Aunt Russell had been about
all that week.

So many people were made happy by
the timely use of this verse. I trust my
little readers will not soon forget it.
“ The rich and the poor meet together ; the
Lord is the maker of them all.”

<3



78 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

CHAPTER X.

“Mortuer,” said Kitty, one morning,
“may I have one of those tarts to carry
for my luncheon ?”

“No,” said her mother, “they are too
rich to be good for you. You cannot
have any thing but an apple. You are
coming home to dinner.”

Kitty was much disappointed. She
loved the tarts very much, and she fret-
ted. This troubled her mother. When
school-time came, she took the little din-
ner-basket, which she usually carried, and,
without bidding her mother good-by, went
into the kitchen to get her apple. Eliza
was: there.

“Do you want your luncheon, Kitty ?”
said she.

“Yes,” said Kitty. “I want my apple.”

“Well, here is an apple and a tart,
too,” said Eliza, putting both into the



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 79

basket. Kitty drew back a little, and her
heart beat fast. She had not asked for
the tart, but it had been given her. She
knew that she ought to take that tart
directly out, and say, “No, my mother
told me I could not have one,” but it
looked very nice and she liked it, so she
put the cover on her basket, and ran off
as fast as she could go.

She ran so fast that she fel) down
before she reached the gate, and hurt her
hand on the hard frozen ground ; but she
was afraid to go back into the house, and
she did not dare to cry aloud, lest her
mother should hear her and come to her,
and see that she had the tart. She felt
guilty, and walked along crying to her-
self, partly because her hand smarted
and partly because she was unhappy.
She met Rosa Day, but Rosa’s “ pleasant
words’ were not “ sweet as honey-comb” to
her that day. She continued to cry
until she got to school. She hung up
her little dinner-basket under her hood,



80 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

as if she feared to have the children see
the outside of it, and then went in. All
the morning she felt so unhappy, that
Miss Preston asked her if she was not
well.

Then she burst into tears, and said,
“her hand smarted.” Miss Preston
looked at her hand, and told her she
did not think she had hurt it much.
Upon this, Kitty cried the more. The
hurt was in her conscience, and when
Miss Preston spoke kindly to her, it made
her think of her mother, whom she had
disobeyed.

Recess came. The children were all
eager for their luncheon. Ben Taylor
pulled out of his pocket a dry crust of
brown bread, and ate it as if it really did
him good. Kitty stood by him with her
rich cranberry-tart and her apple. She
could not enjoy either. She turned the
tart over. It was very inviting. She put
it to her lips and tasted it. It was very
delicious. She tasted again. Oh, it was



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 81

good! But still Kitty was unhappy, and
trembled with fear. Pretty soon she broke
the tart in two, and gave half to Benny.
Then she tried to enjoy the tart, but she
could not. Finally she ate out all the
cranberry, and put a part of her crust
back into her “basket, and sat down to
enjoy her apple. Still she was unhappy.
She had disobeyed a kind mother. She
knew that she had done wickedly. -

She did not want to walk home with
Rosa Day, or any other little girl. She
walked along silently and slowly alone.
Then she left her basket on the entry
table, and went—not into the parlour—
but into the dining-room, and sat down
on a cricket by the stove. By-and-by
Aunt Russell came in. |

“Why, Kitty,” said she, “what are
you doing here, all alone ?”

“ Sitting down,” said Kitty.

“Are you ill?”
“No,” said Kitty.
« What is the mnlits then ?”



82 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“T don’t know,” said Kitty.

“ What is the matter with my Kitty ?”
said Mrs. Brown, who came in just then.

Kitty trembled violently, her lips
turned white, and she burst out crying.
Her mother knew instantly that some-
thing was wrong, so she took the little
girl by the hand, and led her into the
parlour where they could be alone.

“ Now, Kitty,” said she, “tell me what
you have done. What is it makes you
unhappy 2”

Kitty by this time was sobbing so
violently, that she could not speak. Her
mother waited quietly until she was
able to tell her.

“Eliza gave me the tart,” said Kitty,
at length, “and I ate part of it.”

“So you disobeyed me,” said her mo-
ther, sorrowfully.

Kitty nodded assent.

“You knew that you were disobeying
me when you took the tart.”

Kitty again nodded assent.



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 83

“Did you feel happy, Kitty?”

“T’ve felt bad all the morning, mother,”
said Kitty. “I could not think about
any thing else, and I hurt my hand,
too.”

“There is no suffering,” said Mrs.
Brown, “like the suffering of a guilty
conscience.”

Kitty felt that she understood every
word of this. Her mother talked with
her for some time, and then, in much sor-
row, punished her. Kitty. knew that
she deserved it. After confession and
punishment, she felt much happier than
she had done since she took the forbidden
tart.

- That night, when her mother was un-
dressing her, she said to her,

“Kitty, Iam going to repeat a verse
to you, and I wish you to learn it and
repeat it at prayers tomorrow. This is
the verse: ‘Children, obey your parents
the Lord, for this is right.”

Kitty said it, and then threw her arms



84 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

about her mother’s neck. “ Mother, I am
very sorry I disobeyed you. Will you
forgive me? I hope I shall never do so
again.”

“T can easily forgive you, my dear
Kitty, but you have disobeyed God. He
commands you to obey your ‘parents. Ido
not know whether you have asked God
to forgive you or not.”

«Will you ask him, mother?” whis-
pered Kitty. Mrs. Brown kneeled with
her, and asked God to forgive her. After
this, Kitty seemed peaceful and happy.
She sat on her mother’s knee and leaned
her cheek upon her mother’s cheek. She
kissed her mother many times. At length
she was put into her little bed, and went
to sleep with a smile upon her lips.





AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 85

CHAPTER XI.

SaturpDAy forenoon at Miss Preston’s.
school was devoted entirely to religious
instruction.

After a few questions in the Catechism
had been asked and answered, the child-
ren begged the privilege of saying their
Bible verses.

“Yes,” said Miss Preston, “we will
have some Bible verses. As many of you
as can recall one may raise your hands.
I will give you five minutes to think.”

Kitty Brown’s hand was up in a mi-
nute, and so was Rosa Day’s and Frank
Hastings’s. Ben, too, after a time, raised
his hand, and so did Henry Niles, and
several others. But some of the children
could not think of a single verse.

“ Pleasant words are as an honey-comb,
sweet to the soul,” said Rosa Day.

“T was glad when they said unto me,



86 LITTLE KITTY BROWN .

let us go into the house of the Lord,”
said a girl who stood near her.

« A whip for the horse, a bridle for the
ass, and a rod for the fool’s back,” said
Kitty Brown.

“ The rich and the poor meet together ;
the Lord is the maker of them all,” said
Frank Hastings.

“A soft answer turneth away wrath,”
said George Smith.

“God is a spirit; and they that wor-
ship him must worship him in spirit
and in truth,” said Sarah Niles. Kitty
taught her this, that day of the glazing
storm.

“ Study to be quiet,” said Benny.

“Let all things be done decently and
in order,” said Henry Niles.

“ A word fitly spoken,” said Frank, “is
like apples of gold in pictures of silver.”

“May I say another?” asked Kitty,
“ Frank has said two.”

“Yes,” said Miss Preston.

“TI love them that love me; and



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 87

those that seek me early shall find
me.”

“That is a beautiful verse, Kitty,”
said Miss Preston : “it is the one you re-
peated at the Maternal-meeting, and the
lady hoped you would all of you remem-
ber it.”

“Yes, ma'am,” said Kitty.

“Children, obey your parents in the
Lord, for this is right,” said a little boy
who stood next to Kitty. Kitty coloured
a little. She was reminded of the tart,
and her disobedience, and the unhappy
day that came after it.

“ Now,” said Miss Preston, “TI will say
my verse, and you may all repeat it after
me, and then take your seats.”

“ Thy word is a lamp unto my feet and
a light unto my path.”

The children repeated it. Kitty looked
at Rosa and laughed, for Miss Preston's
verse was one of her verses, and she
wished, as usual, to tell Rosa of it.



88 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

CHAPTER XII.

It was a beautiful Sabbath morning.
The sun shone out brightly. Under the
cherry-trees in Kitty’s yard, and along-
side of the fence, and here and there in
a shady nook, patches of snow were still
visible, but for the most part it had dis-
appeared. The path across the common
was quite muddy. The elms, which a
short time before had been so heavily
cased in ice, now lifted their proud heads,
and spread out their giant arms to the
sun, seeking warmth.

“Spring is really here, aunty,” said
Kitty Brown. “I do believe I heard a
robin.”

“Oh, I guess not,” said Aunt Russell.
“The time of the singing of birds has not
come.”

“Yes, I certainly think I did,” per-
sisted Kitty, “and I am going to ask my



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 89

mother if she won’t let me go to meeting
to-day without my coat, it is so warm.”

“Well, you had better study your
Sunday-school lesson now, and talk about
that by-and-by,” said Aunt Russell.

Kitty studied awhile, and then stopped
and looked out of the window.

“Do you remember, aunty,” said she,
“that Sunday when we had the snow-
storm, and Jane’s cottage was all covered
up, and the stage came for us, and you
were going to meeting with your apron on?”

‘Yes, I remember.”

“So do I remember it, because you
said one of my verses: ‘I was glad when
they said unto me, Let us go mto the house
of the Lord.”

Kitty’s mother now came in, and sat
down by her to hear her lesson. She had
committed it to memory, though she did
not seem to understand it very well, and
her mother explained it to her. Then it
was time for her to go, and her mother
- made her ready, though she thought

: 8



90 _ LITTLE KITTY BROWN

it best for her to wear her coat and over-
shoes. ) |

Kitty walked slowly along. She had
her little Bible in her hand. It was one
which her father had presented her on
her first birth-day, and she liked very
much to take it to Sunday-school. Pretty
soon Rosa Day joined her, and in a few
minutes Sarah and Henry Niles were
seen coming up the other road, and then
George Smith and his little brother called
out to them, to wait till they could come
up, and by-and-by Frank Hastings came
running along through the mud; so all
our acquaintances had met, before they
reached the school-house yard. They
spoke quietly to each other, for they had
been taught to remember the Sabbath-day
to keep it holy. They did not talk about
their play. They knew that was not
proper for Sunday. Rosa Day, who
looked so happy that Kitty Brown could
not help observing her, made some in
quiries about the day’s lesson. Some had



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 91

learned it and some had not, and they
were talking quite eagerly about it, when
Miss Preston and another Sunday-school
teacher came up. Miss Preston had
something under her arm. The children
could not see what it was.

“JT want you to wait here a minute,”
said she, addressing them. “ Don’t come
in until I call you.” |

She smiled and looked pleased, and
the children began to wonder very much
what Miss Preston had to show them.
When she came to the door and called
them, there was a great rush for the
school-room. Frank Hastings was in
first, for he pushed, and Rosa Day and
Kitty Brown came last, as Rosa stood
back to let the children pass, and Kitty
had hold of her hand. But, first or last,
they all stood still as soon as they got
into the room, for there, over the mantle-
shelf, just where Rosa had hung Frank's
printed verse,

STUDY TO BE QUIET,



92 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

Miss Preston had now hung a fine large
coloured picture! The children wondered
and admired. There were a great many
figures in the picture, but the most pro-
minent was, a figure dressed in scarlet,
with a purple robe thrown around him,
who sat on the marble step of a palace.
Around his head was a circle of light.
It was a representation of Jesus Christ.
A little boy had just stepped upon the
marble platform, and had nestled close
to the feet of the Saviour, and folded his
hands as if he prayed. Jesus seemed to
be looking lovingly upon him, and had
placed his hand on the boy’s golden curls,
as if he were blessing him. Another child,
with outstretched arms, was running
eagerly towards him, hoping that he, too,
might receive a blessing; but his mother,
who kneeled behind him, threw her arm
about him, and seemed afraid to let him
go, for behind Jesus stood some stern
looking men, who held up their fingers to
her and frowned upon her. So another



AND ER BIBLE VERSES. 93

mother, who was approaching with a
beautiful baby in her arms, seemed to
hang back, and looked up mournfully at
the frowning men, who appeared to be
saying, “Don’t trouble Him with such
little folks.” This was what they did
say, for the picture represented a true
scene in the life of our Saviour. The
reply which Jesus made to these forbid-
ding men was printed underneath in large
letters :

“But when Jesus saw it he was much
displeased, and said unto them, Suffer the
little children to come unto me, and forbid
them not: for of such is the kingdom of God.”

Miss Preston touched the scarlet-robed
figure with a long stick. Then she looked
around on the group of eager faces. “ You
see,” said she, “He did love the little folks
and called them to him. Who is he?”

“< Jesus Christ,” said the children, alto-
gether.

“ And what is he saying to those for-
bidding disciples ?” *



94 LITTLE KITTY BROWN.

“ Suffer the little children to come wnto me
and forbid them not : for of such is the king-
dom of God,” they replied again. After
this they took their seats. Each little
heart seemed to be tuned for the employ-
ments of the morning, and all enjoyed
the Sunday-school.

That night, when Kitty had taken her
favourite seat in her mother’s lap, she
told her about the picture-card which
Miss Preston hung up.

“T like that verse, mother,” said she,
“about ‘Suffer little children, and I
should like to say it to-morrow at pray-
ers, and have it for one of my verses.”

“T hope you will believe it, Kitty,”
said Mrs. Brown, “ and think about it, for
Jesus really said it.”

“ Yes, mother,” said Kitty.

Here we must leave little Kitty Brown
and her Bible verses. Some other time,
perhaps, we may tell you more about her.



THE END.



Full Text




















SSS x SF

oa



Kitty’s House.—p. 6.
LITTLE KITTY BROWN

BIBLE VERSES.





WRITTEN FOR THE AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION.



PHILADELPHIA :
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,
No. 146 CuestnuT STREET.

New York, No. 147 Nassau Street.....Boston, Wo, 9 Cornhill
Lovisviniz, Vo. 103 Fourth Street.


Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1851, by the
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,

in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of
Pennsylvania.



Aap No books are published by the American Sunpay-scn00L Union
without the sanction of the Committee of Publication, consisting of
fourteen members, from the following denominations of Christians, vis.
Baptist, Methodist, Congregationalist, Episcopal, Presbyterian, and Re-
formed Dutch. Not more than three of the members can be of the
same denomination, and no book can be published to which any mem
ber of the Committee shall object.
LITTLE KITTY BROWN

AND HER

BIBLE VERSES.

CHAPTER I.

“ A whip for the horse, a bridle for the
ass, and a-rod for the fools back,” said
little Kitty Brown.

Mr. arown, Kitty s father, smiled and
said, *.)..

. Did you select that verse yourself, my
little daughter?”

“No, sir,” said Kitty: “mother found
it for me, and I learned it. I thought it
was a very pretty verse.”

‘So it is,” said her father.

Kitty was a little girl only about six
years old. She had just learned to ready
Her father told her it would aa? him be

:
>




6 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

she would commit one verse from the
Bible to repeat perfectly every morning
at prayers, and this (with her mother’s
assistance) was her first selection.

Kitty lived in the country in a white
house, which had a large yard in front
of it. This yard was full of cherry-trees,
and there was a path through the middle
of it which led down to the gate. The
gate opened on the road, and the road
ran along the side of the common, and
just across the common, where the road
turned, stood a little red school-house.*
It was there Kitty went to school. On
the week-days she went there to learn to
read and spell, and on the Sabbath she
went there to Sunday-school.

It was Monday morning when Kitty
repeated this verse about “A whip for
the horse,” &c., and soon after family
prayers she made ready for school as
usual. She put on her warm coat and
comforter, and her nice-little hood and

* See Frontispiece. &
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 7

mittens; then she took “ Snow-bird,” (for
that was the name of her little sled,)
kissed her mother a pleasant good-by,
and started off.

She ran down the path in the yard,
and across the common, and Snow-bird
flew along behind her. Soon she was in
the school-house entry. There were a
great many little boys and girls there,
but there were none with rosier cheeks
or a happier heart than Kitty Brown.

Kitty found her own nail, and hung
up, first her sled and then her other
things, and then went right in. Her
mother did not like that she should be
late, so she would not stop to talk. She
took her seat like a good little girl, and
she thought Miss Preston (the teacher)
looked pleased that she was so punctual.

And indeed Miss Preston was pleased.
The other children, who stopped to talk
about their sleds in the entry, did not get
seated before the bell rang for the open-
ing prayer. So any could not bow orn
8 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

to worship God reverently, as Kitty did,
but they were standing up, some in the
passage-ways of the room, and some in
the middle of the floor. These late-
comers looked uneasy and ashamed.
They did not hear the prayer either.
Miss Preston seemed to be very sincere
in her prayer. She thanked God that
he had taken such kind care of all these
little children; that none of them had
died; that none of them were sick ; that .
they all met again well and happy on
that beautiful winter morning. She
prayed that they might love God with
all their hearts, and that they might
begin a new week determined to be obe-
dient and faithful in all their studies, so
that they might please him.

There was one boy who did not hear
one word of this prayer. He stood out
by the door. He was the last of all. He
had gone away to slide instead of coming
directly to school, as his mother told him
to do. He loved play better than study.
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. Gg

His name was Frank Hastings. He was
the largest boy in school. Disobedience
and tardiness! This was a poor beginning,
Frank, of a new week !

When Miss Preston saw how late he
was, she reproved him. This made him
sulky, and he shuffled along to his seat,
opened his desk, threw out his books, and
then slammed the cover down so as to
make a great noise.

Miss Preston spoke to him again. This
seemed to make him still more angry.
He did not try to learn his lessons. He
spilled ink all over his copy-book, and
was glad of it. He got down to the foot
of his class in spellmg. He had not one
of his sums right. He paid no atten-
tion to his reading. He was so naughty,
that Miss Preston would not let him
go out at the time of recess. But this
only seemed to make him still more
angry.

When recess was over and the children
came in, little George Smith was passing
10 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

him, and he put out his foot and tripped
him up. George fell against the bench
and cut his lip. It hurt him badly, and
he cried. Miss Preston then thought
Frank had been a naughty boy long
enough, and she determined that she
would have no more of his ill-humour;
so she called him out into the middle of
the floor.

“Frank,” said she, “ you have been a
very naughty boy. You have been dis-
obedient and angry, and I am going to
punish you.”

Frank turned very red in the face, and
hung down his head. He knew that
Miss Preston made a business of it when |
she did punish. Miss Preston opened
her desk and took out a broad flat ruler.
Little Kitty began to tremble all over,
and her heart beat fast.

“ Hold out your hand, Frank.”

Frank did not mind. Miss Preston
took his hand, and struck it two or three
times hard, with the ruler. Frank’s
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 11

face grew redder and redder, but he would
not cry. Little Kitty was crying.

“Now,” said Miss Preston, “ you may
go and stay alone in the entry until I
call you in.”

Frank held up his head, and marched
stiffly and proudly to the door. He was
still very angry. |

“Come back, Frank,” said Miss Pres-
ton.

Frank hesitated.

“ Come back,” said Miss Preston, again.

Frank had to come.

“ Hold out your hand.”

Frank held out his right hand, the one
which had not been struck.

“T want the other,” said Miss Preston.

Now the other was still smarting with
pain, but Frank had to give it, and the
very first blow from the ruler hurt him
so much, that he cried aloud, and held
down his head to protect his hand, and
the second blow of the ruler struck his
forehead and made a slight cut in itt A
12 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

little blood dropped on his cheek, though
he was not much hurt.

Kitty thought he was almost killed,
and she sobbed aloud. Her little heart
was broken. She felt as if she never
should love Miss Preston again in the
world. She was very glad when school
was out. She did not stop to slide with
the children, but ran home and Snow-
bird after her as fast as both could go.

She ran into the parlour. Her eyes
were red with weeping, and she told her
father and mother the whole story as well
as she was able, and how she had made
up her mind that she never could love
Miss Preston any more.

“JT am sorry,” said her mother, “ that
Frank was such a naughty boy.”

“So am I,” said Mr. Brown, “and I
think Miss Preston did right to punish
him.”

Kitty looked up “ astonished.
“Why, father ?”

“ Yes,” said he, “that is Bible doctrine,
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 13

that is the way Solomon told us to do,
and he ‘was avery wise man. What was
your verse this morning, Kitty ?”

« A whip for the horse, a bridle for the
ass, and a rod for the fool's bac ng

“Yes, a rod for the fool,’ said Mr.
Brown. “A fool means here, Kitty, one
who is naughty and wicked, as Frank
was this morning. It means that such —
an one must be punished and made to
do better. Miss Preston tried hard to
persuade Frank to be a good boy by
speaking to him, but he would not mind,
and it was her duty to make him obey,
and she had to punish. him. Now you
watch, and see if Frank does not behave
himself this afternoon; and, if he does, —
you may be sure his whipping did him
good, and you may like Miss Preston
again as well as ever.” :

Kitty watched, and found Frank did
behave himself very well. He had been
quite subdued. He was obedient to
Miss Preston, and Miss Preston was very
14 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

kind to him. So Kitty felt quite happy
again. .

When she was warming her feet that
night, before she went to bed, she thought
it all over, and concluded that Solomon.
was a very wise man indeed, to know so
long beforehand what was best for Frank
Hastings.


AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 15

CHAPTER II.

“Moruer,” said Kitty, one Saturday
afternoon, “may I go and slide on the
pond, back of the school-house A great
many little girls are going there.”

“T do not know,” replied Mrs. Brown.
“] think you are almost too small, Kitty.
I am afraid you will get hurt.”

“No, I will not, mother. Rosa Day
is going. She will take care of me.”

“ Well, if Rosa is going, and will look
after you, you may go.”

Kitty jumped up and down and clapped
her hands. Then she hurried and put
on her things so fast, that she was quite
oft of breath. I do not know but she
thought the pond would run away if she
was not quick. She took Snow-bird, and
away she went across the common, in the
little foot-path, to Rosa’s house. Rosa
saw her coming and opened the door for

. 2


16 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

her, and helped her and her sled over
the steps. Rosa was three or four years
older than Kitty. She was very sweet-
tempered and obliging, and everybody
loved her. .

Rosa made ready at once, when she
saw Kitty was in a hurry, and went right
out with her.

“Tet me lead you, Kitty,” said she.
“Tt is slippery.”

Kitty put her hand in her’s and looked
up in her face. Rosa had a sweet smile,
and Kitty thought her beautiful. Her
words and tones of voice, too, were so
pleasant, that Kitty always felt quiet and
happy by her.

It was not far from Rosa’s house to
the school-house, and directly back of the
school-house was the pond, and behind
the pond was a little hill. From one
point of this hill there was quite a de-
scent, so that the children starting from
there on their sleds could be carried quite
across the pond. Only one sled, how-
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 17

ever, could go at a time. When Rosa
and her little friend reached the pond,
it was already covered with children.
Frank Hastings was there at the top of
the hill. He was determined to have
the first slide, and he had just pushed
Henry Niles into the snow. Henry was
angry, and was making up snow-balls as
large as his little hands could grasp, to
throw at him. Some of the children said,
“That's right, Henry, give it to him !”
and others said, “Never mind; go it,
Frank!” and there was a great uproar.
But as soon as the children caught’ a
sight of Rosa Day, and looked up into her
pleasant face, there was a division in the
camp. They crowded around her and
forgot all about the quarrel. They seized —
her other hand, two or three of them,
and one little girl came up and tried to
pull Kitty away. “You have had your
share of Rosa,” said she, “and now it is
my turn.” |
“No,” replied Kitty, “ Rosa is to take
18 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

care of me all this afternoon. My mother
said so.”

“Tl tell you what we will do,” said
Rosa. “ You and Kitty each take hold of
Snow-bird’s bridle, and then hold on to
my cloak, and the rest all follow with
their sleds, and we will go. up the hill
and form a lineof soldiers, single file, ac-
cording to our height, and then we can
all slide in turn. Frank has had his
ride.” Frank, by this time, was quite
across the pond, and no one seemed to
notice him excepting Henry Niles, who
was still throwing snow-balls after him,
but he was glad to give it up and become

“one of Rosa Day’s soldiers. She arranged
all her company, and a pretty line it was
“too, each standing by a sled, with,
‘¢ Hearts light and faces bright,”
waiting, in perfect good-humour, his or
her turn to slide. They were all there
but Frank. He was sliding rather sul-
lenly on the pond.
“Come, Frank,” said Rosa, “here is
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 19

your place next to me. I am alittle taller
than you, you know.”

If anybody in the world but Rosa
Day had called him, he would not have
gone, but there was no resisting her sweet
voice and pleasant words. So he came
and took his place, and there was no
more quarrelling. *

The afternoon passed very quickly and
very pleasantly. The old school-house
began to throw its shadow on the pond,
and then the little ones knew that it was
time to go home. They followed in
Rosa’s wake, as flowers turn to the sun,
so long as they could, and then separated.
Kitty was telling her mother at the tea-
table what a pleasant time they had on
the pond. ’

“Tt was all because Rosa went, mother,”
said she. “We should not have hada good
time at all if it had not been for Rosa,
for Frank was there, and he would have
wanted the place all the time.”

“ Does Rosa keep you from quarrelling %”

2%
20 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“TI do not know, mother, but the
children are always happy with Rosa,
she is so pleasant, and when they are
happy they do not quarrel.” |

“ Pleasant words are as an honeycomb,
sweet to the soul,” said Mr. Brown.

“Why, that is my verse,” said Kitty.

“Yes,” said her father, “ and you have
seen this afternoon what it means, Kitty.
The children all enjoy Rosa’s company
because she has such pleasant words and
pleasant ways about her. They enjoy
her as much as you did your honey in the
honeycomb the other night.”

“I do believe they do,” said Kitty,
laughing. “She always makes us have
a good time.”

“T hope,” said Mrs. Brown, “ my little
girl will remember how sweet ‘ pleasant
words’ are to her little companions.”

“Yes, mother, I think I shall,” said

.Kitty with a very grave face, which

almost made her mother smile. “I think

I must say my verse to Miss Preston, and
\ tell her it means Rosa Day.”


AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 21

CHAPTER III.

One Sabbath morning Kitty Brown
woke up and reached out her hand to
open the shutter which was near her bed,
that she might let in a little ight; but
no light came. The window was all
blocked up with snow. |

“Why, Eliza!” said she to the nara
girl, “ what is the matter ?”

“ Matter enough,” said Eliza, “we have
had a great snow-storm. It has snowed
all night long, and it’s snowing now, and -
it is burying us all up. Old Jane, under
the hill, is all buried up. You can’t see
any thing of her house but the chimney.”

“Why, dear me!” said many, “how
can I go to church ?”

“T guess you cannot go,” said Eliza,
“nor any of the rest of us, either. I

© think it’s a chance if the minister gets
there.”
92 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“Oh, he will go,” said Kitty. “ Minis-
ters always go. They must go, you
know.”

“But if he can’t he can't,” said Eliza
sharply.

Kitty made haste and went down into
the breakfast-room. Her father and
mother and Aunt Russell were there.
Aunt Russell was sitting before the stove
reading the Bible. She looked quiet and
happy.

“Only think,” said Kitty, after she had
bidden them all good morning, “ Eliza
says Jane is buried up, and the minister
cannot get to church.”

“Come here and look,” said her father.

Kitty looked across what seemed a sea
of snow. Fences and’walls had all dis-
appeared, and in the distance, where
Jane’s cottage used to be, there was only
a chimney sticking out of a snow-bank,
and no smoke came from it.

“Why! why!” said Kitty, “will she
not smother ?”
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 23

“No,” said her father, “but she can
get neither vood nor water. The farmers
must come out with their teams and dig
her out, and then they will break a path
for the minister and some of the rest of
us as far as the church.”

“Shall you go, father ?”

“No, not this morning.”

“T think it would be pleasant,” said
Mrs. Brown, “to have ‘meeting’ at home
to-day. The girls will soon be through
their necessary work, and then we*will
call them all in.” .

“Yes, it would be very pleasant,” said
Aunt Russell.

“A meeting for worship at home!” said
Kitty ; “but then who would preach ?”

“Your father,” said her aunt, “and °
you can help sing. You can be one of
the choir.”

“J. should like that,” said Kitty.
“When shall we begin ?”

“ When the bell rings we will assemble
in the parlour,” said her mother. »
94 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“Shall we put on our things?” said
Kitty. | ’

“No,” said her mother, smiling, “ the
house is warm. We shall not need to
have our things on.”

“ And what shall I do till meeting
time ?” said Kitty.

“Study your Sunday-school lesson,”
said her mother, “and we will have Sun-
day-school at noon.”

Kitty began to think they should have
a very pleasant day of it, notwithstand-
ing the storm: She imagined that she
should like her father’s preaching.

After breakfast she sat down by the
window to learn her lesson, and pretty
soon one team, and another, and another,
‘ came ploughing along, through the snow,
to Janes house. Then the farmers
pulled off their coats, and went to work
in right good earnest, to dig the poor old
woman out. The drift was very deep,
but they soon made a hole in it. By-
and-by, an end of the house, then a win-
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 25

dow, was visible; and soon, the door
and steps were uncovered, and a path
dug to the well and to the wood-pile.

“Many hands make light work.” It
did not. take the farmers long. By the
time old Jane’s house was fairly in sight
it had stopped snowing, and the sun
shone out brightly. The teams on their
way home broke a path up to the meeting-
house, so that a few neighbours could get
there, and all this was accomplished by
the time the first bell had rung for wor-
ship. Kitty watched them, and forgot
to study her lesson. |

“TY am afraid you will not be ready
for Sunday-school,” said her Aunt Rus-
sell.

“Qh, yes, I will,” said Kitty. “Iam
going to study now, very hard, and you
must not talk, aunty.”

She studied with a great noise a few
minutes, and perhaps she thought that
was studying hard. Then her book
dropped, and she began to look out of
26 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

the window again, and to drum on the
chair with her feet.

“Aunt Russell, how long will it be
before our meeting-time comes ?” said she
at length.

“T thought I must not talk,” said Aunt
Russell.

“Oh, yes, you may tell me that,” said
Kitty.

“ Well, in just half an hour.”

Kitty took up her book and began to
study hard again, still looking out of
the window, as before. Pretty soon she
jumped down, and exclaimed,—

“ Aunt Russell! Aunt Russell! There
is the stage, and it has stopped at Mr.
Johnson’s, and it will stop for us, I do be-
lieve.”

Aunt Russell got up and looked out
of the window. Kitty's father and
mother came in just at this time, and
seemed in a hurry.

“ Pettingill has got his stage out, I see,”
said Mr. Brown; “so I think we can go
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 27

to church, after all. We must hurry, for
they will be here in a minute.”

“ And I too?” said Kitty, clapping her
hands. She thought it would be a very
fine thing to ride to church in Pettingill’s
stage.

“Yes,” said Mrs. Brown, “if you can
dress yourself.”

Kitty was ready as soon as the rest.
Indeed, they were all ready when the
stage stopped for them.

“[ will take you in my arms,” said
Kitty’s father to her, “ and the rest must
step in my tracks as well as they can,
down to the gate.” |

As they were going out of the door,
Kitty looked over her shoulder at Aunt
Russell. Something in Aunt Russell’s
face attracted her attention. There was
a very happy, peaceful, glad expression
on her countenance. She wondered with-
‘n herself if it waswbecause her aunt was
going to ride in a stage. The wind blew
back her cloak as she tried to shut the

3
28. . LITTLE KITTY BROWN

eens td

door after her, and Kitty saw that in her
hurry she had forgotten to také off her
apron. |

“ Aunty,” said she, “ you are going to
meeting with your apron on!”

Her aunt smiled, took it off, and threw
it back into the entry. That pleasant
smile seemed to stay about her lips.
Kitty looked at her several times while
they were riding to church. She knew
that Aunt Russell felt happy about some-
thing.

Frank Hastings and Charles Smith
were in the stage, and they next stopped
for Rosa Day. Pettingill’s stage seemed
to be made of India-rubber. It held all
the neighbourhood. The last one who
got in was the minister. He looked
pleased when he saw so many people,
and especially so many little folks out.

They got to the church without any
trouble. The minister preached a good
sermon. His people had an idea that he
always did his best on a stormy Sabbath.
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 29

Perhaps he did. People that make an
effort to go to church through difficulties
are generally paid for it. This day his
sermon was a very comforting one. Aunt
Russell seemed to enjoy every word of
it. The hymns which he gave out, too,
were such as the children understood,
and could sing, and they seemed to enjoy
it. It was, on the whole, a delightful
Sabbath.

Just before evening prayers that night,
Kitty sat by the breakfast-room fire,
thinking about it. Aunt Russell came
in and sat down by her. It seemed as
if she still had the very same smile on
her face, which she had when Kitty told
her about her apron.

“Aunt Russell,” said Kitty, “what
made you look so pleased this morning
when you saw the stage coming ?”

“I was glad,” said she, “when they
said unto me, Let us go into the house of
the Lord.”

Kitty was still for a moment.
30 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“Aunty,” said she then, “is that a
Bible verse ?”

“Yes, my dear.”

“T think it is a very pretty one,” said
Kitty.

“So do I,” said her aunt.

“T wish you would teach it to me, and
let me say it at prayers to-morrow morn-
ing. Father will like it, I know.”

“ Well, I will,” said her aunt.

Kitty soon learned it, and she did
repeat it the next morning at prayers
very correctly, and her father was much
pleased.


AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 31

CHAPTER IV.

Not long after this great snow-storm,
there came a change in the weather.
The sun did not shine. It was foggy
and warm. The snow did not melt and
run off in streams of water, but seemed
to be sinking silently into the earth. It
was in just the right state for children
to work with. Quite a fortification had
been thrown up around the pond, back
of the school-house. This was pierced at
regular distances, so that the children
might look through.

Some of the younger boys, among whom
was Henry Niles and George Smith,
thought they should get along better by
themselves; so they left the fort and came
round into the little yard, in front of the
school-house. They decided to build a
snow-man, and were quite ambitious to

have him as tall as Miss Preston. They
gi |
82 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

worked away all the play-time they had
during a whole day, and had him built
about up to his knees at the close of the
afternoon recess. It was their intention
to remain after school and finish him.
Now the days were beginning to
lengthen a very little. It was lighter
through those western windows, when
the first bell rang for the children to lay
aside their books, and take their Bibles,
and they could find their places more
readily. There was something cheerful
about the hour of evening prayer. The
children felt quiet. Their day’s work
was done, and at this season of the year
there was generally a glorious sunset to
be seen through those old windows. So
it was often the case, that when they
were dismissed they were all in good
humour. It was so this evening, though
there was quite a rush for hats and cloaks.
Henry and George, being among the
smaller boys, had their nails at the end
of the long passage, which ran along by
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 83

the wood-closet, and the passage was so’
narrow, and there were so many in it,
they could not get out as soon as they
wanted to. Frank Hastings hung his
cap near the door; so he was off almost
as soon as school was dismissed.

When Henry and George were fairly
out, they ran immediately to finish their
- gnow-man. How astonished they were
to find Frank Hastings there before them,
working away like a beaver!

“It’s just like him,” said George, stop-
ping short, “he must have his finger in
everybody's pie. We may as well give
it up.”

“J shall not, either,” replied Henry
Niles,—his face reddening very much.
“It’s none of his business, and he shall
let it alone, or I'll give it to him!”

Henry cleared the steps at one leap,
and ran through the snow. He was very
angry. He would have been, glad could
he have struck Frank Hastings, and hurt
aim. As soon as he reached him he
84 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

caught him by his coat, and began to
kick him. “Let that man alone,” said
he: “ He’s mine.”

Frank turned round, but the beauty
of those western clouds, or, probably, the
beauty and peacefulness of that evening
prayer had subdued him, and the spell
was on him yet. With perfect good
humour, he twisted himself out of
Henry’s hands, and said, pleasantly,

“T thought you would like my help
to finish him. You can’t get him done
before dark, and the snow may be all
gone to-morrow; but if you don’t want
any help, that’s another affair.”

As water puts out fire, this reply put
out all Henry’s anger in a moment. He
stood, ashamed and silent, before Frank
Hastings. : |

“Yes, we do want help,” said George.
“Do help us, Frank. We are not tall
enough to put his hat on.”

“Henry does not want me to,” said
Frank.
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 85

“ You may,” said Henry, “if you won't
call him your's.”

“T don’t care whose you call him,”
said Frank, and the three boys went good-
naturedly to work.

Rosa Day was standing in the path,
and Kitty Brown on the other side of
Miss Preston. They were both listening
to the boys, and so was Miss Preston,
though she seemed to be trying to lock”
the school-room door. |

“A soft answer turneth away wrath,”
said Miss Preston, as she finished locking
the door, and put the key in her basket.
“ How true that is!”

“Yes, ma'am,” said Kitty, thinking
Miss Preston spoke to her. “I know it.
That is one of my verses. Sometimes I
say it at prayers; pretty often I do, be-
cause it is a short one, and I can think
of it easily.”

Miss Preston and Rosa smiled. Then
they stood a few minutes to see the
snow-man go up, but they left before


36 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

he had his head on, as it was growing —
chilly.

The next morning they found him
standing there, large as life; taller even
than Miss Preston, cocked hat and all
on, and a very grand looking snow-man
he was; but it is quite certain he never
would have been finished, had it not
been for that “soft answer” which “ turned
away” that little boy’s wrath.


AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 37

CHAPTER V.

Tue thaw which I spoke about in the
last chapter continued for some time.
The snow-man fainted away and disap-
peared. The fog thickened, until one
afternoon, when the children were dis-
missed, it turned to rain.

“What shall we do?” said they. “ We
shall get wet through and through, walk-
ing in this ‘ slush.’ ”

“ Let us wait a few minutes,” said Miss
Preston. “ Perhaps some one will come
for you.” |
- Miss Preston was right in this conjec-
ture, for soon Mr. Brown’s well-known
old covered sleigh was seen coming
across the common. ‘Tom (Mr. Brown’s
boy) whipped up his horse and came to
the door on the full gallop. The children
laughed and shouted, for both Tom and
88 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

his establishment were great favourites
with them. |

‘You cannot all ride,” said Miss Preston '
to the eager little group. |

“Pretty much all, ma’am, I guess,” |
said Tom. “If you will please get in
first yourself and take Kitty, we will |
manage the rest.”

“T am afraid we shall like it better
than your horse,” said Miss Preston.

“Oh, never mind him. He’s used to
it,” said Tom. Miss Preston laughed and
stepped in with Kitty.

“Rosa Day must come next,” said
Kitty; so Rosa got m, and then a great
many other little girls.

“Now, boys,” said Tom, “cling on the
runners.”

I do not know where Tom stood. I
know he was not in the sleigh, and that
he looked round on his load with great
satisfaction as he started off, and with
the same good humour and the most
untiring patience, he dropped them at



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 39

the different houses where they be-
longed. | |

Just as he was driving up to Mr. Niles
to leave Henry and his little sister, there
was a great laughing among the boys
who were standing on the runners. The
reason of it was this. Sarah Niles had
stayed at noon. She had a very little
coffee-pot, full of milk, with her dinner.
There was some left, and, fearing she
might spill it when getting out, she found
a little hole in the canvas covering of the
sleigh, and, putting the nose of the coffee-
pot through it, she poured it out, and it
had run down into a boy’s neck! This
made the children laugh so much, that
they did not mind the rain at all. At
last, all got home safe and happy.

This was the end of the thaw. It
grew colder that night after sun-down;
the rain turned into a glazing storm, and .
in the morning the fog had all disap-
peared, and the sun shone out brightly

on a world of icicles. Tall trees and
4
40 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

tender shrubs, branch and twig and gos-
samer grass, were all cased in ice, and
shining like diamonds.

Kitty Brown could scarcely eat her
breakfast. She was running every minute
er two to the window. She could think
of nothing but a fairy land she read about
once.

“T don’t know how you will get
to school to-day, Kitty,” said her mo-
ther.

“Cannot Tom carry me?” said Kitty.

“T do not dare to let him take the
horse out,” said her father. “It is so
slippery. He is not very well shod for
ice. Besides, the branches of the trees are
constantly breaking, the ice is so heavy
on them, and the horse might get fright-
ened. I think I will walk over with you
myself.”

Kitty was pleased with this. She liked
to go with her father anywhere. He
always made it pleasant for her.

“You had better let the fairy land go,
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 41

and eat your breakfast,” said Aunt Rus-
sell, “or you will not be ready.”

So Kitty hurried and was quite through
by the time the prayer-bell rang. Her
father read in the Bible; but Kitty did
not pay very good attention, for she was
looking out of the window. Her father
closed the Bible, and waited for her to
repeat her verse. She was thinking
about the diamond trees, and did not
know even that he had stopped reading.

“Repeat your verse, my daughter,”
said her mother.

Kitty started and blushed. She was
quite confused, and could not immediately
recall one. After hesitating a while,
she said rapidly: “ God 1s a spirit, and
they that worship him must worship him
‘in spirit and in truth.”

No remark was made on her hurried
manner. Soon after prayer, her father —
called her, and told her he must go with
her then, as he was obliged to go down
street. It was me early, but Kitty
42 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

knew the school-room would be warm,
and thought perhaps Rosa Day would be
there. She was soon ready. Aunt Rus-
sell helped her. Then she kissed them
all good-by, and, taking her dinner-basket
in her hand, went out with her father.

She found the walking very slippery ;
indeed, she could scarcely stand in their
own path, but the path across the common
was better. On each side of this path
were magnificent elm trees, which com-
pletely shaded it in summer, but in winter
they were upright and bare. They were,
however, neither upright nor bare on this
morning, when Kitty Brown walked there
with her father, but cased in thousands
of glittering icicles. Bending beneath the
weight of their shining armour, branch
bore down upon branch, forming what
seemed a solid roof of diamonds over the
path. As the wind swayed them to and
fro, they groaned and creaked, and now
and then came tearing and crashing
down.
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 43

————

Kitty was bewildered and a little terri-
fied. All thoughts of fairy land merged
into thoughts of heaven. To her awe-
struck mind, it seemed as if God dwelt in
that shining roof above her, that she could
see him and hear him. She clung closer
to her father, and almost trembled at
the sigh of the wind among those icy
trees.

She was not afraid to talk to her father;
so she tried to tell him how she felt.

“Tt seems to me,” said she, “as if God
was up there. Does not he live in such
a place? If it was not so bright I do not
know but I might almost see him.”

“You cannot see him,” replied her
father. “God is a spirit, and they that
worship him must worship him m spirit
and in truth.”

“Then he is not a shining light?” said
Kitty, “and I cannot see him or hear
him; but don’t I feel him ?”

“ You feel that there is a God, my little
Kitty. You know there must be a God

4%

'
44 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

to make such a beautiful world as this.
Just look back through that path.”

“T cannot,” said Kitty, “it puts my
eyes out.” |

“Glorious! glorious, indeed !” said her
father.

Kitty was silent until they had nearly
reached the school-house.

“Father,” said she then, in a gentle
tone, “I don’t know but I said that verse
too fast this morning, about ‘God is a
spirit. I was not thinking much about it.”

“T saw you were not, my little daugh-
ter,’said her father. “There is a great deal
of meaning in every verse in the Bible,
and we ought to think about them when
we repeat them, Kitty. The Bible is
God’s book, and God is a great God.
Though we cannot see him, he sees us.”

“Yes, sir, I know it,” said Kitty.

They were now on the school-house
steps. Rosa Day was there, early as it
was, and she came, with her pleasant good
morning, to meet Kitty.
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 45

CHAPTER VI.

Nor long after this glazing storm, there
came a very “cold snap.” The children
crowded around the old Franklin stove
in the school-room, with aching fingers
and blue noses. There was more con-
fusion than warmth there.

Miss Preston came late that morning,
and the children observed, almost as soon
as she entered, that she looked quite sober.

‘“‘ What is the matter ?” said she, almost
immediately, and not in a very gentle
tone. “Stand back, children. Do you see
_ how you make it smoke ?”

The children pushed back. Frank
looked over his shoulder at another boy,
and winked. This was as much as to say,
“She’s cross to-day !”

Miss Preston tried to fix the fire, but
she found the wood had been sawed too
46 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

long for the stove, and there was no way
to prevent its smoking.

“What shall we do?” said she, in a
despairing tone, to Rosa Day. “It will
not burn, and the room is as cold as a
barn.”

“Perhaps some of the boys might saw
the sticks in two,” replied Rosa. “The
man has left his saw and horse here.”

¢T will! I will! I will!” was heard
from half a dozen.

«Frank and Henry may go,” said Miss
Preston, “and the rest of you may put
on your over-coats and take your seats.
There is nothing gained by standing here.
We will open the school.”

Miss Preston’s prayer was short, and
her voice seemed sad. Some of the
children observed that she frequently put
her hand to her head.

Frank brought in his arms full of wood,
and Miss Preston asked Rosa Day if she
would attexd to the fire, which the child-
ren also noticed, as it was unusual. Then
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 47

she attempted to hear the class in spell-
ing, and the little spellers soon found out
it made no difference whether they
spelled right or wrong. All at once,
Miss Preston turned very pale, and laid
her hand down upon her desk. The
school-room was very still. In a minute
or two, Rosa Day stepped softly up to
her and spoke to her.

“Yes, thank you!” said Miss Pres-
ton. Dad

Rosa got her a cup of water, and she
revived a little. Soon, she felt able to
hold her head up again. She talked
a few minutes with Rosa, keeping her
eyes half-closed, and then spoke to the
children.

“T have a very violent head-ache,”
said she, “and I find that I shall not be
able to stay. Lam going to leave you in
charge of Rosa. I trust you will do the
best you can to make it easy and pleasant
for her. I shall take it as a great kind-
ness to me if you behave well.”
48 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

The children looked as if they meant
to do their best, and Miss Preston went
home.

They did behave very well, indeed,
through the morning; but, at the noon
recess, they became rude and noisy.
Frank addressed Rosa as “School-
ma'am Day,” which made the younger
ones laugh, and set them a bad example.
Then he began running over the tops
of the desks, and, as he had heavy boots
on, he made a great deal of noise.
Soon, other heavily-booted boys chased
him. Rosa was seriously afraid that
some of the neighbours would come in to
see what the disturbance was. She sat
in Miss Preston’s chair, thinking what
she should do. Finally a bright thought
seemed to enter her mind. She opened
Miss Preston’s desk, and took out half a
sheet of foolscap paper. She ruled two
parallel lines, about an inch apart, and,
placing the sheet on the desk, with pen
and ink by it, she wrote something in
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 49

pencil on a scrap of paper, and laid it on
top of the sheet of paper.

This done, she looked up at Frank
Hastings, who was just then trying to
wrench out some iron spikes from the wall.

“Frank,” said she, “will you come
here a minute ?”

“ Certainly, school-ma’am Day.”

“Don’t call me so, Frank. Call me
Rosa.”

Frank ran across the desks, and jumped.
down, making a great noise.

“ What do you want?” said he.

“JT want you to do some printing for
me if you will. You print so much
better than I do.”

“Print! I don’t want to print.”

“Qh! it is only four words ; do, please,
Frank. Here is the paper, and here is
the copy.” .

“Ts that all?” said Frank.

“Yes, that is all.”

“I must do it with a pencil, first,” said

Frank.
5
50 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“ Well, I'll sharpen one for you!”

“Now, how large do you want the
letters ?”

“ Why, as wide as between those lines.”

Frank went to work, and the school-.
room was comparatively still.

“ Shall I ink it?” said he.

“Yes,” said Rosa.

Frank inked it.

“Now, what is to be done?” said he.

“T will dry it first,” said Rosa, “and
then I shall want you to help me some
more.”

Rosa dried it.

‘Now, Frank, won't you get a couple
of nails, and nail it up there over the
fire-place, as high as you can reach? I
will hold the lower side.”

Frank was quite willing to do this.
The printing was nailed up, and then the
children began all at once to read, “ Studi
to be qui-it.”

“Srupy TO BE QUIET,’ said Frank.
“Can’t you read straight ?”
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 51

“That is some of Rosa Day’s composi-
tions,” said the children, “to make us be
still.”

“The spelling might be mended,” said
some one.

“No, it is not Rosa Day’s,” said Kitty
Brown. “It is in the Bible, I know, for
it is one of my verses.”

“No, it is not in the Bible,” said some.

“But I know it is,” persisted little
Kitty. “Is it not, Rosa?”

“Yes,” said Rosa, “and I will show it
to you in Miss Preston’s Bible. Here it
is, Frank. Hold it so they can all see
it.”

The children were all satisfied that it
was in the Bible. !

“ Now, believe Kitty Brown, next time,
will you ?” said Frank. “She knows more
Bible verses than any of you.”

“Or you either, Frank,” said Henry.

“ Well, did I say she didn’t?”

“What does it mean, Rosa?” asked

some one.
0
52 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“ Study to be quiet :” it means don’t dis-
turb other people. Make a business of
*t to see how little you need to disturb
other people,” said Rosa, hesitating a little
how to express her thought. “ I suppose
it means, wherever we are, we must make
a real study of it, to see how we can help
disturbing others.”

“Yes, that is what it means,” said
Kitty Brown. “My father explained it
to me, but I do not remember his words.”

“Tf we study to be quiet,” said one little
girl, “then we must not run any more
on the tops of the desks, because that
disturbs others. Must we, Rosa?”

“{ think not,” said Rosa, smiling.

Frank began to whistle.

“ Let us all sit down around the stove,
and eat our apples, and tell stories,” said
Rosa. “The youngest must begin, and
everybody must tell something.”

This plan pleased them all very much,
and the was no more noise of any conse-
quence. If there came an outbreak, some
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 53

little finger pointed up to Frank’s print-
ing, and the noise soon stopped. The
children really seemed, after this, to
“study to be quiet.” They all of them
respected Bible verses.

Miss Preston did not return, so Rosa
took her place in the afternoon. She
was gentle and pleasant, and the children
were obedient and studious, and they got
along harmoniously together.

At length, golden light began to stream
in through those western windows. The
sun was going down, and it was time to
dismiss school. Rosa asked the children
to read in the Bible as usual. Her heart
was beating fast, for Miss Preston had
left her a prayer to read aloud. She was
timid about it. She was afraid the great
boys would laugh at her. But when
Rosa felt it was her duty to do any par-
ticular thing, she always did it, cost
what it might. So she read the prayer,
though her voice trembled and tears stood
in her eyes. The great boys did not
54 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

laugh, and Rosa felt happy that she had
done it. This is the way we all feel,
when we make’ a proper effort to do
right.

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AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 55

CHAPTER VII.

“Herre, Kitty,” said Eliza, one day.
“Your mother says you must have on
your other frock, and a white apron, be-
fore you go to school.”

“Why? What for?” said Kitty.

“ Because you are going to some meet-
ing or other.” |

“Meeting! What meeting?”

“T don’t know. You must ask her or
Aunt Russell.” ,

“ What is it? Do tell me, aunty.”

“Tt is a meeting of the maternal asso-
ciation, Kitty.”

“ Shall I come out of school ?”

“School is to be dismissed at three
o'clock.”

Kitty jumped up and down. It was
her favourite way of expressing pleasure.

“Oh, I am so glad! Ishall like that,”

said she.
5x
56 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

Kitty hurried off to school and told the
children about it, and Miss Preston found
them in very earnest conversation on the
subject.

“Are we going to be dismissed early,
to go to the maternal meeting?” Rosa Day
asked her.

“Yes,” said Miss Preston, smiling, “and
we will spend what little time we have
in making preparations for it. You may,
each of you, select a hymn to say, and
study it, and I will hear you repeat it.”

The children hurried to their seats,
and soon, buzz, buzz, went many little
lips. Miss Preston heard their hymns
as fast as they were learned, and three
o'clock soon came. Then she dismissed the
school, and the children were soon ready,
and she was ready, and they all went out.
The children waited in the yard, while
she locked the school-room door, and
then followed close behind her. She took
the path which ran on the south side of
the common, and walked along until she








———_
—————

They were both ‘listening to the boys, and so was Miss
Preston though she seemed to be trying to lock the
school-room door.—p. 35.



AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 59

came to a sudden turn. She followed
the turn, went a short distance, and then
struck off into a broad path which led
directly up to the door of a large white
house. Here she stopped and rang the
bell. Her little flock quite covered the
steps,—as they looked up at her with
bright and smiling faces.

“Knock off all the snow from your
feet,” said Miss Preston.

There was a great stamping. The
children were in earnest about it, and
the servant who opened the door stood
and laughed. |

“That will do,” said Miss,Preston ;
“ now we will go in.” |

“ Walk in here, first, if you please,”
said the servant.

They followed her into a large dining-
room, and took off their coats and hats.
Then she opened the parlour door, and
they went in there. Miss Preston spoke
to the lady, but the children stood still
60 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

and said nothing. They did not know
what to do. |

“Tet the children take seats on these
benches,” said the lady. The benches
had been arranged around the room,
but there were not quite seats enough
for all of them. Kitty Brown and one
or two other little girls were left stand-
ing.
“The little girls can sit on these
crickets,” said the lady. So she placed
two or three crickets right before the
fire. Kitty sat down on one. There
was a bright wood-fire. The hearth was
swept clean, the andirons shone like gold,
and the fender before the fire (made of
green wire and mounted with shining
brass) Kitty thought was very beautiful.
Kitty warmed her feet, and then ven-
tured to look around the room. The
walls were hung with pictures in little
_ black frames. Kitty thought these very
handsome too. As she was looking, she
saw her Aunt Russell and her mother, and
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 61

she smiled and looked very happy. When
the room was full, the lady of the house
opened the meeting with reading and
prayer. She then asked Miss Preston
if the children were prepared to repeat
any thing. Miss Preston said they had,
most of them, learned hymns expressly
for the occasion.

“ Frank Hastings,” said she, “ will you
come and say your hymn ®”

Frank came out rather awkwardly.

“Go and stand by the lady, and make
a bow before you begin,” whispered Miss
Preston.

Frank did so, but he repeated his hymn
very rapidly. He did not say it near so
well as he had done in the school-room.
He was a little frightened. After he had
taken his seat, other boys and girls came
up.. Some did well and some did not.
Rosa Day repeated a long piece of poetry,
about the blind man whose sight was
restored. Bie

“That is beautiful,” said the lady,
62 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

smiling, “and you have said it very cor-
rectly, Rosa.” |

Rosa blushed a little at being praised.
After Rosa, a very little girl went up to
the lady. She stood twisting up the cor-
ner of her white, apron, for she had for-
gotten every word of her verse.

“Can you say any thing?” said the
lady, taking her kindly by the hand.

“ Yes,” said the little girl:

“Now I lay me down to sleep,

I pay the Lord my soul to keep ;
If I should die before I wake,

I pay the Lord my soul to take.”

The children laughed at this, but the
lady kissed the little girl, and told her
she had done very well. So she went
to her seat quite comforted.

After her, Kitty Brown went up.
Now Kitty had learned two verses of,

« Am I a soldier of the cross ?”

and repeated them to Miss Preston, but
after she got into the middle of the floor
she could not call them to mind. She
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 63

began to twist her apron as busily as tne
other little girl had done, and the tears
came into her eyes. |

Her mother spoke to her.

“Can’t you think of your hymn, Kitty?”
said she.

“No, mother,’ said Kitty, “I forget
how it begins.”

“Well, repeat the verse you said at
prayers this morning,” said her mother.
“That will do just as well.”

“ T love them that love me, and those that
seek me early shall find me.”

“That is a precious verse,” said the
lady. “I hope all the children hear it,
and will remember it. Do you know who
is meant by J, there, Kitty ?”

“Yes, ma’am,” said Kitty, “J means
God, our heavenly Father.”

“Yes,” replied the lady, “and God
promises to love all the children who love
him. How kind this is in him, when
he has so many people to take care of;
is it not, Kitty ?”
64 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“Yes, ma’am,” said Kitty, “and he
promises, too, that if we try to be Chris-
tians when we are little, he will cer-

tainly help us. That is what father told
- me.”

The lady put her hand on Kitty's
head, who seemed to have forgotten her
fear, and now looked pleasantly round the
room.

“T hope all the children will think
of this when they go away,” said she.
“Remember how much God loves them,
and how ready he is to do all for them
that they need in order to become Chris-
tians, and how he promises to give them
a new heart, if they seek one early. I
wish you would repeat this verse together.”

The children repeated it promptly:
“T love them that love me, and those that
seek me early shall find me.”

After some reading and conversation,
the lady gave out a hymn, and the child-
ren joined in the singing, and the meet-
ing was over.
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 65

ee

Then they followed Miss Preston quiet-
ly into the dining-room, and got ready
to go home. They did not seem to wish
to make a noise. Many of them were
wishing in their hearts that they were
Christians, so that God might love them.
They made no noise after they were in
the-street—they did not seem inclined to
play. They separated soon ; joined their
mothers and friends, and went, many
of them, thoughtfully to their homes.

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66 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

CHAPTER VIII.

Miss Preston’s scholars were very much
impressed by what they saw and heard at
the Maternal Association. Children are
sreat imitators: they like to act over
what impresses them ; and this was soon
shown in the school-room. Miss Preston
observed that the Bibles were in great
use. That many of the children, when
not studying, seemed to be reading chap-
ter after chapter. The Bibles were filled
with bright-coloured paper marks. For
every chapter read, a mark seemed to
be put in, and she . judged from appear-
ances that the strife was, to see who would
get the most marks. She thought it best,
however, to let it pass unnoticed, as the
children were serious about it.

One stormy day Miss Preston and the
school, generally, stayed during the recess.
The children, after amusing themselves
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 67

quietly in the school-room awhile, went,
many of them, into the entry. All at
once, the noise there ceased. Miss Pres-
ton could not imagine what was going on.
The truth was this: some of the children
had proposed that they should go into the
wood-closet and have a meeting. The
proposal was instantly acceded to, and
they crowded in there, as many as could
stand, and shut the door.. One girl said
“she would open the meeting, and then
the rest might pray according to their
ages.” So she closed her eyes and folded
her hands, and began to repeat: “Our
Father who art in heaven.” She did not
know what else to say. The one who
followed her began to repeat Bible verses,
and some of Miss Preston’s usual expres-
sions in prayer.

During all this time, the children
were by no means very quiet. There
was a great deal of nestling and fidget-
ing, for they were crowded. Sarah Niles
had climbed up on the wood, and Kitty
68 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

Brown stood by her. Kitty tried to be
very serious, and keep her eyes closed,
but the light twinkled so curiously,
like stars, through the holes in the closet-
door, that she could not help looking at it.
Then Sarah was very uneasy. She was
afraid that spiders and mice were there,
and every time she moved, a stick of
wood rolled down. This made Kitty
laugh, though she did not wish to laugh.
At last, Sarah was very sure she felt a
mouse on her, and she tried to jump, when,
over went the wood-pile, and she with it,
tearing and crashing down on the other
children! Some cried and some laughed,
and all called out, “Open the door!” Miss ©
Preston and Rosa Day came to see what
was the matter.

“Children, what are you doing?” said
Miss Preston. |

“We were having a prayer-meeting,”
said Kitty, “and Sarah Niles felt a mouse
on her, and knocked down the wood-pile.” .

Miss Preston could not repress a smile.
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 69

“You had better not go in there any
more,” said she. “Come back now, into
the school-room.”

The children did not exactly know
whether they had been doing right or
wrong. They were conscious of a little feel-
ing of shame which they could not explain.

That night, after the usual reading,
Miss Preston said to the children, “ You
have read one verse, which I wish to have
you particularly notice ; itis this: “Let sat
THINGS BE DONE DECENTLY AND IN ORDER.

Kitty, with a very intelligent smile,
looked round at Rosa Day, who sat in
the first seat under the window.

Rosa understood that smile. It said,
“That is one of my verses, Rosa.” So Rosa
bowed, which meant, “I know it, Kitty.”

“ Now,” continued Miss Preston, “ this
means that there is a certain propriety
in choosing the right time and place in
which to do a thing. It is proper and
right for you all to pray; is it not?”

“ Yes, ma'am.”
70 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“God loves to hear children pray, but
does it not seem more ‘decent and in
order’ for you to pray at your mother’s
knee, or in your own room alone, or with a
little friend by your side there, than to be
crowded into a dark, narrow, dirty closet,
where you make prayer half a play ?”

Some of the children smiled and some
hung their heads, and looked under their
eyebrows at their next neighbours.

“You may all repeat the verse,” said
Miss Preston. “I think you will find it
a very useful verse to remember.”

“ Let all things be done decently and in
order,” said the children together.

Miss Preston dismissed the school.
The next day she observed that most
of the bright paper marks had disap-
peared from the Bibles. Some of the
children thought that reading the Bible
‘merely for the sake of putting in a bright
bit of paper, was not exactly a order;
so they took their marks out, and thei
example was soon followed by others
AND HER’ BIBLE VERSES. T1

CHAPTER IX.

Miss Preston’s school was a select one,
and the children were very much on
an equality, so far as wealth and stand-
ing were concerned. There was one poor
boy, however, at school. Miss Preston
gave him his tuition. His name was Ben
Taylor, and he lived down in a lane,
which led off from the turnpike.

His mother was a widow. She had
been left with two children; but the eldest,
(a daughter,) had died the winter before.
Ben was all the child she had now. To
support him and pay the rent of the little
shop she lived in, she worked hard from
morning to night. She was a worthy
woman and much respected. Ben was
going on to be seven years old. He was
stout, but not tall. He helped his mother
all he could. He cut her wood, (little
as he was,) and brought in her water,
72 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

and went on her errands, and made paths
in the snow. He was a bright boy too,
and he learned his lessons as well as any
of them, and Miss Preston took a great
deal of pains with him. But although he
was almost seven, he still wore girls’
clothes. The truth was, his mother was
too poor to buy him clothes, while she
had any on hand, and she thought he
must wear out all which his sister had
left. The boys very often laughed at
him, and Ben would sometimes laugh too,
but sometimes, I dare say, his feelings
were wounded, and he suffered pain.

One morning the children were drying
their feet around the stove. Rosa was
trying to make the fire burn better for
them. Ben came in shivering, and, step-
ping up behind her, held out his hands
over her head to warm them.

“Took at Ben’s hands,” said Henry,
laughing boisterously. “When did you
wash them last, Ben? Is soap dear down
at your house ?”

we
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 73

. “T washed them when I got up,” said
Ben, “but I’ve had to bring in wood and
peat since, and my hands are chapped.
It’s chap. It aint dirt. It won't come
off,—mother says so.” |

“So it is, Benny,” said Rosa, “ and you ’
are a good boy to help your mother.
Here, stand by me and warm your hands.
Do they ache ?”

“Yes, they do,” said Ben.

“Tll warm them,” said Rosa.

So she took those little, chapped, black
hands in her’s and warmed them. Ben
leoked happy.

“Have you no mittens?” said Rosa.

“Thad some,” said Ben, “but mother
is going to mend them.”

“‘ Why, in the name of common sense,”
said a great rough boy, “don’t your
mother dress you decent? Is she going
to keep you in petticoats till you're twen-
ty-one? She'd better call you Peg, and.
have done with it. I declare!” said he,
“that is a good name for him; let's call
74 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

him Peg Taylor. Hurrah for Peg Tay-
lor !” .

George Smith and Henry Niles hur-
rah’d for Peg Taylor, and stamped their
feet.

The tears came in Ben’s eyes. He
looked up imploringly to Rosa.

“ Mother says I must wear out sister's
clothes,”. said he. “She says she has
not any money to buy me any more.”

“Your mother does just right,” said
Rosa, putting her arm around him. “ She
keeps you clean and nice, and it is no
matter what those rude boys say. We all
love you just as well as if you wore boys’
clothes.” —

“ So we do,” said Kitty Brown, coming
up on the other side. “ You dress very
well, Benny. Now, boys,” said Kitty, look-
ing very gravely, “if you had learned my
verse this morning, you would not do so.”

“Let us have it, Kitty,” said Frank
Hastings. “You are great on Bible
verses.” |
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 15

“The rich and the poor meet together ;
the Lord is the maker of them all,” said
Kitty, shaking her head a little to give
emphasis to the words.

The boys laughed more at Kitty's
manner than at her verse, but they
were suddenly checked by the sound of
Miss Preston’s voice.

“That was very well said, Kitty. I
am sorry that any of my children have
the heart to laugh at a little boy because
he is poor. Come here, Benny. Now
you need not feel troubled; you are just
as much of a boy as any of them, if you
do'wear girls’ clothes.”

Benny’s face began to clear. up; and
when Miss Preston dropped a fine rosy ~
apple into the pocket of his frock, the
smiles fairly chased away the tears. He
took his seat, feeling happy, while the
rude boys, who laughed at him, hung
their heads and felt ashamed.

When Kitty was at dinner that day,
she told her father and mother what had
76 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

occurred in the morning, and how she
had given the children her verse, to
make them behave better. Her parents
looked at each other and smiled, as if
they were pleased. Her father put his
hand on her head and smoothed down
her hair lovingly, and there was much
affection lighting up her mother’s eye, as
it rested upon her.

_ J think Kitty applied her verse ex-
ceedingly well,” said Aunt Russell. “‘A
word fitly spoken is like apples of gold m
pictures of silver’”” hope she will always
have the Bible at her tongue’s end.”

“That is my verse, too,” said Kitty.
“1 know that about the ‘apples of gold.’”

“I don’t know,” continued Aunt Rus-
sell, “but widow Taylor ought to be
helped a little.”

That afternoon Aunt Russell went out.
For a week after this, she was much
occupied in her own room. No one
knew what she was doing. At last, one
morning, who should come into school
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. "7

but little Benny Taylor, all dressed up
in a new suit of boys’ clothes. His little
jacket was trimmed with buttons, and
his trousers had pockets in them. There
was not a happier boy in the world than
Benny was that morning. He stood still
at the school-room door, laughing, because
he did not know what else to do, and
then, in a minute or two, he walked
away to his seat, as if he were a little
prince. Miss Preston was glad, and Rosa
Day was glad, and Kitty Brown jumped
up and clapped her hands. Now this
was what Aunt Russell had been about
all that week.

So many people were made happy by
the timely use of this verse. I trust my
little readers will not soon forget it.
“ The rich and the poor meet together ; the
Lord is the maker of them all.”

<3
78 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

CHAPTER X.

“Mortuer,” said Kitty, one morning,
“may I have one of those tarts to carry
for my luncheon ?”

“No,” said her mother, “they are too
rich to be good for you. You cannot
have any thing but an apple. You are
coming home to dinner.”

Kitty was much disappointed. She
loved the tarts very much, and she fret-
ted. This troubled her mother. When
school-time came, she took the little din-
ner-basket, which she usually carried, and,
without bidding her mother good-by, went
into the kitchen to get her apple. Eliza
was: there.

“Do you want your luncheon, Kitty ?”
said she.

“Yes,” said Kitty. “I want my apple.”

“Well, here is an apple and a tart,
too,” said Eliza, putting both into the
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 79

basket. Kitty drew back a little, and her
heart beat fast. She had not asked for
the tart, but it had been given her. She
knew that she ought to take that tart
directly out, and say, “No, my mother
told me I could not have one,” but it
looked very nice and she liked it, so she
put the cover on her basket, and ran off
as fast as she could go.

She ran so fast that she fel) down
before she reached the gate, and hurt her
hand on the hard frozen ground ; but she
was afraid to go back into the house, and
she did not dare to cry aloud, lest her
mother should hear her and come to her,
and see that she had the tart. She felt
guilty, and walked along crying to her-
self, partly because her hand smarted
and partly because she was unhappy.
She met Rosa Day, but Rosa’s “ pleasant
words’ were not “ sweet as honey-comb” to
her that day. She continued to cry
until she got to school. She hung up
her little dinner-basket under her hood,
80 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

as if she feared to have the children see
the outside of it, and then went in. All
the morning she felt so unhappy, that
Miss Preston asked her if she was not
well.

Then she burst into tears, and said,
“her hand smarted.” Miss Preston
looked at her hand, and told her she
did not think she had hurt it much.
Upon this, Kitty cried the more. The
hurt was in her conscience, and when
Miss Preston spoke kindly to her, it made
her think of her mother, whom she had
disobeyed.

Recess came. The children were all
eager for their luncheon. Ben Taylor
pulled out of his pocket a dry crust of
brown bread, and ate it as if it really did
him good. Kitty stood by him with her
rich cranberry-tart and her apple. She
could not enjoy either. She turned the
tart over. It was very inviting. She put
it to her lips and tasted it. It was very
delicious. She tasted again. Oh, it was
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 81

good! But still Kitty was unhappy, and
trembled with fear. Pretty soon she broke
the tart in two, and gave half to Benny.
Then she tried to enjoy the tart, but she
could not. Finally she ate out all the
cranberry, and put a part of her crust
back into her “basket, and sat down to
enjoy her apple. Still she was unhappy.
She had disobeyed a kind mother. She
knew that she had done wickedly. -

She did not want to walk home with
Rosa Day, or any other little girl. She
walked along silently and slowly alone.
Then she left her basket on the entry
table, and went—not into the parlour—
but into the dining-room, and sat down
on a cricket by the stove. By-and-by
Aunt Russell came in. |

“Why, Kitty,” said she, “what are
you doing here, all alone ?”

“ Sitting down,” said Kitty.

“Are you ill?”
“No,” said Kitty.
« What is the mnlits then ?”
82 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

“T don’t know,” said Kitty.

“ What is the matter with my Kitty ?”
said Mrs. Brown, who came in just then.

Kitty trembled violently, her lips
turned white, and she burst out crying.
Her mother knew instantly that some-
thing was wrong, so she took the little
girl by the hand, and led her into the
parlour where they could be alone.

“ Now, Kitty,” said she, “tell me what
you have done. What is it makes you
unhappy 2”

Kitty by this time was sobbing so
violently, that she could not speak. Her
mother waited quietly until she was
able to tell her.

“Eliza gave me the tart,” said Kitty,
at length, “and I ate part of it.”

“So you disobeyed me,” said her mo-
ther, sorrowfully.

Kitty nodded assent.

“You knew that you were disobeying
me when you took the tart.”

Kitty again nodded assent.
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 83

“Did you feel happy, Kitty?”

“T’ve felt bad all the morning, mother,”
said Kitty. “I could not think about
any thing else, and I hurt my hand,
too.”

“There is no suffering,” said Mrs.
Brown, “like the suffering of a guilty
conscience.”

Kitty felt that she understood every
word of this. Her mother talked with
her for some time, and then, in much sor-
row, punished her. Kitty. knew that
she deserved it. After confession and
punishment, she felt much happier than
she had done since she took the forbidden
tart.

- That night, when her mother was un-
dressing her, she said to her,

“Kitty, Iam going to repeat a verse
to you, and I wish you to learn it and
repeat it at prayers tomorrow. This is
the verse: ‘Children, obey your parents
the Lord, for this is right.”

Kitty said it, and then threw her arms
84 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

about her mother’s neck. “ Mother, I am
very sorry I disobeyed you. Will you
forgive me? I hope I shall never do so
again.”

“T can easily forgive you, my dear
Kitty, but you have disobeyed God. He
commands you to obey your ‘parents. Ido
not know whether you have asked God
to forgive you or not.”

«Will you ask him, mother?” whis-
pered Kitty. Mrs. Brown kneeled with
her, and asked God to forgive her. After
this, Kitty seemed peaceful and happy.
She sat on her mother’s knee and leaned
her cheek upon her mother’s cheek. She
kissed her mother many times. At length
she was put into her little bed, and went
to sleep with a smile upon her lips.


AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 85

CHAPTER XI.

SaturpDAy forenoon at Miss Preston’s.
school was devoted entirely to religious
instruction.

After a few questions in the Catechism
had been asked and answered, the child-
ren begged the privilege of saying their
Bible verses.

“Yes,” said Miss Preston, “we will
have some Bible verses. As many of you
as can recall one may raise your hands.
I will give you five minutes to think.”

Kitty Brown’s hand was up in a mi-
nute, and so was Rosa Day’s and Frank
Hastings’s. Ben, too, after a time, raised
his hand, and so did Henry Niles, and
several others. But some of the children
could not think of a single verse.

“ Pleasant words are as an honey-comb,
sweet to the soul,” said Rosa Day.

“T was glad when they said unto me,
86 LITTLE KITTY BROWN .

let us go into the house of the Lord,”
said a girl who stood near her.

« A whip for the horse, a bridle for the
ass, and a rod for the fool’s back,” said
Kitty Brown.

“ The rich and the poor meet together ;
the Lord is the maker of them all,” said
Frank Hastings.

“A soft answer turneth away wrath,”
said George Smith.

“God is a spirit; and they that wor-
ship him must worship him in spirit
and in truth,” said Sarah Niles. Kitty
taught her this, that day of the glazing
storm.

“ Study to be quiet,” said Benny.

“Let all things be done decently and
in order,” said Henry Niles.

“ A word fitly spoken,” said Frank, “is
like apples of gold in pictures of silver.”

“May I say another?” asked Kitty,
“ Frank has said two.”

“Yes,” said Miss Preston.

“TI love them that love me; and
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 87

those that seek me early shall find
me.”

“That is a beautiful verse, Kitty,”
said Miss Preston : “it is the one you re-
peated at the Maternal-meeting, and the
lady hoped you would all of you remem-
ber it.”

“Yes, ma'am,” said Kitty.

“Children, obey your parents in the
Lord, for this is right,” said a little boy
who stood next to Kitty. Kitty coloured
a little. She was reminded of the tart,
and her disobedience, and the unhappy
day that came after it.

“ Now,” said Miss Preston, “TI will say
my verse, and you may all repeat it after
me, and then take your seats.”

“ Thy word is a lamp unto my feet and
a light unto my path.”

The children repeated it. Kitty looked
at Rosa and laughed, for Miss Preston's
verse was one of her verses, and she
wished, as usual, to tell Rosa of it.
88 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

CHAPTER XII.

It was a beautiful Sabbath morning.
The sun shone out brightly. Under the
cherry-trees in Kitty’s yard, and along-
side of the fence, and here and there in
a shady nook, patches of snow were still
visible, but for the most part it had dis-
appeared. The path across the common
was quite muddy. The elms, which a
short time before had been so heavily
cased in ice, now lifted their proud heads,
and spread out their giant arms to the
sun, seeking warmth.

“Spring is really here, aunty,” said
Kitty Brown. “I do believe I heard a
robin.”

“Oh, I guess not,” said Aunt Russell.
“The time of the singing of birds has not
come.”

“Yes, I certainly think I did,” per-
sisted Kitty, “and I am going to ask my
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 89

mother if she won’t let me go to meeting
to-day without my coat, it is so warm.”

“Well, you had better study your
Sunday-school lesson now, and talk about
that by-and-by,” said Aunt Russell.

Kitty studied awhile, and then stopped
and looked out of the window.

“Do you remember, aunty,” said she,
“that Sunday when we had the snow-
storm, and Jane’s cottage was all covered
up, and the stage came for us, and you
were going to meeting with your apron on?”

‘Yes, I remember.”

“So do I remember it, because you
said one of my verses: ‘I was glad when
they said unto me, Let us go mto the house
of the Lord.”

Kitty’s mother now came in, and sat
down by her to hear her lesson. She had
committed it to memory, though she did
not seem to understand it very well, and
her mother explained it to her. Then it
was time for her to go, and her mother
- made her ready, though she thought

: 8
90 _ LITTLE KITTY BROWN

it best for her to wear her coat and over-
shoes. ) |

Kitty walked slowly along. She had
her little Bible in her hand. It was one
which her father had presented her on
her first birth-day, and she liked very
much to take it to Sunday-school. Pretty
soon Rosa Day joined her, and in a few
minutes Sarah and Henry Niles were
seen coming up the other road, and then
George Smith and his little brother called
out to them, to wait till they could come
up, and by-and-by Frank Hastings came
running along through the mud; so all
our acquaintances had met, before they
reached the school-house yard. They
spoke quietly to each other, for they had
been taught to remember the Sabbath-day
to keep it holy. They did not talk about
their play. They knew that was not
proper for Sunday. Rosa Day, who
looked so happy that Kitty Brown could
not help observing her, made some in
quiries about the day’s lesson. Some had
AND HER BIBLE VERSES. 91

learned it and some had not, and they
were talking quite eagerly about it, when
Miss Preston and another Sunday-school
teacher came up. Miss Preston had
something under her arm. The children
could not see what it was.

“JT want you to wait here a minute,”
said she, addressing them. “ Don’t come
in until I call you.” |

She smiled and looked pleased, and
the children began to wonder very much
what Miss Preston had to show them.
When she came to the door and called
them, there was a great rush for the
school-room. Frank Hastings was in
first, for he pushed, and Rosa Day and
Kitty Brown came last, as Rosa stood
back to let the children pass, and Kitty
had hold of her hand. But, first or last,
they all stood still as soon as they got
into the room, for there, over the mantle-
shelf, just where Rosa had hung Frank's
printed verse,

STUDY TO BE QUIET,
92 LITTLE KITTY BROWN

Miss Preston had now hung a fine large
coloured picture! The children wondered
and admired. There were a great many
figures in the picture, but the most pro-
minent was, a figure dressed in scarlet,
with a purple robe thrown around him,
who sat on the marble step of a palace.
Around his head was a circle of light.
It was a representation of Jesus Christ.
A little boy had just stepped upon the
marble platform, and had nestled close
to the feet of the Saviour, and folded his
hands as if he prayed. Jesus seemed to
be looking lovingly upon him, and had
placed his hand on the boy’s golden curls,
as if he were blessing him. Another child,
with outstretched arms, was running
eagerly towards him, hoping that he, too,
might receive a blessing; but his mother,
who kneeled behind him, threw her arm
about him, and seemed afraid to let him
go, for behind Jesus stood some stern
looking men, who held up their fingers to
her and frowned upon her. So another
AND ER BIBLE VERSES. 93

mother, who was approaching with a
beautiful baby in her arms, seemed to
hang back, and looked up mournfully at
the frowning men, who appeared to be
saying, “Don’t trouble Him with such
little folks.” This was what they did
say, for the picture represented a true
scene in the life of our Saviour. The
reply which Jesus made to these forbid-
ding men was printed underneath in large
letters :

“But when Jesus saw it he was much
displeased, and said unto them, Suffer the
little children to come unto me, and forbid
them not: for of such is the kingdom of God.”

Miss Preston touched the scarlet-robed
figure with a long stick. Then she looked
around on the group of eager faces. “ You
see,” said she, “He did love the little folks
and called them to him. Who is he?”

“< Jesus Christ,” said the children, alto-
gether.

“ And what is he saying to those for-
bidding disciples ?” *
94 LITTLE KITTY BROWN.

“ Suffer the little children to come wnto me
and forbid them not : for of such is the king-
dom of God,” they replied again. After
this they took their seats. Each little
heart seemed to be tuned for the employ-
ments of the morning, and all enjoyed
the Sunday-school.

That night, when Kitty had taken her
favourite seat in her mother’s lap, she
told her about the picture-card which
Miss Preston hung up.

“T like that verse, mother,” said she,
“about ‘Suffer little children, and I
should like to say it to-morrow at pray-
ers, and have it for one of my verses.”

“T hope you will believe it, Kitty,”
said Mrs. Brown, “ and think about it, for
Jesus really said it.”

“ Yes, mother,” said Kitty.

Here we must leave little Kitty Brown
and her Bible verses. Some other time,
perhaps, we may tell you more about her.



THE END.



xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0000212300001datestamp 2009-01-26setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Little Kitty Brown and her Bible verses dc:creator Trusta, H., 1815-1852dc:subject Family -- Religious life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )School Stories -- 1851 ( local )Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )Bldn -- 1851dc:description b Statement of Responsibility written for the American Sunday-School Union.Additional Physical Form Electronic version available on the World Wide Web as part of the PALMM Project "Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869 (NEH PA-23536-00)".Attributed to H. Trusta (real name, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps).dc:publisher American Sunday-School Uniondc:date 1851dc:type Bookdc:format 94 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00002123&v=00001002235977 (aleph)AAA2279 (ltqf)ALH6445 (notis)23373869 (oclc)dc:source University of Floridadc:language Englishdc:coverage United States -- Pennsylvania -- PhiladelphiaUnited States -- New York -- New YorkUnited States -- Massachusetts -- BostonUnited States -- Kentucky -- Louisville