Citation
The tales of Peter Parley about Africa

Material Information

Title:
The tales of Peter Parley about Africa with engravings
Running title:
Parley's tales of Africa
Spine title:
Parley's Africa
Creator:
Goodrich, Samuel G ( Samuel Griswold ), 1793-1860
H.S. & J. Applegate and Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Cincinnati
Publisher:
H.S. & J. Applegate & Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1830
Language:
English
Physical Description:
138 p. : ill. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Description and travel -- Juvenile literature -- Africa ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Ohio -- Cincinnati
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Funding:
Brittle Books Program

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026909001 ( ALEPH )
45432799 ( OCLC )
ALH6117 ( NOTIS )

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TALES

.

PETER PARLEY

ABs0UT

AFRICA.



WITH ENGRAVINGS.
f
nenenanareceroan
(roo AC L
REVISED EDITION.

CINCINNATI:
H. S. & J. APPLEGATE & CO.
1851.



DISTRICT UF MASSACHUSETT'S, to uw: :
Lustrict Clerk's Office.
BE 1T REMEMBERED, that on the seventh day of October, A. D. 1830
in the hy fourth year of the Independence of the United States of
America, ray & Bowen, of the said district, have deposited in this office

the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the
words following, to wit;

“ The Tales ot Peter Parley about Africa. With Engravings.”

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States entitled

“ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of

maps, 8, and books, to the authors an roprietors of such copies,

during the times therein mentioned ;” and oe to an act, entitled, “ An

Act supplementary to an act, entitled, An Act for the encouragement of

ning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors

— n. Prietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned ; and

extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and etc].
ing historieal and other prints.”

JNO. W. DAVIS,
Clerk of the District of Massachusetts

ee ee rteemecereretes ee



PREFACE.

_—_OC

The following is the Preface to the revised edition of ‘ Parley’s
America,’ and will explain the nature and design of the present work.

It is now several years since this little work was given to the pub-
lic. It was my first adventure in authorship, and after passing through
several editions, has returned to receive my final revision. I have
bestowed upon it such care as an old worn out man may give; and
as I must soon turn my back upon the world, I take my leave of my
little first-born, forever. The public—I mean the world of “chil-
dren—have bestowed upon it their favor, and I ask no more. =

If my health is spared long enough, I intend to revise the books I
have written. and then I shall feel that the charter of my ban

ig ea
0 Sia

~

but I hope not useless existence, is at an end.

It is proper to say, that this book is the commencement of a series,
designed to give the first ideas of Geography and History. ‘The
second volume is about Europe; the third about Africa; the fourth
about Asia. ‘To these are added three others, Tales of the Islands
in the Pacific Ocean; Tales of the Sea; and Tales of the Farth, the
Sun, Moon and Stars. am



CONTENTS.

Chapter 1 —Parley goes to the
editerranean, and sees an
Eruption of Mount Etna

Ch. 2,—Parley sets out to re-
turn to America, but is over-
taken by a _— and seized
by Pirates. .

Ch. 3. —Parley is “ carried to
Tripoli, where he is impris-
oned, and meets with strange
adventures tt .%

Ch. 4.—A short description of
Ane as"

5.—Description of the city
of Tripoli . .

Ch.6—Account of Algiers,
Morocco, and Tunis . .

Ch. 7.—Parley finds out his de-
liverer, and — an old
acquaintance . ;

Ch. 8.—The story of a Robber

Ch. 9.—Leo’s description of

Egypt

Ch. 10.—Leo finishes his story
Ch. 11.—Parley tells about va-
rious matters, and how Deca-
tur and twenty Americans,

burnt the Philadelphia
Ch. - —Parley arrives in E-
t, and oes with General
ton’ 8 — across
the desert . bo%

PPPOPIOA

Ch. 13.—Arrival at Derne.
he Sirocco. A Battle,
and some other things
re i —Parley sets out for
dina. Something about
eee Riley, and or
stories . .
Ch. 15. cent. Riley’ $ Ship-
wreck .

17} Ch. 16 Captain Riley’ s ed-

61

67

ventures and sufferings
Ch. 17.— Parley continues
his voyage, and tells about
ungo Park, and other
Travellers into Central
MOR ce
Ch. 18. Parley tells of his
voyage, and how they met
with a dreadful gale of
wind, off the Gree - Good
Hope oi
Ch. 19. —Pgrlog! tells about
Cape Colony, the Hotten-
tots, various wild animals,
and other things"

76

80

83
§8

96

. 107

111

Ch. 20.—Parley tells abouts"

various matters and things

Ch. 21 -—Parley tells Caille’s
travels to Timbuctoo; Con-
clusion. . a. a

118

. 126



PETER PARLEY’S TALES

ABOUT AFRICA. | -

—__—_—_—_—-—-—-

CHAPTER I.

PARLEY GOES TO THE MEDITERRANEAN, AND

SEES AN ERUPTION OF MOUNT ETNA.

Lam now going to tell you of what happen-
ed near thirty years ago. After my return to
America, as I have told you in my tales about
Europe, I set out, in a ship for the Mediterra-
nean sea. ,

This sea lies far to the east. To go to it,
we must cross the Atlantic ocean. It lies be-
tween Africa and Europe. Africa is south of
it, and Europe north of it. cr
iho CLOT nT Ti

Which way from you is the Mediterranean seal Between what two

pe countries does it lie? Which way is Africa from the Mediterranean? _
* "Which way 1s Europe from the Mediterraaean?



6 PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.

The name of the ship I sailed in was the
Swan. She was a fine vessel, and I was the
second mate. Every ship has one, or more
mates, whose duty it is, to assist the captain
in navigating the vessel.

I entered the ship at New York, and we
set sail. We had a fair wind, and in a few
days we came in sight .of the Bermudas, a
_ group of small islands, owned by the British
There are now aegood many houses, and a
considerable number of inhabitants, on one
of these islands.

We shortly after saw some of the Canary
islands, where Canary birds first came from.
These islands are very beautiful indeed, and
very fruitful.

One of them called Teneriie, has a very

“lofty peak. This peak is visible at a vast
ae



ae
What was the name of the vessel in which Parley sailed to #-¢ Me
iterranean? Which way did he sail? What group of small islands

he pass? What island did he pass after the Bermudas? Describe the

Canary isles?

x ~



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 7

tance. It is so high, that it is almost always
covered with snow. As I saw it from our
ship, it looked like a tall thunder cloud, piled
very high up in the air. Here you see a pic-
ture of it.



ee WO Pd oe rs .

—~ ae
——

> —

At length we came in sight of Gibraltar.
‘his is a town at which there is a rock, 1500
feet high. In this rock there is a strong for-
tress, Gibraltar is in Spain, and forms the
rost.southern point of Europe. The fortress
Describe the pack of Teneriffe? What of the town of Gibraltar?

+

“ww



8 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

has several thousand men in it, with a great
number of cannon.

At the present time the fortress is in the
possession of the British, and is occupied by
British soldiers. It is situated at the en-
trance of the Mediterranean sea.

SSS ee: Sana ma
sae are



e
are

a ~ = — ==.
= - ——— Sa ae
: == 2

a — ee

Near the town of Gibraltar, are the straits
4 Gibraltar. These straits consist of a nar-
row channel, where the sea flows from the
Atlantic ocelti: into the Mediterranean, The
straits are fifteen miles across at the na@rrow-

What of the fortress? What of the straits of Gibraltar?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 9

est part. As we sailed along through them,
J could see the-land on both sides of us. On
the left hand was Europe; on the right hand,
was Africa.

We now entered the Mediterranean sea.
This sea is 2000 miles in length. In some
places it is two or three hundred miles wide,
in other places it is much narrower.

This sea is surrounded with towns and vil-
lages, and a multitude of inhabitants. ‘There
is a great amount of trade or commerce, car-
ried on upon this sea; here are vessels from
all the countries of Europe, and they are al-
ways crossing it in every direction.

At length we arrived at Sicily. This isa
large island, which produces oranges, §Tapes,
and many other fruits. It also produces wine,
which is made from grapes. The object of
our voyage was, to get fruits and .wine, to
arry back to. New York. ee

‘a ——_ neal

=
Riagree gree

of

What of the Mediterranean sea? What of Sicily?

Ax, 3 ‘



10 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

-Qur voyage to Sicily had been a very pros-
‘perous one. It is very seldom that a vessel
crosses the Atlantic, without meeting some
very rough weather. We, however, had met
no storms ; and in forty days after I left New
York, I was in the island of Sicily.

Very soon after our arrival, we unloaded our
ship, and began to take in our cargo. I wished
very much to go to the top of Mount Etna,
but we were so busy 1 could not be Spared.
Mount Etna is situated in the island of Sicily,
and is one of the most celebrated volcanoes in
the world.

A volcano, as you know, is a mountain that
throws out fire, smoke, ashes, and melted lava
at its top. The hole at the top through
which these things are thrown is called the
crater.

Though I could not go to the top of Mount

How long was Parley in going from New York to Sicily? What of
Mount Etna? What is a Volcano?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. tl

Etna, I had an opportunity of witnessing one
of its eruptions. It-was truly terrible. One
night, loud rumbling noises were heard in the
mountain, like distant thunder.

Very soon, a blaze issued from the crater,
which seemed to rise to the very clouds, and
stand on the mountain like a pillar of fire. At
the same time, clouds of black smoke rolled
from the mouth of the crater. The blaze shed
its light all around, and made it like mid-day.

After a little while, the blaze suddenly dis-
appeared. It seemed to fall back again into
the mouth of the crater. In an instant all
around was darkness.

But very soon, red hot stones were thrown
from the mouth of the volcano, which rose
high in the air, with a whizzing sound, and
then fell upon the sides of the mountain.
Then a mass of red hot lava swelled to the

ee ce una

Describe the eruption of Mount Etna, that Parley saw.



Die

12 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

top of the crater, and gushing over it, ran
down the sides of the mountain.

It rolled along like a river, making a dread-
ful sound. It spread over the land, and des-
troyed several villages. Some of the inhab-
itants fled before it; some were overtaken,
and buried beneath the burning mass.

It was an awful sight, and made me shudder «.
to witness it. The mountain continued to
smoke for several days, but no more lava flow-
ed from it. ‘These eruptions from Mount Etna,
have often taken place for thousands of years.

Within a few years, two towns in Italy
have been dug from beneath the lava, which
issued from Mount Vesuvius and overwhelmed
- them, nearly two thousand years ago. About
this, I have told you in my tales of Europe.



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA 13

CHAPTER II.

PARLEY SETS. OUT TO RETURN TO AMERICA, BUT
IS OVERTAKEN BY A STORM, AND SEIZED
BY PIRATES.

Our vessel was soon loaded, and a few
weeks after our arrival, we set out on. our re-
turn to America. It was not-more than two
days after our departure, when we were Vis-
ited by a storm. ® By

The wind blew very powerfully, and the
agitation of the sea was dreadful. Our ship
rolled violently, and ina few hours, two of
our masts were broken off, and fell into the
sea. The vessel became nearly unmanage-
able, ae

She also sprang a leak, and though we
made the greatest exertion at the pumps, still
the water increased very rapidly. Orders were
now given to lighten the vessel, and a great



14 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

part of the cargo was immediately thrown
overboard.

Night now came on, and the gale increased.
Our large ship shuddered upon the waves, as
if terror had seized the very timbers. Our
captain, however, was a brave man, and he
steadily exerted himself to save the ship.

He spoke cheeringly to the men, and as-
sisted them with his own strength. But it
was allin vain. ‘Phe ping struck the ship,

IS



S < Ss > 3S :
and set the sails on fire. "The Tait of the
sea soon quenched it, but the waves broke

- =
bog . -
PRS a



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 15

over us, and swept away the greater part of
our men.

Out of twenty hands there were now but
five left in the ship. For myself, I never ex-
pected to see the light of another morning.
Yet another morning came; and hope, which
lingers till the last, revived.

The storm was over. The clouds rolled
away, and the sun shone out, bright and clear.
Our vessel however was a mere wreck. We
could scarcely keep her from sinking, by la-
boring at the pumps. ‘The waves also cun-
tinued to roll very heavily, and they yroke
over the ship every few minutes. eo

In this desperate situation, we saw a Need
approaching us. Yet this vessel was more
dreadful to our sight than the troubled sea.
We knew it to be a corsair.

A corsair is a ship sent out to rob and plun-
der other vessels. We had heard many in-

ae





~———



What 18 a corsair?



16 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

stances of vessels being taken, their cargoes
seized, and the crew sold as slaves, or shut
up in gloomy prisons.

As the vessel that approached us seemed to
we small, we determined to make an effort to
prevent ourselves from being taken. We
armed ourselves with pikes and swords, and
stood ready to meet the men from the corsair.

Their vessel came very close to us, but the
sea ran so high, that it was a long time before
they ventured to come along side of us. At
length they came close to us, and: the two
‘vessels lay side by side.

Five or six men armed with swords, imme-
diately jumped on board our ship. Three of
them were -instantly killed by our pikes, and...
two others were knocked down between the
vessels. But other men soon followed from
the corsair.

We struggled with them for a few moments,

7 ee ew

What had Parley heard about these corsarst



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 17

but our captain was shot with a pistol in the
breast. I was stunned with a blow upon my
head, and the remainder of the men, not able
to resist, yielded to their fate.

The most valuable part of our cargo was
»ow taken on board the corsair, and we were
taken there also. Holes were cut in our ves-
sel; she soon filled with water, and the waves
yawning widely, received her into the bosom
of the sea. The billows whirled and foamed
for a moment over the spot, and then we saw.
our ship no more. rb

js oe
NERY

—_—_————e

CHAPTER III. Bie

+ Sa.
PARLEY IS CARRIED TO TRIPOLI, WHERE HE IS
IMPRISONED, AND MEETS WITH STRANGE AD-

VENTURES.

WE soon found out that the corsair which
had taken us, belonged to Tripoli. "Lripoli is

ee
‘To what country did the corsair belong, that captured the vessel in
which Parley was? , 7



18 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

a considerable country in the northern part of
Africa. ‘The principal town is also called
‘Tripoli. :

‘The people are a barbarous and cruel race,
and at the time I am speaking of, they were
engaged in plundering the ships of such other
nations as came in their way.

They had already taken several American
vessels, and we knew that some of our coun-
trymen were shut up in their prisons. We
of course had no other expectation, than to
share their fate.

In five days we arrived at the city of ‘Tri-
poli. We were treated with the greatest cru-
elty, and our captain suffered exceedingly
from his wounds. We were taken ashore,
and attended by soldiers, with dark skins, and
strange dresses, to a large stone building.

This building was a castle. We were taken

Peete cart ditnclptcinmestchdiistta cgi cinta len aN aa

What of Tripoli? What is the principal town in the country of Tri
poli? What ofthe people? In what were they engaged? Where were
Parley and his companions taken to?



PARLEY’S TALES OF -AFRICA. 19

into a dark room in this castle, and here we
remained for four days, with no other food
than bread, and no drink but water. We
were then taken from our prison, and marched
through the town, guarded by soldiers.

I remarked as we went along, that every-
thing had a strange appearance. ‘The inhab-
itants were as dark as our Indians, and their
dress appeared very singular. The streets
were also exceedingly narrow, and the roofs
of the houses very flat.

At length we arrived at another prison, and
here again we were shut up. I was myself
put into a separate room. I had no inter-
course with my companions.

My room was very dark; the light being
only admitted through a long narrow hole in
the wall. I had bread and water brought to
me once a day, and these weremy only sub-
sistence. : Eyeee '

a sath adachnensamaerihtinasanenteseasitiinatininecisatnamacencerccenenteititniinlliaaainmminiimneniis
How were they treated? What does Parley say of the inhabitants of
‘Tripoli? What of the streets, and houses?



20 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRIUA.

Here I remained day after day, and week ©
after week. I knew nothing of the language
of the country; and the surly man who at-
tended the prison, seemed to have no more re-
gard for me than if I had been a brute.

How heavy were the hours as they slowly
passed away! I had no books to read, no one
to talk to. I knew nothing of what was to
be my fate, but E had reason to fear that I
should be put to death.

But so weary was I of confinement, that I
almost felt willing to die, if I could once more
see the open sky, and breathe the free air,
were it only for a few moments.

But weeks passed away, and no change
happened in my situation. Day and night
came, but all went on in dull and dishearten-
ing uniformity. I tried to amuse myself by _
devising means of escape. But the prison _
was of stone, and forbade any attempt to force .
a passage through the walls.



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 2)

ta a
fi iW ie \\
: Ni N

sii
: Muli
Be KK CC
TREY

> ’ LN

bas] "



At length a spider crept into the little win-
dow of my cell, and began to make a net. I
watched him carefully for a long time, and
found great amusement in observing him.

He soon went away, buf the next day, he
came again; I caught several small flies, and
gave them to him. This encouraged him to
come, and very soon he took up his abode
there.

One night soon after this, I thought I heard
a noise at my window. [I listened, and dis-



22 _ PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

tinctly heard some one there. What this
meant I could not imagine.

As [had no reason to suppose that any one
would attempt to set me free, I fancied that it
was evil, rather than good, that was intended.

In the morning I found that my spider was
gone, and his web destroyed. © I'wept that
this only friend of my solitude was thus taken
away. | |
The next night I heard again a noise at-my
window. But I could not conjecture the oc-
casion of it. Again the third night, I heard
it, and imagined that I heard some one whis-
pering to me, but of this I was not certain.

More than a fortnight now elapsed. The
noise at my window, which had excited some
little hope, was heard no more. |

One night I dreamed that Iwas released
from my imprisonment; that I had crossed
the sea; that I had reached my native land
that Iwas at my home; that exclamations of



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 23

joy at my return filled my ears; and while I
imagined that I was kneeling down, to thank
God for my deliverance, and a happy restora-
tion to my family, I suddenly awoke.

For a time I could hardly realize where I
was. But at length, fixing my eye upon the
dim light that entered my little window, I re-
collected that I was in prison, and in the pow-
er of a cruel and barbarous people.

At this moment I heard a noise at the door,
and distinctly heard the key put into the lock,
and the bolt slowly and cautiously turned.
The heavy iron door was then swung open
very silently. Iheard no step, but a hand
was laid upon me, and some one said in a
whisper, ‘ Follow me, and make no noise!’

I was very much surprised, but I did not
hesitate instantly to follow. We passed out.

The door was locked behind us, and we
were on the point of leaving the spot, when
a man who had been sleeping upon the floor,



24 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

sprang suddenly up, and lifted his sword to
strike my. conductor.

The latter, with the quickness of lightning,
struck the man over the head with a stick,
and he fell upon the floor. We then went
through several narrow passages, and at
length came to an open space, with high walls
around it.

My companion clambered up this wall by
means of a rope-ladder, and I followed. We
then sprang into thestreet. We heard a noise
beliind us as if my escape was discovered, and
an alarm given.

We heard several voices, and saw the glan-
cing of lights upon the buildings. My guide
quickened his steps, and turning and winding
through the narrow streets, we were soon at
a considerable distance ftom the prison.

At length we came to a house, which we

entered. I was taken to a remote part of it,
Sie etittnntincnielertndis< tah bod

How was Parley rescued from prison?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 25

and told by my guide to remain, until I receiv-
ed farther instructions.

He then left me. I was in total darkness.
Where I was, of course I knew not.. Who
had delivered me, or for what object I had
been taken from the dungeon, I could not
guess.

For several hours I remained in total un-
certainty. At length a woman came to the
room where I was, with a light. She first
spoke to me in the language of the country,
but I did not understand her. She then spoke’
to me in Italian.

Of this I knew very little, but I was able
to understand, that I must remain quiet,
and be assured that no harm was intended
me. |
In the morning, this woman again came te
my room, and provided me with some food.
She told me that it was necessary for my own
safety and that of my deliverer, = I should



26 PARLEY 8 TALES OF AFRICA.

remain in my room, and by no means attempt
to leave it.

In a few days, she said, he would return
and explain all tome. In the mean time, she
would do all in her power to make my time
pass agreeably. |

I thought it best. to comply with these di-
rections. My female attendant provided me
with food, and gave me a good deal of her
company. She behaved in a kind yet respect-
ful manner, and seemed to be anxious in every
way to make my situation agreeable.

I was soon able to understand a good deal
of her conversation, and I learned from her
many things respecting the country, and the
people where I was.



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA, 27



Map of Africa.



28 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

CHAPTER IV.
A SHORT DESCRIPTION OF AFRICA.

I witt now tell you something about the
country I was in. On the preceding page
there is a map of Africa. The shape of Afri-
ca is somewhat like that of a leg of mutton.

The southern point, which is called the Cape
of Good Hope, forms the small part towards
the knuckle. At the north end you will find,
on the map, the names of several places, as
Tripoli, Tunis, Algiers, and Morocco. These
countries pass under the general name of
Barbary.

Now Africa is an immense region, nearly
southeast of the United States. From the
nost northern, to the most southern ex-



What is the shape of Africa? Where is the Cape of Good Hope?
{n what part of Africa are the four Barbary States? What countries

are included in Barbary? In which direction is Africa from the United
States?





PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 99

tremity, it is five thousand miles; and it is
four thousand six hundred miles wide, at the
widest part.

It contains probably thirty-five millions of
inhabitants, about as many as exist in the
whole continent of America. 'These inhabit-
ants consist chiefly of two races of men, Arabs
and Negroes.

These races have mixed, and produced oth-
ers, partly Arab, and partly Negro. They
pass under different names, and are divided
into a multitude of different tribes, and na-
tions.

The inhabitants of Barbary are chiefly —
Moors, who are nearly the same as Arabs.
Their skin is dark, like that of our Indians,
They have a great many negro slaves, who
are brought from the middle parts of Africa.



What is the length of Africa from north to south? What the width
from east to west? What the number of inhabitants? Of what two
races do the inhabitants of Africa principally consist? What are the in-
habitants of Barbary?’ Describe the Moors of Barhiry



30 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

Barbary is divided into four states or king-
doms; Tunis, Tripoli, Algiers, and Morocco.
Each of these States has a capital, or large
city of the same name as the country.

The people are Mahometans. They are
great enemies to the Christians, and at the
time I was there, it was a part of their regu-
lar business, to send out vessels upon the sea,
to capture the ships belonging to christian
countries.

South of Barbary, there is an immense des-
ert two thousand miles in length from east to
west, and eight hundred miles in width from
north to south. People can only cross it by
means of camels.

It is very dangerous to travel over this des-
ert; for sometimes the wind raises vast clouds
of sand, which bury unfortunate travellers be-
neath them. Beside this, there are many



What ts the capital of Morocco? of Algiers? of Tunis? of Tripoli?
What of the people? What was a part of the business of the people of
Barbary when Parley was there? What of the great desert of Africa?





PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA. oe) |

tribes of Arabs, who wander over the desert,
and attack and rob every body they meet.

South of this great desert called Sahara,
there are several nations of negroes who in-
habit a fertile country.

On the western coast of Africa, from the
river Senegal, which you will find on the map,
to the Cape of Good Hope, there are many
tribes of negroes. Here is the coast of Guinea,
from which a great many slaves have been
brought to America.

Toward the Cape of Good Hope are the
Hottentots, a race of negroes, of which I shall
tell you by and by. At the Cape of Good
Hope, is a large town called Cape Town, 1n-
habitéd by English people. ‘There are also a



What tribes wander over the desert? What nations south of the great
desert? Where is the river Senegal? Into what ocean does it empty?
Which way does it run? What of the country between the Senegal and
the Cape of Good Hope? Where are the Hottentots! What of Cape
‘Town? In which direction is it from Tripoli? Foint your finger toward
Cape Town Toward Tripoli



32 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

number of small English villages, near Cape
Town. |.

On the eastern coast of Africa are several
tribes of negroes, of which the Caffrees are
the most remarkable. They are said to be
the best formed people in the world. As you
proceed north from the land of the Caffrees
you will come to Abyssinia. This is a moun-
tainous country, inhabited by a very singular
race of people.

The Nile, one of the most celebrated rivers
in the world, flows through Abyssinia. It
passes through Nubia and Egypt, and enters
the Mediterranean sea at the eastern ex-
tremity.

Thus I have told you a little about Africa,

so that you may better understand what I am

ees

Where are the Caffrees? Describe the Caffrees? Where is Abyssinia?
In which direction from Morocco? From the Cape of Good Hope?
Describe Abyssinia. What of the Nile? Where is Nubia? Where ie
Egypt? Which way is Egypt from Tripoli? From the mouth of the
Senegal? From the Cape of Good Hope!



MESSE oat ls ES ae

PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 33

going to relate. Ihope you will study the
map very carefully, and see where every place
is, that I have mentioned. " |

eo

CHAPTER V.
DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY OF TRIPOLI.

I must now tell you a little more particu-
larly about the city of Tripoli. It is a large
city, and contains as many inhabitants as Bos-
ton. ‘he houses are square, and but one
story high. ‘The roofs are so flat, that the
people frequently walk upon them.

The streets are narrow, crooked, and sandy.
Almost all heavy articles are carried from one
place to another on the backs of camels,
which raise a huge dust, as they go along the
streets.

Sy See ere emer

How large is the city of Tripoli? Describe the houses. The streets.

How are goods carried from one place to another?

3



34 PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.

‘The city is surrounded by strong walls, with
ramparts for defending it against the attacks
of soldiers. It has two gates, by which peo-
ple go in, and out of the city. One is north,
toward the sea, the other south toward the
country.

At the east end of the city, is the castle,
in which the Bashaw lives. The Bashaw is
a sort of king, and rules over the people. His
dominions are quite extensive, and include
Kezzan, which is a country several hundred —
miles to the south. It is situated in the mid-
dle of the great desert.

The Bashaw is generally a cruel man, and
does what he pleases to the people. His cas-
tle is surrounded by a strong wall, forty feet
high. He is very much afraid of being killed
by some of his people.

He has a great many wives, who live in a

Describe the walls round Tripoli. The gates. What of the castle;
What of the Bashaw? What of Fezzan? |



PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA. 35

particular part of the castle. They are very
richly dressed with jewels, gold and silver or-
naments, and are covered with perfumes.
They are, however, shut up very close, and
are no better than prisoners.

I have told you before, that the principal ©
part of the people are Moors. These people
do not wear hats, but large turbans like the
Turks. They do not wear coats, but a large
— loose garment fastened about the waist. They
also wear large trowsers, and yellow boots.

-'The women wrap themselves up in a cloth
called a barracan, which covers the whole
person. This they hold so close over their
heads, as to conceal their faces, which it ds
not thought modest.to expose to view. om

The climate here is exceedingly hot in Sum-
mer. In Autumn there are powerful rains,
which continue for several days and nights.





What of the Bashaw’s wives? Describe the dress of the men in Tri-
poli. The dress of the women, What of the climate?



36 PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.

These rains after a short period stop suddenly,
and not a drop of water then falls, for a num-
ber of months. |

The people are Mahometans. As I have
said before, they hate Christians. ‘Their re-
ligion teaches those who believe in it, to de-
spise all that do not hold to the same faith.
It teaches, that no Mahometan is bound to be
kind, just, or true, to those who believe in any
other religion. |

In Tripoli there are a good many Jews. AS
the Moors are very indolent, the Jews do a
great part of the business of the place. They
are however treated with the greatest con-
tempt by the Moors. |

A Moor will often spit upon a Jew, and
pull his beard, and the poor Jew has only to
submit. The Christians are also sometimes
treated with the grossest cruelty.

What does the Mohametan religion teach? What of the Jews in Tri-
poli? How are Christians often treated?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 37



A Moor pars a Jew’s beard.

CHAPTER VI.
ACCOUNT OF ALGIERS, MOROCCO, AND TUNIS.

Havine told you about Tripoli,.I will now
tell you about Algiers. Algiers is an exten-
sive country, and contains many inhabitants.
It was under the government of a.Dey, who

By whom is Algiers governed? What can you tell:of the Dey of Al
gierc! :



28 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

resided at the city of Algiers, which is the
largest town. But the French took the coun-
try in 1829, and the Dey fled away.

The city of Algiers is as large as New York.
‘The inhabitants and houses resemble those of
Tripoli. The former are however less barba-
rous, and the latter handsomer and more con
venient.

The roofs of the houses are flat, and com-
municate with each other, so that a person
may walk the whole length of the streets, on
the tops of the houses. Many of the people
have little gardens on their houses.

The houses are all whitewashed, and being
situated on the slope of a hill, the city at a
distance, looks like the sail of a great ship.

Morocco is a very populous country, govern-

ed by an Emperor, who lives at the city of - |

Morocco, This city has three hundred thou-



What of the city of Algiers? Of the inhabitants? Of the houses’
How is Morocco governed! ‘Where does the Emperor live?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 39

sana inhabitants. It is situated in a fruitful
plain, and is surrounded by delightful groves.

The country produces oranges, figs, melons,
apricots, peaches, grapes, pears, dates, plums,
and pomegranates. ‘There are a profusion of
the most fragrant and beautiful flowers here.

Morocco is encircled by very strong walls
for defence. ‘The Emperor’s palace is a
splendid edifice. ‘The city abounds in mosques.
These are places, where the Mahometans wor-
ship.
Near the city is a range of lofty mountains
whose tops are always covered with snow.
[his range is called Atlas. From it we de-
rive the word Atlas, which is applied to a
book of maps.

There are several other towns in the king-
dom of Morocco. Of these, Fez is the most
considerable. 'The buildings of this city are

etter EE

How many people in the city of Morocco? What of the productions
of Morocco? Describe the city of Morocco? What are Mosques?
What mountains near the city of Morocco? What of Fez?



40 PARLEY § TALES OF AFRICA.

the most splendid in Barbary. It has many
mosques, some of which are magnificent.
The gardens abound in all kinds of delicious
fruits. Roses and other fragrant flowers are
so abundant, as to perfume the air to a great
distance.

Tunis is the smallest of the four Barbary ©
States. The principal city is Tunis. The
country is governed by a Bey, who resides in
the city of Tunis.

Near this city, are the remains of ancient
Carthage. More than two thousand years
ago, Carthage was very powerful, and sent
an army against Rome, under the celebrated
Hannibal.

It was built on three hills, and it was
twenty-three miles around it. It contained
seven hundred thousand inhabitants, and was
defended by three strong walls, which en-
circled it.

What of Tunis? How is it governed? Where does the Bey reside’
What of ancient Carthage?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 4l

This city, which flourished seven hundred
years, was at last set on fire by the Romans,
and burnt to the ground. It continued to
burn incessantly for seventeen days. The
remains of this mighty city are now hardly
visible. |

Thus I have told you of the four Barbary
States. ‘Lhe climate is, on the whole, delight-
ful, and the land is in general, very fertile.
The most delicious fruits, the most fragrant,
and beautiful flowers abound in this country.

Nature has done everything to make it one
of the most charming portions of the globe.
But the inhabitants are for the most part,
cruel, and vicious.

At the time I was in Tripoli, which is
almost thirty years ago, these Barbary states
were subject to the Sultan of Turkey; but
since that time, they have become indepen-
dent.

ea te

What of the climate of Barbarv?



$2 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA

They were then renowned all over the
world for their piracies. ‘Their corsairs were
constantly cruising upon the Mediterranean
sea, and they took possession of every vessel
they could capture.

Since that time, these piracies have been —
stopped, but the people remain nearly in the
same condition, though they have. somewhat
improved.

CHAPTER VII.

PARLEY FINDS OUT HIS DELIVERER, AND RE-
' COGNISES AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE.

By this time, I suppose my little reader may
wish to know the remainder of my own stury.
I hope the preceding description of Barbary
will not be thought useless, for it is in some



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 43

degree necessary, in order to make the narra-
tive of my adventures in Africa understood.

I had now remained more than two months,
shut up in the house which I have before
mentioned. I had as yet seen nothing of the
man who rescued me from prison.

The woman who attended me would give
me no hint, which in’ the least satisfied my
curiosity to know who had thus interposed
in my behalf. “In truth, I was totally at a
loss to conceive who it might be, or what
motive had led the individual, to engage in
an enterprise of so much hazard.

At length the time came when my doubts
were to be satisfied. I was one night waked
from my sleep by a man wrapped in a cloak,
who told me to dress myself immediately, and
prepare to accompany him.

This I did, and followed him into the
street. We wound through the narrow
crooked avenues, unti ve came to. one of the



44 PAKLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

gates of the city. Here my conductor had
some conversation with the keeper of the
gate. ’









After awhile, we were allowed to pass
through a narrow door at the side of the
gate. We soon found ourselves upon a
wharf. My guide flashed some powder in a
pistol, and in a few moments a boat came
stealing towards us upon the water.

This we entered, and turning our backs
upon the city, rowed out into the harbour.



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 45

We had four oars-men, and we slid over the
water with great swiftness. We proceeded
in perfect silence for about three miles.

We then approached a small schooner
which seemed to be waiting for us. This we
entered. 'The sails were hoisted, and we put
to sea. The night was clear, but the wind
blew very fresh. The schooner was a ‘fast
sailer, and she seemed to glance over the
waters, as a bird sails on the air.

At length the morning came. Nothing had
been said to me, which enabled me to conjec-
ture who my companions were. I had laid
down on the deck of the vessel, and had fallen
asleep. I did not wake till sunrise.

As I opened my eyes, they fell upon a man
of a very swarthy countenance, whom I in- .
stantly recollected to have seen before. But
where I had seen him I could not tell!

At length he spoke. When I heard his
voice, I knew him at once. It was Leo,



46 PARLEY § TALES OF AFRICA.

whose life I had saved on my voyage to
Europe!

The last time I had seen him, was in the
mountains of Switzerland, as related in my
tales about Europe. He was then at the head
of a troop of mountain-robbers. Knowing
his desperate character, I immediately con-
jectured he was now engaged in some bad
enterprise. —

I had no fear, however, for myself. He
was evidently my deliverer, and I felt sure
that his gratitude for my having once saved
his life, was the cause of his generous con-
duct towards me now.

CHAPTER VIII.
THE STORY OF A ROBBER.

AFTER a few inquiries, Leo took me into
the little cabin of our schooner. It was



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 47

about fifteen years since I had seen him. He
had altered very little. His complexion was
remarkably dark; his eyes very black and
piercing; his hair black, long, and curled over
his ears and forehead. His appearance was
altogether very striking. )

He sat down, and began to speak of our
first. meeting, many years before. After a
little while, I asked what had happened to
him since I had seen him. He then related
his history to me, as follows.

‘After you saw me at the head of a band
of brave fellows in the mountains of Switzer-
land, I continued to follow the profession of a
freebooter. I always conducted my business
with humanity.

‘We took away the people’s goods and
money, who chanced to fall in our way, but
we never committed any unnecessary cruelty.

‘Our success was very good for a consid-
erable time, but at length such loud com-



48 PARLEY ’S TALES OF AFRICA.

plaints were made to the government, that a.

body of more than a thousand soldiers were
sent to take us. Our band consisted of but
afty men.

‘We did not think it best therefore to meet
these troops in the open field, so we retired
to more secret places among the mountains,
and hid ourselves during the day, in caves
formed amid the rocks. At night we sallied
forth, and fell upon such travellers, as chance
threw in our way.

‘But notwithstanding our utmost care, sev-
eral of our men were shot, and others taken.
A reward of a thousand dollars was offered
for my apprehension. One of my men, tempt-
ed by this offer, led the soldiers of the gov-
ernment to the cave, where I was concealed.

‘At first I determined to resist, and endeav-
our to cut my way through them. But a mo-
ment’s reflection satisfied me of the folly of at-
tempting it. I was taken, and carried to Venice.

2



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 49

‘Here I was tried and sentenced to be shot.

[ was confined in a prison on the edge of the ©

sea. I determined if possible to make my
escape. I made various attemps without
SUCCESS.

‘The day at length drew near, which was
fixed for my execution. It was now mid-
night, and at sunrise the next morning, I was
to be Jed out, and shot by a file of soldiers.
I sat in my dark cell reflecting upon my
coming fate.

‘J determined to make one effort more for
escape. I sprang up, and laying hold of

one of the iron bars that were placed before ~

the window of my dungeon, wrenched it with
all my strength. ‘To my surprise it suddenly
broke, and I fell backward upon the floor,
holding the iron bar in my hands. "

‘This gave me fresh courage. I seized

another bar and strained it with the vigor of —

4 lion. This also vielded, and there was
4 C

ihe



50 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

now space for me to creep. out. through the
window.

‘I looked down, and although the night was
dark, I could see the deep water rippling at
the foot cf the prison. I was at least forty
feet above the water, but I did not hesitate a
moment. I let-myself fall from the window,
and plunged into the water.

SSS Toa
Ss hel sebangst
—— - ral cent! (haw
oT

ro
i

} *y ~~ Mt . ~ A Mp,
aa fr al

tT
mh i

ae { Mi , Hg
Bos mie wii i ee i i
Being a good swimmer, I soon rose, and
swam toa wharf, at a considerable distance.





PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 5k

Here I took aboat which I found there, and
stretched away upon the sea.

‘I was afraid to show myself in Italy, so I
determined to yuit my native country. After
various adventures, I took passage in a ship,
which I met with in the gulf Venice, and
ailed for Egypt. Here I entered the service
of the Pacha, as a mameluke.

CHAPTER IX,
80'S DESCRIPTION OF EGYPT.

‘Hasty is-subject to the Sultan of Turkey.
Le Pacha of Egypt governs in the name of -
the Sultan. 'The mamelukes are his soldiers.

‘They are splendidly dressed, and mounted
on fine horses.. They are daring men, and des-
perate fighters. Most of them are from for-

To whom is Egypt subject?) Who governs Egypt? What of the Mam-
elukes?



52 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

eign countries, anda large portion of them,
like myself, are adventurers.* ;

‘In this service I remained for a number of
years, and was engaged in several battles with
Buonaparte. You have no doubt read an ac-
count of the invasion of Egypt by the French
some years ago.

‘Buonaparte would no doubt have succeeded
in conquering: Egypt, had it not been for the
English. ‘The French fieet being destroyed
by the English fleet, under Lord Nelson, Buo-
naparte left his army, which soon followed
him back to France. Thus Egypt was freed
from its invaders.

‘I continued to remain in the service of the
Pacha. As you have never been to Egypt, I
will describe this remarkable country: to you.
It is divided into Upper and Lower Egypt.

* My little reader should recollect that I am telling of things that hap-
‘omeoge almost thirty years ago, Since that time the Mamelukes have

en expelled from Egypt.
ee tee ee a ee



PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA. 53

‘Along the Mediterranean sea, the country
spreads out into a level space of land, on
which, as far as the eye can reach, you see
uothing but a few date trees, a few palm trees,
and groups of huts, built of mud.

‘Near the place where the Nile enters the
sea, it is called the Delta. This is overfiowed
by the Nile every year, and is one of the most
fruitful spots on the globe.

‘In Lower Egypt there are several great
cities. Alexandria was built, there more than
two thousand years ago, by a celebrated con-
queror of ancient Greece, ‘called Alexander.

‘This place now abounds in the most astoit-
ishing remains of its former greatness. For
the space of six miles, around the present
town, which is much smaller than the ancient
city, nothing is to be seen but fragments of
stone which belonged to the ancient edifices.



Describe that part of Egypt that lies along the Mediterranean sea?
What part of Egypt is called the Delta? What of the Nile? What of
Alexandria?



54 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

‘There are heaps, sometimes piled as high
as a house, of pillars, columns, and obelisks.
Many of these are beautifully carved.

‘Among them is one obelisk cut out of a
solid piece of stone, which measures seventy
feet in length. It is covered with sculptured
figures, called hieroglyphics.

‘These hieroglyphics formed the ancient
written language of the Egyptians. ‘This ob-
elisk now lies upon the ground. It once stcod
erect, and was called Cleopatra’s needle, af-
ter Cleopatra a very celebrated and beautiful
Queen of ancient Egypt.

‘Near this city are several remarkable burying
places, called catacombs. In these catacombs
are found at this day, the bodies of persons who
were buried two or three thousand years ago.

‘These bodies were embalmed, and they still
retain, the almost complete form and appear-
ance, of the persons when living.

What of Cleopatra’s needle? What of the Catacombs? What are
found in the Catacombs?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 55

‘Cairo is another very remarkable city in
Lower Egypt. The streets are crooked, and
crowded ‘with men, horses, camels, asses and
dogs.

‘These are continually bustling through the
town, and raise an almost constant cloud of
dust. Cairo is the largest city in Africa, and
contains more inhabitants than Morocco.

‘Upper Egypt lies to the south of Lower
Egypt. In the midst of a vast sandy plain
on- the western side of the Nile are some of
the most remarkable edifices in the world.



==
=

These are the Pyramids, There are a

Aas ites inane eileen alaareitemnnnnte eee eID
What of Cairo? What is the largest city in Africa? Where is Upper
Egypt |



56 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

number of them, but the largest is near five
hundred feet in height. It is built of large
pieces of stone. Its form is square, and one
of the sides, at the bottom, measures about
seven hundred feet.

‘When, and for what object, these vast
structures were built, it is impossible to tell.
Ancient authors, who lived two thousand
years ago, speak of them as then the wonders
of the age.

‘They were as ignorant as we are, of the
origin of these Pyramids. It is probable, that
they are the burial places of some of the an-
cient kings of Egypt, and perhaps were
erected even before the time of Pharaoh, who
is spoken of in the Bible.

‘It has been supposed that the Israelites
during their bondage in Egypt, were occupied
in rearing some of these vast structures.

0 ee
What can you tell of the Pyramids? How high is the largest Pyramid?
When were these Pyramids probably erected? For what object are they
supposed to have been built?



FARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 57

‘Still farther south, in Upper Egypt, and
towards Nubia, the Nile flows through a nar-
row valley between two ranges of mountains.
In this valley, are many remarkable remains
of antiquity.

‘The most wonderful of these, are those of
Thebes. This city must have been more
magnificent, by far, than any city now on the
earth. Its ruins are scattered on both sides
of the Nile, and cover a surface of nearly
thirty miles in extent.

‘The ground is covered with columns of im-
mense magnitude, statues, rows of obelisks,
and other works which fill the mind with
astonishment. It is impossible to convey any
idea of these magnificent ruins.

‘This great city was of very ancient date.
It is mentioned by authors who wrote more
than two thousand years ago, as exhibiting
the same spectacle then, as now. Still far-



What is evident from the splendid ruins that now exist in Egypt?



58 PARLLY S TALES OF AFRICA.

ther south, towards Nubia, there are other
very remarkable remains of antiquity.

‘It is evident that in the earliest ages,
Egypt has been filled with people, who lived
in splendid cities, who possessed a great deal
of learning, and had the knowledge of many
arts which are now lost.

ee

CHAPTER X.
LEO FINISHES HIS STORY.

‘Bur I am forgetting to tell you my own
adventures. Somewhat more than two years
since, there came to Egypt a man of the name
of Hamet Bashaw. He is the second son of
the late Bashaw of ‘Tripoli.

‘The present Bashaw, whose name is Joseph,
caused his father and eldest brother to be put
to death, and thus became Bashaw himself.
Hamet being older than Joseph, had a right
to succeed his father.



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 59

‘'l'o prevent his doing so, Joseph endeavored
to take his life. Hamet heard of his intentions,
and fled to Egypt. He was kindly received,
and some schemes have been set on foot, to
dethrone his brother Joseph and place Hamet
at the head of the government of Tripoli.

‘About six months since, I came secretly
to Tripoli, as the agent of Hamet to promote
these schemes. Appearing to have come on
private business, I have had free access to all
parts of the city, and nobody has suspected
my motive. .

‘When you were brought on shore from your
ship, I happened to be on the wharf, and saw
you. I knew you instantly, and determined
if possible to liberate you.

‘I therefore took the greatest pains to find
out the place of your confinement, and ascer-
tain the means of setting you free.

‘I at length contrived to get over the walls
_of the prison, by a Jadder of ropes, and three



60 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFB Cys

nights in succession I went to your narrow
window, to contrive the means of your escape.

‘Finding that nothing could be done in this
way, I one night took advantage of the gaol-
er’s being asleep, turned the key, and liberat-
ed you as you remember. I then placed you
under the care of a woman from my own
country, in whom I could place confidence.

‘ After this I was absent nearly two months,
engaged in pursuing the object which brought
me to Tripoli. My business being completed,
I took you from your place of concealment,
and brought you on board of this vessel, which
was waiting for me.

‘I am now sailing for Egypt, and if this
fair wind continues, we shall be there in four
days. When you arrive there, you can take
passage in some vessel, and return to your
own country.’



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 6]

CHAPTER XI.

PARLEY TELLS ABOUT VARIOUS MATTERS, AND
HOW DECATUR AND TWENTY AMERICANS,
BURNT THE PHILADELPHIA.

WE continued to sail on our voyage with a
fair wind. During the passage, Leo told me
of some things which interested me very much.
Before I tell them to you, I must go back, and
relate some facts, that it is necessary you
should first understand.

I have told you that the people of Barbary
sent out many vessels, to seize upon the ships
of other nations. Now, many of our American
vessels went to trade in the Mediterranean
sea, and several of these were taken by these
pirates.

The crews were seized, put in prison, and
treated with the greatest cruelty. Some of
them were reduced to slavery, and made to
labor very hard.



62 PARLEY § TALES OF AFRICA.

The sufferings of these unhappy Americans
induced our government to send out some ships
of war, under the command of Commodore
Preble, not only to protect our vessels, in the
Mediterranean sea, but to assist in effecting
the liberation of our countrymen, who were
in captivity. This took place in 1803.

One of the American vessels of war was
called the Philadelphia, and commanded by
Captain Bainbridge. One day, this vessel
was chasing a corsair into the harbor of
Tripoli, when unfortunately she struck the
rround, and could not move.

Unable to escape, the vessel fell a prey to
the Tripolitans. The crew were all taken,
and shut up in prison. 'The vessel remained
in the hands of its captors.

The Tripolitans soon got the Philadelphia
afloat, and intended to make use of her, to

ee
Who was sent to the Mediterranean sea, near thirty years ago, witha

squadron of American ships of war under his command? For what was

Commodore Preble sent with these ships to the Mediterranean?



PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA. ‘63

carry on the war against our ships. ‘There
was a young man by the name of Decatur,
among the Americans, under the command of
Commodore Preble.

He commanded a small vessel called the
Enterprise, and was a very daring young
ofiicer. He proposed to Commodore Preble,
to go and set the Philadelphia on fire, and
thus prevent her being useful to the Tripoli-
tans.

This plan was approved of by Commodore
Preble. So, Decatur waited till it was night,
and then took with him twenty men, and con-
cealed them in the bottom of a small vessel,
and sailed towards the Philadelphia.

The Tripolitans on board this ship, saw the
little vessel approaching, but supposing it be-
longed to their own people, and suspecting no
danger, they allowed it to come close up -
them.



What happened to the Philadelphia?



64 PARLEY S$ TALES OF AFRICA.

Suddenly, Decatur with his twenty men
leaped upon the deck. There were fifty 'T'rip-
olitans on board the Philadelphia. The men
closed upon each other, and a deadly struggle
followed.

The astonished Tripolitans fought bravely
with their sabres. At the first onset, Decatur
was disarmed and thrown down. A Tripoli-
tan lifted his sword over him, and was about
to strike the fatal blow.

At this instant, one of Decatur’s men saw
his danger, and springing between him, and
the Tripolitan, received the stroke of the
sword on his arm.

Decatur rose, and fought like a lion. He
was truly a brave man. His twenty Ameri-
cans were all brave men. The Tripolitans
fell before them, like grass before the scythe:
Decatur set the vessel on fire, and not one
of the fifty Tripolitans ever reached the shore.

Will you tell how Decatur caused the Philadelphia to be burnt?



PARLEY § TALES OF AFRICA. 65

The flames soon rose from the ship, and
lighted the harbor far and wide. The peo-
ple from the city looked on in fear and won-
der, and Decatur returned in triumph to his
vessel.



These were brave deeds, but many of the
poor Americans were still in slavery. The
Bashaw of Tripoli was so angry because the
Philadelphia was burnt, that he was still more
cruel to the American prisoners in his power.

The sufferings of these unhappy men, were
0



66 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

soon known in our country. ‘The subject was
a matter of universal interest. Our govern-
ment was not idle.

They sent General Eaton to the Mediterra-
neal, as an agent to assist in obtaining the
freedom of our imprisoned countrymen. |

General Eaton at length heard of the situa-
tion of Hamet, whom I have mentioned be-
fore. He went to Egypt to see him.

He proposed to Hamet to assist him, in de-
throning his brother, provided Hamet, in com-
ing to the throne, would liberate the Ameri-
cans, and be at peace with America. To this
Hamet agreed, and General Eaton immedi-
ately set about making arrangements to carry
the project into effect.

For what purpose was General Eaton gent to the Mediterraneant

Where did General Eaton meet Hamet Bashaw? What agreement did
he make with Hamet Bashaw?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 67

CHAPTER XII.

PARLEY ARRIVES IN EGYPT, AND GOES WITH
GENERAL EATON’S EXPEDITION, ACROSS
THE DESERT. |
, af

Ir was at this point of time, that Leo made
his communication to me. He told me that
General Eaton was at this moment in Egypt,
and that in a few days he would set out with
a number of soldiers, to make an attack on
the dominions of the Bashaw of Tripoli.

He left me at full liberty, either to return
directly to my country, or join General Eaton’s
expedition. At the same time, he strongly
urged me to adopt the latter course.

He told me that the Bashaw of Tripoli
was a cruel man, that he had murdered his
own father; that Hamet was, by law, entitled
to the throne; and that above all, in joining
General Eaton’s enterprise, I should assist in



68 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

liberating my suffering countrymen from cap-
tivity.

These considerations had some weight with
me, but I did not immediately determine to
follow Leo’s advice. I chose rather to wait
till I arrived in Egypt, and then make up my
mind what to do.

In a few days we arrived at Alexandria, in
Lower Egypt. On inquiry, I found that Gen-
eral Eaton was actually there, as Leo had
said.

Lalso found several American seamen there,
who, in the course of a few days, were to
start on the proposed expedition. I very soon
determined to accompany them. In less than
a week, we were on our march westward,
towards the dominions of the Bashaw of 'Tri-
poli.

As we were going to travel across a desert,
General Eaton hired more than one hundred
camels to carry the baggage. ‘There were



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 69

very few Americans engaged in the expedi-
tion.



The whole number of persons was about
four hundred. Some of them were on horse-
back, but the greater part were on foot.
There were a good many Arabs and Moors,
headed by Hamet Bashaw.

We marched two hundred miles over an
uneven plain, consisting of barren hills of sand.



How many persons were engaged in General Eaton’s expedition? Of
whom did these four hundred persons consist?



70 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

Over this whole distance we met with not
one human habitation. At length, we came
across some tribes of Arabs.

The people were living in tents, and had
some horses and cattle. We were the first
Christians they had ever seen. They laughed
heartily at our dress, which appeared to them
very ridiculous. These Arabs had very dark
complexions, and wore turbans like the Turks.
They were all Mahometans, and like other
people, of this religion, thought Christians
- very much worse than themselves.

They believe that Christians will all be
punished in another world, by being kept for
ages in a dreadful fire. ‘They were very anx-
ious that I should become a Mahometan.

They seemed perfectly sincere, and no doubt
really believed, that if I remained a Christian,
{ should suffer great torments in a future state.

Will you describe the people that Parley says they met with ; after trav-
elling two hundred miles?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 71

Isaw among these Arabs, several Ostriches,
which they had caught when young, and ren-
dered nearly tame. Ostriches are the largest
birds in the world. They are only found in
Africa, and a small part of Asia.

They lay their eggs in the sand, and the
heat of the sun is so great, that the bird is
only obliged to sit on them during the night,
to hatch them. ‘These birds cannot fly, but
they will run as fast as a horse.

The Arabs had also beautiful Antelopes,
that resemble small Deer. These creatures
are very timid, and run with great swiftness.
Many of them are caught by the Panthers
and Lions, who lie concealed, and spring sud-
denly upon them, as cats do upon mice.

As we proceeded on our journey, we met
with almost constant difficulties. Sometimes
the weather was exceedingly hot, and we



~ What can yon tell about the Ostrich? What can you tell about An-
telopes?



72 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

were all, drooping with fatigue and _ thirst.

Sometimes, quarrels took place among the
soldiers, and sometimes Hamet Bashaw and
his men became disheartened, and proposed
to return. |

But General Eaton met these difficulties
with the greatest courage. He cheered the
troops, he inspired Hamet with confidence,
and triumphed over every obstacle.

But at length, we were short of provisions.
We were in a wide desert that produced al-
most nothing. We were surrounded by no
other people, than the wandering tribes of
Arabs, who kept out of sight during the day,
but stole into our camp at night, and robbed
us of our horses.

Our men were now dispersed in every di-
rection, to look for herbs and roots for food.
I went like the rest to find something to eat.
I had gone toa considerable distance from my
companions, when I happened to see between



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 73

the hills, a small low spot, where some shrubs
were growing.

They were in a little valley, i in which there
was a pond. ‘The place was quite green, and
looked very beautiful. all around it being
quite desolate, and barren. - A-spot like. this
in a desert, is called an Oasis. -



Well, I no sooner saw this spot, than I ran.
to it, expecting to find something there, that

would answer for food. What was my sur-
D



74 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

prise, to see four men start, with the sudden-
ness of beasts of prey, from the bushes, and
surround me! I saw at once that they were
Arabs, and being totally unarmed, I had no
means of defending myself. They instantly
fell upon me, and began to strip me of my
clothes, with surprising quickness.



SS ===

————————

They took off my hat and coat, and were
proceeding to rob me of my other garments,
when three or four of our horsemen acciden-
tally appeared in sight.



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 16

They were coming directly towards us.
The Arabs were alarmed, and throwing my
hat and coat upon the ground, they left me,
and sprang to their horses, which were at a
little distance among the shrubs.

They mounted them at a single leap, and
galloped away over the sand hills, disappear-
ing almost as quickly as birds of the air.
The swiftness of the horses, belonging to these
Arabs of the desert, is truly surprising.

Notwithstanding all our researches, we
were still short of food, and were obliged to,
kill one of our camels, which we found to be
excellent meat. |

We continued our march, and in two
months, had proceeded six hundred miles
over the desert. We now arrived at a tolera-
bly fruitful country, ana soon reached the city
of Derne. ,

a LaEEEr Emma memes. iS 7 TE
How long was General Eaton’s expedition in crossing the desert? How
far across the desert? |



76 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

CHAPTER XIII.

ARRIVAL AT DERNE. THE SIROCCO. A BATTLE,
AND SOME OTHER THINGS.

Dernkz is situated on the sea, and is a large
place, nearly equal to Tripoli in size. It be-
longed to the Bashaw of Tripoli, and was gov-
erned by a Bey. Here General Eaton was
joined by several American vessels.

An attack upon the city was resolved upon.
The vessels were to fire upon the town, with
their cannon from the water, and General Ea-
ton with the soldiers, was to attack it by land.

While preparations were making to execute
these plans, we were visited by a dreadful hot
wind, called the Sirocco. This wind filled the
air with small sand. The whoie sky was al-
most the color of copper.

The animals were gasping for breath. The

In what direction is Derne from Alexandria? What can you tell of
Derne?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 77

leaves, plants, and flowers, perished. It was
truly dreadful. I was parched with mee and
my skin seemed on fire.

This lasted for three days, and then the Si-
rocco ceased. ‘This dreadful wind is common
in the deserts of both Africa and Asia, and
often takes away the lives of men, and beasts.

The preparations being at length completed,
the attack on Derne was commenced. The
American vessels poured their cannon shot
upon the batteries of the enemy, and upon
the town.

The roar was loud and terrific. Our troops,
too, assailed the town on the land side. We
were opposed by a large number of 'Tripolitan
soldiers.

A fierce battle followed. General Eaton
was shot in the wrist, but he seemed to heed
it not. He led us on through the thickest of
the fight. It was a brave battle.

Describe the Sirocco. Describe the attack on Derne.



78 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

We had some Greeks with us, who fought
by our sides, and they fought bravely. The
enemy at length gave way. ‘They fled before
us, and we entered the town.

Derne was now captured. Joseph Bashaw
heard of this event with dread. He feared
that his brother Hamet would succeed in driv-
ing him from the throne.

He desired therefore to make peace as soon
as possible, with the Americans. He sent to
Mr. Lear, the American consul, and offered
immediately to release the American prison-
ers, if General Eaton would cease to assist
Hamet Bashaw.

Mr. Lear immediately agreed to this. Gen-
eral Eaton was consequently obliged to with-
draw his troops from Derne. Soon after this,
we all sailed for Malta, an island in the Med-
iterranean sea.

en
What effect had the capture of Derne on Joseph Bashaw? What did

Joseph Bashaw do? What was General Eaton obliged to do in conse-

quence of the arrangement between Mr. Lear and Joseph Bashaw?



te
7

PARLEY ’S TALES OF AFRICA. 79

Poor Hamet Bashaw, thus deserted by his
American allies, had no farther hopes. He
left his cruel brother Joseph to reign, quitted
his country, and came to America.

General Eaton returned to America also,
and after some years he died. He deserves
to be remembered, as a man of extraordinary
courage, energy, and perseverance.

Immediately after the arrangement was
made, between Mr. Lear and Joseph Bashaw,
all the American prisoners in Tripoli, were
set at liberty.

Among these were my companions, who
had been captured with me in the Mediterra-
nean. After we were imprisoned in Tripoli,
I had known nothing of their fate. How
ereat was my pleasure on arriving at Malta,
to meet them all there!

They had suffered a great deal during their



a What did Hamet Bashaw do? What became of General Eaton? For

what does General Eaton deserve to be remembered?

r
« i
a
oe;
i=” ty



380 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

imprisonment, but: were now very happy, in
the prospect of returning to their country.

Fr ee

CHAPTER XIV.

PARLEY SETS OUT FOR CHINA. SOMETHING
ABOUT CAPTAIN RILEY, AND GREAT STORIES.

A Frew days after I arrived at Malta, a large
American ship, called the Kien Long, came
to that island. She had been to Smyrna, a
town in Asia, on the Mediterranean sea, to
get opium. ‘This opium, she was going to car-
ry to China, and exchange it for tea, silks and
other goods. |

While she was at Smyrna, the plague was
raging there. The plague is a dreadful fever,
that is very common in all the large towns,
on the Mediterranean.

Sometimes, many thousands of people die

, What can you tell of the Plague?



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. Ry

of it,in a single city, in the course of a few
months. Several of the seamen on board the
Kien Long, took the disease at Smyrna, and
died there.

When she arrived at Malta, ~ was there-
fore short of men. I was offered the situation
of second mate on board of her.

This I accepted ; and instead of setting out
‘for home as I intended, I started in a few
days, on a voyage to China. |

We passed through the straits of Gibraltar,
and stretched to the west along the northern
coast of Africa. We soon passed the Canary
isles, and at length came near Cape Blanco
on the western coast of Africa.

It was on the coast near this Cape, that
Captain Riley and his crew were wrecked,
about ten years afterwards, that is, in 1815.



In what direction did Parley sail after he left the Mediterranean?
What islands did he soon pass? Where was Captain Riley and his crew
wrecked? In what direction is Cape Blanco from Tripoli? The Cape
of Good Hope from you?



82 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

Captain Riley has written a book, giving an
account of his shipwreck, and his suffering in
Africa. This account is very interesting, but
it has one fault, he is too fond of telling large
stories.

He tells of a great many things, that are
perhaps nearly all true, but yet his descrip-
vions are so extravagant, that many people.
disbelieve his whole book.

Nothing is more unfortunate, than to get a
habit of telling great stories. A person who
has this habit, is very soon laughed at, and
despised. Good people will place no confi
dence in, nor have any esteem for a person
who tells great stories.



PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA, 83

CHAPTER XV.
CAPTAIN RILEY’S SHIPWRECK.

I wILL now give you an account of Captain
Riley’s adventures ; ‘for, as I have said before,
they are very interesting,

Captain Riley was a native of Connecticut,
He sailed in the brig Commerce from Hart-
ford, and went to Gibraltar. From thence he
set sail to go to the Canary islands.

When he came near these islands, the
weather was foggy, and he could not tell exact-
ly where he was. Being deceived by his reck-
oning, he went beyond these islands, and ran
near to Cape Blanco, on the African coast.

A strong wind was blowing the vessel along,
at a rapid rate, towards the shore. Suddenly
Captain Riley heard a great noise in the wa-
ters. He instantly knew it was the noise of
breakers,



o4 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA

Breakers are hidden rocks in the sea, ove!
which the waves tumble with great violence
Scarcely had he heard the roar of the break
ers, before the vessel struck upon them.



Then the waves rose around the vessel, and
beat upon her with a noise like thunder. The
sea broke over her, and she was very soon al-
most full of water. |

Expecting that she would be dashed to
pieces in a few minutes, Captain Riley and



PARLEY S TALES’ OF AFRICA. 85

some of his men got into the boat, and set out
for the shore, which was visible at no great
distance.

The sea was very rough, and the boat was
tossed about like a feather. The billows
broke constantly over it, and almost drowned —
the people who were in it.

It was rapidly driven towards the shore,
and soon it was thrown upon a sandy beach.
Several of the crew were yet on board the
ship, but by the greatest exertions, they were
all at length landed on the shore.

Here then, on the desolate coast of Africa,
were Captain Riley and his crew. ‘Their ves- ,
sel was on the rocks, and they knew she must
soon go to pieces. ‘Their boat was. —"
so that they could not sail in it.

They were indeed in a distressing situation.
But Captain Riley was a man of energy, and
he determined to escape from this dreary
coast, if possible. Accordingly, he and his



86 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

men first built a tent for shelter, and then be-
gan to repair their boat.

Their plan was to mend this, and when the
sea was calm, to sail out upon it, and en-
- deavor to find some friendly vessel, or attempt
to reach some of the English settlements,
which they knew lay to the south, on the coast
of Africa. . te

The morning after they were wreck&y
Captain Riley and his men were surprised to
discover some strange looking persons, coming
towards them.

These were an old man, with a hideous
face, and long hair standing out in all direc-
tions, two frightful old women, and several
children. These creatures were almost na-
ked, and had a wild and savage look.

The shore was strewed with a great vari-
ety of articles, which had floated from the
ship. 'The strange looking people fell to plun-
dering these articles. Thev ripped open the



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 87

feather beds, and were amazingly diverted to
see the air filled with feathers. They opened
some boxes of silk handkerchiefs, and lace
veils, and tied them about their heads, arms,
and legs. |

At length they went away. Night came
on, and Captain Riley and his men slept in
their tent, by the side of the restless ocean.
In the morning, they again began to repair
their boat.

But pretty soon, the Arabs came again.
‘The old man had a spear now, which he
threatened to throw at Captain Riley, and
his men.

There were also several other Arabs with
him, who had spears. They brought with
them a number of camels also, to carry off the
plunder. |

Captain Riley and his men had no weapons
for defence, and could offer no_resistance to
people thus armed. They therefore got into



88 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

their boat, which they had mended, and put
off to their vessel, which still remained on the
rocks.

-_-—__-

CHAPTER XVI.
CAPTAIN RILEY’S ADVENTURES, AND SUFFERINGS,

Tur Arabs now loaded their camels with
the spoil, and destroyed whatever they could
not carry away. They then beckoned to Cap-
tain Riley to come on shore to them, and at
length they persuaded him to come.

But pretty soon they seized him, struck at
him with their daggers, and threatened in-
stantly to kill him.

This was intended to frighten him. They
then told him, they must have the money that
was in the ship. Captain Riley made signs
to his men, and they brought about one thou-
sand dollars in a bucket, and gave to the



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 89

Arabs. But this did not satisfy them; they
wanted more.

Not being able to get more, they again
threatened to kill Captain Riley. Some of
his men seeing his danger, came ashore to as-
sist him. :



But he found that his only chance of safety,
lay in an attempt to escape. So he waited
for a favorable moment. Then he sprang
away from his enemies, ran to the beach, and
plunged into the water.



90 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

He was pursued by three of the Arabs.
They hurled a spear at him, but a wave at
that moment rolled over his head, and saved
him. He swam for his life. He reached the
ship, and escaped his pursuers.

But one of his‘men remained on the shore.
The disappointed savages now turned their
rage upon him. They plunged a spear
through his body, and he fell dead upon the
ground.

The situation of the poor seamen was now
dreadful. Their inhuman enemies were wait-
ing on the land, to take their lives if they
came ashore.

Their poor vessel had been so beat and
pounded on the rocks, by the rough billows,
that the water flowed through her, as if she
were a basket.

Nothing was left to them but to get into
their leaky boat, and push out upon the rough
sea, with the probable chance of soon sinking



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 91

in the waves.. This they chose, rather thar
venture among the cruel people, that occupied
the shore.

Having got their boat ready, Captain Ri-
ley and his ten companions put off to sea. At
first the ocean was tolerably calm, but by and
by the night came on, and with it, a dreadful
storm.

The peril of the poor seamen can hardly
be described. Their boat was very leaky,
and it took in so much water, that all of them
were occupied in bailing it out with their hats,
and whatever else they had, that would an-
swer the purpose.

With all their exertions they could scarcély
keep it from sinking. The night was very
dark, and they could see nothing around them,
save when the bright flashes of lightning,
showed them the tumbling billows.

The roar of the ocean in a storm, is terrific.
It has a fearful sound, even to one, who is



92 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

riding safely in a strong ship. But to the
ears of men in an open boat, that, bends and
trembles at every shock of the sea, the uproar
of the waters must be terrible.

The poor men had indeed no expectation
that they should ever reach the land; yeta
faint hope still remained, and still they contin-
ued to exert themselves for their deliverance.

The storm continued for several days. At
length, they were short of food and water.
Hunger and thirst soon pressed them very
hard. They had only water enough to wet
their lips. They devoured the remains of a
pig, without being cooked, which was all they
had, and gnawed the very bones.

Finally, reduced to the greatest extremity,
and having been a week at sea, they deter-
mined once more to land. They approached
the shore, and, borne along by the surf, were
carried high upon the beach.

The shore was formed of lofty, perpendic-



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 93

ular rocks, at the bottom of which, was a nar-
row beach. Upon this, as night approached,
they laid themselves down to rest.

Weary with exertion, and wasted with anx-
iety, they slept soundly till morning. They
awoke very much refreshed. They then
clambered over the rocks, and travelled to-
wards the east.

The sufferings of the wanderers were now
very great. I cannot undertake to tell you
all that happened to them. Perhaps you will ~
sometime read the whole story in Captain Ri-
ley’s book. I can only tell you now, that af-
ter travelling awhile, they reached the bor-
ders of the great desert.

Here they met with one of those wandering
tribes of Arabs, who roam over the desert,
with their camels and flocks, living by pastur-
age, and plundering all who come in their way.

These Arabs seized Captain Riley and his
men, stripped them of their clothes, and re-



94 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

duced them to a state of slavery. ‘They then
divided them among themselvese

Ne
No

Ly
¢

i

4
=
ss

imei

WN)



The Arabs soon moved to the eastward, and
proceeded to the interior of the desert. Cap-
tain Riley and his companions were placed
on camels, but being destitute of clothing,and
the heat being excessive, they suffered ex-
ceedingly.

Besides, they had no food but camels’ milk,
and hardly enough of this to sustain life.
Their lips were also parched with thirst, and



PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRIVA. 95

such were their torments, that they wished to
die, to be relieved from their misery.

At length Captain Riley and four of his
men, were bought by two Arab merchants,
who were met with upon the desert. These
merchants set out for Morocco, intending to
sell them there.

In this journey, the poor captives endured
the greatest misery, from hunger, thirst, and
fatigue. ‘They had a great variety of adven-
tures, and were once attacked by robbers.

But at length they reached Morocco. Here
they found an English gentleman, who paid
their ransom and treated them with great
kindness.

Emaciated with fatigue and privations, re-
duced to mere skeletons, by every species of
suffering, they now met with kindness and



Where was Capfain Riley carried to by the Arabs? Im what direc-
tion is Morocco from Cape Blanco? Will you relate some of Captain
ley’s adventures and sufferings, in crossing the desert?



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MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-11-16T09:29:06-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-11-16T09:22:03-05:00'
redup
'1228978' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCA' 'sip-files00000cover1.jp2'
540a404870f72b19c4bc45461d9c9142
0c6a97820d43f3cbe7f02ec264a51d3306ab5c5a
'2011-11-16T09:29:56-05:00'
describe
'140603' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCB' 'sip-files00000cover1.jpg'
19212281de98b526b055a0cf763a72a1
c04252c6c5e3ac03a24448043951a0e2b5128540
'2011-11-16T09:22:40-05:00'
describe
'221' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCC' 'sip-files00000cover1.pro'
a19b297b24fdbbec015c224c5c49f9db
ddaf46c91815a284fc36b81e781815ca8aa38e35
'2011-11-16T09:22:59-05:00'
describe
'29110' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCD' 'sip-files00000cover1.QC.jpg'
0b3cc9a4f1b72719247ce91c435322af
a4c999e55a13ab5eb0cbe8846708e3c5dc6e5d56
'2011-11-16T09:23:45-05:00'
describe
'29498678' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCE' 'sip-files00000cover1.tif'
30246940c4c1afddeaf746c8ac8a901a
695962071382323f9f10ac40b4195d54a64dc517
'2011-11-16T09:28:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCF' 'sip-files00000cover1.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-11-16T09:23:44-05:00'
describe
'6639' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCG' 'sip-files00000cover1thm.jpg'
c3a7cece2dc7932a2da2b4e1c9fffd18
49aee8672d53245fe5504284b13039892f669c16
'2011-11-16T09:22:10-05:00'
describe
'1252156' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCH' 'sip-files00000cover2.jp2'
4fa532829e446d736d76f6d066c876b3
b58623a7d736a249d843792570a901320c2182e2
'2011-11-16T09:22:51-05:00'
describe
'48998' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCI' 'sip-files00000cover2.jpg'
dd4b5c96320d1f263af3be6ea28a3974
7defede8875d92e13a97d37ed6a16545bfeb55d1
'2011-11-16T09:25:46-05:00'
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00000cover2.pro'
8bd732ca1bddf300c4160d1348e048e2
754767af2cd24f11f009106977ecb08a84ef9b1a
'2011-11-16T09:28:42-05:00'
describe
'13168' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCK' 'sip-files00000cover2.QC.jpg'
09909e098e2f057a3a001a3c17d36d1f
83849ab525c35ab2fb71ae34e6bb06f3c3817edb
'2011-11-16T09:26:32-05:00'
describe
'30053270' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCL' 'sip-files00000cover2.tif'
3e27291b178a090fdb88138a3929eac0
0649fd377a64b238d7b94dbd98d7275511e9cf1b
'2011-11-16T09:22:53-05:00'
describe
'135' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCM' 'sip-files00000cover2.txt'
f74c53b918c0f4de5457403501f1ae19
0417f8c867d62f41f1e224089aaf0805087d6999
'2011-11-16T09:29:39-05:00'
describe
'3965' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCN' 'sip-files00000cover2thm.jpg'
ddedbb804a4ca48aa00ec4685a9672d8
112f5f240c4b3ed57b55327280d9ad79d8dd5fe2
'2011-11-16T09:23:56-05:00'
describe
'503388' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCO' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
0bda6b15ecd93a732710e7c08bf94394
74a1a3db819c58644940fca1c9ca93495fe43d5c
'2011-11-16T09:25:55-05:00'
describe
'11829' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCP' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
dc023912f7f777bf3f17880d92407e47
8f745a46dfd208920b42fb773a7eb625f982d56b
'2011-11-16T09:26:56-05:00'
describe
'282' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00001.pro'
1eaad170e921fef6139f747c168e2b76
1e16553a3e5de51a1704baa4140b8fc52ccffd65
'2011-11-16T09:24:12-05:00'
describe
'3480' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCR' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
e243e2e3ad294aaa5d0ec57187116c71
d7cb241d9bc76132af7fe50c4af87e67de8426ca
'2011-11-16T09:24:01-05:00'
describe
'7976461' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCS' 'sip-files00001.tif'
070c11ac0797a8de59239825124f85c0
7e8ac28ef70415f508d3b9fc300e5f452ed4c316
'2011-11-16T09:25:17-05:00'
describe
'208' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCT' 'sip-files00001.txt'
c5bacd208f53c7facea2dc900129ea4a
88c2cecc0067a67324a69404f54c2a76e5dd94c5
'2011-11-16T09:28:06-05:00'
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCU' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
2ff937a9b82594ff78ed990bbdd7c8c2
563dbf34ac2bf8dbe0303fd8e45d4b62a7ef6aee
'2011-11-16T09:27:30-05:00'
describe
'691674' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCV' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
a24947956025706cf55a19bc38847ad0
dfe983ae072611440ff63dbc727569deeeba190b
'2011-11-16T09:24:59-05:00'
describe
'30067' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCW' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
fe854d192af0ce9a5cbd12a1f5f0279f
4aa2b49326fa7d322e1f08186ede9fd3116f6ecf
'2011-11-16T09:26:10-05:00'
describe
'3335' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCX' 'sip-files00002.pro'
45d4e81ed6250df84057cd9c4e19a9ce
ffd60582e0631cd44c359b94ae31d9b71a03740a
'2011-11-16T09:29:18-05:00'
describe
'10375' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCY' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
c4e660b98de8068c494d9324a41329c8
0431843ff0a0f2c5c65759f081d62a3f8bfc4f90
'2011-11-16T09:24:56-05:00'
describe
'8042255' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00002.tif'
93a31384c67f5e2d0cfb8904f835fc6a
577c8ebc786134f0c8b314a02f24cb1a538b02ad
'2011-11-16T09:25:50-05:00'
describe
'237' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDA' 'sip-files00002.txt'
cd1f45e95ca1441c57a5f6026c3e4f37
b8802ed0682af9355690534ed5603a57bef559bc
'2011-11-16T09:25:43-05:00'
describe
'3315' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDB' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
c152e85ba878a4ddfb500d2fd899be6f
c18ec8ca4c064d6325afd1e011ce9943d7d62039
'2011-11-16T09:27:25-05:00'
describe
'875236' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDC' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
9c579939238e91527129f6afdb5dd5c0
74957acfefb999829bbb5daf6d0a6470e583a829
'2011-11-16T09:22:21-05:00'
describe
'56796' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDD' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
a2e9424221e238bceab175c21677d9f2
4edf507469bbfdd3524842f228be1f48ea0cf8fb
'2011-11-16T09:29:59-05:00'
describe
'27365' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDE' 'sip-files00003.pro'
784e159a95c257ff150cce3b0f2cb99b
fb8c3a8039e73d1b9fe6ae8dfcb8af2ee39edf47
describe
'17928' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDF' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
33ec5f0adac7aa2ca75b5cb21ed9c580
b9b90a88894ed619ced2540ae50476defd9ef2e7
'2011-11-16T09:24:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDG' 'sip-files00003.tif'
ca96ccdcf44cc1e02edda72f073f1384
925ffd648034ed243bbef9e39d18cbdfbeb32083
'2011-11-16T09:26:45-05:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDH' 'sip-files00003.txt'
b58aa6d91ee97284f195eb89b935db8d
78fe298a361c13e8fb6b24b3967262cf2614b632
'2011-11-16T09:28:16-05:00'
describe
'4809' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDI' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
7516adc8108051c8a22b2f063bdce563
130309981543b14462df51c0d5cf8484f8758987
'2011-11-16T09:23:25-05:00'
describe
'1004207' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
36d61cacd844f9659f3e35c0152cfac0
7c5bae6ac259ec2658954b904025a113db2bede0
'2011-11-16T09:26:48-05:00'
describe
'71385' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDK' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
a27eeded2acb2af2e4ba1c0f6ac8180e
8fef1b2093431bcdbb6e8641ab2bfbdf9162e142
'2011-11-16T09:25:44-05:00'
describe
'28681' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDL' 'sip-files00004.pro'
d476fd6af3e394a6249d8a2bee530f22
2d3fef3798adaa55b1f047de784fa32bff35a269
'2011-11-16T09:26:50-05:00'
describe
'26160' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDM' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
2c753fbf4af82fddc5740e1ee50f7393
e037185498a6fd8ccac5f022feeedaa3bf759ad2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDN' 'sip-files00004.tif'
95b2e0e6b273c4ca0aa33d06f9d5bcd2
a85c6dd627d74d22146b5c5b09a348221cebb192
'2011-11-16T09:26:31-05:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDO' 'sip-files00004.txt'
b388c19bee094252ac076d0662d8e262
9ced55e0716f978e95f256c5a331c65da3153e43
'2011-11-16T09:23:37-05:00'
describe
'7061' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDP' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
eaf62e7d743111103dcbe7058a1cc88c
a79a54566c71d4263cf5ba517b56ebe92d12d558
'2011-11-16T09:23:54-05:00'
describe
'995919' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
e0ade1a0c461e5f74eb09e08f514e8f3
fc257721791833f6da3eaff38950b0acacfc1933
'2011-11-16T09:29:53-05:00'
describe
'88688' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDR' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
0859a507a9e1835895ed1168d2e0eeb3
1b7c7f6bf368b392a4eed36f1624d7996702c387
'2011-11-16T09:29:33-05:00'
describe
'43443' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDS' 'sip-files00005.pro'
2060f9d209df41d6b45bf9b710c8d59d
42342fb28669235c1ecacd5782d6978321e732a6
'2011-11-16T09:22:08-05:00'
describe
'28883' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDT' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
20e20f5a28f143554869df3da14aba01
aa46234f0d9b2ae2f2d1853252fa8853a5a22403
'2011-11-16T09:22:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDU' 'sip-files00005.tif'
618220d080ecf92b504235c6ca230153
b3bb643bcdd1e48879002e869c515cc230d464ae
'2011-11-16T09:27:38-05:00'
describe
'1921' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDV' 'sip-files00005.txt'
1a1025d9fe976d4174575bbb72ccd258
3baeaf5913adb1ccff7db2e1141b7d5308d1f2ea
'2011-11-16T09:29:23-05:00'
describe
'7547' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDW' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
5a198bd77d558c0e1c0c413ec6714429
fc17132cc16dc128ecaa5808e3b157dcd8f34e5d
'2011-11-16T09:26:00-05:00'
describe
'1004192' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDX' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
02bd8b03554d208a7ce36230f636ce94
b10b1bb090e65aa9e4f89290711b9d4ab4d151bf
'2011-11-16T09:26:02-05:00'
describe
'73070' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDY' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
e4c9db31ca5294af9c09c51795577dfe
318aa31cacf417029ccf41527403f0cafe895810
'2011-11-16T09:27:44-05:00'
describe
'16536' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00006.pro'
f61679d1bb166f31e5d7e7a722ab3466
40a8db4cc9c081db5778b9d5ccac1ef52f38fb96
'2011-11-16T09:29:40-05:00'
describe
'25696' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEA' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
b7197164aff56036700edf9627206e99
dfdaa35235f84112aed49e9f52ad5632f98cdfa9
'2011-11-16T09:29:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEB' 'sip-files00006.tif'
9c465458be62afa7c35737c9ab60bfeb
a63196511f9f3491b9281d656e34625d91d0e685
'2011-11-16T09:27:35-05:00'
describe
'759' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEC' 'sip-files00006.txt'
905d1d786e1f0823d49e3835c9834631
8d431106c9a88ae79db393df83b9dd84a1726f54
'2011-11-16T09:23:14-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'7461' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALED' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
e6f4c49e1c5e380dd38396199cb2b90b
2ae4217844097d883c616c575c3283737df797c7
'2011-11-16T09:22:32-05:00'
describe
'996034' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEE' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
ee72cf25e9e72e55ba072b7af69c1826
e08dc943694bec82b66ce839c1b186dc14c8c15f
'2011-11-16T09:23:36-05:00'
describe
'88729' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEF' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
208c3ca0e95f18b76bfdfd3210b4bc81
db7d445591bded873ae38d4fd2ac08242891ccbb
'2011-11-16T09:27:23-05:00'
describe
'23972' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEG' 'sip-files00007.pro'
892ec3a22ced9d59a2916f27fab7aeb0
ec6df4a5c89876511a3303fdb0b1d138b5ef2e8d
'2011-11-16T09:25:51-05:00'
describe
'31238' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEH' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
6626ebaea27ad5512814056ff143c430
cf38883eca883bdb650e342b0591258d9e5331f5
'2011-11-16T09:24:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEI' 'sip-files00007.tif'
f50d57de7b1d1d8a77eade924b2e2c34
b12a54d281a73dacc1c47621fc08583c4b5ea59d
'2011-11-16T09:29:32-05:00'
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
71f0a537050e88b6dfb07b735c5261c4
e39323e1ab384085f5c92c565af1e5dcd8dd8e14
'2011-11-16T09:22:07-05:00'
describe
'9088' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEK' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
c8ca5c6165d062c0136583c494e2b54d
79377537e20902b6edbed19f82dc051d908b3c0f
'2011-11-16T09:29:48-05:00'
describe
'1003906' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEL' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
78e930eab6e369bc59ed84d83c292a1d
e345db2ff5a1f47360e3c7e84eb675d12a2da526
'2011-11-16T09:25:25-05:00'
describe
'88684' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEM' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
1b8f1d4ac31915b54b35a25996297560
190786792f96ffdc14c113bad6fb82702284ef5e
'2011-11-16T09:28:37-05:00'
describe
'13537' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEN' 'sip-files00008.pro'
bbc5eaa0fe5c1dee9e4be13b2de2eb1f
c96920baa0fdbf9d65d8e478aab51c855a475e8b
'2011-11-16T09:25:56-05:00'
describe
'28617' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEO' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
8d390b1a6e6e9d0f95d3655479344f8a
24bdb69fcad14ca75ab5bf1b4b4fe34e46cc07dd
'2011-11-16T09:23:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEP' 'sip-files00008.tif'
7669d7d692c86ca5874afd29dd59efb7
e8978a40645fa744a8462c2012367e60ce17f309
'2011-11-16T09:23:15-05:00'
describe
'601' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
1d15901adde94765f9a23b35eacc9188
4efa527a660d3ac7fbb1ce9e1149c6e71c81db6e
'2011-11-16T09:22:56-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8039' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALER' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
b0633764ae581eace8b256637b3e84bc
0bdf7513a378be50a5cb3bcbfe39bf16091b0529
'2011-11-16T09:29:02-05:00'
describe
'995948' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALES' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
f29b14f408315fac53b3882a4ed1e0eb
9e69947029f03e70557e6f92d8462e59ac22cf0d
'2011-11-16T09:23:40-05:00'
describe
'90948' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALET' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
7f62d4ef1dc19d2d7c63aa9fe843a863
0ac20e858203a05f9814ee6af2d26d4af964f851
'2011-11-16T09:28:27-05:00'
describe
'13700' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEU' 'sip-files00009.pro'
dddc99a5b36ab24b0f297417d6783d91
139c29f240c72ec7d721ac1da92dab0d1342b2fd
describe
'29446' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEV' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
f11170b7625247d7143e77cca7cbae73
c69ad53c1c79f1163ffba7c48a7d993ac70dc95e
'2011-11-16T09:23:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEW' 'sip-files00009.tif'
1c0c275b01c8e97dc9c12e553938d44b
9e75e5fea3faaf92e1dbc3457c2ec08284237bf5
'2011-11-16T09:23:49-05:00'
describe
'587' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEX' 'sip-files00009.txt'
47c41fff115dd29abbb3e6f02975647a
caaef04308659a2ff05d5f6bac678dda132141eb
'2011-11-16T09:29:54-05:00'
describe
'8310' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEY' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
61c744446d71d333a64787a5132c7620
af43dfa670947b54f97965d5306430ae7bb721bd
'2011-11-16T09:27:15-05:00'
describe
'1004228' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
3e83848ce073bdcffec51dc7baaa5892
3bb3c6ae90d49e922380ca68f71632023ed03f13
'2011-11-16T09:27:36-05:00'
describe
'91685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFA' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
6946f64ba76d6120b562a23c059c6638
2af2134723166049ee060472b239a640dc2c0ae7
'2011-11-16T09:27:21-05:00'
describe
'23546' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFB' 'sip-files00010.pro'
c36ae49d088b6ea0c8ddb178baa93dda
156e9c3934a2c63ab958b17f58deec9ff9471be1
describe
'33451' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFC' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
32ee332e5c82eedb8cf89b2fd0c7de35
99804c5b7fa33cc293b040bacd1269bf639b318d
'2011-11-16T09:27:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFD' 'sip-files00010.tif'
61a1120b1694a46351834cda156418d1
1d20b51624e8ff297dd9af60ceecea4b896a36d4
'2011-11-16T09:22:20-05:00'
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFE' 'sip-files00010.txt'
65e24bb7528ce1c847cd608506401fec
7c3e0e93e1ad1201f8914ffcfcf75666853d8cc8
'2011-11-16T09:23:00-05:00'
describe
'9313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFF' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
b3fdff1abdc099bdbbb1deda4c699aeb
2e966d79bb40fa9fd1355dae876738ee0eef8807
'2011-11-16T09:27:14-05:00'
describe
'996033' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFG' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
891a2f3691444f0790448b5cbf7e0b32
90218423fcb7b4a2ae471c10a0db7e1c192548f0
'2011-11-16T09:23:27-05:00'
describe
'87488' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFH' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
20568c4dcc8f11b85045229b3a80a572
894c8c8cb5a9d57cf0ff9077312dd4e4b9073cd0
'2011-11-16T09:23:42-05:00'
describe
'22874' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFI' 'sip-files00011.pro'
2a474c747d80be4cdf63ce1a863e72f7
e9155f7109253dc9ad59975dcbbdb1fd8cb3bc40
'2011-11-16T09:29:13-05:00'
describe
'32710' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
6a59cfc342afff662b5a44c11f64afbe
99b5ccf02b77e9aa1a20ef8d7e7ffb37579b53c1
'2011-11-16T09:25:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFK' 'sip-files00011.tif'
c10abbaf130895ecebd2c640a976d671
c27795bf0fa108d6e5177145d121b90c442b0272
'2011-11-16T09:28:21-05:00'
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFL' 'sip-files00011.txt'
937c12c030705ba08d686798fa137ffc
eeacd3ba76979c61a8eaa6797ac6313b63a91082
describe
'9109' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFM' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
35e98a46949a35915ad33f6a7e52f593
3c62d2d8237514c39f5408f174303fdffb06df2a
'2011-11-16T09:25:23-05:00'
describe
'1004230' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFN' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
bb4dda341c303d2d44979c20805328e6
10e508e38cfce3c331d69ed5688b951303680dc4
'2011-11-16T09:27:54-05:00'
describe
'92337' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
dd0b45e5cbb8d0b79b236a82bb9670bc
cc98b45f115345d353254c0a6cd3dba36d214ae3
'2011-11-16T09:24:06-05:00'
describe
'23460' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFP' 'sip-files00012.pro'
e7d19d4c0d14e170302052683ce649c2
cc11aa8e9b7f4c913310002197b2aafa32eb15dc
'2011-11-16T09:23:26-05:00'
describe
'33525' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
5b2403afb0b7cc12d050582136137c73
df8c9645572c12aa265e54c24b1f1e24870345af
'2011-11-16T09:26:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
569217e7c7582268ec3a14f06d88d18a
78ba7b6bd37f88d448242060e9dcf84b3a8254cb
'2011-11-16T09:24:40-05:00'
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFS' 'sip-files00012.txt'
8b74dd6cc13709d4bdfd4d69ab98a73c
aa758ee135875faf8cfd1cc119af0cc1df92d5da
'2011-11-16T09:24:08-05:00'
describe
'9331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFT' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
e56b4821188eb573a1ef83496dc14863
0e3c86ad0b568031e74d9f65e580a6439d3697b4
'2011-11-16T09:24:34-05:00'
describe
'995874' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
0c355696e2b623661014a232e2980b8a
e6daa10c0fa725aa650ed0b1d900d3b13c07bcff
'2011-11-16T09:24:02-05:00'
describe
'86900' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFV' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
2d7a0382871c1733fa2853f725f93252
ba8502422fef5563175643ecc316a6c109044d52
'2011-11-16T09:23:52-05:00'
describe
'19958' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
6e1cb0493116c8fd16ecba995ea8f639
75632505666965084997ee37fed578ca016385e1
describe
'30939' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
61c533b412aa4310fea9a782f083fa4f
7988c0e9187facf23a2894a40eb554ca573522ae
'2011-11-16T09:29:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFY' 'sip-files00013.tif'
4c3a6c6c29863608fd8a8a4d1f5c4580
eacb64dd556d889aed1a96fa4b47b08f5625f8e6
'2011-11-16T09:24:47-05:00'
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
39662e002e54627c4578a388a0615102
b1318112edd73de9c6b4fbc66d125d0923510ce0
'2011-11-16T09:28:29-05:00'
describe
'8760' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGA' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
7b09bebb5614ee48695c264bf56e37a4
5ccb9a0cf7618b7c41d5825815ee2ed710394fa1
describe
'1004098' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGB' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
34cc7417f1fb47ccd4b238bcaeaa656f
9c31f710d10f6ff7d74b64afc32a682109bd198f
'2011-11-16T09:25:35-05:00'
describe
'88812' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
8fcb4935d3cc5b58e9ad896b2158e1d1
ca4d769c288d48d9a2e1c473bf73e09c202b6c2c
'2011-11-16T09:29:09-05:00'
describe
'18751' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGD' 'sip-files00014.pro'
1f3d45b64a68feef1578fe9da82d86a6
bc6ce9acf9df88a3470a9a11298e6fd774deb790
'2011-11-16T09:23:01-05:00'
describe
'30983' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGE' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
5d1109fae32b149ce36ebd78af690473
e74a8888fc7b194974b474a9c8b42ca5a23f3dbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGF' 'sip-files00014.tif'
19728e3448b7e9304ed55fd9d776eed7
8f1dbf9ece4d8937bf62fef4b80c542e6ae05ac3
'2011-11-16T09:28:10-05:00'
describe
'797' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGG' 'sip-files00014.txt'
61547198c7dbd6617b08871fd00b12d4
ea1471cb8064690bb8b903ea713e6e74f977b433
describe
'8866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGH' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
bae84ec1f5120c107fc71a465d8d14b1
d9c42e91d9a28f9d62ffacd65ab0f2e42e94a3fe
describe
'995939' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGI' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
6eeb516e20ae7934f96a07778b46bb24
c3d7933ed215684365031f8a7b0a7624f62e01e4
'2011-11-16T09:25:59-05:00'
describe
'93028' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
de066de15f42d0f5282a27c2b23c72fd
08d948c362fe62ea710d56092add40ccac8aff64
'2011-11-16T09:28:52-05:00'
describe
'13485' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
af7e4df6bca6012f2cfbc9c53a3f0cac
f8e8ca1d19968f32e20d9c661758b9dfa483de94
describe
'31441' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGL' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f72347fba2c21bbe304dca02275d36e1
60d5d6a15ab687820be01cb96d4442f1d286bd69
'2011-11-16T09:29:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGM' 'sip-files00015.tif'
e6f898a97d16ace33a5eaaa755a2ec52
85dfcdad8959f6651200397d30763142769b0b3f
'2011-11-16T09:22:13-05:00'
describe
'541' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGN' 'sip-files00015.txt'
caf682dc1fb916f48061bf12162a966b
bef466e150cd04bb391af86a0f1d699a7dceb223
'2011-11-16T09:28:38-05:00'
describe
'8398' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGO' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
1d755fbab674f6af1a68ac2d6b47640e
cad3e1fda59d7fc1a313dd810eb10c204a64814c
describe
'1004019' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGP' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
d0dfdaa6f6954c45f1cd66f095399b65
2405ac51bf5ba02b68734ebf25f4dd1cad5b782d
'2011-11-16T09:23:46-05:00'
describe
'89462' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
459d27051672afae4a4c43b312f5a695
4f5314e6a3be8c045ee0931400f0ec8ef280ad56
'2011-11-16T09:29:38-05:00'
describe
'21986' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGR' 'sip-files00016.pro'
0ffc1beff451cd0dd5076c383e7975c5
885071482ec8cdf077ab07be210921e171a91159
'2011-11-16T09:22:49-05:00'
describe
'30804' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGS' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
bee5ab0ead272f52d7222c213489ed5b
e94484135a6fe3d4988e6af12c8b42de64d7c87c
'2011-11-16T09:24:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGT' 'sip-files00016.tif'
3d14bff10a9cbcefd9683d3fdc985ae0
23641950da8ccb5bf7706830344821e6d5e96658
'2011-11-16T09:25:32-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGU' 'sip-files00016.txt'
a792c68d155b16e8c3f4de6f70ebc74d
17a91826f915c85e96dbc6df7f0bd4774206f28b
'2011-11-16T09:25:42-05:00'
describe
'9225' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGV' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
707c3ad1e6bc79299bda60e2d445c84c
19509ac2ba8c387aca3bcc1e83ae95ac66ee197a
describe
'996016' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGW' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
03ca1f657464e68245c2e436393c973e
3e602ab6dd791121d8eb0e93d105b943e545af45
'2011-11-16T09:24:07-05:00'
describe
'88806' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGX' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
9fd1ddc644e1b353341f11cae5b56e7f
1bb36531ebb4c263a81768ee0186654d11ebc3e7
'2011-11-16T09:24:55-05:00'
describe
'22982' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGY' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e30b8a17bd6a26dc95221e331cb60d61
1a82941aa4236d433e10185db6c9f6bad9006a28
'2011-11-16T09:26:59-05:00'
describe
'33988' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
cbd81557ebf0458e1896417182a32e9f
98c90f23990d4d716267adabf30c9f138566da1a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHA' 'sip-files00017.tif'
5018806a41e348a8c362ba6cd09d7ae6
f71732c3f9cc1545a31f5c57bb2e6916efd7c2ff
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHB' 'sip-files00017.txt'
f3c01abfb51c6d2ab9306f96ffdcee75
0f102bb00a38f47ecb52ebccf5d1af7cded7c02a
describe
'9156' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHC' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
a3fe9a594d35025e4beef3e6b07fbbfe
a94c1b8bb69e63e358b30153c42ffbefd5a37fde
'2011-11-16T09:22:11-05:00'
describe
'1004206' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHD' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
0ec9fbedb2e2e2a141137d5800f1abd6
71b5242b864c25e36c2fa54c2ececa0775066a0c
describe
'81962' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
9b314d6aa33c8728d33786bff8e17f2c
43c0cce4a3a94a3ad7cb8d4a68b877ea137b88e1
'2011-11-16T09:29:29-05:00'
describe
'21228' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHF' 'sip-files00018.pro'
17d1fe598127031f2945443efd1302d2
4717fb83a9c2b4415e8413f135f26bf5c0c181c1
describe
'30155' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHG' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
5627a75257933ae18e27dcf82075b675
349f597e78708aba4e087e2c6893ec0e1473f1cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
4de54b57e128dc5250b8a729903b45e6
4259fd7b05bd41eadc5a9b41fbed96ab80a33bdb
'2011-11-16T09:29:52-05:00'
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHI' 'sip-files00018.txt'
4c4c062a70b6a13666845fe68ba78749
6ab6f5ade2075b00f76eb953038d36e6f3490476
'2011-11-16T09:29:19-05:00'
describe
'8509' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
6079a4f83ba5536cf05ecc6ab0f42705
a14733ed5658c9a1b15be7d59f829eab434ff835
'2011-11-16T09:23:33-05:00'
describe
'995958' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
f736fdbb879b3c57d0b8d48d3aa0eb56
efa81624fa84b19ebf5d35ee7fa095a6a4fb4742
describe
'83833' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHL' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
c31fa8c84e947a6f6737c9b7006e6c4c
004fe2dcb483c8b305037fdc27222721ba0627bf
'2011-11-16T09:23:21-05:00'
describe
'24790' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHM' 'sip-files00019.pro'
3e9e90a129f14dcd1f7baf7e08f2e849
17982cfc65e20f4472630ee36419518a85556de6
describe
'32635' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHN' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
47c3e68d17712bf5f703e676df268aab
508819ee23bb520643b76410b4770a407676bcac
'2011-11-16T09:25:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c8cff6eb45c007cac4266c122c5d8dce
b80f2dc703492c79f51e2d1344f4ddbd68ed1268
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHP' 'sip-files00019.txt'
a97a75b42a02964bbb30e253a4b2028d
9c550b164d84f3092ef133f58ead8d5957e233e5
'2011-11-16T09:25:38-05:00'
describe
'8823' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
263386e1ab6f35a360c2936dc5d2512c
2de0767a2e424911f6bcb5d74038b414bf5a5329
describe
'1004242' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHR' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
18348f9fcb5d213b4f7f1eb696cfed05
464a2aa440367302b42aff9af968ed2d9ba75799
describe
'87171' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHS' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
ffc97e262ae10381f56d19331ecf2c5f
3af7c7b81660a421eb449714f6af2fc3661ec6b7
'2011-11-16T09:27:19-05:00'
describe
'24391' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHT' 'sip-files00020.pro'
cd6b22ff2f93205a1d0b249b99bd4192
531b0fd294a304f6bcf31e62eb3a001d78847ce0
'2011-11-16T09:28:13-05:00'
describe
'31175' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHU' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
d1642a919e9dfbeb651c12baf9114295
c41ac050538a9294555c79bb3a59d0636155eaff
'2011-11-16T09:27:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHV' 'sip-files00020.tif'
a318989630c0f6ad493f26d88b1b9364
7f93a56a84ff7944465d8e3c8518b7ba0de40a3e
'2011-11-16T09:22:41-05:00'
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHW' 'sip-files00020.txt'
dd3f8187a2f5bec976626cff810b61e7
9d121810801b6743d45cacc1b29ded20083be3bc
'2011-11-16T09:23:32-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9171' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHX' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
9483e3a2c6aca7df98734819695fbe7b
3bb7c97e866cece720e6a6de2d17f2255be4c4a9
'2011-11-16T09:29:44-05:00'
describe
'996024' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHY' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
2eea93bb8365ea0b8d9dfb2afddd0600
ee52edf5732769a87c646341764945ceb3acf83f
'2011-11-16T09:27:18-05:00'
describe
'87403' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
6b349a2075b45992bcbdcac1fe6a0b81
f63208dfcc4961bf1bfc614732dfc04c43648f0c
describe
'23402' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIA' 'sip-files00021.pro'
ebb18361d4f47820e7faf81bf596cd2d
a5051ea6363e98516a7a42b30a8a916dd974e7e4
'2011-11-16T09:27:22-05:00'
describe
'34396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIB' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
11853f9ea301ea9b9994fef612858415
dd055a7318de2ef0c285753c9e2ae039b9d7c221
'2011-11-16T09:29:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIC' 'sip-files00021.tif'
733f94c56252a51f08d5bac16a8682af
9f54f8812b54cba474e55fc71027c725dae84aaa
'2011-11-16T09:26:53-05:00'
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALID' 'sip-files00021.txt'
d7b6c788e5228f4a918ce2e160ea9bef
24d57a92564850e44b2bf4043134574e891d8c6e
'2011-11-16T09:29:36-05:00'
describe
'9080' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIE' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
4f6d840cf7dd8be85fee2dbe65eafa42
9c5bd2397e176d93b1606e11e781f739e205ce4e
'2011-11-16T09:24:22-05:00'
describe
'1004214' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIF' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
2df4ee3069dee9cb762fd606b9592d84
4a1902437bbfc476c4e4fcf08cc3e5835c8ff3a7
'2011-11-16T09:28:56-05:00'
describe
'84928' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIG' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
a85e2d137459ce764379dc8cad26efcf
a57940444c5b43697ee05da09d9f5adfe5329933
'2011-11-16T09:26:04-05:00'
describe
'12377' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIH' 'sip-files00022.pro'
00a795734aa8716dd222ac72d98c7e33
e3f93241f654abf9a20f1ad1f86bb439d15750f8
'2011-11-16T09:25:31-05:00'
describe
'27773' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALII' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
54387851b7e56e794320621dc8772ed5
60b496fc1ba77842b9d3f1803b3c8c0735f8d4e6
'2011-11-16T09:22:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
17951e6a1432f5c9c31b266f0c591018
6543704e60a53083f7b14197fd899e1c06a27f12
describe
'497' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIK' 'sip-files00022.txt'
45b2f63dce852e05ce8cfacbc988cc41
4e017591c451ddbb6f59cf7c652f315b3ad14b9b
'2011-11-16T09:29:51-05:00'
describe
'7895' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIL' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
06d83f17c2e213b2e4cc7193cce6291d
dfa8a0db4d67d4f4345c208f88e30dac3e9c6050
describe
'996030' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIM' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
4f31a6e7709d3407923fe2b88dbbd8ae
1444ce3f4cf74152d5101056f55beb0ee84570ec
'2011-11-16T09:22:57-05:00'
describe
'86183' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIN' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
34c624d9afef7af58660242ddd2d1e2e
ecacd1f80810c795ca17a835bb6eda56686cc664
'2011-11-16T09:26:23-05:00'
describe
'23079' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIO' 'sip-files00023.pro'
f339a8841554ae45ad9212fbdb6a815a
15c654f3c9fa5855135849a259774738a9afe505
describe
'31148' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
0c2116bf4d7b41c2dda0aeb918015a72
d7aa5bdbf565038faea4a5058a8fe2428dc306a9
'2011-11-16T09:26:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
9ef0d5e00683ca1e6e6e341956cd8006
80ea7a1d85fe1fb3ef07ab8e84b10bd3582fa091
'2011-11-16T09:29:22-05:00'
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIR' 'sip-files00023.txt'
7772a58b9f5262da50969fa8b2a91abd
8df0aceca2fba9691fa7d3ed7b7797944406b203
'2011-11-16T09:23:06-05:00'
describe
'8964' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIS' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
b041f14cb45847729d83b800bf762542
dfeb15c0901bf8a6b299a4a15a40fd5d0fb4a988
describe
'1004243' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIT' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
db7eb9355da9326ed313997a941ca18f
2a0d3205b5e0e749addc5760f631b280886c0619
describe
'92431' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIU' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
4873b5ee6d239ecfa74da6d24ec018e2
f18943d3721a6957ceed10ebc7907ae627e00989
'2011-11-16T09:24:03-05:00'
describe
'24385' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
8257cde5854ebafa094b948a1af7e827
129bd01cde7163365ddfecc08a05b308c661b7e3
'2011-11-16T09:24:26-05:00'
describe
'34594' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
2e2edf6a5c4ddf9e8463dabdf0df5077
2c32fec71cdb2a3d0ccdd7c69f917f693de3ad5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIX' 'sip-files00024.tif'
b52b3f9aa98b3f9af69cec9101a5460f
cb9db79e33850f3ee0b91841a611515db7a079c2
'2011-11-16T09:23:47-05:00'
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIY' 'sip-files00024.txt'
a8508d3b5a53cdb497fae23321df23c9
54537b88c478d0fd5eab54969f592f1a6e64ccec
'2011-11-16T09:27:33-05:00'
describe
'9746' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
604eff85c5c52d1e9f16b43cff50fd8e
cadded2a2626e4e399e2a1ebfc6e4f82bc414297
'2011-11-16T09:28:26-05:00'
describe
'996027' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJA' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
afa09756ce9b41ba4c0c7c8388d7c7e6
d6d34a2c0eaa8fe72f8413a99ef078fbd9a0ed5c
'2011-11-16T09:28:45-05:00'
describe
'84308' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
4f933fa6959406c4fa15bb2d14f67415
5d0cb9edd4d8599c0c79c4db4471930d65869dad
'2011-11-16T09:28:11-05:00'
describe
'22305' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJC' 'sip-files00025.pro'
fa3a720b471be62038fb39e50d84ad75
d0c257384c72f449e588b6fb4766ec4f83cd3bab
describe
'31784' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJD' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
77ec59fae28dd2855a984e637586503a
18f5c8c89caaa67657f0680966d67a48609b3930
'2011-11-16T09:22:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJE' 'sip-files00025.tif'
596c80d9abec0e720e152f19b98d10b6
180b12682df9437e36421ec5170272f1b7e3b5cc
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJF' 'sip-files00025.txt'
8d36c54162f81aaa943d6dd37df6d425
7680780eda1184aaef97736e10b227b984f0aed4
describe
'9011' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJG' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
b174816106504fe95633dc6d984e7e16
1b24d60d2fc1f0779392ea3d2b7da2128016f890
describe
'1004241' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d8c238c35f5308fd69943923757a5bb8
8024d97f7aefaef794d85e545e768f4b67d4db40
describe
'83235' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJI' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8946dd5285f8b8d392e6c7a6ba16277f
5b870f3948f0cb6db319d429d594e6bb670d3f11
describe
'21362' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
a88644745210d682b4203d07182a90a7
281781aaf322d2659e5cde529418c06896eb33ed
'2011-11-16T09:24:11-05:00'
describe
'31126' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJK' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
4cbd778f8f8d3bb72476ca3921b4aa34
08bfaba5de50bc78f2725415957418676759d994
'2011-11-16T09:25:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJL' 'sip-files00026.tif'
290dd50c2464911f00b077e4273a9309
032a35664a7afa80f1648cb2cd02615e982ec6c5
'2011-11-16T09:23:30-05:00'
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJM' 'sip-files00026.txt'
03f909d3cbb215056531d40b518b57b3
04f5226dcd2655f8a444656094105fb391eccbdd
describe
'9028' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJN' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
e7ca85ee930dad4aacbb79771d912ea0
162a3d0a7e768212791759b67568c6f4011a17ee
'2011-11-16T09:25:28-05:00'
describe
'993993' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJO' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
44aa404dfa87f57127b942972aa5d2f4
b15cd6b4d32c1dec9cc065086c08979777f102ae
'2011-11-16T09:23:13-05:00'
describe
'67664' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJP' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
8ac3a6d1672bd4d67f033ece884dfc06
ebc6797bd98119777648479d8e922fee87567c99
'2011-11-16T09:26:33-05:00'
describe
'16833' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
45cc2af6d15cbcbeb586403219fd4a1e
0b5a4addad39813e64340496cded1aee0a922e0d
'2011-11-16T09:27:03-05:00'
describe
'24502' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJR' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
504e0e33c0fc556729952b1aa0e23cef
a7bf67548b8b00e9cdc926556a76786b620ee55f
'2011-11-16T09:26:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJS' 'sip-files00027.tif'
47a7ea7ca3b7567eb51da707962b0ed7
193e53a741a203c822969420bf42144e42dfee53
describe
'678' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJT' 'sip-files00027.txt'
45865b53d2b5da76a9b8c9990f8f2314
092df5c6bfe08707d30207cf249f4d41953fe552
'2011-11-16T09:27:56-05:00'
describe
'7450' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJU' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
1bc970d5b1d0353ddd2e7e5cdfa3bb9f
6398129248099e3054c7f895cc6deb4dad773544
describe
'1059565' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJV' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
55acf5e6dc715f017252f7695ff3c1b4
1b1bcd27e573170f0f4783035e4063d9245d9db3
'2011-11-16T09:27:50-05:00'
describe
'104125' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJW' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c351032ef2ce1e1b6be703cbf5ac0198
dbabc53c32c34f9815d553b1f87c6d1485d17468
'2011-11-16T09:25:11-05:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJX' 'sip-files00028.pro'
909e4b5e11961f46324a031133e94662
9c833f178794fb64bdbef3995683f5ad48c9c0e4
'2011-11-16T09:27:08-05:00'
describe
'34491' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
238be4ff13baa9f57c46d66f54967d4f
86706e6e88ee8e54a7c7cff916f6815673fb0e6c
describe
'8485271' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
ce4363507fac81672c688bae3dedec05
f989fe806e5a26c05d0fd9821739e7b73fd91c9a
describe
'64' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKA' 'sip-files00028.txt'
6d1bd29d0f00cf76f5ffabf5a21ce7ba
b57c9dd2b5c83b9a89cd55a787d0a56f811a8018
'2011-11-16T09:25:20-05:00'
describe
'9399' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKB' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
147ba0a5c8d409e6e69acb57b0f9105b
ab7e3aea64464f7baa45b4a5dad22c4ccee9e14a
describe
'995992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
7f8fd1a652d354515fba43bf66eb9fad
f17fcd3f1d6081b88a9091ea0ebf2daacc02273d
describe
'76387' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKD' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
23aa58f391ca03e338b28df6e3f25086
6dba6ffd522e9bd4aae2fe9b54a3beaf88f99ae5
'2011-11-16T09:25:19-05:00'
describe
'22076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKE' 'sip-files00029.pro'
437ab1539297744f230a8c2d21006023
5926b8289b4be0b09baca48cb781135b35cb120c
describe
'27730' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKF' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
2ba556e59946461f01a85a353003bd29
a53c96fe9c6ad752b2a467d7a1db0561bfbc189d
'2011-11-16T09:29:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKG' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a820bfb85fd7c63194a4e7841236893a
612f3fec7d2516a4108bad7a191b8799a3effb6d
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKH' 'sip-files00029.txt'
4a5232442132e817cff9e683fc82a5fa
cc73df81f922c36b49175f4dd962fd5d2c09a6c1
'2011-11-16T09:26:19-05:00'
describe
'7981' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKI' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
09fffaf1efb2b406bb355f7d55e5c727
89d9987233c2afb867f97366b5c2e10ef9c6e3ac
'2011-11-16T09:22:30-05:00'
describe
'1004236' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
d0018347043fef7ea23b331dcf2cfe92
4920fa8f704c987a1f4f5e5bb90c6236316814b4
describe
'86625' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKK' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
dd587db85b5ca6c408568594a461e8d0
179dfddb482842c3dc542747449db9ae0e8a99ab
describe
'25162' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKL' 'sip-files00030.pro'
bfe2c7bcbeb6201968e73fe75f39f2e4
3084d074e6cc5c471375d725b2012ddaffb1149c
describe
'32068' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKM' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
162c84224d0ee6f1f3074aa796cf6cc2
f659e72f41b9885536db15f501d6bd40d1b6b577
'2011-11-16T09:26:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKN' 'sip-files00030.tif'
06963202ee3153b5d6f443943cc5e855
3858430e6c9bff62841a73ac9b3b1bf43f63a87c
'2011-11-16T09:27:46-05:00'
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKO' 'sip-files00030.txt'
2202a72e3daa90ee6318d304836b3235
b9b481d188f0db34f83f74f2edc4d73263661bc3
describe
'9232' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKP' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
a9ca776df7d3a9d4bfa21783b27c3ff7
3254181a20e8750172649f69c464f07bf744a7a0
'2011-11-16T09:24:00-05:00'
describe
'995970' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
69ba4acc67dd8bedbe3c5d34c9b7c1b8
bedc067530eb83fba3157932cf54dde67b8c5b0b
'2011-11-16T09:22:36-05:00'
describe
'85589' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
04a4ff94c6d634fb1264888735e1d8f1
a1520cf16d93ccbb021001e4a07d827b51848324
'2011-11-16T09:27:24-05:00'
describe
'26349' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
4c945134e44f444b80968e8ebec6d825
61a0df4756bdc13cdd5be7ade33ce844d2d26c18
describe
'32972' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKT' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
caabfb75f4090e834f5a9df2cb1d4ff0
2f0a3e3a766dcf2d6acfba5bc1c8f88887902c11
'2011-11-16T09:23:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
15ea1c7ebe1a6f7e1a318e9b0063a402
0cdd9cf84dee20a17113cc8d8af7c8e4990d2ca3
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKV' 'sip-files00031.txt'
655c2846cf051fa62c6d485f086c5daa
556fab906704284b3fae12f3e92b1c1a9dfd6ec9
'2011-11-16T09:27:40-05:00'
describe
'8892' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
cee013f7f869322e843e9c4ec0b59aae
84d4df1277ef03c951670fdd9b282419726ecff7
'2011-11-16T09:27:41-05:00'
describe
'1004225' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKX' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
b0de7f76fa8f1179d7e6ef2af2ecf406
35eecb16514e7b2ac6ddad631828b70f131560b8
'2011-11-16T09:25:37-05:00'
describe
'89426' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKY' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
a432ecc4a68e6a0aa24b7d48e8c1ec3c
4e30442e9be8f42fd46e41fefd771d6a9311c22c
'2011-11-16T09:22:34-05:00'
describe
'26573' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
8edf0a6649970b4058f7f768e725a155
b0cc3f396a4f32ea3b8f9f6a09a26d6977296091
describe
'31787' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLA' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
f5dec2ad7014aaedaac0f7da89d18f45
6205f352252882164d7bab2fc9e7342ab7add60d
'2011-11-16T09:23:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLB' 'sip-files00032.tif'
8aa17e24c06ad7929f126d4d82aa120c
b03bec91e04eb2883668c0c4d57943142e347788
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLC' 'sip-files00032.txt'
8efcdadd02d07650cc50d9446f4bdd2d
e89e6658defb4a212b06552e9c30108a1d1f7bae
'2011-11-16T09:24:16-05:00'
describe
'9192' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLD' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
2d58e9677a08fc6299c60fd642cd970a
91e7a9fce94ec2092d2d60173fb4d67f25e579da
'2011-11-16T09:29:49-05:00'
describe
'995978' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLE' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
20573b2c157fc4cbfbadff3a1ea5b792
174447d0b4c6d09922f5045d0f9a37f1e15c01a9
describe
'85278' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLF' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
0d86a77b2363d9352514cf388a2575e3
15ed454d4cb97581186740ce525f67b3fa9eb4ac
describe
'24842' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLG' 'sip-files00033.pro'
4a14b5b273f9a1626e770fb0680556d4
ebbf00b7b3fadff57ac54f78eee06d1925ddee83
'2011-11-16T09:23:35-05:00'
describe
'30278' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLH' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
0c7233ba1e106c2d6bc45aace7bee25e
7028c2027b92a9b4c3805deca7ac4d34c63aefb0
'2011-11-16T09:27:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLI' 'sip-files00033.tif'
7081f3138e483bec292338f96c0d3b10
2cc96da60a33e33b07dbb5e63b1d662152799a6d
'2011-11-16T09:29:01-05:00'
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
0749c12e3a684bb21ca42846873feb83
432a3a89e2f3b48797207078b89650736784a70c
describe
'8742' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLK' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
d14a100103a9b846c1dd163e26da1a44
3263889a80997dccb61968beef1887af13ce94d4
describe
'1004204' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLL' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
262d75fb668e66d1da26f96aa25106eb
0a1a5da63ac0136f03b5e9e1eecc0fbd35bfc8d5
'2011-11-16T09:27:13-05:00'
describe
'79082' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLM' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
3e7a2ec8681e1b9a768522813cc321f4
7a7505c8843bc0be9750ae3df85adacac125a903
'2011-11-16T09:27:09-05:00'
describe
'19555' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLN' 'sip-files00034.pro'
d6110f61e0cb07059987a460e72bb1c5
d2a668050bed1b2db429584e53099da3212581fd
'2011-11-16T09:23:16-05:00'
describe
'28760' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLO' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
4b7bd45d1021ef48869660304bb5945b
cfab9ebad7947f5ba15f1b2cd1a5de867b467bfb
'2011-11-16T09:27:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLP' 'sip-files00034.tif'
e2071ec02d4b4299c59ab6ee7378f03a
f292628c78517b904e4e52a4d58b9f8e51da12a4
'2011-11-16T09:28:33-05:00'
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
3c30a58a97589b8c37baac01be8cd9fb
a446049c2c77c036325ec8d501a5bd85b31e3b95
'2011-11-16T09:22:47-05:00'
describe
'8326' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLR' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
abcc33eb6804e1abfe5f26d22da72910
f0c1de3c07bee8e6df3f99825faf6c1f3b26c8ec
describe
'996032' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLS' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
f6b09303e6f174f3afc51e4d699930b3
2c3dafcb07f78c0d81dbbbdcdf526d978dedb9e9
'2011-11-16T09:26:58-05:00'
describe
'86162' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLT' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
971d2ed206403805d0c8a13c4ed508ef
7b695b00409d692cbdd94036717088d2afb21871
'2011-11-16T09:26:07-05:00'
describe
'23461' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLU' 'sip-files00035.pro'
b85d10c92d59fa71625d0c1cfea33a28
3980c9f8e98d2c501277485d117092a2b3481903
'2011-11-16T09:27:05-05:00'
describe
'32026' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLV' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
821660510ed74fb05eee1d86c072fd42
ccb5dadff772008359b22ab26ae086cf0c73725c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLW' 'sip-files00035.tif'
2a64b06f60914b0c66ad4045dc293d92
22caf6a9ff0520fb8abd85afc55e8af6833c8aca
'2011-11-16T09:28:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLX' 'sip-files00035.txt'
78872a2e4ad4811ccc7553944d23f14f
e52d4cda80d5eedaefd5c75b227a2936f7f2407d
'2011-11-16T09:26:57-05:00'
describe
'8934' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLY' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
037acf4b72fe42e497bb45f14a123398
0646b64288c48690584031f14a9dcaf62563cfe7
'2011-11-16T09:25:57-05:00'
describe
'1004239' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
9e448d9056acb3866b521f6cf35eeea3
2946b7326feddd701d53fe022705f2d66c5338b6
'2011-11-16T09:24:25-05:00'
describe
'92913' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMA' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
a2436e09e51f36cba7e79f38e7cff1cc
2649af1119e8c645c7beb178d341d33fffa8a369
describe
'25081' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMB' 'sip-files00036.pro'
383e12975cbb30bb0e78876a431ee182
93a771b514fbb52da48cc30427466e65cfe01be9
'2011-11-16T09:24:10-05:00'
describe
'33181' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d20b1d093b1f79eb2c58d3b41b873a3e
2c35abb94d30c44f247023ddc605765414d9e716
'2011-11-16T09:29:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMD' 'sip-files00036.tif'
867663bc09a603146a4141ab5aa1479b
f26eb1444738dd0d2fcd85b6017ca25b1d955683
'2011-11-16T09:26:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALME' 'sip-files00036.txt'
83d94872926bd269fe92cec44b9ebcd2
4f0bc38eceefa8d34001dee70a4eed3e1cc47f29
'2011-11-16T09:25:07-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9631' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMF' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
5f03fa6173e1559efb3632e3e8c27511
58bf1a3c03e84afe12596d537baea735a290f5fd
describe
'996014' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMG' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
392700bc669615d0be9efe7ceb7659d2
bce13e4ab56d71e4cda042ee927513ec64cc17a8
describe
'86913' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMH' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
6af1ce493461f6c19916e3d6d3b063ae
35704073bee9e063bc240b2d2821eea6ff723c87
describe
'23198' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMI' 'sip-files00037.pro'
2c25744bea43db7823f436c5d5517fb9
3d8b8435e706197b8bf04713f46b95d4fed7dbab
'2011-11-16T09:28:12-05:00'
describe
'32054' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
ab4fc76ce00315a1b4eb3cb44aa48c96
8408b647d55672fda45af22d87cbfcdc5ec757d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMK' 'sip-files00037.tif'
d99fc268edee951363698ae64aab8c08
61d21c775606ee13cf9f511a6816388082baa197
'2011-11-16T09:27:12-05:00'
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALML' 'sip-files00037.txt'
ed6ae86bada2a744375fbb4176f4767c
19923aca735803cc580e0285b20ea7bbdcf7d825
'2011-11-16T09:23:50-05:00'
describe
'8898' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMM' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
60348285b9a451ee54aa7dc76ac66580
fcdcde60e983ff8856f7465923c59891eec19bfd
'2011-11-16T09:28:03-05:00'
describe
'966846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMN' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
f4ff0e06f3b0cf1b7e1f3fdaccf82213
41433f1f76b73c89790226827f098984c06a9dca
describe
'79466' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f6b35ec2af4c0717808d26b0421e048f
06978140c0f6b0f653de518a2ebcabd312823a21
describe
'9425' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMP' 'sip-files00038.pro'
0c25502cb9cc297cd5e9c4b1cfbb6bb4
bd6f7ed026634c42dbf8e9ecdf107ad67ecdf7da
'2011-11-16T09:26:20-05:00'
describe
'26046' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
655b27d3a1af0135fd12b47bc95266f6
4090e00ac718a744e8971160d487c3f7722f3378
'2011-11-16T09:22:26-05:00'
describe
'7743897' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMR' 'sip-files00038.tif'
1b603dfb088a387001913c6b11379fe0
ffc18654f62a8b5515514a43b7e759318e02cd40
describe
'407' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMS' 'sip-files00038.txt'
39f981064639a4468fb3abcf68088793
49b4a8a04e4bf0262cf32c2276cf8b8a4d7eff46
'2011-11-16T09:23:05-05:00'
describe
'7575' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMT' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
935a02fd04b5ef3e8f40f0ec82756c4e
7fe1603fb151034d46197a572574cf9885519078
'2011-11-16T09:27:43-05:00'
describe
'996018' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMU' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
999d28047e1c37039a76fd16c269688b
25ef505f1668f6b757f333054b5186a77cfd5fe3
'2011-11-16T09:25:33-05:00'
describe
'88147' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMV' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
640984bb0e3d12d53b93a5b67ec8ded2
5777426159183e3cbbd39b41afa71b92da30c0f7
describe
'24482' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMW' 'sip-files00039.pro'
c47b8d0acac91387eb434517f4c670aa
d021601ed875ddb57437b478517fbd6ab5372a42
describe
'33130' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMX' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
c2cd37278ef2b94efd48ca7d35743188
21ac1fa6b6cd6eac775355598a69fcf3d37b9b32
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMY' 'sip-files00039.tif'
04e3cf0b2a0bf7f9e4511d3449b8e1d3
21bb73d93c0faaff4a45839225809f507dd1bcfb
'2011-11-16T09:22:46-05:00'
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
b39b64ab831f4ebed00235b79c9b1c00
744bad9b35f7b521da184fcf2ef726cbe71a2bdd
describe
'9148' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNA' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
aacb17117289e0fa6f5484f3a5efc273
5c5968e3102f10e235085eef14e1059fff9c1fc4
describe
'966952' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNB' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
18392f4b80b71b61a096e59d2e91e317
e096158ba0d2620e93abe4d70a498b670dc01997
describe
'94248' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNC' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
cd6e0d8b6bb1ec20e44adda2599cf2e3
6fe533ddbfcf85eff66e21be2aa98cf3822ae814
'2011-11-16T09:26:09-05:00'
describe
'25131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALND' 'sip-files00040.pro'
8b04391f87d7a4e7e6708d4e8b91fad3
f730ae43499598a86d59c6a6b48b01140e854061
describe
'34987' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNE' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
5bec354ef62647f92972138c3b533f37
fc21ac105dd2085a4766ff91bb3df98cf2bbecab
'2011-11-16T09:25:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNF' 'sip-files00040.tif'
f8a012e8cc22deb4374d84d885406b92
5e7cf4d5e96da749ec6b4c67b0fa322f0b21f9c7
'2011-11-16T09:22:28-05:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNG' 'sip-files00040.txt'
72287aaa3bc1f7a9095d68816c1a2d58
08b8e695cf90d32b4acc3747315ed36bc58cc165
describe
'10013' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNH' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
24573f8b3ed255cf7c72a030c14ae556
992294249dde5e800fd54d8191bb86e84f659fc7
'2011-11-16T09:22:35-05:00'
describe
'996010' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNI' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
a6cebab6b64b117150c219f79f421a32
812b581cd00acc5e573557f63725d432869164ec
describe
'83433' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
5feb6740a3b055ac16f702cae2c415fc
9549377b8ca39f62e584fa11cf0a3be54a074972
'2011-11-16T09:25:01-05:00'
describe
'22180' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNK' 'sip-files00041.pro'
43138195b103f9f3e441cf5b0dba468c
1e9dd960b6b3255af0bd5ff63ecc8f97d7ff0eee
describe
'32746' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNL' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1fa4aa36269c021abbd3fc162ecc6215
3983194884946b1d45a79f0d4f3f72024955ef74
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNM' 'sip-files00041.tif'
c4be066a8650758de5077c14d38e1bcc
86eae5fefde447e0dd18ae43d4910d67311eb4cf
describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNN' 'sip-files00041.txt'
c9244cd93d9c1daa7c2b14ce152872f9
52198733767d1907e99444a0a36c4a21a8772d9a
describe
'8961' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNO' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
14b19bd507575e91e66a893caedaa20b
a7de432e9615f222ffdb96f385cd8f1afd990702
describe
'966930' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
41febf9549982ea54e50143f24a60032
72a596f8d1061a252659fb7ca86797f50267d7bd
describe
'84783' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
e0cf132bdb931b1cf3a1b6ee362b9860
5562217977571da50379b02589199371b8da84fe
'2011-11-16T09:23:24-05:00'
describe
'21793' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNR' 'sip-files00042.pro'
f0f4069807090c86f52b630c467ce958
310974e9a01c8807f5ac51917506ef8d8d05224d
'2011-11-16T09:24:18-05:00'
describe
'32234' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
77274d07c1b69d5e8627882086310a3d
f67bfc7e830554b128561311b545c23749c99ef2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
266048e6458689c32e964acfe6d60c8c
86b01ac9c1fda681527206b00f5ddf24fea2bf49
'2011-11-16T09:28:18-05:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
3b288aa0b473515eb962993a8886afc0
ef20c39f91b38a8dc012e77dfc401da16eede764
'2011-11-16T09:23:18-05:00'
describe
'9641' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
3d6105d9fdf1a5679aed2aa0e90c038d
0e5462a1e7771795a7970bd6f414465de77b1a6c
'2011-11-16T09:26:13-05:00'
describe
'996028' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
de94431f9bcd4068066f499c07718a4f
b903b9ddb8f308d866846c8f4a9fff0bb197f68e
'2011-11-16T09:28:31-05:00'
describe
'67167' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
512665c811173c98337c1473374a08bf
e82b2e7ae4d6d5c92182dd5111ce3956ddaa2d48
'2011-11-16T09:28:41-05:00'
describe
'16357' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
f25a808d36e66245904391a57cb2ff00
5fd55696528f9d5b01d46eaff6fd3e7912f7a1f3
describe
'26251' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
7e9b3c982e95a24bbdd046f4173c4a4d
8a057a96350d49ab84487a24e15730d2364a5b0f
'2011-11-16T09:27:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
34b711959872abdf92499b733eaf79bf
70dadd9920a53d69d4bb3d2f4242cd17024ef685
describe
'700' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
338555f40e111a3c393a9fbf813dc608
215b8b54a14c935cdb1e595e7aac1148febce29b
'2011-11-16T09:22:44-05:00'
describe
'7574' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOC' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
554303e3708b0f93028227e2e9424c4f
0dc6f603e5590ed320bd4f0fb06412809d32f4a4
describe
'966867' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
0cba4a4c40456a4f910be55a40480a0c
d9744ef43c397d221ea456ce86577e4c2b2baba8
'2011-11-16T09:23:19-05:00'
describe
'95188' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
8bbda680b098907e0be274aee21adf10
1c4b2a2336c56d24f31cfd8ddbfe79efc072d3ac
'2011-11-16T09:27:47-05:00'
describe
'23122' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
39ff2c0eee349bdc6ba028b6861aff5a
73110355b65f199b5ac3cfff6aa72e03be83a272
'2011-11-16T09:23:08-05:00'
describe
'35076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOG' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
b0fa7f4f0f7f844919f6bcaa5af6fd79
f08337f9af90f797c85a74bb2134b6c043cc52d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
b07fc21385815715f0747e5cbee2417a
5ed7e8d38c3184d096e020634d1ed2a4cd1523f5
'2011-11-16T09:28:25-05:00'
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOI' 'sip-files00044.txt'
ba36397f96dde52af38fc8c6bb87ce5d
4cb26463140fc0605f74e8854275f57f5073ec72
'2011-11-16T09:22:19-05:00'
describe
'10093' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
3d2c1cec909ae26bb75af6b36e1589bd
5e57cbd8cdcfe90b9805364d91f456da462bff75
describe
'996025' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOK' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
1ddb41528aa6d5cbb432ef1bb3467eb7
2afb560d3d18d2fbd2763e084cbdf50b70ccc555
describe
'75606' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOL' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
ddcfcafcc640e7e14005db44c5cb87e2
06b18745d475e8bd84cc8e1e11af472412535887
describe
'11344' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOM' 'sip-files00045.pro'
f54abd4578714197702bb68ffdd9e0a4
40abcf42303f0df40b8f8d9865b6ae8670c6f244
'2011-11-16T09:26:37-05:00'
describe
'23569' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALON' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
84f411a2704b664b57440ec11754771c
1b4fae165bb3398a75f8bcb860384289a62fa016
'2011-11-16T09:26:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOO' 'sip-files00045.tif'
460094a9b6dd7dc1100e7c6a3c7300db
fc43699a363c6cd0a4552556729d2bd96ecf84f4
'2011-11-16T09:27:55-05:00'
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOP' 'sip-files00045.txt'
138cfdc072376e24081302dbe09e7a4e
b1eb71343bfdf9c3db898344bb62c0b2bbe457cb
describe
'7293' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
d500088e0274b99c855cc2aa2f1e7138
13a533778fc946ea3c7cfc5f744f33b0ff795b6c
'2011-11-16T09:24:09-05:00'
describe
'966953' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOR' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
39d0126bfef96878cbfe5be433446934
46034fddf5e6dcc9466f3ca1e32120b788a89c46
'2011-11-16T09:23:02-05:00'
describe
'89276' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOS' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
20403c273d051c19935aee11568c341f
1be20b506b9d2324d063faa38ada241c5c0e1c81
describe
'23492' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOT' 'sip-files00046.pro'
a36f3927a9be920e56d52a246c908e03
131f3df7de0df4f579a18128826ba21f96908e8e
describe
'33992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOU' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
29f2cf90e3314a6c022ce3d2372d284d
0c64a3e36368572a84285cb637ed77fe5ef22487
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOV' 'sip-files00046.tif'
7eb3342ab053066a8301e2bb56121c90
8e0aa896a494e5ca8d4b9fadc580ce00aac0a6d3
'2011-11-16T09:24:14-05:00'
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOW' 'sip-files00046.txt'
8e256f99692c60532505a2341ff0f651
75b3eef58f09c56a0e5ee6522e62872dc131b643
'2011-11-16T09:23:20-05:00'
describe
'9872' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOX' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
043ea4a6768bba1449e537a0fae9e4c8
bcbdbdec8aff9d58cf077e8923b4b6934b31f695
'2011-11-16T09:24:53-05:00'
describe
'995977' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOY' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
310956761da79311b9e9d819020ea8fa
40ed409abd284c9641c3c03895482f15f4aafb8e
'2011-11-16T09:28:32-05:00'
describe
'70607' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
fdafab87f914e704a2367255a1f7972b
5274cacd4f183e5deac81e2668ade1374804602b
describe
'16981' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPA' 'sip-files00047.pro'
e302c0808c034e8eb07e69d29039fd5b
af2ba70423247a95e0cb6851c85b08ec634d78ed
describe
'25641' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
bad3e293cb641252da611ee2c591301a
910bdf6f92a0be3e8f0363760965570c32648c41
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPC' 'sip-files00047.tif'
16174cc5d295cd8b63fce1396b8bdc3d
db200d454d76936c884b4282b1b14b54b29442a9
describe
'726' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPD' 'sip-files00047.txt'
60df0f2270a6c903f49490c0fdfc0827
3a83cb28aed903d39c66830ef992d2bd93c2ba02
'2011-11-16T09:27:58-05:00'
describe
'8127' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPE' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
390d55b4dc658753b7bf2b91e5456177
10ef7085819c8c34b9648bfbb1079174ce4db5f9
'2011-11-16T09:22:15-05:00'
describe
'966701' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPF' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
0e0d79451f6af472a7d475114e0aade3
d6d123775f9ba6aaa87b8fc8b7285ea3aac57204
describe
'88935' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPG' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f05490c3390238eff7ecc2f3e4f6e522
68e60f1ff328502db5c12d40db8ae06fd1610eb7
describe
'22744' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPH' 'sip-files00048.pro'
42eb7a98406f58533dc0de6e7e5b6b2b
43c27dfab4fd4e9d53d1e2fb2af6c12181537eab
describe
'33645' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPI' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
70e5c1dbc9b6ce2048e0ab24de61f607
9bb0fc125199d0a9e7170e9378f2aa9e13ed5d6a
'2011-11-16T09:29:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
aa63c462eb6ada3914c70f575dd46260
76bdb63864324f7e15485b5b9996ce8fe3f27e51
'2011-11-16T09:23:28-05:00'
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPK' 'sip-files00048.txt'
d87965103fac1faca5f8add646a124d7
b7fb713de3bcf46a797618d8d6371f74d5ac19e2
describe
'10032' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
bbe06072ab15995f1603d76adca846bb
34f523a1cd8801713dbefe972b589c3aa4e82cac
'2011-11-16T09:24:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPM' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
2d5aebefda49da9a507b89cafea0aecd
e220d2f30948a9cf816e90fea6a6350492c1d69e
describe
'86179' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPN' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
cfd6ffdcc15243e16ad10be2411aa762
d4968883bdcda4464e549a598ecd35c936628a06
describe
'23845' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPO' 'sip-files00049.pro'
98262c54177a204d4393f8f7dee48b8f
483b590ff9515b47b4ccb194355aedff4008a383
'2011-11-16T09:24:35-05:00'
describe
'32625' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPP' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
6e153431f8c8e5e33c78f5281d59a98b
c08fd91207de8fbfa7086dd4477b3937c326a492
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
5a2f26618961426d7e6ad553610c824d
76c23ef29cf792203e355a77120cd5a59372cd5d
'2011-11-16T09:28:47-05:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPR' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5e76e9361b830db0490d1c2a966db1a3
00239d31bb51f85272708f04b65f065a64d30ad0
describe
'9308' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPS' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
75a13ffb9465b3ec0a3c383cd785890d
5a915a2a09c454cd985c23ccb75884cb1b33bcb4
'2011-11-16T09:24:42-05:00'
describe
'966924' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPT' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
eff605fd759f35613ca46bc88b038e96
9e47bbf6f79678523ded8ace538ded69485bdc19
'2011-11-16T09:28:01-05:00'
describe
'89471' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPU' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
9d3df7a67010ccc0460a773f6b082e66
068820b1c9e2ccabd9fb5705b0d97093d6675a57
describe
'22846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPV' 'sip-files00050.pro'
ffc86d283757163378d8f04dcc2e07c5
465a227d116cdb3a9854f8a1f9597b19173bf652
describe
'33759' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPW' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d8a1cd0f46738bfdfaf36ad2a015f44a
22cd427406ea6c2883ec0bffa91b7ddb3f99aaa6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPX' 'sip-files00050.tif'
8459f2c44ae4fc149fb1e4d10e5e1d0f
72dae68043dc918a31f125d1a4de88542358d831
'2011-11-16T09:23:22-05:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPY' 'sip-files00050.txt'
d175ab59ee49ae10a759f72072ceb8f8
62ef9a1e35a3c3068e659891276e26a98081ac60
describe
'9543' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
b265151b3bfb0bc1034e15de80aee3f7
185e60f83c40d6c4ad0aa99d18fe70008e633ae8
describe
'995932' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQA' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
6a43cd8fdd0e4c6ca41d99d38e634cd0
e83eadd63ae880a3350df1b75be54e8a1ec10942
describe
'80918' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQB' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
54dd4f95d7ca3e9efae1ff7dd7398669
d50a8ab015636b7fe7146d49149ac313798e3ec8
describe
'10937' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQC' 'sip-files00051.pro'
98a1e9880571d2309e8c4b325dc48898
2ff5820479ee4a0aac3d2738ec1492e14bf96927
describe
'25920' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQD' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
16818abb702063113eea6c274a9b5e7d
697b1900667dfa297bfd0dad6c63e50e6ab55f90
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQE' 'sip-files00051.tif'
abcaa00663b36c241e61ee364639d9c7
a96ef5eb675179d58cd358cd3af08baf300e4ee5
describe
'442' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQF' 'sip-files00051.txt'
fd6da35faf42dc76eec5fea4f1805e57
e2718b2c2ab3c101e2cd096aa9d31dc472b112ad
describe
'7350' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQG' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
1031e26b62caf42e688b031099f22989
c70ca9a9e2d12b38199bd61ade22226594e1d5d7
'2011-11-16T09:28:55-05:00'
describe
'966855' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQH' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
f3cfca1554d70c855e20ffb63ca296e6
476f204893b6339ed3160c2488b4ab589c97ddec
'2011-11-16T09:22:45-05:00'
describe
'78923' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQI' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
c3394a90ee82d1c9efb0d641d6f1e3a6
fc3e640bf48419f977378b7f3040b40ef5753045
describe
'18945' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
b19c043fa8c288a08465e7c6a1f40ddf
84ca621f84010663183927d49496c2a910e12566
describe
'28925' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQK' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
97ae78c991513771182bcdc20cf6a2d0
afc9a1829b73b1f0fe7644f56aafd1c90042a14e
'2011-11-16T09:27:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQL' 'sip-files00052.tif'
46f10a4bd68e97f8d5542f6c75541356
2855ca5f848bc44b717e7c492930a7bf6329fefd
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQM' 'sip-files00052.txt'
a78f6bee18ba14d1811612dfb2659494
d754eb262014a75733b037a1a980c1f13f401499
describe
'8247' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQN' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
700cd563c68f0aea45bf2c12d45ecee2
98c0127df7c0dab6f090a41adafe04ab8af783f2
'2011-11-16T09:26:47-05:00'
describe
'995928' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQO' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
88e04f9d5ffc991f0d6bf368fd540b25
d24d4716a1b0c964f1bf446cfc0c766d8889cfbd
describe
'84627' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQP' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
627618a5894e8532cb53ff75d7c90f74
d5835589dc7a6a120a4295a4e5b0c692c21c2db3
describe
'24278' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
4ab8b7fb98214c7764ba6f03685b5e32
a83206bb3500e03792ad0b39a4358776bbd4b071
'2011-11-16T09:28:09-05:00'
describe
'29211' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQR' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
a6f64ac81daad342f8449fbeec5f1af6
ae0d440890021f706d1e6eb4e747a44fb1ddbf3a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQS' 'sip-files00053.tif'
b2971ae930bad61ef7e8f7cf4f6d3309
98db1429cca0d610b080978dc8b435333d53b774
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQT' 'sip-files00053.txt'
9840f7533a2b8a1053eaa1a42630243d
7ef57aae9c28d4d804a81df9ca6930da679c6412
describe
'8985' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQU' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
f2c3141b15d2ab76a7d1c5ba73f06241
e37910b922f64782f05142636919641a39261817
'2011-11-16T09:27:51-05:00'
describe
'966951' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQV' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
3e7f3c3188816eeb5613938b7a25f3fe
83b96fec6db5d81933210a43c1ce016e54822ed3
describe
'93243' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQW' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
7f14f5c40ada463c2509c81c1cd68bed
1e72df9d003304735b2fe2491f265a4a39a424af
describe
'25903' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQX' 'sip-files00054.pro'
facb10bf8d85d5cf3776f3b873cd8857
2087ad46cb01231a75e00a6fbbe5e1a8e9161f4f
describe
'34947' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQY' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
2a52d21c9e7e27f363f02fb0b5e440b9
7242bcfbc0fd5ab655b1ec3138a9a84720e1ae72
'2011-11-16T09:22:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
19f5a69513f610b69510f2e932b4a016
0e5b89fa439124ea7571ae6b4842d5eb44038aeb
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRA' 'sip-files00054.txt'
236eaddab668878c240f6dbedc266888
9cb75a7734ef384741ec5450836e645cc9804fc7
'2011-11-16T09:23:12-05:00'
describe
'9767' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRB' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d75eb70a2b7dc2b4e65dccdb6be0651c
df5214e6bc9487c2d18c207dd3ba1c6e0edc071e
describe
'995973' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRC' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
4c46cbe2db78c49108e828b42e66a392
c15e6470ef2cb46d94c07f12736869cfe1ccc12e
describe
'95304' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRD' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
de468278c37cd661820ab118c7b91ffc
e8e0afcc3c705d61c63c513b46d288c0a72ae748
describe
'24838' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRE' 'sip-files00055.pro'
bb9e9f2b06d4320f14c5661cc62646a9
1894b535d924e1036de10702f643dca0f68be6a7
describe
'35286' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRF' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
6d73cfb3cfa6c632f2093c5a0b50f641
6a4cc33f1b26c8751e5140063cd05845398b7725
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRG' 'sip-files00055.tif'
49b89d0691221d0ba01331df87269bdf
707d723b203badbd98bee3aee7d900e53080d6c0
'2011-11-16T09:29:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRH' 'sip-files00055.txt'
c8200016ca4798b31c0d5ce21c5714f1
aa93c199dd3ee7586652a873e071868330044518
describe
'9460' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRI' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
b74d532689ca21d4c493bb8269189380
5b75f7dab44f510f79e91e26c726aa4139f449d1
describe
'966863' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
15832daf9fbb3a95964391f7f541cc4b
ead5bea7bde5e8cc0ab49c1ab4a6c2e5dc0f9a12
describe
'91808' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRK' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
495ba610f7c336ccff32aec7eb83a653
74af7a3456d06e1a1edb096c01e7cb6cd535f7ef
'2011-11-16T09:25:52-05:00'
describe
'16074' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRL' 'sip-files00056.pro'
8010e7056f382435cacf6ab3b739ffee
6aadf1a2f58f79d972913f706ba208d907393216
describe
'31095' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRM' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
cb9b3186e789d4478f39d921db26869b
ece00bcdc0bb428052a9e1b4cc87d184ba39e065
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRN' 'sip-files00056.tif'
8856ae78eeeab7d80980b77e0296534f
4eaba24d5f6f1f6872c780021476a101ba2ea644
'2011-11-16T09:25:00-05:00'
describe
'652' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRO' 'sip-files00056.txt'
43154d11563f6eef90112d0f956dbfd8
9893672b69237afd66ec44838b382ec9d7f677b2
'2011-11-16T09:29:35-05:00'
describe
'8757' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRP' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
a822899c9950698979bf833e91e51f79
2b379fb6b6404f0e5f0df87cdf9004b44fb33f7d
'2011-11-16T09:28:20-05:00'
describe
'995882' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
dcb315703a0379de05acefcb9ad9f0a4
6933c6c940209103fdc1c9b1aeed52a2fc945b3e
describe
'87088' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRR' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
b09f06f10be7424ea5104cfb5cfef9a2
fa316d0bd1f2e849567fc4f5a0960d0181141341
'2011-11-16T09:23:11-05:00'
describe
'24571' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRS' 'sip-files00057.pro'
8079dcce050f5d097ce7558b5e7d3b9a
bbfe6c95b120aa51eb53b61d34b0d7525c7470c7
describe
'32174' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRT' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
8dfe1081a6b8550fe0ee125358c05f0b
890d710bc1a4c8d32d9148a32f1f5ae2a02a70fe
'2011-11-16T09:22:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRU' 'sip-files00057.tif'
f6ee835eab96d0d7cd036b90039ea45b
cf6940771a9e28c58f538f5b27d6ab2160ce4b13
'2011-11-16T09:27:20-05:00'
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRV' 'sip-files00057.txt'
0010fb3ec9148d7b4c7474863796a716
a974f7916daac1c1563ca1ae105113d858a3edf1
'2011-11-16T09:26:17-05:00'
describe
'9420' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRW' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
400c70a7fcd8325721f7d9b04ca25d0a
870bfe5febaaa6acd4ab5e406102994910a6b2f4
describe
'966940' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRX' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f7876607fa2129abb8129ad36de1ecc3
1cf7e592f8409870d32d0fdfc65a06acf1d7ed6f
describe
'89054' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRY' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
54d55d18063c8375f2052e48a3b497c5
c443cb5e15c0002858443e374dde9cfc1cd46f7d
describe
'23494' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
249fabc9d85292cd95d445b6251859fe
1195c4b1744a1b4fddd6b7c31ce825ab9fd59baf
describe
'34061' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSA' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
1f25d4a0723875e70fa191188d4641c0
b842662593ece6b2f40abfc9deca7111df627025
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSB' 'sip-files00058.tif'
9e82594826d64bc0bceee1a3e36e8876
8de3f761de1cf07b384953d53ada839ef6f89cdf
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSC' 'sip-files00058.txt'
2ba0b799a8454dab9f17986a738c451c
0dc06d7b81af963a470947ec0b19b1c988eb22dc
describe
'9933' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSD' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
a04091e7f900dc9dc6cbfe1124029fa6
44770d3763068a4b0cbb549e47def839a267e9f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSE' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
a119ee09859d234890a0d25c537743cf
d4538744d4665c65a28acc98b9fbdb03305794bb
'2011-11-16T09:26:41-05:00'
describe
'76243' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSF' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
c2772bb34cce9c8ed7e51c908fdc222d
b1547d120bcc1feb951100610aa2388cc214f002
describe
'19313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSG' 'sip-files00059.pro'
0d22d4206997a3607b8097f6650ab1db
ee9b320c7e24ee6dc2d9d354b388db53e5b05ba9
describe
'28960' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSH' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
1ce70c5615d0a0279df708a1638aec9f
9eea7f7eee2668c2b850526e3775e961e326fc5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSI' 'sip-files00059.tif'
f4ca29ca321c22c37369bf63e9305cad
b53d94496b9a6a28a2721ed00e73746d20616643
describe
'812' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
125002d8dcac5d8ec5d6aa73a17436bb
8c3d72c53f619134a9afec2ad145d3faaf08ef19
'2011-11-16T09:22:23-05:00'
describe
'8292' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSK' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
20e03422bf91ba7d0000f01b7791c8eb
e815269b8526178fe9ce4fa6916aa0d53f631162
describe
'966937' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSL' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
0a7105db3233f55b99000d44e3d611cd
6fb9a4fe281066603994b8b9661a3d542ac0a27e
'2011-11-16T09:30:00-05:00'
describe
'90203' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSM' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
7d0c44b453c68d100b2464db148f81e3
815aa8c3ae099f3138d3846074a52ab6dc20608f
describe
'23564' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSN' 'sip-files00060.pro'
c934a3722297ade3263687aefb90d4cb
6fcb27aa4fa210b4e928018316116f221956cafa
describe
'34464' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSO' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
0b5b168cef4e0888205bb7430f42eede
6a52400f38c21d3e4361a6623b442e0e8ad42278
'2011-11-16T09:28:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSP' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f120bd97ff9a8f49a2a6693de36f7af9
ba0dd87338a64bc6aacb2c6a4eeac6a474058b19
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
a47b559804e45b4248455ca2416f1919
5760ae95ef96dd121b05be352591ab5b480dfeef
'2011-11-16T09:27:52-05:00'
describe
'9763' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSR' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
d0478c4e0879478a9675ba53d33aaf26
dcc60c2762f695e0a130b4aea0a8b660b59dacc3
describe
'996031' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSS' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
663c56011993b288ae36e6d30b9a166a
73265fd0db4439c30dbd1e5173c323f6e3e9c413
'2011-11-16T09:23:29-05:00'
describe
'77990' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALST' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
09e9866a3e0ebd178036f6bd6c4c11f5
750741a991d74ef16d8f68619e2e7feb88c8efa6
describe
'21021' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSU' 'sip-files00061.pro'
fe570f751dcbc1d5c8b73c9cb9c2bf0e
ec6f71551dd0fa69485d49caa64f635cec8a4541
describe
'28542' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSV' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
fa03575bf0c900c5aa745e9751a6edd3
285cacf6c408fbd065c32563aa88059d88114876
'2011-11-16T09:24:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSW' 'sip-files00061.tif'
bf5d8029143e4caef395f9c223052d1d
a49eb5dc066561b0be1f6acdcd6c800b1c8279bb
'2011-11-16T09:28:51-05:00'
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSX' 'sip-files00061.txt'
72a8e2bb7b150d62da0e682b0c1d6e29
7a8e258bf353cfb61887bfa91400cbfc03dc076b
describe
'8554' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSY' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
b3533450620aa51d25e1ef8f7684c071
86edabbfe2ffafcd85474df7d6efaf3c80186ff3
describe
'966835' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
836ff784e8150daa3a2839ef2e685b56
312b2179de5991447deaff7d0cdfeb8ca401b56e
describe
'79273' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTA' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
6a24c23762c446dff35a7ad070d31028
2c2f2549707c1e675661a7a57b882639c5f430e2
describe
'19948' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTB' 'sip-files00062.pro'
92cc3fb5737e20248464acc19e4e1191
d57aa4704571b4c6aa6cd6955d9bd85fb0f5a2c1
describe
'29833' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTC' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
9dc00241b7041ea501069edff6052cbd
733efb2ad0f451a76b67ae90b2f451cd01679c34
'2011-11-16T09:22:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTD' 'sip-files00062.tif'
73a995f11cccf77c29d9a90e30bfce9a
09dd655b4b29ef148fb6be4c9e3253fa48e0f8b3
describe
'831' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTE' 'sip-files00062.txt'
44b67e60b4deddf081c5dfa117961250
4d0d98c76da4ce1cf8d5e519084505b7857d7ff1
describe
'8668' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTF' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
35e2704cbf878c91c1de04aa355bc733
30cc2f363645898e6cabbc9f30043243b94d7196
'2011-11-16T09:24:30-05:00'
describe
'996036' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTG' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
4bc3fd45a63da06e1c55d4ef8dfa5ee4
6e6bc7db6dd2065bcacec984116fb8f0ee04d898
describe
'90414' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTH' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
4499458efbca8803fbef181e39ca10a3
9e91a7fe50d7d29756b287145efa7e7057e9e66e
describe
'25985' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTI' 'sip-files00063.pro'
e3d6152b68f57b5e4110993cb58fdc8c
fa1e1058ee132a0f2741170605c721ed2b9c0c26
describe
'32776' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
32be7a233fc8ac2fe1a98bd071265963
444e7bd4ee2c657a7ae2e0ad01bcf8e684708d12
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTK' 'sip-files00063.tif'
373891fe9a7f644249b3471b29c55991
903b756abce5ba9e5ea78ab3cd75ae27a06d8ce9
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTL' 'sip-files00063.txt'
3b5c510906bc9a2f57b3b6d080d57f0e
09a14ca023d80e7bf5d892322800422d65293b4b
describe
'9558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTM' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
4730f0767c96ff2ae08c62ce19d823e2
48bfc7e31116e6e967d0d83fec0fb452fe07854f
'2011-11-16T09:22:24-05:00'
describe
'966915' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTN' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
ac4bd15c1252e047f93b87344b8f3341
115c548eb0b50ceb14fb9ec68ad6511277586468
describe
'87950' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTO' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
27caa1230c627954d0c6ae07b6c9e799
0734dda01f82e7388c2ce0ba98c9962dc375ccbf
describe
'21938' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTP' 'sip-files00064.pro'
ba36a1fbea6ac43b0a69a46207e5bf5d
e2766d1852a62c53c3bc3ebeb3bf9ea5d8bf3cda
'2011-11-16T09:23:41-05:00'
describe
'33218' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ad44d8a7315d121abdc81e2ed43a104d
658680feb5ba582472baa2ebd53915948d60a6af
'2011-11-16T09:25:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTR' 'sip-files00064.tif'
d277dc54acd88b3581db116637b36d1b
0930be22370c8fe69011d5a6a7b9e5b1735d92c4
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTS' 'sip-files00064.txt'
a2de7d941e82a051ffdb9273566f1eac
5c9d4e99ce6690629c81a67524e1c8fdea7cec11
'2011-11-16T09:29:46-05:00'
describe
'9465' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTT' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
826b45e5b7f7df0b6cd5a7ce3fc55643
3abfa39075a8d8c0a4eed7af8757caaf2ad5b52e
describe
'996015' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTU' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
54f13009cc7561bd956f415ddda204d0
8e3e0ccca647f4eb49ebf527c55f2e04a5b09fc9
'2011-11-16T09:29:14-05:00'
describe
'85018' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTV' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
952f04ef79a3baa2a280f327fb6480e7
635470dee50b71bc85d264e85d35fe75dff13903
'2011-11-16T09:25:24-05:00'
describe
'22973' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTW' 'sip-files00065.pro'
4d296a536c39aceb9acef6ee0871eaa2
2ed9ab64f4fffbdf758134548da42b29623a673f
describe
'32780' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTX' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
ffd8034f60dcc4514758134b2f336ae4
4d4a375947b192b523a15edb81c721d910cfc248
'2011-11-16T09:27:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTY' 'sip-files00065.tif'
ed13b95ff2846df8f281c505516fb8a9
66f8ca64912cbd04ccbda12412c090818dfa87f5
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
675720f308bc033cd3f1da5274bd86e8
62283336d1cc1644e75347c7a846e1921397b5a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUA' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
40f866938aca212f2929063b79a8064c
b9c42427948c35dc47c185e9158299996d889027
describe
'966894' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUB' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
c986bc5ff5171e456c6bd38f517d6e9e
ca5d293e48e60febdbdc055270f9fe4879f92713
'2011-11-16T09:25:16-05:00'
describe
'92313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUC' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
af374d7a06f060e9ed377c5fa182f42b
3fa13a76f5776386ff4e9bdd22908f84a6475439
describe
'12298' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUD' 'sip-files00066.pro'
c5d86fc42db4e5960b06b8503050d54f
5196239bc0133989642260fd8a1f4320592fe77e
'2011-11-16T09:24:49-05:00'
describe
'30921' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUE' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
c59678fc6d1ebd85e3c3e0e877d1e013
84b488ba9db87ae804dd46997f3271457eeb86a0
'2011-11-16T09:27:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUF' 'sip-files00066.tif'
28c25ac78f5ede37b71c19c7d01e6e83
1d5bbbc228354d6c1ae024fb7a619aa564f9447a
'2011-11-16T09:29:15-05:00'
describe
'540' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUG' 'sip-files00066.txt'
a08fdf9e6aaa7c72a6740578b03249a7
b742b14a4409b2802183e3ea0db245fc2957d264
'2011-11-16T09:24:27-05:00'
describe
'8408' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUH' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
2ed3ff5f285686a4fc932a3d14db68f0
2e1681c75778a64d946eb5fe47ac662cf4fad6c0
describe
'995851' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUI' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
f231f658e60a8eabdd3ac84765c6e605
3fea7fd73276dc9dd6e88ecf5ae4a521a440ded9
describe
'74908' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
f421c6505e8f179519736e5bedbb8468
2fedba83d360ed254e6a3bc6ed3517287fd982c9
describe
'21204' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUK' 'sip-files00067.pro'
f836145368f890d59e6ec07dfe3554f4
d4455c81674293ef803ad04bbbc5e17c011c6cbf
describe
'27213' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUL' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1b8c0df005fdf2b9c14dde69c6b529c8
01bb470edcb71fafd3764c94e7626d96710c820d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUM' 'sip-files00067.tif'
f213fccaf4706f0104b3a40c91d383ca
07ef1062dfb475dfa5cc3b4d4010371b148d489a
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUN' 'sip-files00067.txt'
ed2997a33e7fe327eef6127c72c42b7e
3a52e83eaa270ac6fdc18c60ed7431b809d4fdff
describe
'7973' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUO' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
c815c47d2d9e9b550d72205c43974708
2c85aaabeda1a0360d9685b36029a17184eeb5e1
describe
'966943' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUP' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
6873d44ec4b78fb66b898b38227d11f2
3c988b5377be7ac7c31aaa2848e4089110a8868c
describe
'77724' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ef4859115f7468aac467bc669e2f5faa
701d9789c9f987f971a9a107956dccf8e38680ff
describe
'20449' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUR' 'sip-files00068.pro'
26eff7a375472d8bdbf1e66f94bd4e62
ab686d74b3819b0fe339647fb04943a2d5f911e0
describe
'29299' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUS' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
2f6dd3dcaf1286beedbffd0e576ce69f
2574e9f0e73ca07b805943104cd56a1912789ea1
'2011-11-16T09:30:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUT' 'sip-files00068.tif'
974a819c35cae9bce6bfbaf268879a21
3894b890b963ae45dd2f26ac7ee922f4efc7c44d
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUU' 'sip-files00068.txt'
3ee6d5022c2641f6ebd7bfac42060375
59788ce0e8332a253544f06f6c411a15f4807e63
'2011-11-16T09:30:02-05:00'
describe
'8386' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUV' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
e6f142ec8406c589d17e853a409c198c
148d95374974a17c2506b11033cd676e074c9aee
describe
'995994' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUW' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
0f0518e03ae1c1fe28eb86625def30bd
4711cb068575c3395ca66c6c3d06fc6209b56412
'2011-11-16T09:22:16-05:00'
describe
'79735' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUX' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
16eda272ed9fcdaff5d9d3fee99f1502
3d3a96896a699e8f7721e0c32ed592bbc1876a76
describe
'21044' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUY' 'sip-files00069.pro'
8937819066cb0956dca249c3adcae1dc
f683ef0a46ef1b826604f4d43f6fe7b1f9e5322e
describe
'31241' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
a61e670ebee8fdef7b157e5e9562dde7
53e1e077fb300b3b47e7175b8190a6a84b735ec0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVA' 'sip-files00069.tif'
f0f9e14037443b84cf5402d9f9590c0b
2e72bd1a201ac32b394ceeb5ad36905b9601dde4
describe
'858' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVB' 'sip-files00069.txt'
12c6b26612564cebb54654457a6276a1
abcb3a143a578b2eb1dd3cbdbbd2ada296bc8ebf
describe
'8675' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVC' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
76f7b9cf92872d2b97fd6f9843cb01f0
4a9f8d529efd8f30033f962107d7198580ace8e5
describe
'966948' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVD' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
d9ae24faec63232bac6ab16de10c8ea5
391d372560a1c588e7f9f37c92df9a1b89fe0189
'2011-11-16T09:29:21-05:00'
describe
'88607' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVE' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
a2de55f4420142018f6bd7dc7b707f4d
104084a4bc6475d878a9c6319773916ccac48557
describe
'12149' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVF' 'sip-files00070.pro'
3e439dbe34df61553c3beec97aec61a2
31b3416afe10edc891a679d3f85c4d3b02d58289
describe
'29628' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVG' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
d6efe26c9ad041966db3778848e9e606
a8a5eb67f10711dcb886135f645571ce6d63cd85
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVH' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b8917cb90d18d0669823f1050a883416
01b6ac8fed146cc2a0be99d67c6aa0f6e5bf017f
'2011-11-16T09:26:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVI' 'sip-files00070.txt'
9170f8ec1152dc519d7403f078b413e0
c19abbc9040dd3b72251c4a89c8c58cb7b793f83
describe
'8406' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
e375166fd0a8a9a1e359773d773d35ee
610e75080e5e31c03eb89eba681b8c6ba8c9ecd2
'2011-11-16T09:24:44-05:00'
describe
'996035' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVK' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
2593eadbaa141f46ea314dd7eaf800e2
cd398ef54ff331484aeaa1b92812c67604bcfd7d
describe
'86101' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVL' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
83eafbe5dfd20e345e7b80bdd993eb93
952fa820b45202f1bb268fa13c9a9a4ea15583d9
describe
'24517' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVM' 'sip-files00071.pro'
67d45a63438de40ecdaf27012fc775a2
8a9752937aaade19de12c0500078740e3c46745e
'2011-11-16T09:29:30-05:00'
describe
'31832' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVN' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
0487dd9f68fbb0452e4b50fe778b0fd1
fb25fe2d37ad3dad0352c2ffe3d57078388ff641
'2011-11-16T09:25:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVO' 'sip-files00071.tif'
21dcc84e76ebf2b91231bc5bffa5763f
94e2e482756a6c43c6678bcda7bfc81cbbeaf832
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVP' 'sip-files00071.txt'
62aaedbb2fc49850a6432d55094f846a
8769b0632964c687330b760c5008773e90bda6b6
describe
'8923' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
64e90feebc14460436c63f5f22b7b905
413547829d0b9f8dfb238a09bda8192791818817
describe
'966866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVR' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a5ddb9c493c149c14a19da5765de9ee2
cab6c1cb8d2c9d79f3d8055b29e4f824ed9af86b
describe
'89591' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVS' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
d904bdc2b35ce755f46c0c934f1bac6b
6be9f07fdb85a184bdfbc2cdee835c09668bd226
describe
'23632' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVT' 'sip-files00072.pro'
379cc05b76d69333a200d777166bb808
27a00c9a25aff725cfd875b40ae9eeaf57178751
describe
'33897' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVU' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
99d65081371da731834b0766fa4d6aee
85c287d9dfb330f5eba0e4215b3fb214739c9e85
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVV' 'sip-files00072.tif'
8c6d6e3463668ddc1803ec2f741e7588
95580e60255239046851baf9898e725fbe32a733
'2011-11-16T09:24:37-05:00'
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVW' 'sip-files00072.txt'
d97d0ab9de048da8f6d1eb64a01f0e2f
7c7bb040bd478019591a544ec4351f34c1d30202
describe
'9565' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVX' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
71b876a09870c3bb5c0c614705fe1874
db7a48a1466d5758ac7148f629e4280675960b74
describe
'996006' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVY' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
596febb0ba02924be4961631376fe314
c26eca7e6158d0cb4401e080240c60da2b00dedc
describe
'89700' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
fad551638e3c60ec3e0cef89f78ddf86
c0558dd96e77f85c60c2bb91264a536d0eb57e16
'2011-11-16T09:28:08-05:00'
describe
'22735' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWA' 'sip-files00073.pro'
c4c0eb819576cead23cdca3edac0d376
947268ab4072c4fe632e65146d906b87cdb9b605
describe
'34415' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWB' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
d446f6c60287c9c08382787dc9361e0f
c26160778a0522f51f8e65177e0a39dd4a826efc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWC' 'sip-files00073.tif'
c0ea20aa11c393aaf285e63ef9a5d2ad
e8371f751cca22892a7cd86718132c0bc262bf2e
'2011-11-16T09:29:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWD' 'sip-files00073.txt'
12957a66f3b1017cbb07913ec35587d4
2406575c3d3cb6227527b7097ce6c3b0b4d25955
'2011-11-16T09:29:17-05:00'
describe
'9226' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWE' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
630d7989af8476398f6089583694127a
67af21aa9ee3b869c85c020a98f51f79c3ccd171
'2011-11-16T09:23:38-05:00'
describe
'966901' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWF' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
fb92ea6801113feda036f46b33ee8aed
8b2566125f0b41f72bf25adb3786ee16ad2b520d
describe
'87964' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWG' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e274372bce0fc538ccbc97e810111580
0571eb88e04c1d0d1af346ea27d99a85f8cf9900
describe
'11413' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWH' 'sip-files00074.pro'
fabed4a3df3e4cea8f2ff79d44bf8d11
17b55191527dff03773712578cc0e8ae5eca2edb
describe
'27388' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWI' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
b245c15c3bed5dd11bc445440070040c
b329715d0cca0c273e5b44703b8ccfdb50514736
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
1c6459fc389264e3fabb8421ce14c0a3
b541efd0e2a6f1cab1259052a8f98bca3aa213ee
'2011-11-16T09:29:16-05:00'
describe
'489' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWK' 'sip-files00074.txt'
bc73374c4b7675378b4f86dc8c4dfa7d
2574513a07b185fe59d4a2fdbec507fcc6a22413
describe
'7765' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWL' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
4269919fc1b21335738f87950559a1f4
c851c673b15fe8bc0c4376ab97841050fcb16073
describe
'996017' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWM' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
2ee493edcbb6c1f1f2c784e66df3062d
56d2fd93afa3e02cc571a51f4e28fad0fdf54552
describe
'84846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWN' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
930769dde0bb2ede718e1b6c5a8d86b5
047378873af08683877ab13e1d8985e9f9060971
'2011-11-16T09:25:40-05:00'
describe
'12633' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWO' 'sip-files00075.pro'
fdfcd8c77ed975598a34e3cbe2dd04fc
5a2508e0f4d825093ed9e5c71c298d46edc6fbf7
describe
'29020' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWP' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
044c0356c95595f34332542751181f18
dbd39420a075db4e35020f0a2dd69c996fdc1485
'2011-11-16T09:28:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
ccb9898017188cb0dda13d9e7b06bb88
3fc3cc1d416cf6f525221776207909d968d79e09
'2011-11-16T09:22:37-05:00'
describe
'530' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWR' 'sip-files00075.txt'
ad6e80a631a53a5bafd6e2ad432cc792
d0b779425f19db7ebd4c600b6918e85fc42a030a
describe
'8189' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWS' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
7221c6c33a90dbb4c9621655b4ea3f0e
481847e606cf788b7262b99983f6407c83fba6e2
'2011-11-16T09:27:26-05:00'
describe
'966939' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWT' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
1bd1bceb401a6554fd3eaced56495e69
24155ed98e9e4e3a266c51aa9901524051e0b782
describe
'86332' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWU' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
c1c46ff327c2c455ffec5703c7d1073b
92eb7670b9e6233f44fa77bf25498e668ea6ff07
describe
'22787' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWV' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0df7cea586bf6e3d9df4bba5917a07b4
9d1345931e165d4f7a65bea10a2e11deeadf3439
describe
'32310' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWW' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
cae05da1e231238878f8b4c41ab4e767
6706e1425375ed66dca1e1716262a1d891fcc9ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWX' 'sip-files00076.tif'
3be51102959856c4f0ec15bb602e04e7
1036df1ca43b3458d2680ba0b2b20fbae5d23ff0
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWY' 'sip-files00076.txt'
8c045a9db9b5d56ae2be183006df468a
ab309b75efe1b9221221c32ef0679114ef58f539
describe
'9385' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
fb329cda549b67be93f583fea913dd84
7faeb900fa4169083ef42d22b32d76bcee76b063
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXA' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
13102cf4a4a7f0931bc60d79ec975952
749270d8cb872dd10e3bc882a7c26e5be53fc2fa
describe
'81947' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXB' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
ac5ba4003d45483043ef10e435a07b4b
496d7820b33781472b6b6aa84f428710fc2dba96
describe
'21357' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXC' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6e10e269d09aedae3102dfa8125cb515
6b78aa33819bf3f4f9106b4e81e1cec79202b355
describe
'30239' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXD' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
62180aad1deb26513f5530642205686b
75f8979fa2aef7f1f5731ecd1ce94a53d169ea66
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXE' 'sip-files00077.tif'
ad88e3cfbad5ace1a5725939985d37af
25b1cd98a59986a69d98cb63bed0376fe624ad45
'2011-11-16T09:26:12-05:00'
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXF' 'sip-files00077.txt'
c5e1f6824213fbd5fbbe44e82cc52b79
35b82376da5e4a5006ef0cca2819c109ff232f65
describe
'8604' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXG' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
964f78266bc7b719d9cb36a266db0b7b
f32fb8f3b46f8ea29fad5aee082ff672ecdbacf0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXH' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
0eed2e25fe348fa441a740f64578fa32
f3588d0e45132601c75f61bd4b3dfbf208ead140
describe
'88783' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXI' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
f080a19fbd9cfaf5423def1d68fe0663
fa26ef186f34a6fd0af7599cdd28a3fa2e5f8802
'2011-11-16T09:29:41-05:00'
describe
'22573' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
4fb58d255265ed2e5814ebc17db035f5
be9093d02810669e1e80aea3a55b648f896e5ff9
describe
'33276' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXK' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
d5de77ce986c034d10a2188e099a7329
8692d9662677b7122a3493248348e8e06f3339fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXL' 'sip-files00078.tif'
d0184d025c012b24df3670defdff2984
9feec9ad89561e167be23a94696e9f5da3fd6090
'2011-11-16T09:28:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXM' 'sip-files00078.txt'
dfc94f40488b8cbbc882c27ae6f260ac
e26862ba307c1f724cabafb9c6e6c54709a02d0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXN' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
cd3bd6fba3c20adf7a2db027f809c383
666355cd37a3b49928a9526ea9fa59221bc1971f
describe
'996019' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXO' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
cf0c0155ad4c8458a8760586c12936ab
c1e7e51ce5384fb06861d23e26f2d08f07adee94
describe
'84787' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXP' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
1b5559b01a89e383b68d19ca80231eee
a33da6af18e1e6228defd23bd58c839512453377
describe
'24558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
ccca3ef7a57e08fc6e33c84c31d85a74
dae447890a27690ba4d9ed60cd59e366a21f234b
'2011-11-16T09:25:30-05:00'
describe
'30379' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXR' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
59979e92f8ebef61e4b5d0c5c9d32da0
2fe2a11cab24758539be4bd2d50eeffab9d8218a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXS' 'sip-files00079.tif'
983fe6747da483f192c9b172992368a2
3a195f904d0b992c775b999cc17d9d244daab779
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXT' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7fc51fead4bdd1247d52b93408a11257
34c576108bb6522c5dbd440f2ec69c197935ae0d
describe
'8688' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXU' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
624975784a61609aa43f58c67545a436
447dcd1b6fc50f066f334aa38421accbe5c792e9
describe
'966931' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXV' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
67a8898cbffa56f2373fb1794934ef3b
ed1c45728a688ccb29124e3926dc8e7c61d5b505
describe
'87767' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXW' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
61e64cae90fe13a564d6ca9290cc20b8
d8878cd43c187e86863e6f1ff8103537c9d52b18
describe
'23253' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXX' 'sip-files00080.pro'
afb28f2d3de5a407e6a161e61ecaba01
c4d46a284c62509891f2c2b5e516ae03231090f3
describe
'33271' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXY' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
9401b5b708e5ba0d4039817200af909a
0621dc515236d402bd3db11ad9281a6282d60138
'2011-11-16T09:22:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
56cb5bccbd0063b04908cbe7c0ed64e7
be16cc3f094a918b81b4440a0c6f783d00b3a0d7
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYA' 'sip-files00080.txt'
b7d90dcbdb66c5dc7f13f34fd17ae196
3be0a038a0c62a2cc6b530c247d0abcb1a40f95f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYB' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
4382a17a936832b3aa23841825b23c5f
1e2fa345aaee9865d7ea2351b9f27381afce2c5f
describe
'995985' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYC' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
3ce1929469822d3e3572ba8138407f32
129eaed887ffae2f0499289366eced1fda6ded3e
describe
'77456' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYD' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
5d9242e55ae8c46195faf71f96837178
01b237a4e13de8f19197cab435b905472433ee7a
'2011-11-16T09:24:36-05:00'
describe
'18758' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYE' 'sip-files00081.pro'
7c38cdd079d270ff486ebfab153494d8
82a43909895416f26d7ffbebbdbbdefd37f4fdcd
describe
'27272' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYF' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
3700ec8b129f55c31d4670d7c33bbd73
ec56685343191a2db3a1c411a3e09334b886a236
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYG' 'sip-files00081.tif'
e767b8519e7269ade12f7fdf450c9959
e9a76f776d3b90422dcd5fca81edb60c3481a3d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYH' 'sip-files00081.txt'
cdef764d5d0771775b01faf46b746937
9915d7705b9934fc400d74addd4ea084efa8229a
describe
'8111' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYI' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
4e925089b6bcfc52a02403fed2f0c097
e64be883d0e44056e8640b2fcd0d1ae67a1b0f2d
'2011-11-16T09:26:55-05:00'
describe
'966927' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
95819deaa460536f85ee08f8b06e3075
a16e2e6bacd2b2dbcbdacce192fdf0a7e0ed68b1
describe
'90131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYK' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
88b5d1420b8f2bdfd46376323c01d8ef
ac416486b2a1777bedc038e58bb0480f1bd57759
'2011-11-16T09:26:05-05:00'
describe
'25077' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYL' 'sip-files00082.pro'
2da345607142b084bce8a8e2704e62c1
a6ad69709d39da09352828b965089d88f9cf17dd
describe
'33634' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYM' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
7765566b07137a4128d05d247e2568c8
addf8c0f55ed5e667ff3fa897b1004239d685658
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYN' 'sip-files00082.tif'
24a8fbf8ec319faa165c68c0ca2145de
0b13e6e48ac9186119ad750b21858dcb524cf165
'2011-11-16T09:24:17-05:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYO' 'sip-files00082.txt'
b68c72166fc931759108030fb3b78cb9
db832ad5a0dc30d21c8cbdc25525e929c4b291ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYP' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
55712222e3ed50f38096827f951f6bda
ccf315a5a52a7179f978c7f348b449767ec8aa5c
describe
'995866' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
d4ab95714ff8537009413297d823897b
915c7e2612ef5f5dc01d583a70eabdc4ecf64b1e
describe
'67007' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYR' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
6f3f9282a2360684fc23f2d48c0fc6cc
4ef0773ccfd8ce8f4fce89855bb5314b1a2a20e0
describe
'16617' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYS' 'sip-files00083.pro'
12e7b2dec0911d3423f95c5722424ac7
ea757f1d5c8688b040b78e2e7d7f3ab0000155bd
describe
'25435' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYT' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
a9dba6698b47cff97ffd30f3105550e1
0d45649a64a20c2bc3577550857831b8cce8c56a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYU' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e8591493d86dc0d45392e5c6d67a0d4b
ec205b486ada57fb5ffdad56900fab2bccf30914
'2011-11-16T09:22:18-05:00'
describe
'664' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYV' 'sip-files00083.txt'
7c72cd70feaeca2324ec4fe0302f4139
b5fe39e5d19e39a65e3001dabac255338dd8efd1
describe
'6981' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYW' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
fe51f7899b7e5936e4f6a8a1fd6922fe
26f6931f88e8efeec6bfd66f3d4d3d58f1361dcb
describe
'966890' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYX' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
609d33782c9c2254c4609c6b157a6d0c
dfb49f39b454c1461ca1603b2c865a225067805b
'2011-11-16T09:22:39-05:00'
describe
'81365' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYY' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
55f8de42c6033ed74eb9a5d766b43136
969993c09dd7e24a4379c6eeb4a80ac23c13c982
'2011-11-16T09:29:12-05:00'
describe
'20088' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
6f8eda4d5e30d76ae9e59642c43ab30d
09d457683bfc536eb9d1208428aedf47e6b8085f
describe
'29804' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZA' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
59b165b5fe5f9f2b387785743ef7c94b
46266a5504ab77cc6b43c7483429c9f7bf13281a
'2011-11-16T09:29:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZB' 'sip-files00084.tif'
f70e8fbbeca8704acf959e9f73385883
0ce1b34871596020d201049f69ed109441d8a6a4
'2011-11-16T09:23:23-05:00'
describe
'828' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZC' 'sip-files00084.txt'
0ae60b22a8d42352afb5d52f3419d43c
cc4a8614321fb10ae07b4dbaad97ec2582e57854
'2011-11-16T09:24:45-05:00'
describe
'8377' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZD' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
f5a17e64898a303224bd9889e12c24b1
89682f8591d2590c17e37288654a815d3e56dbdc
describe
'995991' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZE' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
30e1644dd534f7fd52de067f0b090adb
0f66168f595d2bcf9a4e377b37bd28e17855ed8e
'2011-11-16T09:27:02-05:00'
describe
'85385' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZF' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
06558a6fea39ae50b7f495f1194b82c2
22d38803e84069d6996b23b5f3992309dbea8814
describe
'11681' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZG' 'sip-files00085.pro'
5f43665b8595ea3fe7197c1818751a44
c3e7f5d3ce7c402f3399fd13b409fdf314bbc49e
describe
'27251' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZH' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
153ab255e90fde122af2d3acaf143eea
394e52b6ca97b922d5fa74427e78ea4552a367ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZI' 'sip-files00085.tif'
c958285e63e375750bcb1fc4cbf44b49
688c901ab7b154efb24c01b170f4c406bb2ceaac
describe
'475' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
8321f8af154da9732d31d528cbfdb874
289ac95dabd69e26252ab2c09d4e5f5fb687bc8f
'2011-11-16T09:27:27-05:00'
describe
'7848' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZK' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
7fc263c5419f275ad74cf7afcfc789ae
5acb84c56e8679847019ee8c2b1610f27af80b35
describe
'966941' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZL' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
f7eec3071e3f627277e7328a3729868f
bbeea68a765f556a97c2978bc294358827216ed2
describe
'91276' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZM' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
5be4b264d996d568fa50f0e1822f64a2
c988b417d0726b96703fc1409a13c03d2d78fe10
describe
'23103' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZN' 'sip-files00086.pro'
f3dd2813df633a2ad7c803d49db98be6
e0035defd7dc2427e07ef6b9e9115f5b2b6a942b
describe
'34039' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZO' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
4b2dd6d07994f9159080058cee30d406
7c944e5b5221a697280508be8a3bcadba681a70c
'2011-11-16T09:29:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZP' 'sip-files00086.tif'
b9bd8cb63b56a044f37f05b33438c173
6bbfd5f5205e41b3802e7435f8c0b7c757a9b238
'2011-11-16T09:29:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
ffe3101efa21e9034d0801236aebcdc5
3cee1f4433159d005fba311772a3899f2308404f
'2011-11-16T09:25:05-05:00'
describe
'9570' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZR' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
3a889c0967e9bfff9b8f2e98e5e7f074
c69f8de0af94faa9ca6f7c9b60fa93d55fc35f9d
'2011-11-16T09:22:42-05:00'
describe
'1029677' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZS' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
60c84860fce7a0890e3c34cdc5d7c7b6
b7c15e6a4d6552ff1f325ff64e02ffd90db3f035
'2011-11-16T09:26:15-05:00'
describe
'82747' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZT' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a2ffffded1f540e5583610ff77f00b4c
a3d9453cb40ec2823ac196087a9117aceffc013e
'2011-11-16T09:25:47-05:00'
describe
'22669' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZU' 'sip-files00087.pro'
9da00598e0c1054cd80ce9aff72f658a
9a44c7217fbc427fc4adb8248acd02248c730c79
'2011-11-16T09:28:43-05:00'
describe
'30420' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZV' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
8cd396d0b6ca6a82c52eca79fd36c3cf
4f439998b203f15e74d60d21b61dad2077b36553
describe
'8246257' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZW' 'sip-files00087.tif'
cd078f83fc30db1e3e1bd1684cb4c36b
3eba55edc6dac8bfdccdfe8ea2808c4265fb5cfd
'2011-11-16T09:26:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZX' 'sip-files00087.txt'
aa21549bdfea9e2aa1b5155611931d93
7de5ecda044d2d834d49d0340d129c941065d03c
'2011-11-16T09:27:42-05:00'
describe
'8813' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZY' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
3e011bb9514bb185cfaab40605c987a5
7b0a440b7d13a180d92c2aba9d9a5e1c7892bf00
describe
'1059140' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
6d0d724c10de746d3ac7bab1643ff974
808e840817609af0e806b7e3237eadb421cc3c64
describe
'80481' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
f70b4dc24e660f3c07d12b7e9996c445
204f46c8bf963b3fc9ed31feaf1c96f9133a5429
describe
'20807' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00088.pro'
a44b78bd2a492a8631ec7930117a62b1
8b047c8dcd9ce940c69c23eb0d4ca056d564dc37
describe
'28181' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
d31cc5fdff1646f0f45b1b5095311202
1c75663d34a468053d5fb8a71113e62433f4cfc6
'2011-11-16T09:28:17-05:00'
describe
'8481759' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00088.tif'
43f4d1547c8ec7ee40fd363aff2e3dd5
e8e15d003a570c8be0f631175515f2230ae8e395
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00088.txt'
3deeea1e8681052f8795d22322e2bfd5
0e45c9380179f80e572571fc4ad2f7d424ff15fd
'2011-11-16T09:22:31-05:00'
describe
'8369' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
a3c0449228a9adc1fc8e155ebc384674
ea4b06188d96fe94e08e072b7c32427d1db824c6
describe
'1029718' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
81d28af45949380b2fe42b6307c9f5dd
a43697f6d600870eb11a812847a43cacfc73cd82
describe
'75373' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
3ad41b92c3709ea2e696457d4c20ae4e
186d928b2b88835bea8c7a11d8b55ce26aedd00a
describe
'18548' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00089.pro'
6105bedcf7a05debde8f468c2cd538b5
fc948a4c3be8f58766a749ff7a5e6bee19ef6e6a
'2011-11-16T09:22:43-05:00'
describe
'27713' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
88001468cc09ac1168039ac2a240d1ab
b06bbcccf9cd9c34880d4585220d35c053a8599e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00089.tif'
ca2063ecbca51861132d1fcc2b4dda04
c90f746f3b652075cb9ab82f40de2763d469a5e7
'2011-11-16T09:26:36-05:00'
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00089.txt'
5b02e767425b546c8198edf9ec714986
2a4bb2a355ffcc39fbbf3045cf63d19d9baa07da
describe
'8057' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
a02bb0efbd60c2ac4cf2507cee99c6b4
b256905ba5665120d970ed400a06a328a4c40cbc
describe
'1059147' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
ed70095bf43c25de3fb579f73bee07e8
7efe45a938e7be8e359d39d56a07380eb6983bc0
describe
'75863' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
f067e425585ba378f4c634c5e552ff4c
07cf2b672908c6258db71c9b00d830027255c501
describe
'11107' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00090.pro'
1b9159f0c1b655f768f43022c988fd93
51ccb771fc0e22f318e96479adb11910dec15a22
describe
'25962' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
2af769627c4bf275d9ffc57c289295c7
3d54aba665652ea969793ab8d699db772e4ea901
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00090.tif'
b9df65b4454d1191a3e1716d8737a1c1
536bc74eb4a01a92fc591f3bc24fc56742b2a250
describe
'479' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c1f9e387cb04b1cb629ed5aaacd4d8b9
4f1a86ec326def74653dcbc1ad26dc74b2e8bcbb
'2011-11-16T09:22:54-05:00'
describe
'7516' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
b0e56e75ef32fa6afcd75e96a0cff43b
2aa84935fac632175e00df5e6c5ad6fd7a37b262
describe
'902621' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
2313c3e80dde40eb1c7ce0716a60e185
b663c0dc76ce39c3278827592fa2952d613800e3
describe
'73367' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8d5b158b49652c2a3cb2d25b5ad9918e
a6f900a0a3b55a69d7005603ba5b90a7a74d3725
'2011-11-16T09:25:13-05:00'
describe
'21558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00091.pro'
7c5590d8903409c0d8e1ace0cee17105
eac9afac627aea9e81b135fa0a82bf3a65eb2bce
describe
'28595' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
cc621c666638c725479b40b4a13bbf74
22df2cf570bc23d4c79f341fbd5532be3a6db641
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00091.tif'
6df5ef4663f344513573bd698b6770dc
f0d10c00a295c7459ca8b73f34672645bcadfcbe
'2011-11-16T09:28:05-05:00'
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
1cb344af753be999723de7264c5954b3
64d4b81ee68624e7c72018c2232b8d2872f0f410
describe
'8631' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
759e4d5e38262edb553cb497c75f3fcc
8cfd6a92779026dbc57b78ba03c99aef3ef333ac
describe
'960663' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
709783eda66d8ad6bd9741d861de79cc
a5f6ace55d2a539eed1ee79713bc9e55c6962945
describe
'73493' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
8ce8340c266068469634e312181c0556
2e112c2fcf3e644b90001900308fa592ce684f51
describe
'22504' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00092.pro'
f7ac67f211818fd0c92ca4d1a8ebd7b6
77d02244e932ff32478d162d89b3ebd79d43e488
describe
'26137' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
55350e168a3c1775000ceaf75fafd1ea
8e8737d553ca3c808e25863e5ba6bd8d55f28d51
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00092.tif'
30544c36317435f045956d5582ffb434
4767228261b87e516acb8406fe2fa9e1dd56906f
'2011-11-16T09:29:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00092.txt'
3fd1360847fc65d2f6e4a133ab4c199f
b8adfd991d242d6f524d4f5d18deb4af373c2438
'2011-11-16T09:25:49-05:00'
describe
'8348' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
a6ca04cd9b2420b78f08827ec2516559
d4cfb3781d4b9962465b1cff11fb77d6b4156992
describe
'1029664' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
5e5423bd26ffe1796b2aa5d4b04257f5
f15bb55d4fcebc2f58a0faa2f0c768bb38ce713b
describe
'86790' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
15e438b1bc490bb95829ff8468b4d07b
04885f705fca982884ba0f41ca4fd87c7c7ffd93
describe
'23817' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00093.pro'
63427a6c0a57a18b9b2bd5b780a3f8aa
6d263b0ef8123b4f3a0899742f545869130ecfe5
'2011-11-16T09:27:32-05:00'
describe
'33162' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
8fc5d5b0caff8ea7fa308e5ac3cf0514
e9158e8d9378af169b8e93f034ca4638c5bbdf7e
'2011-11-16T09:27:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00093.tif'
00b43ed190af0fcb246b525db81cc0ea
1ddd1711bafb739a501762844e1c3473e079993c
'2011-11-16T09:25:39-05:00'
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b81feaf83857de51337ac09a97363cdb
0cc71bd24986571b0b87466cbc1ab50ee3e940d8
'2011-11-16T09:26:18-05:00'
describe
'9560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
87740488c43b303bf2438e9151fdeb91
fbb15cfe789541309a9306158a9d4fb34b4bb084
describe
'1059075' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
0da85d5bd05174edd32c38f91332bbea
c2eb37c61886440dceb2295d84f50dae178badf5
'2011-11-16T09:22:27-05:00'
describe
'85194' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
8272d1babd274d0896b3147cac59d46c
19e15f7506ed30047863a0ac362c9dcc950532ce
'2011-11-16T09:25:36-05:00'
describe
'23568' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00094.pro'
5b3a1da69fa8402065d3b02a1a35f37a
6aa70c77c16d77837be530d26253a75917ec6b5b
describe
'33189' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
9c7705027d4aaed65c9aa81235fd8bfe
45f7bea36aacbdd65ba18dc9cd2257fc3c56ce98
'2011-11-16T09:26:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00094.tif'
a248c93e6b574defd7b447eab83f2175
c9e463d4ccd53cf05ec19cec8287756db20ad795
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00094.txt'
da33da37912d05dfe84751a30721948f
d5fe94078e16608b2a52dd609332ffd3c64518b6
'2011-11-16T09:28:35-05:00'
describe
'8978' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
87a2907dbefe47b1a684431d0d80c9e7
cfbd428479fe3bb9c3c279855edcaa159d6eac1e
describe
'1029702' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
727aa9248ec71166384a969c2983d2f6
197e406006d1b5dbee70474fd24c3e602d5d21d5
describe
'85233' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
b7d59261ba4f651d60d30b023215de35
fad7d5876ded241ad10749db39c807b3f6fca74a
'2011-11-16T09:26:49-05:00'
describe
'12572' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00095.pro'
01702e438ce47db8ea9fc489798799ca
5998fbf536ad3f4a8ee0ddf3f960d07c8cfebca5
describe
'28397' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
293928917dd6086ee92fd88c0cf97ff0
a72cdf94171ebbbb111bfd5b128c658ba7d79827
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00095.tif'
2236c2a87fb066264749735b0c91e118
025e03adf6ad59fd1d1fd46c4afccf8366a2e20d
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00095.txt'
7ade6b8594a165630de1ba71432a43e0
655dd7419693f10aa6966dfa5a07974fde1cbb37
'2011-11-16T09:29:31-05:00'
describe
'8089' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
8e0b1647d45d0c0cc79a25a1e5b94ddc
4d8065c1ad93c5f4c6c21482caa0fbcb5eca9f11
describe
'1059085' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
9e00445d300d3bc860fa28776229f072
9852414417e316dcf5a144f019e762ceda8659d5
describe
'80861' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
be44b6c6fa54ab47039b1dd2339c7acd
1058990ec71eb9557c254034221787bd8c986c0c
describe
'23970' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00096.pro'
ea099f4a3cf16178c45a74b21866294a
aa6c779e1461faf65a5d538e06326b5831b8bff9
describe
'28441' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
75175af2e97737351825c0279b03c72f
f8d1ba3e13e4655f2ceb1eddc2818ebcc66e4c82
'2011-11-16T09:27:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00096.tif'
3d237335168f2433fd9a66e5de5259aa
8a1da21df9549399574b40f05f7459132c70d20d
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00096.txt'
79e0aa9af23641fee2493d75727d7f70
7892690c77936ba1f25649a466c46d8fa7ca4109
describe
'8493' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
e210d4acd94bc2cfac879c9e1e970b77
b7d48665e3e2c490ce6f932219cf2119f4d28735
describe
'1000265' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
2b25366fee648cffcd825f0d1ba95ef1
b3da57210d7a8f0d0cb853a9174314b636578a5b
describe
'70238' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
13c57e62e4b35badf88bf471ac2e22eb
48314a6cbf5f486f90794499d8477ee82e1ebe95
describe
'17587' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00097.pro'
9e484c58b410408718b92c6872420799
1b7295f2a6a9f506f8809aaf256ed8acd5849a02
describe
'26047' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
74205f1b71366d6e6d3fca64d90f55b4
bc9eed4e45b8adfd76f649cb8dbac4365963ec53
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00097.tif'
4ae078a4e4e96c452f655205580a1ba2
6e00366438468b2c045295e1896be668e676aa43
describe
'760' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00097.txt'
a0b7903762885a44ef63ef96391f6539
282f866d5a5afa6951dfbeb96f64d90b7f357f88
describe
'7674' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
a4ecea0a800a0f3f073b166d20fa69fc
b9c403f22b3a2622beca5d28034e3ceb3a826ee1
describe
'1058999' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
4a864852ce202bcbf3b1fd9763cdc30e
55c5b40978e7931c37727fb17fdaa74ae65e1728
describe
'76939' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
69d491c7e19df1c5702bf7f2affcfb6e
5944523d17bc8f26736d64110d7fba5b90c06555
describe
'23208' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00098.pro'
e786a3b6ca1933cf6fc7036a44b03f54
6108026c254475f833f5d0562f346306d0e392e6
describe
'25934' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
dd307987f542fea046e8ee09cdd7036f
3a67732b21a843ea6f8a5e8f5985e6a250421845
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00098.tif'
bfb05758e901c62c8cc647e3f0b20ed4
9191ba3fe47c8c149438b033061209bd5f942a1a
'2011-11-16T09:29:57-05:00'
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00098.txt'
66229f4264c8af5ddacca71b6d7423ed
f2239a8c11e3ca6ab84cc7463229ada9595fecc8
describe
'8217' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
00a018a1339fd0d70c26891bcd78a6ac
e19fa05605eb8a3fa2fa313b42bbae1d2c3702d8
'2011-11-16T09:23:51-05:00'
describe
'1029719' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
807be26c2f05a050ac50b0f6e174a2d0
914d044f1ea34401e4dcda59542feaf414733f05
'2011-11-16T09:25:53-05:00'
describe
'86877' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
b7bb426d258a6e5d42d9c3bc4ce676f6
1c886182a4548caef86d35241c4e4e0b8c053dde
describe
'24689' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00099.pro'
228d0c2b1109ad7422b53894a02f9bf5
8a4dc67a77d982e52b9356b48eaa1c319d105393
describe
'33476' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
efe49f9727d71f52463bc7c89960f275
80dc67bddc312bb1d9fbea964e37d959185a4261
'2011-11-16T09:26:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00099.tif'
547a5492bddc22c6f69a1e14719c099e
499ca287355cdb18081148c6c3e4fed700b95508
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00099.txt'
b07927db7989a58a1409972854293250
7a8255f3ce7781d0016bc9c813e4dde141ae3725
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
a03bc57d7f114f2374adc4dc30ad1489
9651f4b9b338dcf34100024c80732fb549e1bd5b
describe
'1058986' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
be0d48bd00816c51aee5b6984fa60c8c
f0c9c6fee929560aa853b2b17fb12d9f13d1c570
describe
'87272' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
b3c1c53209a1925f34b3506698780e92
d234da5323aa3dd86946fe7f211f19ca650f68bd
describe
'25535' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00100.pro'
d01f9a4ff51cef25e532daf60e546512
1441641ad120bbf67753c0ea4b866a17b9009770
describe
'31327' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
6e8eb7bd66d977e09029a5bc507e427b
e75733a0a508d0f9eaccb397ec25faa78c8d4672
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
733afce56425a8377eaa097df589f2d4
d6f6180c8c76d532cf517ea52d8eedce8f81c3c9
'2011-11-16T09:24:29-05:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00100.txt'
75bd06f6e5a5064276aaf676f0953d96
30ffeef9f597ced0e849be22eb87ea26b1c5d97c
'2011-11-16T09:26:42-05:00'
describe
'8847' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
3fee66950457f839637f1d4a391bb118
f88355e6894e0559ef74d62e9d0c463fe3cd911d
describe
'1029710' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
6eadbd15a420406b65a0bab0925029c0
469980982209d8b53b5b1e9aaec0bf1ae40a3350
describe
'88343' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
43e0f92ea58df1ef180205b7b470e25b
f03d7a213ae2489cf83ecb82544cc72e8c4b5ddb
'2011-11-16T09:24:57-05:00'
describe
'13410' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00101.pro'
0cc4a75bdaab1fb8257ad0e03b0442f2
76bbd93a13058186afdc8f3deb4beee7bb8471d9
describe
'29673' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
42cee136609d987f7a63b187a33938ca
c812eebcb5b38802f5131bac1a6b2054d38e2f59
'2011-11-16T09:23:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
b8ab27b962f9994a51637bfb24ae06ab
1796abbd4f59201d7678b890b15a39ad3dff7cc7
describe
'554' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00101.txt'
2e707aadd489c44a5be92c36b6bf07ed
673b5e3945bb0edb470972aca26e747d95ab3376
describe
'8371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
ef6c76b70f3d121e6544bc0116a1c56e
22abb2ef8e9664f1ba0ba0104dae0eb2307f3fcb
'2011-11-16T09:24:23-05:00'
describe
'1059072' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
30ea6e8b6168234b21965cbaa20d2e18
5d85c37c72950747991fc62bb08da78f6d8db588
'2011-11-16T09:24:58-05:00'
describe
'80885' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
36d5be921bd5ea99a4717ed728d9ff29
f4a2d8300157534347962fc9feaa6488b8e1e400
describe
'22811' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00102.pro'
5124f9ec8201f03e050e17d5d77a020b
bd0a5ba4ac2c6fc424ed6649c619355285db25d8
'2011-11-16T09:23:59-05:00'
describe
'32603' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
6d41b2d90cc1f2e2cf1aa14936f3c25d
9025601cab20451c248ad16d19b09e44feb1e39e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00102.tif'
63a0d6da9effef139e7c41218d43859e
a112c6e24a0e55cc5d35562d3919ffc7a40dc0db
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00102.txt'
b2d94876d1cca5f0ab19be7fdf47912b
0fd6bcf8e816a649d9e69b01dfef48ec7bfd1d60
describe
'8478' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
1bdcbbc7b64b8e759a47d64a4ebf15ff
b30914bfb3b77ebf9979bacfe54252e68dda3ab9
describe
'1029656' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
9c6c8e1ef7b8a26f9865e08a69cc365c
2113f636e55453ed9b64c9d41719d1fddff16ca6
'2011-11-16T09:26:26-05:00'
describe
'90159' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
8c2573ed770f5bfda22a6290f7187a2c
5df8b8e3cf7d7cf7f97f3cb0259f6a1796336308
describe
'11312' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00103.pro'
2879af6f89ba092bc082797ba9faebd6
01f372a606c916d82313095c357cbd1c5b5c9747
describe
'28052' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMED' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
b47330ce2d4c12fdd68b6f65d3983615
3e8f2bce005085f204bf83472c9827fefdbc5bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00103.tif'
1d0bf0b54e27b8fd4b47018eec2b435e
c3aa87b1a23403f49f6a73dc4dce8b6555271416
'2011-11-16T09:28:48-05:00'
describe
'477' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00103.txt'
8d73ece9df3151de5aae105e990c4c87
59230b60a4a9c0a0c67c8779658b961c5a531011
describe
'7946' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
9410a9644aad0d980a740ff0b1621aad
3d99c80653da04430dc20cc47169a4e5c217d7a5
describe
'1059145' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
f757075e9e1637b95f229d256be5ae09
30a96140ae70fe3b55ad9972091439ef9f1c416f
describe
'84284' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
07dae2734ef13c813a41347598a21bea
76fec20471087da511a9619b54b4629f0d458451
describe
'22760' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
d1098c6f8f26d741573b9bee50aec5b8
501f8514804485bba9f69eb4dedeacc9f2efc59f
describe
'29350' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
61de77d8bc73090763a84f4cf9b39212
027586753182345e32b4557143ea9d6855e97c64
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00104.tif'
247dcd0366fc9ca5ccb94673d02f317b
f21eb53f52850e462c93d0af8589ab37a697557d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00104.txt'
8fd5e691ec51a23fba2045ddc7c70aeb
cbffbfebe57264e865b6c21db85d7dfd32ca82f2
describe
'8646' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
11a6b2bc00adc229f7f48f9b488f77cd
761b4b3b4830d74a314d24a069546ca6440c62fd
describe
'1029721' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
d521a84ec4710bd8f1c09081420a6038
469d03383cd455569651be5d41ebcd70441993a5
'2011-11-16T09:25:21-05:00'
describe
'92669' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
d6e96900b622b1c4e17526f30ea027ca
5e1e83850924a950a68f0233a59df0c0dc9a3c11
describe
'11233' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00105.pro'
3f06498dec899480835d4bbbd7e97417
1a06e849ddf6f64f7da2e4c7caf2e37fa57a6047
describe
'29906' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMER' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
3d3970a9128b87f1cb6784cc6244b6d7
d05badcadd659dcc5ea553a49fa0c388e0368452
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMES' 'sip-files00105.tif'
51e25c252186f7f4fe5ae0a8de7f2b66
a6449bc7ead8748fb445b4530f34c7b52eae7d72
describe
'469' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMET' 'sip-files00105.txt'
c13800a1d7dec12885af0ac4d5e74eff
b7583b57cd0b6b78b3471fd4cbf908fd2f1702b2
'2011-11-16T09:28:53-05:00'
describe
'8497' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
9dc94b7fba82d2e0f9df31573471a79b
bd73f894a86384698d9544990a860183eb827819
describe
'1059149' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
82037d4ac28794d230c1f8239d29c1d9
1abbb7c40fc48bcfef44d9b16927d1a4b0d26841
'2011-11-16T09:29:00-05:00'
describe
'85402' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
d20f005627483db17c0b16bb2edb5fc2
338616e67f29ddc3924f106179662c8a26abba76
describe
'15491' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00106.pro'
d0fc317f9734e9c5c43c04dc96576e30
fd41c031cb3160aefc459bd3ffe582f69c74058e
describe
'28481' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
c491603ed5c0146f370b9972c6f30728
9cdf68b1cafe7f39428f37bc0e11bfd8ad788c53
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b1737eb40ef68a22a4451278145c8c14
a9bae626e5895fe818cbd053849cd716318441ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00106.txt'
8c3917111158bc27dc30757eb59bd41b
d0ffa29af7882e0f40e557f7c670aff44e91acf3
'2011-11-16T09:28:49-05:00'
describe
'7750' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
d349fcd3edd9dd262ca27f4ceaea1695
7b04bd48e57392234efe2ea8911d69aac0dc1e8e
describe
'1029594' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
5208f8d3eb2c1b48a6232347464685e7
9b64d4b5b095ed87aac97d644ea7a73870af423f
describe
'85617' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
f46c6bfc1a54c1acc8d33b98aa2009a6
efc07ab24ee2b954a156723ece44c8366180a544
'2011-11-16T09:24:04-05:00'
describe
'23563' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00107.pro'
9f53d421b43595ccdd0678b132c9a485
4c6d42c6fb3c202835df9a1c3346c952337300b7
describe
'32895' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
0968e262920b273775f73b23ed8f2dab
809dd28b41ea2bab98638de716aebbbe422e4ac3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00107.tif'
0a8a3af629253b0dd74ba5966854a9d9
73672a337241ec62f1f42f1d00fedefc5ba38892
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ec014cc5a08c0a5a93e07d57eda657ee
9cd808e1ed85f257244b31bbcc2db4ccc7874383
describe
'9323' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
befcc129dc05da3277ee0cfeded92c50
fa2ea6d4aa9bc56b93e6f10b7a12574be066e787
describe
'850071' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
af6b12804c3051a08d8995a1b7f9e431
90040e3e2dd7a0daaf0a7ec03c549eab6c38ea96
describe
'49623' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
2f05c649695f950bade9b6050831df94
e018ad5873d62666a9de341c09a54192c6fcff29
describe
'11242' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00108.pro'
206d56e589d71acbb6c080cbbc1fc514
6a2579602cd695348a8106bd08018bcc1e46b442
describe
'18876' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
0710b31bc3f41274c4d6404d3b973054
738d59d68736985ded00590f2fc6f519f9a59a5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00108.tif'
dcde41029a67df1ff45bc86671a006a5
5a8d7afef9d519a380e00fbf4b53f1def6bb9b77
describe
'501' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00108.txt'
ba3c753b63abef9e47ac1af9f3d64a25
936f5f16540d5b5dbbe798c4f6d9a06de1e10860
describe
'5692' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
c4bc7d7032704cf318a6d561fa89b24c
c3ed1a680c505db2aced5d9940112b363695d38f
describe
'1029722' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
0e1f2d20deda1682fec316ac0e6ad28f
b25315ee4ef95056b9490a7a28e4221e040d2226
describe
'81322' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
33f030eee935099975cd4ecdc38a1e48
728ac3c37b3b791f11fd69c9738df2dc2a863531
'2011-11-16T09:26:40-05:00'
describe
'23205' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00109.pro'
40d317d6e0a4864acf0c42ab620179b5
fd5fa7a7c233c481892274e7dc2d5f92afc201d4
describe
'31151' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
abeae1d8f4065f5f90b8f0f988366ba8
52e506a5d5101789f280d73693ad000d20fc6ed3
'2011-11-16T09:28:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00109.tif'
6e49bf35d2b7f13e2e76306679752688
be11517cf7c71905b7059d1023194e21f2984b8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00109.txt'
0024c6a25aad4e243fe91ff465d88e94
4da6e3b61973048ba6bab9947718ce5ad3ef8c76
describe
'8932' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
f403b137e5f7c81e0c66716f52466344
5b5c581d58d141afb6f03d1821b7a9f79716b215
describe
'1059063' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
829c2ce90f04ad80e0a2c59d7b72558a
97667ba7cd84260e36e9e972d55ba4284269436d
describe
'80396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
6fb6cad743bca0b909ee7cc89e27a637
b8c3fa0248f93bcc94059bd943282f17499dd681
describe
'23577' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
5a8ca15d97429bc593f05cd8631f372f
5eb68005a89b722e2cdfbee6e1dda28110889085
describe
'29305' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
6aaaf8e31e77bcf940de01e88b772986
58e7ab8b7a9135a9b06d45b0b362d670bf4a559e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00110.tif'
d937f57da4f03bfacf9a0e152778e718
730edffbe5301bd7146eb46ff4aa863b9d7a1674
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
62c245aca27d2af0e909c2f4be18c78b
22d6712a4acb43a642fd0fada3b66147d691cf98
'2011-11-16T09:23:07-05:00'
describe
'8470' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
87aa071991c56ccb544b13cdcf654ccb
2d432910e5f8f85e6a63ad6ee6a7d8c1cd307ead
describe
'903825' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e4a541ed019f9cc02d9c20659e0cbe51
ed0350060b8319d10c5f79c6cd8df72ede31ac3d
describe
'64814' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
3a921061ade310a591e6e16e0b0a2b78
90b006959a5ff69ad4939f2a32660b728f172b50
describe
'16328' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00111.pro'
80e0468c90d936b3f4b0a0f4583ed72b
703d80c57a9780fb30a88e3385e3baa6b3cdabb2
'2011-11-16T09:24:24-05:00'
describe
'24690' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
1e54ac9c316e0fa444421ec8b390d7b5
c26a5dabc58f4ed28cd86b09184741d87bae5aed
'2011-11-16T09:29:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00111.tif'
5b7b88e126149a868a9798cff8259419
65563f12b8c3d3bb2d0a4619fb90ebe1e47ff2df
'2011-11-16T09:26:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
9a9c775fff3aa2cc306b3a5eee55b78e
5181b59962b5deb2ec38192514226b6e6f643c95
describe
'7374' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
61d040601ea39b6034efa1027154d7bf
6a4b005b1786f2d34e4c1f4b898cb33ad6001cc0
describe
'1059106' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
36b391153e81b16560e1af87e4bd29f5
b71ea635b7cfcc728c0f00e411164e36df7b31eb
describe
'68670' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
38092c48dc96a6e48a251ae76ec33180
cc8e65baad92f75835b8b896d207a5177b6863bd
describe
'10525' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00112.pro'
0f780eea4af1e2e750bd5c70555820a3
524e25db77bdccb61d658b9d721394e61c561a95
describe
'22893' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
72cd65a92c17c68c57f05d0e902e4f65
f95a85d4531cf360b5d3efc7c0cab67e484fddba
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00112.tif'
3436c21f90e948d633642899ed2b4049
655514d5ee5568debf83a97a2cbd66acd1d00815
'2011-11-16T09:28:02-05:00'
describe
'470' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00112.txt'
17385c3ec6ae00e82092ee4dc974552e
7b1b2796f723c62759ff87dc21d9d2d8219de394
describe
'7099' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
9f48d8f5f80eb11767db6b4eb9953148
cbde55ab40058f8a1c8f0e083495faaa369bb124
describe
'1029688' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
4e48d1bcfe0dd7b0461a36b52f3e65a3
514b96ea5ed2ac9bcf6de0ad89fd3762ec92580e
describe
'87409' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
eb5d42188641edd25486ce78495293b6
355dfe02517cf69163a43286dc77161bfec48f21
describe
'25541' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00113.pro'
e71f61ea72d1e0bc5dfdcd357fe918a9
84cd40d2a81c25a0eb548a442efebb509450859a
describe
'32639' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
60dc869f49a69b41628ab31e3c2de323
5a809eb598a243d982f082d1d24feb9a4c66848b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00113.tif'
c55fde30cf052bb58dd810cb0782b079
61887b3df9056ba637853ee090f43e7652a30da7
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00113.txt'
eb53be8c4c54f6a4141e445d586509da
5ccab0b3e612f6f1cfa5e5dfa00891acf21e221c
describe
'9201' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
202ec62412a9ea0d1cdb92dbc9be115b
a238c326e59f83ff56e1ffed186b07151d86f075
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
2a4f66ad03f12ce120b1f022596cf678
ce81b5481838bb872fe3bdd5bbe13caa6987af16
describe
'84734' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
d40616675119f5eff93cdf78ae712e0b
b625e07b7686f1f0a00c797cfb0572cb8503cd5b
describe
'15667' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00114.pro'
b258dce25dfd851b6de1a6cbdb26a0fc
d61adcbacfed617be0f102ff65c9409481ef5f1c
describe
'28837' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
dac7f00269efc0ddabc89a0411770fe6
d53684410c286b7469bbeb0e217d59067bdec625
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00114.tif'
eea75af906028266ed5d297f7826aab3
11d566d5bb039e89e03f0cc729537b40c0651aed
'2011-11-16T09:23:48-05:00'
describe
'674' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00114.txt'
467109eeb5fcc8cbe8f3fc88e76af4cc
801fccbc920be700abed4412bb62fefec11244f7
describe
'7956' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
8b8d29c83255a1ede099dd7c369db398
2b35a5a11ae6e1d2aec9745add0c59a63c4b5b0b
describe
'1029647' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
cb4f7ab4778d52ad9113bb3e81d8ddfd
15150792f7df3a6c94842e8a297263ab75bfb783
describe
'81163' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
b29162e00d68d604ac984840bd4f0503
139036de51a31c362ecd749f2a083f774a034ede
describe
'22062' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00115.pro'
3d0c0d1f8d45062ecf5f4f69601e5834
1d0008f9ab43f0be683730cb1f0b8fe2c343e826
describe
'30242' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
5f10ae2c537305be913f7fd11088a52d
4ca260b9e9761aaefe61f8c78fdc4838cdbd2a19
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00115.tif'
5b300ced8cb15ed9680003d99de47a51
3679089462055bb5b2d374f8341de52c9f07c6d7
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00115.txt'
371dffb5e3272a15156f86cd1529d875
8f635356fed72a72a45946f295baee68a448e447
describe
'8747' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
7cc84b085a734a6062e669dfdc3e05ff
4921b07743ac5993073ed26f16a9deb5345488b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
35805828e3d959102585e4f0cf5a42d9
d1bb4e84b33d72069402470f0c4ff52d7879204a
'2011-11-16T09:29:45-05:00'
describe
'87349' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
b004a846b0ccfc47ff94401f712bd28a
555e1792eab693ba9cb053191c1d9737e919dfef
describe
'10374' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00116.pro'
06337a587ad13040245cb2c52991a41a
1663c091c41aa11cc9472b4092f9cf366baf41cd
describe
'27240' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
7d4b5a19cab80f3d3d3a31bb509612ba
e8785487545bcee63649f0fb343e8f069c237dd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00116.tif'
f4c48f0c3393542032d615db1af9c0d5
f7123f9b97af32973e48a1e1e3f1fb9bb7ac7b60
describe
'425' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00116.txt'
c5bbd204af1b737bb23eea34c0c2363a
c235353602c228052a157afe016100e6b44880c8
describe
'7763' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
eb70ce4408402bd12ea73f09c82b6122
fec86737afe11fd6db709d7ee3dc658d209499e8
'2011-11-16T09:28:15-05:00'
describe
'1029659' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
95753222b2191ed94c367ec15e5779e8
3fb24b4a5495494b60198da2f2dfe24d6f346a51
describe
'81419' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
1f7c1fbf2c435aed953b6462198e9f20
0f43a561fca7a8b7653d5a9fbd025e85303f61e2
describe
'22695' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00117.pro'
2bd63e2e85baa650cabba19b91e8b962
0929f0fc8ce82906b71404353c4628296bd7e95e
'2011-11-16T09:27:34-05:00'
describe
'30765' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
08a6073fb413cbedeb77f8017b37a45d
020eb5b565c2a0302752feecf5261242cdeba964
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00117.tif'
0c798a025401189cd3b158ee116af7b1
a8bc7ecb36b43a29a14ef8257c590276eef5367a
'2011-11-16T09:26:28-05:00'
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
816c82c5d05158aea5d00316ab929e6c
c39937e42468a3020694ee5a716166b6cc832f09
describe
'8716' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
9791bd8853970403e5c546df34cc47cd
a8a59bca748a22b6a98ad51a7b5f1bbbc8bbe9e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
82315c78dc5843d31751c0f36a5a03dc
457adf8c28510e5f607e945aaae6ba0fbf8a81cc
describe
'78880' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
065e04f355a36d4e7806179c92bbd4f4
2973226f27891e62fe0028431887c4727f19f775
describe
'22642' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMID' 'sip-files00118.pro'
021f490b82d9d7b1e3259bce56addc37
be93545c533a062ad10774b1c907c7ad5dac8f4c
'2011-11-16T09:27:57-05:00'
describe
'32525' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
0798f530d1d11eb10c30bf7e612efb15
e7fd62b2e4b36ce398d339ac4a01867dabdb0a23
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00118.tif'
8a6f90ea37f75efe4ba96f48ba258708
91b94d85ac5252a2897397eae8a5451641eb286d
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00118.txt'
aa2d4212da48e143e2f990a8b5662f4c
670ed08885179dbf36e888f8f36fb1105628c3b3
describe
'8580' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
ec8e260c577f18ef3057150191daa500
b88387352ff7d02517ad588daab7450969ccd01a
describe
'1020438' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMII' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
bc6ea97b9b3e8f99e3a92205f87d718b
9f6d7da4e0f8ea095e0a81dfe71686513f49e1f7
describe
'75903' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
d047f747c23a801f30fb2570c6927fa5
be3be9c252020471f9e3401ed062b4115d3a3e2a
describe
'20552' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00119.pro'
0080677f89ace430324d14b7a498cd8e
6b7d22f979df3eb95d11b6cb9c31df7bc77ef9de
describe
'28808' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
765749a0314bc1eead4907aaf195fdbb
f1b4a020e16ba18067e61057c2b205798d04faf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00119.tif'
1bbc6180c259e45c4d457439dc5244b8
60791864a49c0a8f97e0082217588f93c5610001
describe
'879' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00119.txt'
af8355d9fa014acac5e909160aeeb1a8
b65110aff017dd93e6cebb4d81cc062cfb44903b
describe
'8045' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
eeffe3ee238a1322c6610239aa4e8917
bc16d4a477c07dfb4127b5fc2e3e6c4ac07ba2f3
describe
'1059150' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
9e509dfd00c0c8542cbec033b910a731
088e858aebc829ba703eb1e0ed8c378982d6adad
describe
'80218' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
688810cd8ed74608b12b1890491bb6a0
6e68de1368e34c3aa605c9914255a81744d39f6d
describe
'22589' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00120.pro'
7dcd5a3574a476c936ea16537d2db36f
573c1d8357e42ce9a58d89b7b394dc67b6476dea
describe
'31683' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
d67fa4ecf163952e37e9bb4389f3933b
d6895ed76e328916ae064794cecb6b3a9456dce6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00120.tif'
07292dcc091c27d2e58a0f93d6ca236a
299ca8e0ff793543442d98ee834ee91cb0d25f4f
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00120.txt'
7b08fb8a1071a9d13575a45a73caeaf3
71763c465d27560d5c047cfd55d75fc92f1c08b8
describe
'8802' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
f77bf32ef6a4d44e0229a0354b473a7e
88a66bc810e4a3c61b94c6f7e6fa0ef932791fae
describe
'1029711' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
59cc3f30d91f9a3ebceaf16d075a5633
41ee2ee83dfadd355a2f1b8b10ac1d89b9f55aab
describe
'83366' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
6b737656d7f7c657a5affb35d632c753
e5430682676007cae8cb7dcc1563ab2d9bc4f45d
'2011-11-16T09:28:59-05:00'
describe
'22508' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00121.pro'
b97985bdc62a9ff8fe65e9313af525c9
f429211540d4f9bd7c0a58019e68cfc04bb20f9d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
3e11bea2107db09ccd5c6a57fcbdee6b
75ad30c96c283d25271c4ec42ee04fdb8234ab2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00121.tif'
76761608c9bfdc398adbbb7a61327c49
81e433d38c2ba9c4aeb8126c6b8485ec60249779
'2011-11-16T09:28:40-05:00'
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00121.txt'
5729175cbf1ffd16e037fe4443c4b16f
d45a5b73c59e2b18e3f85bdc683427b2b8bc7a20
describe
'8920' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
739e1b8daf2fe79924b8c026860d484a
093d414e1eeb3545a8d9f8ca9a04366955839d71
describe
'1059116' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
813c89061f78d0f12cb25da77527eca3
07a6c70823d82e0621a52d74b5527f2b214ff688
describe
'88882' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
701d5938523a6679a44412f95cc9f2ad
fd412e61067c783bc9d2a4ce674b2d28eb05419d
describe
'24560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
1ac625454fd85bcc766eea7a904c6dbf
af80876152bd938473ce408b796e5d5f2216ccf9
describe
'35169' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
ea6265aab97b40d5e7470ef874de1901
534606d8a361288808fd6db16106e515f7f22ba6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00122.tif'
771285f88edf42de1cc3bc720825184b
03a0410f8148848de32ef78c7371ca9fcf4e12d6
'2011-11-16T09:24:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00122.txt'
579b2eee69a6cf9674911875444f8a5e
9d9d6bfd6706d49f973d0b28876136292f618362
describe
Invalid character
'9270' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
cc22a1a640a169dc9d0ed702daade243
df30ac021726523e045d05a94ba830b64ff4843a
describe
'1029709' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
b1b5e88e39dd271c97df0f083f8407d5
bcae4bdde43742e2017a80bfb899800b871b36ef
describe
'85362' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
08bfac59c5a594957c1c16f1d1c4c8cf
652b01ab0aa9936dc1551c3d6092441803516f53
describe
'23591' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00123.pro'
d7f672e135204c890f17877b43dae3be
c3b16acf2c5177742411ef97583b76cc14bcaadd
describe
'32994' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
d7be2a4bbae191e4e7b8f635bce4a582
4e27f848e64a1f39f510c41a3cc52a76a25646f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00123.tif'
0a65a1bdfabd6ab4b56edec8af8fe406
b17c6857c008fa1eaf51efc2b5ef4b7ac76d5679
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00123.txt'
8dded116d01b6b5cb44d4d6532bd870c
686a4035fdae54bd80dad742913390a55ef45333
describe
'9277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
babb0d8baa89e57fbdc0c2dec4028627
cf9054e52ff359b48b6cdfbf5d6dfe1ba7d61cd8
describe
'1059134' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
e5871c615ca6f3ad188f17546aeecc56
854e018b52d926ac7bf57a2a46e197c7153e9c68
describe
'87791' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
1da46c56333b04961a5d0df60251b4e2
d5f06347823a3c6787eec250043bb1eed3e5b050
describe
'24455' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00124.pro'
16ce9dd26467ed96746446141ad35b0b
bb255175da52111fc87e0de8073a672847a11f8e
'2011-11-16T09:29:25-05:00'
describe
'32790' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
8dac64668586ccde60db7ffc20905e31
a61488893cfcc536c12bdbd36a62041e56dcc46b
'2011-11-16T09:22:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00124.tif'
e7fb32cc1d153aad61364600901bd762
2da5c2e01094b71217792c1e9c580663f24d99a6
'2011-11-16T09:23:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00124.txt'
74b1fd7644f6480e8b93f70b29341aa5
fd064be5937d0e89555361eba894ce2b1e96f502
describe
'9141' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
ca91fbcee9fe7ddeb2553e5e7950bd3b
d1f796bd666d845344e500209a9c8f6d26ec636b
describe
'1029707' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
5fbd5f8777516b0824bd2ca318658ad8
c24896c715d95c44f876930b433fe2dacc642570
describe
'83904' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
b1afc2d973eb2aece958afcb8eda00e2
9b43cb1076a68f96339fdb5117054e761eeb2b1d
describe
'22992' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00125.pro'
f45afd70cb9f6983ca6e50abcf47f1fd
e2b3831c7c68e8ba5d651bfc431deb4a0df8b238
describe
'31436' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
be09f474aaf06c5b1a4460a9ba561045
ac8a615d59c6855990a0a35209672d633c49fb75
'2011-11-16T09:28:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00125.tif'
768e2657b8f981792a263463cbeaa4d0
cff0a0ee2a57316bf752ef47c45bd9bc4c343722
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00125.txt'
e983ddfb478ea42c333fb2703870009e
2461d84d2e72008f5911994a4ef462eb03b82025
describe
'9134' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
039a06145620fa521c6563b853fc184d
f0bf42916689e981c3dc0a4f6b879c3d19f69a9c
describe
'1059142' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
2b2bbacc4325e7e94c9ee211ea7e40cb
969c2a936a9cd47fcd6ea0fdccc4773ddf65fe51
describe
'86922' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
1996104776a1b1f64de35bb6008aefdc
9d8ef42edae4dd9e97917640b4fffba9fd9087b3
describe
'24042' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00126.pro'
8fc369ea99d7af0f337ba03e5bcc8d48
e99a7afc34a7b2d96db736654bccaca82479c53a
describe
'29471' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
04996e287f79344e862c67397944cf2c
f1753ddfddf6a5d920c77d0fc4e96bff64204a04
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
be5fdb8fe39c4e5bce52051a4ea3ac99
9d9d44af29cfaecf9758a2a53af2d1c1a99d497e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00126.txt'
fdfcd4e64bab30bf9bac5ca8977c7666
a6e499e5a35bc7d616de6ca3c2960b45f26e11dc
describe
'8962' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
95bc4b9d1314fc0e4079ad05a13d9be1
9416d8a84560cc6fc181461db33ded2ed37363f2
describe
'969606' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
d76e684b1c3fdfa0a23038f3ed3350cf
402612ba773918cd7ba0ab4fe5adf5fd13017fe6
describe
'70110' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
ec3a09bd213a8da9d62770fe25bf4629
dd8e4f9238473d460980c54afc124e06bf4ddc33
describe
'18364' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00127.pro'
dc95d751e1e11d77b96bc1d55d1b6a8b
e5f637ae6f07a75c2f4d64e712d49ef7cdd69e9e
describe
'26618' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
a9646197a077e047234f0dff7c6e8f11
4b8d1ac0c0c4a7fbe1db371a8975918b003a45c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
6234b80b066a6e85ae40259a4d033c0f
7a28562d8921835428f7867a02885440298f34c0
describe
'786' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00127.txt'
143b235a1a064a615600db08abaad78a
26cc3cbbf66a1e25fd4e3f967d6ab41c9e66b1f7
describe
'7922' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
b2ca73aa11df695968539c31b21b3ee7
67821a975070797a99112b172bfe7285424f178a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
55ba4c266db702db6e3a206f50150df9
4a4aa2ed47cc65d88db59612aebf66cb53915a23
describe
'84541' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
44339abcebc870d6bdcc1427e3dea9ce
f858b1bbd7e840e6b8d8fb29b3de52146e52e10e
describe
'23988' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00128.pro'
8040805b1837cdc5b26420b86fd86cfc
ba4580243296ab7ef74115e003fd8176631a6feb
describe
'34282' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
20643ccb209409a67ef715e4c80954af
deff78a82765f23d28b9605511bc194df1e1498d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00128.tif'
f07474cfe0e6bb528f22501040a094fe
9549f23f69546336d1403451c3de3c92064a77b1
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00128.txt'
1f907d54a3265a0e739925720a9c1ccf
193289c92e47c77bd187f603fe424d342c904053
describe
'8860' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
690ef06075f0a1aa41ab626b6ccfd237
719ade6767e0ebd456326a3bd2b25daabb0df7f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
40d7e1421603d8f7cee081a9c43252ed
be69bb8fca6843ed33fc908743bd047d1302c73c
describe
'89699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
abae18d8b736af130446c01980d88506
02781ea135ad34f579beef2569d2b2395ecff5ec
describe
'23901' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00129.pro'
6777239809b20569afe6f682e82771cb
4a33ce270b048b119e9cd8dd960ccb5b81a5786f
describe
'33793' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
1f5cd40e4fc106f230d376e22ab7d13b
440eacbbbd1c2680134a0ac8129e74d407009ac9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00129.tif'
90ef9ed2e03515a55b0145e2c562bee5
40a7de98c559cd7088ff6eb8fef344e0c67cdc07
'2011-11-16T09:29:47-05:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00129.txt'
4e9738dcd6692d9cf6e0bb357f036152
641c2158db55204795f08b038683bbc76880087b
describe
'9364' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
9e4d60475649a0bbc3eea565ba8fe274
3749ec2eb9e347bc6d57312938b0b2e631492509
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
3678d24a1ccd36b91150baef062114a9
0bd4eb32381107d28026e7e182e1313d54a7a97d
describe
'79415' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
eeba7947a2eff9bd972e6e20dd11c972
641fe4d264d13243cefabe19cb0267402811533d
describe
'22390' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
8e4eb20e536f09f1e3130a4d8fe60678
709037e4b87858a4793e3de43019f0e8183f221e
describe
'33378' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
344cbae03ca1a0b6db89be9c09f9fa97
7ff23bd873ab5e4a7fc924c03a2e8fc7ce62720e
'2011-11-16T09:24:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00130.tif'
c6a8071dd72eedf863dd31655e8f33b2
4fcb08759c91fcb65e6a9fdb1b6d332753152292
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00130.txt'
e938ba96cf86ae8619fa039562ce56ef
4f0e069184f3cac6e2090868eb5afff3c5386d92
describe
'8981' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
0339a10b0a8fa45b6f3e74c6cff7a6fe
ff8ca0ff89cc739f671709f35f426701233a4454
describe
'1029690' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
ea0a2fe63f0dd68a0af09a81eacf9ee9
66a79f4e94e3225a3480bfde158ae6333f3fe28b
describe
'87436' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
09246bb78973cc4ed514aa3ff43c79d5
e7982ea6c49848513141ff30c02dad5e3d02ec39
describe
'23731' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
5e03cd93caed6486eec238977dc71298
edc5bd18f428e0b48c2328bca6a6b1c82ee334de
describe
'33087' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
e341cafe9bc778a0e303e083591c13c3
9e74614dad3983989e2e9acb40d8ce5507365b94
'2011-11-16T09:27:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00131.tif'
b14396185766c09361339ca69c71a303
4183d92f50f8a64fb2a26415515b274be3e2510d
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00131.txt'
be3bffa482822656dd681c5e46ed89f3
c96cd6a7ffb33110db4058a4c7222e939b1c6d7f
describe
'9388' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
ccb14f98b1e8374de7ac62d901bd4437
eda27c8b6b9b42f19ce6e6de1f512c8686a70336
describe
'1059123' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
b8382083ea95981fd7d7f146687b0d9b
756af1428f7621b654e2a05ddf7c5c4d1eaa9c6c
describe
'88360' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
9cdc51acd5e4882b20979db2a2a848ef
6a371ca7cfb65964dec72deb178c5a3b1d8498ff
'2011-11-16T09:25:48-05:00'
describe
'24702' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00132.pro'
cd43a98e268378ec67b393dcc40d34a9
dece3d43bc64fceddbfc62c54c3e2272543f53d8
describe
'33390' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
df47932541f9e0d554757f5ec2cef7c2
5601689f6e1da17d48c8051f1cb1b26e027bfeef
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
28ef1df3d5157400cdf23c21f05d32e3
3a7894ef630877b355aeee3a65faaa5558b8dea9
'2011-11-16T09:28:19-05:00'
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00132.txt'
146f8f1229d2e8d11f782b157aa48e3a
6774c7105817bb1df0919b7c603d4435456f0e75
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
9af8a16e68538da833f8c56931d440a9
07afe2d88a0c551bdb754a55f2be863da9ba807a
'2011-11-16T09:22:09-05:00'
describe
'1029699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
4a8574f100285930eb897ecb94aece79
4852c96246d33b32a534d03af66be2edc4788000
describe
'83279' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
489dc30ebd36b6a6618b3405c2c36f60
963216f7b48a96429236e91b2f432078a0ffe3e0
describe
'23025' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMME' 'sip-files00133.pro'
b3b9387f1fcae236adbb2a8d0edccfab
bbd8b29ec9af4961b6bb9ce9c1594280ed81c0e1
describe
'31672' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
21287244cb72847de1d7a0ff19bc6b7c
04231f0f3fdc941484a6bd2cef43ccdcfbd8f3b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00133.tif'
fa108c9ddeb46d8b20fe51e19ab01566
d9aedd2dc132274128d2d4bd9ebd285423417b3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00133.txt'
4aa66510dc8a60a93e405c9061f88d9d
f78b59d1ae823c9627c1d2ddbda38bb73f3f3350
describe
'9234' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
1bba5d0cf2baa24168b5955f3d627cda
5461b2c6bf573fc3558b1d5d723a639671c07ef0
describe
'1059133' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
8dc3e708a87bc8a919f33f43aa31c84e
f4d456bb8b7329a8e2bf1d9e695db6d4b8b426d7
describe
'86936' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
0d87d7ae32fe6512c095207bd71305ec
b47ee00b37e50edeac1d1cd28c2f39cc1b3ded71
describe
'23958' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMML' 'sip-files00134.pro'
93b0727abe593a30af1bd06deb446934
a96c7c48acb8169c6d41b2dda569f0c11e7360a2
describe
'32670' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
6296f875a5b8586a753123f4a79ee447
e4a5724607cbdf41415c12112836a56f118ef950
'2011-11-16T09:24:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00134.tif'
74ba560371c5b949047e4fefeaa88679
448a8f75e34c205f5a258b62386077bb55cd465e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00134.txt'
ca1640066de8860714926dd5b5ef955b
114dab1a2b662fca12f3462eabc5582fbea2f3e9
describe
'9019' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
7551d1d9bc9b2d15f7d4d5f1d6ce9bb8
5d31beba5c72c0e6859a57b007d876489cd852fe
describe
'1029723' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
c9141469186ab3df87fa5af35c12cad7
048a666b10018d34cf0c72423777aeb3f690de10
describe
'88398' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
280c57c9006add2c73ca60f0b6f3a7d8
6a2b00d8ea4035286c76749a1ef5c94359ba5186
describe
'22814' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00135.pro'
04a3fc08e9f420f90c08f8033afb6fa4
d04c6db60082d34e5e903c8f3b05cb0903527adf
describe
'32871' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
cb4446ac28c2e174278f8fb1af0427c6
48fa206d1f3e217003cbe9f4657ae5228819b208
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00135.tif'
b5191fa97e8e5e8516c298984da1614d
94f10e289e5865ebc0f582b15ccfbd9f72c170d6
'2011-11-16T09:28:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00135.txt'
94e833a16a011d62094582e74b668028
d853d4ff4c5d1286e461e54024084f8ad3851dbb
describe
'9393' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
aac946403e99ad066ef8549c19940526
c1816336661484a7eed47932497594bda8d97d62
describe
'1059148' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
5c56062f70129fc2c3340468b4635d18
02921aa7127c3f4e18ad074694ff5f9a31a2a17a
describe
'88484' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
f35333902ce023818d1c6a8c82448750
f5a6c8a043e0a5996ba8d774f30fbad5e0bf0b1d
describe
'23333' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
bdcec0b0a5d6385dc73fe0a6133e79d1
c418857b05b599072013edaf4be108439ea94323
describe
'29953' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
aefc612ce46138456c39520efbbcf769
3cc573812ec833a581eb6827de4ea08b4dd71188
'2011-11-16T09:24:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00136.tif'
607e31594672263eb6e70405a724fd2d
4cb76f269b3c704e370116af7a07b9c4176e6610
'2011-11-16T09:22:58-05:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00136.txt'
dd3e785cec0971bc5e36da6cf07bfdec
e36c22842e47c0ddd67ed8e294dedc1900747a72
describe
'9144' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMND' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
994f264f1d7a7301601d5c3e4f48dae8
c8f8d777c9f565e7fc954ec47d8572f27cce35f0
describe
'1029698' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
9786a8509db8a6b36ebffe6fa95915dc
fda9b1a5ee7ae047812975187ebbf6b621dbf5bd
describe
'90864' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
d45428b50e66cd22458ed358a2971b37
9aeeed100a51601235694732d79cfb7cfbef0510
describe
'23242' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00137.pro'
1dd1ebcc65018e7b3def0a6d257e5ae1
01e34c42b2e29d09052bfd47998ef52b46e06ff7
describe
'33949' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
177c8213ae80180d507cc9b4772b3e43
b8898819cb11ea22b655cfafc004e3c3bbc16381
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00137.tif'
050839c1211c629488766b7aaf82aea3
f5a961c94f4b3d8f19ba921317f6b9cd1c1fc926
'2011-11-16T09:23:55-05:00'
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
72319ef9846feffbdf8d4c520de49753
0e1941cae5b60112222d898b52dce84f3deaca62
describe
'9564' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
87877d05898c176fab5477c17cfa0483
deccba9365510cc4f09cea869999b1e43ce152df
describe
'1059107' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
04678d22e6d0809d7d41c653c4b6ba46
af49741f954af2249d09f59e21ba8c74c21eb5d5
describe
'89670' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
ef1e64d6e4dae6229e0bf2d794b37536
87e9c609242859a2b62bce7fccbd52abf96d10c1
describe
'20822' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00138.pro'
605559136c159d369659ccec6a790c87
ab3cfbefe41816d659350a37d29dbfa2b2bf1996
describe
'30835' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
ee10ba1cd6c87bdca6dd79a5152a5c76
49732719493f612320717a5b2b987fec59fa2b70
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00138.tif'
9e6486608b9b544f66df0db24bdc611a
51aefc16d66e638b0f853901f828f28f499221ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00138.txt'
105784e626804b9eeda95057b850b541
53fa00ce9ad0480f3844bc7e469bcd91f8929a96
'2011-11-16T09:26:54-05:00'
describe
'9049' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
468e289c588602f152a68fb01dabbdef
ec2daab26dde12061585c8e5af13ac09b04d82bd
describe
'989468' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
3239cb670c1cc8de661b8f07e38d93b4
06dbb785d9f3f77ebb8622ad5cc72537b560321c
describe
'63037' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
36acd995c63e1a4be6493f68b3e5a68a
878fb63d7d4047f0f9561758912739c9c744503a
describe
'11981' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00139.pro'
45af1ea817452723ead4cee9053f5729
02c7ebdad9bb0f044e1399abe125dd979ed9c0ae
describe
'22693' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
5322f7825dc27e2d6f0f4fb8cfa53cb9
8dbb0d5cea35cdd4a1c31e4ef445045c6c3b5ba3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00139.tif'
b93ccbe3ac203867b4257abb0c15df18
f344a6ceef06f5710f5da0e563749fd572bc5426
describe
'492' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00139.txt'
fcff27cb8c613697a10ba5094168b8ed
f43a25bdbca75e80f641af749dc9cadc1bb7b26c
describe
'6518' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
775e83ffa442abc1282391547a143091
5a0d2091e6bab3aab2b9fde5e0eef5625ae7c138
describe
'716371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
046478b908a9ef0fd6af75fc0ee0caeb
a55580571b65ae506c178d5d135f9c7c6900baee
describe
'26785' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
33e352b0ff2c5d66827b639a222fa5b4
189924ca77c2b1b5d024e25b99f49168ae5feaaf
describe
'348' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00140.pro'
ba11617072e10d2be91f9cf8763fa048
5b1a526e0fe223d302e5e4a9f93c43aff3f294b8
describe
'8614' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
aef14828507d7619d6f11376416337fa
b371a4feb23b38ce35d85dd01456bc1eb86f8d88
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00140.tif'
c9c154635bf77f1e6c46f941dbbb1110
e944aa278b27a85899ff75cf834f5701c5d37efb
describe
'377' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00140.txt'
d02f02028c0b61b327c40350cbc910cb
4b71dc27a9bc1081ad8c2edf1d3aee5543ea2373
'2011-11-16T09:25:09-05:00'
describe
'2674' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
6e253287bcfdbebc32f00da9903aef81
24843e3c07a2ba33712f2d2db3495905adbf0e49
describe
'1252123' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOG' 'sip-filescover3.jp2'
e869284b26a4f482363ae7479b1e0e99
e5dff1744d3450d4ccfb8a054f8b8b2b0ba0ce1d
describe
'53700' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOH' 'sip-filescover3.jpg'
4f9ae4a33f2070a3e66b0458315df8ce
f7c6bfb34b74dcfe022fbbde96f531db508d14d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOI' 'sip-filescover3.pro'
36723dad2e626c0d50c04a0f3de04cb7
3cf232c89f12477b6ce99f64f3b2b2ffa6e18853
describe
'14989' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOJ' 'sip-filescover3.QC.jpg'
5dfd3651176e814ac1a566cf5f7eb0db
25b3525f83c8f7cca02d32ff77c6a2d4043e8be7
'2011-11-16T09:27:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOK' 'sip-filescover3.tif'
205c07d5ad6c3dc7f7e0afbcd9b72c61
c2fb5a7c55064578c109a7b7570a6e806077719a
describe
'89' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOL' 'sip-filescover3.txt'
48b05dd083b1d33dc8560f5014595009
bf5f61596873631bbb5f9e7d2aef6c71b2efa95e
describe
'4505' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOM' 'sip-filescover3thm.jpg'
4909594facc0e4a9902ef4c178f162c7
e871c76543fb68355e57349b1c59f9f29c59767b
describe
'1228880' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMON' 'sip-filescover4.jp2'
3dbde4c480266329dbc5aa10f8e4e872
1c86487fe1fc22dcc2501b73afdc69094c31bbc1
'2011-11-16T09:25:12-05:00'
describe
'137016' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOO' 'sip-filescover4.jpg'
960680d028c212748c15f7ca664e0439
8eaa61eeb914d6c2ad35ffa38e5e8ebfeabbcbd2
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOP' 'sip-filescover4.pro'
96dc8f34bfd0124086408641293d78ea
3c859d1583734006a9831bbcf0baab115e1ff876
describe
'28664' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOQ' 'sip-filescover4.QC.jpg'
ab9666faf3037a40f8e99db4039d3803
c88466e14e8d0b343f30cf4dd0a25cd129d6aefe
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOR' 'sip-filescover4.tif'
c8d8134e03987e6fc3cd46d97e8a487f
09fdeb5cee3373e9b2c4d5bd683abd44b77b58be
describe
'6593' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOS' 'sip-filescover4thm.jpg'
6b136504adb5052d33b704e86aa43ce4
dd8e0fb75a897988731fb414ea803952456333de
describe
'133937' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOT' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
02f66036c4ab3826d25184b74c109c41
275a22ec94924fc60198d7ba610783ad9ca13a49
'2011-11-16T09:24:28-05:00'
describe
'25130' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOU' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
a6e05c6a1cfa3380bb32b3fc37ca6eba
93255dc7f91183b898df75520512da3f837a9bbd
describe
'412' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOV' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
e33c407303cdbb8d6bde57d64dd6ee73
c96c826ecaea467b48a947f70569ba431e0ff1d9
describe
'6353' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOW' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
aacf95bdf7437bd3e4b11441dc020b96
dd8c2c1cf6295de235713c529c7402c06b9c95f5
describe
'3218312' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOX' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
5ccf0fde26fe0544415a7d21949d94e0
c2e2b860e9b997d0a3596cc2f5eaeb512196ece6
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOY' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
c47fcf3a459de9bc488361c4484b043b
31e5fff300ef8dd04f2d075d75fc6b96b4165c44
describe
'2766' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMOZ' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
71ab47f50a14b31f9d723eacb6f75cd2
fe9446243849992f346e57626a0eaff30d07dfec
'2011-11-16T09:26:08-05:00'
describe
'243542' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVDfileF20080920_AAAMPA' 'sip-filesUF00002109_00001.mets'
87e2bc7a51e2d549f9bb665da43157b8
bad774131a73fe6d2fb05828fa51979d0385770b
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T08:50:43-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
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TALES

.

PETER PARLEY

ABs0UT

AFRICA.



WITH ENGRAVINGS.
f
nenenanareceroan
(roo AC L
REVISED EDITION.

CINCINNATI:
H. S. & J. APPLEGATE & CO.
1851.
DISTRICT UF MASSACHUSETT'S, to uw: :
Lustrict Clerk's Office.
BE 1T REMEMBERED, that on the seventh day of October, A. D. 1830
in the hy fourth year of the Independence of the United States of
America, ray & Bowen, of the said district, have deposited in this office

the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the
words following, to wit;

“ The Tales ot Peter Parley about Africa. With Engravings.”

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States entitled

“ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of

maps, 8, and books, to the authors an roprietors of such copies,

during the times therein mentioned ;” and oe to an act, entitled, “ An

Act supplementary to an act, entitled, An Act for the encouragement of

ning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors

— n. Prietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned ; and

extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and etc].
ing historieal and other prints.”

JNO. W. DAVIS,
Clerk of the District of Massachusetts

ee ee rteemecereretes ee
PREFACE.

_—_OC

The following is the Preface to the revised edition of ‘ Parley’s
America,’ and will explain the nature and design of the present work.

It is now several years since this little work was given to the pub-
lic. It was my first adventure in authorship, and after passing through
several editions, has returned to receive my final revision. I have
bestowed upon it such care as an old worn out man may give; and
as I must soon turn my back upon the world, I take my leave of my
little first-born, forever. The public—I mean the world of “chil-
dren—have bestowed upon it their favor, and I ask no more. =

If my health is spared long enough, I intend to revise the books I
have written. and then I shall feel that the charter of my ban

ig ea
0 Sia

~

but I hope not useless existence, is at an end.

It is proper to say, that this book is the commencement of a series,
designed to give the first ideas of Geography and History. ‘The
second volume is about Europe; the third about Africa; the fourth
about Asia. ‘To these are added three others, Tales of the Islands
in the Pacific Ocean; Tales of the Sea; and Tales of the Farth, the
Sun, Moon and Stars. am
CONTENTS.

Chapter 1 —Parley goes to the
editerranean, and sees an
Eruption of Mount Etna

Ch. 2,—Parley sets out to re-
turn to America, but is over-
taken by a _— and seized
by Pirates. .

Ch. 3. —Parley is “ carried to
Tripoli, where he is impris-
oned, and meets with strange
adventures tt .%

Ch. 4.—A short description of
Ane as"

5.—Description of the city
of Tripoli . .

Ch.6—Account of Algiers,
Morocco, and Tunis . .

Ch. 7.—Parley finds out his de-
liverer, and — an old
acquaintance . ;

Ch. 8.—The story of a Robber

Ch. 9.—Leo’s description of

Egypt

Ch. 10.—Leo finishes his story
Ch. 11.—Parley tells about va-
rious matters, and how Deca-
tur and twenty Americans,

burnt the Philadelphia
Ch. - —Parley arrives in E-
t, and oes with General
ton’ 8 — across
the desert . bo%

PPPOPIOA

Ch. 13.—Arrival at Derne.
he Sirocco. A Battle,
and some other things
re i —Parley sets out for
dina. Something about
eee Riley, and or
stories . .
Ch. 15. cent. Riley’ $ Ship-
wreck .

17} Ch. 16 Captain Riley’ s ed-

61

67

ventures and sufferings
Ch. 17.— Parley continues
his voyage, and tells about
ungo Park, and other
Travellers into Central
MOR ce
Ch. 18. Parley tells of his
voyage, and how they met
with a dreadful gale of
wind, off the Gree - Good
Hope oi
Ch. 19. —Pgrlog! tells about
Cape Colony, the Hotten-
tots, various wild animals,
and other things"

76

80

83
§8

96

. 107

111

Ch. 20.—Parley tells abouts"

various matters and things

Ch. 21 -—Parley tells Caille’s
travels to Timbuctoo; Con-
clusion. . a. a

118

. 126
PETER PARLEY’S TALES

ABOUT AFRICA. | -

—__—_—_—_—-—-—-

CHAPTER I.

PARLEY GOES TO THE MEDITERRANEAN, AND

SEES AN ERUPTION OF MOUNT ETNA.

Lam now going to tell you of what happen-
ed near thirty years ago. After my return to
America, as I have told you in my tales about
Europe, I set out, in a ship for the Mediterra-
nean sea. ,

This sea lies far to the east. To go to it,
we must cross the Atlantic ocean. It lies be-
tween Africa and Europe. Africa is south of
it, and Europe north of it. cr
iho CLOT nT Ti

Which way from you is the Mediterranean seal Between what two

pe countries does it lie? Which way is Africa from the Mediterranean? _
* "Which way 1s Europe from the Mediterraaean?
6 PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.

The name of the ship I sailed in was the
Swan. She was a fine vessel, and I was the
second mate. Every ship has one, or more
mates, whose duty it is, to assist the captain
in navigating the vessel.

I entered the ship at New York, and we
set sail. We had a fair wind, and in a few
days we came in sight .of the Bermudas, a
_ group of small islands, owned by the British
There are now aegood many houses, and a
considerable number of inhabitants, on one
of these islands.

We shortly after saw some of the Canary
islands, where Canary birds first came from.
These islands are very beautiful indeed, and
very fruitful.

One of them called Teneriie, has a very

“lofty peak. This peak is visible at a vast
ae



ae
What was the name of the vessel in which Parley sailed to #-¢ Me
iterranean? Which way did he sail? What group of small islands

he pass? What island did he pass after the Bermudas? Describe the

Canary isles?

x ~
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 7

tance. It is so high, that it is almost always
covered with snow. As I saw it from our
ship, it looked like a tall thunder cloud, piled
very high up in the air. Here you see a pic-
ture of it.



ee WO Pd oe rs .

—~ ae
——

> —

At length we came in sight of Gibraltar.
‘his is a town at which there is a rock, 1500
feet high. In this rock there is a strong for-
tress, Gibraltar is in Spain, and forms the
rost.southern point of Europe. The fortress
Describe the pack of Teneriffe? What of the town of Gibraltar?

+

“ww
8 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

has several thousand men in it, with a great
number of cannon.

At the present time the fortress is in the
possession of the British, and is occupied by
British soldiers. It is situated at the en-
trance of the Mediterranean sea.

SSS ee: Sana ma
sae are



e
are

a ~ = — ==.
= - ——— Sa ae
: == 2

a — ee

Near the town of Gibraltar, are the straits
4 Gibraltar. These straits consist of a nar-
row channel, where the sea flows from the
Atlantic ocelti: into the Mediterranean, The
straits are fifteen miles across at the na@rrow-

What of the fortress? What of the straits of Gibraltar?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 9

est part. As we sailed along through them,
J could see the-land on both sides of us. On
the left hand was Europe; on the right hand,
was Africa.

We now entered the Mediterranean sea.
This sea is 2000 miles in length. In some
places it is two or three hundred miles wide,
in other places it is much narrower.

This sea is surrounded with towns and vil-
lages, and a multitude of inhabitants. ‘There
is a great amount of trade or commerce, car-
ried on upon this sea; here are vessels from
all the countries of Europe, and they are al-
ways crossing it in every direction.

At length we arrived at Sicily. This isa
large island, which produces oranges, §Tapes,
and many other fruits. It also produces wine,
which is made from grapes. The object of
our voyage was, to get fruits and .wine, to
arry back to. New York. ee

‘a ——_ neal

=
Riagree gree

of

What of the Mediterranean sea? What of Sicily?

Ax, 3 ‘
10 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

-Qur voyage to Sicily had been a very pros-
‘perous one. It is very seldom that a vessel
crosses the Atlantic, without meeting some
very rough weather. We, however, had met
no storms ; and in forty days after I left New
York, I was in the island of Sicily.

Very soon after our arrival, we unloaded our
ship, and began to take in our cargo. I wished
very much to go to the top of Mount Etna,
but we were so busy 1 could not be Spared.
Mount Etna is situated in the island of Sicily,
and is one of the most celebrated volcanoes in
the world.

A volcano, as you know, is a mountain that
throws out fire, smoke, ashes, and melted lava
at its top. The hole at the top through
which these things are thrown is called the
crater.

Though I could not go to the top of Mount

How long was Parley in going from New York to Sicily? What of
Mount Etna? What is a Volcano?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. tl

Etna, I had an opportunity of witnessing one
of its eruptions. It-was truly terrible. One
night, loud rumbling noises were heard in the
mountain, like distant thunder.

Very soon, a blaze issued from the crater,
which seemed to rise to the very clouds, and
stand on the mountain like a pillar of fire. At
the same time, clouds of black smoke rolled
from the mouth of the crater. The blaze shed
its light all around, and made it like mid-day.

After a little while, the blaze suddenly dis-
appeared. It seemed to fall back again into
the mouth of the crater. In an instant all
around was darkness.

But very soon, red hot stones were thrown
from the mouth of the volcano, which rose
high in the air, with a whizzing sound, and
then fell upon the sides of the mountain.
Then a mass of red hot lava swelled to the

ee ce una

Describe the eruption of Mount Etna, that Parley saw.
Die

12 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

top of the crater, and gushing over it, ran
down the sides of the mountain.

It rolled along like a river, making a dread-
ful sound. It spread over the land, and des-
troyed several villages. Some of the inhab-
itants fled before it; some were overtaken,
and buried beneath the burning mass.

It was an awful sight, and made me shudder «.
to witness it. The mountain continued to
smoke for several days, but no more lava flow-
ed from it. ‘These eruptions from Mount Etna,
have often taken place for thousands of years.

Within a few years, two towns in Italy
have been dug from beneath the lava, which
issued from Mount Vesuvius and overwhelmed
- them, nearly two thousand years ago. About
this, I have told you in my tales of Europe.
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA 13

CHAPTER II.

PARLEY SETS. OUT TO RETURN TO AMERICA, BUT
IS OVERTAKEN BY A STORM, AND SEIZED
BY PIRATES.

Our vessel was soon loaded, and a few
weeks after our arrival, we set out on. our re-
turn to America. It was not-more than two
days after our departure, when we were Vis-
ited by a storm. ® By

The wind blew very powerfully, and the
agitation of the sea was dreadful. Our ship
rolled violently, and ina few hours, two of
our masts were broken off, and fell into the
sea. The vessel became nearly unmanage-
able, ae

She also sprang a leak, and though we
made the greatest exertion at the pumps, still
the water increased very rapidly. Orders were
now given to lighten the vessel, and a great
14 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

part of the cargo was immediately thrown
overboard.

Night now came on, and the gale increased.
Our large ship shuddered upon the waves, as
if terror had seized the very timbers. Our
captain, however, was a brave man, and he
steadily exerted himself to save the ship.

He spoke cheeringly to the men, and as-
sisted them with his own strength. But it
was allin vain. ‘Phe ping struck the ship,

IS



S < Ss > 3S :
and set the sails on fire. "The Tait of the
sea soon quenched it, but the waves broke

- =
bog . -
PRS a
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 15

over us, and swept away the greater part of
our men.

Out of twenty hands there were now but
five left in the ship. For myself, I never ex-
pected to see the light of another morning.
Yet another morning came; and hope, which
lingers till the last, revived.

The storm was over. The clouds rolled
away, and the sun shone out, bright and clear.
Our vessel however was a mere wreck. We
could scarcely keep her from sinking, by la-
boring at the pumps. ‘The waves also cun-
tinued to roll very heavily, and they yroke
over the ship every few minutes. eo

In this desperate situation, we saw a Need
approaching us. Yet this vessel was more
dreadful to our sight than the troubled sea.
We knew it to be a corsair.

A corsair is a ship sent out to rob and plun-
der other vessels. We had heard many in-

ae





~———



What 18 a corsair?
16 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

stances of vessels being taken, their cargoes
seized, and the crew sold as slaves, or shut
up in gloomy prisons.

As the vessel that approached us seemed to
we small, we determined to make an effort to
prevent ourselves from being taken. We
armed ourselves with pikes and swords, and
stood ready to meet the men from the corsair.

Their vessel came very close to us, but the
sea ran so high, that it was a long time before
they ventured to come along side of us. At
length they came close to us, and: the two
‘vessels lay side by side.

Five or six men armed with swords, imme-
diately jumped on board our ship. Three of
them were -instantly killed by our pikes, and...
two others were knocked down between the
vessels. But other men soon followed from
the corsair.

We struggled with them for a few moments,

7 ee ew

What had Parley heard about these corsarst
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 17

but our captain was shot with a pistol in the
breast. I was stunned with a blow upon my
head, and the remainder of the men, not able
to resist, yielded to their fate.

The most valuable part of our cargo was
»ow taken on board the corsair, and we were
taken there also. Holes were cut in our ves-
sel; she soon filled with water, and the waves
yawning widely, received her into the bosom
of the sea. The billows whirled and foamed
for a moment over the spot, and then we saw.
our ship no more. rb

js oe
NERY

—_—_————e

CHAPTER III. Bie

+ Sa.
PARLEY IS CARRIED TO TRIPOLI, WHERE HE IS
IMPRISONED, AND MEETS WITH STRANGE AD-

VENTURES.

WE soon found out that the corsair which
had taken us, belonged to Tripoli. "Lripoli is

ee
‘To what country did the corsair belong, that captured the vessel in
which Parley was? , 7
18 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

a considerable country in the northern part of
Africa. ‘The principal town is also called
‘Tripoli. :

‘The people are a barbarous and cruel race,
and at the time I am speaking of, they were
engaged in plundering the ships of such other
nations as came in their way.

They had already taken several American
vessels, and we knew that some of our coun-
trymen were shut up in their prisons. We
of course had no other expectation, than to
share their fate.

In five days we arrived at the city of ‘Tri-
poli. We were treated with the greatest cru-
elty, and our captain suffered exceedingly
from his wounds. We were taken ashore,
and attended by soldiers, with dark skins, and
strange dresses, to a large stone building.

This building was a castle. We were taken

Peete cart ditnclptcinmestchdiistta cgi cinta len aN aa

What of Tripoli? What is the principal town in the country of Tri
poli? What ofthe people? In what were they engaged? Where were
Parley and his companions taken to?
PARLEY’S TALES OF -AFRICA. 19

into a dark room in this castle, and here we
remained for four days, with no other food
than bread, and no drink but water. We
were then taken from our prison, and marched
through the town, guarded by soldiers.

I remarked as we went along, that every-
thing had a strange appearance. ‘The inhab-
itants were as dark as our Indians, and their
dress appeared very singular. The streets
were also exceedingly narrow, and the roofs
of the houses very flat.

At length we arrived at another prison, and
here again we were shut up. I was myself
put into a separate room. I had no inter-
course with my companions.

My room was very dark; the light being
only admitted through a long narrow hole in
the wall. I had bread and water brought to
me once a day, and these weremy only sub-
sistence. : Eyeee '

a sath adachnensamaerihtinasanenteseasitiinatininecisatnamacencerccenenteititniinlliaaainmminiimneniis
How were they treated? What does Parley say of the inhabitants of
‘Tripoli? What of the streets, and houses?
20 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRIUA.

Here I remained day after day, and week ©
after week. I knew nothing of the language
of the country; and the surly man who at-
tended the prison, seemed to have no more re-
gard for me than if I had been a brute.

How heavy were the hours as they slowly
passed away! I had no books to read, no one
to talk to. I knew nothing of what was to
be my fate, but E had reason to fear that I
should be put to death.

But so weary was I of confinement, that I
almost felt willing to die, if I could once more
see the open sky, and breathe the free air,
were it only for a few moments.

But weeks passed away, and no change
happened in my situation. Day and night
came, but all went on in dull and dishearten-
ing uniformity. I tried to amuse myself by _
devising means of escape. But the prison _
was of stone, and forbade any attempt to force .
a passage through the walls.
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 2)

ta a
fi iW ie \\
: Ni N

sii
: Muli
Be KK CC
TREY

> ’ LN

bas] "



At length a spider crept into the little win-
dow of my cell, and began to make a net. I
watched him carefully for a long time, and
found great amusement in observing him.

He soon went away, buf the next day, he
came again; I caught several small flies, and
gave them to him. This encouraged him to
come, and very soon he took up his abode
there.

One night soon after this, I thought I heard
a noise at my window. [I listened, and dis-
22 _ PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

tinctly heard some one there. What this
meant I could not imagine.

As [had no reason to suppose that any one
would attempt to set me free, I fancied that it
was evil, rather than good, that was intended.

In the morning I found that my spider was
gone, and his web destroyed. © I'wept that
this only friend of my solitude was thus taken
away. | |
The next night I heard again a noise at-my
window. But I could not conjecture the oc-
casion of it. Again the third night, I heard
it, and imagined that I heard some one whis-
pering to me, but of this I was not certain.

More than a fortnight now elapsed. The
noise at my window, which had excited some
little hope, was heard no more. |

One night I dreamed that Iwas released
from my imprisonment; that I had crossed
the sea; that I had reached my native land
that Iwas at my home; that exclamations of
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 23

joy at my return filled my ears; and while I
imagined that I was kneeling down, to thank
God for my deliverance, and a happy restora-
tion to my family, I suddenly awoke.

For a time I could hardly realize where I
was. But at length, fixing my eye upon the
dim light that entered my little window, I re-
collected that I was in prison, and in the pow-
er of a cruel and barbarous people.

At this moment I heard a noise at the door,
and distinctly heard the key put into the lock,
and the bolt slowly and cautiously turned.
The heavy iron door was then swung open
very silently. Iheard no step, but a hand
was laid upon me, and some one said in a
whisper, ‘ Follow me, and make no noise!’

I was very much surprised, but I did not
hesitate instantly to follow. We passed out.

The door was locked behind us, and we
were on the point of leaving the spot, when
a man who had been sleeping upon the floor,
24 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

sprang suddenly up, and lifted his sword to
strike my. conductor.

The latter, with the quickness of lightning,
struck the man over the head with a stick,
and he fell upon the floor. We then went
through several narrow passages, and at
length came to an open space, with high walls
around it.

My companion clambered up this wall by
means of a rope-ladder, and I followed. We
then sprang into thestreet. We heard a noise
beliind us as if my escape was discovered, and
an alarm given.

We heard several voices, and saw the glan-
cing of lights upon the buildings. My guide
quickened his steps, and turning and winding
through the narrow streets, we were soon at
a considerable distance ftom the prison.

At length we came to a house, which we

entered. I was taken to a remote part of it,
Sie etittnntincnielertndis< tah bod

How was Parley rescued from prison?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 25

and told by my guide to remain, until I receiv-
ed farther instructions.

He then left me. I was in total darkness.
Where I was, of course I knew not.. Who
had delivered me, or for what object I had
been taken from the dungeon, I could not
guess.

For several hours I remained in total un-
certainty. At length a woman came to the
room where I was, with a light. She first
spoke to me in the language of the country,
but I did not understand her. She then spoke’
to me in Italian.

Of this I knew very little, but I was able
to understand, that I must remain quiet,
and be assured that no harm was intended
me. |
In the morning, this woman again came te
my room, and provided me with some food.
She told me that it was necessary for my own
safety and that of my deliverer, = I should
26 PARLEY 8 TALES OF AFRICA.

remain in my room, and by no means attempt
to leave it.

In a few days, she said, he would return
and explain all tome. In the mean time, she
would do all in her power to make my time
pass agreeably. |

I thought it best. to comply with these di-
rections. My female attendant provided me
with food, and gave me a good deal of her
company. She behaved in a kind yet respect-
ful manner, and seemed to be anxious in every
way to make my situation agreeable.

I was soon able to understand a good deal
of her conversation, and I learned from her
many things respecting the country, and the
people where I was.
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA, 27



Map of Africa.
28 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

CHAPTER IV.
A SHORT DESCRIPTION OF AFRICA.

I witt now tell you something about the
country I was in. On the preceding page
there is a map of Africa. The shape of Afri-
ca is somewhat like that of a leg of mutton.

The southern point, which is called the Cape
of Good Hope, forms the small part towards
the knuckle. At the north end you will find,
on the map, the names of several places, as
Tripoli, Tunis, Algiers, and Morocco. These
countries pass under the general name of
Barbary.

Now Africa is an immense region, nearly
southeast of the United States. From the
nost northern, to the most southern ex-



What is the shape of Africa? Where is the Cape of Good Hope?
{n what part of Africa are the four Barbary States? What countries

are included in Barbary? In which direction is Africa from the United
States?


PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 99

tremity, it is five thousand miles; and it is
four thousand six hundred miles wide, at the
widest part.

It contains probably thirty-five millions of
inhabitants, about as many as exist in the
whole continent of America. 'These inhabit-
ants consist chiefly of two races of men, Arabs
and Negroes.

These races have mixed, and produced oth-
ers, partly Arab, and partly Negro. They
pass under different names, and are divided
into a multitude of different tribes, and na-
tions.

The inhabitants of Barbary are chiefly —
Moors, who are nearly the same as Arabs.
Their skin is dark, like that of our Indians,
They have a great many negro slaves, who
are brought from the middle parts of Africa.



What is the length of Africa from north to south? What the width
from east to west? What the number of inhabitants? Of what two
races do the inhabitants of Africa principally consist? What are the in-
habitants of Barbary?’ Describe the Moors of Barhiry
30 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

Barbary is divided into four states or king-
doms; Tunis, Tripoli, Algiers, and Morocco.
Each of these States has a capital, or large
city of the same name as the country.

The people are Mahometans. They are
great enemies to the Christians, and at the
time I was there, it was a part of their regu-
lar business, to send out vessels upon the sea,
to capture the ships belonging to christian
countries.

South of Barbary, there is an immense des-
ert two thousand miles in length from east to
west, and eight hundred miles in width from
north to south. People can only cross it by
means of camels.

It is very dangerous to travel over this des-
ert; for sometimes the wind raises vast clouds
of sand, which bury unfortunate travellers be-
neath them. Beside this, there are many



What ts the capital of Morocco? of Algiers? of Tunis? of Tripoli?
What of the people? What was a part of the business of the people of
Barbary when Parley was there? What of the great desert of Africa?


PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA. oe) |

tribes of Arabs, who wander over the desert,
and attack and rob every body they meet.

South of this great desert called Sahara,
there are several nations of negroes who in-
habit a fertile country.

On the western coast of Africa, from the
river Senegal, which you will find on the map,
to the Cape of Good Hope, there are many
tribes of negroes. Here is the coast of Guinea,
from which a great many slaves have been
brought to America.

Toward the Cape of Good Hope are the
Hottentots, a race of negroes, of which I shall
tell you by and by. At the Cape of Good
Hope, is a large town called Cape Town, 1n-
habitéd by English people. ‘There are also a



What tribes wander over the desert? What nations south of the great
desert? Where is the river Senegal? Into what ocean does it empty?
Which way does it run? What of the country between the Senegal and
the Cape of Good Hope? Where are the Hottentots! What of Cape
‘Town? In which direction is it from Tripoli? Foint your finger toward
Cape Town Toward Tripoli
32 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

number of small English villages, near Cape
Town. |.

On the eastern coast of Africa are several
tribes of negroes, of which the Caffrees are
the most remarkable. They are said to be
the best formed people in the world. As you
proceed north from the land of the Caffrees
you will come to Abyssinia. This is a moun-
tainous country, inhabited by a very singular
race of people.

The Nile, one of the most celebrated rivers
in the world, flows through Abyssinia. It
passes through Nubia and Egypt, and enters
the Mediterranean sea at the eastern ex-
tremity.

Thus I have told you a little about Africa,

so that you may better understand what I am

ees

Where are the Caffrees? Describe the Caffrees? Where is Abyssinia?
In which direction from Morocco? From the Cape of Good Hope?
Describe Abyssinia. What of the Nile? Where is Nubia? Where ie
Egypt? Which way is Egypt from Tripoli? From the mouth of the
Senegal? From the Cape of Good Hope!
MESSE oat ls ES ae

PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 33

going to relate. Ihope you will study the
map very carefully, and see where every place
is, that I have mentioned. " |

eo

CHAPTER V.
DESCRIPTION OF THE CITY OF TRIPOLI.

I must now tell you a little more particu-
larly about the city of Tripoli. It is a large
city, and contains as many inhabitants as Bos-
ton. ‘he houses are square, and but one
story high. ‘The roofs are so flat, that the
people frequently walk upon them.

The streets are narrow, crooked, and sandy.
Almost all heavy articles are carried from one
place to another on the backs of camels,
which raise a huge dust, as they go along the
streets.

Sy See ere emer

How large is the city of Tripoli? Describe the houses. The streets.

How are goods carried from one place to another?

3
34 PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.

‘The city is surrounded by strong walls, with
ramparts for defending it against the attacks
of soldiers. It has two gates, by which peo-
ple go in, and out of the city. One is north,
toward the sea, the other south toward the
country.

At the east end of the city, is the castle,
in which the Bashaw lives. The Bashaw is
a sort of king, and rules over the people. His
dominions are quite extensive, and include
Kezzan, which is a country several hundred —
miles to the south. It is situated in the mid-
dle of the great desert.

The Bashaw is generally a cruel man, and
does what he pleases to the people. His cas-
tle is surrounded by a strong wall, forty feet
high. He is very much afraid of being killed
by some of his people.

He has a great many wives, who live in a

Describe the walls round Tripoli. The gates. What of the castle;
What of the Bashaw? What of Fezzan? |
PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA. 35

particular part of the castle. They are very
richly dressed with jewels, gold and silver or-
naments, and are covered with perfumes.
They are, however, shut up very close, and
are no better than prisoners.

I have told you before, that the principal ©
part of the people are Moors. These people
do not wear hats, but large turbans like the
Turks. They do not wear coats, but a large
— loose garment fastened about the waist. They
also wear large trowsers, and yellow boots.

-'The women wrap themselves up in a cloth
called a barracan, which covers the whole
person. This they hold so close over their
heads, as to conceal their faces, which it ds
not thought modest.to expose to view. om

The climate here is exceedingly hot in Sum-
mer. In Autumn there are powerful rains,
which continue for several days and nights.





What of the Bashaw’s wives? Describe the dress of the men in Tri-
poli. The dress of the women, What of the climate?
36 PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA.

These rains after a short period stop suddenly,
and not a drop of water then falls, for a num-
ber of months. |

The people are Mahometans. As I have
said before, they hate Christians. ‘Their re-
ligion teaches those who believe in it, to de-
spise all that do not hold to the same faith.
It teaches, that no Mahometan is bound to be
kind, just, or true, to those who believe in any
other religion. |

In Tripoli there are a good many Jews. AS
the Moors are very indolent, the Jews do a
great part of the business of the place. They
are however treated with the greatest con-
tempt by the Moors. |

A Moor will often spit upon a Jew, and
pull his beard, and the poor Jew has only to
submit. The Christians are also sometimes
treated with the grossest cruelty.

What does the Mohametan religion teach? What of the Jews in Tri-
poli? How are Christians often treated?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 37



A Moor pars a Jew’s beard.

CHAPTER VI.
ACCOUNT OF ALGIERS, MOROCCO, AND TUNIS.

Havine told you about Tripoli,.I will now
tell you about Algiers. Algiers is an exten-
sive country, and contains many inhabitants.
It was under the government of a.Dey, who

By whom is Algiers governed? What can you tell:of the Dey of Al
gierc! :
28 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

resided at the city of Algiers, which is the
largest town. But the French took the coun-
try in 1829, and the Dey fled away.

The city of Algiers is as large as New York.
‘The inhabitants and houses resemble those of
Tripoli. The former are however less barba-
rous, and the latter handsomer and more con
venient.

The roofs of the houses are flat, and com-
municate with each other, so that a person
may walk the whole length of the streets, on
the tops of the houses. Many of the people
have little gardens on their houses.

The houses are all whitewashed, and being
situated on the slope of a hill, the city at a
distance, looks like the sail of a great ship.

Morocco is a very populous country, govern-

ed by an Emperor, who lives at the city of - |

Morocco, This city has three hundred thou-



What of the city of Algiers? Of the inhabitants? Of the houses’
How is Morocco governed! ‘Where does the Emperor live?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 39

sana inhabitants. It is situated in a fruitful
plain, and is surrounded by delightful groves.

The country produces oranges, figs, melons,
apricots, peaches, grapes, pears, dates, plums,
and pomegranates. ‘There are a profusion of
the most fragrant and beautiful flowers here.

Morocco is encircled by very strong walls
for defence. ‘The Emperor’s palace is a
splendid edifice. ‘The city abounds in mosques.
These are places, where the Mahometans wor-
ship.
Near the city is a range of lofty mountains
whose tops are always covered with snow.
[his range is called Atlas. From it we de-
rive the word Atlas, which is applied to a
book of maps.

There are several other towns in the king-
dom of Morocco. Of these, Fez is the most
considerable. 'The buildings of this city are

etter EE

How many people in the city of Morocco? What of the productions
of Morocco? Describe the city of Morocco? What are Mosques?
What mountains near the city of Morocco? What of Fez?
40 PARLEY § TALES OF AFRICA.

the most splendid in Barbary. It has many
mosques, some of which are magnificent.
The gardens abound in all kinds of delicious
fruits. Roses and other fragrant flowers are
so abundant, as to perfume the air to a great
distance.

Tunis is the smallest of the four Barbary ©
States. The principal city is Tunis. The
country is governed by a Bey, who resides in
the city of Tunis.

Near this city, are the remains of ancient
Carthage. More than two thousand years
ago, Carthage was very powerful, and sent
an army against Rome, under the celebrated
Hannibal.

It was built on three hills, and it was
twenty-three miles around it. It contained
seven hundred thousand inhabitants, and was
defended by three strong walls, which en-
circled it.

What of Tunis? How is it governed? Where does the Bey reside’
What of ancient Carthage?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 4l

This city, which flourished seven hundred
years, was at last set on fire by the Romans,
and burnt to the ground. It continued to
burn incessantly for seventeen days. The
remains of this mighty city are now hardly
visible. |

Thus I have told you of the four Barbary
States. ‘Lhe climate is, on the whole, delight-
ful, and the land is in general, very fertile.
The most delicious fruits, the most fragrant,
and beautiful flowers abound in this country.

Nature has done everything to make it one
of the most charming portions of the globe.
But the inhabitants are for the most part,
cruel, and vicious.

At the time I was in Tripoli, which is
almost thirty years ago, these Barbary states
were subject to the Sultan of Turkey; but
since that time, they have become indepen-
dent.

ea te

What of the climate of Barbarv?
$2 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA

They were then renowned all over the
world for their piracies. ‘Their corsairs were
constantly cruising upon the Mediterranean
sea, and they took possession of every vessel
they could capture.

Since that time, these piracies have been —
stopped, but the people remain nearly in the
same condition, though they have. somewhat
improved.

CHAPTER VII.

PARLEY FINDS OUT HIS DELIVERER, AND RE-
' COGNISES AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE.

By this time, I suppose my little reader may
wish to know the remainder of my own stury.
I hope the preceding description of Barbary
will not be thought useless, for it is in some
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 43

degree necessary, in order to make the narra-
tive of my adventures in Africa understood.

I had now remained more than two months,
shut up in the house which I have before
mentioned. I had as yet seen nothing of the
man who rescued me from prison.

The woman who attended me would give
me no hint, which in’ the least satisfied my
curiosity to know who had thus interposed
in my behalf. “In truth, I was totally at a
loss to conceive who it might be, or what
motive had led the individual, to engage in
an enterprise of so much hazard.

At length the time came when my doubts
were to be satisfied. I was one night waked
from my sleep by a man wrapped in a cloak,
who told me to dress myself immediately, and
prepare to accompany him.

This I did, and followed him into the
street. We wound through the narrow
crooked avenues, unti ve came to. one of the
44 PAKLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

gates of the city. Here my conductor had
some conversation with the keeper of the
gate. ’









After awhile, we were allowed to pass
through a narrow door at the side of the
gate. We soon found ourselves upon a
wharf. My guide flashed some powder in a
pistol, and in a few moments a boat came
stealing towards us upon the water.

This we entered, and turning our backs
upon the city, rowed out into the harbour.
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 45

We had four oars-men, and we slid over the
water with great swiftness. We proceeded
in perfect silence for about three miles.

We then approached a small schooner
which seemed to be waiting for us. This we
entered. 'The sails were hoisted, and we put
to sea. The night was clear, but the wind
blew very fresh. The schooner was a ‘fast
sailer, and she seemed to glance over the
waters, as a bird sails on the air.

At length the morning came. Nothing had
been said to me, which enabled me to conjec-
ture who my companions were. I had laid
down on the deck of the vessel, and had fallen
asleep. I did not wake till sunrise.

As I opened my eyes, they fell upon a man
of a very swarthy countenance, whom I in- .
stantly recollected to have seen before. But
where I had seen him I could not tell!

At length he spoke. When I heard his
voice, I knew him at once. It was Leo,
46 PARLEY § TALES OF AFRICA.

whose life I had saved on my voyage to
Europe!

The last time I had seen him, was in the
mountains of Switzerland, as related in my
tales about Europe. He was then at the head
of a troop of mountain-robbers. Knowing
his desperate character, I immediately con-
jectured he was now engaged in some bad
enterprise. —

I had no fear, however, for myself. He
was evidently my deliverer, and I felt sure
that his gratitude for my having once saved
his life, was the cause of his generous con-
duct towards me now.

CHAPTER VIII.
THE STORY OF A ROBBER.

AFTER a few inquiries, Leo took me into
the little cabin of our schooner. It was
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 47

about fifteen years since I had seen him. He
had altered very little. His complexion was
remarkably dark; his eyes very black and
piercing; his hair black, long, and curled over
his ears and forehead. His appearance was
altogether very striking. )

He sat down, and began to speak of our
first. meeting, many years before. After a
little while, I asked what had happened to
him since I had seen him. He then related
his history to me, as follows.

‘After you saw me at the head of a band
of brave fellows in the mountains of Switzer-
land, I continued to follow the profession of a
freebooter. I always conducted my business
with humanity.

‘We took away the people’s goods and
money, who chanced to fall in our way, but
we never committed any unnecessary cruelty.

‘Our success was very good for a consid-
erable time, but at length such loud com-
48 PARLEY ’S TALES OF AFRICA.

plaints were made to the government, that a.

body of more than a thousand soldiers were
sent to take us. Our band consisted of but
afty men.

‘We did not think it best therefore to meet
these troops in the open field, so we retired
to more secret places among the mountains,
and hid ourselves during the day, in caves
formed amid the rocks. At night we sallied
forth, and fell upon such travellers, as chance
threw in our way.

‘But notwithstanding our utmost care, sev-
eral of our men were shot, and others taken.
A reward of a thousand dollars was offered
for my apprehension. One of my men, tempt-
ed by this offer, led the soldiers of the gov-
ernment to the cave, where I was concealed.

‘At first I determined to resist, and endeav-
our to cut my way through them. But a mo-
ment’s reflection satisfied me of the folly of at-
tempting it. I was taken, and carried to Venice.

2
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 49

‘Here I was tried and sentenced to be shot.

[ was confined in a prison on the edge of the ©

sea. I determined if possible to make my
escape. I made various attemps without
SUCCESS.

‘The day at length drew near, which was
fixed for my execution. It was now mid-
night, and at sunrise the next morning, I was
to be Jed out, and shot by a file of soldiers.
I sat in my dark cell reflecting upon my
coming fate.

‘J determined to make one effort more for
escape. I sprang up, and laying hold of

one of the iron bars that were placed before ~

the window of my dungeon, wrenched it with
all my strength. ‘To my surprise it suddenly
broke, and I fell backward upon the floor,
holding the iron bar in my hands. "

‘This gave me fresh courage. I seized

another bar and strained it with the vigor of —

4 lion. This also vielded, and there was
4 C

ihe
50 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

now space for me to creep. out. through the
window.

‘I looked down, and although the night was
dark, I could see the deep water rippling at
the foot cf the prison. I was at least forty
feet above the water, but I did not hesitate a
moment. I let-myself fall from the window,
and plunged into the water.

SSS Toa
Ss hel sebangst
—— - ral cent! (haw
oT

ro
i

} *y ~~ Mt . ~ A Mp,
aa fr al

tT
mh i

ae { Mi , Hg
Bos mie wii i ee i i
Being a good swimmer, I soon rose, and
swam toa wharf, at a considerable distance.


PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 5k

Here I took aboat which I found there, and
stretched away upon the sea.

‘I was afraid to show myself in Italy, so I
determined to yuit my native country. After
various adventures, I took passage in a ship,
which I met with in the gulf Venice, and
ailed for Egypt. Here I entered the service
of the Pacha, as a mameluke.

CHAPTER IX,
80'S DESCRIPTION OF EGYPT.

‘Hasty is-subject to the Sultan of Turkey.
Le Pacha of Egypt governs in the name of -
the Sultan. 'The mamelukes are his soldiers.

‘They are splendidly dressed, and mounted
on fine horses.. They are daring men, and des-
perate fighters. Most of them are from for-

To whom is Egypt subject?) Who governs Egypt? What of the Mam-
elukes?
52 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

eign countries, anda large portion of them,
like myself, are adventurers.* ;

‘In this service I remained for a number of
years, and was engaged in several battles with
Buonaparte. You have no doubt read an ac-
count of the invasion of Egypt by the French
some years ago.

‘Buonaparte would no doubt have succeeded
in conquering: Egypt, had it not been for the
English. ‘The French fieet being destroyed
by the English fleet, under Lord Nelson, Buo-
naparte left his army, which soon followed
him back to France. Thus Egypt was freed
from its invaders.

‘I continued to remain in the service of the
Pacha. As you have never been to Egypt, I
will describe this remarkable country: to you.
It is divided into Upper and Lower Egypt.

* My little reader should recollect that I am telling of things that hap-
‘omeoge almost thirty years ago, Since that time the Mamelukes have

en expelled from Egypt.
ee tee ee a ee
PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA. 53

‘Along the Mediterranean sea, the country
spreads out into a level space of land, on
which, as far as the eye can reach, you see
uothing but a few date trees, a few palm trees,
and groups of huts, built of mud.

‘Near the place where the Nile enters the
sea, it is called the Delta. This is overfiowed
by the Nile every year, and is one of the most
fruitful spots on the globe.

‘In Lower Egypt there are several great
cities. Alexandria was built, there more than
two thousand years ago, by a celebrated con-
queror of ancient Greece, ‘called Alexander.

‘This place now abounds in the most astoit-
ishing remains of its former greatness. For
the space of six miles, around the present
town, which is much smaller than the ancient
city, nothing is to be seen but fragments of
stone which belonged to the ancient edifices.



Describe that part of Egypt that lies along the Mediterranean sea?
What part of Egypt is called the Delta? What of the Nile? What of
Alexandria?
54 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

‘There are heaps, sometimes piled as high
as a house, of pillars, columns, and obelisks.
Many of these are beautifully carved.

‘Among them is one obelisk cut out of a
solid piece of stone, which measures seventy
feet in length. It is covered with sculptured
figures, called hieroglyphics.

‘These hieroglyphics formed the ancient
written language of the Egyptians. ‘This ob-
elisk now lies upon the ground. It once stcod
erect, and was called Cleopatra’s needle, af-
ter Cleopatra a very celebrated and beautiful
Queen of ancient Egypt.

‘Near this city are several remarkable burying
places, called catacombs. In these catacombs
are found at this day, the bodies of persons who
were buried two or three thousand years ago.

‘These bodies were embalmed, and they still
retain, the almost complete form and appear-
ance, of the persons when living.

What of Cleopatra’s needle? What of the Catacombs? What are
found in the Catacombs?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 55

‘Cairo is another very remarkable city in
Lower Egypt. The streets are crooked, and
crowded ‘with men, horses, camels, asses and
dogs.

‘These are continually bustling through the
town, and raise an almost constant cloud of
dust. Cairo is the largest city in Africa, and
contains more inhabitants than Morocco.

‘Upper Egypt lies to the south of Lower
Egypt. In the midst of a vast sandy plain
on- the western side of the Nile are some of
the most remarkable edifices in the world.



==
=

These are the Pyramids, There are a

Aas ites inane eileen alaareitemnnnnte eee eID
What of Cairo? What is the largest city in Africa? Where is Upper
Egypt |
56 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

number of them, but the largest is near five
hundred feet in height. It is built of large
pieces of stone. Its form is square, and one
of the sides, at the bottom, measures about
seven hundred feet.

‘When, and for what object, these vast
structures were built, it is impossible to tell.
Ancient authors, who lived two thousand
years ago, speak of them as then the wonders
of the age.

‘They were as ignorant as we are, of the
origin of these Pyramids. It is probable, that
they are the burial places of some of the an-
cient kings of Egypt, and perhaps were
erected even before the time of Pharaoh, who
is spoken of in the Bible.

‘It has been supposed that the Israelites
during their bondage in Egypt, were occupied
in rearing some of these vast structures.

0 ee
What can you tell of the Pyramids? How high is the largest Pyramid?
When were these Pyramids probably erected? For what object are they
supposed to have been built?
FARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 57

‘Still farther south, in Upper Egypt, and
towards Nubia, the Nile flows through a nar-
row valley between two ranges of mountains.
In this valley, are many remarkable remains
of antiquity.

‘The most wonderful of these, are those of
Thebes. This city must have been more
magnificent, by far, than any city now on the
earth. Its ruins are scattered on both sides
of the Nile, and cover a surface of nearly
thirty miles in extent.

‘The ground is covered with columns of im-
mense magnitude, statues, rows of obelisks,
and other works which fill the mind with
astonishment. It is impossible to convey any
idea of these magnificent ruins.

‘This great city was of very ancient date.
It is mentioned by authors who wrote more
than two thousand years ago, as exhibiting
the same spectacle then, as now. Still far-



What is evident from the splendid ruins that now exist in Egypt?
58 PARLLY S TALES OF AFRICA.

ther south, towards Nubia, there are other
very remarkable remains of antiquity.

‘It is evident that in the earliest ages,
Egypt has been filled with people, who lived
in splendid cities, who possessed a great deal
of learning, and had the knowledge of many
arts which are now lost.

ee

CHAPTER X.
LEO FINISHES HIS STORY.

‘Bur I am forgetting to tell you my own
adventures. Somewhat more than two years
since, there came to Egypt a man of the name
of Hamet Bashaw. He is the second son of
the late Bashaw of ‘Tripoli.

‘The present Bashaw, whose name is Joseph,
caused his father and eldest brother to be put
to death, and thus became Bashaw himself.
Hamet being older than Joseph, had a right
to succeed his father.
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 59

‘'l'o prevent his doing so, Joseph endeavored
to take his life. Hamet heard of his intentions,
and fled to Egypt. He was kindly received,
and some schemes have been set on foot, to
dethrone his brother Joseph and place Hamet
at the head of the government of Tripoli.

‘About six months since, I came secretly
to Tripoli, as the agent of Hamet to promote
these schemes. Appearing to have come on
private business, I have had free access to all
parts of the city, and nobody has suspected
my motive. .

‘When you were brought on shore from your
ship, I happened to be on the wharf, and saw
you. I knew you instantly, and determined
if possible to liberate you.

‘I therefore took the greatest pains to find
out the place of your confinement, and ascer-
tain the means of setting you free.

‘I at length contrived to get over the walls
_of the prison, by a Jadder of ropes, and three
60 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFB Cys

nights in succession I went to your narrow
window, to contrive the means of your escape.

‘Finding that nothing could be done in this
way, I one night took advantage of the gaol-
er’s being asleep, turned the key, and liberat-
ed you as you remember. I then placed you
under the care of a woman from my own
country, in whom I could place confidence.

‘ After this I was absent nearly two months,
engaged in pursuing the object which brought
me to Tripoli. My business being completed,
I took you from your place of concealment,
and brought you on board of this vessel, which
was waiting for me.

‘I am now sailing for Egypt, and if this
fair wind continues, we shall be there in four
days. When you arrive there, you can take
passage in some vessel, and return to your
own country.’
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 6]

CHAPTER XI.

PARLEY TELLS ABOUT VARIOUS MATTERS, AND
HOW DECATUR AND TWENTY AMERICANS,
BURNT THE PHILADELPHIA.

WE continued to sail on our voyage with a
fair wind. During the passage, Leo told me
of some things which interested me very much.
Before I tell them to you, I must go back, and
relate some facts, that it is necessary you
should first understand.

I have told you that the people of Barbary
sent out many vessels, to seize upon the ships
of other nations. Now, many of our American
vessels went to trade in the Mediterranean
sea, and several of these were taken by these
pirates.

The crews were seized, put in prison, and
treated with the greatest cruelty. Some of
them were reduced to slavery, and made to
labor very hard.
62 PARLEY § TALES OF AFRICA.

The sufferings of these unhappy Americans
induced our government to send out some ships
of war, under the command of Commodore
Preble, not only to protect our vessels, in the
Mediterranean sea, but to assist in effecting
the liberation of our countrymen, who were
in captivity. This took place in 1803.

One of the American vessels of war was
called the Philadelphia, and commanded by
Captain Bainbridge. One day, this vessel
was chasing a corsair into the harbor of
Tripoli, when unfortunately she struck the
rround, and could not move.

Unable to escape, the vessel fell a prey to
the Tripolitans. The crew were all taken,
and shut up in prison. 'The vessel remained
in the hands of its captors.

The Tripolitans soon got the Philadelphia
afloat, and intended to make use of her, to

ee
Who was sent to the Mediterranean sea, near thirty years ago, witha

squadron of American ships of war under his command? For what was

Commodore Preble sent with these ships to the Mediterranean?
PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA. ‘63

carry on the war against our ships. ‘There
was a young man by the name of Decatur,
among the Americans, under the command of
Commodore Preble.

He commanded a small vessel called the
Enterprise, and was a very daring young
ofiicer. He proposed to Commodore Preble,
to go and set the Philadelphia on fire, and
thus prevent her being useful to the Tripoli-
tans.

This plan was approved of by Commodore
Preble. So, Decatur waited till it was night,
and then took with him twenty men, and con-
cealed them in the bottom of a small vessel,
and sailed towards the Philadelphia.

The Tripolitans on board this ship, saw the
little vessel approaching, but supposing it be-
longed to their own people, and suspecting no
danger, they allowed it to come close up -
them.



What happened to the Philadelphia?
64 PARLEY S$ TALES OF AFRICA.

Suddenly, Decatur with his twenty men
leaped upon the deck. There were fifty 'T'rip-
olitans on board the Philadelphia. The men
closed upon each other, and a deadly struggle
followed.

The astonished Tripolitans fought bravely
with their sabres. At the first onset, Decatur
was disarmed and thrown down. A Tripoli-
tan lifted his sword over him, and was about
to strike the fatal blow.

At this instant, one of Decatur’s men saw
his danger, and springing between him, and
the Tripolitan, received the stroke of the
sword on his arm.

Decatur rose, and fought like a lion. He
was truly a brave man. His twenty Ameri-
cans were all brave men. The Tripolitans
fell before them, like grass before the scythe:
Decatur set the vessel on fire, and not one
of the fifty Tripolitans ever reached the shore.

Will you tell how Decatur caused the Philadelphia to be burnt?
PARLEY § TALES OF AFRICA. 65

The flames soon rose from the ship, and
lighted the harbor far and wide. The peo-
ple from the city looked on in fear and won-
der, and Decatur returned in triumph to his
vessel.



These were brave deeds, but many of the
poor Americans were still in slavery. The
Bashaw of Tripoli was so angry because the
Philadelphia was burnt, that he was still more
cruel to the American prisoners in his power.

The sufferings of these unhappy men, were
0
66 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

soon known in our country. ‘The subject was
a matter of universal interest. Our govern-
ment was not idle.

They sent General Eaton to the Mediterra-
neal, as an agent to assist in obtaining the
freedom of our imprisoned countrymen. |

General Eaton at length heard of the situa-
tion of Hamet, whom I have mentioned be-
fore. He went to Egypt to see him.

He proposed to Hamet to assist him, in de-
throning his brother, provided Hamet, in com-
ing to the throne, would liberate the Ameri-
cans, and be at peace with America. To this
Hamet agreed, and General Eaton immedi-
ately set about making arrangements to carry
the project into effect.

For what purpose was General Eaton gent to the Mediterraneant

Where did General Eaton meet Hamet Bashaw? What agreement did
he make with Hamet Bashaw?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 67

CHAPTER XII.

PARLEY ARRIVES IN EGYPT, AND GOES WITH
GENERAL EATON’S EXPEDITION, ACROSS
THE DESERT. |
, af

Ir was at this point of time, that Leo made
his communication to me. He told me that
General Eaton was at this moment in Egypt,
and that in a few days he would set out with
a number of soldiers, to make an attack on
the dominions of the Bashaw of Tripoli.

He left me at full liberty, either to return
directly to my country, or join General Eaton’s
expedition. At the same time, he strongly
urged me to adopt the latter course.

He told me that the Bashaw of Tripoli
was a cruel man, that he had murdered his
own father; that Hamet was, by law, entitled
to the throne; and that above all, in joining
General Eaton’s enterprise, I should assist in
68 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

liberating my suffering countrymen from cap-
tivity.

These considerations had some weight with
me, but I did not immediately determine to
follow Leo’s advice. I chose rather to wait
till I arrived in Egypt, and then make up my
mind what to do.

In a few days we arrived at Alexandria, in
Lower Egypt. On inquiry, I found that Gen-
eral Eaton was actually there, as Leo had
said.

Lalso found several American seamen there,
who, in the course of a few days, were to
start on the proposed expedition. I very soon
determined to accompany them. In less than
a week, we were on our march westward,
towards the dominions of the Bashaw of 'Tri-
poli.

As we were going to travel across a desert,
General Eaton hired more than one hundred
camels to carry the baggage. ‘There were
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 69

very few Americans engaged in the expedi-
tion.



The whole number of persons was about
four hundred. Some of them were on horse-
back, but the greater part were on foot.
There were a good many Arabs and Moors,
headed by Hamet Bashaw.

We marched two hundred miles over an
uneven plain, consisting of barren hills of sand.



How many persons were engaged in General Eaton’s expedition? Of
whom did these four hundred persons consist?
70 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

Over this whole distance we met with not
one human habitation. At length, we came
across some tribes of Arabs.

The people were living in tents, and had
some horses and cattle. We were the first
Christians they had ever seen. They laughed
heartily at our dress, which appeared to them
very ridiculous. These Arabs had very dark
complexions, and wore turbans like the Turks.
They were all Mahometans, and like other
people, of this religion, thought Christians
- very much worse than themselves.

They believe that Christians will all be
punished in another world, by being kept for
ages in a dreadful fire. ‘They were very anx-
ious that I should become a Mahometan.

They seemed perfectly sincere, and no doubt
really believed, that if I remained a Christian,
{ should suffer great torments in a future state.

Will you describe the people that Parley says they met with ; after trav-
elling two hundred miles?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 71

Isaw among these Arabs, several Ostriches,
which they had caught when young, and ren-
dered nearly tame. Ostriches are the largest
birds in the world. They are only found in
Africa, and a small part of Asia.

They lay their eggs in the sand, and the
heat of the sun is so great, that the bird is
only obliged to sit on them during the night,
to hatch them. ‘These birds cannot fly, but
they will run as fast as a horse.

The Arabs had also beautiful Antelopes,
that resemble small Deer. These creatures
are very timid, and run with great swiftness.
Many of them are caught by the Panthers
and Lions, who lie concealed, and spring sud-
denly upon them, as cats do upon mice.

As we proceeded on our journey, we met
with almost constant difficulties. Sometimes
the weather was exceedingly hot, and we



~ What can yon tell about the Ostrich? What can you tell about An-
telopes?
72 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

were all, drooping with fatigue and _ thirst.

Sometimes, quarrels took place among the
soldiers, and sometimes Hamet Bashaw and
his men became disheartened, and proposed
to return. |

But General Eaton met these difficulties
with the greatest courage. He cheered the
troops, he inspired Hamet with confidence,
and triumphed over every obstacle.

But at length, we were short of provisions.
We were in a wide desert that produced al-
most nothing. We were surrounded by no
other people, than the wandering tribes of
Arabs, who kept out of sight during the day,
but stole into our camp at night, and robbed
us of our horses.

Our men were now dispersed in every di-
rection, to look for herbs and roots for food.
I went like the rest to find something to eat.
I had gone toa considerable distance from my
companions, when I happened to see between
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 73

the hills, a small low spot, where some shrubs
were growing.

They were in a little valley, i in which there
was a pond. ‘The place was quite green, and
looked very beautiful. all around it being
quite desolate, and barren. - A-spot like. this
in a desert, is called an Oasis. -



Well, I no sooner saw this spot, than I ran.
to it, expecting to find something there, that

would answer for food. What was my sur-
D
74 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

prise, to see four men start, with the sudden-
ness of beasts of prey, from the bushes, and
surround me! I saw at once that they were
Arabs, and being totally unarmed, I had no
means of defending myself. They instantly
fell upon me, and began to strip me of my
clothes, with surprising quickness.



SS ===

————————

They took off my hat and coat, and were
proceeding to rob me of my other garments,
when three or four of our horsemen acciden-
tally appeared in sight.
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 16

They were coming directly towards us.
The Arabs were alarmed, and throwing my
hat and coat upon the ground, they left me,
and sprang to their horses, which were at a
little distance among the shrubs.

They mounted them at a single leap, and
galloped away over the sand hills, disappear-
ing almost as quickly as birds of the air.
The swiftness of the horses, belonging to these
Arabs of the desert, is truly surprising.

Notwithstanding all our researches, we
were still short of food, and were obliged to,
kill one of our camels, which we found to be
excellent meat. |

We continued our march, and in two
months, had proceeded six hundred miles
over the desert. We now arrived at a tolera-
bly fruitful country, ana soon reached the city
of Derne. ,

a LaEEEr Emma memes. iS 7 TE
How long was General Eaton’s expedition in crossing the desert? How
far across the desert? |
76 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

CHAPTER XIII.

ARRIVAL AT DERNE. THE SIROCCO. A BATTLE,
AND SOME OTHER THINGS.

Dernkz is situated on the sea, and is a large
place, nearly equal to Tripoli in size. It be-
longed to the Bashaw of Tripoli, and was gov-
erned by a Bey. Here General Eaton was
joined by several American vessels.

An attack upon the city was resolved upon.
The vessels were to fire upon the town, with
their cannon from the water, and General Ea-
ton with the soldiers, was to attack it by land.

While preparations were making to execute
these plans, we were visited by a dreadful hot
wind, called the Sirocco. This wind filled the
air with small sand. The whoie sky was al-
most the color of copper.

The animals were gasping for breath. The

In what direction is Derne from Alexandria? What can you tell of
Derne?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 77

leaves, plants, and flowers, perished. It was
truly dreadful. I was parched with mee and
my skin seemed on fire.

This lasted for three days, and then the Si-
rocco ceased. ‘This dreadful wind is common
in the deserts of both Africa and Asia, and
often takes away the lives of men, and beasts.

The preparations being at length completed,
the attack on Derne was commenced. The
American vessels poured their cannon shot
upon the batteries of the enemy, and upon
the town.

The roar was loud and terrific. Our troops,
too, assailed the town on the land side. We
were opposed by a large number of 'Tripolitan
soldiers.

A fierce battle followed. General Eaton
was shot in the wrist, but he seemed to heed
it not. He led us on through the thickest of
the fight. It was a brave battle.

Describe the Sirocco. Describe the attack on Derne.
78 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

We had some Greeks with us, who fought
by our sides, and they fought bravely. The
enemy at length gave way. ‘They fled before
us, and we entered the town.

Derne was now captured. Joseph Bashaw
heard of this event with dread. He feared
that his brother Hamet would succeed in driv-
ing him from the throne.

He desired therefore to make peace as soon
as possible, with the Americans. He sent to
Mr. Lear, the American consul, and offered
immediately to release the American prison-
ers, if General Eaton would cease to assist
Hamet Bashaw.

Mr. Lear immediately agreed to this. Gen-
eral Eaton was consequently obliged to with-
draw his troops from Derne. Soon after this,
we all sailed for Malta, an island in the Med-
iterranean sea.

en
What effect had the capture of Derne on Joseph Bashaw? What did

Joseph Bashaw do? What was General Eaton obliged to do in conse-

quence of the arrangement between Mr. Lear and Joseph Bashaw?
te
7

PARLEY ’S TALES OF AFRICA. 79

Poor Hamet Bashaw, thus deserted by his
American allies, had no farther hopes. He
left his cruel brother Joseph to reign, quitted
his country, and came to America.

General Eaton returned to America also,
and after some years he died. He deserves
to be remembered, as a man of extraordinary
courage, energy, and perseverance.

Immediately after the arrangement was
made, between Mr. Lear and Joseph Bashaw,
all the American prisoners in Tripoli, were
set at liberty.

Among these were my companions, who
had been captured with me in the Mediterra-
nean. After we were imprisoned in Tripoli,
I had known nothing of their fate. How
ereat was my pleasure on arriving at Malta,
to meet them all there!

They had suffered a great deal during their



a What did Hamet Bashaw do? What became of General Eaton? For

what does General Eaton deserve to be remembered?

r
« i
a
oe;
i=” ty
380 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

imprisonment, but: were now very happy, in
the prospect of returning to their country.

Fr ee

CHAPTER XIV.

PARLEY SETS OUT FOR CHINA. SOMETHING
ABOUT CAPTAIN RILEY, AND GREAT STORIES.

A Frew days after I arrived at Malta, a large
American ship, called the Kien Long, came
to that island. She had been to Smyrna, a
town in Asia, on the Mediterranean sea, to
get opium. ‘This opium, she was going to car-
ry to China, and exchange it for tea, silks and
other goods. |

While she was at Smyrna, the plague was
raging there. The plague is a dreadful fever,
that is very common in all the large towns,
on the Mediterranean.

Sometimes, many thousands of people die

, What can you tell of the Plague?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. Ry

of it,in a single city, in the course of a few
months. Several of the seamen on board the
Kien Long, took the disease at Smyrna, and
died there.

When she arrived at Malta, ~ was there-
fore short of men. I was offered the situation
of second mate on board of her.

This I accepted ; and instead of setting out
‘for home as I intended, I started in a few
days, on a voyage to China. |

We passed through the straits of Gibraltar,
and stretched to the west along the northern
coast of Africa. We soon passed the Canary
isles, and at length came near Cape Blanco
on the western coast of Africa.

It was on the coast near this Cape, that
Captain Riley and his crew were wrecked,
about ten years afterwards, that is, in 1815.



In what direction did Parley sail after he left the Mediterranean?
What islands did he soon pass? Where was Captain Riley and his crew
wrecked? In what direction is Cape Blanco from Tripoli? The Cape
of Good Hope from you?
82 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

Captain Riley has written a book, giving an
account of his shipwreck, and his suffering in
Africa. This account is very interesting, but
it has one fault, he is too fond of telling large
stories.

He tells of a great many things, that are
perhaps nearly all true, but yet his descrip-
vions are so extravagant, that many people.
disbelieve his whole book.

Nothing is more unfortunate, than to get a
habit of telling great stories. A person who
has this habit, is very soon laughed at, and
despised. Good people will place no confi
dence in, nor have any esteem for a person
who tells great stories.
PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA, 83

CHAPTER XV.
CAPTAIN RILEY’S SHIPWRECK.

I wILL now give you an account of Captain
Riley’s adventures ; ‘for, as I have said before,
they are very interesting,

Captain Riley was a native of Connecticut,
He sailed in the brig Commerce from Hart-
ford, and went to Gibraltar. From thence he
set sail to go to the Canary islands.

When he came near these islands, the
weather was foggy, and he could not tell exact-
ly where he was. Being deceived by his reck-
oning, he went beyond these islands, and ran
near to Cape Blanco, on the African coast.

A strong wind was blowing the vessel along,
at a rapid rate, towards the shore. Suddenly
Captain Riley heard a great noise in the wa-
ters. He instantly knew it was the noise of
breakers,
o4 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA

Breakers are hidden rocks in the sea, ove!
which the waves tumble with great violence
Scarcely had he heard the roar of the break
ers, before the vessel struck upon them.



Then the waves rose around the vessel, and
beat upon her with a noise like thunder. The
sea broke over her, and she was very soon al-
most full of water. |

Expecting that she would be dashed to
pieces in a few minutes, Captain Riley and
PARLEY S TALES’ OF AFRICA. 85

some of his men got into the boat, and set out
for the shore, which was visible at no great
distance.

The sea was very rough, and the boat was
tossed about like a feather. The billows
broke constantly over it, and almost drowned —
the people who were in it.

It was rapidly driven towards the shore,
and soon it was thrown upon a sandy beach.
Several of the crew were yet on board the
ship, but by the greatest exertions, they were
all at length landed on the shore.

Here then, on the desolate coast of Africa,
were Captain Riley and his crew. ‘Their ves- ,
sel was on the rocks, and they knew she must
soon go to pieces. ‘Their boat was. —"
so that they could not sail in it.

They were indeed in a distressing situation.
But Captain Riley was a man of energy, and
he determined to escape from this dreary
coast, if possible. Accordingly, he and his
86 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

men first built a tent for shelter, and then be-
gan to repair their boat.

Their plan was to mend this, and when the
sea was calm, to sail out upon it, and en-
- deavor to find some friendly vessel, or attempt
to reach some of the English settlements,
which they knew lay to the south, on the coast
of Africa. . te

The morning after they were wreck&y
Captain Riley and his men were surprised to
discover some strange looking persons, coming
towards them.

These were an old man, with a hideous
face, and long hair standing out in all direc-
tions, two frightful old women, and several
children. These creatures were almost na-
ked, and had a wild and savage look.

The shore was strewed with a great vari-
ety of articles, which had floated from the
ship. 'The strange looking people fell to plun-
dering these articles. Thev ripped open the
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 87

feather beds, and were amazingly diverted to
see the air filled with feathers. They opened
some boxes of silk handkerchiefs, and lace
veils, and tied them about their heads, arms,
and legs. |

At length they went away. Night came
on, and Captain Riley and his men slept in
their tent, by the side of the restless ocean.
In the morning, they again began to repair
their boat.

But pretty soon, the Arabs came again.
‘The old man had a spear now, which he
threatened to throw at Captain Riley, and
his men.

There were also several other Arabs with
him, who had spears. They brought with
them a number of camels also, to carry off the
plunder. |

Captain Riley and his men had no weapons
for defence, and could offer no_resistance to
people thus armed. They therefore got into
88 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

their boat, which they had mended, and put
off to their vessel, which still remained on the
rocks.

-_-—__-

CHAPTER XVI.
CAPTAIN RILEY’S ADVENTURES, AND SUFFERINGS,

Tur Arabs now loaded their camels with
the spoil, and destroyed whatever they could
not carry away. They then beckoned to Cap-
tain Riley to come on shore to them, and at
length they persuaded him to come.

But pretty soon they seized him, struck at
him with their daggers, and threatened in-
stantly to kill him.

This was intended to frighten him. They
then told him, they must have the money that
was in the ship. Captain Riley made signs
to his men, and they brought about one thou-
sand dollars in a bucket, and gave to the
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 89

Arabs. But this did not satisfy them; they
wanted more.

Not being able to get more, they again
threatened to kill Captain Riley. Some of
his men seeing his danger, came ashore to as-
sist him. :



But he found that his only chance of safety,
lay in an attempt to escape. So he waited
for a favorable moment. Then he sprang
away from his enemies, ran to the beach, and
plunged into the water.
90 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

He was pursued by three of the Arabs.
They hurled a spear at him, but a wave at
that moment rolled over his head, and saved
him. He swam for his life. He reached the
ship, and escaped his pursuers.

But one of his‘men remained on the shore.
The disappointed savages now turned their
rage upon him. They plunged a spear
through his body, and he fell dead upon the
ground.

The situation of the poor seamen was now
dreadful. Their inhuman enemies were wait-
ing on the land, to take their lives if they
came ashore.

Their poor vessel had been so beat and
pounded on the rocks, by the rough billows,
that the water flowed through her, as if she
were a basket.

Nothing was left to them but to get into
their leaky boat, and push out upon the rough
sea, with the probable chance of soon sinking
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 91

in the waves.. This they chose, rather thar
venture among the cruel people, that occupied
the shore.

Having got their boat ready, Captain Ri-
ley and his ten companions put off to sea. At
first the ocean was tolerably calm, but by and
by the night came on, and with it, a dreadful
storm.

The peril of the poor seamen can hardly
be described. Their boat was very leaky,
and it took in so much water, that all of them
were occupied in bailing it out with their hats,
and whatever else they had, that would an-
swer the purpose.

With all their exertions they could scarcély
keep it from sinking. The night was very
dark, and they could see nothing around them,
save when the bright flashes of lightning,
showed them the tumbling billows.

The roar of the ocean in a storm, is terrific.
It has a fearful sound, even to one, who is
92 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

riding safely in a strong ship. But to the
ears of men in an open boat, that, bends and
trembles at every shock of the sea, the uproar
of the waters must be terrible.

The poor men had indeed no expectation
that they should ever reach the land; yeta
faint hope still remained, and still they contin-
ued to exert themselves for their deliverance.

The storm continued for several days. At
length, they were short of food and water.
Hunger and thirst soon pressed them very
hard. They had only water enough to wet
their lips. They devoured the remains of a
pig, without being cooked, which was all they
had, and gnawed the very bones.

Finally, reduced to the greatest extremity,
and having been a week at sea, they deter-
mined once more to land. They approached
the shore, and, borne along by the surf, were
carried high upon the beach.

The shore was formed of lofty, perpendic-
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 93

ular rocks, at the bottom of which, was a nar-
row beach. Upon this, as night approached,
they laid themselves down to rest.

Weary with exertion, and wasted with anx-
iety, they slept soundly till morning. They
awoke very much refreshed. They then
clambered over the rocks, and travelled to-
wards the east.

The sufferings of the wanderers were now
very great. I cannot undertake to tell you
all that happened to them. Perhaps you will ~
sometime read the whole story in Captain Ri-
ley’s book. I can only tell you now, that af-
ter travelling awhile, they reached the bor-
ders of the great desert.

Here they met with one of those wandering
tribes of Arabs, who roam over the desert,
with their camels and flocks, living by pastur-
age, and plundering all who come in their way.

These Arabs seized Captain Riley and his
men, stripped them of their clothes, and re-
94 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

duced them to a state of slavery. ‘They then
divided them among themselvese

Ne
No

Ly
¢

i

4
=
ss

imei

WN)



The Arabs soon moved to the eastward, and
proceeded to the interior of the desert. Cap-
tain Riley and his companions were placed
on camels, but being destitute of clothing,and
the heat being excessive, they suffered ex-
ceedingly.

Besides, they had no food but camels’ milk,
and hardly enough of this to sustain life.
Their lips were also parched with thirst, and
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRIVA. 95

such were their torments, that they wished to
die, to be relieved from their misery.

At length Captain Riley and four of his
men, were bought by two Arab merchants,
who were met with upon the desert. These
merchants set out for Morocco, intending to
sell them there.

In this journey, the poor captives endured
the greatest misery, from hunger, thirst, and
fatigue. ‘They had a great variety of adven-
tures, and were once attacked by robbers.

But at length they reached Morocco. Here
they found an English gentleman, who paid
their ransom and treated them with great
kindness.

Emaciated with fatigue and privations, re-
duced to mere skeletons, by every species of
suffering, they now met with kindness and



Where was Capfain Riley carried to by the Arabs? Im what direc-
tion is Morocco from Cape Blanco? Will you relate some of Captain
ley’s adventures and sufferings, in crossing the desert?
96 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

care, which soon restored their health and
strength.

Captain Riley returned to America, where
he published an account of his shipwreck, and
sufferings. Most of his men also found their
way back to America. 7

—————

CHAPTER XVII.

PARLEY CONTINUES HIS VOYAGE, AND TELLS
ABOUT MUNGO PARK, AND OTHER TRAV-
ELLERS, INTO CENTRAL AFRICA.

Tuvs I have told you of Captain Riley's
adventures. If you will look on the map, you
will be able to trace his route. )

It appears that the western coast of Africa,
north of Cape Blanco, is thinly inhabited by
savage tribes of Arabs, who are ready to

es ceentealieeptennnsliiiiitinmclaererin aman erent
What of the inhabitants of the coast of Africa, north of Cape Blanco!
PARLEY $ TALES OF AFRICA. 97

plunder such unfortunate seamen, as may be
wrecked upon the shore.

Not satisfied with robbing them of what-

ever goods they may possess, they make slaves
of them, and subject them to the greatest cru-
elty and hardships.
_ It appears that the Arabs are kind and hos-
pitable to each other; but towards their ene-
mies they have no mercy. ‘They look upon
all people, who do not profess the Mahometan
religion, as wicked outcasts; and fit only to
be made slaves of.

There are multitudes of these Arabs in the
northern, middle, and eastern parts of Africa;
and it is a part of their business, and one of
their means of subsistence, to attack and car-
ry off people whom they can overcome, and
then sell them as slaves.

‘The negroes who are very numerous in the
middle parts of Africa, are constantly hunted

What is a part of the business of the Arabs?

7 K
98 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

by these pirates of the land, and many thou-
sands of them are every year, torn from their
homes, separated from their friends and fami-
lies, and carried away into distant countries.

There, deprived of their liberty, they labor
for the luxury and enjoyments of rich persons,
who buy them. They die in a land of exile,
and never know what becomes of their chil-
dren or their friends, whether they are living
or dead, happy or unhappy.

But I must now tell you about my voyage.
We continued to sail along the coast of Africa
till we came near Cape Verd. A little west
of Cape Verd, are the Cape Verd islands.
These are sixteen in number, but several of
them are only barren rocks.

St. Jago is the principal island. A great
many vessels come to these islands, to get salt,
which is formed of sea water, by the heat of ©
the sun. |

ss imamate ED
What of the: Negroes? Where is Cape Verd? What islands near
Cape Verd? Describe these islands. |
PARLEY'S TALES OF AFRICA. 99

Soon after we passed Cape Verd, we also
passed the mouth of the river Gambia. This
river you will see laid down on the map.

It is a large muddy stream, in which there
are a great many Hippopotami, and huge
Crocodiles. On the banks, are thousands of
Monkeys.

About thirty-five years ago, a famous Scotch
traveller went up this river, into the interior
of the country, to discover what sort of peo-
ple lived there. His name was Mungo Park

Before that time, very little was known of
this part of Africa. Many travellers had at-
tempted to explore the country, but they were
obliged either to return, without success, o~
were killed before they got back.

Mr. Park found the country to be inhabited
by a variety of negro nations. He had many
curious adventures, .

For what do vessels visit the Cape Verd islands? Where is the river
Gambia? Describe this river. What famous traveller went up this riv
er to explore the country, about thirty-five years ago?
100 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA

One day, he went to see the negro king of
Boudou, to whom he gave an umbrella, and
several other things, with which the king was
very much pleased.

He then began to praise Mr. Park’s blue
coat, and bright yellow buttons, and concluded
by asking Mr. Park to give it to him, promis-
ing to wear it on all public occasions. So Mr.
Park took off his coat, and laid it at the feet
of the king.



— —

After remaining a considerable time in these

Tell me something of Munge Dark’s travele
(aAnLGiS TALES OF AFRICA. 101

countries, Mr. Park returned to Engiand, and
published an account of his travels. About
ten years after, he again went up the river
Gambia to explore the country.

This took place only a few months before
my voyage to China. At the very time that
I was sailing along the coast, Mr. Park was
in the interior of the country, prosecuting his
travels.

As he was one day travelling on horseback,
he saw a lion lying by the road, His horse
was frightened, but the huge beast lay still,
and did no harm. ‘You will find a picture of
this incident on the next page.

In this latter expedition, Park was accom-
panied by nearly fifty Europeans, several of
them soldiers, whose object it was to protect,
and assist him.

He pursued nearly the same course as be-
fore, but he and his companions were beset
with difficulties, and dangers, on all hands.
102 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

These they encountered with the utmost for-
titude, and continued to proceed, till at length
all had died by sickness, and other causes, but
Mr. Park and four others.

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—— —

Mr. Park and the Lion.

These reached a town called Boussa, a lit-
tle farther east than Tombuctoo. As they
were in a boat proceeding eastward, down
A I a ie

What can you tell of Park’s second expedition into the interior of Af
rica?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 108

the river Niger, they were attacked by the
natives.

They defended themselves with the utmost
bravery ; for three days they resisted their en-
emies, but at length, overpowered by numbers,
they all perished.

Not one of this whole expedition escaped,
to tell their sad story. Their fate was indeed
unknown, until about twenty years after-
wards, when Captain Clapperton, another
English traveller, reached Boussa, and learned
the fate of Park, and his companions.

Notwithstanding the ill fate which had at-
tended most of the travellers in central Africa,
still others were found bold enough to venture
into these regions.

About a dozen years ago, Major Denham,
and Captain Clapperton, whom I have men-

rere LL LLL

Describe Mungo Park’s death. What can you tell of Major Denham
and Captain Clapperton’s travels? In which direction is Bornou. from
Triopoli?
104 PARLEY $ TALES OF AFRICA.
tioned above, cros

sed the desert from Tripolt
to Bornou.

Here they found a large jake called Tchad,
upon which there were multitudes of birds, so
gentle, that they would scarcely move out of
the way, as Majo

|




They found Bornou to

be a large and pow-
erful kingdom of Negroes, where the horse-
soldiers cover themselves, in time of

battle,

What can you tell of Bornou?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 105

with steel shirts, formed of many small links.

Captain Clapperton proceeded as far west-
ward as Sackatoo. He found the country
through which he passed very populous, and
a part of it beautiful, and well cultivated.

We 7/\s y
VA aa’ : = :
% Yn
. / Bh
s INS “a2 P
e ARN

Ae
fis
en |
i
: a eee
yy
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ce amen ee
These two travellers returned safely to

England, and published:a very interesting ac-
count of what theyyse

In 1825, this same Captain Clapperton
made an expedition into central Africa, from



Where did Captain Clapperton go to? In which direction is Sackatoo
from Tripoli? What other expedition into Centra] Africa, was made bv
Cavtain Clapperton?
106 PARLEY ’S TALES OF AFRICA.

the western coast. He proceeded from Eng-
land by water to Bagadry, which you will
find on the map.

Here he landed, and proceeded to Boussa,
where, as I told you before, he discovered the
fate of Mr. Park. From this place, he went
to Sackatoo, which he had formerly visited.
Here he was taken sick, and died. His faith-
ful servant returned to England and gave an
account of his master’s*travels. His name
was Lander. He afterwards made two ex-
peditions to the interior of Africa, and made
some great discoveries.

Perhaps you are tired of hearing about
travellers to Central Africa, but I must men-
tion one more. This was a Frenchman by the
name of Caillée, who has recently been to
Tombuctoo, a large city inhabited by Ne-
groes. You will find it on the map.

At what place did Captain Clapperton die? ‘'T’o what celebrated place
in Africa has Mr. Caillee recently been?

ey
wv
PARLEYS TALES OF AFRICA. 107

A great many travellers had before endea-
vored to reach this place; but none has ever
succeeded and returned, but Mr. Caillée. He
is now in Paris, and has just published a” ac-
count of his travels.

CHAPTER XIX.

PARLEY TELLS OF HIS VOYAGE, AND HOW THEY
MET WITH A DREADFUL GALE OF WIND,

OFF THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.

Wet, I must now go to my own story.
Our vessel continued on her voyage. We
108 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

had fine weather, and a fair wind, and in a
few weeks after we set out, we were near the
Cape of Good Hope.

But as we were turning round that southern
point of Africa, to proceed eastward, we were
visited by a violent storm. I had been often
at sea, and seen many gales of wind; but
never before did I witness so violent an up-
roar of the elements, as then.

The sea did not rise in lofty billows, and
sink in deep hollow vales between ; but large
masses of the sea were lifted upon the wind,
and strewed in white foam upon the surface
of the deep.

We took in the sails so as to present to the
wind, only the naked hull of out ship, with
her masts and rigging. But she was driven
along, as swiftly as if she had wings.

The sea broke over us in a continued sheet,
and our vessel leaned over so much, as to dip
the ends of her spars in the water. Several
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 109

of the seamen were shaken from the masts
into the sea, and disappeared forever.

It was at once a terrific, and sublime scene.
The storm continued for near two days. Ev-
ery effort was made by the captain and the
sailors, to prevent accident.

But suddenly a heavy swell of the sea
struck the vessel, and threw her over on her
side. It was now a moment of great peril.
The captain ordered the masts to be cut
away. ‘This was instantly done, and the ves-
sel rightec.

Again, she sat bravely on the water, and
contended with the billows. A moment be-
fore, we had abandoned all idea of escape,
now we were cheered with the hope of safe-
ly riding out the gale.

The storm at length abated. The clouds
rolled away, the sun shone forth, and a dead

Where did the Kien Long meet witha violent storm? What happened
to the ship during the storm? Where was the ship taken to refit?
110 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

calm settled upon the waters. We took ad-
vantage of this moment, to repair some of the
damage done to our vessel.

We also rigged up a temporary mast, upon
which we hoisted a sail, and when the breeze
sprung up, we laid our course for Cape Town,
an English settlement, at the Cape of Good
Hope.

In two days we arrived at that place, and
here we supplied ourselves with masts, and
other necessary articles to put our vessel in
complete trim.

While at Cape Town, I had an opportunity
of learning many things about the southern
part of Africa, of which I will tell you in an-
other chapter. :
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 111

CHAPTER XIX,

PARLEY TELLS ABOUT CAPE COLONY, THE HOT-
TENTOTS, VARIOUS WILD ANIMALS, AND
OTHER THINGS.

Care Town was settled many years ago,
by some Dutch people. 'They found the country
inhabited by a race of tall, slender Negroes,
of a very gentle temper, called Hottentots.



They took away the lands of these people



By whom was Cape Town first settled?
112 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

without ceremony, made slaves of some uf
the inhabitants, and drove the rest back into
the country.

The colony continued to increase, and after
awhile, it fell into the hands of the English,
who have ever since kept possession of it.
Cape Town is quite a considerable place. It
has more inhabitants than Providence.

A great many of them however are Negro
and Hottentot slaves, some of whom are very
cruelly treated. Most of the slaves are Ma-
hometans, because their selfish masters are
not willing to have them taught Christianity.

Near Cape Town, there is a very remark-
able mountain called Table Mountain. It is
perfectly flat on the top, like a table, and one
of its sides is cut down in such a manner,
as to form an almost perpendicular face.
This mountain is four thousand feet high.

aor sa a eniceaespemncasenaiecnccnatiiy aaa SSS

How did the Dutch settlers treat the Hottentots? ‘To what nation
does Cape Colony now belong? What of Cape Town? What remark.
able mountain near Cape Town’?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 113

‘To the north of Cape Colony, the country
1s inhabited by various tribes of Hottentots,
Some of them are wild and savage; but for
the most part, they are mild, gentle, and kind
hearted.

- >



tied
Quagga, or Wild Ass. . ;

There are many Lions and Elephants in
these regions, as well as other wild animals
There are Camelopards, Zebras, and Quag-
gas, a species of wild ass, which the Lion
often makes his prey.

There are also vast companies of Antelopes,

How is the country, north of Cape Colony inhabited? What is the
eharacter of the Hottentots? What wild animals in South Africa?


114 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

sometimes ten thousand in number, seen to
cover the plains. —

The Lion lurks among these herds, and
often springs from his ambush upon them.
Sometimes he will put his mouth to the ground,
and utter a terrible roar.

This frightens the Antelopes, and they run
in all directions ; not knowing which way the
dreadful sound comes from, they often rush to
the very spot where the Lion is concealed and
thus fall victims to his artifice.

The inhabitants have a great many adven-
tures with Lions. In general, these danger-
ous animals will Jet a man pass without at-
tacking him; but if very hungry, they forget
their usual politeness.

I have heard of a Dutchman by the name
of Lucas, who was riding through the Hotten-
tot country, when he saw a Lion at no great
distance.

ED

How does the Lion deceive the Antelopes?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 115

Lucas expected that the Lion would let
him pass; but instead of this, he leaped from
his ambush, and came upon both horse and
rider, like a thunderbolt.

ooo See =







The horse was instantly thrown to the
ground, and the teeth of the Lion were fast-
ened in his throat. Lucas scrambled out
of the fray, and ran with all his might.

The Lion was too busy with the horse to
116 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA,

follow him. So he escaped to a house at some
distance. After awhile he returned to the
spot.

The Lion was gone, but the flesh of the
horse was entirely devoured, and nothing was
left, but his clean picked bones. Even the
saddle had disappeared, and poor Lucas never
found it.

On the eastern coast of Africa, near Cape
Colony, is a nation called Caffrees. ‘They
inhabit a fruitful country, and are said to be
the handsomest Negroes in the world.

They live in small villages; their houses
consist of small half-round huts covered with
coarse mats. ‘They have large herds of
cattle. ‘They are fond of hunting, and are
much devoted to a stiff ridiculous kind of dance.

Still farther to the north, along the eastern
coast of Africa, there are other tribes of Ne-

What of the Caffrees? What of the inhabitants to the north of the
Caffrees?
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 117

yroes, and several tribes of Arabs; but little
however is known of them, and I shall not
therefore undertake to describe them.

I have already told you so much about Af-
rica, that you are perhaps weary of the sub-
ject. But.to me it is an interesting part of
the world.

Formerly, the accounts given us of the peo-
ple of Africa, represented the negro races, as
a stupid, debased portion of the human family,
only fit to be the slaves and servants, of the
rest of mankind.

But modern travellers, more worthy of
credit, give more favorable representations.
Both Denham and Clapperton found the Ne-
groes of Central Africa more intelligent, and
more civilized, than the world has been led to
believe them.

The Caffrees and Hottentots are now known
to be superior in every respect, to what their
Dutch neighbors, used to say they were.
118 PARLEYS TALES OF AFRICA

There is in truth little reason to doubt, that
for the purpose of providing some excuse, for
the barbarous and cruel treatment of the Ne-
groes, the Europeans have been accustomed
to misrepresent their character.

How much more delightful would it be, to
see all christian people uniting with heart and
hand, to spread the light of education, and re-
ligious knowledge, among the unfortunate
millions of Africa, rather than to send people
to force away the inhabitants, by violence
and treachery, and then attempt to excuse
this mean and dastardly conduct, by repre-
senting them as brutes, rather than men !

CHAPTER. XX.
PARLEY TELLS ABOUT VARIOUS MATTERS
AND THINGS.
I nave now given you an account of some
of the inhabitants, cities, and countries of
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 119

Africa. I have also told you something about
the animals; but of them I will adda few
stories that I think will please you.

In some parts of Africa the woods are full
of monkeys. ‘These merry fellows live chiefly
on the trees, and seem to be completely at
home there. There are also great serpents,
and many other creatures.

The following extract from the account
given of Major Denham’s travels in Africa,
by my friend Solomon Bell, will be found
interesting.

Very soon after leaving Lari, the travellers
discovered the foot prints of elephants, among
the forests. 'They saw places where these
huge creatures had lain down, and crushed be-
neath their heavy bodies, young trees, shrubs,
and underwood.

They also killed a monstrous serpent,
eighteen feet long. They fired five bullets
into him, but still he was moving away, when
120 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

two Arabs cut his head off with their swords.
The travellers also saw herds of wild cattle, .
pounding over the hills like deer. 1

The woods at length became so thick, that
the travellers could hardly find a clear place
to encamp in. In the woods, wild animals
seemed to abound. ‘There were many beau-
tiful birds, and among them wild Guinea
fowls.

There were many monkeys, who leaped,
frisked, and chattered at the travellers. One
of these was so impudent, that they pursued
him for half a mile. He did not run straight
forward, but jumped and bounded about, con-
stantly looking back over his shoulder at his
pursuers. But they could not catch this lively
fellow. |

The travellers having stopped at a little
negro town called Woodie, Major Denham
went into the woods, accompanied by an
Arab, insearch of game. At length they saw
PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA. 121

a drove of more than one hundred and fifty
elephants, feeding upon the grass. They did
not think it worth while to disturb these huge
beasts; they therefore left the elephants, and
went in pursuit of some antelopes; but these
swift animals kept out of their way.

One night, as the travellers were encamped
in the desert, the wild beasts came around
them, and made a dreadful howling. They
kept fires the whole night, to scare them
away; but, notwithstanding all this, one of
the camels was nearly devoured by a lion,
and the hyenas finished what the lion left.

One day, Major Denham gained permission
of the Sheik, to make an excursion to Lake.
Tchad. He was attended by some of the»
Sheik’s people. They found a multitude of
beautiful birds near the lake, as well‘as many
antelopes. ‘They also saw a drove of forty
elephants. Three of them were grazing heaa
the water. Major Denham and his attend:

Tr £,
122 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

ants approached them very closely. At first
the elephants paid but little attention to them,
but by and by they began to move off, utter-
ing a loud roar which shook the earth under
their feet.

One of them was a very large one, at least
sixteen feet high. A negro hurled a spear at
him, which struck him near the tail. This
seemed to hurt him about as much as it
would to prick your finger with a pin. He
threw up his proboscis, and discharged a quan-
tity of sand in the faces of his pursuers, which
nearly blinded Major Denham.

Major Denham fired several balls into his
skin, which seemed to hurt him no more than
the bite of a fly. Away he went, and .ne
more was heard of him. By and_by, eight
elephants were seen coming towards the par
ty. They immediately set out to meet them.

The elephants did not turn their backs and
run away, until several spears had been
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 123

nurled at them, and several bullets had been
shot. At length, they moved majestically
away. On their backs were several small
birds resembling thrushes. They are said to
be very useful to the elephant in clearing parts
of his skin of vermin, which he cannot reach
either with his tail or his proboscis.

One night, as they were travelling, Major
Denham saw several panthers; but they ran
off very swiftly, twisting their long tails in the
air. By and by, they saw another panther.
He had just killed a negro, whose body was
found. The animal had sucked his blood,
and was so full that he could not run fast.
One of the Arabs hurled a spear at him,
which went through his neck.

‘The huge beast rolled over, broke the spear,
and ran away with the shaft in his body.
Another man now rode close to the panther,
and struck him through the body with another
spear. ‘The panther was in the very act of
124 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

springing upon his pursuer, when an Arab
shot him through the head, and killed him
on the spot.

These animals, as well as leopards, are
very common in this part of the country.
They are sly animals, and generally spring
upon their prey from behind. ‘They will sei-
dom attack a man, but often watch for little ne-
gro children, in the neighbourhood of villages.
These they sometimes kill. ‘They eat the
flesh of young animals, but only suck the
blood of old ones. )

One day, as they were passing along the
borders of a lake, at sunrise, With a negro
army, the hippopotami, which are nearly as
large as elephants, put theirheads out of the
water, to hear the drums. So pleased were
they with the music, that they followed the
drummers the whole length of the lake, some-
times coming very near the shore, and spout- ..
ing forth great columns of water.
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 125

On his way back to Kouka, Major Denham
lad the pleasure of seeing three camelopards.
These are very singular animals. There are
some of them sixteen feet high, and they are
the tallest animals known. They feed upon
the branches of trees. ‘They possess long
slender tongues, whch are almost as useful
as the trunk of an elephant. Major Denham
chased these animals for a considerable time,
but could not overtake them.

It must be a very pleasant thing to travel
in a country, where one meets with such
strange things. But as every body cannot
travel in Africa, they must be content to
hear other people tell stories about it.

You must remember that it is a good many
years since I was in Africa. But within a
very short time, Mr. Macomber has been in
Southern Africa, to catch wild beasts. He
has been very successful, and has sent home
some beautiful zebras, and quaggas, and gnoos,
126 PARLEYS TALES OF AFRICA.

and hyenas, and pelicans, and other curious
creatures.

These are kept in cages, and are taken
about the country to be looked at. It is a
pleasant and useful thing to go and examine
these animals; and I advise all my young
friends to lose no good opportunity of taking
a peep at them.

a

CHAPTER XXII.
PARLEY TELLS OF CAILLE’S TRAVELS TO-
TIMBUCTOO : CONCLUSION.

I have already mentioned the travels of a
Frenchman, by the name of Caillé, who lately
went to the great city of ‘Timbuctoo. But
I am sure you will like to hear his story more
particularly.

He was born in France in 1800; and as he
read a great many books of travels when he
was a boy, he formed a strong desire to be-
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRIUA. 127

come a traveller himself. He was so much
captivated with Mungo Park’s narratives,
that he resolved to make his way into the
regions to which they relate, and proceed,
if possible, to 'Timbuctoo.

At a very early age, he set off for the west-
ern coast of Africa. But various circum-
stances prevented his fulfilling his grand design
until 1825. In April of that year, he proceed-
ed to Kakondy, a negro town on the river
Nunez, not far from the sea. At this place,
caravans are constantly arriving from the
interior of Africa, and others setting out on
their return.

These caravans come to trade with the |
various English and French settlements on
the western coast of Africa. 'They bring gold
dust, bees’ wax, gum arabic, gum senegal, ivory,
skins of wild animals, and other things; and
get in exchange, fire arms, gunpowder, spirits,
cotton goods, and trinkets of various sorts.
128 PARLEY S$ TALES OF AFRICA.

Mr. Caillié attached himself to a small car-
avan that was going to 'Timbuctoo. As he
knew that the various tribes of people through
which he was to pass, were Mahometans, and
hated the Christians, he disguised himself as
an Arab, or Mahometan.

On the 19th of April, the caravan started
and proceeded in an easterly direction. Their
route at first lay ovet @ mountainous country,
‘inhabited by negroes called Mandingoes ; who
live in small villages, -containing three or four
hundred inhabitants each.

After awhile, they met with a great many
Foulahs of Felatahs, who, as â„¢Y reader
knows, are negroes, but esteem themselves
much superior to the Mandingoes. The Fou-
Jahs are chestnut color like the Felatahs of
Houssa, while the Mandingoes are black.
Many of the former live in mountainous dis-
tricts, and subsist by keeping herds of cattle.

They are very devout Mahometans, and as
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 129

they believed Mr. Caillié to be a good Mahom-
etan, they treated him very kindly. At
almost every village, they brought him pres-
ents of milk, and showed great anxiety to
make him comfortable. Sometimes the wo-
men gave him oranges and figs, of excellent
quality. |

One morning the caravan halted near a
spring surrounded by trees and rocks. Mr.
Caillié went alone to drink some of the water.
When he got near it, two red apes came down
from the trees toward him, and began to bark
at him like dogs.

They approached nearer and nearer, and,
as he had nothing to defend himself with, he
became alarmed; these animals being very
strong, active, and mischievous. But at this
moment two of the Mandingoes came up,
and the apes ran away.

It appears that the thunder storms in these
regions, are very terrific, during the rainy
130 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

season. ‘This commences in April and con-
tinues till September. As it was April when
the caravan started, they were often visited
by thunder storms. Sometimes the flashes of
lightning succeeded each other so rapidly, as
to keep up 4 continued blaze inthe sky. ‘The
thunder was very heavy, and made the hills
and valleys tremble.

One night, a thunder storm came Op while
the travellers were among the mountains, but
the hospitable Foulahs permitted them to
enter their tents till it was over.

The caravan at length arrived at Fouta
Dhialon, a country inhabited by Foulahs, who
resemble those already described. ‘They ap-
pear, however, to be morte civilized. They
live in villages, and each village has a school
They keep 4 great number of black cattle
sheep, and dogs. They have horses of @
small breed, and abundance of poultry.

The people of these countries, believe that
PARLEY’S TALES. OF. AFRICA. 131

the Europeans live on little islends in the sea.
They suppose, therefore, thar they are very
anxious to get possession u. these regions.
This renders the negroes very jealous of them.
‘This notion is not wholly without foundation,
There is probably not a king in Europe, who
would not, if he had the power, subject these
African nations to his authority.

The traveller continued on his journey, and
at length entered the kingdom of Bambara.
He describes the people as resembling the
oulahs in appearance. They are very gay,
and spend nearly the whole night in dancing
to the music of drums and hautbovs. In their
dispositions, they seem to be very gentle and
humane. They are Mahometans, like the
other negroes in this part of Africa.

The caravan at length reached Jenné. At
the time Mungo Park visited this place in
1795, it was the capital of Bambara, and the
king resided there. But at the time. Caillié
132 PARLEY S TALES UF AFRICA-

was there, that is, in March 1826, J enné was
not the capital. |

Jenné is situated on an ‘sland in the Niger.
It is about two miles and a half in circumfer-
ence, and is surrounded by @ Very ill con-
structed wall of earth, about ten feet high.
The houses are puilt of bricks dried in the
sun. ‘The streets are straight, and are broad
enough for a country where no carriages are
used; they are kept in good order, and are
swept almost every day.

The town of Jenné is full of pustle and
animation; every day numerous caravans of
merchants are arriving, and departing, with
all kinds of useful productions. The popula-
tion of this place, consists of Mandingoes,
Foulahs, Bambaras, and Moors. ‘The number
of inhabitants may be computed at eight or
ten thousand. ‘The people are generally
dressed in white, and they have a neat ap-
pearance. :

~*~
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 133

After leaving Jenné, the travellers proceed-
ed down the river toward Timbuctoo. They
observed a great many boats, some going up,
_ and some going down, laden with various
productions and various kinds of merchandise.

They were made of thin planks, fastened
together by ropes. Some of these boats were
one hundred feet long, and would carry sixty
or seventy tons. Sometimes sixty er eighty
of these boats were seen pursuing their voyage
in company.

On the 19th of April, the travellers arrived
at Cabra, the port of Timbuctoo. It is sit-
uated on the Niger, a few miles south of that
city. The next day, thé party proceeded
over desolate wastes of sand to Timbuctoo,
and reached that place about sunset.

Timbuctoo is situated eight miles north of
the Niger, and stands in the midst of a vast
barren plain, of yellowish sand. As far as
the eye can reach, on all sides, nothing is to
134 PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA.

be seen but the level desert, spread out like a
sea, Mr. Caillié estimates the whole number
of the inhabitants, to be but ten oF twelve
thousand.

This city is surrounded by mud walls, is of
a triangular shape, and is about three miles in
circuit. ‘The streets have a. dull appearance ;
there is no bustle nor activity. "The people
seem to be very quiet, and very indolent.

The king 1s 4 white haired old negro, much
beloved by the people. He lives without
ostentation, and engages; like his subjects, 10
business. He does not seem to exercise 2
very regular government, but is regarded
rather as the father, than the king of the
people. He has four wives and a great many
negro slaves. His sons are merchants.

There are 2 good many European goods
for sale at Tirabuctoo. Among other things,
Mr. Caillié saw some very peautiful French
fowlingpieces.
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 135

As the country around Timbuctoo is unfit
for cultivation, the people are obliged to pro-
cure their supplies of food almost entirely
from Jenné. Yet they appear to be well fed,
and very comfortable. There are a- good
many Moors in the city, some of them from
Morocco and other parts of Barbary. ‘These,
by carrying on trade, amass;fortunes in a few
years, and return to their native»countries.
The people of Timbuctoo are Mahometans.

The trade of this place is a good ‘deal
cramped by the Tooaricks. These warlike
people are the scourge of all the negro na-
tions throughout Soudan. Their chiefs often
come to Timbuctoo with a considerable num-
ber of followers. ‘The people endeavor to ap-
pease them by presents’and flattery. Some-
times they stay for several weeks, and the
timid inhabitants are obliged to furnish them
with the best of everything.
136 PARLEY $ TALES OF AYVRICA-

At length they 8° away, and carry with
them great quantities of rice, millet, honey;
and other articles which they have extorted
from the people. These freebooters often
attack caravans that are coming to Timbuc-
too, or going from it, and wring from the peo
ple a considerable part of their wealth.

Having remained about eighteen months at
Timbuctoo, Mr. Caillié attached himself to 4
caravan of six hundred camels, and set out
for Morocco on the 4th of May, 1828. Fo
four months they travelled in a northerly di-
rection. ‘They suffered very much, as al
travellers do in the desert, from heat and thirst.
But at Jength Mr. Caillié arrived at Tangier,
worn down with sickness and fatigue.

Here he entered on poard a vessel, and
sailed for Toulon in France, which he reached
in safety. He then proceeded to Paris, and
then published an account of his travels.
PARLEY’S TALES OF AFRICA. 137

Such is the story of Mr. Caillié. He is the
first European traveller who has reached
‘Timbuctoo, and returned in safety. But there
is one thing about him, which is not to be
approved.

He always travelled under the pretence of
being a Mahometan, and an Arab. It is true,
that by this means he was treated as a friend,
but it is never pleasant to see a person acting
the part of a deceiver.

I have now given you a long story about
Africa, and I suppose you are tired of it. IT
will therefore bring it to an end.

After a stay of four weeks at Cape Town,
our vessel was ready to proceed on her voy-
age. We therefore hoisted our sails, and
bidding adieu to Africa, we stretched forth
to the eastward upon the great Indian Ocean.
This we crossed without any particular acci-
dent. :
138 PARLEY S TALES OF AFRICA.

One day, as we Were sailing along with a
smooth sea, and a light breeze, we saw before
us a large object, which appeared to be rising
out of the very bosom of the ocean. As we
approached, it evidently grew larger, and in
shape, bore a striking resemblance to the back
of an Elephant.

But here I am at the end of my book; 1
shall tell you the remainder of my VOY@8%
and about Asia, very S008. Till I meet you
again. Farewell!