Citation
The Little drummer, or, Filial affection

Material Information

Title:
The Little drummer, or, Filial affection : a story of the Russian campaign
Added title page title:
Filial affection
Added title page title:
Story of the Russian campaign
Creator:
Nieritz, Gustav, 1795-1876 ( Author, Primary )
Dulcken, H. W ( Henry William ), 1832-1894 ( Translator )
Gilbert, John, 1817-1897 ( Illustrator )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Thompson and Davidson ( Printer )
Addey and Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Addey and Co.
Manufacturer:
Thompson and Davidson
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
viii, 132, 16 p. , 4 leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Filial piety -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Napoleonic Wars, 1800-1815 -- Campaigns -- Juvenile fiction -- Russia ( lcsh )
War fiction -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1852
Genre:
War fiction ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869 (NEH PA-23536-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
translated from the German of Gustav Nieritz by H.W. Dulken ; with four illustrations drawn by Gilbert, engraved by Dalziels.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026891757 ( ALEPH )
45768297 ( OCLC )
ALH5403 ( NOTIS )

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THE

LITTLE DRUMMER.

OR,

FILIAL AFFECTION:

A STORY OF THRE RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN.
—~—.

Translated trom the German of Gustad Nierits,
By H. W. DULCKEN.

WITH FCUR ILLUSTRATIONS, DRAWN BY GILBERT,

ENGRAVED BY DALZIEL.



LONDON:
ADDEY AND CO., 21, OLD BOND STREET,

-__oeoeo

1852.

he ht nn etnninannentethaiathicnnse ila: i. ae



LONDON:
THOMPSON AND DAVIDSON, PRINTERS,
GREAT ST. HELENS.





PREFACE

eee mene

THE judicious mingling of historical truth
with pleasant fiction, has at all times been
justly considered a desirable object, in the
production of books for the amusement and
instruction of the young. There is doubtless
many a lad now living among us, in whom
a taste for the study of history has been
pleasantly but surely called forth, by the
perusal of such a book as Miss Strickland’s
Edward Evelyn. Works of: this class are
calculated to leave on a youth’s mind a desire

to learn more of the subjects about which he



vi PREFACE.
has been reading, while he may turn satiated
from the most elaborate treatise of a Mignet
or a Lamartine. With the aim of thus com-
bining the wtile with the dulce, this slight sketch
of Napoleon’s celebrated Russian Campaign
has been produced. It is taken, as its title
implies, from the Jugendschriften of Gustav
Nieritz, stories “familiar as household words”
in the mouth of every German schoolboy.
Whatever may be the merits or demerits
of this little book, the translator feels assured
that nothing will be found, on the one hand
to excite horror, or on the other, to instil
into the youthful mind those false notions
concerning what is called “the Glory of
War,” which the present age so rightly and
universally condemns.

H. D.



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
THE SICK CHILD . . ° .

CHAPTER II.
THE UNWELCOME GUESTS. .

CHAPTER III.
THE GOOD SON . : : .

CHAPTER IV.
AUGUSTUS JOINS HIS REGIMENT .

CHAPTER V.
“WHAT JOY, OH WHAT PLEASURE, A

CHAPTER VI.
LIFE AMONG THE SOLDIERS . .

CHAPTER VII.
“LA GRANDE ARMEE” . . ,

SOLDIER TO BE.”

Page

17

26

31

41

47



Vill CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VIII. Page.
THE BURNING OF THE MILL. ; , ; cat ah
CHAPTER IX.
AUGUSTUS IS SHOT Rta gos uk ee .
CHAPTER X.
AUGUSTUS'S THREE COMBATS—WIiTH HIMSELF—WITH
ee ee ee a ee
CHAPTER XI.
eames i‘(< i‘ Tk i ; ; oe ae

CHAPTER XII.
THE BATTLE. ‘ ‘ i ‘ ‘ a : 84

CHAPTER XIII.
MOSCOW—WILFUL WASTE . me ‘ , ‘ on

CHAPTER XIV.
THE RETREAT—WOFUL WANT . : . ‘ . 103

CHAPTER XV.
THE BEREZINA . . . tiie . : - 5S

CHAPTER XVI.
THE RETURN HOME. : ° ° : : - 122

CHAPTER XVII.
CONCLUSION . ; ‘ ; 6 ‘ ‘ o | ame





THE

LITTLE DRUMMER.
CHAPTER I.
THE SICK CHILD.

THERE was sorrow and tribulation in the house of
Master Wunsch, the saddler; for Emily, his infant
daughter, was very ill. The poor child lay tossing
in a burning fever, which threatened to put an un-
timely end to her innocent life. Many and fervent
were the prayers offered up by the anxious parents to
Him who alone could send help in their time of need.—
The sixth night of Emily’s illness had arrived. In
a room,-dimly lighted by the flickering rays of a
night lamp, still further shaded by a large book
placed on end before it, by way of screen, stood the
cradle of the little sufferer, over whom the mother
bent in speechless anxiety. Though for six nights
B



\
2 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

sleep had not closed her weary eyes, she still watched
beside her darling’s pillow, with that deep and un-
tiring affection which none but a mother’s heart can
feel. As the clock of a neighbouring church struck
twelve, the door was opened softly, and the saddler
entered. Advancing on tiptoe to the cradle he
enquired anxiously,—‘ No better yet?”

The mother shook her head mournfully as she
pointed to the cradle, in which the child lay rolling
restlessly from side to side, with glowing cheeks and
fluttering breath. For a moment Master Wunsch
stood silently regarding the sick baby; then he said
kindly, —‘‘ Now go to bed, dear wife; it is my turn
to watch.”

“No,” replied she, “I could not sleep, even if I
were to lie down—I should be only the more anxious
away from the child.”’

“But, dearest wife, consider your health,””—re-
monstrated the saddler; “‘ you will never be able to
bear all this fatigue,—and the end will be that I shall
have two invalids in the house instead of one.”

“Do not fear for me,”—was the reply. ‘ You
stand more in need of rest than I, for you have to
earn bread for us all, and you cannot work without
sleep. Alas, these are hard times, and we must exert |
ourselves more than ever to keep the wolf from the
door, — that unhappy billeting too, costs so much
money. ‘To-day we shall have twenty Frenchmen





OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 3

to provide for, who will want the best of everything.
But I should’nt mind all that, if poor little Emily
were only out of danger—I am dreadfully alarmed
about her.”

After trying in vain to induce his wife to lie down,
Master Wunsch retired to his bed, leaving her sitting
by the cradle. But exhausted nature could bear no
more, the weary head sunk gradually back, and the
hand relaxing its grasp, ceased to rock the cradle.
In a few minutes the good mother was in a deep
sleep.

“Drink, drink,”—cried the child, half in de-
lirium. “ Drink!’ repeated little Emily in a louder
voice,

Still the mother did not stir. The little one burst
into a fit of passionate crying. At this moment the
door of the adjoining bed-room was opened, and
Emily’s brother Augustus, a boy of fourteen years,
hurried in half undressed.

“Be quiet, dear Emily,” said he coaxingly.—
“You shall have something to drink in a minute ;”—
so saying he warmed some tea over the night lamp,
and, after testing its temperature, offered it to the
child.

“‘ Mother give it,”—sobbed Emily fretfully.

‘Our mother cannot, dear child,””—answered the
brother soothingly, “she is asleep. You see poor
mother is tired, so very tired. She has been watch-

B 2



\
4 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

ing beside you these six nights, and you see there she
sits still. Come drink, dear Emily.’’

The cup was eagerly snatched by the feverish
patient, who drank greedily and sank back on her
pillow. Augustus began gently to rock the cradle.

‘* Sing, sing,’’—cried she.

Augustus complied, and sang, in a low voice, a
little cradle song, beginning,—

“Sleep, baby, sleep;

Angels hover round thy head,

Close thine eyes and guard thy bed,
Sleep, baby, sleep.

But, dearest child, you must not toss about and throw
off the bed-clothes in that way, or you will catch
cold,”’ expostulated the boy, carefully arranging the
covering round his sister.

‘‘ More drink,” cried she again,—“ water, not tea.”’

Augustus did as she wished, and warmed some
water for her. Thus it continued throughout the
whole night. Too feverish to sleep, the child started
up in bed every minute, and Augustus had to cover
her up, to give her drink, and to sing his song over
and over again.

As morning dawned little Emily became quieter.
The crimson. flush faded from her cheek and gave
place to a deathlike pallor. Her eyes remained
longer closed, her breathing was more regular, but





OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 5

heavy and oppressed. An unearthly stillness per-
vaded the room, as the flame of the expiring lamp
flickered fitfully up. The weathercocks on the neigh-
bouring houses creaked as they swung to and fro in
the morning breeze, which moaned so dismally in the
chimney that the boy felt quite frightened. A cold
shudder crept over him, as with teeth chattering
with the cold he sung his cradle song. The thought
suddenly fell like a thunderbolt upon his soul—
“What if the angels should close thy sister’s eyes
FOR EvER?” For a time he felt strangely depressed,
and at length found relief in a flood of tears. Alas!
they were all so fond, so very fond of the droll, sen-
sible, little child. Every new word she learnt to
lisp, every sound of her merry laugh, was to them a
source of interest and pleasure. And to think that
the cheerful voice might so soon be hushed, the
dimpled face become cold as marble, the laughing
eyes close to open no more—that an ugly coffin was
to be Emily’s cradle, and worms were to eat her
delicate limbs. Oh, the thought seemed too hard to
bear !

As the clock struck five the mother started from
her chair with a cry of alarm. “ Merciful heavens!
what have I done,”—exclaimed she. ‘ Wretch that
fT am, I have neglected my child;’” and she wrung
her hands in anguish as she gazed at the infant.

‘¢ Never fear, dear mother,” said Augustus, turning



\
6 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

away his face to hide his tears. ‘I have been here
and have taken care of little Emily.”

‘But have you been here all the time?” continued
the still anxious mother. “I cannot remember at
what hour I fell asleep, and perhaps my darling has
caught cold and made herself worse.”

The boy, however, consoled his mother by the as-
surance that such was not the case, and thus relieved
her mind from a great burden.

‘‘ What a great misfortune you may have prevented
by your thoughtfulness,” said she, tenderly embracing
her son. ‘I should never have forgiven myself if
any harm had happened through my carelessness.
Bless you, my good boy.”

Overjoyed at having earned his mother’s thanks,
Augustus went to finish dressing himself, and then
proceeded to assist in the various arrangements which
had to be made for the expected guests.





OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. ° 7

CHAPTER II.
THE UNWELCOME GUESTS.

‘t How I should like to be a soldier!” observed the
saddler’s younger son, Robert, a sturdy urchin of
eight years, as with his sister Bertha, a girl rather
older than himself, he was arranging the long table.
‘‘ How I should like to be a soldier,” repeated he:
“They are such lucky fellows; they get Sunday
dinner every day,—Did you see the splendid piece of
veal, roasted as brown as a nut, which my mother is
preparing in the kitchen? My father has sent for
twenty quarts of beer and three quarts of spirits, and
I never in all my life saw such an immense dish of
potato-salad—I’m so fond of it—I hope the soldiers
will leave some for me.”

“‘ And the great loaves of new bread,”’ interrupted
Bertha, “and five large pieces of fresh butter, as
- yellow as gold.”

‘And such a number of cheeses,’’—chimed in
Robert; “what gluttons they must be if they de-
vour it all,”’



\
8 THE LITTLE DRUMMER };

A noise was heard in the street.

“They’re coming, they’re coming,” cried Bertha,
running to the window.

In a few minutes heavy footsteps were heard
ascending the stairs. The startled children ran out
of the room.

The noisy foreigners took possession of the rooms
assigned to them. Muskets and caps, knapsacks and
swords were flung pell-mell into a corner, and in less
than five minutes the unbidden guests had explored
every room in the house, and shouted and sang like
men who felt: themselves perfectly at home.

In the meantime a workman of Master Wunsch’s
was assisting the servant in carrying up the dinner
prepared for the Frenchmen. It was not without a
feeling of envy, that little Robert saw the before-
mentioned splendid piece of veal and the mighty dish
of potato-salad, carried up stairs for demolition.
Augustus, who could speak a little French, was sent
to call the soldiers together by the magic words:—
‘‘ Messieurs, on a servi;’’ a summons they lost no
time in obeying. As soon as it became apparent, by
the clatter of plates and spoons, that dinner had
begun, the saddler’s family retired to little Emily’s
sick room, which had been converted for the time
being into a sitting room.

Suddenly, however, the sound of angry words was
heard in the room above. A volley of imprecations



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 9

was thundered out by furious voices and a crash in the
street below, as of some heavy substance, caused
Mrs. Wunsch to run in alarm to the window. Look-
' ing out, she saw that the peaceable guests were
pouring away the beer in large streams, and bom-
barding the passers by with the cheeses. As she
looked, the heavy loaves came thundering down like
mill-stones. Poor little Robert cried with vexation,
when he saw the much lauded veal lying in the road,
among the ruins of the baking dish, and surrounded
by a large mass of potato salad, Master Wunsch
hurried up stairs, and, rushing past the weeping and
terrified servant girl, nearly fell over his journeyman,
whom the French soldiers had summarily ejected.

Such a scene was enough to ruffle the mildest
temper. Wunsch and the workman looked at each
other with eyes sparkling with rage, and longed to
inflict a well deserved chastisement on the brutal
foreigners. But what was to be done? They were
only two men against twenty, who were besides
armed with deadly weapons.

“ Augustus,”—cried the saddler, in a voice trem-
bling with anger, as he re-entered the sick room,
‘Run as fast as you can to the colonel’s quarters, and
inform against the rascals. Beg one of the officers
to accompany you hither.’’

The boy ran off to execute his commission. During
his absence the tumult increased more and more, as



\

10 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

none of Wunsch’s people dared show their faces.
After a while the messenger returned, alone and
breathless.

‘“‘ Well!” eagerly enquired the father; “‘ Why did
you not bring the officer with you?”

‘¢ Alas, father,” answered the boy, ‘there is no
redress to be had there. When I had made my request
known, the gentlemen told me that no one would
think of acting against troops for such a trifle, par-
ticularly after a fatiguing march, when they had
every right to expect a very good dinner. And so
the gentlemen turned their backs and would listen
to nothing I had to say. And only think, father,
what I saw as I came back; it is really too dreadful!
You know, a number of the Rhenish troops have
just arrived—the broad street is quite crowded with
them. Well, before they were dismissed to their
quarters, newly baked rye loaves were distributed
to each man. What do you think these reckless
wasteful people did?—They laid down the loaves in a
double row all across the street, and walked to and
fro over them, shouting with laughter, ‘To keep
their boots from getting dirty,’ they said. A few
even tore the insides out of the loaves, and, putting
them on as overshoes, went shuffling through the
mud. The wretches! to waste the gifts of God in
such a shameful way.”

The hearers stood aghast at this narrative. At



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 11

length Master Wunsch broke silence. “If Germans
act in this way,” said he, ‘can we wonder at any-
thing the Frenchmen do.”

“Yes, you are right,” observed the mother,
“therefore, dear husband, be calm, and wink at what
they have done. Let us send up stairs, and ask what
fault the soldiers find with the dinner we have pro-
vided. It is better to come to an understanding with
them, than that they should break everything in the
house, and perhaps ill-use us into the bargain. Does
not the Almighty seem pleased to send us joy in
another respect. Look at our little Emily, how
much better she is; she is sleeping so quietly, and
the doctor gives me the best hopes of her recovery.
He says the crisis is past, and the danger almost over.
We have only to take great care that she is not dis-
turbed. Is not this good news worth a thousand
times more than the few dollars you will have to
spend, to keep the dissatisfied strangers in good
humour.”

The father nodded in cordial acquiescence, as he
looked with a joyful smile on the slumbering infant.
He then cheerfully went to spend part of his hard-
earned savings in the purchase of poultry and wine,
for the use of the unruly foreigners.

Suddenly the house-door was thrown open, and a
number of German soldiers appeared in the passage,
—“ Fifteen privates of the Rhenish corps and a



\
12 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

drummer,” gasped the servant girl, holding out the
billeting warrant to her startled mistress.

‘“¢ Merciful heavens!” ejaculated Mrs. Wunsch,
‘have we not trouble enough already, without this.”
- But there was no time to lose in useless lamen-
tation,—deeds, not words, were the order of the day,
for the soldiers impatiently demanded to be shown to
a room.

‘Take them into the workshop,” said Wunsch,
after a moment’s reflection, ‘‘I would rather give my
men a holiday, than expose my child to new danger.”

Leaving little Emily in the charge of Robert and
Bertha, the mother hurried into the kitchen to pro-
vide, as quickly as possible, for the entertainment of
the new comers.

But the soldiers were not to be satisfied so easily.
The saddler’s wife had been absent but a few
minutes, before she heard footsteps approaching,
and the din of angry voices. She could distinctly
hear that the Germans were entering Emily’s room,
and flew like an arrow to bear off her precious
treasure—the sick child. In an agony of alarm,
she threw herself in the path of the soldiers, who
noisily entered the apartment.

“Do you think that we are dogs, you block-
heads,” roared the brutal drummer, “and that you
can shut us up in any kennel you choose. You're
mistaken, I tell you.—Those braggadocio French-



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 13

men are accommodated with the best room in the
house, and we Germans are thrust into a little den
which looks out upon the back yard. What, are
those monkeys so much better than we ?—Don’t
we spill our best blood for you in the battle field
as well as they?—We’ll stay where we are, com-
rades, and no one shall make us stir an inch.”

‘“‘Gentlemen, dear gentlemen,’”’ sobbed the poor
mother, “have compassion on my sick child, who
lies yonder, enjoying a quiet sleep for the first time
these six days. Alas! are there not some among
you who can sympathise with my affliction !—have
you no pretty children of your own at home, of
whom you think with affection! No! I am sure
you do not wish to harm my baby.”

While speaking thus, Mrs. Wunsch was employed
in taking from the soldiers their knapsacks and mus-
kets, which she deposited in a corner, as noiselessly

as possible. After renewing her request for silence,
she hurried back into the kitchen, leaving Robert
and Bertha sitting at Emily’s bedside.

For a short time the men behaved statabilis
enough. Drawing their chairs to the table, they
began to converse together in a low tone; but the
drummer grew impatient at the non-appearance of
the dinner. He sat muttering low curses between
his teeth, and presently broke out into noisy
abuse.



\

14 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

‘‘ What are the rascally people keeping us waiting
for,’”’ shouted he; “if we were Frenchmen, I warrant
they’d move faster. I suppose they’re scraping to-
gether the dinner the Frenchmen flung into the
street, and want to dish it up again for us. Zounds,
I should’nt wonder if our slut of a hostess were to do
it, as she wanted at first to shut us up in that dog-
hole of a workshop. Wait a bit, my lady, Pll teach
you manners,—it’s a good thing I know your weak
point.”” So saying, he cast a malicious glance at the
innocent child, whom his voice, purposely raised to
its highest pitch, had failed to rouse from its deep
sleep. Robert and Bertha stood like guardian angels
by the cradle, looking with speechless fear at the tall
soldier, whose grey eyes sparkled with fury. Both
turned pale as they saw him seize his drum, and
draw his chair to Emily’s cradle. Unable to utter a
word, they bent over their sleeping sister, entreating
the barbarian’s mercy by looks of anxious dread.
But the drummer did not, or would not, understand
this eloquent language of the heart. With a loud
burst of laughter, he took the drum between his legs
—‘* Bah,” cried he, ‘it won’t do the brat any harm,
if I teach its mother to move faster.”

Canst thou picture to thyself, gentle reader, what
my pen shudders to record? It is no effort of the
imagination, no falsehood; for woe to that man whose
fancy can give birth to such hideous phantoms.



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 15

With her tiny hands crossed upon her bosom, the
little Emily lay sleeping in her innocence, uncon-
scious that the eyes of that human hyena were
glaring upon her. As she lay with her angel face
half shaded by golden locks, and tinged with the
faint hue of returning health, she seemed the very
emblem of a spotless being fresh from the hand of
the Almighty. But though the barbarian saw this
lovely image—though he saw imploring looks fixed
upon him by the terrified brother and sister—he had
yet the heart to seize his drumsticks, and beat a
loud roll.

A ery of horror sprang from the lips of the chil-
dren. The sleeping child started violently. Her
blue eyes opened slowly, and gazed in astonishment
at the bearded stranger, whose hands had called
forth the dreadful sounds. A moment more, and
the eyes were turning wildly in their sockets—the
angel countenance became livid—and the battle of
life with death had begun.—Who is that rushing
into the room like a lioness despoiled of her young ?
It is the mother. Her oppressed bosom cannot utter
a sound, but she casts herself in agony at the drum-
mer’s feet, and seizes his ruthless hands !—Her next
glance rests upon her dying babe !—Snatching it
from the cradle, she holds it high above her head—
“Air, air may yet revive it!” She bedews the sense-
less infant with her tears. She calls her darling



\
16 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

by the most endearing names, Vain, alas, is the
attempt to stay the departing spirit !

The death struggle was soon over. The tiny
limbs stretched themselves—the heart ceased to
throb—and the innocent soul returned to Him who
gave it.

With a shriek that rang through the house, the
mother sank fainting to the ground. A moment after
the drummer fell also, struck by the father’s aveng-
ing hand; he had followed his wife into the room,
and now punished the deed of murder. After de-
fending himself with the energy of desperation, his
sword was at length wrested from him, and he was
bound hand and foot by the soldiers.



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 17

CHAPTER III.
THE GOOD SON.

Earty on the third morning after the events related
in the preceding chapter, a man in a black cloak
was seen to issue from Master Wunsch’s door, carry-
ing a child’s coffin, slung round his neck by a broad
strap. He was followed by a woman in mourning
garments, and by the saddler’s three children, Augus-
tus, Bertha, and Robert. Their eyes were swollen
with weeping, and the tears still flowed fast, as the
little group wended their way through the empty
streets towards the neighbouring cemetery. The
beams of the rising sun tinged the white tomb-
stones and the black crosses with a golden lustre,
as the great gate swung creaking on its hinges, and
admitted the mourners. Everything around seemed
to tell of death and decay,—the angels with inverted
torches—the skeletons with scythes—the weeping
statues on the tombs. '
Stopping before a newly made grave, the bearer
unbuckled the coffin, and set it gently down.
C



18 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

“Do you wish to see your little sister once more?”
kindly enquired the nurse. The sobbing children
nodded assent, and the coffin lid was thrown back.
There, with her pale face surrounded by a chaplet of
roses, and her tiny hands grasping a wreath of sum-
mer flowers, lay the little Emily. The expression
of perfect repose in her countenance gave her the
appearance of a sleeping angel. Even in her life-
time the child had never appeared more lovely than
now, as she lay cold in death. At this sight the
mourners broke out into loud lamentations. Stoop-
ing down to kiss the cheek of his little sister,
Augustus started back with a shudder at its icy
coldness. But the nurse said solemnly—“ Let the
dead rest; disturb them not, they are happy!”

The coffin lid was shut, the cords creaked ag the
yawning ‘grave received its prey, the service was
over, and little Emily slept peacefully beside her
grandparents, and a baby brother who had died in
his infancy. When the grave had been filled up, the
children turned away, and sorrowfully quitted the
churchyard. For a time they walked on in mournful
silence, which Bertha was the first to break. “ Bile?
said she, “suppose our mother were to die too! I
heard the doctor saying yesterday that she was in a
dangerous state.”’

“Oh dear!” sobbed poor little Robert, and “ sup-
pose the soldiers were to do as they threaten, and



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 19

really shoot our poor father! What should we do
then? We should have to go into the orphan’s house,
and sing in the streets.”’

Augustus did not answer, but continued to walk
on in deep thought. Suddenly he stood still and
asked his sister—‘‘ What said the text, Bertha, that
we learnt at school last Saturday ?”

‘How came you to think of the text?” said
Bertha, looking at him in astonishment.

“T want to know what it was,” insisted Augustus.

“Tt was—'We should lay down our life for our
brethren,’ ” replied his sister, after a moment's con-
sideration. 7

‘That was it,” said the boy. “Do you see—we
should lay down our life for our brethren,—how much
more then for our parents! Robert,’’ continued he,
_ after a pause, “T will give you my two*pigeons, they

shall be yours; but mind you do not neglect them,
or forget to give them food every day.”

“What!” cried little Robert, forgetting his grief
for a moment in surprise and joy at the unexpected
present, “do you really mean to give me your
pigeons, of which you are so fond ?”

“T care for nothing now,” sorrowfully answered
the other. ‘“ My little Emily is dead, our mother is
dangerously ill, and in few days our father may be
no more.” After another mournful pause he added
—* Bertha, when our mother has recovered, and

c 2



\
20 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

they have set father free, repeat the text to them—
you know which I mean—then they will feel re-
signed, and will not be angry with me. And you
must tell them that for their sakes I gladly went
to—to join our Emily.”

‘““What can you mean!” cried both the children
together.

“Hush, hush,” answered Augustus, “you will
learn in time. But promise me you will not Say
anything about this to our mother until she is quite
well.”

Robert and Bertha did as he wished, and they
returned somewhat comforted. Augustus ran to his
mother’s bedside, and seizing her unconscious hand,
bedewed it with his tears. He felt as though his
heart would break; and, alas, how gladly would he
have confided to his mother what he purposed doing!
But poor Mrs. Wunch was delirious, and two
nurses were obliged to hold her in bed by force.
When her son entered the room in his black dress, she
shrieked out— There is the black drummer with
the great beard come to kill my child! Drive him
away, or my husband will stab him!” The poor
boy rushed from the house half frantic with grief,

‘‘ Back!” cried the sentinel, who was walking to
and fro before the door of the prison in which the
saddler was confined, as his son attempted to cross
the threshold.



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 21

“But it is my father,’’ remonstrated Augustus,—
““T want so much to see him.”

“‘Can’t be dene,” replied the stranger gruffly, as
he resumed his walk.

“J entreat you for pity’s sake,” pleaded the poor
boy, bursting into tears. “Do let me go to him, I
have come to bid him farewell.”

“‘Can’t be done,’’ repeated the Frenchman. “ Be-
sides, what good would your visit do him. A bottle
of wine would be of much more use than your
whimpering, for it would give him a little heart to
set out on his last promenade with. But a parting
scene with you would take away the little nerve
he may have, to face the gunbarrels.”

While this conversation was going on, several of
the passers by had stood still, and heard what was
said. ‘The women now began to murmur loudly.

“Tt is too bad,” said one, “the poor fellow is not
even allowed to embrace his father once more.”’

“Had I been in Master Wunsch’s place,’ cried
another, “I should have done exactly as he did!”

“Knock the French dogs on the head!” suggested
a third. |

The soldier cast an uneasy look on the increasing
crowd of angry faces. “TI have strict orders,” said
he, “‘to admit nobody to the prisoner, If the lad
wants to see his father, he must go to the colonel
and ask his permission.’’



\
22 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

Our hero accordingly ran off, followed by some
of the townspeople, to the colonel’s quarters, a
house before which two sentinels were keeping
guard. Entering boldly, he found himself in a
room thronged with officers, who stood chatting in
groups, without noticing Augustus, who looked from
one to the other in no small embarrassment. Sud-
denly the door of a side room opened. The officers
stepped respectfully back and formed a large circle,
in the centre of which appeared a tall, stout man,
attired in a splendid uniform, with several crosses on
his breast. Augustus felt his heart sink when he
found himself standing face to face with the dreaded
colonel, but summoning up all his courage, he ad-
vanced a step or two, and said firmly enough.—
“Honoured colonel, it is written in the Bible, ‘We
should deliver up our life for our brethren,’ so I
have come to beg you to let me be shot instead of
my father.”’

The commandant stepped back at this unexpected
address, and stared at the boy in utter amazement.
“What!” cried he with a laugh, “ you want to be
shot?” “With popguns, I suppose !”’

“Honoured colonel,’’ resumed Augustus, with
tears in his eyes, “my errand is anything but a
laughable one. In sad earnest, I come to ask you
to let me die for my father.”

All appearance of mirth fled from the colonel’s



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 23

face. He questioned the boy, who related the circum-
stances which occasioned his coming, and described
his parents’ misery with touching simplicity. The
officers hardly knew what to reply, and all felt
heartily ashamed of their comrade, the inhuman
drummer.

When Augustus had finished his story, the colonel
stroked his long moustache, and turned to those
around him. “This is a peculiar case,””—said he, “I
cannot set the boy’s father at liberty, for it would be
establishing a bad precedent. If such a deed were
allowed to go unpunished, our people would in future
have to submit to insult. To try the prisoner by
martial law would never do, for he would most pro--
bably be condemned, particularly if the drummer
does not recover from his wound, which is very
doubtful. Still I pity the man, the more so on
account of his brave son.—There is no time to appeal
to the king’s mercy, for the regiment must march,
and the drummer’s place be supplied in a couple of
days—yet stay—I’ve thought of a plan,’’ continued
he, turning towards Augustus, who had stood in
mute anxiety awaiting the result of the conference.

“So, my lad, you really want to be shot instead of
your father. That’s no trifle, though the words are
soon spoken. But when you come to feel the cold
leaden bullets thrill through your flesh, and smash
your bones, you'll sing in another key.” As he said



\
24 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

these words the colonel looked sharply at the boy,
who only shook his head, without changing colour.

‘Provided the man does not die, whom your
father has wounded,” continued he, “I think we can
manage without having you shot. But then I
should require you to supply the vacant place among
the drummers, as we march in a couple of days.
Have you the courage to do that?”

“‘You want me to be a drummer !’’—cried Augus-
tus, clasping his hands in horror, “ Oh, anything in
the world but only not that!—I should never dare to
show my face again before my mother, for since poor
Emily’s death she cannot endure the sight of a drum,
and the sound of one would send her into fits.’

“ Now just look at the tiresome boy,”—replied the
the colonel angrily; “I wish todo him a kindness,
and he doesn’t even thank me for my pains. I'll
tell you what, my lad, I didn’t think you were such
a blockhead; if I have you shot you can certainly
never show your face before your mother again, but
as matters now stand, when you have taken off your
uniform and put away your drum, you'll be her
dear son just the same as ever. And do you think
your father will thank you for your choice, or will
ever feel happy, if you purchase his life by the
sacrifice of yours ?”

“Oh dear!” ejaculated the boy dolefully, “TI am
sure I would do anything to save my poor father,—I



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 25

will even be a drummer, if you are determined not to
shoot me.”’

The officers could scarcely refrain from laughing
at this strange speech. “ Well,’’ said the colonel,
‘then that matter is settled. But I have a few
conditions to make, to which you must agree. In
the first place your father cannot be liberated until
the regiment has left the town, a measure for which
I have the best reasons. And, secondly, I cannot
allow you to see your father before we start,—
besides, why should you make the parting more bitter
by a sorrowful leavetaking? You had better stop
here at once. I will put you under the protection of
my old sergeant, Hoyer, who will take care of you,
and teach you to handle your drumsticks during the
time we remain here, so that your awkwardness may
not excite attention.”

Augustus could scarcely murmur his thanks. He
detested the very idea of becoming a drummer, and
thought, in the enthusiasm of the moment, that he
would much rather have been shot.



\
26 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

CHAPTER IV.
AUGUSTUS JOINS HIS REGIMENT.

Ovr hero drummed and drummed till his arms ached.
His master was well satisfied with him, but it was
necessary every now and then to tap him on the
shoulder, when the boy, absolved in sorrowful reflec-
tions, made too long a pause. Then he would pass
the sleeve of his new uniform hastily across his eyes,
and begin to drum afresh. At first he could not
repress a shudder as he thought of his murdered
sister, and of his mother, who still lay dangerously
ill. The dreaded morning soon arrived, on which
the regiment was to march.

The old sergeant called him early in the morning,
and kindly showed him how to pack his knapsack, so
as to save as much room as possible. Poor Augustus
nodded mechanically to all Hoyer said, for he felt
his heart heavier than the knapsack at his back, and
he dared not trust his voice to speak. Meanwhile
the drums were heard calling together the soldiers in



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 27

the streets. As our hero was a novice, and the
colonel wished to avoid exciting attention, it was
arranged that he should leave his quarters with ser-
geant Hoyer, instead of joining the drummers. He
thought his heart would burst as he passed his father’s
door. Robert and Bertha, the maid, and even the
journeymen, were anxiously looking out for him at
the upper windows, but the curtains of the room in
which his mother lay were closely drawn. Raising
his tearful eyes, Augustus waved his hand, and
called out in a broken voice, ‘Give my love to our
father and mother. Farewell! Farewell all!”

“ Augustus! Augustus !’”—was cried in heartrend-
ing accents by those above, and the heads disap-
peared like lightning from the window. ‘They are
coming to give me a last embrace,” thought the boy,
lingering. But Hoyer dragged away his pupil by
the arm. ‘ Nonsense,” said he, not without emotion,
‘“‘what’s the use of making yourselves more sad than
you are already. Allons—forward!” Hurrying
towards the market-piace they found the whole
regiment assembled there. ‘That is Augustus
Wunsch, the good son who is going to battle to
save his father’s life. Good bye, my brave boy !”
cried many voices, as he disappeared among a crowd
of his new comrades.

The drummers of the regiment, thirty in number,
received orders to advance. Suddenly they found



\
28 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

themselves in the midst of hundreds of spectators,
mostly children, and several people were seen forcing
their way through the crowd. It was Bertha and
Robert, with the maid and the journeymen, who had
come to bid the boy a last farewell, and who hung
about him unable to utter a word. No one could
view the scene without emotion.

Poor Augustus sobbed aloud as he pressed his
brother and sister to his heart. His eyes were
blinded with tears, and everything appeared to
swim around him.

“Quick march! Forward!” cried the colonel’s
deep voice. The drummers struck up a lively tune.
Our hero felt himself forcibly torn from his brother’s
arms and carried away with the rest, Swinging his
drum round his neck, he convulsively grasped his
drumsticks, and thundered upon it as though he
would beat his grief into the parchment.

His heart seemed torn from his bosom, and in its
place he felt an indescribable void, accompanied by
the dull smart of a wound newly received. All this
time he was mechanically moving forward with his
comrades. After marching for some distance the regi-
ment halted for a short time on a hill. The soldiers
drew forth their spirit flasks, and beguiled the time
with joking and laughter.

“Drink, my little friend, drink!” cried one of
these worthies, offering his bottle. “Here is the





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OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 29

true water of Lethe, which makes one forget all
grief and sorrow. Drink my little warrior.”

Augustus declined the proffered draught, and fixed
his eyes upon his native town, which lay before him,
lighted up by the beams of the rising sun. “ Shall
I ever return,’’—thought he—“ perhaps as a wretched
cripple! And my dear parents, have I indeed em-
braced you for the last time. Farewell then, for
ever! Heaven defend you, ye dear ones, think
sometimes of your absent son.’ Occupied with
these thoughts he hastily wiped away his tears,
lest those around him should observe them, and
make a jest of his misery. His comrades were
laughing and singing noisily, as though they were
going to a feast instead of to battle. “And yet,”
thought Augustus, “most of these men must have
left friends and relations at home, who are offering
up anxious prayers for the absent ones.’

At length his grief seemed gradually to decrease,
for youthful sorrow, though violent, is not lasting.
A voice within him seemed to repeat the words of

the hymn,—

«With weeping and fretting we nought can gain,
But who prays to God, shall not ask in vain,”

and as he thought of the Almighty, and of his
omnipresence, he felt marvellously strengthened.
His tears were dried, his heart felt lighter, the



30 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

love of life returned by degrees, and he rose to
continue his march, more refreshed in body and
mind, than his comrades by the brandy they had
drunk,



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 31

CHAPTER V.

‘“WHAT JOY, OH, WHAT PLEASURE, A SOLDIER
TO BE!’

Was a song Augustus had heard sung by several of
his comrades, as they rested on the hill. ‘How
strange!” thought he,— for my part I should feel
inclined to sing,—

“‘ What joy, oh, what pleasure no soldier to be!”

Besides, I have always noticed when recruits were
drawn for the rggiments, the men on whom the lot
fell looked very gloomy indeed. I must try to find
out who is right.”’

Our hero had not to watch long to discover one of
the pleasures of a soldier’s life. The knapsack, to
which he was unaccustomed, seemed an intolerable
burthen, which was still further increased by the
drum being slung over it. The soldiers were, if
anything, even worse off than he, for they had con-
tinually to carry a heavy musket on their shoulder.



32 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

Another, and not a small] grievance, was the cloud
of dust which surrounded the regiment on the high-
roads. In a short time the dark uniforms were
completely covered with it, and instead of pure air,
the men inhaled a fine white powder, which seemed
to dry up the mouth and throat, and penetrate even
into the lungs, Every now and then they passed a
well of pure limpid water, but very few of the thirsty
soldiers received permission to leave the ranks for
the purpose of filling their bottles, —the majority were
to march by, thirsty and uncomplainine. Bathed
in perspiration, aching in every limb, and almost
exhausted, Augustus at length arrived in the village
where the regiment was to dine; it was already one
o’clock, and he had eaten nothing that day. Hun-
gry as the men were, however, they had to wait for
more than half an hour before they were billeted on
the different farm. houses, where the Owners had
made preparations for the expected, but unwelcome,
guests. With twenty of his comrades, Augustus
entered a room where a long table was laid out in
readiness for them, with large loaves, cheeses, and
butter. Brandy and beer had also been plentifully
provided. When the soldiers had disencumbered
themselves of their knapsacks and muskets, they
sat down to the table, on Which large dishes of
salted pork and dumplings presently appeared. The
peasant who rented the farm, with his wife and



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 33

family, took their stations behind the soldiers’ chairs
to attend to their wants, and the father uncovered
his grey head in expectation of hearing grace
said. But the novice Augustus was the only one
who whispered the accustomed blessing; the others
immediately fell upon the dinner, which was furnished
in profusion. The customary bickering soon began,
by the soldiers swearing horribly at the tough stringy
meat, and the hard dumplings. One gentleman
compared the latter to four-pound cannon balls,
while another offered to carry out the simile by
breaking their entertainers’ heads with them. It
was in vain that the frightened hostess protested
that the dinner had been ready for two hours, ‘and
had been spoiled by standing so long; the soldiers
were with difficulty prevented from breaking the
plates and dishes. Augustus meanwhile patiently
forced down the tough fare, which was rendered
still more unpalatable by the sourest of beer. When
the soldiers made this discovery there was a renewal
of the disturbance.

“My good sirs,”’ said the farmer, ‘‘ we have to
drink beer such as this, nearly all the year round,
and to pay a good round price for it besides. You
must complain to our landlord, who compels us to
buy it.”

“You may thank your stars,’’ replied one, ‘that
we are Germans ands not Frenchmen, who would

D



34 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

have thrown the stuff in your faces and made you
furnish wine, whether you liked it or not.’

‘Those who have no wine can give none,’’—was
the answer. “Where there’s nothing to take, there’s
nothing to have.”

In spite of all their grumbling and scolding, the
guests had meanwhile managed to clear the board
of all that was eatable, and they now dispersed to
employ the remainder of their time as best they
might. While some slipped into the dairy to pilfer
the cream, others made particular enquiry as to the
situation of the poultry yard and dovecote. Some
climbed into the loaded cherry trees, and a few
were not too proud to pay their dutiful respects to
the basket of cheeses. Left to himself in the long
room, our hero found the feeling of despondency return
with double force; “ What are they doing at home?”
thought he, “when shall I ever see them again?”
He was roused from his reverie by a noise in the
yard, where the peasants were trying to rescue their
property from the marauders,

Augustus felt deeply ashamed of his comrades, and
was debating with himself whether he ought not to
go out and reproach them with their dishonesty,
when he was surprised by a cry from a child’s voice
from the far corner of the room, and for the first
time noticed a little girl, who had been asleep in a.
cradle behind the great Stowe, and who seemed not



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 35

unlike his own little sister. Lifting the child gently
from her bed, he began to dandle her in his arms;
the little one stopped crying at the sound of his
friendly voice, looked in wonder at her strange
nurse, and began playing with his gay shoulder-
knots. The boy was walking laughingly up and
down with his charge, when the door was opened by
the hostess. The expression of her flushed and
angry face changed in an instant, when she saw
what the drummer was about.

“He ‘seems to be the only lamb among those
wolves’’—said she. ‘I thought so at once, when I
saw how quietly he said his grace, and how well he
behaved at table ;—just look at the child, what a
fancy she has taken to the boy! MJ’ll warrant
you’ve just such a little sister at home, eh!” con-
tinued she, addressing our hero.

‘tT had one,’’ was the sorrowful answer, “ but my
predecessor drummed it to death.”

‘Drummed it to death!’’ cried the woman, with
a look of horror; how was that? Tell me.”

Augustus was about to reply, when the drums
were heard in the distance.

“'That’s the recall,” said he, hurrying away, “I
must go and join my comrades.”

‘Wait one moment’’—said the hostess, running
out of the room, and reappearing a moment after
with a dish of ripe cherries. “Take these with

D2



\
36 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

you——you are welcome to them—and you have
earned them honestly.” So saying, she filled all
his pockets with the fruit, and dismissed him with
a cordial farewell. |

Once more joining his comrades, our hero was
soon marching at the head of the regiment.. The
heat and dust were as oppressive as in the morning,
but the cherries were a capital refreshment to the
thirsty lad. Late in the evening they reached a
considerable town, where quarters had been assigned
for the night, to the great joy of the troops, who
were in high glee at the prospect of a plentiful
supper and good accommodation after the fatigues
of the day, and waited impatiently until they were
dismissed to their lodgings. The interval while
Supper was preparing, was occupied in cleaning
muskets and dirks, brushing uniforms, and the
refreshing use of soap and water, and the razor.
The knapsacks were next opened, and a number
of pilfered articles of all descriptions brought to
light. One man ran into the kitchen with half-a-
dozen eggs, which he wanted boiled. Another
produced a stolen chicken, and a third a couple of
doves, intended as provision for the road next day.
With a shout of laughter, a fourth produced a
decapitated goose, which he held up in triumph,
to the envy and admiration of his less successful
comrades. ‘As I was trudging along through the



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 37

garden,” said he, “this chatterbox thrust her long
neck between the palings of her yard, and hissed
vigorously at me; ‘your servant, ma’am,” thought X
“you're the very person I want,” and I drew my dirk
and cut her head off at a blow. The jade ought to
be fat—at least she weighed heavy enough in my
knapsack,’””—so saying, he took it into the kitchen
to be cooked.

The hosts had provided most sumptuously for the
men’s entertainment; even the most inveterate of
those habitual grumblers could find no fault with the
glorious roast beef, the fresh crisp salad, and the
foaming beer placed on the board, to which the
hungry troops sat down in high good humour. They
were employed in discussing the first spoonfuls of
their soup, when the door was thrown hastily open,
and a young officer strode into the room, clanking
his heavy spurs.

‘¢ Drummer,” he cried, “ beat the rappel—quick !”’

These words produced an universal consternation
among the soldiers; the spoons fell from their hands,
and all sat as if petrified, staring in ludicrous dismay
at the messenger. Sergeant Hoyer was the first
who recovered himself sufficiently to stammer out.
“ Are you in earnest, lieutenant? Are the men to
march again to-night, after all the fatigue they have *
had to-day ?”’

“JT never joke with my salesionn |’? — replied



\
38 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

the young lieutenant, haughtily—“ Remember that,
if you please; and remember too, that when you
speak to your superior officer, it is your duty to rise
from your seat. Haven't you learnt so much as
that yet?—Don’t you see that you are setting a
bad example to the men, which I suppose is the
reason why the boors remain sitting so quietly
in my presence,—zounds! you rascals, I’ll teach
you discipline |”?

Hoyer and the soldiers rose from their seats like
automatons strung on a wire. Without moving a
muscle, the old sergeant listened to the insulting
words of the young lieutenant, whose father he
might well have been, both in age and experience,
No sign of anger or impatience was visible in his
countenance, which had, however, become somewhat
pale. When the officer had finished his polite speech,
he answered in a respectful tone :—

*‘ May not the men finish their supper, lieutenant ?”

“No!” answered the lieutenant, “it must be left
for the Frenchmen, who will arrive presently, and
for whom we are to make room. I shall stay here,
and see that nothing is touched.”

The hungry soldiers cast many a longing, lingering
look at the table, as they reluctantly prepared to
depart. The before-mentioned proprietor of the
goose made an attempt to sneak into the kitchen,
in the hope of rescuing his prize,



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 39

“Whither away?” asked the lieutenant, calling
him back. ‘Into the—kitchen,” stammered the
man; ‘I was going—

‘Stay where you are!” commanded the officer.
At this moment he observed that the drummer was
still present. ‘ Why, you young scoundrel!” roared
he, half drawing his sword, “will you be off this
instant ?”’ Our hero seized his drum, and vanished
precipitately.

‘‘Qne can easily see,’ muttered the soldiers
among themselves, ‘that this is our lieutenant’s
first campaign, or he would not bully his men as he
does; he had better mind what he’s about. He
would’nt be the first tyrant picked off by his own
men on the battle-field.”’

The village, whither the Rhenish troops had to
move on so short a notice, was full three miles
distant from the town, and to increase their distress,
a heavy storm of rain came pelting down, wetting
the exhausted soldiers to the skin. Who could
wonder that they felt inclined to murmur, or that
the poor peasants, who could offer them nothing but
meagre fare and a bed of straw, had to bear the
effects of their ill temper.

Stretched on the hard couch beside his companions,
our hero had full leisure to reflect on the joy and
pleasure of being a soldier, which by this time,
appeared to him very small indeed. The insulting



\
40 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

behaviour which the good sergeant had to endure
from the conceited stripling, annoyed him more than
all the rest. As he compared his former condition
with his present lot, he could not help sighing at the
difference. ‘“ However,” thought he, “there is no
use in repining—

‘With weeping and fretting we nought can gain,

But who prays to God, shall not ask in vain.’ ”

and so saying, he turned round and fell fast asleep.



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 4]

CHAPTER VI.
LIFE AMONG THE SOLDIERS.

Augustus thought at first, that he should not be
able long to endure the fatigues of his new pro-
fession; but he found he was mistaken. Every
succeeding day, the weight of his knapsack became
less oppressive; the long marches were performed
with greater ease, and he almost ceased to regard
the heat and dust as hardships. He found that he
could sleep as soundly on hay or straw, as on a
feather bed, and rise every morning refreshed and
invigorated, even if his sleep had been short. The
continual sojourn in the open air—added to the
healthy exercise of walking—made his heart light,
as the youthful blood coursed gaily through his
veins. He felt joyous and happy, without being
able exactly to tell why; gradually, also, as he
became a favourite among his companions, he dis-
covered that in general it was not real wickedness,
but an excited state of mind, which led them into
all manner of excess. What disgusted him more



\
42 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

than anything else, was their almost universal habit
of profane swearin » €veryone seemed ashamed to
pray, but always ready to blaspheme. The most
diabolical oaths were uttered on the most trifling
Provocation. One day, Augustus could not help
exclaiming openly against this pernicious practice ;
it happened in this way :—

One evening, as the soldiers were, according to cus-
tom, brushing their uniforms, a button fell from the
coat of one of them; the man immediately gave
vent to a frightful imprecation.

“Oh you dreadful sinner!” cried the boy, “to
take God’s name in vain for the sake of a miserable
button !”

His comrade stared at him in amazement, Don’t
be a fool!” replied he, “who'd take things in that
Way ?”

“ Did you not take God’s name in vain,” insisted
our hero,

“Bah! you know I didn’t mean it,” was the
Teply, “it was only my fun.”

“Fun !’’ repeated Augustus, “Do you remember
how angry our lieutenant became the other night,
when Hoyer thought he was in fun; and how posi-
tively he forbade anything like making fun, though,
after all, the difference in rank between him and
father Hoyer is not so very great. And I’m sure you
dou’t allow anybody to make fun with your loaded



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 43

gun, though you make a jest of the name of the
Almighty, which should never be uttered without
reverence? It is too bad!’

A forced laugh was the answer to this reproof, but
the man nevertheless became more careful in his
language, at least before the boy, who also did much
good among his comrades by the example he set.
No one ever heard him complain of the weather, the
fatiguing marches, bad food, hard couch, or other
grievances; nor was he ever seen to treat their en-
tertainers with rudeness, or to appropriate to himself
what belonged to others. The sacrifice he had made
for his father, added to the goodwill of the colonel
and the protection of the sergeant, gave him more-
over a certain position in the eyes of the soldiers.

On the first opportunity which presented itself, he
wrote the following letter to send home :—

“My Dear FATuer,

‘* As our kind colonel has told me that the wicked
drummer, who killed our little Emily, has recovered,
and is now on his way to rejoin the regiment, I trust
you have been set at liberty. I hope our dear
mother is quite well again, and has in some measure
recovered from the loss of our little sister. You need
none of you be anxious about me, for I am quite well,
and have never yet been in want. The colonel is very
kind to me, and Hoyer still more so. Do you know,



\

44 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

a soldier’s life is really not so bad as I expected, and
we have seen nothing of the enemy yet. But we are
certainly only in Poland, and when we get to Russia
I suppose we shall see more than enough of them.
But tell my mother not to be afraid for me, for all
bullets do not hit, as my sergeant tells me, and they
are sure to shoot over the head of such a little fellow
asIam. Excepting the towns, this same Poland is
a real pig’s country. Only think—not one of the
peasant’s huts has a chimney, so that the rooms are
always filled with smoke, which finds its way out at
little holes left in the walls about three feet from the
ground. Instead of carrying the dung to the field,
they pile it up in great heaps round the cottages,
each of which is thus surrounded by a filthy morass.
On these fragrant heaps may be seen children, craw-
ling about in such a state, that it is disgusting to
look upon them, Parents, children, and servants, all
look squalid and wretched, covered with dirt and
vermin. How our fastidious friends, the Frenchmen,
will open their eyes, when they see their new quarters!
For my part, I like much better to bivouac in the
open air, a plan which we have lately adopted.
We lie down, wrapped in our cloaks, with our
knapsack for a pillow, and the clear sky above us:
in the morning we are aroused by the fresh breeze.
Sometimes, in fact, he gives us a good shaking, this
same fresh breeze, so that I am obliged to take a



OR, FILIAZ AFFECTION. 45

glass of brandy on rising, as there is no coffee
to be had here. But, with this exception, I never
drink spirits, neither do I swear or smoke, though
my comrades laughed at me at first. I am afraid
there is no chance of getting my discharge, at any
rate not for some time to come, as our colonel says
we shall soon want plenty of men; so I have quite
resigned myself to my fate. I should very much
like to know how you all are at home, but a letter
could hardly reach me, as we never stay long in one
place. Now, dearest father, I must conclude. Give
my very best love to dear mother, Robert, and
Bertha, and remember me kindly to good Hannah
and the workmen. As soon as possible, I will write
again; till then, good bye, God bless you all.
“Your affectionate
*¢ AUGUSTUS.”

This letter occasioned great rejoicing in Master
Wunsch’s family. The parents shed tears of joy
over their good son, mingled with some bitter ones,
at the thought of his absence. Robert and Bertha
jumped about and clapped their hands, old Hannah
chuckled with pleasure, to find that her young
master had not forgotten her, and the workmen
were loud in their praises of brave Augustus. The
letter was read to half the population of the town.
Master Wunsch was, for his part, anxious to travel



\
46 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

after the army and purchase his discharge at any
price; he was only dissuaded from carrying his
resolution into effect, by the earnest remonstrances
of his friends, who saw the hopelessness of the un-
dertaking, and the danger of leaving his wife alone
and unprotected in the present unsettled state of
affairs.



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 47

CHAPTER VII.
“TA GRANDE ARMEE.”

In the summer of the year 1812, the French army
crossed the Russian frontier. Such a body of men,
so completely armed and accoutred, had never be-
fore been seen in Europe. Half a million of infan-
try, 80,000 cavalry, and more than twelve hundred
pieces of cannon composed this redoutable mass. Its
ranks were swelled by auxiliaries from almost every
Kuropean state: Austrians, Prussians, Bavarians,
Westphalians, men of Wurtemburg, Saxony, Baden,
Holland, and Italy, and all clad in the gayest uni-
forms. Well might the Emperor Napoleon rejoice
as the innumerable swarm of warriors defiled past
him. It was, in truth, a splendid sight. The blue
clad infantry regiments marched past, in serried
ranks, broad as a mighty river. First came the soul-
inspiring music, then the rattling drums, and these
were followed in their turn by three rows of bearded
pioneers, with white leathern aprons and glittering



\
48 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

axes. All was one step, one grasp, and one motion.
The soldiers looked like moving walls, as their
bayonets flashed in the sun. Instead of a banner, a
golden eagle with expanded wings was borne at the
head of each regiment. The emperor’s guards parti-
cularly distinguished themselves. In their tall bear-
skin caps they looked like bearded giants. —They were,
however, surpassed in splendour of appearance by the
guards from Holland, who were clad in uniforms of
the finest cloth, much too good for rough service.
The immense masses of cavalry were perhaps the most
remarkable of all. Numerous regiments of chasseurs
rode in the van, in green uniforms with red facings ;
their burnished helmets were bordered with a piece
of fur—in imitation of a tiger’s skin—and ornamented
with a horsehair plume. Behind these, rode the
hussars, in their tagged jackets and low fur caps,
from which depended a red bag with a gold tassel.
They were mounted on horses of a gigantic breed,
and preceded—like the rest of the regiments—by
military music. But all the thousands of sabres,
drawn in honour of the emperor, were destined to be
dyed in human gore; the whole of that brilliant mass
of warriors was trained to—murder. Greyheaded
men shook their heads and sighed, as they stood at
their cottage doors and saw the lumbering cannon,
each drawn by six or eight horses, and surrounded
by artillerymen with burning matches, roll heavily



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 49

by; and many there were, who had a dark fore-
boding of calamity to come.

Our hero, however, felt nothing of all this, as in
his turn he passed before the emperor. He had eyes
only for Napoleon, who sat on horseback in the midst
of his brilliant staff. Surrounded as he was by
brilliant uniforms, his attire seemed the more re-
markable for its simplicity—he wore a green coat,
ornamented by a single star, white knee-breeches,
and heavy riding boots. He was short of stature,
and rather corpulent; -his eyes were unusually keen
and piercing, his nose was aquiline, and his com-
plexion sallow. Such was the man who from a
simple lieutenant had raised himself to be the chief
of a mighty nation—who had led his victorious
legions over the burning plains of Africa, and the
snow-clad: summits of the Alps—who could dare,
sword in hand, to issue his mandates to the cabinets
of Europe—and who, ten short years afterwards,
was sleeping in an island of the ocean, with a plain
marble slab to mark his resting-place, and a willow
tree drooping over his lonely tomb.

On crossing the Russian frontier, Napoleon had
addressed his soldiers in words like the following.
‘Soldiers! once more does a field of fame lie stretched
before you. From the plains of the Pyramids to
this land, you have trodden the path of victory.
It is for you to continue in it. We will conquer

E



\

50 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

these barbarians, the Russians, and drive them from
Europe. Within two months I will lead you to
the capital of the ancient czars, to Moscow. There
you will rest from your fatigues, and enjoy in quiet
the fruits of your valour. Then I will dictate a
peace and lead you back to your fatherland, covered
with glory.”

How well were it for this poor sinful world, had
the words of truth found so ready a credence as that
given by the French soldiers to the boastful promises
of Buonaparte. No one dreamed for an instant of
doubting the fulfilment of the vaunt, and, from the
whole army, as from one man, rose the cry ‘ Long
live the Emperor.”’



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. OL

CHAPTER ‘VIII.
THE BURNING OF THE MILL.

In the evening of the day on which the French
army had first set foot in Russia, the church bells in
Moisevka, a village on the high road leading to
Smolensk, rang out a peal at an unusual hour. Old
and young repaired to the sanctuary at the unexpected
summons. With more of wonder than devotion in
their looks, the villagers thronged into the illuminated
church, on the steps of which stood a venerable priest,
clothed in the vestments of his office. Raising his
right hand to command silence, he thus addressed
them :—

‘My children! The godless hordes of the French
nation have this day invaded the holy soil of our
dear native land, to lay it waste with fire and sword.
Our troops have received orders to retreat into the
interior, to lure the foe on to their destruction. The
French may be here to-morrow, and it becomes our
duty to hinder their advance by every means in our
power. Yon must therefore at once break down the

E 2



\

52 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

bridge across the stream, destroy the wells, burn
down your dwellings, and drive the cattle into the
interior, that the enemy, on their arrival, may find
only a heap of ruins. But first of all, let us pray
to the Lord, that He may send a curse upon these
miscreants, and utterly destroy them. My children,
you are assembled in this church for the last time.
I shall apply the torch to it with my own hands,
that the Lord’s house may be saved from profa-
nation.

The peasants, falling down on their knees, broke
out in deep imprecations against their enemies. Then
rising, they left the church, and proceeded to the
work of demolition. The neatly thatched cottages
lay gleaming in the chastened splendour of the even-
ing sun. Groups of merry children were chasing
each other among the elder bushes and lime trees,
which rustled cheerily in the cool breeze. Mur-
muring and chafing at its confinement, a stream of
pure water rushed through the narrow arches of a
massive bridge, crowded by the lowing herds return-
ing from pasture. The great wheel of a water-mill
clattered busily round, and in front stood the miller,
seemingly lost in thought.

Ere long the cattle were driven from the stables,
and the geese, ducks, and hens collected into a large
flock. While the women loaded themselves with

their greatest treasure, the homespun linen, the men



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 53

were employed in fastening bundles of straw round
the timbers which supported the bridge, and setting
fire to them. In a few minutes every dwelling
throughout the village was wrapped in flames; the
wooden chapel shared the general fate. Driving the
cattle before them, the children first left the blazing
homesteads; they were followed by the women,
heavily laden with the more valuable of their pos-
sessions; the men and the priest brought up the
rear.

“How now, Master Naumann?’ inquired the
latter, in a tone of surprise, of the miller, who had
stood all the time, looking at the mill in evident
perplexity— Why do you not follow our example?”

“By your leave, reverend father,’ replied Nau-
mann, “I really do not know what to say. The
cottages, which are burning yonder, can be built with
little trouble, but with a mill it is a very different
matter. Besides I am a German by birth, and, as
you know, there are plenty of Germans among the
invaders, so that I think I shall be left unmolested.”
- Here some of the Russians angrily interposed,
erying out “Away with the false stranger—burn
down the mill over his head—he is a traitor and a
friend to the Frenchmen !”’

‘‘Peace!’’ cried the priest, “let him have his
will, I promise you he will soon repent it. For my
part, I pity his poor wife, our sister Kathinka, and



\
o4 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

her children. Upon thy head, stranger, be their
blood, should any harm befall them !”

The Russians moodily departed. A few hours
later, at midnight, the French arrived. The want
of a bridge did not prevent their passing the shallow
river, but it was necessary to reconstruct it imme-
diately, in order that the cannon which were to follow
might cross.

The neighbouring mill, with its massive beams,
offered the necessary materials, so, turning a deaf
ear to the miller’s entreaties, the soldiers immediately
set to work at pulling down the outhouses, and com-
pelled the proprietor to assist in the task. How
bitterly did Naumann already repent that he had
not followed the advice of the priest. More than
once he attempted to escape, but was each time
driven back by the soldiers who swore they would
shoot him if he did not desist. They also asserted
that the torches did not give enough light; to
remedy this evil, the officer in command ordered the
mill to be set on fire, which was done with joyful
alacrity. Poor Naumann almost fainted with horror
when he saw the flaming mill shed a piercing glare
over the landscape, and thought of his wife and
children. In spite of his prayers and protestations,
his brutal captors refused to let him give the alarm,
and compelled him, by hard seatain to continue
working.



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 095

At this moment our hero’s regiment reached the
scene of conflagration. The miller’s wife, carrying
two infants in her arms, and followed by a girl about
eleven years of age, was rushing from the burning
pile. ‘Mary,’ cried she to her daughter, “ take
care of the children. I will try what I can save.”
So saying she hurried back towards the mill.

‘‘Mother, dear mother, stay with us!” cried the
little ones piteously. It was more than Mary could
do to restrain them, as they clung half wild with
terror to their mother’s gown.

“Let me go”—cried Mary, and disappeared in the
flaming building. The miller’s wife waited for her
return in breathless anxiety. The flames hissed and
crackled, the heat waxed fiercer and more fierce, but
Mary reappeared not. At length her voice was
heard crying—‘“ Mother, mother, I can’t find the
way out!”

Frantic with terror, the mother tore herself from
the grasp of her little ones; but two French soldiers
sprang forward and seized her arms. ‘“ Remain
here,” cried they. “It is useless.” The girl’s cries
became fainter and fainter. The mother struggled
like a maniac to escape from the soldiers, while the
terrified children shrieked aloud.

Augustus could no longer remain a passive spec-
tator of this scene. He left the ranks, and ran
towards the mill. A French officer who stepped



\
56 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

forward to prevent him, fell over the drum which our
hero had thrown away before dashing into the mill.
Hastening up the burning staircase, he dragged the
half suffocated girl from place to place, sometimes
clambering over burning fragments, and once nearly
crushed by a falling beam. At length he found
himself with his companion in the basement story of
the mill, and took refuge in a small vaulted cellar,
just above the water mark, beside the great wheel.
Above them the flames still raged fiercely, and every
now and then burning fragments would rain down,
and fall hissing into the water beneath. Through
all the noise and uproar they could distinctly hear
the screams of the poor miller’s wife, and little Mary
shouted in reply, till she could shout no longer.
After a time all was still, but it was impossible for
the children to leave their place of refuge, till the
heat should have abated. As yet they had only had
time to exchange a few hurried words. The girl’s
thoughts were with her absent parents, and our hero
was fully but not very pleasantly occupied, in weigh-
ing the probable consequence of his leaving the ranks
without leave. He had, however, observed that his
little companion spoke German pretty fluently.

As soon as the attempt seemed at all possible, the
children tried to extricate themselves from their un-
comfortable position. In this they succeeded, and
after much difficulty reached the open fields. Of the



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. o7

regiment not a trace was to be seen; nothing but
ruined homesteads and blackened walls, in the place
so lately alive with the busy hum of men;—every- _
where ruin and desolation. Little Mary called aloud
for her father and mother, in German and Russian—
she repeated the names of her brother and sisters,
and of the neighbours—no sound was heard in reply
but the crackling of the charred beams in the burnt
cottages. At length the poor child sat down weep-
ing among the ruins. Our hero, too, became more
and more disquieted. Successful as his adventure had
been, he could not but feel anxious at finding himself
alone in a strange land, and the longer he lingered
the more alarmed did he become. At length he rose,
and taking his little companion’s hand, set out in
search of comrades, comforting the child with the
hope of soon finding her parents. Towards noon
they overtook a troop of French soldiers, who, to the
no small astonishment of our hero, took him prisoner
as a deserter, and an hour afterwards delivered him
up to his regiment, which was quartered in a little
town, abandoned like Moisevka, by its inhabitants.
‘“‘Be careful, comrade,” said the soldiers, who were
leading the boy to his trial, ‘your case is a bad one;
you'll need all your wit to get out of the scrape.’’
Augustus begged his captors to take pity on the
poor forsaken girl, and give her into the care of ser-
geant Hoyer, which they promised faithfully to do.



\
58 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

CHAPTER IX.
AUGUSTUS IS SHOT.

Tx room into which the drummer was led for trial,
was a large apartment, thronged with officers from
the different regiments. Among them, Augustus -
recognized the colonel of his regiment, and also the
Frenchman who had fallen over his drum the pre-
ceding evening. The company were laughing and
chatting, as they discussed their luncheon of wheaten
bread, Dutch cheese, and wine, and everybody
seemed in the best possible humour. Nobody seemed
to take the least notice of the lad, who was detained
for some time in custody, before the corporal made
his report to the colonel. The examination itself
did not occupy more than ten minutes. Augustus
could not deny that he had quitted the ranks without
leave, had caused a staff officer to fall over his drum,
and that he had afterwards been taken prisoner as a
deserter. The officer who presided at the examina-
tion declared, that to commit any one of these crimes,



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 59

was more than a soldier’s life was worth. “ Firstly,”
said he, ‘‘you have broken your oath of allegiance ;
secondly, you have offended against the law of sub-
ordination ; and thirdly, you are the first who has
been guilty of a breach of discipline in the enemy’s
territory.”

Without regard to the boy’s youth, and utter
inexperience, he was sentenced—to be shot. The
whole affair was conducted with as much indifference
as though the life of a dog or cat had been in ques-
tion, and not that of a human being. This levity
pained our hero the more, as he could not help
contrasting the agonizing grief his parents would
feel, with the total unconcern of his judges. The
colonel, too, seemed no longer the kind-hearted man
he had always been. With folded arms and knitted
brows, he stood apart among the rest, and purposely
avoided meeting the beseeching glance of the poor
culprit, who in his defence, could only plead that he
had not left the ranks for any bad purpose, but on
the contrary, to save the life of the Russian girl.
This assertion by no means benefited him, and he
was prevented from saying more, by the young
lieutenant, who had, on a former occasion, insulted
Hoyer—

‘“‘ Why, you young blockhead,” angrily interrupted
this merciful man, “‘do you suppose we are come
here to save the lives of the Russians, or to conquer



\

60 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

and destroy them?—Besides, a soldier has no right
to act for himself, but should pay blind obedience to
the orders of his officers. If your own father or
brother were among the enemy, your sword or
bayonet should be pointed at him, just as though
he were a stranger.’”’ Augustus was horrified at the
bare idea of such a thing. ‘I would rather be shot
a hundred times,” thought he, “than kill my good
father, or my brother.’

On being motioned to retire, he could not go,
without making an appeal to the only friend he
had. Hastening towards him, he seized his hand
and kissed it passionately, pouring forth in a voice
almost inarticulate with emotion, a prayer that the
kind colonel would make but one effort to save his
young life.

The old man’s face grew still more dark, as, biting
his lips, he sternly replied, “I could do nothing to
Save you, even if I would; your crime is too great.
Had you offended me personally, I might have for-
given it, but an offence committed against a French
officer is never pardoned.’”’ So saying, he turned
moodily away.

“Honoured colonel,’’ continued the boy, “ Had it
not been for you, I should have lost my life two
months ago. But my poor parents !—will you tell
them that I thought of them at my last hour—that
I thank them for their love and kindness to me all



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 61

my life long, and’’—here the boy’s voice faltered—
‘that we shall meet again.”

The colonel nodded slightly, in token of acqui-
escence, turned hastily away, and swallowed a glass
of wine. “Captain Warneck, you will command at
the execution,’’—said he.

At a sign from the French colonel, a French
officer stepped forward, saying, ‘‘I will accompany
you, captain !”’

The party addressed replied by a formal bow, and |
Augustus was marched off by the sentinels. Ser-
geant Hoyer was waiting outside with a file of
soldiers, of whom four were armed with pickaxes
and shovels; a drummer, beating the dead march,
led the way, and the little procession, leaving the
town, entered a field outside the ramparts, where a
grave had already been dug. ‘The soldiers stood
grouped around the delinquent in moody silence.
Not a voice was raised to speak a word of comfort,
no kind hand was there to wipe away the perspira-
tion, which hung in bead-like drops upon his brow—
no preacher of the gospel to strengthen him for his :
last journey. With great difficulty Hoyer maintained
his calmness; he glanced uneasily at the young
culprit, whose gaze wandered wildly from one to
another, and stroked his long moustache in evident
indecision.

‘As sure as my name’s Christopher,” muttered



62 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

he,—‘ I must let the poor lad into the secret, or he
will go mad with terror.” Then stepping forward,
he said with a loud voice, ‘‘ Ten men step forward
and fire when the word is given; should they miss,
the other ten are to step forward and take their place.
Aim at the head, comrades, and you are sure to hit.
Now, my poor fellow,’’ continued he, addressing
Augustus, “‘I must lead you to your place.”’

These words awoke the boy from his reverie.
Summoning up all his courage he cried out—“ Fare-
well, comrades—aim truly, and do not let me suffer
long.”

“Warewell!’’ cried they all.

Hoyer now led the delinquent to the sand heap
beside the grave. On the way he said,—

“Ts there anything I can do for you, my poor
boy ?”

“Nothing,’’ answered Augustus sadly — “ Yes,
though—the Russian girl, I have paid dearly for
saving her. Promise me, father Hoyer, that you
will provide for her, and restore her in due time to
her parents.”

“That I will, if I live,” replied the sergeant.”’

By this time they had reached the sand heap.

‘“‘Kneel down, dear boy,” said Hoyer, “and let
me blindfold you.” He drew his handkerchief from
his pocket, and bound it round the lad’s eyes, who
could not suppress a shudder.



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 63

‘¢ Tt’s no use, colonel,” again muttered Hoyer, “I
must tell the poor fellow, if you should chop me into
mincemeat for it. You have nothing further to say?”
continued he aloud, “or should you wish to repeat
a short prayer ?”

Our hero folded his hands, and began, with a
trembling voice, to repeat the Lord’s Prayer.

‘“‘ How strange it is,’ thought Hoyer, “that all
condemned criminals should ask for daily bread
before they die, when it is hardly likely they will
need any more: I suppose it’s because they can
think of no other prayer at such a moment than the _
one they have learnt from the cradle. Well, well,
our Heavenly Father knows what we want before
we ask,”’

When Augustus had finished his prayer, the ser-
geant again stepped forward, and whispered a few
words in his ear, whereupon the boy began to
tremble violently, and almost sank down upon the
sand hill.

‘¢ Comrade, don’t be a coward!” cried the sergeant
aloud. ‘Kneel as upright as you can, so that you
don’t fall before you’re shot, and prolong your
suffering.’’

So saying, he turned away and rejoined his
comrades, who had in the meantime loaded their
muskets, at their captain’s orders. Ten men ad-
vanced to within twenty yards of our hero, and



\

64 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

the captain gave the word—“Make ready—present
—Fire !’’

Bang, bang, went the muskets, and Augustus fell
backwards into the grave.

Hoyer advanced quickly, took the bandage from
his eyes, and, bending over the inanimate body, cried
‘Well aimed, comrades,—six of the bullets have
struck him !’’

With the help of one of the soldiers he proceeded
to lay out the body. Captain Warneck took the
arm of the French captain, who had been an atten-
tive spectator, and they walked together towards the
town. The soldiers, who had feigned to be filling
up the grave with great assiduity, ceased their work
as soon as the two officers were out of sight. They
formed a close circle round the grave, and each man
pulled out of his mouth a bullet, which he had bitten
off the cartridge on loading his musket. The men
laughed heartily at the thought of the trick they had
played the Frenchmen.

“‘That’s what we call shooting a man @ la Fran-
case,” cried one; ‘they taught us the trick them-
selves, the braggarts,—how many men they have shot
who have ran away in the next battle alive and well.”’

“I think the French colonel had his suspicions,” —
said another, “and that’s why he sent one of his men
to see fair play. Well, we’ve tricked him with all
his cleverness !”’



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 65

The soldiers were in high glee at their successful
maneeuvre. Hoyer took hold of Augustus’s arm, and
shaking him heartily, cried out, ‘ Comrade, it’s time
to get up.”

But the boy could not get up, for the agitation had
been too much for him—he had fainted. |

‘What nonsense, to take such a trifle to heart,”’
grumbled Hoyer, pulling out his brandy flask—“ Wait
till you have gone through half a dozen battles, my
lad, and you'll think nothing of such a freak as this,”
Taking the patient’s head between his knees, he
bathed his forehead with spirits, a proceeding which
had the desired effect. |

The boy opened his eyes, and stared vacantly round
him. Gradually they made him understand they
had fired at him with blank cartridges. This was,
in fact, what Hoyer had whispered to him, but
what he had not dared to believe.

With tears of joy Augustus shook each of his
comrades in turn by the hand. “But does the
colonel know of this?”’ he asked. ‘He seemed
to have quite given me up.”

“That was only pretence, because the French-
men were all watching him,” replied Hoyer. “Don’t
you see, without his consent we should not have
dared to play such a trick. ‘ Hoyer,’ said he,
‘now mind you act your part well. I should never
forgive myself if the poor lad were to lose his life,

F



66 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

merely because the Frenchman’s pride has been
wounded,’ ”’

‘‘ Heaven bless him for a kind gentleman!” cried
the boy with enthusiasm—‘ I would go through fire
and water for him, and for you too, father Hoyer,
and for you all!” continued he, turning to the
soldiers,

Why, you’ve grown quite a salamander since
yesterday morning,” returned the sergeant, laugh-
ing. “ But for the present we can’t take advantage
of your fire-eating propensities, for you must leave
us, and that quickly.”

“‘ Leave you!” cried Augustus, in surprise.

“Aye, my lad, that you must,” replied the ser-
geant. “You see, if you are seen among us, the
trick that has been played would be found out, and
the colonel would get into a scrape. Moreover, we
mustn’t stay any longer palavering here, or sus:
picion will be excited. Here is an old blouse for
you to put on over your uniform, and see, behind
yon garden wall your little miller’s maid is waiting
for you. You can go with her to the Russians, and
if you don’t like remaining with them, and no oppor-
tunity occurs of returning to Germany, you can
rejoin us in a little while, when to-day’s business
will have blown over.’’

Augustus could not refrain from shedding tears at
parting with his comrades and the good old sergeant,



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 67

whom he particularily charged to thank the colonel
a thousand times for his kindness, He then went
to seek out the little Russian, whom he found wait-
ing for him behind the garden wall, as Hoyer had
said. The two companions lost no time in setting
out for the ruined village, where they hoped to gain
some tidings of Mary’s parents.



68 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

CHAPTER X.

AUGUSTUS’S THREE COMBATS—WITH HIMSELF—
WITH A WOLF——AND WITH A DOG.

AttHoucH the drummer’s uniform was effectually
concealed by the blouse provided by Hoyer, he was
afraid to keep the high road, lest he should be
recognized and taken prisoner a second time. He
therefore led his companion along by unfrequented
footpaths, taking care, however, to keep the road in
sight, and at the same time to avoid attracting the
observation of the bands of soldiers who every now
_ and then appeared in view. This deviation from
the straight path, added to the delay occasioned by
their stopping so frequently to hide, considerably
increased the wearisomeness of their march. Augus-
tus, for his part, was far from feeling fatigued, but
every now and then he glanced anxiously at the
hittle girl, who was not so well inured to long marches
as himself. He therefore took every opportunity of
stopping to rest, and each time asked her if she felt



‘OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 69

tired. Though little Mary only shook her head in
reply, her companion could plainly see that it was
only the feverish excitement caused by her anxiety
regarding her parents, which kept her from sinking
with exhaustion. The mid-day sun now poured
down his beams upon them more fiercely than
Augustus could have thought possible in such a
country as Russia. Every time the children passed
a spring or even a pond, they stopped to quench
their thirst, but neither thought of eating.

At length the ruined village appeared in the
distance. By this time the sun had already set, and
evening was closing in, Little Mary now began
to hurry forward faster than ever, and Augustus
followed more slowly, recommending her to be
cautious. But caution was unnecessary, for not a
trace of a human being was to be discovered, Sitting
disconsolately down on the threshold of the ruined
dwelling house, poor Mary gave way to a passionate
burst of grief. |

Augustus seated himself beside her, and was soon
absorbed in meditations of a far more pleasant kind.
His thoughts were wholly and solely fixed on his
beloved home, and his dear parents. Now at length
he was free! The road lay open before him, and
there was nothing to prevent his setting out at once.
How his heart swelled at the idea.—What cared he
for the fatigues of a long journey, or for his total



\
70 . THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

want of money. With the prospect of home before
him, he felt he could gladly beg his bread from day
to day.

“Oh, father! oh my dear mother, and you Bertha
and Robert.—How glad you will be to see me
again!’”’ cried he, jumping up rapturously. A
stifled sob from his companion recalled him to him-
self, and reminded him that he was not alone, and
that he must not think only of himself.

A feeling of deep despondency came over him.
He glanced sorrowfully at the Russian girl, who
with feelings far different from his, was calling upon
the names of her lost parents. The thought at once
struck him,—would it be generous, would it be just
and right on his part, to induce Mary to accompany
him on his long and perilous journey, and to take
her, perhaps for ever, from her fatherland and her
friends?—On the other hand,—could he leave her
alone, perhaps to perish? Gradually he overcame
the strong temptation, and glanced tenderly at the
weeping girl.

‘Don’t cry, Mary,” said he cheerfully—“ We will
go and seek your parents. You say the villagers
went away yonder. Come we will follow in the
same direction.”

The cravings of hunger now began to manifest
themselves pretty strongly in our hero’s case.
‘What have you in that bundle?” enquired he,



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 71

observing for the first time, a parcel which lay by
Mary’s side.

“The man with the great moustache gave it me.”
replied she, drying her eyes with the corner of her
apron.

“Oh, Hoyer,” said Augustus, stretching out his
hand for the packet. As he had expected, on being
opened, it was found to contain some bread and
meat, besides a small flask of water, mixed with
spirit. The children made a hearty meal, for youth-
ful sorrow, though violent, is not lasting. Then
they rose and left the ruined village, hoping that
some of the inhabitants might be in its neighbour-
hood. Twilight had now deepened into night,
and the stars came out one by one; still it was
warm, and not very dark. Every sound, even to the
chirp of the crickets in the scorched grass, seemed
hushed, and a solemn stillness reigned over all things
as the children passed on.

“See,” cried Augustus, suddenly, pointing to a
dark object some distance ahead, “see, there sits a
shepherd’s dog, and where there are dogs men are
sure not to be far off.”

Mary looked up and caught her companion by the
arm, without however appearing much alarmed.
“That is a wolf, and not a dog,” replied she.

‘A wolf!” cried Augustus in horror, instinctively
feeling for his cutlass, which had been taken from



\
72 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

him, at his trial—‘‘ a wolf! for heaven’s sake let us
flee, or we are lost—perhaps he hasn’t observed us
yet.”

Augustus’s timidity seemed to affect his companion,
who hurriedly replied—

‘My father says, if one runs away from a wolf
he’s sure to follow.”

‘But what are we todo? We can’t stand here
to be eaten up alive !’’

“ There’s not much fear of that,’”’ answered Mary
quietly. “My father says, a wolf will not attack
any one singly, except in winter, and then only
when he’s very hungry, and then he’d be sure to
howl, and wouldn’t sit so quietly.”’

Augustus stood staring in consternation at the
wolf, who stared at him in return. At length he
could stand it no longer. ‘We can’t stand waiting
here all night,” said he, attempting to swagger,
“let us make a circuit and pass him,”

“But suppose he should follow us,” said Mary
anxiously. |
_“T can bear this no longer!’ cried our hero, who
by this time had screwed up his courage. ‘“ Why
should I be afraid of a rascally wolf, when I went
through the fire yesterday, and was shot this morn-
ing. [ll teach you to stand here opening your great
wide mouth at me, old Grizzly !”

So saying he stooped down and picked up.a large



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 73

stone. “Now Mary, if he should come after us, you
must run away as fast as you can. I only wish I
had my cutlass.”’

He threw the stone with all his force. It hit the wolf
full on the back, and with bristling hair the drummer
awaited the result of his experiment. It was with a
feeling of intense relief that he saw the dreaded animal
rise slowly and slink away with its tail between its legs.

“T’ve taught him manners,” cried Augustus,
boastfully. “Only let him come again, and I’ll
smash his skull.” Notwithstanding his vaunt, he
could not avoid turning his head repeatedly, to see
if the wolf were not following.

“Aha! look here!” cried he joyfully, picking up
a thick cudgel which was lying in his way. ‘“ This
may be of some use to us. I see the poetry in my
lesson-book at home is not true, which said,

‘A rabid wolf of the Russian school,
Dined on a carpenter, supped on his rule.’

Only let him come now, I’ll beat such a tattoo on
his hide, that he shall remember it all his life long.”

When our hero’s warlike courage had somewhat
cooled down, he asked his companion if she could
distinguish anything like a house or.a village.

“No,” answered Mary, with a yawn.

“Ts that a wood before us ?”’

“Yes, I think so,” replied the girl.



74 THE LITTLE DRUMMER; ~

‘Tt is just in our road. Perhaps a whole herd of
wolves are in it. Now I don’t care for one, but
when it comes-to ”’—

Bow, wow, wow! barked a great dog, as it came
bounding towards them.

“Back,” roared Augustus, brandishing his club,
‘keep your distance, or I’ll smash you !”

Now whether the dog, being a Russian, did not

“inderstand German, or whether it was that he did
not feel appalled by the threat, we know not. How-
ever this may have been, he sprang forward, and
dexterously avoiding a blow aimed at him, seized
the end of the cudgel with his teeth. All the tug-
ging in the world could not make him let go, but on
the contrary he kept working his way up till the boy
was at last obliged to drop the stick, or his hand
would have been bitten. He had no sooner let go
than the enemy sprang upon him and pulled him to
the ground.

Augustus thought it was now all over with him,
but the dog stood watching him quietly enough,
showing, however, a very formidable set of teeth,
when his prisoner attempted to rise.

‘‘ Pray lie still, Augustus, and he will not harm
you,” said Mary.

As he could do nothing else, our hero was com-
pelled to obey. Footsteps were now heard, and a
voice hailed thém in Russian. Mary answered in



SE

~ ad
Fao |

SOR UOTT



Tue Rosstan Doe



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 75

the same language, and in a few moments two wild
looking men, armed with guns, stood before them.
On being ordered to rise, the little braggart obeyed,
rubbing his head ruefully, and followed the men,
who turned towards the wood. In a hollow at a
little distance, they found a fire, around which a
number of Russians lay grouped. All sprang up,
at the arrival of the new comers. Augustus found
himself surrounded by eager, enquiring, distrustful
faces, and stood in the centre like a condemned
criminal. Mary courageously came to his assistance
and related their adventures since the preceding
day; and fortunate was it for Augustus that he had
a companion to interpret for him. The children now
learnt that their hosts were a party lying in wait
to surprise and kill any Frenchmen who might be
found straying from the main body. They could give
no intelligence concerning Mary’s parents. They
said that the boy should be safe, if he would not
again rejoin the enemy, which Mary eagerly promised
in his name. Some food was now given them, and
they were directed to lie down on a heap of dry
leaves, over which some furs had been spread. Ex-
hausted with the fatigues of the day, they obeyed
right willingly, and were soon in a sound sleep.



76 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

CHAPTER XI.
THE SURPRISE.

“As dwa! tritchoti!’”” commanded the little drum-
mer, in broken Russian, drawing himself up to his
full height. ‘‘ Eyes right! attention!” continued he
in German, and Mary, who marched beside him,
interpreted.

“Halt!” cried Augustus.

“ Stoi!’”’ shouted Mary.

A long file of sturdy peasant lads stood like a rock
at the word of their diminutive leader. Each was
provided with a drum, rudely fashioned, and covered
with calf-skin, and their sturdy fists grasped drum-
sticks of formidable dimensions.

‘‘ Now,” cried Augustus, ‘ beat the tattoo, softly
at first. Row de dow, row de dow, dow.”

‘“‘T can’t translate that,” said Mary.

‘Never mind,” rejoined the drummer with a
business-like air. ‘The lads must learn it without.
Now then. ‘Row de dow, row de dow, dow.” And
the hopeful pupils raised a tremendous din.



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION.» 77

‘‘T should like father Hoyer to see me now,” said
Augustus, laughing. ‘‘ How he would stare to see
me turned drum-major. But my pupils here shall
do me credit, for I’ll make capital drummers of
them. ,

The reader, who will no doubt wonder as much as
sergeant Hoyer, at finding Augustus appearing in
this new character, should here be made acquainted
with the children’s further adventures, from the time
when we left them with the Russians in the hollow.
They had quitted their hosts on the following
morning, and wandered from place to place, vainly
hoping to obtain some tidings of Mary’s parents.
They were but scantily supplied with food, being
obliged to subsist on the precarious charity of the
peasants, who had but little to spare, as provisions
grew scarcer every day. In the meantime an im-
perial proclamation had gone forth, and the Russians
were assembling from every quarter to join the army
and give battle to the enemy. The little wanderers
arrived one day at a town, where our hero’s birth
and profession could no longer be concealed. He
was cited before the authorities, who gave him his
choice, either to be locked up as a prisoner of war,
or to assist in the defence of the country. He chose
the latter, as he was merely required to initiate the
young peasants, before mentioned, into the art and
mystery of beating the drum, Comfortable quarters



78 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

were assigned to him and his companion, he received
regular pay, and could as we have seen, play the
commander in a small way. Mary had become quite
reconciled to their new mode of life, and learned to
look up to Augustus as her friend and protector.

Several weeks had glided on in this way, when
Augustus began to pine for his home. For whole
nights together he would lay awake, thinking of his
absent friends. Besides this he did not at all like
the Russian mode of living. Hardly a day passed
on which he did not see several cudgellings given
and received, and even the officers sometimes got
their ears boxed by the colonels. Augustus some-
times trembled for his own back, though as yet he
had got on very well. One night he had lain awake
for some hours thinking, as usual, of his home, and
at length fell into a doze, and began to dream that
he had returned to his native town. A peace was
being proclaimed, and the town bells were ringing
and cannons firing. The noise seemed to grow
louder and louder, till all the windows rattled again.
A bright light flashed up. He gradually became
conscious of a child’s voice shouting in his ear—he
started and awoke.

Little Mary was standing by his bedside, crying
with fright, and tugging at him with might and
main. The room was lighted up with so bright a
glare that a pin might have been seen on the floor.



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 79

In the street below were heard furious voices, mingled
with groans and shrieks. Musket-balls came crash -
ing through the windows, and buried themselves in
the walls. The houses on the Opposite side were in
flames.

“Oh, Augustus, Augustus, how frightened I am!”
wept Mary. “The enemy have come at last,”

Augustus, who was still half asleep, rubbed his
eyes and stared in surprise, now at the weeping girl,
and now at the burning houses,

‘Stoop, stoop down!” cried Mary pulling him
back, as a fresh volley came crashing into the room.

‘Why those are our people!” cried Augustus,
gleefully, “that is my regiment! Hoyer, Hoyer,
here am I!” and taking his companion’s hand he
ran down stairs.

As the children opened the door which led into
the street, a private of Augustus’s company rushed
towards them.

“Hail, comrade!” cried Augustus. But the
comrade could neither see nor hear from excess of
rage. The expression of his countenance was s0
terrible that Mary was quite terrified at him, and
pulled Augustus back into the passage with such
force that both fell down. This was lucky for them,
as the soldier would probably have run one of them
through with his bayonet. In a little while Mary
ventured to open the door once more, and Augustus



\

80 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

recognized the colonel, on horseback, at the head of
his men.

“Colonel, honoured colonel! ’ cried Augustus,
running out into the road. But the colonel turned
to his followers, and cried,—

Forward lads, forward! hew down whatever
opposes you! Spare none ; give no quarter ! For-
ward, forward.”

“ How the kind man must have changed’ ’—said
our hero sorrowfully, as he once more retired into the
house, deeming it most prudent, under existing cir-
cumstances, to keep out of the way. ‘‘T must have
altered very much,” continued he, “or perhaps my
comrades think I left them on my own accord. I
wonder what Hoyer would have done.”

The words were hardly uttered, when the house
door was flung open, and in marched the sergeant,
followed by several of his men. 7

“ Hoyer! father Hoyer!” shouted the boy. Hoyer
raised his musket to strike; but Augustus quickly
added, “I am Augustus Wunsch, your drummer.
Don’t you know me?”’

“By the powers of war!’ cried the sergeant.
“How came you here? I didn't know you at
all.’’

‘‘ Indeed, you all seem dreadfully changed since I
left you,” said Augustus ruefully. ‘‘ Private Stiesel,
of our company, wanted to run me through with his



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 81

bayonet—the colonel told them to give me no quarter,
and you, father Hoyer’”—

“Ha, ha, ha!” laughed the sergeant —*‘* It’s
plain enough that you are a novice in the noble art
of war. As for us, we are the same men as we were
betore, and what makes you wonder so much, is only
the rage of war. When that seizes us, we neither
see nor hear. In the fight we clear away everything
that crosses our path, and does’nt wear our uniform.
If our father or brother were there, we should’nt
know him, and often we can’t stop to notice whether
people wear trowsers or petticoats. On we g0,
blindfold—cut and thrust—the more the merrier !””

‘* But what in the world has put you all into such
a rage?” enquired Augustus. ‘N obody knew that
you were near, and last night every one went quietly
to bed.”

“Just so,”—cried Hoyer, laughing. “ And we
surprised them in their beds, and burnt their houses
for them, lest they should catch cold.”

‘‘ Poor creatures !’’—said the young drummer with
asigh. ‘They have treated me kindly enough, and
never in their lives injured any of you.”

“ That’s true enough,” replied the sergeant—“ but
you see this is time of war.”’

‘‘ But why must war be?” urged Augustus. “ Here
we're marched hundreds of miles away to kill people

whom we have never seen in our lives, and’”’—
G



\

82 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

“Hold your tongue, boy !”"—interrupted his hearer
angrily—‘ Don’t grumble—a soldier must obey and
not murmur. Napoleon has said: ‘It is war—the
Russians are your enemies;’ and so every good
soldier must fall upon them without mercy. If the
Emperor were to-morrow to give the word,—‘ Peace
—sheathe your swords’—why then we'll cry Hurrah!
brother Russian—hail comrade, well met’

“T always thought,” observed Augustus, “ that
love and hatred could not be commanded by any
one.”

““ Napoleon can do everything,”—was the answer.
“There isn’t another man in the world like him. A
few words from his lips do more work than a hundred
cannons. And who knows,” continued the old
sergeant, and his grey eye kindled, as he drew him-
self proudly up,—‘‘ who knows, but that I may some
day earn a little bit of ribbon, with a white cross at
the end.”

“ A bit of ribbon and a cross ?”” enquired Augustus,
wondering.

“Bah! you're a stupid boy,””—cried Hoyer angrily.
“ And here am I listening to your prate, whilst my
people up stairs are packing up everything that’s
worth taking. I must go and look after my share,”
and he turned towards the stair.

“ Pather Hoyer!” cried the boy after him.

“ What now?” answered Hoyer, looking back.



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 83

“T always took you for an honest man”—

‘Thunder and lightning! who says I’m not ?”

‘‘ But you’re going to steal other people’s property.”

‘‘Harkee, youngster, don’t presume on my good
nature—and choose your words better, Plundering
isn’t stealing, and is always the custom in time of
war !” roared the sergeant, as he ran up stairs.

“‘T see now,” muttered Augustus, “that war is a
cloak for everything that’s bad.”

The soldiers now came tramping down stairs, laden
with booty. Whatever they could not use, or carry
away with them, was wantonly destroyed. Provisions,
clothing, linen, candles, soap, and household furniture
lay heaped pell-mell in the street. By far the greater
part of the booty was wantonly destroyed. Augustus
looked at the devastation with a sigh, and with a
heavy heart prepared to follow his comrades, who
were about to quit the town, and rejoin the main
body of the army.



\

84 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

CHAPTER XII.
THE BATTLE.

Our hero now resumed his place in his regiment.
The colonel welcomed him kindly, as did also his
comrades. Through Hoyer’s influence, Mary was
entrusted to the care of a sutler woman, and could
either walk or ride at pleasure; but she liked best
to walk beside her old companion, whenever this
could be done. Augustus soon observed, to his great
astonishment, that the regiment was reduced to little
more than half its former number. He ran to sergeant
Hoyer, and asked the reason.

‘Why, boy,” said the sergeant—“ it was perhaps
lucky for you that you were shot in sport, and had to
leave us, or you might have been shot in earnest.
For they made us storm a rascally old fortress—
Smolensk they called it—and many of our poor
fellows didn’t see the sun rise next morning.—Six of
our drummers were killed, and you might have been
in the black list.’

A few days afterwards, a report was spread abroad,



OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 85

that the Russian army was on its march, and that a
decisive battle must soon be fought. Strange as it
may appear, the news was hailed with universal joy.
The soldiers were all heartily tired of the long and
wearisome marches, so that they rejoiced in the
prospect of any change, even though it should cost
the lives of thousands. The different portions of the
army were now brought together, and the station of
each regiment was fixed. The army was spread out
something in the form of a gigantic bird. In the
centre, strengthened by innumerable cannon, were
posted the best regiments, and the enormous wings
were to surround and hem in the enemy. A large
body of reserve stood ready to support the army in
case of need.

It was on the 4th of September, 1812, that to-
wards evening the booming of cannon announced the
commencement of the battle. The earth seemed to
shake and tremble at the dreadful din. Augustus,
who had never heard cannons firing so near him,
became red and pale by turns, The soldiers, how-
ever, sat round him quite unconcerned, talking,
laughing, and eating, as though the firing did not
disturbed them in the least. This Strange indifference
increased the boy’s alarm;—he took refuge with
Hoyer, who soon observed that all was not right with
the drummer.

‘This firing does not concern us,’—said he. “Tt



\

86 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

is on the left wing. But the enemy’s great redoubt
will cost a great many lives, for we must have it at
any price, and the village of Borodino too.”

‘¢ And what then ?”

“Why then’—continued Hoyer—‘‘ there will be
nothing to hinder us from entering Moscow.”

‘“¢ And what then?” again asked Augustus.

“Then peace will be made, and we shall return
home.”

‘‘ But we had peace already, before the war began.
Why must we all march so many hundreds of miles,
and kill so many people, to gain what we had already
at home.”

“Bah! you don’t understand me at all,”—said
Hoyer. “It was destined that there should be war,
and the great comet didn’t appear in the sky last
year for nothing.”

‘ But I thought Napoleon began the war, and not
the comet?”

“ Well, so he did, boy !—I am saying that the
comet predicted it was Heaven’s will that there
should be a war.”

“Why, the comet can’t speak,’—insisted Au-
gustus; “How can it predict a war?”

‘‘What nonsense!—They prophesied last year
there would be a war.”

“ Who prophesied? Not the comet, but after all
only men, who practise on our superstition.”



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“HKygs Rieut! ATTENTION


THE

LITTLE DRUMMER.

OR,

FILIAL AFFECTION:

A STORY OF THRE RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN.
—~—.

Translated trom the German of Gustad Nierits,
By H. W. DULCKEN.

WITH FCUR ILLUSTRATIONS, DRAWN BY GILBERT,

ENGRAVED BY DALZIEL.



LONDON:
ADDEY AND CO., 21, OLD BOND STREET,

-__oeoeo

1852.

he ht nn etnninannentethaiathicnnse ila: i. ae
LONDON:
THOMPSON AND DAVIDSON, PRINTERS,
GREAT ST. HELENS.


PREFACE

eee mene

THE judicious mingling of historical truth
with pleasant fiction, has at all times been
justly considered a desirable object, in the
production of books for the amusement and
instruction of the young. There is doubtless
many a lad now living among us, in whom
a taste for the study of history has been
pleasantly but surely called forth, by the
perusal of such a book as Miss Strickland’s
Edward Evelyn. Works of: this class are
calculated to leave on a youth’s mind a desire

to learn more of the subjects about which he
vi PREFACE.
has been reading, while he may turn satiated
from the most elaborate treatise of a Mignet
or a Lamartine. With the aim of thus com-
bining the wtile with the dulce, this slight sketch
of Napoleon’s celebrated Russian Campaign
has been produced. It is taken, as its title
implies, from the Jugendschriften of Gustav
Nieritz, stories “familiar as household words”
in the mouth of every German schoolboy.
Whatever may be the merits or demerits
of this little book, the translator feels assured
that nothing will be found, on the one hand
to excite horror, or on the other, to instil
into the youthful mind those false notions
concerning what is called “the Glory of
War,” which the present age so rightly and
universally condemns.

H. D.
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
THE SICK CHILD . . ° .

CHAPTER II.
THE UNWELCOME GUESTS. .

CHAPTER III.
THE GOOD SON . : : .

CHAPTER IV.
AUGUSTUS JOINS HIS REGIMENT .

CHAPTER V.
“WHAT JOY, OH WHAT PLEASURE, A

CHAPTER VI.
LIFE AMONG THE SOLDIERS . .

CHAPTER VII.
“LA GRANDE ARMEE” . . ,

SOLDIER TO BE.”

Page

17

26

31

41

47
Vill CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VIII. Page.
THE BURNING OF THE MILL. ; , ; cat ah
CHAPTER IX.
AUGUSTUS IS SHOT Rta gos uk ee .
CHAPTER X.
AUGUSTUS'S THREE COMBATS—WIiTH HIMSELF—WITH
ee ee ee a ee
CHAPTER XI.
eames i‘(< i‘ Tk i ; ; oe ae

CHAPTER XII.
THE BATTLE. ‘ ‘ i ‘ ‘ a : 84

CHAPTER XIII.
MOSCOW—WILFUL WASTE . me ‘ , ‘ on

CHAPTER XIV.
THE RETREAT—WOFUL WANT . : . ‘ . 103

CHAPTER XV.
THE BEREZINA . . . tiie . : - 5S

CHAPTER XVI.
THE RETURN HOME. : ° ° : : - 122

CHAPTER XVII.
CONCLUSION . ; ‘ ; 6 ‘ ‘ o | ame


THE

LITTLE DRUMMER.
CHAPTER I.
THE SICK CHILD.

THERE was sorrow and tribulation in the house of
Master Wunsch, the saddler; for Emily, his infant
daughter, was very ill. The poor child lay tossing
in a burning fever, which threatened to put an un-
timely end to her innocent life. Many and fervent
were the prayers offered up by the anxious parents to
Him who alone could send help in their time of need.—
The sixth night of Emily’s illness had arrived. In
a room,-dimly lighted by the flickering rays of a
night lamp, still further shaded by a large book
placed on end before it, by way of screen, stood the
cradle of the little sufferer, over whom the mother
bent in speechless anxiety. Though for six nights
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2 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

sleep had not closed her weary eyes, she still watched
beside her darling’s pillow, with that deep and un-
tiring affection which none but a mother’s heart can
feel. As the clock of a neighbouring church struck
twelve, the door was opened softly, and the saddler
entered. Advancing on tiptoe to the cradle he
enquired anxiously,—‘ No better yet?”

The mother shook her head mournfully as she
pointed to the cradle, in which the child lay rolling
restlessly from side to side, with glowing cheeks and
fluttering breath. For a moment Master Wunsch
stood silently regarding the sick baby; then he said
kindly, —‘‘ Now go to bed, dear wife; it is my turn
to watch.”

“No,” replied she, “I could not sleep, even if I
were to lie down—I should be only the more anxious
away from the child.”’

“But, dearest wife, consider your health,””—re-
monstrated the saddler; “‘ you will never be able to
bear all this fatigue,—and the end will be that I shall
have two invalids in the house instead of one.”

“Do not fear for me,”—was the reply. ‘ You
stand more in need of rest than I, for you have to
earn bread for us all, and you cannot work without
sleep. Alas, these are hard times, and we must exert |
ourselves more than ever to keep the wolf from the
door, — that unhappy billeting too, costs so much
money. ‘To-day we shall have twenty Frenchmen


OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 3

to provide for, who will want the best of everything.
But I should’nt mind all that, if poor little Emily
were only out of danger—I am dreadfully alarmed
about her.”

After trying in vain to induce his wife to lie down,
Master Wunsch retired to his bed, leaving her sitting
by the cradle. But exhausted nature could bear no
more, the weary head sunk gradually back, and the
hand relaxing its grasp, ceased to rock the cradle.
In a few minutes the good mother was in a deep
sleep.

“Drink, drink,”—cried the child, half in de-
lirium. “ Drink!’ repeated little Emily in a louder
voice,

Still the mother did not stir. The little one burst
into a fit of passionate crying. At this moment the
door of the adjoining bed-room was opened, and
Emily’s brother Augustus, a boy of fourteen years,
hurried in half undressed.

“Be quiet, dear Emily,” said he coaxingly.—
“You shall have something to drink in a minute ;”—
so saying he warmed some tea over the night lamp,
and, after testing its temperature, offered it to the
child.

“‘ Mother give it,”—sobbed Emily fretfully.

‘Our mother cannot, dear child,””—answered the
brother soothingly, “she is asleep. You see poor
mother is tired, so very tired. She has been watch-

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4 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

ing beside you these six nights, and you see there she
sits still. Come drink, dear Emily.’’

The cup was eagerly snatched by the feverish
patient, who drank greedily and sank back on her
pillow. Augustus began gently to rock the cradle.

‘* Sing, sing,’’—cried she.

Augustus complied, and sang, in a low voice, a
little cradle song, beginning,—

“Sleep, baby, sleep;

Angels hover round thy head,

Close thine eyes and guard thy bed,
Sleep, baby, sleep.

But, dearest child, you must not toss about and throw
off the bed-clothes in that way, or you will catch
cold,”’ expostulated the boy, carefully arranging the
covering round his sister.

‘‘ More drink,” cried she again,—“ water, not tea.”’

Augustus did as she wished, and warmed some
water for her. Thus it continued throughout the
whole night. Too feverish to sleep, the child started
up in bed every minute, and Augustus had to cover
her up, to give her drink, and to sing his song over
and over again.

As morning dawned little Emily became quieter.
The crimson. flush faded from her cheek and gave
place to a deathlike pallor. Her eyes remained
longer closed, her breathing was more regular, but


OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 5

heavy and oppressed. An unearthly stillness per-
vaded the room, as the flame of the expiring lamp
flickered fitfully up. The weathercocks on the neigh-
bouring houses creaked as they swung to and fro in
the morning breeze, which moaned so dismally in the
chimney that the boy felt quite frightened. A cold
shudder crept over him, as with teeth chattering
with the cold he sung his cradle song. The thought
suddenly fell like a thunderbolt upon his soul—
“What if the angels should close thy sister’s eyes
FOR EvER?” For a time he felt strangely depressed,
and at length found relief in a flood of tears. Alas!
they were all so fond, so very fond of the droll, sen-
sible, little child. Every new word she learnt to
lisp, every sound of her merry laugh, was to them a
source of interest and pleasure. And to think that
the cheerful voice might so soon be hushed, the
dimpled face become cold as marble, the laughing
eyes close to open no more—that an ugly coffin was
to be Emily’s cradle, and worms were to eat her
delicate limbs. Oh, the thought seemed too hard to
bear !

As the clock struck five the mother started from
her chair with a cry of alarm. “ Merciful heavens!
what have I done,”—exclaimed she. ‘ Wretch that
fT am, I have neglected my child;’” and she wrung
her hands in anguish as she gazed at the infant.

‘¢ Never fear, dear mother,” said Augustus, turning
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6 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

away his face to hide his tears. ‘I have been here
and have taken care of little Emily.”

‘But have you been here all the time?” continued
the still anxious mother. “I cannot remember at
what hour I fell asleep, and perhaps my darling has
caught cold and made herself worse.”

The boy, however, consoled his mother by the as-
surance that such was not the case, and thus relieved
her mind from a great burden.

‘‘ What a great misfortune you may have prevented
by your thoughtfulness,” said she, tenderly embracing
her son. ‘I should never have forgiven myself if
any harm had happened through my carelessness.
Bless you, my good boy.”

Overjoyed at having earned his mother’s thanks,
Augustus went to finish dressing himself, and then
proceeded to assist in the various arrangements which
had to be made for the expected guests.


OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. ° 7

CHAPTER II.
THE UNWELCOME GUESTS.

‘t How I should like to be a soldier!” observed the
saddler’s younger son, Robert, a sturdy urchin of
eight years, as with his sister Bertha, a girl rather
older than himself, he was arranging the long table.
‘‘ How I should like to be a soldier,” repeated he:
“They are such lucky fellows; they get Sunday
dinner every day,—Did you see the splendid piece of
veal, roasted as brown as a nut, which my mother is
preparing in the kitchen? My father has sent for
twenty quarts of beer and three quarts of spirits, and
I never in all my life saw such an immense dish of
potato-salad—I’m so fond of it—I hope the soldiers
will leave some for me.”

“‘ And the great loaves of new bread,”’ interrupted
Bertha, “and five large pieces of fresh butter, as
- yellow as gold.”

‘And such a number of cheeses,’’—chimed in
Robert; “what gluttons they must be if they de-
vour it all,”’
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8 THE LITTLE DRUMMER };

A noise was heard in the street.

“They’re coming, they’re coming,” cried Bertha,
running to the window.

In a few minutes heavy footsteps were heard
ascending the stairs. The startled children ran out
of the room.

The noisy foreigners took possession of the rooms
assigned to them. Muskets and caps, knapsacks and
swords were flung pell-mell into a corner, and in less
than five minutes the unbidden guests had explored
every room in the house, and shouted and sang like
men who felt: themselves perfectly at home.

In the meantime a workman of Master Wunsch’s
was assisting the servant in carrying up the dinner
prepared for the Frenchmen. It was not without a
feeling of envy, that little Robert saw the before-
mentioned splendid piece of veal and the mighty dish
of potato-salad, carried up stairs for demolition.
Augustus, who could speak a little French, was sent
to call the soldiers together by the magic words:—
‘‘ Messieurs, on a servi;’’ a summons they lost no
time in obeying. As soon as it became apparent, by
the clatter of plates and spoons, that dinner had
begun, the saddler’s family retired to little Emily’s
sick room, which had been converted for the time
being into a sitting room.

Suddenly, however, the sound of angry words was
heard in the room above. A volley of imprecations
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 9

was thundered out by furious voices and a crash in the
street below, as of some heavy substance, caused
Mrs. Wunsch to run in alarm to the window. Look-
' ing out, she saw that the peaceable guests were
pouring away the beer in large streams, and bom-
barding the passers by with the cheeses. As she
looked, the heavy loaves came thundering down like
mill-stones. Poor little Robert cried with vexation,
when he saw the much lauded veal lying in the road,
among the ruins of the baking dish, and surrounded
by a large mass of potato salad, Master Wunsch
hurried up stairs, and, rushing past the weeping and
terrified servant girl, nearly fell over his journeyman,
whom the French soldiers had summarily ejected.

Such a scene was enough to ruffle the mildest
temper. Wunsch and the workman looked at each
other with eyes sparkling with rage, and longed to
inflict a well deserved chastisement on the brutal
foreigners. But what was to be done? They were
only two men against twenty, who were besides
armed with deadly weapons.

“ Augustus,”—cried the saddler, in a voice trem-
bling with anger, as he re-entered the sick room,
‘Run as fast as you can to the colonel’s quarters, and
inform against the rascals. Beg one of the officers
to accompany you hither.’’

The boy ran off to execute his commission. During
his absence the tumult increased more and more, as
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10 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

none of Wunsch’s people dared show their faces.
After a while the messenger returned, alone and
breathless.

‘“‘ Well!” eagerly enquired the father; “‘ Why did
you not bring the officer with you?”

‘¢ Alas, father,” answered the boy, ‘there is no
redress to be had there. When I had made my request
known, the gentlemen told me that no one would
think of acting against troops for such a trifle, par-
ticularly after a fatiguing march, when they had
every right to expect a very good dinner. And so
the gentlemen turned their backs and would listen
to nothing I had to say. And only think, father,
what I saw as I came back; it is really too dreadful!
You know, a number of the Rhenish troops have
just arrived—the broad street is quite crowded with
them. Well, before they were dismissed to their
quarters, newly baked rye loaves were distributed
to each man. What do you think these reckless
wasteful people did?—They laid down the loaves in a
double row all across the street, and walked to and
fro over them, shouting with laughter, ‘To keep
their boots from getting dirty,’ they said. A few
even tore the insides out of the loaves, and, putting
them on as overshoes, went shuffling through the
mud. The wretches! to waste the gifts of God in
such a shameful way.”

The hearers stood aghast at this narrative. At
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 11

length Master Wunsch broke silence. “If Germans
act in this way,” said he, ‘can we wonder at any-
thing the Frenchmen do.”

“Yes, you are right,” observed the mother,
“therefore, dear husband, be calm, and wink at what
they have done. Let us send up stairs, and ask what
fault the soldiers find with the dinner we have pro-
vided. It is better to come to an understanding with
them, than that they should break everything in the
house, and perhaps ill-use us into the bargain. Does
not the Almighty seem pleased to send us joy in
another respect. Look at our little Emily, how
much better she is; she is sleeping so quietly, and
the doctor gives me the best hopes of her recovery.
He says the crisis is past, and the danger almost over.
We have only to take great care that she is not dis-
turbed. Is not this good news worth a thousand
times more than the few dollars you will have to
spend, to keep the dissatisfied strangers in good
humour.”

The father nodded in cordial acquiescence, as he
looked with a joyful smile on the slumbering infant.
He then cheerfully went to spend part of his hard-
earned savings in the purchase of poultry and wine,
for the use of the unruly foreigners.

Suddenly the house-door was thrown open, and a
number of German soldiers appeared in the passage,
—“ Fifteen privates of the Rhenish corps and a
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12 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

drummer,” gasped the servant girl, holding out the
billeting warrant to her startled mistress.

‘“¢ Merciful heavens!” ejaculated Mrs. Wunsch,
‘have we not trouble enough already, without this.”
- But there was no time to lose in useless lamen-
tation,—deeds, not words, were the order of the day,
for the soldiers impatiently demanded to be shown to
a room.

‘Take them into the workshop,” said Wunsch,
after a moment’s reflection, ‘‘I would rather give my
men a holiday, than expose my child to new danger.”

Leaving little Emily in the charge of Robert and
Bertha, the mother hurried into the kitchen to pro-
vide, as quickly as possible, for the entertainment of
the new comers.

But the soldiers were not to be satisfied so easily.
The saddler’s wife had been absent but a few
minutes, before she heard footsteps approaching,
and the din of angry voices. She could distinctly
hear that the Germans were entering Emily’s room,
and flew like an arrow to bear off her precious
treasure—the sick child. In an agony of alarm,
she threw herself in the path of the soldiers, who
noisily entered the apartment.

“Do you think that we are dogs, you block-
heads,” roared the brutal drummer, “and that you
can shut us up in any kennel you choose. You're
mistaken, I tell you.—Those braggadocio French-
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 13

men are accommodated with the best room in the
house, and we Germans are thrust into a little den
which looks out upon the back yard. What, are
those monkeys so much better than we ?—Don’t
we spill our best blood for you in the battle field
as well as they?—We’ll stay where we are, com-
rades, and no one shall make us stir an inch.”

‘“‘Gentlemen, dear gentlemen,’”’ sobbed the poor
mother, “have compassion on my sick child, who
lies yonder, enjoying a quiet sleep for the first time
these six days. Alas! are there not some among
you who can sympathise with my affliction !—have
you no pretty children of your own at home, of
whom you think with affection! No! I am sure
you do not wish to harm my baby.”

While speaking thus, Mrs. Wunsch was employed
in taking from the soldiers their knapsacks and mus-
kets, which she deposited in a corner, as noiselessly

as possible. After renewing her request for silence,
she hurried back into the kitchen, leaving Robert
and Bertha sitting at Emily’s bedside.

For a short time the men behaved statabilis
enough. Drawing their chairs to the table, they
began to converse together in a low tone; but the
drummer grew impatient at the non-appearance of
the dinner. He sat muttering low curses between
his teeth, and presently broke out into noisy
abuse.
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14 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

‘‘ What are the rascally people keeping us waiting
for,’”’ shouted he; “if we were Frenchmen, I warrant
they’d move faster. I suppose they’re scraping to-
gether the dinner the Frenchmen flung into the
street, and want to dish it up again for us. Zounds,
I should’nt wonder if our slut of a hostess were to do
it, as she wanted at first to shut us up in that dog-
hole of a workshop. Wait a bit, my lady, Pll teach
you manners,—it’s a good thing I know your weak
point.”” So saying, he cast a malicious glance at the
innocent child, whom his voice, purposely raised to
its highest pitch, had failed to rouse from its deep
sleep. Robert and Bertha stood like guardian angels
by the cradle, looking with speechless fear at the tall
soldier, whose grey eyes sparkled with fury. Both
turned pale as they saw him seize his drum, and
draw his chair to Emily’s cradle. Unable to utter a
word, they bent over their sleeping sister, entreating
the barbarian’s mercy by looks of anxious dread.
But the drummer did not, or would not, understand
this eloquent language of the heart. With a loud
burst of laughter, he took the drum between his legs
—‘* Bah,” cried he, ‘it won’t do the brat any harm,
if I teach its mother to move faster.”

Canst thou picture to thyself, gentle reader, what
my pen shudders to record? It is no effort of the
imagination, no falsehood; for woe to that man whose
fancy can give birth to such hideous phantoms.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 15

With her tiny hands crossed upon her bosom, the
little Emily lay sleeping in her innocence, uncon-
scious that the eyes of that human hyena were
glaring upon her. As she lay with her angel face
half shaded by golden locks, and tinged with the
faint hue of returning health, she seemed the very
emblem of a spotless being fresh from the hand of
the Almighty. But though the barbarian saw this
lovely image—though he saw imploring looks fixed
upon him by the terrified brother and sister—he had
yet the heart to seize his drumsticks, and beat a
loud roll.

A ery of horror sprang from the lips of the chil-
dren. The sleeping child started violently. Her
blue eyes opened slowly, and gazed in astonishment
at the bearded stranger, whose hands had called
forth the dreadful sounds. A moment more, and
the eyes were turning wildly in their sockets—the
angel countenance became livid—and the battle of
life with death had begun.—Who is that rushing
into the room like a lioness despoiled of her young ?
It is the mother. Her oppressed bosom cannot utter
a sound, but she casts herself in agony at the drum-
mer’s feet, and seizes his ruthless hands !—Her next
glance rests upon her dying babe !—Snatching it
from the cradle, she holds it high above her head—
“Air, air may yet revive it!” She bedews the sense-
less infant with her tears. She calls her darling
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16 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

by the most endearing names, Vain, alas, is the
attempt to stay the departing spirit !

The death struggle was soon over. The tiny
limbs stretched themselves—the heart ceased to
throb—and the innocent soul returned to Him who
gave it.

With a shriek that rang through the house, the
mother sank fainting to the ground. A moment after
the drummer fell also, struck by the father’s aveng-
ing hand; he had followed his wife into the room,
and now punished the deed of murder. After de-
fending himself with the energy of desperation, his
sword was at length wrested from him, and he was
bound hand and foot by the soldiers.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 17

CHAPTER III.
THE GOOD SON.

Earty on the third morning after the events related
in the preceding chapter, a man in a black cloak
was seen to issue from Master Wunsch’s door, carry-
ing a child’s coffin, slung round his neck by a broad
strap. He was followed by a woman in mourning
garments, and by the saddler’s three children, Augus-
tus, Bertha, and Robert. Their eyes were swollen
with weeping, and the tears still flowed fast, as the
little group wended their way through the empty
streets towards the neighbouring cemetery. The
beams of the rising sun tinged the white tomb-
stones and the black crosses with a golden lustre,
as the great gate swung creaking on its hinges, and
admitted the mourners. Everything around seemed
to tell of death and decay,—the angels with inverted
torches—the skeletons with scythes—the weeping
statues on the tombs. '
Stopping before a newly made grave, the bearer
unbuckled the coffin, and set it gently down.
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18 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

“Do you wish to see your little sister once more?”
kindly enquired the nurse. The sobbing children
nodded assent, and the coffin lid was thrown back.
There, with her pale face surrounded by a chaplet of
roses, and her tiny hands grasping a wreath of sum-
mer flowers, lay the little Emily. The expression
of perfect repose in her countenance gave her the
appearance of a sleeping angel. Even in her life-
time the child had never appeared more lovely than
now, as she lay cold in death. At this sight the
mourners broke out into loud lamentations. Stoop-
ing down to kiss the cheek of his little sister,
Augustus started back with a shudder at its icy
coldness. But the nurse said solemnly—“ Let the
dead rest; disturb them not, they are happy!”

The coffin lid was shut, the cords creaked ag the
yawning ‘grave received its prey, the service was
over, and little Emily slept peacefully beside her
grandparents, and a baby brother who had died in
his infancy. When the grave had been filled up, the
children turned away, and sorrowfully quitted the
churchyard. For a time they walked on in mournful
silence, which Bertha was the first to break. “ Bile?
said she, “suppose our mother were to die too! I
heard the doctor saying yesterday that she was in a
dangerous state.”’

“Oh dear!” sobbed poor little Robert, and “ sup-
pose the soldiers were to do as they threaten, and
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 19

really shoot our poor father! What should we do
then? We should have to go into the orphan’s house,
and sing in the streets.”’

Augustus did not answer, but continued to walk
on in deep thought. Suddenly he stood still and
asked his sister—‘‘ What said the text, Bertha, that
we learnt at school last Saturday ?”

‘How came you to think of the text?” said
Bertha, looking at him in astonishment.

“T want to know what it was,” insisted Augustus.

“Tt was—'We should lay down our life for our
brethren,’ ” replied his sister, after a moment's con-
sideration. 7

‘That was it,” said the boy. “Do you see—we
should lay down our life for our brethren,—how much
more then for our parents! Robert,’’ continued he,
_ after a pause, “T will give you my two*pigeons, they

shall be yours; but mind you do not neglect them,
or forget to give them food every day.”

“What!” cried little Robert, forgetting his grief
for a moment in surprise and joy at the unexpected
present, “do you really mean to give me your
pigeons, of which you are so fond ?”

“T care for nothing now,” sorrowfully answered
the other. ‘“ My little Emily is dead, our mother is
dangerously ill, and in few days our father may be
no more.” After another mournful pause he added
—* Bertha, when our mother has recovered, and

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20 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

they have set father free, repeat the text to them—
you know which I mean—then they will feel re-
signed, and will not be angry with me. And you
must tell them that for their sakes I gladly went
to—to join our Emily.”

‘““What can you mean!” cried both the children
together.

“Hush, hush,” answered Augustus, “you will
learn in time. But promise me you will not Say
anything about this to our mother until she is quite
well.”

Robert and Bertha did as he wished, and they
returned somewhat comforted. Augustus ran to his
mother’s bedside, and seizing her unconscious hand,
bedewed it with his tears. He felt as though his
heart would break; and, alas, how gladly would he
have confided to his mother what he purposed doing!
But poor Mrs. Wunch was delirious, and two
nurses were obliged to hold her in bed by force.
When her son entered the room in his black dress, she
shrieked out— There is the black drummer with
the great beard come to kill my child! Drive him
away, or my husband will stab him!” The poor
boy rushed from the house half frantic with grief,

‘‘ Back!” cried the sentinel, who was walking to
and fro before the door of the prison in which the
saddler was confined, as his son attempted to cross
the threshold.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 21

“But it is my father,’’ remonstrated Augustus,—
““T want so much to see him.”

“‘Can’t be dene,” replied the stranger gruffly, as
he resumed his walk.

“J entreat you for pity’s sake,” pleaded the poor
boy, bursting into tears. “Do let me go to him, I
have come to bid him farewell.”

“‘Can’t be done,’’ repeated the Frenchman. “ Be-
sides, what good would your visit do him. A bottle
of wine would be of much more use than your
whimpering, for it would give him a little heart to
set out on his last promenade with. But a parting
scene with you would take away the little nerve
he may have, to face the gunbarrels.”

While this conversation was going on, several of
the passers by had stood still, and heard what was
said. ‘The women now began to murmur loudly.

“Tt is too bad,” said one, “the poor fellow is not
even allowed to embrace his father once more.”’

“Had I been in Master Wunsch’s place,’ cried
another, “I should have done exactly as he did!”

“Knock the French dogs on the head!” suggested
a third. |

The soldier cast an uneasy look on the increasing
crowd of angry faces. “TI have strict orders,” said
he, “‘to admit nobody to the prisoner, If the lad
wants to see his father, he must go to the colonel
and ask his permission.’’
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22 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

Our hero accordingly ran off, followed by some
of the townspeople, to the colonel’s quarters, a
house before which two sentinels were keeping
guard. Entering boldly, he found himself in a
room thronged with officers, who stood chatting in
groups, without noticing Augustus, who looked from
one to the other in no small embarrassment. Sud-
denly the door of a side room opened. The officers
stepped respectfully back and formed a large circle,
in the centre of which appeared a tall, stout man,
attired in a splendid uniform, with several crosses on
his breast. Augustus felt his heart sink when he
found himself standing face to face with the dreaded
colonel, but summoning up all his courage, he ad-
vanced a step or two, and said firmly enough.—
“Honoured colonel, it is written in the Bible, ‘We
should deliver up our life for our brethren,’ so I
have come to beg you to let me be shot instead of
my father.”’

The commandant stepped back at this unexpected
address, and stared at the boy in utter amazement.
“What!” cried he with a laugh, “ you want to be
shot?” “With popguns, I suppose !”’

“Honoured colonel,’’ resumed Augustus, with
tears in his eyes, “my errand is anything but a
laughable one. In sad earnest, I come to ask you
to let me die for my father.”

All appearance of mirth fled from the colonel’s
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 23

face. He questioned the boy, who related the circum-
stances which occasioned his coming, and described
his parents’ misery with touching simplicity. The
officers hardly knew what to reply, and all felt
heartily ashamed of their comrade, the inhuman
drummer.

When Augustus had finished his story, the colonel
stroked his long moustache, and turned to those
around him. “This is a peculiar case,””—said he, “I
cannot set the boy’s father at liberty, for it would be
establishing a bad precedent. If such a deed were
allowed to go unpunished, our people would in future
have to submit to insult. To try the prisoner by
martial law would never do, for he would most pro--
bably be condemned, particularly if the drummer
does not recover from his wound, which is very
doubtful. Still I pity the man, the more so on
account of his brave son.—There is no time to appeal
to the king’s mercy, for the regiment must march,
and the drummer’s place be supplied in a couple of
days—yet stay—I’ve thought of a plan,’’ continued
he, turning towards Augustus, who had stood in
mute anxiety awaiting the result of the conference.

“So, my lad, you really want to be shot instead of
your father. That’s no trifle, though the words are
soon spoken. But when you come to feel the cold
leaden bullets thrill through your flesh, and smash
your bones, you'll sing in another key.” As he said
\
24 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

these words the colonel looked sharply at the boy,
who only shook his head, without changing colour.

‘Provided the man does not die, whom your
father has wounded,” continued he, “I think we can
manage without having you shot. But then I
should require you to supply the vacant place among
the drummers, as we march in a couple of days.
Have you the courage to do that?”

“‘You want me to be a drummer !’’—cried Augus-
tus, clasping his hands in horror, “ Oh, anything in
the world but only not that!—I should never dare to
show my face again before my mother, for since poor
Emily’s death she cannot endure the sight of a drum,
and the sound of one would send her into fits.’

“ Now just look at the tiresome boy,”—replied the
the colonel angrily; “I wish todo him a kindness,
and he doesn’t even thank me for my pains. I'll
tell you what, my lad, I didn’t think you were such
a blockhead; if I have you shot you can certainly
never show your face before your mother again, but
as matters now stand, when you have taken off your
uniform and put away your drum, you'll be her
dear son just the same as ever. And do you think
your father will thank you for your choice, or will
ever feel happy, if you purchase his life by the
sacrifice of yours ?”

“Oh dear!” ejaculated the boy dolefully, “TI am
sure I would do anything to save my poor father,—I
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 25

will even be a drummer, if you are determined not to
shoot me.”’

The officers could scarcely refrain from laughing
at this strange speech. “ Well,’’ said the colonel,
‘then that matter is settled. But I have a few
conditions to make, to which you must agree. In
the first place your father cannot be liberated until
the regiment has left the town, a measure for which
I have the best reasons. And, secondly, I cannot
allow you to see your father before we start,—
besides, why should you make the parting more bitter
by a sorrowful leavetaking? You had better stop
here at once. I will put you under the protection of
my old sergeant, Hoyer, who will take care of you,
and teach you to handle your drumsticks during the
time we remain here, so that your awkwardness may
not excite attention.”

Augustus could scarcely murmur his thanks. He
detested the very idea of becoming a drummer, and
thought, in the enthusiasm of the moment, that he
would much rather have been shot.
\
26 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

CHAPTER IV.
AUGUSTUS JOINS HIS REGIMENT.

Ovr hero drummed and drummed till his arms ached.
His master was well satisfied with him, but it was
necessary every now and then to tap him on the
shoulder, when the boy, absolved in sorrowful reflec-
tions, made too long a pause. Then he would pass
the sleeve of his new uniform hastily across his eyes,
and begin to drum afresh. At first he could not
repress a shudder as he thought of his murdered
sister, and of his mother, who still lay dangerously
ill. The dreaded morning soon arrived, on which
the regiment was to march.

The old sergeant called him early in the morning,
and kindly showed him how to pack his knapsack, so
as to save as much room as possible. Poor Augustus
nodded mechanically to all Hoyer said, for he felt
his heart heavier than the knapsack at his back, and
he dared not trust his voice to speak. Meanwhile
the drums were heard calling together the soldiers in
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 27

the streets. As our hero was a novice, and the
colonel wished to avoid exciting attention, it was
arranged that he should leave his quarters with ser-
geant Hoyer, instead of joining the drummers. He
thought his heart would burst as he passed his father’s
door. Robert and Bertha, the maid, and even the
journeymen, were anxiously looking out for him at
the upper windows, but the curtains of the room in
which his mother lay were closely drawn. Raising
his tearful eyes, Augustus waved his hand, and
called out in a broken voice, ‘Give my love to our
father and mother. Farewell! Farewell all!”

“ Augustus! Augustus !’”—was cried in heartrend-
ing accents by those above, and the heads disap-
peared like lightning from the window. ‘They are
coming to give me a last embrace,” thought the boy,
lingering. But Hoyer dragged away his pupil by
the arm. ‘ Nonsense,” said he, not without emotion,
‘“‘what’s the use of making yourselves more sad than
you are already. Allons—forward!” Hurrying
towards the market-piace they found the whole
regiment assembled there. ‘That is Augustus
Wunsch, the good son who is going to battle to
save his father’s life. Good bye, my brave boy !”
cried many voices, as he disappeared among a crowd
of his new comrades.

The drummers of the regiment, thirty in number,
received orders to advance. Suddenly they found
\
28 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

themselves in the midst of hundreds of spectators,
mostly children, and several people were seen forcing
their way through the crowd. It was Bertha and
Robert, with the maid and the journeymen, who had
come to bid the boy a last farewell, and who hung
about him unable to utter a word. No one could
view the scene without emotion.

Poor Augustus sobbed aloud as he pressed his
brother and sister to his heart. His eyes were
blinded with tears, and everything appeared to
swim around him.

“Quick march! Forward!” cried the colonel’s
deep voice. The drummers struck up a lively tune.
Our hero felt himself forcibly torn from his brother’s
arms and carried away with the rest, Swinging his
drum round his neck, he convulsively grasped his
drumsticks, and thundered upon it as though he
would beat his grief into the parchment.

His heart seemed torn from his bosom, and in its
place he felt an indescribable void, accompanied by
the dull smart of a wound newly received. All this
time he was mechanically moving forward with his
comrades. After marching for some distance the regi-
ment halted for a short time on a hill. The soldiers
drew forth their spirit flasks, and beguiled the time
with joking and laughter.

“Drink, my little friend, drink!” cried one of
these worthies, offering his bottle. “Here is the


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OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 29

true water of Lethe, which makes one forget all
grief and sorrow. Drink my little warrior.”

Augustus declined the proffered draught, and fixed
his eyes upon his native town, which lay before him,
lighted up by the beams of the rising sun. “ Shall
I ever return,’’—thought he—“ perhaps as a wretched
cripple! And my dear parents, have I indeed em-
braced you for the last time. Farewell then, for
ever! Heaven defend you, ye dear ones, think
sometimes of your absent son.’ Occupied with
these thoughts he hastily wiped away his tears,
lest those around him should observe them, and
make a jest of his misery. His comrades were
laughing and singing noisily, as though they were
going to a feast instead of to battle. “And yet,”
thought Augustus, “most of these men must have
left friends and relations at home, who are offering
up anxious prayers for the absent ones.’

At length his grief seemed gradually to decrease,
for youthful sorrow, though violent, is not lasting.
A voice within him seemed to repeat the words of

the hymn,—

«With weeping and fretting we nought can gain,
But who prays to God, shall not ask in vain,”

and as he thought of the Almighty, and of his
omnipresence, he felt marvellously strengthened.
His tears were dried, his heart felt lighter, the
30 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

love of life returned by degrees, and he rose to
continue his march, more refreshed in body and
mind, than his comrades by the brandy they had
drunk,
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 31

CHAPTER V.

‘“WHAT JOY, OH, WHAT PLEASURE, A SOLDIER
TO BE!’

Was a song Augustus had heard sung by several of
his comrades, as they rested on the hill. ‘How
strange!” thought he,— for my part I should feel
inclined to sing,—

“‘ What joy, oh, what pleasure no soldier to be!”

Besides, I have always noticed when recruits were
drawn for the rggiments, the men on whom the lot
fell looked very gloomy indeed. I must try to find
out who is right.”’

Our hero had not to watch long to discover one of
the pleasures of a soldier’s life. The knapsack, to
which he was unaccustomed, seemed an intolerable
burthen, which was still further increased by the
drum being slung over it. The soldiers were, if
anything, even worse off than he, for they had con-
tinually to carry a heavy musket on their shoulder.
32 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

Another, and not a small] grievance, was the cloud
of dust which surrounded the regiment on the high-
roads. In a short time the dark uniforms were
completely covered with it, and instead of pure air,
the men inhaled a fine white powder, which seemed
to dry up the mouth and throat, and penetrate even
into the lungs, Every now and then they passed a
well of pure limpid water, but very few of the thirsty
soldiers received permission to leave the ranks for
the purpose of filling their bottles, —the majority were
to march by, thirsty and uncomplainine. Bathed
in perspiration, aching in every limb, and almost
exhausted, Augustus at length arrived in the village
where the regiment was to dine; it was already one
o’clock, and he had eaten nothing that day. Hun-
gry as the men were, however, they had to wait for
more than half an hour before they were billeted on
the different farm. houses, where the Owners had
made preparations for the expected, but unwelcome,
guests. With twenty of his comrades, Augustus
entered a room where a long table was laid out in
readiness for them, with large loaves, cheeses, and
butter. Brandy and beer had also been plentifully
provided. When the soldiers had disencumbered
themselves of their knapsacks and muskets, they
sat down to the table, on Which large dishes of
salted pork and dumplings presently appeared. The
peasant who rented the farm, with his wife and
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 33

family, took their stations behind the soldiers’ chairs
to attend to their wants, and the father uncovered
his grey head in expectation of hearing grace
said. But the novice Augustus was the only one
who whispered the accustomed blessing; the others
immediately fell upon the dinner, which was furnished
in profusion. The customary bickering soon began,
by the soldiers swearing horribly at the tough stringy
meat, and the hard dumplings. One gentleman
compared the latter to four-pound cannon balls,
while another offered to carry out the simile by
breaking their entertainers’ heads with them. It
was in vain that the frightened hostess protested
that the dinner had been ready for two hours, ‘and
had been spoiled by standing so long; the soldiers
were with difficulty prevented from breaking the
plates and dishes. Augustus meanwhile patiently
forced down the tough fare, which was rendered
still more unpalatable by the sourest of beer. When
the soldiers made this discovery there was a renewal
of the disturbance.

“My good sirs,”’ said the farmer, ‘‘ we have to
drink beer such as this, nearly all the year round,
and to pay a good round price for it besides. You
must complain to our landlord, who compels us to
buy it.”

“You may thank your stars,’’ replied one, ‘that
we are Germans ands not Frenchmen, who would

D
34 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

have thrown the stuff in your faces and made you
furnish wine, whether you liked it or not.’

‘Those who have no wine can give none,’’—was
the answer. “Where there’s nothing to take, there’s
nothing to have.”

In spite of all their grumbling and scolding, the
guests had meanwhile managed to clear the board
of all that was eatable, and they now dispersed to
employ the remainder of their time as best they
might. While some slipped into the dairy to pilfer
the cream, others made particular enquiry as to the
situation of the poultry yard and dovecote. Some
climbed into the loaded cherry trees, and a few
were not too proud to pay their dutiful respects to
the basket of cheeses. Left to himself in the long
room, our hero found the feeling of despondency return
with double force; “ What are they doing at home?”
thought he, “when shall I ever see them again?”
He was roused from his reverie by a noise in the
yard, where the peasants were trying to rescue their
property from the marauders,

Augustus felt deeply ashamed of his comrades, and
was debating with himself whether he ought not to
go out and reproach them with their dishonesty,
when he was surprised by a cry from a child’s voice
from the far corner of the room, and for the first
time noticed a little girl, who had been asleep in a.
cradle behind the great Stowe, and who seemed not
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 35

unlike his own little sister. Lifting the child gently
from her bed, he began to dandle her in his arms;
the little one stopped crying at the sound of his
friendly voice, looked in wonder at her strange
nurse, and began playing with his gay shoulder-
knots. The boy was walking laughingly up and
down with his charge, when the door was opened by
the hostess. The expression of her flushed and
angry face changed in an instant, when she saw
what the drummer was about.

“He ‘seems to be the only lamb among those
wolves’’—said she. ‘I thought so at once, when I
saw how quietly he said his grace, and how well he
behaved at table ;—just look at the child, what a
fancy she has taken to the boy! MJ’ll warrant
you’ve just such a little sister at home, eh!” con-
tinued she, addressing our hero.

‘tT had one,’’ was the sorrowful answer, “ but my
predecessor drummed it to death.”

‘Drummed it to death!’’ cried the woman, with
a look of horror; how was that? Tell me.”

Augustus was about to reply, when the drums
were heard in the distance.

“'That’s the recall,” said he, hurrying away, “I
must go and join my comrades.”

‘Wait one moment’’—said the hostess, running
out of the room, and reappearing a moment after
with a dish of ripe cherries. “Take these with

D2
\
36 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

you——you are welcome to them—and you have
earned them honestly.” So saying, she filled all
his pockets with the fruit, and dismissed him with
a cordial farewell. |

Once more joining his comrades, our hero was
soon marching at the head of the regiment.. The
heat and dust were as oppressive as in the morning,
but the cherries were a capital refreshment to the
thirsty lad. Late in the evening they reached a
considerable town, where quarters had been assigned
for the night, to the great joy of the troops, who
were in high glee at the prospect of a plentiful
supper and good accommodation after the fatigues
of the day, and waited impatiently until they were
dismissed to their lodgings. The interval while
Supper was preparing, was occupied in cleaning
muskets and dirks, brushing uniforms, and the
refreshing use of soap and water, and the razor.
The knapsacks were next opened, and a number
of pilfered articles of all descriptions brought to
light. One man ran into the kitchen with half-a-
dozen eggs, which he wanted boiled. Another
produced a stolen chicken, and a third a couple of
doves, intended as provision for the road next day.
With a shout of laughter, a fourth produced a
decapitated goose, which he held up in triumph,
to the envy and admiration of his less successful
comrades. ‘As I was trudging along through the
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 37

garden,” said he, “this chatterbox thrust her long
neck between the palings of her yard, and hissed
vigorously at me; ‘your servant, ma’am,” thought X
“you're the very person I want,” and I drew my dirk
and cut her head off at a blow. The jade ought to
be fat—at least she weighed heavy enough in my
knapsack,’””—so saying, he took it into the kitchen
to be cooked.

The hosts had provided most sumptuously for the
men’s entertainment; even the most inveterate of
those habitual grumblers could find no fault with the
glorious roast beef, the fresh crisp salad, and the
foaming beer placed on the board, to which the
hungry troops sat down in high good humour. They
were employed in discussing the first spoonfuls of
their soup, when the door was thrown hastily open,
and a young officer strode into the room, clanking
his heavy spurs.

‘¢ Drummer,” he cried, “ beat the rappel—quick !”’

These words produced an universal consternation
among the soldiers; the spoons fell from their hands,
and all sat as if petrified, staring in ludicrous dismay
at the messenger. Sergeant Hoyer was the first
who recovered himself sufficiently to stammer out.
“ Are you in earnest, lieutenant? Are the men to
march again to-night, after all the fatigue they have *
had to-day ?”’

“JT never joke with my salesionn |’? — replied
\
38 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

the young lieutenant, haughtily—“ Remember that,
if you please; and remember too, that when you
speak to your superior officer, it is your duty to rise
from your seat. Haven't you learnt so much as
that yet?—Don’t you see that you are setting a
bad example to the men, which I suppose is the
reason why the boors remain sitting so quietly
in my presence,—zounds! you rascals, I’ll teach
you discipline |”?

Hoyer and the soldiers rose from their seats like
automatons strung on a wire. Without moving a
muscle, the old sergeant listened to the insulting
words of the young lieutenant, whose father he
might well have been, both in age and experience,
No sign of anger or impatience was visible in his
countenance, which had, however, become somewhat
pale. When the officer had finished his polite speech,
he answered in a respectful tone :—

*‘ May not the men finish their supper, lieutenant ?”

“No!” answered the lieutenant, “it must be left
for the Frenchmen, who will arrive presently, and
for whom we are to make room. I shall stay here,
and see that nothing is touched.”

The hungry soldiers cast many a longing, lingering
look at the table, as they reluctantly prepared to
depart. The before-mentioned proprietor of the
goose made an attempt to sneak into the kitchen,
in the hope of rescuing his prize,
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 39

“Whither away?” asked the lieutenant, calling
him back. ‘Into the—kitchen,” stammered the
man; ‘I was going—

‘Stay where you are!” commanded the officer.
At this moment he observed that the drummer was
still present. ‘ Why, you young scoundrel!” roared
he, half drawing his sword, “will you be off this
instant ?”’ Our hero seized his drum, and vanished
precipitately.

‘‘Qne can easily see,’ muttered the soldiers
among themselves, ‘that this is our lieutenant’s
first campaign, or he would not bully his men as he
does; he had better mind what he’s about. He
would’nt be the first tyrant picked off by his own
men on the battle-field.”’

The village, whither the Rhenish troops had to
move on so short a notice, was full three miles
distant from the town, and to increase their distress,
a heavy storm of rain came pelting down, wetting
the exhausted soldiers to the skin. Who could
wonder that they felt inclined to murmur, or that
the poor peasants, who could offer them nothing but
meagre fare and a bed of straw, had to bear the
effects of their ill temper.

Stretched on the hard couch beside his companions,
our hero had full leisure to reflect on the joy and
pleasure of being a soldier, which by this time,
appeared to him very small indeed. The insulting
\
40 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

behaviour which the good sergeant had to endure
from the conceited stripling, annoyed him more than
all the rest. As he compared his former condition
with his present lot, he could not help sighing at the
difference. ‘“ However,” thought he, “there is no
use in repining—

‘With weeping and fretting we nought can gain,

But who prays to God, shall not ask in vain.’ ”

and so saying, he turned round and fell fast asleep.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 4]

CHAPTER VI.
LIFE AMONG THE SOLDIERS.

Augustus thought at first, that he should not be
able long to endure the fatigues of his new pro-
fession; but he found he was mistaken. Every
succeeding day, the weight of his knapsack became
less oppressive; the long marches were performed
with greater ease, and he almost ceased to regard
the heat and dust as hardships. He found that he
could sleep as soundly on hay or straw, as on a
feather bed, and rise every morning refreshed and
invigorated, even if his sleep had been short. The
continual sojourn in the open air—added to the
healthy exercise of walking—made his heart light,
as the youthful blood coursed gaily through his
veins. He felt joyous and happy, without being
able exactly to tell why; gradually, also, as he
became a favourite among his companions, he dis-
covered that in general it was not real wickedness,
but an excited state of mind, which led them into
all manner of excess. What disgusted him more
\
42 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

than anything else, was their almost universal habit
of profane swearin » €veryone seemed ashamed to
pray, but always ready to blaspheme. The most
diabolical oaths were uttered on the most trifling
Provocation. One day, Augustus could not help
exclaiming openly against this pernicious practice ;
it happened in this way :—

One evening, as the soldiers were, according to cus-
tom, brushing their uniforms, a button fell from the
coat of one of them; the man immediately gave
vent to a frightful imprecation.

“Oh you dreadful sinner!” cried the boy, “to
take God’s name in vain for the sake of a miserable
button !”

His comrade stared at him in amazement, Don’t
be a fool!” replied he, “who'd take things in that
Way ?”

“ Did you not take God’s name in vain,” insisted
our hero,

“Bah! you know I didn’t mean it,” was the
Teply, “it was only my fun.”

“Fun !’’ repeated Augustus, “Do you remember
how angry our lieutenant became the other night,
when Hoyer thought he was in fun; and how posi-
tively he forbade anything like making fun, though,
after all, the difference in rank between him and
father Hoyer is not so very great. And I’m sure you
dou’t allow anybody to make fun with your loaded
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 43

gun, though you make a jest of the name of the
Almighty, which should never be uttered without
reverence? It is too bad!’

A forced laugh was the answer to this reproof, but
the man nevertheless became more careful in his
language, at least before the boy, who also did much
good among his comrades by the example he set.
No one ever heard him complain of the weather, the
fatiguing marches, bad food, hard couch, or other
grievances; nor was he ever seen to treat their en-
tertainers with rudeness, or to appropriate to himself
what belonged to others. The sacrifice he had made
for his father, added to the goodwill of the colonel
and the protection of the sergeant, gave him more-
over a certain position in the eyes of the soldiers.

On the first opportunity which presented itself, he
wrote the following letter to send home :—

“My Dear FATuer,

‘* As our kind colonel has told me that the wicked
drummer, who killed our little Emily, has recovered,
and is now on his way to rejoin the regiment, I trust
you have been set at liberty. I hope our dear
mother is quite well again, and has in some measure
recovered from the loss of our little sister. You need
none of you be anxious about me, for I am quite well,
and have never yet been in want. The colonel is very
kind to me, and Hoyer still more so. Do you know,
\

44 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

a soldier’s life is really not so bad as I expected, and
we have seen nothing of the enemy yet. But we are
certainly only in Poland, and when we get to Russia
I suppose we shall see more than enough of them.
But tell my mother not to be afraid for me, for all
bullets do not hit, as my sergeant tells me, and they
are sure to shoot over the head of such a little fellow
asIam. Excepting the towns, this same Poland is
a real pig’s country. Only think—not one of the
peasant’s huts has a chimney, so that the rooms are
always filled with smoke, which finds its way out at
little holes left in the walls about three feet from the
ground. Instead of carrying the dung to the field,
they pile it up in great heaps round the cottages,
each of which is thus surrounded by a filthy morass.
On these fragrant heaps may be seen children, craw-
ling about in such a state, that it is disgusting to
look upon them, Parents, children, and servants, all
look squalid and wretched, covered with dirt and
vermin. How our fastidious friends, the Frenchmen,
will open their eyes, when they see their new quarters!
For my part, I like much better to bivouac in the
open air, a plan which we have lately adopted.
We lie down, wrapped in our cloaks, with our
knapsack for a pillow, and the clear sky above us:
in the morning we are aroused by the fresh breeze.
Sometimes, in fact, he gives us a good shaking, this
same fresh breeze, so that I am obliged to take a
OR, FILIAZ AFFECTION. 45

glass of brandy on rising, as there is no coffee
to be had here. But, with this exception, I never
drink spirits, neither do I swear or smoke, though
my comrades laughed at me at first. I am afraid
there is no chance of getting my discharge, at any
rate not for some time to come, as our colonel says
we shall soon want plenty of men; so I have quite
resigned myself to my fate. I should very much
like to know how you all are at home, but a letter
could hardly reach me, as we never stay long in one
place. Now, dearest father, I must conclude. Give
my very best love to dear mother, Robert, and
Bertha, and remember me kindly to good Hannah
and the workmen. As soon as possible, I will write
again; till then, good bye, God bless you all.
“Your affectionate
*¢ AUGUSTUS.”

This letter occasioned great rejoicing in Master
Wunsch’s family. The parents shed tears of joy
over their good son, mingled with some bitter ones,
at the thought of his absence. Robert and Bertha
jumped about and clapped their hands, old Hannah
chuckled with pleasure, to find that her young
master had not forgotten her, and the workmen
were loud in their praises of brave Augustus. The
letter was read to half the population of the town.
Master Wunsch was, for his part, anxious to travel
\
46 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

after the army and purchase his discharge at any
price; he was only dissuaded from carrying his
resolution into effect, by the earnest remonstrances
of his friends, who saw the hopelessness of the un-
dertaking, and the danger of leaving his wife alone
and unprotected in the present unsettled state of
affairs.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 47

CHAPTER VII.
“TA GRANDE ARMEE.”

In the summer of the year 1812, the French army
crossed the Russian frontier. Such a body of men,
so completely armed and accoutred, had never be-
fore been seen in Europe. Half a million of infan-
try, 80,000 cavalry, and more than twelve hundred
pieces of cannon composed this redoutable mass. Its
ranks were swelled by auxiliaries from almost every
Kuropean state: Austrians, Prussians, Bavarians,
Westphalians, men of Wurtemburg, Saxony, Baden,
Holland, and Italy, and all clad in the gayest uni-
forms. Well might the Emperor Napoleon rejoice
as the innumerable swarm of warriors defiled past
him. It was, in truth, a splendid sight. The blue
clad infantry regiments marched past, in serried
ranks, broad as a mighty river. First came the soul-
inspiring music, then the rattling drums, and these
were followed in their turn by three rows of bearded
pioneers, with white leathern aprons and glittering
\
48 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

axes. All was one step, one grasp, and one motion.
The soldiers looked like moving walls, as their
bayonets flashed in the sun. Instead of a banner, a
golden eagle with expanded wings was borne at the
head of each regiment. The emperor’s guards parti-
cularly distinguished themselves. In their tall bear-
skin caps they looked like bearded giants. —They were,
however, surpassed in splendour of appearance by the
guards from Holland, who were clad in uniforms of
the finest cloth, much too good for rough service.
The immense masses of cavalry were perhaps the most
remarkable of all. Numerous regiments of chasseurs
rode in the van, in green uniforms with red facings ;
their burnished helmets were bordered with a piece
of fur—in imitation of a tiger’s skin—and ornamented
with a horsehair plume. Behind these, rode the
hussars, in their tagged jackets and low fur caps,
from which depended a red bag with a gold tassel.
They were mounted on horses of a gigantic breed,
and preceded—like the rest of the regiments—by
military music. But all the thousands of sabres,
drawn in honour of the emperor, were destined to be
dyed in human gore; the whole of that brilliant mass
of warriors was trained to—murder. Greyheaded
men shook their heads and sighed, as they stood at
their cottage doors and saw the lumbering cannon,
each drawn by six or eight horses, and surrounded
by artillerymen with burning matches, roll heavily
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 49

by; and many there were, who had a dark fore-
boding of calamity to come.

Our hero, however, felt nothing of all this, as in
his turn he passed before the emperor. He had eyes
only for Napoleon, who sat on horseback in the midst
of his brilliant staff. Surrounded as he was by
brilliant uniforms, his attire seemed the more re-
markable for its simplicity—he wore a green coat,
ornamented by a single star, white knee-breeches,
and heavy riding boots. He was short of stature,
and rather corpulent; -his eyes were unusually keen
and piercing, his nose was aquiline, and his com-
plexion sallow. Such was the man who from a
simple lieutenant had raised himself to be the chief
of a mighty nation—who had led his victorious
legions over the burning plains of Africa, and the
snow-clad: summits of the Alps—who could dare,
sword in hand, to issue his mandates to the cabinets
of Europe—and who, ten short years afterwards,
was sleeping in an island of the ocean, with a plain
marble slab to mark his resting-place, and a willow
tree drooping over his lonely tomb.

On crossing the Russian frontier, Napoleon had
addressed his soldiers in words like the following.
‘Soldiers! once more does a field of fame lie stretched
before you. From the plains of the Pyramids to
this land, you have trodden the path of victory.
It is for you to continue in it. We will conquer

E
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50 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

these barbarians, the Russians, and drive them from
Europe. Within two months I will lead you to
the capital of the ancient czars, to Moscow. There
you will rest from your fatigues, and enjoy in quiet
the fruits of your valour. Then I will dictate a
peace and lead you back to your fatherland, covered
with glory.”

How well were it for this poor sinful world, had
the words of truth found so ready a credence as that
given by the French soldiers to the boastful promises
of Buonaparte. No one dreamed for an instant of
doubting the fulfilment of the vaunt, and, from the
whole army, as from one man, rose the cry ‘ Long
live the Emperor.”’
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. OL

CHAPTER ‘VIII.
THE BURNING OF THE MILL.

In the evening of the day on which the French
army had first set foot in Russia, the church bells in
Moisevka, a village on the high road leading to
Smolensk, rang out a peal at an unusual hour. Old
and young repaired to the sanctuary at the unexpected
summons. With more of wonder than devotion in
their looks, the villagers thronged into the illuminated
church, on the steps of which stood a venerable priest,
clothed in the vestments of his office. Raising his
right hand to command silence, he thus addressed
them :—

‘My children! The godless hordes of the French
nation have this day invaded the holy soil of our
dear native land, to lay it waste with fire and sword.
Our troops have received orders to retreat into the
interior, to lure the foe on to their destruction. The
French may be here to-morrow, and it becomes our
duty to hinder their advance by every means in our
power. Yon must therefore at once break down the

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52 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

bridge across the stream, destroy the wells, burn
down your dwellings, and drive the cattle into the
interior, that the enemy, on their arrival, may find
only a heap of ruins. But first of all, let us pray
to the Lord, that He may send a curse upon these
miscreants, and utterly destroy them. My children,
you are assembled in this church for the last time.
I shall apply the torch to it with my own hands,
that the Lord’s house may be saved from profa-
nation.

The peasants, falling down on their knees, broke
out in deep imprecations against their enemies. Then
rising, they left the church, and proceeded to the
work of demolition. The neatly thatched cottages
lay gleaming in the chastened splendour of the even-
ing sun. Groups of merry children were chasing
each other among the elder bushes and lime trees,
which rustled cheerily in the cool breeze. Mur-
muring and chafing at its confinement, a stream of
pure water rushed through the narrow arches of a
massive bridge, crowded by the lowing herds return-
ing from pasture. The great wheel of a water-mill
clattered busily round, and in front stood the miller,
seemingly lost in thought.

Ere long the cattle were driven from the stables,
and the geese, ducks, and hens collected into a large
flock. While the women loaded themselves with

their greatest treasure, the homespun linen, the men
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 53

were employed in fastening bundles of straw round
the timbers which supported the bridge, and setting
fire to them. In a few minutes every dwelling
throughout the village was wrapped in flames; the
wooden chapel shared the general fate. Driving the
cattle before them, the children first left the blazing
homesteads; they were followed by the women,
heavily laden with the more valuable of their pos-
sessions; the men and the priest brought up the
rear.

“How now, Master Naumann?’ inquired the
latter, in a tone of surprise, of the miller, who had
stood all the time, looking at the mill in evident
perplexity— Why do you not follow our example?”

“By your leave, reverend father,’ replied Nau-
mann, “I really do not know what to say. The
cottages, which are burning yonder, can be built with
little trouble, but with a mill it is a very different
matter. Besides I am a German by birth, and, as
you know, there are plenty of Germans among the
invaders, so that I think I shall be left unmolested.”
- Here some of the Russians angrily interposed,
erying out “Away with the false stranger—burn
down the mill over his head—he is a traitor and a
friend to the Frenchmen !”’

‘‘Peace!’’ cried the priest, “let him have his
will, I promise you he will soon repent it. For my
part, I pity his poor wife, our sister Kathinka, and
\
o4 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

her children. Upon thy head, stranger, be their
blood, should any harm befall them !”

The Russians moodily departed. A few hours
later, at midnight, the French arrived. The want
of a bridge did not prevent their passing the shallow
river, but it was necessary to reconstruct it imme-
diately, in order that the cannon which were to follow
might cross.

The neighbouring mill, with its massive beams,
offered the necessary materials, so, turning a deaf
ear to the miller’s entreaties, the soldiers immediately
set to work at pulling down the outhouses, and com-
pelled the proprietor to assist in the task. How
bitterly did Naumann already repent that he had
not followed the advice of the priest. More than
once he attempted to escape, but was each time
driven back by the soldiers who swore they would
shoot him if he did not desist. They also asserted
that the torches did not give enough light; to
remedy this evil, the officer in command ordered the
mill to be set on fire, which was done with joyful
alacrity. Poor Naumann almost fainted with horror
when he saw the flaming mill shed a piercing glare
over the landscape, and thought of his wife and
children. In spite of his prayers and protestations,
his brutal captors refused to let him give the alarm,
and compelled him, by hard seatain to continue
working.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 095

At this moment our hero’s regiment reached the
scene of conflagration. The miller’s wife, carrying
two infants in her arms, and followed by a girl about
eleven years of age, was rushing from the burning
pile. ‘Mary,’ cried she to her daughter, “ take
care of the children. I will try what I can save.”
So saying she hurried back towards the mill.

‘‘Mother, dear mother, stay with us!” cried the
little ones piteously. It was more than Mary could
do to restrain them, as they clung half wild with
terror to their mother’s gown.

“Let me go”—cried Mary, and disappeared in the
flaming building. The miller’s wife waited for her
return in breathless anxiety. The flames hissed and
crackled, the heat waxed fiercer and more fierce, but
Mary reappeared not. At length her voice was
heard crying—‘“ Mother, mother, I can’t find the
way out!”

Frantic with terror, the mother tore herself from
the grasp of her little ones; but two French soldiers
sprang forward and seized her arms. ‘“ Remain
here,” cried they. “It is useless.” The girl’s cries
became fainter and fainter. The mother struggled
like a maniac to escape from the soldiers, while the
terrified children shrieked aloud.

Augustus could no longer remain a passive spec-
tator of this scene. He left the ranks, and ran
towards the mill. A French officer who stepped
\
56 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

forward to prevent him, fell over the drum which our
hero had thrown away before dashing into the mill.
Hastening up the burning staircase, he dragged the
half suffocated girl from place to place, sometimes
clambering over burning fragments, and once nearly
crushed by a falling beam. At length he found
himself with his companion in the basement story of
the mill, and took refuge in a small vaulted cellar,
just above the water mark, beside the great wheel.
Above them the flames still raged fiercely, and every
now and then burning fragments would rain down,
and fall hissing into the water beneath. Through
all the noise and uproar they could distinctly hear
the screams of the poor miller’s wife, and little Mary
shouted in reply, till she could shout no longer.
After a time all was still, but it was impossible for
the children to leave their place of refuge, till the
heat should have abated. As yet they had only had
time to exchange a few hurried words. The girl’s
thoughts were with her absent parents, and our hero
was fully but not very pleasantly occupied, in weigh-
ing the probable consequence of his leaving the ranks
without leave. He had, however, observed that his
little companion spoke German pretty fluently.

As soon as the attempt seemed at all possible, the
children tried to extricate themselves from their un-
comfortable position. In this they succeeded, and
after much difficulty reached the open fields. Of the
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. o7

regiment not a trace was to be seen; nothing but
ruined homesteads and blackened walls, in the place
so lately alive with the busy hum of men;—every- _
where ruin and desolation. Little Mary called aloud
for her father and mother, in German and Russian—
she repeated the names of her brother and sisters,
and of the neighbours—no sound was heard in reply
but the crackling of the charred beams in the burnt
cottages. At length the poor child sat down weep-
ing among the ruins. Our hero, too, became more
and more disquieted. Successful as his adventure had
been, he could not but feel anxious at finding himself
alone in a strange land, and the longer he lingered
the more alarmed did he become. At length he rose,
and taking his little companion’s hand, set out in
search of comrades, comforting the child with the
hope of soon finding her parents. Towards noon
they overtook a troop of French soldiers, who, to the
no small astonishment of our hero, took him prisoner
as a deserter, and an hour afterwards delivered him
up to his regiment, which was quartered in a little
town, abandoned like Moisevka, by its inhabitants.
‘“‘Be careful, comrade,” said the soldiers, who were
leading the boy to his trial, ‘your case is a bad one;
you'll need all your wit to get out of the scrape.’’
Augustus begged his captors to take pity on the
poor forsaken girl, and give her into the care of ser-
geant Hoyer, which they promised faithfully to do.
\
58 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

CHAPTER IX.
AUGUSTUS IS SHOT.

Tx room into which the drummer was led for trial,
was a large apartment, thronged with officers from
the different regiments. Among them, Augustus -
recognized the colonel of his regiment, and also the
Frenchman who had fallen over his drum the pre-
ceding evening. The company were laughing and
chatting, as they discussed their luncheon of wheaten
bread, Dutch cheese, and wine, and everybody
seemed in the best possible humour. Nobody seemed
to take the least notice of the lad, who was detained
for some time in custody, before the corporal made
his report to the colonel. The examination itself
did not occupy more than ten minutes. Augustus
could not deny that he had quitted the ranks without
leave, had caused a staff officer to fall over his drum,
and that he had afterwards been taken prisoner as a
deserter. The officer who presided at the examina-
tion declared, that to commit any one of these crimes,
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 59

was more than a soldier’s life was worth. “ Firstly,”
said he, ‘‘you have broken your oath of allegiance ;
secondly, you have offended against the law of sub-
ordination ; and thirdly, you are the first who has
been guilty of a breach of discipline in the enemy’s
territory.”

Without regard to the boy’s youth, and utter
inexperience, he was sentenced—to be shot. The
whole affair was conducted with as much indifference
as though the life of a dog or cat had been in ques-
tion, and not that of a human being. This levity
pained our hero the more, as he could not help
contrasting the agonizing grief his parents would
feel, with the total unconcern of his judges. The
colonel, too, seemed no longer the kind-hearted man
he had always been. With folded arms and knitted
brows, he stood apart among the rest, and purposely
avoided meeting the beseeching glance of the poor
culprit, who in his defence, could only plead that he
had not left the ranks for any bad purpose, but on
the contrary, to save the life of the Russian girl.
This assertion by no means benefited him, and he
was prevented from saying more, by the young
lieutenant, who had, on a former occasion, insulted
Hoyer—

‘“‘ Why, you young blockhead,” angrily interrupted
this merciful man, “‘do you suppose we are come
here to save the lives of the Russians, or to conquer
\

60 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

and destroy them?—Besides, a soldier has no right
to act for himself, but should pay blind obedience to
the orders of his officers. If your own father or
brother were among the enemy, your sword or
bayonet should be pointed at him, just as though
he were a stranger.’”’ Augustus was horrified at the
bare idea of such a thing. ‘I would rather be shot
a hundred times,” thought he, “than kill my good
father, or my brother.’

On being motioned to retire, he could not go,
without making an appeal to the only friend he
had. Hastening towards him, he seized his hand
and kissed it passionately, pouring forth in a voice
almost inarticulate with emotion, a prayer that the
kind colonel would make but one effort to save his
young life.

The old man’s face grew still more dark, as, biting
his lips, he sternly replied, “I could do nothing to
Save you, even if I would; your crime is too great.
Had you offended me personally, I might have for-
given it, but an offence committed against a French
officer is never pardoned.’”’ So saying, he turned
moodily away.

“Honoured colonel,’’ continued the boy, “ Had it
not been for you, I should have lost my life two
months ago. But my poor parents !—will you tell
them that I thought of them at my last hour—that
I thank them for their love and kindness to me all
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 61

my life long, and’’—here the boy’s voice faltered—
‘that we shall meet again.”

The colonel nodded slightly, in token of acqui-
escence, turned hastily away, and swallowed a glass
of wine. “Captain Warneck, you will command at
the execution,’’—said he.

At a sign from the French colonel, a French
officer stepped forward, saying, ‘‘I will accompany
you, captain !”’

The party addressed replied by a formal bow, and |
Augustus was marched off by the sentinels. Ser-
geant Hoyer was waiting outside with a file of
soldiers, of whom four were armed with pickaxes
and shovels; a drummer, beating the dead march,
led the way, and the little procession, leaving the
town, entered a field outside the ramparts, where a
grave had already been dug. ‘The soldiers stood
grouped around the delinquent in moody silence.
Not a voice was raised to speak a word of comfort,
no kind hand was there to wipe away the perspira-
tion, which hung in bead-like drops upon his brow—
no preacher of the gospel to strengthen him for his :
last journey. With great difficulty Hoyer maintained
his calmness; he glanced uneasily at the young
culprit, whose gaze wandered wildly from one to
another, and stroked his long moustache in evident
indecision.

‘As sure as my name’s Christopher,” muttered
62 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

he,—‘ I must let the poor lad into the secret, or he
will go mad with terror.” Then stepping forward,
he said with a loud voice, ‘‘ Ten men step forward
and fire when the word is given; should they miss,
the other ten are to step forward and take their place.
Aim at the head, comrades, and you are sure to hit.
Now, my poor fellow,’’ continued he, addressing
Augustus, “‘I must lead you to your place.”’

These words awoke the boy from his reverie.
Summoning up all his courage he cried out—“ Fare-
well, comrades—aim truly, and do not let me suffer
long.”

“Warewell!’’ cried they all.

Hoyer now led the delinquent to the sand heap
beside the grave. On the way he said,—

“Ts there anything I can do for you, my poor
boy ?”

“Nothing,’’ answered Augustus sadly — “ Yes,
though—the Russian girl, I have paid dearly for
saving her. Promise me, father Hoyer, that you
will provide for her, and restore her in due time to
her parents.”

“That I will, if I live,” replied the sergeant.”’

By this time they had reached the sand heap.

‘“‘Kneel down, dear boy,” said Hoyer, “and let
me blindfold you.” He drew his handkerchief from
his pocket, and bound it round the lad’s eyes, who
could not suppress a shudder.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 63

‘¢ Tt’s no use, colonel,” again muttered Hoyer, “I
must tell the poor fellow, if you should chop me into
mincemeat for it. You have nothing further to say?”
continued he aloud, “or should you wish to repeat
a short prayer ?”

Our hero folded his hands, and began, with a
trembling voice, to repeat the Lord’s Prayer.

‘“‘ How strange it is,’ thought Hoyer, “that all
condemned criminals should ask for daily bread
before they die, when it is hardly likely they will
need any more: I suppose it’s because they can
think of no other prayer at such a moment than the _
one they have learnt from the cradle. Well, well,
our Heavenly Father knows what we want before
we ask,”’

When Augustus had finished his prayer, the ser-
geant again stepped forward, and whispered a few
words in his ear, whereupon the boy began to
tremble violently, and almost sank down upon the
sand hill.

‘¢ Comrade, don’t be a coward!” cried the sergeant
aloud. ‘Kneel as upright as you can, so that you
don’t fall before you’re shot, and prolong your
suffering.’’

So saying, he turned away and rejoined his
comrades, who had in the meantime loaded their
muskets, at their captain’s orders. Ten men ad-
vanced to within twenty yards of our hero, and
\

64 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

the captain gave the word—“Make ready—present
—Fire !’’

Bang, bang, went the muskets, and Augustus fell
backwards into the grave.

Hoyer advanced quickly, took the bandage from
his eyes, and, bending over the inanimate body, cried
‘Well aimed, comrades,—six of the bullets have
struck him !’’

With the help of one of the soldiers he proceeded
to lay out the body. Captain Warneck took the
arm of the French captain, who had been an atten-
tive spectator, and they walked together towards the
town. The soldiers, who had feigned to be filling
up the grave with great assiduity, ceased their work
as soon as the two officers were out of sight. They
formed a close circle round the grave, and each man
pulled out of his mouth a bullet, which he had bitten
off the cartridge on loading his musket. The men
laughed heartily at the thought of the trick they had
played the Frenchmen.

“‘That’s what we call shooting a man @ la Fran-
case,” cried one; ‘they taught us the trick them-
selves, the braggarts,—how many men they have shot
who have ran away in the next battle alive and well.”’

“I think the French colonel had his suspicions,” —
said another, “and that’s why he sent one of his men
to see fair play. Well, we’ve tricked him with all
his cleverness !”’
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 65

The soldiers were in high glee at their successful
maneeuvre. Hoyer took hold of Augustus’s arm, and
shaking him heartily, cried out, ‘ Comrade, it’s time
to get up.”

But the boy could not get up, for the agitation had
been too much for him—he had fainted. |

‘What nonsense, to take such a trifle to heart,”’
grumbled Hoyer, pulling out his brandy flask—“ Wait
till you have gone through half a dozen battles, my
lad, and you'll think nothing of such a freak as this,”
Taking the patient’s head between his knees, he
bathed his forehead with spirits, a proceeding which
had the desired effect. |

The boy opened his eyes, and stared vacantly round
him. Gradually they made him understand they
had fired at him with blank cartridges. This was,
in fact, what Hoyer had whispered to him, but
what he had not dared to believe.

With tears of joy Augustus shook each of his
comrades in turn by the hand. “But does the
colonel know of this?”’ he asked. ‘He seemed
to have quite given me up.”

“That was only pretence, because the French-
men were all watching him,” replied Hoyer. “Don’t
you see, without his consent we should not have
dared to play such a trick. ‘ Hoyer,’ said he,
‘now mind you act your part well. I should never
forgive myself if the poor lad were to lose his life,

F
66 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

merely because the Frenchman’s pride has been
wounded,’ ”’

‘‘ Heaven bless him for a kind gentleman!” cried
the boy with enthusiasm—‘ I would go through fire
and water for him, and for you too, father Hoyer,
and for you all!” continued he, turning to the
soldiers,

Why, you’ve grown quite a salamander since
yesterday morning,” returned the sergeant, laugh-
ing. “ But for the present we can’t take advantage
of your fire-eating propensities, for you must leave
us, and that quickly.”

“‘ Leave you!” cried Augustus, in surprise.

“Aye, my lad, that you must,” replied the ser-
geant. “You see, if you are seen among us, the
trick that has been played would be found out, and
the colonel would get into a scrape. Moreover, we
mustn’t stay any longer palavering here, or sus:
picion will be excited. Here is an old blouse for
you to put on over your uniform, and see, behind
yon garden wall your little miller’s maid is waiting
for you. You can go with her to the Russians, and
if you don’t like remaining with them, and no oppor-
tunity occurs of returning to Germany, you can
rejoin us in a little while, when to-day’s business
will have blown over.’’

Augustus could not refrain from shedding tears at
parting with his comrades and the good old sergeant,
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 67

whom he particularily charged to thank the colonel
a thousand times for his kindness, He then went
to seek out the little Russian, whom he found wait-
ing for him behind the garden wall, as Hoyer had
said. The two companions lost no time in setting
out for the ruined village, where they hoped to gain
some tidings of Mary’s parents.
68 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

CHAPTER X.

AUGUSTUS’S THREE COMBATS—WITH HIMSELF—
WITH A WOLF——AND WITH A DOG.

AttHoucH the drummer’s uniform was effectually
concealed by the blouse provided by Hoyer, he was
afraid to keep the high road, lest he should be
recognized and taken prisoner a second time. He
therefore led his companion along by unfrequented
footpaths, taking care, however, to keep the road in
sight, and at the same time to avoid attracting the
observation of the bands of soldiers who every now
_ and then appeared in view. This deviation from
the straight path, added to the delay occasioned by
their stopping so frequently to hide, considerably
increased the wearisomeness of their march. Augus-
tus, for his part, was far from feeling fatigued, but
every now and then he glanced anxiously at the
hittle girl, who was not so well inured to long marches
as himself. He therefore took every opportunity of
stopping to rest, and each time asked her if she felt
‘OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 69

tired. Though little Mary only shook her head in
reply, her companion could plainly see that it was
only the feverish excitement caused by her anxiety
regarding her parents, which kept her from sinking
with exhaustion. The mid-day sun now poured
down his beams upon them more fiercely than
Augustus could have thought possible in such a
country as Russia. Every time the children passed
a spring or even a pond, they stopped to quench
their thirst, but neither thought of eating.

At length the ruined village appeared in the
distance. By this time the sun had already set, and
evening was closing in, Little Mary now began
to hurry forward faster than ever, and Augustus
followed more slowly, recommending her to be
cautious. But caution was unnecessary, for not a
trace of a human being was to be discovered, Sitting
disconsolately down on the threshold of the ruined
dwelling house, poor Mary gave way to a passionate
burst of grief. |

Augustus seated himself beside her, and was soon
absorbed in meditations of a far more pleasant kind.
His thoughts were wholly and solely fixed on his
beloved home, and his dear parents. Now at length
he was free! The road lay open before him, and
there was nothing to prevent his setting out at once.
How his heart swelled at the idea.—What cared he
for the fatigues of a long journey, or for his total
\
70 . THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

want of money. With the prospect of home before
him, he felt he could gladly beg his bread from day
to day.

“Oh, father! oh my dear mother, and you Bertha
and Robert.—How glad you will be to see me
again!’”’ cried he, jumping up rapturously. A
stifled sob from his companion recalled him to him-
self, and reminded him that he was not alone, and
that he must not think only of himself.

A feeling of deep despondency came over him.
He glanced sorrowfully at the Russian girl, who
with feelings far different from his, was calling upon
the names of her lost parents. The thought at once
struck him,—would it be generous, would it be just
and right on his part, to induce Mary to accompany
him on his long and perilous journey, and to take
her, perhaps for ever, from her fatherland and her
friends?—On the other hand,—could he leave her
alone, perhaps to perish? Gradually he overcame
the strong temptation, and glanced tenderly at the
weeping girl.

‘Don’t cry, Mary,” said he cheerfully—“ We will
go and seek your parents. You say the villagers
went away yonder. Come we will follow in the
same direction.”

The cravings of hunger now began to manifest
themselves pretty strongly in our hero’s case.
‘What have you in that bundle?” enquired he,
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 71

observing for the first time, a parcel which lay by
Mary’s side.

“The man with the great moustache gave it me.”
replied she, drying her eyes with the corner of her
apron.

“Oh, Hoyer,” said Augustus, stretching out his
hand for the packet. As he had expected, on being
opened, it was found to contain some bread and
meat, besides a small flask of water, mixed with
spirit. The children made a hearty meal, for youth-
ful sorrow, though violent, is not lasting. Then
they rose and left the ruined village, hoping that
some of the inhabitants might be in its neighbour-
hood. Twilight had now deepened into night,
and the stars came out one by one; still it was
warm, and not very dark. Every sound, even to the
chirp of the crickets in the scorched grass, seemed
hushed, and a solemn stillness reigned over all things
as the children passed on.

“See,” cried Augustus, suddenly, pointing to a
dark object some distance ahead, “see, there sits a
shepherd’s dog, and where there are dogs men are
sure not to be far off.”

Mary looked up and caught her companion by the
arm, without however appearing much alarmed.
“That is a wolf, and not a dog,” replied she.

‘A wolf!” cried Augustus in horror, instinctively
feeling for his cutlass, which had been taken from
\
72 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

him, at his trial—‘‘ a wolf! for heaven’s sake let us
flee, or we are lost—perhaps he hasn’t observed us
yet.”

Augustus’s timidity seemed to affect his companion,
who hurriedly replied—

‘My father says, if one runs away from a wolf
he’s sure to follow.”

‘But what are we todo? We can’t stand here
to be eaten up alive !’’

“ There’s not much fear of that,’”’ answered Mary
quietly. “My father says, a wolf will not attack
any one singly, except in winter, and then only
when he’s very hungry, and then he’d be sure to
howl, and wouldn’t sit so quietly.”’

Augustus stood staring in consternation at the
wolf, who stared at him in return. At length he
could stand it no longer. ‘We can’t stand waiting
here all night,” said he, attempting to swagger,
“let us make a circuit and pass him,”

“But suppose he should follow us,” said Mary
anxiously. |
_“T can bear this no longer!’ cried our hero, who
by this time had screwed up his courage. ‘“ Why
should I be afraid of a rascally wolf, when I went
through the fire yesterday, and was shot this morn-
ing. [ll teach you to stand here opening your great
wide mouth at me, old Grizzly !”

So saying he stooped down and picked up.a large
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 73

stone. “Now Mary, if he should come after us, you
must run away as fast as you can. I only wish I
had my cutlass.”’

He threw the stone with all his force. It hit the wolf
full on the back, and with bristling hair the drummer
awaited the result of his experiment. It was with a
feeling of intense relief that he saw the dreaded animal
rise slowly and slink away with its tail between its legs.

“T’ve taught him manners,” cried Augustus,
boastfully. “Only let him come again, and I’ll
smash his skull.” Notwithstanding his vaunt, he
could not avoid turning his head repeatedly, to see
if the wolf were not following.

“Aha! look here!” cried he joyfully, picking up
a thick cudgel which was lying in his way. ‘“ This
may be of some use to us. I see the poetry in my
lesson-book at home is not true, which said,

‘A rabid wolf of the Russian school,
Dined on a carpenter, supped on his rule.’

Only let him come now, I’ll beat such a tattoo on
his hide, that he shall remember it all his life long.”

When our hero’s warlike courage had somewhat
cooled down, he asked his companion if she could
distinguish anything like a house or.a village.

“No,” answered Mary, with a yawn.

“Ts that a wood before us ?”’

“Yes, I think so,” replied the girl.
74 THE LITTLE DRUMMER; ~

‘Tt is just in our road. Perhaps a whole herd of
wolves are in it. Now I don’t care for one, but
when it comes-to ”’—

Bow, wow, wow! barked a great dog, as it came
bounding towards them.

“Back,” roared Augustus, brandishing his club,
‘keep your distance, or I’ll smash you !”

Now whether the dog, being a Russian, did not

“inderstand German, or whether it was that he did
not feel appalled by the threat, we know not. How-
ever this may have been, he sprang forward, and
dexterously avoiding a blow aimed at him, seized
the end of the cudgel with his teeth. All the tug-
ging in the world could not make him let go, but on
the contrary he kept working his way up till the boy
was at last obliged to drop the stick, or his hand
would have been bitten. He had no sooner let go
than the enemy sprang upon him and pulled him to
the ground.

Augustus thought it was now all over with him,
but the dog stood watching him quietly enough,
showing, however, a very formidable set of teeth,
when his prisoner attempted to rise.

‘‘ Pray lie still, Augustus, and he will not harm
you,” said Mary.

As he could do nothing else, our hero was com-
pelled to obey. Footsteps were now heard, and a
voice hailed thém in Russian. Mary answered in
SE

~ ad
Fao |

SOR UOTT



Tue Rosstan Doe
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 75

the same language, and in a few moments two wild
looking men, armed with guns, stood before them.
On being ordered to rise, the little braggart obeyed,
rubbing his head ruefully, and followed the men,
who turned towards the wood. In a hollow at a
little distance, they found a fire, around which a
number of Russians lay grouped. All sprang up,
at the arrival of the new comers. Augustus found
himself surrounded by eager, enquiring, distrustful
faces, and stood in the centre like a condemned
criminal. Mary courageously came to his assistance
and related their adventures since the preceding
day; and fortunate was it for Augustus that he had
a companion to interpret for him. The children now
learnt that their hosts were a party lying in wait
to surprise and kill any Frenchmen who might be
found straying from the main body. They could give
no intelligence concerning Mary’s parents. They
said that the boy should be safe, if he would not
again rejoin the enemy, which Mary eagerly promised
in his name. Some food was now given them, and
they were directed to lie down on a heap of dry
leaves, over which some furs had been spread. Ex-
hausted with the fatigues of the day, they obeyed
right willingly, and were soon in a sound sleep.
76 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

CHAPTER XI.
THE SURPRISE.

“As dwa! tritchoti!’”” commanded the little drum-
mer, in broken Russian, drawing himself up to his
full height. ‘‘ Eyes right! attention!” continued he
in German, and Mary, who marched beside him,
interpreted.

“Halt!” cried Augustus.

“ Stoi!’”’ shouted Mary.

A long file of sturdy peasant lads stood like a rock
at the word of their diminutive leader. Each was
provided with a drum, rudely fashioned, and covered
with calf-skin, and their sturdy fists grasped drum-
sticks of formidable dimensions.

‘‘ Now,” cried Augustus, ‘ beat the tattoo, softly
at first. Row de dow, row de dow, dow.”

‘“‘T can’t translate that,” said Mary.

‘Never mind,” rejoined the drummer with a
business-like air. ‘The lads must learn it without.
Now then. ‘Row de dow, row de dow, dow.” And
the hopeful pupils raised a tremendous din.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION.» 77

‘‘T should like father Hoyer to see me now,” said
Augustus, laughing. ‘‘ How he would stare to see
me turned drum-major. But my pupils here shall
do me credit, for I’ll make capital drummers of
them. ,

The reader, who will no doubt wonder as much as
sergeant Hoyer, at finding Augustus appearing in
this new character, should here be made acquainted
with the children’s further adventures, from the time
when we left them with the Russians in the hollow.
They had quitted their hosts on the following
morning, and wandered from place to place, vainly
hoping to obtain some tidings of Mary’s parents.
They were but scantily supplied with food, being
obliged to subsist on the precarious charity of the
peasants, who had but little to spare, as provisions
grew scarcer every day. In the meantime an im-
perial proclamation had gone forth, and the Russians
were assembling from every quarter to join the army
and give battle to the enemy. The little wanderers
arrived one day at a town, where our hero’s birth
and profession could no longer be concealed. He
was cited before the authorities, who gave him his
choice, either to be locked up as a prisoner of war,
or to assist in the defence of the country. He chose
the latter, as he was merely required to initiate the
young peasants, before mentioned, into the art and
mystery of beating the drum, Comfortable quarters
78 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

were assigned to him and his companion, he received
regular pay, and could as we have seen, play the
commander in a small way. Mary had become quite
reconciled to their new mode of life, and learned to
look up to Augustus as her friend and protector.

Several weeks had glided on in this way, when
Augustus began to pine for his home. For whole
nights together he would lay awake, thinking of his
absent friends. Besides this he did not at all like
the Russian mode of living. Hardly a day passed
on which he did not see several cudgellings given
and received, and even the officers sometimes got
their ears boxed by the colonels. Augustus some-
times trembled for his own back, though as yet he
had got on very well. One night he had lain awake
for some hours thinking, as usual, of his home, and
at length fell into a doze, and began to dream that
he had returned to his native town. A peace was
being proclaimed, and the town bells were ringing
and cannons firing. The noise seemed to grow
louder and louder, till all the windows rattled again.
A bright light flashed up. He gradually became
conscious of a child’s voice shouting in his ear—he
started and awoke.

Little Mary was standing by his bedside, crying
with fright, and tugging at him with might and
main. The room was lighted up with so bright a
glare that a pin might have been seen on the floor.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 79

In the street below were heard furious voices, mingled
with groans and shrieks. Musket-balls came crash -
ing through the windows, and buried themselves in
the walls. The houses on the Opposite side were in
flames.

“Oh, Augustus, Augustus, how frightened I am!”
wept Mary. “The enemy have come at last,”

Augustus, who was still half asleep, rubbed his
eyes and stared in surprise, now at the weeping girl,
and now at the burning houses,

‘Stoop, stoop down!” cried Mary pulling him
back, as a fresh volley came crashing into the room.

‘Why those are our people!” cried Augustus,
gleefully, “that is my regiment! Hoyer, Hoyer,
here am I!” and taking his companion’s hand he
ran down stairs.

As the children opened the door which led into
the street, a private of Augustus’s company rushed
towards them.

“Hail, comrade!” cried Augustus. But the
comrade could neither see nor hear from excess of
rage. The expression of his countenance was s0
terrible that Mary was quite terrified at him, and
pulled Augustus back into the passage with such
force that both fell down. This was lucky for them,
as the soldier would probably have run one of them
through with his bayonet. In a little while Mary
ventured to open the door once more, and Augustus
\

80 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

recognized the colonel, on horseback, at the head of
his men.

“Colonel, honoured colonel! ’ cried Augustus,
running out into the road. But the colonel turned
to his followers, and cried,—

Forward lads, forward! hew down whatever
opposes you! Spare none ; give no quarter ! For-
ward, forward.”

“ How the kind man must have changed’ ’—said
our hero sorrowfully, as he once more retired into the
house, deeming it most prudent, under existing cir-
cumstances, to keep out of the way. ‘‘T must have
altered very much,” continued he, “or perhaps my
comrades think I left them on my own accord. I
wonder what Hoyer would have done.”

The words were hardly uttered, when the house
door was flung open, and in marched the sergeant,
followed by several of his men. 7

“ Hoyer! father Hoyer!” shouted the boy. Hoyer
raised his musket to strike; but Augustus quickly
added, “I am Augustus Wunsch, your drummer.
Don’t you know me?”’

“By the powers of war!’ cried the sergeant.
“How came you here? I didn't know you at
all.’’

‘‘ Indeed, you all seem dreadfully changed since I
left you,” said Augustus ruefully. ‘‘ Private Stiesel,
of our company, wanted to run me through with his
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 81

bayonet—the colonel told them to give me no quarter,
and you, father Hoyer’”—

“Ha, ha, ha!” laughed the sergeant —*‘* It’s
plain enough that you are a novice in the noble art
of war. As for us, we are the same men as we were
betore, and what makes you wonder so much, is only
the rage of war. When that seizes us, we neither
see nor hear. In the fight we clear away everything
that crosses our path, and does’nt wear our uniform.
If our father or brother were there, we should’nt
know him, and often we can’t stop to notice whether
people wear trowsers or petticoats. On we g0,
blindfold—cut and thrust—the more the merrier !””

‘* But what in the world has put you all into such
a rage?” enquired Augustus. ‘N obody knew that
you were near, and last night every one went quietly
to bed.”

“Just so,”—cried Hoyer, laughing. “ And we
surprised them in their beds, and burnt their houses
for them, lest they should catch cold.”

‘‘ Poor creatures !’’—said the young drummer with
asigh. ‘They have treated me kindly enough, and
never in their lives injured any of you.”

“ That’s true enough,” replied the sergeant—“ but
you see this is time of war.”’

‘‘ But why must war be?” urged Augustus. “ Here
we're marched hundreds of miles away to kill people

whom we have never seen in our lives, and’”’—
G
\

82 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

“Hold your tongue, boy !”"—interrupted his hearer
angrily—‘ Don’t grumble—a soldier must obey and
not murmur. Napoleon has said: ‘It is war—the
Russians are your enemies;’ and so every good
soldier must fall upon them without mercy. If the
Emperor were to-morrow to give the word,—‘ Peace
—sheathe your swords’—why then we'll cry Hurrah!
brother Russian—hail comrade, well met’

“T always thought,” observed Augustus, “ that
love and hatred could not be commanded by any
one.”

““ Napoleon can do everything,”—was the answer.
“There isn’t another man in the world like him. A
few words from his lips do more work than a hundred
cannons. And who knows,” continued the old
sergeant, and his grey eye kindled, as he drew him-
self proudly up,—‘‘ who knows, but that I may some
day earn a little bit of ribbon, with a white cross at
the end.”

“ A bit of ribbon and a cross ?”” enquired Augustus,
wondering.

“Bah! you're a stupid boy,””—cried Hoyer angrily.
“ And here am I listening to your prate, whilst my
people up stairs are packing up everything that’s
worth taking. I must go and look after my share,”
and he turned towards the stair.

“ Pather Hoyer!” cried the boy after him.

“ What now?” answered Hoyer, looking back.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 83

“T always took you for an honest man”—

‘Thunder and lightning! who says I’m not ?”

‘‘ But you’re going to steal other people’s property.”

‘‘Harkee, youngster, don’t presume on my good
nature—and choose your words better, Plundering
isn’t stealing, and is always the custom in time of
war !” roared the sergeant, as he ran up stairs.

“‘T see now,” muttered Augustus, “that war is a
cloak for everything that’s bad.”

The soldiers now came tramping down stairs, laden
with booty. Whatever they could not use, or carry
away with them, was wantonly destroyed. Provisions,
clothing, linen, candles, soap, and household furniture
lay heaped pell-mell in the street. By far the greater
part of the booty was wantonly destroyed. Augustus
looked at the devastation with a sigh, and with a
heavy heart prepared to follow his comrades, who
were about to quit the town, and rejoin the main
body of the army.
\

84 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

CHAPTER XII.
THE BATTLE.

Our hero now resumed his place in his regiment.
The colonel welcomed him kindly, as did also his
comrades. Through Hoyer’s influence, Mary was
entrusted to the care of a sutler woman, and could
either walk or ride at pleasure; but she liked best
to walk beside her old companion, whenever this
could be done. Augustus soon observed, to his great
astonishment, that the regiment was reduced to little
more than half its former number. He ran to sergeant
Hoyer, and asked the reason.

‘Why, boy,” said the sergeant—“ it was perhaps
lucky for you that you were shot in sport, and had to
leave us, or you might have been shot in earnest.
For they made us storm a rascally old fortress—
Smolensk they called it—and many of our poor
fellows didn’t see the sun rise next morning.—Six of
our drummers were killed, and you might have been
in the black list.’

A few days afterwards, a report was spread abroad,
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 85

that the Russian army was on its march, and that a
decisive battle must soon be fought. Strange as it
may appear, the news was hailed with universal joy.
The soldiers were all heartily tired of the long and
wearisome marches, so that they rejoiced in the
prospect of any change, even though it should cost
the lives of thousands. The different portions of the
army were now brought together, and the station of
each regiment was fixed. The army was spread out
something in the form of a gigantic bird. In the
centre, strengthened by innumerable cannon, were
posted the best regiments, and the enormous wings
were to surround and hem in the enemy. A large
body of reserve stood ready to support the army in
case of need.

It was on the 4th of September, 1812, that to-
wards evening the booming of cannon announced the
commencement of the battle. The earth seemed to
shake and tremble at the dreadful din. Augustus,
who had never heard cannons firing so near him,
became red and pale by turns, The soldiers, how-
ever, sat round him quite unconcerned, talking,
laughing, and eating, as though the firing did not
disturbed them in the least. This Strange indifference
increased the boy’s alarm;—he took refuge with
Hoyer, who soon observed that all was not right with
the drummer.

‘This firing does not concern us,’—said he. “Tt
\

86 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

is on the left wing. But the enemy’s great redoubt
will cost a great many lives, for we must have it at
any price, and the village of Borodino too.”

‘¢ And what then ?”

“Why then’—continued Hoyer—‘‘ there will be
nothing to hinder us from entering Moscow.”

‘“¢ And what then?” again asked Augustus.

“Then peace will be made, and we shall return
home.”

‘‘ But we had peace already, before the war began.
Why must we all march so many hundreds of miles,
and kill so many people, to gain what we had already
at home.”

“Bah! you don’t understand me at all,”—said
Hoyer. “It was destined that there should be war,
and the great comet didn’t appear in the sky last
year for nothing.”

‘ But I thought Napoleon began the war, and not
the comet?”

“ Well, so he did, boy !—I am saying that the
comet predicted it was Heaven’s will that there
should be a war.”

“Why, the comet can’t speak,’—insisted Au-
gustus; “How can it predict a war?”

‘‘What nonsense!—They prophesied last year
there would be a war.”

“ Who prophesied? Not the comet, but after all
only men, who practise on our superstition.”
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 87

“T tell you you’re a fool”—said mar turning
angrily away. ,

“T still keep to my opinion”—muttered the
youngster. ‘They lay the blame of their own evil
~—* on the poor comet, to appear better in the eyes
of men.’

At ade the cannonade ceased, and, as tie as the
eye could reach, innumerable watch-fires flashed up.
The soldiers lay grouped around, but suspense kept
most of them on the alert. As the night wore on,
however, many a soldier, spent with fatigue and
watching, closed his eyes to enjoy a short slumber,
perhaps for the last time on earth. The watchfires
went out one by one, and deeper grew the silence,
broken only at intervals by the challenge of a sentry,
or the neighing of a horse. But when the first faint
glimmer of light in the east, announced the coming
of the eventful day, every one was up and stirring.
The piled muskets were appropriated, each by its
owner, and the whole army was drawn up. The
colonels walked up and down the ranks of their re-
spective regiments, exhorting the men to faithfulness
and duty; the sergeants read out the lists of their com-
panies, and the word “ Stand at ease!’”’ was given.
And now the golden sunlight came streaming over
the fields, to look on carnage and desolation instead
of blessing and plenty. That day no lark carolled
forth its glad hymn of praise in the blue sky; the
\

88 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

birds had all fled from the sound of the cannon,
which was heard booming at intervals through the
morning mist. As the armies stood waiting in ex-
pectation of the word to begin the fight, the order
was given to throw up mounds of earth or redoubts,
and before night the whole plain was covered with
long banks of earth and deep trenches.

The second night passed quietly away, but on the
third morning, at sunrise, a dreadful carnage began.
Twelve hundred pieces of heavy artillery vomited
forth flames and death, reddening the heavens with .
their glare. Every now and then a messenger of
death would fly whizzing past Augustus’s regiment,
who stood motionless leaning on their muskets. The
young drummer himself felt very uncomfortable, his
sinews seemed all unstrung, so that his knees knocked
powerlessly together. The young lieutenant, of whom
we have already made mention, seemed in the same
predicament. With trembling hands he lifted his
spirit flask to his parched lips;—the soldiers were
not slow in observing these indications of cowardice.

‘Our downy-bearded lieutenant has the cannon
fever,’--whispered they one to another.

It was in truth a most disagreeable fever with
which most of the novices were seized.—One after
another the regiments advanced to the attack; now
the regiment in front of our hero’s had moved from

its place, and it would be his turn next. The officers
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 89

buckled their belts tighter, the privates lifted their
knapsacks a few inches higher, and all waited breath-
lessly for the word of command, This was given.
With all the power of his deep voice the colonel
cried “ Attention !—fix bayonets !—gquick march !—
forward !”’

The band struck up an inspiring air, the tones of
which were however inaudible except to those who
stood nearest. The pace at which they advanced
increased every moment in celerity. Not one of the
soldiers could discern the goal towards which they
were hastening; the only things they could see were
the long dark lines of the regiments before them,
in whose ranks large gaps continually appeared,
which were presently filled up. The thick cloud of
smoke barred all further prospect. Suddenly the
word was given,—‘‘ Double quick time !”

The music was stopped, and our hero’s duty com-
menced. He had to run behind the company to
which he belonged, beating his drum at every step.
Suddenly a tremendous volley came ploughing
through the ranks. Augustus stumbled over some-
thing, and fell to the ground. On scrambling up
again, he saw the whole space around strewed with
dead bodies and dying men. The regiment seemed
completely broken up.

“Close your ranks!’ thundered the colonel.—
“* Forward, lads!”
\

90 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

The thinned ranks formed again, and rushed on,
over the bodies of their fellow comrades.

A puff of wind now for an instant blew away the
smoke, and Augustus saw, at some distance ahead, a
large redoubt, on which the Russian artillerymen
were reloading their cannons. In another minute
countless streams of fire poured forth. There was a
roar, as though the vault of Heaven were rent
asunder, and once more the boy was thrown to the
ground. This time he found it impossible to rise,
for he was pressed almost to suffocation by the bodies
of several soldiers who had fallen over him. His
senses deserted him and he fainted.

A fresh discharge of cannon aroused him from his
stupor, but with all his struggling he could not shake
off the weight that encumbered him, and was soon
forced, from sheer exhaustion, to lie quietly. Whether
he was wounded, and if so, where, he could not make
out.

As he renewed his endeavours to push away the
dead bodies above him, he heard a strange noise,
which increased every moment. ‘The earth seemed
to vibrate, and a certain rushing sound, unlike the
noise of thunder or of cannon, came nearer and nearer.
It resembled the pattering of a hail-storm, mingled
with the rattling of ten thousand chains. In another
minute he felt himself crushed by something passing
over the dead bodies beneath which he lay. The
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 91

pain of the concussion once more took away his
senses.

The regiments of Saxon cavalry, guards, and cui-
rassiers were dashing across the field, towards the
great redoubt. Once more did the enemy’s cannons
deal slaughter among the assailants, and then they
were hushed. The redoubt was taken—the battle
won. |

For a long time Augustus lay without sense or
motion, till a pull at his arm at length brought him
to himself. A French soldier was standing over
him, endeavouring to pull off his’ coat. On the
drummer’s asking the reason of this proceeding, the
man sulkily answered,—“ That he had thought him
dead, and had constituted himself his heir.” And so
saying he turned away and began plundering one of
the dead bodies which lay around.

Augustus got up, and gazed in horror at the scene
of blood. The corpses lay piled around, not singly,
but in heaps. Many were already stripped of their
clothes, and nearly-all horribly mutilated by wounds
and the marks of horses feet. He himself had had a
narrow escape, for if the dead bodies of his ¢omrades
had not prevented his feeling the full weight of the
horses that passed over them, he must assuredly have
been trampled to death.

At a little distance lay the colonel’s horse, stark
and stiff, but the colonel was nowhere to be seen.
\

92 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

Sick with horror the boy staggered towards the place
where his regiment had stood; there lay the great
drum, shattered by a cannon ball, marking the place
where the musicians had stood. By degrees his me-
mory came back. Great Heaven !—now he could re-
member—yes, distinctly remember, that little Mary
had crept to his side in the early part of the day—
what had become of her when they were ordered to
advance, he could not tell. |

‘Mary !—Dear Mary!’’—cried he. ‘‘ Unhappy
child, where are you—why did you not stay where
you were safe.’”” The poor boy wandered about for
more than hour, calling her name.

Suddenly the lid of an overturned powder waggon
opened, and Mary herself crept forth, sound in life and
limb, but with her face swollen with weeping. The
children embraced each other in a transport of thank-
ful joy. They were now no longer alone, and hor-
rible as was the scene which surrounded them, they
felt almost lighthearted.

Mary briefly explained that she had run beside
Augustus till she was separated from him by the
crowd,—that she had been dreadfully frightened at
the roar of the cannons, and had crawled into the
overturned waggon for safety, nor dared to venture
forth till she heard her preserver’s voice.

Hand in hand they wandered towards the great
redoubt, which had cost such thousands of lives; by
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 93

climbing to the top they hoped to discover any of
their comrades, who might be near.

‘I wonder why they were so bent upon taking
that thing,” said Augustus thoughtfully,— Perhaps
the Russians had hidden great treasures or other
things of importance in it.”

The mound was so covered with dead bodies, that
they could scarcely gain the summit. The blood ran
down literally in streams, and fragments of bodies,
arms, legs, and heads lay scattered around in ghastly
profusion.

In the entrenchment itself nothing was to be seen
but earth, heaps of corpses, broken cannon wheels,
and wounded men. The latter presented a piteous
spectacle. One of them, a Russian officer, whose
head had been fearfully gashed, was stammering out
some words in a faint voice.

“What does the poor man say?” enquired Au-
gustus, compassionately.

‘““He is begging in the name of Heaven for a
drink of water,’ answered Mary sobbing.

Looking round, in search of the means to fulfil
this prayer, Augustus descried two French soldiers
standing by a wounded man. “ Perhaps,” thought
he, “they have a drink of water in their flasks.”
But on approaching them, what a sight did he be-
hold. A Russian, with shattered arm and wounded
foot, was sitting on the ground. The Frenchmen
\

94 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

were employed in tearing off his uniform, regardless
of the agonised groans of the sufferer, on whom they
were inflicting the most exquisite torture. “And all
for the sake of a miserable coat !’”’—thought the boy,
turning away in sickening disgust.

A few paces off, a greyheaded Russian, mortally
wounded, leant against a bank of earth ;—a broad
white line on his forehead told of approaching disso-
lution, but his hands were folded in devotion, and
with his glazing eyes turned towards heaven, he
prayed loud and fervently.

“See, Mary,” said Augustus with emotion, “ how
piously yonder soldier is praying—No doubt he is
commending his soul to God’s mercy.”

“No indeed,” replied Mary, shuddering—‘“ he is
cursing the enemies of his country, and praying
heaven to grant a full and deep revenge.”’

“Oh how glad I am,” cried Augustus,—“ that
these curses cannot fall upon me. If I had my will,
there should be no more war—and I could never for-
give myself, if a man lost his life by my means.”

As the children turned to quit the scene of carnage,
they became aware of a number of horsemen, splen-
didly mounted and accoutred, who were riding slowly
towards them. Napoleon was coming with his staff
to view the field of battle. With a face cold and
passionless as marble he rode among the wounded,
the dying, and the dead. Not a glance betrayed
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. ae

emotion or pity for the thousands who lay groaning
and blaspheming in their agony about him.

“A noble victory!’ cried one of the generals.
“The redoubt and the village yonder were bravely
defended, before they were taken. Fifty thousand
dead and wounded men lie stretched on the plain.”

“Fifty thousand men for a mound of earth and
a ruined village,”—thought Augustus. ‘ What a
price !”’

“There is now nothing to hinder us from entering
the imperial Moscow,” continued the general; “ Long
live the Emperor !”

‘Long live the Emperor!’ echoed the whole staff.

But the old Russian, with the white line on his
forehead, seized a musket;—a French general, ob-
serving this, cut him down with his sabre, and the
Emperor and his staff rode away.

And the day waned, and night came on. But the
moon hid herself behind dark clouds, as though she
could not bear to look down with her pure soft light
upon the earth, which had drunk so deeply of its
children’s blood. Thousands of dying men lay
groaning in the still midnight, and praying for death
as a release from their burning torment. And the
pale scythe bearer descended, and quenched one life
after another, as candles are extinguished when the
midnight mass is said. Then the weary eyes closed,
the cold limbs stretched themselves, and the wounds
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96 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

ceased to bleed. But many there were who tried
hard to die, and could not; whose life clung to them
like fetters of iron. Deaf to their groans, death
passed them by, and would not release them for many
days.

On the great redoubt, friend and foe lay bedded
together like brothers. Some were even sitting erect,
leaning against the high breastwork, and looking
down upon the battle field like living men. The sun
and the rain bleached their bones, and innumerable
skeletons bore witness to the greatness of the con-
queror, and to the glorious victory he had won.

But the mothers who had tended these men from
their childhood upwards, with deep unwearied atffec-
tion, and who were awaiting their return with
anxiety darkening into despair, cried woe upon the
conqueror. The spirits of those murdered men were
gathered to the hundreds of thousands who had been
sacrificed at the shrine of his ambition, to witness
against him at the last day.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 97

CHAPTER XIII,

MOSCOW.—WILFUL WASTE.

Moscow, the rich prize of the conqueror, lay with
its ancient palaces and churches before the eyes of
the French army. The gilded turrets of the Krem-
lin flashed in the sun’s rays, gladdening the hearts
of the victorious invaders with the prospect of a rich
booty. The city was entered without opposition.

Napoleon’s expectations, however, were doomed to
remain unfulfilied. Here no deputation came forth
to meet him with obeisance and obsequious humility.
No mob was here to gaze in awe and admiration at
his splendid array. ‘The town seemed as if stricken
with the plague, so silent and dreary were the
streets.

Strange to say, the man who affected to treat with
scorn the homage of crowds, felt much annoyed now
that this homage was wanting. He rode gloomily
through the deserted streets, and fixed his head-
quarters in the Kremlin. The soldiers, on the other
hand, rejoiced greatly when they found so many

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98 THE LITTLE DRUMMER

splendid houses empty. They took possession of suites
of apartments furnished for the use of princes. They
amused themselves by lying with their dirty boots on
the silken sofas, and slept on couches of down under
gilded canopies. The finest porcelain of Sévres and
Dresden supplied the place of their earthen dishes.
Cellars and storehouses were broken open, and the
costliest wines flowed in streams. Chests of drawers
were rummaged through, and the finest linen, shawls,
and luxuries of every kind purloined. When night
came on, the soldiers would light whole bundles of
torches and candles, and carry them about in the
magazines, reckless as to whether combustible ma-
terials were stored up there or not. The natural
consequence of this carelessness was, that several
conflagrations took place, in addition to those which,
it was even then rumoured, were intentionally caused
by the Russians. Nobody thought of quenching the
flames. On the contrary, the soldiers looked on with
malicious pleasure, to see the enemy’s property burn.
General and common soldier—all acted alike. But
a heavy punishment was in store for them.

Among the wooden houses of Moscow, the fire
spread with fearful rapidity. Still the impending
calamity might have been avoided, had the soldiers
been less intent on plundering, and exerted them-
selves to stop its ravages. But no one thought of
such a thing. In their foolhardy security the de-
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 99

luded men were already counting on new victories
and fresh conquests,

It was on one of these fearful days, that a coach
with three horses, harnessed abreast, in the Russian
fashion, stood at the door of a house. Presently
several soldiers of the Rhenish corps appeared, carry-
ing a wounded officer, whom they laid gently in the
carriage, under the superintendence of a surgeon. A
little girl took her seat beside him, and a soldier
with his arm in a sling and his head bandaged up,
was assisted on to the box.

“But will the colonel be able to bear the jour-
ney?” anxiously enquired a youngster in a drummer's
uniform, who was no other than our friend Augustus,

“ Never fear, my lad’—answered the surgeon.
“The colonel can do no good here, and even when
he gets well he can never take the field again, It
is best for him to return to his home, where he can
be properly attended to.”

“ Farewell, Mary!” said Augustus turning to the
girl. ‘Take good care of our honoured colonel, and
do all you can to lighten the journey for him. I
shall see you again when you have returned to your
parents, who have no doubt rebuilt their mill by this
time. Farewell then, till we meet again.”

The tears stood in the boy’s eyes, as she leant
forward to kiss him.

“ Alas, Hoyer, I am very sad’”—said he, turning

H 2
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100 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

to the soldier on the coach-box. ‘All who were
fond of me—you, the colonel, and Mary—are going
away.—How is all this to end? The lieutenant is
not kind, and that bad man Déhnert, who murdered
little Emily, has rejoined the regiment. He bears
me a grudge, and is only waiting till you are gone,
to wreak his spite upon me.

‘Don’t grumble, my lad,” answered the sergeant,
looking down from his high seat. “It’s sinful to
grumble. For haven’t you as yet escaped better
than any of us, without a scar or a scratch? I'd
change with you in a minute.—I shouldn’t so much
mind this gash in my head, but I’ve lost three fin-
gers, which makes a helpless cripple of me. Well,
good bye, till we meet again.” And the sergeant
held out his left hand which Augustus shook heartily.
As the carriage rolled slowly away, he walked beside
it for a short distance.

‘“'That’s my reward !” muttered poor Hoyer look-
ing ruefully at his wounded hand. “Yes, yes—the
horse that earns the corn, doesn’t always get it to
eat. I made quite sure I should get the cross of
the Legion of Honour, and I always stood like a
rock when we faced the enemy.—But who have got
it instead of me? A parcel of cowards who turn pale
when a bullet whistles past them, and in the battle
would be glad to hide in a ditch, if they dared, rather

than endanger their valuable lives.’’
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 101

Augustus thought he would gladly give up all
the crosses in the world, if he were once more at
home. With tearful eyes he stood gazing after the
carriage, long after it had vanished.

Moscow looked like a large fair, where ‘nia of
valuables are exposed. Costly mirrors, curtains,
furniture of all sorts, chests, tubs, bales of goods,
and a hundred other articles, had been dragged out
of the burning houses, and lay heaped pell-mell in
the streets; one after the other they fell a prey to
the hungry flames.

For a long time the wiiien looked on all this
with great indifference, and took no thought for the
future. At length, however, the fire reached such
a pitch, that they were obliged to provide for their
own safety. There were but few houses left, so that
they had to live inconveniently crowded, and even
the most reckless began anxiously to hope for the
termination of the campaign. But week after week
passed, and nothing was done. In the midst of
their glittering treasures they now began to ex-
perience a want of provisions, which they had till
now so shamefully wasted. All the country had
been exhausted—all the villages around lay in
ashes, and no peasants appeared with fresh sup-
plies, so that Napoleon was at length compelled
to give the order to retreat. This was, however,
a bad alternative, as the troops must needs return
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102 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

by the same road they had already traversed, and
had but little prospect of food or shelter. To in-
crease their troubles, autumn had set in earlier than
usual, and with uncommon severity.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 103

CHAPTER XIV.
THE RETREAT.—WOFUL WANT.

Tue keen wind of autumn had stripped the trees,
and hardened the ground with its chilling breath.
The sky was obscured by dark clouds, and a thick
driving snow began to fall, which ina short time
covered everything with a stiff icy rind. As far as
the eye could reach the French legions appeared on
the plain. They had quitted Moscow laden with
booty, but the wonted hilarity no longer reigned in
their ranks. They marched on, silent and gloomy,
but every now and then an impatient curse would
escape their lips, when they encountered fresh diffi-
culties. Their countenances were pale, and wore an
expression of suffering and distrust. They were still
the same troops who, but a few short months before,
had astonished and delighted the beholder; but the
splendour of their appearance was gone, and had
given place to a motley diversity of costumes. In-
stead of their gilded helmets, many now wore low
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104 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

unsightly fur caps, and others had wrapped shawls
or costly hangings round their head and shoulders.
The cloaks were full of rents and burns, and the
uniforms soiled and dirty. The horses of the cavalry
were mere skeletons, panting under a burden which,
in their emaciated condition, they could scarcely
support. Another cause of suffering lay in the
penetrating dampness of the snow, which loosened
the stitches of the soldiers’ boots, so that they hung
in tatters round their feet, and the majority of the
army had to march barefoot.

The inspiring music, and the glad sound of the
trumpets were heard no longer. Twelve weary horses
tugged panting at one cannon, and could hardly be
urged, even by incessant flogging, to anything like
speed. When noon arrived there was no welcome
farm-house, no warm fire, no nourishing meat to
throw wastefully away. How glad would those
hungry men now have been, could they have pro-
cured rye loaves half as good as those they had
formerly despised. They might be seen eagerly
searching their knapsacks for something eatable, or
greedily gnawing a frozen crust, or a tough piece of
horseflesh. If any of them ventured to leave the
main body in the hope of finding provisions, they
were almost certain not to return, for bands of enraged
peasantry, and parties of mounted Cossacks lay in
wait for such stragglers, and put them to death with-
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 105

out mercy. Many and anxious were the glances
cast every evening at the setting sun, for numbers
perished during the long dreary nights. If a soldier
stumbled in the dim twilight, and fell to the ground,
no comrade stretched out a helping hand to raise
him. They all marched callously by the fallen
wretch, who was soon buried under the drifting
snow, and passed unconsciously from the scene of his
troubles. Later comers would stumble over the
corpses, and with greedy hands open their knap-
sacks, to see if they contained gold or silver. When
this was the case they were carried away, but the
increased burthen generally proved fatal to the
bearer.—The cold increased daily, and the misery
grew more and more fearful. When, after a march
of a many days, a town was at length reached,
nothing but ruins appeared. The houses had neither
doors nor windows, and all the stored up provisions
had been wantonly wasted by the French themselves,
during their march towards Moscow. How bitterly _
did the miserable men repent of their wastefulness,
when at night they sank down exhausted on the
snow, and a few of the heartiest went to collect fire-
wood, which had frequently to be brought from
some distance. When a fire was kindled, the half-
frozen men would cluster round it like flies, with
their swelled feet turned towards the flame; stretched
upon the ground they would gradually approach
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106 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

nearer and nearer to the grateful warmth, uncon-
scious that their clothes were singeing, and their
numbed feet scorching in the fire. A leaden sleep
then fell upon them; the snow fell hissing into the
fire, which was gradually extinguished, and with it
the life of many a soldier. When the drummer gave
the signal for departure next morning, it frequently
happened that scarcely one man rose from among
the stiffened corpses, to obey the summons.

The horses, which rarely ever passed the night in a
warm stable, or received any sustenance beyond a little
musty hay, lost all their remaining strength, and fell
down by hundreds. In a single night six thonsand
of them died. All the cavalry had now to march on
foot, as the remaining horses hardly sufficed to drag
the cannon and ammunition waggons.

Then it was plainly seen how weak and short-
sighted is man. The half a million of warriors, by
whose aid Napoleon had intended to overcome the
world, were scattered like a snow-drift by the icy
breath of winter, and their commander was not able
to lessen the cold one degree, or to provide the
starving men with food for a single day. All
thoughts of obedience, discipline, or order, vanished
in the universal distress. The men marched on or
halted to rest whenever they chose, so that the army
resembled a confused many-coloured mass. The
road was everywhere blocked up with waggons,
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 107

cannon, and bodies of men and horses.—Tens of
thousands were already dead and gone, and Augus-
tus still lived. He lived, was in tolerable health,
and had as yet seldom suffered hunger. Under
Heaven, he had to thank Mary for this; before
leaving Moscow, she had given him some valuable
advice regarding the climate of Russia. Amongst
other precautions, he had provided himself with
strong boots, covered with a kind of varnish com-
posed chiefly of pitch, and with a good stock of warm
clothing. In his knapsack he had stowed away a
few pounds of chocolate, as provision for time of
need. His youth, added to his modesty and readi-
ness to oblige, often procured him food while others
were obliged to suffer hunger. As he marched
stoutly on, his healthy appearance created not a little
envy among the handful of men to which his regiment
was now reduced; and Déhnert, the drummer, more
especially looked upon him with no friendly eye, on
account of the well-deserved chastisement he had re-
ceived from Augustus’s father. Fortunate was it
for the boy that Déhnert’s strength and spirit had
been broken by hunger and cold, or it might have
fared hard with him.

They had now passed the ruined fortress of Smo-
lensk, and halted one evening, to bivouac as usual,
in the open air. Augustus, as the strongest, was
sent out to collect firewood, and had soon kindled a
\

108 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

blazing fire, round which the soldiers sat cooking
dry pieces of horseflesh. Augustus had still the
greater portion of his chocolate remaining, and had
for several days purposed making some of it into a
strengthening drink. But this must be done secretly,
for if the others saw what he had, they would have
taken it from him. He therefore waited till all were
asleep, and then putting an earthen pipkin full of
snow to the fire, was soon busily employed at his
cookery. It was just ready, when to his great vex-
ation, Déhnert the drummer suddenly turned round.

“Ah!” cried he—‘‘that smells deliciously—what,
chocolate—let’s see, my boy.”

Augustus could have cried with rage when he saw
the rascal rise and stagger towards him. ‘‘Comrade,”’
said he, at last—‘‘I’m contented to share with you,
though I’ve little enough for myself.”

““What’s that about sharing,” cried the drummer
angrily,—‘‘T’ll share with nobody—give me the
pipkin; give it here I say !’’—and stretching forward,
he seized it with both hands, and began greedily to
swallow the boiling liquid.

The boy looked on with indignant eyes. Of all
men, Déhnert was the last whom he would have
wished to share with,—and to rob him outright was
too bad. He felt strong enough to hurl the emaci-
ated wretch who sat crouching before him, into the
fire, and involuntarily raised his hand to give him a
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION 109

violent push; but it was only a momentary impulse.
“Tt is better to suffer wrong than to do it,’’ thought
he, and turning away, threw himself down beside his
companions, using his knapsack as a pillow. Still
he could not refrain from shedding a few tears as he
lay awake, cold and hungry. Sleep came however,
in a few hours; but on waking the next morning he
found himself without his knapsack, and alone. He
could tell by the manner in which the snow lay
heaped around him, that somebody had piled it up
thus, to hinder his comrades from seeing him. This
could be no other than the thief of the chocolate and
the knapsack, namely, Déhnert. Augustus rose and
looked around him. Several corpses lay near, frozen
stark and stiff, but not a living creature was to be
seen. Full of mournful forebodings he set out to
overtake his comrades, and after a few hours march-
ing, arrived at a village which seemed familiar to
him. Yes—surely—there were the ruins among
which he and Mary had wandered, and yonder heap
of stones was all that remained of the mill. Every
morsel of woodwork had been burnt for fuel by the re-
treating army. Several traces of newly extinguished
fires, and other more mournful mementos in the
shape of numerous dead bodies, shewed that a portion
of the French army had bivouacked here on the pre-
ceding night.—But how completely was Augustus
deceived in his expectations! He had hoped to find
\

110 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

the village, or at least the mill rebuilt, and that he
should see Mary and her parents, who would wel-
come him joyfully.—And now hunger, that importu-
nate creditor, knocked loudly to be satisfied.—After
vainly searching all his pockets for a crust, he looked
eagerly round to discover something eatable. The
swollen carcase of a horse, from which large strips of
flesh had been cut, lay at a little distance; but
hungry as the lad was, he could not bring himself to
eat of such food. ‘Perhaps I shall find something
in one of the knapsacks which are lying about,’’ said
he, taking up one. But it was in vain that he opened
one after another; in some he found gold, and in
others silver, but not a scrap of food. A waggon
with broken wheels lay in a hollow on the margin of
the stream; round it were scattered several broken
barrels, and also some smaller ones, which had sus-
tained no damage, and felt very heavy.

“Gold, and nothing but gold,’—sighed Augustus,
when with infinite labour he had succeeded in break-
ing open one of the little barrels. “Oh that they
contained biscuit or flour !’’ thought he, as he turned
away to continue his search,

A little carriage, harnessed to which was a miser-
able horse that had fallen down dead, now drew
his attention, The snow had driven in at the open
door, covering all the inside with a thick icy coating.
A few wretched coverlets were frozen so stiffly that
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 111

Augustus was obliged to use his knife to sever them,
and what was his horror to find that the occupants,
a young woman and an infant, were quite dead.
They were past all pain, and had slumbered tran-
quilly away into a world of blissful rest.
Accustomed as our hero had of late become, to
scenes of death and misery, there was something so
exquisitely pathetic in the expression of the little
pale face, sleeping so peacefully in its mother’s arms,
that he felt quite unmanned, and sat down weeping
bitterly. Hunger, however, compelled him to prose-
cute his search, and this time he was successful. In
one corner of the carriage he discovered a large bag,
which, on being opened, proved to contain a mixture
of barley-meal and rye. A tin can was also found,
and by melting some snow, and boiling the grain
therein, he produced a dish which, in his famished
state, appeared to him the most delicious he had ever
tasted. When he had satisfied his hunger, Augustus
proceeded to put some of the gold pieces he had
found into his pockets, taking care, however, that it
should not be enough to impede his progress, A
happy thought now struck him. He remembered
the subterranean chamber in the mill, into which he
had crept with Mary on the night of the fire, and
proceeded to deposit there all the little barrels, and
all the knapsacks which contained money, ‘ That
will be more than enough to rebuild the mill,’’—said
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112 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

he cheerfully, as he placed his great treasure, the
bag of meal in an empty knapsack, before continu-
ing his march. In the evening he overtook some
French soldiers, who were bivouacking near a thicket.
Straying among the ranks, in the hope of finding
some of his countrymen, he was accosted in French
by a weak voice, and looking up, beheld an officer,
strangely attired, sitting beside his horse. The
lower part of his body was covered by a thick
furred petticoat, over which he wore a military
coat, gorgeously embroidered, but dirty and ragged.
Over his shoulders he had thrown a horsecloth; he
wore on his head a thick handkerchief, twisted like a
turban, and haybands were wound round the remains
of what had once been boots. He leant with his
head against the body of the horse.

“ Comrade,” — said this strange apparition, —
“have you nothing to eat?—I only beg for a few
mouthfuls.”

Augustus stood still, debating with himself whether
he should grant the stranger’s request. “ Has not
heaven this very day given me ample provision?” —
said he to himself,—‘ and we are told in the Bible
to do good to all men.”

“Have patience for a few minutes,’—said he
aloud, “TI will go and kindle a fire.”

So saying, he ran off to cut down a number of
pine branches in the adjoining thicket, and proceeded
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 113

to light his fire. This was, however, a task of no
little difficulty, for the branches were covered with
frozen snow, and quite wet. After many fruitless
attempts, he at length got them to burn. The next
thing was to fill the can with snow, and to put it on
the fire to melt; but it had to be replenished several
times, before water enough was produced. When
the water boiled, the drummer shook in some of the
barley and rye, and stirred it round and round.

“But I have neither salt nor suet,’’—said he to
his guest, who sat with his hungry eyes fixed upon
the steaming can. |

The Frenchman put his hand into the pocket
of his uniform, and brought forth a small parcel.
‘‘ There comrade,’’—replied he,—‘ there is suet.”

On opening the paper, a piece of tallow candle
appeared, which was immediately popped into the
soup, and stewed down. The Frenchman now handed
another paper to his host, saying—“ Here comrade, is
salt.”

This time a cartridge of gunpowder came to light,
which was also added to the frugal dish. Augustus
now handed the produce of his cookery to his guest,
together with a spoon he had cut out of a piece of
bark. The Frenchman ate six spoonfuls with an
appearance of great relish, and then Augustus’s turn
came. But while the guest was eating, the firelight
streamed full upon him, and Augustus recognised the

I
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114 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

countenance of the colonel by whose means he had so
nearly been shot. The Frenchman had in the mean
time risen to the rank of general, and had not the
least idea that his present benefactor was the
wretched drummer, whom he had long numbered
among the dead. It was with a feeling of intense
pleasure that Augustus saw his unconscious enemy
regaling at his cost, and so absorbed was he with his
discovery, that he had almost forgotten the business
in hand, till the general held out the spoon towards
him, and said—“ Eat comrade—it’s good, very
good.”

They ate on in turn, and between them the mess
soon vanished. When they had finished, the general
advised his companion to lean his head against the
horse for warmth, and try to sleep. Augustus was
about to obey, when the cry arose— the Cossacks !
the Cossacks !”’

Shots were fired, and yells of rage and pain re-
sounded through the still night. The general started
up, sprang on his wearied horse, and fled. Augustus
never saw him again. Crouched beneath some
branches, which he had collected to replenish his fire,
he waited patiently till the tumult subsided.
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 115

CHAPTER XV.
THE BEREZINA.

Tue French army had now reached the banks of the
Berezina, and two frail bridges were hastily thrown
across the river. Whilst this was being accomplished,
the number of fugitives and carriages of every kind,
waiting to cross, increased more and more. Every
one wished to be the first on the opposite bank, and
none would give way an inch, so that the road was
soon completely choked up with horses, cannon,
waggons, and men. Almost at the end of the con-
fused mass stood a carriage; some Frenchmen had
taken away the horses, which were not yet quite
exhausted, to harness them before a cannon. In
the carriage lay Augustus’s colonel, wounded and
helpless.

‘“‘Look to your safety, my children,’’—said he to
Mary, and to Sergeant Hoyer, who still kept his
place on the coach-box, ‘ Leave me to my fate,—I
have learnt to look death in the face without quailing,

12
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116 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

even should he come armed with a knout instead of
his scythe.”

“God forbid, honoured colonel!”’ ‘ee Hoyer.
‘‘He must be a bad soldier, who would leave the
father of the regiment in the lurch. Besides, we are
caught here like mice in a trap, and can neither ad-
vance nor retreat. We must wait, till the enemy’s
bullets have cleared the way.”

The colonel only answered with a deep sigh.’
“ Are you hungry, dear child?” asked he, turning to
Mary. The poor girl shook her head in reply,
though her famished looks told plainly to the con-
trary.

Night came on, and with it the confusion increased.
It reached its highest pitch when the Russians began,
on the following day, to rain a shower of bullets
among the dense mass of fugitives. Thousands were
thrown down, trampled under foot, and run over,
and thousands perished by the enemy’s fire.

“Save yourselves who can!’ was the cry. The
wounded men and the women were driven without
mercy from the carriages, which were then piled in
heaps and burnt.

Several soldiers approached the carriage in which
the colonel lay, when Hoyer jumped angrily up.
‘Comrades!’ shouted he, “‘ would you burn us like
rats? In this carriage lies my honoured colonel,
who has fought sixteen battles, and received thirteen
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 117

wounds in your Emperor’s service. Have you no
regard for an officer of the legion, that you can’t
leave him to die in quiet, and respect the coffin of a
brave soldier ?”’

The Frenchmen, some of whom understood Ger-
man, looked at each other irresolutely, spoke a few
words among themselves, and went away. Hoyer
watched them narrowly.

“Mary,” cried he eagerly, “did you see what
yonder Frenchman was doing on_ the powder
waggon ?”’

‘‘No,”’ answered Mary.

‘Do you see nothing there—my eyes have become
so weak.”’

““T see a thin smoke, like that from a lighted
pipe.”

‘“‘T knew it,’ muttered Hoyer—“ Lord have mercy
upon us.”’

“The bridge is burning! we are all lost! ’”’—was
now the cry, and a wild lamentation arose.

‘Yes, we are done for now,”—said Hoyer to him-
self. ‘In ten minutes, we shall be burnt, or at least
blown into the air. Well, at any rate, we shall not
die of cold, and perhaps it’s all for the best, for we
shall be the sooner out of our misery; still a man
should do his best to lengthen his life, and moreover
I pity the poor innocent child. But what’s to be
done? Wounded as I am, I can’t even leave the
\

118 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

carriage without help, and poor little Mary here
can’t force her way through the crowd to take
away the match.—Well, I’ll try if any one will
do it.”

‘‘ Halloa,—” continued he, as loud as he could—
“the powder waggons yonder will explode presently.
Who will save all our lives by pulling away
the match which those rascally Frenchmen have
lighted ?”

These words produced an effect entirely opposite
to the sergeant’s intention. A panic fear came upon
all who heard them, and all endeavoured to escape
from the dangerous neighbourhood by precipitate
flight. In a few minutes only the wounded and
exhausted men remained, so that the space around
grew somewhat clearer. But the match smouldered
slowly on, and Hoyer began to despair of any succour .
arriving in time to save them.

“ Are you afraid to die, Mary?” asked he.”

“‘ No,”"—replied the child in a weak voice, ‘I shall
be in Heaven then, and have no more cold and
misery to endure.”’

“You are right, dear child,”—said the sergeant
with emotion,—“let us pray to God to forgive us our
sins, for his Son’s sake.”

And amid the turmoil of death and destruction,
the feeble voice of that little child rose in suppli-
cation to Him who has taught us by the mouth of
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 119

infinite wisdom, that “of such is the kingdom of
Heaven.”

But a new actor appeared on the scene.—“ Au-
gustus—there is Augustus!” shrieked Mary, and fell
into his arms.

“Hurrah!” cried Hoyer joyfully,—* Are you still
alive, my boy—Throw yourself on the ground, and
perhaps you may yet escape. The match on the
powder waggon yonder will set fire to it in a couple
of minutes.—Hurrah, now I should like to live a
little longer myself—would’nt you Mary?—Even the
colonel would rally, if he could see the boy.”

Following the direction of Hoyer’s eye, Augustus
at once comprehended the danger which menaced
them. Running to the waggon, he pulled away the
match, and hastily shut the lid.

Surrounded as they were by the horrors of death,
the three friends forgot everything in the joy of
meeting one another. The colonel, however, was
past all emotion; he lay in the carriage, almost in-
sensible. But their joy did not last long. Shots
were fired more and more frequently, and at length
a cannon ball grazed the carriage, and shattered one
of the hind wheels. A splinter struck Augustus on
the head, and at the same moment the carriage fell
on his leg and broke it. With a piercing shriek he
swooned away.

When he recovered his senses, it was night, and
\

120 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

the stars were shining brightly. The carriage still
lay on his leg, and within it all was still; Hoyer was
still on the coach-box, asleep from sheer exhaustion.
At a short distance Augustus could hear a noise,
which proceeded from the Russians, who were plun.-
dering the waggons, and making prisoners.

Help, whether it came from friend or foe, was
now most sorely needed. After endeavouring in
vain to draw his broken limb from under the car-
riage, he at length began to call out for help—but
nobody heard him.

Just then, he descried his drum lying close beside
him. Here was a means of making himself heard.
Drawing the instrument towards him, he seized his
drumsticks, and commenced beating a loud tattoo.
The effect of this proceeding was first manifest in
the carriage. Little Mary began crying in her sleep,
and said, “ Stoop Augustus, or the bullets will hit
you.” Hoyer’s deep voice grumbled from the box—
“Directly, captain; only wait till I’ve got my
sword !”—Even the colonel cried in delirium—
‘Forward, lads, forward! Strike down all! Give
no quarter !”’

At the sound of the drum, a wounded man, who
lay close by, raised himself on his elbow. His
wasted face was pale as death itself, and his glassy
eyes gleamed spectrally in the moonlight. With
teeth chattering with cold and horror, he stammered
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION, 121

out—‘* Woman, leave me—It was not I this time—
I only did it once—how could I tell that it would
hurt the child!—Let me go, I say—Why do you
claw me so!’’—With the strength of desperation he
rose to his feet, staggered forward a few paces, and
fell down dead.

The drumsticks fell from our hero’s hands, and he
sat gazing in speechless horror at the fallen. man—
He to whom alone vengeance belongeth had in His
own good time repaid the slayer ;—stretched at Au-
gustus’s feet lay his bitterest enemy—the murderer of
his sister—Dohnert, the drummer.

A file of Russians now approached the carriage. —
Mary, now fully awake, instantly recogniscd in one
of them, a quondam pupil of Augustus, and cried
out ‘ Bibikoff—help your teacher—don’t you know
us?” |

This appeal in the Russian language, procured for
them a fate more bearable than that of the remain-
ing prisoners. Their money was indeed taken from
them, but they were cared for as well as circum-
stances would allow. The three wounded ones
recovered slowly, but effectually, in a Russian
hospital. 3
\

122 THE LITTLE DRUMMER ;

CHAPTER XVI.
THE RETURN HOME.

A sumMER and two winters had passed away. The
cottages in Mary’s native village had all been re-
built, and a handsome church stood on the site of the
old one; but the mill was still a blackened ruin.
It was in the spring of the year 1814, and the
feathered denizens of the woods were chirping among
the fresh green of the trees. Not a trace of war was
left, save here and there the bleached rib or skull of
a horse.

- On a fine sunny afternoon a clumsy Russian
vehicle, half carriage, half waggon, came rolling into
the village, and stopped before the ruined mill. Our
old acquaintance, Master Naumann, the miller,
handed out his wife and two children.

‘Here we are at last’’—began he after a pause,
during which all had stood sorrowfully regarding
their once thriving home. ‘ But how are we to
rebuild the mill ?”

‘Dear husband, do not let us stay here,””—replied
his wife. ‘I could never sleep in quiet in the place
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 123

where my poor Mary lost her life. I should con-
tinually fancy I heard her screams.”

“T feel much in the same way’’—replied the
miller thoughtfully. ‘But tell me, what are we to
do? Of course I should like to return to my native
country, the more so, as our neighbours bear me a
grudge, because I would not burn my mill during
the war. But poor as I am, I can scarcely return to
Germany. What might I get for the ground? A
trifle, perhaps.”

A troop of men, all wearing coats of coarse cloth
over shabby uniforms, and carrying stout sticks, now
appeared in view. They were German prisoners,
who had been set free at the conclusion of the war,
and were now returning to their homes. As they
drew near, four persons separated themselves from
the rest, and approached the mill. They were Au-
gustus, the Colonel, Sergeant Hoyer, and Mary.
The child flew with a scream of delight into the
arms of her parents, who could scarcely believe their
eyes, when they saw the daughter whom they had so
long mourned as dead. Explanations were hurriedly
given, and Augustus was overwhelmed with thanks
and praises.

“ But I cannot reward you for your heroic action,”
said Naumann, after a pause.—The war has almost
ruined me.”’ -

On hearing these words, Augustus contrived to
\

124 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

slip away unperceived. He had preferred saying ~
nothing about the money he had buried in the cellar,
until he had made sure it was still there. Trembling
with excitement, he began scraping away the earth
he had piled upon his treasure, and soon found, to
his great joy, that nothing had been disturbed. The
knapsack had burst asunder, and the barrels were
worm-eaten, but the gold was still there. After
filling his pockets, he rejoined his comrades. Young
as Augustus was, he had already had sufficient ex-
perience to know that gold often breeds discord even
amongst the best friends, and therefore he thought it
right to secure for himself at least a portion of his
money. With his countenance. radiant with good
news, he rejoined the others.

‘* During our retreat’’—he began—‘I secreted a
considerable treasure in this mill, and I propose
that we share it in the following manner :—Master
Naumann must receive a third part, as proprietor of
the ground on which it is hidden. The remaining
two-thirds should be divided amongst us poor wan-
derers.—Do you agree to this ?”

All the hearers listened to him in great astonish-
ment, and the colonel was the first who answered.

“| rejoice at your good fortune,” said he,—‘ and
for my part, I only ask for a small loan to pay my
expenses on the journey home. I have enough
property, and therefore require no more.”
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 125

Old Sergeant Hoyer looked at his hands, on which
only two whole fingers and three halves were left—
and said smiling—* I cannot work, that’s very sure
—and I’m ashamed to beg. So I’ll take my share,
and God bless you, my boy!”

The miller and his wife were almost beside them-
selves for joy, and nearly stifled the little treasure-
seeker with caresses.

The money was now secretly brought out of the
cellar, deposited in the carriage, and carefully covered
over, lest any of the inhabitants of the village should
suspect what was going on. They then all mounted
the vehicle, and quitted the village. Naumann de-
termined to return with the rest to Germany, and
purchase a mill with his share of the treasure. In
the next town the spoil was divided, and an addi-
tional carriage procured. As they were about to
resume their journey, a party of their former com-
panions came up, and looked curiously at them,
wondering how they had procured such a luxury as
a carriage. One man stepped forward, and begged
the colonel that he might travel with him. This was
no other than the haughty lieutenant, who had by
this time grown considerably less haughty and more
conciliating.

“Sir’”’—replied the colonel— the carriage does not
belong to me, but to my two comrades here. If they
will take you, I have no objection.”
\

126 THE LITTLE DRUMMER;

This time the officer did not consider it ‘ altogether
beneath his dignity” to speak kindly to his subordi-
nates. They welcomed him cordially, and willingly
granted his request.




OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 127

CHAPTER XVII.

CONCLUSION.

One day in the beginning of May, 1814, Master
Wunsch stood in his workshop, cutting leather. He
was alone, and there would not even have been room
for workmen, as the whole place was full of house-
hold furniture and beds. Everything around wore
an aspect of poverty, and it was easy to see that the
world had not gone prosperously with the saddler.
Suddenly the door opened, and a man in travelling
attire entered.

‘*Good morrow to you, friend Wunsch,” said he
cheerfully.”

Wunsch looked up, and his melancholy face
brightened immediately. He shook his visitor
warmly by the hand, saying with surprise—“ Are
you come back at last, old schoolfellow Naumann—
Where have you been hiding, all these years ?””’

‘In Russia’”’—replied the other. ‘I had built a
mill and married a wife; but during the war the
French burnt the mill, so I have returned here with
all my family.”’
\

128 THE LITTLE DRUMMER}

“And what do you intend doing?” asked the
saddler.

“T must buy a mill, or rent one.”

“* Have you money ?”

“No, but I have good friends, who will no doubt
assist me. ‘There is yourself, for instance—you are
no doubt in good circumstances, and have plenty of
custom and credit. You could do much for me.”’

‘Poor companion in misfortune’’—said Wunsch
with a bitter smile,—‘‘you are wofully deceived. I
had all you mention, but I have it no longer. You
see around me the miserable wreck of my former
possessions. This workshop, which serves me also
for a dwelling house, is only mine for a few days
longer. Then it will be sold to pay my debts, and I
must go. Yes, yes, friend Naumann, the war has
robbed me of all my fortune, and more—far more.”

‘How do you mean—more?” asked Naumann
incredulously.

“It has robbed me of two children’”—answered
the saddler, turning gloomily away. He went to a
kind of dark outhouse, which was used as a kitchen,
and called out— Come hither, dear wife—an old
friend of mine has come, and little Emily is lying
awake in her cradle-—Come and feed her before she
annoys us with her crying.”

Mrs. Wunsch bade the stranger kindly welcome,
and took her little daughter out of the cradle.


OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 129

‘A pretty child,’’ said Naumann.

‘That is true,” answered the father,—“ but I had
rather it had been a boy—I should have christened
it Augustus.”’

‘““Why so? Do you love boys more than girls?”

‘‘No”—replied Wunsch—“ Besides, Heaven has
kindly sent this child to comfort me for the loss of
my former little Emily—But my poor boy.”

The saddler could say no more, but turned away
to hide his emotion.

‘What about your son?”’ asked came in a
sympathising voice.

‘He died for me,”—sobbed Wunsch—“ a, bitter
death—to save me—bless thee dear child,” added he
solemnly—“ Heaven bless thee, even in eternity.”’

Mrs. Wunsch bent over the child in her lap, and
wept bitterly.

“‘ How did it ae ?”’ asked Naumann, after a
pause.

“Spare me the detail’’—said Wunsch—“ You
must have seen and heard in what a fearful manner
the soldiers perished in Russia,—through battle,
cold, and hunger. My son died in this way.”

“But are you sure of that?’ again asked the
miller. ‘(Many German prisoners of war are now re-
turning from Russia, and I myself am the bearer of
a letter from a young drummer, born in this town.”

“A young drummer, from this town!” éried the

K
\

130 THE LITTLE DRUMMER};

saddler and his wife, in one breath. Both trembled
with expectation, and grew red and pale by turns.

“Tt is as I say”—said Naumann quietly, putting
his hand in his pocket. ‘The direction has been
hastily written, and has become illegible during the
long journey.”

Wunsch rushed forward and seized the letter. “ It
is my son’s writing’”’—shouted he, after glancing for
a moment at the address. In the tumult of his joy he
almost tore the letter in pieces, instead of reading it.

Mrs. Wunsch started up, and holding the screaming
baby in one arm, was in a moment at her husband’s
side, gazing at the letter both were almost too excited
to read. Its contents were merely—

“My Dearest Parents,
“T am still alive, and well. In another moment
I shall be with you.
“ Auaustus.”’

The door was thrown violently open. Bertha and
Robert rushed in, holding their school books in one
hand and dragging Augustus in by the other.

His parents fell upon his neck, and for the next
few minutes nothing was heard but a confused noise
of laughter and weeping, and disjointed exclama-
tions.

In the meantime the room had become filled with
OR, FILIAL AFFECTION. 131

spectators. ‘The colonel, the lieutenant, Hoyer, and
Naumann’s wife and children, among whom Mary
was foremost, stood round looking on the scene with
tearful eyes.

When the tumult of greeting had somewhat sub-
sided, Augustus said—TI have brought a keepsake
for you, which we will treasure up as a remembrance
of the days gone by,’’—and he drew forth his drum-
sticks. ‘‘These I have saved, but the drum itself I
lost in Russia.”

“'There’s another little remembrance”’—said Hoyer
smiling, and pointing to the table, on which the men
had in the meantime placed several bags of gold.

“That's more than my share,”—cried Augustus
hastily.

“By your leave,” continued Hoyer—“I have
added my share to it. If you have a little room in
the house, to give to an old soldier, who doesn’t re-
quire much, and who, though his fingers are absent
without leave, can rock a cradle and make himself
generally useful—I’ll engage it for myself. My
honoured colonel has promised to procure my dis-
charge.

‘“¢ And we will remain here too,’’—said Naumann,
“and hire a mill somewhere in the neighbourhood.
We'll make one family, and forget all our troubles.
You see, friend Wunsch, you can buy your house
back again, and still have something left.”
\

132 THE LITTLE DRUMMER.

‘You are heartily welcome, all of you!” cried
Master Wunsch, joyfully. ‘Gentlemen, you are I
hope my guests to-day, and will take things as you
find them. And let us thank Heaven for its great
mercy, in not tempting us beyond what we were able
to bear, but ordering all for the best, in its infinite
wisdom—Heaven be praised for all. things !—And
soon may war be talked of among men, as an evil
thing that has passed away for ever!”

THE END.

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The House that Jack
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Little Bo-Peep.

The Old Woman and
her Eggs.

Old Mother Goose.

The Death of Cock

Robin.
Old Mother Hubbard.

The Three Bears.
Little

Goody Two-
Shoes.
Little Red Riding-
Hood.
The Babes in the
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ood.
The Fair One with
Golden Locks.

CONTENTS.

The Sleeping Beauty.
Beauty and the Beast.
Cinderella ; or, the Lit-
tle Glass Slipper.
Princess Rosetta.
Jack the Giant Killer.
J “ee and the Bean

Stalk.
Sir Guy of Warwick.
Tom Hickathrift.
Bold Robin Hood.
Tom Thumb.
Puss in Boots.
The Ugly Little Duck.
The ite Cat.
The Charmed Fawn.
The Eleven Wild
Swans.

The Blue Bird.

Little Maia.

The Elves of the Fairy
Forest.

The Elfin Plough.

The Nine Mountains.

J ohnny and Lisbeth.

The Little Fisher Boy.

Hans in Luck.

The Giant and the
Brave Tailor.

Peter the Goatherd.

Red Jacket; or, the

Nose Tree.
Three Golden
Hairs.
The Jew in the Bram-
e Bush.

*,* This Volume contains about Forty of the long-established

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modern taste reproves
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describe
'1792' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATMV' 'sip-files00001.pro'
1656cd709e56a088c579d66ea2331903
04b456113816d36fc3a5cb3f6f9d17ec7881bc4f
'2011-11-16T09:26:02-05:00'
describe
'9576' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATMW' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
18bcd4dce5ca8a7f118697622be59e4d
96b26a370105f2ac2396ccfeb8cedfd56d8acc35
'2011-11-16T09:19:11-05:00'
describe
'11424739' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATMX' 'sip-files00001.tif'
90d011332f3b048237ef72a64ec1a5b6
87c7b568432e179ebf7f6bd456af745081661ec1
'2011-11-16T09:19:45-05:00'
describe
'108' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATMY' 'sip-files00001.txt'
89814be667a24341aaa81586c6f3c3a3
24d9d16245ecd6dc8c6ddcfe16c84e6490583f99
'2011-11-16T09:20:07-05:00'
describe
'3184' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATMZ' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
243a835b4bedea1235487a1a9b233431
0625c1566998283f2ffd388c76dbcb225917a083
'2011-11-16T09:21:05-05:00'
describe
'1277604' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNA' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
f59b5b69188302482680a753b90bdd1c
6ebb3270c9d5abd26d457c7c7d09179cac73b7fe
'2011-11-16T09:20:49-05:00'
describe
'39899' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNB' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
3d1bd90372ac633316434a726d08ba18
b6d48b095addd6aca115bffe75f6f51402b168a7
'2011-11-16T09:22:04-05:00'
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNC' 'sip-files00002.pro'
2b3991d9310a67befed4ee60c2afb74b
4409fad8e57deb904baebdeb10c22bcd9921cbba
'2011-11-16T09:18:14-05:00'
describe
'12691' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATND' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
79565c300ca975f68b3e8872d5208418
81e0280410041d90e0ea3695f7a0261163d458e7
'2011-11-16T09:18:22-05:00'
describe
'11188623' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNE' 'sip-files00002.tif'
cd5b59501df43b40541e54151d417502
b5c66ecb58d199683146de0959f747c4d226d160
'2011-11-16T09:26:27-05:00'
describe
'128' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNF' 'sip-files00002.txt'
5a29cd3ff47acff62a359a7a58ad3853
c56ef3f8482ba5736e61e3eb4799722c5c8ad81e
'2011-11-16T09:24:51-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'4330' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNG' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
aa17d7dca15a2cc2c826f27991659a6a
3fe8596980b3eda4c3ed11bb6f16c82ee3fd77f1
'2011-11-16T09:23:51-05:00'
describe
'894574' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNH' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
a2f524b8de41b694c708ba354d3fe4f7
76b2a03a35ae28847b26c175a08af4253bdc74d3
'2011-11-16T09:18:35-05:00'
describe
'20290' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNI' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
7d2761e4816daa3a39f4fce02b9c3dad
3b24ca922b9421949c50724274658466b60deacf
'2011-11-16T09:19:57-05:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNJ' 'sip-files00003.pro'
cdca86b50bb5e81d548b8c6c068a184c
57095e033136a363632d09bae2b2750b73aa41c7
'2011-11-16T09:17:59-05:00'
describe
'5400' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNK' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
2f621fbcc5e3c5568c014eb6fd801eb2
f62b331e38c4511e4eb5adfdf4760722dc96a90b
'2011-11-16T09:20:20-05:00'
describe
'9446685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNL' 'sip-files00003.tif'
e51c256c96f0cc36cc28ee1b51e3badd
e2f45f836ca3981d6218fc29b385ca8a18758044
'2011-11-16T09:18:54-05:00'
describe
'54' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNM' 'sip-files00003.txt'
40cd1298d029748ba961d4009919d9c2
421ace4a7de62b38d2bf81a3b6f4489c2be56eeb
'2011-11-16T09:21:17-05:00'
describe
'1975' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNN' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
aec95f5a67e9ec3953728b7324b6a273
f3ba28857765643c8c1c60b2d71f58590b8cebec
'2011-11-16T09:20:39-05:00'
describe
'803101' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNO' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
79a76ff26a77ace985feb24990a839f4
058e964e22d566b6410c1822b95dd379810c6222
'2011-11-16T09:18:50-05:00'
describe
'15275' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNP' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
fbf70fb10406e54744d4f693445f5426
e56d726b210b58cc6c716f4a394e3f3ca6be691a
'2011-11-16T09:19:31-05:00'
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNQ' 'sip-files00004.pro'
e71d134aa8f6f5848d1c89fdc116791a
978d6d43ff5e94ebbc7e0b95670d4afa3aab991d
'2011-11-16T09:20:17-05:00'
describe
'4050' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNR' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
094c5364298541da916dab4090771ffb
61914e1da37500dc3e5a3d9243eb462391116903
'2011-11-16T09:26:53-05:00'
describe
'9031339' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNS' 'sip-files00004.tif'
cee4c861a40a0768dd7b35ff1acf35dd
e1773721d1a238fe7711fd9a4afcad6a9eedab62
'2011-11-16T09:24:10-05:00'
describe
'58' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNT' 'sip-files00004.txt'
c7610d48f8de26e91651bae39e152010
18a6c2bd8da4d386f350f3a6ecbf70a8ca0bac14
'2011-11-16T09:19:20-05:00'
describe
'1763' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNU' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
563ef9b97de41869f84972c57d8a2fa2
c656e75122524d65b1b79f7c76bbb7a76b679f92
'2011-11-16T09:25:31-05:00'
describe
'1280026' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNV' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
34eeb8968e9cce18c1b366622d45bbef
46deb586070d4dcff33e1a66392f17f2bee04809
'2011-11-16T09:18:03-05:00'
describe
'101660' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNW' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
3a93f26525a5a5023e3faa942b482c7c
68c2eb7820f025cedb231b66d88a75a8688b890c
'2011-11-16T09:22:51-05:00'
describe
'2542' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNX' 'sip-files00005.pro'
32199a519094f5ce2649296df6d38ae9
c0e8337b44776916dc03e652b6269e251c9a00ce
'2011-11-16T09:19:18-05:00'
describe
'27037' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNY' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
ff4cc8d03f0b08f8acf235a9ed3d70c8
f37a709207d0e6fd4952ecc3968701a82536ed79
'2011-11-16T09:25:37-05:00'
describe
'10251091' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATNZ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
3182177c52adda93a9cc0cdd98deb3a2
02447ecf9592397da4e0015aa56ca41633633c0b
'2011-11-16T09:18:23-05:00'
describe
'272' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOA' 'sip-files00005.txt'
7b945089a9f2292ebd58f22dc3b4ffaa
35ac0d6917a88914635e5078681b10f140eadc94
'2011-11-16T09:17:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7883' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOB' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
f23630dc55399f4c6694784198785e33
31daac7f2a0856ccaca77da1b47cf37c3f5ec75f
'2011-11-16T09:20:16-05:00'
describe
'1314954' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOC' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
154585e45dd427929fd5d334ef5eb5e4
3f6407cd128bc6dfd9b88400814fc7cbe57f7fbd
'2011-11-16T09:20:57-05:00'
describe
'48902' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOD' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
e9f717c952fc0f72a63fc4108e4f939f
9c8175a132be6c461ba2a70e3489dae426562968
'2011-11-16T09:24:23-05:00'
describe
'7127' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOE' 'sip-files00006.pro'
007fab58ca796ecc3d475b7234863909
d9f8f6ca10e3eb645ec170a680ba4e7edc4f78fc
'2011-11-16T09:18:10-05:00'
describe
'14887' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOF' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
a92887ce281da2a833b3f5a029176ccd
61d0f5fbe28e0b112c26158c3c757743c801b66e
'2011-11-16T09:20:27-05:00'
describe
'10530883' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOG' 'sip-files00006.tif'
25515f8d36abd36920cd203145938de8
bdbce268fe956779576bc5a8490ce09587ae47c1
'2011-11-16T09:18:21-05:00'
describe
'416' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOH' 'sip-files00006.txt'
8ae3289ccbb001663a87b4a35e75ab4b
cde736bcf43687765283ff7664b9ef8163c93e35
'2011-11-16T09:23:42-05:00'
describe
'4822' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOI' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
fa28b91b283441399d29b09d25746623
573b7048113b2d571086ac23df3f6acf99d8affc
'2011-11-16T09:20:12-05:00'
describe
'905002' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOJ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
1f53f1b9adf16c92ab9decde36ea68cd
dcf26e5fd4062097a490a8e6f662fc47405821b5
'2011-11-16T09:19:55-05:00'
describe
'18800' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOK' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
1819059ebeb11049719a4365fd676b50
95fc7f771b686c704b8e349192cd6f2c0f05eb70
'2011-11-16T09:20:26-05:00'
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOL' 'sip-files00007.pro'
00100ee4a95421bcd75b8fe889fd3f53
ff686b8da6f3b28a0ff0256915ccb1451d3c475c
'2011-11-16T09:18:05-05:00'
describe
'4969' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOM' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
3fe809116f7ca9d81c6497c82b77dde4
82f3f250176267ea176538118b723bac40eacfdc
'2011-11-16T09:25:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATON' 'sip-files00007.tif'
b65820ed4e9407b25119a79442bdb595
2728597b0ef4cd071b75e3c065b020836155b23b
'2011-11-16T09:21:25-05:00'
describe
'171' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOO' 'sip-files00007.txt'
f26abfa16be420b3a12d95013b2e94ea
7792bd513908753723eb0d60df76425ca6426267
'2011-11-16T09:17:53-05:00'
describe
'1938' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOP' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
5981d2fd65f7084dfde49f37248f58e3
d0a22f15cff9e51e6b325a5a8ac6deba40068db0
'2011-11-16T09:25:44-05:00'
describe
'1151934' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOQ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
59c55b993c804f58e2193fd85c66d073
cf74df8d65b547bf3e9dad318c736271d4860b1b
'2011-11-16T09:23:27-05:00'
describe
'46706' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOR' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
46d3999e05d16b27acae190640f85a29
f82e26faa735f7f65dc55ae08e69ef41b49e0aaa
'2011-11-16T09:26:52-05:00'
describe
'14062' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOS' 'sip-files00008.pro'
8f0c3b0095ad993fedfc79695bc68f45
83b9eab9ee285985fde117330407f1dddaf25905
'2011-11-16T09:17:40-05:00'
describe
'16025' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOT' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
fd3f151b6a92d5470b476261ac330ba5
8319f48a2f4f552cede9203a46472496c084cd75
'2011-11-16T09:20:24-05:00'
describe
'9683301' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOU' 'sip-files00008.tif'
b5ac333a484f12d562685cf0f4f481e8
fba5be9db2938e64f038903e11ac7a7b7d3a8cba
'2011-11-16T09:19:10-05:00'
describe
'583' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOV' 'sip-files00008.txt'
cca643478fc0320b46208c14c30410c0
49d118b4a8f964bb17ce77f1b04669ca990af8b9
describe
'5850' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOW' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
b4f55eadf5fe135c297ca51a0800ad7b
9e2d3e73bc2bb8e76c0d2ccc372130ba283d9857
'2011-11-16T09:19:58-05:00'
describe
'1179493' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOX' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
c0d7057dc0be1be6bcf3d3ba35d86ce2
62201e335d3445d1c0c822bba36da1f4d65c857b
describe
'57922' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOY' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
8fd387ad321fcbe2cdd8931fc9a29320
3adf4575bb7aa2bbef0917b4fae3c19b36ce1506
'2011-11-16T09:23:47-05:00'
describe
'19557' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATOZ' 'sip-files00009.pro'
5b9c931cf99f8e261e61bfcbf590feec
58863d03b29dad9a1eb08285f84e2127db979a52
'2011-11-16T09:23:07-05:00'
describe
'21203' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPA' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
227b7643ee9784e89c011c75b70542db
faef33f9974ab0c2efdcc981727aac3d8e250eb7
'2011-11-16T09:18:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPB' 'sip-files00009.tif'
22225066ecdee572ac57b9c3285280c4
408611e14258671c4e17cc165a635739e6eb4740
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPC' 'sip-files00009.txt'
b936b9e2cb2ed21fd30e1f0bfc2749f5
6f372bc9ef0d16c2db2de2c5406112ef5f67586d
'2011-11-16T09:22:31-05:00'
describe
'7932' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPD' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
5c289d83eb6add5f07389c8f1d6afe9d
21e906c39a89b386144ea54554b72096ad1b3a80
'2011-11-16T09:20:32-05:00'
describe
'1036654' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPE' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
7b3cac49439833b28c361afa7cdab8a1
de9253e90180a42155733f0eb96cf06143545343
'2011-11-16T09:23:32-05:00'
describe
'28994' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPF' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
1ac0803750f55dc2370eac7c884977af
0f40db2ac8d23d5c75110176b7086ba4d0d29a6f
'2011-11-16T09:26:43-05:00'
describe
'10439' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPG' 'sip-files00010.pro'
35d47c25d0304c1a8d6a438e00fbb231
4f717e424ad5794851c26b5ed84c691263260170
'2011-11-16T09:18:55-05:00'
describe
'9467' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPH' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
2dea1bac00bcd0423fdc3d1b2eb6619a
c85c09c3e00cb3625c4e41061951833351109d90
'2011-11-16T09:26:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPI' 'sip-files00010.tif'
f122df71ded6eb1c6ad03e7d1edcf300
556d7a3aee8fb3d64bb9d92e825585151118891c
'2011-11-16T09:21:34-05:00'
describe
'730' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPJ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
24351932e9b4f6f4e0a6f720eac8d113
c66361bfd71a63509886b909c345f5b55a5989c9
'2011-11-16T09:23:36-05:00'
describe
'3555' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPK' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
5fa68a064e40201c133a00a1f93febb3
1b362b65298c9308f6c633c05309f5064bd323bc
describe
'1023167' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPL' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f26194faaf29fc43ed1f3ed63cb4ffeb
6cef7697b59f6873a72a6a549483f50e36efb1f9
'2011-11-16T09:20:33-05:00'
describe
'34816' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPM' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
8636135f1f6726f5e02ef743803405f2
00dc5923ff538dc4b3327aad5a8720a4a6b40c5b
'2011-11-16T09:18:07-05:00'
describe
'12970' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPN' 'sip-files00011.pro'
f5dd8d4bdf84294b33e8a77fefc49e88
100b4e0909b08ee9c6eec65a7ea8a10c0dd4e7d9
'2011-11-16T09:22:05-05:00'
describe
'12344' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPO' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
44e2b3f57990a81509c369b174ff6c41
3f4f36488d0b1bc9be305f1a1e164564b318d578
'2011-11-16T09:19:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPP' 'sip-files00011.tif'
fb504a7b4d832c5c08cbd49c82cd4499
44d55c27115941e5824b6b69d770024c62bf26f4
'2011-11-16T09:24:17-05:00'
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPQ' 'sip-files00011.txt'
28bec089918456bc2d0008e01046952d
88f3e5a571e31eb6093b4fcc2bba7a07e4d89246
'2011-11-16T09:19:12-05:00'
describe
'4936' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPR' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
63ba8eaf0f3a5a548d782d05a475ff09
e78dad3b6ada35afffce4efe4a51e20c607204f3
'2011-11-16T09:20:55-05:00'
describe
'1209074' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPS' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
594d84b720468ac3689d8c4c667a15b1
0f1cf5d4e83d1b2523f0f132f2eae53ae89f2ccd
'2011-11-16T09:24:50-05:00'
describe
'57823' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPT' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
7fd6a2882260ca3ed3596bcd6bca5d73
976d4bcdca55c4d9b542d0c87db23bec9e6c1824
'2011-11-16T09:22:21-05:00'
describe
'18759' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPU' 'sip-files00012.pro'
1f0f3446ae9469dad2226d84ccdd5163
6168697f93ec4387cbec1fb9f8d8ca0816b47519
'2011-11-16T09:24:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPV' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
4b8461363a8cda102cd9b7b7ca6d6960
dc95b768019a9ba1bf170eb0c4914c09f1e8f9ea
'2011-11-16T09:20:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPW' 'sip-files00012.tif'
e253496f437c97b0e7493d1e96380cfb
5b1898c9498466c6a365eea94f94bfe090f887a4
'2011-11-16T09:18:52-05:00'
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPX' 'sip-files00012.txt'
98e012cae35c6a7e55906260bc09579d
659e15f37d9f5687ad2e89d828f07a8934e899e4
'2011-11-16T09:20:52-05:00'
describe
'5986' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPY' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
73e8451ff0e1ea3f83ecc4017b0a7e30
5e026e571002b802ac3016a6b1d08e21e320bce0
describe
'1179463' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATPZ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7ed1306a953c99ffeff0f3b5d0e2bee7
b0a9d3bb392df5c9125aa2f81049ec86f32159a4
describe
'81480' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQA' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
483caf5d102041c175d8c3ddaad54a3f
1231a88248961d5870dc28f7c061a169786527b0
'2011-11-16T09:21:08-05:00'
describe
'35554' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQB' 'sip-files00013.pro'
1c082376ac62ca514b825f9a33e5e452
ef1bf35d1241a0e5017399f3ffbdc5232be37975
'2011-11-16T09:19:22-05:00'
describe
'29228' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQC' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
2d90e72294c3d449e393bded2e456074
2066f5417b80bfb4586f242adeb3bd6a6e453079
'2011-11-16T09:18:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQD' 'sip-files00013.tif'
177b7721ca0b5587f0aa1e5b5c237af0
22d5ebd76e6d4e05e8e5c0a33b8b70384c8fe14f
'2011-11-16T09:24:52-05:00'
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQE' 'sip-files00013.txt'
431f9c50ff1dda41d6cecdfa21ab97e9
2f34eae135996bf92fa1fa072b4a3b24ff10e8ea
'2011-11-16T09:18:26-05:00'
describe
'9547' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQF' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
842c88433534735735445de28e4f02ea
ad08b1ce2286016a6a267220f62293755aad502a
describe
'1208915' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQG' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
104b9ad0dcd3f9d701159994d5c66d41
6dacf6f4e62590a5d37c2e2662a376c710889aec
'2011-11-16T09:19:48-05:00'
describe
'78299' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQH' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
e6677a384f165dfdf72431e428dc4f10
563384dddce66d3ed277ec8ed0e67850d2bd969e
'2011-11-16T09:20:22-05:00'
describe
'32134' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQI' 'sip-files00014.pro'
95c62d82404b3d83abb11f438cff233c
7093da2f751de071c082f5db5a7f9a696d19304d
'2011-11-16T09:24:11-05:00'
describe
'27627' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQJ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
602f21ede05d0325737a531bba12c25d
8a06b364b34b529b74dc70f5912b763ed1e69d4b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQK' 'sip-files00014.tif'
86bda8abd8da2fd6a34a5d7ad7e463c3
dfb46f5c386075ddcb26badc025660077d1417fe
'2011-11-16T09:19:43-05:00'
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQL' 'sip-files00014.txt'
ee7bc8bca9b5c6c7773d513da8f7c850
c31d170f0c4be925ad1d53aa6a5ceff9328b24f0
'2011-11-16T09:21:53-05:00'
describe
'8591' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQM' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
a9ff7aa781e98f466a5b652f8afb921d
737272910d0af4f4cfb735963965cc79fa4f6235
describe
'1179295' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQN' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
5bc6ef78e9c7e0fa0a7d344d9a440be6
ad8d9858db9f47ff1941ba03c699c1627bcd2bc5
describe
'71891' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQO' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
6565ee867cd8b0b8b5e358e70128bf5d
9f644a26c452ea06c2120d417d08d05079a96098
describe
'30661' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQP' 'sip-files00015.pro'
29f45687c40edc0f9494a2e30c721742
4f66ac8078692833fe899f7240880769e070dc08
'2011-11-16T09:18:38-05:00'
describe
'24747' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQQ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
32fa096672dd2a121d848b2ab94141ed
10b72f698565f43ddeff917f7e7524f27b1d4345
'2011-11-16T09:20:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQR' 'sip-files00015.tif'
44357059fcff1a258063cb84bc931715
bcc136adf569c7494c868be39743f16dc8432cbf
'2011-11-16T09:22:12-05:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQS' 'sip-files00015.txt'
7b7bc9d3c80a0d6d92651c2fc19c8c3b
481217e4a2a31be97f28f7078c468437f7615abd
'2011-11-16T09:25:50-05:00'
describe
'8571' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQT' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
2cdfb551e79c6c4f308bb9cf0ec6addb
139673f26cab3ba8746c2cd90831a67e54b08adb
'2011-11-16T09:21:47-05:00'
describe
'1208977' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQU' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
f5eb7df94891bc91c92daab78d41a315
80cc7e9cbea8ea0cb25bf7f584c17c4b0e59590f
describe
'84502' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQV' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
4913b3977ca2b744ac6afd5e053f5f19
259f81fe05e47847c01a15261e8aee076e2654e8
describe
'36435' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQW' 'sip-files00016.pro'
2447b65907b0ac34375ca101c99ffbf6
684140ece31905ae86af7b7f3f7ff1edf8010f1f
'2011-11-16T09:17:58-05:00'
describe
'29165' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQX' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
6b666c7004fce5890fbb581735634828
9f3a633ee931d030c07559620a174cc6451a6c20
'2011-11-16T09:25:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQY' 'sip-files00016.tif'
14cba4cdbe5e0ee08643222c9339ded6
8265e3a9ce1393d58c5a5f5e4f36b2b7fdff9313
'2011-11-16T09:23:05-05:00'
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATQZ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
6a7c844ca5a1782ee8a56d90e5068f86
b10dfef41b5f2524565e65f6e759724a9eb06ed0
'2011-11-16T09:25:42-05:00'
describe
'9079' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRA' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
215953e1ab21ef4834a88640ba5acfe7
3827aa7779c4854a94279e446616cd35a9eddae1
describe
'1179444' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRB' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
6472e993b1f85c1b4986f3ee1f4540d4
64301a308c44021118e52a0c8e423f81dc527e71
'2011-11-16T09:17:41-05:00'
describe
'61063' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRC' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
e7bb631ceb01bbce858238a8b8f5ee2e
2a1819f2a31aaaa43fc8fa0df9c6f6a3b7296131
'2011-11-16T09:19:59-05:00'
describe
'22472' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRD' 'sip-files00017.pro'
9de79c2c86fe6c8f4e0f372b4a5b3dca
7009b19659f6b5760b3cd5940150d2e9aae311d3
'2011-11-16T09:19:35-05:00'
describe
'20259' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRE' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
76d98a78a090a5f2a4d8d98fe99480a5
724d71f1023fc31d3970819150da01b035248d4f
'2011-11-16T09:19:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRF' 'sip-files00017.tif'
32a83f9ca41537a72b926b4aa40f6436
acb617bcfe629ad29797128874089a1b823590ee
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRG' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a50d2e6330fdbdcf0ca51fbe224be092
4475dcc4fe86b537618e1de9625c8bf096d0d2b6
'2011-11-16T09:19:39-05:00'
describe
'6793' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRH' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
d083dfa80d416bcc7fa2f583630bbbb2
c9e75ae5a375b7cb6b9d5b68d1d4eda162eb2dab
'2011-11-16T09:22:06-05:00'
describe
'1208828' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRI' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
a3b07adecd40f52e0a369c6c38ad9208
b2915f211b158f6ebfac09dfe667be2b6cfb55b8
'2011-11-16T09:25:25-05:00'
describe
'64016' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRJ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
5074a57440fc77d4a08488c3eaba36fa
c16eabc5bba5add002391520ce2ed0a7da534176
describe
'23899' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRK' 'sip-files00018.pro'
ea6c8e7289dd5a264d964f08c6be514a
147d2015192e7aee861c77bad7b7fb6e3de05def
'2011-11-16T09:20:13-05:00'
describe
'21558' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRL' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
49dc93990ee0930b0ab27ada696ca434
8aef64997c850217f2011937cd5abe41549bac92
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRM' 'sip-files00018.tif'
c2e2d86fbe67d9c9885b72cc4e1ddaf9
5eb1253db67987e15a8e1b6cf7e5c5ca134cfc05
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRN' 'sip-files00018.txt'
b8e49d67c781c81fa52f0c44b58032a8
854461ecdff339ac5266e1111679f0bfc3a94953
'2011-11-16T09:22:57-05:00'
describe
'7055' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRO' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
cb756a008fd081d58bf32386e2294772
f519952b168a3fd05a705aee72ac077c89c221eb
'2011-11-16T09:23:24-05:00'
describe
'1179269' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRP' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
dfbc7221844a81717a0148163bd4653a
58d9807580b8fcefa9da272b3de592345bef2445
describe
'81139' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRQ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
8e5c01c3ce331ffb8983b4b4b146da03
e59f2ef59cec2d67eb9f6db958ef751889ae4679
'2011-11-16T09:19:56-05:00'
describe
'34733' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRR' 'sip-files00019.pro'
b2ccf4abe6f35291ca351c22bcd78236
fd8fec8bbe07d9a41f1a367732ff77b4223ed88d
'2011-11-16T09:25:57-05:00'
describe
'27677' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRS' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
66680c1a5bfed614b0ce37470f615ade
313a8b54467adc02cb2a41b2631562b88722d2df
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRT' 'sip-files00019.tif'
e0591902bac1ad1d4d1c930bae235375
9817e5807a32ab6d7574f0dfc6864dad2a194a6c
'2011-11-16T09:19:51-05:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRU' 'sip-files00019.txt'
8441606d18707bbb498ad2da59678b24
4cd00b118931cd415e1d1942f0643966b353bd0c
'2011-11-16T09:18:12-05:00'
describe
'9280' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRV' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
9362401b59ecd1bb357f96b8ec4b59c8
410ca9546e5d359b8904bcc13de49dc6b2ccfe6b
'2011-11-16T09:20:14-05:00'
describe
'1209097' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRW' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
c115af098d48a047992eaaf67c859e70
ff5567f542054c97a93f0b8fd13014010e8d3e2f
'2011-11-16T09:20:19-05:00'
describe
'85899' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRX' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
ba9f78eeac053dc536789992c6925d6d
36d4e44f1249541fe2c74107f276593de49cae2e
'2011-11-16T09:21:35-05:00'
describe
'35889' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRY' 'sip-files00020.pro'
d28a0dfc3267551b096843dbb0176e45
8ca5d603c4e97c2a9a2bb0616d74c15f02f5d0fb
'2011-11-16T09:24:27-05:00'
describe
'29959' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATRZ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
7f313208a78c1079344575a86c9156af
2237223a4c601ba685714c84516a1084fb0b9f84
'2011-11-16T09:21:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSA' 'sip-files00020.tif'
f10ccf0e09978e39baff88f58bc0b92e
665ebe1e0601ca133078b71a05f743c90128f84f
'2011-11-16T09:18:09-05:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSB' 'sip-files00020.txt'
966ed23b8a9ff4001f2331c5a8d60335
0b52119b88bf87e9326579ff6deda95e126b5954
describe
'8984' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSC' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
c1f1821aef09dded79c48ae41cddcd0b
a49dc8148492f69532ab5a7a7de6e7aa975c4ee8
'2011-11-16T09:17:44-05:00'
describe
'1179488' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSD' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
716645c2edfcb3a218742da3a59a9dce
99db00271273a541905ca29a8a14ef354fe627b8
describe
'82768' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSE' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
a264c214c1c5d3463bb6d461c0387b3f
1562dd65981343fd4523972cd5a8609e03d3ef50
'2011-11-16T09:18:06-05:00'
describe
'34999' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSF' 'sip-files00021.pro'
93e77f2803915562776008e67a9204a5
9c0648e1363ae0b73cfee516235e9ec0f6670151
'2011-11-16T09:23:12-05:00'
describe
'28848' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSG' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
b021f9439b86ef5b73916f2a4a9915aa
afca081dc5607305882c6e94fc5aa70a27ee245a
'2011-11-16T09:20:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSH' 'sip-files00021.tif'
c087c14d38a245922bef57e26f52d49d
9588e7016f6d71bae9eb6f4d77f04f1fa39dd37c
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSI' 'sip-files00021.txt'
f644b4f7ebde0c30da93219066e68231
430d53cf882b7c3d6102ba2b12ee63ee22ac881b
'2011-11-16T09:22:46-05:00'
describe
'9739' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSJ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
ffd555aca96a0a67d6cd7a8cdb8cb456
2d28fc6db5c9e81aa4a99e2e4cc37a6b3628b2c0
'2011-11-16T09:26:00-05:00'
describe
'1208969' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSK' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
02847d010029b1d506207899d30d924e
d861b3a095f3c500ca8e7866a6e8427939ec1512
'2011-11-16T09:24:47-05:00'
describe
'85804' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSL' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
4d9f2c8b3dbe2e38813e26a43819c4ab
679e87918d188fb16200cb83aeb03b88a3b04ad7
'2011-11-16T09:23:49-05:00'
describe
'35589' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSM' 'sip-files00022.pro'
ad50201ee22a35f1ddce58ff53eba76d
363dd631affe9635f6c6e87e4098900136f144b9
describe
'29619' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSN' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
b5f58677225d1ff7f9301b121f13323e
806c3a7a8ed44eb178a192249753463d9856df19
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSO' 'sip-files00022.tif'
4fcccaa7c8eb62154da44da784a365ef
79682128e62c754aa4b7055e3c665c083c1ba09a
'2011-11-16T09:22:16-05:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSP' 'sip-files00022.txt'
f2a1c76f20d7551d3e6f434c32024a3f
503011219fde20d01dc2d476067d51062f9f907c
'2011-11-16T09:23:40-05:00'
describe
'9060' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSQ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
e5b178d9ae3c25be8f9e6758148c2d7e
1d106ee6166d674c88723ca951d221222b828d63
'2011-11-16T09:20:10-05:00'
describe
'1179507' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSR' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
0c58579aa1f5087f07122badc2f93d1a
8127c3785ce62a1437282d4cd2eb5b025e3a42e6
describe
'80900' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSS' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
9329033e06d7b5933e3ce3b43e1227f9
7735b3a491535895a87402c7daea95e04d91b797
'2011-11-16T09:22:01-05:00'
describe
'34667' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATST' 'sip-files00023.pro'
31a289550e34fff3541daab65c704cbd
3ecbbb8aa5c126f0d448406d5c7451067d64ca7c
describe
'27843' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSU' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
1cdb27c91701d355822e13be72096c1b
0c09b325ce5e39b74375f4277c9026e12eae5ec3
'2011-11-16T09:20:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSV' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7e9f4e9ed010f7ed8b520495cb7ffeaf
869798d68bdcdef618d378f2a7682541d1b0c06e
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSW' 'sip-files00023.txt'
2bddd2bd398dd98d0f58e19f33253333
1366e4239625fdcfb342e38efd1d1902ff15c164
describe
'9126' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSX' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
22d40a95697864f7018b0a4299262773
047bb67ef2d4bcb977ce1ec24ebb0468fec5231f
'2011-11-16T09:18:59-05:00'
describe
'1209072' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSY' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ea72e28a7887ac9ff302844cfa5c63d1
b07617d30b33fc7e8cf089d15505da4d52ee6c4a
describe
'81835' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATSZ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
7fbf02b071c6098c68eb98709dd333d2
e8ba3b97accba6dd7886252eb6ef5ceb421db78f
'2011-11-16T09:21:07-05:00'
describe
'34452' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTA' 'sip-files00024.pro'
39b8d7b6305ecae2fba4e95eb94a01fb
4893869c620e07b1671e8f4e87000a5725b14f95
'2011-11-16T09:18:33-05:00'
describe
'28695' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTB' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
d534879bdbce516e5206e1ce33afa2a2
eb8e5fcf5c1fea54b73b345193822690c5f1c938
'2011-11-16T09:24:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTC' 'sip-files00024.tif'
1b47891e817305b8df2b615e9a1710e3
a70c6ed7c538822e3f6fcbb48f4da68407013084
'2011-11-16T09:26:47-05:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTD' 'sip-files00024.txt'
35ca00cdfddc08e77b3024c61c64fbf9
67456481d7d07a9de49c3ec379fd7da34ee00bc3
describe
'8806' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTE' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
40018d030d3c0e5ec5a8dfe1b5996622
ddb9ab98ac98351a17eff9b34de53a7d0d52e906
describe
'1179479' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTF' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
0c2e286af4c2e516cc3c036373cb9593
9cef2c4a5fc88f4686f4d6e5d577ada386ed4e1e
'2011-11-16T09:22:09-05:00'
describe
'86336' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTG' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
2a1ad9502f56e4abadc4fa6436d7e99c
6442e186a4568d09d6b00f6eb8057bae778d3f1a
'2011-11-16T09:22:45-05:00'
describe
'38202' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTH' 'sip-files00025.pro'
f3a33d9083b77b685313289acf8e7aa6
a5edf5151667f610634123b8ed57c586f1d6bea7
'2011-11-16T09:19:47-05:00'
describe
'29865' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTI' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
91a6d30d544e4a497aef78f092974653
2e4efd3759a175f6d650d24eb7ceaee282ceb587
'2011-11-16T09:19:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTJ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
4cf8566cebeb4f7f7ea8a29b7ef60f1a
c9e5b0031e315f05c357f7d1903eda188fdd56f4
'2011-11-16T09:18:16-05:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTK' 'sip-files00025.txt'
d544ee3414795b13f6a6dbb51b61b7b5
c335caeecee96fe2d1e9fc3185c8a11170a00999
'2011-11-16T09:26:42-05:00'
describe
'9612' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTL' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
2facfddfdba8d8bbc3b48372508a5065
e0778835df8a784378298bb63f9494ff42c373f6
describe
'1209000' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTM' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
f40e479862bf792d96dad4a69a1888d7
a30990f52364cdd359ea5e838505eba4a63a2762
'2011-11-16T09:24:48-05:00'
describe
'85073' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTN' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8dc40dd6c47c12d2f78481a283be5c93
470a4790577f9af4bc6feb8ce8d5e12543bcbbf8
'2011-11-16T09:17:57-05:00'
describe
'36082' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTO' 'sip-files00026.pro'
2422c9915eddb6094482e6484879d0f8
32947837823be18f178c8b67ae34b80143be739e
describe
'29393' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTP' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
3598c4257035602f48f33b675c279fcf
9f800f5c95319c6a829f75f5d58aa4775ed0fdb2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTQ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
c6a60793e26a452c7d4f36246a6207eb
ff230f1232a17b95b99ffee6a86a00e9b76cb811
'2011-11-16T09:24:07-05:00'
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTR' 'sip-files00026.txt'
cc29e46416a71dea8e32d603b13d99d4
6e633ec8bed68185e4cdc72cf113502d4c40c64b
'2011-11-16T09:25:20-05:00'
describe
'9050' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTS' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
a3aa7fb5cba3871049cc378ecf1070a1
ab71525f052cd6ea1f22d0163ded627c99770006
'2011-11-16T09:23:06-05:00'
describe
'1179339' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTT' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
dc11b7033bad096536956abd2954b48b
2834c38a49dd742732437ae7b2b04851e349023c
'2011-11-16T09:24:21-05:00'
describe
'51512' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTU' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6ff6d5c1e5dba0a8c88764b5e75da662
12194be0096cbbb586404c444c9017f04c4cdc8c
describe
'17184' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTV' 'sip-files00027.pro'
8b407f8309881d47c28bc6ade21db3ca
97e4f008d7e0eb237db9644062956b9635327d02
'2011-11-16T09:23:54-05:00'
describe
'16707' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTW' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
dbf81a7e8a2ac7dfde863a1d261d3436
cf7d67d3da7f9d121345afa7be30284d7b9b2448
'2011-11-16T09:24:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTX' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c3e9fc4968e3aa1f961710fa4194c357
5e595d441833160a5b8c0f61e1ef3e82eb656b5a
'2011-11-16T09:20:21-05:00'
describe
'691' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTY' 'sip-files00027.txt'
16db7e077ae0e8650466cc624e79c766
9b76bec65d30b6c99e0d17879d450935ffa05592
describe
'5591' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATTZ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
466b4dee2e636c787012a80788189c42
ad537598fc454c1ff67e944ea90b77221c023316
'2011-11-16T09:20:37-05:00'
describe
'1209061' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUA' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
4b67f1e7f825b4e653d220ef6b448ef4
618310fb5c2fc0385ccff1883f98869daea29a8e
describe
'61836' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUB' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
a986d904bf776c049237c64f5b12d2d2
7c1e5f680d4e4f7156fcf68d9fa306e8cb6986b2
describe
'25440' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUC' 'sip-files00028.pro'
ccef5101266a6ed645a3f761eaaf89e7
c1e1c1885067394c82ee8fc80b4a89110baa3f02
describe
'20860' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUD' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
2cb66e0692f286ef48d76076a55014dc
967f7b1c5874f64f2109d85c2dd4bf861b06458e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUE' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a62117655a3659e6a147a072561fa5d0
e1bf8c0a595b1c2a83b486bc95955129ce1f306d
'2011-11-16T09:17:47-05:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUF' 'sip-files00028.txt'
5e95d287cab2fa75efaa3f5a0fbdfb5b
fc9e6b88018fa4ef62e9f0cdbbdcbd1774fa6e3b
'2011-11-16T09:21:54-05:00'
describe
'6657' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUG' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
4a5e479f5dabfbfcfc9dafff3cfb537f
c1de1adf72b7695b2bd428aa58a90c438ef544b0
describe
'1179496' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUH' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
48649481d21a9a94e429c5f1f5ec365c
dde65b6bf7fa484ed1d678b8a98191fd972e689b
'2011-11-16T09:23:45-05:00'
describe
'80392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUI' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
31558934c4540a68fd851e72e6b58f07
a63f01a4fc9d7330f7787e7b99520497a53454d6
'2011-11-16T09:23:26-05:00'
describe
'36791' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUJ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
f2c39df5ab0edd5f6ff075febef3efb2
237313e320f327393441fbb45e3a8f0efab0140e
'2011-11-16T09:26:31-05:00'
describe
'28667' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUK' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
16e7a1a251a1dfdf1ce01c4e6aac5527
4d0c5d23301f4a85518e97d498e58ba6001bd10e
'2011-11-16T09:23:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUL' 'sip-files00029.tif'
ef2c2e637725e30f54030655c6135abc
12500221d57c7622f19a560f742091ca31cb0077
'2011-11-16T09:21:06-05:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUM' 'sip-files00029.txt'
8188003dd2d7b2695dabd2677b469a37
f5ae491feb2504ea38c3c264f4ff72ace941aee2
'2011-11-16T09:17:54-05:00'
describe
'9263' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUN' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
dd964fae9ae437d14e20374982e56234
dbdd91b5a6e6ce991b08821c727818a13f0d5f88
'2011-11-16T09:21:59-05:00'
describe
'1209027' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUO' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
b49f985a261d19b3faa08a20e19b66fe
f87703389e112525393d61f4b7c7257e144d476d
describe
'76775' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUP' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
5d077ea91dd7df1397cf9082c6a5180e
e1ba1bc7b66b49783cb3c8a7d6a34e6ba9090c64
'2011-11-16T09:19:04-05:00'
describe
'34048' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUQ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
53a2087f97c90008bc2a4918dc32d011
67293350541216d91d24bc31babf5c27120d285a
'2011-11-16T09:19:24-05:00'
describe
'27686' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUR' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
f7367005e48f5f39c59dae05b84a4145
8b8f8c5dbfa10ed55a78062da660870129726463
'2011-11-16T09:20:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUS' 'sip-files00030.tif'
c11698ca6e9cdbba5289621cb3313a1e
0b65b4dc593240aff1d681b51441d0be75c7c79d
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUT' 'sip-files00030.txt'
5b4230a40caf7754109ec5ee4f4c8291
498b9f944aa6fbee8b744c2bf5c40c39a765e086
'2011-11-16T09:20:34-05:00'
describe
'8721' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUU' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
0f26d4a7a69ca1acbc6bad61231bb6fa
d905ed705331c66d2a75b89e5982e19480c68228
'2011-11-16T09:23:46-05:00'
describe
'1179448' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUV' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
0c23cc5d9dd96896f6db01e968f9a15e
51e25308bf61d01111dd4ffc43f1836d24f7165d
'2011-11-16T09:18:04-05:00'
describe
'74861' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUW' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e3b20a7dec3541bfd078f708852b116e
5a4992f3247600cca9ba9f31ded5fc1a0383fd3e
describe
'32980' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUX' 'sip-files00031.pro'
96840ce3cead609778cfd631c687ff52
a144c278aa96bd0ccf6d7a43b8f97b30d88a789a
'2011-11-16T09:17:50-05:00'
describe
'27170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUY' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
57e72363a10542ee34f3a66de3729b04
4f8ddde29c0d548aa21e596bfb657bcfc47748f3
'2011-11-16T09:25:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATUZ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
3b9373073197ebfc42ff6b8972e50328
191d452968b0a0eca993935a9748f8350b72e958
'2011-11-16T09:18:11-05:00'
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVA' 'sip-files00031.txt'
f98febb5a10c47de95ea2f0829a60c76
d9c8673d68260ded8af3ab32a32dcd4fb9873c9f
'2011-11-16T09:19:36-05:00'
describe
'8813' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVB' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
4404bbd12ab0d0ec76ea644352b2b5ff
2c01ff754d2ff25e2ab96f0687743cec9103f572
'2011-11-16T09:24:26-05:00'
describe
'1209025' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVC' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
90619734bfe9b8a12c53c6a2003a7b5f
61d68f6797ec68c0e0e93e9a8acc69405005bbee
describe
'74683' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVD' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
0d8c4280bc0843311cabe8be499fc5f9
8749a648f98a8cb6ea02a9c46843dd10f7643e15
'2011-11-16T09:23:21-05:00'
describe
'32986' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVE' 'sip-files00032.pro'
3c59e10435f19ccaa90b6a50bfd8645c
aa9edd951962c47f8a6d8af8d2720dd12d40579e
'2011-11-16T09:23:37-05:00'
describe
'26857' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVF' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
be8f2ef55c443892bb6e6bc53f96d609
72b81964ecfb576c519d18d670b5e8c2329091db
'2011-11-16T09:19:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVG' 'sip-files00032.tif'
078901a650952d40d3411511f42484c2
2ca69ec5b467f31f269af523527cc84ee5661d8f
'2011-11-16T09:18:42-05:00'
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVH' 'sip-files00032.txt'
445119a0310a8d129d65521f351d2689
ea0b67088679dc2950bf5e4d93cb98f337c9e1b6
'2011-11-16T09:18:25-05:00'
describe
'8543' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVI' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
959fd52ff0017abd701787e5c678ae6d
6b5062412695d455bfe23db0c3027234693d4291
'2011-11-16T09:26:19-05:00'
describe
'1179469' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVJ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
4035608f2e59452aeb87030a1119c515
ab4092d4c677056d5b06535f8318fea77d8a990e
describe
'78886' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVK' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
76069e90e86190a1306ff8474619f169
532227190207df06ba817cbcd1cbd89438f021a3
'2011-11-16T09:18:37-05:00'
describe
'35209' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVL' 'sip-files00033.pro'
e8a2fbac3c939e34bfa9852e31cda256
5c4de8611ee2d3939890ef1675f1489bfae006c2
describe
'28046' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVM' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
151ff71a3f145733f005cbf068533af3
7854854b8fa8bfd785cc04c4d076f6cdca53a80a
'2011-11-16T09:19:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVN' 'sip-files00033.tif'
854e2848a3121bd1a62326ce3aae58cc
3352c1bc19c33c9dd62f921c09ff9faa8d6e27f2
'2011-11-16T09:22:27-05:00'
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVO' 'sip-files00033.txt'
afa0b5b36d0eeb656537e5a74a9940b0
fe0b7c68d3dfe6692577b2d97884cd719f11712b
'2011-11-16T09:20:31-05:00'
describe
'9235' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVP' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
6c1bcb010112eb84a9258a0999cb8d88
a78ffbf763ed618ed6dc7c56048d93524ec2c255
'2011-11-16T09:18:49-05:00'
describe
'1209076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVQ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
5e2b7c3e7556469a39a81aba7e82fcf2
a384388219445f14b446ecfd6e342a28cb079a8a
'2011-11-16T09:20:03-05:00'
describe
'80794' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVR' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
088c6d043f8337e4ba7fcc5c9b4b56bf
5c5fde1e00d6c01421821d19347aa4c201e9b1a3
'2011-11-16T09:25:17-05:00'
describe
'36496' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVS' 'sip-files00034.pro'
c26c195764352beac06ddac9e9f9e46e
2dd60f05c4279ac2e5085285f397d46929ff14e6
describe
'29063' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVT' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
0396d86498c548f4365b7585c5427e32
c71457580161068b122f891208421efa1d4423bb
'2011-11-16T09:23:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVU' 'sip-files00034.tif'
0b076161f953058895456affc47fbc89
d3f17f641295f18b66a6f6f07bdd8fa5b15e4f4d
'2011-11-16T09:26:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVV' 'sip-files00034.txt'
ddae841c328c843245315a2dc75b1db1
70b5ea9965bb3c2addb970417c7855522ac70e3b
'2011-11-16T09:24:46-05:00'
describe
'8954' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVW' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
93d6ae6e77ab3e2b5c77245e3c5a6bb9
23ec3af1842fc4e955161f2ad83101a271d6082f
'2011-11-16T09:21:20-05:00'
describe
'1179470' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVX' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
deb0dead0dcfd71e3ce76e97ad2da548
dc8b62d77772d6be2d18ed2e242eb305e1ef4dbc
'2011-11-16T09:26:15-05:00'
describe
'80244' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVY' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
f9e6f03a13c87ea736fc87527d24c0ef
2fbdc2e8fb782fab4fa5157cc6ad1c4fb4ad988a
describe
'36114' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATVZ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
1a866d50dd00b1c4c600f74dbc0061d6
26a33463e417be6927dbcd84c5217d03461cfd57
'2011-11-16T09:22:34-05:00'
describe
'28789' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWA' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
73b33194b36d863cacf0542466dffeec
38cc5f7a07e8c7fb5ec47a63d89b7f60b2a87485
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWB' 'sip-files00035.tif'
5ef07d8d9848693755d96f21665d20c3
2369cd95133c328e07cc11632ca35e2fd269ab96
'2011-11-16T09:26:51-05:00'
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWC' 'sip-files00035.txt'
28a30ee27c5579496bd1a8cccba36bda
6ddb6813dc44dbe17f209eebc57c5baa454fb925
describe
'9454' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWD' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
663c0d993134a2873bd107b904c178a7
b07e7ba50ceda239a7840df967229522ed9a6119
'2011-11-16T09:26:28-05:00'
describe
'1209094' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWE' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
8df416231fb45453b7ff40805726989c
1ffd955fa9a79d2649a8550bb9ed3be089d36f27
'2011-11-16T09:22:24-05:00'
describe
'62251' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWF' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
2b0b11319aaccac826324d096713eb2b
9be03d1e59ccd68a39c1b16c338d1d0c681c0746
describe
'26202' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWG' 'sip-files00036.pro'
5c36879bcb114e4bd686f07f7d725412
ee58a20f794689e52825db85d7486c360af8d304
'2011-11-16T09:19:52-05:00'
describe
'21772' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWH' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
5b9e3c81750788f92d8c1ec25ebcd20a
e05bd24a544e646444c5a7178cf5aa928317077e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWI' 'sip-files00036.tif'
eaaf79775ea1d8c5e8daf94ba3060e14
e7d51120ad2ec9029c6123adb513b0b220f929f0
'2011-11-16T09:17:45-05:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWJ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
0e643c86a5593ed49dca98686e603fa1
a4f7a4a433e8ce0b57ecccdc9d056c3aa58abf4e
describe
'7004' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWK' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
55eb134a83a0304c1d1c0102f43dab5d
d234f892720a026f5a32e99f839db3dc59a2ebd6
'2011-11-16T09:21:14-05:00'
describe
'1147274' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWL' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
d35574edd8390c0c33a629aa697eec80
d1ef642340ed682702d68e5003d4d6aeb5e18813
describe
'59613' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWM' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
3def31bc2e4993707a6ba68f79580962
197bb384c477eba8e5856a3fe17d6d918a820bab
'2011-11-16T09:19:03-05:00'
describe
'25125' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWN' 'sip-files00037.pro'
bc9d014a857af53b2a6b1986af027879
bf9eea351e0411aa850395b9199700ddb8f164d2
'2011-11-16T09:20:45-05:00'
describe
'20837' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWO' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
2ba40d8d9f0c9dadaa828922a71aa743
f8135489daad74e90d4bf1c3c7249eee93541c00
'2011-11-16T09:18:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWP' 'sip-files00037.tif'
105ee71bc9cee58392c4c516bf42c289
63a316a8acde00a6d307f8b59b061a13cf6fbe3c
'2011-11-16T09:22:33-05:00'
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWQ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
93994e5f75903c096664d4ac81b06cae
42e573d5af2472b69d2374443319024690eb2592
'2011-11-16T09:18:32-05:00'
describe
'7023' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWR' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
d742c4ab1a4376dde38a45ee420966b1
e8f4e0ec17d2d38eaf481695a3db50ae1192fb6c
'2011-11-16T09:22:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWS' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
0d8d729a2c02e4e1b54d5d0ffb280307
13d2d67cb76a1be99aa4ee10605005a6a2ffa580
'2011-11-16T09:21:50-05:00'
describe
'81154' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWT' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
6c55568cb0068b9ecd05c0e10f8c7092
f478e2e3b56b0a93ce9cdc9ae984bfeacc4e3dd1
'2011-11-16T09:23:52-05:00'
describe
'36015' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWU' 'sip-files00038.pro'
58e817ebc314c5f4c60046f0b8670e51
4c3e8f9109a88467cf0fc75e86de219981d86424
'2011-11-16T09:21:49-05:00'
describe
'29048' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWV' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
34aa2e1b858cb45c2e370fb1e790d2e5
f95fea2f398f80d7cf6d7789c3cc3842590708e6
'2011-11-16T09:17:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWW' 'sip-files00038.tif'
4112f89a0b2b0f1e7e39571e2baa8ad5
31a027e40c850ae271f544ef94ea806ce8b02897
'2011-11-16T09:20:30-05:00'
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWX' 'sip-files00038.txt'
9a0fc947be6e1bffdcd99284fe52fcc5
c1fe3107891beeab593fc029b0cfe39353976f19
describe
'8964' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWY' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
9474921ab6bc3d34cd3592812456e7b0
29f26cc8508421bd8e98b37075b90851b73d7f20
describe
'1179513' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATWZ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
db08dfb48c99083620a59d0613b7c976
2e70eb16be33a7327f55fcdd10abcafc01a3a6cb
'2011-11-16T09:26:29-05:00'
describe
'78348' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXA' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
db96a771f330bbd96021e36955f89185
155ddb7d5f1c4d6c17f79b22f67533950fb626e6
describe
'35134' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXB' 'sip-files00039.pro'
27946dcd512af0012b51e16b21885ad3
23e640e0bb5a634c087bc1294450bcb64370b5a9
'2011-11-16T09:25:13-05:00'
describe
'27894' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXC' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
128418ca5e52f05d4c6a1f5c39293e6f
880f66618c946baa8037aa29b38178869e2b8f63
'2011-11-16T09:24:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXD' 'sip-files00039.tif'
21c9a914ca78cddf626cb577ab26c84e
7f98222839263bf6bd262786a976d37693bd63cc
'2011-11-16T09:23:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXE' 'sip-files00039.txt'
2f3383fbf298c52eb35c3d38b470cca4
6aa135acb82f60f50f46251f73a8d9bb92ce50a8
describe
'9188' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXF' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
e938efbef5e0225acb3a0fb6b6bca3ae
323ef7463143602dddc8773655a03c12a6d308ef
'2011-11-16T09:20:02-05:00'
describe
'1209069' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXG' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
bc63be3a799e9ee5478ae016ab0ff1bf
a64abcc39d11d23e689187b105f160b9524ef77a
'2011-11-16T09:26:21-05:00'
describe
'91825' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXH' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
c7df8b092bf0849f9088dd24b15856ec
16950aa0c0e254deb19fc57a69f52ef327d76da8
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXI' 'sip-files00040.pro'
542060ac4a7e290c0abf05f3a02217de
8ff0b71bb47cfc083e77b77bd1755439a7e30c3c
describe
'26404' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXJ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
20ad8dfb3f07c9f54f81beed7f890e78
4d353097d176a992c54fe0fc56fed1d5b6baa800
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXK' 'sip-files00040.tif'
5febd73160f1efedc179ed673d9aca4d
4a269e427cdd31951df00d68ea7995c89b94ffca
'2011-11-16T09:18:48-05:00'
describe
'282' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXL' 'sip-files00040.txt'
1b625e979c57d7667ac42451305bcc6d
266c45d61334824c403f5e7b75016610447ecb67
describe
Invalid character
'8395' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXM' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
63fc1c37f2668e7bce13099bf92416ee
de36f0891bb131d1ec66b8f4cfed5728fe674bc5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXN' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
f7e9ab05baad27cb2e6f49efa6f0d3ac
9e78428f1efb611e523c9c31bde1595f5bc05d38
'2011-11-16T09:20:40-05:00'
describe
'76263' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXO' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
91d73c90b6e764df99ada8e891206918
fd812f8d321596fd081bffc1ce42af2b1d800e49
'2011-11-16T09:19:34-05:00'
describe
'34181' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXP' 'sip-files00042.pro'
83c6a6eca39927f9c9175df29ca34eb7
3280b5abbd05835b8061788449c1b309f926962f
describe
'26798' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXQ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
4c5480a532f739745857ae28aabde21f
0729785cf4bd2359b245a455597952160b096ca8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXR' 'sip-files00042.tif'
d4da35e68d8c4ab902fd8eb73adb676d
a5dfc00a6ab8db4e4b0690683b1e762e70cb809c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXS' 'sip-files00042.txt'
07724db594ff2e9673fb40f2eb6c81ff
85517ddd8a824945519234e51f4495ae22a1382e
describe
'8463' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXT' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
1d4c8f073470eeba55a13e508798b161
bb3342d86d0f528a4d233c72e341af74a2f0baa2
describe
'711227' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXU' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
2c9d5791be9b3e0b7669e7cb33b1ad98
f091770ed5ffba55515ded7bde8738f3566918a0
'2011-11-16T09:23:14-05:00'
describe
'19426' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXV' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
e258cf6e79476d9da06dc6ca0db09c8a
8d138911d86fcd6d2ed8a21940454c0d1f1c05fa
describe
'4801' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXW' 'sip-files00043.pro'
bc1d9b269d5fa6f7ba92177988f7a0a3
23e7c95276aa103476e1a38a44093d72ac1acbb1
describe
'6485' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXX' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
12e18829dc15ecdda679616fb6573d08
d5cb33e3c38139c031f622859ab277fa2f3b1050
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXY' 'sip-files00043.tif'
8944136c11a1f738c9d0c45790cbc4b1
7a5f17cf3ce6d4683473eb166a8cec23d48a44af
describe
'201' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATXZ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
6dd40c43eefeca5ccfd4f3e73ecc1ffe
9bce964a55e6dfd460b36bb2908e0349e6346726
describe
'2483' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYA' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
f37858f3da579f886b693b5929caea68
72b2ddf1339c3442cd82deeea116e2098e4353da
'2011-11-16T09:19:37-05:00'
describe
'1131380' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYB' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
77769dc19a63b13a164d4d62ff193fc1
939b5bead0dfda3749c3fe47773b018e0b559424
'2011-11-16T09:18:19-05:00'
describe
'53741' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYC' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
fa15e37da8dd0cf3aa0a647e505c271d
7d1857d0a9d17586a45d81a016d912f245c12c50
describe
'21645' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYD' 'sip-files00044.pro'
1e07627de5b2e372b78aa124d734e292
35fa47f4f4c6ecfbb49e832f020420fc3f99b7dc
describe
'18901' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYE' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
9fa2ebae5c8bb55fd6a1f22777041a8e
2489cecc9553732579a33f2682c5d9c80bae2361
'2011-11-16T09:18:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYF' 'sip-files00044.tif'
a4a7d878311a9ab9c77f57ddd906a3c8
f761ab9e020e14159c7de61954b3dc807ebf50c9
'2011-11-16T09:20:36-05:00'
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYG' 'sip-files00044.txt'
40c617dda3586754c704885f8b9e313a
4dae6fad834c5eaf10c8f12034161f24c01c2451
'2011-11-16T09:24:19-05:00'
describe
'6401' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYH' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
3b15522e6af68c5f6271c6b32cc6c1a0
95fae63f63cee10421b6be8c40763621bebc927e
describe
'1179485' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYI' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
eaf7657f5fb3209da0b5947a8ff09c01
c59d4d96023add53f54e8fd7545953aa9942aab7
'2011-11-16T09:24:30-05:00'
describe
'82528' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYJ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
b5a11132eda1467c4000c07bfd07af77
dcf545a41af19aab78f1d84742d9c0c6613c97b4
'2011-11-16T09:22:13-05:00'
describe
'37515' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYK' 'sip-files00045.pro'
07b6b1af127f3a747074b89bdcf965c3
198aa6ea5d74373e46bc86a945caaac05975110f
describe
'29091' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYL' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
712ec7d5cc5f6412259aad0c033d2423
df0bf73b78eb0eeceb33821ea7b99c1af97d34fc
'2011-11-16T09:22:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYM' 'sip-files00045.tif'
2fa83740f6170141d24592f1b907e984
b0aabacdf7f920d238d47a9fc61d899ffd263451
'2011-11-16T09:24:05-05:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYN' 'sip-files00045.txt'
1ccf65a1d5fdf84c1109c319ce4871b1
d45c94c0e5c73d11eabd4bd5cf9d3ca5bb04b21b
describe
'9376' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYO' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
679bcca3cc1051f05d6a307a2520fd20
cfc8f10a99f455e046924a3b1436df4d5f864134
describe
'1144367' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYP' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
a6d31010bf942905774fcbb35bf24f73
639174ca948c3e47204bc41aefe956762c44a991
'2011-11-16T09:26:41-05:00'
describe
'77592' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYQ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
be549b9e7789ba1caa8684399afa6f8f
f88974a2aaddbae3f60fdf614ef654fec4845d29
'2011-11-16T09:18:24-05:00'
describe
'35277' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYR' 'sip-files00046.pro'
8615da372cbaa350e000eb9447191b39
044ed8ba42aa7e4a88becb3421fd764b8a67b575
describe
'28158' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYS' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
6d1ba4cee946e2f97df6191cc2291af4
3989f3b4462c5a1b2f8713501f964102b915b2d1
'2011-11-16T09:24:53-05:00'
describe
'9165505' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
2589c3f75fbaa9a5d1e540207f3a2f98
34b99592fe7aa6c79e17498bc9ee75fa8d5f4d56
'2011-11-16T09:22:56-05:00'
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
471a5d7480c4b262d18412b61125e059
ae1645f96b609643d304aa1c9a0caba7e5b13e9e
'2011-11-16T09:19:26-05:00'
describe
'9246' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYV' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
6b47194da68b6d98ff963cec68adb062
8debcca6f56f97e195374c372d8b458630ed055f
'2011-11-16T09:20:53-05:00'
describe
'1203865' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYW' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
0ff024d0feed13c24886cf9c7565030a
59dff4e01dbca493169be1d2e5395f87dfffaaf1
'2011-11-16T09:20:04-05:00'
describe
'77626' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYX' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
fc37e71cb9e21c53c63b3a81c2244c02
0d9251beeaf670925a547c8c89bc7933ca4b554e
describe
'36061' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYY' 'sip-files00047.pro'
9d0a16b1e8d34a6e90e494d192228608
cbf688c5ff6daf2b383010c1d8b740d983a6b114
'2011-11-16T09:24:56-05:00'
describe
'27787' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATYZ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
10d9856ecad90199115c14c79400b7a7
93dd7377b63f3cc548abcf32836d51bb3c32992e
describe
'9641781' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZA' 'sip-files00047.tif'
356f4a48b0924e6bce276e3761642f6b
ca0c1d3fa7af69c845b772ea37ac8e7bfe82cc62
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZB' 'sip-files00047.txt'
a7ff1dca481214721494c85be9c85e30
f15f5ec2caf058595b9f0789224d681507cf51fe
describe
'8807' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
ffd57f39154504dd8b6fc79b99788215
cd9655d29db34be21de39a3f700a82e5f5ba35f8
'2011-11-16T09:20:42-05:00'
describe
'1169044' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZD' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
1d43e84ffa122603235992edba27207e
aeb1bf54591024378247568422e0234a046166b2
describe
'71751' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZE' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
847892f173633527b1b127f38f852fa2
15b23b16b58cf5a4a6fd72ef20e88e1d43028183
describe
'33483' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZF' 'sip-files00048.pro'
fdb11df506bdf269e35fab7ca162198e
64b76a815d2e41698741793ed08444e3c7d3d9fc
describe
'26238' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZG' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f2da5c0a02d7fd008ad18b0f63f307b0
2a0211ce31d8c54f2d7566a4adb5a3eba2f0ee53
'2011-11-16T09:21:55-05:00'
describe
'9597325' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZH' 'sip-files00048.tif'
bf6a00ceddb44cf621adab75e00a33dd
eed075560a6aaa55bfec5b49850b3af8fa34d729
'2011-11-16T09:18:51-05:00'
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZI' 'sip-files00048.txt'
b5405d111b3850dbecc12b7cd44d43d3
c92fe598a73b09a99ee5df87216e8c1ae991ea36
'2011-11-16T09:23:29-05:00'
describe
'8627' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZJ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
78bf6b764cadc89b608a4e1193656127
5cde261967eba570dd934148ec95df158f6c5f28
'2011-11-16T09:22:10-05:00'
describe
'1200540' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZK' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
459831122fc2418cfa39c77ffcbf6ffc
5c102aec698618a1843aba89cf536815304af155
describe
'75010' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZL' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
c6af2987cc96b3484ca7a240a0fa05fc
3097957a2ae4e0b7c0d70786160cd2e8d2e503b2
'2011-11-16T09:22:00-05:00'
describe
'35849' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZM' 'sip-files00049.pro'
bdee4b3fad9515b0982707420a6d9482
70e4b5fbbeead44c076b5eb1bc7de1644c672174
describe
'27383' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZN' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
29060e2e66f7cd8dc4b798925c931ccd
fe1f028147c71ff4b8ae46ca6e3d67229792b6c7
'2011-11-16T09:23:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZO' 'sip-files00049.tif'
7e0408eeca7b2b02880b39d2efc9692c
e3169915e2460a41720e5a4141021cb7f1701721
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZP' 'sip-files00049.txt'
f06f2502931b346670bd39c633e6db74
19cf0db8248c01d2054f10c124d08c63d6be561f
describe
'8745' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZQ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
21b53c54193f84e0623b012a08e82ae8
ec97b993949e0bee9df9a20a2fcbeee8e2761df2
'2011-11-16T09:23:53-05:00'
describe
'1198318' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZR' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
10cbe3d0d92df76166ab69d575a977f4
6926d4ced1eac88dccfaa5942e0740be51b34235
describe
'73304' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZS' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
9cbf5f052e3bdcf2fb6ccf19ac6b3156
d02a704c17407efa38c72d574b22f70bc53adcf2
describe
'34637' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZT' 'sip-files00050.pro'
08c4bf0fa34c14a639b9e5d5b5afa1cf
4490a383c0170ee42975af2ee77cef0515322b1b
'2011-11-16T09:22:30-05:00'
describe
'26188' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
0017332553b4ba03fcef118e163bdf35
5e1fd06860570c0bad1310d73c0cab57016036b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
07e2d925a03a5aa15003d67454fd2dce
6c0bb38542e0bc22448fba55dea9a3d211afb0ad
'2011-11-16T09:18:28-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZW' 'sip-files00050.txt'
dcdf6b8a25790a3649fc38bf4f286c65
1707857cdfaad47ce23957f7e868a9d94bd198ef
'2011-11-16T09:25:56-05:00'
describe
'8615' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZX' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
e21cf00c3c64f113de30389f7d7c84a4
9ba0f335f914d5236d556b22378a330bd92cdfc9
describe
'1203856' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZY' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
c3d4534358cb54615eef540cd6de64df
8be921a7b62e3aa6ed594056980490096aa1f0f2
describe
'76723' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAATZZ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
de9d1b426ce7bd016760169da501c594
5595f373a514034eeaf651d1744452e091b353a2
'2011-11-16T09:22:40-05:00'
describe
'35097' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAA' 'sip-files00051.pro'
d2a1f66f3834fa2b08b4954022c0bfea
dbf3392bf20fb3d715c3a57599d20dbc192df3b5
'2011-11-16T09:17:49-05:00'
describe
'27222' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAB' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
669a492bfecb485f917b1fed2f5fb236
b8d7b96b527cd854ca9ac2a23c895ccd7acc1f13
'2011-11-16T09:17:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAC' 'sip-files00051.tif'
826502d5be6b95bd4c6fd776a65472c4
ee3470297c5fd4ee5f84c4bab5c97a9dd0245959
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAD' 'sip-files00051.txt'
0d0baa24b15897bb9a1aa89c01eeca86
fb334a59ddd7a229ccec31e23d3ea72f26bc2b28
'2011-11-16T09:24:59-05:00'
describe
'8700' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAE' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
ffbe015673a530b4e595d7c19e4d10e3
00d49af774c5710922bc15d9910e098c6becc3f4
'2011-11-16T09:19:17-05:00'
describe
'1198271' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c9bf60b99a63f2e34406c8e1bfcef600
3c7715a582683c0d1d77a92b9c59cf7ecb3decac
'2011-11-16T09:24:14-05:00'
describe
'72047' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAG' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
f5e66f443e42a6b88fed101dfdb2c4a6
3c2d89b621a00f7adf0898323e23267dbe9c074d
describe
'33737' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAH' 'sip-files00052.pro'
15f73a79997d0a41001c71869abce630
1798e8c6aa904bc85ebf717aff4fb9137616a339
describe
'25862' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
4000a830836d6689e3758d67fc125054
f7c3f7785d98f495d633aa88db1c6da97917fd59
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0e8585d2dbad615e3bab5b2ae4266285
5ee1b14df76c2f72156b6e59d199f578a9993a32
'2011-11-16T09:18:53-05:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAK' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f754234f8df0dfeaca28358364be5698
02fe1dc5750b7f3015b6724f5b3b513faab2f240
'2011-11-16T09:18:18-05:00'
describe
'8624' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAL' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
bb277324168de580cbe01854087c7898
535ffc99a1ae852f4508b8aaf85592a987f38ec8
describe
'916503' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAM' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e249612dad85aeedaa4bee8e1456c7fa
4b79ad252eeb84b1fb9356bfc30ea8df27cd4773
'2011-11-16T09:17:38-05:00'
describe
'33680' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
901a4ce3e826e3674653d3cb40fd323c
eae0f23c41f87ba3274947298c28e834a6ef3120
'2011-11-16T09:18:01-05:00'
describe
'11764' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
d96c2a9cba9d7d6b88f3eb5f061b7d89
a4c7f308da6a0e79ea29b32978728df55a377f07
describe
'11221' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAP' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
f0e023cc8f6fbf73cff6ccdd30b18fdf
80cdb2558a46e0f978d69e3e98d40024578c1904
'2011-11-16T09:21:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
7f57e790efb647b6821d0b49c9cfa29f
e67f98aee34223074a47ae5aaaeb4bfc8a2c8d75
'2011-11-16T09:24:32-05:00'
describe
'492' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAR' 'sip-files00053.txt'
78e113ca95dc1340f3c3934cad4e69e1
909631c9718a5c33995613a02ee705724c8ba6bd
describe
'3975' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
5c20111df59530d65845f89865c44362
e41d233ff92318a916bc004a4188ad11c895a241
'2011-11-16T09:19:42-05:00'
describe
'1198279' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
e76fb82a0744b13878ba83be3572c2e8
756e151911afd76c7601021e7bb816ff4bdd179c
describe
'60458' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
dde7a127c68bb8a9c500ffc7fcb7ef93
8f065ffdeb71c5e5a8332110c70eb2f44a0e6f7b
'2011-11-16T09:23:50-05:00'
describe
'26057' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAV' 'sip-files00054.pro'
62f5ba7ee66dabed2ad0e5d1341ee368
43d7906d9dcb70a9bfbe3fb1643d88fc2adb67de
describe
'21339' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
ef15004e7f90336f3c730e4858223f2c
9cff0964b1dc7fd31ba258dd9d18e14b66eeec31
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAX' 'sip-files00054.tif'
1b3a0c64b45af9e312a990f5287fdaa6
106f2ce81743c02f23cde98a63b048e533ee8629
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
3ba729eb636944a2ea5f140557ec2652
c34685649d38589b40ef19b1dbcd7affcf454fe0
describe
'7065' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUAZ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
94b0547a2ce2bf911cfa27525cab28b7
22e69b434d3c826f63c19876899395a2c1039ecc
'2011-11-16T09:25:58-05:00'
describe
'1203846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
8fbddd4be71948c9fa4a0dd0786aa006
3e01cf98d843ba4d7c9e60960dce3c8d3857aabc
'2011-11-16T09:23:57-05:00'
describe
'72573' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBB' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
2bd6dd6d2a3e53e9b25ef131432d6a0a
2457f3c28b9637a172aeb6735383050eb78802ba
describe
'31982' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
13d4c4def3cd27e39d92d32b464ea2a9
ef035f73600cbb541200ad0c9ce07befdabd59ce
'2011-11-16T09:17:56-05:00'
describe
'25798' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
9d3f33217ce4f0735d0ac8eb48700945
6275577a91c5cad7420b1e928b7906f6fa3cfd43
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
9b911bdb14085544c18ed2bfda5052a3
6dd85cac11b8b2993a68bc22612a8dbf9a560daf
'2011-11-16T09:18:27-05:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
ed2d33de47c74a3121e8384f8cc3a27a
269d1a607b53e30784425f04899ffd30a51bfd24
describe
'8685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBG' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
1089ffdffe2c0f27aba46c890d2c93c4
6727af77ad0ffb8024ed3e76123419f5a2438db7
'2011-11-16T09:19:44-05:00'
describe
'1198234' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
fc7ce6d45f0239061d5191f2eac980c4
8f966a7194f87a686b5a5400283ef0fae68cab4a
describe
'76026' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
278b57bf42457273839692f649461278
273b91be9ed7a5b91977a0b366e8c6c4923ed47a
'2011-11-16T09:19:33-05:00'
describe
'35063' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBJ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
07983c09555aaa499a7ed5d6c7e3ed0d
09c7427f450a3e7171dfce3c0f6edd54cf6ac6c1
describe
'26774' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
20ae552e65ba86f48ecaf8ca88675dc3
3f45693d806d2284ef234743768e02450c8ddaab
'2011-11-16T09:23:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
058554f289d7de0ea8c8a575594205d3
2170482db79a32f75449e16f8e812c7b779b008f
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
6919bb347e7b743d173c4021dfbacce6
1236f663131cd8db2ccb8a2ebe072e777412a7cf
'2011-11-16T09:21:56-05:00'
describe
'8628' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
74e746420bdfc3664c99a4a780802851
0bea99a8590ebca466938dd6c17b82eaffabcc30
'2011-11-16T09:21:36-05:00'
describe
'1203843' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
af4acca0417f0d47cb99453d369e65b4
81234481906137f180c4873b8f49ad09d3db6bfd
describe
'81964' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
6c2f20b617ee74a4dc93fc824d853718
7d0c8d0aee6642b74051afaa261e00b5707c6c14
describe
'38629' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBQ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
468b5e73a1239a786c86a048834cc0af
268bdee4d94d3f1cbc1ad53e25cc2be1976a9ede
'2011-11-16T09:24:13-05:00'
describe
'29142' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBR' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
88dd0085602991ce5182b86bddadd96a
d04cd3735f0eaf68a7b58f187e0b7c868366052f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBS' 'sip-files00057.tif'
1c5537c5e18f7a2d39c5b14df6eba9fd
2e58daf8c29967bb548f1ccd7ce30e196d5d7817
'2011-11-16T09:21:11-05:00'
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBT' 'sip-files00057.txt'
9960e3b52b10c2472e0620bc0ab1509f
015ea846891ac13e0f9ed6f9ee1671dc8ecf528d
'2011-11-16T09:24:58-05:00'
describe
'9147' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
ec0a7fca96bfb25b78d25239ebb43fd9
a5ebe00d0f5595909b5aee04c0f673a54b66dd2c
'2011-11-16T09:24:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBV' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
79e1c3915a11f836fc78213ee6b923ea
e44d3774e3b1bd143f9c9de1c70c13c17656b341
describe
'73396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBW' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
86e62978f30da6520f72f791aa1eff04
9e20d4999feafb6cc968d901c3f0c4bdce0038eb
'2011-11-16T09:18:15-05:00'
describe
'33780' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBX' 'sip-files00058.pro'
23da50eed7210f7201d4f437b9d53d53
1cc6cd48c2e5d051ef068a641680b27bf37028fd
describe
'26204' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
b3da120ae0e9ef0f71f791c585d20e2f
4a1ad95f9a81094ca2315f16ac158b82e235c9a4
'2011-11-16T09:23:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUBZ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
4ea310bef5cc671357704e7f42854467
d23c5e8525c063580823878a900494742a17d003
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCA' 'sip-files00058.txt'
191bd9cf0675838463370334c2fb77ee
cd59248c8082c1132a3fefea3611ebbcaf6bc873
describe
'8535' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
e99badfff8ab4382bda686f510cd4498
2859243e70cd48eed8232d2dbc356f63a06e0c91
'2011-11-16T09:20:54-05:00'
describe
'913264' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
7b1dc1dc9d36e2a274063253cdadce46
64618bd0d5d92c4ec7119fa2f8894bc487abafd1
describe
'29556' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCD' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
4e9b851cec6ba4da2e5914c3c4baa47d
ce70b346d37db5a30f483e57f079655f842f3465
describe
'9040' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
3e1474d5a5fa23c44ca3fb9aea93d1a1
a57c3cea43bf3877acc3dec80bea236be41b929f
describe
'9890' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
9cbc3ce49cfeffaebc8536116eb02014
169b164c800aee0cb9cb39a6f5f81baa2540afc7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
6f443c25f0e467186806e3b20ac98f38
9c7c990d9e83d2355cd73cca5c3080309908c283
describe
'368' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCH' 'sip-files00059.txt'
f3be1c723dd369a2ed9b4c59a8793c10
089be321113cb2c526ad48560441fd1d35b07789
'2011-11-16T09:25:51-05:00'
describe
'3452' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCI' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
afead67505c29944167855f1cc3f4533
6fa4c9aeb1ab0134fe4711d1dd2a596683359385
describe
'1198297' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCJ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
49147472a38fc5e68d2f523c3ef68815
62927c0ac572e67b062347d7e0c4b935bc37cce5
'2011-11-16T09:26:04-05:00'
describe
'60850' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCK' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
83dcf2c032be04856b3c1f673d4b0395
0d4635dfd01783287e0b40ea9fd5a807da05c8e7
describe
'25267' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCL' 'sip-files00060.pro'
dcc59f4ee0bc078032444a52140208f7
7d53ddca6fa5e31516c0a4f81bd6a22a3953907b
describe
'21178' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCM' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
576751ae3e4b20514f87c84ef2f303b1
2926c17103dc2945cbdfe093f9c1d2793c16c51d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCN' 'sip-files00060.tif'
5be8994a2d19624d84994f9b5820ab80
8d1e6848cadfa1a4d28cbf1220ffb62dfd13611c
'2011-11-16T09:19:32-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCO' 'sip-files00060.txt'
a15587fecde9e11f32eedee5b90e95ba
51f55099f961ae2ef646055887f021f5068bb48f
describe
'6989' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCP' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
f589094c9e8a4020785ba86bc5de1a64
41083c002128883e8f106fe10ac4689ec292a329
describe
'1203880' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
c8215bc4aad1f02f4e4f4b40e552bf84
f6a9067b767cd939ee32919a1ff29f4e39492ff3
'2011-11-16T09:23:20-05:00'
describe
'82136' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCR' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
46375431155f3a821b393ff373922fd8
ea541ebb08170b02237025b68d6147732b2a4a1a
'2011-11-16T09:20:59-05:00'
describe
'38003' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCS' 'sip-files00061.pro'
20693ce6fad0f2e0ff04d61ef4a7d4b4
a5047b8378a692c1ddb0185487da5b90861f0abd
describe
'28724' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCT' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
11395afea688bd53b27707087c1e0e31
b7db0ae2a4475999b5a1205482631941f8f78d0b
'2011-11-16T09:25:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
eb6db4e939cbdf4fcb6cb2738d72497d
2ddb8d1a5509bd8f147457988bf3fa6f04a785de
'2011-11-16T09:18:57-05:00'
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCV' 'sip-files00061.txt'
27ff9ea00f36df52d5997d1b7f81b942
164863569d9e64e280e956f2e8f20f37bb440e36
describe
'8886' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCW' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
7c8b0ae1c205477e4113b929509ec88c
08f0c61f4e9406196893adfa815193406587ed14
'2011-11-16T09:22:53-05:00'
describe
'1198239' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCX' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
466cc3adf4fd4f6b724ac9a09bde646f
ca718d4b86284c7f3b8abf8d44e71244bc7b2bcf
describe
'78016' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCY' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
9535c543b8a9c121df7551d71b4cd250
30f35ada4a1e610f5426cc375382de03b6ad5081
'2011-11-16T09:19:30-05:00'
describe
'36364' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUCZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
9bf6c3d61f78487a39ac782e0f1dc9bf
b3080af03ed1df233d499d5e2b010d4df9d67831
describe
'28080' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
f18251748c599d6bfe773f794a595347
46a504ced3bad7a61ac4c084660f35ac056d21d3
'2011-11-16T09:22:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDB' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3e8823e62844db46ffe3cdc25f40061d
c71e7038840f91ae51de96a81f07a71f6b8e03fc
'2011-11-16T09:18:41-05:00'
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
225dbe01676e2591ea20d3d62ee3353e
17b1d1458ff07a5f0259d4e1ac69dc84f4d40ed0
describe
'9046' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
3aee4f4f03695b479c9cdfd3148de9f7
6d15068fa63a8502b88e1ed48d5b4044bee79753
'2011-11-16T09:21:41-05:00'
describe
'1075323' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
75b7bcaddd4b805e1515d6a31ecb2bbb
10c9e5fa5bf909c2100a8f614e205f938f048838
describe
'46660' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
5bbe9d0d5819327fef0b01adb89522f2
c33df716ab682d09b08cae8292ec2cbe562f4557
'2011-11-16T09:26:05-05:00'
describe
'17592' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
43dc7fce7561eff44110fe7db8599b02
70d796b959e94e2adb08f5df46264668f38158d1
describe
'15802' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
81e50ba3784e3f7fccde3f6e6afcdda6
fdfe03bca18cbea18d87d24c541cf1a2ee66a685
'2011-11-16T09:21:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
f5e1d0f6f14dfbfc1ebe430281b111e8
2bd36cbf6cc7338da6c16a77277a5111741de841
'2011-11-16T09:20:08-05:00'
describe
'704' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
755bdce9c2795879d516d96278abb4de
3143fb0d717e7929087cf9ae86bbe52cf512707d
describe
'5308' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
ccd6e9b63322b844c5eba4048053045d
061734763294fe8e1a0f482fd55f228fe0897513
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
62f274110749c14fde70ef220539c0e8
c02112ecdb42436d402ca266728e302906059302
describe
'61906' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
ed1541bc55f398b4fd3a9b05763da0c9
82252b2c3fd55aeaba469f6301b6b295121d9ca2
describe
'26086' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDN' 'sip-files00064.pro'
2784c91bc4dfbf67e14b6b71f84e98b6
24bd12ae0b464d6fff69369c0d9554b3b8d04d98
describe
'21449' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c5e1a8de07efc782e945db3a64b14201
6f97681d150257542bdfa90fd09f2acfb049f8bc
'2011-11-16T09:25:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDP' 'sip-files00064.tif'
fefa0512ecf93a109bf6662d1dd0047f
3c88033b05afdce96ee55833c16721e5aa6a9840
'2011-11-16T09:24:04-05:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
a2de0099c3c74176c408c6e982d5f5e5
b3c7b1fc9d6fe35aaf3b7b51e06516c3e545bc73
describe
'7094' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
0737e520fc14998ee231fb6c95302089
85dd41920bd652f5586ccfb8636aa15e4a743110
'2011-11-16T09:23:01-05:00'
describe
'1203897' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
6d5366a65e56983b7605e3449e28dc2c
dd459f9d82c2a63db98d36e42edc4460b1f5f441
describe
'78076' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDT' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
caa914725408817befe3241bf7698ec9
81a4a979850ae1d1af3205c6be98b683d1d9494c
describe
'36181' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
a1da2519173c6ab0ec085dd3fc334303
94afeadf9e86d10da59c7b7ce6e0cdffaebcb02a
'2011-11-16T09:18:13-05:00'
describe
'27590' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
e1586706ca3a3bcc2df13d7cd818f8ce
ad8a947573cc6087a874b5c929390f56f6a4571a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
315f980e2816e3d49ac2f990e48d564b
08dbdb9f0a42a4cd2840fa1dc3995372f00d4239
'2011-11-16T09:22:25-05:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
f35118bbab2293b663ff1240d710f26a
7d494fa453b61d2e8bb5372ac15ba7e71dc8b5ef
describe
'8978' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDY' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
6b54cb118d9c05f5d26e94d534ca460e
bac2a1aac58766206384eb1320d4137d5ec7d46a
describe
'1198210' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUDZ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
f3bc66bce0716797098f6851fed7328a
068ddcac2bb6405d176869240a3b7d574cdaf95c
'2011-11-16T09:24:06-05:00'
describe
'76266' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEA' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
f63f5a81abb382276b3c253e26e21a66
f01d92a480c71adf0d0ae539aab080045d8f20a7
describe
'35094' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEB' 'sip-files00066.pro'
54a5133b6442ae9c75a0b48c4c0c04e5
72c8bdd87db09934fb91494c996c9254fff46957
describe
'27326' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEC' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
70b40d18651ef38281b8d230ba87e926
4053bb184e5c0d7ac82ce4d759256fe01d370424
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUED' 'sip-files00066.tif'
1ac45f00d4269a3bdabf19379458e22e
0b8ce7a00a06bdf184b37d2acc1f14feab65288e
'2011-11-16T09:24:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEE' 'sip-files00066.txt'
acf950135d1a940bfcd2c0f672841c35
1095c5171e82ca3ae9428ad10079c3948eb57293
'2011-11-16T09:23:13-05:00'
describe
'8913' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEF' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
3bc36646b7aa32eda149c86a6112ab61
618db15586cb5b7cc6e53bd77f2b15bfdf083422
describe
'1203854' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEG' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
fbc68fee437da9331fd24f77b51aa14d
8670a2cb2e5b870f54a6e507b69673f7791e3b10
describe
'79233' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEH' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
3da041042115d4155534aa2467da994d
b02101ad4d56bf9c41daa3848fb491145c7f301a
describe
'35324' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEI' 'sip-files00067.pro'
0baab371cdb74e17621d8cc0683401fb
c00995e3440ee1fa43a71ff415b9852875a6dc59
'2011-11-16T09:22:36-05:00'
describe
'28554' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEJ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d28f1bce20e3cdd91becd059b30a8b90
491a7d7408b0d72fbe105c43d698a6889fbddc44
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEK' 'sip-files00067.tif'
0cad6f63fcdb72444362eba19273e6a0
0e6ae872792df25c36e5ee76745ea4ddfef9026d
'2011-11-16T09:25:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEL' 'sip-files00067.txt'
a9370528eb7c498c9420439562ef8ab5
13b5bf5b309b69efd2f4db55f098a5881951931b
'2011-11-16T09:24:49-05:00'
describe
'9100' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEM' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
30e84917ab3acec88f1cc1fd2787880c
e3e9c0f8faecc4c3f8807960db94a65a02c6b119
describe
'1198294' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEN' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
97f5d7f9bdfa15240ee6163bfe6e4c5b
2cbb2c75dc52091f5a6dfeaa41272300f074838f
describe
'77171' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEO' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
56ff2e0b306b65369cf25c787817ffc3
60072d9e59ab246f6ed3e315ffe08b9a460898df
'2011-11-16T09:19:38-05:00'
describe
'35207' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEP' 'sip-files00068.pro'
e83a9290c2d4f14789c5fb76eb3608bf
0ce74fba33ef9ff67a30ea1da95e704e0c411cc5
'2011-11-16T09:18:31-05:00'
describe
'27582' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEQ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
4256d917c4590b0c300754182b17ab4d
ac5cd148e387e97aaa0ff99a736d96ece47f9a80
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUER' 'sip-files00068.tif'
ddbab3cd58c1451544c64620e74c3c17
5eb3070f77dc8a103ad7d21aa4d157e2b31d30a4
'2011-11-16T09:19:40-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUES' 'sip-files00068.txt'
f82055b92287595764a4a45432c31fbc
54e4e1e6f09f0c2799a4cce68aeb71bba1402860
describe
'9032' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUET' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
7912ca6e580843804d263d9f4bdb1609
85e7a4e5df3a22ff8bb9a518746debbdb7915c17
describe
'1203901' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEU' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
96eedddd61aa1febb7f5e7629f14218c
bfe934ea8d564f318c572ab3c9d46bba7d2461bc
describe
'83953' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEV' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
267197b98e52a3b4ea4c595054f000ca
368f3c92d1d87fd6e41c841b700b5d325c4ee5e6
'2011-11-16T09:26:23-05:00'
describe
'38377' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEW' 'sip-files00069.pro'
00532eb1468070fb8d970226c9684d38
8200ff00bfc84a188ea09c5cf636520d975a5497
describe
'29251' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEX' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
34c594678d4cf0e07611cc1b7ee76b84
7cf15bb0fc2cfa37b5705b7b6280fcfdb285aa0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEY' 'sip-files00069.tif'
14807f857f622eab1ad1bdc6848c914f
40ed812c8e644e22a21055c6774fc4c7735e2370
'2011-11-16T09:18:08-05:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUEZ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
d183e7d7f08b3b5060885fa02e2d62bc
a012b9b521a493c3ce461b598327fe1e4e22db48
describe
'9127' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFA' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
e8b801f0c3d4974a2278a8920dc0c5af
21137db3016bf499ad3c1857859c3dc00fb9693b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFB' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e5d5344072c89d3053ffba7dd66e8edd
6f3017e442c646c8024a97b05bbd68bdee42a397
'2011-11-16T09:18:02-05:00'
describe
'82869' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFC' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
cfefd595c38996ebcfe6ce8a2126e5f1
133b389172cedc91ac544bc22b02dd0e7bab9903
'2011-11-16T09:23:02-05:00'
describe
'38175' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFD' 'sip-files00070.pro'
fe0948d4b149d864dd7f0e7147a86ae8
dbb8ceb9983d32bb506bf89794be389832ca852e
'2011-11-16T09:25:36-05:00'
describe
'29483' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFE' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
342bdb46005f47148d75f0efa1a9ced9
4bcea4b790b32e40ca1dbff49e8394b7e9099cc8
'2011-11-16T09:20:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFF' 'sip-files00070.tif'
6ae49b7f9011bf07b527e6d033e7bb91
39b62322d45a2a4672191b6ac30477d264db68b2
'2011-11-16T09:20:51-05:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFG' 'sip-files00070.txt'
65bac79554271845b646bd9e02d5bd92
79f17ac2be2de32771e5a6fb223e884ccc3c42a4
describe
'9287' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFH' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
4c0012a0d3d197f359a4c79c4db1321d
49af2655eba1de02c2189ebd7c6daf88082bc50e
describe
'1203870' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFI' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
4a641b25b9510f3bcb7fd8a2c3234ace
51df56ba90c6d7a74d2bf7968acf4cd695b0f69c
describe
'62344' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFJ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
a4c227f14e45c302b2e9c8f10cc20b59
9cd1a98df0d62eae6adb1d8e4d6f75c90d97f80a
describe
'25496' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFK' 'sip-files00071.pro'
b84c30cd68945dc215e6b66710260ab7
601b6d62d32bd4ec793f69578a07c00c67c61008
describe
'21373' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFL' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
95dff7dd6b736c6c1a6a278380603d11
a9c96c6a7aaf09804b7b846f88bc34408bc762a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFM' 'sip-files00071.tif'
666a36e703de63816ba9ae3d682fd308
7ef5cad4032acd441d5815bb4ade06ec40db0841
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFN' 'sip-files00071.txt'
0b865478a12fdd2f7ae0d450812bc266
b1cc35214304dbf51672750b55740c73531e8167
describe
'6960' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFO' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
5bce50b0e03ed2e0bea557b290b56419
da8a826ca6a28ce059c28eaa186aa0d44f49095f
'2011-11-16T09:22:17-05:00'
describe
'1198304' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFP' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
8f25755e973136e0fa0029eb806031e4
cb3b650e730d65dff2c3330469f873974a5698b1
describe
'77899' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFQ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
bb949c4b4c2c7c72a2b824dcf248ae1f
a1245c1bddac1af500c052d86653d6e10d57bef6
describe
'35455' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFR' 'sip-files00072.pro'
b555bbcfc2154fe033a0e98d19f5ea62
3a785e785327662d278cf3e13d2ab755f7533b74
'2011-11-16T09:19:54-05:00'
describe
'28294' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFS' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
bdb2d129d98c4795fb0a0ce82db0196b
5652839c2dbd944e96ae9dcbe819a6f2403399b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFT' 'sip-files00072.tif'
047b5d6cb19b0e78b84d33165a633788
1a3650386736e13d311e6673399dfdc790f5b5f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFU' 'sip-files00072.txt'
ed1c40b2c3a89f7acbc2b3626709bc02
429eea8c9e2b7fe9e8a91b7df44e21152244e6e9
'2011-11-16T09:25:22-05:00'
describe
'9143' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFV' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
ca9125db53548f193d2c99635b6cea74
4fdbe82b1adc96b2794b705fd9c477cb19c54fbd
describe
'1203732' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFW' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
67fd16b6f5591e47831e74ae46803fc9
b39ab24f47eb73cf5099f7591ec1d23b56e648e2
'2011-11-16T09:23:08-05:00'
describe
'76216' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFX' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
573f4b34b3e0a2dc258beea9d3a49111
58a50a77d07bb6fe1e729c4f8c97b949667fdfee
'2011-11-16T09:26:34-05:00'
describe
'34720' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFY' 'sip-files00073.pro'
1b8f16f78240bd7f4c2567922725b442
8e6f2b93d57687aa5ad39c1e0aec7fefcf0c258d
describe
'26908' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUFZ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
e7ca60064205d6c953318600c1c2dbd1
57c89b1f07e0338ba9386e2aa511da0e540a9f09
'2011-11-16T09:21:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGA' 'sip-files00073.tif'
0667a76d490a5916e699b0bf48748feb
d6d05c2a783566c2a81155d05e36974f48d440be
'2011-11-16T09:18:36-05:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGB' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5dfc872f695795e327c2f1c94a9d0d28
823f7439bfab5475ef3947bb1d7e2277222c7eae
'2011-11-16T09:21:03-05:00'
describe
'8737' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGC' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
b70b72a905b4357f7e820a9d788e259e
89c37aac9030ec78fc3cf5a9b46307fcf6fe60f9
'2011-11-16T09:23:31-05:00'
describe
'1198228' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGD' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
58927f41321fb97021d78d33350f806f
53db617de987252647c1e176b6b237cdee531308
describe
'73666' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGE' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
df2e0ec88ffefbba85ac88b43a0202de
f2b242900aab28f5a27419ee3e3e83a989d86778
'2011-11-16T09:26:10-05:00'
describe
'33714' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGF' 'sip-files00074.pro'
18faec852fbeb1fb3af439c04ae53467
94786196ebd04a5dc5aeb095854e3b56b9bf1e11
'2011-11-16T09:22:20-05:00'
describe
'26092' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGG' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
b2b4cfc3fbdae2a5bee1392801e551a3
c4fcaf887711611a725a1495b5a45937ae37b1f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGH' 'sip-files00074.tif'
18b326c6b491b2a423bb87b8c3814cb2
155fe2e8d2f3b0e02638ea7bdf3019588c713312
'2011-11-16T09:21:22-05:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGI' 'sip-files00074.txt'
3bb09bb4fff6be4e18cfc9405551a263
1224dd82a518abdad3b89b4d0dd1fd4f0b4c865b
'2011-11-16T09:26:56-05:00'
describe
'8548' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGJ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
42b939a331ac4a6acda08a68e4ab4582
21132fa77d714abdf95eeb187c790dd305933023
describe
'1203814' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGK' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
9a393ee4c1f689461488aa948f4beb16
b2ac46af2a6f086625a7ea95d44c1cc13b4cd6f2
describe
'73561' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGL' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7e97a8eff8b0f2a7182f143fb8c53cca
fa36c85173b496fa640365ff5042040eeda908b5
describe
'31942' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGM' 'sip-files00075.pro'
df536012ead1c5f6c2e0b73cb5c8322b
b1c30b77eb90ec32b3d914e8264f9a2a0d356ddc
'2011-11-16T09:21:58-05:00'
describe
'26128' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGN' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
fbfce1de6b040e7f5518fceaea24915b
576d5582a40af100f8269f655094e395d8a94b85
'2011-11-16T09:22:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGO' 'sip-files00075.tif'
2f4daae31554115a766e5ac4ca8ef307
87d23a59c0993e59b9aa7130e2f645a6937b2eda
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGP' 'sip-files00075.txt'
7b0988ddbfa7bfbf1edb2b647859f902
2a370b7f53f0718229a25b597f9fe09141d5005d
describe
'8680' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGQ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
d964716cfb3b2208e03aa6f08e7b65ba
b2b580c4980ae14c91e69a19a41eb02e4b92066a
describe
'1198232' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGR' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
aecb7b97bb0ace939d67081605a8bdb0
e72780c1dcb4a9f9b4bdccf6fa75b4a8dc3e17dd
describe
'72957' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGS' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
c79023d0a88f440d2bddbfcfcc2bbe2f
49f602f7d0238d7f0d88b5ad4cba30989d3653bd
describe
'32323' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGT' 'sip-files00076.pro'
d2f0649f1f81fe9f01e4b2b227524a16
075d7872a4cbdd9f94360796e6797f74417a3231
'2011-11-16T09:25:29-05:00'
describe
'26440' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGU' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
27c595d9ea8d4f58aa2b18a2aba3d6db
84cd7eaf0365cdc9ca724f66ca5bf914dece40cd
'2011-11-16T09:22:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGV' 'sip-files00076.tif'
0d4db29476f21285b018b50d6ac3f6c6
d64365f168cc6e56c07164a560d1e066c0b3e56a
'2011-11-16T09:21:37-05:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGW' 'sip-files00076.txt'
47b147fd76b4c41bf22fed9674651000
04c51d913576ee34ab7ff857d65854549e3973d3
'2011-11-16T09:20:46-05:00'
describe
'8845' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGX' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
d302514897fa166a541632489633877b
3fdcc2058e1f0fd263cf62341b1047d9c6c1ed36
describe
'1203822' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGY' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b209fead6026ef5d6b6daa5f91dbcceb
f64ec826fd82618a6ebafae79348cb0ddc4ffc79
'2011-11-16T09:24:37-05:00'
describe
'76386' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUGZ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
8fea1cd930a9fc13063d184ebe9e8b55
7d1f3297bb6bf1276df8aed3248966fad44ceb35
describe
'33399' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHA' 'sip-files00077.pro'
03d1902f35626df29d3b3375bba9f6ff
a5261de833c170548f886757365cfb9fdd269b9a
'2011-11-16T09:19:21-05:00'
describe
'26668' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHB' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
7b4ceccce7b223e838f96dd8945638ef
a319740cf0988e42a19d0f2f582a93dcab783e78
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHC' 'sip-files00077.tif'
a089a6d93306e45a8cb43abd77bb672c
ddafe3f2c5c544215ae6f8b95dd77071a006724d
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHD' 'sip-files00077.txt'
55f13646379457617a720ce85b0a1b8d
d79bdb732ca18d01582674fa52b221c5d6063d32
describe
'8707' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHE' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
faf9c5dfcc21b551bd9f3597d442cbeb
dd6457ff01e8038eeb72041af5291fc6a975ad86
describe
'1198314' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHF' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
75457a998b997fcee740106e979563ef
01395a9c3481049ac37078cb3f241d19a6106bb3
describe
'77321' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHG' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
84f40f5e13f942b8878f9ffa0c62f215
8aaa3a03e5c17af7326a719028f7a510da90bae2
describe
'34262' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHH' 'sip-files00078.pro'
b02fd1a6f34b87da46c8f8bbcca2e082
731b610faa66604d88ab6687a73349ee5eb6998a
describe
'27171' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHI' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
9855db392c28ab169f326020a66a93af
ba2c5248b34a9e6bbe72b20445cd50393035b9d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHJ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
49e93adcd56eb0cf6223553244810d62
da7fe7c52c6c30e12fcc5f9f2088dba76a460b33
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHK' 'sip-files00078.txt'
78c44920e908e5835db819a2b155ac61
64e03f9d0759ba84f565111c5659a87b5c0e0ffc
describe
'8808' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHL' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
8abe32481861df5f796bf9bec6e81d13
4e462b5d3a6382c70fd87ba74ef66e748825277c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHM' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
ae530a19e336da733a6eb069525a6f0b
04c46f1bebe127e410705dd09895a22b2fc8fe80
describe
'75888' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHN' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
4a04257e383e2a2b5c6b10556a1b7bf9
f2fa9dd08bd25f2fa6a5c4fc1eaf595f5d37b277
describe
'33501' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHO' 'sip-files00079.pro'
13a795ca28f08499c3bf397bfc9b42a7
a3f04c76877ce5b2e7d0750481425053792aca69
'2011-11-16T09:22:11-05:00'
describe
'27221' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHP' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
c0e749933c060120a1e2a58440c4052f
2ce6a1cda01c0d42feef7b720278c5d2bcdb3714
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHQ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
6c6d0055df87c0d01deb2c8dad8b0dbd
e6692ff0061773e39e26fdcf65add87795801f4b
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHR' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7599275337dca62b050d945f088bf541
58d06b064ef8a05aca797e6590e7f55994dc24c1
'2011-11-16T09:26:32-05:00'
describe
'8647' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHS' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
9c548c65bf08706c796636f9ab518267
e5aec4d51fd81fc395ef3ff809e19abe43176eca
'2011-11-16T09:17:42-05:00'
describe
'970529' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHT' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
9ebc5d1ffcf1927493c741fb0abbc7ef
0aea6114c375d47491f3366266192cf46b43fa0b
describe
'33087' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHU' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
cbd7dcb63974758bb4601eb67cf0d20a
2083fdb14a146e76fe80fa5ad61a8776357bfed1
describe
'9807' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHV' 'sip-files00080.pro'
b0388109fb8a09222ebee5dc81811e6c
6c911a2d5d24c9de15b38951c1d4e9c2f449ea92
'2011-11-16T09:21:10-05:00'
describe
'10594' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHW' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
eb7e519f9365e0faf0393f06f21817b3
c2e3bf46436aabdc89218e14eca8040376ded5b5
'2011-11-16T09:26:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHX' 'sip-files00080.tif'
3e40fe2ba77b7270fe59f2b7030e28eb
cd6b54b114d391adbd015701acd51e3007b97d5c
describe
'397' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHY' 'sip-files00080.txt'
9bfa758b43d5480bddde66d4c2e01bff
796bd864255179cd1a19bc58f2474c3d456ae874
describe
'3653' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUHZ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
8530c9f5f1b5d2ed75615e661ee4f605
3918da9b3b03c2a575d92466586ae70d7f03185f
describe
'1145973' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIA' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
7f1d05e21873150ff8fb815a4567b3dc
fd9147994fedb5432506e4cf73252ad7df57a05b
describe
'61012' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIB' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
09d03b458d473634c3a6bd52844a0966
921e4b339f8012add069e62afaa68ccf75a98cd9
describe
'25302' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIC' 'sip-files00081.pro'
4db3ae9c4a779414a7d7d7d6721765d4
033e99d25a5050ce9f59ccadcc4691a9e5d5c628
describe
'21381' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUID' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
19d494bd9f9a0699addd8931c8d74169
7075108752d1e7a51365663b3650a6056b4258c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIE' 'sip-files00081.tif'
60064991448449437685a5991e8b39ce
9fe3c9f9a828934b620c91fbcd1a94eca1fec56e
'2011-11-16T09:23:55-05:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIF' 'sip-files00081.txt'
03ef8c8d096ee78c45e599b03d2bacba
d26da7fc9433d0bf7cf0ce6df1890e4c234e5583
describe
'7000' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIG' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
824a20e2939cfed4910ea5f937587ca8
e3c30049494cf55026f8a7a363d57154f2e49ae2
describe
'1198321' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIH' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
3140951f0ddcc2251e4625c55efc5d88
6c1ecfb0a421787f3c370c0ccb02b94493018929
describe
'80748' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUII' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
f2a5b3ba492ae6b40c30784b2985ca92
a447478a1045735bef97de668df96d96fb787e7c
describe
'35976' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIJ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
43fcaf7a131e2a2c8861265e1d8d3b8f
da53c65c6313372aac1c56ce4790a5c3d74da26a
'2011-11-16T09:24:02-05:00'
describe
'28679' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIK' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
b08c94277d5a8a588040717915ecdf89
93cffc1ac0e22204eaa488e66246bc7c44c147f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIL' 'sip-files00082.tif'
24ed5cd2a522184646506442f6ce5cce
dcef288c188c2705eadb8425867b0fde4b50b274
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIM' 'sip-files00082.txt'
5f5a01ce518ae279a20592ce20d7f213
6209433cbff0d1c6535221d54356d41fe45dc380
describe
'9130' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIN' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
291c36e7ab0ecac588ec3486ba745527
2f1340c05ab1ee055f03efd16b4eeef7afac868a
'2011-11-16T09:23:17-05:00'
describe
'1203891' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
b550e684ec9792004d2092d493f8861a
779aaaef62d9f1611c0927810e0c330d40def07f
'2011-11-16T09:20:15-05:00'
describe
'78087' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIP' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
ea257b669ed77aafd8ce084543e589dd
06b01d66428fdcd76ac05575de084ddfe1cf72ee
describe
'33461' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIQ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
107a4add86c5ec74fe2859282adbf0ff
f320ac6eb7c41dd8d3e95e5415865dabee695274
describe
'27764' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIR' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
9aec8b589426e8678f1863322ac4cf4e
40fc624b38b54ab638e165d9d67ebef053d88fc5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIS' 'sip-files00083.tif'
5546867f319fbfb9c72f38d586c44f60
6819d2c71b613ef83b61f3841f8f8741e1acc353
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIT' 'sip-files00083.txt'
aee4502577c7309cd96f52e2c955887c
27ec581aeaf0c686a3f4f5ee8569fd8a2d9d05f4
describe
'8803' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIU' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
6ff10c4747c3347f36a9bdc9b45d70df
aedab7b56105c1e83aaa3c24a88a23432c32b5d5
'2011-11-16T09:22:55-05:00'
describe
'1198209' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIV' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
df18c5dc662275424f053fcb69fdbfb6
010d5b7f64a2af90b883f9aa2d859c203525ed5f
describe
'75315' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIW' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
70d868e209c87944bb4fe096199b536a
5f6ff82965c30fa6c7a7d9964e84a6a3178a74f8
describe
'33842' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIX' 'sip-files00084.pro'
314b8bb01897e7f4342deb263e930fdc
63e33db5df9c9daf3a698a7469370600ecfb8083
describe
'26931' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIY' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
84097a6659bd1484dc9db76b224b846b
647e8b89c4617151049af029276407c77ecf495a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUIZ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
e9e505d8b1620a01fe59d9a6bf1ffeb0
3d18126cb28d6d1437bc3e19080191ca2c8ce43a
'2011-11-16T09:17:52-05:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJA' 'sip-files00084.txt'
7e654dbf1be189b881caf987b87c549a
fd5d39db64c4197374b4ed979eb0cc8174f5715d
'2011-11-16T09:23:19-05:00'
describe
'8776' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJB' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
d194cce0c15cce68f60e11930ab0313d
b1a1c319786ddda98152cd90f966ed25aa26e41e
'2011-11-16T09:22:14-05:00'
describe
'1203850' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJC' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
8d8edab3c6ed4e9df4884c8bec6259f7
e1d8208e171c662a334d88895cb73441af06685b
describe
'72392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
d2d2bebb84df2a9a0ee4c4a4f7b0f7d6
31279bb26efa49c8cceafd0f4373490f973a5959
describe
'31561' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJE' 'sip-files00085.pro'
05ccf6606ab15ddc98479faffd1c537a
eacbe5f0407daa9af6301b520d679040421431ca
describe
'25789' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJF' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
1889625c27ddc68dc1ac2da1ef37d705
0a00e0a283a2f166f4f5146623595dcbd472f2d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJG' 'sip-files00085.tif'
82a8c6c8de24757d32af87443c5df6f0
6690f2f6ae80bc499770879f5314764c460c2e8f
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJH' 'sip-files00085.txt'
11f55b486055e18d70eca24fa9daab94
f3b7e85c32177d235efe196ac667b3f6b484c61c
describe
'8498' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJI' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
3525895f27e9bd10cfa889d3e06d613f
7efd170abd5ce1f59515cdb1e6ef9ec054a9223f
describe
'1198317' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJJ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e65aae29a10a2869354f2599b2d84672
708325ac2ddb316a5d1c68fcb4d4b14ad1edd27a
'2011-11-16T09:20:29-05:00'
describe
'73170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJK' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
df853ff35f8bf9d021f967f9e5e7b1ed
41af899613b81be7b4d38fd4ef17d6bda3212327
'2011-11-16T09:21:27-05:00'
describe
'33213' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJL' 'sip-files00086.pro'
4016b28e8796bad019c2705d91857050
1622312f216ebba7e174d69d529f99a17d3b144e
'2011-11-16T09:24:34-05:00'
describe
'25592' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJM' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
9f01bc7599ab60fdfe889d06d5eb6ce7
b8280240317ff7bb9f704ac7029bd09ddf4a0267
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJN' 'sip-files00086.tif'
92dc24d064eafea6faf1684aef77ff65
06b15941944d56f6aaa08a8affe3e2bbfcb155c6
'2011-11-16T09:17:43-05:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJO' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c3f8504fd2e76269afcd18216cc88245
0c43cefab10aa3a63393c95b1be967e7f6c6e50c
describe
'8335' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJP' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
3430af4cd2f83c180905fb23af1be699
d39ee742139e29baabad40da88aa921632745c60
describe
'1203705' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJQ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
88eb5ff2aac00e899f4ce962387f2dee
4ffa30957db09154844a18c1a37fd861259bc9a6
describe
'76653' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJR' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
44e4e2bc65a21d624472ef63ce2b7fe3
a8f7208d0271376d707e6da1c29da7f43ab96af9
describe
'32826' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJS' 'sip-files00087.pro'
384d3f515fda30830b79f5c102d27faf
81c7f5593aa8b3d7ff838c3533f44c8187a3cc60
describe
'26521' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJT' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
46ace0f1a6be31b4b6c6ad3fbdb41187
feab418d2d50e8dc18b916960de3dbad743712c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJU' 'sip-files00087.tif'
4931ffaed1037edc1bdc60a98d883834
bc46f481af271008e9f43c1000517c7a82dd33d2
'2011-11-16T09:25:52-05:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJV' 'sip-files00087.txt'
97573a92cc0234e3609059cb0da35979
b527426c8655766810382a3dfe6b4ba3fd4778b0
'2011-11-16T09:17:46-05:00'
describe
'8739' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJW' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
01f82094d458b859286b1cc75b268ce1
562515f3f84ac04a44895ae7f8e33c9b1b582ebc
describe
'1198333' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJX' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
7924a46858b6253fb65fb6151796dbd9
ff0d0c24371f692525171142ebb2ee2385280bae
describe
'92952' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJY' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
3e494fb0ea21135d1b59c85a44361c47
7c076ad3817620a6146ac6843dafb70c3a714cfc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUJZ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
6405fb0cf92ae61c3c96d498c5977999
bd4db17721a6985f3c83fdd080658de17475be1b
describe
'25094' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKA' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
3330e357bb3298bc87bc79522b278056
080d4652355fc1e313794bbc418028d40ce00de4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKB' 'sip-files00088.tif'
733aae5da33d268be47cdd5015700159
1e33afff7014e894cefee33d769e3b446fdf7dea
'2011-11-16T09:23:25-05:00'
describe
'165' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKC' 'sip-files00088.txt'
9b26e0f0d1062ab86f2e505af711eda2
d3f2171d2adf74667ecabd25136e6c25f2a3c08a
describe
'8203' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKD' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
9ff5e457ad631c59d2b7b6f0b59e2ee1
fc773a8b20064ca33c69af639cc03a5a247b977e
describe
'1198298' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKE' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
92b72fc9266bc589605d592077305700
da58de8d84ddae1007f93779d28292df1bb66577
describe
'76173' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKF' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
5b370278c302a8b9cea8a49a29f37336
06b38e54e8dfd9d31aa9b39ed89b7ce32de86cdc
describe
'33142' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKG' 'sip-files00090.pro'
90381836558c137e4e36504ee1e003bd
2eed058a1348253c5c3fb756618b01767bd37e64
'2011-11-16T09:22:15-05:00'
describe
'26583' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKH' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
df48f72bfd3375d82d3ab317fa9d5901
dc80597fe890a930323111541de0b0630692d98e
'2011-11-16T09:18:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKI' 'sip-files00090.tif'
7044f12cc07d0c2f4107715bea00968a
f5dd44bbfcea0b86bfb951d2264e3397c0244cd0
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKJ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
2b5d7212d95dc0715819c66785044e7e
9aa004875df0601749b5a850030ed6ac26db3a7f
describe
'8782' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKK' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
fd9a6fbcea4e3d9f260e4712288effe1
1aa25f8ad357e4002447e80e446ae23d9ae9614f
describe
'1182661' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKL' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
59059d8c55f0d63549ad3e79a5b01396
a5be6744d5a189f1f4c233cf9ea8d935dbfd4333
describe
'59034' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKM' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
eb8c474ddb0d63f51a34e98b62831c7f
9e4392bba7c5fb6a89cd4d15c8e5314a188f0b3d
describe
'22721' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKN' 'sip-files00091.pro'
57aa07f9067421c5ee862fdf6add2723
2d23b0f24474f32fcb9826cff95392b8b617cdae
'2011-11-16T09:25:45-05:00'
describe
'19948' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKO' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
399209c8d133dec3cbda30ba5c59b209
40c5a38cdb6763874dd5d033dd0c671dc0b79a7d
'2011-11-16T09:18:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKP' 'sip-files00091.tif'
98a0dac5d678bcc01d201c45ece0eb2e
262dd340a9bc031815d59da86dc50a885fa08c1e
'2011-11-16T09:24:41-05:00'
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKQ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
062c59a298bae00934a1db8c4a4fbb45
b6f606e882a8cc75b43aedfc903739bac7b84e77
describe
'6440' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKR' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
77dfae8347e0cedd69ffe264c6b29c79
3a9db011c181d7d6879fc6956587f9f586b06c41
'2011-11-16T09:25:30-05:00'
describe
'1198139' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKS' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
5f2e1002fce6addac54be38a241ba031
c5996e0ec2d725fbf108678ad5555662a0e87552
describe
'82554' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKT' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
cac40f6c57e06175009c9b002ea01b03
82052b8f01c76aa3e338ddd2fcef5a21a4837bae
describe
'36359' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKU' 'sip-files00092.pro'
1cbc958fa64e9e641ed5b38343f94d0b
5364ae72827f2b1012dd3269921c4991002bc9e3
describe
'28368' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKV' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
6fdf29c9adbae06ac26bdc0b842a482a
dea0b916e25db2f77d815f6a03863a93bf7eb048
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKW' 'sip-files00092.tif'
8ccd1332d3c8b791b4cbbaa64622bdb6
341318bc706b336943839f1f174530780a4fc071
'2011-11-16T09:24:55-05:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKX' 'sip-files00092.txt'
2e5209ffeeec72da97c62ff19cefde93
9c37942832bc0686b25a23068560d5f1f0902c8d
describe
'9274' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKY' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
2e2d8f190154dda8bea245dd088b2ac8
c4fa92d52e437486d6da19b93dc06ae8e6dd7f42
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUKZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c9888a4041f0f36082559587758281f4
d97b0c0fda55e06be7e97ba70a09f217363747f8
describe
'82409' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULA' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
eed0fe34337556dd0d633d73d95da5e2
f210abeb832231c8578d9adccc9d7d9cd20af038
'2011-11-16T09:24:28-05:00'
describe
'36480' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULB' 'sip-files00093.pro'
0281a7248fe9f8c0b05a50280983378f
85e5693874d12f961f58cba49ea65fe89a29d742
'2011-11-16T09:25:05-05:00'
describe
'29167' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULC' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
e77eccbef3b63047e09bb9a42b3e87f6
6a6d32cb32e37937ac4fd8ad32eaff1c8c69b6c6
'2011-11-16T09:20:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULD' 'sip-files00093.tif'
904dc8116e2309c82f3e804d254c4e27
1b760a92fc6078875a985c495f4c9b444e2bd8bf
'2011-11-16T09:25:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULE' 'sip-files00093.txt'
bd65bf718bb044bc948625f5d6384a96
50f8b23ac15a4b57c1bec2b4622985bad8ce745a
describe
'9364' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULF' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
c8d554fad90f85480f79b8cc757e0a90
125cab6561b7e41981855fba34b04c4973b7064b
describe
'1198326' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULG' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
160dc79d138ffae7d0258dcbc9a99b39
ef5833bbc7a902bc04c2729c9455b33538b630e7
describe
'76338' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULH' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
16fb941788c964402c2fb86e8fccc1a8
4c0a8fdf1e41b5ac27d0c8e41ca9d1ad7eb4a3fa
describe
'33351' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULI' 'sip-files00094.pro'
9f56ba06a505320d15a6dd1486d59193
5f7d3157e35d2c3b88b5c34807abb8de738a0c63
describe
'26858' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULJ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
00d0348818be8a1178473b6dc866c8e8
8f23b1190d65075150f42b1e871ac2f32c78e6ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULK' 'sip-files00094.tif'
455f367a3d028f9c75b97a08ffe12888
4bdee9088d0ddbf2526844f3f5201f1a041bb77f
'2011-11-16T09:20:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULL' 'sip-files00094.txt'
2a8fdd997d21e13f37faa69860b02ef1
29672125e2e8e5c9b36a2bc9cb4cdc163d3efde9
describe
'9115' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULM' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
0e319d232d7656f1fee4a1aeeb2c7020
92895c61fe297873e790a9dcd93c80db784a3805
describe
'1203798' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULN' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
b4c576ef4f5c75f910a85512b49b0d8a
8422a060a73903d2424ef622ab5ded35947efb66
describe
'74829' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULO' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
b9b4182a75b68813c513fce5cd62e87b
7d065d50eba9f716abe5c41ebccaaf869a8d5840
describe
'31333' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULP' 'sip-files00095.pro'
4b48ad3ea0ce376fd1d0182e620d0e3d
54c70b18bbb996dbfe5ee9683f9cb5f158c67136
describe
'26756' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULQ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
5b4de77c03c5a1d2e59ed8af4c3bb60c
e078cfd20b9f255dd9479dc34b1c7c844a3587b8
'2011-11-16T09:24:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULR' 'sip-files00095.tif'
1d6690ddd2a0d78a0357d77b60fc13f3
fa6eb6f1e217ba5ef95cda5b60e775baf3d4dbf7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULS' 'sip-files00095.txt'
b33c4a9c905bd02d39b1ca0642fcb942
03c0854c68534cc6793aa59eec61b0bad921d3fb
describe
'8701' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULT' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
d069856524a93c4ceda84c7c5f082f0b
94d1419c126b895ab2eb33c1d6ac8c99af2b3560
describe
'1198264' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULU' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
2bba64826e75288b07c2f4b997dd1f68
53d15e7417f410958be25b0771de9298283eb9f2
describe
'76098' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULV' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
93b8d4c2b4b1e5b41361d3a968f30205
42a05f750808a477a6eec28b112d2fdd39c114c1
describe
'34185' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULW' 'sip-files00096.pro'
e9f0e764a050607960a19a6cb906739e
7eba7b3534ae9469806baa8ec061142fc3df308e
describe
'26824' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULX' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
6ca7e6100efc499d87073c6d4a09d646
80baa1f862d2867897f2d68d4b958d973bc64f8e
'2011-11-16T09:18:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULY' 'sip-files00096.tif'
cc0bd83067e21fb3262d7f243c335342
70757b74073410e9f6e8ae22a0062c23e229592c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAULZ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
2ab226b03d56f37f09ad3611c551c0ab
a8197dd62315ca15fb39611171d4d68c94d87014
describe
'8908' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMA' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
517545cef48218f62a3ed3bb95ac62ee
94c3b28b49b7cd1171c8551638e45e750a6547a5
describe
'1203890' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMB' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
3be7300efc2c60a4b1bee0c904488b70
fd2ea407f7319c352f5d9fc4657b77ab395542fb
describe
'74725' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMC' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
2826112cc588eaa3c0f67917477d9455
55d2e6718ee414f9dc03abcb3281b904eb1c5d3f
describe
'32813' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMD' 'sip-files00097.pro'
43d2efee56d0ce26a035cdfdd684f800
48db5efea019ed6a7256d3142da1f9d4dbf7ec85
describe
'25918' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUME' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
34235f7a8dda39a0af54b186e8e33ba5
2203be51ceeff6e18c62391c56151e2095d9bb25
'2011-11-16T09:24:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMF' 'sip-files00097.tif'
987ee90c74ddd1c737c4d5cc7285e1ad
af07a98052bd4b9a1e791dea3572f216cf0543d1
'2011-11-16T09:22:59-05:00'
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMG' 'sip-files00097.txt'
9c1248f0506515eb7c3f1f0065cc8772
09c58a5ffc259cb4ff8816013cab6776ed9a74b2
describe
'8649' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMH' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
0a278e4596f744a229978abe029e7207
155ebf27c754ff44856ba5ddf915aa60e06a44e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMI' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
46945d1e5cb0acc1b38434c8ac9e9e8c
0422ab904be302037e8b0b5a0fbc96b2778cac7e
describe
'58968' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMJ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
b1555e930e9919ba0dec6ee93753ff62
ba9d062f1a778bea28b5e6131c29aea6ef22d107
describe
'24409' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
50dd2de44ac7f327a1f8f91aadad22c3
ee9de932a1d58fe031c79b63ae3ad3926313d84f
describe
'20064' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUML' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
d93624edc2d12181e1804d0e58604195
3bea0ae579efcaacf91d76b1794f32f8c305201d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMM' 'sip-files00098.tif'
4ba4af14ff07f3b82bf92012a50dbbf7
316275cc0adcf60466cecd04d6de6f1135cb0dbe
'2011-11-16T09:21:12-05:00'
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMN' 'sip-files00098.txt'
cb0ae49d8837f4b6073106329bf644ef
0955d15197c48e03f13c419670f16e8230f6b219
describe
'6699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMO' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
8c6647ef5e70a417ccc38a3537ae74cd
3478cb9b6a79024e69b1933a2d56ee7bc224158a
describe
'1127422' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMP' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
825a57c5b54c44eb3fe306899b2815ab
79799892dec2439f879641923b2edaf28da3c30b
'2011-11-16T09:24:39-05:00'
describe
'60075' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMQ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
a8c51ef96f675b5ef1aecca83ad5852e
717e9261d40fb15fc312e95ae0f30313f91904d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMR' 'sip-files00099.pro'
d5cca788c3b3dfae174f6e66c7cb11b7
da5834a394b42e187d30d8d90ca181513582256d
'2011-11-16T09:20:06-05:00'
describe
'21646' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMS' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
e0ac778ba30add1f0067ab917a63cb4c
ecf0ef9555926eca43df2551ee14be4d7274e9dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMT' 'sip-files00099.tif'
acbb010becd610cb6bf1edf1c4a94c6a
2e64d330aa733d6ca49868fad549eacc2b9c6f41
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMU' 'sip-files00099.txt'
c7558c9b83a0fd3a9605973ffd00068c
bb05389a0890ce4b7e7cf0952b136a58d76795e6
'2011-11-16T09:18:40-05:00'
describe
'6927' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMV' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
d952c6c13a4715cb0f8cdfe0579daaf6
8f30b89ca10fd479930f1eff9ae709fed26b03ea
describe
'1198285' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMW' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
6ed83fe85a563266375e881a3408da5a
5f44f9a71aa64b1bc649e89fd60f79e58509f0d5
'2011-11-16T09:20:56-05:00'
describe
'78862' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMX' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
8f0b0d60faf9f42325c629ac5ca2508b
5b4050e8ec17a6e8d20c3c3cef8bad41c1c00313
'2011-11-16T09:19:19-05:00'
describe
'35383' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
42dd20e6972c5c06ebf2ad6ffc4b9753
aabd89f6b25483b3dcc6edc259406b729e6b5858
describe
'28016' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUMZ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
9f25d603fa00a6debf74d105ddf674db
b107905ac30a4b9c962e6a0b83fa5f855f61da75
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNA' 'sip-files00100.tif'
b98af2ad87391cd96154685503d9da4e
ecd85305cad5e09de647b8f6ad3bdd5f42a29207
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNB' 'sip-files00100.txt'
132ca10dfee5dae29d14281141a67297
beb75e2cce37743f667b8a3bf5b0c404ca2b4d3a
describe
'9172' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNC' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
1928a5b4c4ca60edde297f42593c163e
e143678ca7b65d9daa2283f94c11ce906ba71c0a
describe
'1203859' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUND' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
8bb91028d7ccd1e1c2d520dbaa0a4190
d1f7862ab83cc1c942fd7c0566a98c64b824482f
'2011-11-16T09:21:01-05:00'
describe
'68815' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNE' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
7ce3c5abe80fa7115b743e5524bddd88
8188dd868c8dcd819811696a87b2438f9dbb2a58
describe
'29362' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNF' 'sip-files00101.pro'
0d88a6941fc3a8dd0c190af4592eae63
aa1243f614b62cd21694c9c670b189bc2b0db1b2
'2011-11-16T09:23:48-05:00'
describe
'24414' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNG' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
132a584c36208667df7313c511497fd4
bac548a772f6dce864c872d09adf8cb843d2e776
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNH' 'sip-files00101.tif'
af3281e61f506dc24abf89723a8951b5
dc21e7616152374025504cf46fad6b2bd852dcf4
'2011-11-16T09:25:10-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNI' 'sip-files00101.txt'
136b92d6ab2946941001187d7bf0d94b
4284f1caafe0187cdb97795c173747f0bf3a3296
describe
'8047' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNJ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
468630ae4e77a32e185598a66245ffe6
118e855675a17a869be885352e8d12a8d0843f20
describe
'1198320' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNK' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
5171dd83e61ccfd87f45a32b20823959
c7358bf1e584b5ec137fe3a09eb4d756937e1a3e
describe
'78136' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNL' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
d5d9784968669044710bc7f31c587fcb
db280eeed6330325c57ccb9fa1c77634444e7576
describe
'35940' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNM' 'sip-files00102.pro'
bf152134c73374ff83e54eb047e9b035
86b530b54ef3b1c12156af40822821b10bfae15b
describe
'27540' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNN' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
7fded7e9373955f6c54036e778d817a1
82e8eb15604b18cf4fb987be5bea33199881d47f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
581c38f116735abc5075e6c36258a2ee
c27dcf1ea18205c64f46487415748d3430b056cd
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNP' 'sip-files00102.txt'
05fc7926f7e1f962bc0d84736742d2ef
91dde26871eaab042d2ae5e1c9640d8abc7ea8b1
describe
'8922' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNQ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
06ad3929e4e038e080cf9978ecea6b96
0e5cf14c4b529d277a28f908e2a7e6916dd9449a
'2011-11-16T09:26:40-05:00'
describe
'1203801' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
d017d7bc38b9d50f60478083545e3046
644cf47d83b97056d6c28d7f5cd934ed987763d0
describe
'83377' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNS' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
fed78b63ec1cb273334af240bd2c8649
98441dd43ef78f967a5a3b5b56c5caca7eb4a96f
describe
'37199' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNT' 'sip-files00103.pro'
e0ea92d65dbedacad94f1971064750b0
f503169ed547e324fcea11745da711b88bb04f21
'2011-11-16T09:18:43-05:00'
describe
'29507' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNU' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
9aa340565f0afc26a15faf0e614463d2
ec49721375d7ebd3f8577b21535d927bd82d72b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNV' 'sip-files00103.tif'
ff1dee021e953b00b615f5159cb8df1b
b3ad9fdbffc7ebf060d809245658ab34645853cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNW' 'sip-files00103.txt'
f8dc6510bb8f24ac8494e5ef0fa32f4d
b81ede5a8baa6732422aba4cb04e4e628a98be66
describe
'9041' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNX' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
9d3775ee343fc28615535f7f4a200b93
a2ea48fb61e7f35b88f8fb82c4a70d19f18292a2
'2011-11-16T09:25:23-05:00'
describe
'1198300' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNY' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
abfa1e7a0574703b509aaa050929ca43
6108f6a9addada563d518aaeb8885053195a429d
describe
'76041' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUNZ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
f3b440c1eea8fcffa354c2593f14e73c
1d9e95cd8aed95e87a04b4fb4134f40c36e0da21
describe
'33936' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOA' 'sip-files00104.pro'
982e200301a6d7caff48fe4ce6b4da2f
32eebf1e33aba7cbaf2ad33a044da2009b88dd6f
describe
'27340' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOB' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
26d24214a46d22985279879255e92b58
9fc0ca5d456e6f18b1d68606625466f1ea7a4cdc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOC' 'sip-files00104.tif'
83569a9955aad9b73b9d033f07a3145f
dec2cb0235a200fb312b8033ff51ff7a0c1303f2
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOD' 'sip-files00104.txt'
14412fbba2fc1738c582394f3dac8985
1fc14d3ab452df15dda377438de1ad6afbc248f9
describe
'8802' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOE' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
34edff46eb832fb4833a4c6782463cf6
e76cc9985e38d63abc76131b7392252657c464a1
describe
'1203759' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOF' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
0069a1e8da16942f7a36b64a3c6e7236
dd4be0b6d9d72973b800cca61026ff5301b19ef6
'2011-11-16T09:22:54-05:00'
describe
'79392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
1b39a30f465f93ef3b25ff935b608496
1ec39cfb1d317bd05369bbaa6babce185d5491a0
describe
'35968' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOH' 'sip-files00105.pro'
652f45ddb5fe6a00e44b8e5e59ff6bcf
f87cf67e4301d68fa7ee7898d935d3e526e0c659
describe
'27658' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOI' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
9a2a5893d273dc43c5b9425c2aec983c
450dc8930fd36a47d991c86e6f98d5ee9273533d
'2011-11-16T09:18:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOJ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
82ac18f35c77e5587130e5d6aff9872d
b15fed07121767d041451c0da091a8255fe013a6
'2011-11-16T09:24:12-05:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOK' 'sip-files00105.txt'
9fe460149f232c47aac2ca0111de2833
06cfb0d01713f2f3f3fd23cd955ffab4975052b8
describe
'8690' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOL' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
3f68c37998c84e71ecdf93a6cefc31d9
7a8e9c1ac2aeb3dc8cff8001dd6e57130fa1bb9a
describe
'1198153' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOM' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
490c09918b75269cb2c32eb82e3a868a
debc78c341b9c964f5fc62c9f4819b87db33e0fb
describe
'76111' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUON' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
97e24670c9bc43448561386a3d39a5ae
b1441b189ce8500312b66ad73ea41be1c4c8f0bc
describe
'34300' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOO' 'sip-files00106.pro'
33e5337431fd91fc193379a8f714f012
1d538dd8d091ebf4ba01d21feca59a75151f5a41
describe
'26517' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
26eaf9587d376ad3960dfb0ed59e7dc2
1348c4cef5f7a76e6a1c7023bb438d1f1574e698
'2011-11-16T09:24:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOQ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
d2299b34434ca0ede7069ffebc6a52f0
ce2009e4d318691aadd524ddf221040f335f40af
'2011-11-16T09:21:15-05:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOR' 'sip-files00106.txt'
04d098b44e382596e35f937b3b726ba1
d370e0b8c4375391eb8db8e78b2cc83ba88bea17
'2011-11-16T09:19:23-05:00'
describe
'8828' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOS' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
04f8ed32ea354f75fe5fe0b650009a83
eb8d5cab56cb63bf0ef49b45193d121ff1e7f774
describe
'1203853' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOT' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
7ff33c2972a867b03082e92d539f3be0
cc6062fa5bf2282a511f3537c802a5597f20e614
describe
'80218' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOU' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
d7cab98b7f0083c357b7088153e220db
5a70b05d3322860db7abbb3bcb5b379c42c7a769
describe
'35625' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOV' 'sip-files00107.pro'
31445dba925134d6428a7e6f6df906b6
e64e1265b0022421f44bfcd62b68789bc00e45b2
describe
'28560' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
5f86e8342b8975e307e97a5fee61e9f1
f9cc79833f20bd985f0129cc965bd10c50c2a626
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOX' 'sip-files00107.tif'
375b15384eb3ebca36a6348f79336edf
bf8a46b80ee30950f8249fd037a77c2f9d07db35
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOY' 'sip-files00107.txt'
e62e90c44e831c2fe99b827dd24b04b9
24b8728fbf04eef70fdb550e53a0f057b6aa5c17
describe
'8846' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUOZ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
2422e858f56896c8db23fe387781b189
6c6a9d4d9d1ef3de45ac014ea788ad6a39f2cfdd
describe
'1198295' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
b1458969c275236b7426146db0049ae0
e007d0bfff715f8fa70ed6299f41c90b1d8445ec
describe
'75589' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPB' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
9441966d288de3370dfa8fd4c7cd687c
3e1f2e37f2b6f7427d9fe866e96782693e8c1f45
describe
'33257' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPC' 'sip-files00108.pro'
8764958ee3cd0e82940b8d9e41d8f16e
2e8fa6666a55a18959943281d97f705ce80c8a7b
describe
'26695' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPD' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
b60f1834a65242a246ba351c7b6bdb6b
904145adf76f2ebb0d6934a465c4f7b3468adac4
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPE' 'sip-files00108.tif'
dbf4ef0ad68e7cff7e95a8ad996cd099
f8636416c897d54e7022cd7c62e7d9b51caa994f
'2011-11-16T09:21:32-05:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPF' 'sip-files00108.txt'
3f799a37ebe423148395e4ef145644cc
11bfc7ec13c9d265e652f09eb562dcb140293d40
describe
'8854' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPG' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
42487417ca68b92965f4d46bfc5ef7a6
60c42db6682311c8f849c9f2b4532eaf1db647ad
describe
'1203883' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
b8439a102d12150f2e76169861071705
32a0a605592db590fed5f16aa7ca5aeed872fbe1
'2011-11-16T09:21:51-05:00'
describe
'80247' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPI' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
96911a3b6efeebd49e41422930c22d8d
7b79b13b9d8a83c2229b8a535e525898ea6556f0
describe
'35934' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPJ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
aed7e6d044c8ada13f7467f09868118a
e76d3ce93f85f14391d86c417f09179af69c3ded
describe
'28170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPK' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
5750502a962721e77e92d0b3de5ea2da
2e27d0618fd00da2f2c547c07f114365bd269798
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPL' 'sip-files00109.tif'
b448d5e57446f042b3251f937ea7a829
471525dc2d9eb14b9cbf76cd2e745c3e5c4b5ad0
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPM' 'sip-files00109.txt'
5c64592ff0f3d9235e0a42ea324df9aa
179c81532ebc827c8b6b7e3d8eb1093675152223
describe
'8988' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPN' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
c2c245e3f82a4fe709f28544ef9e4d5b
bce408d417ef03bcfc2c206d73bec97324d0b8a3
'2011-11-16T09:17:48-05:00'
describe
'1198224' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPO' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
bcf7caf15f8a1e1ecf519e0dfc8dbe8b
3ff48b95660b0805aaf8f978b731a0e548f3e696
describe
'76857' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPP' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
e382356c689bee6e7e018b4e5c0f6232
baadc95aed173f520c048eb1762412d07b08340c
'2011-11-16T09:21:52-05:00'
describe
'34636' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPQ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
7222e1142904b7a46188d6e275a51ade
10397b7c36ecbfdece20867fcb3b1e58c4e21336
describe
'27318' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPR' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
e603f73d888a3545cae2ff42b82abb46
f642a8b0da4a5a1d8e38333fcc2a1ab0a157e804
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPS' 'sip-files00110.tif'
33bdae3d27551d84411b9114af0578d5
f0fd87a9dccf743e1420508931c96596f8042661
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPT' 'sip-files00110.txt'
19a4a089d86ddc6c4fbc4f34078813c8
487aa135cbf65a13a46dc57d1a4155d5cc368463
describe
'8842' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPU' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f10a844d00b4c3dcc4940d54095b2bf6
0818f30867cdfca1ec49232809450d23dfe2029f
describe
'1184520' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPV' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
32046852bb9a31aeac1cefb37b68f1f3
90f7b9dc2291081f1f9e830f2266abfcda955939
describe
'61574' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPW' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
560d96409f30e2646c9df4a7eef2b5b3
a3c9061ce116bb33bc72d7ebb20ba6e63d3b297a
describe
'25499' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
e5c896dfaf52b269e393d076abc6c857
301d11cfefee0d5eb31af77819c5977213da8191
describe
'21112' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
ec2c34cd2031546015ffeeb822d2a172
0965cf24cab54e85a035bf40c6d4c364333ca46f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUPZ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
10b90b63b272ed3978dc89939245a703
e58c017a5530feaefc2adeb19a3da4b99e340329
'2011-11-16T09:25:19-05:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQA' 'sip-files00111.txt'
463efcb05beae1c423f016c64103cd8a
25474729b6b2b5c9d6df25d22c99576d23071873
describe
'6684' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQB' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
39451cefb9f96db2c132779988421707
a414d16b830d8003eefedf65dc87e1ec7d06aa4a
describe
'1198336' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQC' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
53bf20f68cfebdb42ef9a361d7d36b1f
e097908f0f44b229850b1e76fa2bcc02556c9124
describe
'60617' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQD' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3a41cf5556a417a168687c122d6b962a
0da51ec71893ea44f3c85b1519d290f44a4c7dcb
describe
'25682' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQE' 'sip-files00112.pro'
2d696114bac751ab892add7342470250
e693d0b48f1317cf19b89fb2ca479642f555459f
describe
'21170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQF' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
635896a017f926b082d39de212a88b0e
674959c3a32a25a90b0c975b0d9c23a63151eb21
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQG' 'sip-files00112.tif'
7147de98a1c001f4121996b53d740dc3
75adf57cbf102ff55a4a2a99a9eb5996184b2b67
'2011-11-16T09:25:07-05:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQH' 'sip-files00112.txt'
6be45db0b931358169f20903f1eb7825
2e02cdb1ba557d8b29096d299b358139260d7c35
describe
'6831' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQI' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
fb063fb2b95c8d1d32ac8877527218ad
53dedff01bd23d2884d607374135865a507674c0
describe
'1203752' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQJ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
eb9350994a29c505a077db4d8fde9c1e
0879ef3b448719574e7a66f66c099eb2e0afae17
describe
'81417' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
ec17587ed1943008a1b8ef9a08cee82c
72c55ef998c745ddff364046755e7a610f41321b
describe
'38138' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQL' 'sip-files00113.pro'
119c75389655fff837294300c6194469
8d1c38a7f8896d2a0efdf22a9dd86079a1783546
describe
'28945' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQM' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
900258d1651f5499e33a7697feb38341
b40e12a4275cbe1f65ebe9ecf00a697161c46675
'2011-11-16T09:26:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQN' 'sip-files00113.tif'
967b95dc25c645016cbed40b90070468
8c5a5e2936fae19cee4ebd1b457eca2ad0e826bd
'2011-11-16T09:18:34-05:00'
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
6ec419271d0220e483e09aacf26349fb
016ef022846527d002fbfa082e54d647673c4077
describe
'8894' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQP' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
d036466b184ca65d4b28d0f6474a3b91
5477cd86daab4214f1fb7107eff66eb023e34ef9
describe
'1198289' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
6b4911c8882d942325e28e6511b269f0
84495a1018f14e29c12490f29d88ba117225dae7
describe
'74489' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQR' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
36215005676f96b707eb19d99c84f339
0d65d7b2f6b0c93faa7e0941bd459ff344d56eaf
describe
'34812' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQS' 'sip-files00114.pro'
6f9c7cbd7bbfc94080bf46a0b33649f6
b2079a20efe67465a419e6675ee2020e28593241
describe
'26503' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQT' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
6d45b2db58b879c4558b2d0e7fb2d341
b8057774b1ab687655d73b5bfef06be5daee427c
'2011-11-16T09:23:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQU' 'sip-files00114.tif'
e4f06ce80d58af2d1ceac3ca028893ed
86c24500b008691afe60f1e85da214a93d14eb78
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQV' 'sip-files00114.txt'
2b45fa718a3231dca34dbe5b725361cd
3198d5d8587e67f8e933092083ff6df15017de01
describe
'8836' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQW' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
fc45b503003624590c6dc77e5773e846
d622eab7d2942606eb5a674039a374cc628c0de3
describe
'1203824' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQX' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
7e3547753244b7d9a9dea10be2b677f9
026db95263081ec4af6cdaa58b0e7e091810b4e9
'2011-11-16T09:22:26-05:00'
describe
'78655' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQY' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
22b11ddf5f7e0f48e1319ad3a231ff13
7dde86055f4cdeaeba36e065a7c8faf6fc3b5207
describe
'35929' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUQZ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
5546eb8c36be9f1465affcd3a8298ebb
5014d06b6d52202c02403d5041a292c5d1c8c299
describe
'27826' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURA' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
7b38e478c9b89b8ad24e5bea08e40583
a748405739807d3838a027e960ce817f12786fea
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
acf15c21c7948035f7c79b8760bdd3c3
5dee9df59375db93a7e415d137b7bcc85a6edde6
'2011-11-16T09:25:47-05:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURC' 'sip-files00115.txt'
c0fdc40062b0ee9485e4786ad15d4d55
27b37cba6a2ab168e9bd2b61f891241ef6f8ab97
describe
'8742' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURD' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
8cadfafe5ae231ea3f1b916da16b85ac
93856cc1f7dc884868df31b1a47d89a6179c7916
'2011-11-16T09:18:20-05:00'
describe
'1198291' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURE' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
8846f5555167ed5fbe04261e0f67e6b6
2adc4786e9bee249683654057b2c6872ed7cf2fd
describe
'76475' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURF' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
ca4c902728bd3b0a63d849acf5eadc34
c33f67141857652df057fb9261be248e477e30bd
describe
'36280' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURG' 'sip-files00116.pro'
f7bde94461258763877fc83b0d682504
5ff10f025ed2bd5ce4d9dc621565eeca1cde251f
describe
'27176' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURH' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
c90121df019a2bb81d6e3e87338b1691
7da19d80b5faf60bacf18dfc4655b9a158b5c1e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURI' 'sip-files00116.tif'
adedf52b96874fb0137e67403419e2ef
592f9d958ce5c806ef746e262a120dee69ca13e8
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURJ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
2819c74f02db31d33f82693dcd1ccb7e
0fefe60a8d7c6f2e97cf7ebc49a29ac174c94aee
describe
'8851' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
4da7d27d9b25f85fe02449ec44ed3db7
13e432868e387a69131bf99af98a03b9f056361b
describe
'776675' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURL' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
eda27278fd526fa6b7f0f58a575734bb
3d472c154b23cc9b8c5b6cd33ec05d6b93d6c2fb
describe
'22578' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURM' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
838377d4aeb8c21358437272f99c528d
487a5336f697d759ad82b064f4f073040ba701e7
describe
'5853' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURN' 'sip-files00117.pro'
a14d91b5ad14bb3b7cae901e893c84cd
104e1b4276ecafd22398184bef4c04c9927c52a0
'2011-11-16T09:23:22-05:00'
describe
'7224' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURO' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
cbcacddc3f84c9e1929529fd7dfddea1
7c13a904836d8633581f23cd15f92fcdace000fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURP' 'sip-files00117.tif'
41cbab7f231ec5a7d0d238d96d5a5506
1f2dbc393bf604ee8c26d8c405f43f1cf6aa4607
'2011-11-16T09:21:57-05:00'
describe
'241' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURQ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
cc82cf97822e6dfe1b1a5cb4a1c78ac1
c14ae526bc93347c04a3b6020ecf4b3921e5f636
describe
'2630' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURR' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
cd1fd2aac5a90e504560809ea5193fc3
f4813959cebd79091cef2d263e37ac1d13e5cf22
describe
'1193380' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURS' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
6d942b96a5a643fae78810011cee80c2
e8cc41b66e8eaaa86af4d49e2658cb5efe17fbe3
describe
'59551' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURT' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
80a9c3a2beb51fc50f892130e19e77d8
19411f5675c8227b9a20bb7b406fe5e2ffbd9c25
describe
'25600' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURU' 'sip-files00118.pro'
bb39c8f75756e417095095634e21483c
59bcc7ffa3c50529c64d6152a0020d8ec5f1558d
describe
'20928' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURV' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
fc5d83de0da7c10892e7643528606a68
434d4f1a0709d115ba6b82f548c31eeb14a964e0
'2011-11-16T09:20:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURW' 'sip-files00118.tif'
ace9f75bf938d0b77c3d785bcec17798
68ccc4fa2de2762d348651d47df1c991ba0d64ab
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURX' 'sip-files00118.txt'
d37b9f6a5cc7f039234c3cedbbaffe1e
4f0ca83d31e892c14e6b591875e3109b5830b851
describe
'7059' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURY' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
9efc1feeee15e3d25230095019149a0c
c418864a5a48c8bb399725f529a3b348917cc107
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAURZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
4590af1c34f4e46b7303a68453904568
eaad6fcfa4efb309b27566c71049aebb3adb32b0
describe
'81405' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSA' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
34a5cb7998eb8c28641b85598252da80
fd272bad03d17a010c82be37a4c80a685a0cee8f
describe
'37000' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSB' 'sip-files00119.pro'
396b945a6156e97d8d3ecc271b4e89ee
1faf07c206f1f94236d64335344ce92c45037cd6
describe
'28589' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSC' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
500cd4023f389f16cd1684ef55450867
bbdf4cbef1a2eddcc80450290f151102c270138d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSD' 'sip-files00119.tif'
9226edf80e093dd4a1d22cf1f4394a1a
483d57dfa82d1b70537b60901986852fb728ddb8
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSE' 'sip-files00119.txt'
e5e2296c0a276ade458c45fa8ec47f22
b2b06c94c0baf7d206bbb2208ab8b1688428b749
describe
'9106' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSF' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
583f97d7355c8af0d0924eed0a53969e
81608dd9e72808644a31e28aa4c118e510977091
describe
'1198330' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSG' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
9da1fc3c98ceb438078ed0e8b1e52b1f
02cd741f85848eb796ddd69b10711b0bdcc4687b
describe
'80280' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSH' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
ebcb1295da87e621c16fbd5e9a141c8d
bae4e5b62ff3f79318abccd30a629d7d869be8d7
describe
'37222' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSI' 'sip-files00120.pro'
2b50c3daa104b8baece78145af7ff869
e5f6d30277daf5388870546c23afc4ab661fe5ff
describe
'28404' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSJ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
25ecb4586491469ab447826d17e515d0
4016ce85c03aa1077847f907e5f246ae49f60783
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSK' 'sip-files00120.tif'
3295ffd6f956d9041eceb066d0894c74
8cb4ee07a5aaf292cf012c34242a99794d35a05a
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSL' 'sip-files00120.txt'
1ef577a295176350d554d7b0b1ed624e
4cdb1913c4c18b5d6b734250b3252b3ee80206be
'2011-11-16T09:19:08-05:00'
describe
'9083' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSM' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
8eea61aae532a457358d241988804a74
78d6b058c97b0c4dc5975706c313a3fb4209eb8c
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSN' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
6c86fe9ecf573ffb37b78d681bc2a296
3e9d354d6e6198494dfccf865b832f8ec6c14ebe
describe
'80875' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSO' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
0337a834d5cee8a8b79be4736ad3a831
91648188a9401173252842d430f810065b419217
describe
'37294' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSP' 'sip-files00121.pro'
20815e741c3960eefcda04fb79880d4f
1fc9865ed78cc04a7c755487eb2a6aea9be5d298
describe
'28749' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSQ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
7502b26118591e279ecff38ae49daa31
69697e27dfab5cf83a09616a20c1323fbe1bbe8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSR' 'sip-files00121.tif'
57df63c548dd3c2f9b503f4093715af1
5715fa1f99589bb5559c56d9cce2ba4ccb4577bb
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSS' 'sip-files00121.txt'
da1126e375fec6c947fe9dc8e19f35ed
1d8e0091c98d80bb26d7df10d8566ba427f546b4
describe
'8910' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUST' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
7fea59b97eb0ce37cc35db4d54b09701
47d6650108d7e2fa14cb3b9e033869b1accb1040
describe
'1198204' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
d8f1721578863518691c571693eb3a42
785845018e17e78e3ef72e7a20c53372cfe2ef5c
describe
'78286' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSV' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
2ea1ba74f4c3e13cfe24b93068b67d44
a4eb15c57c525eaeb406530833ac673db4d16784
describe
'36516' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSW' 'sip-files00122.pro'
b757709f67f5e8d5ab93899d599f4b29
a2c8665a43018d342cc5a1d2ee4eb0900e304ac4
describe
'27799' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSX' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
03c38315ae6d2f1e9cc068f981841162
0ab58ef8d632ca1b83de7f6f48af0c112a696afc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSY' 'sip-files00122.tif'
c5dd98b60f903ce078f74c35fc23cf07
de38efbbdeebc32648b9accf909e72c0a86b5fa3
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUSZ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
28867e35cc6df283f102d32c3884fd9e
a36241f99302ab9c340564311b939e8a3e486241
'2011-11-16T09:26:30-05:00'
describe
'8973' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTA' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
7c6af9cf0e9ce8c8afd5f55908d12d02
ffccb281e75a8f484520bf12841110e31627fd3b
'2011-11-16T09:22:49-05:00'
describe
'1203884' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTB' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
f86ac9a01148e89e082f031439a446d3
23967c72a92861cb2c02358069450d0c5e7417f1
describe
'79887' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTC' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
904f153ed5aac0a3bfde4c9f694729e8
0a9c5cc52e2b3ba1fbf6945100eea0190cb6d126
describe
'36491' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTD' 'sip-files00123.pro'
85291c4b1231bc18d695702a21a1ea91
e05f0c6117cec2c0ffebc0c36e006d1451778faa
describe
'28180' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTE' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
f27d8c03e9bbc44da17792aa48f50c7f
38b2aa6ca078e4baf48b2e4b3ef1de2227cf824f
'2011-11-16T09:24:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTF' 'sip-files00123.tif'
216a4d63c5042c79b8d5791cdf80ffaf
7d6a2797885484d5d62af942a1ad014a06ac8e40
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTG' 'sip-files00123.txt'
9e1d3265d4bb5d4d4dbeb3d3b2eed4b2
6b38c5584999d4d59f6cf9b9fb345f73d8f50e4a
describe
'9170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTH' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
f41101ca70b199f21ae76b3bfb3623cd
a0659ca8879fc48ea66524f99e297484c502b890
describe
'1198322' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTI' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
d57635c2d559542c7c4f3c802d7a6e30
a933d57254da70c6de1ac1543384de15b38bc27f
describe
'81310' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTJ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
0a3551784c45dbf156814621bc1d9918
a91f06ea12ca6859d8017e42f03a12688fe8df40
describe
'37717' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTK' 'sip-files00124.pro'
1df307b24525aeaf822c0e9e81106b69
b0416ea2e00abacd6d3c30646965654f646993a8
describe
'29099' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTL' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
c520037dd76a2ca1673b5bc9fa952eae
900c8b26c8fa2d16276306493fde02879ed4ad35
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTM' 'sip-files00124.tif'
cf469544d38b11e21c3d97f2163b9af1
7c00cebf126174b919a55f09d7df5b68c391b8f9
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTN' 'sip-files00124.txt'
810c7ab324eb7ee316da5a50eaac2506
89056c90bf2dbcdddd3fb46e0e0e3e073a23f030
'2011-11-16T09:25:11-05:00'
describe
'9210' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTO' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
6e4687720cf9423b076842fc591d7059
ea5c8a391fcd98c409272b1cbb269e0e8549d3e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTP' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
3d52c0dadfec8dd7ab2f95c7e7399595
17e3f75deaf59d106964d9feb7eb8e4528e13236
describe
'81079' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTQ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
6eb0b506dc97a23505415e5141373613
6dc3670dcf4174c45745bdde2ef5f39f6c4134a4
describe
'37875' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTR' 'sip-files00125.pro'
cb793cee562709cb84bdc20d0f2d48b5
7a62a1ed2bc1001f1b9b1792e735aaad1baea862
describe
'28522' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTS' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
47d8fb6306c5b207ccc05426690c91d7
15caccf7d274837a0885a30f971fff4a1fef7fa8
'2011-11-16T09:24:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTT' 'sip-files00125.tif'
3fba807aa33d65036e10b4af37790ec1
0f4ef4fc127a074be66ea2afd0f4f200da2ae174
'2011-11-16T09:19:29-05:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTU' 'sip-files00125.txt'
d550f80a1d47541ede610951f16d733a
ffdefae50ec383913dfb60f397398915e951ad4c
describe
'8915' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTV' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
0435e0915d0afb7f4120afd2379fb45f
83690178f79d4eb32c1ea4ea2d81fedc5c06907e
describe
'1198286' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTW' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
be9033a02abdea34d7d332baed901c8e
22f70ea6ef3670fe77102963668688fbe48342c5
describe
'81508' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTX' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
bedfecfa8fde9ed85c774a9743cbf769
2c688d71f408fbcb310b86436b2a55f0e9deaafe
describe
'37695' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTY' 'sip-files00126.pro'
5088cc5f0682286fedb8e4163bc5116f
ba77d23af8aaa57cef404ec932940bece207964c
'2011-11-16T09:25:00-05:00'
describe
'28806' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUTZ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
2110e595a6862396b55ba1095fe5433f
3b7a927abe1374cfb009dc5c09d59624772caf4b
'2011-11-16T09:26:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUA' 'sip-files00126.tif'
4130375a9366ac3e03e074098a43ed35
7feaf3ff0697fc653a15a70ab32a9360ebf132d6
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUB' 'sip-files00126.txt'
7b11dd3c0844a1323931725dfc43b401
2b3f04e20f76e387fed78ed28816f63809f513b7
describe
'9081' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUC' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
8f766e8603b8969719ca2268296e6bad
fc85255ea9b1039a623bd50f6819a0961b7c2685
describe
'1189790' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUD' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
52fbaa2d2bae6fc0a018543a60e9c0a9
fda44d1cb7db2d7f0ab86c357fbf495e02929d42
describe
'75660' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUE' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
89503eb124446765aac72311873ad89a
1ad13f77ce8b56c900d3a7d418695a543719e1d8
describe
'35042' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUF' 'sip-files00127.pro'
759278ceafe46842e1ea38a028ecd579
16cfe452396ce54a5be408e2e69bce513feb4c6f
describe
'27398' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUG' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
e8eb29c7875dcadc12a7a0303ae14c31
de8691506dc73baef325e80d8ccf95233aa60867
describe
'9886285' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUH' 'sip-files00127.tif'
5c770dce74e8a48f7ba151339b414acd
249490e141da39b7b483bad4cc793f713cfa165e
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUI' 'sip-files00127.txt'
8088453395d5626a0ef6e5874f41521d
02104d2890fa5df7cf17e495dc9f511661a6a6af
describe
'8188' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUJ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
52c4bf2e1daa192d9e685dc44782fde0
b4aa67b66b6e5930bed1ef3a93da4b9e0e9720cb
'2011-11-16T09:21:09-05:00'
describe
'1253677' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUK' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a13696e380abb7fea32cd9c9482940bb
7e3ea2d83b38ab4ff7e4deacf6782181ca3edf57
'2011-11-16T09:20:41-05:00'
describe
'79748' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUL' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
49436ca1e81606b73e0d0cd136fb631f
454a9ebbc3066e147cdff620127bee82214c9bb0
'2011-11-16T09:23:15-05:00'
describe
'2575' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUM' 'sip-files00128.pro'
fb3eb2733f095976198c91b778fda9ef
0c7188b72fe363f7bb9ed4b5d472b397c3c8e5e4
describe
'22776' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUN' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
6955d8646fed475812943e853794b036
c925aae50f142b8f1215c695869d4f9720cd00d4
'2011-11-16T09:21:21-05:00'
describe
'10040611' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUO' 'sip-files00128.tif'
344059022d7b630c467c094166bd1f98
ef6c7188e6f9f8b3676e6fb6616d049eac497cb1
'2011-11-16T09:22:50-05:00'
describe
'279' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUP' 'sip-files00128.txt'
2c3c8f0fd6ffe1b1c38e1b6c9495289b
93d4c5f937fb24fc539b12c2cab5329227cd5203
'2011-11-16T09:22:39-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7355' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUQ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
560833367f0508ce2f150e8a65a9a0df
db04221f4ac19486dea59702feae022383b7d8d2
'2011-11-16T09:18:17-05:00'
describe
'1196121' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUR' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
5b2399f6e8c61ae35c545e9d4d874717
7214776cbb6dc10c068cbf5c880ef8d844cf7c6e
describe
'73325' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUS' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
5b7b170e6183c6eeb047efe9a7a3c008
1c7e7ae2ba28986caf9291c29895d61dfe6bd615
'2011-11-16T09:19:15-05:00'
describe
'35177' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUT' 'sip-files00130.pro'
e4dbc28b39b42a0e490142059c95d892
d4f169e15111e1b76177de9621fda6df6c456150
describe
'25907' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUU' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
d65321243e8f8938a9f79b1ffcb3b585
5f9c368326cf0252695fa9cbf0bf0f3bdd8589f8
describe
'9580371' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUV' 'sip-files00130.tif'
1c2f8dff738bfa52fe5fdbaeb9c3aaae
89c1f1d12b169b52a0a79b16c1bcc05340bbd520
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUW' 'sip-files00130.txt'
2ca8924848ba1e549cfcc86bb90e1997
2162c88a5202d7da18ea9ef7fc5d73ca1b43c7fc
describe
'8749' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUX' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
3b5dfacb91ab81011d06536ea6c252eb
43ac40eef22bf20caae9f2ae0b548fa0e3ceaef2
describe
'1281131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUY' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
4d356cdd8f3609d8244171f793592a24
0603acd616cb3fc61ae224c26c53069e63425850
describe
'71984' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUUZ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
363dd2dc134400feb16fb1e0fc7d502a
0046587f215459f15da04b471998fef320072312
describe
'30331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVA' 'sip-files00131.pro'
3ae32ca2442f7c8562eb9c3fbc2cc375
62f3b2241f1c98d9c6279d74868af51a3a0eef67
'2011-11-16T09:26:39-05:00'
describe
'25365' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVB' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
96bc8dfbc03383de6e1692c754c537fd
743a9e5fb564d856535437a9649276a0641ef9ae
describe
'10259583' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVC' 'sip-files00131.tif'
aed172adbed07b501f17cfeaf3173e61
295251ba350b24a5a4e171ec88ca148b9d1eb8b9
'2011-11-16T09:26:49-05:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVD' 'sip-files00131.txt'
9929554f88c72449064171ee203156eb
9b4e47c0c934225ffa6849fdc093e4b9e54ff9aa
describe
'7253' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVE' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
3be96128fa3183995c7a290bf5098c91
b87e0cacd1708cb1d6390232995bace0d50c2382
describe
'1208307' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVF' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
e4ca6724def5aa0423def1ce4246008e
a52f2619e0dd7a46b769a731b76ae378295d012a
describe
'58734' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVG' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
5acbc3b8947ceefe736eaa536f22bd2e
c7f33fbb2b43625b4767c1b6c33ec3b4e8302397
describe
'24031' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVH' 'sip-files00132.pro'
68a4c18db10e7436e8a3ed87f3f26835
7f49c3a7007b81cbd4afc66d25c1f9a1323faad1
describe
'20497' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVI' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
5d9f49061c18dc4aec505c12677daf78
cb61fe31740f9e193ccd46a3e6f9e0d2b0d8e237
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVJ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
07b4d56cfac27dadf10643686dd102b7
aa69fd0feb5a968eaf6e9d088e20203d34e84e66
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVK' 'sip-files00132.txt'
3bb630a40f795452465fea065c4c078a
53a0b1eb83e7f75a7589ac299e3d67a6432d83a9
describe
'6632' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVL' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
004f573a7c15ea8c9203e418fb2cbe87
c1a24c56912828fdae5f1833acbd1c46a6009d67
describe
'1281119' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVM' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
9a56d4c2e3a2520c18c630fdd963b751
fe7ec575bd90de2c970873ea776d02512ddf1c79
describe
'76815' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVN' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
33d4888522013ae81ba6d2861423d0b3
13f750360fca8fd5db7c6f8d94fb7a5f5c8bc0db
describe
'33919' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVO' 'sip-files00133.pro'
254d81a9aca7f1be776e4b6238f6af5d
8e47adc6dd1856d0da010514056151025446d66b
describe
'27470' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVP' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
fb1ee61b86443442ec87550f54facbc5
2067eef465b505b604b3590c3a8d7399ff2a3cfa
'2011-11-16T09:26:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVQ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
07c3cbad22582fe43dee282f5c1c83e6
2b28e93ef3f06a334516f99c97bd52d78b62df0c
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVR' 'sip-files00133.txt'
b388197346d1f7fa43eef1eddb40604a
dc3b6edb61d2918b111949a0b0730b7dc7a1f42d
'2011-11-16T09:19:50-05:00'
describe
'7677' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVS' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
a31534bb43c811b78d78709d792e82a0
e93cc2312b1671dbc4a2e3833f53424d388d07cc
describe
'1253595' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVT' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
5dd1ce2d21319035e303c030c547caf8
d25f25cd3a491f658e8f9788ff24582237d66986
'2011-11-16T09:22:41-05:00'
describe
'67331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVU' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
e092312cbf0b9acc60cf5983e010d6a0
3558a2879bf4a23b280c844c2cb287375a33a530
describe
'29995' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVV' 'sip-files00134.pro'
33efe78130a5ab66ec6cce2b6b20acd9
a570d2492166e0341172ef39c96d4fe31bcd4766
describe
'23905' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVW' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
280cf6bc4dd07a92136481995ac4e683
bdf34c4c09c75d7711ff339719d9b3c735203c8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVX' 'sip-files00134.tif'
e8f3ddc5bde6f6ff3fa546aa9b313523
82c2b54ab13ae47c29a11f5fe8c15c0dc42ac6c3
'2011-11-16T09:26:48-05:00'
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVY' 'sip-files00134.txt'
e7b04e187dc2c7fc4f18361cab14348b
429362e0933f6fc2654f224deff104a3c0f92dca
describe
'7566' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUVZ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
09753dd7f8dca66f2e786bf03353c3ab
c8dab26835f9d08877d64785caad2f121ebf6ea9
describe
'1281122' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWA' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
34702c9b5fefe2beb2cd26e7099a1a74
701c4fe4ce7406a1c888cc9b8a52292baf6e8d15
'2011-11-16T09:23:28-05:00'
describe
'76763' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWB' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
611e42f4b588e2a6bcbc6bbad40dd3b1
b1426d495536a564632c48513d2831849f5d5522
describe
'32714' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWC' 'sip-files00135.pro'
f1d38f95431de85b22238fbe23e4c0f6
a925d7bc4174e5fb570b671fa6f24d139b8634ab
describe
'27655' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWD' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
4e1264a2bea9d02a83262346205c70a0
bd55915122bda8a92d231c204ec2b53fd37301f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWE' 'sip-files00135.tif'
11d311f2f222d1d6381893ed4666bbaa
2d8464307819e9fbecc90af261b6386756a0fa4b
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWF' 'sip-files00135.txt'
09e05be0cee9013c7eebf7fcd22b47ec
28ed321d3d117e3d70c116e1ec9b16281767895d
describe
'8095' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWG' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
4510c28efa6d7867c261d4423deaec80
11355fe2f415cd374e39c22e69fffa81259cd1d3
describe
'1253601' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWH' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
003498fb9a6322cd195a3576684d3e88
5652b8f2560bd595a13a04a54879dbea7f77c123
describe
'75798' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWI' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
d4dfc3242a03c814320b2911aa0c4cf9
240b6186b93d2d1742788f9cf932049201542f53
describe
'33413' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWJ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
41c0cde3c01d43a90299cde89da8ff1a
0dde0060cf9955c94a7420c1de51829863aa8419
describe
'26759' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWK' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
5e98aa7565fac8adb2c55764132bd36e
7b77f015dce0df759dd2c6a7f40eeff28509169b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWL' 'sip-files00136.tif'
246f22ea57a9008d4429e5e73ee4800c
bf07f99ac417060b1c897d2a4b347e0ae02a1448
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWM' 'sip-files00136.txt'
83ddcc87e3a3cd0361ad9f8ca0203a62
aaadca3a55ab1fce3938a1909aa6f4e0aa1d1466
describe
'8499' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWN' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
05cb44804be32bd5e297e419c40f948d
e9c6614d675f567cddfb9e863adde5e3d96462c4
describe
'1281033' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWO' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
ca1fb9acf70460ec09868e19956fbe97
ec6e4753906ff642dcdedc4c73bdbade137f9ef2
describe
'80398' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWP' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
2370739f7e69022a3dabf85566bb0e9c
fa30a0c47bc1be29c8cc2bd6542f308b6c2a8b9c
describe
'35750' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWQ' 'sip-files00137.pro'
006cc6036bb6d176add8569db72e13a4
ebc056e27c15bbd025a5e7334850e69761d28208
describe
'28262' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWR' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
5464a5491d6a38f5e5dfc4a3c91d6a9e
17f5ed4c74f29dfc597eaa3cff1e53d43b99926e
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWS' 'sip-files00137.tif'
6aabf1659e6683277e7d588a5592bcdf
8e69acec98e5c663ff4da2a47fa5fa69139e104c
'2011-11-16T09:24:00-05:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWT' 'sip-files00137.txt'
10dac30498f6a3955729725053668823
9342b6c7e05201974279915708546819e9756238
describe
'7915' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWU' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
ce9c845797af758a86a668dff0a80aef
45f8e7b9536b024a9fa4f31d5bec93e0995d1174
'2011-11-16T09:25:24-05:00'
describe
'1253727' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWV' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
fdcd2313c1e34df52e878d37c1dbe412
fdafc04ea7b828e32211783230a74cd10bbc696a
'2011-11-16T09:19:09-05:00'
describe
'64688' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWW' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
e436cbad09b10267a3bd3c06124bb48c
fe4d13991ad20d032f077dabc66b7b67f579ed5b
'2011-11-16T09:22:02-05:00'
describe
'28285' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWX' 'sip-files00138.pro'
dedfb1757128a268bbd2139e978e6ea8
58c65ea4cbae6a354fa44cd0cdf99be95b0e40c6
describe
'22156' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWY' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
1fe6d6c8b956cf993544c2d50629c37f
d94860658707512361e0e65aeeb435c26a065986
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUWZ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
a9b936a9059ddddafe0892e7f7850c39
a694b02c1c7748ffcc1fc4a990a4ab995935d784
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXA' 'sip-files00138.txt'
6ebb544c5fa3a6efa47d9ece632a3906
a48d79a379ad3a9d9b6aba6e2e7190fdc51d4268
describe
'7058' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXB' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
8c2645d8b8dc5744ee2c034dda317e74
0ec41da03e1e7083f0cd502480c56ef56573e794
describe
'1226673' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXC' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
b70a9691c469ab0570216b16ec508625
c7bdbfb01684110bcbb46ecf25157036814d6a20
'2011-11-16T09:26:44-05:00'
describe
'63602' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXD' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
c75d71e5ff4f03c4cf2ebb863b04b847
717912e0a03545339453e308a912082ead61ebd2
describe
'25778' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXE' 'sip-files00139.pro'
8c939bccfdbc37865dcf52d1fa4d38a5
fad553579136826568aac9871e9621729789598e
describe
'22913' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXF' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
0417df4d933ee2f540a814842aac1978
d2f96e55abc08295073c87f0630f22a825c53b07
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXG' 'sip-files00139.tif'
b0033dbd9fe561575bbcd7114a62a27a
66be0ff80a5eb06d0c23832b23b03e4126ed413f
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXH' 'sip-files00139.txt'
57795be06253db2c185ab5b2698d8e31
1d79f980a9c3b3782caf82b678e2923b4926f2e9
describe
'6641' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXI' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
7427151245270bb0045d4dd25dcd2701
7400719e0fdb0b83a93eb5bccddc5d73120647d1
describe
'1253605' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXJ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
6d6910454885b7d5f7897a2785d229c7
04d055fdbe8bc3860e4c6f7df44352f770ef5b6e
describe
'76396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXK' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
d7f937a399d8c341e3f30aa9bcc1d601
6d281ae34b30bf12cd3e230342b53b146cf4f65c
describe
'33532' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXL' 'sip-files00140.pro'
7e879fc6c6f1c8691273ab1b49f3e787
1ea5925043b13d946303a7d32234efb415410def
describe
'27545' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXM' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
b326c96b40c8f46fcc659335d70f0dce
a6741965d739039633781a604d95638271787ce1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXN' 'sip-files00140.tif'
e7180e7e2cdb37f0b13f07f294bb8d5b
3b96b0a6ccd07f6e8caddd4bff06e16e208699cc
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXO' 'sip-files00140.txt'
7c50413c0bfbc98d91d073c5439ebe89
b8632863febbd1b12af85a833ed572438158d596
describe
'8440' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXP' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
6801e4babd9956db95c1e29d69b8cb71
41d74d49f3c62ada7be6e6e08197792d5fd08d1a
describe
'1281097' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXQ' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
8068be157b5298369b8eb3ed24ce9619
f7241551705bd24f0383138ffe1bc822e2734a1d
describe
'81138' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXR' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
3d98719701558b38b0728ddc6a606e49
aa6ae7b100339da2f3614cd8e17f5fd4b69d07c0
describe
'36757' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXS' 'sip-files00141.pro'
9197744ba6792a8f23025b4b6a2c6e24
d0f5bfce66665daf993bdd3566a24338b3b627af
describe
'28817' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXT' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
8b059753668442b44c7c08474047ddf4
ec8d9fb13b44d5c1e4e5fe3b49583e1fe9562653
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXU' 'sip-files00141.tif'
f423a25530811d67b6a540c3033a091b
5e8b7985cf0c5fb6d97b122987176250d6be7847
'2011-11-16T09:23:59-05:00'
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXV' 'sip-files00141.txt'
a98d3cf9155226eafeb39ef71db13c7e
24a7f814ff1f43a15a60e2d7fdc803aed7527f80
describe
'7713' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXW' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
e97bceba6f446293809ed9c88d0aff3a
f8512638cadce480dc962d7fb982f05967633064
'2011-11-16T09:24:57-05:00'
describe
'1253712' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXX' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
e2adb4bb8010cbeda05a778aed5ec31f
bad2bcde5d865cc12ebc9658682f6b3f705786ea
describe
'75815' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXY' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
37aeecdfb02dddeeefa11a89d0020457
3c3ced4db3099a856bb6049ca4925642aafa6c14
describe
'34896' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUXZ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
7d29a20a6ce7a84f6e6b7be59d85b4a3
a115ce976313d6ddb7e71e93671880d2c1b24bad
'2011-11-16T09:26:20-05:00'
describe
'26369' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYA' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
0278eb1010e9a59b8fc69fb98532f82a
547dc44079964d894d1249ff187b94911f2f5652
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYB' 'sip-files00142.tif'
303e5222511a91a531569c7780a28c32
44d57461e57715c62838a82b5d92a8c06f0e8a3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYC' 'sip-files00142.txt'
baa58756c8af28965d34f41d2084cfcc
658386d0067e1ce665906c0d347e7602d8ac0985
describe
'8015' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYD' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
949bf1b5605a4ac1fc97b26a641710ab
ea92d07c2fbcb3c0e53ff44c2b59cccc30426212
'2011-11-16T09:26:57-05:00'
describe
'874271' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYE' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
dfcb83509966e8c2a7d79f33c567e29c
e353aed967ed3d6ed1742b71bd7721be3399bdaa
describe
'25396' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYF' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
f48793657aae1e0c7f255f9b0086e795
16e4dc6952e4ea26eceb74d4e3c41a8ab30b4e1c
describe
'5598' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYG' 'sip-files00143.pro'
0316ea3b16f787171efd8cee1d417eb0
cee660ff3177343d0fde42a20bf28705a6085c8d
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYH' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
4b6a729ae530120970a71fab75fd1391
0a2d911d1f40350dd511cb2d1f8020fbc3823973
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYI' 'sip-files00143.tif'
fba71f15f72c818b708cd69240f318b9
b022e0a8f5dadc0de81c95ee168aad83008b1755
describe
'232' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYJ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
b7de8f813be1eaabed4f65fa837b003e
3da59d20011b51d00dc7d2ed90587fc36ca1a8d8
describe
'3042' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYK' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
c7f492d7b095b0f129ad91ab302aff54
ffc979bfca0d88bcc516de784bb2730ab740941b
describe
'1253732' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYL' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
c5f769373faac4ce76fc07f158681df8
20b2510ae7bba335021acbc524e2b97910f95790
'2011-11-16T09:21:48-05:00'
describe
'60301' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYM' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
264091364f01c7f902f0f373c9eb3956
36215fa88950a73f06bab1d0467eb21e0b94ba38
describe
'24164' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYN' 'sip-files00144.pro'
c07597474db428c5c115addc0a9402bc
7b8b658a8a06d7e386d8dbf81505e742b79b88a9
describe
'20777' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYO' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
45df54fc42689f1c59f3310731b609d9
82e3504a0866fa5a2ef69fabe72b6cdfaf2a2760
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYP' 'sip-files00144.tif'
5795f90193d4869b415ddbbdcfee8b82
ea8c092434b99c584bd8ee8a947d8088139e0f00
'2011-11-16T09:23:00-05:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYQ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
8feb4bc43448dbbebc64d474ec31761b
a4346c51088cae796186f03649d0d2600a36ab43
describe
'6579' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYR' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
4218a1b78c2b7e42e6edb4cb832b9d38
3677badbd61b4ca6ccfb30a21970eb638b9af1ec
'2011-11-16T09:22:03-05:00'
describe
'1281101' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYS' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
300027789486ee051dee7f32c0ad1efc
6b5ec421aea4594be232146ae8d8fa202f4ea557
'2011-11-16T09:22:32-05:00'
describe
'75003' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYT' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
fb687dbbaac6d796fcc7793b1953f557
ee1d29d41c494f3f731233400544ea30f4351390
describe
'32765' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYU' 'sip-files00145.pro'
7b4e1e626df869a6632f4ca2a179b86e
36ae500fb3952b9f88555b5fe4182f4240c3f651
describe
'26939' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYV' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
562aa22f5fb51f3f490d5c13eab40385
38a0025f78ba7424f09a7597eb75fae77faa6799
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYW' 'sip-files00145.tif'
1911b6f8d7b21035dc3f027d25bc6c88
20ab8496413b8a47d3018e414d39bb0e39a7f026
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYX' 'sip-files00145.txt'
0d67090712d2e780b75e6057b5668563
b357dbf21e37e5de21a8590582135374a5d9ef58
describe
'7552' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYY' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
3e515ad41928859bd7aff4bf7721fe3d
81d7acdc7192bdfba6acacba17655e94b3a2d613
describe
'1253596' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUYZ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
f09b066c6b852bbb5262aa19e56e23e5
5c93cc5dc946af2a5d0daacb79e2993dcd2b8166
describe
'72063' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZA' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
44257ff31a527df76718a71b725feb3b
ed98c9b9979312986344c891975ecd344645f604
describe
'30711' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZB' 'sip-files00146.pro'
49014b5a2dccac85f944126e735063c9
e24a7deb35eae5ed0f734105c5a7cd5a96ffcadc
describe
'25263' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZC' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
50379b2891cece9b07ba688bf146da3e
6186fb699a56a036fe17737b97f4d10fc069a2a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZD' 'sip-files00146.tif'
3e0b7370594ea19f00d2df7f5360de93
63660517375fa7b49e3d44fba69e7da1fcbe93de
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZE' 'sip-files00146.txt'
100e9b7c25dc6c427b46b0dc7bbf7ad2
c0c6ba9a0d676f4fc613363d2aad9c25b9f5351f
describe
'7806' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZF' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
0c066467a074488405e309be90098b29
4cb3a79df2d27aca8d8522519e2341cad0974bbd
'2011-11-16T09:21:13-05:00'
describe
'1281108' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZG' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
5001bae3c7761d96ee684f0973153eea
462135d4786167b352d4218c1c1ce80761af7921
'2011-11-16T09:23:16-05:00'
describe
'72095' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZH' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
d010083d1bbabb6269b648a9faedac9a
a50949341b66b284e6aaf3e540bb4d876646c1ca
describe
'30694' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZI' 'sip-files00147.pro'
a7ed49d33dd1c656781a05d6260718ab
abf552f6a2082e14fea884cd25266408cdb6878e
describe
'25021' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZJ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
6011561c57e015be28f264e6224aee69
4e5112e1f41587e9eac0dc34acadd95ccded41a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZK' 'sip-files00147.tif'
a833ab197e653b87dfdfc8eafcfe8bb6
b9d96aec4679066b56f19f93e2725c07f9403a47
'2011-11-16T09:21:46-05:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZL' 'sip-files00147.txt'
62c3d20001d0b25ad5baede3a42f6595
ec24caf710e130bf0e1e238f481349c4f134a2ee
'2011-11-16T09:25:59-05:00'
describe
'7171' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZM' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
a23a3f481651f0cb965acc9e440c2cc7
2fa1af53d2d82b28b128b446ed861b7a52c0091b
describe
'1253717' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZN' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
60da4c4e073c3e30ca2d49f5da8d94f1
157333f1f2b165008b39d67fa1d1c2ed8a5f71a3
'2011-11-16T09:25:43-05:00'
describe
'72819' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZO' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
6319a9317143bcccb9cbe4a7cf5da550
206e4bbc2eba606194eb6bb7fae74e69e55e9b29
describe
'32735' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZP' 'sip-files00148.pro'
b149410bbe3517659082b6c8b1676cb5
3b51547ccbae75636d54b470e1a63e230cb886ec
describe
'25518' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZQ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
5727f7a61e90b9f5f5fe9faa45d98d8a
c47dd12a810ab36216139cf9bbe9fbc44391be07
'2011-11-16T09:26:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZR' 'sip-files00148.tif'
33dc218755e023c9e82c8c4fd0a3cf6f
c773d0b65345bf5a2879ceb3e081b53630dd166a
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZS' 'sip-files00148.txt'
1ef48a60cc451efb6defb1ff3e92ecf4
3bbbb85d7b7745eebc650e05c200cad1ae9430fc
describe
'7922' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZT' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
8c30bafad20e4593f7d23170a05e5a29
941fda4b224497c86173143bdf9294f6c9076cbd
describe
'1041341' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZU' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
055b364ae7eb47532333fa92fc1e30f7
f07ce14005b60cc4e277ed402de90e05a8fc472e
describe
'41123' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZV' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
abda39070eee006d8e56c0917a764bd2
82fe17fe799f4c98446871657678dec23b85e068
describe
'13976' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZW' 'sip-files00149.pro'
f1a3870a31de74b9e7a2f1a2fbef0630
f9f307b6c370ddf17665519c19eba6d6f6626cf4
describe
'13644' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZX' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
a8246e46345884b5585fa6a35c6a95ac
871b85b9410d0ef8265edba7abbe28b29d3db1c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZY' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e4be365e88b962725cfe374d31586f3d
a57a660bfb3970becc4277b4eff14dc5beee2cee
describe
'602' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAUZZ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
1cda583d458590786d2e738d4d6c16e2
d9265311bd02225c57992a664dce08b8c78bdf8d
describe
'4031' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAA' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
92ce91fec733ca1c167de692d62a9925
4f93eececaf71b1bc73a240f8e528386280237f6
describe
'1253664' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAB' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
717ef7c5529a3797f3010bba1764699d
464024f5be01c87e4312ef1a82df7394b6bd3b98
describe
'58999' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAC' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
12c350feae3dbf4d9098209d4d0d1387
07bb6de46ddeee151dbdbeaa1f7543355c109f01
describe
'26898' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAD' 'sip-files00150.pro'
83ea54ed2517b4abf0e9e05a8723c4d4
f2e5e6fa52ad4883440ea8f788c49a1250022965
'2011-11-16T09:25:46-05:00'
describe
'19165' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
69deb44f055615cbd059eaddbf7c3d73
fdacf523ffd22af3e35b2c3770b54c0d844f839b
'2011-11-16T09:26:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAF' 'sip-files00150.tif'
2af9f6bfdf88cf6a4b13f307b7ee831f
99939ee57891449d41f219a925e208fdd587833c
'2011-11-16T09:19:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAG' 'sip-files00150.txt'
61497de74450a49d29b7fbcc3c314a3a
338002f1e92bce88f2f092a9cffc3c848e55839d
'2011-11-16T09:22:18-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6089' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAH' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
0586c7f2ed876b9d4455015f2facec23
1e407ddde117fd12769b160a76baf510bcbb283e
describe
'1281115' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAI' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
990a6b51bea2b6007419df0237e67663
87e0333c4169a71cf25dd56621b7871851890213
describe
'80223' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAJ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
3b92f7320bd4ef99ade40ded30ac155c
56ecccbd090142e6b20e935c10bfea0e9293a7e1
describe
'48905' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAK' 'sip-files00151.pro'
23f170d50042eafae0c40f3a2dec50af
3da4a13622694cea3cca78052a3f79f33148916c
describe
'26491' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAL' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
79e35de6a272ba293ac886357f2dbda6
c088429a1a3c45b2eb7159af59dc2e3b3981276f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAM' 'sip-files00151.tif'
d9623f4f65a818f612b80abe0744c722
2c5535f4dfadef14a8d29bc95ba452bf485f81c0
'2011-11-16T09:22:23-05:00'
describe
'2344' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAN' 'sip-files00151.txt'
ffc8382da59ed7a9d7cf407755912ab8
c7469d3f97582847a99a76b4b74bf44c0333985e
describe
'7198' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAO' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
203a3bdbe24fe593e5bbbf47189608f1
b92ae264a200aea518147085d9461c1a52f9bcc2
describe
'1253719' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAP' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
81af8956311756e4490f3c1b4333c43e
323a75296172330f1af1df1201c99f285b44224f
describe
'62611' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAQ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2628e09a33e6c75a35ce0b546531b52c
93eb9193121d0131f427fefba06a8126baa5e2f0
describe
'32667' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAR' 'sip-files00152.pro'
5bdc6df36fc7c23ffacc70bfc080e298
e5aebef72bc8ecb1c4e2cf469dc80e325d35a32d
describe
'20779' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAS' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
b4cc66f6f7f44110398e5e720ddeb94f
4b1f72d7bfd6eff7abfe513346f3aa41c036f10f
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAT' 'sip-files00152.tif'
96d2fecce10b05fb8b94741543b3862f
9f26a88e02c0dc159f33a12a6c06ff222493c87d
'2011-11-16T09:21:16-05:00'
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAU' 'sip-files00152.txt'
c6b399033c5bae5724d79285120a1bc9
292a007bdcef5cbceb77cf203a6ead670054e7ac
describe
'6705' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAV' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
226bbbdff4c658706713458fd48ebbaa
3a4863a2de9663753cbc828d7b0d29ba4c0627de
describe
'1281070' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAW' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
54dba53859c1509c8fa5c0a2249bf00c
cf78eb7b482e93eea8f43da9cd070554538cfb92
describe
'83685' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAX' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
e3a227e0fb8387a5ff08fdb8576d1137
68ec7356d7b03dcb01ffa54707752c1bd281d28d
describe
'51272' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAY' 'sip-files00153.pro'
d1d6b923274fac48ba55217727300983
cbdff20c2202cb8eb3edc66b3367494daff057c3
describe
'26306' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVAZ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
8a58194df6cf80d99ac667f3f16f3c41
72e68faadd9737356e6102af5d985dc460eb9ed5
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBA' 'sip-files00153.tif'
e3207d28236ec4ace0ece122f64827f2
ef5232c66a4fda60a56751a3ae56d1181df9f75e
describe
'2442' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBB' 'sip-files00153.txt'
3a512c7284bc5d0981171c8d1a12fedc
ee886f2d9292f490a23f0fe19c064434dcef0198
describe
'7086' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBC' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
f713a5515dc4c7ddc5a75129c57d41b8
6b1fb9e5690d379dc569a2b3d090c69471a05643
describe
'1193118' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBD' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
0ae7b4c2ac47f78b9a9c9e2ff80db9dc
e509984d19db169e8af81e18281964bb15ba0676
'2011-11-16T09:24:09-05:00'
describe
'62334' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBE' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
d8de574ffde8772204742a04ff5b9bfe
97e06ae5172e41f1dbdb3290a43beb1f60868274
describe
'23384' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBF' 'sip-files00154.pro'
91d97569bdf73bae74464e5def04c89f
e0c4aed17766e485f43402b9665695feb04c8210
'2011-11-16T09:18:47-05:00'
describe
'20546' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBG' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
0a3861a80e198af95c2e0d606f781d05
d54cff10b8725f7345d1af866ec658bcda80a3a6
describe
'9557477' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBH' 'sip-files00154.tif'
cb5bf33b8050826caba9a72e456c2fb7
164fe8f238d0de77f937eb695c5b01796c04eb80
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBI' 'sip-files00154.txt'
406e33327bd344d59d4fea185e38b28c
b3a9604aeb6e73a6a5a629e814fc936f6d25684d
describe
'6949' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBJ' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
d2e12dc732aec0f5cd7f2e79fbf83ccc
563fea070ecfd72aecb6133954775bd3e7a7525d
'2011-11-16T09:26:38-05:00'
describe
'1281046' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBK' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
0709a799498d0773d8f1e1f0abbb7475
e04bdcabdc6c0eeff33b52ccd3d1af7d76d39211
describe
'92218' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBL' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
e276b5b2d7a45fffea833fc2ecdf4d88
03cacf0559984c9997470a85afffdbad1634294e
'2011-11-16T09:24:35-05:00'
describe
'62699' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBM' 'sip-files00155.pro'
9dfa2a4b88135c16142333aa25513ac2
f712b0444a4420ad944acdd740c17892bab71180
describe
'28736' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBN' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
10ef45674803174a8daf28aba0f9ffb3
96289cc6fbb13f360ed0fcd7812e4184cdac9eca
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBO' 'sip-files00155.tif'
93529b6352e1a38cf1931df48beb8b3e
42776646efe79b88a98a1d90649b4f72e86aeb2a
describe
'2763' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
07e93fef00e3368a9c0509cd255d77a0
e0f94e3d9e4027ae077f6bffb6d0edfe636301a5
'2011-11-16T09:23:43-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7573' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBQ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
599f6acb49745a1bab7959af3a054da2
19abe4b5a28b34dcb776e953fe201d6045b6ea98
describe
'1212618' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBR' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
c9ca3329d2e79e2db8b002474a67f4aa
ba53e43d57535260bf5d1b331e4b63a972f76adb
describe
'62776' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBS' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
2591e0035f848978d9c13f7ed9e1eb57
4538325020d58e8b30e4370c497321f6c8fda269
describe
'29413' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBT' 'sip-files00156.pro'
58773157162295c592c4f7172f1e044b
b500479d2e1d745f6f55a6856c70ae15d5e4e73a
describe
'21146' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBU' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
5db9cba32a5362e50e8ffb7ab160d420
f1bced86f4b6198d5ed8689d756e8ec3481be9b6
describe
'9711915' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBV' 'sip-files00156.tif'
d8586873f01c227357295bed2bc2cb64
95073ea01831cd88c6007bb93e96b0915f80650c
'2011-11-16T09:25:12-05:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBW' 'sip-files00156.txt'
2e4f13604b0a1c1927886e8893e8254b
7e5455a958db6c98532dc5a25376b917efee6057
describe
'6880' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBX' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
86902c5f1d149876e803e538c5e37231
fa8edc6bed9c63978601eb3d337ecb97e840b2dc
describe
'1266096' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBY' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
d0c8f36a859190ddf3478575f4ae684c
77b763c2feab9312905321fa3ccb9e05be58b4c7
describe
'71151' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVBZ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
96699b260a218dc868aa9dc04c0410bb
06fafd54c293721845df6aac76568471a64e6f45
describe
'33830' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCA' 'sip-files00157.pro'
32308fb75f7da44be1b5b82a2f3d0339
4223be2f1b5471205288013633df3b04209a2f9b
describe
'24011' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCB' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
73d3dcd4e387b24e4fe9e71d0fcaf76a
5110454ac67b4022a86c1e981137f38d78891c78
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCC' 'sip-files00157.tif'
4e3b3b28b0a09cdcd8a9d8abe2e6de3f
75be34e8bf26c12ba36707dd7c3bb2739681a881
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCD' 'sip-files00157.txt'
e379cc1e0ead530c7a5fc8899926cf13
4a66e1a335b0a0e79b19bcd0334b3c4b50ec64d9
describe
'6845' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCE' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
b0c95b772a561704ef284d4e3ac79c8b
ee1c4edd9f2074500ada57ea519fd71e131222b7
describe
'1191305' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCF' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
2103c45a470efd32f7718f6c973d92c8
5c8de3566fe7e674cbe3be4d81fd250834f1a1e7
describe
'59291' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCG' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
9eb89c091626e15e9125293e85c5e260
e0d0f6d38a4d52dfd01a67a904273b3a76ebdb1d
describe
'24196' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCH' 'sip-files00158.pro'
7f4c81c12f4d5128cc20a499a02bc106
8c20c20b2fdbee87865782ee249c62032e7f59a6
describe
'20178' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCI' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
48515506eee51f0778ea767775b7659a
c98e7427ddc273d0139b6ac761188a66c1a7a8fa
describe
'9655683' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCJ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
202542f461582ae7c6b3a7c2ac517e49
5046f788bf21c850edd2faadc4109f5a005bbb13
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCK' 'sip-files00158.txt'
d1aeae14eeb9d54c7d628c24f742bad4
0becbaff715dd76ad24fa95915b5a875dde8097b
describe
'7019' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCL' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
d1a684f13c37a216d9b45d0c08bc8dd3
99d2202c4efcf898b63024dc473585569638e432
describe
'1281093' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCM' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
0c5633f9c67ef282deddaa81727fe3af
ba420ec3de3474cede7ad3c4f43aabece83668c7
describe
'88126' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCN' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
329fb16c59eb776ef8257fc0be77219f
c28a8ef538b2f79eafc2d701f1f1a29bb23c8429
describe
'55694' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCO' 'sip-files00159.pro'
d72df856c94a8e02623042c2cdf1eec1
2755065c380acc791c28587e2590739b5c236730
'2011-11-16T09:19:16-05:00'
describe
'27969' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCP' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
dcf4af0b4c9006a334a2820b742e7161
1bcc6a7b19da578a3cf099f46a3a60466c3f0d27
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCQ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
7d307b0ac6ce60d504f6a311e9f1b365
6adf3a778c0390ca87df643597148a768b5f0fb4
'2011-11-16T09:21:18-05:00'
describe
'2513' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCR' 'sip-files00159.txt'
5cc7a74d8245aaedea2f5a69d1e30610
139534acc13c48205065baee251dffcdaadcadc4
describe
'7369' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
bd66f29090ae817013dc7d75bfd08903
7079d72513faa0905912d143a48ca1c7a35ce42e
describe
'1205437' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCT' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
21595d18d4097c42b4b9729ecc6e976b
c0e75916229d2f6c44721765016d6b3e35b3603f
describe
'66372' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCU' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
e62023c0abcdfebbbafc310dbfc4c4cb
740f4c83dd530089f4dcc4a137aec735d3770fa9
describe
'34710' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCV' 'sip-files00160.pro'
9b73551db92ce20f85688ebb69e24eaa
6b8faee62450a143a527d11603e5e5cb2e77b7db
describe
'22474' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCW' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
4c2023af7ebfa12adff2edab420f00c1
ed7d0da6b097c050a2b6d145c4a9f310ed71f774
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCX' 'sip-files00160.tif'
df077baad9d46fa852ba591bffae1dba
284b1b30f13b0c699902689db82061fcc8ee5b25
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCY' 'sip-files00160.txt'
542369cc298935287c745c841ff8b110
b5fe789459834d4a25f72eff8a6aae5bded4bfd9
describe
'7521' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVCZ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
e45427c6bc3e930c56570730e467a70b
53f91645c831efd1e84958f06d620697e2342215
describe
'1221953' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDA' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
c35fe1f1c97ae7e6b829fe17b4a158d7
2e71edb5fd66d6d37cdbe4af39d9da090cb2a473
describe
'65330' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDB' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
57387c3fb095c6b5047517192a25e174
2ee1eaf3fb685396413b9d744578978edc6c5462
describe
'26245' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDC' 'sip-files00161.pro'
f34b5a57fd1e40dcbf90168a01b62889
4ebfdd336ae4d7911647b3616eb483f6fdd278fe
describe
'22959' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDD' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
b81ad5bd39315bf36aeec7f980e8a8bc
9e06d29b5e98025985be02bdcae1fcd8b0052164
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDE' 'sip-files00161.tif'
ed13d3e10ba28529ce024f87c6f4bada
0850116bae577f54b0c7b36ddee8d63aceae67c1
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDF' 'sip-files00161.txt'
b69c202268cfc5ba296b0f2d39c0a790
ce6e13609ac021d5a8c8cf5eb7179711bd4bf998
'2011-11-16T09:21:23-05:00'
describe
'6583' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDG' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
20f9d5d0f72fd0d6c4a1ef5348579a66
24d223004fe01cd27cfb61c0533e8883fcd567d2
describe
'1196127' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDH' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
270e6af08bfece4629f3af9d6d099efe
2bbb744a43918acb57716dedf3e7d5b4438f90db
'2011-11-16T09:25:15-05:00'
describe
'61296' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDI' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
258f5e068a03fe53713e9cb67ab29735
2a2e87791bba0ca6f442754b27c308cef9308cb5
describe
'27219' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDJ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
466ca770e264a5af8540bd27d89ca691
0310054bf2d6a15320a4c4313c9b1487b7527389
describe
'20756' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDK' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
3040e1b391bf17b393eeaa9a0af746d5
a22226ee765fe98675e524603f6d28069207a1dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDL' 'sip-files00162.tif'
0adddab3183607f2296b488e99bad151
c7511a23884c60e524630a904b67e21e08154da6
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDM' 'sip-files00162.txt'
5d9c5a79041ed80552fa04725cf056bd
208f361e00af2d0eb12ca3a017a97811a676df55
describe
'7333' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDN' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
c632565e2fbd33adf4927066b5abf8b8
e11363868ae2c94c3d39eff1f293c8f1f3251e51
describe
'1281121' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDO' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
496727862f7be5f4d32e6944b11f6d3d
a0abf7bc779a0e90f2bdfa1ae41cf17ec5ecde29
describe
'75208' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDP' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
4f782014f21d9f403daa4eb290961d6e
6f9659ecf9afaa08d3cefd23884a996962f22ca7
'2011-11-16T09:26:13-05:00'
describe
'39564' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDQ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
ea62252cc119e1953543f98165e47bd5
2ced77b73e21b0332ff5f6cd97e69c7d7c78ac8d
describe
'25339' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDR' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
ce4fd3f8499357af563d127ba706da6f
f83acf070659a5d9828b143a0ff98933391b43f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDS' 'sip-files00163.tif'
c5b0d74ac94316b4337fb5febe1a4e66
a43d198ed67c5db172ab93ebf6cd58532576f5ff
describe
'1862' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDT' 'sip-files00163.txt'
c7f4f54eb5ca421e393161a5ae837a0e
a9d9d2c37e5973177747553cd9e3524258d8a273
describe
'6956' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDU' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
8827615c4f3a1560f857fe95791a7b31
267091cfbb84079f49053d63ac815046ea8af078
describe
'1208120' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDV' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
0f3ee9d67e003d2b75afdd4048c81f96
9d1481f79014d9410caabc6bc76c4787ad4b6725
'2011-11-16T09:26:17-05:00'
describe
'74464' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDW' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
0103752349bc0db4df3fb35ff83a21f0
07fa9a50ad1e8dffb8b52354811dfa17769e8a06
describe
'40344' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDX' 'sip-files00164.pro'
92edbc83b4e05ebccead3df92d68e31b
7591294028c7fc94f7037b4d1af3b7b06aee9b7d
describe
'23919' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDY' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
3afbdabf13fcb2b89acf1c05fcb76191
73572b83054cc72ff9b2e09229d5aae022cfdfa5
describe
'9676453' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVDZ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
ae2deb90caef02b4675ef19e729a047e
acc62880e7857bdb7fd7bf1821e442cce51a6309
'2011-11-16T09:22:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEA' 'sip-files00164.txt'
8826f9ab9752cd1b17553906af94fc38
862dc228f6e8e1a8d8d13dd48610d1675a6f7bc1
describe
'8331' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEB' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
fd56179f7f81e636d385d77cdf90dfaf
ba6b8c08afa883e17c2e59b977a09df1488b5a60
describe
'1264452' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEC' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
58dcd33e232411de204d21362dc66d9d
2888953cbd07e45a301424028de7a2c2529ff90a
describe
'69211' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVED' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
8e90a984a24faeee114c3e3aa4cb4975
ebd2304b59520e0de2d80c32916b0c1d5bf651e9
describe
'29171' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEE' 'sip-files00165.pro'
82969d222966983b1fb5e1c464ae9ab4
73bdfb81f5638af2e073f57c2117feada716f541
'2011-11-16T09:25:40-05:00'
describe
'23549' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEF' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
f76a1f427a4223d365cba12a84c759ae
5cb9ee54f432fe0b4051fa2d926a549bea77779a
'2011-11-16T09:20:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEG' 'sip-files00165.tif'
f9dfb69d3d81f7397c7e48ea6227009c
43294fa1fc3b4c7a3539d27e65ed4855c50656cc
'2011-11-16T09:22:44-05:00'
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEH' 'sip-files00165.txt'
a02fd0cf63c4bd103b46c675c8ac337a
a6986afd1d5c95a891af604b4b5deebc73051f10
describe
'6697' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEI' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
184adab215bf2193cdaf0a6fc477e50d
e816a34cd7c38211d066935b73f537b57e2d2f7f
describe
'1210768' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEJ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
28f1e181179cbde2fad78829dac6b702
fffe7ae5fcd0b38a4f63346757f22a54f9273ec7
describe
'84437' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEK' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
2791ad404de3476eb27e1c397f024a8a
b899e53fe1eadb65ea02476264f4de518b643572
describe
'50780' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEL' 'sip-files00166.pro'
e5f87ca5c490c9aaef3acec274599471
36142abd5b5c692ac529be7bb52be72ee1052206
describe
'26613' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEM' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
ffcbdbf28e797e90110898c0b87ac672
bce9eae23bf1036fc02bbefc8624a2b779cce515
describe
'9697523' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEN' 'sip-files00166.tif'
6a0b867558d45e9e1482c2650a1e4817
70379a3eaafe58f88f478d7ec2599d762cc6f68d
'2011-11-16T09:18:58-05:00'
describe
'2217' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEO' 'sip-files00166.txt'
b11a41f483d8f466a50066282c553cf3
6c7dec5cac87808676c8cd88fe519be3f20ccc60
describe
'8510' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEP' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
22086232fefae292946e00139080536e
ccec00f29cf6f90e918bd86d9664352a5952b199
describe
'1281086' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEQ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
5c8bf660517c10bc54c51bf7a9d55897
f6c35b5bc03cd1f7c041f5e44e950dbc97cbfb29
describe
'92712' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVER' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
ddcb15f8cc25163298fe86b41399df06
f149803e342f0f6ab5a5de190bc2878d99a2ef53
describe
'58458' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVES' 'sip-files00167.pro'
3b4b5fbb590a1591f521ef1992c49f12
7624ed96384c2d79feaa3f099cac8f301cc930ef
describe
'29246' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVET' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
c58e46e7dd87a20419fb787e6bd646f0
2e5f3b81c5d4960655baa51bc6800e2ca2ab85fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEU' 'sip-files00167.tif'
dddf69119a07f7405770ceb030dde7ae
c7520b96a93fba62efd8c5f527b9029e3891ad8f
'2011-11-16T09:19:49-05:00'
describe
'2497' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEV' 'sip-files00167.txt'
0cd0142557b42df1edfb5aaa2a6c378f
98aa08cbde25807b8537c07ca9214c1dac5b091e
'2011-11-16T09:24:43-05:00'
describe
'7811' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEW' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
da96cbabc102dbea97ab5173c8dfd011
2e5e483ea202eafa302ef3d4072d98a520c0b839
describe
'1185252' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEX' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
f9582121747362f9af4e949d9c06ba9d
cb2b5d5bfd4f78329a02eebc0600cfbc05b5e342
describe
'64265' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEY' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
351a8906937803948f4737a8486d7a04
d1bba1ee41079a31b473a16a3743eaa1d60d503b
describe
'29993' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVEZ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
a597c21ca2b13bcf1d2d7c7e478f0a17
02dd3f3b320ba16f1eda71fa76571b67b053e870
describe
'21440' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFA' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
92c4545b0a3a24a4d1920deaa9f707b0
0247a47b7820aee0933479cd9ffe28a85673a8a1
describe
'9493361' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFB' 'sip-files00168.tif'
12fdc3194b62ca7c205af965afa09616
da23dbe1716f088bab3f76a0897636c6eb4c93ff
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFC' 'sip-files00168.txt'
4fee91538a2a8bc9f6ac138ba1910afb
d2f4f4bf43c8e486fcc41a8282d058d95d0da9c9
describe
'7048' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFD' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
4cc9712ae154ba049d1534dbf8fc83ca
a71978e97be2a45e1b889394c37fa32a91471a1d
describe
'1321018' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFE' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
7d2c380fc5ec075c5eb4a0c821a1cdc7
bdb18e7e14698b7f2e9d8620f90ba0b12a429157
describe
'68254' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFF' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
ebfe0bec0c6b376e683b99a8e3bffaef
68d8cd89faf01225fb83854df6061d136f43ddd2
describe
'33428' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFG' 'sip-files00169.pro'
a672ae8e7b561267938bdab5a8831ca6
ea545fb99ab2b0d30835acca9795221db8249554
describe
'22549' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFH' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
4d66e7a12f4003b0b8f62017e6c7e769
b4d0ea35a3e368a47b6d63f73ee5414d11223c3e
describe
'10677313' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFI' 'sip-files00169.tif'
b8715d852b270d35c2eac445b0e0245a
a5ac15921a980acfbb39bba985c09208b47830b4
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFJ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
8577b2df52c1c64f9eed92d0d8175c2f
5ccfcd8c49937e0a7e357dd6472a38393607ba67
describe
'7165' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFK' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
d993b5c6fcecf9e0832920b201d64a4b
6ef80e633ecf07f79089fdcc180d99e36b7cde6c
describe
'1030205' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFL' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
ddf0046ffd4ad7900911c0ae17646991
ef41f87f21e0bbbcc0d4bdcebca7eb7b74c3a58e
describe
'23200' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFM' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
9b452c61210ac482e483c72d98857d4a
d849b46f95883649ebbccd262b1591c79cb07534
describe
'325' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFN' 'sip-files00170.pro'
aea07fe09c9c5646b0ac4c488e81f2dd
56752f2e3bdfd2ae9df52a673b2db597bab218ca
describe
'6297' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFO' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
465c06c196024b00cb03ce166f599f5c
d2b93e94f53e1ab7a7a27446570a688e38f0b362
describe
'10609475' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFP' 'sip-files00170.tif'
7232766baa591638d82fe1dbe4d94fce
b84aa862e96c36dbb782da7a1362004dc829ea73
describe
'10' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFQ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
4f7f5d89b8819a1a74c490de9fe96e26
5060f7843f83f4fb818d15ece543a4f7f55053e8
'2011-11-16T09:25:48-05:00'
describe
'2258' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFR' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
f9cf81d8e01018280eca8de4b87f945e
c5a856a5550d81b1543ec722ef1fd16fd9b87810
describe
'1165062' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFS' 'sip-filesBack Cover.jp2'
2a503a88fca12dcaeddf5abbb91edf3d
f4d1d4d1e5da2e30fbad89c2d2f1c099d96121dc
describe
'112114' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFT' Cover.jpg'
1431d5a3b9f808aa39966bd323a52500
8981b2127163fc672efa850b3e9e63267cc6daa3
describe
'220' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFU' Cover.pro'
d04cfd79cf16b21a64076c35af5bebc1
eb65792e41a9c2e361269c809808eb622a8f6465
describe
'22469' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFV' Cover.QC.jpg'
bbec9d7e39d74af187631cc49b0d1499
b02115c73459fe4ed8e4af592016531c49c998d2
describe
'27966356' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFW' Cover.tif'
71d862310955c02183befe086ce1c9a6
81bb829b2ce250aaa4022e8fa555786330263408
'2011-11-16T09:19:01-05:00'
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFX' Cover.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'5967' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFY' Coverthm.jpg'
32078a60860f12c0e5bf5c823a432b9e
8dbfcdafe108c12baaaeef1fc21c059488669e0e
describe
'1189735' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVFZ' 'sip-filesFront
883659b57ebd34b302e93ceb7107fe3d
96371bb795a018e52f6e9c59bac0a3bc0898913f
describe
'118788' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGA'
963962b92b04b8941e4fa1ba023c35d2
3ef7e46a2c315453cbfce6d502eccf866b929791
describe
'221' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGB'
6f7cd4a15ad3ca978c3f68e6236e1013
e81839362676adb61374672875c0c86f0cafd34e
describe
'24170' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGC'
699b66f5ac979f4587b66cb8f43ccec0
df6ff2e52d033cbe20c482f7352fb8054c0b0ec0
describe
'28555916' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGD'
fb2306cd2933f284c41ed82a2e6a6339
029cae7aab38cc75e74a760ce2c7eb916574b6be
describe
'5678' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGE'
87b289ab283f5276e70eca6a9e239fae
713f035b45317c4db21469f87fcb0ae2d513b709
describe
'194060' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGF' 'sip-filesSpine.jp2'
8a484840b386dac6d7086aa95c9fb58d
fc9fb325b3367fa4fb7fa84169e00eacba9d1a09
describe
'25586' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGG' 'sip-filesSpine.jpg'
77ab7c8dd295c6fcf7641885dc9683b8
49bcfcccd4180679e689e5b65a6026febe2fc3a5
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGH' 'sip-filesSpine.pro'
37ff4db55ae57090d878a815cddab4cc
01d4ea69f7bf917b4b7d0247de6ae4e5600ba9c0
describe
'6543' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGI' 'sip-filesSpine.QC.jpg'
fcd69cfd01b448002f789b8742abf4d7
1d60c0ec9cf134c20d03a51dd86bfefa25183012
describe
'4662972' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGJ' 'sip-filesSpine.tif'
f48e30a33643b704ecbface35cf589ea
12344c39d8cc718ba9df5c7a04658ee174214ff1
describe
'142' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGK' 'sip-filesSpine.txt'
0f07dc3e223fc6be84588d57cd6a3f22
a111ce09b94842bba75909aa55f8947de9acd785
'2011-11-16T09:25:21-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2921' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGL' 'sip-filesSpinethm.jpg'
df89d9b44e73662d8db2762a331d98a9
43aa6230f3c06d144b9c69e724b5bce8ac466292
describe
'288612' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGM' 'sip-filesUF00002057_00001.mets'
3e8aa1729999ea74f056fe9f52e96c30
0c1c3760ee18259c7b2f30c33daf2261cb90f504
'2011-11-16T09:26:54-05:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T08:20:09-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'370843' 'info:fdaE20080919_AAAAVIfileF20080920_AAAVGP' 'sip-filesUF00002057_00001.xml'
2e1a9474da2c6da501bda1e8848e28a6
0351737aa9c7a25f86192559e598c1047bc0ee78
describe
'2013-12-16T08:20:06-05:00'
xml resolution