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The Life of a fox

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Title:
The Life of a fox
Creator:
Smith, Thomas, 1790-1898 ( Illustrator )
Whittaker & Co ( Publisher )
Gilbert & Rivington ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Whittaker and Co.
Manufacturer:
Gilbert & Rivington
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
ix, 150 p., [5] leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fox hunting -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Baldwin -- 1852
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisement follows text.
General Note:
Errata inserted.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
written by himself ; with illustrations by Thomas Smith.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026846276 ( ALEPH )
45805543 ( OCLC )
ALH3406 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
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LONDON:
GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,
ST. JOHN’S SQUARE.


















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THE

LIFE OF A FOX,

WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS,
BY

THOMAS SMITH, ESQ.

AUTHOR OF “ EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF A HUNTSMAN.”



Second Cdition.



LONDON:
WHITTAKER AND CO. AVE MARIA LANE,
1852.









ADVERTISEMENT.

Turs little book may be looked upon as a curious
manifestation of the Movement among Foxes,
_The Editor ventures to send it forth, for an agree-
able reminiscence to many who assisted in scenes
which it describes; for some little instruction to
sportsmen who have had less experience than
himself; and for the common entertainment of
all, who like to listen to the way of the world
in the woods.

Hill House, Hambledon,
June 10, 1843.

* 4S






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TO THE RIGHT HON.
CHARLES EARL OF HARDWICKE,

go. Se. Ke.

My Lorp,

It is customary in a Dedication to use
the language of fulsome adulation, even in cases
where the writer and the person addressed affect
an equal abhorrence of it. Adopting a more sim-
ple, straightforward course, and one more worthy
of my name, for few foxes have run more straight,
Twill candidly inform your Lordship, that the love
I bear you is much the Same as that borne to my-
self by the most venerable hen now cackling in
your farm-yard, whose half-fledged brood I have

As



v1 DEDICATION.

often thinned. But, my Lord, although I openly
acknowledge my aversion to the unfeathered
biped species to which you belong, yet the kinds
and degrees of hatred are various as the cha-
racters of those towards whom we entertain it;
and while some, affecting to treat my persecuted
race a8 noxious vermin, destroy us by day and
by night with snare, trap, gun, and every other
engine which their ingenuity can devise, we have
always found in your Lordship a fair and open
enemy, and one who disdained to have recourse
to the cowardly contrivances above referred
to. It is on this account, my Lord, that I have
done you the honour to dedicate to you the
ollowing narrative of my eventful life.

Many are the happy hours that I have
Spent, some years since, in the neighbourhood
of your Lordship’s hen-roost. in Hampshire,
and latterly many a tender rabbit, &c. have
I carried home from the plantations and fields
which you now so handsomely preserve for
the use of myself and my kindred at Wimpole ;

this conduct on your part would have ensured



DEDICATION. Vil

my lasting gratitude, could I forget how fre-
quently I have been driven by hound and horn
from those treacherous coverts. Although, from
the above reasons, there cannot be friendship
between us, there may, I trust there does, exist
some feeling of mutual respect: you and your
brethren are not insensible to those merits in our
species which you affect to depreciate. Fabulists
and other writers, in all languages, have quoted
the sayings and doings of my ancestors, as lessons
of instruction for youth ; while the craft and cun-
ning of your ablest statesmen’ have been, in many
instances, entirely derived from our acknowledged
principles and practice. Our heroism in the en-
durance of a violent and cruel death is equalled
only by our dexterity in avoiding it. It was only
last winter, that a cousin of mine led a gallant
field of two hundred horsemen over thirty miles
of the finest country in England: and when»at
length overtaken by twenty couple of his enemies,
each one larger and stronger than himself, he died
amid their murderous fangs, without suffering a

yell or cry to escape him! Yet do the poets of



V1ll DEDICATION.

your race celebrate as a hero, one Hector, a timid
biped, who, after a miserable run round the walls
of Troy, suffered himself to be overtaken and
killed by a single opponent!

Such, my Lord, is the justice of historic fame
in this world, wherein thousands of men have
written ; whilst I alone of my tribe have been
endowed with the power of thus using the quills
of that excellent bird, which has been for cen-
turies the favourite object of pursuit amongst the
brave and skilful of my race.

However determined [ still may be to trespass
upon your Lordship’s preserves, I will do so no
longer upon your time. Our walks in life are
different ; *tis yours to ride, ’tis mine to run ; “tis
yours to pursue, ’tis mine to be pursued: we
shall meet again in the field, the horn will sound
the alarum, my appearance will be greeted with
a view-halloo, that shall set the blood of hundreds
in motion! Whether after that day of trial I
shall again sit amongst my listening cubs, and
relate to them how many peers, parsons, and

squires lay prostrate on the turf, and were soused



DEDICATION, 1x

in the brook while pursuing my glorious course,
or whether my brush shall at length adorn
your Lordship’s hat, fate must decide.

Meanwhile I remain,
Your Lordship’s obliged Friend,

WILY.

Main Earth,
June 6th, 1843.







DIRECTIONS TO THE BINDER.

| PAGE
The fox, the frontispiece, to face the Title.
Pin CUOW Roma FN a ee BS ido ei ER
Plan of an artificial earth,t#o face. . . 2. 1... + - . 7

The fox jumping from the tree, to face. . ...... 70

The huntsman with the hounds running after four foxes,
to face -. « 134

ERRATA.

Page 4, line 2, for, I was born, read, I am descended from the
ancient family of the Wilys, and was born.

— 9,—17, for, after each other, read, after one another.



of eviews off

det

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Patent

sade, cralio indy taste x:







A FAITHFUL history of the life of even a Fox

may be not without its interest, for, to the wise,
nothing in nature is mean, and truth is never
insignificant. I was prompted to write this ac-
count of myself by overhearing one day, as I lay
in a covert by the roadside, the following remarks
by one of a party who were passing by on their
return home from hunting a fox, which, as. it
appeared, the hounds had failed to kill.—

B



2 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

“ Well, I’d give a good deal to know what
became of our fox,—how was it he could have
beaten us? There is nothing I should like better
than to invite to supper all the foxes that have
escaped from packs by which they have been
respectively hunted to-day, and then persuade
them to declare to what cause they owed their
escape. ‘To tempt them there should be, rabbits
at top, rabbits at bottom and sides, rabbits cur-
ried, fricaseed, and rabbits dressed in every
imaginable way, by the best French cook.”

The thought pleased me, and resolving to gra-
tify my own curiosity, I invited all of my friends
who had at any time beaten some pack of repute.

It was a,fine moonlight night, in the middle of
summer, when ten of my guests, besides an
interloper, a stranger to us all, arrived at the
place appointed, beneath an old oak tree in
the New Forest.

For the foundation of my feast, nothing could
be better than the bill of fare projected by the
hospitable hunter ; but as I knew that my friends
would prefer every thing au naturel, I dispensed



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 3

with the services of M. Soyer, and merely added,
for the sake of variety, some fine rats and mice, a
profusion of beetles, and a bird or two for the
few whose taste might be depraved enough to
choose them. Our repast being over, it was
agreed, that for our mutual instruction and enter-
tainment, each in his turn should with scru-
pulous fidelity relate by what arts and stratagems,
or by what effort of strength and courage, he had
eluded and baffled those ruthless disturbers of
our repose, the huntsman and his hounds. I
was first called on to tell the story of my life,
and thus began.



WILY’S STORY.

I was born on the 25th day of March, in the year
——. Within three or four weeks from that
day of the year every fox of us in this country
is probably brought forth; and it seems espe-
cially designed that the female should thus pro-
duce her only litter in the year at. a season when
our favourite food, young rabbits, are most abun-
dant. The spot in which I first drew breath was
_ 4 breeding-earth, carefully chosen by my mother,
in a well known covert, called Park Coppice, situ-
ated in the centre of the Hampshire Hunt. It
was not until the tenth day after my birth that I
first saw light, or acquired sufficient strength to
crawl with safety to any little distance round our
nest. Had I earlier possessed the use of sight, I
might have strayed beyond my warm shelter, and





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WILY ADDRE







THE LIFE OF A FOX. 5

for want of sufficient strength to return to it have
perished with cold. Thus Nature goes on to care
for us. I had two brothers and two sisters, and
we all throve and grew rapidly with the nourish-
ment of our mother’s milk alone, until we were
six weeks old, when she began to supply us with
other food, such as rabbits, and. rats and mice,
which she.tore to pieces and divided. amongst us
in equal shares, not however so much to our satis-
faction as to prevent our snarling and quarrelling
with each other thus early over our meals. That
part of the earth where we lodged was between
two and three feet square, with several passages
just large enough for our mother to crawl along :
several of these crossed each other, and of two
that terminated outwards one only was used by
our mother, who stopped up the other for times
of emergency. In these several passages we daily
amused ourselves with chasing each other round
and round. On one occasion, we were inter-
rupted in the midst of our gambols by the sudden
entrance of our mother, who seized us with her
sharp teeth, and carried us to the back of the
B 3









a a -





6 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

earth. It seemed that she had been watching
outside, for immediately after this we were alarmed
by a sound hitherto unheard by us. It was the
voice of a man crying out, “ Eloo in, Viper! fetch
em out! hie in there—hie in!” The light was
instantly shut out by the intrusion of a dog in a
low and narrow part of the passage, which com-
pelled him to crawl along with his head to the
bottom. Our mother waited for him, where she
had the advantage of higher space, and as he
approached with his head thus low, she fixed her
teeth across the upper part of his nose and pinned
him to the bottom of the passage, where she held
him so that he could not bite her, which he would
have done had she attacked him after he had got
beyond the lower part, when he might have
raised his head up'. Whilst bleeding and howling

1 If this were attended to in making artificial earths, it would
be an advantage to the fox, who might then defend himself better

_ from dogs of every sort : the great point is, to have the entrance

only just sufficiently high for him to get in.

They should be so arranged that the breeding places are
situated higher than the entrances, so that water may run away ;
and when it is necessary to make the earth on level ground, the







_ = =









TET

ARTIFICIAL
I OrkS arch. FOX HAR THS.

Lnlerior Passage.



LL

L ntrance PAUSSADES Marked this TOMI
1 inches high and 1% wide.

Lntercor passages —————— 12 inches high & 42 wide.

Short pares tmmm 3 /gez long, Yinches high and. 12 wide.

Linds of passages for Creeding places 27 dins. aeross, and
SH 2ins high, centre Of arch.

Breeding places to be higher than the entrances tp Prevent
accumilation of water



GO feel LORY,

A i:
‘ RE Le
‘ ‘i ; > ao Slee? oe | Py
i i Ni Lt; iit. ie





THE LIFE OF A FOX, 7

with agony, he drew her backwards to the open-
ing, where she let him go. It was in vain that
the man tried to make him go in again, and so he
left the place, declaring his conviction that there
were cubs within, and that he would have them
out another day. He was, however, disappointed,
for our mother that night took us one by one to a
large earth in a neighbouring wood. We were now
two months old, and ceased to draw our mother’s
milk, which we no longer needed, as we were able
to kill a rabbit or pluck the feathers of a fowl,
when she brought it to us, as well as she, _ Some
of these feathers, which in our frolics we had
carried to the mouth of the earth, once betrayed
us to a couple of poachers, who had been lurking

breeding places should be on the surface, and covered over with
earth, so as to form a mound. |

The places for breeding should be formed jn @ circle, in
order that they may be more easily arched, like an oven, with-
out having wood supports. |

The passages should be floored with bricks or flints, to pre- °
vent rabbits from digging.

It is desirable to have the low passages not more than seven
inches high, to exclude dogs. Four-inch work at the sides is
sufficient, except for a foot or two at the entrance.

B 4



8 THE LIFE OF «A FOX,

about the wood, and who noticing them, procured
@ long stick and thrust it into the earth, nearly
breaking the ribs of one of my brothers. When
they pulled it out again, they found the end of it
covered with his hairs, This satisfied them, and
leaving us scrambling and huddling together up to
the back of the earth, they went away, resolving
to come back next day with tools to unearth us,
and expecting, as they said, to sell us for half.a-
guinea a-piece,
. “*Twas a ’nation pity,” added one of them,
“we hadun’t brought my little terrier, Vick; she
would have fetched ’em out alive in her mouth,
without our having the trouble of digging, though
they was as big as the old ’un.” :
* Mind,” said the other, “we beant seen, or
else the squire will gie us notice to keep off.”
‘Their intentions were defeated ; for our mother,
who had been all the time watching their goings
on, anxiously waited for their departure, and no
sooner had night set in, than she again removed us
to a gorse covert hard by, and placed us in a

nicely sheltered spot, where she herself had often



THE LIFE OF A FOX, 9

lain before. Here we were safe from poaching
kidnappers, as it would have been impossible for
them to find us, without being found out them-
selves whilst searching for us, Let every mother
lay up her cubs in gorse, or close and thick
coverts, rather than in large earths, which are
sure to be well known to the fox-taker. We were
now three months old, and living upon young
rabbits and mice, with which such coverts
abound, feeding also upon other food, such
as black-beetles; rabbits, however, were our
favourite food, and if we could find them, we
cared for little else. They are fruitful breeders,
particularly at this season of the year; and a
female has been known to carry two distinct
broods of young at the same time, and to
bring them forth three weeks after each other.
This astonishing fact I have witnessed myself,
and I have heard that the same thing has
‘occurred with the female hare, The usual time
of bearing is twenty-eight days. We now began
to venture out of the covert at night-fall, or
even before, being warned by our mother, when-
B 5



10 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

ever there was danger, with a peculiar noise

that she made, like “keck, keck ;” which we no
sooner heard than we were out of sight in the
covert, where we stayed until all was still again.
As we grew older, we grew more bold and
more cunning; and being four months old,
ventured farther abroad, even in the day time

entering the fields of standing corn, until it was

cut down, when the deeds we did there were

suddenly brought to light.

“Why, John,” says the farmer, “ there must
be some young foxes hereabouts; look at the
rabbits’ feet lying about: and what’s the meaning
of all these white feathers? This comes of not
locking up the fowls o’ nights. Never blame
the foxes, poor craturs; but just go to the
kennel, and tell Foster, the huntsman, as soon
as the corn is off, to bring his hounds.” “ Very
well, sir.’ ‘ But mind, he a’nt to kill more than
one of em, or else be hanged if ever I takes ‘care
of another litter.”

All this was explained to me afterwards, for

at the time I did not understand much about



THE LIFE OF A FOX. ie

it. I only knew that the speaker was a very
nice sort of man, and never doubted that he
meant every thing that is pleasant; although
I must say that his outward looks, the first
time I saw him, did not at all take my fancy.
There appeared to me something so ungainly
and unnatural, something so very absurd, to see
an animal reared up on end, and walking about
on his hind legs; to say nothing of what seemed
his hide, which hung about him in such a loose
and uncouth fashion, as if Nature had been sick
of her job, and refused to finish it.

A few evenings after this I was crossing a
field, and watching some young rabbits, with
which I longed to become more nearly ac-
quainted, when suddenly a large black dog and
an ugly beast called a game-keeper, jumped over
a hedge. I immediately lay flat on the ground,
hoping that I should not be seen; when, how-
ever, I found them coming within a few yards
of me, I started off, closely pursued by the
villanous dog, and seeing that I should soon
be overtaken, turned round, and slipt away

B 6



12 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

between his legs. I then made towards the
hedge, and the dog springing after me, I suddenly
turned round again, when he, trying to do the
same, tumbled heels over head, and nearly broke
his precious neck. My comfort was to think
that he was certainly born to be hanged, for he
followed me again as if nothing was the matter,
and soon overtaking me, wearied as I was with
the sport (I think they call it), he seized me on
the back of the neck, and jogged away, with me
in his mouth, to his master, who clapped me
into his enormous pocket, and carried me home.
I was there kept in a dark and. dirty place, where
all sorts of animals had been kept before. ; There
I remained, who by nature am the cleanliest of
animals, with my hairs all clotted with mire
and filthy moisture, and should certainly have
perished of a certain loathsome sickness, had
not another. gamekeeper luckily seen me,. and
told my owner the certain consequence of keep-
ing me so. I was then taken out and put into
a hamper out of doors, ready to be carried by

the night coach to London for sale. After trying



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 13

in vain to gnaw a hole for my escape, I set about
making all the noise I could, which, the night
being still, reached the ears of my mother, who
quickly came and helped me with her teeth to
finish the work which I had nines and so “<
got out and away. |

Having thus suffered for my boldness, I
scarcely ever ventured out of the covert till dark,*
or nearly so; generally, indeed, I remained in
my kennel the whole of the day, unless I had not
been fortunate in procuring food the night before.
I have seen a female fox, when she had young
ones, moving about earlier in the afternoon;
otherwise it is contrary to our habits to do so.
Night is more dear to us than day, and the
tempest suits our plans; for man is then disposed
to keep quiet, and we venture more boldly to
approach his dwellings in search of stray poultry,
which are to be found abroad, not having been
driven into the hen-roost, owing to the neglect
of their owners. |

I resolved to accompany my mother in future

as_much as possible in her excursions, that I



14 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

might profit by her prudence, and observe her
ways. She seldom went abroad till night, though
sometimes she would venture in the dusk of
evening. Upon one occasion I was much amused
with an example of her engaging tricks. It was
a bright moonlight night, when I saw her go
into a field, in which many rabbits and hares were
“feeding. On first seeing her, some of them ran
away for a few yards, some sat up on their hind
legs and gazed at her, and some squatted: close
to the ground. My mother at first trotted on
gently, as if not observing them; she then lay
down and rolled on her back, then got up and
shook herself ; and so she went on till the sim-
ple creatures, cheated by a show of simplicity,
and never dreaming she could be bent on any
thing beyond such harmless diversion, fell to
feeding again, when she quietly leaped amongst
them and carried off an easy prey.
We were now fully able to gain our own sub-
sistence, but not the less would she watch over
our safety. One of my brothers having found a

piece of raw meat had begun to devour it, which



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 15

she observing ran forwards, and as if in anger
drove him away from it. He became sick and
lost all his hairs, owing to poison, which I after-
wards learnt had been put in the meat. It was
fortunate for us that we had left the breeding
earth, for we must otherwise have all been in-
_ fected with the same noisome disease, the mange.
By first smelling it, and then turning away, she’
taught us in future to avoid any thing of the
kind that had been touched by the human hand.
Thus when we happened to be smelling with
our noses to a bait covered over with leaves,
moss, grass, or fine earth, she would caution us
to let it alone by her manner of looking about,
as if she were alarmed and expected to see our
enemy the keeper. Sometimes the iron trap
would be seen; and then she would lead us to
look at and smell it. Our noses however would
not always be a safeguard, for after the trap
has been laid some days, particularly if washed
by rain, the taint of the evil hand would be
gone, and though we ourselves, thanks to the

watchfulness of. our mother, escaped the danger,



16 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

hundreds of others, led on by hunger, have fallen
into the snare, losing either leg or toes. Baits
for catching stoats and weasels, set upon a stick
some fourteen inches above the ground, we car-
ried away without mischief from the trap below °*.
At about six months old we were three parts
grown, I and my brothers being something
larger than our sisters, whose heads were thinner
and more pointed. The white tip of the brush
was not, let me remark, peculiar to either sex
of us. Iand one of my brothers, and also one
of my sisters, had it, whilst the other sister and
the. other brother were altogether without it,
not having a single white hair. That brother
has been known to profit by the exemption,
when on being viewed in the spring of the year
the hounds have been stopped with the remark,
It ’s a vixen; there is no white on her brush.”
I have since observed that old male foxes are
of a much lighter colour on the back than are

the old female ones, which are commonly of a

° See sketch, “ Extracts from the Diary of a Huntsman,” p. 211.



THE LIFE OF A FOX. - 17

dark reddish brown; and so it was with my
parents. Our sire never helped ‘to furnish us
with food, although I have reason to think that
I often saw him prowling about with my mother
at night; instances, however, have been known
where the sire has discharged such an office
after the young had lost their mother. For a
few weeks we went on living a rolicking kind of
life, and fancied ourselves masters of the coverts.
There was a coppice of no more than two years
growth, which enabled me to enjoy the beams
of the sun as I lay in my kennel. © This
kind of shelter we all of us choose, especially
when there are no trees of a large growth to
be dripping down upon us in wet weather.
Here as I lay one morning, .early in October,
I was roused from a sound sleep by the noise
of voices, and of dogs rushing towards me.
Away I ran, and had not gone above twenty
yards before I heard the report of a gun, and
instantly received a smart blow on my side, which
nearly knocked me down, breaking however none

of my bones, and causing only a little pain and



18 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

loss of blood. “ Ponto!—curse that dog; he’s
after him,” cried a voice, when the dog turned
back, or else he must certainly have caught me,
as I had only power to run a short distance into
some thick bushes, where I lay down and listened
to the following rebuke.

“You young rascal, how dared you to shoot at
a fox—here, too, above all places? Don’t you
know that this is the very centre of the hunt?
Had you killed him, you would have been a lost
man, an outcast from the society of all good peo-
ple, a branded vulpecide. Who do you think,
that has the slightest regard for his own character,
would have received you after that?” “I really,”
_ replied the offending youth, “mistook him for
a hare.” “ Yes, and if you had killed such a
hare, you should have eaten him, and without
currant jelly too.”

Now, if an humble individual of a fox may
venture to give an opinion upon such a moment-
ous question, I will say that the practice of
destroying our breed, for the purpose of preserv-
ing the quantity of game, is, where it prevails,



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 19

equally selfish and short-sighted. For every fox
thus destroyed, hundreds of men are deprived of
a day’s sport, and sometimes more than that ; and
if none of us were spared, those hundreds of hunt-
ers would become so many keen shooters,—how
could the game-preserver then keep up his stock
as he did before? and where would the wealthy
capitalist rent his manor? After this unlucky
adventure, I resolved in future to sleep with one
eye open, and not without reason. I had scarcely
recovered from the injuries which I had suffered,
and had just settled in my kennel one morning
about day break, coiling myself up for the usual
snoose all day, and sticking my nose into the
upper part of the root of my brush—the rea-
son by the bye why the hairs there are gene-
rally seen to be standing on end or turned back-
wards—when I was startled by the voice of John
Foster, whose name has been mentioned before ;
“ Kloo in; e-dhoick, e-dhoick—in-hoick, in-hoick.”
Disturbed by the unaccustomed sounds, I rose
upon my fore legs, and pricking up my ears

listened for a moment. or two, when I heard the



20 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

rustling of the hounds running straight towards
me, being led on by the scent that was left in
the track of my feet, which parts, especially
when heated by running, seem to leave more
scent than any other part of the body. Thus
the same organ becomes at once the means of
‘Inviting pursuit, and of escaping it. Off I went
—the awful tongue of an old hound ringing in
my ear, and having about it surely some charm;
for no sooner had he opened than a score or
two others of the pack came rushing from all
sides towards him, and then such a horrible din
as there was behind me. I ran—I flew, I knew
not whither—I crossed a road in. the wood—and
then such frantic screaming and shouting,—
“Tally O—tally O,” mixed with the blast of
Foster’s horn, that I was almost mad with fright,
and must have fallen a victim to my savage
pursuers, had not my brothers and sisters been
disturbed by the clamour, and consequently been
the cause of the pack being divided into several
parts, thus enabling me to steal away towards

the opposite side of the wood, where I remained.



THE LIFE OF A FOX, 21

My state was such that I could not be still,
as I ought, and I kept moving backwards and
forwards and away from the cry of the hounds,
which at times hunted us in several packs, then
all together as they crossed each other, and then
again separated. This had gone on for nearly half
an hour when, to my great joy, they all went
away with a frightful yell, leaving the wood and
me miles behind them. I was congratulating myself
on my escape, and listening to hear if they were
returning, when I was startled by the sound of
steps approaching, and a panting, as of some ani-
mal in distress; it was one of my brothers, evidently
more beaten and terrified than myself, and who,
on hearing something move and not knowing it
was I, ran back out of sight in a moment, and I
saw no more of him then. I remained where I
was hidden until I had partly recovered from my
fears, and not hearing the noise of hounds, had
crept into some thick bushes, where I lay quiet,
when to my horror I again heard the holloa of the
huntsman, who seemed to be taking the hounds

round the wood, with now and then the tongue of



22 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

a single hound; then, all on a sudden, the deep
voice of Sawyer, the whipper-in, calling, “'Tally-o !
there he goes; ’tis a mangy cub!” In a minute
every hound was after him, and in full cry
for a quarter of an hour; suddenly the noise
ceased, and the fatal holloa, “ Whoop!” was often
repeated by the men with “Tear him boys;
whoop! whoop!” And that was the end of my
poor mangy brother. They then, not having seen
any other of us for some time, thought we were
gone to ground, and went away. Happy was I to
hear that horn, which had before caused me such
terror, calling away the hounds, that, to judge
from their loud breathing as they passed near me,
were not loath to go; for it was nearly ten o’clock,
and the heat most oppressive. They were mis-
_ taken in thinking we were all gone away, although
my brother and sisters had taken advantage of the
hounds running in the open, and had gone across
to the gorse covert, from which my unfortunate
brother just killed had often, in consequence of
his mangy state, been driven by our mother.

Again we had to thank that mother for our



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 23

safety, for at the time when we were all nearly
dead with toil and alarm, it seems she took an
opportunity of running across the wood in front
of the hounds, which soon got on her scent,
and followed her as she led them away for some
miles out of the covert. The huntsman then,
convinced that they had got on an old fox, as
soon as the men could stop the hounds, imme-
diately brought them back to the covert where
they had left us, hoping to kill one of us young
ones.

It was not till some time after this memorable
day, that we ventured to take up our quarters in
the wood again. Our mother thought it right to
take us away to a covert about two miles distant,
where, as the hounds only hunted cubs at this
early part of the season, there were no young
foxes; consequently, for that time, we were left
undisturbed, and soon began to feel as much at
home as in the covert which we had left. Had
it not been for the shooters, who frequently
came with their spaniels, we should have even

preferred it; and they so frequently moved



24, THE LIFE OF A FOX.

us, that we soon took little notice of them,
except by going from one part of the wood to
the other. Indeed we were rather benefited by
them than otherwise, for we occasionally picked
up a wounded or dead bird, hare, or rabbit, and
after eating as much as we could, we always
buried the remainder, scratching a hole in the
ground with our claws, and covering it over
with earth. Even this made us enemies ; for
when by accident the dogs smelt it, and drew it
out, the keepers immediately told their master
that if they were not allowed to kill the foxes,
there would not be a head of game left.

Constant disturbance after this induced us to
return to the strong gorse where we had pre-
viously been, and which was nearly impenetrable
by shooters ; but we had not been here more
than a few days, when, about ten o’clock in the
morning, towards the end of October, I was
again alarmed by hearing Foster the hunts-
man’s now well-known voice; “Sawyer, get round
the other side of the covert: if an old fox breaks
away, let him go, stop the hounds, and clap them

12



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 25

back into the covert again, and then they will get
settled to a cub.—In-hoick ! e-dhoick ! e-dhoick !”
I listened with breathless fear, and soon heard
the rustling of hounds on every side of me, then
a solitary slight whimpering, and Foster’s cheer,
“ Have at him, Truemaid; hoick! hoick !” These
to my ears most frightful sounds sent every
hound to the same spot; and I started from my
kennel, and got as fast as I could to the other
side of the gorse. I soon gladly returned, and
meeting an old dog-fox, that at first I mistook
for a hound, dashed away on one side, before the
pack had crossed my line. They ran by me, and
continued following the old fox, till I heard
* Tally-o! gone away;” with a smacking of
whips, and “hoick back, hoick back ;” then for
a few minutes all silent; and then again the
same terrible tongues drove me from my quarters.
They were not in pursuit of me in particular, but
running after either my mother, or one of the rest
or all of us, divided as they were into different lots,
One of these at last got fast on my track, and
away I went straight to the earth where we were

Cc



26 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

born; but to my surprise and disappointment I
found it stopped up with a bundle of sticks, and
covered over with fresh earth; for it was not in
that state when I passed by it the night before.
I waited for a few moments, and tried to scratch
an opening; but hearing the hounds hunting
towards me, I returned to the gorse, where they
shortly followed me. Owing to my being smaller
than they were, I could easily run a good pace
in it, where they were obliged to go slowly; and,
running in the most unfrequented tracks, I con-
trived to keep out of their way. At times they
were all quite silent, and could not hunt my scent
at all, owing, probably, to the ground and covert
where the hounds had been running so often being
stained. This dreadful state of things went on for
a length of time, till at last I heard them halloo,
“'Tally-o! tally-o! gone away.” Shortly after
this the hounds left the covert, hunting after the
fox which was seen to go away, and which again
happened to be our mother. The men soon
found out their mistake; and as they were some

time absent, they must have had difficulty in



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 27

stopping them, which at first I heard them trying
to do.

Meanwhile I had been flattering myself that
I was safe, and that once more I had escaped;
but quickly I heard them coming back very
quietly, as if intending again to hunt me. Pre-
viously to this I had found a rabbits’ burrow,
into which I crept. I was luckily, as it hap-
pened, too much distressed and too heated to
remain there, and left it, and went to the op-
posite side of the covert. At this time a cold
storm of wind and rain came on, notwithstanding
which an old hound or two got on my line of
scent, and hunted it back the contrary way to
that which I had gone, till they came to the
rabbit burrow, where they stopped, and began
baying and scratching with their feet at the
entrance.

There can be little doubt that hounds have a
language well understood by each other, and I
never can forget the noise made by the whole
pack, as they all immediately came to the spot ;
the men halloed “Whoop! whoop! have at him,

c2



28 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

my lads;” and one was ordered to fetch a
terrier, and tools for digging. During the. time
they were at this, 1 stole away from the covert
in another direction, and so saved my life. It
seems they soon found out that I had left the
earth, tried the covert over again, and then went
home, vowing my destruction another day.

This was warning enough to prevent my
remaining longer in or near this covert for the
present. Venturing further abroad, I returned
to that in which I had been disturbed by the
shooters, and there frequently picked up more
wounded birds: I also found, in a field close
by, part of a dead sheep, which a: shepherd
had left for his dog. Some of this I took away
and buried. I was returning for another bit,
when the rough dog, which had just arrived,
suspecting that I had purloined his meat, flew
at me the instant he saw me, with such fury
that he knocked me over and over again without
getting hold of me. He then turned, and was
in the act of securing me with his teeth, when

I griped one of his legs, and bit it through; the

~~



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 29

pain which he suffered prevented him from more
than mumbling me with his teeth; so I got off, .
and made the best of my way to the covert that
evening.

I felt next day that, bruised as I was, I
could not have escaped for ten minutes from
a pack of hounds, had they found me; I there-
fore lost no time in reaching a main earth, into
which I got before the earth-stopper had put
to; but I had scarcely done so when he came,
at daylight, and to my great dismay stopped it
up. I remained there all day, and till late at
night, and no one came to open it, and, had
I not contrived to scratch my way out, I know
not how long I might have remained there;
for I have reason to know that many of us
are stopped up in rocky earths and drains for
weeks, and starved to death, owing to the for-
getfulness or sheer cruelty of the stoppers.
I have heard such sad tales as—but just now
it would interrupt my story to tell them.

It so happened, my friends, that for some
time I was not hunted by hounds, and con-

te c3



30 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

trived to extend my rambles, till I was ac-
quainted with a great part of the country. Oc-
casionally lying in my kennel, if in an open
covert, and hearing a pack of hounds. in full
cry near, I moved off in an opposite direction,
but sometimes not without being seen by some
of the wide and skirting hunters, who lost their
day’s sport in riding after me, and halloomg
“Tally-o!” but I always kept quiet in my
kennel when I heard hounds in full cry, if I
happened to be in a strong gorse covert. Thus
passed off the greater part of the first winter of
my life. | !

On one occasion I was lying im rather an
exposed: place by the side of a pit, in the middle
of a field, when I saw a man. pass by on horse-
back, who, on seeing me, stopped, and, after look-
ing a short time, rode on. Till the noise of his
horse’s feet was out of hearing I listened, and
then stole. away, which was most fortunate, for
in the course of a few hours the hounds were
brought to the pit, the man having told the

huntsman where he had seen me, as he thought,



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 31

asleep; though we foxes, however it may seem,
are seldom otherwise than wide awake.

When the month of February arrived, I
showed my gallantry by going and visiting an
interesting young friend of mine of the other
sex in a large covert some distance off, and
there, to my chagrin, I met no less than three
rivals, bos

One morning we were surprised by hearing the
voice of Foster, drawing the covert with his hounds,
and giving his peculiar “ E-dhoick! e-dhoick!
kille-kid—hoick! (probably for Eloo-in-hoick !)”
It seems that none of us felt very comfortable or
much at home here, and all must have left our
kennel about the same time; for the hounds were
soon divided into several packs, and running in
full cry in different directions. Fortunately those
that were following me were stopped ; at which
I rejoiced not a little, having travelled twenty
‘miles the night before, besides my wanderings in
and about the covert. These travellings and wan-
derings are the cause why so many more of us
dog-foxes are killed by hounds in the month of

c 4



32 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

February than in any other three months of the
year, ‘Two dog-foxes, which had come from a
great distance, were killed by the hounds that day.
I had had reason to be jealous of them, as they
had for the last week or two been tracing and
retracing the woods, in pursuit of a female, inces-
santly each night, until daylight appeared, when
they were obliged, through fatigue, to retire to
their kennels.

I recollect hearing, as I lay that day in a piece
of thick gorse, the following proof of the patience
and good temper of Sawyer, the whipper-in. The
hounds had followed a fox into a wood close by,
haying hunted him some time in close pursuit,
when a jovial sort of person, who constantly rode
after these hounds, saw a fresh fox,—being no
other than myself,—and began hallooing to the
full extent of his voice. Sawyer immediately rode
up to him, and addressed him thus: “ Now, pray
Mr. W——, don’t ye holloa so, don’t ye holloa;
‘tis a fresh fox!” But still the person continued
as loud as ever. The same entreaty was repeated

again and again, and still he would halloo, At



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 33

last, Sawyer gave it up as a forlorn hope, and left
him, just remarking, “Well, I never see’d such
an uneasy creature as you be, in all my life.” He
then followed the pack, which had by that time
left the cover in pursuit of the first fox, which
they had been running all the time. Yet we foxes
have reason to know that a more determined and
ardent enemy to us, in the shape of a whipper-in,
than this man, never lived. It fortunately hap-
pened for me that the weather now became very
dry ; for I was not unfrequently disturbed by these
hounds, and though the scent was not very good
in this plough country, I was at times much
more distressed after being hunted than on former
occasions, and was often nearly beaten ; for it is not
in our nature to be moving in the heat of the day,
and not being so much inured to it as the hounds
were, I expected to fall a prey to their able hunts-
man, who, when his hounds would not hunt me,
appeared to know where I was gone to; and very
often, when all was silent, and I thought myself
safe, brought them on without hunting, and cross-
ing the line I had come; so that against him
c 5



34 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

and his clever whipper-in, I had, notwithstanding
the dry weather, enough to do to save my life,

On one occasion, I had a most severe day’s
work, for the scent was remarkably good. I was
lying quiet in my kennel, very unwilling to
move, though I heard the hounds running a fox
close to me, which they very soon lost, as they
could not, or would not, hunt it. I thought this
very strange, as by the use of my nose I knew it
to be a good scenting day. It turned out that
the fox was a vixen, which had just laid up her
cubs ; the effect of which generally is, that the
scent: becomes so different, that hounds, old ones
particularly, appear to know it, as if by intuition,
and will not hunt it. As I had not had more notice
of their approach, I thought my best chance of
escape was to be perfectly still,—a plan often
adopted by me since on a good scenting day; but
it was of no use, for the huntsman almost rode
upon me in drawing the cover; and I was
obliged to fly when the hounds were close to
me; however, after a long run, I most luckily

escaped.



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 35

The breeding season for game now came on,
and being still young I frequently was near
being tempted to seize an old bird as she ‘sat on
her eggs, but the difference in the scent of
the bird prevented me. At length, when I had
been prowling about near a farm yard in which
poultry were kept, one night that I had not
met with other food, I pounced on a hen which
was sitting in a hedge, but the state she was in
gave such an unpleasant taste to her flesh, that
after eating a little I left it, and have never
since touched a bird of any sort when sitting.
She has at that time, indeed, but little flesh on
her bones, and I believe that no old fox will
take one for his own eating, although a female
may sometimes carry one off, when hard pressed
for food for her young. The same instinct which
prevents hounds from hunting a fox with young,
thus prevents much destruction of. birds when
sitting. It seems like a design of Nature, to
save the race of birds that have their nests on
the ground, from being entirely destroyed by our-
selves, or by vermin, such as stoats and weasels.

c 6



36 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

Rabbits are too often the perquisites of the
game-keeper, and the iron traps which he sets
with the pretence of catching them are the
destruction of hundreds of us. This might be
prevented if the master would only insist on these
traps not being employed at all, and compel the
use of the wire snare, and of ferrets to get the
rabbits out of their burrows.

Having by this time learnt from my mother
all that she could teach me, I followed her ex-
ample in many things. Amongst them I remarked,
that on a wet and windy night, she almost always
chose, for various reasons, to lie in a gorse covert.
It is generally dry and without droppings from
trees; it is also more quiet and freer from the
roaring of the wind than when near to them.
Besides this, we are not so liable to be disturbed
by the shooters, and though we should be so, are
out of sight. We are also there out of sight of
some of our troublesome feathered neighbours,
the crows, magpies, and jays, who would betray us
when moving abroad during the day-time. They

are always moving with the first appearance of



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 37

daylight, and we. are glad to get out of their
sight as soon as we can and go into our kennel,
lest they should betray us to the keepers, who
are also often abroad at that time. The worst is,
that at times, when we think we have got away
from hounds which are hunting us, these birds,
by making a noise and darting down almost upon
us, as they continue to do where we run along,
point out to the hunters exactly where we are.

It has often happened that I have been betrayed
by an old cock pheasant. No bird has a quicker
eye than he has, and directly he saw me he would
begin kuckupping, and continue to make this
noise as long as I remained near him, obliging
me to move away.

My life during the summer months was one of
almost uninterrupted pleasure. Naturally fixing
my head quarters near the part of the country
where I was bred, I would often ramble by night a
great distance, and frequently remarked with sur-
prise, as I crossed any line that I had taken when
hunted, the wonderful straightness with which I

had pursued it, as it was often in a direction



38 ‘THE LIFE OF A FOX.

where there were no large woods or earths; but
I recollected that I had the wind for my only
guide, and went as if blown forward by it; so
that I could hear whether the hounds were fol-
lowing me, at a greater distance than if I had
gone against it; and besides this, it was more
difficult for them to smell the scent which was
lodged on the ground over which I had run, when
blown away from their noses, than when blown
towards them.

One circumstance occurred to check my joy,
namely the loss of my other brother, who had ac-
companied me in one of my midnight rambles into
the adjoining country near Hambledon; and (for
though so long ago as 1828, I well remember it)
we had been induced to swim across some -water
to an island situated in Rookesbury Park, belong-
ing to Mr. Garnier, on which it so happened there ~
was a nest of young swans; and although we did
not venture to touch them, the old ones were so
angry with us for our intrusion, that when we
attempted to quit the island, they would not allow

us to do so; but continued swimming backwards



THE LIFE OF A FOX, 39

and forwards to show their anger. At length, as
daylight was appearing, my poor brother was rash
enough to make a sally, and had nearly swum
across to the land, when, overtaking him, they
commenced an attack, and by flapping their wings
against his head, and keeping him under water,
speedily drowned him, just as a man came up to
see what they were about.

_ They seemed to exult in their prowess, and
whilst they were proudly throwing back their
heads, and rowing in triumph round their victim,
I took an opportunity of crossing the water on
another side, and escaped, resolving never in
swimming to encounter the same risk again.
Nothing worth relating occurred until towards the
beginning of the following winter. It is true that
I was often induced to move and to quit the wood
in which I lay, owing to my being disturbed by the
hounds ; but as they never followed me far, and
were stopped by the whipper-in when I left the
covert, it was evident they came on purpose to hunt
young cubs; I therefore took care to retire to a

gorse covert near. Sutton Common, where none



40 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

were bred, much to the regret of the owner, a
Rev. Baronet, who is one of our greatest friends,
as no keeper of his would dare to destroy a fox
without pain of losing his place. Here I remained
quiet for some months, till one morning I was
waked by the noise of Foster the huntsman; and
shortly afterwards the whimpering of a hound told
me that he was on the scent left by my footsteps
on my way to my kennel, although it was where
I had passed before day, and several hours had
gone by. I was led by the wind that day to
take them over a country seldom if ever gone over
by them before, namely Wolmer Forest, crossing
one or two rivers, from extreme dread of this
huntsman and his powerful pack. Whether it
was the water or the fences that stopped him, I
cannot say, but I suspect it was the latter;
although a few years before nothing could have
done it. The hounds were at times running
without him, and it was in consequence of that
I think that I eventually beat him, and escaped.
In the course of a few days I returned to the

same covert, and had not been there more than



THE LIFE OF A FOX, 4]

fourteen more, when this man’s awful voice
startled me again,

I was soon prepared for another run with a
north-east wind, which might have led me to
take the same line as before ; but that I heard
Sawyer the whipper-in exclaim, “Tis our old
fox, and he went through the same holes that he
did the last time we found him.” He gave the
view-halloo directly afterwards. I felt certain that
they came again thus soon, determined if possible
to kill me; and though frightened a little, I took
care to keep on without stopping to listen, as
I had done before; so that I kept a good dis-
tance ahead of them, and continued my best pace
for many miles, crossing Wolmer Forest into
Sussex. I no longer heard the hounds follow-
ing me, and being much distressed with fatigue,
ran forward to very short distances, and then
turned either to the right or to the left, in order
to baffle my pursuers. At length I came opposite to
some buildings, and seeing a large pile of wood,
crept in amongst it and lay down. After listening
for some time, I heard the cry of a few hounds



42 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

not far off; but the noise ceased just about the
spot where I turned down the road, and all was
silent for some time. At last I heard the voice
of Sawyer the whipper-in, saying he must take
the hounds home to the kennel, if his horse
would enable him; but that the huntsman’s and
the other whipper-in’s horses were both done ;
and so they were, for they never lived to reach
their stable. |
Having again escaped from that clever hunts-
man Foster and his pack, I at first determined
to remain in this part of Sussex. It was hunted
by Colonel Wyndham, whose hounds I soon had
reason to know were not less fatal than those by
which I had lately been so severely hunted. They
seemed to me to be quicker in their work, and
to keep closer to me when it was a good scenting
day; although when it happened to be otherwise
they could not hunt me so long or so far as the
other pack had done. Once or twice when I
was nearly tired they left me, owing to the scent
being bad, and went to find another fox, when
I believe that Foster and his pack would have



THE LIFE OF A FOx. 43

gone on longer, if not killed me. The pace they
obliged me to go, when hunting me over the
hills, was terribly fast, and very probably the
cause of their not making so much cry when in
pursuit. Indeed they ran almost mute, and at
times got very near to me before I was aware of
their approach.

This I found was too dangerous a country
for me to remain in; and so when on another
occasion they found me, I ran into the Ham-
bledon country, not far from Stanstead Forest,
where I fortunately escaped, and finding myself
in a wild part near Highdown Wood, did -not
venture to return, feeling sure: that with the
Colonel’s quick pack and blood-like horses, if
they found me on a good scenting day, I must be
beaten by them. However, here was in store for
me as great a trial of my powers; for it seemed
that Mr. Osbaldiston’s hounds were just come
for this part of the season to hunt the country.
One morning I heard Sebright’s voice cheering
on his pack, which, with a burning scent, were

running a fox like lightning. Suddenly there



44, THE LIFE OF A FOX.

was an awful silence; then Dick Buxton’s
screech, and the “ Whoop!” soon followed. Fora
minute or two only I heard a noise, as if hounds
were quarrelling, and that no sooner ended
than Sebright saying, “Now, Mr. Smith, this
is the first real good scenting day we have had.”
I could stop no longer, but stole away, hoping
not to be seen; but, my friends, fancy my
horror, when, on stealing from the gorse on the
open down, and thinking that the rising ground
would screen me, I saw this famed pack, and
first-rate huntsman, within two hundred yards
of me. I stopped for an instant, but scorned to
return into the gorse, so took away across the
hilly downs near Hog’s Lodge, and crossed
the Petersfield road to Portsmouth, over the
open down for two miles, with the pack viewing
me the whole time, except a moment or two,
when I was rounding the tops of the_ hills,
then again they saw, and swung after me down
the steep sides of the hills. I cleared the first
fence adjoining the down, and had scarcely

got fifty yards, when I saw the whole pack



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 45

flying over it after me, and at the next fence
I turned short to the right as soon as I had
cleared it. They were driven a little beyond
it before they turned, which gave me a trifling
advantage. I now continued to gain ground in
advance of the pack, and though they never
once were at fault, or lost the scent for a
minute, and went on several miles across open
downs into Sussex, still I kept on, determined
to save my life.

I had gone full nine miles, as straight as [|
could go, and had just turned for the first time
to the right, and was ascending the top of the
highest point of the down, when, to my great
joy, I saw the hounds stopping, and trying in
vain to recover the scent, which was destroyed by
my having run through a large flock of sheep.
They now could not hunt the scent a step
further, though on the middle of an open down;
and such was the disappointment and chagrin
occasioned by it to Sebright, that he was heard
by a friend of mine to say, that if the *squire
would give him a thousand a year, he would



46 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

not stop to hunt a country, where the scent
was so soon entirely lost; and that, until this
occurred, nothing in the world would have made
him believe that any fox could have run straight
away from such a pack as his, under such ap-
parently favourable circumstances.

I remained till the following season in this
part of the country, in a covert belonging to
Sir J. Jervoise, called the Markwells, when I
was first roused from my slumber by the voice
of another huntsman, Mr. Smith, who at that
time hunted his own hounds, known as the
Hambledon pack. It was about one o’clock in
the afternoon, in the month of December, and
fortunately I prepared myself for a day’s work,
for sure enough I had it. When I first broke
cover, I took the open, and in running had
the wind in my face for about two miles,
then finding the new pack pressing close to
my heels, I turned short back with the wind,
which most fortunately, as it appeared to me, was
now blowing in a direction straight to a large
earth that I had formerly discovered at Grafham



THE LIFE OF A FOX, 47

Hill in Sussex. The pace had blown the hounds,
and the great change, by turning back, and down
the wind, caused them to stop for a minute or
two; and although I soon heard them again
hunting me, at a pace not quite so fast, their
perseverance induced me to keep on straight
forward. I had already gone for about ten or
twelve miles, when, crossing a grass field near
some buildings, I was startled at hearing the
noise of other hounds close by. It was the
pack in Colonel Wyndham’s kennel. A view-
halloo, which came from one of his men, made
me continue to get on as fast as I could, and by
the time it was nearly dark, I fortunately reached
the large earth at Grafham Hill. I had not been
there for more than a few minutes, when, lying
with my head near the entrance of the earth, in
order to breathe more freely, I heard the hounds
come up to the spot, and try to get in, on which
I retreated, but no farther than I was obliged to
do, according to the plan I always adopted when
distressed or nearly run down.

The distance I had run, straight ahead from



48 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

where I started, was found to be twenty-seven
miles. One of the four or five men who came
in said that they must have changed their fox
when the hounds ran through these large coverts.
The reply was, that it was scarcely possible,
as they never once broke out of the road and

rides, within which the fox had kept during the
- whole time.

It was now dark, and the hounds had full forty
miles to return to their own kennel. I had rea-
son, however, to know that they stopped that night
half way, at the Drove Kennel; for during the
night I had returned back as far as I could to the
place whence I came, and intended to remain
there; but all the middle of the next day I heard
the sound of the horn which I had so often heard
during the severe run I had had the day before,
and which it appears was blown with the hope
of its being heard by two hounds that were
missed the night before, having come to the
earth and remained some time after the pack had
gone away. On hearing the horn, I soon left my

kennel, and, though very stiff, was obliged to



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 49

make the best use of my legs that I could; for
the pack, on their way home, crossed the line
I had taken in the night, and were soon heard
running in full cry after me. Glad was I to
hear Mr. Smith order his men to stop them; for
I must speedily have fallen to them, had they
only been aware of my weakness. One curious
fact remains to be told, namely, that the two
hounds remained for three days in the part near
where they were left at the earth, and found their
way back to the kennel on the fourth day after-
wards. Now it is true that we foxes easily
retrace our way on all occasions, but it must be
recollected that we are often led straight, by
having in view some point, a main earth, for in-
stance: when that is not the case, on being pur-
sued by the hounds and guided by the wind, we
notice the different points as we pass, and choose
that line in which it appears least likely for us
to be viewed; we thereby without difficulty re-
trace our line the same night, at least for some
distance, unless too exhausted to travel more than
necessary to procure food, when we remain near

D



50 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

where the hounds have left us. I have done this
for a short time, when the coverts and country
to which I belonged have been much disturbed
by the hounds; but invariably returned the
same night. Now the hound has enough to do
when hunting us, without taking notice of the
country which he passes over; and we must not
assume to ourselves greater sagacity than belongs
to him, for I believe that we are but varieties of
the same kind. I observe amongst our party one
who may have something to say upon that subject
presently.

I underwent another severe day’s work in the
same country with another pack of hounds. In
consequence of finding plenty of rabbits in a
covert near the Waterloo Inn, I remained there
for some time, and my peace was undisturbed,
until I was roused one morning by the strange
but fine voice of Mr. King’s huntsman, Squire.
After running round the covert a few times, I
found that his quick pack were not to be trifled
with ; I, therefore, went straight away in the

direction of Sussex. They still pressed me on



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 51

through the large coverts there, and I left them
in a wood, their huntsman and his master, Mr.
King, imagining that I had gone to ground in a
wood in Colonel Wyndham’s country,—a mistake
which happened in consequence of my having
crept into an earth that I remembered to have
seen there, but which, when I found that it
was merely a rabbit earth, I left, and went on.
The hounds stopped there, but it was soon dis-
covered that they would not lie, and the delay
caused my escape, for I must otherwise have been
killed. It was a terribly severe day, for I had
been hunted by them more than twenty miles
from the place where they found me. A great
part of the country I ran across was the same
that I had gone over in the previous year, when
hunted by Mr. Smith’s pack, though the distance
was not so far by some miles. The great differ-
ence I observed in these two packs was, that the
present one were rather faster, and could not
be heard so plainly when running: this was in
Some measure made up for by Squire’s voice,
which I so often heard to cry “ Whoop !”
D2



52 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

I was afraid to remain in these parts, so tra-
velled westward, until I reached a wood by the
sea-side, near Southampton ; and there, owing to
the scarcity of rabbits, was obliged to seek other
food, often consisting of dead fish, which I found
on the shore. I had more than once a narrow
escape from being shot by sailors, as they passed
by in a boat at moonlight, and was induced to
leave this part also. Following the sea-shore,
I crossed the Itchen Bridge,—for I had not for-
gotten my escape from the swans, and would
never trust myself again in water when it. could
be avoided, and by degrees, as the spring came
on, I got into the New Forest. Fortunately for me,
the system of hunting in that part until near the
middle of May was discontinued by Mr. Codring-
ton, who then hunted it. He was an excellent
Sportsman: and would never take an unfair ad-
vantage of us, but left all to his hounds.

Although I had escaped during the winter
months from other good packs, it was doubtful
that I could have escaped at this season, when the

weather is sometimes very hot; for although, as I



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 53

have observed before, the heat affects the hounds,
it is more usual for them to be moving about in
it than it is for us, and they therefore suffer from
it less.

I passed this summer most agreeably, living
much on beetles, with which the forest abounds,
occasionally visiting the sea-shore to seek for
dead fish, and getting a fair supply of rabbits.
The old rabbits frequently laid up their young in
the open parts of a country, in the middle of
fields, or any where far from hedges, pro-
bably to be more out of the way of stoats and
weasels. The number of nests of young rabbits
that a single one of us destroys is so enormous,
that it would seem to many quite incredible.
I got well acquainted with the purlieus of the
forest in my frequent travels; in spite of which
my feet were never tired by treading on hard
flints, as they used to be in upper Hampshire ;
and, strange as it may appear, in that flinty
country I do not recollect ever having had them
cut or made sore by them, even when I was
pursued by the hounds; probably in some mea-

D3



54 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

sure owing to our quickness of sight, and to our
not having to hunt a scent, so that our atten-
tion is not diverted. I believe I owed to these
very flints the salvation of my life, as they obliged
the hounds to go more slowly over them, and
thus afforded me more time. $

The autumn had nearly passed, and being un-
disturbed by hounds, I flattered myself that I
was safe; but my dream soon vanished; for
it appeared that the only reason why they had
not disturbed me was, that they are not allowed
to hunt in the forest so early as is done in
other countries. I was soon alarmed by hearing
at intervals Mr. Codrington’s deep voice, so unlike
the style of the huntsmen by whom I had been
hunted ih other parts. The hounds appeared
to understand it well enough, and as they soon
spread through the covert adj oining that where
I lay, I stole away to some distance, where I
remained within hearing of them. It was a long
time before they left the first covert, as it hap-
pened to be one in which I had been moving

about when searching for food, and consequently



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 55

these well-nosed hounds got on my scent,—there
called “the drag.’ This fine old huntsman be-
lieving that a fox was near, persevered for an
unusual length of time in trying to find one, and
owing to one or two hounds occasionally throwing
their tongues, waited in an agony of expectation.
At length being led to the covert which I had
just left, they soon got on the line which I
had taken when I came from my kennel two
hours before, and which they had great difficulty
in hunting. By this time, I thought it right to
leave the wood, where I had stopped. A man
saw me go away, and hallooed loudly, but still
the hounds were not allowed to be brought on;
and they continued a walking pace until they got
to the spot where I had waited, at the extremity
of the wood, and where, though at some distance,
I heard the cry of the hounds following me too
closely to be despised by me as they had hitherto
been. It seemed that they were left entirely to
themselves, for I heard no men’s voices cheering
them on, as in other countries when running
in the same way. .As they continued without
D 4



56 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

any stopping, I resorted to the only means then
im my power, and ran through a herd of deer, with
which the forest abounds. This plan succeeded,
and probably saved my life; for when the deer
heard the hounds coming towards them in full
cry, they came straight after me in the line I had
run, and so spoilt the scent which I had left.

I well recollect, a short time after this, over-
hearing, as I lay in my kennel, the following
conversation between two men as they rode by.
“ What a pity it is that Mr. Codrington is so
silent when his hounds are hunting their fox.”
“Well, I don’t know that; for suppose now you
saw some weasels hunting a rabbit, do you think
they would hunt it better if some fellow was
to keep on hallooing to them?” No reply fol-
lowed the question, although I anxiously waited
to hear one. As far as I was concerned, I
regretted that more noise was not made, as it
would have assisted me, and not the hounds.
The silent system is, at all events, a most
dangerous one for the fox before he is found.

I have had some narrow escapes from these



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 57

very hounds being brought to a small covert
or bog in this forest, so silently that they sur-
rounded me before I was aware, and I have
with difficulty got away from them. Indeed
many female foxes have thus been killed heavy
with cub, and in that state incapable of great
exertion. Had these females heard the hunts-
man’s voice in time, they might have moved and
run to earth, or shown in what state they were,
so that the hounds might have been stopped
in time to save their lives. As to the system
of not assisting the hounds, I am sure that every
fox will agree with me in approving it. Give
me. plenty of roads, and dry fallows, or a few
deer or sheep, and even when the scent is good.
I shall not fear to be killed by an unassisted
pack, Without such impediments a pack so
educated would be the most dangerous of all,
and even with them, if in the hands of a judi-
cious huntsman,

This pack was (alas! that I should say was,
for he is no more,) hunted by a kind-hearted
and excellent man, who has been heard to say,

D5



58 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

at a’ moment when his hounds were running
very hard, and going like Leicestershire,—he
being nearly twenty stone,—“I hope I shall not
see them any more till they have killed.” Not-
withstanding the system just described, as many
of my friends have fallen victims to this pack
as to any in this part of the country. Never-
theless here I shall remain for the present, and
not go away until I am fairly driven.

I now, my friends, conclude for the present
the history of my life, only omitting such im-
portant events as may happen to come out in
the course of your own stories; for I must now
call upon you to tell us what you have to say
of yourselves. |

But hold hard there. Who or what art thou,
half-bred thing, that durst be showing thy ill-
breeding with feigning to sleep, or with eating
rabbit, when thou shouldst have listened to the
words of thy betters? Cock-tail, speak.

“Call me Cock-tail, half-bred, ill-bred, mongrel
cur; but know that I claim kindred with your

noble selves.’



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 59

All, Audacious dog-face !”

“ Honour ye the Cock-tail! Cock-tail had a
grandfather !” |

All, “Impossible! Never!”

* Listen, then, to facts; facts are stubborn
things, and if my story do not please, it may

at least surprise you.”

p6



COCK-TAIL’S STORY.

Ir is known, I believe, that half-bred animals do
not reproduce their kind, and if it were otherwise
innumerable would be such kinds. My mother’s
father was a fox. Her mother was a well-bred terrier
in colour much like your own. She belonged to a
man who lived near Harborough in Leicestershire,
and was valuable to him for her extraordinary
talent in killing rats and mice, as well as for the
use which he occasionally made of her in poach-
ing at night. Wishing to procure a mixed breed
between her and a fox, he took her one night,
at a particular period of the spring, to a certain
spot in a wood which he knew to be much
frequented by foxes, and having fastened her
against a tree left her there till morning. On



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 61

the following night he removed her to a short
distance from the spot where she was left the
night before. After doing the same for several
nights he took her home, and in nine weeks after
that, she produced four young ones, all of which
are now living, and much like a fox. My father
was a brown terrier, and my mother may be seen
at any time, as she is fastened up by a chain in the
inn-yard at Market Harborough. The hair on her
back and sides is thick, and stands nearly upright
like that of a fox. The hairs upon the upper
side of the tail are not so long and full as those
of a fox, but the under part and the sides are
the same: the tips of them are black. Her legs
and feet are black, and the latter are round
like yours, with a little tan colour behind the
knee joint. Her ears are pointed, and when
she is at rest laid back, but when she is roused
pricked up like your own. All these properties
you may behold in me, but not exactly in an —
equal degree. The most remarkable difference
between ourselves and you is this ; that neither

my mother nor myself are endued with the



62 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

strong. odour peculiar to the fox. My mother
has never been let loose by the consent of her
keepers, even in the inn-yard, but having once
got loose by accident, when about two years old,
she ran away a long distance, and being followed
into a yard was there secured again. It was
observed when running that she carried her tail
level as I do, like a fox; sometimes it was
crooked, but never upright. It was not so much
curled as mine is.

I lived with my mother, and when I was two
years old, a master of fox-hounds happening to
hear of us, came to see us; and after making
many inquiries, persuaded my owner to let him
take me away with him. I was then placed under
the care of the old feeder of hounds, with orders
that I should be allowed to run about in the
house, with his children for companions. I was
shown to every one as a curious animal, and be-
came a great favourite; but all attempts to tame
me failed, and I never would let a stranger touch
me. My master took me out with his dogs when

he went to shoot rabbits, but found. me wholly



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 63

useless. The sound of the gun and the barking
of the dogs frightened me so much, that I always
ran away into the nearest hedge or wood to hide
myself; and I felt that my fate was sealed when
I heard the old feeder say to my master one day,
“ Now Sir I am sure that this here ‘ vulp’” (for
so I was called) “will never be no use at all; for
he is as wild and timorous now he is two years
old as ever he was. We can’t get un to do any-
thing like the terriers; he frisks about like an
eel, so as we can’t touch un at times.” Finding
that I had no friend to say a good word for me I
absconded, and when seen at a distance, have often
been mistaken for a fox, and scared by the cry of
Tally-o, Tally-o, and the hounds following me.
That they never caught me, I suppose may be
attributed to my not having the fox’s strong scent.

“Thy story is marvellous; but I must doubt
its truth, until I see thy mother. I fear that
thou art like other vain creatures, who, knowing
their own unworthiness, would fain connect them-
selves with those who are in any way excellent—

but beware of betraying us.”



64, THE LIFE OF A FOX.

“ Hah! is it so?—I am off.”

“He is gone, and grins defiance! This mongrel
will think nothing of destroying us by the dozen;
but he may suffer for it yet.”

And now, my friends, as we have heard the
mongrel’s account of himself, let us hear Craven’s
story. Open thy lips and throw thy tongue
freely ; tell us how many times thou hast beaten
these vexatious hounds, and be not chary of thy

experience,



65

CRAVEN’S STORY.

Ir is unnecessary to enter into the ordinary de-
tails of my life, after having heard our friend
who invited us here. Consequently my story will
be a short one. I was born and bred in Saver-
nake Forest, in the Craven Hunt, where my father
and mother had been considered to be of some
importance, having often beaten a famous pack
of hounds in that country. To the best of my
recollection, the first pack of hounds by which I
was hunted belonged to Mr. I. Ward: from them
I had many narrow escapes, which I now, having —
since been hunted by other hounds, set down
to their immense size, for although they could

and did hunt me in an extraordinary manner,



66 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

and pursued me closely in the flat country, and
in the forest: yet I found that I left them far
behind when running over the flinty hills which
separate that country from Mr. Ashton Smith’s.
Their steady style of hunting made it difficult
to shake them off elsewhere. I once overheard
a man remark to their master, that they were
larger than any that he had ever seen, especially
as to their heads. The reply at first surprised me.
“Yes, I like them large, for when once they get
them down in hunting they are so heavy, that
they cannot get them up again.” After being
hunted by them under his direction, I was hunted
by them when they belonged to Mr. Horlock,
from whom also I have had some narrow escapes,
principally by running through large woods,
where they soon changed me for another fox. I
recollect once, when lying in a small covert, near
Benham Park, I was startled by hearing the cry of
another but smaller pack of hounds, as I could dis-
tinguish them to be by the sound of their tongues.
Shortly afterwards I saw a fox pass near me,
much distressed, and very soon the fatal “ whoop”
12



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 67

was heard. It afterwards appeared that this
gentleman’s brother had permission to try whether
he could kill with his small pack a fox which
had more than once beaten the large one. The
following season I was surprised one morning,
by hearmg the voices of some different men
with hounds, drawing the wood in which I lay.
I soon moved and went away from the wood;
but was seen by men, who commenced hallooing,
“Gone away.” The hounds were then hunting
another fox in the wood; where they continued all
day without killing him. At length I was found
by them where there was no other fox. They
pursued me for many miles in a most extraordi-
nary way; and such good hunting hounds they
were, that had I not gone down a road where
a flock of sheep had just gone before, unknown
to the huntsmen, I must have been killed. They
there came to a check, and as it was contrary
to Mr. Wyndham’s system to assist his hounds
by holding them forward, they never got near
me again that day. It was very like the system
described by our friend in the New Forest.



68 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

The following year, I was again surprised by
hearing the voice of another strange huntsman,
before I knew that hounds were just coming into
the wood. However, this notice was sufficient
to prepare me for a start. Soon after I had
moved from my kennel, a single hound threw
his tongue. Mr. Smith gave a very loud cheer,
and every hound appeared at once to be run- -
ning on the scent. This so frightened me that
I lost no time in leaving the covert, and taking
my way straight to the forest, where other foxes
were soon moved by hearing the hounds: I
this time also escaped. Not feeling however quite
safe, I resorted to a plan which had been adopted
by other foxes before. I contrived to crawl up
the side of a large oak tree, by means of some
small branches which grew out of its trunk
near the bottom, and the stems of Ivy which
covered it further up. At a considerable distance
from the ground I found a desirable spot to rest
upon, where the large branches, about which was
a thick patch of the ivy, divided. To this place I

resorted every morning for a long time, and



THE LIFE OF A FOX. © 69

thence could frequently see the horrible hounds,
myself lying, as I fancied, in certain safety. One
day, however, as I turned my head towards where
they were hunting a fox in the wood close by,
my attention was so riveted, that I did not |
observe a keeper, who in passing the tree on
the other side had seen me, and was proceeding
towards the hounds just at the moment the fatal
“whoop |” was heard,—the hounds having killed
the unfortunate fox which they had been hunting.
_ Soon afterwards the keeper told Lady Eliza- -
beth Bruce where I was; it was also communi-
cated to Mr. Smith, who said, that although the
hounds had had a hard day’s work, the fox should
be dislodged from his extraordinary situation, if
her ladyship wished to see it done. To my hor-
ror, the keeper brought the hounds straight to my
tree, and pointed to the spot where I lay as close
as I could. As soon as they were taken away
to a considerable distance, and out of sight, the
keeper was desired to climb up the tree, and bring

me down. The horror of my situation may be easily



70 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

conceived, as I heard him ascending. I did
not move until I-saw his hand close to me; but
as he was on the point of taking hold of me, I
sprang from my lofty nest. Fortunately dropping
on some branches which projected about half
way down, I broke the fall, which would have
broken my neck, and fell to the ground, from
which I rebounded, I think, some feet. Much
shaken by the fall, but, fortunately, nothing
worse, I soon was on my legs, and away across
the forest straight to the west woods, which were
about three miles distant. When the hounds were
only the distance of half a field, they saw me
enter this immense covert; but, as several foxes
were soon moving, I escaped; and the hounds
were kept running till it was nearly dark. I:
have since heard, that the height from which I
sprang to the ground was afterwards measured,
to decide a bet, and that it was proved to be ex-
actly twenty-seven feet.. It was a strange adven-
ture, but can be attested by many who saw it;
and with this I conclude my story.



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THE LIFE OF A Fox, 71

Now for N orthampton Pytchly. Thou art fami-
liar with these things: thou hast, no doubt, thy

story by heart, and canst go a slapping pace.





72

PYTCHLY’S STORY.

RECOLLECT, that when the pace is good, it cannot
last long; and so with my story, for I remember
but little of my very early days. I have had the
good luck to escape from several packs of hounds
which have hunted my country, and am now ar-
rived at a venerable age; indeed, so far advanced —
in my teens, that I began to believe myself to be
the oldest fox in the country, until I saw one
who is fastened up by a chain in the back yard
of the Peacock Inn, at Kettering. Having been
there ever since he was a cub, he is known to
be eighteen years old, and he is now full one
fourth shorter than when in his prime of life.
It is not likely that foxes often attain to such an
age, as before that they become infirm; and in



THE LIFE OF A FOX. 73

countries where there are hounds, become an easy
prey to them, and where there are no hounds,
they are killed by the gamekeepers.

The first pack of hounds by which I was hunted
belonged to Mr. Osbaldiston, and a most trim-
ming pack they were; but luckily for me, when
they were going their best pace in pursuit of me,
they sometimes overran the scent, owing to their
great courage, which, in the breeding of them,
seemed to have been more attended to than the
nose. They sometimes ran away for a little while
even from all the fast riders. These however
generally contrived to get up again to them, espe-
cially when at a check; but every moment’s -
delay made more clear to all the necessity of
having best noses.

It may appear strange that I should have
escaped from the different packs, since the Squire’s
left, in so fine a country as this to which I belong,
especially when such expense has been incurred
to procure a strong pack on purpose to destroy us ;
but, luckily for us, the hunters fell into the mis-
take of trying to make what they called a flying

E



74, THE LIFE OF A FOX.

pack, and to this end getting rid of all those
which they called slow hounds, many of which
were such as would not go the pace without a
good scent, as they would have them do. Such
hounds were always drafted, although, when
there was a good scent, this sort could puzzle
even the fast riders to keep with them. Partly
to this cause, then, I attribute my having
lived to my great age. There are other rea-
sons why fewer foxes are killed than formerly.
In the first place, the country is overrun with
drains, of which thexe are thousands unknown to
the hunters, but known to us. When severely
pressed by the hounds, I have often got into one
of them, and it frequently happened to be in the
middle of an open field, when hounds in chace
of me have run over it; and owing to their mettle
and to their being pressed by hard riders, they
have been urged on beyond it, then held on forward
in every way by the huntsman ; and if, after this,
the drain has been discovered, the scent, owing to
the time lost, has been nearly gone. The entrance

to drains is generally in a low part of the land,



Full Text
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LONDON:
GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,
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THE

LIFE OF A FOX,

WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS,
BY

THOMAS SMITH, ESQ.

AUTHOR OF “ EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF A HUNTSMAN.”



Second Cdition.



LONDON:
WHITTAKER AND CO. AVE MARIA LANE,
1852.



ADVERTISEMENT.

Turs little book may be looked upon as a curious
manifestation of the Movement among Foxes,
_The Editor ventures to send it forth, for an agree-
able reminiscence to many who assisted in scenes
which it describes; for some little instruction to
sportsmen who have had less experience than
himself; and for the common entertainment of
all, who like to listen to the way of the world
in the woods.

Hill House, Hambledon,
June 10, 1843.

* 4S



Â¥ i eae
2 eta


TO THE RIGHT HON.
CHARLES EARL OF HARDWICKE,

go. Se. Ke.

My Lorp,

It is customary in a Dedication to use
the language of fulsome adulation, even in cases
where the writer and the person addressed affect
an equal abhorrence of it. Adopting a more sim-
ple, straightforward course, and one more worthy
of my name, for few foxes have run more straight,
Twill candidly inform your Lordship, that the love
I bear you is much the Same as that borne to my-
self by the most venerable hen now cackling in
your farm-yard, whose half-fledged brood I have

As
v1 DEDICATION.

often thinned. But, my Lord, although I openly
acknowledge my aversion to the unfeathered
biped species to which you belong, yet the kinds
and degrees of hatred are various as the cha-
racters of those towards whom we entertain it;
and while some, affecting to treat my persecuted
race a8 noxious vermin, destroy us by day and
by night with snare, trap, gun, and every other
engine which their ingenuity can devise, we have
always found in your Lordship a fair and open
enemy, and one who disdained to have recourse
to the cowardly contrivances above referred
to. It is on this account, my Lord, that I have
done you the honour to dedicate to you the
ollowing narrative of my eventful life.

Many are the happy hours that I have
Spent, some years since, in the neighbourhood
of your Lordship’s hen-roost. in Hampshire,
and latterly many a tender rabbit, &c. have
I carried home from the plantations and fields
which you now so handsomely preserve for
the use of myself and my kindred at Wimpole ;

this conduct on your part would have ensured
DEDICATION. Vil

my lasting gratitude, could I forget how fre-
quently I have been driven by hound and horn
from those treacherous coverts. Although, from
the above reasons, there cannot be friendship
between us, there may, I trust there does, exist
some feeling of mutual respect: you and your
brethren are not insensible to those merits in our
species which you affect to depreciate. Fabulists
and other writers, in all languages, have quoted
the sayings and doings of my ancestors, as lessons
of instruction for youth ; while the craft and cun-
ning of your ablest statesmen’ have been, in many
instances, entirely derived from our acknowledged
principles and practice. Our heroism in the en-
durance of a violent and cruel death is equalled
only by our dexterity in avoiding it. It was only
last winter, that a cousin of mine led a gallant
field of two hundred horsemen over thirty miles
of the finest country in England: and when»at
length overtaken by twenty couple of his enemies,
each one larger and stronger than himself, he died
amid their murderous fangs, without suffering a

yell or cry to escape him! Yet do the poets of
V1ll DEDICATION.

your race celebrate as a hero, one Hector, a timid
biped, who, after a miserable run round the walls
of Troy, suffered himself to be overtaken and
killed by a single opponent!

Such, my Lord, is the justice of historic fame
in this world, wherein thousands of men have
written ; whilst I alone of my tribe have been
endowed with the power of thus using the quills
of that excellent bird, which has been for cen-
turies the favourite object of pursuit amongst the
brave and skilful of my race.

However determined [ still may be to trespass
upon your Lordship’s preserves, I will do so no
longer upon your time. Our walks in life are
different ; *tis yours to ride, ’tis mine to run ; “tis
yours to pursue, ’tis mine to be pursued: we
shall meet again in the field, the horn will sound
the alarum, my appearance will be greeted with
a view-halloo, that shall set the blood of hundreds
in motion! Whether after that day of trial I
shall again sit amongst my listening cubs, and
relate to them how many peers, parsons, and

squires lay prostrate on the turf, and were soused
DEDICATION, 1x

in the brook while pursuing my glorious course,
or whether my brush shall at length adorn
your Lordship’s hat, fate must decide.

Meanwhile I remain,
Your Lordship’s obliged Friend,

WILY.

Main Earth,
June 6th, 1843.

DIRECTIONS TO THE BINDER.

| PAGE
The fox, the frontispiece, to face the Title.
Pin CUOW Roma FN a ee BS ido ei ER
Plan of an artificial earth,t#o face. . . 2. 1... + - . 7

The fox jumping from the tree, to face. . ...... 70

The huntsman with the hounds running after four foxes,
to face -. « 134

ERRATA.

Page 4, line 2, for, I was born, read, I am descended from the
ancient family of the Wilys, and was born.

— 9,—17, for, after each other, read, after one another.
of eviews off

det

c> s4 =

a

Patent

sade, cralio indy taste x:




A FAITHFUL history of the life of even a Fox

may be not without its interest, for, to the wise,
nothing in nature is mean, and truth is never
insignificant. I was prompted to write this ac-
count of myself by overhearing one day, as I lay
in a covert by the roadside, the following remarks
by one of a party who were passing by on their
return home from hunting a fox, which, as. it
appeared, the hounds had failed to kill.—

B
2 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

“ Well, I’d give a good deal to know what
became of our fox,—how was it he could have
beaten us? There is nothing I should like better
than to invite to supper all the foxes that have
escaped from packs by which they have been
respectively hunted to-day, and then persuade
them to declare to what cause they owed their
escape. ‘To tempt them there should be, rabbits
at top, rabbits at bottom and sides, rabbits cur-
ried, fricaseed, and rabbits dressed in every
imaginable way, by the best French cook.”

The thought pleased me, and resolving to gra-
tify my own curiosity, I invited all of my friends
who had at any time beaten some pack of repute.

It was a,fine moonlight night, in the middle of
summer, when ten of my guests, besides an
interloper, a stranger to us all, arrived at the
place appointed, beneath an old oak tree in
the New Forest.

For the foundation of my feast, nothing could
be better than the bill of fare projected by the
hospitable hunter ; but as I knew that my friends
would prefer every thing au naturel, I dispensed
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 3

with the services of M. Soyer, and merely added,
for the sake of variety, some fine rats and mice, a
profusion of beetles, and a bird or two for the
few whose taste might be depraved enough to
choose them. Our repast being over, it was
agreed, that for our mutual instruction and enter-
tainment, each in his turn should with scru-
pulous fidelity relate by what arts and stratagems,
or by what effort of strength and courage, he had
eluded and baffled those ruthless disturbers of
our repose, the huntsman and his hounds. I
was first called on to tell the story of my life,
and thus began.
WILY’S STORY.

I was born on the 25th day of March, in the year
——. Within three or four weeks from that
day of the year every fox of us in this country
is probably brought forth; and it seems espe-
cially designed that the female should thus pro-
duce her only litter in the year at. a season when
our favourite food, young rabbits, are most abun-
dant. The spot in which I first drew breath was
_ 4 breeding-earth, carefully chosen by my mother,
in a well known covert, called Park Coppice, situ-
ated in the centre of the Hampshire Hunt. It
was not until the tenth day after my birth that I
first saw light, or acquired sufficient strength to
crawl with safety to any little distance round our
nest. Had I earlier possessed the use of sight, I
might have strayed beyond my warm shelter, and


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WILY ADDRE

THE LIFE OF A FOX. 5

for want of sufficient strength to return to it have
perished with cold. Thus Nature goes on to care
for us. I had two brothers and two sisters, and
we all throve and grew rapidly with the nourish-
ment of our mother’s milk alone, until we were
six weeks old, when she began to supply us with
other food, such as rabbits, and. rats and mice,
which she.tore to pieces and divided. amongst us
in equal shares, not however so much to our satis-
faction as to prevent our snarling and quarrelling
with each other thus early over our meals. That
part of the earth where we lodged was between
two and three feet square, with several passages
just large enough for our mother to crawl along :
several of these crossed each other, and of two
that terminated outwards one only was used by
our mother, who stopped up the other for times
of emergency. In these several passages we daily
amused ourselves with chasing each other round
and round. On one occasion, we were inter-
rupted in the midst of our gambols by the sudden
entrance of our mother, who seized us with her
sharp teeth, and carried us to the back of the
B 3






a a -





6 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

earth. It seemed that she had been watching
outside, for immediately after this we were alarmed
by a sound hitherto unheard by us. It was the
voice of a man crying out, “ Eloo in, Viper! fetch
em out! hie in there—hie in!” The light was
instantly shut out by the intrusion of a dog in a
low and narrow part of the passage, which com-
pelled him to crawl along with his head to the
bottom. Our mother waited for him, where she
had the advantage of higher space, and as he
approached with his head thus low, she fixed her
teeth across the upper part of his nose and pinned
him to the bottom of the passage, where she held
him so that he could not bite her, which he would
have done had she attacked him after he had got
beyond the lower part, when he might have
raised his head up'. Whilst bleeding and howling

1 If this were attended to in making artificial earths, it would
be an advantage to the fox, who might then defend himself better

_ from dogs of every sort : the great point is, to have the entrance

only just sufficiently high for him to get in.

They should be so arranged that the breeding places are
situated higher than the entrances, so that water may run away ;
and when it is necessary to make the earth on level ground, the

_ = =









TET

ARTIFICIAL
I OrkS arch. FOX HAR THS.

Lnlerior Passage.



LL

L ntrance PAUSSADES Marked this TOMI
1 inches high and 1% wide.

Lntercor passages —————— 12 inches high & 42 wide.

Short pares tmmm 3 /gez long, Yinches high and. 12 wide.

Linds of passages for Creeding places 27 dins. aeross, and
SH 2ins high, centre Of arch.

Breeding places to be higher than the entrances tp Prevent
accumilation of water



GO feel LORY,

A i:
‘ RE Le
‘ ‘i ; > ao Slee? oe | Py
i i Ni Lt; iit. ie


THE LIFE OF A FOX, 7

with agony, he drew her backwards to the open-
ing, where she let him go. It was in vain that
the man tried to make him go in again, and so he
left the place, declaring his conviction that there
were cubs within, and that he would have them
out another day. He was, however, disappointed,
for our mother that night took us one by one to a
large earth in a neighbouring wood. We were now
two months old, and ceased to draw our mother’s
milk, which we no longer needed, as we were able
to kill a rabbit or pluck the feathers of a fowl,
when she brought it to us, as well as she, _ Some
of these feathers, which in our frolics we had
carried to the mouth of the earth, once betrayed
us to a couple of poachers, who had been lurking

breeding places should be on the surface, and covered over with
earth, so as to form a mound. |

The places for breeding should be formed jn @ circle, in
order that they may be more easily arched, like an oven, with-
out having wood supports. |

The passages should be floored with bricks or flints, to pre- °
vent rabbits from digging.

It is desirable to have the low passages not more than seven
inches high, to exclude dogs. Four-inch work at the sides is
sufficient, except for a foot or two at the entrance.

B 4
8 THE LIFE OF «A FOX,

about the wood, and who noticing them, procured
@ long stick and thrust it into the earth, nearly
breaking the ribs of one of my brothers. When
they pulled it out again, they found the end of it
covered with his hairs, This satisfied them, and
leaving us scrambling and huddling together up to
the back of the earth, they went away, resolving
to come back next day with tools to unearth us,
and expecting, as they said, to sell us for half.a-
guinea a-piece,
. “*Twas a ’nation pity,” added one of them,
“we hadun’t brought my little terrier, Vick; she
would have fetched ’em out alive in her mouth,
without our having the trouble of digging, though
they was as big as the old ’un.” :
* Mind,” said the other, “we beant seen, or
else the squire will gie us notice to keep off.”
‘Their intentions were defeated ; for our mother,
who had been all the time watching their goings
on, anxiously waited for their departure, and no
sooner had night set in, than she again removed us
to a gorse covert hard by, and placed us in a

nicely sheltered spot, where she herself had often
THE LIFE OF A FOX, 9

lain before. Here we were safe from poaching
kidnappers, as it would have been impossible for
them to find us, without being found out them-
selves whilst searching for us, Let every mother
lay up her cubs in gorse, or close and thick
coverts, rather than in large earths, which are
sure to be well known to the fox-taker. We were
now three months old, and living upon young
rabbits and mice, with which such coverts
abound, feeding also upon other food, such
as black-beetles; rabbits, however, were our
favourite food, and if we could find them, we
cared for little else. They are fruitful breeders,
particularly at this season of the year; and a
female has been known to carry two distinct
broods of young at the same time, and to
bring them forth three weeks after each other.
This astonishing fact I have witnessed myself,
and I have heard that the same thing has
‘occurred with the female hare, The usual time
of bearing is twenty-eight days. We now began
to venture out of the covert at night-fall, or
even before, being warned by our mother, when-
B 5
10 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

ever there was danger, with a peculiar noise

that she made, like “keck, keck ;” which we no
sooner heard than we were out of sight in the
covert, where we stayed until all was still again.
As we grew older, we grew more bold and
more cunning; and being four months old,
ventured farther abroad, even in the day time

entering the fields of standing corn, until it was

cut down, when the deeds we did there were

suddenly brought to light.

“Why, John,” says the farmer, “ there must
be some young foxes hereabouts; look at the
rabbits’ feet lying about: and what’s the meaning
of all these white feathers? This comes of not
locking up the fowls o’ nights. Never blame
the foxes, poor craturs; but just go to the
kennel, and tell Foster, the huntsman, as soon
as the corn is off, to bring his hounds.” “ Very
well, sir.’ ‘ But mind, he a’nt to kill more than
one of em, or else be hanged if ever I takes ‘care
of another litter.”

All this was explained to me afterwards, for

at the time I did not understand much about
THE LIFE OF A FOX. ie

it. I only knew that the speaker was a very
nice sort of man, and never doubted that he
meant every thing that is pleasant; although
I must say that his outward looks, the first
time I saw him, did not at all take my fancy.
There appeared to me something so ungainly
and unnatural, something so very absurd, to see
an animal reared up on end, and walking about
on his hind legs; to say nothing of what seemed
his hide, which hung about him in such a loose
and uncouth fashion, as if Nature had been sick
of her job, and refused to finish it.

A few evenings after this I was crossing a
field, and watching some young rabbits, with
which I longed to become more nearly ac-
quainted, when suddenly a large black dog and
an ugly beast called a game-keeper, jumped over
a hedge. I immediately lay flat on the ground,
hoping that I should not be seen; when, how-
ever, I found them coming within a few yards
of me, I started off, closely pursued by the
villanous dog, and seeing that I should soon
be overtaken, turned round, and slipt away

B 6
12 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

between his legs. I then made towards the
hedge, and the dog springing after me, I suddenly
turned round again, when he, trying to do the
same, tumbled heels over head, and nearly broke
his precious neck. My comfort was to think
that he was certainly born to be hanged, for he
followed me again as if nothing was the matter,
and soon overtaking me, wearied as I was with
the sport (I think they call it), he seized me on
the back of the neck, and jogged away, with me
in his mouth, to his master, who clapped me
into his enormous pocket, and carried me home.
I was there kept in a dark and. dirty place, where
all sorts of animals had been kept before. ; There
I remained, who by nature am the cleanliest of
animals, with my hairs all clotted with mire
and filthy moisture, and should certainly have
perished of a certain loathsome sickness, had
not another. gamekeeper luckily seen me,. and
told my owner the certain consequence of keep-
ing me so. I was then taken out and put into
a hamper out of doors, ready to be carried by

the night coach to London for sale. After trying
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 13

in vain to gnaw a hole for my escape, I set about
making all the noise I could, which, the night
being still, reached the ears of my mother, who
quickly came and helped me with her teeth to
finish the work which I had nines and so “<
got out and away. |

Having thus suffered for my boldness, I
scarcely ever ventured out of the covert till dark,*
or nearly so; generally, indeed, I remained in
my kennel the whole of the day, unless I had not
been fortunate in procuring food the night before.
I have seen a female fox, when she had young
ones, moving about earlier in the afternoon;
otherwise it is contrary to our habits to do so.
Night is more dear to us than day, and the
tempest suits our plans; for man is then disposed
to keep quiet, and we venture more boldly to
approach his dwellings in search of stray poultry,
which are to be found abroad, not having been
driven into the hen-roost, owing to the neglect
of their owners. |

I resolved to accompany my mother in future

as_much as possible in her excursions, that I
14 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

might profit by her prudence, and observe her
ways. She seldom went abroad till night, though
sometimes she would venture in the dusk of
evening. Upon one occasion I was much amused
with an example of her engaging tricks. It was
a bright moonlight night, when I saw her go
into a field, in which many rabbits and hares were
“feeding. On first seeing her, some of them ran
away for a few yards, some sat up on their hind
legs and gazed at her, and some squatted: close
to the ground. My mother at first trotted on
gently, as if not observing them; she then lay
down and rolled on her back, then got up and
shook herself ; and so she went on till the sim-
ple creatures, cheated by a show of simplicity,
and never dreaming she could be bent on any
thing beyond such harmless diversion, fell to
feeding again, when she quietly leaped amongst
them and carried off an easy prey.
We were now fully able to gain our own sub-
sistence, but not the less would she watch over
our safety. One of my brothers having found a

piece of raw meat had begun to devour it, which
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 15

she observing ran forwards, and as if in anger
drove him away from it. He became sick and
lost all his hairs, owing to poison, which I after-
wards learnt had been put in the meat. It was
fortunate for us that we had left the breeding
earth, for we must otherwise have all been in-
_ fected with the same noisome disease, the mange.
By first smelling it, and then turning away, she’
taught us in future to avoid any thing of the
kind that had been touched by the human hand.
Thus when we happened to be smelling with
our noses to a bait covered over with leaves,
moss, grass, or fine earth, she would caution us
to let it alone by her manner of looking about,
as if she were alarmed and expected to see our
enemy the keeper. Sometimes the iron trap
would be seen; and then she would lead us to
look at and smell it. Our noses however would
not always be a safeguard, for after the trap
has been laid some days, particularly if washed
by rain, the taint of the evil hand would be
gone, and though we ourselves, thanks to the

watchfulness of. our mother, escaped the danger,
16 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

hundreds of others, led on by hunger, have fallen
into the snare, losing either leg or toes. Baits
for catching stoats and weasels, set upon a stick
some fourteen inches above the ground, we car-
ried away without mischief from the trap below °*.
At about six months old we were three parts
grown, I and my brothers being something
larger than our sisters, whose heads were thinner
and more pointed. The white tip of the brush
was not, let me remark, peculiar to either sex
of us. Iand one of my brothers, and also one
of my sisters, had it, whilst the other sister and
the. other brother were altogether without it,
not having a single white hair. That brother
has been known to profit by the exemption,
when on being viewed in the spring of the year
the hounds have been stopped with the remark,
It ’s a vixen; there is no white on her brush.”
I have since observed that old male foxes are
of a much lighter colour on the back than are

the old female ones, which are commonly of a

° See sketch, “ Extracts from the Diary of a Huntsman,” p. 211.
THE LIFE OF A FOX. - 17

dark reddish brown; and so it was with my
parents. Our sire never helped ‘to furnish us
with food, although I have reason to think that
I often saw him prowling about with my mother
at night; instances, however, have been known
where the sire has discharged such an office
after the young had lost their mother. For a
few weeks we went on living a rolicking kind of
life, and fancied ourselves masters of the coverts.
There was a coppice of no more than two years
growth, which enabled me to enjoy the beams
of the sun as I lay in my kennel. © This
kind of shelter we all of us choose, especially
when there are no trees of a large growth to
be dripping down upon us in wet weather.
Here as I lay one morning, .early in October,
I was roused from a sound sleep by the noise
of voices, and of dogs rushing towards me.
Away I ran, and had not gone above twenty
yards before I heard the report of a gun, and
instantly received a smart blow on my side, which
nearly knocked me down, breaking however none

of my bones, and causing only a little pain and
18 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

loss of blood. “ Ponto!—curse that dog; he’s
after him,” cried a voice, when the dog turned
back, or else he must certainly have caught me,
as I had only power to run a short distance into
some thick bushes, where I lay down and listened
to the following rebuke.

“You young rascal, how dared you to shoot at
a fox—here, too, above all places? Don’t you
know that this is the very centre of the hunt?
Had you killed him, you would have been a lost
man, an outcast from the society of all good peo-
ple, a branded vulpecide. Who do you think,
that has the slightest regard for his own character,
would have received you after that?” “I really,”
_ replied the offending youth, “mistook him for
a hare.” “ Yes, and if you had killed such a
hare, you should have eaten him, and without
currant jelly too.”

Now, if an humble individual of a fox may
venture to give an opinion upon such a moment-
ous question, I will say that the practice of
destroying our breed, for the purpose of preserv-
ing the quantity of game, is, where it prevails,
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 19

equally selfish and short-sighted. For every fox
thus destroyed, hundreds of men are deprived of
a day’s sport, and sometimes more than that ; and
if none of us were spared, those hundreds of hunt-
ers would become so many keen shooters,—how
could the game-preserver then keep up his stock
as he did before? and where would the wealthy
capitalist rent his manor? After this unlucky
adventure, I resolved in future to sleep with one
eye open, and not without reason. I had scarcely
recovered from the injuries which I had suffered,
and had just settled in my kennel one morning
about day break, coiling myself up for the usual
snoose all day, and sticking my nose into the
upper part of the root of my brush—the rea-
son by the bye why the hairs there are gene-
rally seen to be standing on end or turned back-
wards—when I was startled by the voice of John
Foster, whose name has been mentioned before ;
“ Kloo in; e-dhoick, e-dhoick—in-hoick, in-hoick.”
Disturbed by the unaccustomed sounds, I rose
upon my fore legs, and pricking up my ears

listened for a moment. or two, when I heard the
20 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

rustling of the hounds running straight towards
me, being led on by the scent that was left in
the track of my feet, which parts, especially
when heated by running, seem to leave more
scent than any other part of the body. Thus
the same organ becomes at once the means of
‘Inviting pursuit, and of escaping it. Off I went
—the awful tongue of an old hound ringing in
my ear, and having about it surely some charm;
for no sooner had he opened than a score or
two others of the pack came rushing from all
sides towards him, and then such a horrible din
as there was behind me. I ran—I flew, I knew
not whither—I crossed a road in. the wood—and
then such frantic screaming and shouting,—
“Tally O—tally O,” mixed with the blast of
Foster’s horn, that I was almost mad with fright,
and must have fallen a victim to my savage
pursuers, had not my brothers and sisters been
disturbed by the clamour, and consequently been
the cause of the pack being divided into several
parts, thus enabling me to steal away towards

the opposite side of the wood, where I remained.
THE LIFE OF A FOX, 21

My state was such that I could not be still,
as I ought, and I kept moving backwards and
forwards and away from the cry of the hounds,
which at times hunted us in several packs, then
all together as they crossed each other, and then
again separated. This had gone on for nearly half
an hour when, to my great joy, they all went
away with a frightful yell, leaving the wood and
me miles behind them. I was congratulating myself
on my escape, and listening to hear if they were
returning, when I was startled by the sound of
steps approaching, and a panting, as of some ani-
mal in distress; it was one of my brothers, evidently
more beaten and terrified than myself, and who,
on hearing something move and not knowing it
was I, ran back out of sight in a moment, and I
saw no more of him then. I remained where I
was hidden until I had partly recovered from my
fears, and not hearing the noise of hounds, had
crept into some thick bushes, where I lay quiet,
when to my horror I again heard the holloa of the
huntsman, who seemed to be taking the hounds

round the wood, with now and then the tongue of
22 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

a single hound; then, all on a sudden, the deep
voice of Sawyer, the whipper-in, calling, “'Tally-o !
there he goes; ’tis a mangy cub!” In a minute
every hound was after him, and in full cry
for a quarter of an hour; suddenly the noise
ceased, and the fatal holloa, “ Whoop!” was often
repeated by the men with “Tear him boys;
whoop! whoop!” And that was the end of my
poor mangy brother. They then, not having seen
any other of us for some time, thought we were
gone to ground, and went away. Happy was I to
hear that horn, which had before caused me such
terror, calling away the hounds, that, to judge
from their loud breathing as they passed near me,
were not loath to go; for it was nearly ten o’clock,
and the heat most oppressive. They were mis-
_ taken in thinking we were all gone away, although
my brother and sisters had taken advantage of the
hounds running in the open, and had gone across
to the gorse covert, from which my unfortunate
brother just killed had often, in consequence of
his mangy state, been driven by our mother.

Again we had to thank that mother for our
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 23

safety, for at the time when we were all nearly
dead with toil and alarm, it seems she took an
opportunity of running across the wood in front
of the hounds, which soon got on her scent,
and followed her as she led them away for some
miles out of the covert. The huntsman then,
convinced that they had got on an old fox, as
soon as the men could stop the hounds, imme-
diately brought them back to the covert where
they had left us, hoping to kill one of us young
ones.

It was not till some time after this memorable
day, that we ventured to take up our quarters in
the wood again. Our mother thought it right to
take us away to a covert about two miles distant,
where, as the hounds only hunted cubs at this
early part of the season, there were no young
foxes; consequently, for that time, we were left
undisturbed, and soon began to feel as much at
home as in the covert which we had left. Had
it not been for the shooters, who frequently
came with their spaniels, we should have even

preferred it; and they so frequently moved
24, THE LIFE OF A FOX.

us, that we soon took little notice of them,
except by going from one part of the wood to
the other. Indeed we were rather benefited by
them than otherwise, for we occasionally picked
up a wounded or dead bird, hare, or rabbit, and
after eating as much as we could, we always
buried the remainder, scratching a hole in the
ground with our claws, and covering it over
with earth. Even this made us enemies ; for
when by accident the dogs smelt it, and drew it
out, the keepers immediately told their master
that if they were not allowed to kill the foxes,
there would not be a head of game left.

Constant disturbance after this induced us to
return to the strong gorse where we had pre-
viously been, and which was nearly impenetrable
by shooters ; but we had not been here more
than a few days, when, about ten o’clock in the
morning, towards the end of October, I was
again alarmed by hearing Foster the hunts-
man’s now well-known voice; “Sawyer, get round
the other side of the covert: if an old fox breaks
away, let him go, stop the hounds, and clap them

12
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 25

back into the covert again, and then they will get
settled to a cub.—In-hoick ! e-dhoick ! e-dhoick !”
I listened with breathless fear, and soon heard
the rustling of hounds on every side of me, then
a solitary slight whimpering, and Foster’s cheer,
“ Have at him, Truemaid; hoick! hoick !” These
to my ears most frightful sounds sent every
hound to the same spot; and I started from my
kennel, and got as fast as I could to the other
side of the gorse. I soon gladly returned, and
meeting an old dog-fox, that at first I mistook
for a hound, dashed away on one side, before the
pack had crossed my line. They ran by me, and
continued following the old fox, till I heard
* Tally-o! gone away;” with a smacking of
whips, and “hoick back, hoick back ;” then for
a few minutes all silent; and then again the
same terrible tongues drove me from my quarters.
They were not in pursuit of me in particular, but
running after either my mother, or one of the rest
or all of us, divided as they were into different lots,
One of these at last got fast on my track, and
away I went straight to the earth where we were

Cc
26 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

born; but to my surprise and disappointment I
found it stopped up with a bundle of sticks, and
covered over with fresh earth; for it was not in
that state when I passed by it the night before.
I waited for a few moments, and tried to scratch
an opening; but hearing the hounds hunting
towards me, I returned to the gorse, where they
shortly followed me. Owing to my being smaller
than they were, I could easily run a good pace
in it, where they were obliged to go slowly; and,
running in the most unfrequented tracks, I con-
trived to keep out of their way. At times they
were all quite silent, and could not hunt my scent
at all, owing, probably, to the ground and covert
where the hounds had been running so often being
stained. This dreadful state of things went on for
a length of time, till at last I heard them halloo,
“'Tally-o! tally-o! gone away.” Shortly after
this the hounds left the covert, hunting after the
fox which was seen to go away, and which again
happened to be our mother. The men soon
found out their mistake; and as they were some

time absent, they must have had difficulty in
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 27

stopping them, which at first I heard them trying
to do.

Meanwhile I had been flattering myself that
I was safe, and that once more I had escaped;
but quickly I heard them coming back very
quietly, as if intending again to hunt me. Pre-
viously to this I had found a rabbits’ burrow,
into which I crept. I was luckily, as it hap-
pened, too much distressed and too heated to
remain there, and left it, and went to the op-
posite side of the covert. At this time a cold
storm of wind and rain came on, notwithstanding
which an old hound or two got on my line of
scent, and hunted it back the contrary way to
that which I had gone, till they came to the
rabbit burrow, where they stopped, and began
baying and scratching with their feet at the
entrance.

There can be little doubt that hounds have a
language well understood by each other, and I
never can forget the noise made by the whole
pack, as they all immediately came to the spot ;
the men halloed “Whoop! whoop! have at him,

c2
28 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

my lads;” and one was ordered to fetch a
terrier, and tools for digging. During the. time
they were at this, 1 stole away from the covert
in another direction, and so saved my life. It
seems they soon found out that I had left the
earth, tried the covert over again, and then went
home, vowing my destruction another day.

This was warning enough to prevent my
remaining longer in or near this covert for the
present. Venturing further abroad, I returned
to that in which I had been disturbed by the
shooters, and there frequently picked up more
wounded birds: I also found, in a field close
by, part of a dead sheep, which a: shepherd
had left for his dog. Some of this I took away
and buried. I was returning for another bit,
when the rough dog, which had just arrived,
suspecting that I had purloined his meat, flew
at me the instant he saw me, with such fury
that he knocked me over and over again without
getting hold of me. He then turned, and was
in the act of securing me with his teeth, when

I griped one of his legs, and bit it through; the

~~
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 29

pain which he suffered prevented him from more
than mumbling me with his teeth; so I got off, .
and made the best of my way to the covert that
evening.

I felt next day that, bruised as I was, I
could not have escaped for ten minutes from
a pack of hounds, had they found me; I there-
fore lost no time in reaching a main earth, into
which I got before the earth-stopper had put
to; but I had scarcely done so when he came,
at daylight, and to my great dismay stopped it
up. I remained there all day, and till late at
night, and no one came to open it, and, had
I not contrived to scratch my way out, I know
not how long I might have remained there;
for I have reason to know that many of us
are stopped up in rocky earths and drains for
weeks, and starved to death, owing to the for-
getfulness or sheer cruelty of the stoppers.
I have heard such sad tales as—but just now
it would interrupt my story to tell them.

It so happened, my friends, that for some
time I was not hunted by hounds, and con-

te c3
30 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

trived to extend my rambles, till I was ac-
quainted with a great part of the country. Oc-
casionally lying in my kennel, if in an open
covert, and hearing a pack of hounds. in full
cry near, I moved off in an opposite direction,
but sometimes not without being seen by some
of the wide and skirting hunters, who lost their
day’s sport in riding after me, and halloomg
“Tally-o!” but I always kept quiet in my
kennel when I heard hounds in full cry, if I
happened to be in a strong gorse covert. Thus
passed off the greater part of the first winter of
my life. | !

On one occasion I was lying im rather an
exposed: place by the side of a pit, in the middle
of a field, when I saw a man. pass by on horse-
back, who, on seeing me, stopped, and, after look-
ing a short time, rode on. Till the noise of his
horse’s feet was out of hearing I listened, and
then stole. away, which was most fortunate, for
in the course of a few hours the hounds were
brought to the pit, the man having told the

huntsman where he had seen me, as he thought,
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 31

asleep; though we foxes, however it may seem,
are seldom otherwise than wide awake.

When the month of February arrived, I
showed my gallantry by going and visiting an
interesting young friend of mine of the other
sex in a large covert some distance off, and
there, to my chagrin, I met no less than three
rivals, bos

One morning we were surprised by hearing the
voice of Foster, drawing the covert with his hounds,
and giving his peculiar “ E-dhoick! e-dhoick!
kille-kid—hoick! (probably for Eloo-in-hoick !)”
It seems that none of us felt very comfortable or
much at home here, and all must have left our
kennel about the same time; for the hounds were
soon divided into several packs, and running in
full cry in different directions. Fortunately those
that were following me were stopped ; at which
I rejoiced not a little, having travelled twenty
‘miles the night before, besides my wanderings in
and about the covert. These travellings and wan-
derings are the cause why so many more of us
dog-foxes are killed by hounds in the month of

c 4
32 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

February than in any other three months of the
year, ‘Two dog-foxes, which had come from a
great distance, were killed by the hounds that day.
I had had reason to be jealous of them, as they
had for the last week or two been tracing and
retracing the woods, in pursuit of a female, inces-
santly each night, until daylight appeared, when
they were obliged, through fatigue, to retire to
their kennels.

I recollect hearing, as I lay that day in a piece
of thick gorse, the following proof of the patience
and good temper of Sawyer, the whipper-in. The
hounds had followed a fox into a wood close by,
haying hunted him some time in close pursuit,
when a jovial sort of person, who constantly rode
after these hounds, saw a fresh fox,—being no
other than myself,—and began hallooing to the
full extent of his voice. Sawyer immediately rode
up to him, and addressed him thus: “ Now, pray
Mr. W——, don’t ye holloa so, don’t ye holloa;
‘tis a fresh fox!” But still the person continued
as loud as ever. The same entreaty was repeated

again and again, and still he would halloo, At
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 33

last, Sawyer gave it up as a forlorn hope, and left
him, just remarking, “Well, I never see’d such
an uneasy creature as you be, in all my life.” He
then followed the pack, which had by that time
left the cover in pursuit of the first fox, which
they had been running all the time. Yet we foxes
have reason to know that a more determined and
ardent enemy to us, in the shape of a whipper-in,
than this man, never lived. It fortunately hap-
pened for me that the weather now became very
dry ; for I was not unfrequently disturbed by these
hounds, and though the scent was not very good
in this plough country, I was at times much
more distressed after being hunted than on former
occasions, and was often nearly beaten ; for it is not
in our nature to be moving in the heat of the day,
and not being so much inured to it as the hounds
were, I expected to fall a prey to their able hunts-
man, who, when his hounds would not hunt me,
appeared to know where I was gone to; and very
often, when all was silent, and I thought myself
safe, brought them on without hunting, and cross-
ing the line I had come; so that against him
c 5
34 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

and his clever whipper-in, I had, notwithstanding
the dry weather, enough to do to save my life,

On one occasion, I had a most severe day’s
work, for the scent was remarkably good. I was
lying quiet in my kennel, very unwilling to
move, though I heard the hounds running a fox
close to me, which they very soon lost, as they
could not, or would not, hunt it. I thought this
very strange, as by the use of my nose I knew it
to be a good scenting day. It turned out that
the fox was a vixen, which had just laid up her
cubs ; the effect of which generally is, that the
scent: becomes so different, that hounds, old ones
particularly, appear to know it, as if by intuition,
and will not hunt it. As I had not had more notice
of their approach, I thought my best chance of
escape was to be perfectly still,—a plan often
adopted by me since on a good scenting day; but
it was of no use, for the huntsman almost rode
upon me in drawing the cover; and I was
obliged to fly when the hounds were close to
me; however, after a long run, I most luckily

escaped.
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 35

The breeding season for game now came on,
and being still young I frequently was near
being tempted to seize an old bird as she ‘sat on
her eggs, but the difference in the scent of
the bird prevented me. At length, when I had
been prowling about near a farm yard in which
poultry were kept, one night that I had not
met with other food, I pounced on a hen which
was sitting in a hedge, but the state she was in
gave such an unpleasant taste to her flesh, that
after eating a little I left it, and have never
since touched a bird of any sort when sitting.
She has at that time, indeed, but little flesh on
her bones, and I believe that no old fox will
take one for his own eating, although a female
may sometimes carry one off, when hard pressed
for food for her young. The same instinct which
prevents hounds from hunting a fox with young,
thus prevents much destruction of. birds when
sitting. It seems like a design of Nature, to
save the race of birds that have their nests on
the ground, from being entirely destroyed by our-
selves, or by vermin, such as stoats and weasels.

c 6
36 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

Rabbits are too often the perquisites of the
game-keeper, and the iron traps which he sets
with the pretence of catching them are the
destruction of hundreds of us. This might be
prevented if the master would only insist on these
traps not being employed at all, and compel the
use of the wire snare, and of ferrets to get the
rabbits out of their burrows.

Having by this time learnt from my mother
all that she could teach me, I followed her ex-
ample in many things. Amongst them I remarked,
that on a wet and windy night, she almost always
chose, for various reasons, to lie in a gorse covert.
It is generally dry and without droppings from
trees; it is also more quiet and freer from the
roaring of the wind than when near to them.
Besides this, we are not so liable to be disturbed
by the shooters, and though we should be so, are
out of sight. We are also there out of sight of
some of our troublesome feathered neighbours,
the crows, magpies, and jays, who would betray us
when moving abroad during the day-time. They

are always moving with the first appearance of
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 37

daylight, and we. are glad to get out of their
sight as soon as we can and go into our kennel,
lest they should betray us to the keepers, who
are also often abroad at that time. The worst is,
that at times, when we think we have got away
from hounds which are hunting us, these birds,
by making a noise and darting down almost upon
us, as they continue to do where we run along,
point out to the hunters exactly where we are.

It has often happened that I have been betrayed
by an old cock pheasant. No bird has a quicker
eye than he has, and directly he saw me he would
begin kuckupping, and continue to make this
noise as long as I remained near him, obliging
me to move away.

My life during the summer months was one of
almost uninterrupted pleasure. Naturally fixing
my head quarters near the part of the country
where I was bred, I would often ramble by night a
great distance, and frequently remarked with sur-
prise, as I crossed any line that I had taken when
hunted, the wonderful straightness with which I

had pursued it, as it was often in a direction
38 ‘THE LIFE OF A FOX.

where there were no large woods or earths; but
I recollected that I had the wind for my only
guide, and went as if blown forward by it; so
that I could hear whether the hounds were fol-
lowing me, at a greater distance than if I had
gone against it; and besides this, it was more
difficult for them to smell the scent which was
lodged on the ground over which I had run, when
blown away from their noses, than when blown
towards them.

One circumstance occurred to check my joy,
namely the loss of my other brother, who had ac-
companied me in one of my midnight rambles into
the adjoining country near Hambledon; and (for
though so long ago as 1828, I well remember it)
we had been induced to swim across some -water
to an island situated in Rookesbury Park, belong-
ing to Mr. Garnier, on which it so happened there ~
was a nest of young swans; and although we did
not venture to touch them, the old ones were so
angry with us for our intrusion, that when we
attempted to quit the island, they would not allow

us to do so; but continued swimming backwards
THE LIFE OF A FOX, 39

and forwards to show their anger. At length, as
daylight was appearing, my poor brother was rash
enough to make a sally, and had nearly swum
across to the land, when, overtaking him, they
commenced an attack, and by flapping their wings
against his head, and keeping him under water,
speedily drowned him, just as a man came up to
see what they were about.

_ They seemed to exult in their prowess, and
whilst they were proudly throwing back their
heads, and rowing in triumph round their victim,
I took an opportunity of crossing the water on
another side, and escaped, resolving never in
swimming to encounter the same risk again.
Nothing worth relating occurred until towards the
beginning of the following winter. It is true that
I was often induced to move and to quit the wood
in which I lay, owing to my being disturbed by the
hounds ; but as they never followed me far, and
were stopped by the whipper-in when I left the
covert, it was evident they came on purpose to hunt
young cubs; I therefore took care to retire to a

gorse covert near. Sutton Common, where none
40 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

were bred, much to the regret of the owner, a
Rev. Baronet, who is one of our greatest friends,
as no keeper of his would dare to destroy a fox
without pain of losing his place. Here I remained
quiet for some months, till one morning I was
waked by the noise of Foster the huntsman; and
shortly afterwards the whimpering of a hound told
me that he was on the scent left by my footsteps
on my way to my kennel, although it was where
I had passed before day, and several hours had
gone by. I was led by the wind that day to
take them over a country seldom if ever gone over
by them before, namely Wolmer Forest, crossing
one or two rivers, from extreme dread of this
huntsman and his powerful pack. Whether it
was the water or the fences that stopped him, I
cannot say, but I suspect it was the latter;
although a few years before nothing could have
done it. The hounds were at times running
without him, and it was in consequence of that
I think that I eventually beat him, and escaped.
In the course of a few days I returned to the

same covert, and had not been there more than
THE LIFE OF A FOX, 4]

fourteen more, when this man’s awful voice
startled me again,

I was soon prepared for another run with a
north-east wind, which might have led me to
take the same line as before ; but that I heard
Sawyer the whipper-in exclaim, “Tis our old
fox, and he went through the same holes that he
did the last time we found him.” He gave the
view-halloo directly afterwards. I felt certain that
they came again thus soon, determined if possible
to kill me; and though frightened a little, I took
care to keep on without stopping to listen, as
I had done before; so that I kept a good dis-
tance ahead of them, and continued my best pace
for many miles, crossing Wolmer Forest into
Sussex. I no longer heard the hounds follow-
ing me, and being much distressed with fatigue,
ran forward to very short distances, and then
turned either to the right or to the left, in order
to baffle my pursuers. At length I came opposite to
some buildings, and seeing a large pile of wood,
crept in amongst it and lay down. After listening
for some time, I heard the cry of a few hounds
42 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

not far off; but the noise ceased just about the
spot where I turned down the road, and all was
silent for some time. At last I heard the voice
of Sawyer the whipper-in, saying he must take
the hounds home to the kennel, if his horse
would enable him; but that the huntsman’s and
the other whipper-in’s horses were both done ;
and so they were, for they never lived to reach
their stable. |
Having again escaped from that clever hunts-
man Foster and his pack, I at first determined
to remain in this part of Sussex. It was hunted
by Colonel Wyndham, whose hounds I soon had
reason to know were not less fatal than those by
which I had lately been so severely hunted. They
seemed to me to be quicker in their work, and
to keep closer to me when it was a good scenting
day; although when it happened to be otherwise
they could not hunt me so long or so far as the
other pack had done. Once or twice when I
was nearly tired they left me, owing to the scent
being bad, and went to find another fox, when
I believe that Foster and his pack would have
THE LIFE OF A FOx. 43

gone on longer, if not killed me. The pace they
obliged me to go, when hunting me over the
hills, was terribly fast, and very probably the
cause of their not making so much cry when in
pursuit. Indeed they ran almost mute, and at
times got very near to me before I was aware of
their approach.

This I found was too dangerous a country
for me to remain in; and so when on another
occasion they found me, I ran into the Ham-
bledon country, not far from Stanstead Forest,
where I fortunately escaped, and finding myself
in a wild part near Highdown Wood, did -not
venture to return, feeling sure: that with the
Colonel’s quick pack and blood-like horses, if
they found me on a good scenting day, I must be
beaten by them. However, here was in store for
me as great a trial of my powers; for it seemed
that Mr. Osbaldiston’s hounds were just come
for this part of the season to hunt the country.
One morning I heard Sebright’s voice cheering
on his pack, which, with a burning scent, were

running a fox like lightning. Suddenly there
44, THE LIFE OF A FOX.

was an awful silence; then Dick Buxton’s
screech, and the “ Whoop!” soon followed. Fora
minute or two only I heard a noise, as if hounds
were quarrelling, and that no sooner ended
than Sebright saying, “Now, Mr. Smith, this
is the first real good scenting day we have had.”
I could stop no longer, but stole away, hoping
not to be seen; but, my friends, fancy my
horror, when, on stealing from the gorse on the
open down, and thinking that the rising ground
would screen me, I saw this famed pack, and
first-rate huntsman, within two hundred yards
of me. I stopped for an instant, but scorned to
return into the gorse, so took away across the
hilly downs near Hog’s Lodge, and crossed
the Petersfield road to Portsmouth, over the
open down for two miles, with the pack viewing
me the whole time, except a moment or two,
when I was rounding the tops of the_ hills,
then again they saw, and swung after me down
the steep sides of the hills. I cleared the first
fence adjoining the down, and had scarcely

got fifty yards, when I saw the whole pack
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 45

flying over it after me, and at the next fence
I turned short to the right as soon as I had
cleared it. They were driven a little beyond
it before they turned, which gave me a trifling
advantage. I now continued to gain ground in
advance of the pack, and though they never
once were at fault, or lost the scent for a
minute, and went on several miles across open
downs into Sussex, still I kept on, determined
to save my life.

I had gone full nine miles, as straight as [|
could go, and had just turned for the first time
to the right, and was ascending the top of the
highest point of the down, when, to my great
joy, I saw the hounds stopping, and trying in
vain to recover the scent, which was destroyed by
my having run through a large flock of sheep.
They now could not hunt the scent a step
further, though on the middle of an open down;
and such was the disappointment and chagrin
occasioned by it to Sebright, that he was heard
by a friend of mine to say, that if the *squire
would give him a thousand a year, he would
46 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

not stop to hunt a country, where the scent
was so soon entirely lost; and that, until this
occurred, nothing in the world would have made
him believe that any fox could have run straight
away from such a pack as his, under such ap-
parently favourable circumstances.

I remained till the following season in this
part of the country, in a covert belonging to
Sir J. Jervoise, called the Markwells, when I
was first roused from my slumber by the voice
of another huntsman, Mr. Smith, who at that
time hunted his own hounds, known as the
Hambledon pack. It was about one o’clock in
the afternoon, in the month of December, and
fortunately I prepared myself for a day’s work,
for sure enough I had it. When I first broke
cover, I took the open, and in running had
the wind in my face for about two miles,
then finding the new pack pressing close to
my heels, I turned short back with the wind,
which most fortunately, as it appeared to me, was
now blowing in a direction straight to a large
earth that I had formerly discovered at Grafham
THE LIFE OF A FOX, 47

Hill in Sussex. The pace had blown the hounds,
and the great change, by turning back, and down
the wind, caused them to stop for a minute or
two; and although I soon heard them again
hunting me, at a pace not quite so fast, their
perseverance induced me to keep on straight
forward. I had already gone for about ten or
twelve miles, when, crossing a grass field near
some buildings, I was startled at hearing the
noise of other hounds close by. It was the
pack in Colonel Wyndham’s kennel. A view-
halloo, which came from one of his men, made
me continue to get on as fast as I could, and by
the time it was nearly dark, I fortunately reached
the large earth at Grafham Hill. I had not been
there for more than a few minutes, when, lying
with my head near the entrance of the earth, in
order to breathe more freely, I heard the hounds
come up to the spot, and try to get in, on which
I retreated, but no farther than I was obliged to
do, according to the plan I always adopted when
distressed or nearly run down.

The distance I had run, straight ahead from
48 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

where I started, was found to be twenty-seven
miles. One of the four or five men who came
in said that they must have changed their fox
when the hounds ran through these large coverts.
The reply was, that it was scarcely possible,
as they never once broke out of the road and

rides, within which the fox had kept during the
- whole time.

It was now dark, and the hounds had full forty
miles to return to their own kennel. I had rea-
son, however, to know that they stopped that night
half way, at the Drove Kennel; for during the
night I had returned back as far as I could to the
place whence I came, and intended to remain
there; but all the middle of the next day I heard
the sound of the horn which I had so often heard
during the severe run I had had the day before,
and which it appears was blown with the hope
of its being heard by two hounds that were
missed the night before, having come to the
earth and remained some time after the pack had
gone away. On hearing the horn, I soon left my

kennel, and, though very stiff, was obliged to
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 49

make the best use of my legs that I could; for
the pack, on their way home, crossed the line
I had taken in the night, and were soon heard
running in full cry after me. Glad was I to
hear Mr. Smith order his men to stop them; for
I must speedily have fallen to them, had they
only been aware of my weakness. One curious
fact remains to be told, namely, that the two
hounds remained for three days in the part near
where they were left at the earth, and found their
way back to the kennel on the fourth day after-
wards. Now it is true that we foxes easily
retrace our way on all occasions, but it must be
recollected that we are often led straight, by
having in view some point, a main earth, for in-
stance: when that is not the case, on being pur-
sued by the hounds and guided by the wind, we
notice the different points as we pass, and choose
that line in which it appears least likely for us
to be viewed; we thereby without difficulty re-
trace our line the same night, at least for some
distance, unless too exhausted to travel more than
necessary to procure food, when we remain near

D
50 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

where the hounds have left us. I have done this
for a short time, when the coverts and country
to which I belonged have been much disturbed
by the hounds; but invariably returned the
same night. Now the hound has enough to do
when hunting us, without taking notice of the
country which he passes over; and we must not
assume to ourselves greater sagacity than belongs
to him, for I believe that we are but varieties of
the same kind. I observe amongst our party one
who may have something to say upon that subject
presently.

I underwent another severe day’s work in the
same country with another pack of hounds. In
consequence of finding plenty of rabbits in a
covert near the Waterloo Inn, I remained there
for some time, and my peace was undisturbed,
until I was roused one morning by the strange
but fine voice of Mr. King’s huntsman, Squire.
After running round the covert a few times, I
found that his quick pack were not to be trifled
with ; I, therefore, went straight away in the

direction of Sussex. They still pressed me on
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 51

through the large coverts there, and I left them
in a wood, their huntsman and his master, Mr.
King, imagining that I had gone to ground in a
wood in Colonel Wyndham’s country,—a mistake
which happened in consequence of my having
crept into an earth that I remembered to have
seen there, but which, when I found that it
was merely a rabbit earth, I left, and went on.
The hounds stopped there, but it was soon dis-
covered that they would not lie, and the delay
caused my escape, for I must otherwise have been
killed. It was a terribly severe day, for I had
been hunted by them more than twenty miles
from the place where they found me. A great
part of the country I ran across was the same
that I had gone over in the previous year, when
hunted by Mr. Smith’s pack, though the distance
was not so far by some miles. The great differ-
ence I observed in these two packs was, that the
present one were rather faster, and could not
be heard so plainly when running: this was in
Some measure made up for by Squire’s voice,
which I so often heard to cry “ Whoop !”
D2
52 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

I was afraid to remain in these parts, so tra-
velled westward, until I reached a wood by the
sea-side, near Southampton ; and there, owing to
the scarcity of rabbits, was obliged to seek other
food, often consisting of dead fish, which I found
on the shore. I had more than once a narrow
escape from being shot by sailors, as they passed
by in a boat at moonlight, and was induced to
leave this part also. Following the sea-shore,
I crossed the Itchen Bridge,—for I had not for-
gotten my escape from the swans, and would
never trust myself again in water when it. could
be avoided, and by degrees, as the spring came
on, I got into the New Forest. Fortunately for me,
the system of hunting in that part until near the
middle of May was discontinued by Mr. Codring-
ton, who then hunted it. He was an excellent
Sportsman: and would never take an unfair ad-
vantage of us, but left all to his hounds.

Although I had escaped during the winter
months from other good packs, it was doubtful
that I could have escaped at this season, when the

weather is sometimes very hot; for although, as I
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 53

have observed before, the heat affects the hounds,
it is more usual for them to be moving about in
it than it is for us, and they therefore suffer from
it less.

I passed this summer most agreeably, living
much on beetles, with which the forest abounds,
occasionally visiting the sea-shore to seek for
dead fish, and getting a fair supply of rabbits.
The old rabbits frequently laid up their young in
the open parts of a country, in the middle of
fields, or any where far from hedges, pro-
bably to be more out of the way of stoats and
weasels. The number of nests of young rabbits
that a single one of us destroys is so enormous,
that it would seem to many quite incredible.
I got well acquainted with the purlieus of the
forest in my frequent travels; in spite of which
my feet were never tired by treading on hard
flints, as they used to be in upper Hampshire ;
and, strange as it may appear, in that flinty
country I do not recollect ever having had them
cut or made sore by them, even when I was
pursued by the hounds; probably in some mea-

D3
54 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

sure owing to our quickness of sight, and to our
not having to hunt a scent, so that our atten-
tion is not diverted. I believe I owed to these
very flints the salvation of my life, as they obliged
the hounds to go more slowly over them, and
thus afforded me more time. $

The autumn had nearly passed, and being un-
disturbed by hounds, I flattered myself that I
was safe; but my dream soon vanished; for
it appeared that the only reason why they had
not disturbed me was, that they are not allowed
to hunt in the forest so early as is done in
other countries. I was soon alarmed by hearing
at intervals Mr. Codrington’s deep voice, so unlike
the style of the huntsmen by whom I had been
hunted ih other parts. The hounds appeared
to understand it well enough, and as they soon
spread through the covert adj oining that where
I lay, I stole away to some distance, where I
remained within hearing of them. It was a long
time before they left the first covert, as it hap-
pened to be one in which I had been moving

about when searching for food, and consequently
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 55

these well-nosed hounds got on my scent,—there
called “the drag.’ This fine old huntsman be-
lieving that a fox was near, persevered for an
unusual length of time in trying to find one, and
owing to one or two hounds occasionally throwing
their tongues, waited in an agony of expectation.
At length being led to the covert which I had
just left, they soon got on the line which I
had taken when I came from my kennel two
hours before, and which they had great difficulty
in hunting. By this time, I thought it right to
leave the wood, where I had stopped. A man
saw me go away, and hallooed loudly, but still
the hounds were not allowed to be brought on;
and they continued a walking pace until they got
to the spot where I had waited, at the extremity
of the wood, and where, though at some distance,
I heard the cry of the hounds following me too
closely to be despised by me as they had hitherto
been. It seemed that they were left entirely to
themselves, for I heard no men’s voices cheering
them on, as in other countries when running
in the same way. .As they continued without
D 4
56 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

any stopping, I resorted to the only means then
im my power, and ran through a herd of deer, with
which the forest abounds. This plan succeeded,
and probably saved my life; for when the deer
heard the hounds coming towards them in full
cry, they came straight after me in the line I had
run, and so spoilt the scent which I had left.

I well recollect, a short time after this, over-
hearing, as I lay in my kennel, the following
conversation between two men as they rode by.
“ What a pity it is that Mr. Codrington is so
silent when his hounds are hunting their fox.”
“Well, I don’t know that; for suppose now you
saw some weasels hunting a rabbit, do you think
they would hunt it better if some fellow was
to keep on hallooing to them?” No reply fol-
lowed the question, although I anxiously waited
to hear one. As far as I was concerned, I
regretted that more noise was not made, as it
would have assisted me, and not the hounds.
The silent system is, at all events, a most
dangerous one for the fox before he is found.

I have had some narrow escapes from these
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 57

very hounds being brought to a small covert
or bog in this forest, so silently that they sur-
rounded me before I was aware, and I have
with difficulty got away from them. Indeed
many female foxes have thus been killed heavy
with cub, and in that state incapable of great
exertion. Had these females heard the hunts-
man’s voice in time, they might have moved and
run to earth, or shown in what state they were,
so that the hounds might have been stopped
in time to save their lives. As to the system
of not assisting the hounds, I am sure that every
fox will agree with me in approving it. Give
me. plenty of roads, and dry fallows, or a few
deer or sheep, and even when the scent is good.
I shall not fear to be killed by an unassisted
pack, Without such impediments a pack so
educated would be the most dangerous of all,
and even with them, if in the hands of a judi-
cious huntsman,

This pack was (alas! that I should say was,
for he is no more,) hunted by a kind-hearted
and excellent man, who has been heard to say,

D5
58 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

at a’ moment when his hounds were running
very hard, and going like Leicestershire,—he
being nearly twenty stone,—“I hope I shall not
see them any more till they have killed.” Not-
withstanding the system just described, as many
of my friends have fallen victims to this pack
as to any in this part of the country. Never-
theless here I shall remain for the present, and
not go away until I am fairly driven.

I now, my friends, conclude for the present
the history of my life, only omitting such im-
portant events as may happen to come out in
the course of your own stories; for I must now
call upon you to tell us what you have to say
of yourselves. |

But hold hard there. Who or what art thou,
half-bred thing, that durst be showing thy ill-
breeding with feigning to sleep, or with eating
rabbit, when thou shouldst have listened to the
words of thy betters? Cock-tail, speak.

“Call me Cock-tail, half-bred, ill-bred, mongrel
cur; but know that I claim kindred with your

noble selves.’
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 59

All, Audacious dog-face !”

“ Honour ye the Cock-tail! Cock-tail had a
grandfather !” |

All, “Impossible! Never!”

* Listen, then, to facts; facts are stubborn
things, and if my story do not please, it may

at least surprise you.”

p6
COCK-TAIL’S STORY.

Ir is known, I believe, that half-bred animals do
not reproduce their kind, and if it were otherwise
innumerable would be such kinds. My mother’s
father was a fox. Her mother was a well-bred terrier
in colour much like your own. She belonged to a
man who lived near Harborough in Leicestershire,
and was valuable to him for her extraordinary
talent in killing rats and mice, as well as for the
use which he occasionally made of her in poach-
ing at night. Wishing to procure a mixed breed
between her and a fox, he took her one night,
at a particular period of the spring, to a certain
spot in a wood which he knew to be much
frequented by foxes, and having fastened her
against a tree left her there till morning. On
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 61

the following night he removed her to a short
distance from the spot where she was left the
night before. After doing the same for several
nights he took her home, and in nine weeks after
that, she produced four young ones, all of which
are now living, and much like a fox. My father
was a brown terrier, and my mother may be seen
at any time, as she is fastened up by a chain in the
inn-yard at Market Harborough. The hair on her
back and sides is thick, and stands nearly upright
like that of a fox. The hairs upon the upper
side of the tail are not so long and full as those
of a fox, but the under part and the sides are
the same: the tips of them are black. Her legs
and feet are black, and the latter are round
like yours, with a little tan colour behind the
knee joint. Her ears are pointed, and when
she is at rest laid back, but when she is roused
pricked up like your own. All these properties
you may behold in me, but not exactly in an —
equal degree. The most remarkable difference
between ourselves and you is this ; that neither

my mother nor myself are endued with the
62 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

strong. odour peculiar to the fox. My mother
has never been let loose by the consent of her
keepers, even in the inn-yard, but having once
got loose by accident, when about two years old,
she ran away a long distance, and being followed
into a yard was there secured again. It was
observed when running that she carried her tail
level as I do, like a fox; sometimes it was
crooked, but never upright. It was not so much
curled as mine is.

I lived with my mother, and when I was two
years old, a master of fox-hounds happening to
hear of us, came to see us; and after making
many inquiries, persuaded my owner to let him
take me away with him. I was then placed under
the care of the old feeder of hounds, with orders
that I should be allowed to run about in the
house, with his children for companions. I was
shown to every one as a curious animal, and be-
came a great favourite; but all attempts to tame
me failed, and I never would let a stranger touch
me. My master took me out with his dogs when

he went to shoot rabbits, but found. me wholly
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 63

useless. The sound of the gun and the barking
of the dogs frightened me so much, that I always
ran away into the nearest hedge or wood to hide
myself; and I felt that my fate was sealed when
I heard the old feeder say to my master one day,
“ Now Sir I am sure that this here ‘ vulp’” (for
so I was called) “will never be no use at all; for
he is as wild and timorous now he is two years
old as ever he was. We can’t get un to do any-
thing like the terriers; he frisks about like an
eel, so as we can’t touch un at times.” Finding
that I had no friend to say a good word for me I
absconded, and when seen at a distance, have often
been mistaken for a fox, and scared by the cry of
Tally-o, Tally-o, and the hounds following me.
That they never caught me, I suppose may be
attributed to my not having the fox’s strong scent.

“Thy story is marvellous; but I must doubt
its truth, until I see thy mother. I fear that
thou art like other vain creatures, who, knowing
their own unworthiness, would fain connect them-
selves with those who are in any way excellent—

but beware of betraying us.”
64, THE LIFE OF A FOX.

“ Hah! is it so?—I am off.”

“He is gone, and grins defiance! This mongrel
will think nothing of destroying us by the dozen;
but he may suffer for it yet.”

And now, my friends, as we have heard the
mongrel’s account of himself, let us hear Craven’s
story. Open thy lips and throw thy tongue
freely ; tell us how many times thou hast beaten
these vexatious hounds, and be not chary of thy

experience,
65

CRAVEN’S STORY.

Ir is unnecessary to enter into the ordinary de-
tails of my life, after having heard our friend
who invited us here. Consequently my story will
be a short one. I was born and bred in Saver-
nake Forest, in the Craven Hunt, where my father
and mother had been considered to be of some
importance, having often beaten a famous pack
of hounds in that country. To the best of my
recollection, the first pack of hounds by which I
was hunted belonged to Mr. I. Ward: from them
I had many narrow escapes, which I now, having —
since been hunted by other hounds, set down
to their immense size, for although they could

and did hunt me in an extraordinary manner,
66 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

and pursued me closely in the flat country, and
in the forest: yet I found that I left them far
behind when running over the flinty hills which
separate that country from Mr. Ashton Smith’s.
Their steady style of hunting made it difficult
to shake them off elsewhere. I once overheard
a man remark to their master, that they were
larger than any that he had ever seen, especially
as to their heads. The reply at first surprised me.
“Yes, I like them large, for when once they get
them down in hunting they are so heavy, that
they cannot get them up again.” After being
hunted by them under his direction, I was hunted
by them when they belonged to Mr. Horlock,
from whom also I have had some narrow escapes,
principally by running through large woods,
where they soon changed me for another fox. I
recollect once, when lying in a small covert, near
Benham Park, I was startled by hearing the cry of
another but smaller pack of hounds, as I could dis-
tinguish them to be by the sound of their tongues.
Shortly afterwards I saw a fox pass near me,
much distressed, and very soon the fatal “ whoop”
12
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 67

was heard. It afterwards appeared that this
gentleman’s brother had permission to try whether
he could kill with his small pack a fox which
had more than once beaten the large one. The
following season I was surprised one morning,
by hearmg the voices of some different men
with hounds, drawing the wood in which I lay.
I soon moved and went away from the wood;
but was seen by men, who commenced hallooing,
“Gone away.” The hounds were then hunting
another fox in the wood; where they continued all
day without killing him. At length I was found
by them where there was no other fox. They
pursued me for many miles in a most extraordi-
nary way; and such good hunting hounds they
were, that had I not gone down a road where
a flock of sheep had just gone before, unknown
to the huntsmen, I must have been killed. They
there came to a check, and as it was contrary
to Mr. Wyndham’s system to assist his hounds
by holding them forward, they never got near
me again that day. It was very like the system
described by our friend in the New Forest.
68 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

The following year, I was again surprised by
hearing the voice of another strange huntsman,
before I knew that hounds were just coming into
the wood. However, this notice was sufficient
to prepare me for a start. Soon after I had
moved from my kennel, a single hound threw
his tongue. Mr. Smith gave a very loud cheer,
and every hound appeared at once to be run- -
ning on the scent. This so frightened me that
I lost no time in leaving the covert, and taking
my way straight to the forest, where other foxes
were soon moved by hearing the hounds: I
this time also escaped. Not feeling however quite
safe, I resorted to a plan which had been adopted
by other foxes before. I contrived to crawl up
the side of a large oak tree, by means of some
small branches which grew out of its trunk
near the bottom, and the stems of Ivy which
covered it further up. At a considerable distance
from the ground I found a desirable spot to rest
upon, where the large branches, about which was
a thick patch of the ivy, divided. To this place I

resorted every morning for a long time, and
THE LIFE OF A FOX. © 69

thence could frequently see the horrible hounds,
myself lying, as I fancied, in certain safety. One
day, however, as I turned my head towards where
they were hunting a fox in the wood close by,
my attention was so riveted, that I did not |
observe a keeper, who in passing the tree on
the other side had seen me, and was proceeding
towards the hounds just at the moment the fatal
“whoop |” was heard,—the hounds having killed
the unfortunate fox which they had been hunting.
_ Soon afterwards the keeper told Lady Eliza- -
beth Bruce where I was; it was also communi-
cated to Mr. Smith, who said, that although the
hounds had had a hard day’s work, the fox should
be dislodged from his extraordinary situation, if
her ladyship wished to see it done. To my hor-
ror, the keeper brought the hounds straight to my
tree, and pointed to the spot where I lay as close
as I could. As soon as they were taken away
to a considerable distance, and out of sight, the
keeper was desired to climb up the tree, and bring

me down. The horror of my situation may be easily
70 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

conceived, as I heard him ascending. I did
not move until I-saw his hand close to me; but
as he was on the point of taking hold of me, I
sprang from my lofty nest. Fortunately dropping
on some branches which projected about half
way down, I broke the fall, which would have
broken my neck, and fell to the ground, from
which I rebounded, I think, some feet. Much
shaken by the fall, but, fortunately, nothing
worse, I soon was on my legs, and away across
the forest straight to the west woods, which were
about three miles distant. When the hounds were
only the distance of half a field, they saw me
enter this immense covert; but, as several foxes
were soon moving, I escaped; and the hounds
were kept running till it was nearly dark. I:
have since heard, that the height from which I
sprang to the ground was afterwards measured,
to decide a bet, and that it was proved to be ex-
actly twenty-seven feet.. It was a strange adven-
ture, but can be attested by many who saw it;
and with this I conclude my story.
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THE LIFE OF A Fox, 71

Now for N orthampton Pytchly. Thou art fami-
liar with these things: thou hast, no doubt, thy

story by heart, and canst go a slapping pace.


72

PYTCHLY’S STORY.

RECOLLECT, that when the pace is good, it cannot
last long; and so with my story, for I remember
but little of my very early days. I have had the
good luck to escape from several packs of hounds
which have hunted my country, and am now ar-
rived at a venerable age; indeed, so far advanced —
in my teens, that I began to believe myself to be
the oldest fox in the country, until I saw one
who is fastened up by a chain in the back yard
of the Peacock Inn, at Kettering. Having been
there ever since he was a cub, he is known to
be eighteen years old, and he is now full one
fourth shorter than when in his prime of life.
It is not likely that foxes often attain to such an
age, as before that they become infirm; and in
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 73

countries where there are hounds, become an easy
prey to them, and where there are no hounds,
they are killed by the gamekeepers.

The first pack of hounds by which I was hunted
belonged to Mr. Osbaldiston, and a most trim-
ming pack they were; but luckily for me, when
they were going their best pace in pursuit of me,
they sometimes overran the scent, owing to their
great courage, which, in the breeding of them,
seemed to have been more attended to than the
nose. They sometimes ran away for a little while
even from all the fast riders. These however
generally contrived to get up again to them, espe-
cially when at a check; but every moment’s -
delay made more clear to all the necessity of
having best noses.

It may appear strange that I should have
escaped from the different packs, since the Squire’s
left, in so fine a country as this to which I belong,
especially when such expense has been incurred
to procure a strong pack on purpose to destroy us ;
but, luckily for us, the hunters fell into the mis-
take of trying to make what they called a flying

E
74, THE LIFE OF A FOX.

pack, and to this end getting rid of all those
which they called slow hounds, many of which
were such as would not go the pace without a
good scent, as they would have them do. Such
hounds were always drafted, although, when
there was a good scent, this sort could puzzle
even the fast riders to keep with them. Partly
to this cause, then, I attribute my having
lived to my great age. There are other rea-
sons why fewer foxes are killed than formerly.
In the first place, the country is overrun with
drains, of which thexe are thousands unknown to
the hunters, but known to us. When severely
pressed by the hounds, I have often got into one
of them, and it frequently happened to be in the
middle of an open field, when hounds in chace
of me have run over it; and owing to their mettle
and to their being pressed by hard riders, they
have been urged on beyond it, then held on forward
in every way by the huntsman ; and if, after this,
the drain has been discovered, the scent, owing to
the time lost, has been nearly gone. The entrance

to drains is generally in a low part of the land,
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 75

which is chilled by water upon it, and there-
fore may not hold a scent to discover that we
have gone into one.

During the time that that fine old sportsman,
Lord Spencer, hunted this country, there were
nothing like so many of these drains as there are
now, which may in some measure account for
fewer foxes being killed at the present time, than
when Charles King hunted the hounds. I have
heard my old granny say, that the first thing his
lordship thought of and wished to do, was to im-
prove and strengthen his pack in every possible
way. Of late, the pack has been thought to be
of least consideration; and it would seem by the
system adopted, that a fox is to be run down by
men who can ride fast, and that whippers-in are
nearly all that is wanted. For instance, when
I have been pursued by the hounds, if I have
run towards or through any covert, I have fre-
quently been astonished, after passing through
it, and almost before the hounds had arrived at
it, to see one of the whippers-in riding beyond
it, in order to see me go away, which he rarely

E 2
76 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

or never could do; and if he did by accident get
in time to see me at all, the consequence was, that
when I saw him I went back again into the covert,
and then, if there was any fresh fox or foxes in it,
they were pretty sure to be changed and hunted,
and I escaped. It generally happened that I had
gone on through the covert before the whipper-in
got round, in time to see, not me, but a fresh fox
go away, to which he would probably halloo on
the hounds, and, not knowing the difference, de-
clare it was the hunted one’.

I suppose you will now not wonder that
I have lived to so great. an age in this
country. It is. true I have had some narrow
escapes within the last few seasons, particularly
one in the year 1840, when I was found by the
hounds then belonging to Mr. Smith, and in
consequence of beating them, called the Hero
of Waterloo. I attributed my escape to the sys-
tem above described and adopted by the men on

that occasion, when the hounds were hallooed

+ Vide “ Extracts from the Diary of a Huntsman.”
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 77

on to a fresh fox, which the whipper-in Jones
had viewed away on the farther side of Loalland
Wood, at a time when the hounds were hunting
my scent through it, I having gone through and
away from it long before he got there. On looking
back I witnessed, to my regret, Mr. Smith’s dis-
pleasure at the system, which from that time
he insisted should not be continued. However
I was, four days afterwards, lying in a small
wood at Kelmarsh, when the hounds pursued
a fox in full cry, and came straight towards
where I lay. Just before they arrived, I heard
the following words addressed by Mr. Smith
to his whipper-in: “Where are you riding to
before the hounds, when they are running hard ?
Keep behind them in your place. If we cannot
kill our fox without your acting thus, we had
better have a pack of whippers-in, and no hounds
at all.” I never heard of or saw the same system
again. |

Many other changes took place, which, as
being unlike what we had been used to, were by
no means agreeable to us. One of them was

E 3
78 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

the former way of giving up hunting a fox, and
going to find another. On some occasions, when
I have been found and hunted by the hounds, and
fancied that I was safe, as I had done on previous
occasions whenever I could not hear them, I was -
surprised to hear them, after a short time, again
hunting on the line I had come. I was once found
by the hounds in a covert close to Fox Hall, and
after they had pursued me closely for a few
miles, I, in consequence of there being a line
of dry fallows, left them far behind; so that I
had given up all idea of being disturbed again
by them that day, and stopped in Mr. Hope’s
plantation; I had been but a short time there
when they again approached, but slowly, and
I heard the following words addressed to Mr.
Smith, who was hunting his hounds: “ How
much longer shall you go on with this cold
scent? Don’t you think you can find another
fox?” The reply was, “I shall hunt this as
long as a hound will own the scent. We shall
get up to him by and by, and kill him too.”

On hearing this it was time to be off. I
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 79

was shortly after seen in the plantation, and
hunted closely by the hounds, which, after
another long check, again got on my scent
in the wood where I was first found. They
hunted me very fast across some of the finest
grass country, and I was obliged to take refuge
in a drain under a road leading to a field,
where fortunately I found another fox, and
succeeded in getting beyond him in his retreat,
It often occurs that the fox which is hunted
and frightened forces his way beyond the fresh
one, and there remains during the operation
of digging, and when the huntsmen come by,
the fresh fox is drawn out, and given to the
hounds. Such was the case now, and so
I escaped, for luckily it was getting late,
and the hounds were taken away immediately,
without their discovering that I was left
behind. I had time to remark that only one
man, who was addressed as his Grace, was with
the hounds at the finish, or indeed for a long
time during the run, nearly all having left at
the time of slow hunting.
E 4
80 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

And now, my friends, I have done.

“Done! Tell us first what has become of
our friend old King Stumpy. There is a rumour
that he is dead, and I do not perceive any one
here without a brush.”

Alas! he is no more. He was captured, and
massacred, and died an ignominious death. It
happened, last autumn, that he was found as
usual in Grafton Park one morning, as soon
as it was light, by this new pack, when he had
imprudently glutted himself, and was thinking
again to save his life by immediately running
into a drain, in which he had so often saved
himself before, after a severe day’s hunting. He
who had been king of the forest, and had for
so many years fairly beaten his enemies, was
now dug out, and devoured by the hounds on
the spot. Oh! the ruthless and unfeeling beasts!
Yet, be it confessed, that we ourselves do some-
times dig out a mouse or so, but it is to eat
him kindly, you know.

Here I intended to finish my story; but as
I am expected to explain how I have escaped
THE LIFE OF A FOX. SI

from every pack by which I have been hunted,
I must add, that having for a long time had
a wish to see that part of the N orthampton
country hunted till last year by the Duke of
Grafton’s hounds, in which the woods were of
immense size, having heard that T. Carter and
his killing pack had left the country, and
thinking it would be a place of greater security
for my old age, I went there last spring, but
had not been long settled in Puckland’s Woods
before I was disturbed by hearing another pack,
which soon found me out, and pursued me for
some time most closely, till at length they came
to a check. When listening, I heard a person
ride up and use these words to the huntsman:
“Well, what are you going to do now? You
had better be doing something; it’s no use stand-
ing still.” There was some reply, which I could
not hear. However I discovered that the man
addressed was Taylor the huntsman, and that
the pack was the remainder of that by which
I had first been hunted, when it belonged to
Mr. Osbaldiston. The only difference I could
E 5
82 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

observe was, that they were not quite so power-
ful. That they were stout enough I had reason
to know; for although I escaped after their
hunting me for several hours in these large
woods, they afterwards killed another fox without
leaving the covert.

On another day, when I was lying in a large
covert adjoining the Forest of Whittlebury, and
the hounds had been drawing some distance
beyond the spot where I lay, I thought that I
could steal away unseen, and had nearly reached
the outside of the wood, when I was much
annoyed by the noise of a jay, which kept flying
above me as I went on. When I stopped I
heard a man say, “There is a fox moving close
to that jay, Pll be sworn; just look, you will
see him cross that path directly.” This talking.
frightened me from the spot, and on my going a
little further and crossing a path, another man
exclaimed, “There he goes; it was a fox
that jay was making such a noise about.” He
then gave a loud view-halloo; the hounds

soon came up; and after running some time
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 83

in the forest, I left them following another
fox.

The little I had to say is said.

“ Come, Dorset, fain would we hear thy story
next. Our thoughts should be open as the
heavens above, and free as the winds that follow
us. We are brethren and fellows in our way
of life, and thou may’st not doubt that we will
judge thy deeds fairly but kindly.”

“ Justice, then, is fled to lowly beasts, for
men have none of it. Listen to my story, friends ;
a plain and unvarnished one it is, and you shall

have it freely and entirely.”

E 6
DORSET’S STORY.

I was born in Cranborne Chace, which is in Mr.
Farquharson’s hunt, and it was here that I first
heard the sound of a huntsman’s voice, the voice
of old Ben Jennings; and melodious as it might
have been considered by others, it was any thing
but agreeable to my ear, when he used it to
cheer on his hounds, which appeared so well to
understand it. It frequently was the cause of
my leaving this large covert. I returned to it
because the hounds were apt to get on the scent
of another fox. The voice became at last so
familiar to me, that I heeded it not, but rather
found amusement in it, taking little trouble to
be out of hearing of it when the hounds were

hunting me; but another season came, and great
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 85

was the difference. I lay in a favourite covert
called Short Wood, when I was startled by another
voice instead of old Ben’s, that of the new hunts-
man, Treadwell’s, clear and beautiful—not so
powerful as that which I had been used to of late,
nor was it “vox et preterea nihil ;” for his system
was one which soon made me give up listening,
when the hounds were pursuing. I found that I
had now no longer time to wait and hang about
as I had done. I was obliged to get away as fast
as I could, and had enough to do to escape from
the new man, whose coolness and perseverance
frightened me. My first escape was owing to
an imperfect cast which he made when the
hounds had come to a check in a field, where
there was a flock of sheep, for instead of taking
the hounds entirely round and close under the
hedge, beginning at the left hand, he missed
that corner for about fifty yards, where it hap-
pened that I had gone through the fence, and
by the time he had taken them close all round
every where else and held them on forward, time

was lost, and the hounds got on the scent exactly
86 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

opposite. Although it now became slow hunting,
I did not feel safe until I heard him blow his
horn to go home. I believe that this kind of
mistake, or rather neglect, has been frequent
on the part of other huntsmen by whom I have
been hunted. Be that as it may, one or two
escapes from this able man and his pack were
sufficient to induce me to get quickly into another
hunt out of his way. Those escapes may be
attributed to the want of scent, and they will not
seem surprising, if the time be calculated which
was lost at every check, whilst I was going on
without listening as the hare always does. Having
stopped some little time in a strong covert of
gorse in an open down, in Mr. Drax’s country,
south of Blandford, and close adjoining to Lord
Portman’s, I was one morning annoyed by hear-
ing the voice of Mr. Drax’s huntsman, John Last,
who was drawing the covert with his hounds,
by which I was shortly after surrounded, Being
ignorant of the runs and tracks in the gorse, I
was so pressed by them, that I sprung upon the
top of the gorse, and ran along it for a few yards,
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 87

but the hallooing of the hunters soon frightened
me down again. At length I went straight away
across the down in view of all the hunters, and
had not gone more than a hundred yards, before
a large man on a heavy grey horse rode between
me and the covert, and began hallooing in the
most frightful manner, at the same time waving
his hat, as if he was out of his mind; the con-
sequence of which was, that the hounds, which
were hunting me closely out of the covert, im-
mediately they saw and heard him, threw up their
heads and ran wildly after him, expecting to see
me, which fortunately they did not, as I had by
that time just got beyond a small elevation in
the down, which prevented the man also from
seeing me. I turned directly to the left. He
now found out the mischief he had done, by
causing the hounds to lift their heads, and
galloped on still further, hoping to get another
view of me, but in vain, as I had sunk into a
small valley, and he luckily turned the hounds in
a direction opposite to that in which I had gone.
The scene at this time defies description. ‘ What
88 THE LIFE OF A Fox.

are you at, you crazy old man? you have lost
our fox!” and endless execrations were lavished
on him. I believe this circumstance saved my
life; for had it not occurred, the hounds would
have had me in view for three miles across the
downs, and although it was some little time be-
fore they got on my scent again, they came
after me at a most terrific pace, which for-
tunately however was slackened, on their crossing
the road, and having to climb over a wall into
the grounds adjoining some immense woods,
through the whole of which they hunted me
again at a good pace, and straight on for nine
or ten miles, till I was almost exhausted ; luckily
they were stopped when crossing a field where
there was a flock of sheep, no one being there
to assist them. Shortly I heard in a loud voice,
“John! Where is John?” and finding that they
were not likely to get much assistance from the
huntsman, I quietly retraced my steps towards
the place from which I started, but remained
there for a short time only.

I was again lying one morning in a piece of
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 89

gorse near the Down House, when I was waked
by hearing what I thought was the whistle of
the keeper, but which turned out to be that
of Lord Portman’s huntsman, whose hounds
were all round me before I was aware. The
men on horseback were scattered in all direc-
tions over the down, and it would have
served them right if they had lost their day’s
sport, which they very nearly did, as I stole
away to a large rabbit earth close by, into which
I ran.

Unluckily some of the hounds got on my:
scent, and hunted it up to the earth, where
they marked it by stopping and baying. Shortly
after this two or three of the hunters rode up,
and I heard the following words: “Not worth
saving: get him out and give him to the hounds;
he can’t run a yard.” However, it was decided
that I should have a chance, as they called it;
and a pretty chance it was. I was dug out,
_ put into a sack, and given to the whipper-in,
with orders to turn me out on the down. Some-

thing was said about cutting my ham-strings,
90 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

in order to lame me, and one wished to cut
off my brush; and that it was not done was
a great disappointment to the wretch. I was
turned out at only about a hundred yards from
the pack, but contrived to reach a hedge just as
one of the leading hounds had got close to me,
when I turned short to the left down the narrow
ditch. The hounds all sprang over the fence, and
then, not seeing me there, fortunately turned
first to the right; and before they had found
out that I had gone down the ditch, I had
got out on the other side again, and ran
to a corner, when I turned through it again
into another cross-hedge. By these means I
got clear off, before they had another sight of
me; for they overran my line of scent a little
when they got back on the down on my track,
I well recollect hearing the huntsman calling
loudly to the whipper-in to get on, and head
the fox from going to the woods; but he,
poor thing, was in a state of too much excite-
ment to understand what was meant, and even
if he had understood, it would have been a
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 91

fruitless attempt to stop me from making my
point to reach a wood or place of safety on such
an occasion, even if my first attempts had been
prevented. I may flatter myself that a hundred
witnesses are ready to pronounce it as clever
an escape as was ever effected by a fox in
similar circumstances. For the future they
will not say that a fox cannot run, and con-
demn him to be given to the hounds, merely
for running into an earth.

I now made the best of my way straight to
the large woods which I had passed through
when hunted by the other pack, and luckily
made good use of my time, for they came
after me as if their feet had been winged,
neither road nor wall delaying them. I had
enough to do to keep out of their way through
these large woods, which they traversed nearly
as fast as if in the open country. At the extre-
mity of the woods, to my surprise, I met the
noble master of the pack, who had succeeded
in getting to that point before me, the result
of which was that I turned back into the covert
92 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

before he saw me, and caused a slight check,
after which they again approached me, just as
I had reached the wall which surrounded the
wood, at the top of the hill looking into the
vale, where I descended, and looking back, saw
the hounds for a short time again at a check,
owing to that high ground being slightly covered
with snow. I dreaded lest they should take
the hounds on beyond the snow towards the
vale where I was; but they soon turned back,
and I heard no more. It was nearly three
o’clock, which some think time to go homeward,
rather than from home, as would have been
the case if they had followed me, when probably
I should not have lived to tell my tale. The
scent in the vale is always so much greater than
on the hills from which they had hunted me,
that I must have fallen a prey to this pack.
Although we are endowed with so large a
share of wisdom, it is not all-sufficient; or
else we should be aware that when pursued
by hounds, and nearly beaten by them, it

must be all but certain death to us to run
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 93

from a bad scenting country into a good
one.

Having now openly defeated the enemies who
had conspired against me, I remained in the
vale until I was tempted to move into a finer
and fairer country. Great changes are going
on in the hunting of the country which I left;
and should we ever meet again, there may be
much for me to tell. For the present I have
done.

“We now look to thee, Warwick, to give
us something good; thy country has produced
one of the most extraordinary men that ever
lived. He knew all the wiles of the wiliest crea-
ture that walks the earth. Dost thou think
that Shakespeare would have been a good hunts-
man ?” |

“ By the faith of a fox, I should have been
most loath to try him. Did he possess the fol-
lowing qualities: boldness, perseverance, activity,
enterprise, temper, and decision? Had he a
keen perception of relative place? Had he a
good eye and ear? If he had all these, and
94, THE LIFE OF A FOX.

more, then might Shakespeare have been an
immortal fox-hunter.

“It is little that I have seen in this country,
and I have little to tell; but I will at once
proceed and state to what cause I attribute my

escape on one or two occasions lately.”
95

WARWICK’S STORY.

In the month of March last I was lying in a
strong gorse covert, not far from Nuneham, when
after hearing the voice of Stephens, the huntsman
to the Atherstone hounds, I heard the following
remarks, by one sportsman to another, both
being on horseback, and waiting close to where
I was in my kennel.

“ Well, I do hate that silent system; had
Robert not been so sparing of his voice, or had
he only given one blast of his horn, when he
began drawing the small spinney just now, the
hounds would not have chopped that vixen in cub;
for vixens in that state are unable to run far, and
are unapt to move, till pressed to do so by the
approach of danger. She probably had been so
96 THE LIFE OF A FOX,

much used to see the keeper and his dogs pass,
that, not hearing the huntsman’s voice or horn,
she was taken by surprise when the hounds
got round her; if she had moved before, she
might have been seen, and the hounds stopped in
time to save her. No doubt she had been there
some weeks before, and, in consequence of having
a good friend at the great house, not being ever
disturbed, she believed that she was safe.”

I would not venture to listen any longer, for I
heard the same hounds running another fox in
the gorse close by me. It appeared that there
was also another besides, making altogether three
ofus. Finding this to be the case, and thinking
to he very cunning, I took an early opportunity
of quitting the covert; and had scarcely got
across two fields, before I saw a multitude of
men on horseback riding along the road in a
parallel direction to that which I was going. They
had seen me leave the covert, without waiting for
the hounds, which they ought to have known
were running still after another fox; however,

when they found that the hounds were not run-
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 97

ning after the same fox that they were themselves,
they began hallooing, and the hounds were shortly
afterwards brought and got on my scent. Of
course I returned to the covert, for I had no
notion of being thus hunted by men, and wished
to let the gentlemen know that I would not go
unless I chose to do so, let them halloo as they
would. I therefore punished them by running
for nearly three quarters of an hour longer in the
covert. This brought them a little to their senses,
and they gave me room to make another attempt.
Not liking to remain in such close quarters with
this sticking pack, I seized an opportunity, and
went away on the side of the covert opposite to
that which I had first attempted, and though I
was viewed away by several men, it happened
that they were able this time to hold their horses
and their tongues until I had got fairly away,
when they certainly did halloo, so that about half
the pack came to them. The whipper-in was sent
to stop them, and as soon as the huntsman had
got a few more he also came to them; but not
having quite three parts of the pack he did not

F
98 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

go on with them, but stopped and blew his horn
for the others which he had left. Some of them
shortly after came, but seeing him stopping where
he was, did not appear to be in any haste, pos-
sibly because they were aware that they had left
a fox in the covert; but, from his stopping, it
might not have appeared to them that a fox had
gone on, or they would not have taken it so
leisurely.

To this, then, do I attribute my escape ; for,
though they did hunt me for a mile or so, the
time was lost, and so too, of course, the scent ;
this, added to the impatience shown by the men
who were out, settled the business for me. An
accident which had lately occurred to Stephen,
the huntsman, by which his foot was injured, pre-
vented him, I conclude, from being every moment
close to the hounds, when these men were 80
anxious to get on, and the huntsman’s presence
was so absolutely necessary to prevent their doing
mischief, However, I had no reason to regret it,
for I went straight across a fine country; though

it was reported that I had returned to the covert,
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 99

which was not likely; I may add, on this
occasion, that I went to the coverts at Comb,
to which place they also came to find another
fox. They did not cross the line I had
come, but passed through part of a large
covert where I had stopped, without drawing
it, expecting to find a fox at the other end
of it. |
Seeing this, I slipped back behind them, and
was stealing away, as I thought, undiscovered
(no uncommon thing for me to do), but, un-
luckily, a man in a red coat had stopped back,
as if on purpose to see any fox that might be
left behind; and as soon as I was out of sight
he gave a loud view-halloo, by repeating which
he brought the hounds after a short time on
to the line of my scent. This caused me to.
lose no time, and having now a good start, I
ran straight through all those large woods until
I got to the end of that near the railway, when
I turned to the right;. and after stopping in
an outside covert for some time, thinking that
I had escaped, I heard the hounds hunting
F 2
100 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

very slowly, till they were quite silent. But I
was soon after surprised to hear the huntsman
taking them across the wood where I was, and
instantly left it in a direction opposite to that
where I had seen all the hunters ride; conse-
quently only a few followed with the hounds
when they hunted me across the river and railway
into the open, beyond Coventry. They ran me
back to near the side of the river, when they were
taken to the other side, which happening to be
towards Leamington, I remained in that part, and
had got so far as Upton Wood. I was found
there a few days afterwards, by the new huntsman
of the Warwickshire hounds and that pack. Hav-
ing previously heard that they had learned much
from Carter, the Duke of Grafton’s late hunts-
man, under whom he had been whipper-in, and
that he had been doing much mischief amongst
us, I lost no time in leaving this large covert, and
was soon followed by the pack, which hunted me
at a fair pace, until they had followed me part
of the way across a dry fallow field. As my

good luck would have it, there was also another
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 101

fallow in the direction which I had gone, straight
beyond. It seems that Stephen, the huntsman,
made one or two casts with his hounds across
each of these fallow fields, without success.
In his anxiety not to lose, I suppose he forgot
that if the hounds could not hunt scent over one
fallow they could not over another. He omitted
to hold the hounds on, and across the next field
of wheat beyond it, and took them back towards
the covert where I came from, and thus it was
that I escaped; for after some remark was made
to him on the subject, he directly took the hounds
back to the field beyond the fallow; they there
got on my line of scent, and after hunting slowly
for a couple of miles, fortunately for me gave it
up; otherwise, the line I had taken was so good
that I might have fallen a victim to this persever-
ing and promising young huntsman. After a
little more experience, he will be a dangerous
enemy of ours.

“ Now, Chester, tell us how ein go on in thy
part of the world, and how thou hast contrived to
escape from that famous hunting pack of hounds,

F 3
102 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

which we are told belonged to the late Mr. Cod-
rington. ‘Tell us, moreover, is it a good hunts-

man they have to hunt them >”
103

CHESTER’S STORY.

As foxes are scarce in our country, I alone could
be found to travel here, and having been hunted
only one season, I am, from my own experience,
but ill qualified to reply to your question, as
to the huntsman. I have as yet escaped from
being hunted by him, but I do hear that he is
in all respects most excellent. Unfortunately for
him, but fortunately for us, he was lately dis-
abled by the fracture of a bone of his leg; and
consequently could not come with the hounds
when they hunted the last week in the Nampt-
wich country. For reasons to be given hereafter,
I had rarely lain in coverts of late, and had
preferred lying in hedge-rows. I happened, how-
ever, to be lying in a covert one day, when I
F 4
104 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

heard the voice of a man who was hunting
hounds which turned out to be Mr. White’s, and
as they were close to me before I heard them,
my only chance was to leave the covert imme-
diately; but in the first field I was met by some
men on horseback who frightened me_ back
again. I was not seen by the hounds, which
ran out of the wood on my scent as far as I had
gone, but were turned back, not without a little
loss of time, which was a favourable occurrence
for me. I went straight through the wood and
away on the opposite side, and soon found that
they were after me. I kept on, but not in a
straight line, which rather puzzled the gentleman
who«was hunting them. They came at length
to a final check, and could hunt no farther. I
thought that if Marden had been hunting them,
there was one cast which he would have made, and
that was to the left of the field where they lost
the ‘scent; for although each of the other sides
were tried by casting the hounds that way twice
over, they were never taken once round beyond
the field to the left; and to this I attribute my
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 105

escape, for I was nearly beaten, and it appeared
that the pack which I found such difficulty in
shaking off and defeating, by turning so short
as I had done during the run, was that which
belonged to the late Mr. Codrington. It. is
stated that they killed every fox that they hunted
during eight following weeks. They are said
not to be compared for beauty to the former
pack, which is reported to have been a magni-
ficent one; but “handsome is that handsome
does.” .

Now, my friends, I will tell you why I prefer
hedge-rows and out of the way places to fix on
for a kennel. Listen to a matter of fact, but a
melancholy story of what took place in a part
of the country where I was bred. It happened
when in a favourite little covert near Namptwich,
that I was attracted by the scent of a bait which
was placed under a large iron trap, carefully
covered over with some light grass and moss;
on attempting to remove these, I unfortunately
struck the trap, which went off and caught me
by the foot. Need I describe the agony I en-

F 9
106 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

dured, confined as I was by the mangled foot?
Day-light appeared, when, nearly exhausted
with pain, I made a desperate effort with my
other fore-foot, and succeeded in pulling out
the peg that confined to the ground the chain
of the trap, which I dragged away for some
distance. I then lay down overcome with pain,
and in this deplorable condition remained for
two or three days and nights. The foot being
now as it were benumbed, and almost insensible,
I in order to save my life fairly bit it off with
my teeth, and thus released myself from the trap.
Not long after this had occurred a more tragical
affair took place in this very same covert. In the
early part of the month of March in the present
year eighteen hundred and forty-three, I was lying,
as was my custom, in a thick and broad hedge,
when late in the day I was much frightened by
the approach of the hounds, passing near me
rather quickly, to my great relief, for it appeared
that they had not found a fox all day. They
immediately begun drawing the covert, and shortly

afterwards a fox was seen with an iron trap fast
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 107

to his fore leg, which was broken above the knee.
In the course of a few minutes the fatal “whoop”
was heard, the signal of his death.

During the tumult which ensued amongst the
gentlemen who had been hunting, an_ honest
farmer, whose land surrounded the covert, came
up, and stated that a short time before he
had found in a field close by a large trap
exactly of the same sort, which had in it two
of a fox’s toes. They belonged to the foot
which I parted with myself. It is impossible
to describe the sensation created by this addi-
tional circumstance; but it caused amongst
other remarks the following, which reached my
ears: “These acts of shocking cruelty were
scarcely ever heard of in this part, till game
became an article of traffic to the landlord, and
shooting on his land began to be let to strangers
who have no interest whatever in the welfare of
the country where it lies. Nothing conduces to
that welfare more than brilliant sport afforded
by a pack of hounds; as it leads others, as well
as those who own estates, to become residents

F 6
108 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

in the country. Noblemen and gentlemen have
now lost their good old English feelings, and
instead of inviting their friends for the sport,
they let their shooting, or sell their game in the
market. It frequently happens that the persons
to whom the shooting is let, are men who are
engaged in business and reside in large towns.
They are consequently ignorant of the tricks
and cruelties of their keepers during their ab-
sence, and unaware of the disappointment these
keepers create to hundreds of gentlemen who
reside in the country, who keep large establish-
ments of horses for the express purpose of hunt-
ing, and whose money might otherwise be spent
in‘more questionable ways in town or elsewhere.”

I have heard the following lines recited by one
who said, that they ought to be put up over
the mantel-piece of every farmer in the king-

dom :—

“ Attend, ye farmers, to this tale,
And when ye mend the broken rail,
Reflect with pleasure on a sport
That lures your landlord from the court,
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 109

To dwell and spend his rents among

The country folk from whom they sprung ;

And should his steed with trampling feet

Be urged across your tender wheat,

That steed, perchance, by you was bred,

And yours the corn by which he’s fed,

Ah ! then restrain your rising ire,

Nor rashly curse the hunting squire.” — Warburton.

“So, Devonian, tell us thy history, for me-
thinks ’twill be something strange.”
110

DEVONIAN’S STORY.

My story must needs be a short one. In my
own country I am called “The Bold Dragoon,”
and as every name either has or ought to have
a particular meaning, I am so called in con-
sequence of having once been in the possession
of a certain captain of dragoons, who lived in
the far West. These are my facts. I was
born and bred in a wild part of Devonshire, and
when a year old fell into the possession of
_ a keeper. To state exactly how such a thing
happened, might sometimes be inconvenient,
as in hunting countries a man scarcely dares
to confess the crime of capturing a fox, for
lucre at least, But here the keeper, thinking

me remarkable for size and strength, car-
THE LIFE OF A FOX. lll

ried me to Captain T——y, who sent me off
immediately as a present to Mr. G. Templar,
the master of a pack of small fox-hounds at
Stover in Devonshire, and I was carried into
a dark and gloomy place, which had been
at first intended for a large stable, and was
above seventy feet in length, and nearly the
same in breadth. Here I was let loose, and
looking about me in my fright, what should I
see but at least twenty other foxes, all coiled
up in the snug holes which they had made
for themselves. Besides these there were others
out of sight. They all took much care to hide
themselves when any man came in. As soon
as he who had brought me there had left
the place, they all came round me. I soon
learnt for what purpose I was brought hither,
for it appeared that each of them had been
separately hunted by this gentleman’s hounds,
which he had brought under such command,
that they scarcely ever killed the fox they
hunted; for when hunting up to him, if a

rider was near enough to make his voice heard,
112 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

and he rated or spoke to them, they would only
bay at him till he was again captured, placed
in a bag, and carried home again.

It rarely happened that not the master nor
huntsman, nor the reverend friend who called
himself first whipper-in, were up at the time,
as they were generally mounted on thorough-
bred horses, which they well knew how to ride.
For myself, it is a well-known fact, that I
have been turned out and hunted by these
hounds eighteen times, though I have striven
hard to get away. On no occasion was I in-
jured by the hounds, and I must do my possessor
justice by stating that he thoroughly under-
stands the nature of all the animals that he had
to manage.

The extraordinary distance which we ran,
when. hunted by these hounds, may be attributed
to our perfect ignorance of the country where
we were turned out, which also accounts for
our not oftener running at once to the imprac-
ticable parts which abound here, and in which

no horses could have followed the hounds. In
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 113

consequence of our knowing none of the coverts,
we often ran straight across Dartmoor, where
the scent was so good, that the pace at which
we were followed by the hounds made it often
most severe work for us; and it became almost
a relief to be taken up and replaced in the
bag, which was carried for that purpose, and
reconveyed to’ our gloomy prison, where we
were well supplied with rabbits and other food.

‘s The various habits of our race were most
apparent. Some would keep quiet in their
kennels, which were holes made by them
in the ground, or where loose stones had
been removed from the bottom of the wall
which surrounded our prison, watching what
was going on; whilst others were constantly
moving about, as if in search of some outlet
for escape. One, whose activity’ was extra-
ordinary, had chosen for his place of rest a
hole in the wall, being the opening intended
for a window, which had been stopped up on
the outside. It was full eight feet from the

ground, and it was surprising, even to us, to
114 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

see him run, with the greatest ease, up the
perpendicular wall, as he daily did, aided by
the roughness of the surface alone.

It now remains for me to explain how I am
here and at liberty. We were one day surprised
by the entrance of our feeder, who brought in
several hampers, in which we were all taken to
be turned out in the adjoining woods, there to
shift for ourselves.

So you see that although I cannot boast of
having beaten a pack of hounds, according to
the tenor of the invitation, I have run away
from them altogether, and am here to do you
service, by proving the error of the arch enemy,
in’ thinking it absolutely necessary for his
hounds to devour the animal they have been
hunting, that their ardour in the chase may be
increased. I have been sorely hunted by them,
my friends, and not until they had won the day,
and run up to their object, did they relax—
not till then were they satisfied.

Again I would ask, why should our enemy

wish to slaughter us, when seeking refuge in
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 115

an earth, up to which his hounds have hunted?
seeing that those hounds so plainly show their
contentment with having succeeded, and done
all that was required of them.

All, “Bravo! bravo! well said, thou bold
Dragoon !”

“Now, Berkshire, we pray thee tell us
whether thou dost like a royal neighbourhood ;
whether thou art safer, and whether thy treat-
ment there is preferable to our own. ‘Tell us all
that thou canst, as thou livest. nearer to those

parts than most of us do.”
116

BERKSHIRE’S STORY.

On that score, my friends, I have not much to
boast of; but having heard that the fair Queen
had taken to herself a consort who rejoiced in
the chace, I resolved to visit the royal forest.
Soon I found that foxes here existed only in
name. Some day in December I was lying in
Windsor Forest about three o’clock in the after-
noon, when I was disturbed by the voice of
Sir J. Cope’s huntsman, Shirley, who was taking
the hounds through the forest to find a fox.
Though so late, he was most persevering, and
appeared determined to learn whether or not
within the purlieus of the forest there was a fox
left alive by the keepers. Seeing this I lost no

time; but when stealing away was viewed by
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 117

some of the hunters. The hounds soon followed
me, and though it was a bad scenting day, I
narrowly escaped. I saw enough of them to
convince me that they were not to be trifled
with, and that a tolerable scent would tax all
my powers to beat them.

It was some years ago that I was lying in
a covert at Billingbeare, when I was startled by
Shirley’s voice. I soon got away from the covert,
thinking that I was not seen, but I was mistaken.
A view-halloo was given, and the hounds were
soon on my scent. I went the best pace I could
straight towards and through the large woods at
Shottisbrook, and onwards in the direction of
Maidenhead Thicket, where I passed through the
middle of a small village. As the hounds had not
been seen or heard, no one was looking out, and
consequently no one saw me, although I passed
through a cottage garden; and it behoves me to
state, that I probably owed my safety to nothing
more dignified than a pig-sty attached to that
garden, and which neutralized the scent ; for the

hounds soon afterwards hunting so far, were
118 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

unable to hunt farther. It was supposed by the
huntsman that I had taken refuge in some of
the buildings, and a search was made; when a
sportsman who was present expressed his sur-
prise to a gentleman well known in the hunt,
that they did not first hold on the hounds be-
yond the village, and make that good first; they
would then have seen whether I had gone on
or not, and if not it would have been time to
come back and try all those places. This hint
was taken, but too late to gain by it, for the
scent, which the hounds had got on again, was
now so cold that they could hunt me but slowly,
instead of going at the pace they had hitherto
gone, and which must have been the death of
me had it been continued but a short time longer.
I went straight on for several miles, until I
reached the Thames near Cookham. I did not
like to cross it, and returned to Bisham Wood ;
by which time, owing to my stopping about in
a part of the wood, the hounds had got very
near to me, when it luckily grew nearly dark;

and though I was seen by them at not more than
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 119

five hundred yards distance, they were stopped
and taken home, and I narrowly escaped from
one of the most dashing. packs in the kingdom.
It is to be hoped by us in this part, that his
Royal Highness Prince Albert will have his com-
mands obeyed by the keepers in Windsor Forest,
and that this pack of hounds will not be driven
elsewhere to find a fox, I now remained for a
short time in a very thick covert, called Pigeon-
House Coppice, through which I passed when
hunted by the hounds.

There is a tragical story connected with this
covert. The hounds many years since had met,
and the gentlemen were all assembled, when the
keeper who had the care of the coverts made his
appearance, and producing a sack in which there
was a fox, told them that unless they gave him
a certain sum of money for it to turn out and
hunt, he would shoot him before their eyes. This
atrocious threat made them all quite furious,
and they refused to give him any thing; on which
this monster in the shape of man immediately

laid the sack which contained the fox on the
120 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

ground, and according to his threat shot him
dead. The rage which was felt by all present it
is impossible to describe. They did not put him
in his own sack and throw him into a pond close

“rr by; but he was soundly horsewhipped and in-
stantly discharged from his place.

A much better feeling towards us now exists
in this part of the country, and I have no longer
a dread of being shot. But it is my intention to
return to my old country, near Billingbeare and
Shottesbrook, as I hear that the keepers there
receive strict orders never to destroy one of us.
This is the more handsome on the part of the
occupier of the latter place, as he is not a fox-
hunter himself. No doubt I shall be suffered to lie
in the coverts of the former, though I find much
of my food at Shottesbrook, where the coverts are
so thin and hollow, that I could not remain there
during the day without many chances of being
disturbed by the keeper’s dogs. I hope at some
future time to be able to tell you that the breed

' of foxes in those parts, and in the royal purlieus,

has so increased that it has been unnecessary for
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 12]

me to risk my life very often with Sir J. Cope’s
fine pack of hounds. It is reported that he in-
tends to pay more frequent visits to these parts in
future, in consequence of having given up the
distant part of the country.

“ And now, Sandy, tell us what is going on north
of Tweed. Be there any hounds there? It is
reported that foxes there are shot like rabbits.
The mountains, it seems, are not to be rode over,

and so no fox-hunting; is it so?”
122

SANDY’S STORY.

Ler me at once undeceive you upon one point.
It is not the mountains there, but the hounds,
that are hard to be rode over, and that on account
of the scent. We have, however, noble lords and
others, who can and do keep with the hounds,
except on the steepest parts of Cheviot. In the
next place, let me pray of you not to believe the
slanderers, who say that we are so unmercifully
slaughtered. No, my friends, it is not so. We
have patrons as good as, if not better than you
have in the South. One gentleman alone has
lately raised, at his own expense, for our sole use,
a score of coverts, which was the only thing re-
quired, as both sides of Tweed, Berwickshire, and

Northumberland, are as fine country as can be
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 123

desired, and, unfortunately for us, as good scent-
ing as any in the kingdom.

It is supposed that, when people can fly thither
by steam, it will become the Melton of the
North ; but I hope the idea will end, as it began,
in smoke. You, my southern friends, appear to
think that we do not go the very fast pace that
you do, and that the hounds by which we are
hunted are not equally as good as those in
your country ; but in this, too, you are much
mistaken. So good is the scent there, that,
if it were not for the drains, which are now so
general in the cultivated parts, the hounds, at
the awful pace they go, would in a very short
time kill nearly every one of us. Then the hunts-
men are not to be despised; on the contrary,
we have to contend with one who, with the
following qualifications, is near perfection,—the
eye of an eagle, fine temper, boldness, enterprise,
coolness, perseverance, intelligence, and, above
all, decision. This is the rare man with whom,
and with whose pack, we have to contend. I am
proud to say that I have been hunted by, and -

G2
124 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

escaped from him, on a good scenting day too, by
taking refuge in the crevice of a rock, after one of
the fastest runs possible for five miles. It began
thus :—One morning early last season, when lying
in a covert, called Bushen Glen, I was startled by
hearing a man riding quickly by. He then sud-
denly stopped, and addressed these few words to
the whipper-in, who brought the hounds.

“ How long have you been here ?”

“ Just come, my lord.”

“1s Mr. Smith here ?”

“ Not yet, my lord.”

“ Well, I never was so thoroughly drenched ;
never rode twenty-four miles in such a deluge;
80, by Jove, I can’t wait. Give me my horse.”

No sooner done, than “Cover hoick!” reached
my astonished ears, and I instantly left my ken-
nel, prepared for a start. In a few minutes, I was
stealing away, and after clearing the wall and run-
ning in the open moor, I passed near the gentle-
man, I suppose, who was expected, and whe, on
seeing me, said not a word. I therefore, thinking

I was unseen, did not turn back to the covert,
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 125

but, laying my ears well back on my poll, took
straight away across the moor, and just had a
glimpse of the hounds and their noble huntsman,
Lord Elcho, topping the wall at the same time.
My flight, however, was too rapid to allow time
for much curiosity. This was enough to make
me go my best pace straight across the moor for
four miles, and then a mile or two beyond, over
fields, till I reached a hanging covert on a steep
by the side of the Whiteadder River, at which
time the hounds were not more than four hundred
yards from me. Although they did not see me,
they ran the whole way as if they really did.
Here, although there was soon another fox or
two moving, they still went on with my scent;
for with the most unerring judgment this hunts-
man kept the pack from changing, till at length
I crossed the river, and over the moor on the
other side to a place of refuge, a crevice in
a rock, for I could not go farther. The gen-
tlemen rode up, and I heard these words:
“Well, I never saw a finer run. During the
first four miles the tail hounds never got to
G 3
126 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

the head at all, though not one hundred yards
behind those that were leading when they first
started.” 7

On other occasions I have saved my life in
a similar way, but a circumstance occurred
which almost made me resolve never again to
resort to a drain. I was one night crossing a
farm, not many miles from Dunse, when I heard
cries as of a fox in distress, and on going to
the spot whence the noise proceeded, I discovered
that two of my brethren were confined in a stone
drain, where they had been several days without
food, and were nearly starved. I used every exer-
tion in my power to scratch away the stones which
had been placed to stop up the entrance, in order
to prevent a fox going into it, as Lord Elcho’s
hounds were .to meet near it next day. For-
tunately Mr. Wilson, the owner of the land,
passed that way, and saw that the ground and
stones had been lately disturbed by me, when
he removed them, and saw the two foxes, one
of which was found dead shortly after. He
ascertained that his man had stopped them in
THE LIFE OF A FOX, 127

nine days before, and that he forgot to open the
drain again.

I once crossed the Tweed at a dangerous part,
thinking that I should, by so doing, leave the
hounds and all behind. Not so; for the hunts-
man was not to be stopped, but swam his
horse, as two or three others did, across the
river; Treadwell, Mr. Robertson’s huntsman,
taking the lead. Having thus crossed the river
without gaining my point, and running in a ring
of several miles, I recrossed the river at a spot
where it was impossible for horses to cross; so
that, being-a long way round, the hounds were
stopped, and it was agreed that I was drowned in
the Tweed.

Having seen some part of the country on the
English side of the Tweed, I determined to
cross back to it; and after being there a short
time only, and lying in a field of large turnips,
not uncommon in this part, I was awakened
by hearing a loud voice: « Treadwell, I wish
you would draw the hounds through this turnip
field. It is a very likely place to find a fox.”

G 4
128 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

This order was obeyed with the utmost silence ;
- but fortunately, having had the previous notice,
I was off and away as fast as my legs could
carry me, and was not seen, owing to the height
of the turnips, until I reached the next field.
The hounds soon got on my scent, and pursued
me closely, for about twenty-five minutes, so
extremely fast, that I began to think I had
changed my country for the worse. Indepen-
dently of their great speed, I could not hear
them, as I did those by which I had been
hunted on the other side of Tweed. I reached
in safety a small covert, in passing through
which it appeared that the hounds got on the
scent of another fox, which turned out to be
a cub, and so I escaped; for although an old
sportsman saw me after I left the covert,
going apparently much distressed, and evidently
the hunted fox'; yet the hounds were not
allowed. to be taken from that which they

were running, which it appeared they some

1 See “ Extracts from the Diary of a Huntsman,” p. 155.
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 129

time afterwards killed, scarcely having left the
covert.

I had one or two more escapes from this deter-
mined huntsman and _ his killing pack, which
escapes I attributed to my good luck in having
been hunted by them on bad Scenting days,
and also in taking refuge in drains. Learning
that many of my friends had been killed by
them, I was induced to move into Roxburghshire,
the country hunted by the Duke of Buccleuch’s
hounds, and adjoining the two hunts before
described to you. There I had not been long,
before I was found in a small covert by the
Duke’s pack, as. Williams, the huntsman, calls
it, though he seems to do just what he likes
with it. Be that as it may, he knew pretty well
where to find me, and it was done in a few
minutes. The hills form a part of the country
that he surpasses most men in riding across ;
and after running over them for some time -
towards the Cheviot, the blue tops of which
seemed at the time to be higher than the clouds,
the hounds came to a check, owing, as it was

G 5
130 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

thought, to my having overtaken some cattle,
and to too much delay in holding on the hounds ;
and I escaped.

- It appeared to me that these hounds had at the
time rather too much flesh, though shortly after-
wards the fault was mended; for I never was
pressed more by any pack in my life. Every
hound seemed to go as if he had the leading
scent. All came nearly abreast for several fields,
and they were close to me when I again took
refuge in a drain. The extraordinary scent just
described induces me to relate the events of that
day from the beginning. A remark was made,
before the hounds had thrown off, by an old
sportsman, as follows. It happened that several
coverts were drawn by the hounds without their
finding a fox, although it was notorious that
foxes had been on every former day most abun-
dant there; on hearing this, the gentleman said,
«J have often observed that on good scenting
days foxes are not to be found, even where they
are known to abound as they do here.”

“ How do you account for that >”? was asked.
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 13]

“Probably on these good scenting days foxes
lie under ground, or in places not disturbed by
hounds ; for as they live by the use of their noses,
they cannot but know their danger of being
hunted on such days.”

The hounds were taken on some distance
towards another covert, but on passing by a
small piece of gorse, not half an acre across, they
were taken quietly to it,.and in a short time
killed a fox which had not moved from his kennel.
This created some amusement at the expense of
a gentleman, who had stated his belief that it
was a good scenting day, and some one said,

“ Now what do you think ?”

“Why that I am now more sure of it: for if
this fox had moved under the circumstances,
when the hounds were so close to him, the scent
being a good one, would have made it almost
certain death; and so his best chance of escape
was to lie still; but he has been too cun-
ning.”

_ Rather more than the hallooing usual when a
G 6
132 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

dead fox is given to hounds took place ; and the
three men appeared to be trying who could often-
est repeat, “Tally-o!” The hounds were again
taken on towards the next large covert; and no
sooner were they in it than they all threw their
tongues and ran as if close to a fox, which was not
the case; for it happened to be my own scent, and
I having heard the dreadful hallooing before de-
scribed, and knowing it to be a good scenting day,
had moved away some time before the hounds
had reached the covert; although the crash they
made there seemed as if close tome. I then ran
as described before, straight to a drain about
three or four miles off; but although I had so
good*a start they nearly overtook me before I
reached it. Waiting near the entrance I over-
heard the following remarks :—

«“ How very unlucky, just as the hounds were
running into him. Such a swift pace they came —
he could not have stood it five minutes longer.”
I then distinctly heard the gentleman alluded
to before exclaim, “ Well! I shall not be surprised
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 133

if there are half-a-dozen foxes in this drain; some-
where they must be.”

Then another voice,—“ Well, Will, what do you
think now of Mr. Smith’s foresay, as to its being
a good scenting day?”

“ My lord, he was right; I never, in all my
life, saw the hounds run so fast ;—faster they
could not go.” He suddenly turned towards the
man who ought to have stopped the drain,—
“ Hoot, mon, how is this? The earth’s open at
yer vary ain door?”

“ Will, where ’s the terrier >”

“ Got none, my lord.”

“ Was ever the like? Seventeen years I have
hunted with these hounds, and though every
field in this country is full of drains, they have
never had a terrier that was worth hanging. Jack,
go and fetch the farmer’s terrier; be off like a
shot! How can they expect to save their poultry,
if they do not put gratings to their drains ? With-
out them, it is impossible for hounds to kill their
foxes.”

Having by this time recovered my breath, I
134 - (HE LIFE OF A FOX.

began to move away from the entrance, when,
to my surprise, I found that there were no less
than three foxes in the drain beside myself; hav-
ing with great difficulty forced myself past the
first I came against, and whilst waiting anxiously
the result, we were all much frightened by sud-
denly seeing a glimpse of light some distance up
the drain beyond us. The men had dug a hole
through the top of the drain at that spot; and
shortly after this we heard them trying to force
a rough terrier, of the real Mackerson breed,
to enter; they at length succeeded; when he
immediately came down straight towards us.
Not a little alarmed, and each of us struggling
and striving to get away first, out we all bolted,
with the terrier close at our heels. The scene
which followed, it is almost impossible to de-
scribe. The first fox was pursued by the
greatest number of hounds, and, as I came se-
cond, the next greatest number followed me; and
so after us they came ; but our sally was so sud-
den that we fortunately had gained the start of

them by some ten or twenty yards.
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THE LIFE OF A FOX. 135

I think I still hear the voice of old Will, crying
out, “ Every hound has got a fox!” As I jumped
over the fence, he was still holding his whip in
the air, undecided which of the four lots (into
which the hounds had divided) he should follow.
So good was the scent on that day, that although
only about four couples of hounds followed me, I
went straight to another drain; and, strange to
say, there found another of the same party as
before, which accounted for the two first lots of
hounds leaving a short time before they ran up to
the earth. Here our lives were again in danger ;
and, hearing the men again digging at some dis-
tance, I profited by what’ had passed, and pushed
beyond it. My unfortunate fellow was again
forced out by the same terrier, and fell a victim
to our foes ; who, not suspecting that another fox
was in the earth; again left me. |

“ Well, Will, do you recollect the foresay about
there being half-a-dozen foxes in the last drain hf

“J do, my lord; and now the gentleman’s
foresays have all been fulfilled from beginning to

end.”
136 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

During the time they were waiting for the ter-
rier at the last drain, and doubting whether he
could be found, a farmer was filling in the stones
at the entrance of the drain, and being asked what
he was about, he answered,—* Why, if the terrier
don’t come, we will starve the fox to death, which
is easy to do in this drain. He has had mony
fowls; about forty I ken.”

“ What’s that?” said the Southron. “ Pretty
sort of encouragement for a gentleman to spend
so much money in the country in keeping hounds.
Why the Duke pays more money to the farmers
in one week, than all the poultry in the hunt
would sell for in a twelvemonth ; to say nothing
of all.that is spent in it by the gentlemen who
hunt. If there were no foxes, there would be no
hounds.”

“ Vary true, vary true,” was the reply; “ but
Mr. Williams is raather too close fisted, when he
pays a bittee o’ the Duke’s siller.”

The worst part of the story, as relates to our-
selves, remains to be told, namely, that when they

left, a hard bargain was going on for the purchase
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 137

of the terrier which had driven us out of our
retreat, and he was to be taken to the kennel for
the same employment when required, which, sure
enough, was often the case. Luckily for me,
he was not with the hounds a short time after,
when I was again found by this pack, as I lay in
a wood, near Fleurs, belonging to the Duke of
Roxburgh, who, though no fox-hunter, is one of
our best friends, and gives his keepers strict orders
never to destroy us. But for the absence of this
terrier I must have been in jeopardy that day; for,
having heard the hounds running after another
fox, I was just stepping away to a drain, close to
the Tweed, in a contrary direction, not before I
was seen, and a few hounds got on my scent,
which they followed until they reached the drain
where I was. On being told of which, old Will,
the huntsman, brought the rest of the hounds to
the spot, determined to get me out. Tools were
procured, and several attempts were made, but in
vain. Some half-bred terriers were then sent for,
but they would not venture near me, nor could

they a second time be urged to go in. Other
138 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

fruitless attempts were made, anda great part of
the morning was lost in this way by a throng of
hunters, and amongst them the noble: master of
the pack. Whilst this was going on, and they
were looking at and admiring the beauties of the
stately river, a large salmon leaped clean out of
the water, as if on purpose to amuse or to tantalize
them. Whereupon, a gentleman present asked
his Grace if it would give him pleasure to have a
throw with a fly for such a fish. His fit reply
might well be a source of satisfaction and pleasure
to all who hunt in countries where his Grace has
property.

“To tell the truth, I care little for that kind
of* sport; but, as to the other, I am never per-
fectly happy unless I have on a red coat.”

All at length left the place, exceedingly annoyed
that the terrier, the hero of the former day, had
not been with them. Probably the bargain for
him was not completed, and, consequently, I
escaped.

Wishing to return to my old haunts, I had

got as far as a covert, called the Hursel, belong-
THE LIFE OF A FOX: 139

ing to Lord Hume, where I had not been long
when one day I heard two reports, which turned
out to be from the keeper’s gun, discharged
at two innocent young fox-hound puppies, thus
deliberately butchered for having strayed by
chance from the hospitable home of the kind mis-
tress whose pets they were, and whose gentle
care and caresses they had so often enjoyed. You
will not be surprised, when I tell you that our
race appears to be almost extinct about these
woods.

After this tragical event, I lost no ‘time, but
went to the farthest covert belonging to this
estate, and nearly surrounded by Lord Elcho’s
country. I hoped to be there as far as pos-
sible from danger, and thought myself secure, as
the outside covert was kept quiet, and scarcely
disturbed even by the hounds of the Duke in
whose hunt it is retained. It is suspected that
the keeper kills all of us foxes that he can in that
part, because no hounds hunt it enough. He says,
that all the foxes in Lord Elcho’s country come
there to be quiet. Be that as it may, the last time
140 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

the hounds found me there, they had before
drawn all the other woods, and only found one
fox, and that a mangy one. I was disturbed first
by hearing old Will cheering his hounds, as if he
had just seen a fox, giving his cheer thus, “ Hooi-
here, here, here!” which, in any other country,
would pass for a view-halloo,

After listening and expecting to hear the
hounds in full cry, I found it was only his cus-
tomary cry in drawing a whin covert, parti-
cularly when he wished his hounds to get into
it. I noticed that they did not attend to the
halloo so readily when a fox was really seen.
Notwithstanding this, they understood their
huritsman’s system well enough to make it no
safe thing to be hunted by them. I soon left
the covert, and when they had pursued me
for some miles, and were getting nearer to
me, they suddenly came to a check; on look-
ing back, I saw the huntsman almost imme-
diately take them away beyond the next large.
field, rather to the left of where my line was

hitherto pointing; I suppose either because there
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 141

was a flock of sheep in that field, or because
he thought I had gone to a covert in that direc-
tion. If the hounds had had their time, they
would have hit off the scent to the right of
the field. The upshot was, that I, thinking that
they had given me up, took the first oppor-
tunity of getting out of sight, not because I
was tired and beaten, as some suppose must
always be the case when we seek such places
of refuge; which they soon ascertained was the
case, for nearly as soon as the hounds had hunted
up to the drain on one side of the road, I started
off on the other; and though they had as good a
start with me as they could wish for, I contrived
to run away from them, owing to the scent not
being good enough for hounds to kill a stout fox
without assistance; and probably to the hunts-
man repeating his former mistake in making an
injudicious forward cast, when not wanted. He
did not now venture to hold the hounds for-
ward and across the line I came, or else they
would have got on the scent, as I returned

nearly the same way, which was ascertained by a
142 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

hunter on his return home, a man having seen
me.

Having escaped from this lively pack of
hounds, I did not venture to remain in this
part ; but at once took up my abode near Foulden,
where I was again found by Lord Elcho and
his pack, though I fancied I had selected an
out of the way spot near the river: Whiteadder,
with which part I was well acquainted, as
his lordship has reason to know and to regret.
After they had hunted me some time, finding
myself distressed, I was induced to return to
my old haunts, creeping along a narrow track,
by the side of the steep and rocky bank which
overhung the river, the height of which, where
I passed, was nearly a hundred feet. Several
of these high-couraged hounds, in attempting
to follow me, lost their footing, fell to. the bottom,
and were killed. It was only strange that a
single hound escaped ; and though I certainly did
not intend to assist in preventing their destruc-
tion, yet such happened to be the case; for

having waited, when in my narrow track, for
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 143

some time, and thinking myself safe, I heard
the piercing ery of a hound, which I then be-
lieved was following me. I ran straight along
the. top of the.precipice, and was seen by the
whipper-in and some of the hounds, and the
noise they instantly made by hallooing a view
with all their might, assisted by his lordship
blowing his horn, attracted the notice of the
other hounds, or they would otherwise have
followed on the line to certain destruction. . I
attribute my escape to the powerful effect this
event had on the feelings of the owner of the
pack. Lest I should again lead them back to
the same spot, he immediately took them off my
scent and sent them home, and I flattered my-
self that we should never again see these hounds
run to find a fox in this part of the country;
for the anguish created in his lordship’s mind it
is impossible for me to describe, although it may
be easily imagined.

However, all my hopes of living a quiet life
here were destroyed. . A great friend of his lord-
ship’s, and of ours, Mr. Wilkie, of Foulden, near
144 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

where this occurred, and on whose rabbits I
sometimes subsisted, immediately took measures
to prevent the same calamity from happening
again; and although it was hitherto pronounced
an impossibility, he has, as far as I at present
can judge of it, succeeded. It was managed by
cutting away my narrow track at the edge of
the rock which overhung the river. To do this
required much labour and risk; but it was
effected by suspending a ladder, which was
fastened by strong ropes to stakes driven in the
ground some distance above. I need not say
that I watched the work with no great satisfac-
tion; and as I saw the foundation of my once
favorite track fall into the river below, when they
gradually broke it away, it made my heart ache.
I felt that I must now either stay and be killed,
or move into another country. I decided on the
latter.

Although I vowed, in an. hour of distress,
when first hunted by the hounds there, never to
run the risk of them again if I escaped, | re-
crossed the Tweed into England, and have taken
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 145

up my quarters on one of the highest parts of
the Cheviot Hills, hoping to find a safe retreat
from them. There are, however, dangers to be
dreaded there, as well as in every country where
hounds are not kept to hunt us: but the system
of destruction to be dreaded by me is one that
1s adopted on mountainous parts alone. The
shepherds of the mountains, on certain days,
gather together against us, armed with guns,
and aided by dogs of all sorts, from the grey-
hound to the colly. The sagacity and docility
of the latter are very astonishing; but the saga-
city of an old dog of the fox-hound sort is
superior to that of every other. The colly dog:
is taught by man what to do, whilst the old
fox-hound teaches his master. Had it not. been
for the sagacity of the hound, I should have
been spared many a perilous run. The shep-
herds pretend that the breed of the mountain
fox is of a different kind from our own, and that
the head of the male is larger. For my own part,
I believe the animals to be of the same kind as
ourselves, and to be merely larger altogether ;

H
146 THER LIFE OF A FOX.

for I have sometimes met one in my rambles.
Their superior size may be accounted for as
follows: having been born or bred in the whole-
some air upon the mountains, where food, such
as rabbits, is probably scarce, they find and
fatten upon sheep which from various accidents
die there. Having once got a taste for such
food, it is not surprising that they will take a
lamb, or attack an old one which has fallen
through illness or neglect. Anxious as I am
to protect my own race, I cannot blame the
shepherds for waging war against the transgres-
sors; as it is known that when once a fox has
taken to such a habit he seldom gives it up
but with his life. Felons are to be found every
where; but, as to ourselves, the following facts
will prove that the generality of us are not
guilty of charges frequently laid upon us. On
the first day of February last, being the last
day of pheasant shooting, I was lying in a thick
plantation, in the middle of a park, at Lady
Kirk, on the other side of the Tweed, and which

covered a space of ground not more than a
THE LIFE OF A FOX. 147

quarter of an acre, when a party were shooting
not far off, and I suddenly heard one of them
exclaim, “ Look out, there goes a fox; he jumped
up close by me. There he goes, straight away.
I wish the hounds were here.”

In the course of an hour after this, I was again
startled by hearing, “ Tally-o! tally-o! there goes
another fox! Don’t mistake him for a hare, and
shoot him; he’s close to you, in the clump be-
tween!” And then again the same loud voice,
— There he goes, right across the park; what a
fine fellow he is!”

It shortly afterwards became my turn to exhibit.
They came to the clump where I was, and a man °
who went in beyond directly called out, “There
goes a hen pheasant; there go two, three!” and
so on. He had just cried out, “That makes
thirteen hen pheasants!” when a spaniel rushed
into the thick bushes, and obliged me to face the
whole party. A glorious cheering they gave me;
and when they had expressed their surprise and
satisfaction, the keeper assured them of his belief,
that there were as many pheasants left as had

H2
148 THE LIFE OF A FOX.

been there at the beginning of the season, except-
ing those that had been shot by sportsmen. Now
if I, or any of us, were so much given to destroy
game as we are reported to be, there would not
have been a pheasant left alive in a week’s time
from the beginning of the season, whereas it was
now nearly the end of it. This fortunately oc-
curred in the presence of several persons, who
saw allthree of us. No less than five other foxes,
from the same park, have been killed by Lord
Elcho and his pack this season.

Hoping that I have given you all sufficient
encouragement to induce you to make us a visit

~ in the north, I conclude my story.
149

CONCLUSION.

One more friend was about to begin his story.
Whether he was from York, Lincoln, Notting-
ham, or Bedfordshire, was not ascertained, for on
a sudden we were startled by the cawing of an
old crow and the screams of a jay, which, added
to the chatterings of a couple of magpies, warned
us that daylight was appearing; and I was reluc-
tantly obliged to request that his story might be
deferred to some future time, should we ever meet
again, when we might all have more to relate
concerning the inexhaustible subject of our lives.
Chanticleer now clapped admiring wings, and
sang out a loud applause. This excited the
particular notice of one of our party, who ex-
claimed, “I’ll go round and have a sly bite at
150 CONCLUSION.

his tail, for "tis a quiet retired place, and no one
yet about.”

“Take heed,” said I, “that thou bring us not
into trouble.”

Soon afterwards we were again interrupted by
the clamour of those tell-tale birds; for it seems
that our friend was returning without his intended
booty, having been seen by the keeper, who fast
approached towards us. Therefore, hastily bid-
ding adieu until we should meet again, we all

returned to our favorite coverts.

THE END.

lh iaiatiaerdieialeciddenienaieiillinmiarerencemmnainticitentnerianlooninne
Gruzert & Rivineton, Printers, St. John’s Square, London.
Also recently published by the same Author,
EXTRACTS

FROM THE

DIARY OF A HUNTSMAN.
By T. SMITH, Esa.

LATE MASTER OF THE PYTCHLY HOUNDS.

In 8vo, with Lithographic Illustrations, drawn on Stone by the
Author.

Second and Cheap Edition. Price 10s. 6d.



“ Every man, we say it advisedly, whether master of hounds,
one who rides up to them, the huntsman, the whips, nay, the very
earth-stoppers and feeders, all may derive information and in-
struction from this book, which is from no less an authority than
Thomas Smith. Smith, undoubtedly, is a common enough name;
and it so happens that there have been two Thomas Smiths,
whcse names are immortalised as out-and-out fox-hunters, There
was Thomas (Asheton) Smith, who used to hunt the Quorn, and
Thomas Smith—the man with whom we have just now to do—
who was for some years master of the Craven.

“This gentleman has put his admirable instructions—for such
they really are—into the modest form of ‘Extracts from the
Diary of a Huntsman ;’ but with all this modesty there is not a
chapter that may not be well and profitably read. Above all, the
feeling that obviously pervades the work cannot be too strongly
inculeated. The writer is most anxious to restore a love of the
good old sport of fox-hunting, in preference to the absurd modern
fancy for mere hard-riding, in defiance of sport and every thing
else but the personal vanity of a few puppies, who have no brains
to lose even if they should happen to break their heads,”—
Morning Post.

“ This work, which we must premise is invaluable to a sports-
man, has just come under our notice, and realises all we have
heard of its intrinsic worth ; for without the frippery of studied
composition, the author treats his subjects with the hand of a
master, and in a style at once short, sharp, and decisive,”—Bell’s
Life in London.

“ The value of this work must be increased by the author’s
great success in our country. It is full of original matter. The
hunting terms, and a sketch of a cast when hounds are at check,
and also pictures of a fresh and tired fox, &c., are most valuable.”
—Northampton Herald.
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describe
Invalid character
'6332' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBK' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
cefe8e7526c8203511cfe0f466512286
b2adad4cfa88c05b3c2b0149ef8226e957731bd3
'2011-11-14T23:10:36-05:00'
describe
'1624217' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBL' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
16140c097f4e27cc271a1208fc6b5d23
46139897dc4489d53cccd51eba85a0e1049a0000
'2011-11-14T23:10:46-05:00'
describe
'72974' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBM' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
1965513aefcec4cee203d216726b3c42
9a7674f0f846d9a1322f73c874b144235b85400e
'2011-11-14T23:06:53-05:00'
describe
'2681' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBN' 'sip-files00005.pro'
5b3193eb04f343a026ebd239b7457544
1094edeeae8f45a80433c16c97d5aaf14d5cc8e0
'2011-11-14T23:11:02-05:00'
describe
'21556' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBO' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
3e9a75ba3a7da88c899bad490a2fe085
c6b01b5afbf0a0d02f42c3d9fe4a0620f7f0e3c0
'2011-11-14T23:09:47-05:00'
describe
'13006187' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBP' 'sip-files00005.tif'
5c93be4dde617a12064d6f565e5594d4
33e4e663b6f6e7d00c941de7a4b83c8a353f1916
'2011-11-14T23:07:04-05:00'
describe
'473' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBQ' 'sip-files00005.txt'
9294f84634d4eeda2aae506a6cbab3b3
1baa06785fa39b17a988d032c92b78589ab5177d
'2011-11-14T23:10:51-05:00'
describe
'7395' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBR' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
226c51fa15e6283d482396c3cc8c3a73
3823fd4927590ef223788da20bdbed6f06efb339
'2011-11-14T23:10:45-05:00'
describe
'1434787' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBS' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
6a18fb2fdc2274d9094461ee78b89e7e
9e35581da538e5551c2b9384c2f6dcc8065c52a6
'2011-11-14T23:07:23-05:00'
describe
'53114' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBT' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
5a23e2e9ef1c3b1ff9d0273150804a65
0de283f1b3318317695feea21fe529be4bb1732c
'2011-11-14T23:06:29-05:00'
describe
'4149' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBU' 'sip-files00006.pro'
619714d8744122c343e1c98826c352bb
73d5ebd5c2bc5d17d9325eaad14dcf90a2733419
'2011-11-14T23:08:33-05:00'
describe
'14418' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBV' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
0b5babf52387aca896800d12c7b5b6bb
9cf850410c7bd22b605bb48acf22eb270a5facb4
'2011-11-14T23:07:16-05:00'
describe
'11490833' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
45c795a04e3a64d11eaf7c69e3e356ee
a7c2dec3975829a8acde37324fac2a7f24c782e3
describe
'220' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBX' 'sip-files00006.txt'
32e34ef61f944dab5eb98822553d6f28
ededafbdc7f77d7d89379bac4f3104cb38a40b27
'2011-11-14T23:09:04-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4910' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBY' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
8b5382051bf25f175f0a1b161a34d490
4f2fe9ad2811af7d461501df9502199d29b571e2
'2011-11-14T23:10:22-05:00'
describe
'1637403' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABBZ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
dfcf971cb81fdad606baad6e8f8acc0f
3b18e5fa2ad92593369c15d412f682b6cb91d671
describe
'66078' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCA' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
cf95129110f63466d429a27cacf6b71a
f5c08b1e7cb77972934a66da9c3dd8936f09837e
'2011-11-14T23:09:59-05:00'
describe
'6819' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCB' 'sip-files00007.pro'
255cc2481c08df30e26271e0f75ff9c5
0f96cba6c5090dd1a0c93ba5804fc863538704b5
'2011-11-14T23:07:52-05:00'
describe
'18437' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCC' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
bad6a793da40a40cc1d6c4075248b3fb
9b9988631d8134876af749252bb0838e82c9c706
'2011-11-14T23:05:51-05:00'
describe
'13111743' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCD' 'sip-files00007.tif'
86e72ef8426894d930498e26b6af9cbc
18a6321496b102d07bc594ad7d4b65586823059e
'2011-11-14T23:07:21-05:00'
describe
'596' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCE' 'sip-files00007.txt'
6782d080123b9f8c7d52214e5afa303f
1a5115b398ce6314232d8e9862de4d2ae55d4898
'2011-11-14T23:09:44-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6146' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCF' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
834000eb1c6ddfcb620956747c54e5b4
676f3ddb3ac7d6c978f5ddefe509378a6fc7c710
describe
'1416918' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCG' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
d24a038713db293c0c7fdd29ac26ed34
97e7d18f20afca5a1de9438a7c08c5370d22e724
'2011-11-14T23:06:05-05:00'
describe
'42708' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCH' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
6f93e9b7c4ca1574f65ce89ef5a49f42
6c6b64fbd84fc8e51c022aea9d91eb742236a918
describe
'6686' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCI' 'sip-files00008.pro'
8b5ae467f55d35daec5b68d9f2f36ef4
2eef9b3b2098f3a0e35b646f96759479d6368fc7
'2011-11-14T23:08:52-05:00'
describe
'11990' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCJ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
71a76822181f042b9293f66cd3860603
d0311e6cc2209e57d0de8b50b5590041135fbd55
'2011-11-14T23:06:26-05:00'
describe
'11349071' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCK' 'sip-files00008.tif'
3453b5dfa2a94f2d218f151cb6039c5b
4b149edc48e031eaf7628d5a40d245b8a1ed8b4e
'2011-11-14T23:08:53-05:00'
describe
'353' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCL' 'sip-files00008.txt'
bd4f80af3b1ca1c2e7956f65216f68a6
a06ad8946ede1cf8d4e54dc338519be89c721626
'2011-11-14T23:06:47-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4319' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCM' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
771ff5c4bfa068d427c7098fef5cb0e5
b7fa8f0ad09a8d676584893baabb282b4c54aa1f
'2011-11-14T23:06:44-05:00'
describe
'1335260' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCN' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
cbf634c9d843df109683857dbc0c2d77
b3fe8d892dfddadd564edd432ab369f36df9c8c4
'2011-11-14T23:10:50-05:00'
describe
'20279' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCO' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
5dbc20946aad5ad20711cbaceb85ab7d
a1986440beff5d9f428411ee4836b08852799aae
'2011-11-14T23:10:04-05:00'
describe
'418' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCP' 'sip-files00009.pro'
bb85fb8965a96e2c669749667bb8b04f
351889ee242bf211cbd382bf64c75a6d500b9296
'2011-11-14T23:08:24-05:00'
describe
'5459' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCQ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
0f3609da08ac34d039c5c63ceac55563
4bee752cba9dbbe2ad0ae6975a0a23e96703151f
'2011-11-14T23:07:18-05:00'
describe
'12961441' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCR' 'sip-files00009.tif'
0f1345c58435cc9fd8f65f6e5c8ac73a
7cbd30d039a135d9bb6a7e2c93e3f50396f480a0
'2011-11-14T23:07:43-05:00'
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCS' 'sip-files00009.txt'
54db12cbe9abbe0cb56b93faf30a6de7
3628dbf32c7edb27e50787343237b2002c2d1047
'2011-11-14T23:07:51-05:00'
describe
'2069' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCT' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
403ef4911276a745241d5b04f20a9fa7
2606d630b1f98f8cf342b93b5500d84486a6a454
'2011-11-14T23:06:00-05:00'
describe
'1225293' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCU' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
45afbcc47c16ef13def09815253a6bf9
f1ea03b6d9fdcc2234f38de471f91095a1fe77fb
'2011-11-14T23:10:34-05:00'
describe
'39545' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCV' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
f82e2b81561808f768bdcf55a7a3555b
cbf1e22c27503699a5d7a1084f2d1530484dfc24
'2011-11-14T23:09:56-05:00'
describe
'12011' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCW' 'sip-files00010.pro'
c74deaa9e86155ca2d16bfc642a379a3
fc226a11654da53cd49eadfa2c40daf192514b12
'2011-11-14T23:06:40-05:00'
describe
'13796' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCX' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
5b1cc4b397781e62fd09bb45aed72ce7
2536797e0c04bf6f8acd77190d1490fdd3eddcda
describe
'11187359' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCY' 'sip-files00010.tif'
ae24aa6aafd45d3d9cde2315783f9c4e
b36f6743a3de3234c41e7de265eb86aa59ac0dc3
'2011-11-14T23:10:41-05:00'
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABCZ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
4fbdafff59c2866f9b320c867ac48d59
90535bf8dcfbf3697333420893c163aed3973023
'2011-11-14T23:07:33-05:00'
describe
'5489' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDA' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
22d3f4be9690905753f635ab5fa718d8
4cc930e53d6221b4150bb47a30fa5cbf41fdb251
'2011-11-14T23:11:01-05:00'
describe
'1023970' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f683edf64eaba1065335a9c1b3813a8e
a3893b0b28877bbb4afbe8abd42ae09f9e183615
'2011-11-14T23:07:37-05:00'
describe
'18092' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
0b2e9e57afc60d6d7d541812d6110624
b59ab257438b1a019f0dd52fd8bb2fbbd38c87d8
'2011-11-14T23:10:33-05:00'
describe
'363' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDD' 'sip-files00011.pro'
994ee7cbae2b00d5dbcb8259a9c628f9
b1bb5fc220b213ee35f4327660ee0a455831d5f5
'2011-11-14T23:06:27-05:00'
describe
'5234' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
e38aa5820d18ce7f1bc4e38cbf0aa7db
f689995b71743549882e9c64c40885e91493c0b1
'2011-11-14T23:05:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDF' 'sip-files00011.tif'
ca2d932b6bcfb01f17da8ec275449627
415319b63cfba8de25a354948f5b784ba3b18aa2
'2011-11-14T23:05:58-05:00'
describe
'150' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDG' 'sip-files00011.txt'
b9e875d0b57022ee32fb858a6606dc93
b420aa5a0310969f7d0f6dcfb6f4234ab372529b
'2011-11-14T23:06:18-05:00'
describe
'1959' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDH' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
5e9e167ce5e0f7a503c9adac00d6955c
97cbebaa9ef7d717c31bbe58a3631b7a1e98b41e
'2011-11-14T23:10:30-05:00'
describe
'1399967' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDI' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
3b76207d9df1325a2e3184b85e96fc99
112b0d86b9542a9527abcf3063727e9349362265
'2011-11-14T23:09:27-05:00'
describe
'49695' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDJ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
e8f94ecf48f20d835ea34959b612a483
fb7f36004bc2f2eba77e778d30d41e3bde2ccfcc
'2011-11-14T23:06:37-05:00'
describe
'14221' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDK' 'sip-files00012.pro'
45bae01c99e89b99e57417bc84937033
8a2515274faf39a87c660103881f856402a075d5
describe
'17048' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDL' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
88a295b750b0b7dabe594862ea968582
5a9067192f7b2cf2e28f4a15ca914e75f7960be3
'2011-11-14T23:07:41-05:00'
describe
'11211881' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDM' 'sip-files00012.tif'
ec70601088b34b33c9daf6d713b3cd87
a7afcd1695020221ad872f8b2ea60bf95734cecd
'2011-11-14T23:06:46-05:00'
describe
'643' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDN' 'sip-files00012.txt'
106e517eb88c6dabb11c7d2c8a977fa0
eb94db518e9b62338c822c3eb8844e62edaf761f
'2011-11-14T23:08:56-05:00'
describe
'6281' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDO' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
b4dc0c6f7b245474f042368b04a7fd5d
6c9b050d4167dfae468f64ff1b221a4799e38bdd
'2011-11-14T23:09:01-05:00'
describe
'1518248' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDP' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
1aae5b693ceddfa2fedf88aa699b98d6
da48dd8bface1a16723debbc823d67cd50ff9617
describe
'73101' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDQ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
f18ace9499e5aef642e4ef3949879444
d2f218e85d94846d3b7bdd25276206100d81523a
'2011-11-14T23:09:03-05:00'
describe
'28158' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDR' 'sip-files00013.pro'
b4e74189eb78c11387adf1cb898878ae
8c495e71b2802e6ab33eb98459793cf12b580fc4
'2011-11-14T23:07:31-05:00'
describe
'25808' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDS' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8e801805474f643a0e61a0e6f2e4abf3
dc3d87e71089cbdf646caf7f1cda6fa0e013a083
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDT' 'sip-files00013.tif'
545771a8a1acd62cacdfef3313f94647
a31027eca16034e78041e58cd11c4e87086943f1
'2011-11-14T23:09:26-05:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDU' 'sip-files00013.txt'
d15d6d7124965f742f268e301beba034
9dd2b38dfeb6825fee2e8b318ba9a518579697a4
'2011-11-14T23:08:54-05:00'
describe
'8690' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
189324d9fb988e61f756e580fa0e6f0c
4f3ee00c3fa6d4aab0df5177be8848edf9224274
'2011-11-14T23:05:48-05:00'
describe
'1406751' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDW' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
42e7f73b30c537e1121ecf9f3fced66c
f94b7b51169ac04f27186f9f0cf2c90fb148f2b8
'2011-11-14T23:06:32-05:00'
describe
'75926' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDX' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
6170c251bc07b4c79be4bac472b0d2b6
058034407d82780b9a29082c33128b866ec690a8
'2011-11-14T23:09:29-05:00'
describe
'29797' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDY' 'sip-files00014.pro'
d5376261e2b73d331a8adaffa1b92bbf
8db557742fbb5ea2af02972aeddf9ac4e3c635d7
describe
'27419' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABDZ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
533de105069179fe42b7053bd2afafd3
379cd7e4b59d9549205660be05cd4215ca8f9e19
'2011-11-14T23:09:09-05:00'
describe
'11266265' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEA' 'sip-files00014.tif'
bc30789e8c5f7e77382d1a4f27db6d4c
848beb43f27a166073014d8a22ebbad29774434f
'2011-11-14T23:07:26-05:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEB' 'sip-files00014.txt'
6051a283ccb2ed4c3926b31db46f9781
9c3d8efe5f4be6f29b0e6dbda431d877ca735b28
describe
'9868' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEC' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
7d1f0914d1420abdcc9a8fbd16d8e747
56be53e204a0c39dfb007652d0c213d55173e163
'2011-11-14T23:10:26-05:00'
describe
'1518241' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABED' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d54a4480bb61875fe2dab28640c7ce95
41b415845d4ea0b22a09d1c1683facb1563fed23
'2011-11-14T23:06:11-05:00'
describe
'72127' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
3576f5f20f6c92bd35b2309b31ef9b13
f21ca27b268c506c076cf065ee2144418c6d8209
describe
'28936' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
3fc8ca6468a42164eef82611d80c3984
a8cfab7bf08e5b0f56253e433c2586a4dbe08ef3
'2011-11-14T23:08:11-05:00'
describe
'25008' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
ee3b5e650062396b7355f515898411c2
79baaa17d7964f41d7dd35a9f684c7c3d4cf9510
'2011-11-14T23:07:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEH' 'sip-files00015.tif'
7417f17b005b8b642822b4d903ffe0e1
23c211aae13e384cdc14dca7842be6013e172095
'2011-11-14T23:09:55-05:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEI' 'sip-files00015.txt'
6ec55022ebe18466300e397763d928d6
969fd29e3fdbb10ba7008f164faaa6574743a03b
describe
'8673' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEJ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c16332928dbaad61ac7112875803fa90
9fd9fdb5a008f6cf2b66c24aef5a7e46df4d3829
'2011-11-14T23:09:49-05:00'
describe
'1284315' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEK' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
2e070cbcbaf158cdad6c50f480e680fd
13b12579eed537d34207de736c0bf386c1b86ed2
'2011-11-14T23:07:46-05:00'
describe
'27728' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
0b030875c18b6cc67a1339f71fac5cc4
018f5c60485dffe23adc69941eacb00430b293c3
'2011-11-14T23:06:23-05:00'
describe
'6408' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEM' 'sip-files00016.pro'
e58faced520319be9b84a4b487a9fd86
a978b5811bfe29e659031309ce9a23bb6ed0aa1e
'2011-11-14T23:08:21-05:00'
describe
'8652' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEN' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
a2eaf2da44c431310744fe38c43c7b71
4c1ad3f0ccbe20185794e00687e5ec48232fd002
describe
'12241291' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEO' 'sip-files00016.tif'
8eaf764f545dfe36061a56dd64303566
60c651d2f83d77b070de4c76158deafe6459954f
'2011-11-14T23:05:40-05:00'
describe
'360' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
6d93eefe9c27b2123ade9d98902fefe9
e9816c8c6a040bc4fe4fc5da7d3482abe590de20
describe
'3136' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEQ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
83c93b584229bd63a60240af48dd4c1d
038373db63c617fcf95224da0c92fdb235c6f6c8
describe
'1129732' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABER' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
4aad2ceccfdac34731071c0f2410ef75
1a57e1b886aa844acbad8a403f419cf55f487211
'2011-11-14T23:06:12-05:00'
describe
'17572' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABES' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
09b6ef93a6b82a4243b431490170535e
5d33ddeafac271330dbcdd28b15d1bd837e93db9
'2011-11-14T23:06:10-05:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABET' 'sip-files00017.pro'
00d612b803b076741ff54905ce083a12
c75a9914151712b29e9e89a369babdcb4fa0dc74
describe
'4655' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEU' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
c98b7d839b3465ab59a52abc6accf90b
938fee14f4696bd6dbb397bbeeb3cbebdd6da3c9
'2011-11-14T23:10:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEV' 'sip-files00017.tif'
742dc54c96b77ca6aec12cfbf9aa5a79
e11173371a116dad65894c262f489f8c13d27de4
'2011-11-14T23:07:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-11-14T23:06:54-05:00'
describe
'1808' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEX' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
c6dc7f004df8136819086f5103cd8f0c
a07cbdc67a4648008a7a27505da7f832db312cb0
'2011-11-14T23:06:45-05:00'
describe
'1291783' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEY' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
30e24d4eb870767f1b8f314419d58168
b2126f8605af0fbd94f3073d44690d72c2b4dbc3
'2011-11-14T23:08:07-05:00'
describe
'34264' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABEZ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
6a58fdaf63a68411e4e6cfe940dd47bc
1b549ad46dda6ab4c9a809a1f907cc7a6b6c7530
'2011-11-14T23:10:02-05:00'
describe
'13863' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFA' 'sip-files00018.pro'
fbaf9e525daf15c6d410b9e1461777a5
90252d406dad0ace675fbd8b5f6732f54d64b68f
describe
'11218' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFB' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
7b528efc3943c7966a6c4b3d4f72284d
7a2f9eea47e4412b67df6625c4671c09210261d0
describe
'11278619' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFC' 'sip-files00018.tif'
dfc5569f3b6d68e552e60005233e0740
d7f1f20d2f605e4dd74a298b7708d325d4cf2ede
describe
'728' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFD' 'sip-files00018.txt'
514ea76d88d985c0424be5ab037f4179
7e1850073ebfaf1cfacd606d083506468d301329
describe
'4209' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFE' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
4e476ebf3f9a81e8b6559405a4a82fb7
8ca6120642043d6a88fb6bbff6446d0dd9aab147
'2011-11-14T23:10:24-05:00'
describe
'1088438' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFF' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
991b7bf55c533aca0ce595e2b11ea7da
c4db3b5c40474ae7e0716afb668b9baf9d1df5e8
describe
'16746' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFG' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
338eb16d2bec9932ba55c459cf938d59
ea6bff32ca41402820c1ea7a0f11e3c4aa1da250
'2011-11-14T23:09:18-05:00'
describe
'284' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFH' 'sip-files00019.pro'
b6324a88d11b334379a943806f94f373
18c119f6dd84b02fc871337755b07cc1bd59beb8
'2011-11-14T23:05:53-05:00'
describe
'4369' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
3208c3893263547488f5a40af58f74e8
01d157566e6896caccba4bd3d67655f45d020f24
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
5dd5c5934a89de9cece19c000fe0b19e
6af1a566d6fd339c335d02d1a3b37b1af1b0e311
'2011-11-14T23:08:51-05:00'
describe
'180' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
d9b1b6761d4d343a0dde36fa976888a9
ed78ec068600b3df0353a481d0a68b55d47c27aa
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFL' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
246a244af3081bf38ce8477d5b50b3f2
b8055d8a9053630bbd90994a5d7197d425521317
'2011-11-14T23:06:07-05:00'
describe
'1595604' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFM' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
b787befd8bf50780de1611d481b1f7e2
397d0518ddc722cca0896aa43ed77bf8c838a61e
'2011-11-14T23:10:31-05:00'
describe
'52293' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFN' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
dbf8f952605c59ed71fcd53f48f135d0
d8345bc03222661cd4ef051361995b6b7f34480e
describe
'11375' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
d0f412b913233e9f43df382767ad6280
67eb750c430459797d26122fe04d618b9eb873aa
'2011-11-14T23:06:31-05:00'
describe
'16479' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFP' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
6312dca7980a56490451c5a170538c5b
ca1c862e8921cf7302d8db6f1a47030dc5130bcd
describe
'12778355' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFQ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c1e934906a175341c689d766b8c3853a
6e8b8011f117869e1dc18eecd156e932826ff3fa
'2011-11-14T23:08:23-05:00'
describe
'531' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFR' 'sip-files00020.txt'
ad36289ca2247bb8bb9b5343212d41d7
8afd99279add05681721b3146cfcc0d406e4a862
describe
'5717' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFS' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
89a27704b6ef4449100024ed09c1224c
363daa5d823663671c9c277bce11f301a4712033
'2011-11-14T23:08:13-05:00'
describe
'1518229' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
3ed9f4eb4c664a25253673ef2a5a82c9
7cc67953d1d64a4119f119bdcff4bfd945f8e105
'2011-11-14T23:10:12-05:00'
describe
'72761' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFU' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
91d85352e0b0af3899fbd1b13e1dfa3f
9bc34fd57622c2d4d898a91544c387e72930106c
describe
'28087' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFV' 'sip-files00021.pro'
0405ab654ee403fb224a419692d4a8f3
c198f99f6ec84d4a265aa16a9aa79357514630b8
'2011-11-14T23:06:16-05:00'
describe
'27550' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFW' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
b46313b1e4efafe34dbc5c041a156fc6
c5dc5e586b8557561fc773d1c29f78d4f41fe25f
'2011-11-14T23:09:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
e13d94269eb9a28a2c7f5c2a1bf3cbe3
c90b963817552a0dca4c9bba4c4ba6e011bdeb7a
'2011-11-14T23:08:27-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
a50a14c3fd0dd1e1ee58cc93adcee39c
a5725950c529d9c8347b44c87dcfffb02c5e2380
describe
'8821' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABFZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
36870546922276d2a3ece90cbe2fa4ed
e98415f978c020e14538ef3c069ac27a7564cabd
describe
'1466208' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
e318e47b3b571c8b64ed4820c837aa8a
78a7050f3b9c5a64712a5734bb4f2b6020e8592c
'2011-11-14T23:05:43-05:00'
describe
'55931' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
510b2eb90a0fc85793da985621164e74
f570d01464ea32884ffe4d5f5e327be7b9318cbf
'2011-11-14T23:05:36-05:00'
describe
'16279' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGC' 'sip-files00022.pro'
ff55e1bde651ee410cf491854813cd60
6db5923a9557c7c4617a54b4548c36758699e910
'2011-11-14T23:08:44-05:00'
describe
'17258' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGD' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7ca3cc57f7f4fde601fe5b8456621b49
10e552b1f87dda314ad8a9b0daef2dcade609453
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGE' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e7ec81c89d4c1e1e8b4bd4a10ca18a58
1f2ae0236d2ec0f4ef6f061c52a2742ed417260d
'2011-11-14T23:05:57-05:00'
describe
'649' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGF' 'sip-files00022.txt'
cd9824b0bdd27419ece809006419ad43
bcc291754c7f5a6b2b0a6730d20c1e5867714856
describe
'6269' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGG' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
807d07f3c8696d969f23e17de87dfb1e
ca3b8ede0cd3f321d6aaa55b41fd5cf18fcf789d
'2011-11-14T23:05:32-05:00'
describe
'1518217' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
82205b4eba79d7f7ae7c70198ab8f3c1
5d85cdc6a97e7b90f450cf31b32501cc2ec4273c
describe
'65267' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGI' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
8818d2c6cb2402dc508f15656e2bcffe
096a28ac695e4db728d7168a0e0426c4d024e06a
'2011-11-14T23:09:35-05:00'
describe
'21120' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGJ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
bd689f0f6e56415884d06c16a8a81688
a82daa6f424a591ecb87b1fccedbddc59f9957de
describe
'21368' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
906629f722a035b2605a0f20585c6ac4
9f323266ca8bb7b8cdf48b828b801dcdb8ca9d6e
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGL' 'sip-files00023.tif'
ff6fac7ba6f2045648ea4f9b227a5a67
3b019f9b850a21210c151e42b48b76c318858616
'2011-11-14T23:06:57-05:00'
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGM' 'sip-files00023.txt'
1e6a8e90559e3f539e295b67e65ff810
8d963da1a24551e0cab644afdf2e1ef41687f34f
describe
'7249' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGN' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
58842dbb42047d6a6b27352d54e38413
c244517bf56a58acd98cef8d97642e2288c114f4
'2011-11-14T23:08:28-05:00'
describe
'1683086' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGO' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
46d72397a7b9790a29e61ca4bc3a592c
e2d2c393e42ad26a574c1d3f594ca38ad2d67c34
'2011-11-14T23:09:05-05:00'
describe
'142908' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGP' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
2fc42477b6721c036846836eec75bcfe
e7980d2463864a6ef4b2631eeeb55c03cb138d83
describe
'7430' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGQ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
864201ff2d61d2111e676c816c6281d8
f2378229cdb65a9a321ca889bf4d9a1da4897767
describe
'41264' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGR' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
f736eecfcc8e195e7c415ba472406706
b0bc4146f7564b712205a529efb0ef868cf5d43b
describe
'13483583' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGS' 'sip-files00024.tif'
cc277105bf6a3d1431f8087beab2a918
17c5165131cf957b8eaa599268a9f0d6da44e07d
'2011-11-14T23:08:48-05:00'
describe
'764' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGT' 'sip-files00024.txt'
bfa0a87cd80553090e169bcdeea283c5
bc605af04d8f2c105304042a7a9922d00ea646a4
'2011-11-14T23:08:38-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11731' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGU' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
65591b03524d7b8cb7a784d3910d883d
151a1347db009b25326c737483dd7b94f0471d35
'2011-11-14T23:09:17-05:00'
describe
'1518156' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGV' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
633d12325c161f51ed4cdb47a6f3e9ef
e0c2c7af453c602acec7d3f49bff191ae4b49f4c
'2011-11-14T23:07:57-05:00'
describe
'51035' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGW' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
f99d88f0a6082b5403b5a1cc05a45dec
74bf298749c5de828d037efe16d6b8332533081c
describe
'5992' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e61481f11d319719917d2a518b6a1833
bb9414963ae10933b0006191ee4c59622a695069
'2011-11-14T23:07:02-05:00'
describe
'14921' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGY' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
ad4b0c4265a8f01b8cc2f3a382871941
11b3b360552c80771f5698f2c3fc2ef6999e9674
'2011-11-14T23:08:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABGZ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
69c55eeb7d702101f5c8e30d6b2d8947
40e9899aa395539f32742efeb9e85913048d071e
'2011-11-14T23:07:01-05:00'
describe
'349' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHA' 'sip-files00025.txt'
e3724d9184d03a6e7e01f8c3eebe61b8
6fda3d555b1fb62c0747b3adf060d74d5d07f90b
'2011-11-14T23:09:21-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5223' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHB' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
95cc9e0110e94c20f93f93f74f9b9890
2cf6623cf6c19a51b3075884ec8f7fc4b6d18e25
'2011-11-14T23:05:44-05:00'
describe
'1466236' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
f379fa35d424f7c479472083e0c3f0b5
3b5c664da47e69352d6ecdbf8b3e0cc199e23423
'2011-11-14T23:06:30-05:00'
describe
'81665' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHD' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
53df7a4acf5c41b23ce1050c8293e60a
14d4ec71eee1a6ca56cdd03648d1e7ebf4e4bf2a
'2011-11-14T23:06:56-05:00'
describe
'29741' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHE' 'sip-files00026.pro'
2335cca3682e68ce09d6a3310ac6ec46
424faa8cfbec939044336f747ea1a14ef33e8ae4
describe
'27620' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHF' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
8067a5289aed8eca4513383ed28f9bde
6754c6fa59b13b456c9cb425aad14287225a0ad7
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHG' 'sip-files00026.tif'
915197d5629103c859918818efeb184a
a358e157277385276d86bb20d9562d04164059fb
'2011-11-14T23:05:45-05:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHH' 'sip-files00026.txt'
d529afac12bc9dea32b751c1a0a3bde0
b5bd3a6242a7764f0955b68081b2e968d550584a
describe
'9572' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHI' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
f1f05b4a4467e0d197e2d879499dec9e
6549288e533704fc84c56a199b5e3c55033bed29
'2011-11-14T23:10:35-05:00'
describe
'1518129' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHJ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
14ee191f4849b0bfc0190782cc1cdbb1
661abd916210fc0a188a5b38bf7c4a71a8145d7b
describe
'81921' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHK' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6032f3f4155560a92dcc3109c0d6b6f6
9c9b28c9c08c57b2cc8e80ec03f59306e0ed512d
'2011-11-14T23:05:59-05:00'
describe
'33237' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHL' 'sip-files00027.pro'
affc49b94cead897f27061c4f76627ab
65ac5a94d66d2bb7a0fa37bd3b4d6d30901dd9a8
'2011-11-14T23:07:06-05:00'
describe
'29947' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHM' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
9358d0ed20be82e66d565b438a1c183c
134a21f2ed7e921293a10a829a7f0494d6deb657
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHN' 'sip-files00027.tif'
bde2e783607c0a082eb9c508e061d070
5dfe6811df44b12f7c0b776ae6053fc9b3d03bde
'2011-11-14T23:05:50-05:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHO' 'sip-files00027.txt'
9c6766ea35ae727b4869a1171d22a75b
5fc34253b6de6c878457b5b5f17a5aa803cd36bd
describe
'8864' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHP' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
836549d16cba311d3223de58da50372c
993c23d49c5e5f4f6bb8ce768867229936b899ca
describe
'1466062' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHQ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
d9d856ac3e7c8fe5552e6525ffd62248
ce9ccfbbb889bcdd71a8e7fbf366f93b1cee8024
describe
'38941' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHR' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
ef73883db9af0482ee7f83fa4733de27
2fcb621f9b05642bbf8749edb5dbe744e7323f42
'2011-11-14T23:10:52-05:00'
describe
'4742' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHS' 'sip-files00028.pro'
ac4a5568dfec3b2e18a4c6dd24405277
ff57da96e40c412c63268ecf808e0c5aa1e48d3f
'2011-11-14T23:08:04-05:00'
describe
'10427' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHT' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
354515b3f332564e6014c3b5917fcfc1
05fe5db184ad8e104baa1b66f4f96ed0d5b7a665
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHU' 'sip-files00028.tif'
da1408c93f9e739d208e67ed0f5e2c60
80d0317377adef76693a4619acb50bb047fdadf2
'2011-11-14T23:07:29-05:00'
describe
'307' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHV' 'sip-files00028.txt'
fcc02b34aa95d3855ce9f25105c0140d
9c29379eb429ee54976504930fa4213322961415
describe
Invalid character
'3740' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHW' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
f6ec5c27b0ec1edc80996ad40ada7e78
5aa1995ae43f6d8e818511dc1cef4d9b95ec4349
describe
'1686919' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHX' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
12512f2e3be64556ebee33152184a3eb
07f3b5fa1c0ed161dc86a36b0e3ae576bd346743
'2011-11-14T23:10:16-05:00'
describe
'69945' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
019e8b83ccd1f4801752a0730bb10c4d
049304b9b732b0924ce9809d0333dea61fd21236
describe
'13422' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABHZ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ac5518a8277f4375cc0534a460d252f3
5a973284997f77174bf3588ebc6283985355ee2c
'2011-11-14T23:07:40-05:00'
describe
'21448' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
d9992e92f92e60e0e939183623fcb809
e50b428421ecc6635f189d14a52d0b76e0b3d398
'2011-11-14T23:06:03-05:00'
describe
'13514109' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIB' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a5f415c2d41239c64ced0bb84a0c3abc
2890739a132e81de1080d3ef0cb676ffde3f40f2
'2011-11-14T23:07:10-05:00'
describe
'580' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIC' 'sip-files00029.txt'
b729ce5799b3410cdff59417d4fc7980
c3f518ca12bdf4dd4c2abe815fa3905edd766f74
describe
Invalid character
'6870' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABID' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
041064050e1ad6f67460c04e2a219a82
fd35791e5e330032bafdfa489db74f55b8bfaaa9
'2011-11-14T23:08:47-05:00'
describe
'1466194' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIE' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
441c94fd442ab7f137b66cec76c2ff76
91a58f9a8aac00594311f7b523ac65178cfd96d4
describe
'78585' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIF' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
d1758911bf9da1315d5b258c5a72895f
1cfe6153eb9c4e77fb31643dee8b176589ccf737
'2011-11-14T23:06:13-05:00'
describe
'32966' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIG' 'sip-files00030.pro'
be429a5cac865725b361c72126318e8c
cdd83f17fc595eb5de36108a4cc433656a2d46ce
'2011-11-14T23:05:47-05:00'
describe
'26409' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIH' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
6174cc04f1a589df273578dc6fc22d28
80f65d7681308456c4dc5371a498bd5d5ebe751c
'2011-11-14T23:07:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABII' 'sip-files00030.tif'
ae16d71543b026f93b3f6966f26dfbe5
361c9072c56ab781e1923cf95ddcdc3618545193
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
01dd746eb2886d8a3ee614d44ea7852e
5aa2615910cf72d89837e2be17109efce83b83cf
describe
'8755' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIK' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
a3a2e43d9a44d7a09a572dad0fd88b59
70265795227818fe0c88fd24b14733a9a68cf36b
describe
'1518246' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIL' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
24e022e2cf4be0b359662ff4ef689350
825cf950a14990e2a787451ea0cd71bd13d7e9e0
describe
'74840' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIM' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
0707f4a5da0f6b5c6d72c7cbf9689a37
7727b7a04fe052a71f48a03119707c3afe9b5303
describe
'28813' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIN' 'sip-files00031.pro'
0e0f8c5802afe250160a0814717e3377
153040c96b6684498b89895457536159277b3aa3
describe
'25373' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIO' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
9ff86f69814fe174b547f50fbeefe1e9
bb482bcbaf713433faf79b7591906aedc8838922
'2011-11-14T23:06:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIP' 'sip-files00031.tif'
b82e754a4e6a56e5f70832d6680c8372
34889521c886d1ef1aec68c52675347975c3d659
'2011-11-14T23:09:50-05:00'
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIQ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
102a694232e35be4970f05b23754c855
a336b5f07bfe05063285ef1c05c6fb537fdaad08
'2011-11-14T23:09:06-05:00'
describe
'8685' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIR' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
9f18ec4b488c3e9e286286865c2a0f80
dc9062dc7f935d3d281e8eb5005ad25e88bb851e
describe
'1466224' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIS' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a6d7a417c6450690aaa41d6199bc0570
c056c0ddb260e466653ce9c0ed316d9cf116a625
'2011-11-14T23:07:03-05:00'
describe
'74086' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIT' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
6c228e9bae565d66946c06bbbcc8e543
58049455b2e498259d3464cf0c6443e2b0106ca4
'2011-11-14T23:10:58-05:00'
describe
'28505' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIU' 'sip-files00032.pro'
d7fc7e2fd2bfb0a6f38dcd0cb7f2c684
3368579859a066ee75398ea90701948e51d8ff35
describe
'25034' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
0f23345b300e63b927994d6d4bf77324
8929ac755319c1cd0ca85374b0010d561cc0f3e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
afdc249ddfbaa6331477c5aa900f3975
cc25743a35bac9081207d97a64bd18287ac9c6fe
'2011-11-14T23:08:41-05:00'
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIX' 'sip-files00032.txt'
f7929b42dc7806a53c9102fbc06b1984
2c2e6b8ea3b7f4d0d273ab598f519d9ac3fd8a41
describe
'9200' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
ebf00ee68815f9b5d699e83cb5b49f22
3f1969b61df95320026db6e4a4a39b8b9c998417
describe
'1518231' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABIZ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
accf0afd0928886ac04b1d481927455e
a7588c77fe68003d60a42780d883cc567ef90afe
'2011-11-14T23:08:46-05:00'
describe
'71134' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJA' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
3b4555fbb9bec4f639e5eab1e21d3ba0
65bbae178f5f8458938e22fa27debb14bcfff81a
'2011-11-14T23:06:06-05:00'
describe
'27678' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJB' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ffc1f79572102867abc8d8786896f312
61ad2a89a36743ff269b8eb4dd220263aeae4e42
describe
'22888' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJC' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
427dc8c913dcff6f0a8cfeb8fe6c47fc
9766c8d97d510734a15171a219706e8b1d42e6a0
'2011-11-14T23:09:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJD' 'sip-files00033.tif'
24cd4d514b4d59a24183cd5bb984d042
3f8cf4cd1620e30f6d426f6c2fbd89e64e1784b6
'2011-11-14T23:10:38-05:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJE' 'sip-files00033.txt'
a1aebb2db37eea96482192309ad55946
9b33d42839b66050ed0791c2e9b0837a6ccc4d83
describe
'8671' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
c9fd5e33f413ce29b41b183570f52e15
27c2f465a42d94833c414a40b3b657942a24c739
'2011-11-14T23:09:19-05:00'
describe
'1466140' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJG' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
884cef5936edbfae1d3230bbdce9b674
9fc2ddd47347ee444b2d712136dbc58b26f6dca9
describe
'73435' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJH' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
c2fc8f6dc6e8a92d3621ee640919fd01
19e1a91098076239c718bb0792d1e903d6cb5b47
'2011-11-14T23:07:07-05:00'
describe
'27988' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJI' 'sip-files00034.pro'
29cedb4823fca0446265bbb37e71dd94
f88286575defeb2286ed35a19b6e5a5060be4e55
'2011-11-14T23:07:42-05:00'
describe
'29727' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJJ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a108f6a924e21f34c8e9711e08a54c36
fe13d1ceac522842ceb85a7bf1f4e53c23112dbb
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
8178921a10465b1c34438404df33d9aa
8077ce137412387f4fbc360e161cbef5e56ba78b
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJL' 'sip-files00034.txt'
65587361683fc9f2254d1cc8dd5ed87d
451b87c363799f260fb6f81c6ae97c74954e0b5d
'2011-11-14T23:07:22-05:00'
describe
'8934' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
eb7cef3f70b2b5872e3e198d0bef7cf1
ca6ca8efbd0033916ba5797794dafd1d936024df
describe
'1518131' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJN' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
1d5a6830b035a775fb69a907727e4f10
bc37bed0f3663df381b28c00b921b0b4b876e624
'2011-11-14T23:08:32-05:00'
describe
'75102' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
20d070e5854f7831512083e4d2631683
a3011fd9b38564d1c6338d6970966b7c89ba6e46
'2011-11-14T23:07:56-05:00'
describe
'29080' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJP' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0c3ecd09c6a6c4ba45c68d572cecc634
0c5dc8e11cec70bc823cbe22b6651956fcd025f6
'2011-11-14T23:07:25-05:00'
describe
'30026' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJQ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
de27a8fddc0830ddbc3e3d50888254d8
5f323c690fd4b06919116605487b25b1e35c680c
'2011-11-14T23:10:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJR' 'sip-files00035.tif'
1401dabbeaf84747d259b89201f880b4
d0b27cbe2a2e4c437a566b34dbe210fa7cb3d80a
'2011-11-14T23:09:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJS' 'sip-files00035.txt'
cfcb26a152ed4659228ee03e73012abd
cfe05d79814bf76269f80bea73cf71e4202c4ac7
describe
'8727' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJT' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
e99fe8c95c94ddcd02a2c6e3dca731a7
652776bbe7665b65bac98438fdfd3b3dd04430e2
'2011-11-14T23:06:59-05:00'
describe
'1466295' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a8b908bdde3084b343a83dd29c2551ba
1b84785c47608311eac9d4981ac6fc8ff8d66d87
'2011-11-14T23:05:35-05:00'
describe
'72135' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
4ab2f9e908114029e46187518eb87254
279e0475ebc7f7db8195ee5c0fd61e3fb0a78d98
'2011-11-14T23:05:54-05:00'
describe
'27571' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
cb7997bd423ecb0bdf413aaa5bba6612
14a7714b859defedc2b5a7eb77e7c6ce7c622f72
describe
'29001' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
0a676ad340ee4a4b77b8bad54b9e1a7d
a6d95f21b86fbf6acfce6997fac5a83ff9bdf268
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
be4873d35816bef4e9b90fc91522d460
49d2bf2dec83f4c845314182f7a6f343895b0acf
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABJZ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
5b19c03616ca978a7dcd819215a91db1
8f7b19d3ed901be388b9ff22845ff72da6ac8c41
'2011-11-14T23:07:39-05:00'
describe
'8606' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
eee55aa707e2ad64884386af4bdb8466
940d45f81420fc6ca8314ed89399dffb229d387b
'2011-11-14T23:08:05-05:00'
describe
'1518218' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKB' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
cd6a4e4c77ffae4b96f75c70ed1d1c2c
66f47e9debd2f597a82a0e2df5331a3715994d23
'2011-11-14T23:05:39-05:00'
describe
'73629' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKC' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
32dca799e32b0bb0659571fbb2df9f74
a3b9aaa191bafdf88afe56f5584abaf568871ba6
'2011-11-14T23:10:05-05:00'
describe
'28648' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKD' 'sip-files00037.pro'
00bec61192896d7d68a110e0bab5d464
8c06edeae64ed6495ead959062e6e7736484f25d
describe
'29502' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
b1f666c962df6c24ef648a37f8f6857a
a04bbadf1a78772e8cdd385cd3428e79fb433caf
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKF' 'sip-files00037.tif'
b65cfdaa2b27f2a6961d72b75660f5bf
38c12a87217a8c7f4b54d1f20b1aa85fabce43b5
'2011-11-14T23:08:35-05:00'
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKG' 'sip-files00037.txt'
deeac6f6f0c7910f585e84c965d802fd
5cb9ba98154a8b3df079141a220529d36a9af1ab
'2011-11-14T23:06:48-05:00'
describe
'8926' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKH' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
de5a612cd980a16b98b72f5fb755df3c
e0ed9cd3a90d3ce86d2da30378ac412ba1c5c22a
describe
'1466284' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKI' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
80faef7ce3212c6483e8d4e5e55d1b61
7994f3f280d9c58d8856fb68bd08184037341ce5
'2011-11-14T23:10:39-05:00'
describe
'73251' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKJ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
1e6e9d05efbce73268be29f6c348076d
e4f8d9811cdec42b9cf41123d451b16c8b48a6f7
'2011-11-14T23:05:56-05:00'
describe
'28811' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKK' 'sip-files00038.pro'
f65dc18deec337b8a73a8f2846310b59
455ea251cc3ccf9bc64ab794ca5ec40854acf1ca
describe
'27500' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
8a9fd09a8ce403cf1afb57a462ffa1db
cba696e1860c00df3be19f7112655a07f486507e
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKM' 'sip-files00038.tif'
aee736747e772ff65f842caa037ba8d7
c5c3d452e49e5476f3a0f725b8fc37e41dd9693b
'2011-11-14T23:09:31-05:00'
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKN' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1a7f82689de58d85c2799d2ea1e52e86
8ada1d09f62fedd7d5d64cc7ee20dbc6489c7349
'2011-11-14T23:09:38-05:00'
describe
'8863' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKO' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
b8038ea0c4dd0ab64ca57cc1ad789edb
2e60108cbe44be88e1ff828bbd41141071814036
describe
'1518188' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
91f9004c2c0811735a868e8b590b2117
f7c4147f3f8693bdd8716c84bfd20fb927437673
'2011-11-14T23:08:06-05:00'
describe
'70178' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKQ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
08600500eb6db0915d1772f779caaff3
633e23c49eded2d4e7bea4393e139bea5d6b5ec6
'2011-11-14T23:09:45-05:00'
describe
'28278' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKR' 'sip-files00039.pro'
372a7feb0e89a806e127dd39d5d42943
768f5a876e96700d2d4882c948f939233de33767
'2011-11-14T23:05:46-05:00'
describe
'28809' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
d678bce84750badaf1daa43225a2ba2f
7317715fbeb93247792b08295ec65c116f37683c
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKT' 'sip-files00039.tif'
8dd595a3219761380c294776421ae99e
435b7e9efc9d2368fb4315f123c075f2089ad839
'2011-11-14T23:07:30-05:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5032b56238ecd4b19f676948556270af
b6d03df05553183fbfedee488951478c272c4df6
describe
'8638' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKV' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
a868340aa8296c0c98f6ed44be3cbc40
b521daaf7808e815265a3cb0e212974f54a5e89f
'2011-11-14T23:09:16-05:00'
describe
'1466047' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKW' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
72c1aacb24bdf14ce5802c77eb143e10
fafac8e2b4fddfdcb4871d68a8181244a9a0d593
'2011-11-14T23:10:49-05:00'
describe
'73058' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKX' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
9eb7a41172a7cad38bac9b376b850e16
1c40458747ac67613a82719654b03da7ebd8ac28
describe
'28286' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
a9f55ecd5d651177d29c64bc422d404b
aad5d628bea046ae1c85d9a263aa35e6ff32bd03
'2011-11-14T23:09:28-05:00'
describe
'26612' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABKZ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
9f41e7c4c1d699758ffcc25cdbcb41ad
60cd17659f57d4a5b1295bcff5940cb101126793
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLA' 'sip-files00040.tif'
58d7ada30f01a14d1508238242c13830
763a868eed145100c972e6c32e2d3e72173d7ffc
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
fe4381342bbb6b16e07f069bee68162f
9028dca440583a072d0843497b6b202fc92007ad
describe
'9056' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
b2f7deded030bcce75de76b7676c5eb6
3f44050020af4464a132aa5c61e4281f2be87e12
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLD' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
fe73a31960643f755ab7c4d11cfb998d
02f19529eb50d846d7ba57eb5b98fb4efb1e1022
describe
'71397' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLE' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
3e7123ae93fbf52c3033cb3dcfe43817
293c8bd0f30a1aec00cb641be5abec654393a8ef
describe
'28017' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f76224be748c1ef78371b4b07f996910
378bcc4591b922bdc8ff66483a2637a3a881cbfe
describe
'27650' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLG' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
a861d06833ebe0b31306e1dcaaf169f0
46d93bb8679c46671783e76bea02d35ae449ea22
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLH' 'sip-files00041.tif'
8b2715ea5144b285eae7ff7723409227
831cb5f0b77322c4c5c10d4a7e0d227b7bfaaed9
'2011-11-14T23:06:24-05:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
291739d7f29cb523e92df4f40142d2d9
e52f28f389a526fb2520fab4ba510b0d82611a66
'2011-11-14T23:11:00-05:00'
describe
'8624' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLJ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
8a56d90de5b2d081ee9452cb27c479c8
5c37d4ae772a4abb0d6eeb954e411332f47ef3fb
'2011-11-14T23:08:18-05:00'
describe
'1466159' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLK' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
0e889c8db4373be1ffb4f36213880713
4e1bc80b23426c7b6970b6e169f29ef3af0bcd6e
'2011-11-14T23:09:58-05:00'
describe
'74506' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLL' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
43721f9b085ad94a7218ebf8fe217df8
cb48ef7ec616a97ff2ae3b8285977f6fb2f3344d
'2011-11-14T23:06:14-05:00'
describe
'29207' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLM' 'sip-files00042.pro'
93ebef10300bddae66ca52d502bb4c7a
f9462389e117d67f7394e179107e350d79edee12
describe
'23660' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLN' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
2c90c8c7890ab19aedeeb7c36d7a1dbe
2a7348d4a820f20dfe39e09248468c45a261c7c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLO' 'sip-files00042.tif'
3fdcfbc7046905d583a92b939609d692
d0fb30fe11bd58f4ba18e3163f6c139594cc587b
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLP' 'sip-files00042.txt'
faaf2319b51a48b51219df78fc65f5e0
738c3fda3e060d9c885cbd5dd2cabdd0735aae30
describe
'9336' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLQ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
b7aa9cb365e1273169a24f70817db706
e733e2a67b9f9353061187993a1b0634d32283d2
describe
'1518019' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLR' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
1d7938efb1ac31db67a4a17c5253ce02
ed72021d4fc22fd0112cfbeb61bbcb81a2d64b0f
'2011-11-14T23:07:38-05:00'
describe
'73813' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLS' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
9daa8855388a217a1b25e4918a2f41d9
a1a11db85c1173d9f1d558535706bff20d1abdf0
'2011-11-14T23:09:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLT' 'sip-files00043.pro'
eb01b455dd070370ede822a1ee74795d
b0b77c1223a5314a22752abc1613827ae72375de
describe
'23841' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLU' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
bf254705dad35cc8bb1fb4c5f175a0aa
2d35278a1f45825711b61333685c1b962d2767a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLV' 'sip-files00043.tif'
ce00526763c667a15cbd6eb806509cae
13e09abc4287d3882db6f46852810becd72a77bc
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
5194dcedab4fd0d43c85f6594b7ee93f
2c5acb0330c9a94668091ceb89e4f9fa685a7830
'2011-11-14T23:10:25-05:00'
describe
'9091' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLX' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b25a31a43c3f58cddb2c03219514e30a
1287e9e4c553546035219debb5bbfcb224221c33
'2011-11-14T23:09:11-05:00'
describe
'1466273' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
48bac62713cb616b7b961ec64b772e38
1db954567442a4f4150dbe1ce574250f9a04e6db
describe
'76713' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABLZ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
f7a343fa1371147d0caa72c922e8e208
b89fed97901fd457928b268c1013f54a367446e6
describe
'29503' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMA' 'sip-files00044.pro'
eea8646345cdf954cf95ddc8a2555eac
8a3e2a5218ebdbeaf3682a38020b0ef8fdb14743
describe
'24234' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMB' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
5b16284c53f120e311b5f06f62c369eb
daf0f66fb1df65a171ca39e4ab6392c5d93a738c
'2011-11-14T23:05:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMC' 'sip-files00044.tif'
21399fe381ac33de25e23d26ec16ebdc
a2ff16b451721f8b9c679e2fdb7d5d7ae80ae3f4
'2011-11-14T23:09:20-05:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMD' 'sip-files00044.txt'
8e68ca3c399d01b1f81fbc1eae7861b5
4e2b0ff33bec85af9ca98a42122d02b056399778
'2011-11-14T23:07:12-05:00'
describe
'9500' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABME' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
0da842b25f4980bd6dd62770cb5e12c1
90f3a1dd640914c87083a270bbf0ed0eda07a9dd
'2011-11-14T23:08:39-05:00'
describe
'1518224' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMF' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
a9b25875527b8f7dee5d53d957b6c9a5
489cfdb399c7f322e973ca29df5a459b9f711192
describe
'72514' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
7f2be36dfb638b3550ef25575f019f91
b5783c07b6da5228d08c456507f8a0548c8d4414
describe
'29385' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMH' 'sip-files00045.pro'
055c78c2d7335407c0e1027e7e6d276b
008895fd5e30579a1073fbf60e11e84ec0e0077f
describe
'22515' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMI' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
0b4b1aea2127ddcd11ae6219a4869317
edaee2fcdfa3d596bf11ed3d3bf9c41fca5a1efc
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
66af34cab76ff158c7431492a4d43be5
89fface81998485dca84822663eeecdfe8202448
'2011-11-14T23:10:28-05:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMK' 'sip-files00045.txt'
c1659b27d6a084f0ec741f0c9ce936c1
1f93d868bc5f6d72f94f0e12121dec04c7f571bd
describe
'8777' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABML' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
ac6648d2c27990b6bbb06aff2fc314d5
eb4378bbcd01c19cbe5c9ed667c1854f706536d5
describe
'1466290' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMM' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
5c2ef3d15199658491e3dc42dcfecd19
f67627af992d2c681810e8dc0af838ee3b57b309
describe
'71363' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMN' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
5d24729e037d2481d1032c2e812ce1ad
78f97089ed8fd0bbadad4bae8cb25a4189327c46
describe
'27707' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMO' 'sip-files00046.pro'
6bb8a7d19a3e8bf43c043000869d723f
d33bdaf7b547b7c6e2634fec64fe3896c5eb412d
describe
'26030' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMP' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
442cdbb75004af83407abed4c9c2a068
7d7d70d40b4f6c5406357afbc7846131944e2263
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMQ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
bda657442f93f54223271ee86f43e2db
f6e07c6efb464133290193f130f977f4b8a50aa4
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMR' 'sip-files00046.txt'
d3b6c0b50c53e1d3ac698ce8ae80a678
c5cbec8b3a19b442d82d7406111488d1a3d6912c
describe
'9257' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMS' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
4724d03acdf5e73aaee42aa0585b7361
55335418ab7956c0eb827dc893ef6ed80256e5b2
'2011-11-14T23:07:35-05:00'
describe
'1518204' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMT' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
1b84d15229bf808edf98e440b817e02b
9d7c4bf521a1147b1842d991c14a62076d92fe73
describe
'72848' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMU' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
18ead2c1eb4cf090484501745e474b3c
f92c05a54369d59cfd3ee906908f27873c4d8fe4
'2011-11-14T23:10:20-05:00'
describe
'28781' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMV' 'sip-files00047.pro'
be2d5375ef2253521906929048bcb640
3f15fd03ad352095bcfd595c5e6692d59b902169
describe
'28787' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMW' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
a8a8f82b8a458909b0dd2105a9229417
cd3b9340b250c7ad53437a795beb66e4c46a02f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMX' 'sip-files00047.tif'
1bc2567b393f6bc9f959801068a732a2
a6a87dad289009d79cde98fcdeb2e2927efde9a1
'2011-11-14T23:10:07-05:00'
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMY' 'sip-files00047.txt'
a21fa5756ae4a888dd7ea783442b9776
a4b67554a3c54e262e9c24d32bbae763c22d31cc
describe
'8817' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABMZ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
fbbae9970410ac4e7378f21018814143
cc771f818f6c8a58907a3ae7016a888ae44afeca
describe
'1466272' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNA' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
18594bb7a20a183032498a9c926e6d43
1b5431d502334bb559c3f14c4652f0a91432f7d2
'2011-11-14T23:10:18-05:00'
describe
'75015' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNB' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
17e6264619c335dce426b15a1677e955
265c7d75c63b4fdbcc8266a16e95d03862e86a5e
describe
'29701' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNC' 'sip-files00048.pro'
ea7251cd9230136f3f1c74ea007153ee
54e3be94b6dad0238227589348f0e87568c3b116
'2011-11-14T23:08:17-05:00'
describe
'31010' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABND' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
cd1b92694862647f546b8185c6b4bf81
59ef59779022e23a0cae976a504600360c6d0612
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNE' 'sip-files00048.tif'
3906a0830c1ad187c4cbe9b1f992acdf
1c764b6226420bae73fbd88c8a097e21a84b6c0e
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNF' 'sip-files00048.txt'
2fb3e6531001933631159d64ed8673c2
4c635994fde403dedb64fb00b5ceb7b1d388c1f1
describe
'9524' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNG' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
4df7b3e3b3361af3ccfe1d5a86b54fd6
57617ad8080dc26824710c06d449ae0c40d76a71
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNH' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
0ff4f20a7c2a7216f4943e2f6d857cea
2be859b219bce907ed478ae3639f2120b0280789
describe
'75808' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNI' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
10e8c1b5eac3645af808f2f156dbba85
11c1d56dbe447a912bf13e84fd2983b1b5caf66f
'2011-11-14T23:09:23-05:00'
describe
'29906' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNJ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
ab991ff610f9497d6893b01c1fba758f
d291d527318bcae9468f5bb517cc0b2226d828cf
'2011-11-14T23:08:20-05:00'
describe
'29596' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNK' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
f6859b9c9013403c7a15e6eadec4dd4c
c1291c238694308a608ab7abe773963f34d473ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNL' 'sip-files00049.tif'
0c6e70db8e21f170613c8aa5e37d5326
98bc345cd1b2d8a7b3a0104f1c28c9dc60bad2ce
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNM' 'sip-files00049.txt'
52c54a2e28eca2c5190bb9d79b01cacc
2357bedca76ddff892af6e45917bf5d97d02b03d
'2011-11-14T23:10:27-05:00'
describe
'8814' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNN' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
a77f7d0f7ab752f5400bc8d02655d1ba
809539bf3130013ef993da1028f0a04884fb4b19
describe
'1466280' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNO' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
23dd76cfc7bd33d8cdf4f6c837a54bb5
0a1fbc9d34a73033ecdbbae518faf81dcdb7258c
'2011-11-14T23:08:37-05:00'
describe
'71977' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNP' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
ca9fae06e04c7723037795ea71e835c7
f0d5c9b135b47b1174a634d0e17ad458bcc7809d
describe
'26560' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNQ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
03b6dbb0c48c0b344adf461a2655f557
f6991c2219d96baae278c6ddd55e154f3886340b
'2011-11-14T23:07:44-05:00'
describe
'27012' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNR' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
a3f09eb0a5d82ebb304b7d4d2c9bb17e
cbf1d1070708aa2cf812fc77e0eb63e88fa241a2
'2011-11-14T23:05:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNS' 'sip-files00050.tif'
b32d11de308300f64f34133cc9f48a01
8e6090db16cdd4250fce5a75136b2c621408b839
'2011-11-14T23:10:03-05:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNT' 'sip-files00050.txt'
4d773be0d278c4304d1b5fd87423c69e
a5a8398a97031a23584cb00e4c531e455d3dd8a2
describe
'8876' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNU' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
634da12bbe81149d747d9fb6399b7941
e596880881e78948438d32d1cd9714509b087f56
describe
'1518182' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNV' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
27a49d903594bee1aaee7bfd861749f2
9b565b988e4dd5b4b410263eb2f991c0d16eba58
describe
'73951' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNW' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
a3c46e1ecff92bc2275da4468c116719
158a864d584851d3fb4344fbadfb7a80409bf76b
'2011-11-14T23:06:38-05:00'
describe
'28438' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNX' 'sip-files00051.pro'
d2461181fea820b11057164c4323533d
0c39c5dff4a8982dcaac0414ff03fe737c6af45d
describe
'30147' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNY' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
f55ca69cf2aff76c1e3f63b7bd06510a
839c151469b57a9baa2456a44df0395711d00371
'2011-11-14T23:05:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABNZ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
47b1de9a38f2fcfc545230e89d195a46
3fc6c0186bb2a5d41c9b637f8d4798f5c17ddb4d
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOA' 'sip-files00051.txt'
f61f5f90378656fa14d19bafafd2a7cd
b309ba843c0452a1dea3fbe433e9432fcf63ee77
describe
'8882' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOB' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
d1f23fa5f512dd7262d8ccdd67a70a13
070cebdf649a51eb2e706a8e2561c91f9e052b87
'2011-11-14T23:07:24-05:00'
describe
'1466253' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOC' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
32a4acb7335fad4bb61980e1733f54a1
036d37c80353b9773c4e69a3a7e88b5fefe52414
'2011-11-14T23:08:36-05:00'
describe
'71653' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOD' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
1acdbdf355057aa45b2c86cc3f9a906e
f8665d7386960999981115d3e061564210fbc3dd
describe
'27068' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOE' 'sip-files00052.pro'
36b52f03edbc1baa283dea9409ac4c6f
4500dbecbd15ef9ce5c164c21ee36917099afefb
describe
'24951' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOF' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
b0b92db33bb855a09dd018ca324b8f4f
664a784e478d467e081bd9a3a8f579b0dac48262
'2011-11-14T23:08:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOG' 'sip-files00052.tif'
78b4bcae46c997af14ca548974644e83
fee4a0e77b3ba95e98aeee551050d2d92cab54c6
'2011-11-14T23:05:52-05:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOH' 'sip-files00052.txt'
21bfec56de96c22d6c77424837dc32a4
c7cf5b97f2c1921b40da731d1866aa05d6abda06
describe
'9199' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOI' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
c4ae99adaa82d7d28e8d331c3a0ba3f8
8b63c87e32d58e3b714f1187c878de62fe9061d1
describe
'1518177' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOJ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
52ff1c1ec74079de180cc422ea33e360
fe582f91dbb4c3dbfffc31b954801ef40e691bb8
describe
'73148' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOK' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
8a796f41ffe1f67d65f282274bd8c8cc
39f1a5c4c8e86941df5a8ec7a6cbfd5d76050c06
describe
'28085' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOL' 'sip-files00053.pro'
7e8a3997ff2f0247f8837bb949d466da
fdf63bf79cdd997f1053a4a362096972a2ee0c03
describe
'24156' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOM' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
bd91a343e768d5d807579fcbc7463279
6a94513b99df81f05486692cc8c7a7ceeb284c1e
'2011-11-14T23:07:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABON' 'sip-files00053.tif'
ad1e77c4d1f9943c1f206cb1ad8c9c65
81cbec950dc9873461c87d7b0382ab4e41237156
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOO' 'sip-files00053.txt'
5c16953a83f0898ea496145fd934d200
533942d8807eeeae2a106e40c1a00ef5540df1dc
describe
'8651' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOP' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
8c13babf4e4d7d22a7a5115206f55f65
f906282a58b2b9f51a035c822cd5334d1763756f
describe
'1466196' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOQ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
e07fdfa2a7a03e698c3ab54c4050d479
83820f4da8512569346f468352a031dc3a0946e5
'2011-11-14T23:06:22-05:00'
describe
'73079' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOR' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
e335b3569ff76e5ddda242340ecc1b9a
e4122cee23824517cd3f74e12c5283c1cc277b17
describe
'27924' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOS' 'sip-files00054.pro'
05b86fb2b96c22cb427a573febf5dedb
9f9ce70045d846e58e0a9a866500f85bde05e89d
describe
'26635' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOT' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3ebe78d1560f328eea159a21a309517a
f63ae448ef53084b33aacda9902efaa850f4e044
'2011-11-14T23:09:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOU' 'sip-files00054.tif'
382fb55272e701a20ae470f775443692
07e1f47c77f64d1142ad3667b0264eb06b37515b
'2011-11-14T23:07:28-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOV' 'sip-files00054.txt'
caaab2d96acb656a9e5e6981c49b0372
8c88ccaf19ea9272d2a1c08d6e8cc8190ce85bd7
describe
'9260' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOW' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
ad21dee8f2803b5ceea1bdcc126f7df3
b33bea98f8bf7435c899734879c459cdb7024d24
describe
'1518104' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOX' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
9adf84a0a7b5e5eef2f81797b88b5286
dc87962675de21762e7d9ad18a2c8a49954de982
describe
'71521' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOY' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
88b8136f9c2a0323639fdfeccce08f4a
4c871bc860a9275225b8fc8d41aef36ad5aa2df7
'2011-11-14T23:07:20-05:00'
describe
'29159' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABOZ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
931c3f79d0d2ebfb159f240a257bb04e
ad13e89afd47f57613d6c86d766c3f6673d9bc95
'2011-11-14T23:07:55-05:00'
describe
'24848' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPA' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
8ea701724e59a0ed2c67715ee47ec58f
0eb293534df0504fb6c3672ab6a6e91e4df8a495
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPB' 'sip-files00055.tif'
1a11c81104b5a41cd9adc7c3223d683d
2fe596a32f5e10efe881ba5ce77906d1ae7a14ba
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPC' 'sip-files00055.txt'
e45db5cc7337c57b389c783c625717cf
2a296e9bccfb35a438161ba55e6c8155b7b29219
describe
'9027' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPD' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
6d2bbcccc0e05344bb7158a850a1c589
0083c8cb733a8146df37482a999747eea69c36f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPE' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
58136747c77eb59cf503c7cc36dad1f1
a4a8444cf3e64e34996382df6d0734fc7e02fe25
describe
'75464' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPF' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
478dbb0e422e4a91dc36e42e31939586
78b80f2b23236227d3ad6c55e2123db0a771b35f
describe
'30519' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPG' 'sip-files00056.pro'
60d9e798269f683f2e40d6012548b988
8b1729e333a19f235d7c8c85df77911aabca4bc1
describe
'25322' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPH' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
16ae6523332e23bdd31d35d1430f68b8
12d36f9df82aef0985703c5231646011506c103b
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPI' 'sip-files00056.tif'
ac6d959564ee55daaae1e35a3d103fa1
442b746f92a62c8493b7dc90918fb92b9fd15f00
'2011-11-14T23:10:23-05:00'
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPJ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
3f43174bc14fa389a59b52a3f0de74c4
c1a071c87445950e6c17e36828b2100153b67a62
describe
'9464' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPK' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
d6be544a77eaf9354502efaad6ef9edb
2eb911bc9e073e2e71016451d4506326cbfe056e
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPL' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
af8aaa83f4eed7a9dce6879e04a094bb
88c681b103bd9b161741d7ba1bbb5d987f649d8c
'2011-11-14T23:05:49-05:00'
describe
'70650' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPM' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
3690bf6f107dee6009051e113f67abb7
33fe66c35118763818de77d2035e0f581bfe3509
'2011-11-14T23:07:09-05:00'
describe
'28410' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPN' 'sip-files00057.pro'
4a9d522bd85579775101c95935465c48
4a2a219c385e3b6c4c88e631f22d62cbccd97f47
'2011-11-14T23:07:53-05:00'
describe
'24737' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPO' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
89eb79547ad3980bb9f18971ca9e2e99
ed22555a3a21633957de86bf69e791a8cb93afd4
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPP' 'sip-files00057.tif'
3cc40d5ab99672ebd0e8b75a0a098ceb
c1c6ef3c81195a5613fba95d315d7b5fc85ac18d
'2011-11-14T23:06:19-05:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPQ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
96df600e633c05e6eee1d7279aa51517
18fc84ba2b5c23af8303167f1a40a80d90408993
describe
'8790' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPR' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
0749aca128c150ad284546c03b9e42d7
1c643032f17893493e2819ed193603753516497a
describe
'1466283' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPS' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
8c4e5063f32e275f2714acab3be6d0fb
10915d615651be8e4263b25219ef2a9c824c8bd7
describe
'72686' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPT' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
261cb5b13bdc88ec8a038acbcc4e638a
9ecbc900d4c974b669098eb91e415bfadba82e83
describe
'29053' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPU' 'sip-files00058.pro'
8bd82da8c2588bbd8c0cb22e519bc5e9
0d8894bf475d50b0ffbd30646275210551628574
'2011-11-14T23:05:42-05:00'
describe
'24495' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPV' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
81ceffd8b6c69955774cbadac1e752b6
f688d37412d53652c7d01c05445eaaa1375fe290
'2011-11-14T23:06:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPW' 'sip-files00058.tif'
56ad9ad7a97b2a384a116077042c01f0
c67bb922cce9b11681d93a65dd6676a26c52bf5d
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPX' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c11b191515863ef5055a5cea75fcd2a1
66069f338c1936b5daf5c37d875b4605b12d2a6a
describe
'9278' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPY' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
71bd55d3bce13fc265a55fecfa10270c
3c01393bd4ebaab1cfd47166c0e6264c9a99bd68
describe
'1518195' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABPZ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
565f2df96199e3b9b6a5634c6e760035
9f6880de23d7281b409f827fd3d3e4ba914e46fc
describe
'71735' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQA' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
803ff44ee14af224d7fde7f6446ec5b4
f2d93d75c4086f2e4a6a830f93b1459d388ea06e
describe
'28977' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQB' 'sip-files00059.pro'
41402ce062214165b173d05446dbdd01
30a4f0a9f7e1445bdc529a2932122f1edaf4b661
describe
'24957' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
ab38338f79f1840a65e20aa00f660ae0
f3ad086803d3cabd9f83828c03e6ca632472336c
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQD' 'sip-files00059.tif'
dc2e3031e36f2f2882b92edf6da2ed70
9738a00ab0612b1576ddbc14052fdf39a7f7f8d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQE' 'sip-files00059.txt'
22c86fd474c8aa151e931ac8dcdab82f
a7687a8854ce6853fce416f3a4cb56a5520dbfff
describe
'9022' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQF' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
aed1cd960f92f82960295ffbb79a0478
d9116b3ae9795b38350e9eebeb4b971c18a2aaae
'2011-11-14T23:06:39-05:00'
describe
'1466247' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQG' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
b44dcfab1abef288b993b4b2d1f12a33
ac528cbed94fcdadeb5fff7c037c7abbb28613cf
describe
'73439' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQH' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
7534fa1ef5cd655e48b0644bac5826da
894109c1dc042059da3389e089c9cf07de63d6ea
describe
'28501' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQI' 'sip-files00060.pro'
eb90991643071740d257aad822d715a8
ba9c0d98b39be4e245e4ea606e0c0929528c2580
describe
'24604' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQJ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
a926b7f33d2c604b85830a7574128e33
262869de2fb497755ca220e77c917702487aa1d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQK' 'sip-files00060.tif'
4b67953d2eac3fdb2af660a0986e8177
3463c0c694fc3d928fd0d6b913ebd8791a8ecf3d
'2011-11-14T23:10:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQL' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d3fff61055d1ba6bcc37a32000bad620
22c84583fd3555627f35d47189b953a9d535d0fc
describe
'9263' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQM' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
de2b64eaeeaad3fab600cd6314d90e22
1f259b3ce0f62fc06a53de1923c27ef3f601527c
describe
'1518187' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQN' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
51a7de570166c13cc192ef68b538c2ee
e7c0499a7dbbbcb47f70bd3f287dcb4c963e5dc5
describe
'71718' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQO' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e0b9a01996348106f7f0e0a90d58a6c7
eb019a5841b38a9df675e8276f55444fd2f2b0da
'2011-11-14T23:06:51-05:00'
describe
'28512' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQP' 'sip-files00061.pro'
6e799f52fe4ebbca6cb001b8e82c4133
a906e460d556b28d8c2aceb34f5f9136b23f7f7e
describe
'28226' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQQ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
c5505a8d15a8c900f8ef7ceec95a3d96
fb5b2a28b34d4d9ad9fb2ba04ccc4ce8a30f8841
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQR' 'sip-files00061.tif'
82a1b397eb0d5fa01fe235983c2d25e8
fd0f0b5004f1f6d039e0f0ded51fd5f0c80c2345
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQS' 'sip-files00061.txt'
c4373c11d74a7f3704ab9c852a57a49d
50cbbdb0307ddb8f6c1fd804da6e6570499d61ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQT' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
a17776b5499509c8f9ea688308ed8ffa
31721150df33ebe976f17bbfe153ec346c5d4eea
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQU' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
15838d66033ad0ef4ae82661485e2233
85f02ed9816295e0ffdb8d4bd2688d0591b9e236
describe
'74350' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQV' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
78c644ca5fb43631df4f8ed95a0d3729
1063ef348b05fbdaf5f8c66c60a4f0f27851ace6
describe
'28708' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQW' 'sip-files00062.pro'
522de9903db0fa40135e16b65fac9b84
d119c51da31cf0021dca322680aa2049d0b6c604
describe
'25967' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQX' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
765f62bb891756ba8e533fe6a651185a
8ad9a9e1507457635852cdddcd46cd8d9b419ad8
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQY' 'sip-files00062.tif'
da08730478f711ea2c0bfd6940ed6d58
336be65c705b5a6ba3b27f047c6ac7d41be27188
'2011-11-14T23:05:34-05:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABQZ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
3ac0482c6a3bfd38bd555f68c835561a
84ec3b6e145ae92db480fd906fcb6dc7352fcc6b
'2011-11-14T23:07:19-05:00'
describe
'9288' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRA' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
2bdfc71d55d244e30eea5c7383f60d31
51c8b69e57b1946a775da474aca7691f4f08b2c1
'2011-11-14T23:05:29-05:00'
describe
'1518152' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRB' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
e476453b6f42920c3bb3442fa26000a7
d064299e97b737210415b419c66ffcc6ccdd6def
describe
'72655' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRC' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
a3f67b93be7d4fe54c5a49d5f9d2c3ac
a1f889c8e314ef8cd36457a15a1ba47e053b8edd
'2011-11-14T23:10:14-05:00'
describe
'29217' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRD' 'sip-files00063.pro'
cf11dd2442ebb8a94d88f8d4ac90a6e8
76c63e37292060babe00310ecc05f8b525f13de5
describe
'25484' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRE' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
b5bb062086e6c5cc6e0f6fb92a7a3790
621efc85394cf1f6b14555a6854e0b3c297cae83
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRF' 'sip-files00063.tif'
8d335d79ae05fde60d5170f8067c03d9
f6e7521ae29391bf784dde97f4f04c087a3331f2
'2011-11-14T23:10:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRG' 'sip-files00063.txt'
b21159f1c6746586bcba23cf8fd2cdba
8ab22d0fdb2d6ce08175ed5f8020ce4ad7bd70ea
describe
'8737' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRH' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
b27f21a101d6f5a1a2f113432c2cb489
ac95d617840f5b2112d80d887a8cc26fe83adf7e
describe
'1466215' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRI' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
06f19fbe89d9a8de5801122155c0181e
fa49895ca19774f34c91144fe1a27f534f046904
describe
'73726' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRJ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
902a70270d81013f3c4086a9f8d56d7f
ecb1efff56155496d06672e2d05f7a29a69dd3e8
'2011-11-14T23:06:09-05:00'
describe
'28497' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRK' 'sip-files00064.pro'
e3c5299ab14e6da5773ac11dbe0f7d65
3575a8e772fadefb5490f786d99c03cbeddf829d
describe
'28399' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRL' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
4b9207caf3d0e63427425e252b5e9082
25f7b8890822188853d48e32c6a75091616b7567
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRM' 'sip-files00064.tif'
6ca89f04ff8fc87958ed120c2b3c63b6
459cd2595eec5492d3de3d1ad2074daf418f48cc
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRN' 'sip-files00064.txt'
85c16ecaaee88ccd3dd78fdb237aeb87
4805f845f5913a38025fc359f9a336bb459e3644
describe
'9248' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRO' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
6189c558bb642109a6e9e8750e6b95e2
d79d25285d282d14f07873e19653299219de68a8
describe
'1518244' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRP' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
983a2965a1858154fc130736bb44e0c7
b48ecc94b2768ec5beb83128f7e3e9890ef418f7
'2011-11-14T23:08:34-05:00'
describe
'72384' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRQ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
c333180746f6611c7320f655124def41
cd5978fb0d8e07e723b6a9534246a43b04b39c37
describe
'28299' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRR' 'sip-files00065.pro'
306491db3bd774481c024cc7b357dc05
cdac26b7c46a9e90a70aa6f7fc1e9a07c4c95be1
describe
'24334' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRS' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
442a22ac6b8bc0c0c85d8adcff9fd1df
e1c194140f835603d9f1accd828dbb9678053e77
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRT' 'sip-files00065.tif'
3095926e610a00332d370795ad56a914
234cd560eb48598f26be0b967085fce1002930e0
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRU' 'sip-files00065.txt'
8cdf3ed9213e4107f687257b773149fd
795da92ffe24cbc6d8c0bc6f05bb274917db087a
describe
'8905' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRV' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
9f59f85a29d5965ae3190b0a950efe87
5291ab0317eacd9834b02e16b5d2833bcb7a6e0f
describe
'1466122' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRW' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
3a056ae0465d7d61f2b413c05564b46c
af89e2252ebe0ad82360428c6ef923276b303757
describe
'73075' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRX' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
9eabce74cb72cbaa1b2c3c7d7fcc5981
69205f88a69bec7844c4f4b0a4d101a04d993e48
describe
'27642' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRY' 'sip-files00066.pro'
ab4190af270e45d1edf70e0d55aabeb1
f3ce0ae314a86b04d8ab0cedc3e7226d654f3880
describe
'25813' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABRZ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
793001514d098d8bd0c59e0e87f32ddc
25f156fccdcbaaeff8c5b999eb249e3bf9ce168c
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSA' 'sip-files00066.tif'
5cbfb0626f3529647ee38295324e1f2f
a8d06350438a7fc7adda80ccea5b6c98fd246388
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSB' 'sip-files00066.txt'
396d922381227ad5925a8b3bc1b690b5
7d8f18273f99aca9f281f445cf47754fb0f8176f
'2011-11-14T23:08:29-05:00'
describe
'9079' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSC' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
375831efc3157082239bcda6e17e9989
bbaec1b295da12a2c7f9c108a834419f078922f1
describe
'1518234' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSD' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
3ab3ae652b9ae8e29396804ead79d824
56fd6eaead3f16edf56bc2240e7ce2eb576f98d6
'2011-11-14T23:06:21-05:00'
describe
'70230' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSE' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
14afd5a54a35bb40ffb4f1f82e4a17e0
b83296155f358349e56add330c3cf79da73273ca
describe
'28346' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSF' 'sip-files00067.pro'
1b82cd69e30580d72849a23785621f1e
8678d779dff2b7b1d8e083c9eccc3b7bf2f9148d
'2011-11-14T23:09:33-05:00'
describe
'23940' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSG' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
6b168d3047af70e3c15d10fefe67ef54
21d6eac12005b675876b18d4fd463a96f4e4de95
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSH' 'sip-files00067.tif'
13fcd868d05a1a1093a9502626b3dc20
7c0d78584e5581293cc4e7fa62059d3b87260287
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSI' 'sip-files00067.txt'
5af2702e6fc74ac4d4572ba910139549
b7a8fd733a3bcc2fb47c01ac39513c147c7eab5f
'2011-11-14T23:09:14-05:00'
describe
'8931' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSJ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
74a30f66a3ca3a720e52ee9e37026f8d
9182f5ce291a9d2426ab6cd01b441fa82cc980d5
'2011-11-14T23:07:14-05:00'
describe
'1466263' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSK' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
a475d17c46865056cc4e21e26c61f8af
1fb6d1fd5fdb5609665d5919d9ef22f42dfeacfa
describe
'71765' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSL' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
1741811905159bff45e10766703c8705
6744975105013573952476eab6fa5c0adf491f97
describe
'27543' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSM' 'sip-files00068.pro'
481da2142203ed96ccd2643f5f242896
0d34487039dbd32d8ae855c47eb22ef9c31cdfa1
describe
'25536' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSN' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
45a810575bec285d1d548c7281cc4ff3
23c1bb9a5a10040cadc8dabaa625cc7aa89691f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSO' 'sip-files00068.tif'
402b5392657166f608cde8135cdd2cea
5b29c0d2ac769e411f76d162031859eae865b932
'2011-11-14T23:09:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSP' 'sip-files00068.txt'
4bd97db277c508d980ed6cbf9fd5c746
b816f813d95e53ef1368d07e1045ad200423fd0c
'2011-11-14T23:08:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSQ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
efba643ce16ba6cd7be04b3daf28656c
b21db46e8f6399cb2d058fe661b6b553b3c21055
describe
'1518236' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSR' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
6f9a65f57f3a57801f08242bb5e5b9f0
b4d6b5223b379bd4743b07046456a482bdfe421f
describe
'72728' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSS' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
43f0aae8b3f5ec3681c16688f486cb03
d51b9828797772b7b86fdbdf42acda8bc19f7590
describe
'28112' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABST' 'sip-files00069.pro'
b14542d315129e294d8b85095ffca515
4c2dfdd33b29e9e301f18cb648019f617468a2a2
describe
'26027' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSU' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
af5330d6545bcc370dcae12b4c3ba320
9723a7398afc3a3ee57a0f41a7271bba62f12d10
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSV' 'sip-files00069.tif'
f4f61f5d7c462b0e669973fcb3eb0f8c
e1dcbb3ae3ff787fae5b6dc0888def019ddc77d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSW' 'sip-files00069.txt'
3cc6cf2a4589de9ef5d6ffaf3f08c485
f6c399b87e603af2c476cf2d261d021547629f0e
describe
'8732' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSX' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
9f533c9ea07a34cc1125225bc3edffe2
fd268d735d28d74c159b34596d3e6ee9602ded82
'2011-11-14T23:06:35-05:00'
describe
'1466269' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSY' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
69deaab3deee56afea80f8166eb9bc18
09731ab03441279a8222eeeb715a7791b12788a6
'2011-11-14T23:08:45-05:00'
describe
'73164' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABSZ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
b318cbeeee17c5a2fab8549de3e56d52
41c20d962776a7f586417e7f94d627402a3ea5ad
describe
'28452' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTA' 'sip-files00070.pro'
2eedb525c8c351cbd150ca804abe8d2e
f0ef28ac6a04c2fcb4e91bf1663336a1a49b14a0
describe
'25850' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTB' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
f469bdf25e21f53cb75c2d2b58714618
8000962bb3e1b23a09b958a2cefccc884f0be4e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTC' 'sip-files00070.tif'
6eb25a98b532b8f14d41239e382028c9
2cfdc01ab394f16dd50f51c4274a18f48499a00f
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTD' 'sip-files00070.txt'
e6f44849a37237764838f3c952ae3851
0b89c6d34bce6151b96ae727e80cfa8b5dc3115c
describe
'9342' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTE' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
abafe48110630c67b0f87995fb70063d
8c4bee56c1a88706b69cc6ca722f84ae4e3b1627
'2011-11-14T23:10:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTF' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
27e74f6e1bfa58cd332713e2a3038e83
efd541d4da97a8ef024a684fe07fd475939dd133
describe
'71818' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTG' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
fa65dbd0eaa0353d86d45e6d4e5d5b1f
8d6d31e894574c1eb66329a3afb06309ae81f4a6
'2011-11-14T23:10:55-05:00'
describe
'28276' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTH' 'sip-files00071.pro'
8dd8e77fe89a284b59eb51d8b9f581bb
58c3e73ca025ea8ef064ca26ae9988291c4b6634
describe
'24575' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTI' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
b00e24835e81307858e4d84e870d473c
301c0b851b1931497a4e3d06f0bc23c12c0ee2e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTJ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
4002a142407ec969b1c1b3cdf8f3e9e2
1b645b66ddfe09049d242b3ed46f0fa4d41678e6
'2011-11-14T23:09:12-05:00'
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTK' 'sip-files00071.txt'
64f513bd0637c4a488f992bb6823ee27
8cfb089d073396624de7d863c001e7e0b70f87b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTL' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
9926bc09b93cbc45cd38584aeaf6008b
307437c355fc25e1c0df1749a144f56673368b97
'2011-11-14T23:07:27-05:00'
describe
'1466292' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTM' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
293b5fc30ceb6840a69f9e6f763da9ac
2381ae3e0abdaceb63ce67beb6522306894507f1
describe
'74633' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTN' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
2240adfae0687e34499aa60f509e4af4
d6bd6ecd358ac934b6e1bca903bf7f780f4887a8
describe
'29426' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTO' 'sip-files00072.pro'
870f618ce69f4a5dc760155ca3b06d2f
d0ca36adb406fed51a72a336de47fe4f8bc2f107
describe
'25582' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTP' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
2658ba31765cf4b9b98ae66886398a76
12608b27e05b90cd465ca45867c1a440a32b4894
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTQ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
f5258640982f80c34f73753043986555
c507b849ff80ae7d6cf19e2a96c02ef3bd0e7001
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTR' 'sip-files00072.txt'
4e1151d3021503d831fe0a2193061f44
618e8d65e72fcf51d7c68653d631b07feb6f40d3
describe
'9171' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTS' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
e48cc2f00402deb02954231af0b8107c
a25815955aaad04a83712a8a5f488fa41b74ef0e
'2011-11-14T23:06:41-05:00'
describe
'1518227' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTT' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
2da40465f8ccaabe8ffa29d08f8a0cfa
f9b98fa371a1b1640b4b05d700aab671f46ac021
describe
'72297' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTU' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
57e4af4fb3f149e36b737b240e09a86e
b79621b47c3c136f0d7bd8798c4e73b6abe0f9c1
describe
'28012' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTV' 'sip-files00073.pro'
beaf5d1138171be0ea0840ef1a342d6f
6eeed4bea5beee5643f9b9652916ca7336594e40
describe
'29390' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTW' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
92d079028cab9f9cb127dda58edef254
27a87ee9d21f3b2781c1236c3ade12bd2877a8ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTX' 'sip-files00073.tif'
06d0053a47bbe1e4ea06cfdc28c90561
1d7702764f9ead261655ef0c760afd80e6cec7a8
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTY' 'sip-files00073.txt'
6dc51c42cbd0fa8390aa689aa736117f
8b90e999e5f86438c64b84f87afc3134e21288d9
'2011-11-14T23:09:51-05:00'
describe
'8883' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABTZ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
08c87f730d5f160fae88cc7f41119c67
07ba34cb3a4a39b8bf193a129af328d6a34cf947
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUA' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
f378fe78f0d9dee90a7de6764881d033
b3d11f824953ce209d7591391c22df7f60c19f8b
describe
'74194' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUB' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
f3343944c339ff2d7eb17da8a37cc9c7
33d89fc26095beb1b9cd2879c7d8ae80a598949f
describe
'28722' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUC' 'sip-files00074.pro'
fa97d1dcb66b8ae7bdb57794e0c66790
a50c877198a6b2df515166452d59241e59909fec
describe
'24140' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUD' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
a67dcb4461e78c7193e91d8d0d67380b
90435da5c6b0a09127132cf6d344431ff640c0c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUE' 'sip-files00074.tif'
7b2a5691036a08a3865995701ecb6415
83e0f03c97f4b0c43131e97ca9154a9428913a4f
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUF' 'sip-files00074.txt'
072314f1b1056a8fdc711d658b67be8c
cdf2fc601de51e1534758189ad74f4181fdcf45d
'2011-11-14T23:07:48-05:00'
describe
'9143' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUG' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
5d3a4c306b3cd78090980a659b8f036f
8143e64ec62f5e859d4bf0385142370b6773d7ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUH' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
978a0369b4d87475a635265b18ceeb4a
0835598dc6b9dccd488c7deef80a8bb8af8171cb
describe
'74041' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUI' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
cad391e7ddc64c77c0adcbe8c8e21f3b
1677ea68eedebd8c2c14b9fae2c865d2f1b5de12
'2011-11-14T23:07:45-05:00'
describe
'29392' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUJ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
5585213e855a3162593a7d75c4dd8104
b98fe52df8c319063e37fe212fbb47d2eee58fca
describe
'25052' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
272eb6ad65c04df3f85bb9411547e798
187c425e07a5fe50f2a80ea31ed9e03f1ee11fc8
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUL' 'sip-files00075.tif'
72495f75f04d9ec8f240eba181e413cd
f3ff2595111e667d8f474241d61195753b9bd5de
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUM' 'sip-files00075.txt'
93ff87e0dbc79dba1592e8ad66ec9a24
b67b0dd4d950aedbb09ca348eaffd4c51324bed4
describe
'9074' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUN' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
93b5e4ff7273897ed8c495df0195b54a
77e0b5084888394dea83369367fcc979bdd26b73
describe
'1466179' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUO' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
37c3d8cd0eff13d0cf2db4ecc1e6af3f
9535987df0f9c3ea6c84bcd432f16fef013e155a
'2011-11-14T23:10:19-05:00'
describe
'70855' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUP' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
993a335c165ae8b0ecfb1ae959884b63
8795a5b5ce8fbdde9e203b543ada90cbd1bb0b5d
describe
'28237' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUQ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
b6779815dc38906321dc611ffdee0cb3
c4ea3e4b84b3fd2cf5cf3879dcb715fcd6139171
describe
'23774' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUR' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
8be86fb984ddff86d982535e7b925660
0c87353d066ad3fba0a2e027f45db51dd431c953
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUS' 'sip-files00076.tif'
8fa8b85923a6395ed4e8ad1012e905de
15de4d1c226f055eeac69bb9eb523d721f8e93ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUT' 'sip-files00076.txt'
2de6cc772fa1f8ee86ea3154d71e37a0
e6f86af5b1500be6b6f79ec4796349bd6d65c68a
'2011-11-14T23:07:32-05:00'
describe
'9135' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUU' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
9c1e4413b0410e2cc19ab3c5c49295bf
9960cff9e954beb4433ec6a98245f00ad8b19e25
describe
'1518232' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUV' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
8e336eca5d643c6a85f55f5fe614894f
914df7eac4d23654cd3104fe1274c79b92a5de9e
describe
'72173' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUW' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
4fa98a0d13dfae9eb285113bb9a1f618
1568e77d0c03dd7f66a6e76a590edd70d736bc50
describe
'28598' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUX' 'sip-files00077.pro'
e5e9c669eb442c0a7b6be4048a32082c
802fa9fccecdd49b5eef6dfc6e914925d6ef8b8c
describe
'24607' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUY' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
17fdb4e728855c062f1649afb4416b6f
b8a8fce395f70ecbe154f54bdca1d6d217b5db99
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABUZ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
a736133af6174d747f07d75a25fff22e
2c33fe803408814c9b8fc6733fc846a5a45b6f87
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVA' 'sip-files00077.txt'
a66e2504aa71a56c3d17da218462775d
672036c46c9d64778c149f1e944cc6a80446212c
describe
'8826' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVB' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2fdd6469ac819c309267aefce193c8fb
1f9c629e0e4d8d9cfc7de600783905ca11784ae5
describe
'1466171' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVC' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
226c9f204e0808c9a874e48c3a41a90c
a219dbd2a1019b8ee4ed79bc7c31262f79ceed72
describe
'74175' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVD' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b8322a4d47fda1cb777263642cd3ab82
071a771bc1120b4afd0f5029bb2c92d02d0962be
describe
'29307' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVE' 'sip-files00078.pro'
93c8d5cf40af2f689846b0d3b40a5ed2
f0c9d1cad6a686035d1ab201fa83cfe182da153d
describe
'23344' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVF' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
258cb611ffb725ca7e5b91be57116769
c32285cab5b11b95d707a7cdad4526ef16268377
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVG' 'sip-files00078.tif'
6bf74733f39bb64b75b011493aac9e31
79fcfde9cce7aa86d647318cf7a6fd8a4705c56f
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVH' 'sip-files00078.txt'
ff2ba0a2a0ec6ffdc58645ff8a907f7d
7cc3a86e12c377d3aad5a091d122a35deff04c0d
describe
'9450' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVI' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
5e791d5b9bd1842d100167c75ea6157e
9491cfb0fb91cdcddf157886c3bfa332dc9650bd
describe
'1518185' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVJ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
c77e836b1ebb9ebd768f88f1883e59d6
ca307d03f60a7947945ba0e65ee3907d85443f93
describe
'71570' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVK' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
728f7dcbb49898f19d4939f6059cad98
7b37801e5ff14812c72d59056647eb7821c993de
describe
'28876' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVL' 'sip-files00079.pro'
15e7d7bb16886036969e741aaada5f5c
29fd6542e98f2c9ab3fe0287373dc4fdd238d939
describe
'24247' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVM' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
5c61da7b04a735971763f0e7d8fa47ee
f0ae64a55a27cc06301d1d9fd856ee64f7aaf749
'2011-11-14T23:10:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVN' 'sip-files00079.tif'
234fc345e22a8f8bb73ae38e71a4f48c
33c1175f5d363da7d0ebc8a967109242c8a375ed
'2011-11-14T23:07:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVO' 'sip-files00079.txt'
50a97d64a779b2241fca361feb48d45a
2b89982de3d7f9b442789b36a1e003e1471e41b3
describe
'8961' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVP' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
378045e2afd0e15d7eff6658ceb089f8
578e93e75235fe8467f06fbd8be4bba7474dd384
describe
'1466096' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVQ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
ac91f92bc311bea12f4148eb71829bcb
2f7eacd1a8793ef24eb0fe816eadc044c9f0d945
describe
'70912' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVR' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
052292287d0f178ab6dfc51af49f1bc9
1719e5e7042b4e617bd55f352c87825b9bf037c5
describe
'27614' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVS' 'sip-files00080.pro'
67bb6e56342e9cc0e630cc00971a683a
f9a8ad418d9dae7d23d6cdd43599f4ba89c03684
describe
'22649' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVT' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
fedab55482b0b22c443866e2fc1b4814
36eec9e0ecca80f934f44bf9bde182671176c7f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVU' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c7f96e0f86a06ce0a28bb78f8ff3924e
2004d558a36d9dbdf8374d64de897f39dc81803f
'2011-11-14T23:08:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVV' 'sip-files00080.txt'
a28652e0bb341c5c2a759e9832303aff
9e63441bb3ac45ee0685017fc31761e07f47b2ef
describe
'8869' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVW' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
a822d2fb52a62faa916bdf2e35535623
11b3a5c4c9c19f38c00256d299648dd2147af881
describe
'1518235' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVX' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d66ae8fc6633d78a9b6648f391489070
a1f78e0c25b183b0f2639ccb023a0e209c71b1de
describe
'69103' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVY' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
b11f3c6b585384e5f374ff0d56cb564b
f9cb001178a1fffd64b712bd969e59d565aebcb7
describe
'26895' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABVZ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
29fb2aa5fec799723bb845eee5f2d860
56f2ff3caa56032bcc54ea506d6400855867ddcd
describe
'22287' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWA' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
7ee7efea87b68dbe5e79c6c8cb968503
6084dafee5693794d9e2da6e3100c969a6df17c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWB' 'sip-files00081.tif'
11808a01b0219433b2a6201ea89e2c3b
b5831e5338555f53bd858631703e0d072e80577b
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWC' 'sip-files00081.txt'
561c9e82fe5cc4d0bcecfa2fb37b3cec
f338748c41909ed448c9814fa143a2e97a4fc88f
'2011-11-14T23:07:05-05:00'
describe
'8258' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWD' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
e210322a6ee4d9f97930d4038e121db7
5a2a24c9f3edf488f29c376061c930295b9ed22d
describe
'1236979' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWE' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
02c86deb23a4ccda8a46570a9eca3ec6
bbb7408bf8b7cea7057cc898eaf6e2d34968269f
'2011-11-14T23:09:15-05:00'
describe
'33000' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWF' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
85fa41623348fbc106768b83e798b232
6c156e072bcb798895941a26ba720104983ef00e
'2011-11-14T23:06:34-05:00'
describe
'7017' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWG' 'sip-files00082.pro'
54ad88fd7f083dd4b6084353e8c38ce5
268c93ad18912427ee6852cfc5491a78f7abc392
'2011-11-14T23:09:37-05:00'
describe
'9721' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWH' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
d14909fb5c2e021485c2eef4225452e0
529247cebaadedb92b48c5ccb45e246b8d175065
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWI' 'sip-files00082.tif'
f8ab92964bc3d024e1e7ef5bbe8bca8d
49cf4cbe708b78e6e85da828901f0b9e3d11ddcf
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
f2ca50928a19fd03e31ee6799ddd9ac8
2ce75df956aee8746ea877b87cedcce0607ab5ec
describe
'3904' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWK' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
9c290bde8c098f00c6dee2a012bbb676
ef6661d63a95d38da207ecc09247075fca4c89be
'2011-11-14T23:06:49-05:00'
describe
'1428882' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWL' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
9a564d8c3188e2f8e474a9bc8b35f447
a483d5b312a37a744c8af5eccb24bfcee78c6f93
'2011-11-14T23:07:15-05:00'
describe
'55024' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWM' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
91934aa1c10ba0444768e36e24859be6
93ba499722c7b630a788b9c0b4ff07336b820de2
describe
'19695' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWN' 'sip-files00083.pro'
52cea719e387b8eef71f9e6120295985
991d2249b4b23c17355a2cccd889095f8aa6448d
describe
'19567' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWO' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
34a369c6f189d669add7f5b1dd71fa46
76cf71e0c2b14b118faa08cd3ed9044726aa6ae1
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWP' 'sip-files00083.tif'
fa865ab81b7270674c3002a22241de55
eeac431faaa65c067a3d7d2da39ba5cf38cbd1a6
describe
'787' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWQ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
9322a114c6447d729d2154c59dd295df
8b073b9c5035be928b4d37975ed0ef3e95e4a4f9
describe
'6766' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWR' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
f331166bdec134bda021889c5db72f8b
ef05f1228bca12528629be7943c0bf75fa38ce7f
describe
'1466259' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWS' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
7d37b6c9143754cc76fd6231e452eb69
a82e207517366ac8cd6895b368116c3d37135f51
describe
'73762' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWT' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
11813faa155b014d9fa6a0ff5ea1b068
238a4733209810e0570b35673a204a646c6ed066
describe
'29183' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWU' 'sip-files00084.pro'
8bdbe18ea06e6c35b04c67f56502c335
049564c95b2eb441d904533f55d6771306c2cf12
describe
'26605' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWV' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
ec939a3dae90a18000e7dbbdfbac95ee
b9a3176d31121dc9108efdedf38a80cf641487c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWW' 'sip-files00084.tif'
1a949f61b9057d15969230102aec56f2
9388337316094bd0719ee7d47b05171c303e7a8e
'2011-11-14T23:08:42-05:00'
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWX' 'sip-files00084.txt'
9044431e6888697c0f0eae94cf78d6f9
30250c1cc8812202603e4b1e86198bb767515e7d
describe
'9484' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWY' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
2e26e223a4d9331144a49bace581c5c7
1268e955a636c8da1a5e6018ada1ea4da8d65a30
describe
'1518226' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABWZ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
05ab98ee868a50c93dabfc90dbfa055b
efae3cd2e314a3fc24d4989687e737f6ebb0def7
describe
'70978' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXA' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ad6e787a47c40bb8910dcca97aab5196
fecfaf37c5c033d7cf0efde7ec42f6f32f770271
describe
'28309' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXB' 'sip-files00085.pro'
c5272728662140fb302bd16233cfdbac
b9d2a9fc4c74305d9092fa819744890ed4969f17
describe
'22113' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXC' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
942f7e861ed9804855a0d74bbb6056a3
54cbde67c550c4fc679b15507dde96423d626794
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXD' 'sip-files00085.tif'
79ea245595a521d18779316661671193
cc2ae7d56d8be0312b7e4f0bb5c9b43274b7f573
'2011-11-14T23:09:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXE' 'sip-files00085.txt'
f8ef23f93dc17140aa81ded8c43557e6
f3450ccdd5eae63097e5adbda328db8d7646e7f8
describe
'8919' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXF' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
96a7a487b75632596821df34658cc84f
8925750d495819fa00322658f026a83d21bea6a9
describe
'1466169' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXG' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
afad9e97e4726a85b4377696024eb9e7
620a67cc1d4e56e7452af7cd99374671a798c165
describe
'73909' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXH' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
fe60bd3a6e4fbb5c4ba5e373db3c704e
9ada8c713fcfa72f682d2346b022fa1efbf27105
describe
'29302' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXI' 'sip-files00086.pro'
4d3f37e7770ab6d15848e39578773189
02b46d1a4195fcad893273c9fce75aa34baafa3f
describe
'27105' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXJ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
5b50dc3bff70bc4a7eacd18fad6667ee
e4e08b1da79ccf0075ea20569b854c9a70c816b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXK' 'sip-files00086.tif'
aa71eacc40bba5a4f88e475174c4d748
39dc4d7074c2f4ece39aa3f941117efb52a32efc
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXL' 'sip-files00086.txt'
601dac4e88792bfc678db0cf6720580a
75bc354e7c145ec728768d9c2e2f21b461db8ccf
describe
'9402' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXM' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
cd685b2f3152d252fa1fc17a90448f5d
5d1bc9d6a0695c767fab2dbb029f037839779ecc
'2011-11-14T23:07:13-05:00'
describe
'1254935' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXN' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
853dcbc21a451d096e04189056f442c5
81df639f3f340ba156a1345811880ecaa7903dbe
describe
'39647' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXO' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
ada82e63499e07cd677972fbf70aa314
e5599cddb2bec3d640d78d6406572c0b522fdb64
describe
'11377' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXP' 'sip-files00087.pro'
038479b5901c4f0eb62a0138e29d342c
a3d14b18f1109c9f4bdc73942b0ff76ca2a0f183
describe
'12317' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXQ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
913a281369da747b19f5be4891e4635c
f6bf025fcda873998657d42cd386501d2e2d1ae8
'2011-11-14T23:05:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXR' 'sip-files00087.tif'
abbf7efe4975b679e7baf58753a7c9a7
3ca73355df5d87263c5b5102308813f752964a1c
describe
'465' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXS' 'sip-files00087.txt'
f3d6276c439ad83becdfba27b6f6d62b
801de73618fe8da2259e47107660d28f48bd7b3d
describe
'4864' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXT' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
db46ddca3fc36be369f2e1d4e310dc52
9e67f66198fd2ab1e29b0835320d01a067ee6b28
describe
'1436097' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXU' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
3a120c7c37aba789e40ebb6c93a7e567
b1d511ede5f84290612200b40684135147b99e9a
describe
'53699' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXV' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
d14fac0afd699a24fd585bdbd0bfad36
295956e2be49477aed3602f1588f61d1e57b8c11
describe
'17855' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXW' 'sip-files00088.pro'
22d80919cd7496b7c610b9fb86786a04
a7b4a8ce2443cb8a72a05629422e0e0bb8ce04d2
describe
'19902' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXX' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
9df1922b834a35de6b97f49589bd7bea
44be9ba33571047068a58e02960b9562157630a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXY' 'sip-files00088.tif'
453a10f451ec5f1d6fa3dd9d88fe2253
077f5be74fe288db8acaec1400935b618c4dab03
describe
'721' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABXZ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
5e3ef384e8c1972298330346ff58123e
cbc0f67bd3999b35eff29706313148d5e38d2fd4
'2011-11-14T23:10:32-05:00'
describe
'6398' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYA' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
819af9c6d96148d23f7e0bff5ce1574c
4c9db0ebb75a317d86235ec40c1a45a737acad4a
describe
'1518228' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYB' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
dd8763e5d5dc50d24e12edde675bb58a
ba04d7ea034e51899a41d1260600ec1100d5650c
describe
'75441' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYC' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
3eac42ddba0965e50c8104a2e6267233
d5b541a1b60988a84ddc35581b854382b5ab63f7
describe
'29817' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYD' 'sip-files00089.pro'
da3418c3b8e198e27c0729158667b5a6
d3d6bceda7c591d71936bd6ad6c0a0bc428d4a77
describe
'30444' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYE' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
3602be52a4456782d222fc03eaee02ea
79023746936a32a3d9631e8657067132afb76f1c
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYF' 'sip-files00089.tif'
4d7c323300360cea6b533ca591074413
4b7942951da7c892b6df6d824e229c2b0f6d3395
'2011-11-14T23:10:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYG' 'sip-files00089.txt'
0fbaa52d48cbffefb6121d602334f1b7
13667ad1b5d6347b99c8c689b7219343eb9c191f
describe
'8812' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYH' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
6eaefc596dbfab1740c2f2ad88db577b
687e0082e91d96450c9f76947ad2402924525186
describe
'1466285' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYI' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
547b36978aadd38bb8fb5927624839ee
124bf0b05034019730b2e1143ca41b7bb7a45533
describe
'73219' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYJ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
f148ff29fb3ec1d1b5bf32616acf4c30
c0ce03a72987a7152c30463031ccce6948275906
describe
'28175' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYK' 'sip-files00090.pro'
c1b0737827f983ca3945095e20d479d8
2e1504b132766bfc2d78637c598fe4048aa291ba
describe
'29368' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYL' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
4cc4515112382add9a7c9632f0714d51
48ac3cdf7b827e3b53914697dd6fb5e262e69464
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYM' 'sip-files00090.tif'
c2a4ea39f633a4c68e1b7808fe518b96
d9a0692f410d6a239f84e18c4f72b8f293d68a7f
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYN' 'sip-files00090.txt'
def89ef32bfde7a9a40e570ed7e79f67
9668a1df10d72889fcf8096278b0143600c1b013
describe
'9176' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYO' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
d40164e01efc60d2242fe410d8a1755a
a13dd777d235b0949ab334a8827c18b0ee1d75ea
describe
'1518238' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYP' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
38098149a9f4e0fcb00b77c94e94185f
63e1b800fae0ca6d5b5605125702fdd4b16f463a
describe
'73559' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYQ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
aa10eeb4a1ff5abadbeb2cbaf980075d
aba5ae3c171fddfeea7b6247f6535283317d365d
describe
'29038' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYR' 'sip-files00091.pro'
6760247820b3cd62918601a75ae0f646
3a4505caf917a128a8999be85c921834a6db5334
'2011-11-14T23:10:59-05:00'
describe
'29353' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYS' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
63cf59f98e4f300df591cbf1740fd8e9
60ea0e0f3ddbe070f9d6c4bcecbc64cfc9829ffc
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYT' 'sip-files00091.tif'
2eaf8acf00664cc741a762caa30ff318
f451783bff5b24a46fea5ea28e8a17cc9fc62944
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYU' 'sip-files00091.txt'
a948bce2f331ad1205359c6802670aed
e0840159bbdaf77ae98749e991486bea72929963
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYV' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
53cd2408e6b51d6c8425a84bb537a53c
b11332b9d593d2fb177203c8dd8f15007dfb9d29
describe
'1466252' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYW' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4e0ecc1140c871faecc5ea3df0416e28
19dd3678344f76ff6716c3370ef79e9337e403eb
describe
'73157' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYX' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
29080f61c093f4e908bb2af93ddcada2
659c9489181348f533adef191b604ff932abec8d
describe
'28386' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYY' 'sip-files00092.pro'
888d8f2ea9da852f578beacfcd0e216f
fb38227db7b4cb3e4f480ece1220f8a81921424b
describe
'26899' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABYZ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
d10bc24b70b17e5107e8da0ccb3adbfe
a1f5de65633f8932531f1277c2ef4edd49cd59fe
'2011-11-14T23:09:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZA' 'sip-files00092.tif'
5b458318e0c819c790b59f1e739db6fc
603dac4772d6bbd92f8c87429fec2c30293b1d6d
'2011-11-14T23:06:28-05:00'
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZB' 'sip-files00092.txt'
110baa989a23b58e4e8ffb0239a35e45
1e8d3ee3080f7400b8b25b36520c2a1effe20dee
describe
'8760' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZC' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
081a2b5dcc2b51023d508e93732f8109
42bca251d2928b3ede9c2dbc565a227fcb74c740
describe
'1518201' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZD' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
9b61f226407450817d5f907fc3c7ca11
7fede201f6d5b4d0d5949ee0e0726e98f2ca3fbb
describe
'74060' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZE' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
d5733f1bc714fec1e6b9ab9373240a90
c11014463e5b2bb7186d937c268eccf9455e18da
describe
'27479' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZF' 'sip-files00093.pro'
c9d035fa4a71ddde9df687ee8c7df61b
7273c6e6b8e75ada924b89d7e20a2b45b9a22912
describe
'27724' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZG' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
32a1f026acb1abb4035477de620e6776
6889b85d09108c39bf700de009b7ef1a8512e267
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZH' 'sip-files00093.tif'
46d61a9c10aef730c90a1c3c8d956945
59e9a40dd4076af211967074128a026873c85d2c
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZI' 'sip-files00093.txt'
4b5f7d2bcbcee0ca3a54e11cf3d66e20
8cc7a7048b77a186976b8e1966743924f53ee97c
'2011-11-14T23:10:17-05:00'
describe
'8571' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZJ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
f3f3fd894a871183d66f81f8cc9f7778
ada715db025cb15315a5c76e15e0dc83ab9d01a1
describe
'1715849' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZK' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
31461f068bf7089fa98b382bad4d8151
c77d934ebaa0f9a983c0ac348ca6d945a9c8574d
describe
'138443' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZL' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
f2729c206ca3bcbe5edcf6484adf7adc
ca308f93c089d49f1138bd42826edd3ef1b05500
describe
'6642' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZM' 'sip-files00094.pro'
e91b1ba343baf04e5be3d0cb56d19dcd
0b272da8ce8244d984b8004004f92b73afbe3e11
describe
'41779' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZN' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
dc7bba7481e53dcc408e4c9692ac6808
e3ef03c9d1865cde883e8ca5709d904c1cf17935
describe
'13745731' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZO' 'sip-files00094.tif'
8862687515edeabd18e0c8f76e6f1edb
8811c5d98803b2a52552a79b15e2eb8eb0ac347e
describe
'692' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZP' 'sip-files00094.txt'
44508bbd963cbcd077c5e6334617d8d7
2c11b94dd647877c4c2092a653e4773ecc45e843
describe
Invalid character
'12178' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZQ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
6e7b08975ee8e6968c165938013a6736
fc86330f4d4abab95e259102c519318ab27a8666
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZR' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d7177702a848eb58ce5146f76b772463
4df376ed7dd37286fc7d1bbc2a17d53425fc576b
describe
'46725' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZS' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
ef8a422820b515af26115685701baaf0
9f9377cad2f39d44f98e93243a741539335bd458
describe
'5555' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZT' 'sip-files00095.pro'
a54777c1af5ce6a1ae2192db5a877b45
01167310ac1bc9cbadfbce2cc5058f850b8472e5
describe
'13614' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZU' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
6786cb0ef6bee3389ccde53834d06e6a
8f5b45630a2a842bac614868ad211b9c0054934a
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZV' 'sip-files00095.tif'
9c989898f42f7b9933705706288f0e09
b11885169d81c48333677b8cff3ec9ffac399926
describe
'333' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZW' 'sip-files00095.txt'
fe4a543ee0271aed0165589e951d1666
3610fe97863f1200d3db5573ce7d003ec9eb3c28
describe
Invalid character
'4743' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZX' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
bb1cf0b24ec403cfc869e57825cf7a0f
91c0996b49b456e47dffd31a15e00c3be6e02f21
describe
'1457355' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZY' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
08e9b2c693d1ed02af7d10466f4f40e8
7c88848d527b2696c7ac32e70e320b1a61f0f3b5
describe
'33041' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAABZZ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
edf9105df0928552ec4a36e316ad5e1d
38dcc782fa799d43cc8ae0da0db769ba3ebd52d6
describe
'4559' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAA' 'sip-files00096.pro'
a69485f94d952b0ce4e5715a0310a31f
162f1fa722ef95be6aee874926ab9967087c3b3e
describe
'9468' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAB' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
da1b4b663e38e01dfbfa36f469dd1cfb
68e302b40c0111f867f03ab0e5b326a08ef59086
'2011-11-14T23:09:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAC' 'sip-files00096.tif'
62b025973e3248c8f218700ecb52edcb
332142c70b1999f3bb188a404beee9e6e439976c
describe
'208' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAD' 'sip-files00096.txt'
aa30797eae8268c03eab5de634f61d2e
10c216faaf27a013ef134bbb64afbe6a5ced0039
describe
'3374' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAE' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
323e57812263b28183d2d588b39a8210
47f84212893904c9a0078427225833687029450a
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAF' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
78f672fa981f5356cc7888a6a16cfd4f
38136d7425690737f572852cdd6a058f039d6280
describe
'56093' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAG' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
f9a34eac4e4330232df0cd4e0e205543
606deec485a527393a739a9a2b7b409dde831272
describe
'19652' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAH' 'sip-files00097.pro'
33de0ffd762ca5356ee35eedaaac0a82
795cd703d665336a0250a71728399b4893bdc95f
describe
'19391' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAI' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
5ed26acf3b02d825863e9609c22cce87
f20912e740215f66f98c38f0373c193bdd4072a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
ac7f8bd2b82e9ae77b1b821672322ddb
826a5091007bf930441fd85aa679b2299ab0a3d7
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAK' 'sip-files00097.txt'
2f887cce4754c7884971e172b2b1477b
8d6d37c12251eb13073366935aefce3a0fe8f521
describe
'6653' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAL' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
18d4c12376d2ce4cba3a8a0ceabb3971
2498e52023fee15d3ecbf327ce25cd3725cde461
describe
'1466150' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAM' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
c64734d37c7556ac3503148b1f6c4e58
7b07a91b9c0a0cfcbf94b4c2ea77b7a2ac05805b
describe
'74445' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAN' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
93e221d0c36dc4f2c570bda20d541267
e17595fd6dd5040dc75f15aa60813df73b2600a6
describe
'28625' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAO' 'sip-files00098.pro'
f7fc4d31ffca2d858ff653f842b1716e
8b5bfbf8365dbc637390d9764fda63bc56a7cfaa
describe
'24824' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAP' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
5e85c15716bf67e303f66fe7ea5e2c6d
77161c7906d8ff1c530be6e698705d684ddb5c6a
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAQ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
63354ef25116d138dac911f71d740378
3a12c63bbb69ee7dee45d19c52e7ac4e50f6d675
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAR' 'sip-files00098.txt'
28334c35cc4f7878c7ed93316c98b80e
a8f101cf3e895b1e76b390be12425bdb13e91191
describe
'9284' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAS' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
4915a4b1959f89b40e3eb2b3ba8ea09a
9bbef806f31808bb362722d536f758741bfb7578
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAT' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
b74a3e982a8639224607f156f7c1f32e
cebd5efd2fc679c82c7e4dce7451509f20fe07f2
describe
'75301' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAU' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
4b6b9791b3c26ca4346b7af792e483f4
850d502fa221d105ff6e3cee116dff96a7c2668e
describe
'29544' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAV' 'sip-files00099.pro'
31c69f9f0eb2e667156a23772d1afae1
c0fe380fc302aed28df3c4505c8ad59a9a82c551
describe
'25779' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAW' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
4dbef5ae59aec3521e37fb046e1ed0f7
26c3f2ccd60e0a060812b8d2c4ec6d2e5cb4b9db
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAX' 'sip-files00099.tif'
ec4ea6e79d56514a9b111df11fb25448
410986ad9e9f505afe1828da9cafe7edf2cca66b
'2011-11-14T23:10:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAY' 'sip-files00099.txt'
b6aee3661b4b74439474eafda4cedd2f
c9468f0d25d614979778a42373fad62a0324b9a0
describe
'9182' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACAZ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
78587c037a9203d2380fbb04c171e0a7
3d21291e57883522086fb649af8ba1ce07113a15
describe
'1466287' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBA' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
96465edb4faec9db0ec0f4e158fceb4f
612a79ae08f06af11e4d969ecaf8fced75fc7e82
describe
'73758' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBB' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
b6d97bdf74216417a52c05f2bb623d60
c7b587e3b782f463ced4461d4f26dc617a79d25d
describe
'28649' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBC' 'sip-files00100.pro'
66633b6945b04cf91eac8009402e4cac
526949e452cdf84ce3cf6ee9aa4fc17ead1e4854
describe
'24300' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBD' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
c2ca30a70d2f959534458bf3cfec7e76
0682703f772b782081144b257d3bf061c53f3447
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBE' 'sip-files00100.tif'
fc86da17533d8c7a666a15fcc54dadfb
861dd53d95a0ac119a4ecb5b1d66b990041a7f09
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBF' 'sip-files00100.txt'
eb006f28dd140698a554a39c26d8ad5b
331fd7a5571d66b5ef239a7e7fb86bab748c5bac
describe
'9012' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBG' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
26f76396049328280730b2fd6183e117
9446efea02237b7f252b99438cc41faa151834cc
describe
'1518240' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBH' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
4dab223d56039e522fe80298cc2a411b
d2d328c1e7a5e2434b4f4097ab7ec1393f700f10
describe
'71782' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBI' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
0ab6b536f13b5dcce5fc85c09f964ba5
3fa19cb77958359fb74df2a95ba909a2802addb3
describe
'27832' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBJ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
1706e5b997c825fc0a327f7421042d50
8b2f1671ddd70375efb15f2a8a54af4f32669e62
describe
'23694' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBK' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
44aa267afbf9eed817417b92afd81e4a
353577f37c356d361de7ae22fe9e1ed38c1f1df2
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBL' 'sip-files00101.tif'
2c1f0bdb317afdddd49988c469578c70
9e8ee8caf692ca27a6cdc4284af65007e394514c
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBM' 'sip-files00101.txt'
8f29266347d7d05b13d8da55d8f4c463
3e2d41f4a8d63dcf7362b83fc3d4dee41e40babb
describe
'8561' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBN' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
3c43a5ac1a298e1676ba0338f975c0fb
216a72d052b9d28868dedd2f0a01d7865637474a
'2011-11-14T23:09:24-05:00'
describe
'1466143' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBO' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
1dcb6676bf46c5502a60724afe7274db
d7984eadace65916c0faee05280d37de5e1f95a8
describe
'71810' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBP' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
3f5f1f566e2f526a97f8c36cba843153
0fd5c07418bb9c607281137782b2f0d84ec8ffcf
describe
'27529' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBQ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
b4032eb5187e0b142308ff9290089d2b
c6717e32124e5344b98847aa4bc08a19f7711b94
describe
'25881' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBR' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
f0ec3b56d11d1733777f6d9ff4031367
6be02861caa342597fe7ef71eb37f296cb9448d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBS' 'sip-files00102.tif'
f7d6da22ed8a5ec706cabb088a45148b
042c89de4dd16a58d802a105fb457bb2d4e9c675
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBT' 'sip-files00102.txt'
15a3e3fb83b61e5bcfad37525c1323e6
5535480f81ac957b022bffb8a9b91156dbe5e0da
describe
'9015' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBU' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
5c84bc86c610dc4111c7c36da39dcadc
68798a6909f282caeb9200a70fa9d3bca8daacff
describe
'1518213' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBV' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
f22b6c2cec1546945002c1f1045e1760
d48ee8f2e7fda27f1359d8590243240d3e7df8bf
describe
'75498' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBW' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
f9af8b99e3de17336e372b44acf3c39b
29b6b2992323ee56633b98a615eaa36724e45932
describe
'28739' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBX' 'sip-files00103.pro'
b1d25982d437ccf39fd3c73d4e983874
10d3f815ea33fe67b34b2075f6e6d43a7437e32c
describe
'30581' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBY' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
73abf73bed7009033c9a7e433bc4b87e
ed2ccebb243e38a7dc06c6c463db509c716dcc1f
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACBZ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
b9a5bde575378211af567c96add4c321
41e5728d8427ec49916e87ae10251e7eb3484b62
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCA' 'sip-files00103.txt'
f029b9384ddbb90c7eb497ebff5807c7
007ecbcb128a31d13e46e953857dd7c9820c52e3
describe
'9078' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCB' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
3a975d25f75d626b74515793bec23d20
dac9d6d995b38ebdefade9321fd5a09b26077729
describe
'1466238' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCC' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
8e15806e3004f0f9177fa3febd924bd7
d7b9a6394858794641b0d0beca311171d967cb26
'2011-11-14T23:07:59-05:00'
describe
'72543' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCD' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
991ac1bd637fe7dd0ea6a145f36aede2
369bfb9a9290a5006a81a4548d88c8a00d994c86
describe
'27308' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCE' 'sip-files00104.pro'
7668dd6540a052154299c4da610a6f7d
dbb10cbdb4c104fc5c68ac563757d853432b7dc4
describe
'22587' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCF' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
3e6b14f4c8d60752e2b3fd459f206807
10ecb49b1213a329f6178af6514651eacf3f267e
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCG' 'sip-files00104.tif'
7a961461443033ad29363bc706b20b81
8004e20a6023092fb8cbbd0b0fe000eb7173fb77
'2011-11-14T23:09:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCH' 'sip-files00104.txt'
4b644aec7cc89f875ea43d146bb9e892
a0d9eb38357ab9414afd9f4d977cd278ff7f7bc5
describe
'8947' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCI' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
59018a31215784a68ef04a817adc79f5
29905621558fed1093be936014927e7b68b09b15
describe
'1518233' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCJ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
99abd2893ee3907615d9230a268b4a68
634e17050ee758f9fb2d9c95fec51229ee5a59f8
describe
'71091' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCK' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
39c768485c0c3e997086be51cb2a0044
779d2d387143d0960d40892a3c3e337c29305b24
describe
'26841' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCL' 'sip-files00105.pro'
61c9f244cacbd18fdb1d55e83c4c1f04
b37e4ad78d1208f38852e295211765a398bb3aba
describe
'26994' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCM' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
a40b96c963aa3c481426bf3fe5d05516
565079ee52d9a863e904a335085b9f26c88b514b
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCN' 'sip-files00105.tif'
43d3c868b367e8cbe33b2a271d21337c
4f82b6dd96dacda4d77e8bd43feec4d374077d97
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCO' 'sip-files00105.txt'
c8eb346bbd0cb6a7eba610fdf8458492
9766c3109f40ca2c4b6e4faee11d62dd0c30dc72
'2011-11-14T23:06:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCP' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
2fba29abca3ea3dcf6e47d8b2d04a6af
71ebc7c26d8df33d96051bd6a7b2adc8352d19cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCQ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
eed0cb37b51b6f7860c6832c146e0c8c
92b0b929e81c8ac2454f47334c9c4eefa225927f
describe
'73340' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCR' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
c9179f8e6eff0d73ec3873d82f430006
9559115509fea8fda3c462f844c85ebe8debca6d
describe
'28218' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCS' 'sip-files00106.pro'
34f25a13b21644c5b421d8e20ffa2edb
b2b97119c63ed72fdea405619ca27669c633136f
describe
'28711' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCT' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
545f7608eac86a425044647c0e49cf16
edb266a9c6f6ba07fae1a1d9118eecbe7a397c01
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCU' 'sip-files00106.tif'
191f7571e43ea2b4e44c514a6643c3a9
042a2118d00d7476ac53fdc14218769a755697c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCV' 'sip-files00106.txt'
b26f663fdc305b7c1c2972f68d140717
cb14ff16513601ba15613261007399022a77c1c1
describe
'9370' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCW' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
2b50f51f3e472d28624f201a56a653c3
d94ece1f9c3f9bdaf0341200cc99148645edcb51
describe
'1518200' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCX' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
db556ef39648e66aee0c9708ab2fa6b4
1ec75f5e12d67dcdbb2b0b438c52083548728c92
'2011-11-14T23:07:49-05:00'
describe
'72570' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCY' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
83f7c0a1e10cdcffefc8c437c96d3a00
c9cdbae9bdf63cd66268cbca1ba4bc27cf036a9e
describe
'27621' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACCZ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
464153d9bf973fb380042840171ca1cd
bc65ccea5498d6992adff8458157f46527c01066
describe
'29448' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDA' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
1c85b3a98a9ccb6d12df239fcc1fae27
6364aa88decff47c32a78fe4068abc35df613abb
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDB' 'sip-files00107.tif'
137b01abd38e4361f5ee09935bbb6435
c7ea357801dcf0ef443a39ccdbe79d84a45b1479
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDC' 'sip-files00107.txt'
f86c19cd8382710382ed5864c512ac9e
181bc6672b37a90f7af5a68d010b6da7b0c75310
describe
'8994' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDD' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
6c39026995b1dd4d72ac13694578f5bf
1b4cc6e8646a0579c0f42708075789d30c30e079
describe
'1398772' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDE' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
3c6595fcf06fa74a09af04e2e367519f
7c42e2017e1ac30fd2d97e530855ea7dbfb2a827
describe
'46563' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDF' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
89dffa4acd271c394983c5f94df49434
9598c827f0ab9d9d7be55079c33bb627c01ec496
describe
'14447' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDG' 'sip-files00108.pro'
80d7e7186945358209feb601b0c865f5
34a8624daad49edf7f652a8b636fc83661ef7126
describe
'15067' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDH' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
0f2d197d54adb15ece224ea80864c168
0b93d291b3a4bc8a091f7b23283b3711738a0c8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDI' 'sip-files00108.tif'
97ad55663af8a47eb2a149491292ff4e
600fa7ad36f98969f2c9ce9c27baadbb816e400a
'2011-11-14T23:08:16-05:00'
describe
'582' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDJ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
72a861159466c1cfe050f88eca9a7b76
a54f0319039b915476a09fec26bc708d10ae0c21
'2011-11-14T23:08:14-05:00'
describe
'5755' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDK' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
d993b0f240c2adb0e62e78c0cc66b6be
bc2c82661e6e9ab2062d9a363f3719d472b5d4df
describe
'1438556' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDL' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
f170a1451f969de7fb886a54cc2e5ede
62cc36f216f247c090943a96513b69ff2f22e4b3
'2011-11-14T23:10:00-05:00'
describe
'55113' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDM' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
913d46a236ce01b60268c43fce95e4a4
04cb820792a5497bb61fbbde01ab8479d1c0dc73
describe
'19396' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDN' 'sip-files00109.pro'
52dc603402e31aebcb0f2aa3a1cc67a8
492f62990c989cf601115663f2e93c33fc7a5db9
describe
'20537' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDO' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
d07ebddec049060f2d724eed78b5706a
4b39b19a402f1793bbf22772d07032b5d1aeafea
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDP' 'sip-files00109.tif'
53b0141fd72666e772f98f55971a922b
26d4b81ae11ecd3f21dd393ca0309f7fe85a6bf3
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDQ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
ccffbd6dbc84719959c9054b6c2e31a7
d6be27e8c0cb135111674cac88b97319dafe8acf
describe
'6899' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDR' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
ec1ab2b7021de77444b044d24b2f6194
5706e77b52cc5c7d10586acde915bae08b32e884
describe
'1466254' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDS' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
33f4391102a04ff6af17c71c4aa3219c
bfc76bff41988eeaec5280dc6a38bb8b9a784d81
describe
'72814' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDT' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
4bd037af80848f5e4b67fda8f5a62b8d
427210591fbf26232e67dcfaec001e3cf9b8eb24
'2011-11-14T23:10:40-05:00'
describe
'29182' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDU' 'sip-files00110.pro'
b808859350f547baa6a10470b84cc55c
5d014f4eadbfc606302e8cd182801b6f85e5f4a2
describe
'24560' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDV' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
3ab68971f155ae800c9bc86f72f76805
008bcccd7dd8ca8f352422d52d4fe20c56bb868a
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDW' 'sip-files00110.tif'
a13160ca1e5bc385aca7a1910f9dd307
adc103eb5b5d2669495fe6b24be1d1523164d907
'2011-11-14T23:06:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDX' 'sip-files00110.txt'
63a0644fae78437654bb4bdbf69ac8c6
a35444b0d3dfb7872392b0cd68402c11ae6f64b9
describe
'9010' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDY' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
20ebfec64dc99a29c6a01bde44ff4db5
4ecfc5db0072ed43976e4adcf34e803836a7402c
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACDZ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
055b957fbb9d3d10d4e84f0ce09758b9
5fde6966be800e1fc39c5b2a0770921bade1d00b
describe
'74314' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEA' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
9a6b3541964f5a5d80a0c062a570e5da
63237ba78a7a1d755b29df69bcf63e473eec84a4
describe
'29456' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEB' 'sip-files00111.pro'
ad40cd16eba386f783ce92cfa0c265e4
7ad4fa717910f6c5bbafe4bd1b59894451808eec
describe
'26316' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEC' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
0be278608bdb55d4ebc1e906c01f48dc
3e65d473c4106590febcacfe48e4d1ce81824a2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACED' 'sip-files00111.tif'
4def2d0b46febcd0b58d0e30a9217879
a25ee7e2a6706f2e45494e48766506e51f094f19
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEE' 'sip-files00111.txt'
a4fb9b7c816c52237c176b55bd272f3a
6596fef5379e93fb28b938af68283fb6387787ce
describe
'9226' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEF' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
b15ac374be7891493ff9e9bbd6e1e711
b8c97d3811d1cd2e8ddae9d97cd15045a731b3ab
describe
'1466275' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEG' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
cc90d4168215316ed781332550445ddd
aca0dc1bdb890b6033a095e03ead74102ce90ed1
describe
'73138' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEH' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
b53b99b9a03f9193a6e614acf2a63618
d48fec476bae1eb67ab26675e79fc598a2ddaf67
describe
'29260' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEI' 'sip-files00112.pro'
3370d97b082e5e8c7664f1b1d8969130
00ae4149d917224d3c8fd0afa3cb34869af612ce
describe
'28480' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEJ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
3b69e439571b9eff2a962f5c8f35ad86
112ffb24a920f60a8c060d7ab5662cd9fa4b0000
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEK' 'sip-files00112.tif'
ff9c406924eef0eaab15f8d318e7284b
6bf7315b1e495b52f1affdf9667e6b7727d84ad2
'2011-11-14T23:08:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEL' 'sip-files00112.txt'
e4d6ab9216faa6b1887d6d2d815320b8
8f22d4d07a9e28c55b8eeabdf4369ae621143d69
describe
'9442' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEM' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
fe2bc87001739c5a477d8bcd45feca28
39caaed0f0e3b2c5c98c66ee692a778371636329
describe
'1518183' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEN' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
91f233cc5e8b10e10cb2964a0989367d
aad290e89a0057943aa1743e80da8777be46d55e
describe
'73196' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEO' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
e7f70e29b74cffc0cbe50cb90907a1cf
abbf40fa5aab6f0ff4ef748545ac294b3271b049
describe
'28554' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEP' 'sip-files00113.pro'
2a03ac659924556bf4cd4c11457a05d3
1e299f99bf96f68acb7f6f3dff94a904edd0e1f3
describe
'26377' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEQ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
72e4f6a109df2ce36c9bc09fe67fa387
09a13477b4cfdbd864525efc10cb69c9c46dc1b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACER' 'sip-files00113.tif'
1f66dba392f3235e899a21ed549a8fa1
8ca515f93c315e8ad0f196d266af9c2e5f8825d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACES' 'sip-files00113.txt'
15c24ff32e815c3dd9a8e1e3679b5c39
8709041288309fa2211b5e2ee7c54f2b8a228a0c
'2011-11-14T23:09:46-05:00'
describe
'9008' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACET' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
a623e2a292ae0ed2abd414b037aeb20b
405caae9c3000ad37e42e639b48666a22bae1051
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEU' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
9d3280cdc2cae9e1ebeebc5e87f954c9
e0149933166931f019b7686c3a13bae0fcac4db3
describe
'72394' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEV' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
62011befb03d1d056bbd28b03607d144
5747da1d93d94efb0ff509ae1687ca4e2f083ac3
describe
'26920' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEW' 'sip-files00114.pro'
cd58522bb58aecfaf2591171ca61a392
f4798d725132c81fdcdd247d177b11ebe01a61ed
describe
'29317' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEX' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
5d8244c01746e001b5faed14dbf030a4
4ac7aedbd7f40e2c5aaf1ee7cc512c693fb04ee8
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEY' 'sip-files00114.tif'
6d9ad3164a46a33916c77e5f48eef4c4
4eb5f334ac9bcaf8f40d7ca150bf819723db105a
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACEZ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
cb880d53d16cfcf132ea8fb3c9b90fa2
f9dfecad38f7ff163fa69c47cadac5838413d283
'2011-11-14T23:08:57-05:00'
describe
'9089' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFA' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
9eb3e5a5af50feefc745b8d0ceecb7ce
6fd4f2fa69c749709e75e94d0f6d517a882597e1
describe
'1437890' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFB' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
a186e4b83161e4fcfca4d3fe2c02572a
6d75318f2b82a823bc46207292ee3ecf6a779f01
describe
'71447' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFC' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
6d088a209c59cb786db1d551d3117021
aa40cb9ec6f44601d16e0551b900e8e28b1b63f0
describe
'28062' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFD' 'sip-files00115.pro'
9179a1540515dbcc10019cdd9a7d4d50
01754645fad18974b50b7d4cb3d7b5738624b2a3
describe
'27359' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFE' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
0da5fd77e1d428947601499e608fb33c
c533a2f49f602a6c8a0ba45ecb883d0ab285d7bb
describe
'11514873' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFF' 'sip-files00115.tif'
37e3c92837411ac63f5773fff641d89f
a9d37babe8c47f62737dc3fe3aad71e3a0243138
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFG' 'sip-files00115.txt'
6d780648eb0f647c617586b2aad6eebc
2bd61b804ecfaa79be696a60b38fa86fb205ceef
describe
'9085' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFH' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
b16cdabe53109ec4c23276f2d05c7dfd
6719c47ed47edc241fa6adb4184b5cd7f3e94e55
describe
'1421847' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFI' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
e386d52e0f5dc8bde9c274fd40b7e570
09166b9caada5ab478e9def390516562cb19c2ca
describe
'72513' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFJ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
67523ec741fa080f960a162cb4a34da8
67d54dc0b8dfa9abf480dd44409e8b51faedeca4
describe
'27400' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFK' 'sip-files00116.pro'
734d71ed74bb184e3e200b50b590b2a3
4fa7d201ae9e37184bb8f3bf39136b005397ba56
describe
'26824' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFL' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
c987218115243230e455f7686437316d
09b9cd50d2e33589329937669e487dd2eeebc191
describe
'11387415' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFM' 'sip-files00116.tif'
35360f38f04991638ce1f5f421c47eee
39fafef505455dcb1c499894937645a3939ed699
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFN' 'sip-files00116.txt'
3059d8ee4abf3b34be84e9e06da11eb6
e28975203f64585404512d0387d61376f0d24e91
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFO' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
7a9634a3b57ffb25ddd8743f0b99e989
dc2647632c0aaf62b43493e0f0f52335cb8711fa
describe
'1384690' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFP' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
9e0e7b480b9f9c9768fbbf037f93a2fc
18a372587bd17a7227452ccd57e63f6f2a8bdf1c
describe
'70142' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFQ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
0e085e4c384650578293372a8adba3bc
fc93da7650f189dce66d32bd7827b160d549326d
describe
'27839' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFR' 'sip-files00117.pro'
7c9e2146d505362f169168b443b74503
1be843e88d06998ff0cae5bed25dc1ddfffeab97
describe
'26236' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFS' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
ad469ee65b030394ed6adb4bbccae0f6
d9ee3d406fe8fa8146503aab332055ab08213ff9
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFT' 'sip-files00117.tif'
77e205b3e27946af50614bb45dec3bf2
20b8b71e46a687e6143d39e6214175f3946ad3da
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFU' 'sip-files00117.txt'
54a0954a042ef752263f3b97f21c3c01
0f7b0eeb5cb82deee8cab57d56f4d9fd9972a1d0
describe
'9186' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFV' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
a5fd62f8857de51e256053c22923faca
dbd7a8cabac623ed9fdd270d0d3fb12bee68e3a1
describe
'1383791' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFW' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
85b5d7d31cf475c7bfdfdc7f4ffce6e7
a6aa5cfb32a8d97459763adf282731b23375c68d
describe
'65538' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFX' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
4e385df2115b760fea750a061d8fcf90
b3e73c2e6dd8a5aaab8ef53d2e361018c60510c7
describe
'24689' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFY' 'sip-files00118.pro'
2f6203ecd3ee062a530cdfe2b660635e
5727daa5b297141a9077a5fd2bfa8548ffcccf9b
describe
'24754' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACFZ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
f1581a95034771040e0c509c87a34b2a
40061669b51e1354ad2d1c989ac0ef8b959a81f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGA' 'sip-files00118.tif'
d2b5e0acbda8a8f7a7c6d058fb784ebe
9697fe7f425ecdf79f0fab5e7ec28b418841ee04
'2011-11-14T23:09:22-05:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGB' 'sip-files00118.txt'
2f5b3fbe3a608901197fb6d1dd0e99ad
6bad65b996d50e82600001d5c5c15a699407f3ca
'2011-11-14T23:09:48-05:00'
describe
'8540' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGC' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
82feb7e934c27e4aa84c810f0437fdc4
0853e4707b90c1a3f29dd66a59d7a28a39bfef4f
describe
'1017354' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGD' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
590d5617a0ca6e3fd111295482143c46
edc7c6dd00dedc9f7b7e682f8b6c894eee8aa3b8
'2011-11-14T23:08:08-05:00'
describe
'30782' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGE' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
781938f57a621041221d935a5cebdb9e
534e12329719f4748c6b3a00ebd4edbca19fc266
describe
'7349' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGF' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a0408a2634cf48cb66e95957f8213925
de8294b46166f75e758057fb795bf7fadde74275
describe
'10469' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGG' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
7f3b69de1dfb5ace46e8b018ef5dbcf5
eb56a5a556c6894d99fd1e2014597df71746edb0
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGH' 'sip-files00119.tif'
dc54f77d58c9dae918e3d4c25eec997f
706fbaddf6ffc3187649001a7c590577d696f757
'2011-11-14T23:10:57-05:00'
describe
'299' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGI' 'sip-files00119.txt'
e7b2176c5d79583ee328500f6d7dabc8
03b88dbc9c3f40bdead0ece4c9370e899e67ea2a
describe
'3825' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGJ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
3c90d3f0f19e95eafdd9fb1b86be5a23
9738eea1ce0da49eab0f8409839719d3627aa7d2
describe
'1302079' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGK' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
6cf4736e739b3c531ec571ac8991a762
3f0e2d0c0a8a66d0297a5b3964ecb91214cfb0c0
describe
'55648' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGL' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
179ec96af057b27503d9b29e9b716e96
19f5289ca18b526a8a5acb016cfe10dba7328bdf
describe
'18440' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGM' 'sip-files00120.pro'
23f2f8ca8f0222d6f6d1cb46fb2538b0
72e0b2a6c1a3522d5f05cded14aaa768ff8abf58
describe
'20322' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGN' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
88b70bfb8fa69fe51899722b0c407dea
7f8dcd21232dd417d1be9e0eeee0b636142065fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGO' 'sip-files00120.tif'
7cc1571d7df4311044f8cdca68a588ca
1724ea3ba7c2587400195ea420638eb8c42d1219
describe
'746' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGP' 'sip-files00120.txt'
df6c2bd23730d087eff0c2f3ab95b927
6c873504dcf38999ce909fe0e833b7690765980b
describe
'6620' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGQ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
a829ea3634a71a7612baf10e4161b52c
c2ff69062058afed85d3174e959436a347e710bb
describe
'1437909' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGR' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
f015815a5582a1ab0e82fe1ad619745f
79715084a1da80a92a1473f85abc9a04ab5c2f9a
describe
'73624' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGS' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d3719d513ee4e3b7ddad72ddc0bc1898
38325dc8b40f94bd3da303c532b379cb127ce794
describe
'29090' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGT' 'sip-files00121.pro'
d322909172f8755c615d49cd1871f2c3
b3a9db786bbf5f0f6b10fc4f3f76be879a1be323
describe
'27955' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGU' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
6a2ab8719208f34c8553b0dbe13481f3
aa78fcab69f503c3fac15e8c6d6ec9089c0dc5f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGV' 'sip-files00121.tif'
37b169064d3d0d428f158b4dfc51ed69
5fe145103312b467b9c4d5d13bdd778b8a490fc6
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGW' 'sip-files00121.txt'
42e4c12dd92a4eba014970f3b36d3e5f
ed4e3e5b720f657f68f25a1ed9e9ba89b1457640
describe
'9030' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGX' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
69ab8cdb8844578b50af18d88547a24e
3fdbe884d90cc16b53101a5c114fff88cb94ee8a
describe
'1422014' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGY' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
201bacf620d70003ddfbd719c3deb766
7f21318bce207495471b7a2e050a6867f19b546f
describe
'76903' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACGZ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
7f736064dd2308e82b14a3a73fa262a7
b85ae3da10bc9ccdd69cd58d4c4f7050a0ed358a
describe
'29582' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHA' 'sip-files00122.pro'
e93bdfe39e37a89bd51b6c6b63c5f31a
12ba8365f67ea407f155ef7b990a76623abf8861
describe
'29067' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHB' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
17f456990ef05ee0583bf55665e2d949
a4fc1c402095ce0156b7b92cb1aa32e63c2b2c18
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHC' 'sip-files00122.tif'
2104d764cee51870b5c813cf3710f61e
c633342cf0d071369832285045a0c95cbae0c75b
'2011-11-14T23:06:17-05:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHD' 'sip-files00122.txt'
9a262cdfd4b78864556646f8318ee34d
03ca81a2ebf4312071495422cc21949235904f38
describe
'9050' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHE' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
38f30d43d55683edbd3c0a69fd3491b1
b40ab2f3596524a9131d7bb55cbb5d9cc033035d
describe
'1437913' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHF' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
6a3b8d8d3e4a964828da91d8dd9003d0
d79fc3fa8de93df1c0555d24e0877a8481d23409
describe
'72820' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHG' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
61b835813d912c20afd5e867b9f0360b
98ea2697f3b40561fe8b62701cd94db5423741fa
describe
'28697' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHH' 'sip-files00123.pro'
73972226028d32f87f5dc322cec0937f
b02cec979de5c8d501797937b1afea974f25de39
describe
'26738' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHI' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
6f0f8a08110566688214faec0a704cb6
021e344db4885d582302637c2e0e49da84d9ba51
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHJ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
df06de71de7408bfa5acde9aa7e78dde
9d6f36a6368efda92ca358b29b52aeb06859bd70
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHK' 'sip-files00123.txt'
fdf6bb86169a48b374e61fd82faa1141
c3e576427cea1386f0e970985ebce56fab1de2a8
describe
'9149' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHL' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
283e63d62bfe48d353584e49c16684e3
75ccc2951af07d29c29feb415364cc2205b659e4
describe
'1422003' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHM' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
172510b94f51d5b0acae1fa7f3ce5b8f
ba08f1ce89e13da1d9c7d53645b55e18f70255f2
describe
'73216' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHN' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
7fae4808b338143ef59766c942e85298
24c4097a80a1d0e3d2a38d2715f1f6c27a1ed4c4
describe
'26967' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHO' 'sip-files00124.pro'
6fdb639ca56983abc77f8563cc9cbafb
6fd8bb6a0c76159a2daa5e67e5793631c4539789
describe
'27657' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHP' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
0c8de342db11546abb33d20d0b85417b
8adb840cb9f8dcf9e3ad510bbaaeee7d79192f7c
'2011-11-14T23:08:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHQ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
f8d109226901df700817ceb1634a66af
bbc5246c0c595e01af3967a222f609e7f2f6df39
'2011-11-14T23:10:29-05:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHR' 'sip-files00124.txt'
8939b0f95255690cfaa2a3486d663d38
6c042fcbba3b32681c673e175bc79cd21a286eb3
describe
'8800' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHS' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
58712c09f5e4b5dcba0cbac7dcd1b020
c5947341038e1d44d5a6f57dfa6d7e5748b886f3
describe
'1437895' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHT' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
caffa189b6451171d0f663afea23d260
f415239cfe0a47abe6ef7197ea8a4ae8d4a7fec9
describe
'75608' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHU' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
16dca92b2099147f4d9f7ae10af13490
fb5c678dbadf72971f3b150a675beded41d7d053
describe
'29255' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHV' 'sip-files00125.pro'
c27a76c00c7e99b78db5073b5d40e0a5
2d453376c07cbb6862e3bf244c76f4aaee397954
describe
'27641' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHW' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
068ade3c16a7694df2355bdfcf1bbf8b
21fb2827647cb603f5a19146b9e8111acf9e34a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHX' 'sip-files00125.tif'
c5b6c049e8e7f93187e6a5f8f639162d
4684d91f6bfcf3fb47548b606cf5dae7876631c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHY' 'sip-files00125.txt'
b8e727acece03e6aaf14e53e5a62c4c1
aa293ef882ce005ed86df2fbac21aba741a77cca
describe
'9197' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACHZ' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
780881fe0db5b68bdc20cc16c0676fa3
177eb2563c3d31c84a985ccdf872a49c0cb2c061
describe
'1421964' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIA' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
5d0e675b4f8161e18461f79dc7b1b9b4
bb82058f1a683902908bc0dd928820c67bbf2e1d
describe
'75342' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIB' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
307597f0dd369eb3a04ad12b0fbc1894
42d8ca2ca3c3da7296a0cb8b0d4ddce544d3e9f2
describe
'28855' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIC' 'sip-files00126.pro'
aef63f0fa30eeda30f8aed90c605d643
258589ecf75f961e4e69481369af0e54076edb00
describe
'27599' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACID' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
b612b46f496e459ae0d67ff5bf35c4a2
819090683677665a741b65e63d24ae5107572595
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIE' 'sip-files00126.tif'
a0eb7abfae081bfeffb104e2bab1ea93
80369f315d12b72e781c044287aa53576990a624
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIF' 'sip-files00126.txt'
747ab53a3f2d4560418bb53f30e1bce1
42f896308bcc4b26cbc3814200a7374a7af86b2d
describe
'8688' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIG' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
66f53c3b5a49ae9fdfc4f73bd682486d
4a11c0f4d09b8b136df821d1861629ddccd1d78b
describe
'1053812' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIH' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
858e09e13dfe643ed65373b5b92f1485
fece57075835673e4d9d201539f35c1890d66e9e
describe
'26873' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACII' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d6661ace2473019a06c6f59984529117
9fa5f3393791c1c42ddacde1b1cce65e87073d4e
'2011-11-14T23:05:30-05:00'
describe
'4161' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIJ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
2ff6e19c1a323175b0a74392cc621d58
f059af7c87c940d50a97ccafbe0e4123d113b7e8
describe
'9037' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIK' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
88987e059860963b636cc4fda6e46538
8ba5f302be233d73a9b931590cbbf9a9530ed012
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIL' 'sip-files00127.tif'
093da7051a33de2707472aa56efebb95
2b7665b3debcd650e7525963da7ad758feae4bef
describe
'174' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIM' 'sip-files00127.txt'
24e2f7691fe518b9860cee9179f3fdf0
7a0f60abfb08ce87566a988f2e30202fce98723e
describe
'3234' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIN' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
9a176ea56f40002bea3fa4c64da9864b
fd900ca8e898ee93f3b740fa1b28ed44a8102d68
'2011-11-14T23:07:47-05:00'
describe
'1405930' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIO' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
f52d97c3484a2e1b312d5ca1c19c4c51
c36e3e3f234f751bab019817646dafd41e607397
describe
'58512' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIP' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
26b0a2a929f15ef4ed1b561a99505578
7c0d8d8b6357b7637b4743437dae8f21858917e2
'2011-11-14T23:08:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIQ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
b38325ea00a31c9db7713346969c2ccc
2cc46f23f396ce4015acae052708c9844d0a81cf
describe
'21330' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIR' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
f8aa93ece49b846cae9db42960062aed
da334e87de04010541664906a5cd6985233a064b
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIS' 'sip-files00128.tif'
e3730361e5c468d61e57eeeb8a5ca2e3
c0d14152708712e892e3f446733f31a11b2b3961
describe
'800' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIT' 'sip-files00128.txt'
9e826834725ed9a7fcd4708fff2da6fe
e1e134f9b7a5a69973dc5184e51c162e1241ef81
describe
'6831' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIU' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
14c8908ea892fcd1fc600fdf20b54331
d5b1a3eba69e2b3b50a33ca71371ee49dee8fd06
'2011-11-14T23:09:43-05:00'
describe
'1437908' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIV' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
6884bae744994aa263604825b8178ae4
200d73ae9628bb4890877eb8ce36ab385362ffdf
describe
'74438' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIW' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
6a4a77634dc867b0261a206c2f20e3d9
6258edcb07fa05ceacc39abe17add2efc15aa8d4
describe
'28884' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIX' 'sip-files00129.pro'
3593c3333e732a1154e0bfc30399b2aa
024f9f0c00ec936076c708dbd89f4871aadf86eb
describe
'28136' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIY' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
59e8cb211934ece1bca3f0c136dc6dfc
24f6e98380dcfbd68fa736c17824e1ceeb198382
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACIZ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
73380236bf737d63239a3e1c1dbcb123
6afbe59b357928df52a6842625efc9c78e670038
'2011-11-14T23:05:33-05:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJA' 'sip-files00129.txt'
9ff14cff73d4da667eee84d3c47f9927
d1715499fdac1df5be6504bfd56164190021e573
describe
'9509' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJB' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
41027146a9485c99b30a82c87a1c4138
351c642cb11fed860e0299ad48e5fc1704708f06
'2011-11-14T23:06:36-05:00'
describe
'1422008' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJC' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
2a39ef05c11a4c6b67bf799c3e2acbec
818efe0a2828e67c7f76111b10a3e3882259ec1d
describe
'74686' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJD' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
d5f6f53b878c929e1ccc064563c9a0ac
6a070409dc4a92087ed65c3d248f63b2ad69ec35
describe
'27786' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJE' 'sip-files00130.pro'
ff886b102d191ad855eeae8099fb08ed
8b5cf4d00c50cc7124b839fde2017fd129db0f22
describe
'27468' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJF' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
a2271c5287cc045e10b5202c5b90e2c2
22130f8d28393a9dbcbe713479850465ec9c7cc9
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJG' 'sip-files00130.tif'
1f5754ecfa0c40c90aaf74e7a005007f
f5c3773f5a1e6a8c7a41890b635755316d069aca
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJH' 'sip-files00130.txt'
065f1f18a468c0ea3d6f695c07d2547f
2fc6fe6d61e836e11ea6df073c72bd3bde892135
describe
'8719' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJI' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
b7cf3aee299d1e6313825128033f7b1f
507c298e8a2f31975e146859899a32bf837e3394
describe
'1437878' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJJ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
29edddad8bcf94ce6e3d4b012d6b378e
4c16deda0a5bf6db9d55a224d471b2e95ffd050b
describe
'75614' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJK' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
c55606fda397496e2efb49c4ae783197
4b745e5b46579f395a9916d6255455196310edc0
describe
'29291' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJL' 'sip-files00131.pro'
8d98122f233d93b0a56c523eb255cb7d
90869d811978917fad4dc08dd7a9a0fb825a460c
describe
'28515' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJM' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
370af8b8690091e316edf91733b704eb
bc8dd3cb56532bbb2f5d7493b45f54d48b69c599
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJN' 'sip-files00131.tif'
246f6129cc2822a0eb15e11c0fad13dd
f7e2a992fcb327d3ce807126b943ec174c2830da
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJO' 'sip-files00131.txt'
eed3e3416cfa326b8b2abcaf4b1530e4
d1501dd237114dba53fa80a8feeed354bf8c9e2b
describe
'9639' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJP' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
eb93c300daf127a35a6586e8717a9fb3
a37d4d96d52cc65814c0a745012a44b76daf5223
describe
'1421971' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJQ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
2d38391efad615c46ce70201eb089770
6e7700c0e741f45f6b3548291a68d18383a20f94
describe
'74636' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJR' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
2d77812466053ac8b0cc97e3f6d8383c
d83531ad4b410c266946f3dac939c0c9a04f7af3
describe
'28482' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJS' 'sip-files00132.pro'
06e49ea42caa90bf4055889ac33dbd80
ec51eee41de02d4e6365d0e6435fb5c12797753e
'2011-11-14T23:06:33-05:00'
describe
'27726' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJT' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
bdb7f94720f9611a16ff7aa1848e6b09
c2c4bbe0f1343293fd11940dc9dfa5afeb4a2578
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJU' 'sip-files00132.tif'
fd1c659b88043c9ab0340c966c835b0f
62c3769bc33e6b0e205af3313331681a7b09c418
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJV' 'sip-files00132.txt'
41f6745d4ac3fdd3619c000fa05500cd
b8fc7c1da37cd7a47a2ee2374893d3055837d1d0
describe
'8962' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJW' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
ea5cbc538d4fde18547d8033d7d22768
cc546b5138a1ce422e6cdc7a928c5f51241397bf
describe
'1429249' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJX' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
7702b6f1f7730f12f4c5f3a97cb38a92
a0def4020f08d73811ffc11724882ffcdc09e7bc
describe
'68043' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJY' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
11e648af7a7770e719041bb1d08132e3
f6b18287c3c1dbab7e24ddc4172069e33cfac6b7
describe
'26897' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACJZ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
e49b1e47bfb9a1d48bd69e993c6c07e5
80a1c0f6ea5cdfd3bf4458ef6f8ea8688af9df38
describe
'25085' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKA' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
ef3cbe53bd3c6cfa69ce50749b1ca4e1
db2490002dfaf6d9d852adf3f45dffea34dce0d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKB' 'sip-files00133.tif'
0194bf9c89a6858cec6959f735747790
49d28d048e567da647f25148e3742027dcc683e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKC' 'sip-files00133.txt'
54e908dfaff8f6aec5d9dd2c112b6def
a55e9e8bfefa5493ae92715e3b6de9cfbc56e55c
describe
'8435' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKD' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
795863bc351789fffb82c133f37b79cc
86c09a5254b2c66245d084c96066d660191fd91b
describe
'1167650' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKE' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
9fbc391476c9a980e232e083e6480b98
861c94891959245414e76232b925d1257b4f04dc
describe
'36405' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKF' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
83483bfbceb935f0b54f903d6a999915
e58ce0c914c792de27417fced9a8120fd8ebbc62
describe
'11126' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKG' 'sip-files00134.pro'
4f5f27e642bc1870f786742a110b90d4
201e7b99019e474e60acfce2c9ed6ee397bc33db
describe
'11964' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKH' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
49a07c527a64e388a8ed8dacc30384e9
bdba2b4468d94bd0275588ba0dda2f934d89285f
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKI' 'sip-files00134.tif'
9109882d91a0caab0c95cd42bcf4ddb5
6d2464274382f851fb17812de886a95bc8c975d5
describe
'563' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKJ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
7431707de0a2aec0e1729025351d9d0e
6fbd557a47d85076e9362ecaf8dfffb4cb1ed33f
describe
'3919' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKK' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
30d4548cceab4b39854af713a0ad72c3
49de4bc682065500d0a180f8138e2f13526c25d7
describe
'1277706' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKL' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
1485b562c8f62c1c9bba580f88ce42dc
af4f4987c5c07ad2bff2e6368424aede2a40cdb3
describe
'53627' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKM' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
ede025b2e62155d3acc6231cbb1a7230
3dfa3000e2a0f8ab1245eeb30a02218003dcb6a3
describe
'18538' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKN' 'sip-files00135.pro'
f61aa19c54ad1fdec2d0c96cc90f5d0f
ba9003cb0df1b1cfd746f088c3855fed08615878
describe
'19317' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKO' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
5fc5c23e70f49ad3bfd1e1b384ab9f12
1480df4525ffe16e34d655bfd11c2fe2e757d077
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKP' 'sip-files00135.tif'
c222d9bb84ba70a7802497e0fb9b66b9
e1016781f0b7c8effdd10bc4c5c2aa555f0ddbef
'2011-11-14T23:08:12-05:00'
describe
'749' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKQ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
6580990e4c18f80576a89953020961f8
2f1ec67a4c961a46e12f64bb198d220bc58c928a
describe
'7048' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKR' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
cf2258248d6079d77d79d8ebec05dcdb
df66cdc626cffbbccf7d6c0672dbea487303ef4d
describe
'1422002' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKS' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
3f232ae4ac0c5d79d8338adec1ce73d4
c0dddef9109c91ca3a2f14dd445d459620f1d964
describe
'73307' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKT' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
6aea56df854eebf6a1a453aaec2fe053
31adb60dbeea644d406d63cb81b73bed0ef98cc8
describe
'27286' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKU' 'sip-files00136.pro'
af524a21e421d41b30af5e024135da64
9232bfc0b2ec92f4d7c439dfe6cb98aa7b5d4085
describe
'27933' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKV' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
6b02a0386485c17c704591d4c32fd228
a31dffe823422588a53e3ef786ace3dc2ddb3965
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKW' 'sip-files00136.tif'
906874ca1e05556db9cd82151418c1b7
f5d7753af9da3eb08e76e95f17f2f0ca4a0dab9b
'2011-11-14T23:09:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKX' 'sip-files00136.txt'
9723ed7f9be7560829388d46a9774fcb
a3b704bdf1ecd61417e6939c463dc5e496e755f5
describe
'8902' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKY' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
9ee7c27c2fbba89103d4fb1b4a73e6c8
41cebe5c84eca344550133da1739e888d42c58bc
describe
'1437910' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACKZ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
12026ad090661c54e749997b4a62dade
83cdc39884bcb1654a4b712b3dbc1c9356586023
describe
'70713' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLA' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
633ac435f28f68625c8d69443eebba02
a3b11244afe0737b28c0e804935b35df0aef18e1
describe
'26973' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLB' 'sip-files00137.pro'
f71461665a6b11da8ae5a5ceb9faf66a
840226d24c508158c20cddbe99381dc4665a8bba
describe
'27730' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLC' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
680c6a0b258449a4f7dea0f5d7332ef4
326a124699df6e64ab3914365703ee4e29fecd9a
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLD' 'sip-files00137.tif'
ac4c90e625d0837d27de38d184bb0125
50d7b213874dbfa0cdff1eb4d6828ed2f14fd789
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLE' 'sip-files00137.txt'
9b50ea32a758449e3be9d1a0ab8220ad
f6c9282f39821599703b48f3f0289a0a1fe44f1c
describe
'9303' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLF' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
dab5188776f69447d746c0ccb3d8586d
d193890ecc5566c4fe9e1175b5f11bc637500278
describe
'1421988' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLG' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
f99f6254fe174eb18cd32fb4e2134673
03cfd673a943804b88e564dd2fcecb2b618de675
describe
'73154' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLH' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
ff0c01223974926bd19186792a98725e
02d0bf8f46f890d76d374ac5bfe4980c5bfa4cf5
describe
'27513' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLI' 'sip-files00138.pro'
5dd21889accdf74e510cf78f61ac9707
6b5b0e0fcdffee1f6a90eb4284bd7661c9be82c6
describe
'27171' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLJ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
ecd8c00a43fcb481879a695acf616211
455eb822b2c51993243792570cc8bb9355fe5592
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLK' 'sip-files00138.tif'
63b966821eed71dcd18cba4528720892
410bddb2f700fd8d1263baa4892c0aba73a81f41
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLL' 'sip-files00138.txt'
ca3b4ae8471bb4eeec9d4f18e2755a98
861a9fa35694cfe56f6c3341df018636f7b0cc40
describe
'9145' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLM' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
de3802777cad87ddd83f282a1b799354
33f956c5787eaf60954be67aa8a1aebdac83e08b
describe
'1437888' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLN' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
596f0e772771712a60f57c1c6b04c608
f45ff6d374f0b739cc50535ff968f7df65cd771e
describe
'69946' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLO' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
21252ffdf092b047c95181910250b02d
dfaddd78f6f55407ed626a7b26b40ca77a50ec25
'2011-11-14T23:10:06-05:00'
describe
'27030' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLP' 'sip-files00139.pro'
94eb612906c56ed3fece86e4b6f1bf59
f471d154e358f751eae117c060348d47cd063cd7
describe
'25927' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLQ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
bd2eebb473a8c8db4c247350277a55a6
ea52ab61fdef66fa02d2641d677e214a924c5242
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLR' 'sip-files00139.tif'
866341361e319da3f2464b1c83b93f4e
6812e1e0e07f21d2ef95efc29e3a9729ad526b38
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLS' 'sip-files00139.txt'
7c9e84e443e81af9ef18a7c3602497a4
a0157d1d7e9b9b604b9f8ed31e7ea5d01b5fbd38
describe
'9115' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLT' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
4c44c49f0e3224d23d1eb73eb3c32076
0af2494aae34291875db4be2ea9aa89e545478e3
describe
'1269280' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLU' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
f3c91a69e706c7378e8c539f2df3c0a4
36fb9066b10925b7422a41723b116fd3d9a23209
describe
'45855' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLV' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
db247902236fb715f25dcf89d59e99c9
70fd6e434394900f5ced133c304e00673c77304d
describe
'13460' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLW' 'sip-files00140.pro'
777d928f913d45978ceccb92f2b61e3d
1c4ac4cc95d3bb947fcb0cd3501f3ca7f0fa53cb
describe
'16168' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLX' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
ea68a64cbd8a2ef8a7cef88d04591ecd
4e4fb386d6ca813c58f7c1556e75b9b8868e397a
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLY' 'sip-files00140.tif'
f8bee096ff69d97e500b9f8f38831e96
e0cad62a675b61f59887caf4412eaa6dad1ac7dd
describe
'560' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACLZ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
5434ab98dabcc4767078906323d8af8e
e3d8a79233804b3a591968e253b82a53d6c20de7
describe
'5528' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMA' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
da84e84789740fd551c600421503684c
ff045ea4ce9fa3604fce4ab0a3e4ef073e8048c5
describe
'1326471' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMB' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
354c32b8d8c224c647f21e12ddb133d0
92f62f02f5c6cffd00d0f9599c208908aa9f6b09
describe
'55357' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMC' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
453c50eab5a19d77493e6106522980fd
380e62e683c492c9a78aba6ab8f090545e558ff8
'2011-11-14T23:06:15-05:00'
describe
'19107' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMD' 'sip-files00141.pro'
8bfd478302edb79763eb64f2da6e736d
1a22943621d2ecb8a2f71a4b454d837da9e38a06
describe
'20422' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACME' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c215b8bfb09ea50e7f302d4c0c0259c3
fdb2cc3113ca7c76c62ca3660fa39c760472fe1b
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMF' 'sip-files00141.tif'
fd53c40314f0d6a445ae16b0d161c4cd
4bcc2e252dd6f606ee58910f038b608c376ed440
describe
'763' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMG' 'sip-files00141.txt'
e0126df885326e1badf0d5581b5b30fb
5f90869e299cb8e81e442185b0ee6f337b32a973
describe
'6952' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMH' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
4aaab00137950656841a8517cd421143
428d6f66f6afe4d30aea31f64733280ef9a8fc13
describe
'1421956' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMI' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
bcf17d32c312fcaec7e60e348279fc81
0e0a8d06aebcc84fc87b94602d4e35c089b9c111
describe
'74321' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMJ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
c091fe659918b9b4af0bc1b81f3525df
1026ea9d0efa9690b9ccd48904f0d443f0c26690
describe
'28350' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMK' 'sip-files00142.pro'
2094e011b9302eb90e8231bb571e1557
d4cd3378bf93061014a7a805ec3df6eb12c187af
describe
'27563' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACML' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
d652b18aad3f58be8ab55e0fd6b8d0f2
e9efd10298547efa09008eb0f6d3a75a3b13df6d
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMM' 'sip-files00142.tif'
4e658dfbc44c28b21e7aa096782aa32b
124598aaf46c6d91070cb467f63f85032f10fa57
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMN' 'sip-files00142.txt'
025c21b20cfeb9b7f6fadba75a2efb60
bfa8dd5dd4c3526d1bc8cd93cdcde14429819cfb
describe
'9161' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMO' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
426a3345651d210706ad4b744d2c62ab
83621e4ff747ec4cbec38ec4bc5385645d50952e
describe
'1437771' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMP' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
73109a8ed046582db6bc9936de8211bc
b30d5b98961dbc02cfeb26ed5cd8a6cfe92582ca
describe
'72775' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMQ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
5bf7e85035b44f0280be0969a26a0558
771028eeba451096212476020f4ce3bb4bc41036
describe
'28692' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMR' 'sip-files00143.pro'
51c8fbd539e33765c40e712dac83465b
4fd9595641aad0e20efd2bf51da780e2de45f991
describe
'27185' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMS' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
0503fb954ec23618d9e89b74ba6ece63
f966a0bb792bf8eeaf196171e96d92610f71722c
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMT' 'sip-files00143.tif'
771aa68fc73c1f9d702b228dc5e9ffd0
2710bf8830d481e427d30d2562f3f03d0a756024
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMU' 'sip-files00143.txt'
cc78d1f98e42007c2ede4f6465c1c886
c38bd0f45bb1d5194d9209144603c38f5d1024b0
describe
'9339' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMV' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
2743409f7f6b6051680abae8d86083e3
fbaa479dd315117a1a197f2fc2d5c2c6925379ca
describe
'1421986' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMW' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
63ecd4e86f02e2fb1b16b2a75ff73188
bd77ab97144d83a9bc62b040c6753a68d34ea7e0
describe
'74807' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMX' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
993a335031082c7de52c3c8745638c3e
7f128a3a157ceb19536864a094f22477d9daff11
describe
'28369' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMY' 'sip-files00144.pro'
4e0d262ce430ea8a59ac90656dd5d4ed
d1e6732d788fff5cd0e3fbfcbd6653d177d389b3
describe
'27972' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACMZ' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
7c7169ab3c0d8df9eec2c1acccb6c90a
5a380b939e0b447a3126b803218608dd8a586e91
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNA' 'sip-files00144.tif'
c3ee03096755b66fe5cbc3188ee294da
edc69b34f289ad450daded11d10496552de4efc5
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNB' 'sip-files00144.txt'
eeafd58607fa9b59a60b553d124a41b2
ed79664fd6d8af45f56104726963dd80149bbfb4
describe
'9221' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNC' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
63754f3859c90ea06867bee0dd9a45ae
179e9ca70eea634ee567e9b94709ea63f05ee698
describe
'1437788' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACND' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
5f428682decdf851de29c021f9f99811
2ecb88e2899e7ba236b57e7b53987de72a922375
describe
'74851' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNE' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
752c66243f51d14892091fc2a9a575ec
093dc3e222a260e294eab946427d82e9e315834d
describe
'29934' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNF' 'sip-files00145.pro'
4787bef60b2903f8840b177d6e6af880
c01dc3934a4cbe2697b0d0d95e2bceb8a2f6b143
describe
'27562' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNG' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
76fafd6497280d13b1858f38321b33a6
0fd8bd4c7272eb9677f14e7d8534652d79871f96
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNH' 'sip-files00145.tif'
79de2bdd1de518ccdf70a832a78a1817
ee2e82aefce881538e20b9c6808420506a19c355
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNI' 'sip-files00145.txt'
55d6dcf5b77d27de873f5b123a7b16e5
4ce8ec31d2faa56c981818abf59b83a0d6ad1da8
describe
'9267' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNJ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
d5dc119d6471495a8e45e766b9ae3316
7f3e69dc9adc3746cb52f965598a68b4940303b1
describe
'1276252' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNK' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
f6c39cd4c366a40bfe191fa45aacfa88
7bc2f4dc72880ca6969900ef7ef912ce69ffff1b
describe
'45297' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNL' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
478648077d99b2a87f564112286c0c20
335f04dd235c825ef81f972a63291e3d6eaa1aa6
describe
'12789' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNM' 'sip-files00146.pro'
f7c3a52ae18f65fe0b08d383d5c03d96
25800d766875e3db7a7ce93075dacb806cc3a601
describe
'15558' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNN' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
95ebe81101200b6cf3e3b89c4c112e44
aa84882a2fc65a130adc3c1ef13e7f3a33a94a99
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNO' 'sip-files00146.tif'
e6bdd6b8168a8062ed193228631f9607
ea75e072336efd355afbd07ffe09823476f3dd14
describe
'512' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNP' 'sip-files00146.txt'
c15d303bce798b6c5c810280b7a0531f
a14aa206e588be04b2bc0dc243e8a59183b1cdb1
describe
'5041' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNQ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
c71f60f61400232c49537fb630f106be
16c085d67e5e331cb54ace0890ade864770b80b9
describe
'1324698' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNR' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
4b68090361b302fb0beee643d789a4be
60254e7236a8a5dc89a5246915005262abd8dc1e
describe
'56464' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNS' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
31bd27ddeb3bdd9b6f4ae989532ffd76
eb7b22c96f2e53efbecf044f4e3daf496274df77
describe
'19575' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNT' 'sip-files00147.pro'
460b3034463f90eeae9582185836db57
1a19618a6dcbcd3d78b358a817ea96e265b2cc19
describe
'20405' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNU' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
aad20426872226e194e583fad231d2ee
7d72fc48f73b079e4cdf4c65f54a062f2690e06d
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNV' 'sip-files00147.tif'
f2e470a37411f8b1bf159ed187c04f0b
1acb4c10565ac56e7b9c7d21b09c6b9bc01391bd
'2011-11-14T23:07:34-05:00'
describe
'785' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNW' 'sip-files00147.txt'
34c11240e4a3d1bc2b6dbb6fe3b6e025
e25a13860cb25765ab9bbf7564c6f83582cb88ef
describe
'6961' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNX' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
d73ad735df771d07f9e96cdedfad2275
c3fed4bdfd3c42e00f00b1fa022535dda9b2c412
describe
'1421987' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNY' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
78f120e91d845823a9702f36894a01fb
df3f4c8920b3be84b69f60a43c5be58a8340df18
describe
'74740' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACNZ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
9c3513b05e8e2a3aa55bcb35dbdde676
8b52ed8166f64d93543afc0973564298ad67168d
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOA' 'sip-files00148.pro'
751a9f92c0becd0d02f59df64ee95402
dccab86ed21b08e2ed202a7064bbcd152abb9cd7
describe
'27710' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOB' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
01c74d02664ed80b8ec587925e49c490
7fe537ebb3749bf7baaff03af6b7d84ffb53b2ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOC' 'sip-files00148.tif'
63a10288c4d9f0861eed985c7ae01914
765de6a2949e6e3d55de0a1c162739a1c9ea5d53
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOD' 'sip-files00148.txt'
0c48f6cdec0cefa198a0cb39a54c5543
879411016bd140b62db10700b21d64af58bfe1af
describe
'8987' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOE' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
15011ae373656cd590779911a5c52f20
95ba3b67b86b060688862641e03013b7f1cf1b9c
describe
'1437748' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOF' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
1b307c88ddf918213c3bf6ecd3cb954d
93bedc1fbe1d2a61dff58b039bf1ec1144da4f92
describe
'70157' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOG' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
14afd7d5e2ab0c20cebb3ce311d7be3e
063e7096c465c6306d293bafd0d10bd2887bf267
describe
'27392' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOH' 'sip-files00149.pro'
142502c1c683e65d02efeaf473bc21eb
d5b43f04659aad0bb59ca3ddd423ad03e85d2699
describe
'25919' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOI' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
d561ebd7c9f361704f41470336b3281b
c75b623151fb550024d26dee07fdead356f87730
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOJ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
53306cc0bb367230b699f417826f4eb2
664880f7635eb4f26397410ecfa63d8ea09996a8
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOK' 'sip-files00149.txt'
9d057610d8aa61751aa720b7fdf55ed7
b437a37ca20191fec1a223d05fdf46b2467c34c3
describe
'8824' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOL' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
c44c7f40752df26c2bb29aa51811bb22
227fc1d9e7c31725072667b110c9b9121ea183d9
describe
'1421999' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOM' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
0c9e1a80593c52f10fd2c98f8564cefa
ba4fadb8732942175a68af9dd5b96a629ce5ad6c
describe
'76031' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACON' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
6d1a0f10e86de1fc886221ec05f73136
a475d315082026fba6e4ba7754f0e2b910e32d5c
describe
'28913' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOO' 'sip-files00150.pro'
b0d6e1773c25f7795a404e4da95b9d81
c14e0772ab74fb740576b296cb0392645fe84172
describe
'28493' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOP' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
a9d32c116414510a89dcb6eeb84a06d1
a37874cc4d77b3e995d218ec955cc390c5502db9
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOQ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
9b62380b9ca7e8ccaa907475ad0a36e0
7e13774d9840698602856c4966aa28fddb9c5e93
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOR' 'sip-files00150.txt'
c4fb447c6afc138bac0f6ddc35244d99
3372e4c785e3e369732a033eea01c16e1ebbe2d5
describe
'9092' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOS' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
ed52f3f7dc640c21debf4cbff7b5abb1
f81ea1fc81e89297b992bbccd7bc3b336214c7d3
describe
'1437891' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOT' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
3be782cbe0121bb4dead9b35eddadaa9
5d7480782e51cb9812c6e450215fdb2a7b2a148b
describe
'72424' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOU' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
65e372e835e7ca6fb6e0760d72e935eb
b8641e34e1830c58be771603ab40bd39393929fa
describe
'27818' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOV' 'sip-files00151.pro'
e6c74203e5347f4031cdf7e3f2475d69
8f18d9d5262c37daf61faaca2e9d4012cc66c647
describe
'26506' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOW' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
8fd060128f59244a9900bfc64638cb89
5500887805bc5dd5e4588eed5d617bd02684a1df
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOX' 'sip-files00151.tif'
3cc36f4acb378ed56514f2a81dc4c2b7
ba0d774568594565a315c7f373e1554e4e121e55
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOY' 'sip-files00151.txt'
f70d7c42afa4601bc3a4c35bc6a2bbbf
dd6b6f2be0bcdd7108eec47c7caca21295ab0ad5
describe
'9054' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACOZ' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
5a71d3c3aa8e13f59afa1dcda6f52059
017fed2ac92cb21d6f0caa4ece23ed105a62022a
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPA' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
b58d97adf1b14c521e41c477b3187084
7687e06dbf06252f3896c5cfdaf01824c3d1a9e0
describe
'72466' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPB' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
16ead5735ec598247a4e3e2a24dad689
f9833b03b325a65f79b9c2740b75b6e4a5087ba2
describe
'26992' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPC' 'sip-files00152.pro'
5b471bed28fbdad1b8368bf8f8a4218b
e41647638eb10b4f4ba57a6ebbdb78269f5ece36
describe
'26356' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPD' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
022135497549d6b7e8528c75229e8165
984df34658cee57d858c2764b2ec05b1c81cb2da
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPE' 'sip-files00152.tif'
2644806ae265a899cf464d0eb42dda90
9991e85098a5c028e205190ce5dc3aba2f8331fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPF' 'sip-files00152.txt'
47b063c8866ee0419bd01dabf8d40af1
4f56b7a5994785fb1ef95c58f37b998d02140dda
describe
'8748' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPG' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
983d869dcf827503d57ddf55121f2483
4ca0d4dce5ed81266cc72080a07861305d82ed65
describe
'1437893' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPH' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
e7365410c5381d94453602bd5b0e0cc9
454900588e414d7193e8cf06b060f33d8c3d52b5
describe
'69637' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPI' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
59c4de1ac69e035d633039fe759772b0
5bd56bc32b7b8814bb0b80825a9182a3bc9dfd78
describe
'26865' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPJ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
531d166f467bec9e6ffbd2e5400a2980
c18904fd8df433391f8903db69dd0bf715292203
describe
'25814' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPK' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
61ab839e43251dc70afdf7c26f68dd61
757a96c8006ab1cf979c46051627a026495db108
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPL' 'sip-files00153.tif'
ff40ed537b814809d5116120ee7b5ba4
395d311ec48619660d844d6107ff458608a07de9
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPM' 'sip-files00153.txt'
7605a6c561a6a746b8c5936d3dc074bd
400111d654cfc22a95eea43175587fffebfe2e35
describe
'9116' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPN' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
1fad0b363f05283cefb077eaeb85d142
6ba59e382e65418d705ec4c0de0a3de21d96521a
describe
'1422010' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPO' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
48dc246e510347bce047713d6ff14b7f
a846574c02599afebd7ba165d52a5061daaccacc
describe
'72604' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPP' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
5457d097eda6b14f5a36a98aca0f6330
83421535f2efc72a67144f0b477a188e2ff11cd2
describe
'27280' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPQ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
3e22bb8231ac32c1af20c8b2ec7b9271
e3d83828db9a6e930b04ae640533981f0865be82
describe
'26565' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPR' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
6728b9e7601cc7794932bf660134aa3e
ca22c7fd6e547ce425b51de94ed19069992c4f1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPS' 'sip-files00154.tif'
4a0eac557710dbfc5368bce30ab3c40e
3e658b75ac158a1a5a8841530bdf56e21a047133
'2011-11-14T23:09:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPT' 'sip-files00154.txt'
61f48ef22512bc4c7c4e313a7c9cab65
f9e27f3477fd7a77ce3ae448c9cc8ae4ed3bc9fb
describe
'8811' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPU' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
d3189de890842568dbe5a01d22db6bda
e9141eef29619fd8330167413e5990378a97acd7
describe
'1437758' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPV' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
1643101ab2e40c289ef6df957dd4ee4d
5bce31edf73fa028241b9dc1482be3261b7d966f
describe
'71955' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPW' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
271ec0a1d0b8a87f125da7d3650acae2
a6a32b4d72e526989beae6d137b074e940b0b3e4
describe
'27793' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPX' 'sip-files00155.pro'
5f18369faa126235cfaf4fd3702742ea
a460b64e96790c7bb6a9adf9f04fc33d86f382f2
describe
'26485' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPY' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
7a9294296e4349e6fc4b0ff791fbf47b
8c3f9dec1b937c0c587decdd148e9606643f9322
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACPZ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
9f77c3369bac41227402664d77cefe14
d2e27e3e02e58ee0cdb06ea5ec33251f04084c83
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQA' 'sip-files00155.txt'
adaa58289b9ac3b797c5d3ea7f35d341
105251a9201356b85737306671ca2976ae95664b
describe
'9000' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQB' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
c8eadab326d9548ff6480ecb18cd8779
a8382005eab8419ca7ed734925967c51aa2e9425
describe
'1421994' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQC' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
07ea3e73756f24567b89e617f226ae5b
de6fa38eab543c15645a10e7a07228b13b44d049
describe
'68825' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQD' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
4896c5018b484e1043d39ac4d9ac0cac
0d17bcd2c5c929e8f0e14b847da72f1217068478
describe
'25273' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQE' 'sip-files00156.pro'
bac417d4f09d58d56d2ad2d17239ecb8
10adeccd363498cec1a604a469c3198f677a42bc
describe
'24880' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQF' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
1235480c7f20c753d112a0dbd1a10951
5b5f838b05abdc1b4121cf50c4c4283d09063033
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQG' 'sip-files00156.tif'
6a2b292e47191ade752d3aff4361b050
820ddc58d70a61aa69814fc5e2d13654ca7fb942
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQH' 'sip-files00156.txt'
405d178430aa75547485e8eaf5b27e9b
a8f0c93d53aa11296478e9aedcbed48d9fc878ee
describe
'8237' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQI' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
e9fc5c0ed7361a486677e225e9845825
ae77abd0eaae8c1599da2f7bae908747519e673e
describe
'1437696' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQJ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
8ed6824c8d7ee8022f87028b95782027
2253eb6c9f30b77dea837162f3f65bbc24ad0fa0
describe
'72301' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQK' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
81d9083eae5eddc77b9d8d98da3ea9b4
de288d3f5e7c73f9d7e54c0dec0b343779d0951f
describe
'27813' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQL' 'sip-files00157.pro'
ec82469553cdee17737d6aafe2e09d3d
e9805df8fbcb050bcb0820cd903f251761703b60
describe
'26559' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQM' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
62a504f1f02083b63904ce9e0b46ad52
c6d6acbabc34d84f84d26eab74094f31affb34e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQN' 'sip-files00157.tif'
ccd3f3f33aace867281f7db3609f3ddf
f1c3fc4cea1b14523f87ed8d7753878c5d204c5d
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQO' 'sip-files00157.txt'
1fce8eea01357068572bcd67fd0f6508
6ea190580196a64109822b8c4295d2dd51aa945b
describe
'8847' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQP' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
ac5ce03d5564d730663da6db0a539cd2
ae370367cf05523c31aba2d8a1d496eb02f6d2ed
describe
'1421913' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQQ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
fb19c35154ed32b5296abd4029ec5bde
5d70cd64ec78a2b3d2fb1bcdb568d1e4a8b2e602
describe
'71341' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQR' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
f2268c0d012d0b2412f269617aa3ee69
da0e5dea6bd901eaa3911028f45a78793b4063a7
describe
'25176' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQS' 'sip-files00158.pro'
d18cf96443d2c7d8cf86ca66ec9d7ed3
cb081003f4907b2f52ba5e513554b7bcfde580b8
describe
'25319' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQT' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
d6116d9968580a737a6a8c95da3adcbe
4af9289a212a80585f2ea4ce073a5bde75d14cc9
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQU' 'sip-files00158.tif'
64b2642347b7d5b88e21671a3726b1cd
31c57a380a7a53fac0ee7d4903537395ccf4dbdf
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQV' 'sip-files00158.txt'
9038f0354172213c9b258ef80ba112d0
630fcf16dcf363213ca22e2fbb82f5e7a82c5ee3
describe
'8282' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQW' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
0c73915f769b47f4774c27d9edacdfc6
05f762fd05fc27771332f4dd62f42bf0621111a9
'2011-11-14T23:08:25-05:00'
describe
'1437885' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQX' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
a56e0837fa67afbf4126946e2e3e4585
51f34ff105009a8d1980674749cbbc421177b28a
describe
'76824' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQY' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
d2821a46e8e483dd6f7183bd3c69cec2
42078c257788598e7c205bb9f8134b070340c991
describe
'28947' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACQZ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
5a5d477e72d8a211122388f016e0bccb
5c9d1cb6b14cb66678c504d845a91903605e8683
describe
'28419' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRA' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
d0377be5d2f50071c6ab368525fead38
d4e2d58dd72a69c574be020422bf1edab8dae91b
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRB' 'sip-files00159.tif'
17b0d99e8c3d7a1dcaefa7a3d4a2df06
6ec977ae4f3d95a1e60d3d6f560f1d48d4f8f538
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRC' 'sip-files00159.txt'
c96b8996efab2248960dd6dd6daf5ae2
ea12153f2a5651512ddff607ed86f759ee1ea1f8
describe
'9366' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRD' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
3d905af2448afe6bce7313cafe19d1d5
474a697c9c126bdfb00cb6ce175c1704b2ff541b
describe
'1657099' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRE' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
594e146e8b974de5250f6ad164dbcd36
1e0eb851d12e8be1ad8892afaea9725c8aed20b1
describe
'83046' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRF' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
36c979bbef63c79d34b712132aff6d98
68a9f32ca15705f7bbe11f191c85f9163923d7c0
describe
'2628' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRG' 'sip-files00160.pro'
d9ff6ab1c30c169178b657a1a161cf08
454e916a87a90cc7085624ae8eee4ac2746fa000
describe
'25532' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRH' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
bbd0e07def81e5391716020ece1a26ea
ccd632b29cbcaf745ece2b9c5bd2389220e7602b
describe
'13275859' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRI' 'sip-files00160.tif'
0b4e200d10909388560fd40dc3903208
267a11bf4d668bb8603447eff4ce29e1c6404d60
describe
'169' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRJ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
fb641e67bbaefdce98d46a8cfaa8e596
14c7618296b0dd1d3651d8b2041090cfbc933552
describe
Invalid character
'8024' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRK' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
bfaa67ea6615728f196570c11e9f41cc
185265b169c14b02d5c77034576b96ad6e91f429
describe
'1348425' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRL' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
67e0f2280568c531b911cebd906165b8
242baca6307335e2947f4e864201977086e7011f
describe
'42330' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRM' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
7398a3ee3685d73a663f671da584f4ad
1707dd78cc476669165c00042260b93c2466603a
describe
'2206' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRN' 'sip-files00161.pro'
81f2039e86e4b8c00ccfcd8c5e962511
3ddcb88dd966936adc18fbf913aaab54a3c009f7
describe
'13202' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRO' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
e91a791d7457501e8bbde136796942ba
70679086a512bba01b8fdd685dc9bf403775b10c
describe
'11094591' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRP' 'sip-files00161.tif'
6b3aca439259b292781eb9c9f7f8fa39
6b3f84b965a94dfbe9edb87a7b7f1a11dcd40a79
describe
'131' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRQ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
17c825576669b9f27d670471b227e128
a4e1ebd54ef9dad3230b565e8d5d70a731b21881
describe
Invalid character
'5048' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRR' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
4c586205fdec9058e58c1978ff4fe2ec
5a64947d4ae632f6f0f5fa093e6ddb8cd91ecdfb
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRS' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
94d2eb1eeccdcc9552e40ffcca2e0342
46a6296fc6c54fe109ceeb441e71e047807dcebd
describe
'78853' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRT' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
058e622e233cb00a7b8e0b1d2cfd1b1c
2b8a79776358090b9d8dbddc0ecef5814f4a62b0
describe
'28434' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRU' 'sip-files00162.pro'
5eec41a462c31a7fbe889f0a86837905
a9cb75b1f38806a6c161b5533d972518119c7a5b
describe
'27994' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRV' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
57041a2947b8c5ceafb71a36aea40d51
fce99b12af86484a4f9f5d2d2a9cc60f08dbc2df
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
ffcdf49804e1c8faef60e5ee5082927b
62228ceb1463f147f6cf2381bec4f0e5acf3c05b
'2011-11-14T23:09:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRX' 'sip-files00162.txt'
0934da685f191e2a1f274b08be2c0a90
e95790f8701ba2d8da9941631de8e30f90b01dde
describe
'8920' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
6b6f9e05d9b5ab244ac9280502812089
915938e989f230e09a6c5729aba52401a8fcb06d
describe
'1437914' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACRZ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
60b162054b635749589cd8920d65bbcb
e6a701a994955fbaccd84d95b16c6fd63a4993e6
describe
'73853' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSA' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
207dc3754526eb9b2b5beccba09732c3
817228dd0a851abdc739ab1d3fecb470f47cf176
describe
'27833' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSB' 'sip-files00163.pro'
7d5ae0e83d509f9c62b59414a28ead67
ec8ad29c3a2fa33d3018ea01b69c2855cd95a189
describe
'27375' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSC' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
5e63e307cdc979a16424f21f51dc5ffb
881efe0c9bec751349c848f8d60ccf8c02f894ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSD' 'sip-files00163.tif'
7b61bda0464f5a76c8066176bbecad03
c8104415fa13779a60e204132aebbc1da43a4db4
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSE' 'sip-files00163.txt'
cc5fc42652a54e1e0d8d8cbc6bfc45fe
5e2a474ac16b30941f03fa1735f3da1b80df7387
describe
'8915' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSF' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
6b1e9303ab4229f5a115776c2bb9bea3
ee9a9d771716621ff6689a50750f1386f89cd4bc
describe
'1421945' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSG' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
d37d5fa5d6341cdda50f326f064aef44
f1b07acc3d8916baf6849e69d4b50cc40b344dd7
describe
'77175' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSH' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
6566f95808316220092067967120deed
a1924a7f4bc26d2ad2264260d7aaa7e8a345faed
describe
'29664' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSI' 'sip-files00164.pro'
2204d5c44668d7767d9f0dca635a51d4
4b17eb27ff2f7fce573453e696a1503b4b16c65c
describe
'28481' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSJ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
0a000d0aece5c72202613dd5648ef84c
8714fe8bf416bb198bdf807a0b35ad36f4e55eb7
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSK' 'sip-files00164.tif'
c470637d452e1791ceadd4b8887287e9
dc77ea4d98f43d6c70b60adabb8b42fbfa1830a0
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSL' 'sip-files00164.txt'
11bd35d447c0a9cd885b2d108e04ea1d
747c75e6cb53539fc42f9c582df6f538c026914b
describe
'8995' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSM' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
149269c3130eb9a8ac5232a620fdc402
980bf76fae56660d69c9509350f2921f6a048444
describe
'1437858' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSN' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
b44febe04da1df7cf0c1f515989c375c
5fa4807d584d0007738d226a65590725bc1208fe
describe
'71255' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSO' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
1509b95fd31d8566ffab8fc0a8713c71
9b677c299fc8ca29e2cce8c6b9ae4c2192afc495
describe
'27765' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSP' 'sip-files00165.pro'
17e8d3c1036a6415656e24c0d4d49695
932d68b5bd4f3a099903963607f262a8ffacd12c
describe
'25569' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSQ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
70ba76eea7f503ef616a6cc64533565a
40afa388b804822765aecd496effeaa7e557046e
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSR' 'sip-files00165.tif'
8f3f684b3d2f6bd02184bc811f090967
b7f43b0f4a301d1a66f914100763da2b604c59bc
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSS' 'sip-files00165.txt'
fdfb61a6e5f43ec0be663b1c42bbe910
8f593b689726f10bc5e65479796846715fa687fa
describe
'8636' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACST' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
434b913be3e025841c192a7bcca81456
0097f6d9d77a56dfccd3b8f3a4852de1d4cd1986
describe
'1421827' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSU' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
50d3b6a2d3a95fd71e2cf457ee2b24d4
d9412349bb53930802684b99ffa15aa02fe6be6c
describe
'73752' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSV' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
bde2d51f0ef2dbd7ad91a2bfbf8e2a39
0a917556771f2074e1a6f5b185f0dacd0ecafd49
describe
'28156' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSW' 'sip-files00166.pro'
b9f61a4f34d213dfa0c3724c82ee61cf
c4ba6343246a9f432a4ca897b9fd329cdfc436ae
describe
'27298' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSX' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
2e9bc8df682ca647dec90186ae1da811
4e00ff47e21eb2fbfae93ac61f4182f4753c7cd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSY' 'sip-files00166.tif'
a5e55de4b1eac188be3066922e8099a5
91ac66b168600b2f6b485e991f638a2e12073fe8
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACSZ' 'sip-files00166.txt'
279ab9a9a6f7a2ddce6c9d96964f032d
9baa32e9a9a71f628537a1cba0ec77720304529f
describe
'8843' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTA' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
5fa7ca9ff5611aff0fb447c051ba1f3e
bf23ee90546945579c7bb2e0ec8491bc55dd3864
describe
'1437861' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTB' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
7aac6855a62498c7b920b25030bbfa92
eee2ec38e16bc717cd64c26acdc0b635b26965df
describe
'72702' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTC' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
232735f691aae845b0ff4af090fe07e3
ce741d068ca9f27c264469238c53431df1a21630
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTD' 'sip-files00167.pro'
8ddb1fb4e62f3ef18c2d50c4b06fc2be
990efe0f7490722efb09ac2696c1d2bf346e13f6
describe
'26420' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTE' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
a099a024d00abc6b4364cdebd5bee6b8
92a10cfcf920e0dcc9c524d12c91f352cc369b50
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTF' 'sip-files00167.tif'
9f61950a3e1d9068e6882d39b1301bd5
f7b631ffc8f1e0f9d01e105556eb74cf0fe3cc78
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTG' 'sip-files00167.txt'
e8c1838023a92c0631d9c271363b5218
0bf9d558391773131aefdaafcbab736f31695dc8
describe
'9231' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTH' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
bf2e76855435b954eb50095e5ca71769
f498c8d600a815e7497e5d63cba144651e957505
describe
'1421822' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTI' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
53d3ed2af248441e1664bb13d473593c
df78eb920aa3a844aad2f73571bd4a95288559c2
describe
'76667' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTJ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
7c749161989c187226ec217e789829cc
a71ca05cd4516aa90ed8414b374840b7f4f31ed4
describe
'28877' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTK' 'sip-files00168.pro'
785cdd4dbda10f371e2523b24efd7142
e6d028536ce8471b1d39ab59e0e2827773621592
describe
'28700' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTL' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
cc44201a58e8b8947877a8a0c7a2801d
886d33013349379c08a6ce074304d40db5cf3ce9
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTM' 'sip-files00168.tif'
f681fd01166b73a08ecd81fbec87b6fa
8e309e400f301a2a2d735143ddb87d6ca49ee55c
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTN' 'sip-files00168.txt'
161fd4869762ba0a40ee5ae9c839852e
25afd3352757cf2c822d319f9240900c38d99c3a
describe
'9279' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTO' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
5954372c31f6d34362c9d40c93e9b57a
7bf6e6cdd57788c67c04b4186a4927884df6fd3c
describe
'1437887' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTP' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
378a085b22f88f2f16184978337c9e30
a0fd5ed09db43edef05420acfd88d32bc3cb0d4d
describe
'71739' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTQ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
80f62ec6b1a5bd86311fbac0726a280c
35256d3aeea9ad03d8eb8cf97165860da16f890d
describe
'27347' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTR' 'sip-files00169.pro'
390a657dbc4d1dce9bf10d8b97a90be6
4b89c7af82d8b05eecd019ef5de0c8a0ed1fbc07
describe
'26266' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTS' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
9d181ea96adce7d0e8677982bc8d80b7
e0fb29aef1931301fc5d9dfa7557b2b004c8b2c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTT' 'sip-files00169.tif'
06e9220ee1a7b477d960ac24c4f0c888
5cb8b7c8840b34fe6dfa5e8a037f12b207cff2e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTU' 'sip-files00169.txt'
113bdc104909220cd5650932f593c0ee
afe3801d512550728fa55ce02648d165b4ce22f4
describe
'9130' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTV' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
f1a8632b1f167708d4feb19402fab68d
c4cb5cf5df29176f10a486cea3c25e184d7cf4d9
describe
'1422007' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTW' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
a6403e291df9036f18a6c5de7a5383ab
1a9e5d4423c3e7c4ee584c0ef198a325bd688722
describe
'76205' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTX' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
fc06cb9b98c59a1563e3af447681c6cc
8eee0b6c6b5ce329708a7669c92a16cdc8a304f8
describe
'28168' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTY' 'sip-files00170.pro'
c8b6d433ce9fbd1922919cccd6240f71
7da9a4f07e9f405569a016081a3823806ae0ec8e
describe
'27768' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACTZ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
797a9a0a890975009a293f6de94a971f
a315297e2f4d8f8574bcc63d0a1a0cdd5e55159c
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUA' 'sip-files00170.tif'
591da5546713611722fd267228e255ae
6d50ca7a5a05187ef84aa877c7b3d50ae1f00dc9
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUB' 'sip-files00170.txt'
4b779c363029f71768fade1e49e6f51e
6fe4bb839ef8d172c4882a0c12220846a3194866
describe
'9108' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUC' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
21b48b3214608f1182c1918f0874ed2d
207e15e02900a53822d044829e8319822223b9e3
describe
'1437898' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUD' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
b2c97088747ac0a71d3c1c4c0762bf73
f7d7d94542bed8d8e0f4be95e8eebfd829076153
describe
'72580' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUE' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
509fd6cc4b2557c6ab0214469728f492
96a5c503399404ce855b8f88d102db5871be9b3c
describe
'27811' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUF' 'sip-files00171.pro'
9e8c67e54665e920923152b496458377
9cc4b66784295d11e35a867d9f133f37a384b335
describe
'26678' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUG' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
1df0b04ad4d59ba5c5e3b573d511ed5f
003c7a895814add149b568a403d441b218342c73
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUH' 'sip-files00171.tif'
7c50b46ec9de64de5dc217c6c9f5badc
a5e3d82c1ebdad7eb659b0c8e6940706bea2ede8
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUI' 'sip-files00171.txt'
5a3eef3541093d7c79b1f4b343c87a2a
805fcfc46b8c006f084180533c2f9c4547e44f87
describe
'9081' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUJ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
bbb31d717aafec0827038653910a9322
691707c1eddc5fdc0c38657a1cdff207643d531e
describe
'1422015' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUK' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
b7a2b1ad19efb9462b5a3bb25e0948b3
f9cdf4a3d0a9f0e9e49087c2a6878536d33c827e
describe
'75097' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUL' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
a1031b141ea5838619d27d2fe75884b5
8eabd3aae2fa86f8049149f73769eb59c142ffd3
describe
'28818' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUM' 'sip-files00172.pro'
a32670372f828d1df7fd925453da85c7
74d1835594620c1454e8dd692f8597094adbcbcc
describe
'27984' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUN' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
fc7453ca501f73a6db1ad06f9ddf6db8
9aa55d91933fcab8af159367514debecd4841e17
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUO' 'sip-files00172.tif'
18942a52c23a72f02cecbdb4e8eedf8e
8b96638d9f4a86de104555d137ff0f0a6952ac2f
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUP' 'sip-files00172.txt'
89dfcd08e74f88de9d86618040cf4667
4204524bbb532eb8dade208b1b46906b3319c94f
describe
'9276' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUQ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
d2a09948342ae36caffbe02a9d1c874c
623815ed9cb84709f6df2c7ffbc09d4623f2ccf0
describe
'1435120' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUR' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
a6cc8281edc3af4510dec79a8d6df11c
0e8600fc7f8d1b6aee054febca3fa622ded78f3d
describe
'72016' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUS' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
776fb87bad91aaf44fc4598dc76156b0
c1a6eb2e1fa2492f305890f95fa06b49edbaf42d
describe
'28602' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUT' 'sip-files00173.pro'
c3a4f9fa70392e9ecdfdfda803cd2b6d
87eb73bc16e733ee4dd735eefcb9cd313b2df1e6
describe
'27607' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUU' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
be2c6a215a87ebcb5ac7674dbbe0aef6
ee57d626b06982d5afc6bfb235497864790c46b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUV' 'sip-files00173.tif'
77542139d49bbb79fd46a64f34e6ceab
cf34687650f325a91d42aeac79ef3ca277ac7397
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUW' 'sip-files00173.txt'
a165ad8faa4e145cbf21cdf7f84c63f9
c523c26c7903e7f74d6a837654c5ad50dde4e3fa
describe
'9451' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUX' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
751ad4f42a56214490e3e1994ebe6d45
139bb11dcc9ddadc31f52e8b97de735b9c420cd9
describe
'1422005' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUY' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
3983357fd6f67eee79d06c0d4182257a
bb127d630f98490a0b97dadb58b52ee321e9c894
describe
'74109' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACUZ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
bfb37d332307cc23b81744426fbc3cba
b26f1df4e28c24dc41343671704d973e513d447b
describe
'28423' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVA' 'sip-files00174.pro'
e5850accbdaf784d86b40887c01626f6
a446dc08385e8b49e8197d7c8a3d36be027b2024
describe
'27503' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVB' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
5e21807e4344d6c14565eb1774e0248e
681b0a845d99629fd26ebfd82e8e355ca0d53a99
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVC' 'sip-files00174.tif'
ae1902e255c34ca4b53e0ec300984132
bd7da256327a0e12981594e42c66d63f78e2588f
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVD' 'sip-files00174.txt'
e2a067443d79aecf4ef8c9234e0de28a
c08f9b1a321ff5fab5e996e66c6e6fb3f85b3b5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVE' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
673cee7fa3b1b1587d0ec987889b7df2
685f5360e4cd27443b7c5d9422cb4b2e9f748c74
describe
'1226272' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVF' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
b8e3eaef035ae2e253d9209fe3455133
0f0703a67a7007e5c9395c2b5bd60511d2c8a994
describe
'51617' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVG' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
7a13a8a9b7b06dd0e4180ece95445e8c
df6f83f56dea6b9c8143daf34104bca717ffd7ae
describe
'17696' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVH' 'sip-files00175.pro'
fe112b1719e4eaa598283a8147e3fedc
be06c4ab0c36c9d5153c9de6b639167c451ac22b
describe
'18948' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVI' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
8d54969dfded381b382f3240eacb901e
ea0a629e2c7de4e3586029f0802a9cb6942cc836
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVJ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4aaac61a695df6dd6631086f7b6bfb7d
1a409f7d8fc8b691de5cb7e843e205700212c5a5
describe
'707' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVK' 'sip-files00175.txt'
5de5cedf1ff9a922c5df50b27e2c603e
ecb34dbd2a7fc00c1cde9a94157415c253fd11e2
describe
'6456' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVL' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
adcc22f472d23fa4507657ed59d9b423
21c76c216846cceb740f1557e340a480a33a2b19
describe
'1379663' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVM' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
a5afce901f06a378aef31ba24cdf331d
d69f65520750f66a74d69d18cb803dc027171e9d
describe
'57501' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVN' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
f519db8efda99e2db035ed7acdeb7f7d
b648580e4ab0f412a2e417e8d63c2936b22215f5
describe
'19238' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVO' 'sip-files00176.pro'
01624e01d98e0826dceacafaf6cd729f
c7adc2b4f18d2865abab2d497a4b0d4f413cbd0e
describe
'20402' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVP' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
6cd6d643a82a473505a774f39991e994
3689ab958487d719b097164692b6c7db7edb8c31
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVQ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
b2e65e16698b6aaefddb022f55f1374c
532bf0a82a209610742adf6fa0c7993c7f36ac8c
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVR' 'sip-files00176.txt'
2aebeded5a634e035c47f18163948abb
a84254b3fa579cf0e8a1c78faf1bfee2a1d2d08c
describe
'6747' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVS' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
d469e53d5494ab362dd39e85de79a311
8d95a52b1bbbce7999e87a185e13335ab756e9cf
describe
'1229631' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVT' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
18bb063c43eb768c7acc24b524ec9710
4431b82ac9806eb06e3f675f618dfef879845bb0
describe
'45832' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVU' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
5f5b1b9576fa1dafcb29671be9f038ef
d53c02b71cd3a5f32e578b14e72d9646e6f2154b
describe
'14241' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVV' 'sip-files00177.pro'
5c199027330da8c23e384becabf51096
27a4ecb623b6ed6ea2716206305e1d5a60512d49
describe
'15802' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVW' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
a08dbbbaf4c5040f718a12ebb515d99d
42d014a876ee5aa407cbf43d63508fca82865953
describe
'11174007' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVX' 'sip-files00177.tif'
5cb7f90c468646580cb90f79cf11440b
b011d60ea61d17ee1073a683449b766da057ba98
describe
'612' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVY' 'sip-files00177.txt'
c38855c790523cf4547d8e7a3053d0ef
0b91c1a1799ff5acec5479a6b60fba68acf7e6b7
describe
'5634' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACVZ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
75c4e5a5f147adf586c166c1b34e9561
f06ecf85e022f1b76826f707bb1c4ed0622c7fa6
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWA' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
2c5c8cf2fc9ab6a05ca3fdefb980eb4d
cb64a89ceba883c9ee0d325fc4a161d45eaad99c
describe
'95039' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWB' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
ce7b71f1a19d2225f7ab8e591a1b859a
31d4b5eed720bb8e19040c5aa194921bb9e76d68
describe
'52865' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWC' 'sip-files00178.pro'
a260578823ce768e682a94ce4a509b5b
24d26d0e7c8ec5bbc5345d61b4ccd2945762ef22
describe
'29428' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWD' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
fec6391b439498d4c9e7f1901bb5ba38
c2976935af7f00bfb21ce80a5ef4b08e4cf5ef94
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWE' 'sip-files00178.tif'
1c12d6a4c2271b94dfa848aff11e8b8f
a0974c2d91f6088266fcae373e1fa89c9f9df9e9
describe
'2299' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWF' 'sip-files00178.txt'
10632a41dd1813105cc1e364fbae04d4
b74e22e6669632f5a2dd22db73d90483af2c2d87
describe
'8421' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWG' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
14d67327d752e1d1126acab0632728ae
535f1184c4a811cb5e147be9e68b86542e3d1d9d
describe
'1631643' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWH' 'sip-filesback4.jp2'
3868c6ad0f7f045d8f6e906b38db5bdc
1d60fc17d2bba6377ee062995138753a6253f7c4
describe
'122167' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWI' 'sip-filesback4.jpg'
7605356889a58b28566112e16af6dd1b
cd2d23f1fc8d1b6f275f3b400e84f308544b659c
describe
'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWJ' 'sip-filesback4.pro'
e14949949ce777bb3ee28e482813a93d
df3e4a27bc81bd87a6bd4aa33b74787e4a1400ca
describe
'23232' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWK' 'sip-filesback4.QC.jpg'
c80c41abe26dbf281bb32f95e14c029a
67abc2b500264d7e43d9398059e13a21f26363c2
describe
'39163170' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWL' 'sip-filesback4.tif'
dd3cedbd7deb1640031b3bbc2935d0b4
3178e86e528e9dfc1f687b2c34ff943eafed693f
'2011-11-14T23:10:44-05:00'
describe
'5496' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWM' 'sip-filesback4thm.jpg'
cfc3a9b984ce2d1a98d46a14c1b5d3ac
dda4374062aca37b5e74b9e96e7dbc0d141e55f9
describe
'1655360' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWN' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
049c14401f1863fff651a2df8ed37ec5
3efd2691c2a356f2d7dec2e457d3a442d9b0677f
describe
'116970' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWO' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
303963a32e1950729c3580faaa70587c
af2807be435dbf7a0f3a2c90d4923ccc8bdc5be3
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWP' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
f8dae3328aa797c43c2e6fb2b38bacc5
c900d3d6ca16b6505277c66c48bafd7bfae3791c
describe
'23095' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWQ' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
1ca492be859a6078b0c14ee7be149e0b
5d48da58bb1b7441482c441fb7733537afbecde2
describe
'39731340' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWR' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
ad219a2c8bf37c1671416cf3a145f0a7
fac09b1f5752b26c065c679671c4cbcfa31f4a8f
describe
'5280' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWS' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
35a9d50f245d4885924cdaab07bc8e98
879c480ef47fd078682bc1abbdb69b23d5a36e7e
describe
'297713' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWT' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
5428c0264ac07a1338f201658a99100f
7b7df326debc133e7cc033482cc473735cce27a4
describe
'29281' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWU' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
2a6d34809b197fe5a127f17c2261c69e
1cf5f5c68b6d398ddf32adb140adb2901ac0944c
describe
'492' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWV' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
9069244a429eb9345594018e8805521a
f2c76632217fe7c305b78897e7d0f577ef046b4a
describe
'6769' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWW' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
e5a3970c1024e3a04c448d4c57b05a50
003562c2651792f7bc9f00ae16f11db06a33dae9
describe
'7151746' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWX' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
ec0e8db2d508f8b7047307abdba3180d
b9b8eeab949ccd26e913fd6b23f088829fa52823
describe
'30' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWY' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
30ad811459686bb576d27518e0f2f26b
6256da330171695375d920d490da0a54e6046c99
describe
'2592' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACWZ' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
d35f4023b4b338e698f3f1ddb9fa7ba5
efed4a59284adfa9008457ef7e9ea1935cfbcc0e
'2011-11-14T23:05:28-05:00'
describe
'303297' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACXA' 'sip-filesUF00002003_00001.mets'
4be470bb9287b499cf8a33f500aa2f4f
0854de87657fcf4ec056504cc511ad79a26b05ff
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T10:44:27-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'391167' 'info:fdaE20080813_AAAAQBfileF20080814_AAACXD' 'sip-filesUF00002003_00001.xml'
c505834dacc793653f89df7116e08ac1
4ad7f6c4803ec21c0e546c0a45a0f4cba8e33afe
describe
'2013-12-16T10:44:23-05:00'
xml resolution