Citation
Fruits of enterprise, exhibited in the travels of Belzoni in Egypt and Nubia

Material Information

Title:
Fruits of enterprise, exhibited in the travels of Belzoni in Egypt and Nubia
Creator:
Wilson, Lucy Sarah Atkins, 1801-1863
Grant and Griffith ( Publisher )
Samuel Bentley and Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Grant and Griffith
Manufacturer:
Samuel Bentley and Co
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
12th ed.
Physical Description:
xiii, 255 p., <5> leaves of plates : ill. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Antiquities -- Juvenile literature -- Egypt ( lcsh )
Antiquities -- Juvenile literature -- Nubia ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Dialogues -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Dialogues ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
To which is prefixed a short account of the traveller's death, by the author of "Grove cottage."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027259146 ( ALEPH )
05250904 ( OCLC )
ALK2201 ( NOTIS )

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Frontispiece.

od
ies)
tH
N

ONI ON HIS TRAVELS.



FRUITS OF ENTERPRISE,

EXHIBITED

IN THE

TRAVELS OF BELZONI

IN

EGYPT AND NUBIA,

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED
A SHORT ACCOUNT OF THE TRAVELLER’S DEATH,

BY THE AUTHOR OF “ GROVE COTTAGE.”

TWELFTH EDITION.

LONDON: !
GRANT AND GRIFFITH,

SUCCESSORS TO
J. HARRIS, CORNER OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD.

MDCCCLI,



LONDON :
Printed by SamugL BENTLEY and Co.,
Bangor House, Shoe Lane.



PREFACE.



Piacep in an amphitheatre of boundless
extent, and surrounded by an immense variety
of objects, young persons are naturally inqui-
sitive, and delighted with every new accession
of knowledge; and, as truth is no longer
deemed incompatible with amusement, the
most pleasing mode of conveying the former
seems to be to blend it with the latter.

Since the first appearance of this little
Work, the enterprising individual whose dis-
coveries it relates, and who gave his permis-
sion for its publication, has departed this life.
It was hoped that, through his means, some
account of places, hitherto imperfectly describ-
ed by others, might have been obtained ; but
the decree of Providence has prevented the



1V PREFACE.

accomplishment of so desirable an object.
The following short account of his latter
days will not be considered an improper ap-
pendage to this work :—

“Died at Gato, near Benin, in Africa, on
the 8rd of December, 1823, Mr. G. Brtzon1,
so well known for his Egyptian tombs. He
was so far on his way into the interior, en-
deavouring to reach Houssa, when a dysentery
put an end to his valuable life. He was
buried at Gato the day after his decease, and
a board, with the following inscription, was
placed over his grave :—

‘ Here lie the remains of
G, Bezont,

Who was attacked with Dysentery, at Benin,
(on his way to Houssa and Timbuctoo,)
on the 26th of November, and died at
this Place,

December 3rd, 1823.’

“Mr. Belzoni had been landed by Captain
Filmore, R.N., at Benin. Captain Filmore
exerted himself arduously in assisting the in-



PREFACE. v

trepid traveller, and discharged a man from
his vessel, who was a native of Houssa, that
he might accompany Mr. B. on his route.
The following extract of a letter contains
most of the late particulars respecting this
enterprising and scientific individual :—

‘“*¢ On the night of the 24th of November,
Mr. Belzoni left us, with Mr. Houtson, for
Gato. On parting with us he seemed a little
agitated, particularly when the crew of the
brig which brought him (to each of whom he
had made a present) gave him three loud
cheers on leaving the vessel: ‘God bless you,
my fine fellows! and send you a happy sight
of your country and friends,’ was his answer.
On the 3rd of December I received a letter
from Mr. Houtson, requesting me to come
to Benin, as Mr. B. was lying dangerously
ill; and, in case of death, wishing a second
person to be present. I was prevented going,
not only by business, but by a severe fever.
which had then hold of me. On the 5th,
I had a second letter from Mr. H. with the



Vi PREFACE.

particulars of Mr. B.’s end; and one from
himself, almost illegible, dated December 2,
requesting me to assist in the disposal of his
effects, and to remit the proceeds home to his
agents, Messrs. Briggs, Brothers, & Co., Ame-
rica-Square, London, together with a beautiful
amethyst ring, which he seemed particularly
desirous should be delivered to his wife, with
the assurance that he died in the fullest affec-
tion for her, as he found himself too weak to
write his last wishes and adieus.

‘“** At the time of Mr. Belzoni’s death, Mr.
Houtson had everything arranged with the
King of Benin for his departure, and, had his
health continued, there is no doubt he would
have succeeded. Mr. Belzoni passed at Benin
as an inhabitant, or rather native, of the in-
terior, who had come to England when a
youth, and was now trying to return to his
country. The kings and emigrands (or no-
bles) gave credit to this, Mr. Belzoni being in
a Moorish dress, with his beard nearly a foot
in length. There was, however, some little



PREFACE. Vil

Jealousy amongst them, which was removed by
a present or two, well applied ; and the King
of Benin’s messenger was to accompany Mr.
Belzoni with the King’s cane, and as many
men as were considered necessary for a guard
and baggage-carriers. The King’s name is re-
spected as far as Houssa, and he has a messen-
ger, or ambassador, stationary there. On Mr.
Belzoni’s arrival at Houssa, he was to leave
his guard there, and proceed to Timbuctoo,
the King not guaranteeing his safety farther
than Houssa, and Timbuctoo not being known
at Benin. On his return to Houssa, he would
make the necessary preparations for going
down the Niger, and despatch his messengers
and guard back with letters to his agents and
to Mr. John Houtson: the messenger to be
rewarded according to the account the letters
gave of his behaviour, and the King to receive
a valuable stated present. This was the plan,
and I think it would have proved fortunate, .
had Mr. B. lived.

‘“** Mr. Belzoni was a native of Padua, and



Vlil PREFACE.

had known England many years. He first
visited Egypt with a view of erecting hydrau-
lic engines for the Pacha, to assist in irrigat-
ing the country. In stature he was above six
feet and a half, and possessed of great bodily
strength. His manners and deportment were
marked by great suavity and mildness, ‘and
he had a genuine love for science in all its
branches. He was brave, ardent, and perse-
vering in pursuit of his objects; and his
decease at the moment of a strong hope of
success, must be deeply felt by all who
estimate the true interests of science and the
light of discovery at their true value.’”



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

Bernard’s Picture.—Situation of Egypt.—Belzoni intro-
duced.—Motives for his going into Egypt.—IIl success
of his Hydraulic Machine.—His thoughts turned towards
the antiquities of the country.—Difficulty in removing
Young Memnon from Thebes to Cairo.—Belzoni’s visit to
a Mummy-Cave.—Deceit of the Arabs.—Egyptian Cus-
toms.—Belzoni goes up the Nile, into Nubia.—Visits the
island of Elephantine.—Arrives at Ybsambul.— Attempts
to open its magnificent Temple.—Obliged, for want of time
and money, to give up the project.—Visits the little isle
of Mainarty.— Danger on the Cataract.—Returns to
Thebes.—Removal of Young Memnon to Cairo,—Belzoni
resides for a short time at Rosetta. ° ; Page 1

CHAPTER II.

Bernard’s perseverance.—Belzoni’s second Voyage.—Rapid’
journey from Minieh to Thebes.—Superb Temple at Car-
nac.— Works carried on both at Gournou and Carnac,—



x CONTENTS,

Mummy-caves.—Belzoni’s object in entering them.—Ma-
nufactures of the ancient Egyptians.—Their idols.—Cu-
rious Habitations at Gournou.—He revisits Ybsambul.—
Opens the Temple.—Returns highly gratified to Thebes.
Page 85

CHAPTER III.

Emily amused with a description of Greenland.—Belzoni
makes the valley of Beban el Malook the scene of his
researches.—Enters and explores the tomb of Psammu-
this.—Receives a visit from Hamed Aga.—Returns to
Cairo.—Visits the Pyramids.—Time and purpose of their
erection uncertain.—Enters one, which for more than one
thousand years had appeared a solid mass of stone.

Page 130

CHAPTER IV.

Belzoni’s journey to the Red Sea.—Motives for going thither
—Inundation of the Nile.-—The Caravan crosses the De-
sert.—Account of the Ababde, an independent tribe re-
siding among the rocks on the coast of the Red Sea.—
Search for the ancient city of Berenice.—The boats of the
Ababde fishermen described.—Discovers the remains of
Berenice, mentioned by a former traveller.—Returns to-
wards Esne.—Meets with two shepherd girls tending their
sheep on the mountains.—Description of the sufferings
travellers undergo in crossing the Deserts.—The Cara-
van reaches the banks of the Nile.—Belzoni returns to
Gournou. ; ° ‘ : : : Page 165



CONTENTS. xi

CHAPTER V.

Dr. Franklin’s kitex—Some sailors ascend Pompey’s pillar,
by means of a paper kite.—Removal of the Obelisk from
the island of Philoé—It falls into the Nile.—Ingenious
method of raising it.—It is launched down the Cataract.
— Arrives in safety at Rosetta.—Belzoni goes to Beban el
Malook.—Completes his drawings and models of the
tomb.—Bids a final adieu to Thebes.—Traverses the wes-
tern Desert, in search of the Temple of Jupiter Ammon.—
Procures a Donkey at Benisouef.—Reaches the Lake
Meeris.—Rose-trees in profusion.—Visits the Temple of
Haron, among the rocks near the lake.—Attacked by a
furions Hyena.—Account of the famous labyrinth.—Visit
to the Elloah.—An interview with Khalil Bey.—Account
of the Bedouins.—Belzoni crosses the Desert attended by
Sheik Grumar.—Arrival at Zaboo.—Interview with the
Sheik and Cady of El Cassar.—Belzoni goes to their
village.—Discovers the site of the Temple of Jupiter
Ammon.—Meets with an unfortunate accident on his
return to Zaboo.—Reaches Benisouef.—Arrives at Cairo,
—Embarks for Europe.— Returns to England. Page 208,







Xill

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



BELZONI ON HIS TRAVELS ;
TEMPLE OF TENTYRA .
EMBARKING YOUNG MEMNON
THE Room or Beauties ,
THE FIsHERMAN’s Boat ;

CAMPING OUT IN THE DESERT

PAGE
Frontispiece

30







FRUITS OF ENTERPRISE.

SoaneEnEeEEEEEEEEiee

CHAPTER I.

“Tue last—the very last pyramid! dear
Laura,” exclaimed the little Bernard, as he
climbed upon his sister’s chair, and surveyed
a sketch, that she was copying from one in a
large folio volume.

‘‘ And now, when you have shaded the side
of that pyramid, will you draw the wheel of
my cart? Iam quite tired of your tombs and
your pillars, and your ruins, and your monu-
ments, falling this way and that way :—I
would much rather know how to draw the
spokes of the wheels of my little cart :—you
see I have made my waggon turning down a
shady lane,—it is evening—the lamps are -
lighted on the posts—the moon is peeping
from behind the trees, and the smoke is

B



9 BERNARDS PICTURE.

rising from the chimneys of my carter’s cot-
tage—but my poor cart has no wheels, be-
cause I cannot draw spokes!—And now, is
that tiresome pyramid done, dear Laura?”

“If you knew all that renders those pyra-
mids so interesting to Laura, my love,” said
Bernard's mother, “ you would not be in such
great haste to see them finished; indeed, I
believe you would willingly give up the plea-
sure of seeing your own little picture com-
pleted, to watch your sister as she draws hers.”

‘Indeed, mamma!” exclaimed the lively
boy.—‘“* Where are the pyramids? And why
do you think the account of them would
amuse me so much?”

“My story is a long one,” replied his
mother, ‘‘so I will not begin it till after tea ;
and then we can go on without interruption.”

“Oh, mother! that will be delightful !
And as to my cart, Laura may put in the
spokes to-morrow—the wheels will not signify
for one night, will they mamma?” exclaimed
Bernard; and, without waiting for an an-
swer, he jumped up, fetched his little straw
hat from its hook in the hall, and ran across
the lawn, to tell Owen and Emily, who were
busily engaged in training a white clematis



SITUATION OF THE PYRAMIDS. 3

round one of the pillars of the alcove. They
quickly returned together. Tea was de-
spatched and the cheerful group repaired to
the library. The maps were laid open on
the library table. Laura seated herself be-
tween her two brothers; and Emily, whose
blue eyes sparkled with joy, placed herself
by the side of her mother.

‘And now, why did you think that Laura’s
picture would please me so much, mam-
ma?” said Bernard. ‘‘ Where are those pyra-
mids?”

“Think for a moment, my dear. Do you
not know the name of the country so re-
nowned for these famous mementoes of an-
cient art ?— You have often been told.”

Bernard paused—* In Egypt, mamma,—
in Egypt, an ancient kingdom of Africa.”

“Can you give me any account of Egypt
—do you know anything respecting that
country ?”

Bernard paused again, but Emily looked up
wishfully, and said, “ May I tell you what
I know, mamma?” Her mother nodded
assent.

“Egypt,” said Emily, “ consists of a nar-
row vale on both sides of the Nile, bounded



4. OVERFLOWING OF THE NILE.

by ridges of mountains, or hills. Nubia is on
the south; on the west, it joins the Great
Sandy Desert ; on the north, it is washed by
the Mediterranean, and on the east by the
Red Sea, except where it is joined to Asia by
the narrow neck of land called the Isthmus
of Suez.”

‘© T recollect more about Egypt now that
| Emily mentions the Nile,” exclaimed her
little brother; ‘“‘I have often heard of the
rushes that grew on the banks of that river —
the people used to make their paper of them,
and write all their books upon it—all that
they wrote; they placed the thin leaves of
the stem one over the other, then flattened
them, and plaited them as Fanny plaits her
little paper mats; so that one leaf lay one
way and another another way, and then they
were stuck together with the muddy water
of the Nile, and the leaves were dried and
pressed with heavy weights—and rubbed and
pressed again a great many times.”

“«« And,” said Owen, “ papa has often told
us, that in Egypt there is very little rain, and
that the Nile, at certain periods, overflows
its banks, and carries with its waters a rich
mud which renders the soil fruitful, without



ANTIQUITIES OF EGYPT. 5

that labour which the farmers in England
are obliged to bestow, before the fields are
fit to receive the grain. In Egypt they have
only to put the seeds into the ground.”

“ But if the Nile should not overflow, just
when they expected it,” said Bernard, “ what
would they do then ¢”

“This sometimes happens,” said Laura;
“but you will hear by and by of the means
employed to prevent the famine which is
generally occasioned by such a calamity, and
of the mode used to supply the deficiency, if
the river do not afford its usual assistance.”

“ Well, mamma,” said Owen, “ now that
we know where Egypt is—now for the Pyra-
mids ;—whereabouts are they, and for what
purpose were they erected *”

‘Not so fast, my love. I have not yet
told you that Egypt is divided into Upper,
Middle, and Lower; and that it is a country
renowned in history, having been once the
seat, if not the parent, of the sciences. It
is not only remarkable for those surprising
monuments of antiquity, the famous Pyra-
mids, which baffle the researches of the deep-
est antiquary to fix upon their origin, but also
for many other ‘ glorious structures,’ astonish-

B 3



6 BELZONI.

ing remains of ancient temples, pompous
palaces, obelisks, columns, statues, and paint-
ings. Thus is Egypt rendered interesting ;
and it is at the present time peculiarly so
to us, because a gentleman has lately, with
indefatigable zeal, made many researches in
that country; and his curious discoveries
among the pyramids and temples have excited
the public attention in no small degree. He
has spent many years in this arduous employ-
ment, and is now amply compensated in know-
ing that they have not been spent in vain.”

“Oh mamma!” exclaimed Emily, “ tell
me the name of this gentleman: why did
he go there? Was he fond of antiquities ?
How did he manage to enter the pyramids?
And what did he find in them?”

‘‘T cannot answer so many questions in a
breath, my little girl ; the name of the gentle-
man I mentioned is Bexzon1.” :

“ A native of England, mamma?”

‘* No: a native of Padua.”

‘¢ Padua, an ancient, large, and celebrated |
city of Italy,” said Laura, as she pointed to
the map.

‘‘Is it all true that you are going to tell
us, mother?” said Owen.



HYDRAULICS. 7

“Perfectly true. The account I propose
giving you of Egypt and Nubia is taken from
Belzoni’s own Travels, recently published. ,

‘‘ Unfortunate circumstances falling out
in his native country, compelled Belzoni to
leave it; and many years ago he came to
England. Here he married, and contrived
to live on his own industry, and the know-
ledge he had acquired in various branches
whilst at Rome, in which city he had’ spent
many of his juvenile years. He now turned
his thoughts to hydraulics, a science to which
he had before paid attention, and which in
the end was the principal cause of his going
to Egypt.”

‘Will you tell me, dear mamma,” said Ber-
nard, ** what is meant by hydraulics, and why
Belzoni should go into Egypt on thataccount?”

‘‘The science which has for its object the
motion of fluids is called hydraulics ; and
its principal object is to furnish us with the
means of conducting water from one situation
to another, by canals or other means. Bel-
zoni imagined that an hydraulic machine
would be of great use in Egypt to irrigate
the fields, which only want water to make

»”

them produce at any time of the year !



8 FERTILITY OF EGYPT.

“Then the soil is fertile, and the climate
warm, I suppose, mamma?” said Owen.

“Yes: the soil of Egypt is particularly
noted for the fertility occasioned by its won-
derful river; and while thinking of this, we
are led to observe the two beautiful prospects
which, owing to it, Egypt exhibits, at two
seasons of the year. During owr summer,
the climate there is excessively warm, and
it is impossible to describe a scene more de-
lightful than that which the country presents
at the first overflowing of the Nile: the spec-
tator beholds a spacious sea, spotted with
innumerable towns and villages, sometimes
contrasted with groves of palm trees, while
a magnificent display of sylvan and moun-
tainous scenery bounds the extensive pro-
spect.

‘© On the contrary, if the view be taken
when our gardens and fields are clothed in
the robes of winter, the whole country there
resembles one large meadow, covered with
the finest verdure, and enamelled with the
choicest flowers ; the plains embellished with
flocks and herds; the air, pure and salubri-
ous, scented with orange and lemon blossoms,
which blow in luxuriance.”



WINDS OF THE DESERT. 9

“ [ should like to live in Egypt, mamma!”
exclaimed Bernard.

But inconveniences are to be met with
there, as well as everywhere else, my love.
The heat is oppressive to all who are unused
to it; indeed, the southerly winds are some-
times so sultry as to oblige the natives to
‘mmure themselves in vaults or caves; and,
not unfrequently, these winds raise such
clouds of sand as to obscure the light of the
sun, and even to those who are used to them
to be almost insupportable., The people call
them poisonous winds, or winds of the De-
sert, and, during the three days that they
generally last, the streets are forsaken ; and
in a melancholy condition is the unfortunate
traveller whom they surprise remote from
shelter.”

“ I wonder,” exclaimed Emily, “‘ whether
Belzoni ever encountered them.”

“]T will begin my account, and then you
may hear a description of the various adven-
tures he met with. |

“ Some years after Mr. Belzoni had resided
in England, he formed the resolution of going
to the south of Europe; and, taking Mrs.
Belzoni with him, he visited Portugal and



== -

10 CAIRO.—BOOLAC.

Spain ; and, afterwards, the small but import-
ant isle of Malta, which lies to the south
of Sicily, and is celebrated for its fine port:
and the strength of its fortifications, now be-
longing to Great Britain. Hence they em-
barked for Egypt, and arrived in safety at
Alexandria.”

Emiry.—Here is Alexandria, mamma, on
the sea-coast: I have found it marked on the
map.

Mrs. A.—On entering the harbour of this
city, Belzoni wag informed that the plague
was there. To a European, who had never
been in that country, this was alarming intel-
ligence. Happily, however, it nearly ceased
in a short time ; and as his principal object
was to go on to Cairo, he hired a boat, and
they embarked with an English gentleman,
who was going up the Nile.

Brrnarv.—Here is Cairo, the capital of
Egypt, mamma; to the south of Alexandria.

Mrs. A.—This city is one hundred miles
from the mouth of the Nile. Owing to con-
trary winds, it was some days before our
travellers landed at Boolac, within a mile of
it. At this place a bustling scene presented
itself; and the majestic appearance of Turk-



BOOLAC. 11

ish soldiers in various costumes, Arabs of
many tribes, boats, camels, horses, and asses,
all in motion, formed a striking picture. Im-
mediately after landing, they went to Cairo ;
-but as the holy fathers of the convent of
Terrasanta could not receive women within
their walls, they were accommodated in an
old house at Boolac, belonging to a gentle-
man, the interpreter of Mahomed Ali, and
director of all foreign affairs. He was a man
of great acuteness of understanding, and well
disposed towards strangers.

Bernarp.—Who is Mahomed Ali, mam-
ma ?

Mrs. A.—The Turkish Viceroy, or Ba-
shaw, by whom Egypt is governed.

Owen.—I am glad that this interpreter
was agreeably disposed towards strangers ; as
I suppose that Belzoni had to apply through
his means to the Bashaw respecting his hy-
draulic machine, for which purpose he went to
Egypt, you know.

Mrs. A—Travellers are frequently obliged
to submit to inconvenience, and so were ours.
The house they inhabited was so old and
out of repair, that it appeared every moment
as though ready to fall on their heads: all



12 RESIDENCE AT BOOLAC.

the windows were shut up with broken wood-
en rails; the staircase was in so bad a condi-
tion that scarcely a step was left entire ; the
door was merely fastened by a pole placed
against it, having neither lock nor anything
else to secure the entrance. There were
many rooms in the house, but the ceiling in
all of them was in a most threatening state.
The whole furniture consisted of a single mat
in one of the best rooms, which they consider-
ed as the drawing-room.
Brrnarv.—Oh! what a curious drawing-
room ! supposing owrs had only a mat in it!
Mrs. A.—No chairs are to be had in this
country ; so they sat on the ground, and a
box and a trunk served asa table. Fortu-
nately they had a few plates as well as knives
and forks; and James, an Irish lad whom
they took with them, procured a set of culi-
nary articles. Such were the accommodations
our enterprising travellers met with at Boolac!
Although Belzoni’s chief object was not to
see antiquities at that time, yet he felt desir-
ous of visiting the famous pyramids.
Emity.--I think I have heard you say,
mamma, that they are at the foot of those
mountains which separate Egypt from Libya.



SUN-RISE FROM THE PYRAMIDS. 13

Mrs. A.—The English gentleman who ac-
companied Belzoni up the Nile, obtained an
escort of soldiers from the Bashaw, and went
with him to the pyramids one evening, intend-
ing to ascend one of them the following morn-
ing, to see the sun rise. Accordingly, they
were on the top long before the dawn of day.
The scene they beheld delighted them, being
grand and majestic beyond description. A
mist over the wide sandy plains formed a veil,
which vanished gradually as the sun rose,
and at length opened to their view that beau-
tiful land, once the site of Memphis. The
distant view of the smaller pyramids, on the
south, marked the extension of that vast ca-
pital ; while the solemn spectacle of the im-
mense sandy desert on the west, stretching as
far as the eye could reach, inspired sublime
feelings. The fertile land on the north, with
the winding course of the Nile descending
towards the sea; the rich appearance of Cairo
and its glittering minarets; the beautiful
plain, which extends from the pyramids to
that city; the thick groves of palm-trees in
the midst of the fertile valley,—altogether
formed a scene which Belzoni was well dis-
posed to enjoy.

by :



14 VISIT TO SACARA AND DAJIOR.

Bernarp.— Mamma, I do not understand
how Belzoni mounted the pyramid.

Mrs. A.—There are steps on the outside,
and by them he ascended it.

Having gratified his admiration, he went
with his friend round the next pyramid, and
examined several of the mausoleums; and
they returned to Cairo, highly delighted with
having seen a wonder they had long de-
sired, but never supposed they should have
the pleasure of beholding.

A few days after this time, a party was
formed to go to Sacara by water. After visit-
ing the pyramids at that place, they returned
to Cairo, except Mr. Turner, the English gen-
tleman, and Belzoni, who went on to Dajior,
and examined the remains of many other pyra-
mids there. When they came back to the
Nile, it was dark night, and they had to pass
several villages before they reached a place
where they could embark for Cairo. Their
road lay through a clusterof palm-trees, which,
as the moon was just rising, had a solemn ef-
fect. Some of the Arabs were dancing to the
usual tunes of their tambourines, and, forget-
ting their masters, the Turks, were happy for
a time. At length, Belzoni and his friend



RETURN TO CAIRO. 15

took a small boat, and arrived in Cairo before
morning. Two days after this time, the for-
mer was to be presented to the Bashaw, on
the subject of his hydraulic project.»

Emiuy.—I hope the Bashaw was pleased
with it, after Belzoni had taken so much pains
to promote the comfort of his people.

Mrs. A.—But poor Belzoni met with an
unfortunate accident, which detained him for
some time. He received a violent blow on
the leg from a soldier who was passing on
horseback, and was obliged to be taken to
the convent of Terrasanta.

Brernarv.—It must have been very desolate
to be laid up at such a place; and yet the
convent was, perhaps, more comfortable than
that shabby old house at Boolac. Did he
soon recover, mamma? I think that cruel
soldier had never heard your favourite sen-
tence, “Do as you would be done by.”

Mrs, A.—The common feelings of humanity
were strangers to his bosom. Belzoni, how-
ever, was well enough in a few days to be
presented to the Bashaw.

Owrn.—Is the Bashaw in the place of a
king? What sort of government is it in
Kgypt ?



16 GOVERNMENT OF EGYPT.

Mrs. A.—The form of government in
Egypt is called an aristocracy.

Owrn.— What is an aristocracy, mamma ’
I know that despotism implies the will of the
monarch to be the law; and that a limited
monarchy, as in England, indicates that the
king has only a part of the supreme power in
common with some of his subjects: but I do
not understand what you mean by an arist-
ocracy.

Mrs. A.—An aristocracy is a republican
state, wherein the supreme power is consigned
to nobles and peers. Since Egypt has been
under the dominion of the Turks, it has been
governed by a Bashaw, who resides at Cairo,
and has under him inferior governors in se-
veral parts of the country.

Emity.—I observed, mamma, when you
were talking of the Arabs enjoying the moon-
light under the palm-trees, and playing upon
their tambourines, that you said they were
forgetting their masters, the Turks. What
have Turks to do in Egypt.

Mrs. A.—The inhabitants of Egypt are
composed of different races of people. The
Turks think themselves entitled to be masters
of the country, because the Arabs (who are



MAHOMED ALI. 17

another race) were conquered by them: then
there are the Copts, who are descended from
the first Egyptians ; as well as many others,
under different denominations.

And now, having wandered from our sub-
ject, we will pursue it.

Bernarp.—Oh, Mamma! I want to hear
some of Belzoni’s adventures and escapes.

Mrs. A.—Adventures are delightful things
provided an escape follows. But you must
have patience, my boy. Belzoni made an
arrangement with the Bashaw, and undertook
to erect a machine which would raise as much
water with one ox as the machines of the
country could raise with four.

Owrn.—How did Mahomed Ali like it,
mamma? I expected that he was of too in-
dolent a disposition to admire anything new ;
he was a Turk, you know, and the Turks
are famed for their indolence.

Mrs. A.—You are right, my love, in
supposing that a person of an enervated turn
of mind cannot derive so much pleasure from
a new project as one of a more active dispo-
sition. Ali, however, received our Belzoni
very civilly, and was much pleased with his
proposition.

c3



- r,Y CL OE

i8 BELZONIS HYDRAULIC MACHINE,

Owrn.—And well he might be, when he
could foresee that, if put in execution, it
would spare the expense and labour of many
thousands of oxen. ,

Mrs. A.— Belzoni now commenced his
hydraulic machine. It was to be erected in
Soubra, at the garden of the Bashaw, on the
Nile, three miles from Cairo. He had many
difficulties to encounter, Bernard; for the
very persons who were necessary to furnish
him with wood, iron, carpentry, and so on,
unfortunately recollected that they should be
the first to suffer by it, if the machine suc-
ceeded. However, success is secure unless
energy fails, and Belzoni in time saw his
water-machine completed. But as he was
some time at Soubra, perhaps you may like
to hear how he passed the intervals, when
unoccupied by his work.

Bernarv.— Yes, dear mamma—TI like
him very much. What a clever man he
was |

Mus. A.—You see, my dear little boy,
that a great deal depends upon the turn
that is given to our early pursuits. The
science of hydraulics first became familiar
to Belzoni when he was a boy in Rome.



GARDEN OF THE SERAGLIO. 19

Bernarv.—I dare say he did not then
think of going to Egypt. How, mamma?

Mrs. A.—During his stay at Soubra, Bel-
zoni became acquainted with many Turks,
and particularly with the governor of the
palace, as his house was within his walls.
The garden of the Bashaw was under his
care, and a guard was kept at the gates.
The seraglio is so situated that it overlooks
the Nile; at the back of it is a beautiful
garden under the care of the Greeks, and
kept in excellent order. It is ornamented
with green bowers overhung with flowering
shrubs, and alcoves in the form of little
cupolas, around which the fragrant plants
twine their numerous tendrils, whilst water-
machines, constantly at work, keep up a per-
petual verdure.

Bernarp.— What a delightful place !
But then Belzoni’s were not the first water-
machines.

Mrs. A.—Not actually the first, my dear,
but the largest, the best calculated to answer
any important purpose. You, Emily, who
are so fond of flowers, will perhaps smile at
the amusements which delight the Bashaw
far more highly than watching the progress



Pas

20 THE BASHAW'S AMUSEMENT.

of his shrubs and plants. In the evening,
when the sun is declining in the west, he
quits his seraglio, and seats himself on the
banks of the Nile, with his guards, to fire at
an earthen pot on the opposite side.

Emity.—To fire at an earthen pot, when
in such a place! Ah, mamma? Mahomed
Ali is no botanist !

Owrn.—If he be no botanist, Emily, he is
an excellent marksman; for I ‘believe the
river at Soubra is wider than the Thames at
Westminster Bridge.

Mrs. A.— When it is dark, he vetites into
the garden, and reposes in a shady alcove, or
by the margin of some bubbling fountain, with
all his attendants around him, who endeavour
to amuse him and make him feel in good
humour with himself; whilst the murmuring
of the waters, the lively tunes of the musical
instruments, and the soft beams of the moon
reflected upon the surface of the Nile, height-
en the pleasures of the scene. Here Belzoni
was often admitted, and thus he had an op-
portunity of observing the domestic life of a
man who, from nothing, rose to be viceroy of
Kgypt and conqueror of the most powerful
tribes of Arabia.

gaan Te a te A



ELECTRICAL MACHINE. 21

The Bashaw seemed to be well aware of
the benefit that might be derived from his
encouraging the arts of Europe in his country,
and had already reaped some of the fruits of
it. The manufacture of gunpowder, the re-
fining of sugar, the making of fine indigo, and
the silk manufacture, were introduced much
to his advantage: he is constantly inquiring
after something new, and is delighted with
any novelty. He had heard of electricity,
and he sent to England for two electrical
machines.

Bernarp.—Oh, mamma! now he will be
amused ;—I hope he will receive a good shock.
Do you remember, Emily, our having one in
papa’s study, when you held a little chain,
and I held your hand, and Owen mine, and
we all jumped together ;—I hope this .elec-
trical machine will make Mahomed Ali jump.

Mrs. A.—One of them was broken by the
way; the other was dismounted. No one
could be found who knew how to set it up.
Belzoni happened to be at the garden one
night when they were attempting it, and he
was requested to put the pieces together ;
having done so, he desired one of the soldiers
to mount the insulating stool, when, charging



22 ELECTRIFYING THE BASHAW.

the machine, he gave the Turk a good shock,
who, being thus struck unawares, uttered a
loud ery and jumped off, extremely terrified.
The Bashaw laughed at the man for doing so,
supposing his alarm was a pretence, and not
the effect of the machine; and when told
that it was actually occasioned by the machine,
he positively affirmed that it could not be, for
the soldier was at such a distance that it was
impossible the small chain he held in his hand
could have such power.

Owen.—And how did Belzoni manage to
convince Ali, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—He desired the interpreter to
inform his Highness, that if he would have
the goodness to mount the stool, he would be
convinced of the fact. He hesitated for a
moment whether to believe it or not ; however
he mounted the stool. Belzoni charged well,
put the little chain into his hand, and gave
him a smart shock. He jumped off like the
soldier, on feeling the effect of the electricity,
and threw himself on the sofa, laughing im-
moderately, and unable to conceive how the
machine could have such power on the human
body.

Brrnarp.—How very droll Mahomed Ali



ARAB WEDDING. 23

must have looked when he was standing upon
that little stool, and especially when he found
himself forced to jump off! I like your
story much, very much, mother; and [ do
so, because it is true.

Mrs. A.—The Arabs of Soubra display
as much festivity when a marriage of con-
sequence takes place, as those of any of the
villages in Egypt. One happened while Bel-
zoni was there; and as the windows of his
house overlooked the spot where it was per-
formed, he had an opportunity of witnessing
the ceremony. Early in the morning of the
grand holiday, a high pole was reared in the
centre of the place with a banner belonging
to the village.

«A banner!” whispered Bernard.

‘A streamer, or flag,”’ said Laura; and
Mrs. A. continued:—A large assembly of
people gathered under it, and preparations
were made for an illumination with glass
lamps; music was also prepared.

Emity.—Then, I suppose, the Arabs
from other villages came to the feast also,
beating their tambourines and waving their
flags.

Mrs. A.—You are right; but they re-





24 DANCING AND FESTIVITIES.

mained at some distance from the pole, until
invited to advance.

Emiry.—I fancy, mamma, that the pole
was like that round which the village girls
fasten their garlands on May-day.

Mrs. A.—Very probably. The old peo-
ple seated themselves round and under the
pole, and the strangers were placed at a little
distance. One of them began to sing, while
the rest divided themselves into two parties,
forming two circles, one within the other,
round the pole, and facing each other.

Bernarpv.—I understand, mamma. _ I sup-
pose each man put his arms over his neigh-
bour’s shoulders, and thus formed a chain.

Mrs. A.—Exactly so. The outer circle
stood still, while the people of the inner cir-
cle kept dancing and bowing in an orderly
manner to those in the outer one. Thus
they continued three hours, and those who
were not in these circles made separate rings
by themselves.

Emity.—So this is the mode of dancing
among the Arabs, mamma. How different
from ours? But where were the ladies in the
mean time ?

Mrs. A.—AIl the women were at a dis-



HYDRAULIC MACHINE. 25

tance by themselves, and among them was the
bride. When the dancing and singing were
ended, they all sat down, and a great quantity
of boiled rice was brought to them in wooden
bowls, as well as some dishes of melokie
and bamies, and three or four sheep roasted,
which were soon torn to pieces and devoured.

Bernarv.—Melokie and bamies, mamma!
What are they ?

Mrs. A.—Plants eaten in common by the
Arabs as greens. A number of boys were
fully employed during the whole ceremony
in fetching water from the Nile. At night,
the little coloured lamps were lighted, a band
of tambourines played continually, and the
entertainment ended as it had commenced
with a dance.

Emuy.—I am sure, mamma, that I do
not envy those dancing Arabs. And now, let
us turn to Belzoni. How long was it before his
machine was ready for the Bashaw to see it?

Mrs. A.—Belzoni completed his under-
taking in time. It was constructed on the
principle of a crane with a walking-wheel, in
which a single ox, by its own weight alone,
could effect as much as four oxen employed in
the machines of the country.

D



26 HYDRAULIC MACHINE.

Owern.—Then Belzoni managed his ma-
chine in spite of the difficulties he had to en-
counter with the self-interested workmen.

Mrs. A.—Yes: he was of too enterprising
a disposition to give up a work which was the
chief cause of his going into that country.

Bernarv.— Before you go on, mamma,
will you tell me what you mean by a crane?
—there is a picture of a crane in my Be-
wick—but I cannot at all make out what is
meant by a crane with a walking-wheel.

Owrn.—The crane of which mamma
speaks, Bernard, is not a bird—but a ma-
chine used in building, for raising and lower-
ing huge stones, heavy weights, and sometimes
water, you see.

Mrs. A.—It is a technical term in mecha-
nics, my love; and I will try, by and by,
to explain to you what is meant by a crane
with a walking-wheel.

The Bashaw came to Soubra to examine
the hydraulic machine. It was set to work
and succeeded admirably, drawing in the same
space of time six or seven times as much
water as the common machines.

Bernarp.—Ah! Belzoni is well repaid,
mamma. And the Egyptian farmers may



HYDRAULIC MACHINE. 27

sow their seed, without being afraid of a
famine. Even if the Nile do not overflow,
they can raise water, and water their fields
so nicely.

Mrs. A.—Our best endeavours, though
they sometimes appear at first to be crown-
ed with success, may afterwards defeat the
purpose for which they were intended. So it
was with those of our ingenious friend. The
Bashaw took it into his head to have the ox
taken out of the wheel, in order to see, by
way of frolic, what effect the machine would
have by putting fifteen men into it. Poor
James the Irish lad, you know, entered along
with them; but no sooner had the wheel
turned once round than they all jumped out,
leaving the boy alone in it. The wheel, of
course, overbalanced by the weight of the
water, turned back with such velocity that
the catch was unable to stop it. James was
thrown out, and in the fall broke one of his
thighs. Belzoni contrived to stop the wheel
before it did farther injury, which might have
been fatal to him.

Owxrn.—How shocking, mamma! I am
not at all pleased with those fifteen men, and
I foresee what is coming. The Turks are



28 SUPERSTITION.

so superstitious, that they would consider
such an accident happening to a new inven-
tion as a bad omen, and thus I fear Belzoni's
ingenuity will be thrown away.

Mrs. A.—You are not mistaken. The
Bashaw was persuaded to abandon the affair ;
and the project of Belzoni being thus con-
signed to oblivion, he turned his thoughts
to the antiquities of the country, and, pos-
sessing a spirit for investigation, determined
to make some researches.

A gentleman of the name of Burckhardt,
had for a long time premeditated the removal
of a colossal bust, known by the name of
young Memnon, to England, and had often
tried to persuade Ali to send it as a present
to his Majesty ; however, the Turk did not
suppose it worth sending to so great a person.
But Belzoni, knowing how much that gentle-
man wished it, proposed to undertake its con-
veyance from Thebes to Alexandria, and, with
the Bashaw’s consent, to forward it from
thence to England. He now, therefore, pre-
pared to go up the Nile.

Emity.—At present he is at Soubra, three
miles from Cairo; and where is the bust,
mamma? Had Belzoni any motive for wish-



MEMNON'S STATUE. 29

ing to remove it, besides that of pleasing his
friend !

Mrs. A.—He was directed to search for
this immense statue on the southern side
of a ruined temple, in the vicinity of a vil-
lage called Gournou, near Carnac, and it
was intended to present it to the British
Museum.

Emity.—Here is Carnac, mamma, just by
Thebes; I have traced the course of the
Nile from Cairo, with my little finger, upon
the map, until it has brought me to it. Gour-
nou is not marked, but I know its situation.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni was requested to spare
neither expense nor trouble, in getting it con-
veyed to the banks of the river as speedily
as possible: so he hired a boat, with four
sailors, a boy, and a captain. Everything
was soon ready for their departure from Sou-
bra. The whole of the implements for the
operation of removing the bust consisted of
a few poles and ropes of palm-leaves. Mrs.
Belzoni accompanied her husband, and they
agreed to stay and examine any ruins they
might. pass on the road.

Bernarv.—But poor James, the Irish
boy—where was he, mamma ?

D3



30 VOYAGE UP THE NILE.

Mrs. A.—He was, happily, able to accom-
pany them. And now, you must follow
their course on the map, from Boolac, where
they embarked, to Thebes. In six days
they arrived at Siout, the capital of Upper
Egypt, and from thence they went to Acmin,
where they landed to visit the fathers of a
convent ; and again proceeded, with curiosity
highly raised, towards the noted temple of
Tentyra. This is the first, as well as the
most magnificent, Egyptian temple the tra-
veller sees on ascending the Nile. It is
two miles from the banks of the river; and
Belzoni and his party, having landed, set
off on asses, and proceeded to the ruins.
Little could be seen of the temple till they
came near it, as it is surrounded by high
mounds of rubbish.

Bernarv.—Ah, Belzoni! I should like
to have ridden on my own little Smiler be-
side you !

Mrs. A.— When he arrived there, he was
for some time at a loss to know in what
part to begin his examinations. The numer-
ous objects before him struck him with sur-
prise and astonishment—the immense masses
of stone employed in the edifice—the ma-



i HaCaT AON ANA H OLIED

Tai |

ao A

Yi )
i

A
AD LL

TEMPLE OF TENTYRA.

iy

(ome.

Pf
vat ty
ai}





TEMPLE OF TENTYRA. 31

jestic appearance of its construction—the
variety of its ornaments, and the excellent
preservation in which he found it, had such
an effect upon Belzoni, that he seated him-
self on the ground, lost in delight and ad-
miration. |

Lavra. —I suppose, mamma, that this
temple is the cabinet of the Egyptian arts,
—and I think I have heard papa say, that
it is supposed to have been built during the
reign of the first Ptolemy.

Mrs. A.—It is not improbable that he
who studied to render himself beloved by
his people might erect such an edifice, to
convince the Egyptians of his superiority of
mind over the ancient kings of Egypt, even
in religious devotion. It will take us too
long to describe this famous temple mi-
nutely :—when Mr, and Mrs. Belzoni had
gratified their curiosity, they returned to
their little boat, and embarked for Thebes.

Emiy.—They will soon have completed
their voyage, and then for the great colossal
bust.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni says, that it is impos-
sible to imagine the scene displayed by the
extensive ruins at Thebes. It appeared to



32 RUINS OF THEBES.

him, on entering it, like a city of giants,
who had been all destroyed, leaving only
the remains of various temples, as proofs of
their former existence. The attention is at-
tracted on one side by towering ruins that
project above a noble wood of palm-trees,
and there the traveller enters an endless num-
ber of temples, columns, obelisks, and por-
tals. On every side, he finds himself among
wonders. The immense colossal figures
in the plains, the number of tombs hollowed
in the rocks, those in the great valley of
the kings, with their paintings, sculptures,
mummies, and figures, are all objects worthy
of admiration ; and one cannot fail to won-
der how a nation which was once so great as
to erect these stupendous edifices, could so
far fall into oblivion, that even its language
and writing are totally unknown to us.
Having taken a survey of this seat of an-
cient grandeur, Belzoni crossed the Nile, and
bent his way towards the ruined temple near
Gournou. It stands elevated above the plain.
He entered the groups of columns, facing the
numerous tombs excavated in the high rock
behind them; and his first thought was to
examine the bust he had to take away. He







REMOVAL OF THE STATUE. 33

found it on the southern side of the temple,
near the remains of its body and chair, with
the face upwards. It was beautiful and of
immense size. Laura, who has seen it in the
British Museum, will be able to give you a
more accurate account of it.

Bernarp.—! cannot imagine, mamma, how
Belzoni could attempt to remove it; you
know he had only some poles, and some ropes
of palm-leaves—and palm-leaf ropes, made
ever so strong, would not be able to support
such a weight. I think he had better con-
trived a car, somewhat like that which the
African sheep has to rest its tail upon, in
“ Church’s Cabinet,”—and by this means he
might have brought it to the Nile, and then
had it placed in a boat, and conveyed to
Cairo.

Mrs. A.—No bad scheme, my little boy!
Belzoni’s whole set of implements consisted
of fourteen poles, eight of which he did em-
ploy in making a car, similar to what you
have proposed, four ropes of palm-leaves, and
four rollers—they were better than wheels:
and he now began to be very busy.

Emity.—As the bust was some way from
the Nile, it would have been too far for them



34 REMOVAL OF THE STATUE,

to go to sleep in the boat every night. How
did they manage about that ?

Mrs. A.—A small hut was formed for
them of stones, among the ruins of the tem-
ple.

Brernarv.—They were handsomely lodged,
however, mamma! But perhaps this little
hut might be as comfortable as the shabby
old house at Boolac, which they were always
expecting to fall upon their heads. But now
for the bust !

Mrs. A.—The season at which the Nile
usually overflows was fast approaching, and
all the lands which extend from the temple
to the water-side would have been covered in
the course of a month.

Brrnarv.—Then I advise Mr. Belzoni to
wait till that time, and then to put his head
in a boat, and row, row it away !

Mrs. A.—No such easy matter. The
ground between the bust and the river was
very uneven, so that unless it had been
conveyed over those places before the inun-
dation commenced, it would have been im-
possible to effect it. Belzoni, therefore,
lost no time. With some difficulty, he
procured a number of men, and agreed to





REMOVAL OF THE STATUE. 35

give them thirty paras a-day, which is equal
to four-pence halfpenny English money, if
they would undertake to assist him. A car-
penter made a car, somewhat like that which
supports the tail of your African sheep,
Bernard, only very large ; and the first ope-
ration was to place the bust upon this simple
carriage. The people of Gournou, who were
familiar with Caphany, as they named it, were
persuaded that it could never be removed
from the spot where it lay, and when they
saw, what to them appeared so impossible,
they set up a shout, and could not believe that
it was the effect of their own efforts. The
next thing was to place it on the car. Can
you guess how Belzoni managed this busi-
ness ¢

Bernarv.—I1 fancy, mamma, that he
bound the palm-leaf ropes round and round
Caphany very fast, and very firmly, and then
the men tried and tried until they had lifted
him up, and placed him uponit.

Mrs. A.—Ah, my little friend! you do
not evince much knowledge of the mechani-
cal powers, or you could not suppose that
this image would be moved by mere personal
strength.— Now, Owen, what is your opinion?



36 REMOVAL OF THE STATUE.

Owen.—I should think, mamma, that by
means of levers the bust might be raised so
as to leave a vacancy under it, and then the
car might be introduced by some of the peo-
ple, who were standing ready. After Capha-
ny had been lodged on this, the car itself
might be raised so as to get one of the rollers
beneath, and if the same operation were per-
formed at the back, he would be ready to
be pulled up;—and then, if you please,
Bernard, your palm-leaf ropes may come in
use, to tie him to the carriage, and draw him
along.

Mrs. A.— Well, Owen, I am _ pleased
with your conjecture. This is the very me-
thod Belzoni pursued; and when he had
succeeded in getting it removed some yards
from its original place, he sent an Arab to
Cairo, with the intelligence that the bust
had begun its journey to England. Our in-
genious friend reminds me of a remark made
by a celebrated writer, ‘that it is by small
efforts frequently repeated that man completes
his greatest undertakings, to have attempted
which, at one effort, would have baffled his
ability,” for he had still many difficulties
to encounter. When the Arabs found that





—

REMOVAL OF THE STATUE. 37

they received money for the removal of a
stone, they fancied that it was filled with
gold in the inside, and that a thing of such
value ought not to be permitted to be taken
away. However, the next day, and the next,
and the next, Caphany advanced slowly for-
ward; and, after many delays, owing to the
softness of the sand, the desertion of some
of the workmen, the fear of an inundation,
&c., Belzoni had the gratification of seeing
his young Memnon arrive on the banks of the
Nile. ; |

Emiry.—It is quite true, as you say,
mamma, that perseverance is generally crown-
ed with success. But it yet remains to put
the colossus ina boat; it has a long, long
way to go down the Nile before it arrives
at Cairo; and I expect Belzoni intends to
stop there, to show it to Mahomed Ali.

Mrs. A.—He intends doing so; but no
boat is to be had. We must therefore leave
the bust where it is for the present, and
accompany him, if you please, into one of
the caves that are scattered about the moun-
tain of Gournou, and are celebrated for the
number of mummies they contain ; he wished
to see a famous sarcophagus which was in

E



38 MUMMY-CAVES AT GOURNOU.

one of them, and thither he went. You
know what mummies are.

Owrn.—Mummies are the bodies of dead
persons, which have been wrapped up in a
great many bandages to preserve them; and
a sarcophagus is a sort of tomb or coffin.

Mrs. A.—-Two Arabs and an interpreter
accompanied Belzoni. Previously to enter-
ing the cave, they took off the greater part
of their clothes, and each having a candle,
they advanced through a cavity in the rock,
which extended a considerable length in the
mountain, sometimes high, sometimes very
narrow, and sometimes so low that Belzoni
and his attendants were obliged to creep on
their hands and knees. Thus they went on,
till he perceived they were at a great dis-
tance from the entrance; and the way had
become so intricate that he depended en-
tirely on the two Arabs to conduct him out
again.

Owrn.—I do not envy his situation now,
mamma—you know Arabs are sometimes
treacherous. )

- Mrs. A.—At length, they arrived. in a

* large. place, into which many: other ‘holes
* wr cavities, opened; and, after some exami-





INTERIOR OF THE CAVES. 39

nation by the Arabs, they entered one of
them, which was very narrow, and continued
downward for a long way, through a craggy
passage, till they came where two other aper-
tures led to the interior in a horizontal direc-
tion. One of the Arabs then said, ‘* This is
the place.”

Owen.—Oh, mamma ! How I should have
trembled ! Poor Belzoni ! Far from the light
of day—in a dark craggy passage, in the
midst of a dismal mummy cave, and attended
only by two Arabs and one other man!

Mrs. A.—Dismiss your fears, my love.
The Arab pointed out this spot as being
the situation of the sarcophagus; but Bel-
zoni could not conceive how anything so large
as it had been described to him could have
been taken through so small an aperture.
He had no doubt but these recesses were bu-
rial-places, as skulls and bones were strewed in
all directions; but the sarcophagus could never
have entered an aperture which even Belzoni
himself could not pass through. One of the
Arabs, however, succeeded, as did the inter-
preter, and it was agreed that Belzoni and
the other Arab should wait their return.
They certainly proceeded to a great distance,



40 ALARMING SITUATION.

for the light disappeared, and only a mur-
muring sound from their voices could be dis-
tinguished as they went on. After a few
moments, a loud noise was heard, and the
interpreter distinctly crying, “‘ O mon Diew !
mon Dieu ! Je suis perdu !”—a solemn silence
ensued.

Emury.—Oh, mamma, how dreadful ! Then
he is really lost !

Mrs. A.—Belzoni asked the Arab whether
he had ever been in that place. He replied,
“¢ Never!”

Emity.—I think, mamma, that it would
have been his best plan to return and procure
help from the other Arabs.

Mrs. A.—He wished to do so, but when
he desired the man to show him the way out
again, he said he did not know the road !
He then called—no answer was returned—
all was still as death—he watched for a long
time—no candle appeared, and his own was
almost burnt out.

Owxn.—This was an adventure indeed,
mamma! I am sadly afraid the Arabs had
some design on his life—do you not think he
had better have endeavoured to find his way
to the entrance?







ALARMING SITUATION. 4]

Mrs. A.—It was a complete labyrinth ;
however, he managed to return through some
of the passages to that place where, as I told
you just now, there were many cavities. Here
again he was puzzled ; but at last, seemg one
which appeared to be right, they proceeded
through it along way. Their candles appear-
ed likely to leave them in the dark, and in
that case their situation would have been yet
more deplorable.

Bernarv.—Why did not Belzoni put his
own out, and save the other ?—the Arab had
one, you know.

Mrs A.— Belzoni had more forethought
than my little Bernard has,—supposing that
one had, by some accident, been extinguished?

Bernarv.—Right, mamma: — I forgot
that.

Mrs. A.—At this time, supposing them-
selves near the outside of the tomb, what
was their disappointment on finding there
was no outlet, and that they must retrace
their steps to the place whence they had
entered this cavity. They strove to regain
it, but were as perplexed as ever, and were
both exhausted from the ascents and descents

they were obliged to pass. The Arab seat-
E 3



42 A HAPPY RELEASE.

ed himself, but every moment of delay was
dangerous.

Owern.—I wonder Belzoni’s ingenuity did
not make him think of putting a mark at
the entrance of each cavity as he examined
it, and that plan, you know, might have
helped him a little.

Mrs. A.—He did so, but unfortunately
their candles were not long enough to last
so many researches. However, hope, the
cheering star of life, darts a ray of light
through the thickest gloom; and encour-
aged by it they began their operations. On
the second attempt, when passing before a
small aperture, Belzoni fancied he heard
something like the roaring of the sea at a
distance. In consequence, they entered this
opening: and, as they advanced, the noise
increased, till they could distinctly hear a
number of voices all at one time.

Bernarp.— What joy this must have given
them! As much joy as it gave Owen to hear
papa’s voice in the wood, when he was lost
whilst we were gathering nuts last summer—
perhaps more: for, I am sure, I would rather
be lost in a nice green wood than in an Egyp-
tian mummy-cave !





RAL AERP

DUPLICITY OF THE ARABS. 43

Mrs. A.—At last they waiked out, and,
to their no small surprise, the first person
who presented himself was the interpreter.
How he came to be there seemed astonish-
ing. He told them, that in proceeding with
the Arab along the passage below they came
to a pit which they did not see, and that
the Arab fell into it, and in falling put out
both candles. It was then that he cried out,
“O mon Diew! mon Dieu! Je suis perdu!”
as he thought he also should have fallen into
the pit ; but, on raising his head, he saw, at a
great distance, a glimpse of daylight, toward
which he advanced, and thus arrived at a
small aperture. He then scraped away
some loose sand and stones, to widen the
opening, when he came out, and went to
give the alarm to the Arabs, who were at
the other entrance. Being all concerned for
the man who fell to the bottom of the pit,
it was their noise that Belzoni had heard
in the cave. The place by which the inter-
preter had escaped was instantly widened ;
and, in the confusion, the Arabs did not
regard letting Belzoni see that they were
acquainted with ¢hat entrance, and that it
had lately been shut up. He was not long



44 DECEIT OF THE ARABS.

in detecting their schemes. They had in-
tended to show him the sarcophagus without
letting him see the way by which it might
be taken out, and then to stipulate a price
for the secret ; as it was in reality but one
hundred yards from the great entrance.

Emmy.—So with this view they had taken
him that round-about way! Well, they
paid dear for their intended deception! But
the man in the pit, mamma—what became
of him?’

Mrs. A.—He was taken out of the well,
but so much hurt as to be lame ever after.
Thus the Arabs defeated their own purpose,
and proved that self-interest indeed is blind.
When men stoop to the meanness of equivo-
cation or deceit, especially in hopes of pro-
moting their own good, they are artful, but
not wise; for, as we can only judge of the
circumstances of the present moment, and
cannot foresee consequences, it is very likely,
as it proved with the Arabs, that our cunning
will bring us into still greater difficulties.
It is also certain to deprive us of confidence
in the protecting care of Providence, which,
as I have often told you, is the greatest sup-
port and comfort in every trouble.





:
BELZONIS COURAGE. 45

Bernarv.—I am glad Belzoni escaped,
mamma! I would never have trusted my-
self with those deceitful Arabs again !— But
where is Caphany all this time, with his palm-
leaf ropes ¢

Mrs. A.—Two guards were attending
him by night and by day. Belzoni at length
sent to Cairo for a boat; but, as he knew
it could not arrive for some time, he formed
an enclosure of earth all round the bust,
and spent the mean time in visiting various
antiquities.

Emity.—Then his courage was not daunt-
ed by that alarm, mamma! Many people
would not have ventured into mummy-caves,
at all events, again. How could he preserve
his mind from fear ?

Mrs. A.—By not indulging in it.

Owen. — Right, right! I like Belzoni,
because he possessed real courage—did he
not, mamma?—real fortitude! Although
he was a little terrified when alone with
the Arab in that dismal place, yet he did
not let that fear prevent his undertaking
other projects. When I am a man, mother,
I mean to be a traveller, and to possess as
much perseverance as owr Belzoni !



46 KHALIL BEY.

Mrs. A.—Experience will teach you, my
love, that it is not a very easy thing for one
unaccustomed to an arduous life to pass on
a sudden from the midst of comfort and in-
dulgence to one that is so irregular.

Belzoni determined to go up the Nile into
Nubia, and to leave the bust where it was
during his absence. He sent James to
Cairo, and discharged the carpenter, so that
a small party only remained, and then set.
off for Esne.

Emity.—Here is Esne, only a few miles
from Thebes, I suppose: not a very great
way, mamma.

Mrs. A.—There they landed just in time
to see Khalil Bey, with whom they had
become acquainted, some time before, in
Soubra.

Bernarv.—Who was Khalil Bey? We
have not heard his name before.

Mrs. A.—He was appointed to the govern-
ment of the Upper Provinces from Esne to
Assouan.

Bernarv.— Did he receive Belzoni po-
litely ?

Mrs. A.—Yes; he was just returned from
an excursion into the country, and was much





EGYPTIAN CUSTOMS. 4:7

pleased to see him. Our traveller found him,
with his pipe and coffee, seated on a sofa
made of earth, and covered with fine carpet
and satin cushions, surrounded by a great
number of his chiefs, Cacheffs, and Santons.
Khalil Bey was an Albanian, but his mode
of life was similar to that of the Egyptians
in general,

Brernarpv.— What is that, mamma !

Mrs. A.—The Egyptian rises with the
sun to enjoy the morning air; his favourite
pipe and beverage are brought to him, and he
reclines at ease on his sofa. Slaves, with
their arms crossed, remain silent at the far
end of the chamber, with their eyes fixed on
him, seeking to anticipate his smallest wants.
His children standing in his presence, unless
he permits them to be seated, preserve every
appearance of tenderness and respect: he
gravely caresses them, gives them his blessing,
and sends them back to the harem. He only
questions and they reply with modesty :
they are not allowed that free intercourse
with their parents which you enjoy.

Bernarp.—How strange it would appear
to us, mamma! I am sure I should be
miserable, if I were obliged to be so prim!



48 EGYPTIAN CUSTOMS.

Never to talk to my own papa! Papa him-
self would not be happy !

Mrs. A.—I grant that there is a great deal
of difference between your papa and an Egyp-
tian father, my dear boy. But custom, you
know, reconciles us to everything. The little
natives of that country, having never known
the pleasures of social enjoyment and tender
‘ntercourse with their parents, of course can-
not lament their loss.

Owen.—I think, mamma, that the Egyp-
tian father appears to be the chief, the judge,
and the pontiff, of his family? But does
he spend the rest of the day reclining on his
sofa

Mrs. A.—Breakfast ended, he transacts
the business of his trade or office. When
visitors come, he receives them without many
compliments, but in an endearing manner.
His equals are seated beside him, with their
legs crossed : his inferiors kneel, and sit upon
their heels.

Bernarp.—Ah, mamma ! that is as the
little Laplanders do, around the fire in their
comfortable huts.

Mrs. A.—People of distinction are fa-
youred with a place on a raised sofa, whence





EGYPTIAN CUSTOMS. 49

they overlook the company. When every
person is placed, the slaves bring pipes and
coffee, and set the perfume brasier in the
middle of the chamber, the air of which is
impregnated with its odours; and afterwards
they present sweetmeats and sherbet.

When the visit is almost ended, a slave,
bearing a silver plate, on which precious
essences are burning, goes round to the com-
pany : each, in turn, perfumes the beard, and
then sprinkles rose-water on the head and
hands. This being the last ceremony, the
guests are permitted to retire.

About noon, the table is prepared, and the
refreshments are brought in a large tray of
tinned copper, and, though not great variety,
there is great plenty. In the centre is generally
a dish of rice, cooked with poultry, and highly
flavoured with spice and saffron. Round this
are hashed meats, pigeons stuffed, cucumbers,
and delicious melons and fruits. The guests
seat themselves on a carpet round the table ;
a slave brings water in one hand, and a basin
in the other, to wash. This is an indispensable
ceremony, where each person puts his hand
into the dish, and where the use of forks is
unknown: it is repeated when the meal is

F



50 EGYPTIAN CUSTOMS.

ended. After dinner, they retire to the
harem, where they slumber some hours among
their wives and children. ... Such is the
ordinary life of the Egyptians. |

Laura.What a monotonous way of
spending their time, mamma ! Our intellec-
tual pleasures seem unknown to them! The
days appear to be passed in repeating the same
thing, in following the same customs, without
a wish or a thought beyond. And, mamma,
how do you, who are such an admirer of in-
dustry, tolerate their excessive indolence.

Mrs. A..We must remember, my love,
that nine months of the year the body is op-
pressed by heat; and that, as inaction under
a temperate climate is painful, so here repose
is enjoyment. Effeminate indolence is born
with the Egyptian, grows as he grows, and
descends with him to the grave. It influences
his inclinations and governs his actions; and,
far from daily wishing to obtain knowledge
and enlarge the mental powers, he sighs only
for calm tranquillity.

Owrn.—Well, mamma! I will allow the
idle, solemn, and patient Egyptian some little
excuse, on the strength of the sultry climate
which he endures two-thirds of the year. I





EDFU.——ASSOUAN. 51

know that heat does make one feel languid
and indolent: when I had been haymaking
with Frederick last Tuesday, and came home
so warm in the evening, I was obliged to lie
on the sofa in the breakfast-room, while my
cousins were amusing themselves with papa’s
portfolio in the library, although I particularly
wished to join them. Now, if you please, we
will go back to Belzoni: we left him at Esne,
with Khalil Bey.

Mrs. A.—After smoking a few pipes, and
drinking as many cups of coffee, he left the
Bey and returned to the boat. The follow-
ing day, they continued their voyage, and
arrived at Edfu, where a temple, which might
be compared with that of Tentyra, tempted
our antiquary to land. Having been highly
gratified here, they proceeded to Ombos: the
ruins that are left at this place gave them a
clear idea of what it had been. Our party
proceeded, and, before their arrival at Assouan,
landed on the western bank of the Nile. Here
the country presented a more pleasing aspect
than any they had passed since the Chained
Mountains. Palm-trees in great abundance
grow on each side of the river, and some
cultivated spots of ground extend from the



52 ISLAND OF ELEPHANTIS.

Nile to the mountains. The old town of
Assouan stands on a hill, which overhangs
the river: on its left isa forest of palm-trees,
which hides the modern town ; and on its
right is the distant view of a granite mountain,
that forms the first of the celebrated cataracts.
The island of Elephantis seems to interfere
with the barrenness of the western banks,
and fills the ground with picturesque groups
of various trees. Our travellers landed at
the foot of a hill on the left of the Nile,
and went to see the ruins of a convent on a
high rock, where they observed many grot-
toes, which had served as chapels for Christian
worship. The convent is formed of several
small arched cells, distinct from each other,
and commands a view of the cataract and
adjacent country, with the lower part of the
Nile.

Bernarp.— What is granite, mamma?

Mrs. A.—A sort of stone, composed of
separate and very large concretions, rudely
joined together.

When Belzoni returned to the boat, the
sun was tinging the horizon with its last
beams, and the shades of the western moun-
tains had reached across the Nile, and covered



xi on Bie cs pilbici tic dit mates

ae

a Pod Ne Beet
. wt

AGA OF ASSOUAN. 53

the town. He found the Aga (a person
employed by the Turkish Government) and
all his retinue seated on a mat, under a
cluster of palm-trees, close to the water.

Owrn.—Ha! ha! I guess the Aga is
smoking his pipe and drinking his coffee, ac-
cording to custom, and talking of camels,
horses, asses, caravans, or boats; nothing
very intellectual, Laura!

Bernarp.—Had Belzoni anything to do
with this Aga, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—Yes: he made application to
him for a boat to carry them to Nubia, and
presented to him some tobacco, soap, and
coffee, which were gladly accepted ; he was
a selfish sort of person, and asked a great
price for the use of the boat; engaging,
however, that one should be ready in a day
or two.

The next morning Belzoni went to see
the isle of Elephantis: he crossed the Nile in
a tiny bark, made of the branches of palm-
trees, fastened together with small cords, and
covered on the outside with a mat, pitched
all over. The principal object of attraction
there was a temple of great antiquity, built

on rocks of blue granite: on the western
F 3



54 PHILOE.——DEIR.

bank of the island are many cassia and sy-
camore trees. Having gratified his curiosity,
Belzoni returned ; and, as the Aga’s boat
was now in readiness, he determined to as-
cend the Nile to the second cataract, during
the interval required for the arrival of the
boat from Cairo, which was to convey the
colossal bust. They therefore embarked, and,
on the following morning, long before the
rising of the sun, Belzoni stood at the stern,
waiting for its first beams to unveil the beau-
tiful island of Philoé; and he had much
gratification in taking a hasty view of its ruins,
without stopping to examine them minutely,
as he hoped to return that way: he, how-
ever observed several blocks of stones, and
an obelisk, which he thought might be
easily removed.

Emiy.—Here is Philoé, mamma, in the
middle of the Nile, somewhat south of As-
souan.

Mrs. A.—As the wind was favourable,
they again set sail, and arrived in the course
of a few days at Deir.

Emiry.—My little finger has arrived at
Deir also, mamma ; it is the capital of Lower

Nubia.



ar

ee

|
4
ae
a
4



HASSAN CACHEFF. 55

Mrs. A.—This town consists of several
groups of houses, built of earth intermixed
with stones, and covered with reeds.

Bernarp.—Oh, mamma! somewhat like
the little bamboo huts in Peru. . But how
high are they ?

Mrs. A.—Their height is generally about
eight or ten feet; the height of the parlour
we are in is between eight and ten feet. At
the foot of the sloping and rocky hill is a
small temple; but Belzoni could not go to
see it, as he observed that they were closely
watched.

Bernarv.— Why were they watched, mam-
ma !

Mrs. A.—You shall hear. Belzoni went
immediately to Hassan Cacheff, who receiv-
ed him with an air of suspicion, and wanted
to know his business. He told him, that
he ascended the Nile merely to seek for an-
tiquities, and that he wished to proceed as
far as the Shellah, or second Cataract. This,
the Cacheff said, was impossible: for the
people in the upper country were at war with
each other. He then ordered his mat to be
brought to him, seated himself close before
the door of his house, and invited Belzoni



56 -RAPACITY OF THE CACHEFF.

to sit also. The first question he asked him
was, whether he had any coffee. Belzoni
replied, that they had a little on board for
their own use, but that he should have half
of it. He next asked for soap, and received
the same reply. Then he enquired if he
had any tobacco; Belzoni said that he had
a few pipes, and they would smoke together.
This pleased Hassan Cacheff. The next
question was, whether he had any powder ;
and the answer he received was, that they
had very little, and could not spare any.
At this Hassan laughed; and, putting his
hand on Belzoni’s shoulder, he said, “ You
are English and can make powder wherever
you go.”

Owrn.—I should think Belzoni was glad
that he thought so; and he had better leave
him under this impression, before the selfish,
troublesome Cacheff asks anything more.

Mrs. A.—The pipes are not smoked yet,
my dear. By this time, however, the to-
bacco was brought, and the operation begun.
Hassan still persisted in it that Belzoni’s
sailors would not advance any further ; for
they were afraid, he said, to go into the upper
country. Our friend, unwilling to give up



RAPACITY OF THE CACHEFF. 57

his point, used every means of entreaty; and
at length frankly told him, that, if he would
allow him to pursue his journey, he would
make him a very handsome present of a fine
looking-glass. Hassan replied, “ We will
talk of this to-morrow;” and the indefatiga-
ble Belzoni returned to his boat.

Owen. — A looking-glass was a novelty to
the Cacheff, I suppose, mamma ’

Mrs. A.—Yes: Belzoni went again to
him early in the morning, and told him that
it was ready for his acceptance, provided he
would give him a letter of recommendation
to his brother at Ybsambul, which at last
he did.

Bernarv.—And so Hassan thought his
looking-glass a great treasure! But how
came Belzoni to take such a thing with him‘

Mrs. A.—Previously to his departure from
Cairo, he had taken care to obtain all the
information possible respecting the country
of Nubia, from the natives who came to that
city with dates and charcoal ; and from them
he learned that a looking-glass and a few
beads would be as valuable in their eyes as
gold and diamonds are in ours.

Brernarpv.—How large was the Cacheff’s



58 ANTIQUITIES AT YBSAMBUL.

looking-glass, mamma? I dare say he ad-
mired himself very much.

Mrs. A.—It was about twelve inches
square, and made a great impression on the
people there, who had never seen so large a
one before. The Cacheff was never tired
of admiring his dark-coloured countenance,
and all the attendants behind him strove to
get a peep at their own tawny beauty.

Belzoni, entering the boat again, proceeded
down the Nile till he arrived at Ybsambul,
where two temples presented attractions. I
must describe them, because they were the
objects of another voyage up the Nile. In
front of the minor temple were six colossal
figures, thirty feet high, and hewn out of
the rock; as was also the large temple, which
had one figure of enormous size, with the
head and shoulders only projecting out of
the sand, and most beautifully executed. On
the upper part, or frieze, of the temple, was
a line of hieroglyphics, which covered the
whole front; and above this, a range of
figures, in a sitting posture, as large as life.
The sand on the north side, accumulated be-
hind on the rock above the temple, had gradu-
ally descended towards its front, choked the





TEMPLE AT YBSAMBUL. 59

entrance, and buried two-thirds of it. When
Belzoni approached this temple, the hope he
had formed of entering it vanished at once;
for the heaps of sand were such as to make
it appear an impossibility ever to reach the
door. He ascended a hill of sand at the
upper part of the temple, and there found
the head of a hawk projecting out of the sand
only to its neck. From the situation of
this figure, he concluded that it was over the
door; but how to get to that door was the
grand difficulty.

Owern.——So it was, mamma; for you know
it was necessary to remove the sand in such
a direction, that it might fall off from the
front of the door; but in doing this, the sand
from above would continue to fall on the
place whence that below was removed, and
thus render it an almost endless task.

Laura.—Besides, the natives were like
wild people, and knew nothing of working
for money; indeed, they were ignorant of
money altogether.

Mrs. A.—All these difficulties seemed
such insurmountable objects, that they almost
deterred Belzoni from the thought of pro-
ceeding; yet perseverance, stimulated by



60 TEMPLE AT YBSAMBUL.

hope, suggested to him such means, that at
last, after much exertion, and two voyages
. thither, he had the satisfaction of entering
the great temple of Y bsambul.

By calculating, Belzoni supposed the door
I mentioned to be thirty-five feet below the
sand; and, having taken a proper measure”
ment of the front of the temple, he found
that if he could persuade the people to work
with persevering steadiness, he might succeed
in the undertaking.

Emity.—Who was the Cacheff of Y bsam-
bul, mamma? I think our antiquary had
better have applied to him.

Mrs. A.—Yes, my love: wishing to do
so, he did not examine the smaller temple
that night, but followed the road between the
rocks out of which it is hewn, and arrived
on the banks of the Nile, where they em-
barked, and soon landed at the village. A
group of people, who were assembled under
a grove of palm-trees, seemed somewhat sur-
prised at the arrival of a stranger. Belzoni
desired to see Osseyn Cacheff, telling them
that he bad a letter for him from his brother.

Emiuy.—tThe selfish Cacheff of Deir,

mamma ?





DAOUD CACHEFF. 61

Mrs. A.—Yes: he for some time received
no answer, but at last was told that he who
sat there was Daoud, his son. This was a
man about fifty years of age, clad in a light
blue gown, with a white rag on his head as
a turban, seated upon an old mat on the
ground, a long sword and a gun by his side,
with about twenty men surrounding him,
who were well armed with swords, spears,
and shields. |

Daoud Cacheff begged to know what busi-
ness had brought Belzoni thither? He re-
plied that he had a letter from his uncle,
directed to his father, and that he came into |
that country in search of ancient stones.
Daoud laughed, and said that, a few months
before he had seen another man who came
from Cairo in search of treasure, and took
away a great deal of gold in his boat, and
that Belzoni came for the same purpose—not
to take stones. What could he have to do
with stones, if it were not to procure gold
from them ?

Bernarp.—I am afraid Belzoni will be
puzzled to convince Daoud. How did he
manage, mamma?

Mrs. A.—Very cleverly. He told Daoud

G



62 DAOUD CACHEFF.

that the stones he wished to take away were
broken pieces belonging to the old Pharaoh
people, and that his motive for coming in
search of them was to know whether our an-
cestors came from that country. Daoud then
asked where he meant to go in search of these
stones. Belzoni said that the place in the -
rock had a door, and that by removing the
sand they might enter the temple, and should
perhaps find many stones there ; and-accord-
ingly proposed to have it opened. After
some difficulty, he managed to convince the
people of the value of money, for they had
never heard of such a thing, having been ac-
customed to exchange various articles ; and
Daoud at length consented to find workmen,
provided Belzoni would give them each two
piastres a day, which he consented to do.

Owen.— Well, mamma, Daoud was rather
more reasonable than his uncle Hassan, who
required so many presents before he would
allow Belzoni to continue his voyage. But
there now remains consent to be obtained
from Osseyn Cacheff, Daoud’s father.

Mrs. A.—This was the greatest difficulty ;
he lived at Eshke, a mile and a half up the
Nile. To secure his favour (for favour in



DHOURRA BREAD. 63

this land may often be procured by bribes),
Belzoni sent forward to him some rice, sugar,
and tobacco; and received on board in the
evening some sour milk and warm thin cake
of dhourra bread.

Bernarp.— What is dhourra, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—The common grain of Egypt,
my love. The bread is baked on a flat stone
raised at each corner so as to admit a fire
under it; the paste, which is soft, being laid
on it, spreads in a minute over the stone ; as
soon as one cake is baked, another is done in
the same manner, and so on; and this dhourra
bread forms the general food of the country.

Emity.— It is made very much in the
same manner as the fisherman’s wife (whom
we saw at that pretty cottage on the Cum-
berland mountains) was making her oat-
cakes. Do you remember, Bernard ?

Brernarp.— Oh, yes! yes! And the
fisherman’s rosy boys showed me how to
catch shrimps in a little net, whilst you looked
at the woman making them.—Go on, mam-
ma. I want to know what the Cacheff said
to Belzoni.

Mrs, A.—They went, the next morning,
to his residence at Eshke, and were told that



64 THE SECOND CATARACT.

he was from home, but would return in a few —
days. This occasioned some disappointment ;
but as Mr. and Mrs. Belzoni did not wish
to return to Ybsambul without having had
an interview with him, they went on towards
the second Cataract, and about nine, two
mornings after they had left: Eshke, they
made for the shore, a8 near as possible to
the last cultivated land on the left.

Emity.—I have found the situation of the
second Cataract, mamma ; and the place
of which you speak must be Wady Halfa.

Mrs. A.—A few of the natives came to
look at the strangers; and, at Belzoni’s re-
quest, they willingly brought asses for them
to ride to the Cataract ; and now, Bernard,
place yourself on your own little Smiler, and
fancy yourself one of the party. Proceed to
the Cataract, and take several views in dif-
ferent directions. Mount the rocks, and take
a survey of the wide sandy deserts. Observe
the wild antelopes that are skipping about
on the crags of the few black cliffs which pro-
ject here and there ; and having enjoyed the
grand prospect afforded by this Cataract, and
as the sun again is sinking beneath the hori-
zon, return to the little bark.





i a) eee

ISLE OF MAINARTY. 65

Bernarp.—And from thence, mamma,
where shall I go?

Mrs, A.—You may accompany Mr. and
Mrs. Belzoni, who immediately crossed for
the isle of Mainarty, where they arrived at
dusk. They saw fires and people at a dis-
tance, but on landing, could not find any one.
The huts were left with all they had, which
consisted only of dry dates and a kind of
paste made of the same, which was kept in
large vases of clay baked in the sun, and
covered with baskets made of palm-leaves ;
a baking stove, and a mat to sleep upon, com-
prised the whole of their furniture.

Owrn.—Ah ! they little expected visitors
at such atime! I suppose they were honest
themselves, as they did not suspect their
neighbours. But pray, mamma, how large is
this island ?

Mrs. A.—The whole of the island is about
an eighth of a mile in length, and half as much
in breadth. The whole settlement consisted
of four men and seven women, with two or
three children. They have no communication
with the main land, except when the water
is low; for at any other time, the current,
being just under the Cataract, is so rapid that

G3



TS

66 SIMPLICITY OF THE PEOPLE.

it is impossible to ford it, and boats never go
to this island. They are poor but happy;
knowing nothing of the enticing luxuries of
the world, and resting content with what
Providence supplies as the reward of their
industry. They havea few sheep and goats,
which supply them with milk ; and the few
spots of land they have are all cultivated, pro-
ducing a little dhourra, which, you know, is
the principal food they require. The wool
of their sheep they spin into yarn; they wind
the thread round little stones, and then sus-
pend them to a long stick fixed in a horizontal
position between two trees, to form a warp ;
and, by passing another thread alternately be-
tween these, they fabricate a kind of coarse
cloth, with which they make their dress.

Emizy.— When we were overtaken by the
thunder-storm last summer, we went into the
weaver's cottage at the end of the park, mam-
ma; therefore I understand what you mean
by the warp: but this plan is still more sim-
ple than our weaver’s. I wonder how they
pass the woof—you do not mention their
having a shuttle, mamma ¢—-But where are
the inhabitants all this time.

Mrs. A.—It was quite dark when Belzoni





SIMPLICITY OF THE PEOPLE. 67

found this poor and truly happy people.
They had lighted a fire to make their bread,
and the light of this fire directed him to the
spot where they were. 1 suppose they had
been terrified by seeing him at a distance ;
for they were all hid in a hole under some
ruins of an old castle, which stands on the
south side of the island; and when he ap-
proached them, the women set up a loud
scream. A person who was with him, a na-
tive of Nubia, could talk their language,
and managed to pacify them, but could
not entice more than one man out of the
hole. 7

Bernarv.—I cannot think why they were
so much alarmed, mamma.

Mrs. A.—Their fear was owing to some
depredations committed, a few years before,
by the robbers of Wady Halfa, who, at low
water forded over to the island, and did all
the injury that could be done by such people.
The strangers assured them that they were
not like the robbers of Wady Halfa, but only
came to get some one to show them the way
to the Cataract. At this they were more
alarmed than ever; and said that it never
happened that boats passed higher than Wady





68 PERILOUS VOYAGE.

Halfa,—it being impossible to proceed far-
ther, owing to the number of rocky islands.
At last, however, they prevailed upon two
of the men to accompany them the following
morning, and pilot them towards the Cata-
ract as far as the boat could go.

Bernarp.— W hat courage Belzoni had !

Mrs. A.—According to agreement, they
went on board, and with a strong north wind
advanced in their little bark, until they found
themselves so tossed about by the different
currents and eddies, as to prevent farther
progress ; at the same time they were so
situated, that they could not return, for fear
of being driven against some of the rocks
which threatened them on each side.

Emity.—They are in a deplorable situation
again, mamma ! But no treacherous or de-
ceitful Arabs are with them now.

Mrs. A.—They were confined to one spot
for about an hour. Sometimes, they had a
rapid start for a hundred yards; then, all at
once, they were stopped and turned round
in spite of all their efforts, and of the north
wind, which blew very hard. At last, they
were caught on a sudden in one of the eddies
of water, and driven against a sharp rock con-





VIEW OF THE CATARACT. 69

cealed about two feet below the surface. The
shock was dreadful; it is impossible to de-
scribe Belzoni’s emotions, for he thought at
the moment that the boat was split in two—
and the object of his tenderest solicitude was
on board ; for her he saw no mode of escape :
had he been alone, he might have swum on
shore. However, his trust in the protecting
care of Providence did not forsake him : they
found that no harm was done, and that, by
crossing the rock they were on, they might
reach the other side of the river. They did
so as quickly as possible, and landed, rejoic-
ing in the thought of the danger they had
escaped. They were obliged to pursue their
route on foot : carrying with them provisions
and water, they proceeded on the rocks, over
a plain of sand and stones, until they arrived
at one called Aspir, which is the highest in
the neighbourhood of the Cataract, and com-
mands a complete view of the falls.

Emity.—And now our lovers of nature are
well repaid, I have no doubt, mamma, for the
prospect must have been very fine.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni says that it was a truly
magnificent scene. The several thousand
islands, of various forms and sizes, with as



————————————_ nn res
70 RETURN TO YBSAMBUL.

many different falls of water, running rapidly
onward, whilst counter-currents returned with
equal velocity ; the blackness of the stones ;
the verdant foliage of the trees scattered on
the islets, intermixed with the white bub-
bling froth of the numerous cascades, formed
a picture neither to be described nor de-
lineated.

Having been thus compensated for their
venturous excursion, our travellers returned
to Ybsambul.

Bernarp.—The temples are at that place ;
and now we shall hear how Belzoni endea-
youred to persuade the natives to open them,
and what Osseyn Cacheff, who, I suppose, |
was come home by this time, said to him.

Mrs. A.—He went immediately to his
son Daoud, who presented to him a letter
from his father, and sent for the men who
were selected for the work. These people
were complete savages, and wholly unac-
quainted with any kind of labour. How-
ever, according to direction, they began their
undertaking in such a manner that the sand
would fall off from the centre of the front —
of the temple, where the door was supposed
to be.





CLEARING AWAY THE SAND. 71

Bernarv.—Had they spades to dig away
the sand, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—No, not spades, but a long stick
with a cross piece of wood at the end, at each
extremity of which was a rope.

Bernarpv.—I understand, mamma. One
man would draw the cross-stick back, and
another man would pull it forwards. Did
this plan answer ?

Mrs. A.—Yes: they found it very useful
in clearing away the sand; and as this was
the first day of their enterprise, they pro-
ceeded better than Belzoni had expected ;
all their thoughts and talk were on the quan-
tity of gold, pearls, and jewels, they should
find in the place.

Lavura.—That was a good thing, mamma,
because it acted as a stimulus for them to
proceed.

Mrs. A.—Thus they went on for some
days ; but as they had not before known the
value of money, so now their wish to obtain
it knew no bounds: they continually wished
to procure more than their employer allowed
them ; the other people also began to desire
it, and came in such numbers, that, had he
wished it, he would have found it difficult



72 OPENING THE TEMPLE.

to supply them all. Their desire to see the
‘uside of the temple, and to plunder what it
might contain, increased ; and they gave Bel-
zoni to understand, that all that was there
was their own property, and that the treasure
should be for themselves. He in vain as-
sured them that he expected to find nothing
but stones, and wanted no treasure ; they
still persisted, that if he took away the
stones, the treasure was in them, and that if
he could make a drawing or likeness of them,
he could extract the treasure from that also,
without their perceiving it.

Owern.—They had great confidence in Bel-
zoni’s ability, however, mamma, as well as
an uncommon degree of superstition !

Mrs. A. — Some proposed that, if any
figure were discovered, it should be broken
before he carried it away, to examine the
inside.

Owen.—How provoking! Then poor Bel- —
zoni had no encouragement to proceed ;—it
was not of much use to take so much pains,
only in the end to gratify the selfish curiosity
of those savages ; and, according to this, he
might not make drawings, much less take
away any statue or anything else that might







-RAPACITY OF THE WORKPEOPLE, 73

be found. I think, under such circumstances,
mamma, it will not lessen our ideas of his per-
severance and patience, if he does give up
opening this temple :—I cannot bear the
thought of his spending so many days to no
purpose, .
Mrs. A.— Fromthe slow progress, or rather
from the immense quantity of sand accumu-
lated together, Belzoni perceived that his work
would require more time than he could spare
at that period before its completion: still.
he would have persevered, had not another
and a stronger motive presented itself—the
want of that very article which, a few days
before, was despised and unknown ; and now
he found that he absolutely could not proceed
without it. It was money, which, even here,
had shown its usual power among mankind
of exciting avarice and a selfish disposition.
Owen. —And here the sentence I repeated
in my Latin lesson this morning is just @ pro-
pos, mamma. ‘The love of money increases
as the money itself increases.”
Brrnarv.——But, perhaps, mamma, Belzoni
was nearer the door than he expected; he
_ could not see through the sand, you know.
Mrs, A.—I will tell you how he managed,

H



74 THE WORK POSTPONED.

He had some water brought up from the Nile,
and poured down close to the door.

Owern.—Ha ! ha ! a very clever plan | just
like our ingenious Belzoni ! This would stop
the sand from running, until he had made a
hole deep enough to perceive whether they
were near the door. I hope they are | “He
supposed, in the first place, that the sand was
about thirty-five feet in thickness; and how
many feet had they removed it, do you think,
mamma ?

Mrs. A.—They had removed so much sand
as to uncover twenty feet of the temple; but,
from the hole that was made, Belzoni perceiv-
ed that it would require a longer time to reach
the door than he could stay, and more money
than he could afford; although the colossal
statues above the door were by this time com-
pletely exposed. He therefore obtained a
promise from the Cacheff that no one should
touch the place till his return (which would
probably be in a few months); and, contenting
himself with putting a mark where the sand -
was before his operation had commenced, and -
taking a sketch of the exterior of the temple,
he quitted it, with a firm resolution of
returning some time to accomplish its opening.





RETURN TO ASSOUAN. 75

Emity.—Well, mother, he acted both pru-
dently and judiciously ; but I should have
been afraid lest the selfish people who had
worked for him should have opened it in the
mean time. However, whither did he go
next? and when did he return to young
Memnon, who has been staying this long
period at Thebes, banked up with earth and
palm-leaf ropes ?

Mrs. A.—They set off in the boat, and,
descending the Nile rapidly, arrived in a few
days at Shellal.

Emiry.—Here is Shellal, or the first Cata-
ract, marked on the map: we passed it before,
I recollect.

Mrs. A.—When they reached the Isle of
Philoé, Belzoni took particular notice of the
small obelisk, which he hoped at some future
time to bring to England, and he sent for the
Aga of Assouan.

Kmity.—We have got back to Assouan,
have we, mamma?! I remember it, just on
_ the opposite side of the Nile to that of the
Cataract ; and I remember. the selfish Aga,
too, who asked such a sum for the use of his
boat : why did Belzoni send for him?

Mrs. A.—To persuade him to use his





76 THE AGA OF ASSOUAN.

‘nterest in having the obelisk taken down the
Cataract ; but this, for want of a boat, could
not be effected that season. I mentioned the
obelisk to you before.

Owen.— Yes, mamma: it was formed of
granite, twenty-two feet in length and two in
breadth, so that it would want a pretty large
boat to convey it.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni took possession of it, giv-
ing the Aga four dollars to pay a guard for it
till his return. The next day, they proceeded
to Assouan by land. On their arrival, they
were informed that there were no boats to take
them to Esne, so they were obliged to wait.

Emity.—I dare say the time was not wast-
ed by Belzoni; yet 1 am sorry for him to
meet with this delay, for he, no doubt, was
anxious to return to Thebes, and to see his
young Memnon once more. |

Mrs. A.—What we cannot help, we must,
of course, endure. Our enterprising friend
often found it so; and he amused himself
during this period by taking another tour in
Elephantis.

Eauzy.—And when he returned to Assouan
had the boat made its appearance !

Mrs. A.—No: no boat had yet arrived.







|



THE DIAMOND SELLER. 77

The delay was tedious; however, nothing
could be done but submit to it.

Belzoni was seated, one evening, under a
grove of palm-trees, eating some rice-soup
with the Aga, when an Arab came and whis-
pered in the ear of the latter, as if he
had something of great importance to com-
municate. ,

Brernarp. I should not have thanked him
for the interruption ; I do not like the Arabs
at all, since they treated Belzoni so shabbily
in the mummy-cave.

Mrs. A.—The Aga rose, though his meal
was not finished, and went away with the air
of a man of great business.

Brernarv.—That looked very suspicious ;
what do you think the Arab had whispered
to him ¢

Mrs. A.—You will hear in time. Half an
hour after, he returned, accompanied by two
other persons of distinction and an old man.
They all seated themselves around him, and,

.after introducing the affair with some caution,

asked Belzoni whether he should like to pur-

chase a large piece of diamond. It is true he

was no diamond-merchant : however, he told

the Aga, that if the article were good, and
H 3



78 A DISAPPOINTMENT.

they could agree, he would buy it ; but that
‘+ was necessary for him to see it first. The
Aga said that the piece had been found by
one of the natives of that place, and, as he
was not in want of money, it had been pre-
served in the family for many years: The
original proprietor being now dead, his succes-
sor wished to dispose of it.

Belzoni requested to see it, and therefore
retired with him to some distance out of the
way of the people; when the old man, with
great solemnity, took a small wooden box
from a pocket in his leather belt. In this was
a paper, which he unfolded, and after that,
two or three others ; till at last he displayed
the diamond itself. Belzoni took it in his
hands with no small degree of expectation ;
but, alas! how did he look when he perceived
that this great treasure, which had been so
long carefully stored, was only part of the
stopple of a common glass cruet, of the size
of a hazel-nut, with two or three little gilt
flowers upon it! All his hopes vanished :
and as the others were attentively watching
his motions, they could not fail to observe the
disappointment marked in his countenance,
and their hopes vanished too. When they



ARAB DUPLICITY. 79

were told that it was only a piece of glass,
the words affected their minds like the tidings
of some great misfortune ; they walked off in
solemn silence, not without giving him an in-
quiring look, to learn whether he were really
in earnest; but he shared their disappoint-
ment, and the smile on his: face could give
them no hopes.

Brernarp.— What icioseted ! to mistake a
piece of glass for a diamond! I am glad it
was no worse. When you told us, mamma,
that the Aga walked off in solemn silence, I
began to be alarmed for Belzoni.— Well, is the
boat arrived ? |

Mrs. A.—No: no boat is yet to be seen.
Belzoni, therefore, proposed bespeaking two
camels and travelling to Esne by land ; when
this resolution was known, a boat was soon in
readiness, and he discovered that the whole
delay was a fraud to detain him at Assouan,
several little barks having been concealed in
different places. Our travellers had a rapid
and agreeable voyage down the Nile, and
reached Luxor in safety.

Euiry.—Luxor, just by Thebes, mamma ;
here it is.—Did they find the boat come from
Cairo, to take Caphany thither ?



80 EMBARKATION OF YOUNG MEMNON.

Mrs. A.—The Cacheff had procured one ;
and, when they arrived at Thebes, they found
*t fastened to the bank where the colossal head
was. Belzoni met with much opposition
when he wished to remove this great bust.;—
some thought that it would overbalance the
boat, and, consequently, be lost in the Nile;
others wished to retain it, supposing it con-
tained gold; and others alleged that it was
impossible to put it into the boat, as the bank
was more than fifteen feet above the level of
the water, which had retired at least a hun-
dred feet from it. His vexation was great,
in thinking that all his efforts and exertion
in bringing the head to the Nile were to no
purpose, and that it would probably never
reach England, as the opposition was so power-
ful.

Owen.—A fter having taken so much pains!
After having made the car, and the palm-leaf
ropes ! After having employed so many days
in removing it !—Ah! Belzoni! how little
they knew how to appreciate your industry !

Mrs. A.—Perseverance in laudable pur-
suits, as I have often told you, will reward
all our labour, and produce effects even be-
yond our calculation. With some trouble,



i
4
4





EMBARKATION OF YOUNG MEMNON, 81

Belzoni collected a hundred and thirty men,
and, under his superintendence, they began to
make a causeway, by which to convey the head
down to the river-side. This was finished
_ the next day; and the bust was brought to
- the edge of the slope, ready to be embarked.

Brrnarv.—And how was that managed,
dear mamma ?

Mrs. A.—It required some thought, for
it was no easy undertaking to put a piece of
granite, of such bulk and weight, on board a
boat, which, if it received the weight on one
side, would be immediately upset.

Owen.—Could the Egyptians furnish no
_ mechanical powers, mamma, and thus render
the operation more practicable ?

Mrs. A.—No, my dear; it was to be
done without the smallest help of that kind,
or of even a single tackle; with poles and
ropes only.

Lavra.—The people there know scarcely
anything of mechanics, Owen; their utmost
sagacity reaches only to pulling a rope, or
sitting on the extremity of a lever, as a
counterpoise, or balance,

Brrnarv.— Will you tell me, dear Laura,
what you mean by a lever ?



82 EMBARKATION OF YOUNG MEMNON.

Lavra.—A lever, my love, is the founda-
tion of all the mechanical powers. It is no-
thing more than a straight stick, or bar of |
wood, or iron.

Owrn.—Did you never read, in “ Sandford
and Merton,” Bernard, about the snowball
which they rolled along with so much ease,
by using two long sticks, which were called
levers ?—But we are wandering from Belzoni.
Now, mother, will you tell us how the head
was let down that steep bank ‘

Mrs. A.—The causeway was made gradu-
ally sloping to the edge of the water, close
to the boat; and, with the four poles, 2
bridge was formed from the bank into the
centre of the boat.

Emuy.—I understand, mamma ; and so,
when the weight bore on the bridge, it pressed
only on the middle of the boat.

Owen.—And this slender bridge rested
partly on the causeway, partly on the side
of the boat, and partly on the centre of it.

Mrs. A.— On the opposite side of the
boat, Belzoni put some mats, well filled with
straw. A few Arabs were stationed in it, and
some at each side, with a lever of palm-wood,
as there was nothing else. At the middle








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'7327' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUH' 'sip-files00000coverthm.jpg'
7952e406410304bd0dffc3011558d254
7b952f197b47a623e22a6f61e1c0e7cfe38e1cde
'2011-11-16T17:08:53-05:00'
describe
'762286' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUI' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
c28adac5a5ee3f24574acaf8ac1e0831
b2d1fab9d643548ae4dc6b23eedc9a2399b5486d
'2011-11-16T17:04:04-05:00'
describe
'68048' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUJ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
87e84bdd83bd74546e649fa036ab4c58
c5059dace654c067050147cc7c8d3907888fcd24
'2011-11-16T17:01:18-05:00'
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUK' 'sip-files00001.pro'
22561f59d03b05bc57358303c70336c1
8fc975f61b5a8f15b37a7ee417645e607bc77807
'2011-11-16T17:04:42-05:00'
describe
'19799' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUL' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
10a785cf48550020241e9a41531189b4
e23ccd6bd0c6e88d4b67795ee5bd698d7231828b
'2011-11-16T17:05:54-05:00'
describe
'6104173' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUM' 'sip-files00001.tif'
2033e1325fd2a355e0bd02bfdc1e60fd
592f8b6287b9fe789e5da26c221f25b2e2a217d5
'2011-11-16T17:05:00-05:00'
describe
'151' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUN' 'sip-files00001.txt'
d837cfff1140d31bf5a34f84d85a4619
fe34ee619df14ef57e3ce50003ddf4b2f01dfd48
'2011-11-16T17:03:43-05:00'
describe
'5591' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUO' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
53f1d86acfcef86e02bb27697198edc8
066f7b65f1541c6bf3e599599838b6877d80460d
'2011-11-16T17:02:54-05:00'
describe
'746553' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUP' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
e8da041c6efe58a5bea22b04e3342b92
9b742181e284f07cf9c1dd6ffe8aa189f8780bab
'2011-11-16T17:05:35-05:00'
describe
'57131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
ba169f8ccf488337644ac3fe7c12be5e
71b8c921eec06ff4f366a2813bb1d8c2f0e45f66
'2011-11-16T17:02:30-05:00'
describe
'7876' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUR' 'sip-files00002.pro'
72f5497f2da5460f78baf998dac8e727
1993a4e1593a7f4a936bf73a3828591155439c7e
'2011-11-16T17:09:41-05:00'
describe
'17510' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUS' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
22426a949339b8e0141035f0fd8e7144
ffc3911f1b2a056b776ab37196d77a1cc86aa9e3
'2011-11-16T17:02:06-05:00'
describe
'5978191' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUT' 'sip-files00002.tif'
a8027ae9e4bbe6b1c6113e60d7f0642f
30c5628649a528befded16e3a3321f35477e726d
'2011-11-16T17:01:40-05:00'
describe
'481' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUU' 'sip-files00002.txt'
5390a6510c88096576ecb56ae89aa154
44d933a503a6ef761f4fe4ca1b14b2be5fdf61eb
'2011-11-16T17:09:30-05:00'
describe
'5148' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUV' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
c043d70b153a0bf5f63a48aa685b9ab0
0845dc68c40f7edadf2fd7168ef71972f3f4eef2
'2011-11-16T17:02:33-05:00'
describe
'556669' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUW' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
d60ab31ea2e0c093245333a2c2f061ec
9ef67a6b61130953d6e2e971c41fc7e5e0159303
'2011-11-16T17:02:17-05:00'
describe
'19195' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUX' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
fe50399a4044763c71c608f99fcbfb61
c7574f29c2006e5c6acb0b48954e452a2da4493e
'2011-11-16T17:07:49-05:00'
describe
'1972' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUY' 'sip-files00003.pro'
46577d6442741e6bc9c2e770b51341ee
adcfebb229914e981daf40cbb0c22e6fb966d012
'2011-11-16T17:01:13-05:00'
describe
'5346' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
e6ceee8d2f56cbaac2abcc943f7ebe50
142a93a60c542d4c238de21f0177d1b209332aa7
'2011-11-16T17:05:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVA' 'sip-files00003.tif'
029e30d472365629f5a744d1d8aca35a
244411a20c54e38f821686ff109538f5b3842b1c
'2011-11-16T17:03:16-05:00'
describe
'184' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVB' 'sip-files00003.txt'
9e01838162baafe450cbd1a4fba3a63e
c247c5c2c80b5484fc132ced2fe3392561102053
'2011-11-16T17:03:19-05:00'
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVC' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
6f9671c0a521454c4c40ac5fe3d91b34
a74382d2164bbd2195cfb832f9c2711530e837e2
'2011-11-16T17:03:03-05:00'
describe
'746559' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVD' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
4a326af46749a115a6418b025e04e42b
1ddc36d5912461229a60753aabce3b93ea42b20a
'2011-11-16T17:02:59-05:00'
describe
'71827' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVE' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
616c6bc1c0ad7d303acfa0b8da5dc606
421f3704f498f8e76e5baaf2bdc620f31c6173d2
'2011-11-16T17:06:33-05:00'
describe
'18751' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVF' 'sip-files00004.pro'
f54c87877fa267f8ffeb6ec512fc26e3
b199c4c74e6feb41ca3ea1c9f0a3c5869b9e69c1
'2011-11-16T17:03:59-05:00'
describe
'27093' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVG' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
317a5e0829be4baf567df91dc93887c2
ffcce4adb22cd8a11c6e105c6840a35697339e2c
'2011-11-16T17:07:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVH' 'sip-files00004.tif'
087c81436fa331674cbf898ffda061b1
20373a4c62ff8e2dec4e08ea67d0551bcda742b1
'2011-11-16T17:10:07-05:00'
describe
'767' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVI' 'sip-files00004.txt'
8ba0bc1b3ff6e1eec40423335e1dde0c
a9240e2714098941d53d47ac15df6b6289c12423
'2011-11-16T17:07:50-05:00'
describe
'7928' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
5d4b39b5c740ccde6a9b65cd39585cd8
287426f09acd145bdca0ff497ef90d5686dcda50
'2011-11-16T17:10:08-05:00'
describe
'762299' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVK' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
f79518aa364204d536e3da47c64ad0b5
5e6e2c1f96810c0e9f6c7aba30bd8f7ab12926bd
'2011-11-16T17:06:39-05:00'
describe
'79811' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVL' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
24b7ed8b8c6bf217e5552f4e1a7753dc
df570e4d667c68995cb5615beac72d1d623ec7b4
'2011-11-16T17:02:40-05:00'
describe
'22215' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVM' 'sip-files00005.pro'
b3463898c641df2d6424068f139f1496
38ad06faa70372f83d368e3957b15e98bf67a947
'2011-11-16T17:09:04-05:00'
describe
'30991' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVN' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
5b166dfb413f77cf8fd1d655b8501da0
d56b81ba65f99fec72893e46d86f5b8ccc60ac67
'2011-11-16T17:04:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVO' 'sip-files00005.tif'
9b2ddbc170d400b9d43269765ad7000e
9947fc6c4b0f001bf5117a368777ad5256d9981e
'2011-11-16T17:01:36-05:00'
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVP' 'sip-files00005.txt'
c77556910572e87e0eea404d20779e69
30e9dba49ad684912d5d86ae8aa3c99e7449a677
'2011-11-16T17:05:45-05:00'
describe
'9265' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
f90b93ee6df84e99d669ea19c0bafdbf
fc3996352717a4b5c9bce3b97c1584268a4d30f0
'2011-11-16T17:01:04-05:00'
describe
'746567' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVR' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
eb16e084379f18bdad901b82794a7ca4
1df339589e75da433accb88a882135cfe5590787
'2011-11-16T17:08:50-05:00'
describe
'91291' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVS' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
763e6fe5deafc67e8e5a4ee02478fac7
434cf7978727fcab9588028c8812a05ed8d30399
'2011-11-16T17:07:33-05:00'
describe
'26031' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVT' 'sip-files00006.pro'
5dbaecac69327b4d8f8c5c4a42e7f6da
25e176f2b7741169c1012aa947a54384a68f9adb
describe
'35910' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVU' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
df9b70132f47e0022438f10f5b218322
64f24db952df3ac7a5cfeb96a95530fd5d4d9a76
'2011-11-16T17:08:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVV' 'sip-files00006.tif'
8b2a1800dffb8d7a566027d617c554b6
de18c5f6c5473511ebbadfa1f4b03ca12fa9c57c
'2011-11-16T17:07:07-05:00'
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVW' 'sip-files00006.txt'
00f44fd3975c0c9c947c13bca06b52b3
4db23e649cde7f2fe4b58b691183859857ff1d7a
'2011-11-16T17:09:52-05:00'
describe
'10566' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVX' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
48f74e65c98a33b4a0bca97211838f57
11151b0abb4a4dafbdd8a7526824e83e06edf3a6
'2011-11-16T17:08:45-05:00'
describe
'762166' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVY' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
d1563757b07090854d8f64dbdca86cf0
b0dee6a0241e72137b1008a01222544eabd9208c
'2011-11-16T17:10:00-05:00'
describe
'90673' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
7651eea4301742cafe45a79583e3c9eb
2634a4a584515b7d3cee0fc1c709998d19fc87e8
'2011-11-16T17:03:44-05:00'
describe
'26694' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWA' 'sip-files00007.pro'
a04d506b7065a3d2df17a684718bf80d
060375d01250861f147b1ff1a85a2dc712215855
'2011-11-16T17:06:24-05:00'
describe
'35368' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWB' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5c359c774a5afe11a4cc8a6616788ed8
3107e057d57f0275b2fc1a06c7f91f16006c7c5c
'2011-11-16T17:08:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWC' 'sip-files00007.tif'
ced16b8e54430652df872cb4a35e4002
58c6d2a1357fd69f14d373a1cc5ca9501c5772b1
'2011-11-16T17:04:40-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWD' 'sip-files00007.txt'
bda28664e4241e913b92b3f63e8cbd82
bdb1c39362c1ed9f7381344e6cf18787e54c2459
describe
'10478' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWE' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
110d875887ab1073beee8f96d1869af0
c44e34d790cd5764f7be3991507d27f1f586eacb
'2011-11-16T17:06:04-05:00'
describe
'746561' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWF' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
0f5991dad0108f78dd50c11324b689b0
601ec8ebe78583cac56acbc497858374af2c7766
'2011-11-16T17:04:46-05:00'
describe
'91050' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWG' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
f829caaeace8d68013608d1fb2827b20
a173d182692db43751edd02797f0fce53c9e9881
'2011-11-16T17:03:39-05:00'
describe
'26123' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWH' 'sip-files00008.pro'
7001cb76e19e814f8de39c831a2bbdad
4081292a70c88554b6e5337ad01ffc64b63c76b3
'2011-11-16T17:05:50-05:00'
describe
'35768' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWI' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
f21a3f77e839c8e0365f57b7f959688d
6c14b3749dcfe6f3190ef06b762077458d309a1e
'2011-11-16T17:04:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files00008.tif'
72bfb895a50b449bb61dafe4e3a9501c
6523e5e2687b630a1ab87aa1f142312b076f4a56
'2011-11-16T17:10:05-05:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWK' 'sip-files00008.txt'
24f759b7824f1d31860d6a866c751685
ab095fae34fa597d7c71adee005d99b21a467341
'2011-11-16T17:07:40-05:00'
describe
'10231' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWL' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
f66a7dfdbc02108ebb745d4562517a81
67debbb158c4307f1fef223b2130517e840a4d12
'2011-11-16T17:02:01-05:00'
describe
'762291' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWM' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
236962dae7bc6f53e1af7694bf680fa5
0ff36ba3bac6d6c856ced41a8d5ded457162f2ff
'2011-11-16T17:09:14-05:00'
describe
'59395' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWN' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
ed0956db53c188461b337749dade96f2
d1962725c86d3ff0771b6bfd3b8a2cdffd12072f
'2011-11-16T17:05:20-05:00'
describe
'16379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWO' 'sip-files00009.pro'
d153ad6f6f73f9dc46172b52dc8449af
24e36695de4775429960514367b1f7d865fae05f
'2011-11-16T17:10:49-05:00'
describe
'22503' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWP' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
8054d7391fc72d48b781e3501871b102
8279b9448e565cb4cdf5d847a7b1bacee3f0a04a
'2011-11-16T17:05:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
af13b963db799e416135b3237055437e
e9782c87d75552e635505333ffd9f9216f3797db
'2011-11-16T17:09:21-05:00'
describe
'661' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWR' 'sip-files00009.txt'
9348740c582da84cf4875c3139f8c9bc
0fa4be9feac1094ca3f309c2f2fc545ebf00bfd5
'2011-11-16T17:01:37-05:00'
describe
'6672' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWS' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
19577e355b38977462c05bdf3eb362fe
b3db6c26ccf971b811719b476782fa1d75424ae6
'2011-11-16T17:04:01-05:00'
describe
'746483' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWT' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
62daad744301421744983061b1786063
c5b2e271b7f35336dc80497cb3416ebe72d76d9b
'2011-11-16T17:07:38-05:00'
describe
'61768' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWU' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
2a6ced994e76355d49e32336b847d121
4a0e984c68ccb5ffb1d0b6f23d878b3945fe2d04
'2011-11-16T17:02:32-05:00'
describe
'22437' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWV' 'sip-files00010.pro'
3683628268646745e98578a2d88aed91
18a0c58319f25d432282be8a543d8cf16e58f9ae
'2011-11-16T17:07:04-05:00'
describe
'22473' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWW' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
3f2518c89345161287191ca0ccb66088
8a0b4cbd1390e97dbf0d861d8b09bde7e5610279
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWX' 'sip-files00010.tif'
c111bc4e0ca088cfa952146457d1432b
6d925843025b92824680df144769944366f786fa
'2011-11-16T17:01:17-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWY' 'sip-files00010.txt'
1c152c3be0325f56421b0e6ef51e7822
2fba85e59340a903ddf36ccdc6d437603658e2b1
'2011-11-16T17:06:34-05:00'
describe
'6238' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
c6622c3121ed25546c78e7e029d8047a
d4d26c7865f239d5f1ac3ba2ef1707a956c7b8d5
'2011-11-16T17:04:10-05:00'
describe
'762247' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXA' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
e24b1834fda945169a3e0affe98ffc47
87d3903e03f583b9918b964f86128ab9d8713b1c
'2011-11-16T17:10:26-05:00'
describe
'78293' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXB' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
e9ad4441c6dce9ddda43fdb7a8267355
deab2c51b15c79291cbbf6b7ce587ea4f6d20071
'2011-11-16T17:05:07-05:00'
describe
'31945' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXC' 'sip-files00011.pro'
9a62e5e5f6f5f59ad9cdb7b2b2b81986
a88e00f075878a6f977370b2a1a41702d57b1fc5
describe
'29465' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXD' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
7560c385003129f3f0f31a067bb756da
01f0d82c3c3224ab02221dd146b8d7ac571eef6c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXE' 'sip-files00011.tif'
542ef255ceb940a02f48026a2cabb18b
52504981c349d8519f12c4822a662134966de71d
'2011-11-16T17:04:51-05:00'
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXF' 'sip-files00011.txt'
1d71102ce100e551ac62551f6b18e40f
7106f087967f387105b6493603b88f22beeeb032
'2011-11-16T17:04:32-05:00'
describe
'8524' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXG' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
619dff1540f2039528739d3f640d9144
eda3d89fb889031f05693309eb2038829f7adbd2
'2011-11-16T17:00:57-05:00'
describe
'746557' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXH' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
4ff49079c117711b276ca68b2ceaa977
2b700e4d6dd0b17c83f8fa4b1ebf2bc664557647
'2011-11-16T17:07:05-05:00'
describe
'70960' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXI' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
7ac84614a6556d3b1f4b3b107b92d50b
f0e44b2a59c4bcfa371bce45628d00e1aade1fee
'2011-11-16T17:06:51-05:00'
describe
'27468' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
a70d1b0e5a589495d917281268725750
9d776da619c960d33742e28f143387b95d4868a7
'2011-11-16T17:01:46-05:00'
describe
'26995' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXK' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
682ae4700eafc7baaefb68abd5e55298
ab0e75cd491a789597ad52cbca0dd40706e69c98
'2011-11-16T17:10:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXL' 'sip-files00012.tif'
2f21d98c9cd0a464e9b40f16a1628f1c
9396350d43eab1762e34817cabb8c5068f6f0d6a
'2011-11-16T17:08:31-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXM' 'sip-files00012.txt'
f9c6794e6b356854e90e0f4bc6762e0b
e880a9c78678c0082c55a0df28b7a152a18646b8
'2011-11-16T17:05:58-05:00'
describe
'7196' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXN' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
fbe197f71e6cfa00ae9936f18c2ed9e3
f2d8222a17ab3ccc48cfefac0d5454d9244f0fcb
'2011-11-16T17:01:01-05:00'
describe
'476213' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXO' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
9ea20b202a7dbba44cc1926fe65e1e5d
e917a7392d5a5b830bdb4e99a554f42e6d8135d6
'2011-11-16T17:01:54-05:00'
describe
'14038' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXP' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5af39d2486b63fa317ca90fc3fe08c2f
024e58b6b575df56bc0dee49707ec97168c0c0e9
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
313fe8c4d5aa35f32b308b01813e309c
82f6dff44bfc2365f99a716bb99b024d91205db7
'2011-11-16T17:02:42-05:00'
describe
'3864' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXR' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
4b67f31a09743bd188263631200d4d4f
21d1adcb999f468138c4678ea7fd8026889cf7c5
'2011-11-16T17:10:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXS' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ba84601ecb28296b3c2eeb6e77cb28bd
7c416b8ffad9b24ed3d5af48bba4fcdb07c2afe0
'2011-11-16T17:10:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXT' 'sip-files00013.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-11-16T17:02:50-05:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXU' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
477bfdffdef1309dcec7d5cda0a2c02c
9a275a809c84313afc355790b9542ae1b8235b20
'2011-11-16T17:03:15-05:00'
describe
'565602' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXV' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
eb0753161cb5c3e0b18c8a592c520b08
6ada25fe2c3df1fc0cd8922242790e562ded256f
'2011-11-16T17:01:25-05:00'
describe
'26695' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXW' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
9954041ed1820b4370942167523ffb5f
0cb8e3935c781bce9117417c04edb562b7c34c48
'2011-11-16T17:00:56-05:00'
describe
'6108' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXX' 'sip-files00014.pro'
cc39b3964170daf7aae02ee61ca1cc9e
a7a8939f899c1bf707de773ad05298b6106e8eb8
describe
'9552' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXY' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
ef23fe7baaef85d243854fd4bad827a2
b213e36ae62d22bffe5b71a62a2aa8d3ba01ea55
'2011-11-16T17:04:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
8e072a9722545ab7d6af43d7aa20f4a3
a12793f138cd6a53062b5c289e1252dfa63dfa11
'2011-11-16T17:09:59-05:00'
describe
'290' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00014.txt'
6c2ee4a2760ffb272a2aa64bd3b26fa0
fc8b7b9b9d51e0e36daf547594d9fb6786c3e7b8
'2011-11-16T17:00:51-05:00'
describe
'3164' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
5ccd11afbd766eead7531a3b13abe556
aea0fcb33afcc753e136ff32c7ef7b87241e72d0
'2011-11-16T17:04:25-05:00'
describe
'476013' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
c1f4bac44d8d0f3dc0a9bd9de3ccd21e
fa736f767d81a07fdba0d80dd91a3f28fcb8e161
'2011-11-16T17:08:41-05:00'
describe
'14024' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
d5a8004dc44bd31e661a374c64b06abe
5e6e2b0fbbd23f6948a30eeb42084732475aaec4
'2011-11-16T17:01:28-05:00'
describe
'273' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00015.pro'
8934d692aedcbd49822a9b040727280f
847cb2bb0a9586e4e584d2c8b3e9af71f984a324
'2011-11-16T17:02:35-05:00'
describe
'3953' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
83b85e0b666f20bc0bdc99f51f40e88c
132a6277b0b7fe76a75b1f85ba8927925adfb7e1
'2011-11-16T17:09:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00015.tif'
25cd0503ebecde84a5a9d9dafa2323e2
1aefdaf2bdcaf79feab383d19114e2398ffa4503
'2011-11-16T17:07:01-05:00'
describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00015.txt'
b94f14ab3ee0eafaf8cb6ef299833500
0e18c480245baf08edd9274df1226a8517331fb9
'2011-11-16T17:03:50-05:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
685ecf860cc2ead8ea59dc6acd70d850
8397f556935c0aa2d6e51458cdde98c6bed59dd7
'2011-11-16T17:06:31-05:00'
describe
'746497' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
76228385916b22e21336f3c7feccc443
536c0e5ea0138ecc358eee19ab9124e4314fedd3
describe
'73691' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
122f431fe8cb844260344d5f39ae8112
aced9fe103a43479590b8120d08ed1e3d09e0ea0
'2011-11-16T17:02:07-05:00'
describe
'18047' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00016.pro'
41e007879b28c3962ca1d31a53988c5f
7977d23d5d2f470edc7a107469555257a8cd92e5
'2011-11-16T17:03:02-05:00'
describe
'26254' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
bb74f176d0445289d278af4c5549bf94
872ca1eaedcaaaf6db56ab76e03a7d7b79df6836
'2011-11-16T17:10:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f59f1be87a2b8c82ae177f926b7b2f3a
4e840face7893dcd7d579f2b46eda673727153d0
'2011-11-16T17:10:29-05:00'
describe
'756' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00016.txt'
1adb710ba4cee478acdfd3865469a771
f577494fdc24f599eae21a04b73baa28772a9e4e
'2011-11-16T17:08:33-05:00'
describe
'8236' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
76650a71f7da922112846b7d375d1605
240cd99e7d4023d86bcabaa57daf992d7636f3f6
'2011-11-16T17:07:56-05:00'
describe
'762258' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
3c9ba8bad839ccf64eb9c8c802fcbc24
5674117d6217af6b7d359a47c6079c02e222a22c
describe
'101470' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
f10a7e704cf9d974b1ac3a16af9e34cf
cf6749e140b44be01a1e7fc38ebc1f6d7bed2d0c
'2011-11-16T17:05:14-05:00'
describe
'30018' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00017.pro'
27cdce9219788a5105cb56564f8a8a45
e347804aa858ea7cd5424f0cf7539c85d2534849
'2011-11-16T17:05:17-05:00'
describe
'40081' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
9363b4d3caa32afc5d062561a05ae2e4
8c1d2d24e6fdbb27e9d7dec42d3048ff63cb2956
'2011-11-16T17:01:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00017.tif'
d8bdd8388d6ffae9a212902fcbeed72e
645c63e25ec29de9734dad7249d784c0d939c307
'2011-11-16T17:03:01-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00017.txt'
e8d3cbed167b2fb574bbc8a6e876a89b
4d7e05830e9c160db669783c4f26165a5edc364e
'2011-11-16T17:10:02-05:00'
describe
'11104' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
599150171853fd4a453a4882d7594ba8
0c3594fa58cdb23df11262464373149dc35f7169
'2011-11-16T17:08:21-05:00'
describe
'746542' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
2818967e1578b85fc4a1a8727e9338d1
5bd5e415e52c8fd1684a9c5010a41e16abe5d58a
'2011-11-16T17:11:01-05:00'
describe
'95878' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
77a3884277b2be84a8bd51c8d64264a9
bad365be9e7cf7ebab4599628dcdddf18a9e774d
'2011-11-16T17:10:16-05:00'
describe
'26474' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
5d031579b2b5210b8bc6c58def7b4b8b
141fdf9b388283fde353e64b282c13237b3973f6
describe
'34467' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
7acba6b0b80f0c6f18484371dd0955bf
f8bfb8f64d7f95c494ca02fb6d72be83e7419919
'2011-11-16T17:03:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00018.tif'
7458a4c3e7ec8c6332497dd490831d8c
a4cdb127fc0f8be3a20d622b60aef0d2415491ee
'2011-11-16T17:04:30-05:00'
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00018.txt'
c76b7f6a125bda17d99a5244e106fccf
5225d58179dc887262c7eab09b349bb5625c709a
describe
'10473' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
5db7691c8de0002aaafba44a41041e7d
d4eb19a953e76fd4622edd99fe65089293c76b0c
'2011-11-16T17:01:53-05:00'
describe
'762303' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
3769bee5ac28dad93fad32ab20c6fb63
b34251472621aff72073bf40a3869395670b01fe
'2011-11-16T17:08:52-05:00'
describe
'103518' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
78ca99ee3b0194fd435e6e3fd27b840f
107613903ec627d67488f68d8bb84b9eb107f103
'2011-11-16T17:07:11-05:00'
describe
'30284' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00019.pro'
a5926beb0f8edcfe7c59621de2938c62
df735e8d9a2581c0d18d553f4e890ae6fa64d142
'2011-11-16T17:09:00-05:00'
describe
'40197' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
b1d659020273af293472473224646ba2
2a273b8a77760dada49ecd1615a4148d53f23734
'2011-11-16T17:05:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c5ec7800350c8cacfbb3d76157428324
527f3b19951ba667835786927510baab64e9f801
'2011-11-16T17:08:46-05:00'
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
8611654f1d20fa7896a6f6786dfe5aec
cd5b35e5c0d1820cd07a4cc38a5d8706aa04a085
'2011-11-16T17:06:30-05:00'
describe
'11458' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
9b1d70af769ca098961cadfe3f914211
598dd00ac76b799b2de9d2ce0680d4176787525b
'2011-11-16T17:06:17-05:00'
describe
'746528' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZL' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
7f8011f940516ef0be1689c4572ecced
bf9eacfc2e151b7f0f751476740590ccca352a1a
'2011-11-16T17:02:36-05:00'
describe
'107050' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZM' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
633be3ec7520ed7f3948047fc2cbdb07
2e003972afe318955fd18f75eebdfcb1a51ed1a8
'2011-11-16T17:07:37-05:00'
describe
'29937' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZN' 'sip-files00020.pro'
bd2e1338c20bd38ea9f76a116b2b6af3
659bdfdb7062c30086da8f9b9cea068138916d94
'2011-11-16T17:00:46-05:00'
describe
'41252' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
f802cf2ff50b105a3e588e9752c9eaab
5dc2539e8099fdd8388685d83c420080f7c6df12
'2011-11-16T17:05:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZP' 'sip-files00020.tif'
dcfa6170ecb98f925b9202995a357532
91cab8df0bfbb68346648ad9d4d3153c7655416c
'2011-11-16T17:01:38-05:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b922e38ae9fa600d53794a5b94afae8c
072a0c70857fc9a9a89cb3efc15bd3d358353820
describe
'11280' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZR' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
058dadbdb6a6660cab814ded05932895
23345cf43139abfff1e84ab1760a2c9b11f1b874
'2011-11-16T17:03:10-05:00'
describe
'762302' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZS' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
06919a33890edbc3e104e14d71ca06cd
4657251d6043c41be0f0d609df3b59df3fb57f5b
'2011-11-16T17:04:52-05:00'
describe
'100500' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZT' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0c1c11824698fca72aae183cd96289d8
d5948601c093cf068f412aba057a4bc2fda1a51a
'2011-11-16T17:02:41-05:00'
describe
'27693' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZU' 'sip-files00021.pro'
2bfd11f35a2840601782057f7fd8810c
686b0a8903c78cf77a106e72fefeaf99388833bf
'2011-11-16T17:06:48-05:00'
describe
'37964' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZV' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
49cae1ffb2fd55a70fa1710335cfd9ee
3eabd7ba9896c120ec8b82349affe3328998de15
'2011-11-16T17:03:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZW' 'sip-files00021.tif'
2627c0087793b1665ad97e227c95e4f2
b6135f43a5c6290e5408907376e43acff433d5ba
'2011-11-16T17:06:22-05:00'
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZX' 'sip-files00021.txt'
aea702df853ae31d5198b57c16449364
b357e2c948418463d1aa325a29b9587817670c1c
describe
'10699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZY' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
98dd4b967e9ab51a697f71a2a207e324
4a4c7cf071865dd0504b6d0255f34917f9a5f4c0
'2011-11-16T17:07:09-05:00'
describe
'746554' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
3ddc0fa9a21f8de0bd0b7230d0bee961
bc20b290db12d61693eb91e2ab928c03875c095d
'2011-11-16T17:09:49-05:00'
describe
'111198' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAA' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f6f7c850d6beef5602a223dd9b0ae6a2
a232695f0f51fb2254dc6aff2da07b407d5f11e5
describe
'29407' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAB' 'sip-files00022.pro'
e69336071bd9f12c88aabdcd64262cdf
cf418d64f2d7acb2acf98d600cc29e2cc6981b6a
'2011-11-16T17:03:26-05:00'
describe
'39843' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAC' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
27a1b4327c80f42f8523ab3958d1653c
0815dbab548faee00217117693c9b267ff16106e
'2011-11-16T17:03:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAD' 'sip-files00022.tif'
d288a0fb2c6f88941cf1e0b17eed5de6
842d2187dcadd528a5b71229120233a3f0d683c8
'2011-11-16T17:05:25-05:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAE' 'sip-files00022.txt'
1ffde992e69700f449bf939d7b77cf17
a00da58b3f6badb80b962fae2a1e1695af4d85e2
'2011-11-16T17:09:28-05:00'
describe
'11376' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAF' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
6d28e9ee53ea952cd92c4f2708ee1418
ad5f88f86b7009621326d652bca4f36872281887
'2011-11-16T17:01:26-05:00'
describe
'762193' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAG' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7541311b24386772194ceb813fd3f12b
434210916c3f8d3051bd1043589cc6157584782b
'2011-11-16T17:09:02-05:00'
describe
'103632' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAH' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
94ad0d685bce84186d97df4caceb859e
35c8bd47301349018fba44bd37c51c81682d0e95
'2011-11-16T17:03:06-05:00'
describe
'29705' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAI' 'sip-files00023.pro'
4ba51dfd67672ebb0790b0e1b0aa6bb5
5f456ff22d63abcfbfe64d3ec89070fda3c6e614
'2011-11-16T17:08:27-05:00'
describe
'40012' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAJ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
ed15f7204ec88f63383f9b7f92275fcb
d93f0c47c4c256bc8da109e75638ce40e9d66d12
'2011-11-16T17:02:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAK' 'sip-files00023.tif'
cb912c62c65835a8bc11e29eace6d696
db4637a1d0069430c47a8b4fee5140e7ee7f3303
'2011-11-16T17:06:07-05:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAL' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0809e85ea358c9de2aa27ce4e3ef1c0f
77f465f64d91d7d8f106be0b6a90ab363adda346
'2011-11-16T17:06:16-05:00'
describe
'11173' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAM' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
ddf4e3b8cd69a5e37d01d984a7a90639
5d2201372cf02996621b8f764a60111bc81265d6
'2011-11-16T17:09:07-05:00'
describe
'746479' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAN' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
5b90edf364aae685f2e30078e9c020fd
1cd9882cf69dde02d6015108d8fabbb25a85dd1d
'2011-11-16T17:10:36-05:00'
describe
'98937' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAO' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
815bc27adafa1c28c984a263945ca0e5
639b11ff650a59b7f052861ef32ebb92c357d3ed
describe
'28456' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAP' 'sip-files00024.pro'
2b2e8a2f671d97ebbc13f00bb75040d0
4b0eb40a94c2f820de7ff047521acba99ec7569a
'2011-11-16T17:07:58-05:00'
describe
'36160' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAQ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
6b71052fb06c263dbcdb3edabeb92a1a
a22a295f05a1740a3d1c1fe1505e3d064859cc0b
'2011-11-16T17:04:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAR' 'sip-files00024.tif'
bd2226fac2483bbb8e20099994e6e743
3f4f28b655a999091f8fa7542e24d0e90dc5b899
'2011-11-16T17:10:23-05:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAS' 'sip-files00024.txt'
e1a7765f4c60f8c953e126d8619bcfdd
573c0ceb6bf58353e7b9a3bb1afe4632c71ff739
'2011-11-16T17:01:19-05:00'
describe
'10950' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAT' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
fa6eeb14a3789260acf7dc952c9436eb
229a697b0f4c318c5f8a5eaaba6487ce681a39c5
'2011-11-16T17:09:09-05:00'
describe
'762284' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAU' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
e6191e16b6008b4a66254c1f958546a0
d7b5be781e477b2a51af8438f3b3366ac4f7b255
'2011-11-16T17:01:47-05:00'
describe
'99947' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAV' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
58e2391f06ad460ca0532bba2140fb6f
b511fbcd3f9de267b99aded45bf47c9fc3453412
describe
'28428' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAW' 'sip-files00025.pro'
5397c131e78ce47b89c115a7efc69131
c575c4ec5496096afd47f02a18c537292351a216
'2011-11-16T17:04:39-05:00'
describe
'40029' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAX' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
acce40a7880e86e5a8615bf673880e9d
b7ffc90021036a4b8168de2a4f2600abc27ae80d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAY' 'sip-files00025.tif'
f4abd961dfb0a459de6242cb475e7ff9
45dc1bc1866083460f70a753673be3af252dd3c4
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARAZ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
7f4be87478c671eaf19d38764f180b62
d2c42393b4ec0bd89ed23c6e8ad73c25c9bef4b5
'2011-11-16T17:11:07-05:00'
describe
'10926' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBA' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
dff980b7e369f0052eb3ac02d8a2b247
2c3d2811409b6b088dcd6204c597d3efdc4fd806
'2011-11-16T17:06:56-05:00'
describe
'746544' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBB' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
26d4d248518687fabd425543911a4fbe
00d1b72920a8b4fe9ce68f29e08810d87e817e83
describe
'100904' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBC' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
d28ec5997787297854331a8e44d0e163
29c5c40d86885ecaa138704042faed5ad52bd307
'2011-11-16T17:09:54-05:00'
describe
'28008' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBD' 'sip-files00026.pro'
2becef7d4018bd964b34624e0a811ca7
9c14a30cefea6c9ba1943ff1f63fb7cf5fd9dec3
describe
'41131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBE' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
8123da98de4221ba5797f6350739481e
5a6ffa9a58d7010addf9ec140f3fc34402d54125
'2011-11-16T17:06:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBF' 'sip-files00026.tif'
1694296d938d761681d28466e5771367
2725f4d3702d5bee14347b7aa13d9b97b0a2f2b1
'2011-11-16T17:08:01-05:00'
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBG' 'sip-files00026.txt'
4c1742a6b31639a13a9e3445eef27a23
56a2670d9117b09805c389448f24101e40aa24b4
'2011-11-16T17:08:43-05:00'
describe
'11068' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBH' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
2ec81a9efbfe7af80c6f54bb8c5931c7
701c876368adf2b47fec9bf82f3a6a9d7fcac344
'2011-11-16T17:06:43-05:00'
describe
'749883' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBI' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
a8653e92d44e4fbc2f5090ff51ea2e6a
d2a694979eed5df00339973dff578790cedb3551
'2011-11-16T17:04:06-05:00'
describe
'102603' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBJ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
1491d73c40dce93c309e9b064daf445f
6a7d2b7be0215c6c1b9b21b5cfdc6d1ef11c7243
'2011-11-16T17:06:08-05:00'
describe
'30652' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBK' 'sip-files00027.pro'
6cb2392d577014a7dc7844712b0c2183
0f4c6b88393c1dc82b768535fc3cf734db726bc5
'2011-11-16T17:09:01-05:00'
describe
'40903' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBL' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
827eae9cf0681386fbc31091c64efe34
6acba56f0354f2e5c5aa1ea738eb07bcb44d1f5c
'2011-11-16T17:07:30-05:00'
describe
'6002611' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBM' 'sip-files00027.tif'
27acc6e29c8d9ddb312499e4919647b3
4085dc6a0a3babec858b5a7f8ef23c30c1d2685e
'2011-11-16T17:02:12-05:00'
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBN' 'sip-files00027.txt'
b018625daf5bbfe8c3f367eea4fcfc7f
798ebe77c5bfb4975346fcbb8dc39ff532d80d8a
'2011-11-16T17:02:14-05:00'
describe
'11071' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBO' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
50f2c632c3e1ca78a50c814e4f55b498
484d7d02b9975d2086f3fbce984bb0cc7cae0c81
'2011-11-16T17:02:18-05:00'
describe
'746563' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBP' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
31e84ef0a621de7ac383c14f42517827
fbae06d327b4b453e506039ab4696d1aaa6ac915
'2011-11-16T17:04:54-05:00'
describe
'107620' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBQ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
489d1efefbffffeea9a5f59d421776bb
346ba5fe5f80c1132ddfac1fe159aa0ba928132c
'2011-11-16T17:01:42-05:00'
describe
'31036' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBR' 'sip-files00028.pro'
dd8c8d0958b6c2c2dcc8a788bfdc3b6c
364c9847e065c2b731a96f423191508e89a8318b
'2011-11-16T17:02:29-05:00'
describe
'42245' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBS' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
f4f90bc4598f41813a999ece9fd4792d
3d6400a877c6995c0c8c6bb719b8bc1e2f396cab
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBT' 'sip-files00028.tif'
c746e9f47d2d01e42213b2c305e2e412
280bcd1ad95ddfb788286ccc5bb7832998a4b157
'2011-11-16T17:02:20-05:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBU' 'sip-files00028.txt'
c204046d36914a54932246c413eba7cf
b239852ddbf864b6f23125e870df412bec12b822
'2011-11-16T17:01:48-05:00'
describe
'11541' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBV' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
bf8769d75cc8618f6b60fca754ab2188
18e82ea97a6fc43d4f08276b8a42b87fb21b7f42
'2011-11-16T17:04:28-05:00'
describe
'762189' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBW' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
ee6d554d30b523fa0f1d5987530c35a5
2fc5c61d2d37a75c65e907ac7a513aebaf503797
'2011-11-16T17:10:31-05:00'
describe
'101881' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBX' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
3f8ff325303a7e032f7b59bbad971203
d41130c20421f9a239f5737e319b6e1193db1a92
describe
'30084' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBY' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e3ea8c517c47b9aece3b69bf505a64f3
32c59424ae995d5e2c934a025924534642b73d1a
describe
'39085' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARBZ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
8b8367ec8310196a944bbddca11672a5
d5dc9526b306aca6e7390b206a33673b0b1b07c9
'2011-11-16T17:01:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCA' 'sip-files00029.tif'
bf607c37a4aaf81e683f7de3518b9075
a5a819ca6dca91a03aa6c3483c694653b48f438f
'2011-11-16T17:05:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCB' 'sip-files00029.txt'
3b293bde11428ec6732b25853e50876a
58fcd0b839c8f846d22c170a518e04fa7a58e733
'2011-11-16T17:08:16-05:00'
describe
'10904' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCC' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
f4d06d5eab4b0026c87189ba66cd666a
c3655158f380cddcbe7240bcf41ef0a6107879ea
'2011-11-16T17:02:48-05:00'
describe
'746508' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCD' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
277d178aac1c5a568e1a5409e5077760
f7d80ac1911fd276db0d4622ac1142ef72766e96
'2011-11-16T17:02:55-05:00'
describe
'96383' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCE' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
0782f53a7a39d69ae8e0a721707ef0f8
2da647cc7df5cb73236a661d02755491dd255c2c
'2011-11-16T17:07:59-05:00'
describe
'27807' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCF' 'sip-files00030.pro'
d11d8bb2168ad17b5190a66399f68e5a
000bee4909f65374e2da2899e92396a74b338980
'2011-11-16T17:01:30-05:00'
describe
'34546' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCG' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
ad910a57f4cc2097a0a5833404eb5c33
91f26a3c9acbace47cb101205b506ba02140b22d
'2011-11-16T17:04:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCH' 'sip-files00030.tif'
d92b37333521c20ae1f9ab4fd85cb284
6f6c0f4d7742803163e2d8a0ac8d2706599a42e3
'2011-11-16T17:00:47-05:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCI' 'sip-files00030.txt'
9525762f9180ecc9af5b6068f4b23b06
3bd9e7a3a465db0b6b5febf659c5705991b16463
'2011-11-16T17:01:55-05:00'
describe
'10670' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCJ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
be088b5c814fb4722f2ae21a4078a8e8
253982a664d8956f88abaa72303ff40d2935b3f4
'2011-11-16T17:06:54-05:00'
describe
'762297' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCK' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
32a6eeb4c03e872dedde48be15e621bb
ebe43a8d7c3926eeee922d1b5155d7526b67d864
'2011-11-16T17:02:03-05:00'
describe
'99209' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCL' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
7f9e02533834b2800934a1395ee72b51
52f111c4f777eae7e6d8d874bc649d51414fa81d
'2011-11-16T17:09:43-05:00'
describe
'28527' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCM' 'sip-files00031.pro'
c2d95a6f06ec772c690d117b4b0f1c72
3485e3f34e1c0d93e62891a4323ce39e835e221b
describe
'38527' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCN' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
49ac40b8504ae2cfeeaff8a13e9b077c
1c37d0948b38b7e798ba16db425dd7da0b862501
'2011-11-16T17:07:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCO' 'sip-files00031.tif'
8b7c7515735455c7cf789872da486448
4b79be3e4b86faba5b33a7484286f5f0e900bafb
'2011-11-16T17:02:52-05:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCP' 'sip-files00031.txt'
485761073eb94734836ff7dc066f0332
eeebdfd788d77e9301c0dbd7d84abd762ddda0c1
'2011-11-16T17:10:13-05:00'
describe
'10605' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCQ' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
522c674297807c6fefa195b38575b488
a6cc7d0183f7ee0feab791e4f0e4339736e9db16
'2011-11-16T17:04:31-05:00'
describe
'737342' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCR' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
6a96bfc58301a3f45ac491d22e7ffc9f
0db4149a834f46a59e34ab41ff38049b20c462ac
'2011-11-16T17:04:48-05:00'
describe
'94479' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCS' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
8f67ce1f40ba8dd38eb0439beb01006b
5a87fc57b27b477e6f87cdd9a11f36119b1faa89
'2011-11-16T17:07:06-05:00'
describe
'27792' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCT' 'sip-files00032.pro'
aabf6fa5871094cffc60c0c32b1c18f1
0dbd9085e321ffb6da23127698fd64f74e2aa2d2
'2011-11-16T17:04:22-05:00'
describe
'36393' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCU' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
9341e6b51b96bcc867109f68de5bdc17
dee310f5e9a26e3cf3ad6b5db4af4dc4e8924c5c
'2011-11-16T17:09:10-05:00'
describe
'5902325' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCV' 'sip-files00032.tif'
2fe00f2526d9de0d603227dd238db5b0
4744d6a3a68ae45f426b0a2efe0c2713b9520b4f
'2011-11-16T17:00:44-05:00'
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCW' 'sip-files00032.txt'
001fadaa34830310d0bd28da96a9074f
812bc3a8972aedecbe16510626be44c08461e837
'2011-11-16T17:08:15-05:00'
describe
'10958' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCX' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
8de99bacd2f6b8374e1b6a6dc1765635
4123d075e89b0666a3e1cb50051e53f7b7068eb5
describe
'762294' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCY' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
933b1de2c81abd47643c63e3ebb0c7f3
46de151cee19b23077e5984b84f566feaebb30a6
describe
'96340' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARCZ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
d598576891174d04d526ea6c2b83c500
219c6b55d94f85e4a10265afe230fe896128ff2d
'2011-11-16T17:06:36-05:00'
describe
'27866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDA' 'sip-files00033.pro'
1124d1be8948e7306f9181aaea68e961
92d673dc022195a1e6275927a0596cfbc5cfaf25
'2011-11-16T17:06:40-05:00'
describe
'36532' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDB' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
8b941b1849be0c6a9da3cea8ddee4840
765d8889d6194129613b016ea8b76300cb881209
'2011-11-16T17:04:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDC' 'sip-files00033.tif'
05fac2b67281a810c81a1d7ebe3e2074
7a0c222855dbfffe2a96d6bf7e65d1b9bb9465ec
'2011-11-16T17:01:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDD' 'sip-files00033.txt'
0c3b551e7e00e91432eb9bb69430339b
c96beccb8466537fb36a65d79a7f40011e6924b3
describe
'10883' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDE' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
6c93347ee62b58e5b780faa2f9ab0365
278c6238e67bb774b91b3dbce9839c8201fe2189
describe
'746541' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDF' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
42f90ef6518a6699600813d9cbeadb73
48e9c6c5601859b0eebafe2bd169546ab132a999
describe
'100910' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDG' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
3784c894fa558ba02c04381c7388390d
a348c3c0bdd71ab820a1fc5bddb3d27bb044b4fd
'2011-11-16T17:02:04-05:00'
describe
'29368' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDH' 'sip-files00034.pro'
536299c2c1466bc28c3f2e21ce39768d
17c17e0849f1b22f4dc8e9f6ffa06417600e2fe0
describe
'37153' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDI' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
3e6d990d5362a4f92921e4fe2cdd3264
d84e3cd56d0a4624bc93a6b6d54402caef12a827
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDJ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
e5d5b65f4b55f1af8f88b5e375118ea2
8e29c5a162f41b538eda3cb7e40e7434cae25448
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDK' 'sip-files00034.txt'
aa91d7993b774d849fb101118bd964a9
2c026a36bfc7877b75048a56699ace657f566693
'2011-11-16T17:06:37-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11232' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDL' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
746357ea7b33069fb95dfe811bfc653e
188d854aeefff90d1504f400f4bf425da5f8de92
'2011-11-16T17:03:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDM' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
c19e09c6e8f94d19c6b11026f4d1a6e8
f05e35fa1c1edf295fdae7b37c529260e30b6075
describe
'100069' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDN' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
db0d71ab93dbb1aed8d8febdc94b86f8
3269d6d2313d445a71785aceed9eb8b7d07b7f74
'2011-11-16T17:01:45-05:00'
describe
'29272' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDO' 'sip-files00035.pro'
41c0708d854a6f87cda636f6f3b85293
6018d82b9209647057e1529077190b39e5013353
'2011-11-16T17:02:25-05:00'
describe
'39089' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDP' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
ba6cdd870b16d27e2a3ed069058b5e87
e1e0d3946cbfb87e4ab6e0636025c860984842ae
'2011-11-16T17:04:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDQ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
6d4155b8645956929ee94434b1cede23
e7536da7c1a44a78b5f0eeef22d56f91ddca11cd
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDR' 'sip-files00035.txt'
74de10af20a642c3e9d2652d0f567a58
4ef23453bbef1722e46e21cadb0f0834e039ae8c
'2011-11-16T17:05:32-05:00'
describe
'10659' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDS' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
a3da8478701882c3ca486e6a89498e6a
1b6d6783bb5861ee0cbfc74d7cdc3be8906fafe1
'2011-11-16T17:01:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDT' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
de38625f4b5039192c9c08794e1f0bc6
8218963d9fabba70df13d3ec6d8ceda086e8c466
'2011-11-16T17:07:53-05:00'
describe
'100692' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDU' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
e289d81bba0905e10ed900f3793147e1
b26014a5be163fa0381de22fc67a5723050e944c
'2011-11-16T17:02:05-05:00'
describe
'29709' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDV' 'sip-files00036.pro'
db93f24f8a7aa01f8a1e28757efcb8f7
56b65fa85cdf4ee0ae58fa5b9db412236fd515bd
describe
'42396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDW' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
29d49222f1808fbd722fe31d8cf85825
82fb06cc497e9dc68dd11b6a45d5b2ff436d4a5c
'2011-11-16T17:05:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDX' 'sip-files00036.tif'
e7ac71d74a3c09cecdf9d149b9a09b89
3ca293a3a4790fc281f42b5709628a284c121e92
'2011-11-16T17:02:02-05:00'
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDY' 'sip-files00036.txt'
9ce8cec2a5f953092ea2d3381aadde26
c07fdf99acf22ff385d213ac42eea5592051dc30
'2011-11-16T17:05:27-05:00'
describe
'11141' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARDZ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
8d08dbb789bb4b56ca963c99706bbc0e
e724cfbb3217ee7b2a985f1a80434bbd8cabe117
'2011-11-16T17:08:02-05:00'
describe
'754666' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREA' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
88bf64754a164567b8498b55d22442b7
3841b7bf7529c938cf555c5b9549b4c74f9235a0
describe
'101039' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREB' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
1194464bc7f33000a85ab6f3b4ee9aa1
78ccdda9ce9efd96a88706d51ef53f53db5e391b
describe
'29390' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREC' 'sip-files00037.pro'
841891fa807b57e8852ddfea721c4946
5fa0346bfdd2cbcf6d2892c67251ca0cad9457d9
'2011-11-16T17:07:20-05:00'
describe
'40184' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARED' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
3f35f841fdaa7a124447d8cc1f99b598
a0595579bdac0a7398bd39a9c5c84b6d86b95d02
describe
'6043071' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREE' 'sip-files00037.tif'
393850bd2fdac4f9d2daef48d1fb9fef
2acbabc72b8d7e2d3128868e715a166a7769490e
'2011-11-16T17:08:36-05:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREF' 'sip-files00037.txt'
704aca6c6fa75ecf4bd5c1a432661c5d
4b8418c26fc61e839173caca8c1997b8f5c25a52
describe
'11055' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREG' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
7768f6cade452afcb4fd0902c777bfde
e961785f02fa76759a1c673e77bbe76853be09dc
'2011-11-16T17:09:16-05:00'
describe
'731130' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREH' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
dfd54fcd26b3d799d055f2895075748a
66aacfcacde34146e3778aa735ba734accaa5194
'2011-11-16T17:06:35-05:00'
describe
'95051' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREI' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
a5301cedd035b153861714a2275e9d07
4d7ec074ca7c2d3d0f4067ccbdea067e9900e2e9
'2011-11-16T17:09:55-05:00'
describe
'27255' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREJ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
56ce5dd4ff9b5a79e97c99a38946b6c7
3ea5019c05e32f12e6c804af2fe7a3b70c3be6fa
describe
'37442' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREK' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
13670ffa56366f8dea9a67001a8874b3
6ad988efd6d0b64e5fdbc0da4072bf37bec7858e
'2011-11-16T17:07:31-05:00'
describe
'5855083' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREL' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7b56b0a20899d352e6ae5bcf8cc08e60
fdb2d560d9839a03eae90cdae19ed94df6c7ff08
'2011-11-16T17:09:40-05:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREM' 'sip-files00038.txt'
12f011e0a28491a72173bc70d5759624
687b245dbaf2ce4185c33d5d3e494773789634ce
describe
'11118' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREN' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
00b27c369907b6710ce2ba0b4b74b0be
d8b9f9a42e5aabb252aaf775d51449c1e3ff4ac6
'2011-11-16T17:01:12-05:00'
describe
'754672' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREO' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
034157e7a96e3eb574597176c1e2f65d
d0f3c3816c8ead0e433e45d536e55a92917108a4
'2011-11-16T17:04:13-05:00'
describe
'93856' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREP' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
2b709c38069d35f1f72d05d6c93054d2
a12ee55425012d4f6cab3875eaf340c503aeb2a7
describe
'27803' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREQ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
5f2093a28220bdcfbf54a611175f881b
811cf20db66c9d7fd3cac909f514fa2004d4e8eb
'2011-11-16T17:04:03-05:00'
describe
'34643' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARER' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
6adb5095521e5302ffd9e6f4f49de8e3
2b9ff5812aed7acf775acb2618f2261f49f812c1
'2011-11-16T17:05:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARES' 'sip-files00039.tif'
9ced7163c5c0ee0fe3d130c8d6e672ce
a4c1acbb640f275cb2a384383c7a18121338ba1e
'2011-11-16T17:07:55-05:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARET' 'sip-files00039.txt'
033074cec31e3785cdb829db431e4ab9
d0bfc0e9c3f5578c3baa89a15917bfe0880c1d8d
'2011-11-16T17:09:12-05:00'
describe
'10425' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREU' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
870bfa68e08d829a202b6a38275b4c14
8da6c636ba772456abe4c67e0ca5528f7f7d503a
'2011-11-16T17:06:21-05:00'
describe
'731083' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREV' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
0dccb87d2f3056c470e2747760969ecb
88e25271299d00dccab91ca71030573d05bf2730
'2011-11-16T17:05:28-05:00'
describe
'99234' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREW' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
dcdace3f3995e0c0b39a83136530b634
fe8a54d0682a6f37687036228d9b701148078671
describe
'28396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREX' 'sip-files00040.pro'
ccfa5c897050cdb9c7695a18ef97b0a5
43a17d9385191f2e3b08f055ba3e763a0d10d8dc
'2011-11-16T17:01:07-05:00'
describe
'38992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREY' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
46770482b405d49024f96ab17783b7fa
1337422aca1faa8a6fa5a743d35ea258e8c39f44
'2011-11-16T17:01:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAREZ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1cd3e5a5467ef836363ef0387f94def8
be32c67d71a17266bd4a4d0afe00db3d6b2c47c9
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFA' 'sip-files00040.txt'
f2b0f58037454903f11a04103ac8f3fd
618280b8fc3123a6375380c8bf82b780a46782ba
describe
'11637' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFB' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
bfea242e19e156e5c6d10e013464ff77
b392b5678ae205940f18c5beac454deb7bbfdb45
describe
'754589' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFC' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
bdb212576885ddd79558da4e61f51163
461c21859fb1973035e4f3c638e64a711aba1013
describe
'97507' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFD' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
6bf05157e0726a58e7257af2edea907e
56c7daa50286a9e1402361db01a97d9c50821987
'2011-11-16T17:02:15-05:00'
describe
'28240' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFE' 'sip-files00041.pro'
e16008d13b715660d8ee3a64f5b2ad4c
fde5bfde423ee0057751f236a229ae7200c8358b
describe
'37674' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFF' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
7ec3674d4bf7a1035183cb797b31613d
c8bee26dd0f17fa5e3afc81b111e79f3ce2fe404
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFG' 'sip-files00041.tif'
7eec4957e8c74712e1ed0b38be1262ac
4a7920904e075afceee62d5f489ae704df220565
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFH' 'sip-files00041.txt'
47aad423ffc277a36e35329e130307de
c7c9305d7893385d82f8a4b6b86fb9ad54b8a38c
'2011-11-16T17:05:19-05:00'
describe
'10938' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFI' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
29f8223b2d04e7f31ea938e02105c970
0d89488ed537f77eac6391b57d54fc6e5994c1c8
describe
'731127' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFJ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
a6ff6daea77acd58827ca8f28b006570
6a02ec93421d216a0eaff2412abce028592a176a
describe
'99524' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFK' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
fc9e1cc5af75479c5c6a08dec8ab2066
f98f58ba5e5fb0e70a6ee49f073c6152f8428f35
'2011-11-16T17:01:14-05:00'
describe
'29045' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFL' 'sip-files00042.pro'
d79ac0bd8821e8a4bda988aa3b9fa1dd
b61d343f6d5c0e0c1fe4cb114a581ec90a87c1b9
'2011-11-16T17:05:44-05:00'
describe
'37673' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFM' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
d8cde107ee3c31223eb2ce7f32927cbd
d6828a581396b84c737d5b9d17a69651a8ba2c07
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFN' 'sip-files00042.tif'
3c14d41de27c9cef6babc419d9f0c19d
f696b0a55e29b4346f2bdffb323c05aab0b2c98f
'2011-11-16T17:08:10-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFO' 'sip-files00042.txt'
b9818ce68ffd4f12e1d893a172d9db54
af7dc8f2383f9c73d85d45a25e3470fd4c1909ba
describe
'11694' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFP' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
afaa50971fce893d5380a95d2f297054
4e7b354018746d0d14960dcdf37319fc821ae4c8
describe
'754644' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFQ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ab89ee3c8ee478f9b274daa9d512e13f
e7d60e17ce9c0e156f21be3cbdf13514920d129b
'2011-11-16T17:05:39-05:00'
describe
'101659' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFR' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
d9ba73b0dc791e8e3a2216841e8c7353
7ed5a8b0df96bb4a6e0050c2b90d74b0c7d3a390
'2011-11-16T17:07:21-05:00'
describe
'29629' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFS' 'sip-files00043.pro'
88b3fbb09ef2069da86df7eb2e955c43
152f36c2c46de2f1db19feca6ed077c22b40e6ed
'2011-11-16T17:02:43-05:00'
describe
'38530' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFT' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
27254485cfaa1ee498b77f9da690e38a
663b697b51004921f48fb3e9d16c12752e002edd
'2011-11-16T17:02:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFU' 'sip-files00043.tif'
cce96013da5826de6b34cf5a12c8de59
ae9ebacad4b772dce252f2878707b8a51bcbcb6b
'2011-11-16T17:02:57-05:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFV' 'sip-files00043.txt'
f3db9c1431e4ac0d5516d819f1d8f95a
b25854354f2e92b2dafb1e4af9c2bacf98f3c5a6
describe
'11105' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFW' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
c109bdb0a22bc496a564a74676dbd281
2a3af911562142069b0aa679240a0c8e5e17b899
'2011-11-16T17:10:21-05:00'
describe
'731058' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFX' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
93b08ab07e2c937fdfc61ea5f379554f
7dbdb4c4f2652953f2fbe599f2949a54896c3986
'2011-11-16T17:02:28-05:00'
describe
'92662' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFY' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
f5b26003c9d79c0eadb49478b0f6bbf4
628133af32d853bd214411eb4e1abeb1d31b39b5
describe
'27640' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARFZ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c2d743ce28301999d9bb1c309c98f6ed
5753945e7c1e8ba35a196106655b29c731a9f7b5
describe
'35266' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
f965c6d70ade8bd722cec81238d1db1e
abbf2ec52137c7c5d367dfb7be1a48528a1658f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGB' 'sip-files00044.tif'
8601dfa26b6fe48e5a5731eaeca5ceac
ba5595cf83d7920c5e6bcb0c5a2f577a9ff6c717
'2011-11-16T17:03:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGC' 'sip-files00044.txt'
a1e74be5cf5b83e5a1e06e9cdcbcd732
6b49864f7cf057fb8721fe6026dfed4750b242a1
'2011-11-16T17:02:51-05:00'
describe
'11092' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGD' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
3dd9be3d0575d5f6e8216cd5d28b9cb5
495eb5afdeabbdc5dbcc8c1ca0b2e99ae512a13e
'2011-11-16T17:03:57-05:00'
describe
'764403' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGE' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
d0382ae6f6bd5fbb131a034b6bc49f6e
091a47b7d3810f0a57d4fd3fa4458775e17fe4f7
'2011-11-16T17:03:17-05:00'
describe
'100163' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGF' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
4d8a6865a9ad4dbbd1f4cfc3d585f3a4
59d1a0f080559b6a1624f7e3d31cf55db721017c
describe
'28858' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGG' 'sip-files00045.pro'
93fcf15fbc03dd0bf783f9a8a3927a49
93b4568a250a09dfee9efdc06ebd4b8e13f04bdc
'2011-11-16T17:09:35-05:00'
describe
'38218' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGH' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
baf6afe225443598b0f55346252b6d99
77d144773eea96a0e2aca76279e43be8f9efdd4f
describe
'6121201' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGI' 'sip-files00045.tif'
4039b2a936cc0fae3dce2adb98cbc77a
82bee0cb04e16fa9c6f666183fd7935a0d040fd1
'2011-11-16T17:10:54-05:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGJ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
fe843452bb0c795b9dcbbaae8831d297
809585c8266dffdbb9a3d1c9ff3409445517d66e
'2011-11-16T17:02:37-05:00'
describe
'10640' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGK' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
b233e49c73446b10cd4d3db749cc3da0
bf8b8ef046c83e138cc873399cf5190136dcd938
describe
'712617' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
ede6744ecca001c20c220dabd13d873e
39a2233987cb042175ccd50d4b5dc9f083e7c0d8
describe
'56884' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
f6ecf4bab4cf253f3bb297318dc317b2
b8352f614065b06414dacd241717ecc1462c3b1a
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
619e3e8e90b3fc999a56af6659731ae6
f7ac5f58ee0ecb0d058e5783d83ae66430ea61e8
describe
'16798' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGO' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
196f496208120d3af684026e8e6cc828
46688b4143fc67a80ad3d9aa173477c25e83cc21
describe
'5706031' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
f7fe3d99c603c9895d4714b0316f0d79
05652acde1e5a32a9cdb4a97d13688bd83f87996
'2011-11-16T17:01:34-05:00'
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
5a95946e148ac662fdb71886fcb91c90
1292480950586f88c253acc00b05493232e77e1e
describe
'5152' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGR' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
f1eb2cd178e950cf5e70c8b6a70f6c84
c8ee7178e7f2ed1573ac4437647bec25609273ea
describe
'738057' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGS' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
928fe6144fbb9e4fcc56e7a13f0c7ffc
397f7fbe433f7abe4ef1cdb7c2f53355d14109b3
describe
'98445' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGT' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
c205a6c1043eaebdd128b34cfc082a9e
4f8a095ed74f1c65b9ef85b2fec75e7852f75179
describe
'28007' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGU' 'sip-files00048.pro'
dcd5a1c0b3f8b4bea0364b01ecc6fd03
167f4246ac4f23b8694ef30edd12a2ee4bae3c96
'2011-11-16T17:07:27-05:00'
describe
'37754' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGV' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
9b1e5783e6656fb4f732b224bad73f29
372895fd981a7ddf1a3247e236cde05f4de8fb86
'2011-11-16T17:01:03-05:00'
describe
'5910901' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGW' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d97957541d78541dc309e28ac30dc67b
3ea58dcf4692ab192c7a8ba7c30dad5f4192d0ea
'2011-11-16T17:04:55-05:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGX' 'sip-files00048.txt'
941563e11547efdcb6c14f4157959808
a93307a0c9117351e382def56b31f16808723a32
describe
'11110' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGY' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
eb5921f3fd8ebd0585718f340d5b632a
9abf55ad3e1e80d8724b0339490dc4861fbdf5fb
'2011-11-16T17:00:55-05:00'
describe
'764419' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARGZ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
05273d8c3600be6a86154d363831210a
0fce8bb86ab8819d2e51d93d2c1e3de1005b7d86
'2011-11-16T17:06:06-05:00'
describe
'102442' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHA' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
83e6251e5768c571fab49c61781007ae
469cd6207ed15ce9d8b022cfd1b053cdd17529eb
'2011-11-16T17:03:12-05:00'
describe
'31282' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHB' 'sip-files00049.pro'
7a2487c67d7337887ec708f74a6180c3
95af1e101a1bdb0e0f629772927bbbd1a6bc5c9e
'2011-11-16T17:10:57-05:00'
describe
'39511' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHC' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
5827b43b29c8d1a0be7a766f9443d523
8e92462a898ab00abd213b1f14f3fd309809ca70
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHD' 'sip-files00049.tif'
8582e81bea92462bb435f994c63bf1ee
0e8a68cd952d9586cbf7a802e4ebcac7b598ac75
'2011-11-16T17:08:28-05:00'
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHE' 'sip-files00049.txt'
fcb2a44b7c7c8ebefb91a9880df4deb7
f7ad0eee2cdfe87af65282156b63e4a4aca578cd
'2011-11-16T17:06:26-05:00'
describe
'10933' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHF' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
376323662a7b72accd00552661eea19e
1aecc29886364348df0bc540d52f6d08c08648ef
describe
'738090' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHG' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
2f272cdf13a74101456a3bba51ae171d
e3c2403542a5bcf2a6d0d9fb3747af79fefb8f59
'2011-11-16T17:09:34-05:00'
describe
'99992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHH' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
80c5bdc7be16c8f70c123863c1b6a354
4b10e90b431fd90e540238aa818e666cbfa84c13
describe
'29093' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHI' 'sip-files00050.pro'
ed37149069a9333f40422cb512c3e1f3
2f235d4402b34671fd93b6e5b54b389a8306d455
describe
'38708' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHJ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
219d0cfb90eba3794d98df61b6453c49
991861d05f942d50dca4fe228f0f7c1ba9cbdc6c
'2011-11-16T17:01:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHK' 'sip-files00050.tif'
a774d25c944681361b50b6ce79a7fa35
f28e62124625f7c59aad39eb9cb78204862a3d06
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHL' 'sip-files00050.txt'
83ea2ec8696410479980d6ab19a32808
6127318ee6682c51a832594f9a0f9a09a35483a4
'2011-11-16T17:05:08-05:00'
describe
'11381' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHM' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
d4577848a59e90cbde2f2b92b925e9ff
e93ae4b5f5cf38fa40a31cc153db82b3e72ee56e
describe
'764382' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHN' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
5b4284918eda9662c9212d97587d4a33
a7ae273ec00737b37e738807243bed6b4baf7f27
describe
'92547' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHO' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
369086b4e63f6b4e8e7edfc37761c974
2f6ff20c89c13042b1552b3b0b18a67fbf39fca7
'2011-11-16T17:02:21-05:00'
describe
'27277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHP' 'sip-files00051.pro'
1439987e07e7284b7665f480450e8ded
9dfd729580220fa05a577f93b0fda6e882a7958d
'2011-11-16T17:03:22-05:00'
describe
'37116' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHQ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
b432af7f9ab47000dce80535dfc29422
c7b9ee02aacd945ce57fc279437283a0521f67d2
'2011-11-16T17:10:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHR' 'sip-files00051.tif'
2f14fc9efc562c7923c1ff80d98d397c
10245882e3d7987cf8bcc32a8938d22b4f399c86
'2011-11-16T17:09:44-05:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHS' 'sip-files00051.txt'
2793af0f3b1eb173056cb6e541542ca0
ab7acbef4e8a95ac41250dcdb90c58556ff3ba39
'2011-11-16T17:01:35-05:00'
describe
'10666' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHT' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
cb8838571712cd7a05e8244b6a8edd7c
34b027421bef5c384427bc2d079bb058f9a8ec45
'2011-11-16T17:03:09-05:00'
describe
'738141' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHU' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
048eaf2bcaf6a6818cf1484549ef4ca7
e7a3b82d1a540903ef51a7eda0e69c3fe7c672df
describe
'100074' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHV' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
c542d556460ab8a0958f65578104b96c
20384df0836ac372170d466ae9aaf3380402540e
'2011-11-16T17:01:44-05:00'
describe
'29389' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHW' 'sip-files00052.pro'
7d76f2a2f30ad6d88615082e8e42fb57
613b6a7b512503771db24b1d2d590724817b2607
describe
'39276' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHX' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
3ee3e03196bc9c81d5324966fbcd39d5
b01344600c540d045010751bd7224e684b54594b
'2011-11-16T17:07:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHY' 'sip-files00052.tif'
d1e6834bcfed893e0c84644ad39fcfea
db13537153620df635a968a0929c8f7a83286124
'2011-11-16T17:11:00-05:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARHZ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
5d910e070820f9944b0f3489e2fb4e87
3461e4478c5a046daa37b82f566cbce065ecbc48
describe
'11451' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIA' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
f960e303c5788db341cab9b053c19afa
193a6564203983eacbcfcfa7003728280113dd07
'2011-11-16T17:04:12-05:00'
describe
'764412' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
ac7e451fe7b96f5e0c044315f38bcc7b
eb5621603d9ee4f07d83b71a86ae57fb70e0651b
'2011-11-16T17:08:09-05:00'
describe
'101137' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIC' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
b538e99f68087faf3ff2cf3c35f8c88f
a5ef8d201e35f761fea7b12de51765be3145d1e8
'2011-11-16T17:09:20-05:00'
describe
'30158' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARID' 'sip-files00053.pro'
12e81b7f309c00bfd69b03185e541baf
77af8b53793073f3d383ae14e377cc561a4c0341
'2011-11-16T17:01:20-05:00'
describe
'38359' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIE' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
c521407b7700c9401da33063eebda7b8
268bf332230f7dce4bc252e70ecb8c164610a5a2
'2011-11-16T17:08:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIF' 'sip-files00053.tif'
fd6c1fa7c6db5fe11111d92460e6db4d
0dbb8cd4788b1c093bbd0126aad696e8ddd5cac8
'2011-11-16T17:07:12-05:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
4ff779518047b68fe047e39c9cbd8ace
78a2d79d917e4019ed48dba3a51644d2ec22efcd
'2011-11-16T17:04:36-05:00'
describe
'10990' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIH' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
607089871b9a4d2215e444aa0b75d7e1
4061b9ef07b0565f2ecd6beca1832e0d98e11ce8
'2011-11-16T17:10:28-05:00'
describe
'738147' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARII' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
b2aee4aa4fb3d91dd070eb550132a369
bb1d38424c2f9a8854373a15043c0bda8aaa1681
'2011-11-16T17:02:45-05:00'
describe
'98090' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIJ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
a49f8e0ef21c4cf74d9c31230f80cd5c
488f065c82ed127a6ac69c1d27dadf60a50d63d2
'2011-11-16T17:04:50-05:00'
describe
'28496' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIK' 'sip-files00054.pro'
004b209759e4626d3ce24ff9c3baa7ee
acff206f0c62d0729cae79b302f9c90f2be2a918
describe
'38807' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIL' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
11b11ee7354b66c3e6a0f9ecff22653b
cd7b83d182b2c109e149713f3dbf880df2696a41
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIM' 'sip-files00054.tif'
253ca814847b7451074419265b5af8ef
42a4bac68a1a224e366404ffbb05ef607c685c84
'2011-11-16T17:06:49-05:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIN' 'sip-files00054.txt'
07f85c4d98db09e1a572c97b57b14a67
ad04cc539ed39c462c36e775e622ed758d5ee1a6
describe
'11436' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIO' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
00712ee96da7b994b73573573b1e3a24
916cb8f05bbd4c9b77e2deee316c85a9d80ed94f
describe
'764372' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIP' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
f822da493fc563257037c1bcde698579
e0bf564b5868c060f6e34625ccce41f6965a7d0a
'2011-11-16T17:10:06-05:00'
describe
'96041' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIQ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
cd3321a5562fe9b5fb0145531f8f6601
f3d3520dd7562c05171f2b7ff05327077dd5a21b
describe
'27950' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIR' 'sip-files00055.pro'
aeadc4aafa37d9466a7924fd51e89220
b1dd6b7f3822b463d0bcc9deb049d0ebb346ce03
'2011-11-16T17:10:10-05:00'
describe
'36832' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIS' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
bab377c7e09afba723733e698ba97cd4
81fafb12a414df34140cdec2bb49ed27ed8d9ae9
'2011-11-16T17:07:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIT' 'sip-files00055.tif'
ce4afdf041a89e678db114deef36d02b
8a4eb0cd89341fd95c0154df69ee54efb31fa047
'2011-11-16T17:08:49-05:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIU' 'sip-files00055.txt'
20674a7e9a46bb856ea4994fc1d780b9
58f39972c2eb03896186aa4819bf5628cb276585
'2011-11-16T17:06:41-05:00'
describe
'10580' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIV' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
db9fbac82af6eff2f3d4aa085f36bf4e
a499c6a7b50810854bddb93cb1181f1f7997dd1b
describe
'738142' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIW' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
aa41479955fcf653955359be9629f24c
1c8223e87580c9254d193325107f209f14a63b8d
describe
'99860' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIX' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
84c7c487dcf702a10dc91c4070dda6f8
322c00b1c6dae253daf3fd9b61c648cf343537d3
describe
'28995' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIY' 'sip-files00056.pro'
a1f55ac78d95a4bd26fcd31362737d47
8ef2d853f94413cb9f6ea6ad6012fe1970af5896
'2011-11-16T17:11:04-05:00'
describe
'39221' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARIZ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
35e968d7781777c456b64aafdefa37bf
e1f27782da32dc843dfbc6a93da6ec6ec0798a44
'2011-11-16T17:11:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJA' 'sip-files00056.tif'
0dbcefc5039016c425c5dc97867041b6
99249c115feed94105f4f9ab85d7464d798cc71b
'2011-11-16T17:04:58-05:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJB' 'sip-files00056.txt'
b17af9951ef19eea1b8faf539b00bdb6
daee7e4ddaf96024d735821ca027c84a3b806f2d
describe
'11417' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJC' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
d920da988d22ae8dabf71171f745935f
a22374807f804352c5f4d7fcb4ae6189e65abb79
'2011-11-16T17:02:13-05:00'
describe
'747655' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJD' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
27ae0004ad6c9a28fc6252243f648d1b
3b2de7ec527906dfa3609e66e6682100fb4ef67a
'2011-11-16T17:09:57-05:00'
describe
'89657' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJE' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
e421a1872746a186a808caaa4c52767e
39e2c0a31e3960b4e58ba0553d72290fa57fbb81
describe
'25018' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJF' 'sip-files00057.pro'
aa9d3b39ad9b23b197bcd28949c7cfaf
d433b80730046fee1cb54d5d4876b43156318a15
'2011-11-16T17:04:37-05:00'
describe
'36175' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJG' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
565cea6a77b0bc5fc7f2e0b6be279d1a
d98903f0d877df24acb5e50aea12d897b07a24a6
describe
'5987577' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJH' 'sip-files00057.tif'
496183fd75e4cb46952ea94eacd8cd89
81bebf440d9ffa22af5e405ddfcdfeff4fb4344c
'2011-11-16T17:06:12-05:00'
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJI' 'sip-files00057.txt'
72f39ebc27998d95822b1bd7b0bfea45
eb3093f9c3fe75785b17e1925090d78ba03ea192
'2011-11-16T17:03:41-05:00'
describe
'10406' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJJ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
b0d816a0901f3b673014752dd412ae0f
c621af0b46fd1ef55ff5fcacbb9f0a8ec32deb97
'2011-11-16T17:04:02-05:00'
describe
'752080' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJK' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
33514be073cfc543de6a294ed3912117
1ad33ae00eccec04a3b5152a2a19eb7016d7090f
'2011-11-16T17:09:48-05:00'
describe
'96540' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJL' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
5239e3d4de288b5fdfc01eed10510034
d3daeaeeb4529e08cf2813864db6023f39671579
'2011-11-16T17:09:03-05:00'
describe
'28174' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJM' 'sip-files00058.pro'
62513f4dc639beeebcd8358929e10d4a
384c8d280b35c1585856761e80d682608240f2ca
'2011-11-16T17:06:03-05:00'
describe
'37270' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJN' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
396bd37d4646af3101bac92f0c0bfaaf
787f801173b7ead397bbcab9c9480218966de32e
describe
'6022537' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJO' 'sip-files00058.tif'
3942b7ee08a06904ad07ffabe547a6e0
6e2bcca8ebaef130c1b326a024fcb706aaf73725
'2011-11-16T17:08:56-05:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJP' 'sip-files00058.txt'
b53695e7cfe6fb0db1e24d9d31741e07
4a9f60a405bc72d82b40ee3d9210d060abf69e00
describe
'10512' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJQ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
904e3d4cd8f1e467f934a3d945bf45d9
b347b0a98092feefbd0ff3bdf7f8c3a72b558967
describe
'747721' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJR' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
4315499cb3135f724c462eb08c66202b
1cca16070daa0e5f82693986de6b8cd13390b8d7
describe
'95288' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJS' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
cb40ace8e69d345ae908ce9b133ecd56
e5568773c57047f0c77c8cf7f731959553d39597
describe
'26820' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJT' 'sip-files00059.pro'
8194687a0ffc5885c513e2a164f9ac9f
b943cb3249ad604a0fc4df62abe536eb491d6a99
describe
'38837' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJU' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
3e0c13be9c4310617fc5b0f34dad912f
7f82e06c165487a94c9c369cdea023a6eac974f5
'2011-11-16T17:02:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJV' 'sip-files00059.tif'
ad6afe3018b3b1daba0586f6ae891d23
ae28e3df62e8ef855d4a246a44bbd91b20eada4e
'2011-11-16T17:09:46-05:00'
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJW' 'sip-files00059.txt'
d788eda725f7b113cfb21d63749bb79a
4f3b4a6c2e699b85bc183019f88c72760b4709d0
'2011-11-16T17:08:17-05:00'
describe
'10782' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJX' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
6c39c6e0d111be1b6364f04845160ef3
99a8a083df451c83fbebb670f558a39e050d97cc
'2011-11-16T17:08:38-05:00'
describe
'752056' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJY' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
8e03b1a9f56ce7ef3842d4d109be5627
7c69af8f037b9ed9cd636d5e2c73c5aa17903cba
describe
'98138' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARJZ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
9aef2a29e41df30dc181d97fe7b87a75
6d04abba527941266122c2514dcb61b5ce8ad218
describe
'29642' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKA' 'sip-files00060.pro'
aaf3e675d94db0e8312f4d2133ce3c15
bc8348610cdb51ffd7adbdc2b1489e79673293e9
'2011-11-16T17:10:56-05:00'
describe
'38871' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKB' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
4fb21276097ebbf8a5c47b6336aa5208
0047f158db12b4a6f214441dd25c2587138f202f
'2011-11-16T17:07:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKC' 'sip-files00060.tif'
5aec22909dc5f57529a23a36058045cc
56dc2702d655d36d338cd2ef0ea4d89e459ce22d
'2011-11-16T17:04:53-05:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKD' 'sip-files00060.txt'
970a4994a34a590fcdd05c59aa07ba3d
4f94bf27db34f630170ed90fa72f7e98b5a7f1fb
describe
'10815' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKE' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
c242d5d8fa30fdecbbc8dcf0870d148f
01672116d16c98492357e7d88bf64fa4ce99d05e
'2011-11-16T17:08:24-05:00'
describe
'747737' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKF' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
0f2d5728b022e1fb627c25d797c0378b
44f2c967394fe8371eafe48d9ee7696f34f2e39d
'2011-11-16T17:03:00-05:00'
describe
'101089' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKG' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
06aa654afd46aecad9c6a8b9b2a44558
b5a886e8d6e43b2442055a2ba4ccc2d98e0ff45c
'2011-11-16T17:07:26-05:00'
describe
'29899' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKH' 'sip-files00061.pro'
187f96896366a56794df61db8a57330c
fbfefccaa6f7482925258d89bba2596946ef92d5
describe
'40190' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKI' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
25e9a5999b39bd4c9d7f9e21fa6ba883
01b59c3af5ed93d4e3154d701dc845ec7e859799
'2011-11-16T17:06:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKJ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
a3be7f76cd8052d22afc72b383c96069
c8f71b2a5ccaf05b4f084228d57b5c82248be060
'2011-11-16T17:01:21-05:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKK' 'sip-files00061.txt'
642f8d79e6b0eafe806dd8de77d73866
1ebd78266bd97311e7c40a731963f4e873879829
'2011-11-16T17:06:14-05:00'
describe
'11465' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKL' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
fee4eeda53d7d471be0f9626847cdabc
804ce490ff2b5d4036ac325e5f23913c46f3ed5d
'2011-11-16T17:07:15-05:00'
describe
'752083' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKM' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
4d534e327b75a680dc01346d9d557ee0
3115f45825bb62034203ba30cc9b2cdb47fdf41a
describe
'90503' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKN' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
95ce2bca689e42e7626b9f9d9f13f114
d04beae40b0be3cdc1a61b0d934f7fbf23eaa365
'2011-11-16T17:00:45-05:00'
describe
'26251' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKO' 'sip-files00062.pro'
c660d92376d8c27113929273fca08951
1208905529183675b60b5f7524b33217dd57c7fa
describe
'34985' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKP' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
e76bea17d9770ea964cb4a2bb0af2dea
93dfa2f05e823692487e828bd0b192bfa9e2722b
'2011-11-16T17:04:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKQ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
8337ab624b721c35a36be6896a6d2b4a
e5768ccde0533a5e4a10eb9acad30deee25d9e56
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKR' 'sip-files00062.txt'
1cbbf2458898355b97d00a2fc8cfdb49
3f0fa8799a81de4885689efaf1cd7073402bd74e
'2011-11-16T17:01:59-05:00'
describe
'10113' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKS' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
f96c61d1515cbcf0ea3deed25c2e4e4b
3d298f2a7d19dc13930fdd5c5905dbf05a4c4c3d
'2011-11-16T17:02:38-05:00'
describe
'747582' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKT' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
144eb50fe6b65e169908cb620381b029
68969e46d4789bc2f561a037ed5af3766e41290f
describe
'87799' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKU' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
dd3a5a7adaa16e8e7909b4b1e9beaeb2
50404228830021ed53366b37c20d01b22d4231e9
describe
'23740' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKV' 'sip-files00063.pro'
1ccb0b194bb5148fcbb056ee454f7e23
8a927299f982f8c00fc2f38fb4b67456bf808184
'2011-11-16T17:07:25-05:00'
describe
'32874' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKW' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
1937279b08f1d5238046db3d3c053a14
09e6f0838e4a37d149f9e5b551463909bfa60fff
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKX' 'sip-files00063.tif'
2a05a8ccecbe46654c3d58dc79e27982
8a4a2bc5662e2cfe9aa41257fd1a8188d67fae50
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKY' 'sip-files00063.txt'
7e83e7fb8ffbafa42a043b1d910929b4
c5ac2ccd9e6b03b92b8c2fc8e574e1bbb9830a24
describe
'10257' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARKZ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
4e539012ba739985f15a2b641c824d2d
5690758530626c5a9faf9b9ef54aa2854d47754a
'2011-11-16T17:09:19-05:00'
describe
'752077' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLA' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
10b55c08c32764b525d3a48c1475475a
6ec4ac9f0379fbe87d70551712b20fd2818907f7
'2011-11-16T17:08:47-05:00'
describe
'99602' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLB' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
4d1b05fcdfd2aefdaf144d49641f7e7d
20f114e6e91ef10a84390e12453586dc6b78c171
'2011-11-16T17:07:13-05:00'
describe
'29458' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLC' 'sip-files00064.pro'
f971be3bcbfb83a714954cf408fb2d9e
a55906378af16482b7043972b8ee75b359b4015e
describe
'37994' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLD' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
4633a1c1476512d80a9710ea16102f40
a29383c4fdbf190aec8eec7562f7a228c354ffaf
'2011-11-16T17:03:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLE' 'sip-files00064.tif'
677d767c6f48297b4447d7ff1e531b40
c0458ad7c7f0b87250b1b201a89ec05c6f8fea07
'2011-11-16T17:01:16-05:00'
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLF' 'sip-files00064.txt'
77458981a727922d0f16f79db4126383
6f5293a5a6b12c087223f7325b6cf2844c6bfe55
describe
'10968' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLG' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
c9565e7e706abb08188e28022d2692de
e4745edf3bf683a946bb9e2477004e754fd741e3
describe
'712037' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLH' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
1783804fa7762ee7af1067907066ea40
cbf11b3040c3dfa623f9c6b12ce0ee3e32396da2
'2011-11-16T17:03:53-05:00'
describe
'94329' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLI' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
636d977f2a78e087d990dc8d3c2b0eaf
f9daac1e98b09f54c1c4b3f19aa51945ae8930f4
describe
'26685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLJ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
a84ffdbc7bd7decda076a48b26da54f9
e79a98ffd096a1cae60659608c54a5fb028b644f
'2011-11-16T17:01:39-05:00'
describe
'36575' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLK' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
2fee8adeec5652e2eb0092f25c9403db
9a8c9c160e946af12ea3ea3d86eee41cdd5ea7e8
describe
'5700167' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLL' 'sip-files00065.tif'
8daac8c657a28f70ef0e57a6a26f62b7
31a383e558356d7bdc488ef79dd0e96427eff7f1
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLM' 'sip-files00065.txt'
64b1592f686e0cd45b057ce4cd34ef94
6a241e1afdeab8faf60158e492138c24eb511e18
'2011-11-16T17:07:46-05:00'
describe
'10998' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLN' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
5d1b8ee5aaed7c5c488dc6df6b19daa6
c565edf1efa119f8ea87646764c66d62f5567cfa
'2011-11-16T17:04:05-05:00'
describe
'752038' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLO' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
a2de6862d615131784462d1598ef2d96
0dcc114845ce711f2c8cd1955939d965593f2d4d
describe
'101318' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLP' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
6e2a1b49ef5721fc4fccb5ecb4d7bf87
610094e231f44dd840002ef5e9f60e3d03e8ead7
'2011-11-16T17:10:59-05:00'
describe
'29961' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLQ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
29534ea28baee3aa69a88ab9e1615bf5
de90f10560101fadbb9fdae91b16642ec6a2f90a
describe
'39065' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLR' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
6ed15fd2f77ce5400a04322e40a9f569
916f2f4509bfbf2b2c8bb2d2e50e1f0938437731
'2011-11-16T17:05:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLS' 'sip-files00066.tif'
0c1d4d5ca02bb0aa9c0b0ee1d889913b
1171d15428bc9b17639e48e5619bce6b663389ba
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLT' 'sip-files00066.txt'
1eecd06a801ea1e637512ffe4392594e
95615de1c0cd6ec60e2a60bf7c87711a21b018d8
describe
'10748' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLU' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
9dfa32cfacd2fa0187999c64e8122515
dd7d92b5f94eb3904d5242f4cece5183a0f26d07
'2011-11-16T17:09:36-05:00'
describe
'714542' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLV' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
594ac3e70e6cd6e5dbb3e3bbc69a206e
4509d86929ce6a9e7af4cf1cad023401ebbd0368
'2011-11-16T17:01:22-05:00'
describe
'101667' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLW' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
a0b251e71f1cf9a5b77d99e1f84cb794
8c1d55a8911f308aac4993cf507179e5a06ed428
'2011-11-16T17:04:21-05:00'
describe
'28856' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLX' 'sip-files00067.pro'
09c90eae526a8d1f7a7123b1118aceb5
20b543bc8a0460048bf417e2587685c1391bec4d
describe
'40272' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLY' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d4a48f043f22653035153a49e16d9388
a426173d0e06b5803256d0217b6aa78626f521cb
'2011-11-16T17:05:41-05:00'
describe
'5719847' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARLZ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
7ced93d29c96276e39293ac821df6181
8a9242b75b75c484365a004c11fa9090f73eb63c
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMA' 'sip-files00067.txt'
3c828fad9639a1c8303342387f98aec7
7936a807aa3199680be50aa8a3230709ed74dc07
describe
'11414' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMB' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
5e91f80113efe030203eb37311f1d7c9
95a774c2c0f3bb436ce2472b5bb532226dd48529
'2011-11-16T17:03:38-05:00'
describe
'752092' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMC' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
9657290354901ebd6da46216f8379061
585f2a46a0000c2e0d975b9d70e12550c37a2817
describe
'103615' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMD' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
5180ff1fd15001c7586aa8e897ceaa7c
704376ea77a9d69adc8510bd6e952da96d64e063
'2011-11-16T17:01:32-05:00'
describe
'30507' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARME' 'sip-files00068.pro'
616fe60214564e0006a8667d37c015d8
de3a29623dd26f4585ef0529dbf42b62a700d0fa
describe
'39270' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMF' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
ddfed5fb91e5c411cc7180d995fddaa4
9d81d00a4e2397fd296bf6b2a286660a234426e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMG' 'sip-files00068.tif'
b0f8ef57494daa887211400bf0d97541
6a93876619f9b3215848b2d8384f9e89a37cb049
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMH' 'sip-files00068.txt'
b61f4419fa5f0231fe62bca504245a33
87860f2ab4452d866e41a379dae934ad5a60ee8b
describe
'11259' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMI' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
5595ba745f01512038d91b6b78c49307
9d15d4c1a43f38d0f716239059a920f182492480
describe
'710870' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMJ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
12e563216064c9f7fa66f179e6bb4a0a
585b235237157583ab8fc2de650c9decbe27e10a
describe
'96260' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMK' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
5a203f43a8907e9f8fbbc1255c7c806e
398acfb8d8472d5bd6dd1b2f5f0e30daed8e8134
'2011-11-16T17:10:48-05:00'
describe
'28383' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARML' 'sip-files00069.pro'
b62583c109f46e442686e4bbf2966c85
c414d3ca6c34e37fe2786820ed0866f757d9cce5
'2011-11-16T17:07:54-05:00'
describe
'36432' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMM' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
d9a4fdaf1b9b2c87d5b0750f26cb8a46
a10db1b6dc195765ad765ef9f8169c21f7194258
describe
'5690775' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMN' 'sip-files00069.tif'
8a4a5597e9129273e3ab0a6aa21514a1
d131218aea85660e6ddbe642c88951b4c699b2eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMO' 'sip-files00069.txt'
1a6a43f372c3a562a43a030cc95a602d
a16332c79e2fdab3d531462acadff47ca51eaa4b
describe
'11354' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMP' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
bb024e51ec819653c383eda043fd79e3
e6ed039aaabb37efa1ff8759e493aaaf4de1fc62
describe
'752055' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMQ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
a1ddb219ec7ba9d890ac0a77eaa8a397
8633c33853dd1a19335fd6a2387236be7f1e6b68
'2011-11-16T17:09:06-05:00'
describe
'95398' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMR' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
47c66cd3995454f65148e2e5a9f53a4a
08ca00210a6edacad2eae91dca429322726e4a4b
'2011-11-16T17:00:48-05:00'
describe
'27174' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMS' 'sip-files00070.pro'
621c5c576052cfbfdd84457e983a4ed8
d68b78398f5ca034c2a4af5a9e4f4d6a137291c9
describe
'36762' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMT' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
89bb894fa1447fc18c2be550dc8b7011
c8f18596da7def6c70471edf0f5f89ffe070367d
'2011-11-16T17:07:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMU' 'sip-files00070.tif'
34467e9db29a380c763fe3a1483cc1b7
34431cb1bddcddc0c96b93b101014b22a0c8b00a
'2011-11-16T17:10:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMV' 'sip-files00070.txt'
c58a2e6b2b2abfd7cef3d0079aaf0282
84958a4daf06fc20fb27213c29cb368b33898297
describe
'10833' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMW' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
d847526fdef3db9c09e7e927602da336
d8328ed6716e1d6a789bd9357995db84b3751e6b
describe
'712860' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMX' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
a0702489b7e66c0f30c07ea04182a843
305e3595b2380c3676567cbb40449224c845f38d
'2011-11-16T17:09:42-05:00'
describe
'93131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMY' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
047f1d6962e5d6d058173baa326a08bb
61a274169f6c83eeaf95dba74228bba492de9ec6
describe
'27479' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARMZ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
888994089849918b1c5e13b40c27937a
176581d7497179376b8319e00e3cc632d6a81a99
describe
'35950' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNA' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
6d045c7595100f2ca2cb346bc40f76ab
62586a7af792ca748fb2f979ecc15632f56d9efe
'2011-11-16T17:09:47-05:00'
describe
'5706483' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNB' 'sip-files00071.tif'
0798c538fdf71396328c2d6ebd7d7cda
e81f7c8c60f30583f29d2e2692d5fa9c360e269d
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNC' 'sip-files00071.txt'
39c9bbcfe41c14f8abe2f95cdb901f4f
1132cc4fdb0ca5e868efb5d0f84c4a922cdc8555
describe
'10593' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARND' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
3d51105b481cb7d81f5799bd29a8fae2
421c4a19623c10ba19df89ebfe0388d839b09564
'2011-11-16T17:06:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNE' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
79ebbb8e70d3f4931af60cace4c6f83d
5c2cc7d9db979bcbda2aacc302524c674df80cf8
'2011-11-16T17:07:43-05:00'
describe
'93229' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNF' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
cd516dad255da804c44a6bb6e06f3158
b150483712799d028f1a539f88fef6f2087bd365
'2011-11-16T17:07:35-05:00'
describe
'26422' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNG' 'sip-files00072.pro'
a4171fb5b2262f4edc5aa7fd0d8b7a98
cc2195c7d2bfe09fad8f57dc228438cd59664c2e
'2011-11-16T17:06:53-05:00'
describe
'35985' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNH' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
1e52ada89e31909a1da956f5d9f0445b
52cb33b78b3762ae03557cdae0d00f98573b27d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNI' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e1d7bb7765f83065f163dbc2e934a5ad
f5b8bbfff64f497538a4add84f8ed8404b08a969
'2011-11-16T17:02:09-05:00'
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNJ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
22d95d269cc2e6c3af8daf47e4d7e1e8
d537120dd0d854bf677f3fbba95b3383dfb7b39d
describe
'10464' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNK' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
f2de94690f1fdf85d36c06024e5481ec
f0f49bbd8343a113e29c835adb79643299e31919
'2011-11-16T17:05:04-05:00'
describe
'726649' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNL' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
555495f2b99e5758fe20e34e999975e3
afa7190e295950db8f4c409d94e949e8e27eb3fa
describe
'98551' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNM' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
0d14482cc9b3d2de5f1eb47016e8a2b3
332c6b1901dc43224f523311d272d791b607a1ea
'2011-11-16T17:03:54-05:00'
describe
'29563' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNN' 'sip-files00073.pro'
d45cd3ac5d122860442e073e74bfe3d2
492d52d4410985baf95abeb7cbd4891e75a53d24
describe
'38923' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNO' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
4354c28d30297ebea52fe5493c65b7b4
d07127760912dc338127a5656e2ad323b358d050
describe
'5819209' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNP' 'sip-files00073.tif'
41286b7e72a0b901d71e63ae467b3aa6
3a53f12de1c30304f0911ee0c58f9669dae011b2
'2011-11-16T17:10:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNQ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
07fbc465573251ac10d4b5155cae0018
ef1f90cd6dd0e270203e9c6f5a53431513b4f630
describe
'11485' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNR' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
78742e031ee7770d407a81285cb2e114
e8c89eddcc3eee53c233c4620a68459d4c29a0c0
describe
'745108' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNS' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
6963aa930e51d34c9cd619bed2a9d045
73ca52e6619b4b2bb349d28b305e6bfcbe079a58
'2011-11-16T17:01:57-05:00'
describe
'94338' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNT' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
dfce609e3c03a2a799d51155d1d5ea1c
45c88690ecb1c25dbe0216dc9e7fa6c2a84bda05
'2011-11-16T17:07:48-05:00'
describe
'27642' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNU' 'sip-files00074.pro'
3f39e65496e6316f2293300f46b30201
1a853fd04afe73801a6ef0b946b56e6c1b97f359
'2011-11-16T17:10:25-05:00'
describe
'36624' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNV' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
67bd94284465d265d4c064cef1900d0a
b18b568cc7ff2d3292f74809dcc5bb5392289336
describe
'5966719' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNW' 'sip-files00074.tif'
52045d3c9637f142840fc6997602128b
d40323fa2a5fc31623a1df34f26077ab3867f76e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNX' 'sip-files00074.txt'
77db62c3900e23aa6b04d544fca0d481
d9a3e21a5a4faebd8bb112d38a1c662c1a343d51
describe
'10643' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNY' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
eb74c09be177ba46b79e455a7e70c889
b3a40448e5a5d37694f23b757e731e0b0fdd7baa
describe
'726636' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARNZ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
95e1369d0d54dfd72ece48337c7d8a3c
cc8f094028269e0cee79cb7be0c01a3db8d3ace6
describe
'99835' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROA' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
63f101889528ca917d0f960e9d7deae7
a250af765f4bc782cf97c391643ba63610cf0f3a
describe
'30506' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROB' 'sip-files00075.pro'
9ffb445f522519e4d84436cbef5ef1b7
0f95881d381f8dbbc7b41230f4060dce4cf90d78
describe
'37198' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROC' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
e9c4c73f20d35b3831e4f355d2ef2df4
4f41046c9b2b474b6f66d7de4deed6eefe7b36f7
'2011-11-16T17:03:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROD' 'sip-files00075.tif'
b97875d75b460cf3edd8b15bbdfb9f1f
e4164286b3cce1c813cac13264622da006812606
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROE' 'sip-files00075.txt'
31a4f2060b856479ed251385682c98b9
deea281c4bdbd0d33ad768a0602e8d3f7a1daede
'2011-11-16T17:06:38-05:00'
describe
'11217' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROF' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
8e668d585f3b9865a75d588724eb33b2
fad74ae7fae5fd4eeb85ef811ef83802268ace2e
describe
'745100' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROG' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
7d2a9af3d8a3dbb05f46566d2931d566
f66f2eb11f3dc13a86fd5d2b38c9d196e99e2e6d
'2011-11-16T17:02:46-05:00'
describe
'96438' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROH' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
d3d09278f23d89d2bd0753f983d30871
776720c9cff0ca51c5114d17989030d40abd598c
describe
'28977' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROI' 'sip-files00076.pro'
6c5f8b5a0cf2acff5b86fb85c885ef17
87ac2857fc238080305537a663573597b4f97cab
'2011-11-16T17:08:48-05:00'
describe
'37226' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROJ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
0b38f7719b81f94d74e1054c9236b059
24fe3875a7d621b1d3fad23cacdd22a2e09e7b76
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROK' 'sip-files00076.tif'
2f181b2ddb7cfb660cccddbcfd5875d6
ad16823473292ef1a577d4ef191cfa75ea1d8a3f
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROL' 'sip-files00076.txt'
04a5956dc439bc56bfe255e8fae2fa4a
6b911ab497b6413480224077eaa7f1533c82e0fd
'2011-11-16T17:10:33-05:00'
describe
'10801' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROM' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
5cc529d30cb23e02a05a70448edb4656
f03c5fc5ba1af5778aac8d7be1edaded461ea5f0
describe
'741015' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARON' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
569702710561c74670ca3455830297d5
dca7ac63868bf582c519ed89669fac1b3212120c
describe
'94167' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROO' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
1ad7eb82f69c4d8b1eefe8231a734c6c
6a1bc6aaa52541bd7171c0ff584242aeb87078a5
describe
'27353' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROP' 'sip-files00077.pro'
acff2040cd1f328ed5020871fe5d8232
7caf08d441ae7f31249f56c17a81003c5a406d5b
describe
'36595' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROQ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
3c1019e6f95592a7c5604f8b9be1d645
804f11f55ce57f7da6f1d8e3daee62c4721b90f4
describe
'5931907' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROR' 'sip-files00077.tif'
0b8c277d476771697d7dea5f40d0b650
ad5671d10ff2d7c3462bf9e94defa810d8662899
'2011-11-16T17:05:23-05:00'
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROS' 'sip-files00077.txt'
43f5bf7f054a211ad5f1c6ba497c9283
c2211f680aedd59b95fea6a6b2bbe13798e69b05
describe
'10851' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROT' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
dcd54c579ff9ba1eb9cb80a41e43644e
25a915d120bdc68eca4801ff386bde1ff78c3ded
describe
'753728' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROU' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
221a822993281aa526944a6277e8278f
dfd986cd3a517425ea1ae114229511e4cd822a6d
'2011-11-16T17:03:45-05:00'
describe
'91322' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROV' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
057d5c90ee495643bcb9a9fcef7aba5c
595c0ee15fd1fd108eba42b2bfebc1ebcd7a4218
describe
'26498' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROW' 'sip-files00078.pro'
bbe615fc0d7e66a915c677a243edc4f7
f30c9c6c556e6ed988890b1ea9fe686b002d39b3
describe
'35575' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROX' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
349110ff505f443cc879a051f2e4d7dd
3b2bf2fcb9e04cfaa328b5586ad12b2ebdae8886
describe
'6035983' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROY' 'sip-files00078.tif'
3c94225c1f560b4f6840decec4ad0155
14701c9e7e14697ab3d1ce95b77bb0926068f01c
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAAROZ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
238b08582bf84f4bfea85dd5b934a3f5
ec35c1c3807c680e95babb50d78eb7d591d7e692
'2011-11-16T17:09:45-05:00'
describe
'10592' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPA' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
7e2007c107c542b0b94cbad00640c9fa
ea8faf7fc0efd7d2995076655d849799cfca9f8e
'2011-11-16T17:08:19-05:00'
describe
'749173' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPB' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
1bf122088c7883182b8c678b66afe456
a58ad55a695e9a30e7e5f538f5934a8d59db852d
'2011-11-16T17:02:53-05:00'
describe
'101684' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPC' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
c081c0a90d0a88e455e35ac537e6b8a0
2fd1a48d37034d256026a41d80d7a4649c45d456
describe
'30209' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPD' 'sip-files00079.pro'
dbaad893fcd6af234b2895795f79809b
398206808fc75b4af3b5862536e1dcb77455bb3a
'2011-11-16T17:08:59-05:00'
describe
'39391' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPE' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
f4849da067cea2fd8a409026296607b9
c9da17984fb0063719a1fb2b50736dc5ffd17265
'2011-11-16T17:05:18-05:00'
describe
'5996995' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPF' 'sip-files00079.tif'
b8d4c9a871c2234d097f3db99d461fd2
b07f1f2a8f5c0c2bb44544082f20acf0d83fff15
'2011-11-16T17:04:08-05:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPG' 'sip-files00079.txt'
b0f9d1a5eb38613d4b54309e1c5ca2fb
1e4228535a6a711a48a12e0bd0436b068ea489d3
'2011-11-16T17:01:10-05:00'
describe
'11304' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPH' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
9193917d1a7b2521a7b10ef90284b714
dc5227b7732ce6635a7dbac0961648d81658c1a7
describe
'753761' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPI' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
5f09bd220c04dc8316fcb3cc2de0dcf8
48b6e4140a51b4295d90741621d1b9f6c2340e64
describe
'93775' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPJ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
7af6d75176dab5c58a649b6b01205991
78b1822d146bc21c677f99f88ca0d61e7e082923
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPK' 'sip-files00080.pro'
fc835bf6db2cd9ed600a163f062a7d72
5398c5c01dbd721a7b0070f8919afbc90e758c7f
'2011-11-16T17:11:05-05:00'
describe
'36152' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPL' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
c6b445ab54a861a690887a56ea88d4fc
e917705246269af66c2ca0b28904b94176387d59
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPM' 'sip-files00080.tif'
056f21f5c984391dd78b895e0a22e1b8
72866710af3b2bebe3bbeb267ef08f30c981fcc9
'2011-11-16T17:04:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPN' 'sip-files00080.txt'
939b2f51d94851d11af6cecadde73854
eb636eab175330f340a047c00e2130fcb07dadbf
describe
'10890' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPO' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
47a89c16fc4ac18e4612a8d453077faa
448986215250a30ed65ac87a5767fd51290f6ce3
describe
'781952' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPP' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
b0f911c03a6032e3050ef191bbb5d1e9
3f6d8548583d467839d4ad151b818b4ca5a4f5d9
'2011-11-16T17:10:35-05:00'
describe
'99836' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPQ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
e11b757af734ce66a17b380d372cc75a
8563f8899726838920bb98c59d454336c97e42f2
'2011-11-16T17:09:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPR' 'sip-files00081.pro'
c856646976385ba48fcc9270ff9df5e3
1b02aabb8cf08316c74e592b2d7dc133c4deba02
'2011-11-16T17:09:24-05:00'
describe
'38534' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPS' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
81d2c36f4e9bf0f7b9f493de619d55c8
7bcb00a0a12d4cbda74ebe46041e40bc7dcc466c
describe
'6261847' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPT' 'sip-files00081.tif'
bebabdb7448b079de78b022dd72e175a
cf97cff118b3fe40d8ca708bc71ac479cc97986a
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPU' 'sip-files00081.txt'
26bbd7f4ecb0c692c154da15fbf6b181
5a57b05a17c859b0a4dc7e3cfd84ddd33ab9442b
'2011-11-16T17:02:26-05:00'
describe
'10800' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPV' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
2982b2cedd554ccad585fbd1eecb99ef
4c2d9f5e914662c8d454782af7ce58075857c5b8
describe
'753744' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPW' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
093230d5d41ae9a107df2e6cce61945f
e3c40174322c276905b47572c9b7e2fc2404a915
'2011-11-16T17:01:15-05:00'
describe
'94416' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPX' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
c8bb54dce726849769e1caa6ccef59f9
56ef5171840076acd645b4107e9c2b8102aa2814
'2011-11-16T17:02:39-05:00'
describe
'29064' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPY' 'sip-files00082.pro'
d8d3536df1d08c2594766fd7f59409e7
a1f7294340379cc70184facc434c9faee8a72573
describe
'36529' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARPZ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
eb32f91dab5681f07bbda94a36f41449
a668713d271221216752f0fbca1986e52a1552bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQA' 'sip-files00082.tif'
7006f7827a11f4aff014722b695f4554
4a70b7f63ddb0873e6572b51a155131438368d60
'2011-11-16T17:04:34-05:00'
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQB' 'sip-files00082.txt'
17e41377b0463065d9f6d21864dc3e74
37bf235453c25afe895717fe94b8b17c8aead461
describe
'10821' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQC' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
ac2228ae8933c676e1b6f91a2ef7b7f9
82a190e3593e9f7a3be5fa51330e208a3ba314e0
describe
'781900' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQD' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
afda19769c51692b724309c2105494b7
184b600f3c65571dd059ee95164e2d1b23a06066
describe
'100747' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQE' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
ddec79485776b6b7fecf22a523c8b6be
28359f42153f1b1760e4ddb6ff1211ff33c272b4
describe
'30997' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQF' 'sip-files00083.pro'
fa533b189cedddc5066c95fc6cc3e778
e35c6a06418d3bfc4e8b5c562244e78332209cfb
describe
'38587' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQG' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
14f942d27b337fb44a811925dd4c465a
0b27feafd8c538e6a5f1ea541ea6956ee828c6b6
'2011-11-16T17:03:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQH' 'sip-files00083.tif'
04df4bbfd12a575fd3d5b655285d3501
5252c6892b86faa55f32f643364f3055cc27dfd3
'2011-11-16T17:06:59-05:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQI' 'sip-files00083.txt'
162057605a9a6006fb0ac0aaa6bdcd7a
50f0db3f38b6dfc5e29c7fbec3d3e31a3f70258a
describe
'10959' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQJ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
aaf50081bc782e9374c4fa5ec775380c
d7e7f7de1aca88a434185cc6d97a38e499876b1c
'2011-11-16T17:04:27-05:00'
describe
'753738' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQK' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
d78ffdf0e0fbe22759281f96edc0ef90
a7fcbbd3b76345b09d71cf26d2db9dc5758dd599
'2011-11-16T17:07:41-05:00'
describe
'94381' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQL' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
1936994d18ba03095716263de8cb9371
589d06139d8e80a412309d8de3fe0729ee5cd7d2
'2011-11-16T17:07:45-05:00'
describe
'27875' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQM' 'sip-files00084.pro'
d41af9b3fab059a384bd3d99cf613ebb
b24f734a4525b3e76917ccd2f0de247a356db2bb
'2011-11-16T17:09:53-05:00'
describe
'36097' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQN' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
2f7001880d4939bd41f6896eb7bb6312
79d695cfe758de24b96f9636b285157eedac1a8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQO' 'sip-files00084.tif'
27b18cd0bf9b6186e7ac3240c402732c
da74695d04b9b3238db6dcf582d02b615eb4f5e0
'2011-11-16T17:01:27-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQP' 'sip-files00084.txt'
d5a87b63edde5a2ed26697fcc069ee0c
909bff0d92ab3342a7058d44cc527458d990ad98
describe
'10811' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQQ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
2a6a9492a2eff33ff39da66eabffa220
082ae1ee6594d72519401636cb4d45411f5ef0f6
'2011-11-16T17:03:23-05:00'
describe
'781906' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQR' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
5a2316fc48ca202cfd041c5aba9ba90e
e0a268bd372debb42cbba02e48e8d02648f74d63
describe
'99612' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQS' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9130b6a7a1106a5823bff71df3c98f1c
7923d28fc2b6c017886ed0cfdb262854e289c160
describe
'29977' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQT' 'sip-files00085.pro'
be9741c868055db07b12e82777cbdc45
c0fdddeedc1cffc39703a037cd046694029844bc
'2011-11-16T17:00:50-05:00'
describe
'38654' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQU' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
5a8c16ef3af674cdf05cf9913f49c30a
40e77a8df1c20f6e999d3163cef496b00940c2f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQV' 'sip-files00085.tif'
c5b9178dea9c0c396d85c806e1f94724
443cb7cb18f308f6b9e73d56563a02cc65a0b218
'2011-11-16T17:03:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQW' 'sip-files00085.txt'
c49087b491e00e7fdcf05179f6fc8213
f7e0d1e982a020db6d8c7251405b0c61fa822438
describe
'10784' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQX' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
06ee7f99af46f2b0cdbb5771c886dcee
39eb5bcbb52eac6f64f15d13d1d706d3fa80182b
'2011-11-16T17:02:23-05:00'
describe
'753717' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQY' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
af3778515aea90d85f51f93983811d44
6ad3cb05522fb6d97b3024888ffb1d53e8a5b966
describe
'98904' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARQZ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
112fb50bc9114d413b055f44d8d34fca
2a7cc169af68f454610d5d54ea38df5e36502ec7
describe
'31055' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRA' 'sip-files00086.pro'
daec6e42a0ad46215b3879e2fad41b5c
a5bf58ca365fce20736f95509f07b7400d39188e
describe
'38131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRB' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
b25da973bc833a23291782fbe82f4c58
8c0cf0c7707d259d14b2de619dee041e85d6c4e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRC' 'sip-files00086.tif'
f7ddbfdd7c4640c1b57cafe9f17893fb
aa181c5eefae4a389084444afed0ba0e846d7f73
'2011-11-16T17:00:52-05:00'
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRD' 'sip-files00086.txt'
629125592534303eeaf9d2e8edcfe753
a12e7fb3f38f83eaa7c014f5c615c186e72be8aa
describe
'11170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRE' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
c081952637082d291b772c53b7ac36ac
f97f7465fa84d903deacbf2a3dd5bdae3c9ab1bf
describe
'781974' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRF' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
1804d163101c6b8726b75bb05384cf67
d7d37c97bcf0b50010548ebc3ea2207b94035043
describe
'95034' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRG' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
913431cf45671c47ba043d08ce7abba1
7371710bd86771362982e0468658cc0fb83713e3
describe
'27868' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRH' 'sip-files00087.pro'
c9b75cfda3760c475d19f6b4cbf4e2c6
06344db4dc865e0b9b47716fd500fa73882a1490
describe
'36572' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRI' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
4ab5cadaa1cbf737498cba641b2d7ba5
b7029fba58ce36a5f6f86fdc4539e62b275b7fa0
'2011-11-16T17:05:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRJ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
291d758abbaf96f5d9a19c18cefce95f
ddc2e04e9ffc563d40a8a769b4f68993478f3e13
'2011-11-16T17:09:13-05:00'
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRK' 'sip-files00087.txt'
461f0a434aaca136c17a00edf6e5039e
ab188783065d971d14a39b8efb864ede57e4540f
'2011-11-16T17:00:53-05:00'
describe
'10415' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRL' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
b3a7f82960ec30cdfd1f11d33bdbd887
5b1295bf8a88da204595efd63ea84b7fb928bb04
'2011-11-16T17:07:44-05:00'
describe
'753685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRM' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
4d10f2fc8e3b9f60b5e07da31f9d4e4d
055a574252db703ad9399601fc84a12e3c44f6d0
'2011-11-16T17:04:16-05:00'
describe
'92632' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRN' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
483bcb2df1159bd0d086b68c0f2edec3
72f163adc20a682f51a008de758d2d823c068bc7
'2011-11-16T17:08:13-05:00'
describe
'27339' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRO' 'sip-files00088.pro'
e2c59d4683b9a37d33444c215f687e86
64c25920cc9ac0dcf9eddd2b5f0cc0e5fdfc0a95
'2011-11-16T17:06:00-05:00'
describe
'35388' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRP' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
dfeb6d02b67e0735377e6c629f4f0a81
59235e2eec7aa8f69a2412d9ba0296efceab1191
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRQ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
a3bab96ccd0045a1a9c8c18bbd63091d
7341df3fe8ed62c5f7361207385fbf547579245d
'2011-11-16T17:08:30-05:00'
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRR' 'sip-files00088.txt'
c4b49f57ecebd0d52aa34b2175665d0d
2d02a9892d95e47a86ed7d16a45bba2d6cb9c5f8
describe
'10960' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRS' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
1d61ddcfcde01d9600bcc91f63415495
1eb6eb55522b567239db05eb741d989ef2707a58
describe
'781993' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRT' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
be37a864aa845f7ee050dc0af6aec07a
a55355774f052826c5429a2bc2c2dfeda3816d53
describe
'97441' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRU' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
762cff01207ff9a64cf6bd650bd23ec7
e2c1e2410daf55a856c2e99193b4558ec3050558
describe
'29530' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRV' 'sip-files00089.pro'
6c7cb9111a4c7d91e56a58cc32f7aa17
a089d4ae74e70bc5b26ba78731789072e35ec4c6
describe
'37491' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRW' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
91aaff42d4ead0d5971e36fe65e9cb70
7622a0a76f61eec6ccd5e2c4c235563bd898d07a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRX' 'sip-files00089.tif'
f0a97bb451932d49abb7133ca667204e
4b5e393ad4686ca36bb57bb723d7c9d5fc6cbf17
'2011-11-16T17:01:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRY' 'sip-files00089.txt'
0b2937835f36b4e4ec17597670167256
d54765d1410fc17996c4a2489004a368bb917689
describe
'10683' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARRZ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
31d9e32b3a2fc5a780f5c9490184463b
275de7f4f66e6bab1534f50cc76dd2c00953da44
describe
'753716' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSA' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
04f201ef9a459711fa86fa563302ad9b
f2a6bfa428f76f3738bd4a99bd960450264aa1ba
'2011-11-16T17:05:47-05:00'
describe
'101106' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSB' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
42091e53b3e11b2daf2e20bfd8971a9c
db00596ac9c88c006be31604c5db246f01a1f643
describe
'30165' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSC' 'sip-files00090.pro'
d7c77950e58f625d1f3221d9e8ed57f7
ccdf3cd43c968a386e1b00160f9521693543402f
describe
'38136' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSD' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
4e8b13207c1127c0eb7ae08b62d1e477
085172691f8fa788df719321f6a4990f933673f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSE' 'sip-files00090.tif'
d37d074dda1a945313268f615072e5c1
ac17bb9d38b80227500c3ac12d205cc1741cbc41
'2011-11-16T17:02:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSF' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c73c71428274b314125513bda66c3797
c0cd2e3078432fa1e84f133deb10be6d7c02b86c
describe
'11362' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSG' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
e04a33e36726508be716a467e2d505f3
fba4b3584ea7006a0c8bb460d896dfbfc9ad2ec1
describe
'781997' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSH' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
63a98875de6479a94cc363320b2793c6
c6fc68afa9ebc4261f55d42340c1c97813954a2c
'2011-11-16T17:09:33-05:00'
describe
'101066' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSI' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
b718bcfafba148a53b159538e7418c84
ba306cced24d122dee03144e6b1f5cc930aa8154
describe
'29476' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSJ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
2d54410583a562f565046e632b0e8423
cfed18c386ca0c420eb25669f55861e81124ae46
'2011-11-16T17:05:48-05:00'
describe
'38786' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSK' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
4656e15a71588efa77016bd574e1717b
563241f9b82e0ca75ce194d195301f3e33b39481
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSL' 'sip-files00091.tif'
2cdb17cf36fe2e3ee3be35a781a0a1e1
87aa80bdd776a67d753181fb5d4c9a65f0c868ba
'2011-11-16T17:07:32-05:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSM' 'sip-files00091.txt'
7554b5bf8eaf9ea54c5f9f0c74214ac9
c8ce95cde435a4023a039cdb4541721aa604e8af
describe
'10737' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSN' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
114466f3caaefee1d6c25a75bf84b06b
db239319839575eaeedd2a96da55e51fafef9a5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSO' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
810984b943d55f9b7d3236d85d0227c0
3ad50b7136561878a0f80c0858100b5b0b1b2a16
'2011-11-16T17:03:24-05:00'
describe
'91332' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSP' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
ec8ed77f25dd50d2edc2228ae4e51b3f
177897567c0fc9cd5845c84e4421e093e89cfe2e
describe
'27294' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSQ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
b07eb5e232f6ad4b01e2b406fa64fa7f
a58cbd2a1a0570e112104c69f2e8832532fa8920
describe
'34411' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSR' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7182212d8b22be86843044534eff8074
883e122753ced51f5d18703afa6c8a5b1b542128
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSS' 'sip-files00092.tif'
899eb2f0bceec9e530261e8f731bb049
0c07e669a81b6f6d6f1addc82230ddd1acb5e98f
'2011-11-16T17:06:05-05:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARST' 'sip-files00092.txt'
3d98e994e68ddc8227d5b0da7081b844
1e1ba850457ec7dc0b25355f2e93870fd9905c60
'2011-11-16T17:02:16-05:00'
describe
'10774' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSU' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
d87d893d4215cda764c2ebb74ffb6e6a
978fa90332a5b9c2b02262603ea7a82d753c29d1
describe
'782004' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSV' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
b5cf82411bda38eb04dd1e2ddb99969b
b90a8f2b05a93c2227dfe0f95f504a176e13f5b4
'2011-11-16T17:06:44-05:00'
describe
'95459' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSW' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
b88bb6cd437efc3f358cf1db47663e49
ed5b3f7e5806355832885d660aa63aba6f8960e2
describe
'27482' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSX' 'sip-files00093.pro'
dd5c1cbb4dd4d570e571c932297ea4ea
2fd4586d39400db94f5e8d13add64a8a53e1cc56
describe
'36663' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSY' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
b0f5e7e78933d943fc02cc71133a5a6f
8eecce64e9068c8c9c0ab8ac85e889877e0dbed0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARSZ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
fdc23006303371f3bd19944f022fba3d
7787f05f1002f67e45989ac3b10cef3fd65af96c
'2011-11-16T17:07:42-05:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTA' 'sip-files00093.txt'
5aca1bbc2c4c58dae2ef026fa7d3631f
b6fe4650ce4573c5a2b00f138d79d403111141fe
'2011-11-16T17:00:54-05:00'
describe
'10548' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTB' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
72af16a6a959d4efad8eaa2753d46285
cc606b5eafa69c5386ba64d5c5b68fa56c33f83f
describe
'753759' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTC' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
bb3649080d61279afcd48c8225275119
a1f496cd1d36fe7c19c56fe42532d25f6b594e0f
describe
'92350' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTD' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
cb3a7277739117a3059abe6cf7add9b0
71cb5ba37e1245fd8da10efe615fdc2ce33d9265
describe
'27869' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTE' 'sip-files00094.pro'
a72fffe2a6c1e5f33ce984fb6fac02f7
8529e633ce5fdd5f05e24d2f34b98a80e163a89f
'2011-11-16T17:06:11-05:00'
describe
'36242' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTF' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
8760b5e1135d800d41969d0758f86a15
31eabddfa2adad8a385897e52a9d72bc9e0186e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTG' 'sip-files00094.tif'
1638b2029623dc9d1431fd9fa8af1fde
af91729e766a9eb408979e5fbf5b22090a0f890b
'2011-11-16T17:03:52-05:00'
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTH' 'sip-files00094.txt'
e193da1aeadd64f13d41634c49d943ac
78f96b1374d3b851ededde3179d3ce5d7f0e89bd
describe
'10522' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTI' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
4bfb678cdb61ae14a0e26189e00469f3
e70c93d7d3d97bdd4c483da4305f489560647429
describe
'733836' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTJ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
042ce77a5faef30fda2cfec8e169224f
750749c41255c4bbfbe6943303744e9939d10d1d
describe
'102682' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTK' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
37c835bebcd7868c8ae1f555ecd4bd4a
60c0ae8cfc01656ddb12a077bb6e3817c23e331a
describe
'31218' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTL' 'sip-files00095.pro'
5c50f7f2122309af9fba87a9a6227a1e
c2e3eafc0264f5adc7eb9bc2d739a4d33103ff49
describe
'39180' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTM' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
5cade1f6087f0fd957e2d29fb8d03a7b
daf38b88e9b17f648b466c3782d7570097f18c2b
describe
'5876589' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTN' 'sip-files00095.tif'
e4bcd482031c1e5766a50c8c7ae1f434
c4e20718ec855ac1e1870d1697bda009ebddf117
'2011-11-16T17:08:51-05:00'
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTO' 'sip-files00095.txt'
6660d61f6daa316a5b679ad16fc779d9
07b8971d579406f2f5d4889ac3e4c56c98db4c4d
describe
'11591' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTP' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
1c49d38208aa52a7b7af9299896b8d6c
1f32fa6552c2be79e8531ef9072195066082a37d
describe
'731170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTQ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
f867547a5cb571ba1500c9b4e1da5c5b
8f63fcbeafb29c89211b7ec2c58526030190785c
'2011-11-16T17:05:02-05:00'
describe
'97354' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTR' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
21b65185259fa0b452572f15b118443b
20967e2d3d49fd8b94a1e2c78ae30860714c2eec
describe
'28826' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTS' 'sip-files00096.pro'
8ce8d632628818008f896555c9f50b79
1ecd05075aef10d86b40ba6c577f34b4114ea69b
'2011-11-16T17:02:00-05:00'
describe
'36826' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTT' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
9fcfce7734050f56024cef19ac1106d5
b9130730b000be7981ab17b3d477cb1c245df584
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTU' 'sip-files00096.tif'
88d98611ce0fb43089045b5b14870419
42b1407fb4117a524390eb6bc74c563a6623609b
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTV' 'sip-files00096.txt'
872d905d56de2da5f5179f2057b1c317
c0592d0efe436a792f162aa1941086edbe19b292
'2011-11-16T17:01:23-05:00'
describe
'10889' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTW' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
79eff8496912f3c0d6d10dd03535fef7
b27a067a3a38ac2c320dccfad55a62846d15caa6
describe
'733785' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTX' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
759d433684feb6608dc97a6e6d1295e9
adb5af247d6b9624c568613847a23f7eaca8ecb1
describe
'102066' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
d65cfd20bf2adeab2ff9601274f5c3bb
94a2531073fb4a92b738eeb697cd3dc698d7c65d
'2011-11-16T17:03:55-05:00'
describe
'30566' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARTZ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
f8c618df941a8b1011ff17e2e30655bb
7febaee5df629e79eeedfe1f80e754090b6f9b3e
describe
'40339' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUA' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
dfb54057b69651d9f49b48a07193c5dd
f17be0be019bd203588bd410be2978d810affdf0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUB' 'sip-files00097.tif'
591efcc95d383fef883bcb0c5feb176d
f5b3c8d5cb35f2fdca7121fc742bc5ab1d4f695e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUC' 'sip-files00097.txt'
198514b15280c0a8168d1f5bde82d101
b5476463148312b2753f55ed81f8b264842bba0d
'2011-11-16T17:03:30-05:00'
describe
'11531' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUD' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
df956a83cc08b194487865b057f6f754
40806d454fc13064d51e27a7fb5dfaa567a41cc4
'2011-11-16T17:05:40-05:00'
describe
'724157' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUE' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
447ce8caec535f8af0ec91a949de0e74
1689002a26f82a5a945f4265670713a6e0072b31
'2011-11-16T17:03:28-05:00'
describe
'94908' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUF' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
5950af3302acf557e715922aa1090e66
3076fea3cf0072b7dcff34dde667e7c353d87279
describe
'27189' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUG' 'sip-files00098.pro'
cb61dc65d097fe5f93b82c8c30ded152
e4ff3f874bec79e6d7e3dc245f8fe6a7e94195cf
describe
'36963' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUH' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
b4b44592e6a38eaf06d3ef8729cc63b3
2cf0ede7942a7a63ab2e8d68c0dcc04614439e56
describe
'5799265' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUI' 'sip-files00098.tif'
7771294ed4e2d90cf78f0245f927f41d
8a1ff9419eb902545c60f602cf58847bf9116346
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUJ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
73456dbab521e796e37cb6b81c40183e
5da3a562eee90a617e66675204c5b7364ecea583
describe
'11066' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUK' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
bd2e9568c26ad4af638d27ec01d6f5bd
b39ddccd990bd70536b663eaa466864e93acb442
'2011-11-16T17:04:47-05:00'
describe
'733784' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUL' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
adf46ed5a6b9e4ff98e50b370ceb49e3
89b938fa62892fb88d1716793a84222d41f7e7e1
'2011-11-16T17:07:03-05:00'
describe
'97569' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUM' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
8f756e520d0ead69971e7eb4311a2e27
53aad6a419b523bf194086fbc4eb86a72e64120a
describe
'28694' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUN' 'sip-files00099.pro'
39cbc7ac35b5d2d67394bf8834395b3e
398b11c625d20e3e797c94c525042a812e9133f1
'2011-11-16T17:05:29-05:00'
describe
'37880' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUO' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
338a83a2116d2b5ec87c0d1956d2e01b
1f0ec72b381bbad797c8c41763d3172c94794f12
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUP' 'sip-files00099.tif'
8405b04222469a86e2cb5c6476fa0fb5
df6c4415e5d31c647f191beca33f5e247f81be5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUQ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
86f5b22722aae8e21f26db087506557a
8d5eab7c62fb791be7431a17ef21807ac767738c
describe
'10969' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUR' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
3f49354f804a2b4245e1b4e93ad70f5d
6484df1c7d4e1cff00e541e1f1f8722844bc2e4a
describe
'733823' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUS' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
515cdc296a28e1f350551eaee05d5ca4
37c523b12910660b97fdcf4f76ff6cbfea89eb76
describe
'65217' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUT' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
d71b95722bea1539b68d51506cc08fac
ab293b80f64254448ed957190a4307d1f2129c67
'2011-11-16T17:09:50-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUU' 'sip-files00101.pro'
9f9b6e8f4aaff000c6eecdda719d2360
63bd98a86ae0a06c1ce8569c7415cae9c3e7f9e4
'2011-11-16T17:10:22-05:00'
describe
'19003' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUV' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
14d8ae42ef8670c7b2354cbbd6fe984e
312aa592e8a9b7c0a3e092a37ac0ddf0b814539a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUW' 'sip-files00101.tif'
f5f26417265364e48183cb445297714f
64805364c31b8d47017825d037a233fbd2225d35
describe
'163' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUX' 'sip-files00101.txt'
cb2231152b3ad18f32db42438f92728c
c7dfcbd5f8bf575c780438429061946f4eb1d16e
describe
'5730' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUY' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
3a560287b59ebac441247d501be2dcfb
4f8a89e5b2c4f627e05c84bc5009110bea056350
describe
'724045' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARUZ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
250f3e31a126eff9f8b2679d18cfbe3b
1ab70f8ecb5fe9c133c446aeaf12af74540671b6
describe
'105001' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVA' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
8d5360ae717545fc43e3ab407e4e1fef
922c1c507faa3e96cae2200b6e23d9fd6db846dd
describe
'30337' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVB' 'sip-files00102.pro'
c077d6b2f0d01eb78e0ad393be914731
dc386837d15884df9ee03b7a8ffed7bb3ff33a69
describe
'39233' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVC' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
0f5c5f1b682c03d13bf2a6476cfc5430
10cd7ea36bced2985193121e5baf419a577cae72
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVD' 'sip-files00102.tif'
3fe9e0f6a597f7147a6d775e9b9d1e87
888cbd41779c1359a4a70fb9ca7850c1028fa4c3
'2011-11-16T17:05:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVE' 'sip-files00102.txt'
bcd9def1969e8d1d1903de739820ed1c
58b989a9c3e7a45d7e42a33a003ab0ba87bcd7c1
'2011-11-16T17:05:11-05:00'
describe
'11399' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVF' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
c633e8f74f7cc2430ffe7738252ee673
5c6208cac57b5a2ab3e1b00963b4bd8304156382
describe
'761019' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVG' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
6dbc1b60435a2d6b0901840d63db8d64
d46c6924ca7f6ac26a8defafa67c9a92324dcf21
describe
'101011' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVH' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
cc9b19f851576908aad93dda0bbdfc80
39078426ec1fac1d47b46a677c5a510804f032eb
describe
'30496' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVI' 'sip-files00103.pro'
4ed31ac9a9043b25796e0ea7ff263927
47d2046519f53568ee7f093265e584f848cfc43d
'2011-11-16T17:07:17-05:00'
describe
'38431' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVJ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
af9883fb6414b3c368bf3073490ca9ff
9ad4b94d5e0925dfecbde55e6829de0c6cf9524c
describe
'6094389' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVK' 'sip-files00103.tif'
299263575d7075b4c537a84fdfa2970e
6619652f63d4fec4ab1dbc6f218134c0fa2b959d
'2011-11-16T17:05:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVL' 'sip-files00103.txt'
89e3b5812d40d306011cf805e76c0257
c64b643f9bac745a054f2c07a4e4e89e2d833727
'2011-11-16T17:01:51-05:00'
describe
'11001' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVM' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
e439ec3cc40ad2865a699b6b1b66fd22
02707543765801e3f5ea92cb207fdb36a9f42058
describe
'731157' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVN' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
c3a67311583a1e378cc80c4c1a068786
d37c59b98b05abea4143db4046c0985c63d8357b
describe
'91955' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVO' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
a169f968d9d429a1174548956ceeb332
088b9aa92ed4df78f504259da73f97583b4ce358
'2011-11-16T17:10:58-05:00'
describe
'26698' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVP' 'sip-files00104.pro'
c516377f5ec988a6c9cf9df0b70c1777
9267ee178b3f7bac087e2ca0a2d299719f0453fb
describe
'33845' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVQ' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
36eb41ceaf9ffb16916da853d5ce4087
41f398b5ff7ad197313cf83576147a59217c48a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVR' 'sip-files00104.tif'
5d15f4a702b168c0c63bcfae38efa468
711456e28f2b2600c8559af37b19163262005d5e
'2011-11-16T17:04:23-05:00'
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVS' 'sip-files00104.txt'
70ec3fec3fe80d194df437a1c9c77033
b70889101f66b986eae9f0d6bb25e0c2afcfc7a9
'2011-11-16T17:08:06-05:00'
describe
'10494' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVT' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
275f503603a7a6745a2c59e1f4fe522d
e735e3a051a781c722679ad76d61e2f20ccc0387
'2011-11-16T17:01:52-05:00'
describe
'705713' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVU' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
bb9352f2e66183cc10adab710d7829fa
a34e948c5c711476b12d2ff4e127d5bbd7090467
describe
'104442' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVV' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
469d30be319670c44b4029fb5fee8848
556fd8a7ec091a32a8da192da138d6cb48cb9149
describe
'29512' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVW' 'sip-files00105.pro'
0004b210f82a346091bb69bc76194e58
a299ea2e146bf0499e5183c4079bbb99c68c2b62
describe
'40002' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVX' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
20e24609dc9eb4f13993c8058176819a
17651bafd60395b47f2501fcae004b40b610b640
describe
'5650121' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVY' 'sip-files00105.tif'
caadeecff891336143416307cda91acb
7bf2ec5934b5c575ac12dc86eb5293dfecaf039f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARVZ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
a95cb90b87e074f2b442de0ba7ff24e9
5912fdffaf706122aa02a0732207fcfaa3958748
describe
'12214' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWA' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
e69ca5ac77c76ef9953b8833de30437b
e392aa26a294511957c55f44e38f90fad18386fa
describe
'731166' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWB' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
2c1db57b115ddfac1bfc461099bcf797
b06633fa3e536890f578124414883794a0d1a0a3
describe
'97582' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWC' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
66b705286fc4864b844dbc5805fa597d
d370b1e54728e9bbe28132c857df7ea0da0388ec
describe
'28133' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWD' 'sip-files00106.pro'
7fd6b75031c48d5f3fab198fd1f4adba
aa7b451d12ff52b13541bd1417cfb7538c77e162
describe
'38500' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWE' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
cc7c6f684da4ca7418bb040023ed12be
c9f9ebc0de9445e02906dce6f2b962e802d27b85
'2011-11-16T17:04:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWF' 'sip-files00106.tif'
5adda85a5d618131c91744aebafe1552
241d63b37191c2bedf33ce94c49795254c0025ff
'2011-11-16T17:08:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWG' 'sip-files00106.txt'
8d085e3e27f51a7900f2377a7919cb06
46df9332c41c190e5ebb672154070d45326b0c1c
'2011-11-16T17:00:49-05:00'
describe
'10913' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWH' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
d775e6a2627ff64079a54c8181f67645
5d9bfbe866ebb1f85c936883ed62f0dd08fbe76e
describe
'761068' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWI' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
fc11c7436bc6f2820662b766a1f1668f
ba21bc41ccbef4ee2b4a389e6b10d0716d7e19ab
'2011-11-16T17:05:30-05:00'
describe
'97916' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWJ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
cb923d4b6832fc715946dd281697823d
c4ccb443d7859e917596ab7513ef166ab0df11a6
describe
'28291' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWK' 'sip-files00107.pro'
0428fd72149a194836e2c88fa65e0daf
081276fb9dfe35e5c51402254462133c873754ab
'2011-11-16T17:10:30-05:00'
describe
'38000' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWL' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
359f9c6b527faba9982d9cc9bf26cb5c
4dbe2b8fab964d032e6653df640bbd1194a5bc5b
'2011-11-16T17:10:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWM' 'sip-files00107.tif'
c3461600b15ff80b9d34dc4705856126
b3a7b09189a7a3fcf906aeef8939cda2b1dd6eb4
'2011-11-16T17:07:57-05:00'
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWN' 'sip-files00107.txt'
02213fcc26bfbf578969ff9b48e2520f
afbf097a5c1c557f0db5bf578762395fd3146d11
'2011-11-16T17:05:09-05:00'
describe
'11352' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWO' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
124be99207d9b9d7053ec96e11e2225a
ac04517c3efbd5603d10aa7b3293217483e6712b
describe
'731636' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWP' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
eedffebc154381b5a983fe47b8f2763d
c104c44d79ffef77ae96cdac78aaa84a71c28549
describe
'93963' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWQ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
8833ba526b718df91e91d47c0e8f4801
474315675a48a02dd32809096ea1e61f4bb3d617
describe
'27954' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWR' 'sip-files00108.pro'
b14f1c0673458fccd10c3eb2db7973f6
b9231a1525b9c3adf54c92e6d4b58d74ff617192
describe
'35891' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWS' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
c5e3fe7147fcb0a1863eed81a18c15c4
fb4156a679c766ae9b9dd6a5e8e6c9fe93135c19
describe
'5856981' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWT' 'sip-files00108.tif'
4f588866c500338c56809b5cf381b497
92d699a40fcec3038adef845f31bb3b0a97bceb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWU' 'sip-files00108.txt'
3260ec6f3d9ba21ae337e5f740032ccd
491acc98a7e7518e2a16ba37e250cd6215b7c8be
'2011-11-16T17:05:21-05:00'
describe
'11337' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWV' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
b0a4bc408ad49e5873b41c11260cce3c
02f83d756b15449573325867d3e77b126d280f24
describe
'761074' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWW' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
a7e31fc2f882faaa313b922f898a7f69
9e644089fc3569d5a85a18968539de56fda4e5f1
'2011-11-16T17:06:58-05:00'
describe
'97338' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWX' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
3cb56095f10bae4fdb471a83539acb3e
532f95a0acbcf0b8149f6ac31acbf0d29ba5d44c
describe
'27739' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWY' 'sip-files00109.pro'
6fe5278e60fa44ff4e2be05d85bb9201
57a24aaa88d7707da54d593f0d1ede12e0551c15
describe
'37448' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARWZ' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
ad1a588aeedb353a1d4fd30915eb1eae
c474d00b0232de848ba3dcd1ec872434360f67f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXA' 'sip-files00109.tif'
a7d6ae4ca9e9cb9ebf777d1f71715473
47251700c0829a0052451192a8584f3d47cd44c7
'2011-11-16T17:04:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXB' 'sip-files00109.txt'
71f4e79af5cf69220de4d8ecc9fe1a13
70b95606569327704b671e37ea5446fbbc327ecf
describe
'11183' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXC' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
b1017fcdbd44a54752a21326ecefb48f
3cfa160ab0743771ed52a5ec8695dd91c1368fd5
describe
'715471' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXD' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
4e5940d4868a9131575248f744f05713
6c3577d9a5eaee74aaccbb5366fe059350d03815
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXE' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
7b354b186608f8aa9631f33f1f484fbb
5583ca3099ef78a6bbb69660b8c76fe79a7eecca
describe
'27572' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXF' 'sip-files00110.pro'
4ae0b43f5e785565162ec7dc17703a1b
8cd37c4629a66effe01000972202cd03d492b85f
describe
'39861' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXG' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
b5cc971f99eb4cf99c5a38ff913fff60
01fbd78978dd266657561df1fee7179663c8de3d
'2011-11-16T17:07:22-05:00'
describe
'5727363' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXH' 'sip-files00110.tif'
f3a135e1712cb6c19bf429164de35c74
c83a959e54e95d91ace3830ad7bf6954977b99dc
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXI' 'sip-files00110.txt'
b42f7ae2d835071ec61c40e18b59b4ec
17d36535b09f5c38e0bae1523a718bb38d15c335
'2011-11-16T17:08:11-05:00'
describe
'11111' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXJ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
cb196652c53d11d9ca8c7c8082b2cca0
7c2d07edb2e39bb9c9ff9953bd0ff0cff61256fd
'2011-11-16T17:09:17-05:00'
describe
'738140' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXK' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
1d4cb19513a9bd055213c670cb2787e9
d8a3f4f77b70c0413f45fa7cb2a5c9534f360231
describe
'94362' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXL' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
c6d18c277212e86f631f63c2daeef89a
8dd0e527c812c68f9eace41f7ba53244415a9157
describe
'27055' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXM' 'sip-files00111.pro'
d1ab9d8d52021fa09cd7d2eac5da80d4
de9f90fe9ce38f6864c09bbe5064b429e779d69e
'2011-11-16T17:03:51-05:00'
describe
'38099' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXN' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
844195c29e23ad63343dc483e8fde0bc
9831aebee0d0ed3739cbd65d526428231e5b7d57
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXO' 'sip-files00111.tif'
99a607b8c7e6e4ab48e9d1a783fa4233
3886e28d652c85295c5acd309a4447ac7e804c23
'2011-11-16T17:02:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXP' 'sip-files00111.txt'
5bad60317450486847be82d18b4d7fff
73f7e7ae58cbf775b4fc32a4712229162452b02f
describe
'11228' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXQ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
7cff76a1bac023e57dee54e30a1e3a03
798aad0733e5e5b8ead2385c2bd28aa0ab1709bc
describe
'745074' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXR' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
419fb78ff7bce7b4eeff83150197bcaf
a73b54a438ecef910f0c0307e5c59904c235bf9d
describe
'94911' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXS' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
7a58e6f0f61524b5ec6ef55669f7cf21
662b4214c89d4bd37b9736937a4d4bb4fa1d2c36
'2011-11-16T17:04:35-05:00'
describe
'27309' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXT' 'sip-files00112.pro'
517a672896b66141534f2aca9e0d1598
952655a745689f11bf75a7af0131aab6db86c72f
describe
'36639' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXU' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
c4a6c30e36af2d4ef8f79fa1214c9a8d
e2fc4fee806a7cb17506305068b8ea0f8f748d06
'2011-11-16T17:03:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXV' 'sip-files00112.tif'
7320877bc25e0122c3e70b2938d1c797
281cfd4cb71574b542097eb9ef830e70bc855f57
'2011-11-16T17:06:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXW' 'sip-files00112.txt'
a6a724c52a95d4a045b32e1d30681965
f55cb94c8870db3e42272e8eab31cbc82a5dc7ed
describe
'10706' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXX' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
ac9485bce0c72c7e7b55e46f796b53c3
7a053643ad81190f30271a89ae9ae8781dcee577
describe
'737981' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXY' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
e9c7d47e9190c27581d0fb9d7d3d34f1
9ade657c45041d3d53ae2cf368cb65582b270498
describe
'97133' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARXZ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
94bb63b16cb2b41ae9356ad718f1dc2c
d835fb45eb8a6c0f256d7eaabf84c0c64cbb8c13
'2011-11-16T17:09:08-05:00'
describe
'28410' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYA' 'sip-files00113.pro'
e5f4a550d72d97b2e7bc076c5398a1ce
16bfab05b7615b19890579f8142c9e40c390cbaa
describe
'36022' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYB' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
3af1ade109cb20f6cc603bac9f04d119
7a5601dba3961a3b51839b8def90dcf538af07bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYC' 'sip-files00113.tif'
58aa8e91e9217c2a52e25ed13ff2ba12
9255a9220f4b54b78eda2e777edc95bd4406ef5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYD' 'sip-files00113.txt'
78bdd108ee05589bebc8944ec7c1fd35
c78ed08c693c9089fae8f58abf70f594351e6e60
'2011-11-16T17:02:34-05:00'
describe
'11285' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYE' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
6cf2697f45465961e950aa97747a229e
22ae918d4730f2987cd7e88ab9f6548c724f3bd0
'2011-11-16T17:02:11-05:00'
describe
'745123' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYF' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
64636be4fcbdc978f5f88b45282ea203
4b962a2a2b9a57402c08d4e9ae4ea9941ffce499
describe
'99369' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYG' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
46c66a822c16fef9aa8f1ad6f3d60106
d935bf2ecf492ecc36a653909b000cd0741a5a6a
describe
'29263' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYH' 'sip-files00114.pro'
5f82359a27fd73ad591c3ba1e44b112c
2026c55a545687972e5437a27b93ebbcf9bf8588
describe
'37815' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYI' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
bb78adfce57d9c662bd80c54ee39cf79
e94fbd5b67560e3f99d588de56d9428b61b33670
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYJ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
f855c042ccda7cd5205883aaf3ea0741
f8a65bc1833d5567ae91c3799cb2c17b0759be83
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYK' 'sip-files00114.txt'
137f5170117b8a22db6dc97cb135f1a1
e75b36578e7bd4270832837878cd2c1129cf1c56
describe
'10692' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYL' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
f7981b2810e0e89fc3b66e768378280e
1a4808f4b020449924375c291ac8a339c5950e7e
describe
'761980' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYM' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
b873ed7f2151cbbb33531198a73df18d
23da7577638c27c506de7790c290fc075a35c36a
describe
'103193' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYN' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
420a9c952153ca90865c4fc5acfeaa5d
d6df38f543e8dcf827e0203a8b6445744a8a6e9b
describe
'29960' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYO' 'sip-files00115.pro'
0ee341deda0bfe7cc78fc088ce11629a
8cf6a1855213e95a2435c34f5890c7d25f06467b
describe
'39803' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYP' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
4f20023c850c7b970fe3bc785f130724
afdd5315fa8cb27cbfe39c8eff6d42e33a6a09f1
describe
'6101649' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYQ' 'sip-files00115.tif'
f3c775ee0da4db89757a3d542aedb50e
357879df314751a9392a6e395d98e7339aade759
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYR' 'sip-files00115.txt'
3803d51c1b0bf1966af3b9e40b7cc9ec
159aa8e776a9c9b43f5c4602c78f1744d6560617
'2011-11-16T17:10:45-05:00'
describe
'10964' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYS' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
2b8ba1ba572f43dae0343f7d137eca49
c1b867837d9fddde0ff0c82dbcbc2e86698ac2ed
describe
'745075' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYT' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
436173e45ad8ff54d00325b1b77f3104
faa5b24bf99ec7c93b8f33e4a4a8c7764216b87b
describe
'91797' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYU' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
1b4cd5a9a1dae4767e78f31fbfbf7bdd
484fc38bf6db5d8715f606484378444885185444
'2011-11-16T17:03:56-05:00'
describe
'26732' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYV' 'sip-files00116.pro'
6bf028788e5f58d52a8effe7b4ff5257
c580edd181a7a541f12273d3413349b552c28240
describe
'35699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYW' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
d5145a1d73c0370cebf28ba7b8530779
c878336d94710cd0f8daf244cb8602599448d8f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYX' 'sip-files00116.tif'
c7649f5995b00a85ab006014945fc6b0
3f8dd10f819c6c4d867a32097ed20a9297471018
'2011-11-16T17:09:31-05:00'
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYY' 'sip-files00116.txt'
6a6ba7815ffd903c02ebcfa69b8aad1d
c3cbf1854809669b3e87ce3b863caf3cdce4322f
describe
'10529' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARYZ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
68b8bf65956deb189b3b15699e29a24c
838a6b958dc192187187318a71301d1707d9c354
describe
'742319' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZA' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
35a75edfa3205d162108153d991b032a
e0514b335028b6efe117eb877dee622de3819600
describe
'86994' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZB' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
009399632c4d3221b4fd27d98c3b05a7
6f4389342c8460b065c84977f1322eeb4db3b01a
describe
'25250' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZC' 'sip-files00117.pro'
5893657253e9a6a25e42ad7a1d9faf93
b26e159eb52f7f3318354731387c9a9d1c725ba6
'2011-11-16T17:08:58-05:00'
describe
'33562' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZD' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
1d0d454a97cf3ea131992d34661081d8
7783367579a9924cd4f019fcfa8a8767019d34ee
describe
'5945205' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZE' 'sip-files00117.tif'
cacf9a068678f3511cd58be07a689b6a
c3434bff775679e5aeec1f98e70a7148379b0bd4
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZF' 'sip-files00117.txt'
0cc3987453191e50f98411dff00abc22
00eee7286df1f8e8e0b8304273e48bd96597d9dd
describe
'10470' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZG' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
fdf2d9634dcf243eacd4a74a946e73eb
4b8323f5e337ac41f32f3002ec61ff5c78883d4b
'2011-11-16T17:08:03-05:00'
describe
'746660' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZH' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
e97eec6c56aa967b87936f66534a5d31
be467235c68fa83d43f8ad9c7db3a0de05e04778
describe
'89620' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZI' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
1ccf8f153c43f6823b8027a41392319b
dc931a78d69c9b8cbc2fecdb7f946115cf1a903b
describe
'28698' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZJ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
a6f2763e08be3e64da10bfaa335fbdc0
0b7c550af69e2d7c8a52c4116728312c9bcb0922
describe
'34676' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZK' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
e7d673dd603b1c621f145d0c80c6d7c6
48e33b2a514513dd008d3ee3ed6755c69030b025
describe
'5979517' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZL' 'sip-files00118.tif'
6986829464bfb4b45ad099dcb54c87b9
8418984d0d42f4c2d688e3096099fe3f5530731e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZM' 'sip-files00118.txt'
b578e76c95ab8c1e2fdc05b2a0d820e8
f8cbc261d6fcf7303eb05ffb5d7da846b20737c7
describe
'10531' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZN' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
24eb9a289e8a26c0a3265334236aa29b
387aafe70acb61c1fc1232669b4f0e82d0b2a6b2
describe
'742427' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZO' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
39c51c41058e7502f96dd52d17b63ebb
dc80dca61aed7ea101c0a384297b506622e15439
describe
'97312' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZP' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
de22d2e9273cf8b2b1a92d8c5f4c27a1
293a4cfea0f318b3f2fedfd714f071cc9d57201c
describe
'28873' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZQ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
5b98d0476726fa4d7b3a805b131a9b1f
ca8c80c3b9e6fc5866c847530e458b290ada5b77
describe
'38237' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZR' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
5fc07669958eebe608a8055b312546aa
a75b0fe35491fcc212e85a667a0f11d93494515c
'2011-11-16T17:07:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZS' 'sip-files00119.tif'
c30674109b7458a6bf9ede7bdf31610e
2d158a185e6d4b2e1481c82a4a4b08ca5cb49adb
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZT' 'sip-files00119.txt'
58ecc5b0f7531239bd6e2d57e3c98de0
144eb271425aa036bcaba27647b600d4a0f63c77
describe
'11225' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZU' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
3992808f09aefb74454a0ad0baee3304
0d806a19b6f62b0350d677e9dcd5c1a6a090e320
'2011-11-16T17:02:27-05:00'
describe
'746669' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZV' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
69c0db1d1ecab00e2d053b8e2e0cd88b
30742887a1ab937c034d4bef1ea14b4aa4fd0aa1
'2011-11-16T17:03:48-05:00'
describe
'88779' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZW' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
a461c9d18aed90856b09b0d6db5fae9a
d7686d750c05d63fea283cc255140b9b562886e2
describe
'27422' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZX' 'sip-files00120.pro'
32bf66a7248ce9af55f139fe359e947d
2eefb666e07b5d27ff206a560eec7d60fa91c238
describe
'34330' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZY' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
3f856cdcc07e13920a1c6cc9f80627c1
c46c4791dc6a78284c0a234c603156a5f84ec5ea
'2011-11-16T17:10:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAARZZ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
0d53b35ae3df2e690c653621f2791ce5
44f4ad637b4c6b6002d5e9c8f40e9910cefbceb2
'2011-11-16T17:10:43-05:00'
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAA' 'sip-files00120.txt'
7107cb1f7c974aca2b0f16de56356439
e5ea94d454fa82f7a8c6b357973c74560b0e4f0f
'2011-11-16T17:06:18-05:00'
describe
'10283' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAB' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
9b6fa250aa88a819f8d1ae07260458f9
86ad1dbea63922ce3d7db9a460ab2f8e7cfde745
'2011-11-16T17:07:39-05:00'
describe
'742253' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAC' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
03cc2f09110819c0e91a35ebbd5f9e44
2637a13ebbadaec93f4115c3bc3399049fb2932e
describe
'89715' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAD' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
fe049b42c7e391f567d0e52c57a2d938
158ee6a5d7ba326809152344bb0d579bf55b221b
describe
'26386' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAE' 'sip-files00121.pro'
c4719eb2be8fdd031b12c6434d4311a6
69222dc918748235d198c0eab4c8b579b98b6b1f
describe
'34739' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAF' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
c4705a9018101c7891729e27ef7a2d54
14730a5230d78a4fc7866831b32a563553f237ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAG' 'sip-files00121.tif'
2d863d24e8c52d2281de89067fe381de
030dde4a687e9960d2be1a116d98f5bf406bd560
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAH' 'sip-files00121.txt'
85c463eee6af426311f4fd573e1522db
0688593c735878863bc925ca5157933e289850d0
describe
'10354' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAI' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
cc04dd5e31bd646c4c84acf40ae7a5e7
c6d0a85dd510e1ad7a3bff4b9f87bac6b3fb08b2
describe
'746713' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAJ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
46eb63f0aa555cc219bfa4216d9e180d
29089638507b771717f961dd4d231836ab327953
describe
'95475' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAK' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
565aa66894135a034dd6e9305e17abcd
2c1accef0331cb87a0c70dbd2fe88872fede38b8
describe
'30294' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAL' 'sip-files00122.pro'
986a788c198e4de8c397f53060060525
c7bb6defb24bb03b8a422ba2a3d1e41f67a0d9d0
describe
'36976' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAM' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
727b6752d092560ba22dfc87aae1998d
8475f482abd650956035cc1549a751b638dba43b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAN' 'sip-files00122.tif'
136c1b3eb2d1fe7d5d26fdb3acc22d1a
363cbb13e7417c9b81998737fb36eddb59fe01f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAO' 'sip-files00122.txt'
488f07b8a45adf6b36170bfce212c408
a277b0c3cd97884f3c74f1e449c3dde6dbd47864
describe
'10586' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAP' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
cc52156f965eb804ed8b6a3f12cef3cf
b54484410dcde7b07ee85e9c91f39b1fed953598
describe
'742426' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAQ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
6b7dffaccdb9d535f564f11071eb9fc5
db8d3237cf142540bfe0ec4a9a002952b08515a9
'2011-11-16T17:10:19-05:00'
describe
'97011' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAR' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
d2f65532b23bedec981dd74188a1ec1f
4b3ee9bbcc860239eac2dfc1fae90359644b856e
describe
'29903' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAS' 'sip-files00123.pro'
3e5e7371936b1dce0cbf1b0cf3a8bc8d
0424468b129b0e394a7f6c16661e9531600381b6
'2011-11-16T17:09:05-05:00'
describe
'37397' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAT' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
819b15f225e9fde738310a380f662d40
4c714629b3048537b60c762790d1150dcd22a959
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAU' 'sip-files00123.tif'
bb3d05f8e205586bb940545f8d05125f
d62f05dd95e2f881015439886306d9c63ad23b02
'2011-11-16T17:05:12-05:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAV' 'sip-files00123.txt'
9022a8e9afeca2c3d921a381379e8e81
3cb87c6d480373601a1835017b01dee2f088e943
'2011-11-16T17:05:15-05:00'
describe
'10899' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAW' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
4096277b84eabbf183ddce5161548784
ba914aa2f533336f1d75679fb9c19c300c3c3a85
describe
'746659' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAX' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
ebc3f3204f0b1ae5c22305cc655a3693
a7d407ebca1de92b116d835d196a729e9c9fb36d
'2011-11-16T17:04:59-05:00'
describe
'96948' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAY' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
2e3b2f6e0f55de8f55e7190b76e9376b
244edab9cb460bfb9b31ef177ea70beed9494deb
describe
'29614' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASAZ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
12aa42a264dded7aa75af14ab957c2a5
578e714a71c00b9afffef8ec7d8e4211eb5212da
'2011-11-16T17:06:10-05:00'
describe
'37246' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBA' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
b5ed0d10847e09e9924842656138a59b
d8cd02e0775c2cc3535a6bfc20f1967a5b53b240
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBB' 'sip-files00124.tif'
1322f90ab1490e4a993c26502878c908
f68578d4535e96dfb82e2e1905880bad0bc38793
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBC' 'sip-files00124.txt'
2135f235f95f2840c4fbb45a72aaec36
b708aafda363919e29165659aa5546eea5fd5fff
describe
'11064' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBD' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d1e19c137aeb03ee353da2b3f2e3a946
5a550e626fa142cd6daeafea68daa2a761961e1c
describe
'766051' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBE' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
cbc2c0b5aebe4e683708c07fb5946ee7
4e926df9a697911623bea141d8a2db3930e4b5d0
'2011-11-16T17:03:08-05:00'
describe
'92744' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBF' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
8972caa090d7d2f602ef776d0ae1fc01
131ebf173dd058e77ea1622aa2d25ecff5fb736f
'2011-11-16T17:04:09-05:00'
describe
'28765' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBG' 'sip-files00125.pro'
a9d00b336e73b0bdbfa7bd45ad8df364
9da0070e29ce2917d1e618328c87360fd4f210c4
describe
'35819' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBH' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
661bd31ca1a8fd87078ecaf06b51dd74
628fb490dd598968c7aae24b43f20dd7139975a0
'2011-11-16T17:08:55-05:00'
describe
'6134173' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBI' 'sip-files00125.tif'
b0691e3d65aa698c55cf7c1dbeb51581
cc38953a866cbbb0d45e38dc395ab79f1669d07e
'2011-11-16T17:01:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBJ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
74e72ccc15bea8d6a8967982bf692e64
27623a53377410064bdf4cce664b1692c63af6de
describe
'10101' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBK' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
22ccf21274e1b8077515dbed6c10baae
2ae7e0c1f278bfcf68dedf27ccc898735ed2d71b
'2011-11-16T17:00:58-05:00'
describe
'746694' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBL' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
7a78f213d141e755b2b8c383f48b7090
b60d422db897dca1286c62534a1e1b5d342c9d35
'2011-11-16T17:08:07-05:00'
describe
'88412' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBM' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
23a24f6985b5f85d1b1181f2fc78898d
a1a8c5571463ff9205103b083b5f258a6e7755e1
'2011-11-16T17:02:08-05:00'
describe
'26291' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBN' 'sip-files00126.pro'
a494ef44e69b94ae98db4511868823b3
3c3f2a39ec9495996b1c0546edc6c27c0e14d261
describe
'33609' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBO' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
01947aedfa16ac094ca8ee66efca6608
43da53e573a17a2ee933097f71d1d890ff455874
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBP' 'sip-files00126.tif'
8ef7662728dd9323cb2f6b724232e8ad
f5793e50e55c7839d8336019a3e7c4b5e65df289
'2011-11-16T17:01:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBQ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
7418a38223f6e64f9b3b2b75918ab0f2
cabca325484f94093de4b73c3d11b3b54dee9c69
'2011-11-16T17:03:05-05:00'
describe
'10451' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBR' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
7a57b54a7947f354c63b6e668e084229
beae59a7023b003a3d274154d22178f789e31677
'2011-11-16T17:05:22-05:00'
describe
'732061' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBS' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
3bf0275a68e4320719ba393d94e8ca0d
d69137d89f828b8a8f9c66c46d4737f65f12de58
'2011-11-16T17:01:05-05:00'
describe
'98736' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBT' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
cce218e281c3cccc240d385d8018c16a
94de5af1b351e6cda9e3d6a46f31f28a1c96b987
'2011-11-16T17:03:36-05:00'
describe
'28620' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBU' 'sip-files00127.pro'
5bac1a1859b71922a199a1e2e09ffcd4
98dab41ca879113ecbe14fc816f180ead754da27
describe
'38161' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBV' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
ea5ab2e0148ec5ecb3d03351c306dc2c
c7cecfc8d192603b5904fb9fdfa9d6e226baf8d6
'2011-11-16T17:08:05-05:00'
describe
'5860099' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBW' 'sip-files00127.tif'
35ab59a6d9f3971c18d2ed92d144d952
6fb5de59ad5e672c8c44f6c01c42830f73cd9a50
'2011-11-16T17:05:52-05:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBX' 'sip-files00127.txt'
85610bef47188cc90c60dc63a649c03f
dcfc56a53f6e12a45456868e17176e3bf7f218c8
describe
'11214' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBY' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
ead7b978f00c045d02ed61f6f9873a01
11cc6f36755e2e0818e678f74e691a0f664ad2ae
describe
'746702' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASBZ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
143b6317d88d21adeb45cea0d5c4017c
746da4ad863efcbc288b4a903ea9ed5d9bb3790f
describe
'96056' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCA' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
7c2a8d21e8792aef97abf76a9d151380
59f4c63fa46a8971275eb503990383bd99d02d1c
describe
'27989' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCB' 'sip-files00128.pro'
521f85b38fe91bb52e27a30b1de53d8c
a82a345a9f5c184ff213e4c8f18c1cba273b594a
describe
'36628' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCC' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
88c852c34d8781b3146cc47e17e6e6a7
956cb3c04bcfec0c22ee53543f65696dbe4a3f91
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCD' 'sip-files00128.tif'
ea07ab81dd9a962659e319fb69fc2964
b63596c133688447d2dde66b7109af7de3f3abb1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCE' 'sip-files00128.txt'
a2bd04122fc5e7affdac0db5b600d853
95c944ae752bf2751800e8251e12b1aa5ba4510e
describe
'11062' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCF' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
c3045839b7331acda4d6e01ce3de4955
aaff0e1db62bb4439d2ccdd584d81c8b1ec7e057
'2011-11-16T17:07:02-05:00'
describe
'725188' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCG' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
2a944180b9e23f204bdf18c80c84cf5a
664f011e66bcadc9ff587522c2dc6c248b52bb7d
describe
'98663' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCH' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
19e868e16172f150b543f802a4c03d24
753304fdbca623554c5d4c921a79d69ef0465100
'2011-11-16T17:04:38-05:00'
describe
'30529' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCI' 'sip-files00129.pro'
dbd58539a857f4ec5f56e6f22627e2ed
ce151f0fddb795062cfb6ae3c11c277a7761d6b6
describe
'38820' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
2d64dce641d92884853844b338971c1e
b53196c335c81fd0981e81d540a0cb443238e4fc
'2011-11-16T17:05:51-05:00'
describe
'5805135' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCK' 'sip-files00129.tif'
6e361cecf20bff22dff2e3553141bc70
cc56729cec8cc159098d1551ad5d014706f7f121
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCL' 'sip-files00129.txt'
3248f27655b98f1a3778c46bb51a6771
121cdec15db462a558653f228b3cf87c8fcfdac7
describe
'11552' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCM' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
7d2f2a7030cf169d348f088957b603eb
c89f5f83d2ee3aa552142e45350b0c9eb5c6f399
'2011-11-16T17:01:43-05:00'
describe
'746710' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCN' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
d011863767c8bcbc79979cc17954f0c0
6cb4ff7f3425816631962167ad6f05d77f0a9bc2
describe
'96018' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCO' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
1ae4b4dfe60c9cd0ffbbb5d9d211b635
af723f2b94677af81425fc201a0e8e8098cb8ce0
'2011-11-16T17:06:19-05:00'
describe
'29608' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCP' 'sip-files00130.pro'
168e4bd9458babfc8e194d52f70846eb
8d586651c14fac613b99b2c06f539e5ae1f3235d
describe
'37767' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCQ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
de2fe7f36571646922aacb37f2b5b073
a8e0e6d2b0daf9230d69b9ef7735353fbfc823a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCR' 'sip-files00130.tif'
9eb72b600afe8e555dc49020e1b432ee
7db539c1d56230acea9f3db255edd475925a2b56
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCS' 'sip-files00130.txt'
97708d0920bf6f1a23c4ac8f60b2cc60
4235881f071cff79b7910db660a24ac14ca387ca
describe
'10984' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCT' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
906adbeb4786cacce0cf3198ee120ee7
7635258980b50348743c412ff04ba993a6b1a871
describe
'724530' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCU' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
3bacb1df18feabf26bdd3abf4f71dac4
42a12311a12a2b5f3dd830b7c582bd8fbbf3cc88
describe
'94262' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCV' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
088d2dc0fc22e56f97827f9706861b3a
1533164f3d3712735ddd2358080a5e0b8d4f3095
describe
'27665' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCW' 'sip-files00131.pro'
579fb52b5a24083f21e9f700bb20dcb9
cbc859cce485f259ed2c62b1e0c8683a3d3c50bc
describe
'36741' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCX' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
bb0fb7f4900128d994c4599699fbf0f6
7056cfcab74e9b6c34f27e0421212d6814b1b74c
describe
'5799791' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCY' 'sip-files00131.tif'
0d43e4172d9ac1432175ca6d05fdbdae
66764e13668db9e150e80f3659ca7d3d03098345
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASCZ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
1d72113a0710db228fa8e2054b7893aa
0c00768387bdc71475d14d1af24cdf05c81ea40b
describe
'10865' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDA' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
2fc7743d66295b46e632def6bc538666
6f96c23e82d8465dc987ca4b427ee051e0cc5816
'2011-11-16T17:11:03-05:00'
describe
'746698' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDB' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
af3d23f6812dc0a9c4dfd3dcee9c24e9
395e666f19249f066bcd1f2e6c3eab9b8a71a159
describe
'91557' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDC' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
ad07472414ac79b7cf98b67d3eefee01
c87246e2aa489ac04f45891faa7220fa90eb2438
'2011-11-16T17:02:58-05:00'
describe
'27551' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDD' 'sip-files00132.pro'
a75cad05b2c6833b4fab25b72feb9c83
9f23de5eceb9b15070aeab0070b831439404902e
'2011-11-16T17:10:50-05:00'
describe
'35472' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDE' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
c46d22247fc8fd66278f1dd92c057236
600bcf980211dd7ac4b7f920a2354444607db3d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDF' 'sip-files00132.tif'
df2e5ce6bd9f24a98d72ff9fbc6a0542
94aac56cde00e44f710cdf87463c88d426d6960d
'2011-11-16T17:03:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDG' 'sip-files00132.txt'
6b53bca8bd77b82de5abae4b3338be0a
1d6433862d903f24071bc000b0fc14e78609efc3
describe
'10873' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDH' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
a2c403cfe8081fb2efd8f5499891ae90
7a9758c1df4dee4c974a8fb9f209d6a17f922d42
describe
'735664' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDI' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
a88996b7a3e9160398c8631e451f465b
467cf01a0e7178bf5f73a55f573a64d2c95d8470
'2011-11-16T17:07:52-05:00'
describe
'84938' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDJ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
7bfba5374432992710d220b16d30f58c
d7b4e813c8e3f6a2ed69adb7ebf205d44975574f
describe
'26521' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDK' 'sip-files00133.pro'
df4f805fb8eaa6400b8b009e77f82667
38df3f596cf31fbce1ea048e9980733107f19a63
'2011-11-16T17:10:47-05:00'
describe
'32877' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDL' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
d02044aae8f818fcad93ade0cf174bb2
dd24b9705a1457539671b8b5d1e189f8f254e163
'2011-11-16T17:08:12-05:00'
describe
'5888983' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDM' 'sip-files00133.tif'
7a0136ca70eb1b2087507594592ae680
098326e5588316afd14a0b63432b05b97fa372bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDN' 'sip-files00133.txt'
24c4a3f097f5f97c1f87a6190cc87d7c
db8729ef5f4ec0dfa8d781ad5eefcb0957357cbe
describe
'9750' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDO' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
776f85d43066510529a56f37bcca796e
3bf6383bc1af9c988a8bbbf435fde37f0936ad40
describe
'746699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDP' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
1e7905ebbc6d9886b82fbe90bf870b48
9477e786b50b7ee8b987913bb60c2a4a7b2278a6
describe
'96388' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDQ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
d9a704618de44f82342ea2af897841c7
9b427f42a60e4437ea7d17d99a68a07f4997d4ee
describe
'30332' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDR' 'sip-files00134.pro'
82c111222514d17eccd661ad7f4bde04
993c4b99c9a538cbe79c51f54931035deb8df1a2
describe
'36441' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDS' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
83ea9e3283a2fe5306b0807dbd48e39d
07d468149fbf1ac24d14744187da1eab8feeb730
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDT' 'sip-files00134.tif'
e8aa4b1a10709530e2d0754c994db0df
89a70f645a5efe4fcdb336aa1b3a89a7190b9471
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDU' 'sip-files00134.txt'
6bbd5fad3d3a8adf747c98eccb43774e
48e2d80a28edd499f83dd6773b13350e0058706d
'2011-11-16T17:09:38-05:00'
describe
'11324' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDV' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
1efb60953fadd2b08d3ec735ef21d314
ab4ea4b9211c9be7133ebf854d1a3e08acf83087
describe
'727331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
5d87830ed2bd63e028b933d6f7afde7b
44e1df1752d0d6dbb0553010daaf5cb0f5808728
describe
'98796' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
2fa2057d06b16f8e341e7d4763ab8de2
0a4fc76ff6a43f77eb03071ddfee2fa522c40f8f
describe
'30365' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDY' 'sip-files00135.pro'
a19a6d1160ca3753ffbc2166ecc2a01f
0af5372bedb417568693b7c51b75533a3d4d179d
describe
'38936' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASDZ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
a6fa1a25056155a9e7ddb5d4ce58c4ea
c2510f87fd0dc61dbf299af8dfb8294989c1341f
describe
'5822379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
092668ea6789d8dad36af4cf34fc72dd
07e37685df136980043d2bb61ad35183fdb25fa8
'2011-11-16T17:09:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEB' 'sip-files00135.txt'
7e603ec6806f25fc139bdbe9e19aa4e5
dfa5cbcb4522f7a19b235d77e60e26e4e220c3a8
describe
'11628' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEC' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
329b48fb2ed331f53e658fd31ffce8e1
608e99ad998a436b35f70ac9386c7256c98a77a1
describe
'746665' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASED' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
b91a55698ef0b1ae906d5702a0627eac
86671f787d17b880e5d0b1f9a09f3588da0c9d04
describe
'96754' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEE' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
fc9dcd857cee5d47e95b5b1c9d99f386
1c4a1bf93fdbaaee4fdc8661eb2d1cf46a456ea8
describe
'30473' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEF' 'sip-files00136.pro'
32ca20d32a39b1ebb06a4daadd427489
05fbf039e125f5404868d2c6ee00b72a98cf2c6d
describe
'38650' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEG' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
850aee6cc00d8b703a14ad05f07ab023
337558170b80eb5646cca946f451d2724e45652d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEH' 'sip-files00136.tif'
651e457dd2a21cfd72a2fe65d130a20e
ac56c89306f6658eac662479da3f1d1c0ce512ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEI' 'sip-files00136.txt'
20fba0d629314d9a5de653c16cd6a853
be67b6796204d317b263f35746e4325882ed2796
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEJ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
5ee6b9ef58c3eb6b15a74887f36fc266
d67c82b9385005e6735fe3743d4bd2140ffbca27
describe
'725738' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEK' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
39797be525e849f8e925b0c1ebeed7c1
a4bd50af00a36c07b65cc8e5de03153dd72ccad3
describe
'92805' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEL' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
2b12ce787e1db6e87c5a64c9e54551fe
aae61fce8df6fb465204ec0759f84792b796e953
describe
'27419' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEM' 'sip-files00137.pro'
9ff89ecbf96059f72b770c56d3b86c17
3466ea5985b7f47d10c721d9502ac6e979a3c266
describe
'37915' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEN' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
2207d7e00b30b53a03a0a2d66dcc676b
8de758bf504732f1b0db04d619a3af716e1704c2
describe
'5810007' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEO' 'sip-files00137.tif'
734f184297512e7a8559e0e0c0c55877
1cc9de0d2893f4e385e7a1410e93be6f2cb4d775
'2011-11-16T17:10:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEP' 'sip-files00137.txt'
f2e35204c98f5e2ee9a7ce913bfefce3
292af5cb97737d59992fd448f91ee16f147ced5e
describe
'10979' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEQ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
6dc4fd585aaaa00f2857d57cbb4431ff
49011bae65cc90199f278d62e87402804119c704
describe
'746618' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASER' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
7f548e0533c5591598667baaa7f15046
fc667e0396eda9a18d251fbdf180be727ebbec62
describe
'89698' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASES' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
34e039c21df9911e72b0eeee11a56e9e
debbafc4c131ad1a5b443e153e913fc27cb91eac
describe
'26466' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASET' 'sip-files00138.pro'
0e9193f59693c4567ebd70576b85189f
9b2c17d71bacbb201cc62b0f8508d6771d7a6686
describe
'34478' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEU' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
7659461ec8af43cdd60a105a3fd7f508
bb3111ece9b64de1342cb2718db6c32136e78efa
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEV' 'sip-files00138.tif'
02618acfddde22112717996262554c94
bd33f80a36f894b28f17dc3993ce33d09690d4c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEW' 'sip-files00138.txt'
3e1b2ff85583d567b2da18701378a38d
db104a15994726f5cc144bf84e1ebd9b92e0bdbc
'2011-11-16T17:10:53-05:00'
describe
'10618' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEX' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
d1c709ce85e580de74cf07967f9f6d36
cf61eacf7ee572ce8ae8b09382a92c025caa473d
describe
'729994' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEY' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
a7eb981a261c327508ab4a2e41cc3e48
7493e6f1f8e8ff0e4c710e517870e8ff88d6418c
'2011-11-16T17:05:34-05:00'
describe
'99830' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASEZ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
6080fba5d72a69ac9d38df608c071bb9
1a149d9084d08a91509af39b6d51949cfe801f4c
describe
'29392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFA' 'sip-files00139.pro'
a4e2566902341ae7c4813fabfde6a940
1d4b25a06ecab1564630c4158135d1a3cffeb3a4
'2011-11-16T17:04:24-05:00'
describe
'38976' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFB' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
e6d223fb196b720b065bb3fc04d8d280
e1ef5d06eb4eaf452efe0e36e1a01434b567d4c1
describe
'5843637' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFC' 'sip-files00139.tif'
3998194c9d5c157be1ddf85df499282c
5c587f702028e37347081c2ee8944b9669bdd352
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFD' 'sip-files00139.txt'
3445ac9e333d32895dcc4baa401ca20b
f12cd896c22b16e3a1e94dee07eb681082db26e4
describe
'11515' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFE' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
85742f9900d68e882924492486eb2efc
bea3a2c4f07ddd041903e3fb202b1fcb1df742ff
describe
'756426' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFF' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
5dfdaceb1b8981e3cd8b09fb9ac294e9
44b9462754123ed4cfbafa400053177897e4b044
describe
'93660' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFG' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
d8b5c8a6adfd783f2d8fc21bc5775724
eb81150ef2e33b9076d88716daa8c3aa8721f5a8
'2011-11-16T17:00:59-05:00'
describe
'26984' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFH' 'sip-files00140.pro'
a6e6de775118dd3390031cd8ba53432a
ccc39915d94e2ef36691b0a03ee6ebfdc2eaccf8
describe
'36402' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFI' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
c062392f3f3d25cc47760adc4b8f1102
a60e3d8725810ebb6bd4c65783ec91603841e7f2
describe
'6057489' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFJ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
ac090f46abcf2ef162f45bc8a348fa51
2baa2f6e7a4d6f528565c9f49bd0c2200f36fca0
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFK' 'sip-files00140.txt'
181979812715328bb56e6ed0931fae70
f5ca4b08f66b60b7cba81fd6c35f0de71537b2e8
describe
'10662' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFL' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
25f5750a62c3a0a5969210534465611d
18822807b156522d6ff03dcde8972f298174e34c
describe
'765703' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFM' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
8497187ef4f01d686fb7b1bd76ad507a
8c71d47231f51764ab6e659acfdcb72a0ab1cd03
'2011-11-16T17:03:18-05:00'
describe
'95158' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFN' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
90098d1b403cd4f520820b92fe7df9a8
b8b76e0535b46a884a3c428ed8d7039f39856496
describe
'27649' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFO' 'sip-files00141.pro'
57ccb85abc915cf08120e4edb9d6696c
cd6418fa6b5c92465a82325862e3cd8a3a43b516
'2011-11-16T17:06:25-05:00'
describe
'37473' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFP' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
5baa09ab38dd1a4d510d62c038bbbddf
86684566d9ffa093378f8ad52f27e512ece21b30
describe
'6132189' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFQ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
680c8f8357681dd3f355786bb8d55ea0
3312a2cb3ad552ebbbd75724c13cfc85ef35f0c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFR' 'sip-files00141.txt'
c27a3f5c5db06c88fc11ad052645c5a1
b81b20a9f9bb528eb07c2723f25ddb95cd77ca22
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFS' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
f8a0179b96364c9dec34560f399f95b5
ee53d3b919b7c119527bbdd89bd273435026ea5f
describe
'756419' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFT' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
466934e051db46d83dcaa11fb5219e26
615c2f03300a3cddfe88f516b3baeffc21b72699
describe
'95669' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFU' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
39e6cd42be870a469d3e362f1c4aba83
4397b9276cda086b6ab70cee6cdeba1f6f81943b
describe
'29945' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFV' 'sip-files00142.pro'
a3ad847303770f4fed2d9308b9cca24c
5c8c16eaceff1844ed69689dbb7169128afe22d6
'2011-11-16T17:05:10-05:00'
describe
'36285' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFW' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
68b8b9e2f3875bff285897c4b6b3be4e
bdb5c9835f76c2e92c29aad571388f3f2a47f3d5
'2011-11-16T17:08:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFX' 'sip-files00142.tif'
47fba3a8865b4d0d104241532ae0bb6e
fbb0663d844f8c95311328e30c8585228bcb39f9
'2011-11-16T17:10:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFY' 'sip-files00142.txt'
6f666826507cee841b7ffeb278038900
f1c7b5e173d4c5e5b7444e664a568d5f878f575c
'2011-11-16T17:04:56-05:00'
describe
'10537' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASFZ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
c7b62d45f80cdd31eb0d4b1bf37695db
2824ec318274bab8b9e567f3345370cc356e3678
describe
'765796' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGA' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
76c0594a5317c7e0f4005811c185543c
1ee6fbeb6d33441c93b98704b22d5bd00c5b7c5b
'2011-11-16T17:08:08-05:00'
describe
'94178' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGB' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
d521674da9b8e27bf1273c6c8e6f060c
8b103531a86d4f6b9448a05089908ea9a71c8537
describe
'27939' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGC' 'sip-files00143.pro'
372c6c877a2d129183ff0777eb9a0389
349e0e5ec37d304d4730975048e6f3d2d245bfb4
describe
'36551' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGD' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
168a412bcd3aaf410e3a5826f3440b17
1886d974f9af2e17e27ead0df0133cfa7b05f6af
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGE' 'sip-files00143.tif'
1c609e47d2ec59b7a8fc899a706c738f
fe31828f53f9e0b277046f3c325be5e6b48679fc
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGF' 'sip-files00143.txt'
e9f4c6c7efab7879800fa609ac3a8c4e
80b3a20f62801ce0a6e097dec8f1d37ed07d0389
describe
'10602' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGG' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
e1099d43414acd5359d1d63faa02fe4f
fae825001ccf8555996461958a0a9d33423cc37e
describe
'756438' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGH' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
e64ea713df20578dbd7182d3c2332e6c
2a4b3c759a774e48bb03d69c89841a9a6b4554f2
describe
'99709' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGI' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
8c10481b56f49e565628150687c962b0
de17fc461a4bdb58ffed7778c91537731359e04d
'2011-11-16T17:10:18-05:00'
describe
'31022' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGJ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
30c578ca5db08a43878968629ee06d82
f76c4741dede9bf8e022273025a666b5666ba3b4
describe
'36987' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGK' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
934c87551d36e15e0360bd827bdd01f2
c7de3848efea4184dbe7671b45ef3bffc8aeeffa
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGL' 'sip-files00144.tif'
85f80659745a72189bf226e8812431d6
e78aa7b3952b708437f1ad226d8bb8aa918a65c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGM' 'sip-files00144.txt'
9a9d68b7b142b7518b977fe145f9f6df
2e309473fea75f0d671db2e6639717cfaa4e8fd7
describe
'11072' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGN' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
e5ca983dec3e97acfa33fb8675076ab8
6a474582cfd2aee2d69bf2b2259fafbdc34a10d9
describe
'765798' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGO' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
e1407e34afd313a73190dda4142aeeed
462c2fd36817e6bf57fc79dd3eefeee5b4dcb862
describe
'93498' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGP' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
c2763ff2bb0ee4a48e65a5462643fc7f
8de5e9f7122f4c0286fa503bd42a97f2caa972fe
describe
'27636' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGQ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
ebdaf7b14d2bc101e218f9e41bf8f7f7
e6da36a26d81694e74bbcd1b55f07dcd5cedc9c3
describe
'36699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGR' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
eb702e388825fdbecea01c770ec5bda9
694cc2a1d4631dde41b2a304678808b9ad98d962
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGS' 'sip-files00145.tif'
9687a92a51eb62fb8239b2443d598665
8a10c7b6b92a5b278d053294e183e8587c4f4774
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGT' 'sip-files00145.txt'
6047c92564b29206d3208225212de823
3a61c06b1f19491373972a01f657d98f193c9b68
describe
'10379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGU' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
bc245b47f299992d8d1c74aa7674df65
18108bc396a7eaaf6728f80ec523235ff7567f9a
describe
'756465' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGV' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
ca529e5b18424a8a309d5cf101950b95
01ec9afd841800649b5554937a703c6f25a17dcd
describe
'96838' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGW' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
bd3a66bc40eb864617184b73ac3a3b03
a80cb93b9c7821ea7160f988b7e91b8807132bd8
describe
'28337' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGX' 'sip-files00146.pro'
cf95c9cfb2f1741ed5e8ee3ab23f3ed6
f3cf515c44b0a72330136e4ae489f4563df6a0a3
describe
'38023' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGY' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
e665c4d41abe61e780124fb0b658ebdf
51aaaa1b72e56bc9f29eb238c1e9a7f4c6af3de8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASGZ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
30bd307c76881ff8801222dda2976528
0b4f713dabbac617d88a9bf790b94bb950f516b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHA' 'sip-files00146.txt'
d3d0a205c5bf5002db22143e115c806b
bd022a310fa826801a85213f9da586fbc4504b86
describe
'10632' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHB' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
0b8d073956b9fd08f359fd03a1f978a1
d85e5c5792c0031eb7b855db0252988fc51afef5
describe
'765766' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHC' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
e1ddb8a35fc1f0b8f0d8ad964a76e088
4ceb348a70e3c373b6a273b55a3bbd469784ecc4
describe
'96082' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHD' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
82dd95237742ab1940d1985f44704e52
24b286d4619f546e01f9ec3d929253e49cb9abb5
'2011-11-16T17:09:22-05:00'
describe
'28558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHE' 'sip-files00147.pro'
3986af5db7d0fa06894614e411f7c352
798939a283079db2faae9592ec8687a234b1f26b
describe
'37612' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHF' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
453e7df7d5c0dd78d4f3ce6e3b15f791
0921c59a3d9bdf7691be4e1620c4d891d05f6706
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHG' 'sip-files00147.tif'
f7c9ca98723c4165774c71c9af36634f
ecb72aad524e5a9cfe34685345e9ff5e55d5ef3b
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHH' 'sip-files00147.txt'
64052bea3592c92982200985456b67d9
3909572385b2b6b4a1008a30b0d01c2288f36396
describe
'10807' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHI' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
b5bc2d3c4b268f442203413a651e509d
db0da31bcc66a58761cd64bd5acfc9ecf00a881e
describe
'756459' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHJ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
25254bb9eab73726ce0501bf21dc8037
4a0f1b6ce46afd110de5e3d74d8e1f87344740b2
describe
'96123' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHK' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
c35224d66dd88d4cab2730ae34d1d95a
d919396dfe6016665b4a99f3ecbef0351788f916
describe
'28588' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHL' 'sip-files00148.pro'
f4353841702443bc40093e0477ae70b2
49c98aba61c8ec1e7144bb47b4e2038164ad86d1
'2011-11-16T17:03:40-05:00'
describe
'36921' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHM' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
7ad7633f06bae82ab6fd61b6b44e0c19
a9fddcd6303fc1a0178044d7c72e18d15fde2a2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHN' 'sip-files00148.tif'
d3fa0899fef63f653ce84a4d42f959d5
e33cdbd0db9c28890abb2dc08cecd2a4794205e6
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHO' 'sip-files00148.txt'
6d4e81205376100e13976cfeba2e4e2d
baa13e5bf64c11ec692b7a75e3c2fbb913947497
describe
'10564' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHP' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
bca688977ff387ca9c6cdc59a775e8fe
ee0815bb5c9a8a05308ee9190363961e591f2c57
describe
'765780' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHQ' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
ded9bbb48b45f79585914ce249442209
ecb36308312f3918d4bf60121291bd2104dfa507
describe
'84113' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHR' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
a0ab8a36ded872bd15005abb2ff7a020
6f42c0333ba54d2217702c397c51145929504a6d
'2011-11-16T17:07:51-05:00'
describe
'25157' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHS' 'sip-files00149.pro'
f838150a1854791f4f07aabb91486ceb
154812f7d91b6b8059d9b23416350ede003dc103
describe
'32436' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHT' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
3f3d3a79df06662f6d5c13041f4086c7
dbdce240a88f06c6469bbef24de17450820d06b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHU' 'sip-files00149.tif'
2962110acf1667dfa2c43ee460057618
5e225dccacac727fa9cf51fd3324f77ea4cfb6cd
'2011-11-16T17:06:50-05:00'
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHV' 'sip-files00149.txt'
a5b859253ae2df9e007d0ed675b3fa18
1d3dcff4fcb3a6238771458fc75cb800884ad046
describe
'9643' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHW' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a46d0f9fc2e9222d93885a04d9950449
be5af875a798e89cd39cb8d9920e67edad33b28e
describe
'756462' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHX' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
52809acf60171ad83fb1fc7c7683304a
69ad6ac6848d35c6f8f5a2d0e73b399230799df0
describe
'97847' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHY' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
08f23bdbfdff9d1422f50d3bf4d6e6a6
41d1130e1bcf697a64f744ef9b29822d688c2af4
describe
'30696' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASHZ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
46436936efb54ec878e81e3b891a1e93
ce821dd698de83c3dde8033f12cfb5aa4c233abd
'2011-11-16T17:06:52-05:00'
describe
'38006' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIA' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
d8e5321e585ba8cbe4b9b444d38c52dc
24c09ac14940f7d696e4b62c25f7f2cd338bf44b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIB' 'sip-files00150.tif'
f016d7cc91018374676c8c9f4d42628a
5d30468e230da5f4c1173ac6e376a50d55c53946
'2011-11-16T17:09:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIC' 'sip-files00150.txt'
3c14820fd92068ebf97f27858588dbb8
bfbf2ad81205dd48c3e33e710b509d2e17905490
describe
'10849' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASID' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
1e037e91ca3031d30dd3f7429e48259f
f1b3cee604f48b4670977fc74614e7f39dda7e2c
describe
'765789' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIE' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
121c23f2462e58d8dd290b528ada04a4
cadd618980f2abcb6e10e561c7b7e66195a21af2
'2011-11-16T17:08:57-05:00'
describe
'91036' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIF' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
20f11d2b5bab80f54cebc61b189c1197
34ad239d5859e7b7bc206fa4af7b1348842542cb
describe
'29617' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIG' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f1fd1649ed2415d67145b87cdb4edc4d
0a1e78035ec1a118125f349a14711fbaa165ce11
describe
'35529' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIH' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
185dcf50a8a6a4941254f67543d3a56a
fe3e69b345d00bdf414ac20ddd6d5cacee18c53e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASII' 'sip-files00151.tif'
1ffdfbe1635f6409062a2c7fff4cd50f
e198ea5644408f3c0dcaba38ced610fe8615049c
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIJ' 'sip-files00151.txt'
2fc6e994fc85e247d0b7a96e125cb02a
cc2341f762de0619805c5ddaa6bf8274af179695
describe
'9784' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIK' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
95e1344e40f529f8f67eef6740a64356
8cdede48c69d86ecf7528adb4101b5fcf8ee263d
'2011-11-16T17:10:15-05:00'
describe
'756467' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIL' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
40fdc3464e27b5bae21d3f9f008e8460
99493bf23a5b0e64e6688645e192fc547b1965d6
describe
'95917' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIM' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
6d77c03b86d79c09a24c51f1ded72f39
03441e4ebc41c7bab9ab7d71aebc3be8c365f93f
describe
'28735' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIN' 'sip-files00152.pro'
03ae3e681d7e55fdc43d502e34666d6f
af65aefcd605d07819e0356b881ad2c72bdf1df2
'2011-11-16T17:09:26-05:00'
describe
'36910' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIO' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
ba5b1a5195b03e09172dedfdb00ab4a3
5ee565b4228d4f0e94e72e515d20b6e944c745b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIP' 'sip-files00152.tif'
61db2dc01ba5dbfa36f6c3a27ac9da77
caabc2cdb14c41b1ab98fb04e31d5d08d89d4848
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIQ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
33fb5310a02acaea1f71f68d419993c9
2611341e48ad5dd0433ff50cca8dc0d7d6a5597b
describe
'10671' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIR' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
ce7952edec2634f3e1a5f417cc566ebc
0712f6e89131e97d82b86766d5720fa8c981e2ec
describe
'732815' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIS' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
35c6d5d7dd741d4df94ec73a5f2955cd
5fbfe44e4652f40ce7e0465586311c6dcc78889b
describe
'98603' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIT' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
7757fdb6040bebd8268185edfb0a5b72
679776df82c8ebcd411d1a8a8258a7a71420be4d
describe
'27960' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIU' 'sip-files00153.pro'
823302f7ee2422f509d305232a93fd2c
f95883f41a2479548628336ec4517654fa542cbb
describe
'39716' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIV' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
14e0be88a396133d660b563d521c8b69
34d9347dd8ea58f70c71d2e53cee5cb91eea0667
describe
'5866107' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIW' 'sip-files00153.tif'
e572b9305422f91ad0880cfb15385f25
11b231b07b6e3b0d9a26717548027c964971b33a
'2011-11-16T17:09:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIX' 'sip-files00153.txt'
4765b4a6c8994b660116ec3fd48184e0
f6d7c282491f12bbc7819fcf58b9f882cd069c0e
describe
'11161' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIY' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
8749383450d371c89403a81b26ea7776
46a137e73fc21f48ee2ad8272bd804ad4222bfdb
describe
'756455' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASIZ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
bf84e76cd2ef65179e667eaa693e668a
720c76f2c175396250189d2e8451d0fc3db43079
describe
'88012' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJA' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
91b41c9986398dba1aa1b22891124d5d
06e2ddc0f6adb08e9c17d542f23eb72122bb4f1b
describe
'26604' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJB' 'sip-files00154.pro'
8ffc0f74d7824400fd7ba5f0945e67e8
bff65659ac00b9a20e9a2dab557d4042245cac78
describe
'33678' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJC' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
c88438cd620d42b798ac386aab34b52f
be79e8155bab74ba0edbd52cbe1ad3d6404a9541
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJD' 'sip-files00154.tif'
3f7e4f89b6935b8d97a61236f934efd6
930c0ef35ad51a4d3a117ea32856df44d4b51012
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJE' 'sip-files00154.txt'
b4e6e2f94ac8b37ebc4ec2a1f148609e
1899f22706f03fbb7f101e791a229116c637765f
describe
'10032' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJF' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
dac61be0f6be593f16b2b144920f05b7
1282f15a44c2fde5cf509911b5779f6e9fde2ab2
'2011-11-16T17:09:18-05:00'
describe
'735111' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJG' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
7fbe6cb7ce2c9c9cf51e2a1d65550a6a
05a546750838c7083c8bc3546b2eb34ee64d65f9
describe
'96216' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJH' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
41a9b23c6f52993c4d86f989e927dffe
a0edee63ca1156d4821846c5b3bce1d2128fd7b3
describe
'27262' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJI' 'sip-files00155.pro'
515459f49d35f6ed814153bc4e8c86f0
07f3fb62f9c756627206db4ce80c33a1c19862c6
'2011-11-16T17:01:33-05:00'
describe
'37405' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJJ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
7319866b6dcee92c352358fb7d1a3fce
d8832dfdb2f59a6aa1530d0fe46ba0675ce1adbe
describe
'5884587' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJK' 'sip-files00155.tif'
acfff0a3c9d237bd95ccba21d6867b39
4ca86276f6be4e720c30206082c0c22e532e820f
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJL' 'sip-files00155.txt'
4bcf85fab476b01f9cab55b69527aaa9
4ce7664b9f9fd37a28cd7d4699a62212c6f09914
describe
'10788' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJM' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
b2228c20b2a658173748a37f4152c130
cade27901b014d6b4e72795c7987db9331bc417e
describe
'756417' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJN' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
e4c0fdeae5d083c57ce2c17e6b2c5c74
d7c5dda3f1b554b1ab226af1e896b483ba7f4134
describe
'99544' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJO' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
5815e0ace06dc331c3c576b5f9e3399d
50eef2bdd4631d7594c33992bec5442897e5f8f3
describe
'31161' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJP' 'sip-files00156.pro'
6e39d0d0e35d8e58c997ca2ad38f65c6
78a2371118af0386035f54e60fb78d9263ce32d9
'2011-11-16T17:05:24-05:00'
describe
'38903' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJQ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
06584c2b5c0b8133f1c871734eca8b0e
08a58ae55fd4b654b6bd7d9df6da67f378ac8ad5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJR' 'sip-files00156.tif'
a20229d48f0994f6a9cbd604d933c460
72ebff79ae751bbca037ad8172fd3676f5b20881
'2011-11-16T17:06:27-05:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJS' 'sip-files00156.txt'
3995e13ed948ef488d0bc4ff63a190b6
fb23566e1c9b90434ff769a4d3f8fc179df7b848
'2011-11-16T17:09:39-05:00'
describe
'11011' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJT' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
edd6c6aaa165c45a807a9dec59399495
5b89e358bef4e6f796418d4b32b3c0a9d9567bec
describe
'740683' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJU' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
4a480036507a4636f87a1130374a5a26
cf2fad46b42540cf6bf28048c686104847a3d860
describe
'94445' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJV' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
4d5b3c5a704823cdf3271170d11e9c8c
92806f1e033195d64b9c662081815a102bd8261f
describe
'27525' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJW' 'sip-files00157.pro'
23922020eb4fcf0961b577bfdcac3fa0
0224a032a47f991d13f2549b63debeacb7cae98b
describe
'37119' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJX' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
0c6edfce417f0034a44029ea4262c537
77b488425bd8481c6b12bf699ca0bf1c6f33ae87
'2011-11-16T17:08:18-05:00'
describe
'5929051' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJY' 'sip-files00157.tif'
abd508cf382ea897d30bdba1df57d2f6
a2329ab7561b2eb2868692509ed262ecca8a5c34
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASJZ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
c5bba915c1aaaca0658761386b0e01c0
d431976fb2517fedf2b45d1908a53eaaa172e850
describe
'10656' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKA' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
7a1009ee0618a7fe44b277216e3b4bb4
b7081b0e7c848408dc1805e594c9375d9b2d252a
describe
'756409' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKB' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
956cc79c8919494f06f288fd9b73169d
d2c47ef10fa7b53a79b6c5a98a5b4dbe6566a2a2
describe
'102918' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKC' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
747c63d987074127b9590185e9f0fe6f
a07e81d28c060e8d6b9a74ab182772103da2b01a
describe
'31718' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKD' 'sip-files00158.pro'
9cba8b3b888e77a7663f1ede948fcae7
7d5fddbe99388d6c216fc0bbecbe3f6bdf513ff9
describe
'39277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKE' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
6813679293729c0c425cf1c44c81533a
718bfca1572974206fa0f1376ab16fe10c4c4796
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKF' 'sip-files00158.tif'
410e2bedb3250610b00fd622045bc061
07e1edc8ceb53376151bd7ee55df7362086983d5
'2011-11-16T17:08:29-05:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKG' 'sip-files00158.txt'
4b05125b2394f0832f4b7a2023e0ec23
88d1982f5b7f7f2181403187a98d2645e055ea65
describe
'11108' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKH' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
9fda36653b5212339483b07d314f6dd5
cf7b328e1007469095d298e6315a3e6ebf297cb2
describe
'742549' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKI' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
b7f6803d21b2427ff7d3d216f8d68176
2108f3deb9d3f9c380f956e4f92efaf55da6b1ce
describe
'97304' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKJ' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
2765825c76949f2bba07a249da871ba9
7e94c6d4f9e359d8e2620cbd81d829141c143883
describe
'28912' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKK' 'sip-files00159.pro'
f7b79cc81c90edf0f0a24a1ce2ff4422
103fd80cb5370418502cc8d2166b4c5335503d75
describe
'38277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKL' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
dc31c968f98188dd1b3614462490b548
a6e86be029965bfbd8e8a6e5bb68a2e8d4cd8ed4
describe
'5944531' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKM' 'sip-files00159.tif'
585b7aca096cf55e05cc596d0546cff2
10de289ea407152157e19dde49c8d3186cb9acea
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKN' 'sip-files00159.txt'
427cfe91c4fc795677998e8f78bb2495
89fc84e915113678ee2938d05c034b84710b15aa
describe
'10946' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKO' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
66f18896d38767b05c9bb248a913dda5
f7c23eedb97229f2724581971cee6f2378200691
describe
'756443' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKP' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
730d38be0de8afe7c9b4fafcbe340ce2
4b38b031fde37affc635a70d22d68d62a7cf2b75
describe
'98766' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKQ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
9a34339fd22ccbb53dfc3b250acde492
727545e6c69e010090516b11b252c2ce5ec842a6
describe
'29196' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKR' 'sip-files00160.pro'
74b329b5e0509bc9bf69109d01c67019
f6be504720d22365d78e44c27c63b4989c1f2f91
describe
'38117' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKS' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
e5bac5159e8eca47239ad7213d30e929
07291303ee63a27e3e05ac48dcde55619235cc11
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKT' 'sip-files00160.tif'
2109320ff6b7b1e043040bddc756875b
c71ae1aeef5b1b6a0423913e032b0e6b38d68105
'2011-11-16T17:10:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKU' 'sip-files00160.txt'
1bc22f294e446c39a69fb800b884aa95
5c5adb151b78097c9ededec5429b2a2a07a7a6b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKV' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
ae173ad834d0124c18126b55e27f20ba
a929fa811ea4680cab215b1b4564609b9668e330
describe
'732358' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKW' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
48c8cc02166125dd7263c97fbb4caf22
ea9f8db5c644188b14d87c00db631c3eb8e55351
describe
'95809' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKX' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
19180e5da99bf9b98a107383f9b2c63f
dead58f26cfca86df51ee382ee9d396179817c39
describe
'28313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKY' 'sip-files00161.pro'
64697390215f72332900e9bdc80fee57
158b224516dc64a6ca1d318d3c28d3a6f617c950
describe
'37932' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASKZ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
da52560fb71b958a6fea8ee29c980782
19300dc36100cf2330a2cd52fd286c2547508421
describe
'5862747' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLA' 'sip-files00161.tif'
45c93c17c8fd351650fea3e89af24b17
6ed3e74988077bc2d53958f8cf190d22fb8e7154
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLB' 'sip-files00161.txt'
f7f7c18f8d2d37cea9e627c69b7f0228
51b4360ef84b6e958e1e2ad5039bcd551dffbbb1
describe
'10688' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLC' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
29d8d9942ed6d3a0349d81dd4d1199f3
44fa2e003bf4db2141dc1d6b017a95e5937a0e58
'2011-11-16T17:02:10-05:00'
describe
'756454' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLD' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
5f5bb2369c241d822f6bcd72df0a23aa
08c89bad1f0ece18bf32b079661e4c4bab4aae72
describe
'96392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLE' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
a378cbe177ff8bbc02ef47c919c45be4
120e7b7aa2ac00603f95c8b341486ac7732626bc
describe
'28844' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLF' 'sip-files00162.pro'
d2512730a579464761993eb143771ca7
b184c855ee99e51b6ed94c96e032d313e6b652a1
describe
'37239' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLG' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
fd637d7db7672b3c6f2dfbd424720970
a6dc89f42ca5c321205c129f2e54e85f491513a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLH' 'sip-files00162.tif'
e182d4436a686ba7d4e441fdbaf2fcaa
d3e331abab3010bba67681de69ced1eb7022d573
'2011-11-16T17:08:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLI' 'sip-files00162.txt'
48c63ff3a69e80899e305ea5ce0956d7
dd9403dd95e4c469eeb740dde45366db01962dce
describe
'10942' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLJ' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
47dc90e6c702603a15e532d2c6f53ce0
4096e5ffb171b553d9a1fdd8985b26405498fd46
describe
'731250' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLK' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
38017e520891dc3fa6c0858115bc6787
87d6fcff8c768537070305a6ef97b8cdda69b18f
'2011-11-16T17:06:55-05:00'
describe
'100208' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLL' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
824bed22f245f0fe71f4a13db8b8a895
b79a9bd8d7b15e4896d40db9186a6deb3bec33c5
describe
'29626' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLM' 'sip-files00163.pro'
70fd7116a20b5bd7e92923b30d0a28f4
d8a5c7f9908b03f9054de839baf233c53b62547e
describe
'39304' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLN' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
8fe21c5d96f18109e20136b1066effeb
a2e771aabeea8f4e96514cedd55e51862a34d9f8
describe
'5853827' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLO' 'sip-files00163.tif'
9b7c6ea98da87509348f069a1756911c
bd31f2edd0bd25898122c2936231f61e7c43b6f2
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLP' 'sip-files00163.txt'
9fb9776ebe1eccf5f98e54e7bbd1ad9e
b07404b187438ea07444c2f1cda61ebb98e8ff28
describe
'11015' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLQ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
524b3e65375cfebffcf57c8b88067b16
16ad1ef8a158eb3cab6ab5cab13ba2b4745b6257
describe
'756444' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLR' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
78632351cb2197d7808e86ea82864b8c
e6636c5e63f3d28f9da0e6f2e07e5dcfc02a968c
describe
'96745' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLS' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
8c200e075b4cf63bbeda418415273c30
d873cda49630dd02bc3791a8ab926377a5065adb
'2011-11-16T17:01:02-05:00'
describe
'29718' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLT' 'sip-files00164.pro'
e9ce3af885e47c4aa286b9c114552acd
abecdb4af40f431eea05895edcba82e8c23d3e6f
'2011-11-16T17:07:16-05:00'
describe
'37297' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLU' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
cfee012a45e0a284c9b8bd19ea65ef10
a7cb53cfe71f9002b2547a4eae00709accb86451
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLV' 'sip-files00164.tif'
98983e3e9795b121bc2e9b60311db68b
e38e2fecda4ba2b9abacfbd27e0b1e05ae4b190f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLW' 'sip-files00164.txt'
c5e185b19caf80ebf1a93911c59a4349
0c0979ff95622dedbdf2d0520598f46b7c3ea7c1
describe
'10608' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLX' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
e3eb312590b78d9dbe8eea1c2178c77b
1c34fa0cc8d8f219ac4e9e37836437111f740941
describe
'732629' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLY' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
070e2973f8bc8d58dfa93a39bced0782
baa12efaa5cd82ca6a14df5e376c65d923b9568a
describe
'99879' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASLZ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
616d0a2a41a31c5b9864db9e355e32c9
1b0a1a8cf05d2fa5141b3cd31c44dca7f21b83da
describe
'28248' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMA' 'sip-files00165.pro'
8dfff8ce3383c41e4b57755a90917eb6
f09128207c94c5dbd91547f6eed61ec40f4e7531
describe
'38205' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMB' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
c3c46040521c132470a9f6be35cea3b9
3245d3bcd97c577045c86bcef90a012c79505c52
describe
'5864667' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMC' 'sip-files00165.tif'
c653723382534db941d4afd28532bca5
69dd346e72e0463e640c29fc1b39c89832d2532f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMD' 'sip-files00165.txt'
6aa3bb5bbc10cb32bf5c765e4d2bb9cd
649cf7e4ecf0f95f85a72ba047e79797a70a5052
describe
'10906' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASME' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
364c86ca7c86f3c041deb8298ff2b954
f0d43c60a5d71053a19be441bb640fd0db1230e3
describe
'756464' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMF' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
c91e7e8b4941803198e29e2809eb3388
5f1c901b3ac38c5171209e8946316d6b7a6ebab1
describe
'97283' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMG' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
e9abf0fee778b9e7ddc2baed69cffaf8
bc15055e421acda0b8f5d6d321c029250ed953d4
describe
'28563' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMH' 'sip-files00166.pro'
08c7b7322dd903d8ff84aa0465a768d1
dec50bef61ed47ab57709ee1ce01c080aada1518
describe
'37063' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMI' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
2e3545e4a86c05a47ad0acda38c93cb8
e451c1e73aef4c30849fc95300cc82842c847a0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMJ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
63eb9e0f46f8f6d11aa1bf562f319100
b3dd4b9857aab5c05176555cd73326e8df1515f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMK' 'sip-files00166.txt'
6c2ae0375f264a9afac5dd1704c51686
6cc9f4127bf5bbd6bd7df2365e676bafc4c284a5
describe
'10534' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASML' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
a540dd4e68418ea3da05269343af56e2
fa4008998a9ec1c025e887d9fe9cc6952b592a2b
describe
'766436' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMM' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
84cc81934810dc121395a26f87783e68
cc772a8b4aef017e52c029f0b9fc714aebcbdd68
describe
'89660' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMN' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
093c85346936fe001bf0787ac8bf0047
f1a21b15cc3b585bd7b138924bad23b9858a1a0b
describe
'26399' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMO' 'sip-files00167.pro'
9023cae24f0358852d09eb7297901589
677da567cbb728419076e4e1e56ffe29a1dbc249
describe
'34951' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMP' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
f2859207a5549dca9b62a0b1c99c1d1a
4c1565da584b456c8c9b48a1a0aa2b6ddb487bcb
describe
'6137275' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMQ' 'sip-files00167.tif'
4601a54823f041da1ea9fc717eedbba9
a2afe897cb8176588a255edd4bff2e7aba65f03f
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMR' 'sip-files00167.txt'
40e194aa713c1de5f0435c34700ddcb6
67d5dbb828710ef6c98abe5a6734c721c2e5cc0e
describe
'9885' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMS' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
647101d64cca3a311381731a86c320f3
f977acd2ef9ad0029dfb839968a717d2f78e27e1
describe
'777470' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMT' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
24f05ba6a537c52dcdb5716db4404a37
8d4f6dc8f2089d8c119aad2a089162eac33ef448
describe
'88521' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMU' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
cd8ee1d4c112d82d042934f07cd50bc6
8bbe3a4d24987fdad8e96ffafacac5ecfd2e5e83
describe
'26400' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMV' 'sip-files00168.pro'
b22e6dccb47ea78b39c414c7e4a240fd
317133dc233c8f6a8ea942e5d53be03955f53977
describe
'34110' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMW' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
615b17432595db203a3aafa91aaa6342
424e888017142755d4bd266692da7e23f2d17215
describe
'6225915' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMX' 'sip-files00168.tif'
48441ef74897a30930f124e85d650a4f
60fa3f5e26d18f43bbf220fd6f1793634604f963
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMY' 'sip-files00168.txt'
f00df3696a9b57d2eefec76899a9c355
611602825b50ff4c50204120af38174de2734368
'2011-11-16T17:09:58-05:00'
describe
'9748' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASMZ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
2d6f31bdfc1810f9d2b748f912d614dd
7035cee731815397cc0463dbfab848cd7cced4e0
describe
'766346' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNA' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
55b5d0dd5a89fc7ea86257d3ffe4d05a
c00cfc76cfea47e095254ade4a9a7824c9cfae39
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNB' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
7abea221c0e2b6ff7c319a911da92199
4c37ca1c552524b8fc7262793dec597eb656e894
describe
'29889' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNC' 'sip-files00169.pro'
1e76d118abe6e057342c86fd2edee6ff
94877747b7411f23cd7f965e8a114b3091df0bc9
describe
'37128' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASND' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
7b523bfff2dea41e3d015e70e41d70da
e525d902efe5978eaeb67c18769d3f54d58e50b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNE' 'sip-files00169.tif'
c2653bc30b3d8d42913188d800ec5e6b
8f8bc1b49cd9cee0a62cfd38096b9cce54d83a9a
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNF' 'sip-files00169.txt'
ebcf5a0464094ed1c356984983929133
546fd2735e125b34c98470aa4fc322658cf41bb2
describe
'10437' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNG' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
f7dd2f26441a9f04fec3cea2bf321508
c906f013896b32c74c89b3ae0f0ab4b166a353c1
describe
'777491' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNH' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
015b78ac152d2a3d3c702ddec75f3d30
845c54ebc7fb1ef3964e7e6ec19b74108f9a691a
'2011-11-16T17:01:29-05:00'
describe
'95306' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNI' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
6dcbac589100e8a50d6d82d90c764ce2
40a97f70f1ea3a3fefdcfcd08e73bb95ea90dde6
'2011-11-16T17:06:23-05:00'
describe
'30352' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNJ' 'sip-files00170.pro'
39be211d757d9e3ea5abb4b6b6e7ab6d
251ecd18940bc6b22fcbd18f5c89156c61205fe7
describe
'36505' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNK' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
dbab0ab827bd9068e42cf4a2761a5c7c
e26f7504e305bb11526f8d2914c8fdb4c0ed10c3
'2011-11-16T17:05:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNL' 'sip-files00170.tif'
849dc60ffd3ba3da04229d0e51cddaa0
01a799857f3b279a1a2b5553db0dceb41d6dd84e
'2011-11-16T17:08:25-05:00'
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNM' 'sip-files00170.txt'
eba30e589738f6075c1887eb88a3458b
efcafbf5a39ccf210a63b6da3a336e85b4cf762c
describe
'10063' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNN' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
b0ddb89bbaefb498fc20693abb5f3e12
42c5842eea3e7f10a712849f4bc3a46643b61dbd
describe
'766441' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNO' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
1458245d029412d62eddd051a9c242d9
cb8f2e1781396079c427a582a9b215124091c893
describe
'86284' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNP' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
a7d0089a7e3b6409fd72e2236594389e
af4b678a55ea2ea3963794c04d9985c52f985095
describe
'26148' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNQ' 'sip-files00171.pro'
0e7e7eb8f8acdd7910808eaf1d5bd1d9
aff3870828d74fb6db88ff798347faee55951ce8
describe
'33189' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNR' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
4678c0a7350219d89725aabac3f420dc
ad2ac26dec86d7f47282875db04b746d65bbdb1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNS' 'sip-files00171.tif'
0ce31c38c86cea41f2bc93dca6d9f1e0
ca78ae7066b324a98a8de4c0c2ce6a93a934dd5e
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNT' 'sip-files00171.txt'
01d9d6297747beb447647a518dee6b74
889491d1bb66fd2c7bbe70cc30fc4a70ee673599
describe
'9537' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNU' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
2c386fcfd1190df6532fce498b0adbf9
ac92ba2e47a65961dd0759781d00fededaf346dc
describe
'777521' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNV' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
4a435be63d212cc75541caeccce8f177
9c6fc995bda8371eddbbb8ddf188d6cfee590d41
describe
'89171' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNW' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
67473ebbcae792a188d335313ef238b7
bbc52b2797d1fa2ea399896d4afa4b7100800f86
describe
'26186' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNX' 'sip-files00172.pro'
c43eb53dd940292d98304c0fca9acaa5
2b49daf43193c98cfea08eea905ba0d5d905eb69
describe
'34107' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNY' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
627873c365073d8ba81b799fa2cb0750
446909e6af0c54d2da343ecd3211e5a8a8d0f8cb
'2011-11-16T17:10:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASNZ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
1e40d8809fcdb38da322aabd9c11ad0c
62ded30e03971c822c9d7483502a65485f5a1d2c
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOA' 'sip-files00172.txt'
69de879ba2a2c1979a42743dd97f3882
0e80807f5b330e5329bde29c3e5893021b1c3415
describe
'9841' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOB' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
d5eb7eb8196285a1725810695b8e8dc8
37ea5621aec149ff51e52cf3bb953b0ee61e211f
describe
'742040' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOC' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
8b2569e5560082bfffbae28d42ebbe0f
a81f697ef4cca6b4659144bfaf8fdf67ab067c68
'2011-11-16T17:04:17-05:00'
describe
'97978' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOD' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
9af2f1296ebf4d30ac31ca77682346f1
68b225b49b264591d98016aaf024e104b63df929
describe
'28725' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOE' 'sip-files00173.pro'
52c73bbad2cd4651ab08aa0ded1b1180
ccab791953360e75adae1ece2d26e59c85d0469b
describe
'37537' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOF' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
55f148267b64d3a721fad6242cb4acc3
2e176d9a9b9b07ea366f93aa0d25c2dd50df9178
describe
'5939955' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOG' 'sip-files00173.tif'
d0eba72bfbc1286fdf35ce30661a0dbe
5c6e1b225304822615ab1a0cda04f7ff4938c3c4
'2011-11-16T17:01:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOH' 'sip-files00173.txt'
d6f055a55c82886e56582a5ddc6ce95a
1f29585044a4130d5949bc9cbb67f582992a80e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOI' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
edc67079825c5b17f1e590d06c701b8e
f3329e64475e8778688478b47b926f5ca405e40b
describe
'766088' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOJ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
12916011d284a06040b2e9ffd6dc3459
b1bc923233a199ce020f5be60f32e7f204936b68
'2011-11-16T17:11:06-05:00'
describe
'96078' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOK' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
c046c938ec3bda18feaa8505d51d4f7e
dc1dac2f7d58cff7c4ef4ee481b626f4e67addfa
'2011-11-16T17:03:42-05:00'
describe
'29360' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOL' 'sip-files00174.pro'
83caa5ee9b929ca5a4abee0dd92dbae0
fc204c126302351ee3d43ed29f461755a44ed49b
describe
'36636' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOM' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
c29437cc4e82aab53f32ee0ecffe9f19
8424f07f7384caf59d36d94b8389e46b76f2b52e
describe
'6132539' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASON' 'sip-files00174.tif'
e467fa9580f54cb7b4ec267e719b34b0
06185f3e7a299eeed66b7f41494b530317aa5de2
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOO' 'sip-files00174.txt'
2aca3bf822ff95fb4a2eaa6f8a647595
14a64425c8495387acfad7820f1e78062ef860f7
describe
'10405' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOP' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
c9f6d8a9e95bf702520b1a4c0905b1e7
6300a1103405113e86b4ec1099a73b9edd3bcb6b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOQ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
6328608a9c2d739892f4c401e9275743
cfb57055a610283721fe4cd8c92a64a2e7244ff3
describe
'100564' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOR' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
bf595f3f4a85bc452cd3624a5f7173bb
fddd406e070d2da7c44c79deacce58dea258c94e
describe
'28785' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOS' 'sip-files00175.pro'
636de287e41051afbd5ac5f3066a8299
7438f1bc4ca1a378b99bd58613a2c4664d6d492b
'2011-11-16T17:10:52-05:00'
describe
'38856' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOT' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
561bb6c30f74981497edab669a41e14b
2d3fcfc8b18290d5da0536758231255a661fc536
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOU' 'sip-files00175.tif'
be2d84c3461b84bac0634d064d7e4a64
f8a80c09af673463e8c8f61e497e6ba1d3ce682b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOV' 'sip-files00175.txt'
0ba8dbfc0b98ccb52870b9198334a3c8
0fb28693099c5e9b382c81f860ede69d79163533
describe
'11007' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOW' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
3e91907c246f3527e948e0be04633fbd
3eb5ffb09dbf4c9c69c820bc5258a62d3bda9cad
describe
'763477' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOX' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
1121904ed4f66092fc7a595199252bd6
e521959962921ae2558388d0f9aa8e678df7e275
describe
'93033' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOY' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
9dca2309a0f00bb766d159347509abc8
af81c6617ec5a7c2a4f115b345f0b91f7d9075df
describe
'27731' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASOZ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
d47ccbd3addd5f00875d567a86bee78f
3a68863bf3758db78e4ac58484d6e2e0e056b998
describe
'36151' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPA' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
230249c2d96247556b0e1c985661df3c
053ac3dafdcdb453420c316f19af01ed741fa3a8
describe
'6113631' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPB' 'sip-files00176.tif'
73c0f4edd66b850ce34f8f052689cfd6
7f7c29bbe26fb93c35280a4488ebc122b660064a
'2011-11-16T17:03:25-05:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPC' 'sip-files00176.txt'
81d85aff94f21a9cc905a31b73960f3c
fcea782d8d3ad6cacd158e3f3ea49400b4f1bb06
describe
'10074' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPD' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
187e98cae824e7c87fcf1e93cf62d44b
191060ce9fbd685ba794fa20e689b587f0aba926
describe
'747700' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPE' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
af598cda8c076bc27fd0907ad7e2a3db
61665b17db72a204545eceb4647928286aaa519e
describe
'103584' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPF' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
b5ffcd749f44554c73501c4c38bdaa82
f822a24ce0024e9de40aa6960440949fd8566a75
describe
'30694' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPG' 'sip-files00177.pro'
97791f58389d98f443d35fc8fd87cae5
d16fd0c9e241b05186a03bd7985710e5e1bc0170
describe
'40238' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPH' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
941ab387e165dcbc7051ad63100ba78e
c3d128643cbc987885fdce8dce372959f2609180
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPI' 'sip-files00177.tif'
7624e59dd60e487d585e48f5846b65e6
a1b8fbdf79cc1725dcc3519c40af494f47e96b1b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPJ' 'sip-files00177.txt'
75438e802f5b731c98d187b726df599e
fee6a1a9c8fc22469d260cfb55fdd0da1d065765
describe
'11277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPK' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
537e8b9fd3778ce13d5b85749f17c4a2
3eb160316a2f74e1c1acd633198dbe6fdd988370
describe
'763481' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPL' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
564087eb9d2d83aefbad3d2554adfd22
3480d171280ba01d3ff835070a569f17f01b4310
describe
'96073' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPM' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
2d1fee31bda04cb3dbe61e9a56cfff58
e0d909e371aa191af4c286143b702d76956bec14
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPN' 'sip-files00178.pro'
364e31d1064ae521cf0577ca66643f5c
44a76c0ef13f839debbbab6facb61e807d5dcce1
'2011-11-16T17:02:49-05:00'
describe
'36638' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPO' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
b483504feee9d71bb436e7089300aaac
f532864863d85ea243d0c4fbf6e0abb7f2bdea87
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPP' 'sip-files00178.tif'
a2d81d4f2c13e890adf0ffe3c6cf5b20
e4f6d880d131e540c25d1ddb47161766fed987f2
'2011-11-16T17:08:23-05:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPQ' 'sip-files00178.txt'
0c1759d8b316c875aa9accd4a755820d
4217c2a0b9683953f1365cf7c71fe7a5c1be4978
describe
'10576' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPR' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
8dfebe0f127d331f3a1083312a3540f4
cfda3c87f8897b846e471d33f389ea2e2552b8e8
'2011-11-16T17:06:20-05:00'
describe
'747574' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPS' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
d9d1dda33e887225a940c1bcdee97bec
58438bdf0ceb9c9db943e1189c7489dd23eb8933
'2011-11-16T17:03:11-05:00'
describe
'97215' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPT' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
c3bd527e2fbd37e1153ac4802597cf16
0742114213c2a7bd705b40d3556f9d3aa46ac504
describe
'28272' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPU' 'sip-files00179.pro'
4d1221f0da8bfd25fd952bbfef738c09
b69701fd215a27f7a0b65dde7fced245c2d848ee
describe
'37634' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPV' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
75db309d96fbbcc65282353d10283f49
136e1510ee23d69500f9d57cc8f2d32be9302fcf
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPW' 'sip-files00179.tif'
68d6f49daf53029f8207703cb227e535
1280acdb1d4be96e2e8363f7f9eda4704c1f43fd
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPX' 'sip-files00179.txt'
900bec0fca554700eed0bf4e76348cef
a3f71e862072210a000380a598ba08790644e3cc
describe
'10556' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPY' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
d816d1762a9341af9a729c7ff2fda393
2b7204f89f4130ebea3a0a931aa241fa91ea9262
describe
'763463' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASPZ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
75e7276e8e952eff771eb9510c019261
37c9bd54cc412ec562c6ec4e8b29f0c557532a51
describe
'98795' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQA' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
dd6ad0e70c1184c9b91a5cba190248a7
e6e3676e340e92bfc7eded35d5fd6e8274bb61e1
describe
'29804' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQB' 'sip-files00180.pro'
9cd2cca1ddccfaa914987fcaf07579b7
53b7506110d80c928cb9bf53fdc9c60d05a11e78
describe
'37552' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQC' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
bb59fb2341ff524a53712b89e7005c98
e09ad16e0f904e04e32f4479b309daa5c0f72537
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQD' 'sip-files00180.tif'
224ad176c4628ba8ca22db534d6c4ad1
876aa0aad24119636887fb71d5a10404a1150c3b
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQE' 'sip-files00180.txt'
d1c2a325ccf9459367cd911be160e27f
42594ea2eaa16ec3c1cd24587b80d50647ba55b0
describe
'10456' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQF' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
8ae7cc3597ebc1be471a19f72c0fd51c
2ce97b5b89a1cf5ebe76351673ed6e771412fb51
describe
'747732' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQG' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
63e067581f042ec616c30d8d025ee34f
06cc9348fb4f9a11c452b1dc2fcf74eeb8831a8f
describe
'95889' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQH' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
e194cc8a231e7d47c8f5331d334f1300
a577c659c37b68e80c2478387a379cff965ff070
'2011-11-16T17:09:51-05:00'
describe
'28207' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQI' 'sip-files00181.pro'
69096693b58417986bcc2cce81d63055
1e68003d17dcb40d88dc03d735cd05883a5c47bb
describe
'37010' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQJ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
2d9a8fda13a0a4a99500a8536e9b5e97
a4235b47f02de38c197b597fc87341022a11b0bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQK' 'sip-files00181.tif'
77eb4dcacc9cdcce1056c7f2034edb96
8ee3e9aed74918f08733286c826f51075035a3a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQL' 'sip-files00181.txt'
a0fe7e340e755e24227fcbccbb9326da
1c9b3b4868b2baea75e2a36c81db94836d1d2ee6
describe
'10653' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQM' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
5680d0ed08bdfd3b83665c3377ad54b2
dacecccb25a2a2b87a713cde4deff7c80d82c85c
describe
'763479' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQN' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
37e01b10b18c0e1bf23d19fb51ee69c7
09f1fca87cf5967158f3c4279e6890629494816c
'2011-11-16T17:10:32-05:00'
describe
'95980' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQO' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
2cadb94fd0313578c398fbb1c8945aba
9aa640e23b9c7b5a4371352bda6826a8535882a3
describe
'28812' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQP' 'sip-files00182.pro'
b28781d02becbb8fab3dd6b2383f8d7f
5bcaf6a03befb2a16434f1ef8fb0d52f36ac2185
describe
'37626' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQQ' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
bf215f8573b369703aaa57b7171c027c
05c0627ef9a0261f0511efc6d94a2c8c942d8b42
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQR' 'sip-files00182.tif'
552b8d36fc239cd02e53c2519071651f
b216b5e71236d72ab03c9419d800354829983ed8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQS' 'sip-files00182.txt'
481a5cbae9a7b5313aeee368cca489dd
d7a3d37dcab72f915bc3b1b09096aaecb0c42d48
describe
'10375' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQT' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
3ea6a45c9579f451eca24cf624a9e067
9571f199f588d8c18104c34607861bbe3ba53f13
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQU' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
c67941919b84fc6efe4675cc3af29c83
a40ea6ab9bf5cc916dc5f59c71e23c7ff13efe4b
describe
'98844' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQV' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
233b7554c9892b051d5d992c2f75f867
d6ec422e93f738f64ed364dc4487733d4065eb73
describe
'27622' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQW' 'sip-files00183.pro'
d3fb61200689593f7abcdd654f1fda99
75d7885cf083a33a338a75cc72b1e1e25bcf6dda
describe
'38272' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQX' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
88203dc59915f212da423d3389cdf0d1
1a887eb91809613849c1d2d4adbe4f1074986002
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQY' 'sip-files00183.tif'
1250090b7e47fb79d4d1f721d734e087
49686eba6459e45dc22010eaaec02a249de2b17c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASQZ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
dfc2548301532b7db7df69b179d4ab63
e4ed9db9ab5ce66880a00c83abf905ea5cbe21df
describe
Invalid character
'10845' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRA' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
5dba907385d749eed84c5fc06ea06a66
71c682ec9bed9e2e889840bfd1eb1d42e238aa97
describe
'763466' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRB' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
20b327de6063c05bae412cb800169452
bae3f2fc9334fa008b1ea2833f8ef436a2281a25
describe
'80893' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRC' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
0ebecd18efb1578b0fc21b5e60c2b4a7
4d215796a454b003619ee18a5b693e6c8b46da40
describe
'22800' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRD' 'sip-files00184.pro'
5ef23496ff0c5434b15852e2b4c1328b
e5327690f953da3800a6f819fa81056851ddcf4f
'2011-11-16T17:08:04-05:00'
describe
'30856' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRE' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
314a5231cbb2d1bc32011d2b400bb01d
70474b44cd63c6bf6925ab0ef79734f444924a73
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRF' 'sip-files00184.tif'
6ec2173919e4b60b88e9d38eeca8a991
320d546e605f2cb2620d6ce2fb74fff164b38bd8
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRG' 'sip-files00184.txt'
c3c23d54ba8275882b60f991492bdba2
8e44fbb5cad5b35eb749e819a6c51508404d8c6f
describe
'8935' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRH' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
56a20f9017db7d79dd94c7e681d18dbe
feb6a0f50972af2f3fb14b11351bd0f55a1d79a3
describe
'747555' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRI' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
d0f2669cd837540bbe356bb9cdb8330a
0fe6efdf99d67141ed50f01a291fba34f305fd4d
describe
'93682' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRJ' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
c75029543fa17b65eed504c88f0ef9e9
0e10db1c1a44b5affe1e48b6084a45092b475672
describe
'26828' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRK' 'sip-files00185.pro'
cf49224e118195fc6d6f022f4183eba7
e2b429cb6e3effef114e322c759921eb0873f2dc
describe
'35002' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRL' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
dc41bb79fdea15cbd856fbd346ba4550
60ee817403acd9f9d23a6b03b7b088d5029f4ec0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRM' 'sip-files00185.tif'
6e04d4e4de68866948afcc1fc5b51994
f5ebca3c9c395ba3f428a1ddf68ff2906783d8df
'2011-11-16T17:07:36-05:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRN' 'sip-files00185.txt'
d0fad6d8ccea16d02d4bd5bc735b56dd
f7dda213fe580943bf977d3c2d3b88b78f424f47
describe
'10695' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRO' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
8799ab866c5c1734fc45a45627392ce9
c4268dab0c49cbdfa982e3805ec5828ef07ae259
describe
'763307' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRP' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
3bea3c1d86786c545ffbc4d3ff6669cc
ac7fc2dced32b81891bd517e0402ec36c8c7a477
describe
'87697' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRQ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
f94bceabca674b86e8a5248a45a54344
3014ef602130270b81d149ce98cd747ab69c64cb
describe
'24294' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRR' 'sip-files00186.pro'
50090bf0a9e75366fa0214f08ec001d0
1354f15b911040cf2780921a87f235c4b8d0190b
'2011-11-16T17:10:37-05:00'
describe
'34180' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRS' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
f7b2f1d679beedb9be82c89b28f5a275
5bdf1cc53d4934af8112bf3ee7c3483676f96f3a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRT' 'sip-files00186.tif'
80b13bfc20878e559caff227eddb5a5e
37919d416b44c00dc2bb749dd5ceb80c3652ac05
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRU' 'sip-files00186.txt'
f5f80eb92b2cd780bc74ec7e89e8cdf7
ff71e0d6b2db9b4e3426695ea2a879ccc0fa7c21
'2011-11-16T17:05:26-05:00'
describe
'9834' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRV' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
9333f6642528a8268d655d09a562c5bb
dc9bc5a0a9d7291cd56891f006a1b737d825fbc9
describe
'752076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRW' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
828c0500efb6b62fd49f17289b980a5e
b4d3150a55e377d4c34b6b2a30dc905d8b84d701
describe
'97393' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRX' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
f970f060a393d37e30bf23685a6c22b3
f9c8cb2a734c1dacc3e813d176554befe7c5da2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRY' 'sip-files00187.pro'
94bc3258c525c02341b7c03410add1ea
a02e920760e4369396166369fbc52900840c1d56
describe
'38657' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASRZ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
abbc6948efcaeda453f181fac837f685
f7f406ea3008c1d98677a9eb2794106ad769b43d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSA' 'sip-files00187.tif'
470d74511c0e5479eb0193ba69d57800
8b8ea63b908d4e9407fba16c0419727e4f14ac0a
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSB' 'sip-files00187.txt'
e9845fc1cd5079fd6c55179e37f19722
1f6b417664eb2d72da2529f4b1b0e10ca5d9b5b5
describe
'10869' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSC' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
e5c063eff7225a1a1a7872087998ceda
5ebe85465b2a062906940b657ed88663357034c9
describe
'752102' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSD' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
09a62b588c4a47c21676bb6dd6755925
33465e9f5778550aeddf38d95dddcc66c3b5c7e8
describe
'90611' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSE' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
8ac872d7f39632648ebfb2be28ab3b24
b364e6d3c8d761b8edc8c5279b87c82d71f04adc
describe
'25702' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSF' 'sip-files00188.pro'
3bfd24c4c61faa170a49e6f8def5cce8
29dbfbf5e55585a92d59208c93bf7e635001621c
describe
'34170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSG' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
07416fc3a930be5c0e8118d9e3084af9
5e150bfdcc0bf22b7e5c708f7c6c94e5b517bd4c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSH' 'sip-files00188.tif'
101e0986978b3f70707c5d1f9819b9f8
d65f1e4d551d57f276cd1544829434684aeffb66
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSI' 'sip-files00188.txt'
59af154608737b5af04551c84b0ece84
ae02e29e8d2bcf3613fadc15a6f4b3c5d21f3060
describe
'10339' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSJ' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
4306d86618a8a6bf2b48eb637f90d74a
0c56785ae3107342ba9c86356ba7e574caa95d4e
describe
'752100' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSK' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
e5b2d3484cd00cdf6850b7806445e99c
4ce018520fd1f8bfcd789716b11ac55622d97d31
describe
'100731' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSL' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
8e6b24d4aebcda495e8bc66cfb8c1852
faaaa5f3edfcb98f38a07755240c6e874fef338b
describe
'30884' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSM' 'sip-files00189.pro'
d17e5ca068d502363d6a6bde651e1117
54dd770a680cb76656fceaeabfc8177ac6404145
describe
'40748' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSN' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
032210fded4587fb5bb70a35004ec53b
bf86657ad504fdbe325e35e27ad3e08afed3db83
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSO' 'sip-files00189.tif'
1bcae3ae9120b1d63a353a8581ca9226
3e2acdfddc124bc2f98c63d45421759cf19fe695
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSP' 'sip-files00189.txt'
77a9d754c46075bac50229992de41580
4fa6e86b6f14f5cfa7160d223fab091ae29b6bc0
describe
'11450' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSQ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
61e421dfcd1e8b18e0bf231543809b72
b42a9d9c3382ecd07146c4b944e92a5e80070167
describe
'752006' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSR' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
16c926a8037ef0788609cdb6ac0710d0
9de7ee884db7bc9886194115a9aea5575c3a3927
describe
'98562' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSS' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
3049283c6e8feb179c1c430604c3ef08
bcdb78ed9fc65d70c7acc17c4eb6129933ec7372
describe
'29040' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASST' 'sip-files00190.pro'
0381eecab0718a1ff7b2c6c20c8fee55
dce37154e758f625963b4bdae05b0c19e1d9dfca
describe
'37728' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSU' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
1d1302c7aae662cddd38f4e51490d9bc
9ae979a57fa5542645a34a055693ee37f1e27ad4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSV' 'sip-files00190.tif'
c769640cefa30a008e12d05475df1a2c
982d2f25d1efac46a342fd486a6676235e164811
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSW' 'sip-files00190.txt'
825e9044d689d50ecb7f4bcab5d2fb8f
d9b761e4165bbf8e5c3675ddd6c0298de0bfc0b0
describe
'11085' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSX' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
f855cfbef6c51d5564f30dc6d1cd88e2
38a0367748442d683fcfc8cb16bc7a8f85d49174
'2011-11-16T17:05:06-05:00'
describe
'752012' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSY' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
57bea05e4ee4252eee4c64e92eaeb4e3
c9a7b59f9f7bcdf15ebfa9386bacf40e982f75e7
describe
'95633' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASSZ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
b53d9ee0bbdba5579edfac89a32b65ab
06a0964004cc551bd62007b1fc3491b36a7f0e57
describe
'29387' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTA' 'sip-files00191.pro'
68b90116c91e4cbc6ba82618ce28320c
4bdd32b3f70b47fb387dad2dbae01f8ce01b5e96
describe
'39068' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTB' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
9e3696ef0cf83eeaebe7471d1959b3c2
69e5ac106d22be7eba9a68c35c84b3d8eec274ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTC' 'sip-files00191.tif'
756e88011a1db0cc16d62eccb4841a96
a87768bbf3ecc3f83841cbb5d253885605eaa890
'2011-11-16T17:06:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTD' 'sip-files00191.txt'
65a2a1606946f58c85fac7f95b0b706a
43f8af4144d607ecb72800e1e79e7a9dee75248c
describe
'10930' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTE' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
a19a6bab0ce3b2964558357b3c91bad8
607e19a22f919e7163a591979d5cf3f97ef998fe
describe
'752074' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTF' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
2c6edf83625cd497f7d9f728bcd7c675
432e85d4605a3f16abf581db8070e42736cad8a7
describe
'93551' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTG' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
c6c80c854fc9ee28ccb3e0b2c0f75a48
f2067aaf5776c9378d1562ca8224f11143c97224
describe
'28094' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTH' 'sip-files00192.pro'
f78afc4d14b8cfad192b4a0d668ca98e
8d08f9fb5dbf35dad7c8b1139f813bfb6a53d839
describe
'35390' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTI' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
31bbe53d37f42d0112baaa8228aa6271
515ae20a7025553e2a79565d58e4559b7c3d1d55
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTJ' 'sip-files00192.tif'
85fddb661b9ce34d737a759b156f9014
1ed99466afe4e3b32a5757492c2890082848ea93
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTK' 'sip-files00192.txt'
5507b7f8d2263001af08334c1c4932b3
9c623ca5bb81c7820dd27230b2c7f4c570c4b990
describe
'10650' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTL' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
2f7709d1fc0cfa4839038f81080e71e6
2f3046e07a8099336e4b9e34b26a4d6b6a42964d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTM' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
237376381a622f4f858991d1be07de55
d1356ce2fea71ae543c372f8e07ea9e5c903a527
describe
'93345' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTN' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
3f526be9dfb7bfeea688e4f6ebd317f3
63987d82d5fb9598192bbde360f3e25f27dfef56
describe
'27894' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTO' 'sip-files00193.pro'
c0285552c4acb6f7aac4beca08ff58af
aa7799174704ab1d48d6abb2c489fa33b6fa686f
describe
'37866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTP' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
e40507f92ba4b1a262f094c95d5f99c9
16fbf4e3a84fd6ba45b3e6509583e2f96015578c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTQ' 'sip-files00193.tif'
e1b4f83e118a6b5d425ea4d45c063fd5
153527b57cbb6ee4c6829f9f17317b8950abdab0
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTR' 'sip-files00193.txt'
7c641e2616c54fcb043d953d71de747c
64fe80c952cfb974a4b272e9f8bc51362f580db2
describe
'10559' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTS' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
95857f646b1d7f5de057118070aca191
c4fe90ee9507425cadbb5e03c60811a1cc65a433
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTT' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
54a928940fb9cc6c77c7427648520d6e
d25d6d195c7a59d33b42f7719c437482d5da7697
describe
'97449' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTU' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
622a962298387c44a8824661ddb8374f
bc11ac3b880f55f423af1acd349f9ea58c7323d3
describe
'29445' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTV' 'sip-files00194.pro'
d6a5d51b6a56d998bca55446f0ef3990
a752198ac60ffecbed38140fe9caae0cff56c181
describe
'37772' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTW' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
8165331c15e696d69404cdb3579adca4
4ce478e88ba98ea0bfc0a0a7d9a04197525cebc4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTX' 'sip-files00194.tif'
98c860bf19fa8adc632b6d9ae0f149dd
bd80f63a9e4abfdeb0cfc9b66d239ab1e109d91d
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTY' 'sip-files00194.txt'
a9643718a13d0d2a44f3f0a8920f86b0
2e831f6942f2f474dd2430179971e5fb2c23255c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASTZ' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
de470b93375848452181eba4c6a91073
7da937ca76f9148aa37fd2295dab8e616707ac42
describe
'752008' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUA' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
04e662848f63c1fe09a8925ffeabc6a0
444d56dee37e132da85e01aeabd89a81cb5fd482
describe
'92954' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUB' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
bf4e150e25e3f57e92aae4dce8acc12e
373d756a5ce7c8ce7bc3a0c4a8c2ae5844d64bc5
describe
'26530' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUC' 'sip-files00195.pro'
9b80c3f0000e7c7de7ee62447dbc0ebb
5a83c07bc758256f3dee0b6b1125fc02b00a84ae
describe
'35332' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUD' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
f373f71d410e6ca443efb2aa98416fd6
c2bec7cbff5a7a5a1064343089aa424b21d169ba
'2011-11-16T17:05:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUE' 'sip-files00195.tif'
c86319c33aea6ae236888173fa67391f
6270373f1375cd80999ab4e817aaa105c68142d1
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUF' 'sip-files00195.txt'
1871ce8d52d860088ed7e5f9766f9617
465499a5ddd085fb9117f69ecd1dc3d9c6676b8d
describe
'10712' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUG' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
1701fe004dfee9d639c3b0ca0850957a
4582cb3dabc666a75f296ffa0126d50b6518bd87
describe
'751980' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUH' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
0d9c0125b9d48fe1ddaea5456682478d
a8fbc9a57c9250467431a8b4144587de0c22538c
describe
'89279' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUI' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
9f11b5d9d73955ebd430242584a6e751
f4752a2eeb1d18416964ffe558547b6ed6d8c56b
describe
'26618' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUJ' 'sip-files00196.pro'
462d8bf4b77a6205127696c92df85375
75ea77c5fa9ac49eec00a0d6cb0a76295ea69804
describe
'35494' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUK' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
e4d2b95661ecaffde9900806b91ca161
2fc59c0b9f85eb7aab87cdd5a696dc12a600038c
'2011-11-16T17:08:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUL' 'sip-files00196.tif'
039b3bc59becfb86e0a5007869acb4dc
9f57426cb93dfb09c752eddac6287b778f7e0d72
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUM' 'sip-files00196.txt'
30a22c7030faf840f5bbdd03a4e311ee
8f8e511c72a0f346d20d713fdf502b04f5e9567f
describe
'10070' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUN' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
befe33987c058e3079a77ffcdca344fe
791dc37fabc5979606c2eb6bfcc74f120d729774
describe
'752103' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUO' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
c96b1cabc74f7b616362c263e497eb32
b4038138ca995027b3ca2b87ff007ba4223e6069
describe
'88136' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUP' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
c244a409abf417cc86400bfae7929479
cb2f03da2e97db6730eb7a9b85195ba56c7d5ad0
'2011-11-16T17:09:56-05:00'
describe
'25347' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUQ' 'sip-files00197.pro'
c0d0f5479d1abd5517798efbcc419348
b563844aa8fb44a026a2be423a252c0d5d49595a
describe
'36011' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUR' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
0d6dbbcf5dd215214110f20934cdede3
88ba9a33242c3f508412b7482908f3402fa714db
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUS' 'sip-files00197.tif'
be56188f846bba2be7cd7cc6ccb6e28d
bce46156b8dda2c4e3527df96044fc83c94f1f53
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUT' 'sip-files00197.txt'
0e60c839c3fcd7cd14e7688e57e34c4b
ebce99fcc1eb3bbed9dc47dab74a42dcde5db7ff
describe
'10360' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUU' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
e4eccb7dfaa048c1f48f734e2309ed6a
b12893ae822e2f930e48dfa17f42b770b6adb9d8
describe
'752088' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUV' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
5e56bf13091f3b17dceef59ba710fce0
bcf0630561f5d354909a641595d2aea544dbf1f5
describe
'98296' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUW' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
a57176fc02a87a7a093f279253658fe8
cdb1535b7e2a1fe48558b0bba024c047db73d36c
describe
'29534' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUX' 'sip-files00198.pro'
d4f552435245b13e5cc0f1bff340bab4
06111d4b55899585b2e195d4ee2763025beafd4e
describe
'39281' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUY' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
418c74e4a0d7521f924617f0bd78cbd1
aa7a0ecee32907a93b4098f9826548483e2f82be
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASUZ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
9480e9ec71725aaba7e3165310ee049e
dce6ec0636b06e382fa506d5bcd3a86af4bce904
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVA' 'sip-files00198.txt'
c5090cf4ecdfd49c430f6e5f4681ffc5
b27271d3ead3f4997b7d94c7d2e361e6b9112b30
describe
'10903' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVB' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
6c9932499d5b8273eea5ba970a238524
b662f137d67124e68c6ecba03daaf0a88348f0ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVC' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
4c34e8aa502525d048894bd282fba6f5
e5f5591399bb419885c23bf17c61c56fc4c6892d
describe
'98193' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVD' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
6f45c3521fac0662f6aebdc06dd25956
d7d9827f379274417d6c73912a8b6fdc3c341588
describe
'29382' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVE' 'sip-files00205.pro'
7e3f3cb64cbb3debe9bb5fc888be897f
b98c8256a1c01737569e89e1fdb131c6f9fe93f7
describe
'36455' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVF' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
cdc4102465593b70cde33660e7aefa24
71794be25bea7db78f2b173d9f1dcfd22d74e564
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVG' 'sip-files00205.tif'
12e0a74692dc9e160b0766e8c3a513a6
70de707711d068adf50c93b0010a69f4f2ff39b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVH' 'sip-files00205.txt'
5431646143c377b68bc7e80857660e6e
158087f49231e7191a0dcb2d9ab6175babd2b6a2
describe
'11026' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVI' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
21608e5d0fa90c52d1971b7856e75eac
6330e85d84212a6833b217b1f9df1e0f8ff5d34e
describe
'752068' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVJ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
3a2e84af8213b3598b34426d0ec47acb
d65586c6abf22f7a41132512f8c78635eded77e5
describe
'92801' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVK' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
0d2bc0c83d554d15948dd53a9961a568
5e0b20caaa8eec3b22f0087692c4dfc7bfbeb2f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVL' 'sip-files00206.pro'
2d85a999883461a93b2a8330df611d62
25d77d2d295daaa779fa7422724889b5c3c1b65a
describe
'34805' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVM' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
79fce8dd19888881eb0b1f108e5025cb
3a3857e289b54bc692c15e9ff60a191b64aead98
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVN' 'sip-files00206.tif'
18b181c1098e06f2e645313b3c71ec68
5208223b24506985e566935767296bae51dfe656
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVO' 'sip-files00206.txt'
98bf8511882bdda1f75efca4caa5936a
b7de93e41068072f6aa67a09673f13e0204b71a3
describe
'10281' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVP' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
0705e6e41329fcc95a4481e5e34460c3
a9ea8da4b192fc459c6dcf5b86d895584ff8e000
describe
'704130' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVQ' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
23d4c3de8d7ad03b8ad2ef4ed4eb3b1a
697836f2229c412e2fa207e89246a59f9eb7ea98
describe
'102002' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVR' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
29a4314e49d53cd60fcb56bcb2654b6f
77803e6793af8a8327cf8b7cc4533b9b582748e9
describe
'30278' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVS' 'sip-files00207.pro'
e76574ea8a39b8215516d4f7eff2eff7
fe54773610d75622770dcea5fa8b9a7cca001cbb
describe
'39901' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVT' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
6a0387741a84d83e7a31b33c5d50bda6
9483427e055004ba0b06387231cbcd4c148fbe43
describe
'5636799' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVU' 'sip-files00207.tif'
147523ee7d8392deb5b4af45359943fa
ad6513d991bdb5d63a761999f2a8a9b6d6532521
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVV' 'sip-files00207.txt'
d2b1e24ae0d10defee8dc9d833810193
35311795d5c201314f9866418579fc9937a348f4
describe
'12245' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVW' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
250aacd8ab760af61be43c2e6ec9376d
8cafde89162e5f40eae6ae8237b5b1da9f6ba52f
describe
'752042' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVX' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
5505d002c7ac4ff533b9e93fdf952178
4eeae6827f559726d66a6e2e834b2a21b15ee87b
describe
'99044' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVY' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
b4ee1d9992d8a1ba106f624d935197c9
a01d19a70cbc4c4a9f67475094c02d11bc8fb312
describe
'30095' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASVZ' 'sip-files00208.pro'
49218a8409e04873aec542716b67bef3
91263b22f5b9f66d61ba44316fd6f9f3ed17f5e1
describe
'38539' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWA' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
a0ddb1aa0683414d05b358edbb7804f4
d474680a38260f12b388b860d6b8217d77f5dddc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWB' 'sip-files00208.tif'
2a3e46ae093a34d13c5838742e27dd85
c9da688d3b0a665176cf813a75772bdd2995fe8c
'2011-11-16T17:05:33-05:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWC' 'sip-files00208.txt'
2895673b8d5858f0c97108f57d35bbd1
70c191f2086e5c020eb56428d47ecb0773c74103
describe
'10768' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWD' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
f5d4f7c4cc2728ee98044cf760e3a144
56f5a71b051689be19ed8a1695327688e90f9fbd
describe
'711878' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWE' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
9d18ce29ce9b9743228ad8292f29266d
8eb60c1f345d6750dc046a0ac514f62a1278e617
describe
'96034' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWF' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
f9773f4d231981d09ad4af1c870e1cff
77c3e293c36ebef2d73971f2d412ab1c544a4eb9
describe
'29776' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWG' 'sip-files00209.pro'
ccfbc6b74c77898a2d9698cf2b6482c5
4aad6ca72f3de4301d165d6fb35ee3ef592bd8af
describe
'38592' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWH' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
0bc70aa0170ce1c218fa9e355c6bab29
3ae2906ac0efccbba05341390872be9da33bdf11
describe
'5698659' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWI' 'sip-files00209.tif'
01ff278d631a419478b61da0a79fca50
69af5acaebab842604fa6ecaba958a8d950fdac5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWJ' 'sip-files00209.txt'
73a9e85197d3926549a663a5f29ebcfd
7e999f97df09b785ddb2735ee3d3e9ed07fe8e8f
describe
'11500' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWK' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
36359ff97d3372b92702168d73c728ce
2395f19e3a5b21dea56435ee7b3e8409869bdb1f
describe
'752096' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWL' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
b6fc5bbf548008ce12831aae08caa14f
0add91f34537c0986cf82b968c6f2c636b590c50
describe
'95379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWM' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
4b7e6b5d40ed7819238797e8c760323e
fc6001906c0517e13ba895094cc441a30c916a64
'2011-11-16T17:04:45-05:00'
describe
'28667' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWN' 'sip-files00210.pro'
4ed3b7d4cfb9cdc3aef56c808a8ca55b
5357ec413b0b4f000998f86fd6bf17523cfb089e
describe
'37280' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWO' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
b303dfb4d017b79e6a71853dff49b648
eb64e82a8b3a697db7d00b7c4d7b91db4d76f473
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWP' 'sip-files00210.tif'
2b04e407426aa503e9f0186eacd7f9a4
eef49ed47c1336a26c3c540a3e15e5bea4c7d909
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWQ' 'sip-files00210.txt'
c6eb41dc8d119d4f3374c12f13730a98
0f0ccbd9a4dfe9e9545632b33994c574f54594f2
describe
'10685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWR' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
6d47ab353dcb7115aaf8a9236ac8e089
9f9ba8c90ca63a3d9f6daf91e2757cfed5d9ceab
describe
'708670' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWS' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
de2dc4d8314b2bfec75750aabe86e474
a6d3d2e23055e34af74838ec4b6095e3a4f8aca7
describe
'92097' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWT' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
fdcc6499394bdaeb16cd0394fda66320
dd3d0f03b693cee7292205943d921aa6fb649f3f
describe
'27384' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWU' 'sip-files00211.pro'
cd58fb804c17f66a342ea71c2d7e9d8c
b3422540ab50917b21ca0295b436429594b093b2
describe
'36110' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWV' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
ba4c026c9080248703642e77f23b8549
8efe4607bb96df7bb10f945dd5fea83523597ce6
describe
'5673915' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWW' 'sip-files00211.tif'
96ef7a81239e35aa954ff186542ae02f
09478cb10be3784286a5c6c829f9b4a34113b492
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWX' 'sip-files00211.txt'
a10accccea525b50a7065583d2cbe37b
77c20e0453725579c1cf1ca83dabdc88ae6d920e
describe
'11303' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWY' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
f5d4f4fda807a6eabf082d84ea08711e
9309eaeb1ffc52c010c4a2c40bb6525e6915d914
describe
'752093' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASWZ' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
168757b170d261ed3877fcdab856d106
6aaa469ae08c4769f9a97574fbb0e4db9e40a1a7
describe
'100593' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXA' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
fddfc4976ac2d1fc33ae13de0a06af19
650ec606ce643669d8b6126d7d064ca499fadda1
describe
'29589' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXB' 'sip-files00212.pro'
934f62a8f293e74c487668540869b6a9
80efd932da6877f51dd360d90a157ce27aead14b
describe
'38485' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXC' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
ffb15d0abd5791faca81798b658852a4
057c748a3aa7c11e6b040d7b0819a4ad90e62dd7
'2011-11-16T17:06:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXD' 'sip-files00212.tif'
1d9f1642e6180f5bcf39cb3cfd41a72a
63d4ee74b2e1ba5a21c590dfe7a3ba06ad45f757
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXE' 'sip-files00212.txt'
cb240d53b6fc06b0e31e5da2ace15609
75b580d7675ed0cc7b07d2c3bf915d433e2d1bb3
describe
'10793' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXF' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
0249df6ba4197610b59c28d8edb7e577
b1cf07a8d92a5d9d6cf5afb592e34ce9eaf51f48
describe
'698933' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXG' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
95247314c22044517d1c68bfe307ef66
c93fdde23cd097a1f6d085db7fd6bd2e97b1fe67
describe
'101206' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXH' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
d6d14e878204e2c0624b14233c8adb0d
9ce23b218d05a29e4b30c95c546c46b474884d18
describe
'30244' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXI' 'sip-files00213.pro'
d8f2df7f0b1cd725f790ac96120677a2
c031699bf88b0a54097d93b3f0bb5fef947ddb6d
describe
'39076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXJ' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
4296fbcddc55c38934c7498693008e5a
ab60e481de0b972ceb2d918f2d7c61daaa825119
describe
'5595331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXK' 'sip-files00213.tif'
38686852d5b9a56fe158c8a623f01628
b3e9701cb4cd9eb3c838f5f9cbe29d1adda5a7b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXL' 'sip-files00213.txt'
4d342f4a1106b3da72d7c9055a4661c2
17458b1522d77665dc253c631e2e8f3ca6063dd5
describe
'11973' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXM' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
28b419c3831fecff0acfd24c94179571
49f0929d644ece6ba3d9fd57b55aa551b7ab8ca2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXN' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
bc6f2037250d5bb95b9e49c32d5e764b
1b85afed1de3a5a9da75313c53c096888988c530
'2011-11-16T17:06:13-05:00'
describe
'91823' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXO' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
76d7dab930552edc4050e890b8ae4252
41e75ba69256560fd853ab0cbc2563de6e2b177f
describe
'27503' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXP' 'sip-files00214.pro'
bda02f9d1eeec2700bcec279c3139f50
9bc03de7b297c38a147d338d8fef8ce5a72835f2
describe
'35145' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXQ' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
4513adf7d79b177e7b22ca326beaf388
67c01726c9dc44d4485f037079716c8cd40e3b25
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXR' 'sip-files00214.tif'
68a149f26c19a061ff6a51683fbc7335
af742d5c7121bdf6c74eb77a8e540aa6faff4614
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXS' 'sip-files00214.txt'
2af354e88c5626d60c1411b86c531ef6
685516905426d58580c834f80453a6de4bc2d9d9
describe
'10396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXT' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
834c6d6b9f0b446677a65802e2d5c70e
c1a9a31e307599fc43c912a1f82940e1c417c822
describe
'700511' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXU' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
e72bd8bcac1cb4a5078d76bb88c6bbdc
9e8289277702016111f90bd16029a43e619eede9
describe
'95053' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXV' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
e454dafba0bf841f17aa31db84bfd8e3
83ee63fb0b912a0fec153d0b6e74edca7bbadbb9
describe
'28488' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXW' 'sip-files00215.pro'
34e5feadb4364a4552f9f0f3fb18cde1
19347b15a6375ac5e22e844bb3679958303ad1f9
describe
'38004' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXX' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
9ddd38d8003d71e80ec9aabce3c09f0f
c77ab448fa4a68163948aeb02b392069b308a290
describe
'5607879' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXY' 'sip-files00215.tif'
94cdff2d40f08b38154b95c131688eac
ddb0bc5b8401a69bfeb7c2f397f600baa3b0a05f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASXZ' 'sip-files00215.txt'
b07505e4dc655484ad9a0470ce9dd150
f39c3806680bf780bdacad8020d7343e01a7daeb
describe
'12144' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYA' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
a575a20f0633a80f317b314b779997f0
3c332e7a5aa868d13c0e438e04ed4202bcea7707
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYB' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
e91bc4d2871b15dd447d8ffe3448d795
4f2dbcd39512fdb12426fef3518b7df4c410f78b
describe
'100863' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYC' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
57cc718e5933ccc69146520b16cefee1
5039bddc46e71808b4e74b3d6954219278f9cdfb
describe
'30265' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYD' 'sip-files00216.pro'
ce423e408cf4117941d6dfda18d34d32
41e9005a5ed06538d1f8b88c9a845615afa10b30
describe
'39206' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYE' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
92f11daa1ba7f902e3befc98f143d68d
e80783fba43f06f0607b1172e5f00e4012c0c26a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYF' 'sip-files00216.tif'
ad14ceffbff1c5174ba6141f50e5af31
0cfddf1231580893186afd9689bd5b16fe52d3bf
'2011-11-16T17:06:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYG' 'sip-files00216.txt'
653e1ad6f3cf22844b10ca8c101a6eb6
dd5a2b3cfd5ac37da31d00671eecf42caab8c2ae
describe
'11274' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYH' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
097263a868dcc5f85f9196fcb39584a8
aada034d8b66f7306852f8535b5b4238d8eaef22
describe
'706053' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYI' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
0c4f84b13e3c0f4182f869c8dd783ec3
ff7a1c8cc1557f6445fab046ac664e39165d6e73
describe
'92367' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYJ' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
648284dd096d09ec6b3c87b54d5694dd
c592502014aa1f3315e6247beb4db62421e1e01d
describe
'28361' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYK' 'sip-files00217.pro'
53f0678d0e6c5561641d83fc757e18d9
bb4a4e0066caedc724a32baed9c9192886c39842
describe
'35831' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYL' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
f29a46b78a824ad1f9ff4a43ca7551c4
6cb74ed58349c250586906fe7ee97759780cbb48
describe
'5651951' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYM' 'sip-files00217.tif'
0405881cfec29684ca9cf7994b6296d2
4085f32f9425984ae63eac3429c171377315c21c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYN' 'sip-files00217.txt'
e79bd7efa1492c7849af4ee7b02efef4
cb183c46dd25616a063940e1c2418bccc8fde682
describe
'10680' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYO' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
6b81856d41ced9cb44d3640135c67d0b
4bcff6adcbe07ae32e5f37e183e1e704a15ee6bf
describe
'752085' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYP' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
7cea520dcaa0a74b102858089d265842
1749202c4b9753621452d49e2f8b976dd879fb42
'2011-11-16T17:04:49-05:00'
describe
'98883' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYQ' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
23d48e830a3ef4eeb3f2795ac6469ee8
f7030f0bd817327ecdbff20f8146074c1aadda69
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYR' 'sip-files00218.pro'
c3976e2895c092d5a9815623f757e2de
7dd2dad1d538fc2457a3cb011501aeffb8aec3c0
describe
'38126' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYS' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
9402dd664e647d90b340e14c9ebf6af8
d42ba883942bbc492c6a4934f2c089dbab6b69e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYT' 'sip-files00218.tif'
39b2f55d234292e51dcba488453c20ae
6a939b5a1a093568d1df5b564a406bddc76c3d4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYU' 'sip-files00218.txt'
3d24adbfa8ba37bdde1c1b0b48782166
c63959c52fc0d8fd06cd1da82c2566424716a5e1
describe
'10824' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYV' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
bc6dd1846d87cbf99b5e66cdb468430f
55f16294477dbcf8203c74c0d171cb1de14a7807
describe
'696265' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYW' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
90ad41bcac78e44aec6f93a1c6a0265b
9182e98e84f47528216dab4f8f39af24b3adfa42
describe
'95668' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYX' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
c384a2358488d72463340f6fa3b99d34
8aa753b183286ef8b66c7591533522e200449974
describe
'26932' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYY' 'sip-files00219.pro'
808e321f2bcb34c26ef7cc2ecfb3bdcb
2d1d56e103cf8611e001c2768fa1c176c6f8fc8e
describe
'38370' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASYZ' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
025df14cb16e755b28e754b6246ccf7f
a519cbaa475cb234c4fa820fa2cbc0b5d94fa017
describe
'5573687' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZA' 'sip-files00219.tif'
2181ab09031a3f91202d4686fd764e17
162fcdcbbd4b1cf2345dc25be0b73b87cd2faa30
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZB' 'sip-files00219.txt'
8fbfb3d614d4e8077489c8aee2295dcc
3a090d49d989cd2f76a973d5b93b84255fd71479
describe
'11711' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZC' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
28fdd008c2118879a53fc30aa9cb0a5c
a8cf03cdfaeef3a3e38b7dc9b0b60bde2687be6a
describe
'733744' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZD' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
3e5e9005eaa782308a181e369cfcdcb3
6ca685373c55573c40043e7e198707514ef37586
describe
'97973' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZE' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
4c8e0bd5dbec2d8efb6ae203dcfd0ee8
7ff36b23f5fac76ab7a167b0615b5bbe427bc850
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZF' 'sip-files00220.pro'
05aa3fd94e9bcdcf6aa84a420176bf81
9e555cd7c52ab35e33f0f36fce282ccd02516609
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZG' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
130297799bdfc111add8912238dcbf7c
758ac412b9ac6e3475e66c55df49b751eec41d60
describe
'5873715' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZH' 'sip-files00220.tif'
7e6007ca6577f260df067483105687ed
24a81649bf19692ed829a974ebf4a64ea2e5a666
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZI' 'sip-files00220.txt'
aa95ee5c2ef36864d709a294d89e81fe
bade8629743c3d3b5bfb59a7100011e85895e817
describe
'10922' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZJ' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
3aca56cf463d753387556e352e6a16da
e09ff26cb448920ab9a1006bdf1a63b746485fa5
describe
'692918' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZK' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
4e19affb2ddf45f9e217e07c138f0f59
edca4594134d50e49cdfec5ec5b20691c49f7039
describe
'99578' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZL' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
bb7b0801d59cee3a2b02bb2bcc0657df
8c23b97412f71e49fe29444852056127e5c5fe34
describe
'29481' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZM' 'sip-files00221.pro'
09f1e90433bce8f4beae479213c843e0
656cd7d7fea8bc093744022aa6088dfecc254a69
describe
'39002' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZN' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
e205271a167b3cfcc329e61ddaf234b4
3d2a40e909a31e27ce62640a41c11b046d707572
describe
'5546899' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZO' 'sip-files00221.tif'
b12cf58897788b5ebedba7a62aa5ec32
aa25ab0c7c4c93bb2b3d01ea8e627b903fa06d4b
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZP' 'sip-files00221.txt'
48edf263a482ae32cc089f7621a0fc01
a037a20f5dfa94bfc23e05505646f875efad9c2d
describe
'11578' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZQ' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
630dcfd474d37ea4f345a7ad30976110
3d822c644a636f140f2988d0175628071b49f1d1
describe
'704723' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZR' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
41c081cefb785ae05df898f58fb2d6f6
e0df32b68b9d631b0bb152cf9d24e291c6638157
describe
'53240' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZS' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
a3516724c4e96dcdd4782229d5265c66
d0355ffc7e7fadb573c995cc6d041dec479ad626
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZT' 'sip-files00223.pro'
45ec1f49a0660ebab22a34beafec056c
d9c3f733bc2480d856440289dfa38343c829e1a5
'2011-11-16T17:08:22-05:00'
describe
'14643' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZU' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
c652982db9392912a96175a01436c162
f43a52699fa91d8d61cfc1837d95d3ec27488f03
'2011-11-16T17:10:39-05:00'
describe
'5641327' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZV' 'sip-files00223.tif'
b8cd313972bd003ff94b075bf51b4f34
d00d36e1eaa52062855ccc996a86db66352906ab
describe
'138' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZW' 'sip-files00223.txt'
fa67aa8d829b53362b6eaa02b008a637
301be927b931cf2bd07c549133d3c11c08d361fd
describe
'4381' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZX' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
c555a8504d70c475b6def87cdac09739
982e4bc16b990934d5a26a0d2c7bf67c268772b4
describe
'752067' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZY' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
88cbbd5363092ea04891a42651249ad4
6bb36971c822ea87d287b2ee7addcbd72b9d1e5f
describe
'101602' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAASZZ' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
b373b63191f4cc8ce00005ecda836f36
7c02f7aec1112aba9c22bfb938675ea19b9057e7
describe
'28801' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAA' 'sip-files00224.pro'
68aae98eddfb4da718b6ad816b591915
ba1757bad658d8ab6ba4f7b3d584dfd0b25cec70
describe
'38773' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAB' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
cf8ad41585a6692d161880b847d314b6
7d064f4c4a653cc1059e22cccb6e87a8d504d908
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAC' 'sip-files00224.tif'
5e74db76325530844167af80d01f23ec
5101eeb6788bfd048a40c75395866717272168a2
'2011-11-16T17:09:23-05:00'
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAD' 'sip-files00224.txt'
a2bd3e5a6330f0a584c6e3b60ed3c804
2d335a561444a756eebdf7c5d4a7899447291a2f
describe
'11333' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAE' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
e2ebf884168180993d36f811ab997a51
6c86a0fc556377fc370d20dc2e2adb663786be6e
describe
'737898' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAF' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
387e39f1f26366f01dabe310ed6cb379
42351919cd25aeb48f930d05b300de7bd58f75c0
describe
'96313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAG' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
bb5f8c17eb6d887aac002fce9f2bb2b2
ecb33d4217a3648a768bbca1ac57fbb4d2363c27
describe
'28041' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAH' 'sip-files00225.pro'
30df4ca32ebb304836d2989cde5bcd8c
2140a462b225ff7f45c3f8eace4308719080926d
describe
'37505' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAI' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
0743056267af45649930ab2eb06539a5
0b272dddc45b90fcc3b8b47a667874c1011c7e83
describe
'5908989' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAJ' 'sip-files00225.tif'
ec4bfb8dae4dee52e3cd59436e06a487
e1516ddaaf738bb4edd3d10d3deb9bcf721a0f1a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAK' 'sip-files00225.txt'
71c632589a05552ad756afeaccc14ac1
ff4fda108d76e544c7622bccc9e8da1141cbcc1b
'2011-11-16T17:06:32-05:00'
describe
'10876' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAL' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
d88da26b94bd9a93465aa3cb41cb5242
fb9d7a895f3e496a1063f4020d04a69b0c728a46
describe
'749447' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAM' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
07765752f51686efee4c63066b7e44bf
f198e2fe1734ffdeb3811cdb7a202be00d156d7e
describe
'102156' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAN' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
3d5996eee5b9c0483aff827ed29689bf
36a2e7daecb1fbc486fdc32dca73280866385646
describe
'30911' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAO' 'sip-files00226.pro'
56812e693784abc9acbfb1334c40fc09
56ada3e439d77970bde214231edaa4ebc4bfd503
describe
'39149' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAP' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
d505f1e3e8a7a9d7e700c2e403708176
4d35ea09c39f4687a1b59bb0ef9c2604cc95f0e8
describe
'6001347' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAQ' 'sip-files00226.tif'
6655c86ca2a776f1f74b735b184e5c30
382e90e2f02597afcd432d0687a517591a48ce83
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAR' 'sip-files00226.txt'
08e68642e4f22eb81a7002ab3de59b6f
ea4340aa6f82f38cc0cc46b028faa44c6c4ad9bd
'2011-11-16T17:06:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAS' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
ec637bdfe5615291965ddbcee74459be
a7e03155fb779339668bb695ab6979aceb4b8304
describe
'737909' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAT' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
75810dc78937cd8386431623471ee998
c8620719cb482797fefeb5b3bba54a42a105d3f3
describe
'103636' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAU' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
1f25ad5a6fc062db64cdf5b5d140200c
00923de8a264a006c48bcc03374ba572a71621ff
describe
'30743' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAV' 'sip-files00227.pro'
076c7c13be388fdb7a85b7d18f5d0bf7
a2603b8e1f48d1cf03fa2464812458411019132b
'2011-11-16T17:04:57-05:00'
describe
'39889' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAW' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
fe3a2e788d49f2f96d074a8d2a9a18a7
324d0a928466bf1831add3207fdd089fda5c12d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAX' 'sip-files00227.tif'
24c73e5a143f155b62dc852ef6247c42
de3fb94dc040000fa113e1f59719dafb9bc2b056
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAY' 'sip-files00227.txt'
eb5b5d00a330cb7f06d90c50e942397f
0b3807384aba06b58023bee7a96c3bf0944b5859
describe
'11798' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATAZ' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
b07e5979ad0a7e7986ae1fdcce9792c7
991e8b15e91f2b671c9ebfe987c9b5a9a198fb59
describe
'749408' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBA' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
36ac1e3a8fc6e9d2b239e278705ef06c
4d82f3bca32fd02fb1a68e9adf3a427f43c04ddf
describe
'96787' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBB' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
7e86d87239c4f0cd58823dec05ea84f6
029d8a3d9a8567f3bfabbdb98d0133aabec92f7e
describe
'28269' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBC' 'sip-files00228.pro'
d9ea48116b9546c4eec8ed919a0fcf9e
3a2f87311240f0b5398d287b5885a1921c347d52
describe
'37109' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBD' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
212025dc1bdb171881a2c306feff72df
332ec863149c6545ae4588be0d689921c7b63233
'2011-11-16T17:08:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBE' 'sip-files00228.tif'
b393b9b82d22bdd0910095432621b296
f78389f0114a07c21753e95d006c87b9abe409c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBF' 'sip-files00228.txt'
94defe983eb1dbb2b6b7a4cf99e30602
8da5dc81f6f8f7f1de680cd4f93198b53e0316eb
describe
'10719' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBG' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
909fa0cda907d6fd0a91bfd3f013c1c8
65248231892aa6a5be6bd00c1a913b96fecb42e6
describe
'737896' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBH' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
16d2d1159eac8495a8934b5932a6c6eb
93725025c30d9d3d124b300cb2653ccd961e39e8
'2011-11-16T17:01:31-05:00'
describe
'98356' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBI' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
ce347baf7c755fdae48640445f099295
27f6cdf012f95be59a00586982ac598f5d26a730
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBJ' 'sip-files00229.pro'
558cd1a3129ef9831417cfecc6e271dc
f39dd42ec888280137d578806e2f8192d36e8571
describe
'37318' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBK' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
ec41523aa7d6a6967654aa6624aeac04
00b9e75f7688c25232e6031ff7403e4ba46fe24b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBL' 'sip-files00229.tif'
3be08605fa2d7440c39ca6d1a20abbf5
b30605265eae84d1c1c65aa3c5c88f23f7ba5ba8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBM' 'sip-files00229.txt'
3ccbac7dc487fc30e577cf25e6ca80c5
258d8ee3b06c39d1337d2767d7b30e6a2f124757
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBN' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
0ae437a3ad3ed8cc83964cbdba94a1ea
41947a5ed2fde07d0a1788e51619ad7eb42b1c09
describe
'749449' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBO' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
6c0ac15db81efa80b454451ee489ed72
11fa9b9615e1c7c7c5b7c9df7949d2d5a166f3f4
describe
'99430' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBP' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
c09f867386cc90d94a27205b44ef2915
949e7a20ab5c4e1449fbbd3cd25d260834f9a627
describe
'29493' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBQ' 'sip-files00230.pro'
30f4032890144e18ca63f70a6b1f44c3
523973fd197b6e3c29cb85e609ad5174dbdac137
describe
'38838' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBR' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
7be234c3b1f6008b2e02866678ef26aa
1aae702c94d9cf370809bec60a265a10d64d556b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBS' 'sip-files00230.tif'
1f2af606c4eef57f26f0028cd72fe963
c5773a715453e0fb89d8a94fb7656a680ca64570
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBT' 'sip-files00230.txt'
c60f3ff1a731b993c3dec9251f197694
958a1c81580068a686911b1a458056c405936454
describe
'11597' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBU' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
423bec2e8111909a8f032ccd95766d7f
d0ed840c19a78963f2cce8973bc28244f472a57f
describe
'737904' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBV' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
9d79ec9dd05c9c7c3b46ba51f8950948
44fc64b4426d0573eb85f291f61b72adb779c675
describe
'102262' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBW' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
3f57b234f0cba9c9a00bff3f61a4408a
4d398223bd8a79bf25d4174127a461d479256b36
describe
'31930' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBX' 'sip-files00231.pro'
273738e3ea182997027a770230a9f90e
fe7fefb9cc1b8434a21f3cf8f473f422642cb98e
'2011-11-16T17:08:20-05:00'
describe
'41970' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBY' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
b013fc1fad4481c5509ba7d13cd343ea
2ae961916d608b0ee6ba7929a3261f86eea48218
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATBZ' 'sip-files00231.tif'
2350c40aaccc8039330703788e196fb0
835b18b0eafd5568c656ec7f75a08cd291ad9b12
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCA' 'sip-files00231.txt'
d37e7debb12112fcfe5827d9474ec453
62be5cc23e9be8fd920ea44b5f5ba3f7c44bf918
describe
'11355' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCB' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
d7a8cfa533b207e2ce81882ef6284f1b
c48d503d805435fb21882a238dbf8ca544836e77
describe
'730699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCC' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
102c50b931180025b9b3fb02960f815c
f7c4f5c970cb0abb740891786c7116340f3f06a8
describe
'97646' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCD' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
552f855962be1575c11e4897dd507c49
9a5b71c6ea3c7e095917e8388b489aa785685fb0
describe
'29637' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCE' 'sip-files00232.pro'
22121008ec8a80c03a510ff14f25a9b4
21a4594c55457edf14a6b5627a178818defb8835
describe
'39736' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCF' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
61b986b8ae5dab7e4a449441c8c07313
a65ce17c9ca4565683f6647ae2e4615c22d048ec
describe
'5849323' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCG' 'sip-files00232.tif'
952fa70577c7ae7c00eb036d1d59ffa0
ec4cc1908a3b4897ee66b42addbc17d06185c168
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCH' 'sip-files00232.txt'
243e6f0d598dacc45f36eea4fbf13772
3e4c2c655b5831f992c39e0d6f3f65613fd02667
describe
'10623' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCI' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
c8059b4b39b9ec2cfc057b7c277925d0
b5f2e5340f0c401fb7c15030da70f9cc421f7298
describe
'737908' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCJ' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
1dd314baab46afb260d08380e5f6417a
93f97e967cf4c9aae169e21d1bb91c722d027f22
describe
'102082' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCK' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
03c6ed31f44103ce23839d28e698455c
4608efdf58c396261c00f741d49440a874aa81f5
describe
'30014' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCL' 'sip-files00233.pro'
8c5afc73f7cd9d05f0b57129b94efd39
ad42ab640d870522b53375670b36ad249a603ab4
describe
'37283' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCM' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
826b5e5965f549b193a9bdd0fb5c856e
24b3a7a34b163d1c9d8db8b1be02d43157bf8a6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCN' 'sip-files00233.tif'
bb5f90537c7c4f70b3176df3d98e244b
3deab642d631091fa1a0d3074cb290b1f486fc09
'2011-11-16T17:10:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCO' 'sip-files00233.txt'
7873f6d18a6d469dbeca3a1ec3cbe971
7a2acf4bd3b1343a23aa5b40447a89e294dface4
describe
'11401' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCP' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
61a91de2bd1c79db37ecec520586f92c
3a0ccbcbc24078b39861ccf8556f5e17e7fcfe0e
describe
'727623' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCQ' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
ba3b95ac8affa93931f4182034483edb
340cddc926b813da4bd27aa62a448378f149a8bb
describe
'100435' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCR' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
4ab51d06b060d8b8bc50d40df2e4b808
ff8b35c057969565af1eeb6a9a2c8ca077c7cd02
describe
'28747' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCS' 'sip-files00234.pro'
a27e12aa292fdc05251664ca46c403b4
d05fadfecd61698412654557e7c932df98eba89f
describe
'35707' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCT' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
532362634d3382f4781691d9e9d17360
0c147da4a8cf1e0a695e4a76828b9fa3a737bfb0
describe
'5824931' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCU' 'sip-files00234.tif'
b02a2e5d7a99f20a12004e7ebf252954
0f10d9cfa19e14ad6d6e4119bf334145ccab0cba
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCV' 'sip-files00234.txt'
5a93a2c712d89ab3ead4a121b2379539
bde65a052d9ae9e0c9a111c3814482d6a1653a6c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCW' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
d2de6d98adb4136976fcf2336c9f5f95
aa39e19941121483b9c6db8bd06b663fa8742a6a
describe
'753767' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCX' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
17e2722431b5f8f06b4d95d771292811
9948658a031ad52f5c82c2c2519008b329208bcc
describe
'80755' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCY' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
2c1be020f142437c7e6fd2acbedc8e4f
cdd357e95f5a2f3129c94d4f56f343e753373bb1
describe
'23440' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATCZ' 'sip-files00235.pro'
f2ac17a785a7b95797c3a7ec589da900
c55b3a701bbc2f9cee0e4fa7490ddcd4cb857599
describe
'31612' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDA' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
c2e2a312a14be7b4c4988c41e1e03127
5b36287764090e5d8e0aeb2882b67a7f9f7e1476
'2011-11-16T17:05:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDB' 'sip-files00235.tif'
7e59cef5aeac04a90be4de97a43df02a
a298d5103730172e964b7abe1199f6744ccfbb00
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDC' 'sip-files00235.txt'
8eb15517ad1a0b7059623e3a62f54f86
8923b344b48ed72d01a0a1f48a419b4b85992107
describe
'9344' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDD' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
87889d2eb5286082764dba11ad1d683f
6e7a07b6e9391ef47b47dcaf7302517078303e94
describe
'763873' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDE' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
6b0ff493c7c333a32d17c88e0be96785
a709d4ee8fa37273b9f0344c90cd6ef2794e5722
describe
'99091' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDF' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
36f63488cf9bcf9e687e6ed2ef613497
c157d835089d01040a96e91626b41cac13b7fdaa
describe
'29814' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDG' 'sip-files00236.pro'
ca2c4952023e667dcd5f9b3cfb22e6f8
196ba51e3912f6710dd3d16b5aaa3aa1eeda40ea
describe
'39409' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDH' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
012682ce7e823e33ba28468a102e5b4a
2d1256cb14115433ef9287efe41b60d8a89e2b23
describe
'6116751' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDI' 'sip-files00236.tif'
3fe285855250d5bcd0f55ba8fba3535a
04950b5b3898242f5a67933ecf9a781c53f103df
'2011-11-16T17:07:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDJ' 'sip-files00236.txt'
8382a6e3f8c2a614d5421825e96e201d
3991a9b24fc22bc1a3a7c96795273d95d6123e9d
describe
'10754' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDK' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
bc5c434f83d718b391b13bba8cbc4285
15f871fa367561bc43b8200893896870579b3249
describe
'753755' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDL' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
10345c2d9ab88a172365a86538c58851
b3e734b8c36ce0bf821966c557276baa043aa1fb
describe
'93252' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDM' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
a0a064ec0b2ee726b25387c4447cbc2d
813358627e8ca67ad9170325113a59a667edc84e
describe
'28771' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDN' 'sip-files00237.pro'
98469027328b71472b293d917dc5a4cd
427ad13660be99374c746896e1783b260155c08a
describe
'36697' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDO' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
930490a85b32b3d55aeb49e63bd6300e
9dce2ed2fb3c47caa62515c6300102d4b50b44b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDP' 'sip-files00237.tif'
da84cd5d9731b4f692015b8416f30a6a
99142cd7d2b1319d8eca29fa3f0ac898aff6c7d5
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDQ' 'sip-files00237.txt'
ea69dc0e6595ff4a3997328eab24121b
e7542c10f565ce600cbe02bc3c02d9ae4c54085b
describe
'10943' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDR' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
8865107498032899afe959bf2bde7c8b
7bc4cf7adf9db4f18630c3c5c0a050921b761eb9
describe
'763849' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDS' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
6e928582de7e7496812ba6a09518df0e
583a3299aa4ef228d5c153fc7b7cb5333e0330bb
describe
'92364' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDT' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
e3466ffa904f21382b5ad036432be2c9
e24e3882f3bb0ae6e993b181e0bca02fbc165a88
describe
'26839' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDU' 'sip-files00238.pro'
65cea5b5fa85640209a9d60d18e553ee
40c86841bc3522375d5f0e7a639a06bfbec475c8
describe
'35651' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDV' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
d9173cd104f0037400156f2fc8b45757
ce4431d697480dd635bcf4b4e36cee58a2d0903f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDW' 'sip-files00238.tif'
f36f35a5dd5cb0a6b267e5f182488652
11c595533e7edcaee2b0926d205718cb7fa270f4
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDX' 'sip-files00238.txt'
da70e41c0907b86c45e5141ef51ea279
6e2936cc2e5ab244952f68427bd9315c66939f05
describe
'9982' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDY' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
63e1b6726eed86369933068ff883cc80
b3c727974fb34b4ea9085d2a8fb602206276739b
describe
'753771' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATDZ' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
f70960bd6428ac6a8e601135f37d2054
0f9c8289b864bf365048278baa069b0b3878303c
describe
'97137' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEA' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
35ddca8d4c1b73abf119b9e863d03a0b
fc4d206e3ddb47aecc46e2d54ac15ff4e87ea9bc
describe
'30243' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEB' 'sip-files00239.pro'
1bdf496ada04a5dd3fea5bf1fe786dfc
6dee991c8f2470089b38baf8623a80d93199901d
describe
'38395' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEC' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
d42dab30ba7e44ee6d6d6e0574d37471
17a006347fd91d76659fad406f969bbe2a724b5a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATED' 'sip-files00239.tif'
70a999ea7275df897c082c0a4963c182
2254ac497e33e9274dafefbf8e1842c83223be66
'2011-11-16T17:07:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEE' 'sip-files00239.txt'
198ae1ca1d8239e0c5230a9c004afcc5
b00e0d0395ee1cfe1d34bab2acbde318cca08d2d
describe
'11322' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEF' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
f2d89ad078e55898976e3c9d28a8ffa4
8c2c2b17f7bbd06ade0671e316c6bab78218ae24
describe
'763854' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEG' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
969e01939aed18ce793cafd2e843abef
a0aca5e7b9515c9723c0f75ee40232016fe351c9
describe
'97849' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEH' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
da001b19d46e12d23cb79a934d471265
5012450e99fa6dd7581c3e1aa9a1eb20e0647b49
describe
'29042' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEI' 'sip-files00240.pro'
8828f881dd105e18ea0b888ed17516c7
d491ce2ed3a4000c6ee989c655c4c114afbef8ad
describe
'38260' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEJ' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
31898c9ff94fe95bc88a0b0fed0cf310
00e95e8082ac648eb574646e669398479f3a3fa6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEK' 'sip-files00240.tif'
ef8f555eb44988d29794943964046fb3
a21610e7c7c1c8810cfcac8d5827ee4fe4168e1c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEL' 'sip-files00240.txt'
aa6b918c362ee6ca2907ed769e2a825e
a92358bf0544aea0f1aae251913dd250164411a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEM' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
bdf96e1acf78055a276f4dda84da487b
9f4577116d32b4bda5a1414c58854b88746fa74e
describe
'753764' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEN' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
869e99317c1e6f8f289c40c9e712d461
e180e8c3d64d18d0c253d6f785ccf8de6528d1c0
describe
'90511' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEO' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
90b3da1d02d0f0ec7f9cc2bdb7d89de2
c1107e24b2e2a4862630603120f83bb6a095a6e7
describe
'26258' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEP' 'sip-files00241.pro'
f3d4075d670f43478d0c49a0ac8baeb6
66f7f17c8e9906180abf73f2440488d0b2891451
describe
'35382' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEQ' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
99b21b89ace718467806940d597dbd95
c3d1d46b95335c8ad327388bdebd4b46413d02ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATER' 'sip-files00241.tif'
2c4d62979ac4716949733cf60a2ee671
8d6e6efc762f6e5f5a2cfa8e601703a0d756390e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATES' 'sip-files00241.txt'
b8ca1b7535220c8cb91c468c8a48c668
431d66c9133b90c310d8217af6e6610538693a8b
describe
'10687' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATET' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
d9bcacd52667cd3d8c62bbfc78f3182b
bdc1724f35e734fc6ede1f61fd3c449435cccdde
'2011-11-16T17:07:19-05:00'
describe
'763868' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEU' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
c844b990b3b3971eb93788979e7531ae
f5dbeeb52d617711f8dce1a3c78a3add1965447e
describe
'92711' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEV' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
b2ec66f0c1e19ace36d4ec4ca06974d0
cefe428d1eb878b783c7102f02b4d4ca62e1c923
describe
'27884' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEW' 'sip-files00242.pro'
0fdb2426cf33f90cc27b6b355b3a4ec8
1423d3eea51c01889f3f1b472ccc1e25cf09cb5b
describe
'36585' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEX' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
f7fa297db420431c1794cff9eff41805
d5f63e9fb701f91ff422acfb0487742778688317
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEY' 'sip-files00242.tif'
ae07d1b82048bd98f2bbd48e2a1e08f0
6189c1bf5eb054db921b76c2dd405767dbbbcdfc
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATEZ' 'sip-files00242.txt'
ef653dce852c48290a261660bc1a6e91
769a2690bcb72b3f389b07247dc8abdc7da3a2ed
describe
'10170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFA' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
7957127ebeef8ed0e49c502bda617eb3
32ea0adf1b03616363ea6678ad856d2ec3e987ea
describe
'734297' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFB' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
6420a6521f38d67f88b9a7e8e8d0842a
2c4238c933f7d21c15909f2924dc00e70997b441
describe
'91447' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFC' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
0faabf87450bde990ae08e39645a9307
e2bbf23818d47f4324dc04e2e81b5b293bd27ebe
describe
'27610' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFD' 'sip-files00243.pro'
b7496f1a6ce0071d6b2b82524c6719cb
35fdb8a7635dbb907d8715efc945efcbd9db8109
describe
'36671' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFE' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
33df5d6ddb16edf92fabcf33b25896fa
7588876d7232a41f7faba69ba35e95ef02f3c27a
describe
'5878415' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFF' 'sip-files00243.tif'
5a7679d5fd5ae3305dfd377ffeb15195
51b8d7480d6a205a800e34d4743fb9ab8edb3741
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFG' 'sip-files00243.txt'
bef2ce0aa44e211b0952d5e5321166bd
f01418e6a20d02acaef1aeb0c6240c4cadb08dc4
describe
'10744' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFH' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
00c38dad8e4731768fde32474cb73f38
eabdff98980dbc49ef8db0c0e230d2e9d6fd80bf
describe
'763794' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFI' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
daf768c09215265a79958a50261659a8
531c2d8a465d356d09e33838da842c66db2aa677
describe
'99090' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFJ' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
079cdd0881fee861a6b337469b91ab9a
12220580920ad58a8e5554b2785086cca87c4021
describe
'29257' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFK' 'sip-files00244.pro'
d343105414694ec12384c85d3d152250
92feeba7c6eb37ffa5dd427a4200de1476ff570b
describe
'37857' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFL' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
334b596edfeec2ec901cc2e0b5b5deba
6a62a483a2b3e98efe3e179e1443dfffc01b26e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFM' 'sip-files00244.tif'
6c5eb4267eedb8b5aaef4564aba253dc
43127f141bb920c53066c651fb279c09340fd3a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFN' 'sip-files00244.txt'
0daf254700aae95bb4b74e64d2665804
b38ef20c790b871b449d7b24b435ac96477d541d
describe
'10790' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFO' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
dcab9cba964271dfc4599de21f5e838d
a1a91b832034d4392e43f5dce3fd146a40b98093
describe
'756830' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFP' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
df2dbaa7f794c0a09d3865263a239772
b240572aa720ffb3843ca1e15487672efbdd8300
describe
'95392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFQ' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
9713c4833b6df0b1ecb4acd949f61452
0658504c7928152b3fdeb2e90638542912f288c4
describe
'28777' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFR' 'sip-files00245.pro'
8f564708caae18a6dd690385a18967f8
a8eb10a1efe18351c53add2247c5fc917d0d8fab
describe
'37538' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFS' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
ae84d7cda10f3db2aab35b9ab67411f4
baf1859c026b5a540f8be9ff2aa16b0015348455
describe
'6060609' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFT' 'sip-files00245.tif'
95d4a511c6cb6227bc348b40f453d4c6
9b8e94c9b798df2018f7db841d790618fa6fbc9c
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFU' 'sip-files00245.txt'
9926ce80359131bd3062f3c24118fcd5
ad33b5f915bb68296ff012e735285b7807e12c56
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFV' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
04842d6bfc84dd376ad390c15de31e46
3f7b865a4ccec7e9d3143aeb77e0276d537d9228
describe
'763856' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFW' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
8726e25ccd49076a836c8e935a0514d2
ff828b194f39acf565d1fb63a3ca3eda25ce06ca
describe
'98173' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFX' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
c307419d2eab30a5b996fe73cd827650
af5bd9e3b32a4b9e03264caf2e25171811f9dde2
describe
'29671' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFY' 'sip-files00246.pro'
5c86d81c856d500b66dbd2caa533ff74
af20c5da669395c52db3f821845c4486f899aa27
describe
'37999' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATFZ' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
4f1f8e5f543aa46188b8efbebd17db14
b87ed1f80504d0be7db5f014fb5c9cc953a271f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGA' 'sip-files00246.tif'
273a0b0c7d637f601f72ab6932236d3d
ffa8f6345be0500e7035d940d6206834264bd6f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGB' 'sip-files00246.txt'
b4ccaf54d97213172484ec43520124f7
35f9cfdfd48e7d11fa01280877d6cab0116463d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGC' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
af50dcaea0930b37b7db2de8c0b23abf
4d31a1a9442de461c6c409bdb69af97f26df9bd5
describe
'756792' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGD' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
8e80b9da5be898a74c6ac235b538f730
8a9056758a0fab90c977c30b2b8287e562d79c2b
describe
'95275' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGE' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
0f0b4914f6a132f704d87fbebc304e6a
e34bf5b813efafa32e8c8a15db83ba1bbb7309bb
describe
'27867' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGF' 'sip-files00247.pro'
45731d4d326c6ac7112718c5dcb67a6b
9b7a4be48aefb28891fc8f9cc5143da81cafb01e
describe
'36945' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGG' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
6b8a29a0a506653eb1259c238b7c78a6
419df50c542fb097a9791635e82d427295cc6b05
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGH' 'sip-files00247.tif'
06517de7855b7232414cbd379ffffaa4
fa6cff0fe81baf69ea5841f460eb4f127f638351
'2011-11-16T17:08:32-05:00'
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGI' 'sip-files00247.txt'
b2828d6a9c3ded9045373485f05ae4e0
cdca99c232ecebdb03becce30dd09c0167da2cd0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGJ' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
6f3ffc5f6cbd30ebd2a50098c0522303
611bfd81dddad8dbafbc5a93b451552918b110e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGK' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
1c85fd9a94f849821457cb6aea511796
6941ce08c71287335218abd03139d1211f6f9d8b
describe
'98526' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGL' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
28f17c0f832af18fea19405a1a1b8015
a562eeda7562cde9723d51388e118bc87707ac37
describe
'30376' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGM' 'sip-files00248.pro'
f08fab39790aa37a807be65d366d062a
ffe429075af63bde279d75d6a691a347328069de
describe
'38037' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGN' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
777418f961936650c4d99a6d616a6f11
703cc2855beeb554456f4331dc9fa128cd018ca8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGO' 'sip-files00248.tif'
40b0093619e10a3b548ceec4246bd3ab
2aea3a0a18888b6979b06d15eecf19e03c2475a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGP' 'sip-files00248.txt'
3403a2e593212669488f6499c37c05f2
eedaeb16bb60edd5ec1834a80c6051a336ca59d7
describe
'10908' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGQ' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
5f11716bb3025030a4dd016babdb61f8
2da74eb91be3152bd6c6a815aaa8e62be6262e81
'2011-11-16T17:06:46-05:00'
describe
'756849' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGR' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
7aa27fcf2468585fbc98e5da49578cbf
bc13b55f431e81995c149d6df1dd76469b734bed
describe
'94568' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGS' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
31fae1fe1835d90ce543477835dd5d73
9d89785fb5fcb74a25773ff0a797ff0f06bc30be
describe
'27563' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGT' 'sip-files00249.pro'
909ef45421437dccee270ebed012f276
8145290fbd712b4a7b5aebff82737229774ee059
'2011-11-16T17:10:12-05:00'
describe
'36700' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGU' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
3ae16666aa6c9b9e32b225cac2c4c409
09ed93d3459a783bba61c944145aaac061e4c264
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGV' 'sip-files00249.tif'
b3baff503470c02b24d091274e495b57
a94a728d8ed574e0c43fc7ac5267e930b01f8d68
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGW' 'sip-files00249.txt'
0cf6c4e71173dee3a0a2bd7598933923
d0bf38c9e1196733c7d3975665f81229b649d2d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGX' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
3b39f188ea70544a37f63a3ac05b9878
673d834270703afe220588dadb5fdc403062b1d3
describe
'763812' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGY' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
9b5f37ea36ec42a66f87909cd2d7d54a
a7a7ed2bd4cffc9048b6fab2768feda14dfcc0a5
describe
'100384' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATGZ' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
3adc07f6244724fbe044f161a7149a88
b0ec2183ea74364475453bd1f4ee3563787490d3
describe
'30615' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHA' 'sip-files00250.pro'
f40329bf21e78ed06520f48e972086d2
bab99c424c81b3526ef0a237315561c81a3bd046
describe
'39248' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHB' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
23e6f2e7f2b15126cb84dcddefb32ab4
4c91e924e57f734dbb9fe9e1594cc3ca468f1210
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHC' 'sip-files00250.tif'
892d87a193c586f1264e2ac51ac5e4f8
311e3edbbc14efc32c29ec0ad5dc46e43f31c63c
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHD' 'sip-files00250.txt'
dc0d33caf825ad88208a625826e58187
ac51cd5d08d5c44e6467027157fb83d222d2f684
describe
'11076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHE' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
3ac0b8a6dfe212426eb7e7b5104955bc
ab52d5239bedf95debaf3b0df95652e484bc4b50
describe
'756855' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHF' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
33d1eaa22508dff997461890720e1e14
2d9e999faed44610f971199da49f11fa7d12d726
describe
'95907' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHG' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
d7028e1e0ef003944b207153bc3d8cc5
f6001392d32824e71797b8e8d07d656a8eac8799
describe
'28482' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHH' 'sip-files00251.pro'
5038f8e15dff390cd0a9bef2410e6ff2
81bfca1ead735571dd4118d6e460f225e888893c
describe
'37243' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHI' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
5b94324b2e60377bb4009cd505d811fb
d29ea6705b4af7269f0b740805a3ce1c8c99cb87
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHJ' 'sip-files00251.tif'
54bb7678fd6db0df1d7777aec6a5424e
a9caeb4793894bf5e3e334e34a2a152fd3e18a33
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHK' 'sip-files00251.txt'
c56a244374d83c421532feff1d2ca838
084d1bee24f1006fc88437ad3c9f9bb50a0ccfb2
describe
'10822' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHL' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
0570f4e7173d15988a20cf1f8e7a2b8f
053820ce16a97d12dbfe1e564bea3c2a52fd27c1
describe
'751632' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHM' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
acadecbf00a475d4abdd877159e72e6c
bd6fd40661da4367cec98280f7fb1844777df403
describe
'98179' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHN' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
a2bd132396ac0ada1bf37c4cd160e872
9351b84320d971f4f239242856832368afe4c664
describe
'28384' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHO' 'sip-files00252.pro'
b460f4c4af9032e7aaed7afc0826eb76
bca4614ea3413c646bfdabf3ee578b92594282eb
describe
'37987' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHP' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
552f07482225e649d30aa1323c29a483
ee61e3bb49dcffc40768f56a7bd8a951665d9845
describe
'6017103' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHQ' 'sip-files00252.tif'
29d6d0ac931ad42bcae1c9ee81fbb5b9
6c5dd91b6564d716bdf1ae4948f8b040f87580ed
'2011-11-16T17:03:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHR' 'sip-files00252.txt'
984c056d4bae97728fa1ad88a598f4c7
09cd880b788f3079360680c386ab088817484863
describe
'10738' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHS' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
977e2b6b8b8d7505cd73dd03672b6171
96eaad9fdcedcbd8b822601c2465b81ea5e03b2f
describe
'742909' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHT' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
01177b6d26affe090126161711d8ea96
95eadf37cb9a435aea32f8e3435e0e24c9b51ff5
describe
'99910' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHU' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
14da83176535c8aa2e2670a41e3a2295
e620ffdeb9ceafe796e32c8c11398f0851c73d0d
describe
'30864' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHV' 'sip-files00253.pro'
d6e0b8e5ba6263d7a5b3c3474b8851c8
16b3c929b567a91f842775d65c454fa1754f1871
describe
'37696' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHW' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
18c8462760bf28c10524bf0e26f4a511
7caedb6d4d1c11ceb23a1c102e608d889d63211e
describe
'5947187' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHX' 'sip-files00253.tif'
18d59108ace19e45e67949003be3f1ba
be9af696fca4b53a8d7d757769e54e3cb8b9780d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHY' 'sip-files00253.txt'
e1a86ae61fb4083cf9c14905cc9f53dc
427432100a7ef3713efb49dac8aff414765000ef
describe
'11568' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATHZ' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
b1e608f2891d65d7eeee7eccb57e91bb
808b921083fb09945eb59abcbb1539cc0fff5f3b
describe
'752576' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIA' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
16cf0f8cdf7a22644c1f0997a589f745
91545b67ab55d5b97de786c0d0c2a8055ce3fa84
describe
'98589' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIB' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
8da5f18387f4902b09a2bbd2ccd18a05
41d6930a75d860c5def01de33965f780b61ca662
describe
'28951' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIC' 'sip-files00254.pro'
262fafcb8ba2588eba75aacd470cb2af
2b60acdd9465f0b658845da70ab38453f27f0843
describe
'36955' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATID' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
90376d0152e1b60fb73208f80bd713b7
76f41e52167b78e0246daa72efd47868002c395b
describe
'6024899' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIE' 'sip-files00254.tif'
1dc92b665e0c4085d17bbc809f8789b5
8d041d92f3892804bca35f48ad6ca3a621b6721f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIF' 'sip-files00254.txt'
aabaad77317fd2ff6de91608af320161
d29964ff40b10d28c8138f0a67b0079aea34f7ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIG' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
d9c7cc01493b600aee1a65db5aacd8a2
4b790655f9de7d7d3b5979bc7bb4f4a0b2f87473
describe
'756857' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIH' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
96ea1d789083b31d5d2958e542a521fc
3dc36ffd27f0dd4bea88e765dff1d523e614db5f
describe
'97041' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATII' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
1616ee13af9c5a7833262a56448a6ffe
fa8317a9eee11382682c7260bb8123f496359915
describe
'26940' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIJ' 'sip-files00255.pro'
e71f76cfa1c1b56e3efc87a49e778960
adbe8ea9813617f09f24ecc1bed92215e89f3b4a
describe
'36059' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIK' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
6250109a66a05f2eb9730a4c76883eaf
d364583c84716f2f4759854c6f66da32c5a02635
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIL' 'sip-files00255.tif'
6a146d376449fbc919149280b4d4eec0
350ae8eed10150c68403ab8c3b14e8d53133c924
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIM' 'sip-files00255.txt'
28154757e880bd0a87a9df94676fce72
a6dbd9ec17c7ec9bfa54d5d9c754a8c3cb419dd8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIN' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
1ba398efbfa029926a5e2f3a3be1f769
dd1568c5210dea387d523d60b69702aba0f05612
describe
'744384' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIO' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
159a6982d7364a98dc2bc1ff5d93a91c
f8f401f690bfe6a3e200a6c94dec7b9deff3553b
describe
'48087' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIP' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
448df686955f1211804b9b2634864b84
7fab29d2395210b19359f11b8e4f83f4bffdd6e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIQ' 'sip-files00257.pro'
fe0a2f3bcf4e6c1c99f0d021ffce6a07
92c1e0605bfc6fd9c6587b3420a97c78631baa2c
describe
'13768' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIR' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
d213babd33fe7d7bab0bcfea05ae50b3
77941e6f7ef3e623d8722921731c1b014416d08a
'2011-11-16T17:07:23-05:00'
describe
'5959639' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIS' 'sip-files00257.tif'
d1ea4689c79cacd615f2d54ec31070bd
2262a3fd647fbfde38c6638834e31780970398b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIT' 'sip-files00257.txt'
de15100804fb4a4dcb2f6b18a91fee0c
6a4a55c827dc3c4c884527730a8e6d6de28661b8
describe
'4212' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIU' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
6d5d43d599094b68b8cf337cdf512c48
08ec42d9f2a8aaa35872a4c676366bbe817cd13f
describe
'744293' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIV' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
30ddc892ad582aecd89404f4eaa55a8e
982880976c4fcea7f1ffd98be84d42c8abc2e0cc
describe
'103347' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIW' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
4d4e6ddba383d8fe625198fd5b426e1b
08f02cb90af3b3c5f382f0a04e91bf98ced2df91
describe
'29688' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIX' 'sip-files00258.pro'
0a0ccfad87a858ae310940d4a2b20047
9ff1b0c866d0f62a0f65580a322f4e2a685703b2
describe
'39040' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIY' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
60684528d9ad7ebf31234bf642b69df9
a9737a18656bc090b2675ea33510687940494a97
describe
'5958051' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATIZ' 'sip-files00258.tif'
a6a84a43643e60ef57c1acf7d6c7ed7b
79d8b2f37258c09fa30e467abc8cb42f99059c1c
'2011-11-16T17:10:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJA' 'sip-files00258.txt'
c5d9aecf9e3e30cf99a82ea8889e9fbf
e8508c467cb427623b4ac74104642b2a34baec8a
describe
'11281' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJB' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
b75d2651f1957c960838982d0f46276d
fe6b8e819c1e22c34018acdb8cdb8cd0f26e2da7
describe
'710947' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJC' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
3d84398cf10693bb535adb693d74def9
f2020a352907a418a9961efbf79f2886eebc5286
describe
'98328' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJD' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
9c34d66c4582b99b6d991ec00a9dff2c
2421de0a1ab3046b0f48a11e43fcd2e71cb5739c
describe
'28732' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJE' 'sip-files00259.pro'
34a900be60db98d378cf1f21cd740f68
2884f1e8db68eeca442ff09d1be3adc8d7eb2faa
describe
'37800' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJF' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
6105d37a017f663d827f092080647096
b0010a5bc085f6784e5b718034bb72b114806185
describe
'5691287' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJG' 'sip-files00259.tif'
92a0b8948af66576932ae1fe5b6f7c28
085c4e70bab7272f9270bf86ce9ab5e650da6f37
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJH' 'sip-files00259.txt'
77e0d6e9473750c48ab64a20c6697cbe
bee01ea0e2a77e11bbd8fae9ab9a14fa7516ef2e
describe
'11717' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJI' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
b7d915a10cd2afb54d21e39fa378882e
e8319ae2636274239b975bd3634b11b4c4627853
describe
'748564' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJJ' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
46b10507474dd9c33f23ad1926279cdd
0a5927d04e0d31071362560f733b92ef221aab0a
describe
'96219' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJK' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
a203e1a0bd2f8f0727c7f3e2e52e4e4e
dfa642dd1d9599541974d25b2ad72c0dc9c10c50
describe
'29044' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJL' 'sip-files00260.pro'
17f26ef6799b14553a03ddc55e4cbeca
cfe85905e524b8d053e9d51ea798d2e4a2b17c29
describe
'35089' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJM' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
46e925668801cb08604ee2804f48b73c
585962724895f7bc3455eae60869f29543a5c51c
describe
'5992423' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJN' 'sip-files00260.tif'
74e98d8d4e314282b68a679447db2e49
62b706d772ec9c248d70a351493bbf3600f5e104
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJO' 'sip-files00260.txt'
7816ba0454476696d0e319318fa524ed
aca5600537640713e3f8c69f51069931a8855612
describe
'10795' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJP' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
9a756cdb188a0159abb79cd9ba5b3b7b
8ea672fb2cf87cd477866f4177688ab39e8ad1ac
describe
'711825' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJQ' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
b21210c8579e2b2f4f36a7b2c96509dc
199e2c167a2810e98521edb16d911f7e59a4f0cb
describe
'103899' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJR' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
9504791ce7a8a89107093ba6a9c8c1fe
ef2fc9cc10e29fb08d8ef92a8423672b1c3d79ca
describe
'30978' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJS' 'sip-files00261.pro'
5e170664b3ca22e40f3310fb42e47432
8036d97f46b13c78bcc9388a69eda334c82fb903
describe
'41678' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJT' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
3a1349d77c452dd1dc840b5018be172d
648d4bb5a334925ce47daa812de04949c9855503
describe
'5698691' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJU' 'sip-files00261.tif'
3b2ce3b14260e0ecff5d59c263ba9a2b
694525eed90309063516ea797870968802e1bad5
'2011-11-16T17:02:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJV' 'sip-files00261.txt'
127b68ad66da74cdea8d8010e70166b7
b35c38b8fb72871041c09098135d58beb513036d
describe
'12291' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJW' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
db5370394239850c9bdfe252f4d6467e
ed146522ed4555507f9175a66880bd4633928f5e
describe
'751277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJX' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
a21be2191e1725dce1c446a826ec815f
fc0781de2bcab3d898b86e410d11e15453a0595a
describe
'102424' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJY' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
71122cdb3a5f866c68b56677565797d6
782ae344ae058e1a8b783acfd921350177fdf676
describe
'31773' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATJZ' 'sip-files00262.pro'
ab6b79147abe8df7f3b52f8c2e46d681
34123387bd6a0c09ab8eb9d456c2e2cb72cffbb5
describe
'39501' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKA' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
98923c61f13db0e6c988377ab7b92ed3
519ac160c7ebfaaae26a03c570f57f908b535e0a
describe
'6013803' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKB' 'sip-files00262.tif'
81987ba54578854fdedb7707b9cdb3b0
f2ddf07d89d44ab497385968bccf4edb4abd8f05
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKC' 'sip-files00262.txt'
29750637a9fa526658c7e6a03fe219b7
cbc9924238983c18bd1e4621f99195fba75f584d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKD' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
83863b5bd09ee99d3990a19520d77d09
1e0f158c79301094a28cafa3063e3099fe3d566b
describe
'736608' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKE' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
1b590367a5ebae261e47e861a8fdd70f
fa9842638e6421f67271bcfa805a6b3e2be1e90b
describe
'104685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKF' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
24d81e9c6766556ce5c6301c951c7a62
d6bfc0e0b340545adb704a3c7e68a7df8bc68a20
describe
'30560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKG' 'sip-files00263.pro'
fe6f44f6c5d00e23a77c9114826fb4b9
943c0879beef8614c0a1a6c5d83fd9015f3aedb0
describe
'39938' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKH' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
ee71a4568a9cea6b1b00314fa313f6a7
6808e29a20d618a45aed3fce7b819b7f9b227689
describe
'5896611' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKI' 'sip-files00263.tif'
8d26ef419fa0e9545b28026bf6bfe3d6
9c94c633837ac6846dda95dd9052d3b4533f1d98
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKJ' 'sip-files00263.txt'
10833307632f9b939dd45531f8e6602e
f397376dcdf0eacf07279e86dad225d8a599707c
describe
'11600' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKK' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
66e5a959b00178b4bbf586ab63f1e3a9
8eecbb4bdd09d621c5d275268ce2f0394c457bb5
describe
'745049' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKL' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
c8e7e8d5cc1f9131ecbdbe5f52d6b334
83cc19d9d062004913bf77be5275560afb4898e1
describe
'106082' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKM' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
eccf03a28b11a30c2e1d087143848608
406d6f1bad1463b2ecfa7f0f9d36aa1dff97d0f9
describe
'30968' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKN' 'sip-files00264.pro'
b3c0fddb4aae5a77bcaa2af4e9101f9b
eb0ff0f7cf054f9dd8f3a02c630f279159181a93
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKO' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
c8da92b4402fd5489a324c8636b42881
3c10eef59164f2db480e9d5820052abdaa2c205a
describe
'5964571' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKP' 'sip-files00264.tif'
8a318ad6b097158afd2de2024a874c7f
0fc359221e1d7cdba70fca725eb1ff5c5dd3f2c8
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKQ' 'sip-files00264.txt'
832035adc1adff3194e8e2e7f505ebd9
a6bcc906f2586f0c48b10787d82bee279c5dea74
describe
'11204' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKR' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
77c41fb5d2eb3c412e2aa0a6b7f026e1
e0c8a9d9b414a7821750d1602ee6bacea0a054cb
describe
'726988' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKS' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
75f0e493c2b8553c123ee344d3bba37e
16411feb2caa37474d268907d64ecfec92bdb6cc
describe
'103891' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKT' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
d2ec5abb5b0380f4dddcd5bc87e56cf8
9339768fee1dcd88fc673fde73a4587f99f05109
describe
'30561' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKU' 'sip-files00265.pro'
cf100dd55ad5b491df81314c5fff8952
907e211b768dfc637fd1f3ebc8f4d67da315140c
describe
'37702' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKV' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
973ca7a6dac051d201c957ed8924e3d9
d86034e8e4262c2b9a5e543af8fe1ba207d023b0
describe
'5819663' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKW' 'sip-files00265.tif'
85ab86cbb2a9de7397e7f9794f7cb169
05d99925b72f5881e00fad92d38fc553a48c3107
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKX' 'sip-files00265.txt'
e56c1aecde6f1248c258697a087695dd
d723806019ed108e9f0a37f1eb4158d4f5e0e26f
describe
'11490' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKY' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
368e40febca73947faae56d68525f2c5
9873aeddcadb05338195dcbc32af28023b23dd62
describe
'748707' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATKZ' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
5dea7fc67ab16efffeadf69828ebab9e
ef5f9e55f1091253d3ad6949c67a10e2240aaa8a
describe
'104600' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLA' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
018f13174f8b581f0e2329d2916ff3bb
9b75c58261a91c1f182c77c1db2f19d2db11bbf7
describe
'30362' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLB' 'sip-files00266.pro'
9123ba5d0afa32c71247e1b2bd431e5e
a4b6b2f67ba8243cf143b7cdbbf5f1d1632acc8b
describe
'39902' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLC' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
42db19d468a23214b7a4cd76c7d7537e
7766c370b9a652e6285c4b91b638a541732bc4ac
describe
'5993699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLD' 'sip-files00266.tif'
e17882328edf8b69e4240a097933a699
985a2d3f29c0b5ed95cb155d5782d88e23a1197a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLE' 'sip-files00266.txt'
82da1f3273c54d1aeacd12713871f44c
35b1a6a7224f19abc4de79f5923a3031867026a7
describe
'11154' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLF' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
71a129796212a9bf1f8cc41ca4ca94c6
acdff47778f482ddab9e5d4993f3f0d80a3d45cc
describe
'720161' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLG' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
902ac9435cdf7bf33ddd085c29ec02f2
564a78490ee6f35a57901911338eaf5ba3d20d38
describe
'102371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLH' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
908b6b6715d46c55e15d0c6f602740ea
db27683c4ef094410bdd88f61ce219f19df71dc9
describe
'30685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLI' 'sip-files00267.pro'
f9b2d5ac1ebd69f848fdb0d947d2b1d6
2f7e1f8930223840dcf0334f7b3b4a9caf7a254a
describe
'38290' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLJ' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
ce44479fe75785108cf33196a397516e
2fe50cc6b8ff4d3f98b3ce343c288734bbbfba9c
describe
'5764927' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLK' 'sip-files00267.tif'
b350ce6babece7fd013258657f33417b
7bc57eff2cc2ada38297c412ae4c8417bf1cc623
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLL' 'sip-files00267.txt'
1b9b9d22ad49dad290ad23080fc77ac6
84e2b9083eba0cd002e535949165d3258fcecefe
describe
'11905' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLM' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
741958f3be260376ffc9b244530768cb
5575a0bf6fc827c7937a9f4f8c2898024e46e28f
describe
'739827' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLN' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
ac87c5b93985cc8d3220d0313bc4f256
417408feae9c335c2ae673d622df37e8b99b65cc
describe
'99486' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLO' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
6ef09c25db8abff0654e02f7d6ad2f76
2f1297ab7a2dbbde29c114ec5af7693372303713
describe
'29729' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLP' 'sip-files00268.pro'
f6edc1b5a61384c466a332efa24c67f5
66d145786893303cbe3ed0099d685731ed2b48da
describe
'38511' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLQ' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
c4a353c03e890391e74759cb99276c3c
41bc96c6240f635261836fa8a4b456072f3faadd
describe
'5922499' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLR' 'sip-files00268.tif'
6373b2beb6738407168f6f61bd88fb34
04ca5c61bbd9664ebcd1e8c8b909dd6487bf0606
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLS' 'sip-files00268.txt'
fec5202adbcd21e032acc412a34f1e18
2ff8afed7335f204c184f5010ba03e254d6cadce
describe
'10726' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLT' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
34245e2196050241a3366c009aff017e
32f818d6804d80b0c091d2a6fb55e1e586d82249
describe
'722646' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLU' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
77b1729102b2e6c14c0c0de17d264ef0
bc0cc9daa7cf28b311a128f0769f77ad2a5bf83b
describe
'99040' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLV' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
5625678ebd5402b38db1ae70dba78ab8
b74808015a0f1122a57fc08402d03cabe36c2ca0
describe
'28186' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLW' 'sip-files00269.pro'
006a5eb25b89490e855aa1ea5e81db24
6a8f9b9001d9c9d1207bde7bfb4d169ffb47af28
describe
'38142' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLX' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
fe228095f8407340eb525f2f148b8e08
8ffb56422406f31e672a37ebcc5b8c11191c3c2c
describe
'5784735' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLY' 'sip-files00269.tif'
bc5b802a554229381eab44cc74b1a649
e549ff671421cf2155dd33a8dca6ef4886d2c26d
'2011-11-16T17:06:45-05:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATLZ' 'sip-files00269.txt'
d4f025af811da3c17ad25303df7c172a
1dee163ae32ef8cbef92962eb08f8bd89bcc63ba
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMA' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
5a0f65327ec907b1a58a08d782890fc6
743c92dc09dcf6d898f7b8ac1595b424cdc81e57
describe
'744342' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMB' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
53f1f3de263f67a2aea25698213ffbf2
b298e737c6f478ae0d07f666db62b3489897d8a6
'2011-11-16T17:06:57-05:00'
describe
'101439' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMC' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
0e77c8df069e6bc032e49f3f2f43c621
291a43fac7125e88b2ce4ba3fc0b69471082338e
describe
'29715' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMD' 'sip-files00270.pro'
05eec17238aa849681bdfbd510310de2
32dc42006e2b92315f1ee552e8c161d61e428e0d
describe
'40326' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATME' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
122985a4e8e42ee30f139cfac5be8c4a
4bb67ae37481072075b1bc558f11976fe1610932
describe
'5959087' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMF' 'sip-files00270.tif'
4ef13b54ccbc2770a8ec7b38807b70d4
2032395fac72ac00156f4006b56406a25ba5a544
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMG' 'sip-files00270.txt'
fe73c648714b522a5fa8f3aaf0dd288e
32e8dd2fe0dac9490199854d075365508667d09d
describe
'11106' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMH' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
b8bb597ade58c36369b3eebb41a8363b
07614299e7e2e363d5abae2757957e8ecd2003ec
describe
'765135' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMI' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
f61776a9f2cd3380978feedffaafbd45
4f84b535d2800df25d29af12b83a88d3b78d9e5b
'2011-11-16T17:05:57-05:00'
describe
'100109' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMJ' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
f0ecea2b83c397fc85601029a095024c
ae0418685bbd48d06d8fb97b6e1666a7ebb8f1b5
describe
'30036' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMK' 'sip-files00271.pro'
091d81406b19f5ff4ea5eb98c72db6c3
02bff95b520f8c1fff9ff8d4fcb78ac802b7cdf3
describe
'39415' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATML' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
af5ab6ad8e35e351b0ab7123fa0cacca
b5cc4f7e642a1090d13ab25f81e3245357fa9df1
describe
'6127401' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMM' 'sip-files00271.tif'
69ed3666cab3d36384b0bde5631f686f
6f5d4cb30f1b1806c8695ae1cd9bd1995a010ca0
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMN' 'sip-files00271.txt'
017999c692cae2cc2a5530bbe8984d46
05dc9a021ef08feb29d68d5c0c96edaf188e35a3
describe
'11480' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMO' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
84932aba2b9cdb0cbdcbafdda968408f
397522157d61afec636fd3f2ca57dea321266673
describe
'770889' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMP' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
e59cd72142b632fc4ea835ff706147c5
50703f7a5923d38501cf02d8bf817a45f5063836
describe
'100195' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMQ' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
dba83b7ee731295e7bb0ec552f547ba2
0dc4ce24d843d0404dc1aee81df29378204b317c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMR' 'sip-files00272.pro'
a3ad79492653611a7eb01daa746d7a89
ba69de52dd19045e5e3d88e96543a1b2bbe92ab4
describe
'38513' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMS' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
eb0e8d8d529c35a316f6137bb6e6587a
a91bda51953b5000ec9bcdf98124f417581e1b9c
describe
'6172893' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMT' 'sip-files00272.tif'
9c2f3f18a58826566073174e3acda96c
c2b0d7bb26d11bb3435bd74ff3a34f00a2a3fb9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMU' 'sip-files00272.txt'
8047d257bba18c4379bafeebc8c3fb45
6ac393d47d9c22f885735fc287f004849196aeae
describe
'10585' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMV' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
5dbd36c45b3b10196944fe2811d8b628
049ae4740e8d456cd77ce0dc604786de47fde9aa
describe
'765183' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMW' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
167ea9067b3888141c67682e26d4e83c
e7c02b49cff0fafd2460b4b213fa7a24e2aa557c
describe
'102977' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMX' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
828ba8d1e7bdd44dc2feb4060ceddf9e
167375410dbb1c1672b6dc5ed2038869cc686828
describe
'31068' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMY' 'sip-files00273.pro'
40be88228f2f6a39016f3dbcb6b0a4c3
129e6c006d9b28a14afcb7c9a91c551c847abe88
describe
'40023' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATMZ' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
04bce765cb34a288821b465a66cd2438
ca33e9994efcbddf91db092ff4b0cb437fd55d42
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNA' 'sip-files00273.tif'
f284c4b94cda7f59b30c8f4247c5bdc2
65ad9b82bce246bb5fe8b5d7b4a51fd1e91bb695
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNB' 'sip-files00273.txt'
f9a78258523b8f67b0f8f9870de7bb29
a05c3d49a3b6061a1df8a75115ba9e0acf09f863
describe
'11290' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNC' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
c8057a5f92627371b44bf69149cc44f1
ea7e1100cc6277723abcc475d2b1cda67dbf4568
'2011-11-16T17:08:37-05:00'
describe
'770829' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATND' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
3afc34ff35a38c4b297a5d20bb9cc4dd
e05ed3d4164bc29c67b11ba06b410dac319248d1
describe
'98068' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNE' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
8752b13384261fdda2b466d934f0b64f
11995d7d95ec8caacc4a748b360cbd510b3de77f
describe
'30094' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNF' 'sip-files00274.pro'
d12ea4867759ce97b5b47a58cd96a07a
2f7a84d0355fa66bb52fec028c30ae36208dd694
describe
'37874' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNG' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
bdf265439004491c12c94a1e00cba8da
b275f791cc3f8ca3e7a104d5ea734b2c0ba486c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNH' 'sip-files00274.tif'
629dc9ee173895a56ee2ad0f120b6f0c
9d68d4646372bd79d04adea10d138a2ebcf4cf56
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNI' 'sip-files00274.txt'
5424c9cccae082bc5cdd9de865aed71f
e31b939dfd614907c2e7c83917fdd27cc77074c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNJ' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
a74b68fda5e21dd88a1bbd78fbd28f7b
585757da6a7e4104ebe588395e141970abd62df7
describe
'765194' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNK' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
d9f239b007671b740842edb55441dd21
5d514ee38a13c19cd14140fa0f7f0e3fd42fa7ff
describe
'102844' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNL' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
901c71569a1852260da11a47f63b8935
57a2581164dc0b63737a23abc29e887639d44491
describe
'29999' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNM' 'sip-files00275.pro'
4e8d8bc464113427a80f94ca24b3bf5b
45c49df214cbc485e33518555dcceb9c59a815a2
describe
'39756' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNN' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
a3fd649a22c8684cc50a79f02db21bdd
c9cee579390a3e9033be8a07d16c994c1f4dfba2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNO' 'sip-files00275.tif'
d478a861cb7a5016c3af84b59916cbab
b90b8fcad92f5fbac8233ff6ba665285d3354bac
'2011-11-16T17:10:34-05:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNP' 'sip-files00275.txt'
c15f536b14a6427e91cba547fad46157
d54cff8b7bb60f298d2561fd885802a5c708a45a
describe
'11528' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNQ' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
eaba131d4f9e86fb26ba301376058b54
8c5b55439cd28cc4aa9e7deda541dc2cb277901b
describe
'770837' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNR' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
56b729ab8558919da36b52ea9c779c42
f34e9610fd184ae5d402670a67d8d305f3790ffa
describe
'100122' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNS' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
d46d282107299cd8e36479a03c88dcca
fb14ab3bafab87d1702b3e2897ff2c3ee96ff6d0
describe
'29935' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNT' 'sip-files00276.pro'
0658a9bca67d2008d20d1af861cd0bc2
9624509eea99a998572d53e72f8c17b6116f4a66
describe
'38176' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNU' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
ee3c9cd89465aa7b563553356b349d02
f9269e5da17f7253ba2e7455a943af2b2ffb65aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNV' 'sip-files00276.tif'
7992937f9cef6f4ad801ff5bd2e1384a
8a3d8e1a454f642baca080e215310455f70158aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNW' 'sip-files00276.txt'
380bc00c9ea5646077ba6597c29d2681
ae21c73aa48048f3d84ea74f1c26ea2d7647ddfb
describe
'10825' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNX' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
69535ff441ac9a621bf4b5d2b3959240
b1ee8dc3398e8e6a206109f8e70a62d7eded8d35
describe
'765189' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNY' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
c5257865798b6d3842f19a6ea9615499
ee32de268d4a8acc2f8f55c3ef7b05cfb5bb6787
describe
'103918' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATNZ' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
5963ebe94921fb0f6b42f6b0670d030f
04cf8604abd5d04283502a895c02a41fd1a1d11c
describe
'31517' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOA' 'sip-files00277.pro'
cda482252be13a6c796cfc3430a983f5
43ea8ecd6be727b264eb8f646a0af24c49bc4210
describe
'40036' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOB' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
5f9649af7cf77f8ccb99b691d145ec59
6e78b13eb9934e05f1e057d39a8d152adb225b5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOC' 'sip-files00277.tif'
32968af12bed80258f0bae613024e2a1
7413e99847f6e8832608e03fab2f07a27d706768
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOD' 'sip-files00277.txt'
4a54bffbabf014790d320d8395c65051
88c8a769f1b245c23488933efc7ebd80869f198b
describe
'11588' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOE' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
3280402a4832047166dd6161ef92b7f8
138e0d0a6a7cc614e96a08d55a2aa8fb180380d2
describe
'770864' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOF' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
ad2038a35d32a5d18f1a011f2ab1f237
dea88af53a9559e144143393236f911128fc3fa5
describe
'100830' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOG' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
5d90e662859b40e9ec9849294cdb8e59
4e65c3be0a38b5fdd1848b49ac338e63d6d151e5
describe
'30217' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOH' 'sip-files00278.pro'
82a3d06b69e4d4f0d5b9a8657ee06996
12699ce0bae6121cb0e14d391df85398bb2f78f3
describe
'38253' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOI' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
a3df499d53e0c1b409ad3bd7fc08525d
d5cfc48d8c60b167d2540f5bc48a735644dddd80
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOJ' 'sip-files00278.tif'
ea17bc08a7db213f2979e6bc55ba0b46
716f838b4819c9624363cda0d4af642594a77d21
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOK' 'sip-files00278.txt'
ee3b6cd2736075cc8c74227b42ff5595
14ce961665a6202239a6cf80ffa7d1896b515af4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOL' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
13ea39a9da3e3ab2b251786b1f3118f2
7127141de008e40c26e5b05c8aa637c67c049d0f
describe
'765176' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOM' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
8fc5ce1822bf984cc835fa826f93c77d
d3cb9164b24b9106d0106278db8eeeca8d23b59c
describe
'105306' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATON' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
9e56e28c355bcbb7f75a94db88bac713
bd6cf2dbfe65688528d98ca2b214de2d678de87d
describe
'31660' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOO' 'sip-files00279.pro'
543663cf74c9b691500b67108c61062a
4b6d2d2a0fb25fdbbc46bece00d19a6075b71eff
describe
'40318' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOP' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
0889787c62b5d842a6768663090efe8b
c3aed21fa22e6bc7aa952fcb0492a8df51025b55
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOQ' 'sip-files00279.tif'
8e37c5be9a2da6cd4d95fac55e1dd456
723a8e484921b18a20a20471b6537ab3c42af7ef
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOR' 'sip-files00279.txt'
4059188e367e1ddb968e74b4e2ffa7c9
bbdcb2fbcb2d7ff2b9fccfbdeeb0a475a6efd17e
describe
'11640' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOS' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
e1782e631345213a2929f011a538a305
cbbe3d4dc6f4f028cd216071f953efad432640ca
describe
'770891' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOT' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
0f690782412b676f1ef1e0be74807cad
e5954d3d7c230837337b37cee4d1ebb26b1820db
describe
'101264' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOU' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
b538c3b9573b56d16600687412529967
973fe21658f81df522f7bf8fb3c8916f08ca0471
describe
'29880' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOV' 'sip-files00280.pro'
edeee1ec7e821e89f27ecda50626d4d5
c02a2ba3057f94e6c7e32236d3b7c8d1f2bf3426
describe
'38233' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAWEfileF20080921_AAATOW' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
2a2d09173e67c659b5fee6f8b1cecf5b
512eb728918ce036a850dd5753066ab9d79621da
describe
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Frontispiece.

od
ies)
tH
N

ONI ON HIS TRAVELS.
FRUITS OF ENTERPRISE,

EXHIBITED

IN THE

TRAVELS OF BELZONI

IN

EGYPT AND NUBIA,

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED
A SHORT ACCOUNT OF THE TRAVELLER’S DEATH,

BY THE AUTHOR OF “ GROVE COTTAGE.”

TWELFTH EDITION.

LONDON: !
GRANT AND GRIFFITH,

SUCCESSORS TO
J. HARRIS, CORNER OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD.

MDCCCLI,
LONDON :
Printed by SamugL BENTLEY and Co.,
Bangor House, Shoe Lane.
PREFACE.



Piacep in an amphitheatre of boundless
extent, and surrounded by an immense variety
of objects, young persons are naturally inqui-
sitive, and delighted with every new accession
of knowledge; and, as truth is no longer
deemed incompatible with amusement, the
most pleasing mode of conveying the former
seems to be to blend it with the latter.

Since the first appearance of this little
Work, the enterprising individual whose dis-
coveries it relates, and who gave his permis-
sion for its publication, has departed this life.
It was hoped that, through his means, some
account of places, hitherto imperfectly describ-
ed by others, might have been obtained ; but
the decree of Providence has prevented the
1V PREFACE.

accomplishment of so desirable an object.
The following short account of his latter
days will not be considered an improper ap-
pendage to this work :—

“Died at Gato, near Benin, in Africa, on
the 8rd of December, 1823, Mr. G. Brtzon1,
so well known for his Egyptian tombs. He
was so far on his way into the interior, en-
deavouring to reach Houssa, when a dysentery
put an end to his valuable life. He was
buried at Gato the day after his decease, and
a board, with the following inscription, was
placed over his grave :—

‘ Here lie the remains of
G, Bezont,

Who was attacked with Dysentery, at Benin,
(on his way to Houssa and Timbuctoo,)
on the 26th of November, and died at
this Place,

December 3rd, 1823.’

“Mr. Belzoni had been landed by Captain
Filmore, R.N., at Benin. Captain Filmore
exerted himself arduously in assisting the in-
PREFACE. v

trepid traveller, and discharged a man from
his vessel, who was a native of Houssa, that
he might accompany Mr. B. on his route.
The following extract of a letter contains
most of the late particulars respecting this
enterprising and scientific individual :—

‘“*¢ On the night of the 24th of November,
Mr. Belzoni left us, with Mr. Houtson, for
Gato. On parting with us he seemed a little
agitated, particularly when the crew of the
brig which brought him (to each of whom he
had made a present) gave him three loud
cheers on leaving the vessel: ‘God bless you,
my fine fellows! and send you a happy sight
of your country and friends,’ was his answer.
On the 3rd of December I received a letter
from Mr. Houtson, requesting me to come
to Benin, as Mr. B. was lying dangerously
ill; and, in case of death, wishing a second
person to be present. I was prevented going,
not only by business, but by a severe fever.
which had then hold of me. On the 5th,
I had a second letter from Mr. H. with the
Vi PREFACE.

particulars of Mr. B.’s end; and one from
himself, almost illegible, dated December 2,
requesting me to assist in the disposal of his
effects, and to remit the proceeds home to his
agents, Messrs. Briggs, Brothers, & Co., Ame-
rica-Square, London, together with a beautiful
amethyst ring, which he seemed particularly
desirous should be delivered to his wife, with
the assurance that he died in the fullest affec-
tion for her, as he found himself too weak to
write his last wishes and adieus.

‘“** At the time of Mr. Belzoni’s death, Mr.
Houtson had everything arranged with the
King of Benin for his departure, and, had his
health continued, there is no doubt he would
have succeeded. Mr. Belzoni passed at Benin
as an inhabitant, or rather native, of the in-
terior, who had come to England when a
youth, and was now trying to return to his
country. The kings and emigrands (or no-
bles) gave credit to this, Mr. Belzoni being in
a Moorish dress, with his beard nearly a foot
in length. There was, however, some little
PREFACE. Vil

Jealousy amongst them, which was removed by
a present or two, well applied ; and the King
of Benin’s messenger was to accompany Mr.
Belzoni with the King’s cane, and as many
men as were considered necessary for a guard
and baggage-carriers. The King’s name is re-
spected as far as Houssa, and he has a messen-
ger, or ambassador, stationary there. On Mr.
Belzoni’s arrival at Houssa, he was to leave
his guard there, and proceed to Timbuctoo,
the King not guaranteeing his safety farther
than Houssa, and Timbuctoo not being known
at Benin. On his return to Houssa, he would
make the necessary preparations for going
down the Niger, and despatch his messengers
and guard back with letters to his agents and
to Mr. John Houtson: the messenger to be
rewarded according to the account the letters
gave of his behaviour, and the King to receive
a valuable stated present. This was the plan,
and I think it would have proved fortunate, .
had Mr. B. lived.

‘“** Mr. Belzoni was a native of Padua, and
Vlil PREFACE.

had known England many years. He first
visited Egypt with a view of erecting hydrau-
lic engines for the Pacha, to assist in irrigat-
ing the country. In stature he was above six
feet and a half, and possessed of great bodily
strength. His manners and deportment were
marked by great suavity and mildness, ‘and
he had a genuine love for science in all its
branches. He was brave, ardent, and perse-
vering in pursuit of his objects; and his
decease at the moment of a strong hope of
success, must be deeply felt by all who
estimate the true interests of science and the
light of discovery at their true value.’”
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

Bernard’s Picture.—Situation of Egypt.—Belzoni intro-
duced.—Motives for his going into Egypt.—IIl success
of his Hydraulic Machine.—His thoughts turned towards
the antiquities of the country.—Difficulty in removing
Young Memnon from Thebes to Cairo.—Belzoni’s visit to
a Mummy-Cave.—Deceit of the Arabs.—Egyptian Cus-
toms.—Belzoni goes up the Nile, into Nubia.—Visits the
island of Elephantine.—Arrives at Ybsambul.— Attempts
to open its magnificent Temple.—Obliged, for want of time
and money, to give up the project.—Visits the little isle
of Mainarty.— Danger on the Cataract.—Returns to
Thebes.—Removal of Young Memnon to Cairo,—Belzoni
resides for a short time at Rosetta. ° ; Page 1

CHAPTER II.

Bernard’s perseverance.—Belzoni’s second Voyage.—Rapid’
journey from Minieh to Thebes.—Superb Temple at Car-
nac.— Works carried on both at Gournou and Carnac,—
x CONTENTS,

Mummy-caves.—Belzoni’s object in entering them.—Ma-
nufactures of the ancient Egyptians.—Their idols.—Cu-
rious Habitations at Gournou.—He revisits Ybsambul.—
Opens the Temple.—Returns highly gratified to Thebes.
Page 85

CHAPTER III.

Emily amused with a description of Greenland.—Belzoni
makes the valley of Beban el Malook the scene of his
researches.—Enters and explores the tomb of Psammu-
this.—Receives a visit from Hamed Aga.—Returns to
Cairo.—Visits the Pyramids.—Time and purpose of their
erection uncertain.—Enters one, which for more than one
thousand years had appeared a solid mass of stone.

Page 130

CHAPTER IV.

Belzoni’s journey to the Red Sea.—Motives for going thither
—Inundation of the Nile.-—The Caravan crosses the De-
sert.—Account of the Ababde, an independent tribe re-
siding among the rocks on the coast of the Red Sea.—
Search for the ancient city of Berenice.—The boats of the
Ababde fishermen described.—Discovers the remains of
Berenice, mentioned by a former traveller.—Returns to-
wards Esne.—Meets with two shepherd girls tending their
sheep on the mountains.—Description of the sufferings
travellers undergo in crossing the Deserts.—The Cara-
van reaches the banks of the Nile.—Belzoni returns to
Gournou. ; ° ‘ : : : Page 165
CONTENTS. xi

CHAPTER V.

Dr. Franklin’s kitex—Some sailors ascend Pompey’s pillar,
by means of a paper kite.—Removal of the Obelisk from
the island of Philoé—It falls into the Nile.—Ingenious
method of raising it.—It is launched down the Cataract.
— Arrives in safety at Rosetta.—Belzoni goes to Beban el
Malook.—Completes his drawings and models of the
tomb.—Bids a final adieu to Thebes.—Traverses the wes-
tern Desert, in search of the Temple of Jupiter Ammon.—
Procures a Donkey at Benisouef.—Reaches the Lake
Meeris.—Rose-trees in profusion.—Visits the Temple of
Haron, among the rocks near the lake.—Attacked by a
furions Hyena.—Account of the famous labyrinth.—Visit
to the Elloah.—An interview with Khalil Bey.—Account
of the Bedouins.—Belzoni crosses the Desert attended by
Sheik Grumar.—Arrival at Zaboo.—Interview with the
Sheik and Cady of El Cassar.—Belzoni goes to their
village.—Discovers the site of the Temple of Jupiter
Ammon.—Meets with an unfortunate accident on his
return to Zaboo.—Reaches Benisouef.—Arrives at Cairo,
—Embarks for Europe.— Returns to England. Page 208,

Xill

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



BELZONI ON HIS TRAVELS ;
TEMPLE OF TENTYRA .
EMBARKING YOUNG MEMNON
THE Room or Beauties ,
THE FIsHERMAN’s Boat ;

CAMPING OUT IN THE DESERT

PAGE
Frontispiece

30

FRUITS OF ENTERPRISE.

SoaneEnEeEEEEEEEEiee

CHAPTER I.

“Tue last—the very last pyramid! dear
Laura,” exclaimed the little Bernard, as he
climbed upon his sister’s chair, and surveyed
a sketch, that she was copying from one in a
large folio volume.

‘‘ And now, when you have shaded the side
of that pyramid, will you draw the wheel of
my cart? Iam quite tired of your tombs and
your pillars, and your ruins, and your monu-
ments, falling this way and that way :—I
would much rather know how to draw the
spokes of the wheels of my little cart :—you
see I have made my waggon turning down a
shady lane,—it is evening—the lamps are -
lighted on the posts—the moon is peeping
from behind the trees, and the smoke is

B
9 BERNARDS PICTURE.

rising from the chimneys of my carter’s cot-
tage—but my poor cart has no wheels, be-
cause I cannot draw spokes!—And now, is
that tiresome pyramid done, dear Laura?”

“If you knew all that renders those pyra-
mids so interesting to Laura, my love,” said
Bernard's mother, “ you would not be in such
great haste to see them finished; indeed, I
believe you would willingly give up the plea-
sure of seeing your own little picture com-
pleted, to watch your sister as she draws hers.”

‘Indeed, mamma!” exclaimed the lively
boy.—‘“* Where are the pyramids? And why
do you think the account of them would
amuse me so much?”

“My story is a long one,” replied his
mother, ‘‘so I will not begin it till after tea ;
and then we can go on without interruption.”

“Oh, mother! that will be delightful !
And as to my cart, Laura may put in the
spokes to-morrow—the wheels will not signify
for one night, will they mamma?” exclaimed
Bernard; and, without waiting for an an-
swer, he jumped up, fetched his little straw
hat from its hook in the hall, and ran across
the lawn, to tell Owen and Emily, who were
busily engaged in training a white clematis
SITUATION OF THE PYRAMIDS. 3

round one of the pillars of the alcove. They
quickly returned together. Tea was de-
spatched and the cheerful group repaired to
the library. The maps were laid open on
the library table. Laura seated herself be-
tween her two brothers; and Emily, whose
blue eyes sparkled with joy, placed herself
by the side of her mother.

‘And now, why did you think that Laura’s
picture would please me so much, mam-
ma?” said Bernard. ‘‘ Where are those pyra-
mids?”

“Think for a moment, my dear. Do you
not know the name of the country so re-
nowned for these famous mementoes of an-
cient art ?— You have often been told.”

Bernard paused—* In Egypt, mamma,—
in Egypt, an ancient kingdom of Africa.”

“Can you give me any account of Egypt
—do you know anything respecting that
country ?”

Bernard paused again, but Emily looked up
wishfully, and said, “ May I tell you what
I know, mamma?” Her mother nodded
assent.

“Egypt,” said Emily, “ consists of a nar-
row vale on both sides of the Nile, bounded
4. OVERFLOWING OF THE NILE.

by ridges of mountains, or hills. Nubia is on
the south; on the west, it joins the Great
Sandy Desert ; on the north, it is washed by
the Mediterranean, and on the east by the
Red Sea, except where it is joined to Asia by
the narrow neck of land called the Isthmus
of Suez.”

‘© T recollect more about Egypt now that
| Emily mentions the Nile,” exclaimed her
little brother; ‘“‘I have often heard of the
rushes that grew on the banks of that river —
the people used to make their paper of them,
and write all their books upon it—all that
they wrote; they placed the thin leaves of
the stem one over the other, then flattened
them, and plaited them as Fanny plaits her
little paper mats; so that one leaf lay one
way and another another way, and then they
were stuck together with the muddy water
of the Nile, and the leaves were dried and
pressed with heavy weights—and rubbed and
pressed again a great many times.”

“«« And,” said Owen, “ papa has often told
us, that in Egypt there is very little rain, and
that the Nile, at certain periods, overflows
its banks, and carries with its waters a rich
mud which renders the soil fruitful, without
ANTIQUITIES OF EGYPT. 5

that labour which the farmers in England
are obliged to bestow, before the fields are
fit to receive the grain. In Egypt they have
only to put the seeds into the ground.”

“ But if the Nile should not overflow, just
when they expected it,” said Bernard, “ what
would they do then ¢”

“This sometimes happens,” said Laura;
“but you will hear by and by of the means
employed to prevent the famine which is
generally occasioned by such a calamity, and
of the mode used to supply the deficiency, if
the river do not afford its usual assistance.”

“ Well, mamma,” said Owen, “ now that
we know where Egypt is—now for the Pyra-
mids ;—whereabouts are they, and for what
purpose were they erected *”

‘Not so fast, my love. I have not yet
told you that Egypt is divided into Upper,
Middle, and Lower; and that it is a country
renowned in history, having been once the
seat, if not the parent, of the sciences. It
is not only remarkable for those surprising
monuments of antiquity, the famous Pyra-
mids, which baffle the researches of the deep-
est antiquary to fix upon their origin, but also
for many other ‘ glorious structures,’ astonish-

B 3
6 BELZONI.

ing remains of ancient temples, pompous
palaces, obelisks, columns, statues, and paint-
ings. Thus is Egypt rendered interesting ;
and it is at the present time peculiarly so
to us, because a gentleman has lately, with
indefatigable zeal, made many researches in
that country; and his curious discoveries
among the pyramids and temples have excited
the public attention in no small degree. He
has spent many years in this arduous employ-
ment, and is now amply compensated in know-
ing that they have not been spent in vain.”

“Oh mamma!” exclaimed Emily, “ tell
me the name of this gentleman: why did
he go there? Was he fond of antiquities ?
How did he manage to enter the pyramids?
And what did he find in them?”

‘‘T cannot answer so many questions in a
breath, my little girl ; the name of the gentle-
man I mentioned is Bexzon1.” :

“ A native of England, mamma?”

‘* No: a native of Padua.”

‘¢ Padua, an ancient, large, and celebrated |
city of Italy,” said Laura, as she pointed to
the map.

‘‘Is it all true that you are going to tell
us, mother?” said Owen.
HYDRAULICS. 7

“Perfectly true. The account I propose
giving you of Egypt and Nubia is taken from
Belzoni’s own Travels, recently published. ,

‘‘ Unfortunate circumstances falling out
in his native country, compelled Belzoni to
leave it; and many years ago he came to
England. Here he married, and contrived
to live on his own industry, and the know-
ledge he had acquired in various branches
whilst at Rome, in which city he had’ spent
many of his juvenile years. He now turned
his thoughts to hydraulics, a science to which
he had before paid attention, and which in
the end was the principal cause of his going
to Egypt.”

‘Will you tell me, dear mamma,” said Ber-
nard, ** what is meant by hydraulics, and why
Belzoni should go into Egypt on thataccount?”

‘‘The science which has for its object the
motion of fluids is called hydraulics ; and
its principal object is to furnish us with the
means of conducting water from one situation
to another, by canals or other means. Bel-
zoni imagined that an hydraulic machine
would be of great use in Egypt to irrigate
the fields, which only want water to make

»”

them produce at any time of the year !
8 FERTILITY OF EGYPT.

“Then the soil is fertile, and the climate
warm, I suppose, mamma?” said Owen.

“Yes: the soil of Egypt is particularly
noted for the fertility occasioned by its won-
derful river; and while thinking of this, we
are led to observe the two beautiful prospects
which, owing to it, Egypt exhibits, at two
seasons of the year. During owr summer,
the climate there is excessively warm, and
it is impossible to describe a scene more de-
lightful than that which the country presents
at the first overflowing of the Nile: the spec-
tator beholds a spacious sea, spotted with
innumerable towns and villages, sometimes
contrasted with groves of palm trees, while
a magnificent display of sylvan and moun-
tainous scenery bounds the extensive pro-
spect.

‘© On the contrary, if the view be taken
when our gardens and fields are clothed in
the robes of winter, the whole country there
resembles one large meadow, covered with
the finest verdure, and enamelled with the
choicest flowers ; the plains embellished with
flocks and herds; the air, pure and salubri-
ous, scented with orange and lemon blossoms,
which blow in luxuriance.”
WINDS OF THE DESERT. 9

“ [ should like to live in Egypt, mamma!”
exclaimed Bernard.

But inconveniences are to be met with
there, as well as everywhere else, my love.
The heat is oppressive to all who are unused
to it; indeed, the southerly winds are some-
times so sultry as to oblige the natives to
‘mmure themselves in vaults or caves; and,
not unfrequently, these winds raise such
clouds of sand as to obscure the light of the
sun, and even to those who are used to them
to be almost insupportable., The people call
them poisonous winds, or winds of the De-
sert, and, during the three days that they
generally last, the streets are forsaken ; and
in a melancholy condition is the unfortunate
traveller whom they surprise remote from
shelter.”

“ I wonder,” exclaimed Emily, “‘ whether
Belzoni ever encountered them.”

“]T will begin my account, and then you
may hear a description of the various adven-
tures he met with. |

“ Some years after Mr. Belzoni had resided
in England, he formed the resolution of going
to the south of Europe; and, taking Mrs.
Belzoni with him, he visited Portugal and
== -

10 CAIRO.—BOOLAC.

Spain ; and, afterwards, the small but import-
ant isle of Malta, which lies to the south
of Sicily, and is celebrated for its fine port:
and the strength of its fortifications, now be-
longing to Great Britain. Hence they em-
barked for Egypt, and arrived in safety at
Alexandria.”

Emiry.—Here is Alexandria, mamma, on
the sea-coast: I have found it marked on the
map.

Mrs. A.—On entering the harbour of this
city, Belzoni wag informed that the plague
was there. To a European, who had never
been in that country, this was alarming intel-
ligence. Happily, however, it nearly ceased
in a short time ; and as his principal object
was to go on to Cairo, he hired a boat, and
they embarked with an English gentleman,
who was going up the Nile.

Brrnarv.—Here is Cairo, the capital of
Egypt, mamma; to the south of Alexandria.

Mrs. A.—This city is one hundred miles
from the mouth of the Nile. Owing to con-
trary winds, it was some days before our
travellers landed at Boolac, within a mile of
it. At this place a bustling scene presented
itself; and the majestic appearance of Turk-
BOOLAC. 11

ish soldiers in various costumes, Arabs of
many tribes, boats, camels, horses, and asses,
all in motion, formed a striking picture. Im-
mediately after landing, they went to Cairo ;
-but as the holy fathers of the convent of
Terrasanta could not receive women within
their walls, they were accommodated in an
old house at Boolac, belonging to a gentle-
man, the interpreter of Mahomed Ali, and
director of all foreign affairs. He was a man
of great acuteness of understanding, and well
disposed towards strangers.

Bernarp.—Who is Mahomed Ali, mam-
ma ?

Mrs. A.—The Turkish Viceroy, or Ba-
shaw, by whom Egypt is governed.

Owen.—I am glad that this interpreter
was agreeably disposed towards strangers ; as
I suppose that Belzoni had to apply through
his means to the Bashaw respecting his hy-
draulic machine, for which purpose he went to
Egypt, you know.

Mrs. A—Travellers are frequently obliged
to submit to inconvenience, and so were ours.
The house they inhabited was so old and
out of repair, that it appeared every moment
as though ready to fall on their heads: all
12 RESIDENCE AT BOOLAC.

the windows were shut up with broken wood-
en rails; the staircase was in so bad a condi-
tion that scarcely a step was left entire ; the
door was merely fastened by a pole placed
against it, having neither lock nor anything
else to secure the entrance. There were
many rooms in the house, but the ceiling in
all of them was in a most threatening state.
The whole furniture consisted of a single mat
in one of the best rooms, which they consider-
ed as the drawing-room.
Brrnarv.—Oh! what a curious drawing-
room ! supposing owrs had only a mat in it!
Mrs. A.—No chairs are to be had in this
country ; so they sat on the ground, and a
box and a trunk served asa table. Fortu-
nately they had a few plates as well as knives
and forks; and James, an Irish lad whom
they took with them, procured a set of culi-
nary articles. Such were the accommodations
our enterprising travellers met with at Boolac!
Although Belzoni’s chief object was not to
see antiquities at that time, yet he felt desir-
ous of visiting the famous pyramids.
Emity.--I think I have heard you say,
mamma, that they are at the foot of those
mountains which separate Egypt from Libya.
SUN-RISE FROM THE PYRAMIDS. 13

Mrs. A.—The English gentleman who ac-
companied Belzoni up the Nile, obtained an
escort of soldiers from the Bashaw, and went
with him to the pyramids one evening, intend-
ing to ascend one of them the following morn-
ing, to see the sun rise. Accordingly, they
were on the top long before the dawn of day.
The scene they beheld delighted them, being
grand and majestic beyond description. A
mist over the wide sandy plains formed a veil,
which vanished gradually as the sun rose,
and at length opened to their view that beau-
tiful land, once the site of Memphis. The
distant view of the smaller pyramids, on the
south, marked the extension of that vast ca-
pital ; while the solemn spectacle of the im-
mense sandy desert on the west, stretching as
far as the eye could reach, inspired sublime
feelings. The fertile land on the north, with
the winding course of the Nile descending
towards the sea; the rich appearance of Cairo
and its glittering minarets; the beautiful
plain, which extends from the pyramids to
that city; the thick groves of palm-trees in
the midst of the fertile valley,—altogether
formed a scene which Belzoni was well dis-
posed to enjoy.

by :
14 VISIT TO SACARA AND DAJIOR.

Bernarp.— Mamma, I do not understand
how Belzoni mounted the pyramid.

Mrs. A.—There are steps on the outside,
and by them he ascended it.

Having gratified his admiration, he went
with his friend round the next pyramid, and
examined several of the mausoleums; and
they returned to Cairo, highly delighted with
having seen a wonder they had long de-
sired, but never supposed they should have
the pleasure of beholding.

A few days after this time, a party was
formed to go to Sacara by water. After visit-
ing the pyramids at that place, they returned
to Cairo, except Mr. Turner, the English gen-
tleman, and Belzoni, who went on to Dajior,
and examined the remains of many other pyra-
mids there. When they came back to the
Nile, it was dark night, and they had to pass
several villages before they reached a place
where they could embark for Cairo. Their
road lay through a clusterof palm-trees, which,
as the moon was just rising, had a solemn ef-
fect. Some of the Arabs were dancing to the
usual tunes of their tambourines, and, forget-
ting their masters, the Turks, were happy for
a time. At length, Belzoni and his friend
RETURN TO CAIRO. 15

took a small boat, and arrived in Cairo before
morning. Two days after this time, the for-
mer was to be presented to the Bashaw, on
the subject of his hydraulic project.»

Emiuy.—I hope the Bashaw was pleased
with it, after Belzoni had taken so much pains
to promote the comfort of his people.

Mrs. A.—But poor Belzoni met with an
unfortunate accident, which detained him for
some time. He received a violent blow on
the leg from a soldier who was passing on
horseback, and was obliged to be taken to
the convent of Terrasanta.

Brernarv.—It must have been very desolate
to be laid up at such a place; and yet the
convent was, perhaps, more comfortable than
that shabby old house at Boolac. Did he
soon recover, mamma? I think that cruel
soldier had never heard your favourite sen-
tence, “Do as you would be done by.”

Mrs, A.—The common feelings of humanity
were strangers to his bosom. Belzoni, how-
ever, was well enough in a few days to be
presented to the Bashaw.

Owrn.—Is the Bashaw in the place of a
king? What sort of government is it in
Kgypt ?
16 GOVERNMENT OF EGYPT.

Mrs. A.—The form of government in
Egypt is called an aristocracy.

Owrn.— What is an aristocracy, mamma ’
I know that despotism implies the will of the
monarch to be the law; and that a limited
monarchy, as in England, indicates that the
king has only a part of the supreme power in
common with some of his subjects: but I do
not understand what you mean by an arist-
ocracy.

Mrs. A.—An aristocracy is a republican
state, wherein the supreme power is consigned
to nobles and peers. Since Egypt has been
under the dominion of the Turks, it has been
governed by a Bashaw, who resides at Cairo,
and has under him inferior governors in se-
veral parts of the country.

Emity.—I observed, mamma, when you
were talking of the Arabs enjoying the moon-
light under the palm-trees, and playing upon
their tambourines, that you said they were
forgetting their masters, the Turks. What
have Turks to do in Egypt.

Mrs. A.—The inhabitants of Egypt are
composed of different races of people. The
Turks think themselves entitled to be masters
of the country, because the Arabs (who are
MAHOMED ALI. 17

another race) were conquered by them: then
there are the Copts, who are descended from
the first Egyptians ; as well as many others,
under different denominations.

And now, having wandered from our sub-
ject, we will pursue it.

Bernarp.—Oh, Mamma! I want to hear
some of Belzoni’s adventures and escapes.

Mrs. A.—Adventures are delightful things
provided an escape follows. But you must
have patience, my boy. Belzoni made an
arrangement with the Bashaw, and undertook
to erect a machine which would raise as much
water with one ox as the machines of the
country could raise with four.

Owrn.—How did Mahomed Ali like it,
mamma? I expected that he was of too in-
dolent a disposition to admire anything new ;
he was a Turk, you know, and the Turks
are famed for their indolence.

Mrs. A.—You are right, my love, in
supposing that a person of an enervated turn
of mind cannot derive so much pleasure from
a new project as one of a more active dispo-
sition. Ali, however, received our Belzoni
very civilly, and was much pleased with his
proposition.

c3
- r,Y CL OE

i8 BELZONIS HYDRAULIC MACHINE,

Owrn.—And well he might be, when he
could foresee that, if put in execution, it
would spare the expense and labour of many
thousands of oxen. ,

Mrs. A.— Belzoni now commenced his
hydraulic machine. It was to be erected in
Soubra, at the garden of the Bashaw, on the
Nile, three miles from Cairo. He had many
difficulties to encounter, Bernard; for the
very persons who were necessary to furnish
him with wood, iron, carpentry, and so on,
unfortunately recollected that they should be
the first to suffer by it, if the machine suc-
ceeded. However, success is secure unless
energy fails, and Belzoni in time saw his
water-machine completed. But as he was
some time at Soubra, perhaps you may like
to hear how he passed the intervals, when
unoccupied by his work.

Bernarv.— Yes, dear mamma—TI like
him very much. What a clever man he
was |

Mus. A.—You see, my dear little boy,
that a great deal depends upon the turn
that is given to our early pursuits. The
science of hydraulics first became familiar
to Belzoni when he was a boy in Rome.
GARDEN OF THE SERAGLIO. 19

Bernarv.—I dare say he did not then
think of going to Egypt. How, mamma?

Mrs. A.—During his stay at Soubra, Bel-
zoni became acquainted with many Turks,
and particularly with the governor of the
palace, as his house was within his walls.
The garden of the Bashaw was under his
care, and a guard was kept at the gates.
The seraglio is so situated that it overlooks
the Nile; at the back of it is a beautiful
garden under the care of the Greeks, and
kept in excellent order. It is ornamented
with green bowers overhung with flowering
shrubs, and alcoves in the form of little
cupolas, around which the fragrant plants
twine their numerous tendrils, whilst water-
machines, constantly at work, keep up a per-
petual verdure.

Bernarp.— What a delightful place !
But then Belzoni’s were not the first water-
machines.

Mrs. A.—Not actually the first, my dear,
but the largest, the best calculated to answer
any important purpose. You, Emily, who
are so fond of flowers, will perhaps smile at
the amusements which delight the Bashaw
far more highly than watching the progress
Pas

20 THE BASHAW'S AMUSEMENT.

of his shrubs and plants. In the evening,
when the sun is declining in the west, he
quits his seraglio, and seats himself on the
banks of the Nile, with his guards, to fire at
an earthen pot on the opposite side.

Emity.—To fire at an earthen pot, when
in such a place! Ah, mamma? Mahomed
Ali is no botanist !

Owrn.—If he be no botanist, Emily, he is
an excellent marksman; for I ‘believe the
river at Soubra is wider than the Thames at
Westminster Bridge.

Mrs. A.— When it is dark, he vetites into
the garden, and reposes in a shady alcove, or
by the margin of some bubbling fountain, with
all his attendants around him, who endeavour
to amuse him and make him feel in good
humour with himself; whilst the murmuring
of the waters, the lively tunes of the musical
instruments, and the soft beams of the moon
reflected upon the surface of the Nile, height-
en the pleasures of the scene. Here Belzoni
was often admitted, and thus he had an op-
portunity of observing the domestic life of a
man who, from nothing, rose to be viceroy of
Kgypt and conqueror of the most powerful
tribes of Arabia.

gaan Te a te A
ELECTRICAL MACHINE. 21

The Bashaw seemed to be well aware of
the benefit that might be derived from his
encouraging the arts of Europe in his country,
and had already reaped some of the fruits of
it. The manufacture of gunpowder, the re-
fining of sugar, the making of fine indigo, and
the silk manufacture, were introduced much
to his advantage: he is constantly inquiring
after something new, and is delighted with
any novelty. He had heard of electricity,
and he sent to England for two electrical
machines.

Bernarp.—Oh, mamma! now he will be
amused ;—I hope he will receive a good shock.
Do you remember, Emily, our having one in
papa’s study, when you held a little chain,
and I held your hand, and Owen mine, and
we all jumped together ;—I hope this .elec-
trical machine will make Mahomed Ali jump.

Mrs. A.—One of them was broken by the
way; the other was dismounted. No one
could be found who knew how to set it up.
Belzoni happened to be at the garden one
night when they were attempting it, and he
was requested to put the pieces together ;
having done so, he desired one of the soldiers
to mount the insulating stool, when, charging
22 ELECTRIFYING THE BASHAW.

the machine, he gave the Turk a good shock,
who, being thus struck unawares, uttered a
loud ery and jumped off, extremely terrified.
The Bashaw laughed at the man for doing so,
supposing his alarm was a pretence, and not
the effect of the machine; and when told
that it was actually occasioned by the machine,
he positively affirmed that it could not be, for
the soldier was at such a distance that it was
impossible the small chain he held in his hand
could have such power.

Owen.—And how did Belzoni manage to
convince Ali, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—He desired the interpreter to
inform his Highness, that if he would have
the goodness to mount the stool, he would be
convinced of the fact. He hesitated for a
moment whether to believe it or not ; however
he mounted the stool. Belzoni charged well,
put the little chain into his hand, and gave
him a smart shock. He jumped off like the
soldier, on feeling the effect of the electricity,
and threw himself on the sofa, laughing im-
moderately, and unable to conceive how the
machine could have such power on the human
body.

Brrnarp.—How very droll Mahomed Ali
ARAB WEDDING. 23

must have looked when he was standing upon
that little stool, and especially when he found
himself forced to jump off! I like your
story much, very much, mother; and [ do
so, because it is true.

Mrs. A.—The Arabs of Soubra display
as much festivity when a marriage of con-
sequence takes place, as those of any of the
villages in Egypt. One happened while Bel-
zoni was there; and as the windows of his
house overlooked the spot where it was per-
formed, he had an opportunity of witnessing
the ceremony. Early in the morning of the
grand holiday, a high pole was reared in the
centre of the place with a banner belonging
to the village.

«A banner!” whispered Bernard.

‘A streamer, or flag,”’ said Laura; and
Mrs. A. continued:—A large assembly of
people gathered under it, and preparations
were made for an illumination with glass
lamps; music was also prepared.

Emity.—Then, I suppose, the Arabs
from other villages came to the feast also,
beating their tambourines and waving their
flags.

Mrs. A.—You are right; but they re-


24 DANCING AND FESTIVITIES.

mained at some distance from the pole, until
invited to advance.

Emiry.—I fancy, mamma, that the pole
was like that round which the village girls
fasten their garlands on May-day.

Mrs. A.—Very probably. The old peo-
ple seated themselves round and under the
pole, and the strangers were placed at a little
distance. One of them began to sing, while
the rest divided themselves into two parties,
forming two circles, one within the other,
round the pole, and facing each other.

Bernarpv.—I understand, mamma. _ I sup-
pose each man put his arms over his neigh-
bour’s shoulders, and thus formed a chain.

Mrs. A.—Exactly so. The outer circle
stood still, while the people of the inner cir-
cle kept dancing and bowing in an orderly
manner to those in the outer one. Thus
they continued three hours, and those who
were not in these circles made separate rings
by themselves.

Emity.—So this is the mode of dancing
among the Arabs, mamma. How different
from ours? But where were the ladies in the
mean time ?

Mrs. A.—AIl the women were at a dis-
HYDRAULIC MACHINE. 25

tance by themselves, and among them was the
bride. When the dancing and singing were
ended, they all sat down, and a great quantity
of boiled rice was brought to them in wooden
bowls, as well as some dishes of melokie
and bamies, and three or four sheep roasted,
which were soon torn to pieces and devoured.

Bernarv.—Melokie and bamies, mamma!
What are they ?

Mrs. A.—Plants eaten in common by the
Arabs as greens. A number of boys were
fully employed during the whole ceremony
in fetching water from the Nile. At night,
the little coloured lamps were lighted, a band
of tambourines played continually, and the
entertainment ended as it had commenced
with a dance.

Emuy.—I am sure, mamma, that I do
not envy those dancing Arabs. And now, let
us turn to Belzoni. How long was it before his
machine was ready for the Bashaw to see it?

Mrs. A.—Belzoni completed his under-
taking in time. It was constructed on the
principle of a crane with a walking-wheel, in
which a single ox, by its own weight alone,
could effect as much as four oxen employed in
the machines of the country.

D
26 HYDRAULIC MACHINE.

Owern.—Then Belzoni managed his ma-
chine in spite of the difficulties he had to en-
counter with the self-interested workmen.

Mrs. A.—Yes: he was of too enterprising
a disposition to give up a work which was the
chief cause of his going into that country.

Bernarv.— Before you go on, mamma,
will you tell me what you mean by a crane?
—there is a picture of a crane in my Be-
wick—but I cannot at all make out what is
meant by a crane with a walking-wheel.

Owrn.—The crane of which mamma
speaks, Bernard, is not a bird—but a ma-
chine used in building, for raising and lower-
ing huge stones, heavy weights, and sometimes
water, you see.

Mrs. A.—It is a technical term in mecha-
nics, my love; and I will try, by and by,
to explain to you what is meant by a crane
with a walking-wheel.

The Bashaw came to Soubra to examine
the hydraulic machine. It was set to work
and succeeded admirably, drawing in the same
space of time six or seven times as much
water as the common machines.

Bernarp.—Ah! Belzoni is well repaid,
mamma. And the Egyptian farmers may
HYDRAULIC MACHINE. 27

sow their seed, without being afraid of a
famine. Even if the Nile do not overflow,
they can raise water, and water their fields
so nicely.

Mrs. A.—Our best endeavours, though
they sometimes appear at first to be crown-
ed with success, may afterwards defeat the
purpose for which they were intended. So it
was with those of our ingenious friend. The
Bashaw took it into his head to have the ox
taken out of the wheel, in order to see, by
way of frolic, what effect the machine would
have by putting fifteen men into it. Poor
James the Irish lad, you know, entered along
with them; but no sooner had the wheel
turned once round than they all jumped out,
leaving the boy alone in it. The wheel, of
course, overbalanced by the weight of the
water, turned back with such velocity that
the catch was unable to stop it. James was
thrown out, and in the fall broke one of his
thighs. Belzoni contrived to stop the wheel
before it did farther injury, which might have
been fatal to him.

Owxrn.—How shocking, mamma! I am
not at all pleased with those fifteen men, and
I foresee what is coming. The Turks are
28 SUPERSTITION.

so superstitious, that they would consider
such an accident happening to a new inven-
tion as a bad omen, and thus I fear Belzoni's
ingenuity will be thrown away.

Mrs. A.—You are not mistaken. The
Bashaw was persuaded to abandon the affair ;
and the project of Belzoni being thus con-
signed to oblivion, he turned his thoughts
to the antiquities of the country, and, pos-
sessing a spirit for investigation, determined
to make some researches.

A gentleman of the name of Burckhardt,
had for a long time premeditated the removal
of a colossal bust, known by the name of
young Memnon, to England, and had often
tried to persuade Ali to send it as a present
to his Majesty ; however, the Turk did not
suppose it worth sending to so great a person.
But Belzoni, knowing how much that gentle-
man wished it, proposed to undertake its con-
veyance from Thebes to Alexandria, and, with
the Bashaw’s consent, to forward it from
thence to England. He now, therefore, pre-
pared to go up the Nile.

Emity.—At present he is at Soubra, three
miles from Cairo; and where is the bust,
mamma? Had Belzoni any motive for wish-
MEMNON'S STATUE. 29

ing to remove it, besides that of pleasing his
friend !

Mrs. A.—He was directed to search for
this immense statue on the southern side
of a ruined temple, in the vicinity of a vil-
lage called Gournou, near Carnac, and it
was intended to present it to the British
Museum.

Emity.—Here is Carnac, mamma, just by
Thebes; I have traced the course of the
Nile from Cairo, with my little finger, upon
the map, until it has brought me to it. Gour-
nou is not marked, but I know its situation.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni was requested to spare
neither expense nor trouble, in getting it con-
veyed to the banks of the river as speedily
as possible: so he hired a boat, with four
sailors, a boy, and a captain. Everything
was soon ready for their departure from Sou-
bra. The whole of the implements for the
operation of removing the bust consisted of
a few poles and ropes of palm-leaves. Mrs.
Belzoni accompanied her husband, and they
agreed to stay and examine any ruins they
might. pass on the road.

Bernarv.—But poor James, the Irish
boy—where was he, mamma ?

D3
30 VOYAGE UP THE NILE.

Mrs. A.—He was, happily, able to accom-
pany them. And now, you must follow
their course on the map, from Boolac, where
they embarked, to Thebes. In six days
they arrived at Siout, the capital of Upper
Egypt, and from thence they went to Acmin,
where they landed to visit the fathers of a
convent ; and again proceeded, with curiosity
highly raised, towards the noted temple of
Tentyra. This is the first, as well as the
most magnificent, Egyptian temple the tra-
veller sees on ascending the Nile. It is
two miles from the banks of the river; and
Belzoni and his party, having landed, set
off on asses, and proceeded to the ruins.
Little could be seen of the temple till they
came near it, as it is surrounded by high
mounds of rubbish.

Bernarv.—Ah, Belzoni! I should like
to have ridden on my own little Smiler be-
side you !

Mrs. A.— When he arrived there, he was
for some time at a loss to know in what
part to begin his examinations. The numer-
ous objects before him struck him with sur-
prise and astonishment—the immense masses
of stone employed in the edifice—the ma-
i HaCaT AON ANA H OLIED

Tai |

ao A

Yi )
i

A
AD LL

TEMPLE OF TENTYRA.

iy

(ome.

Pf
vat ty
ai}


TEMPLE OF TENTYRA. 31

jestic appearance of its construction—the
variety of its ornaments, and the excellent
preservation in which he found it, had such
an effect upon Belzoni, that he seated him-
self on the ground, lost in delight and ad-
miration. |

Lavra. —I suppose, mamma, that this
temple is the cabinet of the Egyptian arts,
—and I think I have heard papa say, that
it is supposed to have been built during the
reign of the first Ptolemy.

Mrs. A.—It is not improbable that he
who studied to render himself beloved by
his people might erect such an edifice, to
convince the Egyptians of his superiority of
mind over the ancient kings of Egypt, even
in religious devotion. It will take us too
long to describe this famous temple mi-
nutely :—when Mr, and Mrs. Belzoni had
gratified their curiosity, they returned to
their little boat, and embarked for Thebes.

Emiy.—They will soon have completed
their voyage, and then for the great colossal
bust.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni says, that it is impos-
sible to imagine the scene displayed by the
extensive ruins at Thebes. It appeared to
32 RUINS OF THEBES.

him, on entering it, like a city of giants,
who had been all destroyed, leaving only
the remains of various temples, as proofs of
their former existence. The attention is at-
tracted on one side by towering ruins that
project above a noble wood of palm-trees,
and there the traveller enters an endless num-
ber of temples, columns, obelisks, and por-
tals. On every side, he finds himself among
wonders. The immense colossal figures
in the plains, the number of tombs hollowed
in the rocks, those in the great valley of
the kings, with their paintings, sculptures,
mummies, and figures, are all objects worthy
of admiration ; and one cannot fail to won-
der how a nation which was once so great as
to erect these stupendous edifices, could so
far fall into oblivion, that even its language
and writing are totally unknown to us.
Having taken a survey of this seat of an-
cient grandeur, Belzoni crossed the Nile, and
bent his way towards the ruined temple near
Gournou. It stands elevated above the plain.
He entered the groups of columns, facing the
numerous tombs excavated in the high rock
behind them; and his first thought was to
examine the bust he had to take away. He




REMOVAL OF THE STATUE. 33

found it on the southern side of the temple,
near the remains of its body and chair, with
the face upwards. It was beautiful and of
immense size. Laura, who has seen it in the
British Museum, will be able to give you a
more accurate account of it.

Bernarp.—! cannot imagine, mamma, how
Belzoni could attempt to remove it; you
know he had only some poles, and some ropes
of palm-leaves—and palm-leaf ropes, made
ever so strong, would not be able to support
such a weight. I think he had better con-
trived a car, somewhat like that which the
African sheep has to rest its tail upon, in
“ Church’s Cabinet,”—and by this means he
might have brought it to the Nile, and then
had it placed in a boat, and conveyed to
Cairo.

Mrs. A.—No bad scheme, my little boy!
Belzoni’s whole set of implements consisted
of fourteen poles, eight of which he did em-
ploy in making a car, similar to what you
have proposed, four ropes of palm-leaves, and
four rollers—they were better than wheels:
and he now began to be very busy.

Emity.—As the bust was some way from
the Nile, it would have been too far for them
34 REMOVAL OF THE STATUE,

to go to sleep in the boat every night. How
did they manage about that ?

Mrs. A.—A small hut was formed for
them of stones, among the ruins of the tem-
ple.

Brernarv.—They were handsomely lodged,
however, mamma! But perhaps this little
hut might be as comfortable as the shabby
old house at Boolac, which they were always
expecting to fall upon their heads. But now
for the bust !

Mrs. A.—The season at which the Nile
usually overflows was fast approaching, and
all the lands which extend from the temple
to the water-side would have been covered in
the course of a month.

Brrnarv.—Then I advise Mr. Belzoni to
wait till that time, and then to put his head
in a boat, and row, row it away !

Mrs. A.—No such easy matter. The
ground between the bust and the river was
very uneven, so that unless it had been
conveyed over those places before the inun-
dation commenced, it would have been im-
possible to effect it. Belzoni, therefore,
lost no time. With some difficulty, he
procured a number of men, and agreed to


REMOVAL OF THE STATUE. 35

give them thirty paras a-day, which is equal
to four-pence halfpenny English money, if
they would undertake to assist him. A car-
penter made a car, somewhat like that which
supports the tail of your African sheep,
Bernard, only very large ; and the first ope-
ration was to place the bust upon this simple
carriage. The people of Gournou, who were
familiar with Caphany, as they named it, were
persuaded that it could never be removed
from the spot where it lay, and when they
saw, what to them appeared so impossible,
they set up a shout, and could not believe that
it was the effect of their own efforts. The
next thing was to place it on the car. Can
you guess how Belzoni managed this busi-
ness ¢

Bernarv.—I1 fancy, mamma, that he
bound the palm-leaf ropes round and round
Caphany very fast, and very firmly, and then
the men tried and tried until they had lifted
him up, and placed him uponit.

Mrs. A.—Ah, my little friend! you do
not evince much knowledge of the mechani-
cal powers, or you could not suppose that
this image would be moved by mere personal
strength.— Now, Owen, what is your opinion?
36 REMOVAL OF THE STATUE.

Owen.—I should think, mamma, that by
means of levers the bust might be raised so
as to leave a vacancy under it, and then the
car might be introduced by some of the peo-
ple, who were standing ready. After Capha-
ny had been lodged on this, the car itself
might be raised so as to get one of the rollers
beneath, and if the same operation were per-
formed at the back, he would be ready to
be pulled up;—and then, if you please,
Bernard, your palm-leaf ropes may come in
use, to tie him to the carriage, and draw him
along.

Mrs. A.— Well, Owen, I am _ pleased
with your conjecture. This is the very me-
thod Belzoni pursued; and when he had
succeeded in getting it removed some yards
from its original place, he sent an Arab to
Cairo, with the intelligence that the bust
had begun its journey to England. Our in-
genious friend reminds me of a remark made
by a celebrated writer, ‘that it is by small
efforts frequently repeated that man completes
his greatest undertakings, to have attempted
which, at one effort, would have baffled his
ability,” for he had still many difficulties
to encounter. When the Arabs found that


—

REMOVAL OF THE STATUE. 37

they received money for the removal of a
stone, they fancied that it was filled with
gold in the inside, and that a thing of such
value ought not to be permitted to be taken
away. However, the next day, and the next,
and the next, Caphany advanced slowly for-
ward; and, after many delays, owing to the
softness of the sand, the desertion of some
of the workmen, the fear of an inundation,
&c., Belzoni had the gratification of seeing
his young Memnon arrive on the banks of the
Nile. ; |

Emiry.—It is quite true, as you say,
mamma, that perseverance is generally crown-
ed with success. But it yet remains to put
the colossus ina boat; it has a long, long
way to go down the Nile before it arrives
at Cairo; and I expect Belzoni intends to
stop there, to show it to Mahomed Ali.

Mrs. A.—He intends doing so; but no
boat is to be had. We must therefore leave
the bust where it is for the present, and
accompany him, if you please, into one of
the caves that are scattered about the moun-
tain of Gournou, and are celebrated for the
number of mummies they contain ; he wished
to see a famous sarcophagus which was in

E
38 MUMMY-CAVES AT GOURNOU.

one of them, and thither he went. You
know what mummies are.

Owrn.—Mummies are the bodies of dead
persons, which have been wrapped up in a
great many bandages to preserve them; and
a sarcophagus is a sort of tomb or coffin.

Mrs. A.—-Two Arabs and an interpreter
accompanied Belzoni. Previously to enter-
ing the cave, they took off the greater part
of their clothes, and each having a candle,
they advanced through a cavity in the rock,
which extended a considerable length in the
mountain, sometimes high, sometimes very
narrow, and sometimes so low that Belzoni
and his attendants were obliged to creep on
their hands and knees. Thus they went on,
till he perceived they were at a great dis-
tance from the entrance; and the way had
become so intricate that he depended en-
tirely on the two Arabs to conduct him out
again.

Owrn.—I do not envy his situation now,
mamma—you know Arabs are sometimes
treacherous. )

- Mrs. A.—At length, they arrived. in a

* large. place, into which many: other ‘holes
* wr cavities, opened; and, after some exami-


INTERIOR OF THE CAVES. 39

nation by the Arabs, they entered one of
them, which was very narrow, and continued
downward for a long way, through a craggy
passage, till they came where two other aper-
tures led to the interior in a horizontal direc-
tion. One of the Arabs then said, ‘* This is
the place.”

Owen.—Oh, mamma ! How I should have
trembled ! Poor Belzoni ! Far from the light
of day—in a dark craggy passage, in the
midst of a dismal mummy cave, and attended
only by two Arabs and one other man!

Mrs. A.—Dismiss your fears, my love.
The Arab pointed out this spot as being
the situation of the sarcophagus; but Bel-
zoni could not conceive how anything so large
as it had been described to him could have
been taken through so small an aperture.
He had no doubt but these recesses were bu-
rial-places, as skulls and bones were strewed in
all directions; but the sarcophagus could never
have entered an aperture which even Belzoni
himself could not pass through. One of the
Arabs, however, succeeded, as did the inter-
preter, and it was agreed that Belzoni and
the other Arab should wait their return.
They certainly proceeded to a great distance,
40 ALARMING SITUATION.

for the light disappeared, and only a mur-
muring sound from their voices could be dis-
tinguished as they went on. After a few
moments, a loud noise was heard, and the
interpreter distinctly crying, “‘ O mon Diew !
mon Dieu ! Je suis perdu !”—a solemn silence
ensued.

Emury.—Oh, mamma, how dreadful ! Then
he is really lost !

Mrs. A.—Belzoni asked the Arab whether
he had ever been in that place. He replied,
“¢ Never!”

Emity.—I think, mamma, that it would
have been his best plan to return and procure
help from the other Arabs.

Mrs. A.—He wished to do so, but when
he desired the man to show him the way out
again, he said he did not know the road !
He then called—no answer was returned—
all was still as death—he watched for a long
time—no candle appeared, and his own was
almost burnt out.

Owxn.—This was an adventure indeed,
mamma! I am sadly afraid the Arabs had
some design on his life—do you not think he
had better have endeavoured to find his way
to the entrance?




ALARMING SITUATION. 4]

Mrs. A.—It was a complete labyrinth ;
however, he managed to return through some
of the passages to that place where, as I told
you just now, there were many cavities. Here
again he was puzzled ; but at last, seemg one
which appeared to be right, they proceeded
through it along way. Their candles appear-
ed likely to leave them in the dark, and in
that case their situation would have been yet
more deplorable.

Bernarv.—Why did not Belzoni put his
own out, and save the other ?—the Arab had
one, you know.

Mrs A.— Belzoni had more forethought
than my little Bernard has,—supposing that
one had, by some accident, been extinguished?

Bernarv.—Right, mamma: — I forgot
that.

Mrs. A.—At this time, supposing them-
selves near the outside of the tomb, what
was their disappointment on finding there
was no outlet, and that they must retrace
their steps to the place whence they had
entered this cavity. They strove to regain
it, but were as perplexed as ever, and were
both exhausted from the ascents and descents

they were obliged to pass. The Arab seat-
E 3
42 A HAPPY RELEASE.

ed himself, but every moment of delay was
dangerous.

Owern.—I wonder Belzoni’s ingenuity did
not make him think of putting a mark at
the entrance of each cavity as he examined
it, and that plan, you know, might have
helped him a little.

Mrs. A.—He did so, but unfortunately
their candles were not long enough to last
so many researches. However, hope, the
cheering star of life, darts a ray of light
through the thickest gloom; and encour-
aged by it they began their operations. On
the second attempt, when passing before a
small aperture, Belzoni fancied he heard
something like the roaring of the sea at a
distance. In consequence, they entered this
opening: and, as they advanced, the noise
increased, till they could distinctly hear a
number of voices all at one time.

Bernarp.— What joy this must have given
them! As much joy as it gave Owen to hear
papa’s voice in the wood, when he was lost
whilst we were gathering nuts last summer—
perhaps more: for, I am sure, I would rather
be lost in a nice green wood than in an Egyp-
tian mummy-cave !


RAL AERP

DUPLICITY OF THE ARABS. 43

Mrs. A.—At last they waiked out, and,
to their no small surprise, the first person
who presented himself was the interpreter.
How he came to be there seemed astonish-
ing. He told them, that in proceeding with
the Arab along the passage below they came
to a pit which they did not see, and that
the Arab fell into it, and in falling put out
both candles. It was then that he cried out,
“O mon Diew! mon Dieu! Je suis perdu!”
as he thought he also should have fallen into
the pit ; but, on raising his head, he saw, at a
great distance, a glimpse of daylight, toward
which he advanced, and thus arrived at a
small aperture. He then scraped away
some loose sand and stones, to widen the
opening, when he came out, and went to
give the alarm to the Arabs, who were at
the other entrance. Being all concerned for
the man who fell to the bottom of the pit,
it was their noise that Belzoni had heard
in the cave. The place by which the inter-
preter had escaped was instantly widened ;
and, in the confusion, the Arabs did not
regard letting Belzoni see that they were
acquainted with ¢hat entrance, and that it
had lately been shut up. He was not long
44 DECEIT OF THE ARABS.

in detecting their schemes. They had in-
tended to show him the sarcophagus without
letting him see the way by which it might
be taken out, and then to stipulate a price
for the secret ; as it was in reality but one
hundred yards from the great entrance.

Emmy.—So with this view they had taken
him that round-about way! Well, they
paid dear for their intended deception! But
the man in the pit, mamma—what became
of him?’

Mrs. A.—He was taken out of the well,
but so much hurt as to be lame ever after.
Thus the Arabs defeated their own purpose,
and proved that self-interest indeed is blind.
When men stoop to the meanness of equivo-
cation or deceit, especially in hopes of pro-
moting their own good, they are artful, but
not wise; for, as we can only judge of the
circumstances of the present moment, and
cannot foresee consequences, it is very likely,
as it proved with the Arabs, that our cunning
will bring us into still greater difficulties.
It is also certain to deprive us of confidence
in the protecting care of Providence, which,
as I have often told you, is the greatest sup-
port and comfort in every trouble.


:
BELZONIS COURAGE. 45

Bernarv.—I am glad Belzoni escaped,
mamma! I would never have trusted my-
self with those deceitful Arabs again !— But
where is Caphany all this time, with his palm-
leaf ropes ¢

Mrs. A.—Two guards were attending
him by night and by day. Belzoni at length
sent to Cairo for a boat; but, as he knew
it could not arrive for some time, he formed
an enclosure of earth all round the bust,
and spent the mean time in visiting various
antiquities.

Emity.—Then his courage was not daunt-
ed by that alarm, mamma! Many people
would not have ventured into mummy-caves,
at all events, again. How could he preserve
his mind from fear ?

Mrs. A.—By not indulging in it.

Owen. — Right, right! I like Belzoni,
because he possessed real courage—did he
not, mamma?—real fortitude! Although
he was a little terrified when alone with
the Arab in that dismal place, yet he did
not let that fear prevent his undertaking
other projects. When I am a man, mother,
I mean to be a traveller, and to possess as
much perseverance as owr Belzoni !
46 KHALIL BEY.

Mrs. A.—Experience will teach you, my
love, that it is not a very easy thing for one
unaccustomed to an arduous life to pass on
a sudden from the midst of comfort and in-
dulgence to one that is so irregular.

Belzoni determined to go up the Nile into
Nubia, and to leave the bust where it was
during his absence. He sent James to
Cairo, and discharged the carpenter, so that
a small party only remained, and then set.
off for Esne.

Emity.—Here is Esne, only a few miles
from Thebes, I suppose: not a very great
way, mamma.

Mrs. A.—There they landed just in time
to see Khalil Bey, with whom they had
become acquainted, some time before, in
Soubra.

Bernarv.—Who was Khalil Bey? We
have not heard his name before.

Mrs. A.—He was appointed to the govern-
ment of the Upper Provinces from Esne to
Assouan.

Bernarv.— Did he receive Belzoni po-
litely ?

Mrs. A.—Yes; he was just returned from
an excursion into the country, and was much


EGYPTIAN CUSTOMS. 4:7

pleased to see him. Our traveller found him,
with his pipe and coffee, seated on a sofa
made of earth, and covered with fine carpet
and satin cushions, surrounded by a great
number of his chiefs, Cacheffs, and Santons.
Khalil Bey was an Albanian, but his mode
of life was similar to that of the Egyptians
in general,

Brernarpv.— What is that, mamma !

Mrs. A.—The Egyptian rises with the
sun to enjoy the morning air; his favourite
pipe and beverage are brought to him, and he
reclines at ease on his sofa. Slaves, with
their arms crossed, remain silent at the far
end of the chamber, with their eyes fixed on
him, seeking to anticipate his smallest wants.
His children standing in his presence, unless
he permits them to be seated, preserve every
appearance of tenderness and respect: he
gravely caresses them, gives them his blessing,
and sends them back to the harem. He only
questions and they reply with modesty :
they are not allowed that free intercourse
with their parents which you enjoy.

Bernarp.—How strange it would appear
to us, mamma! I am sure I should be
miserable, if I were obliged to be so prim!
48 EGYPTIAN CUSTOMS.

Never to talk to my own papa! Papa him-
self would not be happy !

Mrs. A.—I grant that there is a great deal
of difference between your papa and an Egyp-
tian father, my dear boy. But custom, you
know, reconciles us to everything. The little
natives of that country, having never known
the pleasures of social enjoyment and tender
‘ntercourse with their parents, of course can-
not lament their loss.

Owen.—I think, mamma, that the Egyp-
tian father appears to be the chief, the judge,
and the pontiff, of his family? But does
he spend the rest of the day reclining on his
sofa

Mrs. A.—Breakfast ended, he transacts
the business of his trade or office. When
visitors come, he receives them without many
compliments, but in an endearing manner.
His equals are seated beside him, with their
legs crossed : his inferiors kneel, and sit upon
their heels.

Bernarp.—Ah, mamma ! that is as the
little Laplanders do, around the fire in their
comfortable huts.

Mrs. A.—People of distinction are fa-
youred with a place on a raised sofa, whence


EGYPTIAN CUSTOMS. 49

they overlook the company. When every
person is placed, the slaves bring pipes and
coffee, and set the perfume brasier in the
middle of the chamber, the air of which is
impregnated with its odours; and afterwards
they present sweetmeats and sherbet.

When the visit is almost ended, a slave,
bearing a silver plate, on which precious
essences are burning, goes round to the com-
pany : each, in turn, perfumes the beard, and
then sprinkles rose-water on the head and
hands. This being the last ceremony, the
guests are permitted to retire.

About noon, the table is prepared, and the
refreshments are brought in a large tray of
tinned copper, and, though not great variety,
there is great plenty. In the centre is generally
a dish of rice, cooked with poultry, and highly
flavoured with spice and saffron. Round this
are hashed meats, pigeons stuffed, cucumbers,
and delicious melons and fruits. The guests
seat themselves on a carpet round the table ;
a slave brings water in one hand, and a basin
in the other, to wash. This is an indispensable
ceremony, where each person puts his hand
into the dish, and where the use of forks is
unknown: it is repeated when the meal is

F
50 EGYPTIAN CUSTOMS.

ended. After dinner, they retire to the
harem, where they slumber some hours among
their wives and children. ... Such is the
ordinary life of the Egyptians. |

Laura.What a monotonous way of
spending their time, mamma ! Our intellec-
tual pleasures seem unknown to them! The
days appear to be passed in repeating the same
thing, in following the same customs, without
a wish or a thought beyond. And, mamma,
how do you, who are such an admirer of in-
dustry, tolerate their excessive indolence.

Mrs. A..We must remember, my love,
that nine months of the year the body is op-
pressed by heat; and that, as inaction under
a temperate climate is painful, so here repose
is enjoyment. Effeminate indolence is born
with the Egyptian, grows as he grows, and
descends with him to the grave. It influences
his inclinations and governs his actions; and,
far from daily wishing to obtain knowledge
and enlarge the mental powers, he sighs only
for calm tranquillity.

Owrn.—Well, mamma! I will allow the
idle, solemn, and patient Egyptian some little
excuse, on the strength of the sultry climate
which he endures two-thirds of the year. I


EDFU.——ASSOUAN. 51

know that heat does make one feel languid
and indolent: when I had been haymaking
with Frederick last Tuesday, and came home
so warm in the evening, I was obliged to lie
on the sofa in the breakfast-room, while my
cousins were amusing themselves with papa’s
portfolio in the library, although I particularly
wished to join them. Now, if you please, we
will go back to Belzoni: we left him at Esne,
with Khalil Bey.

Mrs. A.—After smoking a few pipes, and
drinking as many cups of coffee, he left the
Bey and returned to the boat. The follow-
ing day, they continued their voyage, and
arrived at Edfu, where a temple, which might
be compared with that of Tentyra, tempted
our antiquary to land. Having been highly
gratified here, they proceeded to Ombos: the
ruins that are left at this place gave them a
clear idea of what it had been. Our party
proceeded, and, before their arrival at Assouan,
landed on the western bank of the Nile. Here
the country presented a more pleasing aspect
than any they had passed since the Chained
Mountains. Palm-trees in great abundance
grow on each side of the river, and some
cultivated spots of ground extend from the
52 ISLAND OF ELEPHANTIS.

Nile to the mountains. The old town of
Assouan stands on a hill, which overhangs
the river: on its left isa forest of palm-trees,
which hides the modern town ; and on its
right is the distant view of a granite mountain,
that forms the first of the celebrated cataracts.
The island of Elephantis seems to interfere
with the barrenness of the western banks,
and fills the ground with picturesque groups
of various trees. Our travellers landed at
the foot of a hill on the left of the Nile,
and went to see the ruins of a convent on a
high rock, where they observed many grot-
toes, which had served as chapels for Christian
worship. The convent is formed of several
small arched cells, distinct from each other,
and commands a view of the cataract and
adjacent country, with the lower part of the
Nile.

Bernarp.— What is granite, mamma?

Mrs. A.—A sort of stone, composed of
separate and very large concretions, rudely
joined together.

When Belzoni returned to the boat, the
sun was tinging the horizon with its last
beams, and the shades of the western moun-
tains had reached across the Nile, and covered
xi on Bie cs pilbici tic dit mates

ae

a Pod Ne Beet
. wt

AGA OF ASSOUAN. 53

the town. He found the Aga (a person
employed by the Turkish Government) and
all his retinue seated on a mat, under a
cluster of palm-trees, close to the water.

Owrn.—Ha! ha! I guess the Aga is
smoking his pipe and drinking his coffee, ac-
cording to custom, and talking of camels,
horses, asses, caravans, or boats; nothing
very intellectual, Laura!

Bernarp.—Had Belzoni anything to do
with this Aga, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—Yes: he made application to
him for a boat to carry them to Nubia, and
presented to him some tobacco, soap, and
coffee, which were gladly accepted ; he was
a selfish sort of person, and asked a great
price for the use of the boat; engaging,
however, that one should be ready in a day
or two.

The next morning Belzoni went to see
the isle of Elephantis: he crossed the Nile in
a tiny bark, made of the branches of palm-
trees, fastened together with small cords, and
covered on the outside with a mat, pitched
all over. The principal object of attraction
there was a temple of great antiquity, built

on rocks of blue granite: on the western
F 3
54 PHILOE.——DEIR.

bank of the island are many cassia and sy-
camore trees. Having gratified his curiosity,
Belzoni returned ; and, as the Aga’s boat
was now in readiness, he determined to as-
cend the Nile to the second cataract, during
the interval required for the arrival of the
boat from Cairo, which was to convey the
colossal bust. They therefore embarked, and,
on the following morning, long before the
rising of the sun, Belzoni stood at the stern,
waiting for its first beams to unveil the beau-
tiful island of Philoé; and he had much
gratification in taking a hasty view of its ruins,
without stopping to examine them minutely,
as he hoped to return that way: he, how-
ever observed several blocks of stones, and
an obelisk, which he thought might be
easily removed.

Emiy.—Here is Philoé, mamma, in the
middle of the Nile, somewhat south of As-
souan.

Mrs. A.—As the wind was favourable,
they again set sail, and arrived in the course
of a few days at Deir.

Emiry.—My little finger has arrived at
Deir also, mamma ; it is the capital of Lower

Nubia.
ar

ee

|
4
ae
a
4



HASSAN CACHEFF. 55

Mrs. A.—This town consists of several
groups of houses, built of earth intermixed
with stones, and covered with reeds.

Bernarp.—Oh, mamma! somewhat like
the little bamboo huts in Peru. . But how
high are they ?

Mrs. A.—Their height is generally about
eight or ten feet; the height of the parlour
we are in is between eight and ten feet. At
the foot of the sloping and rocky hill is a
small temple; but Belzoni could not go to
see it, as he observed that they were closely
watched.

Bernarv.— Why were they watched, mam-
ma !

Mrs. A.—You shall hear. Belzoni went
immediately to Hassan Cacheff, who receiv-
ed him with an air of suspicion, and wanted
to know his business. He told him, that
he ascended the Nile merely to seek for an-
tiquities, and that he wished to proceed as
far as the Shellah, or second Cataract. This,
the Cacheff said, was impossible: for the
people in the upper country were at war with
each other. He then ordered his mat to be
brought to him, seated himself close before
the door of his house, and invited Belzoni
56 -RAPACITY OF THE CACHEFF.

to sit also. The first question he asked him
was, whether he had any coffee. Belzoni
replied, that they had a little on board for
their own use, but that he should have half
of it. He next asked for soap, and received
the same reply. Then he enquired if he
had any tobacco; Belzoni said that he had
a few pipes, and they would smoke together.
This pleased Hassan Cacheff. The next
question was, whether he had any powder ;
and the answer he received was, that they
had very little, and could not spare any.
At this Hassan laughed; and, putting his
hand on Belzoni’s shoulder, he said, “ You
are English and can make powder wherever
you go.”

Owrn.—I should think Belzoni was glad
that he thought so; and he had better leave
him under this impression, before the selfish,
troublesome Cacheff asks anything more.

Mrs. A.—The pipes are not smoked yet,
my dear. By this time, however, the to-
bacco was brought, and the operation begun.
Hassan still persisted in it that Belzoni’s
sailors would not advance any further ; for
they were afraid, he said, to go into the upper
country. Our friend, unwilling to give up
RAPACITY OF THE CACHEFF. 57

his point, used every means of entreaty; and
at length frankly told him, that, if he would
allow him to pursue his journey, he would
make him a very handsome present of a fine
looking-glass. Hassan replied, “ We will
talk of this to-morrow;” and the indefatiga-
ble Belzoni returned to his boat.

Owen. — A looking-glass was a novelty to
the Cacheff, I suppose, mamma ’

Mrs. A.—Yes: Belzoni went again to
him early in the morning, and told him that
it was ready for his acceptance, provided he
would give him a letter of recommendation
to his brother at Ybsambul, which at last
he did.

Bernarv.—And so Hassan thought his
looking-glass a great treasure! But how
came Belzoni to take such a thing with him‘

Mrs. A.—Previously to his departure from
Cairo, he had taken care to obtain all the
information possible respecting the country
of Nubia, from the natives who came to that
city with dates and charcoal ; and from them
he learned that a looking-glass and a few
beads would be as valuable in their eyes as
gold and diamonds are in ours.

Brernarpv.—How large was the Cacheff’s
58 ANTIQUITIES AT YBSAMBUL.

looking-glass, mamma? I dare say he ad-
mired himself very much.

Mrs. A.—It was about twelve inches
square, and made a great impression on the
people there, who had never seen so large a
one before. The Cacheff was never tired
of admiring his dark-coloured countenance,
and all the attendants behind him strove to
get a peep at their own tawny beauty.

Belzoni, entering the boat again, proceeded
down the Nile till he arrived at Ybsambul,
where two temples presented attractions. I
must describe them, because they were the
objects of another voyage up the Nile. In
front of the minor temple were six colossal
figures, thirty feet high, and hewn out of
the rock; as was also the large temple, which
had one figure of enormous size, with the
head and shoulders only projecting out of
the sand, and most beautifully executed. On
the upper part, or frieze, of the temple, was
a line of hieroglyphics, which covered the
whole front; and above this, a range of
figures, in a sitting posture, as large as life.
The sand on the north side, accumulated be-
hind on the rock above the temple, had gradu-
ally descended towards its front, choked the


TEMPLE AT YBSAMBUL. 59

entrance, and buried two-thirds of it. When
Belzoni approached this temple, the hope he
had formed of entering it vanished at once;
for the heaps of sand were such as to make
it appear an impossibility ever to reach the
door. He ascended a hill of sand at the
upper part of the temple, and there found
the head of a hawk projecting out of the sand
only to its neck. From the situation of
this figure, he concluded that it was over the
door; but how to get to that door was the
grand difficulty.

Owern.——So it was, mamma; for you know
it was necessary to remove the sand in such
a direction, that it might fall off from the
front of the door; but in doing this, the sand
from above would continue to fall on the
place whence that below was removed, and
thus render it an almost endless task.

Laura.—Besides, the natives were like
wild people, and knew nothing of working
for money; indeed, they were ignorant of
money altogether.

Mrs. A.—All these difficulties seemed
such insurmountable objects, that they almost
deterred Belzoni from the thought of pro-
ceeding; yet perseverance, stimulated by
60 TEMPLE AT YBSAMBUL.

hope, suggested to him such means, that at
last, after much exertion, and two voyages
. thither, he had the satisfaction of entering
the great temple of Y bsambul.

By calculating, Belzoni supposed the door
I mentioned to be thirty-five feet below the
sand; and, having taken a proper measure”
ment of the front of the temple, he found
that if he could persuade the people to work
with persevering steadiness, he might succeed
in the undertaking.

Emity.—Who was the Cacheff of Y bsam-
bul, mamma? I think our antiquary had
better have applied to him.

Mrs. A.—Yes, my love: wishing to do
so, he did not examine the smaller temple
that night, but followed the road between the
rocks out of which it is hewn, and arrived
on the banks of the Nile, where they em-
barked, and soon landed at the village. A
group of people, who were assembled under
a grove of palm-trees, seemed somewhat sur-
prised at the arrival of a stranger. Belzoni
desired to see Osseyn Cacheff, telling them
that he bad a letter for him from his brother.

Emiuy.—tThe selfish Cacheff of Deir,

mamma ?


DAOUD CACHEFF. 61

Mrs. A.—Yes: he for some time received
no answer, but at last was told that he who
sat there was Daoud, his son. This was a
man about fifty years of age, clad in a light
blue gown, with a white rag on his head as
a turban, seated upon an old mat on the
ground, a long sword and a gun by his side,
with about twenty men surrounding him,
who were well armed with swords, spears,
and shields. |

Daoud Cacheff begged to know what busi-
ness had brought Belzoni thither? He re-
plied that he had a letter from his uncle,
directed to his father, and that he came into |
that country in search of ancient stones.
Daoud laughed, and said that, a few months
before he had seen another man who came
from Cairo in search of treasure, and took
away a great deal of gold in his boat, and
that Belzoni came for the same purpose—not
to take stones. What could he have to do
with stones, if it were not to procure gold
from them ?

Bernarp.—I am afraid Belzoni will be
puzzled to convince Daoud. How did he
manage, mamma?

Mrs. A.—Very cleverly. He told Daoud

G
62 DAOUD CACHEFF.

that the stones he wished to take away were
broken pieces belonging to the old Pharaoh
people, and that his motive for coming in
search of them was to know whether our an-
cestors came from that country. Daoud then
asked where he meant to go in search of these
stones. Belzoni said that the place in the -
rock had a door, and that by removing the
sand they might enter the temple, and should
perhaps find many stones there ; and-accord-
ingly proposed to have it opened. After
some difficulty, he managed to convince the
people of the value of money, for they had
never heard of such a thing, having been ac-
customed to exchange various articles ; and
Daoud at length consented to find workmen,
provided Belzoni would give them each two
piastres a day, which he consented to do.

Owen.— Well, mamma, Daoud was rather
more reasonable than his uncle Hassan, who
required so many presents before he would
allow Belzoni to continue his voyage. But
there now remains consent to be obtained
from Osseyn Cacheff, Daoud’s father.

Mrs. A.—This was the greatest difficulty ;
he lived at Eshke, a mile and a half up the
Nile. To secure his favour (for favour in
DHOURRA BREAD. 63

this land may often be procured by bribes),
Belzoni sent forward to him some rice, sugar,
and tobacco; and received on board in the
evening some sour milk and warm thin cake
of dhourra bread.

Bernarp.— What is dhourra, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—The common grain of Egypt,
my love. The bread is baked on a flat stone
raised at each corner so as to admit a fire
under it; the paste, which is soft, being laid
on it, spreads in a minute over the stone ; as
soon as one cake is baked, another is done in
the same manner, and so on; and this dhourra
bread forms the general food of the country.

Emity.— It is made very much in the
same manner as the fisherman’s wife (whom
we saw at that pretty cottage on the Cum-
berland mountains) was making her oat-
cakes. Do you remember, Bernard ?

Brernarp.— Oh, yes! yes! And the
fisherman’s rosy boys showed me how to
catch shrimps in a little net, whilst you looked
at the woman making them.—Go on, mam-
ma. I want to know what the Cacheff said
to Belzoni.

Mrs, A.—They went, the next morning,
to his residence at Eshke, and were told that
64 THE SECOND CATARACT.

he was from home, but would return in a few —
days. This occasioned some disappointment ;
but as Mr. and Mrs. Belzoni did not wish
to return to Ybsambul without having had
an interview with him, they went on towards
the second Cataract, and about nine, two
mornings after they had left: Eshke, they
made for the shore, a8 near as possible to
the last cultivated land on the left.

Emity.—I have found the situation of the
second Cataract, mamma ; and the place
of which you speak must be Wady Halfa.

Mrs. A.—A few of the natives came to
look at the strangers; and, at Belzoni’s re-
quest, they willingly brought asses for them
to ride to the Cataract ; and now, Bernard,
place yourself on your own little Smiler, and
fancy yourself one of the party. Proceed to
the Cataract, and take several views in dif-
ferent directions. Mount the rocks, and take
a survey of the wide sandy deserts. Observe
the wild antelopes that are skipping about
on the crags of the few black cliffs which pro-
ject here and there ; and having enjoyed the
grand prospect afforded by this Cataract, and
as the sun again is sinking beneath the hori-
zon, return to the little bark.


i a) eee

ISLE OF MAINARTY. 65

Bernarp.—And from thence, mamma,
where shall I go?

Mrs, A.—You may accompany Mr. and
Mrs. Belzoni, who immediately crossed for
the isle of Mainarty, where they arrived at
dusk. They saw fires and people at a dis-
tance, but on landing, could not find any one.
The huts were left with all they had, which
consisted only of dry dates and a kind of
paste made of the same, which was kept in
large vases of clay baked in the sun, and
covered with baskets made of palm-leaves ;
a baking stove, and a mat to sleep upon, com-
prised the whole of their furniture.

Owrn.—Ah ! they little expected visitors
at such atime! I suppose they were honest
themselves, as they did not suspect their
neighbours. But pray, mamma, how large is
this island ?

Mrs. A.—The whole of the island is about
an eighth of a mile in length, and half as much
in breadth. The whole settlement consisted
of four men and seven women, with two or
three children. They have no communication
with the main land, except when the water
is low; for at any other time, the current,
being just under the Cataract, is so rapid that

G3
TS

66 SIMPLICITY OF THE PEOPLE.

it is impossible to ford it, and boats never go
to this island. They are poor but happy;
knowing nothing of the enticing luxuries of
the world, and resting content with what
Providence supplies as the reward of their
industry. They havea few sheep and goats,
which supply them with milk ; and the few
spots of land they have are all cultivated, pro-
ducing a little dhourra, which, you know, is
the principal food they require. The wool
of their sheep they spin into yarn; they wind
the thread round little stones, and then sus-
pend them to a long stick fixed in a horizontal
position between two trees, to form a warp ;
and, by passing another thread alternately be-
tween these, they fabricate a kind of coarse
cloth, with which they make their dress.

Emizy.— When we were overtaken by the
thunder-storm last summer, we went into the
weaver's cottage at the end of the park, mam-
ma; therefore I understand what you mean
by the warp: but this plan is still more sim-
ple than our weaver’s. I wonder how they
pass the woof—you do not mention their
having a shuttle, mamma ¢—-But where are
the inhabitants all this time.

Mrs. A.—It was quite dark when Belzoni


SIMPLICITY OF THE PEOPLE. 67

found this poor and truly happy people.
They had lighted a fire to make their bread,
and the light of this fire directed him to the
spot where they were. 1 suppose they had
been terrified by seeing him at a distance ;
for they were all hid in a hole under some
ruins of an old castle, which stands on the
south side of the island; and when he ap-
proached them, the women set up a loud
scream. A person who was with him, a na-
tive of Nubia, could talk their language,
and managed to pacify them, but could
not entice more than one man out of the
hole. 7

Bernarv.—I cannot think why they were
so much alarmed, mamma.

Mrs. A.—Their fear was owing to some
depredations committed, a few years before,
by the robbers of Wady Halfa, who, at low
water forded over to the island, and did all
the injury that could be done by such people.
The strangers assured them that they were
not like the robbers of Wady Halfa, but only
came to get some one to show them the way
to the Cataract. At this they were more
alarmed than ever; and said that it never
happened that boats passed higher than Wady


68 PERILOUS VOYAGE.

Halfa,—it being impossible to proceed far-
ther, owing to the number of rocky islands.
At last, however, they prevailed upon two
of the men to accompany them the following
morning, and pilot them towards the Cata-
ract as far as the boat could go.

Bernarp.— W hat courage Belzoni had !

Mrs. A.—According to agreement, they
went on board, and with a strong north wind
advanced in their little bark, until they found
themselves so tossed about by the different
currents and eddies, as to prevent farther
progress ; at the same time they were so
situated, that they could not return, for fear
of being driven against some of the rocks
which threatened them on each side.

Emity.—They are in a deplorable situation
again, mamma ! But no treacherous or de-
ceitful Arabs are with them now.

Mrs. A.—They were confined to one spot
for about an hour. Sometimes, they had a
rapid start for a hundred yards; then, all at
once, they were stopped and turned round
in spite of all their efforts, and of the north
wind, which blew very hard. At last, they
were caught on a sudden in one of the eddies
of water, and driven against a sharp rock con-


VIEW OF THE CATARACT. 69

cealed about two feet below the surface. The
shock was dreadful; it is impossible to de-
scribe Belzoni’s emotions, for he thought at
the moment that the boat was split in two—
and the object of his tenderest solicitude was
on board ; for her he saw no mode of escape :
had he been alone, he might have swum on
shore. However, his trust in the protecting
care of Providence did not forsake him : they
found that no harm was done, and that, by
crossing the rock they were on, they might
reach the other side of the river. They did
so as quickly as possible, and landed, rejoic-
ing in the thought of the danger they had
escaped. They were obliged to pursue their
route on foot : carrying with them provisions
and water, they proceeded on the rocks, over
a plain of sand and stones, until they arrived
at one called Aspir, which is the highest in
the neighbourhood of the Cataract, and com-
mands a complete view of the falls.

Emity.—And now our lovers of nature are
well repaid, I have no doubt, mamma, for the
prospect must have been very fine.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni says that it was a truly
magnificent scene. The several thousand
islands, of various forms and sizes, with as
————————————_ nn res
70 RETURN TO YBSAMBUL.

many different falls of water, running rapidly
onward, whilst counter-currents returned with
equal velocity ; the blackness of the stones ;
the verdant foliage of the trees scattered on
the islets, intermixed with the white bub-
bling froth of the numerous cascades, formed
a picture neither to be described nor de-
lineated.

Having been thus compensated for their
venturous excursion, our travellers returned
to Ybsambul.

Bernarp.—The temples are at that place ;
and now we shall hear how Belzoni endea-
youred to persuade the natives to open them,
and what Osseyn Cacheff, who, I suppose, |
was come home by this time, said to him.

Mrs. A.—He went immediately to his
son Daoud, who presented to him a letter
from his father, and sent for the men who
were selected for the work. These people
were complete savages, and wholly unac-
quainted with any kind of labour. How-
ever, according to direction, they began their
undertaking in such a manner that the sand
would fall off from the centre of the front —
of the temple, where the door was supposed
to be.


CLEARING AWAY THE SAND. 71

Bernarv.—Had they spades to dig away
the sand, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—No, not spades, but a long stick
with a cross piece of wood at the end, at each
extremity of which was a rope.

Bernarpv.—I understand, mamma. One
man would draw the cross-stick back, and
another man would pull it forwards. Did
this plan answer ?

Mrs. A.—Yes: they found it very useful
in clearing away the sand; and as this was
the first day of their enterprise, they pro-
ceeded better than Belzoni had expected ;
all their thoughts and talk were on the quan-
tity of gold, pearls, and jewels, they should
find in the place.

Lavura.—That was a good thing, mamma,
because it acted as a stimulus for them to
proceed.

Mrs. A.—Thus they went on for some
days ; but as they had not before known the
value of money, so now their wish to obtain
it knew no bounds: they continually wished
to procure more than their employer allowed
them ; the other people also began to desire
it, and came in such numbers, that, had he
wished it, he would have found it difficult
72 OPENING THE TEMPLE.

to supply them all. Their desire to see the
‘uside of the temple, and to plunder what it
might contain, increased ; and they gave Bel-
zoni to understand, that all that was there
was their own property, and that the treasure
should be for themselves. He in vain as-
sured them that he expected to find nothing
but stones, and wanted no treasure ; they
still persisted, that if he took away the
stones, the treasure was in them, and that if
he could make a drawing or likeness of them,
he could extract the treasure from that also,
without their perceiving it.

Owern.—They had great confidence in Bel-
zoni’s ability, however, mamma, as well as
an uncommon degree of superstition !

Mrs. A. — Some proposed that, if any
figure were discovered, it should be broken
before he carried it away, to examine the
inside.

Owen.—How provoking! Then poor Bel- —
zoni had no encouragement to proceed ;—it
was not of much use to take so much pains,
only in the end to gratify the selfish curiosity
of those savages ; and, according to this, he
might not make drawings, much less take
away any statue or anything else that might




-RAPACITY OF THE WORKPEOPLE, 73

be found. I think, under such circumstances,
mamma, it will not lessen our ideas of his per-
severance and patience, if he does give up
opening this temple :—I cannot bear the
thought of his spending so many days to no
purpose, .
Mrs. A.— Fromthe slow progress, or rather
from the immense quantity of sand accumu-
lated together, Belzoni perceived that his work
would require more time than he could spare
at that period before its completion: still.
he would have persevered, had not another
and a stronger motive presented itself—the
want of that very article which, a few days
before, was despised and unknown ; and now
he found that he absolutely could not proceed
without it. It was money, which, even here,
had shown its usual power among mankind
of exciting avarice and a selfish disposition.
Owen. —And here the sentence I repeated
in my Latin lesson this morning is just @ pro-
pos, mamma. ‘The love of money increases
as the money itself increases.”
Brrnarv.——But, perhaps, mamma, Belzoni
was nearer the door than he expected; he
_ could not see through the sand, you know.
Mrs, A.—I will tell you how he managed,

H
74 THE WORK POSTPONED.

He had some water brought up from the Nile,
and poured down close to the door.

Owern.—Ha ! ha ! a very clever plan | just
like our ingenious Belzoni ! This would stop
the sand from running, until he had made a
hole deep enough to perceive whether they
were near the door. I hope they are | “He
supposed, in the first place, that the sand was
about thirty-five feet in thickness; and how
many feet had they removed it, do you think,
mamma ?

Mrs. A.—They had removed so much sand
as to uncover twenty feet of the temple; but,
from the hole that was made, Belzoni perceiv-
ed that it would require a longer time to reach
the door than he could stay, and more money
than he could afford; although the colossal
statues above the door were by this time com-
pletely exposed. He therefore obtained a
promise from the Cacheff that no one should
touch the place till his return (which would
probably be in a few months); and, contenting
himself with putting a mark where the sand -
was before his operation had commenced, and -
taking a sketch of the exterior of the temple,
he quitted it, with a firm resolution of
returning some time to accomplish its opening.


RETURN TO ASSOUAN. 75

Emity.—Well, mother, he acted both pru-
dently and judiciously ; but I should have
been afraid lest the selfish people who had
worked for him should have opened it in the
mean time. However, whither did he go
next? and when did he return to young
Memnon, who has been staying this long
period at Thebes, banked up with earth and
palm-leaf ropes ?

Mrs. A.—They set off in the boat, and,
descending the Nile rapidly, arrived in a few
days at Shellal.

Emiry.—Here is Shellal, or the first Cata-
ract, marked on the map: we passed it before,
I recollect.

Mrs. A.—When they reached the Isle of
Philoé, Belzoni took particular notice of the
small obelisk, which he hoped at some future
time to bring to England, and he sent for the
Aga of Assouan.

Kmity.—We have got back to Assouan,
have we, mamma?! I remember it, just on
_ the opposite side of the Nile to that of the
Cataract ; and I remember. the selfish Aga,
too, who asked such a sum for the use of his
boat : why did Belzoni send for him?

Mrs. A.—To persuade him to use his


76 THE AGA OF ASSOUAN.

‘nterest in having the obelisk taken down the
Cataract ; but this, for want of a boat, could
not be effected that season. I mentioned the
obelisk to you before.

Owen.— Yes, mamma: it was formed of
granite, twenty-two feet in length and two in
breadth, so that it would want a pretty large
boat to convey it.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni took possession of it, giv-
ing the Aga four dollars to pay a guard for it
till his return. The next day, they proceeded
to Assouan by land. On their arrival, they
were informed that there were no boats to take
them to Esne, so they were obliged to wait.

Emity.—I dare say the time was not wast-
ed by Belzoni; yet 1 am sorry for him to
meet with this delay, for he, no doubt, was
anxious to return to Thebes, and to see his
young Memnon once more. |

Mrs. A.—What we cannot help, we must,
of course, endure. Our enterprising friend
often found it so; and he amused himself
during this period by taking another tour in
Elephantis.

Eauzy.—And when he returned to Assouan
had the boat made its appearance !

Mrs. A.—No: no boat had yet arrived.




|



THE DIAMOND SELLER. 77

The delay was tedious; however, nothing
could be done but submit to it.

Belzoni was seated, one evening, under a
grove of palm-trees, eating some rice-soup
with the Aga, when an Arab came and whis-
pered in the ear of the latter, as if he
had something of great importance to com-
municate. ,

Brernarp. I should not have thanked him
for the interruption ; I do not like the Arabs
at all, since they treated Belzoni so shabbily
in the mummy-cave.

Mrs. A.—The Aga rose, though his meal
was not finished, and went away with the air
of a man of great business.

Brernarv.—That looked very suspicious ;
what do you think the Arab had whispered
to him ¢

Mrs. A.—You will hear in time. Half an
hour after, he returned, accompanied by two
other persons of distinction and an old man.
They all seated themselves around him, and,

.after introducing the affair with some caution,

asked Belzoni whether he should like to pur-

chase a large piece of diamond. It is true he

was no diamond-merchant : however, he told

the Aga, that if the article were good, and
H 3
78 A DISAPPOINTMENT.

they could agree, he would buy it ; but that
‘+ was necessary for him to see it first. The
Aga said that the piece had been found by
one of the natives of that place, and, as he
was not in want of money, it had been pre-
served in the family for many years: The
original proprietor being now dead, his succes-
sor wished to dispose of it.

Belzoni requested to see it, and therefore
retired with him to some distance out of the
way of the people; when the old man, with
great solemnity, took a small wooden box
from a pocket in his leather belt. In this was
a paper, which he unfolded, and after that,
two or three others ; till at last he displayed
the diamond itself. Belzoni took it in his
hands with no small degree of expectation ;
but, alas! how did he look when he perceived
that this great treasure, which had been so
long carefully stored, was only part of the
stopple of a common glass cruet, of the size
of a hazel-nut, with two or three little gilt
flowers upon it! All his hopes vanished :
and as the others were attentively watching
his motions, they could not fail to observe the
disappointment marked in his countenance,
and their hopes vanished too. When they
ARAB DUPLICITY. 79

were told that it was only a piece of glass,
the words affected their minds like the tidings
of some great misfortune ; they walked off in
solemn silence, not without giving him an in-
quiring look, to learn whether he were really
in earnest; but he shared their disappoint-
ment, and the smile on his: face could give
them no hopes.

Brernarp.— What icioseted ! to mistake a
piece of glass for a diamond! I am glad it
was no worse. When you told us, mamma,
that the Aga walked off in solemn silence, I
began to be alarmed for Belzoni.— Well, is the
boat arrived ? |

Mrs. A.—No: no boat is yet to be seen.
Belzoni, therefore, proposed bespeaking two
camels and travelling to Esne by land ; when
this resolution was known, a boat was soon in
readiness, and he discovered that the whole
delay was a fraud to detain him at Assouan,
several little barks having been concealed in
different places. Our travellers had a rapid
and agreeable voyage down the Nile, and
reached Luxor in safety.

Euiry.—Luxor, just by Thebes, mamma ;
here it is.—Did they find the boat come from
Cairo, to take Caphany thither ?
80 EMBARKATION OF YOUNG MEMNON.

Mrs. A.—The Cacheff had procured one ;
and, when they arrived at Thebes, they found
*t fastened to the bank where the colossal head
was. Belzoni met with much opposition
when he wished to remove this great bust.;—
some thought that it would overbalance the
boat, and, consequently, be lost in the Nile;
others wished to retain it, supposing it con-
tained gold; and others alleged that it was
impossible to put it into the boat, as the bank
was more than fifteen feet above the level of
the water, which had retired at least a hun-
dred feet from it. His vexation was great,
in thinking that all his efforts and exertion
in bringing the head to the Nile were to no
purpose, and that it would probably never
reach England, as the opposition was so power-
ful.

Owen.—A fter having taken so much pains!
After having made the car, and the palm-leaf
ropes ! After having employed so many days
in removing it !—Ah! Belzoni! how little
they knew how to appreciate your industry !

Mrs. A.—Perseverance in laudable pur-
suits, as I have often told you, will reward
all our labour, and produce effects even be-
yond our calculation. With some trouble,



i
4
4


EMBARKATION OF YOUNG MEMNON, 81

Belzoni collected a hundred and thirty men,
and, under his superintendence, they began to
make a causeway, by which to convey the head
down to the river-side. This was finished
_ the next day; and the bust was brought to
- the edge of the slope, ready to be embarked.

Brrnarv.—And how was that managed,
dear mamma ?

Mrs. A.—It required some thought, for
it was no easy undertaking to put a piece of
granite, of such bulk and weight, on board a
boat, which, if it received the weight on one
side, would be immediately upset.

Owen.—Could the Egyptians furnish no
_ mechanical powers, mamma, and thus render
the operation more practicable ?

Mrs. A.—No, my dear; it was to be
done without the smallest help of that kind,
or of even a single tackle; with poles and
ropes only.

Lavra.—The people there know scarcely
anything of mechanics, Owen; their utmost
sagacity reaches only to pulling a rope, or
sitting on the extremity of a lever, as a
counterpoise, or balance,

Brrnarv.— Will you tell me, dear Laura,
what you mean by a lever ?
82 EMBARKATION OF YOUNG MEMNON.

Lavra.—A lever, my love, is the founda-
tion of all the mechanical powers. It is no-
thing more than a straight stick, or bar of |
wood, or iron.

Owrn.—Did you never read, in “ Sandford
and Merton,” Bernard, about the snowball
which they rolled along with so much ease,
by using two long sticks, which were called
levers ?—But we are wandering from Belzoni.
Now, mother, will you tell us how the head
was let down that steep bank ‘

Mrs. A.—The causeway was made gradu-
ally sloping to the edge of the water, close
to the boat; and, with the four poles, 2
bridge was formed from the bank into the
centre of the boat.

Emuy.—I understand, mamma ; and so,
when the weight bore on the bridge, it pressed
only on the middle of the boat.

Owen.—And this slender bridge rested
partly on the causeway, partly on the side
of the boat, and partly on the centre of it.

Mrs. A.— On the opposite side of the
boat, Belzoni put some mats, well filled with
straw. A few Arabs were stationed in it, and
some at each side, with a lever of palm-wood,
as there was nothing else. At the middle


EMBARKATION OF YOUNG MEMNON. 83

of the bridge he placed a sack filled with
sand, that in case the colossus should run
too fast into the boat, it might be stopped.

Owern.—How did he contrive to make it
descend gradually! You know if they had
given it a push, and it had gone at once, it
would have overbalanced the boat, and, per-
haps, drowned the Arabs.

Mrs. A.—Behind the colossus Belzoni had
the trunk of a palm-tree firmly planted, round
which a rope was twisted, and then fastened
to the car, so that it might descend gently.
e set a lever at work on each side, and,
t the same time that the men in the boat
ere pulling, others were slackening the ropes,
nd others moving the rollers as the collossus
dvanced. Thus it descended very, very
lowly, from the main land to the causeway,
hen it sunk a good deal, as the causeway
as made of fresh earth. However, this was
etter than if it had run too fast, towards the
ater. Belzoni thought so too; for, if it
ad fallen into the Nile, it would have been
ot only a mortification to himself, but a
isappointment to many antiquaries in Eng-
nd, who were longing for its arrival. How-
ver, it went safely on board. The Arabs,
















84 ARRIVAL AT ROSETTA.

who were of opinion that it would go to the
bottom of the river, or crush the boat, were
all attention, as if anxious to know the result,
as well as to learn how the operation was to
be performed. When the owner of the boat,
who considered it as lost, witnessed Belzoni’s
success, and saw the huge piece of stone, as
he called it, safely on board, he came forward
and heartily congratulated him. Belzoni was
rejoiced to see his long anticipated project
thus crowned with success. The party ar-
rived at Cairo the following month. Thence
they proceeded to Rosetta.

Emity.—Here is Rosetta, mamma, on the
western branch of the Nile, and near its
mouth. But was the colossus landed there ?

Mrs. A.—Yes: and as tackle was there
to be had, of which Belzoni was destitute
before, as well as proper workmen, it was
rendered quite an easy operation, and con-
veyed in safety to the Bashaw’s magazine,
there to await its embarkation for England.

Mr. Belzoni became acquainted at Rosetta
with a gentleman who received him into his
house in a most hospitable manner, and was
much interested in his affairs; feeling the
pleasure of a true Englishman in seeing one
THE BOTANIST. 85

of the most finished works of Egyptian art
ready to be embarked for his native country.
And here we will for the present take leave of
our friend, wishing that indefatigable zeal,
such as his, may always be rewarded with
equal success; and you, my dear children,
whenever you want a stimulus to patient, per-
severing industry, think of Belzoni !

CHAPTER II.

Lavra was a botanist. She loved to ram-
ble in search of wild flowers, and she fre-
quently did so before breakfast. A few morn-
ings after the preceding conversation, the sun
rose with uncommon splendour; but the glis-
tening dewdrops moistened every blade of
grass, and bespangled every leaf. Laura,
_ instead of wandering in her favourite fields,
proceeded through the little green gate of the
shrubbery, and foHowing a winding gravel path
that brought her to the stable-yard, near which
were the children’s gardens. Here she found
Bernard busily employed with his spade :
carefully replacing flowers that had been
trampled down, trimming them, and cleaning

I
86 HORTICU LTURAL DISASTER.

them, and planting them anew 5 the border,
which he had cultivated with so much delight,
was all in confusion and disorder ; the cherry-
tree, from which he had promised himself so
much pleasure, 10 presenting its first fruits to
his mother, was pulled down from the palisades
against which it had been trained ; his little
crop of wheat was levelled with the ground ;
the young laburnums were eaten; the rose-tree
was broken ;—all was 4 scene of desolation
and confusion! Yet, the persevering little
Bernard did not complain ; he smiled and
looked at Laura ;— Laura smiled also, for she
guessed what thoughts were passing in his
mind.
Our young readers may wish to know what
can have been the cause of all this disturbance.
‘he little gardens, as we have said, were near
the stable-yard. A door that led to them
had, unintentionally, been left open; Smiler
had taken the liberty of walking out, and had
been tempted, by a pendent” branch of Ber-
nard’s cherry-tree, to trample upon that very
spot on which his little master had bestowed
so much pains, and where he had passed many
a happy hour, toiling *n the heat of his brow.
Laura watched her brother. He smoothed

a a a


REWARD OF PERSEVERANCE. 87

the ground with the little rake his papa had
given him; he dug a hole, and planted his
rose-bush afresh, only first cutting off the
broken stalks ; he then, with the utmost pa-
tience, and without uttering one complaint,
assisted the gardener to train the poor cherry-
tree in its former station, holding the little
tin tacks and the shreds of list, as James
turned his hand to receive them; and James
the gardener, and Bernard together, after
working for two hours, had the satisfaction of
beholding the garden restored to neatness and
order.

Bernard came in to breakfast. His cheeks
glowed with a brighter red than usual; his
countenance beamed with cheerfulness and
Joy ; he seemed in perfect good-humour with
himself and with every one around him, and
every one appeared in good-humour with him;
this was the effect of his industry.

His mother, who had heard from Laura
how the morning had been passed, said,
“ Well, my love, you have proved the truth
of my assertion, that perseverance, exerted in
laudable undertakings, will reward all our la-

bour, and produce effects beyond our fondest
hopes !”
ea a ~

—--

88 BELZONI'S SECOND VOYAGE.

“ Ah, mamma!” said Bernard, “it was
Belzoni who first taught me to exert it! .
You know I saw what he gained by perseve-
rance, so I thought I would follow his exam-
ple.”

‘©T am delighted, my dear boy!” replied
the fond and affectionate mother, “‘ in witness-
ing the first fruits of my story ; and having
thus profited by the first account of our en-
terprising traveller, you are well entitled to
another.” A tear glistened in Bernard’s eyes
as his mother bestowed this well-merited
praise. He despatched his basin of milk ;
the breakfast things were soon removed ;
the maps were once more laid on the table,
and Mrs. A. commenced her narrative of
Belzoni’s second excursion up the Nile.

In 1817, a boat was prepared, well covered
with mats, and closely lined all round, with
a curtain to the door, to prevent the dust or
wind from penetrating the cabin. Belzoni
and his little party embarked from Boolac.

Emrty.—Will you tell me, mamma, what
is the principal object of this voyage, and to
what place they went first, that I may follow
them upon the map.

Mrs. A. —Antiquities had touched a chord
PROGRESS UP THE NILE. . 89

in Belzoni’s heart; they were the chief objects
of his researches. He now more particularly
wished to visit the temple of Ybsambul, and
to make preparations for opening it; when
that was accomplished, he intended to return
to the valley of Beban el Malook, and en-
deavour to enter the tombs of the kings; and
afterwards to visit the Pyramids. Do you
recollect the temple I mention ?

Owrn.—Yes: perfectly well. Belzoni
had just made a hole in the sand, when he
left it before, and had discovered that he had
then neither time nor money for exploring it.
I shall be glad if he succeed now. I have
wished all along for him to go back to Ybsam-
bul; and I hope the men will behave better
this time, and not make him say, “ crescit
amor nummi.”

Mrs. A.—Their departure from Boolac
was attended with a contrary wind, which
caused their progress up the Nile to be so slow,
that in four days they only reached Tabeen.

Lavra.—A little village on the eastern
bank, opposite Dajior, Emily,

Euuy.—Then they passed by Cairo, and
by several Pyramids ; for here is Dajior, but
Tabeen is not marked.

13


90 ERRORS OF HASTY JUDGMENT.

Laura.—Because it is 80 insignificant a
place, I suppose. You can put a little mark
with your pencil, my love.

Mrs. A.—It was at this village, Bernard,
that Belzoni drew a view of the distant Pyra-
mids, from which sketch Laura was taking
hers the other evening, at the time you
thought them so uninteresting.

Brernarv.—My opinion 1s changed now,
mamma: it is best not to form a judgment
too soon. I do not call that little village
insignificant ; for Laura’s drawing led to my
knowledge of Belzoni. How long did he stop
there, mother !

Mrs. A.—When the sketch was taken,
they proceeded to Meimond, where their at-
tention was attracted by the cheerful sound
of a tambourine, by which they concluded
that there was an Arabian feast in the village;
so, leaving their comfortable bark, they went
on shore.

Bernarv.—1 wonder if they were dancing
‘n the odd manner you told us about before,
with their arms over each other’s shoulders,
and bowing about.

Mrs. A.—However it might be, they were
not much gratified by the sight, and, there-
RIVAL ANTIQUARIES. 9]

fore, returning to their boat, went on to
Minieh.

Emity.—I have found Minieh, mamma.
It appears to be about half-way between
Cairo and Thebes—did they land there?

Mrs. A.—Yes; it was necessary to do
so, on account of seeing Hamet Bey, who
has command over all the boats on the river.
Belzoni found this mighty commander sitting
on a wooden bench, and attended by two or
- three of his sailors ; and here he also saw two
Copts, who had been sent by Mr. Drovetti,
up the Nile in search of antiquities.

Emity.—In search of antiquities, mamma,
like Belzoni! Then I suppose there will be
some emulation between them; and I am
glad of it. But I should like to know who
this Mr. Drovetti is; the Copts, we already
know, are descended from the first Egyptians
who became Christians.

Owern.—I think, Emily, it was very un-
fortunate for Belzoni that he did meet with
these men; how can you tell but they may
go to Ybsambul and finish removing the
sand, and so spoil all the nice plans that I
have in my head.

Mrs. A.—Mr. Drovetti was the ex-French
92 PROMPTITUDE OF CHARACTER.

Consul, in Alexandria; and Owen is right
in supposing Belzoni would rather have
avoided these men; especially as he learned
that they wished to arrive at Thebes before
him, and to purchase all that the Arabs had
found during the preceding season.

Owen.—How provoking! But the Copts
were now at an equal distance from Thebes
with Belzoni: why, therefore, need they
arrive there before him ¢

Mrs. A.—Because their mode of travelling
on asses or horses, was much more speedy
than the progress of the boat could possibly
be; and thus Belzoni would have no chance
of regaining the spot of ground where you
recollect he found the statues.

Emiuy.—Yes, mamma: upon the plain
at Thebes, where, you told us, “the tra-
veller finds himself on every side among
wonders.”

Mrs. A.—He was not long considering
how to act; he resolved to set off imme-
diately by land, and, by travelling day and
night, was in hopes of reaching the place
before them. Accordingly, a horse and an
ass were got ready: and, taking with him
his Greek servant, he left Mr. Beechey (the


RAPID JOURNEY TO LUXOR. 93

young gentleman who accompanied him on
this journey) to come up the Nile at his
leisure.

Emity.—But where was Mrs. Belzoni!

Mrs. A.—She was left at Cairo with the
British consul. Now I will tell you with
what expedition this rapid journey was com-
pleted. Look on the map, Emily.

Emity.—My finger is at Minieh, mamma.

Mrs. A.—Our traveller set off at mid-
night, and forced marches brought them the
next morning to Manfalout. From this place
they hastened without delay, and arrived at
Siout before daylight. At sun-rise they
mounted again, and arrived before dark at
Tahta. Here they rested in a convent for
four hours, started afresh by the light of the
moon, and reached Girgeh in the night.

Eimity.—That must have been very plea-
sant, mamma; I should like to ride upon a
donkey by moonlight, when the moon was
Just peeping from behind some dark clouds,
and all around was silent and still.

Mrs. A.—They resumed their journey at
one o'clock in the morning, reached Far-
shiout at noon, and, after a delay of four
hours, in consequence of not finding a fresh
94 EGYPTIAN ACCOMMODATIONS.

horse immediately, arrived at night at a vil-
lage near Badjoura. Here they rested two
hours, and arrived at Geneh at three. Hav-
ing dined, they proceeded onward, rested a
couple of hours at Benut at night, and reach-
ed Luxor the following noon. And now,
Owen, what say you to becoming a traveller

Owen.—I say, mamma, that Belzoni de-
serves a great deal of praise, and that |
should like to have been in his place.

Mrs. A.—I see you cannot form any idea
of the difficulties a person must undergo,
travelling through a tract entirely destitute
of the necessaries of life, and sleeping only
eleven hours during five days!

Bernarp.—But had he nothing to eat all
that time, mamma? Are there no inns in
Egypt!

Mrs. A.—The fathers of the convents at
some of the towns through which he passed,
afforded him great accommodation. They
provided him with beasts and provisions for
the road immediately on his arrival ; and, in
places where there was no convent, he went to
the house of the Sheik el Balet, where travel-
lers of all sorts assemble at night: they are
somewhat like our inns, but without our ac-

SME eee

ee sae. ee ee se ee
.

SUPERB RUINS. 95

commodations. Indeed, he was so fatigued
and stiff, that any place of rest was acceptable
to him. The bare earth generally afforded
him a bed; and when he could procure a mat,
it was a luxury. One night, he was refresh-
ed with a few pieces of sugar-cane, which,
after the juice had been extracted, were be-
come pretty soft, and afforded a tolerable bed.
Sugar-canes are common there, and Belzoni
was sometimes regaled with them as a dessert,
after a repast of bread and onions.

Bernarp.—A dinner of bread and onions,
and a sugar-cane bed? Oh, mamma!

Mrs. A.—No time was to be lost; so he
now began to be very busy. He applied to
the Cacheff, who gave orders for him to be
furnished with men, who should do whatever

he pleased. Whilst the works at Carnac were

going on, Belzoni visited the superb ruins of
the temple at that place. In a distant view of
them, nothing can be seen but the towering
propyleum, high portals and obelisks, which,
projecting above the various groups of lofty
palm-trees, present a magnificent spectacle.
But when he entered the avenue of sphynxes,
which leads to the great temple, he was
inspired with equal solemnity and awe.
96 THE TEMPLE AT CARNAC.

Enizy.— Will you, dear mamma, be so good
as to tell me what these sphynxes are, and
why they filled Belzoni’s mind with solemnity |
and awe! I thought that a sphynx was ;
only a sort of moth. ¢

Mrs. A.—The worship of the ancient —
Egyptians, my dear girl, was remarkable for —
superstition. They worshipped idols of wood ~
and stone; and the sphynxes are compound —
figures, having the head and bosom of a ©
woman, the body of a dog, the tail of a ser-
pent, the wings of a bird, and the paws of a ~
lion; all indications of various attributes of
their deities. It was their enormous size, and
the idea of what they were intended to re-
present, that struck Belzoni as he approached —
the avenue. He had never before entered it
alone without being interrupted by the noise
of the Arabs, who seldom leave the traveller —
an instant ; and the colossal and other gigan-
tic statues, obelisks, immense colonnades, the
pillars of which are some twenty and some
thirty feet in circumference ; paintings which”
still retain an incomparable brilliancy ; granite
and marble lavished in the structure ; stones
of astonishing dimensions forming the magni
ficent roofs ; and thousands of broken ~


SUBLIME EXCITEMENT. 97




















which literally strew the ground, made him
remain’ a long time motionless with rapture ;
and he more than once felt inclined to pro-
strate himself before monuments, the erection
of which seemed to surpass the genius and
the powers of man.

Owrn.—I think this scene would have
suited Laura: she is fond of anything sub-
lime.

Lavra.—Yes: how much I should have
_ enjoyed wandering with Belzoni in that mag-
_nificent place! I think, mamma, Rollin very
"justly observes, that “Egypt seemed to place
its chief glory in raising monuments for pos-
eterity.” :

q Brernarp.— Will you show us the drawing,
_ dear Laura?

_ The kind sister fetched a large folio volume
from the library table, and turned to a plate
representing the ruins of the temple at Car-

_ Mrs. A.—Belzoni was there early in the
Morning when the sun was rising; and the
long shades from the various groups of
columns extended over the ruins, intermixed
with the rays of light striking on the masses
in various directions, formed such delightful
K
98 MENTAL ASSOCIATIONS.

views, as (he tells us) baffle all descrip-
tion.

Owrn.—Do you think, mamma, that Bel-
zoni was more pleased with this temple than
with the temple of Tentyra? I remember
you said, that when he first saw that, he
seated himself upon the ground, lost in
wonder and admiration.

Mrs. A.—He thought that edifice exceed-
ed this in point of preservation, and in the
beauty of its workmanship and sculpture ;
but here he was lost in a mass of colossal
objects, every one of which, to use his own
animated language, was sufficient of itself
alone to attract his whole attention.

Emity.—These majestic objects gave Bel-
zoni more delight than that which he received
on escaping from the mummy-cave, I think,
mamma; or even than that he experienced
in seeing young Memnon safe in the maga-
zine at Cairo. ,

Mrs. A.—It was a superior pleasure, my
love and a pleasure which superior minds
only can enjoy. Association gave it one
grand charm.

Emiuty.— What do you mean by associa-
tion, mamma ?
MENTAL ASSOCIATIONS. 99

Mrs. A.—The connection of our ideas is
called association. As Belzoni viewed the
battles, processions, triumphs, feasts, and
offerings painted and sculptured on the walls,
he did not doubt but they related to the
ancient history of a country universally ad-
mitted to be

“The queen of nations and the boast of times,

Mother of science, and the house of gods.”
This idea would lead a contemplative mind
to look back on the days and deeds of other
times—to the consideration that all human
greatness is transitory and fleeting—and that
the time would come when even these memo-
rials of former magnificence should be level-
led with the ground, and known no longer.
_ These reflections would be very natural; do
you not think so?

Emuy.—Yes, mamma; and such feelings
would be both melancholy and _ pleasing.
Now, will you tell us whether those Copts
have arrived at Thebes?

Mrs. A,—It was quite late when our friend
left the ruins, and returned to Luxor to the
little hut of an Arab, who ceded to him part
of his chamber and a mat, which he tells us
formed an excellent bed. He was told that
100 DISAPPOINTMENTS.

the two Copts had arrived, and had begun
their researches extensively.

Emr.y.—That was very mortifying intelli-
gence! But travellers must learn to endure
disappointments. Yet I am sorry for Bel-
zoni, to be thus repaid, after having travelled,
day and night, so many hundred miles !

Bernarp.—I1 think, mamma, that the
Arab’s mat was rather better than the sugar-
cane bed! But what a change! from those
grand and delightful ruins to a little hut !

Mrs. A.—He was obliged to be contented,
however, my love. Being unable to procure
many men on the east side of the Nile, he
determined to try what could be done on the
west, as he had the good will of the Cachefts
there: but, unfortunately, the boat with Mr. .
Beechey had not arrived, and he could not
proceed for want of money: having, from
prudence, as he came by land, brought but
little with him. Accordingly, he left his in-
terpreter, and set off in a small boat to meet
his friend. He arrived at Ghenlh in a day
or two, where they were rejoiced to meet
each other. It took them three days to
reach Thebes, when they moored their bark,
and recommenced their operations with what
MUMMY-CAVES AT GOURNOU. 10]

people they could obtain. The work at Gour-
nou was continued, and occupied as much of
Belzoni’s attention as that at Carnac.

Emity.—Gournou is not marked, mamma.

Owen.—It is just on the other side of the
Nile, nearly opposite to Carnac. The mum-
my-cave is there, you know: the cave into
which Belzoni went with those selfish, deceit-
ful Arabs.

Lavura.—Gournou is a tract of rocks, about
two miles in length, at the foot of the Libyan
mountains, on the west of Thebes: every part
of these rocks is cut out by art, in the form
of large and small chambers, each of which
has its separate entrance; and, though they
are very close to each other, it is seldom that
there is any interior communication from one
to another.

Emity.—I remember, mamma told us they
are celebrated for the numbers of mummies
they contain.

Mrs. A.—It is impossible to give you any
idea of those subterraneous abodes and their
inhabitants.

Bernarp.— Will you tell me, Laura, what
mamma means by subterrancous ?

Lauvra.— When you learned, in your geo-
K 3
102 ARABS OF GOURNOU.

graphical lesson the other day, that the cop-
per mines in Sweden are very numerous, and
formed subterrancous habitations for different
families, I recollect telling you that sub is
Latin for under, terra for earth.

Bernarp.—Sub, terra—under, earth—un-
der-ground: I will try not to forget another
time.

Mrs. A.—There are no sepulchres in any
part of the world like those of Gournou, nor
any excavations or mines that can be com-
pared to those astonishing places. No exact
description of their interior can be given,
owing to the difficulty of visiting them.

Owen.—lI shall tremble for Belzoni, if he
trust himself under the care of a treacherous
Arab.

Mrs. A.—It is true, that the people of
Gournou are superior to any other Arabs in
cunning and deceit ; but when Belzoni had
resided some little time at Thebes, and was
known to them, they found it in vain to
attempt to delude him any more.

Owen.—I do not wonder at that, mamma;
for I do not believe that a very clever person
could be easily deceived.

Mrs. A.—Why not ¢
KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTIVE OF HAPPINESS. 103

Owrn.—Because, mamma, I think we more
frequently see superstitious or cowardly per-
sons imposed on, than those who are not so:
and thus one end of acquiring knowledge is,
that it prevents our being deceived by others,
and enables us to avoid their cunning.

Mrs. A.—Knowledge is intrinsically valu-
able, my dear boy, as it elevates the mind,
and qualifies us for higher degrees of felicity,
both in the present and in a future life ; and
the acquisition of useful knowledge exercises
and invigorates the powers of the understand-
ing; its cultivation in youth promotes virtue :
it is, therefore, the true foundation of all our
happiness.

Owen.—So it is, mamma. Will you now
give us a description of the mummy-caves
in general ?

Mrs. A.—A traveller is generally satisfied
when he has seen the large hall, the gallery,
the staircase, and as far as he can conve-
niently go. Besides, his attention is taken
up by the paintings he observes on the walls;
so that, when he comes to a narrow or diffi-
cult passage, or has to descend to the bottom
of a well or cavity, he declines taking such
trouble, naturally supposing that he cannot
104 INTERIOR OF THE MUMMY-CAVES.

see in these abysses anything so magnificent
as what he sees above, and on that account
deeming it useless to proceed any farther.

Owrn.—The air must be very close and
disagreeable, mamma.

Mrs. A.—Particularly so. Many persons
could not withstand the suffocating effect it
produces; and the enterprising traveller 1s
also annoyed with the immense quantity of
fine dust, and the effluvia arising from the
mummies. The entry, or passage, to where
the bodies are, is roughly cut in the rocks.

Owrn.— And these rocks are of granite ;
the falling of the sand from the upper part
causes the passage to be nearly filled up, I
suppose ?

Mrs. A.— Yes; in some parts there is not
more than a vacancy of a foot or two left,
which you must contrive to pass through in a
creeping posture, regardless of the keen and
pointed stones with which the path is strewed.
After getting through these passages, some of
them two or three hundred yards long, a more
commodious place is generally found, perhaps
high enough to seat yourselves. But what a
place of rest! surrounded by dead bodies,
by heaps of mummies, in all directions, which,
INTERIOR OF THE MUMMyY-cAvVES. 105

previous to being accustomed to the sight,
would impress upon the mind disgust and
horror. The blackness of the walls, the faint
light given by the candles, or torches, for want
of air, the different objects that surround the
venturous traveller, seeming to converse with
each other, and the Arabs, with torches in
their hands, naked and covered with dust,
themselves resembling living mummies, form
a scene that cannot be described.

Bernarv.— But did any one ever venture
so far, mamma ?

Mrs, A.—Yes; in such a situation our
enterprising Belzoni, whom no difficulties
could deter, frequently found himself. At
first, he generally returned exhausted and
fainting ; but, at length, he became so inured
to the exertion, that he could freely venture
into these caves, indifferent to what he suffer-
ed. Sometimes, he tells us, after the trouble
of entering into such a place, through a pas-
sage of fifty, a hundred, three hundred, or six
hundred yards, he would seek a resting-place,
and contrive to sit; but when his weight bore
on the body of some decayed Egyptian, it
crushed it immediately. He would then
naturally have recourse to his hands to sus-
106 FOUL AIR.

tain his weight, but they could find no bet-
ter support, so that he would sink altogether
among the broken mummies, with a crash of
bones, rags, and wooden cases, which raised
such a dust as sometimes left him motionless
for a quarter of an hour, waiting till it sub-
sided again.

Bernarv.—Oh, mamma, how shocking !
But will you tell me why the candles should
burn faintly for want of air!

Mrs. A.—It was a peculiar air, my dear,
and almost unfit for animal life. Belzoni
could not have borne it long at a time; and
this same kind of air, which often proves fatal
to the life of animals, will also extinguish the
flame of a torch or candle. When you are
acquainted with the principles of chemistry,
I shall be better able to explain the cause of
this singular effect.

The people of Gournou live in the entrance
of such caves as have already been opened ;
and, by making partitions within of earthen
walls, they form habitations for themselves,
as well, as for their cows, camels, buffaloes,
sheep, goats, and dogs.

Brernarp. — Live in those horrid caves,
mamma! How miserable that must be!




————

PAPYRI. 107

Mrs. A.—I cannot account for this choice
as they have plenty of stone from the sur-
rounding tombs; unless it be from their in-
dolence, to save the trouble of building
houses, and in hopes of receiving money from
travellers.

Emmy.—For what purpose did Belzoni
enter those caves !

Mrs. A.—His principal object was to rob
the Egyptians of their papyri, of which he
found a few hidden in the numerous folds of
cloth that enveloped them.

Owrn.—But what are papyri, mother ¢

Mrs. A.—You have heard of the papyrus,
or paper-rush, my love, which grew on the
banks of the Nile, and of which the ancients
made clothes, sails, domestic utensils, and
writing paper ?

Bernarp.—I have, mamma; and I under-
stand the process by which they made their
paper. They pressed the leaves that sur-
rounded the stem, flattening and smoothing

. them; I suppose the leaves of the paper-

rush clung round each other, as those of
the great American aloe do in the conser-
vatory.. But what has all this to do with
Belzoni’s papyri?
108 ARTS AND MANUFACTURES.

Mrs. A.—By those papyri are meant the
scrolls, or records, that were usually placed
with the mummies, containing historical facts,
which would prove very useful to the anti-
quary, were he able to decipher them. Such
people as could afford it would have a syca-
more case to be buried in, on which the —
history of their lives was painted ; and those
who could not afford a case, were contented
to have their lives written on papyti, rolled
up and placed above their knees. So, you
are now acquainted with the motive which
‘nduced Belzoni to enter the dismal caves at
Gournou.

Euity.—Were the ancient Egyptians ac-
quainted with linen manufactures, mamma ?
You mention the foldings of their cloth.

Mrs. A.— Yes, evidently, and in a perfec-
tion nearly equal to our own. Belzoni _ob-
served some of the cloth of which their gar-
ments were made, quite as fine as our muslin,
of an even texture, and spun so curiously,
that the threads were scarcely visible.

Owen.— Then their knowledge was not
confined to architecture and sculpture.

Mrs. A.—By no means, my dear. Bel-
yoni was fortunate enough to find many spe-
OF THE ANCIENT EGYPTIANS. 109

cimens of their manufactures, among which
was gold leaf beaten nearly as thin as ours.
They had also the art of tanning leather,
and of staining it of different colours; and
thus they were able to make shoes of various
shapes, and as good as those we wear. They
fabricated a sort of glass, of which they made
beads and other ornaments; and they had
also manufactures of pottery-ware. Thus,
you see, the Egyptians possessed diversity of
talents; things of minor importance were
not forgotten, amidst objects both grand and
sublime.

Laura,— What you have said about
combining great things with matters of com-
paratively small consequence reminds me
of my favourite Elizabeth Smith; who,
although possessing distinguished talents,
thought it no degradation to make a cur-
rant tart !

Mrs. A.—Those are in reality the greatest
minds, which, possessing profound and various
learning, do not object to stoop to the exer-
cise of every domestic virtue.

Besides enamelling, the art of gilding was
in high perfection among the Egyptians, as
Belzoni found several ornaments of that kind.

L
110 KNOWLEDGE OF PAINTING.

They knew how to cast copper, as well as
how to form it into sheets; and had a metal-
lic composition not unlike our lead, but rather
softer.

Owen.—Very much like the lead we see
on paper, in the tea-chests from China, I sup-
pose, mamma? Emily once had some of it,
with the Chinese pictures, from which she
wished to copy the figures for the screens.

Mrs. A.—Yes, it resembled that, only it
was thicker. Carved works were very com-
mon and in great perfection, particularly in
the proportion of the figures, which were made
to preserve that sweet simplicity peculiar to
themselves, and which is always pleasing to
the beholder. The art of varnishing, and
baking the varnish on clay, was carried on in
so superior a style, that it would be difficult
to surpass it in the present day. But paint-
ing was not in so much perfection among the
Egyptians as the other arts. They knew not
how to soften from shade to shade, until the
last in “purest light was lost.” Neither
could they spread the glowing tinge across
a sable landscape; nor yet pencil a delicate
flower unfolding its numerous petals. Their
painting was extremely simple, as they pos-




ARCHITECTURE.——THE VOLUTE. 111

sessed no knowledge of shadowing to elevate
their figures. Great credit, however, is due
to them for their taste in disposing the co-
lours, such as they had. These were only
two sorts of blue, red, green, yellow, and
black. With these they adorned their tem-
ples, tombs, or whatever they wished to have
painted.

Owern.—And now, mamma, tell me about
the style of architecture generally employed.

Mrs. A.—The Egyptians were a primitive
nation: they had to form everything, without
a model before them to imitate: yet so fertile
was their inventive faculty, that, instead of
confining themselves to five orders of architec-
ture, they had so many that new ones might
be continually extracted from their ruins.
We have reason to believe that our Ionic
order originated in Egypt.

Owrn.—Oh, yes: and papa told me he
had heard that the invention of the ornament
called the volute was derived from the cir-
cumstance of a girl leaving a basket, covered
with a tile, on a bed of celery: the plant,
on growing up, and being interrupted by
the tile, having bent backwards and assumed
the spiral form.—Well, mamma, will you
11% HABITATIONS IN THE CAVES.

tell us in what other arts the Egyptians
excelled ¢

Mrs. A. —Their wonderful sculptures are
admired for the boldness of their execution.
Geometry is universally believed to have been
frst found out by them; and astronomy is
also regarded as their invention. Indeed,
that they were early celebrated for their
wisdom and literature is sufficiently obvious
both from sacred and profane history : the
former assuring us that Moses was learned
‘1 all the wisdom of the Egyptians, and that
the wisdom of Solomon excelled all the wis-
dom of Egypt; and the latter allowing this
nation to have been the parent of all philo-
sophical knowledge.

Brrnarp.— Where did Belzoni reside whilst
the works at Gournou and Carnac were car~
ried on?

Mrs. A.—Generally at Luxor; but when
he had been busier than usual he took up his
lodging at the entrance of some of the tombs;
and, far from being miserable, Bernard, he
was amused with the novelty of his habita-
tion. The dwellings are usually in the pas-
sages between the first and second entrance
to a tomb; the walls and the roof are as
EGPYTIAN IDOLATRY. 113

black as any chimney; the inner door is
closed up with mud, except a small aper-
ture sufficient for a man to creep through.
Within this place sheep are kept at night.
Over the door-way there are always some
half-broken Egyptian figures, and the two
foxes

Bernarp.—Stop, mamma, if you please :—
two foxes! What had foxes to do there?

Mrs. A.—The Egyptians attached great
importance to animals; and foxes were con-
sidered as guardians to their burial-places.
You know I have frequently told you, that
these people worshipped animals of different
kinds ; and, in their tombs, Belzoni frequent-
ly found the mummies of bulls, cows, mon-
keys, cats, fishes, birds, and crocodiles, To
the latter they attached great importance,
regarding them with high veneration.

Bernarp.—Had we lived at that time, we
might have worshipped cats and dogs and
crocodiles too.

Mrs. A.—Probably we should have been
no wiser than our neighbours; and we ought
to be very thankful that we live in better
times.

Bernarv.—That puts me in mind of a

L 3


114 EGYPTIAN IDOLATRY.

verse or two, in my ‘“‘ Hymns for Infant
minds :”—

“ I thank the goodness and the grace
Which on my birth have smiled,

. And made me, in these Christian days,
A happy English child.

“ I] was not born, as thousands are,
Where God was never known,

And taught to pray a useless prayer
To blocks of wood and stone.”

But, mamma, you were giving us the descrip-
tion of a grotto at Gournou. Will you go ont

Mrs. A.—A small lamp is placed in a
niche in the wall, and a mat is spread on the
ground; and this formed the grand divan,
wherever Belzoni was. ‘The people used to
assemble around him, and the conversation
turned wholly on antiquities. Such a one
had found such a thing, and another had
discovered a tomb. Various articles were
brought for him to purchase, and he had some-
times reason to rejoice at having stayed there.

Owxn.—Then they had discovered that
he was an antiquary. For my part, rather
than trust myself with the people of Gournou
in one of their black dismal caves, I would
live in one of the bamboo huts of Peru, or


SEES A a

HAPPINESS IN OUR OWN POWER. 115

in one of the little Laplanders’ dwellings,
made of briers and bark and reindeer skins.

Mrs. A.—But it would not have answered
Belzoni’s purpose to have been transported
across the Atlantic, to the flowery fields of
Peru, nor yet to Lapland’s snows; for in
both places antiquities are unknown. Every
human being can be happy if he likes; for
happiness certainly depends on ourselves.

Owen.—It does not suit my views of hap-
piness to talk of it among people who live
in caves like wild beasts: or, rather, who live
in tombs, among the mummies and rags of
an ancient nation, of which I suppose they
know nothing.

Mrs. A.—But this is trifling, compared
with their slave-like state; subject to the
caprice of a tyrannical power, which leaves
them no chance of receiving any remuneration
for their labours, and no prospect of any
change except for the worst. Nevertheless,
they are happy, my love ; for custom recon-
ciles people to all this, The labourer comes
home in the evening, seats himself near his
cave, smokes his pipe with his companions,
talks of the last inundation of the Nile, its
products, and what the ensuing season is
116 MARRIAGES IN GOURNOU,

likely to be; his wife brings him the usual
bowl of lentils and bread, moistened with
water and salt, and when she can add a
little butter, it is considered a feast. Know-
ing nothing beyond this, he is happy.—The
young man’s business is to accumulate the
amazing sum of a hundred piastres (two
pounds and ten shillings) to buy himself a
wife, and to make a feast on the wedding-day.

Emity.—To buy a wife! That is the
drollest thing I ever heard of ! I am sure
I would not be bought.

Mrs. A.—You are not sure of any such
thing, my dear. Were you a young lady of
Gournou, you would most probably resemble
the young ladies there. When a man wants
to marry, he goes to the father of the intended
bride, and agrees with him what he is to pay
for her. This important affair being settled,
so much money is to be spent on the wed-
ding feast. To set up housekeeping nothing
is requisite but two or three earthen pots, a
stone to grind meal, and a mat, which is the
bed. The lady has a gown and jewels of her
own; and if the bridegroom present her with
a pair of bracelets, of silver, ivory, or glass,
she is fortunate and happy indeed, Thus these


MANNERS OF GOURNOU. 117

poor people, having never known our luxuries
and indulgences, sigh not for the want of them.

- Owen.—And their house is ready, mamma,
without rent or taxes: this must be very
convenient. I remember our man, Edward,
said that he could not afford to be married
till next spring, because the rent of the cot-
tage he wished to have was so high.

Mrs. A.—There is no difficulty of this
sort at Gournou. If one house do not please
them they walk out and enter another, as
there are several hundreds, or perhaps thou-
sands, at their command. At length they
fix upon one. No rain can pass through
the roof, and a door is not wanted, as there is
nothing to lose. They make a kind of box,
of clay and straw, which, after two or three
days’ exposure to the sun, becomes quite
hard. It is fixed ona stand ; an aperture is
left to put all their precious things into it,
and a piece of a mummy-case forms the door.

Belzoni had by this time acquired antiqui-
ties enough to fill another boat ; and having
secured all the valuable collection in one spot,
he built a mud wall round it, covered it
with earth, and, leaving an Arab Scheik to
guard it, set off for Assouan.
118 RETURN TO PHILOE.

Emiry.—So, they are going to that old
town again! It was there that Belzoni
found the selfish Aga, and all his retinue
seated on a mat under a cluster of palm-trees.
They are bound to Ybsambul from thence,
I suppose? I shall be glad when they get
to the temple again, mamma.

Mrs. A.—They did not remain long at
Assouan, but proceeded to Philoé. Have
you forgotten this name ¢

Emimy.—Oh no, mamma! _ I remember,
in your account of Belzoni’s last voyage, you
told us that he stood at the stern of the
vessel, waiting for the first beams of the sun to
unveil that beautiful island; that he found an
obelisk there, and gave the Aga four dollars
to pay a guard for it till his return. Is he
going to remove that obelisk, now, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—No: not just at present, but at
some future time ; his chief object now is to
hasten to Ybsambul.

During their stay at Philoé, two captains
arrived who were going up the Nile, as far
as the second cataract; and, as there was
some difficulty in obtaining two boats, it was
agreed that Belzoni should join them, and
thus form one party.
MRS. BELZONI IN PHILOR. 119

Brernarp.—A very good plan, mamma,
because they would pass Ybsambul on their
way.

Mrs. A.—Accordingly they embarked ;
the two captains, Mr. Beechey, three servants,
and Belzoni himself.

Bernarp.—But Mrs. Belzoni, mamma ?—
You have forgotten her.

Mrs. A.—No, no, my good friend. I
have just been thinking how much courage
she possessed; for, as there was only one
boat, she was left in the island of Philoé till
the return of the party.

Owen.—Left by herself, in the island of
Philoé, mamma! Do pray tell us something
about her: how did she live during their
absence ?

Mrs. A.—She very much wished to ac-
company them; but as there was only one
boat, she was obliged, to her own mortifica-
tion, to remain behind, notwithstanding the
great desire she had to witness the opening
of the interesting temple at Ybsambul.
However, it was in vain to give way to use-
less regret. Mrs. Belzoni took up her abode
on the top of the temple of Osiris, in that
island, where, with the help of some mud
120 visit TO THE SECOND CATARACT.

walls, she enclosed two comfortable rooms ;
and amused herself in observing the customs
and characters of the inhabitants, and ex-
changing little articles with the Nubian women
during Mr. Belzoni’s absence.

Bernarp.—Well, she had patience, and
courage, and resolution, indeed, mamma !

Now will you please to tell us when they
arrived at Ybsambul ¢

Mrs. A.—In the course of a few days.
They were disappointed in finding that the
Cacheffs were not there, but at Jomas, oppo-
site Deir. They sent an express, to inform
them that they were come with permission to
open the temple; and in the mean time pro-
ceeded to the second cataract. Previously to
their arrival at Wady Halfa, they followed the
side of the Nile as far as they could go with
their boat, and then landed and walked three |
or four miles to the rock Aspir: for the de-
lightful views, which, you remember, Belzoni
saw on his first excursion, tempted him to
wish to behold them once more; and to ob-
serve the pleasure with which his companions
would look upon them ; but the islands did
not appear so numerous, NOF did the water form
those foaming eddies, which had before s0




TEMPLE AT YBSAMBUL. 121

finely interspersed the views with white and
green. Notwithstanding, the whole was very
grand, and Belzoni was much gratified in see-
ing it again.

Having returned to the boat, they passed
the night on the same side of the river. The
next morning they crossed the water, and en-
tered an inlet of the Nile, where they moored
their bark, near the village of Wady Halfa,
and returned in the evening to Ybsambul.

Emity.—And did they find the Cachefls
there ?

Mrs. A.—No: but after exercising their
patience in waiting a whole week, they ap-
peared, and took up their abode in some
small huts made of rushes, on a sandy bank
of the river. Here Belzoni and his friends
waited upon them, and obtained permission
to recommence the operation of opening the
temple the following morning, with the as-
sistance of thirty men.

Bernarp.—I hope the people will not
want more money than poor Belzoni can sup-
ply them with ¢his time. What a trouble-
some thing selfishness is, mamma !

Mrs. A.—In the morning, the men made
their appearance, and the work was recom-

M
Se

122 SAND WIND OF THE DESERT.

menced with much enthusiasm and many san-
guine hopes. You recollect the immense
mass of sand that obstructed the entrance ‘

Owen.—Perfectly well. Belzoni judged
by calculations that it was not less than thir-
ty-five feet in thickness—thicker than our
house is high! How came the sand there,
mamma /

Mrs. A.—It was a mass accumulated by
the winds for many centuries; and perhaps
the phenomena so common in Egypt had
added to it.

Owern.—I remember your mentioning the
sultry winds that last two or three days, and
raise such clouds of sandy particles as almost
to suffocate those who venture out during
the time. Do you refer to them, mamma !

Mrs. A.—Something very similar, my
dear. - I mean the whirlwinds, which occur
all the year round, but especially at the time
of the poisonous wind. This wind generally
blows from the south-west, and lasts several
days, so very strong, that it raises the sands
toa great height, forming a thick cloud in
the air. The caravans cannot proceed in the
Deserts; the boats cannot continue their
voyages: the whole is like a chaos. Fre-
TEMPLE AT YBSAMBUL. 123

quently, a quantity of sand and small stones
are gradually raised to a great height, and
form a column sixty or seventy feet in diame-
ter, and so thick, that, were it steady on one
spot, it would appear like a solid mass. This
not only revolves within its own circumfer-
ence, but runs in a circular direction over a
great space of ground, sometimes maintaining
itself in motion for half an hour ; and where
it falls, it forms a hill of sand. It is in this
way only that I can account for the prodigi-
ous quantity accumulated before the door of
the temple.

Owrn.—It was Belzoni’s principal object
to reach that door, as the most speedy means
of entering it, I suppose, mamma 2

Mrs. A.—Yes: he divided the men into
two parties, and stationed one on each side
of the colossus that stood over the entrance.
They worked pretty well, but were so few
that the little sand they removed could scarce-
ly be perceived. Seeing that it would be a
very tedious business if carried on in this
way, Belzoni made a proposal to the Cacheff
to pay three hundred piastres for opening the
temple, which was agreed to by both Cacheff
and workmen.
124 RAPACITY AND PERSEVERANCE.

Owen.—Three hundred piastres, mamme !
is it possible! As much money as would
have bought three wives at Gournou !

Mrs. A.—They continued their labour for
three days with much ardour, supposing they
could finish it in that time ; but on the even-
ing of the third day there was as little pro-
spect of seeing the door as on the first. They
became tired at last, and, under some pre-
tence, left the temple, the sand, and the trea-
sure, contenting themselves with keeping the
three hundred piastres, which had, unfortu-
nately been paid them beforehand.

Emy.— How shabby! how extremely
shabby, mamma ! Then how did Belzoni
and his friends manage *

Mrs. A.— They took the resolution to
work at the sand themselves. They were
only seven ; but the crew of the bark offer-
ed their services, and thus they became four-
teen in all.

Owen. — But fourteen in the place of
thirty! Indeed, mamma, it appears to me
that they are attempting impossibilities !

Mrs. A.—Finding that one of them did as
much work as five of their selfish workmen,
they were well satisfied, and determined to
THE TEMPLE OPENED. 125

.

continue. They rose every morning at the
dawn of day, and left off two hours and a
half after sun-rise: after continuing their ope-
rations regularly for some days, they perceiy-
ed a rough projection from the wall, which
seemed to indicate that the work had been
left unfinished, and that no door was to be
found there,

The hopes of some of the party began to
fail. Nevertheless, as you did this morning,
Bernard, they persevered in their exertions,
and completed their work ; three days after-
wards, they discovered a broken cornice, the
following day the torus, and of course the
frieze under it, which made them almost sure
of finding the door the next day. Accord-
ingly, Belzoni erected a palisade to keep the
sand up ; and to his great satisfaction, he saw
the upper part of the door as the evening ap-
proached. They dug away enough sand to
be able to enter that night; but, supposing
the air in the cavity might be unpleasant,

they deferred the entry till the following day.

Karly in the morning of the first of August
they went to the temple, in high spirits at
the idea of entering a newly-discovered place.
They endeavoured to enlarge the entrance as

M 3
126 HIEROGLYPHICS.

much as they could, and soon making the
passage wider, they entered the finest and
most extensive excavation in Nubia; one
that can stand a competition with any in
Egypt, except the tomb more recently dis-
covered, in Beban el Malook.

From what they could perceive at the first
view, it was evidently a very large place ; but
their astonishment increased, when they found
‘+t to be one of the most magnificent of tem-
ples, enriched with statues, paintings, and
figures! They entered at first a very long
portico, supported by two rows of enormous
square pillars. Both these and the walls were
covered with beautiful hieroglyphics, which
exhibited battles, the storming of castles,
triumphs over Ethiopians, and various sacri-
fices.

Bernarv.—Will you be so good, mamma,
as to tell me what you mean by Aierogly-
phies ? . |

Mrs. A.—Most willingly, my love; it is
always a pleasure to me to gratify my little
boy. The Egyptians, before the invention
of letters, from their observations on the
various properties of animals and plants, and
from their knowledge of the uses of different
HIEROGLYPHICS. 127

instruments also, had, with their accustomed
ingenuity, devised a variety of devices or
emblems: and by these, disposed in certain
attitudes, they could make historical records
which would be very intelligible to those who
were acquainted with their system ; and such
devices or emblems were called hieroglyphics.

Brernarp.—Then by these means, mamma,
I suppose Belzoni became acquainted with
the whole history of the country !

Mrs. A.—You forget that even our clever
Belzoni, with all his knowledge, was almost
as much unacquainted as we are with the hie-
roglyphical system. It is many hundred years
since it was in general use; for when those
simple and easy characters, the letters, were
found out, emblematical signs were laid aside.

Owrn.— Were the letters invented by the
Egyptians, mother ?

Mrs. A.—Yes; they are believed to be
the invention of some wise man in the reign
of Cadmus, King of Thebes.

Owrn.—What an ingenious invention it
was, whoever the wise Mr. Somebody might
be! for, by combining the letters, every
sound can be represented ; but when hiero-
glyphics were in use, of course there were as
128 INTERIOR OF THE TEMPLE.

many characters as ideas. Will you tell us
what signs the ancients had to represent some
objects ?

Mrs. A.—The characters now used for the
signs of the zodiac and the planets are speci-
mens of this kind of character ; and so is a
circle or snake with its tail in its mouth,
when used to signify eternity. Flames, which
are ever moving, represent light and life; the
lion or bull indicates strength; the hawk
swiftness; and so on. I will tell you more
about them another time. Let us now
accompany Belzoni through his newly dis-
covered temple.

The second hall into which they entered
was very extensive, containing four large pil-
lars. Beyond this was a shorter chamber, in
which was the entrance to the sanctuary: the
sanctuary contained a pedestal in the centre,
and at the end were four colossal figures. On
the right side of the great hall, entering to
the temple, were two doors, at a short dis-
tance from each other, which led into two
long separate rooms, and other rooms and
galleries opened out of them; so you may
imagine what a fund of amusement and
astonishment Belzoni met with at last. -
OUTSIDE OF THE TEMPLE. 129

Lavra.—The outside of the temple was as
magnificent as the interior. Only fancy it
three times the height of our house—the im-
mense colossi—the figure of Osiris, twenty
feet high, on the top of the door—the cornice
enriched with hieroglyphics, and the frieze
beneath ; and then think that this stupendous
place was nearly two-thirds buried under the
sand, and you cannot fail to admire the la-
bour and perseverance which must have been
exerted to obtain an entrance.

Mrs. A.— Belzoni now experienced the
truth of my motto: ‘“‘ LABOR OMNIA VINCIT.”
He was well compensated for all his toil and
anxiety: he no longer regarded the selfishness
of the workmen ; he no longer regretted the
want of mechanical powers; he had attained
his wish ; he had entered the famous temple
of Ybsambul, excavated in the solid rock!
and, in the course of a few weeks, he return-
ed, completely satisfied, to the little island of
Philos, where Mrs. Belzoni joined the party,
-and accompanied them to Thebes.

Emuy.—And, whilst there, they intend
to visit the valley of Beban el Malook, and
afterwards to explore the Pyramids near
Cairo.
130 GREENLAND.

Will you tell us something more, mamma ?
I believe that the celebrated tomb, of which
we heard so much, at the Egyptian Hall,
in London, is the representation of one that
Belzoni discovered in the valley of Beban el
Malook. Will you tell us how he came to
discover it ?

Mrs. A.—Not at present, my dear Emily.
—I must leave you now; but you may go
and amuse yourselves on the lawn, and tie
up the little almond-tree, my love, that is
almost blown down.

CHAPTER III.

Emiry.—Mamma, I have been looking at
a picture, in the study, of some ice-mountains
in the frigid zone, and papa has been talking
to me about the little Greenlanders. He
tells me that though their country is so cold
and so desolate, they are extremely fond of it,
and would not upon any account exchange
their barren rocks and mountains of snow for
the spicy groves and flowery fields of warmer
climates ; and, what amused me more than |
all, mamma, papa says that two of its inhabi-
GREENLANDERS. 131

tants were brought to Copenhagen, the capital
of Denmark, you know, a few years since,
and they pined for want until they met with
some train-oil, (what could be more disagree-
ble !) which they drank with the same relish
as we drink chocolate or wine; and they
danced about for joy when they found they
were to be sent back to Greenland. Why
do you think they like that cold country so
much, mamma?— The very picture of it
makes me shiver.

Mrs. A.—Habit, my dear little girl, ren-
ders every situation in life easy ; and it is
natural to become attached to our native coun-
try. Custom has taught the Greenlanders to
struggle with the severity of the most pierc-
ing winter, and suffer the hardships of a poor
and scanty subsistence. They scarcely know,
even in idea, what enjoyment we derive from
our woods, and groves, and fields, whilst gen-
tle zephyrs breathe around, and the little birds
- seem to vie with each other in their evening
notes of gratitude and praise. They are un-
acquainted with the delight we experience in
watching the earliest buds of spring, and in
admiring the rich hues of summer flowers, or
the ever-varying tints of autumn, They can-
132 DESCRIPTION OF GREENLAND.

not regret the loss of pleasures unknown to
them. Their year consists only of one night
and one day ; the sun never rising during win-
ter, nor setting while their short summer lasts.

Emity.—Oh, mamma, how dreary! how
dismal! I cannot imagine that I should love
Greenland even if I had been born there. Now
will you tell me something more about those
dark, bleak, and desolate regions ¢

Mrs. A.—As I have just said :

“ There, on an icy mountain’s height,
Seen only by the moon’s pale light,
Stern winter rears his giant form,
His robe a mist, his voice a storm ;
His frown the shiv’ring nations fly,
And hid for half the year in smoky caverns lie.”

These places (the smoky caverns) are half un-
der ground, roofed over with beams and raf-
ters; the walls are composed of sods and turfs,
and the interstices between are filled up with
bushes, turf, and fine earth, and above all is
a covering of skins, which nicely defends the
‘nhabitants from the weather. The interior
of the dwelling is not much more respectable
than the outward parts of it. There is
neither door nor chimney. Instead of the
spacious hall of a gentleman’s house in Eng-
GREENLAND DWELLINGS. 133

land, the entrance is through a long dark pas-
sage, with so low a ceiling, that those who go
into it are obliged to creep on their hands
and knees. In the place of paper hangings,
and elegant silk damask curtains, the walls
are covered with the dried skins of bears,
foxes, and other wild animals, to keep out
the damp. For want of glass, the openings
to let in the light are defended from cold by
the membranous substances of seals or fish.
A raised bench, lined with skins, serves the
purpose either of a bed or a sofa, as they
please, extending the whole length of the
house, and divided into little compartments,
by large skins stretched from the wall to the
posts that support the roof.

Emity.—Just like the stalls in a stable,
mamma! And each partition is, I suppose,
inhabited by a different family, who can
carry on their own business without minding
their neighbours ?

Mrs. A.—It is so. What think you of
the dwellings of the little Greenlanders ?

Kmity.—Indeed, mamma, I own that I
think myself very well off not to be one of
them; and yet I should prefer one of their
smoky caverns to the dismal mummy-caves

N
134 GREENLANDERS AND ARABS CONTRASTED.

at Gournou. Papa says that, although the
countenances of the Greenlanders are un-
pleasing, and their manners savage, they are
not treacherous, like the Arabs who attended
Belzoni, when he entered that melancholy
mummy-cave. We left our traveller at
Thebes, mamma, and he was about to visit
the tombs of the kings; cannot you tell us
something more about him?!

‘Oh, do, dearest mother, do !” cried Ber-
nard, as the sound of Belzoni’s name reached
his ear ; and, though Bernard was busily em-
ployed in putting together his dissected map,
he was eager to leave this favourite employ-
ment, to hear about the tombs of the kings ;
and he began to arrange the pieces in order
in his box.

“There, there goes Russia; the large
Russian empire, mamma ; and there is Swit-
zerland, with its lofty mountains, upon which
the chamois goats bound from crag to crag;
the Swiss are as fond of their country as the
Greenlanders are of theirs, I know by the
song that Laura sings—the Ranz des Vaches,
mamma; and there is Italy, with its orange

groves; and there, Emily, goes your dear
Lapland.”
BELZONTS NARRATIVE RESUMED. 135

Emity.—Laura says, that

** E’en in Lapland’s land of snow,
Lilies spring and roses blow.”

Laura was lately reading Linneus’s Tour
through Sweden and Lapland, mamma, and
she says that he mentions many flowers
which we consider delicate, as flourishing
there, and that the water crowfoot

Bernarv.—Stop, dear Emily, the pieces
‘are placed in the box; so pray leave your
flowers and your crowfoots, and come and
sit by mamma, and hear her talk to us about
Belzoni. I guess we shall have some won-
derful accounts: you know he is going to
Beban el Malook; and I am sure that, for
my part, I would much rather hear about the
tombs of the kings in the valley of Beban el
Malook, than all that you can tell about Lin-
nus and his flowers.

Emity.—Ah, Bernard! you are no more
of a botanist than Mahomed Ali, who
amused himself with shooting across the
Nile at an earthen pot, even when he was
surrounded by Flora’s beauties. But I am
as fond of Belzoni as you are; so please to
go on, dear mamma.


136 AGENTS OF MR. DROVETTI.

Mrs. A.—When our travellers arrived at
Luxor, which town is not far from Thebes,
you recollect, they took up their former abode
in the temple, and found themselves at home —
again? for both these places were now be-
come familiar to them. The two captains set
off for Cairo; and Mr. Beechey began to
take drawings of the different views, whilst
Belzoni recommenced his researches at Gour-
nou. He there found two more agents of Mr.
Drovetti busied in digging the ground in all
directions, and who had been tolerably suc-
cessful in their pursuits after mummies.

Owen.—How unfortunate! I wish that
troublesome Mr. Drovetti would keep his
agents in Alexandria, and not let them come
to disturb Belzoni’s plans. Were these two
fresh agents as disagreeable as the two Copts,
who interrupted him before, and caused him
to travel upon a donkey by day and night
from Minieh to Thebes.

Mrs. A.—These men were not Copts, but
Piedmontese.

Emity.—Natives of Piedmont, mamma :
one of the most populous and delightful
parts of Italy.

Mrs. A.—Although they did interfere with
BEBAN EL MALOOK. ~137

Belzoni’s plans at Gournou, they did him no
injury in the end: for, when he found that it
was in vain to proceed with his work there,
he made the valley of Beban el Malook the
scene of his researches, being confirmed in
the opinion that there was a sufficient prospect
to encourage him to commence his operation.
Brrnarv.—And that was in hopes of disco-
vering the tombs of the kings. But before you
go on, mamma, will you tell me something
about them, and whether this valley was near
Gournou? for, if it were, you know, Mr. Dro-
vetti’s agents might have found out what Bel-
zoni was aboutg and left their own work,
pretending that they wished to assist him.
Mrs. A.—Belzoni was proof against all
pretences of that sort. The valley of Beban
el Malook is the place where the kings of
Egypt were buried; and he thought that he
might possibly discover some of their relics.
It is completely separated from Gournou by
a chain of high mountains, that also divides
Thebes from the valley. The same rocks,
indeed, surround the sacred ground, which
can be visited only by a single natural en-
trance, that is formed, like a gateway, by

thé craggy paths across the mountains. The
N3
138 CALCAREOUS STONE.

tombs are all cut out of the solid rock, which
is of hard calcareous stone, as white as it
is possible for stone to be. They consist, in
general, of a long passage which leads to a
staircase, sometimes with a gallery on each
side of it, and other chambers. Advancing
farther, wider apartments present themselves,
and other passages and stairs, until at length
the traveller finds himself in a large hall,
where stands the great sarcophagus contain-
ing the remains of the Kings.

Bernarv.—What do you mean by calca-
reous stone ?

Emiry.—I have read, Bernard, that calca-
reous is derived from the word calx, which is
lime in Latin; so calcareous stone signifies a
sort of limestone, I suppose.

Owrn.—What sort of workmen did Mr.
Belzoni procure, mamma ¢ I hope he will
not offer three hundred piastres this time.
I dare say, experience has taught him not to
pay them beforehand, at all events.

Mrs. A.—He was furnished with twenty
men, and began in good spirits to search for
the tombs of the monarchs of Thebes.

Emiy.—Had he any guide to direct him
to the spots where they were : |
ADVANTAGES OF OBSERVATION. 139

Mrs. A.—His only guide was the know-
ledge he had acquired in his many researches
among the tombs of Gournou. He is a gen-
tleman of great observation, you know, and he
found that the Egyptians had a particular
manner of forming the entrances into their
tombs, which gave him many leading ideas of
the discovery of them. Three days after the
excavations had commenced, the first tomb
was discovered; the entrance indicated it to
be a very large one, but it proved to be only
the passage of one that was never finished.
However, this partial success gave him encou-
ragement, as it assured him that his idea
respecting their situation was correct. In the
evening of the same day, another tomb was
discovered, but nothing particularly remark-
able was observed in it. The next morning,
an entrance was made into another containing
many chambers and passages. But it was not
till some days after this that Belzoni pointed
out the fortunate spot which repaid him for all
his trouble, and compensated for all the mor-
tification he had received from the operations
of the Piedmontese. He says that this day
gave him more pleasure and more gratification
than wealth could purchase, arising from the
140 SITUATION OF THE TOMBS.

discovery of what had long been sought in
vain, and the prospect of presenting the world
with a new and perfect monument of Egyp-
tian antiquity, which can be recorded as supe-
rior to any other in point of grandeur, style,
and preservation, appearing as if just finished
on the day they entered it: indeed, what
was found in it will show its superiority to
the others. Not fifteen yards from the last
tomb, Belzoni caused the earth to be opened
at the foot of a steep hill, and under a tor-
rent, which, when it rains in the desert, pours
a great quantity of water over the very spot
he had caused to be dug.

Lavra.— But, mamma, how could any
one imagine that the ancient Egyptians would
make the entrance into such an immense
and superb excavation just under a torrent of
water $

Mrs. A.—Belzoni had strong reasons for
supposing it from indications he had observed.
The Fellahs, who were accustomed to dig,
were of opinion there was nothing in that
spot, as the situation of this tomb differed
from that of any other. He continued the
work, however; and, next day, he perceived
that part of the rock was cut, and formed the
THE GREAT TOMB OPENED. 141

entrance. Early on the following morning
the task was resumed, and, about noon, the
workmen reached the entrance, which was
eighteen feet below the surface of the ground.

Brrnarp.—Twice as high as our parlour.

Mrs. A.—The appearance indicated that
the tomb was of the first rate ; but Belzoni
did not expect to find it so magnificent as it
really proved to be. The workmen advanced
till they saw it was probably a large tomb,
when they protested they could go no farther,
because it was so much choked up with Jarge
stones, which they could not get out of the
passage. Belzoni descended and examined
the place, pointing out to them where they
might dig ; and, in the course of an hour, there
was room enough for him to enter through
a passage that the earth had left under the
ceiling of the first corridor. At the end of
this corridor, he came to a long staircase,
at the foot of which a door opened into a still
longer passage, each side of which was sculp-
tured with hieroglyphics in basso-relievo.
The more Belzoni saw, the more he wished
to see.

Owzn.—That was very natural, mamma ;
when our curiosity is excited, it is quite right
142 INTERIOR STRUCTURE.

to gratify it, especially if it be laudable, as
you say. |

Mrs, A.—His anxiety was, however, check-
ed for a time; for, at the end of this long
corridor, he reached a large pit, which inter-
cepted his progress. This pit was as deep as
our house is high.

Brernarv.—He had better take care what
he is about! There is some danger of his
falling into this pit, as the interpreter did into
that at Gournou, and then he may cry Je suis
perdu ! in vain.

Mrs. A.—On the opposite side of the pit,
facing the entrance, Belzoni perceived a small
aperture, only two feet wide and two feet
high; and at the bottom of the wall a quan-
tity of rubbish. A rope fastened to a piece
of wood, that was laid across the passage
against the projections which formed a kind of
door, appeared to have been used by the an-
cients for descending into the pit ; and from
the small aperture on the opposite side hung
another, which reached the bottom, no doubt
for the purpose of ascending. They could
clearly perceive that the water which entered
these passages from the torrents of rain ran
into this pit, and the wood and rope fastened
INTERIOR STRUCTURE. 143

to it crumbled to dust on touching them. At
the bottom of the pit were several pieces of
wood placed against the side of it, so as to
assist the person who was to ascend by the
rope into the aperture.

Owrn.—Surely, mamma, Belzoni will have
more prudence than to hazard his life in at-
tempting to cross this tremendous place.
That rotten cord, although it did for the
ancient Egyptians so many years ago, could .
not now support his weight !

Mrs. A.—He saw the impossibility of ad-
vancing at the moment; and Mr. Beechey,
who was with him, was also disappointed of
advancing any farther. However, the next
day, by means of a long beam, they succeeded
in sending a man up into the aperture ; and,
having contrived to make a little bridge of
two beams, they crossed the pit.

Bernarp.—How wide was it, mamma?

Mrs. A.—It was fourteen feet wide, twelve
feet long, ‘and thirty feet deep.

Bernarp.—Oh, mamma, as deep as this
house is high! I am sure that J would not
have ventured upon that little narrow bridge !

Owrn.—But I am sure that J would, Ber-
nard! How much pleasure Belzoni would
144 ENTRANCE TO THE TOMB.

have lost if he had not been so courageous !
To what place did that small aperture lead,
mamma! I wonder why the Egyptians took
so much pains: always to have crossed that
terrible pit must have been very troublesome.

Mrs. A.—They found this little aperture
to be merely an opening forced through a
wall, that had entirely closed the entrance,
which was as large as the corridor. The
Egyptians had closely shut it up, plastered
the wall over, and painted it like the rest of
the sides of the pit, so that, but for the
aperture, it would have been impossible to
suppose there was any farther proceeding :
and any one would have concluded that the
tomb ended with the pit.

Owen.—So Belzoni and his friend entered
this narrow aperture. Whither did it lead
then, mamma ?!

Mrs, A.—When they had passed through
it, they found themselves in a large and beau-
tiful hall, in which were four square pillars,
At the end of this entrance-hall was a large
door, from which three steps led down into
a chamber with two pillars. Belzoni gave
this room the name of “ the drawing-room,”
to distinguish it from the others; it was
CHAMBERS IN THE INTERIOR. 145

covered with figures, which, though only out-
lined, were so fine and perfect, that one might
think they had been drawn only the day be-
fore. Returning into the entrance-hall, they
found a large staircase descending into a cor-
ridor, which they entered. They perceived
that the paintings became more perfect as
they advanced farther into the interior ; the
varnish that was laid over the colours had
a fine effect, and it was astonishing that they
were in such good preservation. This corri-
dor led them to a smaller chamber, which
they called ‘the room of beauties.”

Bernarp.—The room of beauties! Why
did they name it so, mamma

Mrs. A.—I suppose, because it was adorn-
ed with such beautiful figures in basso-relievo
and painted; when standing in the centre of
this chamber, the traveller is surrounded by
an assemblage of Egyptian gods and god-
desses. Proceeding onwards, they entered
a large hall, in which there were two rows
of square pillars.

Bernarp.—Then that, I suppose, was
‘¢ the hall of pillars,” mamma ?

Mrs. A.—So Belzoni named it. A step
at the end of this hall of pillars led into a

0
146 THE SARCOPHAGUS.

large saloon, with an arched roof, or ceiling,
and there were entrances from this saloon into
many other large rooms and chambers ; but
what Belzoni found in the centre of the sa-
loon delighted him more than anything else,
and sufficiently compensated him for the dan-
ger he had undergone in crossing the little
bridge over the great pit, and creeping
through the narrow aperture.

It was a sarcophagus of the finest oriental
alabaster, nine feet long and three feet wide,
transparent, and minutely sculptured within
and without with several hundred figures,
representing, I suppose, the whole of the
funeral processions and ceremonies relating to
the deceased king, united with emblems and
other devices. ‘To give you an accurate ac-
count of all Mr. Belzoni saw in this tomb—
the drawings, paintings, hieroglyphics, em-
blems, and ornaments which it contained —
would take us too long.

Owrn.-—But were these devices of no use
at all, mamma? Could not Belzoni decipher
them sufficiently to know what monarch was
laid there ?

Mrs. A.—As I have told you before, my
dear, the hieroglyphical system has for many
TOMB OF PSAMMUTHIS. 147

years been thrown aside, therefore it is almost
impossible fully to ascertain any facts con-
veyed by it. Gentlemen of distinguished
eminence in literature have, however, lately
employed much of their time in endeavouring
to find the right key for reading this almost
unknown language; but they have not so
far succeeded in this arduous and difficult
undertaking, as to be enabled to give to the
world the history of one of the most primi-
tive nations, of which we are now nearly
ignorant.

In the hall of pillars, which I mentioned
just now, a company of Ethiopians were paint-
ed, and distinguished by their colour and or-
naments. One of the gentlemen of whom I
am speaking found the name of Psammuthis
- inserted among the hieroglyphics. Psammu-
this made war against the Ethiopians: it is
therefore supposed to be his tomb.—The
Arabs made great report of Belzoni’s disco-
very ; it came at last to the ears of Hamed
Aga, of Kenneh, who was told that great
treasure was found in the tomb.

Owrn.—And that was sufficient to excite
his curiosity, I dare say, but not enough to
gratify it. I suppose he set off full speed
148 ALARM OF TURKS.

to seek this great treasure; and his disap-
pointment will justly repay him.

Mrs. A.—Yes: when the important news
reached him, he collected his soldiers to-
gether, and departed immediately for Thebes,
which is generally a journey of two days;
but he travelled with such rapidity as to
arrive in the valley of Beban el Malook in
thirty-six hours.

Emiy.—Belzoni must have been very
much amused when he saw him, mamma,
knowing that he was come on such a foolish
expedition; and Hamed Aga himself must
have been not a little mortified to find his
trouble was fruitless; for I do not fancy the
paintings and figures gave him much plea-
sure.

Mrs. A.—Before his arrival, some Arabs
conveyed to Belzoni and his friend the in-
telligence that they saw from the tops of the
mountains a great many Turks on horse-
back, entering the valley, and coming towards
them. |

Owern.—This intelligence was not very
gratifying, I suppose; I recollect you once
told us that the Turks think themselves en-
titled to be masters of the country, because
VISIT FROM HAMED AGA. 149

the Arabs were conquered by them; and,
-+¢ T had been in Belzoni’s place, I should
have been displeased at such an interruption.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni could not conceive who
they could be, as he had never seen any
Turks near the spot. Half an hour after,
they gave the signal of their approach, by
firing several guns.

Owen.—And now he was alarmed, I
should think. Not alarmed, either: he had-
too much courage to be easily frightened.
But, if I had been in his place, I should
have fancied that it was an armed force sent
to storm the tombs and rocks, and to blow
up the hall of pillars and the room of
beauties !

Mrs. A.—Belzoni dreaded this, at first ;
but he soon found that it was the well-known
Hamed Aga, of Kenneh, for some time com-
mander of the eastern side of Thebes, and
his followers.

Owrn.—But what business had he to go
to the valley of Beban el Malook ¢ It is
on the west, you know, and consequently
under another ruler.

Bernarv.—Oh, I suppose, that, im case
of a treasure being discovered, the first that

03
150 RAPACITY DISAPPOINTED.

hears of it takes it for granted that he is en-
titled to it !

Mrs. A.—Yes: as a matter of privilege.
When Hamed Aga was introduced to Bel:
zoni, he smiled and saluted him very cor-
dially : perhaps a little self-interest induced
him to do so. They caused several lights
to be brought, and descended together into
the tomb. The symbolical representations
on the walls of this extraordinary place did
not attract his attention in the least: all the
striking figures and lively paintings were lost
upon him; his views were directed to the
treasure alone; and his attendants, equally
regardless of real beauties, sought in every
hole and corner in hopes of finding the wish-
ed-for prize. Nothing, however, appearing
to satisfy their master or themselves, after
a long and minute survey, the Aga ordered
the soldiers to retire, and whispered to Bel-
zoni in a cautious manner, “ Pray, where have
you put the treasure?” —‘ What treasure ? ”
said Belzoni.—‘* The treasure you found in
this place,” replied Hamed. Our friend
smiled, as well he might do, at the question,
and assured him that he had found no trea-
sure there; but this only confirmed the trou-
HAMEP AGA’S WANT OF TASTE. 151

blesome Aga in his supposition. He laughed,
and still continued to entreat that it might
be shown him; adding, “J have been told
by a person io whom I can give credit, that
you have found in this place a large golden
cock filled with diamonds and pearls. I
must see it. Where is it?”

Bernarv.—A large golden cock filled with
diamonds and pearls! How ridiculous.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni could scarcely refrain
from laughing, whilst he assured him that
nothing of the kind had been found there.
Seeming quite disappointed, Hamed seated
himself before the beautiful sarcophagus, to
the great dismay of Belzoni, who dreaded that
he would take it into his head that this was
the treasure, and break it to pieces to see
whether it contained any gold; and, as their
notions of treasure are confined to gold and
jewels, I own there seemed some danger of
it. At last, however, he gave up the idea
of the expected riches, and rose to go out
of the tomb. Belzoni asked him what he
thought of the beautiful figures painted all
around. He just gave an indifferent glance
at them, saying, “This would be a good
place for a harem, as the women would have
152 TASTE NATURAL TQ MAN.

something to look at.” And, though only
half persuaded that there was no treasure,
he set off with an appearance of disappoint-
ment and vexation.

Emuy.—I do not like that Hamed Aga,
of Kenneh, at all! He had no taste, had
he, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—What do you call taste ?

Emuy.—Laura says that it is the power
which the mind possesses of admiring and
relishing the beauties found in nature and
art: therefore I imagine Hamed Aga had
none; and he makes me think of a passage
I was reading yesterday, mamma, about a
Frenchman, who, when he saw the sea for
the first time, said that it was assez jolie.

Mrs. A.—Some of Akenside’s beautiful
lines occur to me:

“ Say what is Taste, but the internal powers
Active and strong and feelingly alive
To each fine impulse ?—a discerning sense

Of decent and sublime, with quick disgust
From things deformed.”

Though our Aga did not possess this ‘‘ in-
ternal power” in any eminent degree, we
must not judge that it is confined to the
polished part of mankind only ; on the con-
ARRIVAL AT BOOLAC. 153

trary, it is as common to a rude state of
society as to an early period of life. Even
the wild tribes who inhabit the back settle-
ments of America, contemplate their exten-
sive lakes, the Ohio and the Ontario, with
astonishment, and gaze upon the starry
heavens with delight. Although born in so
rude a state, they are feelingly alive to each
fine impulse.

Emmy.—I wish Hamed Aga possessed
half the taste of one of the North American
savages !

Mrs. A.—Belzoni, having embarked all
that was found this season, left Thebes with
another accumulation of antiquities, and ar-
rived at Boolac after ten months’ absence.
He there engaged Signor Ricci, a young man
from Italy, to return with him to Thebes,
and to make drawings and imitations of the
hieroglyphics. Mrs. Belzoni resolved to visit
the Holy Land in the mean time, and to
wait for Belzoni at Jerusalem, whither he
intended going when the model of the tomb
should be completed.

Emity.—But why did not Mrs. Belzoni
go with him?

Mrs. A.—Because she did not admire
154 VISIt TO THE PYRAMIDS.

the inhabitants of Luxor and Thebes; and
the idea of visiting the Holy Land had first
‘nduced her to accompany Mr. Belzoni into
Egypt; therefore, thinking this a good oppor-
tunity, she left Cairo, attended by the Irish
boy and a Janizary- Belzoni, however, before
he returned to Thebes, determined to visit
the Pyramids, in company with two other
Europeans. Can you tell me how they are
situated !

Emuy.—Oh, yes, mamma. It is impossi-
ble for us to have forgotten that, when Bel-
zoni was first at Cairo, he visited them, and
that they are scattered about on the Libyan
Desert, to the west of that place. Before
you go on, will you tell us by whom and
when these Pyramids were built ?

Mrs. A.—There is so little agreement
upon the subject of the founders, my love,
either among the natives or historians, that
we, like Pliny, must consider this uncertainty
as a just reward of the vanity of those by
whom they were actually erected ; and of
course, as we cannot determine who were the
builders of them, we should only misspend
our time by attempting to fix the period of
their erection. I believe that their least
VANITY OF THEIR FOUNDERS. 155

antiquity must be near three thousand years,
as Herodotus, who, you know, was one of
our first historians, and lived about two thou-
sand years ago, found so little satisfaction in
his inquiries after them ; and Diodorus, who
also lived before the birth of our Saviour, sup-
poses the great Pyramid to have been built
one thousand years before his time.
Emitry.—Will you tell me, dear mamma,
why the uncertainty in which we are left re-
specting them should be a just reward of the
vanity of those by whom they were erected
Mrs. A.—It is generally supposed that
these Pyramids were designed as tombs and
monuments for the dead; and does it not
appear to you, my dear Emily, that a little
vanity must have actuated men to spend so
much time, and be at so much expense, for
such a purpose; intending, as it were, to
convey to future ages proofs of their power
and mementos of their greatness ¢
Emiry.—Was this the only motive for
which they were built, do you imagine, mam-
ma?
Mrs. A.—By no means, my dear girl. I
am not so uncharitable as to suppose that.
The Egyptian theology taught its votaries,
156 PURPOSES OF THE PYRAMIDS.

that so long as the body was preserved from
decay the soul continued with it, and hence
we may account for the great pains and curl-
ous precautions of the Egyptians with regard
to their deceased friends.

Emiy.—I am glad to hear this, mamma,
for I shall be no longer puzzled with wonder-
ing what so many tombs and monuments
were for: and the motive for embalming the
mummies is now very clear.

Bernarp.—Were the Pyramids hollow,
mamma? And what did Belzoni do there ¢

Mrs. A.—Some of them had an entrance,
and others had not. Whilst Belzoni’s friends
went into the first Pyramid, which is nearly
of the height of St. Paul's Cathedral in Lon-
don, he seated himself on a large stone near
thesecond Pyramid, which is of about the same
height, and fixed his eyes on that enormous
mass, which for so many ages has baffled the
conjectures of ancient and modern writers.

Bernarp.—I should like to know all the
thoughts that passed through his mind as he
sat upon that great stone. I dare say he was
projecting some wonderful plan !

Mrs. A.—The sight of this amazing work
astonished him, as much as the total obscurity
A COMPREHENSIVE MIND. 157

in which we are as to its origin, its interior,
and its construction. One of the greatest
wonders of the world stood before him,
without his knowing whether it had any
cavity within, or whether it were only one
solid mass.

Owen.—I foresee what is coming, mamma.
There was an entrance into the other great
Pyramid, and Belzoni was projecting one
into this,

Mrs. A.— Various attempts had been
made by numerous travellers to find an en-
trance into this Pyramid, but so ineffectually,
that there seemed little probability that even
our enterprising Belzoni could succeed. How-
ever, experience had taught him to antici-
pate success; and he knew very well that
the greatest difficulties may be overcome by
patience and perseverance.

He rose at length, and by an involuntary
impulse walked round the Pyramid, surveying
every part, and almost every stone. When he
came on the north side, he observed indications
that induced him to attempt searching there
for an entrance. He perceived an accumula-
tion of huge stones; consequently, he had
some hopes of finding a passage under this

P
158 ATTEMPT TO OPEN

heap of ruins. The following day he resolved
to make a closer examination, without com-
municating his secret to any one. This re-
view encouraged him to the attempt, and he
applied, without loss of time, to the Bey,
for men to assist him in penetrating one of
the great pyramids of Egypt—one of the
wonders of the world!

Accordingly, he left Cairo, having provided
himself with a small tent and some provisions,
that he might not be obliged to return to the
city. He found eighty Arabs ready to work,
and immediately set about the operation.
They were daily paid one piastre (or sixpence)
each. Several boys and girls, of your age,
were also employed to carry away the earth as
the men dug it. Belzoni contrived to ensure
their good-will by trifles and presents, as well
as by pointing out the advantage they would
gain, if they succeeded in penetrating into the
pyramid, as many strangers would come to see
it, and they would get presents from them.

Owxn.—Belzoni knew that nothing has so
much influence on the mind of an Arab as
reasoning with him about his own interest,
and shewing him the right way to benefit
himself. I wish, mamma, that Belzoni had
THE SECOND PYRAMID. 159

had eighty honest Englishmen in the place of
those eighty Arabs.

Mrs. A.—You have a good opinion of
your own countrymen, to think that their
master’s interest is dearer to them than their
own. Well, be itso? These Arabs worked
with earnestness for some days; but, after
many vain expectations, and much labour
in removing the mortar, which was so hard
that their hatchets were nearly all broken,
they began to flag in their prospect of find-
ing anything; and Belzoni seemed about to
become an object of ridicule for making the
attempt to penetrate into a place which ap-
peared to them, as well as to more civilized
people, a mere mass of stone.

Bernarpv.— What made it appear so, mam-
ma? And why did they use hatchets?
Would not spades have been better ?

~ Mrs, A.—They were the only instruments
that could be procured. The cause of the
Pyramid appearing like a solid rock was,
that the mortar which fell from the upper
part of it had been moistened by the dew,
(for in spring and summer very heavy dews
fall in Egypt at night,) and had gradually

formed itself into one mass with the stones.
160 APPARENT SUCCESS.

Belzoni’s hopes did not forsake him, in
spite of the many difficulties that presented
themselves; and the Arabs, although their
zeal was somewhat lessened, did not cease
to work as long as they received a daily
piastre. At last, after sixteen days of fruit-
less toil, one of the Arabian workmen per-
ceived a small chink betwen two stones of |
the Pyramid.

Bernarp.—This gave Belzoni great joy, I
suppose. How large was that little chink,
mamma ! |

Mrs. A.—Belzoni could just thrust a long
palm-stick into it, which he did upwards of
two yards ; and the Arab was equally delight-
ed with himself, thinking that he had found
the entrance so eagerly sought for. Kn-
couraged by this circumstance, the people re-
sumed their former vigour, and the work went
onrapidly. After removing one of these stones,
and a great quantity of sand and rubbish, they
came to an opening inwards. Having made
it wide enough to enter, Belzoni took a
candle in his hand, and, looking in, perceived
a spacious cavity, about which he could form
no conjecture. The size of the entrance
was increased, and he found that it was a
AN IGNORANT CONCLUSION. 161

forced passage, probably intended to find a
way to the centre of the Pyramid: but the
hope that this would lead to the real entrance
was in vain—it gave him none; and, after
much trouble in enlarging it, he remained as
ignorant as he was before he began.

Brrnarv.—I shall be very sorry if he
despair of entering the Pyramid on this ac-
count.

Mrs. A.—He gave a day’s rest to the
Arabs after this disappointment, and dedicated
the interim of their repose to a closer inspec-
tion of the stupendous pile; for, according to
your wish, Bernard, he was determined on
the accomplishment of his intended purpose.

Owzn.—I suppose that the ill-success of
the discovery of the forced passage was con-
sidered as a failure. However, I hope he
will not give it up. I dare say the thought
of young Memnon, and of the temple of
Ybsambul, gave him encouragement.

Mrs. A.—The result of this day of re-
searches was, that it would be better to begin
in another part: and accordingly the Arabs
were again set to work. They liked to receive
their money, but they had no expectation that
an entrance would ever be found ; and Belzoni

P 3
162 THE PYRAMID OPENED.

often heard them uttering, in a low voice,
“ magnoon !” which is, in plain English,
madman! However, they went on with
their excavations, and in a few days Belzoni
discovered a large block of granite: this gave
him much pleasure. The next day, three
large blocks of granite were uncovered. His
expectation and hope increased, as, to all
appearance, he was near attaining the object
of his search. Happily, he was not mistaken ;
for on the next day, the 2nd of March, 1818,
at noon, they came to the right entrance into
the Pyramid. It proved to be a passage only
four feet high, and it was almost filled up
with large stones, which had fallen from the
upper part. With some difficulty, the stones
were drawn out of this passage; and it was
not until the evening of the next day that
they reached a portcullis, which obstructed
their labour.

Bernarp.— What is a portcullis, mamma :

Owen.— It is a sort of machine like a
harrow, hung over the gates of a city, or
any other place, to be let down to keep out
an enemy.

Mrs, A.—At first sight, it appeared to be.
a fixed block of stone, which said, Ne plus
INTERIOR OF THE PYRAMID. 1635
ultra, as if ready to put an end to all Belzoni’s
prospects. In time, however, the portcullis
was raised high enough for a man to pass.
An Arab entered with a torch, and returned,
saying that the place within was very fine.

Bernarpv.—I should like to have had a
torch, and peeped at the fine place within
the portcullis myself !

Mrs. A.—They continued, by unwearied
efforts, to raise the portcullis, and at last
made the opening large enough for Belzoni
to enter it; and, after thirty days’ exertion,
he had the pleasure of finding himself in the
way to the central chamber of one of the
two mighty Pyramids of Egypt. Having
passed through several long passages, cut
eout of the solid rock, he reached a door at
the centre of a large chamber, and, walking
two or three steps, stood still to contemplate

the place where he was. It was a striking
scene. He was in the centre of that Pyramid
which, from time immemorial, has been the
subject of the obscure conjectures of many
hundred travellers, both ancient and modern,
and against whose hollow sides the sound of
a human voice had not re-echoed for more
than a thousand years !
164 INDUSTRY CROWNED WITH SUCCESS.

Emuy.—Oh, mamma ! how awful it must
have been! This was better than all—even
than entering the temple of Ybsambul, or
the tomb of Psammuthis !

Mrs. A.—Belzoni’s torch, formed of a |
fow wax candles, but faintly glimmered ; and 7
he looked around on the spot where not a
ray of light had penetrated for more than
eleven centuries! He was in the middle of
one of those stupendous Pyramids, which, in
defiance of the ravages of time, still remain
as monuments of ancient magnificence, and
of the evanescent glory of those by whom
they were erected.—When Belzoni had ex-
amined and entered and re-entered the many
chambers and passages within the Pyramid,
he returned to open daylight, highly gratified.
with the result of his researches ; and I
imagine, Owen, that he felt no small degree
of satisfaction in applying to himself our
favourite motto—

Owen.—* Labor omnia vincit,” mamma !

And it shall be my motto, whenever I have
anything difficult to do.

Mrs. A.—In a few days Belzoni, having
arranged his affairs, became anxious to return
to the valley of Beban el Malook ; and °


FURTHER RESEARCHES. 165

not omitting to provide himself with every~
thing necessary for forming models and im-
pressions of the figures, emblems, and hiero-
glyphics in the tomb of Psammuthis, he set
off for his old habitation among the sepul-
chres of Thebes.

Bernarp.— Do let us follow him, dear
mamma: I am very glad he had such success
in entering the Pyramid: and I hope he
will have as much in everything that he
undertakes. I see that patience is a very
good quality, mamma.

Mrs. A.—So it is, my dear boy: and if
you will exercise it till to-morrow evening, I
mean to tell you something more.



CHAPTER IV.

Evenine came. The curtains were drawn;
the candles lighted; and the juvenile party
seated around their mother. ‘‘ Mamma always
fulfils her promise,” whispered Bernard to
Emily: “ we need not put her in mind of
Belzoni.”

Mrs. A. overheard her little boy, smiled,
and resumed her narrative :—
166 SULPHU R-MINES.

Our friend was just about to return to
the tombs of the kings, when we took leave
of him, last night, I believe. After a rapid
and agreeable voyage up the Nile, he arrived
there, and immediately proceeded to take
drawings and models, which employment de-
tained him some months. And we are now
going to accompany him to the Red Sea.

Emitry.—To the Red Sea, between Egypt
and Arabia? I wonder what he means to
do there !

Mrs. A.—Our old friend, Mahomed Ali,
the Bashaw, had been informed that there
were some sulphur mines in the mountains
near the sea-coast, and had sent an escort
of soldiers and sixty camels to load with
sulphur: but they had not succeeded in
procuring it. However, this failure did not
discourage Ali, who was always ready to
persevere in any enterprise. I dare say
you recollect that he was of an active,
inquisitive disposition ; fond of new projects
and new pursuits; like a certain person of
my acquaintance.

Owrn.—Oh, yes, mamma! He was de-
lighted with the electrical machine, because
he had never seen one before; he had a
SULPHUR-MINES. 167

sugar-mill, a silk manufacture, and a gun-
powder-mill; and now he wanted sulphur.
Sulphur is used in the composition of gun-
powder: perhaps that was what he wanted
it for.

Mrs. A.—He was advised to send some
Europeans to the Red Sea, who might bring
him word whether it were worth while to
proceed in the discovery of sulphur. A
Monsieur Caliud undertook the task, and
set off, accompanied by an escort of soldiers
and miners from Syria. But he found
the mines as sterile as they had been de-
scribed, and returned; not neglecting, how-
ever, to visit the emerald mountains in
his way, according to instructions he had
received from his former employer, Mr.
Drovetti.

Bernarpv.—I do not much like Monsieur
Caliud, mamma, now that you say he had
been employed by that troublesome Mr.
Drovetti.

Mrs. A.—He found several caves, or mines,
in those mountains, which had evidently been
left by the ancients.

Emity.—Did Belzoni see Monsieur Ca-
liud °
168 CALIUDS ACCOUNT OF BERENICE.

Mrs. A.—Yes: and his account tempted
him to commence his expedition. Monsieur
Caliud told him that there were mines in
the country, and also that he had visited a
place called Sakiet Minor, situated in a
valley near the sea and surrounded by high
rocks. From the account he gave Belzoni,
a notion became impressed on the minds of
many antiquaries in Egypt, that it must
have been the ancient city of Berenice ;
and, from the moment that our friend heard
this report, he conceived the idea of making |
an excursion into those deserts, on a visit to
Berenice, and only waited a proper time to
perform his intended journey.

Emmy.—When did he set off, mamma; |
and how did he travel And why did Mon-
sieur Caliud fancy that the city of Berenice
was in that valley ‘ |

Mrs. A.—Time had almost destroyed
every remnant of it; but Caliud reported
that he had discovered the remains of eight
hundred houses, and several temples, as well
as a small chapel. cut in the rock, and
that the ruins resembled those of Pompei.
Of course, our enterprising antiquary was
anxious to inspect the remains of this once
PREPARATIONS FOR A JOURNEY. 169

celebrated place; and, having hired a boat
to take them to Edfu, they embarked near
Gournou. The company consisted of him-
self, Mr. Beechey, a doctor, who was going
to cross the desert, two Greek servants, a
miner, and two boys, to take care of the
baggage.

Emity.—What! were they going to cross
a great sandy desert? that will be delight-
ful! Will you be so good as to wait whilst
I open the atlas, mamma? There, now,
I have put my little finger at Gournou,
just by Thebes, and I am going to follow
them, either to the sulphur-mines, or Eme-
rald Mountains, or Sakiet Minor, as you
please.

Mrs. A.—It so happened, that they were
to behold one of the greatest calamities
that have occurred in Egypt in the recollec-
sion of any one living. The Nile rose
this season three feet above its usual height,
with uncommon rapidity, and carried off
several villages and some hundreds of their
inhabitants.

Emiry.—And did Belzoni witness this dis-
tressing scene ?

Mrs. A.—Yes: he says that he never saw

Q
170 INUNDATION OF THE NILE.

any picture that could give a more correct
idea of the deluge than the valley of the Nile
at this season. The Arabs had expected an
extraordinary inundation this year, in con-
sequence of the scarcity of water the preced-
ing year; but they did not apprehend it
would rise to such a height.

Bernarv.—I thought you had told us
that they generally make fences of earth and
reeds around their villages, to keep the water.
from entering their houses.

Mrs. A.—So they do. But the force of
this inundation baftled all their efforts. Their
cottages, being built of earth, could not stand
one instant against the current, and the water
had no sooner reached them than it levelled
them with the ground. The rapid stream
eatried off all that was before it; men, wo-
men, children, cattle, corn,—everything was
washed away in a moment, and left the place
where the village of Agalta had stood without
anything to indicate that there had ever been
a house on the spot. Belzoni says, they ap-
peared to be in the midst of a vast lake, con-
taining various islands, and magnificent edi-
fices. On one side they beheld the high
rocks and the temples of Gournou, and on the
DESTRUCTION OF AGALTA. 171

other the vast ruins of Carnac and Luxor.
He saw several villages in danger of being
destroyed like that of Agalta. The rapid
stream had already carried away their fences,
and the unfortunate inhabitants endeavoured
to ascend the highest parts, with the little
they could preserve from the water. Their
distress was very great. Some of them had
only a few feet of land, and the water was
expected to rise for twelve days more, and
after that to remain twelve days at its height,
according to the usual term of the inunda-
tion.

Owrn.—How melancholy it would have
made me to see them, mamma! Could they
not have contrived little bridges from one
island to another—little bridges of beams,
you know, like that upon which Belzoni
crossed the pit in the tomb ¢

Mrs. A.—It was a most distressing sight.
Some poor wretches crossed the water on
pieces of wood—bridges would have been no
security—some on buffaloes or cows; and
others with reeds tied up in large bundles.
The small spots of high ground that stood
above the water, were crowded with people,
who held out their hands and implored help.
172 DESTRUCTION OF AGALTA.

Bernarv.—Poor creatures! There obliged
to stand, dreading every moment, I suppose,
to be washed away; or, at least, without any
hope of relief before the end of twenty-four
days. Were there no boats to be had; and
had they nothing to eat, mamma?

Mrs. A.—The scanty stock of provisions
they had saved was the only subsistence they
could expect. The Cacheffs and Caimakans
of the country did all they could to assist the
unfortunate creatures with their little boats ;
but they were so few in proportion to what
were wanted, that they could not relieve the
greater part of them.

Owen.—Could not Belzoni have taken
some in his own little boat ?

Mrs. A.—He would have done so most
willingly, but he knew it would be dangerous
to attempt it, for so many would have entered
it at once that the boat would probably have
sunk. On their arrival at Erments, where
happily the land was very high, they found
many of the neighbouring people collected.

Bernarp.—I dare say Belzoni landed
there, however, and employed his boat to
fetch some of the poor wretches. He was
courageous, mamma ; and papa says that real
ISLAND OF HOVASEE. i738

courage is generally united with humanity
and kindness.

Mrs. A.—You are right: Belzoni was
rejoiced to find that he could be of some
little service, and his boat was sent again and
again, in company with others, to fetch the
people from the opposite village. It at first
returned with men and boys; then with men,
corn, and cattle ; then with more corn, buffa-
- Joes, sheep, goats, asses, and dogs; and then
with the women, who, I am sorry to say, are
there treated as the most insignificant part
of their property— With the gratifying re-
flection of having been of some little service,
our party arrived at Esne.

Owrn.—Did they go to see their old
friend, Khalil Bey?

Mrs. A.—He was from home; they
therefore proceeded to the island of Hovasee,
on the opposite side of the Nile to Edfu.

Emiry.—aA little dot points out the situa-
tion of this island, mamma. How long did
they stop there?

Mrs. A.—Only long enough to procure
camels and men to accompany them across
the desert, and they then went on shore on
the eastern side, and set off the next day.

Qa 3
174 SHEIK IBRAHIM.

Bernarv.—Just tell me, mamma, how
many camels they had ¢

Mrs. A.—They had sixteen of these pa-
tient gentle creatures; six of them were laden
with provisions, water, and culinary utensils.
Camels were niuch better than horses, because
they are used to carry merchandize across the
large sandy plains, which would be impassable
unless Providence had created this useful ani-
mal, which is capable of enduring hunger and
fatigue, and wonderfully provided with a re-
source against thirst by an internal formation,
which enables it to drink at one time water
enough to serve it for many days. The party
was increased by a soldier from Esne, four
camel-drivers, and a Sheik to guide them.

Bernarv.—Fourteen men in all. But,
pray, who was the Sheik !

Mrs. A.—Sheik Ibrahim was an Arab.
He had engaged to attend the caravan as
chief, promising to conduct Belzoni and his
friends to the ancient Berenice.

Bernarp.—I suppose the Sheik was a
fine brave fellow, and I hope he will guide
them there in safety.

Mrs. A.—They set off very early in the

morning, and arrived at the first well in three
VALLEYS IN THE DESERT. 175

hours. There they remained the whole day,
waiting for Ibrahim, who had not yet joined
them. However, the following morning he
appeared, and they entered a good and level
road through a valley. Many sunt and syca-
more trees were interspersed about this val-
ley, with the thorny plant called basillah.

Owrn.—Is not that the plant upon which
the camels feed, mamma?

Mars. A.—Yes, my love. It is green, I
believe, in the spring, but it soon becomes
dry, and, of course, of a straw colour. It
bears a small fruit the size of a pea. The
stalk resembles that of a rush, and it never
grows higher than three feet. As our party
advanced the valley became narrow, and the
trees, in some parts, thicker: but they gradu-
ally diminished, until Belzoni and his com-
panions found themselves on a wide and open
plain; they took up their abode for the day
at a sort of temple, or inclosure, evidently
built for the accommodation of travellers.
‘The next morning they pursued their journey.
Not the least vegetation was to be seen any-
where. Sometimes they passed over wide
and level plains, and sometimes crossed hills
of loose sand, till two hours before sunset,
176 A CARAVAN.

when they entered a valley called Beezak by
the Arabs.

Bernarpv.—I am glad they are come to
a valley, mamma, because the valleys appear
to be more generally fertile than the hills.

Mrs. A.—Several trees were scattered
about in it, and the usual thorn also.

Emuy.—Then the camels had a feast,
mamma! Did they halt there for the night ¢

Mrs. A.—Yes: and Belzoni was gratified —
by perceiving the marks of camels’ feet im-
pressed on the sand, whence he concluded
that he was on the high road to Berenice.
The next morning, the caravan was divided
into three different detachments.

Bernarv.—Will you tell me what you
mean, mamma, by saying the caravan was
divided? When Owen and I went through
the little gate at the end of the plantation,
one day, we saw a kind of cart going down
the lane, and some gipsies with it; Owen
called that a caravan. When we went to
see the elephant, last summer, it was in a
great wooden house on wheels, you know,
and papa said that was a caravan. So I am
quite puzzled.

Mrs. A.—I will explain it to you. We


THE ABABDE. 177

do call such a carriage as you mention a
caravan in England; but in the eastern
countries, by a caravan is meant a company
of travellers, who for mutual protection
and safety, agree to cross the desert regions
together.

The luggage and provisions were sent for-
ward; the doctor was ill, it was therefore
dangerous for him to proceed any farther,
and he returned towards the Nile, whilst
Mr. Belzoni and his friend Mr. Beechey went
a little out of the way to see something that
the Ababde had mentioned.

Emuty.—Who are the Ababde, mamma ?

Mrs. A.— An independent tribe, who,
preferring freedom and liberty to anything
else, reside among the solitary rocks and
deserts which extend from the confines of
Suez to Nubia, on the borders of the Red
Sea, where they live upon dhourra and
water. But such is their love of liberty,
that they would rather submit to this mode
of life than to the command of any govern-
ment on earth.

Owrn.—So would I! rather than be sub-
ject to the caprice of a tyrannical power,
at all events. Liberty, independence, for
178 THE ABABDE.

me, mamma !—Will you tell me something
more about the Ababde? I admire them
very much.

Mrs. A.—Perhaps your admiration would
be lessened were you to see them: they are
of small stature, badly made, and have gene-
rally a pipe in their mouths. Sometimes,
but not often, they kill a lean goat, and
this they consider a great feast. Their prin-
cipal care is for their camels, which are their
support.

Emity.—How can that be, mamma? I
thought that they never wanted to travel
across the great deserts.

Mrs. A.—Because, when they are arrived
at a certain growth, they send them to be
exchanged for dhourra, which, as [ have told
you, constitutes their food.

Owrn.—In what manner do the Ababde
spend their time ?

Mrs. A.—Some of the most industrious
cut wood and make charcoal with it, which
they send to the Nile on their camels, and
barter it for dhourra, tallow, and tent cloth.
Few, however, undergo such labour, for they
like to live at their ease.

Bernarp.—Well, mamma, [ would much
MANNERS OF THE ABABDE. 179

rather be one of the harmless Ababde, and
cut down sunt trees among the rocks and
deserts, load my camel, and honestly earn
the “reward of my labour, than one of the
deceitful Arabs of Gournou.

Mrs. A.—The Arabs of Gournou seem to
have made a strong impression on your mind,
my dear. However, lam of your opinion,
that a poor and honest life is preferable to
one dependent upon mean resources.

Emity.—What was Belzoni going to see
when we left him, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—He entered, with his friends, a
sandy plain, with rocks of white stone on
each side nearly perpendicular, and passed
through several beautiful and romantic val-
leys. The soil was sandy and stony; but the
thorny trees and the sunt trees formed a com-
plete forest in many parts. One who wishes
to retire from the world might find a charm-
ing retreat in these wilds, were it not for the
want of water, and all that is necessary to
the subsistence of human life ; besides the
intense heat of the sun, which on calm days
is so great as to be almost insupportable.
Continuing to advance, in three hours, they
reached a rising ground, whence they per-
180 ROMANTIC SCENERY.

ceived at some distance, what appeared to be
the walls of a large and extensive town, sur-
rounded by high rocks, as if by fortifications.
On their approach, they found that it was an
extensive sandy plain, with several granite
eminences. From this place they travelled
to the left, towards the valley in which it was
intended they should halt. The caravan had
reached the place before them, and they pro-
ceeded on their march till they overtook it
near a well, situated in the midst of rocks,
which, interspersed with trees, formed an
amphitheatre round it. There they remained
a day or two. |

Brernarp.—Did any of the Ababde visit
them whilst there ?

Mrs. A.—Yes: it was a novelty for stran-
gers to come so near them: the greater part of
them had never quitted their mountains, and
those few who had been to the Nile to pur-
chase dhourra were accounted men of great
knewledge. They said, that they were con-
tent to live in that wild state, as all their fore-
fathers had done, to remain free from tyranny
and despotism; and that they would be quiet
if they were left so; but, on the contrary,
they would rather perish than lose their liberty.
SELF-IMPORTANCE. 181

Owern.—Brave, independent fellows! But
I should have admired them still more had
they not been so indolent.

Mrs. A.—You would have been amused if
you could have seen with what curiosity they
eyed the strangers, and at their ignorance of
things in common use with us. One of them
perceived a piece of lemon-peel lying on the
ground, and wondered what it was, whilst an-
other took it up and ate it with an air of great
self-sufficiency.

Ownn.—Ha! ha! I dare say he had been
to the Nile, and did so to show the great
knowledge he had acquired—that lemon-peel
is good to eat—how wonderfully clever !

Mrs. A.—Belzoni gave them a piece of
loaf-sugar, and, when they had eaten it, they
declared that the valley he came from must
be better than theirs, as it produced such
good and sweet bread.

Owrn.—Had they arms, mamma ¢ But I
suppose not; for, as their neighbours did not
injure them, of course they would not wish to
attack their neighbours.

Mrs. A.—Unfortunately, they had some
use for them, for the soldiers and miners who
had accompanied Monsieur Caliud to the

R
182 MOUNT ZUBARA.

emerald mines, which are among these moun-
tains, had behaved very ill towards them, as-
sailed their huts, and committed many depre-
dations, of which the Ababde complained very
much. Their arms were chiefly slings, spears,
and swords.—Early on the morning of the
28th, Belzoni and his party again set off, and
travelled for two days, when they saw the
Red Sea at a great distance, and bent their
course through several valleys to a very high
mountain, called Zubara; a name given to it
in consequence of the emeralds which have
been found there. At the foot of this moun-
tain about fifty men were encamped, and at
work in the old mines of the ancients, in hopes
of finding some of the precious stone. Their
work had commenced about six months before,
but had been attended with no success, as the
mines were nearly choked up with rubbish.
Belzoni contrived to acquire all the information
he could about the object of their expedition,
and received very favourable accounts of it,
being assured that the ruins of the town of
which he was in search were only six hours
distant ; he therefore hoped to have a fine
view of them before night. Whilst the
camels halted he wept to see the entrances
EMERALD MINES. 183

to the mines. They were something like the
common tombs or mummy-pits at Gournou,
cut in the rock, and extended a great distance
before the emeralds were found. Belzoni pro-
cured an old man from among the natives to
guide them to the ruins of the anticipated
Berenice, and sought information from some of
the miners who had been at the very place
when Monsieur Caliud was there. Their
accounts certainly did not correspond with
his; he had raised Belzoni’s expectations
very high, you know.

Emiuy.—Oh yes, mamma. There must
have been a city, | am sure, for Monsieur
Calind told Mr. Belzoni that he had dis-
covered the remains of eight hundred houses,
and several temples, as well as a small chapel
cut in the rock; and that the ruins resembled
those of Pompeii. 1 dare say that these peo-
ple went only in search of mines, and did not
pay much regard to the beauties of architec-
ture or the grandeur of ancient ruins !

Mrs. A.—So Belzoni thought ; and, encou-
raged by this hope, they prepared for depar-
ture the following morning. When they had
gone about half a mile, they perceived that
they were without their guides: both the
184 SUSPICIOUS CONFERENCE.

Sheik Ibrahim, and the old man who was to
conduct them over the country to see the town
and other places, were missing ; they were
consequently obliged to return in search of
them, and found them hidden behind a rock,
conversing secretly with each other.

Owern.—That was very suspicious. Pray
what account did they give of themselves ‘

Mrs. A.—They professed to have been in
search of a sheep which was stolen in the
night, and they had nothing else to live
upon ; but, as they said they could not find
it, they again set off for the much-desired
and ancient city of Berenice.

Berwarp.—I should not be surprised if
they meet with some disagreeable adventure
through that old man. Why did he hide
himself behind a rock to look for a sheep?
And what could he have been talking about ‘

Mrs. A.—They trusted themselves to his
guidance, however. Their road lay through
high rocks and narrow valleys embosomed in
trees, until they had gradually approached
the mountain of Zubara, the highest of the
emerald mountains. Here they were led
by the old man in various directions, through
wild and craggy places, for seven hours.
POMPEII. 185

He told them that the spot they wanted
to see was near, but that they had a
high pass to go over the mountain named
Arrale.

Bernarv.— Before we follow them, will
you be so good as to tell me where Pompeii
is? Emily said that Monsieur Caliud stated
that the ruins of Berenice resembled those of
that city.

Mrs. A.—It was once a large city of Italy,
my love, but was overwhelmed by an eruption
of Mount Vesuvius, About a hundred years
since, a farmer was digging for a spring of
water, or deep ditch, when he came to the
top of magnificent buildings. This was the
first discovery for many centuries ; and now
several streets and the ruins of many majestic
buildings have been discovered.

Our travellers continued their journey, for
hope gave them patience, and ascended some-
thing like an ancient road or rather path. On
the summit of the mountain above they ob-
served a large wall, so situated that it appear-
ed to look over the path and both sides of the
mountain. When they reached the top of
the road their camels were quite exhausted ;
some of them had fallen on the way, and were

R 3
186 EXCITED EXPECTATION.

unloaded to enable them to ascend ; and the
strongest camels had to return to fetch the
loads of the others.

Bernarp.—Ah, mamma! a steep craggy
road over a mountain is no more adapted to a
camel] than the deep sand of the desert to a
horse. I dare say that my little Smier
would not have been so fatigued ; he is used
to climb up the Cumberland mountains, you
know.

Owen. — But not one of the Cumber-
land mountains is to be compared with that
of Arraie.

Mrs. A.— When they reached the summit,
they began to look for the desired Berenice ;
but, alas! in vain. Their hopes had been so
raised by Monsieur Caliud, that Belzoni’s
active imagination had already pictured the
remains of some majestic dome, or lofty column,
or noble edifice, by which he expected to
distinguish the town, and which was to serve
as a guide to the spot, whither he intended to
hasten the moment he beheld it. His com-
panion was not less anxious than himself,
and his ideas were equally excited. They had
made arrangements how to proceed when they
arrived there. As their provision was scanty
EXCITED EXPECTATION. 187

they could stop but a few days, and had
already distributed their time accordingly.
He was to take drawings of all the beauti-
ful buildings, monuments, figures, paintings,
sculptures, statues, and columns. Belzoni
was to survey all the vast ruins as fast as
he could; to observe where anything was to
be found or discovered; to take measures of
all the monuments, and plans of every stone
in that great city. Such pleasing ideas had
the fertile fancy of our antiquaries excited.
Now to the fact.

From the summit upon which they were
they expected to have a view, not only of the
sea, but of a wide plain also ; as it was natural
to suppose that a town like Berenice could
not have been entirely built among those wild
mountains. Not perceiving any, they expect-
ed to be agreeably surprised, on turning some
of the rocks, by beholding one. The old
man told them, that previously to reaching
the town, they would see some grottoes in
the mountains, which their vivid imaginations
made them conclude were the tombs of the
inhabitants of Berenice. They advanced in-
sensibly, continually keeping their eyes fixed
on the points of some rocks which stood before
188 DISAPPOINTMENT.

them, with the hope that, on turning the next
angle, the glorious sight would present itself ;
and, indeed, the scattered and ruined walls of
some ancient enclosures announced to them
that they would soon see some habitation.

They observed a square hole in the rock,
which had evidently been cut by some of the
miners, in form of a chapel. Belzoni now
began to congratulate himself that they had
nearly arrived, and, whilst employed with
these thoughts, the old man, who was at the
head, serving as a guide, made a sign to halt.
The drivers gave a signal to the camels, and
the camels, which were already weary and
exhausted by passing over the mountains, did
not wait for its repetition, but, with all the
luggage, were crouched in a moment on the
ground, before Belzoni was able to account
for it. He told the drivers that he did not
intend to stop there, but wished to advance
farther into the town, where the houses might
be seen ; when, to his no small astonishment,
he was told by the old man that this was the
very spot where the other Christian had been
before.

Emity.—By the other Christian, the old
man meant Monsieur Caliud, I suppose.
LINGERING HOPE. 189

But it is quite impossible that he could have
called this place Berenice : and where were
the eight hundred houses :

Mrs. A.— Belzoni himself could hardly
suppose that the account he had _ received
would be so exaggerated, as to lead him to
suppose he should find another Pompeii in-
stead of the place at which he had just ar-
rived: and he reproached the old man for
stopping there, and not advancing to the
town, which, according to his own account,
could not be far off. He again protested that
this was the spot, and that there was no
other, with houses in any part of the deserts
or mountains. Belzoni was incredulous ; and
resolving not to submit to what he believed
to be the imposition of the old man, as it
now wanted four hours to sunset, he mounted
his camel again.

Brrnarp.—His poor, wearied camel! I
imagine it would much rather have stayed
where it was, than have gone in search of
old Berenice. Did his friend, Mr. Beechey,
go too?

Mrs. A.—Yes: consequently all the cara-
van followed at a distance. They entered a
long valley, and, filled with the hope of see-
190 CONJECTURES IN A DESERT.

ing the ancient city, our travellers proceeded
for four hours without perceiving a single
habitation.

Emiy.—Oh! I fancy, mamma, how deso-
late and how much disappointed they must
have felt. The sun was just setting, you
know, therefore it was getting dark ; and no
house was near.

Mrs. A.—At length they reached a valley
called Wady el Gomal, which was almost
covered with a beautiful tree called the
egley ; and, having lost all hopes of finding
Berenice that evening, they halted to rest on
a clean bed of sand, which I believe was as
comfortable as the sugar-cane bed, Bernard ;
though Belzoni would certainly rather have
slept among the magnificent temples of the
great city. But the poor camels, instead of
reposing, were obliged to fetch water both
for themselves and their masters, from a well
not less than fifteen miles distant.

Owrn.— What could induce the old man
not to show them the place described by
Monsieur Caliud? Perhaps the miners at
Zubara had told him to keep it a secret, for
foar Belzoni should discover any emerald-
mines in or near Berenice.
ASCEND A MOUNTAIN. 191

Mrs. A.—Indeed they did not know what
to think. Their provisions began to make
them cautious: they had biscuit for twenty
days, but their sheep was lost, you remember.
Still they were easily satisfied, so that they
did but reach the desired emporium of the
commerce formerly carried on by the nations
of Europe with India.

Early on the following morning they per-
ceived a high monument, four or five miles
from the valley ; and as they had to wait for
the return of the camels, they thought they
might ascend the mountain to have a view of
the country, or of the remains of the cele-
brated Berenice. They set off, and observed
on their way several flocks of wild antelopes
skipping about the craggy rocks on each side
of the beautiful valley, which, bemg orna-
mented with suvaroe and debbo trees, in
addition to the egley, formed a delightful
contrast to the wide sandy desert. No one
had probably been im this spot for many
centuries, and, very likely no one will pass
through it for many more to come. When
they reached the summit of the mountain,
they took a view all round: they had a small
telescope with them and the peak on which
192 PERSEVERANCE IN THE

they stood commanded a prospect many miles
in extent. But, alas! Berenice, the much-
sought-for town, vanished, or rather never
appeared. No remnants of it were to be
discerned, and Belzoni might have exclaimed,
in the words of Shakspeare :

“ The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve,

And, like the baseless fabric of a vision,
Leave not a wreck behind.”

Indeed there was ocular demonstration in
the truth of this assertion, with respect to its
towers, temples, and palaces ; for the once
brilliant and flourishing city had disappeared !
and they now began to be persuaded that
Monsieur Caliud had seen the town, with its
eight hundred houses, and so much like Pom-
peii, in his own imagination only.

Owen.—That provoking Monsieur Caliud !
I thought nothing good would ever come
from him and his wonderful tales ; and I like
the old man better now.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni observed some high moun-
tains on the south-east, which the old man,
who had followed them all the way, said were
near the sea. They determined to pursue that
MIDST OF DIFFICULTIES. 193

course, and try whether they could reach the
spot described by a former traveller as being
the situation of the Berenice Trogloditica.
They descended the mountain, and returned
to the beautiful valley in which they had
passed the preceding night.

Bernarp.—And they waited there, I sup-
pose, for the return of the camels with a fresh
supply of water.

Mrs. A.—Yes: they wanted it sadly, for
a single zemzabie only remained.

Brrnarp.— What is a zemzabie

Mrs. A.—A leathern bag, containing about
three quarts, was so called. Their thirst was
great, and they felt, in some degree, the cala-
mity of living without water. Hunger is pain-
ful to endure, but thirst is far more intolerable.
At last, however, to their great joy, the ca-
mels appeared in sight. The poor drivers
were exceedingly fatigued, and almost unable
to proceed. ‘The caravan travelled on for
some hours, and arrived in another valley, the
rocks of which were nearly perpendicular.
After this the hills became small; and the
sandy banks, rising one behind another, made
them expect to see the sea very shortly. They
went on till a late hour, and at length halted

.
194 THE RED SEA.

at a spot where they thought the sand might
again prove a comfortable bed. Fortunately
for Belzoni it was so; for his camel was so
weary, that, no sooner did he reach it, than
he threw him off his back, and leaving him
there, saddle and all, set off without delay to

feed among the thorns.

Early the next day they resumed their
journey, but the hills of sand, instead of
diminishing, increased in size, which made
them fearful that they were yet far from the
sea. However, about noon, the valley open- _
ed all at once, and at the distance of five
miles they saw the Arabian Gulf.

Emity.—How much joy the sight of the
open horizon must have given them, after
having been so long shut up in that narrow
valley !

Brrnarv.—I should think they would
be glad to plunge in the sea, or to stand on
the beach and let the waves roll over them.

Mrs. A.—They perceived, on arriving at
the shore, that it was composed, as far as they
could see, of a mass of petrifactions of various
kinds.

Emity.—I have heard, mamma, that the
Red Sea is particularly noted for its sea-
BERENICE. 195

weeds, corals, shells, and similar productions,
and that the bottom of it is literally a forest
of submarine plants.

Mrs. A.—And these are formed into a
solid mass like a rock, which extends, from the
bank of sand that forms the boundary of the
tide, and runs into the sea for a great length.
They resolved to take the road along the
coast until they should reach the spot which
was pointed out as Berenice, according to the
account of the traveller whom I named before.

Emiuy.—Will you be so good as to show
me jts situation? It is not marked on the
map, mamma.

Mrs. A.—No, not on our modern maps. |
But I believe it is just by that point of land
projecting into the sea, called Cape Lepte,
a little beyond the 24th degree of latitude.

Emity.—I have made a dot with my pen-
cil, and shall not forget that it is intended
for Berenice.

Mrs. A.—They acquainted the drivers
with their intention, who, poor creatures,
were too much fatigued willingly to acquiesce
in it. They indeed went so far as absolutely
to refuse proceeding, but at last found it in
vain to resist. It was concluded that two of
196 COAST OF THE RED SEA.

the camels should go first to the nearest well
for water, and that the caravan should wait
their return. During this interval, Belzoni
and his friends made a little excursion along
the coast; the plain, which extended from the
mountains to the sea, was covered in many
places with woods of sycamore-trees, and, at
the foot of these mountains, they saw several
mines of sulphur, which they wished Maho-
med Ali could have viewed also. They made
a good repast out of some shell-fish, which
abound along the coast, and they were pro-
bably as great a feast to our wearied and
hungry friends, Emily, as the train-oil was to
your little Greenlanders.

Eainy.—Well, mamma, I am glad they
found something, and that they did not pe-
rish by hunger.

Mrs. A.—On their return to the caravan,
they found that the guide had met with an
acquaintance of his, who lived by catching
fish, not far from where they were. His only
habitation consisted of a tent, four feet high
and five feet wide; and his wife, her son and
daughter, formed the family.

Bernarp.—lIf this old fisherman were as
good-natured as the fisherman near the lake












Page 197.

THE FISHERMAN’S BOAT.
i

THE FISHERMAN'S BOAT. 197

of Winandermere, mamma, I think he would
have gone and procured some fish for them,
when he saw they were so hungry. Our
fisherman gave us shrimps in abundance,
you know.

Mrs. A.—Money presented an attraction,
and persuaded him to try what he could do.
Their mode of fishing is somewhat strange.

Bernarp.—I dare say they had no little
nets, such as Robert and Alfred had at the
cottage in Westmoreland.

Mrs. A.—They make a curious sort of
boat ; in which, I own, I should not much
like to see my little Bernard. They throw
into the water part of the trunk of a tree, at
one end of which a small pole is stuck upright,
to serve as a mast, and on the top of it a
piece of wood is horizontally fastened. A
woollen shawl being thrown over it, forms a
kind of sail; two fishermen place themselves
on the large trunk, as you used to do across
your stick-horse, and by means of a cord
fastened to the middle of a sail, they take
the wind more or less as is required.

Owrn.—When the fishermen are thus
equipped, and at some distance from the
shore, how do they seize their prey *

s 3
198 SINGULAR MODE OF FISHING.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni could scarcely tell, but
he fancied that they darted their long spears
at the fish, and procured them by this means.
The old man brought one to Belzoni: he
could not tell its name, but he had seen a
very good representation of it among the
hieroglyphics in the tomb of Psammuthis.

Emry.—How long was it before the camels
made their appearance again ¢

Mrs. A.—They returned in the course of a
day or two, with a load of fresh water, and
the caravan now divided into two parties.
The Greek servant and some of the camels
were sent to a spring in the adjacent moun-
tains, there to wait the return of the rest, who
set off in the forenoon along the coast. On
their road they passed the abodes of several
other fishermen: but when they saw our tra-
vellers at a distance, they left their tents and
marched off towards the mountains. All the
sions that were made to stop them were of
no avail.

Emity.—They were like the people of Mai-
narty, mamma, who hid themselves in that
great hole, under the ruins of an old castle,
and would not come out when Belzoni went
to visit them.
REMAINS OF BERENICE. 199

Mrs. A.—Yes: I recollect they left their
huts in a similar manner. When our friends
arrived at the tents, they found some excellent
fish just roasted, which the inhabitants had,
no doubt, intended for their own supper.
They, however, partook of their meal; and,
having left some money in payment on the top
of a water-jar, continued their journey. To-
wards evening, they left the shore, and began
to feel the short allowance of water, as they
knew that, without great care, it would soon
be entirely gone. A few hours after, they
crossed a very extensive plain, and arrived
again at the sea. Not expecting to discover
the remains of Berenice that night, it was an
agreeable surprise to find themselves, all at
once, on one of those heaps of ruins, which
point out the situation of ancient towns, SO
often seen in Egypt. They entered, and at
once beheld the regularsituations of the houses,
the principal streets, and, in the centre, a small
Egyptian temple, nearly covered with sand,
as well as the insides of the houses; their won-
der increased on examining the materials with
which the houses were built: they could see
nothing but coral roots, madrepores, and
several petrifactions of various sea-weeds.
200 REMAINS OF BERENICE.

Emimy.—These were singular buildings,
however, mamma! We have heard of the
little huts in Peru, which are made of bamboo
canes; and of the wigwams of North America,
formed of stakes, and leaves, and turf; and of
the dwellings of the little Laplanders, com-
posed of bark and reindeer skins; and we have
seen the cottages of poor people, in England,
built of mud; but we have never heard of
coral and sea-weed houses before !

Mrs. A.—The situation of this town was
delightful. Our travellers concluded it to be
the Berenice laid down by D’Anville, as it
nearly agreed with the situation marked on his
map. They determined to examine it most
minutely. They measured the town, and took
the plan of the temple, which was built of soft
calcareous earth in the Egyptian style. Their
grand difficulty was about the water ; it was
become so scarce, that they had reason to
dread remaining there the whole of the next
day. The nearest well was a day’s journey
distant. Notwithstanding their excessive
thirst, they were determined to endure it,
rather than give up their project; and it
being moonlight, they devoted the hours of
rest to an examination of the place.
SELF-WELCOME. 201

Bernarp.—How very much tired, and how
very hungry they must have been! They had
only taken some biscuit and water for a long
time, except the fish, which they found in the
tents of the fishermen.

Mrs. A.—They contented themselves very
well with respect to food, but their thirst was
continually increasing; and their zamzabie,
which some days before contained only three
quarts, was nearly empty- However, that
they might be perfectly sure of having actually
reached Berenice, they persuaded the Sheik to
go farther with them, Just to take a survey of
the country, and to leave the rest of the people
where they were in the mean time. Before
they departed they set little Mussa to dig
near the temple.

Bernarp.— Who was little Mussa, mamma’

Mrs. A.—One of the boys, who had been
brought with them from Gournou. He was to
dig in the temple; he had no spade, poor
fellow! but as it was only soft sand, a shell
or coquille, supplied the place of one.

Emity.—I remember that two boys joined
the caravan at Gournou, to take care of the
luggage ; and I suppose he was one of them.

Mrs. A.—Proceeding onwards, they saw
202 AN EGYPTIAN TEMPLE.

nothing but an extensive plain to the foot of
the mountain that formed the cape on the
south ; they had telescopes, but could see no
sort of elevation, or anything else that could
lead them to imagine there were any remains
of habitations. They therefore returned to the
town, and found that the boy had excavated
about four feet of sand, near one corner of the
temple, and, to their surprise, discovered that
it was Egyptian. They had imagined that it
was erected by the Greeks. The walls were
adorned with sculpture and _ hieroglyphics,
and they carried a small marble slab away
as a memento.

Emity.—The little Mussa had worked very
well, I think, considering he had only a shell
in the place of a spade.

Mrs. A.—The plain that surrounds this
town is very extensive, and partly covered
with small plants of sunt and suvaroes.

Owren.—We have heard of the sunt-tree,
but suvaroes is quite a new name.

Mrs. A.—It is a small tree, and its leaves
resemble those of the laurel ; it grows close to
the salt water, and generally out of the rocks.
Belzoni carefully examined the town, and
counted the houses (of which there were two
_

*

THE WELL OF AHARATRET. 203

thousand), that he might not make a wrong
report, and be mistaken for another Caliud.
This place, being on the coast, was once a
port of commerce with India. Having spent
as much time there as they prudently could,
they recommenced their journey towards the
north-west, firmly intending, at some future
time, to inspect the whole of the ruins.

Owen.—To the north-west; then they are
returning to Esne, I suppose? I hope they
will fall in with some well, to relieve their
thirst.

Mrs. A.—They left the spot on the evening
of the same day, and, after travelling some
hours by moonlight, fortunately arrived at the
well of Aharatret, a mountainous place, where
the water was good to drink.

Brrnarpv.— What joy it must have given
them! But their biscuits were nearly gone
by this time, I should think.

Mrs. A.—Yes: however, they were agree-
ably surprised to find a few sheep around the
well, as they hoped to be able to purchase one.
They approached, intending to do so, when
the guardians of the flock beat a forced march
into the mountain, and drove the intended
repast away from them. But they were not
204 COPTIC SHEPHERDESSES.

inclined to be deprived of what they could
purchase ; and they sent some of the drivers
to follow the flock, which they willingly did,
being as hungry as themselves. The fugitives
were pursued and stopped. They reached
the flock, and found that its guardians were
two shepherd girls. The tawny-coloured
nymphs were surprised at the fountain by
their pursuers, and took refuge on the moun-
tains; but, unlike the fishermen on the coast
of the Red Sea, or the people of Mainarty,
they were easily persuaded to return, and
allowed the hungry group to take one of their
lambs.—The caravan arrived at Sakiet Minor
in a few days, and thence proceeded to the
valley of Wady el Gomal; after which it
crossed a very wide sandy plain, and reached
the entrance of the chain of mountains that
leads to the Nile. Their camels were by this
time so much exhausted as to be scarcely able
to go on: they had already lost three on the
road. It is difficult for those who have never
seen a desert, to form a correct idea of one; it
appears like an endless plain of sandand stones,
without roads or shelter, and without any sort
of produce for food. The scattered trees and
shrubs of thorns, that only appear when the
DISTRESS FOR WANT OF WATER. 205

rainy season leaves some moisture, barely
serve to feed wild animals and a few birds.
Everything is left to nature. The springs of
water are generally at the distance of four,
six, or eight days’ journey. One of these
may perhaps happen to be dry, and then, if
the same dreadful calamity happen at the
next well, which is so anxiously sought for
by the wearied travellers, the misery of their
situation cannot be adequately described.

Brernarv.—The camels are with them, you
know mamma,

Mrs. A.—Although their only dependence
is placed on these useful creatures, yet they
themselves are sometimes so thirsty as to be
unable to proceed. Their condition must
be distressing, for it admits of no resource.
Many perish, the victims of insatiable thirst.
It is in such a state that the value of “a cup
of cold water” is really felt.

Emmy.—And what a prize a single zem-
zabie must be !

Mrs. A.—In these cases there is no dis-
tinction ; if the master have none, the servant
will not give it him: for very few are the in-
stances in which a man will voluntarily sacri-
fice his life to save that of another, particu-

T
206 MISERIES OF EXTREME DROUGHT.

larly in a caravan in a desert, where the
people are strangers to each other. What a
situation for a man to be placed in! Riches
will avail nothing; he may perhaps be the
owner of the caravan, and yet die in the
desert for want of a cup of cold water! No
one gives it to him: he offers all he possesses;
no one hears him; they are all dying, though
by walking a few miles farther they might be —
saved ; the camels are lying down, and will
not attempt to rise; no one has strength to
walk. Only he who has so much as a glass of
that liquid, which he would not part with for
all the emeralds of Zubara, has any chance of
living ; and if he is enabled to crawl a mile
farther, perhaps he dies too.

Owrn.— What a dreadful situation! Ex-
posed to the burning sun, without water, and
without shelter, in the midst of a scorching
desert !

Mrs. A.—I believe the sufferings of those
who have experienced what it is are the
greatest that a human being can sustain.
The eyes become inflamed; the tongue and
lips swell! a hollow sound is heard in the
ears; a faintness or languor, takes away the
power to move: some wandering tears escape
CHANGE OF SCENERY. 207

from the eyes; the poor sufferer drops on the
earth and becomes insensible: all these feel-
ings arise from the want of a little water.—
And now we will return to Belzoni.

Emiry.—Yes, mamma, We left him just
entering the chain of mountains that leads to
the Nile.

Mrs. A.—The caravan proceeded very much
as before, until it arrived on the banks of that
river, and the freshness of its water made them
sensible of its superiority over that of almost
any other. They went on board their little
boat the same night, and set off for Esne.

Bernarp.—How did the country look,
mamma? You know, when they went upthe -
Nile, almost all the land around was under
water, and the poor people were standing
about on the little islands, holding out their
hands and imploring assistance.

Mrs. A.—Although the water had only re-
tired fifteen days, yet all the lands that were
before overflowed were now not only dried up,
but actually planted ; the mud villages carried
off by the current were all rebuilt, the fences
opened, the Fellahs at work in the fields; the
aspect was quite changed, and all presented a
scene of industry and happiness.
208 INFANTINE CUNNING.

They arrived at Esne in a day or two, and
visited the Bey, who received them very
politely, inquired about the mines, and was
anxious to learn the result of their journey.
They then set off again, and reached our well-
known Gournou, after an absence of forty days.

————_—

CHAPTER V.

“Mamma! exclaimed Bernard, running
into the breakfast-room, where his mother
was seated, and throwing his straw-hat on
the sofa, “ Do you know what I have been
thinking about ?”

‘‘ Indeed, my dear,” said Mrs. A. ‘‘ your
employments are so various, and your thoughts
generally dependent upon them, I suppose,
that I feel at a loss to imagine.”

“Guess, mamma, guess !” exclaimed Ber-
nard.

The kind mother endeavoured to gratify
her little boy, and mentioned his garden—his
donkey—his little telegraph—his favourite
cherry-tree :—but all in vain.

“T have been thinking,” said he, “ that,
when I am older, I shail get Owen, or papa,
DR. FRANKLIN. 209

to teach me how to swim; and that I shall
fly my kite whilst I am in the water, as Dr.
Franklin did when he was a boy. How do
you like my plan?”

Mrs. A.—I own that I think some little
danger would be attached to it, just at pre-
sent, however. Dr. Franklin was a native
of Boston, in America, and was taught the
practice of swimming when very young, so
that he was particularly expert and skilful in
this, as in almost every other respect. But
what led you to think of him now?

Brernarp.— Owen and I are just come from
the park, where we have been flying our new
kite ; and Owen has been telling me how
much pleased Dr. Franklin was with his new
method of swimming. Do you remember it,
mamma? He one day wished to amuse him-
self with his kite, and to enjoy at the same
time the pleasure of swimming; so he got
into the water, and lying on his back, held
the end of the string in his hands, and went
along in such a delightful manner. I wish I
had been Dr. Franklin! He engaged a boy
to carry his clothes round the pond, to a place
which he pointed out to him on the other

side, whilst he, in the mean time, crossed the
23
210 POMPEY'S PILLAR.

pond with his kite flying high in the air.
Was it not a clever idea ?

Mrs. A.—He managed to do two things
at once, certainly. But I do not admire Dr.
Franklin for his new mode of swimming only.
He was clever whilst a boy ; and, when grown
up, became a very useful character, and ren-
dered great services both to his own country
and the world at large; however, I would
advise you not to attempt to imitate him in
the exploit that has pleased you so much,
until you acquire a little ofhis experience. I
can, if you please, tell you of another achieve-
ment performed by means of a kite.

‘“‘ Pray do, dear mamma,” said Bernard, as
he reached his little stool, and placed himself
by the side of his mother.

Mrs. A.—You have perhaps heard of
Pompey’s pillar.

Bernarp.— Yes, mamma. It is not far
from Alexandria, the place at which Belzoni
landed when he went to Egypt; and I sup-
pose that this column was erected to the
memory of the great Roman warrior, as papa
calls him. Pompey was killed as he was
going to that country, you know, soon after
he had stepped into the little bark. I won-
EXPLOIT OF ENGLISH SAILORS. 211

der whether Achillas was sorry when he heard
Cornelia shriek. Do: you think he was,
mamma !

Mrs. A.—The feeling of humanity was
a stranger to his bosom; but we will talk
about that another time.—The column called
Pompey’s pillar is one hundred and ten feet
high; the Monument in London is two hun-
dred and two feet from the ground, so you
may judge of the height of the former. It
has suffered little or no injury from time. It
is of the Corinthian order, which is at once
simple and beautiful. The pedestal has been
somewhat damaged by the instruments of
travellers, who are anxious to possess a relic
of this antiquity ; and one of the volutes of
the column was immaturely brought down,
a few years ago, by the ingenuity of some
English captains. So I have heard; however,
I cannot vouch for the truth of my story,
farther than the authority of the traveller
who relates it.*

Brrnarp.—How did they manage to pro-
cure one of the volutes? I suppose it had
not steps within it, as the Monument has.
And pray when was it built !

* Irwin.
912 ASCENT OF POMPEY'S PILLAR.

Mrs. A.—Pompey was killed in the year
of Rome 706. The time of the erection of
the pillar is scarcely known, but it was named
after him in the fifteenth century, when learn-
ing began to revive from a torpid state, in
which it had long languished, and men of
science bestowed names on all the monuments.

A strange fancy entered the thoughts of
one of those seamen, as they were coasting
about in the harbour of Alexandria, and the
eccentricity of the idea caused it to. be im-
mediately adopted ; for its apparent impossi-
bility only made them the more anxious to
put it into execution. And now, Bernard,
perhaps: you may be as long in discovering
their scheme, as I was in guessing that your
thoughts were employed about Dr. Franklin.

Brrnarpv.—I believe it has something to
do with Pompey’s pillar; perhaps they in-
tended to mount it, mamma: but how they
could possibly contrive to do so, I am sure
I cannot tell.

Mrs. A.—They ordered out the boat, and,
with proper implements, pushed ashore, in-
tending to drink a bowl of punch on the top
of it. They arrived at the spot, and many
contrivances were proposed to accomplish the
ASCENT OF POMPEY’S PILLAR. 913

desired project. But their labour was vain ;
and they began to despair of success, when
the genius who struck out the frolic happily
suggested the means of performing it. A
man was despatched to the city for a paper
kite. The inhabitants were by this time ap-
prised of what was going forward, and flocked
in crowds to be witnesses of the address and
boldness of the English. The governor of
Alexandria was told that some sailors were
about to pull down Pompey’s pillar ; how-
ever, he politely left them to themselves, say-
ing, that the English were too great patriots
to injure the remains of Pompey. The kite
was brought, and the wind being in the right
direction, it flew so directly over the pillar,
that, when it fell on the other side, the string
lodged upon the capital.

Brernarp.—Clever, clever people! Who
besides could have thought of such a plan!
I foresee what is coming! They will be up
in a minute or two !

Mrs. A.—The chief obstacle was now
overcome. A thick rope was tied to one end
of the string and drawn over the column by
the end to which the kite was fixed. By
this rope one of the sailors ascended to the
214 POMPEY'S PILLAR.

top (sailors are used to run up the shrouds,
you know, and this was somewhat similar) ;
in less than an hour a kind of rope-ladder was
constructed, by which the whole company
went up amidst the shouts and claps of the
astonished multitude.

Bernarv.—How delightful to be a sailor !
Sailors can do such wonderful things! And
what a useful kite !

Mrs. A.—T'o the eye below, the capital
of the pillar does not appear capable of hold-
ing more than one man upon it; but our sea-
men found it could contain no less than eight
persons very conveniently.

Emity.—Did no accident happen, mam-
ma? I should have thought, that looking
down from such a height would have made
them giddy.

Brernarv.— You forget that they were
sailors, Emily, and used to look down from
the tall masts.—But did they do the pillar
any injury, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—The only one was the loss of
the volute I mentioned before, which descend-
ed with a thundering sound, and was brought
to England by one of the captains, They
reported that one foot and an ankle of a
POMPEY S PILLAR. 215

statue were still remaining upon the monu-
ment,—probably of Pompey himself.

Bernarp.—Do you believe the account
you have given us to be true!

Mrs. A.—I cannot say that I am sure such
a thing did really and actually happen. I
can only depend on what I have heard from
others. But the adventurers themselves have
left a memento of the fact, by the initials of
their names painted in large black letters just
beneath the capital.

Bernarv.—Well, it is a very amusing
anecdote, mamma. Kites are very ingenious
—as ingenious as the somebody who thought
of the plan: and I like my own pretty kite
that Edward gave me far better than any
other. Without kites, they could never have
got to the top of Pompey’s pillar.

Emiry.—You know, mamma, that Belzoni
was at Alexandria. Did he see it!

Mrs. A.—I cannot tell, my dear; I do
not recollect that he mentions it: but he was
at Alexandria more than once, for he took
the obelisk thither which he discovered in
the island of Philoé.

Emiry.—Do, dear mamma, tell us some-
thing about that obelisk. Belzoni left it in
216 OBELISK AT PHILOE.

the island at Philoé, on his return from
Ybsambul, and gave the Aga four dollars
to pay a guard for it, till he could procure
a boat to convey it down the Nile.

Owrn.—The obelisk was lying among
several blocks of stones: it was made of
granite, and was twenty-two feet long.

Mrs. A.—I dare say you recollect that we
left Belzoni at Gournou. He did not remain
there very long, but went up the Nile to As-
souan.

Emity.—Here is the old town of Assouan ;
it stands on a hill which overhangs the river,
and is on the opposite side of the Nile to the
first Cataract ; and Philoé is in the Nile be-
tween them.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni went to this island, to
take a view of the bank where he had to
embark the obelisk. In a few days he set
the men to work, and procured a boat to put
it in. The greatest difficulty seemed to be
to persuade the captain to have the boat
launched down the Cataract, which it neces-
sarily must be, with the obelisk on board.
However, the promise of a handsome present
procured an assurance that he would accom-
plish the undertaking. He had some little
A DISAPPOINTMENT. 217

trouble to procure a few sticks, or small poles,
from Assouan, as there is no wood in these
places, except what they procure from Cairo.
He had also some difficulty in removing the
obelisk from its situation: but, once put on
its way, it soon came to the water-side.

Bernarv.—I wonder whether they made
a causeway, and contrived to embark it as
cleverly as they did young Memnon.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni gave orders for a sort
of temporary pier to be made of large blocks
of stone. When finished, no doubt arose
of its being strong enough for the weight it
had to support. But, alas! when the obelisk
came gradually on from the sloping bank,
and the heavy mass rested on it, the pier,
with the obelisk and some of the men, took
a slow movement, and, to Belzoni’s dismay,
descended majestically into the river !

Emuy.—How much mortified poor Bel-
zoni must have been! Why did he not
make himself sure that the pier was quite
secure ? |

Mrs. A.—He had no reason to doubt that
it was. It is true, he was not present dur-
ing its erection, because he had gone to ex-
amine a passage in the cataract, down which

U
218 MORTIFICATION ON SEEING

the boat would have to be launched ; and now
it was too late. When he fixed his eyes
upon the spot where the pier set off into the
Nile, he observed that the stones which were
to serve as a foundation on the sloping bank,
had been only laid on the surface of it, so
that it was almost impossible for the obelisk
to do otherwise than press it down into the
river

Owrn.—Well, it was a very unfortunate
thing! and all these reflections are now of no
use. The obelisk from Philoé is there, and
there it must stay.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni was not quite so full
of despair as you are, Owen. He was cer-
tainly extremely mortified, and, being only
three yards off when it happened, he stood
for some minutes in confusion and astonish-
ment. At length, the loss of such a piece
of antiquity, and the blame that would be
attached to him by other antiquaries, occurred
to his recollection, and he resolved to try
what could be done.

Brernarv.—He may try, and try again. I
do not believe, for my part, that he will ever
get the great obelisk out of the Nile.

Emity.—You forget that he generally suc-
A FAVOURITE SCHEME FAIL. 219

ceeded in whatever he undertook: he often
proved the truth of mamma’s motto, “‘ Labour
conquers all !”

Mrs. A.—The obelisk was still peeping
a little above the water. The labourers were
of various humours; some were sorry, not
for the obelisk, which was no loss to them,
but for the loss of what they might have gain-
ed in future operations, by passing it down
the cataract ; others were laughing, probably
at the evident disappointment expressed in
the countenance of our friend. Some went
one way, and some another ; and he remained
alone, absorbed in thought, and contemplating
the little part that projected out of the water.

Emiuy.—And now I suppose he began to
reflect, and to see the possibility of taking
the obelisk up again. I hope he will con-
trive a good plan, and put it into execution.

Mrs. A.— He reflected, indeed, that he
was as badly off as he had been with Young
Memnon, in being destitute of instruments ;
and that the palm-leaf ropes, which he had
with him, were broken, old, and of little use.

Owxzn.—That was very unfortunate. Gould
he get none anywhere !

Mrs. A.—He soon made up his mind to
220 CONTRIVANCE FOR RAISING

have the obelisk taken up, at all events ; and,
accordingly, ordered the men to come the
next morning, and sent to Assouan to procure
some new ropes for the purpose.

Emitry.— Will you tell us, dear mamma,
in what manner this mighty operation was
performed ?

Mrs. A.—The labourers were excellent
watermen, and could bear the water the
whole day without inconvenience ; so Belzoni
had the advantage in this respect. The fol-
lowing morning the work commenced. Seve-
ral men entered the river, and made a great
heap of stones on the side of the obelisk op-
posite to the shore.

Owen.—That was to form a bed for the
levers to rest upon, I suppose.

Mrs. A.—Yes: he then placed the levers
under the obelisk, so that by their pressure
it was forced to turn round upon its axis.

Owrn.—But I do not understand how the
men could put down the levers under water
as they do on shore.

Mrs. A.—They could not, certainly, my
love; but, by seating themselves on the ex-
tremity of the long pieces of wood, the pres-
sure of their own weight produced the effect.
THE OBELISK OUT OF THE RIVER. 221

Owxn.—Then you mean that one end of
the long poles, called the levers, passed under
the obelisk, and, while a portion of them rest-
ed upon the rock of stones, the men seated
themselves on the other ends, and thus caused
the obelisk to turn gently round, and round,
and round, until it reached the dry ground.

Mrs. A.—Exactly so. ‘T'wo ropes were
also passed under it, and the men on shore
pulled the ends of these ropes with all their
might. At the side where the levers were,
some good divers were stationed, who were
ready to put large stones under the obelisk,
as it rose, that it might not return to its
former situation.

Owern.—I can fancy how busy they all
looked. The men at the ropes were pulling
with all their strength; those on the rocks
were rising and sitting, to make the levers act
and the divers were placing stone after stone,
whilst the obelisk was gradually rising and
moving round at each turn by its own weight.
So they go on, until, to Belzoni’s great joy;
he beholds it once more on terra firma.

Mrs. A.—Where it was in the course of
two days; but another difficulty awaits it,
before it reaches Alexandria.

u 3
222 THE OBELISK EMBARKED.

Emity.—And that is, descending the cata-
ract, I expect. You were saying something
about its being launched.

Owrn.—You forget, Emily, that it is not
yet embarked.

Bernarv.—Pray tell us, mamma, how that
was done. Belzoni will make no deceitful
piers again, I dare say.

Mrs. A.—This operation was performed
by means of a bridge of palm-trees, thrown
from across the boat to the land under the
obelisk, which was then turned on the bridge,
and placed on board ; when in the centre of
the boat the trees were moved from under it;
and no sooner was this done, than the party
set off with the obelisk, to have it ready to
be launched down the cataract the next
morning.

Owrn.—I want to know how this danger-
ous operation was performed. I hope it will
not fall into the Nile again.

Mrs. A.—It had to descend the greatest
fall of water in the cataract. When the in-
undation is half high in the Nile, it is a
column of water about three hundred yards
in length, which falls among rocks and stones
projecting in various directions. The boat
PREPARATIONS FOR LAUNCHING. 223

was brought to the margin of the cascade ;
a strong rope, or rather a small cable, was
fastened to a large tree, the end of which was
passed through the beams of the boat, so as
to slacken or stop it at pleasure. In the
boat there were only five men; and on the
rocks on each side of the cascade a number
of others, in various places, with ropes attach-
ed to the boat, so as to put it either on one
side or the other, as it required, to prevent
its running against the stones; for you know
if it had been touched ever so slightly, with
such a weight on board, and in such a rapid
stream, the boat would probably have been
- dashed to pieces.

Owzn.—But I thought that the rope Bel-
zoni had got from Assouan was strong enough
to stop it in its course, in case it should be in
danger of running against a rock ¢

Mrs. A.—It was only sufficient to check
it; and you forget, that when the boat was
moving so rapidly, an attempt to stop its
progress would make the water run in and
sink it in a moment. Under these circum-
stances, all depended upon the dexterity of
the men, who were posted in various parts
to pull or slacken as necessity required. Bel-
224 PUSILLANIMITY.

zoni did not fail to use all the persuasion pos-
sible; and the wild people, as he calls them,
were upon this occasion as careful as so many
pilots. The Reis, or owner of the boat, was
in great distress, thinking it would certainly
be lost.

Emiy.—Then was he present, mamma ¢

Mrs, A.—Yes: he had engaged his vessel
merely because it happened “that his trade
failed; but when he saw the danger it was
in, he cried like a child, and begged Belzoni
would relinquish his project, and return his
boat to him in safety.

Owrn.—How foolish, to. cry like a child!
I hope Belzoni paid no regard to his distress.

Mrs. A.—Tears were certainly useless ;
but we must remember that his livelihood,
poor fellow, depended on his boat. When
he saw it on the point of being launched, he
threw himself with his face to the ground,
and did not rise till it was out of danger.
When all was ready, Belzoni gave the signal
to slacken the cable. The boat moved for-
ward with great rapidity. The men on land
slackened the rope, and it continued its course
till it reached the bottom of the cataract.

Bernarv.—I am glad of it, mamma! I
DESCENT OF THE CATARACT. 925

like Belzoni to receive the reward of his la-
bour! How delighted the poor Reis must
have been! I dare say he did not lie on the
ground any longer.

Mrs. A.—Oh, no: he went full of joy
to congratulate himself and Belzoni. The
workmen altogether seemed pleased at the
success of the attempt, even independently
of the interest they might derive from it.
This was gratifying to our antiquary ; for it
is not very often that such feelings enter the
bosoms of the Arabs. Having only two or
three places, of little danger, to pass, they
arrived safely at Assouan on the same day.
Belzoni immediately prepared to depart from
thence to Thebes; he quitted the boat; tra-
velled by land, and took up his old residence
at the tombs in Beban el Malook.

Enu.y.—But what became of the obelisk ¢
I thought it was going to Alexandria.

Mrs. A.—It proceeded to Luxor.

-Emmy.—Just by Thebes, mamma.

Mrs, A.—And from thence to Rosetta,
where it remained some time.

Beanarp.—You say that Belzoni took up
his residence in Beban el Malook. I am
afraid he forgot that it was settled for him
226 EMBARKING OF THE SARCOPHAGUS.

to go to Jerusalem, to join poor Mrs. Bel-
zoni.

Mrs. A.—No, he had not forgotten. He
had written to tell her that he could not go
into Syria, and she had in consequence return-
ed from Jerusalem and now waited to welcome
his arrival in the valley. I once told you,
as you perhaps recollect, that the entrance
into the newly-discovered tomb was situated
under a small torrent of water, which, when it
rains, runs into it. This is not often the case
in Egypt; but it so happened, that whilst
Belzoni was absent up the Nile, it did rain,
and consequently the water ran into his.tomb,
carrying with it a great deal of mud, and
damaging some of the figures. However, this
disaster could not be remedied. Belzoni com-
pleted his models and drawings, and with
some difficulty removed the great sarcophagus,
and put it intoa strong case. The place it
had to pass to reach the Nile was rather un-
even for more than two miles, but it was con-
veyed on rollers, and put safely on board ;
and our traveller was now about to bid a final
adieu to Thebes. Before he embarked, he
retraced the scenes which had yielded him so
much delight ; he paid a melancholy visit to
SAFE ARRIVAL AT ALEXANDRIA. 227

the magnificent remains of ancient grandeur;
gazed for the last time upon the temples and
columns which have triumphed over the cor-
roding influence of the universal ravager ;
and beheld the valley, the place in which his
labours had been crowned with so much suc-
cess, with painful feelings and mingled emo-
tions of pleasure and regret. He left the
spot, so long known and so long endeared
to him, in January 1819, and arrived in Cairo
the following month. At this place they
stopped only a few days, and continued their
voyage to Rosetta, where, taking the obelisk
with them, they re-embarked on board a
djerm, and arrived in the course of a short
time at Alexandria, whence they intended
to take a passage for Europe.

Bernarp.—And now, mamma, all our plea-
sure is ended; Belzoni is really going back
to England ; and we shall hear of his adven-
tures no more.

Mrs. A.—They did not quit Alexandria
immediately ; and, if you please, we may
yet accompany our friend in another journey,
that he took to visit a temple in the western
Desert: we have not yet been on that side
of the Nile.
228 TEMPLE OF JUPITER AMMON.

Emity.— Will you shew me the situation
of that temple upon the map, Laura, and tell
me why Belzoni went there ?

Laura.—The temple of Jupiter Ammon
had been sought for a long time, and by more
than one traveller: but the true spot where
it existed had not yet been fixed upon: and
to discover this as well as to visit some Pyra-
mids, and search for the famous Labyrinth,
were objects which presented great attractions
to Belzoni.

Emity.— Why was the temple dedicated
to Jupiter Ammon ?

Laura.—Because Jupiter Ammon-was one
of the gods in the Egyptian mythology. He
was worshipped under the figure of a ram.

Mrs. A.—Having left Mrs. Belzoni in
Rosetta, our traveller took a small boat, and
proceeded to Benisouef, where he arrived in
nine days.

Emity.—My finger is following him up the
Nile, and now it stops at Benisouef, a long
way south of Cairo.— Who accompanied Bel-
zoni, mamma ? ?

Mrs. A.—A servant and a Moorish Had-
gd, who was just returned from Mecca, and
begged to be allowed to join him. At Beni-


CAMPING OUT IN THE DESERT.
‘CAMPING OUT” IN THE DESERT. 229

souef they procured donkeys, to take them
as far as the lake Meeris. They set off on the
same day, and directed their course through
a large plain of cultivated land, of corn and
other products of the country. This plain was
all under water at the time of the inundation,
excepting the scattered villages, which ap-
peared like little islands, as I have before
described. A few miles from the Nile, the
mountains on the west are but low; they
open and form a valley into a province called
the Faioum; and it was at this entrance
our party arrived on the first night of their
journey.

Bernarp.—Did they sleep on the sand,
mamma ?

Mrs. A.—They took their station under
some date-trees near a canal that passes
through the valley, about two miles from the
first Pyramid. Here, after a little repast,
Belzoni went to sleep on his usual bed, a mat-
tress, thin enough to serve as a saddle when
folded up, but forming, when laid on the soft
ground, as comfortable a bed as he could de-
sire. The servant, the Hadg®, and the don-
key-drivers, kept watch in turn; and this plan
was pursued during the whole of the journey.

x
230 VALLEY OF FAIOUM.

Brernarp.—What do you mean by the
Hadgé, mamma? It isa curious name.

Mrs. A.—It signifies pilgrim: you may
remember that he was just returned from
Mecca.—The next morning Belzoni again set
off, and soon arrived at the Pyramid. He
found that it was composed of burnt bricks,
and about sixty feet in height, affording a
fine prospect from the top. Our party then
continued along the hills, till they were oppo-
site to another Pyramid, of about the same
size, surrounded by smaller tombs, and the
remains of a magnificent Egyptian temple.
The whole country was very fertile, and in-
terspersed with plantations of fruit-trees and
roses.

Emitry.—What ! Do roses grow in Egypt ¢
I did not know that before !

Mrs. A.—This place is celebrated for the
making of rose-water, which is sold in Cairo,
and all over the country, for the use of the
great people, who continually keep their
apartments sprinkled with it, and present it
also to any stranger who visits them.

Owzn.—I remember that when you were
talking of the customs of the Egyptians, you
told us that a slave generally carries a silver
VALLEY OF FAIOUM. 231

plate in which essences are burning, to per-
fume the beard and sprinkle the visitors with
them. I suppose they use rose-water pro-
cured from the roses that grow in the valley
around the Faioum.

Mrs. A.—Next morning, a soldier joined
the party as guide, and they advanced towards
the lake Meris; but that night arrived only
at Senures, a village ten miles from it.

Emi.y.—How very convenient maps are,
mamma; I can trace their route so well.
Here is Benisouef on the Nile, where they
hired the donkeys; and here is the chain of
mountains, and a space left for the entrance
between them into the Faioum; they have
only just to cross this province to reach Bir-
ket Keroum, as the lake is called on the map ;
the Pyramids themselves are marked ; and
I believe I know the very spot where the
rose-trees grow, and the roses blow, but not
to

‘* Waste their sweetness on the desert air.”

Mrs. A.— Leaving Senures, the following
morning they proceeded on their journey ;
and, after passing through several groves of
palm-trees, the view opened all at once on
a wild country, gradually sloping to the edge
232 LAKE MRIS.

of the lake. The water extended some way
on each side, and the mountains opposite had
an awful and sterile appearance. At noon
they reached the lake, but could observe no
trace of any living being. The guide con-
ducted them along the shore, till they arrived
at a fisherman’s hut, situated near the place
where the canal discharges itself into the lake.
The hut was inhabited by a few poor fisher-
men, and the guide sent one of them for a
boat, the only one to be had, but the shabbi-
est thing imaginable. It was composed of
rough pieces of wood, scarcely joined, and
fastened by four other pieces, wrapped to-
gether by four more across, which formed the
deck: no tar, no pitch, either inside or out;
and the only preventive against the water
coming in was a kind of weed moistened,
which had settled in the joints of the wood.
However, there was no alternative: Belzoni
wished to cross the lake, and he was obliged
to submit to what he could not help. He
stepped in, and they advanced towards the
west ; as evening came on, the plantations
and groves disappeared, the lake and the
mountains alone remained in sight ; and when
they reached the shore, the owner of the boat,

*
TEMPLE OF HARON. 233

who accompanied them as pilot, lighted a fire ;
whilst the others went out to fish with a net,
and soon returned with a supper of fish.

The land where they now were had for-
merly been cultivated as there appeared many
stumps of palm and other trees, and around
them wild vines twined their luxuriant ten-
drils in profusion. The scene here was beau-
tiful; the silence of the night; the beams of
the radiant moon shining on the calm surface
of the crystal lake; the solitude of the place ;
the group of fishermen; the little fire; alto-
gether formed a picture, which Belzoni had
never before in reality witnessed, though I
know not how often his lively imagination
might have painted such a scene.

However, morning came: they entered their
shattered vessel, which nevertheless conveyed
them safely till they arrived near the end of
the lake, where they landed, and set off for the
Temple of Haron, about three miles distant,
standing in the midst of the ruins of a town,
and surrounded by fragments of columns and
other temples. Part of the town was covered
with sand; on one side of it there was some-
thing like a gateway, and, a little way off, a
Greek chapel, elevated on a platform, with

x 3
234 THE HYENA.

cellars under it. After having taken a proper
view of the temple and the town, Belzoni went
to see this small Greek chapel, accompanied
by the two boatmen; and, not apprehending
any danger, left his gun and pistols in the
temple: but he now nearly suffered for his
thoughtlessness ; for just as he was mounting
the little steps that led to the platform of the
chapel, a large and furious hyena rushed from
_ the apartments beneath, stopped three or four
yards from him, howled dreadfully, and then
turned round, as if determined to attack him.

Bernarp.—Oh, mamma, now he is lost !

Mrs. A.—No, he was notlost,mylove. The
fierce animal appeared, on second thoughts,
to relinquish its intent, gave a hideous roar,
and galloped away as fast as it could.

Owern.—I wish I had been there: it should
never have escaped in that way. I would
have shot it in a moment,

Brrnarp.—But Belzoni had no pistol with
him, you know; I, for my part, think that it
was a very dreadful adventure; and I am glad
I was not in his place. I dare say, Achillas,
when he killed Pompey, would have been
terrified had he heard that ravenous hyena set
up its horrid roar, though he paid no regard to
THE LABYRINTH. 235

the shrieks of Cornelia—What made it give
up the attempt, do you think, mamma ¢

Mrs. A.— Belzoni attributed its flight to the
noise made by the two boatmen who were near
at the time.—Having surveyed the temple,
and escaped other dangers, he returned with
his attendants to the boat, and they were
wafted back by a high wind to the spot they
had left in the morning. They there collected
plenty of wood, made a fire, and passed the
night under shelter of a mat hung over two
sticks planted in the ground. Belzoni had
heard that the situation of the Labyrinth wason
the left side of the lake Merris, and heemployed
the few following days in making diligent re-
searches in that part, in the hope of finding
some remains of it: but in vain, for not the
smallest appearanceof an edifice was to be seen.

Bernarp.—What do you mean by the
Labyrinth, mamma? Papa calls the new
shrubbery a labyrinth, because there are so
many little paths in it. Was the Labyrinth
Belzoni wished to discover like ours ¢

Mrs. A.—No; it was not a shrubbery, but
a celebrated building, apparently designed as
a pantheon of all the Egyptian gods that were
worshipped in the provinces. This astonishing
236 DISAPPOINTMENT.

edifice contained no less than three thousand |
chambers, fifteen hundred of which were sub-
terraneous, and set apart either for the sepul-
chreof thekings, or for the abodes of thesacred
crocodiles. The passages were sonumerous and
intricate, the doors and entrances so many,
the galleries and lobbies so extensive and
almost innumerable, that it well deserved the
designation of Jabyrinth, which word implies
a place formed with inextricable windings.
Bernarp.—Oh, mamma! what a delightful
place it would have been for hide-and-seek !
Owrn.— You would have hid to some pur-
pose indeed, Bernard ; for you would never
have been found from that time to this!
Mrs. A.—Belzoni failed in his endeavours
to discover this wonderful structure; but as it
was not of great height, the lower apartments
being under-ground, he concluded that it was
probably buried by the earth which is yearly
brought thither by the water of the Nile. He
had no doubt that it was somewhere there,
from the number of stones, columns, and other
relics of antiquity that were scattered about,
some on the road, some in the houses of the
Arabs, and others used in the erection of huts;
all implying that some magnificent and splen-
ANXIOUS INQUIRIES. 237

did building had fallen to ruins. Having
given up the attempt as fruitless, our enter-
prising traveller prepared for his journey into
the Elloah on the west: accordingly he went
to see Hussuff Bey, and to request he would
procure a Bedouin guide to conduct him
through the desert; he said that the Bedouins
were all encamped in that part of the province
which was subject to Khalil Bey.

Emiuy.—I thought that our good old friend
Khalil Bey lived at Esne, and had the
government of the Upper Provinces between
that place and Assouan.

Mrs. A.—He had left Esne, and now re-
sided at Benisouef. Belzoni learned that the
Bedouins were encamped about ten miles
distant; he set off immediately, hoping to
gain some information from them respecting
the Elloah on the west; but was disappointed,
for none of them knew anything about it:
however, they told him that one of their Sheiks,
who lived in a camp a little way off, had a
daughter married to one of the Sheiks of the
Elloah. Belzoni fancied that this said Shiek
would accompany him thither. He remained
all night at the camp, and set off in the morn-
ing for the Nile again. He passed through
238 KHALIL BEY.

bowers of roses, with which, as I have said
before, they make rose water; the cotton
plant was quite abundant, and figs were so
plentiful, that the people dried them in the
sun and sent them to Cairo. It was night
when they arrived on the banks of the Nile.

Bernarp.—Belzoni unfolded his saddle and
slept on the ground again, I suppose ‘

Mrs. A.—Yes; and as soundly as you
sleep upon a pillow of down! he was become
so accustomed to inconvenient things, as not to
regard them. He proceeded on his journey
the next morning, and went to see Khalil Bey,
who was now commander of Benisouef. He
was as he had been before, very polite, and
glad to render his friend any service in his
power. Belzoni informed him that he wished
to penetrate into the western desert—he di-
rectly complied with his request, and sent for
the Sheikh or chief of the Bedouins. But the
Sheik was not so punctual as Khalil, and did
not arrive for two or three days; indeed, when
he did come, he protested that he was unable
to shew him the road to the place he wished to
visit. The Bey insisted that he should find
some one in his camp who knew the road,
which he of course promised to do; and it
BEDOUIN ARABS. 239

was agreed that Belzoni should meet Sheik
Grumar at a village at the foot of the desert,
whence he was to conduct him to the Elloah.

Emmy.—Is the name of that village
Sedmin el Djabel, mamma? Such a place
is marked on the map.

Mrs. A.—It is, my dear; there the Be-
douins were encamped, and among them
Sheik Grumar, a tall stout man, six feet high,
with a stern countenance, which bespoke a
resolute mind, and a sort of authority over
those whom he considered beneath him.

Owen.—Oh, what a fierce-looking fellow !
—Just right for a Sheik !

Bernarp.—Do, mamma, tell us who the
Bedouins are, and something about them.

Mrs. A.—Most willingly. They are a tribe
of Arabs, who live a wandering life, without
any settled habitation, but completely different
from that of the Arabs of Egypt in general.
They are divided into a great number of tribes,
and distinguished by the names of their chiefs.
Each tribe forms a sort of village, and each
family has a tent, or portable hut, of its own.
Their tents consist of four sticks, set in the
ground, about a yard in height, to which is
fastened one of their shawls as a cover, with
240 MANNERS OF THE BEDOUINS,

another behind, so as to form a kind of shelter
from the sun, wind, or dew. They generally
pitch their camps in a fertile spot, but always
at the foot of the mountains near the deserts.

Owern.—A very good plan; and then, in
case of surprise, they may soon be in their
native country.

Mrs. A.—The men commonly wear a dark
brown baracan, which covers them from head
to foot. The women are likewise covered
with a thick woollen garment, folded round
them in an elegant manner.

Brernarp.— What is a baracan, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—A sort of large woollen shawl,
which constitutes the chief manufacture
among the Arabs. The work is done by the
women who make no use of the shuttle, but
conduct every thread with their fingers; and
then with a machine they have in their hands,
not unlike a wooden comb, press down each
thread as they lay it across.

Emity.—The people of Mainarty use no
shuttle ; and I dare say they never heard of
one, or they would not go without such a
useful thing. What other employments have
the Bedouins, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—The young boys and girls attend
MANNERS OF THE BEDOUINS. 241

the flocks; the husband is engaged in tilling
the ground; and the wife, in grinding at the
mill, working at the loom, or dressing pro-
visions. Their tents are not very sumptuous
within; they are generally raised from the
sand, which, without any preparation, serves
for the floor of the apartment.

Owrn.—Then when any one rises from
this soft floor, with his large heavy flowing
baracan, he must raise a cloud of dust enough
to eclipse the whole family !

Mrs. A.— When the Bedouins wish to con-

verse, they do not sit at their ease, as we do,
upon sofas, or chairs, without any ceremony,
but place themselves in a formal circle on the
ground: the man who speaks first, makes a
smooth place with his hand on the sand, and
continues the conversation with his fingers,
making spots, and strokes, and points as re-
quired. When they meet each other they
exclaim, “‘ Salam Aliekum!” “Peace be with
you!” clapping at the same time the right
hand on the heart.

Emity.— Well, I would rather be a wan-
dering Bedouin than one of the independent
Ababde !—Now will you return to Belzoni?

Owren.—Do, mamma. He was just arrived

Y
942 CROSSING THE WESTERN DESERT.

at the camp of the Bedouins, which made
us wish to know who they were: and the
proud Sheik Grumar was going to attend him
through the desert. Did they ride upon
donkeys or upon camels.

Mrs. A.—They exchanged their donkeys
for the latter, and advanced towards the
west, passed through several rocky valleys,
and slept the first night under a sand-bank :
the second night, the foliage of some palm-
trees afforded them shelter; and, in the
morning, continuing their course, they came
to a wide open plain of sand and stones, with
several heaps piled above the rest. These
were tumuli, but nothing of the Temple of
Jupiter Ammon was to be seen. They went
on, until at noon, they saw a high hill at a
distance, and soon after the guide pointed out
the rocks of the Elloah. In the afternoon, to
their great joy, they saw two crows—

Brrnarp.—Two crows! What of that? We
can see plenty of crows every day in the grove.

Mrs. A.—Had you been in Belzoni’s place,
you might have been equally rejoiced; for
the appearance of these birds was a sure sign
that water was not far off—a great treat to
the traveller in a hot sandy desert.
CAMELS SCENTING WATER. 243

Enity.—You have mentioned the Elloah
several times, mamma: what do you mean
by it?

Mrs. A.—It is a valley surrounded by
high rocks, which form a spacious plain,
twelve miles long, almost covered with sand;
some small hills, overgrown with rushes and
other plants, are scattered here and there :
and the temple of which Belzoni was in search,
was supposed to have been in.or near this spot.
Our travellers advanced towards a forest of
date-trees, situated near a village named Za-
boo, and all of them were exceedingly thirsty.
Before the camels arrived, they scented the
water at some distance, and set off at full gal-
lop, without stopping till they reached a rivu-
let, where, having alighted for a short time to
allow the camels to drink, Belzoni observed a
certain uneasiness in the manner of Sheik Gru-
mar, for which he did not know how to account.

Owen.—Had he been an Arab of Gournou,
I should have thought that some bad design
had entered his head: but he was an honest
Bedouin, you know. I want to hear what
reason he had for behaving so.

Mrs. A.—Belzoni went farther down the
rivulet to drink too; and after having watered
244 FORTUNATE RECOGNITION.

the camels, they were about to proceed slowly
towards the village ; but no sooner were they
mounted, than they heard some one calling to
them; and at the same moment a man rushed
~ out of the bushes with a gun, and put himself
into an attitude, as if to fire upon them.

Owen.—Some plot of Sheik Grumar’s for
certain! Pray, who was that man?

Mrs. A.—His appearance was not very
terrifying, nor did his dress bespeak him to be
a person of much consequence. He was not
more than four feet high, of a chocolate colour,
(as the Bedouins generally are,) and covered
with a black woollen cloth. The Sheik im-
mediately dismounted, speaking to him in the
Arabic dialect. The man recognised him,
and Belzoni was pleased to observe that they
appeared friendly towards each other. The
man was anxious to learn of whom the party
consisted; the guide told him that they were
people in search of old stones; to which he
replied, that no one ever came there to seek
for old stones; and he did not know what the
Sheiks of Zaboo, the village to which they
were going, would think of it; he said also,
that he had intended to shoot Belzoni while
he was kneeling to drink at the spring.
SHEIK GRUMAR. 945

Owzn.—What an escape! Sheik Grumar
was of some use; for you know, mamma, if
that mysterious little man had not recognised
him, he might have carried his design into
execution.

Mrs. A.—They continued to advance to-
wards Zaboo, and the man began to walk be-
fore them; but when they had nearly reached
the village, he ran off as fast as he could into
a wood of palm-trees. Our travellers now en-
tered a valley, which formed a most pleasing
contrast to the barren scenes of the desert, for
it was full of date and palm-trees, some co-
vered with blossoms, and others loaded with
fruit ; apricots scented the air with their mel-
low fragrance; figs, almonds, and grapes grew
in profusion; the ground was covered with
verdure, and here and there a spot of culti-
vated land was seen waving with rice. On
their approaching a wide place, the guide halt-
ed, and desired them to wait till his return; he
walked on, and Belzoni perceived that he went
into a kind of habitation at some distance.

Owen.—I am sure, if I had been Belzoni I
would never have waited there at the pleasure
of Sheik Grumar. :

Mrs. A.—The poor Sheik seems no favour-

y 3
246 IMPORTANT CONFERENCE.

ite of yours: perhaps you will alter your
mind presently. Half an hour passed, and
he did not return! Belzoni inquired of the
drivers whither the guide was gone; they
replied they did not know. Another hour
passed, no Sheik appeared ; Belzoni was tired
of waiting, and set off with his gun towards
the place which he had seen the guide enter ;
but, before he reached the spot, he heard the
voices of men, women, and children; and
when he came nearer, he saw a wall enclosing
a great many houses ; and just within the
gates there was a yard, in which were assem~-
bled all the chiefs of the village, and many
others, sitting on the ground, debating whether
or not the strangers should be admitted; and
the guide was very busy in persuading them
that they were but harmless people, and only
come there to look after old stones.
Owern.—My opinion 4s changed, mamma.
I did not much like the conduct of the Sheik
at first; but it seems that he wished to make
friends with the inhabitants of Zaboo, and
that he was a brave fellow after all. I will
not form a judgment so soon another time.
Mrs. A.—Endeavour to adhere to your re-
solution, my dear boy ; for it is not wise to
BELZONI EXCITES WONDER. 247

form an unfavourable opinion upon too slight
a foundation.

On the arrival of Belzoni, their whole at-
tention was turned towards him, and a perfect
silence ensued. He walked straight forward,
when they all arose, without speaking a word,
and gazed upon him in wonder and astonish-
ment. He inquired who was their Sheik,
when his guide pointed out three or four old
men, telling him they were the Sheiks of the
place. Belzoni shook hands with them; some
of the people received him with good humour,
and others went away murmuring. They in-
quired what he wanted. He told them he
was a stranger, and merely came to visit the
place, as he expected to find some stones
belonging to his ancestors, and hoped they
should be friends. At the same time, he
sent his guide to fetch the camels; and, on
their arrival, he ordered coffee to be made.
A fine carpet was spread upon the ground, and
they became sociable by degrees: in a short
time the rest of the village had assembled—
cows, camels, sheep, donkeys, men, women, and
children—all gazing upon him in amazement.

Emity.—The people had never seen a
Frank before, I dare say.
248 UNCOURTEOUS SEPARATION.

Mrs. A.—They were acquainted with
Turks and other tribes of Arabs, but had never
geen a Christian. They told Belzoni that he
would see nothing there, but must go some-
where else ; it seemed that they did not like
the thought of his searching for stones. How-
ever, they gave him a large bowl of rice for his
supper; and he lighted a wax candle, which
surprised them very much, as they had never
seen a candle before; but they used him rather
shabbily, for, without saying a single word,
they all rose and walked off with the candle,
leaving him in the dark, with his carpet and
saddle to sleep on. This circumstance did not
disturb his repose; and the next morning, after
some little difficulty and many assurances that
stones and not treasures were the objects of his
search, Belzoni set off through a thick wood
of palm-trees, and traversed many sandy plains,
barren deserts, ruined edifices, and old towns;
but no Temple of Jupiter Ammon was to be
seen, and he returned half in despair to Zaboo.

Emuy.—Did he proceed from thence to
the Nile, mamma? |

Mrs. A.—Not immediately. By this time
the inhabitants of the village of El Cassar,
which is only separated from Zaboo by a high
IMPORTANT PERSONAGES, 249

rock, were informed that a stranger had ar-
rived there in search of treasure. They were
all in an uproar immediately, and protested
that he should never enter their village.

Bernarp.—How mortifying! What did
Belzoni do ?

Mrs. A.—A. man, who lived half-way be-
tween the two villages, and occasionally re-
ported what was passing from one to the other,
came to Belzoni, and said there was a very large
temple in the other village, which excited his
curiosity: so he got the man to take a message
from him to the Sheik and Cady, and tell
them that he came to the Elloah to visit them;
that he was not a soldier, and that they would
gratify him by appointing a place where they
might meet him the next morning. He then
returned to the village, and the man to his
habitation on the side of the rock.

Emrty.—I hope the Sheik and the Cady of
El Cassar were pleased with Belzoni’s mes-
sage, and gave him a kind reception.

Mrs. A.—The next morning our friend was
informed that these two great people werecom-
ing towards Zaboo. He of course thought it
favourable intelligence, and hastened to meet
them. The Sheik of the Elloah came first ;
250 REACHES EL CASSAR.

he was a good-natured looking man; on horse-
back, dressed in red-striped linen cloth, with
pistols and a gun: the Cady (Cady signifies
justice of peace) was a rough-looking fellow,
clothed in green cloth and turban, and ac-
coutred like his companion. After these two
mighty personages came about twenty horse-
men, and as many foot, all well armed. Hav-
ing reached the village, they dismounted, some
mats were brought, and the chiefs seated them-
selves whilst the attendants stood around.
Belzoni presented the usual salute, Salam
Aliekum, and was requested to sit down among
them. They became very anxious to know
what had brought him there, making many
inquiries, and it was a long time before they
could be assured that to search for antiquities
was his only motive. At last, however, Bel-
zoni gained his end, and obtained permission
io enter their village. Having made a repast
of coffee, the chiefs set off; and when they
were gone, our antiquary prepared to follow
them. He commenced his journey before sun-
set, passed over the sandy banks on the west
of the village, crossed the plain, ascended the
rocks which separate the two villages, and
reached El Cassar on the evening of the next
A BEDOUIN HOUSE. 251

day. He was received by the Sheik, who
was become quite friendly towards him, with
somewhat like English hospitality; he begged
him to sleep at his house, and sent him a
large bowl of rice for his supper. Accord-
ingly, Belzoni accepted his invitation, though
I do not know that he reposed more soundly
upon the Sheik’s mat than he had often done
under a sand-bank, or upon a sugar-cane bed.

Emitry.—What. sort of a house had the
Sheik, mamma ?

Mrs. A.—It was similar to the others,
being made of mud; a few beams of the palm-
_ tree laid across formed the roof, on the top
of which was thrown a great quantity of
straw, with old mats over it. They had much
conversation together, and the Sheik told
Belzoni, in confidence, that it was the father
of the Cady who had so strongly objected to
his visiting the ruins in their village.

On the following morning a long consulta-
tion took place, whether he should or should
not be allowed to examine them ; at length
it was settled for the old man himself to
accompany him, and they set off together.
When they arrived at the spot, Belzoni was
much gratified by observing many ruins and
252 TEMPLE OF JUPITER AMMON.

fragments which shewed that there had evi-
dently been some magnificent edifice ; and,
though little remained, he returned highly de-
lighted, in the assurance that he had discover-
ed the seat of the celebrated Temple of
Jupiter Ammon.

Bernarv.— Well, I am glad he succeeded,
and I think that the man on the rocks deserv-
ed his very best thanks. Did Belzoni return
to Zaboo ?

Mrs. A.—Yes: he expressed his gratitude
to the old man who had conducted him to the
ruins; made several presents of coral, soap,
and coffee to the Cady and the good-natured
Sheik ; and parted in friendship with all the
people at the village of El Cassar. An unfor-
tunate accident happened to him, as he was
ascending the rock which he had to pass on
his way to Zaboo. The foot of his camel
slipped on one side, and the animal rolled
down the rock the height of about twenty
feet, taking his rider, of course, with him.

Owen.—That was a very sad thing, for I
dare say these rocks were not like the sandy
spot in Wady el Gamel, where his camel threw
him before. Was Belzoni much hurt, mamma?

Mrs. A.— Yes: he was very much bruised,
THE TRAVELLER HURT BY A FALL. 253

and conveyed on a donkey to Zaboo, and
there carried to the house of a Sheik, where
he was accommodated in a narrow passage
which led from the street-door to a yard be-
hind the house, his saddle, as usual, forming
his only bed. This was a miserable place for
any one in his condition, for the men, women,
children, buffaloes, cows, donkeys, goats, and
dogs, passed backwards and forwards con-
tinually, totally regardless of him.

Brernarv.—lI wish I could have given him
my bed to lie upon.—How long was it before
he was well enough to be removed from that
little disagreeable passage ¢

Mrs. A.—In the course of a few days,
though his side was still painful, they proceed-
ed once more, and, by short stages, arrived
in about a week in the valley of the Nile
at the Bahr Yousef, which, if you remember,
they had crossed before: on the evening of
the same day, they reached Sedmin.

Emmy.—Ah, Sedmin el Djabel, at the
foot of the range of low mountains which
forms the skirt of the desert, and where he
had engaged his guide, Sheik Grumar; then
he was pretty near Benisouef, mamma; and
when he gets there, I expect his old friend,

Z
254 RETURN TO EUROPE.

Khalil Bey, will take care of him, and be very
glad to see him too.

Mrs. A.—They arrived at Benisouef the
next day. Belzoni did not remain long at
that place, but embarked for Cairo, and
thence proceeded to Rosetta.

Emity.—Mrs. Belzoni was there, and she
could take better care of him than any one
else.

Mrs. A.—At length, having settled all his
affairs in Egypt, in 1819, our enterprising
traveller embarked for Europe. After an
absence of twenty years, he returned to his
native country, and into the bosom of his
family; from whence he departed for Eng-
land; and, I think, we owe him many thanks
for the amusement and instruction his “ Re-
searches” have afforded us.

Brrnarp.—So he actually reached England
at last! And I learn from your account,
mamma, that perseverance will enable us to
do great things, which without it could never
be done.

Emiy.—And I am glad, mamma, to find
you have proved the truth of your assertion,
that patience conquers difficulties, and crowns
all our endeavours with success.
CONCLUSION. 955

Owen.— Belzoni was quite a boy when his
attention was first turned to the science of
hydraulics; otherwise, he might never have
gone into Egypt, for he went there, you
know, mamma, in hopes of convincing the
Bashaw that an hydraulic machine would be
of use to irrigate his fields. Had he not done
so, the great Pyramid might have remained
unopened a thousand years longer; the tomb
of Psammuthis, in the valley of Beban el
Malook, might never have been explored, and
we should never have heard this amusing
narrative of Belzoni’s discoveries in Kgypt
and Nubia. You see how much depends
upon our youthful pursuits.

Mrs. A. smiled, and said,—

“ | grant it, and no plainer truth appears,
QUR MOST IMPORTANT ARE OUR EARLIEST YEARS.”

THE END.

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12/15/2014 12:49:03 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:03 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:03 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:04 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00131.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:05 PM 00141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00143.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00143.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00144.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00144.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00146.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00146.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00147.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00147.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00148.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00148.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00149.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00149.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00150.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00150.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00151.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00151.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00152.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00152.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00153.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00153.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00154.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00154.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00155.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00155.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00156.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00156.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00157.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00157.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00158.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00158.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00159.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00159.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00160.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00160.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00161.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00161.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00162.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00162.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00163.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00163.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00164.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00164.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00165.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00165.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00166.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00166.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00167.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00167.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00168.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00168.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00169.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00169.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00170.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00170.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00171.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00171.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00172.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00172.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00173.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:06 PM 00173.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00174.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00174.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00175.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00175.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00176.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00176.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00177.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00177.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00178.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00178.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00179.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00179.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00180.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00180.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00181.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00181.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00182.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00182.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00183.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00183.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00184.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00184.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00185.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00185.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00186.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00186.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00187.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00187.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00188.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00188.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00189.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00189.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00190.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00190.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00191.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00191.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00192.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00192.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00193.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00193.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00194.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00194.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00195.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00195.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00196.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00196.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00197.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00197.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00198.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00198.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00205.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00205.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00206.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00206.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00207.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00207.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00208.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00208.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00209.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00209.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00210.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00210.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00211.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00211.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00212.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00212.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00213.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00213.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00214.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00214.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:07 PM 00215.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00215.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00216.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00216.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00217.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00217.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00218.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00218.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00219.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00219.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00220.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00220.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00221.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00221.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00223.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00223.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00224.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00224.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00225.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00225.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00226.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00226.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00227.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00227.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00228.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00228.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00229.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00229.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00230.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00230.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00231.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00231.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00232.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00232.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00233.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00233.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00234.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00234.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00235.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00235.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00236.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00236.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00237.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00237.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00238.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00238.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00239.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00239.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00240.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00240.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00241.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00241.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00242.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00242.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00243.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00243.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00244.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00244.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00245.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00245.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00246.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00246.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00247.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00247.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00248.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00248.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00249.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:08 PM 00249.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00250.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00250.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00251.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00251.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00252.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00252.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00253.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00253.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00254.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00254.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00255.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00255.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00257.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00257.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00258.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00258.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00259.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00259.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00260.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00260.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00261.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00261.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00262.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00262.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00263.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00263.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00264.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00264.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00265.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00265.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00266.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00266.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00267.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00267.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00268.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00268.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00269.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00269.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00270.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00270.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00271.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00271.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00272.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00272.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00273.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00273.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00274.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00274.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00275.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00275.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00276.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00276.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00277.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00277.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00278.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00278.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00279.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00279.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00280.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00280.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00281.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00281.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00282.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00282.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00283.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00283.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00284.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00284.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00300back.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00300back.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:09 PM 00301Spine.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:10 PM 00301Spine.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:49:10 PM