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Annals of the poor

Material Information

Title:
Annals of the poor consisting of The Dairyman's daughter, The African servant, and The Young cottager...
Added title page title:
Dairyman's daughter
Added title page title:
African servant
Added title page title:
Young cottager
Creator:
Richmond, Legh, 1772-1827
Hawes, Joel, 1789-1867
Smith, Thomas B., 19th cent ( Stereotyper )
G. & C. Merriam Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Springfield Mass
Publisher:
G. & C. Merriam
Manufacturer:
stereotyped by Thomas B. Smith
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
140 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life ( lcsh )
Salvation ( lcsh )
Poverty ( lcsh )
Slavery ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Springfield

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Rev. Legh Richmond...With a brief memoir of the author and an introductory letter, by Rev. Joel Hawes.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
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AAA2105 ( LTQF )
ALH7097 ( NOTIS )
00937448 ( OCLC )
026934488 ( AlephBibNum )

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THE DAIRYMAN'S COTTAGE.

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ANNALS OF THE POOR:

CONSISTING OF

THE DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, THE AFRICAN
SERVANT, AND THE YOUNG COTTAGER,

AUTHENTIC NARRATIVES,

BY REV. LEGH RICHMOND,

OF BEDFORDSHIRE, ENG.

WITH A BRIEF MEMOIR OF THE AUTHOR,
AND AN INTRODUCTORY LETTER,
BY REV, JOEL HAWES, D.D.

“Let not ambition mock their humble toil,
Their homely joys, and destiny obscure ;
Nor grandeur ies with a disdainful smile,
The short and simple aNNALS OF THE POOR,”
Gray's Eueey,

SPRINGFIELD, MASS.:
PUBLISHED BY G. & C. MERRIAM,
CORNEE OF MAIN AND STATE STREETS,

1852.



STEREOTYPED BY
THOMAS B, SMITH,
216 William St., N. Y.



Hartrorp, Dee, 2, 1851,

Mr. Cuarrtes MERRIAM,

Dear Sin—When some time since you requested me
to write an Introductory Notice of the three Traets by
Rey. Legh Richmond, viz., the Dairyman’s Daughter, the
Young Cottager, and the African Servant, which you
proposed to publish in a small volume for general cireu-
lation, my thought was, that I would do so at once. But
on re-perusing them,—for I read them first some thirty
years ago with great delight,—I could not but feel that
no Introduction was needed for these admirable Tracts—
so widely are they known, so be.rutiful in style, so sweet
in spirit, so full of evangelical truth and so deeply inter-
esting, as they have always been to all who have read
them. I must, therefore, beg to be excused from writ-
ing the Notice I gave you reason to expect from me; and
would simply say that in my judgment you could not put
in circulation a more interesting little volume than that
you are about to publish, comprising the three Tracts
above named by the excellent Legh Richmond. His
name is as ointment poured forth. Though dead he
speaketh, and through the medium of these little publi.
cations, he will, I trust, continue to live and do good till
time shall be no more.

Affectionately yours,
J. Hawes,






BRIEF SKETCH

OF THE

LIFE OF REV. LEGH RICHMOND.

BY REV. JOHN AYRE.

Leen Ricxmonp was born at Liverpool, Jan. 29, 1772.
He was the eldest child of Dr. Henry Richmond, the de-
scendant of an ancient and honorable family. A remark-
able casualty befell him in his childhood, the effects of
which he never recovered. Ata very early age, in leap.
ing from a wall, he contracted an injury in his left leg,
which issued in incurable lameness. It is somewhat sin-
gular that an accident nearly similar occurred to his

ounger and only brother, and also to his second son,

ach of them, in infancy, fell from an open window.
The former was killed, and the latter was ever after
afflicted in the same limb with the same kind of lameness
as his father.

After a private preparatory education, Legh Richmond
was admitted a member of Trinity College, Cambridge.
While an under-graduate, he pursued his studies with a
talent and a zeal which gave fair promise that the highest
honors of his year were not beyond his reach. ‘These
hopes were however blighted by a severe illness, which
was partly owing to his anxious and unremitted applica-
tion. Precluded by this cause, from engaging in the
honorable contention of the senate-house, he received



8 LIFE OF

what is academically termed an egrotat depree; coms
mencing B.A. in 1794; and, with some intermissions, he
resided in the university three years longer.

We are now to view Mr. Richmond in a totally differ-
ent character. In the summer of 1797, he became, with-
in the space of a very few weeks, (to borrow his own
words,) “academically a master of arts, domestically a
husband, parochially a deacon.” He had been originally
destined to the law; but having imbibed a distaste for
that profession, his attention was subsequently directed
to the ministry, and he was now admitted to the sacred
office. Brading, a secluded village in the Isle of Wight,
was the scene of his earliest pastoral labors. He was
ordained to the curacy of this place and the little adjoin-
ing village of Yaverland; and in Yaverland church he
Seed his first sermon.

These scenes will long be dear to Christian remem-
brance. Lovely in themselves, and consecrated by the
pen of Legh Richmond, they will be viewed with no or-
dinary feelings; and he who disdains not the “simple
annals of the poor,” while he treads the sod which covers
“little Jane,” or visits the lowly cottage of the “ Dairy-
than,” will not fail to glorify God for those who here
have slept in Jesus, and “thongh dead, yet speak.”

At the time of his ordination Mr, Richmond saw little
of the magnitude of that work in which he was engaging.
As yet, he was himself but little acquainted with the
things of God, and was therefore little qualified to be-
come the spiritual instructor of others. His habits of life
were decoroug and exemplary, his, pulpit compositions
interesting and moral, but as yet he was little imbued
with the spirit of vital godliness. This man, however,
(may it not be said,) was “a chosen vessel to the Lord.”
Ere many months elapsed a complete revolution was

effected in his religious sentiments. This is, under Ged, ©

mainly to be ascribed to the perusal of Mr. Wilberforce’s
“Practical View of Christianity.” He now with enlight-
ened understanding and decisive zeal, set himself to “do
the work of an evangelist.” Not only was he in the pul.





LEGH RICHMOND. ee

it, instant in “ preaching the word,” but he was also to
be found with his pastoral admonitions in the dwellings
of his flock, and could descend, with sweet and winning
gentleness, to “feed his lambs.” The fruit of his labors
was speedily apparent. “Little Jane’? was the first
flower which bloomed from the good seed he was sow-
ing. :
The circumstances attendant upon his intercourse with
the subjects of the Annals will be found narrated in the
several 'Fracts. I only observe in this place, that “ little
Jane” died January 30th, 1799, in her fifteenth year: that
the conversations with the “ African Servant” were held
during the summer of i803, and that the death of the
“ Dairyman’s Daughter” took place May 30th, 1801: her
age was thirty-one.

After a residence of about seven years in the Isle of
Wight, where his labors had been evidently and largely
blessed, Mr. Richmond removed to London. He was
here to take a share in the duties of the Lock Chapel.
The very first sermon he delivered from the pulpit of this

lace was, there is every reason to believe, under God’s
lessing, the instrumental means of effecting a saving
change in the heart of at least one individual.

Scarcely, however, was he well settled in this new
scene, when the good providence of God removed him to
the rectory of Turvey, Bedfordshire. He was presented
to this living by Miss Fuller, in 1805.

Long will the name of Richmond be venerated at Tur-
vey; long will the savor of his affectionate ministrations
abide in the hearts of his mourning flock. A singular
blessing still attended him. From the earliest to literall
the latest, his preaching was visibly “in demonstration o
the Spirit and of power.”

It was during his residence at Turvey that most of Mr.
Rithmond’s publications were undertaken. He had pre-
viously printed two or three single sermons ;* but it was

* These were, a Fast-day Sermon, and one on the’Close of the Year,

reached at Brading ; and a Sermon on Cruelty to the Brute Creation, de
fivesall at Bath, ? ae



10 | LIFE OF

at Turvey that his great work, “’ The Fathers of the En.
glish Church, was carried on. For the superintendence
of this important undertaking he was eminently qualified.
Accident, or | would rather say, a remarkable providence,
had, in the first instance, introduced him, while in the Isle
of Wight, to the writings of our earlier and greatest the-
ologians; and the study of them he had ever since zeal-
ously prosecuted. To a familiar acquaintance with the
works of these divines, Mr. Richmond united the greatest
impartiality and judgment in forming his selections, His
work therefore presents, in a comparatively small com-
pass, the large proportion of the most valuable of the re-
mains of our martyrs and confessors. It is not perhaps
too much to say that it has been mainly instrumental in
awakening to the reformers that attention and interest
with which they are now a regarded.

It was during his residence at Turvey also that Mr.
Richmond drew up the narratives which are contained in
the present volume. ‘They were originally (in substance)
inserted in the earlier numbers of the Christian Guardian.
Having here attracted considerable attention, ~— were
then published in the form of separate Tracts, and after-
wards, with considerable augmentations, in the first edi- _
tion of this volume. |

It may perhaps appear unnecessary to pronounce an
opinion on productions which have been circulated by
millions, and translated into twenty languages; and which,
in a multitude of well-authenticated instances, have been,
by the blessing of God, signally effective of good. I
cannot however forbear to say, that in Legh Richmond’s
writings, more than in those of perhaps any other author,
you behold the character of the man. His beautiful sim-
plicity, his lively imagination, his tenderness of feeling,
his devoted piety, were the characteristics of the man
which enshrined him in the affections of all who knew
him. And who can read a page of his annals, and not
recognize in those interesting narratives the same simple
plainness, the same glowing fancy, the same touching
pathos, the same ardent piety? In sketching his villagers,





LEGH RICHMOND. 11

he has unconsciously delineated himself. He admits us
to his retirement and meditations, shows us his hopes
and fears, and presents us with all the secret workings of.
his soul. We admire the gifted minister of God, who in
the deep humility of his spirit disdained not to listen to
the voice of admonition, though it reached him from the
lowly cottage ; we cannot withhold our affection from the
man. |

If I were called on to say which of the narratives [
prefer, ] should most probably be inclined to fix on that
of the “Young Cottager.” ‘There is something, in my
judgment, irresistibly engaging in the character and his-
tory of that simple girl. 1 can venerate the high and ex-
alted piety of the “ Dairyman’s Daughter,” who, with a
masculine strength of understanding, had ever her word
of counsel even for the minister; but I love the little back-
ward, neglected, retiring child, who starts forth at once in
all the moral beauty of Christian attainment, There is
sontething too in the condition of Jane which seems
especially to call for our apepainy: The Dairyman’s
Daughter was constantly surrounded by a circle of affee-
tionate relatives, who regarded her with reverence and
love; while Jane’s religion was, at best, little appreciated,
often despised and ridiculed by her family, and her last
hours were disturbed by sounds of blasphemy proceeding
from a parent, Many of the incidents also of this tale
might be appealed to as conferring upon it a peculiar in-
terest. The scene, for example, where Mr. Richmond, on
his first visit to her, while speaking of the good news of
the Gospel, inquires, “ Who brings this good news?” and
is answered, “ Sir, you brought it to me,” I know not who
can read unmoved. Her parting benediction too—* God
bless and reward you”—when with an unexpected exer-
tion she threw her arms around him and died—is inex-
pressibly affecting.

During his residence at Turvey, Mr. Richmond became
extendedly known to the public as the cordial friend and
ready advocate of the different religious societies which
have, within , last thirty years, grown up amongst us.



12 LIFE OF

His persuasive and pathetic eloquence in the pulpit or on
the platform, when awakening Christian sympathy in be-
half of the idolatrous Gentile, or the unbelieving Jew,
will not be readily forgotten by the multitudes who have
so often delighted and instructed, hung upon his lips. J
believe his earliest appearance in this character was on
the Ninth Anniversary of the Church Missionary Society,
before whom he was appointed, in 1809, to preach their
annual sermon, This sermon may be appealed to as a
fair and characteristic specimen of his powers in the pul-
pit; though I must be allowed to say, thaf his flowing
and harmonious language, his graceful delivéry and sweet
expression of features, beaming with love to God and
good-will to men, imparted a charm which the mere read-
er of a printed sermon can by no means duly appreciate.

His preaching, for a long series of years, was altogether
extemporaneous. His ready utterance; his ieaans
fancy, his aptness of illustration, his deep knowledge of
divine things, rendered his sermons always interesting
and useful. Perhaps he did not, upon common occasions,
allow himself sufficient previous study; but if this were
his fault, he acted upon principle. “* Why,” he would
often say, “ why net [ labor, when our simple villagers
are far more usefully instructed in my plain, easy, familiar
manner? ‘The only result would be, that I should ad-
dress them in a style beyond their comprehension.”

His appearance on the platform of a public meeting was
universally hailed with pleasure. His ready adaptation of
passing incidents, the suavity of his addresses, sometimes _
solemn, sometimes even jocose, interspersed with inter- ~
esting narratives, which he could so well relate, deservedly —
placed him high in public esteem. :

I ought perhaps to state, that-in 1814 Mr. Richmond ©
was appointed chaplain to the late Duke of Kent, by whom |
he was honored with a share of his Royal Highness’ |
friendship. In 1817 Mr. R. was presented, by the late
Emperor Alexander, of Russia, with a splendid ring, asa ~
testimony of the approbation with which his Imperial —
Majesty viewed the narratives in this volume. | ,





LEGH RICHMOND. 13

Many peaceful years were passed at Turvey. Happy
in the bosom of his family, no man more excelled as a
pattern of domestic virtues than Legh Richmond.

At length, in 1825, Mr. R.’s domestic happiness sus-
tained a severe blow by the death of his second son, a

outh in his nineteenth year. For this beloved child he
had fostered many a fond hope and anxious expectation,
and beheld, with all a father’s joy, his fair promise; but
this flower was withered by consumption, and the bereaved
parent, though he submitted as a Christian, yet sorrowed.
as aman. In a few short months the stroke was re-
posted, Intelligence arrived that his eldest son, who had
been absent many years, had died on his voyage from
India to England.

These afflictive dispensations had a marked and pecu-
liar effect upon Legh Richmond. He who used to be the
life of the domestic and social circle, would now be silent
_ and abstracted; yet it was not the morbid gloom of a
repining heart, it was rather the solemnity of conviction
that he should ere long rejoin his lamented children. His
bodily health too seemed, in some measure, decaying.
His multitude of pastoral duties were too heavy for his
strength. For the last twelve months of his life he was
troubled with an irritating cough, which seemed to indi-
eate anaffection of the lungs. At Jength, (March, 1827,)
he contracted a violent cold, which issued in pleurisy ;
from which, however, he shortly appeared to be recovering.
During all this time, when certainly no immediate danger
was apprehended, he was peacefully and quietly setti
his house in order. To his family he knew the idea of
separation would be agony; he therefore scarcely hinted
to them what he felt was nigh at hand, but to a clerical
friend, he, in striking words, professed that simple reliance
on the atonement of Christ which alone can cheer and
support the soul in the hour of dissolution. It soon
became evident to those around him, that the flood of life
was @bbing calmly yet fast; and at last, (May 8,) without
paltorstruggle, the ready spirit sweetly and softly passed

: 9



14 LIFE OF LEGH RICHMOND.

from her mortal tenement, and Legh Richmond slept in
Jesus !

Farewell, dear friend and father! Very pleasant were
the hours and years of our communion; but they are
passed away, and the savor only, sad yet sweet, remains.
“ Farewell, dear friend, till the morning of an eternal day
renew our personal intercourse!” May J meet thee in a
better world.

I cannot but connect the closing hours of my beloved
friend with that affecting prayer which he has breathed in
the Young Cottager. He had been describing the useful
course and peaceful termination of a little rivulet which
glides through a very lovely glen, by which he was medi-
tating. “May my course be like unto thine, thou little
rivulet! Though short be my span of life, yet may I be
useful to my fellow-sinners as I travel onwards! Let me
be a dispenser of spiritual support and health to many!
Like this stream, may I prove the poor man’s friend by
the way, afid water the souls that thirst for the river of
life wherever I meet them! And if it pleases thee,O m
God, let me in my latter end be like this brook! It
calmly, though not quite silently, flows through this scene

of peace ahd loveliness, just before it enters the sea, -_

Let me thus gently close my days likewise; and may I
not unusefully tell to others of the goodness and mercy
of my Saviour, till I arrive at the vast ocean of eternity,”

That prayer was surely answered. He did tell to men,
with abundant blessing, of the goodness and mercy of his
Saviour: he did thus gently close his days,

Soldier of Christ, well done !
Praise be thy new employ ;

And while eternal ages run,
Rest in thy Saviour’s joy,

JA,





THE

DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER:

AN AUTHENTIC NARRATIVE,

BY REV. LEGH RICHMOND.



y





‘

DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER.

—— ee

Ir is a delightful employment to discover and trace the
operations of divine grace, as they are manifested in the
dispositions and lives of God’s real children. It is pecu-
liarly gratifying to observe how frequently, among the
poorer classes of mankind, the sunshine of mercy beams
upon the heart, and bears witness to the image of Christ

which the Spirit of God has impressed thereupon. Among

such, the sincerity and simplicity of the Christian charae-
ter appear unencumbered by those obstacles to spirituality
of mind and conversation which too often prove a great
hindrance to those who live in the higher ranks. Many
are the difficulties which riches, worldly consequence,
high connections, and the luxurious refinements of pol-
ished society, throw in the way of religious professions.
Happy indeed it is, (and some such happy instances I
know,) where grace has so strikingly supported its conflict
with natural pride, self-importance, the allurements. of
luxury, ease, and worldly opinions, that the noble and
mighty appear adorned with genuine poverty of spirit,
- -denial, humble-mindedness, and deep spirituality of
eart,

But, in general, if we want to see religion in its most
simple and pure character, we must look for it among the
poor of this world, who are rich in faith. How often is

Q*



18 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

the poor man’s cottage the palace of God! Many of us
ean truly declare, that we have there learned our most
valuable lessons of faith and hope, and there witnessed -
the most striking demonstrations of the wisdom, power,
and goodness of God.

The character which the present narrative is designed
to introduce to the notice of my readers, is given from real
life and circumstance, I first became acquainted with the
Dairyman’s Daughter by the reception of a letter, a part
of which I transcribe from the original, now before me.

“Rey. Sir,—I take the liberty to write to you. Pray
excuse me, for I have never spoken to you. But I once
heard you preach at church. I believe you are
a faithful preacher, to warn sinners to flee from the wrath
that will be revealed against all those that live in sin, and
die impenitent.

“] was much rejoiced to hear of those marks of love
and affection which you showed to that poor soldier of
the S. D. militia. Surely the love of Christ sent you to
that poor man; may that love ever dwell richly in you by
faith. May it constrain you to seek the wandering souls
. men with the fervent desire to spend and be spent for

is glory.

“Bir, be fervent in prayer with God for the conviction
and conversion of sinners. He has promised to answer
the prayer of faith that is put upinhis Son’s name. ‘Ask
what you will, and it shall be granted you.’ Through
faith in Christ we rejoice in hope, and look upin expecta-
tion of that time drawing near, when all shall know and
fear the Lord, and when a nation shall be born in a



y.

“What a happy time, when Christ’s kingdom shall
come! Then shall ‘his will be done on earth, as it is in
heaven.’ Men shall be daily fed with the manna of his
love, and delight themselves in the Lord all the day long.

“Sir, I] began to write this on Sunday, being detained
from attending on public worship. My dear and only
sister, living as a servant with Mrs, —~~, was so ill that



DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 19

I came here to attend in her place, and onher. But now
she is no more.

“She expressed a desire to receive the Lord’s supper,
and commemorate his precious death and sufferings.
told her, as well as I was able, what it was to receive
Christ into her heart; but as her weakness of body
increased, she did not mention it again. She seemed
quite resigned before she died. I do hope she has gone
from a world of death and sin, to be with God for-
ever.

“ My sister expressed a wish that you might bury her.
The minister of our parish, whither she will be carried,
cannot come. She died on Tuesday morning, an@ will be
buried on Friday or Saturday, (whichever is most conve-
nient to you,) at three o’clock in the afternoon. Please
to send an answer by the bearer, to let me know whether
you can comply with this request.

“From your unworthy servant,
“ ELIZABETH W——~£.”

I was much struck with the simple and earnest strain
of devotion which the letter breathed. It was but indif-
ferently written and spelt; but this the rather tended to
endear the hitherto unknown writer, 4s it seemed charac-
teristic of the union of humbleness of station with emi-
nence of piety. IJ felt quite thankful that I was favored
with a correspondent of this description; the more so, as
such characters were, at that time, very rare in the neigh-
borhood. As soon as it was read, I inquired who was the
bearer of it.

“ He is waiting at the outside of the gate, Sir,” was the

reply.

: went out to speak to him; and saw a venerable old
man, whose long hoary hair and deeply wrinkled counte-
nance commanded more than common respect. He was
resting his arm upon the gate, the tears were streaming
down his cheeks. On my approach he made a low bow,
and said,

“Sir, I have brought you a letter from my daughter;





20 | ANNALS OF THE POOR.

but I fear you will think us very bold in asking you to
take so much trouble.”

“By no means,” I replied; “I shall be truly glad to
oblige you and any of your family in this matter.” .

I desired him to come into the house, and then said,

“ What is your occupation ?” )

“ Sir, I have lived most of my days in a little cottage
at , six miles from here, have rented a few
acres of ground and kept a few cows, whieh, in addition
to my day labor, has been my means of supporting and

bringing up my family.” .

- What family have you 2?” ,

“ A wife, now getting very aged and helpless ; two sons
and one daughter; for my other poor, dear child is just
departed out of this wicked world.”

“T hope for a better,”

“T hope so too; poor thing, she did not use to take to
such good ways as her sister; but I do believe that her
sister’s manner of talking with her before she died was
the means of saving her soul. What a mercy it is to
have such a child as mine is! I never thought about my
own soul seriously till she, poor girl, begged and prayed
me to flee from the wrath to come.”

“ How old are you?”

“Turned seventy, and my wife is older; we are get~
ting old and almost past our labor ; but our daughter has
left a good place, where she lived in service, on purpose
to come home and take care of us and our little dairy,
And a dear, dutiful, affectionate girl she is,”

“ Was she always so ?”

“No, Sir; when she was very young she was all for
the world, and pleasure, and dress, and company. Indeed
we were all very ignorant, and thought, if we took care
for this life, and wronged nobody, we should be sure to
go to heaven at last. My daughters were both wilful,
and, like ourselves, were strangers to the ways of God
and the word of his grace. But the eldest of them went



dut to service; and some years ago she heard a sermon .

preached at —--— church, and from that time she be-



DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 21

came quite an altered creature. She began to read the
Bible, and became quite sober and steady. The first
time she came home afterwards to see us, she brought us
a guinea which she had saved from her wages, and said,
as we were getting old, she was sure we should want
help: adding, that she did not wish to spend it in fine
clothes, as she used to do, only to feed pride and vanity.
She would rather show gratitude to her dear father and
mother; and this, she said, because Christ had shown
such mercy to her.

“ We wondered to hear her talk, and took great delight
in her company, for her temper and behavior were so
humble and kind, she seemed so desirous to do us good
both in soul and body, and was so different from what we
had ever seen her before, that, careless and ignorant as
we had been, we began to think there must be somethin
real in religion, or it never could alter a person so muc
in a little time.

“Her younger sister, poor soul, used to laugh and
ridicule her at that time, and said her head was turned
with her new ways. ‘No, sister,’ she would say, ‘not my
head, but I.hope my heart is turned from the love of
sin to the love of God. I wish you may one day see, .
as I do, the danger and vanity of your present condi-
tion. |

“Her poor sister would reply, ‘I do not want to hear
any of your preaching: [ am no worse than other
eople, and that is enough for me,—‘ Well, sister,’
lizabeth would say, ‘if you will not hear me, you can-
not hinder me from praying for you, which I do with all
my heart.’ 7 '

“ And now, Sir, I believe those prayers are answered.
For when her sister was taken ill, Elizabeth went to wait
in her place and take care of her. She said a great deal
to her about her soul; and the poor girl began to be so
deeply affected, and sensible of her past sin, and so thank-
ful for her sister’s kind behavior, that it gave her great
hopes*indeed for her sake. When my wife and I went
to see her as she lay sick, she told us how grieved and



22 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

ashamed she was of her past life; but said, she had a
hope, through grace, that her dear sister’s Saviour would
be her Saviour too; for she saw her own sinfulness, felt
her own helplessness, and only wished to cast herself
upon Christ as her hope and salvation.

“ And now, Sir, she is gone, and I hope and think her
sister’s prayers for her conversion to God have been
answered. ‘The Lord grant the same, for her poor father
and mother’s sake likewise.”

This conversation was a very pleasing commentary
upon the letter which I had received, and made me anx-
ious both to comply with the request, and to become ac-
quainted with the writer. I promised the, good old
Dairyman I would attend the funeral on Fridley at the
appointed hour; and after some more conversgijion re-
specting his own state of mind under the presefiftrfal, he
Went away. ,*

He was a reverend old man; his furrowed cheeks,
white locks, weeping eyes, bent shoulders, and feeble
gait, were characteristic of the aged pilgrim ; and as he
slowly departed, supported by a stick, which seemed to’
have been the companion of many a long year, a tein of |
reflections occurred which I retrace with emotion and’
pleasure. |

At the appointed hour I arrived at the church; and af-
ter a little while, was summoned to meet at. the church- |

ard gate a very decent funeral procession. The aged —
parents, the elder brother and the sister, with other rela-
tives, formed an affecting group. I was struck with the
humble, pious, and pleasing countenance of the young —
woman from whom I received the letter: it bore the
marks of great seriousness without affectation, and of |
much serenity mingled with a glow of devotion.

A circumstance occurred during the burial service,
whieh I think it right to mention.

A man of the village, who had hitherto been of a very
careless and even profligate character, came into the
church through mere curiosity, and with no better purpose
than that of a vacant gazing at the ceremony. He came







DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 93

likewise to the grave; and during the burial service his
mind received a deep, serious conviction of his sin and
danger, through some of the expressions contained there-
in. It was an impression that never wore off, but gradu-
ally ripened into the most satisfactory evidence of an
entire change, of which I had many and long-continued
progfs. He always referred to the burial service, and to
. some particular sentences of it, as the clearly ascertained
instrument of bringing him, through grace, to the knowl-
edge of the truth.

he day was therefore one to be remembered. Re-
' membered let it be by those who love to hear “the short
and singel annals of the poor.”

WwW re not a manifest and happy connection between
the’ ci@usiance that providentially brought the serious
and thé’careless to the same grave on that day together?
How auch do they lose, who neglect to trace the leadings
of Gdd in providence, as links in the chain of his eterna]
purpose of redemption and grace!

“ While infidels may scoff, let us adore,”

_ Aft@r the service was concluded, I had a short conver-
‘sation with the good ald couple and their daughter. Her
aspect and address were highly interesting. I promised
to Visit their cottage; and from that time became well
acquainted with them. Let us bless the God of the poor,
and pray continually that the poor may become rich in’
faith, and the rich be made poor in spirit.

A sweet solemnity often possesses the mind, while
retracing past intercourse with departed friends. How
much is this inereased, when were such as lived and
died in the Lord! The remembrance of former scenes
and convérsations with those who, we believe, are now
enjoying the uninterrupted happiness of a better world,
fills the heart with pleasing sadness, and animates the soul
with the hopeful anticipation of a day when the glory of
the Lord shall be revealed in the assembling of all his
children together, never more to be separated, * W.

-



24 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

they were rich or poor, while on earth, is a matter of tri-
fling consequence ; the valuable part of their character is,
that they are now kings and priests unto God. In the
number of departed believers, with whom I once loved to
converse on the grace and glory of the kingdom of God,
was the Dairyman’s Daughter.

About a week after the funeral I went to visit the ,
family at , where the youngest sister had lived and
died, and where Elizabeth had remained for a short time.
She was indeep mourning; but there wasa calmness and —
serenity in her countenance which exceedingly struck me, ~
and impressed some idea of those attainments which a
farther acquaintance with her afterwards so much in-
creased. After a brief interview, I left her with an assnu-
rance that | proposed very shortly to visit her parents, to
whom she was about to return. ‘

I quitted the house with no small degree of satisfaction,
in consequence of the new acquaintance which | had
formed. I discovered traces of a cultivated as well as a
spiritual mind, I felt that religious intercourse with those
of low estate may be rendered eminently useful to others
whose outward station and advantages are far above their
own.

How often does it appear that “God hath chosen the
weak things of the world to confound the things which
are mighty: and base things of the world, and things
which are despised, hath God chosen, and things which —
are not, to bring to naught things that are; that no flesh —
should glory in his presence.” |

It was not unfrequently my custom, when my mind
was filled with any interesting subject for meditation, to —
seek some spot where the beauties of natural prospect —
might help to form pleasing and useful associations. I —
therefore ascended gradually to the very summit of the
hill adjoining the mansion where my visit had just been |
made. Here was placed an elevated sea-mark: it was in
the form of a triangular pyramid, and built of stone. I
sat down on the ground near it, and looked at the sur-









DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 95

rounding prospect, which was distinguished for penne
and magnificence. It was a lofty station which command-
ed a complete circle of interesting objects to engage the
spectator’s attention.

Southward the view was terminated by a long range
of hills, at about six miles’ distance. They met, to the
westward, another chajn of hills, of which the one whereon
I sat formed a link, and the whole gine nearly encom-
passed a rich and fruitful valley filled with cornfields and
pastures. Through this vale winded a small river for
many miles; much cattle were feeding on its banks.
Here and there lesser eminences arose in the valley ;
some covered with wood, others with corn or grass, and
a few with heath or fern. One of these little. hills was
distinguished by a parish church at the top, presenting a
striking feature in the landscape. Another of these ele-
vations, situated in the centre of the valley, was adorned
with a venerable holly-tree, which has grown there for
aves, Its singular height and wide-spreading dimensions
not only render it an object of curiosity to the traveller,
but of daily usefulness to the pilot, as a mark visible from
the sea, whereby to direct his vessel safe into harbor.
Villages, churches, country-seats, farm-houses, and cotta-

es, were scattered over every part of the southern valley.
n this direction also, at the foot of the hill where I was
stationed, appeared the ancient mansion which I had just
quitted, embellished with its woods, groves, and gardens.

South-eastward I saw the open sea, bounded only b
the horizon. The sun shone, and gilded the waves wi
a glittering light, that sparkled in the most brilliant man-
ner. More to the’east, in continuation of that line of
hills where I was placed, rose two downs, one beyond
the other, both covered with sheep, and the sea just visi-
ble over the farthest of them, as a terminating boundary.
In this point ships were seen, some sailing, others at
anchor. Here the little river, which watered the southern
valley, finished its course, and ran through meadows into
the sea in an eastward direction. ,

On the north the sea appeared like a noble river, vary-

3



26 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

ing from three ta seven miles in breadth, between tha
banks of the opposite coast and those of the island which
I inhabited. Immediately underneath me was a fine
woody district of country, diversified by many pleasing
objects, Distant towns were visible on the opposite
shore, Numbers of ships occupied the sheltered station
which this northern channel afforded them. The eye
roamed with delight over an expanse of near and remote
beauties, which alternately caught the observation, and
which harmonized together and praduced a scene of pecu.
liar interest.

Westward the hills followed each other, forming seve.
ral intermediate and partial valleys, in a kind of undula.
tions, like the waves of the sea; and, bending to the south,
completed the boundary of the larger eee before
described, to the southward of the hill on which I sat. In
many instances the hills were cultivated with corn to their
very summits, and seemed to defy the inclemency of
weather, which, at these heights, usually renders the
ground incapable of bringing forth and ripening the crops
of grain. One hill alone, the highest in. elevation, and
ahout ten miles to the south-westward, was enveloped in
a cloud, which jyst permitted a dim and hazy sight of a
signal-post, a light-house, and an ancient chantry, built
on its summit.

Amidst these numerous specimens of delightful scenery
I found a mount for contemplation, and here I indulged it,

“How much of the natural beauties of Paradise stil]
remain in the world although its spiritual character has
been so awfully defaced by sin! But when divine grace
renews the heart of the fallen sinner, Paradise is regained,
and much of its heauty restored ta the soul. As this
prospect is compounded of hill and dale, Jand and sea,
woods and plains, all sweetly blended tagether and re-
lieving each other in the landscape, so do the gracious
dispositions wrought in the soul, produce a beauty and
harmony of scene to which it was before a stranger.”

[ looked towards the village, in the plain below, where

the Dajryman’s younger daughter was buried. I retraced





DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 27

the simple solemnities of the funeral: I connected the
principles and conduct of her sister with the present
probably happy state of her soul in the world of spirits,
and was greatly impressed with a sense of the importance
of family influence as a means of grace. “That young
woman,” I thought, “has been the conductor of not only
a sister, but perhaps a father and mother also, to the true
knowledge of God, and may, by divine blessing, become
so to others. It is a glorious occupation to win souls to
Christ, and guide them out of Egyptian bondage through
the wilderness into the promised Canaan. Happy are the
families who are Walking hand in hand together, as pil-
grims, towards the heavenly country. May the number
of such be daily increased !”

Casting my eye over the numerous dwellings in the
vales on my right and left, 1 could not help thinking,
“how many of their inhabitants are ignorant of the ways
of God, and strangers to his grace! May this thought
stimulate to activity and diligence in the cause of immor-
tal souls! They are precious in God’s sight—they
ought to be so in ours.” .

Some pointed and affecting observations to that effect
recurred te my mind as having been made by the young
person with whom I had been just conversing. Her
mind appeared to be much impressed with the duty of
speaking and acting for God “while it is day ;” con-
scious that “the night cometh when no man can work.”

I soon rode, for the first time, to see the family of the
Dairyman at their own home. The principal part of the
road lay through retired, narrow lanes, beautifully over-
arched with groves of nut and other trees, which screened
the traveller from the rays of the sun, and afforded many
interesting objects for admiration in the beautiful flowers,
shrubs, and young trees, which grew upon the high banks
on each side of the road. Many grotesque rocks, with
little streams of water oscadidiadly Vecakitne out of them,

varied the recluse scenery, and produced a romantic and
pleasing effect.

=



28 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

Here and there the more distant and rich prospect be-
yond appeared through gaps and hollow places on the
road-side. Lofty hills, with navy signal-posts, obelisks,
and light-houses on their summits, appeared at these in-
tervals: rich corn-fields were also visible through some
of the open places; and now and then, when the road
ascended a hill, the sea, with “ee at various distances,
opened delightfully upon me. But, for the most part,
shady seclusion, and objects of a more minute and con-
fined nature, gave a character to the journey, and invited
contemplation.

What do not they lose who are strangers to serious
meditation on the wonders and beauties of nature! How
gloriously the God of creation shines in his works! Not
a tree, or leaf, or flower—not a bird or insect, but pro-
claims, in glowing language, “God made me.”

As I approached the village where the good old Dairy-
man dwelt, I observed him in a little field driving a few
cows before him towards a yard and hovel which adjoin-
ed his cottage. I advanced very near him without his
observing me, for his sight was dim. On my calling out
to him, he started at the sound of my voice, but with much
gladness of countenance welcomed me, saying, “Bless
pene heart, Sir, 1 am very glad you are come; we have

ooked for you every. day this week.”

The’ cottage-door opened, and the daughter came out
followed by her aged and infirm mother. The sight of
me naturally brought to recollection the grave at which
we had before met. Tears of affection mingled with the
smile of satisfaction with which I was received by these

worthy cottagers. I dismounted, and was conducted |

through a very neat little garden, part of which was sha-
ded by two large, overspreading elm-trees, to the house.
Decency and cleanliness were manifest within and with-
out. Everything wore the aspect of neatness and pro-

priety. On each side of the fire-place stood an old oaken —

arm-chair, where the venerable parents rested their weary

limbs after the day’s labor was over. On a shelf, in-one |

corner, lay two Bibles, with a few religious books and

es







DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 20

Tracts. The little room had two windows ; a lovely pros
pect of hills, woods, and fields, appeared through one—
the other was more than half obscured by the branches
of a vine which was trained across it; between its leaves
the sun shone, and cast a cheerful light over the whole
place.

This, thought [, is a fit residence for piety, peace, and
contentment. May I learn a fresh lesson in each, through
the blessing of God on this visit. |

“ Sir,” said the daughter, “ we are not worthy that you
should come under our roof. We take it very kind that
you should come so far to see us.”

“My Master,” I replied, “came a great deal farther to
visit us poor sinners. He left the bosom of his Father,
laid aside his glory, and came down to this lower world
on a visit of merey and love; and ought not we, if we.
profess to follow him, to bear each other's infirmities, and
go about doing good, as he did?”

The old man now came in and joined his wife and
daughter in giving me a cordial welcome. Our conversa-
tion soon turned to the late loss they had sustained; and
the pious and sensible disposition of the daughter was
peculiarly manifested, as well in what she said to her pa-
rents, as in what she said to me. I was struek with the
good sense and agreeable manner which accompanied her
expressions of devotedness to God, and love to Christ,
for the great mercies which he had bestowed upon her.
She seemed anxious to improve the opportunity of my
visit to the best purpose for her own and her parents’
sake; yet there was nothing of unbecoming forwardness,
no self-consequence or conceitedness in her behavior,
She united the firmness and earnestness of the Christian
with the modesty of the female and the dutifulness of
the daughter. It was impossible to be in her company,
and not observe how truly her temper and conversa.
tion adorned the evangelical principles which she pro-
fessed.

I soon discovered how eager and how successful also
she had been in her endeavors to bring her father and

3



30 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

mother to the knowledge and experience of the truth.
This is a lovely circumstance in the character of a young
Christian. If it hath pleased God,.in the free dispensa-
tions of his mercy, to call the child by his grace, while
the parent remains still in ignorance and sin, how great
is the duty of that child to do what is possible for the
conversion of those to whom it owes its birth! Happy
is it when the ties of grace sanctify those of nature!

This aged couple evidently looked upon and spoke of
their daughter as their teacher and admonisher in divine
things, while they received from her every token of. filial
submission and obedience, testified by continual endeavors
to serve and assist them to the utmost in the little con-
cerns of the household. |

The religion of this young woman was of a highly
spiritual character, and of no ordinary attainment. Her
views of the divine plan in saving the sinner, were clear
and scriptural. She spoke much of the joys and sorrows
which, in the course of her religious progress, she had
experienced; but she was fully sensible that there is far
more in real religion than mere occasional transition
from one frame, of mind and spirit to another. She be-
lieved that the experimental acquaintance of the heart
with God, principally consisted in so living upon Christ
by faith, as to seek to live like him by love. She knew
that the love of God toward the sinner, and the path of
duty prescribed to the sinner, are both of an unchangeable
nature. In a believing dependence on the one, and an
affectionate walk in the other, she sought and found “the
peace of God which passeth all understanding ;” “ for so
he giveth his bare rest.”

he had read but few books besides her Bible; but

these few were excellent in their kind, and she spoke of
their contents as one who knew their value. In addition
to a Bible and Common Prayer Book, “ Doddridge’s Rise
and Progress,” “ Romaine’s Life, Walk, and Triumph of
Faith,” “ Bunyan’s Pilgrim,” “ Alleine’s Alarm,” “ Baxter’s
Saints’ Everlasting Rest,” a hymn-book, and a few Tracts,
composed her library. )





DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 31

I observed in her countenance a pale and delicate look,
which I afterwards found to be a presage of consumption ;
and the idea then occurred to me that she would not live
very long. In fact, it pleased God to take her hence about
‘ a year and a half after I first saw her.

Time passed on swiftly with this interesting family ;
and after having partaken of some plain and wholesome
refreshment, arid enjoyed a few hours’ conversation with
them, I found it was necessary for me to return home-
wards. | '

“]T thank,you, Sir,” said the daughter, “for your Chris-
tian kindness to me and my friends. I believe the bless-
ing of the Lord has attended your visit, and I hope I have
experienced it to be so. My dear father and mother will,
J am sure, remember it, and I rejoice in an opportunity,
which we have never before enjoyed, of seeing a serious
minister under this roof. My Saviour has been abun-
dantly good to me in plucking me ‘as a brand from the
burning,’ and showing me the way of life and peace: and
I hope it is my heart’s desire to live to his glory. But I
long to see these dear friends enjoy the comfort and
power of religion also.”

“T think it evident,” I replied, “that the promise is ful-
filled in their case: ‘ It shall come to pass, that at evening
time it shall be light.” |

“T believe it,” she said, “and praise God for the blessed |
hope.” b

“Thank him too that you have been the happy instru-
ment of bringing them to the light.’ ”

“I do, Sir; yet when I think of my own unworthiness
and insufficiency, I rejoice with trembling.”

“ Sir,” said the good old man, “I am sure the Lord will
reward you for this kindness, Pray for us, that, old as
we are, and sinners as we have been, yet he would have
merey upon us at the eleventh hour. Poor Betsy strives
hard for our sakes, both in body and soul; she works
hard all day to save us trouble, and I fear has not strength
to support all she does; and then she talks to us, and
reads to us, and prays for us, that we may be saved



32 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

from the wrath to come. Indeed, Sir, she’s’ a rare child
to us.”

* Peace be to you, and all that belong to you.”
“Amen, and thank you, dear Sir,” was echoed from
each tongue. |

Thus we parted for that time. My returning medita-
tions were sweet, and, I hope, profitable. Many other
visits were afterwards made by me to this peaceful cot-
tage, and I always found increasing reason. to, thank God
for the intercourse I enjoyed. c

I soon perceived that the health of the Speier was
rapidly on the decline. The pale, wasting eoAsumption,
which is the Lord’s instrument for removing so many
thousands every year from the land of the living, made
hasty strides on her constitution. The hollow eye, the
distressing cough, and the often too flattering red on the
cheek, foretold the approach of death.

I have often thought what a field for usefulness and
affectionate attention on the part of ministers and Christian
friends, is opened by the frequent attacks and lingering
progress of consumptive illness. How many such pre-
cious opportunities are daily lost, where Providence
seems in so marked a way to afford time and space for
serious and godly instruction! Of how many may it be
said, “ The way of peace have they not known ;” for not
one friend ever came nigh to wafn them to “ flee from the
wrath to come.”

But the Dairyman’s Daughter was happily made ac-
quainted with the things which belonged to her everlast-
ing peace, before the present disease had taken root in
her constitution. In my visit to her, I might be said rather
to receive information than to impart it. Her mind was
abundantly stored with divine truths, and her conversa-
tion was truly edifying. ‘The recollection of it still pro-
duces a thankful sensation in my heart.

I one day received a short note to the following effect :

Dear Sir,

I should be very glad, if your convenience will allow,

that you would come and see a poor unworthy sinner :



DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. ' $8

my hour-glass is nearly run out, but I hope I can see
Christ to be precious to my soul, Your conversation
has often been blessed to me, and I now feel the need of
it more than ever. My father and mother send their duty
to you.
rf From your obedient and
mar or servant,
LIZABETH W



I obeyed the summons that same'afternoon. On my
arrival at the Dairyman’s cottage, his wife opened the
door. The tears streamed down her cheek, as she si-
lently shook her head. Her heart was full. She tried
to = but could not. I took her by the hand, and
said,

“My _ friend, all is right, and as the Lord of wis-
dom and mercy directs.”

“Oh! my Betsy, my dear girl, is so bad, Sir: what
shall I do without her !—I thought I should have gone
first to the grave, but——”

“ But the Lord sees good, that, before you die yourself,
you should behold your child safe home to glory. Is
there no mercy in this ?” dios

“Qh! dear Sir, lam very old, and very weak; and she
is a dear child, the staff and prop of a poor old creature,
as I am.” i |

As I advanced, I saw Elizabeth sitting by the fire-side,
supported in an arm-chair by pillows, with every mark of
rapid decline and approaching death. She appeared to
me within three or four weeks at the farthest from her
end. A sweet smile of friendly complacency enlightened
her pale countenance, as she said, = =

“This is very kind indeed, Sir, to come so soon after I
sent to you. You find me daily wasting: away, and I
cannot have long to continue here. My flesh and my
heart fail, but God is the strength of my weak heart, and
I trust will be my portion forever.””

The conversation which follows was occasionally inter-
rupted by her cough and want of breath, Her tone of



84 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

voice was clear, though feeble; her manner solemn and
collected ; and her eye, though more dim than formerly,
by no means wanting in liveliness as she spoke. I had
frequently admired the superior language in which she
expressed her ideas, as well as the scriptural consistency
with which she communicated her thoughts. She had a
good natural understanding; and grace, as is generally
the case, had much improved it. On the present occasion
I could not help thinking she was peculiarly favored.
The whole strength of grace and nature seemed to be in
full exercise.

After taking my seat between the daughter and the
mother, (the latter fixing her fond eyes upon her child
with great anxiety while we were conversing,) I said to
Elizabeth,

“]T hope you enjoy a sense of the divine presence, and
can rest all upon him who has ‘ been with thee,’ and has
kept ‘thee in all places whither thou hast gone,’ and will
bring thee into ‘the land of pure delights, where saints
immortal reign.’ ”

“Sir, I think Ican. My mind has lately been some-
times clouded, but I believe it has been ‘partly owing to
the great weakness and suffering of my bodily frame, and
partly to the envy of my spiritual enemy, who wants to
persuade me that Christ has no love for me, and that I
have been a self-deceiver.”

“And do you give way to his suggestions? Can you
doubt, amidst ok numerous tokens of past and present
merey ?”

“No, Sir, I mostly am enabled to preserve a clear evi-
dence of his love. Ido not wish to add to my other sins
that of denying his manifest goodness to my soul. I
would acknowledge it to his praise and glory.”

“ What is your present view of the state in which you
were before he called you by his grace ?”

“Sir, ] was a proud, thoughtless girl; fond of dress
and finery; I loved the world and the things that are in
the world; I lived in service among worldly people, and
never had the happiness of being in a family where wor-

EE oe en



DAIRYMAN'S DAUGHTER. 35

ship was regarded, and the souls of the servants cared
for, either by master or mistress. I went once on a
Sunday to church, more to see and be seen, than to pray,
or hear the word of God. I thought I was quite good
enough to be saved, and disliked and often laughed at re-
— people. I wasin great darkness; I knew nothing
of the way of salvation; I never prayed, nor was sensible
of the awful danger of a prayerless state, 1 wished to
- maintain the character of a good servant, and was much
lifted up whenever | met with applause, I was tolerably
moral and decent in my conduct, from motives of carnal
and worldly policy; but E was a stranger to God and
Christ ; I neglected my soul; and had I died in such 4
state, hell must, and would justly, have been my portion.”

“ How long is it since you heard the sermon which you
hope, through God's blessing, effected your conversion ?”

“ About five years ago.” ,

“How was it brought about?”

“ It was reported that a Mr. , who was detained
by contrary winds from embarking on board ship, as
chaplain, to a distant part of the world, was to preach at.
church. Many advised me not to go, for fear he
should turn my head; as they said he held strange no-
tions. But curiosity, and an opportunity of appearing in
a new gown, which I was very proud of, induced me to
ask leave te go. Indeed, Sir, 1 had no better motives
than vanity and curiosity. Yet thus it pleased the Lord
to order it for his own glory. |

“T accordingly went to oaks and saw a great crowd
of people collected together, I often think of the con.
trary states of m ae during the former and latter part
of the service. For a while, regardless of the worship of
God, I looked around me, and was anxious to attract
natice myself. My dress, like that of too many gay,
vain, and silly girls, was much above my station, and
very different from that which becomes a humble sinner,
who has a modest sense of propriety and decency. Tha
state of my mind was viaible enough from the foolish

finefy of my apparel,







36 ANNALS QF THE POOR.

“At length the clergyman gave out his text: * Be ye
clothed with humility.” He drew a comparisom between
the clothing of the body and that of the soul.*. At a very
early part of his discourse I began to feel ashamed of my
passion for fine dressing and apparel; but when he came
to describe the garment of salvation with which a Chris-
tian is clothed, | felt a powerful discovery of the naked-
ness of my own soul. I saw that I had neither the
humility mentioned in the text, nor any one part of the
true Christian character. I looked at my gay dress, and
blushed for shame on account of my pride. I looked at
the minister, and he seemed to be as a messenger sent
from heaven to open my eyes. I looked at the congre-

ation, and wondered whether any one else felt as I did.

looked at my heart, and it appeared full of iniquity. I
trembled as he spoke, and yet I felt a great drawing of
heart to the words he uttered.

“ He opened the riches of divine grace in God’s method
of saving the sinner. I was astonished at what I had
been doing all the days of my life. He deseribed the
meek, lowly, and humble example of Christ; I felt proud,
lofty, vain, and self-consequential. He represented Christ
as ‘ Wisdom ;’ I felt my ignorance. He held him forth as
‘Righteousness ;’ I was convinced of my own guilt. He
proved him to be ‘Sanctification; I saw my corruption.
He proclaimed him .as** Redemption ;’ I felt my slavery to
sin, and my captivity to Satan. He concluded with an
animated address to sinners, in which he exhorted them
to flee from the wrath to come, to cast off the love of
outward ornaments, to put on Christ, and be clothed with
true humility. | ,

“From that hour I never lost sight of the value of my
soul, and the danger of a sinful state. [inwardly blessed
God for the sermon, although my mind was in a state of
great confusion.

“The preacher had brought forward the ruling passion
of my heart, which was pride in outward dress; and by
the grace of God it was made instrumental to the awa-
kening of my soul. Happy, Sir, would it be, if many a





DAIRY MAN’S: p AUGHTER, 37

poor girl, like myself, were turned from the love of out-
ward adorning and putting on of fine apparel, to seek
that which is not corruptible, even the ornament of a
meek and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God of
great price.

“The greater part of the congregation, unused to such
faithful and scriptural sermons, disliked and complained
of the severity of the preacher; while a few, as I after-
wards found, like myself, were deeply affected, and ear-
nestly wished to hear him again. But he preached there
no more.

“From that time I was led, through a course of private
prayer, reading, and meditation, to see my lost estate as
a sinner, and the great mercy of God, through Jesus
Christ, in raising sinful dust and ashes to a share in the
tare happiness of heaven. And oh! Sir, what a

aviour have I found! He is more than I could ask or
desire. In his fullness.I have found all that my poverty
could need; in his bosom I have found a resting-place
from all sin and sorrow; in his word I have found strength
against doubt and unbelief.” |

“Were you not soon convinced,” said I, “that your
salvation must be an act of entire grace on the part of
God, weekly independent of your own previous works or
deservings ?”

“Dear Sir, what were my works before I heard that
sermon, but evil, carnal, selfish, and ungodly? ‘The
thoughts of my heart, from my youth upward, were only
evil, and that continually. And my deservings, what were
they, but the apie of a fallen, depraved, careless
soul, that regards neither law nor Gospel? Yes, Sir, I
immediately saw, that if ever I were saved, it must be by
the free mercy of God, and that the whole praise and
honor of the work would be his from first to last.”

“ What change did you perceive in yourself with re-
spect to the world?”

“ It appeared all vanity and vexation of spirit, I found
it necessary to my peace of mind to ‘come out from
among them and be separate.’ I gave myself to prayer;

4



38 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

and many a precious hour of secret delight I enjoyed in
communion with God. Often I mourned over my sins,
and sometimes had a great conflict through unbelief, fear,
temptation to return back again to my old ways, and a
variety of difficulties which lay in my way. But he who
loved me with an everlasting love, drew me by his
loving-kindness, showed me the way of peace, gradually
strengthened me in my resolutions of leading a new
life, and taught me that, while without him I could
do nothing, I yet might do all things through his
strength.”

“Did you not find many difficulties in your situation,
owing to your change of principle and practice ?”

“ Yes, Sir, every of my life. I was laughed at by
some, scolded at by others, scorned by enemies, and pitied
by friends. I was called hypocrite, saint, false deceiver,
and many more names, which were meant to render me
hateful in the sight of the world. But I esteemed the
reproach of the cross an honor.—I forgave and prayed for
aay peeeeateen and remembered how very lately I had
acted the same part toward others myself. I thought
also that Christ endured the contradiction of sinners; and,
as the disciple is not above his Master, I was glad to be
in any way conformed to his sufferings,”

“Did you not then feel for your relatives at home?”

“ Yes, that I did indeed, Sir; they were never out of
my oe I prayed continually for them, and had a
longing desire to do them good. In particular I felt for
my father and mother, as they were getting into years,
and were very ignorant and dark in matters of religion.”

* Ay,” interrupted her mother, sobbing, “ignorant and
dark, sinful and miserable we were, till this dear Betsy—
this dear Betsy—this dear child, Sir, brought Christ Jesus
home to her poor father and mother’s house.”

“No, dearest mother, say rather, Christ Jesus. brought
your poor daughter home to tell you what he had done
for her soul, and I hope, to do the same for yours.”

At this moment the Dairyman came in with two pails
of milk hanging from the yoke on his shoulders, He



DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 39

had stood behind the half-opened door for a few minutes,
and heard the last sentences spoken by his wife and
daughter. .

“ Blessing and mercy upon her,” said he, “it is very
true; she would leave a good place of service on purpose
to live with us, that she might help us both in sou) and
body. Sir, don’t she look very ill? I think, Sir, we
shan’t have her here long.”

“Leave that to the Lord,” said Elizabeth. “ All our
times are in his hand, and happy it is that they are.
I am willing to go; are not you willing, my father, to
part with me into hts hands who gave me to you at
first ?”

“ Ask me any question in the world but that,” said the
weeping father.

“I know,” said she, “ you wish me to be happy.”

“JI do, 1 do,” answered he; “let the Lord do with you
and us as best pleases him.”

I then asked her on what her present consolations
chiefly depended, in the prospect of approaching death.

“ Entirely, Sir, on my view of Christ. When I look at
myself, many sins, infirmities, and imperfections cloud the
image of Christ which I want to see in my own heart.
But when I look at the Saviour himself, he is altogether
lovely ; there is not one spot in his countenance, nor one

cloud over all his perfections. |
' “YJ think of his coming in the flesh, and it reconciles me
to the sufferings of the body; for He had them as well as
I. I think of his temptations, and believe that he is able
to succor me when I am tempted. Then I think of his
cross, and learn to bear my own. [I reflect on his death,
and long to die unto sin, so that it may no longer have
dominion over me. I sometimes think on his resurrec-
tion, and trust that he has given me a part in it, for! feel
that my affections are set upon things above. Chiefly I
take comfort in thinking of him as at the right hand of
the Father, pleading my cause, and rendering acceptable
even my feeble prayers, both for myself, and, as I hope,
for my dear friends.



40 ANNALS OF THE POQH.

“ These are the views, which, through mercy, I have of
my Saviour’s goodness; and they have made me wish
and strive in my poor way to serve him, to give myself
up to him, and to labor to do my duty in that state of
life into which it has pleased him to call me.

“ A thousand times I should have fallen and fainted, if
he had not upheld me, I feel that I am nothing without
him. He is all in all.

“Just so far as I can cast my care upon him, I find
strength to do his will. May he give me grace to trust
him to the last moment! Ido not fear death, because I
believe he has taken away its sting. And oh! what hap-
piness beyond! Tell me, Sir, whether you think | am
right. I hope I am under no delusion. [ dare not look
for my hope at any thing short of the entire fulness of
Christ. When I ask my own heart a question, I am
afraid to trust it, for it is treacherous, and has often de-
eeived me. But when I ask Christ, he answers me with
promises that strengthen and refresh me, and leave me
no room to doubt his power and will to save. I am in
his hands, and would remain there; and I do believe
that he will never leave nor forsake me, but will perfect
the thing that concerns me. He loved me and gave him-
self for me, and I believe that his gifts and calling are with-
out repentance. In this hope [ live, in this I wish to die.”

I looked around me as she was speaking, and thought,
“ Surely this is none other than the house of God, and
the gate of heaven.” Every thing appeared neat, cleanly,
and interesting. The afternoon ha Set rather overcast
with dark clouds, but just now the setting sun shone
brightly and rather suddenly into the room. It was re-
flected from three or four rows of bright pewter plates
and white earthen-ware arranged on shelves against the
wall; it also gave brillianey to a few prints of sacred sub-
jects that hung there also, and served for monitors of the
birth, baptism, crucifixion, and resurrection of Christ. A

map of Jerusalem, and a hieroglyphic of “the old
and new man,” completed the decorations on that side of
the room. Clean as was the white-washed wall, it was

*

.|

rr ne att ta maa aa a



“s.

DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 4]

not cleaner than the rest of the place and its furniture.
Seldom had the sun enlightened a house where order and
general neatness (those sure attendants of pious poverty)
were more conspicuous.

This gleam of setting sunshine was emblematical of
the bright and serene close of this io Christian’s de-
parting season. One ray happened to be reflected from
a little looking-glass upon the face of the young woman.
Amidst her pallid and Recasins features there appeared a
calm resignation, triumphant confidence, unaffected hu-
mility, and tender anxiety, which fully declared the feel-
ings of her heart.

Some further affectionate conversation, and a short
prayer, closed this interview. ©

As I rode home by departing daylight, a solemn tran-
quills reigned throughout the scene. The gentle low-
ing of cattle, the bleating of sheep, just penned in their
folds, the humming of the insects of the night, the dis-
tant murmurs of the sea, the last notes of the birds of day,
and the first warblings of the nightingale, broke upon the
ear, and served rather to increase than lessen the peace-
ful serenity of the evening, and its corresponding effects
on my own mind. It invited and cherished just such
meditations as my visit had already inspired. Natural
scenery, when viewed in a Christian mirror, frequently
affords very beautiful illustrations of divine truth. We
are highly favored, when we can enjoy them, and at the
same time draw near to God in them. |

Soon after this I received a hasty summons, to inform
me that my young friend was dying. It was brought by
a soldier, whose countenance bespoke seriousness, good
sense, and piety.

“T am sent, Sir, by the father and mother of Elizabeth
W———., at her own particular request, to say how much
they all wish to see you. She is going home, Sir, very
fast indeed.”

“ Have you known her long?” I replied.

“ About a month, Sir; I ove to visit the sick, and

4



42 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

menaing of her case from a serious person who lives
close by our camp, I went to see her. I bless God that
ever I dd go. Her conversation has been very profitable
to me.”

“T rejoice,” said I, “to see in you, as J trust, a brother
soldier. ‘Though we differ ia our outward regimentals, I
hope we serve under the same:spiritual Captain. I will
go with you.”

My horse was soon ready. My. military companion
walked by my side, and gratified me with very sensible
and pious conversation. He related some remarkable
testimonies of the excellent disposition of the Dairyman’s
' Daughter, as they appeared from some recent intercourse
which he had had with her. '

“She is a ane diamond, Sir,” said the soldier, “and
will soon shine brighter than any diamond upon earth.”

We passed through Janes and fields, over hills and val-
leys, by open and retired paths, sometimes crossing over,
and sometimes following the windings of a little brodk,
which gently murmured by the road side. Conversation
beguiled the distance, and shortened the apparent time of
our journey, till we were nearly arrived at the Dairyman’s
cottage.

As we approached it we became silent. Thoughts of
death, eternity, and salvation, inspired by the-sight of a
house where a dying believer lay, filled my own mind,
and, I doubt not, that of my companion also,

No living object yet appeared, except the Dairyman’s
dog; keeping a kind of mute watch at the door, for he
did not, as formerly, bark at my approach. He seemed
to partake so far of the feelings appropriate to the cir-
cumstances of the family, as not to wish to give a hasty
or painful alarm. He came forward to the little wicket-
ea then looked back at the house-door, as if conscious

ere was sorrow within, It was as if he wanted to say,
“ Tread softly over the threshold, as you enter the house
of mourning; for my master’s heart is full of grief.”

A solemn serenity appeared to surround the whole
place, It was only interrupted by the breeze passing



DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 43

through the large elm-trees which stood near the house,
which my imagination indulged itself in thinking were
plaintive sighs of sorrow. I gently opened the door; no
one appeared, and all was still silent.. The soldier fol-
lowed; we came to the foot of the stairs.

“They are come,” said a voice, which I knew to be the
father’s ; “ they are come.” |

He appeared at the top; I gave him my hand and said
nothing. On entering the room above, I saw the
mother and her son — the much-loved daughter
and sister; the son’s wife sat weeping in a window-seat
with a child on her lap; two or three persons attended in
the room to discharge any office which friendship or ne-
cessity might require.

I sat down by the bedside. The mother could not
weep, but now and then sighed deeply, as she alternately
looked at Elizabeth and atme. The if tear rolled down
the brother’s cheek, and testified an affectionate regard.
The good old man stood at the foot of the bed, leanin
upon the post, and unable to take his eyes off the child
from whom he was soon to part.

Elizabeth’s eyes were closed, and as yet she perceived
me not. But over: her face, though pale, sunk, and hol-
low, the peace of God, which passeth all understanding,
had cast a triumphant calm,

The soldier, after a short pause, silently reached out
his Bible toward me, pointing with his finger at 1 Cor.
xv. 55, 56, 58. I then broke silence b PP the pas-
sage, “ O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is
thy victory? The sting of death is sin, and the strength
of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, who giveth us
the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ,”

At the sound of these words her eyes opened, and
something like a ray of divine light beamed on her coun-
tenance, as she said, “ Victory! victory! through our Lord
Jesus Christ.” |

She relapsed again, taking no further notice of any one

resent, } ;
. “God be praised for the triumph of faith,” I said.



44 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

“ Amen,” replied the soldier.

The Dairyman’s uplifted eye showed that the Amen
was in his heart, though his tongue failed to utter it.

A short struggling or breath took place in the dying
oung woman, which was soon over, and then | said to
er,

“My dear friend, do you not feel that you are sup-

ported ?”

“The Lord deals very gently with me,” she replied.

“ Are not his promises now very precious to you ?”

“They are all yea and amen in Christ Jesus.”

“ Are you in much bodily pain?”

“ So little that I almost forget it!”

“How good the Lord is!”

“ And how unworthy am I!”

“ You are going to see him as he is.”

ag Shdinn E hone-ol believe that I am.”

She again fell into a short slumber.

Looking at her mother, I said, “ What a mercy to have
a child so near heaven as yours is!” ,

“And what a mercy,” she replied in broken accents,
“if her poor old mother might but followher there! But,
Sir, it is so hard to ,

“T hope, through grace, by faith, you will soon meet,
to part no more ; it will be but a little while.”

“ Sir,” said the Dairyman, “ that thought supports me,
and the Lord’s goodness makes me feel more reconciled
than I was.”

“ Father....mother....” said the reviving daughter, “he
is good to me.....trust him, praise him evermore.”

“Sir,” added she in a faint voice, “I want to thank you
for your kindness to me....[ want to ask a favor.,..you
buried my sister....will you do the same for me?”

“ All shall be as you wish, if God permit,” I replied.

“ Thank you, Sir, thank you....1 have another favor to
ask....When I am gone, remember my father and mother.
They are old, but I hope the good work. is begun in their
souls.,..My prayers are heard....Pray come and see them



DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 45

1 cannot speak much, but I want to speak for their
sakes..,.Sir, remember them.”

The aged parents now sighed and sobbed aloud, utter.
ing broken sentences, and gained some relief by such an
expression of their feelings. gx ‘bo

At length I said to Elizabeth, “Do you experience any
omy or temptations on the subject of your eternal

ety ?

“No, Sir; the Lord deals very gently with me, and
gives me peace.”

“ What are your views of the dark valley of death, now
that you are passing through it?”

“Tt is not dark.”

“ Why so?” |

“ My Lord is there, and he is my light and my salva.
tion.”

“ Have you any fears of more bodily suffering?”

“The Lord deals so gently with me, I can trust him.”

Something of a convulsion came on. When it was
past, she said again and again,

“The Lord deals very gently with me. Lord, I am
thine, save me.....Blessed Jesus.....Precious Saviour.....His
blood cleanseth from all sin....Who shall separate 2....His
name is Wonderful....Thanks be to God....He giveth us
the victory....1, even I, am saved...0 grace, mercy, and
wonder—Lord, receive my spirit! |

“ Dear Sir....Dear father, mother, friends, I am going...
but all is well, well, well “wi .

She relapsed again—We knelt down to prayer. The

rd was in the midst of us and blessed us.

She did not again revive while I remained, nor ever
speak any more words which could be understood. She
slumbered for about ten hours, and at last sweetly fell
asleep in the arms of the Lord, who had dealt so gently
with her.

I left the house an hour after she had ceased to speak.
I pressed her hand as I was taking leave, and said,
“ Christ is the resurrection and the life.”

She gently returned the pressure, but could neither





46 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

open her eyes nor utter areply. I never had witnessed
a scene so impressive as this before. It completely filled
my imagination as I returned home. ‘

“ Farewell,” thought I, “dear friend, till the morning
of an eternal day shall renew our personal intercourse, .
Thou wast a brand plucked from the burning, that thou
mightest become a star shining in the firmament of glory.
I have seen thy light, and thy good works, and f will
therefore glorify our Father which is in heaven, I have
seen in thy example what it is to be a sinner freely saved
by grace. I have learned from thee, as in a living mirror,
who it is that begins, continues, and ends the work of
faith and love. Jesus is all in all; he will and shall be
glorified. He won the crown, and alone deserves to wear
it, May no one attempt to rob him of his glory; he
saves, and saves to the uttermost. Farewell, dear sister
in the Lord. Thy flesh and thy heart may fail, but God
is the strength of thy heart, and shall thy portion
forever.” \

I was soon called to attend the funeral of my friend, who
breathed her last shortly after my visit. Many pleasing
yet melancholy thoughts were connected with the fulfil-
ment of this task.. | retraced the numerous and important
conversations which I had held with her. But these could
now no longer be held on earth. I reflected on the inter-
esting and improving nature of Christian friendships,
whether formed in palaces or in cottages ; and felt thank-
ful that I had so long enjoyed that privilege with the
subject of this memorial. I indulged a sigh for a moment,
on thinking that I could no longer hear the great truths
of Christianity uttered by one who had drunk so deep of
the waters of life. But the rising murmur was checked
by the animating thought, “ She is gone to eternal rest—
could I wish to bring her back to this vale of tears ?”

As [ travelled onward to the house where lay her re-
mains in solemn preparation for the grave, the first sound
of a tolling bell struck my ear. It proceeded from a
village church in the valley directly beneath the ridge of



DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 47

a high hill, over which I had taken my way—it was Eliz-
abeth’s funeral knell. It was a solemn sound, but it
seemed to proclaim at once the blessedness of the dead
whe die in the Lord, and the necessity of the living pon-
dering these things, and laying them to heart.

The scenery was in unison with that tranquil frame of
mind which is most suitable for holy meditation. A rich
and fruitful valley lay immediately beneath; it was
adorned with corn-fields and pastures, through which a
small river winded in a variety of directions, and many
herds grazed upon its banks. A fine range of opposite
hills, covered with grazing flocks, terminated with a bold
sweep into the ocean, whose blue waves appeared at a
distance beyond. Several villages, hamlets, and churches
were scattered in the valley. The noble mansions of the
rich, and the lowly cottages of the — added their re-
spective features to the landscape: ‘The air was mild, and
the declining sun occasioned a beautiful interchange of
light and shade upon the sides of the hills. In the midst
of this scene the chief sound that arrested attention was
the bell tolling for the funeral of the Dairyman’s daugh-
ter.

Do any of my readers inquire why I describe so mi-
nutely the cireumstances of prospect scenery which may
be connected with the incidents I relate? My reply is,
that the God of redemption is the God of creation like.
wise ; and that we are taught in every part of the Word
of God to unite the admiration of the beauties and won-
ders of nature to every other motive for devotion. When
David considered the heavens, the work of God’s fingers,
the moon and the stars, which he has adorned, he was
thereby led to the deepest humiliation of heart before his
Maker. And when he. viewed the sheep, and the oxen,
and the beasts of the field, the fowl of the air, and the
fish of the sea, he was constrained to ery out, “O Lord,
our Lord; how excellent is thy name in all the earth !”

I am the poor man’s friend, and wish more especially
that every poor rs should know how to con-
nect the goodness of in creation and providence



48 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

with the unsearchable riches of his grace in the salvation
of a sinner. And where can he learn this lesson more
instructively than in looking around the fields where his
labor is appointed, and there tracing the handy-work of
God in all that he beholds? Such meditations have often
afforded me both profit and pleasure, and I wish my
readers to share them with me.

The Dairyman’s cottage was rather more than a mile
distant from the church. A lane, quite overshaded with
trees and high hedges, led from the foot of the hill to his
dwelling. lt was impossible at that time to overlook the
_ suitable gloom of such an approach to the house of
mourning.

I found, on my entrance, that several Christian friends
from different parts of the neighborhood had assembled
together to pay their last tribute of esteem and regard to
the memory of the Dairyman’s daughter. Several of
them had first become acquainted with her during the
latter stage of her illness; some few had maintained an
affectionate intercourse with her for.alonger period. But
all seemed anxious to manifest their respect for one who
was endeared to them by such striking testimonials of
true Christianity. |

It is not easy to describe the sensation which the mind
experiences on the first sight of a dead countenance,
which, when living, was loved and esteemed for the sake
of that soul which used to give it animation. A deep
and awful view of the separation that has taken place
between the soul and body of the deceased since we last
beheld them, occupies the feelings; our friend seems to
be both near, and yet far off. The most interesting and
valuable part is fled away; what remains is but the
earthly perishing habitation no longer occupied by its
tenant. Yetthe features present the accustomed associa-
tion of friendly intercourse. For one moment we could
think them asleep; the next reminds us that the blood
circulates no more—the eye has lost its power of seeing,
the ear of hearing, the heart of throbbing, and the limbs
of moving. Quickly a thought of glory breaks in upon





DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 49

the mind, and we imagine the dear departed soul to be
arrived at its long-wished-for rest. It is surrounded by
cherubim and seraphim, and sings the song of Moses and
the Lamb on Mount Zion. Amid the solemn stillness of
the chamber of death, imagination hears heavenly hymns
chanted by the spirits of just men made perfect. In
another moment the livid lips and sunken eye of the
clay-cold corpse recall our thoughts to earth and to our-
selves again. And while we think of mortality, sin,
death, and the grave, we feel the prayer rise in our bosom,
“© let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last
end be like his!”

If there be a moment when Christ and salvation, death,
judgment, heaven, and hell, appear more than ever to be
momentous subjects of meditation, it is that which
brings us to the side of a coffin containing. the body of a
departed believer.

Elizabeth’s features were altered, but much of her like-
ness remained. Her father and mother sat at the head,
her brother at the foot of the coffin, manifesting their
deep and unfeigned sorrow. The weakness and ho
of old age added a character to the parents’ grief, whic
called for much tenderness and compassion.

A remarkably decent-looking woman, who had the
management of the few simple though solemn ceremonies
which the ease required, advanced towards me, saying

“ Sir, this is rather a sight of joy than of sorrow. Our
dear friend Elizabeth finds it to be so, I have no doubt.
She is beyond alfsorrow. Do you not think she is, Sir ?”

“After what I have known, and seen, and heard,” I
replied, “I feel the fullest assurance, that while her body
remains here, her soul is with her Saviour in Paradise.
She loved him here, and there she enjoys the pleasures
which are at his right hand for evermore.”

“ Mercy, merey upon a poor old creature almost broken
down with age and grief, what shall Ido? Betsy’s gone
—my daughter’s dead. Oh! my child, I shall never see
thee more! God be merciful to me a sinner!” sobbed
out the poor mother.

d



50 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“'That last prayer, my dear good woman,” said I, “will
bring you together again. It is a cry that has brought
thousands to glory. It brought your daughter thither,
and I hope it will bring you there likewise. He will in
no wise cast out any that come to him.”

“ My dear,” said the Dairyman, breaking the long si-
lence he had maintained, “let us trust God with our
child, and let us trust him with our own selves. The Lord
gave, and the Lord has taken away ; blessed be the name
of the Lord! We are old, and can have but a little far-
ther to travel in our journey, and then”—he could say no
more.

The soldier before mentioned reached a Bible into my
hand, and _ said, “ Perhaps, Sir, you would not object to
reading a chapter before we go to the church.”

I did so; it was the fourteenth of the book of Job. A
sweet tranquillity prevailed while Iread it. Each minute
that was spent in this funeral-chamber seemed to be val-
uable. I made a few observations on the chapter, and
connected them with the case of our departed sister.

“Tam but a poor soldier,” said our military friend,
“and have ne of this world’s goods beyond my daily
subsistence; but | would not exchange my hope of sal-
vation in the next world for all that this world could
bestow without it. What is wealth without grace?
Blessed be God, as I march about from one quarter to
another, I still find the Lord wherever I go; and thanks
be to his holy name, he is here to-day in the midst of this
company of the living and the dead. I feel that itis good
to be here.” |

Some other persons present began to take a part in
the conversation, in the course of which the life and ex-
perience of the Dairyman’s Daughter were brought for-
ward in a very interesting manner; each friend had
something to relate in testimony of her gracious disposi-
tion. One distant relative, a young woman under twenty,
who had hitherto been a very light and trifling character,
appeared to be remarkably impressed by the conversation
of that day; and I have since had ground to believe that





DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 51

divine grace then began to influence her in the choice of
that better part, which shall not be taken from her,

What a contrast does such a sceneas this exhibit, when
compared with the dull, formal, unedifying, and often
indecent manner in which funeral parties assemble in the
house of death!

But the time for departure to the church was now at
hand. I went to take my last look at the deceased.
There was much written on her countenance: she had
evidently departed with a smile. It still remained, and
spoke the tranquillity of her departing soul. According
to the custom of the place, she was decorated with leaves
and flowers in the coffin: these indeed were fading flow-
ers, but they reminded me of that Paradise whose flowers
are immortal, and where her never-dying soul is at rest.

I remembered the last words which I had heard her
speak, and was instantly struck with the happy thought,
that “death was indeed swallowed up in victory.”

As I slowly retired, I said inwardly, “Peace, my hon-
ored sister, to thy memory, and to my soul, till we meet
in a better world.”

In a little time the procession formed: it was rendered
the more interesting by the consideration of so many that
followed the coffin being persons of truly serious and
spiritual character.

After we had advanced about a hundred yards my
meditation was unexpectedly and most agreeably inter-
rupted by the friends who followed the family beginning
to sing a funeral Psalm. Nothing could be more sweet
or Solemn. ‘The well-known effect of the open air in
softening and blending the sounds of music was here pe-
culiarly felt. ‘The road through which we passed was
beautiful and romantic: it lay at the foot of a hill, which
occasionally re-echoed the voices of the singers, and
seemed to give faint replies to the notes of the mourners.
The funeral knell was distinctly heard from the church
tower, and greatly increased the effect which this simple
and becoming service produced.

I cannot describe the state of my own mind as pecu-



52 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

liarly connected with the solemn singing. I never wit-
nessed a similar instance before or since. I was reminded
of elder times and ancient piety, 1 wished the practice
more frequent. It seems well calculated to excite and
cherish devotion and religious affections.

We at length arrived at the church. The service was
heard with deep and affectionate attention. When we
came to the grave, the hymn which Elizabeth had select-
ed was sung. All was devout, simple, decent, animating.
We committed our dear friend’s body to the grave, in full
hope of a joyful resurrection from the dead.

hus was the veil of separation drawn for a season.
She is departed and no more seen. But she will be seen
at the right hand of her Redeemer at the last day ; and
will again appear to his glory, a miracle of grace and a
monument of mercy.

My reader, rich or poor, shall you and I appear there
likewise? Are we “clothed with humility,” and arrayed
in the wedding-garment of a Redeemer’s righteousness ?
Are we turned from idols to serve the living God?
we sensible of our own emptiness, flying to a Saviour’s
fulness to obtain grace and strength? Do we live in him,
and on him, and by him, and with him? Is he our all in
all? Are we“ lost and found ?” “dead and alive again ?”

My poor reader, the Dairyman’s daughter was a poor
“aed ee the child of a poor man. Herein thou resemblest

er: but dost thou resemble her as she resembled Christ?
Art thou made rich by faith? Hast thou a crown laid
up for thee? Is thine heart set upon heavenly riches !
If not, read this story once more, and then pray earnestly
for like precious faith. If, through grace, thou dost love
and serve the Redeemer that saved the Dairyman’s
daughter, grace, peace, and mercy be with thee. The
lines ure fallen unto thee in pleasant places: thou hast a
goodly heritage. Press forward in duty, and wait upon
the Lord, possessing thy soul in holy patience. Thou
hast just been with me to the grave of a departed believer.
Now “go thy way till the end be; for thou shalt rest,
and stand in thy lot at the end of the days.” Dan. xii. 13.



DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 53

Nore. The mother died about six months after her
daughter, and I have good reason to believe that God was
merciful to her, and took her to himself. May every
converted child thus labor and pray for the salvation of
their unconverted parents. The father continued for
some time after her, and adorned his old with a walk
and conversation becoming the Gospel. 1 cannot doubt
that the daughter and both her parents are now met to-
gether in “the land of pure delights, where saints immor-
tal reign,”







THE
AFRICAN SERVANT:

AN AUTHENTIC NARRATIVE.

BY REV. LEGH RICHMOND.





a



. THE
4

“AFRICAN SERVANT.

Durine a residence of some years’ continuance in the
neighborhood of the sea, an officer in the navy called
upon me and stated that he had just taken a lodging in
the parish for his wife and children, and that he an
African whom he had kept three years in his service.
“The lad is a deserving fellow,” said the officer, “and
he has a great desire to be baptized; I have promised
him to ask you to do it for him, if you have no objec-
tions.” |

“ Does he know anything,” I replied, “ of the principles
of the Christian religion ?”

“Q yes, 1 am sure he does,” answered the captain;
“for he talks a great deal about it in the kitchen, and
often gets laughed at for his pains; but he takes it all
very patiently.”

* Does he well as your servant ?”

“ Yes, that he does: he is as honest and civil a fellow
as ever came aboard a ship, or lived in a house.”

“ Was he always so well behaved ?” .

“No,” said the officer; “when I first had him he was
often very unruly and deceitful; but for the last two
years he has been quite like another creature.”

“ Well, Sir, I shall be very glad to see him, and think
it probable I shall wish to go through a course of in-



60 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

struction and examination; during which I shall be able
to form a judgment how far it will be right to admit him
to the ordinance of baptism. Can he read ?”

“ Yes,” replied his master; “ he has been taking great
pains to learn to read for some time past, and can make
out a chapter in thé Bible pretty well, as my maid-servant
informs me. He speaks English better than many of his
countrymen, but you will find it a little broken. When
will it be convenient ‘that I should send him over to
you?”

“To-morrow afternoon, Sir, if you please.”

“He shall come to you about four o'clock, and you
shall see what you can make of him.”

With this promise he took his leave. I felt glad of an
opportunity of instructing a native of that land whose
wrongs and injuries had often caused me to sigh and
mourn.

. At the appointed hour my African disciple arrived. He
was a very young-looking man, with a sensible, lively,and
pleasing turn of countenance.

I desired him to sit down, and said, “ Your master in-
forms me that you wish to have some conversation with
me respecting Christian baptism ?”

“Yes, Sir, me very much wish to be a Christian.”

“ Why do you wish so?”

“ Because me know that Christian go to heaven when
he die.”

“ How long have you had that wish?” I said.

“Ever since me hear one good minister preach in
America two years ago.”

“ Where were you born ?”

“In Africa. Me was a very little boy when me was
made slave by the white men.

“ How was that ?”

“ Me left father and mother one day at home to go to
get shells by the sea-shore ; ‘and, as I wasstooping down
to U arword them up, some white sailors came out of a boat
and took me away. Me never see father nor mother
again. .



AFRICAN SERVANT. ‘61

“ And what became of you then ?”

“Me was put into a ship and brought to Jamaica, and
sold to a massa, who kept me in his house to serve
him some years; when, about three years ago, Captain
W—, my massa that spoke to you, bought me to be
his servant on board his ship. And he be good massa;
and me live with him ever since.” :

“ And what thoughts had you about your soul all that
time before you went to America?” | asked him.

“ Me no care for my soul at all before then. No man
teach me a word about my soul.”

“Well, now tell me farther about what happened to
you in America. How came you there!”

“My massa take me there in a ship, and he stop there
one month; and then me hear the good minister.”

“ And what did that minister say ?”

“ He said me was a great sinner.”

“ What, did he speak to you in particular?”

“Yes, me think so; for there were a great many to
hear him, but he tell them all about me.”

“ What did he say ?”

“He say all about the things that were in my heart.”

“ What things ?”

“My sin, my ignorance, my know nothing, my believe
nothing. The good minister made me see that me think
nothing good, nor do nothing good.”

“ And what else did he tell you ?”

“He sometime look me in the face, and say, that Jesus
Christ came to die for sinners, poor black sinners as well
as white sinners. Me thought this was very good, very
good indeed, to do so for wicked sinner.”

“And what made you think this was all spoken to you
in particular ?”

“ Because me sure no wicked sinner as me in all the
place. The good minister must know me was there.”

“ And what, did you think about yourself while he
preached about Jesus Christ ?” )

“ Sir, me was very much afraid when he said the wick-
ed must be turned into hell fire. For me felt that me

a 6 _



62 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

was very wicked sinner, and that make mecry. And he
talk much about the love of Christ to sinners, and that
make me cry more. And me thought that me must love
Jesus Christ ; but me not know how, and that make me
cry nn '

“Did you hear more sermons than one during that
month ?” |

“Yes, Sir; massa give me leave to go three times, and
all the times me wanted to love Jesus more, and do
what Jesus said; but my heart seem sometime hard like
a stone.”

“ Have you ever heard any preaching since that time ?”

“ Never, till me hear sermon at this church last Sunday,
and then me long to be baptized in Jesus’ name.”

“ And what have been your thoughts all the time since
you first heard those sermons in America; did you tell
anybody then what you felt?”

“No; me speak to nobody but to God. The good
minister say that God hear the cry of the poor; so me
ery to God, and he hear me. And me often think about
Jesus Christ, and wish to be like him.”

“Can you read %”

“ A little.”

“Who taught you to read ?”

“God teach me to read,”

“What do you mean by saying so?”

“God give me desire to read, and that make reading
easy. Massa give me Bible, and one sailor slow me the
letters; and so me learn to read by myself with God’s
good help.” )

“ And what do you read in the Bible ?”

“O me read all about Jesus Christ, and how he loved
sinners; and wicked men killed him, and he died and
came again from the grave, and all this for poor negro.
And it sometimes make me ery, to think that Christ love
80 poor ym ry
d what do the people say about your reading and
praying, and attention to the things of God?”

“Some wicked people, that do not love Jesus Christ,



AFRICAN SERVANT, 63

call me great fool, and negro dog, and black hypocrite.
And that make me sometime feel angry; but then me
remember Christian must not be angry. Jesus Christ
was called ugly black names, and he was quiet as a lamb;
and so then me remember Jesus Christ, and me say
nothing again to them.”

I was much delighted with the simplicity and apparent
sincerity of this poor African; and wished to ascertain
what measure of light and feeling he possessed on a few
leading points. St. Paul’s summary of religion* occur-
ring to me, I said, * Tell me what is faith? What is your
own faith? What do you believe about Jesus Christ and
your own soul ?”

“Me believe,” said he, “that Jesus Christ came into
the world to save sinners; and though me be chief of
sinners, Jesus will save me, though me be only poor black
ne ”

“What is your hope? What do you hope for, both as
to this life and that which is to come ?”

“ Me hope Christ Jesus will take good care of me, and
keep me from sin and harm, while me live here: and me
hope, when me come to die, to go and live with him
always, and never die again.”

“What are your thoughts about Christian love or
charity? I mean, whom and what do you most love?”

“ Me love God the Father, because he was so good to
send his Son. Me love Jesus Christ, because he die for
poor sinner. Me love all men, black men and white
men too; for God made themall. Me love good Chris-
— people, because Jesus love them, and they love

esus.”

Such was my first conversation with this young disci-
ple; I rejoiced in the prospect of receiving him into the
church, agreeably to his desire. I wished, however, to
converse somewhat further, and inquire more minutely
into his conduct ; and promised to ride over and see him
in a few days, at his master’s lodgings.

_ * Now abideth faith, hope, charity; these three: but the greatest of
theee is charity. 1 Cor. xiii. 1,



64 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

When he was gone, I thought within myself, God hath

indeed redeemed souls, by the blood of his Son, “ out of |

kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation.” | It

is a happy thought, that “Ethiopia shall soon stretch

forth her hands unto God. Sing unto God, ye kingdoms
of the earth, O sing praises unto the Lord!”

Not many days after the first. interview with my Afri-
ean disciple, ] went from home on horseback with the
design of visiting and conversing with him again at his
master’s house, which was situated in a part of the parish
near four miles distant from my own. The road which
I took lay over a lofty down or hill, which commands a
prospect of scenery seldom equalled for beauty and mag-
nificence. It gave birth to silent, but instructive contem-
plation..-

The down itself was covered with sheep, grazing on
its wholesome and plentiful pasture. Here and there a
shepherd’s boy kept his appointed station, and watched
over the flock committed to his care. I viewed it as an
emblem of my own situation and employment. Adjoin-
ing the hill lay an extensive parish, wherein many souls
were given me to watch over, and render an account of,
at the day of the great Shepherd’s appearing. The pas-
toral scene before me seemed to be a living parable, il-
lustrative of my own spiritual charge. I felt a prayerful
wish that the good Shepherd, who gave his life for the
sheep, might enable me to be faithful to my trust,

It occurred to me about the same time, that my youn
African friend was a sheep of another more distant fol
which Christ will yet bring to hear his voice. For there
shall be one fold and one Shepherd, and all nations shall
be brought to acknowledge that he alone “restoreth our
souls, and Jeadeth us into the paths of righteousness for
his name’s sake.” On the left hand of the hill, as I ad-
vanced eastward, and immediately under its declivity,
extended a beautiful tract of land intersected by a large
arm of the sea, which (as the tide was fast flowing in)
formed a broad lake or haven of three miles in length.



AFRICAN SERVANT. 65

Woods, villages, cottages, and churches, surrounded it in
most pleasing variety of prospect. Beyond this lay a
large fleet of ships of war, and not far from it another of
merchantmen, both safe at anchor, and covering a tract
of the sea of several miles inextent. Beyond this again,
I saw the fortifications, dock-yards, and extensive public
edifices of a large seaport town. The sun shone upon
the windows of the buildings and the flags of the —
with great brightness, and added much to the splendor
of the view.

I thought of the concerns of empires, the plans of
statesmen, the fate of nations, and the horrors of war.
- Happy will be that day, when He shall make wars to
cease unto the end of the earth, and peace to be estab-
lished on its borders !

On my right hand, to the south and south-east, the
unbounded ocean displayed its mighty waves. It was
covered with vessels of every size, sailing in all directions ;
some outward-bound to the most distant parts of the
world ; others, after a long voyage, returning home laden
with the produce of remote climes. |

At the south-west of the spot on which I was riding,
extended a beautiful semi-circular bay of about nine or
ten miles in circumference, bounded by high tliffs of
white, red, and brown-colored earths. yond this lay
a range of hills, whose tops are often buried. in cloudy
mists, but which then appeared clear and distinct. This
chain of hills, meeting with another from the north,
bounds a large fruitful vale, whose fields, now ripe for
harvest, proclaimed the goodness of God in the ok ome
vision which he makes for the sons of men. It is he who
“prepares the corn; he crowns the year with his good-
ness, and his paths drop fatness. They drop upon the
pastures of the wilderness, and the little hills rejoice on
every side. The pastures are clothed with flocks; the
valleys are also covered over with corn: they shout for
joy, they also sing.”

As I pursued the meditations which this magnificent
and varied scenery —" in my mind, I approached the



66 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

edge of a tremendous perpendicular cliff with which the
down terminates ; I dismounted from my horse and tied
ittoabush. The breaking of the waves against the foot
of the cliff, at so great a distance beneath me, produced
an incessant and pleasing murmur. The sea-gulls were
flying between the top of the cliff where I stood and the
rocks below, attending upon their nests built in the holes
of the cliff. The whole scene, in every direction, was

rand and impressive; it was suitable to devotion. The

reator appeared in the works of his creation, and called
upon the creature to honor and adore, To the believer
this exercise is doubly delightful. He possesses a right
to the enjoyments of nature and providence, as well as to
the privileges of grace. His title-deed runs thus: “ All
things are yours, whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas,
or the world, or things present, or things to come; all
are yours, and ye are Christ’s, and Christ is God's.”

I cast my eye downwards a little to the left, towards a
small cove, the shore of which consists of fine hard sand.
It is surrounded by fragments of rock, chalk cliffs, and
steep banks of broken earth, Shut out from human in-
tercourse and dwellings, it seems formed for retirement
and contemplation. one of these rocks I unexpect-
edly observed a man sitting with a book which he was
reading. The place was near two hundred yards perpen-
dicularly below me ; but I soon discovered by his dress,
and by the black color of his features, contrasted with
the white rocks beside him, that it was no other than my

African disciple, with, as I doubted not, a Bible in his |

hand, I rejoiced at this unlooked-for opportunity of
meeting him in so solitary and interesting a situation. I

descended a steep bank, winding by a kind of rude stair- |
case, formed by fishermen and shepherd’s boys, in the |

side of the cliff down to the shore.

He was intent on his book, and did not perceive me
till I approached very near to him.

“ William, is that you?”

“ Ah! massa, me very glad to see you. How came





AFRICAN SERVANT. 67

massa into this place? Me thought nobody here but
only God and me.” ,

“] was coming to your master’s house to see and you
rode round by this way for the sake of the prospect.
often come here in fine weather to look at the sea and
the shipping. Is that your Bible ?”

“ Yes, Sir, this is my dear good Bible.”

“T am glad,” said I, “to see you so well employed ; it
is a good sign, William.”

“ Yes, massa, a sign that God is good to me; but me
never good to God.’

“ How so ?”

“Me never thank him enough, me never pray to him
enough; me never remember enough who give me all
these things. Massa, me afraid my heart very bad. Me
wish me was like you.”

“Like me, William? Why, you are like me, a poor
helpless sinner, that must, like yourself, perish in his
sins, unless God of his infinite mercy and grace pluck
him as a brand from the burning, and make him an in-
stance of distinguishing love and favor. There is no
difference ; we have both come short of the glory of God:
all have sinned.”

“No, me no like you, massa; me think nobody like
me, nobody feel such a heart as me.”

“Yes, William, your feelings, I am persuaded, are like
those of every truly convinced soul who sees the exceed-
ing sinfulness of sin, and the greatness of the price which
Christ Jesus paid for the sinner’s ransom. You can say
in the words of the hymn,

“T the chief of sinners am,
But Jesus died for me.”

“O yes, Sir, me believe that Jesus died for poor negro.
What would become of poor wicked negro, if Christ no
die for him? But he die for the chief of sinners, and
that make my heart sometime quite glad.”

“What part of the Bible were you reading, William ?”

“Me read how the man on the cross spoke to Christ,



68 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

and Christ spoke to him. Now that man’s prayer just
do for me. ‘Lord,remember me ;’ Lord, remember poor
negro sinner: this is my prayer every morning, and some-
time at night too: when me cannot think of many words
then me say the same again, Lord, remember poor negro
sinner.”

“ And be assured, William, the Lord hears that prayer.
He pardoned and accepted the thief upon the cross, and
he will not reject you; he will in no wise cast out any
that come to him.”

“No, Sir, I believe it; but there is so much sin in my
heart, it make me afraid, and sorry. Massa, do you see
these limpets,* how fast they stick to the rocks here?
Just so sin stick fast to my heart.”

“Tt may be so, William ; but take another comparison :
do you cleave to Jesus Christ by faith in his death and —
righteousness, as those limpets cleave to the” rock, and
neither seas nor storms shall separate you from his
love.” ) :

# That is just what me want.”

“Tell me, William, is not that very sin, which you
speak of, a burden to you? You do not love it: you
would be glad to obtain strength against it, and to be
freed from it, would you not?”

“QO yes; me give all the world, if me had it, to be
without sin.”,

“ Come, then,'and welcome, to Jesus Christ, my broth-
er; his blood cleanseth from all sin. He gave himself
as a ransom for sinners, He hath borne our griefs and
carried our sorrows. He was wounded for our trans-
gressions; he was bruised for our iniquities; the chas-
tisement of our peace was upon him, and with his stripes
we are healed. The Lord hath laid on him the iniquity
of us all. Come, freely come to Jesus, the Saviour of
sinners.”

“ Yes, massa,” said the poor fellow weeping, “ me will
come, but me come very slow; very slow, massa; me

* A kind of shell-fish which abounds in the place where we were, and
which sticks to the rocks with great force.



AFRICAN SERVANT. 69

want to run, me want to fly. Jesus is very good to poor
negro, to send you to tell him all this.”

“But this is not the first time you have heard these
truths.”

“No, Sir, they have been comfort to my soul many
times since mé hear good minister preach in America, as
me tell you last week at your house.”

“ Well, now I hope, William, that since God has been
so graciously pleased to open your eyes, and affect. your
mind with such a great sense of his goodness, in giving
his Son to die for your sake; I hope that you do your
endeavor to keep his commandments; I hope you strive
to behave well to your master and mistress, and fellow-
servants. He that is a Christian inwardly, will be a
Christian outwardly ; he that truly and savingly believes
in Christ, will show his faith by his works, as the Apos-
tle says. Is it not so, William ””’

“Yes, Sir, me want to do so. Me want to be faithful.
Me sorry to think how bad servant me was before the
good things of Jesus Christ come to my heart. Me wish
to do ob te my massa, when he see me, and when he
not see me, for me know God always see me. Me know
that if me sin against my own massa, me sin against God,
and God be very angry with me. Besides, how can me
love Christ, if me do not do what Christ tell me? Me
love my fellow-servants, though as me tell you before,
they do not much love me, and J pray God to bless them.
And when they say bad things, and try to make me
angry, then me think, if Jesus Christ were in poor negro’s
place, he would not revile and answer n with bad
words and temper, but he say little, and pray much.
And so then me say nothing at all, but pray God to for-
give them.”

The more I conversed with this African convert, the
more satisfactory were the evidences of his mind being
spiritually enlightened, and his heart effectually wrought
upon by the grace of God.

The circumstances of the place in which we met to-
gether, contributed much to the interesting effect which



710 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

the conversation produced on my mind. The little cove
or bay was beautiful in the extreme. The air was calm
and serene. ‘The sun shone, but we were sheltered from
its rays by the cliffs. One of these was stupendously
lofty and large. It was white as snow: its summit hun
directly over our heads. The sea-fow} were flying aroun
it. Its whiteness was occasionally chequered with dark
green masses of samphire, which grew there. On the
other side, and behind us, was a more ual declivity
of many-colored earths, interspersed with green patches
of grass and bushes, and little streams of water trickling
down the bank, and mingling with the sea at the bottom.
At our feet the waves were advancing over shelves of
rocks covered with great variety of sea-weeds, which
swam in little fragments, and displayed much beauty and
elegance of form, as they were successively thrown upon
the sand.

Ships of war and commerce were seen at different dis-
tances. Fishermen were plying their trade in boats
nearer to the shore. The noise of the flowing tide, com-
bined with the voices of the sea-gulls over our heads,
and now and then a distant gun fired from the ships as
they passed along, added much to the peculiar sensations
to which the scene gave birth. Occasionally the striking
of oars upon the waves, accompanied by the boatmen’s
song, met the ear. The sheep aloft upon the down
sometimes mingled their bleatings with the other sounds.
Thus all nature seemed to unite in impressing an atten-
tive observer’s heart with affecting thoughts.

I continued for a considerable time in conversation
with the African, finding that his master was gone from
home for the day, and had given him liberty for some
hours. I spoke to him on the nature, duty, and privilege
of Christian baptism; pointed out to him the principles
of the Scriptures upon that head, and found that he
was very desirous of conforming to them. He appear-
ed to me to be well qualified for receiving that pledge
of his Redeemer’s love; and I rejoiced in the prospect
of beholding him no longer a “stranger and foreign-



AFRICAN SERVANT, 71

er, but a fellow-citizen with the saints and household of
God.”

I was much pleased with the affectionate manner in
which he spoke of his parents, from whom he had been
stolen in his childhood; and his wishes that God might
direct them by some means to the knowledge of the
Saviour.

“Who knows,” I said, “ but some of these ships may
be carrying a missionary to the country where they live,
to declare the good news of salvation to your country-
men, and to your own dear parents in particular, if they
are yet. alive.”

“Q! my dear father and mother: my dear, gracious
Saviour,” exclaimed he, leaping from the ned he
spake, “if thou wilt but save their souls, and tell them
what thou hast done for sinners—but—”

He stopped, and seemed much affected.

“My friend,” said I, “I will now pray with you for
your own soul, and those of your parents also.”

* Do, massa, that is very good and kind; do pray for
poor negro souls here and everywhere.”

This was a new and solemn “house of prayer.” The
sea-sand was our floor, the heavens were our roof, the
cliffs, the rocks, the hills, and the waves, formed the walls
of our chamber. It was not indeed a “place where
prayer was wont to be made,” but for this once it became
a hallowed spot: it will by me ever be remembered as
such. The presence of God was there.—I prayed.—The
African wept. His heart was full. I felt with him, and
could not but weep likewise.

The last day will show whether our tears were not the
tears of sincerity and Christian love.

It was time for my return; I leaned upon his arm, as
we ascended the steep cliff in my way back to my horse,
which I had left at the top of the hill. Humility and
thankfulness were marked in his countenanee. I leaned
upon his arm with the feelings of a brother. It was a re-
lationship I was happy to own. I took him by the hand
at parting, appointed one more interview previous to the



72 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

present.
“ God bless you, my dear massa.”
“ And you, my fellow-Christian, forever and ever.”

day of baptizing him, and bade him farewell for the

The interesting and affecting conversation which I had
with the African servant, produced a sensation not easy
to be expressed. As I returned home I was led into
meditation on the singular clearness and beauty of those
evidences of faith and conversion of heart to God which
I had just seen and heard. How plainly, I thought, it
— that salvation is freely by grace, through faith ;
and that not of ourselves; it is the gift of God; not of
works, lest any man should boast. t but the Holy
Spirit, who is the Author and Giver of the life of grace,
could have wrought such a change from the once dark,
perverse, and ignorant heathen, to this now convinced,
enlightened, humble, and believing Christian? . How
manifestly is the uncontrolled sovereignty of the divine
will exercised in the calling and translating of sinners
from darkness to light! What a lesson may the nomi-
nal Christian of a civilized country sometimes learn from
the simple, sincere religion of a converted heathen!

I afterwards made particular inquiry into this youn
man’s domestic and general deportment. Everything 1
heard was satisfactory; nor could J entertain a doubt
respecting the consistency of his conduct and. character.
I had some further conversations with him, in the course
of which I pursued such a plan of scriptural instruction
and examination as I coneeived to be the most suitable
to his progressive state of mind, He improved much in
reading, carried his Bible constantly in his pocket, and
took every opportunity which his duty to his master’s
service would allow, for perusing it. I have frequently
had occasion to observe, that among the truly religious
poor, who have not had the advantage of learning to read
in early youth, a concern about the soul, and desire to
know the Word of God, have proved effectual motives
for their learning to read with great ease and advantage



AFRICAN SERVANT. 73

to themselves and others. It was strikingly so in the
present case.

I had, for a considerable time, been accustomed to meet
some ‘serious persons once a week, in a cottage at no
great distance from the house where he lived, for the
purpose of religious conversation, instruction, and prayer.
Having found these occasions remarkably useful and in-
teresting to myself and others, I thought it would be very
desirable to take the African there, in order that there
might be many witnesses to the simplicity and sincerity
of real Christianity, as exhibited in the character of this
promising young convert. I hoped it might prove an
eminent means of grace to excite and quicken the spirit
of prayer and praise among some over whose spiritual
progress J was anxiously watching. _

I accordingly obtained his master’s leave that he should
attend me to one of my cottage assemblies, His master,
although he did not himself appear to live under the in-
fluence of real religion, or to manifest any serious con-
cern respecting his own state, yet was pleased with my
attention to his servant, and always spoke well of his
behavior.

I set out on the day appointed for the interview. The
cottage at which we usually assembled was near four
miles distant from my own residence, and was situated
at the corner of an oak wood which screened it both from
the burning heat of summer suns, and the heavy blasts
of winter south-west storms. As I approached it I saw
my friend, the African, eg under a tree waiting my
arrival. He held in his hand a little Tract which I had
given him; his Bible lay on the ground. He rose with
much cheerfulness, saying,

“ Ah! massa, me very glad to see you; me think you
long time coming.”

“William, I hope you are well. Iam going to take
you with me to a few of my friends, who, I hope, are
also the friends of the Lord. We meet every Wednes-
day evening for conversation about the things that belong

7



74 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

to our everlasting peace, and I am sure you will bea
welcome visitor.”

“Massa, me not good enough to be with such good
people. Me greatsinner. They be good Christians.”

“Tf you were to ask them, William, they would each
tell you they were worse than anybody. Many of them
were once, and that not very long ago, living in an open-
ly sinful manner, ignorant of God, and the enemies of

esus Christ by thought and deed. But divine grace
stopped them in their wicked course, and subdued their
hearts to the love and obedience of him and his Gospel.
You will only meet a company of poor fellow-sinners,
who love to speak and sing the praises of redeeming
love; and I am sure that is a song in which you will be
willing to join them.” |

“OQ! yes, Sir, that song just do for poor William.”

By this time we had arrived at the cottage garden-
gate. Several well-known faces appeared in and near
the house, and the smile of affection welcomed us as we
entered. It was known that the African was to visit the
little society this evening, and satisfaction beamed in
every countenance, as I took him by the hand and intro-
duced him among them, saying, “I have brought a broth-
er from Africa to see you, my friends. Bid him welcome
in the name of the Lord.”

“ Sir,” said a humble and pious laborer, whose heart
and tongue always overflowed with Christian kindness,
“we are at all times glad to see our dear minister, but
especially so to-day, in such company as you have brought
with you. We have heard how gracious the Lord has
been to him. Give me your hand,‘good friend, (turning
to the African,) God be with you here and everywhere ;
and blessed be his holy name for calling wicked sinners,
as I hope he has done you and me, to love and serve him
for his mercy’s sake.”

Each one greeted him as he came into the house, and
some addressed him in very kind and impressive lan-

guage. ye
“Massa,” said he, “me not know what to say'to all



AFRICAN SERVANT, 715

these good friends; me think this look like little heaven
upon earth.” |

Ho then with tears in his eyes, whieh, almost before
he spoke, brought responsive drops into those of all pres-
ent, said,

“ Good friends and brethren in Christ Jesus, God bless
you all, and bring you to heaven at last.”

It wus my stated custom when I met to converse with
those friends, to begin with prayer and reading a portion
of the Scriptures.

When this was ended, I told the people present that
the providence of God had brought this young man for
a time under my ministry; and that finding him very se-
riously disposed, and believing him to be sincere in his
religious profession, I had resolved on baptizing him
agreeably to his own wishes. I added that I had now
brought him with me to join in Christian conversation
with us; for, asin old times “they that feared the Lord
spake often one to another,” as a testimony that they
thought upon his name, so I hoped we were fulfilling a
Christian and brotherly duty in thus assembling for mu-
tual edification.

Addressing myself to the African, I said, “ William,
tell me who made you ?”

“ God, the good Father.”

“Who redeemed you?”

“ Jesus, his dear hin. Who died for me.”

“Who sanctified you?”

“The Holy Ghost, who teach me to know the good
Father, and his dear Son, Jesus.”

“What was your state by nature ?”

“ Me wicked sinner, me know nothing but sin, me do
nothing but sin; my soul more black than my body.”

“ Has any change taken place in you since then?

“ Me hope so, massa, but me sometime afraid no.”

“If you are changed, who changed you?”

“ God, the good Father; Jesus, his dear Son; and God
the Holy Spirit.”

“ How was any change brought about in you ?”



76 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“God make me slave when me was young little boy.”

“How, William! would you say God made youa slave?”

“No, massa, no; me mean God let me be made slave
by white men to do me good.” |

“ How to do you good ?” |

“He take me from the land of darkness and bring me
to the land of light.” __ TS pari

“ Which do you call the land of light; the West India
Islands ?”

“ No, massa, they be the land of Providence, but Amer-
ica be the land of light to me; for there me first hear
good minister preach. And now this place where I am
now, is the land of more light; for here you teach me
more and more how good Jesus is to sinners.”

“ What does the blood of Christ do?”

i» cleanse from all sin. And as me hope, from my
ein. |

“ Are then all men cleansed from sin by his blood ?”

* O no, massa,”

“ Who are cleansed and saved ?”

“Those that have faith in him.”

“Can you prove that out of the Bible ?”

“ Yes, Sir; ‘He that believeth on the Son hath ever-
lasting life; and he that believeth not the Son shall not
see Ii e, but the wrath of God abideth on him.’ John iii.
36.

“ What is it to have faith ?”*

“Me suppose that it is to think much about Jesus
Christ; to love him much, to believe all he says to be
true, to pray to him very much; and when me feel very
weak and very sinful, to think that he is very strong, and
very good, and all that for my sake.”

“ And have you such faith as you describe %”

“QO! massa, me think sometimes me have no faith at
all.”

“Why so, William ?”

“When me want to think about Jesus Christ, my mind
run about after other things; when me want to love him
my heart seem quite cold; when me want to believe all



AFRICAN SERVANT. “97

to be true what he says to sinners, me then think it is
not true for me; when me want to pray, the devil put
bad, very bad thoughts into me, and me never thank
Christ enough. Now all this make me sometimes afraid
I have no faith.”

I observed a very earnest glow of attention and fellow-
feeling in some countenances present, as he spoke these
words, I then said,

“T think, William, I can prove that you have faith,
notwithstanding your fears to the contrary. Answer me
a few more questions,

“ Did you begin to think yourself a great sinner, and
to feel the want of a Saviour,of your own self, and by
your own thoughts and doings ?”

“QO! no, it came to me when me know nothing about
it, and seek nothing about it.”

“ Who sent the good minister in America to awaken
your soul by his preaching ?”

“ God, very certainly.”

“Who then began the work of serious thought and
feeling in your mind?”

“The good God; me could not do it of myself, me
sure of that.”

“Do you not think that Jesus Christ and his salvation
is the one thing most needful and most desirable ?”

“Q! yes, me quite sure of that.”

“Do you not believe that he is able to save you?”

“Yes, he is able to save to the uttermost.”

“Do you think he is unwilling to save you ?”

“Me dare not say that. He so good, so merciful, so
kind, to say he will in no wise cast out any that come to
him.”

“Do you wish, and desire, and strive to keep his com-
mandments ?”

“Yes, massa, because me love him, and that make me
want to do as he say.”

“ Are you willing to suffer for his sake, if God should
call you to do so?”

“Me do think me could die for the love of him; he

+



78 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

not think it too much to die for wicked sinner; why
should wicked sinner think it much to die for so good
and righteous a Saviour ?”

“J think and hope I may say to you, William, Thy
faith hath made thee whole.”

Thus ended my examination for the present. The
other friends who were in the house listened with the
most affectionate anxiety to all that passed. One of
them observed, not without evident emotion,

“T see, Sir, that though some men are white, and some

are black, true Christianity is all of ong color. My own

heart has gone with this good man every word he has
spoken,” : :

“ And so has mine,” gently re-echoed from every part
of the room,

After some time passed in more general conversation
on the subject of the African’s history, I said, “Let us
now praise God for the rich and unspeakable gift of his
grace, and sing the hymn of redeeming love”—

“Now begin the heavenly theme,
Sing aloud in Jesus’ name,” é&e,

which was accordingly done. Whatever might be the
merit of the natural voices, it was plain there was melody
in all their hearts. 7

The African was not much used to our way of singing,
yet joined with great earnestness and affection, which
showed how truly he felt what was uttered. When the
fifth verse was ended,

“Nothing brought him from above,
Nothing but redeeming love,”

he repeated the words, almost unconscious where he
was
“No, nothing, nothing but redeeming love bring him
down to poor William; nothing but redeeming love.”
The following verses were added, and sung by way of
conclusion ; .



AFRICAN SERVANT. 79

See, a stranger comes to view ;
Though he’s black,* he’s comely too ;
Come to join the choirs above, ,
Singing of redeeming love.

Welcome, Negro, welcome here,
Banish doubt, and banish fear ;
You, who Christ's salvation prove, -
Praise and bless redeeming love.

I concluded with some remarks on the nature of sal-
vation by grace, exhorting all present to press forward
in the heavenly race, It was an evening, the circumstan-
ces of which, had they never been recorded on earth,
— yet doubtless registered in the book of remembrance
above. |

I then fixed the day for the baptism of the African,
and so took leave of my little affectionate circle,

The moon shone bright as I returned home, and was
beautifully reflected from the waters of the lake: harmo-
ny and repose characterized the scene. I had just. been
uniting in the praises of the God of grace and providence ;
and now the God of nature henabe a fresh tribute of
thanksgiving for the beauties and comforts of creation, as
David sang, “ When I consider thy heavens the work of
thy fingers, the moon and the stars which thou hast or-
dained: what is man that thou art mindful of him, or the
son of man, that thou visitest him ?”’ |

In a few days the African was baptized; and not long
after he went a voyage with his master. |

Since that time 1 have not been able to hear any
tidings of him: whether he yet wanders as a pilgrim in
this lower world, or whether he has joined the heavenly
choir in the song of redeeming love in glory, I know not.
Of this Iam persuaded, he was a monument to the Lord’s
praise. He bore the impression of the Saviour’s image
on his heart, and exhibited the marks of converting grace
in his life and conversation, with singular simplicity and
unfeigned sincerity. O! give to God the glory.

* Song of Solomon, i, 5.







THE

YOUNG COTTAGER:;

AN AUTHENTIC NARRATIVE.

BY REV. LEGH RICHMOND.







THE
YOUNG COTTAGER.

I ee no apology for introducing to the notice
of my ers a few particulars relative to a young fe-
male Cottager, whose memory is particularly endeared to
me from the circumstance of her being, so far as I can
discover, my first-born spiritual child in the ministry of
the Gospel. She was. certainly the first of whose con-
version to God, under my own pastoral instruction, I can
speak with any degree of precision and assurance,

Every parent of a family knows that there is a very in-
teresting emotion of heart connected with the birth of
his first-born child. But may not the spiritual parent be
allowed the indulgence of a similar sensation in his con-
nection with the children whom the Lord gives him! If
the first-born child in nature be received as a new and
concrete blessing, how much more so the first-born
child in grace! I claim this privilege; and crave permis-
sion, in writing what follows, to erect a monumental
record sacred to the memory of a dear little child, who,
I trust, will at the last day prove my crown of rejoicing.

Jane 8 was the daughter of poor parents in the
village where it pleased God first to cast my lot in the
ministry. My acquaintance with her commenced when
she was twelve years of “ee by her weekly attendance





86 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

at my house among a number of children whom I regu-
larly instructed every Saturday afternoon. —

They used to read, repeat catechisms, -— hymns,
and portions of Scripture. I accustomed them also to
pass a kind of free examination, according to their age
and ability, in those subjects: by which I hoped to see
them made wise unto salvation.

In the summer I frequently used to assemble this.little
group out of doors in my garden, sitting under the shade
of some trees which protected us from the heat of the
sun. From hence a scene appeared which rendered my
occupation the more interesting ; for adjoining the spot
where we sat, and only separated from us by a fence,
was ‘the church-yard, surrounded with beautiful prospects
in every direction.

I had not far to look for subjects of warning and ex-
hortation suitable to my little flock. I could point to
the graves and tell my pupils that, young as they were,
none of them were too young to die; and that probably
more than half of the bodies which were buried there
were those of little children.

I told them who was “the resurrection and the life,”
and who alone could take away the sting of death. I
used to remind them that the hour was “coming in the
which all that are in the grave shall hear his voice, and
shall come forth; they that have done good unto the res-
urrection of life, and they that have done evil unto the
resurrection of damnation. I often availed myself of
these opportunities to call to their recollection the more
recent deaths of their own relatives,

Sometimes I sent the children to the various stones
which stood at the head of the graves, and bade them
learn the epitaphs inscribed upon them. I took pleasure
in seeing the little ones thus dispersed in the church-
yard, each committing to memory a few verses written
in commemoration of the departed. They would soon
accomplish the desired object, and eagerly return to me
to repeat their task. |

Thus my church-yard became a book of instruction



YHE YOUNG COTTAGER. 87

and every grave-stone a leaf of edification for my young
disciples,

Theehurch itself stood in the midst of the ground. It
was a spacious antique structure. Within those very
walls I first proclaimed the message of God to sinners.
As these children surrounded me, 1 sometimes pointed to
the church, spoke to them of the nature of public wor.
ship, the value of the Sabbath, the duty of regular attend-
ance on its services, and urged their serious attention to
the means of grace. I showed them the sad state of
many countries where neither churches nor Bibles were
known; and the no less melancholy condition of multi-
tudes at home, who sinfully neglect worshipand slight
the Word of God. I thus tried to make them sensible
of their own favors and privileges. Neither was I ata
loss for another class of objects around me from which I
could draw useful instructions, for many of the beauties
of nature appeared in view.

Eastward of us extended a large river or lake Of sea-
water, chiefly formed by the tide, and nearly enclosed
by land. Beyond this was a fine bay and road for ships,
filled with vessels of every size,, from the small sloop or
cutter to the first-rate man-of-war. Qn the right hand
of the haven rose a hill of peculiarly beautiful form and
considerable height. Its verdure was very rich, and many
hundred sheep grazed upon itssides and summit. From
the opposite shore of the same water, a large sloping ex-
tent of bank was diversified with fields, woods, hedges,
and cottages. At its extremity stand, close to the edge
of the sea itself, the remains of the tower of an ancient
church, still preserved as a sea-mark. Far beyond the
bay a very distant shore was observable, and land beyond
it; trees, towns, and other buildings appeared, more es-
pecially when gilded by the reflected are of the sun.

To the south-westward of the garden was another
down, covered also with flocks of sheep, and a postion of
it fringed with trees. At the foot of this hill lay the
village, a part of which gradually ascended to the rising
ground on which the church stood.



88 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

From the intermixture: of houses with gardens, or-
chards, and trees, Se a very pleasing aspect.
Several fields adjoined the garden on the east and north,
where a number of cattle were pasturing. My own little
shrubberies and flower-beds variegated the view, and
recompensed my toil in rearing them, as well by their
beauty as their f nee, i

Had the sweet Psalmist of Israel sat in this spot he
would have glorified God the Creator by descanting on
these his handy-works. I cannot write Psalms like Da-
vid, but I wish in my own poor way to praise the Lord
for his goodness, and to show forth his wonderful works
to the children of men. But had David been also sur-
rounded with a troop of young scholars in such a situa-
tion, he would once more have said, “Out of the mouths
of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength.”

I love to retrace these scenes—they are past, but the
recollection is sweet. A

I love to retrace them—for they bring to my mind
many former mercies which ought not, for the Lord’s
sake, to be forgotten.

Ll love to retrace them—for they re-assure me that, in
the course of that’ private ministerial occupation, God was
pleased to give me a valuable fruit of my labors.

Little Jane used constantly to appear on these weekly
seasons of instruction, I made no very particular obser-
vations concerning her during the first twelve months.
She was not then remarkable for any peculiar attainment.
Her countenance was not engaging—her eye discovered
no remarkable liveliness. She read tolerably well, took
pains, and improved. )

Mildness and quietness marked her general demeanor.
She was very constant in her attendance on public wor-
ship, as well as on my Saturday instructions. But, gen-
erally speaking, she was little noticed except for her reg-
ular conduct. Had I then been asked of which of my
young scholars J had formed the most favorable opinion,
poor Jane might probably have been omitted,

How little Gs we oftentimes know what God is doing



THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 89

in other people’s hearts! What. poor judges we fre-
quently prove till he opens our eyes! His thoughts are
not our thoughts, neither are our ways his ways.

Once, indeed, during the latter part of that year, I was
struck with her ready attention to my wishes. I had,
agreeably to the plan above mentioned, sent her fale the
chureh-yard to commit to memory an epitaph which I
admired. On her return she told me that in addition to
what I had desired, she had also learned another which
was inscribed on an adjoining stone; adding that she
thought it a very pretty one.

I thought so too, and perhaps my reader will be of the
same opinion. Kittle Jane, though dead, yet shall speak.
While | transcribe the lines, I can powerfully imagine
that I hear her voice repeating them.

EPITAPH ON MRS. A. B.

Forgive, blest shade, the tributary tear,
That mourns thy exit from a world like this;
Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here,
And stayed thy progress to the seata of bliss.

No more confin’d to grov’lling’ scenes of night, ©
Nu more a tenant pent in mortal clay,

Now should we rather hail thy glorious flight,
And trace thy journey to the realms of day.

The above was her appointed task; and the other,
which she voluntarily learned and spoke of with pleasure,
is this :

EPITAPH ON THE STONE ADJOINING.

It must be so—our father Adam’s fall

And disobedience brought this lot on all.
All die in him—but hopeless should we be,
Blest Revelation, were it not for thee.

glorious Gospel! heavenly light, whereby
We live with comfort, and with comfort die;

And view be ond this gloomy scene, the tomb,
‘A life of endless happiness to come,

I afterwards discovered that the sentiment expressed
in the latter epitaph had much affected her. But at the
8*



90 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

riod of this little indident I knew nothing of her mind.
Thad comparatively overlogked her. I have often been
sorry for it since, - Conscience seemed to rebuke me,
when I afterwards discovered what the Lord had been
doing for her soul, .I seemed to have neglected her ; yet
it was not done designedly. She was unknoWn to us
all; except that, as I since found out, her regularity and
abstinence from the sins and follies of her young equals
in age, brought upon her many taunts and jeers from oth-
ers, which she bore very meekly. But at that time I
knew it not. I was young myself in the ministry, and
younger in Christian experience. My parochial plans
had not as yet assumed such a principle of practical order
and inquiry, as to make me acquainted with the character
and conduct of each family and individual in my flock.

My young scholar soon became my teacher! I first
saw What true religion could accomplish, in witnessing
her experience of it. The Lord once “called a child
unto him, and set him in the midst of his disciples,” as an
emblem and an illustration of his doctrine. But the
Lord did more in the case of little Jane. He not only
called her, as a child, to show by a similitude what con-
version means; but he also called her by his grace to be
a vessel of merey and a living witness of that almighty
oe and love by which her own heart was scam to

0 ge

It was abont fifteen months from the first period of
her attendance on my Saturday school, when I missed
her from her customary place, Two or three weeks had
gone by without my making any particular inquiry re-
specting her. I was at length informed that she was not
well, But apprehending no peculiar cause for alarm,
nearly two months passed away without any further men-
tion of her name being made. er ies

At length a poor old woman in the village, of whose
religious disposition I had formed a good opinion, came
and said to me, “ Sir, have you not missed Jane S—— at
your hotse on Saturday afternoons ?”



THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 91

“Yes,” I replied, “I believe shé is not well,”

“Nor ever will be, I feur,” said the woman.

“What, do you apprehend any danger in the case ?”

“ Sir, she is very pdorly indeed, and I think is in a de-
cline. She wants to see yon, Sir; but is afraid you
would not come to see‘such a poor young child as she
is.’

“Not go where poverty and sickness may call me}
eae she imagine so? At whose house does she

ive?” .

“ Sir, it is a poor place, and she is ashamed:to ask you
to come there. Her neighbors are noisy, wicked people,
and her own father and mother are strange folks. ey
all make game at poor Jane, because she reads her Bible
s0 much.” at |

“Do not tell me about poor places and wicked people, *
that is the very situation where a minister of the Gospel
is called to do the most good. I shall go to see her; you
may let her know my intention.” |

“] will, Sir; I go in most days to speak to her, and it
does one’s heart good to hear her talk,”

“Indeed!” said 1; “what does she talk about ?”

“Talk about, poor child! why, nothing but good
things, such as the Bible, and Jesus Christ, and life and
death, and her soul, and heaven, and hell, and your dis-
courses, and the books you used to teach her, Sir. Man
scoff at her, and say they suppose Jane counts hersel
better than other folks. But she does not mind all that.
She will read her: books, and then talk so pretty to her
mother, and beg’ that she would think about her soul.”

“The Lord forgive me,” thought I, “for not being
more attentive to this poor child’s case.” I seemed to
feel the importance of early instruction more than ever
I had done before, and felt, a rising hope that this girl
might prove a kind of first fruits of my labors.

now recollected her quiet, orderly, diligent attendance
on our little weekly meetings; and her marked appro-
bation of the epitaph, as related above, rushed into —
thoughts. “I really hope,” said I, “this dear child wi



92 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

rove a true child of God. And if so, what a mercy to
er, and what a mercy for me.”

The next morning I went to see the child. Her dwell-
ing was of the humblest kind. It stood against a high
bank of earth, which formed a sort of en behind it.
It was so steep that but little would grow in it; yet that
little served to show not only, on the one hand, the pov-
erty of its owners, but also to illustrate the happy truth,
that even in the worst of circumstances the Lord does
make a kind provision for the support of his creatures.
The front aspect of the cottage was chiefly rendered
pleasing by a honeysuckle, which Juxuriantly climbed up
the wall, enclosing the doors, windows, and even the
chimney, with its twining branches. As I entered the
house-door, its flowers put forth a very sweet and re-
freshing smell. Intent on the object of my visit, I at the
same moment offered up silent prayer to God, and enter-
tained a hope that the welcome fragrance of the shrub
might be illustrative of that all-prevailing intercession of
a eemer, which I trusted was, in the case of this little
child, as “ a sweet-smelling savor” to her heavenly Father.
The very flowers and leaves of the garden and field are
emblematical of higher things, when grace teaches us to
make them so.

Jane was in bed up stairs. I found no one in the
house with her, except the woman who had brought me
the penniee on the evening before. The instant I looked
on the girl I perceived a very marked change in her coun-
tenance ; it had acquired the consumptive hue, both white
and red. A delicacy unknown to it before, quite sur-
poner me, owing to the alteration it produced in her

ook. She received me first with a very sweet smile,
and then instantly burst into a flood of tears, just sob-
bing out,

“Tam so glad to see you, Sir.”

“] am very much concerned at your being so ill, my
child, and grieved that I was not sooner aware of your
state. But I hope the Lord designs it for your good.”



THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 93

Her eye, not her tongue, powerfully expressed, “I hope
and think he does.”

“Well, my poor child, since you can no longer come
to see me, I will come and see you, and we will talk over
the subjects which | have been used to explain to you.”

“ Indeed, Sir, I shall be so glad.”

“That I believe she will,” said the woman; “for she
loves to talk of nothing so much as what she has heard
you say in your sermons, and in the books you have
given her.”

“ Are you really desirous, my dear child, to be a true
Christian ?” ‘ |

“OQ! yes, yes, Sir, 1 am sure I desire that above all
things.’ \

I was astonished and delighted at the earnestness and
simplicity with which she spoke these words.

“Sir,” added she, “I have been thinking, as I lay on
my bed for many weeks past, how good you are to in-
struct us poor children: what must become of us with-
out it ?”

“T am truly glad to perceive that my instrictions have
not been lost upon you, and pray God that this your pres-
ent sickness may be an instrument of blessing, in his
hands, to prove, humble, and sanctify you, My dear
child, you have a soul, an immortal soul, to think of;
you remember what I have often said to you about the
value of a soul: ‘ What would it profit a man to gain the
whole world and lose his own soul ?”

“Yes, Sir, I remember well you told us that when our
bodies are put into the grave, our souls will then go
either to the good or the bad place.”

“ And to which of these places do you think that, as a
sinner in the sight of God, you deserve to go ?”

“'T’o the bad one, Sir.”

“ What, to everlasting destruction ?”

“ Yes, Sir.”

“ ‘Why so?”

“ Because I am a great sinner.”

“ And must all great sinners go to hell ?”



94 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“ They all deserve it; and I am sure I do.”

“ But is there no way of escape? Is there no way for
a great sinner to be saved ?”

“Yes, Sir; Christ is the Saviour.”

“ And whom does he save ?”

“ All believers.”

“ And do you believe in Christ yourself?”

“IT do not know, Sir; I wish I did; but I feel that I
love him.”

“What do you love’ him for ?”

“Because he is good to poor children’s souls like
mine.” :

“ What has he done for you?”

“He died for me, Sir, and what could he do more ?”

“ And what do you hope to gain by his death ?”

“A good place when I die, if I believe in him, and Jove
him.” |

ts you felt any uneasiness on account of your
soul P

“QO! yes, Sir,a great deal, When you used to talk to
us children on Saturdays, I often felt as if I could hardly
bear it, and wondered that others could seem sd careless.
I thought I was not fit to die. I thought of all the bad
things I had ever done and said, and believed God must
be very angry with me; for you often told us that God
would not be mocked; and that Christ said, if we were
not converted we could not go to heaven. Sometimes I
thought I was so young it did not signify: and then
again it seemed to me a great sin to think so; for [knew
I was old enough to see what was right and what was
wrong; and so God had a just right to be angry when I
did wrong. Besides, I could see that my heart was not
right; and how could such a heart be fit for heaven ?
Indeed, Sir, I used to feel very uneasy.”

“My dear Jane, 1 wish I had known all this before.
Why did you never tell me about it ?”

“Sir, I durst not. Indeed I could not well say what
was the matter with me; and I thought you would look
upon me as very bold, if I had spoken about myself to



THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 95

such a gentleman as you: yet I often wished that you
knew what I felt and feared. Sometimes, as we went
away from your house, I could not help erying; and
then the other children laughed and jeered at me, and
said I was going to be very good they supposed, or at
least to make people think so. Sometimes, Sir, I fancied

ou did not think so well of me as of the rest, and that

urt me; yet I knew I deserved no particular favor, be-
cause I was the chief of sinners.”

“My dear, what made St. Paul say he was the chief of
sinners? In what verse of the Bible do you find this ex-
pression, ‘the chief of sinners? Can you repeat it?”

“* This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all accepta
tion, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sin-
ners; is not that right, Sir?”

“Yes, my child, it is right; and I hope that the same
conviction which St. Paul had at that moment, has made
you sensible of the same truth. Christ came into the
world to save sinners; my dear child, remember, now
and for evermore, that Christ came into the world to save
the chief of sinners.”

“Sir, I am so glad he did. It makes me hope that he
will save me, though I am a poor sinful girl. Sir, 1 am
very ill, and I do not think I shall ever get well again. I
want to go to Christ, if I die.”

“Go to Christ while you live, my dear child, and he
will not cast you out when you die. He that said, ‘ Suf-
fer little childgen to come unto me, waits to be gracious
to them, and forbids them not.

“ What made you first think so seriously about the state
of your soul ?”

“ Your talking about the graves in the churchyard, and
telling us how many young children were buried there.
I remember you said one day, near twelve months ago,
‘Children! where will you be a hundred years hence?
Children! where do you think you shall go when you
die? Children! if you were to die to night, are you sure
you should go to Christ and be happy? Sir, I shall



96 ANNALS OF THE POOR, ~

never forget your saying ‘children’ three times together
in that solemn way.’

“Did you never before that day feel any desire about
your soul ?”

“ Yes, Sir, I think I first had that desire almost as soon
as you began to teach us on Saturday afternoons; but on
that day I felt as [never did before. I shall never forget
it. All the way as I went home, and all that night, those
words were in my thoughts, ‘ Children! where do you
think you shall go when you die? I thought I must leave
off all my bad ways, or where should I go when I died ?”

. i what effect did these thoughts produce in your
mind ?”

“Sir, I tried to live better, and I did leave off many
bad ways; but the more I strove, the more difficult I
found it, my heart seemed so hard; and then I could not
tell any one my case,”

“Could you not tell it to the Lord, who hears and
answers prayer ?”

“ My prayers (here she blushed and sighed) are very

poor at the best, and at that time I scarcely knew how
to pray at all as I ought. But 1 did sometimes ask the
Lord for a better heart.”
_ There was a character in all this conversation which
marked a truly sincere and enlightened state of mind.
She spoke with all the simplicity of a child, and yet the
seriousness of a Christian, I could scarcely persuade
myself that she was the same girl I had been accustomed
to see in past time. Her countenance was filled with in-
teresting affections, and almost spoke much more than
her tongue could utter. At the same time, she now pos-
sessed an ease and liberty in speaking, to which she had
formerly been a stranger; nevertheless she was modest,
humble, and unassuming. Her readiness to converse was
the result of spiritual anxiety, not childish forwardness,
The marks of a divine change were too prominent to be
easily mistaken; and in this very child I, for the first time,
witnessed the evident testimonies of such a change.
How encouraging, how profitable to my own sqpl !



THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 97

« Sir,” continued little Jane, * I had one day been think-
ing that I was neither fit to live or die; for L could find
no comfort in this world, and I was sure I deserved none
in the other, On that day you sent me io learn the verse
on Mrs. B——’s headstone, and then I read that on the
one next to it.”

“I very well remember it, Jane; you came back and
repeated them both to me.”

“There were two lines i in it which made me think and
meditate a great deal.”

“ Which are they ?”

“* Hail, glorious Gospel! heavenly light, whereb
We live with comfort, and with comfort die. 9

“I wished that glorious Gospel was mine, that I might —
live and die with comfort; and it seemed as if I thought
it would be so. ©} never felt so happy about my soul
fore. The words were often in my thoughts,

‘Live with comfort, and with comfort die,’ ”

“ Glorious Gospel, indeed!” I thought. —
“ My dear child, what is the meaning of the word Gos-
el?” ;
ee Good news.”
“Good news for whom ?”
“For wicked sinners, Sir.”
“Who sends this good news for wicked sinners?” |
“The Lord Almighty.”
“ And who brings this good news ! ”
“Sir, you brought it to-me.’

- Here my soul melted in an instant, and I could not re-
press the tears which the emotion excited. The last an-
swer was equally unexpected and affecting. I felt a
father’s tenderness and: gratitude for a first born child.

Jane wept likewise. “After a little pause she said,

“O Sir! 1 wish you would speak to my father, and
mother, and litile brother ; ; for 1 am afraid they are going
on very beaty." ;

“ How so ?



eee Ol

98 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“Sir, they drink, and swear, and quarrel, and do not
like what is good; and it does grieve me so, 1 cannot
bear it. If I speak’a word to them about it, they are
very angry, and laugh and bid me be quiet, and not set
up for their teacher. Sir, I am ashamed to tell you this
of them, but I hope it is not wrong; I mean it for their
good.”

“] wish your prayers and endeavors for their sake may
be blessed; I will do also what I can.”

I then prayed with the child, and promised to visit her
constantly.

As I returned home, my heart was filled with thank-
fulness for what I had seen and heard.

Divine grace educates the reasoning faculties of the
soul, as well as the best affections of the heart; and
happily conseerates them both to the glory of the Re-
deemer. Neither the disadvantages of poverty, nor the
inexperience of childhood, are barriers able to resist the
mightv influences of the Spirit of God, when he goeth
forth “ where he listeth.” “God hath chosen the foolish
things of this world to confound the wise; and God hath
chosen the weak things of the world to confound the
things which are mighty.”

. Little Jane’s illness was of a lingering nature. I often
visited her. ‘The soul of this young Christian was grad-
ually, but effectually, preparing for heaven. I have sel-
dom witnessed in any older person, under similar cireum-
stances, stronger marks of earnest inquiry, continual se-
riousness, and holy affections. One morning as I was

_ walking through the churchyard, in my way to visit her,

I stopped to look at the epitaph which had made such a
deep impression on her mind. I was struck with the
reflection of the important consequences which’ might
result from a more frequent and judicious attention to
the inscriptions placed in our burying-grounds, as memo-
rials of the departed, I wish that every grave-stone
might not only record the names of our deceased friends,
but also proclaim the name of Jesus, as the only name



THE YOUNG COTTAGER, 99

iven under heaven whereby men can be saved. Perhaps,
if the ministers of religion were to interest themselves
in this matter, and accustom their people to consult
them as to the nature of the monumental inscriptions
which they wish to introduce into churches and church-
yards, a gradual improvement would take place in this
respect. What is offensive, useless, or erroneous, would
no longer find admittance ; and a succession of valuable
warning and consolation to the living would perpetuate
the memory of the dead.
When I arrived at Jane’s cottage, I found her in bed,
reading Dr. Watts’ Hymns for Children, in which she

took _— pleasure.

“ What are you reading this morning, Jane ?”

“Sir, I have been thinking very much about some
verses in my little book. Here they are:

‘There is an hour when I must die,
Nor do I know how soon ’twill come ;
A thousand children, young as [,
Are called by death to hear their doom.

Let me improve the hours J have,
Before the day of grace is fled ;
There's no repentance in the grave,

Nor pardon offered to the e

“Sir, I feel all that to be very true, and I am afraid
I do not improve the hours I have, as J] ought todo. I
think I shall not live very long; and when I remember
my sins, I say,
‘ Lord, at thy foot, ashamed I lie,
Upward I dare not look ;

on my sins befure I die,
And blot them from thy book,’ .

“Do you think he will pardon me, Sir ”

“My dear child, I have great hopes that he has par-
doned you; that he has heard your prayers, and put you
into the number of his true children already, You have
had strong proofs of his mercy to your soul.”

“ Yes, Sir, | have; and I wish to love and bless him
for it. He is good, very good.” 3



100 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

It had for some time past occurred to my mind, that a
course of regulated conversations on the first principles
of religion would be very desirable from time to time, for
this. interesting. child’s sake; and I thought the Church
Catechism would be a proper ground-work for that pur-

se.

“ Jane,” said I, “ you can repeat the Catechism ?”

‘* Yes, Sir, but I think that has been one of my sins in
the sight of God.”

“What, repeating your Catechism ?”

« Yes, Sir, in such a way as I used to do it.”

“How was that!”

“Very carelessly indeed. I never thought about the
meaning of the words, and that must be very wrong.
Sir, the Catechism is full of good things; I wish 1 un-
derstood them better.”

“Well then, my child, we will talk a little about those
good things which, as you truly say, are contained in the
Catechism. Did you ever consider what it is to be a
member of Christ, a child of God, and an inheritor of the
kingdom of heaven ?” .

“T think, Sir, I have lately considered it a good deal,
and I want to be such, not only in name, but in deed.and
in truth. You once told me, Sir, that ‘as the branch is
to the vine, and the stone to the building, and the limb
to the body and the head, so is a true believer to the Lord
Jesus Christ.’ But how am I to know that I belong to
Christ as a true’ member, which you said one day in the
church, means the same as a limb of the body ?”

“Do you love Christ now in a way you never used to
do before ?”

“ Yes, I think so, indeed.”

“ Why do you love him?”

- * Because he first loved me—he died for sinners.”

“ How do you know that he first loved you?”

- “Because he sent me instruction, and made me feel
the sin of my heart, and taught me to pray for pardon,
and love his ways: he sent you to teach me, Sir, and to
show me the way to be saved, and now I want to be



THE YOUNG COTYAGER, 101

saved in that way that he pleases. Sometimes I feel as
if I loved all that he has said and done, so much, that I
wish never to think about anything'else. I know I did
not use to fee] so; and I think if he had not loved me
first, my wicked heart would never have cared about him.
I once loved anything better than religion, but now it is
overzeniag to me.”

“Do you believe, in your heart, that Christ is able and
— to save the chief of sinners ?”

, “eae

“ And what are you ?”

“ A young but a great sinner.”

“Ts it not of his merey that you know and feel your-
self to be a sinner?”

“Certainly ; yes, it must be so.”

“Do you earnestly desire to forsake all sin ?”

“If I know myself, I do.”

“Do you feel a spirit within you resisting sin, and
making you hate it?”

“ Yes, I hope so.”

“ Who gave you that spirit? Were you always so?”

“It must be Christ who loved me and gave himself for
me. I was quite different once.”

“Now then, my dear Jane, does not all this show a
connection between the Lord Jesus Christ and your soul ?
Does it not seem as if you lived, and moved, and had a
spiritual nn from him? Justas the limb is connected
with your body, and so with your head, and thereby gets
power to live and move through the flowing of the blood
from one to the other, so are you spiritually a limb or
member of Christ, if you believe in him. Do you under.
stand me?”

“ Yes, Sir, 1 believe I do; and it is very comfortable
to my thoughts to look up to Christ as a living head,
and to consider myself as the least and lowest of all his
members.”

“ Now tell me what your thoughts are as to being a
child of God ?” |

“Tam sure, Sir, Ido not deserve to be called his child.”



102 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“Can you tell me who does deserve it ?”

“No one, Sir.”

* How then comes any one to be a child of God, when
by nature we all are children of wrath ?”

“ - God’s grace, Sir.”

“ What does grace mean ?”

“Favor; free favor to sinners.”

“Right; and what does God bestow upon the children
of wrath, when he makes them children of grace ?”’

“A death unto sin, and a new birth unto righteous-
ness; is it not, Sir?” . 7

“ Yes, this is the fruit of Christ’s redeeming love ; and
I hope you are a partaker of the blessing. The family of
God is named after him, and he is the first-born of many
brethren. What a-mercy that Christ calls: himself ‘a
brother.’ My little girl, he is your brother, and will not
be ashamed to own you and present you to his Father at
the last day, as one that he has purchased with his
blood.”

“] wish I could love my Father and my Brother which
are in heaven, better than Ido. Lord, be merciful to me,
a sinner: I think, Sir; if 1 am a child of God,I am often
a rebellious one. He shows kindness to me beyond oth-
ers, and yet I make a very poor return.

“Are these thy favors by
To me above the fy | avs

Then let me love thee more than they,
Afid strive to serve the best.’”

“'That will be the best way to approve yourself a real
child of God. Show your love aa thankfulness to such
a Father who hath prepared for you an inheritance among
the saints in light, and made you an inheritor of the king-
dom of heaven, as well as a member of Christ and a
child of God. Do you know what the kingdom of heaven
means?”

_ Just at that instant her mother entered the house be-
low, and began to speak to a younger child in a passion-
ate, scolding tone of voice, accompanied by some very



THE YOUNG COTTAGER, 103

offensive language ; ‘but quickly stopped on hearing us
in conversation up stairs. a |

“ Ah, my poor mother!” said the girl, “ you would not
have stopped so short if Mr. —— had not been here.
Sir, you hear how my mother goes on; pray say some-
thing to her, she will not hear me.”

I went toward the stair-head and called to the woman ;
but she suddenly left the house, and for that time escaped
reproof. .

“Sir,” said little Jane, “I am so afraid if I go to heaven
I shall never see my poor mother there. As I lie here
a-bed, Sir, for hours together, there is often so much
wickedness, and noise, and quarrelling down below, that
I do not know how to bear it. It comes very near, Sir,
when one’s father and mother go on so. I wantthem all
to turn to the Lord, and go to heaven. Tell me now,
Sir, something about being an inheritor of the kingdom
of heaven.” |

“You may remember, my child, what I have told you
when explaining the Catechism in the church, that ‘ the
kingdom of heaven’ in the Scriptures means the church
of Christ upon earth as well as the state of glory in heav-
en. The one is a preparation for the other, All true
Christians are ‘heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ,’
and shall inherit the glory and happiness of his kingdom,
and live with Christ, and be with ‘him forever. ‘This is
the free gift of God to his adopted children; and all that
believe aright in Christ shall experience the truth of that
promise, ‘lt is your Father’s good pleasure to give you
the kingdom.’ You are a poor girl now, but I trist*an
entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly into
the everlasting kingdom of our Lord. and Saviour Jesus
Christ.’ You suffer now, but are you not willing to suf.
fer for his sake, and to bear patiently those things to
which he calis you?” .

“O yes, very willing; I would not complain. It is all
right.” , ven"

Se Then, my dear, you shall reign with him. Through
much tribulation you may perhaps enter the kingdom of



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THE DAIRYMAN'S COTTAGE.

- AS a nee mane
-

ANNALS OF THE POOR:

CONSISTING OF

THE DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, THE AFRICAN
SERVANT, AND THE YOUNG COTTAGER,

AUTHENTIC NARRATIVES,

BY REV. LEGH RICHMOND,

OF BEDFORDSHIRE, ENG.

WITH A BRIEF MEMOIR OF THE AUTHOR,
AND AN INTRODUCTORY LETTER,
BY REV, JOEL HAWES, D.D.

“Let not ambition mock their humble toil,
Their homely joys, and destiny obscure ;
Nor grandeur ies with a disdainful smile,
The short and simple aNNALS OF THE POOR,”
Gray's Eueey,

SPRINGFIELD, MASS.:
PUBLISHED BY G. & C. MERRIAM,
CORNEE OF MAIN AND STATE STREETS,

1852.
STEREOTYPED BY
THOMAS B, SMITH,
216 William St., N. Y.
Hartrorp, Dee, 2, 1851,

Mr. Cuarrtes MERRIAM,

Dear Sin—When some time since you requested me
to write an Introductory Notice of the three Traets by
Rey. Legh Richmond, viz., the Dairyman’s Daughter, the
Young Cottager, and the African Servant, which you
proposed to publish in a small volume for general cireu-
lation, my thought was, that I would do so at once. But
on re-perusing them,—for I read them first some thirty
years ago with great delight,—I could not but feel that
no Introduction was needed for these admirable Tracts—
so widely are they known, so be.rutiful in style, so sweet
in spirit, so full of evangelical truth and so deeply inter-
esting, as they have always been to all who have read
them. I must, therefore, beg to be excused from writ-
ing the Notice I gave you reason to expect from me; and
would simply say that in my judgment you could not put
in circulation a more interesting little volume than that
you are about to publish, comprising the three Tracts
above named by the excellent Legh Richmond. His
name is as ointment poured forth. Though dead he
speaketh, and through the medium of these little publi.
cations, he will, I trust, continue to live and do good till
time shall be no more.

Affectionately yours,
J. Hawes,
BRIEF SKETCH

OF THE

LIFE OF REV. LEGH RICHMOND.

BY REV. JOHN AYRE.

Leen Ricxmonp was born at Liverpool, Jan. 29, 1772.
He was the eldest child of Dr. Henry Richmond, the de-
scendant of an ancient and honorable family. A remark-
able casualty befell him in his childhood, the effects of
which he never recovered. Ata very early age, in leap.
ing from a wall, he contracted an injury in his left leg,
which issued in incurable lameness. It is somewhat sin-
gular that an accident nearly similar occurred to his

ounger and only brother, and also to his second son,

ach of them, in infancy, fell from an open window.
The former was killed, and the latter was ever after
afflicted in the same limb with the same kind of lameness
as his father.

After a private preparatory education, Legh Richmond
was admitted a member of Trinity College, Cambridge.
While an under-graduate, he pursued his studies with a
talent and a zeal which gave fair promise that the highest
honors of his year were not beyond his reach. ‘These
hopes were however blighted by a severe illness, which
was partly owing to his anxious and unremitted applica-
tion. Precluded by this cause, from engaging in the
honorable contention of the senate-house, he received
8 LIFE OF

what is academically termed an egrotat depree; coms
mencing B.A. in 1794; and, with some intermissions, he
resided in the university three years longer.

We are now to view Mr. Richmond in a totally differ-
ent character. In the summer of 1797, he became, with-
in the space of a very few weeks, (to borrow his own
words,) “academically a master of arts, domestically a
husband, parochially a deacon.” He had been originally
destined to the law; but having imbibed a distaste for
that profession, his attention was subsequently directed
to the ministry, and he was now admitted to the sacred
office. Brading, a secluded village in the Isle of Wight,
was the scene of his earliest pastoral labors. He was
ordained to the curacy of this place and the little adjoin-
ing village of Yaverland; and in Yaverland church he
Seed his first sermon.

These scenes will long be dear to Christian remem-
brance. Lovely in themselves, and consecrated by the
pen of Legh Richmond, they will be viewed with no or-
dinary feelings; and he who disdains not the “simple
annals of the poor,” while he treads the sod which covers
“little Jane,” or visits the lowly cottage of the “ Dairy-
than,” will not fail to glorify God for those who here
have slept in Jesus, and “thongh dead, yet speak.”

At the time of his ordination Mr, Richmond saw little
of the magnitude of that work in which he was engaging.
As yet, he was himself but little acquainted with the
things of God, and was therefore little qualified to be-
come the spiritual instructor of others. His habits of life
were decoroug and exemplary, his, pulpit compositions
interesting and moral, but as yet he was little imbued
with the spirit of vital godliness. This man, however,
(may it not be said,) was “a chosen vessel to the Lord.”
Ere many months elapsed a complete revolution was

effected in his religious sentiments. This is, under Ged, ©

mainly to be ascribed to the perusal of Mr. Wilberforce’s
“Practical View of Christianity.” He now with enlight-
ened understanding and decisive zeal, set himself to “do
the work of an evangelist.” Not only was he in the pul.


LEGH RICHMOND. ee

it, instant in “ preaching the word,” but he was also to
be found with his pastoral admonitions in the dwellings
of his flock, and could descend, with sweet and winning
gentleness, to “feed his lambs.” The fruit of his labors
was speedily apparent. “Little Jane’? was the first
flower which bloomed from the good seed he was sow-
ing. :
The circumstances attendant upon his intercourse with
the subjects of the Annals will be found narrated in the
several 'Fracts. I only observe in this place, that “ little
Jane” died January 30th, 1799, in her fifteenth year: that
the conversations with the “ African Servant” were held
during the summer of i803, and that the death of the
“ Dairyman’s Daughter” took place May 30th, 1801: her
age was thirty-one.

After a residence of about seven years in the Isle of
Wight, where his labors had been evidently and largely
blessed, Mr. Richmond removed to London. He was
here to take a share in the duties of the Lock Chapel.
The very first sermon he delivered from the pulpit of this

lace was, there is every reason to believe, under God’s
lessing, the instrumental means of effecting a saving
change in the heart of at least one individual.

Scarcely, however, was he well settled in this new
scene, when the good providence of God removed him to
the rectory of Turvey, Bedfordshire. He was presented
to this living by Miss Fuller, in 1805.

Long will the name of Richmond be venerated at Tur-
vey; long will the savor of his affectionate ministrations
abide in the hearts of his mourning flock. A singular
blessing still attended him. From the earliest to literall
the latest, his preaching was visibly “in demonstration o
the Spirit and of power.”

It was during his residence at Turvey that most of Mr.
Rithmond’s publications were undertaken. He had pre-
viously printed two or three single sermons ;* but it was

* These were, a Fast-day Sermon, and one on the’Close of the Year,

reached at Brading ; and a Sermon on Cruelty to the Brute Creation, de
fivesall at Bath, ? ae
10 | LIFE OF

at Turvey that his great work, “’ The Fathers of the En.
glish Church, was carried on. For the superintendence
of this important undertaking he was eminently qualified.
Accident, or | would rather say, a remarkable providence,
had, in the first instance, introduced him, while in the Isle
of Wight, to the writings of our earlier and greatest the-
ologians; and the study of them he had ever since zeal-
ously prosecuted. To a familiar acquaintance with the
works of these divines, Mr. Richmond united the greatest
impartiality and judgment in forming his selections, His
work therefore presents, in a comparatively small com-
pass, the large proportion of the most valuable of the re-
mains of our martyrs and confessors. It is not perhaps
too much to say that it has been mainly instrumental in
awakening to the reformers that attention and interest
with which they are now a regarded.

It was during his residence at Turvey also that Mr.
Richmond drew up the narratives which are contained in
the present volume. ‘They were originally (in substance)
inserted in the earlier numbers of the Christian Guardian.
Having here attracted considerable attention, ~— were
then published in the form of separate Tracts, and after-
wards, with considerable augmentations, in the first edi- _
tion of this volume. |

It may perhaps appear unnecessary to pronounce an
opinion on productions which have been circulated by
millions, and translated into twenty languages; and which,
in a multitude of well-authenticated instances, have been,
by the blessing of God, signally effective of good. I
cannot however forbear to say, that in Legh Richmond’s
writings, more than in those of perhaps any other author,
you behold the character of the man. His beautiful sim-
plicity, his lively imagination, his tenderness of feeling,
his devoted piety, were the characteristics of the man
which enshrined him in the affections of all who knew
him. And who can read a page of his annals, and not
recognize in those interesting narratives the same simple
plainness, the same glowing fancy, the same touching
pathos, the same ardent piety? In sketching his villagers,


LEGH RICHMOND. 11

he has unconsciously delineated himself. He admits us
to his retirement and meditations, shows us his hopes
and fears, and presents us with all the secret workings of.
his soul. We admire the gifted minister of God, who in
the deep humility of his spirit disdained not to listen to
the voice of admonition, though it reached him from the
lowly cottage ; we cannot withhold our affection from the
man. |

If I were called on to say which of the narratives [
prefer, ] should most probably be inclined to fix on that
of the “Young Cottager.” ‘There is something, in my
judgment, irresistibly engaging in the character and his-
tory of that simple girl. 1 can venerate the high and ex-
alted piety of the “ Dairyman’s Daughter,” who, with a
masculine strength of understanding, had ever her word
of counsel even for the minister; but I love the little back-
ward, neglected, retiring child, who starts forth at once in
all the moral beauty of Christian attainment, There is
sontething too in the condition of Jane which seems
especially to call for our apepainy: The Dairyman’s
Daughter was constantly surrounded by a circle of affee-
tionate relatives, who regarded her with reverence and
love; while Jane’s religion was, at best, little appreciated,
often despised and ridiculed by her family, and her last
hours were disturbed by sounds of blasphemy proceeding
from a parent, Many of the incidents also of this tale
might be appealed to as conferring upon it a peculiar in-
terest. The scene, for example, where Mr. Richmond, on
his first visit to her, while speaking of the good news of
the Gospel, inquires, “ Who brings this good news?” and
is answered, “ Sir, you brought it to me,” I know not who
can read unmoved. Her parting benediction too—* God
bless and reward you”—when with an unexpected exer-
tion she threw her arms around him and died—is inex-
pressibly affecting.

During his residence at Turvey, Mr. Richmond became
extendedly known to the public as the cordial friend and
ready advocate of the different religious societies which
have, within , last thirty years, grown up amongst us.
12 LIFE OF

His persuasive and pathetic eloquence in the pulpit or on
the platform, when awakening Christian sympathy in be-
half of the idolatrous Gentile, or the unbelieving Jew,
will not be readily forgotten by the multitudes who have
so often delighted and instructed, hung upon his lips. J
believe his earliest appearance in this character was on
the Ninth Anniversary of the Church Missionary Society,
before whom he was appointed, in 1809, to preach their
annual sermon, This sermon may be appealed to as a
fair and characteristic specimen of his powers in the pul-
pit; though I must be allowed to say, thaf his flowing
and harmonious language, his graceful delivéry and sweet
expression of features, beaming with love to God and
good-will to men, imparted a charm which the mere read-
er of a printed sermon can by no means duly appreciate.

His preaching, for a long series of years, was altogether
extemporaneous. His ready utterance; his ieaans
fancy, his aptness of illustration, his deep knowledge of
divine things, rendered his sermons always interesting
and useful. Perhaps he did not, upon common occasions,
allow himself sufficient previous study; but if this were
his fault, he acted upon principle. “* Why,” he would
often say, “ why net [ labor, when our simple villagers
are far more usefully instructed in my plain, easy, familiar
manner? ‘The only result would be, that I should ad-
dress them in a style beyond their comprehension.”

His appearance on the platform of a public meeting was
universally hailed with pleasure. His ready adaptation of
passing incidents, the suavity of his addresses, sometimes _
solemn, sometimes even jocose, interspersed with inter- ~
esting narratives, which he could so well relate, deservedly —
placed him high in public esteem. :

I ought perhaps to state, that-in 1814 Mr. Richmond ©
was appointed chaplain to the late Duke of Kent, by whom |
he was honored with a share of his Royal Highness’ |
friendship. In 1817 Mr. R. was presented, by the late
Emperor Alexander, of Russia, with a splendid ring, asa ~
testimony of the approbation with which his Imperial —
Majesty viewed the narratives in this volume. | ,


LEGH RICHMOND. 13

Many peaceful years were passed at Turvey. Happy
in the bosom of his family, no man more excelled as a
pattern of domestic virtues than Legh Richmond.

At length, in 1825, Mr. R.’s domestic happiness sus-
tained a severe blow by the death of his second son, a

outh in his nineteenth year. For this beloved child he
had fostered many a fond hope and anxious expectation,
and beheld, with all a father’s joy, his fair promise; but
this flower was withered by consumption, and the bereaved
parent, though he submitted as a Christian, yet sorrowed.
as aman. In a few short months the stroke was re-
posted, Intelligence arrived that his eldest son, who had
been absent many years, had died on his voyage from
India to England.

These afflictive dispensations had a marked and pecu-
liar effect upon Legh Richmond. He who used to be the
life of the domestic and social circle, would now be silent
_ and abstracted; yet it was not the morbid gloom of a
repining heart, it was rather the solemnity of conviction
that he should ere long rejoin his lamented children. His
bodily health too seemed, in some measure, decaying.
His multitude of pastoral duties were too heavy for his
strength. For the last twelve months of his life he was
troubled with an irritating cough, which seemed to indi-
eate anaffection of the lungs. At Jength, (March, 1827,)
he contracted a violent cold, which issued in pleurisy ;
from which, however, he shortly appeared to be recovering.
During all this time, when certainly no immediate danger
was apprehended, he was peacefully and quietly setti
his house in order. To his family he knew the idea of
separation would be agony; he therefore scarcely hinted
to them what he felt was nigh at hand, but to a clerical
friend, he, in striking words, professed that simple reliance
on the atonement of Christ which alone can cheer and
support the soul in the hour of dissolution. It soon
became evident to those around him, that the flood of life
was @bbing calmly yet fast; and at last, (May 8,) without
paltorstruggle, the ready spirit sweetly and softly passed

: 9
14 LIFE OF LEGH RICHMOND.

from her mortal tenement, and Legh Richmond slept in
Jesus !

Farewell, dear friend and father! Very pleasant were
the hours and years of our communion; but they are
passed away, and the savor only, sad yet sweet, remains.
“ Farewell, dear friend, till the morning of an eternal day
renew our personal intercourse!” May J meet thee in a
better world.

I cannot but connect the closing hours of my beloved
friend with that affecting prayer which he has breathed in
the Young Cottager. He had been describing the useful
course and peaceful termination of a little rivulet which
glides through a very lovely glen, by which he was medi-
tating. “May my course be like unto thine, thou little
rivulet! Though short be my span of life, yet may I be
useful to my fellow-sinners as I travel onwards! Let me
be a dispenser of spiritual support and health to many!
Like this stream, may I prove the poor man’s friend by
the way, afid water the souls that thirst for the river of
life wherever I meet them! And if it pleases thee,O m
God, let me in my latter end be like this brook! It
calmly, though not quite silently, flows through this scene

of peace ahd loveliness, just before it enters the sea, -_

Let me thus gently close my days likewise; and may I
not unusefully tell to others of the goodness and mercy
of my Saviour, till I arrive at the vast ocean of eternity,”

That prayer was surely answered. He did tell to men,
with abundant blessing, of the goodness and mercy of his
Saviour: he did thus gently close his days,

Soldier of Christ, well done !
Praise be thy new employ ;

And while eternal ages run,
Rest in thy Saviour’s joy,

JA,


THE

DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER:

AN AUTHENTIC NARRATIVE,

BY REV. LEGH RICHMOND.
y


‘

DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER.

—— ee

Ir is a delightful employment to discover and trace the
operations of divine grace, as they are manifested in the
dispositions and lives of God’s real children. It is pecu-
liarly gratifying to observe how frequently, among the
poorer classes of mankind, the sunshine of mercy beams
upon the heart, and bears witness to the image of Christ

which the Spirit of God has impressed thereupon. Among

such, the sincerity and simplicity of the Christian charae-
ter appear unencumbered by those obstacles to spirituality
of mind and conversation which too often prove a great
hindrance to those who live in the higher ranks. Many
are the difficulties which riches, worldly consequence,
high connections, and the luxurious refinements of pol-
ished society, throw in the way of religious professions.
Happy indeed it is, (and some such happy instances I
know,) where grace has so strikingly supported its conflict
with natural pride, self-importance, the allurements. of
luxury, ease, and worldly opinions, that the noble and
mighty appear adorned with genuine poverty of spirit,
- -denial, humble-mindedness, and deep spirituality of
eart,

But, in general, if we want to see religion in its most
simple and pure character, we must look for it among the
poor of this world, who are rich in faith. How often is

Q*
18 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

the poor man’s cottage the palace of God! Many of us
ean truly declare, that we have there learned our most
valuable lessons of faith and hope, and there witnessed -
the most striking demonstrations of the wisdom, power,
and goodness of God.

The character which the present narrative is designed
to introduce to the notice of my readers, is given from real
life and circumstance, I first became acquainted with the
Dairyman’s Daughter by the reception of a letter, a part
of which I transcribe from the original, now before me.

“Rey. Sir,—I take the liberty to write to you. Pray
excuse me, for I have never spoken to you. But I once
heard you preach at church. I believe you are
a faithful preacher, to warn sinners to flee from the wrath
that will be revealed against all those that live in sin, and
die impenitent.

“] was much rejoiced to hear of those marks of love
and affection which you showed to that poor soldier of
the S. D. militia. Surely the love of Christ sent you to
that poor man; may that love ever dwell richly in you by
faith. May it constrain you to seek the wandering souls
. men with the fervent desire to spend and be spent for

is glory.

“Bir, be fervent in prayer with God for the conviction
and conversion of sinners. He has promised to answer
the prayer of faith that is put upinhis Son’s name. ‘Ask
what you will, and it shall be granted you.’ Through
faith in Christ we rejoice in hope, and look upin expecta-
tion of that time drawing near, when all shall know and
fear the Lord, and when a nation shall be born in a



y.

“What a happy time, when Christ’s kingdom shall
come! Then shall ‘his will be done on earth, as it is in
heaven.’ Men shall be daily fed with the manna of his
love, and delight themselves in the Lord all the day long.

“Sir, I] began to write this on Sunday, being detained
from attending on public worship. My dear and only
sister, living as a servant with Mrs, —~~, was so ill that
DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 19

I came here to attend in her place, and onher. But now
she is no more.

“She expressed a desire to receive the Lord’s supper,
and commemorate his precious death and sufferings.
told her, as well as I was able, what it was to receive
Christ into her heart; but as her weakness of body
increased, she did not mention it again. She seemed
quite resigned before she died. I do hope she has gone
from a world of death and sin, to be with God for-
ever.

“ My sister expressed a wish that you might bury her.
The minister of our parish, whither she will be carried,
cannot come. She died on Tuesday morning, an@ will be
buried on Friday or Saturday, (whichever is most conve-
nient to you,) at three o’clock in the afternoon. Please
to send an answer by the bearer, to let me know whether
you can comply with this request.

“From your unworthy servant,
“ ELIZABETH W——~£.”

I was much struck with the simple and earnest strain
of devotion which the letter breathed. It was but indif-
ferently written and spelt; but this the rather tended to
endear the hitherto unknown writer, 4s it seemed charac-
teristic of the union of humbleness of station with emi-
nence of piety. IJ felt quite thankful that I was favored
with a correspondent of this description; the more so, as
such characters were, at that time, very rare in the neigh-
borhood. As soon as it was read, I inquired who was the
bearer of it.

“ He is waiting at the outside of the gate, Sir,” was the

reply.

: went out to speak to him; and saw a venerable old
man, whose long hoary hair and deeply wrinkled counte-
nance commanded more than common respect. He was
resting his arm upon the gate, the tears were streaming
down his cheeks. On my approach he made a low bow,
and said,

“Sir, I have brought you a letter from my daughter;


20 | ANNALS OF THE POOR.

but I fear you will think us very bold in asking you to
take so much trouble.”

“By no means,” I replied; “I shall be truly glad to
oblige you and any of your family in this matter.” .

I desired him to come into the house, and then said,

“ What is your occupation ?” )

“ Sir, I have lived most of my days in a little cottage
at , six miles from here, have rented a few
acres of ground and kept a few cows, whieh, in addition
to my day labor, has been my means of supporting and

bringing up my family.” .

- What family have you 2?” ,

“ A wife, now getting very aged and helpless ; two sons
and one daughter; for my other poor, dear child is just
departed out of this wicked world.”

“T hope for a better,”

“T hope so too; poor thing, she did not use to take to
such good ways as her sister; but I do believe that her
sister’s manner of talking with her before she died was
the means of saving her soul. What a mercy it is to
have such a child as mine is! I never thought about my
own soul seriously till she, poor girl, begged and prayed
me to flee from the wrath to come.”

“ How old are you?”

“Turned seventy, and my wife is older; we are get~
ting old and almost past our labor ; but our daughter has
left a good place, where she lived in service, on purpose
to come home and take care of us and our little dairy,
And a dear, dutiful, affectionate girl she is,”

“ Was she always so ?”

“No, Sir; when she was very young she was all for
the world, and pleasure, and dress, and company. Indeed
we were all very ignorant, and thought, if we took care
for this life, and wronged nobody, we should be sure to
go to heaven at last. My daughters were both wilful,
and, like ourselves, were strangers to the ways of God
and the word of his grace. But the eldest of them went



dut to service; and some years ago she heard a sermon .

preached at —--— church, and from that time she be-
DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 21

came quite an altered creature. She began to read the
Bible, and became quite sober and steady. The first
time she came home afterwards to see us, she brought us
a guinea which she had saved from her wages, and said,
as we were getting old, she was sure we should want
help: adding, that she did not wish to spend it in fine
clothes, as she used to do, only to feed pride and vanity.
She would rather show gratitude to her dear father and
mother; and this, she said, because Christ had shown
such mercy to her.

“ We wondered to hear her talk, and took great delight
in her company, for her temper and behavior were so
humble and kind, she seemed so desirous to do us good
both in soul and body, and was so different from what we
had ever seen her before, that, careless and ignorant as
we had been, we began to think there must be somethin
real in religion, or it never could alter a person so muc
in a little time.

“Her younger sister, poor soul, used to laugh and
ridicule her at that time, and said her head was turned
with her new ways. ‘No, sister,’ she would say, ‘not my
head, but I.hope my heart is turned from the love of
sin to the love of God. I wish you may one day see, .
as I do, the danger and vanity of your present condi-
tion. |

“Her poor sister would reply, ‘I do not want to hear
any of your preaching: [ am no worse than other
eople, and that is enough for me,—‘ Well, sister,’
lizabeth would say, ‘if you will not hear me, you can-
not hinder me from praying for you, which I do with all
my heart.’ 7 '

“ And now, Sir, I believe those prayers are answered.
For when her sister was taken ill, Elizabeth went to wait
in her place and take care of her. She said a great deal
to her about her soul; and the poor girl began to be so
deeply affected, and sensible of her past sin, and so thank-
ful for her sister’s kind behavior, that it gave her great
hopes*indeed for her sake. When my wife and I went
to see her as she lay sick, she told us how grieved and
22 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

ashamed she was of her past life; but said, she had a
hope, through grace, that her dear sister’s Saviour would
be her Saviour too; for she saw her own sinfulness, felt
her own helplessness, and only wished to cast herself
upon Christ as her hope and salvation.

“ And now, Sir, she is gone, and I hope and think her
sister’s prayers for her conversion to God have been
answered. ‘The Lord grant the same, for her poor father
and mother’s sake likewise.”

This conversation was a very pleasing commentary
upon the letter which I had received, and made me anx-
ious both to comply with the request, and to become ac-
quainted with the writer. I promised the, good old
Dairyman I would attend the funeral on Fridley at the
appointed hour; and after some more conversgijion re-
specting his own state of mind under the presefiftrfal, he
Went away. ,*

He was a reverend old man; his furrowed cheeks,
white locks, weeping eyes, bent shoulders, and feeble
gait, were characteristic of the aged pilgrim ; and as he
slowly departed, supported by a stick, which seemed to’
have been the companion of many a long year, a tein of |
reflections occurred which I retrace with emotion and’
pleasure. |

At the appointed hour I arrived at the church; and af-
ter a little while, was summoned to meet at. the church- |

ard gate a very decent funeral procession. The aged —
parents, the elder brother and the sister, with other rela-
tives, formed an affecting group. I was struck with the
humble, pious, and pleasing countenance of the young —
woman from whom I received the letter: it bore the
marks of great seriousness without affectation, and of |
much serenity mingled with a glow of devotion.

A circumstance occurred during the burial service,
whieh I think it right to mention.

A man of the village, who had hitherto been of a very
careless and even profligate character, came into the
church through mere curiosity, and with no better purpose
than that of a vacant gazing at the ceremony. He came




DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 93

likewise to the grave; and during the burial service his
mind received a deep, serious conviction of his sin and
danger, through some of the expressions contained there-
in. It was an impression that never wore off, but gradu-
ally ripened into the most satisfactory evidence of an
entire change, of which I had many and long-continued
progfs. He always referred to the burial service, and to
. some particular sentences of it, as the clearly ascertained
instrument of bringing him, through grace, to the knowl-
edge of the truth.

he day was therefore one to be remembered. Re-
' membered let it be by those who love to hear “the short
and singel annals of the poor.”

WwW re not a manifest and happy connection between
the’ ci@usiance that providentially brought the serious
and thé’careless to the same grave on that day together?
How auch do they lose, who neglect to trace the leadings
of Gdd in providence, as links in the chain of his eterna]
purpose of redemption and grace!

“ While infidels may scoff, let us adore,”

_ Aft@r the service was concluded, I had a short conver-
‘sation with the good ald couple and their daughter. Her
aspect and address were highly interesting. I promised
to Visit their cottage; and from that time became well
acquainted with them. Let us bless the God of the poor,
and pray continually that the poor may become rich in’
faith, and the rich be made poor in spirit.

A sweet solemnity often possesses the mind, while
retracing past intercourse with departed friends. How
much is this inereased, when were such as lived and
died in the Lord! The remembrance of former scenes
and convérsations with those who, we believe, are now
enjoying the uninterrupted happiness of a better world,
fills the heart with pleasing sadness, and animates the soul
with the hopeful anticipation of a day when the glory of
the Lord shall be revealed in the assembling of all his
children together, never more to be separated, * W.

-
24 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

they were rich or poor, while on earth, is a matter of tri-
fling consequence ; the valuable part of their character is,
that they are now kings and priests unto God. In the
number of departed believers, with whom I once loved to
converse on the grace and glory of the kingdom of God,
was the Dairyman’s Daughter.

About a week after the funeral I went to visit the ,
family at , where the youngest sister had lived and
died, and where Elizabeth had remained for a short time.
She was indeep mourning; but there wasa calmness and —
serenity in her countenance which exceedingly struck me, ~
and impressed some idea of those attainments which a
farther acquaintance with her afterwards so much in-
creased. After a brief interview, I left her with an assnu-
rance that | proposed very shortly to visit her parents, to
whom she was about to return. ‘

I quitted the house with no small degree of satisfaction,
in consequence of the new acquaintance which | had
formed. I discovered traces of a cultivated as well as a
spiritual mind, I felt that religious intercourse with those
of low estate may be rendered eminently useful to others
whose outward station and advantages are far above their
own.

How often does it appear that “God hath chosen the
weak things of the world to confound the things which
are mighty: and base things of the world, and things
which are despised, hath God chosen, and things which —
are not, to bring to naught things that are; that no flesh —
should glory in his presence.” |

It was not unfrequently my custom, when my mind
was filled with any interesting subject for meditation, to —
seek some spot where the beauties of natural prospect —
might help to form pleasing and useful associations. I —
therefore ascended gradually to the very summit of the
hill adjoining the mansion where my visit had just been |
made. Here was placed an elevated sea-mark: it was in
the form of a triangular pyramid, and built of stone. I
sat down on the ground near it, and looked at the sur-






DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 95

rounding prospect, which was distinguished for penne
and magnificence. It was a lofty station which command-
ed a complete circle of interesting objects to engage the
spectator’s attention.

Southward the view was terminated by a long range
of hills, at about six miles’ distance. They met, to the
westward, another chajn of hills, of which the one whereon
I sat formed a link, and the whole gine nearly encom-
passed a rich and fruitful valley filled with cornfields and
pastures. Through this vale winded a small river for
many miles; much cattle were feeding on its banks.
Here and there lesser eminences arose in the valley ;
some covered with wood, others with corn or grass, and
a few with heath or fern. One of these little. hills was
distinguished by a parish church at the top, presenting a
striking feature in the landscape. Another of these ele-
vations, situated in the centre of the valley, was adorned
with a venerable holly-tree, which has grown there for
aves, Its singular height and wide-spreading dimensions
not only render it an object of curiosity to the traveller,
but of daily usefulness to the pilot, as a mark visible from
the sea, whereby to direct his vessel safe into harbor.
Villages, churches, country-seats, farm-houses, and cotta-

es, were scattered over every part of the southern valley.
n this direction also, at the foot of the hill where I was
stationed, appeared the ancient mansion which I had just
quitted, embellished with its woods, groves, and gardens.

South-eastward I saw the open sea, bounded only b
the horizon. The sun shone, and gilded the waves wi
a glittering light, that sparkled in the most brilliant man-
ner. More to the’east, in continuation of that line of
hills where I was placed, rose two downs, one beyond
the other, both covered with sheep, and the sea just visi-
ble over the farthest of them, as a terminating boundary.
In this point ships were seen, some sailing, others at
anchor. Here the little river, which watered the southern
valley, finished its course, and ran through meadows into
the sea in an eastward direction. ,

On the north the sea appeared like a noble river, vary-

3
26 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

ing from three ta seven miles in breadth, between tha
banks of the opposite coast and those of the island which
I inhabited. Immediately underneath me was a fine
woody district of country, diversified by many pleasing
objects, Distant towns were visible on the opposite
shore, Numbers of ships occupied the sheltered station
which this northern channel afforded them. The eye
roamed with delight over an expanse of near and remote
beauties, which alternately caught the observation, and
which harmonized together and praduced a scene of pecu.
liar interest.

Westward the hills followed each other, forming seve.
ral intermediate and partial valleys, in a kind of undula.
tions, like the waves of the sea; and, bending to the south,
completed the boundary of the larger eee before
described, to the southward of the hill on which I sat. In
many instances the hills were cultivated with corn to their
very summits, and seemed to defy the inclemency of
weather, which, at these heights, usually renders the
ground incapable of bringing forth and ripening the crops
of grain. One hill alone, the highest in. elevation, and
ahout ten miles to the south-westward, was enveloped in
a cloud, which jyst permitted a dim and hazy sight of a
signal-post, a light-house, and an ancient chantry, built
on its summit.

Amidst these numerous specimens of delightful scenery
I found a mount for contemplation, and here I indulged it,

“How much of the natural beauties of Paradise stil]
remain in the world although its spiritual character has
been so awfully defaced by sin! But when divine grace
renews the heart of the fallen sinner, Paradise is regained,
and much of its heauty restored ta the soul. As this
prospect is compounded of hill and dale, Jand and sea,
woods and plains, all sweetly blended tagether and re-
lieving each other in the landscape, so do the gracious
dispositions wrought in the soul, produce a beauty and
harmony of scene to which it was before a stranger.”

[ looked towards the village, in the plain below, where

the Dajryman’s younger daughter was buried. I retraced


DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 27

the simple solemnities of the funeral: I connected the
principles and conduct of her sister with the present
probably happy state of her soul in the world of spirits,
and was greatly impressed with a sense of the importance
of family influence as a means of grace. “That young
woman,” I thought, “has been the conductor of not only
a sister, but perhaps a father and mother also, to the true
knowledge of God, and may, by divine blessing, become
so to others. It is a glorious occupation to win souls to
Christ, and guide them out of Egyptian bondage through
the wilderness into the promised Canaan. Happy are the
families who are Walking hand in hand together, as pil-
grims, towards the heavenly country. May the number
of such be daily increased !”

Casting my eye over the numerous dwellings in the
vales on my right and left, 1 could not help thinking,
“how many of their inhabitants are ignorant of the ways
of God, and strangers to his grace! May this thought
stimulate to activity and diligence in the cause of immor-
tal souls! They are precious in God’s sight—they
ought to be so in ours.” .

Some pointed and affecting observations to that effect
recurred te my mind as having been made by the young
person with whom I had been just conversing. Her
mind appeared to be much impressed with the duty of
speaking and acting for God “while it is day ;” con-
scious that “the night cometh when no man can work.”

I soon rode, for the first time, to see the family of the
Dairyman at their own home. The principal part of the
road lay through retired, narrow lanes, beautifully over-
arched with groves of nut and other trees, which screened
the traveller from the rays of the sun, and afforded many
interesting objects for admiration in the beautiful flowers,
shrubs, and young trees, which grew upon the high banks
on each side of the road. Many grotesque rocks, with
little streams of water oscadidiadly Vecakitne out of them,

varied the recluse scenery, and produced a romantic and
pleasing effect.

=
28 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

Here and there the more distant and rich prospect be-
yond appeared through gaps and hollow places on the
road-side. Lofty hills, with navy signal-posts, obelisks,
and light-houses on their summits, appeared at these in-
tervals: rich corn-fields were also visible through some
of the open places; and now and then, when the road
ascended a hill, the sea, with “ee at various distances,
opened delightfully upon me. But, for the most part,
shady seclusion, and objects of a more minute and con-
fined nature, gave a character to the journey, and invited
contemplation.

What do not they lose who are strangers to serious
meditation on the wonders and beauties of nature! How
gloriously the God of creation shines in his works! Not
a tree, or leaf, or flower—not a bird or insect, but pro-
claims, in glowing language, “God made me.”

As I approached the village where the good old Dairy-
man dwelt, I observed him in a little field driving a few
cows before him towards a yard and hovel which adjoin-
ed his cottage. I advanced very near him without his
observing me, for his sight was dim. On my calling out
to him, he started at the sound of my voice, but with much
gladness of countenance welcomed me, saying, “Bless
pene heart, Sir, 1 am very glad you are come; we have

ooked for you every. day this week.”

The’ cottage-door opened, and the daughter came out
followed by her aged and infirm mother. The sight of
me naturally brought to recollection the grave at which
we had before met. Tears of affection mingled with the
smile of satisfaction with which I was received by these

worthy cottagers. I dismounted, and was conducted |

through a very neat little garden, part of which was sha-
ded by two large, overspreading elm-trees, to the house.
Decency and cleanliness were manifest within and with-
out. Everything wore the aspect of neatness and pro-

priety. On each side of the fire-place stood an old oaken —

arm-chair, where the venerable parents rested their weary

limbs after the day’s labor was over. On a shelf, in-one |

corner, lay two Bibles, with a few religious books and

es




DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 20

Tracts. The little room had two windows ; a lovely pros
pect of hills, woods, and fields, appeared through one—
the other was more than half obscured by the branches
of a vine which was trained across it; between its leaves
the sun shone, and cast a cheerful light over the whole
place.

This, thought [, is a fit residence for piety, peace, and
contentment. May I learn a fresh lesson in each, through
the blessing of God on this visit. |

“ Sir,” said the daughter, “ we are not worthy that you
should come under our roof. We take it very kind that
you should come so far to see us.”

“My Master,” I replied, “came a great deal farther to
visit us poor sinners. He left the bosom of his Father,
laid aside his glory, and came down to this lower world
on a visit of merey and love; and ought not we, if we.
profess to follow him, to bear each other's infirmities, and
go about doing good, as he did?”

The old man now came in and joined his wife and
daughter in giving me a cordial welcome. Our conversa-
tion soon turned to the late loss they had sustained; and
the pious and sensible disposition of the daughter was
peculiarly manifested, as well in what she said to her pa-
rents, as in what she said to me. I was struek with the
good sense and agreeable manner which accompanied her
expressions of devotedness to God, and love to Christ,
for the great mercies which he had bestowed upon her.
She seemed anxious to improve the opportunity of my
visit to the best purpose for her own and her parents’
sake; yet there was nothing of unbecoming forwardness,
no self-consequence or conceitedness in her behavior,
She united the firmness and earnestness of the Christian
with the modesty of the female and the dutifulness of
the daughter. It was impossible to be in her company,
and not observe how truly her temper and conversa.
tion adorned the evangelical principles which she pro-
fessed.

I soon discovered how eager and how successful also
she had been in her endeavors to bring her father and

3
30 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

mother to the knowledge and experience of the truth.
This is a lovely circumstance in the character of a young
Christian. If it hath pleased God,.in the free dispensa-
tions of his mercy, to call the child by his grace, while
the parent remains still in ignorance and sin, how great
is the duty of that child to do what is possible for the
conversion of those to whom it owes its birth! Happy
is it when the ties of grace sanctify those of nature!

This aged couple evidently looked upon and spoke of
their daughter as their teacher and admonisher in divine
things, while they received from her every token of. filial
submission and obedience, testified by continual endeavors
to serve and assist them to the utmost in the little con-
cerns of the household. |

The religion of this young woman was of a highly
spiritual character, and of no ordinary attainment. Her
views of the divine plan in saving the sinner, were clear
and scriptural. She spoke much of the joys and sorrows
which, in the course of her religious progress, she had
experienced; but she was fully sensible that there is far
more in real religion than mere occasional transition
from one frame, of mind and spirit to another. She be-
lieved that the experimental acquaintance of the heart
with God, principally consisted in so living upon Christ
by faith, as to seek to live like him by love. She knew
that the love of God toward the sinner, and the path of
duty prescribed to the sinner, are both of an unchangeable
nature. In a believing dependence on the one, and an
affectionate walk in the other, she sought and found “the
peace of God which passeth all understanding ;” “ for so
he giveth his bare rest.”

he had read but few books besides her Bible; but

these few were excellent in their kind, and she spoke of
their contents as one who knew their value. In addition
to a Bible and Common Prayer Book, “ Doddridge’s Rise
and Progress,” “ Romaine’s Life, Walk, and Triumph of
Faith,” “ Bunyan’s Pilgrim,” “ Alleine’s Alarm,” “ Baxter’s
Saints’ Everlasting Rest,” a hymn-book, and a few Tracts,
composed her library. )


DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 31

I observed in her countenance a pale and delicate look,
which I afterwards found to be a presage of consumption ;
and the idea then occurred to me that she would not live
very long. In fact, it pleased God to take her hence about
‘ a year and a half after I first saw her.

Time passed on swiftly with this interesting family ;
and after having partaken of some plain and wholesome
refreshment, arid enjoyed a few hours’ conversation with
them, I found it was necessary for me to return home-
wards. | '

“]T thank,you, Sir,” said the daughter, “for your Chris-
tian kindness to me and my friends. I believe the bless-
ing of the Lord has attended your visit, and I hope I have
experienced it to be so. My dear father and mother will,
J am sure, remember it, and I rejoice in an opportunity,
which we have never before enjoyed, of seeing a serious
minister under this roof. My Saviour has been abun-
dantly good to me in plucking me ‘as a brand from the
burning,’ and showing me the way of life and peace: and
I hope it is my heart’s desire to live to his glory. But I
long to see these dear friends enjoy the comfort and
power of religion also.”

“T think it evident,” I replied, “that the promise is ful-
filled in their case: ‘ It shall come to pass, that at evening
time it shall be light.” |

“T believe it,” she said, “and praise God for the blessed |
hope.” b

“Thank him too that you have been the happy instru-
ment of bringing them to the light.’ ”

“I do, Sir; yet when I think of my own unworthiness
and insufficiency, I rejoice with trembling.”

“ Sir,” said the good old man, “I am sure the Lord will
reward you for this kindness, Pray for us, that, old as
we are, and sinners as we have been, yet he would have
merey upon us at the eleventh hour. Poor Betsy strives
hard for our sakes, both in body and soul; she works
hard all day to save us trouble, and I fear has not strength
to support all she does; and then she talks to us, and
reads to us, and prays for us, that we may be saved
32 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

from the wrath to come. Indeed, Sir, she’s’ a rare child
to us.”

* Peace be to you, and all that belong to you.”
“Amen, and thank you, dear Sir,” was echoed from
each tongue. |

Thus we parted for that time. My returning medita-
tions were sweet, and, I hope, profitable. Many other
visits were afterwards made by me to this peaceful cot-
tage, and I always found increasing reason. to, thank God
for the intercourse I enjoyed. c

I soon perceived that the health of the Speier was
rapidly on the decline. The pale, wasting eoAsumption,
which is the Lord’s instrument for removing so many
thousands every year from the land of the living, made
hasty strides on her constitution. The hollow eye, the
distressing cough, and the often too flattering red on the
cheek, foretold the approach of death.

I have often thought what a field for usefulness and
affectionate attention on the part of ministers and Christian
friends, is opened by the frequent attacks and lingering
progress of consumptive illness. How many such pre-
cious opportunities are daily lost, where Providence
seems in so marked a way to afford time and space for
serious and godly instruction! Of how many may it be
said, “ The way of peace have they not known ;” for not
one friend ever came nigh to wafn them to “ flee from the
wrath to come.”

But the Dairyman’s Daughter was happily made ac-
quainted with the things which belonged to her everlast-
ing peace, before the present disease had taken root in
her constitution. In my visit to her, I might be said rather
to receive information than to impart it. Her mind was
abundantly stored with divine truths, and her conversa-
tion was truly edifying. ‘The recollection of it still pro-
duces a thankful sensation in my heart.

I one day received a short note to the following effect :

Dear Sir,

I should be very glad, if your convenience will allow,

that you would come and see a poor unworthy sinner :
DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. ' $8

my hour-glass is nearly run out, but I hope I can see
Christ to be precious to my soul, Your conversation
has often been blessed to me, and I now feel the need of
it more than ever. My father and mother send their duty
to you.
rf From your obedient and
mar or servant,
LIZABETH W



I obeyed the summons that same'afternoon. On my
arrival at the Dairyman’s cottage, his wife opened the
door. The tears streamed down her cheek, as she si-
lently shook her head. Her heart was full. She tried
to = but could not. I took her by the hand, and
said,

“My _ friend, all is right, and as the Lord of wis-
dom and mercy directs.”

“Oh! my Betsy, my dear girl, is so bad, Sir: what
shall I do without her !—I thought I should have gone
first to the grave, but——”

“ But the Lord sees good, that, before you die yourself,
you should behold your child safe home to glory. Is
there no mercy in this ?” dios

“Qh! dear Sir, lam very old, and very weak; and she
is a dear child, the staff and prop of a poor old creature,
as I am.” i |

As I advanced, I saw Elizabeth sitting by the fire-side,
supported in an arm-chair by pillows, with every mark of
rapid decline and approaching death. She appeared to
me within three or four weeks at the farthest from her
end. A sweet smile of friendly complacency enlightened
her pale countenance, as she said, = =

“This is very kind indeed, Sir, to come so soon after I
sent to you. You find me daily wasting: away, and I
cannot have long to continue here. My flesh and my
heart fail, but God is the strength of my weak heart, and
I trust will be my portion forever.””

The conversation which follows was occasionally inter-
rupted by her cough and want of breath, Her tone of
84 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

voice was clear, though feeble; her manner solemn and
collected ; and her eye, though more dim than formerly,
by no means wanting in liveliness as she spoke. I had
frequently admired the superior language in which she
expressed her ideas, as well as the scriptural consistency
with which she communicated her thoughts. She had a
good natural understanding; and grace, as is generally
the case, had much improved it. On the present occasion
I could not help thinking she was peculiarly favored.
The whole strength of grace and nature seemed to be in
full exercise.

After taking my seat between the daughter and the
mother, (the latter fixing her fond eyes upon her child
with great anxiety while we were conversing,) I said to
Elizabeth,

“]T hope you enjoy a sense of the divine presence, and
can rest all upon him who has ‘ been with thee,’ and has
kept ‘thee in all places whither thou hast gone,’ and will
bring thee into ‘the land of pure delights, where saints
immortal reign.’ ”

“Sir, I think Ican. My mind has lately been some-
times clouded, but I believe it has been ‘partly owing to
the great weakness and suffering of my bodily frame, and
partly to the envy of my spiritual enemy, who wants to
persuade me that Christ has no love for me, and that I
have been a self-deceiver.”

“And do you give way to his suggestions? Can you
doubt, amidst ok numerous tokens of past and present
merey ?”

“No, Sir, I mostly am enabled to preserve a clear evi-
dence of his love. Ido not wish to add to my other sins
that of denying his manifest goodness to my soul. I
would acknowledge it to his praise and glory.”

“ What is your present view of the state in which you
were before he called you by his grace ?”

“Sir, ] was a proud, thoughtless girl; fond of dress
and finery; I loved the world and the things that are in
the world; I lived in service among worldly people, and
never had the happiness of being in a family where wor-

EE oe en
DAIRYMAN'S DAUGHTER. 35

ship was regarded, and the souls of the servants cared
for, either by master or mistress. I went once on a
Sunday to church, more to see and be seen, than to pray,
or hear the word of God. I thought I was quite good
enough to be saved, and disliked and often laughed at re-
— people. I wasin great darkness; I knew nothing
of the way of salvation; I never prayed, nor was sensible
of the awful danger of a prayerless state, 1 wished to
- maintain the character of a good servant, and was much
lifted up whenever | met with applause, I was tolerably
moral and decent in my conduct, from motives of carnal
and worldly policy; but E was a stranger to God and
Christ ; I neglected my soul; and had I died in such 4
state, hell must, and would justly, have been my portion.”

“ How long is it since you heard the sermon which you
hope, through God's blessing, effected your conversion ?”

“ About five years ago.” ,

“How was it brought about?”

“ It was reported that a Mr. , who was detained
by contrary winds from embarking on board ship, as
chaplain, to a distant part of the world, was to preach at.
church. Many advised me not to go, for fear he
should turn my head; as they said he held strange no-
tions. But curiosity, and an opportunity of appearing in
a new gown, which I was very proud of, induced me to
ask leave te go. Indeed, Sir, 1 had no better motives
than vanity and curiosity. Yet thus it pleased the Lord
to order it for his own glory. |

“T accordingly went to oaks and saw a great crowd
of people collected together, I often think of the con.
trary states of m ae during the former and latter part
of the service. For a while, regardless of the worship of
God, I looked around me, and was anxious to attract
natice myself. My dress, like that of too many gay,
vain, and silly girls, was much above my station, and
very different from that which becomes a humble sinner,
who has a modest sense of propriety and decency. Tha
state of my mind was viaible enough from the foolish

finefy of my apparel,




36 ANNALS QF THE POOR.

“At length the clergyman gave out his text: * Be ye
clothed with humility.” He drew a comparisom between
the clothing of the body and that of the soul.*. At a very
early part of his discourse I began to feel ashamed of my
passion for fine dressing and apparel; but when he came
to describe the garment of salvation with which a Chris-
tian is clothed, | felt a powerful discovery of the naked-
ness of my own soul. I saw that I had neither the
humility mentioned in the text, nor any one part of the
true Christian character. I looked at my gay dress, and
blushed for shame on account of my pride. I looked at
the minister, and he seemed to be as a messenger sent
from heaven to open my eyes. I looked at the congre-

ation, and wondered whether any one else felt as I did.

looked at my heart, and it appeared full of iniquity. I
trembled as he spoke, and yet I felt a great drawing of
heart to the words he uttered.

“ He opened the riches of divine grace in God’s method
of saving the sinner. I was astonished at what I had
been doing all the days of my life. He deseribed the
meek, lowly, and humble example of Christ; I felt proud,
lofty, vain, and self-consequential. He represented Christ
as ‘ Wisdom ;’ I felt my ignorance. He held him forth as
‘Righteousness ;’ I was convinced of my own guilt. He
proved him to be ‘Sanctification; I saw my corruption.
He proclaimed him .as** Redemption ;’ I felt my slavery to
sin, and my captivity to Satan. He concluded with an
animated address to sinners, in which he exhorted them
to flee from the wrath to come, to cast off the love of
outward ornaments, to put on Christ, and be clothed with
true humility. | ,

“From that hour I never lost sight of the value of my
soul, and the danger of a sinful state. [inwardly blessed
God for the sermon, although my mind was in a state of
great confusion.

“The preacher had brought forward the ruling passion
of my heart, which was pride in outward dress; and by
the grace of God it was made instrumental to the awa-
kening of my soul. Happy, Sir, would it be, if many a


DAIRY MAN’S: p AUGHTER, 37

poor girl, like myself, were turned from the love of out-
ward adorning and putting on of fine apparel, to seek
that which is not corruptible, even the ornament of a
meek and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God of
great price.

“The greater part of the congregation, unused to such
faithful and scriptural sermons, disliked and complained
of the severity of the preacher; while a few, as I after-
wards found, like myself, were deeply affected, and ear-
nestly wished to hear him again. But he preached there
no more.

“From that time I was led, through a course of private
prayer, reading, and meditation, to see my lost estate as
a sinner, and the great mercy of God, through Jesus
Christ, in raising sinful dust and ashes to a share in the
tare happiness of heaven. And oh! Sir, what a

aviour have I found! He is more than I could ask or
desire. In his fullness.I have found all that my poverty
could need; in his bosom I have found a resting-place
from all sin and sorrow; in his word I have found strength
against doubt and unbelief.” |

“Were you not soon convinced,” said I, “that your
salvation must be an act of entire grace on the part of
God, weekly independent of your own previous works or
deservings ?”

“Dear Sir, what were my works before I heard that
sermon, but evil, carnal, selfish, and ungodly? ‘The
thoughts of my heart, from my youth upward, were only
evil, and that continually. And my deservings, what were
they, but the apie of a fallen, depraved, careless
soul, that regards neither law nor Gospel? Yes, Sir, I
immediately saw, that if ever I were saved, it must be by
the free mercy of God, and that the whole praise and
honor of the work would be his from first to last.”

“ What change did you perceive in yourself with re-
spect to the world?”

“ It appeared all vanity and vexation of spirit, I found
it necessary to my peace of mind to ‘come out from
among them and be separate.’ I gave myself to prayer;

4
38 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

and many a precious hour of secret delight I enjoyed in
communion with God. Often I mourned over my sins,
and sometimes had a great conflict through unbelief, fear,
temptation to return back again to my old ways, and a
variety of difficulties which lay in my way. But he who
loved me with an everlasting love, drew me by his
loving-kindness, showed me the way of peace, gradually
strengthened me in my resolutions of leading a new
life, and taught me that, while without him I could
do nothing, I yet might do all things through his
strength.”

“Did you not find many difficulties in your situation,
owing to your change of principle and practice ?”

“ Yes, Sir, every of my life. I was laughed at by
some, scolded at by others, scorned by enemies, and pitied
by friends. I was called hypocrite, saint, false deceiver,
and many more names, which were meant to render me
hateful in the sight of the world. But I esteemed the
reproach of the cross an honor.—I forgave and prayed for
aay peeeeateen and remembered how very lately I had
acted the same part toward others myself. I thought
also that Christ endured the contradiction of sinners; and,
as the disciple is not above his Master, I was glad to be
in any way conformed to his sufferings,”

“Did you not then feel for your relatives at home?”

“ Yes, that I did indeed, Sir; they were never out of
my oe I prayed continually for them, and had a
longing desire to do them good. In particular I felt for
my father and mother, as they were getting into years,
and were very ignorant and dark in matters of religion.”

* Ay,” interrupted her mother, sobbing, “ignorant and
dark, sinful and miserable we were, till this dear Betsy—
this dear Betsy—this dear child, Sir, brought Christ Jesus
home to her poor father and mother’s house.”

“No, dearest mother, say rather, Christ Jesus. brought
your poor daughter home to tell you what he had done
for her soul, and I hope, to do the same for yours.”

At this moment the Dairyman came in with two pails
of milk hanging from the yoke on his shoulders, He
DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 39

had stood behind the half-opened door for a few minutes,
and heard the last sentences spoken by his wife and
daughter. .

“ Blessing and mercy upon her,” said he, “it is very
true; she would leave a good place of service on purpose
to live with us, that she might help us both in sou) and
body. Sir, don’t she look very ill? I think, Sir, we
shan’t have her here long.”

“Leave that to the Lord,” said Elizabeth. “ All our
times are in his hand, and happy it is that they are.
I am willing to go; are not you willing, my father, to
part with me into hts hands who gave me to you at
first ?”

“ Ask me any question in the world but that,” said the
weeping father.

“I know,” said she, “ you wish me to be happy.”

“JI do, 1 do,” answered he; “let the Lord do with you
and us as best pleases him.”

I then asked her on what her present consolations
chiefly depended, in the prospect of approaching death.

“ Entirely, Sir, on my view of Christ. When I look at
myself, many sins, infirmities, and imperfections cloud the
image of Christ which I want to see in my own heart.
But when I look at the Saviour himself, he is altogether
lovely ; there is not one spot in his countenance, nor one

cloud over all his perfections. |
' “YJ think of his coming in the flesh, and it reconciles me
to the sufferings of the body; for He had them as well as
I. I think of his temptations, and believe that he is able
to succor me when I am tempted. Then I think of his
cross, and learn to bear my own. [I reflect on his death,
and long to die unto sin, so that it may no longer have
dominion over me. I sometimes think on his resurrec-
tion, and trust that he has given me a part in it, for! feel
that my affections are set upon things above. Chiefly I
take comfort in thinking of him as at the right hand of
the Father, pleading my cause, and rendering acceptable
even my feeble prayers, both for myself, and, as I hope,
for my dear friends.
40 ANNALS OF THE POQH.

“ These are the views, which, through mercy, I have of
my Saviour’s goodness; and they have made me wish
and strive in my poor way to serve him, to give myself
up to him, and to labor to do my duty in that state of
life into which it has pleased him to call me.

“ A thousand times I should have fallen and fainted, if
he had not upheld me, I feel that I am nothing without
him. He is all in all.

“Just so far as I can cast my care upon him, I find
strength to do his will. May he give me grace to trust
him to the last moment! Ido not fear death, because I
believe he has taken away its sting. And oh! what hap-
piness beyond! Tell me, Sir, whether you think | am
right. I hope I am under no delusion. [ dare not look
for my hope at any thing short of the entire fulness of
Christ. When I ask my own heart a question, I am
afraid to trust it, for it is treacherous, and has often de-
eeived me. But when I ask Christ, he answers me with
promises that strengthen and refresh me, and leave me
no room to doubt his power and will to save. I am in
his hands, and would remain there; and I do believe
that he will never leave nor forsake me, but will perfect
the thing that concerns me. He loved me and gave him-
self for me, and I believe that his gifts and calling are with-
out repentance. In this hope [ live, in this I wish to die.”

I looked around me as she was speaking, and thought,
“ Surely this is none other than the house of God, and
the gate of heaven.” Every thing appeared neat, cleanly,
and interesting. The afternoon ha Set rather overcast
with dark clouds, but just now the setting sun shone
brightly and rather suddenly into the room. It was re-
flected from three or four rows of bright pewter plates
and white earthen-ware arranged on shelves against the
wall; it also gave brillianey to a few prints of sacred sub-
jects that hung there also, and served for monitors of the
birth, baptism, crucifixion, and resurrection of Christ. A

map of Jerusalem, and a hieroglyphic of “the old
and new man,” completed the decorations on that side of
the room. Clean as was the white-washed wall, it was

*

.|

rr ne att ta maa aa a
“s.

DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 4]

not cleaner than the rest of the place and its furniture.
Seldom had the sun enlightened a house where order and
general neatness (those sure attendants of pious poverty)
were more conspicuous.

This gleam of setting sunshine was emblematical of
the bright and serene close of this io Christian’s de-
parting season. One ray happened to be reflected from
a little looking-glass upon the face of the young woman.
Amidst her pallid and Recasins features there appeared a
calm resignation, triumphant confidence, unaffected hu-
mility, and tender anxiety, which fully declared the feel-
ings of her heart.

Some further affectionate conversation, and a short
prayer, closed this interview. ©

As I rode home by departing daylight, a solemn tran-
quills reigned throughout the scene. The gentle low-
ing of cattle, the bleating of sheep, just penned in their
folds, the humming of the insects of the night, the dis-
tant murmurs of the sea, the last notes of the birds of day,
and the first warblings of the nightingale, broke upon the
ear, and served rather to increase than lessen the peace-
ful serenity of the evening, and its corresponding effects
on my own mind. It invited and cherished just such
meditations as my visit had already inspired. Natural
scenery, when viewed in a Christian mirror, frequently
affords very beautiful illustrations of divine truth. We
are highly favored, when we can enjoy them, and at the
same time draw near to God in them. |

Soon after this I received a hasty summons, to inform
me that my young friend was dying. It was brought by
a soldier, whose countenance bespoke seriousness, good
sense, and piety.

“T am sent, Sir, by the father and mother of Elizabeth
W———., at her own particular request, to say how much
they all wish to see you. She is going home, Sir, very
fast indeed.”

“ Have you known her long?” I replied.

“ About a month, Sir; I ove to visit the sick, and

4
42 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

menaing of her case from a serious person who lives
close by our camp, I went to see her. I bless God that
ever I dd go. Her conversation has been very profitable
to me.”

“T rejoice,” said I, “to see in you, as J trust, a brother
soldier. ‘Though we differ ia our outward regimentals, I
hope we serve under the same:spiritual Captain. I will
go with you.”

My horse was soon ready. My. military companion
walked by my side, and gratified me with very sensible
and pious conversation. He related some remarkable
testimonies of the excellent disposition of the Dairyman’s
' Daughter, as they appeared from some recent intercourse
which he had had with her. '

“She is a ane diamond, Sir,” said the soldier, “and
will soon shine brighter than any diamond upon earth.”

We passed through Janes and fields, over hills and val-
leys, by open and retired paths, sometimes crossing over,
and sometimes following the windings of a little brodk,
which gently murmured by the road side. Conversation
beguiled the distance, and shortened the apparent time of
our journey, till we were nearly arrived at the Dairyman’s
cottage.

As we approached it we became silent. Thoughts of
death, eternity, and salvation, inspired by the-sight of a
house where a dying believer lay, filled my own mind,
and, I doubt not, that of my companion also,

No living object yet appeared, except the Dairyman’s
dog; keeping a kind of mute watch at the door, for he
did not, as formerly, bark at my approach. He seemed
to partake so far of the feelings appropriate to the cir-
cumstances of the family, as not to wish to give a hasty
or painful alarm. He came forward to the little wicket-
ea then looked back at the house-door, as if conscious

ere was sorrow within, It was as if he wanted to say,
“ Tread softly over the threshold, as you enter the house
of mourning; for my master’s heart is full of grief.”

A solemn serenity appeared to surround the whole
place, It was only interrupted by the breeze passing
DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 43

through the large elm-trees which stood near the house,
which my imagination indulged itself in thinking were
plaintive sighs of sorrow. I gently opened the door; no
one appeared, and all was still silent.. The soldier fol-
lowed; we came to the foot of the stairs.

“They are come,” said a voice, which I knew to be the
father’s ; “ they are come.” |

He appeared at the top; I gave him my hand and said
nothing. On entering the room above, I saw the
mother and her son — the much-loved daughter
and sister; the son’s wife sat weeping in a window-seat
with a child on her lap; two or three persons attended in
the room to discharge any office which friendship or ne-
cessity might require.

I sat down by the bedside. The mother could not
weep, but now and then sighed deeply, as she alternately
looked at Elizabeth and atme. The if tear rolled down
the brother’s cheek, and testified an affectionate regard.
The good old man stood at the foot of the bed, leanin
upon the post, and unable to take his eyes off the child
from whom he was soon to part.

Elizabeth’s eyes were closed, and as yet she perceived
me not. But over: her face, though pale, sunk, and hol-
low, the peace of God, which passeth all understanding,
had cast a triumphant calm,

The soldier, after a short pause, silently reached out
his Bible toward me, pointing with his finger at 1 Cor.
xv. 55, 56, 58. I then broke silence b PP the pas-
sage, “ O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is
thy victory? The sting of death is sin, and the strength
of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, who giveth us
the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ,”

At the sound of these words her eyes opened, and
something like a ray of divine light beamed on her coun-
tenance, as she said, “ Victory! victory! through our Lord
Jesus Christ.” |

She relapsed again, taking no further notice of any one

resent, } ;
. “God be praised for the triumph of faith,” I said.
44 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

“ Amen,” replied the soldier.

The Dairyman’s uplifted eye showed that the Amen
was in his heart, though his tongue failed to utter it.

A short struggling or breath took place in the dying
oung woman, which was soon over, and then | said to
er,

“My dear friend, do you not feel that you are sup-

ported ?”

“The Lord deals very gently with me,” she replied.

“ Are not his promises now very precious to you ?”

“They are all yea and amen in Christ Jesus.”

“ Are you in much bodily pain?”

“ So little that I almost forget it!”

“How good the Lord is!”

“ And how unworthy am I!”

“ You are going to see him as he is.”

ag Shdinn E hone-ol believe that I am.”

She again fell into a short slumber.

Looking at her mother, I said, “ What a mercy to have
a child so near heaven as yours is!” ,

“And what a mercy,” she replied in broken accents,
“if her poor old mother might but followher there! But,
Sir, it is so hard to ,

“T hope, through grace, by faith, you will soon meet,
to part no more ; it will be but a little while.”

“ Sir,” said the Dairyman, “ that thought supports me,
and the Lord’s goodness makes me feel more reconciled
than I was.”

“ Father....mother....” said the reviving daughter, “he
is good to me.....trust him, praise him evermore.”

“Sir,” added she in a faint voice, “I want to thank you
for your kindness to me....[ want to ask a favor.,..you
buried my sister....will you do the same for me?”

“ All shall be as you wish, if God permit,” I replied.

“ Thank you, Sir, thank you....1 have another favor to
ask....When I am gone, remember my father and mother.
They are old, but I hope the good work. is begun in their
souls.,..My prayers are heard....Pray come and see them
DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 45

1 cannot speak much, but I want to speak for their
sakes..,.Sir, remember them.”

The aged parents now sighed and sobbed aloud, utter.
ing broken sentences, and gained some relief by such an
expression of their feelings. gx ‘bo

At length I said to Elizabeth, “Do you experience any
omy or temptations on the subject of your eternal

ety ?

“No, Sir; the Lord deals very gently with me, and
gives me peace.”

“ What are your views of the dark valley of death, now
that you are passing through it?”

“Tt is not dark.”

“ Why so?” |

“ My Lord is there, and he is my light and my salva.
tion.”

“ Have you any fears of more bodily suffering?”

“The Lord deals so gently with me, I can trust him.”

Something of a convulsion came on. When it was
past, she said again and again,

“The Lord deals very gently with me. Lord, I am
thine, save me.....Blessed Jesus.....Precious Saviour.....His
blood cleanseth from all sin....Who shall separate 2....His
name is Wonderful....Thanks be to God....He giveth us
the victory....1, even I, am saved...0 grace, mercy, and
wonder—Lord, receive my spirit! |

“ Dear Sir....Dear father, mother, friends, I am going...
but all is well, well, well “wi .

She relapsed again—We knelt down to prayer. The

rd was in the midst of us and blessed us.

She did not again revive while I remained, nor ever
speak any more words which could be understood. She
slumbered for about ten hours, and at last sweetly fell
asleep in the arms of the Lord, who had dealt so gently
with her.

I left the house an hour after she had ceased to speak.
I pressed her hand as I was taking leave, and said,
“ Christ is the resurrection and the life.”

She gently returned the pressure, but could neither


46 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

open her eyes nor utter areply. I never had witnessed
a scene so impressive as this before. It completely filled
my imagination as I returned home. ‘

“ Farewell,” thought I, “dear friend, till the morning
of an eternal day shall renew our personal intercourse, .
Thou wast a brand plucked from the burning, that thou
mightest become a star shining in the firmament of glory.
I have seen thy light, and thy good works, and f will
therefore glorify our Father which is in heaven, I have
seen in thy example what it is to be a sinner freely saved
by grace. I have learned from thee, as in a living mirror,
who it is that begins, continues, and ends the work of
faith and love. Jesus is all in all; he will and shall be
glorified. He won the crown, and alone deserves to wear
it, May no one attempt to rob him of his glory; he
saves, and saves to the uttermost. Farewell, dear sister
in the Lord. Thy flesh and thy heart may fail, but God
is the strength of thy heart, and shall thy portion
forever.” \

I was soon called to attend the funeral of my friend, who
breathed her last shortly after my visit. Many pleasing
yet melancholy thoughts were connected with the fulfil-
ment of this task.. | retraced the numerous and important
conversations which I had held with her. But these could
now no longer be held on earth. I reflected on the inter-
esting and improving nature of Christian friendships,
whether formed in palaces or in cottages ; and felt thank-
ful that I had so long enjoyed that privilege with the
subject of this memorial. I indulged a sigh for a moment,
on thinking that I could no longer hear the great truths
of Christianity uttered by one who had drunk so deep of
the waters of life. But the rising murmur was checked
by the animating thought, “ She is gone to eternal rest—
could I wish to bring her back to this vale of tears ?”

As [ travelled onward to the house where lay her re-
mains in solemn preparation for the grave, the first sound
of a tolling bell struck my ear. It proceeded from a
village church in the valley directly beneath the ridge of
DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 47

a high hill, over which I had taken my way—it was Eliz-
abeth’s funeral knell. It was a solemn sound, but it
seemed to proclaim at once the blessedness of the dead
whe die in the Lord, and the necessity of the living pon-
dering these things, and laying them to heart.

The scenery was in unison with that tranquil frame of
mind which is most suitable for holy meditation. A rich
and fruitful valley lay immediately beneath; it was
adorned with corn-fields and pastures, through which a
small river winded in a variety of directions, and many
herds grazed upon its banks. A fine range of opposite
hills, covered with grazing flocks, terminated with a bold
sweep into the ocean, whose blue waves appeared at a
distance beyond. Several villages, hamlets, and churches
were scattered in the valley. The noble mansions of the
rich, and the lowly cottages of the — added their re-
spective features to the landscape: ‘The air was mild, and
the declining sun occasioned a beautiful interchange of
light and shade upon the sides of the hills. In the midst
of this scene the chief sound that arrested attention was
the bell tolling for the funeral of the Dairyman’s daugh-
ter.

Do any of my readers inquire why I describe so mi-
nutely the cireumstances of prospect scenery which may
be connected with the incidents I relate? My reply is,
that the God of redemption is the God of creation like.
wise ; and that we are taught in every part of the Word
of God to unite the admiration of the beauties and won-
ders of nature to every other motive for devotion. When
David considered the heavens, the work of God’s fingers,
the moon and the stars, which he has adorned, he was
thereby led to the deepest humiliation of heart before his
Maker. And when he. viewed the sheep, and the oxen,
and the beasts of the field, the fowl of the air, and the
fish of the sea, he was constrained to ery out, “O Lord,
our Lord; how excellent is thy name in all the earth !”

I am the poor man’s friend, and wish more especially
that every poor rs should know how to con-
nect the goodness of in creation and providence
48 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

with the unsearchable riches of his grace in the salvation
of a sinner. And where can he learn this lesson more
instructively than in looking around the fields where his
labor is appointed, and there tracing the handy-work of
God in all that he beholds? Such meditations have often
afforded me both profit and pleasure, and I wish my
readers to share them with me.

The Dairyman’s cottage was rather more than a mile
distant from the church. A lane, quite overshaded with
trees and high hedges, led from the foot of the hill to his
dwelling. lt was impossible at that time to overlook the
_ suitable gloom of such an approach to the house of
mourning.

I found, on my entrance, that several Christian friends
from different parts of the neighborhood had assembled
together to pay their last tribute of esteem and regard to
the memory of the Dairyman’s daughter. Several of
them had first become acquainted with her during the
latter stage of her illness; some few had maintained an
affectionate intercourse with her for.alonger period. But
all seemed anxious to manifest their respect for one who
was endeared to them by such striking testimonials of
true Christianity. |

It is not easy to describe the sensation which the mind
experiences on the first sight of a dead countenance,
which, when living, was loved and esteemed for the sake
of that soul which used to give it animation. A deep
and awful view of the separation that has taken place
between the soul and body of the deceased since we last
beheld them, occupies the feelings; our friend seems to
be both near, and yet far off. The most interesting and
valuable part is fled away; what remains is but the
earthly perishing habitation no longer occupied by its
tenant. Yetthe features present the accustomed associa-
tion of friendly intercourse. For one moment we could
think them asleep; the next reminds us that the blood
circulates no more—the eye has lost its power of seeing,
the ear of hearing, the heart of throbbing, and the limbs
of moving. Quickly a thought of glory breaks in upon


DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER. 49

the mind, and we imagine the dear departed soul to be
arrived at its long-wished-for rest. It is surrounded by
cherubim and seraphim, and sings the song of Moses and
the Lamb on Mount Zion. Amid the solemn stillness of
the chamber of death, imagination hears heavenly hymns
chanted by the spirits of just men made perfect. In
another moment the livid lips and sunken eye of the
clay-cold corpse recall our thoughts to earth and to our-
selves again. And while we think of mortality, sin,
death, and the grave, we feel the prayer rise in our bosom,
“© let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last
end be like his!”

If there be a moment when Christ and salvation, death,
judgment, heaven, and hell, appear more than ever to be
momentous subjects of meditation, it is that which
brings us to the side of a coffin containing. the body of a
departed believer.

Elizabeth’s features were altered, but much of her like-
ness remained. Her father and mother sat at the head,
her brother at the foot of the coffin, manifesting their
deep and unfeigned sorrow. The weakness and ho
of old age added a character to the parents’ grief, whic
called for much tenderness and compassion.

A remarkably decent-looking woman, who had the
management of the few simple though solemn ceremonies
which the ease required, advanced towards me, saying

“ Sir, this is rather a sight of joy than of sorrow. Our
dear friend Elizabeth finds it to be so, I have no doubt.
She is beyond alfsorrow. Do you not think she is, Sir ?”

“After what I have known, and seen, and heard,” I
replied, “I feel the fullest assurance, that while her body
remains here, her soul is with her Saviour in Paradise.
She loved him here, and there she enjoys the pleasures
which are at his right hand for evermore.”

“ Mercy, merey upon a poor old creature almost broken
down with age and grief, what shall Ido? Betsy’s gone
—my daughter’s dead. Oh! my child, I shall never see
thee more! God be merciful to me a sinner!” sobbed
out the poor mother.

d
50 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“'That last prayer, my dear good woman,” said I, “will
bring you together again. It is a cry that has brought
thousands to glory. It brought your daughter thither,
and I hope it will bring you there likewise. He will in
no wise cast out any that come to him.”

“ My dear,” said the Dairyman, breaking the long si-
lence he had maintained, “let us trust God with our
child, and let us trust him with our own selves. The Lord
gave, and the Lord has taken away ; blessed be the name
of the Lord! We are old, and can have but a little far-
ther to travel in our journey, and then”—he could say no
more.

The soldier before mentioned reached a Bible into my
hand, and _ said, “ Perhaps, Sir, you would not object to
reading a chapter before we go to the church.”

I did so; it was the fourteenth of the book of Job. A
sweet tranquillity prevailed while Iread it. Each minute
that was spent in this funeral-chamber seemed to be val-
uable. I made a few observations on the chapter, and
connected them with the case of our departed sister.

“Tam but a poor soldier,” said our military friend,
“and have ne of this world’s goods beyond my daily
subsistence; but | would not exchange my hope of sal-
vation in the next world for all that this world could
bestow without it. What is wealth without grace?
Blessed be God, as I march about from one quarter to
another, I still find the Lord wherever I go; and thanks
be to his holy name, he is here to-day in the midst of this
company of the living and the dead. I feel that itis good
to be here.” |

Some other persons present began to take a part in
the conversation, in the course of which the life and ex-
perience of the Dairyman’s Daughter were brought for-
ward in a very interesting manner; each friend had
something to relate in testimony of her gracious disposi-
tion. One distant relative, a young woman under twenty,
who had hitherto been a very light and trifling character,
appeared to be remarkably impressed by the conversation
of that day; and I have since had ground to believe that


DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 51

divine grace then began to influence her in the choice of
that better part, which shall not be taken from her,

What a contrast does such a sceneas this exhibit, when
compared with the dull, formal, unedifying, and often
indecent manner in which funeral parties assemble in the
house of death!

But the time for departure to the church was now at
hand. I went to take my last look at the deceased.
There was much written on her countenance: she had
evidently departed with a smile. It still remained, and
spoke the tranquillity of her departing soul. According
to the custom of the place, she was decorated with leaves
and flowers in the coffin: these indeed were fading flow-
ers, but they reminded me of that Paradise whose flowers
are immortal, and where her never-dying soul is at rest.

I remembered the last words which I had heard her
speak, and was instantly struck with the happy thought,
that “death was indeed swallowed up in victory.”

As I slowly retired, I said inwardly, “Peace, my hon-
ored sister, to thy memory, and to my soul, till we meet
in a better world.”

In a little time the procession formed: it was rendered
the more interesting by the consideration of so many that
followed the coffin being persons of truly serious and
spiritual character.

After we had advanced about a hundred yards my
meditation was unexpectedly and most agreeably inter-
rupted by the friends who followed the family beginning
to sing a funeral Psalm. Nothing could be more sweet
or Solemn. ‘The well-known effect of the open air in
softening and blending the sounds of music was here pe-
culiarly felt. ‘The road through which we passed was
beautiful and romantic: it lay at the foot of a hill, which
occasionally re-echoed the voices of the singers, and
seemed to give faint replies to the notes of the mourners.
The funeral knell was distinctly heard from the church
tower, and greatly increased the effect which this simple
and becoming service produced.

I cannot describe the state of my own mind as pecu-
52 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

liarly connected with the solemn singing. I never wit-
nessed a similar instance before or since. I was reminded
of elder times and ancient piety, 1 wished the practice
more frequent. It seems well calculated to excite and
cherish devotion and religious affections.

We at length arrived at the church. The service was
heard with deep and affectionate attention. When we
came to the grave, the hymn which Elizabeth had select-
ed was sung. All was devout, simple, decent, animating.
We committed our dear friend’s body to the grave, in full
hope of a joyful resurrection from the dead.

hus was the veil of separation drawn for a season.
She is departed and no more seen. But she will be seen
at the right hand of her Redeemer at the last day ; and
will again appear to his glory, a miracle of grace and a
monument of mercy.

My reader, rich or poor, shall you and I appear there
likewise? Are we “clothed with humility,” and arrayed
in the wedding-garment of a Redeemer’s righteousness ?
Are we turned from idols to serve the living God?
we sensible of our own emptiness, flying to a Saviour’s
fulness to obtain grace and strength? Do we live in him,
and on him, and by him, and with him? Is he our all in
all? Are we“ lost and found ?” “dead and alive again ?”

My poor reader, the Dairyman’s daughter was a poor
“aed ee the child of a poor man. Herein thou resemblest

er: but dost thou resemble her as she resembled Christ?
Art thou made rich by faith? Hast thou a crown laid
up for thee? Is thine heart set upon heavenly riches !
If not, read this story once more, and then pray earnestly
for like precious faith. If, through grace, thou dost love
and serve the Redeemer that saved the Dairyman’s
daughter, grace, peace, and mercy be with thee. The
lines ure fallen unto thee in pleasant places: thou hast a
goodly heritage. Press forward in duty, and wait upon
the Lord, possessing thy soul in holy patience. Thou
hast just been with me to the grave of a departed believer.
Now “go thy way till the end be; for thou shalt rest,
and stand in thy lot at the end of the days.” Dan. xii. 13.
DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, 53

Nore. The mother died about six months after her
daughter, and I have good reason to believe that God was
merciful to her, and took her to himself. May every
converted child thus labor and pray for the salvation of
their unconverted parents. The father continued for
some time after her, and adorned his old with a walk
and conversation becoming the Gospel. 1 cannot doubt
that the daughter and both her parents are now met to-
gether in “the land of pure delights, where saints immor-
tal reign,”

THE
AFRICAN SERVANT:

AN AUTHENTIC NARRATIVE.

BY REV. LEGH RICHMOND.


a
. THE
4

“AFRICAN SERVANT.

Durine a residence of some years’ continuance in the
neighborhood of the sea, an officer in the navy called
upon me and stated that he had just taken a lodging in
the parish for his wife and children, and that he an
African whom he had kept three years in his service.
“The lad is a deserving fellow,” said the officer, “and
he has a great desire to be baptized; I have promised
him to ask you to do it for him, if you have no objec-
tions.” |

“ Does he know anything,” I replied, “ of the principles
of the Christian religion ?”

“Q yes, 1 am sure he does,” answered the captain;
“for he talks a great deal about it in the kitchen, and
often gets laughed at for his pains; but he takes it all
very patiently.”

* Does he well as your servant ?”

“ Yes, that he does: he is as honest and civil a fellow
as ever came aboard a ship, or lived in a house.”

“ Was he always so well behaved ?” .

“No,” said the officer; “when I first had him he was
often very unruly and deceitful; but for the last two
years he has been quite like another creature.”

“ Well, Sir, I shall be very glad to see him, and think
it probable I shall wish to go through a course of in-
60 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

struction and examination; during which I shall be able
to form a judgment how far it will be right to admit him
to the ordinance of baptism. Can he read ?”

“ Yes,” replied his master; “ he has been taking great
pains to learn to read for some time past, and can make
out a chapter in thé Bible pretty well, as my maid-servant
informs me. He speaks English better than many of his
countrymen, but you will find it a little broken. When
will it be convenient ‘that I should send him over to
you?”

“To-morrow afternoon, Sir, if you please.”

“He shall come to you about four o'clock, and you
shall see what you can make of him.”

With this promise he took his leave. I felt glad of an
opportunity of instructing a native of that land whose
wrongs and injuries had often caused me to sigh and
mourn.

. At the appointed hour my African disciple arrived. He
was a very young-looking man, with a sensible, lively,and
pleasing turn of countenance.

I desired him to sit down, and said, “ Your master in-
forms me that you wish to have some conversation with
me respecting Christian baptism ?”

“Yes, Sir, me very much wish to be a Christian.”

“ Why do you wish so?”

“ Because me know that Christian go to heaven when
he die.”

“ How long have you had that wish?” I said.

“Ever since me hear one good minister preach in
America two years ago.”

“ Where were you born ?”

“In Africa. Me was a very little boy when me was
made slave by the white men.

“ How was that ?”

“ Me left father and mother one day at home to go to
get shells by the sea-shore ; ‘and, as I wasstooping down
to U arword them up, some white sailors came out of a boat
and took me away. Me never see father nor mother
again. .
AFRICAN SERVANT. ‘61

“ And what became of you then ?”

“Me was put into a ship and brought to Jamaica, and
sold to a massa, who kept me in his house to serve
him some years; when, about three years ago, Captain
W—, my massa that spoke to you, bought me to be
his servant on board his ship. And he be good massa;
and me live with him ever since.” :

“ And what thoughts had you about your soul all that
time before you went to America?” | asked him.

“ Me no care for my soul at all before then. No man
teach me a word about my soul.”

“Well, now tell me farther about what happened to
you in America. How came you there!”

“My massa take me there in a ship, and he stop there
one month; and then me hear the good minister.”

“ And what did that minister say ?”

“ He said me was a great sinner.”

“ What, did he speak to you in particular?”

“Yes, me think so; for there were a great many to
hear him, but he tell them all about me.”

“ What did he say ?”

“He say all about the things that were in my heart.”

“ What things ?”

“My sin, my ignorance, my know nothing, my believe
nothing. The good minister made me see that me think
nothing good, nor do nothing good.”

“ And what else did he tell you ?”

“He sometime look me in the face, and say, that Jesus
Christ came to die for sinners, poor black sinners as well
as white sinners. Me thought this was very good, very
good indeed, to do so for wicked sinner.”

“And what made you think this was all spoken to you
in particular ?”

“ Because me sure no wicked sinner as me in all the
place. The good minister must know me was there.”

“ And what, did you think about yourself while he
preached about Jesus Christ ?” )

“ Sir, me was very much afraid when he said the wick-
ed must be turned into hell fire. For me felt that me

a 6 _
62 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

was very wicked sinner, and that make mecry. And he
talk much about the love of Christ to sinners, and that
make me cry more. And me thought that me must love
Jesus Christ ; but me not know how, and that make me
cry nn '

“Did you hear more sermons than one during that
month ?” |

“Yes, Sir; massa give me leave to go three times, and
all the times me wanted to love Jesus more, and do
what Jesus said; but my heart seem sometime hard like
a stone.”

“ Have you ever heard any preaching since that time ?”

“ Never, till me hear sermon at this church last Sunday,
and then me long to be baptized in Jesus’ name.”

“ And what have been your thoughts all the time since
you first heard those sermons in America; did you tell
anybody then what you felt?”

“No; me speak to nobody but to God. The good
minister say that God hear the cry of the poor; so me
ery to God, and he hear me. And me often think about
Jesus Christ, and wish to be like him.”

“Can you read %”

“ A little.”

“Who taught you to read ?”

“God teach me to read,”

“What do you mean by saying so?”

“God give me desire to read, and that make reading
easy. Massa give me Bible, and one sailor slow me the
letters; and so me learn to read by myself with God’s
good help.” )

“ And what do you read in the Bible ?”

“O me read all about Jesus Christ, and how he loved
sinners; and wicked men killed him, and he died and
came again from the grave, and all this for poor negro.
And it sometimes make me ery, to think that Christ love
80 poor ym ry
d what do the people say about your reading and
praying, and attention to the things of God?”

“Some wicked people, that do not love Jesus Christ,
AFRICAN SERVANT, 63

call me great fool, and negro dog, and black hypocrite.
And that make me sometime feel angry; but then me
remember Christian must not be angry. Jesus Christ
was called ugly black names, and he was quiet as a lamb;
and so then me remember Jesus Christ, and me say
nothing again to them.”

I was much delighted with the simplicity and apparent
sincerity of this poor African; and wished to ascertain
what measure of light and feeling he possessed on a few
leading points. St. Paul’s summary of religion* occur-
ring to me, I said, * Tell me what is faith? What is your
own faith? What do you believe about Jesus Christ and
your own soul ?”

“Me believe,” said he, “that Jesus Christ came into
the world to save sinners; and though me be chief of
sinners, Jesus will save me, though me be only poor black
ne ”

“What is your hope? What do you hope for, both as
to this life and that which is to come ?”

“ Me hope Christ Jesus will take good care of me, and
keep me from sin and harm, while me live here: and me
hope, when me come to die, to go and live with him
always, and never die again.”

“What are your thoughts about Christian love or
charity? I mean, whom and what do you most love?”

“ Me love God the Father, because he was so good to
send his Son. Me love Jesus Christ, because he die for
poor sinner. Me love all men, black men and white
men too; for God made themall. Me love good Chris-
— people, because Jesus love them, and they love

esus.”

Such was my first conversation with this young disci-
ple; I rejoiced in the prospect of receiving him into the
church, agreeably to his desire. I wished, however, to
converse somewhat further, and inquire more minutely
into his conduct ; and promised to ride over and see him
in a few days, at his master’s lodgings.

_ * Now abideth faith, hope, charity; these three: but the greatest of
theee is charity. 1 Cor. xiii. 1,
64 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

When he was gone, I thought within myself, God hath

indeed redeemed souls, by the blood of his Son, “ out of |

kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation.” | It

is a happy thought, that “Ethiopia shall soon stretch

forth her hands unto God. Sing unto God, ye kingdoms
of the earth, O sing praises unto the Lord!”

Not many days after the first. interview with my Afri-
ean disciple, ] went from home on horseback with the
design of visiting and conversing with him again at his
master’s house, which was situated in a part of the parish
near four miles distant from my own. The road which
I took lay over a lofty down or hill, which commands a
prospect of scenery seldom equalled for beauty and mag-
nificence. It gave birth to silent, but instructive contem-
plation..-

The down itself was covered with sheep, grazing on
its wholesome and plentiful pasture. Here and there a
shepherd’s boy kept his appointed station, and watched
over the flock committed to his care. I viewed it as an
emblem of my own situation and employment. Adjoin-
ing the hill lay an extensive parish, wherein many souls
were given me to watch over, and render an account of,
at the day of the great Shepherd’s appearing. The pas-
toral scene before me seemed to be a living parable, il-
lustrative of my own spiritual charge. I felt a prayerful
wish that the good Shepherd, who gave his life for the
sheep, might enable me to be faithful to my trust,

It occurred to me about the same time, that my youn
African friend was a sheep of another more distant fol
which Christ will yet bring to hear his voice. For there
shall be one fold and one Shepherd, and all nations shall
be brought to acknowledge that he alone “restoreth our
souls, and Jeadeth us into the paths of righteousness for
his name’s sake.” On the left hand of the hill, as I ad-
vanced eastward, and immediately under its declivity,
extended a beautiful tract of land intersected by a large
arm of the sea, which (as the tide was fast flowing in)
formed a broad lake or haven of three miles in length.
AFRICAN SERVANT. 65

Woods, villages, cottages, and churches, surrounded it in
most pleasing variety of prospect. Beyond this lay a
large fleet of ships of war, and not far from it another of
merchantmen, both safe at anchor, and covering a tract
of the sea of several miles inextent. Beyond this again,
I saw the fortifications, dock-yards, and extensive public
edifices of a large seaport town. The sun shone upon
the windows of the buildings and the flags of the —
with great brightness, and added much to the splendor
of the view.

I thought of the concerns of empires, the plans of
statesmen, the fate of nations, and the horrors of war.
- Happy will be that day, when He shall make wars to
cease unto the end of the earth, and peace to be estab-
lished on its borders !

On my right hand, to the south and south-east, the
unbounded ocean displayed its mighty waves. It was
covered with vessels of every size, sailing in all directions ;
some outward-bound to the most distant parts of the
world ; others, after a long voyage, returning home laden
with the produce of remote climes. |

At the south-west of the spot on which I was riding,
extended a beautiful semi-circular bay of about nine or
ten miles in circumference, bounded by high tliffs of
white, red, and brown-colored earths. yond this lay
a range of hills, whose tops are often buried. in cloudy
mists, but which then appeared clear and distinct. This
chain of hills, meeting with another from the north,
bounds a large fruitful vale, whose fields, now ripe for
harvest, proclaimed the goodness of God in the ok ome
vision which he makes for the sons of men. It is he who
“prepares the corn; he crowns the year with his good-
ness, and his paths drop fatness. They drop upon the
pastures of the wilderness, and the little hills rejoice on
every side. The pastures are clothed with flocks; the
valleys are also covered over with corn: they shout for
joy, they also sing.”

As I pursued the meditations which this magnificent
and varied scenery —" in my mind, I approached the
66 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

edge of a tremendous perpendicular cliff with which the
down terminates ; I dismounted from my horse and tied
ittoabush. The breaking of the waves against the foot
of the cliff, at so great a distance beneath me, produced
an incessant and pleasing murmur. The sea-gulls were
flying between the top of the cliff where I stood and the
rocks below, attending upon their nests built in the holes
of the cliff. The whole scene, in every direction, was

rand and impressive; it was suitable to devotion. The

reator appeared in the works of his creation, and called
upon the creature to honor and adore, To the believer
this exercise is doubly delightful. He possesses a right
to the enjoyments of nature and providence, as well as to
the privileges of grace. His title-deed runs thus: “ All
things are yours, whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas,
or the world, or things present, or things to come; all
are yours, and ye are Christ’s, and Christ is God's.”

I cast my eye downwards a little to the left, towards a
small cove, the shore of which consists of fine hard sand.
It is surrounded by fragments of rock, chalk cliffs, and
steep banks of broken earth, Shut out from human in-
tercourse and dwellings, it seems formed for retirement
and contemplation. one of these rocks I unexpect-
edly observed a man sitting with a book which he was
reading. The place was near two hundred yards perpen-
dicularly below me ; but I soon discovered by his dress,
and by the black color of his features, contrasted with
the white rocks beside him, that it was no other than my

African disciple, with, as I doubted not, a Bible in his |

hand, I rejoiced at this unlooked-for opportunity of
meeting him in so solitary and interesting a situation. I

descended a steep bank, winding by a kind of rude stair- |
case, formed by fishermen and shepherd’s boys, in the |

side of the cliff down to the shore.

He was intent on his book, and did not perceive me
till I approached very near to him.

“ William, is that you?”

“ Ah! massa, me very glad to see you. How came


AFRICAN SERVANT. 67

massa into this place? Me thought nobody here but
only God and me.” ,

“] was coming to your master’s house to see and you
rode round by this way for the sake of the prospect.
often come here in fine weather to look at the sea and
the shipping. Is that your Bible ?”

“ Yes, Sir, this is my dear good Bible.”

“T am glad,” said I, “to see you so well employed ; it
is a good sign, William.”

“ Yes, massa, a sign that God is good to me; but me
never good to God.’

“ How so ?”

“Me never thank him enough, me never pray to him
enough; me never remember enough who give me all
these things. Massa, me afraid my heart very bad. Me
wish me was like you.”

“Like me, William? Why, you are like me, a poor
helpless sinner, that must, like yourself, perish in his
sins, unless God of his infinite mercy and grace pluck
him as a brand from the burning, and make him an in-
stance of distinguishing love and favor. There is no
difference ; we have both come short of the glory of God:
all have sinned.”

“No, me no like you, massa; me think nobody like
me, nobody feel such a heart as me.”

“Yes, William, your feelings, I am persuaded, are like
those of every truly convinced soul who sees the exceed-
ing sinfulness of sin, and the greatness of the price which
Christ Jesus paid for the sinner’s ransom. You can say
in the words of the hymn,

“T the chief of sinners am,
But Jesus died for me.”

“O yes, Sir, me believe that Jesus died for poor negro.
What would become of poor wicked negro, if Christ no
die for him? But he die for the chief of sinners, and
that make my heart sometime quite glad.”

“What part of the Bible were you reading, William ?”

“Me read how the man on the cross spoke to Christ,
68 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

and Christ spoke to him. Now that man’s prayer just
do for me. ‘Lord,remember me ;’ Lord, remember poor
negro sinner: this is my prayer every morning, and some-
time at night too: when me cannot think of many words
then me say the same again, Lord, remember poor negro
sinner.”

“ And be assured, William, the Lord hears that prayer.
He pardoned and accepted the thief upon the cross, and
he will not reject you; he will in no wise cast out any
that come to him.”

“No, Sir, I believe it; but there is so much sin in my
heart, it make me afraid, and sorry. Massa, do you see
these limpets,* how fast they stick to the rocks here?
Just so sin stick fast to my heart.”

“Tt may be so, William ; but take another comparison :
do you cleave to Jesus Christ by faith in his death and —
righteousness, as those limpets cleave to the” rock, and
neither seas nor storms shall separate you from his
love.” ) :

# That is just what me want.”

“Tell me, William, is not that very sin, which you
speak of, a burden to you? You do not love it: you
would be glad to obtain strength against it, and to be
freed from it, would you not?”

“QO yes; me give all the world, if me had it, to be
without sin.”,

“ Come, then,'and welcome, to Jesus Christ, my broth-
er; his blood cleanseth from all sin. He gave himself
as a ransom for sinners, He hath borne our griefs and
carried our sorrows. He was wounded for our trans-
gressions; he was bruised for our iniquities; the chas-
tisement of our peace was upon him, and with his stripes
we are healed. The Lord hath laid on him the iniquity
of us all. Come, freely come to Jesus, the Saviour of
sinners.”

“ Yes, massa,” said the poor fellow weeping, “ me will
come, but me come very slow; very slow, massa; me

* A kind of shell-fish which abounds in the place where we were, and
which sticks to the rocks with great force.
AFRICAN SERVANT. 69

want to run, me want to fly. Jesus is very good to poor
negro, to send you to tell him all this.”

“But this is not the first time you have heard these
truths.”

“No, Sir, they have been comfort to my soul many
times since mé hear good minister preach in America, as
me tell you last week at your house.”

“ Well, now I hope, William, that since God has been
so graciously pleased to open your eyes, and affect. your
mind with such a great sense of his goodness, in giving
his Son to die for your sake; I hope that you do your
endeavor to keep his commandments; I hope you strive
to behave well to your master and mistress, and fellow-
servants. He that is a Christian inwardly, will be a
Christian outwardly ; he that truly and savingly believes
in Christ, will show his faith by his works, as the Apos-
tle says. Is it not so, William ””’

“Yes, Sir, me want to do so. Me want to be faithful.
Me sorry to think how bad servant me was before the
good things of Jesus Christ come to my heart. Me wish
to do ob te my massa, when he see me, and when he
not see me, for me know God always see me. Me know
that if me sin against my own massa, me sin against God,
and God be very angry with me. Besides, how can me
love Christ, if me do not do what Christ tell me? Me
love my fellow-servants, though as me tell you before,
they do not much love me, and J pray God to bless them.
And when they say bad things, and try to make me
angry, then me think, if Jesus Christ were in poor negro’s
place, he would not revile and answer n with bad
words and temper, but he say little, and pray much.
And so then me say nothing at all, but pray God to for-
give them.”

The more I conversed with this African convert, the
more satisfactory were the evidences of his mind being
spiritually enlightened, and his heart effectually wrought
upon by the grace of God.

The circumstances of the place in which we met to-
gether, contributed much to the interesting effect which
710 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

the conversation produced on my mind. The little cove
or bay was beautiful in the extreme. The air was calm
and serene. ‘The sun shone, but we were sheltered from
its rays by the cliffs. One of these was stupendously
lofty and large. It was white as snow: its summit hun
directly over our heads. The sea-fow} were flying aroun
it. Its whiteness was occasionally chequered with dark
green masses of samphire, which grew there. On the
other side, and behind us, was a more ual declivity
of many-colored earths, interspersed with green patches
of grass and bushes, and little streams of water trickling
down the bank, and mingling with the sea at the bottom.
At our feet the waves were advancing over shelves of
rocks covered with great variety of sea-weeds, which
swam in little fragments, and displayed much beauty and
elegance of form, as they were successively thrown upon
the sand.

Ships of war and commerce were seen at different dis-
tances. Fishermen were plying their trade in boats
nearer to the shore. The noise of the flowing tide, com-
bined with the voices of the sea-gulls over our heads,
and now and then a distant gun fired from the ships as
they passed along, added much to the peculiar sensations
to which the scene gave birth. Occasionally the striking
of oars upon the waves, accompanied by the boatmen’s
song, met the ear. The sheep aloft upon the down
sometimes mingled their bleatings with the other sounds.
Thus all nature seemed to unite in impressing an atten-
tive observer’s heart with affecting thoughts.

I continued for a considerable time in conversation
with the African, finding that his master was gone from
home for the day, and had given him liberty for some
hours. I spoke to him on the nature, duty, and privilege
of Christian baptism; pointed out to him the principles
of the Scriptures upon that head, and found that he
was very desirous of conforming to them. He appear-
ed to me to be well qualified for receiving that pledge
of his Redeemer’s love; and I rejoiced in the prospect
of beholding him no longer a “stranger and foreign-
AFRICAN SERVANT, 71

er, but a fellow-citizen with the saints and household of
God.”

I was much pleased with the affectionate manner in
which he spoke of his parents, from whom he had been
stolen in his childhood; and his wishes that God might
direct them by some means to the knowledge of the
Saviour.

“Who knows,” I said, “ but some of these ships may
be carrying a missionary to the country where they live,
to declare the good news of salvation to your country-
men, and to your own dear parents in particular, if they
are yet. alive.”

“Q! my dear father and mother: my dear, gracious
Saviour,” exclaimed he, leaping from the ned he
spake, “if thou wilt but save their souls, and tell them
what thou hast done for sinners—but—”

He stopped, and seemed much affected.

“My friend,” said I, “I will now pray with you for
your own soul, and those of your parents also.”

* Do, massa, that is very good and kind; do pray for
poor negro souls here and everywhere.”

This was a new and solemn “house of prayer.” The
sea-sand was our floor, the heavens were our roof, the
cliffs, the rocks, the hills, and the waves, formed the walls
of our chamber. It was not indeed a “place where
prayer was wont to be made,” but for this once it became
a hallowed spot: it will by me ever be remembered as
such. The presence of God was there.—I prayed.—The
African wept. His heart was full. I felt with him, and
could not but weep likewise.

The last day will show whether our tears were not the
tears of sincerity and Christian love.

It was time for my return; I leaned upon his arm, as
we ascended the steep cliff in my way back to my horse,
which I had left at the top of the hill. Humility and
thankfulness were marked in his countenanee. I leaned
upon his arm with the feelings of a brother. It was a re-
lationship I was happy to own. I took him by the hand
at parting, appointed one more interview previous to the
72 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

present.
“ God bless you, my dear massa.”
“ And you, my fellow-Christian, forever and ever.”

day of baptizing him, and bade him farewell for the

The interesting and affecting conversation which I had
with the African servant, produced a sensation not easy
to be expressed. As I returned home I was led into
meditation on the singular clearness and beauty of those
evidences of faith and conversion of heart to God which
I had just seen and heard. How plainly, I thought, it
— that salvation is freely by grace, through faith ;
and that not of ourselves; it is the gift of God; not of
works, lest any man should boast. t but the Holy
Spirit, who is the Author and Giver of the life of grace,
could have wrought such a change from the once dark,
perverse, and ignorant heathen, to this now convinced,
enlightened, humble, and believing Christian? . How
manifestly is the uncontrolled sovereignty of the divine
will exercised in the calling and translating of sinners
from darkness to light! What a lesson may the nomi-
nal Christian of a civilized country sometimes learn from
the simple, sincere religion of a converted heathen!

I afterwards made particular inquiry into this youn
man’s domestic and general deportment. Everything 1
heard was satisfactory; nor could J entertain a doubt
respecting the consistency of his conduct and. character.
I had some further conversations with him, in the course
of which I pursued such a plan of scriptural instruction
and examination as I coneeived to be the most suitable
to his progressive state of mind, He improved much in
reading, carried his Bible constantly in his pocket, and
took every opportunity which his duty to his master’s
service would allow, for perusing it. I have frequently
had occasion to observe, that among the truly religious
poor, who have not had the advantage of learning to read
in early youth, a concern about the soul, and desire to
know the Word of God, have proved effectual motives
for their learning to read with great ease and advantage
AFRICAN SERVANT. 73

to themselves and others. It was strikingly so in the
present case.

I had, for a considerable time, been accustomed to meet
some ‘serious persons once a week, in a cottage at no
great distance from the house where he lived, for the
purpose of religious conversation, instruction, and prayer.
Having found these occasions remarkably useful and in-
teresting to myself and others, I thought it would be very
desirable to take the African there, in order that there
might be many witnesses to the simplicity and sincerity
of real Christianity, as exhibited in the character of this
promising young convert. I hoped it might prove an
eminent means of grace to excite and quicken the spirit
of prayer and praise among some over whose spiritual
progress J was anxiously watching. _

I accordingly obtained his master’s leave that he should
attend me to one of my cottage assemblies, His master,
although he did not himself appear to live under the in-
fluence of real religion, or to manifest any serious con-
cern respecting his own state, yet was pleased with my
attention to his servant, and always spoke well of his
behavior.

I set out on the day appointed for the interview. The
cottage at which we usually assembled was near four
miles distant from my own residence, and was situated
at the corner of an oak wood which screened it both from
the burning heat of summer suns, and the heavy blasts
of winter south-west storms. As I approached it I saw
my friend, the African, eg under a tree waiting my
arrival. He held in his hand a little Tract which I had
given him; his Bible lay on the ground. He rose with
much cheerfulness, saying,

“ Ah! massa, me very glad to see you; me think you
long time coming.”

“William, I hope you are well. Iam going to take
you with me to a few of my friends, who, I hope, are
also the friends of the Lord. We meet every Wednes-
day evening for conversation about the things that belong

7
74 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

to our everlasting peace, and I am sure you will bea
welcome visitor.”

“Massa, me not good enough to be with such good
people. Me greatsinner. They be good Christians.”

“Tf you were to ask them, William, they would each
tell you they were worse than anybody. Many of them
were once, and that not very long ago, living in an open-
ly sinful manner, ignorant of God, and the enemies of

esus Christ by thought and deed. But divine grace
stopped them in their wicked course, and subdued their
hearts to the love and obedience of him and his Gospel.
You will only meet a company of poor fellow-sinners,
who love to speak and sing the praises of redeeming
love; and I am sure that is a song in which you will be
willing to join them.” |

“OQ! yes, Sir, that song just do for poor William.”

By this time we had arrived at the cottage garden-
gate. Several well-known faces appeared in and near
the house, and the smile of affection welcomed us as we
entered. It was known that the African was to visit the
little society this evening, and satisfaction beamed in
every countenance, as I took him by the hand and intro-
duced him among them, saying, “I have brought a broth-
er from Africa to see you, my friends. Bid him welcome
in the name of the Lord.”

“ Sir,” said a humble and pious laborer, whose heart
and tongue always overflowed with Christian kindness,
“we are at all times glad to see our dear minister, but
especially so to-day, in such company as you have brought
with you. We have heard how gracious the Lord has
been to him. Give me your hand,‘good friend, (turning
to the African,) God be with you here and everywhere ;
and blessed be his holy name for calling wicked sinners,
as I hope he has done you and me, to love and serve him
for his mercy’s sake.”

Each one greeted him as he came into the house, and
some addressed him in very kind and impressive lan-

guage. ye
“Massa,” said he, “me not know what to say'to all
AFRICAN SERVANT, 715

these good friends; me think this look like little heaven
upon earth.” |

Ho then with tears in his eyes, whieh, almost before
he spoke, brought responsive drops into those of all pres-
ent, said,

“ Good friends and brethren in Christ Jesus, God bless
you all, and bring you to heaven at last.”

It wus my stated custom when I met to converse with
those friends, to begin with prayer and reading a portion
of the Scriptures.

When this was ended, I told the people present that
the providence of God had brought this young man for
a time under my ministry; and that finding him very se-
riously disposed, and believing him to be sincere in his
religious profession, I had resolved on baptizing him
agreeably to his own wishes. I added that I had now
brought him with me to join in Christian conversation
with us; for, asin old times “they that feared the Lord
spake often one to another,” as a testimony that they
thought upon his name, so I hoped we were fulfilling a
Christian and brotherly duty in thus assembling for mu-
tual edification.

Addressing myself to the African, I said, “ William,
tell me who made you ?”

“ God, the good Father.”

“Who redeemed you?”

“ Jesus, his dear hin. Who died for me.”

“Who sanctified you?”

“The Holy Ghost, who teach me to know the good
Father, and his dear Son, Jesus.”

“What was your state by nature ?”

“ Me wicked sinner, me know nothing but sin, me do
nothing but sin; my soul more black than my body.”

“ Has any change taken place in you since then?

“ Me hope so, massa, but me sometime afraid no.”

“If you are changed, who changed you?”

“ God, the good Father; Jesus, his dear Son; and God
the Holy Spirit.”

“ How was any change brought about in you ?”
76 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“God make me slave when me was young little boy.”

“How, William! would you say God made youa slave?”

“No, massa, no; me mean God let me be made slave
by white men to do me good.” |

“ How to do you good ?” |

“He take me from the land of darkness and bring me
to the land of light.” __ TS pari

“ Which do you call the land of light; the West India
Islands ?”

“ No, massa, they be the land of Providence, but Amer-
ica be the land of light to me; for there me first hear
good minister preach. And now this place where I am
now, is the land of more light; for here you teach me
more and more how good Jesus is to sinners.”

“ What does the blood of Christ do?”

i» cleanse from all sin. And as me hope, from my
ein. |

“ Are then all men cleansed from sin by his blood ?”

* O no, massa,”

“ Who are cleansed and saved ?”

“Those that have faith in him.”

“Can you prove that out of the Bible ?”

“ Yes, Sir; ‘He that believeth on the Son hath ever-
lasting life; and he that believeth not the Son shall not
see Ii e, but the wrath of God abideth on him.’ John iii.
36.

“ What is it to have faith ?”*

“Me suppose that it is to think much about Jesus
Christ; to love him much, to believe all he says to be
true, to pray to him very much; and when me feel very
weak and very sinful, to think that he is very strong, and
very good, and all that for my sake.”

“ And have you such faith as you describe %”

“QO! massa, me think sometimes me have no faith at
all.”

“Why so, William ?”

“When me want to think about Jesus Christ, my mind
run about after other things; when me want to love him
my heart seem quite cold; when me want to believe all
AFRICAN SERVANT. “97

to be true what he says to sinners, me then think it is
not true for me; when me want to pray, the devil put
bad, very bad thoughts into me, and me never thank
Christ enough. Now all this make me sometimes afraid
I have no faith.”

I observed a very earnest glow of attention and fellow-
feeling in some countenances present, as he spoke these
words, I then said,

“T think, William, I can prove that you have faith,
notwithstanding your fears to the contrary. Answer me
a few more questions,

“ Did you begin to think yourself a great sinner, and
to feel the want of a Saviour,of your own self, and by
your own thoughts and doings ?”

“QO! no, it came to me when me know nothing about
it, and seek nothing about it.”

“ Who sent the good minister in America to awaken
your soul by his preaching ?”

“ God, very certainly.”

“Who then began the work of serious thought and
feeling in your mind?”

“The good God; me could not do it of myself, me
sure of that.”

“Do you not think that Jesus Christ and his salvation
is the one thing most needful and most desirable ?”

“Q! yes, me quite sure of that.”

“Do you not believe that he is able to save you?”

“Yes, he is able to save to the uttermost.”

“Do you think he is unwilling to save you ?”

“Me dare not say that. He so good, so merciful, so
kind, to say he will in no wise cast out any that come to
him.”

“Do you wish, and desire, and strive to keep his com-
mandments ?”

“Yes, massa, because me love him, and that make me
want to do as he say.”

“ Are you willing to suffer for his sake, if God should
call you to do so?”

“Me do think me could die for the love of him; he

+
78 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

not think it too much to die for wicked sinner; why
should wicked sinner think it much to die for so good
and righteous a Saviour ?”

“J think and hope I may say to you, William, Thy
faith hath made thee whole.”

Thus ended my examination for the present. The
other friends who were in the house listened with the
most affectionate anxiety to all that passed. One of
them observed, not without evident emotion,

“T see, Sir, that though some men are white, and some

are black, true Christianity is all of ong color. My own

heart has gone with this good man every word he has
spoken,” : :

“ And so has mine,” gently re-echoed from every part
of the room,

After some time passed in more general conversation
on the subject of the African’s history, I said, “Let us
now praise God for the rich and unspeakable gift of his
grace, and sing the hymn of redeeming love”—

“Now begin the heavenly theme,
Sing aloud in Jesus’ name,” é&e,

which was accordingly done. Whatever might be the
merit of the natural voices, it was plain there was melody
in all their hearts. 7

The African was not much used to our way of singing,
yet joined with great earnestness and affection, which
showed how truly he felt what was uttered. When the
fifth verse was ended,

“Nothing brought him from above,
Nothing but redeeming love,”

he repeated the words, almost unconscious where he
was
“No, nothing, nothing but redeeming love bring him
down to poor William; nothing but redeeming love.”
The following verses were added, and sung by way of
conclusion ; .
AFRICAN SERVANT. 79

See, a stranger comes to view ;
Though he’s black,* he’s comely too ;
Come to join the choirs above, ,
Singing of redeeming love.

Welcome, Negro, welcome here,
Banish doubt, and banish fear ;
You, who Christ's salvation prove, -
Praise and bless redeeming love.

I concluded with some remarks on the nature of sal-
vation by grace, exhorting all present to press forward
in the heavenly race, It was an evening, the circumstan-
ces of which, had they never been recorded on earth,
— yet doubtless registered in the book of remembrance
above. |

I then fixed the day for the baptism of the African,
and so took leave of my little affectionate circle,

The moon shone bright as I returned home, and was
beautifully reflected from the waters of the lake: harmo-
ny and repose characterized the scene. I had just. been
uniting in the praises of the God of grace and providence ;
and now the God of nature henabe a fresh tribute of
thanksgiving for the beauties and comforts of creation, as
David sang, “ When I consider thy heavens the work of
thy fingers, the moon and the stars which thou hast or-
dained: what is man that thou art mindful of him, or the
son of man, that thou visitest him ?”’ |

In a few days the African was baptized; and not long
after he went a voyage with his master. |

Since that time 1 have not been able to hear any
tidings of him: whether he yet wanders as a pilgrim in
this lower world, or whether he has joined the heavenly
choir in the song of redeeming love in glory, I know not.
Of this Iam persuaded, he was a monument to the Lord’s
praise. He bore the impression of the Saviour’s image
on his heart, and exhibited the marks of converting grace
in his life and conversation, with singular simplicity and
unfeigned sincerity. O! give to God the glory.

* Song of Solomon, i, 5.

THE

YOUNG COTTAGER:;

AN AUTHENTIC NARRATIVE.

BY REV. LEGH RICHMOND.

THE
YOUNG COTTAGER.

I ee no apology for introducing to the notice
of my ers a few particulars relative to a young fe-
male Cottager, whose memory is particularly endeared to
me from the circumstance of her being, so far as I can
discover, my first-born spiritual child in the ministry of
the Gospel. She was. certainly the first of whose con-
version to God, under my own pastoral instruction, I can
speak with any degree of precision and assurance,

Every parent of a family knows that there is a very in-
teresting emotion of heart connected with the birth of
his first-born child. But may not the spiritual parent be
allowed the indulgence of a similar sensation in his con-
nection with the children whom the Lord gives him! If
the first-born child in nature be received as a new and
concrete blessing, how much more so the first-born
child in grace! I claim this privilege; and crave permis-
sion, in writing what follows, to erect a monumental
record sacred to the memory of a dear little child, who,
I trust, will at the last day prove my crown of rejoicing.

Jane 8 was the daughter of poor parents in the
village where it pleased God first to cast my lot in the
ministry. My acquaintance with her commenced when
she was twelve years of “ee by her weekly attendance


86 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

at my house among a number of children whom I regu-
larly instructed every Saturday afternoon. —

They used to read, repeat catechisms, -— hymns,
and portions of Scripture. I accustomed them also to
pass a kind of free examination, according to their age
and ability, in those subjects: by which I hoped to see
them made wise unto salvation.

In the summer I frequently used to assemble this.little
group out of doors in my garden, sitting under the shade
of some trees which protected us from the heat of the
sun. From hence a scene appeared which rendered my
occupation the more interesting ; for adjoining the spot
where we sat, and only separated from us by a fence,
was ‘the church-yard, surrounded with beautiful prospects
in every direction.

I had not far to look for subjects of warning and ex-
hortation suitable to my little flock. I could point to
the graves and tell my pupils that, young as they were,
none of them were too young to die; and that probably
more than half of the bodies which were buried there
were those of little children.

I told them who was “the resurrection and the life,”
and who alone could take away the sting of death. I
used to remind them that the hour was “coming in the
which all that are in the grave shall hear his voice, and
shall come forth; they that have done good unto the res-
urrection of life, and they that have done evil unto the
resurrection of damnation. I often availed myself of
these opportunities to call to their recollection the more
recent deaths of their own relatives,

Sometimes I sent the children to the various stones
which stood at the head of the graves, and bade them
learn the epitaphs inscribed upon them. I took pleasure
in seeing the little ones thus dispersed in the church-
yard, each committing to memory a few verses written
in commemoration of the departed. They would soon
accomplish the desired object, and eagerly return to me
to repeat their task. |

Thus my church-yard became a book of instruction
YHE YOUNG COTTAGER. 87

and every grave-stone a leaf of edification for my young
disciples,

Theehurch itself stood in the midst of the ground. It
was a spacious antique structure. Within those very
walls I first proclaimed the message of God to sinners.
As these children surrounded me, 1 sometimes pointed to
the church, spoke to them of the nature of public wor.
ship, the value of the Sabbath, the duty of regular attend-
ance on its services, and urged their serious attention to
the means of grace. I showed them the sad state of
many countries where neither churches nor Bibles were
known; and the no less melancholy condition of multi-
tudes at home, who sinfully neglect worshipand slight
the Word of God. I thus tried to make them sensible
of their own favors and privileges. Neither was I ata
loss for another class of objects around me from which I
could draw useful instructions, for many of the beauties
of nature appeared in view.

Eastward of us extended a large river or lake Of sea-
water, chiefly formed by the tide, and nearly enclosed
by land. Beyond this was a fine bay and road for ships,
filled with vessels of every size,, from the small sloop or
cutter to the first-rate man-of-war. Qn the right hand
of the haven rose a hill of peculiarly beautiful form and
considerable height. Its verdure was very rich, and many
hundred sheep grazed upon itssides and summit. From
the opposite shore of the same water, a large sloping ex-
tent of bank was diversified with fields, woods, hedges,
and cottages. At its extremity stand, close to the edge
of the sea itself, the remains of the tower of an ancient
church, still preserved as a sea-mark. Far beyond the
bay a very distant shore was observable, and land beyond
it; trees, towns, and other buildings appeared, more es-
pecially when gilded by the reflected are of the sun.

To the south-westward of the garden was another
down, covered also with flocks of sheep, and a postion of
it fringed with trees. At the foot of this hill lay the
village, a part of which gradually ascended to the rising
ground on which the church stood.
88 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

From the intermixture: of houses with gardens, or-
chards, and trees, Se a very pleasing aspect.
Several fields adjoined the garden on the east and north,
where a number of cattle were pasturing. My own little
shrubberies and flower-beds variegated the view, and
recompensed my toil in rearing them, as well by their
beauty as their f nee, i

Had the sweet Psalmist of Israel sat in this spot he
would have glorified God the Creator by descanting on
these his handy-works. I cannot write Psalms like Da-
vid, but I wish in my own poor way to praise the Lord
for his goodness, and to show forth his wonderful works
to the children of men. But had David been also sur-
rounded with a troop of young scholars in such a situa-
tion, he would once more have said, “Out of the mouths
of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength.”

I love to retrace these scenes—they are past, but the
recollection is sweet. A

I love to retrace them—for they bring to my mind
many former mercies which ought not, for the Lord’s
sake, to be forgotten.

Ll love to retrace them—for they re-assure me that, in
the course of that’ private ministerial occupation, God was
pleased to give me a valuable fruit of my labors.

Little Jane used constantly to appear on these weekly
seasons of instruction, I made no very particular obser-
vations concerning her during the first twelve months.
She was not then remarkable for any peculiar attainment.
Her countenance was not engaging—her eye discovered
no remarkable liveliness. She read tolerably well, took
pains, and improved. )

Mildness and quietness marked her general demeanor.
She was very constant in her attendance on public wor-
ship, as well as on my Saturday instructions. But, gen-
erally speaking, she was little noticed except for her reg-
ular conduct. Had I then been asked of which of my
young scholars J had formed the most favorable opinion,
poor Jane might probably have been omitted,

How little Gs we oftentimes know what God is doing
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 89

in other people’s hearts! What. poor judges we fre-
quently prove till he opens our eyes! His thoughts are
not our thoughts, neither are our ways his ways.

Once, indeed, during the latter part of that year, I was
struck with her ready attention to my wishes. I had,
agreeably to the plan above mentioned, sent her fale the
chureh-yard to commit to memory an epitaph which I
admired. On her return she told me that in addition to
what I had desired, she had also learned another which
was inscribed on an adjoining stone; adding that she
thought it a very pretty one.

I thought so too, and perhaps my reader will be of the
same opinion. Kittle Jane, though dead, yet shall speak.
While | transcribe the lines, I can powerfully imagine
that I hear her voice repeating them.

EPITAPH ON MRS. A. B.

Forgive, blest shade, the tributary tear,
That mourns thy exit from a world like this;
Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here,
And stayed thy progress to the seata of bliss.

No more confin’d to grov’lling’ scenes of night, ©
Nu more a tenant pent in mortal clay,

Now should we rather hail thy glorious flight,
And trace thy journey to the realms of day.

The above was her appointed task; and the other,
which she voluntarily learned and spoke of with pleasure,
is this :

EPITAPH ON THE STONE ADJOINING.

It must be so—our father Adam’s fall

And disobedience brought this lot on all.
All die in him—but hopeless should we be,
Blest Revelation, were it not for thee.

glorious Gospel! heavenly light, whereby
We live with comfort, and with comfort die;

And view be ond this gloomy scene, the tomb,
‘A life of endless happiness to come,

I afterwards discovered that the sentiment expressed
in the latter epitaph had much affected her. But at the
8*
90 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

riod of this little indident I knew nothing of her mind.
Thad comparatively overlogked her. I have often been
sorry for it since, - Conscience seemed to rebuke me,
when I afterwards discovered what the Lord had been
doing for her soul, .I seemed to have neglected her ; yet
it was not done designedly. She was unknoWn to us
all; except that, as I since found out, her regularity and
abstinence from the sins and follies of her young equals
in age, brought upon her many taunts and jeers from oth-
ers, which she bore very meekly. But at that time I
knew it not. I was young myself in the ministry, and
younger in Christian experience. My parochial plans
had not as yet assumed such a principle of practical order
and inquiry, as to make me acquainted with the character
and conduct of each family and individual in my flock.

My young scholar soon became my teacher! I first
saw What true religion could accomplish, in witnessing
her experience of it. The Lord once “called a child
unto him, and set him in the midst of his disciples,” as an
emblem and an illustration of his doctrine. But the
Lord did more in the case of little Jane. He not only
called her, as a child, to show by a similitude what con-
version means; but he also called her by his grace to be
a vessel of merey and a living witness of that almighty
oe and love by which her own heart was scam to

0 ge

It was abont fifteen months from the first period of
her attendance on my Saturday school, when I missed
her from her customary place, Two or three weeks had
gone by without my making any particular inquiry re-
specting her. I was at length informed that she was not
well, But apprehending no peculiar cause for alarm,
nearly two months passed away without any further men-
tion of her name being made. er ies

At length a poor old woman in the village, of whose
religious disposition I had formed a good opinion, came
and said to me, “ Sir, have you not missed Jane S—— at
your hotse on Saturday afternoons ?”
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 91

“Yes,” I replied, “I believe shé is not well,”

“Nor ever will be, I feur,” said the woman.

“What, do you apprehend any danger in the case ?”

“ Sir, she is very pdorly indeed, and I think is in a de-
cline. She wants to see yon, Sir; but is afraid you
would not come to see‘such a poor young child as she
is.’

“Not go where poverty and sickness may call me}
eae she imagine so? At whose house does she

ive?” .

“ Sir, it is a poor place, and she is ashamed:to ask you
to come there. Her neighbors are noisy, wicked people,
and her own father and mother are strange folks. ey
all make game at poor Jane, because she reads her Bible
s0 much.” at |

“Do not tell me about poor places and wicked people, *
that is the very situation where a minister of the Gospel
is called to do the most good. I shall go to see her; you
may let her know my intention.” |

“] will, Sir; I go in most days to speak to her, and it
does one’s heart good to hear her talk,”

“Indeed!” said 1; “what does she talk about ?”

“Talk about, poor child! why, nothing but good
things, such as the Bible, and Jesus Christ, and life and
death, and her soul, and heaven, and hell, and your dis-
courses, and the books you used to teach her, Sir. Man
scoff at her, and say they suppose Jane counts hersel
better than other folks. But she does not mind all that.
She will read her: books, and then talk so pretty to her
mother, and beg’ that she would think about her soul.”

“The Lord forgive me,” thought I, “for not being
more attentive to this poor child’s case.” I seemed to
feel the importance of early instruction more than ever
I had done before, and felt, a rising hope that this girl
might prove a kind of first fruits of my labors.

now recollected her quiet, orderly, diligent attendance
on our little weekly meetings; and her marked appro-
bation of the epitaph, as related above, rushed into —
thoughts. “I really hope,” said I, “this dear child wi
92 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

rove a true child of God. And if so, what a mercy to
er, and what a mercy for me.”

The next morning I went to see the child. Her dwell-
ing was of the humblest kind. It stood against a high
bank of earth, which formed a sort of en behind it.
It was so steep that but little would grow in it; yet that
little served to show not only, on the one hand, the pov-
erty of its owners, but also to illustrate the happy truth,
that even in the worst of circumstances the Lord does
make a kind provision for the support of his creatures.
The front aspect of the cottage was chiefly rendered
pleasing by a honeysuckle, which Juxuriantly climbed up
the wall, enclosing the doors, windows, and even the
chimney, with its twining branches. As I entered the
house-door, its flowers put forth a very sweet and re-
freshing smell. Intent on the object of my visit, I at the
same moment offered up silent prayer to God, and enter-
tained a hope that the welcome fragrance of the shrub
might be illustrative of that all-prevailing intercession of
a eemer, which I trusted was, in the case of this little
child, as “ a sweet-smelling savor” to her heavenly Father.
The very flowers and leaves of the garden and field are
emblematical of higher things, when grace teaches us to
make them so.

Jane was in bed up stairs. I found no one in the
house with her, except the woman who had brought me
the penniee on the evening before. The instant I looked
on the girl I perceived a very marked change in her coun-
tenance ; it had acquired the consumptive hue, both white
and red. A delicacy unknown to it before, quite sur-
poner me, owing to the alteration it produced in her

ook. She received me first with a very sweet smile,
and then instantly burst into a flood of tears, just sob-
bing out,

“Tam so glad to see you, Sir.”

“] am very much concerned at your being so ill, my
child, and grieved that I was not sooner aware of your
state. But I hope the Lord designs it for your good.”
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 93

Her eye, not her tongue, powerfully expressed, “I hope
and think he does.”

“Well, my poor child, since you can no longer come
to see me, I will come and see you, and we will talk over
the subjects which | have been used to explain to you.”

“ Indeed, Sir, I shall be so glad.”

“That I believe she will,” said the woman; “for she
loves to talk of nothing so much as what she has heard
you say in your sermons, and in the books you have
given her.”

“ Are you really desirous, my dear child, to be a true
Christian ?” ‘ |

“OQ! yes, yes, Sir, 1 am sure I desire that above all
things.’ \

I was astonished and delighted at the earnestness and
simplicity with which she spoke these words.

“Sir,” added she, “I have been thinking, as I lay on
my bed for many weeks past, how good you are to in-
struct us poor children: what must become of us with-
out it ?”

“T am truly glad to perceive that my instrictions have
not been lost upon you, and pray God that this your pres-
ent sickness may be an instrument of blessing, in his
hands, to prove, humble, and sanctify you, My dear
child, you have a soul, an immortal soul, to think of;
you remember what I have often said to you about the
value of a soul: ‘ What would it profit a man to gain the
whole world and lose his own soul ?”

“Yes, Sir, I remember well you told us that when our
bodies are put into the grave, our souls will then go
either to the good or the bad place.”

“ And to which of these places do you think that, as a
sinner in the sight of God, you deserve to go ?”

“'T’o the bad one, Sir.”

“ What, to everlasting destruction ?”

“ Yes, Sir.”

“ ‘Why so?”

“ Because I am a great sinner.”

“ And must all great sinners go to hell ?”
94 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“ They all deserve it; and I am sure I do.”

“ But is there no way of escape? Is there no way for
a great sinner to be saved ?”

“Yes, Sir; Christ is the Saviour.”

“ And whom does he save ?”

“ All believers.”

“ And do you believe in Christ yourself?”

“IT do not know, Sir; I wish I did; but I feel that I
love him.”

“What do you love’ him for ?”

“Because he is good to poor children’s souls like
mine.” :

“ What has he done for you?”

“He died for me, Sir, and what could he do more ?”

“ And what do you hope to gain by his death ?”

“A good place when I die, if I believe in him, and Jove
him.” |

ts you felt any uneasiness on account of your
soul P

“QO! yes, Sir,a great deal, When you used to talk to
us children on Saturdays, I often felt as if I could hardly
bear it, and wondered that others could seem sd careless.
I thought I was not fit to die. I thought of all the bad
things I had ever done and said, and believed God must
be very angry with me; for you often told us that God
would not be mocked; and that Christ said, if we were
not converted we could not go to heaven. Sometimes I
thought I was so young it did not signify: and then
again it seemed to me a great sin to think so; for [knew
I was old enough to see what was right and what was
wrong; and so God had a just right to be angry when I
did wrong. Besides, I could see that my heart was not
right; and how could such a heart be fit for heaven ?
Indeed, Sir, I used to feel very uneasy.”

“My dear Jane, 1 wish I had known all this before.
Why did you never tell me about it ?”

“Sir, I durst not. Indeed I could not well say what
was the matter with me; and I thought you would look
upon me as very bold, if I had spoken about myself to
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 95

such a gentleman as you: yet I often wished that you
knew what I felt and feared. Sometimes, as we went
away from your house, I could not help erying; and
then the other children laughed and jeered at me, and
said I was going to be very good they supposed, or at
least to make people think so. Sometimes, Sir, I fancied

ou did not think so well of me as of the rest, and that

urt me; yet I knew I deserved no particular favor, be-
cause I was the chief of sinners.”

“My dear, what made St. Paul say he was the chief of
sinners? In what verse of the Bible do you find this ex-
pression, ‘the chief of sinners? Can you repeat it?”

“* This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all accepta
tion, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sin-
ners; is not that right, Sir?”

“Yes, my child, it is right; and I hope that the same
conviction which St. Paul had at that moment, has made
you sensible of the same truth. Christ came into the
world to save sinners; my dear child, remember, now
and for evermore, that Christ came into the world to save
the chief of sinners.”

“Sir, I am so glad he did. It makes me hope that he
will save me, though I am a poor sinful girl. Sir, 1 am
very ill, and I do not think I shall ever get well again. I
want to go to Christ, if I die.”

“Go to Christ while you live, my dear child, and he
will not cast you out when you die. He that said, ‘ Suf-
fer little childgen to come unto me, waits to be gracious
to them, and forbids them not.

“ What made you first think so seriously about the state
of your soul ?”

“ Your talking about the graves in the churchyard, and
telling us how many young children were buried there.
I remember you said one day, near twelve months ago,
‘Children! where will you be a hundred years hence?
Children! where do you think you shall go when you
die? Children! if you were to die to night, are you sure
you should go to Christ and be happy? Sir, I shall
96 ANNALS OF THE POOR, ~

never forget your saying ‘children’ three times together
in that solemn way.’

“Did you never before that day feel any desire about
your soul ?”

“ Yes, Sir, I think I first had that desire almost as soon
as you began to teach us on Saturday afternoons; but on
that day I felt as [never did before. I shall never forget
it. All the way as I went home, and all that night, those
words were in my thoughts, ‘ Children! where do you
think you shall go when you die? I thought I must leave
off all my bad ways, or where should I go when I died ?”

. i what effect did these thoughts produce in your
mind ?”

“Sir, I tried to live better, and I did leave off many
bad ways; but the more I strove, the more difficult I
found it, my heart seemed so hard; and then I could not
tell any one my case,”

“Could you not tell it to the Lord, who hears and
answers prayer ?”

“ My prayers (here she blushed and sighed) are very

poor at the best, and at that time I scarcely knew how
to pray at all as I ought. But 1 did sometimes ask the
Lord for a better heart.”
_ There was a character in all this conversation which
marked a truly sincere and enlightened state of mind.
She spoke with all the simplicity of a child, and yet the
seriousness of a Christian, I could scarcely persuade
myself that she was the same girl I had been accustomed
to see in past time. Her countenance was filled with in-
teresting affections, and almost spoke much more than
her tongue could utter. At the same time, she now pos-
sessed an ease and liberty in speaking, to which she had
formerly been a stranger; nevertheless she was modest,
humble, and unassuming. Her readiness to converse was
the result of spiritual anxiety, not childish forwardness,
The marks of a divine change were too prominent to be
easily mistaken; and in this very child I, for the first time,
witnessed the evident testimonies of such a change.
How encouraging, how profitable to my own sqpl !
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 97

« Sir,” continued little Jane, * I had one day been think-
ing that I was neither fit to live or die; for L could find
no comfort in this world, and I was sure I deserved none
in the other, On that day you sent me io learn the verse
on Mrs. B——’s headstone, and then I read that on the
one next to it.”

“I very well remember it, Jane; you came back and
repeated them both to me.”

“There were two lines i in it which made me think and
meditate a great deal.”

“ Which are they ?”

“* Hail, glorious Gospel! heavenly light, whereb
We live with comfort, and with comfort die. 9

“I wished that glorious Gospel was mine, that I might —
live and die with comfort; and it seemed as if I thought
it would be so. ©} never felt so happy about my soul
fore. The words were often in my thoughts,

‘Live with comfort, and with comfort die,’ ”

“ Glorious Gospel, indeed!” I thought. —
“ My dear child, what is the meaning of the word Gos-
el?” ;
ee Good news.”
“Good news for whom ?”
“For wicked sinners, Sir.”
“Who sends this good news for wicked sinners?” |
“The Lord Almighty.”
“ And who brings this good news ! ”
“Sir, you brought it to-me.’

- Here my soul melted in an instant, and I could not re-
press the tears which the emotion excited. The last an-
swer was equally unexpected and affecting. I felt a
father’s tenderness and: gratitude for a first born child.

Jane wept likewise. “After a little pause she said,

“O Sir! 1 wish you would speak to my father, and
mother, and litile brother ; ; for 1 am afraid they are going
on very beaty." ;

“ How so ?
eee Ol

98 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“Sir, they drink, and swear, and quarrel, and do not
like what is good; and it does grieve me so, 1 cannot
bear it. If I speak’a word to them about it, they are
very angry, and laugh and bid me be quiet, and not set
up for their teacher. Sir, I am ashamed to tell you this
of them, but I hope it is not wrong; I mean it for their
good.”

“] wish your prayers and endeavors for their sake may
be blessed; I will do also what I can.”

I then prayed with the child, and promised to visit her
constantly.

As I returned home, my heart was filled with thank-
fulness for what I had seen and heard.

Divine grace educates the reasoning faculties of the
soul, as well as the best affections of the heart; and
happily conseerates them both to the glory of the Re-
deemer. Neither the disadvantages of poverty, nor the
inexperience of childhood, are barriers able to resist the
mightv influences of the Spirit of God, when he goeth
forth “ where he listeth.” “God hath chosen the foolish
things of this world to confound the wise; and God hath
chosen the weak things of the world to confound the
things which are mighty.”

. Little Jane’s illness was of a lingering nature. I often
visited her. ‘The soul of this young Christian was grad-
ually, but effectually, preparing for heaven. I have sel-
dom witnessed in any older person, under similar cireum-
stances, stronger marks of earnest inquiry, continual se-
riousness, and holy affections. One morning as I was

_ walking through the churchyard, in my way to visit her,

I stopped to look at the epitaph which had made such a
deep impression on her mind. I was struck with the
reflection of the important consequences which’ might
result from a more frequent and judicious attention to
the inscriptions placed in our burying-grounds, as memo-
rials of the departed, I wish that every grave-stone
might not only record the names of our deceased friends,
but also proclaim the name of Jesus, as the only name
THE YOUNG COTTAGER, 99

iven under heaven whereby men can be saved. Perhaps,
if the ministers of religion were to interest themselves
in this matter, and accustom their people to consult
them as to the nature of the monumental inscriptions
which they wish to introduce into churches and church-
yards, a gradual improvement would take place in this
respect. What is offensive, useless, or erroneous, would
no longer find admittance ; and a succession of valuable
warning and consolation to the living would perpetuate
the memory of the dead.
When I arrived at Jane’s cottage, I found her in bed,
reading Dr. Watts’ Hymns for Children, in which she

took _— pleasure.

“ What are you reading this morning, Jane ?”

“Sir, I have been thinking very much about some
verses in my little book. Here they are:

‘There is an hour when I must die,
Nor do I know how soon ’twill come ;
A thousand children, young as [,
Are called by death to hear their doom.

Let me improve the hours J have,
Before the day of grace is fled ;
There's no repentance in the grave,

Nor pardon offered to the e

“Sir, I feel all that to be very true, and I am afraid
I do not improve the hours I have, as J] ought todo. I
think I shall not live very long; and when I remember
my sins, I say,
‘ Lord, at thy foot, ashamed I lie,
Upward I dare not look ;

on my sins befure I die,
And blot them from thy book,’ .

“Do you think he will pardon me, Sir ”

“My dear child, I have great hopes that he has par-
doned you; that he has heard your prayers, and put you
into the number of his true children already, You have
had strong proofs of his mercy to your soul.”

“ Yes, Sir, | have; and I wish to love and bless him
for it. He is good, very good.” 3
100 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

It had for some time past occurred to my mind, that a
course of regulated conversations on the first principles
of religion would be very desirable from time to time, for
this. interesting. child’s sake; and I thought the Church
Catechism would be a proper ground-work for that pur-

se.

“ Jane,” said I, “ you can repeat the Catechism ?”

‘* Yes, Sir, but I think that has been one of my sins in
the sight of God.”

“What, repeating your Catechism ?”

« Yes, Sir, in such a way as I used to do it.”

“How was that!”

“Very carelessly indeed. I never thought about the
meaning of the words, and that must be very wrong.
Sir, the Catechism is full of good things; I wish 1 un-
derstood them better.”

“Well then, my child, we will talk a little about those
good things which, as you truly say, are contained in the
Catechism. Did you ever consider what it is to be a
member of Christ, a child of God, and an inheritor of the
kingdom of heaven ?” .

“T think, Sir, I have lately considered it a good deal,
and I want to be such, not only in name, but in deed.and
in truth. You once told me, Sir, that ‘as the branch is
to the vine, and the stone to the building, and the limb
to the body and the head, so is a true believer to the Lord
Jesus Christ.’ But how am I to know that I belong to
Christ as a true’ member, which you said one day in the
church, means the same as a limb of the body ?”

“Do you love Christ now in a way you never used to
do before ?”

“ Yes, I think so, indeed.”

“ Why do you love him?”

- * Because he first loved me—he died for sinners.”

“ How do you know that he first loved you?”

- “Because he sent me instruction, and made me feel
the sin of my heart, and taught me to pray for pardon,
and love his ways: he sent you to teach me, Sir, and to
show me the way to be saved, and now I want to be
THE YOUNG COTYAGER, 101

saved in that way that he pleases. Sometimes I feel as
if I loved all that he has said and done, so much, that I
wish never to think about anything'else. I know I did
not use to fee] so; and I think if he had not loved me
first, my wicked heart would never have cared about him.
I once loved anything better than religion, but now it is
overzeniag to me.”

“Do you believe, in your heart, that Christ is able and
— to save the chief of sinners ?”

, “eae

“ And what are you ?”

“ A young but a great sinner.”

“Ts it not of his merey that you know and feel your-
self to be a sinner?”

“Certainly ; yes, it must be so.”

“Do you earnestly desire to forsake all sin ?”

“If I know myself, I do.”

“Do you feel a spirit within you resisting sin, and
making you hate it?”

“ Yes, I hope so.”

“ Who gave you that spirit? Were you always so?”

“It must be Christ who loved me and gave himself for
me. I was quite different once.”

“Now then, my dear Jane, does not all this show a
connection between the Lord Jesus Christ and your soul ?
Does it not seem as if you lived, and moved, and had a
spiritual nn from him? Justas the limb is connected
with your body, and so with your head, and thereby gets
power to live and move through the flowing of the blood
from one to the other, so are you spiritually a limb or
member of Christ, if you believe in him. Do you under.
stand me?”

“ Yes, Sir, 1 believe I do; and it is very comfortable
to my thoughts to look up to Christ as a living head,
and to consider myself as the least and lowest of all his
members.”

“ Now tell me what your thoughts are as to being a
child of God ?” |

“Tam sure, Sir, Ido not deserve to be called his child.”
102 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“Can you tell me who does deserve it ?”

“No one, Sir.”

* How then comes any one to be a child of God, when
by nature we all are children of wrath ?”

“ - God’s grace, Sir.”

“ What does grace mean ?”

“Favor; free favor to sinners.”

“Right; and what does God bestow upon the children
of wrath, when he makes them children of grace ?”’

“A death unto sin, and a new birth unto righteous-
ness; is it not, Sir?” . 7

“ Yes, this is the fruit of Christ’s redeeming love ; and
I hope you are a partaker of the blessing. The family of
God is named after him, and he is the first-born of many
brethren. What a-mercy that Christ calls: himself ‘a
brother.’ My little girl, he is your brother, and will not
be ashamed to own you and present you to his Father at
the last day, as one that he has purchased with his
blood.”

“] wish I could love my Father and my Brother which
are in heaven, better than Ido. Lord, be merciful to me,
a sinner: I think, Sir; if 1 am a child of God,I am often
a rebellious one. He shows kindness to me beyond oth-
ers, and yet I make a very poor return.

“Are these thy favors by
To me above the fy | avs

Then let me love thee more than they,
Afid strive to serve the best.’”

“'That will be the best way to approve yourself a real
child of God. Show your love aa thankfulness to such
a Father who hath prepared for you an inheritance among
the saints in light, and made you an inheritor of the king-
dom of heaven, as well as a member of Christ and a
child of God. Do you know what the kingdom of heaven
means?”

_ Just at that instant her mother entered the house be-
low, and began to speak to a younger child in a passion-
ate, scolding tone of voice, accompanied by some very
THE YOUNG COTTAGER, 103

offensive language ; ‘but quickly stopped on hearing us
in conversation up stairs. a |

“ Ah, my poor mother!” said the girl, “ you would not
have stopped so short if Mr. —— had not been here.
Sir, you hear how my mother goes on; pray say some-
thing to her, she will not hear me.”

I went toward the stair-head and called to the woman ;
but she suddenly left the house, and for that time escaped
reproof. .

“Sir,” said little Jane, “I am so afraid if I go to heaven
I shall never see my poor mother there. As I lie here
a-bed, Sir, for hours together, there is often so much
wickedness, and noise, and quarrelling down below, that
I do not know how to bear it. It comes very near, Sir,
when one’s father and mother go on so. I wantthem all
to turn to the Lord, and go to heaven. Tell me now,
Sir, something about being an inheritor of the kingdom
of heaven.” |

“You may remember, my child, what I have told you
when explaining the Catechism in the church, that ‘ the
kingdom of heaven’ in the Scriptures means the church
of Christ upon earth as well as the state of glory in heav-
en. The one is a preparation for the other, All true
Christians are ‘heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ,’
and shall inherit the glory and happiness of his kingdom,
and live with Christ, and be with ‘him forever. ‘This is
the free gift of God to his adopted children; and all that
believe aright in Christ shall experience the truth of that
promise, ‘lt is your Father’s good pleasure to give you
the kingdom.’ You are a poor girl now, but I trist*an
entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly into
the everlasting kingdom of our Lord. and Saviour Jesus
Christ.’ You suffer now, but are you not willing to suf.
fer for his sake, and to bear patiently those things to
which he calis you?” .

“O yes, very willing; I would not complain. It is all
right.” , ven"

Se Then, my dear, you shall reign with him. Through
much tribulation you may perhaps enter the kingdom of
104 ANNALS, OF THE POOR,

God; but tribulation worketh patience, and patience ex-
perience, and experience hope. As a true,member of
Christ, show yourself to be a dutiful child of God, and
your portion will be that of an inheritor of the kingdom
of heaven. Faithful is He that hath promised; commit
thy way unto the Lord; trust also in him, and he shall
bring it to pass.”

# Thank you, Sir; Ido so love to hear of these things.
And I think, Sir, I should not love them so much if I had
no part in them. Sir, there is one thing I want to ask
you. It isa great thing, and I may be wrong—I am so
young—and yet I hope [ mean right

, Here she hesitated and paused.

“ What is it? do not be fearful of mentioning it.”

A tear rolled down her cheek—a slight blush colored
her countenance. She lifted up her eyes to heaven for
a moment, and fixing them on me with a solemn, affecting
look, said,

“ May so young a poor child as I am be admitted to the
Lord’s Supper? I have for some time wished it, but dared
not to mention it for fear you should think it wrong.”

“My dear Jane, I] have no doubt respecting it,* and
shall be very glad to converse with you on the subject;
and hope that He who has given you the desire, will bless
his own ordinance to your soul. Would you wish it
now or to-morrow ?”

“To-morrow, if you please, Sir—will you come to-
morrow and talk to me about it? and if you think it

roper, I shall be thankful. I am growing faint now—I
ope to be better when you come again.”
was much pleased with her proposal, and rejoiced in
the prospect of seeing so young and sincere a Christian
thus devote herself to the Lord, and receive the memo-
rials of a Saviour’s love to her soul. :



* It will be perceived that this interesting and excellent Tract is from
the pen of a devout Episcopalian ; and in publishing this incident entire,
it may be proper to say, that the Publishing Committee would not be
understood a any opiuion in relation to the practice of admin-
istering the | Supper in private,
@

THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 105

Disease was making rapid inroads upon her constitu-
tion, and she was aware of it. But as the outward man
‘decayed, she was strengthened with might by God’s
Spirit in the inner man. She was evidently ripening fast
for a better world.

I remember these things with affectionate pleasure. [
hope the recollection does me good. I wish them to do
good to thee likewise, my reader; and therefére I write
them down.

I was so much affected with my last visit to little Jane,
and particularly with her tender anxiety respecting the
Lord’s Supper, that it formed the chief subject of my
thoughts for the remainder of the day.

I rode in the afternoon to a favorite spot, where I
sometimes indulged in solitary meditation; and where I
wished to reflect on the interesting case of my little dis-
ciple. ,

Me was a place well suited for such a purpose. |

In the widely sweeping curve of a beautiful bay, there
is a kind of chasm or opening in one of the lofty cliffs
which bound it. This produces a very romantic and
striking effect. The steep-descending sides of this epen-
ing in the cliff are covered with trees, bushes, wild flow-
ers, fern, wormwood, and many other herbs, here and
there contrasted with bold masses of rock or brown
earth. , =

In the higher part of one of these declivities, two or
three picturesque cottages are fixed, and seem half sus-
oéeaed in the air. | |

From the upper extremity of this great fissure or
opening in the cliff, a small stream of water enters by a
cascade, flows through the bottom, winding in a varied
course of about a quarter of a mile in length, and then
runs into the sea across a smooth expanse of firm hard
sand, at the lower extremity of the chasm. At this point
the sides: of the woody banks are very lofty, and toa
spectator from the bottom, exhibit a mixture of the grand
and beautiful not often exceeded.
106 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

Near the mouth of this opening was a little hollow re-
cess, or cave, in the cliff, from whence, on one hand, I
could see the above-deseribed romantic scene; on the
other, a long train of perpendicular cliffs, terminating in
a bold and wild-shaped promontory, which closed the
bay at one end, while a conspicuous white cliff stood di-
rectly opposite, about four miles distant, at the farther
point of the bay.

The open sea, in full magnificence, occupied the cen-
tre of the prospect; bounded, indeed, in one small part,
by a very distant shore, on the rising ascent from which
the rays of the sun rendered visible a cathedral church,
with its towering spire, at near thirty miles’ distance.
Everywhere else the sea beyond was limited only by
the sky.

A frigate was standing into the bay, not very far from
my recess; other vessels of every size, sailing in many
directions, varied the scene, and furnished matter for a
thousand sources of contemplation.

At my feet the little rivulet, gently rippling over peb-
bles, soon mingled with the sand, and was lost in the
waters of the mighty ocean. The murmuring of the
waves, as the tide ebbed or flowed, on the sand; their
dashing against some more distant rocks, which were
aoa fantastically with sea-weed and shells; sea-birds
floating in the air aloft, or occasionally screaming from
their holes in the cliffs; the hum of human voices in the
ships and boats borne along the water: all these sounds
served to promote, rather than interrupt, meditation.
They were soothingly blended together, and entered the
ear in a kind of natural harmony.

In the quiet enjoyment of a scene like this, the lover
of nature’s beauties will easily find scope for spiritual
illustration. .

Here I sat and mused over the interesting character
and circumstances of little Jane. Herel prayed that
God would effectually teach me those truths which I
ought to teach her,

en I thought of her youth, [ blushed to think how
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 107

superior she was to what I wéll remembered myself to
have been at the same age: nay, how far my superior at
that very time. I earnestly desired to catch something
of the spirit which appeared so lovely in her: for simple,
teachable, meek, humble, yet earnest in her demeanor,
she bore living marks of heavenly téaching.

“'T’he Lord,” thought I, “ has called this little child, and
set her in the midst of us, as a parable, a pattern, an em-
blem. And he saith, ‘ Verily, except ye be converted, and
become as little children, ye shall not enter into the king-
ae of heaven.’ O that I may be humble as this little
child!

I was thus led into a deep self-examination, and was
severely exercised with fear and apprehension, whether J
was myself a real partaker of those divine influences
which [ could so evidently discover in her. Sin appear.
ed to me just then to be more than ever “ exceeding sin-
ful.” Inward and ‘inbred corruptions made me tremble.
The danger of self-deception in so great a matter alarmed
me—lI was a teacher of others: but was I indeed spirit-
ually taught myself? Ang |

A spirit of anxious inquiry ran through every thought;
I looked at the manifold works of creation around me;
I perceived the greatest marks of regularity and order;
but within I felt confusion and disorder.

“The waves of the sea,” thought I, “ebb and flow in
exact obedience to the laws of their Creator, Thus far
they come, and no further—they retire again to their a¢-
customed bounds; and so maintain a regulated succes.
sion of effects.

“ But, alas! the waves of passion and affection in the
human breast, manifest more of the wild confusion of
a storm, than the orderly regularity of a tide—Grace can
alone subdue them. .

“ What peaceful harmony subsists throughout all this
lovely landscape! These majestic cliffs, some clothed
with trees and shrubs; others bare and unadorned with
herbage, yet variegated with ee earths ; these
are not only sublime and delightful to behold, but they
108 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

are answering the end of their creation, and serve as a
barrier to stop the progress of the waves. |

“ But how little peace and harmony can I comparative-
ly see in my own heart! "The landscape within is mar-
red by dreary barren wilds, and wants that engaging char-
acter which the various parts of this pa ak kb me
so happily preserve. Sin, sin, is the bane of mortality,
and heaps confusion upon confusion wherever it pre-
i .

“ Yet, saith the voice of Promise, ‘ Sin shall not have
dominion over you.’ O! then, ‘ may I yield myself unto
God, as one that am alive from the dead, and my members
as instruments of Rewepiyness unto God,’ And thus
may I become an able and willing minister of the New
Testament !

“T wish I were like this little stream of water. It
takes its first rise scarcely a mile off; yet it has done.good
even in that short course. It has passed by several] cot-
oer in its way, and afforded life and health to the in-
habitants—it has watered their little gardens as it flows,
and enriched the meadows near its Taare It has sat-
isfied the thirst of the flocks that are feeding-aloft on the
hills, and perhaps refreshed the shepherd’s boy who sits
watching his master’s sheep hard by. It then quietly
finishes its current in the secluded dell,and, agreeably to
the design of its Creator, quickly vanishes in the ocean.

“ May my course be like unto thine, thou little rivulet!
Though short be my + ‘of life, yet may I be useful
to my fellow-sinners as I travel onwards. Let me be a
dispenser of spiritual support and health to many! Like
this stream, may I prove ‘the poor man’s friend’ by the
way, and water the souls that thirst for the river of life,
wherever! meet them! And, if it please thee,O my God!
let me in my latter end be like this brook. It calmly,
though not quite silently, flows through this scene of
peace and loveliness just before it enters the sea. Let
me thus gently close my days likewise; and may I not
unusefully tell to others of the goodness and mercy of
my Saviour, till I arrive at the vast ocean of eternity !


THE YOUNG COTTAGER, 109

“'Thither,” thought I, bien er is fust hastening.






Short, but not useless, hasbeen Aer course. I feel the
great importance of it in my soul at'this moment, I view
a work of merey there, to which I do hope I am not quite
a stranger in the experience of my own heart. The thought
enlivens my ws and leads me to see that, great agis
the power of sin, the power of Jesus is greater; and,
through a I may meet my dear young disciple, my
child in the Gospel, my sister in the faith, in a brighter,
a better world hereafter.” '

There was something in the whole of this meditation
which calmed and prepared my mind for my promised
visit next day. I looked forward to it with affectionate
anxiety. |

It was now time to return homewards, The sun was
setting. The lengthened shadows of the cliffs, and of
the hills towering again far above them, cast a brown,
but not unpleasing tint, over the waters of the bay. Far-
ther on the beams of the sun stil] maintained their splen-
dor. Some of the sails of the distant ships, enlivened by
- its rays, appeared like white spots in the blue horizon,
and seemed to attract my notice as if to claim, at least,
the a prayer, “God speed the mariners on their
vO hs ;

I quitted my retreat in the cliff with some reluctance :
but with a state of mind, as I hoped, solemnized by re-
flection, and animated to fresh exertion. |

I walked up by a steep pathway, that winded through
the trees and shrubs on the sides of one of the precipices.
At every step the extent of prospect enlarged and acquir-
ed a new and varying character, by being seen through
the trees on each side. Climbing up a kind of rude inar-
tificial set of stone stairs in the bank, I passed by the sin-
gularly-situated cottages which I had viewed from be-
neath ; received and returned the evening salutation of
the inhabitants sitting at their doors, and just come home
from labor; till I arrived at the top of the precipice, where
I had left my horse tied to a cow

The sun was now set; the bright colors of the western
110 ANNALS OF THE POOR. ”

clouds faintly reflected from the south-eastern hills, that
were unseen from my retreat in the cliff, or only perceived
by their evening shadows on the sea, now added to the
beauty of the prospect on the south and west. Every
element Sinwivated tp the interesting effect of the sce-

ry. The earth was diversified in shape and ornament.
Tie voaters of the ocean presented a noble feature in the
landscape. The air was serene, or only ruffled by a re-
freshing breeze from the shore. And the sun’s fiery
beam, though departing for the night, still preserved suc
a portion of light and warmth as rendered all the rest de-
lightful to an evening traveller.

The next morning I went to Jane’s cottage, On enter-
ing the door, the woman who so frequently visited her
met me, and said:

“ Perhapsy Sir, you will not wake her just yet; for
she has Tata asleep, and she seldom gets much rest,
poor girl.”

I went gently up stairs, The child was in a half sit-
ting posture, leaning her head upon her right hand, with
her Bible open before her. She had evidently fallen
asleep while reading. Her countenance was beautifully
componet and tranquil. A few tears had rolled down her
cheek, and (probably unknown to her) dropped upon the

pages of her book.
looked around me for a moment, The room was
outwardly comfortless and uninviting; the walls out of
repair; the sloping roof somewhat shattered ; the floor
broken and uneven; no furniture but two tottering bed-
steads, a three-legged stool, and an old oak chest—the
window broken in many places, and mended with
pele of paper. A little shelf against the wall, over the
stead where Jane lay, served for her medicine, her
food, and her books.

“Yet here,” I said to myself, “lies an heir of glory
waiting for a happy dismissal. Her earthly home is poor
indeed: but she ~ a house not made with hands, eter-
nal, in the heavens. She has little to attach her to this
world, but what a weight of glory in the world to come!
@ -

THE YOUNG COTYrAGER. 111

This mean, despised chamber, is a palace in the eye of
faith, for it contains one thats an inheritor of a crown.”
J approached without waking her, and observed that
she had been reading the twenty-third chapter of St.
Luke. The finger of her left hand lay upon the book,
pointing to the words, as if she had been using it to g
her eye while she read. I looked at the place, and Ws
pleased at the apparently casual circumstance of her fin-
ger pointing to these words:

, “ Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy king-

om.”

“Ts this casual, or designed?” thought I—“ Kither way
it is remarkable.” But in another moment I discovered
_ that her finger was indeed an index to the thoughts of
her heart. She half awoke from her dozing state, but
not sufficiently so to perceive that any person was pres-
ent, and said in a kind of a whisper,

“ Lord, remember me—remember me—remember—re-
member a poor child—Lord, remember me——”

She then suddenly started, and perceived me, as she
became fully awake: a faint blush overspread her cheeks
for a moment, and then disappeared.

“Dame K , how long have I been asleep ?—Sir,
I am very sorry "

“ And Iam very glad to find you thus,” I replied: “ you
may say with David, ‘J laid me down and slept; I awaked,
for the Lord sustained me.’ What were you reading ?”

“The history of the crucifying of Jesus, Sir.” _—

“ How far had you read when you fell asleep ?”

“To the. prayer of the thief that was crucified with
him; and when I came to that place, I stopped, and
thought what a mercy it would be, if the Lord Jesus
should remember me likewise—and so I fell asleep and
I fancied in my dream that I saw Christ upon the cross;
and I thought I said, ‘Lord, remember me’—and I am
sure he did not look angry upon me—and then I awoke.”

All this seemed to be a sweet commentary on the text,
and a most suitable forerunner of our intended sacra-
mental service, .






112 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

“ Well, my dear child, 1 am come, as you wished me,
to administer the memorials of the body and blood of our
blessed Saviour to you; and I dare say neighbor K——
will be glad-to join us.”

“Talk to me a little about it first, Sir, if you please.”

“ Well, you know this is an institution established by
Christ himself. The Lord has ordained bread and wine
in the holy supper, as the outward mark which we be-
hold with our eyes. It is a token of his love, grace, and
blessing, which he promises to, and bestows on all who
receive it, rightly believing on his name and work. He,
in this manner, preserves among us a continual remem-
brance of his death, and of the benefits which we receive
thereby.”

P t do you believe respecting the death of Christ,
Jane ?” .

“That because he died, Sir, we live.”

“ What life do we live thereby ?”

“The life of grace and mercy now; and the life of
glory and happiness hereafter: is it not, Sir?” |

“Yes, assuredly; this is the fruit of the death of
Christ; and thus he opened the kingdom of heaven to
all believers. As bread and wine strengthen and refresh
your poor, weak, fainting body, in this very sickness, so
does the blessing of his body and blood strengthen and
refresh the souls of all those that repose their. faith, hope,
and affections on him who loved us and gavé himself for
us.

Tears ran down her cheeks as she said, “OQ! what a
Saviour !—O! what a sinner !—How ,kind! how good!
—And is this for me ?”

“Fear not, my child. He that has made you to love
him thus, loves you too well todeny you. He will in no
wise cast out any that come to him.” |

“Sir,” said the girl, “I can never think about Jesus,
and his love to sinners, without wondering how it can
be. I deserve nothing but his anger on account of my
sins; why then does he love me?. My heart is evil;
why then does he love me? I continually forget all his
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 113

goodness ; why then does he love me? I neither pray
to him, nor thank him, nor doany thing as I ought to do;
why then such love to me ?”

“ How plain it is that all is merey from first to last!
and that sweetens the blessing, my child. Are you not
willing to give Christ all the honor of your salvation,
and to take all the blame of your sins on your ow
self?” |

“Yes, indeed, Sir, I am. My hymn says,

‘Blest be the Lord, that sent his Son
To take our flesh and blood ;

He for our lives gave a own,
To make our peace with God.

He honored all his Father’s laws,
Which we have disobey’d ;

He bore our sins upon the cross,
And our full ransom paid.’” —

“JT am glad you remember your hymns so well, Jane.”

“Sir, you don’t know what pleasure they give me. I ,
am very glad you gave me that little book of hymns for
children.’ |

A severe fit of coughing interrupted her speech for a
while. The woman held her head. It was distressing
to observe her struggle for breath, and almost, as it were,

efor life. |

“Poor dear!” said the woman, “I wish I could help
thee, and ease thy pains; but they will not last forever.

“God helps me,” said the girl, recovering her breath,
“God helps me; he will carry me through. Sir, you
look frightened—J am not afraid—this is nothing—I am
better now. Thank you, dame, thank you. I am very
troublesome ; but the Lord will bless you for this and
all your kindness to me; yes, Sir, and yours too. Now
talk to me again about the Lord’s. supper.”

“ What is required, Jane, of them who come to the
Lord’s supper? There are five things named in the
Catechism—do you remember what is the first ?”

She paused; and then — a solemn and intelli..

1
114 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

gent look, “To examine themselves whethér they repent
truly of their former sins.”

“Y hope and think that you know what this means,
Jane: the Lord has given you the spirit of repentance.”

“No one knows, Sir, what the thoughts of past sins
have been to me. Yes, the Lord knows,’ that is
enough; and I hope he forgives me for Christ’s .sake.
His blood cleanseth from all sin, Sir, I sometimes think
of my sins till I tremble, and it makes me cry to think
that I have offended such a God; and then he comforts
me again with sweet thoughts about Christ.”

* It is well, my child: be it so. The next thing men-
tioned in that answer of your Catechism, what is it ?”

“ Steadfastly purposing to lead a new life.”

“ And what do you think of that ?”

“ My life, Sir, will be a short one; and I wish it had
been a better one. But from my heart I desire that it
may be a new one for the time to come. I want to
forsake my evil ways and thoughts, and evil words,
and evil companions; and to do what God bids and
what you tell me is right, Sir, and what I read of in
my Bible. But I am afraid I do not, my heart is so full
of sin. However, Sir, I pray to God to help me. My
days will be few; but I wish they may be spent to the
om God.”

“ The blessing of the Lord be upon you, Jane, so that
whether you live, you may live to the Lord; or whether
you die, you may die unto the Lord; and that, living or
dying, you may be the Lord’s. What is the next thing
mentioned ?”
aso have a lively faith in God’s mercy, through Christ,

“Do you believe that God is merciful to you in the
pardon of your sins?’

“T do, Sir,” said the child, earnestly.

“And if he pardons you, is it for your own sake,
Jane?” :

“No, Sir, no: it is for Christ’s sake, for my Saviour
Jesus Christ’s sake, and that only—Christ is all.”

i
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 115

“Can,you trust him ?”

.* Sir, | must not mistrust him? nor would I if I might.”

“Right, child; he is worthy of all your trust.”

“ And then, Sir, I am to have a thankful remembrance
of his'death. I can never think of his dying but I think
also what a poor unworthy creature I am; and yet he is
so good tome. I wish I could thank him. Sir, I fave
been reading about his death. How could the people do
as they did to him? But it was all for our salvation.
And then the thief on the cross—that is beautiful. I
hope he will remember me too, and that I shall always
remember him and his death most thankfully.”

“And lastly, Jane, are you in charity with all men?
Do you forgive all that have offended you? Do you bear
ill-will in your heart to anybody ?”

“ Dear Sir! no; howean I? If God is so good to me,
if he forgives me, how can I help forgiving others? There
is not a person in all the world, I think, Sir, to whom I
do not wish well for Christ’s sake; and that from the
bottom of my heart.” Ta

“ How do yow'feel in regard to those bold, wanton, ill-
tempered girls at the next door, who jeer and mock you
so about your religion ?” |

“ Sir, the worst thing I wish them is, that God may give
them grace to repent; that he may change their hearts,
and pardon all their wicked ways and words. May he
forgive them, as I do with all my soul!” |

he ceased—I wished to ask no more. My heart was
full, “Can this be the religion of a child?” thought I;
“QO that we were all children like her !”

I then said, “ My dear friends, I will now, with God’s
blessing, partake with you in the holy communion of our
Lord’s body and blood.”

The time was sweet and solemn. I went through the
sacramental service. ) a

The countenance and manner of the child evinced pow-
erful feelings. Tears —— with smiles; resignation
brightened by hope; humility animated by faith; child-
like modesty adorned with the u anding of a riper
116 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

age , gratitude, peace, devotion, patience—all these were
visible.

When I had concluded the service I said, * Now my
dear Jane, you are indeed a sister in the church of Christ.
May his Spirit and blessing rest upon you—strengthen
ak refresh you !”

* My mercies are great, very great, Sir, greater than I
can express—I thank you for this favor—l thought | was
too young—it seemed too much for me to think of; but I
am now sure the Lord is good to me, and J hope I have
done right.”

“Yes, Jane; and I trust you are sealed by the Holy.
Ghost to the day of redemption.”

“ Sir, I shall never forget this day.”

“ Neither, I think, shall I.”

“Nor I,” said the good old woman; “sure the Lord
has been here in the midst of us three to-day, while we
have been gathered together in his name.”

“Sir,” said the child, “1 wish you could speak to my
mother when you come again. I am so. about
_ her soul; and I am afraid she cares nothing at all about
it herself.”

“TI hope I shall have an opportunity the next time I
come. Seven my child.”

“ Good-by, Sir, and I thank you for all your kindness
to me,”

“ Surely,” I thought within myself as I left the cot-
tage, “this young bud of grace will bloom beauteously
in Paradise. The Lord transplant it thither in his own

od time! Yet, if it be his will, may she live a little
onger, that I may farther profit by her conversation and
example.”

Jane was hastening fast to her dissolution. She still,
however, preserved sufficient strength to converse with
much satisfaction to herself and those who visited her.
Such as could truly estimate the value of her spiritual
state of mind were but few; yet the most careless could
not help being struck with her affectionate seriousness,
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 117

her knowledge of the Scriptures, and her happy applica-
tion of them to her own ease. “The holy spark divine,”
which regenerating grace had implanted in her heart,
brightened as she drew near the close of life, and kindled
into a flame which warmed and animated the beholder.
To some, | am persuaded, her example and conversation
were made a blessing. Memory reflects with gratitude,
while I write on the profit and consolation which I indi-
vidually derived from her society. Nor I alone. The
last day will, if I err not, disclose farther fruits, resulting
from the love of God to this little child; and, through
-her, to others that saw her. And may not hope indulge
the prospect, that this simplé memorial of her histo
shall be as an arrow drawn from the quiver of the Al-
mighty to reach the heart of the young and thoughtless ?
Direct its course,O my God! May the eye that reads,
and the ear that hears, the record of little Jane, through
the power of the Spirit of the Most High, each become a
witness for the truth as it is in Jesus!

I remembered the tender solicitude of this dear child
for her mother. I well knew what a contrast the dispo-
sitions and conduct of her parents exhibited, when com.
pared with her own,

I resolved to avail myself of the first opportunity I
could seize, to speak to the mother in the child’s pres-
ence. One morning soon after the interview above rela-
ted, I chose another path for my visit. The distanee was
_ not quite half a mile from my house. The path was re-
tired, I hereby, avoided the noise and interruption which
even a village street will sometimes present to disturb
the calmness of interesting meditation.

AsI passed through the churchyard and cast my eye
on the memorable epitaph; “Soon,” I thought within
me, “will my poor little Jane mingle her mouldering re-
mains with this dust, and sleep with her fathers! soon
will the youthful tongue which now lisps hosannas to the
Son of David, and delights my heart with the evidences
of early piety and grace, be silent in the earth! Soon
shall i called to commit her body to the ground,
118 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

‘earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust.’ But O!
what a glorious change! Her spirit shall have then re-
turned to God who gave it. Her soul will be joining the
hallelujahs of Paradise, while we sing her requiem at the
grave. And her very dust shall here wait, ‘in sure and
certain hope of a joyful resurrection from the dead.’”

. I went through the fields without meeting a single ‘in-
dividual. I enjoyed the retirement of my solitary walk ;
various surrounding objects contributed to excite useful
‘meditation, connected with the great subjects of time and
eternity. I was now arrived at the stile nearly adjoining
her dwelling. The upper window was open, and I soon
distinguished the sound Of voices: I was glad to hear
that of the mother. I entered the house-door unperceived
by those above’stairs, and sat down below, not wishing
as yet to interrupt a conversation which quickly caught
my ear.

“Mother! mother! I have not long to live. My time
will be very short. But I must, indeed I must say some-
thing for your sake before I die. O mother! you havea
soul—you have a soul; and what will become of it when
~~ die? O my mother, 1 am so uneasy about your
soul.”

“O dear, ! shall lose my child—she will die—and what
or do when you are gone, my Jane ?”—~she sobbed

oud.

“Mother, think about your soul. Have you not neg-
lected that ?”

“Yes, I have been a wicked sinner, and not loved that
which was good. What can I do”

“ Mother, you must pray to God to pardon you for
Christ’s sake. You must pray.”

“ Jane, my child, | cannot pray; I never did pray in all
my life. I am too wicked to pray.”

“ Mother, I have been wanting to speak to you a long
time; but I was afraid to do it. You did not like me to
say anything about yourself, and I did not know how to
begin. But indeed, mother? must speak now, or it ma
be too late. I wish Mr. —~'was here, for he could talk
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 119

to you better than I can. But perhaps you will think of
what I say, poor as it is, when] am dead. Iam buta
young child, and not fit to speak about such things to any-
ody. But, mother, you belong to me, and I cannot bear

to think of your perishing forever. My Lord and Saviour
has shown me my own sins and corruptions; he loved
me and gave himself for me; he died and he rose again ;
I want to praise him for it forever and ever. I hope I
shall see him in heaven; but I want to see you there
too, mother. Do, pray do, both father and you, leave
off swearing and all other bad ways; go to church and
hear our minister speak about Jesus Christ, and what he
has done for wicked sinners. He wishes well to souls,
He ee me the way, and he will teach you, mother.
Do not be angry with me, mother; I only speak for your
good. I was once as careless as you are about the things
of God. But I have seen my error. I was in the broad
road leading to destruction, like many other children in
the parish, and the Lord saw me, and had mercy upon me.”

“Yes, my child, you was always a good girl, and mind-
ed your book.”

“No, mother, no; not always. I cared nothing about

oodness, nor my Bible, till the minister came and sent

for us, as _ now, on Saturday afternoons. Don’t
you remember, mother, that at first you did not like me
to go, and said you would have no such godly pious doings
about your house; and that I had better play about the
streets and fields, than to be laughed at and made
of for pretending to be so good? Ah, mother! you did
not know what I went for, and what God designed for
me and my poor sinful soul. But, thank God, I did go,
and there learned the way of salvation. Mother, I wish
you had learned it too.”

As I listened to this affecting conversation, it appeared
to me, from the tone and manner of the mother’s voice,
that she was more under the influence of temporary grief,
on account of her child’s extreme illness, than sincere
sorrow*for any real sense ofther sins. I however hoped
the best, and rejoiced to hear such weighty and impor-
120 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

tant exhortations dropping from her daughter's lips. I
felt that present circumstances rendered it far more val-
uable than my own could have been.

I have often, since that time, seen the wicked and care-
less much affected while sitting by the dying bed of a
near relative: I have witnessed their temporary acknowl-
edgments of sin, and heard their professions of amend.
ment. But, after a short season, all has passed away
like the morning dew. The friend has been buried out
of sight. ‘The world and its cares, the flesh and its sins,
have returned with new temptations, and the eloquence
of iniquity has prevailed over the voice of truth.

_ On the other hand, how frequently have the death-beds

of true believers been blessed to the eye-witnesses of the
triumphs of grace over sin, death, and hell! Often has
the careless bystander received the first saving impres-
‘sion of divine truth, while the dying Christian has expe-
rienced and testified the supports of love and mercy in
the trying hour. At such seasons, faith wields a bright
and burning torch, which occasionally softens the hard-
est, and warms the coldest heart. The expressions of
that heavenly consolation and devout solicitude which
the Holy Spirit vouchsafes to some, thus become the
happy means of grace and blessing for the conversion and
edification of others,

At this moment the house-door opened, and a younger
child, a brother of Jane’s, came in. The mother asked
from above, who it was: the boy replied; and, without
farther inquiry, she remained in the chamber. I beckon-
ed to the lad to sit down quietly; and thus it stil] re-
mained unknown that I iran belo,

“ Mother,” continued Jane, “that is my brother, and
will soon be your only remaining child. Do, pray, en-
courage him to follow good ways; and send him to Mr.
——, and he will be kind to him, as he has been to me.
He is a wild boy, but I hope he will be brought to think
about his soul in time. Those naughty wicked boys
teach him to swear and fight, and run after all nanner
of evil. Lord, help him to flee from the wrath to come.”
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 121

I made a sign to the boy to listen to what his sister said
concerning him. He seemed to hear with attention, and
a tear dropped down his cheek.

“ Ay, Jane, it is hoped that he will, and that we all shall
likewise.”

“ Mother, then you must flee to Christ. Nothing you
can do will save you without that. You must repent
and turn from sin—without the grace of God you will
never do it; but seek, and you shall find it, Do, for
your own sake, and for my sake, and my little brother’s

e,”’ "

The woman wept and sobbed, without replying. Inow
thought it time to appear, went to the bottom of the stairs,
and said, “ May a friend come up?”

“ Mercy on me!” said the mother; “ there is Mr. ——.”

“Come in, Sir,” said Jane; “I am very glad you are
come now. Mother, set a chair.”

The woman looked rather confused; Jane smiled as I
entered, and weleomed me, as usual,

“T hope I-shall be forgiven both by mother and daugh-
ter, for having remained so long below stairs, during the
conversation which has just taken place. I came in the
hope of finding you together, as I have had a wish for
some time past to speak to you, Sarah, on the same sub-
jects about which J] am happy to say your daughter is so
anxious. You have long neglected these things, and I
wished to warn you of the danger of your state; but
Jane has said all I could desire, and I now solemnly ask
you whether you are not much affected by your poor
child’s faithful conversation? You ought to have been
her teacher and instructer in the ways of righteousness; |
whereas now she is become yours. ippy; however, will
it be for you, if you are wise and consider your latter
end, and the things which belong to your peace, before
they are hidden from your eyes! Look at your dying
child, and think of your other and only remaining one, an
say whether this sight does not call aloud upon you to
hear and fear.” |

Jane’s eyes were filled with tears while Ispoke. The

11
122 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

woman hung her head down, but betrayed some emo-
tions of dislike at the plain dealing used towards her.

“ My child, Jane,” said I, “ how are you to-day ?”

“Sir, I have been talking a good deal, and feel rather
faint and weary, but my mind has been very easy and
happy since I last saw you. I am quite willing to die
when the Lord sees fit. I havé no wish to live, except
it be to see my friends in a. better way before I depart.
Sir, I used to be afraid to speak to them; but I feel
to-day as if I could hold my peace no longer, and I must
tell them what the Lord has done. for my soul, and what
I feel for theirs.” — Bie ek

There was a firmness, I may say dignity with which
this was uttered, that surprised me. ‘The character of
the child seemed to be lost in that of the Christian: her
natural timidity yielded to a holy assurance of manner,
resulting from her own inward consolations, mingled
with spiritual desire for her mother’s welfare. This
produced a flush upon her otherwise pallid countenance,
which in no small degree added to her interesting appear-
ance. ‘The Bible lay open before her as she sat up in
the bed. With her right hand she inclosed her mother’s.

“ Mother, this book you cannot read ; you should there-
fore go constantly to church, that you may hear it ex-
plained. It is-God’s book, and tells us the way to
heaven; I hope you will learn and mind it; with God’s
blessing it may save your seul. Do think of that, moth-
er, pray do. Iam soon going todie. Give this Bible to
my brother; and will you,be so kind, Sir, as to instruct
him? Mother, remember what J say, and this gentleman
is witness: there is no salvation for sinners like you and
me, but in the blood of Christ; he is able to save to the
uttermost; he will save all that come.to him; he waits
to be gracious; cast yourself upon his mercy. I wish—
I wish—I—I.” |

She was quite overcome, and sank away ina kind of
fainting fit. |

Her mother observed that she would now probably
remain insensible for some time before she recovered.
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 123

I improved this interval in a serious address to the
woman, and then prepared to take my departure, perceiy-
ing that Jane was too much exhausted for further con-
versation at that time. -

As I was leaving the room the child said faintly,
“Come again soon, Sir my time is very short.”

I returned home by the same retired road which I had
before chosen. I silently meditated on the eminent
proofs of piety and faith which were just afforded me in
the scene I had witnessed. Surely, I thought, this is an
extraordinary child! What cannot grace accomplish !
Is it possible to doubt, after this, who is alone the Author
and Finisher of salvation? or from whom cometh every
good and perfect gift? How rich and free is the mercy
of Jehovah! Hath not he “chosen the weak things
of the world to confound the things which are mighty ?”
Let no flesh glory in his presence; but he that glorieth,
Jet him glory in the Lord.

_ Ata very early hour on the morning of the following
day, I was awoke by the arrival of a messenger, bringing
an earnest request that I would immediately go to the
child, as her end appeared to be just approaching. It
was not yet day when I left my house to obey the sum-
mons. ‘The me star shone conspicuously clear.
The moon cast a mild light over the prospect, but grad-
ually diminished in brightness, as the eastern sky became
enlightened. ‘The birds were beginning their song, and
seemed ready to welcome the sun’s approach. The dew
plentifully covered the field, and hung suspended in drops
from the trees and hedges. A few early laborers ap-
peared in the lanes, travelling towards the scene of their
daily occupations. All bestia was still and calm. My
mind, as I proceeded, was deeply exercised by thoughts
concerning the affecting events which I expected soon to
witness, The rays of the morning star were not so
beautiful in my sight as the spiritual lustre of this young
Christian’s character. Her night was far spent; the
morning of .a better day was at hand. When I arrived
at the house I found no one below; I paused a few min-
124 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

utes, and heard the girl’s voice very faintly saying, “ Do
you think he will come? I should be so glad—so glad
to see him before I die.”

I ascended the stairs—her father, mother, and brother,
together with the elderly woman before spoken of, were
in the chamber. Jane’s countenance bore the marks of
speedy dissolution. Yet although death was manifest in
the languid features, there was something more than
ever interesting in the whole of her external aspect. The
moment she saw me,a renewed vigor beamed in her eyes
—grateful affection sparkled in the dying face.

Although she had spoken just before | entered, yet for
some time afterwards she was silent, but never took her
eyes off me. There was animation in her look—there
was more—something like a foretaste of heaven seemed
to be felt, and gave an inexpressible character of spiritual
beauty even in death.

At length she said, “ This is very kind, Sir—I am going
fast—I was afraid I should never see you again in this
world ?”

I said, _ My child, are you resigned to die ?”

a Qui 3

“ Where is your hope ?”

She lifted up her finger, pointing to heaven, and then
directed the same downward to her own heart, saying
successively as she did so, “Christ there, and Christ
here.’

These words, accompanied by the action, spoke her
meaning more solemnly than can easily be conceived.

A momentary spasm took place. Looking towards her
weeping mother, she said, “I am very cold, but it is no
matter, it will soon be over.” _

She closed her eyes for about a minute, and on open-
ing them again, she said, “I wish, Sir, when I am gone,
you would tell the other children of the parish how good
the Lord has been to me, a poor sinner—tell them that
they who seek him early will find him—tell them that the
ways of sin and ignorance are the ry os) ruin and hell;
ne pray tell them, Sir, from me, that Christ is indeed the
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 125

way, the truth, and the life; he will in no wise cast out
any that come. Tell them, that I, a poor girl——”

She was quite exhausted, and wall for a while, into a
torpid state, from which, however, she recovered gradually,
uttering these expressions : * Where am I ?~I thought I
was going—Lord, save me.”

“ My dear child, you will soon be forever in his arms
who is now guiding you, by his rod and staff, through the
valley of the shadow of death.”

“] believe so, indeed I do,” said she; “I long to be
with him! 0, how good, how great, how merciful !—
Jesus, save me, help me through this last trial.”

She then gave one hand to her father, the other to her
mother, and said, “God bless you—God bless you—seek
the Lord—think of me when J am gone—it may be for
your good—remember your soul ! for Christ’s sake,
remember your souls, then all may be well; you cannot
know what I have felt for both of you. Lord, pardon and
save my dear father and mother !”

She then took hold of her brother’s hand, saying,
“Thomas, I beg of you to leave off your bad ways; read
the Bible—I give you mine—I have found it, a precious
book. Do you not remember oor little brother who died
some years since '~he was praying to the last moment
of his life. Learn to pray when you are in health, and you
will find the comfort and power of it when you come to
die ; but first of all pray for a new heart—without it you
never will see God in heaven; your present way leads to
misery and ruin. May the Lord turn your heart to love
and follow him.” |

To the other woman she said, “I thank you, Dame
K , for all your kindness since I have been ill; you
have been a Christian friend to me, and ] hope the Lord
will remember you for it, according to his rich mercy.
You and I have many a time talked entas about death ;
and though I am the youngest, he calls me first to pass
through it; but, blessed be his name, I am not terrified.
I once thought I never could die without fear, but indeed
I feel quite happy now it is come; and so will you, if

1]


126 ANNALS OF THE POOR.

you trust him—he is the God both of the old and the
young.’

“ Ah, my child!” said the woman, “I wish I was as fit
to die as you are; but I fear that will never be—my sins
have been many, very many.”

“ Christ’s blood inanstt from all sin,” said the child.

At this moment, instead of growing weaker through
the fatigue of so much speaking, she seemed to gather
fresh strength. She turned to me with a look of surpris-
ing earnestness and animation, saying,

“You, Sir, have been my best friend on earth; you
have taught me the way to heaven, and I love and thank
you for it—you have borne with my weakness and my
ignorance—you have spoken to me of the love of Christ,
and he has made me feel it in my heart—I shall see him
face to face—he will never leave me nor forsake me—
he is the same, and changes not. Dear Sir, God bless

ou.

The child suddenly rose up, and with an unexpected
exertion threw her livid, wasted arms aroundme as | sat
on the bedside, laid her head on my shoulder, and said
distinctly, “God bless and reward you—give thanks for
me to him—my soul is saved—Christ is everything to
me. Sir, we shall meet in heaven, shall we not ?—O

es, yes—then al] will be peac e—peace——”
She sunk back on the bed, and spoke no more—fetch-
ed a deep sigh—smiled, and died.

At this affecting moment the first rays of the morning
sun darted into the room, and seemed to describe the
glorious change which her soul had now experienced.

For some time [ remained silently gazing on the breath-
less corpse, and could hardly persuade myself that Jane
was indeed no longer there.

As I returned homeward, I found it difficult to repress
the strong feelings of affection which such a scene had
excited. Neither did I wish it. Religion, reason, and
experience rather bid us indulge, in due place and season,
those tender emotions which keep the heart alive to its
more valuable sensibilities. Jesus himself wept over the
THE YOUNG COTTAGER. 127

foreseen sorrows of Jerusalem. He wept also at the
grave of his friend Lazarus. Such an example conse-
crates the tear of affection, while it teaches us, concerning
them which are asleep, not to “ sorrow as those that have
no hope.”

I s6on fell into meditation on the mysterious subject
of the flight of a soul from this world to that of depart-
ed spirits. “Swifter than the rays of light from the sun,
has this child’s spirit hastened, in obedience to its sum-
mons from God, to appear in his immediate presence.”
How solemn a truth is this! But, washed in the blood
of the Lamb that was slain, and happily made partaker
of its purifying efficacy, she meets her welcome at the
throne of Go Sin, death, and hell are vanquished
through the power of Him who hath made her more than
conqueror. He will himself present her to his Father, as
one of the purchased lambs of the flock—as one whom
the Spirit of God ‘ has sealed unto the day of redemption.’

\“What a change for her! from that poor tattered
chamber, to the regions of Paradise! from a bed of straw
to the bosom of Abraham! from poverty, sickness, and
pain, to eternal riches, health and joy! from the condition
of a decayed, weary pilgrim, in this valley of tears, to
that of a oo traveller, safely arrived at home, in the
rest that remaineth to the people of God! |

“T have lost a young disciple, endeared to me by a
truly parental tie. Yet how can I complain of that as
lost, which God has found? Her willing and weleome
voice no longer seeks or im instruction here. But
it is far better employed. The angele who rejoiced over
her when her soul first turned to God, who watched the
pangpe of her short pilgrimage, and who have now car-
ried her triumphantly to the heavenly hills, have already
taught her to join

‘In holy song, their own immortal strains.’

Why then should I mourn? The whole prospect, as it
concerns her, is filled with joy and immortality : ‘ Death
is swallowed up in victory.’”
128 ANNALS OF THE POOR,

On the fourth day from thence Jane was buried. I
had never before committed a parishioner to the ground
with similar affections. The attendants were not many,
but. I was glad to perceive among them some of the chil-
dren who had been accustomed to receive my weekly
private instructions along with her. I wished that the
scene might usefully impress their young hearts, and that
God would bless it to their edification, As I stood at
the head of the grave during the service, I connected
past events, which had occurred in the churchyard, with
the present. In this spot Jane first learned the value of
that. Gospel which saved her soul. Not many yards from
her own burial-place was the epitaph which has already
been described as the first means of affecting her mind.
with serious and solemn convictions. It seemed to stand,
at this moment, as a peculiar witness for those truths
which its lines proclaimed to every passing reader. Such
an association of objects pboibueok a powerful effect on
my thoughts.

The evening was serene—nothing occurred ‘to inter-
rupt the quiet solemnity of the occasion. “Peace” was
the last word little Jane uttered while living; and peace
seemed to be inseribed on the farewell scene at the grave
where she was laid. A grateful remembrance of that
peace revives in my own mind, as [ write these memori-
als of it; and O! may that peace which passeth all under-
standing be in its most perfect exercise, when I shall
meet her again at the last day. |

Attachment to the spot where this young Christian lay,
induced me to plant a yew-tree close by the head of her
grave, adjoining the eastern wall of the church, I de-
signed it as an evergreen monument of one who was
dear to my memory. The young plant appeared healthy
for a while, and promised by its outward vigor long to
retain its station. But it withered soon afterwards, and,
like the child whose grave it pointed out to notice, early
faded away and died. The yew-tree proved a frail and
short-lived monument. But a more lasting one dwells
in my own heart. And possibly this narrative may be
a

THE YOUNG COTTAGER, 129

permitted to transmit her memory to other generations,
when the hand and heart of the writer shall be cold in
the dust.

Perchance some, into whose hands these pages may
fall, will be led to cultivate their spiritual young plants
with increased hope of success in so arduous an endeavor.
May the tender blossoms reward their care, and bring
forth early and acceptable fruit!

Some, who have perhaps been accustomed to under-
value the character of very youthful religion, may hereby
see that the Lord of grace and glory is not limited in the
exercise of his power by age or circumstance. It some-
times appears in the displays of God’s love to sinners, as
it does in the manifestation of his works in the heavens,
that the /east of the planets moves in the nearest course
to the sun, and there enjoys the most powerful influence
of his light, heat, and attraction.

The story of this Young Cottager ipvolves a clear
evidence of the freeness of the operations of divine grace
on the heart of man; of thé inseparable connection be-
tween true faith and holiness of disposition; and of the
simplicity of character which a real love of Christ trans-
fuses into the soul. |

How many of the hous¢hold of faith, in every age,

“ Alike unknown to fortune and to fame,”

have journeyed and are now travelling to their ‘city of
habitation, through the paths of modest obscurity, and
almost unheeded piety! Itis one of the most interesting
employments of the Christian minister to search out
these lillies of the valley, whose beauty and fragrance are
nearly concealed in their shady retreats. To rear the
flower, to assist in unfolding its excellencies, and bring
forth its fruits in due season, is a work that delightfully
recompenses the toil of the cultivator.

While he is occupied in this grateful task of laboring
in his heavenly Master’s garden, some blightsome tempest
may chance to take away a favorite young blossom in a
premature stage of its growth.
-_~

130 GRAVES OF DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER,

If such a case should befall him, he will then perhaps,
as I have often done, when standing in pensive recollec-
tion at little Jane’s grave, make an application of these
lines, which are inscribed on a grave-stone erected in the
same churchyard, and say,

“ This lovely bud, so young and fair,
Call’d hence by early doom,
Just came to show how’sweet a flower
would bloom.”

VISIT TO THE GRAVES OF THE DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER
AND YOUNG COTTAGER, JULY, 1823.

The most interesting reflections, says a writer in the
London Baptist Magazine for June, 1824, were suggested
by a visit to the Isle of Wighi;* in company with a long-
respected Christian friend, who kindly solicited the writer
to leave, for a few days, the cares and hurry of active
life, for a scene so conducive to health and so exhilarat-
ing to the mind. It was scarcely possible to contemplate
the works of God in that lovely island, without being re-
minded ofthat paradise which contributed to the happi-
ness of our first parents in the days of their innocence,
and which could not THEN fail to excite their holy admi-
ration, and to elicit from them that glory to the Crea-
tor which corresponded with the powers with which
they. were endowed. We were effectually reminded,
however, that the Isle of Wight was not the garden of
— ; for we beheld the memorials and the triumphs of

eath.

On entering the churchyards we saw, in conspicuous
characters, the records of the generation that had passed
away within our remembrance. Near these inseriptions
we saw, in fading characters, a tribute of respect to the

* This beautiful island, which is about twenty-one miles long and
thirteen broad, lies near the Southern shore of England. ,
AND YOUNG COTTAGER, 131

Sea that passed away in the days of our fathers.
e also saw stones and monuments covered with yellow
and hoary lichen, and containing an account of the grand-
fathers, and great-grandfathers, and still more remote
ancestors, till our attempts to make out the inscriptions
ceased to be successful. On these occasions the reader
may easily conceive that we were strongly impressed with
the awful and extensive dominion of the king of terrors.
Our object, however, was not so much to visit the tombs
of the unknown among the dead, as to repair to those
churehyards where we could find the ‘sequestered spots
devoted to those concerning whom we each could say,
“ Let me die the death of the righteous, and Jet my last
end be like his!” In such researches we found the grave
of “ Little Jane,” the “ Young Cottager,” in Brading church-
yard, where the writer copied her epitaph.

On the following day, (July 16, 1823,) we visited the
cottage where “the Dairyman’s Daughter” had resided,
and where she closed the days of her pilgrimage. Her
mother, we were informed, did not long survive her affee-
tionate daughter; and the aged Dairyman, we learned,
had been dead a few years. ‘The _— is now occupied
by her brother and his wife, both of whom we saw: and
among other ed we were highly grat-
ified with 4 sight of Elizabeth’s Bible; on inspecting
which, we saw not only her own hand-writing, but also
that of a succession of ancestors for more than a century
before her death.

Proceeding over the same ground as the funeral pro-
cession had done, we arrived at Arreton churchyard,
where we found, without difficulty, the grave we sought.
Indeed, every child seemed perfectly familiar with the
spot. :

The interesting Memoir, by Rev. T. 8. Grimshawe, of
the Author of the “ Dairyman’s Daughter,” “ the ae
Cottager,” and the “ African Servant,” substantiates eac
of those Tracts as x Narrative of facts which occurred
under the author’s ministry in the Isle of Wight, where
he labored nearly eight years, when, in 1805, he was re-
132 GRAVES OF DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER,

moved to Turvey, where he died, May, 1827, in the 56th —
year of his age, and the 30th of his er:

The Memoir contains a letter from Mr. John Higgins,
a friend of Rey. Mr. Richmond, who, having obtained
from him permission to examine the original letters of
the Dairyman’s Daughter, says, “ It was not without pleas-
ure and surprise I found, on the perusal of the originals, |
that they were in every respect as he had given them,
with the exception of the bad. spelling, the unnecessary
use of capital Jetters, and a word which was here and
there added or omitted to make the young woman’s mean-
ing more intelligible.”

The Memoir also states that the Rev. Mr. Hughes, one
of the Secretaries of the British and Foreign Bible Socie-
ty, visited the spot where the Dairyman’s Daughter for-
merly resided, and “ interrogated her brother, whether the
circumstances of the story were precisely the same as re-
lated in the Tract. To this he replied, there was only
one fact that was misrepresented. Being asked, with
some degree of anxiety, what the fact was, he observed,
that Mr, Richmond had described a vine, trained by the
side of the window, whereas it was not a vine, but an
apple-tree.”

othing could be more satisfactory as to the essential
authenticity of the, Narrative. The Memoir states (in
1828) that 4,000,000 copies of this Tract were said then
to have been circulated in nineteen different languages,

The reports of Tract Societies relate multitudes of —
instances in which this Tract has been blessed in the con-
version of souls to God. Many such accounts were di-
rectly transmitted to the author, the last of which, receiv-
ed by him but 24 hours before his death, was that of a
clergyman whose antipathy against Tract Societies had
induced him to select the Dairyman’s Daughter for the
purpose of criticizing and exposing its defects, In the
perusal of it he was so penetrated by the truths it con-
tained, that the pen of criticism fell from his hand, and
he was himself added as another trophy of Divine e.

In 1822, Rev, Mr. Richmond visited the Isle of Wight,
AND YOUNG COTTAGER. * 133

and the following is an extract of a pastoral letter, ad-
dressed, during his absence, to his a at Tur-
vey: “I went one day to a part of my old parish where
religion most prevailed, and sent word that I should be
glad to shake hands with as many as would come down
to the sea-shore, where I sat upon a rock. More than
500 men, women, and children came, and I gave each a
Tract and a blessing. It was a scene full of deep and
trying affections. 1 can never describe it, or think of it,
without ardent feelings. We have put up grave-stones
to Little Jane and the Dairyman’s Daughter. Some
hundreds attended, and the Tracts were distributed that
respect those dear persons. It was a time of great feel-
ing, and a tribute of much love was paid to the graves of
the deceased. Seme were there weeping with gratitude
in having been brought to God through the reading of
these very Tracts. 'The father and mother of Little Jane
were at the grave while the stone was putting up. We
then went to the house where she died, and the ‘ Youn
Cottager’s’ Tract was given to every one that came. it
will be a sweet day of remembrance to me, for it took
place on September 12. On that day, twenty-five years
ago, I first received my own serious impressions through
reading Mr, Wilberforce’s beok on Christianity, in my
little study, at Brading; and Little Jane was the first
fruits of my change of principles.” |

The Rev. Mr. Richmond received, in Scotland, numer-
ous testimonies to the usefulness of his Tracts. On one
occasion he distributed a copy of the ‘ Young Cottager’
to each of sixty Sabbath School scholars, who encireled
themselves around him. “Not an eye,” he says, “was
dry, and my own with difficulty allowed me to g0 through
the simple and interesting ceremony. One girl, who was,
two years since, converted by God’s blessing on this
Tract, as she approached me was so affected, that she
dropped on her knees and burst into tears.”

12
—

134 GRAVES OF DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER,

The first of the following epitaphs on the coin
of the Dairyman’s Daughter and the Young Cottager, was
written by a lady, the other by the faithful and affection-
ate minister to whom the world is indebted for these
records of their religious experience. oe

TO THE MEMORY OF
ELIZABETH WALLBRIDGE,
“THE DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER.”
Who died, May 30, 1801, aged 31 years.

She being dead, yet speaketh,

Stranger, if e’er, by chance or feeling led,
Upon this hallowed turf thy footsteps tread,
Turn from the contemplation of this sod,
And think on ber whose spirit rests with God.
Lowly her lot on earth; but He, who bore
Tidings of grace and blessings to the poor,
Gave her, his truth and faithfulness to prove,
The choicest pleasures of his boundless love—
Faith, that dispell’d affliction’s darkeat ,
Hope, that could cheer the passage to the tomb,
Peace, that not Hell’s dark legions could destroy,
And love, that filled the soul with heavenly joy ;
Death of its sting disarm’d, she knew no fear,
ae pence Be eee oe lingered here.
p t; May we, like thee, be bleat—
In life be faithful, aad in dpaith find. vent.

SACRED TO THE
MEMORY OF LITTLE JANE, — _
Who died, Jan. 30, 1799, in the 15th year of her age.

Ye who the power of God delight to trace,
And mark with joy each monument 4f grace,
Tread lightly o'er this grave, as ye |

“The short and simple annals of the poor.”
A child reposes underneath this sod,

A + ee ee aoa to God.
Rejoice, yet a8 thetic tear—
Jane, the “ Young Cotinger,” lies buried here,
AND YOUNG COTTAGER, 135

| ad

JOURNAL OF A VISIT TO THE ISLE OF WIGHT, BY REV.
JAMES MILNOR, D.D., CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE OF THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, IN THE
YEAR 1830,

- Werwere now approaching Brading, where the Rev.
Legh Richmond commenced his ministry, were passing
through the rich and delightful scenery which -he so
tastefully describes, and about to behold, and in some
instances to press with our footsteps, those almost hal-
lowed spots on which occurred events the remembrance
of which he has perpetuated in those memorable Tracts,
the “ Young Cottager,” the “African Servant,” and the
“ Dairyman’s Daughter.” . We had with us these invalu-
able Tracts, and employed ourselves in reading such
parts of them especially as were calculated to direct our
attention to the several. places which he does not name,
but describes with such fidelity to nature, that the obser-
vant traveller needs no other guide to point them out. I
am glad that we’can bear our testimony to the accuracy
of his descriptions, because many have supposed them to
be principally fanciful, and on this account much that
adds greatly to the interest of his narrative, and is highly
instructive in showing the Christian the religious feeling
with which the works of the great Creator should be
viéwed, and the profitable use to which their contempla-
tion may be applied, has been in many editions of them
@mitied. Though not so intended by the curtailers of
these Tracts, the retrenchments, in my opinion, is an in-
justice to their lamented author, and an injury to the
narratives themselves. |

On arriving at Brading, we drove immediately to the
churchyard where are interred the remains of little Jane.
There were sevéfal children playing near the gate. I
asked a fine-looking little gir] if she could show us the
grave of Jane, the Young Cottager. “O yes,” she said,
and advanced before us as our guide. After showing us
the grave of Jane, and standing over it as long as we
136 GRAVES OF DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, ©

desired, in silent, but affecting meditation, she told us —
she would show us the verses on Mr. and Mrs. Berry’s
tomb-stone, that Jane had got by heart, and repeated to
Mr. Richmond, “ Well, my dear,” said I, “ the a’
of these verses helped Jane to become a good girl, an
to die happy, did it not?” She answered, “ Yes, Sir,” as
she did my next inquiry, whether she would not try to be
as good a girl and die as happy as little Jane. The epi-
taphs which little Jane committed to memory, and espe-
cially the one on Mr. B.’s tomb-stone, which was probably
the means, under God, of her first serious impressions,
are both pious and es and their influence on the
mind of this youthful candidate for heaven may show the
simple means the Holy Spirit often employs to accom-
plish the conversion of the soul to God.

We went from the graveyard into the church, a very
ancient structure, not less, the sexton assured, us than
eleven hundred years old, It has been enlarged since its
first erection, and is remarkable for nothing in its interi-
or, but two singular tombs with wooden effigies of the de-
ceased, several] plainer but apparently very old monuments
of stone, and a most helter-skelter inconvenient arrange-
ment of the pews. ‘Its location, however, is at once se-
questered and convenient to the village, above which it
is considerably elevated. The parsonage, a comfortable-
looking abode, is immediately adjacent to the churchyard.
From the church, the view of Brading Haven, the bay
beyond, the elevated hill on the right, and the a
bank upon the left, and the other scenery describe Ff,
Mr. Richmond in the Young Cottager, as seen from this
epots are all just as there represented. On our way from

rading to Sandown-bay, the prospects were variegated
and pleasing, and as we passed the fort, we emerged
upon one of the grandest views of the ocean through the
bay we had yet seen. Here was pointed to us the high
down, which Mr. Richmond describes in the African Ser-
vant, the perpendicular cliff in which it terminates, and
the jutting rock under which he discovered and conversed
so interestingly with his sable friend. Nothing could be


AND YOUNG COTTAGER. 137

mote true to nature than the surrounding scenery as he
describes in that Tract.

We saw the cottage of the celebrated John Wilkes, in
the garden of which are flourishing several rose-bushes,
said to have been planted by his own hands. It is very
near the water, but on an eminence so raised above it as
to present an extensive sea-view. We then proceeded on
to the village of Shanklin, consisting of a few neat cot-
tages, and stopped at a residence bearing nothing of a
tavern aspect, but affording us the refreshment we need-
ed. After our lunch we walked down to what is called
Shanklin Chine, a large romantic fissure or chasm in the
cliff that fronts upon the sea. The descent to the beach is
7 an ordinary road, and then you return again through the
chasm to Shanklin. No description extant of this singu-
lar spot is either. so minutely accurate or so beautiful as
that given by Mr. Richmond in the “ Young Cottager,”
as one of his places of solitary religious meditation. We
occupied the same “ little hollow recess in the cliff” from
which he surveyed and delineated the scenery around.
We there read deliberately his graphic description of the
various interesting objects that: lay before him, and could
discern no difference between it and the noble scene in
actual view, except that a mist hid from us “ the tower-
ing spire” of the Chichester cathedral, that in these
ful times we beheld no “ frigate standing in the bay,” and
but few vessels of any description happened at that time
to enliven the prospect. We lingered long upon and near
the beach, and then proceeded up the chine, along the
side of which the fishermen have formed a convenient
footpath, with a resting-place or two on the way, where
an interesting point of observation happened to offer.
Several neat cottages with small gardens have been erect-
ed within the fissure, each of which, while sheltered from
the weather by its lofty sides, enjoys an extensive pros-
pect of the sea,

Returning to the village, we resumed our carriage, and
passing by Shanklin church, a neat old edifice, we came
to Bonchurch village, which is quietly seated in what is

12
138 GRAVES OF DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER,

called the undercliff, a deep recess between a very lofty
eminence or down on the inland side, and a high bank
towards the sea. We got out of the carriage and pro-
ceeded along the bank, for the sake of the view which it
presented of some excellent scenery not before disclosed.
Below the village we threaded the way down a foot-path
to the road, and got into our carriage, our course now
lying up a valley between gently sloping but lofty hills
on either side. Landscapes of peculiar beauty and varie-
ty, exhibiting numberless fields of grain nearly ripe for
the harvest, herds of cattle and flocks of sheep, with here
and there a company of hay-makers busily employed, pre-
sented themselves in ever-changing aspects as we ascend-
ed or descended the successive slopes of this delightful
valley. We had long in sight, and at length passed at
some distance, the splendid seat and extensive park and
grounds of Lord Yarborough, called Appuldurcomb,
Travellers have given rapturous descriptions of the inte-
rior and its rich collections of paintings and sculpture.
Of these we shall probably never have a sight; but it
was commended to our notice by circumstances of a very
different kind. It was there that the sister of the Dairy-
man’s Daughter died, whose funeral Mr. Richmond at-
tended at the request of the latter; and where, on a visit
about a week after, he had his first conversation with her
whose religious experience, as narrated by that faithful
minister, has had a more extensive influence in the world
than ever attended any similar publication. He gives in
the Dairyman’s Daughter a correct account of the situa-
tion and appearance of Appuldurcomb, and of the adja-
cent scenery. We saw “the summit of the hill adjoin-
ing” the venerable mansion, to which he ascended after
the visit referred to ; the triangular pyramid of stone near
which he sat down to meditate, oa the magnificent sur-
rounding prospect. In full view of this elevated spot we
read his extended description, and turned southward, and
south-eastward, and northward, and westward, and ad-
mired, as he had done, the unequalled beauty of the
scene. Certainly neither of us had ever read the descriptive
AND YOUNG COTTAGER, 189

part of the Dairyman’s Daughter with the like interest
und emotions. My feelings obliged me to resign the
book to my companions, and under the various emotions
the narrative and the scene excited, it was difficult for any
of us to prosecute our reading; but with an intensity of
interest: we gazed upon the lovely prospect until it could
be no Jonger seen.

We now approached Arreton, the village in the ehurch-

ard of which lie interred the mortal remains of Eliza-
eth Wallbridge, the sainted daughter of the Dairyman.
About a mile from it we stopped before the cottage from
whieh her soul ascended to its rest, and were kindly re-
ceived by her ee brother, a man now advanced in
years, and still a resident in the mansion of his birth.
He showed us Elizabeth’s Bible, in which was simply
written, “ Elizabeth Wallbridge, daughter.of Joseph and
Elizabeth Wallbridge ; bern 1771— us up stairs into the room in which she expired. We
added our names to a long list in a book kept by her
brother for the purpose, and then took our leaye; Mr.
Wallbridge in a very respectful manner thanking us for
our visit.

Our simplicity in finding satisfaction in such a visit,
would be a fruitful subject of derision to men of the
world; but if they will indulge our simplicity, and we
can enjoy feelings such as these scenes excited, let them
laugh, and we will delight in everything calculated. to
cherish the memory of the pious dead.

On leaving the cottage, our path was the same as that
over which moved the funeral procession of the Dairy-
man’s Daughter, in the manner so affectingly described
by Mr. Richmond. It lay through a narrow but excel-
lent road, winding between high green hedges, and some-
times under an arch formed by the trees on either side ;
a lofty cultivated hill on the right, and a charming view
of the luxuriant valley now and then breaking upon us
to the left. As we read the account of the solemn
passage of the mourning yet rejoicing relatives and friends
of the deceased, we were ready almost to realize its ac-
140 GRAVES OF DAIRYMAN’S DAUGHTER, ETC.

tual vision, and-hear the pious strains of melody as they
then filled the air and ascended to the skies. ‘Thus pre-
pared, we reached Arreton church, and leaving our car-

iage to ascend the hill without us, we went to the grave
of Elizabeth, read the beautiful lines which love of her
character, and the recollection of her triumphant death
have caused to be inscribed on her simple monument,
meditated for a while on her present glorious state, drop-
a a tear of sympathy, but not of sorrow, and silently re-
tired.

From this to Newport, our destined resting-place, we
could only talk on things connected with the scenesyand
incidents, and reflections of the day ; uniting in the sen-
timent, that Paris, with all its palaces, and gardens, and
paintings, and statues, had afforded no such gratification
to our eyes as the glorious works of God on which the
had dwelt'in this enchanting isjgnd ; and none of its mul-
tiplied attractions ‘such an inward feast as the mental
associations. of this day’s travel had supplied.

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xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20090917_AAAAPC' PACKAGE 'UF00001940_00001' INGEST_TIME '2009-09-17T16:07:35-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:03:22-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300109; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-11T16:30:00-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '60318537' DFID 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEM' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesBinder4.pdf'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 2de4d1a66c9fb87cbb7b31fdcfe8b2f3
'SHA-1' d9929ba078a0106f53cc9af479b00638fb2cb0ae
EVENT '2012-04-05T12:18:24-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'3235912' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEM-norm-0' 'ARCHIVE' 'aip-filesF20090917_AADUEM-norm-0.pdf'
58da86cb029b12e0f1ee0824012f9180
d79804fd7b06451e33762061222ce73658fe025e
'2013-12-11T15:51:28-05:00'
describe
'2013-12-11T15:39:33-05:00'
normalize
'1347003' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_001.jp2'
63cb14afde8af65ca039025eaa14115b
a519cb8b72f91cf3390225a53300c3a79bfb2c5c
'2012-04-05T12:33:25-04:00'
describe
'148047' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_001.jpg'
1ad9f438f72040d08819053977895e61
9ec22bb15a7f15c9ca5e5a08ef33eeccd4216207
'2012-04-05T12:24:13-04:00'
describe
'2292' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_001.pro'
30952e59afa27c92e58f3acaa7e45dfe
11dacaacc20e0d4c3668b75baf3f71bf8be6d53e
'2012-04-05T12:15:39-04:00'
describe
'42383' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_001.QC.jpg'
f950a7fd99ee25ef57b3cd9da2a99c17
768e77e887222c22176ecfa17558fdd337488fc0
'2012-04-05T12:19:40-04:00'
describe
'32359920' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUER' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_001.tif'
4a988a0dddc6bc0ec34e307cf8922933
b7ee5ff6a2215157da5a42a75a13a041e6865db9
'2012-04-05T12:32:21-04:00'
describe
'86' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUES' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_001.txt'
8510c010d6a41d408bbbaddf23deb16b
a1711df4e68128290164ca01696d58c025d11f4f
'2012-04-05T12:19:24-04:00'
describe
'10594' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUET' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_001thm.jpg'
49a79a0efe666f9fbe327105de74053d
83662954274220a2e0b855a668d1d5f664c8d2a7
'2012-04-05T12:22:02-04:00'
describe
'441811' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_002.jp2'
e805991d8ad5260eb0d9e50a496f583a
97b06e08384c254aa44d5b16c0674d3cf20c22dd
'2012-04-05T12:19:52-04:00'
describe
'46209' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_002.jpg'
648d653b1422094cf64547272b7acfee
3e2cde5dc350d56d9428020ab53ab8be16c6ec63
'2012-04-05T12:18:14-04:00'
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_002.pro'
f5da34f160c60ba2980aa3a1a7b96cae
0bc17f7bb4fb1b018f25460ce621d467904501b9
'2012-04-05T12:27:10-04:00'
describe
'19008' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_002.QC.jpg'
cecec953c48132caad8e28ff8ecf9afa
abd0aa2b6b4e3462471ea74cdbf25e06916f91ef
'2012-04-05T12:22:28-04:00'
describe
'26770872' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_002.tif'
07e16d0a6fb12b9e0d69e31d02b9a841
2b3419407fee0bd172d7690482e48315e20fcaa3
'2012-04-05T12:20:03-04:00'
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUEZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_002.txt'
ad3b0e9958189b0e7f9f00e12a6c1b83
12e2b0410c38d4aa83c9802fd91c73dd562aaa29
'2012-04-05T12:34:52-04:00'
describe
'7243' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_002thm.jpg'
97d33cf65ea3e49456aa3a8f57a40a54
9727a1dd5e914cae7fc912334a11cff1206e2529
'2012-04-05T12:33:23-04:00'
describe
'500474' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_003.jp2'
7c49ad64685bdcacafe1b52ed900a99b
360fdc85ada801ec9fc388b7c527eb544330bd29
'2012-04-05T12:34:13-04:00'
describe
'43938' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_003.jpg'
cf80dc59928a004f52a3453b4599ea99
cc377545c12676527345495eeed390f834cd9bfb
describe
'1984' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_003.pro'
5bd55cde7d579481df9b30eb4ad6105a
7cf5e28e8834fcc4b05c66c13243cb7ce03db8b9
'2012-04-05T12:27:05-04:00'
describe
'11899' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_003.QC.jpg'
7ae0567b84be5b7b67359ddbf6784f38
bc9da77aa27cddd99f19dfec45367c04bceacd0c
'2012-04-05T12:21:19-04:00'
describe
'12021780' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_003.tif'
ad57a2099584f33c1141d3b547f8339a
cb0a7f566499bb4006097baa1a8937ba9b695368
describe
'136' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_003.txt'
4a5119e50d6cf04037c4edab17a52584
d5e5deb0f7462568c27b14fb38e400271eb25468
'2012-04-05T12:20:43-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'3654' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_003thm.jpg'
2d94df0ab0d6acc0f273d350e39ae6aa
0cbd765260d57c674b8c32bf3d8a127b787312cd
'2012-04-05T12:33:14-04:00'
describe
'1552018' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_004.jp2'
85b97a7f1b3b47d7c4971e4213bcab83
fa98d01dbf43dee8e9bc2ee77cc32eaffc7e2467
'2012-04-05T12:30:17-04:00'
describe
'55489' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_004.jpg'
c4ab3cc012dba8c528829e93d45afe9d
507a79e5efa79334f8d894bda06b12327ec090f8
'2012-04-05T12:31:02-04:00'
describe
'15036' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_004.pro'
fb071688b73c597b6e3b84894de96542
c0b68cb2001413eb21885432cd50d18a93b70197
'2012-04-05T12:21:58-04:00'
describe
'18709' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_004.QC.jpg'
4a348a1cec61ffabeba2c1c5b0bd93af
1635fd7f0d5cd00029d0f4ff038dc617f8b0ab99
'2012-04-05T12:31:30-04:00'
describe
'37286794' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_004.tif'
8babe9dd37f6d406114496540279c259
f2980f81b47c8b987e93cf59c5fafc5af8af7c76
'2012-04-05T12:25:38-04:00'
describe
'777' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_004.txt'
80ec297803d1d7cf2d389f9ee98a417c
2028464dd516a14071abc7313d21f983caeb2555
'2012-04-05T12:34:40-04:00'
describe
'6914' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_004thm.jpg'
6e5f6e38f286c6d233c4d397acd23ce0
09eda13438a36808bdbfcbd545f6afa5e481b26a
'2012-04-05T12:20:50-04:00'
describe
'1063412' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_005.jp2'
83accc208a94fae69e5d1b9f470e0ad0
b15f7a8321cf859b28dd016dfd5701b424ec963e
'2012-04-05T12:17:41-04:00'
describe
'28677' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_005.jpg'
2cdfe0f1edd4cce1d1b0193b0e2f8b98
ce0cb9dba6a2a6be86acb9765d3a3c526153bc80
'2012-04-05T12:32:05-04:00'
describe
'1763' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_005.pro'
ba002888d8c48e335c89a7d41d366215
dc8898d092288dffad93c39259fefdce9925792d
'2012-04-05T12:16:28-04:00'
describe
'8417' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_005.QC.jpg'
2a5cfa72823e578b6d16c20223534c87
7fdbd39ac37fc2f57d05f1a30eaecdef66afea05
'2012-04-05T12:20:04-04:00'
describe
'35607716' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_005.tif'
0871c73ca9d24ac5e1c2363c811bdff5
0b292d24d97e30bb71fcc1e7a7c4c761cd927e5d
'2012-04-05T12:31:37-04:00'
describe
'118' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_005.txt'
ea384d17c9a3148399c826e31e851de6
6514cbcaa08f5c22edaa6cd4e134d52ae627080d
'2012-04-05T12:34:43-04:00'
describe
'3039' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_005thm.jpg'
b5e01682cc6dc3c5b5952142d6382a83
b880bc784074d68077ca7a191843076675dc8391
'2012-04-05T12:33:05-04:00'
describe
'1552124' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_006.jp2'
92127266790995a5fb1f0491a72bfbc5
ed22cebce7b3e3e1ae74a25d56c79bf1c0ef19e9
'2012-04-05T12:16:13-04:00'
describe
'79148' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_006.jpg'
a5b356e59fa87047e0113b74b34968b9
dd5ef9166a8ffb1fa7b1a5e92cda80d88d2af4aa
'2012-04-05T12:34:36-04:00'
describe
'34448' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_006.pro'
ca2c345011145b23bf756856f92cfc67
0c8ad29efbea65e6a76c57213c92b7ddeb5eacfe
'2012-04-05T12:30:27-04:00'
describe
'27719' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUFZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_006.QC.jpg'
f1fa21e6385ad483656a9d3d7b816444
6f30089f968498688c2f65becac4e7aaf345ec3f
'2012-04-05T12:34:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_006.tif'
ffb4f20067a0a132705de24b3d1fe0a3
ae7a3fba832f998ecaafee3f369912b898985501
'2012-04-05T12:22:20-04:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_006.txt'
17b54d5f8657fcf82b23dc89856f8a4b
12af9520da6f25d3fedd696033a1e90f8808587d
'2012-04-05T12:34:26-04:00'
describe
'8842' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_006thm.jpg'
0820e841b0c420363beb203405786120
cc3bd058767b4a06cdce6605294cc73b1141d2b0
'2012-04-05T12:24:06-04:00'
describe
'1039686' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_007.jp2'
8710a367cc09fb3333a4d88c2630587e
96e406e401bdc3194117e2f581cac0abd1702b0b
'2012-04-05T12:22:07-04:00'
describe
'27532' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_007.jpg'
265b6b57b4e790bbf455fa9ac01a3d16
07a5f3d1e89da157821736ec1c8d55922f2dd500
'2012-04-05T12:23:28-04:00'
describe
'537' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_007.pro'
5ee04416b6af2f7451504653af58b25d
77f8958abb94db5cf26e5bb5e7556f50d7bc2c80
'2012-04-05T12:33:07-04:00'
describe
'8158' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_007.QC.jpg'
fc9058040daf415df5615f34dd6da0f9
cd409fa93804a78a87c100aacdedffd273791936
'2012-04-05T12:21:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_007.tif'
ac358bb7551782750f9fc8c590bef8bd
c3c318a18e4298e5733c2bdeb34d9bc781151466
'2012-04-05T12:16:19-04:00'
describe
'181' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_007.txt'
8efd82cb5af36e53794205158135a00c
113cc0f4ac8cc45134fb4e56295fec4ab8f11b73
'2012-04-05T12:19:58-04:00'
describe
'3087' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_007thm.jpg'
c8acc37e4bd2f8ae004728cbbe6ded04
4dc0df16e0f4a2f0fcdc4caae89ace45821d6410
'2012-04-05T12:22:42-04:00'
describe
'1552133' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_008.jp2'
27d8c57bc97573504ab91a7f4756a035
f973ef5290407d68a6830e053f41c7db6fc10578
'2012-04-05T12:27:04-04:00'
describe
'84682' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_008.jpg'
5f03f6e19b500a5d1a1c90d7ebebabef
b6f5dad043a5bfdf289d211034e0b2615a52c8eb
'2012-04-05T12:26:41-04:00'
describe
'34524' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_008.pro'
d7745934e0b50a5ede9f10b55afac456
9bce6c1c8992b8c54b7bd52d7cfd29a69ba31563
'2012-04-05T12:27:01-04:00'
describe
'28234' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_008.QC.jpg'
2d8eda53962a96e177daf9a245244a6d
57837a96980848311d62afc2fb522d180d769621
'2012-04-05T12:33:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_008.tif'
38bf7324d58054f873a08d52dbff9d75
ea3b3d22fe95940d5d8eacbb0ca80248cb14d48e
'2012-04-05T12:20:37-04:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_008.txt'
13b85bb617e33b4da1df84c987b7ef8d
4687e1857fe85cda8e132a3e4ee5f4a5c3097df7
'2012-04-05T12:22:31-04:00'
describe
'9524' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_008thm.jpg'
34b2bb24b98175e11ca09bcb22447c91
54afa5c9b78c1d010e2f4ad929dfff7d1126d35a
'2012-04-05T12:19:16-04:00'
describe
'1482237' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_009.jp2'
2571681830737c21de308883de7701e4
d13f71ddcada57915f350ea9998a230d12b48b65
'2012-04-05T12:27:22-04:00'
describe
'121095' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_009.jpg'
50cbffa1d21dcce999cb63791ddcdec2
7db63a41fb5378b0e0161a34be5d5ad711eeaf7a
'2012-04-05T12:15:44-04:00'
describe
'58278' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_009.pro'
65a3ddf987bc4baee7bcc52a9a1d797f
8a8ddfd1acf91688f21672f8b79cb689df2c9c15
'2012-04-05T12:20:16-04:00'
describe
'41179' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_009.QC.jpg'
c487a0d374f9930d993ff74b866e9fc3
af6dddff9c4b8bcbf3e2baff014246703fac2a17
'2012-04-05T12:24:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_009.tif'
62b2ab8bf902a237552b76ebee7923ae
94abc176d65a1b2695e359f2eeedf5f3c08b9580
'2012-04-05T12:23:55-04:00'
describe
'2207' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_009.txt'
54f87b56d2ecda7a894c66a05bcacff2
2376b35e7fac93ab82ff95cf98800c8d760ca16c
'2012-04-05T12:16:41-04:00'
describe
'12259' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_009thm.jpg'
8927a45f377d841f6fe34f5bef9f69c8
5dbb7b0967f642ea618c66fd174a636060466945
'2012-04-05T12:23:56-04:00'
describe
'1552120' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_010.jp2'
7b179cfec913407e63f694694a0935d8
3f3df6fd5f06ebffd4a512e5c4b3cff8f4bdc2fe
'2012-04-05T12:25:26-04:00'
describe
'112141' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUGZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_010.jpg'
169642baef4fe425effbe6ff0f417ede
8189a788b8e1e5a2cc0b284af45940862f954427
'2012-04-05T12:18:48-04:00'
describe
'55150' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_010.pro'
108afdad05f042dc1712b1af3693e7a5
04ec429b77a6f13021cd2a5d897df2b429ea2108
'2012-04-05T12:30:01-04:00'
describe
'36726' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_010.QC.jpg'
26abf5c6a4e243e6c48a8d353cb00e16
b31494359597f9f71d0869598b11de3d57e312bb
'2012-04-05T12:24:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_010.tif'
fa3bf31024da8cfd61f67f4cf1f9fdde
51be0f7cbbf12c3d7b44f3ff9e1ec49393be547d
'2012-04-05T12:22:56-04:00'
describe
'2095' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_010.txt'
931c39dea60cf51fc718080e85d8db74
ce7ccbf4eb400b76dc4f0a024c9ad538787d3be2
'2012-04-05T12:23:23-04:00'
describe
'11935' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_010thm.jpg'
92e3f398815c922145d41153d5216dd7
0fc73b3cb8092544429b867a9bcb6ed213d0c8eb
'2012-04-05T12:35:11-04:00'
describe
'1482136' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_011.jp2'
7a36f8cbbf64d79f194614807ec63f0a
bbbf9998e07e0b9cdc411c6abc65b37133d42098
'2012-04-05T12:32:01-04:00'
describe
'122172' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_011.jpg'
9561624d4863d4502f3ad008e2ecc015
66de1851a2068913532ea0776ded3a5aa1a6861f
'2012-04-05T12:20:58-04:00'
describe
'58996' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_011.pro'
f70e4a548b02199381fa08f3c7c9b75b
c187da61db0ef36eafce1413a36719628b14b027
'2012-04-05T12:29:17-04:00'
describe
'40898' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_011.QC.jpg'
e3a101bda44d906ebc3e13c1abddd4ba
40a303c89bffe4c92ee3f8ce1e53485902b4eb2d
'2012-04-05T12:15:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_011.tif'
46091b90e22a3db742b8a5b9a28c73a0
5c8194d55b7e5170e7d837b44f79d5664fb8f7f8
'2012-04-05T12:33:43-04:00'
describe
'2237' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_011.txt'
004c3641be19fc8018432e97d365b214
2dc1a8869fab89d4924834c7b896000ac56578a2
'2012-04-05T12:32:14-04:00'
describe
'12086' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_011thm.jpg'
0aaa32d7a3603dce1f19ed67338c12eb
72b621160cb001384235d9d8355a751fb6e6934e
'2012-04-05T12:19:56-04:00'
describe
'1552140' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_012.jp2'
079d6d2e4d32362acf81d584ef44e106
60eecb4edd477a3d0b8446bf6846a31b0d762742
'2012-04-05T12:22:34-04:00'
describe
'116343' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_012.jpg'
5454a916eb55f980237ad4395f87f0bd
a9789e3f09c4e5933b50ad9fc94af3e8f33ef13e
'2012-04-05T12:25:50-04:00'
describe
'57863' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_012.pro'
ba2bfa96334cfb7a353d564e9233cf43
989fb76e4969b50c20a757858703889bbb493900
'2012-04-05T12:20:59-04:00'
describe
'38604' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_012.QC.jpg'
f017fd01fd2118505cd0f034193c9ce0
3e25b6d894818de7da796bf19a2e8863316674d4
'2012-04-05T12:24:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_012.tif'
4b2d0e1be0e07cca20ffbc22a29a0c82
4f4afae1ffe2e8b1bdcfd13377bcff71d1464844
'2012-04-05T12:32:39-04:00'
describe
'2226' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_012.txt'
209f63a3e3655d71e7f38f2fcb5bbe0a
e07f813a04e6c8cd86bf58150f9a1db37a24ef07
'2012-04-05T12:34:35-04:00'
describe
'11952' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_012thm.jpg'
8635e9ba65e3649e2e80c946b2884df2
38f1bbb4156ba29681d3743628b971bf7db05be6
'2012-04-05T12:33:51-04:00'
describe
'1482205' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_013.jp2'
1cb819abc49ff6159d4695633f98ec8b
4adb174f82fc911c3d8f1e91d70721ace998f5c9
'2012-04-05T12:22:03-04:00'
describe
'121740' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_013.jpg'
6fb1a19bb018857edcab983d22eed80f
b691c0d32809f009326a0e4e9c782b1ecb0de9c3
'2012-04-05T12:16:58-04:00'
describe
'58668' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_013.pro'
4f5ff58586ed2b43ec6cf7984d672949
05f95a6d21b1adca84f6b0e5a3deca5c18197cfd
describe
'40532' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_013.QC.jpg'
11d44f6faa29c2088bbb79e6b8903bfb
2fbe21eb9fa12efccaecd275f8940dfb8668eb33
'2012-04-05T12:24:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_013.tif'
2a2c3a9696f3425235f6b5646e544731
96b0fbf2adc206dcbe854f240c9826f27617bafb
'2012-04-05T12:20:56-04:00'
describe
'2211' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_013.txt'
44103e966111209447cdd53e6e1aaa35
b64b411e3da8e04b1f89f301614f3cb37343f189
'2012-04-05T12:30:40-04:00'
describe
'11827' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUHZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_013thm.jpg'
4cc10a90d4b9d8a3ee12e9aac7c567da
746aba14e04cbf3094772aad6e7a78a0738cb84e
'2012-04-05T12:25:51-04:00'
describe
'1552135' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_014.jp2'
f92af7222911baa59494aacec8f3dfa3
c4ea936ebec4382664b91755b12c7edb96b828b4
describe
'116567' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_014.jpg'
d2bc1a7c1d06fadc89f791e8e96b784e
a20980407c51238bf1df65f4dc78b80e5a18ba40
'2012-04-05T12:30:24-04:00'
describe
'57263' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_014.pro'
231839b6e7123b4505d140789c05fd40
888f149b3c7053d2d34378fa95328e1b53784694
'2012-04-05T12:31:53-04:00'
describe
'38444' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUID' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_014.QC.jpg'
0ecb79b527f95727326f84c1441655e0
c23ec5c549a00f327a67142765562a006a78706d
'2012-04-05T12:34:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_014.tif'
cd7edb1bd1d5bc5e60e9b22ce5fc6fe1
bbbc848755cd32a54b4911002f3992a382927e3a
'2012-04-05T12:22:47-04:00'
describe
'2185' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_014.txt'
c3931f130ff556b70c9c35e9de9ea7ec
10d3d2e1632ddffdc8f822cf8e5054b83a73f18f
'2012-04-05T12:17:16-04:00'
describe
'12227' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_014thm.jpg'
1511170747f0b248f1933d765aa1be63
cfd1622e4f6c6c3d92106fcef21b11b35d2db101
'2012-04-05T12:34:54-04:00'
describe
'1482234' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_015.jp2'
29ef7eeac6661f15a7817cf2a9ffc51f
ccc03add83d2297bbac141639fa34e5158750e11
'2012-04-05T12:21:21-04:00'
describe
'99985' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUII' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_015.jpg'
ed8de498ba1233204b9b2b5827563e75
0a3f0b10e52ce41601069e5858b71f775b97432c
'2012-04-05T12:31:56-04:00'
describe
'45004' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_015.pro'
6cce101b10be888916009bd01fe908ba
5b42d8b0cbc53c8f6ea2df4d9e2374bce3bdbbab
'2012-04-05T12:22:51-04:00'
describe
'33671' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_015.QC.jpg'
07e265b2732b88fbaf65cef84ac90807
dbd3d69eccc3728f8b85546dfa9e4cd516ffe2a4
'2012-04-05T12:19:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_015.tif'
ab433442dc163cb7bb2f47d2935f8fb4
6f70a4942929af16c1aa64b2400307a5c8ac4744
'2012-04-05T12:29:42-04:00'
describe
'1825' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_015.txt'
2a5ce43e10d57b58b6a51392b9d52d35
095f7c811c5b360399b4b0d184bc375cec5c6bc0
'2012-04-05T12:27:19-04:00'
describe
'10160' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_015thm.jpg'
6b4957f54e78793ef7ef9f545be7b398
667c48459dd74d5fa7a8b5066c0c0eee264ba1d9
'2012-04-05T12:25:18-04:00'
describe
'1112177' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_016.jp2'
c078e1250f50c2c2a77fa37eb23cab7b
1a8c930d252d6c9721233daa285ae8d3355ea6ec
'2012-04-05T12:30:26-04:00'
describe
'28460' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_016.jpg'
d5a262c59318223d33fe00c91efd9ad8
ed99431c154f8515cb2ee4a3fc9fd0a65b5ca04f
'2012-04-05T12:33:19-04:00'
describe
'2592' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_016.pro'
7b8b33c7b65c87129088f345e145a269
2bdb36b3494f3b6375be053407e60f9cf04acc01
'2012-04-05T12:15:45-04:00'
describe
'8948' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_016.QC.jpg'
a9049a636618e958aca8389645967c49
83708f578311ffffe484851cb517e05b6ffe294b
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_016.tif'
8f59c464d196386532f10aff71b96ad5
2a5d7749280633bf05a84c99265271152d29955d
'2012-04-05T12:20:13-04:00'
describe
'115' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_016.txt'
ddcb71ea191b958f53ac3dfbb4280afa
e480b0dc3aaa1006483ba579a62a5839cc90c66b
'2012-04-05T12:21:25-04:00'
describe
'3971' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_016thm.jpg'
b1464188234c227351ee232303a515c4
b6b407810ae151bd68bc7c63e3f30651a9f19f53
'2012-04-05T12:25:19-04:00'
describe
'976654' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_017.jp2'
448c8758c2f1f11ce3a597f8bdca37f1
e4da01ecb1d240debbad96044f3f6955150c225e
'2012-04-05T12:15:38-04:00'
describe
'25139' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_017.jpg'
3e3351b1bf4c4159f859dddb3ab9c477
4cae8cdb2822f38d129004d7035b9cdab1217a93
'2012-04-05T12:30:02-04:00'
describe
'830' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_017.pro'
f72919ff550f9cab7428a8592b0396e1
32f820ea3846db7ce54c9c56f5fcf6d49f702b18
'2012-04-05T12:17:30-04:00'
describe
'7504' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_017.QC.jpg'
db002765b188a89de6b27a3fa47c9155
25aea05ae6814a72717c06813f72f50b3f35a28a
'2012-04-05T12:16:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUIZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_017.tif'
d5f43582b50014b6a884d881df4f18cd
4cf68fa84070ceb1c2cce581dbedc042c63e8bc9
'2012-04-05T12:34:25-04:00'
describe
'67' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_017.txt'
42b726dbab3ee67a0d407c8beb67c2ff
94842a600a1e8bbffc8b6da06dbe69b0bb917cf5
'2012-04-05T12:17:50-04:00'
describe
'2774' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_017thm.jpg'
55e04ab63c84c19d28ad88e62e2b51c0
2517bbbf5d19202a6999e40444aa21efa65137fd
'2012-04-05T12:26:54-04:00'
describe
'1552001' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_018.jp2'
264a2e7d0f692cb91eaf7ab4b01137d1
9da3005fc4dd59e6f4a355d620bdafcbb6e693a2
'2012-04-05T12:18:39-04:00'
describe
'89902' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_018.jpg'
f58302b76fdb8601d30bc9898c600822
e771e46627e60d29e0623d6ea50dfd4db567bb80
'2012-04-05T12:16:16-04:00'
describe
'37956' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_018.pro'
30ae4972417b7dfabeb6c5d5b9f532be
58537fb1d44143ad3258df10f63d139cfd469b48
describe
'29644' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_018.QC.jpg'
bb211c87554aa94bd177b258da2ded37
7bc94cde5ac220970ee43eeb35139285a80f7f6d
'2012-04-05T12:32:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_018.tif'
1b4b5b2121da52121fc3a091d63ca727
9eae05d7ee449c4d2243d76de0af74c22f486eef
'2012-04-05T12:34:51-04:00'
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_018.txt'
9afd7cb86dfc6ed3a53cb55990517cd8
28e0f90de9a33bd04116bbe34bdf376bf6f9caec
'2012-04-05T12:29:15-04:00'
describe
'9860' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_018thm.jpg'
fc7e9eb8ce6ed63f06b2b2dc7916692c
752093a8f51e21b39e016c93fde86da18f6cce9f
'2012-04-05T12:24:11-04:00'
describe
'1482236' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_019.jp2'
c12d021f2bf06312198ab614f64d6924
a78726cd1668f6dff4f26ee61eedc1e35d5e5212
'2012-04-05T12:26:20-04:00'
describe
'114253' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_019.jpg'
27cd39e1b2bdaab64a81208ea9587a8d
6e3c6981c04ccd8e1ae80336a121c107edc3bb5c
'2012-04-05T12:34:49-04:00'
describe
'53604' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_019.pro'
87be87263630da8f9e7a9e7ab7d51244
7f304d7ffb3c7da303780c55f3ad7dcc20bb6d13
'2012-04-05T12:20:26-04:00'
describe
'39469' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_019.QC.jpg'
033382d5c17f37c8defb4a54f2b586df
c357492a4bfe267608b32ab0bbf60231136e7299
'2012-04-05T12:34:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_019.tif'
a0228007a46c510e709c355bce94c74f
f1fb15b2233a8a5f2b519d2e84cb127e5f5c92d5
'2012-04-05T12:29:31-04:00'
describe
'2031' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_019.txt'
4e323cd8087366dcaef65fbe998f578d
2da91d12fb2bd6a216868964d7469f7fd9fae5a1
describe
'12024' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_019thm.jpg'
08556738faa4c15c913a3a14b6f31866
8109e0ba43a5cbc081925c921bfe4c00e82a9021
'2012-04-05T12:16:59-04:00'
describe
'1552138' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_020.jp2'
f6279b316fc5d8619f960c8ea483b2a5
48a21ee536bfea4f9d68452ab0cf3d2ced8cfba0
'2012-04-05T12:19:07-04:00'
describe
'107013' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_020.jpg'
a430de3cc89932824281a61f96254d3c
ee130e10e4f7baaa76d54a067c00111ffb7ae1e9
'2012-04-05T12:16:32-04:00'
describe
'49438' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_020.pro'
7501d18fcd0d2f01183e69da4df96601
49f99c17d391af0d06d38cf070ac1b4b3c5abab2
'2012-04-05T12:19:36-04:00'
describe
'36311' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_020.QC.jpg'
5a72522ed7ed198f3c4ea47583ac36ca
36b954d2393bf9d1fe3583183107419e93318618
'2012-04-05T12:28:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_020.tif'
a8334e0e9ff2ca7b7ef5434b108ce5cc
d15eb41b8a2a8d78353f91306b004bb1e561256b
'2012-04-05T12:33:32-04:00'
describe
'1946' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_020.txt'
04770506d7ce5bf5d70d7aac1a547a83
5cb51c0fa921bf27eccf132e2fe70bd1e37ec208
'2012-04-05T12:28:06-04:00'
describe
'12175' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_020thm.jpg'
b73fa2edc79cc008cbdeb0d6ddfa5a66
e348913334ac59416bbc24790040e4dcfa9baa2f
'2012-04-05T12:19:57-04:00'
describe
'1482168' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_021.jp2'
ae7bbb459fabaa2ca6c0b446a3ad0a01
6f5de2f09a7b4dcef2427b62b191719701bb92cd
'2012-04-05T12:30:08-04:00'
describe
'112367' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_021.jpg'
2d02215b2180ca272b0fd0334e798805
6e904f43147ac2d63fafc0207b5928b1fde39909
'2012-04-05T12:32:58-04:00'
describe
'51692' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUJZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_021.pro'
3f64f3181c530868c8af0a9044c06e0e
b1a1f0f8a9d56219fe46da5cd6e65ae8c90c93bd
'2012-04-05T12:20:15-04:00'
describe
'38841' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_021.QC.jpg'
9f02d79ce177a60acc7442afa3c983cf
dd53ce7e96a51223eb89e77fa2dfe136dee3c090
'2012-04-05T12:24:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_021.tif'
a23fca156bd281143f09ccdb126f98e5
31340a541143e919f8b1870fa2282794b7cd961e
'2012-04-05T12:20:39-04:00'
describe
'1967' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_021.txt'
5211069e36c4c927b0e5855e18317b06
9f5785149f17846c429265e4810ca0b9040376e0
'2012-04-05T12:30:30-04:00'
describe
'11754' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_021thm.jpg'
bd9eeae8633a7e9bfe899dfb25c9ba85
8ff47ffb2056238b81821aad503dfd6bba4d1c89
'2012-04-05T12:24:05-04:00'
describe
'1552130' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_022.jp2'
2e59944ed8af7ec865e85dd15fbf00b9
95f353dc5797206e5b28675d9d4439afadd10258
'2012-04-05T12:23:04-04:00'
describe
'113586' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_022.jpg'
ecb3a92a1acf384b12b39d974608273c
f69bf1212390a4fc4ed3fdfdb7f8e0fdbbdbb2c8
'2012-04-05T12:23:52-04:00'
describe
'54558' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_022.pro'
6cef5b43f4f7ccc73b89face2a95567c
95dbfecc4c62a1b373641282d5dd4c79a322c109
'2012-04-05T12:31:27-04:00'
describe
'38490' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_022.QC.jpg'
9542add0f4f1f77495d869f0cefc4ff5
226d23130a37820f26090f36528f8a00281a77f1
'2012-04-05T12:32:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_022.tif'
d3eac97ecfb800ed4badb5e8b2411059
e7504b529438d49f20280882ef97e4f72775dcd6
'2012-04-05T12:24:39-04:00'
describe
'2100' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_022.txt'
0c01de51567bbd4b41ad03939375c6f4
8b70742b50b0cec08038ae0cac48439df05712cf
'2012-04-05T12:33:44-04:00'
describe
'11985' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_022thm.jpg'
dbfa7f22ee903bc4a93d4f2575b240d8
4d5718c9373bd3c2deb57f94392655b973bdb8a2
'2012-04-05T12:20:41-04:00'
describe
'1482224' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_023.jp2'
85c7f9c2706852c24fbc9f38a93cd27e
de1b7193f0a260b06446712b72c57e7d172bccf0
'2012-04-05T12:24:43-04:00'
describe
'118560' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_023.jpg'
b52600968e6c302f769051be83d915ec
e0839b48ed842516aaadea13b61c18491cd9bc7e
'2012-04-05T12:21:45-04:00'
describe
'54870' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_023.pro'
479e9df93d40ac9da3b41d3ab5d12f09
4265d8381973483a0432bd55919c980fa5dc93c3
'2012-04-05T12:27:35-04:00'
describe
'40307' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_023.QC.jpg'
f8705e9ea1500c3670067ef915b0f8ea
7d183a775e9a913b90bee65e766f8951e9670c27
'2012-04-05T12:23:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_023.tif'
7d7941a7bd606f699dcdb56f1219ad23
4ec5ccb27fbce43f0d649070cf76c4041418e573
'2012-04-05T12:34:15-04:00'
describe
'2088' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_023.txt'
a3c84dd67554c126b8bdfb8825e9aef9
f9dc2035eaf9caf601cf8078d3ec1694219b6dd3
'2012-04-05T12:21:48-04:00'
describe
'11864' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_023thm.jpg'
9a5f97ec42c914c1c709356f506c8da9
2b4c056b858263f9a0f67eb0857f9b864a8b6e94
'2012-04-05T12:18:30-04:00'
describe
'1552097' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_024.jp2'
388dece9aff22d7171e47cde074e95a3
4b2495f150bf941d20088907be90e13a6066ab22
'2012-04-05T12:23:08-04:00'
describe
'113964' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_024.jpg'
8e52c4f2ac3c402d8a1ba1e400d11f94
e05533274b5d953ce7b64ad6e288a0eb1b083089
describe
'53669' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_024.pro'
f4be2f677a5436855eb602830a41f128
3b6be054a914ed7e2819b4a155110dd6f4e1c561
'2012-04-05T12:32:04-04:00'
describe
'38042' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_024.QC.jpg'
751433925af9754ff003e7caacbd1bbb
7a95720ede05dc198ddf4f9aa676b0c9af67a389
'2012-04-05T12:27:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_024.tif'
0a03c9e42eac2bfa75d6a99a2883c712
2a8b5da54cfbb5efe5f2a38924e9cb63f8c5ae4d
'2012-04-05T12:31:40-04:00'
describe
'2072' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_024.txt'
12d1e210de7f6cb0d79409f6893c952e
a2cf6a3f0640ed47adca3eaf9bcce7a0e5b728be
'2012-04-05T12:15:53-04:00'
describe
'11919' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_024thm.jpg'
9bae14f649cc62025ad94402cce527d2
007636a3248ba4370bfb22bc3bfb1a38b9b59933
'2012-04-05T12:26:15-04:00'
describe
'1482240' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUKZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_025.jp2'
e42a1bab56b944cbc504084fc652ad35
4abbf2b2ca34c702a9b0af0f16cec93f46507799
'2012-04-05T12:32:00-04:00'
describe
'117873' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_025.jpg'
4cd32c0da2cc4dcbeb526fd59b46e7c4
284996345052fe51ccca85a6cc3825233463a5bb
'2012-04-05T12:28:36-04:00'
describe
'54961' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_025.pro'
99bcae48a10b80a5ccdb0ced2444d68b
b78eda2f000684a7a809d6045097d86eedeba464
'2012-04-05T12:31:44-04:00'
describe
'39786' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_025.QC.jpg'
6af931a3aa2474c95df3e03bdd437a46
1674cb892eff61b169a77632dda0d2a5f9250c41
'2012-04-05T12:23:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_025.tif'
f23c449378b476f4cbe808f3088c2980
d5ec2615f20975cf36301e02ea0e5964f6691be3
'2012-04-05T12:29:57-04:00'
describe
'2079' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_025.txt'
2ba7e4592a2f2d73fd1f53371d13f7e2
41be1ba7c380743d7e005fdf6a97add9b7a541de
'2012-04-05T12:16:00-04:00'
describe
'11786' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_025thm.jpg'
ab13909a5cced4e7a0b82baed5d5aa54
a0cb7b523823b098cda67220f2766d5c80a8cafc
describe
'1552083' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_026.jp2'
4b9ca5880400b565a3743d970439baa8
389dea37757da1d3b5a70ad1887e20ea90305cdb
'2012-04-05T12:34:34-04:00'
describe
'119318' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_026.jpg'
35598f80380fa4c5fde482239e5a8e0c
49a3c0f67dde77a91148093e90cd938682d3ae7e
'2012-04-05T12:25:30-04:00'
describe
'59512' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_026.pro'
26708fe80e2a20dab25b49c83a79f490
316a69d1abfdea725e50c04209425ed0cf3df5ea
'2012-04-05T12:29:12-04:00'
describe
'39163' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_026.QC.jpg'
11c94468f4df66a13357ff5328df3fc8
fd18ab5e1498b42472e0f84ecbb4994c46cc68ca
'2012-04-05T12:17:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_026.tif'
f0e373af49f0591029a818779e9f9e53
7ece4c817cb642a1d957dafab512de6ac4988a8a
'2012-04-05T12:32:28-04:00'
describe
'2281' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_026.txt'
9929be16176bfe283f821b3e41513d33
0ded7bedc1a195b8b5efa0b328c801ce63f891a7
'2012-04-05T12:25:08-04:00'
describe
'12367' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_026thm.jpg'
394da580a22b050ccb74283d6452f4fa
8bbbb9d78eaa1344930e06af1ba3eee2a27b5274
'2012-04-05T12:28:39-04:00'
describe
'1482216' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_027.jp2'
26ea2de6ebfce31005c1f675f60abc52
8caa7570a5f4309832cc21fe06cd725064c7bb58
'2012-04-05T12:28:31-04:00'
describe
'120447' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_027.jpg'
84285c4a51e4d9b0e8c74206a9753b42
a61550d82941cf62038879f2a057551a8d0a3b21
'2012-04-05T12:35:05-04:00'
describe
'57610' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_027.pro'
8fc05f8bd24cfb58bc8864dd3178b852
72094500cc533a495c267950a5153d9a1e17fae4
'2012-04-05T12:23:51-04:00'
describe
'40335' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_027.QC.jpg'
5fb8ad6c8ae21a321649a5bd9dd6238e
ac8d7417458b7dedf2ab963c9743393a5d4e2e92
'2012-04-05T12:32:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_027.tif'
523a3f7fab56c400089c8139a910f467
26d4bd9caa14f6e51ead7599b126b8b328c8d370
'2012-04-05T12:27:34-04:00'
describe
'2175' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_027.txt'
b68d39d44687367285fc3692df2c0ef3
fe734919c6aeb3bc2b4328124fac22b0ddc77cf9
'2012-04-05T12:31:23-04:00'
describe
'11679' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_027thm.jpg'
a8cc7ae6629d2227e866f35069b21f4b
b6b96d90fd60ab973c977fe8227836a643efc645
'2012-04-05T12:18:51-04:00'
describe
'1552077' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_028.jp2'
076fd6d11c2969d0e10f8e15d5c0aa66
edb61582fa929723589a7af37e1817cd8de2d722
'2012-04-05T12:33:37-04:00'
describe
'114033' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_028.jpg'
5b583a9c7bba68ceefef56da428e6b9c
ba0673f3ed06648ca3544d4f583679072ddf12c7
'2012-04-05T12:17:00-04:00'
describe
'55373' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_028.pro'
97f303be7f43bb312ce3773134112cea
554f0a42a792968f60b513eea40ce57719429948
'2012-04-05T12:32:59-04:00'
describe
'37881' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_028.QC.jpg'
f36a10d477ba8d3199ae1057e3ef82a3
7634e97896e7b4ba28da31ae97a61a6cb1fe3a43
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_028.tif'
7ec06eec903a486e590d4ffb0ebe6d0d
0c46ed42017a2727a17e07f578f303cb103caee1
'2012-04-05T12:33:03-04:00'
describe
'2174' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADULZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_028.txt'
3a523203857f2e5e1511feeb8c98b51d
a1cf9b20cdcab891366ad2e32f0494d343646476
'2012-04-05T12:19:20-04:00'
describe
'12209' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_028thm.jpg'
14dadcc282a8150ed9c0a7920de99ca7
a524d4de6e8ae4328cb8b40fabb50490de1bb1c7
'2012-04-05T12:22:22-04:00'
describe
'1482220' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_029.jp2'
e4e9a15882c25053579aa5f728e40a43
1de463f4842de924972fc6574a35c6f31cf13f61
'2012-04-05T12:19:45-04:00'
describe
'120609' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_029.jpg'
9d7ff5314e440fa5247e42717c36d83d
7e24556cc3825a41bf333e7af25e58c7ea8779e8
'2012-04-05T12:27:02-04:00'
describe
'57844' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_029.pro'
8857e434c6182d5a53b880305053f139
ddb4da66082d7a67e35dd062cffa0d0cf9aea288
'2012-04-05T12:18:18-04:00'
describe
'40697' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUME' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_029.QC.jpg'
61959289fc05e0573f642e4cff8c26d2
9de38a0bd29f59c6c210cda91aaf3d574695e3fe
'2012-04-05T12:34:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_029.tif'
9b5fa4c4d2ab9267633815f190ed38b0
fbc607e7a11f6b2e802f5571ab5d4b92e76ca1e5
'2012-04-05T12:35:00-04:00'
describe
'2178' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_029.txt'
9987b32dac4743c1564cc75ce54720a0
8ce0a8dd17e9270df83d1f192da6ef91d862e998
'2012-04-05T12:31:12-04:00'
describe
'11769' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_029thm.jpg'
0b23309340c21ba78008ac62424c12ca
42f1437b96aae03129f9b684c87946406c2f0a0b
'2012-04-05T12:28:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_030.jp2'
d35c2446c4d335e1865578908212f447
136d2c46cbe01e2e0aa01c2fb6c48938bb7699f0
'2012-04-05T12:30:38-04:00'
describe
'114834' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_030.jpg'
b27c056da0e52918a73e1ad975061875
ec639d751e388d291b2872a7d196287c79b46759
'2012-04-05T12:29:24-04:00'
describe
'55425' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_030.pro'
e01fb342689fb13b0b7c32228c3212de
043c98dcfef54484a9d15c13728299ff44e63cd8
'2012-04-05T12:24:46-04:00'
describe
'38535' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUML' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_030.QC.jpg'
0e7ab15c9825c6191d79314781e7c964
345e568647dd28989a58f4d16281cd6db984e3bc
'2012-04-05T12:15:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_030.tif'
ecc7d1864f3cbdff8df1941dc69666a5
22917ba8516a0932ab440683b45a178c715357ba
describe
'2133' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_030.txt'
dbbb13a2c2dff1fce221c55a7648b063
8cbc365158c7cfe72824e18fdcd80f47cd43cfbd
'2012-04-05T12:21:20-04:00'
describe
'12512' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_030thm.jpg'
f4b628ca673ebf39a047a1e9b43e9f05
2e5662aba6ee3fa660ff68aeb416d78932d09a9f
'2012-04-05T12:17:03-04:00'
describe
'1482250' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_031.jp2'
0517173c6f902cc8205f8b7b7b736a9b
6dc99c1da58b9c3e2f8ceec52ade78fb164c0083
'2012-04-05T12:20:57-04:00'
describe
'120373' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_031.jpg'
89a3417ec839a1495cc150ca840964aa
2630fe8867ac640bfd24f06dd6aaf488319f10bf
'2012-04-05T12:31:47-04:00'
describe
'57496' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_031.pro'
591454fb77ee9fd713f54e0ba3f3ecfe
ef08e78717f31d0501a5fab9a3f2c31618f8c166
'2012-04-05T12:18:15-04:00'
describe
'40856' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_031.QC.jpg'
b6998cb2b3fb4dfd9b421f1ea794766d
d5f91704bf0dd57926719ae248cab665db7f4164
'2012-04-05T12:21:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_031.tif'
af66b9f2497b92f316bd79664066ba4f
353515b7db9f671d16d8d9dff0e5c46758ca85d0
'2012-04-05T12:34:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_031.txt'
e7e33123716788f4f8c4888bd1fa6c74
aeb74680a1fc95a04ee4138171564978945cce85
'2012-04-05T12:31:54-04:00'
describe
'11978' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_031thm.jpg'
6f287fb9801aeeb3a6732dbec99b0b4b
8f36576c04e389eac0cdcfb1bd4cdc8793204774
'2012-04-05T12:30:29-04:00'
describe
'1552103' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_032.jp2'
df58efec4c6d9e68552a034ad2c9e501
2ebc6acde7e6b8faf5d82095b30bfce8a296d360
'2012-04-05T12:16:10-04:00'
describe
'112519' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_032.jpg'
a93b3d29cfa4b2bb62cf1c8b34b10e8d
5231b0bcefae979451d1deff738e603c869b80fd
'2012-04-05T12:28:38-04:00'
describe
'54874' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_032.pro'
52695e48166cd81bfd13b71dab5aa8ee
2e47d4f0533daee8efa32c406521d8df4eec2c70
'2012-04-05T12:27:39-04:00'
describe
'37990' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUMZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_032.QC.jpg'
7c72c08ffb7b6ca1ddd233a82e721219
692db74a2bb271f377d92b2331a3851af126c10f
'2012-04-05T12:24:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_032.tif'
712e5fc3dc9d8e8560879cbc9bb70de8
b9d23291b2f5acd5b21a8b196d3f8a952a2b1538
'2012-04-05T12:31:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_032.txt'
751b9a1df6e7b6081a94ebf21e98d2b2
708bdd2260a6e3e26a870f3160607b50762fbc98
'2012-04-05T12:17:09-04:00'
describe
'12323' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_032thm.jpg'
7a758f218c506af49795f3c85d6ee746
f2356ead9d00f89f3a43acd6170dc235d15be494
'2012-04-05T12:27:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUND' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_033.jp2'
28a787cb44a8a310409e1c8f67b60e4c
b6214bbe42cac3a7ac855fc10b39fac5641e833a
describe
'113531' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_033.jpg'
b3cde34f1010c78e53d49d12dc0bae95
86e8eef160ee351b3c5b6cb0973c1600d15d9b45
'2012-04-05T12:26:04-04:00'
describe
'52586' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_033.pro'
e8a8bd02834e318069d6c3e4ac5c0978
0730e89ca8e5a2542a88c414744f6097783bab36
'2012-04-05T12:20:08-04:00'
describe
'38903' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_033.QC.jpg'
32e691d23afe712ed0f07f9b53ff3a72
72713b83a9d9d823876fe1d773e1d53c8b742acc
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_033.tif'
605c255a09771b9f2319e8e8ce1e151e
abd6c9211c710ce41700fc52d785db3f40d415aa
'2012-04-05T12:18:37-04:00'
describe
'2014' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_033.txt'
5e2a8ce96e3b1f40aa885876c15a669a
d2029bc15bd8f5e7cddcff85896707b8b66ef915
'2012-04-05T12:35:12-04:00'
describe
'11651' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_033thm.jpg'
cb562b805d22154d5fc3b86d63e3b6a9
9f90fbab03e5a4f8958079705330a72619e64982
'2012-04-05T12:19:48-04:00'
describe
'1552137' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_034.jp2'
4cb333cc5551dbdb67b0ee681e16e187
8132147d29233370ceab2907354fe7a09b1e0b86
'2012-04-05T12:20:01-04:00'
describe
'101058' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_034.jpg'
93e6cb8d08f9787eef886177b0ecad34
26fee30c5d29d87e9da38b97bc4b9ac7f28ab5ff
'2012-04-05T12:27:13-04:00'
describe
'47421' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_034.pro'
957e8bba1a5b13fa7b0da4a243755a82
5512a167617999241cae0afde033b392d527b788
'2012-04-05T12:19:25-04:00'
describe
'34441' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_034.QC.jpg'
01173a8453353aefc9c4590370b3406b
02ddad2709faa506d2c64ad26346652c437b1757
'2012-04-05T12:34:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_034.tif'
b5b4c482e03a645de64192d6c9e14842
82653ee68ec6f92e373ef70841256ebb479bb57e
'2012-04-05T12:15:57-04:00'
describe
'1888' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_034.txt'
231ebe6f147b6ef46e8b343adb91c8fb
406bc467f7c6d7d6fc2df468ab53421236a32a6b
'2012-04-05T12:26:05-04:00'
describe
'11270' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_034thm.jpg'
ed5007a0c57a9726a247a749a9f56259
c49769c254ca927380efacf96613d237a1d75b68
'2012-04-05T12:20:45-04:00'
describe
'1482242' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_035.jp2'
71f3f791fd9ebfd13146421c8740da87
a714e36a924ebc4239e03038de6e317d3e769666
'2012-04-05T12:23:21-04:00'
describe
'112686' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_035.jpg'
02c7db39b31fb7821ce0b5ebe98a4e29
d2ed9788868b46dc8ec6049199310766a88982b0
'2012-04-05T12:31:42-04:00'
describe
'53063' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_035.pro'
5902ef8318f4e145ca125a81ec2e1176
4e92ae74a68f6d3b9bcbf26889b01e40df331244
'2012-04-05T12:19:30-04:00'
describe
'39028' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_035.QC.jpg'
d63c5eae98e62f74cbbc1688810de6a9
6d2f4317aac3e024e2d2c48fabc0eb0840cad172
'2012-04-05T12:34:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_035.tif'
814ffe22e6bb54b35a89c29fc414b295
d9df4c8918fb9aee6f39ba41c5eca1666c4d3743
'2012-04-05T12:30:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_035.txt'
38146652fae441b0575e501b7be8bd7a
e0184c36bf6e6110adc4ba9d1c701b15c7bdaad3
'2012-04-05T12:29:46-04:00'
describe
'11870' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_035thm.jpg'
03fe5ec5a561511650eb7fe274126487
b96f5a213bd01a6bf77148247161feb89f40d66e
'2012-04-05T12:15:48-04:00'
describe
'1552099' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_036.jp2'
5d23cfb52ac66747c2a36ff8e45699f5
f7b0f7fc236e69a8d9d52d1163803431a29d6196
'2012-04-05T12:25:24-04:00'
describe
'112482' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUNZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_036.jpg'
474aab17da8143b6faf3aedb7fbdc8ed
784ea5c4421ed1ab55d813881b110cf561b96428
'2012-04-05T12:34:17-04:00'
describe
'55906' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_036.pro'
7488fb8baf5ed785a94b5205b2efb431
cb6eafde57505a79839e4c9eb08d087ffd7f29a2
'2012-04-05T12:24:27-04:00'
describe
'37299' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_036.QC.jpg'
d1c02ef74d523646c4bc494ee7e7753e
7f0c055fec2a7365eebc5136f5624b6fb489b70c
'2012-04-05T12:21:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_036.tif'
ecb39d0c5d46b3cd592438cf6947fd50
9cfd7224ee2cf3b62c3647cf32be56add1acada2
'2012-04-05T12:28:49-04:00'
describe
'2116' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_036.txt'
94d502b7d001e5dcca15335651112f64
32cef84c8eaa91436d837da71cd4012055d92953
'2012-04-05T12:33:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_036thm.jpg'
823e32aea066b19be5620024086cb7af
e8b49693d82a8333de20e329b22b06534ada9bcb
'2012-04-05T12:17:07-04:00'
describe
'1482241' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_037.jp2'
cf81fe01c356afc9f601a7529ba03415
212fb81c22e68c302c76ab1c0c24aca9fd80e77d
'2012-04-05T12:29:49-04:00'
describe
'120858' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_037.jpg'
cf6550b2c468ad29f843d5d7dd09309d
7cb220d2d8f13dbd9730b70cc61df726ba7c3c53
'2012-04-05T12:19:55-04:00'
describe
'56573' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_037.pro'
a9e6298e7504dec0f5487230dbe55b99
08672944c381d4d26c313754ee94500de8186b62
'2012-04-05T12:29:28-04:00'
describe
'40903' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_037.QC.jpg'
4e9fea4fdbbb46db46b7357bc983eb18
89d86968403d1d44f3abf4b8c711172a6416c3a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_037.tif'
f63dc4733f4376f3b5321fcdf04bd724
31aee35a0ab60a9fc55f87d70c99fd681dfa2426
'2012-04-05T12:34:22-04:00'
describe
'2168' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_037.txt'
788c594ec2326a18739bbe4c160ead6c
3cba8937df8390b2cb881d41f9d9fcc01c31e37f
'2012-04-05T12:20:40-04:00'
describe
'12165' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_037thm.jpg'
3642341601f9a253d461886763ea3626
4d2c2458c4a19e5db54e292a20f032a376de3d06
'2012-04-05T12:17:52-04:00'
describe
'1552108' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_038.jp2'
01e083a16b3a7a7735dba83d750a0b8e
84a575da281f55986ec671386de3a53030cd7109
'2012-04-05T12:21:54-04:00'
describe
'112926' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUON' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_038.jpg'
0830549660f7b9bfe9a01019d6f2dc3d
903d198542bac700100c30a309297f7b8624d5b6
'2012-04-05T12:19:53-04:00'
describe
'54141' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_038.pro'
5afd33bf491fc1fc4ba2cf9fa8431879
5aa720d32b1071ac276487d55f1d0b00fdb304ad
'2012-04-05T12:23:24-04:00'
describe
'38255' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_038.QC.jpg'
68a25dfd8c453bf601177ab36769263d
1e596ba8c270f502d03a1a488c70c5cd1e3a364c
'2012-04-05T12:15:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_038.tif'
fc63c01d1524293b2b007d06fde94495
2bd497cefba397f94ffcc94f9a36389ec9bcb72b
'2012-04-05T12:22:41-04:00'
describe
'2093' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_038.txt'
62326f435ec3079451961e06bb5d0388
f1de4ed2ff6a781f282d281c731e533b3357040a
'2012-04-05T12:32:54-04:00'
describe
'12035' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_038thm.jpg'
c4151e4823b24cf1a77852ff72a13431
3478eb57a688e5a6c38c6e9901051e8249d879ab
'2012-04-05T12:17:59-04:00'
describe
'1482233' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_039.jp2'
bab5a0db6dbed6acf6b1c3470fb4f32a
add34de2a2402aa1e424c8501b7e0e10c20b1764
'2012-04-05T12:26:55-04:00'
describe
'121158' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_039.jpg'
5819bcda62f66bfcaaa7c498157f6217
ace6c0591aa4357a4ab72949add85fdcb12d4f81
'2012-04-05T12:16:12-04:00'
describe
'56363' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_039.pro'
0a3cf8fa2adfd795912b285a1f5de00c
b98d93e0e00e9ef7a4174ae1c0f3e0bde5c7d6ce
'2012-04-05T12:19:08-04:00'
describe
'41375' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_039.QC.jpg'
04b7caaa4d49b50d6ed553e519378cda
426835486a73fccf117b061d4d08f7db5a05bce0
'2012-04-05T12:31:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_039.tif'
0c2ba0629e2e0ff4d93c811204a50c00
944a04c71ac0f69ccac29a9680e299c74651430e
'2012-04-05T12:27:30-04:00'
describe
'2157' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_039.txt'
6a96a9600efe33e527047ac1aa894d31
3e38cc05264053069816a9f92d19b64563950f63
'2012-04-05T12:33:24-04:00'
describe
'12261' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUOZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_039thm.jpg'
3fec3f0635dca2e5769a5e8b1bd04dc0
c708e52233a69e67229ffda760102010d6126528
describe
'1552115' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_040.jp2'
5df6c015277c5375b88a3486941322d6
27bed0d8eda991344c895951d0f78bb84e89bf8d
'2012-04-05T12:35:01-04:00'
describe
'109097' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_040.jpg'
36cf0c345a3753928c7f480985fde1b1
dd79b19a8e775df13b29ed3e04ae5cb5be98596c
'2012-04-05T12:33:28-04:00'
describe
'53213' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_040.pro'
d27119897debabd13ccdb7feb8c4f065
bb1d4b6e3ea737b5a145c22654d2c35148f7d90f
'2012-04-05T12:32:02-04:00'
describe
'37567' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_040.QC.jpg'
8bbb9e0aa95d7c31cfd097b1ebda0851
36823065ffe2d4335f5585729edd57f078085f85
'2012-04-05T12:33:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_040.tif'
c6413c3674c977df87daf16c75e22785
93a42ad2887e53f8a12fe0cef9744a487cfeef76
'2012-04-05T12:31:01-04:00'
describe
'2028' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_040.txt'
6ca862d55ee37f7e1c9dcfd56275a3c7
3f9cdaeb91992779edef07f87caffd8df01b69f5
'2012-04-05T12:19:54-04:00'
describe
'12215' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_040thm.jpg'
52f20b165db4e77a1ea2966bada98cc2
c0b7fbe213d0ae6c209bcc9307fa28eaa1193b33
'2012-04-05T12:21:07-04:00'
describe
'1482225' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_041.jp2'
9ef5ecb0ce4c7681dab64c25d5b25ba7
4fd27a397eff895f2d5abd1b86762265f0bf2d28
'2012-04-05T12:21:23-04:00'
describe
'121861' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_041.jpg'
93cb4832160f136c2861d6cffef3b897
b942218d2aaf2b06b606b78d5fc4683ff2a60410
describe
'58442' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_041.pro'
a3cd570716b33a642d495a7185d9bd2c
d9299930f8e196fbd63f3414cd2aa700ff7fca34
'2012-04-05T12:21:24-04:00'
describe
'41233' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_041.QC.jpg'
ec5ab0e049c11e6279d37d3d4447c67a
0c4165f2ee30a36c0a95babd4ab16f08319aa90d
'2012-04-05T12:34:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_041.tif'
035c857c852450bf9d666e1d22f56000
f307619e5b6980a796791a4fceb058cbca9ee62f
'2012-04-05T12:32:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_041.txt'
a117a6857bb76838ea6f9e7dcce32a5d
d195a3d42de84fcf60fd1c5e9109eec686cae97c
'2012-04-05T12:26:03-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'12118' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_041thm.jpg'
0d5125d7d98b495bc9bcc3bcd68cdbfd
935b797a6d0a9d08db297d6195d6829577899933
'2012-04-05T12:26:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_042.jp2'
4acf61cdebab56954e423fb425466f33
050dc39e582e59f0b47901d0c4e2b43ad76d8112
'2012-04-05T12:23:57-04:00'
describe
'111560' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_042.jpg'
a28f86fcc4a100aa77d4c95563f1d43d
f5264451ee7cd8022bc14bfe11887555381a330c
'2012-04-05T12:34:46-04:00'
describe
'53095' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_042.pro'
0186978eb410feb23606c404a78f77a5
c9dbd5e04f15d2ff3dd2dbcb1d4de7247af0ef40
'2012-04-05T12:22:50-04:00'
describe
'37587' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_042.QC.jpg'
8b3d60efeb7c27ae2da6e5db8584885e
46b265654d953d154834310a03bd793731f4653f
'2012-04-05T12:25:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_042.tif'
0b3a2c1afb7fb9497ae61c73b679ae9b
3f36b0df964b6cf3ebc38643261171bc738573e5
'2012-04-05T12:18:58-04:00'
describe
'2268' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_042.txt'
0a983293e2a3e560e3203fe6f1cfbeca
8c1440599d1951c247ea2d197686345b2f36a92f
'2012-04-05T12:25:20-04:00'
describe
'12557' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_042thm.jpg'
c1b8ad4d3d925c16d0d8f30e53df59db
ced296f71c12ea7985b1d2e84f3e93393ad48ca0
'2012-04-05T12:17:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_043.jp2'
fecb197c4f5337f11b3fe830782ba04c
57c83460c820baaf3e084ecfea6531a526247f8b
'2012-04-05T12:33:38-04:00'
describe
'119329' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_043.jpg'
b48a31a09116254b8514bcb196cb13ba
a3c8c8ae1376476aca39267b4b57f463b63fa50d
'2012-04-05T12:27:28-04:00'
describe
'54473' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_043.pro'
aca3a745736c52aab24112e60dc70a30
2e7cc185bac05a7a211271e55a53ed279a20fd0a
'2012-04-05T12:23:29-04:00'
describe
'40396' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_043.QC.jpg'
6a36411ede68c88b53cc94bb6aa0fe29
856bc11da5ee7c51e4360d8e90db76559af6ae1b
'2012-04-05T12:18:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUPZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_043.tif'
65f10ea84f32e03131ac467f24ca3711
f2f63cc66d710b6231a5a49f0e849acca2de9951
'2012-04-05T12:26:48-04:00'
describe
'2074' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_043.txt'
d9a2a815215612aa2a201a55cf03ef5e
1bd27c24ad79a2028844a6d471d4f02929ff356f
'2012-04-05T12:30:34-04:00'
describe
'12186' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_043thm.jpg'
20c6b3b6dd11f7b710aa877824976f4e
97134e9d545285b5d9d7c2df926913eba936f656
'2012-04-05T12:19:37-04:00'
describe
'1552118' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_044.jp2'
706b000a1a7be14bc918018782c84f08
4672041fa16fd351d0c3f060026df2b637043164
describe
'113009' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_044.jpg'
38d11a5ab06b22dd799aa6dda6a3f043
8ece8c4e4a3a85aa321abc02fbe385bb2ce9a30d
'2012-04-05T12:27:31-04:00'
describe
'53650' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_044.pro'
3f7b58ab9c5fc1b4abf4e96c5f97e4e7
2f806a594f1414b1f7088a315efeb2f2294aa79a
'2012-04-05T12:33:50-04:00'
describe
'38224' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_044.QC.jpg'
fbc1baf9e7e1ef2d0806605fc917d2a9
c20d6ef15c5e5443629ebc05e19c58a0b94fd17c
'2012-04-05T12:33:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_044.tif'
9d78d24b9fcd434209a6c232568dcb94
f5b520787f53a69e4384da561f81e18c1c615fa8
describe
'2048' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_044.txt'
a5b273307c808b8ad1c1190aded583a0
6a029aedf949da716d4fd2652be344e1d96ea41b
'2012-04-05T12:16:55-04:00'
describe
'12312' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_044thm.jpg'
0ee45f8cd3d2d737bf75ae49aa38816c
f574df308e06e6ed135e86d86aca6ae57c06190f
'2012-04-05T12:23:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_045.jp2'
17df20e48051bb726e37d3ea11636222
b895b090d24288c751ceffdebe116880b1dcc9df
'2012-04-05T12:30:15-04:00'
describe
'103933' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_045.jpg'
ed8ebf4c1cfb8efeeee7b052f8941f77
af20dbe4e8c30e30da77d1769935441e095b1946
describe
'46314' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_045.pro'
7abe30740ce92ce762f19f640d3c9a82
ec52449c4492dfc3807829d518b02c4a284f7a5a
describe
'36189' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_045.QC.jpg'
81f48176b3e762f7e3387c42082af6cb
0f4239ff29e9be0d8b368a5ba3bc20d1f2bdd5a2
'2012-04-05T12:28:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_045.tif'
d00e7d419e16f0bcbd42fb0c6c550edc
a8e8db211658b932737878169f97c4689cda14eb
'2012-04-05T12:20:22-04:00'
describe
'1800' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_045.txt'
0eed6a0a25b670f743abd39f897be287
85d926b83aa6d8df1370a635f6228dc0ebf34ce8
'2012-04-05T12:28:35-04:00'
describe
'11301' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_045thm.jpg'
de326af6b1cf167ffa82f39ae811f570
d0035fd190daeb97d2dfa2afae7e6dea4bc15d89
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_046.jp2'
4cdd0d2f0fdb90459a158321714ee853
e3b1eefb801b5bb9faebaba627ba28ab62234570
'2012-04-05T12:20:00-04:00'
describe
'102646' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_046.jpg'
5f131ab912635d37e15d876adec4d43c
2aeb6ae800a2328613380fff12c44d5d5ee2f4b3
'2012-04-05T12:22:04-04:00'
describe
'47567' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_046.pro'
56546f6b92062efb2ab09ea5238a0a57
de3205b4fa30af28c71edb18d936c41627b34bd8
describe
'35439' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_046.QC.jpg'
286ffb8344269fa718b80d87a371e4ca
49bd0730b45920cb89f87ed524c5d361352f4a01
'2012-04-05T12:27:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_046.tif'
42759dcb704eaa6f0ad9d7350d30693f
13c7284f101b0184517948b0da8584184fb91e7c
'2012-04-05T12:33:58-04:00'
describe
'1811' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_046.txt'
eacda36b2f8c3d86cb54b18fe6ae9fb2
0cb4a862eb94bbbd9d61fee655e638921acc58c0
'2012-04-05T12:35:06-04:00'
describe
'11494' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_046thm.jpg'
152b82636a4a2514b190ea63cd7f01eb
747fb978b7547c1fbeb3c9deb7eb20a8fbbbb80d
'2012-04-05T12:21:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_047.jp2'
45892df66085ba6a3e93b87135404b56
36668cfd92eb30fe7f22cd4bdaa7ddf3dcd44f96
'2012-04-05T12:24:10-04:00'
describe
'120093' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_047.jpg'
c65c6a9f5c379660f6e9ae0f708910c5
d3d2653620aa5c46835b80dde4e704eab2991233
describe
'56643' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUQZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_047.pro'
6dcbf1bebc3e4eddc55957c0b6a310aa
07c439f8b34397d1b1aea1f2405cb19f14f95186
'2012-04-05T12:30:36-04:00'
describe
'41176' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_047.QC.jpg'
afcec01b2f276ff22ce73efc840b929d
ff1e919a32f231e7ac991f5380278c0195d85599
'2012-04-05T12:26:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_047.tif'
f33b84f95acb57ea31211a710f0be84e
4a2516b1636934c99efa5ab2a3cabb4dfbeb8c50
'2012-04-05T12:25:23-04:00'
describe
'2145' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_047.txt'
d8c91dcd5cab43de0197f7809b2c7d9c
783582c40bde025f5d4a8ff1aa75855d2ff56971
'2012-04-05T12:33:55-04:00'
describe
'12277' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_047thm.jpg'
6c3049559cdf5f161433f3cfdcc89cf7
e7a5f3a9985dc26ab4da82d0d60be0c980a852ca
'2012-04-05T12:20:02-04:00'
describe
'1552110' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_048.jp2'
135bb3fdd72899ba1ee355899c8e82ba
b80696d7558e28adc87bf36a5d2511ee5a7587bc
'2012-04-05T12:32:08-04:00'
describe
'117537' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_048.jpg'
07b73f80891e0f07deea075e0fcd8aa3
e8ea89e01227f697ff1a3011b8a5f8512eddc75d
'2012-04-05T12:26:22-04:00'
describe
'58192' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_048.pro'
519d0435013b749ab5139794cd40d78c
ebb1a351a6764d9873b4bbeb4d6951dd167b99f1
'2012-04-05T12:29:25-04:00'
describe
'38926' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_048.QC.jpg'
49e63071e7a41d275cc71d4cb60d4a0a
41c65045275670845188eba5dbd6be208ff491b3
'2012-04-05T12:28:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_048.tif'
379371ea6ebf0bf6814a46161fff31a7
ac211344b3492fa7d8db73d299da3e0d855ec90f
'2012-04-05T12:16:21-04:00'
describe
'2219' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_048.txt'
d9653ad5c4237b9f1ac71acb312fdc43
9717da025a1e79843288fd80b0339b7c12339be9
describe
'12602' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_048thm.jpg'
b91e3c26b9d5e5ecb7290c0acd0a171b
ada0028be1a26f7f4129935dbbb94d2b8ffddf58
describe
'1482247' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_049.jp2'
c08458ead274966e268049ebb2a7e7b9
efac2631fac7a3f1ffcb5de1acdf4970dd4f1584
'2012-04-05T12:32:56-04:00'
describe
'120622' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_049.jpg'
ca5e0763510282227ab93bfa21f80ce7
4deebabb7a0dd78ac7bfcb18c960f72e37271dc8
'2012-04-05T12:27:38-04:00'
describe
'56364' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_049.pro'
6b07e7356c564acf6cbef5c4d31d23f5
4d82a3bc84724f77ce22bc9dfb6c02b1eed08f21
'2012-04-05T12:18:19-04:00'
describe
'40959' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_049.QC.jpg'
4ceee7dfd77a63904efe66c8a99a1267
7cdd3ddd2e4a724ad25bd2fef94d73f18bbf14f5
'2012-04-05T12:26:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_049.tif'
e1833a6d98ff013cc417f6481760e035
916c6e5d47b2cde14a801c27e4ebe4bfd57ea629
'2012-04-05T12:29:22-04:00'
describe
'2199' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_049.txt'
6a891c56caaf2e2d10211d2b2fd80c85
9fdafef66de2112ea457406e4b9031742399b8ff
'2012-04-05T12:25:21-04:00'
describe
'12101' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_049thm.jpg'
1a91da3524182f04ee3970333255ab03
b8f2ea0369f89ee739f91c8eae0346bb539a6883
'2012-04-05T12:33:08-04:00'
describe
'1552078' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_050.jp2'
c9b40aed4714d832c26d6a3581a6ccfd
1faf9362dac668beacc47298837a29682fa9a18b
'2012-04-05T12:26:21-04:00'
describe
'113486' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_050.jpg'
b19caa958158441d04f8c361e31a8535
1729b563386fa714f5af9aad7fd23e58dcf0971b
'2012-04-05T12:30:58-04:00'
describe
'55947' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_050.pro'
aba82c1672a1b6f0a594945e2c444941
da2ae6a50292730d6303a246fd86ea44d7c79e8a
describe
'38430' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_050.QC.jpg'
25ab139ec7590f1e85ff6e728befd228
6dea7f294563efd448e0f83e551eb4bc29e218b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_050.tif'
09f13200a5b71937d70ef3486194135d
6c3335e0ea32aa4d6e6a3fceb6264f92d9a97d9b
'2012-04-05T12:21:41-04:00'
describe
'2139' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_050.txt'
d467c40f37d0bdec326211aa2d9b9e1d
dc50e568865dfc7484282102810aa4eb0527efd3
'2012-04-05T12:29:26-04:00'
describe
'11979' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_050thm.jpg'
7a94ff4e83ece2fca3f3cfc923573abf
bfe5e263fe4a876dd532fb6e65d5d6ab31f03467
'2012-04-05T12:27:48-04:00'
describe
'1482217' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADURZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_051.jp2'
7fa3985651bec86aef7531a8933c1efc
e4c3666308aaaf0db7f7ad50f0cc8ab948fdeccc
'2012-04-05T12:30:04-04:00'
describe
'117462' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_051.jpg'
e4d92b73e466c128feff5ea0f2299ea6
f1756ca95d43bf1fcaca46cb830f1a3b8f1b36b6
describe
'56322' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_051.pro'
d073872bbc3b56a792e0bd7184a91656
34bf023d132415285ce63a629711a8167633353e
'2012-04-05T12:16:07-04:00'
describe
'40124' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_051.QC.jpg'
38c0ec72901ce267eb25fdb1486d2239
4f666db1f978cd921330d6bf0995b964678f05e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_051.tif'
a81a9928e07552b41dab017f80a9711b
afe7ce38091014c5d8b9c02fd83706cc27da71d7
'2012-04-05T12:26:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_051.txt'
8a8d87cb49a560f8d1b02f7f1b17929f
b51200fccaa365f3719db74fe41426388244bb5b
describe
'12143' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_051thm.jpg'
f94e4253948045078435cac3de4d1612
32fa32debfb151ef04ce5791b479d38b890c016a
'2012-04-05T12:18:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_052.jp2'
5d82a96e252062d9561bdc3ea19dcaa4
d44dc0f80203e5094082c8017780b8fcff321557
'2012-04-05T12:34:33-04:00'
describe
'113757' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_052.jpg'
5eb5b754b6e5d95768bb76ae69389cff
20413262acadf6e5af9bd95c61625274c4c562ef
'2012-04-05T12:28:41-04:00'
describe
'55495' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_052.pro'
5c5fa0cb6af0bbf85200bc0b6f529ed0
bf037ddda15c2e0db557b9302798203270d5cbb9
'2012-04-05T12:16:14-04:00'
describe
'38510' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_052.QC.jpg'
87857e685965b765e9fdafdd4eb0fed4
4354580eab022cd10f19be74382b2286e795313e
'2012-04-05T12:21:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_052.tif'
0ffda394dc03eb8200e5498722af930e
e6d852794a10d4473363a882ef4cfd0073a1f359
'2012-04-05T12:16:09-04:00'
describe
'2123' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_052.txt'
436b67eab188690c75c1ee60a8f3beae
ab9abc47d9ac5278109a00bd456d3daef23b3d91
describe
'12511' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_052thm.jpg'
4d6a7b0807bfc18fe0919170c8236719
01184b993fd8dbe084c731605032d8f3c791292b
'2012-04-05T12:26:52-04:00'
describe
'1427395' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_053.jp2'
c654bd8c88732726c8e62f77a6e2776a
1358c61499be9862ec0e100b9891339df53d0719
'2012-04-05T12:32:06-04:00'
describe
'120045' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_053.jpg'
73ab0d2e176fd81d1040b6c2fd2a2f08
bbbc80eb5dd78ee3e73096cec05a60cfa4690007
'2012-04-05T12:21:38-04:00'
describe
'58115' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_053.pro'
0a285d859b9beeedfbd4f2ff35057584
5f163ddbc78006f352ebdee9dc7ea329895097c1
'2012-04-05T12:32:11-04:00'
describe
'41848' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_053.QC.jpg'
dbd55d68f9589bf9fc4fe3060e1f298c
1130aa3a9ea798e926bc3c5dfe0505a3046a497a
'2012-04-05T12:17:17-04:00'
describe
'34291254' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_053.tif'
82b3cebbf1c542ca90b524c3e894371e
6d95d0ecedcc54859517bc7a6245b630344ec8b3
'2012-04-05T12:16:37-04:00'
describe
'2210' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_053.txt'
aeec3999b248109dae0ed3a0be91e981
0a811b4e9eff0754a912ff14f997edde043f4a18
'2012-04-05T12:16:57-04:00'
describe
'11574' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUST' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_053thm.jpg'
b428a7df8d61f335ac66e7f98db4d978
764fd8b5fe655eb9e16917c05dab2571490f9661
'2012-04-05T12:15:59-04:00'
describe
'1227378' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_054.jp2'
10c41994843e142ac1785ce5fb5df32a
e3b00e554585e4fea9c35cf19d48bf3ad831cd67
'2012-04-05T12:29:04-04:00'
describe
'42343' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_054.jpg'
37937b2dc296928a833c5147c59e7bc3
8007b5d51ea0fee2956a337bcb6fef4a67d5523c
'2012-04-05T12:31:07-04:00'
describe
'14148' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_054.pro'
13ad6f39a9d68bc01ff6b6157cb141b7
be5aca0d892aec141d0b92ddd51d98c66e6c7849
'2012-04-05T12:21:26-04:00'
describe
'14117' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_054.QC.jpg'
fb5fe297fb15bbc9109567f8b05ad7be
b4b191be4f7becb624ca13fa34d7949285a12c27
describe
'36530026' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_054.tif'
3374ce6a3c47f6db1fe9105ef93d01d0
ffb59f709bb324110dc654ed95bda77e361db4a7
'2012-04-05T12:18:55-04:00'
describe
'557' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUSZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_054.txt'
b47fa7f50c90626ea48b5e83bf8e0f22
bcf6086bed7caf0311074cb679818607a6fa2209
'2012-04-05T12:32:12-04:00'
describe
'4782' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_054thm.jpg'
1d3cedad8a3baa17b0de6d400bb1b7f8
08a299243cfb06ad35de066724342a83242cd6ab
'2012-04-05T12:27:07-04:00'
describe
'541433' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_057.jp2'
c793a7e53ae4383df5533e0240b0bd1d
6df6cd5ce66e1e4408c4cf1d274c7d2de82ee72d
'2012-04-05T12:28:16-04:00'
describe
'42810' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_057.jpg'
804cf103988ff112d8d4499152f10b76
1692f18a52f4a775392a10aa551eff637231cad3
'2012-04-05T12:32:23-04:00'
describe
'385' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_057.pro'
b43d007fa936aab8421389106b718b7a
c9e406829dff94e929e9661184ce65ba0a023349
'2012-04-05T12:25:33-04:00'
describe
'12135' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_057.QC.jpg'
a80fac5bc84494dce6c1ddadc4c58f7c
1281ad1b7ff3005d2ed719c1e5474fc5b71414a0
'2012-04-05T12:22:11-04:00'
describe
'13007154' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_057.tif'
ceddefeff4e3b97ea06b1cab94a71487
e69dcc6765f51ceb169f64f8f5caf89f3e735d26
'2012-04-05T12:22:23-04:00'
describe
'83' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_057.txt'
f8fc91a003a95a50462e5ecbbebdc48f
92a81b43a967ac3b9192a7436738621468af08b3
'2012-04-05T12:17:56-04:00'
describe
'3649' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_057thm.jpg'
a3c7d274f07f2e797b03de6dc3ed04ef
d3ef2c455e3c9d7d2bd617702353e1e2e0117c6c
describe
'1059391' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_058.jp2'
cb00633dfea5d9aedc24fa66c23982c4
c9caf6cc50669ad9debc580d74773d18af1f85d4
'2012-04-05T12:24:18-04:00'
describe
'30420' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_058.jpg'
2e9ff914de915f57a93d2d88c922873e
c093cf0088012e87303584ee6f587190947eee3a
'2012-04-05T12:16:24-04:00'
describe
'2395' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_058.pro'
b6e6c4dcfba948de0764bbf92ca51c6d
f68f2ef49b654d236228bba0cabc50195a45eae9
'2012-04-05T12:33:39-04:00'
describe
'9762' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_058.QC.jpg'
eb86e69638b6458fcfabb7f993ce4e64
4f3e6d699d71fdf0c1feedab2618d5dd17ab697c
'2012-04-05T12:16:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_058.tif'
bc17f6d441d179856220c8716ac6bc04
49ec338d5541e28ee5e1954504fedb7a9d70261f
'2012-04-05T12:28:59-04:00'
describe
'140' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_058.txt'
e81e06b7942928a5ee7f865887c3167d
158787993465e358852389aea199694645a8907c
'2012-04-05T12:15:43-04:00'
describe
'3906' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_058thm.jpg'
4d631bf1f60f1a52a87d2b63615d86bb
8d4d85d85ea94e1ba6ac4c3c2d3799f3e6e77153
'2012-04-05T12:17:32-04:00'
describe
'871810' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_059.jp2'
a544cde51db363d7dcba9d5902822743
b6931a4b02d51a53d0463a28194f80c3c1ec4009
'2012-04-05T12:27:06-04:00'
describe
'23869' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_059.jpg'
a2a374d53139294ec57638687015fd6e
5b992c9c03943f41ed41c17a9ae8b1bbb6a95f04
'2012-04-05T12:21:22-04:00'
describe
'423' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_059.pro'
67c6404f0ae3346533f04f4a0d2e63e5
575669b6b00ddc9bfe9fcd94ef3182e03cb4b6da
'2012-04-05T12:33:13-04:00'
describe
'6962' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_059.QC.jpg'
a44dd737876efde5cc1b8738d5d39a84
b78061a13f720c462b9c44add67cdd9f2f2fee11
'2012-04-05T12:35:10-04:00'
describe
'35379108' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_059.tif'
27a30a78caad7f26144fef3cfa3ac1ba
1b6a9ede67eaf0152cfbf1714ad1ddc0bc839aee
'2012-04-05T12:23:34-04:00'
describe
'91' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_059.txt'
d7040f398a1baec9fb219a3dfcd11621
a19dc84b169070926083d7051443a459dd8805d5
'2012-04-05T12:26:08-04:00'
describe
'2437' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_059thm.jpg'
d9d3dfe741815c84896e8d94a82ecd19
adc4bff15d0b45d7e21072336b7c899614191f3b
describe
'1520600' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_060.jp2'
f39df1fcebe44fb795d2aaa538d63188
e39ec63982ed865a6112f31357bb07bce9916635
'2012-04-05T12:27:58-04:00'
describe
'83869' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_060.jpg'
d278a258ea5b293410ee61a532e7390a
c2f07dad251c37b9e00aa069579d71482a2d71ee
describe
'33094' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_060.pro'
bafb0bafc555b9bd19a962577ed69c97
9ca882d7e4b4683b806311d4de58a1cb896ea412
'2012-04-05T12:19:00-04:00'
describe
'28087' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUTZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_060.QC.jpg'
6dd5d3d381bbac2278a75e3db023bfe2
ebf226c0eb330ed788f1cd7305b3fd9f07b79c06
'2012-04-05T12:18:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_060.tif'
111cebdcad893ee09b40ea0f13828778
b915e14afdbf5a2b5b63638e2ce6358c2de1b3cc
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_060.txt'
55e7c4607449898f924af865c5a350c6
2d45dc359e245c3faa04da9fd90c475868c426c9
'2012-04-05T12:35:04-04:00'
describe
'9094' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_060thm.jpg'
2db9bea7412860b8eb3b4295ae45e68b
4572ec7a5238c738d135942b0fd1be6e91f59449
'2012-04-05T12:22:16-04:00'
describe
'1449420' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_061.jp2'
981eefd257acc0b253ff0cbffa2d6c72
8723fa3fa0f1f54229fc274d72ce74815b21dc34
'2012-04-05T12:29:02-04:00'
describe
'107182' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_061.jpg'
df3a51643ea443aa3e8219debbd22d7a
24c0e3cc4785fe0c526c9b4bb99e20de114e34f7
'2012-04-05T12:19:28-04:00'
describe
'46440' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_061.pro'
bd06e1f9f0baaf6a729a252bae8bc642
1eba6fe036d58bbc21205220a8042d861e1be651
'2012-04-05T12:34:45-04:00'
describe
'37173' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_061.QC.jpg'
8abc8d8377eebaf5937531496cae5b5a
356ce2dd8ca87450322382341779ef45b0ec7d2b
'2012-04-05T12:23:49-04:00'
describe
'34819416' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_061.tif'
9341f12be3dbc0e736c41b71b0f68f80
174c8130bed28a7c786bb2e28dd888b8512155dc
'2012-04-05T12:16:04-04:00'
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_061.txt'
2bc3d0c69498105dd8a1c4ff02ee3380
ddd9ba303ef0aeddcb9322627a9f7bbabdcf86cf
describe
'10592' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_061thm.jpg'
063d82eb15df16c8ecf7a7f1c45ba532
d1042be06cea479353416c7b3209e5e2bb19f9bd
'2012-04-05T12:17:55-04:00'
describe
'1520631' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_062.jp2'
135ca5525a05e78ccec2932faccdb163
67e67e5e6001579936a88f7349407ce41be38012
'2012-04-05T12:32:51-04:00'
describe
'106009' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_062.jpg'
fece28584c0e66b26605b150d4ed2854
ecf147009c977b0c241cc597372c4e3517b4d8b8
'2012-04-05T12:21:35-04:00'
describe
'48047' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_062.pro'
05ba6653081ab64246cfe7d3364c0211
ad0e16f2cde9f2b11c20439d1f7562fa1c527682
describe
'35831' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_062.QC.jpg'
5084d593747b1a32ea984f6e1e8a667b
7579d07696caf03fccd0768e72fc7db90810b8f8
'2012-04-05T12:30:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_062.tif'
189b313483cf468ff4eca08b997b73cf
093eb4f92d9e155a47a060b91d7c7dd8d8a7060a
'2012-04-05T12:30:22-04:00'
describe
'1885' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_062.txt'
da33eac4ce35fb4dd4214cf3ae658262
e22c1fe82642f08bf37f55bdad08ed75acd559d1
'2012-04-05T12:17:58-04:00'
describe
'11409' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_062thm.jpg'
b09d30e826ee22d9d2e0408c51e5365b
707c4ac1c8a029e4b89f6e6a4d6c9c04267119e4
'2012-04-05T12:32:17-04:00'
describe
'1408399' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_063.jp2'
1ae25a044fcaf58c852c02fa10bfcf90
f1573ad80f21e8f4b75d566d4f2aa8d142211e3d
'2012-04-05T12:31:33-04:00'
describe
'108527' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_063.jpg'
e6b0d9e784e1323951f43317deb70eb2
501cfd3f9c0ea87ef63413c2d5d57a0149c56b00
'2012-04-05T12:28:29-04:00'
describe
'45686' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_063.pro'
8b664fb52ab42ffebc6e106acdc09d0e
ca1be938f0388e37ef0bda78085268dcd8282898
describe
'37913' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_063.QC.jpg'
1942596cc47205bcb8b8f37e10fd9fc2
d92864a79428a71235c741ccf6a69514a8cdb6f6
describe
'33834040' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_063.tif'
d6bd9bc9dbbc9b8e145a54bcf7170762
294a79975c5a89d5def1ede4179d2afc94f9fc64
'2012-04-05T12:15:47-04:00'
describe
'1754' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_063.txt'
604a0c27e3f2f49f3240ab1e7589b708
c6a023cbaf0d3be6ae5a9207f2c1b16b88c023b8
'2012-04-05T12:22:08-04:00'
describe
'10910' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_063thm.jpg'
27a9bab437622b595f1f1077ed73286f
6ef9278729c83b461e485d6035c6fdfd62ca0877
describe
'1520614' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_064.jp2'
91220674bd5745e25405be8e8138583c
ef08883240433ee2791fbf3ac36386774b7b4f3a
describe
'110134' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUUZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_064.jpg'
14e336c841f77e7ea887ce72beb5347f
4f33edbc0f75be1490496c7a0e0557f918774815
'2012-04-05T12:17:05-04:00'
describe
'51817' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_064.pro'
f9ed19f094e341a41b05a675a70a19af
57783e5d64b9488a02574af5531ebb989cec5ae7
'2012-04-05T12:32:19-04:00'
describe
'36922' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_064.QC.jpg'
0dcd923f2a87fce62e18e43f7d5d7c8e
8245b4195135d88427704d9dc1c36f1cc07e79ab
'2012-04-05T12:25:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_064.tif'
0d48b7224c5c9194d86277979a11b897
29ad7e965a58d0b4be0ae12211dd538398d26b1a
'2012-04-05T12:16:02-04:00'
describe
'1972' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_064.txt'
b57f73c146e0e737e680113a33f04705
c3642eccfc9a34eff81477eafc94320aa1574ba8
'2012-04-05T12:16:29-04:00'
describe
'11709' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_064thm.jpg'
cd38b4de0b64871db50c1cafd5ced7d9
d99c9dfe36018ef38d5b3d9214cb11831e480167
'2012-04-05T12:25:42-04:00'
describe
'1408409' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_065.jp2'
d4d5d110b62db2a9d22fd4fe04229575
96ec45af74f7b352607cf8ff33633f43871a57ec
'2012-04-05T12:21:53-04:00'
describe
'124890' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_065.jpg'
7325888d4dde0b1b7533c98d162e44ef
cb02f8446c432142a497bee9d1b49809c07d1d24
'2012-04-05T12:30:23-04:00'
describe
'56504' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_065.pro'
5f20c0118368305faa17619136c50c7f
20b0cbe82e806eb0625d8078068f4d1e5890665d
'2012-04-05T12:21:28-04:00'
describe
'42148' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_065.QC.jpg'
7208dddef32ec50deff5c27481018386
50680fcb30eefb03e6f0281462d6bf0c4a02c1b4
'2012-04-05T12:34:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_065.tif'
140281e70b66a1f5513f89ab592d2d55
cb325f29efe8ba22ee529370cd566a41b5ce70d5
'2012-04-05T12:33:48-04:00'
describe
'2135' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_065.txt'
f6c9b0aa377f3c0ee3ad195656922b87
d4a45d3a7a6d2c83e2531448230f742813b18abb
describe
'11765' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_065thm.jpg'
051926455321496c85b1838a25e9461d
8c5a1691c994866424a72e93c774c4b38e1392a4
'2012-04-05T12:26:53-04:00'
describe
'1520611' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_066.jp2'
3709a8b4d9321c9bedf7b55c6bf54145
a9198cb73a95f3121275406a85e0f34dfbedec9c
'2012-04-05T12:26:30-04:00'
describe
'115165' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_066.jpg'
cf750bcbf6b65798483d2e2cc37e6019
1327d06b7bcdab79867c0669600db976e83b302c
'2012-04-05T12:33:40-04:00'
describe
'55909' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_066.pro'
2a5492e96e1c69f4be24fef90072cccd
01270806e5ce17424495edbe6a6abdb4ee8c3cdb
'2012-04-05T12:26:40-04:00'
describe
'39229' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_066.QC.jpg'
95f1687f6ec94a055c3883a20a1d2db8
c5f8d3eacb4ceaf5ae3e9c13861a2530a747236e
'2012-04-05T12:25:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_066.tif'
85bdf25902117f85828a12a79c16967b
88f9ff6cbb9e0120066f19f6304d205afa6cfb8b
'2012-04-05T12:26:46-04:00'
describe
'2140' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_066.txt'
bab626ffd9692deac9b7bb699b6d310a
b873b83654b8cad01904677520bf90709e891571
'2012-04-05T12:26:19-04:00'
describe
'11962' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_066thm.jpg'
b206e3eb891901f71ea7983ba7261481
c2a3ece5b9fbfd979a33caf97219d7b316e5c4e8
describe
'1534094' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_067.jp2'
ac0f16d16f95fe700c6cd160b5eac663
79e72bf0c99e5e09b0ea029bd72e3187fab62dbb
describe
'119034' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_067.jpg'
314d28c56985bd792b9ce4270379056b
af590e492952bf58ad9e6317920d409953b6cd6f
'2012-04-05T12:15:50-04:00'
describe
'56118' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_067.pro'
aabc89d195caff486d3274119623d0dd
1155ce6b62ca41e32eb91e7b9e6a356a9f5859b2
'2012-04-05T12:31:10-04:00'
describe
'39476' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_067.QC.jpg'
5a9130578458fea369d97afd48132e31
2df2edda05d779ea8fcbeae1263cb7535aa22ff6
'2012-04-05T12:33:00-04:00'
describe
'36853230' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_067.tif'
ed69aeea574bee485116e29a44830a5e
893b0894709d9f6da259ed622ef7b8d3798cdd9f
'2012-04-05T12:22:10-04:00'
describe
'2125' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_067.txt'
71b689221190da0b5970ee49549f0649
2555ac694849c4638225dfe8be9dc8d9065d3be6
'2012-04-05T12:29:52-04:00'
describe
'12494' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUVZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_067thm.jpg'
614513dfa9d7876cc64fb715e0ee2335
af7b226d114441d0e6bedbb3b377bb08790564fd
'2012-04-05T12:32:18-04:00'
describe
'1520601' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_068.jp2'
2b003677946780b14423610952c15a3b
e1994b3876e1e51f672c5d03fdab5685087fe0ae
'2012-04-05T12:21:08-04:00'
describe
'105135' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_068.jpg'
c735e2804b8d3713360f73438e36a1f6
fcaa7e5005af1949ad1cdfc6b606cf68f816521e
'2012-04-05T12:22:05-04:00'
describe
'46351' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_068.pro'
21fffd578980a21c509e2f672d658b8e
a38b29ce726f1120801d2921ca24099ae7de75ea
'2012-04-05T12:32:26-04:00'
describe
'36322' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_068.QC.jpg'
216ef0e85dc89c9afaca093004725d33
41d561353b916a39b2ffc517a83d8c1125908429
'2012-04-05T12:26:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_068.tif'
5915cfd2d1ff04eeef7d54528bf5a041
3dc9cb67c0eaf0803ad18f294b05cc00b49c3caf
'2012-04-05T12:25:29-04:00'
describe
'1820' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_068.txt'
1ffa95f1e0f6d499a509224078f31cfc
0eedc7aecf4e550d80560631f1dc5fd33274ef80
'2012-04-05T12:22:29-04:00'
describe
'11865' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_068thm.jpg'
2ec5470ac8dc851c6fe6077ca33637a7
9992c72a4f5057563b521b895a8d3170a3b688ee
'2012-04-05T12:19:27-04:00'
describe
'1408342' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_069.jp2'
b4301a4b5de41dfa094cbc8ec10e2b16
37f30a389eaa20af15698acca85a86d2093c4544
describe
'113076' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_069.jpg'
97795c1421a258f5428b90edbb78bc30
19fd9b8fb98e9168b2f23d13bef8885f766ed7a5
'2012-04-05T12:32:40-04:00'
describe
'50745' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_069.pro'
30cbd0120d65755c00e56385e12f8179
4102120a4612182454eca318474b8f4a5a4c3180
'2012-04-05T12:19:09-04:00'
describe
'39689' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_069.QC.jpg'
04675cdfb5e0e34890d7d1e893c76333
dcab8a24d5876beada5733c8b56ee017eb5411fc
'2012-04-05T12:27:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_069.tif'
0fb83020960b100c65ace9f36c45c5a6
6bf47b65c98902bce9dbd11eb97f083980061c42
'2012-04-05T12:22:59-04:00'
describe
'1936' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_069.txt'
f47e5cf94aa55cb799ddea4f3318f485
185affd3c6c06ab15f655fa8daadabe7e31ceed1
describe
'11183' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_069thm.jpg'
6d89f4c8fbe820deaa6928de8302de91
67cc626e68d05168d9cbbe36b445ee4ce8d5b35b
describe
'1520575' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_070.jp2'
61b291e8507f0978b057eeaaa27c68d5
9be204fda92d5de73be5725cca7d766175ca4246
'2012-04-05T12:33:54-04:00'
describe
'114099' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_070.jpg'
5dc2bc6f80af1c9911f480f4acb1d518
12ea88f3174bda8e7d2eb3aecef2076047db9ce7
'2012-04-05T12:23:44-04:00'
describe
'53848' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_070.pro'
6661495e6aa9893a5e1d8d43494ba3b8
603ce1ad29bef698dc5859624ef6810ebf2c416a
'2012-04-05T12:22:38-04:00'
describe
'38742' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_070.QC.jpg'
ddba5034355f380688b0e047ca2aaaf9
047aa3cce5c531a456aa3dfa25fbd713c9576b0c
'2012-04-05T12:34:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_070.tif'
1275d8b6a5b030293d90cc6cbfe6773e
8f7e9da5246a1e890aaf2d7ab2c6153271334289
'2012-04-05T12:19:51-04:00'
describe
'2049' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_070.txt'
7a22544056fd63bd0c005e3f2c20451c
5fb5af5b03c1a9725ee87e3c3ef35e482a32f61f
describe
'12046' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_070thm.jpg'
fd93647db813328feb06ff72505d97f9
a3274a83226a0f709371711d03f933a5f6e41d87
describe
'1408380' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_071.jp2'
d42b4d54b1ce810e3a8899acb26ce832
cc10b21dd6f6880f1404d765454af0a05f607640
describe
'125683' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_071.jpg'
2b70e582084efd61dbb6c226cb10e2db
e00ce4f3aa24fedd1754aeceb944fe565cc38853
'2012-04-05T12:24:23-04:00'
describe
'57403' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_071.pro'
460cc4001b3066fe51b7f38216cfe343
7c188077f8d68ded00b4b9bd11c373f5a665ff18
'2012-04-05T12:33:09-04:00'
describe
'42751' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_071.QC.jpg'
9d23e68d412f272fa0680e34a05486de
5a740bf51e8b7310b692d5c5af3f58ea81039236
'2012-04-05T12:27:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUWZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_071.tif'
224fc9476e53a7346624050072a2fd90
449daa24856b251ae8274dda376c5ce6f5e10c9d
'2012-04-05T12:32:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_071.txt'
766577392526f2b5389742e137c6770b
4347c1532606e199445990a54fc219f0dc58f30d
describe
'11694' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_071thm.jpg'
f20dfbae445b6a0ec24b0b6ccaa0a01e
85e72e22948a28ff66212cb5e7c5664db6b3ec49
describe
'1520599' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_072.jp2'
cbfa9be6dcd5e539733a0bc8b0892e8b
039c812f1ba57e855638d2204b3eb3a20b843320
'2012-04-05T12:20:20-04:00'
describe
'110203' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_072.jpg'
551d5b24dc78c50ff5f075521b429249
5f7cff4769357a32f5248baac4c45634446939d4
describe
'52082' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_072.pro'
58f0e59101971ab5ca1241be4b6b3ba3
6f7a91c0246f33b0f4f2cd521848320806559374
describe
'37489' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_072.QC.jpg'
e1e0e5e3c538a32229b5ebb99e73f69c
9524986664e2064311ffa8d49d4d5dd1971a721b
'2012-04-05T12:27:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_072.tif'
2de6ae8908eef0d40ad3dccbc91ec79f
712469959cb306627b9925fea401aa7cf3a9b7dc
'2012-04-05T12:30:11-04:00'
describe
'2004' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_072.txt'
2899de6983ac87b32d94fe7b5b3117a5
804f694f9c0b2dc51e30880fd7da0e2d83c43187
'2012-04-05T12:35:07-04:00'
describe
'11683' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_072thm.jpg'
bb021b3c4c359791f906359bb198f84d
975e6ed96d8d2c0da305f7c69df2ec9eb3606b2f
describe
'1408372' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_073.jp2'
eb119329b9202462bd76518346fb4245
222d66ddd03364f7a1629691c741355464f057eb
'2012-04-05T12:18:11-04:00'
describe
'123951' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_073.jpg'
35964fc4f8a239374dad6dd061d11392
dfd0a1a381056fef56b78e9abfd99e70b9f771d4
'2012-04-05T12:33:06-04:00'
describe
'55795' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_073.pro'
229d76a1a5c2f6c9d98ee8388eb907fb
a04453849ee3ea1b22b7798b517a092450747f19
'2012-04-05T12:16:52-04:00'
describe
'41818' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_073.QC.jpg'
bf2347a3aa073b1210933b55efbdfb92
5c31d4fcb9bb197da6d88fa9fd66e163f3a97277
'2012-04-05T12:24:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_073.tif'
dd8109403d9e96ca24adc1d619feead2
af0e03e48b3efc781df6f3a77372e15179b955b2
'2012-04-05T12:16:15-04:00'
describe
'2112' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_073.txt'
5ea69a5ef685978353b00f77b202376f
26d58d3cbbfa07e40d7435e0e620ae0f5dd9b896
'2012-04-05T12:33:10-04:00'
describe
'11366' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_073thm.jpg'
03aea651abf24971f03a4208f1791606
9062cd7b9a0a05c1373018bcd58d204be986cbcd
'2012-04-05T12:19:10-04:00'
describe
'1520618' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_074.jp2'
c42779c9c2dba28e78ff0d9b8286f73d
301ed8de18a75f80754d8e1cb63970c7e1ed83ad
'2012-04-05T12:23:01-04:00'
describe
'111174' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_074.jpg'
45630fdf83d526a2031e688b5951367a
bcfa543e9c5f09e3eb382d924983612799bbcdff
'2012-04-05T12:35:13-04:00'
describe
'52878' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_074.pro'
9f5438958d33cecf02fc6e4a056ef4d3
c42700d1a83e21531fc39786b930e6918548cc81
'2012-04-05T12:25:39-04:00'
describe
'37043' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_074.QC.jpg'
d079ead1d67ff2665d0d65a899c5b387
d9851bba26a7e330989d04d769f0cb759aaa759f
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_074.tif'
3effa148c34f629bc74c2b9d9fa9410d
648f10fd8bc8082ba4f4be1ec919dc20a2b8dbc6
'2012-04-05T12:25:11-04:00'
describe
'2063' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_074.txt'
876eb45a5af5e396068bb93f2e5b8848
f6fa533cdd21437a269ec463c99484c097725a89
describe
'11586' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_074thm.jpg'
be2281ff508de6bf5086728b3eedbeac
f0c351c5b9f6a1d5f619a1539e3c62a03fbfafc4
'2012-04-05T12:31:32-04:00'
describe
'1584945' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_075.jp2'
a9e9d8e8c4b7f5a4dccaed3d466fc990
8666661cbfbef4459c7da71eb345145dc38cdb97
'2012-04-05T12:19:59-04:00'
describe
'110598' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_075.jpg'
6b5dc1e04e50f4114d5adc45a65fbbee
efaed565b65fcc90d4ac407df23b2bd33a83ea77
'2012-04-05T12:27:00-04:00'
describe
'54334' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUXZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_075.pro'
284a7dfda4b9ea4d74b222144508b394
7d4cb8e6b746d477f2369da832230c5cd85f1e50
'2012-04-05T12:24:40-04:00'
describe
'36905' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_075.QC.jpg'
086d5ec40c9b6ed7018d61162a951ff8
11c798d731366356e8bf757ce2d8972945c34a57
'2012-04-05T12:18:52-04:00'
describe
'38075094' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_075.tif'
773806a6d98587c751f8b7111b52cb2e
21e9b04a99457c92e560cf88b5ede8d653c29a8b
'2012-04-05T12:34:32-04:00'
describe
'2067' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_075.txt'
feccd0916e0a10ab508a5c04f437cf08
a6c623c8b03e05d09c4b582bfb177efd489d12c7
describe
'12378' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_075thm.jpg'
125cdfaf5ae854068c8c847871181f2c
f16f04ff14369c4b85a85d0feca22498c5c4640d
describe
'1520630' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_076.jp2'
52cb878c176558bcf72c0e5b690accd1
42d6ab6ef118cd2f06e6242b3fea5bf05dc308ff
'2012-04-05T12:30:42-04:00'
describe
'103153' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_076.jpg'
6a73591adff10f0482325c01c90b6861
c3bc0cb73836647caff84e7e87985c6cd5144a25
'2012-04-05T12:31:57-04:00'
describe
'46732' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_076.pro'
c7b2e4dcad41060381050259e86c2453
4c1f4316db911e6bfb8b0ba886349d99ae650a1c
'2012-04-05T12:20:05-04:00'
describe
'34687' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_076.QC.jpg'
26638b905b0cc94a67ffb47006256fef
be7c99509e618e2d9e73878b69e21a6496ff637f
'2012-04-05T12:22:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_076.tif'
f3c6ff7b5e71eb4e293078c84649b837
94c3dbf2b8b18a2e9cd7516c1ebc63a094e665a2
describe
'1839' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_076.txt'
1e7f100466f23cdd835b8a42b88e80bb
cc4ba5fcc11a08dc6ec7cd3ef82589dd8ed80a94
'2012-04-05T12:23:15-04:00'
describe
'11172' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_076thm.jpg'
5fb1e1d12b901a302f7331adff5b984c
97eb93bbf3f025316dcaec3d0fa96dd54a99a2dd
'2012-04-05T12:26:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_077.jp2'
43c2d419c69a0e503aa7d4155d023ab8
e0df5ceac5d9cdd86e432e2a146ab2167f97846f
describe
'105323' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_077.jpg'
5bd74eed154e998d430c799c297a1123
4ac2bf53cda59f9a4e8cb472d29f232abf4ed883
'2012-04-05T12:19:18-04:00'
describe
'44754' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_077.pro'
187f848a8d348763f1f571c625e6e04b
9b94e963eadf314850914ad79cd697c09271404d
describe
'36557' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_077.QC.jpg'
f28404a657c6d48bbc40eabcaa7587fa
1a6312ae604ab3b2c85d08a2afdcb7dcfd838d96
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_077.tif'
06cdf97db26a6d7cde042d5a8dcc4fdc
ec3d0db2485ed1d0eaf317910663d9295fc62372
'2012-04-05T12:20:11-04:00'
describe
'1739' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_077.txt'
608276ea65ccbdb0edd71e7b033fd8d1
361257f58755b7f695dbfccfaf5f1fa9dc192c6c
'2012-04-05T12:23:10-04:00'
describe
'10647' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_077thm.jpg'
cdaddcb2c67ca1663cedf733be2232fd
5ad36707f341bec116ecf5a5e39d97a9762d4c1a
'2012-04-05T12:23:39-04:00'
describe
'1520591' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_078.jp2'
4f270f3ce37a01a09b1bb2dd4e266ba6
3177b1e9bd42996ddb3b3d65aa7765909888b24e
'2012-04-05T12:30:59-04:00'
describe
'100480' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_078.jpg'
7f6b2c51aecccdd3399cd050892f448f
bed976e111e1966f510fa97c2b437d7819ee14ba
'2012-04-05T12:17:08-04:00'
describe
'44775' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_078.pro'
0a278615274a7cdb0d1dc69f1bf870e3
bcf26ed4f914e22a8ab999f1a4edf1b49427b726
'2012-04-05T12:22:00-04:00'
describe
'34256' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_078.QC.jpg'
31b242cfac577c93710d5a3e83d26032
d55d59db2be8072d81482cd0e435984282b4d1a0
'2012-04-05T12:28:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_078.tif'
1ac4dd90a62f35ef271661c668093f6a
bc8941d43bbdfb5a55c4dac309aec23e8a5bba96
'2012-04-05T12:20:25-04:00'
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_078.txt'
a35cb7a21f1839a06c4346b66ee343bf
fd27779f1407971db6585f6adcf2cc7a7c078f6c
'2012-04-05T12:17:13-04:00'
describe
'11109' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_078thm.jpg'
61e07a6d74c05b1c2490c325d997a423
aef297decd2eb5160eee7ae54b85b8e8e73a3ce4
'2012-04-05T12:29:55-04:00'
describe
'1408371' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUYZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_079.jp2'
105cad12517aa6505d5e67556a7dd737
d709a2a494fc0bcfde4a7b4c71cd6f5c63149f51
'2012-04-05T12:31:52-04:00'
describe
'100967' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_079.jpg'
3b7fcde29a7726b8dd254956aee64226
1ac729d46813f04ddf0af9527b132d22f60b2bd4
'2012-04-05T12:28:40-04:00'
describe
'42038' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_079.pro'
e84d597e2ad1301fb5a18d28131e454a
b33d88ec7a2c7c012e123f5930ebc27faee86bda
'2012-04-05T12:34:28-04:00'
describe
'34993' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_079.QC.jpg'
bd1173614c27566494f9f01f3f9b1cdd
b9383d362d4c5479be9125d92339452c398a7b7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_079.tif'
a169f6b85feeeca4a76db829b7d5cc00
4c15bd5dd7818d22ce95848f6633f55e684f133f
'2012-04-05T12:18:04-04:00'
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_079.txt'
fa1678a4a8973550f189735369419b06
59eeedb61f0f8a58f108d3ad762e0a64f5f44f9b
describe
'10225' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_079thm.jpg'
a9cd39d16bb54e2bf5961d7a55fa1d2d
50eb11b60c6d50dc5b11f4a08f5a7c7d20063a41
'2012-04-05T12:34:39-04:00'
describe
'1520613' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_080.jp2'
560e547a605b0b1940dedb525e1b483b
df3d4ab6d04b6b1293b05b64cdc3734fcbb45fae
describe
'101586' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_080.jpg'
4ba21de173de50e74593343437a09333
a70c98f2cc37540da5bc0abf6c4fa19e2559d505
'2012-04-05T12:32:45-04:00'
describe
'49574' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_080.pro'
72eae26b4074d92f7836d23fe823a012
11abd1d86f7295e645ed0843fea8629d301b5493
'2012-04-05T12:33:45-04:00'
describe
'34360' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_080.QC.jpg'
5078c61ecf386f228ddb5f6f1dd98a0a
e2ca4a07f50f3ba9c0c62523826e20881cf83b12
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_080.tif'
53569ece695d77b9e0ebd5dfc261aa72
6334e0162f4123b391a38bddbfa106f9fb8d4c95
'2012-04-05T12:15:55-04:00'
describe
'2023' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_080.txt'
422077be74d9348ac5dddaab629f2f95
d817bfcc2a5bc02bf8786cb344a3ddd2f848614f
'2012-04-05T12:30:53-04:00'
describe
'10714' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_080thm.jpg'
16aabb0e792933447d5c5ce34cdc98b9
67524309d0beba442cec8cbcbcc7d3e384f0ab87
describe
'515503' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_083.jp2'
5c2b7e6a60bd45957d24df779d510bab
7a3bd9f02cf30c826621dd606333517598068012
'2012-04-05T12:15:42-04:00'
describe
'48846' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_083.jpg'
daf5d6a245a9c73a63925910db819cd2
d87eb0cb8237f4e41abc238ee17cd5e2cf109257
'2012-04-05T12:21:27-04:00'
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_083.pro'
d7721e79bf7c69b8e00653e55b3b26f7
970115adda3294ba191826e42d2f75c7ed8c428b
'2012-04-05T12:18:13-04:00'
describe
'13141' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_083.QC.jpg'
c911881daf5b635eca8cb04abbf4b021
2432d026e9a78528dc2cd696b84a5163f8ffe5c8
describe
'12384398' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_083.tif'
58026777e02e10c5d9820e582ef8a748
9dabe51a5690b809042e3e90af7bba9f9f2e904f
'2012-04-05T12:21:13-04:00'
describe
'106' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_083.txt'
9837e4d38786d08b77680a28ca33eb4b
5db45f5dea7d7ba9e92037c4ce1e37f859b57cf5
describe
'3940' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_083thm.jpg'
788f5c7ff5d038fd545737febec93a3a
009258c8b4a56ba93944e9efc2ff3432507a2e4e
'2012-04-05T12:28:37-04:00'
describe
'1145442' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_084.jp2'
2207c30c71f0f220433d94e30eb54136
60a350f088c1d80951a2bb381f8ea8c4efbe8ad0
describe
'31115' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_084.jpg'
753dabb74104b29b6a445bf64e2bf7c2
99854483907f80417a70d960fd843ae5107bd272
'2012-04-05T12:31:31-04:00'
describe
'2269' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_084.pro'
6b467b873f69e40aa02d8ebfc2dc1ed8
38581ab11ef8e7ca906251d7f948fafd28fb9fc0
'2012-04-05T12:35:15-04:00'
describe
'9850' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_084.QC.jpg'
983c037de02ae8609c4ea1dbfa79e817
1db5a6835644f08536a8287fea602c1eda6db2ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_084.tif'
11b57c1f3ebdb758c0a0f75c5226d4c3
b1b758cdffb2b54822ebb0a3d9e0619f66f196aa
'2012-04-05T12:20:53-04:00'
describe
'112' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADUZZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_084.txt'
b5eafae0c98ebb3584669661fda5d6cd
cb218107cf169f2b54098c710cd838086d1b0895
'2012-04-05T12:16:31-04:00'
describe
'3907' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_084thm.jpg'
e6dddd36bab7b12d64286b909a6c1c46
61bd02da58963ab391fae7070534ca402d7b8b56
describe
'830686' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_085.jp2'
67bc91c285ed7a879416163eef617e88
1e2dc4f05ec9bf04e16b2d4a389a7c1ac1ed2e32
'2012-04-05T12:17:31-04:00'
describe
'21744' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_085.jpg'
79707335ec47693ad90963364fc1ba0f
047f04f618d388ed55b5a0f2157d3ac673ac9483
'2012-04-05T12:28:23-04:00'
describe
'476' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_085.pro'
9b0e9c4e3cda666cc69583f9779ac9e3
3b9729d5c23b72217797733a742331ef32f2760b
'2012-04-05T12:19:32-04:00'
describe
'6058' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_085.QC.jpg'
75e0115ea55ead6edc96b7e6a9f63629
6c7431e0f95fe8f1ec5bf6cfa88cc87060db9ede
describe
'34259722' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_085.tif'
57a0a58a3939c32af30965eaa90f8857
72ff09c8c10428b9785175a214c38e2d389f19f9
'2012-04-05T12:29:33-04:00'
describe
'433' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_085.txt'
97cf2f37ea18850df968efad08934ff2
90c9326075f62454a2cd185ebc02bdd43b4926a0
'2012-04-05T12:24:42-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2109' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_085thm.jpg'
f515803cc098df6724dbcb635c70cec1
b6858c169909fb99a8c9684e5d353caf99ebd8ca
'2012-04-05T12:20:44-04:00'
describe
'1520447' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_086.jp2'
fec0f1ac06fb7348c43b9c5361156f30
8fc407f143e6e56a9a251c8e79f8084d17293935
'2012-04-05T12:30:35-04:00'
describe
'88030' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_086.jpg'
0891998c329b22fdb63a6828f2775386
0da7e650fd292bf1bd544e90d2a95ba5ea75c05e
'2012-04-05T12:32:33-04:00'
describe
'36094' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_086.pro'
26324298932d475a70079088ff7e59c1
e54a1fb168ef6f75e0edf28b1f04daa711c1c8e3
'2012-04-05T12:28:33-04:00'
describe
'29081' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_086.QC.jpg'
2a6d2ae1290967f3ae6d1f3a6586ca8b
dd950e89d901e41d7efbc7680a3c5aef1cc50c68
'2012-04-05T12:32:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_086.tif'
b922216fcb757b4f2172a968d2ae2a05
53d1e9e86f91889c7667c021f570649bd04db7b0
'2012-04-05T12:22:18-04:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_086.txt'
ad1e8756450762dcdf6fd2bce5d76606
19efb5962501912773b3cfe5b5e57548310651fe
describe
'9052' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_086thm.jpg'
9953544e9918c8eeb32462df9528a9fa
a2e32b60b5c4e92a97bddd8ab554d710183f0e9d
'2012-04-05T12:30:28-04:00'
describe
'1408420' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_087.jp2'
e234e110adb23e6094a0e6f05b11933d
d5ea7b378da0369964ef5972f309a5ef7bef4a0e
describe
'118277' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_087.jpg'
4ce40e63384c5a0b286c1959cc346fd5
003de5071bed105ca65214e8b03b2c1a6c420e11
'2012-04-05T12:25:05-04:00'
describe
'54584' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_087.pro'
99c4cc37f7113412a2df094e8cdb0e0b
d184cbc12d87d061a42f3c504793dee7c6a207cd
describe
'40974' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_087.QC.jpg'
8ddfd2cfc6627de6b6da3bd38cf2db7e
e653376790d74be5ab62195d6030e65a3a5d0fd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_087.tif'
8f1053ca50580116c0d0d01cc52d47f0
a414c33933b574906a03485e829dfb396244c951
'2012-04-05T12:30:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_087.txt'
ad44e1b4e7f02ed95df312e0edc4ffee
e55f660076c3a61d667bde81cf8784f0731bf915
'2012-04-05T12:34:18-04:00'
describe
'11171' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_087thm.jpg'
1ffcbc8d065c2a4d4547bfac6c92fabe
961f5e03eee192e8d9e5474ba4d0f3d143ea1f89
'2012-04-05T12:18:40-04:00'
describe
'1520640' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_088.jp2'
153a314d5225bf1b1fef6d6b5b15ccd5
80f11c00f4ab657180e7788e96ccf46d6d036fae
describe
'117733' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_088.jpg'
a1aaa61ec15e5e4ede2011ed1dfb82e5
aeec99260d31c5718d42962ea59550a004aed773
'2012-04-05T12:25:52-04:00'
describe
'57369' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_088.pro'
ec53325f46a27a67ea0d652f456d764b
234a1046310b9f230236bef5410e2ae191176ba2
describe
'39840' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVAZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_088.QC.jpg'
c312e5bb4f479fb3597bf6144f207cf0
fa0d951d05cb8bfec414475b7472d8c7670adfc5
'2012-04-05T12:22:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_088.tif'
c52c475b138d63cba5c5468aa49ca162
2cbab4826c0937379531e238d030d269b0edf2e5
'2012-04-05T12:16:06-04:00'
describe
'2165' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_088.txt'
32ca821bac9269405cdbceae182db99d
4f7daf2b9e6fba04f62fe543b793d8ac132ba507
'2012-04-05T12:16:11-04:00'
describe
'12192' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_088thm.jpg'
8d1222cc83cf3f7d783fa98b4dbc55c3
c8fdf921463aa12bceb17dd150aacba5018833d1
describe
'1422203' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_089.jp2'
34abb7cdbb98a6b605257e118ecdcaaa
cdbe4e199311a9b4d01a572c8c7bb6efeafffa8f
'2012-04-05T12:17:29-04:00'
describe
'120140' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_089.jpg'
9917e1a17fde78c40fa73a04e9f3bb8d
aa430871f4ff592d987d2dcb21628c544ca48681
'2012-04-05T12:31:45-04:00'
describe
'54887' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_089.pro'
f0399cf0e9111982bd4412027c0ad561
62c48572d37d94230b9726acad885d33bacb2cf6
'2012-04-05T12:33:20-04:00'
describe
'40876' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_089.QC.jpg'
7ab351713cd530af31032344200097df
b331b0a51aa65e98271202ed9232c404dbc54629
'2012-04-05T12:21:59-04:00'
describe
'34165126' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_089.tif'
520a392c5ee5c44c50219309af820672
edc5c28aa66c71140bdfb4c18de958e893d47319
'2012-04-05T12:21:31-04:00'
describe
'2080' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_089.txt'
575c089a415ad9503084ecd715e1e5bc
96d3c17a8b1c0d0379b49d658abad1f7ea986a61
'2012-04-05T12:26:11-04:00'
describe
'11358' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_089thm.jpg'
ea68f528866887e18798fd72fb70f715
537212000bef1b8a5fe92c6607cacd93f7b636f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_090.jp2'
b9959dc5c8d478e0dd68e63c0ea50b5d
ed2598ce6e218932f8f0fc27993b89707e11a7b0
'2012-04-05T12:18:07-04:00'
describe
'96488' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_090.jpg'
9dfcba35029c04f7a4f7895b80f064ae
16f8d2b98150da3580d6da3386c7410a98ab06af
describe
'48001' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_090.pro'
656827fe14d43381d32b6be20a9f146a
909de6c3e947e984695e9d81669acfec32fb3759
describe
'32289' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_090.QC.jpg'
9d6d8eb1203f8dd93849ec88cd2ba3a5
d30dabff96733ab62b337ae5b24fa6b6cbfffa01
'2012-04-05T12:21:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_090.tif'
0d262b76bbd7c1b4a1801c480808e6ad
e8ec3487d905f7cbdb02ef13aa4d925029f6a48a
'2012-04-05T12:28:28-04:00'
describe
'2043' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_090.txt'
3d752cd518e38c85fbc8c3029b9bde44
0d05231ca2c9e0822ce8e78c1f9bf0a3c19e8b64
'2012-04-05T12:25:44-04:00'
describe
'10514' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_090thm.jpg'
cac8a35a30e20ba8e68923d39c46bf21
7e59f73c9a45e036c9cb684e63ea8dadf998d290
describe
'1435578' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_091.jp2'
7c07d8544b0499d1d1a33669c8dc5e26
58f1bc2df008bb50a162e01a3483eeef58fd9cd8
'2012-04-05T12:31:21-04:00'
describe
'121060' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_091.jpg'
be1d21bd56608d1eb45cb786d29eb31e
a8c53a658866488c6c9d9a39f32314859afb58de
describe
'54477' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_091.pro'
17ce3c45a3ea93d8571013acd78cf43f
a86b5098bd291c6b470a7d27f7ee6ca782f4066f
'2012-04-05T12:28:07-04:00'
describe
'41564' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_091.QC.jpg'
7cb2fec663be5c107e3e6a2e9b6b1ea4
d13670a880e458d9ce0202cd35f7c849ab5003a3
'2012-04-05T12:28:00-04:00'
describe
'34488330' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_091.tif'
9f2d5f223ba82e6bbb20e4c515269ead
9d4db95cc0e1708b1a0f14ff6d29403661c26b3b
'2012-04-05T12:27:12-04:00'
describe
'2068' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_091.txt'
d6ce1e0d93441f69abbde323ee765c00
289b4a16b05ebf5d30743f73accebd2cd0daeb3d
describe
'11342' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_091thm.jpg'
9c11f7a79d69d4db40ff68e0a4fa65ee
ca6145c5e3187c75701eb84e71b0e74a320ba167
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_092.jp2'
8b3205ffa95d42642dbd87c3b1f7270c
b2e642ee5b2002be8a335518a7a480a82d6f8c67
'2012-04-05T12:23:26-04:00'
describe
'113883' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVBZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_092.jpg'
15b293b5bf94faaad94c5bdc8c923d30
60d953ae34f2e2e358b5d16920cc485f32aaeb76
describe
'53230' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_092.pro'
7c4334c6903bb824857d80bba8eb5eda
4d0578d760db16793e31beb4953ac1b342f1c8d1
'2012-04-05T12:24:47-04:00'
describe
'38182' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_092.QC.jpg'
6f832b9efbd4daa521191602321a85ab
0afae25dab6ff1b0a6d76a151cd573946023758e
'2012-04-05T12:32:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_092.tif'
ca5549dafed490a8ef4c8905e9c5ff7d
f734ec7cfae92a8665023902b7dd0dc8fcc969b7
'2012-04-05T12:33:34-04:00'
describe
'2056' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_092.txt'
629245975b7710e0deef8688e8f50013
adf2ad621e898f13a047ee404565b89e9acce55d
'2012-04-05T12:17:33-04:00'
describe
'11905' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_092thm.jpg'
14122573c18d9c4a23718f64a31bab8d
a82cc07ec879d1e42329db568ccb13ee5d57bb8b
'2012-04-05T12:27:41-04:00'
describe
'1435619' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_093.jp2'
203e2b262f55744e36dda31c41c523cd
3821f764c3b102e3a32f55a9312ada22e2eb3343
'2012-04-05T12:20:33-04:00'
describe
'119665' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_093.jpg'
eba856ed14db2091c3bf8f902257afac
06b7461e8a2200ee6618f69e2d505829e3ba3e8f
'2012-04-05T12:24:41-04:00'
describe
'54236' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_093.pro'
3f3f19205908c0a1c29b4613b1630433
47d5915797f2df3e2244c9523192a709a0acc2d0
'2012-04-05T12:33:46-04:00'
describe
'40905' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_093.QC.jpg'
ebd33632250d401332c81d7dd413f0a8
00682e3652161c9ea5a4ef141c5764a096441205
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_093.tif'
9a37b706d3935789254998c053509d58
2e5cec651d70f77de0b339a7849d092b9cf4612a
'2012-04-05T12:20:31-04:00'
describe
'2059' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_093.txt'
a468b4c364a4e1db65d5df93f9c77b34
34a824798dbbe77241ddb177a378f3050ee6b9cd
describe
'11311' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_093thm.jpg'
0dae1409c1b552cbc68209ca0b5b0463
e934d585ac6bce3da96e2984f209c858179835a1
describe
'1520617' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_094.jp2'
21db9a798f13748ad9a58a24ccbf5ff6
5c49053e6d3e469860d79da5f077496b4491043b
describe
'102709' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_094.jpg'
bc0b76f65f164c0ad8738b7a8aad0df2
b263fd31e119f7422acf3b700bf5bcaa9b7283cb
'2012-04-05T12:23:16-04:00'
describe
'46334' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_094.pro'
0f6fd128d71f9f176e586e16b2b5d2a3
bfeb18063c217a042686f8ad8fa308c2faafeaad
'2012-04-05T12:31:03-04:00'
describe
'34814' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_094.QC.jpg'
a1bbf2a1d5305a99e5a9096933a38539
21fe5d66e8aa4e155a0122201b81fc7a7f806580
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_094.tif'
483a3ae8dcc0353aa13e1f405eaa36be
69ff533d62a726730fbdc7f7c4fafcee38ce92e1
'2012-04-05T12:21:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_094.txt'
e7fed6d7dade000e673c3cfeb49128c1
821b1e226631f08225feb56d23167afdf81ad611
'2012-04-05T12:31:58-04:00'
describe
'11149' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_094thm.jpg'
b546153978c83d677346ff42b5213659
6263fc13cbaab8e0387583d2bc748e740001591b
'2012-04-05T12:25:09-04:00'
describe
'1430351' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_095.jp2'
0f9d4b0d6edb62eb5b9d633b9b313bbd
72cd203d68e2d8b5a6630d74abbcae5c6dbfd3f1
describe
'109056' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_095.jpg'
334aa907fa6f9b5c977b653b59278fb2
fd83702844351047fa53861d44d7b33908012990
'2012-04-05T12:28:46-04:00'
describe
'47337' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_095.pro'
6968bc8b0ca7aae1baf5006d3e1f1202
326e2635993ccae35e9c4e4e63afd94fb6861298
'2012-04-05T12:20:29-04:00'
describe
'38000' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_095.QC.jpg'
18e889bb8aad1ec1140a9145d6ace03a
897822baf674862cf44096bb00c9a3760e23ef2e
'2012-04-05T12:29:13-04:00'
describe
'34362202' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_095.tif'
eac90a42ed07c8c5b062589efca7a355
ca972731ddfb3b11253315b269d6451ae808f67c
'2012-04-05T12:19:35-04:00'
describe
'1813' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_095.txt'
a6ffda49740f397680f7c7bf3978f54e
b1778ad5b0c1fd66a1c27bef82ef757526c44bb0
describe
'10919' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVCZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_095thm.jpg'
61749c20c72a3f922e5cc7d1cf3371e4
4d43ae6ed65750e73873ea38b12d7aaa59c07fe0
'2012-04-05T12:21:02-04:00'
describe
'1520642' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_096.jp2'
993b63018ce5c31f95307deb76a557c2
367dd290af75db0a5c68f4a2b744ce09f6afedbc
'2012-04-05T12:29:03-04:00'
describe
'110367' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_096.jpg'
7aa4f443e334701006188aebdaca2eb5
153b7f62d9216c7a1d51455f11758ffed2bf48e9
'2012-04-05T12:23:27-04:00'
describe
'53160' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_096.pro'
380f4c1a3b5d7c5da302eb6fc34d53a0
a26147831394f8a2da49c43abdfbb54e51c47d73
'2012-04-05T12:17:42-04:00'
describe
'37687' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_096.QC.jpg'
f6cd7980a77ea44dcd9dd76fa06e0a5f
a411c69a11f94d698a7853c9cc23beb8aeb14637
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_096.tif'
e4b2767c83690b56c4a4f9d878ea78b8
203dd9cc5965f417ff673f745914128d30931825
'2012-04-05T12:21:44-04:00'
describe
'2055' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_096.txt'
8cc669483105dd954dc4c618a3e52f50
b83ad9dffb7d7e694fd59b2415dd3e01907fa0a1
describe
'11829' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_096thm.jpg'
2693d378a8581f259115e3747f508f64
8f4d8afa410408d07dcafce5494c1df1f1a3149b
'2012-04-05T12:18:27-04:00'
describe
'1427454' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_097.jp2'
19072856ac085815520894340e3a8373
c667c0a7609c5a67b6defdf5f189c20033905a79
'2012-04-05T12:34:53-04:00'
describe
'120076' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_097.jpg'
b92424d1e97371be48fbfad880eb0147
f01cecdabaa8b297b61ed1ebba6a4139cec89999
'2012-04-05T12:18:46-04:00'
describe
'53471' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_097.pro'
2581747aa1e019cf657748b349f9f4df
e2ce3ec8471bf10d0bc4ece56c407dfad4479e59
describe
'40534' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_097.QC.jpg'
f4d5f6d476f69b5ead030d8f1ba26562
c03e1f2cc01555a1352dcc69c58589072f599462
'2012-04-05T12:22:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_097.tif'
5a1430a679fbbe02c247940089d18358
62d0b8ff1e3a7ff5a1c9774bc338a0c918dcd6c2
'2012-04-05T12:29:08-04:00'
describe
'2036' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_097.txt'
b5a000f3ffd2f52eb4fcaa63185e969a
b67a10e383027eac13c453a954dade7f075834d6
describe
'11344' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_097thm.jpg'
da398022a2763d80f910604168804f07
3a9f4aeb13d3edf3bafb0afa24d90f1fd34b8f44
'2012-04-05T12:17:34-04:00'
describe
'1520637' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_098.jp2'
1c3eb876a2488bad5dc9c886bcfdf35f
ad7e27624c3fc56b5bf479e16c9880e51c8018a5
'2012-04-05T12:34:37-04:00'
describe
'96616' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_098.jpg'
da1eb806b32036d99b54651804dcabfc
ba996352c38b2f02c047772d0b018077f67a5eed
'2012-04-05T12:20:19-04:00'
describe
'42426' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_098.pro'
0d7999a77b6e57f5bd08efeed15e1a6f
481a9f0ee874a2231d1887d0bf58958e601e5135
'2012-04-05T12:22:39-04:00'
describe
'33126' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_098.QC.jpg'
2572db12555b19bd1c9f920d94fb1699
0e09b6dc8021f460727925cb87e5e8a75c4e1371
'2012-04-05T12:32:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_098.tif'
b530a11017471d7b1a3348d95839cf0e
70915447d15f963b0b7d2593bd3c35e848d48451
'2012-04-05T12:17:54-04:00'
describe
'1708' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_098.txt'
9eca3bca1e45e6cf64e961882a3f1bb4
56935acaed4d41123062d7de332e182733fb16cb
'2012-04-05T12:33:22-04:00'
describe
'10627' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_098thm.jpg'
d9bd9c690409d0bef3d7c672c0ab476e
abe9bb6743e10a4a72f7c0465d81ac6e1ee09c42
'2012-04-05T12:33:41-04:00'
describe
'1408419' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_099.jp2'
195b7b591f128c606dd5c7a4c9413ca5
bd2e3b6f42e46319d29d5976555f3915893325f2
'2012-04-05T12:26:17-04:00'
describe
'115789' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_099.jpg'
9caefbdf03ee222fa8e28e663dd8b526
95f0f32b80dd7902df7d60962ef161935adda9c1
describe
'53635' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_099.pro'
e9504e15d053f9db0350eda670838c49
0d12f3c7d7c783c9b315b606f54016a5f0937924
'2012-04-05T12:18:33-04:00'
describe
'40212' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_099.QC.jpg'
43f82ddafb39e1f31627091c31a2484a
f6a932cf646f7a7fec6cb17dc06a786b2683188a
'2012-04-05T12:27:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVDZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_099.tif'
3d7275d490cfa556e9c8cd96a98b352f
5269d2245498fe94f91a8476ecfa18a43067f944
'2012-04-05T12:16:40-04:00'
describe
'2030' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_099.txt'
2a56870815e562886d6084d09f65bef7
063be9ee98d70897e3c0628c5322d7e8b4c858e6
'2012-04-05T12:17:28-04:00'
describe
'11049' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_099thm.jpg'
60086cddfeaa439a33d394feaa254655
216ce06ce9a13dfa6095773d33e4228a835d2033
describe
'1520561' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_100.jp2'
c186963d33db6c98d790cd32f5ea30fc
f239fe1a77938fbdd1770e58bcd9b501471f6f55
'2012-04-05T12:17:15-04:00'
describe
'96554' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVED' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_100.jpg'
eb8a8879f0d8e2ede1a41ccba96e10a7
bb432495a17d4a7b25be35482dc6eeb32922133f
describe
'46832' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_100.pro'
3c7c7f13c82c8bac7d51cddd2d65541e
26bbdfecf8c401ec1079789a2fdd273d2fb6d42e
'2012-04-05T12:19:31-04:00'
describe
'32461' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_100.QC.jpg'
3ef51e610a34ddc350cc1b699c2b30db
a474b106e360d78f3d95aff94dcbc1d50b6af491
'2012-04-05T12:27:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_100.tif'
14929fafe4e4659b60ab59929e5c609d
4f6415d4ea80ee0a17fd41de2ece3277cc95316d
describe
'1940' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_100.txt'
791a10a2d18200b8df29366ae9f5e67a
f7fa5837ffddc614c14a36bc1d5d6072913e78e3
describe
Invalid character
'10560' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_100thm.jpg'
97f09824ea68ec8c7c8b18450810708c
c4e5f8b53c55e1eea19c796ab80b21f3ede76e20
'2012-04-05T12:25:53-04:00'
describe
'1408423' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_101.jp2'
fba382459e95ec02cf5efc8ff5ecb774
da37c82ef179dbdcf3e40ed56b85bc4b4ce923cc
'2012-04-05T12:27:49-04:00'
describe
'111745' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_101.jpg'
da046e3777ed0bf0a7f1a793adce65f9
5f8821af2278165ad42d65a41fcf79ad53bfcd38
'2012-04-05T12:18:44-04:00'
describe
'49915' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_101.pro'
1a0d0309b03575680c9264d16925957e
9d5a41d13a119e7c049950db8041beda458d5e32
describe
'39162' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_101.QC.jpg'
521b07b7be8ec699f0e1edb5e6473039
f6f2012c2168a1eeffb6b5eee0ae6e1760d3e2b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_101.tif'
fc34865d73fdada588e16a30192db09a
7af25108ca0844df933f9246fc82130f60112da1
'2012-04-05T12:18:01-04:00'
describe
'1922' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_101.txt'
cfc4420ae56bbcc862aff14fd9569603
cedae739220cf69fcad6a4a142407fe0a8eafbc0
'2012-04-05T12:31:59-04:00'
describe
'11022' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_101thm.jpg'
9950f99ff542f97974f22ca1fc273211
14e856eb6a1d6c271c2695f8f897bc45a1a3e681
'2012-04-05T12:24:03-04:00'
describe
'1520616' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_102.jp2'
5872b61b4aaddb94f41d4222f619f7c6
33f63f8a8b7781402582a0fc102ff4426e7b99ec
'2012-04-05T12:29:09-04:00'
describe
'101133' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVER' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_102.jpg'
25a4f16e4399ecfac051d9fb81d189f9
27ebd130c9118e3e4da880f345dd28abc666e771
'2012-04-05T12:17:26-04:00'
describe
'46826' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVES' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_102.pro'
fc7cced1fd2d3f99be6c37857b433514
26839535bbcb86dd7933f23474216ab4254d73a1
describe
'34504' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVET' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_102.QC.jpg'
008d7eccd91134f92281ff7e4900f665
403a8c07291914cc6e2d738df54edacc7eb96b28
'2012-04-05T12:28:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_102.tif'
a29f1c8e4c00226eaa76b28271568410
7077115aca9acc4f3338a05864097715d3120751
'2012-04-05T12:20:47-04:00'
describe
'1816' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_102.txt'
fe79539d4d5408cd694412b70e5cc595
d2ea5aabc9812bc6dcff06c12ad773f9cf0f7bf1
'2012-04-05T12:23:43-04:00'
describe
'11306' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_102thm.jpg'
e6bde91b12a06e024778b8d56eac204d
8da319a4346ca08fed97734eb1b039742afde175
'2012-04-05T12:32:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_103.jp2'
4428bd6630e09ad5518891dc8ffef911
fe35627f2a184c2d86de4dc9bbc07cd3eeffc07a
'2012-04-05T12:25:41-04:00'
describe
'107282' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_103.jpg'
f5300208d2249f3da3464d07b2c115b9
caf248d076c5f3c589125047fc90c0192ffd3d39
'2012-04-05T12:16:17-04:00'
describe
'46830' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVEZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_103.pro'
3e4b98c410e083ee0036fd06f2f3dcb8
514ec7f86284c72d7918d908dd7b308c2a88b0b2
'2012-04-05T12:22:14-04:00'
describe
'36848' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_103.QC.jpg'
53a1af8bc1383f01ac4c5170b9c5c3bf
3f84c14cc8bc656edcd9923a2dfb9cb776c77692
'2012-04-05T12:17:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_103.tif'
48036753ddf6b11bcc1f35fea60aabe9
a61d941675a99153a845a54a1bb3da9502442c50
'2012-04-05T12:29:54-04:00'
describe
'1846' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_103.txt'
bb90eb2e12d71695bfc1e666de81c58a
787cf083e4894d92a87676e93ba365951ee88684
'2012-04-05T12:18:10-04:00'
describe
'10439' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_103thm.jpg'
a77909d784498e5208cdb48c9aa0e009
c4d075a614ef8c036bb208a97314c7803fecf237
'2012-04-05T12:21:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_104.jp2'
da7401bf808f0b2951116e72597f2fd2
6adff2f38c117f4f85f2925c6b45d5d5503949c7
describe
'113113' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_104.jpg'
51a08fde763c1dcb6c88e8f8bdb8af91
200f1265735fffbe11086bfda540700526c9d667
'2012-04-05T12:26:09-04:00'
describe
'53520' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_104.pro'
23b88105f909e8f6b1c343c045595586
dc059a4fbca36cf55394f03c8aad20f1122b4360
describe
'38428' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_104.QC.jpg'
3656244f83b47c07719249aef5c6aa28
9ce4f6eadce3f07aefc268f65b0ce3e09cd28645
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_104.tif'
2a70eec9fb9988e5c1fc1543ccaca5b4
9d7d2a86532c5264c2dd6588f2ffd2f62e1eef02
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_104.txt'
7c08132752d15387b9edbc65501740cf
1bc51df22a2e8938ed45f2e551a40963062e1781
describe
'11946' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_104thm.jpg'
7a80f55a5bc1204d6b31f12dc35b6f0d
ccd7ca05bafe16356ae301fc287bb44f3d23cfa3
'2012-04-05T12:28:43-04:00'
describe
'1408385' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_105.jp2'
7caa1dd09a2f0ed9cf8387760054d000
2bc99a6d7b58845a86b660d9b67ade88bd9078ff
'2012-04-05T12:28:08-04:00'
describe
'115601' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_105.jpg'
931be30996ed2227d53fb4bd036da7e2
7033d065bc12f75969be4d9626157ee59459b9f2
'2012-04-05T12:26:37-04:00'
describe
'55057' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_105.pro'
7450a331cae92f05c423496c5e3ad101
8429140012000042aa90b26897ad3795fef9d467
'2012-04-05T12:22:01-04:00'
describe
'39507' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_105.QC.jpg'
9fad7b504de7fbc00cd26e162f0c6311
6b16c4d99589633d222bb0fe2c7e37bf455ca105
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_105.tif'
e495b467f71a3e30228ee2bef49f3f1e
c9cf599e1577a8773d29705a3a89cb0f5b6a16dd
'2012-04-05T12:19:47-04:00'
describe
'2117' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_105.txt'
7323923d9319cc1412b51fa68c3b6433
f9cb7647fdfb16dc4190ceacf1d411a87e11f4ed
'2012-04-05T12:32:07-04:00'
describe
'11187' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_105thm.jpg'
5a3e08faefdf9ff35e8aad05cd5e3300
ec6569abb277baca007ce1fca64f01441a8012ca
'2012-04-05T12:17:40-04:00'
describe
'1520607' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_106.jp2'
45370bb033d3cebb8ab9c864d9036468
e312e8fdc5024ba2c1a6fcf0e600b81138120366
'2012-04-05T12:26:39-04:00'
describe
'109905' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_106.jpg'
6c56031f84414dc090a5e299476ac7c7
8c3cb510a5a3b5982057f7ff333d449a4275ab87
describe
'50982' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_106.pro'
ad895239605c707c2a484bd7277168fa
d7f2cff3302d2115eceacbaa0e704cdc2c28cbfc
describe
'37126' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_106.QC.jpg'
6fc76dabc72c1f5d6cf66b055141e12e
cf1316963aa5e34b04952d9f9b89daa1a506ae34
'2012-04-05T12:17:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_106.tif'
2c93dee128e0da7b783028d6d7b98014
385cc9c36bcac9223523e416500162f19036c44e
'2012-04-05T12:31:26-04:00'
describe
'1969' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_106.txt'
ca8699037f28ca35d2e3b53bc64414f4
d268a65cb6ea71b92a9adae7fd6df75912465c73
'2012-04-05T12:25:35-04:00'
describe
'11867' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_106thm.jpg'
94c47536446e8bac0989c3486da794b6
78680fb6a9ee765725c06545825d79c50dda229d
'2012-04-05T12:23:02-04:00'
describe
'1424829' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVFZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_107.jp2'
1e4ae002b89431448a148adead8d91a3
d76c6b883ef267cdb4203ee73e910ed91c488d9d
'2012-04-05T12:17:37-04:00'
describe
'117499' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_107.jpg'
aed2b125c76d3391b4d15a2fab0fc9e0
4bde0243ec89f34fb32c9bacfd664e3489482f5f
describe
'53931' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_107.pro'
69a0ff677179d429728afdf99f68c14c
4c0307eca8f11ff6c8c59918082412227cdf8f94
describe
'40103' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_107.QC.jpg'
f85f97c34f05b93472ffea99720538a5
0cb563157ea56c8f5fba4427dfc4800dc556193e
'2012-04-05T12:21:37-04:00'
describe
'34228190' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_107.tif'
3afc1fd2df72efd59c672e6cd2b8a5cd
638976e79aae7028f986b743f5d8cc7ca22fc85f
'2012-04-05T12:23:46-04:00'
describe
'2057' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_107.txt'
ccc033cf3e96252fcf16a9b200d79f96
92ca4c88773d00a97cdf54d02100e34507b7973d
describe
'11196' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_107thm.jpg'
369c82b628628b29d585819844d11056
bca44f6c3556534d70419129940953b7e135c711
describe
'1520623' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_108.jp2'
099d1a3a45b772fc172d62faae27ca4c
98248ecb610f177c96898d2ac371472663785104
'2012-04-05T12:25:07-04:00'
describe
'113879' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_108.jpg'
98dab64c575f21930cb9ba8b9055e3c6
0be30d3838109d75b59ae80983487ebceecdb062
'2012-04-05T12:33:26-04:00'
describe
'54824' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_108.pro'
f91c8dd5195cdeb6b597f0e015a659c5
0aef8713ac50531ba092b5b5aa747c8f542ab11e
'2012-04-05T12:31:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_108.QC.jpg'
cb37a81587413798d5e6c587d1d8f5c4
fdcbabe6ee93b677e6c70bd420ad511c885bad27
'2012-04-05T12:23:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_108.tif'
cc6be4dce17b865b67ed3b876186e288
17801c5e046fa5478420a73025d24546159980ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_108.txt'
2312fca5687d9256019cb39ada267f90
6dd520e69dbc27640d06f806e3f383407c818935
'2012-04-05T12:22:33-04:00'
describe
'11846' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_108thm.jpg'
c598bb7d2334c121e00c9780a81efabd
9cdd339f99afca935c1e130fef582414a73b6c2a
'2012-04-05T12:22:32-04:00'
describe
'1427450' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_109.jp2'
00e24fc70f00d052484c7a9dbd29cb75
eda679db831841156508df8b36b3946e53680cc8
describe
'124423' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_109.jpg'
7ae3c07710900f465ea7341ab1fa8939
c3968c31ee80ff24d7fd7d597854dfd4a9997629
'2012-04-05T12:24:24-04:00'
describe
'57352' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_109.pro'
674614f4a83d156e941a3e26467dc979
24521143ed4f1c8b89c738d0d5691848e296c93b
'2012-04-05T12:28:55-04:00'
describe
'42375' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_109.QC.jpg'
b46a319c08ec8ffc4596a6e6f36275f4
dac7f7e2a27b2e74b91b15535f55b5c54b2f2621
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_109.tif'
61f4f2593940fd9800b1c5ad967420b2
c5a13f2ecc0a1423abfe244016a21a1a47f65857
'2012-04-05T12:24:26-04:00'
describe
'2172' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_109.txt'
4aabd82a35327e64fd1c9986d367803b
ecd553273b6dc1a347d605e45dd0a0c88ce96e8f
'2012-04-05T12:32:34-04:00'
describe
'11671' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_109thm.jpg'
8bea0be00c09fe3793b82c18a6153ca9
17e135eb6e2f4ac4a4af04ff20457e9c1a310c08
describe
'1520567' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_110.jp2'
ff1fe7f0bc5426c4415844badc8ed50b
0c5b1b0eda1c5170bddb1c36d2eea34e316f1d2b
'2012-04-05T12:33:30-04:00'
describe
'116244' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_110.jpg'
31b6a9b66040ac6a7bd669ec35797a0a
c0b95017664f90597a2df91178b67bc80ac4aae6
describe
'55987' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_110.pro'
24726f829e5d4a7dfa5b105ae0998982
10cdef5f2a22f9b40b04a4a56e55f0a4f5908d7c
'2012-04-05T12:29:23-04:00'
describe
'38862' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_110.QC.jpg'
a8e42a9e8c61f1a4b344ffee4cb4d597
a521699fa23a360d0b33683839eb7374dce4bcde
'2012-04-05T12:31:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_110.tif'
cca93bbef2f8b7519ee61649ca26e3a5
efad3fb782cad7dc29b7de8b81afe24350d105f9
'2012-04-05T12:28:22-04:00'
describe
'2180' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVGZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_110.txt'
bb90f19f699afdbfba5a1cbed6d04730
ad5ed6121c11bc3b164f325c6725aa5b21a5c8f1
'2012-04-05T12:32:57-04:00'
describe
'12245' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_110thm.jpg'
134ab5dca71c05003decbd47af64d5eb
640c1a5031c16b4f152734b443302faa8e5fe0e5
describe
'1408402' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_111.jp2'
f5ca5a06608791a255d2ac0aeeb9246e
99e60b10a4ac6f2ce147139787f5df06add2eb69
'2012-04-05T12:25:45-04:00'
describe
'119405' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_111.jpg'
429c0255e7ef9bddc0e3b827dc30845a
be7fe5b4cae93c2df038ad6be236f1ae2e7c5cb1
'2012-04-05T12:27:27-04:00'
describe
'54237' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_111.pro'
be4b59c1ecac708e5c27ce7d10cf35b7
6f26887fc80fdde194406aee1336bc064684f947
describe
'41184' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_111.QC.jpg'
3db7a4fb8a7f7a8c423a45cdf5511a03
efde7ed8ec08fc4d90bcbe6a3fe29f86175335c1
'2012-04-05T12:23:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_111.tif'
a55f5c171ca12b838f6920165ab62ad2
83f1c0e4c6bfc049675af49c41d1a2036a2395f5
'2012-04-05T12:28:12-04:00'
describe
'2060' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_111.txt'
85d23dfbba68018591b315a81ec969f3
d2a1a621870401ce7f3cfc8807d387613fc1987d
describe
'11401' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_111thm.jpg'
984713d0541a1a772150995143e19d48
64d1ca806555da3d9ffdda466e6f826d7baedcbe
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_112.jp2'
ad72ebeee798052db415d27797f5ddad
0dfb2ea388f750298ae5dc214f51e25c03a3e4b0
'2012-04-05T12:20:48-04:00'
describe
'111391' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_112.jpg'
313655270559ee57983fbfc6e76f6d1e
9a5662f2d53372e72bcd1e82d3b49ff0241401a3
'2012-04-05T12:34:57-04:00'
describe
'52364' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_112.pro'
9e0fbb6c5f7c38b3a447a06ffd2a752f
974fce87e2a3f5d13a44a914094495776aff685d
'2012-04-05T12:27:20-04:00'
describe
'38041' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_112.QC.jpg'
1195b59c89f6960714d9c8840996b223
e487cb38029c1334404cdfa6a77c0ba68f459049
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_112.tif'
611b318d9b5fe376f5f848a919a02a80
298c2f5464144443639fe5bbd23e9c77de3f4758
'2012-04-05T12:26:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_112.txt'
bd9e3b5009a4cc47c27b2e3d240fc1fd
fc40474345216ec757fd61dadd0f67c9d1bd97b9
'2012-04-05T12:26:42-04:00'
describe
'11808' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_112thm.jpg'
05219d6369636a39c139c2eedb9a3af6
7c2b2e1c4a22e69a6298612feb215e1f1ecb2c65
'2012-04-05T12:29:27-04:00'
describe
'1430357' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_113.jp2'
624fe36df4e14d7dccff5d0a08e952a8
6874349c80525c060b9849871899be482a73579a
'2012-04-05T12:17:23-04:00'
describe
'117372' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_113.jpg'
61a6627a3341f837079455d60bc90e97
6578a782f79d123491fa33c66bf0de0eb232acb7
'2012-04-05T12:20:42-04:00'
describe
'51426' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_113.pro'
62b8aa267621ac55550dcd5b13b71df3
15dae7d1f9396bdcd2dc474ae09d758d0f1cd457
'2012-04-05T12:17:51-04:00'
describe
'40854' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_113.QC.jpg'
da6221980702b7ca68aeeae8d2d04d88
7ecf633b799e92815d4d6fd15d107a4767dc8b00
'2012-04-05T12:27:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_113.tif'
85b9b0fb7d51da7f514e9844b9c4faec
52d6180a41b91517dbd7a421006c61c1099728c5
'2012-04-05T12:24:09-04:00'
describe
'1968' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_113.txt'
30651e43dd3d16949196640197b15049
fcaf2abbf038ebd7804d1a8d6d6ece4e1d3c5709
describe
'11862' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_113thm.jpg'
0b68eae8fb830f86478a03d43710b439
8b0b9f0f99021b907ae552bdb30493474a3cf8ee
describe
'1520632' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_114.jp2'
1dbbca9119938d4d6c6034c594b85740
a5b5c847fddd1a5ae28def51eb566734fd9a46d5
describe
'100585' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_114.jpg'
b667a49bac52ed751e38e40c20faba24
029749cbd22e47724b282c1a5e7ca2187327b4a0
'2012-04-05T12:33:49-04:00'
describe
'46131' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_114.pro'
c5c7586846bcbd939d4d27d62f14bed3
50c7fee605260881fb11f3802ee4dc513438bd6d
describe
'33961' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVHZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_114.QC.jpg'
6013531e10b2b460187ccb15835aedc0
fd8c4cd2141dcb55d844b15af43f23c307b428f8
'2012-04-05T12:17:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_114.tif'
56aa1161f58b8cd2e193df89348cc018
f735dd61f28e66edf3c2e7e1159e42aa1c5507b7
'2012-04-05T12:31:16-04:00'
describe
'1911' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_114.txt'
771751bde7c289877e3d5cda34cc136e
6818e6b9eb31ebe64412b10265085322acec37ad
'2012-04-05T12:32:15-04:00'
describe
'11210' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_114thm.jpg'
d93510f8870058554e7cdc48ff973bee
91af89d1f5496fc5b855c163ed7db125464e8f4f
'2012-04-05T12:19:38-04:00'
describe
'1408355' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVID' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_115.jp2'
45d5d68967256b0649e523a8d7a106ca
0799060901a827313dbfbe5907ea2ea18b0bacd6
'2012-04-05T12:24:45-04:00'
describe
'116521' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_115.jpg'
b695296d0874fae1f07fb79928778397
9f8b4017458e4bdac2ccbf405da8a9109dde396d
describe
'49419' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_115.pro'
c00790ffa8d62309ea272b155eb267b2
4525476c60f37f03db4adc64c73465334dd7603e
'2012-04-05T12:26:28-04:00'
describe
'41181' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_115.QC.jpg'
21d12313bc4ba51c68fcd6a589d4d015
7e73cca68d0989d51014695a8cc55636509c62d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_115.tif'
5fb5a4ce942392c5253e36e70cdb522d
98a5a61a09485a9f666bfdaaa3328115bd1a0bfa
describe
'1907' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVII' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_115.txt'
33500ead232587952700e498ada8eb99
bfa14dbf10eeeef0fe1127bb73cf2f4af21bbac7
'2012-04-05T12:22:35-04:00'
describe
'11447' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_115thm.jpg'
9e09682ca8df1d323a163f7c1cecf443
0cea2a191f929377a564d8f605981d910d5b677c
'2012-04-05T12:27:52-04:00'
describe
'1520620' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_116.jp2'
88d367673c5a27067c9bc5dfd0acf60c
633973c3d93a0fb5fc3b61c877e814b7eed2ec94
'2012-04-05T12:32:13-04:00'
describe
'113512' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_116.jpg'
e16810fd6886e7fb0023d2082e37d112
748bc9f20a34387fc125996dc3a4e3b812592bb3
describe
'52625' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_116.pro'
48f27948c98b3acdf6f144de5a4c8c90
b2b43b2472c3f6bc0af1b58778e7789a68158b98
'2012-04-05T12:31:34-04:00'
describe
'38681' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_116.QC.jpg'
2a7ce9b5440cd5a818904065b04485ba
143073734249e8a14efdd7c9c101b2fd05ee94c4
'2012-04-05T12:34:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_116.tif'
3d96ec668c9440cd83115964bacf8ffe
400392ae8e86f31b71ecc2f46579f16ab7c7b2e2
'2012-04-05T12:15:52-04:00'
describe
'2003' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_116.txt'
c441cf5afd2853c7455ea9a16723c480
563e984d09c31d708f53504c46a99ae183c4d54a
describe
'12016' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_116thm.jpg'
43d27eec4b96727777c305714edc4e8e
4c8787e04b8a626f6546ba6c5b05a8c4cb9091c8
'2012-04-05T12:33:15-04:00'
describe
'1435657' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_117.jp2'
f4ed4e76a1621b3f6de9e94a15b590b9
355a547534eaca6853c72b026f056f4c93a9979b
'2012-04-05T12:29:50-04:00'
describe
'110843' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_117.jpg'
655542ef27825e31b4f03adfa88e0b0c
c82b57ca0edb29db7720fe2b4cb006b8650682e3
'2012-04-05T12:30:13-04:00'
describe
'47550' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_117.pro'
fc46f805066df144405fbcde67e7c166
f191042a6512a0b9332c3052ba6a551dc764fbf9
describe
'38653' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_117.QC.jpg'
9b8085e8001b68f809fc13b0f986d137
0ccb0d5d2ee9525e0b5674f16ece31f026e3aae3
'2012-04-05T12:24:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_117.tif'
42f668ce4f37698210523c24f1592b66
7a6f9092e3b91f6666192cf1dd63e49307feccbf
'2012-04-05T12:31:50-04:00'
describe
'1830' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_117.txt'
feaa4f037042532cb3d0f58db158e4a7
e6a31c7f34991562c29d30bc1575b9529e3c06bc
describe
'11440' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_117thm.jpg'
6ae5563f5710d8413c49577bcf8c2f73
7c872372e9e5ba892dde37b2dab4f268eea91b73
'2012-04-05T12:31:20-04:00'
describe
'1520635' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_118.jp2'
0d97997ddeaa09590d05360ec87f33a8
cf181cb0ea9a0b35151a52525aed5df7678b3b74
describe
'118147' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVIZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_118.jpg'
58e10bd6e0cdc09f037cc5ca0d247984
b6ff6e1c370bb105f2af54091f46d604c08fc25e
'2012-04-05T12:18:45-04:00'
describe
'57761' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_118.pro'
c39d3f4058cd57b5359b91d9571d50cb
86f2bddde76c5c371f4b04d193bc0264248db19a
describe
'39738' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_118.QC.jpg'
d353eb623cce06614c81a260333f65b9
91e022517b566bc7c14df1fecad4cb357dea1b63
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_118.tif'
3bd77adb506d2cda894d94c26ff5687a
591bbec013cf37ed410be3ee3c7398ba1e0c8853
describe
'2224' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_118.txt'
fce465903a20a0b85dd8e0f7a01931ad
a0b84a4002b57548cd806acb10109214791d98d1
describe
'12360' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_118thm.jpg'
dccba4527232e7c5431cfb8aa80ebf44
2f0a09b9bd5351462a3c3335df777bbf44e22ab3
describe
'1432997' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_119.jp2'
c480b12e05df3494709b29e05db5b3ce
e25cdd5c4c8e8b436730bdacf77f80a58910f887
'2012-04-05T12:26:24-04:00'
describe
'116239' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_119.jpg'
baf32cf5f41af69193b0367a38152413
0081083fce0831c6fbce8187e2afd96da1bc162d
describe
'51980' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_119.pro'
e8d29380805f4e8d446535f5c2b33292
6e7e2bf2fb4240e28fc3369a846a6e005f5da024
'2012-04-05T12:16:56-04:00'
describe
'40108' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_119.QC.jpg'
6d1defe608acf4bb715955cd92b08a92
4a5da56381aa686ecf92695a78b12b899486dada
'2012-04-05T12:30:52-04:00'
describe
'34425266' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_119.tif'
c2ad9b19aabab3da6c4c9d9b5c6c363d
29fb8d8a1d8f28ef6aa1831f0c6c8775512dbc90
'2012-04-05T12:18:29-04:00'
describe
'2001' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_119.txt'
b3f975fe51fecb167f64b17d843e1771
5b2c31dca976ba0877ade11951bfc7f272aa117b
'2012-04-05T12:27:18-04:00'
describe
'11579' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_119thm.jpg'
7fb60fee8e0bff419c1a8879c29c7604
e08069fd2e80912726d6c5b153ade3b1e6197438
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_120.jp2'
e56fc4d6d6cb7bc0575078f5496269f4
7d9fec7cb3ec02cce5c9d06b063370fbc193adbe
'2012-04-05T12:31:09-04:00'
describe
'116780' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_120.jpg'
c1e6835e7ffeeab03bdcc0f951af0ccf
64320d5928365d9d4d69ae5ac783e5c7a2420629
describe
'57120' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_120.pro'
72b808271516e387c0129c5c57881f55
853adadd09be881e9025e669992c2db4dc2d2b5d
describe
'39714' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_120.QC.jpg'
a4528c0c8417326f9366649bf12492c7
995b4eb357646b874d4adff2c7463b4c76123993
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_120.tif'
7eee5840f287d6fd9c8548a7d188568c
992e9e76d73910f317f0a4ebfd25e30909240d1a
'2012-04-05T12:17:20-04:00'
describe
'2158' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_120.txt'
fe75548f678b795328462213e1660afd
e8b179168aac0a027f0170d9d21887d9df901cf4
describe
'12008' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_120thm.jpg'
3bdea85207c7870516adfdb47a27da58
94dd604077d8dca4b55fc9abb97bc45d075a057c
'2012-04-05T12:25:36-04:00'
describe
'1408349' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_121.jp2'
c0c065fe23752d2bdb748eb540769730
d23c8c3e260d1d62d712590267020c1307005c35
'2012-04-05T12:22:24-04:00'
describe
'124437' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_121.jpg'
cc46f7c6bd242c1b9ce9112edc0c9bbf
6f32db0a4ce4a043b24cc6365f7705f4d1f84368
'2012-04-05T12:18:59-04:00'
describe
'57036' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_121.pro'
fe3599184811cce733b7397519ff631a
e1eda41be20421762fc1d667a26ed8f94cc97672
'2012-04-05T12:31:13-04:00'
describe
'42055' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_121.QC.jpg'
09f8960fa875a6845b31bd5a44bc8110
ab0b0ecf85b2066414bbe62a26ac241374337441
'2012-04-05T12:29:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_121.tif'
06054b4326c11a6a706a5ff4676cd0ee
fc1d45d00a3e0ff83128684f229548bb7c225dd6
'2012-04-05T12:24:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_121.txt'
b7a1d6ac10338df1ba56011ee7bae07d
902117b5d1b710f916aa15fafdca02e826dd364e
describe
'11721' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVJZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_121thm.jpg'
e5847032be57213dcbcb9d2b16581434
c8df6c1064599796b871c691b1a37a0e47b3df64
describe
'1520604' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_122.jp2'
4e883167ed58b7ee2899a228fc68f031
53c2f5efc893383428f1bc011524ea6eadff00d4
'2012-04-05T12:24:04-04:00'
describe
'112055' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_122.jpg'
ffb03b15975c1ce3308ecc84b1df1451
691528d1adcc671b1c449a8757365a1050d40e2c
describe
'53381' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_122.pro'
3e65dffd956b92ee5996fe5d5a2bb2f4
af5ceec74ed0e7d87c13ee25291250b279613a7f
describe
'37980' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_122.QC.jpg'
fa9d3dc23cdb5b3344564c5c1d74ed32
3d690f5fb8a59c9cbcf7f1e8a63adcaa212cd28e
'2012-04-05T12:17:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_122.tif'
32b8bb728da11aa0641a479e976def58
620c016b07096120a99cfc0104c6bb9d3eaf7ab2
'2012-04-05T12:16:49-04:00'
describe
'2041' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_122.txt'
af6c332bd490049fca744cc1540dd9d5
a2b1ad20414fef05f642849d68b974fe466b4f5e
describe
'11792' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_122thm.jpg'
fcc694488d9b528b6db5be33e429d460
4370d30fa73dabbee95aeb8abad353825166b95e
'2012-04-05T12:28:13-04:00'
describe
'1408366' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_123.jp2'
e296607e57819d3c38972120416136e6
e33cbff0244611fe5c47385076751693236897a6
describe
'118315' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_123.jpg'
fc280e154ec5cd7d634c39f37f05ae9c
839819954b8c40c0ab904bdda41d64f3ce9303fb
'2012-04-05T12:20:09-04:00'
describe
'55295' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_123.pro'
8054f4218819108822e50fa4e995f441
08c147bf9505970c2b41810d7fe0d04b951fedf8
'2012-04-05T12:21:36-04:00'
describe
'40815' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_123.QC.jpg'
777ef518f325e01efdcc86b9d8b38ad8
0b8241e656ec905fbd1bea09ba5fd995889c3f9a
'2012-04-05T12:23:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_123.tif'
7733f79146a005f14b9d9e0d9846b274
11c5509b770e8fc0c2b01efcbcdd10a3b8dbb53d
'2012-04-05T12:22:27-04:00'
describe
'2110' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_123.txt'
897cb2900882aeb144c42786d0d49a70
1041439714f7d3dcb321dacd09ae3449cf5f2215
'2012-04-05T12:18:41-04:00'
describe
'11198' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_123thm.jpg'
75a8956672691c5f0d20bd2b152ebd3d
1c24ac59de30717d3f4a677a869674bccaf7701d
'2012-04-05T12:29:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_124.jp2'
fc22453aa1e3630173e803e4d32f8423
0f86dbcfbecd8ed7cba845c8eef9b5ed7b47c8c0
'2012-04-05T12:27:53-04:00'
describe
'116623' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_124.jpg'
32c03a6905fc4c25e0526f74ac79cd17
2758a1af6a021808394a8734756241cba479e1c9
describe
'57323' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_124.pro'
131b90040099f1e8ade53ae09378a47a
b7ff02a711243de8b96382be85ac108940d6c598
describe
'39324' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_124.QC.jpg'
0dc9c437164fca116c82d7e8e9d69ae5
f205bfc934eef9d53cad519903876b1fb7830984
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_124.tif'
e1fb21344b83df9c77c0efa94257a5b9
d0c8dd58d58ca2f3462e3d65517b52b864b66e92
'2012-04-05T12:25:14-04:00'
describe
'2149' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_124.txt'
b4feb4920b7ecd262537091f0c1e095e
6849b84cd17f7665343c658d5006b99d9f160f08
'2012-04-05T12:27:45-04:00'
describe
'11910' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_124thm.jpg'
7c9566de9275a5ff675114799ce686f0
07c411ed81ff097b856de387aec2d7010ee45e0f
describe
'1408401' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_125.jp2'
e5477a56911f868abb9f438a4fa366c8
c467f8c05bab6e6695f5b2dbabe856d61cb225ae
'2012-04-05T12:33:04-04:00'
describe
'114466' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_125.jpg'
cb846c79a0341f4c4624a317edd049dc
46716a3684cb93d0b8f648670f3c922594fa3c7b
'2012-04-05T12:31:28-04:00'
describe
'51659' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_125.pro'
41b8fed9a920ae2bbeeea495bad903e8
0cc0ce5d51690a1f7a8da35f3c12c9904eec4bed
'2012-04-05T12:19:29-04:00'
describe
'39944' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_125.QC.jpg'
ce12e316bb8a20de357de7e1cac145c7
8e3db8f85620b2552bd82cbe04a71d5809232971
'2012-04-05T12:28:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVKZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_125.tif'
69367c645c255a25c6aa7c982ec525b1
3c823adebd783208015a953e090262bdd2f5f147
'2012-04-05T12:19:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_125.txt'
0cc07f77de5dc433066a581c64aff439
56b406cdddedc943577edb9223598337f732f510
describe
'11174' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_125thm.jpg'
540ff8451731af030fef12263d5bb8c4
1dba8b3b1c1d172db56527e5224377d51e3d8120
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_126.jp2'
f7409cd133ab87863cfef37fbde97585
5d996801cdae7b7592b6a42c8c2c5d56648c2542
'2012-04-05T12:32:30-04:00'
describe
'116057' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_126.jpg'
c1d1ae7ef0cd4a4f5530bf8ffaceeb7e
6282df62357f2c2b85f261b0087ab085c247d517
'2012-04-05T12:18:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_126.pro'
b8996f7fc8cc0da6e4d8aba1503094e2
29adf66f5ee9a15fa403f0f83ca41ffa45cf1a6e
'2012-04-05T12:24:51-04:00'
describe
'39619' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_126.QC.jpg'
c8844b0338c61b4e6c8dce3193a0ca90
1c02ebdad4053171a4e7b807f4eb25b57547dc54
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_126.tif'
19177068786a47c9ab21e9be14e1ea88
29fc719c113c5934deda3eb27ec1abed5aa89c8c
'2012-04-05T12:28:53-04:00'
describe
'2171' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_126.txt'
456c3038a6358e427d9c70d20403af2a
d2c411ba0dd67da702677c0c05e6d138e0a3d29b
'2012-04-05T12:20:34-04:00'
describe
'12394' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_126thm.jpg'
a8e10adaa6a25a215a5ee427a5e71713
c57182b859a04b3d860dc4236c056697fdd08705
describe
'1408405' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_127.jp2'
fadd0e7379548221dab1ec49209e6eb1
6fc3a286ab16bd6aede50bd49835cf22aaa6ed56
'2012-04-05T12:28:04-04:00'
describe
'118348' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_127.jpg'
f9bfc1c8aa49924045e403fbf83e9901
f58b3f5a58139b3325ffac2b27139580fff62456
describe
'52998' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_127.pro'
863977645102a3c1a46c9d3632eb7c2d
af5da1cf396933f6fc872a6453e0da3c99d62bb5
describe
'41147' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_127.QC.jpg'
a1ef655010f6c57da1a5aa3d77cf043d
f248472117ba5e2fde1901ddd153707f2aa1b48d
'2012-04-05T12:18:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_127.tif'
46bc931b47d247aafa97619b314a688e
6879876da15b30cc8e27d88d97ac35085be390eb
'2012-04-05T12:24:22-04:00'
describe
'2017' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_127.txt'
90574b69085a4a432c05edee2e29be1d
c6f5ccb0550365d4777aa2f5742d08b362b3b0de
'2012-04-05T12:31:48-04:00'
describe
'11460' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_127thm.jpg'
275cdb7228a61dca7caa006e7d529bf0
cf5d1cc10f911f65e647a8af4c249187d3487e3a
'2012-04-05T12:24:50-04:00'
describe
'1520626' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_128.jp2'
e64898608d3bb58c34d3288685b50e7c
f61949567ace5d967a6c54f0a137008248fc0656
describe
'114537' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_128.jpg'
7343628e852ce073e7f76c5668f41d73
2b19302b85a6baab40eb51abff11b77759c62311
describe
'54390' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_128.pro'
03ef9b069d8b5f5e26486bcd203672a2
49c0f95fb03696e0a8c7a19f84ddf8566ef05516
'2012-04-05T12:17:38-04:00'
describe
'38551' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_128.QC.jpg'
9b7de59f329758263615321db496ba64
92843c7fc422047ff05d9226f76c5e5b776bfaa2
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_128.tif'
0fb4e9ef67ddc142199e42cecb4f56dc
aa830bd3cd6fb0d1bb1fdd63618c6f178b6716fa
'2012-04-05T12:35:03-04:00'
describe
'2087' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_128.txt'
c1b74082ccdaf77dd362dd91d7819b9a
67046c02f820a9f039c9fe0345069dbec94b009f
describe
'11891' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_128thm.jpg'
6dbc435ced5b79a29cc0c8371f14eda3
a5e6b61db44283ec7fe8314122bf0fea01fa934b
describe
'1408406' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_129.jp2'
dedce3a10c9a4af604dc6b292294a775
bbecadc17087a3e56f7fe220c96674ff8204ae54
describe
'123144' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_129.jpg'
a5a36bff038f3e060f5d94e1816ed96a
17dbf1f7051c796c9b5d828d75cbd652143daff2
'2012-04-05T12:23:03-04:00'
describe
'57178' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVLZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_129.pro'
e03487c7462f00a5ecdabc8bfc99d5df
ef95a6f09738e7aae6180dc0f4fa9ae9acb485f5
describe
'41987' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_129.QC.jpg'
464a8a4ba14a9461bc8689b74ca30992
0bdc97dd14f753a8d646b2acc1db08f6b4e2df34
'2012-04-05T12:19:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_129.tif'
85ad11f66a5ba3b011afb926f5888b1a
aea091c3664ed63aa6a9849b6abf25644d8aa621
'2012-04-05T12:32:47-04:00'
describe
'2162' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_129.txt'
8079a2fe57737f77dd10dc9e610bc1b8
4fd024de52bcef41bb81712597811f609c3c8361
'2012-04-05T12:31:46-04:00'
describe
'11476' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_129thm.jpg'
3ba1445ad6ae78f0a00c250b9887df31
44ba924990f3c02a5c1deaaa846c614a9b28a8d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVME' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_130.jp2'
127cbb67d8422105c6f73a53effa852b
398144869ba7b42512190391a30f0d951978d40d
describe
'112271' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_130.jpg'
8e5c92ca42073df166e411d069ed68fb
587ed8d4b295199ffa154e4a7ad9f9a763d57af2
'2012-04-05T12:25:31-04:00'
describe
'53884' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_130.pro'
07993661de4ab224622719a4bd16008d
9a936cad4562a86264c65f2374a0e5a50425dff8
describe
'38009' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_130.QC.jpg'
3596d783658ef60d8f11af7c882d0e41
12a1e6c87297ee4e9c170053beefdf73c8cd81c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_130.tif'
ecabdcef920be28ba04cfff635bc4d57
9b6e5536006d5823645385407a5c235003ad9e79
describe
'2047' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_130.txt'
01cae133e4f3e894db8de55436c127f0
2da9ae876a4f0c67212474b25cc220204e5d506e
'2012-04-05T12:28:25-04:00'
describe
'11847' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_130thm.jpg'
dfae3fba42faa06a0001de1aaf7f0f0e
b08ecce39c808a059feb603236d8664914cd9427
'2012-04-05T12:32:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVML' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_132.jp2'
a01d348dc6bc4bd417efa6757fd22214
275f38b5d98147da552467e212c4ab53d80bf683
describe
'104771' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_132.jpg'
28b027bfc1c5ea5422263dd393f2aea3
63151417fa76c8a48eac1db2be4e9ad7a4f12e43
describe
'47821' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_132.pro'
2462aa34826bd9ac60497a9557b41d4d
b97a131a0a312d9a843df8aebaea6567ac5beb27
'2012-04-05T12:17:14-04:00'
describe
'35682' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_132.QC.jpg'
578adcaf979a370387e745934e3f9af8
f2429ddc611f35500779bb03e0ebc45850cad74a
'2012-04-05T12:23:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_132.tif'
dc9b8e61acd3cfe690f8c54f9a1a885b
9cca46a4ed3b505b67cd6a2a47e83fcd8a2cf580
describe
'1878' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_132.txt'
866f497ad133b9440a3b0d2373f343d5
5e04a8d9054b6379aa0d92430bc7d67e6ac451e6
describe
'10039' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_132thm.jpg'
86c2818b6ed58c41a80440a7995d359c
9bae31198b66063c5df6cf5d682ba628dbd39951
'2012-04-05T12:23:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_133.jp2'
f18ed3e5c6028f0030bd2865d356f875
0ad91727fb798e36154775ec7b2fcdce0f5c74fc
'2012-04-05T12:16:23-04:00'
describe
'117289' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_133.jpg'
7ee169d92a0179cde538b7f3be656952
ccf32ebcc9c88de9f24f2922cde7abe7305bafd6
'2012-04-05T12:21:55-04:00'
describe
'56765' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_133.pro'
dbe2ecc6c90b76884d44df7bf505ddd9
7b57adbf0ffca78e9e44cce7970eb896239b19e0
'2012-04-05T12:30:16-04:00'
describe
'39113' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_133.QC.jpg'
8269c5db94d503fd4e9a64d765b84f86
a81b45ae2228c3c0f55c42e5d5f1b2b67aa9dc3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_133.tif'
a5523666d1eaf654f91091755cee6cc4
af2fd4f762857af1ff801ab8b9fef466064bc414
'2012-04-05T12:33:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_133.txt'
6139d117bcc2e40f609489f27d504a56
44f2c175405f1ce11c09b20511fec702a742c48b
describe
'12133' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_133thm.jpg'
a7e8fa8f14a79e3bd4e70d0f533cd875
232f58fdae99f350bff8635f06c412cdc0aaca47
'2012-04-05T12:23:17-04:00'
describe
'1408328' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVMZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_134.jp2'
e7e10a926165be12c489dd02b7da9da9
aa9fbe1a06594be27b7132c91386c6c8eb10a2b5
'2012-04-05T12:27:24-04:00'
describe
'124258' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_134.jpg'
eb30a41975f16bc968bd405d38ee6956
4d6d8251c48f28d8ce6823484f561c65c6265c39
'2012-04-05T12:23:38-04:00'
describe
'57727' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_134.pro'
895b6dc0d9de12bf6f8b11653d68723f
670fabbe51da99dd3a9261e5a79346f5b9929d73
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_134.QC.jpg'
ce4c6dc21e9a83b04c4658246c23150c
8e4891a30ecd5422bcb59b45c5e329ecfba69b0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVND' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_134.tif'
238ada050bb71c8d5ef6ddfc5296ee90
f95ecf1947139592b168b179561bc15f3d2638bd
'2012-04-05T12:29:36-04:00'
describe
'2183' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_134.txt'
6244d3052cfd8c5c0f6102b81f1f3dc7
fb3cfb15f4e439f43b70d4a2f20d2498b59b77cb
describe
'11657' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_134thm.jpg'
3496e36296a39fcfd0d9f54aba71d515
48d575ab9270469f3871e4d980bc342686237177
'2012-04-05T12:23:58-04:00'
describe
'1520634' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_135.jp2'
2a5fe0f6c7da0f39478e954474ec2a01
b51e2f04c3c8ee3514fd6181878234e75c6158ba
'2012-04-05T12:29:39-04:00'
describe
'112997' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_135.jpg'
2cda065bcce6764fd41f3ea5692af47f
ffb2717222019b5b8ab582d20ba6e4d198e8bd5a
describe
'53722' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_135.pro'
fd4989b216dff3a1b90f0ad88a58e4e1
381d156a8769824cf2a48a8ffeceb4231e34ec6c
'2012-04-05T12:18:35-04:00'
describe
'37923' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_135.QC.jpg'
8b27b0e7bb8a7ad427c79ea5fceb2b29
0a3d65663e40614543ae86816cf8514ac3c3f3cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_135.tif'
5b1f10eaa6ab63c1253e02e22334e99d
24f8453fa67a9e265a21c25d80ced95c83b2ad21
'2012-04-05T12:23:20-04:00'
describe
'2071' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_135.txt'
bcf56b052502416c81de08f9c6dd1cf8
b055817649003026fb7e7b498fa211576ef5e4ea
describe
'11650' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_135thm.jpg'
57614742e39d5ccc6da9c5445efb7dcc
abbdfe5c4bf877b45d7125849e39d5f040e3a8e4
describe
'1408272' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_136.jp2'
f0a74a1d56387de7e072b58d4e86a4bb
488f1c167ca2875ee789774872dccaf527361714
'2012-04-05T12:21:12-04:00'
describe
'89713' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_136.jpg'
b9d78b8484567e48706969a612ff29c2
3b3c289217e01be60bf0ac48135aff32501abc53
describe
'43186' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_136.pro'
bdc1406dc99f21a1815a9b76a52e2a82
2ee18262b2224b51a472b435fb7f7972b852745d
'2012-04-05T12:30:33-04:00'
describe
'30178' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_136.QC.jpg'
56f096299852a332f9c79cac11e604ce
7341cc163443abb4841c9a40df94ed2501ded243
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_136.tif'
d25b932852bdff1fbd8d2b7e97ba9e41
2184f63a2c92c53147fcf7b317707299ec12df6c
'2012-04-05T12:21:18-04:00'
describe
'1998' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_136.txt'
652ffe885b26699271db840af3c1f487
fb4a24761239d190d6f0234a07885262a813980c
describe
'8625' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_136thm.jpg'
b5f2879d1f04a1c72a27843610cd1403
9e3e38010d077260ed593e77a19b537dd9550727
'2012-04-05T12:28:51-04:00'
describe
'1486511' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_137.jp2'
601e6ad4c6f9c16839ce06caf8930282
7ed0906066940f5af6c203fb6612b2838717ccac
'2012-04-05T12:26:01-04:00'
describe
'111961' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_137.jpg'
45e0ca9b9f2f9eedbfc58082540ea3fa
ad851250e5b573b3b691280fb50c27077819d987
describe
'53673' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_137.pro'
ea3d1d56add5fec82607cf8c0fa6321f
fd61862ee963492165101537cb6bc57f7fa3a7e1
'2012-04-05T12:19:33-04:00'
describe
'36913' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_137.QC.jpg'
d9de6c272f82fbecb751ed5c93b46b7c
273eee089f74fba3110dcad61e812a73b31d9d2c
describe
'35710194' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_137.tif'
240c18d4abcd9308192b03cb02e48e60
5e208b39b2e711203940c6439b9f4008e39a0fcd
'2012-04-05T12:28:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVNZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_137.txt'
1aede9fb8e9851f05b9851dae5fcc4ad
e01933573428a35f658e63a30a1629bc8608b22e
'2012-04-05T12:23:22-04:00'
describe
'11026' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_137thm.jpg'
7eb0de656ced900832e5d708e0bb0df6
3c4e14a875e260b84b838ce6ec6f1b880d986ec1
describe
'1408400' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_138.jp2'
5e920c44ac1d557766da902ab1029733
ca4b36596f7f3681450c9ad62cce5c398a42709f
'2012-04-05T12:29:11-04:00'
describe
'128501' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_138.jpg'
9b5818a8f261d37e4abc3ef2f33a2541
f338a4e95bf59ac4f9c869eb0f0d89f1f06cf067
describe
'59831' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_138.pro'
774b4d31fe1024d6b6f43361d9c251c9
5a30732f0bb17e46ac6d7f9d032bc9d11563e387
'2012-04-05T12:20:06-04:00'
describe
'43617' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_138.QC.jpg'
45c9ab94878e1c35b8dcf3503f495c46
9447ea1cfbd4f4b45ffcc05fd55d9d591921afe3
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_138.tif'
65cbaa9a1c292dcbe42da8b19dd78ec3
582df1f6f8eb965cda82e91d6721b692a9d1068a
'2012-04-05T12:21:05-04:00'
describe
'2254' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_138.txt'
102868e9f9831400bb30a8eea46fa328
ae6f777001cd75eb324e95c5c87297bfbfc0951a
describe
'11898' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_138thm.jpg'
831e160dff32238eced9700dc6329bdc
0bb62eddcf68f17c9266f44b1d13541483f93c94
describe
'1520569' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_139.jp2'
f188eb0624ac93640b6a4b96e5119a40
dca48d10277d5bb1f3b025075f2f3aa60beb426b
describe
'120186' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_139.jpg'
c8f0901830064436fc4beafb1df1d3da
d81c86b056543eb624d8d0654200a763fcf23e7c
describe
'59188' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_139.pro'
2bb56511b0eb801dc3ad76c8d0042289
dff39befff17506ae0c23366e14490edc3190a88
describe
'40623' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_139.QC.jpg'
42c3c552f7433ea6bdc1b0764f6d722e
4d286a7b57b839cbd3271afb44efc3f15b133115
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_139.tif'
01fd9055dcfd1989714a88767a9253ee
d50d7648c25f1d1c0245815d854395ce1cc34135
'2012-04-05T12:22:44-04:00'
describe
'2274' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVON' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_139.txt'
6af344b10853ca92fdd2805cd9fe8e68
2cc5a112c4cbbf2a1b63216a4e604e8f52199f89
'2012-04-05T12:35:14-04:00'
describe
'12473' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_139thm.jpg'
40a66332bd14a7de35982fb0e679ee8d
7b9a7a021a5e38946c4c25651ddded8b7155d5ff
'2012-04-05T12:19:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_140.jp2'
b51b24c0c18f1b0b733e247762bd7346
5373d5d676d0bf98f703d95d9432806d2ee99577
describe
'128146' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_140.jpg'
73b019d38b6ede65829a85da14667216
fe0da1b280b1c2edf02380bdf50dfb05fd066846
describe
'60576' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_140.pro'
4dac019ccfab049aadb73bb583159d62
f6ede046fd347de93730dad4ad403ea28cee1351
describe
'44144' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_140.QC.jpg'
cea8b3776b1feca16551937fcdc74959
d780fe2c29ea4311876389ed1938fe05686dd619
'2012-04-05T12:17:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_140.tif'
dd59781b4a80a80ada63cf03e47f6821
0b43ecf1c0cc50053baa416c227650c0fe6b617f
'2012-04-05T12:19:43-04:00'
describe
'2279' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_140.txt'
e255097aa788a92caacc80882628d8ee
18dd1c135ef1aec86a037867db3b317a132f0607
'2012-04-05T12:34:58-04:00'
describe
'11619' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_140thm.jpg'
6c5ba4796b0d4e28d5af5e1d6fe5ebc2
baa81dc6a174e5b74179f6b36831a5f3657df42e
'2012-04-05T12:18:43-04:00'
describe
'1520625' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_141.jp2'
13b3e9462ab1777589a918f59c20501f
94e0fff11350aeb15060ed0a3cf8709c4dc98dde
describe
'117645' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_141.jpg'
7f3a6465cbb44ce4012544ceafa21d78
715f20b9cdc918161dbbae76676521374df04b05
'2012-04-05T12:29:44-04:00'
describe
'56910' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOY' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_141.pro'
f432e28fe4f295fca436cf54f84e53d2
530465df57b063c19d3e5934de90f49abbf1fa3f
describe
'39789' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVOZ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_141.QC.jpg'
44f6a13d0e95974ff9a5a1b5bc8dbbef
9c56f5c2c4bdf6aed54e4007ee4df64f71dfc299
'2012-04-05T12:34:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPA' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_141.tif'
b0d3ce89ba8a8827adabe8c72a493b65
be79ebb7c49e904b3c1d06268d907d2a8b47fab7
'2012-04-05T12:16:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPB' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_141.txt'
7ed045ca77fe241363d213b7610bc40d
9746f7015b3b8a53d1384ab08e77aa55ce789960
describe
'12599' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPC' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_141thm.jpg'
af0050ab3a07d0615ababa02ff91095a
2b7225f6b82dbc312e45a3362174d6bcc21c915a
'2012-04-05T12:27:14-04:00'
describe
'1408393' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPD' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_142.jp2'
42833e9bdab20c2ee133f7726d055cc5
30da3020c3b090b8c2b48b751998eb5cfcbd4425
'2012-04-05T12:16:25-04:00'
describe
'82024' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPE' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_142.jpg'
05616afaddc1ebe7d8ffb687ddfcfd78
e34dce7c795c783bde22de7b462871034e381ff3
describe
'28459' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPF' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_142.pro'
c66bbefdd2e4e1e6c83f36d0b1eda712
15781b180b7eb0793d05216e5986bf3c0fe7039e
describe
'27746' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPG' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_142.QC.jpg'
da3fdda46cdc219f99c33010e066fbed
5a9405fa86a7789804d32d0c423f757806ee9a2b
'2012-04-05T12:19:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPH' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_142.tif'
23d7320cb4cde05e2ffcba204ca43395
80ecd44e4806e041f0a3797fba09473ffdc2621d
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPI' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_142.txt'
5e1133148468ec6287391b8cda1989d4
9d7b17e52e2233ae58ccd64bb46233c2474c22d3
describe
'8075' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPJ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_142thm.jpg'
34cbe55ff7d6474f112b059c9e258ee2
bfa9b2ef950026c6b36c69511785ada3c45792d1
'2012-04-05T12:33:29-04:00'
describe
'1347005' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPK' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_144.jp2'
86ca15c451c1f47500709bed3ec48ade
286c452bfe818fb4a03bac4e3e116ebcb3be97aa
'2012-04-05T12:28:42-04:00'
describe
'160756' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPL' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_144.jpg'
b09af5735ee12ad461bd63f2864c24da
326059f54109d70532eeddde37e86c5465de0865
'2012-04-05T12:19:17-04:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPM' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_144.pro'
42e0b834ab632a461b4788bb9f13b8c8
bf4e074aec19f1a2b23f0897b3a1e363c0ec0cc6
'2012-04-05T12:28:34-04:00'
describe
'46296' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPN' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_144.QC.jpg'
beed3f387c8e1e7ab3d843400da7537d
73ec5eff77bcb5715a1160df66faf4bb23a9107f
'2012-04-05T12:24:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPO' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_144.tif'
31f890e7325c8d5805ebf51c8b29f29a
2828dc3fdbff0a7718ab81c6cd31ac3ea67bcf67
'2012-04-05T12:29:01-04:00'
describe
'266' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPP' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_144.txt'
1a96fbb57dde6168a7c845f913d063fb
3aa3bc0e052a43c5df8c8e3dd5af94945d931007
'2012-04-05T12:25:56-04:00'
describe
'11719' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPQ' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_144thm.jpg'
35626aec3c605664cb547a2bb23a076f
b517c369055f878875d46172f6e5322d8aa4d6b7
describe
'9456999' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPR' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_145.jp2'
35b904436f3e5e76ba0478cb860d42bd
83f2e354095666826c54bf48df2aa1c7d9476b84
'2012-04-05T12:33:59-04:00'
describe
'26783' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPS' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_145.jpg'
6b3da6cac6ddaf26390f3875b85abf4c
df53119b63a9ef452bddd6a92a075327f7b8c762
'2012-04-05T12:30:14-04:00'
describe
'2073' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPT' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_145.pro'
f058d81572c8dd482a5aaa7c32e56f49
fba80e944fbc1a27cea759e0be1516e75492eb79
'2012-04-05T12:28:45-04:00'
describe
'7273' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPU' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_145.QC.jpg'
13704c313fe37143df6a536966733186
0d60eaa75c6a70260c89f5c31001db7a3bd010d6
'2012-04-05T12:26:59-04:00'
describe
'227196148' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPV' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_145.tif'
d35c55b6d85164f47b26fb5dff556ef0
7e808088ac57ee3c78ec6d156f493993cee9daca
'2012-04-05T12:25:04-04:00'
describe
'179' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPW' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_145.txt'
b51a539cdf6ca0ed5e3ca5c729f6a792
9411f56c254c859f63917f554266bcb12b123742
'2012-04-05T12:26:50-04:00'
describe
'3191' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPX' 'sip-filesBinder4_Page_145thm.jpg'
204c87b308913089886b62ec3af9fddb
7dbfd2f08f3e2ea9e6a2c84c66d36df0138c9e0b
'2012-04-05T12:21:09-04:00'
describe
'218741' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVPY' 'sip-filesUF00001940_00001.mets'
4eb111fda078111a658a7440969bd6cb
5d33a4148503e142a398e62a7903a6abd127e158
'2012-04-05T12:17:11-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T15:53:36-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'267909' 'info:fdaE20090917_AAAAPCfileF20090917_AADVQB' 'sip-filesUF00001940_00001.xml'
0af52f9afb43d606cd14e7b0fed0144d
a977fe9940e8b3f0fd937b3d43162914fed2ffd7
'2012-04-05T12:17:49-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T15:53:38-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.












Package Processing Log















Package Processing Log







12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Error Log for UF00001940_00001 processed at: 12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_001.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_001.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_002.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_002.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_003.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_003.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_004.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_004.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_005.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_005.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_006.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_006.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_007.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_007.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_008.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_008.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_025.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_025.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:29 PM Binder4_Page_035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_036.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_036.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:30 PM Binder4_Page_080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:31 PM Binder4_Page_119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_144.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_144.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM Binder4_Page_145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:32 PM