Citation
Tales worth telling, or, A traveller's adventures by sea and land

Material Information

Title:
Tales worth telling, or, A traveller's adventures by sea and land told to his young listeners, Frederic and Lucy ; illustrated with one hundred and thirty-three engravings
Portion of title:
Traveller's adventures by sea and land
Caption title:
Frederic and Lucy, or, Food for young minds
Creator:
Munroe & Francis ( Publisher )
C.S. Francis & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
New-York
Publisher:
Munroe and Francis
C.S. Francis & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
264 p., <2> leaves of plates : ill., map ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages around the world -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Vesuvius (Italy) ( lcsh )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1852 ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
Travelogue storybooks ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Added engraved t.p.
General Note:
Map on p. 46: Mount Vesuvius and surrounding area.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026981365 ( ALEPH )
45891452 ( OCLC )
ALH8804 ( NOTIS )

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BOSTON.









TALES WORTH TELLING;

OR
A TRAVELLER’S

ADVENTURES BY SEA AND LAND,

TOLD TO HIS YOUNG LISTENERS,

—>—- :
Illustrated with one hundred and thirty-three engravings.
—e—
BOSTON:

MUNROE AND FRANCIS.
NEW=#YORK:
C.S. FRANCIS & CO. 252 BROADWAY

1852.





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PREFACE.

a

Ir is the humble purpose of this little work
to convey to the rising generation a small col-
lection of ‘‘ facts more wonderful than fiction.”
These compositions are a condensed series of
truths in travel, related in evening fireside con-
versation, connected by no chain but the que-
ries of children and a mother’s replies. ‘They
were thus related because the purchase of many
books was inconvenient, and because, if prac-
ticable, their formidable exhibition would have
frightened a fastidious little auditory ; thus de-
feating the object in view. They were
briefly rehearsed in colloquial familiar speech,
as an incitement to juvenile curiosity, leaving

_ future gratification and filling up of the picture
_ to time and opportunity. The Editor’s children
_ were anxious for information and entertain-

ment, and she endeavored to satisfy their wish-
es in a manner agreeable to themselves, but
not in a totally frivolous mode. She tried to

_ simplify and suit to their capacities a few in-
_ teresting topics, brought to light by recent trav-
_ellers or skilful. and enterprising men, with a



iv PREFACE.

modicum of amusing oF playful recital. Toa
numerous young family these “ prief chroni-
cles” appeared to afford pleasure and profit,
and perhaps at least created a relish for future

reading and proficiency, one of the objects

dearest to a mother’s heart.
In the hope that what was beneficial to a

solitary coterie of youthful inquisitors might be ©
of similar use in families similarly situated, and —

at the kind solicitation of many esteemed
friends, she presents this little work to the pub-

lic, as an sntroduction or pioneer to more eX-_

tensive observation and perusal of the records
‘of useful knowledge.
A MOTHER.
Boston, 1852.



!

5
7



CONTENTS.

Among the many answers to the children’s questions are replies on the fol-
lowing subjects :

PAGE
Arab and his Goat - - 4l
Ancient Juvenile Games 74
African Moors - - ee

Arabian Camel and the Lover 164
American Prairie Bee Hunt 188
African Lion - - 102
American Fruits - - 20
African Sociable Bird - 114
Anecdotes—Bengal sharks,é&c. 233

Art of Printing — - a
Banian tree and the Poet 248
Birds’ Nests a ee
Bees and Honey ole an
Boston Tea Party - - 16
Black Hole of Calcutta - 180
Bamboo Tree - ©
Carpenter Spider o (ati
Cacao, or Chocolate-tree - 135
Caravan entering Mecca 145
Catching Wild Ducks - 241
Calcutta and the Ganges 168
Cormorant Fishers - - 24!
Cinnamon Tree - = 5
Chinese Pagoda and Teapickers 14
Cocoa Nut tree - = BW
Duck Trap oc ee TE
Date-tree of Arabia, Anecdotes 109
Eddystone Lighthouse - 6
Elements—Fire, Air, &c. 233
Eve’s Apple tree - -
Great Deserts of Arabia 130
Geese and the Gallic army 61
Hero’s Ancient Toys 74
Happy Family —e 7
Hindoo Statues ot o.:

Humming Birds - -
Indigo Plant - - ~- 208
Inventions—James Watt 82
Inquisitive Boy andthe Lady 68

PAGE
Killing of Birds in sport 63
Looking-glass Tiger Trap 225
Lark’s Nest - oe
Lion Hunt . oe ee
Mount Vesuvius - = 46
Monkey Tea-gatherers - 19

Minot’s Ledge Lighthouse 97
Mason Bee, Tapestry Bee,&c. 199

Mount Etna . - - 31
Noss of Brassah - 91
Nutmeg Tree - <= 249
Native Combat witha shark 258
Orange tree . ‘*- one
Orkney Island Bird Catching 94
Palm-tree Date - - 133
Pompeii and Herculaneum 47
Pensile Grosbeak e. 6°
Pearl Fisheries of Ceylon 226
Rail-road to the Red Sea 147
Royal Bengal Tiger - 209
Snake Charmers - - 168
Spider’s Web - -

Shark Combat -

St. Kilda Precipices -

Summer Visit - °

52
258
90
150
Sugar Cane and Maple - 200
Tempests of the Ocean 99
8

222

242

Tea Plant - o -«s

Tree Tiger Hunting -
Talipot tree a Sox
Tailor Bird ee. ee
Visit to the Mill, Miller, &c. 152
Wild Duck Catching 241
Watt’s Engine - ¢: Jae
Walter Scott and Mr. Watt 89
White Ants ») .¢ -—e
Windmill 2. ohh). aan

Wild Elephants - + ie
Wax Tree o «3 a

















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FREDERIC AND LUCY:

OR

FOOD FOR YOUNG MINDS.

THE HAPPY FAMILY.

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson had three children, Fred-
eric, Lucy, and William. Frederic and Lucy could
read tolerably well when assisted by their kind pa-
rents. -William was avery little fellow, and could
only read little words ; but he liked much to listen,
when his father and mother were explaining to his
brother and sister what they could not understand, in
the books they read, or the plants they saw. He took
much pains to learn, and used every day to say he
hoped soon to be able to read such great books as his
father and mother read, that he might know as many
useful and pleasant stories as they did.

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson had great pleasure in im-
parting to their children such information as was suit-
ed to their years ; because Frederic and Lucy took
great care to remember what they were told; and,
when they saw any lions, tigers, or other uncommon



8 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

animals, or any curious plants, would endeavor to rec
ollect all they had been told about them.

TT

THE TEA PLANT. _

One morning, when Mrs. Johnson was going to
make tea for breakfast, she accidentally let the tea-
canister slip from her hand, and a great quantity of P|
tea was scattered upon the table-cloth. All the chil-
dren were standing round the table, breakfasting on ©
bread and milk; they eagerly offered to assist in —
gathering up the scattered tea, and returning it to ©
the tea-canister ;—while so doing, Lucy observed ©
how very different tea in the canister appeared from —
the leaves which were spread out by the hot water —
in the tea-pot ; and she requested that her mother
would be so good as to inform her how the tea was —
made to look so dry ;— for I think, mother,’ said she, ‘
‘you have told me that tea comes from a shrub; and, |
if it is the leaves of a shrub, how is it made to look ©
so dry and twisted ? i

| will tell you, my dear,’ replied her mother: ‘the ©
leaves of the tea-shrub are, when first gathered, (that 1
is, picked off the shrub,) moistened by the vapor of
boiling water, then put into large flat iron pans, and
heated over a fire, until they become quite hot : they
are then thrown out upon clean mats ; and people,
who stand ready for the purpose, roll the hot leaves










FREDERIC AND LUCY. 9

_ between the palms of their hands, until they become
| dry and curled, as you see them.’
| ‘ Mother,’ said Frederic, ‘ does the tea-shrub grow
in our country ? I never saw one in our garden.’
‘No, my dear, tea does. not.grow here: it grows
_in China and Japan, countries very distant from ours,
and it is brought to us in ships. The gathering of
tea leaves forms a great part of the employment of
the poor people of those countries ; for the leaves
are taken from the shrubs four times in the year ; and
these leaves must not be hastily pulled from the tree,,
but plucked off one by one, with much care. Chil-.
dren learn to do this; and, had you been born in
China or Japan, instead of the United States, you,,
‘probably, would have been little tea-pickers.’

The children smiled at this idea, and little William
asked what kind of a leaf a tea-leaf was.
_ ‘When the leaves are allowed to grow a long:
time, William, they very much resemble the leaves:
of a cherry-tree, and are called black or bohea tea ;-
but when they are pulled young, you can see their-
pei by a whole leaf taken from the tea-pot, which



s called old hyson, one of the kinds of'green tea, al-.
hough hyson-skin is also called black or boliea, be--
ing the broken or poorer part of the hyson.”
_ ‘Is a tea-leaf like a cherry-leaf’?? asked William.
_ ‘ The tea-plant is an evergreen shrub, and grows
» toa woh varying between three. and: six feet,,and
|
5

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10 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

the flower, a drawing of which I will show you, is
shaped like the wild rose in our pasture.’

4

)

Fi oS Ny i )



‘The-seeds are sown in holes drilled in the ground
at equal distances inregularrows. Whilst growing,
the plants are regularly watered. Among other sto-
ries relative to the tea-tree it is asserted that some of
the finest specimens grow wild on the precipitous
sides of rocky mountains, where it is too difficult for
human beings to gather them ; and that the Chinese,
in order to gather the tea, pelt a race of monkeys,
which ‘inhabit these mountains, with stones, provo-
king them to return the compliment with a shower
of :teasbranches. ‘China is a great and populous



FREDERIC AND LUCY. ll

empire, and the choicest tea grows in particular
provinces, and in some of these spots the emperor





12 FREDERIC ANDLUCY-

and nobility cultivate favorite species at great eX-
pense, care, and cleanliness, for their own use. Hence
the names Imperial, Gunpowder, Ningyong, &c. In
some places tame monkeys are trained to climb the
heights, and strip the leaves from the bushes. The
leaves then either roll down the rocks, or the wind
blows them down, and the owners gather the tea,
and reward the monkeys with something of which
they are fond, and treat them with kindness for
their labor, fatigue, and mischances. This is one
way in which mankind turn the instinct and indus-
try of animals to their own advantage. The mon-
keys sometimes climb the rocks by means of ropes,
fastened at the summit of precipices, and sometimes
mount these without such secure footing, in which
last case, notwithstanding their activity, they once
in a while meet with an accidental tumble, as in the
monkey picture at the head of page 17.’

‘Mother,’ said William, ‘ are the hills so steep in
such an old country as China ?

‘ Hills are sometimes levelled, my dear, but rocky
precipices and mountains usually ‘ endure forever.’
Mr. Ellis, an English traveller, says, ‘ Our walk
lay through a valley, where we saw, for the first
time, a tea-plant. It isa beautiful shrub, resembling
a myrtle, with a yellow flower extremely fragrant ;
we also saw the ginger in small patches, covered
with a frame-work to protect it from the birds. The
view from the top of the mountain repaid the labor



FREDERIC AND LvUey. 13

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of our ascent. The scene was in the true mountain
style, rock above rock in endless and sublime variety.
This wildness was beautifully contrasted by the cul-
tivation of the valleys, speckled with white cottages.’

‘ But, mother, is every leaf of tea in all the chests
at the tea-store,—marked all over with hieroglyphics,
or what we children call pot-hooks and trammels,
—are all these millions of millions of leaves rolled
in the hand, to make them curl, as Lucy: does her
hair in pieces of old newspaper, or crimp with a
pair of curling-tongs ? said little William.



14 FREDERIC AND LucY.

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‘Some kinds of tea are only exposed under a shed
to the sun’s rays, and frequently turned. The pro-
cess in this picture is probably only used in green
teas. A drying-house, a section only of which is
given in the cut, will contain from ten to twenty fur-
naces, on the top of each of which is a flat-bottomed,
shallow iron pan ; there is also a long, low table,
covered with mats, on which the leaves are spread
and rolled. When the pans -are rightly heated, a
few pounds of fresh and juicy leaves are spread on
them, and the operative or workman stirs them rap-



7

FREDERIC AND LUCY. 16

idly with his bare hands, until the heat is too hot
for the touch. At this moment he takes off the leaves
with a kind of shovel like a fan, and pours them on
the mats before other operatives, who, taking up a
few leaves, roll them in the palms of their hands in
one direction only, while other assistants with fans
rapidly cool the leaves by fanning them. This heat-
ing, each time more moderately, is sometimes repeat-
ed two or three times, till the moisture is evaporated.
It is afterwards sorted into several classes, packed in
chests with the name of the district, grower, and
inspector, and called, from a Chinese word, meaning
seal or measure, Cuops.’

‘ Mother, how far distant, is China ? said Lucy.

‘ Perhaps our ships have to sail 10,000 miles, in
a round-about way, to arrive at Canton in China.’ .

‘ What a distance to send for breakfast, mother !’
But what is meant by the tea-act ? said Frederic.
‘Do tell us about this, mother.’

‘You are little Bostonians, and ought to know
what was done by your fathers and grandfathers.

‘ England, you know, was the mother country of
the United States, and, when she undertook to en-
force ‘ taxation without representation,’ the then col-
onies separated from Great-Britain. The tea-act,
stamp-act, and finally the Boston Port-bill, shut-
ting up the harbor, and stopping all navigation and
commerce, were the most obnoxious of these oppres-
sions, and, rather than receive tea and other articles



16 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

under such hard terms, they threw the tea overboard
at Griffin’s (now called Russia-wharf,) got rid forever
of paying the tea and all other taxes, separated
from the mother country, fought our way to liberty
and freedom, and, under the administration of Wash-
ton, brought tea ourselves to Boston and other places.
‘ Town-meetings and other peaceable measures had
been resorted to from the year 1769 to "73, and then
the inhabitants of Boston and vicinity held a town
meeting at Faneuil-hall, which was not large enough
to hold them, and they adjourned to the Old South
church, appointed Dr. Joseph Warren and seven oth-
ers to wait upon Gov. Gage at Milton, petitioning
him not to land three cargoes of tea. Upon his re-
fusal, sixty of the assembly, disguised as Indians,
marched from the church to Griffin’s wharf, and made
tea for the fishes of half the water in the dock. Two
hundred and forty chests with one hundred half chests
were staved and emptied over the sides of the vessels
‘nto the sea. The transaction was conducted with-
out noise or disturbance, and no injury was done to
any person or article except the tea, although these
ships were almost under the guns of the fort and near
the barracks of the English soldiery. The revolu-
tionary war and the battles of Lexington and Bunker
Hill soon followed, and independence was established.
Good, however, has come out of this consummation,
and both countries have been enriched, increased,
mutually benefited, and ennobled by the division.



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 17

‘I will now go on with my story, whereI broke off.
Monkeys, as I told you before, in climbing, some-
times fall from the crumbling rocks.

,
ON Non

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tt



‘Tea was not introduced into England till 1710,
and, owing to its cost, not much used in America till
fifty years later. It is probably to this period that
we may refer the anecdote, if true, of the country
lady, who receiving, as a present from a town ac-
quaintance, a small quantity of tea, in total igno-
Tance of its real use, looked upon it as some outlan-
dish vegetable, boiled it till she thought it was ten-
der, and then, throwing away the water, endeavored
to eat the leaves.’

' + ah. mother,’ said Lucy, ‘ I have seen you take



18 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

out a different kind of tea when you were going to
have company.’

‘Yes, my dear, that tea is finer-tasted, and more
expensive, than what I use daily, and is called gun-
powder. The younger the leaves, the finer or more
pleasant the tea ; but then, you know, as there must
be a much smaller quantity of tea produced from se-
lected leaves not arrived at their full size, so this
tea is sold ata higher price. At seven years old, a
tea-shrub yields nothing but poor, hard, low-prized
leaves. Gunpowder and old hyson are the first and
best pickings, or ‘ first chop,’ inChinese terms. The
following picture is probably the method of gathering



bohea or black tea in pastures, and drying them un-
der sheds, as a cheap or less expensive kind, or chop.’

‘IT once saw a China man in the street. mother,’
said Frederic, ‘ dressed strangely.’

.



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 19

‘The dress of the Chinese is almost as singu-
lar and curious as their productions, manners and
customs. The men wear a bell-looking hat without
rim, shaped nearly like a basin or dish-cover. Their
black hair is very long and braided, and hangs down
behind them, reaching more than half way to their
feet, and sometimes with an addition which looks
something like a whip-lash, ornamented with little
pieces of colored riband. They wear wooden shoes,
with the toes turned up, something like sleigh-run-
ners, long stockings, short pantaloons, sack coats, @

mar

See Fiat SM



long robe with wide sleeves like a loose gown, a sort
of decorated apron, and flowing silk girdle ; the
tobe is sometimes of rich figured stuffaccording to the



90 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

caste or rank of the wearer; and the rich button
of coral, crystal, or gold, mounted in his funnel-shaped
hat, shows his rank, from the emperor and mandarins
down to the poor little fanner of tea-leaves, of the
lowest caste of Chinese supposed degradation.’

‘ Do the ladies dress so strangely ? asked Lucy.

Female fashions are sometimes very hurtful to
health in all nations. Iwill mention one Chinese
fashion which tortures or lames young females of the
higher castes, and is foolishly imitated by the mid-
dling classes, but it merely makes hobbling cripples of
them, and does not otherwise greatly injure them.
Some of the lowest classes, or castes, chiefly confined
to the mountains, or distant provinces, have not adop-
ted this unnatural fashion. You know, no doubt, that
I refer to a Chinese lady’s shoe, which is formed of
silk and beautifully embroidered. The foot is confined







FREDERIC AND Luvey. 21

in infancy, except the great toe,and tortured in youth
into this stunted unnatural shape. You, Lucy, lately
saw a Chinese lady in Boston, wearing this little
Shoe, but this fashion jeopardizes not the life of its
wearer, like our silly fashion of tight lacing. The
old English fashion of peaked-toed boots was carried
to such extravagant lengths that occasionally the
incommoded wearer tied the toe end of his boot above
his knee, and in battle cavaliers got rid of the nui-
sance by cutting off half a yard of it.

We have no excuse for our fashions, and the
Chinese only a lame one for theirs. The fe-
males in China without small feet are held in con-
tempt, and employed only as servants. Even if two
sisters, otherwise equal in every respect of person or
mind, if the one has been thus maimed, and the other’s
feet suffered to grow naturally, the latter sister is
considered unworthy to associate with the rest of the
family, a sort of banished Cinderella, who cannot put
on a little glass slipper, and therefore doomed to per-
petual obscurity, or the drudgery of the kitchen.’

‘Do they live upon food like ours ? said Frederic,
‘and do the boys dress and play as we do 2’

‘In many respects their modes and even their
sports are at antipodes, or directly contrary to ours.
For instance, the boys play shuttlecock with their
feet instead of their hands ; and, what is more
strange, Frederic, they strike the bird or ball with
the sole of the foot ; at which they are very expert.



22 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

«



Even the pedlar, walking behind them, exhibits his
wares, consisting of toys, dolls, scaramouches, and
skipjacks, strung upon a long pole.

The wealthy sometimes treat their visiters with
hundreds of rich courses ata single dinner,eating from



|

—————————

FREDERIC AND LUCY. 23

diminutive plates and cups. The Hong merchant,
Mowgqua, at Canton, lately invited an Englishman a-
mong his guests, and met him at the door along with
his son, a white knob upon his cap,betokening the fifth
rank of mandarins, and both their attires of the most
rich and splendid kinds. Young Mowqua wore, over
all his silk coats and vests, confined by a beautiful
sash, a cloak of the costliest furs, the badge of nobility.
Wealthy nobles and merchants live in splendor. And
six long hours was the poor visiter kept eating,
drinking, and smoking.

But the Chinese people eat almost everything
that comes to hand. In the streets or squares, birds
are daily exposed for sale, which we have excluded
from our bills of fare, such as hawks, owls, eagles,
and storks; to us nothing would appear more laugh-
able than to see the Chinese arrive with a carrying-
pole supporting two bird-cages, which, instead of
birds, contain fat dogs and cats. The flesh of these
last, when of the best age and quality are admitted
upon tables of the nobles. Other Chinese marketers
bring upon their tall carrying-poles many dozens of
rats, nicely drawn and cleaned, suspended by means
of a cross-piece through the hind legs. These rows
of rats, tho’ highly prized, are eaten only by the poor.

Mrs, Johnson now said she had letters to write, and
desired the children to go into the garden. They

obeyed her immediately.



24 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

THE LARK’S NEST.

Wuen Mrs. Johnson had finished writing, she _
called her children to walk with her in the pastures, —
They were very glad ; for they all delighted in see- _
ing wild flowers ; and, when little William was not _
of the party, (for he was too young to have long —
walks without being tired,) Frederic and Lucy al-
ways brought him a nosegay of wild pinks or roses.

The morning was beautiful, the sun shone bright,
and the sprightly notes of the lark, as she ascended ~
high in the air, increased the lively gaiety of the
children. In the excess of their delight, they boun- ©
ded over the meadows ; and sometimes they stopped
to listen to the music of the lark, and admire the —
height of her flight.



While running across a large field, they suddenly
stopped on observing a bird, which they supposed a
lark, rise from the ground, and presently fly so high





fee

FREDERICANDLUCY. 25

as scarcely to be discerned. Frederic advised Lucy
to tread very lightly, as it was probable the lark had
a nest on the ground. He had seena lark’s nest,



but Lucy had not ; and, when her brother Fred-

eric told her that larks made their nests on the

ground, she was greatly surprised, for she had al-
c



96 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

ways imagined that every bird made its nest in a
tree ora hedge. She stepped softly, with her body
-most double, so fearful was she of not finding the
nest. Presently she saw another bird fly from the
ground, just at her brother’s foot, who at that mo-
ment cried out, ‘I have found it, I have found it!
one,—two,—three,—four birds !’ Lucy crept for-—
ward, and then knelt down to the nest, and saw, as ©
Frederic had counted, four pretty little birds, covered ©
with yellow down, and stretching up their little ga- —
ping bills as thoughthey expected food. Just atthe ©
time they were kneeling at the nest, their mother
came up, and asked what excited their attention.

The children showed her the nest, and she joined ©
in their admiration of it and its pretty inhabitants.
Frederic proposed taking the nest home ; ‘ and then,’
said he, ‘ Lucy and I can take care of the larks, and
then we shall hear their sweet singing every day—
even, you know, mother, when it rains, so that we
cannot go out.’

‘ But, my dear little boy,’ replied his mother, ‘ you —
forget, that, while you are endeavoring to make the
young birds happy, you would make the old ones
very miserable. Even your kindness would be very
much misplaced ; for you would be doing the great-
est injury to these little birds, by taking them from
the care of their father and mother, who, no doubt,
were the birds you saw rise from the ground, and
who, most likely, are gone in search of food for their



Se Etna pty As Ss Raa PI te MNCL RE LL DRI EP Py VID BBB ONE LAER STAT REE AE

PO SEP IS:

ee

eee

FREDERIC AND LUCY. 27

young ones ; and think, Frederic, what they would
suffer when they returned with their store of provis-
ions, and found the nest they had taken so much
pains to form, and their little ones, all gone ! Think
what your father and I should feel, if, when we re-
turned: from a journey, we were to find you and your
brother and sistet taken away : and, in proportion,
feel as much as we should do,—for God has given to
all animals a strong affection towards their young.’

‘ Indeed, mother, I did not think it would have
been a cruel action to take the larks, or I would not
have offered to do so. I have often seen boys seek-
ing birds’ nests ; and I did not know it was_ wrong,
although one of these boys I was told finally fell from
a tree, where he was attacked by the old bird, and
broke both his arms.’



‘I believe you, my dear; I know you would not
intentionally be cruel.”

‘ No indeed, mother, I would not be cruel,’ said
Frederic, the tears starting from his eyes.



28 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



The best birds are recklessly destroyed for game
or sport, but all, except birds of prey, are of great
use. Seven-eighths of their food in summer is in-
sects ; they feed their young almost wholly on them.
That little bird you see on the hedge, called a hair-
bird or sparrow, feeds her young 365 times an hour,
which, at 14 hours a day, is 3500 insects destroyed —
in a week by a single bird. All other countries en-
courage their increase, whilst we persecute them,

As for those boys, said Mrs. Johnson, whom
you saw robbing birds’ nests, perhaps they are more
to be pitied for their ignorance, than blamed for their
cruelty ; for probably nobody told them how cruel it
is to rob birds of their young or their eggs. You
see you were yourself just going to commit a cruel
action from want of consideration. I am always
grieved when I see children whose friends do not
take pains to teach them humanity. But now, my
dears, I tell you what we willdo. Every fine morn-



FREDERIG AND LUCY. 29

ing we will walk to this field, and you shall bring
crumbs of bread, and lay them by the nest. In time
the little birds will learn to know you ; probably the
parent birds will also¢ You can watch the growth
of the young ones, and, when they are old enough
‘to trust to their own strength, they will leave the
“nest, and then you may take it up and carry it home
_ to examine how curiously and skilfully it is made ;
‘and perhaps some of your father’s friends, when
they call upon us, may tell you something more.

_ Frederic and Lucy were delighted at this permis-
sion ; and Lucy said, she thought she had taken so
much notice of both the young and old birds, that
_ she believed she could draw a picture of them, when
she got home. Her mother approved Lucy’s inten-
‘ tion of endeavoring to delineate the birds, saying, she
_ was always pleased when her children tried to use
_ the pencil for themselves, and were not, like some
silly children, constantly teasing their friends to
_ draw them pictures.









THE VISITER.

"the dining-room, they found, with their parents, a

gentleman whom they had never seen before. Little
_ William hung down his head at the sight of a stran-
ger, which made him look very foolish, and Lucy





30 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

was rather inclined to look bashful; but when she ©
saw her brother Frederic shaking hands with the |
gentleman and answering his questions properly like 4
a child of sense, she followed his good example ; and, —
when the gentleman desired her to come to him, she ~
went directly ; and when he desired to know if she —
could read, she spoke up and said, ‘ Yes, sir, I can 4
read a little, but not very well.’ He then talked a 3
great deal more to her, because he saw she was not —
a silly child; but, if she had gone into a corner, or —
a window, without speaking, and hung down her ~
head, put her fingers in her mouth, nipped her frock, :
or any other foolish action awkward children are apt 4
to do, the gentleman would not have taken any no- '

tice of her.

Little William soon forgot his diffidence, when he q
found his brother and sister so kindly treated ; he ©
climbed up the gentleman’s knee, and held up his



mouth to kiss him. ‘That is a clever fellow, and a_

kind one,’ said the gentleman ; ‘I perceive you and |

I shall be good friends. If I find you so, I can tell”
you many entertaining stories about several curious
things I have seen.’ The children looked with de-—

light at each other ; then at their father and mother;
and then with wonder at the stranger.

‘ My dears,’ said their father, ‘ this gentleman is —

my particular friend, his name is Mr. Selby,—we
were playfellows when we were as young as you are.

The reason you have never seen him is, because he ©



;
|
| FREDERIC AND LUCY. 31

has been many years travelling in foreign countries ;
and, when you deserve the favor, I dare say he will
oblige you with recounting something of what he
has seen and heard.
_ Do, my dear sir, continue the account you were
just giving us of the volcano you visited in Sicily.’
Volcano ! volcano !” repeated Frederic and Lu-
cy, with astonishment. ‘ Pray, mother, what is a
volcano ?
_ ‘ tain, with a large opening at the top, like that of
‘wells and coal-pits. This opening, you must re-
member, is called the crater ; and out of it issues
‘flames and smoke, for the mountain is on fire with-
in, and burns with great violence. Here is a pic-
“ture of one in the night-time. Sometimes great
“quantities of stones are thrown out of the mouth of
the volcano ; and melted stones, red hot, run down
the sides of the mountain, like streams of water, and
whatever is touched by them is destroyed: these
melted stones are called Java. You must remember,
the mouth, or opening of the mountain, is called
*crater,—and the melted matter, which runs down its
_ sides, lava ; because Mr. Selby will have frequent
5 occasion to mention these names in giving his ac-
count, and, if you forget them, you will not under-
stand his strange narrative.’

The children were filled with amazement, for they
had never heard of anything so wonderful as a burn-













So tes Sh Sciam ae



‘
:
:



32 FREDERIC AND LUCY.












ing mountain, Mr. Selby, perceiving how much
their attention was fixed, began to give them a dem
cription of the mountain he had visited.

MOUNT ETNA.

‘ I agreed with a party of friends,’ said Mr. Selby
‘to visit the summit of this extraordinary mout
tain ; but, as we were unacquainted with the road
we were obliged to procure a guide. Etna is 4
mountain of such an immense size, that you cai’
form no idea of it from any hill you have ever seer

‘This mountain you must suppose to be divides
into three circles, or, as they are called, region:
The first is named the Rural Region, because it is
beautiful, pleasant country of cornfields and gardens}
vineyards and orchards ; the second is called the
Woody Region, from the magnificent trees which’
adorn it like a vast green belt surrounding the moun- -
tain ; and the third, the Barren Region, from its be- 1
ing always covered with snow ;—but, the better to
enable you to understand these divisions I will ere 7
you an outline of it,’ added Mr. Selby, taking a
pencil out of his pocket.

Frederic and his sister both declared they could
now easily imagine how the mountain was divided
into three belts, the top one like a white cap ; but
they thought it very wonderful that the region next



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 33



the fire should be covered with snow. Lucy sup-
posed the great heat of the flames would ‘ soon have:
melted the snow all away.’

‘Sometimes, I believe, it does in part,’ replied Mr..
Selby, ‘ for it has frequently happened that torrents:
of hot water have rushed down the mountain. But:
I must proceed in telling youmy journey. Wesoon:
passed through the rural, and entered the woody,,

Tegion, where our admiration was called forth by the:
D



34 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

immense size of the trees, especially some most ex-
traordinary chestnut-trees, — one, in particular, our
guide pointed out, whose branches extended so wide,
that a hundred mounted horsemen could be sheltered
under its shade! Its branches extended 200 feet in
circumference. It is called the Castago dei centt
cavalli, or ‘ chestnut of a hundred horses.’ It is
found marked in an old map of Sicily near 100 years
old ; hence its age must be considerable.

‘ Do chestnuts, such as we eat, grow on such
great mountain trees ? said little William.

Yes, my boy ; ina ball, like that of a sycamore,
horsechestnut, or shagbark.

‘ But chestnuts are flat on one side.’

Yes, because two of them grow together in a round
ball or pod looking like a large bur, or prickly plant.
This chest or green covering is very bitter, but the
nuts themselves, you know by taste, when boiled,
are as sweet as any nut. The chestnut-tree is very
ornamental, whilst growing, and very durable for
timber and fences and posts.. A gate-post or house-
rafter will remain sound for more than 50 years, and
the growth of the tree is very rapid.

‘If itis such a beautiful tree, why is it not planted
in our common ? said Lucy.

‘Probably because it is a fruit-tree, and exposed to
injury from mischievous boys, But this species of
nut is sweeter and more nutritious in some countries
than others; in the south of France, Spain, and Cor-.



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 35

sica, it constitutes, when boiled, the principal food of
the poorer people. Some of the French even make
their fine chestnuts, which are grafted, into cakes,
confectionery, puddings, and bread,




\)

NOS INS
NXg SE /
WS WS. Ne j

TY

SI
RS
" SN

S

“=~

iy

4/2
4
iB
WH

. This is the shape of the twigs on which they
grow, with leaves, flowers, and fruit. The nuts



36 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

which fall to the ground fatten swine, and a squirrel
here and there gambols among the branches,

7)



ee

‘ Chestnuts do not grow in our wood-lot,’ said
William, ‘ but walnuts and hazel-nuts do, and pigs
root round the trees with their noses.’

Walnuts and hazel-nuts grow in oval or round
bitter-tasting pods ; but I will show you the differ-
ence between the three fruits. The walnuts are seen
under the letter a in the picture, and, on account of
the great quantity of oil in them, are hard of diges-
tion ; they are eaten in desserts along with apples,
the cider in the apples qualifying the oil, otherwise
it is best to leave them to the squirrels. Two chest-



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 37



nuts, and the prickly pod, holding two more, are seen
above the letter 4 in the picture. Chestnuts are in-
digestible, unless boiled or otherwise cooked, when
they become very nutritious. The hazel-nut or
filbert is above the c inthe drawing. Farmers would
reap much advantage by planting butter-nuts, chest-
nuts and walnuts, the wood being very valuable,and
the fruit commanding a great price.

But Imust resume my journey. Our attention was
attracted by the beautiful plants, whose sweet flow-
ers perfumed the air. Slowly we wandered through
this party-colored, fragrant, delightful forest, unwil-
ling to quit the examination of its beauties ; but the
setting sun reminded us to seek a habitation or
shelter for the night.

No human dwelling being nigh, we were glad
to make our abode in a large cave, which our guide



-_—-_——w oo

38 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

told us was called Goats’ Cave, because these ani-
mals frequented it in bad weather. We had seen
several goats skipping from point to point as we pas-
sed, or lying down in the shade. We broke off some
branches of oak to make a fire, and, after rubbing
two dry pieces together very hard, sparks of fire were
at length produced, and we soon had a comfortable
blaze. We had brought with usa tea-kettle, sugar,
tea, and bread ; but in vain we looked for water, and
were beginning to fear we should not be able to make
tea, when we fortunately espied a large quantity of
snow, heaped up in the corner of the cave ; with this
we filled our tea-kettle, and made a comfortable sup-
per. We then gathered the dry leaves of the oaks,
strewed in front of our cave, to make our bed, and,
being greatly fatigued, we gladly laid down to rest.
But our sleep was much interrupted by the terrific
noises which issued from the crater of the burning
mountain, resembling loud thunder.

Next morning we again melted snow, and made
our breakfast as we had done our supper. We had
risen very early, and, when we left the cavern, the
sun had not risen: the gloomy shades of the forest,
the sullen noise from the mountain, (which was not
50 loud as at night,) and the dim view of the sea ata
great distance below, made the scene awful and
grand. Every one’s mind was employed by his own
thoughts, reflecting on the almighty power of the
Creator, and we proceeded in silence.



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 39

When we entered the highest region, which, as.
I before told you, was covered with snow, we were
desired by our guide to step with great caution, as
the melted snow frequently settled in pools, which
were difficult to discover, because the surface of the
water, as well as the snow, was often covered with
black ashes. The ascent over the ice and snow was
steep and fatiguing, ‘but we were not discouraged,
and finally arrived at an ancient ruin,where we rested.

Owing to the beautiful clearness of the air, we
observed the stars, which were yet shining, and ap-
peared much larger than they did when we were at
the foot of the mountain. We went yet a little
higher, until we felt the warm air from the crater 5
but we did not approach the crater itself, for that is
extremely dangerous, and many people have lost
their lives by venturing too far. We were fully re-
compensed for the labor of ascending this high moun-
tain, by the exceeding fine prospect which the height
enabled us to view. So much were we delighted,
we scarcely could prevail upon ourselves to leave the
enchanting spot.

We had not descended far on our return, before
[ suffered greatly from my own heedlessness ; for,
without considering the ice on which we were tread-
ing, I thoughtlessly turned to speak to one of my
friends, when my foot slipped, and I fell with great
violence. For some time! was in much agony, from
the extreme pain in my ankle ; but,as it was im-



40 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

possible to procure assistance, I was obliged to rise
and limp on as well as I could, my friends kindly
supporting me under each arm.

At length we arrived at the cave where we had
slept the previous night. We were somewhat ‘star-
tled and surprised to find our bed of leaves occupied,
as far as the darkness of the cave would permit us
to observe, by'a venerable patriarch of the goat kind,
with a long white beard, and piebald, or black-white-
chocolate-colored hide, and a formidable butting pair
of horns ; at his feet lay a kid, fast asleep. The old
goat seemed in no hurry to retreat, and the guide told
us he had formerly been tamed.



‘ Do goats live on chestnuts 2 said little William.
Mr. Selby said he believed they subsisted princi-
pally on green leaves, twigs and buds of all kinds.



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 41

‘ Whilst they are skipping from rock to rock, why
don’t they fall as you did, and sprain their ankles ?
added William.

They climb mountains to secure themselves from
wild beasts, and to procure delicate food, and their
legs and hoofs are shaped for these purposes. Dr.
Clarke says in his travels: ‘ Upon our road from
Jerusalem to Bethlehem, we met an Arab with a
goat, which he led about the country for exhibition,
in order to gain a livelihood for itself and owner. He
had taught this animal, while he accompanied its
movements with a song, to move upon little cylindri-
cal pieces of wood, placed successively one above an-

aoQy=——
SF. ——— 3 = a SSS

ef





42 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

other, and in shape resembling the dice-boxes be-
longing to a backgammon table. In this manner the
goat stood, first upon the top of one cylinder, then
upon the top of two, and afterwards of three, four,
five, and six, until he remained balanced upon the
top of them all, elevated several feet from the ground,
and with his four feet collected upon a single point,
without throwing down the disjointed fabric upon
which he stood. The practice is very ancient. No-
thing can show more strikingly the tenacious footing
possessed by this quadruped upon the jutty points
and crags of rocks ! and the circumstance of its a-
bility to remain thus poised may render its appear-
ance less surprising, as ‘t is sometimes seen in the
Alps, and in al] mountainous countries, with hardly
any place for the feet, upon the sides and by the
brink of most tremendous precipices. The diameter
of the upper cylinder, on which its feet ultimately
remained, until the Arab had ended his ditty, was
only two inches, and the length of each cylinder
was six inches.’ :

Goats appear to court danger in climbing, reckless
of consequences. | heard once of some of them who
found out a short cut from one mountain to another
by a precipice across the valley 150 feet high. The
road for a considerable distance was but about two or
8 inches wide, consisting of alittle jagged cornice or
shelf, with perpendicular rock above and below. This
did very well whilst all passed one Way > unfortu-



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 43

nately however, one day two goats, when in the mid-
dle of the passage, met face to face. Their loud bleat-
ing collected hundreds of people in the valley, but no
assistance could be given to these poor animals,
perched 150 feet in the air, where human foot had
never trod. At this moment, one of the goats kneel-
eddown and the other carefully walked across his
back, and both were’ safe. ‘ There is a special prov-
idence in the fall of a sparrow,” and what was not
in the heart of man to conceive was happily thought
of by the native instinct, experience, or sagacity of a
couple of brute nanny goats.

One species of goat or antelope, which inhabit the
Alps and Pyrenees, and called Chamois, have longer
- hind legs than front ones, and make incredible leaps,
sometimes ten or twenty feet. They browse on
seemingly inaccessible heights, but are followed by
daring hunters. When alarmed, théy warn the flock
by a loud hiss, which re-echoes through rocks and
forests as forcibly as a rail-road whistle, although this
noise proceeds only from the nose of the Chamois.





44 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



Your mother no doubt has told you the true story
of Selkirk or Crusoe and his goats, whom, for their
amusement and his own, he taught to dance.

But to resume my journey. My friends prepared
a bed of leaves, and, when I had lain down on it, it.
was sucha relief,I thought I had never lain on a bed
so delightful. After a comfortable cup of tea, I fell
into a sound sleep, and, when I awoke, I was much
refreshed, but incapable of walking. Our guide
soon procured me asure-footed horse, and we safely
descended through the woody region to the bottom
of the mountain. I had great reason to lament my
carelessness, for my ankle became so painful and



FREDERIC AND LUCY. ' 45

swelled, it prevented me from making any more ex-
cursions for a long time.

‘ Does lava run from the crater ?” said Lucy.

It does commonly ; but the terrific element some-
times bursts the sides of the mountain, taking a
new, unexpected, and destructive track across cities
and villages to the ocean.

The kingdom of Naples has two, volcanoes, one of
them on the island of Sicily, and the other near the
great and beautiful city of Naples. In eruptions of
this last volcano, called Vesuvius, nearly 2000 years
ago, the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum were
destroyed by the fire bursting the top of the moun-
tain. Pompeii was covered 50 feet deep with ashes,
mud, pummice stones, and cinders; but a stream
or river of sulphurous lava ran a great distance and
overflowed Herculaneum with a sea of fire ; and this
last substance, lava, when cool, is almost as hard as
rock. Here is a drawing of the position of these cities.

Both cities remained buried till a few years ago,
when an excavation of Pompeii was begun.

‘ What are the lines on the map, sir ?’ said Lucy.

The dotted line shows the present outline of the
coast,—the first black line that of the coast at the
time of the eruption, A. D. 79. The other lines
show the roads leading to Pompeii. In the year of our
Lord 79, when the first eruption happened, the beau-
tiful heights of Vesuvius, like those now round Bos-
ton, were covered with villas, country seats, palaces,



46 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

gardens, and vineyards. Most of the vast populace
of the cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii were sit-
ting in their large amphitheatres, seeing combats be-
tween wild beasts, the cruel sports of the ancient Ro-
mans, when the bursting of the mountain happened.

/







E Ss

i |

ae,
NAY;
ae
~ TT ZX 7

w

HAN

on

z Qasl

S



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 47

Dense clouds of smoke, dust, and cinders turned
day into night for three days, during which profound
darkness continued, lighted only by fresh floods of
flame from the mountain. The dust or ashes was
so abundant in the air that it reached Africa, Syria,
and Egypt. It not only destroyed fields and towns,
but such sulphurous quantities of it filled the air or
fell into the sea, that the birds and fish of all the
neighboring coasts were killed.

So completely was Pompeii buried that the articles
of use or luxury, houses, streets, and utensils, have
been preserved nearly 1800 years.

Py ° Swe SL
% al ~*~ =
Ws SS
‘ge MMM OWW ‘
ava WO
Wed . ~

Oe . ,
zt ar
aA =

bec is ge



The above drawing isa portion of Pompeii, ree
stored to light after a lapse of seventeen centuries,
during all which time new eruptions have occurred,
at intervals of three or four years. At the latest
eruption, the stream of lava was a mile and a half
broad and injured or destroyed 800 houses.



48 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

THE SPIDER.

Tur next morning the children went with their
mother to visit the lark’s nest. Little William made
one of the party ; and highly delighted was he to
go, for much he wished to see the nest and all the
little nestlings.

The children jumped, and skipped, and sung,
through the fields, until they came to that in which
was the nest ; when they arrived within a few yards
of it, each was careful to tread quite softly, and not
to make the least noise, lest they should disturb and
frighten the poor little birds ; but, notwithstanding,
the old birds, ever watchful for the safety of their
young ones, were alarmed, and flewup. The children
slowly approached, and, peeping into the nest, saw
all the little family well, and as brisk as ever.

They strewed the crumbs they had brought around
the nest, pleasing themselves with imagining how
the parent birds would rejoice to find so much good
food so near home ; and then they left the nest, in
order to gather some beautiful flowers, that grew in
this and the neighboring pasture. In doing this, Lucy
saw another bird fly from the hedge, which Mrs.
Johnson told her was a goldfinch. They soon found
the nest, which contained five very pretty speckled
eggs, their main color being white, gently tinged
with blue, but the delicate spots upon them were of



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 49



a dark purple hue. The groundwork of the nest was
made of moss and fine grass, so curiously put togeth-
er as not to have a single leaf of the grass or moss
project, and lined or felted with wool. No weaver
could have better knotted and woven and put on the
map or soft covering over the inside surface, than
these little feathered mechanics. Frederic asked his
mother to tell them more about the mother birds.

‘I will tell you,’ said Mrs. Johnson, ‘ what our
neighbor, Mr. Bolton, told me, ‘On the 10th of May

E



50 FREDERIC AND LUCY

I observed a pair of goldfinches beginning to make
their nest in my garden. They had formed the
groundwork with moss. gTass, &c. as usual ; but, on
my scattering small parcels of wool in different parts
of the garden, they in a great measure left off the
use of their own stuff, and employed the wool. Af-
terwards I gave them cotton ; on which they reject-
ed the wool, and used the cotton. The third day I
supplied them with fine down, on which they forsook
poth the others, and finished their work with this
last article. This nest was beautifully tied and wove.
Are birds ever so very tame ? said Lucy.

Birds, although seemingly shy, have a friendship
for men or boys who leave them unmolested. They
build near them to avoid birds of prey. A shed in our
neighborhood, which long had a wren’s nest under
its eves, was taken down in spring. The owner, ob-
serving the old birds fidgeting about, stuck the skel-





FREDERIC AND LUCY. $1

eton of a horse’s head on the top of a pole, and the
birds within an hour took legal possession, by filling
the cavity of the brain with sticks, hay, hair,and wool,
and, in a few days, nine little black and white speck-
led eggs were in this strange-looking wren-house,
which continued their domicil for many years, till
the tall pole was violently blown down in an October
gale, and the old horse’s head broken to pieces.’

Each of the children now gathered a large bunch
of wild flowers, for there were a great many differ-
ent kinds in this field,and about the hedge-side ; and,
when their mother saw they had sufficient, she pro-
posed going to a green bank, which they saw at a
little distance, to rest themselves, and examine the
beauty of the flowers. They all were willing to do
this, for, with running and jumping they had nearly
tired themselves.

When they were seated, they began to open their
nosegays, and Lucy showed them some wood-wort,
which she had at first greatly admired for its dark
purple flowers, curiously dotted with very small white
spots ; but she found it had so disagreeable a smell,
that she thought it was better to throw it away ; and
she was going to do so, when she observed two of
the leaves were curiously folded together ; and, on
opening one, exclaimed, ‘ O, mother! O, Frederic !
look, what a beautiful, beautiful spider!’ It was,
indeed, an extremely beautiful insect, having a pink
back, lightly striped with brown, and a yellow belly ;



52 FREDERIC ANDLUCY.



and its legs were so fine, that the whole party wish-
ed for a microscope, to enable them the better to
discern their delicate form.

Lucy saw that the leaf of the woodwort had been
closed by the spider’s threads, which were joined to
each side of the leaf, and then drawn together, so as
to make the leaf into a three-cornered shape. There
was a little round ball woven also by the spider ;
and, when Lucy gently opened it with a pin, several
very small balls rolled out ; these, Mrs. Johnson in-
formed them, were the spider’s eggs, which she had
thus enclosed in a bag of her own spinning, and that
these eggs would all in time become insects.

‘ Does an old spider learn her daughters,—all her
two or three hundred young ones, to spin, reel, twist
and weave, mother 2’ asked little William.

‘They are born with an instinct to do all that is
necessary for their existence.

‘ You, Lucy, have been at Lowell, and seen 70
spindles turning, and 70 threads spun by one person
as easily as your grandmother used to spin a



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 53

single thread on the old spinning-wheel in our attic.
What 70 persons could hardly accomplish. in a day a
few years ago, is now done by a Lowell girl, and ad-
mirably done, by means of a_ single Spinning
Jenny. But art is only an imitation of nature ; and
in this particular case, and perhaps in all cases, is in-
ferior to nature. This little pink spider is now sus-
pended from a twig, seemingly spinning one thread ;
what if I tell you, that, seen through a microscope,



she is absolutely seen spinning 5000 threads, and
twisting them by some inconceivable means into



54 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

the single thread by which she is lowering herself to
the ground ? This despised spider is doing the work
of 70 Lowell girls, operating each of them with 70
spindles ; or of 5000 old spinning-wheels, laboriously



twirled by 5000 females of years gone by—the spider
braiding or gluing all these threads into a single tiny
rope, at the same time, with mathematical precision.
And perhaps there are a thousand other spiders in
this field as busily employed in the manufacture of
nets and fly-traps, of such gossamer fineness that sil-
ly gnats and musquitos are entangled before they
are aware. You have read the fable of Gulliver, tied
down in a similar manner by pigmies with needlefuls
of thread. The little spider, no doubt, has no other
means of providing a dinner for her somewhat nu-
merous family. The works of nature are, however,
too wonderful to be spoken of with levity. We feed
upon useful animals, spiders upon noxious insects.

‘ How does the little spider spin at once these in-
numerable threads ? said Lucy.

‘You see five little dots in the insect’s back. Natu-



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 55

ralists call them spinnerets, these may be seen, in large
spiders, by the naked eye. When we look at these
spinnerets with a strong magnifying glass, we see
that they are divided into regular rows of minute
points, about a thousand to each spinneret,—making
5,000. These little points are called spennerules.
Each of them may be regarded as a little tube, from
which the spider spins a thread of amazing fineness,
and, within the distance of a single inch, weaves and
warps it into a rope of 5000 strands or threads.



‘ Here is a drawing of the five dots or spinnerets
greatly magnified ; but, as it would be impossible to
show you 5000 threads in so small a space, only 50



56 IREDERIC AND LUCY.

are represented. Each thread in the picture, there-
fore, stands for 100. It is most wonderful that a sin-
gle thread of spider’s web should be formed of 5,000
smaller threads. But so naturalists say itis. One of
them estimates four millions of these little threadlets,
in a small spider, to be only equal in size when uni-
ted to a hair in a man’s whisker.

‘What was the necessity, mother, for having them
in this manner ? and why did not the great and good
Creator have one thread spun out from a little spi-
der, instead of 5000 2’ said Frederic.

The only reply I can give, my dear, is, that the
present plan makes the thread stronger than it would
otherwise be ; for every ropemaker knows that the
finer the threads are, of which his rope is composed,
the stronger it is. ‘The more we examine the works
of the Great Architect, the more we are convinced of
the wisdom and beauty of the design. Look at the
endless varieties of spiders, plants, and all created
things,and you find them skilfully fufilling their ends
of creation. ‘ In wisdom has he made them all.”
Look at the beautiful flowers in your-hand; they
neither toiled nor spun, yet ‘ Solomon in all his glo-
ry” was not so richly or wonderfully arrayed as one
of these lilies-of-the-valley, or as this skilful little
pink spider. This despised insect and this nosegay,
‘born to blush unseen,’ show new beauties under. the
microscope, whilst human skill looks bungling in the
comparison, under this severe magnifier of defects



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 57



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i
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invisible to the naked eye. New reasons for the:
wisdom visible around us are daily discovered in all’
things, though many have escaped human scrutiny
for 6000 years till the present time, and millions on;

millions will remain for future discovery,
F



58 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

The beautiful pink spider had, all the time, been
running about in the greatest uneasiness, from one
leaf to another ; but they observed she never attemp-
ted to enter the opposite closed leaf, in which was an-
other spider, like herself ; all the children pitied her
distress, and, to relieve it, Lucy laid the piece of
wood-wort upon the stump of a tree, near which they
were standing. When the poor spider found herself
at liberty, she soon began to unite the two torn sides
of the bag in which her eggs had been wrapped. This
she accomplished with much dexterity, and, when it
was completely restored to its former shape, she be-
gan to fasten up the leaf, by spinning a thread from
one edge of the leaf to the other, and then draw-
ing these threads tight, until they brought both edges
of the leaf close together, over herself and the bag.

When the children had fully gratified their curi-
osity, Lucy said she would run to the hedge-side,
and lay the piece of wood in it, that the pretty spi-
ders might enjoy themselves at full liberty. Fred-
eric and William said, they also would like to run
to the hedge-side ; and their mother gave them leave
to go, saying she would sit on the green bank until
they came back.

When they returned, they asked their mother
many questions, more indeed than she could answer,
but she told them, when they could read alone, she
would give them a book containing accounts of in-
sects, from which they might learn a great deal ; at



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 59

the same time, she was perfectly willing to tell them
what she knew. ‘OQ, pray do, mother !’ cried Lucy ;
‘T have often seen spiders running about the walls
of the house, and have seen Betty brushing away
cobwebs as she called them, complaining that spiders
were constantly making them, but I used not to mind
them. I only thought that spiders were ugly crea-
tures, but, if you tell me anything curious about
them, I will notice them when I go home.’

‘Indeed, my dear, they are well worth observation ;
and, if you had allowed a spider to run upon your
hand, and had examined it narrowly, you would have
seen it was far from ugly ; and the cobwebs, which I
suppose Betty thought it a trouble to dust away so
frequently, are really very curious things.

‘ When the house-spider begins to form her web,
she usually chooses the corner of a room or a
staircase or an elbow or twig of a tree, because
she can then more easily fix the thread across from
one wall to the other; and, when she has gota suf-
ficient number of threads laid one way, she begins to
cross them the other way, until it is completely wove,
rivetted, and knotted : when it is done, she conceals
herself in a small hole, or cell, previously made in
the corner of the nest. She is so diligent a weaver,
laboring in her vocation, or for the support of her chil-
dren, increasing faster than those of William’s ‘old
lady that lived in a shoe,’ she works all night, whilst



60 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

her victims the flies are asleep, not dreaming that the
spider is mending her nets, or weaving new coils.

‘ There is a kind of spider, who can make a cell
with a door to it, which she can shut or open at
pleasure, and which perfectly secures her when she
is likely to be disturbed by any larger insect. The
spider weaves her web as symmetrically and as
mechanically as our wite mouse-trap, to catch flies
or small insects, which are her food. When they
alight upon the web, their slender legs are soon en-
tangled in the crossed threads or meshes, and, while
they are struggling to get loose, the spider darts
from her concealment, throws new diminutive ropes
across the wings, head, or body of her victim, draws
the cords tight, and, with thread upon thread in all
directions, much the same as the Lilliputians bound
Mr. Lemuel Gulliver, secures the unfortunate fly,
and then greedily devours her prey.





FREDERIC AND LUCY. 6l

There are other spiders which inhabit fields and
gardens. I dare say you have observed the beauty
of their webs, when they are covered early in the mor-
ning with dew, sparkling in the sun’s rays. They are
quite differently formed from the housespider’s.

‘ Yes, indeed, both Lucy and I,’ answered Fred-
eric, ‘ have often admired those beautiful webs, and
we have often seen long threads hanging from one
tree to another, at great distances ; were these also
woven by the spiders ?

Yes, my dear; on those long threads, which the
spiders weave, they transport themselves from one
tree to another.

You and your father, Frederic, were admiring
a spider’s web on the door of our wood-house. Do

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62 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

you know that, like Jonah’s gourd, it was the silent
work of a single short summer’s night ? and that
millions of silken beams formed its rafters? Yet a
spider is called one of the most disgusting objects in
nature. Scavengers generally look disgusting, but they
make clean work. ‘There is a purpose to everything

ee Sire

ix,
Whe
oe rt Oa

ks





FREDERIC AND LUCY. 63

under the sun,’ and this insect is, as it were,a high
constable in the fields, and ‘ takes the body’ of all
the loafing noisy insects on whose shoulders he can
fasten his brizrean claws ; even an intruding horsefly,
bee, or diamond beetle, are ‘ ejected’ by him, or eaten
sans ceremonie. Here is a pretty daisy, fresh, fra-
grant, and beautifully colored. Were it not for the
little pink spiders, a sort of police ‘ on duty,’ it would
have been eaten up by thousands of may-bugs.
Cruel sportsmen murder the birds, the beautiful
guardians of the fields, and, in the economy of na-
ture, spiders are perfect ‘ sheriff-substitutes,’ and
enforce stringent or biting laws on trespassing insects.

‘ But, mother,’ said Lucy, ‘ you said, the house-
spider’s threads crossed over one another ; but Ido not
remember seeing any threads in any of these webs.’

That was, because they are so very fine, replied
her mother, and spun so close to each other. A
spider’s thread, as I have already told you, is much
finer than a hair of your head ; but in some countries
there are spiders of much larger size, whose threads
are a great deal stronger. A Frenchman once un-
dertook to manufacture, that is, to prepare and spin,
the webs into threads strong enough to be woven in-
to stockings ; and he actually did weave one pair of
stockings, which were very beautiful, and were kept
asa great curiosity; but the thread, made from
the web of the spider, was not near so strong as that
made from the web of the silk-worm.



64 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

‘0, silk-worms, mother exclaimed Frederic ;
I want to know a great deal about them.’

But, my dear, you must at present be satisfied
with what I have told you about spiders, for we
have been a long time from home, and must hasten
our return, forI have several things to do before
dinner. You now see what an advantage it would
be, if you read without assistance. I should then
give you proper books, and you might read to your
sister all you want te know; at present you are
entirely dependent on me for information, and, if
business, sickness, or company, prevents my in-
tructing you, you must remain ignorant of much
useful and pleasant knowledge.

They walked quietly home, Frederic and Lucy
declaring that they would take great pains to im-
prove themselves, that they might soon be able to
read all the pleasing books their mother promised
them.

INVENTIONS.

A rew days after, Mr. Selby paid his friend a
second visit. The children were rejoiced to see him,
and, as they went out to meet him, he inquired if
they had all been very good. On their father and
mother assuring him they had, Mr. Selby told them
he had not forgotten his promise of gratifying them
with accounts of his travels in different parts of the



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 65

world ; and, if it was agreeable to Mr. and Mrs.
Johnson, he would stay that afternoon, and relate
his journey to Glasgow.

I had been in Scotland when I was a boy, but, in
my first journey, I was as many days on the road, in
order to travel the same number of miles, as I now
quietly rode in the same number of hours ; such has
been the rapidity of improvements in journeying
in the course of my short life.

The children anxiously asked Mr. Selby to tell
them why this great change had happened. ‘There
are only 60 minutes in an hour, and 1440 in a day,’
said Frederic; and little William added, that * he
had been thinking whether Hop-o’-my-Thumb, with
his seven-league boots, could have done it in so
short a time.’

I like to hear your doubts, that I may remove them,
said Mr. Selby. The story of the boots, William,

was a fiction ; but reality, in our day, outruns fiction





66 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

with regard to rail-roads and electric telegraphs,
Shakespeare’s wildest imaginings only ‘ put a girdle
round the earth in 40 minutes,’ whereas the telegraph
might do it in two seconds of time. That is, taking
the Boston and New York wires as a criterion, a mes-
sage could absolutely be expedited 200 times more
rapidly by them than by the poet’s Queen Mab and
Robin Goodfellow, or fairy-line ancient conveyance,

‘Do please tell us, then, about your last journey,’
said Lucy.

Mr. Selby said, in order to do this, he must first
tell them about a poor litile sick boy, and about
some ancient toys for children, moved by steam pow-
er, more than 2000 years ago, yet in some degree
connected with my true Story. Useful subjects must
be carefully explained in order to be understood.

When I reached Glasgow, I was introduced to an
elderly gentleman, whose name was

JAMES WATT.

Watt was born at Greenock, in Scotland, Jan. 1736.
He was the son of a ship-chandler. From the ex-
treme delicacy of young Watt’s health when a child,
he was unable regularly to attend the public school,
so that much of his instruction was received at home.
His mother taught him reading, and his father wrij-
ting and arithmetic ; he thus acquired those habits
of inquisitive and precocious reflection, so often ob-



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 67

served in feeble-bodied children, when taught by heir
kind parents. A gentleman one day calling upon his
father, observed the child bending over the marble
hearth and wainscoating, with chalk in his hand.

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68 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

‘ Mr.Watt,’ said he, ‘ you ought to send that boy to
school, and not let him trifle away his time at home.’

‘ Look how my child is employed, before you con-
demn him,’ replied the father. The gentleman then
approached the child, and found that he was trying
to solve a problem in geometry. He put some ques-
tions to him, and was astonished with the mixture of
intelligence, quickness, and simplicity in his answers.

In this way, confined by ill-health, young Watt,
always busy in early years, acquired at his father’s
fireside that general information for which he was in
after-life remarkable. His father for his amusement
presented him with a number of tools, such as are
used in cabinet-work, with which young Watt began
to exhibit his mechanical taste in the fabrication of
numerous toys, and among the rest a small electri-
cal machine.

One day, having accompanied his mother on a
visit to a lady in Glasgow, the boy, at the request of
the lady, was left behind. The next time Mrs. Watt
went to Glasgow, her friend said to her, ‘ You must
take your son James home ; I cannot stand the de-
gree of excitement he keeps me in ; I am worn out
for want of sleep. Every evening before ten o’clock,
our usual hour of retiring to rest, he contrives to en-
gage me in conversation, then begins some striking
tale ; and, whether humorous or pathetic, the inter-
est is so overpowering, that the family all listen to
him with breathless attention, and hour after hour



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 69

strikes unheeded.’ This wonderful faculty of story-
telling, which robbed the Glasgow lady of her sleep,
Watt preserved through life to his dying day, toa
degree unparalleled perhaps, except in his cotempo-
rary, and fellow-countryman, Sir Walter Scott.

Young Watt returned home to occupy himself with
the sciences. The whole range of physics had at-
tractions for him. In excursions to the banks of
Loch Lomond, he studied botany, entered into geo-
logical observations among the rocks and secondary
formations, and collected traditions and ballads a-
mong the clansmen and highlanders. At home, du-
ring his frequent hours of ill-health, he devoured
books on chemistry and general science, natural phi-
losophy, medicine, and surgery ; the detailed des-
cription of diseases was familiar to him. In short,
by incessant reading and mental activity, he acquired
and digested a vast mass of miscellaneous and scien-
tific information.

The profession, to which young Watt was put ap-
prentice, was that of mathematical and nautical in-
strument making, for the acquisition of which he went
to London. ‘ Thus,’ says M. Arago, ‘ the man who
was about to cover England with engines, in com-
parison with which the antiqne and colossal machine
of Marly is but a pigmy, commenced his career by
constructing, with his own hands, instruments, which
were fine, delicate, and fragile, — those small but
admirable reflecting sextants used in navigation.’



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70 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

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In 1757, at the age of 21, he commenced business
as a mathematical instrument maker in Glasgow.
At first he experienced great opposition—one of the
privileged corporations regarding him as an intruder,
and refusing the young mechanic the privilege of
setting up a workshop. In this dilemma, the univer-
sity gave him a room, and conferred on him the title
of « mathematical instrument maker to the College
of Glasgow.’ In this university was a cluster of em-
inent men. Adam Smith, Robert Simson, Drs. Black
and Robinson, were the professors. They saw his
worth, and Watt’s new position brought him into
contact with these great men. ‘I had always,’ says
professor Robinson, ‘ a great relish for mathematical
and mechanical philosophy. When I was introduced
to young Watt, I saw a workman, and expected no
more; but was surprised to find a philosopher,



FREDERICANDLUCY. 71

younger than myself, and I was rather mortified at
finding Watt so much my superior. Whenever any
puzzle came in the way of us students, we sent to
Watt.’ This and similar records figure his early life
—a young, amiable, and ingenious man, a great fa-
vorite with professors and students, occupied a great
part of the day in his workshop, but constantly en-
gaged in the evening in some profound or curious
question in mathematical or physical science ; aware
at the same time of all that was going on in the arts.

‘ Did young Watt still continue sick ? said Lucy.

Yes, so much so, that it was the cause of his re-
turn home from London. In 1763 he enlarged his
business by including engineering ; and began to be
consulted in the construction of canals, bridges, &c.



and in the following winter, professor Anderson, find-
Ing that a small steam-engine would not work, sent



72 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

it to young Watt for repair; it was this model of
Newcomen’s engine that begot in Watt’s mind_the
germ of those ideas which led to such gigantic con-
sequences. ‘The little black model on the young
mathematical-instrument-maker’s table was the con-
densed epitome, as it were, of all that the world then
knew of steam-power. In the brain of young Watt,
bending by candle-light over the broken model, lay,
as yet undeveloped, all that the steam-engine has
since become. This accident to an imperfect model
was the cause of as great a revolution in mechanics
as had been produced by the art of printing.

‘ But I thought,’ said Frederic, ‘ that steam power
began to be applied to mechanical purposes about
the years 1778 or ’80.’ ,

Yes, said Mr. Selby ; the delay, for 14 years, was
owing to the poverty of young Watt.



IN CONTINUATION.

Tue two greatest inventions yet found out, said
Mr. Selby, namely, printing and steam power, were
originally contrived for children’s toys, so you see,
my young friends, there is philosophy, ingenuity,
and utility even in makinga plaything. A citizen of
Harlaem, named Coster, whilst walking in a wood,
began to cut letters and pictures on the bark of the
beech ; with these letters he enstamped marks upon



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 73

paper in a contrary direction, in the manner of a seal,
until at length he formed a little primer or picture-
‘book for the amusement of his grandchildren, or of his
sister's children. Such was the discovery of the art

DU TLL



of printing, which will make readers of all mankind,
and without the aid of which the reformation of Lu-
ther could not have been established.

Seals, which are a ‘miniature inlittle’ of the art of
printing, were used in the times of Darius and A-
hasuerus, several hundred years before the Christian
era, and perhaps the Chinese stamped the letters
now used on tea-chests, in the same manner, some

G



74 FREDERIC ANDLUCY.

thousands of years ago ;_ yet, So prone are mankind
to do ‘as grandfather did,’ that no advance was
made in improvement till the times of Coster and
Guttenberg.

The origin of the other invention I will endeavor
briefly to relate to you.

Srram, said Mr. Selby, or, as it was anciently
called, ‘ water transformed into air by the action of
fire,’ was described in the writings of Hero, a Greek,
120 years before Christ, in an account of a toy for
children, as made to produce a rotatory motion ; sO
you see, my dears, ancient philosophers fabricated
toys to go by steam 2000 years ago, in much the
same manner as described in your Boy’s Own Book,
or in Parlor Magic, with this difference only that
his toy acquired perpetual motion by steam, whilst
your Prancing Dragoon and Bowing Beau were se-





FREDERIC AND LUCY. 75

cretly kept nodding or galloping by unseen magical
weights underneath the table or statue.

The principle of Hero’s toy, however, was inferior
and different from that of steam-engines, in which
the power consists not in the mere re-action caused
by steam, but in the prodigious expansive force of
steam itself. An inch of water is, on its conversion
into steam, expanded so as to fill the space of a foot.
You, Frederic, have seen gunpowder explode, but
this is nearly 8 times as great as the expansive power
of gunpowder. If by any means we could catch wa-
ter in the act, as it were, of passing into steam, so
as to obtain the use of this enormous expansive force
for our own purposes, young Watt thought it was
evident that we could produce most powerful effects
by it. To do this—to catch the water in the act of
passing into steam, and to turn the expansive power
to account—is the whole purpose of steam-engines.

‘ Was this power known formerly ? asked Lucy.

Even this expansive force was in some degree
known to the ancients. Often, in casting fine metal
statues, when a drop of water was left in the clay or
plaster moulds, an explosion, attended with disas-
trous accidents, resulted. Arguing from such instan-
_ ces, ancient naturalists accounted for earthquakes
and submarine explosions, by supposing the sudden
turning into vapor of a mass of water by volcanic heat.

* Such as that of Etna and Vesuvius,’ said Lucy.

Nor were the ancients afraid of handling this po-



76 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

ent power. In the images of the ancient gods, as in
Hero’s toy, were concealed crevices, containing wa-
ter with the means of heating it ; and tubes, pro-
ceeding from these crevices, conducted the steam, S0
as to make it blow out plugs from the mouths and
foreheads of the hollow images, with loud noise, and
seeming clouds of smoke.

‘Please tell me, sir, more about Hero’s toy,’ said
William ; ‘ what is a hollow image ?

All images are not hollow ; but cast ones, of the size
of men or boys, sometimes are hollow likeLucy’s doll.
Whilst in India, I visited a huge statue of solid granite,
30 miles from Seringapatam, and, as measured by
Rev. Dr. Buchanan, nearly 70 feet high. It rep-
resents Gomuta Raya, a celebrated Hindoo saint. It
stands on the summit of a conic granite hill about
200 feet high, which serves for a pedestal.. The
statue still constitutes a part of the solid rock, which
originally may have been 300 feet high ; the stone,
which anciently formed a part of the mountain, hav-
ing been chipped or carved away. The hill proba-
bly was anciently a steep cone, oF peak, of which
some bold sculptor, ot succession of sculptors, have
taken such magnificent advantage. It stands boldly
up against the sky, and I certainly never saw, in all
my travels, any work of man, which gave me 80
complete an idea of a giant, or colossal image.

An image or monster statue in Egypt, it is true,
with the head of a virgin and the body of a lion, is



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 77




=k
=

said to be 163 feet high ; but it stands on a plain,
and is half buried in moving sands.

Hero describes one of the pagan impositions by
smoke and fire through hollow molten images.
To accomplish this trick, he recommends vessels half
full of strong wine, or other combustible liquids, to
be concealed in two images of men, standing on
each side of the altar. From these vessels, tubes in
the form of bent syphons proceed along the arms of
the images to the tips of their fingers, which were
held over the flame of pagan sacrifice. Other tubes



78 FREDERIC AND LUCY,

from the same vessels proceeded downwards through
the feet of the images, communicating through the
floor with the altar and the fire.

In Asia are mauy heathen gods, carved from hills,
and the pagans worship the work of their own hands,
but, with all their superstition, they prefer making
gigantic monsters. |



Hero wrote 2000 years ago; yet, from his time
to the 17th century, no advance appears to have
been made in the application of steam. The very re-
membrance of it, like that of the Greek fire, seemed
lost, till Charles I. of England employed De Laus in

designing fountains, grottoes,&c. who revived in sub-



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 79

stance the artifice mentioned by Hero, in the shape
of a steam-toy ; so that,my dears, toys are often the
harbingers of the greatest inventions. Men try new
experiments to please their little ones, and stumble,
as it were, upon important discoveries, which have
escaped the most profound research. Even the
beautiful Roman aqueducts were built on a level a-



cross vallies by arches and viaducts, like the Erie ca-
nal, because they were ignorant of the improved me-
thod by pipes, as in the Cochituate, Croton, and
Fairmount water-works. But the skill of the engineer
de Laus was eclipsed by that of the marquis of
Bridgewater, in 1663, who describes among other
things a mode of raising water 100 feet, and which
will drain all sorts of mines, and furnish cities with
water, though never so high-seated.

It is necessary, my young friends, in describing
inventions, to follow their progress step by step. In
1699 Mr. Savary exhibited a model for draining



80 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

mines ; succeeded by one from Dennis Papin, who
did not work out his own conceptions,—did not pet-
ceive all their conveniences. The next was by T.
Newcomen, an ironmonger, in the yeat 1705. Soon
after, the celebrated Smeaton employed his skill, but
no progress was made till in the hands of Watt.

Young Watt wasa man with whom everything be-
came the beginning of a new and serious study ; ac-
cordingly, not content with repairing professor An-
derson’s model, he devoted himself to a thorough in-
vestigation of the machine. Directing his attention
first with all his profound physical and mathematical
knowledge to its working, ‘he determined the extent
to which the water dilated in passing from its liquid
state into steam — the quantity of water which a
given weight of coal would vaporise—the quantity of
steam in weight, which each stroke of one of the
machines of known dimensions expended—the quan-
tity of cold water which required to be injected into
the spindles, to give the descending stroke of the
piston a certain force—and finally the elasticity of
steam at different temperatures.

But Lam certain, said Mr. Selby, that my patient
little friend William ought to have a moment to ask
questions about hard words, which I necessarily use,
and it is time he should have some relaxation, in
skip-jack affairs, and hop-step-and-jump exercises.
And Frederic will wonder how an invalid boy could
enjoy himself apart from society, without amusement



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 8l

and exercise. But young Watt in childhood posses-
sed all he wished ; his scientific pleasures of read-
ing, sketching, and experimenting in Euclid, Newton,
and other mathematicians, made these philosophers
his playnfates,with whom he enjoyed himself in books.
As to exercise, the machinery made by means of his
cabinet-maker’s tools, at intervals, engrossed his at-
tention. They were his toys and gymnastics.



MR. SELBY’S SECOND VISIT.

Mr. Selby called the next day. After dinner,
the children were impatient ; and he said :

My young friends, you will think that all these in
vestigations would have occupied the lifetime of a
laborious philosopher ; but young Watt brought alli
his numerous and difficult researches to a conclusion, .
without allowing them to interfere with the labors of
his workshop, or with his evening amusements with
his friends. The evils of Newcomen’s old machine:
Watt remedied by a simple but beautiful contrivance
—his separate condenser—a metallic vessel in which
water or air are condensed by heat. The cylinder was
thus left a vacuum, without having lost any of its heat
by the process ; the piston now descended with full
force ; and, when the steam rushed in from the boil-.

er, no portion of it was wasted in re-heating it. The.
H

-



82 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

old evils were thus happily overcome ; but another
contrivance was needed, to withdraw the accumula-
ted water, air, and vapor ; and this young Watt ac-
complished by his condenser pump. The power of
the machine was diminished by this invention, but
the total gain was enormous,—equivalent to making
one pound of coal do as much work as had formerly
been done by five pounds in the old engine ; and,
since the year 1780, improvements have continued
till one pound of coal does the work of the 20 pounds
in Newcomen’s machine. Numerous other improve-
merts were made by Watt within two years of his
first inspecting the old model.

One would suppose that, when the fact of the con-
struction of this engine, which has since revolution-
ized mechanical skill throughout the world,—which
may, by facility of transit by sea and land, form all
mankind into one family, turning their swords into
pruning-hooks,—when this fact was generally known,
that it would at least have displaced the expensive
process of draining mines by the old tedious engines.
This, however, was not the case. Watt himself was
poor ; but in 1769 Dr. Roebuck became a partner.
He soon became embarrassed ; and young Watt,
till 1774, was employed in engineering, canals, &c.,
allowing the steam-engine to lie, like lumber, in an
old factory of delft ware—the same engine, that is
now applied to all purposes, and saving the labor of
millions of people and horses, was stowed in an attic.



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 83

What Johnson says of Goldsmith might be said
of Watt—*‘ he touched not that which he did not a-
dorn.’ In the course of his busy surveys, he impro-
ved all the instruments he used, and invented among
other things the chronometers for measuring arms of
the sea, and many scientific articles. He was never

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idle. Atlength in 1774 Watt entered into part-
nership with Mr. Bolton, a man of science and en-
terprise. Bolton & Watt’s first business was to pro-
cure a prolongation of Watt’s patent-right, which
had been procured in 1760, and was nearly run out.
The value of the invention began to be appreciated
only when the enterprizing and wealthy Bolton pa-
tronized it. A strong opposition was made in parlia-
ment, and out of it, by engineers and coal-miners,
who wished to pirate the invention. But the patent
was renewed ; and Bolton & Watt agreed with the



84 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

interested miners that the patentees should receive
from those who used the machine one third part of
the value of the coal saved by Watt's engine. This
seemed a trifle; yet, in asingle year, Bolton & Watt
received from the single coal-mine of Chasewater,
£2500 (about $100,000), for each engine, instead of
the value of a third part of coal saved, which would
have nearly doubled that sam. Mr, Watt knew the
quantity of coal consumed by the invention of a me-
ter, kept double-locked in an iron box, ingeniously
registering every stroke of the machine. Attempts
were continually made to plagiarise the engine
or its principle of action ; but Bolton & Watt, by in-
vention or otherwise, successfully protected the right.

Witt’s steam-engine now gave an impetus to mi-
ning. “Ble wished to apply it to many other purpo-
ses, especially navigation, but had enough to do in
introducing it gradually into pits. New mines were
opened ; old ones, full of water, rubbish, and closed,
were again put in operation. But the active mind
of Watt was not content with applying the engine
merely as a pump for draining mines, he restlessly
wished to make it subservient to other purposes. He
effected this by that most graceful and beautiful in-
vention, the sight of which in operation produces a
feeling of pleasure, like that derived from contem-
plating a fine work of art,—the parallel motion. At
the end of the beam of a steam-engine may be seen
a curious contrivance or parallelogram, with the pis-



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 85

ton-rod attrched to one of its angles or elbows. When
the engine is in action, it will be observed that,
while three of the angles move in small circular ares.
the fourth is so pulled upon by opposite forces, that,
although tending to move in a curve, it strangely
moves in a straight line. This result, though sim-
ple, depends upon a curious mathematical principle.
Mr. Watt’s next improvement was the double-acting
engine ; and, afterwards the means of shutting off
the steam from the boiler. This he did not fully
complete, but it has been since done by other artists,
by which a bushel of coal has been made to perform
the labor of 20 men, equivalent to performing @
man’s daily labor at the cost of a halfpenny, }
Watt had thus increased power. Power, howev-
er, is not the only element of success in the fbors
of industry. Regularity of action is of no less im-
portance. The coal is of unequal quality ; the work-
men are often far from intelligent, and frequently
inattentive. Of course the propelling steam would
be sometimes superabundant, sometimes sparse, and
Tush sometimes with less and sometimes with more
rapidity into the cylinder, occasioning great irregu-
larities of movement. Watt's genius provided a rem-
edy for this remissness of operatives, by an inge-
nious application of an apparatus called the governor,
or revolving bells. You, F rederic, no doubt, when
looking at an engine, considered them only at first as
a pretty toy ; but such is the efficacy of this ap-

9



86 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

paratus, that, by its means, a steam-engine may be
made to give motion to a clock which shall keep good
time. It is this regulator which confers on Watt’s
steam-engine, applied to any purpose oF art, a work-
ing movement that is wholly free from irregularity,
and by which it can weave the most delicate fabrics,
as well as communicate a gigantic movement to the
ponderous stones of a mill, however massive.

If I undertook to describe all the other inven-
tions of a minor kind, which came from the prolific
genius of Watt, it would require weeks instead of an
evening. I intended to tell you about his youth and
his steam-engine in brief terms. He invented it, and
took his patent in 1760, before he was 24 years old ;
if his pursuits were uncommon, and such as are not
usually followed by boys, yet boys like variety, and
his acquisitions command universal admiration for
their novelty. Young Watt played as joyfully with
syllogisms as other boys at fives or cricket. All juve-
nile sports originated from ancient martial exercises,
games, races, popular speaking, and skill of the head
as well as the hand; and young Watt was pleas-
antly engaged in the last named sports. For want of
funds and popularity, his engine, which now gives
almost perpetual motion to all labor, and as it were
a half-miraculous power to man,—stood idle for 14
years. It does not follow that his fruitful brain was
all this time idle. His whole life was prolific of inven-
tions, as well as in labor as an engineer and surveyor.



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 87

Steam navigation, railway travelling, automaton
factory labor, steam printing, mining, and hundreds
or thousands of other arts have been brought to their
present state only by means of Watt’s discoveries.
Steamboats were perfected on the Hudson river, New
York, by R. Fulton, a native of Pennsylvania, in1807.

The steam-power, employed in 1844, in England
alone, was equal to eight millions of men’s power,
or 1,600,000 of horse-power. It requires eight times
the quantity of soil for pro uéing food for a horse
that it does fora man; 1, 00,000 horses, therefore,
require as much soil or food as. 12,000,000 of men.
The United States in 1851 have an equal quantity
of Watt’s steam-power in operation for manufactures
and railways ; all the countries of the world have a-
dopted or will soon use them. Almost all the luxu-
ries and comforts of life, all the refinements of social
existence, may be traced to machinery, aided direct-
ly or indirectly by steam. Machinery is the result
of experiment, experience, and a study of the
working principles of nature, which are hidden from
superficial observers, Every day some new applica-
tion of steam is diminishing the amount of human
drudgery. This study of nature forms a never-failing
source of intellectual enjoyment, and proves by its
effects that ‘ knowledge is power.’

Watt was the inventor of machines for copying
letters ; the plan for heating houses by steam; the
instrument for multiplying copies of busts and sculp-



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FREDERIC AND Lucey. 89

ture ; and was connected, more than any other per-
son, with that grand chemical discovery, the compo-
sttion of water, which was formerly supposed to be
a simple element, but is a compound of two gases, or
airy fluids, formerly unknown.

Mr. Watt withdrew from business in the year
1800, but lived 20 years longer among his friends—
and died in 1819. Sir Walter Scott says of him,
‘ It was only once my fortune to meet Watt, when
there were assembled about a half a score of our
northern lights. Amidst this company stood Mr,
Watt, the man whose genius discovered the means
of multiplying our national resources to a degree per-
haps even beyond his own stupendous powers of cal-
culation and combination ; bringing the treasures of
the abyss to the summit of the earth— giving to the
feeble arm of man the momentum of an Afrite—com-
manding manufactures to arise—affording means of
dispensing with that time and tide which wait for no
man—and of sailing without that wind which defied
the commands and threats of Xerxes himself. This
potent commander of the elements—this abridger of
time and space—this magician whose cloudy machi-
nery has produced a change in the world, the effects
of which, extraordinary as they are, are perhaps only
“eginning to be felt—was not only the most profound
man of science, the most successful combiner of pow-
ers, and calculator of numbers, as adapted to practi-
cal purposes—was not only one of the most general-



90 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

ly well-informed, but one of the best and kindest of
human beings. There he stood, surrounded by the
little band of northern literati. In his 8lst year, the
alert, the kind, benevolent old man, had his attention
at every-one’s question, his information at every-
one’s command. His talents and fancy overflowed
on every subject. One gentleman was a deep phi-
lologist—he talked with him on the origin of the
alphabet, as if he had been coeval with Cadmus ;
another, a celebrated critic — you would have said
that the old man had studied political economy and
belles-lettres all his life ; of science it is only neces-
sary to speak—it was his own distinguished walk.’



IN CONTINUATION.

Wuust I was in Scotland, said Mr. Selby, I had
an opportunity of visiting some of the rugged neigh-
boring islands of Orkney and the still more distant
Shetland isles, 86 in number, part of which are in-
habited. On some of these coasts, the people sub-
sist on sea-fowl and their eggs, whilst the down and
feathers are a source of great profit. In some places
wide fragments of rocks have been cut off from the
main land by convulsions of nature’ or the washing
of the sea. On these spots immense flocks of sea-
birds securely built their nests, till some bold inva-
ders found means of crossing these dreadful abysses



FREDERIC AND LUCY. 91

—
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by cradles passing on ropes. One of these is at the
Noss of Brassah, which is 100 feet from the adjacent
land and 300 feet of perpendicular rock above the
sea. The tops of the rocks on each side of the cleft
or fissure have two stakes festened in each of them .
to these are ropes tied, and upon them is hung an



92 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

article which they call a cradle; in this a man
moves himself from the higher rock on the main
land to the lesser rock opposite, where he secures as
many fowl or eggs as he wishes. To return, how-
ever, is a more difficult task, because it is an ascen-
ding or up-hill course, and his cradle is loaded with
game ; but this difficulty is overcome by a spare
rope attached to the cradle and held by people on the
main land, who drag him back. ‘To reach the clefts
between these precipices and the sea, a more dan-
gerous method is resorted to, of tying a rope round
a man’s middle, and lowering him in a basket, which
he fills with eggs and birds, and is then drawn Up
from the abyss.

At St Kilda, another small island, the inhabitants
trust more to their own steadiness of head, strength
of muscle, and daring spirit, to ensure success. They
are accustomed from infancy to climbing, and drop
from crag to crag almost as sure-footed as so many
goats, or the birds themselves. Practice makes per-
fect, and they have been so long habituated to bird-
catching as a means of livelihood and profit, that
they follow their vocation to frightful lengths. They
depend upon ropes of two kinds, one made of hides,
and the other of cows’ tails, all of the same thick-
ness. The former are the strongest, and are less
liable to wear away, or be cut, by rubbing against
the sharp edges of rocks. ‘These ropes are from 90
to 200 feet in length, and about three inches in cir-



FREDERIC AND LUcyY. 93

cumference. Those of hide are made of cows and
sheep’s hide mixed together. The sheep’s hide, after
being cut into narrow strips, is plaited over with wi-
der slips of cow’s hide. Two of theseare then twis-
ted together. So valued are these ropes, when right-
ly made, that one of them forms a marriage-portion
ofa St. Kilda girl; and, to this secluded people,
whose lives and all their comforts often depend on
the strength of this article, it is of more value than
gold and jewels. The favorite resort for birds is the
tremendous precipice of Fulmars, 1800 feet in height,
supposed to be the loftiest face of precipitous rock in
Britain. To these precipices, to look down which
produces giddiness and fainting with strangers, men
and boys resort for birds’ eggs, gulls and other fowl.

Many of these bird-catchers go on these expedi-
tions alone, without any one to hold the rope or assist
them ; an instance is related by Mr. Stanley. ‘It
was on such a solitary excursion, that a man, having
fastened his rope to a stake on the top, let himself
down far below; and in his ardor for collecting
birds and eggs, followed the course of a ledge, be-
neath a mass of overhanging rock. Unfortunately
he had omitted to take the usual precaution of tying
the rope round his body, but held it carelessly in his
hand ; when, in a luckless moment, whilst he was
busily engaged in pillaging a bird’s nest, it fell from
his grasp, and, after Swinging backwards and for-
wards three or four times, without coming within



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12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:20 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:21 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00131.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00143.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00143.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00144.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00144.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00146.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00146.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00147.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00147.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00148.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00148.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00149.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00149.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00150.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00150.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00151.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00151.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00152.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00152.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00153.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00153.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00154.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00154.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00155.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00155.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00156.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00156.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00157.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00157.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00158.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00158.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00159.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00159.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00160.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00160.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00161.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00161.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:22 PM 00162.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00162.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00163.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00163.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00164.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00164.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00165.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00165.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00166.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00166.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00167.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00167.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00168.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00168.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00169.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00169.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00170.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00170.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00171.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00171.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00172.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00172.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00173.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00173.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00174.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00174.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00175.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00175.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00176.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00176.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00177.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00177.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00178.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00178.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00179.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00179.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00180.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00180.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00181.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00181.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00182.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00182.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00183.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00183.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00184.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00184.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00185.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00185.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00186.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00186.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00187.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00187.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00188.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00188.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00189.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00189.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00190.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00190.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00191.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00191.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00192.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00192.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00193.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00193.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00194.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00194.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00195.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00195.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00196.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00196.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00197.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00197.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00198.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00198.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00199.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00199.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00200.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00200.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00201.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00201.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00202.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00202.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00203.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00203.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00204.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00204.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00205.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00205.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00206.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00206.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00207.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:23 PM 00207.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00208.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00208.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00209.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00209.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00210.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00210.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00211.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00211.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00212.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00212.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00213.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00213.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00214.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00214.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00215.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00215.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00216.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00216.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00217.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00217.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00218.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00218.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00219.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00219.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00220.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00220.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00221.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00221.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00222.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00222.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00223.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00223.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00224.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00224.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00225.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00225.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00226.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00226.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00227.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00227.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00228.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00228.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00229.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00229.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00230.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00230.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00231.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00231.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00232.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00232.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00233.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00233.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00234.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00234.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00235.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00235.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00236.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00236.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00237.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00237.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00238.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00238.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00239.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00239.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00240.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00240.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00241.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00241.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00242.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00242.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00243.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00243.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00244.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00244.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00245.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00245.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00246.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00246.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00247.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00247.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00248.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00248.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00249.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00249.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00250.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00250.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00251.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00251.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00252.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00252.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:24 PM 00253.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00253.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00254.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00254.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00255.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00255.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00256.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00256.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00257.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00257.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00258.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00258.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00259.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00259.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00260.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00260.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00261.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00261.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00262.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00262.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00263.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00263.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00264.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00264.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00265.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00265.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00266.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00266.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00267.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00267.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00268.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00268.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00269.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00269.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00270.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00270.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00271.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00271.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00272.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM 00272.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM Back Cover.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM Back Cover.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM Spine.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM Spine.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:43:25 PM












xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081031_AAAAAT' PACKAGE 'UF00001938_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-11-01T17:02:49-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:36:03-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299160; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-14T20:57:35-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00009.txt '
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-10-31T18:36:42-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-10-31T18:31:02-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfile1' 'sip-files00272.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-31T18:35:24-04:00'
describe
'2011-10-31T18:31:06-04:00'
redup
'966548' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANC' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
b1da4576d3ab5dffdf519a2a2c130299
8b3aa3ecb527613023409cd7b996cececa269889
'2011-10-31T18:34:44-04:00'
describe
'35985' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAND' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
417e7944be5b8add53d6640be867f0a8
a4aad7ab58b2c469311f9f7c1b22057db62095c4
'2011-10-31T18:35:35-04:00'
describe
'2249' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANE' 'sip-files00001.pro'
70f65648a4be9f6a8b9956e2cb7b0a95
9f5f739b881c0b4425e05fe6a76bdd5e348132ce
'2011-10-31T18:35:26-04:00'
describe
'10576' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANF' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
a9d94425dd8896c83acddcc95bfaec06
9e8be3fe3e167f969740a0b7068c60cf0711828c
'2011-10-31T18:33:33-04:00'
describe
'7855253' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANG' 'sip-files00001.tif'
749c881db673a02109c20893c104bba4
1e16c75f1baf4d6647742851b6d3bed04acdc7c5
'2011-10-31T18:31:22-04:00'
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANH' 'sip-files00001.txt'
1a9278795f45d5f093a412179d180395
6c45d52ebee14f4f5364c06f79dcee7c908b135f
'2011-10-31T18:35:27-04:00'
describe
'3288' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANI' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
57a3c9340b727c79e8bb744b80ca5785
226aad3e07aa05748db55838de7cae670520606e
'2011-10-31T18:35:53-04:00'
describe
'932292' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANJ' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
3231473245e1dd0af687e7f1cdaa2910
a589a8612969cad9d388c859bce50921ccfbdd2d
'2011-10-31T18:37:50-04:00'
describe
'43655' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANK' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
41a8540e9a334ea5de166e48e7a7971d
75f636a069d913a7f414c6e7188ae4cff794ccce
'2011-10-31T18:35:03-04:00'
describe
'1967' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANL' 'sip-files00002.pro'
64a042b2e64a8569ab374109896d739b
a16fe2ac90265c23fdb1e92f53b06b34c3498faf
'2011-10-31T18:32:44-04:00'
describe
'13329' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANM' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
c92b21fc5fb2df0cd6cc35bb7f2444eb
689aed8a6f42ba8f09494708cddcfe6b9addcfaa
'2011-10-31T18:32:53-04:00'
describe
'7467679' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANN' 'sip-files00002.tif'
43c0f876151477a13645bc6c80d5e6c8
fc12d6db0283632f8f6a830f90159392b5a17617
'2011-10-31T18:36:37-04:00'
describe
'173' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANO' 'sip-files00002.txt'
324569d3c02acd9207ac9e6ec6cdd649
066529383276931386193276e003fbf769712278
'2011-10-31T18:31:58-04:00'
describe
'4549' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANP' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
97aaf5d2fba6e9abb8404a3885f82c02
52897c577027e940ea2b5a278b3b9312a6b26a08
'2011-10-31T18:35:20-04:00'
describe
'807196' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANQ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
c3c3a0f4204c921d563d4b614541b077
367658cb3cc537f63defcdb737db305f29e8d7f1
'2011-10-31T18:35:49-04:00'
describe
'98216' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANR' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
771b668d3bfe24da6a78e7cf0734832d
d23bc619654313c3f69fd209134762606066fbdf
'2011-10-31T18:31:31-04:00'
describe
'559' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANS' 'sip-files00003.pro'
29721439299c0d645927749a289c0e16
a5c775b1de71241cef402da9f78304b7cc5a7ea7
'2011-10-31T18:34:19-04:00'
describe
'27432' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANT' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
ea845fc68149abf3b0b0014589280ce4
9e98e450f383ee74eb5c34102be6c982b2b9f849
'2011-10-31T18:32:42-04:00'
describe
'6464165' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANU' 'sip-files00003.tif'
de3b8739daf7422183e2d9cce12f4187
e69d4dcb564b188f1cace5522cd229e3651028b1
'2011-10-31T18:36:09-04:00'
describe
'28' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANV' 'sip-files00003.txt'
b96c6fb38f6eb6dc3a20db45488435a2
3a3a9c9b7a782dc568e0f37cbb1d64ada1a92a89
'2011-10-31T18:33:09-04:00'
describe
'8298' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANW' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
5ff69a10b5fad0ad4eb7417e0915112b
e062589761a30c86c1e47ad21766e9e81bdb384b
'2011-10-31T18:32:43-04:00'
describe
'790727' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANX' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
bb6b82e198ce8b7758feeabe19159daf
fa93618066525f2a002290094479daadd65b83f6
'2011-10-31T18:33:37-04:00'
describe
'74445' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANY' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
8b1cdbd8564481116089ccab40b3f06f
571197314fce337959d5a65945669c58d7780702
describe
'9675' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABANZ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
8d0cb7de4a24295d73afaa283025bb02
8ecf3f2958ff482013bf565434ea8bc54c9717ff
'2011-10-31T18:34:53-04:00'
describe
'19874' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOA' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
5228310baff1335a17f1c6af4991a334
37a6aeeb1874b9eb1ad987bbdcbe3c2f4584a1e6
'2011-10-31T18:33:03-04:00'
describe
'6334535' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOB' 'sip-files00005.tif'
00db95323090117ab672a7e38f635199
c0265211719d92653a6e4a33e1552bbab0802f64
'2011-10-31T18:37:55-04:00'
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOC' 'sip-files00005.txt'
23aa53f8f7049d0ea06c499cb454ea4b
d650f3d48583b14f712d215f367cfc259711ced7
'2011-10-31T18:31:59-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'6128' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOD' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
ec9a2daf27658539bba5a8ea23d3c878
d5eb791fa2e303d159e4beafc3cffa48f49991cd
'2011-10-31T18:33:16-04:00'
describe
'823292' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOE' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
b7cbc2a8c707e9d9dc0642fdfd2ca5ae
4b34c461394e598cf78b9f685d528603705e2283
'2011-10-31T18:33:17-04:00'
describe
'74322' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOF' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
763aba6a265c84c6938e0e6b039c68a1
e5401a50ed51860db958892d8cc5e4977a5e9f1d
'2011-10-31T18:31:28-04:00'
describe
'3146' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOG' 'sip-files00006.pro'
51b89182519c2a8f8363c259cb4da490
0393e1d793f283c27c6c7261b40029cc6e4bf6de
'2011-10-31T18:33:00-04:00'
describe
'22579' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOH' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
09f2aeb2911b264cea94b1ea9a13f079
117f44278e1c35e03ee77579db537431e30540a4
'2011-10-31T18:33:30-04:00'
describe
'6593203' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOI' 'sip-files00006.tif'
51cad4569f2866c60915d82583376374
c9d31700fc7d0b1f294d7ed4b54f88eeccd83688
'2011-10-31T18:36:07-04:00'
describe
'254' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOJ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
17a7ff8847dab23875f3c2de3ae46dbc
d38878f0d3e0ef8324da7d5c911a517825c91ba5
'2011-10-31T18:32:18-04:00'
describe
'6943' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOK' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
0821dfeca89adbf2414837a3ce01bc02
9eb815cfc60735efb615e7a6476f2e8dea662bda
'2011-10-31T18:35:09-04:00'
describe
'691446' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOL' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
7233f79f98f02c0e398bbcc8ec0fa820
d8801e2cd71f5de8861625f6b8da815e739cbd1f
'2011-10-31T18:33:58-04:00'
describe
'20865' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOM' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
df74c1a27350d73d830be04eccbf7a9c
53c55a9d9e931c0dc5ddb3fbabe9a16b442abdcb
'2011-10-31T18:36:19-04:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAON' 'sip-files00007.pro'
3fd4b4177772e6958508136fe5409ae0
4c6cdb8fa764a82a4f404c3ed01953596dfc0e8a
'2011-10-31T18:35:25-04:00'
describe
'5124' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOO' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
5eff598a551de26a6c28116b87aa4a7f
caf81e0eebe9aaedd20d352e2140335ab3c540e5
'2011-10-31T18:34:23-04:00'
describe
'6161933' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOP' 'sip-files00007.tif'
a2aa2050df3a6ffd44842d9e222e7d85
4e96067f3fcb518591e1087afa2b061f958a0252
'2011-10-31T18:31:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOQ' 'sip-files00007.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-10-31T18:31:23-04:00'
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOR' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
782a50c7c27c4a7ad407644d6ed1047f
951624a849ed511f2c304c223d86c715afbbc372
'2011-10-31T18:37:33-04:00'
describe
'788677' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOS' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
b5cfe965eb6f0acec4ff34037687b381
f9375b9da4a82c5e21829ccc785c75d3402819b7
'2011-10-31T18:34:39-04:00'
describe
'42485' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOT' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
58f4c3452b33af3e91aa1a0b3469d0e4
8da9c7b0f880830246d57b566573e980438f20a3
'2011-10-31T18:32:49-04:00'
describe
'6232' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOU' 'sip-files00008.pro'
e3a8f82e91a00db250f5acd7e26871b9
a9c10664c6528f4fdd7edd70f2141c189373d803
'2011-10-31T18:34:36-04:00'
describe
'15326' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOV' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
dce1b6f4b3bbe12552331e65566466ea
fe1a943993bab2682fa07c7411e0a302d89c9b31
'2011-10-31T18:33:34-04:00'
describe
'6568251' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOW' 'sip-files00008.tif'
bce494cccd92f1309c95518bc92cbee1
8edbbd699a02162d4226834100896d3181153014
'2011-10-31T18:35:22-04:00'
describe
'391' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOX' 'sip-files00008.txt'
1f88dfcd94e47c016c1d8f316b932bb3
ab7d95b6e26d1d83318ac8d5a0f07fd14e300af6
describe
'5813' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOY' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
2fcec5c5c1af78f04f3c2cb41122b7a4
b8bb52adf25f09eb48a2d4297ec49c10f2777d40
'2011-10-31T18:33:47-04:00'
describe
'513509' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAOZ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
7e0c34aeb6286c68a9ba085f1f00dc0b
11bff09abb02e6e63297a7a9bc99ecea3ec3336f
'2011-10-31T18:36:44-04:00'
describe
'15945' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
6a90ab457fb580c2a8a165e032ec5cfb
f8939df4e94cf24f2fa1d9c4da4893fe132f1f2b
'2011-10-31T18:34:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPB' 'sip-files00009.pro'
088f116f7fdad76aede74c8119184437
32e1817ec85792c2e0516b571c729fc6875d068f
'2011-10-31T18:37:22-04:00'
describe
'4629' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPC' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
531f6b100e15ab384e5dd6bce643f533
80e9fd61b1691b83f9496f8aa77c773e0c2b8346
'2011-10-31T18:35:21-04:00'
describe
'6145743' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPD' 'sip-files00009.tif'
ffcb6d59476ea325bacba946e8e0c593
bb2ececc060defdb59bc25ded8e4b1083d3a3674
'2011-10-31T18:34:34-04:00'
describe
'1849' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPE' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
35aff0192ff6941cd8a8cf9e5ba7600a
35e356bbf0fcc0ae9c4dd13a70718ecb7415383c
'2011-10-31T18:33:54-04:00'
describe
'858292' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPF' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
6eb697f1a2c7d57b6a6083c12f6c1602
1dc3fd0b941a12f51f9e005eda2b29cbda9feccd
'2011-10-31T18:35:29-04:00'
describe
'89799' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPG' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
25de483f8152fcf43424853d6e3d81cf
65150fba45e11057e68ee09aa058039e6b8839e3
'2011-10-31T18:37:40-04:00'
describe
'28488' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPH' 'sip-files00010.pro'
c9ef72d9355af6354e4aa1308a286e1f
7640ba67e1585fd900749be4df1afc0148178f0a
'2011-10-31T18:31:19-04:00'
describe
'33003' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPI' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
1120e03349a14db6ada36fc4680f215d
7960793956b290624762b7a91fa28a34375258bb
'2011-10-31T18:35:32-04:00'
describe
'6873013' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPJ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
be6b273549dfb1fa5a1b969fc8964a5f
2e6fa63acfdc8ae018aa88adaacff4f01680bc86
'2011-10-31T18:33:10-04:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPK' 'sip-files00010.txt'
d7500b2eaa4bcb629956d2503203a08a
86176dee4bef94464ab49fc8c252969812d3b7f4
'2011-10-31T18:31:33-04:00'
describe
'10680' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPL' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
77944f4e1aa116fe8fa8962d4629f272
0835a3de412bab5257bc8237b9f5ceef890ae312
'2011-10-31T18:34:14-04:00'
describe
'807104' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPM' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
0ee8f31a2e27565100c42e77e17c3a99
57ea70f479ea21f0a9662f60a4eb3611b7a81724
'2011-10-31T18:35:19-04:00'
describe
'65274' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPN' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
54e0fe0d21aaf9e25fd368f6420c9cc0
637c963929fae52d4a74977b09e4ca865f1c1d1e
describe
'16912' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPO' 'sip-files00011.pro'
c2dd25a775a3b466e63aaf09c6b7e84b
6a252c47849bd257e499d60995db600ce219aed2
describe
'24333' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPP' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
9e8f7fb7f4a2c83eedbf75228101b9ab
f8c2c27a7dc8a5041595e89e7e7f5daea449192a
'2011-10-31T18:32:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPQ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
e30ce7f49616a391e7b8670e00af126b
e18acf1eb43bb32811b58c125642a26495804ea5
'2011-10-31T18:35:48-04:00'
describe
'728' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPR' 'sip-files00011.txt'
101beceb04d36e32b75292b58ab30509
31764f4030e6836c8d625b192d272b682767b98d
'2011-10-31T18:36:46-04:00'
describe
'7871' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPS' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
af213036f4b514effbd4d9225c418fe3
3f194dcf6446d0806659eb5d881507eb13e8c7cb
describe
'815508' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPT' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
b6c805e72db5616bcc6f72a52193182e
aab587e4293e2044c26644ac87a82f28dc6b798e
describe
'93570' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPU' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
2edc5ed908cffbe4bd4d29c752d83062
27c59006bb4cdf6d94b895a704691651e24133c6
'2011-10-31T18:34:57-04:00'
describe
'58806' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPV' 'sip-files00012.pro'
236363e0baca2d85625ee30d2d532461
5a4b878db8c212865f4f9ae4a46e387935eb782f
'2011-10-31T18:34:29-04:00'
describe
'33712' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPW' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
c5297b3dc4a05b9d75ee2f3cb7ffd62a
964f618348b0afc885151af93089693e73817399
'2011-10-31T18:37:26-04:00'
describe
'6531049' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPX' 'sip-files00012.tif'
500067348062114d35d68b7ebb0c93c7
aa6d6ee4f5ea123217f3a0d55cf0fbf407eab698
'2011-10-31T18:37:25-04:00'
describe
'2796' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPY' 'sip-files00012.txt'
4d1ba15fb130835f7260c9e5a1a6e4c9
f316a10e11731c416d69451474bb22710933b641
'2011-10-31T18:36:33-04:00'
describe
'10515' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAPZ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8f6d91fc9026f7ea9bf8119b08fdd5eb
82ea198daaa9d8f73a225080801af64d1ccb040c
describe
'505443' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQA' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
9aa29148b592dcf11a1117b3d7c5f99e
41cb799140e84205bfd7d5e32d02460197de179a
describe
'21161' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQB' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
9796be43f4662e6a392d94fa954384e6
e58885ed2a339ea9c89feef45cd277a7ec77f332
'2011-10-31T18:32:57-04:00'
describe
'297' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQC' 'sip-files00013.pro'
85ad419eec8c1b4629e2b6763cf0758e
299de9ad9113a8760c5c53b2c5e3fdc86d8ba428
'2011-10-31T18:32:20-04:00'
describe
'6654' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQD' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
f1e3a750ab1636539e2d07e0f820e366
e5e21d1edd0ab666c23a72e531138705086c0d76
'2011-10-31T18:32:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQE' 'sip-files00013.tif'
81988753825592b67e7b04a8d04b4bac
add871a2191538b2e1df038c5f5534cfff1381f8
'2011-10-31T18:35:00-04:00'
describe
'185' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQF' 'sip-files00013.txt'
1faa559d3f6c0c95fdbe4db55679aa3f
0a380f9137e740f954680dc75e8a1a9c28287155
'2011-10-31T18:31:38-04:00'
describe
'2393' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQG' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
60588c9aee83c71182c1947f8065343b
4fc4316e5deafe6e87c8dac85da33dfca902f900
'2011-10-31T18:38:01-04:00'
describe
'842485' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQH' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
590e0dc331c366abaf94bb495990f77d
5322e840611d7a6acc562de0872096a751ba32d2
'2011-10-31T18:36:15-04:00'
describe
'77909' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
dd74aa7c4c7ef4b551741142f2c9cc78
ffada0baccd9ea518d6390336e732dd6c67c00e3
'2011-10-31T18:36:56-04:00'
describe
'24021' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
115ba632b9919b15d8f734906728a916
b43f66dcf2cfd3cb66ae9297ce15fa231206b07a
'2011-10-31T18:32:00-04:00'
describe
'29099' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
55316d36cbce28073420be7a5aa2c5e0
6fe214b07b1c82cd42fe5eeda06f44981fdb6868
'2011-10-31T18:37:20-04:00'
describe
'6746493' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1d5d0100d6dcae50a5223584eb5d1e52
58bdc8df69c0e8a35757d4ab89e64e3453d957dd
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
1c01ff3fe74d60cf6a3b2871b8b6bb75
89f3797ce0eeb405e29b6cc84c91f01434a7c02c
'2011-10-31T18:36:13-04:00'
describe
'9153' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQN' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
ef6103d50a3a373340dcd98988b76d23
62b5be87d76be89f5f2d10d3391395acdc2c1f88
'2011-10-31T18:32:39-04:00'
describe
'840484' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQO' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
2891e48dee4438c338e232050b307c5d
aad649a8c14a4e4932c39cff710cb586b4e87c65
'2011-10-31T18:31:32-04:00'
describe
'92623' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQP' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
3b24221bb88b1d89df9b07ccf7f4d6f8
7cc26ef040b26c9b381d76a197ee492cac56886b
'2011-10-31T18:32:37-04:00'
describe
'32644' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQQ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
9fd5668327c7f1cb85f37170796b52ff
9d04b80c062922a33b186f293924e569c1f5ea88
'2011-10-31T18:31:14-04:00'
describe
'35332' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQR' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
4a2be82bed1776b2d1b5bec335f47904
7b478f9e20c875ec041d439a4c6e5d51ccc7c5b5
'2011-10-31T18:32:16-04:00'
describe
'6730445' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQS' 'sip-files00015.tif'
ea2064394e9d90d55c44fd295689cfd5
02104678841390495b49d8f03e54d70d5b9d2b54
'2011-10-31T18:34:04-04:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQT' 'sip-files00015.txt'
42f3ed19e125c5e667b8a909123f1e16
db653279261af9519690691a5921c0982e4ac9d4
'2011-10-31T18:34:33-04:00'
describe
'11407' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQU' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
68367d9f47d1327e993c9362ee92c9f2
8f19b073e6fb6cfbad6dbab54f8a109534aab0a8
'2011-10-31T18:34:20-04:00'
describe
'862876' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQV' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
66c33f742f6e77c1520cd673459c7d9d
3198c51c02f99ff2ce62c8b2ee41b1e5abcc35f3
'2011-10-31T18:36:01-04:00'
describe
'98663' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQW' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
83f2224925d15c8af3c4e705706044bc
94ed57ec14e15873136ca7b7cce88aa6323d77e9
'2011-10-31T18:31:55-04:00'
describe
'35804' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
2b2951ad6a92e69b83b7fc9f3deaf767
5df60d9b5d6f58742b7719cd68d83184605852d9
'2011-10-31T18:34:24-04:00'
describe
'36479' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQY' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
9eee31baaf37e54ce13ab7130c17ba47
3158d38891dad91819c09d1bcb6785fe1d5977e3
'2011-10-31T18:35:58-04:00'
describe
'6910021' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAQZ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
58facfb66b2383555b7753daeeba52dc
c4c6028ee188d49db3e946491dce50e21b9e7eef
'2011-10-31T18:34:22-04:00'
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARA' 'sip-files00016.txt'
745b14839d1dee06be5c68e187cbbb0f
dca11694b94f6be068dbd47e1e86fcea3c2fe472
'2011-10-31T18:33:06-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11616' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARB' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
87bb606dcfccd79cf90e1ed38638a86e
a21d2eb4f48dafa18bf33af7e8d0a77829ad9a5b
'2011-10-31T18:37:21-04:00'
describe
'807180' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARC' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
d50cff33cc8b4ec7a96b6e31afb02c08
3d68a9ece12a64b90a99f9e80334aebb4bf30dbb
describe
'86964' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARD' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
de5cc0e3d643a15e11f767ee9617c88c
8639417a21771fb25f21440d41aa570b09507578
describe
'17889' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARE' 'sip-files00017.pro'
bf9f0c5159419368c30e89363c21c4fb
525ae175d9b66190f788f73b87038e93b45844ff
'2011-10-31T18:36:52-04:00'
describe
'30339' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARF' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
84ab7cfedb4aa6e4c909345fe21fb26a
488773999d09d0fd12de735e5114500113f23fc4
'2011-10-31T18:35:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARG' 'sip-files00017.tif'
34f18a2216a2bf2c0968c32e00cd183c
bf036e5821199e06c66f001d3deab41de0d348e6
'2011-10-31T18:37:07-04:00'
describe
'721' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARH' 'sip-files00017.txt'
76f362b524ec2997637bdddd0f4b8668
dfff36c919a60ab7d67d5df722ca32b88bdcb948
describe
'9823' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARI' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
6ff8e06b6e9835e20d6fb223bf59c42b
0358fbbdffeefb1c7bca9bedad66337c434ea4fc
'2011-10-31T18:31:18-04:00'
describe
'842376' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
1e23afc268f5141a1d877f926f6fe9ee
457c9c8d2369052e8c1627e3139870314106abe2
'2011-10-31T18:36:45-04:00'
describe
'100765' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARK' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
6b1367596caf9d8d48bc0679004bd317
89c0be2ba26f33c34abbc71d687e00ac7047cf61
describe
'3453' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARL' 'sip-files00018.pro'
3c54f490bd37e36c24460d9afc4e9500
9dd86828ec1de92433d50d6f0741878b709a3ca0
'2011-10-31T18:31:15-04:00'
describe
'30328' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARM' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
7f173e6978c46b84a8832de476396b57
c75b6cdbf245a7036a9356feef88b5508bc7d284
'2011-10-31T18:33:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
33de82fa65aced340a231a33d38fca75
0134269f743b46fde9987bc0fac9d1aad26f587d
'2011-10-31T18:34:45-04:00'
describe
'152' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
bfb9144ddd793c1a438cb48f16f7139c
d9d329c9582802cbd1f2a76fbf6bb9b4c73fd019
'2011-10-31T18:35:08-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9381' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARP' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
f85ff4db1ec175b6fdf08953bfdaef39
620d12ce2c1d957e121aebc64ca683228feb820a
'2011-10-31T18:31:13-04:00'
describe
'807223' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARQ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
eeebd7ba59a9e1caf6616f7bd32e4bd4
f76b3e326a66dea42deaf709007c0c2c8e055e78
describe
'104907' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARR' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
b331d4db2bae5ce1c350b75ff5800b8b
c5f05d69b26eef282a873ca0e5bd85753c618cda
'2011-10-31T18:38:00-04:00'
describe
'36514' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARS' 'sip-files00019.pro'
a33fa3a10d2b070ed351f37cb8630867
7933b04b24a6ea5eea183d8cc3672b7677438fd3
'2011-10-31T18:34:56-04:00'
describe
'39806' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABART' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
5872cc16b6feefba82ee237d3805ef42
5f9748f56ccd8a82d1267008e79fdecc00cff2d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARU' 'sip-files00019.tif'
ba13c03644cbca5cfea5ad0ce7d1be52
887281f848687ffdbf478e9789c748d88339bde3
'2011-10-31T18:37:51-04:00'
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARV' 'sip-files00019.txt'
833bd3906bc5140e2bc9310af27a8f45
5a4d18a2fe3cb89cd760e2ea4a322ba0cd9593c7
describe
'12075' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
38f636338b7733dc016a8f19ff4e08c9
baba57898f27f561e62da06225f6bfca0c55d2c8
'2011-10-31T18:32:59-04:00'
describe
'842501' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARX' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
bb8282eb3785cd4ab947cea219f4800c
440fc8754b06602b5151a5d00323194a742bad54
'2011-10-31T18:34:32-04:00'
describe
'110026' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
489445cd47784e4fe046994a8a6563ec
eda0958d42b4fe9188cef822ef6bb8b7ba215b2e
'2011-10-31T18:31:20-04:00'
describe
'15583' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABARZ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
e3259e5912e6f3d4360b17df3dc90450
50ab48a7c58cabc84ef3758012689fad5d1793ca
describe
'35056' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASA' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
544129943792d9873ebb6b6204c4b638
2c5a5bd1bb20af3f1582b664f73e529270583520
'2011-10-31T18:35:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASB' 'sip-files00020.tif'
2a0118e16d9bdecb3bb2473b4464198d
a210f1a7a26677f1bae2e358e55b908002c07e86
'2011-10-31T18:33:11-04:00'
describe
'622' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASC' 'sip-files00020.txt'
a4262ccbcdd437e642a0ba455de8727a
38161d5b134fccde13c56ef35d19d14c95acd1fa
describe
'10773' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASD' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
357c3e1f9f77c1ef6408ad4f0872e772
1b5ce43eb8f16df0d014bd018aec3340459d2218
'2011-10-31T18:33:45-04:00'
describe
'807199' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASE' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
189fa7ed3c1a86dd18ddc4e40ba3764d
4073aa548f867d5513ed05503f632bf6775d44e8
describe
'113472' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASF' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
f742a5faa6dac25686a1d8629e8ba067
c5204cf92104572cce95bc8a88efcff26f6ec02f
describe
'15353' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASG' 'sip-files00021.pro'
fb9582d85053be47e040f270d16b6df1
6feba7063046608a5e45838a4303fa0b8ef1b710
'2011-10-31T18:37:39-04:00'
describe
'35532' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
010ae6a2b8032b70b6290aa3c4957d8a
11d976eefeded05afd7ca7079f842577d38cf1ad
'2011-10-31T18:35:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
555dcc43a8188e414a50a3bfcb606fa1
1c9cdc9629f65258aa715d1ebade72146914f3a9
'2011-10-31T18:36:21-04:00'
describe
'611' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASJ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
f012719ce1373608fa9e83140663a1b9
e19e2788d76db45175ff8b339e084b298fca133b
describe
'10895' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
931ebfd0f3e9c63fb348c8de87fc35f9
32768ac533ae833f39f7ecd46df3b9aa0020c67a
'2011-10-31T18:34:02-04:00'
describe
'842489' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASL' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
9a88ac81de602ac21ae1ffa2190abb93
fee67549cccf7fd2b400a5a5a350a58dcb5b05da
'2011-10-31T18:31:52-04:00'
describe
'103181' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASM' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
dc64ce9e701c81b3435f0d91178e2667
ca0d08f1a52532820e7b5a8b5bcd3adc658559ac
'2011-10-31T18:36:57-04:00'
describe
'36591' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASN' 'sip-files00022.pro'
77a74ab325890e49a8d056505a052071
9eaf2cc44cd6c01f952ab2c7a3a1fe33f689c434
'2011-10-31T18:37:03-04:00'
describe
'37891' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
3710465832dbe68d5afe671339f74eeb
507f14b6feb8e9e6cee1bf218953fb555f36848b
'2011-10-31T18:32:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
5bae6b543a92fc5bd4b2573819ea8353
ce0378f9317ddeac6d41a5b1003d7f86d1b8af4b
'2011-10-31T18:37:54-04:00'
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
8c8a71eeced1c08df57e2d29473d9bfe
cfd0ebf5451ee0c6ed74363200401418c588af21
'2011-10-31T18:32:30-04:00'
describe
'11129' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASR' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
906134ec91d59876ff2aebf8651fee03
ab4aad9c9a6c8be9ebbd21bae22a307636293ea5
'2011-10-31T18:33:02-04:00'
describe
'807193' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASS' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
adf1559d415b111a2928f890594eef8f
259947c22a52fc3d1b92c7f68bb7efa32ee9036d
'2011-10-31T18:37:24-04:00'
describe
'107761' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAST' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
a3a1fe545b050a06ede3431c1e9db5da
2e64a301e94f996b03feb8091b31ec3f87e9c92c
'2011-10-31T18:31:37-04:00'
describe
'38155' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
1c40fed23ab153263bd2ee03051b4b99
65abb61225bf53594ba4e91c60bf770c8404b178
'2011-10-31T18:32:35-04:00'
describe
'39656' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASV' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
cc552b625b13635c42145cbc99dc02f1
16d2d62229372df13c69f45d9ad74edf6c0aa3ed
'2011-10-31T18:32:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASW' 'sip-files00023.tif'
1a390c53a348642998a35cf6ee78fd8c
b3db5ea76db2c31d3afcc6af922778af642a7e42
'2011-10-31T18:32:14-04:00'
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASX' 'sip-files00023.txt'
8bd2de4817f947a54375c250ce76e474
433ed5d91bf6be0be0f4e2b2a828fbb661f77d2c
describe
'11862' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASY' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
971adf9ec3739a6b3e4b69b44b5566aa
362f3363caa0dda6c71eb7b0fdc1733a2c6a29d7
'2011-10-31T18:31:49-04:00'
describe
'842523' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABASZ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
b4096b551bfd5e1bf1ebe51e16b4faca
2c54f4ac06f12ea5c3c7818006ac2f089040eee8
'2011-10-31T18:34:54-04:00'
describe
'92996' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATA' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
7738cf0f8338d3cf8e91f8d2018a7e5d
e683e26394fc5ec1e2295c715ead7ad300d573db
'2011-10-31T18:35:23-04:00'
describe
'17548' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATB' 'sip-files00024.pro'
af696eae027f51b1dafe31788bb20893
c73a32b5abc832c2a7a7aa4178ba6e062a825dc3
'2011-10-31T18:36:32-04:00'
describe
'32107' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATC' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
4bc8e58eec7035e26b32455df90cc66e
d9ae3868a33144659111a89ec592e773cb142128
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
68cde85e167733126d8e3eb27165fe9a
cf4fb94b0df54b1d0038ffb5b6870f6df2cb4b4e
'2011-10-31T18:35:01-04:00'
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATE' 'sip-files00024.txt'
6dbd0732a0df7e90de34b75eafa0ae6c
4741ee8974f3bd7f644241d5a29e61d7e0240221
'2011-10-31T18:36:26-04:00'
describe
'10123' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
55ecf88c14a406990f91834ee05be54c
cb84669f1bb90e7e6b25b092280dcf55c82d5146
'2011-10-31T18:35:52-04:00'
describe
'807246' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
b5f95395f86cdf8690b5094cbb7c5ea2
307a471d834362ee245fee210885fdd2451c0ca1
describe
'90775' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
52699ed880f160914d1fe31c1f46644b
193fde7e1aa18514105407ee6bc8aa0704a31187
'2011-10-31T18:36:08-04:00'
describe
'21530' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
103b99bce5c280388578195c4472e04b
d3bb5739e6fb55f6f1d0c2f9c5641af824ea29c8
'2011-10-31T18:36:11-04:00'
describe
'32633' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
86c8ca0917154120570c5084ec0a21ef
e2e25dc46ba12c7937e0e1956a8e99d8a4b304f9
'2011-10-31T18:34:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATK' 'sip-files00025.tif'
556fc2a34ee03a547590f91d7df837b5
df642594058edead2e932a55ebc9a00aaa44c412
'2011-10-31T18:34:37-04:00'
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATL' 'sip-files00025.txt'
72c31740b070816fe732b4c63f179f28
1a4e5b7bc9ffe3182ced5014e657a239530c10eb
'2011-10-31T18:33:13-04:00'
describe
'10282' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATM' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
052e1f89e1d680d8c31b90ebb4670f70
161c6fbefb95d4ab5ccdede22d15939e4f9e2b81
'2011-10-31T18:34:16-04:00'
describe
'842522' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATN' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
21026256e30abdfd9896e092bd8b7dcd
e37eccdd808827e2560f8a5de63bb3cfd21cec5a
'2011-10-31T18:33:14-04:00'
describe
'87037' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATO' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
b83b01ea8affa1c2ebab3207ca5b7c66
914e70d9194610a5f90366533eacf31c79d9e2af
'2011-10-31T18:37:58-04:00'
describe
'18752' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATP' 'sip-files00026.pro'
fb7732dee9f0c9b3f889325e86721d85
f75a34edb7dafbdd645d5e4dea9a220acab4a51f
'2011-10-31T18:37:06-04:00'
describe
'30515' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
a4f31996c5c1885b98eee96504070832
aed9c43133ce2cfbc373e48864de8613b06df3a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATR' 'sip-files00026.tif'
236ff84885a3b718fc12104727983a76
16bcce6e27267d5963ce264cb5c41c8d8de01e0d
'2011-10-31T18:31:27-04:00'
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATS' 'sip-files00026.txt'
6d6aaac60b3bf266cc64441813131cce
c980255a041bf612c83d806805e4a06e60341468
'2011-10-31T18:32:50-04:00'
describe
'9551' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATT' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
31ebb33dd69c6c8376d910060231020b
890bdf26b4d4b69b07b96979d41edbc2e1497933
'2011-10-31T18:35:36-04:00'
describe
'842499' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATU' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
dcf8ecfb81acd2d0286ce311695c84fa
880813241f143f865aecb9f6db07a12e288862bd
describe
'77476' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATV' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
32c4f030fa2094993ca4a963980a9b9a
0a64cdd55a53c8bd3949969afa47697ebcc946ae
'2011-10-31T18:31:53-04:00'
describe
'22594' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATW' 'sip-files00027.pro'
433fcd8a1dd75f81617d1623d747533c
48dd871a36a19bb5688886d11aca94d7a8919e5e
'2011-10-31T18:33:07-04:00'
describe
'27654' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
8112999e2f7b93fc509ba72d9a03a3ac
2dc57287cb847bf391350f745f0463d11312b539
'2011-10-31T18:38:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATY' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c1b05bbfa3d47ef3b155653839283e48
86a3ea8c22ede207e24fd479e6c244fcc6cb2dee
'2011-10-31T18:35:28-04:00'
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABATZ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
1de4fb8c0d8e1d60275e49203591cd20
0d53db16e9b02990b8bbc52921d20092b9c3b7ef
'2011-10-31T18:32:03-04:00'
describe
'8464' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUA' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
13deaf387f77e0edccfdf62d9304ab92
41fcd797d17485b1aaa28dd4db3fe950742b98e6
'2011-10-31T18:35:46-04:00'
describe
'844591' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUB' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
9c58d496a06bc18cbae8aab70ec34c47
b403088780b474d30d2210e346555cfea06c4b38
'2011-10-31T18:37:16-04:00'
describe
'99854' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUC' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b9b75689f1808b7038efa02142bfa6c0
5f514d3681a3ae757df5336d166a392e1d772365
'2011-10-31T18:32:08-04:00'
describe
'37798' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUD' 'sip-files00028.pro'
5162c5b7737fbf7518fbbc35c90a7bd4
af3f00b56d715d1782987c623b549cee67e905ae
'2011-10-31T18:34:10-04:00'
describe
'37674' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUE' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
25e3a5c34febf96ecaf4f513db84dfba
75d34dc3d57904497ca54971d0c15fcdb768dd69
'2011-10-31T18:33:29-04:00'
describe
'6763189' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUF' 'sip-files00028.tif'
37f69d290cf741e5f7e29a4f75910041
4279f2e163058e74f22c3680714d60605a41d0a7
'2011-10-31T18:36:50-04:00'
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUG' 'sip-files00028.txt'
0c7cf8f254fc31605f80e32f0b122321
c867c5a808324ae7e5bf2ad060378a646e4f8a13
'2011-10-31T18:35:13-04:00'
describe
'11913' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUH' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
e58681686585faa018b9b92d000e89bb
f7480943e14f4bae6f1efb8e1235c8bfc4244b42
'2011-10-31T18:37:15-04:00'
describe
'809244' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUI' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
8917458c5d9d32e846b8538da4483f82
6fbf51f188d5e3d010d862ffeb82a64ea5300d02
describe
'99527' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUJ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
27d51f5f65e5a718de83ce65fe81d074
6b66cee6a638cc54becfbb0d4dc6cfa981f78b16
describe
'8721' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUK' 'sip-files00029.pro'
67066570760e85a6f790ab1d4f116aeb
893170b587618fe48395383901579e54ec1eed3a
describe
'30565' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUL' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
acb9517203f1da500317836cbf9be90e
50d8462619f61a86bd7d44468d446d967f1cf033
describe
'6480319' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUM' 'sip-files00029.tif'
d660f047011736f9ac49afc41a65b663
614586997af4c343d62876b25fd7bcd7055d8886
'2011-10-31T18:37:14-04:00'
describe
'409' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUN' 'sip-files00029.txt'
aca58c75607efc5d144f2db7b441dfc4
47de2e23a12336a783e49659ed28159144a13644
describe
Invalid character
'10000' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUO' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d5a181c4a1530306a9353ac7af224cdb
55ce234ea093bc571dcb35f62dae365f4ea92b9f
'2011-10-31T18:37:48-04:00'
describe
'844592' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUP' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
2ae0cd3cb8319aaa9af6f046c090688d
27100069db714660d647911a39fd5a21378cccf1
describe
'101069' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUQ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
7cd3b698de99fb55a0e7cb6d16421ca7
8a7fb6f618bbb2069e5182b1ddd10011fd7806eb
'2011-10-31T18:34:48-04:00'
describe
'35201' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUR' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b4c07bdc1e7b8a0506c1c8b6b0d44dc5
83b2a7a6d8305bef55ad0da18d0a67fb0ef8b25f
'2011-10-31T18:36:12-04:00'
describe
'36357' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUS' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
4ccd53575641217c77ac6235ab8873fd
ff50d4dbab607b27b4e4bdd93bd69edbc5203146
'2011-10-31T18:31:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUT' 'sip-files00030.tif'
ed9f1908d3761439b5d0f2fdd42cd6b8
f60beca80fef0f26fb1e7fd8880f60055ee825de
'2011-10-31T18:34:26-04:00'
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUU' 'sip-files00030.txt'
01b30ae34b64624e23deb90770154cb3
e94c669d48b5bcbbbaacaed3f853490fc529564d
'2011-10-31T18:32:24-04:00'
describe
'11567' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUV' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
f900c52338509edb248ca4b2a4157825
65ebdbbf62089ec8e298dbe5157555a14745ff28
describe
'842524' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f849102f9305873ab6b170eee31b014f
d29448f4e8ec9371a43d503fd05d96cce6f0eb31
'2011-10-31T18:37:36-04:00'
describe
'82979' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUX' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
bc465e582b42b6af2072edab14c59414
60b95b5402470e6d3fe019715acebd4dab1adb7c
describe
'22191' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
28b1c7957bad959a6cc70aa95872a5c6
83318ecb1943af56754ec8b2116835bd57791e35
describe
'29056' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAUZ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
1e4e4e79ca3fb1404aadd40a1fef1490
61e6fe8dc95a5175d1833918a21f5a14e1fed439
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7002a0ab19f04da88ee1c5eaf0231aea
7d19c4a3718461f8af1d5ee42965b36465f0f755
'2011-10-31T18:34:25-04:00'
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVB' 'sip-files00031.txt'
559d0576634f4f6f8297ecb9bf9ed95f
ea80fa699e7573fac61b27cadf2833933c7885e7
'2011-10-31T18:33:05-04:00'
describe
'8859' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVC' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
00283743e57728d9a6bd0ab257d09d2e
9b35163d7b0b5d747ea7a20f32e92f3f17a8e8c6
'2011-10-31T18:34:58-04:00'
describe
'844393' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVD' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
b51b322aba793a388db27e6ecb0edada
d3cbc985353ab93538eda4ac642c9df4c8ea0876
'2011-10-31T18:36:04-04:00'
describe
'97819' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVE' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
484d8eb016110fae9682808100d6e241
ae50f964d82c6b68505242a2c70560be28b836c7
'2011-10-31T18:33:28-04:00'
describe
'8315' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVF' 'sip-files00032.pro'
bd9b1873f7b9cca98cc79b8222e18717
1d911f273b0e70f21f624630b6ca529cc87a7509
'2011-10-31T18:36:24-04:00'
describe
'29799' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVG' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
25a8a40ba5f91e480a92427fa2ffa711
2d4d69a8b5e42c2d1b9cee378cadcb210ee15d7e
'2011-10-31T18:35:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
bddbceb7845eed42f26e81a489555ead
495ee71877c9fb9d25c3dd9b207ea442ad1e7b5f
'2011-10-31T18:32:33-04:00'
describe
'371' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVI' 'sip-files00032.txt'
2265dc2f8521a883da625aea4d908acb
27e1a64073ae5a4985ac23b43822ef2536bd7072
'2011-10-31T18:35:15-04:00'
describe
'9632' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVJ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
80c89155d920851528bad2297955b247
739aa4e5f736816da956596845082ae84fb9ac61
'2011-10-31T18:36:27-04:00'
describe
'842451' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
8c400befbb330f2dbdb6f0f5bd2a4d6b
a2d8adead71637286992155708da89f61fad48ba
'2011-10-31T18:31:44-04:00'
describe
'105331' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVL' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
43618beaa0400efadb081ca545d5728e
2e837b858632fa7f2a6f2cc6b9d65fd2cf8eab20
describe
'38472' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVM' 'sip-files00033.pro'
fe9a71ae3302993168ff906d2023a5ff
6957953b19a07aedfe45a902a25e90182ce5ab7f
'2011-10-31T18:37:30-04:00'
describe
'38521' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVN' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
953c8dd7487d3f36324c6ce72f83f63f
c6950cae6ab9d82342d41061c38f1d6e01144a64
'2011-10-31T18:33:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVO' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f69cd103d5d108c6c3784c1c13f2feb7
11663ec380a9fc92cb695fe87771b5d7fc286c32
'2011-10-31T18:36:17-04:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVP' 'sip-files00033.txt'
9ba018ce8ce0a12705fca7e06afd81db
0d144b25eef1be90aab08d684777f746b77a4465
'2011-10-31T18:33:04-04:00'
describe
'11371' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVQ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
b80a0e27920233940d60864b8294f361
9d5f13ca727e30c322b675345ffadc138a5e00a5
describe
'844552' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVR' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
cd607a7e145a536c0c8407268bd32160
2b8cf934b66cca0f63b0d4ab24bd6b53cf9e44e4
'2011-10-31T18:36:29-04:00'
describe
'93793' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVS' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
dc8e0ebb3b1ad588620e173762330038
f4838947dfe0386b2601573af5c2ec7cf21f8d11
'2011-10-31T18:37:12-04:00'
describe
'24730' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVT' 'sip-files00034.pro'
abe0b238c2c9aa40678f975499ed2a99
3d36c46e7b94ca2c2c5d96dfe04e5213ab31c8e2
describe
'32686' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVU' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
966880681cc473ffe71559bdae626eb9
2a8793e3e34d5ec6127c1a4a8837974c07565e27
'2011-10-31T18:31:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVV' 'sip-files00034.tif'
e163916157365516cdb6ba1830e32314
e5263ceea20359a8f50d03719deb7e21205584d6
'2011-10-31T18:33:52-04:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVW' 'sip-files00034.txt'
eed07334ef404b7b4bae5f30abafd53f
3f4f7bf9e5d1c8f1e7bbf7121bccb4944d90c673
describe
'10404' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVX' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
3da04d5ef1c18ae8fd58a403b0aeda75
88dd9dd780b9b32d5039fc79a1795fbbf6279121
describe
'842463' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVY' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
9fbfe233b35a49c7508620bad4b8568b
f2e02bea3b26fd2d0ab94cc03bfed663fc5a9975
describe
'93195' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAVZ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
d88dfcb018d8a6cfd6653cd905749f8f
9f06a1a78769d7d3571543a9d236b8fb8e96ccad
describe
'24865' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWA' 'sip-files00035.pro'
55af3d83d88df50cc232336bb8c21021
9e3e3644a3ad3452922dc77ba226f2efa9c9eecf
describe
'33555' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWB' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
a5ef72aae647cfd744eecacd507b6492
805e3b3206e9729597f94d13f959dd8f7d6384c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWC' 'sip-files00035.tif'
3fb030829e286e8d8aa1da7188c51b44
2c5cf34231bebae80c7aecf37ca188188b5b8fcd
'2011-10-31T18:31:16-04:00'
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWD' 'sip-files00035.txt'
fa392bdf1964eb8c4726a940451813ce
21817268f14ac69c5869d72891d49d396e09e725
describe
'9987' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
23d106aa6a4d38dbed5440702edb2060
f205fea1f8778bfc9915450c8f0a301134f65f4b
'2011-10-31T18:33:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWF' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
9b29015bb2d697dafd029ce989127672
f4822f7492ee835f7e49d9407bf346d80ca85d4f
describe
'91987' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWG' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
2d1923cb00160f68457b2bd12d04b937
9ae5a60b7a64f350ecd5ed66fc1a029737f83284
'2011-10-31T18:33:50-04:00'
describe
'31858' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWH' 'sip-files00036.pro'
ae305f2139ed1a3652601ad65f184faf
60ab416bd61f9db455aa34c0a12e224aac64888b
describe
'34059' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWI' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d4d8822f968740139f8ae562cac047b5
2abfe8de11b174b128044922401b266388a9013a
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWJ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
9bb1e3a09fefb986ec364a338e6baa1f
66942436ebb99707c576ad4eb556d7cb2c61ecb2
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWK' 'sip-files00036.txt'
39158ebcf46a3d8c75d070f2b7816b24
0965d5d03c311c0298d77b2ffe89e974d558abd9
describe
'10788' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
555d0558e8c1e2bb2c62d64abd781a9f
17876333594dd8cb24fba4dc012adbe425be13fe
'2011-10-31T18:32:01-04:00'
describe
'842509' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWM' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
7371c1ca50cf78489a053fb30b60fc49
9416eaec43c04011164060bf948ac422b38b26c3
describe
'102659' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
966093aeddf79a82192a7a8f7cb73a34
6666be57d46e00ef13681aa6a05220e9b4b2fafe
'2011-10-31T18:37:09-04:00'
describe
'36700' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
7cec9ec8b9a1d2c432a026ccf9703bb4
a3a9ae9459220a995c3cfeafebac8bf445280107
'2011-10-31T18:32:51-04:00'
describe
'37961' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWP' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
412ebbd5f0488aa6f976e3af19797696
cf29c63e9f3a9a132a1850c343223679a94e33d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
9528b8d3cefeaffad92ea4f5b368f723
6748b3676fb341b41fe5e54c7454d8893f164c46
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWR' 'sip-files00037.txt'
9c0f524052b5ea3b34e59be32fcb7ac4
a88057580d6dae99106f9a049dc7e3c0b9ced901
'2011-10-31T18:36:10-04:00'
describe
'11110' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
3ee3e91375332a2da542cd2171fe4af3
560c72d4109c29a09e218e728171e936fbdac991
'2011-10-31T18:37:31-04:00'
describe
'829713' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
12b6dc12e7b5340666b1295e0761d556
20cc6a32dd9ec7ae425d9580db2a4c2cedf8a0e7
describe
'97159' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
6b9a2e8476ffaa8c383408107e2f5ea4
e1c072fffce8fe0ace76c600a00a45c36e4245f0
'2011-10-31T18:32:04-04:00'
describe
'34833' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
d4ca2c7bfb3a7b709e27fb3fc5ec6d47
659e293887a130de72b8265c54fcc738d99e1060
'2011-10-31T18:37:43-04:00'
describe
'36107' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
d7b9b66a3acc3c9a26f5d63b23ec5372
52c14d4055784fd7cdc421243da16f86925cbcbd
'2011-10-31T18:34:05-04:00'
describe
'6644317' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
b4fc42f9f47778cab9fd9d51cec83187
0abbcba6bbafaf862008a6672a5d2be633ad5db6
'2011-10-31T18:36:40-04:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
df234e8fa0d9ce14033d2f29d62119be
db5d0e77219d8d171b42f2206245e313b438931a
describe
'11515' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAWZ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
2224c78575c682c334b5745b5d1e08b2
8d2235f7647025ef75a5e3b3a2e593148dd98e45
'2011-10-31T18:37:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXA' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
f12b1d73e747acedea1590275f101701
2094e25590154e6a2b913f0bfc7f35424d558762
'2011-10-31T18:36:49-04:00'
describe
'93678' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
c0322ad8aa8cf68a27c605246f578995
71e1e970b6f93c35de06762644ffd62b4d396d0c
'2011-10-31T18:34:09-04:00'
describe
'31290' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXC' 'sip-files00039.pro'
126a18ba60811b8a2ab30f79c4db9ba9
0328c6f7bf9701ea43bdf41cc4b1a3ed70b888a9
'2011-10-31T18:31:17-04:00'
describe
'34630' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXD' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
382f7736bdf2078320e4c23e1a72a5c1
c0502f378f42eb9842a7395c95b3f1ef1d711c08
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXE' 'sip-files00039.tif'
beeee3e9b4d0d410ac961621ea0b5940
7b27019b412b9b5cfc9fd211f6549fadade64950
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXF' 'sip-files00039.txt'
da5b829ac4ce7688e89726f1e81ac8ab
b538455b60c76b0a3ee6b022e66ce64ddc45c925
describe
'10436' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXG' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
29f378cc65b1fa1905cc34e4e0a2451a
1eadc6016f65e7aebba4632c9c2659f5c80d6684
describe
'826107' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXH' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
02b2699f642d526ddcab2d48c4962917
8e66d885f0668b7f6081b9f96afcf0e43747decd
describe
'95280' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXI' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
691ee4967c6f017364ff53363ea1c319
cc18d5422ed190bc5a03ebccd03e79743be60e55
'2011-10-31T18:37:42-04:00'
describe
'11807' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXJ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
085e4561f166d86236cfdeeb492e4519
d7f39a14aaba11031409bc02069e93da6a27ea80
'2011-10-31T18:36:35-04:00'
describe
'28303' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
d04f125bd8e8a272b605a441e86cdf04
6628f73616c7d704cfc8817623acabdcf6cb2d33
'2011-10-31T18:33:19-04:00'
describe
'6615261' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXL' 'sip-files00040.tif'
525175c2602a633a4bebe235654d5ed8
f6185589dae1644cecabc31b33237dc5b70f0579
describe
'496' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXM' 'sip-files00040.txt'
d22f34dc4eeaf97ebc37bc3a0c2d4724
9cd1f877642894d93b30a101eb2e4a1ede8f4af4
describe
'8906' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXN' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
19c27b1abb7f043b4dd0088669b85f05
b45e858c454442da4a05fb18c9df7ec62afea0eb
'2011-10-31T18:33:32-04:00'
describe
'836115' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXO' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
abfdca669d45c64d9e951fb86722549d
20e642ce9eac7a912c92fa3596dd502bb51d13dd
describe
'99154' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXP' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
a70f86d4a0ab653b54f7d15499adb3bd
922c76b4069a4e09bfd39c8cccbf448e7f5c63d3
describe
'35673' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXQ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
12907ca7c57c8bc3e7319ccae2e15f1b
c595ce3753d7cdbf23536b6fcde0a6fd14e8e2d4
'2011-10-31T18:34:06-04:00'
describe
'35740' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXR' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
a3875e2c5365fe8a690ecb779fe35aa8
16286b81cd9054d788a051fbe89667de492388b3
describe
'6696271' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXS' 'sip-files00041.tif'
bf559a5f7ec1d3728b8a1043e37f0898
e7e96be7d3a6b7b89d981ba6c4adf74ae916a420
'2011-10-31T18:33:55-04:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXT' 'sip-files00041.txt'
98eadf6065eecfc0895b1234aaed5e31
e76f2a8faffbf7b07a62301fd2ed45385b95e798
'2011-10-31T18:32:02-04:00'
describe
'11094' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXU' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
a79119db515a6f6913ad79abbec71328
64d3872eaa2722cfe0f81ec4abe1923f73ad9c9c
'2011-10-31T18:31:43-04:00'
describe
'899816' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXV' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
aedb4c436fca69996e712f463d6e517f
369ba35aa40ba1413ebc3c23a8b9ab4d4674ff1b
describe
'77186' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXW' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
5e726487e438855cdd94202a8adf0281
35203c79072b4785a78ca9920e885a5193d204ab
'2011-10-31T18:37:17-04:00'
describe
'7925' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXX' 'sip-files00042.pro'
57e6377708d400e00e7ad534ea54cbe9
b1e0fef6445548dc64e2a37b7ff16d55a3612379
'2011-10-31T18:33:56-04:00'
describe
'25166' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXY' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
49b908f197503ed6f89493424a72cab0
6ed5f9be13cd041cbdce82c713a5201a71fb10b5
describe
'7207173' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAXZ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
aaf505ade1e811df468ab71beaca15bd
7083271794ade3fd14568a01adfd19179d957d44
describe
'389' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYA' 'sip-files00042.txt'
243a11ec63b0116cabb4d9abb0ee90df
61bd241a58a2d6ee2ab38c5838ca4e7030ac0f52
'2011-10-31T18:37:44-04:00'
describe
'7560' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYB' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
ee2f20c30a2f1565c2090a56ab10d76c
1034c85003dda42e62ed7f6abe78a0e87df3377c
'2011-10-31T18:31:57-04:00'
describe
'836230' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYC' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
3b16a1efba42e04fbefa1b0111f937c2
b20be1b61d1d6ff4edae6bcb51254aee45a490c9
'2011-10-31T18:35:47-04:00'
describe
'80599' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYD' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
8b1963cfbc644404d66773473caf1bdf
27cac52e25a593d2acae5bd0fd638780161dfafc
describe
'17026' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYE' 'sip-files00043.pro'
814bafc7f4dee4c2c0205e4e8b078ebc
17cb85c314bb2a3ed8472612106ab63b8aa6f12e
'2011-10-31T18:33:39-04:00'
describe
'28305' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYF' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
0068d7e97871551619b8915ff32b9004
272f3bd2554454808b51789d90aad284d697833c
'2011-10-31T18:37:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYG' 'sip-files00043.tif'
5f45f4de402d235cfde9855daa8ef7fd
7bd54faf50f6e51ce124a9255783bab6f58fcb28
'2011-10-31T18:34:00-04:00'
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYH' 'sip-files00043.txt'
6d07a72c8eab985407e541a015148fff
980849b08fcaacfb681f65dc0f9373957188c5aa
describe
'8999' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYI' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
9a65ca3843f6be93a35d609e2b357285
60a1aaf3e1a747144ea4d5182a5c22a0a9e1e79e
'2011-10-31T18:37:47-04:00'
describe
'899814' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYJ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
cd1908f370d5c28fe81a547078b1383a
0d59c999c370ce15b0e9f55af490ad31285cc952
'2011-10-31T18:32:05-04:00'
describe
'94058' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYK' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
e26891f8a01b2ee56f08f0c9e49cfb75
de96e90dabbf572a5d6804d1aed05518c71ccb43
describe
'21321' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYL' 'sip-files00044.pro'
7f8ac44e417d55e5f1d55155a6e9c5ae
50e0d5433998def53705279ae651774cc01a47b4
describe
'32458' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYM' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
b24ab74067513a0a3d1ca7f406943d3f
4a7f56e02e61742994475328d73d8d98b46f4968
'2011-10-31T18:36:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYN' 'sip-files00044.tif'
8e3e438e77d149b56d3f092d78f95493
0bc83ff13aaa91b80159e13e55371ae0bcdd1205
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYO' 'sip-files00044.txt'
91214e2d46339697463be2f99f1c8d68
99cf3a4a903b24788759b6c6f8247af7d74264f8
describe
'9093' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYP' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
623ac9b9ef79f8a7c6c6bb24c5c9358e
231587c88ced7c81142e8ad4cd36abb84259241f
'2011-10-31T18:32:27-04:00'
describe
'836131' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYQ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
26972471c11d55755afbabd0d53eaeb5
e1122a2ed2aea0f393a78e47739d3eeed747fe4f
'2011-10-31T18:32:56-04:00'
describe
'101208' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYR' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
5a538b96c97aedfbad6d8ff008a0d8a6
599fed2a59390116241ca01429b7173e112e9a9d
'2011-10-31T18:34:21-04:00'
describe
'36952' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYS' 'sip-files00045.pro'
6f99e098afb9b287eb22e33bbcc0930a
4c9242103d74d0e98ecb6760a6fb793ffaa0f264
describe
'37760' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYT' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
fc51c3f9eeeb2b634d7a97659ca961ae
0fdb49e842aa62695ef752db461777d71c271fcc
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYU' 'sip-files00045.tif'
8a9ae643b0f175201a75779403ba5a5a
077bc8fc69f7fa55326030eaba331bc3aa2a8665
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYV' 'sip-files00045.txt'
7aa77ef1a7956296568a917004f7698e
f8d9762183467b60d2f1e28a024678854092f8df
'2011-10-31T18:34:59-04:00'
describe
'11622' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYW' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
4a148bf57a58966c404216017121c9c4
296792a0721dc354a18a34b85ba7912b00726810
describe
'899768' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYX' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
98ddfd72da5a3f31a41b1805eb019e65
f2673a421e3e1c4040c445185666c36d2a447598
'2011-10-31T18:31:51-04:00'
describe
'104212' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYY' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
79b53e2821ebf0de61a9ee775572fbe9
c6c6a0504e2bdd9e9e4abf9589ca67467c7fa517
'2011-10-31T18:35:44-04:00'
describe
'36767' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAYZ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
4d0a317c70f7c2e73219a6b2da0933b4
99b9ccb832f75464c86d60ec5327b292a71a6593
describe
'38523' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZA' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
30d2f0bb9575db09068475f97871f441
3e322bc10349e166153cd097e62dfe61880e36cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZB' 'sip-files00046.tif'
8391b756524c01e910f17178b33f1cc0
b8ef00e1b8f92f4a821fb61372f1599ed614f798
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZC' 'sip-files00046.txt'
af254683428079e706d6399b99c7fb82
9bd21de0d456fd4a85379d3f5f257fe5b58f5eef
'2011-10-31T18:31:40-04:00'
describe
'10368' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZD' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
7a148d377e094eb98028c6f35db0f0be
3e1a0af76ec6bc58ee42ac16891154b884cf23ac
describe
'844886' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZE' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
04b2c2bf14714dcc9ba7ae58b9243576
72f2b62e85baa8c57731d18a9dd945f817f0964e
describe
'97857' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZF' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
b3bfca45f47eaf95c006c7f2a8430918
1ade77a2ec046d5860cf52d5ef397accb6c3be0a
'2011-10-31T18:36:25-04:00'
describe
'20459' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZG' 'sip-files00047.pro'
97598f4d3925f9742d64ba31305f5b8f
502ffb74b913f8bf3f375d966af2c9aaa8bd7b36
describe
'32084' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZH' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
86d2b265c4705038b384023a61168fea
7067c18d725c4200d1621afd4d8d6a56a77348c5
'2011-10-31T18:36:23-04:00'
describe
'6765701' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZI' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c7f90df51bc50ae93faa634d17f7b427
8a48c4ba470c6099d10d0de7e97a9894162f2c15
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZJ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
7779340fc8e6500870ca2a96caef79c0
2c2910555324fa5a8e5d89bded2a01ee01ea5dc4
describe
'9742' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZK' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
795a34897d060180631c40be996f6947
64d6bcf370466449a774b7ce5b91a4c3b5d02a47
'2011-10-31T18:35:10-04:00'
describe
'873363' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZL' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
27a9b319a14bb369c9eedd12d7e0e7d4
c5a2e2d080884d2cf9485e00c99727fb89ba226c
'2011-10-31T18:36:55-04:00'
describe
'87579' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZM' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
dea2092b1cb704140b3ac2e95ab25862
a3bb4bf70b5879bc34bd72d8cf1eb626bc5ba223
'2011-10-31T18:37:59-04:00'
describe
'16605' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZN' 'sip-files00048.pro'
5a5ff4397d5116b9aedc1b198ecf36b0
7654d1467c66ad3f1bdc6168e8c6c0e51c670422
'2011-10-31T18:32:32-04:00'
describe
'29186' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZO' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
015ae6002f70b5503236cee414fd058f
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:34:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZQ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
5c73302b2f92217e1a02986c4f650772
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describe
'9988' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZR' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:36:20-04:00'
describe
'857276' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZS' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
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describe
'99797' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZT' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
918e1fec2a71aa56be7242d6bd8d97bf
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'2011-10-31T18:31:26-04:00'
describe
'37004' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZU' 'sip-files00049.pro'
84eece8fed9f1d5421d7f20079785b39
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'2011-10-31T18:31:45-04:00'
describe
'36597' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZV' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
e8ec5409ac4a04333e033734da6abb2b
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'2011-10-31T18:35:38-04:00'
describe
'6864839' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZW' 'sip-files00049.tif'
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describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZX' 'sip-files00049.txt'
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describe
'10898' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZY' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:37:32-04:00'
describe
'864728' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABAZZ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
8e7e7f99a53e0d7331530a6e3affcfd8
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describe
'88579' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAA' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:34:15-04:00'
describe
'27309' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAB' 'sip-files00050.pro'
df44a3a87da34a1c75fd2cebbed7b6c6
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describe
'31397' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAC' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
c3f9f2ea5831bf02c64f3e0a491a8c8a
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'2011-10-31T18:33:31-04:00'
describe
'6924757' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAD' 'sip-files00050.tif'
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describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAE' 'sip-files00050.txt'
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describe
'10127' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAF' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
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describe
'900481' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:35:16-04:00'
describe
'109440' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAH' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
29057a5575b3d9158aae15fea56a34aa
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describe
'16889' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAI' 'sip-files00051.pro'
23f5cff934d640cf51a0d21043e80e16
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describe
'35005' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
752ac03206efc2b9e88fcbcb816b318c
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'2011-10-31T18:34:40-04:00'
describe
'7212739' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAK' 'sip-files00051.tif'
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describe
'702' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAL' 'sip-files00051.txt'
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describe
'10308' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAM' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
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describe
'891490' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAN' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:37:53-04:00'
describe
'36519' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAP' 'sip-files00052.pro'
94799e19e893fc1ae5eec6ac3696a51f
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'2011-10-31T18:35:56-04:00'
describe
'36152' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAQ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAS' 'sip-files00052.txt'
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describe
'10807' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAT' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
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describe
'883399' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAU' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:33:08-04:00'
describe
'67844' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAV' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
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describe
'7305' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAW' 'sip-files00053.pro'
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describe
'22742' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBAX' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
28f5dc0c283e15414a38f72ae03adab5
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'2011-10-31T18:37:45-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:36:41-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:31:11-04:00'
describe
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describe
'23375' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBD' 'sip-files00054.pro'
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'2011-10-31T18:31:39-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:33:21-04:00'
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBG' 'sip-files00054.txt'
3d701637b1904fe7d8a03cd9a4b5e542
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'2011-10-31T18:32:45-04:00'
describe
'10100' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBH' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
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describe
'873222' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBI' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:36:31-04:00'
describe
'89178' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBJ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
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describe
'33474' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBK' 'sip-files00055.pro'
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'2011-10-31T18:34:30-04:00'
describe
'32344' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBL' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:32:28-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
'10227' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBO' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'28676' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBS' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7036883' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBT' 'sip-files00056.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'23457' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBY' 'sip-files00057.pro'
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describe
'30223' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBBZ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:35:45-04:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCB' 'sip-files00057.txt'
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:37:18-04:00'
describe
'866946' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCD' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
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describe
'100127' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCE' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:32:41-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-31T18:37:46-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-31T18:37:52-04:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCI' 'sip-files00058.txt'
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'2011-10-31T18:33:59-04:00'
describe
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describe
'874001' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCK' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:35:07-04:00'
describe
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'2011-10-31T18:33:35-04:00'
describe
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describe
'29838' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCN' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:32:58-04:00'
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCP' 'sip-files00059.txt'
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'2011-10-31T18:33:20-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
'68526' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCS' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:32:55-04:00'
describe
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describe
'23307' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCU' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:32:11-04:00'
describe
'6978915' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCV' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a0fa6a5c6007abe3b6c4599225ce7ea7
c6c92b2186882e064ecd8db3cb97c063149982dd
'2011-10-31T18:35:42-04:00'
describe
'629' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCW' 'sip-files00060.txt'
917d810ee7381c0602cd916b018dd1ed
47195e59d66b111fd5e3dbdb4213eed024eaf833
'2011-10-31T18:34:27-04:00'
describe
'7850' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCX' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
b264a6aa0196a208156d837100c37461
da9985369f060612ff46778d569bb43cdf7622c5
describe
'882705' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCY' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
20b6aa51d807a680f2d2ac51069376eb
1589db7c64753097de786c8b8556973cf73fe7cb
describe
'83886' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBCZ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
9c76cd70b5363ec9564f0bb15b1fcc28
475fabcf637512ef8d8a02621f9b9c7635b83992
'2011-10-31T18:31:48-04:00'
describe
'27530' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDA' 'sip-files00061.pro'
e39cae49a720facc090aa94c79a70b87
262f8723892ea4ea0a36a84ae49ae5185af84901
'2011-10-31T18:32:10-04:00'
describe
'30669' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDB' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
25874268813d35d5c482b5b42f5c2e36
29aff958e7b081fe3fc83a89907cd201952f219f
describe
'7068283' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDC' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f7f0eec25e00bc6a3be29d704d2f7bfa
54fc3ac1202979dd7b596bda3cbe68fd014fb21b
'2011-10-31T18:37:02-04:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDD' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a05641ec6ae5b2a3b49371096ad5ed47
f8ca0dba8cc4018f905953cdcac88f1a01e60e4a
describe
'9412' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDE' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
97ad1c4941ec215a198a82b4c758f58e
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describe
'909057' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDF' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
04b4b4410d38971dc56534df65a8b02a
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describe
'77741' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDG' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
6989ccf8158fc18eb8759db2c46c467c
960899b250b3edb50a927a77500a1cb891456215
describe
'17375' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDH' 'sip-files00062.pro'
a9fe2765d4b1d1cc60c130fc598d25c0
86635ae8f93b02c0011b2debfa8ab8a49a035dd8
'2011-10-31T18:31:36-04:00'
describe
'26172' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDI' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
ce0195af934d237493b0009550161dd2
1ef32cdc56cbfd6346989f0f43798309390e1771
'2011-10-31T18:32:52-04:00'
describe
'7281619' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDJ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
cd520a236ae162e174ebf3bdbd81861f
0ebdb09c2d0839d81693b8d43eaa4cfae82d9be3
'2011-10-31T18:35:31-04:00'
describe
'724' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDK' 'sip-files00062.txt'
5a064414928dd6ede358f8eb2f7ad213
d906953a996317f64f3351dd1458eb9ccc7947ae
describe
'8036' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDL' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
2a64a717d8407c3c7647be22befb6123
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describe
'893853' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDM' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
a43ca7c3df1e7badc5257f29db562fae
3fa0e16b3d1d9fb43fd75c9531462c987676192f
describe
'100294' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDN' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
50515eca5838430dce889a29baf45667
a70f5816db13611ba4ab76d24aac3177d67022d0
'2011-10-31T18:36:06-04:00'
describe
'38192' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDO' 'sip-files00063.pro'
0bc8e688f5f12a6f6746d6e607c0ec45
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describe
'36477' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDP' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
7fa1d0379724bd040b482c9276234a29
9af39fccc6f1e0cf7107284944403b52efde62dd
'2011-10-31T18:35:11-04:00'
describe
'7160009' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDQ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
4ee0a3c9c6a89e6d5f671bd8191d225a
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'2011-10-31T18:34:28-04:00'
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDR' 'sip-files00063.txt'
5aac872dedda49da28ea3077a75ee02c
b841d6dcabab5cd7a97a1a4754459cda18bbea1d
'2011-10-31T18:31:29-04:00'
describe
'10432' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDS' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
55ea0004a2b78402058888a5a1bae380
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describe
'872911' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDT' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
5544d52e6298ea455579031c07580cab
d562b8ec1d93b9851e04677e5fa8de7dcfb0adac
'2011-10-31T18:31:56-04:00'
describe
'67914' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDU' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
fe84cf1664d297fcd9fee98a4320e558
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describe
'7065' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDV' 'sip-files00064.pro'
1288ff8ebcc39ad2e2b0e50303cd3b45
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describe
'23410' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDW' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
759f664fe2cd1fe4013b8273ce037f45
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describe
'6990257' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDX' 'sip-files00064.tif'
bb697cd498b60fc29f499266766f68a2
8d922355c8e42e288e5f815a39b7b9f43aa3407e
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDY' 'sip-files00064.txt'
edc405cd4fe76df061e98f503249a8d4
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describe
'8466' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBDZ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
b5a0174ebadc32dc38be6f7aedb3100a
312a7d8f61d74350f668856b2fbab64e122c5833
'2011-10-31T18:36:02-04:00'
describe
'870679' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEA' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
46f8b89e7c94cfd0c4f2d86afd4022d1
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'2011-10-31T18:33:24-04:00'
describe
'100147' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEB' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
7b594664eb3ddf782ebcdb27baa7ca0f
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describe
'37402' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEC' 'sip-files00065.pro'
44a9421057132b737c5840e89fba0c0c
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describe
'36456' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBED' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
3bfe6b1f93a705a720ef86dcd22a8fb5
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describe
'6972403' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEE' 'sip-files00065.tif'
f20c0db1d32aefbc13b23890f12e9bba
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'2011-10-31T18:32:29-04:00'
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEF' 'sip-files00065.txt'
8fb1d136aff3ef5bab0b6c4b6d76230e
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describe
'11264' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEG' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
d5cef54d0201ab46ffdfaa9a67b58615
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describe
'852061' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEH' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
76dd7e4e67ea6dc35d02a9c5b58eb4bc
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'2011-10-31T18:35:54-04:00'
describe
'95109' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEI' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
c934107d7b2d3031f1b00063897b8953
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEJ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
c9a4cc46a6b1a2bf505e0cff2bf504f1
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'2011-10-31T18:31:35-04:00'
describe
'34880' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEK' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
1a9c541f66c4891b9404140139d7df7f
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'2011-10-31T18:32:17-04:00'
describe
'6823083' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEL' 'sip-files00066.tif'
4cd344f09df160efbf0ff5c50b5d3381
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describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEM' 'sip-files00066.txt'
6aff9d9b43536b3d808686d956a0bbae
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describe
'11514' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEN' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
6feb566bf738ef242c8327955619bdfb
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'2011-10-31T18:34:01-04:00'
describe
'849948' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEO' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
7ed61a409a6fc91b2cabe3d0b31c8d5a
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describe
'81984' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEP' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
c5c880b53866e95e80a5681cef209f77
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describe
'23169' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEQ' 'sip-files00067.pro'
da52b43eb5812dd876efa860282a85a3
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'2011-10-31T18:36:47-04:00'
describe
'29562' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBER' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
59eb3c4caefdff307e6a8ba2f13099ba
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'2011-10-31T18:35:50-04:00'
describe
'6806411' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBES' 'sip-files00067.tif'
53db1e10479dd1cd10b23b5514f7ef41
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'2011-10-31T18:37:57-04:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBET' 'sip-files00067.txt'
af482671455f563eb333cc41dc9443d7
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describe
'9488' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEU' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
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describe
'867735' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEV' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
c5bd400c48790ffc7873d9891c609600
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'2011-10-31T18:33:27-04:00'
describe
'89564' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEW' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
d7807fbb20dcb771bbd1f33916dc6779
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describe
'17986' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEX' 'sip-files00068.pro'
9237302d14ac8917162961e1270ef827
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describe
'30358' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEY' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
83d6c5fa4f9eb35c69fd06fe62e8cab1
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describe
'6948675' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBEZ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
8d110b52228a09f99a3eb1e4d2f9e717
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describe
'777' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFA' 'sip-files00068.txt'
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describe
'9601' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFB' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
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describe
'814664' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFC' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
7e6d000c70be65b17d7c74438a8bed99
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'2011-10-31T18:32:34-04:00'
describe
'79887' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFD' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
9af20c9f65061773667e15df147a67f9
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describe
'8545' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFE' 'sip-files00069.pro'
4e82337ce449c2a6337c5ed910d6443a
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'2011-10-31T18:35:04-04:00'
describe
'27525' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFF' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
ba52ca67df373934517063394ba27c49
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describe
'6524231' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFG' 'sip-files00069.tif'
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describe
'394' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFH' 'sip-files00069.txt'
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'2011-10-31T18:35:18-04:00'
describe
'9089' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFI' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
36d98a6338e7c81ff53248e0467c25b2
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'2011-10-31T18:31:24-04:00'
describe
'860139' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFJ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
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describe
'100582' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFK' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
ce150812b24ce2c316e5a0860357adf3
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describe
'37997' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFL' 'sip-files00070.pro'
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describe
'36617' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFM' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6887785' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFN' 'sip-files00070.tif'
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describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFO' 'sip-files00070.txt'
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describe
'11131' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFP' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
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describe
'814755' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFQ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
509b58db8a994ffea7c5d816b9bf71c1
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'2011-10-31T18:37:05-04:00'
describe
'91406' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFR' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
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describe
'31174' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFS' 'sip-files00071.pro'
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describe
'34601' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFT' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
d15d03ec30a843562c8cc6452d30f6a7
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFU' 'sip-files00071.tif'
51564b5d780542f33f4705bbeb8c2753
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'2011-10-31T18:37:23-04:00'
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFV' 'sip-files00071.txt'
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describe
'10421' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFW' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
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describe
'860168' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFX' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:37:04-04:00'
describe
'90735' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFY' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
54ec3fd5c45dc2d0126a1d0628ad94b4
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'2011-10-31T18:37:38-04:00'
describe
'22467' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBFZ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
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describe
'31220' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGA' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGB' 'sip-files00072.tif'
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describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGC' 'sip-files00072.txt'
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describe
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describe
'814686' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGE' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
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describe
'94294' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGF' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
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describe
'32703' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGG' 'sip-files00073.pro'
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'2011-10-31T18:31:34-04:00'
describe
'34797' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGH' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGI' 'sip-files00073.tif'
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describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGJ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
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describe
'10389' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGK' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
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describe
'860078' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGL' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'5916' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGN' 'sip-files00074.pro'
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describe
'27674' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGO' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGP' 'sip-files00074.tif'
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describe
'270' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGQ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
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describe
'8634' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGR' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'37017' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGU' 'sip-files00075.pro'
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describe
'37980' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGV' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGW' 'sip-files00075.tif'
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describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGX' 'sip-files00075.txt'
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describe
'11243' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGY' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
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describe
'860128' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBGZ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'36694' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBHB' 'sip-files00076.pro'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBHD' 'sip-files00076.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'814739' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBHG' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBHK' 'sip-files00077.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBIA' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'16077' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJM' 'sip-files00085.pro'
6ecf33b0169b3f37946933b381687c8f
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describe
'32096' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJN' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
0829c8b9452e88727facbeacffb797ff
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describe
'6847731' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJO' 'sip-files00085.tif'
f2846c884fb94467203f5e8cc101a4cd
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describe
'683' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJP' 'sip-files00085.txt'
da8bd6b1d7960b4e6ecdcd57da27285c
4bea69249b9c73100be5ad32713404a4208a2223
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJQ' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
481d79868f555f6c53a967b2e032846d
1c4719d8bc07f9f7438e9fba530e9e71e467684a
describe
'856308' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJR' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
af66e66298b9bb97cf5b8ccf03bf05ea
27194be864ee628ca8bc7dc77fd4baf9a5d14d6c
'2011-10-31T18:32:46-04:00'
describe
'88127' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJS' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
bb389f423d966b86dd5cf0be7f912948
142a25f632e48043d55ee0506034de2bbaf635f2
'2011-10-31T18:37:28-04:00'
describe
'24501' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJT' 'sip-files00086.pro'
deb0df2a2a0b0e14d126440995737cbb
9aa7823687a381de924861881cd2af900a89c82a
describe
'30768' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJU' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
9f5f0e2166a7bc81bcb2b135e0627c7d
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describe
'6857257' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJV' 'sip-files00086.tif'
5fe6026edc80a6030ae015a66173427b
092e19b4f3d49f86aafe66cecfa67b763bc72924
'2011-10-31T18:37:29-04:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJW' 'sip-files00086.txt'
dcc84c4bfe5855e4ba6fd4f6b46f0b38
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describe
'10569' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJX' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
806f38af5356039e0b003454f6ae6122
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describe
'832949' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJY' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
64b7933e37d6b7b0e871c48285776d46
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'2011-10-31T18:36:00-04:00'
describe
'97913' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBJZ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
45273cf63c115fb4c6bd740a97d1bab9
0e08c2c3fc41d4fd5135df36ba6485b95527b72d
describe
'37054' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKA' 'sip-files00087.pro'
c1caa96b1571bcce6ae236d5381a3e5e
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describe
'35940' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKB' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
2eba99f50ea39fd4d13d03e5e1702cd1
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describe
'6670115' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKC' 'sip-files00087.tif'
3f498eaa628e2cb56488de1be3906b75
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKD' 'sip-files00087.txt'
a45c3eb32bafed516a7677b2d8917eab
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describe
'11451' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKE' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
bdee6783bfb2b64e8729b5820698e441
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describe
'847751' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKF' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
0cadabb8b8a4fe19c488c4b38666e804
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describe
'88706' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKG' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
c7b2e524a3221e36a8bb4c24e0a8dfa0
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describe
'32275' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKH' 'sip-files00088.pro'
271311db287d3ce8e6ecfa8424b69444
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describe
'32157' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKI' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
e5ff4543fedadeb33ca9574c8c7e27ef
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describe
'6788747' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKJ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
6680d0c2e33f9d40faaa29c49bc1b264
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describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKK' 'sip-files00088.txt'
8675fffb663d96ca0c71ccc2bfee1d15
b35cbc75a8b4a0b0f2086520eb690f70acc7876b
'2011-10-31T18:34:43-04:00'
describe
'10331' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKL' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
f4591f2c1121351e7a5e94a9acde0177
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describe
'860351' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKM' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
d85e0d45889d02bed2dffde8d375b4ee
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describe
'101715' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKN' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
962f5d9e8b925e7907287042af4fc8ab
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describe
'36973' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKO' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7316cad82f85c3162bcda25598925eeb
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describe
'37245' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKP' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
573a46e83fd06ac216a108e6f05560c3
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describe
'6889309' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKQ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
06b4920d74e9c7d35c9919d1276ae8c0
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describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKR' 'sip-files00089.txt'
05ca5ae70f435b57ccd5f0bca6a27d88
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describe
'11501' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKS' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
4ad0ec1dbdc6b2928ee8ff324fc492fa
0357d3da137ad8f237c406fee2ca2d07ac6584ba
'2011-10-31T18:33:38-04:00'
describe
'880264' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKT' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
f1c04f827aec208841a4e403cff9c611
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describe
'97578' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKU' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
8232b9e8cc81f7b65c92d23c6995b1cc
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'2011-10-31T18:33:26-04:00'
describe
'22243' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKV' 'sip-files00090.pro'
123dae3b398eb3679a6bbc109309b071
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describe
'32533' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKW' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
e9cca8f430bb15566ef6cf3bfb258437
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describe
'7050007' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKX' 'sip-files00090.tif'
0ecf19fb8b60d4411634aaeb12601c71
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'2011-10-31T18:35:37-04:00'
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKY' 'sip-files00090.txt'
7e0f6e60aa96c03e4b6a460a0bcf8115
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describe
'9931' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBKZ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
c8e29440908c7aa8e036c9c313d1ce38
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describe
'860303' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLA' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
79573bc4da2855cf03c15cf4a1f4e9f4
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describe
'101816' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLB' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
a8a79b1d568a4a6315e5923e810dbe4e
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describe
'37807' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLC' 'sip-files00091.pro'
d0c5a300236891caed1de43f4acc880c
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describe
'37679' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLD' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
6cd2a6c6a2e4cb71ab8ab1decfac1cf9
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLE' 'sip-files00091.tif'
47e79007c3d53ea5951d4dde6a66bc34
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'2011-10-31T18:36:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLF' 'sip-files00091.txt'
f788feef0cde096977f5002c46be059f
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describe
Invalid character
'11623' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLG' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
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describe
'854502' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLH' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
164254b5b9b9d4328620608f98ce8c85
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describe
'101860' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLI' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
37f7a8d95de11216b5b0f3682c96fa05
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describe
'37869' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLJ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
dcd0f72b12c62780b5018c5497f84064
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describe
'37576' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLK' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
ca0308214ac4398fb2c149884ca9dbca
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describe
'6842807' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLL' 'sip-files00092.tif'
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describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLM' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b93611d4b4875d4055a4d881c03258a6
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describe
'11347' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLN' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
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describe
'834847' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLO' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
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describe
'102995' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLP' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
64bae8cfa47fc4dc043c036f98683ba8
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'2011-10-31T18:36:59-04:00'
describe
'38214' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLQ' 'sip-files00093.pro'
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describe
'37686' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLR' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
c00710218c8e80f2f60fe53eba809648
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describe
'6685529' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLS' 'sip-files00093.tif'
56f5dc2f7019611ab8639fc7c39fc3a4
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describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLT' 'sip-files00093.txt'
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describe
'12023' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLU' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
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describe
'852413' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLV' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
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describe
'101560' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLW' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
fc4f1d466fa172fe265917ecc6e60c2e
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'2011-10-31T18:33:25-04:00'
describe
'37164' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLX' 'sip-files00094.pro'
49c39576b2c8437b4f23fcc6849231f5
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describe
'36929' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLY' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6826141' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBLZ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMA' 'sip-files00094.txt'
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describe
'11693' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMB' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
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describe
'814073' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMC' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
9fcc2d14392a8c070aa05cdfd1683b16
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describe
'58833' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMD' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
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describe
'406' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBME' 'sip-files00095.pro'
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describe
'18105' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMF' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
2d1bf12fa7261031a24c317e00d07482
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'2011-10-31T18:32:19-04:00'
describe
'6520323' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMG' 'sip-files00095.tif'
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describe
'50' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMH' 'sip-files00095.txt'
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describe
'6920' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMI' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:31:21-04:00'
describe
'847333' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMJ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
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describe
'102744' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMK' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
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describe
'36779' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBML' 'sip-files00096.pro'
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describe
'37754' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMM' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6785467' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMN' 'sip-files00096.tif'
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describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMO' 'sip-files00096.txt'
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describe
'11486' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMP' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
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describe
'858126' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMQ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
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describe
'93681' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMR' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
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describe
'33214' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMS' 'sip-files00097.pro'
9c0a1ba8dfd875589dc25563813e4f7c
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'2011-10-31T18:31:54-04:00'
describe
'34217' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMT' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
c78601161c78eb904ac87570304f457e
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describe
'6871491' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMU' 'sip-files00097.tif'
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describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMV' 'sip-files00097.txt'
2d65a627050fba56f77721a57edd41f7
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'2011-10-31T18:33:01-04:00'
describe
'10688' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBMW' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:33:57-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'9355' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBND' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
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describe
'846112' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBNE' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'36623' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBNH' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBNJ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
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describe
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describe
'875253' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBNL' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:34:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBNN' 'sip-files00100.pro'
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describe
'37360' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBNO' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBNQ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'863702' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBNZ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'36866' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBOB' 'sip-files00102.pro'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'32580' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBOX' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:33:53-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'29719' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBPE' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'412' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQI' 'sip-files00110.txt'
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describe
'9358' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQJ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
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describe
'864659' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQK' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
980e86ec0fb6ea04d0166eca0b9eaa6b
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describe
'95846' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQL' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
7bfb189b1557fa514158125fd091c10a
fda3ecc4f9d56f6e0e8c9dc47be6a0ac7c43c9e0
'2011-10-31T18:32:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQM' 'sip-files00111.pro'
5b93198dd2e7b2d2ac99c0048a9e25b8
966811136a748796ccde18790f1a72e4e7ba7773
describe
'35761' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQN' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
ed2d73796b45c212bcf6a3c4e48ce1c7
f0c0841ea3ee20e284d2322a41b63dab01e83e9c
'2011-10-31T18:37:01-04:00'
describe
'6924119' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQO' 'sip-files00111.tif'
4af6d9ade6f640fa7fa5c935c93128ff
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describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQP' 'sip-files00111.txt'
6f8955e3e5a9d54d28fb3179cded6bbb
d3a169892c455f4ee21aa517e3c7d6f80d605986
'2011-10-31T18:34:12-04:00'
describe
'10836' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQQ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
d7ba78fa712895becae0ae4b98b0ef91
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describe
'854220' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQR' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
c9a5a5a183c0a5fc839104cc0d4ef593
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describe
'99379' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQS' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
2cf011a0d6ba51118bd2a26ed4d8c035
f4d428c2d9d4d125c81b6adf8dee98d2d886f29f
'2011-10-31T18:36:14-04:00'
describe
'37062' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQT' 'sip-files00112.pro'
0533e5bb3262ce327cea53e108ac85a1
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describe
'36831' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQU' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
51afa8ce469d58dc4b9248477d0896f9
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describe
'6840287' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQV' 'sip-files00112.tif'
8d50b1e7f393d4bd1519ca9419dadd03
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describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQW' 'sip-files00112.txt'
fcfeab0084dd0d44bc35fb66d8c1d82f
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'2011-10-31T18:36:36-04:00'
describe
'11012' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQX' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
abf380b9260f4dd66c234c24e8047c0c
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describe
'855461' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQY' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
b1bb39e829def6381b705af580b90f6e
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describe
'88266' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBQZ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
7bc189dfb5616a55c4d207e3b00da099
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describe
'31624' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRA' 'sip-files00113.pro'
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describe
'32830' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRB' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6850397' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRC' 'sip-files00113.tif'
04340ff476d0ba2bf093eea61ba62f08
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRD' 'sip-files00113.txt'
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describe
'10205' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRE' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
321e2be97b9685f35e1796ce300ce805
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describe
'854629' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRF' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
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describe
'98269' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRG' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
819767159cff8f27d2cd13ac46ecd693
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describe
'36090' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRH' 'sip-files00114.pro'
ce27ee7a8dbcd045b2771a42fe4f14f6
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describe
'35913' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRI' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6843615' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRJ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
2db3c82e8749a18e096e65460bccf78b
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'2011-10-31T18:32:06-04:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRK' 'sip-files00114.txt'
3e9f4e018a13989bf2b98766cb591987
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describe
'11415' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRL' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
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describe
'834850' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRM' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
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describe
'106108' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRN' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
ec9aaebc6e40c84b74baac8beb9aa7f9
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describe
'37804' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRO' 'sip-files00115.pro'
2e8b3d3f39aeed56a38f0f658a025b45
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describe
'39976' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRP' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6684921' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRQ' 'sip-files00115.tif'
f2edabfea1fa754f4f9986f02f0af9c0
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'2011-10-31T18:36:39-04:00'
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRR' 'sip-files00115.txt'
f149c9311f3f83e851a6775460fc97a4
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describe
'11159' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRS' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
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describe
'819543' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRT' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
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describe
'102142' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRU' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
d7d0492ebc3239b0bafddd196c9b6377
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'2011-10-31T18:33:40-04:00'
describe
'37577' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRV' 'sip-files00116.pro'
e3352b21a1d3edd5a8ad4d3b3516743c
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describe
'38708' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRW' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
3a1093fa5d3b827696aae430b62086e3
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describe
'6563433' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRX' 'sip-files00116.tif'
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describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRY' 'sip-files00116.txt'
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describe
'11944' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBRZ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
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describe
'834844' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSA' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
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describe
'87440' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSB' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
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describe
'24081' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSC' 'sip-files00117.pro'
cbc8ab94fe5714db92b9b73863051696
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describe
'32227' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSD' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
f8d08f70b1ad451ee2b4a9de9f12f185
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSE' 'sip-files00117.tif'
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describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSF' 'sip-files00117.txt'
7392785c1910a142112b004f19425a87
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'2011-10-31T18:37:34-04:00'
describe
'9322' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSG' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
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describe
'819578' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSH' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
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describe
'96190' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSI' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
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describe
'19588' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSJ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
b3598e6f9458850ed51abde76480cbc2
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describe
'33279' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSK' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSL' 'sip-files00118.tif'
e7a438aae24e39676e078e79d54dc24d
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'2011-10-31T18:31:30-04:00'
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSM' 'sip-files00118.txt'
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describe
'10769' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSN' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
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describe
'834811' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSO' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
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describe
'107445' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSP' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
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describe
'39775' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSQ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
da563dbef7a7be6f5590290e2677cbb8
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'2011-10-31T18:33:41-04:00'
describe
'40265' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSR' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
ece85c6b3f74e3273d9db56dbb951ca4
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSS' 'sip-files00119.tif'
9354b30fc0fcd7359744dead2eb255a7
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'2011-10-31T18:37:11-04:00'
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBST' 'sip-files00119.txt'
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describe
'11084' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSU' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
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describe
'819639' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSV' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
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describe
'101334' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSW' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
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describe
'20330' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSX' 'sip-files00120.pro'
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describe
'34609' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSY' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBSZ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
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describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTA' 'sip-files00120.txt'
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describe
'10874' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTB' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
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describe
'834766' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTC' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:33:48-04:00'
describe
'101702' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTD' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
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describe
'18619' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTE' 'sip-files00121.pro'
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describe
'35021' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTF' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTG' 'sip-files00121.tif'
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describe
'768' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTH' 'sip-files00121.txt'
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describe
'9923' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTI' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
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describe
'819619' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTJ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
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describe
'101619' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTK' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
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describe
'37134' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTL' 'sip-files00122.pro'
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'2011-10-31T18:36:05-04:00'
describe
'38344' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTM' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTN' 'sip-files00122.tif'
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describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTO' 'sip-files00122.txt'
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describe
'11723' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTP' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
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describe
'783123' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTQ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:36:43-04:00'
describe
'84657' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTR' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
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describe
'17585' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTS' 'sip-files00123.pro'
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describe
'29863' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTT' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6271147' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTU' 'sip-files00123.tif'
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describe
'740' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTV' 'sip-files00123.txt'
096ebbc81a73614e383579c7bc6fc653
b71c9e185ea5fe1c9edb650496c89ea2ee709554
'2011-10-31T18:38:05-04:00'
describe
'9530' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTW' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
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describe
'819547' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTX' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
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describe
'100253' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTY' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
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a9f753fefef1e936a32e9b0ce478137cd7b7cfac
describe
'37111' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBTZ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
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describe
'37334' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUA' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUB' 'sip-files00124.tif'
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'2011-10-31T18:34:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUC' 'sip-files00124.txt'
0c277df98a8576ea53f344eaf788ca02
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describe
'11708' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUD' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
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describe
'790504' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUE' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
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describe
'95225' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUF' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
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describe
'16975' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUG' 'sip-files00125.pro'
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describe
'32515' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUH' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6330367' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUI' 'sip-files00125.tif'
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describe
'699' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUJ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
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describe
'10176' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUK' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
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describe
'819623' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUL' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
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describe
'80425' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUM' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
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describe
'10697' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUN' 'sip-files00126.pro'
2d4595e42af9f65642c88bc95c2a8126
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'2011-10-31T18:35:59-04:00'
describe
'26508' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUO' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUP' 'sip-files00126.tif'
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describe
'477' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUQ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
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describe
'8917' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUR' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
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describe
'834820' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUS' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
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describe
'85710' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUT' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
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describe
'15619' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUU' 'sip-files00127.pro'
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describe
'29884' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUV' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUW' 'sip-files00127.tif'
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'2011-10-31T18:35:17-04:00'
describe
'657' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUX' 'sip-files00127.txt'
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describe
'8921' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUY' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
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describe
'819609' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBUZ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
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describe
'64924' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVA' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:32:22-04:00'
describe
'8935' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVB' 'sip-files00128.pro'
4949a14ac31e7b81fda9f72cce7fb60f
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'2011-10-31T18:32:15-04:00'
describe
'22421' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVC' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVD' 'sip-files00128.tif'
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describe
'367' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVE' 'sip-files00128.txt'
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describe
'7763' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVF' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
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describe
'834734' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVG' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
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describe
'94089' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVH' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
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describe
'28732' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVI' 'sip-files00129.pro'
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describe
'34856' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVK' 'sip-files00129.tif'
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'2011-10-31T18:36:48-04:00'
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVL' 'sip-files00129.txt'
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describe
'9766' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVM' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
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describe
'819585' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVN' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
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describe
'84751' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVO' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
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describe
'4818' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVP' 'sip-files00130.pro'
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describe
'27292' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVQ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVR' 'sip-files00130.tif'
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describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVS' 'sip-files00130.txt'
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'2011-10-31T18:36:22-04:00'
describe
'9281' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVT' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
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describe
'834836' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVU' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
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describe
'107146' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVV' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
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describe
'37736' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVW' 'sip-files00131.pro'
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describe
'40290' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVX' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVY' 'sip-files00131.tif'
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describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBVZ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
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'2011-10-31T18:36:30-04:00'
describe
'11114' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWA' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWB' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
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describe
'104054' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWC' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
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describe
'38375' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWD' 'sip-files00132.pro'
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describe
'39380' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWE' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWF' 'sip-files00132.tif'
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describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWG' 'sip-files00132.txt'
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describe
'12172' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWH' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
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describe
'834828' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWI' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:33:44-04:00'
describe
'70905' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWJ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
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describe
'15762' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWK' 'sip-files00133.pro'
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describe
'25296' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWL' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWM' 'sip-files00133.tif'
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describe
'675' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWN' 'sip-files00133.txt'
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describe
'7685' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWO' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
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describe
'819539' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWP' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
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describe
'90471' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWQ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
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describe
'24940' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWR' 'sip-files00134.pro'
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describe
'31908' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWS' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWT' 'sip-files00134.tif'
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describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWU' 'sip-files00134.txt'
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describe
'10122' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWV' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
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describe
'795015' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
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describe
'97956' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
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describe
'8117' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWY' 'sip-files00135.pro'
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describe
'31505' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBWZ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6366557' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
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describe
'347' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXB' 'sip-files00135.txt'
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'2011-10-31T18:31:50-04:00'
describe
'9825' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXC' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
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describe
'819610' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXD' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
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describe
'88767' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXE' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXF' 'sip-files00136.pro'
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describe
'33043' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXG' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXH' 'sip-files00136.tif'
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describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXI' 'sip-files00136.txt'
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describe
'10694' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXJ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
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describe
'854575' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXK' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
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describe
'103564' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXL' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
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describe
'37351' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXM' 'sip-files00137.pro'
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describe
'37640' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXN' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6843653' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXO' 'sip-files00137.tif'
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describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXP' 'sip-files00137.txt'
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'2011-10-31T18:34:49-04:00'
describe
'10823' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXQ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
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describe
'866032' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXR' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
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describe
'109048' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXS' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
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describe
'37377' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXT' 'sip-files00138.pro'
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describe
'39943' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXU' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6936905' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXV' 'sip-files00138.tif'
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describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXW' 'sip-files00138.txt'
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'2011-10-31T18:34:55-04:00'
describe
'10924' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXX' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
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describe
'854644' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXY' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
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describe
'98279' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBXZ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
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describe
'35884' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYA' 'sip-files00139.pro'
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describe
'37487' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYB' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYC' 'sip-files00139.tif'
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describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYD' 'sip-files00139.txt'
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describe
'11207' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYE' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
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describe
'866047' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYF' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
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describe
'89737' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYG' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
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describe
'20427' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYH' 'sip-files00140.pro'
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describe
'31494' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYI' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYJ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
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'2011-10-31T18:33:18-04:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYK' 'sip-files00140.txt'
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describe
'8850' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYL' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
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describe
'854532' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYM' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
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describe
'101175' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYN' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYP' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYQ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
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describe
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describe
'10919' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYS' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
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describe
'866034' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYT' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
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describe
'102339' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYU' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
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describe
'36266' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYV' 'sip-files00142.pro'
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describe
'37819' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYW' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYX' 'sip-files00142.tif'
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describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYY' 'sip-files00142.txt'
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describe
'10179' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBYZ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
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describe
'854660' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZA' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:35:39-04:00'
describe
'79116' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZB' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
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describe
'5661' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZC' 'sip-files00143.pro'
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describe
'25229' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZD' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZE' 'sip-files00143.tif'
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describe
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describe
'8221' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZG' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
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describe
'866002' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZH' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZL' 'sip-files00144.tif'
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describe
'659' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZM' 'sip-files00144.txt'
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describe
'8482' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZN' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
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describe
'854666' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZO' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:33:12-04:00'
describe
'102045' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZP' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
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describe
'37076' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZQ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
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describe
'38026' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZR' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZS' 'sip-files00145.tif'
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describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZT' 'sip-files00145.txt'
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describe
'11191' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZU' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
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describe
'866033' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZV' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABBZZ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAH' 'sip-files00147.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAN' 'sip-files00148.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAO' 'sip-files00148.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'24057' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAS' 'sip-files00149.pro'
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describe
'32083' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAT' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAU' 'sip-files00149.tif'
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describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAV' 'sip-files00149.txt'
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describe
'9767' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAW' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
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describe
'866007' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAX' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
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describe
'104982' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAY' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
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describe
'22234' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCAZ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
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describe
'35728' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBA' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBB' 'sip-files00150.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBC' 'sip-files00150.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBD' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
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describe
'829561' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBE' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
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describe
'85455' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBF' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
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describe
'19263' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBG' 'sip-files00151.pro'
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describe
'30608' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBH' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:34:08-04:00'
describe
'6642979' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBI' 'sip-files00151.tif'
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describe
'805' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBJ' 'sip-files00151.txt'
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describe
'9719' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBK' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:34:18-04:00'
describe
'865950' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBL' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
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describe
'105453' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBM' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
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describe
'23671' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBN' 'sip-files00152.pro'
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describe
'35827' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBO' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBP' 'sip-files00152.tif'
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'2011-10-31T18:34:35-04:00'
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBQ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
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describe
'9904' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBR' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
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describe
'837344' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBS' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
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describe
'104767' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBT' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'32213' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBV' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6705203' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBW' 'sip-files00153.tif'
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describe
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describe
'9956' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCBY' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'108385' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCA' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
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describe
'37625' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCB' 'sip-files00154.pro'
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describe
'40366' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCC' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCE' 'sip-files00154.txt'
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describe
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describe
'854538' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCG' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'27235' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCI' 'sip-files00155.pro'
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describe
'35918' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCJ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCK' 'sip-files00155.tif'
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describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCL' 'sip-files00155.txt'
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describe
'10608' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCM' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
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describe
'849024' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCN' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
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describe
'90248' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCO' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
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describe
'30571' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCP' 'sip-files00156.pro'
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describe
'33503' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCQ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6800603' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCR' 'sip-files00156.tif'
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describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCS' 'sip-files00156.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCT' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
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describe
'854645' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCU' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'23075' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCW' 'sip-files00157.pro'
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describe
'34176' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCX' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCY' 'sip-files00157.tif'
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describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCCZ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
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'2011-10-31T18:32:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDA' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
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describe
'848106' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDB' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
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describe
'98872' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDC' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'35715' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDE' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDG' 'sip-files00158.txt'
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describe
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describe
'854663' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDI' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
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describe
'83565' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDJ' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
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describe
'24749' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDK' 'sip-files00159.pro'
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describe
'29842' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDL' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDM' 'sip-files00159.tif'
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describe
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describe
'8904' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDO' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
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describe
'835213' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDP' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
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describe
'82873' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDQ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
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describe
'21482' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDR' 'sip-files00160.pro'
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describe
'29960' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDS' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDU' 'sip-files00160.txt'
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describe
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describe
'884903' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDW' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'32348' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCDZ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'20273' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEF' 'sip-files00162.pro'
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a548feadab9c04d9935ab1e1c57c66e2cbd38456
describe
'31133' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEG' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
50a631a34ef4ede202694da19139ed4f
5993d009b37153194d3cd28017c9ef546d29d0de
describe
'6972467' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEH' 'sip-files00162.tif'
dc75f1e92d3479a56a2280ea1d8fff82
4346637c4e413badeff57f7ca139884204eb1563
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEI' 'sip-files00162.txt'
bade86c50ba884c4b12c582ae749a897
3e3a1503aa8da980298356da0ae461f50e20819b
describe
'9424' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEJ' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
6fc24ba0e7d97e92132135f280778503
ca3af929a4703b50bc321418605853711afde41a
describe
'884911' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEK' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
00745477cd859719e97fdcae9f2ff539
5a1a71748f5d88f4dc624e232c6ff185b762d742
describe
'97544' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEL' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
e24541a86b29bf8b93381c314a305200
82ad40f590037da1de1686f7b496f3cd0cc8b7f0
describe
'35340' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEM' 'sip-files00163.pro'
6e98281dfb723fe299b344d5b1e2cb8b
603f739ba29c61bfe30f532a727c6b950fbaeb16
describe
'36568' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEN' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
e400c774793b9d3bb67ed35345431db7
938f04ff0288059496f82b1664567f32da8cbb7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEO' 'sip-files00163.tif'
8599ecdf46e6473d6f0758cf88a57778
81cab2b41f9e4cff5b5423eaa585315372bad643
'2011-10-31T18:33:42-04:00'
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEP' 'sip-files00163.txt'
7e4d3fd582690aa33a9da54299e53c01
5dff01fd6dde266475869c10d3440c7360471869
describe
'10344' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEQ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
e649b19567264667b4e7a68a97aecd02
fe0043c648323e1586b74639e39f57ab9de5544e
describe
'870722' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCER' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
08838708aaf34acdba40f8cf315013c8
e673e611d6edac967345987942d18866250855c8
describe
'89941' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCES' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
f0ea3a8c6c46c215fa6b22156be54561
1279eee9f84dac63afc539d7219277c392c76fb6
describe
'17256' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCET' 'sip-files00164.pro'
f0b6a0f37f58fef0a6ed0d8a9d3e04d4
95cb8145e374c89447371e1c9c221426db6ecdb4
describe
'30154' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEU' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
0b7b0b1a971fcc5126188736f11a5045
8fffb82b4f82e99b8984e7fde9f2f6d85c13f668
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEV' 'sip-files00164.tif'
74d8ad03de5b6a7f9c8678ab6d0a2878
17b81bce018cd412edbd73dc6c3ddae84f857e7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEW' 'sip-files00164.txt'
56e52f0ee3f1ce5b40688d1bd012fb03
d269d7706108e3b0543b608cd4ec6c1e93ed1d06
describe
Invalid character
'9012' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEX' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
8434f75246a838c0e7512c3e4bff0a35
9311498b69e566840884e59adbc85f5cadf98d6d
describe
'884895' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEY' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
e897aae91ad5ce0ef077b80dccd3d006
9a776aad6aa32eda1b67951ce1961832add17050
describe
'88147' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCEZ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
7388a403ddf4567f71432d1d041c6b3e
d71c7e8a592b7df15793076d9f708f9e84fae714
describe
'22116' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFA' 'sip-files00165.pro'
4e4be3f4e9a0de696527db2328da58fa
74a4323c2a472903e7c2509afc02128ccc1917ad
describe
'30617' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFB' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
7be7ba538c13d7132e6cb1fea59a6c44
0ff1ac1ce3e27fa587503e580b27d7d6f0d38b68
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFC' 'sip-files00165.tif'
1aedc5d5ab7d6810fa7996aaed4045e5
59a798246fde419278282ab1c9eae1c5721858d4
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFD' 'sip-files00165.txt'
95c1896fd952095dfd2d88ca3a541953
2c2c973134f27c93d9f6b0fd63c1efcfb13bdf38
describe
'8843' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFE' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
dd7e5bb281a585eea2ce88fe83067c7e
cca0a7f019d61fba2214c89bba6850877f191fdd
describe
'870732' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFF' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
8d0fdd3626633e6bc8bbe2ea17cc691f
c952a82b3d9c324c4fb1fe1bbbd49e662f1caef7
describe
'102618' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFG' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
8fae1717d596e842a945c148918713bd
7de77ab0f237fc90054234e2b01cb3929ba638e9
describe
'37518' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFH' 'sip-files00166.pro'
7258a3392a31ad64d7c8fa493c3fd4fa
d1d0a7b5d564131daefe3dee52bd50284257c57d
describe
'37711' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFI' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
e1007f6f0ad18d96bc7d7453d287b1e5
31b623b8889095978f1f5bf42d061e55eedb03b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFJ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
2df67075f400a647dc26032dbbecd62d
f91214d765a346f81f171e5c925da31728993eca
'2011-10-31T18:32:48-04:00'
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFK' 'sip-files00166.txt'
d6a787ea4f4ede881f495270e479efcc
23f99cd52b32edb8e92d451627ed765f71c79e83
describe
'10921' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFL' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
039178f59b128a57a630935132fe74d3
1e3f78828182341ca2005cd9ec359e859f85a140
describe
'884907' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFM' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
a787d2540a8ac4b3c6c89dc80a1840fc
e47240d824a12ceb0e96098cd020a998abb475ab
describe
'82027' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFN' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
8d6a352b1e3e6a1e9b4f7b8a45098326
b37f7e965d8433173cdcd5531901ae29fa307705
'2011-10-31T18:35:51-04:00'
describe
'11843' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFO' 'sip-files00167.pro'
f2ff6ab0b80cd9251a197d4d832a87bf
703ba9d2484266783e892e4cf18c093472997734
describe
'27471' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFP' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
3ae540a7abdadd59c105e95b5b61739c
63543c2710f5902d3b7e30ee9cbb06b590ec9960
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFQ' 'sip-files00167.tif'
0573df7a57a76c4395a83cfc89becdcc
ef16970027c66fdf88dfd494f5202c2ad7819968
describe
'486' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFR' 'sip-files00167.txt'
4bbd42c391cf78fb29019be517f9aeea
5db861b580408e01bbfa7f2a960f4e8973e3b1be
describe
'8008' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFS' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
5a2b24c7d59946232b7a1c6ab3124ced
6718683d90514fa686268e94e338f45ebc33cb1f
describe
'870587' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFT' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
6099b31babd8f9a98c6f2a690609d2e0
f204d85561d775db664cf1ef5a31e260f65bb7af
'2011-10-31T18:32:38-04:00'
describe
'98570' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFU' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
8a8b7fd7f04a09f0da016e48bac5dde1
b16db91977b1bc0af14f457c7bf35663cacf3c5b
describe
'18554' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFV' 'sip-files00168.pro'
a6e94da6e4d9f6b1c65c0800627713b0
a5850e2057073b789855451c8c7b51c0a4d2eeed
describe
'32401' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFW' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
5b9a69da1c1e294df43ec1441ecbadec
4f8104d25f4895feeeed6413862dedbbfb72bc2a
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFX' 'sip-files00168.tif'
5b1c8761ad5bb88b9ae4b7d58a598af6
b4bbaafd28f7199ff615786e8baf9cd1893c6817
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFY' 'sip-files00168.txt'
8f009b6c04afcd9ffd545b890a7a6d86
9a23effa796ed2be5f54ca92bcccf441fd27b6b6
describe
'9691' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCFZ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
86d32233eadb74a17bc0c0ec316564fa
4c0570d384b2bec08beae1dffc1637756ba054fb
describe
'884775' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGA' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
cc2ee9f02f528b5b17cf00461cda4732
eb3b8331a9c836f72f50242a1be5afbe7fa5a8ff
describe
'93470' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGB' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
81c525479183d79457c35192c60aedc6
32c61cce0961655a86a0e2a69a6b753e5eedcfb8
describe
'17172' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGC' 'sip-files00169.pro'
ebf5e4d060de1f333d0c06ef71bfc3ea
743ec15542547fe458e8721e4e14440373ac7482
describe
'31107' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGD' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
b5a19fc8d5c81548d54964631fcd36ec
a089e7b0aecdad3b865681f58b1cab3a19e7bffb
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGE' 'sip-files00169.tif'
602d5591595e98e85b6c1f04140d203a
799b1f24451303b0de8196464df58decb10741a3
describe
'719' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGF' 'sip-files00169.txt'
a4d1d740bf93c26c88cd54d2f6099fff
8603e652fb6018ad442e6330f684f332e6f337e4
describe
'8876' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGG' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
4e2fdc7c90bc51657613e2f87a472a11
3d3d6da22f64ce491f39d2c9bd034a62b7a33458
describe
'870556' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGH' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
74707ad468d1af0994eca22bde27a4ca
cc062645aec2b54c7d600bf7dd808d06c4c20a54
describe
'91140' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGI' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
c75d7d113051d1af20f0b46a2993f7cd
6f90d213e66d5202b023c03fd2f5d8a0c57500d3
describe
'23771' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGJ' 'sip-files00170.pro'
b554cec45410d6a118584ca8406c4a43
29c1bf6f6e52316901a3efd0c642158c18f7413f
describe
'31825' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGK' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
adb109f4215d6021df3c5afb396527c0
04405a53ba6d79774b8c4e63f7a4476eff1e14b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGL' 'sip-files00170.tif'
e8e2e60a9e798439544bc326a36d20fe
0a2ea5ef56ac8a7e6a119ebffea58d42b979f998
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGM' 'sip-files00170.txt'
a55d2198b87f1b841d6ae30c090a5f21
97dfd1a5e374fc6694c24941acbaac6a9d47494e
describe
'9835' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGN' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
d5aacbe1501d581cfb4009f09f43b6ea
326b77d19f59ae2be2ff1ad99fdb110501dd5654
describe
'884892' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGO' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
11d0fc3372d02e507ec4acec34eefb5a
5ff9799f9691d7c34032f4d800fee97920e162d5
describe
'99513' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGP' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
fb96993fd34882bfd84d75f87c363117
25b87ab9e90c3df23df32928b2e24e8ac983db85
describe
'36007' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGQ' 'sip-files00171.pro'
49f126fd3f73c3d90752d949cf975d8e
1902fc7477421438ea48a32056848fc0e0ed2680
describe
'37108' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGR' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
5dc182783f02550c33fa83d5f928d9ed
0b157cbe7a5b429034754d38034050f944b77c6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGS' 'sip-files00171.tif'
05129d200c86988942110676f6fcff0b
3c47b9804bf2b5cfaa32c1c9db94260155e9f1cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGT' 'sip-files00171.txt'
445049f1521cbb770ce7e51fa0ad1579
aba107ef44e6b6af4a4ea8845b9c4e9c8354df94
describe
'10217' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGU' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
674d8c30ae971afb0df80c55478c4311
e394e9e2242932a6f36882855463540992f7be4d
describe
'870700' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGV' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
c54a8ee6609017b80a6d815672c39757
5ba5d0602fcc5655a4879d04f63b0227fa2b77dc
describe
'90094' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGW' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
717dc8d6b86ac458f4e632f6f88e913d
2c9555e0a8c0a4bb23a2544a9fb8f3156580a5cb
describe
'30427' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGX' 'sip-files00172.pro'
08d240f899caf90c200cbbd065318056
77a3dca672c962ae1acfccda2d96da2330b63571
describe
'32824' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGY' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
dadb657b8b6783a0bf876579c45da161
5492a969001d35a8ca60df22f570b4211a4ff5cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCGZ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
26293d40a73d6d3dc0fd7a11d7b1e786
94c614efcaaf227e4ec33004238ba9c726a03239
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHA' 'sip-files00172.txt'
b8f5eb1b932a88ffac46c86aba8edfbd
6b44abc566dbae8cd01cefa8211bc5938e916b80
describe
'9929' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHB' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
9f27004119c70cc9a05b552ad6250724
9a4b573764ec24ffbce270b7b26f31b73a4c43fa
describe
'884799' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHC' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
c8f0fd2d3c5cea716253cd9f6e6b2fe9
2848e0ebc6e99194e1396d5946854757a1326447
describe
'83920' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHD' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
c8494018ddcabf9eaa0a51bcdb68363b
80b7cc9efcb94a528d166a082f971774316be536
'2011-10-31T18:33:49-04:00'
describe
'28578' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHE' 'sip-files00173.pro'
900e6a418df4f55027d984efce0a0cca
664cd47881d6e645debc903917ffd274facf0cad
describe
'31183' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHF' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
6f81806cb7392542cef0e12257d01e3a
43ed20f208811ca4fed25da7f4feee68e111fa52
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHG' 'sip-files00173.tif'
6e3715c4c45196b1b7fa42ae68b23e47
eb2c1ad6d44a35d9fa598e77d9d5324147d6a580
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHH' 'sip-files00173.txt'
cce57cb2f87bc760f2d8fbc85a819051
51604f05fe4569af06fc13dd9811d4ba47ce8c4f
describe
'9039' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHI' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
f57086084c187a1b723dc4e93e797377
d82df2c48fe4cb7864115d1201c0efce6fba1f94
describe
'870623' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHJ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
e8b62964eef70830bacfaf9af18b5096
ab58e7beadf80a48f7cf079680b2826dc66293cd
describe
'88519' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHK' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
a311e4ceb97c1acd6ff5c40c642b24fe
a5674c4bfcf162384b736f3788c91a96f15ef451
describe
'30662' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHL' 'sip-files00174.pro'
149bcdfdcf308f5d75b051c534dcd4c6
7e8e062bf0d48d27f053aeb30ca66746b873788f
describe
'32629' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHM' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
0989c28d78728216d0c64432bef2656b
ad994c5b9df322c08d7a586486118ca7180404b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHN' 'sip-files00174.tif'
fb06eabf8e31853e6973d20a3da86cf7
1e523792bd50027aab3b6869e451dc31d8d75c7c
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHO' 'sip-files00174.txt'
3ea1b919abb4d4f9538803d7316986d2
788dda599e5e204ad29a4f861166dab0f894fa75
describe
'9949' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHP' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
f1b6c8d6408f3f11cd686bd8b39f7899
bb5556506d61d6ada08efcd8a95af4a0742a4ab0
describe
'825779' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHQ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
ccc40ee440201154078e7b552572cb7a
7aadf054365de625f73e5c2e739c63c26587a6c9
describe
'96175' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHR' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
c61c0c8e28673a1ec7bfa40349226cae
9f9f44b66311423f18b7b834fe0ec04175e7cd2f
describe
'20038' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHS' 'sip-files00175.pro'
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describe
'32363' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHT' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6613281' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHU' 'sip-files00175.tif'
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'2011-10-31T18:37:00-04:00'
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHV' 'sip-files00175.txt'
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describe
'10733' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHW' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
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describe
'870707' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHX' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
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describe
'92317' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHY' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:35:06-04:00'
describe
'32426' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCHZ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
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describe
'34455' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIA' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIB' 'sip-files00176.tif'
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describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIC' 'sip-files00176.txt'
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describe
'10252' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCID' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
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describe
'884909' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIE' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:32:09-04:00'
describe
'107851' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIF' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIG' 'sip-files00177.pro'
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describe
'40226' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIH' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCII' 'sip-files00177.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIJ' 'sip-files00177.txt'
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describe
'10979' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIK' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
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describe
'854161' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIL' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
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describe
'101558' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIM' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
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describe
'18189' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIN' 'sip-files00178.pro'
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'2011-10-31T18:35:34-04:00'
describe
'34133' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIO' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6840259' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIP' 'sip-files00178.tif'
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describe
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describe
'10231' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIR' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCIW' 'sip-files00179.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'37352' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCJJ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'880309' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCJN' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
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describe
'102309' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCJO' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
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describe
'37446' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCJP' 'sip-files00182.pro'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'10868' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCJT' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
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describe
'864808' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCJU' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'885712' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCKB' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'34446' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCKE' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'357' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCKN' 'sip-files00185.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCKO' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
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describe
'864014' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCKP' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'35202' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCKR' 'sip-files00186.pro'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'11038' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCKV' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'34499' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCKY' 'sip-files00187.pro'
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describe
'35977' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCKZ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6676679' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLA' 'sip-files00187.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'101870' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLE' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLI' 'sip-files00188.txt'
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describe
'11393' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLJ' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
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describe
'824901' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLK' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
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describe
'96467' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLL' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
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describe
'35605' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLM' 'sip-files00189.pro'
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describe
'35978' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLN' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLP' 'sip-files00189.txt'
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describe
'12151' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLQ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
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describe
'890307' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLR' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'19575' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLT' 'sip-files00190.pro'
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describe
'28313' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLU' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7129027' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLV' 'sip-files00190.tif'
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describe
'863' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCLW' 'sip-files00190.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'12081' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMA' 'sip-files00191.pro'
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describe
'25319' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMB' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6724785' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMC' 'sip-files00191.tif'
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describe
'509' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMD' 'sip-files00191.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCME' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
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describe
'867247' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMF' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:36:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMH' 'sip-files00192.pro'
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describe
'35990' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMI' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMK' 'sip-files00192.txt'
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describe
'11380' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCML' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
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describe
'844404' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMM' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T18:34:07-04:00'
describe
'81885' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMN' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
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describe
'17943' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMO' 'sip-files00193.pro'
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describe
'29594' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMP' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'9853' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCMS' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'34444' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCNC' 'sip-files00195.pro'
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describe
'34144' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCND' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'10980' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCNG' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCNM' 'sip-files00196.txt'
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describe
'9182' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCNN' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'11781' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCNU' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
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describe
'864526' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCNV' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
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describe
'102255' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCNW' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
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describe
'37725' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCNX' 'sip-files00198.pro'
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describe
'37590' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCNY' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCOA' 'sip-files00198.txt'
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describe
'11238' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCOB' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCOO' 'sip-files00200.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-10-31T18:37:19-04:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCOV' 'sip-files00201.txt'
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describe
'12392' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCOW' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
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describe
'868720' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCOX' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
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describe
'76977' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCOY' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'24026' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPA' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPC' 'sip-files00202.txt'
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describe
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describe
'838753' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPE' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
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describe
'102157' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPF' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
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describe
'38433' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPG' 'sip-files00203.pro'
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describe
'37604' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPH' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6716903' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPI' 'sip-files00203.tif'
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describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPJ' 'sip-files00203.txt'
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describe
'12261' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPK' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:37:49-04:00'
describe
'872737' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPL' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
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describe
'73995' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPM' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
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describe
'6011' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPN' 'sip-files00204.pro'
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describe
'23958' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPO' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6988907' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPP' 'sip-files00204.tif'
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'2011-10-31T18:34:52-04:00'
describe
'257' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPQ' 'sip-files00204.txt'
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describe
'8183' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPR' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
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describe
'878708' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPS' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'35408' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCPV' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCQE' 'sip-files00206.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'9253' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCQT' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCQZ' 'sip-files00209.txt'
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describe
'12130' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCRA' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
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describe
'875047' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCRB' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'841049' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCRI' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCRL' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCRN' 'sip-files00211.txt'
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describe
'11836' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCRO' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'34793' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCRY' 'sip-files00213.pro'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'11273' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSC' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
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describe
'874199' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSD' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
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describe
'101512' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSE' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'36996' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSG' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSH' 'sip-files00214.tif'
9301ce35d2bc975cad3f9f68f7558c11
de32b616c21e48db3f6f717864f915de9d2a4dd4
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSI' 'sip-files00214.txt'
6a7d209f9e6507c99ff9b779c5885ea1
8dcb4f03fc6b686a50fe3d71e1a45a844295570b
describe
'10981' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSJ' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
9b6a3bc5e8b3a353944d5b13fc886228
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describe
'853135' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSK' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
e2fe824fb5788e605f6e1f2ebf716c51
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describe
'86936' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSL' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
c3bac35e7a04d4f20ec32c7e93e47b05
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describe
'31437' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSM' 'sip-files00215.pro'
7d224dc646144278ff5ea9b4f3b48f7f
9a1b7d397acc5d85818523841dad57ef9ce6c9cb
describe
'32519' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSN' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
7e8be9cc285a40a10c8de2df212995dd
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describe
'6831643' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSO' 'sip-files00215.tif'
7bc5c20452d4effdeebc31fbb0bd1b01
48fbf8bd1fc22587e9995bdb7bad275436b64916
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSP' 'sip-files00215.txt'
700780e19b9b2d83094ce6346c78b806
0c5f390af23b5054ca8b2447ddc6e2691bd438c3
describe
'10634' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSQ' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
089b94a9a35cda6b0a84e405dcdbc011
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describe
'882200' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSR' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
6bd2febda48c6f6ae465b7e112ac5c7a
2d7ec816805672e7b923d3458f1cdc272010fdeb
describe
'97300' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSS' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
dbd46412d6a44feb13de795a8131c126
46791fc23e46fc4c4be59712576f9c5253fff365
describe
'18827' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCST' 'sip-files00216.pro'
b9d96d62b68a21c9a818fc270abd0ca2
23da2e5dc6e3b0ec4c5397ae0c0ddffe34a4bb9c
describe
'32089' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSU' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
f780aebefc5d497c31e2788c6aab695c
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describe
'7064509' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSV' 'sip-files00216.tif'
446c3616a8bbc3993559c799198b2442
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describe
'778' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSW' 'sip-files00216.txt'
c2a2fbc0c960ef3725bc57db7cf89af6
97d74407d3fa476cbe63ec15c256d5444584fee8
describe
'10038' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSX' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
f84fc098e37204ef908e6bb72477f571
fdc9283a505fcc2f959c3fc4a16f4d0ce128327f
describe
'837261' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSY' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
4353fe9d9ad3f2227f51be8999e28f7f
834ecf827bdc544de70c40c6c0a741f9b89efd77
describe
'99309' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCSZ' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
4a7b0bc2eab96cb483a55848a81684ca
0ac8de80f60461fb1a622ce0b6c87fdf8c40584e
describe
'36465' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTA' 'sip-files00217.pro'
a1bd3cff9fe70350a5b26a4253f5b3f4
9122e2f150cc0e8b5fed6cd5dce4bed64657c240
'2011-10-31T18:36:53-04:00'
describe
'36913' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTB' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
2082fddee3928108f19edc9e708c0984
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describe
'6705549' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTC' 'sip-files00217.tif'
1cde2767426c2d2f8aba8d5200a98cda
4085eda55533ef5a174f30789a4963e0f37a9791
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTD' 'sip-files00217.txt'
752f4a7a4202eea010c4e0c50d2d15a6
7c3a12df345592f58dc24b19322346e9b5e77176
describe
'11895' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTE' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
b010a2fbc1e00495a9bfa1e9f16bb040
7662d7fd1a99a2edb8216989d94df2bd92041214
describe
'876010' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTF' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
2cefcba27164c0733d2279521cb76dcb
6cad91388a785efd013d59b0994f119e31fe483e
describe
'86389' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTG' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
86e7db818e03dd463ce1181b93ebaf08
0f93c204dd0a45bcd81af5abece8c3f7a15dde5b
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTH' 'sip-files00218.pro'
752a1c6f49a2f8900fe417144e0eb530
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describe
'26036' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTI' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
43424eb94e9b9e9a432e356a555833b4
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describe
'7016413' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTJ' 'sip-files00218.tif'
ef26990aebf3c7a7eae00c4120fff4ea
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describe
'66' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTK' 'sip-files00218.txt'
2ef64f7b9cd6f4a0298ab6fd09ee839f
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describe
Invalid character
'8681' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTL' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
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describe
'909136' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTM' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
2fb5d2f6d9e50339f6d8c7ee6060c4ae
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describe
'101338' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTN' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
ac860670cb5cdfce9da991d44171217c
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describe
'37875' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTO' 'sip-files00219.pro'
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describe
'37803' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTP' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
b11547bd145944e3d18c0bafe30c55e6
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describe
'7282895' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTQ' 'sip-files00219.tif'
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describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTR' 'sip-files00219.txt'
0a8f815e1916a0a84c0686de49fb87cb
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describe
'11133' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTS' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
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describe
'897222' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTT' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
c83665c7d2279ed1662cf9b60807c30d
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describe
'92385' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTU' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
07869dfb8ee6ac34cc78bb9894731d53
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describe
'23018' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTV' 'sip-files00220.pro'
b769dbba01c5212e20a6bb2a701b83be
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describe
'32333' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTW' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
1e03a0143be6c5077ece0ab495875dc3
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describe
'7186789' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTX' 'sip-files00220.tif'
8d1617fff3984d387c604c69f5ada29b
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTY' 'sip-files00220.txt'
3672018977b1c3afdba6786e560b3477
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describe
'9641' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCTZ' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
9040dfa0c67154d599a54f03277e97cc
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describe
'841949' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUA' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
5116929be33925ee7c63c86a7a500efa
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describe
'84356' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUB' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
12104bcd2cd61b0968417db7c0532fc0
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describe
'17241' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUC' 'sip-files00221.pro'
80d18981f10c3af5a214f2278ed88b3b
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describe
'28510' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUD' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
d31a5eaacbe9a052043202a883b8d5af
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describe
'6742151' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUE' 'sip-files00221.tif'
3a38c3b0de88396a47336ac7b0cad612
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describe
'731' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUF' 'sip-files00221.txt'
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describe
'9119' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUG' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
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describe
'869050' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUH' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
9d04808901ae040c9b67977d1ea62e2a
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describe
'101685' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUI' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
80eb2ce5743da891e7cf32835cfa4a1e
d7c07f0f1b447560b495c2eaa71dc4208cbd7f2f
describe
'37995' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUJ' 'sip-files00222.pro'
c1ed630c673dde75b1e3a16513689281
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describe
'37596' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUK' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
00861469adc21e21596a590e5384e6b8
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describe
'6958929' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUL' 'sip-files00222.tif'
0c2598ba690333d05e2ee888087a4a93
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'2011-10-31T18:34:47-04:00'
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUM' 'sip-files00222.txt'
b06f819d1f2995daeaf89e7d4cbc33d0
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describe
'11196' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUN' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
3f9b3cba192ebfb295751ec98c275833
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describe
'858098' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUO' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
9297ab3a643381eb84bf3171e00088e2
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describe
'91175' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUP' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
fb1d8f9d146435ed61306424f61ef56b
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describe
'24434' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUQ' 'sip-files00223.pro'
e1c7470154b125aa73a4402b409ee0b3
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describe
'32763' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUR' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
fb480fb6a2a5c7b2b931819df254a3c8
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describe
'6871267' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUS' 'sip-files00223.tif'
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describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUT' 'sip-files00223.txt'
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describe
'10285' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUU' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
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describe
'842244' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUV' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
d7ccfcb27daa73b4f1ed83b848e6d891
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describe
'81518' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUW' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
237afbfcb7cf1bfe0f10e2403fa7db22
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describe
'19885' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUX' 'sip-files00224.pro'
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describe
'27847' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUY' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6745037' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCUZ' 'sip-files00224.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVA' 'sip-files00224.txt'
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describe
'9336' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVB' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
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describe
'862397' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVC' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
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describe
'99209' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVD' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
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describe
'36340' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVE' 'sip-files00225.pro'
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describe
'37097' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVF' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
a86bd4e608114144c5606a76589b054a
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describe
'6905903' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVG' 'sip-files00225.tif'
dad38b38e6a229fbe58eae9af7ab1359
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describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVH' 'sip-files00225.txt'
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describe
'11670' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVI' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
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describe
'871545' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVJ' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
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describe
'76779' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVK' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
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describe
'19106' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVL' 'sip-files00226.pro'
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describe
'26013' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVM' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
839efefdc497bd8a52432c505d9b16ea
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVN' 'sip-files00226.tif'
8601f480af73cc6783269aa2ee8b0994
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describe
'800' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVO' 'sip-files00226.txt'
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describe
'8614' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVP' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
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describe
'854206' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVQ' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
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describe
'87944' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVR' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
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describe
'19063' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVS' 'sip-files00227.pro'
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describe
'30623' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVT' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
ed79375e379b90d7600611a5adbc74b1
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describe
'6841171' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVU' 'sip-files00227.tif'
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'2011-10-31T18:36:38-04:00'
describe
'794' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVV' 'sip-files00227.txt'
50af2d8cfef11a33a946e3a072e83b46
e8f694f68b962bdee4d7906da7d43e35f30d1f21
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVW' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
d19a390bd352fd2094c376b1d823c8a5
5d9a22e48465051d17829a9afca4138a33f33943
describe
'876709' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVX' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
fbf0726e0cc0c2e88f9c5ab8f0f35e88
ca9747c23f8207cff5e3fbe8573d430625f4cd89
describe
'99835' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVY' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
940604e8a3d303e64a2af6380f4752d8
50470097d674d70862298614bef9f5e501eabaae
describe
'37495' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCVZ' 'sip-files00228.pro'
04558e517a858504ae46e59f951a3170
a65bbd17e13da5676f3e6328971fcfbe093fa6f3
describe
'36675' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWA' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
0333b1d9ec36ee222615ecefb12f4478
a7a8c00be6d34a1bbf3709c5af7c9772fbb73696
describe
'7020371' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWB' 'sip-files00228.tif'
93b75a9f8b8c1b0473a1fb485995ee3c
162b3f23608290b3c247bbee49860a64e0afdc8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWC' 'sip-files00228.txt'
f22fa10887049635ca0315811a306cc0
5e04bb3ae40d202e8b745f864d22fc24cc74d698
describe
'10887' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWD' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
af475f199773b9aec1d6d93c88ef3494
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describe
'854203' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWE' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
7907da85dac210c671038e94322ac9d1
41055e856cef20079e4b9254718dd6167beeb3de
describe
'97713' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWF' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
8587784f909b5a25f2dd32e1c08cd479
07447040492bbe0a95a47be1ce387a73bccecae2
describe
'26588' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWG' 'sip-files00229.pro'
60f045dc3454f8fb5f3777275adfe987
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describe
'34319' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWH' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
7f62f46567930d80cbf8ac9dc824a8d9
527d4b0999041165c9c24eeed8fe355dc8fac11f
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWI' 'sip-files00229.tif'
078404f3b79311bb9b4a1a2d20d0e939
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describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWJ' 'sip-files00229.txt'
d3d103438827341ceeeb356145231f2f
7e6f4d544c7ef01b8664e726d2986e4b849cf4b1
describe
'10744' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWK' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
c03f9546b4bb7ea82ebe5c791eeb92c8
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describe
'864742' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWL' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
e306ecb4768f7b1e90261eae30a65c3a
1caed2dc7c0bbe0a29810e17986ab155fe47baa8
describe
'84441' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWM' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
8eb45a040892f1e8bd3865984a562049
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describe
'24679' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWN' 'sip-files00230.pro'
d2c98e4467202e80ce5908eeeadb12e4
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describe
'30128' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWO' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
b761dc92b21b58c6a4fcba919ff28181
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describe
'6924955' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWP' 'sip-files00230.tif'
a2d9c8c9f949b0d8c91e5aae3c965840
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describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWQ' 'sip-files00230.txt'
6f923cb656414fd0f34c03f53d52b80c
cb1586dd2d0ee802acf3484b0bf942a5f54898eb
describe
'9795' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWR' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
3624be187c2f389dc89641c4e1cfe356
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describe
'861692' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWS' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
c8afa2a685fe788854a2a1c06d2507ca
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describe
'99986' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWT' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
cbd7ea4b415a9000e3ebc3579fa03c5d
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describe
'36926' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWU' 'sip-files00231.pro'
0646cf10c45a428fd2d64cf6d6b9c943
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describe
'36802' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWV' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
59a2fe81147654c3aed7f505e44f4d93
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describe
'6900137' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWW' 'sip-files00231.tif'
aeacdd4ec4e586ee0819fc10ffb4b2fd
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWX' 'sip-files00231.txt'
378cb97ad7da4c33d9b6005f4db20928
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWY' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
5fa43ef3b29fd6c8ab90b0db58d6a219
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describe
'892056' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCWZ' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
239d0884ce0255454a4ad18932a26994
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describe
'95997' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXA' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
db35a3edce0cd29b659e84616dd52857
42ef58ac9354d565d1e53c2b5592de816aff0c80
describe
'24787' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXB' 'sip-files00232.pro'
4b53d98ce6736788ac3477e64ec30e9c
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describe
'32847' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXC' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
e55e27dca5fd55f0104710d00f77f19c
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describe
'7145741' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXD' 'sip-files00232.tif'
e925a05bc8894b2865f2bb1bacfd1add
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describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXE' 'sip-files00232.txt'
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describe
'9761' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXF' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
e17d2c04bbde2810689300d3dcdf1cd8
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describe
'833251' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXG' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
71ab2ee09edbf7e20192f9261bb36dcf
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describe
'95284' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXH' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
93d1adf96648f3d4668e017ec85aa353
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describe
'32436' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXI' 'sip-files00233.pro'
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describe
'35469' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXJ' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6673267' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXK' 'sip-files00233.tif'
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describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXL' 'sip-files00233.txt'
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describe
'10940' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXM' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
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describe
'857628' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXN' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
3822f4c5a97d206883878685d421d127
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describe
'102932' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXO' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
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describe
'37439' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXP' 'sip-files00234.pro'
b4984253c5eb93b781233031703bcb5b
1a94bc377076c8eb6f6063e6c4884fc8f485130f
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXQ' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
13b6e956d1d87d312462a44a60dd9d68
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describe
'6867827' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXR' 'sip-files00234.tif'
63ff2c99fc229b68494ec8d22918dfd3
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXS' 'sip-files00234.txt'
96859e1a23b2dcf1d20192c2f468b20f
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describe
'11704' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXT' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
36c2c776225bdbb21d62c8ff0bf41109
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describe
'858510' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXU' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
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describe
'77534' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXV' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
11e55ebe4189987488f052d69d461624
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describe
'24550' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXW' 'sip-files00235.pro'
fea7b8abdec1f68cc614450de53c20cc
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describe
'28861' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXX' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
36138dc0b97731df902bb521cd564397
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describe
'6874797' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXY' 'sip-files00235.tif'
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describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCXZ' 'sip-files00235.txt'
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describe
'9235' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYA' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
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describe
'892851' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYB' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
1a2ede0deae9e606bc1485796a6f322b
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describe
'99436' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYC' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
8745cea16f46ff84655d7690407f003e
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describe
'36459' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYD' 'sip-files00236.pro'
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describe
'36024' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYE' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7149451' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYF' 'sip-files00236.tif'
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describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYG' 'sip-files00236.txt'
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describe
'10864' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYH' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
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describe
'847170' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYI' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
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describe
'97885' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYJ' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
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describe
'34480' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYK' 'sip-files00237.pro'
9bf8db904f79178b5f0a4f463fdda220
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describe
'35859' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYL' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
f64b6164ed38bb1d85d79e5154b59ca4
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describe
'6784531' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYM' 'sip-files00237.tif'
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describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYN' 'sip-files00237.txt'
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describe
'11318' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYO' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
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describe
'860337' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYP' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
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describe
'77577' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYQ' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
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describe
'21528' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYR' 'sip-files00238.pro'
3fc1d51e3981130a1889ec25b9d9dd61
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describe
'27484' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYS' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYT' 'sip-files00238.tif'
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describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYU' 'sip-files00238.txt'
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describe
'9053' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYV' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:35:30-04:00'
describe
'830379' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYW' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
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describe
'99047' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYX' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
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describe
'36950' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYY' 'sip-files00239.pro'
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describe
'36308' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCYZ' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T18:38:06-04:00'
describe
'6649747' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZA' 'sip-files00239.tif'
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describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZB' 'sip-files00239.txt'
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describe
'11664' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZC' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
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describe
'874186' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZD' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
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describe
'98501' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZE' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
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describe
'35477' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZF' 'sip-files00240.pro'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZG' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7000379' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZH' 'sip-files00240.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZI' 'sip-files00240.txt'
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describe
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describe
'865855' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZK' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
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describe
'92878' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZL' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
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describe
'29735' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZM' 'sip-files00241.pro'
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describe
'33708' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZN' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZP' 'sip-files00241.txt'
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describe
'11135' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZQ' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
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describe
'862821' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZR' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
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describe
'76730' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZS' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
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describe
'18340' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZT' 'sip-files00242.pro'
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describe
'26435' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZU' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'799' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZW' 'sip-files00242.txt'
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describe
'8752' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZX' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
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describe
'864846' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZY' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
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describe
'99847' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABCZZ' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
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describe
'37608' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAA' 'sip-files00243.pro'
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describe
'36965' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAB' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAC' 'sip-files00243.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAD' 'sip-files00243.txt'
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describe
'11444' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAE' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
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describe
'881508' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAF' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'10309' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAL' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
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describe
'850600' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAM' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
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describe
'104353' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAN' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAR' 'sip-files00245.txt'
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describe
'11969' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDAS' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDBE' 'sip-files00247.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDBF' 'sip-files00247.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDBT' 'sip-files00249.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDCG' 'sip-files00251.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'29378' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDCT' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAATfileF20081101_AABDDC' 'sip-files00254.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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BOSTON.



TALES WORTH TELLING;

OR
A TRAVELLER’S

ADVENTURES BY SEA AND LAND,

TOLD TO HIS YOUNG LISTENERS,

—>—- :
Illustrated with one hundred and thirty-three engravings.
—e—
BOSTON:

MUNROE AND FRANCIS.
NEW=#YORK:
C.S. FRANCIS & CO. 252 BROADWAY

1852.


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PREFACE.

a

Ir is the humble purpose of this little work
to convey to the rising generation a small col-
lection of ‘‘ facts more wonderful than fiction.”
These compositions are a condensed series of
truths in travel, related in evening fireside con-
versation, connected by no chain but the que-
ries of children and a mother’s replies. ‘They
were thus related because the purchase of many
books was inconvenient, and because, if prac-
ticable, their formidable exhibition would have
frightened a fastidious little auditory ; thus de-
feating the object in view. They were
briefly rehearsed in colloquial familiar speech,
as an incitement to juvenile curiosity, leaving

_ future gratification and filling up of the picture
_ to time and opportunity. The Editor’s children
_ were anxious for information and entertain-

ment, and she endeavored to satisfy their wish-
es in a manner agreeable to themselves, but
not in a totally frivolous mode. She tried to

_ simplify and suit to their capacities a few in-
_ teresting topics, brought to light by recent trav-
_ellers or skilful. and enterprising men, with a
iv PREFACE.

modicum of amusing oF playful recital. Toa
numerous young family these “ prief chroni-
cles” appeared to afford pleasure and profit,
and perhaps at least created a relish for future

reading and proficiency, one of the objects

dearest to a mother’s heart.
In the hope that what was beneficial to a

solitary coterie of youthful inquisitors might be ©
of similar use in families similarly situated, and —

at the kind solicitation of many esteemed
friends, she presents this little work to the pub-

lic, as an sntroduction or pioneer to more eX-_

tensive observation and perusal of the records
‘of useful knowledge.
A MOTHER.
Boston, 1852.



!

5
7
CONTENTS.

Among the many answers to the children’s questions are replies on the fol-
lowing subjects :

PAGE
Arab and his Goat - - 4l
Ancient Juvenile Games 74
African Moors - - ee

Arabian Camel and the Lover 164
American Prairie Bee Hunt 188
African Lion - - 102
American Fruits - - 20
African Sociable Bird - 114
Anecdotes—Bengal sharks,é&c. 233

Art of Printing — - a
Banian tree and the Poet 248
Birds’ Nests a ee
Bees and Honey ole an
Boston Tea Party - - 16
Black Hole of Calcutta - 180
Bamboo Tree - ©
Carpenter Spider o (ati
Cacao, or Chocolate-tree - 135
Caravan entering Mecca 145
Catching Wild Ducks - 241
Calcutta and the Ganges 168
Cormorant Fishers - - 24!
Cinnamon Tree - = 5
Chinese Pagoda and Teapickers 14
Cocoa Nut tree - = BW
Duck Trap oc ee TE
Date-tree of Arabia, Anecdotes 109
Eddystone Lighthouse - 6
Elements—Fire, Air, &c. 233
Eve’s Apple tree - -
Great Deserts of Arabia 130
Geese and the Gallic army 61
Hero’s Ancient Toys 74
Happy Family —e 7
Hindoo Statues ot o.:

Humming Birds - -
Indigo Plant - - ~- 208
Inventions—James Watt 82
Inquisitive Boy andthe Lady 68

PAGE
Killing of Birds in sport 63
Looking-glass Tiger Trap 225
Lark’s Nest - oe
Lion Hunt . oe ee
Mount Vesuvius - = 46
Monkey Tea-gatherers - 19

Minot’s Ledge Lighthouse 97
Mason Bee, Tapestry Bee,&c. 199

Mount Etna . - - 31
Noss of Brassah - 91
Nutmeg Tree - <= 249
Native Combat witha shark 258
Orange tree . ‘*- one
Orkney Island Bird Catching 94
Palm-tree Date - - 133
Pompeii and Herculaneum 47
Pensile Grosbeak e. 6°
Pearl Fisheries of Ceylon 226
Rail-road to the Red Sea 147
Royal Bengal Tiger - 209
Snake Charmers - - 168
Spider’s Web - -

Shark Combat -

St. Kilda Precipices -

Summer Visit - °

52
258
90
150
Sugar Cane and Maple - 200
Tempests of the Ocean 99
8

222

242

Tea Plant - o -«s

Tree Tiger Hunting -
Talipot tree a Sox
Tailor Bird ee. ee
Visit to the Mill, Miller, &c. 152
Wild Duck Catching 241
Watt’s Engine - ¢: Jae
Walter Scott and Mr. Watt 89
White Ants ») .¢ -—e
Windmill 2. ohh). aan

Wild Elephants - + ie
Wax Tree o «3 a














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FREDERIC AND LUCY:

OR

FOOD FOR YOUNG MINDS.

THE HAPPY FAMILY.

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson had three children, Fred-
eric, Lucy, and William. Frederic and Lucy could
read tolerably well when assisted by their kind pa-
rents. -William was avery little fellow, and could
only read little words ; but he liked much to listen,
when his father and mother were explaining to his
brother and sister what they could not understand, in
the books they read, or the plants they saw. He took
much pains to learn, and used every day to say he
hoped soon to be able to read such great books as his
father and mother read, that he might know as many
useful and pleasant stories as they did.

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson had great pleasure in im-
parting to their children such information as was suit-
ed to their years ; because Frederic and Lucy took
great care to remember what they were told; and,
when they saw any lions, tigers, or other uncommon
8 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

animals, or any curious plants, would endeavor to rec
ollect all they had been told about them.

TT

THE TEA PLANT. _

One morning, when Mrs. Johnson was going to
make tea for breakfast, she accidentally let the tea-
canister slip from her hand, and a great quantity of P|
tea was scattered upon the table-cloth. All the chil-
dren were standing round the table, breakfasting on ©
bread and milk; they eagerly offered to assist in —
gathering up the scattered tea, and returning it to ©
the tea-canister ;—while so doing, Lucy observed ©
how very different tea in the canister appeared from —
the leaves which were spread out by the hot water —
in the tea-pot ; and she requested that her mother
would be so good as to inform her how the tea was —
made to look so dry ;— for I think, mother,’ said she, ‘
‘you have told me that tea comes from a shrub; and, |
if it is the leaves of a shrub, how is it made to look ©
so dry and twisted ? i

| will tell you, my dear,’ replied her mother: ‘the ©
leaves of the tea-shrub are, when first gathered, (that 1
is, picked off the shrub,) moistened by the vapor of
boiling water, then put into large flat iron pans, and
heated over a fire, until they become quite hot : they
are then thrown out upon clean mats ; and people,
who stand ready for the purpose, roll the hot leaves







FREDERIC AND LUCY. 9

_ between the palms of their hands, until they become
| dry and curled, as you see them.’
| ‘ Mother,’ said Frederic, ‘ does the tea-shrub grow
in our country ? I never saw one in our garden.’
‘No, my dear, tea does. not.grow here: it grows
_in China and Japan, countries very distant from ours,
and it is brought to us in ships. The gathering of
tea leaves forms a great part of the employment of
the poor people of those countries ; for the leaves
are taken from the shrubs four times in the year ; and
these leaves must not be hastily pulled from the tree,,
but plucked off one by one, with much care. Chil-.
dren learn to do this; and, had you been born in
China or Japan, instead of the United States, you,,
‘probably, would have been little tea-pickers.’

The children smiled at this idea, and little William
asked what kind of a leaf a tea-leaf was.
_ ‘When the leaves are allowed to grow a long:
time, William, they very much resemble the leaves:
of a cherry-tree, and are called black or bohea tea ;-
but when they are pulled young, you can see their-
pei by a whole leaf taken from the tea-pot, which



s called old hyson, one of the kinds of'green tea, al-.
hough hyson-skin is also called black or boliea, be--
ing the broken or poorer part of the hyson.”
_ ‘Is a tea-leaf like a cherry-leaf’?? asked William.
_ ‘ The tea-plant is an evergreen shrub, and grows
» toa woh varying between three. and: six feet,,and
|
5

]

:
[
Ly
y
10 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

the flower, a drawing of which I will show you, is
shaped like the wild rose in our pasture.’

4

)

Fi oS Ny i )



‘The-seeds are sown in holes drilled in the ground
at equal distances inregularrows. Whilst growing,
the plants are regularly watered. Among other sto-
ries relative to the tea-tree it is asserted that some of
the finest specimens grow wild on the precipitous
sides of rocky mountains, where it is too difficult for
human beings to gather them ; and that the Chinese,
in order to gather the tea, pelt a race of monkeys,
which ‘inhabit these mountains, with stones, provo-
king them to return the compliment with a shower
of :teasbranches. ‘China is a great and populous
FREDERIC AND LUCY. ll

empire, and the choicest tea grows in particular
provinces, and in some of these spots the emperor


12 FREDERIC ANDLUCY-

and nobility cultivate favorite species at great eX-
pense, care, and cleanliness, for their own use. Hence
the names Imperial, Gunpowder, Ningyong, &c. In
some places tame monkeys are trained to climb the
heights, and strip the leaves from the bushes. The
leaves then either roll down the rocks, or the wind
blows them down, and the owners gather the tea,
and reward the monkeys with something of which
they are fond, and treat them with kindness for
their labor, fatigue, and mischances. This is one
way in which mankind turn the instinct and indus-
try of animals to their own advantage. The mon-
keys sometimes climb the rocks by means of ropes,
fastened at the summit of precipices, and sometimes
mount these without such secure footing, in which
last case, notwithstanding their activity, they once
in a while meet with an accidental tumble, as in the
monkey picture at the head of page 17.’

‘Mother,’ said William, ‘ are the hills so steep in
such an old country as China ?

‘ Hills are sometimes levelled, my dear, but rocky
precipices and mountains usually ‘ endure forever.’
Mr. Ellis, an English traveller, says, ‘ Our walk
lay through a valley, where we saw, for the first
time, a tea-plant. It isa beautiful shrub, resembling
a myrtle, with a yellow flower extremely fragrant ;
we also saw the ginger in small patches, covered
with a frame-work to protect it from the birds. The
view from the top of the mountain repaid the labor
FREDERIC AND LvUey. 13

\
\\

Hall ;

== BEA Ni
N \ N \ NAN i eS \ \\ Ss
pre eS z Zz —— as - \ : oe \\



of our ascent. The scene was in the true mountain
style, rock above rock in endless and sublime variety.
This wildness was beautifully contrasted by the cul-
tivation of the valleys, speckled with white cottages.’

‘ But, mother, is every leaf of tea in all the chests
at the tea-store,—marked all over with hieroglyphics,
or what we children call pot-hooks and trammels,
—are all these millions of millions of leaves rolled
in the hand, to make them curl, as Lucy: does her
hair in pieces of old newspaper, or crimp with a
pair of curling-tongs ? said little William.
14 FREDERIC AND LucY.

SS

MY

AAI

pares
-_
nea
Lae
—
ee)
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a.

ANS
4
}

2



‘Some kinds of tea are only exposed under a shed
to the sun’s rays, and frequently turned. The pro-
cess in this picture is probably only used in green
teas. A drying-house, a section only of which is
given in the cut, will contain from ten to twenty fur-
naces, on the top of each of which is a flat-bottomed,
shallow iron pan ; there is also a long, low table,
covered with mats, on which the leaves are spread
and rolled. When the pans -are rightly heated, a
few pounds of fresh and juicy leaves are spread on
them, and the operative or workman stirs them rap-
7

FREDERIC AND LUCY. 16

idly with his bare hands, until the heat is too hot
for the touch. At this moment he takes off the leaves
with a kind of shovel like a fan, and pours them on
the mats before other operatives, who, taking up a
few leaves, roll them in the palms of their hands in
one direction only, while other assistants with fans
rapidly cool the leaves by fanning them. This heat-
ing, each time more moderately, is sometimes repeat-
ed two or three times, till the moisture is evaporated.
It is afterwards sorted into several classes, packed in
chests with the name of the district, grower, and
inspector, and called, from a Chinese word, meaning
seal or measure, Cuops.’

‘ Mother, how far distant, is China ? said Lucy.

‘ Perhaps our ships have to sail 10,000 miles, in
a round-about way, to arrive at Canton in China.’ .

‘ What a distance to send for breakfast, mother !’
But what is meant by the tea-act ? said Frederic.
‘Do tell us about this, mother.’

‘You are little Bostonians, and ought to know
what was done by your fathers and grandfathers.

‘ England, you know, was the mother country of
the United States, and, when she undertook to en-
force ‘ taxation without representation,’ the then col-
onies separated from Great-Britain. The tea-act,
stamp-act, and finally the Boston Port-bill, shut-
ting up the harbor, and stopping all navigation and
commerce, were the most obnoxious of these oppres-
sions, and, rather than receive tea and other articles
16 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

under such hard terms, they threw the tea overboard
at Griffin’s (now called Russia-wharf,) got rid forever
of paying the tea and all other taxes, separated
from the mother country, fought our way to liberty
and freedom, and, under the administration of Wash-
ton, brought tea ourselves to Boston and other places.
‘ Town-meetings and other peaceable measures had
been resorted to from the year 1769 to "73, and then
the inhabitants of Boston and vicinity held a town
meeting at Faneuil-hall, which was not large enough
to hold them, and they adjourned to the Old South
church, appointed Dr. Joseph Warren and seven oth-
ers to wait upon Gov. Gage at Milton, petitioning
him not to land three cargoes of tea. Upon his re-
fusal, sixty of the assembly, disguised as Indians,
marched from the church to Griffin’s wharf, and made
tea for the fishes of half the water in the dock. Two
hundred and forty chests with one hundred half chests
were staved and emptied over the sides of the vessels
‘nto the sea. The transaction was conducted with-
out noise or disturbance, and no injury was done to
any person or article except the tea, although these
ships were almost under the guns of the fort and near
the barracks of the English soldiery. The revolu-
tionary war and the battles of Lexington and Bunker
Hill soon followed, and independence was established.
Good, however, has come out of this consummation,
and both countries have been enriched, increased,
mutually benefited, and ennobled by the division.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 17

‘I will now go on with my story, whereI broke off.
Monkeys, as I told you before, in climbing, some-
times fall from the crumbling rocks.

,
ON Non

~



3 ; Sat oa SAR Se
tee. NS ate
tt



‘Tea was not introduced into England till 1710,
and, owing to its cost, not much used in America till
fifty years later. It is probably to this period that
we may refer the anecdote, if true, of the country
lady, who receiving, as a present from a town ac-
quaintance, a small quantity of tea, in total igno-
Tance of its real use, looked upon it as some outlan-
dish vegetable, boiled it till she thought it was ten-
der, and then, throwing away the water, endeavored
to eat the leaves.’

' + ah. mother,’ said Lucy, ‘ I have seen you take
18 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

out a different kind of tea when you were going to
have company.’

‘Yes, my dear, that tea is finer-tasted, and more
expensive, than what I use daily, and is called gun-
powder. The younger the leaves, the finer or more
pleasant the tea ; but then, you know, as there must
be a much smaller quantity of tea produced from se-
lected leaves not arrived at their full size, so this
tea is sold ata higher price. At seven years old, a
tea-shrub yields nothing but poor, hard, low-prized
leaves. Gunpowder and old hyson are the first and
best pickings, or ‘ first chop,’ inChinese terms. The
following picture is probably the method of gathering



bohea or black tea in pastures, and drying them un-
der sheds, as a cheap or less expensive kind, or chop.’

‘IT once saw a China man in the street. mother,’
said Frederic, ‘ dressed strangely.’

.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 19

‘The dress of the Chinese is almost as singu-
lar and curious as their productions, manners and
customs. The men wear a bell-looking hat without
rim, shaped nearly like a basin or dish-cover. Their
black hair is very long and braided, and hangs down
behind them, reaching more than half way to their
feet, and sometimes with an addition which looks
something like a whip-lash, ornamented with little
pieces of colored riband. They wear wooden shoes,
with the toes turned up, something like sleigh-run-
ners, long stockings, short pantaloons, sack coats, @

mar

See Fiat SM



long robe with wide sleeves like a loose gown, a sort
of decorated apron, and flowing silk girdle ; the
tobe is sometimes of rich figured stuffaccording to the
90 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

caste or rank of the wearer; and the rich button
of coral, crystal, or gold, mounted in his funnel-shaped
hat, shows his rank, from the emperor and mandarins
down to the poor little fanner of tea-leaves, of the
lowest caste of Chinese supposed degradation.’

‘ Do the ladies dress so strangely ? asked Lucy.

Female fashions are sometimes very hurtful to
health in all nations. Iwill mention one Chinese
fashion which tortures or lames young females of the
higher castes, and is foolishly imitated by the mid-
dling classes, but it merely makes hobbling cripples of
them, and does not otherwise greatly injure them.
Some of the lowest classes, or castes, chiefly confined
to the mountains, or distant provinces, have not adop-
ted this unnatural fashion. You know, no doubt, that
I refer to a Chinese lady’s shoe, which is formed of
silk and beautifully embroidered. The foot is confined




FREDERIC AND Luvey. 21

in infancy, except the great toe,and tortured in youth
into this stunted unnatural shape. You, Lucy, lately
saw a Chinese lady in Boston, wearing this little
Shoe, but this fashion jeopardizes not the life of its
wearer, like our silly fashion of tight lacing. The
old English fashion of peaked-toed boots was carried
to such extravagant lengths that occasionally the
incommoded wearer tied the toe end of his boot above
his knee, and in battle cavaliers got rid of the nui-
sance by cutting off half a yard of it.

We have no excuse for our fashions, and the
Chinese only a lame one for theirs. The fe-
males in China without small feet are held in con-
tempt, and employed only as servants. Even if two
sisters, otherwise equal in every respect of person or
mind, if the one has been thus maimed, and the other’s
feet suffered to grow naturally, the latter sister is
considered unworthy to associate with the rest of the
family, a sort of banished Cinderella, who cannot put
on a little glass slipper, and therefore doomed to per-
petual obscurity, or the drudgery of the kitchen.’

‘Do they live upon food like ours ? said Frederic,
‘and do the boys dress and play as we do 2’

‘In many respects their modes and even their
sports are at antipodes, or directly contrary to ours.
For instance, the boys play shuttlecock with their
feet instead of their hands ; and, what is more
strange, Frederic, they strike the bird or ball with
the sole of the foot ; at which they are very expert.
22 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

«



Even the pedlar, walking behind them, exhibits his
wares, consisting of toys, dolls, scaramouches, and
skipjacks, strung upon a long pole.

The wealthy sometimes treat their visiters with
hundreds of rich courses ata single dinner,eating from
|

—————————

FREDERIC AND LUCY. 23

diminutive plates and cups. The Hong merchant,
Mowgqua, at Canton, lately invited an Englishman a-
mong his guests, and met him at the door along with
his son, a white knob upon his cap,betokening the fifth
rank of mandarins, and both their attires of the most
rich and splendid kinds. Young Mowqua wore, over
all his silk coats and vests, confined by a beautiful
sash, a cloak of the costliest furs, the badge of nobility.
Wealthy nobles and merchants live in splendor. And
six long hours was the poor visiter kept eating,
drinking, and smoking.

But the Chinese people eat almost everything
that comes to hand. In the streets or squares, birds
are daily exposed for sale, which we have excluded
from our bills of fare, such as hawks, owls, eagles,
and storks; to us nothing would appear more laugh-
able than to see the Chinese arrive with a carrying-
pole supporting two bird-cages, which, instead of
birds, contain fat dogs and cats. The flesh of these
last, when of the best age and quality are admitted
upon tables of the nobles. Other Chinese marketers
bring upon their tall carrying-poles many dozens of
rats, nicely drawn and cleaned, suspended by means
of a cross-piece through the hind legs. These rows
of rats, tho’ highly prized, are eaten only by the poor.

Mrs, Johnson now said she had letters to write, and
desired the children to go into the garden. They

obeyed her immediately.
24 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

THE LARK’S NEST.

Wuen Mrs. Johnson had finished writing, she _
called her children to walk with her in the pastures, —
They were very glad ; for they all delighted in see- _
ing wild flowers ; and, when little William was not _
of the party, (for he was too young to have long —
walks without being tired,) Frederic and Lucy al-
ways brought him a nosegay of wild pinks or roses.

The morning was beautiful, the sun shone bright,
and the sprightly notes of the lark, as she ascended ~
high in the air, increased the lively gaiety of the
children. In the excess of their delight, they boun- ©
ded over the meadows ; and sometimes they stopped
to listen to the music of the lark, and admire the —
height of her flight.



While running across a large field, they suddenly
stopped on observing a bird, which they supposed a
lark, rise from the ground, and presently fly so high


fee

FREDERICANDLUCY. 25

as scarcely to be discerned. Frederic advised Lucy
to tread very lightly, as it was probable the lark had
a nest on the ground. He had seena lark’s nest,



but Lucy had not ; and, when her brother Fred-

eric told her that larks made their nests on the

ground, she was greatly surprised, for she had al-
c
96 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

ways imagined that every bird made its nest in a
tree ora hedge. She stepped softly, with her body
-most double, so fearful was she of not finding the
nest. Presently she saw another bird fly from the
ground, just at her brother’s foot, who at that mo-
ment cried out, ‘I have found it, I have found it!
one,—two,—three,—four birds !’ Lucy crept for-—
ward, and then knelt down to the nest, and saw, as ©
Frederic had counted, four pretty little birds, covered ©
with yellow down, and stretching up their little ga- —
ping bills as thoughthey expected food. Just atthe ©
time they were kneeling at the nest, their mother
came up, and asked what excited their attention.

The children showed her the nest, and she joined ©
in their admiration of it and its pretty inhabitants.
Frederic proposed taking the nest home ; ‘ and then,’
said he, ‘ Lucy and I can take care of the larks, and
then we shall hear their sweet singing every day—
even, you know, mother, when it rains, so that we
cannot go out.’

‘ But, my dear little boy,’ replied his mother, ‘ you —
forget, that, while you are endeavoring to make the
young birds happy, you would make the old ones
very miserable. Even your kindness would be very
much misplaced ; for you would be doing the great-
est injury to these little birds, by taking them from
the care of their father and mother, who, no doubt,
were the birds you saw rise from the ground, and
who, most likely, are gone in search of food for their
Se Etna pty As Ss Raa PI te MNCL RE LL DRI EP Py VID BBB ONE LAER STAT REE AE

PO SEP IS:

ee

eee

FREDERIC AND LUCY. 27

young ones ; and think, Frederic, what they would
suffer when they returned with their store of provis-
ions, and found the nest they had taken so much
pains to form, and their little ones, all gone ! Think
what your father and I should feel, if, when we re-
turned: from a journey, we were to find you and your
brother and sistet taken away : and, in proportion,
feel as much as we should do,—for God has given to
all animals a strong affection towards their young.’

‘ Indeed, mother, I did not think it would have
been a cruel action to take the larks, or I would not
have offered to do so. I have often seen boys seek-
ing birds’ nests ; and I did not know it was_ wrong,
although one of these boys I was told finally fell from
a tree, where he was attacked by the old bird, and
broke both his arms.’



‘I believe you, my dear; I know you would not
intentionally be cruel.”

‘ No indeed, mother, I would not be cruel,’ said
Frederic, the tears starting from his eyes.
28 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



The best birds are recklessly destroyed for game
or sport, but all, except birds of prey, are of great
use. Seven-eighths of their food in summer is in-
sects ; they feed their young almost wholly on them.
That little bird you see on the hedge, called a hair-
bird or sparrow, feeds her young 365 times an hour,
which, at 14 hours a day, is 3500 insects destroyed —
in a week by a single bird. All other countries en-
courage their increase, whilst we persecute them,

As for those boys, said Mrs. Johnson, whom
you saw robbing birds’ nests, perhaps they are more
to be pitied for their ignorance, than blamed for their
cruelty ; for probably nobody told them how cruel it
is to rob birds of their young or their eggs. You
see you were yourself just going to commit a cruel
action from want of consideration. I am always
grieved when I see children whose friends do not
take pains to teach them humanity. But now, my
dears, I tell you what we willdo. Every fine morn-
FREDERIG AND LUCY. 29

ing we will walk to this field, and you shall bring
crumbs of bread, and lay them by the nest. In time
the little birds will learn to know you ; probably the
parent birds will also¢ You can watch the growth
of the young ones, and, when they are old enough
‘to trust to their own strength, they will leave the
“nest, and then you may take it up and carry it home
_ to examine how curiously and skilfully it is made ;
‘and perhaps some of your father’s friends, when
they call upon us, may tell you something more.

_ Frederic and Lucy were delighted at this permis-
sion ; and Lucy said, she thought she had taken so
much notice of both the young and old birds, that
_ she believed she could draw a picture of them, when
she got home. Her mother approved Lucy’s inten-
‘ tion of endeavoring to delineate the birds, saying, she
_ was always pleased when her children tried to use
_ the pencil for themselves, and were not, like some
silly children, constantly teasing their friends to
_ draw them pictures.









THE VISITER.

"the dining-room, they found, with their parents, a

gentleman whom they had never seen before. Little
_ William hung down his head at the sight of a stran-
ger, which made him look very foolish, and Lucy


30 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

was rather inclined to look bashful; but when she ©
saw her brother Frederic shaking hands with the |
gentleman and answering his questions properly like 4
a child of sense, she followed his good example ; and, —
when the gentleman desired her to come to him, she ~
went directly ; and when he desired to know if she —
could read, she spoke up and said, ‘ Yes, sir, I can 4
read a little, but not very well.’ He then talked a 3
great deal more to her, because he saw she was not —
a silly child; but, if she had gone into a corner, or —
a window, without speaking, and hung down her ~
head, put her fingers in her mouth, nipped her frock, :
or any other foolish action awkward children are apt 4
to do, the gentleman would not have taken any no- '

tice of her.

Little William soon forgot his diffidence, when he q
found his brother and sister so kindly treated ; he ©
climbed up the gentleman’s knee, and held up his



mouth to kiss him. ‘That is a clever fellow, and a_

kind one,’ said the gentleman ; ‘I perceive you and |

I shall be good friends. If I find you so, I can tell”
you many entertaining stories about several curious
things I have seen.’ The children looked with de-—

light at each other ; then at their father and mother;
and then with wonder at the stranger.

‘ My dears,’ said their father, ‘ this gentleman is —

my particular friend, his name is Mr. Selby,—we
were playfellows when we were as young as you are.

The reason you have never seen him is, because he ©
;
|
| FREDERIC AND LUCY. 31

has been many years travelling in foreign countries ;
and, when you deserve the favor, I dare say he will
oblige you with recounting something of what he
has seen and heard.
_ Do, my dear sir, continue the account you were
just giving us of the volcano you visited in Sicily.’
Volcano ! volcano !” repeated Frederic and Lu-
cy, with astonishment. ‘ Pray, mother, what is a
volcano ?
_ ‘ tain, with a large opening at the top, like that of
‘wells and coal-pits. This opening, you must re-
member, is called the crater ; and out of it issues
‘flames and smoke, for the mountain is on fire with-
in, and burns with great violence. Here is a pic-
“ture of one in the night-time. Sometimes great
“quantities of stones are thrown out of the mouth of
the volcano ; and melted stones, red hot, run down
the sides of the mountain, like streams of water, and
whatever is touched by them is destroyed: these
melted stones are called Java. You must remember,
the mouth, or opening of the mountain, is called
*crater,—and the melted matter, which runs down its
_ sides, lava ; because Mr. Selby will have frequent
5 occasion to mention these names in giving his ac-
count, and, if you forget them, you will not under-
stand his strange narrative.’

The children were filled with amazement, for they
had never heard of anything so wonderful as a burn-













So tes Sh Sciam ae
‘
:
:



32 FREDERIC AND LUCY.












ing mountain, Mr. Selby, perceiving how much
their attention was fixed, began to give them a dem
cription of the mountain he had visited.

MOUNT ETNA.

‘ I agreed with a party of friends,’ said Mr. Selby
‘to visit the summit of this extraordinary mout
tain ; but, as we were unacquainted with the road
we were obliged to procure a guide. Etna is 4
mountain of such an immense size, that you cai’
form no idea of it from any hill you have ever seer

‘This mountain you must suppose to be divides
into three circles, or, as they are called, region:
The first is named the Rural Region, because it is
beautiful, pleasant country of cornfields and gardens}
vineyards and orchards ; the second is called the
Woody Region, from the magnificent trees which’
adorn it like a vast green belt surrounding the moun- -
tain ; and the third, the Barren Region, from its be- 1
ing always covered with snow ;—but, the better to
enable you to understand these divisions I will ere 7
you an outline of it,’ added Mr. Selby, taking a
pencil out of his pocket.

Frederic and his sister both declared they could
now easily imagine how the mountain was divided
into three belts, the top one like a white cap ; but
they thought it very wonderful that the region next
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 33



the fire should be covered with snow. Lucy sup-
posed the great heat of the flames would ‘ soon have:
melted the snow all away.’

‘Sometimes, I believe, it does in part,’ replied Mr..
Selby, ‘ for it has frequently happened that torrents:
of hot water have rushed down the mountain. But:
I must proceed in telling youmy journey. Wesoon:
passed through the rural, and entered the woody,,

Tegion, where our admiration was called forth by the:
D
34 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

immense size of the trees, especially some most ex-
traordinary chestnut-trees, — one, in particular, our
guide pointed out, whose branches extended so wide,
that a hundred mounted horsemen could be sheltered
under its shade! Its branches extended 200 feet in
circumference. It is called the Castago dei centt
cavalli, or ‘ chestnut of a hundred horses.’ It is
found marked in an old map of Sicily near 100 years
old ; hence its age must be considerable.

‘ Do chestnuts, such as we eat, grow on such
great mountain trees ? said little William.

Yes, my boy ; ina ball, like that of a sycamore,
horsechestnut, or shagbark.

‘ But chestnuts are flat on one side.’

Yes, because two of them grow together in a round
ball or pod looking like a large bur, or prickly plant.
This chest or green covering is very bitter, but the
nuts themselves, you know by taste, when boiled,
are as sweet as any nut. The chestnut-tree is very
ornamental, whilst growing, and very durable for
timber and fences and posts.. A gate-post or house-
rafter will remain sound for more than 50 years, and
the growth of the tree is very rapid.

‘If itis such a beautiful tree, why is it not planted
in our common ? said Lucy.

‘Probably because it is a fruit-tree, and exposed to
injury from mischievous boys, But this species of
nut is sweeter and more nutritious in some countries
than others; in the south of France, Spain, and Cor-.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 35

sica, it constitutes, when boiled, the principal food of
the poorer people. Some of the French even make
their fine chestnuts, which are grafted, into cakes,
confectionery, puddings, and bread,




\)

NOS INS
NXg SE /
WS WS. Ne j

TY

SI
RS
" SN

S

“=~

iy

4/2
4
iB
WH

. This is the shape of the twigs on which they
grow, with leaves, flowers, and fruit. The nuts
36 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

which fall to the ground fatten swine, and a squirrel
here and there gambols among the branches,

7)



ee

‘ Chestnuts do not grow in our wood-lot,’ said
William, ‘ but walnuts and hazel-nuts do, and pigs
root round the trees with their noses.’

Walnuts and hazel-nuts grow in oval or round
bitter-tasting pods ; but I will show you the differ-
ence between the three fruits. The walnuts are seen
under the letter a in the picture, and, on account of
the great quantity of oil in them, are hard of diges-
tion ; they are eaten in desserts along with apples,
the cider in the apples qualifying the oil, otherwise
it is best to leave them to the squirrels. Two chest-
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 37



nuts, and the prickly pod, holding two more, are seen
above the letter 4 in the picture. Chestnuts are in-
digestible, unless boiled or otherwise cooked, when
they become very nutritious. The hazel-nut or
filbert is above the c inthe drawing. Farmers would
reap much advantage by planting butter-nuts, chest-
nuts and walnuts, the wood being very valuable,and
the fruit commanding a great price.

But Imust resume my journey. Our attention was
attracted by the beautiful plants, whose sweet flow-
ers perfumed the air. Slowly we wandered through
this party-colored, fragrant, delightful forest, unwil-
ling to quit the examination of its beauties ; but the
setting sun reminded us to seek a habitation or
shelter for the night.

No human dwelling being nigh, we were glad
to make our abode in a large cave, which our guide
-_—-_——w oo

38 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

told us was called Goats’ Cave, because these ani-
mals frequented it in bad weather. We had seen
several goats skipping from point to point as we pas-
sed, or lying down in the shade. We broke off some
branches of oak to make a fire, and, after rubbing
two dry pieces together very hard, sparks of fire were
at length produced, and we soon had a comfortable
blaze. We had brought with usa tea-kettle, sugar,
tea, and bread ; but in vain we looked for water, and
were beginning to fear we should not be able to make
tea, when we fortunately espied a large quantity of
snow, heaped up in the corner of the cave ; with this
we filled our tea-kettle, and made a comfortable sup-
per. We then gathered the dry leaves of the oaks,
strewed in front of our cave, to make our bed, and,
being greatly fatigued, we gladly laid down to rest.
But our sleep was much interrupted by the terrific
noises which issued from the crater of the burning
mountain, resembling loud thunder.

Next morning we again melted snow, and made
our breakfast as we had done our supper. We had
risen very early, and, when we left the cavern, the
sun had not risen: the gloomy shades of the forest,
the sullen noise from the mountain, (which was not
50 loud as at night,) and the dim view of the sea ata
great distance below, made the scene awful and
grand. Every one’s mind was employed by his own
thoughts, reflecting on the almighty power of the
Creator, and we proceeded in silence.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 39

When we entered the highest region, which, as.
I before told you, was covered with snow, we were
desired by our guide to step with great caution, as
the melted snow frequently settled in pools, which
were difficult to discover, because the surface of the
water, as well as the snow, was often covered with
black ashes. The ascent over the ice and snow was
steep and fatiguing, ‘but we were not discouraged,
and finally arrived at an ancient ruin,where we rested.

Owing to the beautiful clearness of the air, we
observed the stars, which were yet shining, and ap-
peared much larger than they did when we were at
the foot of the mountain. We went yet a little
higher, until we felt the warm air from the crater 5
but we did not approach the crater itself, for that is
extremely dangerous, and many people have lost
their lives by venturing too far. We were fully re-
compensed for the labor of ascending this high moun-
tain, by the exceeding fine prospect which the height
enabled us to view. So much were we delighted,
we scarcely could prevail upon ourselves to leave the
enchanting spot.

We had not descended far on our return, before
[ suffered greatly from my own heedlessness ; for,
without considering the ice on which we were tread-
ing, I thoughtlessly turned to speak to one of my
friends, when my foot slipped, and I fell with great
violence. For some time! was in much agony, from
the extreme pain in my ankle ; but,as it was im-
40 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

possible to procure assistance, I was obliged to rise
and limp on as well as I could, my friends kindly
supporting me under each arm.

At length we arrived at the cave where we had
slept the previous night. We were somewhat ‘star-
tled and surprised to find our bed of leaves occupied,
as far as the darkness of the cave would permit us
to observe, by'a venerable patriarch of the goat kind,
with a long white beard, and piebald, or black-white-
chocolate-colored hide, and a formidable butting pair
of horns ; at his feet lay a kid, fast asleep. The old
goat seemed in no hurry to retreat, and the guide told
us he had formerly been tamed.



‘ Do goats live on chestnuts 2 said little William.
Mr. Selby said he believed they subsisted princi-
pally on green leaves, twigs and buds of all kinds.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 41

‘ Whilst they are skipping from rock to rock, why
don’t they fall as you did, and sprain their ankles ?
added William.

They climb mountains to secure themselves from
wild beasts, and to procure delicate food, and their
legs and hoofs are shaped for these purposes. Dr.
Clarke says in his travels: ‘ Upon our road from
Jerusalem to Bethlehem, we met an Arab with a
goat, which he led about the country for exhibition,
in order to gain a livelihood for itself and owner. He
had taught this animal, while he accompanied its
movements with a song, to move upon little cylindri-
cal pieces of wood, placed successively one above an-

aoQy=——
SF. ——— 3 = a SSS

ef


42 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

other, and in shape resembling the dice-boxes be-
longing to a backgammon table. In this manner the
goat stood, first upon the top of one cylinder, then
upon the top of two, and afterwards of three, four,
five, and six, until he remained balanced upon the
top of them all, elevated several feet from the ground,
and with his four feet collected upon a single point,
without throwing down the disjointed fabric upon
which he stood. The practice is very ancient. No-
thing can show more strikingly the tenacious footing
possessed by this quadruped upon the jutty points
and crags of rocks ! and the circumstance of its a-
bility to remain thus poised may render its appear-
ance less surprising, as ‘t is sometimes seen in the
Alps, and in al] mountainous countries, with hardly
any place for the feet, upon the sides and by the
brink of most tremendous precipices. The diameter
of the upper cylinder, on which its feet ultimately
remained, until the Arab had ended his ditty, was
only two inches, and the length of each cylinder
was six inches.’ :

Goats appear to court danger in climbing, reckless
of consequences. | heard once of some of them who
found out a short cut from one mountain to another
by a precipice across the valley 150 feet high. The
road for a considerable distance was but about two or
8 inches wide, consisting of alittle jagged cornice or
shelf, with perpendicular rock above and below. This
did very well whilst all passed one Way > unfortu-
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 43

nately however, one day two goats, when in the mid-
dle of the passage, met face to face. Their loud bleat-
ing collected hundreds of people in the valley, but no
assistance could be given to these poor animals,
perched 150 feet in the air, where human foot had
never trod. At this moment, one of the goats kneel-
eddown and the other carefully walked across his
back, and both were’ safe. ‘ There is a special prov-
idence in the fall of a sparrow,” and what was not
in the heart of man to conceive was happily thought
of by the native instinct, experience, or sagacity of a
couple of brute nanny goats.

One species of goat or antelope, which inhabit the
Alps and Pyrenees, and called Chamois, have longer
- hind legs than front ones, and make incredible leaps,
sometimes ten or twenty feet. They browse on
seemingly inaccessible heights, but are followed by
daring hunters. When alarmed, théy warn the flock
by a loud hiss, which re-echoes through rocks and
forests as forcibly as a rail-road whistle, although this
noise proceeds only from the nose of the Chamois.


44 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



Your mother no doubt has told you the true story
of Selkirk or Crusoe and his goats, whom, for their
amusement and his own, he taught to dance.

But to resume my journey. My friends prepared
a bed of leaves, and, when I had lain down on it, it.
was sucha relief,I thought I had never lain on a bed
so delightful. After a comfortable cup of tea, I fell
into a sound sleep, and, when I awoke, I was much
refreshed, but incapable of walking. Our guide
soon procured me asure-footed horse, and we safely
descended through the woody region to the bottom
of the mountain. I had great reason to lament my
carelessness, for my ankle became so painful and
FREDERIC AND LUCY. ' 45

swelled, it prevented me from making any more ex-
cursions for a long time.

‘ Does lava run from the crater ?” said Lucy.

It does commonly ; but the terrific element some-
times bursts the sides of the mountain, taking a
new, unexpected, and destructive track across cities
and villages to the ocean.

The kingdom of Naples has two, volcanoes, one of
them on the island of Sicily, and the other near the
great and beautiful city of Naples. In eruptions of
this last volcano, called Vesuvius, nearly 2000 years
ago, the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum were
destroyed by the fire bursting the top of the moun-
tain. Pompeii was covered 50 feet deep with ashes,
mud, pummice stones, and cinders; but a stream
or river of sulphurous lava ran a great distance and
overflowed Herculaneum with a sea of fire ; and this
last substance, lava, when cool, is almost as hard as
rock. Here is a drawing of the position of these cities.

Both cities remained buried till a few years ago,
when an excavation of Pompeii was begun.

‘ What are the lines on the map, sir ?’ said Lucy.

The dotted line shows the present outline of the
coast,—the first black line that of the coast at the
time of the eruption, A. D. 79. The other lines
show the roads leading to Pompeii. In the year of our
Lord 79, when the first eruption happened, the beau-
tiful heights of Vesuvius, like those now round Bos-
ton, were covered with villas, country seats, palaces,
46 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

gardens, and vineyards. Most of the vast populace
of the cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii were sit-
ting in their large amphitheatres, seeing combats be-
tween wild beasts, the cruel sports of the ancient Ro-
mans, when the bursting of the mountain happened.

/







E Ss

i |

ae,
NAY;
ae
~ TT ZX 7

w

HAN

on

z Qasl

S
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 47

Dense clouds of smoke, dust, and cinders turned
day into night for three days, during which profound
darkness continued, lighted only by fresh floods of
flame from the mountain. The dust or ashes was
so abundant in the air that it reached Africa, Syria,
and Egypt. It not only destroyed fields and towns,
but such sulphurous quantities of it filled the air or
fell into the sea, that the birds and fish of all the
neighboring coasts were killed.

So completely was Pompeii buried that the articles
of use or luxury, houses, streets, and utensils, have
been preserved nearly 1800 years.

Py ° Swe SL
% al ~*~ =
Ws SS
‘ge MMM OWW ‘
ava WO
Wed . ~

Oe . ,
zt ar
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bec is ge



The above drawing isa portion of Pompeii, ree
stored to light after a lapse of seventeen centuries,
during all which time new eruptions have occurred,
at intervals of three or four years. At the latest
eruption, the stream of lava was a mile and a half
broad and injured or destroyed 800 houses.
48 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

THE SPIDER.

Tur next morning the children went with their
mother to visit the lark’s nest. Little William made
one of the party ; and highly delighted was he to
go, for much he wished to see the nest and all the
little nestlings.

The children jumped, and skipped, and sung,
through the fields, until they came to that in which
was the nest ; when they arrived within a few yards
of it, each was careful to tread quite softly, and not
to make the least noise, lest they should disturb and
frighten the poor little birds ; but, notwithstanding,
the old birds, ever watchful for the safety of their
young ones, were alarmed, and flewup. The children
slowly approached, and, peeping into the nest, saw
all the little family well, and as brisk as ever.

They strewed the crumbs they had brought around
the nest, pleasing themselves with imagining how
the parent birds would rejoice to find so much good
food so near home ; and then they left the nest, in
order to gather some beautiful flowers, that grew in
this and the neighboring pasture. In doing this, Lucy
saw another bird fly from the hedge, which Mrs.
Johnson told her was a goldfinch. They soon found
the nest, which contained five very pretty speckled
eggs, their main color being white, gently tinged
with blue, but the delicate spots upon them were of
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 49



a dark purple hue. The groundwork of the nest was
made of moss and fine grass, so curiously put togeth-
er as not to have a single leaf of the grass or moss
project, and lined or felted with wool. No weaver
could have better knotted and woven and put on the
map or soft covering over the inside surface, than
these little feathered mechanics. Frederic asked his
mother to tell them more about the mother birds.

‘I will tell you,’ said Mrs. Johnson, ‘ what our
neighbor, Mr. Bolton, told me, ‘On the 10th of May

E
50 FREDERIC AND LUCY

I observed a pair of goldfinches beginning to make
their nest in my garden. They had formed the
groundwork with moss. gTass, &c. as usual ; but, on
my scattering small parcels of wool in different parts
of the garden, they in a great measure left off the
use of their own stuff, and employed the wool. Af-
terwards I gave them cotton ; on which they reject-
ed the wool, and used the cotton. The third day I
supplied them with fine down, on which they forsook
poth the others, and finished their work with this
last article. This nest was beautifully tied and wove.
Are birds ever so very tame ? said Lucy.

Birds, although seemingly shy, have a friendship
for men or boys who leave them unmolested. They
build near them to avoid birds of prey. A shed in our
neighborhood, which long had a wren’s nest under
its eves, was taken down in spring. The owner, ob-
serving the old birds fidgeting about, stuck the skel-


FREDERIC AND LUCY. $1

eton of a horse’s head on the top of a pole, and the
birds within an hour took legal possession, by filling
the cavity of the brain with sticks, hay, hair,and wool,
and, in a few days, nine little black and white speck-
led eggs were in this strange-looking wren-house,
which continued their domicil for many years, till
the tall pole was violently blown down in an October
gale, and the old horse’s head broken to pieces.’

Each of the children now gathered a large bunch
of wild flowers, for there were a great many differ-
ent kinds in this field,and about the hedge-side ; and,
when their mother saw they had sufficient, she pro-
posed going to a green bank, which they saw at a
little distance, to rest themselves, and examine the
beauty of the flowers. They all were willing to do
this, for, with running and jumping they had nearly
tired themselves.

When they were seated, they began to open their
nosegays, and Lucy showed them some wood-wort,
which she had at first greatly admired for its dark
purple flowers, curiously dotted with very small white
spots ; but she found it had so disagreeable a smell,
that she thought it was better to throw it away ; and
she was going to do so, when she observed two of
the leaves were curiously folded together ; and, on
opening one, exclaimed, ‘ O, mother! O, Frederic !
look, what a beautiful, beautiful spider!’ It was,
indeed, an extremely beautiful insect, having a pink
back, lightly striped with brown, and a yellow belly ;
52 FREDERIC ANDLUCY.



and its legs were so fine, that the whole party wish-
ed for a microscope, to enable them the better to
discern their delicate form.

Lucy saw that the leaf of the woodwort had been
closed by the spider’s threads, which were joined to
each side of the leaf, and then drawn together, so as
to make the leaf into a three-cornered shape. There
was a little round ball woven also by the spider ;
and, when Lucy gently opened it with a pin, several
very small balls rolled out ; these, Mrs. Johnson in-
formed them, were the spider’s eggs, which she had
thus enclosed in a bag of her own spinning, and that
these eggs would all in time become insects.

‘ Does an old spider learn her daughters,—all her
two or three hundred young ones, to spin, reel, twist
and weave, mother 2’ asked little William.

‘They are born with an instinct to do all that is
necessary for their existence.

‘ You, Lucy, have been at Lowell, and seen 70
spindles turning, and 70 threads spun by one person
as easily as your grandmother used to spin a
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 53

single thread on the old spinning-wheel in our attic.
What 70 persons could hardly accomplish. in a day a
few years ago, is now done by a Lowell girl, and ad-
mirably done, by means of a_ single Spinning
Jenny. But art is only an imitation of nature ; and
in this particular case, and perhaps in all cases, is in-
ferior to nature. This little pink spider is now sus-
pended from a twig, seemingly spinning one thread ;
what if I tell you, that, seen through a microscope,



she is absolutely seen spinning 5000 threads, and
twisting them by some inconceivable means into
54 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

the single thread by which she is lowering herself to
the ground ? This despised spider is doing the work
of 70 Lowell girls, operating each of them with 70
spindles ; or of 5000 old spinning-wheels, laboriously



twirled by 5000 females of years gone by—the spider
braiding or gluing all these threads into a single tiny
rope, at the same time, with mathematical precision.
And perhaps there are a thousand other spiders in
this field as busily employed in the manufacture of
nets and fly-traps, of such gossamer fineness that sil-
ly gnats and musquitos are entangled before they
are aware. You have read the fable of Gulliver, tied
down in a similar manner by pigmies with needlefuls
of thread. The little spider, no doubt, has no other
means of providing a dinner for her somewhat nu-
merous family. The works of nature are, however,
too wonderful to be spoken of with levity. We feed
upon useful animals, spiders upon noxious insects.

‘ How does the little spider spin at once these in-
numerable threads ? said Lucy.

‘You see five little dots in the insect’s back. Natu-
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 55

ralists call them spinnerets, these may be seen, in large
spiders, by the naked eye. When we look at these
spinnerets with a strong magnifying glass, we see
that they are divided into regular rows of minute
points, about a thousand to each spinneret,—making
5,000. These little points are called spennerules.
Each of them may be regarded as a little tube, from
which the spider spins a thread of amazing fineness,
and, within the distance of a single inch, weaves and
warps it into a rope of 5000 strands or threads.



‘ Here is a drawing of the five dots or spinnerets
greatly magnified ; but, as it would be impossible to
show you 5000 threads in so small a space, only 50
56 IREDERIC AND LUCY.

are represented. Each thread in the picture, there-
fore, stands for 100. It is most wonderful that a sin-
gle thread of spider’s web should be formed of 5,000
smaller threads. But so naturalists say itis. One of
them estimates four millions of these little threadlets,
in a small spider, to be only equal in size when uni-
ted to a hair in a man’s whisker.

‘What was the necessity, mother, for having them
in this manner ? and why did not the great and good
Creator have one thread spun out from a little spi-
der, instead of 5000 2’ said Frederic.

The only reply I can give, my dear, is, that the
present plan makes the thread stronger than it would
otherwise be ; for every ropemaker knows that the
finer the threads are, of which his rope is composed,
the stronger it is. ‘The more we examine the works
of the Great Architect, the more we are convinced of
the wisdom and beauty of the design. Look at the
endless varieties of spiders, plants, and all created
things,and you find them skilfully fufilling their ends
of creation. ‘ In wisdom has he made them all.”
Look at the beautiful flowers in your-hand; they
neither toiled nor spun, yet ‘ Solomon in all his glo-
ry” was not so richly or wonderfully arrayed as one
of these lilies-of-the-valley, or as this skilful little
pink spider. This despised insect and this nosegay,
‘born to blush unseen,’ show new beauties under. the
microscope, whilst human skill looks bungling in the
comparison, under this severe magnifier of defects
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 57



- \ 1]
i
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ANS
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WS " \
YN ma
Y a
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NOON x A\\\

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a
bit

invisible to the naked eye. New reasons for the:
wisdom visible around us are daily discovered in all’
things, though many have escaped human scrutiny
for 6000 years till the present time, and millions on;

millions will remain for future discovery,
F
58 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

The beautiful pink spider had, all the time, been
running about in the greatest uneasiness, from one
leaf to another ; but they observed she never attemp-
ted to enter the opposite closed leaf, in which was an-
other spider, like herself ; all the children pitied her
distress, and, to relieve it, Lucy laid the piece of
wood-wort upon the stump of a tree, near which they
were standing. When the poor spider found herself
at liberty, she soon began to unite the two torn sides
of the bag in which her eggs had been wrapped. This
she accomplished with much dexterity, and, when it
was completely restored to its former shape, she be-
gan to fasten up the leaf, by spinning a thread from
one edge of the leaf to the other, and then draw-
ing these threads tight, until they brought both edges
of the leaf close together, over herself and the bag.

When the children had fully gratified their curi-
osity, Lucy said she would run to the hedge-side,
and lay the piece of wood in it, that the pretty spi-
ders might enjoy themselves at full liberty. Fred-
eric and William said, they also would like to run
to the hedge-side ; and their mother gave them leave
to go, saying she would sit on the green bank until
they came back.

When they returned, they asked their mother
many questions, more indeed than she could answer,
but she told them, when they could read alone, she
would give them a book containing accounts of in-
sects, from which they might learn a great deal ; at
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 59

the same time, she was perfectly willing to tell them
what she knew. ‘OQ, pray do, mother !’ cried Lucy ;
‘T have often seen spiders running about the walls
of the house, and have seen Betty brushing away
cobwebs as she called them, complaining that spiders
were constantly making them, but I used not to mind
them. I only thought that spiders were ugly crea-
tures, but, if you tell me anything curious about
them, I will notice them when I go home.’

‘Indeed, my dear, they are well worth observation ;
and, if you had allowed a spider to run upon your
hand, and had examined it narrowly, you would have
seen it was far from ugly ; and the cobwebs, which I
suppose Betty thought it a trouble to dust away so
frequently, are really very curious things.

‘ When the house-spider begins to form her web,
she usually chooses the corner of a room or a
staircase or an elbow or twig of a tree, because
she can then more easily fix the thread across from
one wall to the other; and, when she has gota suf-
ficient number of threads laid one way, she begins to
cross them the other way, until it is completely wove,
rivetted, and knotted : when it is done, she conceals
herself in a small hole, or cell, previously made in
the corner of the nest. She is so diligent a weaver,
laboring in her vocation, or for the support of her chil-
dren, increasing faster than those of William’s ‘old
lady that lived in a shoe,’ she works all night, whilst
60 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

her victims the flies are asleep, not dreaming that the
spider is mending her nets, or weaving new coils.

‘ There is a kind of spider, who can make a cell
with a door to it, which she can shut or open at
pleasure, and which perfectly secures her when she
is likely to be disturbed by any larger insect. The
spider weaves her web as symmetrically and as
mechanically as our wite mouse-trap, to catch flies
or small insects, which are her food. When they
alight upon the web, their slender legs are soon en-
tangled in the crossed threads or meshes, and, while
they are struggling to get loose, the spider darts
from her concealment, throws new diminutive ropes
across the wings, head, or body of her victim, draws
the cords tight, and, with thread upon thread in all
directions, much the same as the Lilliputians bound
Mr. Lemuel Gulliver, secures the unfortunate fly,
and then greedily devours her prey.


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 6l

There are other spiders which inhabit fields and
gardens. I dare say you have observed the beauty
of their webs, when they are covered early in the mor-
ning with dew, sparkling in the sun’s rays. They are
quite differently formed from the housespider’s.

‘ Yes, indeed, both Lucy and I,’ answered Fred-
eric, ‘ have often admired those beautiful webs, and
we have often seen long threads hanging from one
tree to another, at great distances ; were these also
woven by the spiders ?

Yes, my dear; on those long threads, which the
spiders weave, they transport themselves from one
tree to another.

You and your father, Frederic, were admiring
a spider’s web on the door of our wood-house. Do

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62 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

you know that, like Jonah’s gourd, it was the silent
work of a single short summer’s night ? and that
millions of silken beams formed its rafters? Yet a
spider is called one of the most disgusting objects in
nature. Scavengers generally look disgusting, but they
make clean work. ‘There is a purpose to everything

ee Sire

ix,
Whe
oe rt Oa

ks


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 63

under the sun,’ and this insect is, as it were,a high
constable in the fields, and ‘ takes the body’ of all
the loafing noisy insects on whose shoulders he can
fasten his brizrean claws ; even an intruding horsefly,
bee, or diamond beetle, are ‘ ejected’ by him, or eaten
sans ceremonie. Here is a pretty daisy, fresh, fra-
grant, and beautifully colored. Were it not for the
little pink spiders, a sort of police ‘ on duty,’ it would
have been eaten up by thousands of may-bugs.
Cruel sportsmen murder the birds, the beautiful
guardians of the fields, and, in the economy of na-
ture, spiders are perfect ‘ sheriff-substitutes,’ and
enforce stringent or biting laws on trespassing insects.

‘ But, mother,’ said Lucy, ‘ you said, the house-
spider’s threads crossed over one another ; but Ido not
remember seeing any threads in any of these webs.’

That was, because they are so very fine, replied
her mother, and spun so close to each other. A
spider’s thread, as I have already told you, is much
finer than a hair of your head ; but in some countries
there are spiders of much larger size, whose threads
are a great deal stronger. A Frenchman once un-
dertook to manufacture, that is, to prepare and spin,
the webs into threads strong enough to be woven in-
to stockings ; and he actually did weave one pair of
stockings, which were very beautiful, and were kept
asa great curiosity; but the thread, made from
the web of the spider, was not near so strong as that
made from the web of the silk-worm.
64 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

‘0, silk-worms, mother exclaimed Frederic ;
I want to know a great deal about them.’

But, my dear, you must at present be satisfied
with what I have told you about spiders, for we
have been a long time from home, and must hasten
our return, forI have several things to do before
dinner. You now see what an advantage it would
be, if you read without assistance. I should then
give you proper books, and you might read to your
sister all you want te know; at present you are
entirely dependent on me for information, and, if
business, sickness, or company, prevents my in-
tructing you, you must remain ignorant of much
useful and pleasant knowledge.

They walked quietly home, Frederic and Lucy
declaring that they would take great pains to im-
prove themselves, that they might soon be able to
read all the pleasing books their mother promised
them.

INVENTIONS.

A rew days after, Mr. Selby paid his friend a
second visit. The children were rejoiced to see him,
and, as they went out to meet him, he inquired if
they had all been very good. On their father and
mother assuring him they had, Mr. Selby told them
he had not forgotten his promise of gratifying them
with accounts of his travels in different parts of the
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 65

world ; and, if it was agreeable to Mr. and Mrs.
Johnson, he would stay that afternoon, and relate
his journey to Glasgow.

I had been in Scotland when I was a boy, but, in
my first journey, I was as many days on the road, in
order to travel the same number of miles, as I now
quietly rode in the same number of hours ; such has
been the rapidity of improvements in journeying
in the course of my short life.

The children anxiously asked Mr. Selby to tell
them why this great change had happened. ‘There
are only 60 minutes in an hour, and 1440 in a day,’
said Frederic; and little William added, that * he
had been thinking whether Hop-o’-my-Thumb, with
his seven-league boots, could have done it in so
short a time.’

I like to hear your doubts, that I may remove them,
said Mr. Selby. The story of the boots, William,

was a fiction ; but reality, in our day, outruns fiction


66 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

with regard to rail-roads and electric telegraphs,
Shakespeare’s wildest imaginings only ‘ put a girdle
round the earth in 40 minutes,’ whereas the telegraph
might do it in two seconds of time. That is, taking
the Boston and New York wires as a criterion, a mes-
sage could absolutely be expedited 200 times more
rapidly by them than by the poet’s Queen Mab and
Robin Goodfellow, or fairy-line ancient conveyance,

‘Do please tell us, then, about your last journey,’
said Lucy.

Mr. Selby said, in order to do this, he must first
tell them about a poor litile sick boy, and about
some ancient toys for children, moved by steam pow-
er, more than 2000 years ago, yet in some degree
connected with my true Story. Useful subjects must
be carefully explained in order to be understood.

When I reached Glasgow, I was introduced to an
elderly gentleman, whose name was

JAMES WATT.

Watt was born at Greenock, in Scotland, Jan. 1736.
He was the son of a ship-chandler. From the ex-
treme delicacy of young Watt’s health when a child,
he was unable regularly to attend the public school,
so that much of his instruction was received at home.
His mother taught him reading, and his father wrij-
ting and arithmetic ; he thus acquired those habits
of inquisitive and precocious reflection, so often ob-
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 67

served in feeble-bodied children, when taught by heir
kind parents. A gentleman one day calling upon his
father, observed the child bending over the marble
hearth and wainscoating, with chalk in his hand.

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68 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

‘ Mr.Watt,’ said he, ‘ you ought to send that boy to
school, and not let him trifle away his time at home.’

‘ Look how my child is employed, before you con-
demn him,’ replied the father. The gentleman then
approached the child, and found that he was trying
to solve a problem in geometry. He put some ques-
tions to him, and was astonished with the mixture of
intelligence, quickness, and simplicity in his answers.

In this way, confined by ill-health, young Watt,
always busy in early years, acquired at his father’s
fireside that general information for which he was in
after-life remarkable. His father for his amusement
presented him with a number of tools, such as are
used in cabinet-work, with which young Watt began
to exhibit his mechanical taste in the fabrication of
numerous toys, and among the rest a small electri-
cal machine.

One day, having accompanied his mother on a
visit to a lady in Glasgow, the boy, at the request of
the lady, was left behind. The next time Mrs. Watt
went to Glasgow, her friend said to her, ‘ You must
take your son James home ; I cannot stand the de-
gree of excitement he keeps me in ; I am worn out
for want of sleep. Every evening before ten o’clock,
our usual hour of retiring to rest, he contrives to en-
gage me in conversation, then begins some striking
tale ; and, whether humorous or pathetic, the inter-
est is so overpowering, that the family all listen to
him with breathless attention, and hour after hour
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 69

strikes unheeded.’ This wonderful faculty of story-
telling, which robbed the Glasgow lady of her sleep,
Watt preserved through life to his dying day, toa
degree unparalleled perhaps, except in his cotempo-
rary, and fellow-countryman, Sir Walter Scott.

Young Watt returned home to occupy himself with
the sciences. The whole range of physics had at-
tractions for him. In excursions to the banks of
Loch Lomond, he studied botany, entered into geo-
logical observations among the rocks and secondary
formations, and collected traditions and ballads a-
mong the clansmen and highlanders. At home, du-
ring his frequent hours of ill-health, he devoured
books on chemistry and general science, natural phi-
losophy, medicine, and surgery ; the detailed des-
cription of diseases was familiar to him. In short,
by incessant reading and mental activity, he acquired
and digested a vast mass of miscellaneous and scien-
tific information.

The profession, to which young Watt was put ap-
prentice, was that of mathematical and nautical in-
strument making, for the acquisition of which he went
to London. ‘ Thus,’ says M. Arago, ‘ the man who
was about to cover England with engines, in com-
parison with which the antiqne and colossal machine
of Marly is but a pigmy, commenced his career by
constructing, with his own hands, instruments, which
were fine, delicate, and fragile, — those small but
admirable reflecting sextants used in navigation.’
eee

i

70 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

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In 1757, at the age of 21, he commenced business
as a mathematical instrument maker in Glasgow.
At first he experienced great opposition—one of the
privileged corporations regarding him as an intruder,
and refusing the young mechanic the privilege of
setting up a workshop. In this dilemma, the univer-
sity gave him a room, and conferred on him the title
of « mathematical instrument maker to the College
of Glasgow.’ In this university was a cluster of em-
inent men. Adam Smith, Robert Simson, Drs. Black
and Robinson, were the professors. They saw his
worth, and Watt’s new position brought him into
contact with these great men. ‘I had always,’ says
professor Robinson, ‘ a great relish for mathematical
and mechanical philosophy. When I was introduced
to young Watt, I saw a workman, and expected no
more; but was surprised to find a philosopher,
FREDERICANDLUCY. 71

younger than myself, and I was rather mortified at
finding Watt so much my superior. Whenever any
puzzle came in the way of us students, we sent to
Watt.’ This and similar records figure his early life
—a young, amiable, and ingenious man, a great fa-
vorite with professors and students, occupied a great
part of the day in his workshop, but constantly en-
gaged in the evening in some profound or curious
question in mathematical or physical science ; aware
at the same time of all that was going on in the arts.

‘ Did young Watt still continue sick ? said Lucy.

Yes, so much so, that it was the cause of his re-
turn home from London. In 1763 he enlarged his
business by including engineering ; and began to be
consulted in the construction of canals, bridges, &c.



and in the following winter, professor Anderson, find-
Ing that a small steam-engine would not work, sent
72 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

it to young Watt for repair; it was this model of
Newcomen’s engine that begot in Watt’s mind_the
germ of those ideas which led to such gigantic con-
sequences. ‘The little black model on the young
mathematical-instrument-maker’s table was the con-
densed epitome, as it were, of all that the world then
knew of steam-power. In the brain of young Watt,
bending by candle-light over the broken model, lay,
as yet undeveloped, all that the steam-engine has
since become. This accident to an imperfect model
was the cause of as great a revolution in mechanics
as had been produced by the art of printing.

‘ But I thought,’ said Frederic, ‘ that steam power
began to be applied to mechanical purposes about
the years 1778 or ’80.’ ,

Yes, said Mr. Selby ; the delay, for 14 years, was
owing to the poverty of young Watt.



IN CONTINUATION.

Tue two greatest inventions yet found out, said
Mr. Selby, namely, printing and steam power, were
originally contrived for children’s toys, so you see,
my young friends, there is philosophy, ingenuity,
and utility even in makinga plaything. A citizen of
Harlaem, named Coster, whilst walking in a wood,
began to cut letters and pictures on the bark of the
beech ; with these letters he enstamped marks upon
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 73

paper in a contrary direction, in the manner of a seal,
until at length he formed a little primer or picture-
‘book for the amusement of his grandchildren, or of his
sister's children. Such was the discovery of the art

DU TLL



of printing, which will make readers of all mankind,
and without the aid of which the reformation of Lu-
ther could not have been established.

Seals, which are a ‘miniature inlittle’ of the art of
printing, were used in the times of Darius and A-
hasuerus, several hundred years before the Christian
era, and perhaps the Chinese stamped the letters
now used on tea-chests, in the same manner, some

G
74 FREDERIC ANDLUCY.

thousands of years ago ;_ yet, So prone are mankind
to do ‘as grandfather did,’ that no advance was
made in improvement till the times of Coster and
Guttenberg.

The origin of the other invention I will endeavor
briefly to relate to you.

Srram, said Mr. Selby, or, as it was anciently
called, ‘ water transformed into air by the action of
fire,’ was described in the writings of Hero, a Greek,
120 years before Christ, in an account of a toy for
children, as made to produce a rotatory motion ; sO
you see, my dears, ancient philosophers fabricated
toys to go by steam 2000 years ago, in much the
same manner as described in your Boy’s Own Book,
or in Parlor Magic, with this difference only that
his toy acquired perpetual motion by steam, whilst
your Prancing Dragoon and Bowing Beau were se-


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 75

cretly kept nodding or galloping by unseen magical
weights underneath the table or statue.

The principle of Hero’s toy, however, was inferior
and different from that of steam-engines, in which
the power consists not in the mere re-action caused
by steam, but in the prodigious expansive force of
steam itself. An inch of water is, on its conversion
into steam, expanded so as to fill the space of a foot.
You, Frederic, have seen gunpowder explode, but
this is nearly 8 times as great as the expansive power
of gunpowder. If by any means we could catch wa-
ter in the act, as it were, of passing into steam, so
as to obtain the use of this enormous expansive force
for our own purposes, young Watt thought it was
evident that we could produce most powerful effects
by it. To do this—to catch the water in the act of
passing into steam, and to turn the expansive power
to account—is the whole purpose of steam-engines.

‘ Was this power known formerly ? asked Lucy.

Even this expansive force was in some degree
known to the ancients. Often, in casting fine metal
statues, when a drop of water was left in the clay or
plaster moulds, an explosion, attended with disas-
trous accidents, resulted. Arguing from such instan-
_ ces, ancient naturalists accounted for earthquakes
and submarine explosions, by supposing the sudden
turning into vapor of a mass of water by volcanic heat.

* Such as that of Etna and Vesuvius,’ said Lucy.

Nor were the ancients afraid of handling this po-
76 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

ent power. In the images of the ancient gods, as in
Hero’s toy, were concealed crevices, containing wa-
ter with the means of heating it ; and tubes, pro-
ceeding from these crevices, conducted the steam, S0
as to make it blow out plugs from the mouths and
foreheads of the hollow images, with loud noise, and
seeming clouds of smoke.

‘Please tell me, sir, more about Hero’s toy,’ said
William ; ‘ what is a hollow image ?

All images are not hollow ; but cast ones, of the size
of men or boys, sometimes are hollow likeLucy’s doll.
Whilst in India, I visited a huge statue of solid granite,
30 miles from Seringapatam, and, as measured by
Rev. Dr. Buchanan, nearly 70 feet high. It rep-
resents Gomuta Raya, a celebrated Hindoo saint. It
stands on the summit of a conic granite hill about
200 feet high, which serves for a pedestal.. The
statue still constitutes a part of the solid rock, which
originally may have been 300 feet high ; the stone,
which anciently formed a part of the mountain, hav-
ing been chipped or carved away. The hill proba-
bly was anciently a steep cone, oF peak, of which
some bold sculptor, ot succession of sculptors, have
taken such magnificent advantage. It stands boldly
up against the sky, and I certainly never saw, in all
my travels, any work of man, which gave me 80
complete an idea of a giant, or colossal image.

An image or monster statue in Egypt, it is true,
with the head of a virgin and the body of a lion, is
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 77




=k
=

said to be 163 feet high ; but it stands on a plain,
and is half buried in moving sands.

Hero describes one of the pagan impositions by
smoke and fire through hollow molten images.
To accomplish this trick, he recommends vessels half
full of strong wine, or other combustible liquids, to
be concealed in two images of men, standing on
each side of the altar. From these vessels, tubes in
the form of bent syphons proceed along the arms of
the images to the tips of their fingers, which were
held over the flame of pagan sacrifice. Other tubes
78 FREDERIC AND LUCY,

from the same vessels proceeded downwards through
the feet of the images, communicating through the
floor with the altar and the fire.

In Asia are mauy heathen gods, carved from hills,
and the pagans worship the work of their own hands,
but, with all their superstition, they prefer making
gigantic monsters. |



Hero wrote 2000 years ago; yet, from his time
to the 17th century, no advance appears to have
been made in the application of steam. The very re-
membrance of it, like that of the Greek fire, seemed
lost, till Charles I. of England employed De Laus in

designing fountains, grottoes,&c. who revived in sub-
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 79

stance the artifice mentioned by Hero, in the shape
of a steam-toy ; so that,my dears, toys are often the
harbingers of the greatest inventions. Men try new
experiments to please their little ones, and stumble,
as it were, upon important discoveries, which have
escaped the most profound research. Even the
beautiful Roman aqueducts were built on a level a-



cross vallies by arches and viaducts, like the Erie ca-
nal, because they were ignorant of the improved me-
thod by pipes, as in the Cochituate, Croton, and
Fairmount water-works. But the skill of the engineer
de Laus was eclipsed by that of the marquis of
Bridgewater, in 1663, who describes among other
things a mode of raising water 100 feet, and which
will drain all sorts of mines, and furnish cities with
water, though never so high-seated.

It is necessary, my young friends, in describing
inventions, to follow their progress step by step. In
1699 Mr. Savary exhibited a model for draining
80 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

mines ; succeeded by one from Dennis Papin, who
did not work out his own conceptions,—did not pet-
ceive all their conveniences. The next was by T.
Newcomen, an ironmonger, in the yeat 1705. Soon
after, the celebrated Smeaton employed his skill, but
no progress was made till in the hands of Watt.

Young Watt wasa man with whom everything be-
came the beginning of a new and serious study ; ac-
cordingly, not content with repairing professor An-
derson’s model, he devoted himself to a thorough in-
vestigation of the machine. Directing his attention
first with all his profound physical and mathematical
knowledge to its working, ‘he determined the extent
to which the water dilated in passing from its liquid
state into steam — the quantity of water which a
given weight of coal would vaporise—the quantity of
steam in weight, which each stroke of one of the
machines of known dimensions expended—the quan-
tity of cold water which required to be injected into
the spindles, to give the descending stroke of the
piston a certain force—and finally the elasticity of
steam at different temperatures.

But Lam certain, said Mr. Selby, that my patient
little friend William ought to have a moment to ask
questions about hard words, which I necessarily use,
and it is time he should have some relaxation, in
skip-jack affairs, and hop-step-and-jump exercises.
And Frederic will wonder how an invalid boy could
enjoy himself apart from society, without amusement
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 8l

and exercise. But young Watt in childhood posses-
sed all he wished ; his scientific pleasures of read-
ing, sketching, and experimenting in Euclid, Newton,
and other mathematicians, made these philosophers
his playnfates,with whom he enjoyed himself in books.
As to exercise, the machinery made by means of his
cabinet-maker’s tools, at intervals, engrossed his at-
tention. They were his toys and gymnastics.



MR. SELBY’S SECOND VISIT.

Mr. Selby called the next day. After dinner,
the children were impatient ; and he said :

My young friends, you will think that all these in
vestigations would have occupied the lifetime of a
laborious philosopher ; but young Watt brought alli
his numerous and difficult researches to a conclusion, .
without allowing them to interfere with the labors of
his workshop, or with his evening amusements with
his friends. The evils of Newcomen’s old machine:
Watt remedied by a simple but beautiful contrivance
—his separate condenser—a metallic vessel in which
water or air are condensed by heat. The cylinder was
thus left a vacuum, without having lost any of its heat
by the process ; the piston now descended with full
force ; and, when the steam rushed in from the boil-.

er, no portion of it was wasted in re-heating it. The.
H

-
82 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

old evils were thus happily overcome ; but another
contrivance was needed, to withdraw the accumula-
ted water, air, and vapor ; and this young Watt ac-
complished by his condenser pump. The power of
the machine was diminished by this invention, but
the total gain was enormous,—equivalent to making
one pound of coal do as much work as had formerly
been done by five pounds in the old engine ; and,
since the year 1780, improvements have continued
till one pound of coal does the work of the 20 pounds
in Newcomen’s machine. Numerous other improve-
merts were made by Watt within two years of his
first inspecting the old model.

One would suppose that, when the fact of the con-
struction of this engine, which has since revolution-
ized mechanical skill throughout the world,—which
may, by facility of transit by sea and land, form all
mankind into one family, turning their swords into
pruning-hooks,—when this fact was generally known,
that it would at least have displaced the expensive
process of draining mines by the old tedious engines.
This, however, was not the case. Watt himself was
poor ; but in 1769 Dr. Roebuck became a partner.
He soon became embarrassed ; and young Watt,
till 1774, was employed in engineering, canals, &c.,
allowing the steam-engine to lie, like lumber, in an
old factory of delft ware—the same engine, that is
now applied to all purposes, and saving the labor of
millions of people and horses, was stowed in an attic.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 83

What Johnson says of Goldsmith might be said
of Watt—*‘ he touched not that which he did not a-
dorn.’ In the course of his busy surveys, he impro-
ved all the instruments he used, and invented among
other things the chronometers for measuring arms of
the sea, and many scientific articles. He was never

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idle. Atlength in 1774 Watt entered into part-
nership with Mr. Bolton, a man of science and en-
terprise. Bolton & Watt’s first business was to pro-
cure a prolongation of Watt’s patent-right, which
had been procured in 1760, and was nearly run out.
The value of the invention began to be appreciated
only when the enterprizing and wealthy Bolton pa-
tronized it. A strong opposition was made in parlia-
ment, and out of it, by engineers and coal-miners,
who wished to pirate the invention. But the patent
was renewed ; and Bolton & Watt agreed with the
84 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

interested miners that the patentees should receive
from those who used the machine one third part of
the value of the coal saved by Watt's engine. This
seemed a trifle; yet, in asingle year, Bolton & Watt
received from the single coal-mine of Chasewater,
£2500 (about $100,000), for each engine, instead of
the value of a third part of coal saved, which would
have nearly doubled that sam. Mr, Watt knew the
quantity of coal consumed by the invention of a me-
ter, kept double-locked in an iron box, ingeniously
registering every stroke of the machine. Attempts
were continually made to plagiarise the engine
or its principle of action ; but Bolton & Watt, by in-
vention or otherwise, successfully protected the right.

Witt’s steam-engine now gave an impetus to mi-
ning. “Ble wished to apply it to many other purpo-
ses, especially navigation, but had enough to do in
introducing it gradually into pits. New mines were
opened ; old ones, full of water, rubbish, and closed,
were again put in operation. But the active mind
of Watt was not content with applying the engine
merely as a pump for draining mines, he restlessly
wished to make it subservient to other purposes. He
effected this by that most graceful and beautiful in-
vention, the sight of which in operation produces a
feeling of pleasure, like that derived from contem-
plating a fine work of art,—the parallel motion. At
the end of the beam of a steam-engine may be seen
a curious contrivance or parallelogram, with the pis-
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 85

ton-rod attrched to one of its angles or elbows. When
the engine is in action, it will be observed that,
while three of the angles move in small circular ares.
the fourth is so pulled upon by opposite forces, that,
although tending to move in a curve, it strangely
moves in a straight line. This result, though sim-
ple, depends upon a curious mathematical principle.
Mr. Watt’s next improvement was the double-acting
engine ; and, afterwards the means of shutting off
the steam from the boiler. This he did not fully
complete, but it has been since done by other artists,
by which a bushel of coal has been made to perform
the labor of 20 men, equivalent to performing @
man’s daily labor at the cost of a halfpenny, }
Watt had thus increased power. Power, howev-
er, is not the only element of success in the fbors
of industry. Regularity of action is of no less im-
portance. The coal is of unequal quality ; the work-
men are often far from intelligent, and frequently
inattentive. Of course the propelling steam would
be sometimes superabundant, sometimes sparse, and
Tush sometimes with less and sometimes with more
rapidity into the cylinder, occasioning great irregu-
larities of movement. Watt's genius provided a rem-
edy for this remissness of operatives, by an inge-
nious application of an apparatus called the governor,
or revolving bells. You, F rederic, no doubt, when
looking at an engine, considered them only at first as
a pretty toy ; but such is the efficacy of this ap-

9
86 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

paratus, that, by its means, a steam-engine may be
made to give motion to a clock which shall keep good
time. It is this regulator which confers on Watt’s
steam-engine, applied to any purpose oF art, a work-
ing movement that is wholly free from irregularity,
and by which it can weave the most delicate fabrics,
as well as communicate a gigantic movement to the
ponderous stones of a mill, however massive.

If I undertook to describe all the other inven-
tions of a minor kind, which came from the prolific
genius of Watt, it would require weeks instead of an
evening. I intended to tell you about his youth and
his steam-engine in brief terms. He invented it, and
took his patent in 1760, before he was 24 years old ;
if his pursuits were uncommon, and such as are not
usually followed by boys, yet boys like variety, and
his acquisitions command universal admiration for
their novelty. Young Watt played as joyfully with
syllogisms as other boys at fives or cricket. All juve-
nile sports originated from ancient martial exercises,
games, races, popular speaking, and skill of the head
as well as the hand; and young Watt was pleas-
antly engaged in the last named sports. For want of
funds and popularity, his engine, which now gives
almost perpetual motion to all labor, and as it were
a half-miraculous power to man,—stood idle for 14
years. It does not follow that his fruitful brain was
all this time idle. His whole life was prolific of inven-
tions, as well as in labor as an engineer and surveyor.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 87

Steam navigation, railway travelling, automaton
factory labor, steam printing, mining, and hundreds
or thousands of other arts have been brought to their
present state only by means of Watt’s discoveries.
Steamboats were perfected on the Hudson river, New
York, by R. Fulton, a native of Pennsylvania, in1807.

The steam-power, employed in 1844, in England
alone, was equal to eight millions of men’s power,
or 1,600,000 of horse-power. It requires eight times
the quantity of soil for pro uéing food for a horse
that it does fora man; 1, 00,000 horses, therefore,
require as much soil or food as. 12,000,000 of men.
The United States in 1851 have an equal quantity
of Watt’s steam-power in operation for manufactures
and railways ; all the countries of the world have a-
dopted or will soon use them. Almost all the luxu-
ries and comforts of life, all the refinements of social
existence, may be traced to machinery, aided direct-
ly or indirectly by steam. Machinery is the result
of experiment, experience, and a study of the
working principles of nature, which are hidden from
superficial observers, Every day some new applica-
tion of steam is diminishing the amount of human
drudgery. This study of nature forms a never-failing
source of intellectual enjoyment, and proves by its
effects that ‘ knowledge is power.’

Watt was the inventor of machines for copying
letters ; the plan for heating houses by steam; the
instrument for multiplying copies of busts and sculp-
TAMU TUL ami |

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FREDERIC AND Lucey. 89

ture ; and was connected, more than any other per-
son, with that grand chemical discovery, the compo-
sttion of water, which was formerly supposed to be
a simple element, but is a compound of two gases, or
airy fluids, formerly unknown.

Mr. Watt withdrew from business in the year
1800, but lived 20 years longer among his friends—
and died in 1819. Sir Walter Scott says of him,
‘ It was only once my fortune to meet Watt, when
there were assembled about a half a score of our
northern lights. Amidst this company stood Mr,
Watt, the man whose genius discovered the means
of multiplying our national resources to a degree per-
haps even beyond his own stupendous powers of cal-
culation and combination ; bringing the treasures of
the abyss to the summit of the earth— giving to the
feeble arm of man the momentum of an Afrite—com-
manding manufactures to arise—affording means of
dispensing with that time and tide which wait for no
man—and of sailing without that wind which defied
the commands and threats of Xerxes himself. This
potent commander of the elements—this abridger of
time and space—this magician whose cloudy machi-
nery has produced a change in the world, the effects
of which, extraordinary as they are, are perhaps only
“eginning to be felt—was not only the most profound
man of science, the most successful combiner of pow-
ers, and calculator of numbers, as adapted to practi-
cal purposes—was not only one of the most general-
90 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

ly well-informed, but one of the best and kindest of
human beings. There he stood, surrounded by the
little band of northern literati. In his 8lst year, the
alert, the kind, benevolent old man, had his attention
at every-one’s question, his information at every-
one’s command. His talents and fancy overflowed
on every subject. One gentleman was a deep phi-
lologist—he talked with him on the origin of the
alphabet, as if he had been coeval with Cadmus ;
another, a celebrated critic — you would have said
that the old man had studied political economy and
belles-lettres all his life ; of science it is only neces-
sary to speak—it was his own distinguished walk.’



IN CONTINUATION.

Wuust I was in Scotland, said Mr. Selby, I had
an opportunity of visiting some of the rugged neigh-
boring islands of Orkney and the still more distant
Shetland isles, 86 in number, part of which are in-
habited. On some of these coasts, the people sub-
sist on sea-fowl and their eggs, whilst the down and
feathers are a source of great profit. In some places
wide fragments of rocks have been cut off from the
main land by convulsions of nature’ or the washing
of the sea. On these spots immense flocks of sea-
birds securely built their nests, till some bold inva-
ders found means of crossing these dreadful abysses
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 91

—
=

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by cradles passing on ropes. One of these is at the
Noss of Brassah, which is 100 feet from the adjacent
land and 300 feet of perpendicular rock above the
sea. The tops of the rocks on each side of the cleft
or fissure have two stakes festened in each of them .
to these are ropes tied, and upon them is hung an
92 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

article which they call a cradle; in this a man
moves himself from the higher rock on the main
land to the lesser rock opposite, where he secures as
many fowl or eggs as he wishes. To return, how-
ever, is a more difficult task, because it is an ascen-
ding or up-hill course, and his cradle is loaded with
game ; but this difficulty is overcome by a spare
rope attached to the cradle and held by people on the
main land, who drag him back. ‘To reach the clefts
between these precipices and the sea, a more dan-
gerous method is resorted to, of tying a rope round
a man’s middle, and lowering him in a basket, which
he fills with eggs and birds, and is then drawn Up
from the abyss.

At St Kilda, another small island, the inhabitants
trust more to their own steadiness of head, strength
of muscle, and daring spirit, to ensure success. They
are accustomed from infancy to climbing, and drop
from crag to crag almost as sure-footed as so many
goats, or the birds themselves. Practice makes per-
fect, and they have been so long habituated to bird-
catching as a means of livelihood and profit, that
they follow their vocation to frightful lengths. They
depend upon ropes of two kinds, one made of hides,
and the other of cows’ tails, all of the same thick-
ness. The former are the strongest, and are less
liable to wear away, or be cut, by rubbing against
the sharp edges of rocks. ‘These ropes are from 90
to 200 feet in length, and about three inches in cir-
FREDERIC AND LUcyY. 93

cumference. Those of hide are made of cows and
sheep’s hide mixed together. The sheep’s hide, after
being cut into narrow strips, is plaited over with wi-
der slips of cow’s hide. Two of theseare then twis-
ted together. So valued are these ropes, when right-
ly made, that one of them forms a marriage-portion
ofa St. Kilda girl; and, to this secluded people,
whose lives and all their comforts often depend on
the strength of this article, it is of more value than
gold and jewels. The favorite resort for birds is the
tremendous precipice of Fulmars, 1800 feet in height,
supposed to be the loftiest face of precipitous rock in
Britain. To these precipices, to look down which
produces giddiness and fainting with strangers, men
and boys resort for birds’ eggs, gulls and other fowl.

Many of these bird-catchers go on these expedi-
tions alone, without any one to hold the rope or assist
them ; an instance is related by Mr. Stanley. ‘It
was on such a solitary excursion, that a man, having
fastened his rope to a stake on the top, let himself
down far below; and in his ardor for collecting
birds and eggs, followed the course of a ledge, be-
neath a mass of overhanging rock. Unfortunately
he had omitted to take the usual precaution of tying
the rope round his body, but held it carelessly in his
hand ; when, in a luckless moment, whilst he was
busily engaged in pillaging a bird’s nest, it fell from
his grasp, and, after Swinging backwards and for-
wards three or four times, without coming within
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FREDERIC AND Lvey. 95

reach, it at last became stationary over the ledge of
the projecting rock, leaving the bird-catcher appa-
rently without a chance of escape,—for to ascend the
precipice without a rope was impossible, and none
were near to hear his cries, or afford him help. What
was to be done ? Death stared him in the face. Af-
ter a few minutes’ pause, he made up his mind. By
a desperate leap, he might regain the rope, but if he
failed, and at the distance at which it hung, the
chances were against him, his fate was certain, a-
midst the pointed crags ready to receive him, over
which the waves were dashing far, far below. Col-
lecting therefore all his strength, with outstretched
arms, he sprang from the rock, and lived to tell the
tale,—for the rope was caught !’

On my return from Scotland to England, among
other places I visited Plymouth. About fourteen
- miles from this port, and ten from Ramhead, are the
Eddystone rocks, on which a lighthouse is built, It
was perhaps in some degree the model after which
the lighthouse on Minot’s Ledge, in Boston harbor
was reared. The Eddystone lighthouse is exposed
to the swells of the Bay of Biscay and the Atlantic
_ ocean, whose waves often break upon it forty feet
in height, even in moderate weather. It was sup-
_ posed an impossibility to work, or even land upon
these rocks ; yet, in 1696, it was undertaken by
Henry Winstanly, Esq. of Littlebury. He comple-
96 FREDERIC AND LUCY:

ted it in 1700, after four years labor, and was so cef-
tain of its strength, that he declared it to be his wish
to be in it “ during the greatest storm that ever
blew.” His wish was amply gratified 5 for, on the
96th of November, 1703, whilst he and his workmen


FREDERIC AND LUey.. 97

and the lighthouse keepers were there, a tremendous
storm devastated all Great Britain. The next mom-
ing, when the storm abated, assistance was sent at
great risk ; but nothing was found standing, the sea
breaking over the rocks where it had stood, some
stumps of heavy iron, rivetted in the rocks only re-
maining ; nor were any of the people, nor any of the
materials of the building, ever found.

In 1709 another structure was built, which braved
the elements till 1755, when it was burnt,

Mr. Smeaton was appointed to erect the present
Eddystone lighthouse, which he finished, and it was
occupied and lighted,1759. He built it of stone, enlar-
ged the base, without increasing the size of the waist
or the solid part above. Its iron roots lie hid below.
The rock, which Slopes south-west, is cut into hor-
izontal steps into which Portland stone and granite
are dovetailed, and united by cement. To the height
of 35 feet, it is a solid mass of stones ingrafted into
each other, and united by every means of additional
Strength. The lighthouse has four rooms, one above
the other ; over these, a gallery and lantern. It is
80 feet high, and, though it has received the assaults
of the elements for 93 years, still braves their fury.

‘Our Minot Ledge lighthouse lately met a simi-
lar fate with that of the first Eddystone,’ said Lucy.

Yes, but in the Eddystone lighthouse 20 persons
were lost, two only were drowned at Minot’s ledge.

I
98 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

MR. SELBY’S THIRD VISIT.

Ar Mr. Selby’s third visit, the family were settled
at their happy fireside, and he said he would relate
what befel him in Africa.

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson said nothing could give
them more pleasure, for they were as anxious as
their children to learn every particular concerning
their friend, during so long an absence,

You will recollect I sailed from Sicily, after as-
cending Mount Etna, with the intention of proceed-
ing to India ; but, alas, it was long, and my suffer-
ings were great, before I arrived there ; for, after we
had safely passed round the western side of Africa,
a dreadful storm arose, and our ship became so leaky,
that all our endeavors to save it were ineffectual.
About midnight, another extensive leak filled the
vessel so fast with water, that we knew she must
sink ; and, as a last resource, all who were upon the
deck clung to the masts, or any loose piece of wood
they could seize ; I laid hold of a plank, which I
grasped in an agony I cannot describe.

We had no time to assist those who were below
deck, for in an instant the ship sunk down, and I
have no recollection of what further happened, until
I felt myself violently thrown upon the beach by the
force of the waves, on which the plank I held had
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 99



floated. The shock I received was so great, that I
soon fell again intoa state of insensibility, from
which I did not recover until the morning light show-
ed me the dreadful loss I had sustained.

I looked around, and found myself alone; not one
of my fellow voyagers had escaped. The sea was
nearly calm, and not the smallest vestige marked
the spot where our vessel had sunk. _I reflected on
the melancholy scene [had witnessed ; and the acute
feeling I experienced, from thus being separated
irom all companions and friends, was greater than I
canexpress ; but soon the consideration that the God
who had, through life, sustained and now most won-
100 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

derfully preserved me, could still provide me with
subsistence, cheered my drooping spirits. With a
firm reliance upon his goodness and power, and with
a thankful heart for the blessing of preservation, I
rose to endeavor to seek some habitation where I
might obtain relief. I was very weak, and found it
a most painful effort to walk ; but I knew that on
this exertion my life depended. Fortunately, I had
a large clasp-knife in my pocket, and with it I cut
down a branch of a tree, which, serving me asacane,
greatly assisted my feeble limbs. I dragged on a
long, long way, but saw no human dwelling.

The sun was beginning to sink, and my spirits
sunk with it ; what will become of me, thought I, if
the darkness of night should prevent my proceeding ;
I must then perish with hunger, for I felt so weak,
that I was certain I could not long survive.

Worn out with walking, I sat down under a tree,
and gazed on the setting sun ; but, what was my joy,
on turning from that object, to perceive, at a little
distance, a negro woman coming towards me! I
crawled to meet her ; she looked at me with pity,
and bade me, in the negro language, which | happi-
ly understood, to follow her. I did so, and we soon
arrived at a hut, so covered with trees, that I had
not before discovered it. I entered with her, and
saw two other women, spinning cotton.

I told them all I had suffered, and, when they
heard how long I had been without food, one of the
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 101

women went out, and soon returned with a very
fine fish, which she presently broiled, and gave me
to eat. They then kindly spread a mat for me on the
floor, on which I laid down ; and, when they thought
me aleep, they began to sing. I listened to their
voices, which were sweet, and I soon found that I
was the subject of their song ; the music of it was
very plaintive, and the words I shall never forget.
‘The poor white man, faint and weary, came and
sat under our tree. He has no mother to bring him
milk ; no wife to grind his corn: let us pity the
white man ; no mother has he.”

The kindness of these poor, but friendly negroes,
delighted and affected me. In the morning, I cut
off the buttons of my coat, as a parting gift; these
were alll had to offer. In return, they gave me a
small bag filled with provisions, showed me the road
I must take to arrive at an European settlement, and
assured me they would offer up prayers for my
safety.

When I left them, my tears, rather than my words
expressed my gratitude. On my way, I reflected on
the kind providence of God, who, at the very mo-
ment I was dreading I should perish with want, sent
this benevolent negro to pity and relieve my distress.


102 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

IN CONTINUATION.

I travelled, continued Mr. Selby, until the day
was far spent, when I was suddenly startled by the
report of a gun. I looked round, but could perceive
no one: however, as the sound somewhat alarmed
me, I thought it best to climb a high tree, that was
near, from whence I might, myself unseen, discern
the cause of the firing. I now saw, ata great dis-
tance, a party of black men firmg ata lion, who was
already wounded, and lying upon the sand. He ap-
peared a very large and fierce animal; and I was
afterwards told that the blacks, having once wound-
ed him, had hopes that they might be able to take
him alive, convey him to a distance, and sell him to
the Europeans, who would be glad of such a prize
to send into their own country.

With this view they consulted together what was
best to be done, and one of them proposed taking
off the roof of a hut, (which in their country could
easily be done, as the roofs are small, of a circular
form, and simply made of a frame-work of bamboos,
covered with thatch,) and throwing this roof over
the lion, while he appeared in so helpless a state,
and then securely bind him with ropes.

This invention was very much approved ; and I
saw them go to a neighboring hut, strip off the
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 103

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thatch, and lift up the bamboo frame upon their
shoulders ; but, before they had returned, the lion
had recovered his strength, and looked at them so
fiercely, that they dared not approach him ; and, to
protect themselves, were about to let the roof fall
upon their own heads ; when, alas! the lion made
a violent spring, just at the moment the roof was
104 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

lowered, and both the beast and his pursuers were
enclosed in one fatal cage! I heard their screams
with unutterable anguish ; for it was entirely out of
my power to assist them. I could only hasten from
the dreadful scene, reflecting with horror on the
dismal end of these poor negroes. The African lion
is very large and powerful, yet he is hunted by the
negroes and the Moors, who tyrannize over the ne-
groes in some distant district. Whilst commis-
erating with them, I forgot the pain of my own suf-
ferings, though my feet were sore with walking on
the heated sand, and my body was covered with
blisters from the extreme heat of the sun.

Presently I was surprised to hear some one call
to me in English ; I turned and saw a negro, dres-
sed lightly, in European fashion. He told me he
had left his native country when a boy ; and, after
living several years in England, was now returning
to his African friends. Observing my dress, he
conjectured I was a person in distress, as this was
not a part of the coast for strangers to land upon.

[ told him his supposition was right, for only the
day before I had suffered shipwreck, and I related
to him all the sad particulars. The compassionate
negro felt for my destitute condition; he said, he
would take me with him to his friends that night,
and set me forward, in a right direction, the next
morning. We turned into a little wood, at the far-
ther end of which was a village.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 105

‘ There,’ cried the black, joy sparkling in his eyes,
‘ there is my native village.’ So saying, he began
to play a lively air on a fife, somewhat resembling a
flute, the sound of which brought out all the villa-
gers ; and, as his return had been expected, he was
soon surrounded by his joyful relatives, and almost
smothered with the affectionate embraces of his bro-
thers and sisters. His mother was an aged woman
and blind, and was led forth, leaning on a staff ; ev-
ery one made way for her, and she stretched out her
hand to bless and welcome her son : she stroked his
face and hands with tenderness, frequently declaring
her latter days were blessed by his return, and her
ears cheered with the sound of his voice.

I sat down, unnoticed, in a corner, enjoying the
sight of their meeting: at length, the traveller turn--
ed to look for me. He informed his friends who I!
was, and for his sake they received me with kindness,
but with great astonishment, inclining to fear. They
had never seen a white man before : when I moved,,
the women retreated a step, and the children scam-.
pered off in great affright. However, as they saw I
was perfectly harmless, by degrees they became rec-
onciled to my appearance, and cordially seated me
at their friendly supper.

In the morning, I went with my host to a neigh-
boring hut. This was a curious ‘habitation—for it
was so low, that we had to creep in at the: entrance

on our hands and knees ; and the furniture and peo-
K
106 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

ple were crowded together like things in a closet.
In the hut was anold man, two young women, and
several children. The women and children were so
alarmed at the appearance of a white man, that they
edged along softly to the entrance, and then dashed
out with the swiftness of greyhounds.

As we returned, I saw some people gathering the
fruit of the lotus, which they call tomborrongs. These
they dry, beat small, mix with water into a paste, and
form into cakes, which, when baked by the heat of
the sun, taste exactly like the finest gingerbread.

The following, or third morning, I felt recruited,
and, the blacks having filled a bag with provisions for
me, and given me the necessary directions for keep-
ing the right road, followed by the good wishes of
‘this poor but happy family, 1 again set out on my
eheerless journey.

IN CONTINUATION.

Wuen I had travelled many miles, said Mr
Selby, I was overtaken and stopped by a party of
Moors on horseback. I dreaded the consequence of
this meeting ; for the Moors, who here inhabit the
same country as the negroes, are of a very different
disposition, being gloomy and cruel. They insis-
ted on my going with them, and I had no power of
resisting. But, as they talked of carrying me be-
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 107

fore their king, I had hopes he would be .merciful,
and aid me in returning to my own country : but in
this I was grievously disappointed—their Chief re-
ceived me with a stern and savage look. He was
seated in a large tent, surrounded by a great number
of blacks. They were all much amazed at my dress ;
and some time was occupied in buttoning and un-
buttoning my waistcoat.

The Moors entertain great hatred to supposed Eu-
ropeans ; and, when I was conveyed to a hut for the
night, I found it was surrounded with guards. Here
they brought me a little boiled rice, and some milk.
The night was sultry ; and my spirits were so de-
pressed, I found it impossible to sleep. At midnight
the door of my hut was slowly opened ; I was great-
ly alarmed ; but my fears were soon dissipated, when,
by the light of the moon, I saw a negro, whom I had
noticed observing me in the chief’s tent with looks of
great compassion. He told me he was come to ena-
ble me to make my escape ; for he knew the Moors
were ill inclined towards me, and no time was to be
lost—the present was the only moment. To-morrow
I might be led to execution! He showed me four
Moors asleep at the door of my hut,—‘ Over these
you must step softly,’ said he ; ‘ if one awake, your
life and mine must pay the forfeit.’

I silently did as the friendly negro directed: we
passed the Moors safely, and stopped not until we
were beyond the town. I would then have thanked
108 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

my guide; but he said. ‘ I must hasten, or I may be
missed,’ and ran off too quickly for reply ; I could
only pray that the blessing of God might follow and
reward him. Ithen made haste to reach the desert,
that I might hide myself in case of pursuit. The
events of the last twenty-four hours appeared to me
like a dream ; but I had no time for dwelling on re-
flection. I hurried on, until the heat of noon made
me ready to faint. In the hope of seeing some dis-
tant hut or village, I climbed a high tree : the view
only extended over vast thickets of underwood, and
hillocks of white sandg peopled here and there with
termite ants, and the groves with birds of prey ot
their victims the gregarious or granivorous tribes,
that is, my dears, feathered songsters who live prin-
cipally on seeds, and flock together at particular sea-
sons : not one human habitation appeared in view.
The birds, though beautiful, appeared unlike ours,
and the animals suited only to these parched soils.
The climate seemed an unfit abode for white men,
and intended by nature only for its swarthy occupants.

Obliged to keep travelling, or perish in the desert,
Idragged my aching limbs along, until evening, when
suddenly a black cloud darkened the sky, and flash-
es of lightning gave hopes of rain : rain—which, in
my present state, would have been such a relief!
Expecting the shower, I opened my mouth to
catch the refreshing drops, having no other means;
but in an instant, J was covered with a cloud of
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 109

hot white sand, driven with so much force by the
wind, as to give no small pain to my face and limbs.
The sand continued to fly, in amazing quantities,
for about an hour; during which I was obliged to
sit, and sometimes lie prostrate under the shelter of
a bank or hillock, to prevent myself from being suf-
focated. After this, however, I again saw the light-
ning flash, and soon I felt the heavy drops on my
face. As my clothes wetted, I sucked them, and
thus relieved my thirst. Presently I heard the croak-
ing of frogs, which convinced me that water was
near: I followed the sound, and came to a pond,
where the frogs were so numerous and so tame, that
it was somewhat difficult to perceive the water, more
so to drink. Here I resolved to spend the remainder
of the night,—being too much fatigued to proceed ;
but, fearing I might fall asleep, in a situation where
wild beasts or wild Moors might attack me, I climb-
ed up into a tree, and, fastening myself by my
clothes, as well as I could, endeavored to sleep. In
the morning, lawoke much refreshed, pleased and
enlivened by the songs of numerous birds, who build
their nests on the banks of a solitary river, not far
distant. What was my joy, on awaking, to find the
tree I had climbed, a date-tree! My heart swelled
with gratitude to the Almighty, for thus furnishing
me so unexpectedly with food. After satisfying
myself, I filled my pockets with dates, descended the
tree, and once more resumed my perilous journey.
110 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

Some of the African birds are a curiosity. Vol-
umes might be filled in describing them. I will on-
ly say a word about two orthree of the herding or so-
ciable kind, called the Pensile Grosbeak, who hang
their nests like our red-winged oriole, which you
have admired ; but the grosbeak does it in a different



manner, attaching nest under nest, knotted, double-
knotted, and quadrupled toa single bough at top. This
innocent bird has to guard against snakes, white
ants, monkeys, birds of prey, insects, reptiles, and
perhaps juvenile offenders. It is about the size ofa
sparrow, and makes her nest of grass, straw, wild flax
and reeds, in the comical shape of what may vulgar-
ly be called a pudding-bag ; with the entrance below,
while it is fastened above to the twigs of trees grow-
ing over the water. On one side of this nest, with-
in, is the true nest. These birds do not destroy
the old nest évery year, but suspend a new one to

“. aes
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 111



the lower end, and as many as five nests may be
seen hanging one under another. Five or six hun-
dred such nests have been sometimes observed,
crowded upon some single undisturbed favorite tree,
branching over a deep river, or inaccessible precipice,
looking like so many millers’ well-filled meal-sacks,
tied at top, and suspended by hair or strong woven
thread, or long strong spear grass, the manufacture
of this skilful little bird. A single nest is from ten
to fifteen inches in length ; of course you may con-
ceive the length of five or six of these tree-rocked
cradles, joined together, swinging over the water, or
perpendicular ledge, each of them 30 or 40 feet long.

Shakspeare said of a castle at Dunsinane, where
martins built their nests,
112 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

Heaven's breath smells wooingly here : Where they
Most breed and haunt, I have observ’d, the air
Is delicate :—

but all the Grosheak needs, in this wilderness, is a
twig, slender but firm, to hang his loop upon ; and he,
with his little bill alone, erects his own nursery-room.
In the words of William’s picture-book, ‘ When the
wind blows the cradle will rock ;’ the careful and con-
siderate parent birds, however, have taken precau-
tions that all the boughs and bow-lines are in good or-
der and condition ; that the ‘ bough shall never
break,’ nor their cradle ever ‘fall.’ I have seen
twenty or more of such strange but beautiful nests,
or long round sacks, hanging from a single tree,
oscillating gently like a pendulum when the weather
was calm, or swinging violently in high winds and
horrible sand storms ; the little innocent nestlings
within the nest lying quiet and unharmed, always
safely outriding every tempest, and perhaps enjoy-
ing their rough but healthy game of rocking in
their sort of baby-jumper. In some huge trees there
are as many feathered songsters as in half a town in
New England, where, for the benefit and growth of
cankerworms, useful birds are wantonly exterminated.

‘ How doall these birds find food to eat?’ said Lucy.

In this warm climate, wherever there is moisture,
vegetation is rapid,and insects not only multiply, but
are of great size. An ant-hill is often 8 or 10 feet
high, and flocks of locusts are sometimes many miles
wide and 100 feet high, and many hours in passing.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 113

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These little birds destroy the smaller insects ana the
eggs of the larger ones ; birds of prey destroy these
songsters, but they also devour snakes and other
noxious reptiles, crocodile’s eggs, and young animals.
It isa land of violence, deserts, and fruitful spots.

But the Sociable Grosbeak, another species of
these birds, which inhabits the same warm regions of
Africa, seems to excel the Pensile Grosbeak, in the
extent if not in the skill of its workmanship. The
industry of this bird is almost equal to that of the
bee. Each individual nest is about three or four
inches in diameter ;_ but, as a colony of these nests
are all in contact with one another around the eaves
of this umbrella-looking structure, they appear to the
eye to foum one building, and are distinguishable
114 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

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from each other only by a little external aperture,
which serves as an entrance to the nest; and even
this is sometimes common to three different nests,
one of which is at the bottom and two at the top.
The number of cells, increasing in proportion to the
increase of inhabitants, the old cells become streets
of communication, the whole formed as it were by
line and level, with mathematical precision. As
this republic of birds increases, the number of cells
must increase under this wide-spreading canopy of
their own ingenious construction, divided and subdi-
vided into other streets, avenues, or sleeping-rooms.

‘ How did these little Grosbeaks learn to tie knots
and make umbrellas ?’ said William. 6
FREDERIC AND LUCY 115

Iam relating facts only, said Mr. Selby. You know
the republic of United America is divided into 34
independent States, under a general government ; in
some such silent way, although living under no writ-
ten compact, a little nation of Grosbeak birds, asso-
ciated under this broad overhanging canopy or um-
brella of their own staple, fabric, and commodity,
appear also to enjoy exclusive family or state rights
and privileges, each carrying on the art and faculty
of hatching eggs, probably under municipal regula-
tions, their language being to us unknown.

Dr. Freyer says in his Travels, “‘ The large nest,
that I examined, was the biggest I saw in the course
of my journey, containing three hundred and twenty
inhabited cells, which, supposing a male and female
to each, would form a society of six hundred and
forty individuals ; but, among this species of birds,
there is only one male to many females, who are
much more numerous.”

Mr.Addison asks the question, ‘ What can we call
the principle, which directs every different kind of
bird to observe a particular plan in the structure of
its nest,and directs all the same species to work after
the same model! It cannot be imitation ; for
though you hatch a crow under a hen, and never let
it see any of its works of its own kind, the nest it
makes shall be the same, to the laying of a stick,
with all the other birds of the same species. It cannot
be reason ; for, were animals endowed with it to as
116 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

great a degree as man, their buildings would be as
different as ours.’

It is so with the Grosbeak. Its nests, and those
of other birds in this country, and the birds them-
selves in Africa and Asia, are different from ours,
yet all their habits, natural or acquired,are appropti-
ate to their wants, climate, protection, and subsist-
ence, and excited my wonder and admiration.

Another of these African birds places its nest in
the thickest bushes, and makes it with a sort of wild
cotton. The nest very much resembles a bottle
with a narrow neck. On the outside of it is a pocket
which serves asa place of lodging for the male.
When the female has left the nest, the male, if he


FREDERIC AND LUCY. ‘117

desires to accompany her, beats violently with his
wings against the sides of the neck of the nest, until
the edges, by coming in close contact with each oth-
er, unite, and entirely close up, the entrance. By
means of this singular contrivance the young are
protected from those voracious insects and animals,
which might otherwise injure them during the ab-
sence of the parent birds.

Dr. Freyer adds to his account of the Sociable Gros-
beak, that ‘ Nature, in the rainy season at Bombay,
affords us a pleasant spectacle, as well as matter for
admiration ; for here is a bird that is not only ex-
quisitely curious in the artificial composure of its
nest with grass, but furnished with devices and strat-
agems to secure itself and young ones from its deadly
enemy, the squirrel ; as likewise from the injury of
the weather, which, being unable to oppose, it eludes
with this artifice ; namely, contriving the nest like a
steeple-bee-hive, with winding meanders, before
which hangs a pent-house for the rain to pass, tying
‘t with so slender a thread to the bough of the tree,
that the squirrel dare not venture his body, though
his mouth water for the eggs, &c. within; yet
it is strong enough to bear the hanging habitation
of the ingenious contriver, free from all the assaults
of its antagonists, and all the accidents of gusts and
storms. Hundreds of these pendulous nests may be
seen on a single tree.’

Whilst I was in England, continued Mr. Selby, I
118 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



saw one bird, which hada very curiously-shaped
nest. It is called Jack-in-the-bottle, from the circum-
stance of the nest having the shape of a bottle, compo-
sed of green mosses, &c. beautifully felted together,
consisting both of tree, earth, and rock moss, caterpil-
lars’ webs, and woolly and cotton articles and feath-
ers, with that order and art that the chief strength
and texture of the walls were of a yellowish-green ;
and the silk-hairy mosses, and tough threads resem-
bling those filaments suspended in the air and flying
up and down like spiders’ webs, which are accounted
a sign of fair weather, connected and interwoven or
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 119

entangled, so firmly together that they could hardly
be plucked asunder. The interior on all sides and
at the bottom was lined with feathers anddown. The
outside was fenced and strengthened with leafy moss
firmly bound together ; the little hole at the neck of
this bottle-nest seemed hardly big enough to admit
the old bird.

‘Qur lark and goldfinch build their nests in
the open pasture,’ said Lucy.

~~
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120 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

Yes, many birds in our country, where they are in
some degree safe compared with Africa, merely
select a hole in a tree, bank, rock, or old wall, eaves
or rafter of a barn, to build nests, which they line with
soft warm substances. Others build on reeds, alders,
hedges and briers ; some excavate holes in clay-
banks, but all line them with feathers ; the night-
hawk and whip-poor-will lay their two eggs on a bare
rock among pebbles and pudding-stones, from which
they are scarcely distinguishable.

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The smaller tribes are more expert in making
nests than those of a larger growth. Among others
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 121



the nest of the Tailor-Bird is very remarkable. It
is constructed of one or two leaves, dexterously sewn
together by a slender vegetable filament, or thread ;
and the interior is lined with cotton. The spoon-
bill, a species of heron, builds on the earth ; and the
toucan, a large bird, with a disproportionate, shovel-


122 FREDERIc AND LUCY.

shaped bill, digs a hole in the sand, builds and lines
it, and sits upon his nest, with his formidable head
and beak at the opening, looking down all opposition.
With a front, as striking and belligerent as that of the
squire in Don Quixote, frowning at Sancho, he thus
protects his long-billed little ones against intruders.



Even some of the African humming-birds are large,
but all extremely beautiful.

‘ There is one, which comes to our garden, not
much bigger than a butterfly,’ said Lucy.

I believe there are nearly ninety kinds of hum-
ming-birds in America, yet only one kind visits the
United States ; and even he retreats further and fur-
ther south towards tropical countries, as the flowers
decrease or die. He is their living companion, or the
presiding genius of flowers and fields, and, from his
quickness of wing, seems absolutely wingless, so
rapid ishis motion. Our pretty visiter is called the
Ruby-throated Humming-bird, the co-mate of spring
blossoms, and commences his northern travels on the
southern borders of the Union in March, flying pro-
bably in the night, as, from sunrise to sunset, he ap-
FREDERIC AND LUC Y.

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pears wholly engaged in feeding. A swallow flies
rapidly and incessantly ; but this bird seems to give ten
or twenty vibrations of the wing to the other’s one.
124 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

Whilst poised in the air, he thrusts his tongue or
proboscis into hundreds or thousands of flowers in
a garden or parterre, and daily, perhaps hourly, visits
hundreds of gardens and fields, where he appears so
suddenly that he seems to have dropped from the
clouds ; supporting himself on air, catching insects
in the petals, and sipping honey, all at the same
time. The blossoming of the peach-tree is the
signal of its approach to New-England : some remain
here to feast and rear families of Ruby-throats ; but
many are birds of passage, who make a few calls up-
on blossoms at stopping-places, and then hurry fur-
ther north. ‘ Full many a rose is born to blush un-
seen,’ says the poet ; but our little Ruby-throat, if he
understood our dialect, might doubt the assertion.
Perhaps there is not a flower in the United States,
and in the sunny south, from Brazil to the Artic
pole, unvisited by this swift-winged bird. Wherever
they go, there is no diffidence about them; they seem
perfectly at home, fearless of man, regardless of their
own race, their young ones excepted ; they will at-
tack any other bird, and are seldom resisted, since
their assaults seem rather to amuse than to irritate
their larger neighbors.

Nothing can be more brilliant than its plumage in
a well-filled flower-garden, variegated colors in both
setting off mutual beauty. The upper parts of this
bird are green and gilded, changing every instant as
it glances in the sun, Its throat is black like velvet
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 125

in some lights, in others it resembles the ruby fiery
red. It shows all its beauty to advantage, as it bal-
ances itself on its wings, and looks sharply into the
flower. It inserts its long bill into the cup or capsule,
and, with its double-tubed tongue, covered with a
glutinous saliva, +t draws out the insects from their
shelter and swallows them : then it sips a little honey
as if in payment of the service it has done the
flower, and darts away with a motion too swift for
the eye to follow. The small insects in the flower
seem to be the object of its pursuit ; the honey is
rather its luxury than its food. They sometimes
light on twigs and branches, spending some time in
arranging their dress, spreading their wing, and
drawing the full length of each feather in succession
through their bill. The nest of the humming-bird
‘s one of the most ingenious pieces of architecture.
It is generally on an old branch, but I have seen one
on a young pear-tree. The bird collects from old fen-
ces a kind of moss in scales, which it glues together
with saliva to form the covering of the nest, and give
it a perfect resemblance to the bough on which it
stands. The next coat consists of cottony substan-
ces, and the inner one of silk or down. When the
bird is on the nest, the appearance of the whole es-
tablishment differs so little from that of the leaves
and branches, that it easily escapes the eye. The
nest is about an inch and a half wide, an inch deep,
and is sometimes formed of gossamer, and the downy
126 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



substance from the mullein plant. The female lays
two eggs which are of a pure white color. When
any one approaches the nest, the little creatures dart
around with a humming noise, within a few inches
of a person’s head. Small as it is, it has violent
passions, and is very courageous, and sometimes a



little pugnacious in pulling flowers to pieces when
they are without honey. When poised in the air,
its wings look like a thin and golden mist.

As I went along, I espied a large red lion, near
a thicket, standing over an animal, which he had
stricken down with a single blow from his powerful
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 127



paw. You may imagine that I was dreadfully a-
fraid ; but, probably, he was already glutted with
prey, for he suffered other animals and myself to
quietly pass. I soon after arrived at a river, which
several blacks were crossing on @ curious bridge.
This bridge was formed by bending. down to the
water’s edge some of the tall trees, which grow on
its banks opposite each other, and tying their ex-
tremities together with supple withes, and then lay-
ing across these trees several planks, or trees, on
which people and their cattle can safely pass. Some
of these negroes regarded me with compassion, and,
after crossing the river, offered to conduct me to a
town, to which themselves were going, and where,
they assured me, I should be well received by a
black who had lived in ‘ white man’s country,’ and
held them in high respect.

I was truly glad to hear I was so near relief. Be-
fore night, we arrived at the town ; and I was taken
128 FREDERICANDLUCY

to the black woman’s small house, built like houses
in our country. She treated me with great kindness.
She explained to me why the blacks, at the place
of my shipwreck, were superstitiously afraid of white
men. It was anciently believed by many tribes of
negroes that white was the color of demons ; and

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FREDERIC AND LUCY. 129

their tyrants, the Moors, still keep up the delusion,
in order to extort tribute. A Moor is whitewashed
from head to foot ; a porcupine-shaped basket placed
on his head, calling himself the great J umbo, or head
of the imps, and, during night, visits the village or
families he wishes to frighten into obedience. She
gave me clean linen, and every refreshment of which
I stood in need, and told me I was welcome to re-
main in her house until an English vessel should
arrive at a neighboring port, where ships usually
stopped to take in provisions.

It was not long before a vessel arrived, bound to
India, whither I wished to go. I was, fortunately,,
known to the captain, and he enabled me amply to:
repay the black woman the value of what had receiv-.
ed. Her kindness I could only repay with gratitude..

As soon as the ship was ready, I went on board,
and proceeded on the voyage.

OBSERVATIONS...

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson warmly: thanked’ their
friend for the pleasure his relation had’ afforded
them ; but the children felt sorry when Mr. Selby
finished the recital of his African adventures. How-
ever, they anticipated with great delight the enjoy~

M
130 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

ment of some future evening, when they should a-
gain hear about foreign countries ; and they felt grate-
ful for the entertainment they had already received.

Both Frederic and Lucy wished extremely to

ask several questions, about things Mr. Selby had
mentioned, which they did not quite understand, but
they felt afraid of being troublesome ; and, for some
time they sat silent,—till at last, Lucy, who remem-
bered that her mother had often told her, it was
right to desire explanation of what she did not un-
derstand, from some person older and wiser than her-
self, otherwise she would always remain as ignorant
as if she had not heard the subject mentioned ; and
‘that nobody would consider such inquiries trouble-
some, if she only took care not to make them when
she saw the person, to whom she applied, engaged
either in reading, writing, or otherwise particularly
employed ; — Lucy recollected this, and, seeing her
mother was not talking, begged, in rather a low
voice, she would tell her something ‘about that place
Mr. Selby called a desert ; and why there were no
houses and people in it.’

The desert, my dear; replied Mrs. Johnson, is so
called from ‘its want of vegetation, occasioned by the
extreme heat of the sun. A desert isa vast plain, like
sthe:common, where you ‘often walk, only a great,
very great deal ‘larger ; and, instead of grass, it is
covered with sand, which becomes so heated, in this
‘hot part of the world, that nothing can grow on it ;
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 131

of course there are no inhabitants, and there is
scarcely any water. In that part of Africa where
Mr. Selby was, the sand is frequently so heated, that
the naked foot cannot be set down without feeling
much pain ; and even the negroes, who can consti-
tutionally bear great heat from the sun, who are also
natives, and can therefore bear this heat much better
than Europeans brought up in a colder climate, yet
even black men cannot walk on these sands without
putting on shoes ; and then, in these deserts, hurri-
canes and violent storms of wind arise, driving be-
fore them or raising vast quantities of this hot sand
‘nto the air; the effects of which, you have already
heard Mr. Selby describe.

‘ But, mother,’ interrupted Frederic, ‘ Mr. Selby
mentioned thickets of underwood, —and you know
he said he climbed a date-tree, and ate its dates; and
you just now told us nothing grew in the desert.’

If you had waited a little, my dear, I should have
explained to you how that was. The interior, or
middle of the desert, is entirely destitute of trees or
plants ; but, towards the extremities or outer parts,
as the air is not.quite so hot, and water more plenti-
ful, trees and shrubs are found, and the thickets of
brushwood and tall grass, of which Mr.Shelby spoke,
afford shelter to wild beasts, none of whom can live
in the interior part of the desert. The camel is the
only animal. that can here endure the heat and
want of water. To-morrow I may give you a

‘
132 FREDERIC AND suey.

short account of the camel,—to-hight I have no time,
and it draws near your bed-time.

‘ But, if you please, mother,’ said Frederic, ‘ tell
me what Mr. Selby meant by European settlement ;
—don’t yoo remember, he said he wished to reach a
European settlement? I did not know what he
meant, so I thought I would ask you, when he had
finished telling his story.’

You are right in so doing, replied Mrs. John-
son. You already know that the world is divided
into four parts or quarters, — Europe, Asia, Africa,
and America, When a number of Englishmen,
Frenchmen, Spaniards, or inhabitants of any Eu-
ropean nation, leave their native land to live
in some other country, wherever they fix their new
abode (say in Africa) the houses they build, their
language and manners differ from those of the native
Africans,and they live separate from them in a town
by themselves, which is called a European settlement.
Do you understand this explanation ?

Lucy and Frederic assured her they did.

William said, he should like to know what kind
of fruit a date is? And why Mr. Selby said noth-
ing about cocoa-nuts ?

The date, my dear, is about the size of a walnut,
of a very agreeable taste, and forms a considerable
part of the food of inhabitants of warm countries,
where fruit of all kinds is particularly refreshing,
The leaves of the tree are very long,—some of them
FREDERIC AND LUcyY. 133



are nine feet in length. Of these leaves are made
baskets, bags, and palm-tree hats, this last article
employing thousands of young girls in the western
part of Massachusetts, New-Hampshire and Vermont,
forming perhaps, as it were, a more reliable marriage-
portion than that of the St. Kilda girls (see p. 99.)
The tough fibres of the leaves are spun into ropes of
considerable strength ; and, when the fruit is dried
and pressed into bags braided from its own leaves it is
a pleasant preserve sold at grocery stores. The wood,
both of the stem and branches, is of great use in
building ; and even the kernel of the nut, ‘which is
very hard, and shaped like a weaver’s little shuttle
or very large barley-corn, is ground in windmills
and given to camels, when better food cannot be
134 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

procured. The leaves grow all at the top of the tree,
forming a circle, which is very beautiful, somewhat
like a gigantic green umbrella spread out.

The first bundle of palm-leaves sent to this country
was received with a cargo of fruit by a Boston mer-
chant, who is still living. Nobody knew what it
was, nor what to do with it, but he, thinking it would
make a handsomer and stronger hat than chip or
straw for his own use, had one braided ; since which
playful occurrence, cargo after cargo have arrived in
this country, and given industrious and lucrative
employment to perhaps more girls than Lowell itself.

When dates are almost full grown or ripe, they
are tied to the base of the nearest leaves, to prevent
their being beaten and bruised by the wind. Ifmeant
to be preserved, they are gathered a little before they
are ripe. Whenripe, they are a delicious fruit.
The date harvest isa time of as much anxiety be-
forehand, and of rejoicing when it comes, as the
grain, potato, and cotton crops of this country. The
owners of it do not depend wholly upon the new fruit,
but, as this fruit cannot be kept fresh for any great
length of time, they form a paste of it by pressing ripe
dates into large baskets.

‘What is the price of dates in Mecca ? is the first
question which Arabs ask each other when they meet.

Ripe dates are also dried, on mats, in the sun.
Those which are brought to this country are prepar-
ed in this way. Travellers in the desert perform
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 135

journeys of many hundred miles with no food but a
little bag of dried dates.

‘ Now for the cocoa-nut, mother,’ said William.
‘Is the cocoa we had for breakfast just like the cocoa
nut, that Frederic gave me, which was as big as
half a dozen oranges or Jane’s apple dumplings ?

They grow on entirely different trees. The shells
you drink for breakfast, the chocolate, and the cocoa
beverage come from the same little nut, about as big
as ahazel-nut. Shells are the bark of the nut. Cocoa
is cracked nuts and shells pounded together and boil-
ed fora time. Chocolate is pure cocoa, mixed and
ground with some oily or fat ingredient intoa heated
paste at the chocolate mills in Dorchester, and moul-
did into square or round shapes, in various gigantic
pattypans. This cacao, cocoa, or chocolate tree looks
like our cherry-tree, with a beautiful flower like a
rose, but scentless ; each half pod of cocoa contains
about twenty nuts, each inclosed in a skin or shell ;
and grows in South America, Jamaica, Trinidad, &c.
When picked from the pods, they are placed in
heaps on platforms of clay, suffered to ferment for 48
hours, and then dried in the sun. A great consump-
tion of chocolate takes place in Spain, where it is
considered as a necessary of life ; and in France it
is fashioned into an endless variety of forms, flavored
with vanilla, cinnamon, and other articles.

When intended for cocoa, the seeds are ground to
136 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



fine powder. The husks, or what is called shells,
boiled in milk, are in great esteem for invalids.

But we must not talk longer to-night. Good night.
May God bless you, my dear children.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 137



THE CAMEL.

Tue next morning was exceedingly fine, and Mrs.
Johnson told the children she would take her work,
and sit in the garden, while they should rake and
weed some of the flower-beds.

Lucy and Frederic were very good gardeners, they
had always assisted their mother : on summer Morne
ings they rose early, and dressed the flower-beds be-
fore breakfast,—tying the plants that needed support
to neat white sticks, and keeping the beds so nice,
that not a weed was to be seen. In autumn they
picked up all the withered leaves and branches that
/

138 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

fell upon the beds and gravel-walks. Many people
used to speak of the neatness of Mrs. Johnson’s gar-
den, and then she felt much pleasure in telling them
it was owing to her own children’s care, while they
were delighted with their mother’s approbation.

In spring, Mr. Johnson himself assisted in digging
the garden, as Frederic and Lucy had not strength
to do it properly ; and, at such times, he showed
them how to plant all kinds of seeds, and instructed
them how to raise delicate plants and vegetables.

While Mrs. Johnson was putting on her bonnet,
Lucy stood on tiptoe at her ear, saying, ‘ The camel.’

Ah that is true, my dear, I promised to say some-
thing of the camel, and I will be as good as my word.
Go into the summerhouse, and I will follow you.
In the mean time you can there take leave of your
father, before he goes on his daily round of business.
The children thanked their good mother, and ran off
as fast as possible. Mrs. Johnson soon followed ;
and, when seated in the garden-chair, beneath the
shade of a large beech-tree, she began :

The camel is the most valuable of all animals in
that part of the world it inhabits. It is the only an-
imal that can endure the extreme heat and want of
water, in the dry and burning sands of Africa and
Asia. Although the form of the camel appear clum-
sy, it is most admirably adapted, both for its own
comfort and for rendering it useful to man. Its feet
are covered with a strong, thick, loose skin, which
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 139

easily gives way to any roughness on the road, and
equally prevents the foot from being injured by the
heat of the sand. Its usefulness was apparent to
man in the earliest times. Abraham had flocks of
camels, oxen, asses, and sheep ; and David built Je-
salem before horses were generally known. Camels

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formed their riches. The camel has a large bag, or
stomach, as it is called, in which it stores a quantity of
water, sufficient to prevent the necessity of drinking
for several days. It sometimes happens that, when
travellers cannot find water in the desert and are al-
most dying for. want of it, they are obliged to kill a
camel, and save their own lives with the water con-
tained in the animal’s stomach. The hunches on its
back, and its great strength, enable it to carry much
greater burdens than the horse. It kneels to be load-
ed and unloaded, which is a convenience, as its great
height would otherwise render it very awkward to


140 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

fasten any burden upon its back. The camel is so
patient and docile, that it will do anything, if well
treated ; but, if beaten or ill treated it rages vio-
lently, and will, in its fury, tear its master to pieces,
if he unfortunately come in its way during the con-
tinuance of its virago humor.

These fits of rage, in this usually gentle and use-
ful animal, like those which also characterize the
elephant, are periodical ; and dissipated or sporting
Turks, whose countries it chiefly inhabits, take ad-
vantage of this propensity and have extensive camel
fights, where they wager on the victory of one poor
beast over another, a cruel and disgraceful amuse-


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 141

ment. ‘ Dog, however, will not eat dog ;’ and cam-
els, even in these periodical fits of rage, will not fight
friendly camels ; the sporting Turks therefore bring
two strange camels against each other on these oc-
casions, who run at each other with the utmost fury,
and the whole battle is as frightful as the onset, al-
though it seems to be a source of much morbid grat-
ification to the crowd of noisy spectators. Such exhi-
bitions are the disgrace of the vulgar—whether they
are the high or the low vulgar—of all countries ; and
the lion-fights of the savage Romans, the bull-fights
of Spain, the badger and bull-baitings and cock-fights
of England, and the camel-fights and quail-fights of
Asia-Minor, are equally indications of a barbarian
spirit, which can only be eradicated by knowledge,
humanity, and pure christian principle.

Of these, however, the camel-fights appear the
least objectionable. The camels of Smyrna are led
out to a large plain, filled with eager crowds. They
are muzzled, to prevent their being seriously injured,
for their bite is tremendous — always bringing a
piece out. An enclosure is made, and two camels,
muzzled, are driven in, and by various means incited
to fight with each other. Their mode of combat is
curious : they knock their heads together, twist their
long necks, and seem to direct their chief attention
to the throwing of their adversary. During the com-
bat, the Turks, deeply interested, will not only back
some one camel, some the other, but will clap their
142 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

hands, and cry out the names of their respective fa-
vorites, just as our amateurs do with their dogs, or
the Spaniards with their bulls at the bull-fights, will
echo the name of the hardy bull or the matador, that
murders him.

The camel resembles the ass in being content with
the poorest food : iteven prefers prickly and thorny
plants to softer vegetables, and yet, like the cow,
this animal yields excellent milk. The camel forms
the wealth of the Arab, or inhabitant of Arabia in
Asia ; for its milk is the support of almost every A-
rab family ; and the flesh of the young camel affords
much nourishment. You know the patriarch Job
had 3000 camels 7000 sheep, and 500 shé-asses, who
also furnish rich milk. These were better riches
than gold and silver. Its hair is much finer than
sheep’s wool, and it is woven into various articles of
ornament and furniture. The fine hair pencils, which
Lucy used in drawing the young larks, were made of




FREDERIC AND LUCY. 143

camel’s hair ; even the manure is useful—for, in
the deserts, where wood is as scarce as water, the
manure, mixed with straw, serves the Arab for firing
—burning with a strong, clear flame.

The usually obedient handy camel seemed created
with an especial adaptation to the wants of man,
from the earliest ages, and in the countries where
man first existed. Its nostrils have the capacity of
closing, so as to shut out the driving sand, when the
whirlwind scatters it over the deserts, or drives itin
waves. A company of eastern merchants cross from
Aleppo to Bussora over a distance of 800 miles en-

MT Taner SSL SS
= = —— : 0



tirely desert sands, each camel of the caravan loaded
with from 500 to 1000 pounds weight. The camel
needs no whip or goad, but, when weary, his driver
sings him a song, or jingles a tune with little bells !
any kind of music pleases this animal, and the de-
144 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

lighted creature forgets his fatigue, and toils forward
with the caravan of some thousand camels, merchants
and pilgrims joining in the chorus of an Arabian
melody, with the acconpaniment of perhaps a thou-
sand tinkling bells, or rude instruments of music.

‘ But, mother,’ said William, ‘one of these camels
in your drawing, has two humps.’

Camels are of two species. The one with one
hump is the Arabian camel, or dromedary. The
species with two humps is the Bactrian camel. But
the people both of Asia and Africa call all pleasure
camels, with which they ride or hunt or race, drom-
edaries ; while the baggage or caravan beasts, are
not dignified with this title, whether with one hump
or two, and travel only half as fast as the racing


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 145

camel or dromedary. Mr. Jackson, in his account of
Morocco, says, ‘ Talking with an Arab of Suez, on
the subject of these fleet camels, and the desert horse,
he assured me that he knew a young man; who was
passionately fond of a lovely girl, whom nothing
would satisfy but some oranges ; these were not to
be procured at Mogadore, and, as the lady wanted
the best fruit, nothing butMorocco oranges would do.
The Arab mounted his heirie at dawn of day, went
to Morocco, about 100 miles from Mogadore, purcha-
sed the oranges, and returned (another hundred miles)
that night, after the gates were shut ; but sent the
oranges to the lady by one of the night watch.’

The caravan camel sometimes carries gigantic
panniers, filled with goods ; and sometimes two or
more of them will bear a sort of litter or carryall, in
which a family of women and little ones are seated.

This is a drawing of Mecca, with camels entering.


146 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

HU
e \ MYM NITIE «U . \ 3
KI y AMET ET TN y} SNe A NAN 5
) \\ / Ws (Feet
HANAN) ‘ Ms . . , Age om

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es
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Tt

(Tae

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Hy i

A
at

el forms the riches of the desert. With

The cam
him the Arab loves his country ; without him, he

Ibrahim, the present new
ploying 100,000 Copts
d a railroad . from
the Isthmus

could scarcely exist.
viceroy of Egypt, intends em
under European engineers to buil
Alexandria on the Mediterranean over
FREDERIC AND Lucy. 147

of Suez to the Red Sea and Arabian Gulf, thus join-
ing, as it were, Europe with Persia, Indostan, and
China. These mighty enterprizes result from the
discoveries of the poor Scotch boy JamesWatt. ‘The
traveller will start from Cleopatra’s Needle, reach
Cairo in sx hours, refresh himself at a mammoth
depot in the midst of the waste howling wilderness,
and stand upon the ancient shores of the Red Sea in
two days after leaving the Delta of the Nile. A rail-
road through the scene of Israel’s flight and Phara-
oh’s rapid pursuit! through the regions where the
law was given from Mount Horeb—now for the first
t:me in thousands of years to be disturbed by the
clanking and roar of modern machinery !_ Here Job
drove his numerous flocks to the great marts of the
south. Over this hallowed ground his contemporary
Moses led the murmuring and mutinous Hebrews to
the Land of Promise. This was the path of the mul-
titudinous mohammedan hosts of Amru, when he led
his fanatical thousands from Syria to Cairo, and pour-
ed his dense dark masses on Southern Europe,to sub-
ject the Cross to the Crescent. Here, too, Napoleon
eyed the same waters that closed over the engulfed
chariots and horsemen of Pharaoh, and exhibited the
temerity of attempting to pass dry-shod through the
waters of the Arabian sea. But what was this des-
ecration, in comparison with the pantingand coughine
of the iron horse, within view of the spot where the
burning bush exhibited its mysterious sign to the
148 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

trembling Moses, where the tables of the law were bro-
ken to fragments, and over which the pillar of cloud by
day and of fire by night, hovered, and guided the
people of Israel to the lovely region of the Philistines
and Canaanites. The tour of the holy land, which,
in the days of the Crusaders, was a pilgrimage of im-
minent peril, and accompanied by privations and suf-
ferings little short of martyrdom, will soon be accom-
plished, by the aid of steamboats and cars, aS an 4a-
greeable summer jaunt ; and all the scenes of scrip-
ture become as familiar to the eye, and commonplace
in the mind of almost every transatlantic tourist as
the Tower of London or the Lake of Como, the Falls
of Niagara or the Notch of the White Mountains.’
The expense of maintaining a camel is very small ;
a cake of barley, a few dates, a handful of beans, ad-
ded to the hard and prickly shrubs of the desert, is all
the camel wants. He is particularly fond of plants that
are like spears and daggers compared with the needles
of the thistle, and which often pierce a man’s boot.


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 149

He might wish such thorns eradicated from the earth,
if he did not see the camel contentedly browsing up-
on them, and thus perhaps preserving both their
lives ; and he thus learns that Providence has made
nothing amiss. Thornsand thistles are the camels’
choicest provender.

Here ended the account of the camel. Now, said
Mrs. Johnson, if you are pleased with knowing the
character of the valuable camel, what a great deal of
pleasure you may yet attain! for, when you can
read well, and are able to learn geography, I intend
you shall read books of travels at the same time ;
and thus you will become acquainted with many cu-
rious and interesting particulars concerning the qual-
ities of animals, the productions of the earth, and
the habits and customs of the many different na-
tions who inhabit the various countries of the globe,
which you see delineated on the map.

THE VISIT.

In the afternoon, the children enjoyed a delightful
treat. They had been for some time invited to spend
an afternoon at a mill, a mile or two distant. The
miller had lately married Mary, a servant who had
lived with Mrs Johnson, and who was much attached
to her and her children. The children were as fond
150 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

of Mary as she was of them, and wished much to
pay the visit. The day was fine, and their mother
told them, if they made haste, and said their lessons
soon and well, she would take them in the afternoon
to the mill; and she sent a servant to ask Mary if
it would be quite convenient for her to receive them.

Mary Atkins returned answer that she should be
delighted to see them all.

After dinner, they set out for the mill. ‘They found
‘Atkins and his wife seated on a bench at the door,
as clean and neat as possible. As soon as Mary saw
her young favorites, she laid down her knitting, and
ran to meet them. She kissed them again and a-
gain,and assured Mrs. Johnson she had given her
great pleasure, to visit her humble dwelling.

When they entered the cottage, which nearly join-
ed the mill and mill-pond, where boys were angling
for perch, they were delighted with its neat appear-


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 151

ance. A large oak table, and the seat of the win-
dow were rubbed as bright as a looking-glass ; and
on the hearth stood a large jar, filled with roses and
woodbines, which perfumed the room most delight-
fully. They also perceived another very pleasant
odor, different from that of the roses. Mary Atkins
soon showod them what caused this delightful fra-
grance—she opened a neat little corner cupboard,
and produced two large dishes of strawberries, gar-
nished with beautiful scented summer flowers, saying

3 ma
3 Ie, as +
wer
Hae n \
y; 2 AR 04 Y, fh NS
A eee» SS . WW Ae
une ea pea = = ee tS f FQge. pee
—s en iA x ~ ers in
eh II» erence ee
= = 32 er ca ti nA Tere | —<———s
——_— — -. a

she had just gathered them in her little garden, ho-
ping Mrs Johnson and the children would find them
refreshing after their walk on sucha hot day. She
then drew a table before them, and placed the straw-
berries on it, and a pitcher of cream, a basin of su-
gar, and plates and tea-spoons. The strawberries
were a most delicious treat, —and Mary’s kindness
made it still more grateful.

When this feast was ended, Mr. Atkins requested
Mrs.Johnson would allow the children to go with
152 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

him to the mill and neighboring windmill, assuring
her he would take all proper care of them, and said,
he was sure they would be highly gratified with the
sight. Mrs. Johnson readily consented, but she
charged them to mind all Mr.Atkins said to them, ob-
serving, that a mill was rather a dangerous place, if
people and children were not careful to avoid touch-
ing the wheels and machinery, which turn round
with great force. She had heard of many sad acci-
dents happening to children and heedless persons, in
consequence of want of proper care and attention.
The children promised to attend strictly to Mr. At-
kins, who said his careful hired man would lead
Frederic, and he would take care of Lucy. Mrs.
Johnson knew that her children always kept their
promises : therefore, when they said they would at-
tend strictly to Mr. Atkins, she felt quite satisfied ;
and told them, as she had seen all kinds of mills, she
would converse with Mary till they returned.


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 153



The mill was a water-mill ; and the children were:
astonished to see the great wheel, which was turned}
by the force of water, cause so many more wheels to:
turn, and put the whole work in motion. Mr. Ate.
kins told them, that there were three kinds of water:
wheels, namely, the old-fashioned undershot stream |
wheel ; the overshot wheel ; and the breast wheel,
The undershot wheel is a simple wheel with a num-.
ber of stationary float boards regularly placed upon:
its outer surface, dipping into a rapid stream of was.
ter flowing from an elevated mill-race or canal ; and!
this large wheel turns smaller cog-wheels and ma-.
chinery inside the building.

‘ One of my playmates made an undershot ‘wheel, .
three inches wide across a gutter, though if had no-
cog-wheels,’ said Frederic ; ‘ but what is an over-.
shot mill ? 0
164 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



The overshot wheel, instead of float-boards, has
little narrow tubs reaching across the surface of the
wheel, which turn and empty themselves as the
wheel turns round. These tubs or buckets re-
ceive the water at the top of the wheel, instead of
the bottom in the old-fashioned wheel, thus husband-
ing the water and increasing the power by the great
weight of water in the buckets. When they suc-
cessively reach the bottom, they turn upside down,
and go upempty on the opposite side of the wheel, to
be again refilled. At the top there is a pen or sluice
for regulating the supply, else the water would run
unequally, or splash over. A stream of about an
inch thus fills the buckets, and the same quantity of
water on the overshot produce double the effect as
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 155

on the undershot wheel, requiring only half as much
water, and acquiring perhaps double power.

Frederic said he thought he would try to make a
little overshot wheel.



TL ;
mit

TTY
\\}

Mr. Atkins said, the third kind of water-wheel is
called the breast wheel. ‘This is the kind of wheel
now most in usé. The water on this wheel, instead
of passing either over the top of the wheel, or entire-
ly beneath it, is poured upon it about half way up.

Frederic and Lucy were next shown how a sack
of wheat or corn, maize, or oats, was drawn up by a
rope, until it was raised over a square box wide at
top and narrowing downward like a tunnel, and call-
eda hopper; this box had a round hole in the bot-
tom, and a small pipe, similar to a funnel, through
which the corn gradually fell between two large, flat,
156 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

heavy stones, which, being turned round very quick-
ly, bruised the corn into a fine powder, which fell
through a hole in the middle of the lower stone into
another large box. Afterwards, they saw the flour
was carried to another long, round box, placed slant-
ing ; but, instead of this being made of wood, it-~was
made of fine wire-work. The use of this wire-box
was to separate the bran from the flour : for, as this
box turned round, the flour fell through the wire,
and the bran was left; but the box being placed
aslant, the bran did not remain in it, but passed off
at the upper end.

Lucy asked if water mills did not saw boards and
shingles and planks, and whether it did not plane or
smooth them ?

Mr. Atkins said, by different machinery, water
power was not only applied to saw-mills but slitting
mills, trip hammers, chocolate and paper mills. In
country towns, where there are falls, this is done by
water power, but, in cities, by steam power. Co-
chituate pipes, in Boston, might, if necessary, be u-
sed as water power for all purposes.

Frederic asked whether steam power did these
things, and whether there were any in Boston.

Yes,there is a steam grist-mill in Blackstone street,
and near by a planing-mill, and monstrous mills for
grinding coffee by steam ; there are many steam
mills for other purposes, and a number on the Mill-
dam that operate by tide-water power. There are
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 157

TT a
i i

i iN
ne :



} a =

eee 1 ttt

nent

steam flour-mills in Commercial street, at the head
of the Eastern rail-road wharf. But we must look
at a windmill. Windmills move almost always, let
the wind blow from what quarter it may, by ma-
chinery. The two first mills in Boston, 1633, were
wind-mills ; one of them stood on Copps’-hill, near
the Gas-works ; the other on Fox-hill, exactly on
the spot in the Public Garden where there is now a
pond, near Charles-street, Boston, and where the
boys now grind ice, not with a pair of mill-stones,
but with hundreds of pairs of Holland skates.

Steam power is applied to pulverizing and refi-
ning beautiful white sugar at East Boston, and mon-
158 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



strous iron works at South Boston, &c. which bore
out cannon, manufacture iron ordnance for peace or
war, and also rail-road locomotive engines.

When the curiosity of the children was fully grat-
ified, they returned to the cottage, and told their
mother what they had seen. But Lucy said, though
Mr. Atkins was very obliging in telling them a great
deal about the parts of the mill, yet neither Frederic
nor herself could well understand or hear him, there
was such a noise from the many wheels turning
round at once, the clanking, clattering sound of the
hopper, and the grinding, crushing, thundering low
bass of the enormous mill-stones running different
ways. Mrs. Johnson said she would next morning
show them a drawing of the machinery of a mill ;
and, as they had now been through one and had a
skeleton view of it, they would gradually know the
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 159

different uses of the little rapid wheels as well as the
stately great wheel ; and she would patiently assist
them to acquire a knowledge of every part ; and she
also told them, that, when they were a little older,
and could understand somewhat about machinery,
she would take them to a paper-mill, where old blue
worthless rags, scraps of gowns, and patch shreds, of
all the colors of the rainbow, black, white, and grey,
are bleached and transmuted or turned into beautiful
pure white paper, in rolls a mile in length, or, if it
were wished, long enough to reach round the world.

Whilst the children were thus telling their adven-
tures, Mary Atkins was in the kitchen preparing tea ;
and, when she brought it in, they saw she had pro-
vided nice wheat knead-cakes, and excellent milk,
warm from the cow : for Frederic and Lucy there
was also a plate of honey ; and they were almost as
much pleased with the examination of the slices of
comb as with the delicious taste of the honey.

After tea, they went into Mary’s garden, which
was stocked with pease, beans, cabbages, melons,
and sweet herbs, and widely bordered with a variety
of flowers, fruit and berry bushes and strawberry
vines. Mary pulled them a nice nosegay; and de-
sired them to gather a basketful of ripe gooseber-
Ties, to carry home to master William. She then
showed them the bee-hives ; but the bees had done
work and were at rest. They were then shown the
poultry ; and Mr. Atkins said the ducks, goslings,
160 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



and pigs were fed with the bran which came from
the flour, mixed with whey and buttermilk. They
saw the ducks swimming about very happily in the
mill-stream, and the geese returning home from the
pond, marching common time, headed by ‘the old
gander, whose opinion when and where and where-
fore to proceed, seemed implicitly followed, although
each and every member of the assembly made the
woods re-echo with their trumpet-like voices. Mr.At-


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 161

kins said, even when in the air, flying periodically
north or south, in a wedge, or in indian file, the
geese were always noisy, and always in the same man-
ner marshalled, an hundred or more in a regiment,
in hollow squares, or cones, like a Spartan phalanx,
the patriarchal gander acting as orderly at the
front of each wild-goose cavalcade. Mrs, Johnson
told the children that Rome was once saved by the
cackling of geese. The enemy mounted the walls
of the citadel at midnight. The guards were all a-
sleep at their posts ; but a flock of geese belonging
to the sacred temple, were wide awake, and, seeing
helmets, spears, and tall figures of warriors clamber-
ing over the ramparts, did good service, by rais-


162 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

ing their shrill clanging cries or cacklings, effectu-
ally rousing Manlius and the garrison by their loud,
incessant gabblings, and Rome was saved. The
assailants were driven headlong over the battle-
ments, and the Gauls retreated, with the disgrace of
having been outgeneralled by a flock of geese.

Mary then showed the barn-yard, where turkeys
and bantums strutted about, looking somewhat silly
with their important airs ; and Cochin, donking, and
dunghill crowers almost stynned them in a variety
of discordant thorough-bass, low bass, and other base
tones. The little pigs with cunning curly tails, look-
ed so neat, so droll, and were so good-natured and


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 163

playful, that they appeared mere pets. Mary’s kind-
ness and gentleness seemed instilled into the dispo-
sitions of the very brutes and birds, and every short-
horn, bug-horn, Durham-breed, spotted, speckled, or
brindled heifer, wasa kind of cosset. Every sleek-
haired, mild, kind-dispositioned cow, yielded, as Mr
Atkins said, each its pailful of milk twice a day, and
was a sort of particular acquaintance, who wished al-



ways to be milked by its mistress. Even the colt
answered by a whinny when she spoke to him, came
when called by her, and coninually gambolled around
the enclosure on his nimble little hoofs, to the great
amusement and admiration of the children.

It was now time for the children to return home,
and they and Mrs Johnson thanked Mary and her
husband for their great civility and kindness. Mary
was very sorry to part with her young guests; and
would insist on filling a small jar with honey, for the
164 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

children to take home, as they were so fond of it.
The children thanked, and kissed, and bid her good-
night, at least twenty times. At length they depart-
ed with their mother,—Frederic carrying the pot of
honey, and Lucy, the little basket of goose berries.

All the way home, they talked in admiration of
Mary’s kindness.

You see, my dears, how pleasant is an obliging
disposition. Mary, whilst with me, was always obli-
ging, and thereby she gained my regard and esteem.
If she had been otherwise, she would not have taken
the trouble of gathering the strawberries, nor of ma-
king the cake, nor of telling or showing us about the
mill or farm ; but an obliging disposition prevents
anything being thought a trouble, which can contri-
bute to the pleasure or comfort of others. Sucha
temper makes its possessors happy,and bestows hap-
piness wherever it extends.

We shall soon reach home, when I shall be busy ;
in the mean time, I will answer all your questions.

Lucy said, when her mother, in the account of the
camel, told about a young man riding from Moga-
dore to buy oranges, he rode on a heirie 200 miles
inaday. ‘ Please tell me what is a heirie, mother ?

The heirie, or camel of the desert, looks somewhat
like other camels, but is more elegant in its shape,
costs a higher price, and is incomparably swifter.
The Arab, mounted upon this useful creature, with
his loins, ears, and breast bound round to prevent
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 165

the fatal effects of the suffocating air of the des-
ert, traverses with immense rapidity the scorching
sands of the Great Sahara, the fiery atmosphere of
which impedes respiration to a degree that would
kill any unprotected rider. The motion of the heirie
is quick and violent, and can only be endured by
those patient, abstemious, and hardy Arabs who can
travel three days without other food than a handful
of dates. When speaking of this fleet courser, the
natives remark in their figurative style,—‘ If thou
shalt meet aheirie, and say to the rider Salam alec,
ere he shall have answered Alec salam (salutation),
he will be nearly out of sight, for his swiftness is
like the wind.” There are three species of the heirie,
easily distinguished by the natives of the African
Wilderness. The first, which is extremely rare, is
denominated the heirie of nine days ; that is, he can
perform a nine days’ journey in one. ‘The second is
the sabayee, which in one day can go seven days’
journey ; and the third is the talatayee, whose speed
is limited to a three days’ journey in one. Witha
goat-skin, or porous earthen vessel, filled with water,


*
166 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

a few dates, and some ground barley, the Arab trav-
els from Timbuctoo to Tafilet, feeding his heirie but
once ; for, on an emergency, this strong powerful
quadruped will abstain from drinking for seven days.

MR. SELBY’S FOURTH VISIT.

Tue next time Mr. Selby made a call, Mr. John.
son was out, but Mrs. Johnson was at home with ©
her children. As soon as they saw Mr. Selby, the
children clung round him, eagerly reminding him of
his promise of telling them about his voyage to India.

‘ Hey-day !’ exclaimed he, ‘ what a pair of impa-
tient little rogues J have to deal with! Pray, mister
and miss Hasty, let me lay down my hat, and drink
a glass of water,—you do not consider I have had a
long walk.’

Lucy felt somewnat ashamed at thus considering
her own gratification before that of another; and,
recéllecting what her mother had the night before
said about being habitually kind and obliging, she
ran down to the dining-room, and brought up what
remained of the basket of gooseberries they had
gathered in Mary’s garden.

Mr. Selby was much pleased with Lucy’s atten-
tion. He ate the gooseberries, telling her they
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 167

were very refreshing, as the heat of the afternoon,
and the dust of the road, had made him extremely
thirsty. Lucy was quite glad that she had thought
of the gooseberries : her mother looked pleased with
her, and she felt ten times happier than if she had
eaten them herself.

Come, said Mr Selby, I find you are worthy to-day
of all the entertainment I can give ; come, sit down
by me, and listen.

The children brought their little stools, and placed
them on each side of Mr. Selby’s chair. Mrs. John-
son drew her work from the work-basket ; and, when
all were seated, their kind friend began :—

You may remember, my dears, I left the African
shore, on my way to India. We had a favorable
passage, and were not long in arriving at the Bay of
Bengal. If your mother has a map, I had better
point out to you where theBay of Bengal is situated,
and also all the other places I visited.

‘] will get you a map with pleasure,’ replied Mrs.
Johnson ; and she presently brought one.

Mr. Selby then showed them all the places that
the vessel had passed in going from Africa to India ;
and he showed them in what part of India Bengal
is situated, and where its chief town, Calcutta,
stands, whither he was going.
168 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

Frederic and Lucy were much pleased with his
tracing on the map the course of the ship from Af-
rica to Calcutta. They declared it made them un-
derstand much easier about the places Mr. Selby
had seen ; and he, finding them so much pleased,
said that, after tea, he would point out to them, on
the map, the whole of bis route from this country.
The children heartily thanked him,—and he contin-
ued his account as follows :-—

After being landed on the Bengal coast, I proceed-
ed immediately to Calcutta. The business I had to



manage kept me close within doors during the day ;
so that I had little opportunity of seeing much of this
large city, though I had several friends at Calcutta ;
for there are great numbers of our countrymen at
that place, it being an European settlement.
FREDERIC AND LUecyY. 169

‘ Pray, my dears,’ said Mrs. Johnson, ‘ do you rec-
ollect my explanation of a European settlement ?

‘O yes ! that we do,’ exclaimed Frederic and his

sister, both at once.

‘Iam glad you do, my loves ; it is a great pleas-
ure to me to find you remember my instructions.’

Mr. Selby continued. ‘ The beautiful fine mus-
lins, which are made in India, are brought to Cal-
cutta, and from thence sent in ships to Europe and
America. This manufacture and its export were very
great a few years ago ; but the effects of the long-
reaching, never-tiring, lever-power of Mr. Watt’s
steam-engine has stopped exportation from Cal-
cutta ina great degree. The fabric is trans-
ferred from India to London and Lowell; and the
staple itself (cotton) from the banks of the Ganges
to those of the Mississippi. The steam factories. at
home and Arkwright’s spinning-jennies begin to su-
persede manual labor to the ends of the earth. The
quantity of cotton, cultivated and wove at home
has enabled Europe and America in some degree
to rival India and China in some of their ancient
products. Cotton goods from Boston and Lowell
are already sold cheaper in Bengal and China than
their own productions. This is only one out of a

thousand of the effects of Watt’s discoveries. Engines
P
170 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

have already, or soon will be in operation, for various
labor-saving purposes, perhaps in Canton and Persia.
A New-Bedford whaler perhaps may hereafter apply
steam to the killing of proper whales and humpbacks
among icebergs at the north pole.

My evenings in Calcutta were partly spent in vis-
iting a few friends, and partly in seeing public a-
musements ; these last, however, among the com-
mon people, are mostly confined to the tricks of jug-
glers, pretended magicians, and mountebanks, and
to feats of strength and dangerous dexterity, com-
pared with which those in our own country are
merely bungling imitations. The jugglers of India
have long been celebrated for dexterity, and, by the
heathen natives generally, they are supposed to have
intercourse with demons ; a delusion which is kept
up by the jugglers. They belong to the lowest castes,
they are universally despised, yet universally dread-
ed. They are outcasts ; but the most common class
among these jugglers, and by far the most harmless,
is that of the snake-catchers, who infest the towns
and fairs, exhibiting their snakes, and accompanying
their movements with a music, from which all mel-
ody is banished, and the most frightful confusion of
sounds produced, worse than our old-fashioned New-
England village wedding accompaniments of marrow
bones and cleavers, cow-horns, conch-shells and tin
kettles. They carry their serpents in round wicker
baskets, in which the creatures lie coiled up ina
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 171

\




5D

TUN er:
pe jy
BRT

= ‘gi 4) s = cu Mi

am

” | yaa ay Ms X = °
| te
: es Tah — ony
Nh Ue

sleepy state, until roused by the harsh tones of
their keepers’ flutes. It is astonishing to see how
they are affected by the tones of those rude instru-
ments ; for, no soonerdo their charmers begin to
blow, than the snakes raise their heads, gradually
erect themselves, waving their necks to and fro, as
if in a state of ecstasy.

This cut represents a snake-charmer with his
cossets coiled around him in all manner of attitudes,
while at the right of the picture is another charmer
blowing his trumpet, to inspire the serpents to ac-
tivity. The fangs of the rock-snake are not hurt-
ful, but the bite of a hooded-snake is generally fatal ;
nevertheless, the charmers do not extract the poison-
172 FREDERIC ANDLUCY.-

ous fangs as is commonly supposed, but exhibit
these reptiles with all their powers of mischief un-
impaired, and it is the perfect knowledge of their
tat secures them from the danger of being
¢ The rock-snake is usually twelve or fifteen

feet long, and allows the man who shows it to tie it

round his neck like a lady's boa, and coils it into all

kinds of fantastic figures.





These jugglers even take the venomous reptiles
in their hands, and put them against their cheeks,
pretending that the fangs are extracted merely to
prevent alarm ‘n those before whom they exhibit.
The jugglers encourage the belief, that is generally
entertained, that they have the power of charming
all venomous snakes, and commanding obedience,
FREDERIC AND LUCY. . 93

The medium of communication, they pretend, is the
musical instrument, the sound of which infuses into
the dumb captive new life and energy.“ The same
art,” says the Abbe Dubois, “ seems to have been
laid claim to by other ancient nations, witness the
allegory of the prophet.” The allegory to which he
refers is in the 4th and 5th verses of the 58th psalm :
« their poison is like the poison of aserpent; they
are like the deaf adder that stoppeth her.ear ; which
will not hearken to the voice of charmers, charming
never so wisely.”

These jugglers frequently impose upon the super-
stitious Hindoos, by persuading them that their hou-
ses are infested with snakes. In order to make this
appear, they contrive to place one or two of their
own tame ones in some of the crevices of the build-
ing. They then enter the house with all the assu-
med wisdom of ancient sages, and begin to pipe such
music as would frighten any other creature than a
snake ; and, when their own reptile peeps out of its
retreat, they snatch it up with becoming gravity, put
it immediately into its wicker prison, and there. the
enchantmentends. These pretended enchanters will
sometimes enter every house in a village, and prac-
tise the same or similar feats of deceit ; and, where
imposition is so easy, and impunity so certain, it is
no wonder that there is such a number of cunning
cheating vagabonds and quacks and travelling fakirs
in all parts of India. It must be confessed, however,
174 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

that among these jugglers are frequently to be found
persons who perform feats of manual dexterity scarce-
ly credible. They possess an elasticity of body, and
a flexibility of limb, far exceeding anything ever wit-
nessed in colder latitudes. ‘These people come ‘to
your house in broad day-light, and perform their
tricks before your own door ; they have no cunning-
ly-devised tables to disguise their art, but only a few
implements of their profession contained in a basket,
As they are almost entirely naked, they have not any
resources common to magicians in other countries.

I will mention an instance, my dears, as it may
amuse you. They took the seed of the mango
fruit-tree, which they put into a small pot of earth,
the size of an ordinary flower-pot. Ina few seconds
the earth heaves, the head of a plant peeps forth. To
the astonishment of the beholder it gradually rises,
the buds swell, the leaves unfold, the blossom ex-
pands, the fruit forms, grows, and ripens, when it is
plucked and is presented to you, and always turns
out to be the rich ripe fruit, called mango. The im-
pression is so vivid, the whole effect so overpowering,
that you really fancy you see the various operations
of the growth. The deception is so perfect, that you
forget the palpable fact that a mango tree is about
the size of the white oak, whereas this counterfeit
rose no higher than a currant-bush. The juggler did
not allow you to approach him during the operation.

His next trick was to cover the ground before your
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 175

door, to the extent of several feet, with growing
flowers. The principal juggler spreads upon the
ground a large coarse cloth, over which he mutters
his potent spell. He then suddenly raises it, and the
whole space underneath is found covered with flow-
ers, of all hues and fragrance, peculiar to that fruitful
and blooming country. Again he spreads his cloth,
and after a minute raised it, but (presto !) no flower
remained, all was bare ground.

After I had seen this done, a tall stout bamboo,
forty feet long, was fixed upright in the ground, suf-
ficiently firm to bear the weight of a heavy man.
About five feet from the top there was a cross pole
fastened to the upright bamboo with strong cords,
the whole forming a lofty cross. When all was
ready, a short active Hindoo, somewhat beyond the
middle age, with compact limbs, and rigid muscu-
larity of frame, approached the cross, grasped the
shaft, and, using his hands and feet with equal dex-
terity, climbed to the cross-bar with the ease and
agility of a cat. Placing himself on his back on one
of the projecting ends of the transverse pole, he fol-
ded his arms, and lay so still that every muscle of
his body appeared in a state of complete repose. In
a moment he sprang upon his feet, without any ap-
parent preparation or perceptible movement of his
limbs ; he then threw himself horizontally upon the
point of the upright bamboo, and spun round with a
velocity quite distressing to the spectator ; one while
176 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



turning on his back, and another on his stomach,
changing his position with a quickness and _pre-
cision that baffles description. He now placed
his head upon the extremity of the pole, shook his
feet in the air, and raised his arms with the most
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 177

terrific animation. Whilst he was thus occupied,
eight brass balls were successively thrown to him,
which he caught and danced into the air one after
another, throwing them in various directions above
and round him, when, suddenly, he sprang upon his
feet, standing upright upon a diameter of not more .
than 2 and a half inches, and caught every ball,with-
out allowing one to fall to the ground. He next per-
formed the most extraordinary feats upon the cross-
pole, having nothing but his own limbs to balance
him, throwing a twelve-pound cannon-ball over his:
head, catching it below his right shoulder, and, by
mere muscular force, repelling it back again, as if it
had been ejected from the hand. After suspending:
himself by the chin, by the toes, and heels, he drop--
ped from the cross-pole to the ground, a height of
full thirty feet into our arms, and received our vol--
untary benefactions with a grateful salaam.

‘Was the bamboo pole like Frederic’s bamboo:
fishing-rod? said little William.

Yes, but larger than an angling or smelt-rod..
Bamboo is a native of the hot regions of India and
Asia, but, you know, the frame of the negro’s hut:
in Africa (see p.103) was made of the same material...
It is scarcely ever brought to our country except as:
an object of curiosity, or to catch flounders, perch,.
and rock-cod at Nahant and Rockaway. But in the:
Q
178 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

a



eountries where it grows it is one of the most uni-
versally useful plants. * There are about fifty vari-
eties of bamboo,’ says Mr. Loudon, ‘ each of them
of the most rapid growth, rising from fifty to eighty
feet the first year, and in the second perfecting its
timber in hardness and elasticity. It grows in clumps
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 179

which are cut every two years. The quantity of
timber, furnished by an acre of bamboos, is im-
mense ;’ and renewed every two years from the same
roots. ‘ Its uses are almost without end. In-build-
ing it forms almost entire houses for the lower castes
in India, and enters both into the construction and
furniture of those of the higher castes or orders.’ A
bamboo chair, for instance, with gildings and trap-
pings, is light, strong, and beautiful. ‘ Bridges,
boats, masts, rigging, agricultural and other imple-
ments and machinery ; carts, baskets, ropes, nets,
sail-cloth, cups, pitchers, troughs, pipes for conveying
water, pumps, fences for gardens, fields, &c. are made
of bamboo. Macerated in water it forms India pa-
per; the leaves are generally put round the tea sent
to foreign countries ; the thick juice is a favorite
medicine. It is almost indestructible by fire, resists
acids, and, by fusion with alkali, forms a transparent
permanent glass.’ Your father’s walking-cane is a
piece of bamboo.

‘T thought it was called a rattan,’ said Lucy.

Rattan is one of the kinds of bamboo, of which
there are many varieties; rattan is tougher, and
more elastic, but does not grow so large or high as
the bamboo in the engraving.

At this moment, Mr. Selby was called out of the
room. When he returned, he told Mrs. Johnson he
was sorry he must leave her on some business of im-
180 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

portance ; however, added he, I have yet an hour to
devote to my young friends’ service.

‘ Then I will order tea :mmediately,’ said Mrs.
Johnson, ringing the bell.

Thank you, replied Mr. Selby ; and, while we are
drinking it, I will relate a sad account told me by one
of my elderly Calcutta friends, which took place a
few years ago at this place. One of the native chiefs
was displeased with the Europeans, and made war on
them: His army was stronget than theirs, and he
destroyed their houses +n Calcutta, and took a great
number of prisoners. Several of these prisoners
were put together snto a small dismal dungeon, where
they had hardly room to move, and which was only
lighted by two narrow windows, strongly barred with
iron. The air is extremely hot in Bengal: and |
these poor men had scarcely been a few minutes in
this close confinement, before they fell into a violent
perspiration, that weakened them exceedingly —they
tried to get a little relief by stripping off their
clothes, and fanning themselves with their hats :
but many of them became so weak, they fell down,
and were suffocated.

The violent heat, and want of air, presently brought
on an intolerable thirst, and difficulty of breathing.
Those who were strong then endeavored to break
open the door of their dungeon ; but all their efforts
were in vain, it was too well secured. They were
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 181

now in such agony, that they implored the soldiers,
who were outside, to fire on them through the grated
windows, that death might release them from the
agonies they were suffering. This the soldiers
durst not do: they had no orders to kill these
wretched sufferers, several of whom now lost their
reason, and became mad, through distress ; while
all who were able, vehemently cried out for water,
water! The soldiers brought them some water,
but in such small quantities, it only increased their
desire for more. It was eight o’clock in the eyening
when these distressed men were put in the prison—
before eleven,which was only three hours after, many
of them were dead, in consequence of their dreadful
sufferings. Among those who survived, one gentle-
man kept his mouth moist, by sucking the perspira-
tion from his shirt sleeves, and catching the heavy
drops as they fell, like rain, from his face. A dis-
gusting smell presently arose from the dead bodies,
which, from the heat and contaminated air, soon be-
came very offensive, and the cry for water was a-
gain changed into an earnest request for air. About
two in the morning, they crowded so much to the
windows, that many died standing up, unable to fall,
on account of the throng and pressure around them.

When day-light appeared, the native chief, who
had been informed of their dreadful situation, sent
an order for their release ; but nearly all had been
already released from torment by death. Of the
182 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

whole number who were crammed into this frightful
prison (about 200), only six came out ‘alive! and
these in the most exhausted and helpless condition,
from which they were long in recovering.’

- During this recital, both Mrs. Johnson and her
children were so much affected with sorrow for the
severe fate of these unfortunate Englishmen, that
Mr. Selby had ceased speaking some time before
any one broke silence. At length, Mrs.Johnson said
she had heard of another calamity at Calcutta,—a
famine ; and asked Mr. Selby if it were true.

Alas ! replied Mr. Selby, that account was but too
true. I was myself in Calcutta at the time, and I
was about to tell you I was partly compelled to leave
Bengal on account of the misery it occasioned.

For many months there had been. no rain, which,
in that country is death to vegetation. The harvest
entirely failed among this improvident population.
When the scarcity began to be felt, the rich people
distributed their own stock of rice among the poor ;
but, when that was all gone, thousands on thousands
died with hunger while wandering in search of food,
lost and sinking down in streets, fields, and hovels ;
and shocking it was to see dogs and vultures feed
on the dead bodies of our fellow-creatures. Many
persons: were employed in throwing the dead into the
rivers, as it was impossible to bury them. This
made the water, as well as the air, corrupt; so that
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 183

the fish, on which some had hitherto subsisted, could
no longer be eaten. Glad wasI that my business
forced me for a time to leave a country, where I had
not the power of assisting the wretched, and where
my own life, from want of sustenance, was in hourly
hazard. Now, added Mr. Selby, looking at his
watch, it is time for me to keep my appointment.



THE BEES.

Next day, at tea, as the children were eating the
honey Mary Atkins had given them, the curious ap-
pearance of the honey-comb induced the children to
ask many questions about bees. They knew how
honey and wax were obtained and preserved by bees,
from reading Miss Edgeworth’s book about. Little
Frank, but they wanted to know a great deal more ;
for they had heard their father once+talking with a
184 FREDERIC AND LUCY

gentleman about the economy of bees, and they did
not know what was meant by the ‘ economy of bees.’

Mrs. Johnson told them, what was called ‘ the
economy of bees’ signified their admirable manage-
ment of their work, and disposal of themselves’ into
parties, the better to accomplish it ; and also their
submitting to be directed by one, whom we call the
Queen-bee, because she commands the whole hive,
all the operations in which are seen in a glass hive.


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 186

This single bee, when young, is fed by the working
bees, with the best of the honey ; and they make
her a cell three timesas large as the cells of the
common working bees. 7

The industry and activity of bees is truly won-
derful ! not one in the whole hive is unemployed ;
Some are engaged in gathering honey and wax ;
others in rebuilding decayed cells ; some keep guard
at the entrance of the hive ; to prevent ants and oth-
er pilfering insects coming in ; some are employed
in carrying out the dead,—for, when one bee dies,
the other bees will not allow the dead body to stay
in the hive ; they drag it to the entrance, and throw
it over the stone on which the hive is placed. If the
dead body be a large one, too heavy for the little la-
borers to drag, they cover him over with wax, so that
nothing is seen, literally embalming him against all
putrescence. They keep the hive beautifully clean
and neat. It is said, by people who have kept glass
hives, that, when they begin to work, which is as
soon as warm weather has covered the fields with
verdure, and the trees and shrubs with sweet blos-
soms, they divide themselves into four companies ;
one of which roves the fields, in search of farina, the
sweet dust of the flower, which they form into bread
or as some say into wax ; a second party is employ-
ed in laying out the bottoms and partitions of the
cells ; a third troop in smoothing off all the rough
corners ; and the fourth, in collecting and bringing
186 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

the honied stores for the support of the hive. Some-
times they relieve one another, by exchanging their
employments, the rovers laboring at home.

I have been told some curious proofs of the attach-
ment of bees to their queen, by a gentleman who
paid particular attention to their movements. He
assured me that bees would not sting, unless offend-
ed; and that if a person, when bees are buzzing
round him, would stand still, be would not be hurt.

When bees swarm, that is, when a colony leave
an overflowing hive, to form a new one, the opera-
tions of the new hive are conducted by a new queen.

The swarm below have alighted on a bough of
alburnum, Their owner had previously prepared ar


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 187

empty hive, smeared inside with walnut or some oth-
er sweet leaves, and holds it under the bough, whilst
an assistant with a long pole strikes the limb a vio-
lent blow, which precipitates the swarm into their
new abode. The face and hands of the owner are
protected from stinging, by transparent gauze or silk.


188 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

This was the old mode of keeping new swarms
at home. The swarming isacurious sight. In the
last drawing they have alighted on a bough, which
they almost bend to the ground. They pile upon one
another in a beautiful, but ingenious manner. The
number of individuals, composing a swarm of bees,
is very great. In the picture, the swarm contains
40,000. They are settled on a fig-tree. The ma-
chinery you see is a contrivance of Reaumer the phi-
losopher, for weighing them when in this situation.

When a swarm is about toalight, the queen-bee
does not, at first, settle on the branch where the rest
of the swarm do, but waits till a considerable num-
ber of her companions are clustered together, before
she joins them. Soon after this, however, they clus-
ter very rapidly ; all the bees in the air hastening to
join their companions, clinging to each other by the
claws of their feet, as they do when they are making
their wax. Swarms vary in size from 12,000 to
40,000 ; but, whether small or large, they form a
beautiful specimen of the wonders of providence.

Mr. Irving, in his Tour in the Prairies, has given
a description of a Bee Hunt.

‘ Please let us hear it, mother,’ said Frederic. -

A BEE-HUNT.

‘The beautiful forest, in which we were encamp-
ed,’ says he, ‘ abounded in bee trees ; that is to say,
trees in the decayed trunks of which wild bees had
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 189



established their hives. It is surprising in what
countless swarms the bees have overspread the Far
West, within but a moderate number of years. The
Indians consider them as the harbingers of the White
Man, as the buffalo is of the Red Man; and say,
that, as the Bee advances, the Indian and Buffalo re-
tire. Weare always accustomed to associate the
hum of the bee-hive with the farm-house and flower-
garden ; and to consider those industrious littie ani-
mals as connected with the busy haunts of man, and
I am told that the wild bee is seldom to be met with
at any great distance from the frontier. They have
been the herald of civilization, steadfastly preceding
it as it advanced from the Atlantic borders—The In-
dians with surprise found the mouldering trees of
their forests suddenly teeming with ambrosial sweets,
and nothing, I am told, can exceed the greedy relish
190 FREDERIC ANDLUCY.

with which they banquet for the first time upon this
unbought luxury of the wilderness.

‘ At present the honey bee swarmed in myriads,
in the noble groves and forests that skirt and inter-
sect the prairies, and extend along the alluvial bottoms
of the rivers. It seems to me as if these beautiful
regions answer literally to the description of the land of
promise, ‘a land flowing with milk and honey ;’ for
the rich pastuarge of the prairies is calculated to sus-
tain herds of cattle as countless as the sands upon the
seashore, while the flowers with which they are enam-
elled render them a paradise for the nectar-seeking
bee. We had not been long in the camp when a party
set out in quest of the bee-tree ; and, being curious
to witness the sport, I gladly agreed to accom-
pany them. The company was headed by a veteran
bee-hunter, a tall lank fellow in homespun garb that
hung loosely about his limbs, and a straw hat shaped
not unlike a bee-hive ; a comrade, equally uncouth
in garb, and without a hat, straddled along at his
heels, with a long rifle on his shoulder. To these
succeeded half a dozen others, some with axes and
some with rifles, for no one stirs far from camp with-
out his fire-arms, soasto be ready either for wild
deer or wild Indian.

‘ After proceeding some distance. we came to an
open glade on the skirts of the forest. Here our lea-
der halted, and then advanced quietly to a low bush,
on the top of which was a piece of honey-comb. This
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 191

I found was the bait or lure for the wild bees. Sev-
eral were humming about, and diving into its cells.
When they had laden themselves with honey, they
would rise into the air, and dart off in a straight line,
almost with the velocity of a bullet. The hunters
watched attentively the course they took, and then
set off in the same direction, stumbling along over
twisted roots and fallen trees, with their eyes turned
up to the sky. In this way they traced the honey
bees to their hive, in the hollow trunk of a blasted
oak, where, after buzzing about for a moment, they
entered a hole about sixty feet from the ground. Two
of the bee-hunters now plied their axes vigorously
at the foot of the tree to level it to the ground.—The
jarring sound of the axe seémed to have no effect in
disturbing’or alarming this most industrious commu.
nity. They continued to ply at their usual occupa-
tions, some arriving full freighted into port, others
sallying forth on new expeditions, like so many mer-
chantmen in a money-making metropolis, little sus-
picious of impending bankruptcy and downfall.—At
length down came the tree, with a tremendous crash
bursting open from end to end, and displaying all the
honied treasures of the commonwealth.

‘ One of the bee-hunters immediately ran up with
a wisp of lighted hay as a defence against the bees.
The bees, however, made no attack and sought no
revenge.—Every one of the party now fell to, with
spoon and hunting-knife, to scoop out the flakes of
192 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

honey-comb with which the hollow tree was_ stored.
—Such of the combs as were entire were placed iu
the camp kettle to be conveyed to the encampment ;
those which had heen shivered in the fall were de-
voured on the spot.—Nor was it the bee-huuters a-
lone—I beheld numbers from rival hives, arriving on
eager wing, to enrich themselves with the ruins of
their neighbors. These busied themselves as eager-
ly and cheerfully as so many wreckers on an India-
man that has been driven on shore : plunging into
the cells of the broken honey-combs, banqueting
greedily on the spoils, and then winging their way
full freighted to their homes. As to the poor propri-
etors of the ruin, they seemed to have no heart to do
anything—but crawled backward and forward in va-
cant desolation, as 1 have seen a poor fellow with his
hands in his breeches-pocket, whistling vacantly and
despondingly about his house that had been burnt.

‘We now abandoned the place, leaving much
honey in the hollow of the tree. ‘It will all be car-
ried off by varmint,’ said one of the rangers. ‘ What
vermin ? asked I. ‘ O, bears, and skunks, and rac-
coons, and ’possums. ‘The bears are the knowingest
varmint for finding out a bee-hive in the world.
They'll gnaw for days together at the trunk till they
make a hole big enough to get in their paws, and
then they’ll haul out boney, bees and all.’

Bears are so fond of honey that they often invade

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FREDERIC AND LUCY. 193

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hives in new settlements even in broad day-light,
reckless of the stings of the whole swarm.

Bees make not only the grateful beverage of hon-
ey for food, but the useful article of bees’ wax.

THE WAX-TREE.

Wax is not only made by bees, but it gTOWS on a
Wax-Tree, in Brazil, a beautiful palm-tree, which
the Portuguese call Catauban, about thirty feet in
height. The wax-tree almost covers some of the low
lands on the banks of the rivers. The leaves are two
feet in length, and, while young, are curiously folded
up, much like Lucy’s fan. They afterwards expand,
and, if cut from the tree as soon as they have reach-

ed their full growth, and dried in the shade, a quan-
R
194 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

tity of light-colored scales will be loosened from their
surface. These melt at about the point of boiling
water, and take the appearance of wax. The wax,
when cool, is of a pale straw color, and, when cold,
is hard and brittle ; and is dissolved by fixed oils, or
by alcohol, at a temperature of boiling water. This
wax possesses most of the properties of bees’ wax ;
and, made into candles, burns with a steady light.

But the produce of its leaves forms only a small
part of the uses of thistree. The fruit, when green,
after having been boiled in several waters, Is a nu-
tritive food. The kernel of the fruit, when ripe, is
covered with a layer of sweet pulp, which is much
used as a wholesome food for cattle. The leaves
make a durable covering for houses, and will with-
stand the weather, without requiring a change, for
twenty years. The trunk of the tree is a useful
wood for building houses, making fences, as well as
for a great variety of other purposes.

The bayberry bush you have seen growing in our
pasture among whortleberry bushes. Its wax or fruit
grows in clusters, and is manufactured into candles
of beautiful greenish wax, or for other purposes. But
there is another species of palm-tree in South Amer-
ica, sometimes 180 feet in height, having leaves 20
feet long. The trunk of this tree is covered with a
substance that is two-thirds resin to one of wax. This
magnificent wax-tree is without limbs, but spreads
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 195

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out at the top like a parasol, 180 feet high, or much
loftier than our fourth-of-July flag-staff.
196 FREDERIC ANDLUCY.

Bees’ wax was formerly supposed to be formed by
these busy little artists from the yellow pollen, with
which their thighs are loaded, taken from flowers ;
but it now appears that it is made by this insect,
from honey or substances fabricated by themselves.
They make not only the store but the storehouse.

Wax figures, fruit, candles,etc. you have seen ; and
great quantities of wax were brought from the Le-
vant, Barbary, and other bee countries ; but the dis-
covery of gas for beautifully illuminating public and
private houses has superseded the necessity of burn-
ing expensive wax candles in any great degree.

Bees have many insect, bird, and animal enemies,
who want to prey upon the fruit of their industry and
honied hoards laid by for a rainy day—Some of these
loafers, like other thieves and robbers, are midnight
and some mid-day marauders. The fox is a dange-
rous enemy in winter, devouring the honey in a hive
at two or three midnight visits ; mice in cold weather,
bats, and birds, are destructive. Ihave seen a king-
bird perched on the ridgepole of a farmhouse, where
hives were kept, watching for bees, who fly home in
straight lines, the bird ever and anon pouncing upon
them in mid air, till observed by the owner, who shot
the thief, and found his crop filled with dead bees.
Toads and frogs place themselves at the opening of
the hive, and catch the bees as they pass ; and spi-
ders set their nets near every hive ; but another in-
sect, still more artful, conceals itself in the corolla of


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 19%



a full-blown poppy ot other blossom, and murders the

innocent bee during his flowery and honied re-
past.

Bees are sometimes destroyed by their own
voracity, quarrels, and wars. During long winters
198 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

the bees of a hive, short of provisions, sometimes
leave home and attack a neighboring hive.

‘Mother,’ said Lucy, ‘ is the large bee we see in
the fields, and which Frederic calls a bumble-bee, a
queen bee ?

No, my dear, that is another species. The bee I
have been describing is called the domestic bee. He
lives under the protection, or in the neighborhood, of
man. All insects, as well as animals, which do not
well endure the winter’s cold, are endowed by nature
with sufficient instinct to lay up for themselves pro-
visions enough to last till the ensuing spring. The
bumble-bee is properly the Humble or humming-bee,
having a humming voice. It is one of the wild
tribes, of which there are many species, and some of
them are highly curious. They are named or distin-
guished by their manners, the formation of their
nests, or other peculiarities ; one or two of these cu-
rious mechanic bees I will notice.

Some are called Leaf-cutters, because they cut the
leaves of rose-bushes and other trees into pieces of an
exact size, as if measured by rule and compass, to
form little cells, in which to deposit their eggs. This
kind of bee does mischief to large trees by digging
holes in the solid timber, sometimes a foot deep.
Within the little Zeaves of leaves, formed as it were
by Gunter with a mason’s line and plummet,
this species of bee deposits a sufficient quantity of
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 199

honey to supply the future young with subsistence,
until it is able to seek food for itself.

There are other kinds which dig similar cavities
in the earth, as cells for their young.

Some of these bees line their cells with fine down ;
others, with the beautiful leaves of the rose, whence
they obtain the name of Tapestry-bees.

Another species are called Mason-bees, because
they build their nest in a very extraordinary man-
ner, in a warm sheltered corner of a house-wall, gen-
erally under the eaves, which serve as a covering for
the nest. When the mason-bee has found a suita-
ble place for her nest, she looks out for sand proper
for her building : this sand she picks up grain by
grain, cementing it with saliva, and braiding it into
little balls ; then, taking this ball in-her mouth, she
transports it to the place which she intends for
her nest, and forms it into cells, about the size and
shape of a thimble. When each cell is finished, the
little mason deposits in it a store of farina, mixed
with honey, for the sustenance of the future bee.

When all the cells are finished, and the eggs laid
in each, the Mason-bee proceeds to close up all the
empty spaces between the cells, and then covers the
whole with coarser grains of sand and cement, until
it becomes so solid, it is difficult to separate it from
the wall, even with a knife or mason’s trowel.

‘ Does a little mason-bee learn to make mortar
and brick from men masons ? said William.
200 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

I believe not, my love ; perhaps masons may have
learnt of the bee. Bricklayers probably built the
tower of Babel ; but, as the garden of Eden was full
of flowers and fruit, and was planted long before the
times of Nimrod, it is probable it abounded with
all kinds of honey-bees. The school of nature is
the school of art ; and, originally, perhaps it was the
only one ; nature was the drawing or picture, by
which, from the time of Tubal-Cain down to that
of Watt, ingenious men, in all ages, have made
surprising and beautiful specimens of human pro-
ficiency, but which, viewed through a microscope,
look very much like bungling imitations of the model.

But it is time for you to go to bed.

THE SUGAR-CANE.

Mr.Selby’s visits were renewed in a few days ; and,
as all his friends, both young and old, were delight-
ed to hear him, he resumed his narrative :—

In a month or two, I returned to Calcutta to com-
plete a cargo of indigo, India sugar, and other arti-
cles, which will bear a long voyage. During my
absence, plentiful showers had renovated the face of
nature, and crowds of people again thronged the
streets and public marts.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 201

‘ Are not fruits, oranges,.figs, and lemons, brought
from Calcutta, as well as indigo, sugar, and rice ?
said Frederic. ‘ Please tell us about sugar.’

Many useful articles are still brought from India,
though less so than formerly ; but fruit, unless
preserved, would be injured by a long voyage.

Sugar has almost become a necessary of life ; its
cultivation has therefore been adopted in climates
congenial with its growth. It has been propagated
extensively in Louisiana in our own country. The
scattered Indians on our borders, and the pioneers
of the woods in Maine, Canada, New Hampshire,
and Vermont, spend the spring months in tapping -



J
ay \IN
an \:

Leaves of the Sugar Maple Tree
s
202 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

millions of maple-trees and boiling the juice. You
have seen maple boughs, with serrated leaves, like
the teeth of a saw, in the young Maple avenue, of
beautiful greenness, on Boston common. The five-
and-twenty millions of inhabitants of Great-Britain
employ three hundred thousand tons of shipping to
export six or seven hundred million of pounds of su-
gar from their colonies inthe East and West Indies.
‘France, Spain, &c. perhaps an equal amount.

The Sugar-cane was a native of China, and, like
tea, its cultivation was monopolized by them for 2000
years before sugar was even known in Europe, and,
for a great part of this time, its nature and uses were
unknown even to nations in the neighborhood ‘of
China. When it found its way, in its crystalline
form, westward, through India and Arabia, it was @
mystery whether ‘¢ was or was not a mineral.

A knowledge of the origin of cane sugar was COr-
rectly revealed in the 13th century, by the celebra-
ted traveller Marco Polo. The plant was soon con-
veyed to Arabia, Nubia, and Egypt, where it was
extensively cultivated. In the 15th century, the su-
gar cane first appeared in Europe ; first in Sicily ;
thence it passed into Spain, Madeira, and the Canary
islands; and, with the discovery of the New World
by Columbus, this plant was conveyed to its conge-
nial climate Hayti, Brazil, and the West Indies.

The sugar-cane in new and moist land sometimes
rises'twenty feet in height. The hoeing of a cane-


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 203



Geld is a most laborious operation, when performed
under the rays of a tropical sun ; but, within a few
years, where the nature of the ground will allow the
use of the plough, that instrument has been substi-
tuted. The planting of canes does not require to be
renewed annually ; many ngére laborers, in such a

case, would be required. Be.


204 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

When the canes are fully ripe, they are cut close
to the ground ; and, being cut in convenient lengths,
are tied up in bundles, and conveyed to the mill.
The canes, on being passed twice between the cylin-
ders of this mill, have all their juice expressed. This
+s collected ina cistern, and must immediately be
placed under process by heat, to prevent its becoming
acid. A certain quantity of lime or lime-water 1s ad-
ded at this moment, to promote the separation of the
grosser matters contained in the juice ; and these
being removed as far as possible at a heat just suffi-
cient to cause the impurities to collect together on
the surface, the cane liquor is then subjected to a
very rapid boiling, in order to evaporate the watery
particles, and to bring the liquor to such a state that
it will granulate (or candy) on cooling. Upon an av-
erage, every five gallons of cane-joice will yield six
pounds of sugar; and will be obtained from about one
hundred and ten well-grown canes.

When the sugar is sufficiently cooled in shallow
trays, itis put into hogsheads, in which it is shipped.
These casks have their bottoms pierced with holes,
and are placed upright overt a large cistern,into which
the molasses—which is the weaker portion of liquor
that will not crystallize—drains away, leaving the
raw sugar in the state +n which we see it at our gT0-
cers’ shops ; the casks are then filled up, headed,
turned upside down, and re-headed at that end.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 205

The liquor in the cistern is put into hogsheads
and sold as molasses, and is distilled into rum.

‘ How did folks sweeten their tea and coffee before
sugar was known ? said Lucy.

Sugar was known and used long before the habit
of drinking tea or coffee ;—bread-and-milk, milk-
porridge, and hasty-pudding, were seasoned with
salt, and meats with spice, sweet herbs, &c. Honey
always existed, ever since the creation of bees.

‘ Please tell us about indigo. Are the casks you


206 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

have shipped, like the blue indigo with which yarn
- is colored ? added Lucy.

INDIGO.

The secret of the existence of indigo and sugar
was brought to Europe by Marco Polo, a Venetian,
who travelled in China and other Eastern countries,
in the 13th century. His only reward was, to be
called “ The Lying Traveller.” All his statements
have proved true ; but the ignorant people of those
dark ages were slow in belief, and the lying travel-
ler, as they called him, died under that imputation.

All knowledge is public property, because it is for
the good of the human race ; China and India there-
fore, if they withheld the knowledge of the uses of
indigo, tea, and sugar, from the rest of mankind, did
wrong ; but, with regard to indigo, no prohibition
ever existed in India. Europeans themselves prohi-
bited it, either because they thought its color was
not durable, or that it was a worthless mineral.
Ignorance of it as a plant, and of its true qualities as
a dye, confined its cultivation to its native place,
and for 2000 years it was used only in India.

‘Indigo,’ said Marco Polo, ‘of excellent quality
and large quantities ‘3s made here (in the kingdom of
Coulan). They procure it from an herbaceous plant,
which is taken up by the roots and put into tubs of
water, where it is suffered to stay till it rots, when
they press out the juice. This, upon being exposed
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 207

to the sun and evaporated, yields a kind of paste,
which is cut into small pieces of the form in which
we see it brought to us.’ Marco Polo also visited
Guzzerat and Kambaia, in India, where it was made.
In the 14th century it was brought to Europe in
bags and in chests, in the same manneras at present.
But it was not until after the discovery of America
that indigo was used in Europe in large quantities.
The plant was found growing wild in most of the
tropical countries of America. Its application had
long been known by the natives; the Aztecs, the
aboriginals of Mexico, and other tribes used it as a
dye in giving a beautiful hue to their cotton fabrics.
Guatimala, or central America, principally supplied
Europe during the last century, and, since throwing
off the Spanish yoke, are now reviving its culture.
This plant was extensively cultivated in the West
Indies. In 1747 it was found growing spontaneously
in Carolina, and 200,000 pounds shipped to England.
The judicious and spirited exertions of English-
men in British India, within a few years have im-
proved its quality so much, that vast quantities are
now shipped from Bengal (the original place of its
culture in the old world) for Europe and America.
The seed is sowed in little furrows about the
breadth of the hoe, two or three inches deep, the fur-
rows in straight lines about a foot apart, like your
father’s pea-garden. The weeds are constantly pal-
led, and the indigo is fit for gathering in two months.
208 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

When it begins to flower, it js cut with a sickle a few
snches above its roots. A second crop from the roots
is cut in six or eight weeks. Four crops from the
same roots are cut in a year, but fresh sowing every
year is needed. The coloring matter is obtained
from the whole plant.

While absent from Calcutta, I had frequent op:
portunities of observing the habits of animals, birds,
Mohammedans, and Hindoos.

‘Did you see any tigers, leopards, elephants, oF
lions ?’ said Frederic.

Yes, but fortunately escaped any harm. I how-
ever heard many sad accounts about them.

‘ Please tell us one or two, at least,’ said Frederic.

A few years ago, a party of young men, while on a
deer hunt, were attacksd by an enormous tiger of the
species called the royal tiger of Bengal, which sprang
upon one of the party, son of sir David Munro,
and carried him off towards a jungle. One of the
other gentlemen Gred at the beast, and his shot took
effect; the tiger ran some distance farther, then drop-
ped his prey, and the unfortunate Munro returned to
his companions, covered with blood, and so dreadful-
ly lacerated by the teeth and claws of the monster,

that he survived but a short time.
Yet more recently, while with a party of hunters,
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 909



fo

an officer was carried off by a tiger; but he fortu-
nately was able, after several’ fruitless attempts, to
extricate a pistol from his belt, and, deliberately put-
ting his hand on the heart of the beast to ascertain
its precise situation, fired with so good an aim, that
the animal fell dead on the spot. The officer was
not very seriously injured.

The skin of the tiger is extremely fine and glossy,
and commands a high price in eastern countries, es-
pecially China, where the Mandarins make use of it
to cover their seats of justice, and also for cushions
and pillows. The ground color, of those of the most
beautiful kind, is yellow, very deep on the back, but
growing lighter towards the belly, where it softens
210 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

to white, and also the throat, and inside the legs. On
the back there is a transverse set of bars of the most
beautiful black, varying in number from 20 to 30,
and becoming black rings on the tail, always 1510
number ; the legs are crossed in the same manner.

The tiger delights in human flesh, and, far from
shunning the presence of man, frequently seizes him
as his victim. These animals seldom pursue their
prey, but lie in ambush, crouched in bushes or high
grass, and bound upon it from a distance almost in-
credible, but always with unerring aim ; their
strength and agility are wonderful, and they some-
times carry off a buffalo with perfect ease. They
will attack all kinds of animals, but are somewhat shy
of the elephant, who is employed in India to hunt
that scourge of the country, as horses have such a
dread of the tiger that they can scarcely ever be
brought to face him.

Against this unfair foe, who seldom attacks open-
ly, sportsmen are found anxious to encounter him,
or the lion, or the leopard, who all lie in ambush,
ready to pounce upon human or brute prey. An
instance was told me. ‘ Lord Combermere and nine
others, composing our sporting party, mounted our
elephants, attended by 20 spare elephants to beat the
covert, and carry the game, and Mahouts (elephant
drivers.) After securing some game we proceeded
towards a swamp, pointed out tous as a lurking-
place of the buffalo-devouring monsters. We beat
211

FREDERIC AND LUCY.

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212 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

the jungle for half an hour, and I was beginning to
yawn in despair, when my elephant suddenly raised
his trunk, and trumpeted several times, which my
Mahout said was a sure sign that a tiger was near.
Our thirty elephants, formed into line, and proceeded
slowly to windward. We had beat the covert in this
direction about three hundred yards, and had enter-
ed a swampy part of the jungle, when the tiger sud-
denly appeared, and a shot was fired at him by Capt.
Mundy. The tiger answered the shot with a loud
roar, and boldly charged the line of thirty elephants.
Then occurred the most ridiculous but most provo-
king scene possible. Every elephant, except lord
Combermere’s (which was a known stanch one) turn-
ed tail, in spite of all the blows and vociferations of
the mahouts. One, less expeditious than the others,
was overtaken by the tiger, and severely torn in one
of his hind legs. The tiger now proceeded to attack
his lordship’s elephant, but, having been wounded in
the loins by the first shot fired, he failed in his
spring, and shrunk back among the rushes. My ele-
phant was one of the first of the runaways to return
to action ; and, when I joined Lord C. whose animal
had stood like a rock, he had expended all his ammu-
nition. I handed him a loaded gun, and we poured
a volley of four barrels upon the tiger, who attempt-
eda fresh charge, but fell from weakness ; recovering
for a moment, several shots were expended upon him
before he dropped dead. He was now triumphantly
FREDERIC AND LUCY 213

stowed upon a pad elephant (baggage carrier) among
other game.’



The cubs of the tiger are very playful. It has
been imagined that the natural ferocity of tigers can
never be wholly subdued, and that neither gentle-
ness nor restraint make any alteration in their dispo-
sition ; but there appears to be no greater difficulty
in rendering this animal docile, than there is in the
case of the lion ; and, in the menageries, both these
animals generally appear under complete control ;
so much so that the keeper will frequently enter
their cages and caress and handle them with as much
good humor as when playing with his dog.

The elephant is invariably employed in hunting
the tiger in Bengal. His delicate scent, his strength
to make his way through the thickest covers, his sa-
gacity, and especially his great height, by which the
hunter is lifted out of danger, render him peculiarly
214 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

fitted for such a work. Horses cannot be brought to
hunt the tiger; and camels are unable to defend
themselves against him.

Iam no friend to animal hunting, and am fully con-
vinced that most wild animals might be tamed for
useful purposes, if reading and our other duties were
not of more consequence. If idle people, however,
must hunt, let them murder noxious animals, and not
elephants and useful birds.

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‘ The Vedahs, a savage tribe near Trincomalee,
says Mr. Holmes, ‘ have a strange way of killing el-
ephants peculiar to themselves. They go out against
the animals in great numbers, and drive a herd upa
hill, when a few marksmen, provided with bows and
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 915

arrows, the latter notched in the centre, steal close
to the heels of their destined prey, and, when the
animal lifts its leg, they discharge their arrows, en-
deavoring to hit the centre of the foot; when the
unfortunate elephant suddenly stamps on the ground
from the pain, and the arrow breaks off at the notch,
and the head is left sticking in the flesh. Perfectly
disabled by his agony, the animal is compelled to lie
down, when a shower of arrows and other missiles
easily despatch him. These people are careful to
select the tuskers, or males, as it is for the tusks,
chiefly, that the Vedahs hunt, for, although they eat
the flesh of the elephant, they do not esteem it so
highly as that of deer and hogs, which they have in
abundance.’ Thus thousands of wild male elephants
are destroyed at Ceylon, &c. for their ivory tusks.

—‘ We fell in with three elephants, standing un-
der a tree at the edge of the jungle; they were
throwing sand over their bodies, and flapping them-
selves with bundles of grass, to keep off the flies.
They sometimes use large branches of trees for this
purpose, which they manage with great agility.’

‘ Elephants,even when wild, evince signs of great
ingenuity, forethought, and memory. They gener-
ally go in herds or companies. If one of the num-
ber gets hurt, the others bring him food. In cros-
sing a river, the old experienced ones swim over first,
to seek a proper landing place ; and, when on the
other side, give a signal, by a sort of trumpet sound
216 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

through their trunk, for the young ones to follow.
The little elephants then venture across, supporting
each other by interlacing or locking their trunks to-
gether. The old ones sometimes carry the very
small ones laid high across their tusks, twining their
trunks round them to prevent them from falling.

There is a story of an elephant who was so fond of
its keeper’s child, that he would not eat his food un-
less the infant’s cradle was placed between his feet.
If the child awoke and cried, the elephant put it to
sleep again by rocking the cradle with his trunk.

In travelling, he sometimes carries a driver and
two or three other persons, and takes them across @
river without inconvenience, his trunk or nostrils
elevated high above the water.



An elephant has the strength and can do the work
of six horses, but is fed with a hundred pounds of
rice in a day, drinking forty gallons of water.

‘ Please, sir, do not oranges come from India ?
FREDERIGC AND LUCY. 217



Oranges are natives of China and India, but, on
account of the distance of these countries from Eu-
rope and America, we import fruit from the West-
Indies, Malaga, Sicily,éc. Perhaps when a rail-road
is made to the Red Sea, steam-boats and cars may
bring fruits from India to Europe in about as many
days as were formerly required in sea voyages to the
West Indies, Mediterranean, &c. Food, as well
as fruit, can be transported. If Watt’s engines had
been in practical operation previous to the great
drought at Bengal (see p.180) no famine would have
been felt, and thousands of lives been saved. All
countries, by the aid of steam, may be furnished with
food, &e.; an‘ all future generations will be secured

against the occurrence of manv ancient disasters.
T
218 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

A rail-road across our quarter of the globe, at
the isthmus of Darien, may connect by steam the
West India and East India islands, and bread stuffs,
in case of famine, be rapidly transported from Atlan-
tic countries to those of the Great Pacific, and vice
versa. These results will be mainly produced by the
poor Scotch boy, who was self-educated in his moth-
er's chimney-corner.

The Orange proper, which you sometimes taste,
grows in Cuba and other islands, and in Florida ;
there are 43 different kinds of sweet oranges ; 32 of
bitter oranges ; 5 of bergamotte oranges ; 8 kinds of
the lime ; 6 of the pampelucos; 12 of the sweet
lime ; 47 kinds of the lemon ; and 17 of the citron.

I will speak only of 2 out of the 170.

The sweet orange tree is about twenty-seven feet
high, but sometimes reaches fifty feet, bearing from
4000 to 6000 oranges. One of these treesat Rome
is 600 years old. The orange tree continues to blos-
som all summer, and the fruit is on the tree two years
to ripen, so that a healthy tree has on it bud, blos-
som, and green and ripe fruit at the same time—
oranges intended for export are picked green. Great
Britain takes three or four hundred millions of them
ina year. They are a wholesome fruit in the
summer season, butsome of our own common sum-
mer fruits are still more so, moderately used.

The Shaddock Orange is much larger than the com-
mon orange, both in the tree and the fruit. The tree
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 219



very lofty and spreading, and the fruit eight inches
in circumference. This fruit is a native’ of China,
where it is very sweet and excellent ; it has howev-
er greatly degenerated in the West Indies, probably
through neglect; although some of these oranges
from particular trees retain their original sweetness.

‘ Which of our summer fruits are as wholesome ?
said Lucy.

All ripe ones, if sweet and eaten with moderation.

I need not speak of cherries and huckleberries, you
know them; and here is a drawing of currants, at a;
‘gooseberry, 5; raspberry,c; strawberry, d; and
mulberry, ate. There are 35 kinds of Currants ; I
will name only four of them, the red, the white, the:
flesh-colored, and the black. The juice of currants,
290 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



boiled with an equal weight of sugar, forms currant
jelly. By adding sugar to currant juice,and fermen-
ting it, currant wine is made. The jelly of the black
currant is so much used in the throat disease called
quinsy, that black currants are sometimes called
quinsy-berries. The dried leaves of black currants
as well as those of huckleberry bushes, have some-
times been substituted for tea,and cured in a similar
manner, (see p.14.)

There are four kinds of Gooseberries, the white,
the yellow, the green, and the red, although there
are 200 varieties. The yellow are the best. The
small ones, like the red currants, are sweetest, be-
cause they grow on the sunny side of the bush.

Raspberries, when fully ripe, especially the red
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 991

some. There are 35 kinds. One of these, called
the thimbleberry, abounds in New England, and the
red raspberry is plentiful among old logs in forests.

Strawberries grow in all countries, divided into 7
kinds, the scarlet, black, pine, green, alpine, hautbois,
and wood. The pine strawberry, plentiest in Vir-
ginia and Louisiana, is the best.

The mulberry tree 1s one of the most useful of
trees, as its leaves are the diet of silkworms. Silk-
worms, it is said, were unknown in Europe till the
time of the Roman emperors, when some eggs were
brought from China in the hollow staff of a pilgrim
or missionary traveller. Silk sold at Rome for its
weight in gold. But it is the fruit of mulberries, of
which we are speaking, and it ought to be eaten the
moment it is ripe. There are four kinds, the black,
white, red, and paper mulberry. I do not think
the fruit very wholesome, except for birds ; no more
than the leaves, except for silkworms. The trees re-
quire gentle shaking to procure sweet fruit, and, to
catch the berries, a sheet is spread on the ground ;
whilst a bird, perched on the tree, never fails of gath-
ering choice mulberries without any inconvenience.

Birds live upon insects ; fruit and seeds are their
dessert ; and children ought to be equally moderate.

Our own cooling fruits and berries, however, com-
ing as they providentially do, just at the time we
want them for the purpose, go far towards counter-
acting all tendency to fever and other diseases.

‘\
222 .FREDERIC AND LUCY.
¢ Are leopards as big as the tiger ? said Frederic.

‘The African leopard, though far inferior to the
lion or Bengal tiger in strength and intrepidity, and
though he usually shuns a conflict with man, is still
an exceedingly active and furious animal. The col-
onists call him a tiger, and he is possessed of some
of the cunning of the fox added to activity truly as-
tonishing, rendering him more troublesome than ei-
ther lion or tiger. His appearance in his wild state
is extremely beautiful, his motions in the highest de-
gree easy and graceful. Of his agility in bounding
among ‘the rocks and woods, no one can form any
idea by seeing these animals in the cages where
they are exhibited in this country, humbled and ta-
med as they are by confinement, the cold of our cli-
mate, and without the excitements of hunger and
habitual depredation. When caught young, they
are, like other tame animals, leopards only in shape,



carrying their tails between their legs, as in the a-
bove drawing,--instead of rampant as in the follow-
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 293 °

%



ing picture, where the animal appears lashing his sides
in fury, whetting his formidable incissor teeth, and
cat-like monstrous claws, his eyes glaring and as
it were striking fire,—or, if couchant, his huge paws
spread out on the ground, his head crouched between
them, excepting his horrid fiery eyes, his body
quivering like that of acat,—previous to bounding
with the quickness of lightning upon his prey.

‘ In 1822, two farmers, returning from hunting the
antelope, roused a leopard in one of the mountain
ravines, and attacked him. The leopard endeavored
to escape by clambering up the precipice ; but, be-
ing hotly pursued, and wounded by a musket bullet,
he turned upon his pursuers, and, springing upon
the man who had wounded him, pulled him from his
horse to the ground, biting him at the same time on
the shoulder} and tearing his cheek severely with his
claw. The other hunter, seeing, the danger of his
comrade, sprang from his horse and endeavored t
224 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

shoot the animal through the head ; but, from fear
of wounding his friend, or the quick motions of the
animal, he unfortunately missed hitting him. The
leopard now abandoned his prostrate enemy, and
darted with redoubled fury upon his second antago-
nist ; and so fierce and sudden was his onset, that,
before the hunter could stab him with his hunting-
knife, the leopard struck him on the head with his
claws, and actually tore the scalp over his eyes. In
this horrid condition, the hunter grappled with the
leopard ; and, struggling for life, they rolled down
hill. All this passed in asingle moment ; and,
before the man who had been first attacked could
start to his feet, and seize his gun, they were rolling
down the declivity. As quick as possible he reload-
ed his gun, and rushed forward to save the life of his
friend. But it was too late. The leopard had seiz-
ed the unfortunate man by the throat, and mangled
him so dreadfully, that death was inevitable ; and
his comrade (himself severely wounded) had only
the melancholy satisfaction of completing the destruc-
tion of the savage beast, who was already nearly ex-
hausted with loss of blood from several deep wounds
inflicted by the hunting-knife of the desperate ex-
piring farmer.’

In Africa the leopard is often seen at night in the
negro villages ; and, being considered a sacred ani-
mal, is never hunted, though children and women
are often destroyed by him. . The white colonists
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 995

have no such respect for him, and of them he is more
shy, only occasionally destroying some defenceless
infant. He lurks round sheep-folds, and sometimes
breaks into them, in spite of troops of watch-dogs.

The leopard is often caught by traps made of large
stones and timbers, in the shape of a stupendous
mouse-trap. When he is hunted, he jumps upon a
tree, both for security and a station from which to
attack his foes, and it is dangerous here to approach
him, as he leaps with ease from his elevation upon
men and dogs to an incredible distance ; the bullets
of his assailants here reach him, though from his ac-
tive movements it is difficult to hit a vital part. He.
is therefore commonly called the Tree Tiger, yet he:
only bounds from limb to limb, or from the greund’
to the crotch of a tree, and thence to greater heights. .
The Africans catch them in pitfalls, covered by slight;
sticks and brush,on which the bait is fastened.

at
WY

SR od
eo



Q Looking-glass Trap.
}

2296 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

Tnere are accounts of leopards being taken in a
trap by means of a looking-glass at the bottom of it.
Seeing, as they think, another leopard in the trap, they
jump in, and bring down the door, as in the picture.



CEYLON.

Mr. Selby’s visits were renewed in a day or two,
and he entertained the children with an account of
the pearl-fishery in the island of Ceylon :—

When I quitted the continent of India, said he, I
proceeded immediately to Ceylon. As we approach-
-ed the shores, our noses were disgusted by a most
disagreeable smell, for which we could not account,
as the island presents, to the eye, a most beautiful
yerdure ; and the fine groves of cocoa-nut trees ex-
tend:in every direction. — The refreshing green of
the fields was the more pleasant to me, who had for
some time past been fatigued with the glare of the
white sand which edges the coast. The beauty of
the rural scenery, however, soon gave place to a dif-
ferent prospect, as we rounded a part of the island,
and made forthe bay of Condatchy.

It was'the season of the pearl-fishery : and the
shore was crowded by hundreds of human beings of
Fast Indian tribes, and with Europeans of different
countries. Tents and huts were erected on the sand,
ith a booth ‘before each, at which pearl-dealers were


FREDERBIC AND LUCY. 997°

busily employed buying, selling, weighing, number-
ing, drilling, and dressing the pearls.

I was told that the oysters which produce the pearl
lie on several banks of sand about this celebrated
bay. The manner of diving for them is highly curi-
ous :—The boats are large enough to contain twenty
men ; ten of whom row, the other ten are divers, who
go into the sea five at a time ; when they come up,
the other five take their turn. The divers tie large
stones to themselves, to quicken their descent. With.
one hand the person, who is going down, grasps
the rope that supports him, and, with his toes, holds
a bag of net-work in which to put the oysters. When
he is at the bottom, he hangs the bag to his neck,
and fills it as quickly as possible; then giving the
rope a pull, his companions in the boat draw him up,
and the other divers in the mean time descend. By
thus alternately diving and rising they soon obtain
a boat-load of oysters. A similar process 1s or was
followed at our pearl-fishery on the coast of Califor-
nia; but gold-digging at Sacramento and San Joa-
quin has somewhat impeded ‘pearl-diving.

The occupation of diving is, in some respects, high-
ly dangerous. Thelongest time the most expert di-
ver can stay under water is six minutes; holding
the breath for a longer time frequently causes blood
to rush from the nostrils. But-the greatest danger
arises from the sharks, who frequent these seas, and
whose bite is dreadful. Whilst'I was looking on, a
228 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



poor diver was drawn up to the boat ina shocking
state : one of these voracious sea-monsters had sei-
zed his right leg, and cut it off, bone and all, at
one bite! This event struck such terror into the
men of this boat, that their day’s diving was ended.

The children shuddered with horror and surprise,
and, with all the eagerness of curiosity and humani-
ty, expressed their pity and at the same time
their anxious desire for further information about
this dreadful fish. Their mother said, that, accor-
ding to agreement, she would explain every thing
more fully at another time.

Mr. Selby, pleased with observing their desire for
knowledge, told them he would give them some
account of the wonderful productions of the isl-
and. Rejoiced with this kind attention to their
wishes, the children heartily thanked him; and
little William placed himself on Mr.Selby’s knee, as

i the most convenient situation for watching every
“gum of his countenance.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 229

‘ Well,’ said Mr. Selby ; ‘ we have got the divers’
oysters, but we have not yet got the pearls. Perhaps,
continued be, taking Mrs.Johnson’s hand, ‘you never
thought these pretty ornaments on your mother’s
ring were produced by an oyster, and obtained with
such labor, hazard of life, drowning, suffocation,
and White Sharks !”

‘Itis,’ observed Mrs. Johnson, ‘ this difficulty of

obtaining them, that adds to their value. Were we .

only to judge by appearance, the necklace I some-
times wear, made of a composition to imitate real
pearl, would altogether answer as well for ornament.’

‘O mother,’ exclaimed Lucy, ‘ I shall now long to
hear all about silver, and gold, and diamonds, and
those pretty red stones on your bracelet-clasps ; for I
suppose their history will be as entertaining as pearls.’

‘ You are right, my dear. When we examine the
productions of nature, we are rewarded for the search
by the most rational pleasure. Depend upon it, Lu-
cy, in learning you to read, I bestow upon you a
most valuable gift ; and, when you are well acquain-
ted with your own language, and begin to learn others,
the sources of enjoyment will increase by opening to
you fresh subjects of enquiry—But we interrupt our
friend.’

When the boats are fullof oysters, continued Mr.
S. these oysters are landed and placed in pits about
a foot deep, lined with mats, to prevent any of the

pearls from being lost: there the oyster remains.

i
230 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

until the animal subtance entirely decays; and the
chéll becomes easy to open, without hazard of injur-
ing the pearl. It is during this state of decay that
the intolerable stench as it were poisons the air.
The merchants are liable to lose some of the pearls
from the thievish disposition of some of the ignorant
boatmen, who narrowly watch the oysters, and, if
they see one gape, will prevent the shell from closing
by slipping in a piece of wood, until they find a con:
venient chance to complete their knavery by extract-
ing the pearl. © I could not help pitying these poor
people, who, knowing nothing of true religion, sub-
mit themselves to strange fanatical persons, who are
their priests or fakirs, If one of these priests can be
prevailed upon to stay in the boat, the divers think
they will be perfectly safe from the sharks. The
pearls, when completely dressed, are white and very
beautiful, and much esteemed in our jewelry stores ;
but in India the yellow Arabian pearls are preferred.
IthinkI have said as much as you ca® understand
about these dearly-bought ornaments ; but tomorrow

will tell you more ‘concerning the island of Ceylon.
THE SHARK.

‘ Now for the shark, mother |, you know you proms
‘sed to tell us about these dreadful fishes.’
I will indeed, my love, with pleasure, replied Mrs.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 931

Johnson. Sharks are truly most formidable enemies
to mankind, and would be more s0, did not the ele-
ment, in which they live, render our meeting with
them rare and accidental.

There are several kinds of sharks ; some of them
are harmless, and known by the name of Baskerville
Sharks, from their habit of lying on the surface of
the water, seemingly sunning themselves. But the
more dreadful kinds, which are common in the great
sea, are extremely fierce, and so fond of human flesh,
that it is said they will swim near the edge of the
water if they perceive a person walking on the shore.
It is certain that, a few years ago, one of them jump-



ed out of water overa fisherman’s boat in Boston
outer harbor, and devoured the fisherman.

The largest of the shark,tribe are prodigious crea-
tures, with throat so wide, they can swallow a man
o
932 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

whole. From this it is conjectured, the fish that
swallowed Jonah was rather a shark thana whale ; as
a whale has a small throat, although he is an enormous
fish. ‘The mouth of the shark is extremely curious ;
it is furnised with six rows of teeth, very sharp and
terrible. These teeth are triangular, or three-sided,
and notched like a saw, which renders their bite pe-
culiarly ragged and dreadful ; the teeth lie flat when
the mouth it shut, but instantly rise when it is open-
ed. He strikes violently with his tail; and, to avoid
the danger incurred by the exertion of this power
even on shipboard, as soon as a shark is caught, the
people anxiously make it their first concern to chop
off the tail with an axe.

We have yet another singular kind of shark, called
the Hammer-head, from its head resembling that of
a hammer. I will some day show you the picture
of one. Their eyes are placed, as it were, at each
end of the hammer, and the middle is so sharp, that
*¢ can cut other fish as the shark swims.

The White Shark is the most blood-thirsty of all
the monsters of the deep. This species does not a-
bound on the coast of New England. In the pearl-
fisheries of South America, where they are numer-
ous, the divers, in their descent for the oyster, are
obliged to go armed with long sharp knives. The
shark endeavors to get above his intended victim,
and slowly settles down over him, with his horrible
mouth extended. The instant he is near enough to
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 233

be reached, the diver stabs him in his vitals. Some-
times the Indian diver takes down four or five hard-
wood sticks about two feet long, sharpened at both
ends. If disturbed by a shark, he deliberately thrusts
one of the sticks between the monster's jaws, as the
animal is closing them. This props them asunder
whilst the force of endeavoring suddenly to shut his
mouth drives the sharp ends into both of his jaws,
and, writhing with pain, the shark hastily retreats.
In the South Sea islands, the people constantly
bathe, without fear,among White Sharks, who are
probably satisfied with fish which thereabound. In
the West Indies, the negroes, armed with knives,
destroy them for sport. And in California, the na-
tives occasionally seek a combat with this species of
shark, 20 or 30 feet long, to amuse our miners. The
shark turns on its back to bite, if he is under his prey.
The shark does not attack birds ; and the sailors
have a proverb, ‘ The shark flees from feather.’

‘ Mother,’ said Lucy, perceiving her mother had
done speaking, ‘ you said the sharks lived in an ele-
ment that prevented them from doing much mischief,
because people could keep out of their way. What
do you mean by an element? don’t they always live
in water ?

My dear child, Iacknowledge that grown people,
when talking to children, make use of terms or words,
of which children do not know the meaning, and I
934 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

highly commend your always asking an explanation
of me. We are every where surrounded by four ar-
ticles, which, being necessary to the formation of
every thing else, are called elements, or simple sub-
stances, from which every variety in nature is com-
posed : these four are Earth, Fire, Air, and Water.

‘That is very odd, mother ; how can all the things
I see be made of fire or water, earth or air? Why I
see no water in this table. You must be jesting,
mother ; I am sure there is neither fire nor water,
earth nor air, in the books lying here.’

‘ Do not be too hasty in your conclusions, my dear.
I really am not jesting ; but the truth is here so won-
derful,I am not at all surprised at your astonishment.
Recollect, this table (that is, the wood) was once a
magnificent, towering tree :
from what did this tree arise,
and how was it nourished into
growth ? You have seen an
acorn ? Here is one in a little
phial where it is beginning to
sprout ; and here, in this lar-
ger phial, it has already assu-
med on a small scale the very
features of the future noble
tree. Well, did-you ever con-
sider that this acorn might in-
crease, have bud upon bud,


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 235

and branch upon branch, and become a large and
spreading tree, and one of the leaves be larger than
its parent acorn ? How is this accomplished ?



‘ The acorn must be put into the ground,’ said Lucy.
Well then, how is it nourished ?

Lucy was silent. She had often admired the size
and beauty of the oak, and she knew some of its uses,
but she had not reflected on the wonder of its growth :
she saw neither fire, earth, air, nor water about it.

‘We will then trace the progress of its growth.
The acorn, planted in the ground, is first swelled by
the moisture of the Earth, then it puts forth shoots,
which soon spring above the ground: rainis then
necessary to supply it with proper juices,—here we

4
236 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

have Water. Warmth from the sun is also necessa-
ry,—thus we add Fire. And, without Air, it would
not thrive at all. Now do you not perceive how the
oak requires these four elements, or first things, to
form it into a tree ? And this tree may be reduced
entirely into earth by being burnt to ashes.

But you think the books are not reducible to these
four elements. Well, we willtry. The leaves are
paper ; paper is made from rags, rags were once cot-
ton or linen cloth ; linen is made of flax, and flax is
a plant nourished into growth in the same manner
as the oak. You have seen the pretty flax in our
field, fed by the same elements, and nourished by the
same process. Cotton grows, in vast quantities, in our
own country, a beautiful plant, flowering on a shrub
in Tennessee, &c. The ink used in printing is, by art,
obtained from mineral or vegetable substances ; so is
the coloring, the gilding, and the varnish.

All this is highly curious : yet it is only a slight
view of what is wonderful in nature in a single ob-
ject. I wish you to search, to find, and to learn for
yourself, I may not be permitted to remain always
your guide, and other people perhaps will not have
leisure or inclination to instruct you. Books afford
inexhaustible sources of information ; and informa-
tion, studiously obtained,and modestly brought forth,
will always be likely to receive assistance from those
who have further information and knowledge. But
sensible books are always at your own command.
‘FREDERIC AND LUCY. 237

FURTHER ACCOUNT OF CEYLON.

Wuen Mr. Selby called, the next day, he resumed
his account, as he had promised, about Ceylon.

You may remember, [ told you the groves of cocoa-
nut trees looked most beautiful on approaching the
Ceylonese shores. But their utility exceeds their
beauty ; they are serviceable for a variety of purpo-
ses. Frederic may have seen the nut ; it is as large
as your head, William, but not of the same shape,
being rather long, like an egg ; and enclosed with a
thread-like substance, which is sometimes woven into
ropes ; the shell of the nut is lined with a white ker-
ne], agreeable in taste, somewhat resembling an al-
mond, and used for similar purposes. The cocoa-nut
also contains a large cupfull of a pleasant liquor cal-
led the milk of the cocoa-nut ; this cooling beverage
is peculiarly refreshing in a hot climate. Thus kindly
has Providence given every country not only what
is suitable to climate and the subsistence of all,
but also with what is agreeable and delicious.

I engaged a servant to attend me, who had served
in Hindostan, and other countries ; but, whilst se-
lecting what I should take on a journey in this won-
derful island, I found part of my provisions stolen. I
had no hope of recovering them; but my servant
knew the credulity of his countrymen, and told those
he suspected that I was a great magician, or wise
238 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

man, and knew what would happen, and I had fore-
told, if the thief did not confess, in a few moments,
his guilt would be made publicly known by a parrot’s
feather growing from the tip of his nose. Whilst he
thus talked, I walked a little distance to a thicket of
bushes, soon followed by my servant, where, unseen,
we observed their motions. Presently we saw one
man put his hand to his nose. Immediately we has-
tened forward, my servant telling the thief we saw
the feather beginning to sprout ; and the poor super-
stitious wretch fell at my feet and restored the goods.

As we journeyed, I observed many curious cus-
toms, and views. The women would be handsome,
were not their noses artificially laid quite flat to the
face. This singular and disfigured appearance is
done during infancy by purposely breaking the gristle
of the nose, a flat nose being considered a mark of
great beauty. Observe, my dears, how mankind
differ in their notions of beauty and fashion ! Some
of the men wore such enormous gold ear-rings, | won-
dered how their ears sustained such burdens ; but I
was told they had had pieces of wood passed through
the ear in childhood, which was gradually enlarged.

I was told that wild ducks are here (as well as in
Hindostan and China) often taken by an inge-
nious, though, as usual in most hunting sports, very
cruel method. ‘The hunters put their heads into
the shells of large gourds, or dry calabashes, in which
they leave holes, through which to see and breathe,
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 239



and then go into the water, frequented by aquatic
birds. The hunters swim about, taking care to have
nothing seen above water, except the gourd shells.
The poor ducks, accustomed to see such things float-
ing about, and to play and seek food among them,
think of no harm. The hunters carefully swim close
to the ducks, lay hold of their feet, and, after draw
ing them quickly under water to prevent their cries,
they wring their necks, fasten them to their girdle,
and proceed to capture more game in like man-
ner.

The Hindoos use the earthen jars, in which their
rice is usually baked, instead of these large gourds,
or calabashes.
240 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

Â¥ i ii

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Here i is a picture of the sport ; and also a fishing.
boat in the background. ‘This last is descriptive of
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 941

a method of catching fish by means of cormorants,
who are a species of pelican, or fish-hawk. In their
wild state, I was told to my astonishment, these large
swimming birds assemble and fish in large circles,
flapping their wings to frighten the fish, gradually
approaching each other by closing the circle with
fish near the surface of the water, and the pelicans
then proceed to devour their prey.

In their tame state these birds show equal sagacity.
Their owner has a number of them in his boat, each
trained to catch fish in his long bill, and bring them
to his master, who, when he has loaded his boat, re-
wards his cormorants with some of the captured fish.
To prevent these birds from swallowing their prey,
a ring is placed round their necks, till the hunt is
over ; but, generally, these faithful servants need no
such precaution; they fish first for him,and then their
grateful master lets the bird fish on his own hook. It
was even told me {though I thought it incredible)
that, when a cormorant caught a fish too bulky for
individual management, two or three of these birds
assisted in towing it to their masters.

‘The feats of these birds are so surprising, that some
writer, in describing them, says :—‘ Scarcely are
the porcelain towers of these populous plains gilded
with the first beams of the morning, when the lake,
formed by the waters of the river Luen, are covered
with ribands and streamers. The boats, pushed from

w
242 FREDERIC ANDLUCY.-

the shore, are abandoned to the gentle breeze and
the wave. Onthe yards of the masts are these birds,
of the most brilliant plumage. At a given signal,
the aérial laborers dart away, suspend themselves a
moment over the unruffled bosom of the wave, to see
their prey. They plunge beneath the surface, and
re-appear each with his fish, and then return, amidst
acclamations and shouts of joy, to the boat of their
master.”

On the road we met a moodelier, one of their great
men, walking,—an exercise here rarely taken, as all
the rich are carried in a sort of sofa, called a palan-
quin, stretched on poles, supported on the shoulders
of coolies or porters, andeattended by numerous Ser-
vants. One bore an umbrella, made of the immensely
large leaf of the talipot-tree, the beautiful ornament
and useful tree of Ceylon ; another carried his gold
box, containing betel, which the inhabitants of the
East chew as sailors do tobacco. The box was beau-
tifully wrought in filigree,—a kind of open-work in
metal, in the elegant execution of which these people
surpass all others. A third attendant, a sort of sec-
retary, had charge of a book, made of the leaves of
the same tree as the umbrella.

The book itself was a curiosity. The talipot tree
supplies many wants. Its leaves are their fan, their
parasol, and their umbrella, and, strange to say, this
natural leaf of the magnificent talipot tree appears as
*¢ it was the model from which the fan of my little
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 243

friend Lucy was originally copied. Perhaps other
works of nature have, ever since Adam was formed
of the dust of the ground, in like manner with this
Ceylonese tall talipot tree, been the prototypes and
models of works of human ingenuity. Nature in this
country furnishes fans in every grove, and a single
grove might afford an abundant supply of the article
for all the stores in Broadway and Washington-street,
if fashion could relish a commodity, the staple and
fabric of which grows here as it were on every hedge.
“However much water may fall on the leaf,
it imbibes no moisture. The British troops, in their
campaign in the jungles against the Ceylonese in
1818, found to their cost how excellent a preservative
it was against wet and damp. The enemy’s musket-
men were furnished each with a talipot leaf, by means
of which they always kept their powder and arms
perfectly dry and could fire upon the invading forcee.
while frequently the British muskets, which had n
such protection, were rendered useless by the heav,
rains, and the moisture of the woods, thickets, ant
jungles, and the soldiers were consequently unabk
to return the fire of the native Ceylonese army.”
Having no paper to make into books, the Ceylones*
cut slips from the talipot leaf, a foot in length, and %
inches in breadth, which they smooth and mark wit
a fine steel pencil, in the Cingalese characters. Tv
make these more distinct, they rub them over with
charcoal and oil, which, sinking into the marks made
244 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

by the steel pencil, blacken and render the words
more legible ; several of these leaves are strung or
tied together, and fastened in thin boards or covers
of highly ornamented ivory. All their customs, luxu-
ries, conveniences,—all their castes, moodeliers, their
rich classes and low ones, artizans and coolies,—are
no doubt exactly similar to those in remote antiquity.

The beautiful Talipot is sometimes called the Sago
or the Landan tree. Knox says it is as big and as
tall as a ship’s mast, and I saw one a hundred feet
high and five in circumference near the ground. It
has no branches, and no leaves except at its summit.
But these leaves are so large as to shelter a dozen
men. From its pith and juices Sago is made, also
bread and cakes ; but, from its leaves, which are im-
pervious to moisture, roofs, hats, books, umbrellas,
and hundreds of other articles are made. It flowers
but once during life, the natives say when it is 100
years old, the Dutch say 30 years—the hard rind of
the flower then bursts with a sharp noise, and the
flower shoots upward, adding about 30 feet to the
height of the tree. Old age and flowers seem to go
hand in hand, for the tree, after beautifully bloom-
ing, immediately decays and dies.

Knox says of its leaves :—‘ A marvellous mercy,
which Almighty God has bestowed upon this poor
and naked people.”

‘ Does all the ivory in the world come from a few
elephants’ tusks ? said Frederic,
FREDERIC AND LUey. 245

Yes. There are many tame elephants, used
in war, in Asia and Africa, and many wild ones, es-
pecially in the Birman empire, where the hunters not
only kill them, but catch many alive by means of fe-
male decoy tame elephants. ‘The ivory is valuable,
and always preserved on the death of all elephants.

‘ Are pearl oysters like New-York oysters 2?

oO 2 —
tr i an i
f Ge x
Bee Vint? : — =
F EEK = - = pak
‘ < hie “
oa) 44 a
7
x .
~



Much the same, but larger. The New-York oys-
ter is caught for the rational purpose of being eaten,
the pearl oyster for the jewel in its empty shell.

THE CINNAMON-TREE.

We presently after arrived at a cinnamon planta-
tion, which presented a beautiful appearance. It was
the season of taking the bark, or outer rind, (the
spice you so much admire,) which is taken off twice
in every year. The bark is carefully picked, tied
up in large parcels, and every piece tasted by a per-
246 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



son appointed for the purpose, before it is delivered
to the merchant. This tasting, for a constancy, is
not a very pleasant office ; for the pungency of such
a repetition of tasting the spice produces painful ef-
fects on the skin of the mouth ; and the tasters are
obliged frequently to chew a piece of bread and but
ter to diminish or mollify this disagreeable effect.
The cinnamon tree is a species of laurel, original-
ly found growing wild on one part of the island; but,
when Ceylon was conquered by the Dutch, they cul-
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 247

tivated it in plantations, and soon obtained 400,000
pounds annually, employing 25,000 people. The tree
is about 30 feet high. The leaves are first of a del-
icate rose color, which turn yellow, and then green.
The flowers are white, spreading around a sweet fla-
vor like that of the bark ; and the fruit yields a fra-
grant oil, which is made into candles, and burnt in
the palace of the king of the island. The tree yields
two other kinds of oil; that which is obtained from
the leaves is called the oil of cloves ; and the bark
of the root affords an aromatic oil, called by the Cey-
lonese islanders, oil of camphor ; and also a kind of
gum camphor, which is very pure and white.

The cirinamon tree grows best in dry and rocky
spots ; and at 10 or 12 years of age yields the most
pungent and aromatic bark. The shoots are cut when
about an inch thick, and the outer skin scraped off ;
the bark is then dried in the sun,.and, when it curls
the smaller pieces rolled within the larger.

We proceeded 150 miles into this beautiful-looking
island, saw the sacred banian-trees, under whose
wide-spreading shade, acres in extent, pious Hindoos
were worshipping at bamboo altars.

The decaying trees, when hollow, serve as burial-
places and tombs for poets, musicians, and buffoons.
Characters of this description are in great esteem a-
mong Africans, while living, but otherwise when
dead ; erroneously supposing their talents derived
from demons, sorcerers, and bad spirits.
248 FREDERIC AND LUCY.



‘You said, (p. 235) tnat cotton grew in our
own country as well as Bengal. Whatare ‘ long
staples’ and ‘ short staples ? said Lucy.

Here is a picture of pretty cotton trees. There
are three kinds of cotton in the United States, the
nankeen cotton, so called, from its color,—the green-
seed cotton,—and the black-seed cotton. The two
first grow in the upper and middle country, and are
called ‘ short-staple ;’ the last is cultivated in the
lower country near the sea, or on islands near the
shore, producing cotton of a fine, white, silky ap-
pearance, very strong, and of a ‘ long staple.’

But I will now resume my narrative :—

We sometimes rested under the shade of some
towering talipot-tree, enjoying ourselves with the
FREDERIC AND LUCY. \ 249

rich native fruits, and watching the women getting
in the rice harvest. After cutting the grain, they
gathered it in bundles at the bottom of a shallow
hole about a foot deep, and eight feet wide, then
drove in half a dozen oxen to trample on it, thus get-
ting 40 or 50 bushelsa day.





THE NUTMEG-TREE.

The Nutmeg is a native of these Spice Islands,.
but most prolific in the group, called the: islands of’

Banda, where it bears blossoms and fruit. on the:
x
250 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

same tree at all seasons of the year. The nutmeg is
gathered at three different seasons, July, November,
and April; and the mace in July, when the nut is
most abundant ; but in April, both the mace and the
nutmeg are in the greatest perfection, the season be-
ing then the driest. The natives gather the fruit by
pulling the branches towards them with long hooks ;
whilst some are employed in opening and taking off
the first rind or shells, which is thrown away. The
inner husk, the mace, is then carefully taken off
with a knife, the pulp thus removed when fresh be-
ing of a crimson color, and covering the whole nut ;
this is squeezed very hard to extract all the moisture,
and dried inthe sun; the dark shell next the mace,
-and which coats the seed, thus becomes brittle, and
the seed, or nutmegs, drop out. They are next
‘soaked in sea-water, and impregnated with lime ;
a process which answers the double purpose of secu-
ring the nutmeg from insects and mould, and of des-
troying the vegetating property. It also neutralizes
the volatile quality of the aroma of the spice.
‘The mace is simply dried in the sun, and sprinkled
with salt-water. ,
When I had wearied myself with my examinations
I went to beg refreshment at a hut, belonging to one
of the owners of the plantation. Here I could not
help being struck with the many uses to which the
valuable (Cocoa-tree is here applied. . The roof
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 951

of the house was composed of its leaves, which
were fastened by the strong threads which attach
the leaves to the tree. The landlady presented me
a pleasant liquor, in a cup made of the shell of the
cocoa, highly polished, curiously carved, and edged
with silver ; and with Ceylonese fruit, in a neat bas-
ket made of the smallest leaves ; and we were show-
ed her hanging-beds, mats, brooms and_ brushes, all
of polished cocoa.

Next day we had to pass through a wood ;—but
such a march ! I shall never forget it !: [had heard
much of reptiles of hot countries, but never met with
anything equal to the sufferings we endured in trav-
ersing this wood. We were first annoyed with a
small species of leech not bigger than a pin, but
which gives more pain than I can describe : to guard
against it is an impossibility. I expected my boots
and gloves were a sufficient defence ; but, to my as-
tonishment and alarm, when I drew them off, I found
them literally filled with blood. Our horses were
almost mad with pain, and kicked and plunged so
violently, we often had to dismount, which rendered
our progress so slow that we had time enough for ob-
servation, and especially to be cautious not toap-
proach too near the nests of the red ants built in the
trees, the bite of this species being very severe.

We had also to avoid the singular dwellings of the
white ants (see p.113) shaped like a sugar-loaf, near-
ly as high as this room, and of so firm a sub-
252 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

stance they cannot easily be broken. They are render-
ed doubly formidable by affording shelter to snakes
and scorpions, whose bite is fatal.

Sometimes we were obliged to stop among the
tangles of brush-wood, woven with webs of the enor-
mous Ceylon spider, almost as large as a mouse, and
with legs three or four inches in length. Besides
the curiosity of these webs, so different in texture to
the delicate production of our small spider, they fur-
ther gratified our curiosity by presenting several
beautiful small birds, which they seem formed to
catch—these little elegant creatures being often the
prey of the Ceylonese spiders. In this wood, whilst
I was examining some flowers, my attendant pointed
out to me one of the kinds of enormous boa snakes,
gorged with prey, basking in the sun in bushes at
a little distance. He seemed about twenty-five feet
long, and his appearance was grand and beautiful.



IN CONTINUATION.

Weaniep with our fatiguing journey, I was de-
lighted when we drew near a beautiful river, which
I proposed crossing on horseback ; but this my guide
highly disapproved, assuring me the rivers of this
island were much infested by alligators, and, not
choosing to run any unnecessary risks, I submitted
to his advice,and we travelled on its banks for some
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 253

time. At last we saw a crowd of people, and had
reason to congratulate ourselves in not venturing into
a Cingalese river. They were collected round an im-
mense alligator, whose body they were opening ; and,
horrible to relate, within it was found the head and
arms of a black man. Shocked as this sight, I was
about to ride off, but, recollecting I might not have
another opportunity of seeing an alligator, I returned.
He was twenty feet in length ; his skin was so hard
and knotty, a musket-ball had made no impression
on it. The crowd were trying to lift the alligator upon
a sort of carriage, formed by fastening two carts to-
gether by cocoa-tree ropes ; and, when loaded, it was
with great difficulty drawn by eight bullocks to Co-
lumbo, the capital, there to be presented to Lord
Stanley, the British governor of the island.

A very beautiful wild animal, called the Ceylon
Deer, attracted our attention among the multitude of
Cingalese curious creatures. It was the smallest spe-
cies Iever saw, not much bigger than a fox, with-
out antlers, its sleek sides spotted with bright red,
and its taper legs not much bigger than a lady’s finger.
This pretty Ceylon animal is caught in traps, its
flesh being in great esteem, for its tenderness,
flavor, wholesomeness, and delicacy.

We rode on in silence,—a silence resulting ftom
reflecting that the people of this country believe that~- ,
Ceylon was the first residence of Adam, after his
254 FREDERIC AND LUCY,

expulsion from Paradise. This notion is merely
founded on their own obscure traditions, which are
mostly very ridiculous ; yet the vast variety of animals
I had seen, since my arrival on the island, forcibly
recalled to memory the fine description, given by
Milton of the beauty, stateliness, and familiarity of
the animals of the garden of Eden :—

Aronnd them frisking played

All beasts of the earth, since wild, and of all chase
In wood or wilderness, forest or den :

Sporting the lion ramp’d, and in his paw

Dandled the kid ; bears, tigers, ounces, pards,
Gamboll'd before them ; the unweildy elephant,
To make them mirth, used all his might, and wreath’d
His light proboscis : close the serpent, sly,
Insinuating, wove with Gordian twine

His braided train, and of his fatal guile

Gave proof unheeded.

The trees in this tropical country appeared to me
strange and numerous ; I migh: have heard of some
of them, yet they surpassed expectation. I saw
a curious one, the fruit of which is called Eve’s Ap-
ple, of a bright orange color, beautiful to behold with
its smooth, glowing surface ; its inside is of a deep
crimson, but very poisonous. Its fruit is strangely
suspended by a natural rope, and hangs down like
a mason’s short plum-line ; but the most curious cir-
cumstance is that every one of these little Eve’s Ap-
ples appears to have a piece bitten from its top.
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 255



I have seen preserved eve’s apples sold at grocery
stores in Boston, &c.as a sweetmeat or fruit. _

We now approached the lofty mountains, over
which extend theCandian dominions. On the high-
est mountain the king resides : it is very difficult of
access, and the natural obstacles are increased by the
dislike the natives have to foreigners. Europeans
have brought upon themselves this hatred, by not
acting with truth towards the original possessors.

At the foot of the mountains we stopt for the night.
256 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

As evening advanced, a sudden darkness covered the
sky, and a most tremendous storm of thunder and
lightning came on, attended with torrents of rain,
and water rushing from the mountains. The thun-
der, re-echoed from the heights, was most awfully
terrific ; but our alarm was forgot whilst beholding
the agonizing distress of the natives ; all had recourse
to incantations, talismans, and every absurdity that
fear and superstition could suggest. These unhappy
people imagine the dreadful storms, so frequent here,
are produced by evil spirits, whose power and malig-
nity they think are unbounded. With this dread on
their minds they are in constant trepidation. We
hope that the light of Christianity and knowledge
will, at some future period, dispel the darkness of
these fearful and degrading superstitions. And ought
we not fervently to thank God for the benefits of
superior knowledge which we have so long enjoyed ?

‘ | have been thinking,’ said Frederic, when Mr.
Selby paused, ‘ it would be a pleasant thing to travel
and see so many curiosities ; but the accounts you
relate, make me think it must often be frightful.’

Very true, my dear, it is so, replied his friend ;
but it is the quality of true courage to overcome fear.
There are many hardships and difficulties, to which
the traveller is exposed, that demand more true
courage of mind than perhaps ever was possessed
by warriors. He, who leads his army to the fight,
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 257

knows all eyes are upon him, and, if he conquer, all
will be repaid by what the world calls glory. But
he, who silently traverses the earth, with the noble
design of dispensing knowledge, extending discove-
ries, and adding to general information, cannot be too
highly esteemed. Such men were Cook, Bruce, Led-
yard, Mungo Parke, Belzoni, Franklin, Parry, and
many others, but, above all, the benevolent Howard,
“ Who, as an angel, all serene went forth
To still the raging tempest of the north.”
‘O, how I long to read about these good travellers !’
cried Lucy. ‘Will you get us books, mother ?
With the greatest pleasure, my dear, but you must
first learn geography,and then we shall, with greater
advantage, connect the works of these travellers, by
tracing the countries they describe on the globe.
And now, my dears, think of the inestimable privi-
lege we enjoy in the art of printing, which places all
knowledge and all these travels within our reach !

Well, my dears, continued Mr. Selby, was there
anything in my account you did not understand ?

‘ Please, sir,’ said Frederic, ‘you said (p. 236)
people sometimes fight and kill sharks for sport ?

Yes, they know the habits of the fish. The shark’s
upper jaw is immoveablegetgeiower one only opens
most horribly wide, likirt Wid of an iron chest, and
he turns sideways or ae down, to seize his prey.

Whilst at the ri 61 Bi nges, near Calcutta, one
of these combats happenet!. which was related to me >






258 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

by an eye-witness : ‘Several coolies or porters were
unlading country boats, when a large shark came so
near the shore, that they retreated a few paces. At
this moment, an up-country native, standing upon the
choppah roof of a boat, advanced, tying a running-
knot ina rope. The shark rose to the surface 6 or 8
yards distant, when the native plunged into the wa-
ter, close to the jaws of the monster, who darted to-
wards him. The man dived beneath the fish, and both
went down together. The man soon re-appeared on
the opposite side of the fish, who also soon rose, and
again darted towards his foe. While the fish passed
over the lower part of the native’s body to seize his
prey, the man threw himself up perpendicularly, and
went down feet foremost, instantly followed by the
shark. They remained long out of sight, whilst I
stood in breathless anxiety, not to say horror. Sud-
denly the man re-appeared, wine» the end of the rope
to the people on the shore, shouted victory, and the
enormous monster was dragged to land. The native
received no injury, except a hurt on the left arm, in-
flicted by the powerful tail or fins of the fish.’

‘Mother,’ said Lucy, ‘ Mr. Selby said animals were
playful ; are any playful except kittens and puppies ?

Yes, instances occur every day, and are sometimes
noticed. Here isa London newspaper, printed only 14
days ago, which has since travelled 3000 miles, I
will read a line or two from it :—‘ Small birds chase
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 259

each other in play, but perhaps the conduct of the
crane and trumpeter bird is the most extraordinary.
The latter stands on one leg, hops about in an eccen-
tric manner, and throws somersets. The South A-
mericans call him the mad bird. The crane expands
its wings, runs round in circles, and, throwing little
stones and pieces of wood in the air, catches them
or pretends to avoid them, as if afraid. Water birds
ofall kinds dive after and chase each other. Deer
often engage ina sham battle, twisting their horns
together, and pushing for the mastery. All animals
that pretend violence in their play, stop short of ex-
cising it ; dogs in playing take care to bite only in jest;
and the ourang outang, in wrestling with his keeper,
attempts to throw him and makes feints of biting
him. Most animals carry out in play the semblance
of catching prey ; small cats, for a familiar instance,
leap after every small moving object, even to leaves
strewed by the autumn wind ; they crouch and steal
forward ready for a spring ; the body quivering and
the tail vibrating with emotion, they bound on the
moving leaf, and again watch and spring at another,
Young jaguars and cuguars have been seen playing
with round substances like kittens. Young lambs
collect together on little hillocks and eminences in
their pastures, racing and sporting with each other
in the most interesting manner. Birds of the pie
kind are the monkeys of the feathered race, full of
amusing mischief, play, and mimicry.’
260 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

The trumpeter bird, here mentioned, has green legs
7 inches high. He is coaxed to use his voice, which
sounds like the tones of a trumpet, loud, and pierc-
ing. This bird, when tame, is almost too familiar,
good-natured, and active. .His feathers are black in
general, those of the neck and breast are ofa glossy
gilded green, with reflecting blue and rainbow colors.
To his master he is a companion, like a fond, fawning
spaniel ; always amusing, but somewhat envious of
all four-footed favorites. He bites the heels of cats
and dogs till they leave the room ; if they resist, so


FREDERIC AND LUCY. 261

much the worse, as his agility evades all their attacks.
He is sometimes trained to keep sheep, and, what
with his wakeful eye, swiftness of foot, aided with
his wings and sharp bill, no watchdog can rival him.
—He even masters the wolf, by tearing out his eyes.
He hops and dances round his master in the morning,
presents his glossy green downy neck to be stroked,
flaps his wings, and expects fondling like a pet dog.



OBSERVATIONS.

One rainy day, the children had colds, and staid
in the house. Towards evening, they were listless,
and wished for bed-time. Mrs. Johnson, to divert
their weariness, said :—‘ Lucy, my dear, did you
ever think what labor it required to furnish this room ?

‘No, mother ; you bought all the things in the
shops, did you not ? I do not think that much trouble,
the shops are all pretty, and I like to go to them.’

And so do I, my dear ; it is very pretty to exam-
ine and admire every ingenious improvement ;_ but
that is not all I mean. I wish you to consider these
productions of nature, altered in so many various ways
we can hardly trace their original. I suppose you
know the carpet is made of the wool of the sheep ?

‘ To be sure, mother.’

But have you thought on the art of the dyer, all
these beautiful figures, the discovery of the coloring
materials, these Tyrian tints, and the art of mixing
262 FREDERIC AND LUCY. :

them, so as to be clear and lasting ; and the ingenuity
of weaving and interlacing this complicated web ?

‘ Where, do they get the dye, mother ®

I cannot tell you all at present, my dear. I only
wish now to show you how many things are daily
within our notice. Of what are these chairs made #

‘Of mahogany.’ :

And where does mahogany grow ? At Honduras,
in South America. Look at the width of that large
table, and consider what a noble tree it must have
been ! covered with beautiful flowers ! what labor
to fell such hard wood! and what skill, taste, and
dexterity are displayed in cutting, forming, and polish-
ing it! Look at these marble pillars and mantlepiece ;
dug from a ragged, ugly quarry, by hard labor. See
these fire-irons ; who, that was ignorant, would sup-
pose, beautifully bright as they are, they were ta-
ken from a dirty, stone-like substance, dug from pits ?

‘Were they indeed, mother ? And was this pretty
yellow wire of the fender also found in pits ?

Yes, my dear, but not in its present state. It is
called brass, and brass is formed by uniting two dif-
ferent metals together. All metals are found in the
earth, usually very deep. The manner of working
mines, purifying minerals by fire, and then mixing
and applying them to all their various uses, will be
a most delightful amusement to you hereafter. See
what a pleasing effect is produced by these clean-
painted white doors and wainscotting ! This pretty
FREDERIC AND LUCY. 263

white paint is made of the same dull-looking metal of
which Cochituate water-pipes are made,—mixed with
dirty manure,—thus turned into pure white powder
for paint ; and this white powder may be changed,
by extreme heat, into a most brilliant red.

‘I wish we could see these things, mother.’

They are made daily at the lead works, in Boston.
I intend also taking you to the glasshouse, S. Boston ;
you will see a few dirty-looking substances changed
by violent heat, into glass—a clear, pellucid, pure,
transparent luxury, unknown in ancient times—one
of the most useful inventions. Glass, with a slight
metallic coating on one side, forms these beautiful
mirrors, or looking-glasses—so called, because, when
we look at them, we see a perfect image of ourselves.
Yet this is one ofits least valuable uses. Glass sup-
plies many other elegancies, ornaments of every
kind, imitations of precious stones, various contrivan-
ces for holding sights, flowers, and fruits, and beau-
tiful drinking-vessels, goblets, and gasometer lamps,
clear, clean, glistening, and elegant. Its most valu-
able uses are its magnifying powers, which assist
the sight of the aged, as you see daily, in the use of
spectacles—its convex or copgave form giving, as it
were, eyes to those who'TRe partially blind. A near-
sighted person, in ancient times, was forever pur-
blind ; but opticians now give the blessing of renewed
vision by a little lens, or piece of hollow glass, lodged
on aman’s nose. You have also seen a microscope,
264 FREDERIC AND LUCY.

which discovers to you the smallest parts of an insect
or a flower—in fact, every thing too delicate for dis-
crimination by the naked eye without this excellent
assistance. ‘Telescopes, in like manner, with larger
and more powerful glasses, bring to view distant ob-
jects, which is of vast consequence at sea, and ena-
bles us nightly to admire worlds otherwise unseen. _

This elegant clear substance, though originally in-
vented from sand and sea-weed,at once keeps out the
cold and storms of winter, and allows us to enjoy all
the varieties of prospect in every season, not only in
our houses, but in cars, omnibuses, and coach-

a ene satan rene

Here the servant entered with a message that tea
was ready. ‘O dear,’ exclaimed Lucy, ‘I did not
think it was so late.’

An hour ago, my dear, you wished for bed-time,

‘ Well, mother, then I was very tired.’

And why, my dear, are you not still tired,—shall
I tell you? Because your mind has been employed.
Either our minds or our bodies must be actively at
work, or we cannot be happy. Iam always sorry
when I hear people exclaim they have nothing to do,
or nothing new to read; the industrious will always
find work; and the love of knowledge, employment
for the mind. Remember, my dears, the sources of
knowledge are inexhaustible.
| END.

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