Citation
The wonders of home

Material Information

Title:
The wonders of home in eleven stories
Creator:
Grey
Fley, Henry ( Printer )
Grant and Griffith ( Publisher )
S. & J. Bentley (Printer) ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Grant and Griffith
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
iv, 166, 4 p., <8> leaves of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Technology -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Science -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Bookplates (Provenance) -- 1850 ( rbprov )
Pictoral cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1850 ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1850 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1850
Genre:
Bookplates (Provenance) ( rbprov )
Pictorial bindings ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Baldwin Library,
Citation/Reference:
cf. NUC pre-1956,
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Grandfather Grey ; with illustrations.

Record Information

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026795479 ( ALEPH )
14126240 ( OCLC )
ALH1218 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text




oe ihe ee
NBEO es

Cibo









452







THE

WONDERS OF HOME,





THE TEA-PLANTATION.











Hn Eleven Stories,

©

By GRANDFATHER GREY.
a: SECOND EDITION.

WBiirh Cighs Filustrations. .



LONDON; |
GRANT AND GRIFFITH,

(Stee SSCS TO JONW HAKRIS,)

OORNER OF ST, PAUL'S CHURCHYARD,

MDPCCCLII. np



*

«
+

oot sonar gecaminage se Bt





a
Baten ee

-_——



THE

WONDERS OF HOME:
In Eleven Stories.

By GRANDFATHER GREY.
SECOND EDITION.

Wiith Ciqht tllustrations.

LONDON:
GRANT AND GRIFFITH,

(SUCCESSORS TO JOHN HARRIS,)

CORNER OF ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD.



MDCCCLII.






PREFACH.

SSS ee

I HAVE attempted in the following pages, with
what success it is not for me to determine, to tell
children about the Wonders of Science with which
they are surrounded. My belief is, that it is wise
to cultivate a wholesome spirit of inquiry in the
minds of the young—to lead them to seek know-
ledge—rather than to drag them to their lessons;
and I hope that my stories of common household
objects may be the means of directing the minds of
many young people to the consideration of the toil
and ingenuity, at the cost of which they enjoy so
many comforts in their modern home. Such studies,
prosecuted in a spirit of gratitude, must be power-





vil PREFACE.

ful for good. Indeed, home might be made to the
poetic minds of children a second fairy-land, if the
marvels of ingenuity and industry with which it
abounds, were laid bare to them. In the tea, coffee,
and sugar; the rice and flour; the chairs and
tables; the lamps and glasses; their frocks and
shoes,—children might be taught to read not only
interesting histories but powerful sermons, incul-
cating strength of will, diligence, and goodness.
Richter says well that “a good action, a noble
sacrifice, a galling’ wrong, are fit building-sites for
a child’s church.” In this belief I send forth my
stories. I trust that they may have the effect I
anticipate from them, and I ask no better success.

GRANDFATHER GREY.



CONTENTS.

enn

Tue Story oF A Cup or TEA

Tue Story oF A Piece or SuGar
THE Story or A Miik-Jue¢

Tue Story or A Lump oF Coat .
Tue Story or some Hot WaTER
Tue Story or A Pin .

Tue Story or JENNY’s SasH

Tue Story or Harry’s JACKET
Tue Srory or A TUMBLER .

Tue Story or A KNIFE

Tue Srory or tu1s Boox

PAGE

27
45
58
67
81
93

. 118
. 127
. 137
. 147









THE »

WONDERS OF HOME

THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA.

‘‘ Our household dwells amidst ten thousand hills,
Where the tea, north and south of the village, abundantly grows;
From Chinshe to Kuhyii, unceasingly hurried,
Every morning I must early rise to do my task of tea.”
Chinese Ballad on Picking Tea.

THE story of the tea which is now being scalded
in the tea-pot is one with which few young readers,
and not many old ones, are acquainted. Most people
know that tea comes from China, but here the
general knowledge on the subject ends. T'ew peo-
ple in England, or indeed in Europe, are intimate
with the various processes which this fragrant leaf
undergoes before our merchant-ships convey it to
B



2 THE WONDERS OF HOME:

our docks, and thence to our tea-caddies. The im-
mense consumption of tea in this country—estimated
lately at fifty-eight millions of pounds yearly—
makes it imperative upon us all to know something
ofits manufacture, that we may be enabled to guard
ourselves and our friends against adulterations of
a character injurious to the constitution. This re-
mark applies more particularly to young people,
since they have a long earthly future to look for-
ward to; whereas old men like myself have, in all
human probability, but a short span of life to mea-
sure. Therefore, let me impress upon my young
readers the responsibility of their position; let me
beseech them to bear in mind that their duty to
their friends, and to those who in years to come will
depend upon them, as they now depend upon their
friends, for guidance and subsistence, should urge
them to garner up industriously all the knowledge
which they are enabled to obtain in the days of their
youth. Let them strive with all their might to
benefit by the instruction of their teachers. Let



THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA, 3

them walk abroad with an inquiring spirit: let
their thirst for knowledge never be quenched. By
knowledge I do not mean only the information to
be gathered from their school-books, but also a fami-
liarity with the history of every thing about them.
I always indulge my grandchildren in this inquisi-
tiveness; and the attention with which they listen
to my stories, and the interest they always take in
them, induce me, at their earnest request, to print my
histories for the benefit of their schoolfellows and
the juvenile public. The first long story which I
told them was that of a Cup of Tea. It was a frosty
night—the wind was howling without: we had
closed the shutters—the fire blazed upon the hearth,
the children’s mamma was making some delightful
hot tea, and the youngest of the family was scorch-
ing himself making toast, to his infinite delight,
when I began my story, which ran, to the best of
my recollection, as follows :—



4 7 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA.

The story of the tea which your mother has just
scalded in the tea-pot, is one, as I said before,
with which few people living beyond the frontiers of
China are familiar. Considerable obscurity envelopes
the ancient history of tea. It is supposed by some,
and, I think, with reason, to be the malabathrum of
the ancient Greeks, though Chinese accounts place
the discovery of the useful and delightful properties
of tea as far back as A.D. 315, and assert also that
it did not come into general use before the period
of the Tang dynasty, that is to say about the be-
ginning of the seventh century. ‘The description
given of malabathrum by the author of the Periplus
favours the idea that it was the leaf of the tea-plant
prepared in a rude manner ; and if this be so, the
native country of the tea-plant is the romantic re-
gion of Assam and Yunnan, where it has recently
been found growing in a wild state.



THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 5

W hen tea first became in general use among the
Chinese, they called it tw; but their modern name
for it is cha. The English w.rd ‘tea’ is a corruption
of the Fuhkien dialect. The Fuhkien people, from
whom the plant was first obtaied by Europeans,
pronounced it tay: the French version (thé) of the
word is therefore more correct than the English.
Botanists call tea, Thea; and it is classed by scien-
tific men, and by the Chinese themselves, with the
Camellia. In China, the tea-plant varies in height
from three to six or seven feet. It usually presents a
dense mass of foliage on an infinite number of small
thin twigs, such as you will often find mixed with
the tea, if you examine it in the caddy. In Assam,
where, as I have already told you, it may be found
wild, it often grows to the height of thirty feet.
The twigs of the plant are carefully pruned, to
increase the quantity of leaves, and develope the
branches laterally, so that the shrubs are usually
of great circumference in comparison to their height.
The leaf in its natural state is of a dark-green



6 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

colour,'and of an oval shape. The flowers of the tea-
tree grow singly, and are white and without scent.
The seeds of the tea-tree very much resemble hazel-
nuts, their kernels being enclosed in a hard husk,
and so oily as to decay soon after ripening. The
oil extracted from these seeds, though acrid and
bitter, is useful to the Chinese for various purposes.
The leaves are first gathered from the plant when
it is about three years old; though it is not full-
grown before it is six or eight years old. The
tea-plant is grown throughout the entire kingdom
of China. The demand for tea has become so great,
that the cultivation of cotton has been partially
abandoned in order to meet the demand for the fra-
erant leaves of the Bohea hills, Fuhkien, Chehkiang’,
and Kiangsu. very cultivator of the soil in China,
be his land extensive or limited in extent to a mere
garden, cultivates a few dozen shrubs, and either
cures the leaves himself, or plucks them to sell to
his richer neighbour. Indeed, the cultivation of the
tea-plant is almost exclusively in the hands of small



THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 7:

cultivators. In China there are few extensive land-
owners; but each little farmer raises carefully his
proportionate crops of cotton, silk, rice, and tea, on
his own ground.

The seeds of the tea-shrubs are thickly planted
in nursery-beds. ‘They are sown thickly, because
from their oily and acrid nature, as I have already
told you, many of them fail. When the nurslings
are a foot or more high, they are transplanted into
rows about four feet apart. A rich sandy earth
with a fair proportion of vegetable mould in it,
and in an elevated situation, is generally chosen for
the propagation of the tea-plant. It is also neces-
sary that the soil be plentifully watered. A loamy
soil, with a sandy, loose covering, generally produces
an abundant crop of leaves; and in the Ankoi-hill
plantations in the Fuhkien province, much of the
tea is coloured with the iron contained in the land.
No preparation of the ground is necessary, nor is
much care usually taken to preserve the shrubs in
a healthy state. The result‘of this want of care is,



8 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

that in the neighbourhood of Canton particularly,
and in other parts of the empire, the tea-shrubs
are often covered with lichens, and sometimes bored
and destroyed by worms. ‘The Chinese might, in
this matter, call to mind their excellent proverb, that
“ trouble neglected becomes still more troublesome.”
You must not, however, fall into the vulgar error of
supposing that this pig-tailed race, so jeered at by
ignorant persons, are the idle, barbarous, and ridicu-
lous people they are commonly represented to be.
I should indeed be sorry to hear my grandchildren
join in this ignorant outcry against a great and in-
dustrious people. I do not mention the carelessness
_ of the Canton tea-growers for the purpose of preju-
dicing you against Chinamen generally; on the
contrary, I am rather anxious to impress your
minds with the gigantic results of their untiring
industry. Not only have these people rendered
every available piece of land in their country use-
ful to the general good of the community, but they
have terraced their native hills almost to their sum-



THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 9

mits, and propagated cotton, tea, and rice, hundreds
of feet above the level of the sea. ‘They practise
upon a vast scale all the rural and manufacturing
arts, and maintain in perfect mternal harmony a
community which may be moderately computed at
about three hundred millions-of souls.

Their customs may at first appear ridiculous in
the eyes of foreigners ; nor is this to be wondered
at. The fundamental principle of their government
is self-dependence. The stupendous fabric they have
raised, their perfect internal harmony, and the pro-
gress of their arts and literature, are evidence of
the wisdom of their rulers. To a Chinaman, or to
a tsin jin, as they love to call themselves, China is
the world. Beyond the boundaries of their empire
is to them a void; and the general belief to this
day among the masses of the Chinese people is that
their country is Zien Hia, meaning Beneath the
Sky, and denoting the World. The common name
for their country in the present time is Chung
Kwoh, or Middle Kingdom, a name given to it



10 THE WONDERS OF HOME..

from an idea that it is centred in the middle of
the earth. These things certainly denote the igno-
rance of the people respecting their geographical
position; but they also account fully for the singu-
larity of their manners. Unaccustomed to mix
with foreigners, or even to admit them to the mys-
teries of their social customs, they have lived alto-
gether isolated from the great family of man, and
have, consequently, contracted habits and customs
differing’ essentially from those of other nations.
Let me, children, guard you from indulging in
ignorant raillery against a people to whose wisdom
the world owes the inventions of the compass, por-
celain, gunpowder, and printing.

Well, to return to the tea-plant: as I have told
you, when the tea-shrub is about three years old,
the Chinaman gathers his first crop of leaves from
it. Three crops of leaves are gathered from full-
grown shrubs during the season. The first picking
takes place about the middle of April, or whenever
the tender leaf-buds begin to open, and while the

a a



THE STORY OF A-CUP OF TEA. 11

leaves retain their youthful down. These young
leaves produce the finest tea; and the down that
remains upon them has given rise to the erroneous
notion that they are the petals of the tea-flower.
The second gathering is made in the early days of
May, when the shrubs, if the weather have been
propitious, are densely covered with full-sized leaves.
The Chinese pay particular attention to the state of
the weather, as they believe that excessive dews, or
the entire absence of moisture, mildews or withers
the leaves, thereby affecting the quality and quan-
tity of the crop. The average annual produce of a
single full-sized plant is said to be from eighteen
to twenty-four ounces; and it is estimated that a .
thousand square yards of land devoted to tea-shrubs
generally contains between three hundred and four
hundred plants. The Chinese are very particular
as to the locality where their tea has been grown.
They have a decided preference for the produce of
the Bohea hills; and pretend to discriminate be-
tween the leaves of adjoinig’ plantations. The



12 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

produce of esteemed nurseries is collected with the
most scrupulous care; and it is affirmed, on the
authority of native dealers, that the price of these
particular lots varies from 4/. to 25/. per pound.

The leaves are collected by handfuls. ‘They are
stripped off the twigs with the utmost rapidity ; and
men, women, and children are indiscriminately em-
ployed to do this labour. Hach picker has a basket
slung round his neck, in which he conveys the leaves
he has plucked to the curing-house. One person
can, on an average, pick from twelve to fifteen
pounds of leaves in a day, for which labour the
wages are about sixpence. ‘The third crop of leaves
is cv lected about the middle of July; and there is
also a fourth gleaning in August, called tsin lu, or
“autumn dew,” from the name of the season in
which it takes place; the three previous crops are
called respectively first, second, and third springs.
The two last crops yield very inferior leaves, which
are seldom exported, but are probably reserved for
the use of the poorer Chinese.



THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 18

Now, though it is reasonable to believe that the
tea-plant puts forth more healthy, and therefore
more valuable foliage in favourable situations, than
when planted in an unfavourable soil, or exposed
to the inclemencies of the weather, yet it appears
to me that the delicacy of the leaf and its flavour
depend to a great extent on the care bestowed
upon it after it is picked. Chinese authorities, in
fact, declare that the mode of curing the leaf has
as much to do with the delicacy and richness of
its flavour, as its age, or the nature of the soil
from which it has been nourished. A few of them
go so far as to assert that some sorts of tea are
quite changed from their original flavour by the .
curative processes to which they are subjected.
You will not fail to observe, children, that as the
leaf grows old, its flavour increases in strength and
loses in delicacy. Your mother will tell you that
the flavour of Pecco and other fine kinds of tea
is more delicate than that of Souchong and Congo.
- Well, the cause of the superior qualities of Pecco



14 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

is its extreme youth. Pecco and all the fine kinds
of tea are produced from the leaf-buds of the tea-
plant; while Souchong and Congo are the full-
blown, mature leaf of the plant. No tea-grower
would cure the delicate leaf-buds of the tea-plant
on the hot-pans where the coarser, because older
leaves had been roasted.

After the leaves have been gathered and housed,
they are carefully assorted, and the yellow and
decayed ones thrown aside. The sound leaves are
then thinly spread upon bamboo trays and placed
in the wind upon frames, where they are left until
the leaves begin to soften; then, while lymg upon
the tray, they are gently rolled and rubbed until
red spots begin to appear, when they are tested by
pouring hot water upon them. If the hot water
turn the colour of the edges of the leaves to a
pale yellowish tint, the leaves are considered to be
ready for firing. The process of working or rolling
is tedious and laborious ; so much so that the Chinese
call the tea so treated kungfu cha, or worked tea.



THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 15

Congo is a corruption of kungfu cha. You may
then remember that Congo tea means rolled or
worked tea. The leaves having been properly rolled
and tested, are next subjected to the action of heat.
The iron pan having been previously heated, the
workman takes a handful of leaves and sprinkles
them carefully and thinly upon it, and waits till
each leaf has popped, when he dexterously brushes
them off into a basket, before they have had time
to become charred. The pans are the iron boilers
used in cooking, set in mason-work in an inclined
position and at a convenient height; three or four
are put into the same form, and heated by means
of a flue passing lengthwise under the whole. The
testing and rolling, which I have described to you,
is dispensed with in the curing of very common
tea; and the fresh leaves are at once thrown upon
the hot pans, and then turned over and kept in
motion by a workman before each pan, while ano-
ther carefully attends to the fire.

The mouth of the man who is watching the



16 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

leaves is careful'y covered: this precaution is ne-
cessary to keep out the hot dust which rises in
clouds from the leaves. During the first firing an
acrid greenish juice is forced out, and 1s partially
evaporated, or given off in the form of vapour; but
as it is pressed out on the bamboo tables by the
workmen, it affects and irritates their hands. Four
or five minutes’ heating is sufficient for the first
firing.

When the leaves have undergone this first firing,
they are thrown upon tables made of split bamboos
laid alongside each other with their round sides
up. The workmen take a handful of the hot
leaves in their hands, and roll and knead them
upon the table, in order to drive the oily green
juice completely out. This juice is allowed to
run through the interstices of the table on the
ground.

When the leaves have been thus rolled and
kneaded, they are shaken out loosely upon basket
trays, and exposed to the air to complete the dry-



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THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 17

ing; the object being to dry them gradually, that
they may not lose their brittleness, nor become too
crisp under the scorching rays of the summer sun.
When satisfactorily dried in this manner, the leaves
are thrown in larg'e quantities into the pans to under-
eo a second firing. ‘This time the pans are heated
in a less degree than before; and the leaves are
thrown about constantly to prevent scorching. If
well rolled previously, this operation tends to make
the leaves shrivel and twist; and as they grow
hotter they are stirred with a brush, and tossed
about till they are completely dried. This second
firing is generally of an hour’s duration. The leaves
are sometimes placed in trays over a charcoal fire
covered with ashes, after exposure to the air, and
left for two or three hours. This process makes
them of a darker colour than when rapidly fired
in the pans.

These processes, however, are occasionally varied
For instance, after the leaves have undergone the
first firing, rolling, and drying in the air, they are

C



18 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

sometimes scattered upon a fine sieve and placed
over a charcoal fire covered with ashes, to prevent
the smoke from reaching the leaves. They are
then removed to a coarser sieve, and the fine and
coarse leaves are in this way partially separated
before they are packed for market. This mode of
drying gives the leaves a greenish hue, varying
in degree according to the length of time they are
exposed to the air and fire. The common sorts of
black tea are left in the sun a much longer time
than the finer teas are allowed to remain. Thus
common black tea is exposed to the air sometimes
as long as two days, until a partial decomposition
has begun from the effects of the heating and roll-
ing. When intended for exportation, this tea is
thrown a second time into the roasting-pans, and
rolled about till it is partially charred, to prevent
the possibility of its turning mouldy in the course
of its voyages.

I have described to you the common mode of
curing tea; but I must not omit to tell you that





THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 19

the Chinese adopt many means to give peculiar
flavours to particular leaves. Thus, the fine leaves
of Hungumey are placed under cover till they al-
most begin to ferment, and then are exposed to
the sun before the first roasting. The round fillets
of gunpowder tea are rolled singly, while damp,
into compact balls. Scented tea is manufactured
by placing fresh flowers of the Olea, Aglaia, and
other odoriferous plants, in a basket under that in
which the fine tea is placed over the fire, for the
last drying, and then stirring them a little with-
out mixing the two. It is necessary to pack the
tea which is scented in this manner directly it is
cured, or it will lose its peculiar flavour. Only
the finer sorts of tea are thus treated; but Chinese
exquisites are extremely particular as to the kinds
of flowers used, and the degree of flavour imparted.
In fact, a Chinaman is as particular about the
quality of his tea as an Englishman is about the
age and beeswing of his port. Many people in
England affirm to this day that black and green



280 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

teas are made from different plants ;—that the shrub
from which green tea is plucked differs from that
whence black tea is gathered. Now this is un-
doubtedly a gross error. The Chinese, who are the
tea-growers, attribute the difference in the colour
of their teas to the mode of preparation. Green
tea is stronger and lighter than black tea for this
simple reason, that it is less worked and less roasted,
and therefore preserves more of its native oil,
strength, and colour, than black tea, which is al-
most charred for exportation. We might as well
hold that a baked potato and a boiled potato could
not possibly come from the same root, since the
baked potato was a dark brown, and the boiled
potato but the palest yellow. Green tea is made
by simply drying young leaves over a gentle heat,
and old ones over a hot fire, for about half an
hour. By this mode, it stands to reason, that
more essential oil will remain in the leaf than if
it were rolled, and roasted a second time.

All kinds of tea are repeatedly tested during







THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 21

the various stages of manufacture, by pouring: boil-
ing water upon a few leaves, in order to observe
the colour, aroma, taste, and other desirable quali-
ties of the infusion. As many—such is the origi-
nal strength of the leaf—as fifteen drawings can
be made from the best leaves before the infusion
produced becomes limpid.

Chinese writers on tea are unanimous in direct-
ing the amateur to observe ten thing's in his choice
of green tea. They insist particularly that the leaf
must be green, firmly rolled, and pulpy; that there
must be no broken leaves or dirty twigs; that the
infusion should be greenish, oily, and send forth a
delicate aroma; that the weight of the parcels, the
taste and hue of the dry leaf, and its smell when
strongly breathed upon, should be carefully at-
tended to. Merchants are in the habit of testing
Ankoi teas with a loadstone; especially since the
rumour has gained ground that the effects some-
times felt upon the nerves after drinking green tea,
are owing to its being cured upon copper. This



99 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

notion is, however, in all probability, an erroneous
one. The injurious effect of green tea is, in my
opinion, to be attributed in part to the greater pro-
portion of oil remaining in the green tea; but far
more to the injurious nature of the substances used
to impart an artificial and uniform colour to it, in
order to make the lots present a marketable appear-
ance. You must understand, children, that the
operations of firg and rolling give various shades
to the leaves in proportion as they come more or
less in contact with the iron, or are exposed to the
sun; and it is the object of the manufacturer—with
the view of disposing of his property at a high price
—to render these tints uniform. Well, he does not
scruple to add to his means at the risk of his fel-
low-creatures’ health ; so when the leaves are in the
pans the second time, he causes them to be drugged,
first with turmeric powder, to give them a yellow
tint, and next with a mixture of gypsum and Prus-
sian blue, or gypsum and indigo firmly combined,
which mixture imparts the desired bloom to the



THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 93

yellow leaves. This imposition cannot be too se-
verely condemned. It appears that at Canton,
when there was an unexpected demand for some
particular descriptions of green tea, it was ascer-
tained that even black tea was coloured to simulate
the required article.

The names given to the various sorts of tea are
for the most part derived either from the place of
their growth, or from their peculiar property or
appearance. Thus, Bohea is the name of the place
where this tea is grown, and not a term for a par-
ticular sort among the Chinese; Sunglo is also a
general term for the green teas which come from
the hills of Kiangsu. Considering the great labour
of preparing tea, and the distance it has to travel
from the provinces to the capital of China (often a
thousand miles), it is surprising to find that good
tea may be had at Canton for about one shilling
per pound. The tea that is packed on the Bohea
hills, or in the fertile regions of Kiangsu, is seldom
disturbed till it is unpacked from those quaint,



24 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

rudely-painted cases, in which the Chinese dispose
of it, in New South Wales or in the Highlands of
Scotland. I believe that the manufacture of the
tea-cases you see in the windows of grocers’ shops
furnishes employment to thousands of poor China-
men at Canton. Very poor people in China, who
cannot afford to dulge in the national drink, sub-
stitute for it an infusion of the dried leaves of a
species of Rhamnus or Fallopia. The refuse of the
packing-houses is sold to the poor at a low rate,
under the names of “ tea-endings” and “ tea-bones;”
and if a few of the rarest sorts do not travel beyond
the boundaries of the Chinese Empire, but are mo-
nopolised by his Celestial Majesty, and his bald
mandarins and clump-footed ladies, neither are we
called upon to consume the poorest products of the
tea-plantations. You have listened so attentively
to the story of my cup of tea, that if your mother
has any left in the teapot, you shall all taste its
good qualities for yourselves. I know you are all
longing for your mother’s assent. Well, if she pro-







THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 25

mises to give you a treat for to-night, will you
think with equal indulgence of the people from
whom we derive this luxury ?

You will promise me not to indulge in ignorant
laughter at the expense of this great and original
nation. Recollect this, that to them our customs
are as absurd and unaccountable as theirs are to
us. You laugh at their pigtails: well, depend
upon it, they, that is to say the ignorant and
thoughtless portion of them, would grin delightedly
at your abundant crop of hair. To them, my child-
ren, you would all be little unaccountable mon-
strosities: recollect this, and learn never to laugh
in ignorance.

See, the tea is made for you: drink it, and try
to remember how much labour and anxiety have
been gone through to fill those little cups.







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THE SUGAR-PLANTATION.





THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR.

You will all be glad to hear the story of a Piece of
Sugar. You are too fond of the result to be in-
different as to the means employed to attain it.
The sugar which is used for domestic purposes in
England, and indeed throughout the world—except
perhaps in France —is, as I need scarcely tell you,
a sweet crystallised substance, extracted in a liquid
state from the sugar-cane, of which there are seve-
ral species. But sugar is also obtained, though in
smaller quantities, from beet-root. The French make
more beet-root sugar than any other nation. Sugar
may be obtained from many vegetable substances ;
in fact, in smaller or larger quantities, from almost
any species of the vegetable kingdom. The sap of
the maple, sycamore, and birch, for instance, con-
tains a large proportion of saccharine, or sweet



98 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

matter. Saccharine matter is obtained in various
forms from animal substances, and may be detected
in the sweetness of new milk, and is reducible to
crystallised sugar like that we commonly consume.
Then there is honey-dew, or aphis sugar, and the
honey of the bee, which may be said to be com- |
pounded of both animal and vegetable substances ; ;
that is, of the pollen which the bee draws from ~
the flowers, and the animal secretion with which |
it kneads the dry pollen into the moist sweet sub-
stance we call honey. Saccharine, or sugar matter,
also exists in great abundance in many ripe fruits, ;
as you may guess from the sweetness of those deli- |
cious Jargonelle pears we received last autumn from |
Guernsey. You may have noticed, too, how dried |
fruits, such as the fig and grape, are surrounded |

|

|

|

|



with hard dry sugar, which has been pressed from
the fruit in the process they have undergone to
keep them sound. Many clever men in France
and Spain have tried to extract sugar equal in
quality to that taken from the sugar-cane from



THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 29

grapes; but with little success. The sugar that
has been pressed from grapes has always been
found coarse, and much inferior to cane sugar in
every respect.

The oldest description in existence of the pro-
cess of extracting sugar from the cane, gives an
account of “sweet honied reeds” called Zucra,
which were found in great quantity about the
meadows of Tripoli by the Crusaders, about the
year 1108. These reeds were sucked by the Cru-
saders’ army, who were greatly pleased with their
sweet taste.

Most authorities on the subject agree in attri-
buting the first cultivation and manufacture of the
sugar-cane and sugar to the Arabs; and it is also
generally believed that sugar first came into exten-
sive use about the beginning of the eleventh cen-
tury. There are many conflicting statements made
by writers of various nations as regards the coun-
tries which may claim the sugar-cane as an indige-
nous or native plant; but, wherever the sugar-cane



30 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

may have been indigenous, there is no reason to
doubt the fact that the manufacture of sugar, de-
rived first from China or India, was introduced into
the western world by the Spanish and Portuguese.
The Venetians were the first Europeans who re-
fined sugar. The height to which the sugar-canes
usually grow, their colour, and the length of their
jomts, vary, as you may well imagine, with the
character of the soil from which they derive their
nourishment, as well as with different species, and
the mode of culture to which they may have been
subjected. But I think I may safely tell you that
they vary in height from eight to twenty feet, and
are divided by short bulging joints at regular m-
tervals. Long narrow leaves sprout from each
jomt, but as the canes become full-grown, the
leaves from the lower joints wither and fall off.
The outer part of the cane is hard and brittle, as
many a schoolboy too well knows; but the mner
part consists of a soft pith which contains the sweet
juice. The juice in each joint has no connexion



THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 31

whatever with the juice in the jomt immediately
above or below it. ‘The canes are usually propa-
gated by cuttings or slips, consisting of the top of
the cane, with two or three of the upper joints, the
leaves being carefully plucked off. ‘These slips are
planted in holes dug by hand, or im trenches made
by a plough, about eight to twelve inches deep,
the earth being banked up upon the margin and
well manured. The distance between the holes or
trenches must be such as to afford free access to a
current of air between the rows and plants, as well
as to allow room for the planters to weed the
ground between the canes. The planters generally
allow about four feet between the rows, and two
feet between the plants. Of course there are many
methods adopted by the sugar-planters of various
countries; but in our own West Indian possessions,
where sugar is most extensively cultivated, the mode
of planting is generally as follows: two or more
slips are laid longitudinally or lengthways at the
bottom of each pole, and covered with earth to the



32 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

depth of about two inches. In about a fortnight
the sprouts begin to appear above ground, when
they are again covered with earth, to give them
additional strength. The time required for bring-
ing the canes to perfection is usually about eight
months. In the British West Indies the slips are
generally planted from August to November; and
the canes are there cut about March or April. The
ripeness of the cane is known to the planter by the
outer part of it becoming dry, hard, and smooth ;
by the weight of the cane; by the greyness or
brownness of the pith, and the sweetness and thick-
ness of the sap or juice. The canes which grow
immediately from the slips are called plant-canes
by the planters; and the second crop of canes
reared in successive years from the slips are known
as rattoons. The plant-canes, however, are more
vigorous than the rattoons ; but the rattoons yield
juice which gives less trouble in clarifying and con-
centrating than that of the plant-canes. Some
planters have raised twenty annual crops of rat-





THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 33

toons from one set of slips. The canes are cut as
near the ground as possible, because the richest
juice is found in the lower joints. One or two of
the top joints of the cane are cut off, and the re-
mainder is divided into pieces of about a yard in
length, tied into bundles, and at once conveyed to
the mill.

The operation of cutting the canes is so arranged
as to keep pace with the crushing-mill which presses
the juice out, so that the canes may be crushed or
eround while quite fresh. In the East Indies very
rude and imperfect crushing-mills are used ; some
of them resembling mortars, made of the lower and
thicker parts of the trunks of trees, in which the
canes are crushed by the revolving and pressing
motion of a pestle, which rests in a slanting’ posi-
tion against the side of the mortar, and is moved
by oxen yoked to a bar attached to it. The juice,
as it is squeezed out, runs off through a hole in the
bottom of the mortar, and, running along a spout,
falls into another vessel placed to receive it. The

D



34 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

planters who use this rude mill are obliged to cut
their canes into very small pieces to make it ef-
fective.

The common cane-mills of the West Indies con-
sist of three rollers, mostly of wood, with narrow
bars of iron bound to their surface, so as to form,
by the spaces left between them, grooves extending
from end to end of the rollers. ‘These rollers are
placed side by side in a strong frame, with contriv-
ances for varying, in a slight degree, their distances
from each other. The moving power is applied to
the middle roller, and communicated from it to the
others by the action of cogged wheels. Steam has
lately been introduced to the West Indies as the
moving power for the working of the sugar crush-
ing-mills, and with great success. When the mills
are in action, a negro applies the canes in a regular
layer or sheet to the interval between the first and
second rollers, which seize and squeeze them vio-
lently as they pass between them. ‘The ends of the
canes are then turned, either by a negro on the op-



THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 35

posite side to the feeder, or by an ingenious frame-
work of wood, called a dumb-returner, so that they
may pass back again between the second and third
rollers. As these are placed nearer together than
the first and second, they squeeze the canes still
more; so that on coming out from this second press-
ing, they are reduced to dry splinters, which the
planters very appropriately call cane-trash, and are
used as fuel in heating the vessels for evaporating
the juice. Channels are placed under the rollers to
receive the juice as it is squeezed from the canes,
which conduct it to the vessels in which it is to
undergo succeeding operations. The mill I have
described to you is a very defective machine, since
it is impossible to supply the canes to the rollers
in so regular a layer as to prevent them crossing
each other. They become, therefore, broken, so
that the liquor is made foul, and the rollers are
exposed to irregular and destructive wear. You
must have often noticed pieces of cane mixed up
with the brown sugar; well, these pieces are the



36 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

result of the imperfect rolling of the sugar-canes.
But these rude mills will soon disappear before the
progress of science. Steam will make its way in
the West Indies, as it has already here; and then
let us hope that all nations will see the extrava-
vance, if not the disgrace, of manufacturing sugar
by the labour of slaves.

Cane-juice, as it comes from the crushing-mill,
is a thick, dull grey-green, sweet and balmy fluid.
It contains, when in this unmanufactured state,
particles of solid matter from the cane, which are
afterwards separated from it by filtration. Dhirectly
this cane-juice runs from the crushing-mill, the pro-
cess of clarifying is commenced. ‘The juice, as you
will recollect, is conducted by gutters from the crush-
ing-mill to a large flat-bottomed copper or pan,
called a clarifier, which is usually large enough to
contain from three to five thousand gallons. Un-
derneath this clarifier there is a fire; and when the
pan is full of cane-juice a little lime is mixed with
it, and the fluid is allowed to get hot, but not to



THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 37

boil. The effect of the lime upon the cane-juice is
to make the solid portions of the cane-juice stick
together and rise to the surface in the shape of
scum. When the proper heat has been given to
the juice, the scum rises in blisters and breaks, which
is the sign for the attendant to close what is called
the damper, an apparatus made to extinguish the
fire rapidly. After an hour’s repose, the liquor is
ready for removal to the first of the evaporating
pans. It is drawn off by a cock in such a manner
as not to disturb the scum, which will remain be-
hind unbroken, and is, of course, removed from the
clarifier before another charge of cane-juice is put
into it. The clarified juice is bright, clear, and of
a pale colour.

From the clarifier the liquid is conveyed to the
largest of a series of evaporating pans, three or
more in number, in which it is reduced in bulk by
boiling, as you all know water is when boiled in
the kettle. The largest of these pans is sufficiently
capacious to hold the contents of the clarifier; but



38 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

the others may become gradually smaller on ac-
count of the diminished bulk of the liquor by evapo-
ration—that is to say, by going off into vapour, as
it is removed into each of them in succession. These
evaporators are placed over a long flue, heated by a
fire of the cane-trash, or crushed and sapless cane,
at one end of which the teache, or smallest, and
consequently the last pan mto which the cane-juice
is put, is placed. In the long process of successive
boilings, impurities which have escaped with the
liquor from the clarifier are thrown up in the form
of scum, which is carefully removed. If, during
the evaporation, it be perceived that the liquor is
not sufficiently clear, some lime-water is added to it,
for the same purpose as the temper or lime was ap-
plied to the cane-juice when in the clarifier, namely,
to make the solid particles adhere together and rise
in a mass to the surface. In the least and smallest
of the evaporating pans, called the teache, the liquor
is finally boiled down to a thick consistency—to
such a consistency as to admit of its being drawn



THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 39

out like india-rubber to a considerable length with-
out breaking. ‘To know when the liquor or syrup
is sufficiently thick and adhesive, a drop is taken
from the teache between the thumb and forefingers,
and drawn out till it snaps asunder. When it has
done so, the portion suspended from the finger
shrinks up, so as to remain at a greater or less
length, according to the degree to which the syrup
has been evaporated. When it is in the proper
state for withdrawal from the teache, the thread on
the finger should be from half an inch to a quarter
of an inch long. This is a most imperfect test.
Some planters try the state of the syrup by observ-
ing the change it will undergo on the back of a
ladle dipped in the teache. When the syrup is
reduced in the teache to the satisfaction of the
planter, it is put into coolers, where it remains to
cool and crystallise.

When the sugar is taken from the coolers, it is
brought to the state of a soft mass of crystals, im-
bedded in molasses, or treacle, which you children



40 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

will most likely think very delicious, but which peo-
ple generally consider to be very coarse and unfit
for use. The separation of this fluid, called mo-
lasses, or treacle, from the crystals, is the next pro-
cess, and is performed in a building called the
curing-house. This is an extensive building, the
floor of which is hollowed out to form a reservoir
for the molasses, which is carefully lined with ce-
ment or lead. Over this reservoir is an open fram-
ing of joists, upon which stand a number of empty
casks, called potting-casks. Each of these has eight
or ten holes bored through the lower end, and in
each hole is placed the stalk of a plantain- leaf
which is long enough to descend a few inches be-
low the level of the joists, and to rise above the top
of the cask. The soft sugar, as it is taken from the
coolers, is removed into these casks, from which the
molasses gradually drains through the plantain-stalk
and falls into the reservoir below, leaving only the
crystallised sugar in the casks. With sugar of
average quality, three or four weeks are sufhcient



THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 41

for this purpose. When it leaves the cwring-house,
the sugar is packed in hogsheads or large barrels
for shipment, as raw, brown, or muscovado sugar ;
and in this state it is commonly brought to us from
our West Indian colonies. As by the process of
curing’, which I have just described to you, the mo-
lasses is generally but partially separated from the
crystallised sugar, it follows that the remaining mo-
lasses will drain through the hogshead while on
board the ship; and so large is this drain after
shipment, that it is said, on good authority, that
one-twelfth part of the raw sugar is drained from
the hogsheads before they reach Europe. When
the raw sugar arrives in England it undergoes the
process of refining; that is to say, the process pur-
sued in the colonies is repeated with greater skill
and care, making the sugar, at last, that highly
crystallised white substance of which you all are
very fond, and for a lump of which you beg very
frequently.

Sugar-candy is the only kind of highly refined



42 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

sugar made in China and India. The Chinese ex-
port sugar-candy in very large quantities: they
have two sorts of candy, one which they call Chin-
chew, and another known as Canton; the former
being the produce of the province of Fokien, and
the latter of that of Canton. Of these, the Chin-
chew is by far the best. Sugar-candy is mostly
used by Europeans resident in the Hast. Candy
is a sugar which, after being refined, is suffered
to crystallise slowly upon strings or twigs.

I have described to you the processes which the
saccharine or sweet juice undergoes after it 1s
pressed from the cane, in order to make it avail-
able for our use; but I have not yet directed your
attention to the poor slaves at the cost of whose
unrewarded labour we, for a long time, enjoyed an
article which enters so largely into household con-
sumption among us. My dear children, your young
hearts would, I hope, be melted in pity were I to
describe to you these poor black creatures in the
misery and degradation to which their wicked and



THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 43

cruel owners have reduced them. Slaves are not
employed in any of our English colonies now ; but
human flesh and muscle are still bought and sold
in the Southern States of America. You should
be proud to know that every foot that presses an
English shore is that of a freeman: that a slave
cannot exist within the dominions of your Queen.
But this blessing is not universal. Slaves—millions
of slaves—are still bartered for, and sold, and beaten
and worked to death, without reward, in many
foreign countries. [England has spent many millions
of money and many valuable lives in a war against
these inhuman dealers in human flesh and blood,
and I trust that you will live to see the day when,
throughout the world, there shall not be a man
branded as the property of his fellow.



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THE STORY OF A MILK-JUG.



45

THE STORY OF A MILK-JUG.

THE potter’s art is of very ancient origin, for it was
known in Egypt, China, and Japan, at a very re-
mote date. Porcelain ornaments have been found
on mummies three thousand years old; and the
British Museum contains specimens of Egyptian
jars, in good preservation, of undoubted antiquity :
indeed, the potter’s wheel is perhaps one of the
most ancient machines on record. Nor has the art
of adapting clay to the domestic purposes of man
been confined to the civilised nations; on the con-
trary, it has been practised by the rudest savages
on the face of the earth. Vases have been found
among the native Indians on the Musquito shore,
and on the banks of the Black River in North
America. Although all vessels made of earth may
be fairly called earthenware, I think you would be



46 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

corrected if you ventured to call the milk-jug so, as
the particular ingredients of which it is compounded
have clarified or cleared the clay, and converted it
into china or porcelain. Before the beginning of
the eighteenth century, English potteries produced
only coarse earthenware ; and we are indebted for
our porcelain articles to the ingenuity and industry
of the Chinese. But in the last century the art
made rapid strides in this country; and we are
mainly indebted to Mr. Wedgwood for the vast
improvements in our ware, which have made it cele-
brated throughout the world, and welcome in every
Kuropean market.

English China, as manufactured in Staffordshire,
is & composition made by the admixture of China
clay with ground bones and Cornish granite. Well,
these materials are mixed together with water, and
reduced to the consistence of cream, in which state
the potters call them “ slips, or slops.” I must tell
you that, before the ingredients are mixed together,
they are separately reduced to a fluid state in vats



THE STORY OF A MILK-JUG. 47

sunk in the ground, whence they are sifted through
fine silk lawns into other vessels, and then more
water is added, until a pint measure of clay slip
weighs twenty-four ounces, and a pint of granite
or flint-slip, thirty-two ounces; so that the potter
mixes accurately by measure, as he knows that
when a pint of clay-slip weighs twenty-four ounces,
and a pint of granite or flint-slip weighs thirty-two
ounces, that the proper quantities of clay, flint, or
oranite, are contained in the water. ‘The mixture
of the various materials is then made in a vat, and
the quantity of each material to be used is marked
by notches on a rod, which the workman dips into
the vat, while the slip-maker pours in the slips, until
each rises to its proper mark on the mixing-rod.
When the proper quantities have been poured into
the vat, the whole is thoroughly stirred and incor-
porated, and is then pumped up into a higher vessel,
from which it descends through a tap into a silk
sieve, which is kept in constant agitation while the
fluid is passing through it. This process is repeated



48 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

two or three times, not only thoroughly to remove
all impurities, but also to ensure the perfect mix-
ture of the various ingredients. This combined and
strained slip is then pumped on to a boiler called a
slip-kiln, the bottom of which is paved with large
flat fire-bricks, under which the heat of the fire
passes by means of four or five flues. The boiling
heat thus imparted to the slip generates steam, which
is, as you know, water given off in minute particles,
and so the quantity of water in the slip is gradually
reduced; and the slip, of course, gets gradually
thicker, till it is about the consistence of paste, when
the fires are put out, and it is allowed to cool. The
next process is to beat the slip to make it closer
and firmer, so that when cut it is smooth and close
like putty. It is necessary for the potter to be
very careful that this process is well performed, for
if the slip be not thoroughly beaten, the ware made
from it will crack and peel off, and, in short, be
utterly useless. Having described the operations
performed in the slip-house, let us at once proceed



THE STORY OF A MILK-JUG. 49

to notice what remains to be done to our milk-jug.
It is now only a lump of dense white paste.

A woman, called a baller, takes up the lump,
and makes it of the proper size for the jug, and then
hands it to the thrower; he receives the clay as
he sits at the thrower’s wheel,—a revolving’ circular
table, which is put in motion by the baller,—and
draws it up into a pillar, then depresses it into a
flat cake. He then opens the hollow of the vessel
with his thumbs, and continues to draw out the
clay, or press it inwards, according to the shape of
the vessel. When a rough outline of the shape is
obtained, the vessel is removed from the table,
placed on a board, and carried into a store-room to
harden. When it is sufficiently hardened, it is
turned upon a lathe resembling that used by wood-
turners. The turner holds the vessel in his hand,
and dexterously shaves away the clay (which is
now about the consistency of soap,) to the proper
thickness, and cuts the mouldings, &c., polishing
the whole with a steel burnisher. The shavings of

. |



50 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

clay which the turner cuts away, are carefully
returned to the slip-vats to be remixed. The
milk-jug is then passed to the handler, who hay-
ing made a handle in a plaster mould, sticks it to
the jug with liquid clay. Our jug is now passed
to a workman who has a number of flat figures,
flowers, and other ornaments in clay, which he
carefully fixes round the jug, according to the
drawing of the pattern, by wetting the under part
of them with a camel-hair pencil. These orna-
mental figures are made out of flat moulds by
children.

The jug being now properly shaped and orna-
mented, is placed on a board to dry. It is next
placed in the biscuit-oven, and made white-hot, its
shape being preserved by being imbedded in flint-
powder. The jug is then dipped into a glaze of
finely-ground felspar (a mineral which may be found
in any part of the world, and is the metallic part of
granite) mixed with a little alkali. I have already
explained to you what alkali is; I therefore hope



THE STORY OF A MILK-JUG. 51

that it is not necessary for me to repeat the ex-
planation. It is then submitted to a second fire
of a moderate degree of heat, which not only
melts the glaze on the surface, but unites with
the entire body of the substance, and so hardens
it, and makes it semi-transparent. The jug is then
cooled.

Our milk-jug is now ready for use. We have
watched it through the many phases of its manu-
facture; we have seen how the skill and ingenuity
of the potter have blended the earths of his country
together, and fashioned from the rudest materials
this polished, elegant, and enduring vessel. Well,
we cannot too often repeat to ourselves that the
comforts of our home are the results of many
centuries of thought and toil; that the luxuries we
so often enjoy without a thought of their source,
are the witnesses of our fellow-creatures’ labour.

If we would look about our household in this
spirit, always thankfully owning our manifold debts
to the labour of bygone generations as well as of



52 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

the present generation, at least we should bear in
mind and seek to do away with the misery in which
our poorer brethren slave for us. So ends my Story

of a Milk-Jug.



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1 WB
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t.

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THE COAL-MINE.



53

THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL.

To tell you the Story of a Lump of Coal at length
would take many days; for it is a most wonderful
and varied story. Indeed it embraces a history
of all the wonderful inventions which have been
made within the last century. It is the mother
of steam ; since by its power the cranks and chains
and wheels which form the engine are fashioned,
and the water is converted to steam. By its aid,
as you have seen in our Story of a Milk-Jug, the
clays of the earth are formed into hard and polished
vessels; and we are indebted to it for warmth in
winter, and for dressing our food always. With-
out coal, how would the steam-engine weave fabrics
to clothe us, or carry us with fairy speed along our
iron roads? Without coal, how would our vessels
plough the deep, against wind and tide, and carry



54 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

our merchandise to the farthest corners of the earth,
defying the power of the elements? Without coal,
how should we see our way along the streets at
night, since from coal we extract the gas that
lights us on our journey homewards?

You would not understand me were I to at-
tempt to give you a technical analysis of coal; but
I will tell you that it is a vegetable substance which
is extracted from the bowels of the earth by long
and laborious exertions. How vegetable matter,
to the growth of which air and light are as neces-
sary as to human existence, became imbedded so
far below the present surface of the earth, is a ques-
tion which has puzzled many learned men; but it
is beyond doubt that our coal-fields are only so
many buried forests, converted by the gases of the
earth and the process of time to that inflammable
substance which we call coal. It is only very re-
cently that the existence of wood in the state of coal
has been found with the original texture of the
wood still preserved. Not only have the branches



THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 55

of trees been identified in the shape of coal, but their
genus has been distinctly traced.

All plants which have been traced in coal for-
mations are called ‘coal-plants.’ Ferns are the
most abundant of all plants in the shape of coal,
almost every yard of coal being marked by these
impressions, and very often containing them in great
multitudes ;—palms also occur occasionally. This
leads us to believe that at the period of the change
which must have taken place in the surface of the
earth, it was covered with a rich and dense vege-
tation; and that many plants grew then of which
no specimens exist in a vegetable form at the pre-
sent time.

An example of the most imperfectly formed coal
is afforded in what is called the brown or wood coal
of Germany, which exists in large quantities im
Hesse-Darmstadt and Salzhausen. This wood-coal
is coal only half formed, and is found in the shape
of trunks and branches of trees, as well as in other
forms of vegetable matter.



56 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

Beds of coal, which are found in many parts of
the world, but abound in England, are called ‘ coal-
fields.’ Coal is found in these fields in strata, or
layers, separated by seams of slate-clay and sand-
stone. Coal is esteemed according to the quantity
of bitumen which it contains. Bitumen, I should
tell you, such as is generally contained in coal, is
a dark-brown glutinous substance, and is only ano-
ther form of naphtha. It will burn readily, but gives
off a quantity of soot. And here let me also explain
to you, that the soot which lodges in the chimney
is simply so much charcoal given off from the coal
in a vaporous state; and a little thought will
enable you to trace the existence of this charcoal,
or charred wood, to the vegetable origin of coal.
Bitumen being more inflammable than charcoal, the
coal which contains the greatest quantity of bitumen
is the most valuable.

Let me now explain to you the mode of work-
ing coal-mines. The probable existence of beds of
coal having been first carefully considered, and per-



THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 57

haps the beds themselves having been traced by a
process called boring, the first thing that is done is
to sink, or, as you would say, dig a shaft or deep
hole like a well, so as to cut through the various
strata or layers between which the coal is im-
bedded. This shaft, or well, is usually circular, and
the upper part of it is generally securely bricked, to
prevent the earth from falling in upon the workmen
below. On reaching the first workable seam of coal,
the sinking of the pit is for a time suspended, and
a broad straight passage, called by the miners a bord
or gate, is dug into the seam in opposite directions.*
The breadth of the passage, varies from twelve to
fourteen or fifteen feet; but its height is regulated
by the depth of the coal-seam, and the height of
these passages is always made of the depth of the
seam:—the roof exposing the strata above the
seam, and the bottom, that immediately below the
seam, and called by the miners the thill. When

* Sketch of the Relations between the Three Kingdoms of Nature.
By Thomas Williams, Esq., M.B.



58 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

these bords have been excavated to some distance
on both sides of the shaft, narrow passages, called
head-ways, are driven from them at regular dis-
tances, and exactly at right angles, as you will find
them in my drawing.

oo a ee oe
te TTT...

When these headways have proceeded eight or
ten yards, they are made to communicate with an-
other bord, whichr uns parallel with the primary
bord; and on this system the mine is extended,
according to the quantity, depth, and extent of the
coal-seams. A coal-mine thus extended has been
likened to a regularly built town (if you can con-
ceive the houses one uninterrupted line of black
walls) ; the bords and headways being respectively
the principal streets and the connecting lanes and
alleys; while the intermediate masses of coal (left



THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 59

for the support of the roof) stand for the interme-
diate masses of buildings.

The water-spring’s, which are usually met with
more or less frequently in the course of the miner’s
operations, are drawn to the surface by the aid of a
very powerful steam-engine, erected near the shaft,
and in such a manner that it may be employed to
draw up the coal and rubbish from the mine in bas-
kets called corves.

If the operations I have attempted to explain
to you have been at all successful, that is to say,
if the quantity of coal found is sufficiently great to
promise a fair return for the money laid out in the
operations of the miners, another shaft will be im-
mediately sunk at some distance from the first, and
the passages and headways made till they com-
municate with those which diverge from the original
shaft. Thus a current of air is carried through the
mine. One shaft is the downcast shaft, and the
other is the upcast shaft. Through the downcast
shaft a current of air is sent into the mine, and is



60 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

made to penetrate every passage and headway, and
to carry away the foul air up through the upcast
shaft. This ventilation is absolutely necessary to
ensure not only the health, but also the immediate
safety of the miners. I dare say you have all
heard of the frightful accidents which have been
caused by the explosion of fire-damp, and of the
safety-lamp invented by Sir Humphrey Davy to
prevent this great sacrifice of life. Let me here ex-
plain to you that fire-damp is a noxious and inflam-
mable or easily inflamed gas, emitted or given forth
from the coal; and that immediately it comes in
contact with the flame of a lamp, it explodes like
gunpowder, and kills all who are within its reach.
The word fire-damp has originated from dampf,
which is the German for vapour or exhalation. Sir
Humphrey Davy’s lamp is so arranged that the
flame is surrounded on all sides by an iron gauze,
through which flame will not pass, and which con-
sequently prevents the flame from coming in contact
with the noxious vapour of fire-damp. This inven-



THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 61

tion has been and is perhaps one of the most valu-
able efforts of man’s ingenuity. It has saved many
thousand lives, and prevented the destruction of pro-
perty of untold value. While the workings on the
first seam of coal are thus rapidly and securely
going forward, shafts are generally sunk from the
first seam to one below, and afterwards to the third
and fourth seams, so that a mine extensively worked
has, as it were, three or four stories. ‘These opera-
tions may be carried on so long as seams of coal
reward the miner’s labour.

The mode in which the miner detaches the coal
is by cutting a narrow way on each side of the huge
piece he wishes to excavate, and then blasting it
out by firing shot at the top of the seam. As much
as one hundred tons of coal is often brought down
at once by this process; and the coal is put into
corves, or baskets, drawn along a tram-road to the
shaft, and then raised to the surface by the steam-
engine.

I think I have now explained to you with sufh-



62 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

cient minuteness the operations which are carried
on underground for the purpose of supplying our
manufacturers and ourselves with fuel. Let me
now tell you what becomes of the thirty-five millions
of tons which, it is estimated, are annually raised
from the mines of England. The coal-field of North-
umberland and Durham supplies nearly all the coal
consumed in London, the eastern and southern
counties, and the neighbourhood of the mines.
Shields, Stockton, Seaham, and Sunderland are the
ports from which the coal is shipped: the Tyne
vessels being the larger, are laden for the London
market. The Lancashire coal-field supplies Man-
chester, Liverpool, and the surrounding district; the
South Staffordshire or Dudley coal-field the nu-
merous iron-works in its neighbourhood, and the
manufactories of Birmingham and the neighbouring
counties. The coal-field of South Wales (to give
you an idea of the extent of these fields,) is upwards
of one hundred miles in length, its breadth averag-
ing from eighteen to twenty miles. Ireland and



THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 63

Scotland also contain coal-fields, but of less import-
ance than those of England. To give you some
notion of the amount of human labour expended
in bringing coals to our markets, I will tell you that
London alone consumes upwards of three million
four hundred thousand tons every year, for the con-
veyance of which eleven thousand nine hundred and
eighty-seven ships are kept in constant activity.
It is estimated also that the iron-works of England
(into which, as you recollect 1 told you in the Story
of a Knife, coal enters largely) consume, in the
operations of smelting, more than seven million tons
of this valuable fuel every year. In 1841 the num-
ber of persons employed in coal-mines was one hun-
dred and eighteen thousand two hundred and twenty-
three.

Having thus briefly given you some idea of the
enormous quantities of coal consumed, let me point
out to you the various benefits which we derive from
the use of it. In the first place, coal is, as I have
already noticed, the mother of steam. We have



64 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

already heard the Story of Steam, so that it 1s un-
necessary for me to repeat my observations on that
subject; but you have heard nothing hitherto of the
manner in which gas is extracted from coal. I will
explain the process to you.

The existence and inflammability of coal-g:as may
be said to have been known for nearly two hundred
years; but although its existence and properties
were known so far back, it was not till the year 1792
that any attempt was made to turn this knowledge
to useful account. In this year, Mr. Murdoch, an en-
oineer living at Redruth in Cornwall, erected a little
apparatus, which produced sufficient gas to light
his dwelling and offices; and in 1798 he erected
extensive gas-works to lieht the premises of Messrs.
Boulton and Watt at Soho. This was the first
application of gas in a large way; but it attracted
little attention till 1802, when Messrs. Boulton and
Son used it for their illumination in commemora-
tion of the peace. The wonderful brilliancy of their
illumination, as compared with those produced by



THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 65

the dull flame of oil, made a great sensation through-
out England, and gas from that time began to be
eradually introduced throughout the country. In
1807, Pall Mall was lighted up by gas, and for some
years this was the only street in London so illumin-
ated ; but its use was gradually extended, till not an
alley in the metropolis was left dark to shield the
doings of dishonesty. Gas has been very properly
called the city’s most vigilant policeman. Coal-gas
is distilled by placing a quantity of coal in a closed
vessel, and subjecting it to the action of a fire, when
a dark oily substance is given off through a tube
into another vessel made to receive it. This dark |
oily substance consists of water, coal-tar, and spirit,
or gas. To get rid of the water and tar, the
mixture is allowed to cool, when the water and tar
settle and run off, leaving the spirit behind. This
spirit is still impure, as it contains a gas which is in-
jurious to health and of an unpleasant smell, called
sulphuretted hydrogen gas. To get rid of this gas,
the spirit is passed through vessels containing lime, to
F



66 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

which it is the property of the sulphuretted hydro-
gen to adhere, leaving the spirit to pass off in the
shape of the pure gas which is now in use through-
out the civilised world.

You now know the two great purposes to which
coal is applied. We might follow it into every in-
dustrial occupation of man. Its use is universal.
To stop the supply of coal would be to bring our
manufactories to a stand-still, to darken our streets,
to stop the railway-engine, and the paddles of our
steamboats. You will, by pursuing this train of
thought to its utmost bearings, see how the opera-
tions of mankind, like the steam-engine, though
complicated and apparently independent of one
another, are one unbroken chain of dependent
actions, which the absence of the minutest crank or
wheel may bring to a dead stop. So ends our Story
of a Lump of Coal.



; f= 4 ‘unin

a ft ]
z ze ge p



THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER.



67

THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER.

My children, the Story of Hot Water is perhaps
the most wonderful history in the world. It is as
interesting and startling as the most marvellous tale
in the Arabian Nights; and it is, let me assure you,
one with which all young persons should be ac-
quainted, for it is destined, in all probability, to
have great influence over the progress towards good
of the rising generation. I have lived to behold
the accomplishment of many scientific wonders: I
can remember the first steamboat, and the first rail-
way; and Harry can remember the first electric
telegraph. A few years ago it was impossible to
travel from London to Paris in less time than five
days; now the journey may be performed in twelve
hours, or half one day. You may now breakfast in
London and sup in Paris. A message, by means of



68 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

the electric telegraph, may be sent from Paris to
London in less time than five minutes. These are
among the wonders which have been revealed to the
world through the labour and ingenuity of learned
men. And now we are progressing towards greater
discoveries. You, children, will most likely live to
see the day when a message from China will be
delivered in London in the course of five minutes ;
and you will enjoy daily communication with people
living at the remotest corners of the earth.

We are told, by men whose learning entitles
them to our belief, that the power of steam was not
entirely unknown to the ancients. I hope you all
know that steam is water made into vapour, or, as
I heard one of you the other day call the vapour
that was rolling out in large white clouds from a
kettle of boiling water, into smoke, by the action of
heat. For the future, do not let me hear any of you
be guilty of such a blunder. Know that smoke is
the gas which proceeds from burning coals or wood,
and that steam is the vapour which rises from boil-



THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. 69

ing water. Among the ancients, steam was a power
very little understood ; and the only evidence of its
subjugation to the purposes of man before the Chris-
tian era, is given to us by Hero of Alexandria, who
has left us the description of a machine in which a
continued movement is given to a wheel by a blast
of steam playing upon it.

It was about the beginning of the seventeenth
century that De Caus, a French engineer, invented
a machine by which a column of water might be
raised by the pressure of steam confined in the ves-
sel above the water to be elevated; and in 1629,
an Italian named Branca contrived a plan of turn- .
ing mills by a blast of steam. These projectors,
though their inventions were rude, and possessed
little power or usefulness, served to turn the atten-
tion of thinking men to the means of making the
immense power of steam useful to the human race.
So far back as 1663, the celebrated Marquis of
Worcester gave to the world an account of the ex-
pansive force of steam. Let me read to you the



70 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

passage from his book, called “A Century of In-
ventions.” “I have taken a cannon, and filled it
three-quarters full of water, stopping firmly up
both the touch-hole and the mouth; and having
made a good fire under it, within twenty-four hours
it burst, and made a great crack.” With this ex-
perience the marquis contrived a rude machine,
which, he tells us, drove up water to the height of
forty feet.

The next name which I shall mention to you in
connexion with the application of steam to useful
purposes, is that of Denis Pepi, a Frenchman.
You understand that if. you fill a kettle full of
water, stop up every hole, and then put it on the
fire, directly it boils, steam will be produced; and
the kettle that is only large enough to hold the
water cannot also contain the steam, which occupies
fifty times the space it takes up in the shape of
water, and that therefore the steam, pressing with
ereat force on all sides of the kettle, will at length
cause it to burst with a loud noise. Well, the great



THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. 71

discovery which Pepin made was that of obtaiming
the sudden return of the steam to water, or, as it
is generally called, its condensation by cold. As
heat turns water into steam, so cold again reduces
steam to water. The result of Pepin’s studies was
the idea of obtaining a moving power by means
of a piston (A) working in a |
cylinder or tube (6). To ob-
tain this, he constructed a tube
or cylinder, into which he in-
troduced a rod or piston, fit-
ting nicely, as one joint of an
opera-glass fits into the other |
in our days. Well, at the c. Steam. p. Water. E. Fire.
bottom of this cylinder he placed some water, and
under the water a fire: the consequence was, that
directly the water boiled, and steam was made, the
steam, wanting room to expand, forced the rod or
piston up. When the piston had been raised, Pepin
removed the fire, and so, as by the action of cold
the steam again became water and returned to its








72 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

compact body at the bottom of the cylinder, the
piston fell. Though Pepin did not live to pertect
his ingenious invention, his labour produced the
basis upon which all our steam-power has been ob-
tained. If you go into any of the factories where
steam is employed as a power, or examine the en-
gine of a steamboat, you will see that piston and
cylinder invented by Pepin producing the power of
the engine by the rising and falling of the piston,
as it is raised by the introduction of steam into the
cylinder, and made to fall by the reduction of the
steam to water.

The first actual steam-engine of which we have
any undeniable record was constructed by Captain
Savery, an Englishman, for the purpose of rais-
ing water. This was in the year 1699. Captain
Savery’s engine, however, from the expense of work-
ing it, and the constant danger of explosion, soon
fell into disuse. It was, in fact, a very rude ma-
chine, as the eondensation of the steam was not suf-
ficiently ensured. ‘These discoveries and inventions, —



THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. V3

however, served to turn the attention of very many
clever men to the improvement of the steam-engine.
In 1705 Thomas Newcomen, an ironmonger, and
John Cawley, a plumber and glazier, constructed
an engine in which the condensation of the steam
was effected by the application of cold water outside
the cylinder. The improvement of their first engine
is due to Newcomen, who having noticed that the
piston rose and fell three or four times with great
rapidity without the application of cold water, ex-
amined this piston, and found a hole in it, through —
which the water intended by him to keep the cylin-
der air-tight, issued im a little jet or fountain, and -
instantly condensed the steam under it: this led
him to introduce a pipe, stopped by a cock, into the
bottom of the cylinder, through which cold water
was supplied from a reservoir. This engine, known
as Newcomen’s engine, required the constant at-
tendance of some person to open and shut the con-
densing cocks or valves, a duty which was gene-

rally fulfilled by boys, called cock-boys. When I



74 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

tell you that we owe a most important improvement
in the steam-engine to the desire of a boy named
Humphrey Potter to joi his comrades at play when
he should have attended to the condensing cock, I
shall not, I trust, make any of you hope to do good
by neglecting your duty. You know that the pri-
mary action of the steam-engine is the rise and fall
of the piston or rod in the cylinder or tube; I have
explained to you that in Newcomen’s engine the
condensing or reducing of the steam was brought
about by the introduction of cold water through a
pipe at the bottom of the cylinder; and I have also
said that this cold-water pipe was stopped by a
cock. Well, the duty of the cock-boy was to turn
the cold water on through the pipe at the bottom of
the cylinder directly the steam had forced the piston
up. This must have been very irksome duty for the
poor boys; at least it appears that Humphrey Pot-
ter found it so; and, in order to be able to leave the
engine without stopping it, he tied the handle of
the cock by a string to the piston, so that when the



THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. w»

piston rose the cock was turned on, the water en-
tered the cylinder, the piston fell, and the cock
closed again; and in this way the steam-engine
was first made a self-acting machine.

I must now tell you about a man who will make
no mean figure in the annals of your country,—I1
allude to James Watt. It was in repairing a work-
ing model of a Newcomen’s steam-engine for the
lectures of a learned professor of Glasgow Univer-
sity, that Watt’s attention was first seriously called
to mechanical invention. At the time of which I
speak, Newcomen’s engine was the most perfect
one in existence. The moving power was the.
weight of the air pressing on the upper surface of
a piston or rod working in a cylinder or tube;
steam being used to raise the piston with its load
of air up again, and then to form a vacuum, or
empty space, by its condensation when cooled by
a jet of cold water, which was thrown into the
cylinder when the piston was raised. The great
improvement which Watt introduced was the con-



76 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

densation of the steam in a separate vessel. He
perceived that as it was necessary in Newcomen’s
engine to introduce cold water into the cylinder in
order to condense the steam, the cylinder must ne-
cessarily be cooled also, and that consequently when
the next blast of steam came, much of it was wasted
by the coolness of the cylinder, which in fact con-
densed the steam, and therefore weakened its power.
Watt at once perceived that the only method to do
away with this defect was to draw the steam off
directly the piston was raised, by making a vessel
void of air, near the cylinder, communicate with it,
into which the steam could be drawn off, leaving
the cylinder perfectly empty, and so giving more
force to the descent, or, as it is called, the down-
stroke of the piston; and at the same time keeping
it warm for the next blast of steam. These im-
provements gave additional power to the engine,
and prevented the waste of steam. In Newcomen’s
engine, not only was the cylinder cooled by the in-
troduction of cold water, but it was allowed to be



THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. VC

full of air and partially condensed steam, so that
the fall, or drown-stroke of the piston, lost much of
its force. Watt improved upon this also, and emp-
tied the cylinder of air, so that in his engine the
interior of the cylinder offered a perfect vacuum, or
empty space, to the fall of the piston. In the mi-
nuter, though important parts of the engine, Watt
made many improvements. He perfected the con-
struction of his engine, so as to regulate its power
with great exactitude, by introducing a certain
quantity of steam, and no more, for each up-stroke —
of the piston. He is, in short, justly esteemed as a
man who contributed largely to the progress of his.
fellow-creatures. He died at his house at Heath-
field, in the county of Stafford, on the 25th of Au-
gust, 1819, in the eighty-fourth year of his age,
having made a large and well-deserved fortune by
his noble labours.

My children, were I to attempt to trace for you
a history of the various applications of the steam-
engine to the different branches of industry, we



78 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

should find ourselves involved in a story of the pro-
oress of the world for the last thirty years. Such
a subject is one too grave and too important to you
to be chatted about round the fire. It isa subject
which you will have to study seriously m your
books: I shall not therefore touch upon it. To give
you an account of the wonders steam has achieved,
would be to count almost every comfort and luxury
which we enjoy. Dr. Lardner, whose book on the
steam-engine you shall all read when you are a few
_ years older, tells us that the steam-engine has in-
creased the sum of human happiness, not only by
calling new pleasures into existence, but by so
cheapening former enjoyments as to render them
attainable by those who before could never have
hoped to share them ; the face of the land and the
surface of the waters are crossed with equal facility
by its power; and by thus encouraging and help-
ing the intercourse of nation with nation, and the
commerce of people with people, it has knit together
countries far away from each other by bonds of



THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. 79

friendship not likely to be broken. Knowledge and
affection are kept up by its power between people
thousands of miles away from one another; those
more advanced in learning shedding the blessings
of knowledge over their barbarous and distant bro-
thers. By this means,—by the subjugation of the
force of hot water to the will of man,—has the pro-
gress of this century been brought about; and you
may be thankful, my dear children, that you are
born in a time when the tree of knowledge is shed-
ding its fruit all over the world, making men friends,
and nations welcome neighbours. ‘This is the story,
the great story of some Hor WarTEr.







81

THE STORY OF A PIN.

Very few children know how much ingenuity and
labour are spent upon a pin. They are accustomed
to see hundreds of pins every day, yet they never
pause to inquire how they are made, or who makes
them. Yet, I can tell them, the story of that little
instrument called a pin is a very interesting and in-
structive.one. There is no account in existence of
the first pin that was ever made; but this is very -
certain, that it was made long before the time of
Henry the Highth,—who, my young readers I trust
remember very well, reigned about three hundred
years ag‘o,—for he would not allow any to be made
that were not properly pointed. In the olden time,
pins were made of many substances,—of boxwood,
bone, or silver ; now they are usually made of brass.
Ten persons are generally employed to make one
G



82 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

pin; and it is well known that these ten people can,
within the space of eight hours, make five thousand
five hundred pins. It may at first appear very
astonishing to you, that so many pins may be made
within this short space of time; but if you take the
trouble to think upon the subject, and to consider
how, by dint of persevering practice, a little girl
will learn to knit with marvellous quickness, you
will cease to feel any surprise at the rapidity and
dexterity of practised pin-makers.

The first thing to be done in the making of a
pin is, to draw out a quantity ef brass to a wire of
the thickness of the pin to be made. This opera-
tion, though it would seem to be more properly the
business of a wire-drawer than of a pin-maker, is
generally performed in the pin-factory, as it is found,
for some particular reason, to be more conducive to
the interests of the proprietor to draw his own wire
to the requisite thickness. When the wire has been
properly drawn out, it is wound up into coils of a
certain and equal size; and then, to burn off any



THE STORY OF A PIN. 83

dirt or impure substance that may cling to it, it is
dipped into a mixture of acid and water, which has
the effect of instantaneously removing any thing
that may adhere to the metal. In the same way,
if you dip a dirty brass rod into vinegar, or rub it
with vinegar, the action of the sour or acid liquid
will cause all the dirt to come from the brass, leay-
ing the rod quite bright and clean. Well, when
the wire that is to be made into pins has been
cleaned, it is straightened and cut into pieces of
equal length. A number of these lengths are then
taken together, and by means of a large and power-
ful pair of shears or scissors, which are worked by ~
the foot, they are cut into shorter pieces, each piece
being a little longer than six pins joined together.
The next thing to be done is to point these pieces of
wire ; and for this purpose two revolving wheels, like
those you see the knife-grinders use in the streets,
only much smaller, and made of steel instead of
stone, are provided. The man whose business it is
to point the wires, places himself before these steel



Full Text






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NBEO es

Cibo



452

THE

WONDERS OF HOME,


THE TEA-PLANTATION.








Hn Eleven Stories,

©

By GRANDFATHER GREY.
a: SECOND EDITION.

WBiirh Cighs Filustrations. .



LONDON; |
GRANT AND GRIFFITH,

(Stee SSCS TO JONW HAKRIS,)

OORNER OF ST, PAUL'S CHURCHYARD,

MDPCCCLII. np



*

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+

oot sonar gecaminage se Bt


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Baten ee

-_——
THE

WONDERS OF HOME:
In Eleven Stories.

By GRANDFATHER GREY.
SECOND EDITION.

Wiith Ciqht tllustrations.

LONDON:
GRANT AND GRIFFITH,

(SUCCESSORS TO JOHN HARRIS,)

CORNER OF ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD.



MDCCCLII.
PREFACH.

SSS ee

I HAVE attempted in the following pages, with
what success it is not for me to determine, to tell
children about the Wonders of Science with which
they are surrounded. My belief is, that it is wise
to cultivate a wholesome spirit of inquiry in the
minds of the young—to lead them to seek know-
ledge—rather than to drag them to their lessons;
and I hope that my stories of common household
objects may be the means of directing the minds of
many young people to the consideration of the toil
and ingenuity, at the cost of which they enjoy so
many comforts in their modern home. Such studies,
prosecuted in a spirit of gratitude, must be power-


vil PREFACE.

ful for good. Indeed, home might be made to the
poetic minds of children a second fairy-land, if the
marvels of ingenuity and industry with which it
abounds, were laid bare to them. In the tea, coffee,
and sugar; the rice and flour; the chairs and
tables; the lamps and glasses; their frocks and
shoes,—children might be taught to read not only
interesting histories but powerful sermons, incul-
cating strength of will, diligence, and goodness.
Richter says well that “a good action, a noble
sacrifice, a galling’ wrong, are fit building-sites for
a child’s church.” In this belief I send forth my
stories. I trust that they may have the effect I
anticipate from them, and I ask no better success.

GRANDFATHER GREY.
CONTENTS.

enn

Tue Story oF A Cup or TEA

Tue Story oF A Piece or SuGar
THE Story or A Miik-Jue¢

Tue Story or A Lump oF Coat .
Tue Story or some Hot WaTER
Tue Story or A Pin .

Tue Story or JENNY’s SasH

Tue Story or Harry’s JACKET
Tue Srory or A TUMBLER .

Tue Story or A KNIFE

Tue Srory or tu1s Boox

PAGE

27
45
58
67
81
93

. 118
. 127
. 137
. 147



THE »

WONDERS OF HOME

THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA.

‘‘ Our household dwells amidst ten thousand hills,
Where the tea, north and south of the village, abundantly grows;
From Chinshe to Kuhyii, unceasingly hurried,
Every morning I must early rise to do my task of tea.”
Chinese Ballad on Picking Tea.

THE story of the tea which is now being scalded
in the tea-pot is one with which few young readers,
and not many old ones, are acquainted. Most people
know that tea comes from China, but here the
general knowledge on the subject ends. T'ew peo-
ple in England, or indeed in Europe, are intimate
with the various processes which this fragrant leaf
undergoes before our merchant-ships convey it to
B
2 THE WONDERS OF HOME:

our docks, and thence to our tea-caddies. The im-
mense consumption of tea in this country—estimated
lately at fifty-eight millions of pounds yearly—
makes it imperative upon us all to know something
ofits manufacture, that we may be enabled to guard
ourselves and our friends against adulterations of
a character injurious to the constitution. This re-
mark applies more particularly to young people,
since they have a long earthly future to look for-
ward to; whereas old men like myself have, in all
human probability, but a short span of life to mea-
sure. Therefore, let me impress upon my young
readers the responsibility of their position; let me
beseech them to bear in mind that their duty to
their friends, and to those who in years to come will
depend upon them, as they now depend upon their
friends, for guidance and subsistence, should urge
them to garner up industriously all the knowledge
which they are enabled to obtain in the days of their
youth. Let them strive with all their might to
benefit by the instruction of their teachers. Let
THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA, 3

them walk abroad with an inquiring spirit: let
their thirst for knowledge never be quenched. By
knowledge I do not mean only the information to
be gathered from their school-books, but also a fami-
liarity with the history of every thing about them.
I always indulge my grandchildren in this inquisi-
tiveness; and the attention with which they listen
to my stories, and the interest they always take in
them, induce me, at their earnest request, to print my
histories for the benefit of their schoolfellows and
the juvenile public. The first long story which I
told them was that of a Cup of Tea. It was a frosty
night—the wind was howling without: we had
closed the shutters—the fire blazed upon the hearth,
the children’s mamma was making some delightful
hot tea, and the youngest of the family was scorch-
ing himself making toast, to his infinite delight,
when I began my story, which ran, to the best of
my recollection, as follows :—
4 7 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA.

The story of the tea which your mother has just
scalded in the tea-pot, is one, as I said before,
with which few people living beyond the frontiers of
China are familiar. Considerable obscurity envelopes
the ancient history of tea. It is supposed by some,
and, I think, with reason, to be the malabathrum of
the ancient Greeks, though Chinese accounts place
the discovery of the useful and delightful properties
of tea as far back as A.D. 315, and assert also that
it did not come into general use before the period
of the Tang dynasty, that is to say about the be-
ginning of the seventh century. ‘The description
given of malabathrum by the author of the Periplus
favours the idea that it was the leaf of the tea-plant
prepared in a rude manner ; and if this be so, the
native country of the tea-plant is the romantic re-
gion of Assam and Yunnan, where it has recently
been found growing in a wild state.
THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 5

W hen tea first became in general use among the
Chinese, they called it tw; but their modern name
for it is cha. The English w.rd ‘tea’ is a corruption
of the Fuhkien dialect. The Fuhkien people, from
whom the plant was first obtaied by Europeans,
pronounced it tay: the French version (thé) of the
word is therefore more correct than the English.
Botanists call tea, Thea; and it is classed by scien-
tific men, and by the Chinese themselves, with the
Camellia. In China, the tea-plant varies in height
from three to six or seven feet. It usually presents a
dense mass of foliage on an infinite number of small
thin twigs, such as you will often find mixed with
the tea, if you examine it in the caddy. In Assam,
where, as I have already told you, it may be found
wild, it often grows to the height of thirty feet.
The twigs of the plant are carefully pruned, to
increase the quantity of leaves, and develope the
branches laterally, so that the shrubs are usually
of great circumference in comparison to their height.
The leaf in its natural state is of a dark-green
6 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

colour,'and of an oval shape. The flowers of the tea-
tree grow singly, and are white and without scent.
The seeds of the tea-tree very much resemble hazel-
nuts, their kernels being enclosed in a hard husk,
and so oily as to decay soon after ripening. The
oil extracted from these seeds, though acrid and
bitter, is useful to the Chinese for various purposes.
The leaves are first gathered from the plant when
it is about three years old; though it is not full-
grown before it is six or eight years old. The
tea-plant is grown throughout the entire kingdom
of China. The demand for tea has become so great,
that the cultivation of cotton has been partially
abandoned in order to meet the demand for the fra-
erant leaves of the Bohea hills, Fuhkien, Chehkiang’,
and Kiangsu. very cultivator of the soil in China,
be his land extensive or limited in extent to a mere
garden, cultivates a few dozen shrubs, and either
cures the leaves himself, or plucks them to sell to
his richer neighbour. Indeed, the cultivation of the
tea-plant is almost exclusively in the hands of small
THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 7:

cultivators. In China there are few extensive land-
owners; but each little farmer raises carefully his
proportionate crops of cotton, silk, rice, and tea, on
his own ground.

The seeds of the tea-shrubs are thickly planted
in nursery-beds. ‘They are sown thickly, because
from their oily and acrid nature, as I have already
told you, many of them fail. When the nurslings
are a foot or more high, they are transplanted into
rows about four feet apart. A rich sandy earth
with a fair proportion of vegetable mould in it,
and in an elevated situation, is generally chosen for
the propagation of the tea-plant. It is also neces-
sary that the soil be plentifully watered. A loamy
soil, with a sandy, loose covering, generally produces
an abundant crop of leaves; and in the Ankoi-hill
plantations in the Fuhkien province, much of the
tea is coloured with the iron contained in the land.
No preparation of the ground is necessary, nor is
much care usually taken to preserve the shrubs in
a healthy state. The result‘of this want of care is,
8 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

that in the neighbourhood of Canton particularly,
and in other parts of the empire, the tea-shrubs
are often covered with lichens, and sometimes bored
and destroyed by worms. ‘The Chinese might, in
this matter, call to mind their excellent proverb, that
“ trouble neglected becomes still more troublesome.”
You must not, however, fall into the vulgar error of
supposing that this pig-tailed race, so jeered at by
ignorant persons, are the idle, barbarous, and ridicu-
lous people they are commonly represented to be.
I should indeed be sorry to hear my grandchildren
join in this ignorant outcry against a great and in-
dustrious people. I do not mention the carelessness
_ of the Canton tea-growers for the purpose of preju-
dicing you against Chinamen generally; on the
contrary, I am rather anxious to impress your
minds with the gigantic results of their untiring
industry. Not only have these people rendered
every available piece of land in their country use-
ful to the general good of the community, but they
have terraced their native hills almost to their sum-
THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 9

mits, and propagated cotton, tea, and rice, hundreds
of feet above the level of the sea. ‘They practise
upon a vast scale all the rural and manufacturing
arts, and maintain in perfect mternal harmony a
community which may be moderately computed at
about three hundred millions-of souls.

Their customs may at first appear ridiculous in
the eyes of foreigners ; nor is this to be wondered
at. The fundamental principle of their government
is self-dependence. The stupendous fabric they have
raised, their perfect internal harmony, and the pro-
gress of their arts and literature, are evidence of
the wisdom of their rulers. To a Chinaman, or to
a tsin jin, as they love to call themselves, China is
the world. Beyond the boundaries of their empire
is to them a void; and the general belief to this
day among the masses of the Chinese people is that
their country is Zien Hia, meaning Beneath the
Sky, and denoting the World. The common name
for their country in the present time is Chung
Kwoh, or Middle Kingdom, a name given to it
10 THE WONDERS OF HOME..

from an idea that it is centred in the middle of
the earth. These things certainly denote the igno-
rance of the people respecting their geographical
position; but they also account fully for the singu-
larity of their manners. Unaccustomed to mix
with foreigners, or even to admit them to the mys-
teries of their social customs, they have lived alto-
gether isolated from the great family of man, and
have, consequently, contracted habits and customs
differing’ essentially from those of other nations.
Let me, children, guard you from indulging in
ignorant raillery against a people to whose wisdom
the world owes the inventions of the compass, por-
celain, gunpowder, and printing.

Well, to return to the tea-plant: as I have told
you, when the tea-shrub is about three years old,
the Chinaman gathers his first crop of leaves from
it. Three crops of leaves are gathered from full-
grown shrubs during the season. The first picking
takes place about the middle of April, or whenever
the tender leaf-buds begin to open, and while the

a a
THE STORY OF A-CUP OF TEA. 11

leaves retain their youthful down. These young
leaves produce the finest tea; and the down that
remains upon them has given rise to the erroneous
notion that they are the petals of the tea-flower.
The second gathering is made in the early days of
May, when the shrubs, if the weather have been
propitious, are densely covered with full-sized leaves.
The Chinese pay particular attention to the state of
the weather, as they believe that excessive dews, or
the entire absence of moisture, mildews or withers
the leaves, thereby affecting the quality and quan-
tity of the crop. The average annual produce of a
single full-sized plant is said to be from eighteen
to twenty-four ounces; and it is estimated that a .
thousand square yards of land devoted to tea-shrubs
generally contains between three hundred and four
hundred plants. The Chinese are very particular
as to the locality where their tea has been grown.
They have a decided preference for the produce of
the Bohea hills; and pretend to discriminate be-
tween the leaves of adjoinig’ plantations. The
12 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

produce of esteemed nurseries is collected with the
most scrupulous care; and it is affirmed, on the
authority of native dealers, that the price of these
particular lots varies from 4/. to 25/. per pound.

The leaves are collected by handfuls. ‘They are
stripped off the twigs with the utmost rapidity ; and
men, women, and children are indiscriminately em-
ployed to do this labour. Hach picker has a basket
slung round his neck, in which he conveys the leaves
he has plucked to the curing-house. One person
can, on an average, pick from twelve to fifteen
pounds of leaves in a day, for which labour the
wages are about sixpence. ‘The third crop of leaves
is cv lected about the middle of July; and there is
also a fourth gleaning in August, called tsin lu, or
“autumn dew,” from the name of the season in
which it takes place; the three previous crops are
called respectively first, second, and third springs.
The two last crops yield very inferior leaves, which
are seldom exported, but are probably reserved for
the use of the poorer Chinese.
THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 18

Now, though it is reasonable to believe that the
tea-plant puts forth more healthy, and therefore
more valuable foliage in favourable situations, than
when planted in an unfavourable soil, or exposed
to the inclemencies of the weather, yet it appears
to me that the delicacy of the leaf and its flavour
depend to a great extent on the care bestowed
upon it after it is picked. Chinese authorities, in
fact, declare that the mode of curing the leaf has
as much to do with the delicacy and richness of
its flavour, as its age, or the nature of the soil
from which it has been nourished. A few of them
go so far as to assert that some sorts of tea are
quite changed from their original flavour by the .
curative processes to which they are subjected.
You will not fail to observe, children, that as the
leaf grows old, its flavour increases in strength and
loses in delicacy. Your mother will tell you that
the flavour of Pecco and other fine kinds of tea
is more delicate than that of Souchong and Congo.
- Well, the cause of the superior qualities of Pecco
14 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

is its extreme youth. Pecco and all the fine kinds
of tea are produced from the leaf-buds of the tea-
plant; while Souchong and Congo are the full-
blown, mature leaf of the plant. No tea-grower
would cure the delicate leaf-buds of the tea-plant
on the hot-pans where the coarser, because older
leaves had been roasted.

After the leaves have been gathered and housed,
they are carefully assorted, and the yellow and
decayed ones thrown aside. The sound leaves are
then thinly spread upon bamboo trays and placed
in the wind upon frames, where they are left until
the leaves begin to soften; then, while lymg upon
the tray, they are gently rolled and rubbed until
red spots begin to appear, when they are tested by
pouring hot water upon them. If the hot water
turn the colour of the edges of the leaves to a
pale yellowish tint, the leaves are considered to be
ready for firing. The process of working or rolling
is tedious and laborious ; so much so that the Chinese
call the tea so treated kungfu cha, or worked tea.
THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 15

Congo is a corruption of kungfu cha. You may
then remember that Congo tea means rolled or
worked tea. The leaves having been properly rolled
and tested, are next subjected to the action of heat.
The iron pan having been previously heated, the
workman takes a handful of leaves and sprinkles
them carefully and thinly upon it, and waits till
each leaf has popped, when he dexterously brushes
them off into a basket, before they have had time
to become charred. The pans are the iron boilers
used in cooking, set in mason-work in an inclined
position and at a convenient height; three or four
are put into the same form, and heated by means
of a flue passing lengthwise under the whole. The
testing and rolling, which I have described to you,
is dispensed with in the curing of very common
tea; and the fresh leaves are at once thrown upon
the hot pans, and then turned over and kept in
motion by a workman before each pan, while ano-
ther carefully attends to the fire.

The mouth of the man who is watching the
16 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

leaves is careful'y covered: this precaution is ne-
cessary to keep out the hot dust which rises in
clouds from the leaves. During the first firing an
acrid greenish juice is forced out, and 1s partially
evaporated, or given off in the form of vapour; but
as it is pressed out on the bamboo tables by the
workmen, it affects and irritates their hands. Four
or five minutes’ heating is sufficient for the first
firing.

When the leaves have undergone this first firing,
they are thrown upon tables made of split bamboos
laid alongside each other with their round sides
up. The workmen take a handful of the hot
leaves in their hands, and roll and knead them
upon the table, in order to drive the oily green
juice completely out. This juice is allowed to
run through the interstices of the table on the
ground.

When the leaves have been thus rolled and
kneaded, they are shaken out loosely upon basket
trays, and exposed to the air to complete the dry-
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THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 17

ing; the object being to dry them gradually, that
they may not lose their brittleness, nor become too
crisp under the scorching rays of the summer sun.
When satisfactorily dried in this manner, the leaves
are thrown in larg'e quantities into the pans to under-
eo a second firing. ‘This time the pans are heated
in a less degree than before; and the leaves are
thrown about constantly to prevent scorching. If
well rolled previously, this operation tends to make
the leaves shrivel and twist; and as they grow
hotter they are stirred with a brush, and tossed
about till they are completely dried. This second
firing is generally of an hour’s duration. The leaves
are sometimes placed in trays over a charcoal fire
covered with ashes, after exposure to the air, and
left for two or three hours. This process makes
them of a darker colour than when rapidly fired
in the pans.

These processes, however, are occasionally varied
For instance, after the leaves have undergone the
first firing, rolling, and drying in the air, they are

C
18 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

sometimes scattered upon a fine sieve and placed
over a charcoal fire covered with ashes, to prevent
the smoke from reaching the leaves. They are
then removed to a coarser sieve, and the fine and
coarse leaves are in this way partially separated
before they are packed for market. This mode of
drying gives the leaves a greenish hue, varying
in degree according to the length of time they are
exposed to the air and fire. The common sorts of
black tea are left in the sun a much longer time
than the finer teas are allowed to remain. Thus
common black tea is exposed to the air sometimes
as long as two days, until a partial decomposition
has begun from the effects of the heating and roll-
ing. When intended for exportation, this tea is
thrown a second time into the roasting-pans, and
rolled about till it is partially charred, to prevent
the possibility of its turning mouldy in the course
of its voyages.

I have described to you the common mode of
curing tea; but I must not omit to tell you that


THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 19

the Chinese adopt many means to give peculiar
flavours to particular leaves. Thus, the fine leaves
of Hungumey are placed under cover till they al-
most begin to ferment, and then are exposed to
the sun before the first roasting. The round fillets
of gunpowder tea are rolled singly, while damp,
into compact balls. Scented tea is manufactured
by placing fresh flowers of the Olea, Aglaia, and
other odoriferous plants, in a basket under that in
which the fine tea is placed over the fire, for the
last drying, and then stirring them a little with-
out mixing the two. It is necessary to pack the
tea which is scented in this manner directly it is
cured, or it will lose its peculiar flavour. Only
the finer sorts of tea are thus treated; but Chinese
exquisites are extremely particular as to the kinds
of flowers used, and the degree of flavour imparted.
In fact, a Chinaman is as particular about the
quality of his tea as an Englishman is about the
age and beeswing of his port. Many people in
England affirm to this day that black and green
280 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

teas are made from different plants ;—that the shrub
from which green tea is plucked differs from that
whence black tea is gathered. Now this is un-
doubtedly a gross error. The Chinese, who are the
tea-growers, attribute the difference in the colour
of their teas to the mode of preparation. Green
tea is stronger and lighter than black tea for this
simple reason, that it is less worked and less roasted,
and therefore preserves more of its native oil,
strength, and colour, than black tea, which is al-
most charred for exportation. We might as well
hold that a baked potato and a boiled potato could
not possibly come from the same root, since the
baked potato was a dark brown, and the boiled
potato but the palest yellow. Green tea is made
by simply drying young leaves over a gentle heat,
and old ones over a hot fire, for about half an
hour. By this mode, it stands to reason, that
more essential oil will remain in the leaf than if
it were rolled, and roasted a second time.

All kinds of tea are repeatedly tested during




THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 21

the various stages of manufacture, by pouring: boil-
ing water upon a few leaves, in order to observe
the colour, aroma, taste, and other desirable quali-
ties of the infusion. As many—such is the origi-
nal strength of the leaf—as fifteen drawings can
be made from the best leaves before the infusion
produced becomes limpid.

Chinese writers on tea are unanimous in direct-
ing the amateur to observe ten thing's in his choice
of green tea. They insist particularly that the leaf
must be green, firmly rolled, and pulpy; that there
must be no broken leaves or dirty twigs; that the
infusion should be greenish, oily, and send forth a
delicate aroma; that the weight of the parcels, the
taste and hue of the dry leaf, and its smell when
strongly breathed upon, should be carefully at-
tended to. Merchants are in the habit of testing
Ankoi teas with a loadstone; especially since the
rumour has gained ground that the effects some-
times felt upon the nerves after drinking green tea,
are owing to its being cured upon copper. This
99 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

notion is, however, in all probability, an erroneous
one. The injurious effect of green tea is, in my
opinion, to be attributed in part to the greater pro-
portion of oil remaining in the green tea; but far
more to the injurious nature of the substances used
to impart an artificial and uniform colour to it, in
order to make the lots present a marketable appear-
ance. You must understand, children, that the
operations of firg and rolling give various shades
to the leaves in proportion as they come more or
less in contact with the iron, or are exposed to the
sun; and it is the object of the manufacturer—with
the view of disposing of his property at a high price
—to render these tints uniform. Well, he does not
scruple to add to his means at the risk of his fel-
low-creatures’ health ; so when the leaves are in the
pans the second time, he causes them to be drugged,
first with turmeric powder, to give them a yellow
tint, and next with a mixture of gypsum and Prus-
sian blue, or gypsum and indigo firmly combined,
which mixture imparts the desired bloom to the
THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 93

yellow leaves. This imposition cannot be too se-
verely condemned. It appears that at Canton,
when there was an unexpected demand for some
particular descriptions of green tea, it was ascer-
tained that even black tea was coloured to simulate
the required article.

The names given to the various sorts of tea are
for the most part derived either from the place of
their growth, or from their peculiar property or
appearance. Thus, Bohea is the name of the place
where this tea is grown, and not a term for a par-
ticular sort among the Chinese; Sunglo is also a
general term for the green teas which come from
the hills of Kiangsu. Considering the great labour
of preparing tea, and the distance it has to travel
from the provinces to the capital of China (often a
thousand miles), it is surprising to find that good
tea may be had at Canton for about one shilling
per pound. The tea that is packed on the Bohea
hills, or in the fertile regions of Kiangsu, is seldom
disturbed till it is unpacked from those quaint,
24 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

rudely-painted cases, in which the Chinese dispose
of it, in New South Wales or in the Highlands of
Scotland. I believe that the manufacture of the
tea-cases you see in the windows of grocers’ shops
furnishes employment to thousands of poor China-
men at Canton. Very poor people in China, who
cannot afford to dulge in the national drink, sub-
stitute for it an infusion of the dried leaves of a
species of Rhamnus or Fallopia. The refuse of the
packing-houses is sold to the poor at a low rate,
under the names of “ tea-endings” and “ tea-bones;”
and if a few of the rarest sorts do not travel beyond
the boundaries of the Chinese Empire, but are mo-
nopolised by his Celestial Majesty, and his bald
mandarins and clump-footed ladies, neither are we
called upon to consume the poorest products of the
tea-plantations. You have listened so attentively
to the story of my cup of tea, that if your mother
has any left in the teapot, you shall all taste its
good qualities for yourselves. I know you are all
longing for your mother’s assent. Well, if she pro-




THE STORY OF A CUP OF TEA. 25

mises to give you a treat for to-night, will you
think with equal indulgence of the people from
whom we derive this luxury ?

You will promise me not to indulge in ignorant
laughter at the expense of this great and original
nation. Recollect this, that to them our customs
are as absurd and unaccountable as theirs are to
us. You laugh at their pigtails: well, depend
upon it, they, that is to say the ignorant and
thoughtless portion of them, would grin delightedly
at your abundant crop of hair. To them, my child-
ren, you would all be little unaccountable mon-
strosities: recollect this, and learn never to laugh
in ignorance.

See, the tea is made for you: drink it, and try
to remember how much labour and anxiety have
been gone through to fill those little cups.

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THE SUGAR-PLANTATION.


THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR.

You will all be glad to hear the story of a Piece of
Sugar. You are too fond of the result to be in-
different as to the means employed to attain it.
The sugar which is used for domestic purposes in
England, and indeed throughout the world—except
perhaps in France —is, as I need scarcely tell you,
a sweet crystallised substance, extracted in a liquid
state from the sugar-cane, of which there are seve-
ral species. But sugar is also obtained, though in
smaller quantities, from beet-root. The French make
more beet-root sugar than any other nation. Sugar
may be obtained from many vegetable substances ;
in fact, in smaller or larger quantities, from almost
any species of the vegetable kingdom. The sap of
the maple, sycamore, and birch, for instance, con-
tains a large proportion of saccharine, or sweet
98 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

matter. Saccharine matter is obtained in various
forms from animal substances, and may be detected
in the sweetness of new milk, and is reducible to
crystallised sugar like that we commonly consume.
Then there is honey-dew, or aphis sugar, and the
honey of the bee, which may be said to be com- |
pounded of both animal and vegetable substances ; ;
that is, of the pollen which the bee draws from ~
the flowers, and the animal secretion with which |
it kneads the dry pollen into the moist sweet sub-
stance we call honey. Saccharine, or sugar matter,
also exists in great abundance in many ripe fruits, ;
as you may guess from the sweetness of those deli- |
cious Jargonelle pears we received last autumn from |
Guernsey. You may have noticed, too, how dried |
fruits, such as the fig and grape, are surrounded |

|

|

|

|



with hard dry sugar, which has been pressed from
the fruit in the process they have undergone to
keep them sound. Many clever men in France
and Spain have tried to extract sugar equal in
quality to that taken from the sugar-cane from
THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 29

grapes; but with little success. The sugar that
has been pressed from grapes has always been
found coarse, and much inferior to cane sugar in
every respect.

The oldest description in existence of the pro-
cess of extracting sugar from the cane, gives an
account of “sweet honied reeds” called Zucra,
which were found in great quantity about the
meadows of Tripoli by the Crusaders, about the
year 1108. These reeds were sucked by the Cru-
saders’ army, who were greatly pleased with their
sweet taste.

Most authorities on the subject agree in attri-
buting the first cultivation and manufacture of the
sugar-cane and sugar to the Arabs; and it is also
generally believed that sugar first came into exten-
sive use about the beginning of the eleventh cen-
tury. There are many conflicting statements made
by writers of various nations as regards the coun-
tries which may claim the sugar-cane as an indige-
nous or native plant; but, wherever the sugar-cane
30 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

may have been indigenous, there is no reason to
doubt the fact that the manufacture of sugar, de-
rived first from China or India, was introduced into
the western world by the Spanish and Portuguese.
The Venetians were the first Europeans who re-
fined sugar. The height to which the sugar-canes
usually grow, their colour, and the length of their
jomts, vary, as you may well imagine, with the
character of the soil from which they derive their
nourishment, as well as with different species, and
the mode of culture to which they may have been
subjected. But I think I may safely tell you that
they vary in height from eight to twenty feet, and
are divided by short bulging joints at regular m-
tervals. Long narrow leaves sprout from each
jomt, but as the canes become full-grown, the
leaves from the lower joints wither and fall off.
The outer part of the cane is hard and brittle, as
many a schoolboy too well knows; but the mner
part consists of a soft pith which contains the sweet
juice. The juice in each joint has no connexion
THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 31

whatever with the juice in the jomt immediately
above or below it. ‘The canes are usually propa-
gated by cuttings or slips, consisting of the top of
the cane, with two or three of the upper joints, the
leaves being carefully plucked off. ‘These slips are
planted in holes dug by hand, or im trenches made
by a plough, about eight to twelve inches deep,
the earth being banked up upon the margin and
well manured. The distance between the holes or
trenches must be such as to afford free access to a
current of air between the rows and plants, as well
as to allow room for the planters to weed the
ground between the canes. The planters generally
allow about four feet between the rows, and two
feet between the plants. Of course there are many
methods adopted by the sugar-planters of various
countries; but in our own West Indian possessions,
where sugar is most extensively cultivated, the mode
of planting is generally as follows: two or more
slips are laid longitudinally or lengthways at the
bottom of each pole, and covered with earth to the
32 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

depth of about two inches. In about a fortnight
the sprouts begin to appear above ground, when
they are again covered with earth, to give them
additional strength. The time required for bring-
ing the canes to perfection is usually about eight
months. In the British West Indies the slips are
generally planted from August to November; and
the canes are there cut about March or April. The
ripeness of the cane is known to the planter by the
outer part of it becoming dry, hard, and smooth ;
by the weight of the cane; by the greyness or
brownness of the pith, and the sweetness and thick-
ness of the sap or juice. The canes which grow
immediately from the slips are called plant-canes
by the planters; and the second crop of canes
reared in successive years from the slips are known
as rattoons. The plant-canes, however, are more
vigorous than the rattoons ; but the rattoons yield
juice which gives less trouble in clarifying and con-
centrating than that of the plant-canes. Some
planters have raised twenty annual crops of rat-


THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 33

toons from one set of slips. The canes are cut as
near the ground as possible, because the richest
juice is found in the lower joints. One or two of
the top joints of the cane are cut off, and the re-
mainder is divided into pieces of about a yard in
length, tied into bundles, and at once conveyed to
the mill.

The operation of cutting the canes is so arranged
as to keep pace with the crushing-mill which presses
the juice out, so that the canes may be crushed or
eround while quite fresh. In the East Indies very
rude and imperfect crushing-mills are used ; some
of them resembling mortars, made of the lower and
thicker parts of the trunks of trees, in which the
canes are crushed by the revolving and pressing
motion of a pestle, which rests in a slanting’ posi-
tion against the side of the mortar, and is moved
by oxen yoked to a bar attached to it. The juice,
as it is squeezed out, runs off through a hole in the
bottom of the mortar, and, running along a spout,
falls into another vessel placed to receive it. The

D
34 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

planters who use this rude mill are obliged to cut
their canes into very small pieces to make it ef-
fective.

The common cane-mills of the West Indies con-
sist of three rollers, mostly of wood, with narrow
bars of iron bound to their surface, so as to form,
by the spaces left between them, grooves extending
from end to end of the rollers. ‘These rollers are
placed side by side in a strong frame, with contriv-
ances for varying, in a slight degree, their distances
from each other. The moving power is applied to
the middle roller, and communicated from it to the
others by the action of cogged wheels. Steam has
lately been introduced to the West Indies as the
moving power for the working of the sugar crush-
ing-mills, and with great success. When the mills
are in action, a negro applies the canes in a regular
layer or sheet to the interval between the first and
second rollers, which seize and squeeze them vio-
lently as they pass between them. ‘The ends of the
canes are then turned, either by a negro on the op-
THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 35

posite side to the feeder, or by an ingenious frame-
work of wood, called a dumb-returner, so that they
may pass back again between the second and third
rollers. As these are placed nearer together than
the first and second, they squeeze the canes still
more; so that on coming out from this second press-
ing, they are reduced to dry splinters, which the
planters very appropriately call cane-trash, and are
used as fuel in heating the vessels for evaporating
the juice. Channels are placed under the rollers to
receive the juice as it is squeezed from the canes,
which conduct it to the vessels in which it is to
undergo succeeding operations. The mill I have
described to you is a very defective machine, since
it is impossible to supply the canes to the rollers
in so regular a layer as to prevent them crossing
each other. They become, therefore, broken, so
that the liquor is made foul, and the rollers are
exposed to irregular and destructive wear. You
must have often noticed pieces of cane mixed up
with the brown sugar; well, these pieces are the
36 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

result of the imperfect rolling of the sugar-canes.
But these rude mills will soon disappear before the
progress of science. Steam will make its way in
the West Indies, as it has already here; and then
let us hope that all nations will see the extrava-
vance, if not the disgrace, of manufacturing sugar
by the labour of slaves.

Cane-juice, as it comes from the crushing-mill,
is a thick, dull grey-green, sweet and balmy fluid.
It contains, when in this unmanufactured state,
particles of solid matter from the cane, which are
afterwards separated from it by filtration. Dhirectly
this cane-juice runs from the crushing-mill, the pro-
cess of clarifying is commenced. ‘The juice, as you
will recollect, is conducted by gutters from the crush-
ing-mill to a large flat-bottomed copper or pan,
called a clarifier, which is usually large enough to
contain from three to five thousand gallons. Un-
derneath this clarifier there is a fire; and when the
pan is full of cane-juice a little lime is mixed with
it, and the fluid is allowed to get hot, but not to
THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 37

boil. The effect of the lime upon the cane-juice is
to make the solid portions of the cane-juice stick
together and rise to the surface in the shape of
scum. When the proper heat has been given to
the juice, the scum rises in blisters and breaks, which
is the sign for the attendant to close what is called
the damper, an apparatus made to extinguish the
fire rapidly. After an hour’s repose, the liquor is
ready for removal to the first of the evaporating
pans. It is drawn off by a cock in such a manner
as not to disturb the scum, which will remain be-
hind unbroken, and is, of course, removed from the
clarifier before another charge of cane-juice is put
into it. The clarified juice is bright, clear, and of
a pale colour.

From the clarifier the liquid is conveyed to the
largest of a series of evaporating pans, three or
more in number, in which it is reduced in bulk by
boiling, as you all know water is when boiled in
the kettle. The largest of these pans is sufficiently
capacious to hold the contents of the clarifier; but
38 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

the others may become gradually smaller on ac-
count of the diminished bulk of the liquor by evapo-
ration—that is to say, by going off into vapour, as
it is removed into each of them in succession. These
evaporators are placed over a long flue, heated by a
fire of the cane-trash, or crushed and sapless cane,
at one end of which the teache, or smallest, and
consequently the last pan mto which the cane-juice
is put, is placed. In the long process of successive
boilings, impurities which have escaped with the
liquor from the clarifier are thrown up in the form
of scum, which is carefully removed. If, during
the evaporation, it be perceived that the liquor is
not sufficiently clear, some lime-water is added to it,
for the same purpose as the temper or lime was ap-
plied to the cane-juice when in the clarifier, namely,
to make the solid particles adhere together and rise
in a mass to the surface. In the least and smallest
of the evaporating pans, called the teache, the liquor
is finally boiled down to a thick consistency—to
such a consistency as to admit of its being drawn
THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 39

out like india-rubber to a considerable length with-
out breaking. ‘To know when the liquor or syrup
is sufficiently thick and adhesive, a drop is taken
from the teache between the thumb and forefingers,
and drawn out till it snaps asunder. When it has
done so, the portion suspended from the finger
shrinks up, so as to remain at a greater or less
length, according to the degree to which the syrup
has been evaporated. When it is in the proper
state for withdrawal from the teache, the thread on
the finger should be from half an inch to a quarter
of an inch long. This is a most imperfect test.
Some planters try the state of the syrup by observ-
ing the change it will undergo on the back of a
ladle dipped in the teache. When the syrup is
reduced in the teache to the satisfaction of the
planter, it is put into coolers, where it remains to
cool and crystallise.

When the sugar is taken from the coolers, it is
brought to the state of a soft mass of crystals, im-
bedded in molasses, or treacle, which you children
40 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

will most likely think very delicious, but which peo-
ple generally consider to be very coarse and unfit
for use. The separation of this fluid, called mo-
lasses, or treacle, from the crystals, is the next pro-
cess, and is performed in a building called the
curing-house. This is an extensive building, the
floor of which is hollowed out to form a reservoir
for the molasses, which is carefully lined with ce-
ment or lead. Over this reservoir is an open fram-
ing of joists, upon which stand a number of empty
casks, called potting-casks. Each of these has eight
or ten holes bored through the lower end, and in
each hole is placed the stalk of a plantain- leaf
which is long enough to descend a few inches be-
low the level of the joists, and to rise above the top
of the cask. The soft sugar, as it is taken from the
coolers, is removed into these casks, from which the
molasses gradually drains through the plantain-stalk
and falls into the reservoir below, leaving only the
crystallised sugar in the casks. With sugar of
average quality, three or four weeks are sufhcient
THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 41

for this purpose. When it leaves the cwring-house,
the sugar is packed in hogsheads or large barrels
for shipment, as raw, brown, or muscovado sugar ;
and in this state it is commonly brought to us from
our West Indian colonies. As by the process of
curing’, which I have just described to you, the mo-
lasses is generally but partially separated from the
crystallised sugar, it follows that the remaining mo-
lasses will drain through the hogshead while on
board the ship; and so large is this drain after
shipment, that it is said, on good authority, that
one-twelfth part of the raw sugar is drained from
the hogsheads before they reach Europe. When
the raw sugar arrives in England it undergoes the
process of refining; that is to say, the process pur-
sued in the colonies is repeated with greater skill
and care, making the sugar, at last, that highly
crystallised white substance of which you all are
very fond, and for a lump of which you beg very
frequently.

Sugar-candy is the only kind of highly refined
42 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

sugar made in China and India. The Chinese ex-
port sugar-candy in very large quantities: they
have two sorts of candy, one which they call Chin-
chew, and another known as Canton; the former
being the produce of the province of Fokien, and
the latter of that of Canton. Of these, the Chin-
chew is by far the best. Sugar-candy is mostly
used by Europeans resident in the Hast. Candy
is a sugar which, after being refined, is suffered
to crystallise slowly upon strings or twigs.

I have described to you the processes which the
saccharine or sweet juice undergoes after it 1s
pressed from the cane, in order to make it avail-
able for our use; but I have not yet directed your
attention to the poor slaves at the cost of whose
unrewarded labour we, for a long time, enjoyed an
article which enters so largely into household con-
sumption among us. My dear children, your young
hearts would, I hope, be melted in pity were I to
describe to you these poor black creatures in the
misery and degradation to which their wicked and
THE STORY OF A PIECE OF SUGAR. 43

cruel owners have reduced them. Slaves are not
employed in any of our English colonies now ; but
human flesh and muscle are still bought and sold
in the Southern States of America. You should
be proud to know that every foot that presses an
English shore is that of a freeman: that a slave
cannot exist within the dominions of your Queen.
But this blessing is not universal. Slaves—millions
of slaves—are still bartered for, and sold, and beaten
and worked to death, without reward, in many
foreign countries. [England has spent many millions
of money and many valuable lives in a war against
these inhuman dealers in human flesh and blood,
and I trust that you will live to see the day when,
throughout the world, there shall not be a man
branded as the property of his fellow.
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THE STORY OF A MILK-JUG.
45

THE STORY OF A MILK-JUG.

THE potter’s art is of very ancient origin, for it was
known in Egypt, China, and Japan, at a very re-
mote date. Porcelain ornaments have been found
on mummies three thousand years old; and the
British Museum contains specimens of Egyptian
jars, in good preservation, of undoubted antiquity :
indeed, the potter’s wheel is perhaps one of the
most ancient machines on record. Nor has the art
of adapting clay to the domestic purposes of man
been confined to the civilised nations; on the con-
trary, it has been practised by the rudest savages
on the face of the earth. Vases have been found
among the native Indians on the Musquito shore,
and on the banks of the Black River in North
America. Although all vessels made of earth may
be fairly called earthenware, I think you would be
46 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

corrected if you ventured to call the milk-jug so, as
the particular ingredients of which it is compounded
have clarified or cleared the clay, and converted it
into china or porcelain. Before the beginning of
the eighteenth century, English potteries produced
only coarse earthenware ; and we are indebted for
our porcelain articles to the ingenuity and industry
of the Chinese. But in the last century the art
made rapid strides in this country; and we are
mainly indebted to Mr. Wedgwood for the vast
improvements in our ware, which have made it cele-
brated throughout the world, and welcome in every
Kuropean market.

English China, as manufactured in Staffordshire,
is & composition made by the admixture of China
clay with ground bones and Cornish granite. Well,
these materials are mixed together with water, and
reduced to the consistence of cream, in which state
the potters call them “ slips, or slops.” I must tell
you that, before the ingredients are mixed together,
they are separately reduced to a fluid state in vats
THE STORY OF A MILK-JUG. 47

sunk in the ground, whence they are sifted through
fine silk lawns into other vessels, and then more
water is added, until a pint measure of clay slip
weighs twenty-four ounces, and a pint of granite
or flint-slip, thirty-two ounces; so that the potter
mixes accurately by measure, as he knows that
when a pint of clay-slip weighs twenty-four ounces,
and a pint of granite or flint-slip weighs thirty-two
ounces, that the proper quantities of clay, flint, or
oranite, are contained in the water. ‘The mixture
of the various materials is then made in a vat, and
the quantity of each material to be used is marked
by notches on a rod, which the workman dips into
the vat, while the slip-maker pours in the slips, until
each rises to its proper mark on the mixing-rod.
When the proper quantities have been poured into
the vat, the whole is thoroughly stirred and incor-
porated, and is then pumped up into a higher vessel,
from which it descends through a tap into a silk
sieve, which is kept in constant agitation while the
fluid is passing through it. This process is repeated
48 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

two or three times, not only thoroughly to remove
all impurities, but also to ensure the perfect mix-
ture of the various ingredients. This combined and
strained slip is then pumped on to a boiler called a
slip-kiln, the bottom of which is paved with large
flat fire-bricks, under which the heat of the fire
passes by means of four or five flues. The boiling
heat thus imparted to the slip generates steam, which
is, as you know, water given off in minute particles,
and so the quantity of water in the slip is gradually
reduced; and the slip, of course, gets gradually
thicker, till it is about the consistence of paste, when
the fires are put out, and it is allowed to cool. The
next process is to beat the slip to make it closer
and firmer, so that when cut it is smooth and close
like putty. It is necessary for the potter to be
very careful that this process is well performed, for
if the slip be not thoroughly beaten, the ware made
from it will crack and peel off, and, in short, be
utterly useless. Having described the operations
performed in the slip-house, let us at once proceed
THE STORY OF A MILK-JUG. 49

to notice what remains to be done to our milk-jug.
It is now only a lump of dense white paste.

A woman, called a baller, takes up the lump,
and makes it of the proper size for the jug, and then
hands it to the thrower; he receives the clay as
he sits at the thrower’s wheel,—a revolving’ circular
table, which is put in motion by the baller,—and
draws it up into a pillar, then depresses it into a
flat cake. He then opens the hollow of the vessel
with his thumbs, and continues to draw out the
clay, or press it inwards, according to the shape of
the vessel. When a rough outline of the shape is
obtained, the vessel is removed from the table,
placed on a board, and carried into a store-room to
harden. When it is sufficiently hardened, it is
turned upon a lathe resembling that used by wood-
turners. The turner holds the vessel in his hand,
and dexterously shaves away the clay (which is
now about the consistency of soap,) to the proper
thickness, and cuts the mouldings, &c., polishing
the whole with a steel burnisher. The shavings of

. |
50 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

clay which the turner cuts away, are carefully
returned to the slip-vats to be remixed. The
milk-jug is then passed to the handler, who hay-
ing made a handle in a plaster mould, sticks it to
the jug with liquid clay. Our jug is now passed
to a workman who has a number of flat figures,
flowers, and other ornaments in clay, which he
carefully fixes round the jug, according to the
drawing of the pattern, by wetting the under part
of them with a camel-hair pencil. These orna-
mental figures are made out of flat moulds by
children.

The jug being now properly shaped and orna-
mented, is placed on a board to dry. It is next
placed in the biscuit-oven, and made white-hot, its
shape being preserved by being imbedded in flint-
powder. The jug is then dipped into a glaze of
finely-ground felspar (a mineral which may be found
in any part of the world, and is the metallic part of
granite) mixed with a little alkali. I have already
explained to you what alkali is; I therefore hope
THE STORY OF A MILK-JUG. 51

that it is not necessary for me to repeat the ex-
planation. It is then submitted to a second fire
of a moderate degree of heat, which not only
melts the glaze on the surface, but unites with
the entire body of the substance, and so hardens
it, and makes it semi-transparent. The jug is then
cooled.

Our milk-jug is now ready for use. We have
watched it through the many phases of its manu-
facture; we have seen how the skill and ingenuity
of the potter have blended the earths of his country
together, and fashioned from the rudest materials
this polished, elegant, and enduring vessel. Well,
we cannot too often repeat to ourselves that the
comforts of our home are the results of many
centuries of thought and toil; that the luxuries we
so often enjoy without a thought of their source,
are the witnesses of our fellow-creatures’ labour.

If we would look about our household in this
spirit, always thankfully owning our manifold debts
to the labour of bygone generations as well as of
52 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

the present generation, at least we should bear in
mind and seek to do away with the misery in which
our poorer brethren slave for us. So ends my Story

of a Milk-Jug.
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THE COAL-MINE.
53

THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL.

To tell you the Story of a Lump of Coal at length
would take many days; for it is a most wonderful
and varied story. Indeed it embraces a history
of all the wonderful inventions which have been
made within the last century. It is the mother
of steam ; since by its power the cranks and chains
and wheels which form the engine are fashioned,
and the water is converted to steam. By its aid,
as you have seen in our Story of a Milk-Jug, the
clays of the earth are formed into hard and polished
vessels; and we are indebted to it for warmth in
winter, and for dressing our food always. With-
out coal, how would the steam-engine weave fabrics
to clothe us, or carry us with fairy speed along our
iron roads? Without coal, how would our vessels
plough the deep, against wind and tide, and carry
54 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

our merchandise to the farthest corners of the earth,
defying the power of the elements? Without coal,
how should we see our way along the streets at
night, since from coal we extract the gas that
lights us on our journey homewards?

You would not understand me were I to at-
tempt to give you a technical analysis of coal; but
I will tell you that it is a vegetable substance which
is extracted from the bowels of the earth by long
and laborious exertions. How vegetable matter,
to the growth of which air and light are as neces-
sary as to human existence, became imbedded so
far below the present surface of the earth, is a ques-
tion which has puzzled many learned men; but it
is beyond doubt that our coal-fields are only so
many buried forests, converted by the gases of the
earth and the process of time to that inflammable
substance which we call coal. It is only very re-
cently that the existence of wood in the state of coal
has been found with the original texture of the
wood still preserved. Not only have the branches
THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 55

of trees been identified in the shape of coal, but their
genus has been distinctly traced.

All plants which have been traced in coal for-
mations are called ‘coal-plants.’ Ferns are the
most abundant of all plants in the shape of coal,
almost every yard of coal being marked by these
impressions, and very often containing them in great
multitudes ;—palms also occur occasionally. This
leads us to believe that at the period of the change
which must have taken place in the surface of the
earth, it was covered with a rich and dense vege-
tation; and that many plants grew then of which
no specimens exist in a vegetable form at the pre-
sent time.

An example of the most imperfectly formed coal
is afforded in what is called the brown or wood coal
of Germany, which exists in large quantities im
Hesse-Darmstadt and Salzhausen. This wood-coal
is coal only half formed, and is found in the shape
of trunks and branches of trees, as well as in other
forms of vegetable matter.
56 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

Beds of coal, which are found in many parts of
the world, but abound in England, are called ‘ coal-
fields.’ Coal is found in these fields in strata, or
layers, separated by seams of slate-clay and sand-
stone. Coal is esteemed according to the quantity
of bitumen which it contains. Bitumen, I should
tell you, such as is generally contained in coal, is
a dark-brown glutinous substance, and is only ano-
ther form of naphtha. It will burn readily, but gives
off a quantity of soot. And here let me also explain
to you, that the soot which lodges in the chimney
is simply so much charcoal given off from the coal
in a vaporous state; and a little thought will
enable you to trace the existence of this charcoal,
or charred wood, to the vegetable origin of coal.
Bitumen being more inflammable than charcoal, the
coal which contains the greatest quantity of bitumen
is the most valuable.

Let me now explain to you the mode of work-
ing coal-mines. The probable existence of beds of
coal having been first carefully considered, and per-
THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 57

haps the beds themselves having been traced by a
process called boring, the first thing that is done is
to sink, or, as you would say, dig a shaft or deep
hole like a well, so as to cut through the various
strata or layers between which the coal is im-
bedded. This shaft, or well, is usually circular, and
the upper part of it is generally securely bricked, to
prevent the earth from falling in upon the workmen
below. On reaching the first workable seam of coal,
the sinking of the pit is for a time suspended, and
a broad straight passage, called by the miners a bord
or gate, is dug into the seam in opposite directions.*
The breadth of the passage, varies from twelve to
fourteen or fifteen feet; but its height is regulated
by the depth of the coal-seam, and the height of
these passages is always made of the depth of the
seam:—the roof exposing the strata above the
seam, and the bottom, that immediately below the
seam, and called by the miners the thill. When

* Sketch of the Relations between the Three Kingdoms of Nature.
By Thomas Williams, Esq., M.B.
58 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

these bords have been excavated to some distance
on both sides of the shaft, narrow passages, called
head-ways, are driven from them at regular dis-
tances, and exactly at right angles, as you will find
them in my drawing.

oo a ee oe
te TTT...

When these headways have proceeded eight or
ten yards, they are made to communicate with an-
other bord, whichr uns parallel with the primary
bord; and on this system the mine is extended,
according to the quantity, depth, and extent of the
coal-seams. A coal-mine thus extended has been
likened to a regularly built town (if you can con-
ceive the houses one uninterrupted line of black
walls) ; the bords and headways being respectively
the principal streets and the connecting lanes and
alleys; while the intermediate masses of coal (left
THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 59

for the support of the roof) stand for the interme-
diate masses of buildings.

The water-spring’s, which are usually met with
more or less frequently in the course of the miner’s
operations, are drawn to the surface by the aid of a
very powerful steam-engine, erected near the shaft,
and in such a manner that it may be employed to
draw up the coal and rubbish from the mine in bas-
kets called corves.

If the operations I have attempted to explain
to you have been at all successful, that is to say,
if the quantity of coal found is sufficiently great to
promise a fair return for the money laid out in the
operations of the miners, another shaft will be im-
mediately sunk at some distance from the first, and
the passages and headways made till they com-
municate with those which diverge from the original
shaft. Thus a current of air is carried through the
mine. One shaft is the downcast shaft, and the
other is the upcast shaft. Through the downcast
shaft a current of air is sent into the mine, and is
60 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

made to penetrate every passage and headway, and
to carry away the foul air up through the upcast
shaft. This ventilation is absolutely necessary to
ensure not only the health, but also the immediate
safety of the miners. I dare say you have all
heard of the frightful accidents which have been
caused by the explosion of fire-damp, and of the
safety-lamp invented by Sir Humphrey Davy to
prevent this great sacrifice of life. Let me here ex-
plain to you that fire-damp is a noxious and inflam-
mable or easily inflamed gas, emitted or given forth
from the coal; and that immediately it comes in
contact with the flame of a lamp, it explodes like
gunpowder, and kills all who are within its reach.
The word fire-damp has originated from dampf,
which is the German for vapour or exhalation. Sir
Humphrey Davy’s lamp is so arranged that the
flame is surrounded on all sides by an iron gauze,
through which flame will not pass, and which con-
sequently prevents the flame from coming in contact
with the noxious vapour of fire-damp. This inven-
THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 61

tion has been and is perhaps one of the most valu-
able efforts of man’s ingenuity. It has saved many
thousand lives, and prevented the destruction of pro-
perty of untold value. While the workings on the
first seam of coal are thus rapidly and securely
going forward, shafts are generally sunk from the
first seam to one below, and afterwards to the third
and fourth seams, so that a mine extensively worked
has, as it were, three or four stories. ‘These opera-
tions may be carried on so long as seams of coal
reward the miner’s labour.

The mode in which the miner detaches the coal
is by cutting a narrow way on each side of the huge
piece he wishes to excavate, and then blasting it
out by firing shot at the top of the seam. As much
as one hundred tons of coal is often brought down
at once by this process; and the coal is put into
corves, or baskets, drawn along a tram-road to the
shaft, and then raised to the surface by the steam-
engine.

I think I have now explained to you with sufh-
62 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

cient minuteness the operations which are carried
on underground for the purpose of supplying our
manufacturers and ourselves with fuel. Let me
now tell you what becomes of the thirty-five millions
of tons which, it is estimated, are annually raised
from the mines of England. The coal-field of North-
umberland and Durham supplies nearly all the coal
consumed in London, the eastern and southern
counties, and the neighbourhood of the mines.
Shields, Stockton, Seaham, and Sunderland are the
ports from which the coal is shipped: the Tyne
vessels being the larger, are laden for the London
market. The Lancashire coal-field supplies Man-
chester, Liverpool, and the surrounding district; the
South Staffordshire or Dudley coal-field the nu-
merous iron-works in its neighbourhood, and the
manufactories of Birmingham and the neighbouring
counties. The coal-field of South Wales (to give
you an idea of the extent of these fields,) is upwards
of one hundred miles in length, its breadth averag-
ing from eighteen to twenty miles. Ireland and
THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 63

Scotland also contain coal-fields, but of less import-
ance than those of England. To give you some
notion of the amount of human labour expended
in bringing coals to our markets, I will tell you that
London alone consumes upwards of three million
four hundred thousand tons every year, for the con-
veyance of which eleven thousand nine hundred and
eighty-seven ships are kept in constant activity.
It is estimated also that the iron-works of England
(into which, as you recollect 1 told you in the Story
of a Knife, coal enters largely) consume, in the
operations of smelting, more than seven million tons
of this valuable fuel every year. In 1841 the num-
ber of persons employed in coal-mines was one hun-
dred and eighteen thousand two hundred and twenty-
three.

Having thus briefly given you some idea of the
enormous quantities of coal consumed, let me point
out to you the various benefits which we derive from
the use of it. In the first place, coal is, as I have
already noticed, the mother of steam. We have
64 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

already heard the Story of Steam, so that it 1s un-
necessary for me to repeat my observations on that
subject; but you have heard nothing hitherto of the
manner in which gas is extracted from coal. I will
explain the process to you.

The existence and inflammability of coal-g:as may
be said to have been known for nearly two hundred
years; but although its existence and properties
were known so far back, it was not till the year 1792
that any attempt was made to turn this knowledge
to useful account. In this year, Mr. Murdoch, an en-
oineer living at Redruth in Cornwall, erected a little
apparatus, which produced sufficient gas to light
his dwelling and offices; and in 1798 he erected
extensive gas-works to lieht the premises of Messrs.
Boulton and Watt at Soho. This was the first
application of gas in a large way; but it attracted
little attention till 1802, when Messrs. Boulton and
Son used it for their illumination in commemora-
tion of the peace. The wonderful brilliancy of their
illumination, as compared with those produced by
THE STORY OF A LUMP OF COAL. 65

the dull flame of oil, made a great sensation through-
out England, and gas from that time began to be
eradually introduced throughout the country. In
1807, Pall Mall was lighted up by gas, and for some
years this was the only street in London so illumin-
ated ; but its use was gradually extended, till not an
alley in the metropolis was left dark to shield the
doings of dishonesty. Gas has been very properly
called the city’s most vigilant policeman. Coal-gas
is distilled by placing a quantity of coal in a closed
vessel, and subjecting it to the action of a fire, when
a dark oily substance is given off through a tube
into another vessel made to receive it. This dark |
oily substance consists of water, coal-tar, and spirit,
or gas. To get rid of the water and tar, the
mixture is allowed to cool, when the water and tar
settle and run off, leaving the spirit behind. This
spirit is still impure, as it contains a gas which is in-
jurious to health and of an unpleasant smell, called
sulphuretted hydrogen gas. To get rid of this gas,
the spirit is passed through vessels containing lime, to
F
66 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

which it is the property of the sulphuretted hydro-
gen to adhere, leaving the spirit to pass off in the
shape of the pure gas which is now in use through-
out the civilised world.

You now know the two great purposes to which
coal is applied. We might follow it into every in-
dustrial occupation of man. Its use is universal.
To stop the supply of coal would be to bring our
manufactories to a stand-still, to darken our streets,
to stop the railway-engine, and the paddles of our
steamboats. You will, by pursuing this train of
thought to its utmost bearings, see how the opera-
tions of mankind, like the steam-engine, though
complicated and apparently independent of one
another, are one unbroken chain of dependent
actions, which the absence of the minutest crank or
wheel may bring to a dead stop. So ends our Story
of a Lump of Coal.
; f= 4 ‘unin

a ft ]
z ze ge p



THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER.
67

THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER.

My children, the Story of Hot Water is perhaps
the most wonderful history in the world. It is as
interesting and startling as the most marvellous tale
in the Arabian Nights; and it is, let me assure you,
one with which all young persons should be ac-
quainted, for it is destined, in all probability, to
have great influence over the progress towards good
of the rising generation. I have lived to behold
the accomplishment of many scientific wonders: I
can remember the first steamboat, and the first rail-
way; and Harry can remember the first electric
telegraph. A few years ago it was impossible to
travel from London to Paris in less time than five
days; now the journey may be performed in twelve
hours, or half one day. You may now breakfast in
London and sup in Paris. A message, by means of
68 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

the electric telegraph, may be sent from Paris to
London in less time than five minutes. These are
among the wonders which have been revealed to the
world through the labour and ingenuity of learned
men. And now we are progressing towards greater
discoveries. You, children, will most likely live to
see the day when a message from China will be
delivered in London in the course of five minutes ;
and you will enjoy daily communication with people
living at the remotest corners of the earth.

We are told, by men whose learning entitles
them to our belief, that the power of steam was not
entirely unknown to the ancients. I hope you all
know that steam is water made into vapour, or, as
I heard one of you the other day call the vapour
that was rolling out in large white clouds from a
kettle of boiling water, into smoke, by the action of
heat. For the future, do not let me hear any of you
be guilty of such a blunder. Know that smoke is
the gas which proceeds from burning coals or wood,
and that steam is the vapour which rises from boil-
THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. 69

ing water. Among the ancients, steam was a power
very little understood ; and the only evidence of its
subjugation to the purposes of man before the Chris-
tian era, is given to us by Hero of Alexandria, who
has left us the description of a machine in which a
continued movement is given to a wheel by a blast
of steam playing upon it.

It was about the beginning of the seventeenth
century that De Caus, a French engineer, invented
a machine by which a column of water might be
raised by the pressure of steam confined in the ves-
sel above the water to be elevated; and in 1629,
an Italian named Branca contrived a plan of turn- .
ing mills by a blast of steam. These projectors,
though their inventions were rude, and possessed
little power or usefulness, served to turn the atten-
tion of thinking men to the means of making the
immense power of steam useful to the human race.
So far back as 1663, the celebrated Marquis of
Worcester gave to the world an account of the ex-
pansive force of steam. Let me read to you the
70 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

passage from his book, called “A Century of In-
ventions.” “I have taken a cannon, and filled it
three-quarters full of water, stopping firmly up
both the touch-hole and the mouth; and having
made a good fire under it, within twenty-four hours
it burst, and made a great crack.” With this ex-
perience the marquis contrived a rude machine,
which, he tells us, drove up water to the height of
forty feet.

The next name which I shall mention to you in
connexion with the application of steam to useful
purposes, is that of Denis Pepi, a Frenchman.
You understand that if. you fill a kettle full of
water, stop up every hole, and then put it on the
fire, directly it boils, steam will be produced; and
the kettle that is only large enough to hold the
water cannot also contain the steam, which occupies
fifty times the space it takes up in the shape of
water, and that therefore the steam, pressing with
ereat force on all sides of the kettle, will at length
cause it to burst with a loud noise. Well, the great
THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. 71

discovery which Pepin made was that of obtaiming
the sudden return of the steam to water, or, as it
is generally called, its condensation by cold. As
heat turns water into steam, so cold again reduces
steam to water. The result of Pepin’s studies was
the idea of obtaining a moving power by means
of a piston (A) working in a |
cylinder or tube (6). To ob-
tain this, he constructed a tube
or cylinder, into which he in-
troduced a rod or piston, fit-
ting nicely, as one joint of an
opera-glass fits into the other |
in our days. Well, at the c. Steam. p. Water. E. Fire.
bottom of this cylinder he placed some water, and
under the water a fire: the consequence was, that
directly the water boiled, and steam was made, the
steam, wanting room to expand, forced the rod or
piston up. When the piston had been raised, Pepin
removed the fire, and so, as by the action of cold
the steam again became water and returned to its





72 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

compact body at the bottom of the cylinder, the
piston fell. Though Pepin did not live to pertect
his ingenious invention, his labour produced the
basis upon which all our steam-power has been ob-
tained. If you go into any of the factories where
steam is employed as a power, or examine the en-
gine of a steamboat, you will see that piston and
cylinder invented by Pepin producing the power of
the engine by the rising and falling of the piston,
as it is raised by the introduction of steam into the
cylinder, and made to fall by the reduction of the
steam to water.

The first actual steam-engine of which we have
any undeniable record was constructed by Captain
Savery, an Englishman, for the purpose of rais-
ing water. This was in the year 1699. Captain
Savery’s engine, however, from the expense of work-
ing it, and the constant danger of explosion, soon
fell into disuse. It was, in fact, a very rude ma-
chine, as the eondensation of the steam was not suf-
ficiently ensured. ‘These discoveries and inventions, —
THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. V3

however, served to turn the attention of very many
clever men to the improvement of the steam-engine.
In 1705 Thomas Newcomen, an ironmonger, and
John Cawley, a plumber and glazier, constructed
an engine in which the condensation of the steam
was effected by the application of cold water outside
the cylinder. The improvement of their first engine
is due to Newcomen, who having noticed that the
piston rose and fell three or four times with great
rapidity without the application of cold water, ex-
amined this piston, and found a hole in it, through —
which the water intended by him to keep the cylin-
der air-tight, issued im a little jet or fountain, and -
instantly condensed the steam under it: this led
him to introduce a pipe, stopped by a cock, into the
bottom of the cylinder, through which cold water
was supplied from a reservoir. This engine, known
as Newcomen’s engine, required the constant at-
tendance of some person to open and shut the con-
densing cocks or valves, a duty which was gene-

rally fulfilled by boys, called cock-boys. When I
74 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

tell you that we owe a most important improvement
in the steam-engine to the desire of a boy named
Humphrey Potter to joi his comrades at play when
he should have attended to the condensing cock, I
shall not, I trust, make any of you hope to do good
by neglecting your duty. You know that the pri-
mary action of the steam-engine is the rise and fall
of the piston or rod in the cylinder or tube; I have
explained to you that in Newcomen’s engine the
condensing or reducing of the steam was brought
about by the introduction of cold water through a
pipe at the bottom of the cylinder; and I have also
said that this cold-water pipe was stopped by a
cock. Well, the duty of the cock-boy was to turn
the cold water on through the pipe at the bottom of
the cylinder directly the steam had forced the piston
up. This must have been very irksome duty for the
poor boys; at least it appears that Humphrey Pot-
ter found it so; and, in order to be able to leave the
engine without stopping it, he tied the handle of
the cock by a string to the piston, so that when the
THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. w»

piston rose the cock was turned on, the water en-
tered the cylinder, the piston fell, and the cock
closed again; and in this way the steam-engine
was first made a self-acting machine.

I must now tell you about a man who will make
no mean figure in the annals of your country,—I1
allude to James Watt. It was in repairing a work-
ing model of a Newcomen’s steam-engine for the
lectures of a learned professor of Glasgow Univer-
sity, that Watt’s attention was first seriously called
to mechanical invention. At the time of which I
speak, Newcomen’s engine was the most perfect
one in existence. The moving power was the.
weight of the air pressing on the upper surface of
a piston or rod working in a cylinder or tube;
steam being used to raise the piston with its load
of air up again, and then to form a vacuum, or
empty space, by its condensation when cooled by
a jet of cold water, which was thrown into the
cylinder when the piston was raised. The great
improvement which Watt introduced was the con-
76 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

densation of the steam in a separate vessel. He
perceived that as it was necessary in Newcomen’s
engine to introduce cold water into the cylinder in
order to condense the steam, the cylinder must ne-
cessarily be cooled also, and that consequently when
the next blast of steam came, much of it was wasted
by the coolness of the cylinder, which in fact con-
densed the steam, and therefore weakened its power.
Watt at once perceived that the only method to do
away with this defect was to draw the steam off
directly the piston was raised, by making a vessel
void of air, near the cylinder, communicate with it,
into which the steam could be drawn off, leaving
the cylinder perfectly empty, and so giving more
force to the descent, or, as it is called, the down-
stroke of the piston; and at the same time keeping
it warm for the next blast of steam. These im-
provements gave additional power to the engine,
and prevented the waste of steam. In Newcomen’s
engine, not only was the cylinder cooled by the in-
troduction of cold water, but it was allowed to be
THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. VC

full of air and partially condensed steam, so that
the fall, or drown-stroke of the piston, lost much of
its force. Watt improved upon this also, and emp-
tied the cylinder of air, so that in his engine the
interior of the cylinder offered a perfect vacuum, or
empty space, to the fall of the piston. In the mi-
nuter, though important parts of the engine, Watt
made many improvements. He perfected the con-
struction of his engine, so as to regulate its power
with great exactitude, by introducing a certain
quantity of steam, and no more, for each up-stroke —
of the piston. He is, in short, justly esteemed as a
man who contributed largely to the progress of his.
fellow-creatures. He died at his house at Heath-
field, in the county of Stafford, on the 25th of Au-
gust, 1819, in the eighty-fourth year of his age,
having made a large and well-deserved fortune by
his noble labours.

My children, were I to attempt to trace for you
a history of the various applications of the steam-
engine to the different branches of industry, we
78 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

should find ourselves involved in a story of the pro-
oress of the world for the last thirty years. Such
a subject is one too grave and too important to you
to be chatted about round the fire. It isa subject
which you will have to study seriously m your
books: I shall not therefore touch upon it. To give
you an account of the wonders steam has achieved,
would be to count almost every comfort and luxury
which we enjoy. Dr. Lardner, whose book on the
steam-engine you shall all read when you are a few
_ years older, tells us that the steam-engine has in-
creased the sum of human happiness, not only by
calling new pleasures into existence, but by so
cheapening former enjoyments as to render them
attainable by those who before could never have
hoped to share them ; the face of the land and the
surface of the waters are crossed with equal facility
by its power; and by thus encouraging and help-
ing the intercourse of nation with nation, and the
commerce of people with people, it has knit together
countries far away from each other by bonds of
THE STORY OF SOME HOT WATER. 79

friendship not likely to be broken. Knowledge and
affection are kept up by its power between people
thousands of miles away from one another; those
more advanced in learning shedding the blessings
of knowledge over their barbarous and distant bro-
thers. By this means,—by the subjugation of the
force of hot water to the will of man,—has the pro-
gress of this century been brought about; and you
may be thankful, my dear children, that you are
born in a time when the tree of knowledge is shed-
ding its fruit all over the world, making men friends,
and nations welcome neighbours. ‘This is the story,
the great story of some Hor WarTEr.

81

THE STORY OF A PIN.

Very few children know how much ingenuity and
labour are spent upon a pin. They are accustomed
to see hundreds of pins every day, yet they never
pause to inquire how they are made, or who makes
them. Yet, I can tell them, the story of that little
instrument called a pin is a very interesting and in-
structive.one. There is no account in existence of
the first pin that was ever made; but this is very -
certain, that it was made long before the time of
Henry the Highth,—who, my young readers I trust
remember very well, reigned about three hundred
years ag‘o,—for he would not allow any to be made
that were not properly pointed. In the olden time,
pins were made of many substances,—of boxwood,
bone, or silver ; now they are usually made of brass.
Ten persons are generally employed to make one
G
82 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

pin; and it is well known that these ten people can,
within the space of eight hours, make five thousand
five hundred pins. It may at first appear very
astonishing to you, that so many pins may be made
within this short space of time; but if you take the
trouble to think upon the subject, and to consider
how, by dint of persevering practice, a little girl
will learn to knit with marvellous quickness, you
will cease to feel any surprise at the rapidity and
dexterity of practised pin-makers.

The first thing to be done in the making of a
pin is, to draw out a quantity ef brass to a wire of
the thickness of the pin to be made. This opera-
tion, though it would seem to be more properly the
business of a wire-drawer than of a pin-maker, is
generally performed in the pin-factory, as it is found,
for some particular reason, to be more conducive to
the interests of the proprietor to draw his own wire
to the requisite thickness. When the wire has been
properly drawn out, it is wound up into coils of a
certain and equal size; and then, to burn off any
THE STORY OF A PIN. 83

dirt or impure substance that may cling to it, it is
dipped into a mixture of acid and water, which has
the effect of instantaneously removing any thing
that may adhere to the metal. In the same way,
if you dip a dirty brass rod into vinegar, or rub it
with vinegar, the action of the sour or acid liquid
will cause all the dirt to come from the brass, leay-
ing the rod quite bright and clean. Well, when
the wire that is to be made into pins has been
cleaned, it is straightened and cut into pieces of
equal length. A number of these lengths are then
taken together, and by means of a large and power-
ful pair of shears or scissors, which are worked by ~
the foot, they are cut into shorter pieces, each piece
being a little longer than six pins joined together.
The next thing to be done is to point these pieces of
wire ; and for this purpose two revolving wheels, like
those you see the knife-grinders use in the streets,
only much smaller, and made of steel instead of
stone, are provided. The man whose business it is
to point the wires, places himself before these steel
84 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

wheels, and taking several of these pieces of wire in
his hand, applies their end to the first wheel, which
has the coarser surface of the two wheels, in order
to prepare the way for the action of the finer wheel ;
and while he holds the ends of the wires to the first
wheel, contrives, by a dexterous movement of the
thumb and first finger, to make the wires revolve in
his hand, so that every side is presented to the action
of the wheel, and a rough round point is made. The
next step is to submit these rough points to the ac-
tion of the fine wheel, which polishes them to the
smooth sharp points which pins generally have.
Having done this, the same workman who makes
the points takes a powerful pair of shears or scissors,
and cuts the wire the length of a pin from the points
he has made, and then proceeds to sharpen the end
of the remaining wire to make the stem of another
pin, and so on till he has made six stems, to the
length of which, my little readers will bear in mind,
the wires are generally cut. The stems of the pins
are now complete, and in a state to receive their
THE STORY OF A PIN. 85

head. For this purpose they pass into the hands
of another workman, whose sole employment is to
fasten the heads on to the stems. But first of all,
we must follow the operations of the man who makes
the heads. Here I must beg that my young readers
will follow me with great attention, as the process
I have to explain to them is a very troublesome
and difficult one. Well, in the first place a piece of
wire called the mould, the same size as that used
for the stems, is attached to a small revolving axis.
At the end of the wire nearest the axis is a hole,
through which is placed the end of a smaller wire,
so that when the wire that is attached to the axis
is made to turn round, it twists the thin wire round
it ; and when this has taken place, the workman cuts
the thin wire, and allows the head which has been
formed by the winding of the thin wire to fall from
the thick wire into a compartment made to receive
it. You may see for yourselves, by examining the
head of a pin attentively, that it is made ofa thin
wire wound carefully, neatly, and smoothly round
86 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

the stem of the pin; and you may judge for your-
self how dexterously the workman must perform
his labour, when I tell you, that in the course of an
hour he makes five thousand five hundred pins’
heads.

When a quantity of heads have been properly
prepared, another workman takes them, together
with an equal quantity of stems, and proceeds to
fasten the heads upon the stems in the following
manner. The workman is provided with a small
upright stake, upon which is fastened a steel die,
containing a hollow the exact shape of half the
head. Above this die is suspended a moving die,
containing another hollow exactly the size of the
other half of the head, which, when at rest, remains
suspended about two inches above the lower one.
Well, being thus provided, the workman takes one
of the stems between his fingers, and dipping the
pointed end into a bow! containing a number of
heads, catches one upon it, and slides it to the other
end. The head when first slipped on in this way is
THE STORY OF A PIN. 87

simply a piece of thin twisted wire; well, to give it
its proper shape, and make it even and smooth as
you see the heads of pins, he places it in the lower
hollow, which, as you know, is exactly the size and
shape of half the head; he then causes the upper
die, containing the mould for the other half of the
head, to fall on the lower half, and so quite close
the pin’s head in, and press it to its proper shape.
This he repeats two or three times, for the purpose
of fastening the head firmly on the stem of the pin.

The pin is now finished-as regards shape, but it
is still an ugly, dark, dirty colour, and quite unfit
to pin ladies’ ribands. To cleanse and whiten it,’
therefore, is the next business of the manufacturer.
When a quantity of pins are finished, they are boiled
in what the workmen call “a pickle,” which is a
mixture of sulphuric acid and water, similar to
that which I have described to you in a previous
page. This mixture has a large proportion of acid,
because it is necessary by its action so to bite into
and roughen the pins as to make them take easily
88 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

the coating of tm which is afterwards given to
them.

After being boiled for half an hour, they are
washed, and then placed in a copper vessel with a
quantity of grain tin, that is to say, powdered tin,
and a mixture of tartar. The mixture of tartar,
acting upon the tin and upon the pins, causes the
tin to adhere or stick to the pins, so that when they
are taken out of the copper vessel, they are quite
covered with the tin, and present a brilliantly white
appearance. They are next sifted or shaken in a
sieve to disengage any loose tin that may adhere to
them, and then carefully washed. To dry them,
the workman throws them into a bag half-full of
bran, in which he shakes them for some time, when
he throws them into a wooden tray, and for the
second time shakes them well for the purpose of
disengaging the bran, which flies off, leaving them
beautifully bright, quite clean, and, in fact, ready
for use.

You will see, by this story, that a great amount
THE STORY OF A PIN. 89

of labour is requisite to produce a pin; and that
you owe the use of this little but most useful m-
strument to the combined strength and ingenuity
of many people.. Women and poor little children,
as well as men, are employed to make pins; and
perhaps, if you reflect upon this, and remember that
every pin wasted by you has been made with much
trouble and weariness by a little boy not bigger
than yourselves, you will feel less inclined to waste
wantonly what has been produced with so much
labour, and, may be, at the cost of a fellow-crea-
ture’s health.

You have noticed that when your mother has
lost any body very dear to her, she has worn black
clothes, and dressed you in black also; and I should
think that the black pins which she used on those
sad occasions did not escape your attention. I
think you would be glad to know how these pins
are made: I will tell you. The best black pins,
that is to say, those that have a dark, very dark
purple hue, are made of steel tempered to a deep
90 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

colour, instead of brass; while those which look
perfectly black, but which, after a severe rubbing,
become white, losing their outer coat, are common
pins dipped in a black varnish instead of the solu-
tion of tartar and tin. You now know the exact
difference between the manufacture of a common
pin and a mourning-pin. May you, children, sel-
dom have occasion to use a black pin, or forget the
poor little workmen whose hard toil provides you
with a white pin. The poor little fellows who work
from morning till night in the pin-factory barely
earn sixpence a-day. We are told, and on very
good authority, that the number of pins made-daily
in England alone is more than fifteen millions.
This astonishing number, I am inclined to think,
is rather below than over the actual number manu-
factured; I am rather led to believe that as many
as twenty millions are made every day in this coun-
try. Be this as it may, I think I have told you
enough to interest you in the Story of a Pin: and
I do hope, that for the future you will bear in mind,
THE STORY OF A PIN, 91

what is so often told to children, that the most in-
significant thing is the result of industry, and that

even a pin is made at the cost of much labour and
ingenuity.



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THE STORY OF A SASH.
93

THE STORY OF A SASH.

I am glad to see Jenny with her new sash. She
deserves the very pretty present her mother has
made her. She has been a very good girl. I like
to see children behave well, not for the sake of get-
ting a reward in the shape of a present, but for the
delight of knowing that they are doing their duty
to their parents as well as to themselves. I am
very happy to hear that Jenny is so pleased with
her mother’s gift. She is very proud of the sash,
I dare say; but can she tell us all about it? No!
Well then, children, gather round the fire, throw
on a shovelful of coals, and let me tell you

THE STORY OF JENNY’S SASH.

I hope you all know that silk comes from the
silkworm. You recollect that when Harry kept
94 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

silkworms, they used, when they had grown to a
certain size, to retire into a corner of their box, and
eradually cover themselves with a fine yellow silk
thread. You noticed them moving their heads to
and fro, from one corner of their little prison to the
opposite corner; and you could, I should think, see
the thread of silk which they seemed to be unwind-
ing from two holes in their head. Well, of that
thin and brilliant web Jenny’s strong sash is made.
The processes which that thin and frail thread has
to undergo before it is strong enough to be worn
are, aS you may imagine, manifold, and I think
very interesting. Well, as you have seen, when
the silkworm has grown to a certain size, it seeks
a corner in which to form its nest, or, as silk-mer-
chants call it, its cocoon. Bear in mind the mean-
ing of the word cocoon, as I shall use it frequently
in the course of my story. This cocoon is formed
by the labour of the worm, as you have also seen.
Gradually the worm becomes quite hidden from
sight, but still it labours on, spinning more and
THE STORY OF A SASH. 95

more length of filament, or silk, from the two holes
in its head, and disposing the rich and glossy thread
round the interior of its hollow dwelling. This nest,
Harry knows, assumes the form of an egg. At
length the worm inside becomes exhausted, and
ceases to spin: its nest or cocoon is finished. Let
me not forget to tell you that the two threads spun
out from two holes in the worm’s head are, by a
peculiar movement of its mouth and front legs,
fastened together, and fixed by a gummy liquid
which comes from its mouth. The worm, if not
interrupted, usually spins out the whole quantity of
its silk in one thread of enormous length. 7

Silkworms are reared in large quantities in Italy,
Franee, India, and China. Harry can tell you that
they are fed upon mulberry-leaves: and I dare say
he remembers Cowley’s verses on the mulberry-tree,
where he says :

“Her fruit is rich, but she doth leaves produce

Of far surpassing worth and noble use.
* * * * *
96 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

They supply
The ornaments of royal luxury :
The beautiful they make more beauteous seem,
The charming sex owe half their charms to them ;
To them effeminate men their vestments owe ;—
How vain the pride which insect worms bestow!”

Do you hear that, Jenny?

‘“‘ How vain the pride which insect worms bestow !”

Always remember, when you feel proud of your
sash, when you look with joy upon its beauty, that
you owe it to the labour of a poor worm. In Italy
and China, the rearing of silkworms is the occupa-
tion of one class of persons, while the winding of
the silk from the cocoons is the occupation of ano-
ther distinct class of people. Those persons who
rear silkworms sell the cocoons to the winders or
reelers. All cocoons, however, are not of equal
value; the cocoon proprietor therefore separates
them into different qualities, to which he gives
separate names. Tor instance, the most perfect
cocoons he calls “ good cocoons ;” next in point of
THE STORY OF A SASH. 97.

value come the “ pointed cocoons,” which are infe-
rior in worth to “ good cocoons,” because they are
apt to break in the winding; then come “ conca-
lons,” or large loose cocoons; then “ doublets,” so
called from imperfection in the thread; then “ souf-
flons,” which are very imperfect cocoons; and so
on, each kind bearing a value proportionate to its
soundness, or the facility with which it is likely to
yield an untangled silken thread.

The Chinese pay great attention to the condition
and feeding of their silkworms, and are particular
as to the time of preparing them for spinning their _
cocoons. They allow the worms three days to spin ;
and in six days they stifle the worm, which, during
that time, has been changed to a chrysalis, or, as
Harry says, a grub. This is done by burying
the cocoons in a jar underground, lined with mats
and leaves, interlaying them with salt, which kills
the grub, and keeps the silk strong and bright.
Packed in these jars, the cocoons can be carried any
distance without receiving injury, and may be kept

H
98 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

unwound for some time. Another mode of destroy-
ing the grub, is by steaming it. The steam not
only destroys the grub, but prepares the silk for
the winder. The Italians kill the grub by exposing
the cocoon to the burning rays of the summer sun.
Some rearers destroy the poor silkworm by putting
the cocoon in a moderately heated oven. This is a
terrible end for the poor silk-makers! How many
worms must have been baked, Jenny, to make your
sash! When the insect is killed, the external loose
covering of the cocoon, better known to you as
floss silk, is opened, and the hard cocoon is pressed
through the opening.

When the winder, or reeler, has purchased the
cocoons from the rearer, he proceeds to prepare
them for the process of unwinding, and forming
them into hanks or skeins. With this view, the
cocoons are thrown into a vessel full of warm
water, and there left till the gum, which the worm
uses as a cement to keep the cocoon together, is so
far softened as to permit the thread to come off.
THE STORY OF A SASH. © 99

The reeler then takes a whisk of fine twigs bound
together, and cut off evenly at the ends; and with
this she (for the reelers are generally women) presses
and stirs the cocoons till the loose ends of the silk
adhere to its points; she then gently raises the
whisk with the threads of silk clinging to it, dis-
engages them one by one from it, and draws their
ends through her fingers, to remove any floss or
dirt that may cling to them. Then, supposing the
thread which she is about to form to consist of ten
filaments, she collects the threads of ten cocoons,
and passes them through small eyes or holesina |
reeling-machine. The first, we will suppose, forms
two groups of five threads each, each group passing
through one eye, which is presently combined with
the other group of five threads, making one solid
thread of ten filaments. This solid thread is then
wound upon a square reel; the cocoons, still im-
mersed in the warm water, being carefully soft-
ened, which will allow them to yield their filaments
freely. As fast as the cocoons are exhausted, others
100 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

are thrown into the water, and their threads ga-
thered up, and united to the solid thread. You
now know how the silk leaves the form of cocoons,
and becomes a skein, or, as the manufacturers call
it, a hank. Well, in the form of hanks or skeins
what manufacturers call “raw” silk is imported
into this country to be woven into ribands, satins,
and velvets.

The Chinese assert, and they have abundant
proof of their assertion, that silkworms were reared,
and silk was manufactured into clothes, as far back
as 780 years before the Christian era. Indeed,
many of their learned men are bold enough to
maintain that the silk of the silkworm was manu-
factured by the Empress Siling, wife of the Em-
peror Hwangti, 2602 years before the Christian
era. An old Chinese record is said to contain these
lines :

“The legitimate wife of Hwangti, named Siling shé, began to rear
silkworms :

At this period Hwangti invented the art of making clothing.”
6

THE STORY OF A SASH. 101

The Chinese esteemed the produce of the silk-
worm so highly, that they worshipped a goddess of
silkworms. We are also told by old Chinese writers,
that in ancient times emperors did not disdain to
plough the lands, nor empresses to cultivate the
mulberry-tree to feed the silkworms, as an example
of industry to their people. There can be no doubt
that the Chinese were the original manufacturers of
silken goods; and at the present day, perhaps a
third of the population of that immense country is
clothed with the filaments of the useful silkworm.
The finest silk in the world comes from China, and °
is called toatle by the Chinese.

The hanks or skeins of silk brought over to this
country vary considerably in size, shape, weight,
and colour. The Chinese silks are the whitest.
Indian silks are imported in small skeins; Italian
raw silk in larger skeins; and the Persian silks,
which are the least valuable of all the silks that
come to our English market, are imported in skeins
weighing usually a pound each.
102 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

We must now carefully follow these skeins (or
raw silk) through the processes called silk-throwing,
which they must undergo to be brought into a
proper state for the use of the weaver and the
stocking-maker. Formerly szlk-throwing was an
art in the hands of foreigners only, until John
Lombe, an English workman, went to Italy, and
by bribing the men engaged in the silk-throwing
mills there, gained sufficient knowledge of the ma-
chinery used by the Italians to guide him in the
construction of the famous old Derby mill, which
he built in 1717 at a cost of 80,0007. This was the
first silk-throwing mill ever erected in England ;
and so well did it succeed, that it did great harm
to the Italian silk-throwers, who, in revenge for
John Lombe’s forbidden visit among them, are re-
ported to have bribed two Italians to poison him
with slow poison. John Lombe lingered two or
three years in agony after the arrival of two Ita-
hans at his mill, and then died, as people supposed,
killed by these foreigners.
THE STORY OF A SASH. 108

Derby, ever since Lombe’s time, has maintained a
great reputation for its silk manufactures. Lombe’s
machinery has been improved by degrees; so that
now some of the silk-mills are great examples. of
factory economy. You have all heard of the poor
Spitalfields men; but you must not confound their
employment with the silk-throwsters. Spitalfields is
famed for the weaving of silk, while Manchester,
Derby, Macclesfield, and Congleton are noted for
sik-throwing mills. Let us now follow some skeins
of silk through a throwing-mill. You must first
understand that the hanks or skeins of raw silk are
taken to the mill in bales or bundles. The appear-
ance of these bales when opened is very brilliant,
from the brightness and richness of the silk. The
process which these skeins undergo depends, of
course, on the purposes to which they are to be
applied afterwards. For instance, there is a kind
called dumb singles, which is silk simply wound and
cleaned ; this is used principally in the weaving of
gauze, and other light fabrics: another kind is
104 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

known as thrown singles ; this is a silk which has
been wound, cleaned, and thrown, and is then used
in the weaving of sashes and common silks. This
is, then, the process which Jenny’s sash has under-
gone. Tram is silk which, besides being wound,
cleaned, and thrown, is ‘ doubled,’ that is, two or
more threads are twisted into one; this thick thread
is used for the weft, or cross threads, of velvets,
and flowered silks, and what are called corded silks.
You will understand, from what I have told you,
that the operations to which silk is submitted differ
according to the purposes to which it is to be ap-
plied. For instance, when the weaver wants a thick
cord, the silk is wound, cleaned, and doubled or tre-
bled ; if, on the contrary, he wants a thin thread to
make gauze and very fine silk material, the silk is
only wound and cleaned.

So that you will see the operations to which the
raw silk is submitted before it is given to the weaver
may be classed as cleaning, winding, doubling, and
twisting or throwing. After a slight washing or
THE STORY OF A SASH. a 105

soaking, comes the process in which the winding-
machine is used. The term ‘ winding’ refers, let
me remind you, to the hanks or skeins of raw silk,
as well as to the manufactured article. You have
often held skeins of silk for your mother to unwind ;
well, in silk-mills, instead of using little children’s
hands to wind from, the manufacturer uses a wooden
contrivance. This wooden frame is called a snift
in the mill, though its movements are slow when
compared with the quick motions of those reels on
to which the silk is wound.

You recollect that the hanks or skeins which
come from various countries are not all of the same
size. I hope Harry recollects, for example, that
the Persian skeins are the largest of all foreign
skeins, and that the silk is of inferior quality. The
swifts are therefore made of different sizes, to suit
the diameter of the skeins. The skeins of raw silk
are opened and spread separately round these swifts;
but when the manufacturer wants to make a thick
skem from the raw hank, he twists several skeins
106 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

round one another, so that they form one thick
thread on the reel below. To shew you, my children,
to what a wonderful state of perfection machinery
has been brought in your own country, I will tell
you, there is in some parts of the operations I have
described to you, a very pretty little contrivance,
which refuses to work when any thing is gomg
wrong. It is a dumb tell-tale, a warnmg which
immediately tells the woman that something requires —
her attention. When the delicate silks of thread
are passing from the revolving swift to the revolv-
ing reel, if the thread happens to be bad or weak
at any part, it will probably break, and if this
breakage were to remain unnoticed, it would seriously
injure the manufactured article. or stance, sup-
pose four skeins from the swift are being turned
into one, and one of the four break, the other three,
if not instantly stopped, would continue to form a
threefold thread only, which would of course be
much thinner than the fourfold thread previously
made. Well, the little tell-tale guards against
‘THE STORY OF A SASH. 107

this, by stopping all the bobbins of one group
instantly, when any one of the threads breaks.
Each thread passes through an eye in the end of
a short lever; and when a thread breaks, the lever
loses a temporary support, falls, and by means of a
sort of catch stops the movement of the reel or bob-
bin on which the doubled thread is being wound.
This stoppage of course attracts the notice of the
person who is watching the machine, who mends
the broken thread; and the ingenious tell-tale then
allows all to go on smoothly till another breakage
calls for its attention and warning.

Hand-twisting is not yet quite supplanted by the
giant steam. There are some kinds of twisted silk
which are required to be thicker and stronger than
the ordinary varieties: this strong and compact silk
is generally manufactured by a process called hand-
twisting. This operation is performed by young
active boys about Harry’s age, but by poor little
fellows less fortunate than he, who have to work
hard for their dinner and supper, and only get very
108 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

coarse food after all their labour, while he has the
best of every thing, and has nothing to do for it.
Well, these poor boys are employed in running
to and fro, carrying silken threads in their hands.
At one end of a very long room is a large wheel,
turned by a man. On one face of the wheel, near
the circumference, are about a dozen hooks rang‘ed in
a circle. Several threads of silk, twelve or a lesser
number, are fastened to these hooks, and the other
ends of the twelve threads are carried to the distant
end of the room by the boys. At that end they are
fastened to hooks attached to a machine made to
move very slowly along the floor, so as to enable
the threads to twist without breaking. Matters
being in this way prepared, the wheel is turned,
by which the hooks on the wheel are made to go
round very fast, and so the threads fastened on them
become twisted one round another very closely,
making at last a strong cord.

All silk is either dyed or bleached at some stage
of the processes which it undergoes while in the
THE STORY OF A SASH. 109

manufacturer's hands; but it is generally either
bleached or dyed soon after the twisting is finished.
Before it is dyed, it is made up into hanks a second
time, and scoured, to remove the gum which may
still stick to it. Before this scouring, the silk is
rough and unpleasant to the touch, and is unfit to
receive dye. It is boiled for three or four hours in
strong soap and water; by which means the gum
is got rid of, and the silk comes out soft and glossy,
as you find it in the shape of riband. ‘The silk is
next washed in a current of clear water, to remove
the soap. It is now ready for the weaver; either
in the shape of thin thread called warp and weft for
weaving, as yarn or thick thread for hosiery and
gloves, as sewing silk, or in thread fit for the
weaving of velvets, &c. It is not possible at the silk-
throwing mills to manufacture all the silk brought
to this country.

You recollect, when we were talking about the
cocoon of the silkworm, that I told you about its
outer covering’ being of a coarse and harsh quality
110 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

of silk, and that this coarse silk was called floss-silk.
As this floss-silk has no connected thread, it is sent
to the silk-spinning mills, which are situated chiefly
in Manchester, where it is spun into yarn (like hemp
for ropes), to be manufactured into inferior silk
articles. The process of manufacturing floss-silk
has not been long carried on; but it now forms a
large trade in the country. Jenny’s sash was not
made of floss silk: certainly not. It was wound
and twisted on the spinning-machine I have drawn
for you, and most likely woven by a weaver at
Coventry. You have seen poor weavers in the
streets plying their trade to move the charity of
passers-by ; well, by one of those weavers, probably,
Jenny’s sash was made, There is a large body of
them at Coventry. You know that most woven
fabrics consist of threads crossing each other at
right angles; the long threads (for instance) of
Jenny’s sash being called the warp, and the cross
threads the woof. If Harry keeps silkworms next
summer, I hope he will take more care of them
THE STORY OF A SASH. lll

than he took with the last he had; and be the
more mindful of them, from knowing how greatly
they contribute to the delight and comfort of his
mother and sisters.
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SHEEP-SHEARING.
113

THE STORY OF HARRY’S JACKET.

You will be surprised to hear that Harry’s jacket
was stolen from the back of a sheep; that what
once formed a great winter-coat for one of these
entle creatures has been altered to a jacket for
young Harry. This is, however, literally the fact.
Whether a sheep has been clipped to clothe a lamb,
or a lamb has been denuded to adorn a sheep, it

remains for Harry by his conduct to determine.
You may well imagine that the wool passes
through many hands after it is sheared from the
back of the sheep, and before it comes home in the
shape of a jacket. Many, many hours of hard la-
bour have been employed to furnish Harry with his
new blue jacket. Yet he puts it on gaily and
thoughtlessly, without for a minute pausing to re-
member the points of its wonderful story. When
I
114 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

he looked upon the tall and dingy chimneys of
Leeds, Huddersfield, and Halifax, and complained
of the black fumes they sent abroad, obscuring the
air, and shutting out the distant landscapes, it never
once occurred to him that the smoke and bustle
which so disgusted him were necessary to furnish
his back with the new jacket for which he had made
such clamorous demands. Young: people, and in-
deed older folks, are apt to fall into the same igno-
rant error.

The wool of English sheep is not much used for
broadcloth ; for it is a curious fact, that in propor-
tion as the flesh of the sheep improves and becomes
better mutton, the wool grows coarser, and less
adapted to the purposes of the cloth-manufacturer.
This may perhaps be accounted for by reference to
the hair or wool of other animals. So far as I
know, you will generally find that the most muscu-
lar animals have the thickest and strongest wool or
hair. Take for instance the lion, and you will find
that he is covered with strong coarse hair: the
THE STORY OF HARRY’S JACKET. 115

bear again has a coat of strong thick fur: on the
other hand, those animals which-possess less strength,
as the leopard, the hare, the otter, and others, have
furs of the finest and smoothest texture. This pe-
culiarity is not less remarkable in the human species,
among whom you will generally know the strongest
man by the coarseness and quantity of his hair.
Formerly we derived the greater part of the
wool employed in our cloth manufacture from the
Spaniards, whose flocks produced the finest wool to
be procured. Afterwards, the Spanish sheep were
introduced into Germany and Saxony, and then the
German wool gradually supplanted that of Spain ;
and now both the German and Spanish markets are
threatened with total annihilation by the superiority
of the wool of our Australian sheep. These sheep
are commonly considered to be one of the handsom-
est races in existence, and form the chief property
of the farmer in that part of the world. German
wool is still extensively used for fine fabrics; but
Australian wool, on account both of its cheapness
116 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

and quality, enters generally into the large bulk of
our woollen manufactures.

The wool is conveyed to the factories in pack-
ages of various shapes and sizes.

The wool from one sheep is called a “ fleece.”
The weight of each fleece varies of course; but on
an average, those from foreign sheep weigh from
two to two and a half pounds. The foreign wools
are usually imported tied up in small bundles of
three or four fleeces each. The coarser English
fleeces weigh, on the average, from five to eight
pounds. When one of these bundles of wool is
opened, the locks are all found entangled and matted
together in a dense and solid mass; and they have
to be separated and loosened before any thing can
be done with them. When the workman into whose
hands the wool first falls has separated and softened
the matted locks, he begins to sort the wool into
parcels of different qualities. To do this, he must
be a most expert workman, as the process demands
the utmost nicety of touch, and very long experience.
THE STORY OF HARRY’S JACKET. 117

When I tell you that the wool-sorter will some-
times take up one lock of wool, and in the course of
a minute distribute it in fifteen compartments, each
compartment containing wool of a quality or colour
different from the rest, you will not be surprised to
hear that it takes long hours of practice before the
sorter can instantaneously, by simply passing a lock
of wool through his fingers, separate the soft fibre
from the strong, the regular from the irregular, the
soft from the rough, and the clean from the dirty.
If you or I were to take up the same lock, and pass
it through our fingers, it would be with the utmost
difficulty that we should be able to divide it into~
two sorts; whereas the practised sorter, as I have
told you, will, without hesitation, find wool of twelve
or fifteen different and distinct qualities in the self-
same lock. This is another instance of the many
useful results which are purchasable only by perse-
vering industry. As the sorter separates the vari-
ous qualities of the wool, he throws them on a wire
grating, subdivided to separate the distinct varieties,
118 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

and the dust and dirt shaken from the wool during
the sorting fall through the grating into a trough
beneath, and are afterwards sold for manure. The
wool thus sorted into distinct qualities is next
scoured in a mixture of hot water and pearlash, as
a means of removing some of the grease which it
retains from the sheep.

The first process, by which the locks of wool are
separated, and the fibres loosened one from another,
is performed by a machine called a willy, or by the
workmen, a devil. This willy is simply a number
of combs fixed in a hollow receptacle, which catch
the wool as it revolves within the machine, and tear
them open, fibre from fibre. Before, however, the
wool is submitted to this rough combing, it is oiled,
to render it soft and easy to work.

When the wool has undergone the processes I
have described to you,—that is, when it has been
sorted, scoured, oiled, and combed,—it is conveyed
at once to the spinning-room. Here the clatter of
wheels, and the rapid and intricate movements of
THE STORY OF HARRY’S JACKET. 119

machinery, will at first bewilder the stranger on his
entrance, and make the seene appear but a vast confu-
sion of cranks and wool and workmen. But should
he remain to examine and analyse the activity and
labours which go forward in the spinning-room, he
must be struck at last with the beautiful harmony
and simplicity of the means which. effect such rapid
and wonderful results. He will see young children
directing the mighty machines in their potent la-
bours, and with their tiny fingers bidding the levi-
athan to work, or cease working. In the spinning-
room the wool undergoes three processes: being’
submitted to the action of the scribbling-machine,;
the carding-machine, and the slubbing-machine. The
scribbling-machine consists of several cylinders, or
rollers, on the surface of which are innumerable points
(precisely similar to those you have seen on the roller
of a musical-box). Well, these cylinders are so.
placed, that the teeth or points of one cylinder,
while revolving, nearly touch the teeth of its neigh-
bour, so that any thing placed on the first cylinder
120 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

is caught up by the second cylinder (when the
cylinders are revolving’), and so on to the third and
fourth cylinders. This being the arrangement, a
girl takes the oiled wool by handfuls from a basket,
lays it on an apron at one end of the machine, and
spreads it as smoothly as possible over the surface.
By the motion given to this apron, the wool is carried
on to the first cylinder, where it is caught by the
teeth, and carried round till brought within the grasp
of the second cylinder, which tears it from the first,
and carries it round to the third cylinder, when it is
torn from the second cylinder; and so one cylinder,
like a rapacious neighbour, tears the wool from the
cylinder nearest to it, till at last, torn into a light
downy substance, it falls from the sertbbling-machine.

This downy layer of wool is next cast upon the
carding-machine by a girl called a card-filler; who
weighs the wool, and puts a certain weight of it on
the apron called the feeding-apron of the machine.
This process determines the thickness of the cloth,
and therefore requires great nicety in laying the
THE STORY OF HARRY’S JACKET. 121

wool equally on all parts of the surface of the apron ;
and can only be entrusted to a girl whose fingers,
by dint of long practice, have acquired a nicety of
touch almost equal to that which I have shewn you
to be necessary to the wool-sorter. The action of
the carding-machine, which is too intricate for you
to understand without the aid of a model, is to lay
the fibres of the wool in what are called pipes of
equal size. ‘These pipes are in the shape of small
skeins of thread, and are joined together by means
of the slubbing-machine, which catches the pipes,
or as they are sometimes called, cardings, at one
end, draws out a small portion, pulls out that small
portion to many times its former length, and winds
the “ slubbing” or soft twist which it has thus made
on a spindle or reel. Children, called “ pieceners,”
are employed to join fresh carding’s to the old ones
as the machine gradually consumes them; so that
the spindles become filled with an unbroken thread
of slubbing,, one ounce of wool yielding from one
to two hundred yards.
122 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

The wool has now reached that state when it is
ready to be spun into yarn for the weaver. ‘This
is done by machines called mule-spinning-machines,
which repeat the process of the slubbing-machine,
drawing out the slubbing to a thinner thread, and
then twisting it as cotton-yarn and silk are twisted,
and which process I have explained to you in the
Story of a Sash.

We now have the wool in the state of spun
yarn, and it now remains for us to follow it to the
weaver’s. Some of the yarn is for weft or cross
threads, the rest for warp or long threads. Some
of the yarn is dipped into a warm size, made of
parchment or leather cuttings, to stiffen it. The
process of weaving cloth is much the same as that
of silk and cotion; and as I trust that you have
not forgotten our Story of a Sash, I shall not weary
you by stopping to explain the matter over again.
Cloth-weaving is still generally performed by hand-
loom weavers: the steam giant has not yet relieved
cloth-weavers from their hard labours.
THE STORY OF HARRY’S JACKET. 123

In regulating the width of the cloth, attention
is paid to the remarkable shrinkage which takes
place after the weaving is completed. For instance,
a piece of cloth to be sixty inches wide when sold
to the tailor, must be woven nearly one hundred
inches wide; and the length must be allowed for
in the same proportion.

So far the manufacture of cloth has presented
no very material difference from the processes em-
ployed to adapt cotton and silk to the purposes of
man: I must now draw your attention to the mil-
ing, fulling, or felting, which the woven cloth un-
dergoes, and which gives to it its peculiar texture,
concealing the weft and warp, and presenting to the
eye a smooth, even, and silken surface. Fulling
consists in beating the fibres of the cloth until they
become so locked in each other that they appear
one solid mass. This process is performed by full-
ing-stocks, which are receptacles in which a huge
oaken hammer rises and falls with immense force,
by the power of a steam-engine. Before the cloth
124 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

is placed beneath these hammers, it is copiously
sprinkled with liquid soap ; it is then folded up into
a pile, and submitted to the action of the hammer
for the space of three entire days, being taken out
twice each day to be re-soaped. This long process
is necessary to make the fibres thoroughly interlock :
it also narrows and thickens the cloth. Itis now
scoured, and stretched out to dry.

The cloth is now in a rough state; and it under-
goes many finishing processes before being ready
for use. The chief of these are cutting and raising.
The process of raising is performed with teazle-
heads, which are rubbed sharply over the cloth, and
have the effect of raising the nap more speedily and
thoroughly than any brush that has been devised
for the purpose. This process is sometimes per-
formed by a steam-engine; and in this case the
teazle-heads are fixed upon a cylinder, and the cloth
made to pass over them.

The nap of the cloth being thus raised, it is cut,

or cropped, to produce an even surface. This used
THE. STORY OF HARRY’S JACKET. 125

to be performed with marvellous dexterity by man-
ual labour, but it is now generally effected by steam-
power. The process is simple enough; the sur-
face of the cloth being made to pass a revolving
spiral cutter, which mows the uneven surface, and
makes it smooth and even as you behold it in Harry’s
jacket. According to the quality of the cloth, the
raising and cropping are repeated more than once, so
as to produce different degrees of fineness of surface.

I have omitted to mention the dyeig’ process.
Cloth is dyed either before it is spun, or after it
comes from the weaver’s hands: in the latter case
it is called piece-dyed cloth. There are many more
processes used to perfect cloth: such as boiling it
to impart a certain glossiness; burling, or picking
it to remove dirt and other imperfections; inking
any little white hairs and fibres that may have es-
caped the action of the dye; pressing it between
hot plates and mill-board; steaming it, or passing
it over cylinders covered either with brushes or a

kind of plush, &e.
126 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

And now the cloth is ready-for the tailor: the
tailor is prepared for orders; Harry’s father gives
him directions to make Harry a jacket, and he sits
diligently to work. I shall not describe the opera-
tions of the tailor; you have all seen patterns of
dresses, and frocks, and jackets, and know how the
tailor takes his measure, and cuts his cloth to the
shape of the customer. And as for sewing, I hope
that Harry and all his companions have often, very
often, seen their sisters with needles in their hands.
Thus ends our Story of Harry’s Jacket.

And when he puts it on, let him give a passing
thought to the skill and labour of those who manu-
factured it.
va y hi
Ly i) i i Wt

Hy} ®) 7 i I it

EOD
= —



THE GLASS-HOUSE.
THE STORY OF A TUMBLER.

I HAVE promised to tell you the Story of a Tum-
bler; and, I can assure you, it is a very interesting
one. I dare say you have often seen glass-blowers,
with the gentlest breath, blow glass into all sorts of
graceful shapes; and you have, in common with
most people who know nothing of the manufacture
of this proverbially hard and unbending substance,
wondered to behold the workman bending, cutting,
and twisting it like so much paste. But I must
first tell you to what accident we are said to owe
the invention of glass. The story is marvellously
old, and very romantic. It is said that some an-
cient mariners who had a cargo of salt in their ves-
sel, having landed on the banks of the river Belus,
a small stream at the base of Mount Carmel in
Palestine, and finding no stones to rest’ their pots
128 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

on, placed under them some lumps of salt, which
being heated by the fire, mixed with the sand of the
beach, and produced a liquid, clear, and transparent
stream of glass. Be this as it may, it is very cer-
tain that the Egyptians were acquainted with the
art of glass-making for many centuries, since many
elass ornamental beads have been found on mum-
mies, which had been embalmed more than two
thousand years ago. Though the art of glass-mak-
ing has been so long known, its application to the
useful purposes of life is of comparatively recent
date. It is not lone that the poor of the country
have, in their humble dwellings, enjoyed the bless-
ings of licht. Two hundred years ago, glass was
so little used in Scotland, that only the upper win-
dows of the royal palaces were furnished with it,
the lower part having only wooden shutters to admit
or exclude the air at pleasure. Several attempts
were made in the sixteenth and seventeenth cen-
turies to introduce the manufacture of glass into
England, but without success; and it was not till
THE STORY OF A TUMBLER. 129

the latter end of the last century, that a company
was established for the manufacture of cast-plate
glass in the country. I give you this history of
the art of glass-making, because it appears to me
that all young people should be as far as possible
conversant with the progress of the arts which con-
tribute to their personal comfort; for they are likely
to be proportionately thankful for the luxuries which
they enjoy in this civilised and enlightened age,
when they are able to contrast the comfort of their
homes with the rude, dark, and cheerless abodes of
their ancestors.

Glass may be briefly described as a compound of
silex or flint, and an alkali, such as pearl-ash, barilla,
soda, &c. Iam afraid that you would scarcely be
able to understand me, if I attempted to explain to
you the chemical properties of alkalies; suffice it,
therefore, that I inform you to this extent, namely,
that pearl-ash, from which flint-glass is always
made, is a substance extracted from burnt wood,
which has the power of combining itself with silex

K
180 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

or sand; thereby forming a liquid and transparent
substance through the action of intense heat. A
very strong and long-continued heat is necessary to
purify the glass, and cast off any impurities which
may be found either in the silex or the pearl-ash.
When all these impurities have been thrown off by
the action of the intense heat, the glass or metal, as
it is called by the workmen, appears colourless and
transparent; and the temperature of the furnace is
gradually abated, when, as fast as the glass cools,
it gets thicker and thicker till it assumes the consis-
tency of paste, in which state it is used by the
blowers, it being just soft enough to yield to the
slixhtest pressure without cracking or breaking.
Throughout the wide range of manufacturing won-
ders, there is, perhaps, no process which excites so
vividly the surprise and admiration of the beholder
as that of modelling flint-glass into all the various
objects of convenience, utility, and ornament, for
which it is employed. To see a substance which,
when it is sent home in the shape of some useful
THE STORY OF A TUMBLER. 131

domestic article, is proverbially brittle, blown with
the faint force of the human breath, pulled, twisted,
cut with a common pair of scissors, and then joined
again in a moment, never fails to excite the utmost
astonishment in all who behold the operation for
the first time. Glass of every kind would be even
much more brittle than it is; so brittle indeed, as
to crack and break with the least heat or cold, if it
were not subjected, immediately after it is fashioned
into the shape it is always to keep, to the process
which is called annealing. |
Annealing consists, with respect to glass, in
heating it below the point at which it softens, in
what are called annealing ovens, which are hotter at
one end than at the other, and gradually passing
the glass from the hotter end of the ovens to the
cooler end. By this process the glass is gradually
cooled, and made as hard as you find it in the shape
of a tumbler. You have most probably noticed that
when boiling water is suddenly poured into a glass
vessel, it often cracks, or quite breaks that vessel ;
182 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

this is caused by the action of the sudden heat ab-
ruptly disturbing the particles of which the glass is
composed, and causing them to separate. ‘The pro-
cess of annealing, by reducing the temperature
round about the glass very gradually, prevents this
concussion of particles, and binds them firmly and
hardly together in one solid, compact mass.

Do you wish to recognise at a glance the mate-
rials from which the tumbler you see before you was
originally made, behold them in my sketch of the
solitary tree that rears its head in the arid barren-
ness of the parched desert, and in the plains of sand
stretching as far as the eye can reach. By the in-
genuity of man a handful of the hot desert sand
and the branch of the tree have been, as by a magi-
cian’s wand, changed to a crystal vessel as clear as
spring water.

You have read with gaping wonder of the mar-
vels wrought by fairy power, as told in the Arabian
Nights; but, children, believe me, in your own home
there are, if you would but trouble yourselves to
THE STORY OF A TUMBLER. 188

discover them, wonders far surpassing any you have
read of in fairy tales. The great book of nature is
full of wonders, which can only be penetrated and
brought to light by dint of perseverance and study.
Around you, behold the results of the laborious
pondering and labours of your forefathers! The
comforts you enjoy have all been purchased at the
price of many lives, of anxiety, trouble, and perse-
cution. The marvellous wonders of your home are
so many monuments of perseverance and martyrdom
in the cause of art or science; they are wonders
that should make you humble, thankful, and anxious
to contribute your full share towards the happiness
of your fellow-creatures. To produce this tumbler,
how many weary hours have been spent, how many
people ruined! You are accustomed to use these bril-
liant vessels daily ; well, all I ask is that you some-
times bestow a thought upon the weary workers at
the cost of whose labour you are enabled to possess
them. A tumbler, after all, is but a lump of sand
and burnt wood mixed up together: but it is also
134 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

an evidence of the power God has given to man
to adapt the simple properties of Nature, and make
them subservient to his comfort. Every day men
are able, by constantly searching after them, to find
new wonders and new powers in the bowels of the
earth, the veins of the trees, and in the gurgling
streams; he has already dug from beneath the soil,
fuel to warm him in the winter, and iron with which
to make his tools; from the veins of plants he
has extracted juices to heal him in sickness; and
he has directed the running brooks to grind his
bread by turning his mill-wheels; and then he has
cast the water into boilers, and so given birth to the
giant steam. He has for ages schooled the winds
to waft him round the world, and of late years sub-
dued the lightning to be the messenger of his wants
and wishes. These are not wonders wrought by
wicked fairies, but every-day marvels, which the
hard labour and study of those about you are con-
stantly bringing to light for your benefit ; and you
must work and strive hard, that you may be able,
THE STORY OF A TUMBLER. 185

when your turn comes, to go abroad into the world,
to contribute your part to the welfare of your fellow-
creatures. While in your youth you reap the bene-
fit of your ancestors’ toil, you must study diligently
that you may presently be able, in your turn, to
accomplish some useful work for the benefit of those
who will be children when you are old and grey.
Think of this, children, and remember the good les-
sons contained in our Story of a Tumbler. |



wes
»

ore
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137

THE STORY OF A KNIFE.

A KNIFE is perhaps, without exception, the most
useful implement used by man. The rudest savages
as. well as the most civilised nations are indebted
largely to the ancient discoverer who found that a
hard substance with a thin edge would divide a
softer substance ; that keen-edged iron divided wood,
and wood divided earth. Indeed we must have in-
herited this knowledge from our first parents, who
were sent forth to earn their bread by the sweat of
their brow. Knives have been made of wood, stone,
and iron; but in modern times those made of iron
have altogether superseded both wooden knives and
stone knives. England has long been famous for
the keenness and strength of her blades. The In-
dians roaming in the wilds of America, and the
aborigines of New Zealand, both set a high value
188 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

upon the cutlery of Sheffield, and shape their bar-
gains with Huropeans accordingly.

I need scarcely tell you that the knives which
are used at table are made of iron; that is to say,
of iron which has undergone a certain process, and
is known to most people as steel. I cannot, for it
would take up too much time, pause to describe to
you the mining processes by which iron-ore is ex-
tracted from the bowels of the earth; I will simply
tell you now, that when iron is first brought to light,
it is mixed up with a quantity of earth, from which
it is afterwards detached by the operation of smelt-
ing-furnaces, from which the pure metal runs in a
liquid state into a vessel placed to receive it, leav-
ing the earthy matter that was mixed with it be-
hind. This pure metal is rolled into bars and rods.
Steel is made by combining carbon, or charcoal, with
the iron. You may wonder to hear that it is pos-
sible to make this combination: but if you will take
the trouble to examine the plumbago in a pencil,
you will find that there is a large proportion of
THE STORY OF A KNIFE. 139

charcoal mixed up with the metal. It is, in fact,
the charcoal which marks, while the metal imparts
brilliancy to the mark. Well, then, in steel there is
a larger proportion of iron than charcoal; while in
plumbago there is more charcoal than iron. Eng-
lish manufacturers are very particular in their selec-
tion of iron for the manufacture of steel; and the
metal which they esteem most valuable for this pur-
pose is Oregund iron, which comes from Danne-
mora, in Sweden. Our finest cutlery is made from
the metal extracted from the Dannemora mine.
Nearly all the produce of this mine finds its way to
Sheffield, to be made into steel. When the iron
arrives in Sheffield, it is first taken to the steel-
works, where it is placed in a converting furnace.
This furnace contains two long troughs, each mea-
suring about twenty feet in length; and they are
so placed that an intense fire may be kept continu-
ally in contact with them, and so raise whatever
may be placed in them to a high heat. On the
bottom of each trough is strewn a layer of coarsely
140 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

powdered charcoal, then a layer of bars; then ano-
ther layer of charcoal and another of bars, and so
on till the troughs are full, when they are covered
over with a clayey substance called wheelswarf to
exclude the air, and so prevent the charcoal from
burning away. A fierce fire is then kindled, and
kept up for many days without intermission. Dur-
ing this time the iron is almost in a state of white
heat, the charcoal is equally heated, and the iron
seems gradually to absorb the particles of charcoal
into the very heart of the bar. The harder the steel
is required, the longer is this heat maintained ; and
it is necessary that the workmen should exercise
great judgment in order to make the steel of the
exact hardness demanded.

When the bars are removed from the converting-
furnace, they are called blister-steel, because their
texture is coarse and uneven. The next process is
called shearing. Shearing is performed in a tilt or
tilt-house, a building firmly built to resist the vibra-
tion caused by the heavy falls of the shearing-ham-
THE STORY OF A KNIFE. 141

mers. Within the ¢e/t-house are furnaces for heating
the blister-steel, to prepare it for the huge and mas-
sive shear-hammers. These hammers are of an
enormous size and remarkable construction, con-
sisting of a mass of iron faced with steel, with a
heavy iron-bound wooden handle, which is moved
rapidly up and down by a steam-engine. The bars
of blister-steel, before they are heated, are broken
up into pieces about a foot long. Having been
broken, they are raised to a white heat, and then
placed under the tilt-hammer, which is smaller and
less heavy than a shear-hammer, by which they are
beaten out to thirty inches in length. To change
these pieces into shear-steel, that is to say, into steel
of close particles,—half-a-dozen are piled one upon
another, and fixed firmly at one end in a groove or
handle. This group is then placed in a furnace
moderately heated,—and is afterwards transferred
to a second furnace, when a fierce fire brings it
to a white heat. The workman attends scrupu-
lously to the equalisation of the heat, as the value
142 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

of the steel greatly depends upon the nicety with
which this part of the manufacture is conducted.
When sufficiently heated, the group is taken out by
the handle, and placed under the largest or shear-
hammer, where it is beaten on all sides till it forms
one dense, solid, compact bar of steel. To effect
this, the force of the hammer’s blows must be tre-
mendous. In some cases, when the steel is required
to be of particularly fine quality, this process is re-
peated. The shear-steel thus beaten is found to
have lost all the flaws and blisters which it contained
as blister-steel. Of this shear-steel, ordinary table-
knives are made.

To make a knife, a length of steel is cut off from
a bar sufficient to make a blade, and forged, that is
to say, heated and beaten into shape ; much in the
same way as you have watched the farrier heat a
lump of iron, and beat it into the form of a horse-
shoe. Well, the piece of steel is heated in the fire,
and beaten into the form of a blade. When this has
been done, the rudely formed blade is welded by
THE STORY OF A KNIFE. 143

heat and pressure to a rod of iron, of sufficient
length to form what is called the shoulder of the
knife, and the “tang,” or part which goes into the
handle. The end of the iron is heated, and beaten
into the shape of a tang’; and the shoulder (which is
the thick part immediately touching the handle) is
next brought into proper shape by hammering’ it
into a die or stamp, called a swage. This being
finished, the whole is heated a second time, and is
further shaped. The blade is then made red-hot,
and being plunged perpendicularly into cold water,
is suddenly cooled, which has the effect of instan+
taneously compressing’ the particles of the steel more
closely together, and so hardening them; and a
gradual heating afterwards, to a certain point, gives
the “temper,” or elasticity, best fitted for the pur-
pose to which the blade is to be applied. When the
blades are thus prepared, they are ground all over
on a large revolving grinding-wheel, till the surface
is made level, the edges straightened, the point
rounded, and the edge made finer. The knives are
144 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

eround a second time upon a finer grindstone,
called the whitening-stone. In some of the larger
Sheffield houses, these grinding-stones are turned by
steam-power. Well, when the knives have been
sufficiently ground, they are ready for glazing, or
polishing. This process is performed on a wheel
called a glazer, made of a circular piece of wood,
and coated on the edge either with leather, or with
a hoop of a metal made of lead and tin mixed.
The knife is now ready to be fixed in a handle, or,
as the Sheffield people say, a haft. The manufac-
ture of hafts is a separate business. Ivory hafts for
table-knives are made by sawing up elephants’
tusks into the most useful pieces they can make, by
means of a circular revolving saw. ‘The saw cuts
the ivory into long pieces, which are afterwards
cut to the requisite shape, polished, and pierced,
for the reception of the tang by hand. Into a han-
dle so prepared, the blade is fastened with glue; and
the knife is ready for use.

You will have noticed that a table-knife goes
THE STORY OF A KNIFE. 145

through many hands before it is placed on the dinner-
table for our use. Even so far back as Chaucer’s
time, Sheffield was famous for the quality of its
cutlery ; for the poet mentions a Sheffield ¢hytal in
one of his poems. In the present time, there is
scarcely a civilised man who has not heard of the
perfection to which the manufacture of steel goods
has been brought in this wonderful hive of human
industry. Perseverance, ingenuity, and indefati-
gable labour have won the battle; and Sheffield
is now famous, through the unflagging labour of
many generations. Thus ends our Story of a Knife.








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147

THE STORY OF THIS BOOK.

AND now, my dear children, for the Story of this
Book :—the story of all books is the same; the ma-
terials and processes, at least, differ so little, that
the story of the book you hold in your hands will
give you, with some few slight exceptions, a fair
notion of the history of all.

The first person concerned in the production of
the book is the author. His labours vary much in
their nature and severity: some books are entirely
works of fiction and imagination; some contain facts,
the result of great reading ; some speculations on
scientific matters; and some are translations from
other languages, or compilations from other books.

The author having completed his manuscript,
takes it to the publisher, who arranges the matters
necessary for its production.
148 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

The paper is the first thing required for our
book: and before telling you about the modern
process by which the beautiful leaves in your book
are produced, I will say a few words about the
ingenious substitutes used by those who lived in the
darker ages, to transmit their history and laws to |
their descendants. The Egyptians, of whom you |
have read and heard, used the mner bark of a kind
of reed which grows on the banks of the Nile;
this reed is called the Papyrus, and from it we
derive the word paper.

Many materials have been used, from time to
time, for the manufacture of paper; but the best
of all has been found to be linen rag’, of which the
paper you have in your book is made; and I think
that some description of the processes by which
dirty rags of all colours and thicknesses are made
into the beautifully white substance you see before
you, will interest you much.

Linen rags are not only collected in this country
for this purpose, but also imported in large quan-


THE STORY OF THIS BOOK. 149

tities from abroad; and some of them being in a
very dirty state, the first processes, when taken to
the mill, are to cut them to pieces and wash them.
The latter is done by putting them into a large
copper with a mixture of carbonate of soda and
quick-lime; in this they are boiled for eight hours
or more, according to their quality. When cool,
they are taken to the engine-house to be reduced
into pulp. They are here placed in vats, in which
a large roller with projecting iron teeth is made to
revolve over a plate or block of wood, also provided
with teeth; and a good supply of pure water passing
through the vat,—the roller being set in motion,—
the rags are again cleansed and cut and torn by the
teeth till they are at last reduced to a pulp, which
then flows through a pipe into the bleaching-house,
and is left for a timein what is called the draming-
chest, for the superfluous water to run off.

It is then placed in stone chests and subjected
to the action of the gas called chlorine, which 1s
possessed of great bleaching properties; and after
150 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

being thoroughly acted upon by it, and all colour
removed, it is taken to an hydraulic-press, where
the liquid is pressed out. It is then again washed
by an engine like the former one, and passes through
the beating-machine, where it comes into what is
called stuff, and is ready to be made into paper.

Paper is made from the stuff by two processes.
The oldest, which I will describe first, is called
making by hand. The pulp is placed in a vat—a
stone vessel about six feet square and four deep,—
and is kept in a proper consistence by means of a
small revolving-wheel called a hog, which is kept
warm by means either of a steam-pipe or a stove.
The moulds into which the pulp is received, and
where it first assumes the character of a sheet of
paper, are of two sorts,—laid and wove.

A laid mould is a mahogany frame with wooden
bars running across it, at the distance of about an
inch and a half from each other; across these are
laid a number of wires about fifteen or twenty to
the inch, and a raised wire laid along each of the


THE STORY OF THIS BOOK. 151

cross-bars interlaces the other wires, and gives to
the /aid paper its ribbed appearance. In a wove
mould, the only difference is that its surface is co-
vered with wire cloth, wove for the purpose, and
containing from forty-eight to sixty-four wires to
‘the inch. The water-mark which you have often’
noticed in paper, when you have held it up to the
heht, is produced by wires bent to the shape re-
quired and sewn to the surface of the mould.

Both moulds are furnished with a deckle, or
movable raised edging, which prevents the pulp
from flowing over and leaving a rough edge. The
stuff in the vat being properly prepared, one of the
workmen, who is called a vat’s-man, takes one of the
moulds and plunges it four or five inches into the
vat; and taking’ up a quantity of the stuff upon it,
he raises it to a level, shaking it so as to distribute the
stuff and form a uniform fabric :—in this process,
the mould being raised, the water runs through the
wires, and the superfluous stuff escapes over the sides.
More water having been drained from it by the
152 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

mould being placed in an inclined position, the sheet
of paper is then placed on a piece of felt; and so the
operation goes on till many sheets have accumulated.
They are then taken to a press, where more water
is squeezed out; after this the paper is pressed as
many times as may be required by its quality, to
remove the impressions of the wires, and being
then sent to the lofts to be dried, it is there hung
upon hair ropes, called tribbles. The next process
is sizing’, as until that is done the paper is soft and
unfit to write on; this is done by dipping the sheets
in a hot gelatinous solution, when they are again
taken to the drymg-room. When dry, the paper is
conveyed to the salle, or finishing-room, where it is
sorted. After this it is again pressed, and then
made up into reams of twenty quires each, and once
more put into the press, where it is allowed to re-
main for ten or twelve hours. It is then packed, and
is ready for use.

But the invention of a most beautiful, though
very complicated machine has to a great extent
THE STORY OF THIS BOOK. 158

superseded the old and slow process of making by
hand:—by its means a continued flow of pulp is
kept up, made into paper, dried, polished, and each
separate sheet cut round the edges and made ready
for use. This wonderful machine is the invention of
M. Louis Roberts, and was introduced into this
country about forty years ago, and here brought to
perfection by the exertions of a few spirited indivi-
duals, who have reaped little or no advantage from it.

The operation by which the author’s writing is
multiplied, and produced in even and uniform letters
on the paper in any number of copies required, is, as
you know, called printing. Before its invention all
records, poems, or works of any kind, had to be
written and copied, and re-copied, with much labour
and a great loss of time. From this cause know-
ledge could not be diffused as it now is, and was
consequently confined to the monks and others who
possessed manuscripts, and kept them solely for
their own use, or only made such copies as they
thought fit. The invention of printing is now gene-
154 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

rally ascribed to Gutenberg of Mayence, a-city in
Germany, in the year 1441; but the origin of it
is surrounded by some mystery, arising from the
desire of the early printers to keep their art a
secret. The first printing done in England was at
Oxford, in the year 1468, but it was with wooden
types:—William Caxton introduced metal types,
such as are now used, in 1474.

I will now give you some account of a printing-
office, and the different operations carried on in it.
The size of the page and type in which the book is
to be printed having been settled, the manuscript
is placed in the hands of the overseer of what is
termed the case department, who takes it into the
composing-room and distributes it to the composi-
tors. Each compositor stands at a sort of frame,
on which are placed two cases divided into unequal
compartments, contaming the letters according to
the proportions in which they are required; for of
course you know that there are a great many more
of some letters wanted than of others. The com-


THE STORY OF THIS BOOK. 155

positor places the part of the manuscript, or copy,
as it is termed, that is given to him, on the upper
part of the case, and takes in his left hand the com-
posing-stick—a small iron or brass frame, one side
of which is movable, so that it may be adjusted to —
the width of the page required. He then, one by
one, places the letter of each word in his stick, re-
ceiving them with the thumb of his left hand. The
letters are arranged on a thin slip of polished brass,
of the same height as the type, called a setting-rule ;
which, as each line is completed, is shifted from be-
hind to receive the next. In each letter there is a
nick, which must be placed: outwards in the com-
posing-stick. A good and well-practised composi-
tor is always distinguished by the uniformity of the
spacing in his lines—the words must not be too
close together in some instances, or too far apart
in others; and this task of equalising the spaces is
often very troublesome. When the compositor has
filled his composing-stick, he lifts out the lmes by
the aid of the setting-rule, and places them in what
156 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

is termed a galley. In lifting the type, a handful,
as it is called, is occasionally broken,—in which
state it is termed p2e,— when the whole has to be
re-set. The compositors have sometimes among
them one who is termed a clicker, whose duty it is
to form into pages the type as it is set up by his
companions. When a sufficient number of pages
are made up to constitute a sheet, they are arranged
on the mposing-stone in their proper order; and a
stout iron frame, called a chase, being placed round
the whole, each page is firmly wedged between
pieces of wood or metal—to regulate the margin,—
called furniture. This is now termed a form; and
such is its compactness, that though composed of
perhaps 50,000 or more pieces, it may be moved
about with ease and security. A proof is now
pulled —that is, a single impression is taken at the
press.

It can hardly be expected but that, in the course
of composing, some mistakes will arise. It is the
duty of the reader (corrector of the press) to mark
THE STORY OF THIS BOOK. 157

these on the proof-sheet; which is then placed in
the hands of the compositor for correction, who pro- —
ceeds, with the aid of a sharp instrument called a
bodkin, to change wrong’ letters; also to insert any
words which may have been omitted, and remove
such as may have been superfluously introduced—
in which latter processes, the lines will require being
re-adjusted in the composing-stick. Sometimes the
omission of a sentence will involve the re-arrange-
ment of one or many pages. The corrections now
being completed, the reader has another proof,
termed a revise; this he compares with his jfirst- .
proof, and so ascertains that all his corrections have
been properly made. A proof is now sent to the
author, by whom it is seldom returned without many
alterations :—the process of correction and revision
has then again to be gone over. When approved
by the author, the proof-sheet is finally read, and
placed in the compositor’s hands for correction, as
a press-proof ;—then comes the press-revise, and
the labour of the compositor is ended. I must tell


158 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

you that the compositors are a very intelligent class
of men, very much more so indeed than any one
who has not had to do with them would believe ;
and the readers are often men of very superior edu-
cation, of high classical serena and great
general knowledge.

We must now go to the press-room : vidi busi-
ness here is to produce clean and well-printed sheets
from the forms prepared by the compositors. I dare
say you will think this is not a very difficult job,
and that the pressman is as much a machine as the
instrument with which he works; but this is not
the case—the pressman must have an eye for colour,
or the sheets will be of unequal blackness. Equality
of colour depends not only on the equal distribu-
tion of the ink, but on the evenness of the impres-
sion, the production of which is termed making-
ready : — these combined operations test the skill of
the workman. . Where pictorial illustrations on
wood, &c., are introduced, with the ordinary quali-
fications of the pressman must be combined an
THE STORY OF THIS BOOK. 159

eye for artistic effect, to do justice to the de-
sions.

In the process of printing, the paper having
been brought from the wetting-room, where it had
been wetted down to facilitate its receiving the ink, is
placed on a wooden stage termed a horse. The form
being made ready, and inked by means of a roller
—composed of a soft elastic substance,—a sheet is
taken from the heap by one of the pressmen and
laid on an iron frame, covered with stretched parch-
ment, termed a tympan ; at the top of this is a slight
iron frame, so far covered with paper as to protect
the margin from any ink which may have lodged
on the furniture in the process of rolling, termed a
frisket ; which being turned down upon the tympan,
and both on the form, the whole is passed beneath
the platten or pressing surface; when, by pulling
the handle of the lever, an impression on one side
is produced. In printing the second side, great
accuracy is required in the backing or register of
the pages :—in this process the pressman is aided
160 ‘THE WONDERS OF HOME.

by two small steel points fixed to the tympan, which,
in printing the first side, or white paper, pierce the
sheets, thus furnishing an index for perfecting ;
as, in working the second side, or retteration, the
sheets are replaced on the points, which indicate
the position of the pages on the first side.

There is, however, a more rapid and wonderful
mode of taking impressions from the forms :—this is
by machine-printing. If paper is made by machi-
nery with a rapidity and perfection scarcely credi-
ble, the mode of printing by steam seems almost,
from its wondrous rapidity, correctness, and equality
of colour, the work of magic:—thousands of im-
pressions are thrown off in an hour, with only a boy
to feed the machine with paper, and another to re-
ceive the sheets as they are printed. So elaborately
curious is this application of mechanism in its con-
struction, that you must see it, fully to understand
its operation.

The number required of each sheet being: printed,
the heaps are, after inspection by the press overseer,
THE STORY OF THIS BOOK. 161

passed to the hanger-up ; who, by the aid of what
is termed a peel, places the sheets on poles to dry.
This being effected, the heaps are placed in succes-
sion, according to the letters of the alphabet, termed
signatures, printed at the foot of the first page of
each sheet, on a long bench, to be gathered; lads
are employed to do this, which is an operation re-
quiring care and cleanliness. After the gathering
is completed, the duty of the collater commences.
The heap being placed before him, he, with a sharp-
pointed bodkin lifts the sheets separately, to ascer-
tain that one only of each has been taken, and that
none have been omitted. The gatherings, when
passed by the collater as correct, are folded in the
centre, and pressed by the ordinary screw-press ;
unless the sheets have, for greater smoothness, been
previously placed between glazed boards, and sub-
mitted to the far greater power of the hydraulic-
press. The books are then warehoused; ready for
delivery to the publisher’s order, which is usually
presented by the book-binder, whose duty it is to
M
162 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

prepare the book for sale, by putting it into a neat
strong cover, such as you see on this book; or some-
times in a more expensive and elegant one. Now
I will tell you something of the process by which
he does it.

If you were to see a sheet of this book as it
came from the press, you would find that the pages
do not follow one another in regular order; so that
the first thing to be done is to have the sheets
folded :—this is usually done by females, who use a
bone or ivory knife to press the folds as they are
made. The next thing is to collect the folded sheets
into a volume :—they must be placed, of course, in
proper order; this is ascertained by the segnature at
the bottom of the first page of every sheet, as de-
scribed in the account of printing. When the book
is thus placed together, it is ready for sewing:
in sewing, a kind of press is used, called a sewing-
press, which has two upright bars rising out of a
flat board, these being connected at the top by a cross-
bar ; from this bar a number of strings are drawn
THE STORY OF THIS BOOK. 163

tichtly down, and fastened at the bottom; the sheets
are laid with their backs close to the strings, having
been previously pressed, and an incision made with
a saw for the reception of each string’, or band, as it
is called; the sewer then passes the needle back-
wards and forwards through the centre fold of each
sheet, twisting the thread round each band. The
book being sewed, the next thing is the cover or
case: it consists of two parts; the board which
stiffens it, and the cloth or leather which hides the
board from sight. When cloth binding is adopted,
the case is completed before the book is placed in it:
prior to which process the book has a thin coat of
glue on the back, to strengthen it, the edges are
trimmed, and the back is rounded while the glue
is damp; after which it is lined with lmen, and
grooves being made for the reception of the boards,
it has then a final lining of paper. When bound
in leather, the boards are first fixed on the book,
and then the material is placed over them. Some
books have their edges marbled, some have them

4
164 THE WONDERS OF HOME.

sprinkled with different colours, and some have
them gilt, the edges having been first cut smooth
with an instrument called a plough; the sides and
backs are also ornamented in different ways, accord-
ing to the expense to be incurred in getting up the
volume. Our book being now ready for sale, my
task is ended. .

And now, my young’ friends, I must say fare-
well. There still remain many more Stories re-
lating to the “‘ Wonprrs oF Home” which I could
have told you, but these may suffice to awaken in
your minds an interest in the objects by which you
are surrounded, and to cause you to think of those
to whose skill and labour you are indebted for so
many comforts and pleasures.

THE END.

LONDON: PRINTED BY ROBSON, LEVEY, AND FRANKLYN,
Great New Street, Fetter Lane.


NEW, INSTRUCTIVE,

AND

Entertaining Works for the Young,

PUBLISHED BY

GRANT AND GRIFFITH,

SUCCESSORS TO NEWBERRY AND HARRIS,

CORNER OF ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD.



Good in Every Thing;

or, the early History of Gilbert Harland. By Mrs. Barwett, Author
of ‘‘ Little Lessons for Little Learners,’’ &c. With Illustrations.
Royal 16mo, price 3s. 6d. cloth; or 4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

The Doll and her Friends.

By the Author of ‘‘ Letters from Madras.’’ With Four Illustrations
by Hastot K. Browne (Phiz). Small 4to, cloth, 2s. 6d. plain ;
3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

Stories of Julian and his Playfellows ;

written by his Mamma. With Four Illustrations by Jonn ABSOLON.
Small 4to, cloth, 2s. 6d. plain; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

Tales from Catland;

written for Young Kittens by an Otp Tassy. With Four Illustrations
by Harrison WEIR. Small 4to, cloth, 2s. 6d. plain ; 3s. 6d. coloured,
gilt edges,

Every-day Things ;
or, Useful Knowledge respecting the principal Animal, Vegetable, and
Mineral Substances in Common Use. 18mo, price 2s. cloth.




2 NEW AND POPULAR WORKS
Home Amusements.

A choice collection of Riddles, Charades, Conundrums, Parlour Games,
and Forfeits. By Perer PuzzteweL, Esq. New edition. Price
2s. 6d. cloth. ‘

Tales of School Life.

By Acnes Loupvon, Author of ‘Tales for Young People,’’ with
Illustrations by Jonn Assozton, Royal 16mo, price 3s. 6d. plain;
4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

Rhymes of Royalty.
The History of England in Verse, from the Norman Conquest to the
reign of her present Majesty Queen Victoria, with an Appendix com-
prising a summary of the leading events in each reign. By S. BLewertr.
Feap. 8vo, with an elegant Frontispiece. Price 2s. 6d. cloth.

Facts from the World of Nature,

Animate and Inanimate. Part 1. Tae Eartu. Part 2. Taz WarTERs.
Part 3. ATMosPpHERIC PHENOMENA. Part 4. AnimaL Lire. By
Mrs. Loupon. With numerous Illustrations on Wood, and a beau-
tiful Frontispiece engraved on Steel. Fceap. 8vo, price 6s. cloth.

‘A volume as charming as it is useful.”—Church and State Gazette.

Glimpses of Nature,

and Objects of Interest described during a Visit to the Isle of Wight.
Designed to assist and encourage Young Persons in forming habits of
Observation. By Mrs. Louvon. Second Edition. With additional
Illustrations, and a new Chapter on Shells. 16mo, price 3s. 6d. cloth.

‘¢ We could not recommend a more valuable little volume. It is full of informa-
tion, conveyed in the most agreeable manner.”—Literary Gazette.

The Dream of Little Tuk,

and other Tales. By H. C. ANpERsEN. Translated and dedicated to
the Author by Cuar tes Boner. Illustrated by Count Poccr. Feap.
8vo, price 3s. 6d. plain; 4s. coloured.

Andersen’s Tales from Denmark.

Translated by C. Boner. With Fifty Illustrations by Count Pocci.
Small 4to, price 6s. plain; 7s. 6d. coloured.
‘‘ We prophesy for these Tales an immortality in the Nursery.”—Blackwood.






PUBLISHED BY GRANT AND CRIFFITH. 3

Fanny and her Mamma;

or, Lessons for Children. By the Author of ‘‘ Mamma’s Bible Stories.”’
In which it is attempted to bring Scriptural Principles into daily prac-
tice ; with Hints dn Nursery Discipline. Illustrated by J. Grtperr.
16mo, price 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

The African Wanderers ;

or, the Adventures of Carlos and Antonio; embracing interesting
Descriptions of the Manners and Customs of the Western Tribes, and
the Natural Productions of the Country. By Mrs. R. Lee (formerly
Mrs. T. E. Bowdich), Author of ‘‘ Adventures in Australia,’’ ‘‘ Anec-
dotes of the Habits and Instincts of Animals,’”’ &c. With Engravings.
Second Edition. Fcap. 8vo, price 6s. cloth.

‘‘ For fascinating adventure, and rapid succession of incident, the volume is equal
to any relation of travel we ever read. It exhibits marked ability as well as exten-
sive knowledge, and deserves perusal from all ages.”— Britannia.

‘‘ In strongly recommending this admirable work to the attention of young readers,

we feel that we are rendering a real service to the cause of African civilisation.”—
Patriot.

The History of a Family ;

or, Religion our best Support. With an Illustration by Joun ABsoLon,
Feap. 8vo, price 2s. 6d. cloth.

‘‘ A natural and gracefully-written story, pervaded by a tone of scriptural piety,
and well calculated to foster just views of life and duty. We hope it will find its way
into many English homes.”—Englishwoman’s Magazine.

Visits to Beechwood Farm ;

or, Country Pleasures and Hints for Happiness. Addressed to the
Young. By M. A. Catruarine Couper. Four beautiful Illustra-
tions by J. ABSoLon. Small 4to, price 3s. 6d. plain; 4s. 6d, coloured.

“Well calculated to impress upon young readers the superiority of simple and
natural pleasures over those which are artificial.”"—Englishwoman’s Magazine.

Les Jeunes Narrateurs ;

ou, Petits Contes Moraux. With a Key to the difficult words and
phrases. By Marin DE LA Voye. 18mo, price 2s. cloth.

The Pictorial French Grammar,

for the Use of Children. By Marin pe va Vore. With Eighty Il-
lustrations. Royal 16mo, price 2s. illuminated cloth.




NEW AND POPULAR WORKS FOR THE YOUNG,

4

The Wonder-Seeker ; |
or, the History of Charles Douglas. By M. F. Tytxer, Author of
‘¢ Tales of the Great and Brave,’’ &c. With Illustrations by ABsoLon.
Second Edition. Fcap. 8vo, price 4s. 6d. cloth; 5s. 6d. coloured,
gilt edges.

‘¢ Books such as this are always delightful.” —A theneum.

The Celestial Empire ;
or, Points and Pickings of Information about China and the Chinese.
By the Author of ‘‘ Paul Preston,’’ ‘‘ Soldiers and Sailors,” &c. With
Twenty Engravings. Fcap. 8vo, price 6s. cloth; 6s. 6d. gilt edges.
‘¢ This very handsome volume contains an almost incredible amount of informa-
tion.”—Church and State Gazette.

Karly Days of English Princes.
By Mrs. Russett Gray. Dedicated by permission to the Duchess
of Roxburghe. With Illustrations by Joun Franxuin. Small 4to,
price 4s, tinted plates; 5s. coloured, cloth. ;
. - — cannot too highly recommend its elegant style and moral tone.”—Brighion
azetie.

The Silver Swan.
A Fairy Tale. By Madame de CuATexatn. Illustrated by Joun
Leecu. Small 4to, price 3s. 6d. plain; 4s. 6d. coloured,
‘‘ The moral is in the good, broad, unmistakeable style of the best fairy period.”—
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Bible Scenes ;

or, Sunday Employment for very little Children. By the Author of
‘¢ Mamma’s Bible Stories,’’ and ‘‘ Short and Simple Prayers for Chil-
dren.’’ Consisting of Twelve Coloured Illustrations on Cards, and
the History written in Simple Language. In a neat Box. Price
3s. 6d.; or dissected as a Puzzle, price 6s. 6d.

First Serres: HISTORY OF JOSEPH.

Seconp Series: HISTORY OF OUR SAVIOUR.

Turrp SEries: HISTORY OF MOSES.

Fourtu Series: THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.

*,* The Illustrations bound with the Letterpress, 3s. col. ; 2s. 6d. plain.



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'2011-11-14T16:12:35-05:00'
redup
'1403615' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDN' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
ab915756939e5f56a353a4ae9469caf9
f6e0ab9130565c505a6d529542d5ff0fbac1f028
'2011-11-14T16:14:38-05:00'
describe
'28732' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDO' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
bedfec0ab35b7da10821ec607c1ca933
44727103fb37be36cd50b13cd09c144447d06e26
'2011-11-14T16:18:49-05:00'
describe
'518' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDP' 'sip-files00001.pro'
dde5e0d513a2f18d0f8c6804fe98990f
a2c097a0094883b06d092db94c17087dd972be6e
'2011-11-14T16:18:41-05:00'
describe
'9025' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDQ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
19ac7b541f9dfb6f39a20de7a3d1fc74
2bde95e7144873adae090aa154bb76a93204f02c
'2011-11-14T16:20:04-05:00'
describe
'11612500' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDR' 'sip-files00001.tif'
6d7cebc691d826e735dab88c6f60bd7c
79e04b2fee61a9b3a10767e24437ed2b48c9d54d
'2011-11-14T16:18:34-05:00'
describe
'36' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDS' 'sip-files00001.txt'
5dafa624477fb942e0aabe540d89649d
75f9330bbfb9463887abe894336526083503fab2
'2011-11-14T16:14:43-05:00'
describe
'3002' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDT' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
b6e77147c110f6eb505d7331a554569b
33a868289dab546ff10196381300882f18297bd4
'2011-11-14T16:15:48-05:00'
describe
'1243243' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDU' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
60154b231efc88eeaceb26b12540721f
a691a65298f528c4f54686cc25e9de767f2492cc
'2011-11-14T16:16:14-05:00'
describe
'17966' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDV' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
6b63152dcea4f8250173fae31089ac67
00d72db8285b536909780e708be047e777153ca0
'2011-11-14T16:17:29-05:00'
describe
'333' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDW' 'sip-files00002.pro'
d7eb55ba7b5da3edf5411476422752c5
98b544bdf5c9bf1c67fdd15f4f93aeaae51a1995
'2011-11-14T16:16:12-05:00'
describe
'4676' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDX' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
93ed07571696f848729b9b027a8eb9e5
9963658b56625b283db439c46eaa16e6383a1e18
'2011-11-14T16:14:25-05:00'
describe
'11044725' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDY' 'sip-files00002.tif'
bddbddc0dc1153e753c9952645282923
2e0a69577b5615793012a30951965b4f2eea13e4
'2011-11-14T16:13:45-05:00'
describe
'10' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXDZ' 'sip-files00002.txt'
9c2a77e0911563804fe65dac66a9eb39
c39b178d16d3624ec2f62a9ac692783c8347a44a
'2011-11-14T16:13:09-05:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEA' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
28d7dca5614ff29c7c4df466a9ebb30d
740af48ae075886dcea891eee52e0d7289bae255
'2011-11-14T16:15:11-05:00'
describe
'1138073' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEB' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
80c529055730e369340fdb920085bae3
f96d95ee32a5debbae4793e61aec97e29e62f6fd
'2011-11-14T16:14:07-05:00'
describe
'18242' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEC' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
7c6c7b267f9a2ed41f09a51886d3ab84
2088fca894b295d89e922094c814e6ec6622eace
'2011-11-14T16:12:47-05:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXED' 'sip-files00003.pro'
2097cfdbcecb4c455fa71f07feb08187
d5f44e4d6600f9cafddd7363578e50a69e140fa1
'2011-11-14T16:19:02-05:00'
describe
'4907' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEE' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
d9510997a0391582e11b852041ad0cd0
d7bb2b94339e301c2b55846e3d8cb1d1ad82b48e
'2011-11-14T16:19:04-05:00'
describe
'10511813' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEF' 'sip-files00003.tif'
6cdbb3b0a89cb506cc68adacca2a6629
2bd0c602eb02bbc3ca984994cf563497caa726e1
'2011-11-14T16:14:02-05:00'
describe
'114' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEG' 'sip-files00003.txt'
26b0d24c68375b14abd170fde5e0814f
bf56024dffcff140899f55ff4108bd4b145d28c9
'2011-11-14T16:14:37-05:00'
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEH' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
bd77aac314e13850b0843fd53a11dc7d
8fbb000a00c671838250bf25e6d1f6c0af187f4a
'2011-11-14T16:16:13-05:00'
describe
'1060353' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEI' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
784b02cc0246d99862f7e03302297928
3fd1e21f3d4f84061236ae2dcc26b43b7ff3f48e
'2011-11-14T16:13:57-05:00'
describe
'25379' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEJ' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
e231505b82356570258937e71b447b86
63016d93498174dfe1da47d670282591968f51ae
'2011-11-14T16:17:45-05:00'
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEK' 'sip-files00004.pro'
d93a7b5d0d766fcbe226cf65b005b9d0
ab57adc8d5f73960cf7aaa2371c313d788a0d0a0
'2011-11-14T16:17:04-05:00'
describe
'7353' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEL' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
b563f112d6fb704778fc0bc2ddcb2e68
9a4470a313232ae41f30c61117b5f2b74ba40c94
'2011-11-14T16:17:58-05:00'
describe
'9458251' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEM' 'sip-files00004.tif'
7364db10e3561579d58917bad556bbb1
3181854cce325033aee833deebe001b41a2b89d0
'2011-11-14T16:18:40-05:00'
describe
'55' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEN' 'sip-files00004.txt'
f521fa97df5efdda6f10c5a4437112f1
0381c0f527b64bb460808952286c6bf157dec9e7
'2011-11-14T16:13:43-05:00'
describe
'2041' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEO' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
ad26ec32e103967e6433ad455c7463b8
c216df9cc0f81ab8f696bf47b8a49cf2cab81205
'2011-11-14T16:18:59-05:00'
describe
'1303689' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEP' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
22ca48bfe0b521a5f50b56f8acef922a
fe138362618076d7a9ebbccade0824afa9339452
'2011-11-14T16:18:04-05:00'
describe
'72639' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEQ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
58fd4f8820f8e22c60c3bbb251ddecc0
471f7eb0ebdfea8db144fb62add23440be3676f5
'2011-11-14T16:13:55-05:00'
describe
'3180' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXER' 'sip-files00005.pro'
5cfadf3bb44fa6be740ce36ca3f0b91a
e390e898014c19215cf6a4f98bb672561654e009
'2011-11-14T16:15:10-05:00'
describe
'20232' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXES' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
a72d66827b07b4ed3692bbb1ff4ca6cb
d5077950976a029ed8bb9ef49b1c0a5cec82d177
'2011-11-14T16:12:46-05:00'
describe
'10440996' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXET' 'sip-files00005.tif'
0661bf9d0c096c9cd03e4ecb8900e9b4
cf43bd80bfaba0687d8a1667879a916fe615d634
'2011-11-14T16:13:33-05:00'
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEU' 'sip-files00005.txt'
f79288186e22fac042411a36229f1a7f
a12c45f4b1b8c220274ccb32e6a40b23d6d2ec2d
'2011-11-14T16:18:54-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'5364' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEV' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
c8dfb8d254032223ab27b0b3877b8cc4
7c564a3f4409d8ce8ccb600b3bf63a9fd9d0d7a0
'2011-11-14T16:18:43-05:00'
describe
'1245813' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEW' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
268a16e073dc37fd50768872dfdb345d
5c40a2d4e3336283d06cea3da571b518355744ee
'2011-11-14T16:17:20-05:00'
describe
'33195' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEX' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
35785bc6d07938ae5c8a3adae279fde1
bf416fb47c7ca32b50db92227d531c58b19ce041
'2011-11-14T16:13:17-05:00'
describe
'5334' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEY' 'sip-files00006.pro'
920d23d113c15f5f98ad478b20e9fa4a
0944555f508ae32c3bb2d3e0b0a8bf6ab81934d8
describe
'9282' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXEZ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
8d7436f9839005243ca9338216e6545c
0f6c11d2997d28c2b40d5be10ed4974952cc763c
describe
'9976259' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFA' 'sip-files00006.tif'
2d337985cb776d2c1c4ffc92fd381572
370dd5b1a35675b27237e491349a29cfad5e3e9b
'2011-11-14T16:20:09-05:00'
describe
'283' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFB' 'sip-files00006.txt'
e4869ee95f49f082ab6180fa95e45b4d
843751ad9046bb6c86f1bbf652dd1ba3c13bf2ac
'2011-11-14T16:14:13-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2824' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFC' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
e3b5f304826860cdb52ed7385b79e942
6faaa1c6daa308bd026ed8591e858466b20f6eae
'2011-11-14T16:17:35-05:00'
describe
'1242017' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFD' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
0695407773520434056c81f3822fb207
ed080850663fdcff471fe04f5a903fa72b0e84b2
'2011-11-14T16:12:54-05:00'
describe
'43925' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFE' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
b1f7ec741b33855aae59caae1c3acbba
4e466bbb9a494c9af326eafc3b58fa7e0c90bfd5
'2011-11-14T16:14:22-05:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFF' 'sip-files00007.pro'
7c1baa32ba4fcc63e109cc5b3e6f28e5
8789cb4c1422c1984803c54ed0f30db8cb7bb76a
'2011-11-14T16:18:30-05:00'
describe
'12119' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFG' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
8d4a29785c22469ab7e6a1d8e28b88bd
d213f537cdb5627d31c7275608923c5700910494
'2011-11-14T16:14:35-05:00'
describe
'9950295' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFH' 'sip-files00007.tif'
4a12cdb7305305728d368141b7f47a62
8c7f22235c0c774fada7818caca17ab8d9f275bc
'2011-11-14T16:13:48-05:00'
describe
'281' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFI' 'sip-files00007.txt'
e27df891159e59b2dbae37c1ed08647f
887ebfd1946d3c5c46646263ca4eea65efa0540d
'2011-11-14T16:13:16-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3423' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFJ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
d5df7c46009354d4f3b57cb94061e5db
e68e8070c1ef22f4f9fadb7b921268c0ff3104e2
'2011-11-14T16:14:42-05:00'
describe
'1226961' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFK' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
7dfa0a471b22761c7f7ae0d68f931f6b
062443f43f6bd14df93c598114325ba57fb9a10c
'2011-11-14T16:17:03-05:00'
describe
'35233' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFL' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
be81ce0fbe8c627a8f74e466e494978d
26816bf4f46bd08c6773391274a85c4cd0945e97
'2011-11-14T16:14:48-05:00'
describe
'5589' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFM' 'sip-files00008.pro'
df7eab8dfe95ee496df95163a5990210
c7138d961e737978463251cdae75c531867d1d3b
'2011-11-14T16:16:31-05:00'
describe
'11374' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFN' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
e21cfd0a6f8bacd1c7d8bca40bb277f5
33281e5973bda85e1886dda97a386a63650b74b4
'2011-11-14T16:19:20-05:00'
describe
'9935611' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFO' 'sip-files00008.tif'
51dc922de855502f95e8755f0bcb0d10
7a89d8afea1695c7d8855b1f5201af945ff0e1af
'2011-11-14T16:13:27-05:00'
describe
'334' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFP' 'sip-files00008.txt'
4e0ba5598839c9be473a992b2e56f453
ca35775ffcc2ae0df5e503e816f52ad52a4d4b45
describe
'3647' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFQ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
296f1be9d0ea6807844a49b06a8d0447
fe537cbf84ff7ebf0275f54519c858534d7406e8
'2011-11-14T16:19:28-05:00'
describe
'864076' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFR' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
5a27e9b8a1bcb8dc68a0f5c3bc4d0d06
db2c543d17402235616fc4d4e0039b51c9460a7b
'2011-11-14T16:19:05-05:00'
describe
'12171' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFS' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
552027d7ff99e56604ac3b21f4abb21a
e08228a7037b4a75a4d7e328835702a07b5407b3
'2011-11-14T16:19:23-05:00'
describe
'769' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFT' 'sip-files00009.pro'
d2f2e64c8aa0edef56c19d7130e12e9f
14e9e126f8916923b52d02a8fa274374d0fceeaf
'2011-11-14T16:17:07-05:00'
describe
'3411' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFU' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
df60e8fd9cc16025869e96621f9dd52c
6aba73aa018e741dd39d238b65342094ce4f1385
'2011-11-14T16:19:53-05:00'
describe
'9935431' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFV' 'sip-files00009.tif'
c9af064424450a6d47076cf756d02036
4af5a9513e10c540551d664a59933524e6341007
'2011-11-14T16:12:42-05:00'
describe
'404' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFW' 'sip-files00009.txt'
c48ebc73ac08a870d61f558129905ac4
a9881c2246701da3538a8b420d437446f7d85be4
'2011-11-14T16:13:08-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFX' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
168393a6700303c55a63eacdc8d4f5a2
115fbbd956f212c198e4919833e126f3d35b0aa2
describe
'1278954' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFY' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
2cb55d9ed225f7e80697bd53582b83df
741a142350dc9ed5bd347467a648fbbfafd2bab3
describe
'62978' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXFZ' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
6050fbd1c5a124b54b34957eedd65b46
9b07f6fb0ece575f31e250300630ada51b4805e5
'2011-11-14T16:14:14-05:00'
describe
'17221' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGA' 'sip-files00010.pro'
90a2168ea317f20ccfa4f03610aac0ab
8cef3d3c8632e18c2f0891a1e72bc93066867aac
'2011-11-14T16:12:55-05:00'
describe
'22864' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGB' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
7ae8bf9a74abe4117b9a3058abbd959d
70c1eaa533fe1ef6be4fdf61c900ab4eb127e1a3
'2011-11-14T16:13:38-05:00'
describe
'10243900' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGC' 'sip-files00010.tif'
8f9dbe15d04bcba3adf5eac82c2e2209
9f5963d8ca3a94b20d4bde9f04b1adb3d9a8d2f7
describe
'688' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGD' 'sip-files00010.txt'
06d55af9e27f8db24654d41a927fbcc1
7515e26a1f0e9256b4ac63b7f731c5783897ad56
'2011-11-14T16:14:55-05:00'
describe
'6613' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGE' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
f3c52345aaeac5a2438e2f03fc8ef382
45b603c9f7004ff9e900018814e7921197a609d7
describe
'1500862' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGF' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
707f7788a86000321e1449fb87fdf6dd
965ed9ddaf2a7da6f6b857fd2727005e8898ce13
'2011-11-14T16:14:36-05:00'
describe
'61682' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGG' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
241feaae33d580cb6f342039bd431550
2cb02c7998947aa844c396931474668e4bb0fd99
'2011-11-14T16:15:04-05:00'
describe
'19572' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGH' 'sip-files00011.pro'
bc870491d097b6bfb91cd7bb8e2f9802
e7d4e277a90a123524acdfc77916cd1bd065287f
describe
'22514' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGI' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
de261bb526352c509dc445bcdaf0cba6
c6096b3a0c4b927f5e61b3093d85a364ca0b0bf7
'2011-11-14T16:20:12-05:00'
describe
'12019500' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGJ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
79d569473208e3adadd6ccd907076f90
ef08573773d4b01bbeae3d1eb0ed6a476cd2e424
'2011-11-14T16:15:09-05:00'
describe
'766' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGK' 'sip-files00011.txt'
391947b8b1cebc5084f21f32a1593b2b
17cd9bfc9c582a63b9bc3844b240447417e6f0d1
'2011-11-14T16:12:40-05:00'
describe
'6123' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGL' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
4bd56262d503bd9c75ce87159bbb3cb8
2e75ee587f7b4e3c89fc03790dbd8d555bceb999
'2011-11-14T16:14:04-05:00'
describe
'1075095' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGM' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
0c44c177d87cd1c41f72b58aeea20c7c
ed5118f1345ac18b10f607b9b8bc62cb63767adc
'2011-11-14T16:15:13-05:00'
describe
'34040' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGN' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
2440cbe03c1214423c2d8aba49cafd8f
dbe37ca7a8999220979b217d195138c2f3aa6ff5
'2011-11-14T16:16:08-05:00'
describe
'10172' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGO' 'sip-files00012.pro'
a8c0bd144bf3fa0540325ddfb0eedb96
0a2169b2f2eff2b2eba2f005b980e3bf6e941270
'2011-11-14T16:14:09-05:00'
describe
'12507' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGP' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
d91989d52bbec0d5b6633658e3f09bf8
f99532ea849214e6296b0d0207a57010ef310633
'2011-11-14T16:16:38-05:00'
describe
'9760707' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGQ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
be784ece55df63ef32f974bbdd96c74f
42c9280d770b4b1fdc7758ab5d79e0eec8765b26
'2011-11-14T16:20:24-05:00'
describe
'544' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGR' 'sip-files00012.txt'
e9b7cb0aad6f9a0a93436394564c2769
9786b379ae2d00cc3135bedc4f504734638dc54f
'2011-11-14T16:13:32-05:00'
describe
'4035' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGS' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
2ea788dedcb8e002b3dc08d30d2a4796
2907072113fd9e1d15aa997ec8ed6a7c60284907
'2011-11-14T16:17:55-05:00'
describe
'1000521' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGT' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
ecb6c78ccf5dfa77e7ea1bc2d93a1419
11d520925f83904731719b41c79d24bf402fa5bc
'2011-11-14T16:15:51-05:00'
describe
'15200' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGU' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
87e6b9fe3ab7bc81565be80f2e33a084
f93594516d55046cf059ef066cc2e25992ff5e66
'2011-11-14T16:15:56-05:00'
describe
'4095' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGV' 'sip-files00013.pro'
e8b468f74517a9b64969a1183b1e9533
9a5f647f606a1f588075e053ec7cf2c380fabfd6
'2011-11-14T16:15:20-05:00'
describe
'4389' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGW' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
d35be548136e84122933fb9c301f035b
92ec08a98d8edb2f1cb08ce68e592123ea1ddefa
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGX' 'sip-files00013.tif'
3cf49230d5f0b1426b2450e9dc956d10
41b40c279c321d3eeeecdca1b7a017d427180c04
'2011-11-14T16:16:32-05:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGY' 'sip-files00013.txt'
db0ce4cf4f4265db13d45d95bfc9d07a
76a6a25af3aca209065acc65dbd0a27a07185800
'2011-11-14T16:13:37-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXGZ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
0610096addaa2b02f2b2517e9d867ed1
9258911ce93ca0436634b7d8f6ada45c626b01a1
'2011-11-14T16:19:17-05:00'
describe
'1274026' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHA' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
0cea53656591dc2d67d5bbba5f2522ef
fe3ae7f5328c45acb2df5ce76db9919a2ea0d192
'2011-11-14T16:14:03-05:00'
describe
'59145' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHB' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
eaef88f9719828c32fb8aa6c6f19b3d8
6b2050029d86c958eb1bfe4188fc0cd8ae3a4439
describe
'18014' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHC' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ab7458be0c38b7c99d4a514ff1709eeb
08aa672853a7e7616234a20a8dbad304c7647e6d
'2011-11-14T16:16:10-05:00'
describe
'22267' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHD' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
acfb5854329ac175a075122cf6ee47d9
b23e77682c0e3023e5d07647d8dc4b6cdf27caa0
'2011-11-14T16:19:48-05:00'
describe
'10204288' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHE' 'sip-files00014.tif'
2c6744033b09056fd650fc9a93dcbc36
f34f70b1de232a2e857643ccf673cddaa7a3b922
'2011-11-14T16:12:41-05:00'
describe
'811' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHF' 'sip-files00014.txt'
61e93f3e9bd7ee402784a110c22776cc
3dd5e3a6a8cc8ce8bda64f1c49905bb795e407a9
'2011-11-14T16:18:14-05:00'
describe
'5982' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHG' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
61d067a98295f4a6c131da34f49be60c
345e9e879ca1a44a94697a00790b80df9d7bf71d
'2011-11-14T16:19:57-05:00'
describe
'1254613' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHH' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
16ad3f93016f101f3d5c2002cbd16cac
390185275d7ef45b750b13695154fae5f374b2cd
'2011-11-14T16:15:05-05:00'
describe
'91792' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHI' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
09b80ba75d26ac52fd9cf5d7d8371dd4
3e1233e22dd5ffdd3f54dd207bfbd25fcad87ba1
'2011-11-14T16:14:27-05:00'
describe
'28376' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHJ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
a5dad92fdb53ca44b98eba3320d82163
2768c4c8917e56ab654451bd39987b827c6bc6e0
'2011-11-14T16:19:13-05:00'
describe
'30611' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHK' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
023322ce1949d19ee9ba81c09ddb80ca
99ff3cb352115ee5b0b8d7792aabf861e15be714
'2011-11-14T16:18:56-05:00'
describe
'10046403' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHL' 'sip-files00015.tif'
8c76b323de24802505c0a7a34b37bc25
ca93f987dcc6f9e6f4286be52c446e638c430738
'2011-11-14T16:17:22-05:00'
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHM' 'sip-files00015.txt'
ca1ed0c61d8d76cec964d1a4e80ed0c4
14bbec0082b6ce571fe0baef49a922ffcc39a57d
'2011-11-14T16:16:05-05:00'
describe
'8826' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHN' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c77097564824a577d22183f457930106
cd4d89044bde9496ccaf12d401559a4e7e1600dc
'2011-11-14T16:14:59-05:00'
describe
'1309503' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHO' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
c8a149968b9763bdeae0bd56ab2e9b83
0781ae5f41a44850c4d1a0471fe03a07cb31d494
describe
'83587' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHP' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
acd0777717098557b74380b7c72c639b
01fa9eff3b37929317225433cf68e7d1f43a4c70
'2011-11-14T16:12:56-05:00'
describe
'25519' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHQ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
72251939f72fdd4a201822ebae1f4a26
c86bbf143106131ebf271ad5b0b3ec90d568a38c
'2011-11-14T16:19:38-05:00'
describe
'28737' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHR' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
592172687192f9dab5db5e450cf1e53d
62654b9d44f46d770a428741f3c24f6abc95c78a
'2011-11-14T16:15:58-05:00'
describe
'10489572' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHS' 'sip-files00016.tif'
404e2966afd90b69cab7fb07d3379f0b
92d436e1e1ee7dc4d546cbe8f5d90b344ed88a7c
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHT' 'sip-files00016.txt'
4f8b3a8476c9144ef84b0b8dac74989d
39cddc714e2269843421828c0f3086d918416939
'2011-11-14T16:18:50-05:00'
describe
'7795' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHU' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
188e416619d44e46308e48bd65526851
0ca5dd11dbde1009eaeffb66cb2800f45e3364c1
'2011-11-14T16:18:39-05:00'
describe
'1350673' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHV' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
fcdfbf89988a85f23f2ccc9f9de1682f
b4899fe6628ddcd65098909dc12a5b2bbc9fb9f2
'2011-11-14T16:13:13-05:00'
describe
'77297' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHW' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
ad2901ed722936542c8de54a64ae447c
77f351a40b74d1e47d1b947b5697833b6bcaec68
'2011-11-14T16:18:23-05:00'
describe
'25455' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHX' 'sip-files00017.pro'
1fce474d8696d4bef1aebb054dcc60d2
e2a75ce535cf624d4bcbd9982ea986afee0f2db3
describe
'27953' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHY' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
c2f8d6cf67ae7876fe737b470736c450
e80180d7550c231bfc083c106c903c8235fcaee0
describe
'10818600' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXHZ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
f44b8b9fd95bf8ade8bb086436c527ff
99e55bafcabf218d24227a6662c000786b107331
'2011-11-14T16:17:30-05:00'
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIA' 'sip-files00017.txt'
84b98c211926b7846442e83a522ce392
230877702589429a7e3e3e826b025054f8132195
'2011-11-14T16:17:25-05:00'
describe
'7211' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIB' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
5c279512eed5ff70cf93b3f103f7e01f
284e0b181df8d5026a5766328300eee1d7ed8c7b
'2011-11-14T16:14:40-05:00'
describe
'1318290' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIC' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
6df9b4e639d27e2b6244cdc0db444a7e
28f7c7e834f82911ae925fc3b28fc9e18ee69256
'2011-11-14T16:17:49-05:00'
describe
'89092' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXID' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
2983a91b6f132a263c89e4ab8ce8e845
2618b94352c12a584c1a678e7a1c0d5bb3c354e3
'2011-11-14T16:18:12-05:00'
describe
'28794' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIE' 'sip-files00018.pro'
9882daa34aa647ae95464b7dd1ce8555
e4a316da6b2765d8c221ce5927f4e3313bf152e2
'2011-11-14T16:15:16-05:00'
describe
'31484' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIF' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
4998df3fdc6258d3ca6d8e0dfd596899
885837497b0a38f99246e539ae33c8f702aaa4b5
'2011-11-14T16:13:04-05:00'
describe
'10560100' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIG' 'sip-files00018.tif'
16b4eab16c624399fd3432cd1a2693b7
95e1a32fe2fc7dac5360e269b9de44510947d80c
'2011-11-14T16:19:15-05:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIH' 'sip-files00018.txt'
c775b37b74e84ece6d8baf2c35900df2
79f7c90e94d0f7481ab47c1ad7cb5039c284cdde
'2011-11-14T16:13:44-05:00'
describe
'8221' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXII' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
79b00d7af9459dda83127448b1bf439a
28fd45dfce8d23c48a9be85c0629f7733a5b66fa
'2011-11-14T16:13:19-05:00'
describe
'1378563' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIJ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
be9490f31fe48f4a538fa232ea8bde4e
9815887c7db43681f6708aaf0cd82230f6cdc070
describe
'86587' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIK' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
21d37821f2c4ff8578f32ecea669108f
f9e1b5656628495ad9aee1c7fefffcecda8ca656
'2011-11-14T16:19:45-05:00'
describe
'29231' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIL' 'sip-files00019.pro'
6d545f5796fc9952cbe8d1e5dd945591
8e02c655c0d848188aea8c4acd17a32ea018d914
describe
'29512' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIM' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
43a32a2c2dc9c6550cda4c8ac282398e
9301d3121101cdd48e6d1501078a5110c2ed341a
'2011-11-14T16:17:13-05:00'
describe
'11042288' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIN' 'sip-files00019.tif'
d99051e17c47b9f30104e5c4f0241e49
0a84a911c3fffadad076cd76455b3f5492d3bef0
'2011-11-14T16:16:19-05:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIO' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4b26d72640a77164389d3afa65b36b92
7da1ca95859e393a9f53a27cb27b3bba59446fc7
'2011-11-14T16:15:36-05:00'
describe
'8038' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIP' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
0784f8fe2d3e0fea1618388665de1909
5f74d87a31686d98d0dd1a1f83a76a86ef451ea9
'2011-11-14T16:15:19-05:00'
describe
'1271880' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIQ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
66dace1c211edd1346952d193e3cc867
a35b71d1ef0796491c3effcf11e63a093929bca6
'2011-11-14T16:14:49-05:00'
describe
'86131' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIR' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
7f8d5f29e3eeb65df19ef75f007521f5
1dfd198c3bfbfdb4335a7b6d547485954b02fde6
describe
'27837' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIS' 'sip-files00020.pro'
e51e8ed616ab943be276d2bb25af3fb5
92844ab9922a837e855bd4e232887f005a0813c7
'2011-11-14T16:15:43-05:00'
describe
'30790' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIT' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
0e7bba7b1afc073881b44957a69f4f9f
5838dd0f0372857e9d9417ac6b1b429bcbb2e14d
describe
'10189361' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIU' 'sip-files00020.tif'
defdac387746b78391c6364f43e6020a
3b89467de9478a9b3997ccb90e1dad66600c9d05
'2011-11-14T16:15:38-05:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIV' 'sip-files00020.txt'
f013e87e91dc3b3910eded6ea264e134
f9298f18e8319a52911b1d5cdc093f4ecf47e878
'2011-11-14T16:13:49-05:00'
describe
'8385' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIW' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
fb096ced858574e5815d0361485618d7
308345b9be03b9fcb6c5f0e875df189a43eb7965
'2011-11-14T16:13:21-05:00'
describe
'1405518' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIX' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
09bfdd1e0c2a525d9be736ce0735168a
af2fccd41b3313c3a7738d8e2a2e514658e5bd44
'2011-11-14T16:19:26-05:00'
describe
'83424' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIY' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
d40f325de36d70843fd9985c8636937b
76ba05ff8e6f262aca44725c4795bf98f172375c
describe
'28986' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXIZ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
253080491b7b1880a8fd30c3f286368d
0b288f702c7f917b73423198a34b168e68b6b2a0
describe
'29096' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJA' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
b2e8f028ca8d036f24c6346aeb47659c
2343920d8045b0e1068d8c2c6d3ee32d88c7f361
describe
'11257696' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJB' 'sip-files00021.tif'
b15c4a61d5e853f8d502013aec002143
a2bb7f9d352f559638b94ba80cacb8cd86b3cc8c
'2011-11-14T16:19:22-05:00'
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJC' 'sip-files00021.txt'
e854eaeccef1d9e66c13b0bc7b9deef5
70dff18eca3d54469362c1ef2d202abc644f015d
'2011-11-14T16:14:20-05:00'
describe
'7375' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJD' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
abd7804bcb45354783bbcf179c2bcd24
f9f8de7fcc3d7ee09fed368720aa9653a4ba6bc2
'2011-11-14T16:16:00-05:00'
describe
'1271881' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJE' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
cc5297fdad80b32870382f6ebacc1ea5
19278449bb5e52c8f2d40119592e5dbb34ab0da1
'2011-11-14T16:16:23-05:00'
describe
'86884' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJF' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
fed176476f0c48c3b92fed8c3e214eaf
8f42895fd2cb5c0f26e9feaae196642004db8e26
describe
'27780' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJG' 'sip-files00022.pro'
fe75a16203fae285dde5a07354970ed3
9dfdfec195534a88cf9db05a74e07c11d4a8075a
describe
'30999' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJH' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
6803dbc63dc3fcad593a892160df9ce1
87bd688ad29dff8ce20dd284b7c8e92515b89433
'2011-11-14T16:15:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJI' 'sip-files00022.tif'
a323dcd01d37ef07ac6a4e197e5f374c
d58c458a0332541502974780fd74c853a9bc9935
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJJ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
cf67ea378834b8418187965d8d7f1ab0
6fc1e5409126f673f907483d4528492ffba17e50
'2011-11-14T16:18:58-05:00'
describe
'8437' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJK' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
7efdc36da2dcee89d33fbb195943276a
7e66942d30fd079b0fca325764df51a2a9251b7d
'2011-11-14T16:13:05-05:00'
describe
'1401183' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJL' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
24227680357010414afd6fdbe1e2cca4
6f1a6de62711d35ab82fc3292c8e0d03641e8696
'2011-11-14T16:17:48-05:00'
describe
'81972' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJM' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
1a6012b8117b8fd3931b44a07ee17ec4
a10c95a598b9e19b36181ccd2abea7d6d2f62908
describe
'28183' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJN' 'sip-files00023.pro'
b10dcae2118c197f3165846077d5991a
2ad9a2bc31dadd3374f2f88c282333587b9db11f
describe
'29235' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJO' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
9c45195e93c4c56081d459e6c3e077a1
af8c190fe7d9acaa349f416cee4ddd86756f8dc1
'2011-11-14T16:13:15-05:00'
describe
'11223356' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJP' 'sip-files00023.tif'
4d51efe514141b926159956e44cb8496
c5848b6b4e3eb1da211e3f15ba29da35c592d7a4
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJQ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
06679bfd28b6a63fab826ded2c273430
08b49ace3e42a0763ea2ac6bdeda63841459095a
'2011-11-14T16:20:33-05:00'
describe
'7940' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJR' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
3df12d82e95a64e991feb797a0a75b57
d6c5639d05f3302912d7ddd5899829574a4f07a4
describe
'1314087' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJS' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
47343b8f25a737e942e609fabdddb6cc
6f96326fb5e7d6f59d943b872b55c351fb1a4714
describe
'88801' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJT' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
787f0e6ccf82ab4f2cf40247e7267c08
975fdee433452ce37133fe14b5fe52a947ed3e2b
describe
'28640' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJU' 'sip-files00024.pro'
f35b11f55bf93f00336d600d8f702304
c4d9c83a8144f82a5dd94b6058cc1229eb151406
'2011-11-14T16:15:27-05:00'
describe
'31875' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJV' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e1a1e1d0c438fc245e907f987ecc9421
e665642d04d26506d936cbcfa3dc21c18655f3f8
'2011-11-14T16:14:32-05:00'
describe
'10526524' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJW' 'sip-files00024.tif'
a9367e429dfe73b904cf202307c05461
5697d8fc97342c8a4f946d761c11859c41a3c840
'2011-11-14T16:13:12-05:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJX' 'sip-files00024.txt'
a3b02877405ecaa95aeddb243295c5ff
63f7cb911b083b176bdd45451841db277e4ad519
describe
'8601' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJY' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
eb576475128fe2475cb711be8caefcda
2a8f2fcb4eddb9157407e05e230fc5acfabc6d47
describe
'1356112' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXJZ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a57aa2d6b9af6703443c1097e643ffa5
64fd9c895196c994686af56c1e18df78153f5b80
'2011-11-14T16:12:43-05:00'
describe
'83098' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKA' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
014e0364cfa1bb64e5068a26b564c951
ee9b8cd967c5b5406e4517537ff511a550e54e42
'2011-11-14T16:19:01-05:00'
describe
'28313' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKB' 'sip-files00025.pro'
227ac9f3df412e1545d6fcd6ae5556d7
5924549da6963104892b2fa2e8d408fb68e1ed0d
'2011-11-14T16:18:18-05:00'
describe
'29780' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKC' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
36ec0fcfbdc86d298b8d12558e61a27c
679c364cae559782d78c9dda79d1d116e3a57954
'2011-11-14T16:13:53-05:00'
describe
'10862536' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKD' 'sip-files00025.tif'
697834b9394f396ec6ad7c73e831251e
bb5ccfde2e7525d1ebd1542c50f40e76f0b1a813
'2011-11-14T16:13:14-05:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKE' 'sip-files00025.txt'
47619b134d6b29bbf73b7182d30b6166
1892ee32ef2fd489eef865c808a9a6349d159882
'2011-11-14T16:20:05-05:00'
describe
'7894' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKF' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
d9cc5a6646e9451a70614bbfd187363a
8c976806de9d3f49aa58bd433899c25c4aab5b8c
describe
'1271893' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKG' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
3229a136ee81becf88a5f9c909ba7b01
76a17231c2b67f4fbf8c88f9e9f998fdbe1ffd39
describe
'86078' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKH' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8dd83c8a2bcc520a5dff8605ecb478ad
5898567d9252e06c7d2ee3c9a47f046bc446233f
'2011-11-14T16:20:01-05:00'
describe
'28529' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKI' 'sip-files00026.pro'
810996a8fd41df1f4d05d6b5f8dbc4d8
82c779b30e1adba4e61fc3d0d322c79d2b76f13f
'2011-11-14T16:18:16-05:00'
describe
'31034' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKJ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
8477f0e7336a706a938f2cf0818d0bfc
ce5eeca7a775b4cc1dfc753fce5516f135955103
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKK' 'sip-files00026.tif'
faf6b9278973d3d474bdaa6b81889a84
cd09ce3eb9f041ef305858dd8ac81d742dd48350
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKL' 'sip-files00026.txt'
3d6d88ca260657d63a584f8732492502
8a1313fc365918159c8b96ed36eb64cd63126b2d
'2011-11-14T16:16:09-05:00'
describe
'8542' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKM' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
fd32a2d402e2700647c3281e4a0cf085
057a7524b0a43f7910491043f09d32774e57d209
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKN' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
8b7ec6cc9bb4636ff41ca7008c0c42b9
130e429cf42de091c020a115a6e3f0a708d08bac
describe
'82904' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKO' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
1a771f32729e4860aa7937ee53fd9b9f
9d7019eb95a89c9c82e80f24b2bc7b08d5b70364
describe
'27664' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKP' 'sip-files00027.pro'
1e56bba891eeae2b70f197ff04abf1e6
7e39d6c0e9976031a3b4aa971760bbaa9e008ffd
describe
'29470' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKQ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
389a204ab4f323ce5efbfadd5c8535ed
84757706d9fdcd378899892d6d3fad9a0d76c635
'2011-11-14T16:13:28-05:00'
describe
'10862652' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKR' 'sip-files00027.tif'
d1951b75980016f73b4f6fac44b8ccd3
333bf1fdeb253dfa79921f7c7c139f41850a1198
'2011-11-14T16:17:44-05:00'
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKS' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d6585954d4e2c4e322e8b956218e18a7
8fe97a4dbf54a3e2b2791bf9056d9bc711f014da
describe
'7780' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKT' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
e07ab01d37b60051f902d3893bf76862
a8ea8dc26476d61c785494ca61ac1f95b873d5df
describe
'1314089' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKU' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e5ce95a6bdf2c0057c762a64919deea6
01b9a3d79f763fc2bd902ebdac6753f0d403c212
'2011-11-14T16:20:38-05:00'
describe
'86053' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKV' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
74ec2c36592a9ad28cabc10be422946d
78afe086f1d3f6643e78ca44c6aea162dcef93ee
'2011-11-14T16:18:24-05:00'
describe
'27395' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKW' 'sip-files00028.pro'
d1522e1bb181c895d0878533f40e5392
da4ba0de9af7030c8ec5c0959dc83cd142e75bfe
describe
'31131' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKX' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
f31eef2cbe0f03347cd904260036076d
34a1e1278dfa97ab0ed5b7230b927a1d2fbd3e08
describe
'10526540' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKY' 'sip-files00028.tif'
763442a336515715b0acd151a3ef60f8
f1cc217e18183e0eee0cf28f53bcdcb57cb8fc18
'2011-11-14T16:14:58-05:00'
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXKZ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
b3cb8cafcdda137c3947c9cbc284fc88
a55fd4f5874c1ce5ab1814a54dfc2f01e22828ba
describe
'8505' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLA' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
fb22992c2249f6832eae44effeee102e
5a66154a26542e38858a0e7b3dc2a888a5f4e7bc
'2011-11-14T16:14:46-05:00'
describe
'1350624' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLB' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
32b01f12896d83ca8a4739524f8ac354
cb01e7bcd21e6fc29f7d1d17acc66b2b2be0f3aa
'2011-11-14T16:15:52-05:00'
describe
'80414' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLC' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
8c27288090d644571da9294dd1db2144
0297c48ad2fbefa356579cfed429470b3ba4bda6
'2011-11-14T16:15:33-05:00'
describe
'25957' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLD' 'sip-files00029.pro'
7b31eafe8580d9ebc90f5d6911e66a79
0827e1c1a425b7313b12f359f2779736b8a1b736
'2011-11-14T16:12:49-05:00'
describe
'28973' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLE' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
983c5e2fa8c5b2daaa60d3c359664dde
580b04da36dfbcbdbf11d47e9f1a79eff5276a00
'2011-11-14T16:17:19-05:00'
describe
'10818060' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLF' 'sip-files00029.tif'
1e017037b61bf246ad346e714cb4f411
3f5773df5873f6e797cc6e4ee92e61a3d0e882ed
'2011-11-14T16:13:58-05:00'
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLG' 'sip-files00029.txt'
6c667f5c52e90468aa5dc76f0feeb173
6a335e5b6936c201746010f4bb27ca3f8761ca35
'2011-11-14T16:20:13-05:00'
describe
'8376' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLH' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
b0e6bf7c27f4ba416df8f32573dec0e0
d1a8545e512c65858ccbc00fd61266314f988482
describe
'1336247' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLI' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
28a3ba6e8d63c9206c26e7f8d93966a9
c4fdc2a92255cae9e36ffa6f067ff310baf16222
describe
'85202' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLJ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
d5683a1bb7376f78b0faf2dc6ae53ce5
b314df3353dabe265596ff2f08b263c2bd5c8df1
'2011-11-14T16:13:22-05:00'
describe
'27929' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLK' 'sip-files00030.pro'
63afdf3b579d0cd7fcabe8e1cf9913b2
17aa49cd56a809b371dc45ef8e9fe5c45691b2e9
describe
'31407' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLL' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
7e23459b7f5e9a730ac51cf86c2b3bdd
9199c946d2edd16c29c72b90fed8d58875ff0edc
'2011-11-14T16:15:30-05:00'
describe
'10703628' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLM' 'sip-files00030.tif'
0272b583c3ff2e29a63603e326b101d7
2179b165411bbc8c0cf6e3fd166bb6288d4a7749
'2011-11-14T16:19:25-05:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLN' 'sip-files00030.txt'
1b5831077f3229fa87e263f273499ee4
ccbb53e74bc772e98f801a7bcda5162ceec1e2dd
describe
'8443' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLO' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
778667ab29c16c2ae43cc7c4b1963b17
414374fce7b7e6bdfe88bea0cbd81249110654fc
describe
'1378569' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLP' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
492fbd7d3d83832dc5091126d84aa135
1dc8e5e3ff1c597a73042749c0c4a585c31e91c7
'2011-11-14T16:19:00-05:00'
describe
'80326' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLQ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
0f375e4061ef72fc876504315424bb58
33f31e27bb3068408bb6ce17ba68293cc54d16ea
'2011-11-14T16:17:52-05:00'
describe
'27319' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLR' 'sip-files00031.pro'
85f3a38e0538103885a84cdb71390e43
dbb913c41f0a1f238f8d22db63f781f91d39ee11
'2011-11-14T16:15:55-05:00'
describe
'28967' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLS' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
6a4b145d85562e22e38ff0066d886f37
231eabedbef936eac714f2491eed577b38123f90
'2011-11-14T16:13:11-05:00'
describe
'11041900' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLT' 'sip-files00031.tif'
e4a657218d29b282e77fc23af46db0b3
fe4a8c3dbb6b4556707754df793903307320d69e
'2011-11-14T16:18:36-05:00'
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLU' 'sip-files00031.txt'
8df27d43cfeefe03c61937fa77a66f3d
1141696308e97a874c0706bcc2c9ca9e9412fa0f
'2011-11-14T16:17:59-05:00'
describe
'7823' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLV' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
ae11f9b7ae1ed3f5fd64d285b982d565
eaed685acc280d8e095235b2b6ed58078b657544
'2011-11-14T16:17:47-05:00'
describe
'1271870' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLW' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
52c2edca3e7b1a3336194eca8cc93094
d7ddbdce02745f868871d13aae68a26aed641482
'2011-11-14T16:15:31-05:00'
describe
'87186' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLX' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
9726155644e77d67d494bcc1aa829825
e2f5cfec8d0ea0f4278d4fd9317aa5de08fe4c2d
describe
'28288' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLY' 'sip-files00032.pro'
eb8e32b00452dbcc9f71003bcab4a51e
22b5b19a5f6d54d769fb00bedb8d3c95d70cc6b0
'2011-11-14T16:14:23-05:00'
describe
'32536' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXLZ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
b5eab19f5d4e02adb2a736e5340dd0b7
1bdc009d009230bcb495e43935c979a9c9ad1638
'2011-11-14T16:16:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMA' 'sip-files00032.tif'
76c17899dfdd34618788c7d7a9009674
1f8c642b15c26fe3c31cba0832319cfa2bcd2c44
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMB' 'sip-files00032.txt'
678b31bb29d401d4870bfafdc8d535a8
7fc44e2562cf4e0fa20c973c5951aff66c533ad2
describe
'8744' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMC' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
0313fec4f3946058204f02f3e0a956d7
300d3f1f65bf5577c4688088677c58aff397775c
'2011-11-14T16:13:10-05:00'
describe
'1331197' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMD' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
d6329e20ab10abef3f799e3fc03ca372
a745e86b1769571696d8a28f3ac74e665b90c7b2
describe
'87088' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXME' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2ee015dddf85de8109bb62bc08dd4e34
9bb007602edddc54add105af4f5e5f88598561b6
'2011-11-14T16:13:36-05:00'
describe
'27897' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMF' 'sip-files00033.pro'
d18d577ca177bbf7e69f4a5013372528
4f88d8a96d369a0c0458bc1f158a67b14432b338
'2011-11-14T16:17:18-05:00'
describe
'32549' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMG' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
92b191b9d2bab4a741c223f5059c5a5a
8ab83b1e43fb43467aad0027f364a2fc63c1e821
'2011-11-14T16:17:46-05:00'
describe
'10663012' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMH' 'sip-files00033.tif'
27f1a92d2a2aebb0e5f575d22bc713c7
03adfb4bcaa5a254fa0dfb6f299bf42aeb44a247
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMI' 'sip-files00033.txt'
37f2b93804e785f977d8125065d85fda
c4af96ba1bc5bfa1b37a49f7055ee97ff1fc373d
'2011-11-14T16:18:05-05:00'
describe
'8795' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMJ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
10fe67e6976099d380069c727ad13d44
29a738e861f29f98ebfa28ab9e8ed5e02610bf44
describe
'1271889' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMK' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
ef512cf368078d375ee9d0f023e9c2cf
4337e2e342ef2c5c8e4a3450fc3890f5f510e21f
'2011-11-14T16:20:26-05:00'
describe
'87743' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXML' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
1b6264a924c2a3e370e5e0e705642b39
aad7e16420f5dd1719cd6fe893f71d8914652cf3
'2011-11-14T16:18:02-05:00'
describe
'27853' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMM' 'sip-files00034.pro'
ecae1438f085ac329a60003610c46c8b
ca3bc63ad6b3f8e6edc16de21baee299d97b51b0
'2011-11-14T16:17:09-05:00'
describe
'31721' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMN' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
3dfe96b90cbc30cc3e55877a8bcbf48b
164d609ef71341fe4c26ba9462e68e04e528b445
'2011-11-14T16:14:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMO' 'sip-files00034.tif'
13c5fb1d6cd29ab97f3e4cc715ef8713
2e637dcbad204fc36c08759411c14139b30b1f43
'2011-11-14T16:19:55-05:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMP' 'sip-files00034.txt'
050be17d3dae658ab1201d3226ca66ea
5ad7e3518f04cea032df8de53dcdd5e8e57ee952
'2011-11-14T16:18:55-05:00'
describe
'8543' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMQ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
4b27ddbcc2114076353a85378c5d897d
f25d17a97769249a71d11f243870f96f6478a315
'2011-11-14T16:15:44-05:00'
describe
'1378564' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMR' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
daf8d9de727a98df5a06568f234064e4
70d43e4f18dabf34dea22fbab6b1c2706175a69b
describe
'83701' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMS' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
13f55b9d90924519a2d674169f7eabd7
99ec3ac7b450173bf45ccbd03b485fe0a7b1f918
'2011-11-14T16:18:45-05:00'
describe
'29127' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMT' 'sip-files00035.pro'
1d7b0c70bae87d03f21a5162bddbed63
521ea9eb7cd4859c4e26bbc06193469ad71da2ee
'2011-11-14T16:13:54-05:00'
describe
'30188' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMU' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
eb3d5f25b6d1a8644028e681a01ec717
64fc99c5e125949c2112a8e485371fe5cffd52a7
'2011-11-14T16:15:28-05:00'
describe
'11042332' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMV' 'sip-files00035.tif'
6f2be578c77de0e4339b9a6274f5acc2
235eff89b8660c8118aead8c882a84a5b5622214
'2011-11-14T16:14:29-05:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMW' 'sip-files00035.txt'
9fe5edd2edff4b333ca9ef3fe4e88cf9
58377164735a329a6e9ec0dc8ae4cf040dc14536
describe
'7779' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMX' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
3c1a96325d350c19c696947c1e234a65
41a7372de0d36f27d1b5293964af06219c750fe6
'2011-11-14T16:15:07-05:00'
describe
'1292908' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMY' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
fa24153d91a0417d49f8ee2dcf20c853
4239677d02b1ede1fc561658a5346a125f51ade2
describe
'85979' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXMZ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
ebd959aec68db3fbb68df78820e57bc7
c830637889ea50f2606b6889ff5cde8292d11b63
describe
'27465' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNA' 'sip-files00036.pro'
44bd093ba7257711dd1dd565a673c0f3
5eb133bd90b67b9758e79e033c0d2b1d6e359981
'2011-11-14T16:13:02-05:00'
describe
'31739' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNB' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
256bf77a5c9101a0020787f90715f2b3
3a7c0fc5708d712fb46d76b4f4691aedb153880b
describe
'10357100' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNC' 'sip-files00036.tif'
7d949b7ef7aa460dc1232c12da64a422
9f37ba53655ec4effaa2a8af6509ecfc37f94b95
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXND' 'sip-files00036.txt'
8fde8a600e230ee23ee74176bb4a4f9a
a5177accb2fbaa69f966689cc2175cd33019c50e
'2011-11-14T16:17:34-05:00'
describe
'8481' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNE' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
e573329ad2e7195c7badf2196f5c051e
f01b4e32f765a7e565bfa2ca55f476ca488ee2e1
'2011-11-14T16:19:47-05:00'
describe
'1333837' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNF' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
d888905127c381bc87d1d0f554359a85
e1510d772b48e4743ed4c8b7321091fb756d135b
describe
'86276' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNG' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
e18ba99ca778bd52e01cbbb9639193b6
278d0feeb48dd0d8ac6c7e2e7838a24a831bcdc5
describe
'28781' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNH' 'sip-files00037.pro'
4c5bff7fd99b31e4faa665e002bea385
4819a44dd19ad4a99be5016cc2b456047aaa0a9c
'2011-11-14T16:13:26-05:00'
describe
'30651' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNI' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
25606eb47a2d93887fcaf7d28c35f07b
0b1974520ab54e027378a373ea132941c0c2b661
describe
'10684352' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNJ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
aff64f5c19572a7ab406f12ba33b9839
04c0c110af209934ef21f4dd745c817d5d68b6df
'2011-11-14T16:20:47-05:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNK' 'sip-files00037.txt'
ce3df7077c9dc38e41ab4e0a1376778a
abdf4e0c7d079f3acf7ba1528c07b6a7cb448d2f
describe
'8281' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNL' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
a01729131fdc58d72b1b277bb91ce96c
3ba22b467c0425408dbfb820a2f123ea9c098100
'2011-11-14T16:19:40-05:00'
describe
'1292866' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNM' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
fa0f3b880896be2ff268214fb904cd59
df67aa4a37c4f2d824f2c71bb5fbaedd2420a390
describe
'68062' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNN' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f5037f0571f65ca86b514167f6fab831
6b5c0d01d1fa5cd3cd3ce4ad1da9fe22691bb139
'2011-11-14T16:14:08-05:00'
describe
'21086' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNO' 'sip-files00038.pro'
3725d099989df389230a7d6917c02cbd
6d48fb9e57fdbe0638207f90da3c3272a5457c3d
'2011-11-14T16:20:00-05:00'
describe
'24837' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNP' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
278dd24e937f10444712b544502c57f6
f3a256ecf74765166758d28ca14d6096043a18ff
describe
'10355868' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNQ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7dd6cb71a65173630d4019535eb51e18
c31e8f9527c6f68aea789e9cbb0d52e1ea5b171c
'2011-11-14T16:16:34-05:00'
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNR' 'sip-files00038.txt'
fb254cf0fc357f33ef80ea257b7417ed
92308a25b6e3e3351bcd13051e66fdac08f4abdb
describe
'6827' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNS' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
b2ca3b1a679712b0c23b5e58406e3e5f
844c2cc6853362f02362e1354847a9ea31e6fe6d
'2011-11-14T16:16:04-05:00'
describe
'1108126' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNT' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
31927c17e3e098b5223e88a4ae5d9ffd
790c779cd7ca404832fe6b058dc0e601a041b73f
'2011-11-14T16:20:32-05:00'
describe
'13552' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNU' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
f8f2d6e2803f184eae561e7b889e6dd6
18546f812d73e91121e4188eebe3355b4cc24843
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNV' 'sip-files00039.pro'
056c9ae998c81b923942a1d5a0993ff1
0388157121b67f17fc29adf1f5bb1af42b592b70
'2011-11-14T16:12:58-05:00'
describe
'3820' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNW' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
ca97a38fa1863026150836435aa7811e
f2edb4b5b639a39575da36b287be7badf488d32b
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNX' 'sip-files00039.tif'
a7efcae08e31f62369b77cd8d2e635ce
2862c7c4f115ee1d38c12ecd55e64114c4bda18b
'2011-11-14T16:17:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNY' 'sip-files00039.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-11-14T16:13:20-05:00'
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXNZ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f52c5927ffa3a32de36b9a07a0d01f83
9a92360f79f05fb566bc26bd0fd1868b99143632
'2011-11-14T16:12:50-05:00'
describe
'1198748' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOA' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
70f0cdf71887ca3c8237b2aa917d7ecf
bf1b5e94bbb8254c6a5908ade38e7dd10d98f8a1
'2011-11-14T16:14:26-05:00'
describe
'90532' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOB' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
1e380e06854077f46cabb389220d3126
1fd1b3e2e8233ff92e10e80b43b14e397fae6cb0
describe
'1831' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOC' 'sip-files00040.pro'
a78eb1b7553fb223e5bca2cd849b366c
3702c7992d83cae7dbfa0e8650c77f302b4c7967
describe
'23763' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOD' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
a7c2b4270a4d341ac4febc309d24049a
1f9f61c9c5a0249d54f0b4d5500a63a9a33debb7
'2011-11-14T16:18:17-05:00'
describe
'9599171' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOE' 'sip-files00040.tif'
3ab7002bb125f07c45916696c8fed939
9d3e55ce2996328f5467ed43cc375315b3b58037
'2011-11-14T16:18:20-05:00'
describe
'270' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOF' 'sip-files00040.txt'
057ecb87e31f9b45591f357764b4a81d
3ed1f6b292e9009b26be9f489cfc190ce579aa01
'2011-11-14T16:17:15-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6344' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOG' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
5334b0f027090911ca064c68a71c37e7
5b814277d42ee02759ae0b8c1ad386597dc71257
describe
'1231619' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOH' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
8a647055697230803822c10881b8cc45
b73cec9685ab7a9cfee8cda065f7d2fa3d5cfe9d
'2011-11-14T16:17:14-05:00'
describe
'76187' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOI' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
8089f9528fbb29216cf0203ba80a3c84
edec604030b3d5d7dc998bf2955c8ef089d110a1
describe
'21997' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOJ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
196e406502aa3af924a37db05a2f934b
0001e360e210c3e369b61dbc79dd2ee0ad912edd
'2011-11-14T16:13:40-05:00'
describe
'27632' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOK' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
a95525918d5656e2ed2bad8faaaf1fc0
4f18f08c004f5d567523311937944bd0149ba004
'2011-11-14T16:15:37-05:00'
describe
'9867592' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOL' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c96968b4d8aab647b2c53987654ac77f
1b0a02fa3f77090d569d7dd431efafb1358451cc
'2011-11-14T16:13:56-05:00'
describe
'879' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOM' 'sip-files00042.txt'
785e908645d00555602e7466500de05e
9cb90012d4aa7339cc30f436c3c51403dbf26172
describe
'7579' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXON' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
895ba1cf436f588595f91580d5355f4a
7d0e95e35126eba850890a677f227874d3ccd0f8
describe
'1311679' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOO' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
2c06350023279482b8b0fedb6d30ccae
7677ec33e24288681a627fbbb0611cc8878fe848
describe
'90336' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOP' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
8ce1c85ea6a8eaadef109846182bb1b9
93266c93bb1e754e380014529a3ab71b3cfa7ff9
describe
'28082' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOQ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
69ed69c3bbcbe6cd14e145cf63a44ea8
449bf760335fd796ee4a838cec58df8ccf09d990
describe
'34205' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOR' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
da910e2d96319b4a580c53355ce27fb9
9993a31b10c93bfaf19dca57d9a6eeb000c49e59
describe
'10506772' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOS' 'sip-files00043.tif'
84d1601335afd202cbeed4e8e8396255
12caec1c6abb71801c366d70fd40d382709d5b1f
'2011-11-14T16:13:42-05:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOT' 'sip-files00043.txt'
5632be371ec74417ad4f6fa0d0f1928e
1146728ba8fe651be9e21f1d3a42b782b760d7ee
'2011-11-14T16:13:06-05:00'
describe
'8998' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOU' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
0f323ef3dacdc63ad94581ab157cbc18
319e8d337223c179824ac6b27e8284dd52eab6c6
'2011-11-14T16:18:09-05:00'
describe
'1191000' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOV' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
cea9652c054120df10d58851fbcbb136
1b6c46b46cf43670a83b79652d6fa10dd4e0e200
'2011-11-14T16:14:11-05:00'
describe
'88331' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOW' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
9cd1c8524a988c2c1656a4cf1920bb6f
87e42e3d6e53e2c549c1f80968f94255c8773813
describe
'25995' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOX' 'sip-files00044.pro'
f996e0c2b1d9460f7cfa89fe3e95a21e
4b3a41126d25ba39fc9bb348b171bade84e9024c
describe
'32940' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOY' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
9e01caa6a2963e8658fc8de6624865df
08d7571be6b3a4c9f977436eac55dba9ffb1293c
'2011-11-14T16:13:41-05:00'
describe
'9541884' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXOZ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
8c4bf87c133f8eb2ffda5ab2a7451f5b
b23520450485e3f3205952038cc80fae7babc4fb
'2011-11-14T16:15:26-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPA' 'sip-files00044.txt'
13696e0f41ad402be083389db3996a25
c4905e51141af39bc0bbcb47a5f358a7e3a3f3dd
describe
'9415' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPB' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
9b31ed6e98415d9480c76c6db079f4de
ea461ea8a0f11acc0cc94d6784d7a8a28693f545
describe
'1284944' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPC' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
25045c22e2cc0698a53329472c7a3cbc
32484389c8c60d878fd6ed6cadcbcb15bac44260
'2011-11-14T16:12:39-05:00'
describe
'90235' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPD' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
eaa09a99dc5a7c7e664cec6656a8fdfe
be9af1d52aa6ebc86d271e5782a26ed2903fd1a1
describe
'28272' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPE' 'sip-files00045.pro'
e4b09328f7b5a80602b30d641351498e
936e7f57f941d5ddf54ee5f64979fdc9805faf00
describe
'34469' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPF' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
a0269746bb57b44caec36c85b445c969
c5494d8527f5359ed4af004174ade5191ebec6f5
'2011-11-14T16:18:10-05:00'
describe
'10293128' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPG' 'sip-files00045.tif'
8603e269adc14938a54c4f388bc92ddc
3210c838a9f257045b993689bc0fe3203e872e50
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPH' 'sip-files00045.txt'
0e4a9330e3199f0455585df0f4ca9ad2
d97e04463450320971247c60961e1654f3e89d85
describe
'8894' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPI' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
f915c47adda09208ff4dfbd6a6688f60
36f75d4305b4ed23f186663a5d274de998df6343
describe
'1223611' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPJ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
85072f1ca05700a2f865744ab766f693
e02e454b97dcf40bd2d1c21703f863654ab40322
describe
'90497' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPK' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
ecb37bd4c02f5dcbca9b4b2003af2714
9c26417e982607b659dd645734ea9110cfd915ac
'2011-11-14T16:12:45-05:00'
describe
'28378' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPL' 'sip-files00046.pro'
bb207c7a01f404d03b2ac34ecc520b55
1266bc322897a9b71e1641b378ed1bc66041e98a
describe
'30702' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPM' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
5da748edf567062d790b34454ee744b9
d126d92798bd23d4932929bbfc5549b813fb3542
describe
'9803012' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPN' 'sip-files00046.tif'
0100632055e6744a5c65810a70ee5b02
b418139c0d66bf470617b3ad5302bd30f473dc70
'2011-11-14T16:18:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPO' 'sip-files00046.txt'
844eb58b53da13c320ea47acfafcb8b2
4ff19c404f6e622b56f3bd5c984c155d45d48bef
describe
'9517' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPP' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
f9d71708120a2217984d904390e0ece9
2b165298e4609a125aab3f38d8f3fdb90bab78bb
'2011-11-14T16:18:13-05:00'
describe
'1273976' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPQ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
ad31cd053278c67e0a7290ae963dae76
9f994669e13f42c0f93e2c8c5b6170f190cc7a63
describe
'87060' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPR' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
b6cfc24e151dbf33465d82eb62be0ea0
31724772ceac9db045f8bf3210905e9a27eba88a
describe
'27949' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPS' 'sip-files00047.pro'
fab38b6060b1a484356b4f37874b096e
974453c540fb5ccf12b63caebe1aa6b52f238299
'2011-11-14T16:15:08-05:00'
describe
'28820' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPT' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
8c8f1e3240f49c3eabab20cd60c871f9
9f3303a06a7b015095ebee1a2268ce176809227c
describe
'10201693' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPU' 'sip-files00047.tif'
d5ed52a3c963a8a798c09a0ccbd663ba
74ca591b442ba305a47d41ae1bf42398760a87a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPV' 'sip-files00047.txt'
b4359e1d06ad924750a7335fd45a5b76
fee61879caeb7ea0f40f1ad396b70a2e689964af
describe
'8815' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPW' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
0e61b43fd5dd265a00aa6f1ed6046878
a3135969e11a8f900b0b622b11aff74d31604166
'2011-11-14T16:15:57-05:00'
describe
'1285986' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPX' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
a3356125b5ee742a554ba82eb1567fce
65fd8d787dac36bfd83190ae7b2eb14432059da2
'2011-11-14T16:15:18-05:00'
describe
'82750' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPY' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
0b185db169f190489795d26adcfc5195
32c7089771c886efebef9b80aa0a893f1ecb99b2
'2011-11-14T16:14:12-05:00'
describe
'27856' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXPZ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
292b9332b6725f029f0e3c91e568be61
92e7af0f85754860d2f9b55703242c4e30464b0b
'2011-11-14T16:20:46-05:00'
describe
'28243' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQA' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f06be8e355799d3cbdfe46f1526e661a
5be41491bb5e247c4e48f1f873a54b8640c8fdf9
describe
'10301812' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQB' 'sip-files00048.tif'
c2c5b557f06e27ac735440bd412871d8
e5763e72516cdb5da1e29c17908e36047ba6ce3d
'2011-11-14T16:17:57-05:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQC' 'sip-files00048.txt'
f21c6a4662f3fe3cec85c12e5a66c650
9e97d33e6480d604a53aeab5f8ce2db3393e69e2
describe
'8558' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQD' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
73d78553f2372186b15c0de54e1656ed
b042f138c9bfca1e1b3cd373a5a8177471f2728f
describe
'1339155' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQE' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
6fe3c0e3ab38de8554cdeb2e79d47485
e99223fac65099799efe84d8e51ec545f9fef1f5
'2011-11-14T16:18:06-05:00'
describe
'83417' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQF' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8b30a6659cfd7da9cc93a699dc5d4f55
cc2614f8d294031bde25ec69dfccc6374b739620
'2011-11-14T16:20:03-05:00'
describe
'27759' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQG' 'sip-files00049.pro'
780b012741d2eaee073c5a2217edd001
31a96c34325d76ee5cd23a3a5b9307c8014c00fc
describe
'29822' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQH' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
658394ef3f9dfcd7cd5fab75717a1d60
9cf02fb34ee24ff6f06f6fa0a21e4c93fcb8bdb7
'2011-11-14T16:20:44-05:00'
describe
'10726752' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQI' 'sip-files00049.tif'
6968f24b09f32f0cc4fa3687024f8de0
d1c35dceb8e120dbcd02a7803162da6e0efe33fd
'2011-11-14T16:17:50-05:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQJ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5108fa2012afcce123102a16d0b07f59
0b8382a382b00999c44ce9025fe0ed1cb52549ed
'2011-11-14T16:20:37-05:00'
describe
'8026' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQK' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
b794a1cd32332b845d8c0151addd1b87
5dc4e964e137e6943b2f22bba74517d3a2ec1cbb
describe
'1285966' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQL' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
ebb47aa3f3f4569db602fc03559d527e
0c4d7d9c2bf5b4bd78b46d430fa961050492024e
describe
'86881' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQM' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
371e593ba3f9101a34953c4ebd8feb71
a219f654073281b4fec726946402146619dc047b
'2011-11-14T16:20:06-05:00'
describe
'28606' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQN' 'sip-files00050.pro'
6615cb4c7fd266c0b6045a212e4fe3b4
c8a9540d39512204481d37b7737ae5298b3212bd
'2011-11-14T16:19:19-05:00'
describe
'33785' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQO' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
212384e72efa564ef7c45d9d86d466c5
6f98471bd4142104daa2ecdf06d982ab89198426
describe
'10301872' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQP' 'sip-files00050.tif'
eb4319251c8eedf793ba07b97049344d
ef659691c1b7c1ccfdb15700e3d5bd668ac0aef0
'2011-11-14T16:15:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQQ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
84d2624b5bf2b59aa78992ddc0bf1d48
be2c240ebb92ba4c3cf6cfbc6b5f590aca8e1675
describe
'8851' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQR' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
792e1d31aaa6720e1b9084b2c4a0cbae
fd9f292d759dab382ad490e84e77a233c299c1d1
describe
'1295047' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQS' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
98772310f30cefa23e59a62d6d787c59
a0fdde5e4315f02aedc09f4e09b77c7012cb1220
describe
'84874' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQT' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
7b7aaa723b2fbcb9be413782a13c3afc
07e959cb4a605ac6fe73083cde09e15f3790b227
describe
'28543' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQU' 'sip-files00051.pro'
adec69fa43fa69f184b42ab6fdab96c1
ef1f4aac1e4bdf6bb9ece81aaabad1da43ec720c
'2011-11-14T16:18:52-05:00'
describe
'30963' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQV' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
1645b501103302731f4a67c29862a727
9c66fdd846ef91a4ecff2f9279472e39a1053266
'2011-11-14T16:17:32-05:00'
describe
'10373764' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQW' 'sip-files00051.tif'
8691e4e8f3aedab87e1ed47e759fd515
340efa42604d5507f2079398529bc3037a9bfabc
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQX' 'sip-files00051.txt'
f3a713de4004e0f10cf938ee48bfef5b
2e8e864adb6688171bec827ea346966a26f0949b
describe
'8409' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQY' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
5bc752295e123f8c2b9d804f0c4d4744
078188c50d24c86dcf31b421a742026acaab3157
describe
'1286044' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXQZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
74efa48e7f37bce40cc62ae1cc92ceab
cb54e4261d372665535491d2a11b08495b77b5f0
describe
'85850' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRA' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
94a143dc5fb393e3a0ead8eee9eec117
71ba2fcc8797851e8693e9ac6bb76de62fe622ce
'2011-11-14T16:12:53-05:00'
describe
'28035' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRB' 'sip-files00052.pro'
1baf00bf39c0523f6052b3f7b650fa28
b7bc4eb797b074dcd99d10a18ba2d3c223b741d1
'2011-11-14T16:17:37-05:00'
describe
'29135' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRC' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
60ca9fccb816726ea55f2df5db63b115
d1dac42eda9856700e43c103ee8c11bfa70a0453
'2011-11-14T16:19:37-05:00'
describe
'10302052' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRD' 'sip-files00052.tif'
306a2d54ecc71b3977e6508d7bebd175
394f27f4a23671664f9d04ff968f6df69cd8765b
'2011-11-14T16:15:47-05:00'
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRE' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f33a53ae83d62552126564725fd34ca0
b183091fbd1005323f606085c8e535efa3ae71e2
describe
'8944' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRF' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
af84c3f44225104bfeda2d3b3d0efbba
46239e9991b6a9a61c9086659198089948dd4f97
describe
'1316806' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRG' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b02bf53ee244d5896eff65352160515a
ebb31ab1d97761d131a1718be192fdbacc20f158
'2011-11-14T16:17:08-05:00'
describe
'87185' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRH' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
2d57396ae030fccc2a05a77e37dd5eac
5f573aad5644f8c2615788cfc6647422d1801f83
describe
'29329' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRI' 'sip-files00053.pro'
93bd88f7b6f95a22c2ed116b7df16512
227dc9d02de6a8d9a8f7f675d0947cedc054d056
describe
'30837' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRJ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
5e1a81c76387bf9feada86621600cf4f
e42f7f15b6d65a7b3233f6f5befa06131d81a094
describe
'10547856' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRK' 'sip-files00053.tif'
30fe53c26662ec86db88efcc13b254e2
dd6cba894cacba8a11fffbe3a8e97a4bd8ecda84
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRL' 'sip-files00053.txt'
ba68dcd14306b5f1f70ef19d5ea8f6ec
75293a6359900606979e9b72339bf20099b5358c
'2011-11-14T16:13:00-05:00'
describe
'8555' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRM' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
fd47aeb956cd5ad7e476655cacb4cb0b
b0dbccb019cfc53337bcfa7b5f2afa35a6ece627
'2011-11-14T16:20:48-05:00'
describe
'1264470' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRN' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
34a0c281b78eff37a014d7d06d2ba25b
18558e127dfacc03fefe40fd06480c7bd3511472
'2011-11-14T16:20:14-05:00'
describe
'85147' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRO' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
435c81fae688fcbdfaf244a9ea39b80a
b022718627475058ec4a3feecf2322bf8483f2a9
'2011-11-14T16:15:42-05:00'
describe
'27677' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRP' 'sip-files00054.pro'
839b4444ea93410b1f52ab37cb7e9e9a
499715402b3ca8826682c0b2e7b74b9915a85abc
describe
'29051' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRQ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
aa7253b7bb1bced6e81b116681d5d0c8
0b1a426f4c6aac859ce0a57abf4203fe620e0726
describe
'10125313' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRR' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c50919f1651ec46c59ace36294217d35
efadc91c12d8909f57ffd7dcb24b4c29e12e0f7b
'2011-11-14T16:20:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRS' 'sip-files00054.txt'
5477a7d1cd537d480a0e889cabe54983
3bc67edf4bbe3407da37338ba0da9be240851e5d
'2011-11-14T16:16:06-05:00'
describe
'8797' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRT' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
1d22fd3c36bfa254b66ae75536543662
662ae1d9ae6df40d60b5a8995f08839c00f482fe
'2011-11-14T16:16:02-05:00'
describe
'1295042' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRU' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
e86c341bafcf25d73df3e2985a2560a7
2fa52baa2124169173c6e2b5febb8ed5e35cb018
describe
'89102' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRV' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
11256b0bd5bd8a2de887a4229997d9e0
8dea8c41047abc473cba37f7b1d06b065bb2afe7
'2011-11-14T16:19:33-05:00'
describe
'29113' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRW' 'sip-files00055.pro'
4499860f977de38ca6076dcfacb2ea07
6025cac45531058276da0bd0897a0137a19e23b2
describe
'32721' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRX' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
fd4714ec2a28bb49fa4ff6c63f4ad226
7d9fb1d80c5797000f1f5db46366cf387182cf0e
describe
'10373976' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRY' 'sip-files00055.tif'
ff30ca4292a27ae011d490d275057116
55db1d0b58d1c925de0888382c6e1fa423781964
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXRZ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
ad8a713aa5bb481c127c2c8f609f7d23
6035efe357fb0f04c5c5e94d9cb15c22e3c0192a
describe
'8878' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSA' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
609103cfc2d191ee6fa8acdc6659efe6
656e3d7fc88712148084dff174c435ae6009dc69
describe
'1264410' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSB' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ee2b0ab1fe924a6ca89298653666aa2c
74641660167c352e68f0b85194f77ccd29bb4add
'2011-11-14T16:12:57-05:00'
describe
'92973' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSC' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c001edba8db478b11e1b475cd01f3c61
408d2176562fb6d24ff525f01aec2e8e7291d7f0
describe
'27400' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSD' 'sip-files00056.pro'
d7ca64b7279ad9bf6e5983bfb3726247
1588eb3acc86257c1cc6e9f4fadb0bf67514f711
'2011-11-14T16:20:25-05:00'
describe
'33814' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSE' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
ad05b2c2a3cb5896e0e59595592e1a73
3813f00326135240ec641ddfd5ab8d7a35d4a8ab
'2011-11-14T16:15:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSF' 'sip-files00056.tif'
8f2e05fe8d0d3dbcc1dd4f44b63b7908
315abbe774f63da7a231a1da1b4f3624af7d1442
'2011-11-14T16:15:06-05:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSG' 'sip-files00056.txt'
150c08a941752ced1de45dfe1fbe9c61
0854685b39d625eb6b9102eec8fa5199566a92c4
'2011-11-14T16:18:53-05:00'
describe
'8958' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSH' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
08fbc8b4675cd9109230e2ad0bcb75ff
4071ac4a07973c2194eade22423f93ff9bb2b62c
describe
'1285511' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSI' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
564f361a62853bbb6475ae2e44666ed9
a10ca56b276d895501c9910bc08f7a907e5083cb
describe
'86618' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSJ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
3669385c975e0b32358286b565742ec2
cdcbcea30cd94af0501a62e823393b8438b3fbb5
describe
'27737' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSK' 'sip-files00057.pro'
68af9fbc92dc5145f8184c4bb25f77b4
87a0bb03fe64a289f787db7775fc2b28fe00dafa
describe
'33747' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSL' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
5f8144d1baf035fe478f41aba60ba72d
8eda548cb7aaec3c07e64349040de39a01bc265f
'2011-11-14T16:12:51-05:00'
describe
'10297592' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSM' 'sip-files00057.tif'
cd925455215b384600b8b0588e472026
c38b66e431466b756a70f3e5ea4b41c34eed252c
'2011-11-14T16:17:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSN' 'sip-files00057.txt'
b55a1abf94e747f221afab024686c57a
6f790251805e85ae812a6db2387537b7d73411d0
describe
'8783' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSO' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
9d0967390204c35802501f335f505734
975df85dac4ce84cded23b671749ad2bb74a5dd0
describe
'1264471' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSP' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
b9cee9adb32f04e1885775021f664040
3c8b904323daffc67e9fceeeb073193d0f5f5bce
'2011-11-14T16:19:43-05:00'
describe
'73540' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSQ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
b9a19359df66e154a9bd1901a798f366
5d1dadcc4db03e484ceabe2aca589090dc7f548b
describe
'21282' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSR' 'sip-files00058.pro'
6fb8f749dab867ec19c5f189b903fd24
449628216afcca87d5a8c7e09ce0a7874dff85a1
'2011-11-14T16:14:06-05:00'
describe
'25651' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSS' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
302f0587c14c80ea93ad20981b918e48
1f9b42dca67fc898ca72bddc8a0159dd522d4bc9
'2011-11-14T16:18:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXST' 'sip-files00058.tif'
dcb298503b34ca1c33fb034346d296dd
03e0d95469aea1b9012bfac2608eb1e75bacc335
'2011-11-14T16:20:34-05:00'
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSU' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c20e6eb279b39014cb20b7ab4c706bd5
87ac5290a2e2a17c5aae00664846fe9c9982f8d9
describe
'6944' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSV' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
45456166146e48b63eb7c336e8ac3c2c
6f3b72423931c8da0395d3d4e36d98f853ddd3f3
describe
'1264276' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSW' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
f1e3ee6bb19f111a2a7e044cea9742f5
0f64c00d17a61477270a7f631fb7272c83d15399
describe
'84882' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSX' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
23f6efd7a9f5462550522fc9f3f36f3d
2925801297a1c44024440b586dafa263ca5a2df9
'2011-11-14T16:15:14-05:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
aa1d703de6634a13f5db33a04c37a7ab
4969a50f23ce6bb8f6b87f6276de5980712e21df
'2011-11-14T16:13:47-05:00'
describe
'22473' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXSZ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
c47d5719a075c5107d69683ac3ed8010
4d516bd005348190e9f93638623968d2d2d248ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTA' 'sip-files00060.tif'
8f1b0d3843ed3d52dbec1245381fc11b
e01ecedea8273c53d07dca5df4b0e71ea1b70b70
'2011-11-14T16:16:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
14164a7c4ce71ed767ad656cb3d68eb1
118d0c4b5c9c9af9b34461986ad7c48db2d7dbee
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTC' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
d98289896328a6ae9ee5e3798a9b9c74
15acb2147305217bee376d2f4c169d4f880db534
'2011-11-14T16:20:10-05:00'
describe
'1288535' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
ea6f9112e7b07a4fd66ea380326f00a9
f38ecdce5415b7af689c8ba04481fead147510dc
'2011-11-14T16:17:33-05:00'
describe
'73364' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
730c8d1bc2fd41dee1507e1f63775fb5
67491062f320e576dbd0fa9c9f402454b77d6410
'2011-11-14T16:14:28-05:00'
describe
'21336' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
e921538195e52fbf09181900e58012fe
4417517d757c463ff6a0e7c8944ed9cb39b3d4b7
describe
'26906' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
16d7559f980a31844ae803cd85a3c86a
cf98963e3b8f90adda7c2f64c1f9b4cf4999fef9
describe
'10321404' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
b53d52b02004c68e26c7d1d7eac5b093
bc43c9e5393b808b59f046b325facd257e086b1e
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
388d75dbf588650e1bbc15c3912f6dad
3aae4986bd61aab8133476af79e53b9c4a0227d9
describe
'7188' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
20ccb4b8321f7b55b4bbdd8f03670fed
b63fc6fd0816c47e7e969ab709b829b6f3c2c9b0
describe
'1263965' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
6de3dfc07955abd847ffcaf7e0a04998
033bc578fcac75bd0a3e1ba3b8339be1303622d1
'2011-11-14T16:17:38-05:00'
describe
'88234' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
bda2fa4d24b6ccefd4ebe81f568e546a
9217271c6cf3c33d77798d875e639d36244c1d2a
'2011-11-14T16:19:44-05:00'
describe
'27789' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
9197b343926b83b2a8cb85f00c9d9dfc
ecfec44b97497f05a36983d802b6a29b3f0db4de
describe
'35020' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
ceb8f103040a1df830f04db5c5938565
e678500719e1de515f27b5e5f8a2b3063a4cd005
'2011-11-14T16:14:47-05:00'
describe
'10125324' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
512397483ac4bea9f1822ab9b332ae63
e1abb1952ecdce07e0ea08cb005fa5df12f420b8
'2011-11-14T16:14:21-05:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
e64941cf43ba50140ad9320988311a3b
2fb9a05135ed39f40af7a15ab8f923d722796e0e
describe
'8670' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTQ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
38e274ee2c5bafa803045c601d65d685
589f37c7f48a4dd87d1871c50dfb786ca0e3c036
describe
'1290243' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
6bf053d077c3f1140fccad305aa9bb36
9535c64b5ccabb0f560e927f5e60b17926ae55cf
describe
'92688' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
8343468e2180c273053d861a05c2d8d4
a7380b123065cc68f16cb2445fc1d2c8134c7c44
describe
'28864' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
4259acf354982923eedc3b5fca614a6e
6debfb9e5b370d5c4448c1641236ced4730a36c5
describe
'34470' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTU' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
7fa2ecb7d50370b2ed446aae208a1b47
76810de0ef7e18c1879ee9fbc6d3a4ffc6b1f548
describe
'10335604' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
94c71956f751482a6de12bcd27e4175c
b3c2788d9252ab3ae2f3188813b7dfaeddd13275
'2011-11-14T16:17:40-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTW' 'sip-files00064.txt'
952f14ffb92079cc5c13195b79a3fa7a
0a88a70bb1ff5fe0711f03cb9dd5716f39086bb6
'2011-11-14T16:14:57-05:00'
describe
'8866' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTX' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
85141e182d532248ac5432993485ff57
1d9a86475250ee45174c99116f2b74a5a0633130
describe
'1303793' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTY' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
2e5682531f798c04a4fb2e64df8447f3
8e76b926fb2e5d790f8c526d01b9c74ecaf9fd14
'2011-11-14T16:14:31-05:00'
describe
'88041' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXTZ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
7b38851b0c0f531dc98c9ae5ac8f59cd
040224a1208b9651e3a119e25c89fdec11005045
'2011-11-14T16:17:28-05:00'
describe
'29449' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
06097fad7102c749e1636baecefec404
21d38f456dc00e5831f9c4f3550a14b5cc9555c2
'2011-11-14T16:13:07-05:00'
describe
'32362' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
1669ea610c5bc8a07243bc48e273a732
fd2e968da0d5f2032c8ff7101345c7905a65e524
'2011-11-14T16:15:02-05:00'
describe
'10444004' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
35eebc19a4d30584d10c797d3bbd3cfe
77d56d861c5f0c602a8e3d0a7e737073a2a2ac3f
'2011-11-14T16:15:54-05:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUD' 'sip-files00065.txt'
8e15722507f09cbd078ada4de849d2a1
494fa952d53b7bee89edb33ba1eb9b2ef37aa632
describe
'8725' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUE' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
0469dff7f5d47edefa7bc08a80eed7e9
ee5209df6553fa198276f23f6df44dfd1263833d
describe
'1264472' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
6d197bd6a320442adec06daef42bda57
f363acb387a43fed00a38f42e313c16f0266596c
'2011-11-14T16:14:56-05:00'
describe
'91665' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
153672e8f2e24e4f854e0d2d60b8c107
ffc886cba966b200a6c60b11f541f67122eac73e
describe
'28063' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
5b85da44e8d2f8419af34d801ce303e3
85eb03cf35a5a3e686d1edc991a2e09a22d9e883
describe
'33237' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a3c81bedf0d55336236b0816a85720bc
6bffb6c3b6dd449d51a940f010c9981eb0e3e206
'2011-11-14T16:14:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
c29f5061080d4b2870bc5f634f88ced9
a1dd87526857d340a78a29f60212009dd3ab4d73
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUK' 'sip-files00066.txt'
7ec88bbbc8094257c321df304dc8fe34
c002b56f4420045e5fc0020822871cda76940a48
'2011-11-14T16:15:35-05:00'
describe
'9055' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUL' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
4f08ee4dbb9a1dab0cef20e5335ef2cb
90e1cf66c545701acc93294efdbe31a183642a79
describe
'1252019' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
b96143695d8b92bbd1be183926c3be59
080e123a95f1d9726c9547e5986a68a92ec3848f
'2011-11-14T16:15:17-05:00'
describe
'83728' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUN' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
c883a6afa94dfb1062eda4b9fea67cf4
21b08bef3d26016e32223162e15f2332d3c227fc
describe
'26551' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
913e858210f778575341fde9a2588e8f
6d1251980673e673840b336e1699a936265ab563
describe
'35296' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
142258e1006ff0da9b5268f2c9144b3c
7760e9f85516699acaaf30b17298ec93ba377e7c
describe
'10025577' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
6299b41c6a628e54bcf5a4491f58f611
bb407fc485fb1b309a250e2fb86cddff068c8eb7
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUR' 'sip-files00067.txt'
27e31eb4069f9343b367ad0f9879179d
a8ba6aa8ba0f92911989cfa6b73a268796ecf147
describe
'9011' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUS' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
7af4479deb9cfac3343669ef7f4001c2
aa663ab6420c738d3200dfe09fd976a494eacdb4
describe
'1290225' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUT' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
171604cacedbc86136276f3de0d4ba53
d8d4677703dec15365bf8cba1f73a0c4bc360755
describe
'85300' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUU' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
0e31c5afb393c0ec6e0a08a5785ac8bd
d18d725a25bfdd1e94d8b688ed468c6ae021a394
'2011-11-14T16:19:10-05:00'
describe
'26781' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
1014b30f2b1260ce67b863873caaa150
292fd17dca0b20a0d77c54b237b31d03ee8711d1
describe
'32550' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
8b9d74a632acef47ce76a9ca2b8e47fe
2c0d68e2b7deb649f3011df8be784af1e7e04f7a
describe
'10335332' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUX' 'sip-files00068.tif'
d83ec847b5017f978cd821719b627db6
b53ecb74cf109c952765eb07e6371fe66e70d7fb
'2011-11-14T16:14:18-05:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUY' 'sip-files00068.txt'
c720fa0a037401996907a4232f11d5a3
36a00c17966e0db936c2a06ea9c64a7f591b9e48
'2011-11-14T16:15:49-05:00'
describe
'8669' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXUZ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
5d3ddce7eb81865ccfafd896a4f9db73
ee93419a7fd91e7106390966aa25761a6d10322d
describe
'1164796' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVA' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
1b8ef44c08ab61a3c4f1a0bda08ba19c
219863b6cea30dceb7376947b75222f8d3d4f504
describe
'30105' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
b28e7b1b7ac623dc7939b765807ce57a
868e715a4bdb6287c6b788aedc86cb34aa28a335
describe
'5255' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
84b772c933488573cda2008c5ce65016
92448b8ddfc42b9316576c7e5573e2878db90fcb
describe
'9401' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVD' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
ae4ab8db50c439f128f27f56236f78c8
a21d98adfa879260501c893495e9a1569e88bb80
describe
'10230268' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVE' 'sip-files00069.tif'
98465af013cacbcf5b39c9f71817c7fd
c41970acb56c6ec1f33b35e39dd5ad4fb7d05834
'2011-11-14T16:17:43-05:00'
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVF' 'sip-files00069.txt'
94e52bf6e5c5d2cf731fd825a6d6b64c
35891ff1217742aa5fbe00b4f9cf03ee029ee854
describe
'3013' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
5c046667842687e92fa084c4c9e6ce84
57478dc7422e1dade1a3a288c433e98c0239d0b0
'2011-11-14T16:15:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVH' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
88c25755ccd5bc7bb2c9f793ee38339b
3714dd35358bf998002932cf02d9ba81873e454e
'2011-11-14T16:17:39-05:00'
describe
'75940' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVI' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
e30c37c15f997a873313bb691888db05
ffed903d33c7a3b7e4b24d829d5ee7834a3b99e2
describe
'1813' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
9ac058d7c5a4560c46e73f60ad82f0e8
6fe66151998400e0c74fcc8e5104fa8563566796
describe
'20073' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
70a84103d65bfb391948710d5d377855
5cda6be68516fe35ceae3ac4d7ce1034e0f03ca0
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
0bb1878a34a66feb81b6027d0bec6295
b0434e0aa6fe1be453baa448ddb41ca38f3da064
'2011-11-14T16:19:59-05:00'
describe
'250' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
fd2ede9c278768fb3265ccdf46bf730c
536ca31e825c057361b07e50bdd139f18e220411
describe
Invalid character
'5497' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVN' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
e0179929cb4cd9df449fd68053896a81
ca2412ee1e31c0203680c1506bd3cb12201c877b
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVO' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a4a2f6516abfc9413c27a4587aae6c92
bb7635ed3a7cbf028dfc464441344fa42ef50073
describe
'75878' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVP' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
71adb61da980f48be2822c19be8b7176
4ba36e829af6446f3b709e457ba5ff63234d4edb
describe
'21536' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVQ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
ad1abb975f0518eede38b92e006d0e9e
1aac4bb6b5905e627a074d098d45a139f8c0bce9
describe
'28777' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVR' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
26dcb865df7a8283fa87bc0862bce50a
d42114407cbeeadcfd2fbc389193ce1e81eec635
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVS' 'sip-files00072.tif'
52f6e8c8fc32bab41b7e66b17bd7378d
4b9b82851d2eed4230d5cccfadfd7a77ed8e6c15
'2011-11-14T16:19:42-05:00'
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVT' 'sip-files00072.txt'
0db0033a77940b0c104b24d28a38691c
4073d665341a2471a8f02776c3119f0eacd9b4a0
describe
'7203' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVU' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
a56855afb62196643ba7b5b0694510a9
b5412ff4b5863b1f215f5b480a6a5b8a27998877
'2011-11-14T16:17:54-05:00'
describe
'1277611' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVV' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
6599a4cf8a42a94de5271ba1e44e7bfc
af8be8b6a16298ca87f21c19836bb93e432eb701
describe
'89161' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVW' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
21322a4dcf4953273e177cade434c804
2a5d80a08a5ae8008d87524bbce8dd9c41e2fd90
describe
'27769' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVX' 'sip-files00073.pro'
92284f604481c2e5cbe223066f48b3b8
561fac44662d21aabf2521b45cb8683ae0b14764
describe
'35358' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVY' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
35f580f1ecb0d4ceda3d5d9649a8686e
e7c76bb57d2ece30095838bf198644cc7a50ff38
describe
'10234680' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXVZ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
ebc78ff6f5df4d1f938f4ac135899c1d
a82b2536693d9e72a5fcfdcc7471163cb1e15c1a
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWA' 'sip-files00073.txt'
27ee7f514ba8dd5a990714c4a64513f5
648dcce71a4756e8dfe82ff4a2c2ae4f3cf613f0
describe
'9068' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWB' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
4336c2b486591593539afdc0627b7037
e3cad217d9403676f3e57630a37dc729744a82bc
describe
'1264457' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWC' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
0eca0b1df6d9722804f3c5c60bb8c95a
a12e78b3fabf6bae41aed93c34a3d3a561063ecc
describe
'88202' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWD' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e1e9c41d57f2938041a6aa8a3aa40b65
54727a4be07be28391cd44429e7820dd4cc5ccd9
describe
'26503' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWE' 'sip-files00074.pro'
7060aab00555ea85fdfbdf3e57ffb4dd
93932cc8f5263395ea357a423eeee29a9422b5c0
describe
'29930' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWF' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
5c996adcae8459c3de14b7fb9c5256ed
3ae066e53b955b0dac0a240db1e38281a08786a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWG' 'sip-files00074.tif'
fc3cb63873a2b99ad30eb63723c8392a
1620ca43d911695413bbebea76959dd4d4860031
'2011-11-14T16:19:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWH' 'sip-files00074.txt'
ee4b8985b137bd6e489cc1a25422d71d
5f1321865eccca9b97a392d9f36f8bfab3ea859b
describe
'8625' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWI' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
8dbb549de9e501e81da7111fbdaa1f6b
c13211c9372307e9c500bd2b185affdc494de1ce
describe
'1277572' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWJ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
d7d4b3cac0109121a46802fbd05cc08c
df45ed4276bd715c01957ebceb44a80bddacffd2
describe
'89370' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWK' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
6d4a9087bb861d9dab1538cac1bf0a80
7d411bb4d44243ca4a1392b2bb6fc5a60e170925
'2011-11-14T16:13:46-05:00'
describe
'27901' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWL' 'sip-files00075.pro'
57006a03a0b32c4130ae7b66c6b5f942
5e5bdaf58162ac7b1f155005e62eef6947d44ae7
'2011-11-14T16:19:54-05:00'
describe
'32763' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWM' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
0da315b5d6b4039136ccb1d2f20a35be
f521c8746286c79655cc6278b41a8dbb602866d9
describe
'10234436' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWN' 'sip-files00075.tif'
a2b3d4e9d6494ee366f0d47db2cf3ab2
d8ec3b303adb17c980a40f7d36ebf72f35d4534d
'2011-11-14T16:14:01-05:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWO' 'sip-files00075.txt'
e805d4f3580afed1fad728b5f29f2dab
aa7c9be02a236c1fbc20c18e13a3e68439cdbc30
'2011-11-14T16:16:03-05:00'
describe
'8579' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWP' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
135b1a33f94a77fbf99fe560fb809c17
b0437e9042cc3747f00cc46eb6d705bffc63c41a
describe
'1290202' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWQ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
31ec1f2ebd68b616fb7b89a3f1220c58
c375834550d279f2d55837a83b79c394bbeed3b6
describe
'87682' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWR' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
f7936c84c582f5cdef9c3eecba5c971e
b5e92012b366bbd35c138b5808ab4d531eb65e21
describe
'28828' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWS' 'sip-files00076.pro'
566469eb808ca28538490670f7bd7558
5c4265723ee5977c28ccae70fc02c3944da2d6d6
describe
'34217' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWT' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
97a32617d293072707a65226d5b1224f
849286c22ef29f8605347898816ea27de331f84d
describe
'10335244' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWU' 'sip-files00076.tif'
e042d9ca901e0e967122f6c6142d5dac
6d50482ad275b511f6291fee389862337135da97
'2011-11-14T16:17:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWV' 'sip-files00076.txt'
f46209e96e78a71e7db46caf0602447b
81e1f0979428f61fc27e21b3abd6650070159cb9
describe
'8678' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWW' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
6e3755db06f7e2e18fc7c6c018d7d014
e4c07d9c89bbf98653e759721e362c9c1bce2409
describe
'1277413' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWX' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
d202d0fa5c924b0ec471fb59b1dcd847
4bb034179d872918100f79a7f8f5f31928816f9d
'2011-11-14T16:19:52-05:00'
describe
'74779' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWY' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
9ceb680b054a0e1c2718279457e2152c
c41e83e63e03f1ec12fe6c7b2ffb74220f76f7f5
describe
'21580' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXWZ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ca5acedf7396a377a5b7b4ef31e37cd6
132f81a2b38f8bc1e7cbf26217f2b30c1366bc4a
describe
'25161' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXA' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b7f2d398f6343584f29282180a5dafa6
6800aaa34434746a4f891d8cd812ab507d8d5613
describe
'10233924' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXB' 'sip-files00077.tif'
0af66605fe5257df31969658a0401b35
1f25f68efcdd633d6e7da80601cd569cb4eed316
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXC' 'sip-files00077.txt'
897db1e874cccae7543d961287221199
3f59dd77365596558cb4a0673cc4899c837fd431
describe
'8004' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXD' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2880e23b5fd0b639a5713de5bab24ff2
4b18d429c5fe5668ff7a4653e45c33328ebee865
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXE' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1c54442ca339965eaea0ac1d6afe2356
a3de794dce49f0585bdd99d3c9a3d81bc2004d62
describe
'91431' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXF' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
bbf6db746ebbf41eeb684534b81cd992
7add02a148c1e9163f4baf6b319f30d2a2a193c5
describe
'27343' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXG' 'sip-files00078.pro'
cadfa8874be58bed9e519455e3e12637
fb139ac9f939dd1db7a325ac0537dfee0b8e3991
'2011-11-14T16:20:19-05:00'
describe
'30741' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXH' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
7aa6034689889d6406ae6ef1522aa9ae
2f5173a28744550135a92dac89a1feacd898c269
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXI' 'sip-files00078.tif'
af18b6fdbbb5fa97a47cc613ee4a389c
e2bc54c3a47b380c444ecd62327c3de0c82f2552
'2011-11-14T16:19:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXJ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
8ddd271d9a8a391f7a483905417db238
b70781e130db586f87ebe33532b03e12512d9497
describe
'8551' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXK' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
198ce5d9f0c78a8222cff8035be229ff
465c9aa4c714a998ec63c9c0e3697b65dc47aa37
describe
'1251749' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXL' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
477bd8f13d57356c7e8724588a50070b
c3d47c4f9970ee8f9bfe800674de64be14b64eb2
describe
'89604' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXM' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
2b27efb4780233d02f38b54d07a97683
04d1f4f4b40997d31bc5400dfd8a423631936c9c
describe
'28151' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXN' 'sip-files00079.pro'
f7e997d596bf23b329a32afae96006a9
e3a4bf5a0c40a2301d59130bacbc5119b5c8e9be
describe
'36344' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXO' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
9c64e2a82cca52cdd9cd38a77578c546
4c9cf930b4b041d1600f221887aa7d143e7dbcfb
'2011-11-14T16:15:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXP' 'sip-files00079.tif'
db704cef5c2ec83f9fddb75ccf46ef98
c82582d5be21ce4c3d06a16a571b8fe6a81427b5
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXQ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
452a285303c68f59c2bf1feecfe663ed
d37c9fea5e8388aac2614cf484d7b412d9d82cd4
describe
'9103' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXR' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
59aa0af6e3768a61cdc68aeddba93e69
0a1193e46fb0f91d6823e8ed0dc2016d2040ee2e
'2011-11-14T16:15:39-05:00'
describe
'1264348' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXS' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
232bd672789404c004b3568e64fc8194
5241802ebc577c867f2536babc9d4b503785c34e
describe
'84495' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXT' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
a9aa50f889be081c647e1524285a3452
daed072dff683ed9c1a9ebe52a76fb97090757c3
describe
'26993' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXU' 'sip-files00080.pro'
b3a33b01af9badf9ff13bd981262af52
ff682e7ba71448a51eeadb20fbe7c40f09d35016
'2011-11-14T16:15:46-05:00'
describe
'34403' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXV' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
0a8507e0734d3ec68efe0c9e4dba8c0e
b656c78cc31e47df34848419d7d69d0982bd55c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXW' 'sip-files00080.tif'
f934d9ff32554386e03f8fb107c78a71
1892f40ba65a4e8c00d8f3a6a8f2a675a48a6275
'2011-11-14T16:19:34-05:00'
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXX' 'sip-files00080.txt'
eb967041002caf7fa7b2455048937589
91d65ccb19e8bffbef240a69914effa49aab5dac
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXY' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
55ca25d3b46cd78f807fbde404a77098
3a81d329f0435962454e5e9bb6e8a2d6f9d92e51
describe
'1277620' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXXZ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
75eb8f441bec5720c21404f1250b6dda
0798f8eb315b085c25a5f2e43a452d045adc0ac0
'2011-11-14T16:19:24-05:00'
describe
'91832' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYA' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
320284ef4dedb555c071847bc2c682df
59f69ca7eec8d693b7d785969083d35243b3da4f
describe
'28123' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYB' 'sip-files00081.pro'
c401eec9fa36c7c5c5c115df06190253
aa387954fe8c766b47d9ea9e6e7fc146f2daed52
describe
'32671' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYC' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
4e0b055db7b6d8e5c354ee11bc79c8b7
c0413d7012150d6d244f62aca463a970d3b9c83c
describe
'10234692' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYD' 'sip-files00081.tif'
6aea4ff59e5a520c4ed01f1d685fd9b9
40a4fc359cfe1293a9532b1222cddeccfb89922b
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYE' 'sip-files00081.txt'
d02ecbdab0e11532377ac43260daa450
f24a374abece3acf13585efa8f96078b955ebd88
'2011-11-14T16:20:43-05:00'
describe
'9084' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYF' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
82f58daee9b24175d4f5dc7ab187982c
36fe632265c740aa1e91d6f019117835edeb71e4
'2011-11-14T16:17:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYG' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
b32b9a812740efc559c18de96f05cc17
a7060f754ff1aeba88717e7c039bec105f8b0af6
describe
'89473' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYH' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
90e95d4925f019c8dad79d3244660d01
4d2ee1ac76cb1adba8f16dad029c750c87325da9
describe
'27631' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYI' 'sip-files00082.pro'
55963a2d5f22a52c49a63c263b667635
d8aea94df29f677ed6fb02fc0b895d7db8e631d2
describe
'32950' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYJ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
a50ae618ea8bd55eb652315e3e3c0d41
5fec9e480c7cbfa814409370cf523371dde5ab6a
describe
'10335420' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYK' 'sip-files00082.tif'
a9c87e70540bfad8a962b102fa70d0f6
7eb219a595227b7e2ec5d0211b46829116c28407
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYL' 'sip-files00082.txt'
0bed13cf7dcc3547993330a78b511ba4
c41c6b37682986cb525b0fa35641c4e7ffddbdce
describe
'8968' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYM' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
f556855d30d35de000444976c03f952c
52ef0493ab9c4658b572c055e65b3e89f72d486f
'2011-11-14T16:15:23-05:00'
describe
'1313061' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYN' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
996bb04857de966f5e41f96b505a50bc
b54b69dbe9e2982206fc892fc37bac4e778bcfd2
'2011-11-14T16:16:21-05:00'
describe
'88302' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYO' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
7846ec6d352326f44d92a4d00f78df9e
876cb35e52d03d0a6d78c6374027282d8fd2bc8a
'2011-11-14T16:13:24-05:00'
describe
'28238' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYP' 'sip-files00083.pro'
9e783efb55a686968b1a38fe96820b50
bbd03489ccaa69f8f96bc9c59b8b7a15effefbf7
describe
'31866' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYQ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
62123dac9ce1927071a5598bb9e3306c
e29761655f671bf861b805c43eb442f977ae9b0a
describe
'10518048' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYR' 'sip-files00083.tif'
7ba8fadce9abe48c0ef44c73ca28a658
e912354ca609b1132b34e3dd9686ad7b57ec9597
'2011-11-14T16:15:24-05:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYS' 'sip-files00083.txt'
47baadb07898243bfea593338076cdc9
8d26f4a98e5f295f10f3dee8aa63b2d81355e028
'2011-11-14T16:19:39-05:00'
describe
'8470' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYT' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
e1b3f9ba030aeece5fb51b58770eecaf
44b5cf45d7caafb7179a1ba72d48079e0f3f072b
describe
'1299463' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYU' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
28cd7a9483d5d8f70d383c91ac82f984
03a945beb4d0e8de12efec99c8e7960f39ce6f72
describe
'94150' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYV' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
8a662237590e2dc735ff6438d7fa836c
292c4a80848d8b8001ffcbb4fe7db509def36213
'2011-11-14T16:18:25-05:00'
describe
'29684' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYW' 'sip-files00084.pro'
401c95fb7c8f2cefd5a91d4f9618065e
626779e89a20b5833f2af6f833c3befe5dde0723
describe
'34023' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYX' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
84f7e05a1f4dac23a8b5fdbc12d0ba32
c485065a434c2c5259480059c5cc7c691fdd014d
'2011-11-14T16:15:25-05:00'
describe
'10409612' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYY' 'sip-files00084.tif'
f2c4c6cbd601866cef4586347f0a402f
456b40acbfb24c51145903743858c254adc41e91
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXYZ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
6e1a7888a5e2cc97f11f6d15ee3df7b9
a841e46503454babdb2c4bdd8160f04cdcb10f8f
describe
'9029' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZA' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
6edc4a5f73cf942f6f978257a2c4bfa1
1b6b43a61dcc41e6829ea9b6129c69a5ecc66e41
'2011-11-14T16:19:49-05:00'
describe
'1298383' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZB' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f78f5489152f2a67f36db7ea6371f418
dee5cc90680d50bdab86457134d42df7dcacec3b
describe
'78094' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZC' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
c3769e918c6644eb4c18874a02332938
f1cbfcd15a53ee4cc5060b461201dd76be172d46
'2011-11-14T16:18:15-05:00'
describe
'22882' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZD' 'sip-files00085.pro'
34778c30bcd99a0b272ceb9b8ad59f02
64b4860532e47e4386f96bc73b062b83cc4f5e77
describe
'27007' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZE' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
7302103f8990193fedecebaf6a94b201
a613bb615d884f29f10d15cfdc6dfa4542533082
'2011-11-14T16:19:36-05:00'
describe
'10400508' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZF' 'sip-files00085.tif'
1898b373410ea12d4817b343f17470fc
617914c458645a5c639377517335e94b8ebec771
'2011-11-14T16:20:02-05:00'
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZG' 'sip-files00085.txt'
1601719a2f2784c5a0e602dcc74b7cc3
54d0a2e3b5b315884ef8c88515c5efecde0d9710
describe
'7573' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZH' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
7638e4dc822f1737cad3f7858f980384
66d16fdb3481943d24488b1370d1fd7000447588
describe
'1264318' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZI' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
ee38ae59bdac51d9a6aa8f3a5a666238
7f935e5cf3c8ce59a760a83fc83597fc56a5480f
describe
'69032' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZJ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
20a9a9ef345e01338b2c7d569c1f4556
017175eb80c30ce65d41d64b5dc16560eb2757d1
'2011-11-14T16:15:21-05:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZK' 'sip-files00086.pro'
b2ed8b93dbfb5fb9f39e90aae47afbb0
d203182f7232b1e770758e0541afb7c821c7dcb2
describe
'19441' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZL' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
67fd568918c3775562055adb8cce930f
d5ed7ba4576aac1cdeb3bce56c451d84d1113675
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZM' 'sip-files00086.tif'
cbd7b8570d590a9f76b50ff3f6c8e6e9
1da62273af755122fd99c9dcf537bacaa0cfc0ec
'2011-11-14T16:14:17-05:00'
describe
'139' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZN' 'sip-files00086.txt'
0592d76feca12262a52cfe7a07c4032f
bfff0c1ce1092bde378540a58a6a8a66ab99df62
describe
'5343' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZO' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
2577fb485419a9c67f8cb8e1d6d16235
cb0adcb7733a332cef30be4daf8f4f42f6a1ed30
describe
'1264453' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZP' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
d00849c59ee12cc001d69485494702db
19b408acc9152dc70d643fc07cd8132f4002e901
describe
'77900' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZQ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
7a00ebd64fd84ab1f9c900f6946631eb
82ec6e16807eef148ee169db3ab2c2cd3e5dc289
describe
'21918' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZR' 'sip-files00088.pro'
362f928accbec75bbfcc34fa4e92160f
56968f36133cc1d9b7f9c67710bc419a7fab2c54
'2011-11-14T16:18:44-05:00'
describe
'27921' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZS' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
dd69d285fc9c4ffd030ecce30400cac0
d862cbeb4267d4aebb7bf5fabe1824f1350ba825
'2011-11-14T16:20:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZT' 'sip-files00088.tif'
a37a474235ab629a34a1689e5c29de58
ac52eaba15400999a722d312b72e097f15b215c7
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZU' 'sip-files00088.txt'
25224cb6fd5cbb3b65ab98fcc717b7c6
9d81a67cc93ec0fe487e713eea2cfdd61940c9d6
describe
'7200' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZV' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
33890ad477d5960c9eccf3f1724383b0
4f2a6b15b4b3f18489943dd136dda750ab8d9f63
describe
'1252008' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZW' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
6967c650d3b084f4924a25b4d3d48a70
7a0274a5fc48d1b0caf916d9562899cc018ac6c1
describe
'91047' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZX' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
5325eab14d3b2127b5e321dd79e6e445
be4a8b1c31fa5752c20350c6ba5a650ae5d32b82
describe
'28115' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZY' 'sip-files00089.pro'
93033ab016a6cd537978e766db1bead7
85cc3b04fcb5a27cced85a4d41be3972c9a5d89c
describe
'32735' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABXZZ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
c6f06da5afab34ab91a8673e7d74ba9c
bc0538c7580e9e70d9f05f078cbae34c2bc6bbdb
'2011-11-14T16:15:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAA' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7b67d56e52aedddac8f346bcd4ebdb16
7467b2cd4db378da9c91ba3f3eb6aecc6d29293f
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAB' 'sip-files00089.txt'
83bf2065f56ff57e940a24d5b4b21d29
97578944aa650309a2fa531ed86919f8a8444015
describe
'8829' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAC' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
22cb6fee903fe1aaacb1fcb65e0569bb
2f1e5b7ca4ca24820af21bd4af544b5be9e6af31
describe
'1311632' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAD' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
854594a4b8ed1ba002d25929373c2822
55b2bc1401455c84caa4ba15154d192e04274eb9
'2011-11-14T16:18:01-05:00'
describe
'86657' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAE' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
dc8749c02316dfdb2d165a7932d57949
55fab3ed8dd03a4253be057c04dd377650408d89
describe
'27806' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAF' 'sip-files00090.pro'
52875f8dc76587459cc8a2fadde20c3d
a35263620a74ffd96d44413d31d7642c9e8ed902
'2011-11-14T16:18:26-05:00'
describe
'30766' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAG' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
8cc70fee6abaf211cd8720dc0377eb60
a3c0778e45d2abbff7fa352ff61e2530d7806dbe
'2011-11-14T16:13:01-05:00'
describe
'10506784' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAH' 'sip-files00090.tif'
661b39770eb2e07ca33de222de2aba1d
f9e751dd47d11c3b633b3a40e7a3d02d8a903136
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAI' 'sip-files00090.txt'
02604254de06133da52fed9afa9145cc
18bf26456228aa17941e607271a386dd76de233f
'2011-11-14T16:15:03-05:00'
describe
'8617' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAJ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
4583cd83e9346ae7eb8518c6d86b276f
f98b7b49ecb0ddfaa743e0032ab525e5fd4a2aed
describe
'1298439' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAK' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
e657b3f8aa27cbdb42c6afdc409b25e4
53cc0b70ecfd87b9781d53ddddf9336f4e7c69f7
describe
'83169' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAL' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
e0e9f216cc6e503fb897821d84521bef
a27334754150dbbe166631e83a0a938a29fda6ba
describe
'27308' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAM' 'sip-files00091.pro'
0b61c6cd00f23a019c021629020999fb
903d3a3498c979b81174c07c374daf3b7ac405a2
describe
'30244' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAN' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
458d3c9eefbfac9c5c1899f1afeadb56
49d7e530547ac6ec08bacceaf90fa5df248e7386
'2011-11-14T16:19:31-05:00'
describe
'10400880' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAO' 'sip-files00091.tif'
9340cf30674d9d8ff44f4fb59bb3f2df
60081e497160cf874c93dd913d47679bf33d2cdc
'2011-11-14T16:13:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAP' 'sip-files00091.txt'
000cb4c33481c1cc736b166586df547e
d1cc35692d5dbd6066a3580a649a0252834b1d10
'2011-11-14T16:14:45-05:00'
describe
'8429' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAQ' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
872b6c7dd2b31b1ec879bc0eae3311ac
cecebcb0f103b45a95e79aef8a3ef1cb3dd706d3
describe
'1311659' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAR' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
1abe4e1ffd0a20675320df69b95d25b9
f9bf2dbdf7f2feaccc6af97cf5d6cae8240e6423
'2011-11-14T16:14:51-05:00'
describe
'82474' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAS' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
cf71f32e715087f26a04ac80fa48dd16
8ea8cd812c14c5a7327144a58170e9d133bc0bf6
describe
'25685' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAT' 'sip-files00092.pro'
55cfe2358ba24d5720a11f28e4c4107d
acb397fe119b3e3bca8a0f5a002aa716c5e43c30
'2011-11-14T16:20:27-05:00'
describe
'30064' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAU' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
01a1d36b9d6f081caedf4dd502540ee9
b25672709f7fc973a87bc698fe69aefbe4882dff
'2011-11-14T16:13:29-05:00'
describe
'10506872' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAV' 'sip-files00092.tif'
88b83cba079da65c37cabd13669dca9e
7ebfddab07812724b8751f914037a7c02399f812
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAW' 'sip-files00092.txt'
d4151caad6de37669dfee020237d6c8c
d67b4395e728aa6471440564e11e176c5c2af15d
describe
'8407' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAX' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
7e8817dd3ba38c706aef613eea3f1b01
aa71e53d22f54b8566a3b6f0ac67c3dc82b77009
describe
'1298430' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAY' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
04fe5b1c37ae4851c8ab57e43d006a7d
0ae1c11f639febac797e4497deb6062253dce725
'2011-11-14T16:17:12-05:00'
describe
'85159' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYAZ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
6aecbcfd2df33ef34acb667ed4dd3899
d35ec0e0ed69a9c58f0cd95dd054a2fb3ef36ef5
describe
'27540' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBA' 'sip-files00093.pro'
897d355a792f10b6952d97d5b8b1b2f9
07e22fe75f320549f8a55801df9398ce979f9999
describe
'30871' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBB' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
a1335998891b63087f475370e68237bf
540592f692299da081d3b4e3a0fd86989154936a
describe
'10400960' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBC' 'sip-files00093.tif'
d2508cb6bbf08dc8120bee9a7e09ae3c
2c2b902d19867bfd6b5c743eee4f96f8adadfb11
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBD' 'sip-files00093.txt'
eda41f54fb1ca186843758ea087bba9e
336efb979a480f4118fe6191e35183f82351e70d
'2011-11-14T16:17:05-05:00'
describe
'8486' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBE' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
447e501cd97682d648170657ffbadddd
5953a476ea1e36378e8036188a67dba8323db9ee
describe
'1288617' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBF' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
cbf846ede177e33d1c1eb5f47bfaca8c
db440c708b52aea902c4dfbb1d70002b3b6e0c3b
describe
'90619' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBG' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
a7125f395c5e1e7baed8b613b1f261ba
7754eb9563614b90134cc944790821a6e84f8742
describe
'28629' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBH' 'sip-files00094.pro'
dd78010cc31323c8316e0536c9d150cb
0b6ac0e11f18e167057f7b8a965f59c23d951f1b
describe
'31805' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBI' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
de66b12c7da2143cd32b6a8aefb5ec85
6b38e058f7f2c442f2ce354866ab4700ffe47869
describe
'10322632' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBJ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
d6670db449c7e239c8f51178470978d6
abe1a7b438958b9083ec27d75d658c1736d8b242
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBK' 'sip-files00094.txt'
eb8946419645c4df23d12036f125e6d1
03e35c204617ce28b93769933689b728050bf0c7
describe
'8984' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBL' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
2b8b0b1bf8d91ec6fabaa161c1482ee2
ef391ca426d80474ab5703e8b4792dd337215ba6
describe
'1312711' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBM' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
9e3a1bfa761fc1fa31f3a80545f123de
d08318fe9f325a11551b0b2a085e378120686495
describe
'88760' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBN' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
ecddf8c9216d2a3eea5ab58970295817
3e9cc13069fa40694a58cfa7c91cf02f7285b3b2
'2011-11-14T16:17:17-05:00'
describe
'28720' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBO' 'sip-files00095.pro'
fff3234ef8396a090b9787726ef41085
235ba981a74fbb5442741cc713d511ff23a0c5bb
describe
'32962' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBP' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
0bd2b95f57d950a668e7072ac858a18b
ce565da2494af7c0853068343a34593d32462fde
describe
'10515488' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBQ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
8070a473f2a2c6047ff0c4225264de63
a70d9772894b55f6c18af553e73d76580db1f403
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBR' 'sip-files00095.txt'
cb20631698defaa2b4521540b6c842c8
d149dc70cdeea1f0581ec1bd4158860b9ee6e0eb
'2011-11-14T16:18:27-05:00'
describe
'8809' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBS' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
55be40db7dbc1beeff4c5537f51a1eea
65871820f26f781b6b1241e966cf1eb94be3d2c3
describe
'1309550' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBT' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
f73febef1a83f6e809c79cb1803468d9
cb9392c225701c21846c270cf6cf3e02ff557367
describe
'85857' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBU' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
f000961d32fd738a5658ef665db9ef0e
96662f6520d3b2ef34c44c3fbe9f5447beac1267
describe
'27402' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBV' 'sip-files00096.pro'
fac8261f2ab45877ae90c37996fa6e14
05a9fd43af711c1164c5bd85d980c2ce5119742c
describe
'31689' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBW' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
307395de51ea9aebfc734ae0693d75a1
c68e81adb5b07d67aea7ec7e2cd62d37c3e3b8ad
describe
'10490212' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBX' 'sip-files00096.tif'
a3a712d6fad7749771083fcf37745a19
17170a3f7d4b5f7a0b45b13c96b20310012f3f40
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBY' 'sip-files00096.txt'
f18a17f523aced9cba6d8ab330c34400
d4fdd600560f2755a17fbb315f906c7149d62b0f
describe
'8719' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYBZ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
06da93c8bb2677f2d0e4f2cd34962ad0
af579757273ebc5a86a66ad401e715c9a5fd194a
describe
'1317995' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCA' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
a0492fe33fd5a145d6040a3d80513627
0db1a359106273bf2bcc9e8487c92ea6058a2167
describe
'86723' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCB' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
d3baaa7c37cab8627fe7a998d218971f
18ab70edbf2a5f58252ad15e9c79a698b20b8dfc
'2011-11-14T16:17:36-05:00'
describe
'28646' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCC' 'sip-files00097.pro'
5186c05926943e8f71321c7977dc3e1d
f935ad54d3b82d6c9ae70a6e30c42989c16c4a68
describe
'31213' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCD' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
fbb802f62af24dea61586c00da86c658
c5ec646e8fa69cd9cee637d0cd90119c0f09b98d
describe
'10558092' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCE' 'sip-files00097.tif'
72792134740888d4dcbc964194758ad1
20b27b966d9875234454f39a90255025961a28a2
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCF' 'sip-files00097.txt'
a8f67b5f3509acc08f5530b0014fa9ac
3083d296cc9b47a74a8d1e9a01fa4086964caaa4
'2011-11-14T16:15:32-05:00'
describe
'8559' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCG' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
1d13cc4ddb0cca0c9c8832e0a2927a0e
b512803a65981d84a0a115564d3c13f4e6384654
describe
'1297270' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCH' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
542cf512356f63f5f126d152fbef74a6
5e9867c533e0d546114ce67e5c2e4cada525f8cb
describe
'88222' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCI' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
fe09680ab9832fd02c7279938c6f4c86
62657c5ddf179a30a642306a4b6eedb56e4ae6ca
describe
'28079' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCJ' 'sip-files00098.pro'
dfba612c48d9d7355288b31fa526c02b
f233f610790888c0e7851cf392a2fc51c4955ae3
describe
'32023' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCK' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
b977d1c1a5068adb080d7cc1231f8eb3
12292d99ec0da9688754a9c922f96fb3295f8698
describe
'10392676' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCL' 'sip-files00098.tif'
78ecf1c2c66185ba55ae4eac389bf610
a70f332c00c4bbc96cec2589ef3ac594022f03f1
'2011-11-14T16:17:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCM' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b728fe129c1929369bcb1bb4a91ed8f8
6d1772bfb276351defcc89101f713bcca06b7139
describe
'8720' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCN' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
a42a572e1a9e5e9f9f34663c31215022
82bdeaa51b927891edfc68e7a77e2e74e31555c0
describe
'1324721' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCO' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
e61f1050538b9e938f3f4669bfbdef27
d8f94d63c80b1d3c080022be84feb9a161c9743d
describe
'85182' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCP' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
f270954298974ff8333dd3bb676face1
f5a8ce033fb45063b2a107a404368a082ea1a17c
describe
'28495' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCQ' 'sip-files00099.pro'
1638d2606add927dac1e44275191f3cb
f787b665887e6c03c2504b1bacb41f808df165f3
describe
'31758' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCR' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
f2bc5df919f09016fdd752dc2ae7c2c9
ab8b72dc3b7935d62a1723be4f1962631c0e50b5
describe
'10611860' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCS' 'sip-files00099.tif'
4c8235964f179c279de9afacbb3ca251
2620e1660996fbabb62ebd20c7c18d75d52f7db0
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCT' 'sip-files00099.txt'
b1900947420d764339bc536ae56ec45b
f1fdd35db1c83f59d5a831b0f13341471e175663
'2011-11-14T16:12:48-05:00'
describe
'8626' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCU' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
3c146199a09a061175f048e8b27f71c6
9764a1471bb879d21115f67936e9a27f44d6a86f
describe
'1304429' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCV' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
6c3bec90c17edc0127a5490b6d0b71ed
dd0c877b00c77f50ea1565150b9e4e3cfd3410be
describe
'61590' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCW' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
7cc9ed86204f10c9f636b593419510d3
363d59b06b6924a9758319f1b5a09434b596a551
describe
'17680' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCX' 'sip-files00100.pro'
16ac5187671aa5756c0bb26a45840f2e
17ff13e69a8a4fc67656c6a0e765eba718e11b03
describe
'21510' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCY' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
e533d7c72097078d2eef8f493c3a60de
5383f9f23a998009bd30d1e828f7bcebef4fcc73
describe
'10447812' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYCZ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
67770e6d29977c4c72d241d8efff9a13
43ea363ee2c7ebef6f8f9437272544ba9af3404f
'2011-11-14T16:19:03-05:00'
describe
'710' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDA' 'sip-files00100.txt'
53a7ffd714b7e075637d2f717ffaaf0f
4bd929a8532e228a82e333717ce6771fa226f14b
describe
'6251' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDB' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
d91f343587126eaf6155e2ded7f0eba0
a13f150eafdd3aa88254b141735fafdff40fa797
describe
'1016547' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDC' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
45ba1541134e22ffcfd2489f705d5a32
5aff806132be98c0a15456efdefe8bf2702d8a32
describe
'13790' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDD' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
129c35111c56c9d13e8c0bf27fd77b1b
b99287b5ec4f1d502634b9406c675333bedf80af
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDE' 'sip-files00101.pro'
2f0dc88404bb0722d32105e337f6daa8
bc2cb302801c3e7fafbf83cfd1c24452cbe5d9d3
describe
'3735' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDF' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
731f0046df024847b993ab5a0a5f3772
943c981fdc2cdd3107a06405d40583c74bb5e3ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDG' 'sip-files00101.tif'
4de1467c3c90add34694875b005bdd45
eee18870ad0a9d26686f0423aeaa7c7b0f09e745
'2011-11-14T16:14:19-05:00'
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDH' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
6c6bd924af8334af28cbaebf93a5accc
7cf1deecb2ea5740567500a7799a054696ca1377
describe
'1264437' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDI' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
f0de462379d727bf1c3ceb435557733f
8637d03f404176741b346694ba79e9f45e3113a7
describe
'74012' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDJ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
dbffecd88c6d0a3ab53e30022d59fe3d
d427b0b79e911a389ad6208f470f6200e62b8973
describe
'21663' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDK' 'sip-files00102.pro'
f856475c2cb243218dea1822ad8493f4
cf375e551ff2ad501797279e41cff36c98f1dc01
describe
'25748' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDL' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
5ff9745721d9c65f0911b14898aba567
1988115af1c26d7314f067ae395193dab0a0636a
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDM' 'sip-files00102.tif'
d779244d483dc7e79ab179694fac4f70
c07f56e4d04fcf885b4bfc2bb6aa9df0c73753c1
describe
'888' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDN' 'sip-files00102.txt'
fc5b94f2a2e0e83bec2790ed1112633b
531f4fbfb85e891ea568fe98353ca97af22ada26
describe
'7183' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDO' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
a1a26e16ff0986e59a2f494a7cd015cf
c68422f078085fc2eda4c67bcdfd526ac6f9a35b
'2011-11-14T16:17:10-05:00'
describe
'1386454' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDP' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
1c573140578b3c1b1aa628ce85d671a8
6f90bc1b72eeb9b379b5f368a56c86b42580ffff
describe
'81251' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDQ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
d42adb9b908c27fa8f60def9f33a48d2
06796170577627619fa6586957b1e2f2b4b31316
describe
'28712' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDR' 'sip-files00103.pro'
05dcedd87eb9e99b6bfeafc21c04ee69
75c4f40e87b189e8cbf275e01d656366434b4c64
describe
'29585' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDS' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
495e469a6aff6703b37d0dcc3f511a2c
fb938822ad478615d0af44f9d3d85ade1e92ab5b
describe
'11104960' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDT' 'sip-files00103.tif'
ee43b091ab38cfd25f6567b52c966cc3
f16e661c7e2a156c01dfc079b1c06c1f727b025e
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDU' 'sip-files00103.txt'
54d50ccfc9de0f066906f8f41a731393
c00d207f245c14404514b6fc489886565232daa4
'2011-11-14T16:14:24-05:00'
describe
'7840' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDV' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
c42c3769d59a986701f1607303e60b2c
6661e1f5fb5ce6ee14fc38db50959ce5c8c6964d
describe
'1264474' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDW' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
fd2d12010c527b11d45cac43018c9b09
1a97227266825d350e4bdb63bbdf24279feb35ff
describe
'88097' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDX' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
b48a3095b2bf4521e82a2d18c9f184cb
2882b0ee354c5b5cbbf4cf33632de3685e24c54e
describe
'28922' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDY' 'sip-files00104.pro'
cd982e0b595f7e3ae63c76b64276d178
9c3a182810b579ae12d1d2d32f72419b2ce0aabe
describe
'31636' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYDZ' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
fa47e5c507d5947c14a3bd1bf8407be7
f001dd6e3b736f783faac68fdd7774609ba362a9
'2011-11-14T16:15:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEA' 'sip-files00104.tif'
6c0461e95362aa50b8fd4c91e16f1178
3fcf158cda5ebfd8c40f4e0d2bfccf45a438eac2
'2011-11-14T16:17:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEB' 'sip-files00104.txt'
9f6d4ae9415094e949d3a5d85c285a96
d588fc27451d4916a290a57952ddc2d66a887d07
describe
'8563' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEC' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
2bdfc2d4e711cf94efec643652a0c23e
633bbbfbef9bf3525c9e4c149db748bab3c10643
'2011-11-14T16:14:15-05:00'
describe
'1312238' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYED' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
352904d60f0c90a195bb0d90bd50c51a
a168255df46f022c0399dc6a02da509dad96f3a8
describe
'87300' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEE' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
1f78126bd895e1432e0bf59f0d8f2228
640306cdbf9edef70b1a1ba8b4e5f230285a6693
describe
'29459' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEF' 'sip-files00105.pro'
0c3a73eab9ce3e43b9871ed10b2d64a5
eff58c1b67c8df8cfb9a9d2e4072cd8a9ec71da3
describe
'31120' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEG' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
4dcafaaa8454f19db72709aa88be9d10
4183866b9d835e32102957b78014a91bbd28b6b9
describe
'10511428' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEH' 'sip-files00105.tif'
7ff9488304e4e88080988510198675e2
8f70137f78f39f7a6990569399ec89d2a16ce67a
'2011-11-14T16:17:41-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEI' 'sip-files00105.txt'
dcedff0f7d2211973a44a4fc91f225d9
16292c66bed50c635287419bc7b7245d48d08237
describe
'8406' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEJ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
a1a09e6738f670911314d6d7a5cf47d5
9436bc5845760eff9c3ae2cabf6dfa32e090d959
describe
'1264468' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEK' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
d40d1cb863fa12bea6ed9ba689553f3f
cd89b749f11beef10f8d64d302011d042747a961
describe
'91305' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEL' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0607c2647e1ff013962866be3ef3783d
112ce773f6ff6e4993401fd23ef4a52c8b444a56
describe
'29192' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEM' 'sip-files00106.pro'
d696b3decefcfbe06360e69cd41f81a2
8530739afe499378d0f18903ad32ad1209f40b48
'2011-11-14T16:16:11-05:00'
describe
'30750' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEN' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
98a5841b67aed30611322c3d34011dc5
8c5a70c8120086be6b422d41f50f5812114eaeea
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEO' 'sip-files00106.tif'
5f7a55932940ed8a3a533cf52a847123
65a8ed068a3dd374b01f6e84e649429f6b9c7731
'2011-11-14T16:18:38-05:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEP' 'sip-files00106.txt'
bae5a68a925c4282ddab2b6894c00e50
ff3de1774338887e4c8e3b447f7879d9f875c144
describe
'8919' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEQ' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
1e77cac573c6cbe5fc14f0f8d41f04f6
287273ade4286e480ea0ca21d2b8d9f3eca7d9f4
describe
'1312226' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYER' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
d9b0e73899f56b70d4bbae453c7ca1fd
18938420b9a179233bc49d2d5ac5c894e1754b76
'2011-11-14T16:14:30-05:00'
describe
'84096' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYES' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
add459393cc0ecf3902020a056a4df22
7293df14ee3d6df6933defb9ca79810b87f0bd5f
describe
'26797' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYET' 'sip-files00107.pro'
76a6621b636533ef3002fc437071f696
4b8ea41252f20ffe3fb6f307ec6f957acc7e5ff1
'2011-11-14T16:20:35-05:00'
describe
'30260' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEU' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
cd2cc6728bbc0b7b50a2ee1f1227442d
56dfd6795843eed3e5c7aa5239cd4a5c18dca0e2
'2011-11-14T16:19:08-05:00'
describe
'10511188' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEV' 'sip-files00107.tif'
8ac3d6eeedc0e3a1c2782ca212737cdd
214d0dc40d86f7c4d264eec3cbbc841361769fb9
'2011-11-14T16:13:34-05:00'
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEW' 'sip-files00107.txt'
31639e629578b7a88272c8b82f2c958c
83552aa05fed15fd5400e6c6767df84333c54ec5
describe
'8516' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEX' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
97336ca312a7b93121073d6ad15f6663
5e4ad60c06a1d0e3d628f843d0a999d4a292b35d
describe
'1288129' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEY' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
063c8da0aa30f6430ec042664be89973
b7da0808d5f90adb91150ba9c795529a474626d0
describe
'91525' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYEZ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
88272eda5d38b58c1167c8093ae5afb0
dbb6e9eb53e31081c490bb9af1da5dbb41e496e4
describe
'29005' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFA' 'sip-files00108.pro'
3888fefbdd16c0745d8f4cb00c9e6164
1ca7f6e17d0cfee8857e58356e8e33b695e8f6a7
describe
'33988' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFB' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
5c9127ca8665cd7a539590ceeb032e49
cead719f6495be1de927fc731f9bc776cfb8f04d
describe
'10318720' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFC' 'sip-files00108.tif'
c9a2f1f319ebab4476c57e74bdf945b7
3c99827403e6bfdac5651704e443799e477ff446
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFD' 'sip-files00108.txt'
4619a0f5d11315ff865a0d706b05ed4c
e33ad831a20a0f47bcf5cd2e739e2197d4811d77
describe
'9042' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFE' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
b17b02f6464d2bc7639a87e106041fe3
2cf76e87276605e74aed10f2a0ac5b41bc5d5227
describe
'1251988' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFF' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
fb0210c0bc8ed10b4d4208c7fa10c1e9
dc598288b37dffc6fc4afb750b65c9c9df3fc50a
describe
'84838' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFG' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
5c5056ab6e5693b4ad3cf03c5dc09323
59947266eb3da614c8e975758b7391c23a2a4023
describe
'26107' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFH' 'sip-files00109.pro'
b2741ebec043bf7e5b280f47847a09a7
c08885fc85aec3c81bb44c7369a81d74f02fdc01
describe
'32538' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFI' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
2f8de23108680cf399a5a602da1013d0
ad09ea4a404c43b093ae4bb564341a6e0d00c2f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFJ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
77d8549f3aee49bb3793e8f61003fb8d
16b616363e08771aec21e06fc2dfaae9a9532df8
'2011-11-14T16:20:39-05:00'
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFK' 'sip-files00109.txt'
c2759c9a4bacbecd379e6c887a1a9922
18efb3478e67b687dfce7f37f95ce404fbca45e5
describe
'8691' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFL' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
78bc88ee849a6ff761878c4d20e27088
5519592661f16b908df39469f6ddfe6aaeb89869
describe
'1264473' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFM' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
76fb95e2efad9030396ee7317bded161
beb09079f729221b566304e7815e6090811b49e3
'2011-11-14T16:20:42-05:00'
describe
'90755' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFN' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
94390534f510b074fa53fe5cdf9c0fbf
b47cae2405552c359f5aa4ca655c998978deb310
'2011-11-14T16:20:40-05:00'
describe
'27534' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFO' 'sip-files00110.pro'
087f6076bf80e04c6a72af437a951d9d
bc6ba65cfc909f84efbc8d2a3aa4fa61b3fce951
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFP' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
647ca29efa4a21fd1be6bf3771f7569c
859af141c898f1b8b977070cec6f60187197b7c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFQ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
b10c074088afad503deea713263787af
859280bdbb96165c2d2aba2f3ad04e51cc61969d
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFR' 'sip-files00110.txt'
0ff730b0b41815b6fcfa08fa0d52179f
3d0562a99580d8972e242d60f1e1b34fbb0ffb1f
'2011-11-14T16:13:59-05:00'
describe
'8853' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFS' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f918ce496095ac0b5d508c3705be83fb
e58e4736b8a41cad31fdf9ef7885599c2ff3d4cf
'2011-11-14T16:20:50-05:00'
describe
'1251994' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFT' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
69e4f6e1ab4b6d9322928981e7e3a251
263ba1743d01e9439a0478546d36542d0d1dee8a
describe
'87114' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFU' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
5ab4b2f96532ec5ffbfea220a8381649
e92690747949ca5a789e5710336c13b3ae9c3a6c
describe
'28197' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFV' 'sip-files00111.pro'
fd587d7b50f4db1c70ac8abca5d79113
73ce1cc0050f451cbd1d89cfc06d9a8cfc272afd
describe
'36106' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFW' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
b502b5b0bac7b967c508c65acb8cd673
56f0aa6ebd495bc83646feff9bb6d1962a5704dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFX' 'sip-files00111.tif'
3143ce06d5c5fec04c76514cea4da4fe
93db7ba395f42db324c8981d9540dd3407719a87
'2011-11-14T16:16:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFY' 'sip-files00111.txt'
96d9ac6edce3c756a31fba197dabf76a
81bbacd5a80ce8a88f29f3e70fe3845ef4e5fdc9
describe
'8904' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYFZ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
8cabeddb04c84eaf81666e2590687658
7f77677a470aacb70bf6a232fe62479ec5a897b3
describe
'1113146' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGA' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
f212741c2967bcdc1e06e5775dec530d
b94b6457b2a4080c6e4782f69e9025c2ed0e0234
describe
'26686' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGB' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
5725b3f539db659175ff4703a1daad08
b2d978024c626e91621aab8a109b1ac0a61f6dcd
describe
'5318' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGC' 'sip-files00112.pro'
59473e17820db28ffd5240ce5e3009f4
abd98b47dd4ad39d945e2aef215c4f835badeeb3
describe
'9222' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGD' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
bc587a78604965e370fc80c5ec88a288
33339a00df376732fbbe078edff1efbdf418955d
describe
'10314264' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGE' 'sip-files00112.tif'
243b25adfd6e2eb987d3da02e2888998
ba55731b1e07f72fb6ed60776108f037daa56534
describe
'232' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGF' 'sip-files00112.txt'
db66e9b468d0fd743542a7ab8c8c69c8
0fde038d09d2cf90e36c0564ca915c54ce511db7
describe
'2900' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGG' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
666f133efaee86ed82d5945e33b8f0b3
cee205bb33db189d17a9a272ce957b1c4162ff8f
'2011-11-14T16:14:52-05:00'
describe
'1264377' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGH' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
4266bf5929af257306fb228f25491b5b
fd0f94a879ad1ca41f5c1aa2321864399edbe417
describe
'77384' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGI' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
ac4340bfc1b9f624886e4a2fc27ac77d
c7d457011ba60c74600d366be88b4fb60950b5b8
describe
'1929' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGJ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
9ddec87e98d49d3b56362fbf6ac932e0
eef3d30d6d85d233263e56e5d44d1d5057901964
describe
'20332' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGK' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
ce4daf2c9392783d218e0c92c20e5774
e61a6d7fc775208ec47b813715f636416dc2ec13
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGL' 'sip-files00114.tif'
1e432be4038ce3b9371ce4f4c165387e
e0de9237862f2b356a40a39a0e86672b18ad390f
'2011-11-14T16:14:05-05:00'
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGM' 'sip-files00114.txt'
c290a8becfdc86d2da719feffcde1beb
1eb45f2a70831e5248d9ed06ee0f97d6993ecb29
'2011-11-14T16:14:54-05:00'
describe
'5792' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGN' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
ed4a77319670530071447286ca1b4d1c
cf1768481b37d4b82224d7319595f473793fd769
describe
'1312012' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
f4cf63b28af561eaa3031eaaa1e1f1cc
de133fcb913760ba27206d6694eaf1717f1ca450
describe
'71083' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGP' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
df0b14796b46f6fd6510694222059bd1
6386f41e40ae7b3515ae2a4ad9743ace18e310be
describe
'20982' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGQ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
9307893dc31ae3503e5604b258248887
a8e7dcb86993923aed3e46fe67f9cda19d969941
describe
'24980' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGR' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
d64f43caec8101186286984416422e1e
79d73b24d773d3ed5e3f25ffedb8619e6293ba38
describe
'10508652' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGS' 'sip-files00116.tif'
0ae763773cfa5ecd1cf7cebcdf1062ca
7c4427b7ae12f0a6f1389a390a3f50664703df0b
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGT' 'sip-files00116.txt'
64c33fb492eac5f1b39214e080d11b24
19b39476c5f82c3ef14c8e2dc921006cbd1c6f9c
describe
Invalid character
'7103' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGU' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
38cf3c6b6ef22ec446fa1d297c85e5c2
49db4c16cb4ebcfdd5cc4a3d66adf369dd995c8a
'2011-11-14T16:12:44-05:00'
describe
'1299255' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGV' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
c7f77c27da4f858f0b1dcf8b36f9aabd
8b8a59b637977ee517c25bc94d6b6d7b6c6aa938
describe
'86890' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGW' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
54fc8b766a66f654438337907877410c
db8889f1884cce86cbfecdf0466c184be993e549
describe
'28878' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGX' 'sip-files00117.pro'
124150d452a38ed9045d6348713c8a04
8321ae30337c1ea75656f4736bed49c25c012684
describe
'31617' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGY' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
e42f3423987f737c6bfa12a384a4c2cc
7de4bb274027c62e7c0ae8a08dd27b84b60dd86c
describe
'10407128' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYGZ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
d3cc2cefe66b8dbf8c3010ac8225b81d
46e8b689fed52c1f62122378265b5209f6fdf7fb
'2011-11-14T16:20:20-05:00'
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHA' 'sip-files00117.txt'
0f30e317c3a3541b882a8ba44b747d9f
d39496d2cef990d6e69a5e9d60317738dae626dd
describe
'8620' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHB' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
9bbb99f9b58b5e529a880631bb377f51
630e5d258bd2d5d624ed5825364b30a5035a00b1
describe
'1264458' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHC' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
926c49624eaf86d2e8d8b824275573f7
f9c8b7729c1d2e05a3d90fc44d8aedfd1e0ed256
describe
'80310' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHD' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
cb7ecf9defab6e72770e052eb8cf4206
8f7fa13e1cbca7067096308a85f4ce5e48513a6c
describe
'26925' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHE' 'sip-files00118.pro'
2071da92f8f0164242ec5b40d218876e
42a410d6d95228ac93c614956dbd18e9c68ec7a4
describe
'26607' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHF' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
e94e0d74d238b9999378cc766dfe45e7
7e396cf171388b47d684e24a53ad593c058153f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHG' 'sip-files00118.tif'
be219f855f60c3c4625312b63d4701e2
a3a83373a9aac4e459507a8bba6dd154a7561454
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHH' 'sip-files00118.txt'
73eb02b58c577c1c0ee64da819711ab7
41a17f7e73a7431a150b09ce07f351d00d8acef1
describe
'8158' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHI' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
a5a5ae8a06a45134892c63e283e268ba
43300a762bd226e74ab1049629083c1fbca707db
describe
'1316456' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHJ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
93f60a75ae5735ef74278b693982f5f0
9e05291d1c4dcabc946ef35b5460eaa2371306a4
describe
'72319' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHK' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
6de26bbd395067c7cae4b32ea081390f
3f5dd97bbd72e1cb5a0b2f6a05b181bd476cf3b0
describe
'25508' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHL' 'sip-files00119.pro'
62bac4fc56a7476ffe969b77f62f8e50
c7f7bc1cd20a9d31f5d66e3f26bc304e7737993a
describe
'25765' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHM' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
c908756593a75543f939a40233abe93e
b119ebcfae6d8046e2b244072ce84135b16a39e6
describe
'10544928' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHN' 'sip-files00119.tif'
aab62cd736747b5c25492babb08074b7
b3e79fdaba79247e1a2a1bbd774d7e9c0ed0d9b0
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHO' 'sip-files00119.txt'
b7e0077dc71d5a8d2ec7c7eacc984fbd
ea325a9548fbd8d26b179843c738b7a9cdb2d732
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHP' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
a97c07d2a4041b739fe2b810d33076b4
391b94b593d9ca937c785a69167bd5c1d3448424
describe
'1275362' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHQ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
ee9d6271921bd472d28a0234327a0e24
d6038259cbef2a89fefc0ebe5b4db2d1bd8a56df
'2011-11-14T16:17:31-05:00'
describe
'86469' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHR' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
fef9071fd295ff8a54068e3527587a62
71d8e121dc333f6473cffb9927bc9469907a7651
describe
'28164' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHS' 'sip-files00120.pro'
17af35dc3dd107859884325a5af87293
3629308d914a59854f7fd486bcfbd19a8b85173d
describe
'29367' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHT' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
f4dd24f68b5c222290caf07ae252318d
c889c69a64b18955b3329ac509decd071a760d81
describe
'10212367' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHU' 'sip-files00120.tif'
c44bf8af40ba6b38642d52c97edb5f45
a2024969b94863250aa5efeaa3b49440496af926
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHV' 'sip-files00120.txt'
70356665e912136a1709fd92f64bcf75
4c5ce836a2d6c7176501e7e45f579e7979d493d4
describe
'8651' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHW' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
8da0cbd902eb2698353d96df5e9b83bf
0f1f423ba786f079415df923761a3e4f3b501b1d
describe
'1292697' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHX' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
a216dd00c91d9b2ad3949a9731bd50b3
44d7a74d60747b437cec2ee39ff6a09d2353ebe9
'2011-11-14T16:16:25-05:00'
describe
'85472' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHY' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
e0c174b1889efe46a70e5a0fe203c33b
85141426e8bea2f50fd5f2ebae855b704f2a3cc0
describe
'27177' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYHZ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
e19440162ecc09ad53d270bf760a1bb8
ef47b77904d747f33b100bde6a675a06b8442e7d
'2011-11-14T16:20:49-05:00'
describe
'31690' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIA' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
4866b182ac3679d84c872674a0808b77
b8f617503260295d32b24a1da647ee8bd02bc7f5
describe
'10355220' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIB' 'sip-files00121.tif'
041244a6e44e92aea44691bf4e98f386
ff22f48f1646aed4ef0769719cabc967809a4c67
'2011-11-14T16:18:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIC' 'sip-files00121.txt'
58a13bf160e164207c0ac7449077d53c
49206718184871a343e9036095c2d73f49c789cd
describe
'8652' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYID' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
412a17415e7b9470d82cfe3e7fa4faaa
b5d2c560fba9777d2a513aa5a4ffe7126a0dffb8
describe
'1275252' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIE' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
39e626548227729ba967907bc6a71350
95fa30df312bb731fa883f3e38a93abac1f649eb
'2011-11-14T16:13:51-05:00'
describe
'89137' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIF' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
82bc9e9f5d843dc414d7268879405d6b
c4c4e1ad82b5b8c57f573b7718997c14a967b910
describe
'28676' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIG' 'sip-files00122.pro'
ed3cc612e3e1c589a53b62e281bedf09
fcbd9f8e883a3bfacbb6e8081293a5b9f864ddda
'2011-11-14T16:13:23-05:00'
describe
'33084' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIH' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
2069eaf9262cc322af075f2d40546b23
40a7210360bc8206046d62bb2b99cc5397f4eeb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYII' 'sip-files00122.tif'
3039cb300a13fae0d8528da366d0c85b
7e8b69f24d3942ae75be8202fcfeacf785318a2b
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIJ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
49c933325ebf41ea02240f46a6780aad
21354be250aebc4c14a18abf8f465cfb40e1bcae
describe
'8536' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIK' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
be0531334197020d8e79dbfbfac376f3
9e75aaf50f5b4754f9c7d1d6b6c77724ffea6bae
'2011-11-14T16:14:10-05:00'
describe
'1292628' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIL' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
5df022c530d9bb8970fc2b4902797800
8f1ee19eedc8db20c8790ce83cc7180e6e514359
describe
'77535' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIM' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
ec0af8322dbf62fb43ce25efbed0184b
b847693503cebd6cfd563cff45a6f1cfa759b193
describe
'25542' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIN' 'sip-files00123.pro'
abce99a433c6c2b07e7192fa0330628c
0bb521e9c6ed4fcbbb588236bdc209eff4605e24
describe
'29541' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIO' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
a3052616e0a59745cd1dfba9b01ae976
7852d388b5a14966c052fb68380ed8904bbd8dd2
describe
'10355012' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIP' 'sip-files00123.tif'
2370789c3244863f4feb5f5aa3d81df5
08306d34023950d4d1c5f52e94b8c0de3194146b
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIQ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
35849d13c52b0a9555d8cd2c00173a07
2ac48cf782d351bd3b5da12789cb407e611da7f1
describe
'8434' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIR' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
89ded151a24a590b3ee693b45b62d02e
9dfc07adeb8079f04722cfd0523a2a095797684a
describe
'1299056' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIS' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
a80980197b0ef3a61de759c59adb15b3
24e900d4cbde5221595e6b34999a654e61fdd0b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIT' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
4d2c4b2a9c80d0d85584b0c38eb463b2
46f8ed22d304026b401a66085a64fbbe7a245ede
describe
'27372' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIU' 'sip-files00124.pro'
c97a37ffe6a0527e61b2ef99c31e5671
3c6d1ef3c28db12385f0e20ab6e0c8077da3966e
describe
'31938' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIV' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
4cd22f45ff83247127838f76b1f8bb29
8e1ae130352fe0e4b9882f39c94c341cc5a4ca9c
describe
'10406384' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIW' 'sip-files00124.tif'
aa8e99c4c052f6088def3df5cc185b13
1e0060a3b653efd2759c8656fe19325258d0867b
'2011-11-14T16:19:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIX' 'sip-files00124.txt'
93679091466756c50df8fd683b79e6d5
43fe910f37abe460296b655a2acc4e49d8dc9756
describe
'8801' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIY' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
00630d4f5989dc7cedc08206cffe9c8d
be1e6d71ca243cb9424f8bdb7d34aab4ed42e9c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYIZ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
a9456a9e5a0312745ea3970125fb6e33
b3630451675529bb210184e5bc735bcfe53862fe
describe
'88094' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJA' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
1f7a0713deda6f31896c56407125d56f
59adcaf04428cd847e02e5de93bad71d9ad6c379
describe
'27348' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJB' 'sip-files00125.pro'
895853d28d76ec8416c75301c2c6d6e2
a6158199b2126ac1e1d24652dde78b7095c05f58
describe
'32576' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJC' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
8861157b3626cdb7d1b82ec96e089890
16dfafc639846c37b86ad83e6d76c497bf36912b
describe
'10355232' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJD' 'sip-files00125.tif'
87c026d521dda0acef65435202149804
d73f280c89d9c194d74fa515f6a8696a43422cda
'2011-11-14T16:18:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJE' 'sip-files00125.txt'
7bfb285e8ebad5e5df68d1ee8353500e
f1b43f417f61743d552ba8b81da421e517ceb515
describe
'8821' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJF' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
ec23561772e74b32ff1fff8f7c76273e
60c8abaccb4a3d27be8db0c9de35649c5e71b761
describe
'1275353' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJG' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
c0fac1b9fcdead2a030f916b588290f2
db051900a1a2807d6412d93ebe95186e790371c6
describe
'88840' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJH' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
1f06a8d90b32dd0e915ba1e90eab99a2
0a889becc660e22b52be0795a2e7a428398f5508
describe
'28273' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJI' 'sip-files00126.pro'
1cb48cd4dff86b78e502021e9f00ee80
daa821d53306cf8611f530b7da23e03fac5a2f69
describe
'31323' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJJ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
bd7ef77c68a0c1c6055009fe22367efb
d3801c1b9c128731b4ab77062b1118a690235eca
describe
'10216524' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJK' 'sip-files00126.tif'
ce5f2927f144a63ccaf30036ddda1988
dfaf8d55b784cf0fd16f7b9f23cd2b753a6abd07
'2011-11-14T16:15:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJL' 'sip-files00126.txt'
471157b2e1eaf53b3e86a0e46d8676d8
81341c1e7c913ebfa19b285af349e21dfa01e1d8
'2011-11-14T16:18:28-05:00'
describe
'8675' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJM' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
a45f84218a1f4e720951818b0947cdf2
fa59c90536e0b592e0093502572a18a0885a3a7d
describe
'1292698' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJN' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
ee63c5dd0245e51649f27178b5a13495
343b32031340434e0d36bca7a344fd8838d73a0a
'2011-11-14T16:18:51-05:00'
describe
'88250' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJO' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
a25e826befddef8fc0c13721226642c4
71d8e241b238956d22594eb5b22a5c5ee3b0a508
describe
'28275' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJP' 'sip-files00127.pro'
f374853a7a5d44954d46a3869033ee38
1b4ccfab00e6040242b6e36a3e8a2fa98cc8590a
'2011-11-14T16:13:03-05:00'
describe
'32861' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJQ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
c84995e45363fcf2a4316b59f7aa202c
65cc3bf4fad9330d6f016686621518f3c59f2ad5
describe
'10355680' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJR' 'sip-files00127.tif'
de341611235a86276f3a0fdfa91e1021
85145e1db967fbe10b7222c8e76945d80b2bae68
'2011-11-14T16:13:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJS' 'sip-files00127.txt'
3607b81ee4e1222af17ecdf34efd8b3f
38ff617aea993ca0a3cca0f872df7e14a4f26c27
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJT' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
79a96212b9f1c1ab1c9e09f9096e07b2
7190f8a54cc8414d4b441c6b61d4198bceb0b9b1
describe
'1322968' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJU' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
8d741f50dc3d0ef1b1d525e90bb7703e
9deedd6588031233df9026d05760bfe4228fa270
describe
'85746' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJV' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
253fcb94e41611647191b1be166fc3d5
91f7cb4a611c7036566b5ac19b67fe5b64cfe1df
describe
'28076' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJW' 'sip-files00128.pro'
5dc90a49d304ede7b2dc08391f8020b4
f0bd884dd4097306b5b6f8a1362bd75477964eac
'2011-11-14T16:16:07-05:00'
describe
'30899' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJX' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
4480cd89817e762bee366143ec05d6ba
b5f456d77c130c382b7f744ca1b12212f2c79559
describe
'10597376' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJY' 'sip-files00128.tif'
6dc5915114c5a6073bf5e462a2a46258
bfbcf5ca6c9bff4fd8ab0f235450f644153c2e60
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYJZ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
91f6156030522bb4b3cf26aafe83f104
401edf0f1eedde7a18a180e44f2e9db43f03676f
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKA' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
a9f19d735ecdce4bc89812f68f2a1c83
074b2fee2e900fd1a52b6fc311ec15ee0c84499c
describe
'1269064' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKB' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
69eadd58babc1475c5b0576524bddda6
2b0a9fa723f3988277257c22f83c165d0b9b0f02
'2011-11-14T16:13:52-05:00'
describe
'89080' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKC' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
141cbfa59eedf9301e61bef3a3f0cbb1
bc36940b79af6717979c3e0049f68b49ad2c9308
describe
'28555' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKD' 'sip-files00129.pro'
2ad0fe97440a1d453b741b1751bb89ad
400472d05ddf9afcc667d4398de5aed3f2fc07a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKE' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
fae4288bb778418cbb33d1916269f1a0
51f62a681184434020af15a49f7f998057bbcc7e
describe
'10166232' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKF' 'sip-files00129.tif'
e3c6183ab4c1dfb7b9c11cf478cf1fc7
7b71274d4ae3b39c964c4972b410c4ecd91b314e
'2011-11-14T16:13:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKG' 'sip-files00129.txt'
009576fbd3c712bec9533cc987bf9e82
dfde052685992695f575ee832a719a56499d7fdc
'2011-11-14T16:18:29-05:00'
describe
'9034' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKH' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
c172e21ca8c2bc04bd3bba4ccc22ccb2
4e3a747f8132f126180489536a3a8726e651cb8f
describe
'1275334' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKI' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
75d18bf99476b8b055ae1357c45c6803
f5500cdd7ba9c0333d668aa9a5d3ed05e3bef82d
describe
'86505' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKJ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
abd27839ed8f0c822b713d29c6cae8a3
f50c5980ecae52532fef30cc02ec3840f4f350f3
describe
'27844' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKK' 'sip-files00130.pro'
cb0df98d6bce2cf912a60496b52cfd38
0fc7c02d5ac550057fd73b205f9e38e4a8f51254
describe
'33763' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKL' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
8abd4140a8053edfd2f4d847cf92667a
3c8bff3860ff63c535813bcd27d9ff3a877cdfb1
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKM' 'sip-files00130.tif'
d4e507ea54ec22d2a7a1c48308f43740
6213fdb4091a53ca9642779225599ac880a9ab4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKN' 'sip-files00130.txt'
78c6af57591701d13d5bd952203a5f70
0096045de46c26b896f7da46f0a96e135f8f68d3
'2011-11-14T16:18:31-05:00'
describe
'8609' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKO' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
52460d4662feb9a1052cfca05e356af0
9574568d3267e58975307942d1fc5efdfaa518ae
describe
'1292675' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKP' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
1d99420a62ab327caa0b7db57b0956e0
7fdc7e8bf845b1d6738d2020068bfbb37c53ccac
describe
'87838' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKQ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
c2da24a46a2d83a795a15e99144df704
f9e3a2a5a0c1798e9d96e8354a38957470f9f52c
describe
'27976' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKR' 'sip-files00131.pro'
c514c73b654c927275a73d6e87725bc7
647d6f003d70a42ebd6b863e52297232bf4e4fa2
describe
'32860' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKS' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
998cd8d41593febce7dcfd64ac1c5ddb
4765640559a41b2f253bb509efc3681102ddc6d8
describe
'10355768' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKT' 'sip-files00131.tif'
698a7047ad3bf56194b3ea0d35795e8a
15172a9484ea37df7a64466964282dc80f4c7073
'2011-11-14T16:18:35-05:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKU' 'sip-files00131.txt'
3d9709a6eae13b374d4539b801f5df85
4f90cc015ea2935230b52222bade71373e59c2a7
describe
'9083' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKV' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
40cb8672955cc56ee4dbccc020248b79
7e86f0fc2e5da20dd3fab2eff9b753d3cad90233
describe
'1299064' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKW' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
5d6f75ceca157047377d2be4b91491d9
c793c235e2b8ade44e58cf3668161b9762769139
describe
'86241' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKX' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
90af28a5fc1ec82eafa8846aca61ec48
bed28e57a0a7bd16b72baaf2e35da41904762dd0
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKY' 'sip-files00132.pro'
5735e01f8639b5cd69a66254644bcfeb
343e83a479d5e58764bfbcddbe9abe1243565023
'2011-11-14T16:20:22-05:00'
describe
'31800' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYKZ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
845d1922b7230a7efe08f6c747b9dda9
72d035ddd8c5f12d76539feb6156a8a420707785
'2011-11-14T16:19:06-05:00'
describe
'10406256' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLA' 'sip-files00132.tif'
813d5b6b3a54d388fda3d92a62976fc9
115904c0d5818d30bbc92182900b1d4ce733ca3c
'2011-11-14T16:15:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLB' 'sip-files00132.txt'
b1e3337ebfaac78dab53adc76b2980fc
ef02212e37e39c75e0e7e9b74c965fb318ce9489
describe
'8792' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLC' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
5e9b158dd4adbf8bb3a03b2efc22a605
78a088afd2c14092e800a40a31c6a1fbda5bcc6f
describe
'1337942' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLD' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
1d0acdb31b18df5945574dfd386d0dfd
a09eaa99bd9e9fac407d17a35654e2f52a903ca6
describe
'85566' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLE' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
62ebf1b7a6f2da2a30e032c65581f37d
8fb3bd0ccd1aff5fa2f935b6ac8fbff8912abda9
describe
'28270' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLF' 'sip-files00133.pro'
414fc8acf3a4401934a15a645139bb77
0c54a8ab260ec64b2acee0dba324893b4589da01
describe
'30578' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLG' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
f9b213358f03c7067a2c0c8cdcd2f181
7eaa964a26bc46421581023d3765beea526e8f9f
describe
'10717400' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLH' 'sip-files00133.tif'
e47a8cd293be845322eedf69a85b041b
d10885199bc8027eb62470cafe2cdc649e2c5e2b
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLI' 'sip-files00133.txt'
b2aa00073b682d1bf932049a28d36c03
554e72f73504ab937add63d7a8c8fed5772d7a06
'2011-11-14T16:14:33-05:00'
describe
'8430' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLJ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
e7b0449be66780b678dbc168fcfeee46
45d97b3e37056bb54ce9f6fb07ecd1127146db3a
describe
'1127386' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLK' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
59e4b1f4dc9dcb45300199dabbb0930d
afd89737996d57dab95041d9dbb5d1ca0c4ea078
'2011-11-14T16:19:30-05:00'
describe
'27042' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLL' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
76b9ced7ad6d9c7c1a7a881adfde4e67
d68464b9aaf66139da3c3c0d61d0394e09dea4b8
describe
'5155' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLM' 'sip-files00134.pro'
eb86d88fdcd7a3ff31a75d192b88c71a
062ad5c9c71ec471a9d0f29ef8b8e1f5f3ee1d83
describe
'9242' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLN' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
02041db24eb7ae0d9fe398bfec63c419
e7fa178260883c3d324456d39e667f828dbfad04
describe
'10458852' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLO' 'sip-files00134.tif'
9b02b59baa3fec808410a89d1599cb7d
6ab44b2a21438db5bc033555ce76aa4e2e1562a6
describe
'224' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLP' 'sip-files00134.txt'
6902c88e302e1b1aee42a5e7d6f3b7cc
c4c7834f16f6daa249c9707af77abf258b0368d1
describe
'2985' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLQ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
007da32a92372e4d6e49eea62e9f6b5d
7e21a34d66928c4d7155bcd3f01750569a5a8d70
describe
'1264737' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLR' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
fb451078a8deabef07d26c5941f4202c
09629d07c4cbaf57ea243badd30c9e1ffe716ace
describe
'82406' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLS' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
4793cd60e0fc85183063170d082b4f73
5ad784108a5efa32961054978e57212a73fed8bb
describe
'4228' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLT' 'sip-files00136.pro'
8fa00fe3667bbd7bb0c98adde535358d
3f9ad8464232dc3acecb216ecc65ce896cb7bd48
describe
'23622' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLU' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
bcd91a3b2384990eeed064b403f44b6a
c1618010fe654347b4d80d1132a5fd6a2177663c
describe
'10129708' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLV' 'sip-files00136.tif'
8fc5695da396eee78837b8025bcf0270
259afc5a7f0adc72c8af899ae80d802bc0bb85f2
'2011-11-14T16:18:48-05:00'
describe
'227' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLW' 'sip-files00136.txt'
957db38a8b0f833a46c4c7dfc197de2b
54a755a79a1d4490893c9e18236e35f979cb0fb9
describe
Invalid character
'6405' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLX' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
8f8ff7d117ee12ee8d20f4c3161d359c
7728a90728f94f79563424e21056716c780675ef
describe
'1337676' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLY' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
b4b2093e1c490169e359225b0b25ac12
20eea165e0b49d39ce9071be279e6473652e2958
describe
'72215' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYLZ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
9d86aeaa0251788c58413e372d3a4855
aa5422ee360cf4dd9f95201a1548afc8f76ed621
describe
'21380' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMA' 'sip-files00138.pro'
76fee40f0490e2037117e5dc8cdb8601
ae75ee317db224eac08a7134df8d8e80eab98ef7
describe
'25359' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMB' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
347558602ac43ecdc31d0e954a635588
b352f755c2d408329e64f25426ac47a186b3c2ee
describe
'10714132' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMC' 'sip-files00138.tif'
85efe8818038565336138794d869d62d
beaa10b52f187fbb7dcb1f364486cd54c06e9e17
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMD' 'sip-files00138.txt'
c260857ca4e83ebb8a4bef233686da9a
cfbea6bc959728aa6a39ef2d2123633d7024e761
describe
'7180' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYME' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
0b61a9a1235aecbd1e99ddc6ac98f695
81bd9a5a5aa608a043a92347fd4587b1cbb55c91
describe
'1275628' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMF' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
39126e8186cd5849897e3976b5433f6f
1301274cfb8aeac42f9a22aecc787c84649b3305
describe
'86971' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMG' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
016d99f6b139c745dc038a7811d72c6d
c3fd7663f835c69decf86f26d5b1bd977bd0d5d1
'2011-11-14T16:13:50-05:00'
describe
'27474' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMH' 'sip-files00139.pro'
a1911503d4fc16ba6e38bdbd79ced8c6
6cb35733f21c0be61b291a2d21e552caa02f2d50
'2011-11-14T16:14:34-05:00'
describe
'31111' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMI' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
ebf11478febed929fd1208ddbfbe94a2
84b6051da428d104157e6a40c5bba7cb4920fa2c
describe
'10219020' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMJ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
a345c7e92a3f1a1c6795e1d10f94274e
fe8e799a8fb8dfadf62b17aa1cfab8628ab8feab
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMK' 'sip-files00139.txt'
58da0090a8d95c07921b50bb9c221b33
ce302d3c0b8c0ebaadce093933f66361c3230b89
describe
'8693' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYML' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
73dd4e3f52558aa8de4bb3386d1b7b0d
849e3579b79f0c17730bf980ed3fefed66b3220c
'2011-11-14T16:16:28-05:00'
describe
'1337699' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMM' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
bc26532f6cbb16ef33c8509f1c016d10
4b14439dfe182fdd45d738b3d7b1acf2e5966c36
describe
'87416' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMN' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
99373ec5aa5089e0a67fc42fdb43368a
69433c6a8681b32efe3241c1e88a8df653ec983b
describe
'28553' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMO' 'sip-files00140.pro'
04538738ba2651bcfd521c12ca40134b
32000894bf531b43c07b36d6acf65292410d6822
describe
'31855' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMP' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
0a3f250b0a9ca86a7c1c57412324182a
d3630a16b3e22566f38cc27dab39e77561b99f72
'2011-11-14T16:20:30-05:00'
describe
'10715344' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMQ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
23c1113a546e1f428b3aa452bc82683b
5b93582d078f3f4450eeeb75cbff574a993ba077
'2011-11-14T16:13:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMR' 'sip-files00140.txt'
101674dcbffca5041647e5eed11fad8a
2a0afac515ebddb9908b57534e44808fbbf2ab4c
describe
'8352' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMS' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
e04cf10ee7f4fcbd76a0c28a7520dcec
f19624b8ec84e113b081026b6157ee4fcce865e2
describe
'1275638' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMT' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
c96b5c78f519fc3fc525a1101050b834
d8ffcc959f3f1ac45e133de78bffae3183179d9b
'2011-11-14T16:16:24-05:00'
describe
'85570' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMU' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
977185d0a8bda34f09b7df948e0ce165
fefdefef5d91f2845609f44189af796055c32ec9
describe
'27307' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMV' 'sip-files00141.pro'
2946104800a88eb453d2f29f53fee5f0
085cfa07298d6a07d2f7965ec02e135c95622fac
describe
'29744' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMW' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
88b6db761f0e3e4c6cf98defd47c3279
d4e4d13e7c048aba9b3960e92ac98aac5ba43882
describe
'10218720' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMX' 'sip-files00141.tif'
6640df4eca1164fbb3a8c452f987ac17
96edfabc5bab4a2c7313697d9b42043b147835e1
'2011-11-14T16:14:50-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMY' 'sip-files00141.txt'
7687286427685ae376b06df3e4bbd25e
bc63e15e4374fbc3d404b7b5a9d8f5a22fda53b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYMZ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
d854b336a6262a32ef94013e79966bb2
4b34e5970c7b54bce2911b3965d7d2a288192959
describe
'1337633' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNA' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
d52b9d7d801d1b90b0f7798db5e05ec5
9930ef0188130417cff088c68efc6ed069ca4a63
describe
'88620' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNB' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
cd2cef94b1911bb012e9f276a0bfc677
0c6733a7500384e69782e576eb625a05988ecff4
describe
'29723' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNC' 'sip-files00142.pro'
94f7703cf146e0f8f7a649e68b9819ef
357ab722bbc4d9acc2339f5f408cb8c3c5b238f0
describe
'32340' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYND' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
5757a5800423a0e2ad917fb686a02c6f
9c5f4bf79f3dbe08eadf922fc81eec166a288f7f
describe
'10715368' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNE' 'sip-files00142.tif'
1a04ed9f2c15fa494679217d6d9685d8
f07ee4ca8cb495a09ad37952477d648cf8bde3b9
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNF' 'sip-files00142.txt'
37d33178e8158c1703c0f22fe0bda8b2
49fb0c8e1bebfcfa8398b0c0d8e67ad2953229bc
describe
'8361' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNG' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
a70f3e830e96b9889590eb5018f75df1
9a7aa23f67a4ddc61dce4e6f77b9dcbda3b3a2c8
'2011-11-14T16:20:31-05:00'
describe
'1245609' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNH' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
61fea3143bcb735ffa9f4198c5aec325
8cf098954c7146aaca2da96b687a869b342e1f10
describe
'88949' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNI' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
f1824de56ce3dc3ec56865bb288f8d58
3ed76c09c9546c0741ca42b55304db900a7e5f19
describe
'27418' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNJ' 'sip-files00143.pro'
e6e32ef8eea65c1288442d860285fc18
5ff8fb433df5af438895855184ef851874a05840
describe
'28722' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNK' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
f8ebbc386c84296106b9974a5850fa09
bdb80dfd5f6e50fba8ed6942eac6b8ab912e2a5d
describe
'9974361' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNL' 'sip-files00143.tif'
7e43092a79dfca58efdba8d8f1a22c15
ea076e2c8940227c57a187de9c02bb0a16b95672
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNM' 'sip-files00143.txt'
650ae9f3e3958d64694eb9684d354415
8c2eb552f64027faef9388a40fbdd9905332dd0f
describe
'8825' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNN' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
78f718382cfab06d1f8afb62d046240f
84a8dac6e0023e3f98f6babba67d7a7a06dc574c
describe
'1337685' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNO' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
1d80f66d7710ae3429421606fbf59989
318c59b5578637ed48a53775e93536538602bd91
describe
'89344' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNP' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
092361d2e037b5e6f6705df3b6bc895b
9f5a250e96dc033e23ab77ca077e37bb28053e42
describe
'29209' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNQ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
d3ce5361b53268998952772694ac0c4d
5c71b1cc8972d0a3f6d41351c879904c80c57bf6
describe
'31913' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNR' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
da4811ce2175f659a7b8c4463ceb933d
556804bb273bb4495a55db0e91413e4230ae1cc0
describe
'10715376' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNS' 'sip-files00144.tif'
01b0973ee82674fd824dab8e4187bbef
d65ebdd0dbab713a1bc7e3a7322b93f5a00f503a
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNT' 'sip-files00144.txt'
2aad580b948ee9d8f0e26169895f843f
ecc83540f3494f382d013b700e387aacff4e12f6
describe
'8500' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNU' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
df0cef47fc097a18ce0ae47508a183ff
5c07179fcd62e39846cf7a967ab5139bb6a51889
describe
'1275632' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNV' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
010ff92909cef53bced0132259014008
9068a5d1372ac62f62b946060ece24c189cdc16d
describe
'92324' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNW' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
afff14591068e1f6f3b11da4ab0c8e0e
a324f4919416e496a47fcc443d527469851e5540
describe
'29559' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNX' 'sip-files00145.pro'
c02b3998fa4504da00e87cfd1803aaa0
0a8724ea26486484a13da3c03aa70e53f49f4c89
describe
'31891' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNY' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
be180b6c2eb8d896a40ef5ecaee07859
198d726329f109f0198ecee956f190ad53b953d5
'2011-11-14T16:13:18-05:00'
describe
'10218868' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYNZ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
ee4dd506b9f8fb3bd9c01af871388eef
3847ab8fddea679ef23b6b3cd34d6017113057de
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOA' 'sip-files00145.txt'
f68a742cc8535b2ca51038e42bfd6ce5
40df0446e159bb59496c6a7c677b65084f6a49b9
describe
'8837' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOB' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
8c44b0675f38489812996ed86994e016
2e270e0bd36ffff4fbe39cc16757bfbe05cabfae
describe
'1306191' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOC' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
18fefc96c02464a40456ca32171faf53
4eacfd93cc2b1653b749774de007a8b9b9521124
describe
'87209' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOD' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
2b3f5873e96d938a420d1d27ed72efa4
61e5f4be5a6ce3981deb58e2f36f85354f0b40ce
describe
'28269' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOE' 'sip-files00146.pro'
e5d5751807b5e791a5e08171cba7d9c2
f1910b9e56a188f766663b945a1eacba5bb9ae08
describe
'32178' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOF' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
44a64661fe69e433641cfd51d21b8a56
dfc12be74d0a5f2cae64bce3a3373e75b3ce30a6
describe
'10462868' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOG' 'sip-files00146.tif'
19895653e09e7529ed036733b3d65861
d5be1351e08fe3b9b05500b7a830984b15336b6e
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOH' 'sip-files00146.txt'
7105771c33231586490904af0ffc4c1c
f14b23c7b99efb22b196da7d095536721f8b0b7f
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOI' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
ad97e0e78db24e64f9eea74109726a88
70d0bda5690b9c9bb369df459472b828de3e1800
describe
'1245610' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOJ' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
9af9539bdb336747a5da71f6e237394c
03738c780b95294c3a89701b3ee3010380ee99ee
describe
'86397' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOK' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
2c2739942a801ba9b928d068064416ad
94ff689ab91ee1d9c5473d3dbe1023e91a43f9ae
describe
'27010' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOL' 'sip-files00147.pro'
40d1cfc8e887e7eb3232df8dcd52cb44
c3136c2172a13686ab55f13d039c9d71c721c86b
describe
'30242' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOM' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
47a17fa20a97d90bc11185d429fb9021
9620c11bafcf955082c22b99bab0a350c21426ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYON' 'sip-files00147.tif'
042fb115a855a4f9912f94ff2d349b5b
bf9c652bd8508c34b816a14615710ea5d730304f
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOO' 'sip-files00147.txt'
8727abffef9eb5e8bda38d82606c6cfd
024e17c178403cadf66115291be11963caae2fae
describe
'8734' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOP' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
37736eaa980f74d0c1b39bc7be5a2eb1
6e4d5e1f00bf6ca605b6c9fa975124335067a51f
describe
'1322326' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOQ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
aaa650c5f92ca7d03fc067aa90889bef
6f50454798165bba59ce8f645daefe31f0b6956d
describe
'84176' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOR' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
a4ac18e75129d6b6bd1921129ffae807
9369e88cce9ea4f5ffa877b1ec34c9578dd09d98
describe
'27706' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOS' 'sip-files00148.pro'
2e0057fb02cf6e15f62f17ce2eda3026
ab767c031fbe0b30641dc3fdcff47549739cd8fe
describe
'31585' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOT' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
1b444b85b411d102d50e8ab3aa9e091a
404efdfb205e9b6ce10c1551b45ee9768d3e018a
describe
'10593496' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOU' 'sip-files00148.tif'
f4b559a268518a8353a40b0f2116f9c9
8920690abd30d04b25510da10ca93ed71feb6a3a
'2011-11-14T16:13:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOV' 'sip-files00148.txt'
a801b012d2fa0da6ff8b20abb9718148
c55a8c3250e28b1da91b9f17f1934ce8bc481ed9
describe
'8534' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOW' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
40e7f1a131852e0edac10c60fb3446fd
5eb46fd282dccc4064af8e2075290ab00481e430
describe
'1291857' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOX' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
0bbd98f5ca91aebe40a946ffc5f272f8
64d078313c43fb29c2a795181d734db515187526
describe
'86236' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOY' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
2024e647b9b0d464571814d59e949be8
6905a396b90f596988c5696cda232563d628ba2b
describe
'27591' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYOZ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
a0ecf6abe01836dc9d4a30d227266b54
c6cd655b9e7e50515bc848e9f4db8c62a8a9afc8
describe
'30895' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPA' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
a1bea31e75a286460470427abe041267
c377665c61619fc7182f9f5d7244f3070a2d9f4e
describe
'10348456' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPB' 'sip-files00149.tif'
b3d9b131244bd6942d2ac61a4c90fd84
b1e7804b5664fd63aaf4e54ba6015ea384d45352
'2011-11-14T16:20:41-05:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPC' 'sip-files00149.txt'
9258c448ddfc7b3852524a05a05dd4cb
c9fb26df1a778e6d70694f92ce7bab3ccb7a1682
describe
'8447' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPD' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a7e2a2af7597b3d2ed92fb8d5daad10a
c290f0f9f66cd8bd454fe221875211172b395dbb
describe
'1318731' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPE' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
f6c5f85b4b995114f112b566186ed902
cf08a77d8234a1287741ece7c05a19f2f44dc9b8
'2011-11-14T16:16:17-05:00'
describe
'84752' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPF' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
9105b9d2d8970acbbf6d5efe2757eeda
07afda82bd7eccb6101e50ad75256956d4ff3503
describe
'28204' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPG' 'sip-files00150.pro'
e121a566f9f6948572937c780fffd486
1e610d3eb21358e99aa0d1c3d5f080a1db87e9a1
describe
'30068' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPH' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
63ac961a57c0f0cb453271b3de178a6d
383e54592ff8fe2d70188ae3948676cd2a31f331
describe
'10563160' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPI' 'sip-files00150.tif'
a2d0b068e8a1d2e4fcf62b5b90daef2b
05772f05b2502ed677cb540924a7527edfedf5da
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPJ' 'sip-files00150.txt'
c2342fdb6f0f0d83a85b72cac1cea982
27c573e11641a1a246a439d0d4569d7e65fcce44
describe
'8359' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPK' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
b488ff2ef361ee1a3f7ab75c0c1bc4e5
a09ad3a0d31343c9de71ce9698d70b4e2abeee69
describe
'1306407' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPL' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
0549d871bd5fb5cb8a53f4061990d0bb
8fdefe6a3150ee503158c38471ffeae5f8c51109
describe
'62110' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPM' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
910c6692cf3e756fc4ec5c14e1745a54
59690f65174dace8d7d92b84ea5e03e3b18382cf
describe
'18235' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPN' 'sip-files00151.pro'
ef009e28513f6a8b5add17fe66985508
7757fdab9d6906d259b2719993c264fd0e3fb6b1
describe
'21572' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPO' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
50075b17a812c4154465b9120cd8fccc
72d7e5121a000e963795771d4148a32cf22a0021
describe
'10463476' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPP' 'sip-files00151.tif'
65b0a77392871f8af15588c79b36da6e
5d8257cbd0c68b976a19fb083b889f0f8eff90d0
describe
'725' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPQ' 'sip-files00151.txt'
8287b1772ea743051e5cb4c7687fbcaf
21fccd9e0b50da179d4a2ab1e230c08a3e8c5749
describe
'5961' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPR' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
c3a0dea653195097fb74c2eedf8b7c66
daf33e915607de1d8d481600a8956d76974ac7ec
describe
'1275264' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPS' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
512572f39bacf7a2e2496fb29d50fe43
fd0d9276e3d406a91d8d4d729212ff446da93dba
describe
'78266' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPT' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
03f95d47a8f5111149f0eb8ab1963d60
94c905bb363a6f1f6eb2c96b2366eb2501206754
describe
'667' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPU' 'sip-files00152.pro'
ca15d1cf94fffc4f8f8ab4fc3766c1e1
2f713e348574845f2453f87f25748e577999530f
describe
'19841' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPV' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
a6120065b2a8192aa47a247ee3943e5d
880deaebb4bd02086ff83937810fcb4a16b5e0fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPW' 'sip-files00152.tif'
eb64e70d762e4887500f2950d91a344f
d44e7cc86fa4223c01b6d64a5fa82dc874c32e8e
describe
'121' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPX' 'sip-files00152.txt'
06699a05c647c401ce9e6c366e0350a4
d32270ababb283880bf2cb81aab56527177abedb
describe
'5471' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPY' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
dc0ee4702408266b4cc88d4fb6589c5c
6085bc9ab397dd09a0ce8c41a8a6cfd8d8d47c7f
describe
'1306177' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYPZ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
5df9e40e789404cc70a6e74cf20c6b1a
a59c322a3b73cc67c366945ac8eb13a32e34f892
'2011-11-14T16:19:12-05:00'
describe
'71860' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQA' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
e34d1fef6f302ca42c7411487532d7dd
71f76d1ab5add1f6da615ad92377bd7695a618f6
describe
'21878' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQB' 'sip-files00154.pro'
273963d50cf93933de9a067f88987791
72ae875cf98599bbddb82d324137f0317326bbec
describe
'25987' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQC' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
f0e1562e3fddb8be2fd12172292b040e
b518b24a8d2075d31ff9c8831a043d298ce611d4
describe
'10462092' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQD' 'sip-files00154.tif'
1d683cfcbb3e5c4528cce0ac9111f71b
f1132593e3ac2e5c956b5675a57c0f097c39b8f7
'2011-11-14T16:20:16-05:00'
describe
'868' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQE' 'sip-files00154.txt'
3321a04c0883afd4427ee68a1e5aa6e6
10670bca99d8f004bb9a648735db47a577e1cf79
describe
'7295' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQF' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
7970b5566ffe921b4e27926a71dcef61
44eb9a6774ebfeb2c7743ce9e13948909828e839
describe
'1337961' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQG' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
15f8ebd62558ba3af647bccfb394b2c1
cc5fed19f6ddada39e2ae3005a50ec921da4c594
describe
'86662' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQH' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
398e7d912e3d9369c91bc391ebd35157
5d370f6874437b8630e913690fa4abd3f4e71102
describe
'28437' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQI' 'sip-files00155.pro'
2ae19181a03db02a1f5b22ae507524f9
e5e0f1770326b25285ea730ea480e52f5513878a
'2011-11-14T16:18:46-05:00'
describe
'31687' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQJ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
5e83680e78039c487bfc8f85efb66ddb
caf3b6ccdb1d993db3055e6845dbdba9748f0c55
describe
'10717076' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQK' 'sip-files00155.tif'
d6a2d8e017787fd8aae8d2d0a1b0c888
ebf13746fc6965de1060b1e1b300e9ebcffc823b
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQL' 'sip-files00155.txt'
7e855d35a2b999c1a5c5d7dbffe6d424
abef2c4dccc67c08a4df357e7e4fcf7a4221af76
describe
'8295' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQM' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
c9908ca8842e61dc86698600681e3ec5
7e262d8b0cd416ad42504567b597dfa161ef7648
describe
'1264898' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQN' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
731e0915ae472eb5f64febd8e2062374
35546fe40f37b741aa9e52701df729da6d0821a1
describe
'93994' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQO' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
63630565f8604c8916d17405159aad30
8c372728f51417ec07cf88d3709830df4775f2d4
describe
'28306' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQP' 'sip-files00156.pro'
29f779ee4e9f8904438c55b1384f764b
8271a92460d5432e9fafad205ce473d7a84e930a
describe
'32123' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQQ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
a0b87eb9fbf345d162c4a7266dcf37cd
6cfcd82b76dbf768a64b9c6d2c7020841e9064ba
describe
'10133000' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQR' 'sip-files00156.tif'
36d18ef7ed973685f35572a379d3ec1c
d766ec67d557deb1e294111882dc576847d40aba
'2011-11-14T16:12:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQS' 'sip-files00156.txt'
ff5da4656384901e6efc3fe095c3c385
c9e8b55c542bc2651c1ce0844466f4d0d6e2b940
describe
'8852' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQT' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
2527c12aed8c1f63f44c795dde48f1d8
41afa85ca6dbdbdf0f33fcff67f1496f12bb5d6f
describe
'1245615' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQU' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
bcbfa3c055d7bc2f5c1c79a9e4c0e8cf
5bf0e9eda2cc868079b9380b420da3d497b5f911
describe
'93633' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQV' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
69b23b1c47a2fd34a9ae21bcf0719a0d
57c1feed5bb5a216c67e0e717704ae750fb82310
describe
'28974' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQW' 'sip-files00157.pro'
4a16cc952119b6fc808dc8dc0f9f7efd
3eb413e3326e5f6565b3b3d6a0de980595748d3f
describe
'31533' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQX' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
18500ce7e168ee61419648372864dfe5
beedbfd6255e72440b585a1b28990076ca01df14
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQY' 'sip-files00157.tif'
ff011366a34e629aa7b387976f7a1953
d4c6a9e3d94e6221dd24abac6fde4302e8b1a00f
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYQZ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
c89399407594d289ca6652cc1ee55666
ca6436d1fea0e05c4bd557445ad941289d7d5677
describe
'8755' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRA' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
a7c64221820c147a60c7734b5b63116c
c26eede3b43cc3fe05c22fbf7fad27d356c2799d
describe
'1275361' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRB' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
1f0209dadc8bf0b4174a8bcc18bc8106
7e855b1fd86021a9c4dd716a4c121acd8d3671cf
describe
'87331' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRC' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
120cfdc84f2d2bec54df09b1dabf6df7
cb26183ce1c6c523f8eb516c80b9d5d706a2a553
describe
'28591' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRD' 'sip-files00158.pro'
c63168ce7cc7fe2875bc46ed1e0774c1
889a145827a0f19213886f3aba4356e3b717e1e9
describe
'32276' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRE' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
e831219b4c75b321e84817745cfddf76
0abb10d740feed4100f38fa6ea390a14df16d672
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRF' 'sip-files00158.tif'
f066f00e77199bf7372a303832a00773
e2ddf57583a9489386e5a8529c7052cb6115ede9
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRG' 'sip-files00158.txt'
e252faf96c854250319c68c75f5bed85
80c35cd6ef2dfe6152b22f13185bad3bf3732fa3
describe
'8595' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRH' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
9af12aaa18f856464259047ff2cfc2b3
72077068175c57cc23486feb19eb63da648b49aa
describe
'1275639' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRI' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
84dd8c9a5d61ec79072a5b31bccadac0
1923b38a7abf9197ee3cda4fc3c3782bba02bf4c
describe
'86894' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRJ' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
c5b1be68b3e7a6d55582a67e7e16eab3
5705c7f8a2fa999cd0532fbcd393b2634ff431c7
describe
'27707' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRK' 'sip-files00159.pro'
79a433e0a7d9bf09514fc5fad27410f8
23ac04261755c020cb1158593052995443975f7d
describe
'31939' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRL' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
e382b8db2b0083b731952f9a3c6db272
83f76623610efd2493cf09efd518c4e2679f87b7
describe
'10218416' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRM' 'sip-files00159.tif'
456fce07cc00a11ec59e63d3c3b63b12
20bc57e0a7d5fa82ea8471d27f815a6e1670e3d8
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRN' 'sip-files00159.txt'
2ebff899feb6510251969fc075ae7c71
084e5e0d544ebba4042a7431d61923ec4c7e811b
describe
'8696' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRO' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
980cb12047a10720fb482cc5295df1e5
778a40dd12571bebb4baa43bb8bc3fbddcd0208b
describe
'1337710' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRP' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
9206e3ff7b580c23350d00daa1009771
8b2f5b75caf4589c6fc405f8ce894844110e56e0
describe
'88670' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRQ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
d7f32a90d0b48eb607a6b25ed9a57230
2f510454ce0274bad158b3e83d15818609e8bd90
describe
'28688' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRR' 'sip-files00160.pro'
f3b8c6778ac3effd867c4b3e6a5d7157
ace54363002f90f2acdf955646ffe0bc613ee493
describe
'31972' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRS' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
c6a359a881cbf5fbbce34b6eb15ed4d7
08f25a3327f60472258395f0901f5a4ababdae99
describe
'10715500' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRT' 'sip-files00160.tif'
3454e972ebb3e09935a9bfbdeb5f7f08
d24356d562bc466a95f933635907f02b4176546e
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRU' 'sip-files00160.txt'
082fc025b3945e7fda69e67b775d557b
1026887c4038157d42a41c79763db66afa224a6b
describe
'8462' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRV' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
5fcbb875eff35912dd20f5d85395b6f5
3e00858f96d7677d8a7fb02fbb51f3f78d993cbd
describe
'1275640' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRW' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
94206513ca2ba5ce1fca976f329ceb65
796e2540db376e79f1398576b14e394778415fc7
describe
'88569' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRX' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
6fad05cce6ed3fc6f2e623c5d6c1502a
fe6d9cc38fb303cae3fe89b9050d17626f41b5fe
describe
'28285' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRY' 'sip-files00161.pro'
8d20f1dc98e642b304f23845cf5cc1f4
cf543c25f7796834c381f962c9719fb728d7fd43
describe
'32411' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYRZ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
72599bfa6d90cb77cba3f5355895582c
84653e57f23742683847231307ebf12d6f9fcc8e
describe
'10218832' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSA' 'sip-files00161.tif'
cc5aab993b9fc1611022907637978390
ec2152547c5466e5713668575bcc36ad9ae9ea42
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSB' 'sip-files00161.txt'
9668fbe67dbae015fa045dc615685e0b
8d5364f63b86fbd171d8d04c82a2c903cb123544
describe
'8933' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSC' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
5eca0e9dc135027f7e7e9ed0e92897d8
c898223cc14cf97aeb191d1e17b25f0beeebc7ff
describe
'1306417' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSD' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
47755d20b99d53b22bbdaf56a87eba92
0f20d9a14d82995956e0e6ea44cacd3bc72c0768
'2011-11-14T16:19:58-05:00'
describe
'45522' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSE' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
9f3fb0d453b5cb89ec40e89eb4096a2b
80baba4e8da842f5560293afd9949a34596aa72a
describe
'12919' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSF' 'sip-files00162.pro'
d45a9da8113130be0a0b2d10a5c1eb79
8c0cb56e51748475ec5396374eac7410855f18b7
describe
'16341' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSG' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
a6e01f0a62ddedf1801b2718efe5af37
6a7e476c789464c0773ef0b15d28f60ff1dfd1e4
describe
'10797796' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSH' 'sip-files00162.tif'
e7cb295fd79e545a4bf1cde2b5f8231a
62f783b7dfd3c05ed14e559ff09bbee2d2f307ea
describe
'524' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSI' 'sip-files00162.txt'
ae3f5e25f64c98a8e1c3c944cd51cea9
d5431b8bcface3b4e53e59d3e6ad6fab5c89b514
describe
'4579' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSJ' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
b39a9ec66c3ad3248c031c45f50ede67
4f7d20c53cbc3c13d637d7e75ed10e1cb45c7dd8
describe
'1018331' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSK' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
3543be1f89451f601be3387f0ae988dc
396962d683e4e7cc0823c2cc434a04d6193e149c
describe
'14151' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSL' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
52ca7f01d7c5a3233015befaf47be8c1
fba8e196e3a46fd801d4b6534c7fc51ae53b0452
describe
'324' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSM' 'sip-files00163.pro'
895a809993027c7c026bceb78ede2e68
83395766a0d59b982812215ecfd9e19e6fa59f72
describe
'3652' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSN' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
4403af2441d8d50c01a9630b971a93ed
0c9acf992e2ef2ab8c7cf393de74bbfb6348a982
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSO' 'sip-files00163.tif'
93bf10e28c74b835989e6d4334042017
311ab85a7b36efe3087220bfe7a6b1faaf434da1
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSP' 'sip-files00163.txt'
b411ce861eb8deeb4457559be44cedb5
ba9239697e570ec9eefae9b9459ca46984618560
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSQ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
a8ffd3a1c4a155c324f94ed410f79a36
de840a352cd5b1fca6eb559c32dc416287372fc5
describe
'1253000' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSR' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
ef8724554e07645af0c9f4c2fc470e0f
0c9510be4a482f0d6db5c6eb2055377370eb8e88
describe
'74442' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSS' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
a8798f32fbd3e80793bc0ef6472e000d
47bf97e80f0bb9d37b8877de6c04d3dc91797cba
describe
'21568' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYST' 'sip-files00164.pro'
90e4e49f4185f711cebdfd5630add0b5
d3fc2a01f0a8d1d6e50a7c75f5c19093efbd459e
'2011-11-14T16:19:07-05:00'
describe
'26762' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSU' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
22670058e18cbc9b49afb220c0957447
6459fe84b52b2001a6b91ea9cc4bf88188ee130f
describe
'10036936' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSV' 'sip-files00164.tif'
27651b2d4753d5e6da0fb9b1a961e818
1825d91990704d189bc0b7126e892823f9203d85
'2011-11-14T16:17:24-05:00'
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSW' 'sip-files00164.txt'
a47cc4d098c996af33bb0271cdac24be
44c8c50051f353f78b77a6c2769aa6d4a9d4c798
'2011-11-14T16:19:14-05:00'
describe
'7367' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSX' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
4187f6dad73c81f25cd17defba6f077a
444d6542dadc15b3c195f8b569336cb4df57ff5b
describe
'1245596' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSY' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
be770fcdb3b5d1488ef5e1b812238e88
8555b7650771a0c7aa8d3653f56481b6056672d5
'2011-11-14T16:18:57-05:00'
describe
'86795' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYSZ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
439584633f089e823d8dacffa1bc3a51
606c3e07ae5f03b8206c7d7b71a09f26a916ccd6
describe
'28698' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTA' 'sip-files00165.pro'
3f39d8ad4fd7d05429814567d732f3ac
93f8b538a4e21df153cd12605aa76d1fbb119b7e
describe
'29045' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTB' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
c40757135c60ce83bbbbe629e819a82a
7a241dfd23aeb21c3324be5d303d3c07d78bcd27
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTC' 'sip-files00165.tif'
a4656659e230c118f2690a3c72ecb6b3
ad1fc0b5545e051d48d730f08207d64c73f09327
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTD' 'sip-files00165.txt'
954c8aae38cf1586da0e76701fdc5e93
afe01bff67dc7b02010f25439870da2e1f33549b
describe
'8650' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTE' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
99b70e8b71f3b8fbfac37d03e29f7a04
99d44a344167a300ca0ee91e919313859ac44ba8
describe
'1289266' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTF' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
f43443b477bf2943cb69a517e2cb56eb
5a2d4b16347de07f0c7985743758ff61cc481e14
'2011-11-14T16:16:26-05:00'
describe
'85764' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTG' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
c32769c1b6c9e7be6729728d79190a26
869b64f6bf12ddab99dbca64cef1a2e1b9a8d65d
describe
'28497' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTH' 'sip-files00166.pro'
d1630e3a02379e0410cf1e48a4d42cf0
8b09b972678aec52a9df0d3e542558fe5a3c8e26
describe
'30301' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTI' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
506a2224134e1f6f03b12fc30323a18e
bb321dca468bb793bcecb09a4f28a4e2dbd7d2f7
describe
'10329240' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTJ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
eb1c29f59426d5ee99a30430c80f4f80
53e738350e952b3f4107f91a290daf4eb8aefc3d
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTK' 'sip-files00166.txt'
0e213ce55117c4c53941ea36479e210d
8101f637091a1be01123ee6c3f8b0d3d7581f478
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTL' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
8b9b2cde99b07ed5d4ff7cb64d028536
96c66772da65839223281df8a52ec45912131a91
describe
'1245623' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTM' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
8504984ac717c8d6c56f665159579aa3
2c1beb793d4f3fc892734ce949d2e708744daaf3
describe
'94021' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTN' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
9b602d66f2774350757966d07cfe9236
49b1ae4c704c9bd2267daab5a57443073d40214b
'2011-11-14T16:15:01-05:00'
describe
'28436' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTO' 'sip-files00167.pro'
0b3d3ff21440b807bf85ba6647914e46
f9c421786600dfca356a892d2075a63b36a0f172
describe
'33622' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTP' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
06c450ec36db223abfad8e33b6f7e12e
bddb1fe983240385dfaf00fe643b2b24d97dd42d
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTQ' 'sip-files00167.tif'
4ba3686a2eaebe24ea377feaf91a514e
85a7e0176917283fc621bd5af96a76fee81e3396
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTR' 'sip-files00167.txt'
011ac09ee44cf55a16b2f2b455485a21
d33df1bcfbd2989336d5d4eaacb9257c3261c42f
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTS' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
c0a2939ca55787451b9a07793cef78bc
a93be7ac06088a80f10d5b332fddf84152b4b9c5
describe
'1313534' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTT' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
594c23e373e434fb19974350d312ad88
3cafdb66cb8eb41dd6ec0dd0554215d5f2b329f4
describe
'84447' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTU' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
3ae7e4775df00941cdef84aa4059c1ab
582d69d22117d9631aed2717a2429be913f2aa88
describe
'28364' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTV' 'sip-files00168.pro'
e76f96d8609cbf6f8305080153077433
e6098922d8e7f10bc6288d1a0453d0ced1ed64f1
describe
'30894' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTW' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
b8012312992b1b2279074e519e06eaaf
b43c670bd060b2f5cbf98c0753f452f012fbae60
describe
'10521956' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTX' 'sip-files00168.tif'
a5e6911849563d63a38e0780058b450c
690358f4eecd40ceafbf6c02d88a81219d8ec81d
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTY' 'sip-files00168.txt'
a682de95ade4e28b54bf0408db4cad38
f837abf4a50c6114f20809b54fb8b5cd2cd97d3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYTZ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
98f79e9f4ed4b14ce3a7c5d707887caa
3db062a4712001355063fcd21b1e1944da7d30a0
describe
'1245616' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUA' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
3d187767ba35bc5a46acb72027c6be1b
26a45b3fbbc0585cf57defc7e2194400c5c4a531
describe
'89972' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUB' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
9a0eb0735fc4466bdaf3bce3e833cf4f
a3c4b470b5f17a60965648d289c47a72b48149e9
describe
'28444' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUC' 'sip-files00169.pro'
9c33eea477d8fee17de57b6f663a13c5
707afaa9579ec4d26857e092794d84b4bb3f8c8c
describe
'34484' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUD' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
29404f7c94be3bde59c4fc8c718ce572
eb00849d803e6eba5ab00515a0d9e0e36b3352ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUE' 'sip-files00169.tif'
9d6aa890d32b3ff169d2bc2f2ceb5d87
a865b3cf758713baee1efaab2ece9869827a966d
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUF' 'sip-files00169.txt'
cb22ebed4d64a12a04a0dcd083667fd6
68c2c212883edd8859cba32a76d7c87e67b49688
describe
'8694' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUG' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
c50a4578630384faeb3d537dc983e57f
28af83cd2212dc7ebeb27590c05fe89321c9fa25
describe
'1301357' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUH' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
365e696961c891e293ce831ff38bb57c
121a4508b1d0dd3d34709b4faf2a569f8fcdf452
describe
'88488' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUI' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
a903569fc1837396548125a511a1fd96
0b561bf55152986a69a74fcf7afec1958e9ebde4
'2011-11-14T16:19:16-05:00'
describe
'28779' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUJ' 'sip-files00170.pro'
af8bf9fecc4978303c31e76de9602915
73c131e22835ed5aa9817e61363adb785c47e2b0
describe
'32143' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUK' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
310a3674af8ebeb27977b414bb4e8986
8f205a2a0e7023316ff17afa9010495d08d1dce8
describe
'10424960' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUL' 'sip-files00170.tif'
b7ba749ca8f39bb84edc10eb6455efe5
89d67d2378b50e382a04ada32da29305f151e78d
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUM' 'sip-files00170.txt'
2fd2579fdccc86b41e79e5ed9b26974d
9f6fa1a0070710569e5b5c53acc783b73ca6dffb
describe
'8860' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUN' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
ed721ed4ddd8145e60e5ce501b6a1fc7
54ed2f09b37dfc291836a89d77cfd63dc7d0c7e6
describe
'1245619' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUO' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
7f69bd14e65bd3f0103eeaee643e3a49
855015f0682f96a8f4836f04eec85d59cf9cc4bc
describe
'85649' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUP' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
f0ee8a8c3a58f32c53d1f43dbf0f3963
ae449e5278ea987bdd861bcf69c2c4eb65d4c465
'2011-11-14T16:20:23-05:00'
describe
'27854' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUQ' 'sip-files00171.pro'
d39af52372f6f139a426d85be61a2f4a
4314c348d8849f0dccc684697b9caa5535574184
describe
'34995' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUR' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
6141aca1357d033412c0a33664aef9a0
22a763aeabea96c8af788b7fe78bda45cdc07c62
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUS' 'sip-files00171.tif'
b54d72631202fc3ffb8b7dc6e82972cd
88d4a143a11a75b8d446d6fb764a839556f73673
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUT' 'sip-files00171.txt'
3cc82d11e34057dc4a43f10d7de9076d
79dad9574a62f30cd12b90d68decf6b02db373da
'2011-11-14T16:17:11-05:00'
describe
'8629' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUU' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
997ac16f54ea72bbceb08c65ba1d85c5
33e203b63dbe01325aa6834a7eda127a3861cbcc
describe
'1289082' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUV' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
0ade42a0dbccfbfb6e1389e0dff34b50
35dbca12fd59c205720a0e6cb055c1fc64e889e6
describe
'57412' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUW' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
a270037e6e5f7643177f6b0c35e38f4f
37e4e2bbe9470dc34c83bfa893ba709fd48ec638
describe
'16737' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUX' 'sip-files00172.pro'
36552e68e61aa603b1b08982e37e0234
a497a79030e2889f466bced715956ac0ba358101
describe
'20745' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUY' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
ac0cf2384e158a24b314910c2cec9919
25dc74afebc4b1e8d15244c9b9a0c368718943bd
'2011-11-14T16:16:29-05:00'
describe
'10326360' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYUZ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
82ea9f2c7ecec12bf728a8fa1b3dcf2a
4755324b146dcfd6d6d3ac26633a88400db18471
describe
'664' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVA' 'sip-files00172.txt'
413e2e16b33fdc2041d6959f1db7c8af
677b98871009cb487093f7e929f353d08ad13259
describe
'6118' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVB' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
6ed77a76bb29648f90c670096f5f2535
4b96de6ad8cd35dcd04310fd978303451e120449
describe
'1034068' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVC' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
f6060172827efe8493279c28b8437c29
1943f98a0bf2224d5161ba5f2c0946fabf5d060c
describe
'14270' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVD' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
26b4797cee784e1da074a6395ee7d531
858dbc30548ae509e4f62820953672f910e718af
describe
'303' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVE' 'sip-files00173.pro'
d61f3a1d4b7f25fe55bfb6264e79f35b
b18ad7f849d4f66bfec4fafaef72f99baa3474cf
describe
'3991' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVF' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
1f8e1d45796b0368b3575132b0f10cfe
5d30087b4b7cc8b4b6a478f88f2b9e9c75115020
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVG' 'sip-files00173.tif'
45eb066a19314943be15cb46a73d3c8a
11640a553d51a1b61fb0d6643f95b6a76c5bc85f
describe
'11' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVH' 'sip-files00173.txt'
dca30c98a93d7771313dd4bc9c954a44
4f57e5fcb508ece0041119b501f1e2f1f815ddc6
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVI' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
79f2aff8b2c90a304ff7e8a3ce746a5e
f345375ccc4f162b15bc2bbf3ba10d47dcb88399
describe
'1290208' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVJ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
9a1d99e6689dfba886cd192cd496cd8e
2ea04584295c71979b72b3e05c3b1864a42551d4
'2011-11-14T16:18:19-05:00'
describe
'69580' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVK' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
61ed49b136e75771d79dd542d9fa1fbd
ee5834e07ce70d9a555346da0b68122297e9f44c
describe
'20961' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVL' 'sip-files00174.pro'
e18ac25fe5666497a6c6e4d1a3b16991
f5ccc1ea1a99cf55f2da368677ec623936f87e35
describe
'24742' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVM' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
46f5049e43ee43f870d375f36ee0a11c
c20434b03e3d776abaabba3f7c9b86d13774a48c
describe
'10334760' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVN' 'sip-files00174.tif'
aa14f55297bd30f6ac3f567bd0b0c533
41aaa9d8507f50332681bfffc957b583b4c3c304
describe
'841' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVO' 'sip-files00174.txt'
0fd92c31aa6a8f5af04511df2e7174c0
a3e23432346bda3c38d1a31cfdb5a81aaa1bbcfc
describe
'6973' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVP' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
a7cfba270400cc7df32ed5715c36f618
f0908388601cb01d0e3b8462e9e4c1d13d6c04b2
describe
'1350015' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVQ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
be7bcd6b2581177d6e74b4b266dafbae
68a716c1e7a62eb96b4d65d09be249d8b444a953
describe
'82759' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVR' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
fdf8bc45dd296c0cb4f2e8eb74f7bb1c
e6170be139a2f72972fed0b70d5f075c3d85a280
describe
'26753' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVS' 'sip-files00175.pro'
0dacd95c784cbb704071227fa19c1078
04a2f6a50a649b4d2aa93625e644e5787f8cc937
describe
'30050' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVT' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
96105da0abb13da1dec20a751f1ef76b
30b86a1b70fd73b7ca67f5758d3cae717bf8590d
describe
'10813988' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVU' 'sip-files00175.tif'
8d7f10168bd16bd732afe3c29fe04264
615234e8eaf3d685cccfcc2c7f9e69d5867bfb41
'2011-11-14T16:18:11-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVV' 'sip-files00175.txt'
9c8bc1f298a5ecf0a0a58b6bd4ab742f
e38f8568fbdf40f3680e4feaa2c6fc48673b8078
describe
'8772' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVW' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
48cc70f36e75e1be9c536e359403be55
c2d95a93583b7cfa2adc0da4e1706c6a6977e44f
'2011-11-14T16:14:53-05:00'
describe
'1251475' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVX' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
fd0229ff24eb185455d115790d5cbf66
727fa175928b24b5db45ac077b3a4a6cb90f9657
describe
'89203' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVY' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
65e01c2eb94dd51896783df666a2336c
50c3339ae18627880678c7be6506e2edd3f194a6
describe
'28633' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYVZ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
be22fcd5bb8c74a8fdcc4705b52a22f1
f3930bf9e866437829a5487f13c588d00a6f87e8
describe
'34683' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWA' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
4a5898249b18fb1bc090b3b5da527f1c
2fc3b716645f8d3ac347f7a9ea506542f2423a4b
describe
'10025696' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWB' 'sip-files00176.tif'
ed22494cc1da2f5fc4aa8ef269e80ce7
7042f5b5aa9ead69cd18a7322affc44ef59b3618
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWC' 'sip-files00176.txt'
1d489bbc8f6db08cfd0cfee6ec9865a4
98e3b7e5b00e68e757fb1de89db7e18eaf34b5d7
describe
'9003' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWD' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
300fc403cfc9b41d6041341976ae4869
61a43a7268a4347ce0850134e6b156cfd5a62fbd
describe
'1337324' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWE' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
b8c5f947c7d05fa8c5469eea8048489b
73193cad77d24dcb843ac15692b98c3d971e93f6
describe
'85269' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWF' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
02ca0e160551c587940d6b57a6510f43
78eb5d0b487a3ac37006a8d5e94a0a1ae84d01a9
'2011-11-14T16:15:41-05:00'
describe
'28050' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWG' 'sip-files00177.pro'
9dcfe2d2ac4ff46ed2dd5a4aebd83e5f
398c10481d3c2d8468ec1b6e603b8aa3a5344214
describe
'31493' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWH' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
901e631c9ecc297afec85ffaec27ba82
a349dd4494f1c84d69f7a99a3337aacd5097d0dd
describe
'10712540' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWI' 'sip-files00177.tif'
56af55f52d8203ded437a9979315d280
942101802daa7258991159253d407f0d898291a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWJ' 'sip-files00177.txt'
6b5dd92a33db4ae0b039ad3d402884ab
431f0f2f878a5591a607b4bf5e3b9573f0559f7c
describe
'8467' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWK' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
874ea11c560c79a6ce977f4ddd2c2aa2
20e1ed158a8143579a7453387720bb48357491d7
describe
'1324522' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWL' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
62a04af33be4b4ba330207fd84dc43a7
2650ff9e9e049a125f062d0eb405eec0132d65dc
describe
'87573' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWM' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
3e2c044c4b5e57b98a0395ec30baa8ef
92c7a81fe99bb365c414c1c4c4967fe2211f5a88
describe
'28662' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWN' 'sip-files00178.pro'
75cf2e47fe1a367c6d2572c164533f34
64a6eb65b03e5a80e83ed921d82b74ee2ae23c30
describe
'31421' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWO' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
7036e736b0e269875eb4e4538f3838a6
492fce478011b41d9685dce403ad60651d943f6d
describe
'10610276' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWP' 'sip-files00178.tif'
2cb7ca794ddbeb01e266dd77713b73e1
03722d08107c16b78a56bd99fdf0cdb1d8097be9
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWQ' 'sip-files00178.txt'
30206faa95b9f63d5d581d4c03b57023
b189b8552522ee73e25df4adf0222fc1311e39f0
describe
'8628' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWR' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
fe8650ae7e7bb2c4a82911823b229eb3
58277469318ec706a3a40f2e44c5b00108090fb6
describe
'1329523' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWS' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
1c51a0c61600965d75d0bee417f436cb
e986106a50bd81cfedcb77b973240f953269ac4f
describe
'87196' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWT' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
0147c1380e4881bee6045c6d61fb0af7
d9571f4b4d16b0bd071451dd31b6a35244af06bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWU' 'sip-files00179.pro'
586af728329db2baf71b58ea9190db82
b530a871281c2fc6bcf758f1757dbfdc84ca30ce
describe
'31649' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWV' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
cc6a07f57d9c4286e292f8692fadc4e9
1e7838c1486ce7c9d09f1a2beb02ac466adaca87
describe
'10650212' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWW' 'sip-files00179.tif'
4708dd84c2062f30340cc39dd54ae27f
8ed6cbccb59ee8858a7232ecfbfda8ae9c8dcb85
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWX' 'sip-files00179.txt'
3d56d7be161c0f64f26d79f56bf6455b
64f5ca89e4ea85630fecc72ba65c6434b17bcc45
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWY' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
938c436d5db50fde73f9b80a4cb7d401
4249a6e68c7320c327a6563fe9159746220d7a4f
describe
'1253322' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYWZ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
5259bdb9ad900b64da370545243c514b
a87ea6806ac47778bc243c63e1d1dbfe3d7957c0
'2011-11-14T16:15:50-05:00'
describe
'92462' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXA' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
492a00b293bc71891fa90fc1db1f86f9
d0a0819e1f79e987207e2c3ce74d9e90df141e85
describe
'28552' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXB' 'sip-files00180.pro'
b258a7577628906bfe244ffb868502a4
8b92cd1de912acc94b421649b5a3f9eb39525b74
describe
'33895' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXC' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
4620b2c6a415eeab452b0d0b4255fb56
55085a8f6b5bf9911f7c63f7d592a530efe8c7d8
describe
'10040444' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXD' 'sip-files00180.tif'
711e21f792a527247834e3465f3e6558
f968d76567f12dcf4ac3b5662e7a19d71ebe9df7
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXE' 'sip-files00180.txt'
c26a43e00713a5bca8de264e6f6d01b2
d3799a4c7a3ab65a285202141ae39c6755cec2bb
'2011-11-14T16:19:29-05:00'
describe
'9201' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXF' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
dd5c5211e7f2553b3254ef7e1bb1a821
d7f4e769c8d61520fa5e9c9ff5f994a3a07b681a
describe
'1339282' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXG' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
5e870ab44a126f8954b19fd670a569e4
930fd1297b986412119497ed1d9569097aa8546e
describe
'84981' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXH' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
52bca504687eb92160290ef1141b1f91
1785505e2dce927c07cc2a22323a9832d1a2935f
describe
'27747' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXI' 'sip-files00181.pro'
30e0d5f3064cdae51e62e222d3914a78
30b8c07633cea44253f3fa0794a62335f748bf86
describe
'30518' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXJ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
04ba6aca9f559441dbe1239a339b9963
b8611bfa02d28b964d4909374f5fe316a0291114
describe
'10727804' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXK' 'sip-files00181.tif'
3b9a41c555a4427d36c6138ea8f34863
9a525327b341e0ad3ac665db2dad4561a3f5615a
'2011-11-14T16:15:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXL' 'sip-files00181.txt'
64a8bf342b84a362b97cec1bdca20816
2bfc1fb37478fe5afb766a254eed29a4061513e7
describe
'8413' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXM' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
fdc1529a9fc2e0cccc399eaa98d35519
035536abb09c191df0945ae999ab71131d48d46f
describe
'1233670' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXN' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
f54355c21da072239726d0d4277285ae
ec69dab13d71b0a645f4ca4d4a5134ee5ef733a7
describe
'94066' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXO' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
4e4003c1c3887dfdd9187c6fe0419179
4a63efb72cc001f2859ccdddcee5ceac940e2982
describe
'29177' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXP' 'sip-files00182.pro'
0e6982e0a039476825273c774fc7be52
f43d3042c1d397350c7360639b239a381a23b789
describe
'33706' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXQ' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
8a04185be870fde391bb4475f837668e
c0f7f3c1e4ba588006e039abc0a3ae2139b2e292
describe
'9882844' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXR' 'sip-files00182.tif'
a96b6d927f4db0a50a0c63edc98b72d7
e666b12844c9a34be5dd5c2e91188c34f92bc4ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXS' 'sip-files00182.txt'
92b24eabcd2257c3f635e7ca29c99cf1
b16a65f5adb9f1d8cfcfb3796f7747d691da68d7
describe
'9254' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXT' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
7621678a685c81b6fda319a6181c985a
42e44b2f8abfc8e57076f3653fdf9120e6b6fc32
describe
'1314311' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXU' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
6f61c6979dd35e195c3ca0c265bd4294
28874a88aa65e8f156e70a693de5b7f4dd587002
describe
'85139' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXV' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
39ac5408d010828be6fc26e32afd866a
44eb1d7f66c5db6e0f7e67c4099b89f832c57ddd
describe
'27431' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXW' 'sip-files00183.pro'
68953cfc90a76411a24e8310f9183882
a4219f2b659c8b29177b844fa9028e4b35f38470
describe
'31400' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXX' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
a4f7a36aff46dcb2943b1066943ea5ef
237b7b689db2447159f2d9448145ffe5e1981f5e
describe
'10529184' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXY' 'sip-files00183.tif'
d011a333be8521484bd25c98e1147136
3a3ccda91431bd2a1ea233125487dd4a9640d8b0
'2011-11-14T16:20:18-05:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYXZ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
abdae0901f7cc72e537290e55bf815e3
739276634249f1cf714fe16dba65cdfd743fb4dc
describe
'8686' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYA' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
5ba311caea091a404ff0f93598aba062
c9e65ceb7372eff4077b10a3f7098e50c5323e60
'2011-11-14T16:14:00-05:00'
describe
'1256982' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYB' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
c833ca2151ff14e8bef02a32900f8721
792f53c31ebe96277e33a7735ecafdc7f2fc464e
describe
'89423' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYC' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
e4b2ea43f84c9a35eb194ae864a36e4e
a26136573026c91865b4313fa5ab83b7ca549595
describe
'28481' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYD' 'sip-files00184.pro'
03be3dec9dde184aec9f788cdef8e338
fb7b99e8c05002f1a4014592fae90302a49b47d4
describe
'35864' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYE' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
75837d378b5c6d1c3ae613a4a6f1dbb2
ae4ea714a167d73c8bbb78a2731370a51ddfa0df
describe
'10069496' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYF' 'sip-files00184.tif'
fc91a8a1eaaf9775c431f0fa27e5b80f
130124800ddbdc51f02a147eb8b6fd9a5cb3966e
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYG' 'sip-files00184.txt'
8f778c4b4fa1c1a2bee47498504ecc12
6f6f38a07a6cd84512cf4d5cbf5d7dfc8f19fa24
describe
'9144' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYH' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
1e99d4c4794c32e62b93711c5b550880
816520505983b20d36b3d31d71ed6d16f3347e69
describe
'1356218' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYI' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
33c3bb55ca018beea9c6bf677e250b71
105a42cd305b0681a55f67c139ebb2556e23ae20
describe
'85495' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYJ' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
3b9a389356f34dee0c4bab7ab7b20b59
a3c6ffce413e768c81431b62a24a7c9f836d67e5
describe
'27980' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYK' 'sip-files00185.pro'
576ed6ce2b811d02138d5dd7a201fee5
92537fd650355d7d40bd327a86811aafd30011fd
describe
'30426' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYL' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
d9fb53a758f76dcf669619e83dd6873e
4a21184fadc9050e39c6d3f1f74883027a3483db
describe
'10863352' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYM' 'sip-files00185.tif'
f6454e5a4b42d65d697ed242359a00ef
697b4986620e03fc41cc4a858a046bf77ef28ec5
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYN' 'sip-files00185.txt'
24b7459b4cc99e2c5d3ec2d075804628
dcc79b84b7738023238dfd3dc0c9444260a2f11f
describe
'8302' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYO' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
fb0902a1942872c5589ca9fb7bfabd71
e5e6634deda91a0a3c6cb038c5bb657333332442
describe
'1277261' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYP' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
f861433cf2007607ebd6aff289b9b58d
0a6ce91fa94f58dfda11b9765a27aeb5e626fc5c
describe
'86174' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYQ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
a98ace51435b92a32c22d6e08a84f7fa
f114dbb5800d4f73ca84df1667bda94e7223ab8f
describe
'27363' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYR' 'sip-files00186.pro'
979bfadc25ffbdef44a5e535b298e9ce
e3b82efa44c1ef0433ebc8101f6c07588f440f2c
describe
'31934' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYS' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
4c592af0ed22d193b71bd50c73d23ce3
c6fad5236fe45a62de85b63a47e609acb86761d9
describe
'10231848' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYT' 'sip-files00186.tif'
58415aaaede8c9a405f1c83f413f4ad4
54706fafeb0a599cb2e1a28630008aa079549260
'2011-11-14T16:16:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYU' 'sip-files00186.txt'
b3f73401cba8134de7a64812bdbf16eb
21faf7d438567bd978b7d4b79dae2419ffa9ca6a
describe
'8608' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYV' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
c700f2e215ce940dc12ed9f129caff2d
450467e90482951cf5ea3804df5c5520af739dc1
describe
'1326170' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYW' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
f9f298622274fa040721bf6dec546bc8
bab9206e0d12003c1e2c3c8d8a766faf3b853c13
describe
'86388' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYX' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
a00fa356d405af5f40f56bd80eba0a26
7092703658ff9ad7d049f45f13a3dcb122a11a31
'2011-11-14T16:19:35-05:00'
describe
'28569' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYY' 'sip-files00187.pro'
5d83aed155eef390a3b2dff56d61b48c
12ce7d09a30629d03bd0542b57bf9f19479971f2
describe
'31324' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYYZ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
8229af4648624d4e4e0cd0a01a927337
58739ac98940b86a2d7b17a9b31f63910295835c
describe
'10623148' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZA' 'sip-files00187.tif'
54e218ef5e25a4e035ed99ae12747356
ff8259a47245aac4e09db3d9723ae50ccb7fa427
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZB' 'sip-files00187.txt'
e0790c1144705b36f4671c7986da3766
e64dac7c1eb68b2f34502934e5843c3597bb761e
describe
'8656' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZC' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
2b103ef85b0e90c711c1e703166b7518
95fc223bfa4f5e12f796aa740c3c97a146b1e404
describe
'1261087' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZD' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
1082e19f9436e343dae81d5c37d6af0b
dc513246834f9053e19595772d820d20c8bfc22e
describe
'93222' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZE' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
343007e472486432df6791826a8eb5bc
5f5617d5593a036791a73c4e790095a243b3a919
describe
'28938' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZF' 'sip-files00188.pro'
b4e4986aae5c54f75906658e36e968b5
930fc7193d6ed8747471fedc04e334f1cc7b0c7a
describe
'32535' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZG' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
8bb3142e92c31c22d13986ebc2b7288b
41ef1c2b9893dec2e4e0f543b96a7339c07b8749
describe
'10102488' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZH' 'sip-files00188.tif'
2fec01a7d98c36f4c2c7a1c150193e5d
e6606d1e0b532cbd421884f233ec5dbf28449233
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZI' 'sip-files00188.txt'
e7c8d1711eb315169af7c77156925077
847a7a870d84544adfc05c57908d8aaae45b4f5a
describe
'9264' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZJ' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
c1ec4b8ab0adfc64d94be54aa526fde0
81d5e0edd7d76f95796bd15233d35670df480f8c
describe
'1345123' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZK' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
38a4f02b6f8695b6724d35c5ccedfe8c
b032b8b0ef454b506ca55ba4b98f6dc27a59c6e3
describe
'81782' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZL' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
89edd6196daff9dd496671ddc291e707
62d02551e53787775c431adb86da4628ef8b602c
describe
'27951' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZM' 'sip-files00189.pro'
b3cec50e03e8eb48d55c5d7dbd45e9a3
1f843a79e77880b21419d32e3377c01dd881ea8d
describe
'29914' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZN' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
ed94c7f561d45aa8c4a57b9d8096d42e
0b10f660e2f14282882b28caa49214015604ab02
describe
'10774816' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZO' 'sip-files00189.tif'
366be05d1b402ff9eab43cc64fafd8fe
b1ba5a08bcaef6fc68fbf6d3a4cbc713a8912ddf
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZP' 'sip-files00189.txt'
8f0d98de412cdfcb8eb48a85e51e7538
8a4a67418cf90ba37050967f37eb8a9d40eb63f5
describe
'8303' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZQ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
ce7de0f26cfa54e83c3c24199503ad95
2e10fcb7334f9907f6029df9e228fff3b93cb7e2
describe
'1308641' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZR' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
d3556aa8dc76d57f895cfc712a230a9c
22da99c5579473e1cab65bff8d03a9b4627bcf4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZS' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
f1f7ef411fafaec2fbd8a800dbe454ef
3997ad1ae977ad3f6de78f45f42e57c0a606c40e
describe
'28713' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZT' 'sip-files00190.pro'
e3ec5f6f62f31bb6b2a68b4abee62f17
5a4d8d4e386a146dc1748c5eed4264f49bb3648f
'2011-11-14T16:16:18-05:00'
describe
'31269' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZU' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
b097e00bf47abcf8e0bd2c47000a9d92
69824020950d2bd14bee9934467ff524d5094331
describe
'10482904' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZV' 'sip-files00190.tif'
1258aa0afbeb719f9b7e745f6de40e67
7e3f54f18bd066dd4b6f4ce8c3b605a0bb45bf20
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZW' 'sip-files00190.txt'
7743bef44d97a10d244c272542062ab1
c64468c41a4b111226daea2f7c6376ca3547bf1b
describe
'8739' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZX' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
12f2f57fb2749bb6edff986f745e73f6
3a9fe35a3f56d7822461e86f4556c9c55eb372fc
describe
'1380009' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZY' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
4a51942e0a470315bf565aebf6c58746
718d808fd06a2f5809667bf12275a93a93879629
describe
'64447' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABYZZ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
6aa104c844f25d182cb794542254660a
8020ac81d96a632784c641ed3ea43f2216a02bf5
describe
'21155' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAA' 'sip-files00191.pro'
0049c536c7eca993cca44dc04180d541
73126c23327f56ca6a6bd274e629adb0be5885e4
describe
'23192' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAB' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
62e0bb625abf720ea53f7daedbe022f6
ef32fddcbcb384962fc09fbf225090f35cb95092
describe
'11053120' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAC' 'sip-files00191.tif'
f8ac7f653be65525d74e2ae891ed443d
6e4eb0b4230c685dfa37f4f1aa83bb951954a035
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAD' 'sip-files00191.txt'
ad7377afd4f05977121f3f68e5894517
b7ae84c64744e85b5408ba0c85656c174a1db68d
describe
'6663' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAE' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
8149a2c3d0a323ad6a3ea859d95e785d
cfd461b2866f2bd88ea6a0c27035a61f87531733
describe
'1275258' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAF' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
5688b2710cf8a9d3ceb74c10253da6d3
66671f9b70729654e0070ebc37afc95c625391c1
describe
'71953' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAG' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
2fc3a1b96b78d90d4e345d18d48ea492
f65ec3c05045d941d4887cd5286af38bcbc36ec0
describe
'26776' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAH' 'sip-files00192.pro'
9383039c0c849dcd22b5d582f811501a
a896afb8bd119e5fcf4d090bbb4137b36cea5839
describe
'24682' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAI' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
77a35583c89aab592ec3ec15283a4f6d
db2595f5963d4a8f50e0c327e9839c51198bc3aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAJ' 'sip-files00192.tif'
d8dd07df8df6f06e105e453aa4b21985
317929d940ebfed6445d7e2463411d290868b92b
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAK' 'sip-files00192.txt'
964cfb0d1146abecc4d10ead01f66eb2
bb7fbc988d83eb0900befb6ec81ba79a5acfc3f6
describe
'6738' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAL' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
e6a95416537e07341c77d37ff035dbe8
4e6a2b005b6387abd70e441ed87ec4b0d17bfaca
describe
'1381071' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAM' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
88aa9483bdd6380dea96e4dea75734f7
1779fb5efccfff21416e87d11e6f1cece960bb16
describe
'90154' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAN' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
05ea60dca630a5ad6a851225c35e76d1
5046a107321ccdd46a26135862b678d41fd99a6c
describe
'47213' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAO' 'sip-files00193.pro'
6b284cfeaee40ae33709d3934c9194e7
97bbd8791873cb7135a8c64ae4a693f2e9b111cb
describe
'28363' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAP' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
0e58faf3681f4186ddc7f3e82c05c370
a18b07607eee315fa1d6050c2e67db5cb23472f3
describe
'11062292' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAQ' 'sip-files00193.tif'
ef48425f092243af720c283ec94e5bac
871bfa770e8c4bef7d68e649b4901d4f492f6bd3
describe
'2025' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAR' 'sip-files00193.txt'
df72bcc55c15f902a92af0ffefd03d6c
108c9415119d747508ba0cb2c749b6569e5ee17f
describe
'7495' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAS' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
ee95d9384832dd0d12fa0e33f042fa1e
d5740203e0a73bfcf8bde987286b0a9ccd08d2a7
describe
'1308647' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAT' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
7af4f81f6fc7cee7e2048d24d84b61f2
29d2a51053405b5436b70322651e4dff76b62fa2
describe
'102540' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAU' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
1bd684f61aade676aaef76b604e118f1
3b0df60a585467397889762305f697393f7da6b0
describe
'53719' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAV' 'sip-files00194.pro'
af7c5fd54cb0466406000dfd5091789e
c190ed5950d3921168a56be05dc6c3e5d8a980a4
describe
'32371' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAW' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
8b971c05a8430b461ff846cb12c4ab27
6e31b8ea80a0dba8e9d1fe2cacb06ce3f14a4bbb
describe
'10482808' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAX' 'sip-files00194.tif'
32d207db745e10fd62290bece0e250c1
e593c4be09fa61b8055323b9b6dbcd25248b8de5
describe
'2274' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAY' 'sip-files00194.txt'
c7b858e8fe9d4b3b6f4253aade2d834e
36dff4650b89b44abc76460b587adba932bfeb79
describe
'8425' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZAZ' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
0a3f044db2a2fca80e2339a3a937355c
602e403124e7160468158f5339f2f3ae24bc045a
describe
'1375772' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBA' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
979cb71e6cd3be7b8329502585bd792d
944b29fdd9587de4aea64c93c7bd91a7001355f4
describe
'88813' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBB' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
e5df5483cb533b61be88f859db94c5f9
907ad893e5d7e41607bcf3cc252c333b78046483
describe
'43812' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBC' 'sip-files00195.pro'
39dd12b92e1a9a89b0b9f0ff535b8b57
52e7c85ac55cddcc955d96bd054d2e1ef6d5f7c1
describe
'28958' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBD' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
57fc914a11cbd032ea758784bd6756b7
e0c8a740b6db309a72822065c64c33a4af077898
describe
'11019832' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBE' 'sip-files00195.tif'
a569053e12f32f5d9f77b39ab972037f
47afa98b906760de639953669d9d0f3ca6e0769d
describe
'1878' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBF' 'sip-files00195.txt'
e582d2902d31ffb9766251df42ac3c6c
a8bd11a3b45baba37bd8a562ccf6d56df7957f59
describe
'7629' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBG' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
9869792284558c5bfb9c90d491f67526
566517e240a3ac2cada902f585a6a143b85b4241
describe
'986999' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBH' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
4338f31738979df46721b3f8bf0da4cd
7cbab65afe05bf2c99134037fd50fe60cbb46e40
describe
'17435' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBI' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
a0b867c77f9d1e899bd7b4bc7a0b7d64
7e20d1ffa37b092e947ee87ae01b82e41fceaf27
describe
'488' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBJ' 'sip-files00196.pro'
9195b484e43f09d75b949abc4ba7d080
52272debb761ddc7d16877d56f22ee1e90d92b1d
describe
'4385' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBK' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
1b12f9e33bde018e168f46274b8ce5c2
a15d15233d1860e91f1f1a2234c9b4e40eb2cfa5
describe
'9748599' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBL' 'sip-files00196.tif'
9f71f02b12280698bf4aac2a9ec6e0a8
7ac791b44a51bc92149f1084a21423510bb975a9
describe
'302' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBM' 'sip-files00196.txt'
1030dec5bc37a98a1e6aa275a0d959a0
8626fe7c01cd434bea53bfdd6692673c45be238a
describe
Invalid character
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBN' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
484c24a0ba520ec41674cf4d4c9409bb
ccade5e8973e6674b70bd124b8ffd76fb9a7bef0
describe
'1395091' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBO' 'sip-filesback2.jp2'
e2e3810def72f4b78d8cb6a9aba6915a
e320d0d935a8ab6bb14a2bc0bd4729eef83fbba8
describe
'119052' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBP' 'sip-filesback2.jpg'
bd758728bbe5683c7e3f77c24efa2415
63cbbc91a780108015e0b4211e7c609b48e8cb25
describe
'2650' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBQ' 'sip-filesback2.pro'
9ff0e20c68de089027fc4c956fe83bea
77dd57c405481391189d7ab0f7862d731e2917b0
describe
'24862' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBR' 'sip-filesback2.QC.jpg'
7668acc436242da19fec0658ae26c457
8aa8e6357ec3a7549086cbf992dfc1acf2565d48
'2011-11-14T16:19:27-05:00'
describe
'33483988' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBS' 'sip-filesback2.tif'
a4987085fded00c9e7e12c2415359e87
7b96bf8afd1eebafbff7687be78adf9904624311
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBT' 'sip-filesback2.txt'
93a91a27a9ce18d9918478f8b707529c
ca1d99aad331187a9647f5a639c9aa2ceb05bdf5
describe
Invalid character
'5543' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBU' 'sip-filesback2thm.jpg'
4306fa70cdcaf156ca2dcf5987fff5e0
2dc9863f7697dce1a82ec266105549191ac0a56a
describe
'1392742' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBV' 'sip-filesCover1.jp2'
2899440f81bf42dd0029fb01f727c6c8
3067f78d2fdf3f5634b1f467342bcf207d44be6f
describe
'98168' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBW' 'sip-filesCover1.jpg'
dd763cb2d72ac7c1e990b0b7908523ea
adb1d6fc9f1b8eafae4f04e7040942c61f2fea9f
describe
'526' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBX' 'sip-filesCover1.pro'
a6a81c00c8c1d6195760e4e9a7f44c83
0204196e80fe5441cf2d8f6b154012a090102045
describe
'20727' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBY' 'sip-filesCover1.QC.jpg'
b1c9579bed7d8c1e62c82c7c7e6c241c
5e369a403c32ef4db7b70f1dd8f72a8ae400d2ca
'2011-11-14T16:20:15-05:00'
describe
'33427338' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZBZ' 'sip-filesCover1.tif'
278441975a6615eb607cf928ff73e662
c99455eceda14a273186265264dd656bcdf16b01
describe
'493' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCA' 'sip-filesCover1.txt'
b1813a0abfed85f2d5b642409034c31a
11f25dd5eb672c52d98bc6659acc31157f847ea2
describe
Invalid character
'4825' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCB' 'sip-filesCover1thm.jpg'
014688519124a7e8e4f090e8f0a6db78
078fc74515c73d2c546d8ef17094516d3e434ad4
describe
'240516' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCC' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
77f89e1d2915a8a37f8ad2ad45c1eb86
95d2194330a281542a72f974c15a42c94f181702
describe
'36591' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCD' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
4a83fc5de66012a0418cf94a6033662c
3573f53d7bf1d74d7a443b7fb54febbe22b68125
describe
'453' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCE' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
71833621ce3f3ecb12359a9c6412d32a
dd27f237559ad9faafdc451518b86d50a899467d
describe
'9418' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCF' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
b60324cfc4a9ba282e2b4e39941736fd
066e6c726faf920e2a82f5465a4c6de36d94d2b7
describe
'5777282' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCG' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
e84c1c069c7ae395b00bf2a8f79bee3d
7b4bf9ff4bc072397ab240b227823037c226b0d4
describe
'58' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCH' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
a6ad22cef169e2fe07e663a4e5e9065d
f313047dd7955847a2ba99f7d976ffc15e42c0e7
describe
'3690' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCI' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
a8aed10ef99a886b3e3ab10905e2d365
c2523ca56a2e7a0270bc3e13621043c5cd42c949
describe
'315347' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCJ' 'sip-filesUF00001976_00001.mets'
1bcd128d4be9a55412a8a54c45277bc7
c135777b56b71e47f74374b2b583e68bd5724d8c
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T11:52:29-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'407171' 'info:fdaE20080810_AAAABBfileF20080810_AABZCM' 'sip-filesUF00001976_00001.xml'
e6b9ba213b3685bb1ee35c3b5ae479d3
3202c15f811263178f22b4c25015dc5448d91831
describe
'2013-12-16T11:52:25-05:00'
xml resolution