Citation
The doll and her friends, or, Memoirs of the Lady Seraphina

Material Information

Title:
The doll and her friends, or, Memoirs of the Lady Seraphina
Portion of title:
Memoirs of the Lady Seraphina
Spine title:
Doll and her friends
Creator:
Maitland, Julia Charlotte, d. 1864
Browne, Hablot Knight, 1815-1882 ( Illustrator )
Green, W. T., fl. 1837-1872 ( Engraver )
Grant and Griffith ( Publisher )
Robson, Levey, and Franklyn (Firm) ( Printer )
Bone & Son ( Binder )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Grant and Griffith (successors to J. Harris)
Manufacturer:
Robson, Levey, and Franklyn
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[4], 91, 16 p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Dolls -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bone & Son -- Binder's tickets (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Bone & Son -- Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
binders' tickets ( aat )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Osborne Coll.,
Citation/Reference:
BM,
General Note:
With four illustrations by Hablot K. Browne.
General Note:
Ill. engraved by W.T. Green.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue: 16 p. at end.
General Note:
Author's name from Osborne cited below.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "Letters from Madras," "Historical charades," etc. etc. ; with four illustrations by Hablot K. Browne.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026860729 ( ALEPH )
13033625 ( OCLC )
ALH4070 ( NOTIS )

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THE

DOLL AND HER FRIENDS;

OR,

Memoirs of the Ladp Seraphina.

BY THE AUTHOR OF

“LETTERS FROM MADRAS,” “HISTORICAL CHARADES,”

ETC. ETC.
WITH FOUR ILLUSTRATIONS BY HABLOT K. BROWNE. :
LONDON: |
GRANT AND GRIFFITH, 3

(SUCCESSORS TO J. HARRIS,)
CORNER OF ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD.



MDCCCLII.,



LONDON :

PRINTED BY ROBSON, LEVEY, AND FRANKLYN,
Great New Street, Fetter Lane.



PREFACE.

My principal intention, or rather aim, in writing this little
book was to amuse children by a story founded on one of
their favourite diversions, and to inculcate a few such minor
morals as my little plot might be strong enough to carry ;
chiefly the domestic happiness produced by kind tempers
and consideration for others. And further, I wished to
say a word in favour of that good old-fashioned plaything,
the Doll, which one now sometimes hears decried by
sensible people who have no children of their own.







THE

DOLL AND HER FRIENDS,



CHAPTER I.

I BELONG to a race the sole end of whose existence
is to give pleasure to others. None will deny the
goodness of such an end, and I flatter myself most
persons will allow that we amply fulfil it. Few of
the female sex especially but will acknowledge, with
either the smile or the sigh called forth by early
recollections, that much of their youthful happiness
was due to our presence ; and some will even 2°0 80
far as to attribute to our influence many a habit of
housewifery, neatness, and industry, which orna-
ments their riper years.

But to our influence, our silent unconscious in-
fluence alone, can such advantages be ascribed ; for
neither example nor precept are in our power ; our
race cannot boast of intellectual endowments; and
though there-are few qualities, moral or mental, that
have not in their turn been imputed to us by partial
friends, truth obliges me to confess that they exist

B



2 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

rather in the minds of our admirers than in our own
persons.

We are a race of mere dependents ; some might
even call us slaves. Unable to change our place.or
move: hand or foot at our own pleasure, and forced
to submit to every caprice of our possessors, we can-
not be said to have even a will of our own. But
every condition has its share of good and evil, and
I have often considered my helplessness and depend-
ence as mere trifles compared with the troubles to
which poor sensitive human being’s are subject.

Pain, sickness, or fatigue I never knew. While
a fidgetty child cannot keep still for two minutes
at a time, I sit contentedly for days together in the
same attitude; and I have before now seen one
of those irritable young mortals cry at a scratch,
while I was bearing needles drawn in and out of
every part of my body, or sitting with a pin run
straight through my heart, calmly congratulating
myself on being free from the inconveniences of
flesh and blood.

Of negative merits I possess a good share. I
am never out of humour, never impatient, never
mischievous, noisy, nor intrusive; and though I
and* “my fellows cannot lay claim to brilliant powers
either in word or deed, we may boast of the same
qualifications as our wittiest king, for certainly none



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 3

of us ever “said a foolish thing,” if she “ never did
a wise one.”

Personal beauty I might almost, without va-
nity, call the “badge of all our tribe.” Our very
name is seldom mentioned without the epithet pretty ;
and in my own individual case I may say that I
have always been considered pleasing and elegant,
though others have surpassed me in size and gran-
deur.

But our most striking characteristic is our power
of inspiring strong attachment. The love bestowed
on us by our possessors is proof against time, fami-
liarity, and misfortune :

“ Age cannot wither” us, “ nor custom stale”
Our “infinite variety.”

With no trace of our original beauty left,—dress in
tatters, complexion defaced, features undistinguish-
able, our very limbs mutilated, the mere wreck of
our former selves,—who has not seen one of us still
the delight and solace of some tender young heart ;
the confidant of its fancies, and the soother of its
sorrows ; preferred to all newer claimants, however
high their pretensions ; the still unrivalled favourite,
in spite of the laughter of the nursery and the quiet
contempt of the schoolroom ? | 3
Young and gentle reader, your sympathy or



4 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

your sagacity has doubtless suggested to you my
name. I am, as you guess, a DoLL; and though
not a doll of any peculiar pretensions, I flatter my-
self that my life may not be quite without interest
to the young lovers of my race, and in this hope I
venture to submit my memoirs to your indulgent
consideration.

I am but a small doll; not one of those splen-
did specimens of wax, modelled from the Princess
Royal, with distinct fingers and toes, eyes that
shut, and tongues that wag. No; such I have
only contemplated from a respectful distance as
I lay on my stall in the bazaar, while they
towered sublime in the midst of the toys, the won-
der and admiration of every passing child. I am
not even one of those less magnificent, but. still
dignified, leathern-skinned individuals, requiring
clothes to take off and put on, and a cradle to
sleep in, with sheets, blankets, and every thing
complete. Neither can I found my claim to notice
upon any thing odd or unusual in my appearance:
I am not a negro doll, with wide mouth and woolly
hair; nor a doll with a gutta-percha face, which
can be twisted into all kinds of grimaces.

I am a simple English doll, about six inches
high, with jointed limbs and an enamel face, a slim
waist and upright figure, an amiable smile, an in-



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 5

telligent eye, and hair dressed in the first style of
fashion. I never thought myself vain, but I own
that in my youth I did pique myself upon my hair.
There was but one opinion about that. I have often
heard even grown-up people remark, “ How ing‘eni-
ously that doll’s wig is put on, and how nicely it is
arranged !” while at the same time my rising vanity
was crushed by the insinuation that I had an ab-
surd smirk or a ridiculous stare.

However, the opinions of human beings of ma-
ture age never much disturbed me. The world was
large enough for them and me; and I could con-
tentedly see them turn to their own objects of in-
terest, while I awaited in calm security the unquali-
fied praise of those whose praise alone was valuable
to me—their children and grandchildren.

I first opened my eyes to the light in the Pan-
theon Bazaar. How I came there I know not; my
conscious existence dates only from the moment in
which a silver-paper covering was removed from
my face, and the world burst upon my view. A
feeling of importance was the first that arose in my
mind. As the hand that held me turned me from
side to side, I looked about. Dolls were before me,
dolls behind, and dolls on each side. For a con-
siderable time I could see nothing else. The world
seemed made for dolls. But by degrees, as my



6 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

powers of vision strengthened, my horizon extended,
and I perceived that portions of space were allotted
to many other objects. I descried, at various dis-
tances, aids to amusements in endless succession,—
balls, bats, battledores, boxes, bags, and baskets ;
carts, cradles, and cups and saucers. I did not then
know any thing of the alphabet, and I cannot say
that I have quite mastered it even now; but if I
were learned enough, I am sure I could go from
A to Z, as initial letters of the wonders with which
I soon made acquaintance. |

Not that I at once became aware of the uses,
or even the names, of all I saw. No one took the
trouble to teach me; and it was only by dint of my
own intense observation that I gained any know-
ledge at all. I did not at first even know that I
was a doll. But I made the most of opportunities,
and my mind gradually expanded.

I first learned to distinguish human beings.
Their powers of motion made a decided difference -
between them and the other surrounding objects,
and naturally my attention was early turned to-
wards the actions of the shopwoman on whose stall
I lived. She covered me and my companions with
a large cloth every night, and restored the daylight
to us in the morning. We were all perfectly help-
less without her, and absolutely under her control.



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. Z

At her will the largest top hummed, or was silent ;
the whip cracked, or lay harmlessly by the side of
the horse. She moved us from place to place, and
exhibited or hid us at her pleasure; but she was
always so extremely careful of our health and looks,
and her life seemed so entirely devoted to us and to
our advantage, that I often doubted whether she
was our property or we hers. Her habits varied
so little from day to day, that after watching her
for a reasonable time, I felt myself perfectly ac-
quainted with her, and in a condition to make ob-
servations upon others of her race. |

One day a lady and a little girl stopped at our stall.

“Oh, what a splendid doll!” exclaimed the
child, pointing to the waxen beauty which outshone
the rest of our tribe. It was the first time I had
heard the word Doll, though I was well acquainted
with the illustrious individual to whom it was ap-
plied ; and it now flashed upon my mind, with pride
and pleasure, that, however insignificant in compa-
rison, I too was a doll. But I had not time to
think very deeply about my name and nature just
then, as I wished to listen to the conversation of
the two human beings.

“ May I buy her ?” said the little girl.

“Can you afford it?” asked the lady in return.
_“ Remember your intentions for your brother.”



8 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“Perhaps I have money enough for both,” an-
swered the child. “ How much does she cost ?”

“Seven shillings,” said the shopwoman, taking
the doll from her place, and displaying her pretty
face and hands to the utmost advantage. |

“T have three half-crowns,” said the little girl.

“ But if you spend seven shillings on the doll,”
answered the lady, “you will only have sixpence
left for the paint-box.”

“What does a paint-box cost ?” asked the child.

“ We have them of all prices,” replied the shop-
keeper ; “ from sixpence to seven shillings.”

The little girl examined several with great care,
and stood some time in deliberation; at last she
said, “I don’t think Willy would like a sixpenny
one.”

“It would be of no use to him,” answered the
lady. “He draws well enough to want better
colours. If you gave it to him, he would thank
you and try to seem pleased, but he would not
really care for it. However, he does not know that
you thought of making him a birthday present, so
you are at liberty to spend your money as you like.”

“* W ould he care for a seven shilling one ?” asked
the little girl.

“ Yes; that is exactly what he wants.”

“ Then he shall have it,” exclaimed the good-



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 9

natured little sister. ‘“ Poor dear Willy, how many
more amusements I have than he !”

She bought the best paint-box, and received
sixpence in change.

“Is there any thing else I can shew you ?” asked
the shopkeeper.

“No, thank you,” she replied; and turning to
the elder lady, she said, “ May we go home at once,
Mama? It would take me a long time to choose
what I shall spend my sixpence in, and I should
like to give Willy his paint-box directly.”

“ By all means,” answered the lady ; “we will
lose no time; and I will bring you again to spend
the sixpence whenever you please.”

Without one backward glance towards the beau-
tiful doll, the child tripped away by the side of her
companion, looking the brightest and happiest of
her kind.

I pondered long upon this circumstance; how
long I cannot say, for dolls are unable to measure
time, they can only date from any particularly strik-
ing epochs. For instance, we can say, “Such an
affair happened before I lost my leg ;” or, “Such an
event took place before my new wig was put on;
but of the intricate divisions known to mortals by
the names of hours, days, months, &c., we have no
idea.



10 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

However, I meditated on the kind little sister
during what appeared to me a long: but not tedious
period, for I was gratified at gaining some insight
into the qualities proper to distinguish the human
race. Readiness to shew kindness, and a prefer-
ence of others’ interests to her own, were virtues
which I easily perceived in the little girl’s conduct;
but one thing perplexed me sadly: I could not un- —
derstand why a doll would not have answered her
kind intentions as well as a paint-box; why could
she not have bought the doll which she admired so
much, and have given that to her brother.

My thoughts were still engaged with this sub-
ject when a boy approached the stall. Boys were
new characters to me, and I was glad of the oppor-
tunity to observe one. He did not bestow a look
on the dolls and other toys, but asked for a box of
carpenter's tools. The shopkeeper dived into some
hidden recess under the counter, and produced a
clumsy-looking chest, the merits of which I could
not discover ; but the boy pronounced it to be “ just
the thing,” and willingly paid down its price. I
followed him with my eyes as he walked about with
his great box under his arm, looking from side to
side, till he caught sight of another boy rather
younger than himself, advancing from an opposite
corner.



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 11

“ Why, Geoffrey,” “exclaimed my first friend,
“ where have you been all this time? I have been
hunting every where for you.”

Geoffrey did not immediately answer, his mouth
being, as I perceived, quite full. When at last he
could open his lips, he said: “ Will you have a
cheesecake ?”

“No, thank you,” replied his friend. “ We must
20 home to dinner so soon, that you will scarcely
have time to choose your things. Where have you
been ?”

“ At the pastrycook’s stall,” answered Geofirey ;
“and I must go back again before I can buy any
thing. I left my five shillings there to be changed.”

The boys returned together to the stall, and 1
saw its mistress hand a small com to Geoffrey.

“ Where is the rest?” said he.

“ That is your change, sir,” she replied.

‘¢ Why, you don’t mean that those two or three
tarts and jellies cost four and sixpence!” he ex-
claimed, turning’ as red as the rosiest doll at my
side. (

J think you will find it correct, sir,” answered
the shopkeeper. “ ‘T'wo jellies, sixpence each, make
one shilling; two custards, sixpence each, two shil-
lings; a bottle of ginger-beer, threepence, two and
threepence; one raspberry cream, sixpence, two and



12 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

ninepence; three gooseberry tarts, threepence, three
shillings; two strawberry tarts, three and twopence;
two raspberry ditto, three and fourpence; four
cheesecakes, three and eightpence; two Bath buns,
four shillings; and one lemon ice, four and sixpence.”

“What a bother !” said Geoffrey, as he pocketed
the small remains of his fortune. “I wish I could
give her some of the tarts back again, for they
weren’t half so nice as they looked, except just the
first one or two.”

“ Because you were only hungry for the first
one or two,” said the other boy. “ But it can’t be
helped now; come and spend the sixpence better.”

“There won’t be any thing worth buying for
sixpence,” said Geoffrey gloomily, as he shuffled in
a lazy manner towards my stall.

“ I want a spade,” said he.

Several were produced, but they cost two shil-
lings or half-a-crown. There were little wooden
spades for sixpence; but from those he turned with
contempt, saying they were only fit for babies.
Nothing at our table suited him, and he walked
towards our opposite neighbour, who sold books,
maps, &c. On his asking for a dissected map, all
the countries of the world were speedily offered to
his choice; but alas! the price was again the ob-
stacle. The cheapest map was half-a-crown; and



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 13

Geoffrey’s sixpence would buy nothing but a childish
puzzle of Old Mother Hubbard. Geoffrey said it
was a great shame that every thing should be either
dear or stupid.

“ Can’t you lend me some money, Ned?” con-
tinued he.

“ T can’t, indeed,” replied the other ;. “ mine all
went in this box of tools. Suppose you don’t spend
the sixpence at all now, but keep it till you get
some more.”

“No, I won’t do that; I hate saving my money.”

So saying, he wandered from stall to stall, ask-
ing the price of every thing, as if his purse was as
full as his stomach.

“ How much is that sailor kite?” “ Two shil-
lings, sir.”—“ How much is that bat?” Seven and
sixpence.”—“ How much is that wooden box with
secret drawer?” “ Three shillings.”

“ How provoking!” he exclaimed. “I want
heaps of thing's, and this stupid sixpence is no good
at all.”

“It is better than nothing,” said Edward. “It
is not every day that one’s aunt sends one five shil-
lings to spend in the bazaar; and in common times
sixpence is not to be despised. After all, there are
plenty of things it will buy. Do you want a top?”

“ No; I’ve got four.”



14 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“ Garden seeds ?”
What is the use of them, when I can’t get a
spade ?”
“ Steel pens? You said this morning you could
not write with quills.”
“ T don’t like buying those kind of things with
my own money.” |
- “A box? Yesterday you wanted a box.”
“ T don’t care for boxes that won't lock, and L
can’t get one with a lock and key for sixpence.”
© A knife?” |
“ Sixpenny knives have only one blade ; I want
two.”
“ Sealing-wax? wafers? a penholder? a paint-
box? India-rubber? pencils ?”
“ Stupid things !”
“A ball? You might have a very good ball.”
“ Not a cricket-ball ; and I don’t care for any
other.”
“ What a particular fellow you are! I am sure
I could always find something to spend sixpence in.
String? One is always wanting string. You may
have.a good ball of whipcord.”
“ These sort of places don’t sell it.”
“Then, I say again, keep your money till you
want it.”
“No, that I’ll never do, when I came on pur-



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 15

pose to spend it. After all, the only thing I can
think of,” contmued Geoffrey, after a pause, “ is to
go back to the pastrycook’s. There was one kind
of tart I did not taste, and perhaps it would be
nicer than the others. I’ll give you one if you like.”

“ No, thank you; I am much obliged to you
all the same; but I won’t help you to spend your
money in that way. Don’t buy any more tarts.
Come and walk about ; there are plenty more shops
to look at.”

They sauntered on, but Geoftrey, by various
turns, worked his way back to the pastrycook’s ; and
as no persuasions could then bring him away, Kd-
ward walked off, not choosing, as he said, to en-
courage him.

Presently I saw a tall gentleman enter the ba-
zaar, and I wondered what he would buy. I did
not then understand the difference between grown-
up people and children, and as he approached my
stall, I could not repress a hope that he would buy
me. But his quick eye glanced over the tables with-
out resting on any of the toys.

“ Can I shew you any thing, sir ?” said my mis-
tress.

“ No, I am much obliged to you,” he answered,
with a pleasant smile. “I am only in search of
some young people who, I dare say, have been



16 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

better customers than I. Ah, here they are,” he
continued, as the two boys of whom I had taken so
much notice ran up to him from different ends of
the room.

“Well, boys,” said he, “ what have you bought?

Must we hire a wagon to carry your property
home 2” -
_ “Not quite,’ answered Edward. “TI have
bought a wagon-load of amusement, but I can
carry it home well enough myself; I have spent
all my money in this box of tools.”

“A very sensible and useful purchase,” said the
gentleman ; “ they will give you plenty of plea-
sant employment. The only objection is, that they
are likely to be lost or broken at school.”

“IT do not mean to take them to school, papa.
I shall use them in the holidays, and leave them
with Willy when I go back to school; that was one
reason why I bought them. Willy could do a good
deal of carpentering on his sofa.”

“True, my boy, and a kind thought. They
will be a great amusement to poor Willy, and he
will take good care of them for you.”

“ Now, Geoffrey, how have you invested your
capital? I hope you have found a strong spade. It
is fine weather for gardening.”

“No, I haven't,” stammered Geoffrey.



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THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 17

© Well, what have you bought ?”

“ I don’t know,” said Geoffrey.

“ Do you mean that you have not spent your
money yet? Make haste, then, for I can only
allow you five minutes more. I expected to find
you ready to go home. Be brisk; there is every
thing on that stall that the heart of boy can wish,”
said the gentleman, pointing to my abode.

But Geoffrey did not move. “I don’t want
any thing,” said he at last.

“ What a fortunate boy !” said the gentleman;
but he presently added, “ Have you lost your
money ?”

« Ne.”

“ Shew it to me.”

Geoffrey slowly produced his sixpence, almost
hidden in the palm of his hand.

“Where is the rest?” asked the gentleman.
“ Have you spent it ?”

“ Yes.”

“And nothing to shew for it? Nothing ?”—
and the gentleman looked at the boy more narrowly.
“ Nothing,” said he again, “except a few crumbs
of pie-crust on your waistcoat? Oh, Geoffrey !”

There was a short silence, and the boy coloured
a good deal; at last he said, “It was my own
money.”

C



18 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“ You will wish it was your own again before
long’, I dare say,” said the gentleman. “ However,
we must hope you will be wiser in time. Come
home now to dinner.”

“ T don’t want any dinner,” said Geoffrey.

“Probably not, but Edward and I do. We
have not dined on tarts; and I dare say Ned is as
hungry as I am.”

So saying, he led the way towards the door,
leaving me, as usual, pondering over what had
passed. One word used by the gentleman made a
great impression on me—USEFUL.

What could that mean? Various considerations
were suggested by the question. Some things, it
seemed, were useful, others not; and what puzzled
me most was, that the very same things appeared
to be useful to some people, and not to others. For
instance, the sixpenny paint-box, which had been re-
jected as useless to Willy, was bought soon after-
wards by a small boy, who said it would be the
most useful toy he had.

Could this be the case with every thing? Was
it possible that every thing properly applied might
have its use, and that its value depended upon
those who used it? If so, why was Geoffrey blamed
for spending his money in tarts? He liked them.
Perhaps he had plenty of food at home, and that



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 19

uselessness consisted in a thing’s not being really
wanted. I revolved the subject in my mind, and
tried to discover the use of every thing I saw, but
I was not always successful. The subject was per-
plexing ; and gradually all my thoughts became
fixed on the point of most importance to myself —
namely, my own use.

How changed were my ideas since the time
when I imagined the world to belong to dolls!
Their whole race now seemed to be of very small
importance; and as for my individual self, I could
not be sure that I had any use at all, and still less
what, or to whom.

Day after day I lay on my counter unnoticed,
except by the shopwoman who covered us up at
night, and re-arranged us in the morning’; and
even this she did with such an indifferent air, that
I could not flatter myself I was of the smallest use
to her. Every necessary care was bestowed upon
me in common with my companions; but I sighed
for the tender attentions that I sometimes saw
lavished by children upon their dolls, and wished
that my mistress would nurse and caress me in the
same manner.

She never seemed to think of such a thing.
She once said I was dusty, and whisked a brush
over my face; but that was the only separate mark



90 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

of interest I ever received from her. I had no rea-
sonable ground of complaint, but I began to grow
weary of the insipidity of my life, and to ask myself
whether this could be my only destiny. Was I
never to be of use to any body? From time to
time other toys were carried away. Many a giddy
top and lively ball left my side in childish company,
and disappeared through those mysterious gates by
which the busy human race entered our calm se+
clusion.

At last even dolls had their day. The beauti-
ful waxen princess no longer graced our dominions.
She was bought by an elderly lady for a birthday
present to a little grand-daughter; and on the very
same day the “old familiar faces” of six dolls who
had long shared my counter vanished from my
sight, one after another being bought and carried
away.

I was sorry to lose them, though while we lived
togethét we had had our little miffs and jealousies.
I had sometimes thought that the one with the red
shoes was always sticking out her toes; that she of —
the flaxen ringlets was ready to let every breath of
wind blow them over her neighbours’ faces; that
another with long legs took up more room than her
share, much to my inconvenience. But now that
they were all gone, and I never could hope to see



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 21

them again, I would gladly have squeezed myself
into as. small compass as the baby doll in the
walnut-shell, in order to make room for them once
more.

One thing, however, was satisfactory: dolls
certainly had their use. Seven had been bought,
and therefore why not an eighth? I had been sink-
ing almost into a state of despondency, but now my
hopes revived and my spirits rose. My turn might
come.

And my turn did come. Every circumstance of
that eventful day is deeply impressed on my me-
mory. I was as usual employed in making remarks
upon the passing: crowd, and wondering what might
be the use of every body I saw, when I perceived
the lady and the little girl who had been almost my
first acquaintances among the human race. As they
approached my stall, I heard the mama say, “ Have
you decided what to buy with the sixpence ?”

“Oh yes, quite,” answered the child ;*““ I am
going to buy a siapenny doll.”

The words thrilled through me; her eyes seemed
fixed on mine, and the sixpence was between her
fingers. I imagined myself bought. But she con-
tinued: “ I think, if you don’t mind the trouble, I
should like to go round the bazaar first, to see which
are the prettiest.”



99 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“ By all means,” replied the lady; and they
walked on, carrying all my hopes with them.

I had often fancied myself the prettiest doll of
my size in the place; but such conceit would not
support me now. I felt that there were dozens,
nay scores, who more than equalled me; and alk
discontented notions of my neglected merit now
sunk before the dread that I had really no merit to
neglect. |

I began also to have some idea of what was
meant by time. My past life had glided away so
imperceptibly, that I did not know whether it had
been long or short; but I learnt to count every mo-
ment while those two mortals were walking round
the bazaar.

I strained my eyes to catch sight of them again;
but when at last they re-appeared, I scarcely dared
to look, for fear of seeing a doll in the child’s hands.
But no; her hands were empty, except for the six-
pence still between her finger and thumb.

They came nearer—they stopped at another stall ;
I could not hear what they said, but they turned
away, and once more stood opposite to me. The
child remained for some moments as silent as my-
self, and then exclaimed, “ After all, Mama, I don’t
think there are any prettier dolls than these in the
whole room.”



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 23

“What do you say to this one, Miss?” said our
proprietor, taking up a great full-dressed Dutch
doll, and laying her on the top of those of my size
and class, completely hiding the poor little victims
under her stiff muslin and broad ribbons.

But on the child’s answering, “ No, thank you,
I only want a sixpenny doll not dressed,” the Dutch
giantess was removed, and we once more asserted
our humble claims.

“ That seems to me a very pretty one,” said the
mama, pointing to my next neighbour. The child
for a moment hesitated, but presently exclaimed in a
joyful tone, “ Oh no, this is the beauty of all; this
little darlmg with the real hair and blue ribbon in
it; I will take this one, if you please.” And before
I could be sure that she meant me, I was removed
from my place, wrapped up in paper, and consigned
to her hands. My long-cherished wishes were ful-
filled, and I was bought. At first I could scarcely
believe it. Notwithstanding all my planning and
looking forward to this event, now that it really
happened, I could not understand it. My senses
seemed gone. What had so lone occupied my mind
was the work of a moment; but that moment was
irrevocable, and my fate was decided. In my little
mistress’ hands I passed the boundaries of the world
of toys, and.entered upon a new state of existence.



24 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

CHAPTER II.

A VERY different life now opened before me. I had
no longer any pretence for complaining of neglect.
My young mistress devoted every spare moment to
the enjoyment of my company, and set no limits to
her caresses and compliments; while I in return
regarded her with all the gratitude and affection
which a doll can feel. My faculties as well as my
feelings were called into fresh exercise; for though
I had no longer the wide range of observation
afforded by the daily crowd of strangers in the
bazaar, I had the new advantage of making inti-
mate acquaintance with a small circle of friends.

Having hitherto been so completely without any
position in the world, I could not at first help feel-
ing rather shy at the idea of taking my place as
member of a family; and it was therefore a relief
to find that my lot was not cast amongst total
strangers, but that I had already some slight clue
to the characters of my future companions.

My mistress, whose name was Rose, was sister
to the Willy for whom she had bought the paint-
box, and. also to Edward, the purchaser of the .



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 25

tools. Geoffrey, the lover of tarts, was a cousin on
_ avisit to them for the holidays; and they had also
an elder sister named Margaret, besides their papa
and mama, whom I had seen in the bazaar.

The first of the family to whom I was introduced
was Willy, and I soon became much interested in
him. He was a pale thin boy, who spent the day
on a sofa, to and from which he was carried in the
morning and at night. In fine weather he went
out in a wheel-chair; but he was unable to move with-
out help, and was obliged to endure many priva-
tions. Though he often looked suffering and weary,
he was cheerful and patient, and always seemed
pleased to hear other children describe enjoyments
in which he could not share. Every body was fond
of Willy, and anxious to amuse and comfort him.
All that happened out of doors was told to him ; all
the kindest friends and pleasantest visitors came to
see him ; the new books were brought to him to read
first; the best fruit and flowers always set apart for
him; and all the in-door occupations arranged as
much as possible with a view to his convenience.
He and his little sister Rose were the dearest friénds
in the world, and certain to take part in whatever
interested each other. As soon as Rose brought
me home from the Pantheon, she ran upstairs with
me to Willy, whom I then saw for the first time,



26 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

sitting on the sofa with his feet up, and a table
before him, on which stood several books, and my _
old acquaintances the paint-box and the chest of tools.

“ Look at this, Willy ; is not this pretty?” ex-
claimed Rose, laying me down on his open book.

Willy looked up with a pleasant smile: “ Very
pretty,” he answered. “TI suppose she is to be the
lady of the new house; and with Ned’s tools, I hope
to make some furniture worth her acceptance.”

“Oh, thank you, Willy dear. And will you
help me to choose a name for her? . What do you
think the prettiest name you know 2”

“ Rose,” answered Willy, laughing ; “ but I sup-
pose that will not do. I dare say you want some-
thing very fine and out-of-the-way.”

“As fine as can be,” replied Rose; “I have
been thinking of Seraphina or Wilhelmina: which
do you like best ?”

“ Call it Molly,” cried Edward, who just then
entered the room; “ Molly and Betty are the best
names: no nonsense in them.”

“Call it Stupid Donkey,” mumbled a voice be-
hind him; and Geoffrey advanced, his mouth as
usual full of something besides words. “ Have any
nuts, Willy ?” he asked, holding out a handful.

“No, thank you,” answered Willy ; “I must
not eat them.”



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 27

“JT wouldn't be you, I know,” said Geoffrey,
cracking one between his teeth; “ never let to eat
any thing but what’s wholesome, and always read-
ing, or doing something stupid. I believe you are
helping Rose to play with that doll now. Put it
into the fire; that is the way to treat dolls. Stupid
things. I hate ’em !”

“Pray do not touch it, Geoffrey,” said Rose.

“Leave it alone, Geff,” said Edward. “ You
have your things, and Rose has hers. I don’t see
the fun of dolls myself, but she does, and nobody
shall interfere with her while I am here to protect
her. Just remember that, will you ?”

“The d-o-ll!” said Geoffrey, drawling the word,
and making a face as if the pronouncing it turned
him quite sick. “Oh, the sweet doll! Perhaps
you would like to stay and play with Rose, and
Willy, and the d-o-ll, instead of coming out to
cricket.”

“ Nonsense, you foolish fellow, you know better,”
answered Edward. “But I won’t have Rose bullied ;
and what’s more, I won’t have Willy quizzed. I
should like to see you or me pass such an exami-
nation as Willy could if he were at school. Why,
he can learn as much in a day as we do in a
week.” :
“Well, he is welcome to learn as much as he



28 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

likes,” said Geoffrey ; “ and let’s you and I go and
play. What stupid nuts these are! I’ve almost
cracked one of my teeth with cracking them.”

The boys ran off; and presently there came into
the room the papa and mama, whom I already knew,
and a young lady very like Rose, but older. I found.
she was Margaret, the eldest sister. They inquired
whether Willy wanted any thing before they went
out; and Margaret fetched a drawing that he
wished to copy, while his father and mother wheeled
his sofa and table nearer the window that he might
have more light. When he was made quite com-
fortable, they told Rose that she might stay and
take care of him till they returned; and she said
she would bring her box of scraps and begin dress-
mg me. Then I came in for my share of notice,
and had every reason to be satisfied with the praises
bestowed on me. The mama said that I deserved
very neatly-made clothes; the papa, that my hair
would be a pattern for Margaret’s ; and Margaret
said I was charming, and that she would make me
a pink satin gown.

They admired the name Seraphina, though the
papa suggested various others which he thought
might suit Rose’s taste—Sophonisba, Cleopatra,
Araminta, Dulcinea, Ethelinda, &c.; but as she
remained steady to her first choice, the Lapy



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS: 29

SERAPHINA was decided to be thenceforth my name
and title. :

And now began the real business of my life. I
was no longer doomed to fret at being of no use, for
the object of my existence was plain enough, namely,
to give innocent recreation to my young mistress
when at leisure from her more serious employments.
Every day she spent some hours in study with her
mother or sister; and she would fly to me for relief
between her lessons, and return to them with more
vigour after passing a little time in my refreshing
company. She often shewed her tasks to me, and
discussed their difficulties. I think she repeated the
multiplication-table to me nearly a hundred times,
while I sat on the Zutor’s Assistant waiting for the
recurrence of the fatal words, “ Seven times nine.”
Day after day she could get no farther; but as
soon as she came to “ Seven times nine,” I was
turned off the book, which had to be consulted for
the answer.

At last, one day she came running into the room
in great glee, exclaiming, “I have done the multi-
plication-table. I have said it quite right, sixty-
three and all. I made no mistake even in dodging.
And you helped me, my darling Lady Seraphina.
I never could have learned it perfect if you had not
heard me say it so often. And now, look at your



30 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

rewards. Margaret has made you a bonnet, and
Willy has made you an arm-chair.”’

Beautiful, indeed, was the bonnet, and commo-
dious the arm-chair ; and I wore the one and re-
clined in the other all the time Rose was learning
the French auxiliary verbs étre and avoir. I flat-
tered myself I was of as much use in them as in the
multiplication-table; but I do not recollect receiv-
ing any particular recompense. Indeed, after a little
time, it would have been difficult to know what to
give me, for I possessed every thing that a doll’s
heart could wish, or her head imagine. Such a
variety of elegant dresses as Rose made for me
would have been the envy of all my old friends in
the bazaar. I had gowns of pink satin and white
satin; blue silk and yellow silk; coloured muslins
without number, and splendid white lace. Bonnets
enough to furnish a milliner’s shop were mine; but
I was not so partial to them as to my gowns, be-
cause they tumbled my hair.

I believe a good many of my possessions were
presents from Margaret to Rose on account of
perfect lessons; but in course of time, I ceased
to superintend Rose’s studies. Margaret said
that I interrupted the course of history ; and
the mama said that Rose was old enough to
learn her lessons without bringing her play into



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. Sl

them, and that I must be put away during school
hours.

Though I did not think that the fault was alto-
gether mine, I quite acquiesced in the wisdom of this
decree ; for during Rose’s last reading-lesson she
had stopped so often to ask me which [I liked best,
Lycurgus or Solon, Pericles or Alcibiades, &c., that
Margaret was almost out of patience. And though
{ made no answer, and had really no choice at all
between the characters, I felt that I rather hin-
dered business.

I was therefore now left to myself for several
hours in the morning ; but I found ample and plea-
sant employment in surveying the comforts and
beauties of my habitation. For I was not forced
to perform the part of an insignificant pigmy in the
vast abodes of the colossal race of man: I possessed
a beautiful little house proportioned to my size, plea-
santly situated on a table in the furthest corner of
the school-room, and commanding an extensive view
of the whole apartment.

I must describe my house at full length. It
had been originally, as I heard, a mere rough pack-
ing-case ; but what of that? The best brick house
in London was once but clay in the fields; and
my packing-case was now painted outside and pa-
pered inside, and fitted up in a manner every way



32 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

suitable for the occupation of a doll of distine-
tion.

My drawing-room was charming; light and
cheerful, the walls papered with white and gold,
and the floor covered with a drab carpet worked
with flowers of every hue. Rose worked. the carpet
herself under the directions of Margaret, who pre-
vailed on her to learn worsted-work for my sake.
So there, again, how useful I was! From the ceil-
ing hung a brilliant glass chandelier, a birthday
present from Edward to Rose; and the mantelpiece
was adorned by a splendid mirror cut out of a
broken looking-glass by Willy, and framed by his
hands. I cannot say that Willy ever seemed to care
for me personally, but he took considerable interest
in my upholstery, and much of my handsomest
furniture was manufactured by him. He made my
dining-room and drawing-room tables ; the frames
of my chairs, which were covered with silk by Mar-
garet ; my sofa, and my four-post bedstead ; and it
was he who painted the floor-cloth in my hall, and
the capital picture of the Queen and Prince Albert
which hung over the dining-room chimney-piece. I
had a snug bed-room, containing a bed with pink
curtains, a toilette-table, with a handsome looking-
glass, pin-cushion, and rather large brush and comb;
a washing-stand, towel-horse, chest of drawers, and



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 33

wardrobe. But the last two, I must confess, were
rather for show than for use. They were French-
polished, and in appearance convenient as well
as handsome, but in reality too small to hold my
clothes. A few minor articles of dress were kept
in them; but the mass of my gorgeous attire was
always in larger boxes and trunks belonging to my
mistress; her work-box, for instance, and at one
time her desk; but her mama turned all my gowns
out of the latter when she banished me from the
lessons, and desired that, for the future, only writ-
ing materials should be kept in it. “ Every thing
in its proper place, Rose,” I heard her say. “ You
have plenty of little boxes for doll’s clothes; and
your doll ought to teach you to be more tidy instead
of less so.” aa ee alk

My dining-room was well adapted for all the
purposes of hospitality, being furnished with a sub-
stantial dining-table, chairs, and a sideboard, on
which there always stood two trays, one filled with
decanters and wine-glasses, and the other with
knives and forks.

My kitchen was resplendent with saucepans,
kettles, pots and pans, and plates and dishes, ranged
upon the dresser, or hung from the walls. of meat was always roasting before the fire, and a
cook of my own race appeared to spend her life in

D



84 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

basting it, for I never failed to find her thus em-
ployed when Rose was so kind as to take me mto
my kitchen. There was also a footman, who sat
for ever in the hall; and I was inclined to con-
sider him rather wanting in respect, till I disco-
vered that, owing to a broken leg, he was unable to
stand. I did not quite comprehend the use of my
servants, as Rose herself did all the work of my
house; but she said they were indispensable, and
that if it were not for want of room, I should have
a great many more.

Besides all these arrangements for my comfort
in-doors, I possessed a beautiful open phaeton, em-
blazoned with the royal arms of England, and
drawn by four piebald horses with long: tails, so
spirited that they never left off prancing. Every
day, after school-time, Rose brought this equipage
to my door; and the four horses stood with their
eight front feet in the air while I was dressed for
my drive. Then, attired in my last new bonnet
and cloak, I sat in state in my carriage, and was
drawn round and round the room by Rose, till she
said I was tired. She made many attempts to per-
suade the lame footman to stand on the footboard
behind, but she never could manage it. He was a
very helpless creature ; and I am not quite certain
that he even did his best, little as that might be.



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 35

The first time Rose set him up behind the carriage,
he tumbled head over heels into the middle of it,
and stood there on his head till she picked him out
again. Then he fell off behind, then on one side,
and then on the other, till she was quite tired of his
foolish tricks, and left him to sit quietly and stupidly
in his old place in the hall.

I lived in great comfort in my pleasant house,
and being of a cheerful, contented temper, never felt
lonely, although left to myself during great part of
the day ; for Rose was very obedient to her mama’s
orders, and even if now and then tempted to forget
the regulation herself, Willy was always at hand
to remind her, and help to fix her attention on her
business. But when it was all over, she flew to
me with redoubled pleasure.

One day she said to me, “ My dear Seraphina,
I am afraid you must be very dull, alone all the
morning.” I longed to assure her of the con-
trary; but not having the gift of speech, I "could
only listen submissively while she continued: “ It
is a pity that you should sit dog nothmg and
wasting your time; so I have brought you some
books, which you are to read while I am at my
lessons; and I shall expect you to learn just as
much as I do.” |

So saying, she seated me on my_ sofa, and



36 _ THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

placing a table with the books before me, “ Look,”
continued she, “I have made them for you myself,
and covered them with these pretty red and green
papers. This is your English History, and this is
your French Grammar ; and here is a Geography
Book, and here is a History of Rome. Now read
attentively, and do not let your thoughts wander ;
and be very careful not to dog's-ear the leaves : that
always looks like a dunce. And mind you sit up- |
right,” added she, looking back, as she left the room
in obedience to a summons from her sister.

I obeyed to the best of my power. ‘To be sure,
I did not know which was geography and which was
grammar; and English and Roman history were
both alike to me. But I did as I was bid. I sat
upright in the place appointed me, staring as hard
as I could at the open pages; and my worst enemy
could not accuse me of dogs-earing’ a single leaf.

When my mistress returned, she pleased me
much by calling me a very good girl, and say-
ing that if I continued to take so much pains, I
could not fail to improve. On hearing this, Willy
laughed, and said he hoped that that was a dupli-
cate of Margaret’s last speech; and Rose looked
very happy, and answered that not only Margaret,
but Mama had said the same.

This was not my only duplicate ‘of Rose’s ad-



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 37

ventures. My education appeared to be conducted
precisely on the same plan as her own. Before long,
she brought a little pianoforte and set it up in my
drawing-room. I thought it rather hid the pretty
paper, but it was a handsome piece of furniture.

“ Now, Lady Seraphina,” said Rose, “ I am
obliged to practise for an hour every day, and you
must do the same. See what a pretty piano I have
given you. You need not mind its being meant for
a housewife and pincushion ; the notes are marked,
and that is all you want. Now practise your scales,
and be very careful to play right notes and count
your time.”

I sat at my piano with all due diligence, but I
am sorry to say that my progress did not seem
satisfactory. One day Rose said that she was sure
I had forgotten to count; and another day, that
I hurried the easy bars and slackened the difficult
ones; then she accused me of not caring whether
I played right notes or wrong, and torturing her
ear by my false chords; then 1 banged the notes
till I broke the string’s: in short, there was no end to
her complaints, till at last she wound them all up by
declaring that both she and I hated music, and that
if Mama and Margaret would take her advice, we
should both leave it off. |

But still I practised regularly, and so, I sup-



38 THE DOLL. AND HER FRIENDS.

pose, did Rose; and gradually her reproaches di-
minished, and she grew more contented with me;
and we both persevered, till she said that really, after
all, I seemed to have a good ear, and to be likely
to make a very respectable player.

“ But you know it all depends upon yourself,
Seraphina; your present improvement is the result
of pains and practice. Pains and practice will do
any thing.”

It was fortunate fe me that I had so careful a
superintendent as Rose; for unless she had kept a .
constant watch over me, there is no saying how
many awkward habits I might unconsciously have
contracted. But she cured me of poking my head
forward, of standing on one lee, of tilting my chair,
of meddling with things that were not my own, of
leaning against the furniture while I was speaking,
of putting my elbows on the table, of biting my
nails, of spilling my tea, and of making crumbs on
the floor.

I cannot say I was myself aware either of the
faults or their cure; but I think one seldom does
notice one’s own faults, and therefore it is a great
advantage to have kind friends who will point them
out to us. I believed Rose when she told me of
mine; so I had a right to believe her when she
gave me the agreeable assurance of their cure, and



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 39

to indulge the hope that I was becoming a pleasing,
well-bred little doll. ,

On one mortifying occasion, however, I must
own that Rose’s anxiety for my always followmg
in her steps was the cause of a serious injury to
me. She remarked that I had got into a horrid
way of kicking off my shoes while I was learning
my poetry; and she thought the best cure would
be to make me wear sandals. I observed that she
"was sewing sandals to her own shoes at the time,
and she consulted Willy about some means of doing
the same by mine. Willy held me head down-
wards, and examined my feet. My shoes were.
painted, therefore sewing was out of the question.
He advised glue. This was tried, but it came
through the thin narrow ribbon of which my san-
dals were to be made, and looked very dirty. They
were taken off; but the operation had spoilt the
delicacy of my white stockings, and Rose said it
was impossible to let me go such an untidy figure ;
we must try some other way. She asked Willy to
lend her a gimlet, that she might bore holes at the
sides of my feet, and glue the ribbon into them, so
as not to shew the glue. Willy said she was wel-
come to the gimlet, but that he advised her to leave
it alone, for that she would only break my feet.
But Rose would not be dissuaded, and began boring.



40 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

It was on this occasion that I most peculiarly
felt the advantage of that insensibility to pain
which distinguishes my race. What mortal could
have borne such an infliction without struggling
and screaming? I, on the contrary, took it all in
good part, and shewed no signs of feeling’ even at
the fatal moment when my foot snapped in two,
and Rose, with a face of utter dismay, held up my
own toes before my eyes.

“Oh, my poor Seraphina!” she exclaimed, “ what
shall we do?”

“Glue it on again,” said Willy. “ You had
better have taken my advice at first, but now
you must make the best of it. Glue is your only
friend.”

So Rose glued the halves of my foot together,
lamenting over me, and blaming: herself so much
all the time, that it seemed rather a comfort to her
when Margaret, coming into the room, agreed with
her that she had been foolish and awkward. Mar-
garet said that ribbon might have been tied over
my feet from the first, without using glue or gimlet
either ; and Rose called herself more stupid than ever,
for not having thought of such an easy contrivance.

My foot was glued, and for the purpose of
standing, answered as well as ever; and Rose
sewed me up in a pair of blue silk boots, and de-



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 4}

clared that I was prettier than before; and my
misfortune was soon forgotten by every body but
myself. I, however, could not but feel a misgiving
that this was.the first warning of my share in the
invariable fate of my race. For I had already lived
long enough to be aware that the existence of a—
doll, like that of every thing else, has its limits.
Hither by sudden accidents, such as loss of limbs, or
by the daily wear and tear of life, decay gradually
makes its progress in us, and we fade away as surely
as the most delicate of the fragile race of mortals.

Though the fracture of my foot was my own first
misfortune, I had had opportunities of remarking
the casualties to which dolls are liable. For it is not
to be supposed that our devotion to human beings
precludes us from cultivating the society of our own
species. Dolls will be dolls; and they have a natu-
ral sympathy with each other, notwithstanding the
companionship of the race of man. Most little girls
are aware of this fact, and provide suitable society
for their dolls. I myself had a large circle of silent
acquaintances, to whom I was introduced by Rose’s
kindness and consideration. When other little girls
came to drink tea with her, they often brought their
dolls to spend the evening with me; and among
them I had more than once the slenswwe of pas
nising an old friend from the bazaar.



49 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

Then I was in my glory. There was a constant
supply of provisions in my larder; and at a mo-
ment’s notice Rose would produce an excellent din-
ner, all ready cooked, and dished in a beautiful little
china dinner-service. Willy compared her to the
genius of Aladdin’s lamp; and though I did not
know what that might mean, I quite understood the
advantage of being able to set such a banquet before
my friends. I could always command salmon, a
pair of soles, a leg’ of mutton, a leg of pork, a tur-
key, a pair of boiled fowls, a ham, a sucking pig, a
hare, a loaf of bread, a fine Cheshire cheese, several
pies, and a great variety of fruit, which was always
ripe and in season, winter or summer. Rose’s papa
once observed that his hothouse produced none so
fine ; for the currants were as large as apples, and
two cherries filled a dish.

Rose and her companions performed the active
duties of waiting at table on these occasions; but
the lame footman was generally brought out of the -
hall, and propped up against the sideboard, where
he stood looking respectable but awkward.

At these pleasant parties I saw a great range
of characters, for Rose’s young visitors were various
im their tastes, and their dolls used to be dressed in
every known costume. Besides plenty of pretty En-
glish damsels, I was introduced now to a Turkish



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 43

sultana, now to a Swiss peasant; one day to a cap-
tain in the British army, another day to an Indian
rajah. One young lady liked to make her dolls per-
sonate celebrated characters; and when she visited
us, most distinguished guests graced my table. I
have had the honour of receiving the Queen and
Prince Albert themselves; the Duke of Wellington,
Sir Walter Scott, and Miss Edgeworth, have all
dined with me on the same day, and Robinson Crusoe
came in the evening’. y

But it was at these social meetings that I be-
came most fully aware of the liability of dolls to
loss of limbs. I never remember giving a party at
which the guests could boast of possessing all their
legs and arms. Many an ingenious contrivance hid
or supplied the deficiencies, and we were happy m
spite of our losses; still, such was the case: and I
saw that dolls, however beloved and respected, could
not last for ever.

For some time after my accident I had no par-
ticular adventures. I lived in peace and plenty, and
amused myself with watching the family. They
were all amiable and easy to understand, except
Geoffrey ; but he was a complete puzzle to me, and
it was long before I could make out why he was so
different from the rest.

The others all seemed to. like to help and please



44 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

one another, but Geoffrey never seemed happy un-
less he was making himself disagreeable. If Willy
was interested in a book, he was obliged to sit upon
the second volume, or Geoffrey would be sure to
run away with it. If Edward was in a hurry to go
out, Geoffrey would hide his cap, and keep him a
quarter of an hour hunting for it. The girls dared
not leave their worsted-work within his reach for a
moment ; for he would unravel the canvass, or chop
up the wool, or go on with the work after a pat-
tern of his own composing’, so that they would be
obliged to spend half an hour in unpicking his
cobbling..

Margaret remonstrated with him in private, and
made excuses for him in public, and did her best to
prevent his tiresome tricks from annoying Willy; Ed-
ward tried rougher means of keeping him in order,
which sometimes succeeded ; but still he could find
plenty of opportunities of being a torment: people
always can when such is their taste.

One day Margaret: was keeping Willy company,
while the rest of the party were gone to the Zoo-
logical Gardens. She had brought a drawing to
finish, as he liked to see her draw, and was some-
times useful in suggesting improvements. But
while they were thus employed, Margaret was sum-
moned to some visitors, and went away, saying that



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 45

her drawing would just have time to dry before ske
returned.

But unfortunately, during her absence, Geoffrey
came home. He had grown tired of the Gardens,
which he had seen very often, and rather hungry,
as he generally was; so after amusing himself by
eating the cakes he had bought for the bear, he had
nothing more to do, and tried to persuade his cousins
to be tired also. But Edward was making himself
agreeable to the monkeys, Rose was cultivating the
friendship of the elephant, and their papa and mama
were waiting to see the hippopotamus bathe; so
that Geoffrey’s proposals of leaving the Gardens
were scouted, and he could only obtain leave from
his uncle to go home by himself.

- He entered the room, as usual, with his mouth
full, having spent his last penny in a piece of cocoa-
nut as he came along the streets. While the cocoa-
nut lasted, he was employed to his satisfaction ; but
when that was finished, he was again at a loss for
something to do. He tried walking round the room
on one leg, working heel and toe, and that suc-
ceeded very well, and did no harm till he unluckily
came to the drawing-table, when he immediately
brought himself to a stand on both feet.

“ Hallo!” cried he, “ here’s a daub! Is this
your splendid performance, Will?” |



46 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“No,” replied Willy, “it is Margaret’s; and mind
you don’t touch it by accident, because it is wet.”

“Touch it by accident!” exclaimed Geoffrey ;
“Tam going to touch it on purpose. I wonder
Margaret is not ashamed to do it so badly. I'll
improve it for her. How kind of me!”

Poor Willy, in dismay, tried to secure the draw-
ing’, but he could not move from his sofa, and
Geoffrey danced round him, holding it at arm’s-
length. Then Willy caught at the bell-rope, but
his mischievous cousin snatched it quicker, and tied
it up out of his reach. Willy called all the servants
as loud as he could, but no one was within hearing ;
and he threw himself back on his sofa in despair,
exclaiming’, “ How can you be so ill-natured, when
Margaret is always so kind to you?”

“ Til-natured !” answered the other; “I’m doing
her a favour. She admired the moonlight in the
Diorama; now I shall make just such a moon in
her drawing.” And while he spoke, a great yellow
moon, like a guinea, rose in the midst of poor Mar-
garet’s brilliant sunset.

“ That’s the thing,” said Geoffrey ; “ and now
I shall put the cow jumping over it, and the little
dog laughing to see such sport. Some figures always
improve the foreground.”

“Oh, you have quite spoilt it!” cried Willy.



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 47

“How I wish I could stop you! I cannot imagine
how you can like to be so mischievous and disagree-
able. Oh, if Margaret would but come back !”

At last Margaret came, and the troublesome
Geoffrey expected great amusement from her dis-
pleasure; but he was disappointed. Margaret was
one of those generous people who never resent an
injury done to themselves. If Geoffrey had spoilt
any body else’s drawing, she would have been the
first to punish him; but now she was much more
vexed at Willy’s distress than at the destruction of
_ her own work, and instead of scolding Geofirey,
she gave herself up to consoling Willy. She as-
sured him that there was no great harm done. She ©
said the drawing was good for very little, and that
she would copy it and improve it so much that he
should be quite glad of the disaster; and she made
a present of the spoilt drawing to Geoffrey, tellmg
him she was sure he would one day be ashamed of
so foolish a performance, but that meanwhile he
might keep it as a specimen of his taste. He had
not the manners to apologise, but he looked very
silly and crest-fallen, and left the room m silence,
with the drawing in his hand. .

When he was gone, Willy exclaimed, “ If it
were not for losing Edward, I should wish the holi-
days were over; Geoffrey is so disagreeable.”



48 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“ He is very thoughtless,” Margaret replied ;
“ but we must not be too hard upon him. Let us
recollect that he has no parents to teach him better,
nor brothers and sisters to call forth his considera-

tion for others. Poor Geoffrey has had neither
* example nor precept till now. But now Papa and
Mama five him good precepts; and if we try to
set him good examples, perhaps we may help him
‘to improve.”

“ Well, I'll hope for the best, and do what I
can,” said Willy. “ Certainly he has some good
qualities. He is as brave as a lion; and he is good-
natured about giving away his own things, though
he is so mischievous with other people’s.”

“ And he is clever in his way, notwithstand-
ing’ his idleness,” added Margaret. ‘“ Those foolish
figures that he put into my drawing were uncom-
monly well done, though they were provoking to us.”

“You are the best girl in the world,” said
Willy ; “and if you think Geoffrey will improve,
Pll think so too; but you must own there is room
for it.”

Perhaps Geoffrey did improve, but it seemed
slow work, faults being more easily acquired than
cured; and for a long time I could perceive no dif-
ference in him. Indeed, as his next piece of mischief
concerned myself, I thought him worse than ever.



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 49

I have often wondered at the extreme dislike
which boys: have to dolls. I was the most inoffen-
sive creature possible, giving myself no airs, and
interfering with nobody ; yet even the gentle Willy
was indifferent to me. Edward, though he pro-
tected Rose in her patronage of me, despised me
thoroughly himself; and Geoffrey never lost an op-
portunity of expressing his mortal hatred to me.
I shrunk from Edward’s contemptuous notice, but,
I was not at all afraid of him, well knowing that
neither he nor Willy would hurt a hair of my head;
but. whenever Geoffrey came into the room, terror
seized my mind. He never passed my house with-
out making: all kinds of ugly faces at me; and I felt
instinctively that nothing but the presence of the
other boys restrained him from doing me any harm
in. his power.

I had hitherto never been alone with him, but
at last the fatal moment arrived. One fine after-
noon, Willy went out for a drive in his wheel-chair,
Edward insisting upon drawing it himself, and the
two girls walking on each side. Geoflrey accom-
panied them, intending to walk with them part of
the way, and to go on by himself when he was
tired of the slow pace of the chair. All seemed safe,
and I hoped to enjoy a few hours of uninterrupted
leisure. I always liked having my time to myself;

E



50 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

and as Rose had set me no lessons, I reposed com-
fortably in my arm-chair by a blazing fire of black
and red cloth, from the glare of which I was shel-
tered by a screen. My dog sat at my side, my
cat lay at my feet, and I was as happy as a doll
could be.

Suddenly the silence was broken by a sound as
of a turkey gabbling in the hall; presently this
changed to a duck quacking on the stairs; then a
cock crew on the landing-place, and a goose hissed
close to the schoolroom-door. I guessed but too
well what these ominous sounds portended, and my
heart sunk within me as the door burst open, and
my dreaded enemy banged into the room. |

“ Why, they are not come home yet!”’ exclaimed
he; “so my talents have been wasted. I meant to
have made them bid me not make every different
noise. When they said, ‘ Don’t hiss,’ I would have
crowed ; and when they said, ‘ Don’t crow,’ I would
have quacked, or barked, or bellowed, or mewed, till
I had gone through all the noises I know. Now I
have nothing to do.”’

He walked to the window and looked out.

“What a stupid street it is!” said he. “ If
my uncle had not taken away my squirt, I would
squirt at the people.”

' Then he yawned, and sauntered to the bookcase.



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 51

“What stupid books! I wonder any body can write
them. I wish Edward had left his tools out; I
should like to plane the top of the shelf. How
stupid it is having nothing to do!”

As he spoke, I shuddered to see him approach-
ing my end of the room. He came nearer ; he made
a full stop in front of me, and looked me in the
face.

“You stupid, ugly thing,” he exclaimed, “ don’t
stare so. I hate to have a doll’s eyes goggling
at me.”

Gladly would I have withdrawn my eyes, if pos-
sible. But they had been painted wide open, and
what could I do? I never was so ashamed of them
in my life; but I had no control over them, so I
stared on, and he grew more indignant.

“Tf you don’t leave off,” he cried, “I'll poke
out your eyes, as I did those of the ugly picture in
my room. I won't be stared at.”

I longed for the gift of speech to represent to
him, that if he would but leave off looking at me, I
should give him no offence; but alas, I was silent,
and could only stare as hard as ever.

“Oh, you will, will you?” said he; “then I
know what I’ll do: I'll hang you.”

In vain I hoped for the return of the rest of the
party. I listened anxiously for every sound, hut



§2 THE DOLL AND HER. FRIENDS.

no friendly step or voice was near, and I was com-
pletely in his power.

He began rummaging’ his pockets, grinning and
making’ faces at me all the time.. Presently he drew
forth a long piece of string, extremely dirty, look-
ing as if it had been trailed in the mud.

“ Now for it,” he exclaimed; “now you shall
receive the reward of all your stupidity and affecta-
tion. I do think dolls are the most affected crea-
tures on the face of the earth.” |

He laid hold of me by my head, pushing my
wig on one side. Alas for my beautiful hair, it
was disarranged for ever! But that was a trifle
compared with what followed. He tied one end of
his muddy string round my neck, drawing it so
tight that I foresaw I should be marked for life,
and hung’ the other end to a nail in the wall.

There I dangled, while he laughed and quizzed
me, adding insult to injury. He twisted the strmg
as tight as possible, and then let it whirl round and
round till it was all untwisted again. I banged
against the wall as I spun like a top, and wished
that I could sleep like a top too. But 1 was wide
awake to my misfortunes; and each interval of
stillness, when the string was untwisted, only en-
hanced them, by shewing in painful contrast. the
happy home whence I had been torn. For I was





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THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 53

hung on the wall directly opposite my own house ;
and from my wretched nail I could distmguish
every room in it. Between my twirls I saw my
pretty drawing-room, with its comfortable arm-
chair now vacant; and my convenient kitchen, with
my respectable cook peacefully basting her per-
petual mutton; I envied even my lame footman
quietly seated in his chimney-corner, and felt that
I had never truly valued the advantages of my
home till now. Would they ever be restored to
me? Should I once again be under the protection
of my kind and gentle mistress, or was I Geoftrey’s
' slave for ever?

These melancholy thoughts were interrupted by
a step on the stairs. “ Hallo!” cried Geoffrey,
“who would have thought of their commg home
just now ?” and he was going to lift me down from
my nail; but when the door opened, the housemaid
came in alone, and he changed his mind.

“ Why, Master Geoffrey,” said she, “ what are
you doing here all alone? Some mischief, I'll be
bound.”

« Bow, wow, wow,” answered he, dancing and
playing all sorts of antics to prevent her seeing”
me.

“ Come,” said she, “those tricks won't go down
with me. ‘The more lively you are, the more I



54 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

know you’ve been after Something’ you ought to
have let alone.”

“ Hee haw, hee haw,” said Geoffrey, twitching
her gown, and braying like a donkey.

“ Well; you're Speaking in your own voice at
last,” said she, laughing. “ But let go of my
gown, if you please » you are big enough to walk
by yourself, and I want to set the room to rights.

here’s some young: ladies coming to tea with Miss
Rose.”

She bustled about, dusting and putting every
thing in order, and talking: all the time, partly to
Geoffrey and partly to herself, about the blacks
that came in at the windows, and made a place
want dusting a dozen times a-day, when her eye
fell on my unfortunate figure, which my persecutor
had just set Swinging like the pendulum of a clock.

was a deplorable object. He had forced me
into the most awkward attitude he could invent.
My arms were turned round in their sockets,
one stretched towards the ceiling, the other at full
length on one side. I was forced to kick one leg
out in front, and the other behind; and my knees
were bent up the Wrong way. My wie had fallen
off altogether from my head, and was now perched
upon my toe. I was stil] swinging, when Sarah
caught sight of me. She looked at me for a mo-



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 55

ment, and then turned round, opening her eyes at
Geoffrey much wider than I had ever done.

“Why, you audacious, aggravating boy!” she
exclaimed, making a dash at him with her duster ;
but he ran away laughing, and she was obliged to
finish her speech to herself.

“To think of his being so mischievous and ill-
natured! What will poor Miss Rose say! To be
sure, there is nothing boys won't do; their equals
for perverseness don’t walk the earth. Though I
ought not to speak against them, while there’s
Master William and Master Edward to contra-
dict me. They are boys, to be sure; but as for
that Geoffrey!” And here she shook her head in
silence, as if Geoffrey’s delinquencies were beyond
the power of words to express. i

She then released me; and after restoring my
limbs to their proper position, and smoothing my
discomposed dress, she laid me gently on my bed,
and placed my wig on my pillow beside me, with
many kind expressions of pity and goodwill.

Repose was indeed needful after so agitating
an adventure; and I was glad to be left quiet till
the young people came in from their walk. I com-
posed my ruffled spirits as well as I could; but I
found it impossible not to be nervous at the idea
of Rose’s first seeing me in such a plight, and I



56 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

anxiously awaited her return, They came in at |
last, Rose, Willy, and Margaret; and after esta-
blishing Willy on his sofa, Rose’s next care was to
visit me. “0 Willy! O Margaret!” she exclaimed, —
and burst into tears,

“What is the matter, my darling?” asked Mar-
garet.

Rose could not answer ; but Sarah was there to
tell the story, and do ample justice to my wrong’s.
Yet I could not help observing, in the midst of all
her indignation, the difference of her matiner to-
wards her present hearers and towards Geoffrey.
She never seemed on familiar terms with Willy,
much less with Margaret or Rose. She neither
cut jokes nor used rough language to them, but
treated them with the respect due to her master’s
children ; though, as I well knew, she was ex-
tremely fond of them, and disliked Geoffrey, in spite
of her familiarity with him.

I saw Geoffrey no more that day. Rose’s
young’ friends soon arrived, and consoled both her
and me by their kind Sympathy and attentions.
One made an elegant cap to supply the loss of m
wig’; another strung a blue necklace to hide the
black mark round my throat; Rose herself put me
to bed, and placed a table by my bedside covered
with teacups, each, she told ne, containing: a differ-



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 57

ent medicine; and the young lady who had once
brought Miss Edgeworth to dine with me, charged
me to lie still and read “ Rosamond” till I was quite
recovered. |

Next morning’, as I lay contentedly performing
my new part of an invalid, I heard a confidential
conversation between Margaret and Geoffrey, in
which I was interested.

They were alone together, and she was taking
the opportunity to remonstrate with him on his un-
kind treatment of me.

“What was the harm?” said Geoffrey. “ A
doll is nothing but wood or bran , or some stupid
stuff; it can’t feel.”

« Of course,” answered Margaret, “we all know
that. It is wasteful and mischievous to spoil a
pretty toy; but I am not speaking now so much
for the sake of the doll as of Rose. Rose is not
made of any stupid stuff; she can feel. And what
is more, she can feel for other people as well as her-
self. She would never play you such an ill-natured
trick.” ,

“ 1 should not mind it if she did,” argued Geof-
frey ; “I am not such a baby.”

“You would not mind that particular thing,”
answered Margaret, “ because you do not care about
~ dolls; but you would mind her interfermg with

er



58 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

your pleasures, or injuring your property. You
would think it very ill-natured, for instance, if she
threw away that heap of nuts which you have
hoarded like a squirrel on your shelf of the closet.”

“ Nuts are not nonsense like dolls,” said he.
“ Besides, she may have as many of mine as she
likes. I tried to make her eat some yesterday.”

“ Yes, and half choked her by poking them into
her mouth, when she told you she did not want
them. She cares no more for nuts than you for
dolls. You would think it no kindness if she teazed
you to nurse her doll.”

“T should think not, indeed,” answered Geoffrey,
indignant at the very idea.

“Of course not. Kindness ig not-shewn by
forcing our own pleasures down other people’s
throats, but by trying to promote theirs. That is
really doing as we would be done by.” .

“ But doing as we would be done by is one’s
duty,” said Geoffrey.

“T fear it is a duty of which you seldom think,”
replied his cousin,

“Why, one can’t be thinking of duty in those
kind of things,” answered he.

“Why not?” asked Margaret.

“ Because they are such trifles; duties are great
thing's,”



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 59

“What sort of things do you consider to be
duties?” Margraret inquired.

“Oh, such things as letting’ oneself be tortured,
like Regulus ; or forgiving an enemy who has shot
poisoned arrows at one, like Coeur de Lion.”

“Well,” said Margaret smiling, “ such heroic
duties as those do not seem likely to fall im your
way just now, perhaps they never may. Our fel-
low-creatures are so kind to us, that we are seldom
called upon to fulfil any but small duties towards
them; or what you would consider such, for I can-
not allow any duty to be small, especially that of
doing as we would be done by. If we do not fulfil
that in trifles, we shall probably never fulfil it at all.
This is a serious thought, Geoffrey.”

Geoffrey looked up; and as he seemed inclined
to listen, Margaret continued talking to him kindly
‘but gravely, bringing many things before his mind
as duties which he had hitherto considered to be
matters of indifference. But Margaret would not
allow any thing to be a trifle in which one person
could give pain or pleasure, trouble or relief, annoy-
ance or comfort to another, or by which any one’s
own mind or habits could be either injured or im-
proved. She maintained that there was a right and
a wrong to every thing, and that right and wrong
could never be trifles, whether in great things or



60 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

small. By degrees the conversation turned upon
matters far too solemn to be repeated by a mere
plaything like myself; but I thought, as I heard
her, that it might be better to be a poor wooden
figure which could do neither right nor wrong’, than
a human being who neglected his appointed duties.
Geoffrey said little, but he shook hands with
Margaret when she had finished speaking, and I
noticed from that day forward a gradual improve-
ment in his conduct. Bad habits are not cured in
a minute, and he did not become all at once as
gentle and considerate as Willy, nor as kind and
helpful as Edward ; but he put himself in the right
road, and seemed in a fair way of overtaking’ them
in due time. He at once left off active mischief :
and if he could not avoid being occasionally trouble-
some, he at any rate cured himself of teazing people
on purpose. And it was remarkable how many
employments he found as soon as his mind was
disengaged from mischief. Instead of his dawdling:
about all the morning calling things stupid, and say-
ing he had nothing to do, all manner of pleasant
occupations seemed to start up in his path, as if
made to order for him, now that he had time to
attend to them. When he relinquished the plea-
sure of spoiling things, he acquired the far greater
pleasure of learning to make them. When Edward



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 61

was no longer afraid of trusting him with his tools,
it was wonderful what a carpenter he turned out.
When Margaret could venture to leave drawing ma-
terials within his reach, he began to draw capitally.
Good-natured Margaret gave him lessons, and said
she would never wish for a better scholar. He found
it was twice the pleasure to walk or play with
Edward when he was thought an acquisition i-
stead of a burden; and far more agreeable to have
Rose and Willy anxious for his company than wish-
ing to get rid of him. But the advantages were
not confined to himself; the whole house shared in
them : for his perpetual small annoyances had made
everybody uncomfortable, whereas now, by attention
to what he used to look upon as trifles, he found he
had the power of contributing his part towards the
happiness of his fellow-creatures, which is no trifle.
On the last day of the holidays, the young people
were all assembled in the schoolroom till it was time
for Edward and Geoffrey to start. While Edward
was arranging various matters with Willy, I heard
Geoffrey whisper to Margaret that he hoped she had
forgiven him for spoiling that drawing of hers. She
seemed at first really not to know what he meant; but
when she recollected it, she answered with a smile,
“Oh, my dear Geoffrey, I had forgiven and forgotten
it long ago. Pray never think of it again yourself.”



62 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

Geoffrey next went up to Rose and put a little
parcel into her hands. On opening’ it, she found a
box of very pretty bonbons in the shape of various
vegetables. When she admired them, he seemed
much pleased, and said that he had saved up his
money to buy them, in hopes she might like them
for her dolls’ feasts. Rose kissed and thanked him,
and said she only wished he could stay and help her
and her dolls to eat them. Every body took an
affectionate leave of Geoffrey, and Willy said he was
very sorry to lose him, and should miss him sadly.

Edward and Geoffrey returned to school, and
I never saw Geoffrey again ; but a constant corre-
spondence was kept up between him and his cousins,
and I often heard pleasant mention of his progress
and improvement.

Time passed on; what length of time I cannot
say, all seasons and their change being alike to me ;
but school-days and holidays succeeded one another,
and our family grew older in appearance and habits.
Rose gradually spent less time with me, and more
with her books and music, till at last, though she
still kept my house in order, she never actually
played with me, unless younger children came to
visit her, and then, indeed, I was as popular as
ever. But on a little friend’s one day remarking
that I had worn the same gown for a month, Rose



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 63

answered that she herself had the charge of her own
clothes now, and that what with keeping them in
order, and doing fancy-work as presents for her
friends, she found no time to work for dolls.

By and by, her time for needlework was fully
engaged in Geoffrey’s behalf. He was going to sea;
and Rose was making purses, slippers, portfolios,
and every thing she could think of as likely to
please him. Perhaps her most useful keepsake was
a sailor’s housewife; but many nice things were sent
him from every one of the family. I saw a trunk
full of presents packed and sent off. And when I
recollected my first acquaintance with him, I could
not but marvel over the chang that had taken place,
before books, drawing materials, and mathematical
instruments could have been chosen as the gifts best
suited to. his taste.

Edward used to come home from school as
merry and goad-humoured as ever, and growing
taller and stronger every holidays. Rose and Mar-
garet were as flourishing as he; but poor Willy
grew weaker, and thinner, and paler. Fresh springs
and summers brought him no revival, but as they
faded, he seemed to fade with them. He read more
than ever; and his sisters were frequently occupied
in reading and writing under his direction, for they
were anxious to help him in his pursuits. His papa



64 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS,

and mama sometimes said he studied too hard ;
and they used to sit with him, and try to amuse
him by conversation, when they wished to draw
him from his books. Doctors visited him, and pre-
scribed many remedies; and his mama gave him all
the medicines herself, and took care that every order
was implicitly obeyed. His father carried him up
and down stairs, and’ waited upon him as tenderly
as even Margaret; but he grew no better with all
their care. He was always gentle and patient, but
he appeared in less good spirits than formerly. He
seemed to enjoy going out in his wheel-cha;; more
than any thing’; but one day he observed that the
summer was fast coming to an end, and that then
he must shut himself up in his room, for that he
minded the cold more than he used.

“I wish we lived ina warmer country,” said
Rose; “ perhaps then you might get better.”

“TI do not know about living,” replied Willy.
“ England is the best country to five in; but I cer-
tainly should like to be out of the way of the cold
for this next winter.” |

“ Why do not you tell Papa so?” asked Rose.

“ Because I know very well he would take me a
Journey directly, however inconvenient it might be
to him.”

Rose said nothing more Just then, but she: took



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 65

the first opportunity of telling her father what had
passed ; and he said he was very glad indeed that
she had let him know.

From that day forward something more than
usual seemed in contemplation. Papa, Mama, and
Margaret were constantly consulting together, and
Edward, Rose, and Willy followed their example.
As for me, nobody had time to bestow a look or a
thought upon me; but I made myself happy by
looking at and thinking: of them.

One morning two doctors together paid Willy
a long visit. After they were gone, his papa and
mama came into his room.

“Well, my boy,” his father exclaimed in an
unusually cheerful tone, “ it is quite settled now;
Madeira is the place, and I hope you like the plan.”

“ Oh, papa,” said Willy, “is it really worth
while ?”

“ Of course it is worth while, a hundred times
over,” replied his father; “ and we will be off in
the first ship.”

“The doctors strongly advise it, and we have
all great hopes from it, my dear Willy,” said his
mother.

“Then so have I,” said Willy ; “ and, indeed, I
like it extremely, and I am very grateful to you.
The only thing I mind is, that you and my father

F



66 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

should have to leave home and make a long sea
voyage, when you do not like travelling, and Papa
has so much to keep him in England.”

“Qh, never mind me,” said his mother; “I
shall like nothing so well as travelling, if it does you
good.”

“ And never mind me,” said his father; “ there
is nothing of so much consequence to keep me in
England, as your health to take me out of it.”

“ Besides, my dear child,” said his mother, “ as
the change of climate is so strongly recommended
for you, it becomes a duty as well as a pleasure to
try it.”

“So make your mind easy, my boy,” added his
father; “and I will go and take our passage for
Madeira.”

The father left the room, and the mother re-
mained conversing with her sick child, whose spirits
were unusually excited. I scarcely knew him again.
He was generally slow and quiet, and rather de-
sponding about himself; but he now thought he
should certainly get well, and was so eager and
anxious to start without delay, that his mother had
some difficulty in reconciling him to the idea that no
ship would sail till next month. She also took oreat
pains to impress upon him the duty of resignation,
in case the attempt should fail, after all, in restoring



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 67

his health ; and she finally left him, not less hope-
ful, but more calm and contented with whatever
might befall him.

And now beg‘an the preparations for the voyage.
There was no time to spare, considering all that had
to be done. Every body was at work; and though
poor Willy himself could not do much to help, he
thought of nothing else. His common books and
drawings were changed for maps and voyages ;
the track to Madeira was looked up by him and
Rose every day, and sometimes two or three times
in the day, and every book consulted that contained
the least reference to the Madeira Isles.

Edward was an indefatigable packer. He was
not to be one of the travellers, as his father did not
choose to interrupt his school-education; but no
one was more active than he in forwarding the pre-
parations for the voyage, and no one more sanguine
about its results.

“We shall have Willy back,’ he would say,
“turned into a fine strong fellow, as good a
cricketer as Geoffrey or I, and a better scholar
than either of us.”

Margaret and Rose were to go; and Rose’s
young friends all came to take leave of her, and
talk over the plan, and find Madeira in the map,
and look at views of the island, which had been



68 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

given to Willy. And a sailor-friend, who had been
all over the world, used to come and describe Ma-
deira as one of the most beautiful of all the beau-
tiful places he had visited, and tell of its blue sea,
fresh and bright, without storms; its high mountains,
neither barren nor bleak; and its climate, so warm
and soft, that Willy might sit out all day in the beau-
tiful gardens under hedges of fragrant geraniums.
And when Willy talked of enjoying the gardens
while his stronger sisters were climbing: the hills,
there was more to be told of cradles borne upon
men’s shoulders, in which Willy could be carried
to the top of the highest hills as easily as his sisters
on their mountain ponies.

And now the packing was all finished, and
the luggage sent on board, and every body was
anxious to follow it; for the ship was reported as
quite comfortable, and the house was decidedly the
reverse. Margaret and her father had been on
board to arrange the cabins, accompanied by their
sailor-friend, who professed to know how to fit up a
berth better than any body. He had caused all
‘the furniture to be fastened » or, as he called it,
cleated to the floor, that it might not roll about
in rough weather. The books were secured in the
shelves by bars, and swinging tables hung from the
ceilmgs. Willy’s couch was in the most airy and



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 69

convenient place at the stern cabin window, and
there was an easy-chair for him when he should
be able to come out on deck. The ship was said
to be in perfect order, whereas the house was in
the utmost confusion and desolation : the carpets
rolled up, the pictures taken down, the mirrors
covered with muslin, the furniture and bookcases
with canvass; not a vestige left of former habits
and occupations, except me and my little mansion.
But in the midst of all the bustle, I was as calm
and collected as if nothing had happened. I sat
quietly in my arm-chair, staring composedly at all
that went on, contented and happy, though appa-
rently forgotten by every body. Indeed, such was
my placid, patient disposition, that Ido not believe
I should have uttered a sound or moved a muscle if
the whole of London had fallen about my little ears.

I did certainly sometimes wish to know what
was to become of me, and at last that information
was given me. .

The night before they sailed, Rose busied herself
with Sarah in packing up my house and furniture,
which were to be sent to a little girl who had long
considered it her greatest treat to play with them.
But Rose did not pack me up with my goods and
chattels. |

“ My poor old Seraphina,” said she, as she re-



70 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

moved me from my arm-chair, “ you and I have
passed many a happy day together, and I do not
like to throw you away as mere rubbish ; but the
new mistress of your house has already more dolls
than she knows what to do with. You are no great
beauty now, but I wish I knew any child who
would care for you.”

“ If you please to give her to me, Miss Rose,”
said Sarah, “my little niece, that your mama is
80 kind as to put to school, would thank you kindly,
and think her the greatest of beauties.”

“ Oh, then, take her by all means, Sarah,” re-
plied Rose; “and here is a little trunk to keep her
clothes in. I remember I used to be very fond of
that trunk ; so I dare say your little Susan will like
it, though it is not quite new.”

“ That she will, and many thanks to you, Miss.
Susan will be as delighted with it now, as you
were a year or two ago.”

So they wrapped me up in paper, and Rose hay-
ing given me a farewell kiss, which I would have
returned if I could, Sarah put me and my trunk
both into her great pocket; and on the same day
that my old friends embarked for their distant
voyage, I was carried to my new home.



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 71

CHAPTER III.

AND now began a third stage of my existence, and
a fresh variety of life.

I at first feared that I should have great diffi-
culty in reconciling myself to the change; and my
reflections in Sarah’s dark pocket were of the most
gloomy cast. I dreaded poverty and neglect. How
should I, accustomed to the refinements of polished
life and the pleasures of cultivated society, endure
to be tossed about with no home of my own, and
perhaps no one who really cared forme? I knew
that I was not in my first bloom, and it seemed un-
likely that a new acquaintance should feel towards
me like my old friend Rose, who had so long known
my value. Perhaps I might be despised ; perhaps
allowed to go ragged, perhaps even dirty! My
spirits sunk, and had I been human, I should have
wept.

But cheerful voices aroused me from this melan-
choly reverie, and I found myself restored to the
pleasant light in the hands of a goodhumoured-look-
ing little girl, whose reception of me soon banished
my fears. For, although altered since the days of



72 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

my introduction to the world in the bazaar, so that
my beauty was not quite what it had been, I still
retained charms enough to make me a valuable ac-
quisition to a child who had not much choice of toys ;
and my disposition and manners were as amiable
and pleasing as ever. My new mistress and I
soon loved each other dearly; and in her family
I learned that people might be equally happy and
contented under very different outward circum-
stances. ,

Nothing could well be more unlike my former
home than that to which I was now introduced.
Susan, my little mistress, was a child of about the
same age as Rose when she first bought me; but
Susan had no money to spend in toys, and very
little time to play with them, though she enjoyed
them as much as Rose herself. She gave me a
hearty welcome ; and though she could offer me no
furnished house, with its elegancies and comforts,
she assigned me the best place in her power—the
corner of a shelf on which she kept her books, slate,
needlework, and inkstand. And there I lived, sit-
ting on my trunk, and observing human life from a
new point of view. And though my dignity might
appear lowered in the eyes of the unthinking, I felt
that the respectability of my character was really
in no way diminished ; for I was able to fulfil the



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 73

great object of my existence as well as ever, by
giving innocent pleasure, and being useful in my
humble way.

No other dolls now visited me; but I was not
deprived of the enjoyments of inanimate society, for
I soon struck up an intimate acquaintance with an -
excellent Pen in the inkstand by my side, and we
passed our leisure hours very pleasantly in commu-
nicating to each other our past adventures. His
knowledge of life was limited, having resided in that
inkstand, and performed all the writing of the fa-
mily, ever since he was a quill. But his expe-
rience was wise and virtuous; and he could bear
witness to many an industrious effort at improve-
ment, in which he had been the willmg mstrument ;
and to many a hard struggle for honesty and inde-
pendence, which figures of his writing had recorded.
I liked to watch the good Pen at his work when the
father of the family spent an hour in the evening in
teaching Susan and her brothers to write; or when
the careful mother took him in hand to help her in
balancing her accounts, and ascertaining that she
owed no one a penny, before she ventured upon any
new purchase. Then my worthy friend was in his
glory; and it was delightful to see how he enjoyed
his work. He had but one fault, which was a
slight tendency to splutter; and as he was obliged



74 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

to keep that under restraint while engaged in
writing, he made himself amends by a little praise
of himself, when relating his exploits to a sympa-
thising friend like myself. On his return with the
inkstand to the corner of my shelf, he could not re-
sist sometimes boasting when he had not made a
smgle blot; or confessing to me, in perfect confi-
dence, how much the thinness of Susan’s upstrokes,
or the thickness of her downstrokes, was owing’ to
the clearness of his slit or the fineness of his nib.

The family of which we made part lived fru-
gally and worked hard: but they were healthy and
happy. The father with his boys went out early
in the morning to the daily labour by which they
maintained the family. The mother remained at
home, to take care of the baby and do the work of
the house. She was the neatest and most careful
person I ever saw, and she brought up her daughter
Susan to be as notable as herself

Susan was an industrious little girl, and in her
childish way worked almost as hard as her mother.
She helped to sweep the house, and nurse the baby,
and mend the clothes, and was as busy as a bee.
But she was always tidy; and though her clothes
were often old and shabby, I never saw them dirty
or ragged. Indeed, I must own that, in point of
neatness, Susan was even superior to my old friend



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. vas)

Rose. Rose would break her strings, or lose her
buttons, or leave holes in her gloves, till reproved
by her mama for untidiness: but Susan never for-
got that “a stitch in time saves nine,” and the
stitch was never wanting.

She used to go to school for some hours every
day: and I should have liked to go with her, and
help her in her studies, especially when I found
that she was learning the multiplication-table, and
I remembered how useful I had been to Rose in
that very lesson; but dolls were not allowed at
school, and I was obliged to wait patiently for
Susan’s company till she had finished all her busi-
ness, both at school and at home.

She had so little time to bestow upon me, that
at first I began to fear that I should be of no use to
her. The suspicion was terrible; for the wish to be
useful has been the great idea of my life. It was
my earliest hope, and it will be my latest pleasure.
I could be happy under almost any change of cir-
cumstances; but as long’ as a splinter of me re-
mains, I should never be able to reconcile myself
to the degradation of thinking that I had been of
NO Use.

But I soon found I was in no danger of what I
so much dreaded. In fact, I seemed likely to be
even more useful to Susan than to Rose. Before I



6 ( THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

had been long in the house, she said one evening
that she had an hour to spare, and that she would
make me some clothes.

“Well and good,” answered her mother ; “ only
be sure to put your best work in them. If you
mind your work, the doll will be of great use to
you, and you can play without wasting your time.”

This was good hearing for Susan and me, and
she spent most of her leisure in working for me.
While she was thus employed, I came down from
my shelf, and was treated with as much considera-
tion as when Rose and her companions waited at
my table.

A great change took place in my wardrobe.
Rose had always dressed me in gay silks and satins,
without much regard to under clothing; for, she
said, as my gowns must be sewn on, what did any
petticoats signify? So she sewed me up, and I
looked very smart; and if there happened to be any
unseemly cobbling, she hid it with beads or span-
gles. Once I remember a very long stitch baffled
all her contrivances, and she said I must pretend it
was a new-fashioned sort of embroidery.

But Susan scorned all make-shifts. Nothing
could have been more unfounded than my fears of
becoming ragged or dirty. My attire was plain and
suited to my station, but most scrupulously finished.



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. V0

She saw no reason why my clothes should not be
made to take off and on, as well as if I had been a
doll three feet high. So I had my plain gingham
gowns with strings and buttons; and my shifts
and petticoats run and felled, gathered and whipped,
hemmed and stitched, like any lady’s; and every
thing was neatly marked with my initial 5. But
what Susan and I were most particularly proud of,
was a pair of stays. They were a long time in
hand, for the fitting them was a most difficult job ;
but when finished, they were such curiosities of
needlework, that Susan’s neat mother herself used
to shew off the stitching and the eyelet-holes to
every friend that came to see her.

Among them, Sarah the housemaid, who was
sister to Susan’s father, often called in to ask after
us all. She was left in charge of the house where
my former friends had lived, and they sometimes
sent her commissions to execute for them. Then
she was sure to come and bring us news of the fa-
mily, as she always called Rose and her relations.
Sometimes she told us that Master William was a
little better; sometimes that she heard Miss Rose
was very much grown: she had generally some-
thing to tell that we were all glad to hear. One
evening’, soon after my apparel was quite completed,
I was sitting on my trunk, as pleased with myself



73 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

as Susan was with me, when Sarah’s head peeped
in at the door. |

“ Clood evening to you all,” said she; “ I thought
as I went by you would like to hear that I have a
letter from the family, and all’s well. I have got a
pretty little job to do for Master Willy. He is to
have a set of new shirts sent out directly, made of
very fine thin calico, because his own are too thick.
' See, here is the stuff I have been buying for them.”

“ Tt is beautiful calico, to be sure,” said Susan’s
mother; “ but such fine stuff as that will want very
neat work. I am afraid you will hardly be able to
make them yourself.”

“ Why, no,” answered Sarah, smiling and shak-
ing her head. “ T am sorry to say, there comes in
my old trouble, not having learned to work neatly
when I was young. Take warning by me, Susan,
and mind your needlework now-a-days. If I could
work as neatly as your mother, my mistress would
have made me lady’s maid and housekeeper by this
time. But I could not learn any but rough work,
more’s the pity: so I say again, take warning by
me, little niece 5 take pattern by your mother.”

Susan looked at me and smiled, as much as to
say, “ I have taken pattern by her ;” but she had
not time to answer, for Sarah continued, addressing
the mother :













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THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. —68

“ How I wish you could have time to do this
job! for it would bring you in a pretty penny, and
I know my mistress would be pleased with your
work ; but they are to be done very quickly, im time
for the next ship, and I do not see that you could
get through them with only one pair of hands.”

“ We have two pair of hands,” cried Susan;
“ here are mine.”

“ Ah, but what can they do?” asked Sarah,
“ and how can they do it? It is not enough to
have four fingers and a thumb. Hands must be
handy.”

“ And so they are,” answered Susan’s mother.
“ See whether any hands could do neater work than
that.” And she pointed me out to Sarah.

Sarah took me up, and turned me from side to
side. Then she looked at my hems, then at my
seams, then at my gathers, while I felt truly proud
and happy, conscious that not a long stitch could
be found in either.

“ Well to be sure!” exclaimed she, after examin-
ing me all over; “do you mean that all that is
really Susan’s own work ?”

“ Every stitch of it,” replied the mother; “ and
I think better need not be put into any shirt,
though Master William does deserve the best of
every thing.”



80 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“ You never said a truer word, neither for Mas-
ter William nor for little Susan,” replied Sarah ;
“and I wish you joy, Susan, of being able to help
your mother so nicely, for now I can leave you the
job to do between you.”

She then told them what was to be the payment
for the work, which was a matter I did not my-
self understand, though I could see that it gave
them great satisfaction.

The money came at a most convenient time, to
help in fitting out Susan’s brother Robert for. a
place which had been offered to him in the country.
It was an excellent place; but there were several
thing's, as his mother well knew, that poor Robert
wanted at starting, but would not mention for fear
his parents should distress themselves to obtain them
for him. Both father and mother had been saving
for the purpose, without saying any thing about it
to Robert; but they almost despaired of obtaining
more than half the things they wanted, till this
little sum of money came into their hands so op-

portunely.
, The father was in the secret, but Robert could
scarcely believe his eyes, when one evening his
mother and Susan laid on the table before him, one
by one, all the useful articles he wished to possess.
At first he seemed almost more vexed than pleased,



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 81

for he thought of the saving and the slaving that his
mother must have gone through to gain them ; but
when she told him how much of them was due to
his little sister’s neatness and industry, and how
easy the work had been when shared between them,
he was as much pleased as Susan herself.

We were all very happy that evening, including
even the humble friends on the shelf; for I sat on my
trunk, and related to the Pen how useful I had been
in teaching Susan to work; and the worthy Pen
stood bolt upright in his inkstand, and confided to
me with honest pride, that Robert had been chosen
to his situation on account of his excellent writing.

Time passed on, and I suppose we all grew older,
as I noticed from time to time various changes that
seemed to proceed from that cause. The baby, for
instance, though still gomg by the name of “ Baby,”
had become a strong able-bodied child, running alone,
and very difficult to keep out of mischief. The most
effectual way of keeping her quiet was to place me
in her hands, when she would sit on the floor nurs-
ing me by the hour together, while her mother and
sister were at work.

Susan was become a tall strong girl, more nota-
ble than ever, and, like Rose before her, she gradu-
ally bestowed less attention on me}; 80 that I was
beginning to feel myself neglected, till on a certain

G



“82 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

birthday of her little sister’s, she declared her inten-
tion of making me over altogether to the baby-sister
for a birthday present. Then I once more rose into
importance, and found powers which I thought
declining’, still undiminished. The baby gave a
scream of delieht when I was placed in her hand as
her own. Till then she had only possessed one toy
in the world, an old wooden horse, in comparison
with which I seemed in the full bloom of youth and
beauty. This horse, which she called Jack, had
lost not merely the ornaments of mane and tail,
but his head, one fore and one hind leg; so that
nothing remained of the once noble quadruped but °
a barrel with the paint scratched off, rather in-
securely perched upon a stand with wheels. But
he was a faithful animal, and did his work to the
last. The baby used to tie me on to his barrel,
and Jack and I were drawn round and round the
kitchen with as much satisfaction to our mistress,
as in the days when I shone forth in my gilt coach
with its four prancing piebalds.

But the baby’s treatment of me, though ovrati-
fying from its cordiality, had a roughness and want
of ceremony that affected my enfeebled frame. I
could not conceal from myself that the infirmities I
had observed in other dolls were gradually gaining
ground upon me. Nobody ever said a harsh word



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 83

to me, or dropped a hint of my being less pretty
than ever, and the baby called me “ Beauty,
beauty,” twenty times a day ; but still 1 knew
very well that not only had my rosy colour and
fine hair disappeared, but I had lost the whole of
one leg and half of the other, and the lower joints of
both my arms. In fact, as my worthy friend the Pen
observed, both he and I were reduced to stumps.

The progress of decay caused me no regret, for
I felt that I had done my work, and might now
gracefully retire from public life, and resign my
place to newer dolls. But though contented with
my lot, I had still one anxious wish ungratified.
The thought occupied my mind incessantly ; and
the more I dwelt upon it, the stronger grew the
hope that I might have a chance of seeing my old
first friends once more. This was now my only re-
waining care.

News came from them from time to time.
Sarah brought word that Master William was bet-
ter ; that they had left Madeira, and gone travelling
about elsewhere. Then that the father had been in
England upon business, and gone back again ; that
Mr. Edward had been over to foreign parts one
summer holidays to see his family, and on his re-
turn had come to give her an account of them.

Sarah was always very bustling when she had



84 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

any news to bring of the family, but one day she

called on us in even more flurry than usual. She
was quite out of breath with eagerness.

“ Sit down and rest a minute before you begin
to speak,” said her quiet sister-in-law. “ There
must be some great news abroad. It seems almost
too much for you.”

Susan nodded, and began to unpack a great
parcel she had brought with her.

“Tt don’t seem bad news, to judge by your
face,” said the other; for now that Sarah had re-
covered breath, her smiles succeeded one another so
fast, that she seemed to think words superfluous.

“T puess, I guess,” cried Susan. “ They are
coming’ home.”

“ They are, indeed,” answered Sarah at last;
“they are coming home as fast as steam-engines
can bring them: and here is work more than enough
for you and mother till they come. Miss Margaret
is going to be married, and you are to make the
wedding~-clothes.”

So saying, she finished unpacking her parcel,
and produced various fine materials which required
Susan’s neatest work.

“ These are for you to begin with,” said she,
“ but there is more coming.” She then read a let-
ter from the ladies with directions about the needle-



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 85

work, to which Susan and her mother listened with
great attention. Then Sarah jumped up, saying
she must not let the grass grow under her feet, for
she had plenty to do. The whole house was to be
got ready ; and she would not have a thing out of
its place, nor a speck of dust to be found, for any
money. .

Susan and her mother lost no time either; their
needles never seemed to stop: and I sat on the
baby’s lap watching them, and enjoying the happy
anticipation that my last wish would soon be ac-
complished.

But though Susan was as sndustrious as a girl
could be, and just now wished to work harder than
ever, she was not doomed to “all work and no
play ;” for her father took care that his children
should enjoy themselves at proper times. In sum-
mer evenings, after he came home from his work,
they used often to go out all together for a walk in
the nearest park, when he and his wife would rest
under the trees, and read over Robert’s last letter,
while the children amused themselves. Very much
we all enjoyed it, for even 1 was seldom left behind.
Susan would please the baby by dressing me in my
pest clothes for the walk; and the oood-natured
father would laugh merrily at us, and: remark how
much good the fresh air did me. We were all very



86 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

happy; and when my thoughts travelled to other
scenes and times, I sometimes wondered whether
my former friends enjoyed themselves as much in
their southern gardens, as this honest family im
their English fields.

Our needlework was finished and sent to Sarah’s
care to await Margaret’s arrival, for which we were
very anxious.

On returning home one evening after our walk,
we passed, as we often did, through the street in
which I had formerly lived. Susan was leading her
little sister, who, on her part, clutched me in a way
very unlike the gentleness which Susan bestowed
upon her. On arriving at the well-known house, we
saw Sarah standing at the area-gate. We stopped
to speak to her.

“ When are they expected?” asked Susan’s
mother.

“They may be here any minute,” answered
Sarah : “ Mr. Edward has just brought the news.”

The street-door now opened, and two gentlemen
came out and stood on the steps. One was a tall
fine-looking boy, grown almost into a young man;
but I could not mistake the open good-humoured
countenance of my old friend Edward. The other
was older, and I recognised him as the traveller
who used to describe Madeira to Willy.



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 87

They did not notice us, for we stood back so as
not to intrude, and their minds were evidently fully
occupied with the expected meeting.

We all gazed intently down the street, every
voice hushed in eager interest. Even my own little
mistress, usually the noisiest of her tribe, was silent
as myself. It was a quiet street and a quiet time,
and the roll of the distant carriages would scarcely
have seemed to break the silence, had it not been for
our intense watching, and hoping that the sound of
every wheel would draw nearer. We waited long,
and were more than once disappointed by carriages
passing us and disappearing at the end of the street.
Edward and his friend walked up and down, east
and west, north and south, in hopes of descrying the
travellers in the remotest distance. But after each
unavailing walk, they took up their post again on
the steps.

At last a travelling carriage laden with luggage
turned the nearest corner, rolled towards us, and
stopped at the house. The two gentlemen rushed
down the steps, flung open the carriage-door, and
for some moments all was hurry and agitation, and
I could distinguish nothing.

I much feared that I should now be obliged to
go home without actually seeing my friends, for
they had passed so quickly from the carriage to the



88 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

house, and there had been so much confusion and
excitement during those few seconds, that my tran-
sient glance scarcely allowed me to know one from
another; but in course of time Sarah came out again,
and asked Susan’s father to help in unloading the
carriage, desiring us to sit meanwhile in the house-
keeper’s room. So we waited till the business was
finished, when, to my great joy, we were summoned
to the sitting-room, and I had the happiness of see-
ing all the family once more assembled.

I was delighted to find how much less they were
altered than I. I had been half afraid that I might
gee one without a leg, another without an arm, ac-
cording to the dilapidations which had taken place
in my own frame; but strange to say, their sensi-
tive bodies, which felt every change of weather,
shrunk from a rough touch, and bled at the scratch
of a pin, had outlasted mine, though insensible to
pain or sickness. There stood the father, scarcely
altered ; his hair perhaps a little more grey, but his
eyes as quick and bright as ever. And there was
the mother, still grave and gentle, but looking less
sad and careworn than in the days of Willy’s con-
stant illness. And there was, first m interest to me,
my dear mistress, Rose, as tall as Margaret, and as
handsome as Edward. I could not imagine her
condescending to play with me now. Margaret



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 89

looked just as in former times, good and eraceful ;
but she stood a little apart with the traveller friend
by her side, and I heard Rose whisper to Susan that
the wedding was to take place in a fortnight. They
were only waiting for Geoffrey to arrive. His ship
was daily expected, and they all wished him to be
present.

And Willy, for whose sake the long journey had
been made, how was he! Were all their hopes
realised? Edward shook his head when Susan’s
mother asked that question ; but Willy was there
to answer it himself. He was standing by the
window, leaning on a stick, it is true, but yet able
to stand. As he walked across the room, I saw
that he limped slightly, but could move about where
he pleased. He till looked thin and pale, but the
former expression of suffering and distress had dis-
appeared, and his countenance was as cheerful as
his manner. I could see that he was very much
better, though not in robust health like Edward’s.
He thanked Susan’s mother for her kind inquiries,
and said that, though he had not become all that
his sanguine brother hoped, he had gained health
more than enough to satisfy himself; that he was
most thankful for his present comfort and independ-
ence; and that ‘¢ he was not quite so strong as
other people, he hoped he should at any rate make



90 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

a good use of the strength that was allowed him.
Turning to Edward, who still looked disappomted,
he continued: “‘ Who could have ventured to hope,
Edward, three years ago, that you and I should
now be going to college together?” And then even
Edward smiled and seemed content. |

As we turned to leave the room, Susan and her
little sister lingered for a moment behind the others, -
and the child held me up towards Rose. Rose
started, and exclaimed, “Is it possible? It really
is my poor old Seraphina. Who would have thought
of her being: still in existence? What a good, use-
ful doll she has been! I really must give her a
kiss once more for old friendship’s sake.”

So saying’, she kissed both me and the baby, and
we left the house.

And now there remains but little more for me
to relate. My history and my existence are fast
drawing to an end; my last wish has been gratified
by my meeting with Rose, and my first hope real-
ised by her praise of my usefulness. She has since
given the baby a new doll, and I am finally laid
on the shelf, to enjoy, in company with my re-
spected friend the Pen, a tranquil old age. When
he, like myself, was released from active work, and
replaced by one of Mordan’s patent steel, he kindly
offered to employ his remaining leisure in writing



THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 91

from my dictation, and it is in compliance with his
advice that I have thus ventured to record my €X-
perience.

That experience has served to teach me that, as _
all inanimate things have some destined use, so all
rational creatures have some appointed duties, and
are happy and well employed while fulfilling them.

With this reflection, I bid a orateful farewell to
those young patrons of my race who have kindly
taken an interest in my memoirs, contentedly await-
ing the time when the small remnant of my frame
shall be reduced to dust, and my quiet existence
sink into a still more profound repose.

THE END.

LONDON *

PRINTED BY ROBSON, LEVEY; AND FRANELYS,
Great New Street, Fetter Lane.



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THE

DOLL AND HER FRIENDS;

OR,

Memoirs of the Ladp Seraphina.

BY THE AUTHOR OF

“LETTERS FROM MADRAS,” “HISTORICAL CHARADES,”

ETC. ETC.
WITH FOUR ILLUSTRATIONS BY HABLOT K. BROWNE. :
LONDON: |
GRANT AND GRIFFITH, 3

(SUCCESSORS TO J. HARRIS,)
CORNER OF ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD.



MDCCCLII.,
LONDON :

PRINTED BY ROBSON, LEVEY, AND FRANKLYN,
Great New Street, Fetter Lane.
PREFACE.

My principal intention, or rather aim, in writing this little
book was to amuse children by a story founded on one of
their favourite diversions, and to inculcate a few such minor
morals as my little plot might be strong enough to carry ;
chiefly the domestic happiness produced by kind tempers
and consideration for others. And further, I wished to
say a word in favour of that good old-fashioned plaything,
the Doll, which one now sometimes hears decried by
sensible people who have no children of their own.

THE

DOLL AND HER FRIENDS,



CHAPTER I.

I BELONG to a race the sole end of whose existence
is to give pleasure to others. None will deny the
goodness of such an end, and I flatter myself most
persons will allow that we amply fulfil it. Few of
the female sex especially but will acknowledge, with
either the smile or the sigh called forth by early
recollections, that much of their youthful happiness
was due to our presence ; and some will even 2°0 80
far as to attribute to our influence many a habit of
housewifery, neatness, and industry, which orna-
ments their riper years.

But to our influence, our silent unconscious in-
fluence alone, can such advantages be ascribed ; for
neither example nor precept are in our power ; our
race cannot boast of intellectual endowments; and
though there-are few qualities, moral or mental, that
have not in their turn been imputed to us by partial
friends, truth obliges me to confess that they exist

B
2 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

rather in the minds of our admirers than in our own
persons.

We are a race of mere dependents ; some might
even call us slaves. Unable to change our place.or
move: hand or foot at our own pleasure, and forced
to submit to every caprice of our possessors, we can-
not be said to have even a will of our own. But
every condition has its share of good and evil, and
I have often considered my helplessness and depend-
ence as mere trifles compared with the troubles to
which poor sensitive human being’s are subject.

Pain, sickness, or fatigue I never knew. While
a fidgetty child cannot keep still for two minutes
at a time, I sit contentedly for days together in the
same attitude; and I have before now seen one
of those irritable young mortals cry at a scratch,
while I was bearing needles drawn in and out of
every part of my body, or sitting with a pin run
straight through my heart, calmly congratulating
myself on being free from the inconveniences of
flesh and blood.

Of negative merits I possess a good share. I
am never out of humour, never impatient, never
mischievous, noisy, nor intrusive; and though I
and* “my fellows cannot lay claim to brilliant powers
either in word or deed, we may boast of the same
qualifications as our wittiest king, for certainly none
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 3

of us ever “said a foolish thing,” if she “ never did
a wise one.”

Personal beauty I might almost, without va-
nity, call the “badge of all our tribe.” Our very
name is seldom mentioned without the epithet pretty ;
and in my own individual case I may say that I
have always been considered pleasing and elegant,
though others have surpassed me in size and gran-
deur.

But our most striking characteristic is our power
of inspiring strong attachment. The love bestowed
on us by our possessors is proof against time, fami-
liarity, and misfortune :

“ Age cannot wither” us, “ nor custom stale”
Our “infinite variety.”

With no trace of our original beauty left,—dress in
tatters, complexion defaced, features undistinguish-
able, our very limbs mutilated, the mere wreck of
our former selves,—who has not seen one of us still
the delight and solace of some tender young heart ;
the confidant of its fancies, and the soother of its
sorrows ; preferred to all newer claimants, however
high their pretensions ; the still unrivalled favourite,
in spite of the laughter of the nursery and the quiet
contempt of the schoolroom ? | 3
Young and gentle reader, your sympathy or
4 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

your sagacity has doubtless suggested to you my
name. I am, as you guess, a DoLL; and though
not a doll of any peculiar pretensions, I flatter my-
self that my life may not be quite without interest
to the young lovers of my race, and in this hope I
venture to submit my memoirs to your indulgent
consideration.

I am but a small doll; not one of those splen-
did specimens of wax, modelled from the Princess
Royal, with distinct fingers and toes, eyes that
shut, and tongues that wag. No; such I have
only contemplated from a respectful distance as
I lay on my stall in the bazaar, while they
towered sublime in the midst of the toys, the won-
der and admiration of every passing child. I am
not even one of those less magnificent, but. still
dignified, leathern-skinned individuals, requiring
clothes to take off and put on, and a cradle to
sleep in, with sheets, blankets, and every thing
complete. Neither can I found my claim to notice
upon any thing odd or unusual in my appearance:
I am not a negro doll, with wide mouth and woolly
hair; nor a doll with a gutta-percha face, which
can be twisted into all kinds of grimaces.

I am a simple English doll, about six inches
high, with jointed limbs and an enamel face, a slim
waist and upright figure, an amiable smile, an in-
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 5

telligent eye, and hair dressed in the first style of
fashion. I never thought myself vain, but I own
that in my youth I did pique myself upon my hair.
There was but one opinion about that. I have often
heard even grown-up people remark, “ How ing‘eni-
ously that doll’s wig is put on, and how nicely it is
arranged !” while at the same time my rising vanity
was crushed by the insinuation that I had an ab-
surd smirk or a ridiculous stare.

However, the opinions of human beings of ma-
ture age never much disturbed me. The world was
large enough for them and me; and I could con-
tentedly see them turn to their own objects of in-
terest, while I awaited in calm security the unquali-
fied praise of those whose praise alone was valuable
to me—their children and grandchildren.

I first opened my eyes to the light in the Pan-
theon Bazaar. How I came there I know not; my
conscious existence dates only from the moment in
which a silver-paper covering was removed from
my face, and the world burst upon my view. A
feeling of importance was the first that arose in my
mind. As the hand that held me turned me from
side to side, I looked about. Dolls were before me,
dolls behind, and dolls on each side. For a con-
siderable time I could see nothing else. The world
seemed made for dolls. But by degrees, as my
6 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

powers of vision strengthened, my horizon extended,
and I perceived that portions of space were allotted
to many other objects. I descried, at various dis-
tances, aids to amusements in endless succession,—
balls, bats, battledores, boxes, bags, and baskets ;
carts, cradles, and cups and saucers. I did not then
know any thing of the alphabet, and I cannot say
that I have quite mastered it even now; but if I
were learned enough, I am sure I could go from
A to Z, as initial letters of the wonders with which
I soon made acquaintance. |

Not that I at once became aware of the uses,
or even the names, of all I saw. No one took the
trouble to teach me; and it was only by dint of my
own intense observation that I gained any know-
ledge at all. I did not at first even know that I
was a doll. But I made the most of opportunities,
and my mind gradually expanded.

I first learned to distinguish human beings.
Their powers of motion made a decided difference -
between them and the other surrounding objects,
and naturally my attention was early turned to-
wards the actions of the shopwoman on whose stall
I lived. She covered me and my companions with
a large cloth every night, and restored the daylight
to us in the morning. We were all perfectly help-
less without her, and absolutely under her control.
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. Z

At her will the largest top hummed, or was silent ;
the whip cracked, or lay harmlessly by the side of
the horse. She moved us from place to place, and
exhibited or hid us at her pleasure; but she was
always so extremely careful of our health and looks,
and her life seemed so entirely devoted to us and to
our advantage, that I often doubted whether she
was our property or we hers. Her habits varied
so little from day to day, that after watching her
for a reasonable time, I felt myself perfectly ac-
quainted with her, and in a condition to make ob-
servations upon others of her race. |

One day a lady and a little girl stopped at our stall.

“Oh, what a splendid doll!” exclaimed the
child, pointing to the waxen beauty which outshone
the rest of our tribe. It was the first time I had
heard the word Doll, though I was well acquainted
with the illustrious individual to whom it was ap-
plied ; and it now flashed upon my mind, with pride
and pleasure, that, however insignificant in compa-
rison, I too was a doll. But I had not time to
think very deeply about my name and nature just
then, as I wished to listen to the conversation of
the two human beings.

“ May I buy her ?” said the little girl.

“Can you afford it?” asked the lady in return.
_“ Remember your intentions for your brother.”
8 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“Perhaps I have money enough for both,” an-
swered the child. “ How much does she cost ?”

“Seven shillings,” said the shopwoman, taking
the doll from her place, and displaying her pretty
face and hands to the utmost advantage. |

“T have three half-crowns,” said the little girl.

“ But if you spend seven shillings on the doll,”
answered the lady, “you will only have sixpence
left for the paint-box.”

“What does a paint-box cost ?” asked the child.

“ We have them of all prices,” replied the shop-
keeper ; “ from sixpence to seven shillings.”

The little girl examined several with great care,
and stood some time in deliberation; at last she
said, “I don’t think Willy would like a sixpenny
one.”

“It would be of no use to him,” answered the
lady. “He draws well enough to want better
colours. If you gave it to him, he would thank
you and try to seem pleased, but he would not
really care for it. However, he does not know that
you thought of making him a birthday present, so
you are at liberty to spend your money as you like.”

“* W ould he care for a seven shilling one ?” asked
the little girl.

“ Yes; that is exactly what he wants.”

“ Then he shall have it,” exclaimed the good-
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 9

natured little sister. ‘“ Poor dear Willy, how many
more amusements I have than he !”

She bought the best paint-box, and received
sixpence in change.

“Is there any thing else I can shew you ?” asked
the shopkeeper.

“No, thank you,” she replied; and turning to
the elder lady, she said, “ May we go home at once,
Mama? It would take me a long time to choose
what I shall spend my sixpence in, and I should
like to give Willy his paint-box directly.”

“ By all means,” answered the lady ; “we will
lose no time; and I will bring you again to spend
the sixpence whenever you please.”

Without one backward glance towards the beau-
tiful doll, the child tripped away by the side of her
companion, looking the brightest and happiest of
her kind.

I pondered long upon this circumstance; how
long I cannot say, for dolls are unable to measure
time, they can only date from any particularly strik-
ing epochs. For instance, we can say, “Such an
affair happened before I lost my leg ;” or, “Such an
event took place before my new wig was put on;
but of the intricate divisions known to mortals by
the names of hours, days, months, &c., we have no
idea.
10 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

However, I meditated on the kind little sister
during what appeared to me a long: but not tedious
period, for I was gratified at gaining some insight
into the qualities proper to distinguish the human
race. Readiness to shew kindness, and a prefer-
ence of others’ interests to her own, were virtues
which I easily perceived in the little girl’s conduct;
but one thing perplexed me sadly: I could not un- —
derstand why a doll would not have answered her
kind intentions as well as a paint-box; why could
she not have bought the doll which she admired so
much, and have given that to her brother.

My thoughts were still engaged with this sub-
ject when a boy approached the stall. Boys were
new characters to me, and I was glad of the oppor-
tunity to observe one. He did not bestow a look
on the dolls and other toys, but asked for a box of
carpenter's tools. The shopkeeper dived into some
hidden recess under the counter, and produced a
clumsy-looking chest, the merits of which I could
not discover ; but the boy pronounced it to be “ just
the thing,” and willingly paid down its price. I
followed him with my eyes as he walked about with
his great box under his arm, looking from side to
side, till he caught sight of another boy rather
younger than himself, advancing from an opposite
corner.
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 11

“ Why, Geoffrey,” “exclaimed my first friend,
“ where have you been all this time? I have been
hunting every where for you.”

Geoffrey did not immediately answer, his mouth
being, as I perceived, quite full. When at last he
could open his lips, he said: “ Will you have a
cheesecake ?”

“No, thank you,” replied his friend. “ We must
20 home to dinner so soon, that you will scarcely
have time to choose your things. Where have you
been ?”

“ At the pastrycook’s stall,” answered Geofirey ;
“and I must go back again before I can buy any
thing. I left my five shillings there to be changed.”

The boys returned together to the stall, and 1
saw its mistress hand a small com to Geoffrey.

“ Where is the rest?” said he.

“ That is your change, sir,” she replied.

‘¢ Why, you don’t mean that those two or three
tarts and jellies cost four and sixpence!” he ex-
claimed, turning’ as red as the rosiest doll at my
side. (

J think you will find it correct, sir,” answered
the shopkeeper. “ ‘T'wo jellies, sixpence each, make
one shilling; two custards, sixpence each, two shil-
lings; a bottle of ginger-beer, threepence, two and
threepence; one raspberry cream, sixpence, two and
12 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

ninepence; three gooseberry tarts, threepence, three
shillings; two strawberry tarts, three and twopence;
two raspberry ditto, three and fourpence; four
cheesecakes, three and eightpence; two Bath buns,
four shillings; and one lemon ice, four and sixpence.”

“What a bother !” said Geoffrey, as he pocketed
the small remains of his fortune. “I wish I could
give her some of the tarts back again, for they
weren’t half so nice as they looked, except just the
first one or two.”

“ Because you were only hungry for the first
one or two,” said the other boy. “ But it can’t be
helped now; come and spend the sixpence better.”

“There won’t be any thing worth buying for
sixpence,” said Geoffrey gloomily, as he shuffled in
a lazy manner towards my stall.

“ I want a spade,” said he.

Several were produced, but they cost two shil-
lings or half-a-crown. There were little wooden
spades for sixpence; but from those he turned with
contempt, saying they were only fit for babies.
Nothing at our table suited him, and he walked
towards our opposite neighbour, who sold books,
maps, &c. On his asking for a dissected map, all
the countries of the world were speedily offered to
his choice; but alas! the price was again the ob-
stacle. The cheapest map was half-a-crown; and
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 13

Geoffrey’s sixpence would buy nothing but a childish
puzzle of Old Mother Hubbard. Geoffrey said it
was a great shame that every thing should be either
dear or stupid.

“ Can’t you lend me some money, Ned?” con-
tinued he.

“ T can’t, indeed,” replied the other ;. “ mine all
went in this box of tools. Suppose you don’t spend
the sixpence at all now, but keep it till you get
some more.”

“No, I won’t do that; I hate saving my money.”

So saying, he wandered from stall to stall, ask-
ing the price of every thing, as if his purse was as
full as his stomach.

“ How much is that sailor kite?” “ Two shil-
lings, sir.”—“ How much is that bat?” Seven and
sixpence.”—“ How much is that wooden box with
secret drawer?” “ Three shillings.”

“ How provoking!” he exclaimed. “I want
heaps of thing's, and this stupid sixpence is no good
at all.”

“It is better than nothing,” said Edward. “It
is not every day that one’s aunt sends one five shil-
lings to spend in the bazaar; and in common times
sixpence is not to be despised. After all, there are
plenty of things it will buy. Do you want a top?”

“ No; I’ve got four.”
14 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“ Garden seeds ?”
What is the use of them, when I can’t get a
spade ?”
“ Steel pens? You said this morning you could
not write with quills.”
“ T don’t like buying those kind of things with
my own money.” |
- “A box? Yesterday you wanted a box.”
“ T don’t care for boxes that won't lock, and L
can’t get one with a lock and key for sixpence.”
© A knife?” |
“ Sixpenny knives have only one blade ; I want
two.”
“ Sealing-wax? wafers? a penholder? a paint-
box? India-rubber? pencils ?”
“ Stupid things !”
“A ball? You might have a very good ball.”
“ Not a cricket-ball ; and I don’t care for any
other.”
“ What a particular fellow you are! I am sure
I could always find something to spend sixpence in.
String? One is always wanting string. You may
have.a good ball of whipcord.”
“ These sort of places don’t sell it.”
“Then, I say again, keep your money till you
want it.”
“No, that I’ll never do, when I came on pur-
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 15

pose to spend it. After all, the only thing I can
think of,” contmued Geoffrey, after a pause, “ is to
go back to the pastrycook’s. There was one kind
of tart I did not taste, and perhaps it would be
nicer than the others. I’ll give you one if you like.”

“ No, thank you; I am much obliged to you
all the same; but I won’t help you to spend your
money in that way. Don’t buy any more tarts.
Come and walk about ; there are plenty more shops
to look at.”

They sauntered on, but Geoftrey, by various
turns, worked his way back to the pastrycook’s ; and
as no persuasions could then bring him away, Kd-
ward walked off, not choosing, as he said, to en-
courage him.

Presently I saw a tall gentleman enter the ba-
zaar, and I wondered what he would buy. I did
not then understand the difference between grown-
up people and children, and as he approached my
stall, I could not repress a hope that he would buy
me. But his quick eye glanced over the tables with-
out resting on any of the toys.

“ Can I shew you any thing, sir ?” said my mis-
tress.

“ No, I am much obliged to you,” he answered,
with a pleasant smile. “I am only in search of
some young people who, I dare say, have been
16 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

better customers than I. Ah, here they are,” he
continued, as the two boys of whom I had taken so
much notice ran up to him from different ends of
the room.

“Well, boys,” said he, “ what have you bought?

Must we hire a wagon to carry your property
home 2” -
_ “Not quite,’ answered Edward. “TI have
bought a wagon-load of amusement, but I can
carry it home well enough myself; I have spent
all my money in this box of tools.”

“A very sensible and useful purchase,” said the
gentleman ; “ they will give you plenty of plea-
sant employment. The only objection is, that they
are likely to be lost or broken at school.”

“IT do not mean to take them to school, papa.
I shall use them in the holidays, and leave them
with Willy when I go back to school; that was one
reason why I bought them. Willy could do a good
deal of carpentering on his sofa.”

“True, my boy, and a kind thought. They
will be a great amusement to poor Willy, and he
will take good care of them for you.”

“ Now, Geoffrey, how have you invested your
capital? I hope you have found a strong spade. It
is fine weather for gardening.”

“No, I haven't,” stammered Geoffrey.
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THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 17

© Well, what have you bought ?”

“ I don’t know,” said Geoffrey.

“ Do you mean that you have not spent your
money yet? Make haste, then, for I can only
allow you five minutes more. I expected to find
you ready to go home. Be brisk; there is every
thing on that stall that the heart of boy can wish,”
said the gentleman, pointing to my abode.

But Geoffrey did not move. “I don’t want
any thing,” said he at last.

“ What a fortunate boy !” said the gentleman;
but he presently added, “ Have you lost your
money ?”

« Ne.”

“ Shew it to me.”

Geoffrey slowly produced his sixpence, almost
hidden in the palm of his hand.

“Where is the rest?” asked the gentleman.
“ Have you spent it ?”

“ Yes.”

“And nothing to shew for it? Nothing ?”—
and the gentleman looked at the boy more narrowly.
“ Nothing,” said he again, “except a few crumbs
of pie-crust on your waistcoat? Oh, Geoffrey !”

There was a short silence, and the boy coloured
a good deal; at last he said, “It was my own
money.”

C
18 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“ You will wish it was your own again before
long’, I dare say,” said the gentleman. “ However,
we must hope you will be wiser in time. Come
home now to dinner.”

“ T don’t want any dinner,” said Geoffrey.

“Probably not, but Edward and I do. We
have not dined on tarts; and I dare say Ned is as
hungry as I am.”

So saying, he led the way towards the door,
leaving me, as usual, pondering over what had
passed. One word used by the gentleman made a
great impression on me—USEFUL.

What could that mean? Various considerations
were suggested by the question. Some things, it
seemed, were useful, others not; and what puzzled
me most was, that the very same things appeared
to be useful to some people, and not to others. For
instance, the sixpenny paint-box, which had been re-
jected as useless to Willy, was bought soon after-
wards by a small boy, who said it would be the
most useful toy he had.

Could this be the case with every thing? Was
it possible that every thing properly applied might
have its use, and that its value depended upon
those who used it? If so, why was Geoffrey blamed
for spending his money in tarts? He liked them.
Perhaps he had plenty of food at home, and that
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 19

uselessness consisted in a thing’s not being really
wanted. I revolved the subject in my mind, and
tried to discover the use of every thing I saw, but
I was not always successful. The subject was per-
plexing ; and gradually all my thoughts became
fixed on the point of most importance to myself —
namely, my own use.

How changed were my ideas since the time
when I imagined the world to belong to dolls!
Their whole race now seemed to be of very small
importance; and as for my individual self, I could
not be sure that I had any use at all, and still less
what, or to whom.

Day after day I lay on my counter unnoticed,
except by the shopwoman who covered us up at
night, and re-arranged us in the morning’; and
even this she did with such an indifferent air, that
I could not flatter myself I was of the smallest use
to her. Every necessary care was bestowed upon
me in common with my companions; but I sighed
for the tender attentions that I sometimes saw
lavished by children upon their dolls, and wished
that my mistress would nurse and caress me in the
same manner.

She never seemed to think of such a thing.
She once said I was dusty, and whisked a brush
over my face; but that was the only separate mark
90 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

of interest I ever received from her. I had no rea-
sonable ground of complaint, but I began to grow
weary of the insipidity of my life, and to ask myself
whether this could be my only destiny. Was I
never to be of use to any body? From time to
time other toys were carried away. Many a giddy
top and lively ball left my side in childish company,
and disappeared through those mysterious gates by
which the busy human race entered our calm se+
clusion.

At last even dolls had their day. The beauti-
ful waxen princess no longer graced our dominions.
She was bought by an elderly lady for a birthday
present to a little grand-daughter; and on the very
same day the “old familiar faces” of six dolls who
had long shared my counter vanished from my
sight, one after another being bought and carried
away.

I was sorry to lose them, though while we lived
togethét we had had our little miffs and jealousies.
I had sometimes thought that the one with the red
shoes was always sticking out her toes; that she of —
the flaxen ringlets was ready to let every breath of
wind blow them over her neighbours’ faces; that
another with long legs took up more room than her
share, much to my inconvenience. But now that
they were all gone, and I never could hope to see
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 21

them again, I would gladly have squeezed myself
into as. small compass as the baby doll in the
walnut-shell, in order to make room for them once
more.

One thing, however, was satisfactory: dolls
certainly had their use. Seven had been bought,
and therefore why not an eighth? I had been sink-
ing almost into a state of despondency, but now my
hopes revived and my spirits rose. My turn might
come.

And my turn did come. Every circumstance of
that eventful day is deeply impressed on my me-
mory. I was as usual employed in making remarks
upon the passing: crowd, and wondering what might
be the use of every body I saw, when I perceived
the lady and the little girl who had been almost my
first acquaintances among the human race. As they
approached my stall, I heard the mama say, “ Have
you decided what to buy with the sixpence ?”

“Oh yes, quite,” answered the child ;*““ I am
going to buy a siapenny doll.”

The words thrilled through me; her eyes seemed
fixed on mine, and the sixpence was between her
fingers. I imagined myself bought. But she con-
tinued: “ I think, if you don’t mind the trouble, I
should like to go round the bazaar first, to see which
are the prettiest.”
99 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“ By all means,” replied the lady; and they
walked on, carrying all my hopes with them.

I had often fancied myself the prettiest doll of
my size in the place; but such conceit would not
support me now. I felt that there were dozens,
nay scores, who more than equalled me; and alk
discontented notions of my neglected merit now
sunk before the dread that I had really no merit to
neglect. |

I began also to have some idea of what was
meant by time. My past life had glided away so
imperceptibly, that I did not know whether it had
been long or short; but I learnt to count every mo-
ment while those two mortals were walking round
the bazaar.

I strained my eyes to catch sight of them again;
but when at last they re-appeared, I scarcely dared
to look, for fear of seeing a doll in the child’s hands.
But no; her hands were empty, except for the six-
pence still between her finger and thumb.

They came nearer—they stopped at another stall ;
I could not hear what they said, but they turned
away, and once more stood opposite to me. The
child remained for some moments as silent as my-
self, and then exclaimed, “ After all, Mama, I don’t
think there are any prettier dolls than these in the
whole room.”
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 23

“What do you say to this one, Miss?” said our
proprietor, taking up a great full-dressed Dutch
doll, and laying her on the top of those of my size
and class, completely hiding the poor little victims
under her stiff muslin and broad ribbons.

But on the child’s answering, “ No, thank you,
I only want a sixpenny doll not dressed,” the Dutch
giantess was removed, and we once more asserted
our humble claims.

“ That seems to me a very pretty one,” said the
mama, pointing to my next neighbour. The child
for a moment hesitated, but presently exclaimed in a
joyful tone, “ Oh no, this is the beauty of all; this
little darlmg with the real hair and blue ribbon in
it; I will take this one, if you please.” And before
I could be sure that she meant me, I was removed
from my place, wrapped up in paper, and consigned
to her hands. My long-cherished wishes were ful-
filled, and I was bought. At first I could scarcely
believe it. Notwithstanding all my planning and
looking forward to this event, now that it really
happened, I could not understand it. My senses
seemed gone. What had so lone occupied my mind
was the work of a moment; but that moment was
irrevocable, and my fate was decided. In my little
mistress’ hands I passed the boundaries of the world
of toys, and.entered upon a new state of existence.
24 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

CHAPTER II.

A VERY different life now opened before me. I had
no longer any pretence for complaining of neglect.
My young mistress devoted every spare moment to
the enjoyment of my company, and set no limits to
her caresses and compliments; while I in return
regarded her with all the gratitude and affection
which a doll can feel. My faculties as well as my
feelings were called into fresh exercise; for though
I had no longer the wide range of observation
afforded by the daily crowd of strangers in the
bazaar, I had the new advantage of making inti-
mate acquaintance with a small circle of friends.

Having hitherto been so completely without any
position in the world, I could not at first help feel-
ing rather shy at the idea of taking my place as
member of a family; and it was therefore a relief
to find that my lot was not cast amongst total
strangers, but that I had already some slight clue
to the characters of my future companions.

My mistress, whose name was Rose, was sister
to the Willy for whom she had bought the paint-
box, and. also to Edward, the purchaser of the .
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 25

tools. Geoffrey, the lover of tarts, was a cousin on
_ avisit to them for the holidays; and they had also
an elder sister named Margaret, besides their papa
and mama, whom I had seen in the bazaar.

The first of the family to whom I was introduced
was Willy, and I soon became much interested in
him. He was a pale thin boy, who spent the day
on a sofa, to and from which he was carried in the
morning and at night. In fine weather he went
out in a wheel-chair; but he was unable to move with-
out help, and was obliged to endure many priva-
tions. Though he often looked suffering and weary,
he was cheerful and patient, and always seemed
pleased to hear other children describe enjoyments
in which he could not share. Every body was fond
of Willy, and anxious to amuse and comfort him.
All that happened out of doors was told to him ; all
the kindest friends and pleasantest visitors came to
see him ; the new books were brought to him to read
first; the best fruit and flowers always set apart for
him; and all the in-door occupations arranged as
much as possible with a view to his convenience.
He and his little sister Rose were the dearest friénds
in the world, and certain to take part in whatever
interested each other. As soon as Rose brought
me home from the Pantheon, she ran upstairs with
me to Willy, whom I then saw for the first time,
26 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

sitting on the sofa with his feet up, and a table
before him, on which stood several books, and my _
old acquaintances the paint-box and the chest of tools.

“ Look at this, Willy ; is not this pretty?” ex-
claimed Rose, laying me down on his open book.

Willy looked up with a pleasant smile: “ Very
pretty,” he answered. “TI suppose she is to be the
lady of the new house; and with Ned’s tools, I hope
to make some furniture worth her acceptance.”

“Oh, thank you, Willy dear. And will you
help me to choose a name for her? . What do you
think the prettiest name you know 2”

“ Rose,” answered Willy, laughing ; “ but I sup-
pose that will not do. I dare say you want some-
thing very fine and out-of-the-way.”

“As fine as can be,” replied Rose; “I have
been thinking of Seraphina or Wilhelmina: which
do you like best ?”

“ Call it Molly,” cried Edward, who just then
entered the room; “ Molly and Betty are the best
names: no nonsense in them.”

“Call it Stupid Donkey,” mumbled a voice be-
hind him; and Geoffrey advanced, his mouth as
usual full of something besides words. “ Have any
nuts, Willy ?” he asked, holding out a handful.

“No, thank you,” answered Willy ; “I must
not eat them.”
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 27

“JT wouldn't be you, I know,” said Geoffrey,
cracking one between his teeth; “ never let to eat
any thing but what’s wholesome, and always read-
ing, or doing something stupid. I believe you are
helping Rose to play with that doll now. Put it
into the fire; that is the way to treat dolls. Stupid
things. I hate ’em !”

“Pray do not touch it, Geoffrey,” said Rose.

“Leave it alone, Geff,” said Edward. “ You
have your things, and Rose has hers. I don’t see
the fun of dolls myself, but she does, and nobody
shall interfere with her while I am here to protect
her. Just remember that, will you ?”

“The d-o-ll!” said Geoffrey, drawling the word,
and making a face as if the pronouncing it turned
him quite sick. “Oh, the sweet doll! Perhaps
you would like to stay and play with Rose, and
Willy, and the d-o-ll, instead of coming out to
cricket.”

“ Nonsense, you foolish fellow, you know better,”
answered Edward. “But I won’t have Rose bullied ;
and what’s more, I won’t have Willy quizzed. I
should like to see you or me pass such an exami-
nation as Willy could if he were at school. Why,
he can learn as much in a day as we do in a
week.” :
“Well, he is welcome to learn as much as he
28 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

likes,” said Geoffrey ; “ and let’s you and I go and
play. What stupid nuts these are! I’ve almost
cracked one of my teeth with cracking them.”

The boys ran off; and presently there came into
the room the papa and mama, whom I already knew,
and a young lady very like Rose, but older. I found.
she was Margaret, the eldest sister. They inquired
whether Willy wanted any thing before they went
out; and Margaret fetched a drawing that he
wished to copy, while his father and mother wheeled
his sofa and table nearer the window that he might
have more light. When he was made quite com-
fortable, they told Rose that she might stay and
take care of him till they returned; and she said
she would bring her box of scraps and begin dress-
mg me. Then I came in for my share of notice,
and had every reason to be satisfied with the praises
bestowed on me. The mama said that I deserved
very neatly-made clothes; the papa, that my hair
would be a pattern for Margaret’s ; and Margaret
said I was charming, and that she would make me
a pink satin gown.

They admired the name Seraphina, though the
papa suggested various others which he thought
might suit Rose’s taste—Sophonisba, Cleopatra,
Araminta, Dulcinea, Ethelinda, &c.; but as she
remained steady to her first choice, the Lapy
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS: 29

SERAPHINA was decided to be thenceforth my name
and title. :

And now began the real business of my life. I
was no longer doomed to fret at being of no use, for
the object of my existence was plain enough, namely,
to give innocent recreation to my young mistress
when at leisure from her more serious employments.
Every day she spent some hours in study with her
mother or sister; and she would fly to me for relief
between her lessons, and return to them with more
vigour after passing a little time in my refreshing
company. She often shewed her tasks to me, and
discussed their difficulties. I think she repeated the
multiplication-table to me nearly a hundred times,
while I sat on the Zutor’s Assistant waiting for the
recurrence of the fatal words, “ Seven times nine.”
Day after day she could get no farther; but as
soon as she came to “ Seven times nine,” I was
turned off the book, which had to be consulted for
the answer.

At last, one day she came running into the room
in great glee, exclaiming, “I have done the multi-
plication-table. I have said it quite right, sixty-
three and all. I made no mistake even in dodging.
And you helped me, my darling Lady Seraphina.
I never could have learned it perfect if you had not
heard me say it so often. And now, look at your
30 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

rewards. Margaret has made you a bonnet, and
Willy has made you an arm-chair.”’

Beautiful, indeed, was the bonnet, and commo-
dious the arm-chair ; and I wore the one and re-
clined in the other all the time Rose was learning
the French auxiliary verbs étre and avoir. I flat-
tered myself I was of as much use in them as in the
multiplication-table; but I do not recollect receiv-
ing any particular recompense. Indeed, after a little
time, it would have been difficult to know what to
give me, for I possessed every thing that a doll’s
heart could wish, or her head imagine. Such a
variety of elegant dresses as Rose made for me
would have been the envy of all my old friends in
the bazaar. I had gowns of pink satin and white
satin; blue silk and yellow silk; coloured muslins
without number, and splendid white lace. Bonnets
enough to furnish a milliner’s shop were mine; but
I was not so partial to them as to my gowns, be-
cause they tumbled my hair.

I believe a good many of my possessions were
presents from Margaret to Rose on account of
perfect lessons; but in course of time, I ceased
to superintend Rose’s studies. Margaret said
that I interrupted the course of history ; and
the mama said that Rose was old enough to
learn her lessons without bringing her play into
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. Sl

them, and that I must be put away during school
hours.

Though I did not think that the fault was alto-
gether mine, I quite acquiesced in the wisdom of this
decree ; for during Rose’s last reading-lesson she
had stopped so often to ask me which [I liked best,
Lycurgus or Solon, Pericles or Alcibiades, &c., that
Margaret was almost out of patience. And though
{ made no answer, and had really no choice at all
between the characters, I felt that I rather hin-
dered business.

I was therefore now left to myself for several
hours in the morning ; but I found ample and plea-
sant employment in surveying the comforts and
beauties of my habitation. For I was not forced
to perform the part of an insignificant pigmy in the
vast abodes of the colossal race of man: I possessed
a beautiful little house proportioned to my size, plea-
santly situated on a table in the furthest corner of
the school-room, and commanding an extensive view
of the whole apartment.

I must describe my house at full length. It
had been originally, as I heard, a mere rough pack-
ing-case ; but what of that? The best brick house
in London was once but clay in the fields; and
my packing-case was now painted outside and pa-
pered inside, and fitted up in a manner every way
32 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

suitable for the occupation of a doll of distine-
tion.

My drawing-room was charming; light and
cheerful, the walls papered with white and gold,
and the floor covered with a drab carpet worked
with flowers of every hue. Rose worked. the carpet
herself under the directions of Margaret, who pre-
vailed on her to learn worsted-work for my sake.
So there, again, how useful I was! From the ceil-
ing hung a brilliant glass chandelier, a birthday
present from Edward to Rose; and the mantelpiece
was adorned by a splendid mirror cut out of a
broken looking-glass by Willy, and framed by his
hands. I cannot say that Willy ever seemed to care
for me personally, but he took considerable interest
in my upholstery, and much of my handsomest
furniture was manufactured by him. He made my
dining-room and drawing-room tables ; the frames
of my chairs, which were covered with silk by Mar-
garet ; my sofa, and my four-post bedstead ; and it
was he who painted the floor-cloth in my hall, and
the capital picture of the Queen and Prince Albert
which hung over the dining-room chimney-piece. I
had a snug bed-room, containing a bed with pink
curtains, a toilette-table, with a handsome looking-
glass, pin-cushion, and rather large brush and comb;
a washing-stand, towel-horse, chest of drawers, and
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 33

wardrobe. But the last two, I must confess, were
rather for show than for use. They were French-
polished, and in appearance convenient as well
as handsome, but in reality too small to hold my
clothes. A few minor articles of dress were kept
in them; but the mass of my gorgeous attire was
always in larger boxes and trunks belonging to my
mistress; her work-box, for instance, and at one
time her desk; but her mama turned all my gowns
out of the latter when she banished me from the
lessons, and desired that, for the future, only writ-
ing materials should be kept in it. “ Every thing
in its proper place, Rose,” I heard her say. “ You
have plenty of little boxes for doll’s clothes; and
your doll ought to teach you to be more tidy instead
of less so.” aa ee alk

My dining-room was well adapted for all the
purposes of hospitality, being furnished with a sub-
stantial dining-table, chairs, and a sideboard, on
which there always stood two trays, one filled with
decanters and wine-glasses, and the other with
knives and forks.

My kitchen was resplendent with saucepans,
kettles, pots and pans, and plates and dishes, ranged
upon the dresser, or hung from the walls. of meat was always roasting before the fire, and a
cook of my own race appeared to spend her life in

D
84 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

basting it, for I never failed to find her thus em-
ployed when Rose was so kind as to take me mto
my kitchen. There was also a footman, who sat
for ever in the hall; and I was inclined to con-
sider him rather wanting in respect, till I disco-
vered that, owing to a broken leg, he was unable to
stand. I did not quite comprehend the use of my
servants, as Rose herself did all the work of my
house; but she said they were indispensable, and
that if it were not for want of room, I should have
a great many more.

Besides all these arrangements for my comfort
in-doors, I possessed a beautiful open phaeton, em-
blazoned with the royal arms of England, and
drawn by four piebald horses with long: tails, so
spirited that they never left off prancing. Every
day, after school-time, Rose brought this equipage
to my door; and the four horses stood with their
eight front feet in the air while I was dressed for
my drive. Then, attired in my last new bonnet
and cloak, I sat in state in my carriage, and was
drawn round and round the room by Rose, till she
said I was tired. She made many attempts to per-
suade the lame footman to stand on the footboard
behind, but she never could manage it. He was a
very helpless creature ; and I am not quite certain
that he even did his best, little as that might be.
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 35

The first time Rose set him up behind the carriage,
he tumbled head over heels into the middle of it,
and stood there on his head till she picked him out
again. Then he fell off behind, then on one side,
and then on the other, till she was quite tired of his
foolish tricks, and left him to sit quietly and stupidly
in his old place in the hall.

I lived in great comfort in my pleasant house,
and being of a cheerful, contented temper, never felt
lonely, although left to myself during great part of
the day ; for Rose was very obedient to her mama’s
orders, and even if now and then tempted to forget
the regulation herself, Willy was always at hand
to remind her, and help to fix her attention on her
business. But when it was all over, she flew to
me with redoubled pleasure.

One day she said to me, “ My dear Seraphina,
I am afraid you must be very dull, alone all the
morning.” I longed to assure her of the con-
trary; but not having the gift of speech, I "could
only listen submissively while she continued: “ It
is a pity that you should sit dog nothmg and
wasting your time; so I have brought you some
books, which you are to read while I am at my
lessons; and I shall expect you to learn just as
much as I do.” |

So saying, she seated me on my_ sofa, and
36 _ THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

placing a table with the books before me, “ Look,”
continued she, “I have made them for you myself,
and covered them with these pretty red and green
papers. This is your English History, and this is
your French Grammar ; and here is a Geography
Book, and here is a History of Rome. Now read
attentively, and do not let your thoughts wander ;
and be very careful not to dog's-ear the leaves : that
always looks like a dunce. And mind you sit up- |
right,” added she, looking back, as she left the room
in obedience to a summons from her sister.

I obeyed to the best of my power. ‘To be sure,
I did not know which was geography and which was
grammar; and English and Roman history were
both alike to me. But I did as I was bid. I sat
upright in the place appointed me, staring as hard
as I could at the open pages; and my worst enemy
could not accuse me of dogs-earing’ a single leaf.

When my mistress returned, she pleased me
much by calling me a very good girl, and say-
ing that if I continued to take so much pains, I
could not fail to improve. On hearing this, Willy
laughed, and said he hoped that that was a dupli-
cate of Margaret’s last speech; and Rose looked
very happy, and answered that not only Margaret,
but Mama had said the same.

This was not my only duplicate ‘of Rose’s ad-
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 37

ventures. My education appeared to be conducted
precisely on the same plan as her own. Before long,
she brought a little pianoforte and set it up in my
drawing-room. I thought it rather hid the pretty
paper, but it was a handsome piece of furniture.

“ Now, Lady Seraphina,” said Rose, “ I am
obliged to practise for an hour every day, and you
must do the same. See what a pretty piano I have
given you. You need not mind its being meant for
a housewife and pincushion ; the notes are marked,
and that is all you want. Now practise your scales,
and be very careful to play right notes and count
your time.”

I sat at my piano with all due diligence, but I
am sorry to say that my progress did not seem
satisfactory. One day Rose said that she was sure
I had forgotten to count; and another day, that
I hurried the easy bars and slackened the difficult
ones; then she accused me of not caring whether
I played right notes or wrong, and torturing her
ear by my false chords; then 1 banged the notes
till I broke the string’s: in short, there was no end to
her complaints, till at last she wound them all up by
declaring that both she and I hated music, and that
if Mama and Margaret would take her advice, we
should both leave it off. |

But still I practised regularly, and so, I sup-
38 THE DOLL. AND HER FRIENDS.

pose, did Rose; and gradually her reproaches di-
minished, and she grew more contented with me;
and we both persevered, till she said that really, after
all, I seemed to have a good ear, and to be likely
to make a very respectable player.

“ But you know it all depends upon yourself,
Seraphina; your present improvement is the result
of pains and practice. Pains and practice will do
any thing.”

It was fortunate fe me that I had so careful a
superintendent as Rose; for unless she had kept a .
constant watch over me, there is no saying how
many awkward habits I might unconsciously have
contracted. But she cured me of poking my head
forward, of standing on one lee, of tilting my chair,
of meddling with things that were not my own, of
leaning against the furniture while I was speaking,
of putting my elbows on the table, of biting my
nails, of spilling my tea, and of making crumbs on
the floor.

I cannot say I was myself aware either of the
faults or their cure; but I think one seldom does
notice one’s own faults, and therefore it is a great
advantage to have kind friends who will point them
out to us. I believed Rose when she told me of
mine; so I had a right to believe her when she
gave me the agreeable assurance of their cure, and
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 39

to indulge the hope that I was becoming a pleasing,
well-bred little doll. ,

On one mortifying occasion, however, I must
own that Rose’s anxiety for my always followmg
in her steps was the cause of a serious injury to
me. She remarked that I had got into a horrid
way of kicking off my shoes while I was learning
my poetry; and she thought the best cure would
be to make me wear sandals. I observed that she
"was sewing sandals to her own shoes at the time,
and she consulted Willy about some means of doing
the same by mine. Willy held me head down-
wards, and examined my feet. My shoes were.
painted, therefore sewing was out of the question.
He advised glue. This was tried, but it came
through the thin narrow ribbon of which my san-
dals were to be made, and looked very dirty. They
were taken off; but the operation had spoilt the
delicacy of my white stockings, and Rose said it
was impossible to let me go such an untidy figure ;
we must try some other way. She asked Willy to
lend her a gimlet, that she might bore holes at the
sides of my feet, and glue the ribbon into them, so
as not to shew the glue. Willy said she was wel-
come to the gimlet, but that he advised her to leave
it alone, for that she would only break my feet.
But Rose would not be dissuaded, and began boring.
40 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

It was on this occasion that I most peculiarly
felt the advantage of that insensibility to pain
which distinguishes my race. What mortal could
have borne such an infliction without struggling
and screaming? I, on the contrary, took it all in
good part, and shewed no signs of feeling’ even at
the fatal moment when my foot snapped in two,
and Rose, with a face of utter dismay, held up my
own toes before my eyes.

“Oh, my poor Seraphina!” she exclaimed, “ what
shall we do?”

“Glue it on again,” said Willy. “ You had
better have taken my advice at first, but now
you must make the best of it. Glue is your only
friend.”

So Rose glued the halves of my foot together,
lamenting over me, and blaming: herself so much
all the time, that it seemed rather a comfort to her
when Margaret, coming into the room, agreed with
her that she had been foolish and awkward. Mar-
garet said that ribbon might have been tied over
my feet from the first, without using glue or gimlet
either ; and Rose called herself more stupid than ever,
for not having thought of such an easy contrivance.

My foot was glued, and for the purpose of
standing, answered as well as ever; and Rose
sewed me up in a pair of blue silk boots, and de-
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 4}

clared that I was prettier than before; and my
misfortune was soon forgotten by every body but
myself. I, however, could not but feel a misgiving
that this was.the first warning of my share in the
invariable fate of my race. For I had already lived
long enough to be aware that the existence of a—
doll, like that of every thing else, has its limits.
Hither by sudden accidents, such as loss of limbs, or
by the daily wear and tear of life, decay gradually
makes its progress in us, and we fade away as surely
as the most delicate of the fragile race of mortals.

Though the fracture of my foot was my own first
misfortune, I had had opportunities of remarking
the casualties to which dolls are liable. For it is not
to be supposed that our devotion to human beings
precludes us from cultivating the society of our own
species. Dolls will be dolls; and they have a natu-
ral sympathy with each other, notwithstanding the
companionship of the race of man. Most little girls
are aware of this fact, and provide suitable society
for their dolls. I myself had a large circle of silent
acquaintances, to whom I was introduced by Rose’s
kindness and consideration. When other little girls
came to drink tea with her, they often brought their
dolls to spend the evening with me; and among
them I had more than once the slenswwe of pas
nising an old friend from the bazaar.
49 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

Then I was in my glory. There was a constant
supply of provisions in my larder; and at a mo-
ment’s notice Rose would produce an excellent din-
ner, all ready cooked, and dished in a beautiful little
china dinner-service. Willy compared her to the
genius of Aladdin’s lamp; and though I did not
know what that might mean, I quite understood the
advantage of being able to set such a banquet before
my friends. I could always command salmon, a
pair of soles, a leg’ of mutton, a leg of pork, a tur-
key, a pair of boiled fowls, a ham, a sucking pig, a
hare, a loaf of bread, a fine Cheshire cheese, several
pies, and a great variety of fruit, which was always
ripe and in season, winter or summer. Rose’s papa
once observed that his hothouse produced none so
fine ; for the currants were as large as apples, and
two cherries filled a dish.

Rose and her companions performed the active
duties of waiting at table on these occasions; but
the lame footman was generally brought out of the -
hall, and propped up against the sideboard, where
he stood looking respectable but awkward.

At these pleasant parties I saw a great range
of characters, for Rose’s young visitors were various
im their tastes, and their dolls used to be dressed in
every known costume. Besides plenty of pretty En-
glish damsels, I was introduced now to a Turkish
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 43

sultana, now to a Swiss peasant; one day to a cap-
tain in the British army, another day to an Indian
rajah. One young lady liked to make her dolls per-
sonate celebrated characters; and when she visited
us, most distinguished guests graced my table. I
have had the honour of receiving the Queen and
Prince Albert themselves; the Duke of Wellington,
Sir Walter Scott, and Miss Edgeworth, have all
dined with me on the same day, and Robinson Crusoe
came in the evening’. y

But it was at these social meetings that I be-
came most fully aware of the liability of dolls to
loss of limbs. I never remember giving a party at
which the guests could boast of possessing all their
legs and arms. Many an ingenious contrivance hid
or supplied the deficiencies, and we were happy m
spite of our losses; still, such was the case: and I
saw that dolls, however beloved and respected, could
not last for ever.

For some time after my accident I had no par-
ticular adventures. I lived in peace and plenty, and
amused myself with watching the family. They
were all amiable and easy to understand, except
Geoffrey ; but he was a complete puzzle to me, and
it was long before I could make out why he was so
different from the rest.

The others all seemed to. like to help and please
44 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

one another, but Geoffrey never seemed happy un-
less he was making himself disagreeable. If Willy
was interested in a book, he was obliged to sit upon
the second volume, or Geoffrey would be sure to
run away with it. If Edward was in a hurry to go
out, Geoffrey would hide his cap, and keep him a
quarter of an hour hunting for it. The girls dared
not leave their worsted-work within his reach for a
moment ; for he would unravel the canvass, or chop
up the wool, or go on with the work after a pat-
tern of his own composing’, so that they would be
obliged to spend half an hour in unpicking his
cobbling..

Margaret remonstrated with him in private, and
made excuses for him in public, and did her best to
prevent his tiresome tricks from annoying Willy; Ed-
ward tried rougher means of keeping him in order,
which sometimes succeeded ; but still he could find
plenty of opportunities of being a torment: people
always can when such is their taste.

One day Margaret: was keeping Willy company,
while the rest of the party were gone to the Zoo-
logical Gardens. She had brought a drawing to
finish, as he liked to see her draw, and was some-
times useful in suggesting improvements. But
while they were thus employed, Margaret was sum-
moned to some visitors, and went away, saying that
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 45

her drawing would just have time to dry before ske
returned.

But unfortunately, during her absence, Geoffrey
came home. He had grown tired of the Gardens,
which he had seen very often, and rather hungry,
as he generally was; so after amusing himself by
eating the cakes he had bought for the bear, he had
nothing more to do, and tried to persuade his cousins
to be tired also. But Edward was making himself
agreeable to the monkeys, Rose was cultivating the
friendship of the elephant, and their papa and mama
were waiting to see the hippopotamus bathe; so
that Geoffrey’s proposals of leaving the Gardens
were scouted, and he could only obtain leave from
his uncle to go home by himself.

- He entered the room, as usual, with his mouth
full, having spent his last penny in a piece of cocoa-
nut as he came along the streets. While the cocoa-
nut lasted, he was employed to his satisfaction ; but
when that was finished, he was again at a loss for
something to do. He tried walking round the room
on one leg, working heel and toe, and that suc-
ceeded very well, and did no harm till he unluckily
came to the drawing-table, when he immediately
brought himself to a stand on both feet.

“ Hallo!” cried he, “ here’s a daub! Is this
your splendid performance, Will?” |
46 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“No,” replied Willy, “it is Margaret’s; and mind
you don’t touch it by accident, because it is wet.”

“Touch it by accident!” exclaimed Geoffrey ;
“Tam going to touch it on purpose. I wonder
Margaret is not ashamed to do it so badly. I'll
improve it for her. How kind of me!”

Poor Willy, in dismay, tried to secure the draw-
ing’, but he could not move from his sofa, and
Geoffrey danced round him, holding it at arm’s-
length. Then Willy caught at the bell-rope, but
his mischievous cousin snatched it quicker, and tied
it up out of his reach. Willy called all the servants
as loud as he could, but no one was within hearing ;
and he threw himself back on his sofa in despair,
exclaiming’, “ How can you be so ill-natured, when
Margaret is always so kind to you?”

“ Til-natured !” answered the other; “I’m doing
her a favour. She admired the moonlight in the
Diorama; now I shall make just such a moon in
her drawing.” And while he spoke, a great yellow
moon, like a guinea, rose in the midst of poor Mar-
garet’s brilliant sunset.

“ That’s the thing,” said Geoffrey ; “ and now
I shall put the cow jumping over it, and the little
dog laughing to see such sport. Some figures always
improve the foreground.”

“Oh, you have quite spoilt it!” cried Willy.
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 47

“How I wish I could stop you! I cannot imagine
how you can like to be so mischievous and disagree-
able. Oh, if Margaret would but come back !”

At last Margaret came, and the troublesome
Geoffrey expected great amusement from her dis-
pleasure; but he was disappointed. Margaret was
one of those generous people who never resent an
injury done to themselves. If Geoffrey had spoilt
any body else’s drawing, she would have been the
first to punish him; but now she was much more
vexed at Willy’s distress than at the destruction of
_ her own work, and instead of scolding Geofirey,
she gave herself up to consoling Willy. She as-
sured him that there was no great harm done. She ©
said the drawing was good for very little, and that
she would copy it and improve it so much that he
should be quite glad of the disaster; and she made
a present of the spoilt drawing to Geoffrey, tellmg
him she was sure he would one day be ashamed of
so foolish a performance, but that meanwhile he
might keep it as a specimen of his taste. He had
not the manners to apologise, but he looked very
silly and crest-fallen, and left the room m silence,
with the drawing in his hand. .

When he was gone, Willy exclaimed, “ If it
were not for losing Edward, I should wish the holi-
days were over; Geoffrey is so disagreeable.”
48 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“ He is very thoughtless,” Margaret replied ;
“ but we must not be too hard upon him. Let us
recollect that he has no parents to teach him better,
nor brothers and sisters to call forth his considera-

tion for others. Poor Geoffrey has had neither
* example nor precept till now. But now Papa and
Mama five him good precepts; and if we try to
set him good examples, perhaps we may help him
‘to improve.”

“ Well, I'll hope for the best, and do what I
can,” said Willy. “ Certainly he has some good
qualities. He is as brave as a lion; and he is good-
natured about giving away his own things, though
he is so mischievous with other people’s.”

“ And he is clever in his way, notwithstand-
ing’ his idleness,” added Margaret. ‘“ Those foolish
figures that he put into my drawing were uncom-
monly well done, though they were provoking to us.”

“You are the best girl in the world,” said
Willy ; “and if you think Geoffrey will improve,
Pll think so too; but you must own there is room
for it.”

Perhaps Geoffrey did improve, but it seemed
slow work, faults being more easily acquired than
cured; and for a long time I could perceive no dif-
ference in him. Indeed, as his next piece of mischief
concerned myself, I thought him worse than ever.
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 49

I have often wondered at the extreme dislike
which boys: have to dolls. I was the most inoffen-
sive creature possible, giving myself no airs, and
interfering with nobody ; yet even the gentle Willy
was indifferent to me. Edward, though he pro-
tected Rose in her patronage of me, despised me
thoroughly himself; and Geoffrey never lost an op-
portunity of expressing his mortal hatred to me.
I shrunk from Edward’s contemptuous notice, but,
I was not at all afraid of him, well knowing that
neither he nor Willy would hurt a hair of my head;
but. whenever Geoffrey came into the room, terror
seized my mind. He never passed my house with-
out making: all kinds of ugly faces at me; and I felt
instinctively that nothing but the presence of the
other boys restrained him from doing me any harm
in. his power.

I had hitherto never been alone with him, but
at last the fatal moment arrived. One fine after-
noon, Willy went out for a drive in his wheel-chair,
Edward insisting upon drawing it himself, and the
two girls walking on each side. Geoflrey accom-
panied them, intending to walk with them part of
the way, and to go on by himself when he was
tired of the slow pace of the chair. All seemed safe,
and I hoped to enjoy a few hours of uninterrupted
leisure. I always liked having my time to myself;

E
50 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

and as Rose had set me no lessons, I reposed com-
fortably in my arm-chair by a blazing fire of black
and red cloth, from the glare of which I was shel-
tered by a screen. My dog sat at my side, my
cat lay at my feet, and I was as happy as a doll
could be.

Suddenly the silence was broken by a sound as
of a turkey gabbling in the hall; presently this
changed to a duck quacking on the stairs; then a
cock crew on the landing-place, and a goose hissed
close to the schoolroom-door. I guessed but too
well what these ominous sounds portended, and my
heart sunk within me as the door burst open, and
my dreaded enemy banged into the room. |

“ Why, they are not come home yet!”’ exclaimed
he; “so my talents have been wasted. I meant to
have made them bid me not make every different
noise. When they said, ‘ Don’t hiss,’ I would have
crowed ; and when they said, ‘ Don’t crow,’ I would
have quacked, or barked, or bellowed, or mewed, till
I had gone through all the noises I know. Now I
have nothing to do.”’

He walked to the window and looked out.

“What a stupid street it is!” said he. “ If
my uncle had not taken away my squirt, I would
squirt at the people.”

' Then he yawned, and sauntered to the bookcase.
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 51

“What stupid books! I wonder any body can write
them. I wish Edward had left his tools out; I
should like to plane the top of the shelf. How
stupid it is having nothing to do!”

As he spoke, I shuddered to see him approach-
ing my end of the room. He came nearer ; he made
a full stop in front of me, and looked me in the
face.

“You stupid, ugly thing,” he exclaimed, “ don’t
stare so. I hate to have a doll’s eyes goggling
at me.”

Gladly would I have withdrawn my eyes, if pos-
sible. But they had been painted wide open, and
what could I do? I never was so ashamed of them
in my life; but I had no control over them, so I
stared on, and he grew more indignant.

“Tf you don’t leave off,” he cried, “I'll poke
out your eyes, as I did those of the ugly picture in
my room. I won't be stared at.”

I longed for the gift of speech to represent to
him, that if he would but leave off looking at me, I
should give him no offence; but alas, I was silent,
and could only stare as hard as ever.

“Oh, you will, will you?” said he; “then I
know what I’ll do: I'll hang you.”

In vain I hoped for the return of the rest of the
party. I listened anxiously for every sound, hut
§2 THE DOLL AND HER. FRIENDS.

no friendly step or voice was near, and I was com-
pletely in his power.

He began rummaging’ his pockets, grinning and
making’ faces at me all the time.. Presently he drew
forth a long piece of string, extremely dirty, look-
ing as if it had been trailed in the mud.

“ Now for it,” he exclaimed; “now you shall
receive the reward of all your stupidity and affecta-
tion. I do think dolls are the most affected crea-
tures on the face of the earth.” |

He laid hold of me by my head, pushing my
wig on one side. Alas for my beautiful hair, it
was disarranged for ever! But that was a trifle
compared with what followed. He tied one end of
his muddy string round my neck, drawing it so
tight that I foresaw I should be marked for life,
and hung’ the other end to a nail in the wall.

There I dangled, while he laughed and quizzed
me, adding insult to injury. He twisted the strmg
as tight as possible, and then let it whirl round and
round till it was all untwisted again. I banged
against the wall as I spun like a top, and wished
that I could sleep like a top too. But 1 was wide
awake to my misfortunes; and each interval of
stillness, when the string was untwisted, only en-
hanced them, by shewing in painful contrast. the
happy home whence I had been torn. For I was


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THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 53

hung on the wall directly opposite my own house ;
and from my wretched nail I could distmguish
every room in it. Between my twirls I saw my
pretty drawing-room, with its comfortable arm-
chair now vacant; and my convenient kitchen, with
my respectable cook peacefully basting her per-
petual mutton; I envied even my lame footman
quietly seated in his chimney-corner, and felt that
I had never truly valued the advantages of my
home till now. Would they ever be restored to
me? Should I once again be under the protection
of my kind and gentle mistress, or was I Geoftrey’s
' slave for ever?

These melancholy thoughts were interrupted by
a step on the stairs. “ Hallo!” cried Geoffrey,
“who would have thought of their commg home
just now ?” and he was going to lift me down from
my nail; but when the door opened, the housemaid
came in alone, and he changed his mind.

“ Why, Master Geoffrey,” said she, “ what are
you doing here all alone? Some mischief, I'll be
bound.”

« Bow, wow, wow,” answered he, dancing and
playing all sorts of antics to prevent her seeing”
me.

“ Come,” said she, “those tricks won't go down
with me. ‘The more lively you are, the more I
54 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

know you’ve been after Something’ you ought to
have let alone.”

“ Hee haw, hee haw,” said Geoffrey, twitching
her gown, and braying like a donkey.

“ Well; you're Speaking in your own voice at
last,” said she, laughing. “ But let go of my
gown, if you please » you are big enough to walk
by yourself, and I want to set the room to rights.

here’s some young: ladies coming to tea with Miss
Rose.”

She bustled about, dusting and putting every
thing in order, and talking: all the time, partly to
Geoffrey and partly to herself, about the blacks
that came in at the windows, and made a place
want dusting a dozen times a-day, when her eye
fell on my unfortunate figure, which my persecutor
had just set Swinging like the pendulum of a clock.

was a deplorable object. He had forced me
into the most awkward attitude he could invent.
My arms were turned round in their sockets,
one stretched towards the ceiling, the other at full
length on one side. I was forced to kick one leg
out in front, and the other behind; and my knees
were bent up the Wrong way. My wie had fallen
off altogether from my head, and was now perched
upon my toe. I was stil] swinging, when Sarah
caught sight of me. She looked at me for a mo-
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 55

ment, and then turned round, opening her eyes at
Geoffrey much wider than I had ever done.

“Why, you audacious, aggravating boy!” she
exclaimed, making a dash at him with her duster ;
but he ran away laughing, and she was obliged to
finish her speech to herself.

“To think of his being so mischievous and ill-
natured! What will poor Miss Rose say! To be
sure, there is nothing boys won't do; their equals
for perverseness don’t walk the earth. Though I
ought not to speak against them, while there’s
Master William and Master Edward to contra-
dict me. They are boys, to be sure; but as for
that Geoffrey!” And here she shook her head in
silence, as if Geoffrey’s delinquencies were beyond
the power of words to express. i

She then released me; and after restoring my
limbs to their proper position, and smoothing my
discomposed dress, she laid me gently on my bed,
and placed my wig on my pillow beside me, with
many kind expressions of pity and goodwill.

Repose was indeed needful after so agitating
an adventure; and I was glad to be left quiet till
the young people came in from their walk. I com-
posed my ruffled spirits as well as I could; but I
found it impossible not to be nervous at the idea
of Rose’s first seeing me in such a plight, and I
56 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

anxiously awaited her return, They came in at |
last, Rose, Willy, and Margaret; and after esta-
blishing Willy on his sofa, Rose’s next care was to
visit me. “0 Willy! O Margaret!” she exclaimed, —
and burst into tears,

“What is the matter, my darling?” asked Mar-
garet.

Rose could not answer ; but Sarah was there to
tell the story, and do ample justice to my wrong’s.
Yet I could not help observing, in the midst of all
her indignation, the difference of her matiner to-
wards her present hearers and towards Geoffrey.
She never seemed on familiar terms with Willy,
much less with Margaret or Rose. She neither
cut jokes nor used rough language to them, but
treated them with the respect due to her master’s
children ; though, as I well knew, she was ex-
tremely fond of them, and disliked Geoffrey, in spite
of her familiarity with him.

I saw Geoffrey no more that day. Rose’s
young’ friends soon arrived, and consoled both her
and me by their kind Sympathy and attentions.
One made an elegant cap to supply the loss of m
wig’; another strung a blue necklace to hide the
black mark round my throat; Rose herself put me
to bed, and placed a table by my bedside covered
with teacups, each, she told ne, containing: a differ-
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 57

ent medicine; and the young lady who had once
brought Miss Edgeworth to dine with me, charged
me to lie still and read “ Rosamond” till I was quite
recovered. |

Next morning’, as I lay contentedly performing
my new part of an invalid, I heard a confidential
conversation between Margaret and Geoffrey, in
which I was interested.

They were alone together, and she was taking
the opportunity to remonstrate with him on his un-
kind treatment of me.

“What was the harm?” said Geoffrey. “ A
doll is nothing but wood or bran , or some stupid
stuff; it can’t feel.”

« Of course,” answered Margaret, “we all know
that. It is wasteful and mischievous to spoil a
pretty toy; but I am not speaking now so much
for the sake of the doll as of Rose. Rose is not
made of any stupid stuff; she can feel. And what
is more, she can feel for other people as well as her-
self. She would never play you such an ill-natured
trick.” ,

“ 1 should not mind it if she did,” argued Geof-
frey ; “I am not such a baby.”

“You would not mind that particular thing,”
answered Margaret, “ because you do not care about
~ dolls; but you would mind her interfermg with

er
58 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

your pleasures, or injuring your property. You
would think it very ill-natured, for instance, if she
threw away that heap of nuts which you have
hoarded like a squirrel on your shelf of the closet.”

“ Nuts are not nonsense like dolls,” said he.
“ Besides, she may have as many of mine as she
likes. I tried to make her eat some yesterday.”

“ Yes, and half choked her by poking them into
her mouth, when she told you she did not want
them. She cares no more for nuts than you for
dolls. You would think it no kindness if she teazed
you to nurse her doll.”

“T should think not, indeed,” answered Geoffrey,
indignant at the very idea.

“Of course not. Kindness ig not-shewn by
forcing our own pleasures down other people’s
throats, but by trying to promote theirs. That is
really doing as we would be done by.” .

“ But doing as we would be done by is one’s
duty,” said Geoffrey.

“T fear it is a duty of which you seldom think,”
replied his cousin,

“Why, one can’t be thinking of duty in those
kind of things,” answered he.

“Why not?” asked Margaret.

“ Because they are such trifles; duties are great
thing's,”
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 59

“What sort of things do you consider to be
duties?” Margraret inquired.

“Oh, such things as letting’ oneself be tortured,
like Regulus ; or forgiving an enemy who has shot
poisoned arrows at one, like Coeur de Lion.”

“Well,” said Margaret smiling, “ such heroic
duties as those do not seem likely to fall im your
way just now, perhaps they never may. Our fel-
low-creatures are so kind to us, that we are seldom
called upon to fulfil any but small duties towards
them; or what you would consider such, for I can-
not allow any duty to be small, especially that of
doing as we would be done by. If we do not fulfil
that in trifles, we shall probably never fulfil it at all.
This is a serious thought, Geoffrey.”

Geoffrey looked up; and as he seemed inclined
to listen, Margaret continued talking to him kindly
‘but gravely, bringing many things before his mind
as duties which he had hitherto considered to be
matters of indifference. But Margaret would not
allow any thing to be a trifle in which one person
could give pain or pleasure, trouble or relief, annoy-
ance or comfort to another, or by which any one’s
own mind or habits could be either injured or im-
proved. She maintained that there was a right and
a wrong to every thing, and that right and wrong
could never be trifles, whether in great things or
60 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

small. By degrees the conversation turned upon
matters far too solemn to be repeated by a mere
plaything like myself; but I thought, as I heard
her, that it might be better to be a poor wooden
figure which could do neither right nor wrong’, than
a human being who neglected his appointed duties.
Geoffrey said little, but he shook hands with
Margaret when she had finished speaking, and I
noticed from that day forward a gradual improve-
ment in his conduct. Bad habits are not cured in
a minute, and he did not become all at once as
gentle and considerate as Willy, nor as kind and
helpful as Edward ; but he put himself in the right
road, and seemed in a fair way of overtaking’ them
in due time. He at once left off active mischief :
and if he could not avoid being occasionally trouble-
some, he at any rate cured himself of teazing people
on purpose. And it was remarkable how many
employments he found as soon as his mind was
disengaged from mischief. Instead of his dawdling:
about all the morning calling things stupid, and say-
ing he had nothing to do, all manner of pleasant
occupations seemed to start up in his path, as if
made to order for him, now that he had time to
attend to them. When he relinquished the plea-
sure of spoiling things, he acquired the far greater
pleasure of learning to make them. When Edward
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 61

was no longer afraid of trusting him with his tools,
it was wonderful what a carpenter he turned out.
When Margaret could venture to leave drawing ma-
terials within his reach, he began to draw capitally.
Good-natured Margaret gave him lessons, and said
she would never wish for a better scholar. He found
it was twice the pleasure to walk or play with
Edward when he was thought an acquisition i-
stead of a burden; and far more agreeable to have
Rose and Willy anxious for his company than wish-
ing to get rid of him. But the advantages were
not confined to himself; the whole house shared in
them : for his perpetual small annoyances had made
everybody uncomfortable, whereas now, by attention
to what he used to look upon as trifles, he found he
had the power of contributing his part towards the
happiness of his fellow-creatures, which is no trifle.
On the last day of the holidays, the young people
were all assembled in the schoolroom till it was time
for Edward and Geoffrey to start. While Edward
was arranging various matters with Willy, I heard
Geoffrey whisper to Margaret that he hoped she had
forgiven him for spoiling that drawing of hers. She
seemed at first really not to know what he meant; but
when she recollected it, she answered with a smile,
“Oh, my dear Geoffrey, I had forgiven and forgotten
it long ago. Pray never think of it again yourself.”
62 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

Geoffrey next went up to Rose and put a little
parcel into her hands. On opening’ it, she found a
box of very pretty bonbons in the shape of various
vegetables. When she admired them, he seemed
much pleased, and said that he had saved up his
money to buy them, in hopes she might like them
for her dolls’ feasts. Rose kissed and thanked him,
and said she only wished he could stay and help her
and her dolls to eat them. Every body took an
affectionate leave of Geoffrey, and Willy said he was
very sorry to lose him, and should miss him sadly.

Edward and Geoffrey returned to school, and
I never saw Geoffrey again ; but a constant corre-
spondence was kept up between him and his cousins,
and I often heard pleasant mention of his progress
and improvement.

Time passed on; what length of time I cannot
say, all seasons and their change being alike to me ;
but school-days and holidays succeeded one another,
and our family grew older in appearance and habits.
Rose gradually spent less time with me, and more
with her books and music, till at last, though she
still kept my house in order, she never actually
played with me, unless younger children came to
visit her, and then, indeed, I was as popular as
ever. But on a little friend’s one day remarking
that I had worn the same gown for a month, Rose
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 63

answered that she herself had the charge of her own
clothes now, and that what with keeping them in
order, and doing fancy-work as presents for her
friends, she found no time to work for dolls.

By and by, her time for needlework was fully
engaged in Geoffrey’s behalf. He was going to sea;
and Rose was making purses, slippers, portfolios,
and every thing she could think of as likely to
please him. Perhaps her most useful keepsake was
a sailor’s housewife; but many nice things were sent
him from every one of the family. I saw a trunk
full of presents packed and sent off. And when I
recollected my first acquaintance with him, I could
not but marvel over the chang that had taken place,
before books, drawing materials, and mathematical
instruments could have been chosen as the gifts best
suited to. his taste.

Edward used to come home from school as
merry and goad-humoured as ever, and growing
taller and stronger every holidays. Rose and Mar-
garet were as flourishing as he; but poor Willy
grew weaker, and thinner, and paler. Fresh springs
and summers brought him no revival, but as they
faded, he seemed to fade with them. He read more
than ever; and his sisters were frequently occupied
in reading and writing under his direction, for they
were anxious to help him in his pursuits. His papa
64 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS,

and mama sometimes said he studied too hard ;
and they used to sit with him, and try to amuse
him by conversation, when they wished to draw
him from his books. Doctors visited him, and pre-
scribed many remedies; and his mama gave him all
the medicines herself, and took care that every order
was implicitly obeyed. His father carried him up
and down stairs, and’ waited upon him as tenderly
as even Margaret; but he grew no better with all
their care. He was always gentle and patient, but
he appeared in less good spirits than formerly. He
seemed to enjoy going out in his wheel-cha;; more
than any thing’; but one day he observed that the
summer was fast coming to an end, and that then
he must shut himself up in his room, for that he
minded the cold more than he used.

“I wish we lived ina warmer country,” said
Rose; “ perhaps then you might get better.”

“TI do not know about living,” replied Willy.
“ England is the best country to five in; but I cer-
tainly should like to be out of the way of the cold
for this next winter.” |

“ Why do not you tell Papa so?” asked Rose.

“ Because I know very well he would take me a
Journey directly, however inconvenient it might be
to him.”

Rose said nothing more Just then, but she: took
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 65

the first opportunity of telling her father what had
passed ; and he said he was very glad indeed that
she had let him know.

From that day forward something more than
usual seemed in contemplation. Papa, Mama, and
Margaret were constantly consulting together, and
Edward, Rose, and Willy followed their example.
As for me, nobody had time to bestow a look or a
thought upon me; but I made myself happy by
looking at and thinking: of them.

One morning two doctors together paid Willy
a long visit. After they were gone, his papa and
mama came into his room.

“Well, my boy,” his father exclaimed in an
unusually cheerful tone, “ it is quite settled now;
Madeira is the place, and I hope you like the plan.”

“ Oh, papa,” said Willy, “is it really worth
while ?”

“ Of course it is worth while, a hundred times
over,” replied his father; “ and we will be off in
the first ship.”

“The doctors strongly advise it, and we have
all great hopes from it, my dear Willy,” said his
mother.

“Then so have I,” said Willy ; “ and, indeed, I
like it extremely, and I am very grateful to you.
The only thing I mind is, that you and my father

F
66 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

should have to leave home and make a long sea
voyage, when you do not like travelling, and Papa
has so much to keep him in England.”

“Qh, never mind me,” said his mother; “I
shall like nothing so well as travelling, if it does you
good.”

“ And never mind me,” said his father; “ there
is nothing of so much consequence to keep me in
England, as your health to take me out of it.”

“ Besides, my dear child,” said his mother, “ as
the change of climate is so strongly recommended
for you, it becomes a duty as well as a pleasure to
try it.”

“So make your mind easy, my boy,” added his
father; “and I will go and take our passage for
Madeira.”

The father left the room, and the mother re-
mained conversing with her sick child, whose spirits
were unusually excited. I scarcely knew him again.
He was generally slow and quiet, and rather de-
sponding about himself; but he now thought he
should certainly get well, and was so eager and
anxious to start without delay, that his mother had
some difficulty in reconciling him to the idea that no
ship would sail till next month. She also took oreat
pains to impress upon him the duty of resignation,
in case the attempt should fail, after all, in restoring
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 67

his health ; and she finally left him, not less hope-
ful, but more calm and contented with whatever
might befall him.

And now beg‘an the preparations for the voyage.
There was no time to spare, considering all that had
to be done. Every body was at work; and though
poor Willy himself could not do much to help, he
thought of nothing else. His common books and
drawings were changed for maps and voyages ;
the track to Madeira was looked up by him and
Rose every day, and sometimes two or three times
in the day, and every book consulted that contained
the least reference to the Madeira Isles.

Edward was an indefatigable packer. He was
not to be one of the travellers, as his father did not
choose to interrupt his school-education; but no
one was more active than he in forwarding the pre-
parations for the voyage, and no one more sanguine
about its results.

“We shall have Willy back,’ he would say,
“turned into a fine strong fellow, as good a
cricketer as Geoffrey or I, and a better scholar
than either of us.”

Margaret and Rose were to go; and Rose’s
young friends all came to take leave of her, and
talk over the plan, and find Madeira in the map,
and look at views of the island, which had been
68 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

given to Willy. And a sailor-friend, who had been
all over the world, used to come and describe Ma-
deira as one of the most beautiful of all the beau-
tiful places he had visited, and tell of its blue sea,
fresh and bright, without storms; its high mountains,
neither barren nor bleak; and its climate, so warm
and soft, that Willy might sit out all day in the beau-
tiful gardens under hedges of fragrant geraniums.
And when Willy talked of enjoying the gardens
while his stronger sisters were climbing: the hills,
there was more to be told of cradles borne upon
men’s shoulders, in which Willy could be carried
to the top of the highest hills as easily as his sisters
on their mountain ponies.

And now the packing was all finished, and
the luggage sent on board, and every body was
anxious to follow it; for the ship was reported as
quite comfortable, and the house was decidedly the
reverse. Margaret and her father had been on
board to arrange the cabins, accompanied by their
sailor-friend, who professed to know how to fit up a
berth better than any body. He had caused all
‘the furniture to be fastened » or, as he called it,
cleated to the floor, that it might not roll about
in rough weather. The books were secured in the
shelves by bars, and swinging tables hung from the
ceilmgs. Willy’s couch was in the most airy and
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 69

convenient place at the stern cabin window, and
there was an easy-chair for him when he should
be able to come out on deck. The ship was said
to be in perfect order, whereas the house was in
the utmost confusion and desolation : the carpets
rolled up, the pictures taken down, the mirrors
covered with muslin, the furniture and bookcases
with canvass; not a vestige left of former habits
and occupations, except me and my little mansion.
But in the midst of all the bustle, I was as calm
and collected as if nothing had happened. I sat
quietly in my arm-chair, staring composedly at all
that went on, contented and happy, though appa-
rently forgotten by every body. Indeed, such was
my placid, patient disposition, that Ido not believe
I should have uttered a sound or moved a muscle if
the whole of London had fallen about my little ears.

I did certainly sometimes wish to know what
was to become of me, and at last that information
was given me. .

The night before they sailed, Rose busied herself
with Sarah in packing up my house and furniture,
which were to be sent to a little girl who had long
considered it her greatest treat to play with them.
But Rose did not pack me up with my goods and
chattels. |

“ My poor old Seraphina,” said she, as she re-
70 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

moved me from my arm-chair, “ you and I have
passed many a happy day together, and I do not
like to throw you away as mere rubbish ; but the
new mistress of your house has already more dolls
than she knows what to do with. You are no great
beauty now, but I wish I knew any child who
would care for you.”

“ If you please to give her to me, Miss Rose,”
said Sarah, “my little niece, that your mama is
80 kind as to put to school, would thank you kindly,
and think her the greatest of beauties.”

“ Oh, then, take her by all means, Sarah,” re-
plied Rose; “and here is a little trunk to keep her
clothes in. I remember I used to be very fond of
that trunk ; so I dare say your little Susan will like
it, though it is not quite new.”

“ That she will, and many thanks to you, Miss.
Susan will be as delighted with it now, as you
were a year or two ago.”

So they wrapped me up in paper, and Rose hay-
ing given me a farewell kiss, which I would have
returned if I could, Sarah put me and my trunk
both into her great pocket; and on the same day
that my old friends embarked for their distant
voyage, I was carried to my new home.
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 71

CHAPTER III.

AND now began a third stage of my existence, and
a fresh variety of life.

I at first feared that I should have great diffi-
culty in reconciling myself to the change; and my
reflections in Sarah’s dark pocket were of the most
gloomy cast. I dreaded poverty and neglect. How
should I, accustomed to the refinements of polished
life and the pleasures of cultivated society, endure
to be tossed about with no home of my own, and
perhaps no one who really cared forme? I knew
that I was not in my first bloom, and it seemed un-
likely that a new acquaintance should feel towards
me like my old friend Rose, who had so long known
my value. Perhaps I might be despised ; perhaps
allowed to go ragged, perhaps even dirty! My
spirits sunk, and had I been human, I should have
wept.

But cheerful voices aroused me from this melan-
choly reverie, and I found myself restored to the
pleasant light in the hands of a goodhumoured-look-
ing little girl, whose reception of me soon banished
my fears. For, although altered since the days of
72 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

my introduction to the world in the bazaar, so that
my beauty was not quite what it had been, I still
retained charms enough to make me a valuable ac-
quisition to a child who had not much choice of toys ;
and my disposition and manners were as amiable
and pleasing as ever. My new mistress and I
soon loved each other dearly; and in her family
I learned that people might be equally happy and
contented under very different outward circum-
stances. ,

Nothing could well be more unlike my former
home than that to which I was now introduced.
Susan, my little mistress, was a child of about the
same age as Rose when she first bought me; but
Susan had no money to spend in toys, and very
little time to play with them, though she enjoyed
them as much as Rose herself. She gave me a
hearty welcome ; and though she could offer me no
furnished house, with its elegancies and comforts,
she assigned me the best place in her power—the
corner of a shelf on which she kept her books, slate,
needlework, and inkstand. And there I lived, sit-
ting on my trunk, and observing human life from a
new point of view. And though my dignity might
appear lowered in the eyes of the unthinking, I felt
that the respectability of my character was really
in no way diminished ; for I was able to fulfil the
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 73

great object of my existence as well as ever, by
giving innocent pleasure, and being useful in my
humble way.

No other dolls now visited me; but I was not
deprived of the enjoyments of inanimate society, for
I soon struck up an intimate acquaintance with an -
excellent Pen in the inkstand by my side, and we
passed our leisure hours very pleasantly in commu-
nicating to each other our past adventures. His
knowledge of life was limited, having resided in that
inkstand, and performed all the writing of the fa-
mily, ever since he was a quill. But his expe-
rience was wise and virtuous; and he could bear
witness to many an industrious effort at improve-
ment, in which he had been the willmg mstrument ;
and to many a hard struggle for honesty and inde-
pendence, which figures of his writing had recorded.
I liked to watch the good Pen at his work when the
father of the family spent an hour in the evening in
teaching Susan and her brothers to write; or when
the careful mother took him in hand to help her in
balancing her accounts, and ascertaining that she
owed no one a penny, before she ventured upon any
new purchase. Then my worthy friend was in his
glory; and it was delightful to see how he enjoyed
his work. He had but one fault, which was a
slight tendency to splutter; and as he was obliged
74 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

to keep that under restraint while engaged in
writing, he made himself amends by a little praise
of himself, when relating his exploits to a sympa-
thising friend like myself. On his return with the
inkstand to the corner of my shelf, he could not re-
sist sometimes boasting when he had not made a
smgle blot; or confessing to me, in perfect confi-
dence, how much the thinness of Susan’s upstrokes,
or the thickness of her downstrokes, was owing’ to
the clearness of his slit or the fineness of his nib.

The family of which we made part lived fru-
gally and worked hard: but they were healthy and
happy. The father with his boys went out early
in the morning to the daily labour by which they
maintained the family. The mother remained at
home, to take care of the baby and do the work of
the house. She was the neatest and most careful
person I ever saw, and she brought up her daughter
Susan to be as notable as herself

Susan was an industrious little girl, and in her
childish way worked almost as hard as her mother.
She helped to sweep the house, and nurse the baby,
and mend the clothes, and was as busy as a bee.
But she was always tidy; and though her clothes
were often old and shabby, I never saw them dirty
or ragged. Indeed, I must own that, in point of
neatness, Susan was even superior to my old friend
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. vas)

Rose. Rose would break her strings, or lose her
buttons, or leave holes in her gloves, till reproved
by her mama for untidiness: but Susan never for-
got that “a stitch in time saves nine,” and the
stitch was never wanting.

She used to go to school for some hours every
day: and I should have liked to go with her, and
help her in her studies, especially when I found
that she was learning the multiplication-table, and
I remembered how useful I had been to Rose in
that very lesson; but dolls were not allowed at
school, and I was obliged to wait patiently for
Susan’s company till she had finished all her busi-
ness, both at school and at home.

She had so little time to bestow upon me, that
at first I began to fear that I should be of no use to
her. The suspicion was terrible; for the wish to be
useful has been the great idea of my life. It was
my earliest hope, and it will be my latest pleasure.
I could be happy under almost any change of cir-
cumstances; but as long’ as a splinter of me re-
mains, I should never be able to reconcile myself
to the degradation of thinking that I had been of
NO Use.

But I soon found I was in no danger of what I
so much dreaded. In fact, I seemed likely to be
even more useful to Susan than to Rose. Before I
6 ( THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

had been long in the house, she said one evening
that she had an hour to spare, and that she would
make me some clothes.

“Well and good,” answered her mother ; “ only
be sure to put your best work in them. If you
mind your work, the doll will be of great use to
you, and you can play without wasting your time.”

This was good hearing for Susan and me, and
she spent most of her leisure in working for me.
While she was thus employed, I came down from
my shelf, and was treated with as much considera-
tion as when Rose and her companions waited at
my table.

A great change took place in my wardrobe.
Rose had always dressed me in gay silks and satins,
without much regard to under clothing; for, she
said, as my gowns must be sewn on, what did any
petticoats signify? So she sewed me up, and I
looked very smart; and if there happened to be any
unseemly cobbling, she hid it with beads or span-
gles. Once I remember a very long stitch baffled
all her contrivances, and she said I must pretend it
was a new-fashioned sort of embroidery.

But Susan scorned all make-shifts. Nothing
could have been more unfounded than my fears of
becoming ragged or dirty. My attire was plain and
suited to my station, but most scrupulously finished.
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. V0

She saw no reason why my clothes should not be
made to take off and on, as well as if I had been a
doll three feet high. So I had my plain gingham
gowns with strings and buttons; and my shifts
and petticoats run and felled, gathered and whipped,
hemmed and stitched, like any lady’s; and every
thing was neatly marked with my initial 5. But
what Susan and I were most particularly proud of,
was a pair of stays. They were a long time in
hand, for the fitting them was a most difficult job ;
but when finished, they were such curiosities of
needlework, that Susan’s neat mother herself used
to shew off the stitching and the eyelet-holes to
every friend that came to see her.

Among them, Sarah the housemaid, who was
sister to Susan’s father, often called in to ask after
us all. She was left in charge of the house where
my former friends had lived, and they sometimes
sent her commissions to execute for them. Then
she was sure to come and bring us news of the fa-
mily, as she always called Rose and her relations.
Sometimes she told us that Master William was a
little better; sometimes that she heard Miss Rose
was very much grown: she had generally some-
thing to tell that we were all glad to hear. One
evening’, soon after my apparel was quite completed,
I was sitting on my trunk, as pleased with myself
73 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

as Susan was with me, when Sarah’s head peeped
in at the door. |

“ Clood evening to you all,” said she; “ I thought
as I went by you would like to hear that I have a
letter from the family, and all’s well. I have got a
pretty little job to do for Master Willy. He is to
have a set of new shirts sent out directly, made of
very fine thin calico, because his own are too thick.
' See, here is the stuff I have been buying for them.”

“ Tt is beautiful calico, to be sure,” said Susan’s
mother; “ but such fine stuff as that will want very
neat work. I am afraid you will hardly be able to
make them yourself.”

“ Why, no,” answered Sarah, smiling and shak-
ing her head. “ T am sorry to say, there comes in
my old trouble, not having learned to work neatly
when I was young. Take warning by me, Susan,
and mind your needlework now-a-days. If I could
work as neatly as your mother, my mistress would
have made me lady’s maid and housekeeper by this
time. But I could not learn any but rough work,
more’s the pity: so I say again, take warning by
me, little niece 5 take pattern by your mother.”

Susan looked at me and smiled, as much as to
say, “ I have taken pattern by her ;” but she had
not time to answer, for Sarah continued, addressing
the mother :










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“ How I wish you could have time to do this
job! for it would bring you in a pretty penny, and
I know my mistress would be pleased with your
work ; but they are to be done very quickly, im time
for the next ship, and I do not see that you could
get through them with only one pair of hands.”

“ We have two pair of hands,” cried Susan;
“ here are mine.”

“ Ah, but what can they do?” asked Sarah,
“ and how can they do it? It is not enough to
have four fingers and a thumb. Hands must be
handy.”

“ And so they are,” answered Susan’s mother.
“ See whether any hands could do neater work than
that.” And she pointed me out to Sarah.

Sarah took me up, and turned me from side to
side. Then she looked at my hems, then at my
seams, then at my gathers, while I felt truly proud
and happy, conscious that not a long stitch could
be found in either.

“ Well to be sure!” exclaimed she, after examin-
ing me all over; “do you mean that all that is
really Susan’s own work ?”

“ Every stitch of it,” replied the mother; “ and
I think better need not be put into any shirt,
though Master William does deserve the best of
every thing.”
80 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

“ You never said a truer word, neither for Mas-
ter William nor for little Susan,” replied Sarah ;
“and I wish you joy, Susan, of being able to help
your mother so nicely, for now I can leave you the
job to do between you.”

She then told them what was to be the payment
for the work, which was a matter I did not my-
self understand, though I could see that it gave
them great satisfaction.

The money came at a most convenient time, to
help in fitting out Susan’s brother Robert for. a
place which had been offered to him in the country.
It was an excellent place; but there were several
thing's, as his mother well knew, that poor Robert
wanted at starting, but would not mention for fear
his parents should distress themselves to obtain them
for him. Both father and mother had been saving
for the purpose, without saying any thing about it
to Robert; but they almost despaired of obtaining
more than half the things they wanted, till this
little sum of money came into their hands so op-

portunely.
, The father was in the secret, but Robert could
scarcely believe his eyes, when one evening his
mother and Susan laid on the table before him, one
by one, all the useful articles he wished to possess.
At first he seemed almost more vexed than pleased,
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 81

for he thought of the saving and the slaving that his
mother must have gone through to gain them ; but
when she told him how much of them was due to
his little sister’s neatness and industry, and how
easy the work had been when shared between them,
he was as much pleased as Susan herself.

We were all very happy that evening, including
even the humble friends on the shelf; for I sat on my
trunk, and related to the Pen how useful I had been
in teaching Susan to work; and the worthy Pen
stood bolt upright in his inkstand, and confided to
me with honest pride, that Robert had been chosen
to his situation on account of his excellent writing.

Time passed on, and I suppose we all grew older,
as I noticed from time to time various changes that
seemed to proceed from that cause. The baby, for
instance, though still gomg by the name of “ Baby,”
had become a strong able-bodied child, running alone,
and very difficult to keep out of mischief. The most
effectual way of keeping her quiet was to place me
in her hands, when she would sit on the floor nurs-
ing me by the hour together, while her mother and
sister were at work.

Susan was become a tall strong girl, more nota-
ble than ever, and, like Rose before her, she gradu-
ally bestowed less attention on me}; 80 that I was
beginning to feel myself neglected, till on a certain

G
“82 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

birthday of her little sister’s, she declared her inten-
tion of making me over altogether to the baby-sister
for a birthday present. Then I once more rose into
importance, and found powers which I thought
declining’, still undiminished. The baby gave a
scream of delieht when I was placed in her hand as
her own. Till then she had only possessed one toy
in the world, an old wooden horse, in comparison
with which I seemed in the full bloom of youth and
beauty. This horse, which she called Jack, had
lost not merely the ornaments of mane and tail,
but his head, one fore and one hind leg; so that
nothing remained of the once noble quadruped but °
a barrel with the paint scratched off, rather in-
securely perched upon a stand with wheels. But
he was a faithful animal, and did his work to the
last. The baby used to tie me on to his barrel,
and Jack and I were drawn round and round the
kitchen with as much satisfaction to our mistress,
as in the days when I shone forth in my gilt coach
with its four prancing piebalds.

But the baby’s treatment of me, though ovrati-
fying from its cordiality, had a roughness and want
of ceremony that affected my enfeebled frame. I
could not conceal from myself that the infirmities I
had observed in other dolls were gradually gaining
ground upon me. Nobody ever said a harsh word
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 83

to me, or dropped a hint of my being less pretty
than ever, and the baby called me “ Beauty,
beauty,” twenty times a day ; but still 1 knew
very well that not only had my rosy colour and
fine hair disappeared, but I had lost the whole of
one leg and half of the other, and the lower joints of
both my arms. In fact, as my worthy friend the Pen
observed, both he and I were reduced to stumps.

The progress of decay caused me no regret, for
I felt that I had done my work, and might now
gracefully retire from public life, and resign my
place to newer dolls. But though contented with
my lot, I had still one anxious wish ungratified.
The thought occupied my mind incessantly ; and
the more I dwelt upon it, the stronger grew the
hope that I might have a chance of seeing my old
first friends once more. This was now my only re-
waining care.

News came from them from time to time.
Sarah brought word that Master William was bet-
ter ; that they had left Madeira, and gone travelling
about elsewhere. Then that the father had been in
England upon business, and gone back again ; that
Mr. Edward had been over to foreign parts one
summer holidays to see his family, and on his re-
turn had come to give her an account of them.

Sarah was always very bustling when she had
84 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

any news to bring of the family, but one day she

called on us in even more flurry than usual. She
was quite out of breath with eagerness.

“ Sit down and rest a minute before you begin
to speak,” said her quiet sister-in-law. “ There
must be some great news abroad. It seems almost
too much for you.”

Susan nodded, and began to unpack a great
parcel she had brought with her.

“Tt don’t seem bad news, to judge by your
face,” said the other; for now that Sarah had re-
covered breath, her smiles succeeded one another so
fast, that she seemed to think words superfluous.

“T puess, I guess,” cried Susan. “ They are
coming’ home.”

“ They are, indeed,” answered Sarah at last;
“they are coming home as fast as steam-engines
can bring them: and here is work more than enough
for you and mother till they come. Miss Margaret
is going to be married, and you are to make the
wedding~-clothes.”

So saying, she finished unpacking her parcel,
and produced various fine materials which required
Susan’s neatest work.

“ These are for you to begin with,” said she,
“ but there is more coming.” She then read a let-
ter from the ladies with directions about the needle-
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 85

work, to which Susan and her mother listened with
great attention. Then Sarah jumped up, saying
she must not let the grass grow under her feet, for
she had plenty to do. The whole house was to be
got ready ; and she would not have a thing out of
its place, nor a speck of dust to be found, for any
money. .

Susan and her mother lost no time either; their
needles never seemed to stop: and I sat on the
baby’s lap watching them, and enjoying the happy
anticipation that my last wish would soon be ac-
complished.

But though Susan was as sndustrious as a girl
could be, and just now wished to work harder than
ever, she was not doomed to “all work and no
play ;” for her father took care that his children
should enjoy themselves at proper times. In sum-
mer evenings, after he came home from his work,
they used often to go out all together for a walk in
the nearest park, when he and his wife would rest
under the trees, and read over Robert’s last letter,
while the children amused themselves. Very much
we all enjoyed it, for even 1 was seldom left behind.
Susan would please the baby by dressing me in my
pest clothes for the walk; and the oood-natured
father would laugh merrily at us, and: remark how
much good the fresh air did me. We were all very
86 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

happy; and when my thoughts travelled to other
scenes and times, I sometimes wondered whether
my former friends enjoyed themselves as much in
their southern gardens, as this honest family im
their English fields.

Our needlework was finished and sent to Sarah’s
care to await Margaret’s arrival, for which we were
very anxious.

On returning home one evening after our walk,
we passed, as we often did, through the street in
which I had formerly lived. Susan was leading her
little sister, who, on her part, clutched me in a way
very unlike the gentleness which Susan bestowed
upon her. On arriving at the well-known house, we
saw Sarah standing at the area-gate. We stopped
to speak to her.

“ When are they expected?” asked Susan’s
mother.

“They may be here any minute,” answered
Sarah : “ Mr. Edward has just brought the news.”

The street-door now opened, and two gentlemen
came out and stood on the steps. One was a tall
fine-looking boy, grown almost into a young man;
but I could not mistake the open good-humoured
countenance of my old friend Edward. The other
was older, and I recognised him as the traveller
who used to describe Madeira to Willy.
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 87

They did not notice us, for we stood back so as
not to intrude, and their minds were evidently fully
occupied with the expected meeting.

We all gazed intently down the street, every
voice hushed in eager interest. Even my own little
mistress, usually the noisiest of her tribe, was silent
as myself. It was a quiet street and a quiet time,
and the roll of the distant carriages would scarcely
have seemed to break the silence, had it not been for
our intense watching, and hoping that the sound of
every wheel would draw nearer. We waited long,
and were more than once disappointed by carriages
passing us and disappearing at the end of the street.
Edward and his friend walked up and down, east
and west, north and south, in hopes of descrying the
travellers in the remotest distance. But after each
unavailing walk, they took up their post again on
the steps.

At last a travelling carriage laden with luggage
turned the nearest corner, rolled towards us, and
stopped at the house. The two gentlemen rushed
down the steps, flung open the carriage-door, and
for some moments all was hurry and agitation, and
I could distinguish nothing.

I much feared that I should now be obliged to
go home without actually seeing my friends, for
they had passed so quickly from the carriage to the
88 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

house, and there had been so much confusion and
excitement during those few seconds, that my tran-
sient glance scarcely allowed me to know one from
another; but in course of time Sarah came out again,
and asked Susan’s father to help in unloading the
carriage, desiring us to sit meanwhile in the house-
keeper’s room. So we waited till the business was
finished, when, to my great joy, we were summoned
to the sitting-room, and I had the happiness of see-
ing all the family once more assembled.

I was delighted to find how much less they were
altered than I. I had been half afraid that I might
gee one without a leg, another without an arm, ac-
cording to the dilapidations which had taken place
in my own frame; but strange to say, their sensi-
tive bodies, which felt every change of weather,
shrunk from a rough touch, and bled at the scratch
of a pin, had outlasted mine, though insensible to
pain or sickness. There stood the father, scarcely
altered ; his hair perhaps a little more grey, but his
eyes as quick and bright as ever. And there was
the mother, still grave and gentle, but looking less
sad and careworn than in the days of Willy’s con-
stant illness. And there was, first m interest to me,
my dear mistress, Rose, as tall as Margaret, and as
handsome as Edward. I could not imagine her
condescending to play with me now. Margaret
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 89

looked just as in former times, good and eraceful ;
but she stood a little apart with the traveller friend
by her side, and I heard Rose whisper to Susan that
the wedding was to take place in a fortnight. They
were only waiting for Geoffrey to arrive. His ship
was daily expected, and they all wished him to be
present.

And Willy, for whose sake the long journey had
been made, how was he! Were all their hopes
realised? Edward shook his head when Susan’s
mother asked that question ; but Willy was there
to answer it himself. He was standing by the
window, leaning on a stick, it is true, but yet able
to stand. As he walked across the room, I saw
that he limped slightly, but could move about where
he pleased. He till looked thin and pale, but the
former expression of suffering and distress had dis-
appeared, and his countenance was as cheerful as
his manner. I could see that he was very much
better, though not in robust health like Edward’s.
He thanked Susan’s mother for her kind inquiries,
and said that, though he had not become all that
his sanguine brother hoped, he had gained health
more than enough to satisfy himself; that he was
most thankful for his present comfort and independ-
ence; and that ‘¢ he was not quite so strong as
other people, he hoped he should at any rate make
90 THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS.

a good use of the strength that was allowed him.
Turning to Edward, who still looked disappomted,
he continued: “‘ Who could have ventured to hope,
Edward, three years ago, that you and I should
now be going to college together?” And then even
Edward smiled and seemed content. |

As we turned to leave the room, Susan and her
little sister lingered for a moment behind the others, -
and the child held me up towards Rose. Rose
started, and exclaimed, “Is it possible? It really
is my poor old Seraphina. Who would have thought
of her being: still in existence? What a good, use-
ful doll she has been! I really must give her a
kiss once more for old friendship’s sake.”

So saying’, she kissed both me and the baby, and
we left the house.

And now there remains but little more for me
to relate. My history and my existence are fast
drawing to an end; my last wish has been gratified
by my meeting with Rose, and my first hope real-
ised by her praise of my usefulness. She has since
given the baby a new doll, and I am finally laid
on the shelf, to enjoy, in company with my re-
spected friend the Pen, a tranquil old age. When
he, like myself, was released from active work, and
replaced by one of Mordan’s patent steel, he kindly
offered to employ his remaining leisure in writing
THE DOLL AND HER FRIENDS. 91

from my dictation, and it is in compliance with his
advice that I have thus ventured to record my €X-
perience.

That experience has served to teach me that, as _
all inanimate things have some destined use, so all
rational creatures have some appointed duties, and
are happy and well employed while fulfilling them.

With this reflection, I bid a orateful farewell to
those young patrons of my race who have kindly
taken an interest in my memoirs, contentedly await-
ing the time when the small remnant of my frame
shall be reduced to dust, and my quiet existence
sink into a still more profound repose.

THE END.

LONDON *

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cannot fail to delight as well as to benefit the young.” —Spectator.

————

GLIMPSES OF NATURE,

AND OpsgcTs OF INTEREST DESCRIBED, DURING A VISIT TO
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THE YOUNG LADIES’ READER:

With observations on Reading aloud, and Remarks prefixed to
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Contents. —NARRATIVE AND DESCRIPTION. — ILLUSTRATIONS OF CHuaA-
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FELLOWS. By the Author of “ Ruopa,” &c., with a Fron-
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————

RHODA: OR, THE EXCELLENCE OF CHARITY.
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SUCCESSORS TO J. HARRIS. 7

SHORT AND SIMPLE PRAYERS,

roR THE Use oF YOUNG CHILDREN, WITH Hymns. Second
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«¢ Well adapted to the — of children,—beginning with the simplest
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By the same Author.
MAMMA’S BIBLE STORIES,

FOR HER LITTLE Boys AND Girzs, adapted to the capacities of

very young children. Seventh Edition, with 12 Engravings,
Piice 3s. 6d. cloth.

A SEQUEL TO MAMMA’S BIBLE STORIES.
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BIBLE SCENES ;

or, SuNDAY EMPLOYMENT ror Very YounG CHILDREN.
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History written in Simple Language. In a neat Box. Price
3s. Gd. ; or dissected as a Puzzle, price 6s. 6d-

First SERIES : HISTORY OF JOSEPH.
SxEcoND SERIES : HISTORY OF OUR SAVIOUR.
TuirRD SERIES: HISTORY OF MOSES.

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————_—

ARITHMETIC FOR YOUNG CHILDREN,

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————

MIDDLETON'S LETTER FROM ROME,

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8 GRANT AND CRIFFITH,

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EMILY’S REWARD ;

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TT

TRUE STORIES FROM ENGLISH HISTORY,

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SCENES IN FOREIGN LANDS;

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SUCCESSORS TO J. HARRIS. 9

OUTLINES of IRISH HISTORY : written for the Use of
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W ARS of the JEWS, as related by Joszpuus ; adapted to the
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STORIES from the OLD and NEW TESTAMENTS, on an
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HOW TO BE HAPPY ; or, Fairy Gifts: to which is added, a
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a capeisiianeniannanannnnninimnnnacccentn tit ite
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SUCCESSORS TO J. HARRIS. il

a

The following Works are handsomely bound in cloth ; with numerous
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ANDERSEN’S (H. C.), NIGHTINGALE AND OTHER
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BIBLE ILLUSTRATIONS; or, A Description of Manners and
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Bible,” &c. Price 4s.

<¢ This volume will be found unusually rich in the species of information so
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THE BRITISH HISTORY BRIEFLY TOLD, and a Descrip-
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Embellished with full-length Portraits of the Sovereigns of England in
their proper Costumes, and 18 other Engravings. Price 4s. 6d.

CHIT CHAT; or, Short Tales in Short Words. By a Morusr.
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CONVERSATIONS on the LIFE of JESUS CHRIST, for
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Engravings, the designs principally from the old Masters. Price 2s. 6d.
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EASY LESSONS; or, Leading-Strings to Knowledge. In Three
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FACTS to CORRECT FANCIES ; or, Short Narratives compiled
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FANNY AND HER MAMMA; or, Reading Lessons for Chil-
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THE FARM: a New Account of Rural Toils and Produce. By
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12 GRANT AND CRIFFITH,

i sesesusseensiemeesneiaianannaianiaceanaiiinaaissiaaiannn nt

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THE JUVENILE RAMBLER; or, Sketches and Anecdotes of
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KEY to KNOWLEDGE; or, Things in Common Use simply
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THE LADDER to LEARNING: a Collection of Fables, Original
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MAMMA’S BIBLE STORIES, for her Little Boys and Girls,
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THE MINE; or, Subterranean Wonders. An Account of the
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Description of the most important in all parts of the World. By the
late Rev. Isaac TayLor. Sixth Edition, with numerous corrections
and additions, by Mrs. Loupon. With 45 New Woodcuts and 16
Steel Engravings. Price 4s.
SUCCESSORS TO J. HARRIS. 13

eee LLL ALAA

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THE NATURAL HISTORY of QUADRUPEDS. By F.
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THE NATURAL HISTORY of BIRDS. By F. Ssoszrt.
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PAUL PRESTON’S VOYAGES, TRAVELS, AND RE-
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THE PICTURESQUE PRIMER; or, Useful Matter made
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SHORT TALES, written for Children. By Dame Truelove and
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THE SHIP; a description of different kinds of Vessels, the Origin
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STORIES of EDWARD and his LITTLE FRIENDS. With 16
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STORIES selected from the HISTORY of FRANCE, chrono-
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SUCCESSORS TO J. HARRIS. 15

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HOME AMUSEMENTS; a
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DAME TROT AND HER CAT. *

GRaAcIOSA AND PERCINET.

GRANDMAMMA’S RHYMES for the
Nursery. With superior wood-
cuts. Plain.

History OF THE AprLE PIE.
Written by Z- With DaME
DEARLOVE’S DITTIES.

History OF THE Hovusrt THAT
Jack BUILT.

INFANT'S FRIEND (The); oF,
Easy Reading Lessons.

INFANT’S GRAMMAR (The) ; or,
‘A Pienic Party of the Parts of

































































Speech. ries in Words of One Syllable.
Lirrte Raymes For LITTLE WHITTINGTON AND His Cart.
FoLks. Worp Boox (The); oF; Stories




Monxzy’s FROLIC (The), &e. chiefly in Three Letters.

Lonpon : Printed by S. & J. Bentiey and HENRY FLEY, Bangor House, Shoe Lane.


STATLER TE ELSES RS TT TESTA STS Lae caese eesteeaeee eeeee



Fe nt











Package Processing Log















Package Processing Log







12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM Error Log for UF00001948_00001 processed at: 12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM cover1.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM cover1.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00001.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00001.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00004.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00004.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00005.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00005.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00006.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00006.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00007.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00007.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00008.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00008.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00036.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00036.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:59 PM 00043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:00 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM back2.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM back2.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:01 PM spine.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:02 PM spine.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:44:02 PM












xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081023_AAAAYI' PACKAGE 'UF00001948_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-10-26T08:05:26-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:35:22-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299142; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-14T23:21:46-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '1497273' DFID 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMNU' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' ff1e63155872d5b4dc67a0c9a034fbc7
'SHA-1' 485795c8cd6fec675ee2b3a6c1a4609f5e238d7b
EVENT '2011-10-30T19:52:39-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'111647' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMNV' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
316fe6bb73934ebb32e493111c43f519
81f0bf59c5473e329f69b011d4f712dd829db4d5
'2011-10-30T19:51:32-04:00'
describe
'4413' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMNW' 'sip-files00001.pro'
9745a39331bc154ef1b11f62733fcee6
44d1890fd648b6df5c8a6f539e2dbb99633bed51
'2011-10-30T19:52:04-04:00'
describe
'29522' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMNX' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
7bf27a313af939cc9efc7afcac85c789
8dc9c7cfb7e64aa1a7df583baa34d27a1d9b40fc
'2011-10-30T19:52:26-04:00'
describe
'11995183' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMNY' 'sip-files00001.tif'
dab117ce09cd1cbfda38d6d0da1b2caf
5a668c020a6cb8b1b365cd74b02035d25872a636
'2011-10-30T19:53:50-04:00'
describe
'424' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMNZ' 'sip-files00001.txt'
6276708988fc3c69407b4298c88efd43
ac52532bdd6a518280be96dfc15de90d6ffab6e0
'2011-10-30T19:54:06-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'7463' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOA' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
ef856104418ab2dedddce433db7cf69d
40685fa4e91eea100542195f6b0dd1d02f09f090
'2011-10-30T19:50:57-04:00'
describe
'1491162' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOB' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
e4195c1658033457e8242a729b4e46ca
f545290f0143cc0852a851e8a50920288113c92f
'2011-10-30T19:51:07-04:00'
describe
'47056' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOC' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
aa5bbe8b6770c93ab6b62f8cffff4ece
94a4d158865a02657ba9327b9d1682b1ded0e96f
'2011-10-30T19:52:42-04:00'
describe
'8308' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOD' 'sip-files00004.pro'
5deb595ea396adeca51f775b0b22ca2c
8e9ac892f9950a400658aae9f84d7bd393560f3e
'2011-10-30T19:53:36-04:00'
describe
'14598' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOE' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
f4615360dd6c2358f199d52798741a2c
3d27b4869c09bec9747649bb1b75340f8cad3838
'2011-10-30T19:54:20-04:00'
describe
'11946311' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOF' 'sip-files00004.tif'
079e3b363c86296d6517c5c3e1ee39dd
5425db735734b971c25dfd493c51f9571494afe3
'2011-10-30T19:53:11-04:00'
describe
'532' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOG' 'sip-files00004.txt'
34c21765229213e35bfd2731d96672a4
06361a2dfc20aa59b751c55040705221f4c248eb
'2011-10-30T19:51:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4421' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOH' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
d04bbe1bd3f3e6f1c4c292416a9d9c04
ae1f50175ffc5ca79d19032d05b51ab4180eb6ba
'2011-10-30T19:51:00-04:00'
describe
'1256333' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOI' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
8573f76ec1c0ae3d9bd844df14623663
d3d1d0f756da008cd6a64d6d12ce1e50699a5ffa
'2011-10-30T19:51:33-04:00'
describe
'18092' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOJ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
ab980a0d8e3725942196c16a5f58c5d4
b07b7ed9ec8ea0172e5aca38725ea801a36d8d80
'2011-10-30T19:53:23-04:00'
describe
'2198' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOK' 'sip-files00005.pro'
4d0969d3da6117507e3cacda7286ed0b
694d5760ea3363e39dc53a2650ecf834a817a2ae
describe
'4844' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOL' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
029555f4796d94cbdf0489beb5a64d54
6bc08109d318764f45a1cca3c82d0ded70e61f47
'2011-10-30T19:51:52-04:00'
describe
'10311943' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOM' 'sip-files00005.tif'
d7bf587769c5d38c4e2126e1cee800f8
876ad1409b948f56d2632b5d672bbab2300230f1
'2011-10-30T19:52:08-04:00'
describe
'169' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMON' 'sip-files00005.txt'
5981661720d0e1e6ceb924cc99320974
728566c94cc229528d48e30ee48d384d4d51f229
'2011-10-30T19:53:30-04:00'
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOO' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
5c84eabb0368050ee3a2aca1ec47a851
0d86e9abeebf451f81cb56a19b636cc9a0db3ece
'2011-10-30T19:50:54-04:00'
describe
'1529328' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOP' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
a50b6490654b8d9b1a2b65ab6c47f71f
9f77e4bc4b996d75a4d6e9b04c4b382342fe2d9a
'2011-10-30T19:51:47-04:00'
describe
'47567' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOQ' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
1d83d40c686885dcd172e18bdc79de5c
6cff43f6d5673e5276be37e489d88055d2e07efc
'2011-10-30T19:51:19-04:00'
describe
'13735' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOR' 'sip-files00006.pro'
d7746d199d430920268a574c0b6a2c80
ef2f60850947d5169c5236bc5b7e39fd5522e705
'2011-10-30T19:52:21-04:00'
describe
'15709' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOS' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
1b2501a5d2afd243b20f7a582cc7b820
25a4f7bfda8f4f99e2d3674bbb569cc140d0f32f
'2011-10-30T19:50:51-04:00'
describe
'12251811' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOT' 'sip-files00006.tif'
002955a1e5f5bd9e0123a86a58e1eba8
8824e49b84334b456b22d0e7b7f56702563399bc
'2011-10-30T19:50:52-04:00'
describe
'576' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOU' 'sip-files00006.txt'
13655c803cfd9912035fe57c1e3a7c18
28e3aca41e9cbb5b6e64b34b0752697cc23b8f50
'2011-10-30T19:53:12-04:00'
describe
'4205' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOV' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
695e3e330da9e05b650b0aba91685385
db52cf57cb4a656fb6e87b4c9121a9ec9821ad3c
'2011-10-30T19:51:24-04:00'
describe
'1209521' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOW' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
bbcfdd58141eae3ac2434ecb4ab3f142
83adf4d1855005a35320b29bbf2db4e783a92c01
'2011-10-30T19:53:31-04:00'
describe
'15443' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOX' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
87e03a99babeeab897d0adff2ab361c3
b3a3e705e7d35abd3a14796f78f7bf753c7fb27e
'2011-10-30T19:52:53-04:00'
describe
'307' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOY' 'sip-files00007.pro'
7b26341005bf152b846ad1ebfca2ce2a
dc08a6c84ff60b1c0090cb203c63c8a74f05c510
'2011-10-30T19:53:14-04:00'
describe
'3984' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMOZ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
39488811ca1ae89546e2510ad04db74d
292cb2a44447c598a1a5e1c952aa7e5992c90162
describe
'10180879' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPA' 'sip-files00007.tif'
cb41f185f718de5d79bd9de65e5d6280
319826099daa8e2e0d055c938ac7e6864dfd1636
'2011-10-30T19:54:01-04:00'
describe
'383' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPB' 'sip-files00007.txt'
14bdfc32116e633bf33eb4214a8742b9
1e89e017de7d9652a8d723db44d0d100f21f20da
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPC' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
80a0e433e8a182db8ca62f2ac1d8312f
dd981edd0e8e81e2d8917d702bd8c36ce144f56a
describe
'1365107' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPD' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
97ccd6c8ac5e4fe52c0a3a01513654fc
38b5bb8c0a8cb1c075c200dbc889130dd2e72c21
'2011-10-30T19:54:14-04:00'
describe
'90479' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPE' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
736e1cd51f9666fd6794e5550e3e16b9
b87860fd0db6227bc1cfcb5d82a2a2b735467fe1
'2011-10-30T19:52:07-04:00'
describe
'24660' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPF' 'sip-files00008.pro'
4157286a32c8472a6d13d22370784163
71354caf4f4d656c4137160b2bac0258ef0401d4
'2011-10-30T19:52:00-04:00'
describe
'32619' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
aaa7605c881c4d4e3464270edcf9ca06
adb6e256ada20c7ab50a3c92a2320f848c09ff35
'2011-10-30T19:53:51-04:00'
describe
'10931611' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPH' 'sip-files00008.tif'
5c88fa9ef855c5573c6347bf4c4acc50
de5cfbcd2b099eec2c5229b9aa58f792b3174a36
'2011-10-30T19:52:05-04:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPI' 'sip-files00008.txt'
947b49f5edc590b9f4a3f03bd73fd2d7
cd679ebd0aee235781ef6ddcca493f4656377c85
'2011-10-30T19:51:26-04:00'
describe
'8652' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPJ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
66a6f4bef168d8bf40fb0d6e23ae17b4
68bbe8593ae7d60e119aa0730616c3fd624047b5
'2011-10-30T19:51:18-04:00'
describe
'1349960' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPK' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
7ea0330d7996dd2dbbcb775b7189c521
45d20bab8e9fff323fdd4a1c35b349b03824d5a9
'2011-10-30T19:53:40-04:00'
describe
'109536' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPL' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
cd72754c0df22690374143c99c7f2e33
a7bdd2063d5d2281a2bda80f7c70fe86837fe7ee
'2011-10-30T19:51:34-04:00'
describe
'33726' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPM' 'sip-files00009.pro'
532d5e090b6ea0037037d1d346f1c73d
f71bd19365fedaac6677ffd86313b1c0c362dcdd
'2011-10-30T19:53:49-04:00'
describe
'39989' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPN' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
6423de8d9752deede18d4075970d1410
ca46e479db68f5eabe8e7d7a7a429500155d60cd
'2011-10-30T19:54:47-04:00'
describe
'10810163' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPO' 'sip-files00009.tif'
cca2ace77e36eb3b82e577132ed075a1
c4e36dd618b54ff0712de8aa28edda34ad10db31
'2011-10-30T19:50:56-04:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPP' 'sip-files00009.txt'
29642d6dab487a621daaaa2e37d40171
96b06a178a96c6250ff6f9d8e08d8b446433505c
'2011-10-30T19:52:36-04:00'
describe
'10423' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPQ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
dc714b802054e9532cc267fc2f52e8ea
a7af269ce2480f353499703eca6c7967a9e7dc35
'2011-10-30T19:53:53-04:00'
describe
'1365124' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPR' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
3d21d94b9f4197e103df56a4b3276787
e53dd4a1f6afba10bbf7c12a821c7525eccaeaec
describe
'106083' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPS' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
ef28b73ad3dde54f11a69e0970ab3483
06eb03d15ed4a14e4721b75fa35797d600a81e4e
describe
'31061' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPT' 'sip-files00010.pro'
05a8e7fe715a0006335f4f19981fa19a
5dc756fe952fcf32ff8f0a1216881f066e9fd73c
'2011-10-30T19:53:18-04:00'
describe
'38270' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPU' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
8f3da52937987ab4492ca3ba6d1ef1f5
78f139d13cb358c8f870c3d56881f1d54b8c2968
'2011-10-30T19:51:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPV' 'sip-files00010.tif'
802f701c22bb2aeedf0ad06db2271b68
3df53a78a4c9df383e2f9558d954296faf3812f9
'2011-10-30T19:54:10-04:00'
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPW' 'sip-files00010.txt'
36922a65c7d7da00b86156c69e0f8241
65e6e5431a04b6eabcf346d05931bb5b3976724d
'2011-10-30T19:53:47-04:00'
describe
'10437' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPX' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
ff821da88e97172c7d193bb9a85bbabd
4397fc02e8d1ddc2c870ea5895f2e301d65e58aa
describe
'1349967' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPY' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
ad955e28effd4ee2315ff640a232f3ee
838a22efb6fd3832e873e3fa597878554fddb493
describe
'111386' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMPZ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
23a85f9be3a77120b95bd9f03c4dc152
aef5ead3ec16e82f3226c038126a49752710e980
'2011-10-30T19:54:00-04:00'
describe
'33934' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQA' 'sip-files00011.pro'
2acb9b761a672140889d67cc3961e8f9
f2be5a0d9447a3efd943750d754fa3ee67d52920
'2011-10-30T19:52:45-04:00'
describe
'40868' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQB' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
cb4ab12d75df6ed937cdeef54fb0fe15
e685244d35cb3c2efdd6cad328d8f7317f059004
'2011-10-30T19:54:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQC' 'sip-files00011.tif'
8425581290bdcfa24c8144f85c752702
dd4c4d4f40b4bc97b9757103ebafd93d968a9876
'2011-10-30T19:51:25-04:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQD' 'sip-files00011.txt'
25a696bc7692e9010ec576930424c852
36628145c891aac4700dc4206df14502d41b3e99
'2011-10-30T19:54:45-04:00'
describe
'11011' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQE' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
984768e93915ce89dcad774326ecbc25
3a20240960f0ea8ba62d11aed57eac2402a67b1b
'2011-10-30T19:53:25-04:00'
describe
'1365121' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
38e72e6ce52e01f3347ea189bb4e809f
88d75914f8512d8cfce1e16f646e3fe00da77a40
'2011-10-30T19:53:39-04:00'
describe
'118094' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQG' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
88dd1c7bbfd6849faef8de23474af4f8
c685a47ba7c1002f24b607e2916d68ae2ce00115
describe
'35051' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQH' 'sip-files00012.pro'
9e050d9a7e897f7c0752c99e8d035111
843ec724b3d1d96f6d0c11b67e1fbca6a50db271
describe
'42771' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQI' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
828ba89f0c721ad1445011ce4406cdad
2afb59bfff532ba5537cd517c67374eb65772ee9
'2011-10-30T19:54:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
32aa2655ddbbe79ca731d0611140e1e8
dd30d0082184538710a477f1e47514e55a69b269
'2011-10-30T19:54:35-04:00'
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQK' 'sip-files00012.txt'
f5bd40498dcbd8e0f13a6e544015a682
e8bd6c22c3bdb18635f90c4fc8aee9f156d4c64b
'2011-10-30T19:51:41-04:00'
describe
'11446' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQL' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
188737cf8adb9dc401901adb939be022
e4da64f88eb7892120132487dcf0a89a9182843d
'2011-10-30T19:51:42-04:00'
describe
'1349926' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQM' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
f276cefc50adfd10ae330fb395c8b05e
738c47a3baad5d4a543550c04d05dcb392b87f99
'2011-10-30T19:51:28-04:00'
describe
'111292' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQN' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
9bca0c99941279b4d2c1576813676ba1
e462c6022b05bcc19c4c0a920609509ed75fac1b
'2011-10-30T19:51:57-04:00'
describe
'34606' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQO' 'sip-files00013.pro'
963fd05e4e98209e9439acb1914f7ec6
bdcbe021f9a03dfbf4654cd701b071270f383f5b
'2011-10-30T19:51:36-04:00'
describe
'39716' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQP' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
d5ef2754869d86f7ec352c38d69f03b8
9894fe69fcc4044da6e9d3c78b590eebb3f7ddb9
'2011-10-30T19:53:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQQ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
76be738ea9b1682beb362d9a816c8d61
d21cb3e04479059e3d579bdb1ba970040fd52ff2
'2011-10-30T19:53:45-04:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQR' 'sip-files00013.txt'
6a4f586f885b24b60b5c5df96b507f41
5d87a3c2d5a2cefd89690d178d90e359fddcdb32
describe
'10471' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQS' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
bec01ad4f73a4258a3d9a9b681cf932b
8f1365714d1e5548296969b1640348ba9d18af50
describe
'1365123' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQT' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
675b0b743842c1ba0a70caaa650b237e
938a860a71773d6e0908a77f1cc5382e421a3b18
describe
'116539' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQU' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
41119b97ee05af501ac74b7380ec01e9
0beb1496891c8d1a658c91283d0e1e1d2b51d767
'2011-10-30T19:51:20-04:00'
describe
'34600' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQV' 'sip-files00014.pro'
7bf2500603cc1459f7961f1fa0443d2a
355931f901349a9fdcd924738a4cd1fdf2457301
'2011-10-30T19:51:59-04:00'
describe
'41817' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQW' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
8f9364bc6d8fdc7509313c34453a737d
31ec09ed7c64bcb701eb3932124d4118989089c6
'2011-10-30T19:54:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQX' 'sip-files00014.tif'
22f9e81bc0ce56bfcfc938755d29c071
8d2a1958b629dac026fe28b722cff27ebee438bd
'2011-10-30T19:51:03-04:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQY' 'sip-files00014.txt'
b12bdbd9222cf0b9cfb973dccb821dcf
3e8676beb84346c3ead6648b115e4f6a951eb93c
describe
'10927' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMQZ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
0c6a7666c30377cd038e425c1e9dfb82
bf7c6abdb2b67e29f60717152f4cce1ffe3a9693
'2011-10-30T19:51:49-04:00'
describe
'1349990' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRA' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
ecea762e6b5c30df6441b890bb4b6ebf
9de3e365bd7b9e133ce59756069dfccce561b056
'2011-10-30T19:51:54-04:00'
describe
'103482' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRB' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c6fa81aedf23d2c6f2b2fe98d5c965ad
077ecfbf602eec632794de6b48c14c2c961c9644
'2011-10-30T19:53:35-04:00'
describe
'31677' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRC' 'sip-files00015.pro'
dec11c27d54b39c44a2ed2cf35ed20d0
2dbe71ec2da66eecdfaff14eb80658c82c91ce7f
describe
'37280' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRD' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
1a492bd0e757f6871a04a3c4816af28e
45c46ca0024d775082267e6e86e9e36ca525a6f7
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRE' 'sip-files00015.tif'
5401ea74285d8cd4f323fb1108b41f8c
df3f5ec6e2872bcd8d78146e4f2ff73601d0427f
'2011-10-30T19:54:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRF' 'sip-files00015.txt'
5be883658ad21a461bd9cd97889f0a35
715100637da7b1658d33e3e3a2246801e6112d69
'2011-10-30T19:50:58-04:00'
describe
'10454' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRG' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
51d99940d1e6f9524aae2dd1d5867d63
ec2354d15e67281ca18577a9a160dfda93f8c3ae
'2011-10-30T19:54:52-04:00'
describe
'1365104' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRH' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
ec0ede4d0bf9b4194ea1b232ed092c8d
c443db2a8d7b9756ad67b5affe81d99589699fb8
'2011-10-30T19:52:17-04:00'
describe
'105459' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRI' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
a44acffcb263bef6acaadd5e1ddf649e
8c404b82d9c1311e4a75a3291de2b9aa2f3885e4
'2011-10-30T19:52:37-04:00'
describe
'30628' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRJ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
11d108fac83c9063dccd58a4ed2a9ccc
156f2d04751c212c78289308750ab97326d9488a
'2011-10-30T19:53:02-04:00'
describe
'38547' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRK' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
d500dfbf9f59d93fabd6dd5f31ee8fa4
3e5a0a843bb00b5af75c4b5cbaac24401679391c
'2011-10-30T19:54:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRL' 'sip-files00016.tif'
01f6b543e7c7656dbf6e3b0b5097470a
4e3e69829220966af8490a0eddbfe47fcbb069dc
'2011-10-30T19:52:20-04:00'
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRM' 'sip-files00016.txt'
a48c5108d52f2d51ef5b345f1ad055bd
c6c04e10195ac4564f7f263cfb4c2728b045e96e
describe
'10641' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRN' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
0ff2ca8329032503238c229b970b816b
c5297c6393978b24185ca637fde7658a99c27678
'2011-10-30T19:52:14-04:00'
describe
'1349983' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRO' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a1ccae2d6a0a7729d82b96fb286f8228
c807032b43943bcb9dc522d2bb39da8055c706fd
'2011-10-30T19:51:53-04:00'
describe
'111755' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRP' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
371838d657edf2766725d5fd762f2a4d
5a1e43caf3621cd068854a55d2f51ad1c67b0a31
describe
'34465' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRQ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
71c7f201ee8cd2841afb495a02530474
f8309e96d018af666990763a912d7cbed6d694a3
describe
'40741' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRR' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
276067b8702189998487483f26823ede
2ca19f9efbacf159dccdda5fcd5a9a879448bec7
'2011-10-30T19:53:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRS' 'sip-files00017.tif'
8b208acc5f0f09a65dacdcd94a65473f
cce2d9e63e3fe1052dec7db5b1d572f2ed88b3e6
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRT' 'sip-files00017.txt'
bf6a1f8e2621dc79b1909339743090e4
112817bcaae129da50f80dd9737ea436648a2c0a
describe
'10690' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRU' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
9d7cc65629423760ce9f2fcf963e0e8b
8f6463c6eda3012f16da0a19d7c831808f8cb135
'2011-10-30T19:52:48-04:00'
describe
'1365116' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRV' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
a06144cd57570c9e3138489960838df2
c9dde3b45b6ee091b433883d70c98939be2f8151
'2011-10-30T19:51:21-04:00'
describe
'106101' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRW' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
e1eda5ca34599e7d5656a62e60ee2ac0
b863534bad9ed41e640596bb32adf3ee3f636add
'2011-10-30T19:51:06-04:00'
describe
'31382' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRX' 'sip-files00018.pro'
581f2d3db067874cbc7dd28bcdec2c3b
a6387813899532fd16f9dc1b3c1917675315d6e5
'2011-10-30T19:53:09-04:00'
describe
'38075' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRY' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
fa9162fc6cde87b7d33d185393c85833
2ac0d96fbe2fc3213ba9a3c804d6e49fb22eb3ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMRZ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3a047e3155ca4c6d0376a903225666f9
fc3dc24789a0137ff45ecc59bd15e51d5a77b625
'2011-10-30T19:53:13-04:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSA' 'sip-files00018.txt'
91776a95612505766682ccd8d6f04660
c389b0d6c0278d35d191678a687febc47be3607a
'2011-10-30T19:51:01-04:00'
describe
'10717' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
246b7640404c5edfc02ade6887be7d75
1969e4c829521fc47366439493058a7408e3c106
describe
'1349975' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSC' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
52eaba11618d734d493715f25cd8b67b
0cd4bec4af592fa56fe47830db23c5b61c4bc17b
'2011-10-30T19:53:06-04:00'
describe
'109947' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSD' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
c72c2398c17636d1dfaa2acb622314f6
12cc57bfef1525233a61b8284ae051931a5e8503
describe
'33937' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSE' 'sip-files00019.pro'
95a03fd060c33ae826c6715473cbc922
a97fc0fa747f4ed8580dcc8c425f35493b0d2c2b
'2011-10-30T19:53:41-04:00'
describe
'40140' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSF' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
7ec502cd0a1c1107b2c08bffc3e47179
3543a33a265a25b21f2a39b85844bcb277eca302
'2011-10-30T19:50:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
1b563cba57db5e71d18be943adfc969c
8339fc3fb9b87dfee735ee77640d71c505097da1
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSH' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4cdc08a0591cffb1e2dcdd060cccf9b0
25386f6f31d07ebe4bb91a3a702286a9f6154ed4
'2011-10-30T19:51:31-04:00'
describe
'10725' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSI' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
38eec2747f506235a4f79d31e7fb3065
101eb0133dd2168f27abf0fe2aa3a5109d3663a3
describe
'1365060' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSJ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
101dcfbd695307d155c546df4da7ab3f
051025f9f57888c6f2d8290c7392552b59b9d177
'2011-10-30T19:52:41-04:00'
describe
'103730' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSK' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
97b3b0f9eb3b98b19fdc09977218e7fb
8dbdf68c7490b8c065073130d858d3062d9c7223
describe
'29878' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSL' 'sip-files00020.pro'
f10cb4278e425d04673246220de70e3a
6c4590c26d50178467a7010390d1e9456b04d953
'2011-10-30T19:54:49-04:00'
describe
'37475' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSM' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
53d6fd453d9c60b9bc54ee175f616e84
b4672aa09777c8020e86e8ef1bf03d26c09dd102
'2011-10-30T19:53:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSN' 'sip-files00020.tif'
e6a85a420593e47e6dd0f484b94c87b0
6ccedfe5b6586c6a0622853a07f28a14b28e1141
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSO' 'sip-files00020.txt'
106a9230c4e678fd618eed1fa1c6e092
3ef7e69a96586360aa39089776b5499525c39d47
describe
'10390' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSP' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
aa656cd57908573caeed821ae18e84fc
4aa2024124c2c404762771a086bed5893e6f585c
'2011-10-30T19:52:57-04:00'
describe
'1349776' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSQ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
6ded24f2bf88920f1d46c7cf2eac6630
1e8756e72a772b881d9527231ef4004ed7cc384c
'2011-10-30T19:53:58-04:00'
describe
'86665' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSR' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
6ce850ee9bc4a1e8922db1cf0f9487e4
3c01fae42a31c9010542a92b4580355cce280d39
'2011-10-30T19:52:32-04:00'
describe
'24942' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSS' 'sip-files00021.pro'
0b95b28cd84462067338c75905b6a2e9
2b07e313779a0889bf4401d860e664c11aad70f6
'2011-10-30T19:54:07-04:00'
describe
'30951' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMST' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
acf3fe05d9fe262dcf3acc24942d28a9
da327b5214e9be470538d98375a29a9698b92218
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSU' 'sip-files00021.tif'
c70e1fdd30bdfc72538eefc61a61b53a
b530d96c726a8a127e6ffcee06fcfafb23f13a41
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSV' 'sip-files00021.txt'
36f2e25804088d421b7b948929bfe05f
c1bf64e6b4cb10fee794f6b1930b01d4688a3621
'2011-10-30T19:54:37-04:00'
describe
'8785' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSW' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
9178b4a6ae3bdb820c1ed1f7509efdaf
7542ebc888d8d157f323a0ed7cfc27d34d1ac2fe
describe
'1365113' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSX' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
0eb94f6bbc9861aff07db32b58822f27
f5e05e1240402a0b8a1fc24603afa8a4bd9aa242
'2011-10-30T19:53:04-04:00'
describe
'108108' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
0bb24ebaa9ce8912ea356fca4c87a74e
43ba4e208620c8375395899779f6f30c81b20bdf
'2011-10-30T19:52:35-04:00'
describe
'31671' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMSZ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
d41ab574cc569ddf1d468325c281ff13
bc079272bb49a95734b80d14a2c86dc7941e7810
describe
'39511' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
46546ff64e1b3cbc7365ceaecf36a24b
da27b04b74a9d1135b979d3b2b05247ac3fcd674
'2011-10-30T19:51:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
234b1031331477a680c725d257ff5cf8
bee2a078b171456b18a92a12dc5200fc8df74916
'2011-10-30T19:52:23-04:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTC' 'sip-files00022.txt'
1283d5c912f7ee0f0b0bc878bc82f264
9b7e6fc3c2d911c8718ec585490e3a1475316201
'2011-10-30T19:52:58-04:00'
describe
'10719' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTD' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
ae765602dfab88dccb6a682410714af7
510c2d653cbf80e076db88909dc235264fe270b3
'2011-10-30T19:52:25-04:00'
describe
'1349982' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTE' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7f2d27028125d4d747540f1f425f6003
6dec4fda045a70d945d8a787d604dcb058218aac
describe
'106261' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTF' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2e766e120c73da4817f4a65b7a984389
3ba367749e771f73dee5966e8f4791242987acc3
'2011-10-30T19:51:10-04:00'
describe
'30381' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTG' 'sip-files00023.pro'
c81d203d213fec181bcb3789b9de9d82
308fd55104c3d6f520e36e864ac787e9a55d4559
describe
'37403' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTH' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
a42a783cb840b6f2d1d7afd08dc9b9a4
3fe1b974944627e2a42ef594776c3f493ad7d192
'2011-10-30T19:52:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTI' 'sip-files00023.tif'
5ef30263f8ab9568326370adc16bbaf4
f50788204437a952178ae90d4c7c906402cc3619
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTJ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
b1920ce59a96ab3dcaeb2efce3ef1090
b2eb96ed03007330a418ad4fc4ffc4106f689366
describe
'10502' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTK' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
6818ee88e5f3cb9c71205ee42e41f0ba
5b1490c37031fff3adc292da6bbb0622bb6087dc
describe
'1365125' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTL' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
576ac1586b6bd0ea7a74e7a941b32286
a1c6b51e7ebda3e104fbbb2f1bdc995968835a80
describe
'114175' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTM' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
bd7fa625571072cb4dae87071bafe59f
745c736374abd9a6c9fc64c04f0b966bec7e146a
'2011-10-30T19:53:37-04:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTN' 'sip-files00024.pro'
adda3be189cd06f760466c7a2c446127
402773bc7a18d7920fc9838260468642b7ea79fb
'2011-10-30T19:53:32-04:00'
describe
'31759' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTO' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
8efef7ced181a59d936363cd9daf8057
660de8cf235aa032448c06d5b22aac855e57a2ff
'2011-10-30T19:53:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTP' 'sip-files00024.tif'
175dfd6bda88d389e9e794d1490ea3e8
9eee6b94d3fa167f9bf6991655dfb7c6c8910ee8
'2011-10-30T19:51:51-04:00'
describe
'66' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTQ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
e255a0ae3d0e4c96f4836a9643568b2b
31a86bbe45986e5ed7c9f7a783ca50cad122e53e
describe
'8278' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTR' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
cd6d3624444967029d8167b80dacb57a
802b02c8f44114c7e97fd0bfd44c7c1c7efdec39
describe
'1365090' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTS' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
8b8862d400eccca351261af4ba7eb310
aaa3e34bcbd2396c7f95ccc318f57eabb8b8b309
describe
'100473' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTT' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
26f5add20f1b3367b412c4ac780c90ae
ae363a7fca2669520cd03436b75f509182f8f2f4
'2011-10-30T19:51:15-04:00'
describe
'26305' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
f3c11682762616d451fb5af87585d0ec
ce544f5ea589e74e0c8f1e7366a18880afaec3c6
'2011-10-30T19:54:39-04:00'
describe
'34492' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
3064698c988c0abfc1d74faf57effb0b
41eb8f296715fc7ce262fe20e053bed71eca42c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTW' 'sip-files00026.tif'
577d240a8794062af0cb4c0e46ef00cb
be19e248af6f58c42d3019e287c05ec9162b8208
'2011-10-30T19:52:16-04:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTX' 'sip-files00026.txt'
09ed350f193dd95fbe01f3b0f0378798
afe0c1b84e553b504fcaab1a4943dda226019047
describe
'9381' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTY' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
0c85f16815785c484d9f1b49c71e9b4b
36c051610aea878e1c58bd2b3d1cd29c4a5bb492
describe
'1349951' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMTZ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
39f83f99c129d5096b56505109ee4e18
8c816186f134d01166e6db9e5248b1a070ba3aa5
'2011-10-30T19:54:27-04:00'
describe
'106935' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUA' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
910dc0823bf8e9b8bfd16eefbc6e2a34
307eb95071d44408c74cedc52614e2439643ea0c
describe
'32053' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUB' 'sip-files00027.pro'
00477d6bb2467684a96dec8a852c4921
beb8863cd4e11916ab1f0d9dbd484ddfdc311705
describe
'38243' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUC' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
26ecd96a5a543892ec8e75c01f420a3b
b41cfe0379377ff32629a0f535cd4b0850bb88ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUD' 'sip-files00027.tif'
d07d0f49cb13c2df98aeb4272108fdbe
11a31afdddf5b40b94b9b3ee7a35309d6181603d
'2011-10-30T19:54:31-04:00'
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUE' 'sip-files00027.txt'
4b3f3d63adb5a096d3e763e0bd058fd2
c9a1fdc2da78d4575235a3371dfd82e4d33154a8
describe
'10300' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUF' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
f4b2782dd90c48768953d45b89864fe9
320c91a410635129f02598a6187b30bb51d31ceb
'2011-10-30T19:54:04-04:00'
describe
'1365075' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUG' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
49c852a34f0e19bbc929ad8a5caec111
be1d05e04666dac09e51fa8ea41594ac87acd908
describe
'112175' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUH' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
3a259125745b7b421ef402d90a304a7a
dde0d6b991bb55ec06cac283da9a321a35dac0e9
describe
'32413' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUI' 'sip-files00028.pro'
300a2114d03864ac9f5ac2209cfb8721
d5e3420a84b003da36b84c1ff4147edf92955af4
describe
'40400' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUJ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
c4e8c715cf9c5aba46dffd04717e697d
cab3c87847f4ad1011fca39f81795f210b1f260f
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUK' 'sip-files00028.tif'
9f8827160796a5810aed4c09b6a5f388
4b1bf346696224c2b4b9a2f28fa7d3a33c26ca50
'2011-10-30T19:54:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUL' 'sip-files00028.txt'
bb8fc1841d028e75b0aab6de84fc166b
2d868a060070e90f451f954cb9fa4e767b161337
describe
'10783' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUM' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
9352fe27c27b33d9994ecb70b3a76369
445989546b8d220e2a47e841b25b4fc2072bfc37
describe
'1349933' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUN' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
087755b93c66a3626c1818d15f656d75
25ca1b1327e749599e6d8024893c71566c9bd393
'2011-10-30T19:51:16-04:00'
describe
'109129' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUO' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
be184467e5af74a62bbe7d27aa940e70
99b531418e5e1355b29fcd0ddff84f781227805d
describe
'33715' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUP' 'sip-files00029.pro'
1dd8615fc1f330570a435f5586731cba
00078c2432ca051892ec3f50137c4e94fc719a05
'2011-10-30T19:54:48-04:00'
describe
'39470' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUQ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
aef6005607895f928934dac085c79722
3385cf132c08dd3408693550f8b74e4e755e161d
'2011-10-30T19:53:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUR' 'sip-files00029.tif'
f53f887d10bdd88a75d516380835797d
0bc00e3f5d3fbcb8002ac91db727f9e100a0d77d
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUS' 'sip-files00029.txt'
1cc38822261a6790a563d0504b5d9fe7
c9be5a24f9ba9d72c3527605c9503b90d202f8a1
describe
'10233' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUT' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
fa6ee17277861bc766ffd73f1d431bb3
4bbee61a72f27d5e05582249d7773a8a6a588bd2
describe
'1365110' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUU' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
e0ed281ca4c1ef389d9ee1c2c3452cc6
b35b63ca7c064f787bda0e065d03ccb9be98626c
describe
'108389' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUV' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
f21749daa65cf7c31b1cff2f2c7f70f8
5d8aa3bd4358ff1e4eb7dd2d2e636881bf5fb55e
'2011-10-30T19:53:55-04:00'
describe
'31471' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUW' 'sip-files00030.pro'
11faff03241c454647b2cdb255bb7b2f
ddd97d389ba46d14104e9531862856abc27d316b
describe
'39112' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUX' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
479d009614e441c54469fef60a920e8c
b3b58b182ef3d7d81d9523bd3c7d44e4fb2af8f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUY' 'sip-files00030.tif'
ca3d3c652f8e6479d98b43389307955a
6eedf6563682bcfecedb9aa488bc1887d5a063d8
'2011-10-30T19:53:38-04:00'
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMUZ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
b119fb7e4a4f1bc23e8f507dde93ffd8
7e436a2e9729b07af447f4a894338d4501369203
describe
'10816' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVA' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
79bcfa03c40b9bf45c139c09fce9f6c2
c5d1a2033dab9776de78cb866bb345e8f9bb311f
describe
'1349938' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVB' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
464ff4946a1fced3630812c58d1e4d8b
d5b4bb0e0bccab400dc4389e5d4bccd9cac03792
'2011-10-30T19:52:27-04:00'
describe
'106609' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
40c62f2fce99b4c7920ffbd2900b007d
32f5428515d048d0437946410ee0f7716fa92ffc
'2011-10-30T19:54:53-04:00'
describe
'32313' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVD' 'sip-files00031.pro'
06164f3fe1ec7c32258090b289e17d86
286bfb730482fd2e6bf6441de5e3c00471591e71
'2011-10-30T19:54:33-04:00'
describe
'38551' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVE' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
4df24cc3e319490b1f3ebd8df28ac120
adffdd818a5b625b786d4bd059859d2a0157a14d
'2011-10-30T19:52:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVF' 'sip-files00031.tif'
89aea06194c83d96ea6e89223b6e122c
2fe55d4484771f9136ebef5f98b932de7956877e
'2011-10-30T19:52:46-04:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVG' 'sip-files00031.txt'
21c82d38fb970c617069c1d96f913bae
8834bfa605899911f0c4d5ccdbc608453cda68bd
'2011-10-30T19:52:47-04:00'
describe
'10480' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVH' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
dd78adbfcd94d0658092c761d99124d9
96009377ccd09a3be7077f81a160615041c0c0a1
'2011-10-30T19:52:31-04:00'
describe
'1365118' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
c2e24f2e5e403ded5d42bcc5c17a1e3d
489008264b3af95efe5d7356d1e89397acac2ca1
describe
'117803' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
b88c63e1f923831ba203f088b44ed8ef
246c91fb9d70a172d09d2d6cfec7731780de7f11
describe
'35016' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVK' 'sip-files00032.pro'
5632751a7d25eee825e66bb5f2bb1ea6
f4ec479bb418ee8726a81380f7d2b04a019cd814
'2011-10-30T19:52:19-04:00'
describe
'42700' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVL' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
296ae1086bd27ad8f64903c3049e22e2
62100924c0aafd52125732f5d5dc5b2455c53217
'2011-10-30T19:52:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVM' 'sip-files00032.tif'
fa97dbea9d2e45044847af4ff4f2364a
9202eb6331e1b6041bb0cb25fab3f530e3784170
'2011-10-30T19:54:02-04:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVN' 'sip-files00032.txt'
9e9943f4da846921fef86c88e03d3174
bac165afe4277b7d1ad5cfb5e4f9ba8b32cd0042
'2011-10-30T19:52:11-04:00'
describe
'11334' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVO' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
91b7608f232f201cbec66f3dcc91cd4b
13f79621b939c3ff665ae67be89319dae94f88a5
describe
'1349988' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
60682178a8c08491b065acbaa313a682
17bab87e2dfafa74527ec12570774968c95d6efb
describe
'98460' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
6be83aa48e43a474a2d1580473edca34
5a18676afe74549f741669c1311f3d0fad2542a6
'2011-10-30T19:54:40-04:00'
describe
'29254' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
afbeef2607b4298ad6dfe30b5f7e27cf
0cd3d41b377e8ca14c694664da9975a1c361a185
describe
'35485' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVS' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
ee79d43ecfea597fa33bbdd353e61305
1fca0d4867d7f2843d438353a130d2e0940587c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVT' 'sip-files00033.tif'
0770885dc720db210799a1da96ac8555
14ac10a355a2695666492f6ee88aee797110e822
'2011-10-30T19:51:46-04:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVU' 'sip-files00033.txt'
8246a3028141804231413ca174767de1
bc4798b6e452a3db3a7d8cdc8dc7d7821829c207
'2011-10-30T19:53:34-04:00'
describe
'9382' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVV' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
4258ae4f0f7f8ba72beef3f0675fded0
7944f867e068ae664c803ee59a8a3c6da792aa86
describe
'1365020' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVW' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
630b303967a3b8dbe9c477b22839dc70
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describe
'118952' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVX' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
da39e69b944b15d6021d7a9024cae992
ade963895bde439b9350c560cb79afa4b7479538
describe
'36095' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVY' 'sip-files00034.pro'
0f2af4a890cc7a84ba44840d255d829b
7daed6cc6595d50c4b89c766d3725d8ca48fd57b
describe
'43380' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMVZ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a3f0ae62a38fd939edeb8c91fbe3a46e
48ce4f0b287080e1cdc30ef1c5c4e0c37ffa421e
'2011-10-30T19:54:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWA' 'sip-files00034.tif'
b99920bac380e866700eabcf14552f2b
b1d14d981b67488daa9a62071b51b94719746d17
'2011-10-30T19:54:51-04:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWB' 'sip-files00034.txt'
519b8a8bf5c341376a40f3afe04445c1
4aad5aa20fe6ceefcdd33ccaaf54811a37998e49
'2011-10-30T19:52:06-04:00'
describe
'11475' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWC' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
2d6b369f043f439da975e6e19426404d
5d6fbcc035f7c7cc4112602f765a602b6a063314
'2011-10-30T19:50:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWD' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ccc667a6b2f5b3cb894452600d24b4ea
c35010d13ce93b118ca51b596403354a2abcf5f8
'2011-10-30T19:52:09-04:00'
describe
'105702' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWE' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
20a7b274f27883db112499fd15819b08
29669c6f2857a67c8718c3e77c44415933f25ad9
describe
'31694' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWF' 'sip-files00035.pro'
1bf5c68a4ba37298cb97bb5b92dc91a6
87dd96ba4cc3df4b1c614bf329c7278d90acff5b
describe
'38938' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWG' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
d8d222130538cbd455f1e39d78a36afb
d3b36af8046d096786d6b275478b6e9db03d46cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWH' 'sip-files00035.tif'
de2de1814a1ff083d68994a68091f24e
57137bc8016873ea49092dfe6f7cf16a48bf51bd
'2011-10-30T19:51:55-04:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWI' 'sip-files00035.txt'
1d8665570f637b1d5de463be81b66e84
7ad1af1e5280e6d432b92ae27d3e772996b66275
describe
'10701' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
0058020f4ffabcd886f4efcf51966254
5d20f791f120c4c7328029320223fbb636fc86bc
describe
'1365128' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWK' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
b86ab5fc04cce8e7b31bb60e215eb632
36f5bf7143401ecd4c72e75cf47b8feb14cb6f21
describe
'109253' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWL' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
412f2581f056048451a9eab8ade56eb1
0c55bfadd3567eff448e11ff0006059a1592dc13
'2011-10-30T19:52:44-04:00'
describe
'31816' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWM' 'sip-files00036.pro'
3e3a70d5894d511c829451aa4e9f725a
94eaa94f4e2578d107f808d71861a3582da483a4
describe
'40414' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWN' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
bcc51b58311f87038277f859542db7cb
f786fa85ca563c6cfe4a07164647a7856bebcf81
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
f2abd4c3bc79329d33b12e987ece371f
50a0b3afa77cab8db68ce1b54023701b9402eb1f
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
eccb4f8d8956f483eeb0ea5f449ad821
e06b1cab5f591f13e27fde7e9c93eaa85ca212c2
describe
'11058' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWQ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
0f5e76c74b06806a420359e0b5461b7f
f9c3c223763d679d67d16de4b70f4bc287d534b0
'2011-10-30T19:54:08-04:00'
describe
'1349974' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWR' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
abe269e6ee88aa2dbd7d72a84bfc1797
a63a7769d230c8882d5d802218524fb96a02ec1d
describe
'113304' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWS' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
8e9356a018d9150d56abac058e9fb543
7bcbf93dce3fd1c5dd5bdeed10159f310e5b9bc7
'2011-10-30T19:52:38-04:00'
describe
'34015' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWT' 'sip-files00037.pro'
3ef5f7abad9e8e4a6e3dce9e5ad27cd7
29ebbc85df4bef9c33a18d10f9cee296ee9ecfb2
describe
'40801' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWU' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
83b40432386a561739b8b9f667de0b25
771e3c25211b0ac3f3bbdd3669b4c01bfb53f4ec
'2011-10-30T19:51:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWV' 'sip-files00037.tif'
4321396e2ec57a99e29bb2c75930d0b3
96284c8b30ed8d699690cd8d7d0b5cf340b3320c
'2011-10-30T19:52:50-04:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWW' 'sip-files00037.txt'
980127ccaa27820b47e294c8cc09710d
c185da4f20ba5d378d640471a00b459505ab79fc
describe
'10795' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWX' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
82041c6c5bcee062ead273a697eb898b
7fcdb7ba02d5e1d36dc6580192b1f229aaef3ff9
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWY' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
6d8dd18b2591986d9a4a38615801d10f
c73400284a6c47e5945c41ff81349c5029a109f9
describe
'114710' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMWZ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
4b1f1bb07ae635c339759231bc5f7721
20bc8515599278635c1d8af643b0c56d7bcb98c8
describe
'34279' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXA' 'sip-files00038.pro'
b98b1aeea3c571af6c55114ff1f57706
7b050d2f157cb639b828cc100b1e7ac614ce6ab4
describe
'41306' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXB' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
339c26f26286d4fefce8149ab029c990
03f6bce0975e559e0f0bb5b2a300f98fcc2fe02a
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
eb3c03dc9399179298ed8bd5979c98da
caa5f8efe2780c3c825f5e22aea1560effc8b4e0
'2011-10-30T19:51:35-04:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXD' 'sip-files00038.txt'
87481b196cde196b1cc65e3032efa178
3c15b2500bb963660a3bd71a50bb1d64595baeb2
describe
'10902' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
420bcf78e5bf4805d18e7667c08979da
155d2bdeac1fe1b75e66da9fc5cbf46c72e318f0
'2011-10-30T19:52:01-04:00'
describe
'1349883' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXF' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
7f2232ab3c03b4a815e08a07e0658612
365162ff7378c799f752786af6ff1cb7edccbbee
'2011-10-30T19:51:30-04:00'
describe
'111145' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5cca8be6f19d653575161e481aaa6e98
e5b68a3851d8b598a2cbf98169b12b7ce98afc90
describe
'34176' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXH' 'sip-files00039.pro'
93417c4e42b647f49fedd71b82227acb
983d83595b441bd7b6ac68632b3dbbbb97390c89
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
b1fe2296dd7c20dce5aec69aa055921a
a64f7afe096b4171eb34305df6cf266467a6ddb3
'2011-10-30T19:53:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXJ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
19038666fbfe837b84bf0e685409d2db
4d29a6d93c95d8de68b28dcaa4e58956d9b1354b
'2011-10-30T19:54:29-04:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXK' 'sip-files00039.txt'
468f00a2e19209dffdb2c9427d901572
741ac0596f8a5852dd10f14330219e2b1d69aaf1
describe
'10840' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXL' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
266020ea11b9a91a362cdc39d7488baa
53827e28e9fe2e08c890f03ae4160c88765a9515
describe
'1365115' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXM' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
939f049639b6c35858340a2616a0c6b7
e7979c6224a5e1b57c36195d3fc98f568d32401e
describe
'113216' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXN' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
716ef5c15665922ece69137bd1fe8182
deeb19e62123ca18a90d9914063413440aa0417a
describe
'33312' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXO' 'sip-files00040.pro'
1e2a379aae0918243f1b74304ef16d4d
10551063f5dabe5c8b01a178d985d4fb31031b17
'2011-10-30T19:51:14-04:00'
describe
'40340' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXP' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
4f71c4f150c072c4d35b5f8ea99862e0
bd0783c2506de34ec3018aaa9fa8bd88b757d3d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXQ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
8188ed074c5b64addcfecb190144fc5e
92c0ff3db19ca62ae1af0b996f561b2bdab627f7
'2011-10-30T19:54:38-04:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXR' 'sip-files00040.txt'
0774fc3b1300430b5d7db62321fc4f53
fe90866010537989823bfbe81d795a374b1ac6ca
'2011-10-30T19:53:48-04:00'
describe
'11389' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXS' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
a29bb9508cf4199dc26f87b9cbd06fcf
e3b7014958c260b789d5fb2d93e463631e341172
'2011-10-30T19:51:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXT' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
dd8199f47b54a11a6f8a6a254ccfe3b3
e002a6bdf216587103c05231c4e5d32e97a65c09
describe
'113633' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXU' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
1db6a015a0ddfd263c33ddfb8aeb6a2c
a04c5609b192f2e5eb70f45ff81b61da21679702
describe
'34512' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXV' 'sip-files00041.pro'
8610ff3bbfb0a8605a32da112fea3948
ca28cb9b17089814781d0ace91e6274596036702
describe
'41084' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXW' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
fd5721125c3cecb23e96c043015cf25b
9ef8aae8348f835d7bbaf7bede3c058f69124304
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXX' 'sip-files00041.tif'
345e74334b916fa1d8f8da4f7656e573
3595fc28c0d78ed17f90428214e6177775e4fa4c
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXY' 'sip-files00041.txt'
20b01b67b7df27a3c60f27a8e1c42dc5
171abd0bbf6004bd21ab0d84d6bf410edfba9958
'2011-10-30T19:54:17-04:00'
describe
'10768' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMXZ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
09affab142d27561eb8468d886ca93eb
cf32cd5ee5743881501f70f90e5ead418ca43ce0
describe
'1365092' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYA' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
12760828a7182393a6e4a89858a7450d
569ccb2c20c6f05da7714a6734c90c2c6181a4ad
describe
'116767' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYB' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
68100861e30b134d007163ab1c247f29
ed25f38ec8e5a41eb8b7abfea0f8301d3931daf9
describe
'33969' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYC' 'sip-files00042.pro'
c765c16852bc12e29ad3fe83082cbd75
cc370d23695dd875e4528aac366411d2e1495d19
'2011-10-30T19:54:50-04:00'
describe
'42619' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYD' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
ebe014786f573c82924a124a5b23d4b5
d5d140b819df848800053eea312c2e0aadd3ddff
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYE' 'sip-files00042.tif'
09e0926d57b40ee17556c6aae2058263
8016bbabafbb897fb51cd3d93066e7bc71067611
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYF' 'sip-files00042.txt'
34952e548504eb12db03bfefee2ee757
7095701d5608072b75d9751fa6fed7075cef354d
describe
'11263' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYG' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
0d5042277c27c19473092ba7caa5a5a2
ab80f7d059283f01d489011757ca84a22ac766b8
describe
'1349929' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYH' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
63e8eecebae12419ab3deab75ccfaa98
8196e6f78a2c3c049dcf0fa423d2858c56f7a6da
'2011-10-30T19:54:34-04:00'
describe
'111556' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYI' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
43218cdae8fb7dde2f024180c9557781
8e33e3f22a398420c07de6cd1d7048c2a093dd9e
'2011-10-30T19:52:43-04:00'
describe
'34944' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYJ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
5d51aa591206027ac610d8996e7e9ae0
a7944f8962254a3a504868460906a42e22b209f2
describe
'40363' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYK' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c0652494b68308268b384336aa6adc40
d9d748a5626314f02fb2c1f01897df4b1aa18f94
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
27b9307cab2b4e5cec3a7ecf447a32c0
5efeb6511fffd0c83d77ddf528106c2980ef5ddd
'2011-10-30T19:51:45-04:00'
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
a40c93d49f4de2d17de3a7459fabb9a5
c74bcc3c18cd9cb7e6f132a17d15a6c388160255
'2011-10-30T19:54:21-04:00'
describe
'10612' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYN' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
6685ba31fe0949f729f196360f6c5d8e
31dfcc9a51685de869dc2693880b09d3498c259f
describe
'1365102' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
a397bae0dcba06ef148b0f6b70e77e9d
04cd2d84948e41b55bb2433e9293de6a6983231f
describe
'113951' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
e7bac862d703136892b67a574d2566c8
c9534e7a999c96bf4615d515edbd57de86202876
'2011-10-30T19:53:56-04:00'
describe
'33682' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
9c46a7e591e0488b5a667d0861376e95
8e8346fb3ffa27522c5b8264e7d5cec2dde0ab29
describe
'41393' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYR' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
714bf0b21ff891a12768b72cfc399f72
495a382d67830526c1d24ef3082ff77ac5e8dc5a
'2011-10-30T19:52:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
b46863744e2ed083676724501cc5081a
cb8526e58932b126352ee36e9048da8d8a2a7f26
'2011-10-30T19:52:56-04:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYT' 'sip-files00044.txt'
1b0ef223ed693a5759540714390a5a41
148019d6cc31cd404fdf26d15a0a509c5b367d97
describe
'11282' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
d4c183ef1c728324b1e708a9ee3552a2
373433a80997bb4ea31a88dc5fb04ce313f9d06b
describe
'1349930' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
6296cd78c839450a020d48168e8dc6f4
8fe44aa0de61f5b286a314277dd66cea3b7c32bf
describe
'115234' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYW' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
7bc69cee8e149aafd92b6b2fe93b72f0
0a205905c2400c4cebc4eb53e6b8c47208aea959
'2011-10-30T19:51:22-04:00'
describe
'34504' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYX' 'sip-files00045.pro'
9d3ae11cf51f6d48fe213eedf0ed05dc
671e18b36791f284ba6b7532e660f3093aa37a33
describe
'41774' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYY' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
fac4b71e7309a3985402b25b9a61ef04
567cdf30d1ff2745059d31cc02c131d65283d25d
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMYZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
0e7f7d6c462f1c1885dca5d8b597d466
b8a052f00b9fc1738be01c9c2a95c25a4eaff9e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
a5e7c934188621328e398a0433a8ebef
96b6868289a76edb9f3e52ad77b5858a4cb8426f
describe
'10943' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
5ecdb44c157a2ef794512ade27a4f2e0
7de3345d2e93eecb04d8ba264a7e5ef355dc39d6
'2011-10-30T19:52:24-04:00'
describe
'1365078' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
84f0418ce00552d171a5521cb813f306
7fcce86bf8571ce6097586a21f8d0199fbff3dee
describe
'115807' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZD' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
0a96e7128f133c070f1f8123460686c3
69f9bb16e0ee437a105c2b5c35b88a511b9d5b7c
describe
'34322' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZE' 'sip-files00046.pro'
590c217e24d7f801c50bd4b7dc7f4cb8
fa1673cc29141bfbe785104d92e00f453d3835c7
describe
'41955' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e9e140f4cf521541c34545698bfe5fd4
84d56b4a621b77046976d6a53ad6f49c0b569a2d
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
7cacf263655f36b1cc96babfa376658f
437eacba67c67c748578b7a75ab4dc4ec7afb9d2
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
22a33beb87e5c8a45944ef945de863b0
1045f1dd65227e5c47b60eb88bebc23ffe5e7a1e
describe
'10972' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZI' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
6048e54139c17848a9917e97c6858e5f
ea636924352bef341728cb071f476fb18754de22
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZJ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
d96a86f1e57db4c75250cc270fbda14d
6c594e84cb220600abdc3d5ec6821c7adbe36441
'2011-10-30T19:54:41-04:00'
describe
'107564' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZK' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
a85e13e46351e6a6667f20cd77590626
54757f78c88b1031371b945f7eda4b42a0ce6bcb
describe
'33240' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
3a6ce60b51cc713770ecb60e54cb4858
eb4e66f7e94d12974632135a0d63cdc2fc5b4536
describe
'39099' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZM' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
5d4dec08e54d50693a8a575cf84d7660
b7f6cb0db9cf3bb3c78b86ac2db40fefbbc4df4b
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZN' 'sip-files00047.tif'
f8fd903c7d75ab93ae5222fbc1b4b0e1
bee55ccf43fef030d3c052e9aac407a650de1eed
'2011-10-30T19:52:02-04:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZO' 'sip-files00047.txt'
855694d60aa00058c5db6623d4dc0fd4
934690d28abe40e359bc304b3a342e3fc0bf2da2
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZP' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
416161fcbd3a4bac6c47fda4ff41945a
fd713daf6a10753c1e939ed630de7bd939c2cb90
'2011-10-30T19:53:24-04:00'
describe
'1365052' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZQ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
0ad669c52fcf692413f304220f65c494
ccb74a9cad83587b185babe43290d9ee8defbb5e
describe
'115382' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
34b7f7244995d670eefb986d6ccd14ca
1b79da3e18765177294ca2380c60d0829c3ceaeb
'2011-10-30T19:51:12-04:00'
describe
'34632' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
16d2626e006d28e05b5ee98a81ddadb3
5cff65ea0248d072c58f5a2be5486fb09d84b19f
describe
'41782' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZT' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
a1e9264443ddb8d023e437e211727acd
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZU' 'sip-files00048.tif'
cd54f47b12bb86019d44dc355b831f0f
bb083eb91b296a554974057c13f5ee92fe002ea8
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
287a57fca742534a83ed719ca6b24515
1c3393aea78fa1882a82b744e172721d84dbd309
describe
'11219' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZW' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
69c38096d9c8463272bb7d9e97aa228b
037369be6e1db49a51b875e20567fb977e97320b
describe
'1349958' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
bfc2a2ea9ddee84b7781a22a1c3428dd
14a7067c3fffebc934c1518a64792206673ff841
describe
'109377' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZY' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
f56cb75c98241e7212b014caddbfc4f8
18fb50547772bc94cac9575ad6887c5ec00975c0
describe
'32560' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABMZZ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
bb91526b76de854400ea518c5537a0a5
fde0252b2af5f740b8196c8f8dbfcd6f1a73fdf4
describe
'39129' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAA' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
fa2e1038be89c63bd917aa81ca7cffe2
20bd417688d4bc4874e1cd422ce1f561894aaa3f
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
32d218c6170bcb01caa2c2b61f5829e7
ec23acfe65ce4c3cfc8d5c042b20b9aaee055395
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
6e926454e95e9d1166b2a52f3ff119e8
c101f5699690b5586d927ae2a555f57afe0d7ca0
'2011-10-30T19:53:33-04:00'
describe
'10760' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAD' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
c0761fb14b74a58e0ff52e5d71ad0b13
cf1631ad37fc0a6628b65baa69eff01a4a16afea
'2011-10-30T19:53:01-04:00'
describe
'1365126' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAE' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
5205bb8d9f18d85a0816187f45657d70
4d6c29063ba04b5a41cc6d24d74a55ce56634243
describe
'120832' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAF' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
3d9a966f642cb73c7bf9acff2e8c1414
ed10e54dce6ed8f91eca80008bc4fbe5187a5dde
describe
'36432' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAG' 'sip-files00050.pro'
e6e76b8333cbece0ae171a893f888bdf
a13ec113f36b0810ff93a11098c18e2311f7f8ae
describe
'43948' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
9c82737d7bbb65a748ab35721ee8be57
3ec3aa7c0d38682461b64a8d039b6134a038aa60
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAI' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2c9f0a986ac949bc636abe5d53be117a
b1f3cb4c0bb6429eec0e3f31f0c3eab1ec1d28f9
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAJ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
c469bd93c6b2cc86439c8d5318ee2fd5
de373973c52b1670f4d3276902fe8681f279e864
describe
'11532' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAK' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
b01b39aa04df360fee3d7411dd687519
770cca4c70c7d91b619b359b5237a4f6e0e62f6e
describe
'1349825' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAL' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
7273cdbe8f8de2f3e5620cd6ff2f72ba
ea619ae574bf040d6b6e6e4836b00ea611bc4ead
describe
'113639' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
8f59691ab8521699cd311b521cad4e88
031f3fcd053dc09c6a75f2527cec37a9e057db94
describe
'35554' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAN' 'sip-files00051.pro'
5069334a7a5aeafb388f0d77c3da3532
574410c6c76548252ecb6d80c1eec389f54a2b34
describe
'39969' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d48b2533da8c5132edfaa767f052bc05
34a77926e38641ce4d2c1d5a2faff23fe041dad4
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
f0c3e94dd5db7cc5145d6198951c1fdc
89201a93e71fc727f0ce181aa33bea245784c88a
'2011-10-30T19:52:59-04:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAQ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c0e1a27a306752f9f56354190cba0581
0cca2d58069c9be511869c9a97a43aca12d5b4d5
'2011-10-30T19:52:51-04:00'
describe
'10757' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAR' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
e1fbd0d112a9bbad0adfa02a43f077f1
550d698b17cb3212daef99f04679339e1e4fa6d5
'2011-10-30T19:53:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAS' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
12d61a33ba40a918a47e6e3f8a2c7cc7
9331bd345e5eb15b38aeed21b119385f0f759a49
describe
'113434' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAT' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
7292658126b899f2cb43add7f4f856ca
002c4d6da6606516f202aba2a04e453c4bc89fde
describe
'33873' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAU' 'sip-files00052.pro'
a87ba7ae9eb1e28d73999a574f01f9b2
cd7cbf9722ce9d52c011441843ce7b915fff0840
describe
'40389' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
51a6a8058dda77b6791cc3e659e24ac8
41a4538e869ebcbea72046106385f38d83e039de
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAW' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0173a1130f983af116b6e5f9a9c4cb7f
35b89f885ac352a99348ca740c7287401c8fa18c
'2011-10-30T19:54:11-04:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAX' 'sip-files00052.txt'
9fce6eeca8a76e2e906a38036109e26c
011cd1561913c20dcbb1624e779a08fd6be63893
describe
'10823' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAY' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
66d322a4dbd67fcd467822faa9b65e25
9f7b67d0176210718391c62054bea9cb5cb5711e
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNAZ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b9cf5f5844701a93bbb771b55ab43221
e9bdf93afa83ab3d557884655385a4e1f1e18583
describe
'113268' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBA' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
a0dd55fe7ec987ee7a902ed61e5e3b47
d53f0cb1b54a7027611edba929a45923d759d890
describe
'34437' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBB' 'sip-files00053.pro'
d50e5dc5c6b7012fa93d89724079fffd
88db2c845d628f5c0102e6ed1a337addf7d94ae5
describe
'40958' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBC' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
d4c38deb9d5113e47460f87d3f656f63
6b0659524f55151467ff623059fc28db1a83e195
'2011-10-30T19:51:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBD' 'sip-files00053.tif'
2f9af73953e69700e60355183a9b46a3
6657aa9746b18ad953850f0598718fb0354a388c
'2011-10-30T19:53:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBE' 'sip-files00053.txt'
72b3d66ae166b46eefaeba71b8bb9ebb
543f420145bcae3e22f5d8f9bf416475647a7ca4
describe
'10843' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBF' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
29f53864581d616231214896771c8618
72e60fa3b7122d382afc791eb7a64ebb6881f70f
describe
'1365114' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBG' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
7016fe4c7fdda2eb511e4747ef66bf97
d2446297330207bb81a22c05a3f03da660ba9fc0
describe
'115885' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBH' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
b719630e8d960e23962afe0726010c3b
5d6664997c628a09b428afde4c9b61be778ad10a
describe
'33723' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBI' 'sip-files00054.pro'
a25f7e319a772e3a2f89dc8abde7ba1c
5ccca3903980bd5ab797c041a661389d6808285c
describe
'41760' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBJ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
a66f3728068ef9a143b6cc07917a752a
1fcca464283f152736f0ce0eb47f98fc65c56f96
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBK' 'sip-files00054.tif'
e6712d74eecb9c18ad93274cd61a2f91
5dd794feadbd0229edca9c953909e17a1d827bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBL' 'sip-files00054.txt'
f431672a46b5f9317d912c5955c25577
c17e92ef07482c0de2c9dd45f55fb915a11da56b
'2011-10-30T19:54:18-04:00'
describe
'11302' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBM' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
89b4ffba1643faa084f2cc788f22dc8c
47b9076731a0e14b86e4436ce23d85f7516a241e
'2011-10-30T19:52:40-04:00'
describe
'1349987' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBN' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
d60e555ae00ef7b14a6621d2f6314b6f
856ff88462d7fe116855b54f09bbabd5c24268e0
describe
'109125' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBO' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
f15ff58fced634c1493bf45946a083c9
1ab01d7d4159da1c108a79a02db9558abf40a67f
describe
'33858' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBP' 'sip-files00055.pro'
ed2f3d2e59de19e653c57951b19c0f02
69c7ee330542734fc721f63ff96cacf3fccc7fab
describe
'39302' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
8f8bfeb57d0751cd0080bf3b9514e9ef
2f99035577d9a9a4fabb2ec3052752afb4e0dc0b
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBR' 'sip-files00055.tif'
8e35a6f3d4e687c1b96d4cc3673da858
2dc64afd5e28b1fd102b6ed6b197db3f9cb2223d
'2011-10-30T19:54:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBS' 'sip-files00055.txt'
437d1df1b88ddf10e416ca7db7369ca3
6d9b78a2737349e78f384b8896efb8e2df360be4
'2011-10-30T19:51:27-04:00'
describe
'10428' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBT' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
728dd72ba254c42fe38ea6a1606d8d70
f9632493340892469762f959cf58d9598acf4b4e
'2011-10-30T19:54:15-04:00'
describe
'1365120' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBU' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
dadf97e2079e23ab23406ca17f456e35
dc058c6b1d29dc25598ef5cddf8b9e316dc5d5e1
describe
'118387' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBV' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
b44feece0dd47954305734ccfbb0181a
fd374e074b5be75646b5a3ebc60597dda107dad4
describe
'34736' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBW' 'sip-files00056.pro'
7a59627e3a0640578bc489675c28a69c
864a72112b30871361800b0a07b54d25b2e880ba
'2011-10-30T19:53:05-04:00'
describe
'42195' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBX' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
463c1c81a8bafffc85d6c012658c3794
5525684708a9780c3257ae59c935e4766cd60251
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBY' 'sip-files00056.tif'
c1dc5f4c7e5ddcca04d11c3f8aecc603
6e291ceb71e5ef317df6f5c3fe0e859383f43eca
'2011-10-30T19:53:59-04:00'
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNBZ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
979cf2dbd7c935e7033ea7671204bd26
2a23fb00d9a2e88bca205d0dbd6c0078b2b89331
describe
'11190' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCA' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
1ca1327d3539bab8d5f8cfe744e9f8ab
3b4df045130a19f5e99d9761db876ac7bad89840
describe
'1349940' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCB' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
9b5975c4ee0fcaa7908319e213c38ea5
cafad7ecda4d6ae93925f79dacd226deeff1ad30
describe
'110499' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCC' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
f78fd4d17c242c1817d99829f8144a0b
86585aaa93bfd05b5c56813b930aacefcebae0fc
describe
'33214' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCD' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f041d8b6d8f956ffa94714526ea715b2
134684566c2ac0f9039e808fd842e4ae72c44b9c
'2011-10-30T19:54:42-04:00'
describe
'39903' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCE' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
7ad9f931cf384f199c6431acb838157a
8c72fa3dd4661dd851e0d68002c5690238d086d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCF' 'sip-files00057.tif'
73fdc0e9f48c0ace0f9159658e3d60bc
bac72cdbb791734cccc8a5f057cce618aa8000fc
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCG' 'sip-files00057.txt'
5f2d4c19638dedaa533026a2a698b108
f77d875c6c5289c43163b0ce2d4db3031d2c094c
describe
'10652' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCH' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
ac9f8abaaf2c6c9cf0ad4271a0fd025f
3c7d3dc59bb78f24c05ad2adefb5247018587559
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
3f381dac0a821606161830190c671f19
05209e52fa88661dbae4929355876246931b9bd2
describe
'117697' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCJ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
0d6ebbcef7d8ac9509a55e7556262da5
8d1dd9c3a100809e8f92b09784e192caf7ebef28
describe
'34633' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCK' 'sip-files00058.pro'
8af7575f9bdb8276edfd3b2454a13b3d
1cbdd67fa6a0edbeab4252df749ffb995180a1e6
describe
'42158' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCL' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
c9c3b9b32367d1d26a6fed3437861c37
40511f00f94a38efadf5e50496c21e4c3bdd3d9a
'2011-10-30T19:50:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCM' 'sip-files00058.tif'
3596dba362cc3f090f865760a68658f4
c906d6119d7e84bb4df074329493d9d7fd4175cb
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCN' 'sip-files00058.txt'
b3d12584dfc4fca808aaf824971ce0ef
1674a045bb244e1bebcf3b75d48e5cb0a2bfd744
'2011-10-30T19:53:44-04:00'
describe
'11103' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCO' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
a629b8cc6aeb28d4dd90a296876a915a
9053b0767ece171746e3d641c267be5058c0ac71
describe
'1349991' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
b4f0af28d353ae41b5861767b8644d13
c61b5def5fa103815377413f6903299f09b9a34f
describe
'109147' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
0fbc9367c4df218f2e25ff8f0d40b0e3
71f46401b7f3312c02cbab67619f7040154d7b71
'2011-10-30T19:53:57-04:00'
describe
'32320' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCR' 'sip-files00059.pro'
aa019a59251068f2cab1861c35572cdf
d0914d95d7027241e5678c50b7cf3f1d66cc9a53
describe
'39688' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCS' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
b8df14af772ac7942729525c28522bf4
ab2e95d1624907a2738229be5d660fbd9574da17
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
81df1e0a6537178c0c1dadf1910d6c20
eb552bf317362c6e9d22b0d4e11b59133fc44a60
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
938bb41d3fd10866d46c1ff20af404fb
1ee1a31a0cc8e86fe06adaa8bade922a11bd7146
describe
'10554' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCV' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
43b0aed819bbf7059336c87aff8b8f2f
e7f10f4a0bfe7b429a5a3e87bb1f10703d013284
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCW' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
e60682ebdd0311e251b56ff29a0e91b9
6d54f7296bf8727480e52ba1e716a3b920714978
describe
'108588' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCX' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
ea35c28f9f0c374abaa2b32dc249b62e
96f616f875ce524b1dcf22968294060a525013ec
describe
'31438' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
fe1b176c16623e220bc06b484f1748c2
ec3c030e21d99a54a9411846f53ecb2f74652292
describe
'38577' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNCZ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
a8192d34c6b7a6d6ddfda6872772144e
3b862c9f6534a2e84d7d92d45c2174c3ab800c7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDA' 'sip-files00060.tif'
baab1b9d4993054450f6ad10d37665ba
3b25f5cbd1a00dcbdcc2a4158ce96a4f61252f13
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
142f9e183346457bdd376eef0087c2dc
e087c4928eb3cf560c621a868b61aea2430486a3
describe
'10680' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDC' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
c62ccf64247c84e7c89ce9a03cee1a2b
eeb9cda42b0b943c426cc4c7eb8165dede64b663
describe
'1418598' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDD' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
b6accea8ba29ab02821cfa81e6d6c827
ccff953cb29b4b3786e8e951e1b2ed6fa41852b8
describe
'114235' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDE' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e0367b8220802c357eceab08f4b5028d
9ee0889beb037ff2df610f6cc63f3888fe0d12d4
describe
'33716' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDF' 'sip-files00061.pro'
3132c78d96918861d2ca6fec19744ba6
a416d868d0f80ca09db2d67827f8fb091202d5e9
describe
'40326' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDG' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
37868080aa929ff92865fa79b3d12bdd
b6a5a4f351a54520f8d904aa19054861098777d7
'2011-10-30T19:53:19-04:00'
describe
'11359803' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDH' 'sip-files00061.tif'
e0c54699de81f84e468a5fa44ef2940a
672589e810d25c66b77b6e433ee833db98472a82
'2011-10-30T19:54:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDI' 'sip-files00061.txt'
7870827618ffc31f7ff884d3dd1a85a0
d650f873ed9239aac7330c5462ea5724018b70ee
describe
'10729' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
aa593a0e3a3105422b4a181b79a95e6a
0424f7a82e8c36aa1fbf2dc3547472ea6375cc8e
describe
'1389606' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDK' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
502b3a0f426e39e7c57bbc7480317385
7aa9a4178bd07cb14ce73c945f8c6d3841802ed8
describe
'106558' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
9d12ed087af41b48ec78d4dc53ceff1f
215507f6182da86905bfd58e27b46054c086482f
describe
'2888' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDM' 'sip-files00062.pro'
4abba640a7dbd766a2b4200de3971f1b
0fdb2b2fdfa59eaea8e43df22d880ed95949ad68
describe
'29639' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDN' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
8ef1a4cbbd27cf3a8bd1c88aeae01991
703311e6927c03cdb00d585e4e538dd72cda328f
'2011-10-30T19:53:03-04:00'
describe
'11127541' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDO' 'sip-files00062.tif'
cca58d11128fe33584ae1a1fe29e9d98
03e146107fa2a8f073f0089d41b1abdb80e225f4
describe
'151' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
6db21a63c97175e2091cf1a369f98835
c19a8386dadbf1e769d1d50e848671b8f2351dab
describe
Invalid character
'7635' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDQ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
660f7aca64e52867c59e1ac51076d8ff
a419e0b77c127f77faf7ae50bdf3e302e90e8076
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
d12ba9a43df468319fd885334a7c66d1
f975eca7473c9c3289e5a7b0c984e71f479a9ee3
describe
'109282' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
12c69773078f295e3645c8041dbc3de7
a85fbbde0a2437183a99b6ac83f2851697c457b6
'2011-10-30T19:53:26-04:00'
describe
'30053' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
f0dbecf85425c1f3d908451f752c3335
7f8cdd3401f8760c22fd836c1329d4aae492e1ec
'2011-10-30T19:54:28-04:00'
describe
'37469' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDU' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
f84c6f532294be6eeb6fcd5fee96aca4
bf107b2a49c065a16e108bac4d877b113adfa340
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
2d54c9f2e07f0db85638fbb9cf249bcd
64cdb9ee12973364ca10aaa0d847fa4d41176699
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDW' 'sip-files00064.txt'
62755ff6e304ec2ba2c0dfd2e0aa63cd
fa46e9492a4c434b461dbafb4c234aeac2036a98
describe
Invalid character
'10385' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDX' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
2f37778ae40fcacacada34636ef4c70e
86a9f2458d4283f19cf9daa6b00c606ed7fe9090
describe
'1376694' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDY' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
0ecdda8302defacd52754a37fac5be32
c4253015c3f1348084f831fb9d6020b55e7899a1
describe
'107970' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNDZ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
e3e425b17b93af36ba0f758d5d356cf0
ada7ff86df0204cc8503055215b3137187a03f30
'2011-10-30T19:53:17-04:00'
describe
'32293' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
12acf8dd3609d3ad29dc2127b56d3148
d6d1fa57fb73acf439e93229cb652d94b306a005
describe
'39668' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
59bf54ac3ed3040dc0fcb16843c549c5
d3dc49b9a4b87b3ddec8d489b7e5a2db86d6e4be
describe
'11024067' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
99c51afc2c2d7d641d59f534acef56e1
60fb4c7219d98255375d79e9f90685abc35754d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNED' 'sip-files00065.txt'
3e4f85e0bf14361eeb31dc9882cd2e8e
b3567a38c27de9df79a93081c128c31d70742d23
describe
'10772' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEE' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
97d32d891344524fabca8d6559f984d3
910a367ea4cc321b73dd87a27f53eadc68e10639
describe
'1389535' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
23de7f0e6a485c3c4ff56f025c347d98
19d87104d62cac50bd0adf568f16ecdbeaf85238
describe
'113747' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
af9f197489f1318766cc799d35df2452
ae9c209a2098c0880cdd4e5ed47e0c1950041122
describe
'33684' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
358326eac8ae9ed45a739e44bf3d2ed2
439d297b473b8f556a87cf99c9a90a8fb9820ea1
describe
'41337' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
31826be35361597cda82570ddfdbdeb5
c04977c6e6521222e1de4ee1fee9ee99ec0c061f
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
fc847c8432c4a961c440ee833d4b9006
31dc43330d9993a05395b7c31d4ad38f3237f884
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEK' 'sip-files00066.txt'
4307b73be15a50c5876d4660e9cfb442
0532552fc35c27b79a8c8d1dc14a80f34e3a007f
describe
'10903' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEL' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
37146cfdd5ddd358ed6f979b61669b0c
9b2c0b2695657c8e33c06730d26dcb52031cb05a
describe
'1376702' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
23b9af6d619fd30177af6f041547b058
e6151b47fe6d023d5545f50dfa8b8bc92ef5502d
describe
'108039' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEN' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
cd5d97d0bc43bc81a79177d8567b29a5
1e0c53721534c5f1d13ff9c4385a16cd453c1272
describe
'32722' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
c901b7c89d46e25d35984caa317f6191
cb36749b8c357246511e76be196b5fe269c605e3
describe
'39110' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
668e6a42025c7f874f43cac42c9b197b
ec734ff104e6b4fc609cec9ddb816151c96508aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
467c12be94ddc76a54e78869bfcadb77
ea2ac7b2fc23ef400a59dbe26c7ab3fde4c10805
'2011-10-30T19:53:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNER' 'sip-files00067.txt'
8f727f77a62c6449348cd3dadcdcba24
4e54f83952c2d7a42af202d2a49fe17348512b03
describe
'10529' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNES' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
3c3e4a85b8774e880ae5a5bbd79c3a28
54bcf0d1b414dfb541a16dd0686658847632e2c1
describe
'1389594' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNET' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
d55a2692258ddfa5ff46bcd6c1054820
67cd4587807477c277cb8b3676910b7318fcfd35
'2011-10-30T19:51:44-04:00'
describe
'101858' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEU' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
7defcebf547cb7e23d2d0eded2dd6b34
36b16d0c7204fc2ae2a4bdbd9ff6fd127112fc62
describe
'30477' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
d5c9135da85f3fc4c250df802f616f5e
874da9000b49a4cbf0b5af28384f09a11a266f8d
describe
'35439' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
be8b4ec7c618cf1ea09d389350f6a2d7
b67f805fdad282c9b117fc1c026cd42692315925
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEX' 'sip-files00068.tif'
179c0fdb0ec61ccf00c0c82158fcad6e
c93c18c8d097d9d6fb33336e10bb4555f6f25b6e
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEY' 'sip-files00068.txt'
8a8427689b4388e35ae9204782da6c2e
0632fcf13948306362de659fbb20da94fb994f3a
describe
'10077' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNEZ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
304981dbf4c313fb5c5473ed54831e67
f1df080c6497fffc0c130548ed1e57d8b47afd46
describe
'1378454' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFA' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
c02a3184f3fe3c244ecf0b407b2e1d4f
9271998739d07e4086a91a1f2d3b01b37ff7d279
describe
'100131' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
5086129fbe12539ab1aa277b6fd0a846
29287a309d1e31d7c57591716cb55e7a6d678153
describe
'29646' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
f50eb656640b7c54c1566b452ee3c47b
943a1cc2d3dda80e061fd57ebb424eeda49e6476
describe
'35821' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFD' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3784c51992f7313162f5b9d7b2d69f73
5cad88c93236c2ed3c29174d54af07fcc792dbdd
describe
'11038143' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFE' 'sip-files00069.tif'
c4a7166c4883f1e7d2f9fdaddae34fb9
f0736fff323d2404c8c167adcf6f9a789615361d
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFF' 'sip-files00069.txt'
cefc39051b05c80919200b635fedf0ef
d143350126d2017ef692788abeeb71ded302ec73
describe
'9896' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
ada579e2bf5f173ff10de1c302508a0b
0f2c1330dd446de5ff546c024fb4ed0d3f0f4c29
describe
'1389618' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFH' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
126f12b49793fa6fa4b21b1b820c0cc2
d982fe24fc526081bc4fca2770bb89ea50f573ba
describe
'114980' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFI' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
0459e0fdf7e101cfff15750b58350f05
bf51d71854db9a27a21e76efe1eda3606ef3a978
describe
'35107' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
311a5e1cd09735a6d60204d7c056b976
170a933373a451430c3a66bb4b4bc94f5740f906
'2011-10-30T19:52:03-04:00'
describe
'40618' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
04bab506fcb443d58c34450a6f3b6902
87f2bc66089611b115064097b17511a622d58d67
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
9d72465a890f89c5ce8e420ff8181bc1
e7330cc85a3a7e54dd44ab21ce623c9b7c4db7a6
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
33b33f0c0b26704080369c5820291e6c
2cac24be13cbfb8ca9860b801790a02831b7d8cb
describe
'10669' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFN' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
c1c6fdff5d57df69f9e17aeb66964aa7
f9afaecef97477d44a4650bf69631ffb6ce2ef0b
describe
'1418560' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFO' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
70018099c4ff85c5db5d703d8ac0d04d
69458f005ad54961a76f23c04a328a50208e0b5d
'2011-10-30T19:51:48-04:00'
describe
'115024' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFP' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
27c6cc15e26d02526f217ede8b34214e
a9bfb291c4d224bd5c8e9bdaa371651ec93dbc93
describe
'35505' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFQ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
d39b37129e38d839b6342d3145113646
963fd4d3cfa101878c6c3bb9e86680db2314e347
describe
'41222' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFR' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
c6e2644190ee88eea13d9b9d198fe7dc
894ba078aa3463495124b888e64864d1a273b1c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFS' 'sip-files00071.tif'
793b117263b2d6bf6d43977d33e2e3da
7666be3f63608fb44fd5229eddf9df49bef41969
'2011-10-30T19:51:02-04:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFT' 'sip-files00071.txt'
ef2d427a6ee5b7272e1c37e92971a7a3
9e8c9bb91a2dca03f7fe30ae9779e15a3fd5c3ac
'2011-10-30T19:53:42-04:00'
describe
'10819' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFU' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2d932c704b97ad874f2206e8bf39eab3
986f3e62a4369986ae621a67e91fe502f257eb9e
describe
'1389619' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
94c838f3dd541a33e76e895736a3bad0
4bcd6b15e4673c3f9f29d4442f0e8202105505bd
describe
'120018' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFW' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
8595f74cd2ccbec32297dcd36de791cd
42fc1fb97676da66557ad0a5e5fd78b9a74de0cb
describe
'36593' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
b8634cd8085a3911d95713cc810b6397
e18d972b63c3a3fa5d68caf718ccaca552ee5908
describe
'42130' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFY' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
7e2ecde16bb565510680cbc9c036d91b
07f1b852922b54e6d7a2ede5f723547f793daf34
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNFZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
f993f2924d3c3d4bcedf23f191878b95
6e2570a7a4afb13f0c4c65f462de1d47f56a2bc7
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGA' 'sip-files00072.txt'
a95d38e4b3d8fbf8cbc31eb0dd0e8437
f4666a3423423775fc1a4822a53f95ad9f33a39c
describe
'10949' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGB' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
321550fd83f0ec03f29bc840c950a58b
7566b1fae643b5200fec3bd95a97423bce1499ed
describe
'1418618' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
490d4af53a6dc9342db63b462a76250a
a38a2b40a5b8f9dea10aab76fbfbe2ae13b04b09
describe
'113834' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGD' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
1afd93b8f782d1b3eb3443def5a42a6e
bcdf25b9e9776ca4d97be01d7a7941fc6a547791
'2011-10-30T19:52:55-04:00'
describe
'34915' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGE' 'sip-files00073.pro'
5cb18a335a88b3065944d89d3b83aa09
6abb8fa789cc7bd3bcc3b6fe88404df40ff63d52
describe
'40776' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGF' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
e745750a704dfc7fec989580560c5f46
f53f77ebc74d97f9d8e8f08d4c649da182fedba3
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
49b4e2cf71103d60e5ea2786e4deeb2c
429de6d83cb2810169fe8a4adb04979d441ae561
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGH' 'sip-files00073.txt'
dba77dcdc09bd69c05ffb8d93d728815
51df26bb8680d0c7f4bb00ae8a1577c13dbd5ff5
describe
'10756' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGI' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
3a64930360ed009ba394cee4f3772499
1cf06183ffe461db81957aadeb3a06848d770ac9
describe
'1389564' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGJ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
10b9ac11a3a357da1d480b137ec964a5
cc7a38a248502b0c37dbd6e1627e0d052a75760d
describe
'116336' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGK' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
68cca83d585595b7fff503554aab23ae
300cc10de57f0c49b9dedf053ea3fe613a165795
describe
'34792' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGL' 'sip-files00074.pro'
4b40063ded1a6c8aedb26c1623ce18ca
e22b04471883641fbeb2ff66d0f7d4c6923fbc3d
'2011-10-30T19:54:25-04:00'
describe
'41257' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
ecff191ba8b76063731ec9625ddcc9c6
4a488c3719a19eebb9da07ead0491e747a00ad1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGN' 'sip-files00074.tif'
cbcbb598dff3d68a7c6cff44f3f156d2
02065c4c6f40b323a665e39a36b046634bf86106
'2011-10-30T19:53:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGO' 'sip-files00074.txt'
98007aaf095e62310bdfbbb49fcecd2a
444d16225cbb56ede4bbc306f68d86e03914fb9e
describe
'10627' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGP' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
a10051a30907589bbd2fcb6163dedae2
03d7d0d99bcdde060579ec43cfbeb62f5f2997f5
'2011-10-30T19:54:24-04:00'
describe
'1418614' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGQ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
40ff5f13e93a3f62445ecad1febd18ec
8b38539bb9c193d33dec065e02ec663fb4698612
describe
'107220' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGR' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
0bf4409ca2bf746c53b57128570c5c41
e294b1aa4bc8228e8a8aa393982866fb3bb6b95b
describe
'33191' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGS' 'sip-files00075.pro'
8a0ba81e866f219afdbe96afeb4f93ec
13d32911781ed176897ed072b83854ff7aa9deb6
describe
'38665' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGT' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
a7b7461ca816ff0ed720d838870351eb
3624c33b31f2b39b1416ebda3db433182d88d02c
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
1c33085d8a4408e682517fabe5906fd3
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describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGV' 'sip-files00075.txt'
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21662bab3218047a5acc39e6c9de807d0befa56c
describe
'10226' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGW' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
cebac8bcccecaf8d4241dfd221a11fa1
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describe
'1389560' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGX' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
43a67f7d6e6341017a50a2b29bf53b1b
ecc5605546c12030b2e2af83afa80b91318c051f
'2011-10-30T19:54:32-04:00'
describe
'104925' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
7d8293d592b68bbf305eb54670576449
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describe
'30286' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNGZ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
bf863546e46fe77729734a79d986cfc8
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describe
'37973' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHA' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
57e09fe27e689ecde0882886f6dc5926
c2632107661ad1f50cc5f7be42a9bf6a562e291b
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHB' 'sip-files00076.tif'
399993059981525e072429f01bf764bd
fb385f38b720d5edc1f0e681dbc716a02c7127ee
'2011-10-30T19:54:36-04:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHC' 'sip-files00076.txt'
d70f0546c757d32b5b1079396c5e2574
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describe
'10271' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHD' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
2a0c393dafa3a967a81c682fb1ae8740
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'2011-10-30T19:51:13-04:00'
describe
'1418640' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHE' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
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describe
'106122' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHF' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
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describe
'32385' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHG' 'sip-files00077.pro'
8a14de9cf4e6e71450fe60a8e67bcc00
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describe
'38737' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHH' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
19bdbcb79776b3066f2644bb033333bb
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'2011-10-30T19:54:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHI' 'sip-files00077.tif'
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describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHJ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
1fa257b5ae0d180c3bdd811d74326ee7
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describe
'10234' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHK' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
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describe
'1389613' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHL' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
ceb38d4ae39996d2a26ba9aa9de16765
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describe
'108725' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHM' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
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describe
'32281' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHN' 'sip-files00078.pro'
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describe
'38960' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHO' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
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f656fc192ef7880d08a7b1aab05a9cddc878d7da
'2011-10-30T19:54:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
7cd923a749d11d789dcee226faa3a2c2
97acf24b75ccbf31230c5174a38081c9abebfed9
'2011-10-30T19:53:20-04:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
faa476536ddf3c5e797148ae83366bba
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describe
'10358' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
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'2011-10-30T19:53:52-04:00'
describe
'1418613' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHS' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
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describe
'116649' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHT' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
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describe
'35804' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHU' 'sip-files00079.pro'
5c67ac53f9f7275539a906cb52458e9e
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describe
'42165' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHV' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
db96894cb24c314ac770118acfe798d5
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHW' 'sip-files00079.tif'
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describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHX' 'sip-files00079.txt'
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describe
'11094' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHY' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
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describe
'1389607' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNHZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
f8b623a20d435833c1d4bb3381f216c6
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'2011-10-30T19:52:22-04:00'
describe
'112591' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIA' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
12f681137a2c7fdf94757001058cc119
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describe
'33688' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
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describe
'40959' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIC' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNID' 'sip-files00080.tif'
d2bb33ba91f703d9880cd9289a22fff0
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIE' 'sip-files00080.txt'
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describe
'10780' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIF' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
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describe
'1418632' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIG' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
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describe
'98959' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIH' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
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describe
'30327' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNII' 'sip-files00081.pro'
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describe
'36079' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIJ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIK' 'sip-files00081.tif'
b5024cd3ae83ff8078dd03d865b11e0e
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'2011-10-30T19:51:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIL' 'sip-files00081.txt'
e8f12d3f0c51dacd2008ea2104bd3800
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describe
'9799' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIM' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
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describe
'1389592' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIN' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
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describe
'96441' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
0cb8d573ff44a3e2df84a5d49682cb40
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'2011-10-30T19:53:29-04:00'
describe
'28212' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIP' 'sip-files00082.pro'
e4901caa9bff739402369260f27922cb
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describe
'34263' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIQ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
2f73c6da252f857521adf875edc33cf0
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIR' 'sip-files00082.tif'
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'2011-10-30T19:53:43-04:00'
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIS' 'sip-files00082.txt'
b07671313a392b68c78c4c94f54dbf0b
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describe
'9243' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIT' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
c113734b84260a666073acaad400bdba
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIU' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
2db4e18209339551b26e65bcb97d2114
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describe
'114118' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIV' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
493876dd0b0f8435640f1d0deb6b591a
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describe
'34499' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIW' 'sip-files00083.pro'
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describe
'41215' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIX' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIY' 'sip-files00083.tif'
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describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNIZ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
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describe
'10928' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJA' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
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describe
'1389561' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJB' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
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describe
'116761' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJC' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
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describe
'35060' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJD' 'sip-files00084.pro'
cdb228291aa7ac83911fd2ca629980de
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describe
'41807' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJE' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJF' 'sip-files00084.tif'
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describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJG' 'sip-files00084.txt'
cd3ce575898e17ad1d25130fbb9b2fd8
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describe
'11122' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJH' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
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describe
'1418572' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJI' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
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describe
'113128' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJJ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
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describe
'35422' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJK' 'sip-files00085.pro'
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describe
'41005' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
cb5fe60e1e773b3a00a5c1ee057f1314
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
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describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJN' 'sip-files00085.txt'
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describe
'10967' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJO' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
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describe
'1389614' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b2dfd594b46f9c04c46beeac8e1054c1
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'2011-10-30T19:53:28-04:00'
describe
'106491' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
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describe
'33641' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJR' 'sip-files00086.pro'
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describe
'38624' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJS' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
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'2011-10-30T19:51:11-04:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJU' 'sip-files00086.txt'
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describe
'10510' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJV' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
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describe
'1418623' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJW' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
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describe
'109506' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
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describe
'33190' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJY' 'sip-files00087.pro'
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describe
'39669' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNJZ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKA' 'sip-files00087.tif'
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'2011-10-30T19:54:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
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describe
'10924' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKC' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
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describe
'1389602' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKD' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
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describe
'115993' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
6a814daa2d3443130c575a44792f27b8
aeb4f605a82faad66ba00ab77114e487b8f11cc7
describe
'35126' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKF' 'sip-files00088.pro'
f743c33cb1d22eff25166b57ea313878
b7e8b63a8da3d2130f4a30fee2d579ac78edd09e
describe
'41589' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
8da205aea4f4e87852dc62bdc8b00c95
50dd9c3fce395d45d16edf687df2bc5f0c83e935
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
7d2127478fb8022f8a733112687077cb
7d92e7bfc4c9405c044ef8c5653aecccead02412
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
404523fba188e382bb655ff70b9fea07
7fefb21abd09cb979e52007aad3fbea8b7b5073b
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKJ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
08f406efa0db369cae9a701f8ed1efb4
90373f52d75d684cecef0f0fa7df221ce385c5a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKK' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
4ac7d32df6b20ba8feea94375d5989e7
daa22f7748e3f23871595498db7b3f2b0c45cc81
describe
'112164' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
b8e43d1af9ec6d1e19c89ecd52ff2cc6
3b93b38e1fad5dd8c0cef42594dfd99c39885888
describe
'33725' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKM' 'sip-files00089.pro'
386cfba9d93e75e4bc658b3714bf2c3e
302c2defd32d1739570f1291af816aef8ee54e17
describe
'39642' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKN' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
ce39680e2c670b99fc5f72dbd489fad4
e9ee466b2f078a181ec228068ed552c470088b1a
'2011-10-30T19:54:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
559f79745ad89e627883e0d758bb7a2f
cfd8c3115ceb7971b7287b124db724c305e64a1c
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKP' 'sip-files00089.txt'
cbbd822fb63dbdd44d86ea7e164412f9
4168ccd6fd68daed0400d03f55600d62a7d4ba08
describe
'10574' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKQ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
3c18eff46d97d06752b3dc6fac0e5a12
573603bb2d0e26644db7d956cd285d38ed032046
describe
'1418594' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKR' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
a5e8499f12eacf08ace5cfcc223bd3df
cb6a7a97862d729f6a1fb0417d3001481979fab7
describe
'115211' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKS' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
89b868186fcd39fc5b7cdab0da92ab1c
803f834c6f0f043397076b9b6fbc602e19525a35
describe
'2782' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKT' 'sip-files00091.pro'
f0a7f7e45e90eac3a8dcb51150a4dcfd
427943a518b96fe69dad43e22dbcc825cf70a81a
describe
'31242' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKU' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
d0b4ea559fd9c4a655dca62936ca148e
7bfef033f00aa68cfc421247490090984bbc0fa2
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKV' 'sip-files00091.tif'
b6e602a2adcfdf0c5deab9d736b70a37
7fca0367d4557661d4f89ec9d8e89585f689c1d3
describe
'409' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKW' 'sip-files00091.txt'
9b1f906c90633fdf6e71b6ffd3d78a1f
9b6e5c64036a642ea6f7de10f07268f0f89014cc
'2011-10-30T19:54:46-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7827' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKX' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
9cec349d7a00221a72c6c21f3030bb6c
23c252317c42e2abf818346cfe0d7089ce1bda6a
'2011-10-30T19:52:33-04:00'
describe
'1389599' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKY' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
877c7b19fa61500cfcdb3e9d7e190e15
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describe
'107401' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNKZ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
b76d7226051a47f77928503dc333967f
168031333ea4ab235cefc44fbe66149b8d773c31
describe
'30005' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLA' 'sip-files00092.pro'
b3644cb208489082400f9361c1e21ea8
3ec3e731b3c42b28c4d4e6c4acd1e27f30bf340f
describe
'37436' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLB' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
d1a85e2bcb0794411e969fea19d2cb5b
775d62a1a148e7b9bee9740b74291262dfef3541
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLC' 'sip-files00092.tif'
ad2479471ae76a6bcb74c9295ec0c507
3920aa3082205d73043ef4e2c9977f144c63fcd5
'2011-10-30T19:54:56-04:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLD' 'sip-files00092.txt'
08dd8e6961b399985e36d0a37f61b6c9
1f02ce4914dfb1b271e870579fa2913a195e4ab2
describe
'10386' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLE' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
026c3bd7b9f6432730679c85d42c9307
bcaa744b8412965483846604c3a195f8c8f528e2
describe
'1422919' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLF' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
2600e25e7321789ac55211cb26ed30ee
297951a80b644dfb69329e30373a2543ccee1288
describe
'108240' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLG' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
86c558716fa81eee0ac141ada6a43d0a
e6ac6adf934b2e8183b13c4fff6f5097a242d353
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLH' 'sip-files00093.pro'
68f839f93a4480da415433502b49130e
f413a77633b9a511e93bde884c4bd359b231df09
describe
'39056' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLI' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
c4fd8ea8a33ef44f6060e30a42c3adc9
661f817342fdb324e139a91a0ac1e3436d74f19d
describe
'11400107' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLJ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
242d6aa4fb8f995b692c704084788890
8f4d439f13cd0321301473e1a93b28eed703ad7a
'2011-10-30T19:53:10-04:00'
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLK' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b925a36b4dcb6b4930456fb8e2289553
1bd21c212b5921cb1ffcce3260ee25aa664edadb
describe
'10325' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLL' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
1de4b9a8207cab45134a4d6c2732b2c8
34dc6e8d2c45d391eaaa82897d410d9cc4bd8e12
describe
'1390506' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLM' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
4f83cbbdcbecbc9162d35fb421736b87
548576ad59cf7f44595a128e531caa61605b3357
describe
'112011' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLN' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
ae39130b739e0ee8a37111699810f169
51e895e67f5098090e533c5c1ca5144e8b854296
describe
'35709' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLO' 'sip-files00094.pro'
b1e62f2aabba367798319b00d67c6154
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describe
'40377' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLP' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
30d5e5cd7398be78ff5aff7dc87c1ae7
116c699dcbfff54a19f4f6e0ab0bc4e5c45012d2
describe
'11139907' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLQ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
3569deedbe98a6fbaa5c237cdc23cfde
d2bf208ec1a842a532c69a4430a5f1c78d12dd8d
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLR' 'sip-files00094.txt'
944a97d7fa4334beaf65f065ad18f192
f0ba0ece4a1442d023f6e0de96eb0cd2b8b1f1ff
describe
'10457' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLS' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
ca2e670ddee39ade42fb3846c3c17bc0
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describe
'1422944' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLT' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
b2f0fc8e62d124ff7c35d35add625a4c
4c7d3d7fffb485244fb9dd5b3d8f9ce21d723155
describe
'115686' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLU' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
ef504b6501e39004fd70afaaaf4323ca
9b5503fe1456430cf85d4859c4d0697ed152bbcd
describe
'35476' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLV' 'sip-files00095.pro'
43dc78df9c1a5a33624ba2aa2da8c8f8
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describe
'41495' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLW' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
53953df9362015ff2061e6f56b9499a0
41a80e7525f1c5971ebb5901bbc416ff902deed4
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLX' 'sip-files00095.tif'
47c4215625b745e306b354decd5abe79
64df5535f934b16fdf77b390e3f6b953d7a6bec1
'2011-10-30T19:50:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLY' 'sip-files00095.txt'
94ab1e6a4a303fba88013bbad0c1038f
e335300a9f2dcb3929321ec44e6e6c969d67d16e
describe
'10808' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNLZ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
719dc5a6e779c4f48709639d840c7caa
9aacaf6c51f74793bddda5a0f71a14a311ddc638
describe
'1390492' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMA' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
9c10d3b6d5b6a641df0b6b1d87e66f2e
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describe
'112181' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMB' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
190a04f964004af966f206610e3f4460
0116396ec9158f6482f497cf8fcb2c43733020ff
describe
'33804' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMC' 'sip-files00096.pro'
30490be94391bcce8c903ce5411ef7e9
9b3bccbd3cce57bb57c61f0220a7187928d55c7d
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMD' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
4d3cdac773da45e325a20c6b5d008515
81d1a076304631719aeca40fefb5f0130d080dee
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNME' 'sip-files00096.tif'
fc5596490470a8e34f02b2d7e26d5466
bd0d09ceb3bb1c1aa0003d5f899e53a78f34201e
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMF' 'sip-files00096.txt'
31248d7dbdd43d86c712353a28d80be1
6059c3f48bc90097ecb53cafb41a2b2f265d393a
describe
'10391' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMG' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
70134456cabc08b6cb162235f7b22350
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describe
'1422980' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMH' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
c6f7eded0f4eb765e59af07bad0ca5cc
3d95452558c03a17819bdd2ea995183ccb3c8a47
describe
'100980' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMI' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8d5a8f8a8bf5e70c2aedc51c1bb9a041
b632022186c3c7c958ee0fd3b18db1fbe339339f
describe
'31262' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMJ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
c0a7b84d62149491028f9df6d257146c
d29984ec85f7579a4caf2280be281157d807e2ae
describe
'36912' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMK' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8c66e36554529d5a3996f55019296410
e8425dd0956ff953efb825cf4660d6de5816e94a
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNML' 'sip-files00097.tif'
dfe8de4418f0cecfb23e286375c901f0
6474238df3f213648268f5bf48f758918d6b4a6b
'2011-10-30T19:52:54-04:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMM' 'sip-files00097.txt'
925b6e2abd2a0e29d6c228b5b8c0bb26
4365ae6d14394208e17e352c7984baea1f4809ca
describe
'9957' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMN' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
a655a97f80ebee83fce27ab1ce7327e1
1b1598a9f675f69b516db58fb511a4551d465ec1
describe
'1390451' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMO' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
ae49a05d84a333520ae9400b086cbf37
db6d8e890e3c5a6dda0f6bb53106a9ce59b9f93b
describe
'108309' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMP' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
888b4460be9b1786481491d0fccee6b0
5aba38df858576ebd477a03107b86c821d916f52
describe
'33491' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMQ' 'sip-files00098.pro'
18e61cd8a9471b605e15ec7d4151b4e2
c0579ac9497f8d2215dc49647b0b2bdb4bf5b08b
describe
'38696' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMR' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
1ab8f591a7bdfd90096a56d51450bedf
c2e32576a6492da7737e10ab34713f61ec5f5fc1
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMS' 'sip-files00098.tif'
049e20d2796dc980c9852616c2d5d7f2
6720497e9f7697c6c98fed846ca02d0dc2b082cc
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMT' 'sip-files00098.txt'
67c0af024bbedf82679d213ea399e3d1
5a5a8a1e6bb25ce83e2d8b54e863c07a267cc260
'2011-10-30T19:51:17-04:00'
describe
'10478' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMU' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
41bec64dc91c430687ad8c3cb3fcb04d
f4b45db1460bc136fcd67c8a59d9c850d1753553
describe
'1422964' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMV' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
1775ce8f43aad035e73760355ad78604
f4f7c11bc6c2a515c7de6ed810a64d1cb00725b8
describe
'105032' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMW' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
06246755b0c3f0631daccc7ba0633808
f963d6aa840dcf667d2150d89a6c1d49c7373c94
describe
'31234' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMX' 'sip-files00099.pro'
3e2db02f3a4f7c8308e43e5911b1f6a4
bb2bf7988edaefc1b7467e1b2048fb54950f8e5f
describe
'37120' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMY' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
a2eab8acbd84fcb0bb9d86bfa29fcb1b
bdb55b91ad42bb88ded498d7f0e5149c7d595b6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNMZ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
d209b446af8cefcc1dd4541fc0faf947
e3979f70d27991adcf1bf94432307f94e957ca7c
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNA' 'sip-files00099.txt'
4f63cde2ca0c46b17343adf98d7f8e10
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describe
'10176' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNB' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
4b0230bcc2ebf3277b75ceaa108d90f5
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describe
'1390413' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNC' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
32139820e938e9f5bb22e11372073e84
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describe
'112344' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNND' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
bd096bb5473830d58bab275ab0f92661
1c6dbf7e16091f12151e69f1da1018b03f5e5f11
describe
'34382' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNE' 'sip-files00100.pro'
885355183fe4340fe70c7b3eb59bc224
b2e5015e0f07ec71c9e55650f3ec73afde933069
describe
'39865' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNF' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
1cfecd62da0d8b58a863ba01d8bc476f
a13a7b5cec6f467c0b836268afab0926ca957704
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNG' 'sip-files00100.tif'
13e74b17e769ab151fb6c3d8670d503d
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describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNH' 'sip-files00100.txt'
7fe6d852e6592be0feeb0eb2e467d275
b114bfbd9500bf64f8d9806f40313b0ea3418025
describe
'10553' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNI' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
4fcec0f63f469b5df8425e033fbc816d
541f4992fef3f37c2258490a55a5c1e8c2388285
describe
'1393737' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNJ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
f148d8e01ea0fc64b0747fc8c5f34ac0
ac6cbbfe4e772738c5f594039c7e12a7e7d9b89a
describe
'115163' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNK' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
8b150b7e91e377c0571657c92d0cef50
c46f1bcb055f75ca2949366feecd4f55169ad1ac
describe
'36200' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNL' 'sip-files00101.pro'
68deff8ce1f300d54f22ee81dd0d6620
392d73fbe7c04c4db453e5035afe4d1c63d8f3b4
describe
'42067' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNM' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
d01ef1aefa765610a8e3ffbfdcffd0a1
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describe
'11160565' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNN' 'sip-files00101.tif'
4ac29bb734ecfd83c862c7b3c032da71
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describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNO' 'sip-files00101.txt'
22720248718f550b4f2669e1787228c4
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describe
'11162' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNP' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
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describe
'1390500' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNQ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
8d27b0143c97b33d98966705f1c4a669
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describe
'110678' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNR' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
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describe
'34731' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNS' 'sip-files00102.pro'
2459c9c81e2588d30115ad5d9adee429
ca138645dd4462af5d51526bd977f7a09cd2c803
describe
'40114' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNT' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
cb17cf5ab5de8da65e6294042ac0287b
101731d50f8bb6c5ebfdd93cd8b8089805b696d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNU' 'sip-files00102.tif'
0f5761a02095e627a878bb2face6a32a
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describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNV' 'sip-files00102.txt'
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800fe630878f96ea7946c15fb0decf532259db45
describe
'10596' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNW' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
359c110f09ca82608307c65c8b9d8cec
69f93e522a7ed0ea237eb1fb34b141a8a111ce1f
'2011-10-30T19:54:09-04:00'
describe
'1422935' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNX' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
c06866e85e65a1c1d54b322555968e37
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describe
'113018' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNY' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
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describe
'34296' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNNZ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
85a5b0bdb37b504a074fce4d1dbc8a89
df9aafdf8dd717123c12804f111da48141a64236
describe
'40730' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOA' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
45d5fb04f48e842af81bef11fddeb086
9d34a5adc1fa0a57b957c5fa65943d5982e14a2e
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOB' 'sip-files00103.tif'
3c4b926bf7fab55bae0a9b4008252ed8
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOC' 'sip-files00103.txt'
b8fd3f75522115fc6bbeeae794d7025a
1e0e822d13bc28d73d6690233d37e9c41b994d80
describe
'10774' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOD' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
8e456cc909cba66e03f969040f1ffbf1
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describe
'1390476' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOE' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e25a5432ec1548d7f789432028dd2e29
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describe
'64914' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOF' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e1d3dace0a91c67f90b35df7b0e4241b
dd560671d66296c9669a47b698fe7034035f7ae6
describe
'18791' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOG' 'sip-files00104.pro'
77d24f0e4c879c709f19afb28b32820f
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describe
'22687' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOH' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
cd45fd9483a5b97a161049258a65c81d
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOI' 'sip-files00104.tif'
00c31be1f690780cdf0b4ac0ca2634bd
0ff38d93ed0b6a88afa92ba7a773a422a62c53ba
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOJ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a290defeec16ae531006734b81c69d18
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describe
'6301' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOK' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
193be842e4fff3f70a39746d82898b5a
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describe
'1417389' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOL' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
cf990cfd342bb0c4233c6ba57d3f750f
001ba3516b512732f7808756a87565a9e69eb11c
describe
'16135' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOM' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
0e7a9831c46f215bb8eaaf9b6c359e09
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describe
'284' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNON' 'sip-files00105.pro'
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describe
'4218' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOO' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
481651c6fdaa5578c314c49b497755f7
c03dc7957a7bc67c1fa8f465bd28c615ad3a57f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOP' 'sip-files00105.tif'
f2fa22b36ae348af2d0a81d6d67cca09
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describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOQ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
f6663a90b788c9992e357d7e534dc319
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOR' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
6bfe1e7f0eef3b0b63e2201af9842e7e
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describe
'1390501' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOS' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
c457b1be472f00c31b45f03c545c6dda
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describe
'90924' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOT' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
afd151ff5dc167d6aa46a5655840c073
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describe
'39600' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOU' 'sip-files00106.pro'
6b1f305965204a775d213b81de541d72
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describe
'29535' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOV' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
44249538bceb8f5594471fa6fb48f072
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOW' 'sip-files00106.tif'
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describe
'1882' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOX' 'sip-files00106.txt'
a25de1a32a36cb5727c37e1523f43960
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describe
'7969' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOY' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
7894793fde504e9131fdaea0d705150c
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describe
'1422986' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNOZ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
a1adabbe3b39775dc66593bb236d331f
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describe
'114749' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPA' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
c48837974e5adcc49427014f07fbbe95
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describe
'63056' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPB' 'sip-files00107.pro'
451dad7ca6eed62ddbf86707f56fcc9a
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describe
'36004' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPC' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
5a72c1c50c5973769c26a2197edb7104
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPD' 'sip-files00107.tif'
ba4fd0be2323222591d63e9e71071576
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describe
'2865' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPE' 'sip-files00107.txt'
bbfabb94c498bac7198e3f4b7bdf4a7f
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describe
'9435' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPF' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
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describe
'1390433' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPG' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
1b441b3b72054565b1213ced48ec1158
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describe
'108531' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPH' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
c739a11ad3530638b8c15ec677a12110
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describe
'58954' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPI' 'sip-files00108.pro'
35736a3a02c27045202626782ab4afbc
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describe
'34391' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPJ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
0683cf0e62f386537bd61c19c09ee454
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPK' 'sip-files00108.tif'
b98c6c76ef1b0318001aea6dd9541e32
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describe
'2581' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPL' 'sip-files00108.txt'
0104d6d2d569641e88d3c092b786d27b
ab63bab25cbc7782175a10654fbe7084ad84b1ce
describe
'9052' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPM' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
e4a80cf9f6250a26f7d55cf3889c56e9
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describe
'1422994' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPN' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
1f931993a34ad99471a9a221f2d6499b
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describe
'110532' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPO' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
b92a62414adb3c848cf78be39f33a50d
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describe
'63738' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPP' 'sip-files00109.pro'
afb7d93d887736619154c4cee8a4d1a1
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describe
'34200' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPQ' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
5e84e02508ada5f0d7b5366ccddb68c7
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPR' 'sip-files00109.tif'
d4e15cefa6d565fbd90a931ccfd33c6c
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describe
'2858' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPS' 'sip-files00109.txt'
7a022a92708beaad2c0bdb7014c53e41
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describe
'8849' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPT' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
be6685071c0aeb598520648b676a7da2
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describe
'1390516' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPU' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
0dd9f8855ac3bb33672993b2d606c7b9
ffb233c2c2e55843efbfdd62c39b7414465dd20f
describe
'113995' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPV' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
39beca717735fa06a10892da0a5edfa1
b5220cdfe372eeb3d00023234fc89589e6b063f5
describe
'65273' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPW' 'sip-files00110.pro'
e4701ee099c1c2382519b9f4a4258d47
728384edb14b4a0a3e60761e2db488125b38ff52
'2011-10-30T19:51:58-04:00'
describe
'35064' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
56cf6e118765764a8b7ad0c9e4afbcb9
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPY' 'sip-files00110.tif'
f45a9e97f1a093fb75cf15409a070e0a
6f8cdb77a194995bfddcc186538789224a009cf5
describe
'2911' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNPZ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
85ff164d5118471db661ffdbf0ceb659
8d9859b08159bc023cfec57145a3dcd498db97ba
describe
'8862' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQA' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
cd78c4636221281ea328c1a2376e6c44
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describe
'1422929' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQB' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
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describe
'108166' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQC' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
6728f48e6eb3c73859b8f5be606224ae
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describe
'62388' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQD' 'sip-files00111.pro'
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describe
'33926' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQE' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
d8a8a780fde24ef72ac790f20a3e29cb
0ee49cde8d96de550b39b4ed8798a0929bc1d9cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQF' 'sip-files00111.tif'
69394fcd018efa6d168557f4a75e4c3b
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describe
'2733' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQG' 'sip-files00111.txt'
b7dd7274479e72169ae5dbeeebe34cd1
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describe
'8934' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQH' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
0a5f629294af1f39a8eae74f37d22b62
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describe
'1390511' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQI' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
116960d390029f1a66565967ec93bcf1
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describe
'106340' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQJ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
b8c13ce764e8f51000ab1005179e1a9e
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describe
'58200' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQK' 'sip-files00112.pro'
d571af4577290b39f01a9e6fe1a8bbfb
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describe
'33519' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQL' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
630b20aa2922900e82791e0ee3f06844
7ce074e8ea98c23dfc4f620eeb4898cf0627018a
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQM' 'sip-files00112.tif'
5f5b25597953ea7a63ed9813fd7d5d0e
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describe
'2608' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQN' 'sip-files00112.txt'
4331bc55cae4ad63bcd27ab900fbe78f
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describe
'8751' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQO' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
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describe
'1422991' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQP' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
3a42f4a4f25aee52c6733bca46091c01
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describe
'96244' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQQ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
23bd50e12721f8b1ae51e03f1f0500f7
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describe
'43367' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQR' 'sip-files00113.pro'
bf66cdd1e4d19f4f8e8a4514bb277d2b
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describe
'31479' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQS' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
17784a4bafff5c7fd7cc2991189cdbfa
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQT' 'sip-files00113.tif'
e709410d62087b056938cdd4c8dc4af6
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describe
'1963' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQU' 'sip-files00113.txt'
73f4de17b3b9c28f67cb62c82a0f3d35
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describe
'8451' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQV' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
d7c791ebd899b7cc74e2b3e2fbeafb02
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describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQW' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
eae108e8252a0aca6f615c22a6cefcba
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describe
'117126' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQX' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
eebadee274da64dfe1ea09d3f6ac0fb8
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describe
'58093' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQY' 'sip-files00114.pro'
c8d2cac093ab4d7f6a4f873a9488f361
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describe
'37267' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNQZ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
7815efc3c9f051c56494971a6665c2fa
b4b1de18a255550443f35ff60e9002f281441e23
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRA' 'sip-files00114.tif'
7213db2e691a919f4f376a41b827a203
597fa0f3f5f11dd6f067de7920e2d78a109fbee5
describe
'2473' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRB' 'sip-files00114.txt'
b1898915e2a699a9310a304ab141a581
dd2004e58b256e51bc926a3b9a3eb5c8776030ba
describe
'9354' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRC' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
c804ab539014a5b98668fdf455a84840
890076ebbfcd360efd3e3f052a77cc611e3fd590
describe
'1422940' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRD' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
bbae1b4e8c147086d1a0113d2663ff30
66a774a1f0823716f767a7b70fb976e38c52b2d2
describe
'106658' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRE' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
124636f58b56a3a9a439bd8887a3c141
6e402d93a738ccba50e06c4bc9fa1c98fe5a2499
describe
'56343' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRF' 'sip-files00115.pro'
5d80fda619fdde355a9b9ff8208669d6
c872793b6455380c5f60635409ee589015c6b6e8
describe
'34290' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRG' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
25c50806dbb88d5a098402db19d36a3a
7e96e81f83b20e41d294cf262be51bf4bbcec016
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRH' 'sip-files00115.tif'
6889751a97894130b24e7ebf7394c39b
8f1477f8f3a95f5b06826e9027021c5c09c0e448
describe
'2404' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRI' 'sip-files00115.txt'
973235bd7850f5f0b2a6c5c0461a8150
7ebd8687e7cd0e4546d0ce97d56a24ace80db198
'2011-10-30T19:52:15-04:00'
describe
'9029' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRJ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
a027761d5c3c54cf0e933d7295ddbaa9
712cdfbd2e9a165bc4c35adb8157f84bcd559c44
describe
'1390363' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRK' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
dd2ed1138c051ed2e611d6f4a7ad09d4
f9fb2e4103955b7ea20cddbbd448b4b32af9c616
describe
'115869' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRL' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
de33f875dd3178b42168d5a2a1345b61
2e0d64b371453efe2ccab395cacc83a659855b2c
describe
'60331' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRM' 'sip-files00116.pro'
99738f8cf7bc84231011acfdd3d51072
d97e7fc1608732e39ffdd5f56fdcbbc61e32c60f
describe
'36710' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRN' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
d6439e58c69e65d01dd73d4528307c32
e5e502bfe49056b61fdbb0fba3df3d8713c3698f
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRO' 'sip-files00116.tif'
c223951348c13d3a2b8677be3405e8f4
6c2e3c5d728048216a3eee7012b6c858ab3813b6
describe
'2561' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRP' 'sip-files00116.txt'
7a99475e01cef5520671bc1d499e4647
d8656e397b3b53edf3904ccae905d2e30e2f2b99
describe
'9317' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRQ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
503a251a8596daf0d366368dfba38d02
6f3e9bccb4d56d79c3d69de9539075f542c04ce1
describe
'1422945' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRR' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
0aef544c7fc425c56bc30625c030dd0c
e60cc50365deea0f7abccadbb215570fa1e6d287
describe
'113536' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRS' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
83a982b665b1f06a6cf3f5eff71bf762
5fe91715f23f11f42f63a28c1b34177b359508e0
describe
'57015' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRT' 'sip-files00117.pro'
4a9d669503cbccdb0e87542e34a6cfef
4222fad44dfc3f6e914187eb09551ae7cdcbd9ee
describe
'36461' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRU' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
07b24039dad4c1915d49f7a6da293f93
386565e657e33d94106866c5d20a6b13d367b27f
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRV' 'sip-files00117.tif'
24a3f61cd0ebd39f6ea5ce8fe4cc55da
dece3f3c2dc847747b358edc1f28a2e116e1f086
describe
'2389' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRW' 'sip-files00117.txt'
872eac85f3a8f9580b259f5eec7f72b8
4e25133c55808e507d372ef1caf4c7902fcf4ae9
describe
'9231' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRX' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
0587faa6bd327bd1303776ce7b450b95
5215a2cf36e4d2949b8f65d99544649ef779b6ad
describe
'1390498' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRY' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
42f41a6a1367a462513331db13dc57af
5db97bd9b6562d5264f1753539bd7ea1c1bbed4a
describe
'109965' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNRZ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b16f44cc3a82c5c8d948f3d6d8426660
882b0fb2d7645f7fe018aa81c17e43689452b1be
describe
'54546' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSA' 'sip-files00118.pro'
12533c3de5f482f93fef58e1033977cc
b8a8ddfa01a4677e868cb35fdc7483e937443233
describe
'35260' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSB' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
2345fb86f8f74366975e9b5f8773f670
65dd5eda51d5ecd85c768f4b8b66b9d83a504571
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSC' 'sip-files00118.tif'
581084139150ff11266dc22775b59a3f
0ad08e1632636954bcf17a1b3d7f15a5ef4990c8
describe
'2316' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSD' 'sip-files00118.txt'
f05245b718af90253e386259135134f4
09b9b8aa65c819080ad9fff93da7151aa9669bc3
describe
'8961' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSE' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
a1eed3ea48a93a2857db6fd7dd860bfb
838652e64a1ed61398a74772fb269335bc2e149f
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSF' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
3ae7ef88f72c56b83849ee91aef6a4e6
e16ba3c19a2d392475be0ac377f110f883c672fe
describe
'100843' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSG' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
9f146c14435f5c478e507dcc73be5508
3096b71fce332fa9324d894c9fe9814af8bbcd45
describe
'47683' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSH' 'sip-files00119.pro'
73e9241c9b705f5625a8548613aa9b6c
36f80d8935a6f8303292fe63e3a0bc771ec767d5
describe
'33239' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSI' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
47498a2e17ee24d8749a052bbb240852
d1bd84ddcddeed206d80ea8df32e4f5cf6850073
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSJ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
dd87b097772234c9ca2a60a8f9f4abac
5fd4ec243080390745a696be6dc13fef8ba67a97
describe
'2110' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSK' 'sip-files00119.txt'
f0d27ef9c4179e34a355c3364a2cfd3b
d116b9d8eefb0361e6ab49bb2284a55a65c6e5ab
describe
'8902' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSL' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
88f47807062727b5f53cd40abaa63bad
23e17462167b05408d22e8bcf0ca2d171f7c74d3
describe
'1390484' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
f23aa000130daa269ece5cf456efc1c2
fdb46995ebd1d9fcbb270d08d90b09c6b64902ec
describe
'115504' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSN' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
ca5507ffe8ffea10e1616a22b05eb839
8dc4a9b25637c777447eb8f0c5dd12a5e0d754ce
describe
'52525' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
fbffc2540c603cb2940ad25f4356855b
7ba02ae98b75cbb95cbd9d92d3b4e22845f6fb2d
describe
'36526' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSP' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
c3cd212e7e880a63725b09d5e8e64438
f033224b4c37979eaae83bf8afecec0cbffde285
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSQ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
39e99e57dcdfe820ac988bbe14458f8e
b4188f9555f8213267ce1f6c915ccb8cc50ee7fc
describe
'2157' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSR' 'sip-files00120.txt'
cdc6401100a14a47e2e3a7571bdc8c4d
9c271d79da14785762081c136f3b83fe07673137
describe
'9014' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
58e9d5ff9ab4a42fe4d605069d89d349
7619496c9c9ac17b337dd8e890dcc2409e8cb19f
describe
'1381150' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNST' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
de19944d632c50ad913925b9cf8d166d
731fcbe1e542fcc6e45556961dc8fedc18260ddd
describe
'107908' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSU' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
fc85d0672d03430d10b7a1157d683596
eacf67b1b10706d3eba6b0b6f181b1d0a0547ebf
describe
'53097' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSV' 'sip-files00121.pro'
ed19bc59e2de20d1f5c3e47e17d9fb40
6a59a636c27a4dcd3d3da760423cf18160dbb546
describe
'35504' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSW' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
2d95fbeaf99daa5d02b8cdb746f5ab3a
23ba251032114dffca4863c7018f8fd51b4c50bd
describe
'11059715' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSX' 'sip-files00121.tif'
f21715359a6750964d1f077f633722bf
0744c072af45dd6c64abe9eff64fea8136c87df4
describe
'2410' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
fdb2c739f01953dfc3565bc78a85337f
fc558edb86329290f81a4ab3dca82d54c6fe6471
describe
'9233' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNSZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
febbe353e7bb5afa12d94401de153b4f
ed9ec7fbea2cf0506334cf6e6c1a9071be54e93e
describe
'1363127' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTA' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
6db82e8d222936b41d0d6adb846b87d1
ce7daf832b4f9b5de0ec906e1830c7de1ed305c6
describe
'15001' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTB' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
c6f35c5f7a2a0031a263c8bae25d76eb
9842b3c336c382bd96b9190c1ce308e4ad94b204
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTC' 'sip-files00122.pro'
9f69751b876c2bfa14e28a7581913943
10c88ae605c6c4147a9aca223e25532c8390262b
describe
'3790' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTD' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
92ad4efff11f6a6c24b97e68158a26c0
5ad59023dc4d9d6306aa5fc2182ad04b63a2197c
describe
'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTE' 'sip-files00122.tif'
8a5c5d14ed1e93ffa44d7e6ae150df85
3195c39605ffcd2fdb3588cf85871c722d932830
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTF' 'sip-files00122.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
cde93210c722c3e2c9a84c6451ae79bf
bb0fb34aca88a80f9544f48448ffbb885db31291
describe
'1532007' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTH' 'sip-filesback2.jp2'
d51d1b5aef69b614e78a7268391cad3e
333996ecfef3d3189788f3892ac565aedfd656fa
describe
'136010' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTI' 'sip-filesback2.jpg'
f99b297e87d59a417442d892baa27351
e89b9814681fe8e4af9912e4528ee2b5aae28ba1
describe
'84365' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTJ' 'sip-filesback2.pro'
ff8f572fab2d1bba2b7108c565ed8812
a8fd9d7f9c1b2eeffbb1782fd8e68084d126dad1
describe
'30220' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTK' 'sip-filesback2.QC.jpg'
60dcbc5ac4d1efc1fd4e4f721881e6a9
03b90fbb7b163ce8da341e860303a183997f4003
describe
'36771116' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTL' 'sip-filesback2.tif'
8f5c770c8cd545d6cfd4c2c4a7a18ba7
f1b01061bfd8bf5430957e90e422c9861a5da539
describe
'4013' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTM' 'sip-filesback2.txt'
7270bd83cde47fd0f5158603935f7894
26899dc3665366697a298d99b377a96247485378
describe
Invalid character
'6693' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTN' 'sip-filesback2thm.jpg'
7322f695ce7da2758be1d79898271df2
27c5fbd980e0ee54b74c7530fee745de9d4076cd
describe
'1519274' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTO' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
627bdbc0b148887db1fe33fa951fcfe5
a10f81d0626e352993301549d96792f2a113dff7
describe
'131112' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTP' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
fec00da5d4b11fb4c83b2ceb1f5c1186
a8896bcaf0ca9f50e6433422b82117f47372bf07
describe
'9288' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTQ' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
f9b35e5e35118b1c0b5db5087cd8fd24
5be9c61072df6eac10d107bd97440f0ce265bb43
describe
'28079' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTR' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
62e16909423418597243694c6ddcd341
60af56c80f1e52c74663b8f397ec447e5156f8f0
describe
'36469822' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTS' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
ad09765e8d0bb02ab46d131fe08cc7bf
758ab6132021ca47bb96a6e22c3987aef61b05d7
'2011-10-30T19:52:30-04:00'
describe
'1768' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTT' 'sip-filescover1.txt'
6f657a765a7ce114d987f82fcb2e842d
af0f28dfccbd9dc43ea6171244164ef8b233f158
describe
Invalid character
'6644' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTU' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
be10ae3543c4fb1e1d7d98b900f1815d
f43bbfc0f5ce98209ad86a761ced57d15e31f1ec
describe
'209383' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTV' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
beb63e9c8b43e3703b7c20ba785eab61
bf8585a9b8fbdfb2efe82207dbb8368b60a9c605
describe
'28053' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTW' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
f5650245a15d76fdb265f58d75e9940b
a933e86754aef5ef2a7217f53918e8f5616a6d1a
describe
'323' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTX' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
c8267d0a27a96431acd6025e88658ff1
9a976424d3375b9d2fb1aa9e09cda6c8788c8cf0
describe
'6978' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTY' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
0969f9bab8b9dc0ae86ceed82275df0b
83d0e8aace300f4c7f0c3a088226a7ce3b9f8faa
describe
'5028614' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNTZ' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
f2770300674c121bc10b98183a298d2b
4ede883c980c184be75a9b3570d7ef35e5990dc3
'2011-10-30T19:52:12-04:00'
describe
'392' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNUA' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
a04e07f48b5fada586a1052e21f4e510
88fabcb9f524f1c12c9570a262d4f72e7db4286c
describe
'3169' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNUB' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
428f6012622d6ef476e2867504ca865b
fc8c0dc49c0c100eb3223391c60b97fa94e36310
describe
'207619' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNUC' 'sip-filesUF00001948_00001.mets'
5b0302e02df5d9057b5660ebec10c971
3c4412c61e4d8cc15e4b541907bc6ea4327e258c
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T23:12:22-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'264920' 'info:fdaE20081023_AAAAYIfileF20081026_AABNUF' 'sip-filesUF00001948_00001.xml'
74608c78e3af30c7cd621a9bc0204fff
0633542c03350e2ce02ff68289b9d2a2e0a8537b
describe
'2013-12-14T23:12:24-05:00'
xml resolution