Citation
The Adventures of Daniel Boone

Material Information

Title:
The Adventures of Daniel Boone : the Kentucky rifleman
Series Title:
Library for my young countrymen
Creator:
Philip, Uncle 1798-1866 ( Author, Primary )
Appleton, George Swett 1821-1878 ( Publisher )
D. Appleton and Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Philadelphia
Publisher:
D. Appleton & Co.
George S. Appleton
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1843
Language:
English
Physical Description:
2, 9-174, 6 p., 1 leaf of plates : 1 ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Biography -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1851
Boone, Daniel -- Juvenile literature -- 1734-1820
Genre:
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Biographies ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
individual biography ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
NUC pre-1956,
General Note:
Author's name from NUC pre-1956 cited below.
General Note:
Frontispiece with guardsheet.
General Note:
Series statement from spine.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements: 2 p. in front & 6 p. at end.
Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "Uncle Philip's conversations."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026806270 ( aleph )
AAA1951 ( ltqf )
ALH1681 ( notis )
12812338 ( oclc )

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Full Text




The Baldwin Library

University
of
Flori













TO
HIS YOUNG COUNTRYMEN
THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES,
AND ESPECIALLY
THE LADS OF KENTUCKY,
This Volume
IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED,

By Uncte PHItir.





2



;

Sow,
ume.

a





CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

Daniel Boone is born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania—
His father removes to the Schuylkill—Boone’s early
passion for hunting—Kills a panther—Wanderings
in the woods—Is sent to school—The school is bro-
ken up—Boone returns to his sports—His father re-
moves to the Yadkin river in North Carolina—While
the farm is improving Daniel is hunting—The neigh-
borhood begins to be settled—Daniel is dissatisfied —
Settlement of Mr. Bryan—Daniel Boone goes out
upon a fire hunt—Strange adventure—Marries Re-
becca Bryan—Makes a home for himself on the head
waters of the Yadi#—Men begin to crowd upon
him—determines to move .

CHAPTER II.

Early visits to Kentucky—James M‘Bride—Dr. Wack-
er and others—John Finlay goes to Kentucky trad-
ing with the Indians—Returns with glowing ac-
counts of the country—Visits Daniel Boone and
spends the winter with him—Boone is charmed with
the stories—They determine in the spring to go to
Kentucky—Meeting at Boone’s house in May—With
four companions they start for the west—Adventures



10 CONTENTS.

Page
by the way—They reach Finlay’s old station on the

Red river—Make their camp—Amuse themselves in
hunting and exploring the country—Beauty of the
country—Abundance of game—Boone and Stewart
are taken by the Indians—Make their escape—Re-
turn to their camp—lIt is plundered and deserted—
Arrival of Squire Boone—Daniel Doone is rejoiced
to hear from his family : ; : . - 26

CHAPTER III.

Hunting party—Stewart is killed by the Indians—nar-
row escape of Daniel Boone—The companion of
Squire Boone returns home—The two brothers alone
in the wilderness—Cheerfulness of Daniel Boone—
Squire returns to the Yadkin for ammunition—Dan-
iel lives in the forest alone—His pleasant wander-
ings—Singular escape from the Indians—Encounter
with a bear—Looks for the return of his brother—
Disappointment—Is very sad—Squire suddenly ar-
rives with ammunition and horses—Plans for the fu-
twre—Daniel Boone chooses a spot on the Kentucky
river—They return for his family—Sport by the way
—They reach the Yadkin—Try to beat up recruits
for Kentucky—Ridicule of the people—They start
with five families—Forty men joi them—Disaster
by the way—They return to Clinch river—Various
employments of Boone—He returns to Kentucky—
Builds a fort—Removes his family to Boonesborough 42

CHAPTER IV.

-~ |
Comforts of Boonesborough—Arrival of Colonel Cal-
away and his daughters—Capture of three girls by
the Indians—Boone and Calaway pursue—Are made

a -



CONTENTS.

prisoners—Happy escape—New emigrants—C ounty
of Kentucky—Indian warfare—Attacks upon Har-
rodsburgh and Boonesborough—Expedition to the
saltlicks on Licking river—Courage of Boone—Over-
comes two Indians—Is met by a large Indian party—
Made a prisoner—His long captivity and escape

CHAPTER V.

Indian customs noticed by Boone during his captivity—
Mode of hardening children—Changing names—
Marriages—Burials—War parties—Celebration of
victories—Torturing prisoners—Making treaties of
peace © 2 er er

CHAPTER VI.

Boone’s disappointment upon not finding his -wife—
Strengthening of Boonesborough—Indian hostilities
—Attack of Boonesborough—gallant defence—Boone
returns to North Carolina—Occurrences during his
absence—Boone returns—Goes to the Blue Licks
for salt—Death of the younger Boone—Daniel
Boone escapes—Kentucky divided into three counties
—Hard winter of 1781—Indian hostilities—Attack
on Bryant’s station—Villany of Simon Girty

CHAPTER VII.

Disastrous defeat at the Blue Licks—General Clarke’s
campaign—Efforts to restore peace—Sullenness of
the Indians—They continue their massacres—Strata-
gems on the Ohio—Bold defence of Captain Hubbil
—Harmar’s campaign—St. Clair’s defeat—Debate
in Congress~General Wayne takes command—De-
feats the Indians—Lays waste their country—Con-

ll

59

91



12 CONTENTS.

Page.
cludes a treaty of peace with the savages in August,

1795. ° e > e e e e e e 109

CHAPTER VIII.

Happiness of the settlers—Boone roams through the
wilderness—Civilization sickens him—He loses his
lands—Moves tothe Kanhawa—Disappointed in find-
ing game—Moves to Missouri—Purchase of Missou-
ri from the French—Anecdote related by Mr. Audu-
bon—Boone loses his wife—His sorrow—War with
England—His old age—His habits—He dies in 1818. 127

APPENDIX.

The adventures of Colonel Daniel Boone, fornierly a
hunter; containing a narrative of the wars of Ken-
tucky, as given by himself. . .- + + °& 143




ZY



DOAN VEL BOON

rom the Basso-Relievo in the Hotunda
of the Capitol at Washmeton



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THE

ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE.



CHAPTER I.

OME men choose to live im
crowded cities ;—others are
pleased with the peaceful quiet
of acountry farm ; while some-
love to roam through wild for-
ests, and make their homes im
the wilderness. The man.of
- whom I shall now speak, was:
one of this last class. Perhaps you
never'heard of Dan1EL Boons, the
Kentucky rifleman. If not, then T
us AGAK have a strange and interesting story
aoe __ to tell you.
Las If, when a child was born, we knew’,
v V that he was to become aremarkable man, —
“s J the time and place of his birth would,
perhaps, be always remembered. But as this cam
not be known, great mistakes are often made on
these points. As to the time when Daniel Boone
2






14 THE ADVENTURES OF

was born, there is no difficulty ; but people have
fallen into many blunders about the place. Some
have said that he was horn in England, before his
parents left that country ; others that he came into
this world during the passage of his parents across
the Atlantic. One has told us that he was born in
Virginia ; another in Maryland ; while many have
stated that he was a native of North Carolina.
These are all mistakes. Daniel Boone was born
in the year 1746, in Bucks county, in the state of
Pennsylvania.

From some cause or other, when the boy was
but three years old, his parents moved from this
home, and settled upon the Schuylkill river, not far
from the town of Reading. Here they lived for
ten years ; ard it was during this time that their
son Daniel began to show his passion for hunting.
He was scarcely able to carry a gun, when he
was shooting all the squirrels, rackoons, and even
wild-cats (it is said), that he could find in that re-
gion. As he grew older, his courage increased,
and then we find him amusing himself with higher
‘game. Other lads in the neighborhood were soon
taught by him the use of the rifle, and-were then
able to join-him in his adventures. On one occa-
sion, they all started out for a hunt, and after
amusing themselves till it was almost dark, were
returning homeward, when suddenly a. Wild cry
was heard in the woods. The boys screamed.out,





DANIEL BOONE. 15

“A panther !-a panther !” and ran off as fast as
they could. Boone stood firmly, looking around
for the animal. It was a panther indeed. His
eye lighted upon him just in the act of spring-
ing toward him: in an instant he levelled his rifle,
and shot him through the heart.

But this sort of sport was not enough for him.
He seemed resolved to go away from men, and
live in the forests with these animals. One morn-
ing he started off as fsual, with his rifle and
dog. Night came on, but Daniel did not re-
turn to his home. Another day and night passed -
away, and still the boy did not make his appear- |
ance. His parents were now greatly alarmed.
The neighbors joined them in making search for
the lad. After wandering about a great while,
they at length saw smoke rising from a cabin in
the distance. Upon reaching it, they found the
boy. ‘The floor of the cabin was covered with the
skins of such animals as he had slain, andiipieces
of meat were roasting before the fire for a.
per. Here, at a distance of three miles from any
settlement, he had built his cabin of sods and
branches, and sheltered himself in the wilderness,

It was while his father was living on the head-
waters of the Schuylkill, that young Boone re-
ceived, so far as we know, all his education. Short
indeed were his schoolboy days. It happened that
an Irish schoolmaster strolled into the settlement,



16 THE ADVENTURES OF

and, by the advice of Mr. Boone and other parents,
opened a school in the neighborhood. It was not
then as it is now. Good schoolhouses were not
scattered over the land; nor were schoolmasters
always able to teach their pupils. The school-
house where the boys of this settlement went was
a log cabin, built in the midst of the woods. The
schoolmaster was a strange man: sometimes good-
_ humored, and then indulging the lads ; sometimes
surly and ill-natured, and “then beating them se-
verely. It was his usual custom, after hearing the
first lessons of the morning, to allow the children
to be out for a half hour at play, during which time
he strolled off to refresh himself from his “labors/
He always walked in the same direction, and the

boys thought that after his return, when they 4

were called in, he was generally more cruel than
ever. ‘I'hey were whipped more severely, and
oftentimes without any cause. They observed

this, but did not know the meaning of i. One
" morning young Boone asked that he might go out,

and had scarcely left the schoolroom, when, he-sawk

@ squirrel running over the trunk of a fallen tree.

‘True to his nature, he instantly gave chase, until:
Me

at last the squirrel darted into a bower of vines:
and branches. Boone thrust his hand in, and, to his
surprise, laid of hold of a bottle of whiskey. This
was in the direction of his master’s morning walks,
and he thought now that he understood the secret of





a->"*, * > :
ig See sail
a es ate. Stat!



DANIEL BOONE. 17

much of his ill-nature. He returned to the school-
room ; but when they were dismissed for that day,
he told some of the larger boys of his discovery.
Their plan was soon arranged. Early the next
moming a bottle of whiskey, having tartar emetic
in it, was placed in the bower, and the other bottle
thrown away. At the usual hour, the lads were»
sent out to play, and the master started on his
walk. But their play was to come afterward: —
they longed for the master to return. At length
they were called in, and in a little time saw the
success of their experiment. The master began
to look pale -and sick, yet still went on with his
work. Several boys were called up, one after the
other, to recite lessons, and all whipped soundly,
whether right or wrong. At last young Boone
was galled out to answer questions in arithme-_
tic. He came forward with his slate and pencil,
and the master began: “If you subtract six from
nine, what remains?” said he. “ Three, sir,” said
Boone. “ Very good,” said the master ; “ now let
us come to fractions. If you take three quarters
from a whole number, what remains ?”—“ The
whole, sir,” answered Boone. ‘ You blockhead!”
cried the master, beating him, “ you stupid little
fool, how can you show that ?”—* If I take one
bottle of whiskey,” said Boone, “and put in its
place another in which I have mixed an emetic,
the whole will remain, if nobody drinks it!” "The
Q*



18 THE ADVENTURES OF

Irishman, dreadfully sick, was now doubly enraged.
He seized Boone, and commenced beating him:
the children shouted and roared ; the scuffle con-
tinued, until Boone knocked the master down upor
the floor, and rushed out of the room. It was a
day of freedom now for the lads. ‘The story soon
ran through the neighborhood ; Boone was rebuked
by his parents, but the schoolmaster was dismissed,
and thus ended the boy’s education.

Thus freed from school, he now returned more
ardently than ever to his favorite pursuit. His
dog and rifle were his constant companions, and
day after day he started from home, only to
roam through the forests. Hunting seemed to
be the only business of his life ; and he was never
so happy as when at night he came home laden
with game. He was an untiring wanderer,

I do not know but that this passion for roaming
was in some degree inherited by Daniel Boone.
His father had already had three homes: one in
England, one in Bucks county, and another on the
Schuylkill ; and he now thought of removing fur-
ther. It is said that the passion of Daniel for
hunting was one cause which prompted his father
to think of this. Land was becoming scarce, the
neighborhood a little crowded, and game less
abundant ; and, to mend matters, he began to cast
his eyes around for anewhome. He was not long

jn choosing one. He had heard of a rich and



.
a

DANIEL BOONE. 19

beautiful country on the banks of the Yadkin river
in North Carolina, and he determined that this
should be the next resting-place for him and his
household.

All things were made ready as soon as possible,
and the journey commenced. It was a fine spring
morning when the father started for his new home,
with his wife and children, his flocks and herds.
Their journey lay hundreds of miles through a
trackless wilderness ; yet with cheerful and fear-
less hearts they pressed onward. When hungry,
they feasted upon venison and wild turkeys (for
Daniel, with his rifle, was in company); when
thirsty, they found cool springs of water to refresh
them by the way; when wearied at night, they
laid themselves down and slept under the wide-
spreading branches of the forest. At length they
reached the land they looked for, and the father
found it to be all that he expected. ‘The woods in
that: region were unbroken ; no man seemed yet to
have found them. Land was soon cleared, a cabin
built, and the father in a little time found himself
once more happily settled with his family.

The old man with his other sons went busily to the
work of making afarm. As for Daniel, they knew
it was idle to expect his help in such employment,
and therefore left him to roam about with his
tifle. ‘This was a glorious country for the youth ;
wild woods were all around him, and the game, —



20 THE ADVENTURES OF.

having not yet learned to fear the crack of the rifle
wandered fearlessly through them. This he though
was, of all places, the home for him. I hope you
will not think that he was the idle and useless boy
of the family, for it was not so. While the farm
was improving, Daniel was supplying the family
with provisions. ‘The table at home was always -
filled with game, and they had enough and to spare.
Their house became known as a warm-hearted
and hospitable abode ; for the wayfaring wanderer,
when lost in the woods, was sure to find here a
welcome, a shelter, and an abundance. Then, too,
if money was wanted in the family, the peltries
of the animals shot by Daniel supplied it: so
that he was, in a large degree, the supporter
of the household. _In this way years rolled on-
ward—the farm still enlarging and improving,
Daniel still hunting, and the home one of constant
péace, happiness, and plenty.

At length the story of the success and comfort
of the family brought neighbors aroundthem. Dif-
ferent parts of the forests began to be cleared ;
smoke was soon seen rising from new cabins ;
and the sharp crack of other rifles than Daniel’s
was sometimes heard in the morning. This grieved
him sadly. Most people would have been pleased
to find neighbors in the loneliness of the woods ;
but what pleased others did not please him. They
were crowding upon him ; they were driving away





Pe tesa A Sep! TEA



DANIEL BOONE. | 21

his game: this was his trouble. But, after all,

._ there was one good farmer who came into the re-

gion and made his settlement ; which settlement,
as it turned out, proved a happy thing for Daniel.
This was a very worthy man named Bryan.
He cleared his land, built his cabin upon a sloping

bill, not very far from Mr. Boone’s, and before
a great while, by dint of industry, had a good farm
- of more than a hundred acres. This farm was
; beautifully situated. A pretty stream of water
_ almost encircled it. On the banks of the Schuyl-
_ kill, Daniel Boone found all his education, such

as it was; on the banks of the Yadkin he found

something far better. I must tell you now of a

very strange adventure.

One evening, with another young friend, he
started out upon what is called a “ fire-hunt.” Per-
haps you do not know what this means. I will
explain it to you. Two people are always neces*
sary for a fire-hunt. One goes before, carrying a |
blazing torch of pitch-pine wood (or lightwood, as
it is called in the southern country), while the other
follows behind with his rifle. In this way the two
hunters move through the forests. When an ani-
mal is startled, he will stand gazing at the light,
and his eyes may be seen shining distinctly : this
is called “ shining the eyes.” The hunter with the
rifle, thus seeing him, while the other shines him,
levels-his gun with steady aim, and has a fair shot.



22 THE ADVENTURES OF

This mode of hunting is still practised in many
parts of our country, and is everywhere known as
a fire-hunt.

Boone, with his companion, started out upon such
a hunt, and very soon reached the woods skirting
the lower end of Mr. Bryan’s farm. It seems they
were on horseback, Boone being behind with the
rifle. They had not gone far, when his companion
reined up his horse, and two eyes were seen
distinctly shining. Boone levelled his rifle, but
something prevented his firing. ‘The animal darted
off. Boone leaped from his horse, left his com-
panion, and instantly dashed after it. It was too
dark to see plainly, still he pursued ; he was close
upon its track, when a fence coming in the way,
the animal leaped it with a clear bound. Boone
climbed over as fast as he could with his rifle, but
the game had gotahead. Nothing daunted by this,
he pushed on, until he found himself at last not very
far from Mr. Bryan’s home. But the animal was
gone. It wasastrange chase. He determined to go
into Mr Bryan’s house, and tell his adventure. As
he drew near, the dogs raised a loud barking, the
master came out, bade him welcome, and carried
him into the house. Mr. Bryan had scarcely in
troduced him to his family as “the son of hit
neighbor Boone,” when suddenly the door of the
room was burst open, and in rushed a little lad of
seven, followed by a girl of sixteen years, crying



DANIEL BOONE. 23

out, “O father! father! sister is frightened to death!
She went down to the river, and was chased by a
panther!” ‘The hunter and his game had met.
There stood Boone, leaning upon his rifle, and
Rebecca Bryan before him, gasping for breath.
From that moment he continued to pursue it;
Farmer Bryan’s house became a favorite resort
for him; he loved it as well as the woods. The
business was now changed: Rebecca Bryan com-
pletely shined his eyes; and after a time, to the
great joy of themselves and both families, Daniel
Boone and Rebecca Bryan were married. It
proved, as you will see, a very happy marriage to
both parties.

Being now a married man, it became Daniel
Boone’s duty to seek a new home for himself. In
a little time, therefore, he left his wife, and wan-
dered into the unsettled parts of North Carolina in
search of one. After moving about for some
time, he found, upon the head-waters of the
Yadkin, a rich soil, covered with a heavy and once
more unbroken forest. “ Here,” thought Daniel
Boone, “is the resting-place for me ; here Rebecca
Bryan and myself may be happy: this shall be
our home.” He returned to his wife, and she,
with a cheerful heart, joined in all his plans.
With tears in her eyes, she bade farewell’ to her
friends; yet, with a light spirit, she statted off
with her husband. A clearing in the woods was

fie, ~

hb ssh



24 THE ADVENTURES OF

soon made, a log cabin of his own soon built, and
a portion of ground planted. Boone seems now to
have thought that he must do something more than
suse his rifle. He was to make a home for his wife
and busied himself, accordingly, in enlarging his
farm as fast as he could, and industriously cul-
tivating it. Still, on his busiest day, he would
find a leisure hour to saunter with his gun to
the woods, and was sure never to return with-
out game. His own table was loaded with it,
as when at his father’s, and his house, like his
father’s, soon became known as a warm and kind
shelter for the wandering traveller. In this indus-
trious and quiet way of farming and hunting, years
were spent, and Daniel Boone was contented and
happy. Several little children were now added to
his group ; and, with his wife, his children, and his
rifle, for companions, he felt that all was well.
But his peace was at length disturbed once more.
His old troubles pursued him ; men again began to
come near. The crash of falling trees was heard,
as the new settlers levelled the forests ; huts were
seen springing up all around him; other hunters
were roaming through the woods, and other dogs
than his were heard barking. This was more
than he was willing to bear. Happy as he had
made his home, he determined to leave it, and find
another in the wilderness, where he could have
that wilderness to himself. For some time he was



DANIEL BOONE. 25

at a loss to know where to go; yet his heart was
fixed in the determination to move. The circum-
stances which pointed him to his new home, and
where that new home was made, you may learn in

ihe next chapter.
2



THE

ADVENTURES

OF

DANIEL BOONE,

THE

KENTUCKY RIFLEMAN.

BY

THE AUTHOR OF “‘ UNCLE PHILIP’S CONVERSATIONS.”

“Too much crowded—too much crowded —I want more elbow:
room.”’—Boone on his way to Missourt.

NEW YORK:
D. APPLETON & CO., 200 BROADWAY.

PHILADELPHIA:
GEORGE S. APPLETON, 164 CHESNUT ST.

MDCCCT,





wwerwvrerveenrnsanemnanaeeasseoeeseeeeeeeees

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1843,
By D. APPLETON & CO.,

ia the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the United States,
for the Southern District of New York.

POPPI - — nmr cm: ate



26 THE ADVENTURES UF

CHAFTER II.




Y young friends all know where
the state of Kentucky is situ-
, Y ated. It is hardly necessary for
* me to say, that at the time of
which I am writing, that region
was an unbroken wilderness.
It was in the year 1754 that
a white man first visited the
< country of Kentucky. This was
Mr RS James M‘Bride. In company with
PW several others during that year, he
‘SQ, was passing down the Ohio, when
he discovered the mouth of Ken-
(M4 tucky river, and made alanding. Near
yw) ® the spot where he landed, he cut upon
@® g 2 tree the first letters of his name ; and
these letters, it is said, could be seen and distinctly
read for many years afterward. With his com-
panions, he wandered through the wilderness ; the
country struck them all as being remarkably beau-
tiful. It is not wonderful, then, that when they
returned home, they were filled with fine stories

———.
a
i "2
Wa

i

<

il






=

—>
pS
Sy

stint HT



&
DANIEL BOONE. 27

about the new region. They declared that it was
“the best tract of land in North America, and
probably in the world.”

In spite of their pleasant stories, however, it was
a long time before any one was disposed to follow
in their track. At length, Doctor Walker, of Vir-
ginia, with a number of friends, started upon a
western tour of discovery. Some say that he was
in search of the Ohio river particularly ; others
that he went merely to collect strange plants and
flowers. Be this as it may, he with his party
wandered through Powell’s Valley, and passed the
mountains at what is called the Cumberland Gap.
_ They then crossed the Cumberland river, and roam-
ing on through the forests, at length, after much

eae eee eS ee le ee ae

fatigue and suffering, reached the Big Sandy. The

country was beautiful, yet they were too much
worn out to go further, and from this point began

to return homeward. They had suffered more than . : e
M‘Bride, and therefore their story was not so bright. *

“9

as his; yet they gave a very pleasant account of ©

the new country.

No one yet, however, seemed ready to make
his home in Kentucky ; and accident at last seems
to have thrown one man into that country, whose
Story, upon his return, made some anxious to go
there. This was John Finley, a backwoodsman
of North Carolina. He was in the habit of roving

about and trading with the Indians. In the year.





28 THE ADVENTURES OF

1767, he, with certain companions as fearless as
himself, led on from place to place by the course
of trade, wandered far into Kentucky. Here he
remained for some time. It was a very beautiful,
yet, as he learned also, a very dangerous country.
No Indian tribe lived there, but all the tribes
roamed over it as a hunting-ground. Upon these
hunts, the fierce and warlike people would often
meet and wage their bloody battles. These fights
were so frequent and so awful, that the region was
known by the name of the “ Dark and Bloody
Ground.” In spite of danger, Finley lived there,
until at last the traders and the Indians began to
quarrel, and, for safety’s sake, he was forced to
run off. He returned to North Carolina, filled with
wonderful stories. Sights like those on the “ Dark
and Bloody Ground,” were nowhere to be seen.
The land was rich, and covered with trees and
flowers ; there were lofty mountains, beautiful val-
leys, and clear streams, throughout it. Then he
spoke of the strange caves in the mountains; of
curious salt springs ; of the foot-prints of men to
be seen distinctly upon the solid rocks; of the
strange figures of huge animals on the sides of the
high cliffs. Game of all sorts was abundant, from
the buffalo down to the partridge. There was no
@ country (he declared) like Kain-tuck-kee.* His

* This was the Indian name for the country.



DANIEL BOONE, - 9g

tale was so wonderful, that people could not well
help listening to it.

Whether John Finley was led there by a knowl-
edge of the man’s character, or whether it was an
accident, it so happened, that about a year after his
return, he wandered into the neighborhood of Dan-
_ lel Boone’s home. It was not long before he fell
in with Boone, and completely charmed him with
his stories. Boone had known some sport in the
forests himself, but the adventures of Finley were -
to him marvellous. He was so much pleased with
the man, that he invited him, as it was now winter,
to come to his house, and make his home there
through the season. The invitation was gladly
accepted ; and in the cabin of Boone, again and
again was the wild beauty of the “ Dark and Bloody
Ground” laid before him. ‘There was no end to
Finley’s stories of this region. The wind whistled
without, but the fire blazed cheerfully within ; and
here they sat, on many a night, almost till dawn,
Finley talking, and Boone listening. The end of
all this was, that they determined, when spring
opened, to go to Kentucky. Boone knew that
there were hardships and perils in the way, and
Finley had practically felt them; but what were
dangers or difficulties to these fearless men? The
first of May was agreed upon as the day for start-
ing, and Finley was then again to meet Boone at
his house.

3*



30 THE ADVENTURES OF

It is not strange that other bold men, who
heard Finley’s stories, were seized with the same
desire for going west. Indeed, Boone helped to
give them that desire, knowing that a few brave
spirits would be of great service in the new coun-
try. He talked, therefore, warmly of the comforts
of a new home in the forest, where there was an
abundance of game, and a complete absence of
towns and villages. Accordingly, on the first of
May, 1769, when Finley repaired to Boone’s house,
he found four others ready for the adventure : these
were John Stewart, Joseph Holden, James Monay,
and William Cool. The people in the neighbor-
hood, learning what was going on, had likewise
gathered to look with surprise upon these six men.
What could prompt men to leave the comforts of
their quiet homes, and wander off into the wilder-
ness? ‘They surely were crazy. Boone was much
beloved as a kind neighbor, and they mourned most
over his madness. Nothing daunted by all this,
they were then ready for a start, and were now on
the point of leaving. We are told that, with tears
in his eyes, Daniel Boone kissed his wife and chil-
dren ; and if the story be true, I love him the more
for it. His spirit was beating for his new hunting-
forests; he could face all the dangers of the
“Dark and Bloody Ground,” but then it was doubt-
ful whether he was not parting with his wife and
children for ever. At all events, he was leaving



DANIEL BOONE. 31

them for months, perhaps for years—he knew
not how long—and who can wonder that tears stood
in his eyes? Each man shouldered his rifle,
shot-bag, powder-horn, and knapsack, and off
they started—every neighbor straining his eyes
after them as far as he could see, as the men upon
whom he was looking for the last time.

For two or three days they saw nothing new, for
they were passing over their old hunting-grounds.
After this, they came to a wild and trackless region,
and saw from time to time the lofty ridge of moun-
tains which separated them from the western coun-
try. In two days more, the provisions with which
uney had started gave out, and the first thing to be
done was to find a fresh supply. Accordingly they
halted, chose a suitable spot for their camp, and
part of them commenced building it of logs and
branches ; the others went into the woods in search
of game. It was impossible for such men to starve
in such a region; game wasabundant. ‘The hunt-
ers returned toward night, with several deer and
wild turkeys. The camp was finished, a bright
fire was burning, and in a little time the venison.
was dressed, cooked, and eaten. The supper was
scarcely finished, when they saw dark clouds gath-
ering, and presently they were visited by a tremen-
dous thunder-storm. ‘The sharp lightning flashed
through the woods, and the rain poured down in tor-
rents ; yet, in their camp they fearlessly sheltered



32 THE ADVENTURES OF

themselves, the branches covering them from the
rain. A man can scarcely be placed during a thun-
der-storm in a more dangerous place than a forest :
every tree is a mark for the lightning ; yet these
men were calm and self-possessed, and were mer-
cifully protected.

The storm having passed over, they made their
arrangements for the night. For safety’s sake, two
men were to keep a constant watch, while the
others slept; and in this duty of watching, they
were totake turns. About midnight, while Boone
and Holden were keeping the watch, a sharp shrill
cry was heard inthe woods. ‘They sprang to their
feet. ‘“ What noise is that?” said Holden. The
sound was familiar to Boone. “Be still,” said
he ; “ it is only a panther ; come along with me.”
Moving cautiously from the camp, they listened
again for the cry. Once more. they heard it.
Creeping through the woods in the direction of the
sound, they at length saw through the darkness
the wild, glaring eyes of the animal. Boone lev-
elled his rifle with steady aim, and fired. Witha
wild yell the panther fell to the ground, and began
to retreat. Both were satisfied that the ball had
struck him, and returned again tothe camp. The
crack of the rifle had waked their companions ; the
adventure was made known to them, and they went
quietly to sleep again, satisfied that for the rest of
the night atleast that panther would not disturb them.



DANIEL BOONE. 33

The next day was a very busy one. Finding
game so plenty in the neighborhood, they deter-
mined to lay in a good supply. Part of them were
therefore out in the woods, hunting, while the rest
were in the camp, smoking, drying, and packing
the venison for the journey. Fatigued with these
labors, when night came they gladly laid them-
selves down, and, like wearied men, slept soundly.

By the first ray of the morning’s light the camp
was stirring. Shouldering their rifles and knap-
sacks, they started on their way. In a little time
they found a dead panther. Boone declared that
this was his panther ; the animal was killed with
one ball, and by comparing that ball with those in
his shot-bag, he found they were of the same size.
In two or three days they reached the foot of the
mountains, and began to ascend. Their journey
was now rough and wearisome, and they made
slow progress. To any men but these, the moun-
tains might have proved impassable ; but they were
bent upon finding the new hunting-grounds of Ken-
tucky, and nothing could keep them back. After
climbing the hills day after day, they found once
more that their provisions were gone, and were .
again forced to halt. Their camp was built on the
side of the mountain, and their rifles easily supplied
their wants. The journey was rigorously renewed,
and after many days of further struggling, they at
length found themselves on one of the tops of the



34 THE ADVENTURES OF ,

Allegany ridge. Here they were, upon Cumber
land mountain. At this place they halted once more,
to look down upon the magnificent prospect which
was spread out before them. ‘This was their first
view of the new region, and they felt that it was
all that Fimley had described it to be. It was in-
deed a glorious country. ‘The land was covered
with trees and flowers ; there were the rolling
hills, and the beautiful valleys, and the clear
sparkling streams, of which he had spoken.

The prospect was too beautiful to allow them to
tarry long: they panted to be in that country.
With more earnest desires than ever, they com-
menced descending the mountains. This part of
the journey was comparatively easy. In a few
days now they reached the western base of the
hills, and entered a lovely plain. Here, for the
first time, the new hunters saw the finest of
western game—a herd of buffaloes. From the skirt
of the wood at the end of the plain, a countless
troop of these animals came rushing over it. The
men were delighted ; they had heard of these noble
beasts of the forest, but none of them, except Fin-
ley, had ever seen one. As the mass came
tramping toward them, they stood gazing in as-
tonishment. Finley, who knew that men were
sometimes trampled to death by these moving
troops, kept his eye steadily upon the herd until
the foremost was within rifle-shot ; he then levelled



-
DANIEL BOONE. 35

his gun, and the leader fell dead. With a wild
bellow the herd parted on each side of the fallen.
animal, and went scampering through the plain.
There seemed no end to the number, as they still
came rushing from the wood. The mass appeared
closing again in a solid body, when he seized
Holden’s rifle, and shot another. Now they were
completly routed ; branching off on the two sides
of the plain, they went bellowing and tearing past
them. ‘ An amazing country, this!” cried Boone ;
“who ever beheld such an abundance?” The
camp was once more soon built, a blazing fire
made, and, for the first time in their lives, five of
these men sat down to a supper of buffalo-meat.
They talked of their new country, the quan-
tity of game, and how joyously they would roam
through the huge forests, until the night had worn
far away.

The next morning, after breakfast, they packed:
up such portions of the animals as they could
readily carry, and resumed their march. Ina little
time they reached Red river. Here Finley began
to feel more at home, for on this river he had lived.
Following the course of the stream, ere long they
came to the place which had been his trading-post’ _
with the Indians. They had been more than @
month reaching this point, and, naturally enough,
were wearied. Finley, too, could no longer guide
them ; and here, for the present, they determined



ee, ——)—lUlcC(“ i‘
iz

36 THE ADVENTURES OF

to halt again. It was now the seventh day of
June.
As this was to be their headquarters for some
; time, they built at once a substantial log cabin.
They were now fairly in the wilds of Ken-
tucky ; and remembering that the whole region
was the fighting-ground of the wandering Indians,
the cabin was built not only to protect them from the
‘weather, but to answer as a sort of fort against the
savages. ‘This shelter being provided, their whole
time now was given to hunting and exploring the
country. Hunting was a pastime indeed, the game
was soabundant. They could look out upon herds
of buffaloes scattered through the canebrakes,
browsing upon the leaves of the cane, or cropping
the tall grass ; the deer bounded fearlessly by the
very door of their hut, and wild turkeys were to
be found everywhere. Everything was in a state
of nature ; the animals had not yet learned to be
afraid of man. Of course, they did not suffer with
hunger : provisions of the finest kind were ever in
their cabin. But the buffaloes provided them with
more than food. From time to time, as they need-
ed moccasins for their feet, his skin supplied them ;
and when at night they felt the dampness of the
weather, his hide was the blanket in which they
wrapped themselves and slept soundly.
The country, as they wandered through it, struck
them as beautiful indeed. There were the lofty



DANIEL BOONE. 37

trees of the forest, with no undergrowth except
the cane, the grass, and the flowers. They
seemed to have been planted by the hand of man at
regular distances. Clear streams were seen wind-
ing through lovely meadows, surrounded by the
gently-sloping hills ; and the fearless buffalo and
deer were their companions every hour. In their
wanderings they came several times to hard and
well-tramped roads. It was by following these
that they discovered many of the salt springs or
licks where salt is made even now. The roads
to these were worn thus hard by the buffaloes
and other animals that were in the habit of visiting
, the springs.

The place of Finley’s old trading-post, where
their cabin now stood, seems to have been chosen
by him not only as a central point for trade : it was
on the side of a finely-sloping hill, and command-
ed a good view of the country below. The situa-.
tion was beautiful. Perhaps he chose it when he
was a lonely white man in the wilderness, because:
thence he might readily see the approach of
Indians, and make his escape, or perhaps it was.
the very beauty of the spot that charmed him. He
had a love for the beautiful. One day, he and Boone
were standing by the door of the cabin. The
wind was sighing in the tops of the forest, and
while they were listening to the music, they were
looking out upon the beautiful region below ; the



ae

38 THE ADVENTURES OF

grass was green, and the bright flowers turned up
their leaves tothe sun. “ Glorious country!” cried
Finley ; “ this wilderness does indeed blossom like
the rose.”—* Yes,” replied Boone, “ and who
would live amid the barren pine-hills of North Car-
olina, to hear the screaming of the jay, and now
and then shoot a deer too lean to be eaten? This
is the land for hunters. Here man and beast may
grow to their full size.”

In this way, for more than six months, these
men fearlessly hunted and roamed through the
woods. Contrary to their expectations, through
the whole summer they saw no Indians, nor did
they meet with any remarkable adventure. The
precaution of a nightly watch was adopted, but
they met with no disturbance from man or beast.
They had glorious sport by day, and slept quietly
at night. After this, as you will see, they began
to meet difficulties.

On the 22d of December, Boone and Stewart
started off, as they had often done before, upon an
exploring tour. After wandering several miles,
they pressed their way through a piece of thick
woods, and came out upon a boundless open forest.
Here they found quantities of persimmon-trev- ,
loaded with ripe fruit, while clusters of wild groves
covered the vines that were hanging from the lofty
branches. Flowers were still in bloom, and scented
the air; herds of animals might be seen through



DANIEL BOONE, 39

the forest in every direction: add to this that the
day was beautiful, and you will not be surprised to
learn that they continued to wander—indeed, that
they wandered much further than they supposed.
It was nearly dark when they reached the Ken-
tucky river, and stood looking upon its rippling
waters. Perceiving a hill close by, they climbed
it, that they might take a better view of the course
of the stream. They were now descending, on
their way homeward, when suddenly they heard:
an Indian yell, and out rushed from the canebrake
a party of savages. ‘They had no time for re-
sistance—indeed, time was nothing; they were
overpowered by numbers. The savages seized
them, took away their rifles and ammunition,
bound them, and marched them off to their
camp. The next morning they started off with
their prisoners, the poor fellows not knowing
where they were going, or what was to be
done to them. They did not know one word of
their language, and could therefore learn noth-
ing: this much, however, they very well under-
stood—that it would not do to show any signs of
fear to the Indians; and therefore they went on
cheerfully. In a little time they became better
acquainted with their captors, and judged, from
certain signs, that the Indians themselves had not
determined what was to be done. Part seemed to

- be forsparing them, part for killing; still their cheer-





40 THR ADVENTURES OF

fulness was the same. This apparent fearlessness
deceived the Indians ; they supposed the prisoners
were well pleased with their condition, and did not
watch them closely. On the seventh niglit of
their march, the savages, as usual, made their
camp, and all laid down to sleep. About mid-
night, Boone touched Stewart, and waked him: °
now or never was their time. They rose, groped
their way to the rifles, and stole from the camp.
They hardly dared to look behind them; every
sound startled them, even the snapping of the twigs
under their feet. Fortunately, it was dark, even
if the Indians pursued. They wandered all that
night and the whole of the next day, when at last,
without meeting a man, they reached their own
camp. But what was their surprise on finding the
camp plundered, and not one of their companions
to be seen? What had become of them? Perhaps
they were prisoners ; possibly they were murdered ;
or it might be that they had started back for North
Carolina. They were safe, but where were their
comrades? Wearied in body, and tormented with
fears for their friends, they commenced preparing
for the night. A sound was now heard. They
seized their rifles, and stood ready, expecting the
Indians. Two men were seen indistinctly ap-
proaching. “Who comes there?” cried Boone.
“ White men and friends,” was the answer. Boone
knew the voice. In an instant more, his brother



DANIEL BOONE. 41

Squire Boone, with another man, entered the cabin.
These two men had set out from Carolina for the
purpose of reaching them, and had for days been
wandering in search of their camp. It was a joyous
meeting—the more joyous, because unexpected,
Big tears were again in Daniel Boone’s eyes when
he heard, from his brother, that his wife and chil-
dren were well.
4*





42 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER III.

HEN Squire Boone had told
y+ his brother all the news of
home, it became his turn to be
a listener, while Daniel talked
to him of all that happened



pwr ors since they parted. After tel-

CH PIO \ PBS . . .
i, (ats ling him of the beautiful coun-
YAR S try, and their happy freedom

We) as they wandered through it for six
ae SF & months, then came the story of his -
e9- captivity and escape. That escape
Us PRY was but just now made, and with a
Z full heart he dwelt upon this part
of his story. It would not have been
7 strange if Squire had now felt alarmed ;
%)),'* but his disposition was much like his
brother’s: he loved the woods, and was afraid of
nothing.
In a little time, the four were once more hunting
freely through the forests. Signs of Indians were
to be seen around, however ; possibly they were






_ oe ee os eee
. ees,

Te



DANIEL BOONE. ee

the very Indians who had captured them. In their
wanderings, therefore, they kept together usually,
for self-protection. One day, they started out upon
a buffalo-hunt. As they came upon a herd of these
animals, Stewart lodged his ball in one of them,
without bringing him down. The buffalo went
tearing through the forest ; and Daniel Boone, with
Stewart, forgetful of everything else, went chasing
after him. Naturally enough, like excited men,
they had no idea. how far they had travelled, until
their very weariness reminded them that it was time
to turn back. , Tired as he was, a harder race was
now before Boone. ‘They had scarcely started on
their return, when a party of Indians rushed from
the cane-brake, and let fly their arrows. Stewart
fell dead onthe spot. Boone would have fired his
rifle, but he felt it was useless: he could kill but
one man ; his only chance of escape was in flight.
With Indian yells and arrows close behind him, he
leaped forward, and, by tremendous exertions, at
last distanced his pursuers. When he reached the
camp, he fell, completely exhausted.

The party, now cut down to three, was ina
little time reduced to two. From some cause or
other they could not tell what—possibly the sad
story )f Stewart’s death, and the fear of like trou-
bles—the companion who had come out with
Squire Boone determined upon returning to North



44 THE ADVENTURES OF

Carolina. Very soon, therefore, he left them alone

in the wilderness.*
It is not strange that, being thus deserted, Squire

Boone felt restless and dissatisfied ; the wonder is,
that Daniel was not dissatisfied likewise. But he
was happy and contented, and often struggled to
call up the same feelings in his brother. ‘“ You
see,” he would often say, “ how little nature re-
quires, to be satisfied. Happiness, the companion
of content, is rather found in our own breasts than
in the enjoyment of external things. I firmly be-
lieve it requires but a little philosophy to make a
man happy in whatsoever state he is. ‘This con-
sists ina full resignation to the will of Providence ;
and a resigned soul finds pleasure ina path strewed
with briars and thorns.” This was good counsel,
my young friends, and I hope you will bear it with
you through life. It will serve to comfort you as
much as it did Squire Boone.

To be idle, was to allow time for this mel-
ancholy, and Daniel Boone kept his brother
constantly busy. The Indians, they were certain,

* It is said by some that this man did not thus leave them.
Their story is, that the three started out upon a hunt ; that this
man was separated from the Boones, and became entangled in
a swamp. The Boones searched for him, but could not find
him. Afterward, they found fragments of his clothes, which
convinced them that the poor man had been torn to pieces by
wolves.

Daniel Boone, however, tells a different story. He says that
the man left them, “ and returned home by himself ;” and I
have preferred his statement to any other.



DANIEL BOONE. 45

knew where their present camp was, and therefore
they resolved to make another. After choosing
their spot, they employed themselves industriously
in erecting another cabin, which might serve to
shelter them through the coming winter. This:
being finished, they went to their old sport, wan-
dering through the woods, admiring the country,
and bringing down now and then a buffalo or a deer
with their rifles. At night, they would return to
their camp, raise a fire, cook their supper, and sit
till long after midnight, talking of their old home
on the Yadkin. Squire forgot his loneliness, and
became quite satisfied. In this way time rolled
off until the winter had passed away, and spring
appeared. Strangely enough, they had been un-
disturbed ; they had met not even with one Indian.

They had learned in the wilderness to dispense
well nigh with all comforts ; food and sleep were
all they expected. But their powder and'shot were
now beginning to run low, and without these they
could not long procure food. It was necessary,
therefore, to make some arrangement whereby they
might obtain a fresh supply. Their plan was soon
settled : Squire Boone was to go back to North Car-
olina, and return with ammunition. They supposed
horses would be valuable, also, and he was like-
wise to bring with him two of these. Perilous as
the plan was, Squire agreed to bear his part in it,
and Daniel as cheerfully consented to his. Ac cord-



46 THE ADVENTURES OF

ingly, on the first day of May, Squire set off for
the Yadkin ; and, as if nothing was to be wanting
to leave Daniel in perfect loneliness, their only
dog followed Squire as he started.

Here, then, Daniel Boone was left entirely alone.
Here he was a sort of Robinson Crusoe in the wil-
derness—with this difference, that Robinson was
shipwrecked, and had no choice; while Boone
chose the wilderness as his home. He was now
completely the “man of the woods”—far away,
hundreds of miles from any white settlement. For
the first time in his life, according to his own con-
fession, he felt lonely. His mind was filled with

_ the remembrance of his wife and children, and the

thought that he should never see themagain. He
knew, however, that sad thoughts, when indulged
in, will grow very rapidly, and therefore dismissed
them.

For safety’s sake now, he changed his camp
every night, that he might avoid the Indians. Some-
times he slept in the canebrake ; sometimes he
laid himself by the side of a stream ; sometimes in
the caves of therocks. By day he was surrounded
by his old companions the buffaloes and deer, and at
night was not unfrequently disturbed by the howl-
ing of the wolves. He roamed over many a beau-
tiful tract of country. Now he would ascend a
hill, and look down upon the scene spread like a
map before him ; now he would trace some stream



DANIEL BOONE. 47

to its source, or, following the well-tramped roads
of the buffaloes, would find some spring bubbling
in the forest. In this way he moved over a
large part of the country. At one time, he struck
the Ohio river, and wandered for days on the banks
of that noble stream. It is said, that in his
rambles, he one day stood upon the spot where the
city of Louisville now stands. He learned to love
the woods more than ever. Long after this, he
used to declare, that “no crowded city, with all
its commerce and noble buildings, could give him
as much pleasure as the beauty of Kentucky at
that time afforded him.”

Fortunately, he met no Indians. At one time
he came in sight of a roving party, but man-
aged to escape from them. The mode in which
he escaped will show you his perfect self-posses-
sion. He had stopped one day to rest under the
shade of a tree, when suddenly he spied the
party m the distance. ‘This was enough for him. |
He immediately commenced his course through
the forest, hoping that they had not seen him, and
therefore would not pursue. From time to time he
would look back through the woods ; and at length
became convinced, to his sorrow, that if they had
not seen him, they had marked his tracks, and
were now on his trail. He pushed on for more
than two miles, trying in various ways to break the
trail, and thus put them out; still, as he looked,



ae

—_- ~F

— ~~

48 THE ADVENTURES OF

back, he could see that they were following him.
He was puzzled to know what to do. A happy
thought now struck him. He had just passed the
brow of a small hill ; the heavy grape-vines were
hanging from the trees all around him. He seized
one of these, and, bracing himself against the tree
with his feet, threw himself as far as he could.
This broke the trail, and he now kept directly on
from the spot where he landed, in a different direc-
tion. The Indians came up, tracking him as far
as the tree: were then lost, and gave up the chase.

Another adventure is told of him during his
lonely wanderings, more perilous even than this.
One day he heard a strange noise in the woods ;
he could see nothing, but stood ready with his rifle.
Presently an immense she-bear was seen approach-
ing him. Surrounded by her young cubs, she was
doubly fierce. .As she came near, Boone levelled
his rifle and fired. Unfortunately, his steady eye
failed this time; the ball did not strike as he
had aimed, and the animal pressed forward, the
more enraged. It was impossible to load again:
the bear was upon him; he had only time to draw
his hunting-knife from his belt. The bear laid her
paws on him, and drew him toward her. The rifle
in his left hand was a sort of guard, while with his
right he pointed the knife directly for the heart of
the animal. Asshe grasped him, the knife entered
her body, and she fell dead.



DANIEL BOONE. 49

As the time drew near for the return (as he
hought) of his brother, Boone went back to the
old camp where they had lodged together, to meet
him. Here day after day he kept his lookout—
day after day he was disappointed. He began
now to be very sad. He did not doubt his broth-
er’s fidelity ; he knew he would not desert him ;
but there were many dangers by the way, and
perhaps he had “perished. Then he thought,
too, of his wife and little ones. If that brother
had perished, he likewise must die without seeing
them. Without ammunition to procure food, or
defend himself, what could hedo? He must die,
there in*the walderness. His brother had been
absent now nearly three months: surely it was
time for his return. Another day of disappoint
ment was now drawing to a close, as Boone sat,
sick at heart, by the door of his.cabin. A sound
broke on his ear ; he rose and stood listening, with
his hand on the lock of his rifle. It was the tread
of horses. The next moment he saw his brother
through the forest leading two horses heavily la-
den. Here was abundance of ammunition and
other comfort. The evening of the 27th of July
was long after this remembered by Daniel Boone
as one of the most joyous of his life.

A fire was soon made, their supper cooked, and
long after midnight they sat talking. Thousands
of questions were asked and answered, until,

; 5 |





50 . THE ADVENTURES OF

wearied out, at last they lay down to sleep. The
sun was high in the heavens when they waked in
the morning.

After breakfast, Daniel Boone proposed a new
plan to his brother. Much as he loved the woods,
he felt that two men could hardly be safe in the
neighborhood of so many Indians. Moreover he
longed to see his family: the stories of Squire
had called up fresh recollections in his heart.
The plan therefore was, to select a suitable spot
for their home, then return to Carolina and bring
out his family. Squire readily assented to this;
and now they employed themselves’-for several
days in hunting and laying in a supply of: provis-
ions. ‘This being done, they went to the Cumber-
land river, and wandered for some time along the
stream without finding a place to please them.
Roaming about now, they found many new streams,
to which, as the first discoverers, they gave names.
Anxious as they were to return to the Yadkin,
they were in no such hurry as to neglect making
a full survey. The whole winter passed away
before they pleased themselves. At length they
came upon the Kentucky river. Here the lands
delighted them. On the banks of this stream they
determined to make their settlement, and now
(March, 1771) turned their faces homeward. As
he left the chosen spot, Boone says that “he felt
it was a second paradise, and was resolved, at the



DANIEL BOONE. 51

r’sk of his life and fortune, that his family should
have a home there.”

As they journeyed eastward from the Kentucky
river, they occasionally blazed their pathway (as
huntsmen say) that they might find their way
back. It was necessary thus to leave some track
through the forest wilderness, that they might
again reach their chosen spot.* Fortunately they
met with no Indians.

We hear of but one adventure on their way
homeward. After travelling quietly several days,
they were one morning startled by a noise. Pres-
ently a herd of buffaloes came rushing and tear-
ing through the forest ; they seemed frantic. The
cause of all this was soon seen. A panther, seated
upon the back of one of the buffaloes, had plunged
his claws and teeth into him. The blood was
streaming down his sides, and the poor animal,
struggling to shake him off, rushed into the midst
of the herd. This frightened the rest, and they
went bellowing and dashing through the woods.
Daniel Boone raised his rifle, and sent a ball
through the panther. He fell dead. Not far off
they met a pack of wolves, following as usual in

* This mode of marking their track is often practised by
hunters in the woods. As they pass through the forest, they
mark the trees by cutting off a small piece of the bark. This
enables them again to find the same pathway, and is commonly
called ‘ blazing the track.”



52 THE ADVENTURES OF

the track of the buffaloes. For the fun of seeing
them scatter, Squire now fired his rifle, and away
they went, scampering in all directions.

In due time they came tothe mountains. After
trying to ascend in various places, at length they
found a narrow and rugged gap, through which
with great difficulty they made their way. It was,
however, the best pass they could discover, and
they blazed their track, that they might find
it again. In a little time now, Daniel Boone
was again in his cabin on the banks of the Yad-
kin. I need hardly say there was a joyous meet-
ing ; he was once more happy in the bosom of his
family. He had been absent nearly two years.

Amid the joys of home, however, he did not
forget his chosen spot in Kentucky ; his heart was
filled with the thought that his happy home might
be happier there. As this was to be his final
move, it was necessary to settle all his business
on the Yadkin ; and as he had tried the wilder-
ness, he felt that a few trusty companions would
be invaluable in that new region. He com-
menced, therefore, making what he thought proper
‘preparations for areturn. ‘To beat up such neigh-
bors as they desired, he and Squire gave glowing
accounts of the new country ; the rich lands, the
forests, the streams, the flowers, and the game,
were all talked of. They saw only, and conse-
quently spoke only, of the bright side of the pic-



DANIEL BOONE. 53

ture. But there were numbers of people to talk
of dificultiés ; these spoke of the folly of the
Boones, in thinking of making such a country
their home, and the madness of any man who
should think of following them; the country was
wild, and all who settled there must suffer many
privations : then, too (according to their story), it
was afflicted with terrible diseases, and they might
all expect to die there, or, if they escaped the
climate, they must fall into the hands of the fierce
and cruel Indians who roamed through those for-
ests ; the place they declared was so dangerous
that it was known, wherever it was known, as
“the dark and bloody ground.” With these sad
stories floating about continually, it is not wonder-
ful that the Boones found difficulty in beating up
companions, and that more than two years passed
away before they were ready for a start. At the
end of that time they found that, while many were
opposed to them, and others wavering as to what
they would do, there were some, prompted by a
spirit of bold adventure, ready to join them. Five
families were willing to go with them to Ken-
tucky. |

Daniel Boone now sold his farm, and all things
being made ready, on the 25th of September, 1773,
the little company bade farewell to their friends
and started for the west, driving before them their
flocks and their herds. In their route, not a great

5*



54 THE ADVENTURES OF

way from the Yadkin, was the settlement of Powe
el’s valley. The story of their plan had spread
through the neighborhood, and when they reached
this spot they were delighted to find that the peo-
ple were not so timid as those on the Yadkin:
forty men here joined the party. Now they trav-
elled on in high spirits ; the whole body, old and
young, numbering between seventy and eighty ©
souls.

In a little time they came to the mountains, and
found the pathway blazed by the Boones. In less
than a fortnight they passed the first ridge of the
Alleganies, known as “ Powel’s range,” and were
now quietly descending the second, known as
“ Walden’s range,” when sorrow overtook them.
They were in a dark and narrow gap, when the
wild yell of Indians broke upon their ears. The
savages rushed into the gap behind them, and let
fly their arrows. Six of the party fell dead, a
seventh was wounded. ‘The men rallied around
the women and children; the first discharge of
their rifles scattered the savages. But the mis-
chief was done ; the sudden attack of the Indians
was like a flash.of lightning; they were seen
only for an instant ; yet, like the lightning, they
had done their work: there were the dead, and
alas! among them was the oldest son of Daniel
Boone

The party, a little time before so happy, was



DANIEL BOONE. 55

now in deep sorrow. What was to be done?
The Indians had not only killed their companions,
but their flocks and herds had all fled in fright,
and could not be again gathered together. In
dismay, the greater part were for retreating in-
stantly to the nearest white settlement ; this was
upon the Clinch river, forty miles behind them.
The Boones begged them to keep on their way—
not to think of turning back; but it was all to no
purpose ; most of them insisted on retreating, and
they at length yielded to the general desire. Ac-
cordingly, the dead were decently buried, and in
great sadness they all traced their way back to
Clinch river.

Here Daniel Boone remained with his family
eight months. At the end of that time he was
requested by Governor Dunmore, of Virginia, to
go to the falls of the Ohio, to serve as a guide to
a party of surveyors who had been sent there
some months before. The western country was
now beginning to attract attention, and the Indians —
were becoming very hostile to the whites. Ac-
cordingly, on the 6th of June, 1774, he started
(with one man, Michael Stoner), and without any
accident reached the point at which he aimed—
the spot where Louisville now stands. The ser-
vice for the surveyors was promptly performed,
and they were. -enabled to complete their work,
while Boone was at liberty to return to his fam-



56 THE ADVENTURES OF

ily. It is remarkable that he made this journey on
foot, a distance of eight hundred miles, through a
trackless wilderness, in the short period of sixty-
two days.

He was not allowed to remain quiet long; soon
after his return, the Indians northwest of the Ohio,
especially the Shawanese, made open war upon
the whites. Governor Dunmore felt bound to
protect his countrymen, and, among other acts
for their defence, sent Daniel Boone, with the title
of captain, to take command of three garrisons.
This service was likewise well performed; mat-
ters were soon more quiet, the soldiers were dis-
charged, and Boone was relieved from his post.

He had not been a wanderer in the woods in
vain; his fame had gone abroad, and his services
were in the following spring sought again. A
company of gentlemen in North Carolina—the
principal man of whom was Colonel Richard Hen-
derson—were attempting to purchase the lands on
the south side of the Kentucky river, from the
Cherokee Indians.* They had agreed to hold a
treaty with the Indians, at Wataga, in March,
1775, to settle the boundaries of their intended
purchase, and they now desired Boone to attend
that treaty, and manage their business. In com-
pliance with their wish, he went to Wataga, and

* It is said that it was by Daniel Boone’s advice that they
first thought of making this purchase.



DANIEL BOONE. 57

performed their service so well, that they gave him
further employment. He was now requested to
mark out a road from their settlement, through the
wilderness, to Kentucky river. ‘This was a work
of great labor. It was necessary to make many
surveys to find the best route, and when the best
was found, it was, much of it, over mountains
and rugged regions. With a number of laborers,
he commenced the work. He met with two at-
tacks from the Indians by the way, in which four
of his men were killed, and five wounded. Un-
daunted, he pushed resolutely on, and, in the
month of April, reached the Kentucky river. To
guard themselves from the savages, they immedi-
ately commenced the building of a fort at a salt
lick, about sixty yards from the south bank of the
stream. The Indians annoyed them from time to
time, while they were thus engaged, but fortu-
nately killed but one man. On the 14th day of
June the fort was finished, and Boone started
back for his family on Clinch river. As an honor
to him, the party gave to this first settlement in
the wilderness of Kentucky the name of Boones-
borough. .

He reached his family without accident, and, as
rapidly as he could, retraced his way with them
through the forest. The fort consisted of several
cabins, surrounded by pickets ten feet high, plant-.
ed firmly in the ground. In one of these, Daniel



= _. —_—T: a eC ee ee eT eT ae ee a a ee ee ae) ee ee oe
‘ ‘

58 THE ADVENTURES OF

Boone found a shelter for his family. The long
desire of his heart was at last gratified: he had a
home in Kentucky. He was the first settler of
that region, and (as he proudly said) his “ wife
and daughter the first white women that ever
stood on the banks of Kentucky river.” “



DANIEL BOONE. 59

CHAPTER IV.
Ci “2 (T was now the season of
autumn ; the trees had not yet

ROC Lys WA) shed their leaves, and the for-
= ests were still beautiful. Mrs.
Boone felt happy as she look-
ed upon her new home. Win-
ter came, and glided rapidly
and joyously away. With
A their axes and rifles, the men in the
( settlement brought in constant and
J), ample supplies of fuel and game,
—— » and around the blazing hearth of
° lh \ © Daniel Boone there was not one in the
Zee. family who sighed for the old home on

Â¥ iN the Yadkin. Boone naturally supposed
se that a fear of the Indians would be the
principal trouble with his wife ; and well she
might dread them, remembering the loss of her
son formerly in the pass of the mountains. For-
tunately, however, she did not see an Indian
through the season. But one white man was
killed by them during the winter, and he lost his







60 THE ADVENTURES OF

life by unfortunately wandering away from the
fort unarmed. After this, the other settlers were
more prudent ; they never went without the pick
ets for fuel without taking their rifles.

When spring opened, they were soon very busy.
A small clearing without the pickets was first
made for a garden-spot. Mrs. Boone and her
daughter brought out their stock of garden-seeds,
and commenced cultivating this, while the men
went on earnestly in the work of preparing for
their fields. They were calculating that they
were making their homes for life. Day after day
the neighborhood resounded with the crash of fall-
ing trees, as these hardy men levelled the forests.
While they were thus engaged, they were made
happy by a new arrival. Colonel Calloway, an
old companion of Boone’s, led by the desire of
finding his old friend and a new country, came out
to the settlement this spring, and brought with him
his two young daughters. Here, then, were com-
panions for Boone’s daughter. The fathers were
happy, and the mother and girls delighted.

Spring had not passed away, however, before
they were in sorrow about these children. When
the wild flowers began to bloom in the woods,
the girls were in the habit of strolling around the
fort and gathering them to adorn their humble
homes. This was an innocent and pleasant occu-
pation ; it pleased the girls as well as their parents.



DANIEL BOONE. 61

They were only cautioned not to wander far, for
fear of the Indians. This caution, it seems, was
forgotten. Near the close of a beautiful day in
July, they were wandering, as usual, and the
bright flowers tempted them to stroll thoughtlessly
onward. Indians were in ambush; they were
suddenly surrounded, seized, and hurried away, in
spite of their screams for help. ‘They were car-
ried by their captors to the main body of the In-
dian party, some miles distant. Night came, and’
the girls did not return; search was made for
them, and they were nowhere to be found. The
thought now flashed upon Boone that the children
were prisoners ; the Indians had captured them.
The parents: were well nigh frantic : possibly the
girls were murdered. Boone declared that he
would recover his child, if alive, if he lost his own
life in the effort. The whole settlement was at.
once roused: every man offered to start off with
the two fathers in search of the children. But
Boone would not have them all; some must re-
main behind, to protect the settlement. Of the
whole number he chose seven ; he and Calloway
headed them; and, in less time than I Have. been
telling the story, laden with their knapsacks and
rifles, they were off in pursuit.

Which way were they to go? It was a long
time before they could find a track of the party.
The wily Indians, as usual, had used all their cun-

6





62 THE ADVENTURES OF

ning in hiding their footprints and breaking theit
trail. Covering their tracks with leaves ; walking
at right angles occasionally from the main path ;
crossing brooks by walking in them for some time,
and leaving them at a point far from where they
entered: all this had been practised, and I pre-
sume that the fathers never would have got on the
track if the girls had not been as cunning as their
captors. After wandering about for some time,

they came at length to a brook, and waded along it

for a great while in search of footprints. They
looked faithfully far up and down the stream, for
they knew the Indian stratagem. Presently Cal-
loway leaped up for joy. ‘“ God bless my child !”
cried he; “they have gone this way.” He had
picked up a little piece of riband which one of
his daughters had dropped, purposely to mark the
trail. Now they were on the track. ‘Travelling
on as rapidly as they could, from time to time they
picked up shreds of handkerchiefs, or fragments
of their dresses, that the girls had scattered by
the way. Before the next day ended, they were
still more clearly on the track. They reached a
soft, muddy piece of ground, and found all the
footprints of the party ; they were now able to tell
the number of the Indians. The close of the next
day brought them still nearer to the objects of

their search. Night had set in; they were still
_ ‘wandering on, when, upon reaching a small hill,

. Pa



DANIEL BOONE. 63

they saw a camp-fire in the distance. They were
now delighted ; this surely was the party that had
captured the girls. Everything was left #o the
management of Boone. He brought his men as
near the fire as he dared approach, and sheltered
them from observation under the brow of a hill.
Calloway and another man were then selected |
from the group; the rest were told that they might
go to sleep: they were, however, to sleep on their
arms, ready to start wstantly at a given signal.
Calloway was to go with Boone; the other man
was stationed on the top of the hill, to give the
alarm, if necessary. ‘The two parents now crept
cautiously onward to a covert of bushes not far
from the fire. Looking through, they saw fifteen or |
twenty Indians fast asleep in the camp ; but where
were the girls? Crawling to another spot, they
pushed the bushes cautiously aside, and, to their
great joy, saw in another camp the daughters
sleeping in each other’s arms. ‘Two Indians
with their tomahawks guarded this camp. One
seemed to be asleep. They crept gently around |
in the rear of this. They were afraid to use
their rifles: the report would wake the other
camp. Calloway was to stand ready to shoot the ‘
sleeping Indian if he stirred, while Boone was to
creep behind the other, seize, and strangle him.
They were then to hurry off with the children.
Unfortunately, they calculated wrong: the



64 THE ADVENTURES OF

whom they supposed to be sleeping was wide
awake, and, as Boone drew near, his shadow was
seeughy this man. He sprang up, and the woods
rangggiith his yell. ‘The other camp was roused ;
the Indians came rushing to this. Boone’s first
impulse was to use his rifle, but Calloway’s pru-
dence restrained him. Had he fired, it would have
been certain destruction to parents and children.
They surre themselves prisoners, pleading
earnestly at the’ same time for their captive daugh-
ters.. The Indians bound them with cords, placed
guards over them, and then retired to their camp.
The poor girls, roused by the tumult, now saw
their parents in this pitiable condition. Here they
were, likewise made captives, for their love of
them.

There was no more sleep in the Indian camp
that night. Till the dawn of the day they were talk-
ing of what should be done to the new prisoners :
some were for burning them at the stake ; others
objected to this. Boone and Calloway were to be
killed, but they were too brave to be killed in this
way. Some proposed making them run the gaunt-
let. At last it was decided (in pity for the girls, it
is said) that the parents should be killed in a more
decent and quiet way. They were to be toma- |
hawked and scalped, and the girls were still to be
kept prisoners. With the morning’s light they
started out to execute the sentence. That the



DANIEL BOONE. 65

poor girls might not see their parents murdered
the men were led off to the woods, and there lashed
to two trees. Two of the savages stood before
them with their tomahawks, while the rest.were
singing and dancing around them. At length the
tomahawks were lifted to strike them; at that instant
the crack of rifles was heard, and the two Indians
fell dead. Another and another report was heard :
' others fell, and the rest fled in dismay. Boone’s.
companions had saved them. All night long they
had waited for the signal: none had been given ;
they had heard the Indian yell; they feared that
they were taken. They had watched the camp
with the greatest anxiety, and now had delivered
them. They were instantly untied ; the girls were
quickly released, and in the arms of their parents ;
and they all started joyously homeward. Mrs.
Boone was delighted to see them. The party had
been so long gone, that she feared her husband
and child were alike lost to her for ever.

Itis not surprising.that when men found out that
a settlement had been made in Kentucky, others
were soon ready to start off for that fertile region.
Accordingly, we find many arriving this year, and
settling themselves in the country. Harrod, Lo-
gan, Ray, Wagin, Bowman, and many other fear-
less spirits, now threw themselves, like Boone,
into the heart of the wilderness, and made their
forts, or stations, as they were called. Phese

: ge







66 THE ADVENTURES OF

were just like the home of Boone—nothing more
than a few log cabins, surrounded by pickets. In-
deed, the country began now to assume so much
importance in the eyes of men, that the Governor
of Virginia thought proper to take some notice
of it. When the legislature met, he recommended
that the southwestern part of the county of Fin-
castle—which meant all the large tract of country
west of the Alleganies now known as Kentucky
—should be made into a separate county, by the
name of Kentucky. The legislature thought it
well to follow his advice. The new county was
made, and had the privilege of sending two mem-
bers to the Virginia’legislature.

Nor is it surprising that the Indians began now
to be more violent than ever in tHeir enmity. They
had been unwilling before that a. white man should
cross their path as they roamed over their hunting-
grounds ; but now, when they saw clearings made,
and houses built, they felt that the whites meant
to drive them for ever from that region. ‘Their
hatred consequently increased now every hour.
Another circumstance at this time served to
rouse them the more against the settlers. If
you will think of the period of which I am
speaking (the year 1776), perhaps you may guess
what.it was. The colonists of America in that
year, you will remember, declared themselves in-
depéndent of Great Britain. In the wat which



DANIEL BOONE. 67

followed (known among us always as the Revolu-
tionary War), England struggled hard to subdue
them ; nor was she always choice as to the means
wkich she used for the purpose. She did not hes-
itate even to rouse the red men of the forests, and
give them arms to fight the colonists. They were
not only turned loose upon them with their own
tomahawks and scalping-knives, but were well .,
supplied with British rifles and balls. All the new
settlements in the land were troubled with them,
and Kentucky had to bear her part of the sorrow.
These Indians would scatter themselves in small
parties, and hang secretly for days and nights
around the infant stations. Until one is acquaint-
ed with Indian stratagems, he can hardly tell how
cunning these people are. By day they would
hide themselves ir the grass, or behind the stumps
of trees, near the pathways to the fields or springs
of water, and it was certain death to the white
man who travelled that way. Atnight they would
creep up to the very gateway of the pickets, and
watch for hours for a white man. If any part of
his person was exposed, he was sure to catch @
rifle-ball. It was impossible to discover them,
even when their mischief was done. They would
lie in the grass flat on their bellies for days, al-
most under the very palisades. Sometimes an In-
dian yell would be heard near one point of the fort,
startling all the settlers—a yell raised only to draw



68 THE ADVENTURES OF

them all in one direction, while the Indians did
their mischief in another In this sneaking mode
of warfare, men, women, and children, were killed
in many places ; and not unfrequently whole droves
of cattle were cut off.

At length, to the great joy of the settlers, the
Indians began to show themselves more boldly :
for anything was better than these secret ambuslies
of the savages ; an open enemy is not so much to
be dreaded as a secret one. Boonesborough and
Harrodsburgh (a settlement made by James Har-
rod, a bold adventurer from the banks of the Mo-
nongahela) were now the principal stations. ‘Tow-
ard these, new emigrants were from time to time
moving, and against these stations,-as being the
strongest, the Indians felt the greatest hatred, and
directed their principal attacks. Early in the
spring of 1777, a party was moving toward Har-
rodsburgh : fortunately, the Indians attacked them ;
for, though two whites were killed, the attack
probably saved the settlement. It was only four
miles from the place, and the Indians were now
on their way there. One young man escaped in
the midst of the fight to give the alarm at Harrods-
burgh. The station was instantly put in a state
of defence. Ere long, the Indians appeared. A
brisk firing at once commenced on both sides ; the
savages saw one of their men fall, and finding that
they were not likely to gain any advantage, soon



DANIEL BOONE. 69

scattered forthe woods. The whites lost one man
also, and three were slightly wounded.

On the 15th of April, a party of one hundred
savages appeared boldly before Boonesborough.
Every man of them was armed with his gun, as
well as bow and arrows. Boone, however, was
prepared for them, and gave them a warm recep-
tion—so warm, that they soon gladly retreated.
How many of their men were killed it was im-
possible*to tell, for they dragged away their dead
with them. In the fort one man was killed, and
four were badly wounded.

Their loss this time only served to make them
more revengeful. In July following they again
came against Boonesborough, resolved upon ven-
geance. ‘They numbered this time more than two
hundred. To prevent any of the white settlements
from sending aid to Boonesborough, they had sent
off small parties to molest them, and keep them
busy. The savages now commenced their attack,
and for two days a constant firing was kept up.
At last, finding their efforts again idle, they raised
a loud yell, and returned to the forests. The
whites could now count their slain and wounded
as they dragged them off: seven were killed, and
nunbers wounded, while in the fort only one white
man was slain. In spite of their numbers and
their cunning, they did but little harm : for Boone
was never found sleeping ; he knew that Indians



70 THE ADVENTURES OF

were his neighbors, and he was always ready for
them. After this, they learned to dread him more
than ever. He now went by the name of the
“Great Long Knife.” :

Attacks of this kind were made from time to
time openly against the settlements, but especially
against these two principal stations. They all
ended very much in the same way, and it would
only weary you if I should attempt to speak of
them. It is enough for you to know that the
whites were always on the lookout, and that
Boone was regarded as their principal leader and
protector. We will pass on, therefore, to some-
thing more interesting.

I have already stated that the stations of these
settlers were usually built, for comfort’s sake, in
the neighborhood of salt licks or springs ; and near
such a lick, as you will remember, Boonesborough
stood.. The supply of salt, however, was not suf-
ficient ; new settlers were often arriving, and it
became necessary to seek a place which would
afford more of that article. Boone was the father
of the settlement, and he undertook to find it.
Having selected thirty men as his companions, on
the lst of January, 1778, he started for the Blue
Licks, on Licking river—a stream, as you know,
emptying itself into the Ohio opposite where Cin-
cinnati now stands. Upon reaching this spot, the
thirty men were soon very busy in making salt,



DANIEL BOONE. — 71

Boone, having no taste for the work, sauntered off
to employ himself in shooting game for the com-
pany. He had wandered some distance from the
river one day, when suddenly he came upon two
Indians armed with muskets. It was impossible for
him to retreat, and the chances were against him
if he steod. His usual coolness did not forsake
him; he instantly jumped behind a tree. As the
Indians came within gun-shot, he exposed himself
on the side of the tree: one savage immediately
fired, and Boone dodged the ball. One shot was
thus thrown away, and this was just what he de-
sired. Exposing himself immediately in precisely
the same way, the other musket was discharged
by the other Indian, to as little purpose. He now
stepped boldly out; the Indians were trying hard
to load again ; he raised his rifle, and one savage
fell dead. He was now on equal terms with the
other. Drawing his hunting-knife, he leaped for,
ward and placed his foot upon the body of the dead
{ndian; the other raised his tomahawk to strike
but Boone, with his rifle in his left hand, warded
off the blow, while with his right he plunged his
knife into the heart of the savage. His two foes
lay dead before him. If you should ever
Washington city, you will see a memorial of this
deed. The act is in sculpture, over the southern
door of the rotundo of the capitol.

After this he continued his hunting excursions



72 THE ADVENTURES OF

as usual, for the benefit of his party ; but he was
not so fortunate the next time he met with Indians.
On the 7th of February, as he was roaming through
the woods, he saw a party of one hundred savages
on their way to attack Boonesborough. His only
chance for escape now was to run. He instantly
fled, but the swiftest warriors gave chase, and be-
fore a great while he was overtaken and made a
prisoner. He was, of all men, the one whom they
desired to take; they could now gain, as they
thought, some information about Boonesborough.
They now carried him back to the Blue Licks.
As they drew near, Boone, knowing that it was
idle to resist, made signs to the salt-makers to sur-
render themselves. ‘This they did, and thus the
savages soon had in their possession tweaty-eight
captives. Fortunately for themselves, three of the
men had started homeward with a supply of salt,
and thus escaped. ?
"Now was the time for the savages to have at-
tacked Boonesborough ; for, with the loss of so
many men, and Boone their leader, we may readily
suppose that the station might have surrendered.
Flushed, however, with the capture of their pris-
oners, they seem not to have thought of it any
longer.

The prisoners were marched immediately to Old
Chilicothe, the principal Indian town on the Little
Miami, where they arrived on the 18th. There



7 ae eee
â„¢

DANIEL BOONE. . 73

.
was great rejoicing over them when they reached
this old settlement of the savages, though Boone
says they were “treated as kindly as prisoners
could expect.” Early in the next month Boone
with ten of his men was marched off to Detroit
by forty Indians. Here Governor Hamilton, the
British commander of that post, treated them with
much kindness. The ten men were soon deliv-
ered up for a small ransom. But when the
Governor offered them one hundred pounds to
give up Boone, that he might allow him to return
home, they refused to part with him ; they looked
upon him as too dangerous an enemy to be allowed
to go free upon any terms. Several English gen-.
tlemen were moved with pity when they saw Boone
thus a helpless prisoner, and offered to supply his
wants. He thanked them for their feeling, but re-
fused to receive any aid, stating that he never ex-
pected to be able to return their kindness, and:
therefore was unwilling to receive it. The truth
was, he was not disposed to receive assistance
from the enemies of his country. |
With no other prisoner than Boone, the Sart

now started again for Old Chilicothe. As they» » .

drew near, after a very fatiguing march,

thought he understood why they had refused to

part with him. Before they entered the village,

they shaved his ead, painted his face, and dressed

him like themselves; they then placed in his
, 7




ie.



74 THE ADVENTURES OF

hands a long white staff, ornamented with deers’
tails. ‘The chief of the party then raised a yell,
and all the warriors from the village answered it,
and soon made their appearance. Four young
warriors commenced singing as they came toward
him. The two first, each bearing a calumet, took
him by the arms and marched him to a cabin in
the village; here he was to remain until his fate
was made known to him. Of all strange customs
of the Indians (and he had seen many of them),
this was the strangest to him. It is not wonder-
ful that he thought he was now to die.

Yet this was a common custom (it is said) among
the Shawanese, who inhabited this village. Pris-
oners were often thus carried to some cabin, and
then the Indian living in the cabin decided what
should be done—whether the prisoner should die,
or be adopted into the tribe. It happened that in
this cabin lived an old Indian woman, who had
lately lost a son in battle. She, of course, was to
decide Boone’s fate. She looked at him earnestly,
admired his aoble bearing and cheerful face, and
at length declared that he should live. He should
aewbe her son, she said; he should be to her the son

, “Ge she had lost. The young warriors instantly
~ alfffounced to him his*fate, and the fact was soon
proclaimed through the village. Food was brought
out and set before him ; and every effort, which In-
dian love could think of, was used to make him .



DANIEL BOONE. 75

happy. He was fairly one of the tribe; and the
old woman who was to be his mother was- espe-
cially delighted.

He was now as free as the rest; his only agr-
row was that he had to live among them. He
knew, too, that if he should be caught trying to
make his escape, it would be certain death to him.
He pretended, therefore, to be cheerful and hap-
py ; and fortunately his old habits enabled him to
play his part well. Like them, he was a man of
the woods, and as fond of hunting as any of them.
They all soon became attached to him, and treated
him with the utmost confidence.

Sometimes large parties would go out to try |

their skill at their sports of racing and shooting at
a mark. Boone was always with them ; he knew,
however, that in trials of this kind the Indians
were always jealous if they were beaten, and
therefore he had to act very prudently. At racing,
they could excel him; but at shooting, ‘hegwas
more than a match for any of them. Still, when
the target was set up, he was always certain to be
beaten. If he shot too well, they would be jeal-
ous and angry; if he shot badly, they would hold
him in contempt: and therefore he would manage
to make good shots, and yet never be the success
ful man. He knew too much of Indians not to
conduct himself properly.

Sometimes they would start out upon hunting



76 THE ADVENTURES OF

parties. Here Boone was at home ; there was no
jealousy when he brought down a buffalo or a deer
with his rifle-ball. He might do his best; they
“- true hunters themselves, and were delighted
with every successful shot. Returning to the vil-
lage, Boone would always visit the Shawanese
chief, and present him a portion of his game. By
this kindness and civility he completely won the
heart of the chief,and was not unfrequently consult-
ed by him on important matters. ‘Thus he passed
his time, joining in all their modes of living; he
was beloved by the old woman, the chief, and all
the tribe: and none suspected that he was not

_ contented and happy.

On the 1st of June, a large party was starting
from the village for the salt-licks on the Scioto, to
make salt. Boone pretended to be indifferent
whether he went or not. The truth was, how-
ever, that he was very anxious to go, for he thought
it would afford a fine opportunity for him to escape.
He seemed so indifferent about the matter, that the
party"urged him to accompany them, and off he
started. For ten days most of them were busy
making salt, while Boone and two or three of the
best marksmen hunted for the benefit of the rest.
He watched his chance fore escape, but none oc-
curred ; he was closely observed ; it was impossi-

. ble for him to attempt,it. To his great sorrow, he

was forced to return home with the salt-makers.



DANIEL BOONE. 77

They had scarcely got back, when the whole
village was summoned to the council-hcuse, to at-
tend a council of war. Boone, as belonging to
one of the principal families, went to this co
Here he met four hundred and fifty armed ==
all gayly painted. One of the oldest warriors then
struck a large drum, and marched with the war-
standard three times round the council-house : this
was the sure signal that they were about to make
war upon some enemy. But who was the enemy ?
What was Roone’s surprise when it was announced
that they meant to attack Boonesborough! He re-
solved now that he would escape, even at every
hazard, and alarm the settlement. Still his pru-
dence did not forsake him. ¢

The old warriors at once commenced gathering
together a supply of parched corn, and beating up
more recruits for the expedition, All the new
men (Boone among the rest, for he’ was forced to
join them) were then marched off to the “ winter-
house” to drink the war-drink. ‘This was a mix-
ture of water and bitter herbs and roots, and was
to be drank steadily for three days, during which
time no man was to eat a morsel. Even if a deer
or buffalo passed by;no man was to kill it; the fast
must be kept. In fact, no man was allowed even
to sit down, or rest himself by leaning against a
tree. ‘This was done by the old men to purify
the young warriors, as they said, and to gain the

7* .




Me

.





78 THE ADVENTURES OF

favor of the Great Spirit. All this was a common
practice with the tribe before they went to battle ;
and the more strictly the fast was kept, the greater

ey supposed) were the chances of success.
=. these three days, Boone, like the rest, kept
the fast, drank the war-drink, and did not even
leave the “ medicine-ground.”

The fast being over, they fired their guns,
yelled, danced, and sang; and in the midst of this
noise the march commenced. The leading war-
chief, bearing the medicine-bag, or budget (as it
was called), went before; the rest followed in
single file. Nothing but shouting and yelling, and
the noise of guns, was heard, as they passed
through the villagetâ„¢ When they reached the
woods, all the noise ceased ; they were fairly on
their march, and that march was to be made after
the Indian fashion, in dead silence. For several
days this dead march was kept up, Boone looking '
every hour for his chance of escape. At length,
early one morning, a deer dashed by the line.
Boone leaped eagerly after him, and started in
pursuit. No sooner was he out of sight of the
Indians, than he pressed for Boonesborough. He
knew they would give chase, and therefore he
doubled his track, waded in streams, and did every-
thing that he could to throw them off his trail.



Every sound startled him; he thouglit the Indians | é

were behind him. With no food but roots and



D4NIKI ROONE 79

berries, and scarcely time to devour these, he
pushed through swamps and thickets for his old
home. Now or never was his chance for liberty,
and as such he used it. At length, after
dering nearly two hundred miles, on the fourt
he reached Boonesborough in safety.







80 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER V.

EFORE we go on, let me
tell you of some of the cu-
{a} rious customs which Boone
Ve noticed among the Indians,
during his captivity. He had
we ~~ a fine opportunity for observa-
JI 9% J\ tion, and I think these strange
7 CY customs will interest you.
wR ° It is not wonderful that Indian
- men and women are so hardy ; they
}



SY are trained to it from their youth:

» and Boone tells us how they are
trained. When achild is only eight

“a i G years old, this training ‘commences ; he

g is then made to fast frequently half a

. day ; when he is twelve, he is made to

fast a whole day. During the time of this fast,
the child -is left alone, and his face is always
blacked. This mode of hardening them is kept .
up with girls until they are fourteen—with boys
until they are eighteen. At length, when a boy



DANIEL BOONE. 81

has reached the age of eighteen, his parents tell
him that his educatfon is completed, and that he i
old enough to be a man: His face is now
blacked for the last time. He is taken to
tary cabin far away from the village ; his
blacked, and then his father makes to hi
speech of this kind: “ My son, the Great Spirit
has allowed you to live to see this day. We have
all noticed your conduct since [| first began to
black your face. All people will understand wheth-
er you have followed your father’s advice, and
they will treat you accordingly. You must now
remain here until I come after you.” The lad is
then left alone. His father then goes off hunting,
as though nothing had happened, and leaves his
boy to bear his hunger as long it is possible for
him to starve and live. At length he prepares) a
great feast, gathers his friends together, and then
returns. The lad is then brought home, his face
is washed in cold water, his hair is shaved, leav-
ing nothing but the scalp-lock ; they all commence
eating, but the food of the lad is placed before him
in a separate dish. This being over, a looking-
glass and a bag of paint are then presented to him.
Then they all praise him for his firmness, and tell
him that he isa man. Strange as it may seem,a
boy is hardly ever known to break his fast

he is blacked this way for the last time.
looked upon as something base, and they have a













82 THE ADVENTURES OF

dread that the Great Spirit will punish them if
hey are disobedient to their parents.
other curious habit*which surprised Boone
at of continually changing names. A white
arries the same name from the cradle to the
e, but among these people it was very differ-
ent. Their principal arms, as you know, are the
tomahawk and scalping-knife, and he who can
take the greatest number of scalps is the greatest
man. From time to time, as warriors would re-.
turn from an attack upon some enemy, these new
names would begin to be known. Each man
would count the number of scalps he had taken,
and a certain number entitled him to a new name,
in token of his bravery. It is not wonderful that
they were revengeful, when they were stimulated
by this sort of ambition. Besides this, they be-
lieved that he who took the scalp of a brave man
' received at once all his courage and other good
qualities ; and this made them more eager in their
thirst for scalps. In this way, names of warriors
were sometimes changed three or four times in a
year.

Marriages in this tribe were conducted very de-
cently. When a young warrior desired to marry,
he assembled all his friends, and named the wo-
man whom he wished for his wife. His relations
then received his present, and took it to the parents
of the young woman. If they were pleased with



DANIEL BOONE. 83

the proposal, they would dress the young woman
in her gayest clothes, and take her, with bundles
of presents, to the friends of the warrior ; the
she pleased, she was to be married. The
no compulsion in the matter. If she was no
isfied, she had only to return his present to the
young warrior, and this was considered a refusal.

Their mode of burying their dead was very
much like that of all the Indians. The dead body
was sometimes placed in a pen made of sticks and
covered over with bark ; sometimes it was placed _
in a grave, and covered first with bark, and then —
with dirt ; and sometimes, especially in the case
of the young, it was placed in a rude coffin, and
suspended from. the top of a tree. This last was
a common mode of infant burial, and the mother
of the child would often be found, long after,
standing under the tree, and ‘singing songs to her
babe.

Boone witnessed, too, the mode in which war-
parties start off for war. The budget, or medicine=
bag, is first made up. This bag contains some-
thing belonging to each man of the _party—some-
thing usually representing some animal, such as
the skin of a snake, the tail of a buffalo, the horns ©
of a buck, or the feathers of a bird. It is always
regarded as a very sacred thing. The leader of
the party goes before with this; the rest follow in
single file. When they come to a stand, the






, 84 THE ADVENTURES OF

budget is laid down in front, and no man may
pass it without permission. To keep their thoughts
n the enterprise in which they are engaged, no
allowed to talk of womenor his home. At
, when they encamp, the heart of whatever
animal has been killed during the day is cut into
small pieces and then burnt. During the burning
no man is allowed to step across the fire, but must
always walk around it in the direction of the sun.
When they spy the enemy, and the attack is to be
made, the war-budget is opened. Hach man takes
out his budget, or totem, and fastens it to his
body. After the fight, each man again returns his
totem to the leader. They are all again tied up,
and given to the man who has taken the first
scalp. He then leads the party in triumph home.

Boone had not Jong been a prisoner among them —
when a successful war-party returned home and
celebrated their victory. When the party came
within a day’s march of the village, a messenger
was sent in to tell of their success. An order
was instantly issued that every cabin should be
swept clean, and the women as quickly commenced
the work. When they had finished, the cabins
were all inspected, to see if they were in proper
order. Next day the party approached the village.
They were all frightfully painted, and each man
had a bunch of white feathers on his head. They
were marching in single file, the chief of the party






DANIEL BOONE. 85

leading the way, bearing in one hand a branch of
cedar, laden with the scalps they had taken, and
all chanting their war-song. As they entered the
village, the chief led the way to the vere
which stood in front of the council-house. In this. -
house the council-fire was then burning. The ,
waiter, or Etissu of the leader, then fixed two
blocks of wood near the war-pole, and placed up-
on them a kind of ark, which was regarded by
them as one of their most sacred things. The
chief now ordered that all should sit down. “He
then inquired whether his cabin was prepared, and
everything made ready, according to the custom
of his fathers. They then rose up and commenced
the war-whoop, as they marched round the war-
pole. ‘The ark was then taken and carried with
great solemnity into the council-house, and here
the whole. party remained three days and nights,
separate from the rest of the people. Their first
business now was to wash themselves clean, and
sprinkle themselves with a mixture of bitter herbs.
While they were thus in the house, all their fe-
male relatives, after having bathed and dressed
themselves in their finest clothes, placed them-
selves in two lines facing each other on each side
of thedoor. Here they continued singing a slow mo-
notonous song all day and night ; the song was kept
up steadily for one minute, with intervals of ten
minutes of dead silence between. About once in
8



86 _ THE ADVENTURES OF

three hours the chief would march out at the head of
his warriors, raise the war-whoop, and pass around
the war-pole, bearing his branch of cedar. This
Â¥ all that was done for the whole three days and
nights. -At length the purification was ended, and
upon each of their cabins was placed a twig of the
cedar with a fragment of the scalps fastened to it,
to satisfy the ghosts of their departed friends. Alt
were now quiet as usual, except the leader of the
party and his waiter, who kept up the purification

three days and nights longer. When he had fin-

ished, the budget was hung up before his door for
thirty or forty days, and from time to time Indians
of the party would be seen singing and dancing
before it. When Boone asked the meaning of all
this strange ceremony, they answered him by a
word which he says meant holy.

As this party had brought in no prisoners, he
did not now witness their horrible mode of torture.
Before he left them, however, he saw enough of
their awful cruelty in this way. Sometimes the
poor prisoner would be tied to a stake, a pile of
green wood placed around him, fire applied, and
the poor wretch left to his horrible fate, while,
amid shouts and yells, the Indians departed.
Sometimes he would be forced to run the gauntlet
between two rows of Indians, each one striking
at him with a club until he fell dead. Others
would be fastened between two stakes, their arms



DANIEL BOONE. 87

and legs stretched to each of them, and then quick-
ly burnt by a blazing fire. A common mode was
to pinion the arms of the prisoner, and then tie one
end of a grape-vine around his neck, while the
other was fastened to the stake. A fire was th
kindled, and the poor wretch would walk the circ
this gave the savages the comfort of seeing the
poor creature literally roasting, while his agony
was prolonged. Perhaps this was the most popu-
lar mode, too, because all the women and children
could join init. They were there, with their bun-
dles of dry sticks, to keep the fire blazing, and
their long switches, to beat the prisoner. Fearful
that their victim might die too soon, and thus .es-
cape their cruelty, the women would knead cakes
of clay and put them on the scull of the poor suf-
ferer, that the fire might not reach his brain and -
instantly kill him. As the poor frantic wretch
would run round the circle, they would yell, dance,
and sing, and beat him with their switches, until
he fell exhausted. At other times, a poor prisoner
would be tied, and then scalding water would be
poured upon him from time to time till he died.
It was amazing, too, to see how the warriors
would sometimes bear these tortures. Tied to the
stake, they would chant their war-songs, threaten
their captors with the awful vengeance of their
tribe, boast of how many of their nation they had
scalped, and tell their tormentors how they might






88 THE ADVENTURES OF

increase their torture. In the midst of the fire

they would stand unflinching, and die without

changing a muscle. It was their glory to die in

this way ; they felt that they disappointed their
emies in their last triumph.

While Boone was with them, a. noted warrior
of one of the western tribes, with which the Shaw-
anese were at war, was brought in as a captive.
He was at once condemned, stripped, fastened to
the stake, and the fire kindled. After suffering
without flinching for a long time, he laughed at his
captors, and told them they did not know how to
make an enemy eatfire. He called for a pipe and
tobacco. Excited by his bravery, they gave it to
him. He sat down on the burning coals, and com-
menced smoking with the utmost composure ; not
a muscle of his countenance moved. Seeing this,
one of his captors sprang forward and cried out
that he was a true warrior. ‘Though he had mur-
dered many of their tribe, yet he should live, if
the fire had not spoiled him. The fire had, how-
ever, well nigh done its work. With that, he de-
clared that he was too brave a man to suffer any
longer. He seized a tomahawk and raised it over
the head of the prisoner: still a muscle did not
move. He did not even change his posture.
The blow was given, and the brave warrior fell
dead.

While among them, Boone also witnessed the



DANIEL BOONE. ‘89

mode in which, the Shawanese make a treaty of
peace. The warriors of both tribes between which
the treaty was to be made, met together first, ate
and smoked in a friendly way, and then pledged
themselves in a sacred drink called cussena.

t

Shawanese then waved large fans, made of ant

tails, and danced. ‘The other party, after this,
chose six of their finest young men, painted them
with white clay, and adorned their heads with
swans’ feathers ; their leader was then placed on
what was called the “consecrated seat.” After
this they all commenced dancing, and singing
their song of peace. They danced first in a bend-

ing posture ; then stood upright, still dancing, and _
bearing in their right hands their fans, while in ~

their left they carried a calabash, tied to a stick
about a foot long, and with this continually beat
their breasts. During all this, some added to the
noise by rattling pebbles in a gourd. This being
over, the peace was concluded. It was an act
of great solemnity, and no warrior was considered
as well trained, who did not know how to join in
every part of it.

Many other strange things were seen by Boone
among these people, but these are enough to show
you that he was among a strange people, with
habits very unlike his own. It is not wonderful
that he sighed to escape, when he looked upon
their horrid tortures. Independently of his love

8* |







90 THE ADVENTURES OF

for Boonesborough, he did not know but that such
tortures might be,his at any moment, when they
became excited. Fortunately, as we have seen,
he did escape, and we will now go on with his

story.

e



DANIEL BOONE. . Qt

CHAPTER VI.

HEN Boone reached Boones-
borough, the object he most
loved was not to be found.
His poor wife, wearied with
waiting for him, and naturally
concluding that he was lost to
her fur ever, had returned to
her friends on the Yadkin.
< The settlers,had begged her to re-
y main, and offered her every kind-
! ness; but her husband was gone:

PE %
re a





t

7, She was heart-sick, and longedâ„¢te,
return to her friends in Carolina, *
Disappointed as he was, however, he
had no time to waste in sorrow. The
Indians were approaching, and Boones-
borough was well nigh defenceless. Just before
his return, a Major Smith had taken charge of the
post, and been busy in strengthening it, but much
was still to be done. Boone’s energies were now
at work, and in a little time the station was ready
for an attack. A white man now came into the sete





92 * THE ADVENTURES OF

tlement with news. He had escaped from the Ine
dians. ‘The party from which Boone had escaped
‘had postponed their attack for three weeks, and
gone back to strengthen themselves. They felt
that Boone had reached home—the alarm was

@given, the place fortified—and that it was idle to
attack it at this time.

Boone determined at once to improve the mean
season. With nineteen men, he started off
to surprise the Indians at Paint Creek Town, a
small village on the Scioto. When he came with-
in four miles of the place, he met a party of the
savages on their way to join the large body march-
ing against Boonesborough. The fight instantly
commenced: one Indian fell dead, several were
wounded, and the rest were forced to retreat ; their
horses and all their baggage fell into the hands of
Boone. Two men were now sent to reconnoitre

' the town. They found no Indians there ; they
had all left. After setting fire to the village, they
returned, and Boone immediately hurried home-
ward.

He had scarcely entered the station, and closed
the gates, when an army of four hundred and forty-
four Indians, led on by a Frenchman named Du-

_ quesne, appeared before the settlement. They
soon sent in a flag, demanding, in the name of the
King of Great Britain, that the station should in-
stantly surrender. A council was immediately



DANIEL BOONE. . 93

held in the fort. With such a force before them,
Smith was in favor of meeting their proposal;
Boone opposed it ; the settlers backed him in this
opposition ; and he sent back for an answer to the
Indians that the gates should never be opened to
them. Presently another flag of truce was sent
in, with a message that they had a letter for Colonel
Boone from Governor Hamilton, of Detroit. Upon
hearing this, it was thought best that Boone and”
Smith should go out and meet them, and hear what
they had to say.

Fifty yards from the fort they were met by three
chiefs, who received them very cordially, and led
them to the spot where they were to hold the par-
ley. Here they were seated upon a panther’s
skin, while the Indians held branches over their
heads to protect them from the sun. The chiefs
then commenced talking in a friendly way, and
some of their warriors now came forward, ground-
ed their arms, and shook hands withthem. Then
the letter of General Hamilton was read ; he invi-
ted them to surrender and come at once to Detroit
where they should be treated with all kindness.
Smith objected to this proposal, declaring that it
was impossible for them, at this time, to move
their women ‘and children; but the Indians had
an answer ready: they-had brought forty hor-
ses with them, they said, expressly to help them |
in removing. After a long and friendly talk, the



94 THE ADVENTURES OF

white men returned to the fort, for the purpose, as
they said, of considering the proposal. They
now informed the settlers that the Indians had no
cannon, and advised them never to think of sur-
rendering. Every man thought the advice good.

‘The Indians now sent in another flag, and ask-
ed what treaty the whites were ready to make.
Boone, who had suspected treachery all the time,
at once sent a reply, that if they wished to make
a treaty, the place for making it, must be within
sixty yards of the fort. ‘This displeased them at
first, but at last, they consented. He then sta-
tioned some of his men, with their guns, in one
angle of the fort, with orders to fire if it became
necessary, and, with Smith, started out to meet
them. After a long talk with thirty chiefs, terms
were agreed upon, and the treaty was ready to be
signed ; the chiefs now said that it was custom-
ary with them, on such occasions, for the Indians
to shake hands with every white man who signed
the treaty, as a token of the warmest friendship.
Boone and Smith agreed to this, and the shaking
of hands commenced ; presently, they found them-
selves seized in the crowd—the Indians were
dragging them off; a fire from the fort now lev-
elled*the savages who grasped them; the rest
were in confusion, and, in the confusion, Boone
and Smith escaped and rushed into the fort. In
the struggle Boone was wounded, though not dan-



DANIEL BOONE. 95

gerously. It was a narrow escape for both of
them.

There was no more chance for deception now ;
the Indians were disappointed, and the whites
were provoked at their treachery. A brisk firing

now commenced on both sides; Duquesne ha- -

rangued the Indians and urged them on, while the
whites shouted from the fort, upbraided them as

treacherous cowards, and defied them. ‘The at- |

tack was furious, the firing was kept up till dark,
and many an Indian fell that day before Boones-
borough. The whites, sheltered by their pickets,
made easy havoc among them.

When night came, the exasperated Indians
crawled under the pickets and began to throw
burning materials into the fort, hoping to set all
on fire; but in this they were disappointed—there

were ample supplies of water inside, and the fire

was put out as fast as it fell.

The next day the firing was resumed, and day
after day it continued, the Indians failing to make
any impression. They were too far from the fort
—the first day’s work had taught them not to
come near. At last they formed a wiser plan for
doing mischief. Boonesborough, as you will re-
member, was only sixty yards from the river, and

they determined, by the advice of the Frenchman, .
to let the water in and force the settlers out. In ©)

the night, they commenced the work of digging @

ica oe
I ore



96 THE ADVENTURES OF

trench under ground, from the river. In the morn-
ing Boone looked out upon the river, and perceiv-
ing that it was muddy, instantly guessed the cause.
He immediately set his men to the work of cut-
ting a trench inside the fort, to cross the subterra-
nean passage of the Indians. The savages saw
what was doing, for Boone’s men were constantly
shovelling dirt over the pickets, but they persever-
ed earnestly in their design. At last, however,
they were forced to stop, for the dirt caved in
as fast as they dug; disappointed in this, they
now summoned the station once more to a treaty.
But Boone laughed at them. “ Do you suppose,”
said he, “ we would pretend to treat with such
treacherous wretches? Fire on, you only waste
your powder ; the gates shall never be opened to
you while there is a man of us living.” Taking
his advice, they commenced their firing again ; at
last, on the ninth day of the siege, wearied with
their fruitless labor, they killed all the cattle they
could find, raised a yell, and departed. This was
a terrible siege for the Indians ; it is said that they
lost two hundred men; Boone counted thirty-sev-
en chief warriors ; while the whites, defended by
their pickets, had but two killed and four wounded.
You may judge, too, how industrious the savages
had been, when I tell you that the whites who
wanted lead, commenced gathering their balls af-
ter they left, and succeeded in picking out of the



DANIEL BOONE. 97

logs, and from the ground, one hundred and twenty-
five pounds.

Boone having thus successfully defended his
settlement, determined now to go in search of his
wife. Accustomed to travelling through the woods,
he soon made his lonely journey to the Yadkin.
They were amazed as he entered the house of
Mr. Bryan, his wife’s father. ‘The appearance of
one risen from the grave could not have surprised
them more than that of Boone—the lost man was
among them, and great was their rejoicing. He
now remained here with his family for some time,
and here we will leave him for a little while, to
talk of what happened in Kentucky during his
absence.

The Kentuckians, roused by the Indian hostil-
ity and treachery, determined soon after he left to
inflict punishment upon them ; against the Shawa-
nese they were most provoked; it was among them
that most of the plots against the whites were
formed, and the attack, therefore, was to be made
upon them. An army of one hundred and sixty
men was soon collected, and the command was
given to a brave man named Colonel Bowman;
they were to march directly against old Chilicothe,
the den of the savages.

In July of this year (1779), they started and
reached the home of the Indians, without being
discovered. At daylight, the fight commenced and

9



Full Text

The Baldwin Library

University
of
Flori




TO
HIS YOUNG COUNTRYMEN
THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES,
AND ESPECIALLY
THE LADS OF KENTUCKY,
This Volume
IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED,

By Uncte PHItir.


2



;

Sow,
ume.

a


CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

Daniel Boone is born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania—
His father removes to the Schuylkill—Boone’s early
passion for hunting—Kills a panther—Wanderings
in the woods—Is sent to school—The school is bro-
ken up—Boone returns to his sports—His father re-
moves to the Yadkin river in North Carolina—While
the farm is improving Daniel is hunting—The neigh-
borhood begins to be settled—Daniel is dissatisfied —
Settlement of Mr. Bryan—Daniel Boone goes out
upon a fire hunt—Strange adventure—Marries Re-
becca Bryan—Makes a home for himself on the head
waters of the Yadi#—Men begin to crowd upon
him—determines to move .

CHAPTER II.

Early visits to Kentucky—James M‘Bride—Dr. Wack-
er and others—John Finlay goes to Kentucky trad-
ing with the Indians—Returns with glowing ac-
counts of the country—Visits Daniel Boone and
spends the winter with him—Boone is charmed with
the stories—They determine in the spring to go to
Kentucky—Meeting at Boone’s house in May—With
four companions they start for the west—Adventures
10 CONTENTS.

Page
by the way—They reach Finlay’s old station on the

Red river—Make their camp—Amuse themselves in
hunting and exploring the country—Beauty of the
country—Abundance of game—Boone and Stewart
are taken by the Indians—Make their escape—Re-
turn to their camp—lIt is plundered and deserted—
Arrival of Squire Boone—Daniel Doone is rejoiced
to hear from his family : ; : . - 26

CHAPTER III.

Hunting party—Stewart is killed by the Indians—nar-
row escape of Daniel Boone—The companion of
Squire Boone returns home—The two brothers alone
in the wilderness—Cheerfulness of Daniel Boone—
Squire returns to the Yadkin for ammunition—Dan-
iel lives in the forest alone—His pleasant wander-
ings—Singular escape from the Indians—Encounter
with a bear—Looks for the return of his brother—
Disappointment—Is very sad—Squire suddenly ar-
rives with ammunition and horses—Plans for the fu-
twre—Daniel Boone chooses a spot on the Kentucky
river—They return for his family—Sport by the way
—They reach the Yadkin—Try to beat up recruits
for Kentucky—Ridicule of the people—They start
with five families—Forty men joi them—Disaster
by the way—They return to Clinch river—Various
employments of Boone—He returns to Kentucky—
Builds a fort—Removes his family to Boonesborough 42

CHAPTER IV.

-~ |
Comforts of Boonesborough—Arrival of Colonel Cal-
away and his daughters—Capture of three girls by
the Indians—Boone and Calaway pursue—Are made

a -
CONTENTS.

prisoners—Happy escape—New emigrants—C ounty
of Kentucky—Indian warfare—Attacks upon Har-
rodsburgh and Boonesborough—Expedition to the
saltlicks on Licking river—Courage of Boone—Over-
comes two Indians—Is met by a large Indian party—
Made a prisoner—His long captivity and escape

CHAPTER V.

Indian customs noticed by Boone during his captivity—
Mode of hardening children—Changing names—
Marriages—Burials—War parties—Celebration of
victories—Torturing prisoners—Making treaties of
peace © 2 er er

CHAPTER VI.

Boone’s disappointment upon not finding his -wife—
Strengthening of Boonesborough—Indian hostilities
—Attack of Boonesborough—gallant defence—Boone
returns to North Carolina—Occurrences during his
absence—Boone returns—Goes to the Blue Licks
for salt—Death of the younger Boone—Daniel
Boone escapes—Kentucky divided into three counties
—Hard winter of 1781—Indian hostilities—Attack
on Bryant’s station—Villany of Simon Girty

CHAPTER VII.

Disastrous defeat at the Blue Licks—General Clarke’s
campaign—Efforts to restore peace—Sullenness of
the Indians—They continue their massacres—Strata-
gems on the Ohio—Bold defence of Captain Hubbil
—Harmar’s campaign—St. Clair’s defeat—Debate
in Congress~General Wayne takes command—De-
feats the Indians—Lays waste their country—Con-

ll

59

91
12 CONTENTS.

Page.
cludes a treaty of peace with the savages in August,

1795. ° e > e e e e e e 109

CHAPTER VIII.

Happiness of the settlers—Boone roams through the
wilderness—Civilization sickens him—He loses his
lands—Moves tothe Kanhawa—Disappointed in find-
ing game—Moves to Missouri—Purchase of Missou-
ri from the French—Anecdote related by Mr. Audu-
bon—Boone loses his wife—His sorrow—War with
England—His old age—His habits—He dies in 1818. 127

APPENDIX.

The adventures of Colonel Daniel Boone, fornierly a
hunter; containing a narrative of the wars of Ken-
tucky, as given by himself. . .- + + °& 143

ZY



DOAN VEL BOON

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THE

ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE.



CHAPTER I.

OME men choose to live im
crowded cities ;—others are
pleased with the peaceful quiet
of acountry farm ; while some-
love to roam through wild for-
ests, and make their homes im
the wilderness. The man.of
- whom I shall now speak, was:
one of this last class. Perhaps you
never'heard of Dan1EL Boons, the
Kentucky rifleman. If not, then T
us AGAK have a strange and interesting story
aoe __ to tell you.
Las If, when a child was born, we knew’,
v V that he was to become aremarkable man, —
“s J the time and place of his birth would,
perhaps, be always remembered. But as this cam
not be known, great mistakes are often made on
these points. As to the time when Daniel Boone
2



14 THE ADVENTURES OF

was born, there is no difficulty ; but people have
fallen into many blunders about the place. Some
have said that he was horn in England, before his
parents left that country ; others that he came into
this world during the passage of his parents across
the Atlantic. One has told us that he was born in
Virginia ; another in Maryland ; while many have
stated that he was a native of North Carolina.
These are all mistakes. Daniel Boone was born
in the year 1746, in Bucks county, in the state of
Pennsylvania.

From some cause or other, when the boy was
but three years old, his parents moved from this
home, and settled upon the Schuylkill river, not far
from the town of Reading. Here they lived for
ten years ; ard it was during this time that their
son Daniel began to show his passion for hunting.
He was scarcely able to carry a gun, when he
was shooting all the squirrels, rackoons, and even
wild-cats (it is said), that he could find in that re-
gion. As he grew older, his courage increased,
and then we find him amusing himself with higher
‘game. Other lads in the neighborhood were soon
taught by him the use of the rifle, and-were then
able to join-him in his adventures. On one occa-
sion, they all started out for a hunt, and after
amusing themselves till it was almost dark, were
returning homeward, when suddenly a. Wild cry
was heard in the woods. The boys screamed.out,


DANIEL BOONE. 15

“A panther !-a panther !” and ran off as fast as
they could. Boone stood firmly, looking around
for the animal. It was a panther indeed. His
eye lighted upon him just in the act of spring-
ing toward him: in an instant he levelled his rifle,
and shot him through the heart.

But this sort of sport was not enough for him.
He seemed resolved to go away from men, and
live in the forests with these animals. One morn-
ing he started off as fsual, with his rifle and
dog. Night came on, but Daniel did not re-
turn to his home. Another day and night passed -
away, and still the boy did not make his appear- |
ance. His parents were now greatly alarmed.
The neighbors joined them in making search for
the lad. After wandering about a great while,
they at length saw smoke rising from a cabin in
the distance. Upon reaching it, they found the
boy. ‘The floor of the cabin was covered with the
skins of such animals as he had slain, andiipieces
of meat were roasting before the fire for a.
per. Here, at a distance of three miles from any
settlement, he had built his cabin of sods and
branches, and sheltered himself in the wilderness,

It was while his father was living on the head-
waters of the Schuylkill, that young Boone re-
ceived, so far as we know, all his education. Short
indeed were his schoolboy days. It happened that
an Irish schoolmaster strolled into the settlement,
16 THE ADVENTURES OF

and, by the advice of Mr. Boone and other parents,
opened a school in the neighborhood. It was not
then as it is now. Good schoolhouses were not
scattered over the land; nor were schoolmasters
always able to teach their pupils. The school-
house where the boys of this settlement went was
a log cabin, built in the midst of the woods. The
schoolmaster was a strange man: sometimes good-
_ humored, and then indulging the lads ; sometimes
surly and ill-natured, and “then beating them se-
verely. It was his usual custom, after hearing the
first lessons of the morning, to allow the children
to be out for a half hour at play, during which time
he strolled off to refresh himself from his “labors/
He always walked in the same direction, and the

boys thought that after his return, when they 4

were called in, he was generally more cruel than
ever. ‘I'hey were whipped more severely, and
oftentimes without any cause. They observed

this, but did not know the meaning of i. One
" morning young Boone asked that he might go out,

and had scarcely left the schoolroom, when, he-sawk

@ squirrel running over the trunk of a fallen tree.

‘True to his nature, he instantly gave chase, until:
Me

at last the squirrel darted into a bower of vines:
and branches. Boone thrust his hand in, and, to his
surprise, laid of hold of a bottle of whiskey. This
was in the direction of his master’s morning walks,
and he thought now that he understood the secret of


a->"*, * > :
ig See sail
a es ate. Stat!



DANIEL BOONE. 17

much of his ill-nature. He returned to the school-
room ; but when they were dismissed for that day,
he told some of the larger boys of his discovery.
Their plan was soon arranged. Early the next
moming a bottle of whiskey, having tartar emetic
in it, was placed in the bower, and the other bottle
thrown away. At the usual hour, the lads were»
sent out to play, and the master started on his
walk. But their play was to come afterward: —
they longed for the master to return. At length
they were called in, and in a little time saw the
success of their experiment. The master began
to look pale -and sick, yet still went on with his
work. Several boys were called up, one after the
other, to recite lessons, and all whipped soundly,
whether right or wrong. At last young Boone
was galled out to answer questions in arithme-_
tic. He came forward with his slate and pencil,
and the master began: “If you subtract six from
nine, what remains?” said he. “ Three, sir,” said
Boone. “ Very good,” said the master ; “ now let
us come to fractions. If you take three quarters
from a whole number, what remains ?”—“ The
whole, sir,” answered Boone. ‘ You blockhead!”
cried the master, beating him, “ you stupid little
fool, how can you show that ?”—* If I take one
bottle of whiskey,” said Boone, “and put in its
place another in which I have mixed an emetic,
the whole will remain, if nobody drinks it!” "The
Q*
18 THE ADVENTURES OF

Irishman, dreadfully sick, was now doubly enraged.
He seized Boone, and commenced beating him:
the children shouted and roared ; the scuffle con-
tinued, until Boone knocked the master down upor
the floor, and rushed out of the room. It was a
day of freedom now for the lads. ‘The story soon
ran through the neighborhood ; Boone was rebuked
by his parents, but the schoolmaster was dismissed,
and thus ended the boy’s education.

Thus freed from school, he now returned more
ardently than ever to his favorite pursuit. His
dog and rifle were his constant companions, and
day after day he started from home, only to
roam through the forests. Hunting seemed to
be the only business of his life ; and he was never
so happy as when at night he came home laden
with game. He was an untiring wanderer,

I do not know but that this passion for roaming
was in some degree inherited by Daniel Boone.
His father had already had three homes: one in
England, one in Bucks county, and another on the
Schuylkill ; and he now thought of removing fur-
ther. It is said that the passion of Daniel for
hunting was one cause which prompted his father
to think of this. Land was becoming scarce, the
neighborhood a little crowded, and game less
abundant ; and, to mend matters, he began to cast
his eyes around for anewhome. He was not long

jn choosing one. He had heard of a rich and
.
a

DANIEL BOONE. 19

beautiful country on the banks of the Yadkin river
in North Carolina, and he determined that this
should be the next resting-place for him and his
household.

All things were made ready as soon as possible,
and the journey commenced. It was a fine spring
morning when the father started for his new home,
with his wife and children, his flocks and herds.
Their journey lay hundreds of miles through a
trackless wilderness ; yet with cheerful and fear-
less hearts they pressed onward. When hungry,
they feasted upon venison and wild turkeys (for
Daniel, with his rifle, was in company); when
thirsty, they found cool springs of water to refresh
them by the way; when wearied at night, they
laid themselves down and slept under the wide-
spreading branches of the forest. At length they
reached the land they looked for, and the father
found it to be all that he expected. ‘The woods in
that: region were unbroken ; no man seemed yet to
have found them. Land was soon cleared, a cabin
built, and the father in a little time found himself
once more happily settled with his family.

The old man with his other sons went busily to the
work of making afarm. As for Daniel, they knew
it was idle to expect his help in such employment,
and therefore left him to roam about with his
tifle. ‘This was a glorious country for the youth ;
wild woods were all around him, and the game, —
20 THE ADVENTURES OF.

having not yet learned to fear the crack of the rifle
wandered fearlessly through them. This he though
was, of all places, the home for him. I hope you
will not think that he was the idle and useless boy
of the family, for it was not so. While the farm
was improving, Daniel was supplying the family
with provisions. ‘The table at home was always -
filled with game, and they had enough and to spare.
Their house became known as a warm-hearted
and hospitable abode ; for the wayfaring wanderer,
when lost in the woods, was sure to find here a
welcome, a shelter, and an abundance. Then, too,
if money was wanted in the family, the peltries
of the animals shot by Daniel supplied it: so
that he was, in a large degree, the supporter
of the household. _In this way years rolled on-
ward—the farm still enlarging and improving,
Daniel still hunting, and the home one of constant
péace, happiness, and plenty.

At length the story of the success and comfort
of the family brought neighbors aroundthem. Dif-
ferent parts of the forests began to be cleared ;
smoke was soon seen rising from new cabins ;
and the sharp crack of other rifles than Daniel’s
was sometimes heard in the morning. This grieved
him sadly. Most people would have been pleased
to find neighbors in the loneliness of the woods ;
but what pleased others did not please him. They
were crowding upon him ; they were driving away


Pe tesa A Sep! TEA



DANIEL BOONE. | 21

his game: this was his trouble. But, after all,

._ there was one good farmer who came into the re-

gion and made his settlement ; which settlement,
as it turned out, proved a happy thing for Daniel.
This was a very worthy man named Bryan.
He cleared his land, built his cabin upon a sloping

bill, not very far from Mr. Boone’s, and before
a great while, by dint of industry, had a good farm
- of more than a hundred acres. This farm was
; beautifully situated. A pretty stream of water
_ almost encircled it. On the banks of the Schuyl-
_ kill, Daniel Boone found all his education, such

as it was; on the banks of the Yadkin he found

something far better. I must tell you now of a

very strange adventure.

One evening, with another young friend, he
started out upon what is called a “ fire-hunt.” Per-
haps you do not know what this means. I will
explain it to you. Two people are always neces*
sary for a fire-hunt. One goes before, carrying a |
blazing torch of pitch-pine wood (or lightwood, as
it is called in the southern country), while the other
follows behind with his rifle. In this way the two
hunters move through the forests. When an ani-
mal is startled, he will stand gazing at the light,
and his eyes may be seen shining distinctly : this
is called “ shining the eyes.” The hunter with the
rifle, thus seeing him, while the other shines him,
levels-his gun with steady aim, and has a fair shot.
22 THE ADVENTURES OF

This mode of hunting is still practised in many
parts of our country, and is everywhere known as
a fire-hunt.

Boone, with his companion, started out upon such
a hunt, and very soon reached the woods skirting
the lower end of Mr. Bryan’s farm. It seems they
were on horseback, Boone being behind with the
rifle. They had not gone far, when his companion
reined up his horse, and two eyes were seen
distinctly shining. Boone levelled his rifle, but
something prevented his firing. ‘The animal darted
off. Boone leaped from his horse, left his com-
panion, and instantly dashed after it. It was too
dark to see plainly, still he pursued ; he was close
upon its track, when a fence coming in the way,
the animal leaped it with a clear bound. Boone
climbed over as fast as he could with his rifle, but
the game had gotahead. Nothing daunted by this,
he pushed on, until he found himself at last not very
far from Mr. Bryan’s home. But the animal was
gone. It wasastrange chase. He determined to go
into Mr Bryan’s house, and tell his adventure. As
he drew near, the dogs raised a loud barking, the
master came out, bade him welcome, and carried
him into the house. Mr. Bryan had scarcely in
troduced him to his family as “the son of hit
neighbor Boone,” when suddenly the door of the
room was burst open, and in rushed a little lad of
seven, followed by a girl of sixteen years, crying
DANIEL BOONE. 23

out, “O father! father! sister is frightened to death!
She went down to the river, and was chased by a
panther!” ‘The hunter and his game had met.
There stood Boone, leaning upon his rifle, and
Rebecca Bryan before him, gasping for breath.
From that moment he continued to pursue it;
Farmer Bryan’s house became a favorite resort
for him; he loved it as well as the woods. The
business was now changed: Rebecca Bryan com-
pletely shined his eyes; and after a time, to the
great joy of themselves and both families, Daniel
Boone and Rebecca Bryan were married. It
proved, as you will see, a very happy marriage to
both parties.

Being now a married man, it became Daniel
Boone’s duty to seek a new home for himself. In
a little time, therefore, he left his wife, and wan-
dered into the unsettled parts of North Carolina in
search of one. After moving about for some
time, he found, upon the head-waters of the
Yadkin, a rich soil, covered with a heavy and once
more unbroken forest. “ Here,” thought Daniel
Boone, “is the resting-place for me ; here Rebecca
Bryan and myself may be happy: this shall be
our home.” He returned to his wife, and she,
with a cheerful heart, joined in all his plans.
With tears in her eyes, she bade farewell’ to her
friends; yet, with a light spirit, she statted off
with her husband. A clearing in the woods was

fie, ~

hb ssh
24 THE ADVENTURES OF

soon made, a log cabin of his own soon built, and
a portion of ground planted. Boone seems now to
have thought that he must do something more than
suse his rifle. He was to make a home for his wife
and busied himself, accordingly, in enlarging his
farm as fast as he could, and industriously cul-
tivating it. Still, on his busiest day, he would
find a leisure hour to saunter with his gun to
the woods, and was sure never to return with-
out game. His own table was loaded with it,
as when at his father’s, and his house, like his
father’s, soon became known as a warm and kind
shelter for the wandering traveller. In this indus-
trious and quiet way of farming and hunting, years
were spent, and Daniel Boone was contented and
happy. Several little children were now added to
his group ; and, with his wife, his children, and his
rifle, for companions, he felt that all was well.
But his peace was at length disturbed once more.
His old troubles pursued him ; men again began to
come near. The crash of falling trees was heard,
as the new settlers levelled the forests ; huts were
seen springing up all around him; other hunters
were roaming through the woods, and other dogs
than his were heard barking. This was more
than he was willing to bear. Happy as he had
made his home, he determined to leave it, and find
another in the wilderness, where he could have
that wilderness to himself. For some time he was
DANIEL BOONE. 25

at a loss to know where to go; yet his heart was
fixed in the determination to move. The circum-
stances which pointed him to his new home, and
where that new home was made, you may learn in

ihe next chapter.
2
THE

ADVENTURES

OF

DANIEL BOONE,

THE

KENTUCKY RIFLEMAN.

BY

THE AUTHOR OF “‘ UNCLE PHILIP’S CONVERSATIONS.”

“Too much crowded—too much crowded —I want more elbow:
room.”’—Boone on his way to Missourt.

NEW YORK:
D. APPLETON & CO., 200 BROADWAY.

PHILADELPHIA:
GEORGE S. APPLETON, 164 CHESNUT ST.

MDCCCT,


wwerwvrerveenrnsanemnanaeeasseoeeseeeeeeeees

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1843,
By D. APPLETON & CO.,

ia the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the United States,
for the Southern District of New York.

POPPI - — nmr cm: ate
26 THE ADVENTURES UF

CHAFTER II.




Y young friends all know where
the state of Kentucky is situ-
, Y ated. It is hardly necessary for
* me to say, that at the time of
which I am writing, that region
was an unbroken wilderness.
It was in the year 1754 that
a white man first visited the
< country of Kentucky. This was
Mr RS James M‘Bride. In company with
PW several others during that year, he
‘SQ, was passing down the Ohio, when
he discovered the mouth of Ken-
(M4 tucky river, and made alanding. Near
yw) ® the spot where he landed, he cut upon
@® g 2 tree the first letters of his name ; and
these letters, it is said, could be seen and distinctly
read for many years afterward. With his com-
panions, he wandered through the wilderness ; the
country struck them all as being remarkably beau-
tiful. It is not wonderful, then, that when they
returned home, they were filled with fine stories

———.
a
i "2
Wa

i

<

il






=

—>
pS
Sy

stint HT
&
DANIEL BOONE. 27

about the new region. They declared that it was
“the best tract of land in North America, and
probably in the world.”

In spite of their pleasant stories, however, it was
a long time before any one was disposed to follow
in their track. At length, Doctor Walker, of Vir-
ginia, with a number of friends, started upon a
western tour of discovery. Some say that he was
in search of the Ohio river particularly ; others
that he went merely to collect strange plants and
flowers. Be this as it may, he with his party
wandered through Powell’s Valley, and passed the
mountains at what is called the Cumberland Gap.
_ They then crossed the Cumberland river, and roam-
ing on through the forests, at length, after much

eae eee eS ee le ee ae

fatigue and suffering, reached the Big Sandy. The

country was beautiful, yet they were too much
worn out to go further, and from this point began

to return homeward. They had suffered more than . : e
M‘Bride, and therefore their story was not so bright. *

“9

as his; yet they gave a very pleasant account of ©

the new country.

No one yet, however, seemed ready to make
his home in Kentucky ; and accident at last seems
to have thrown one man into that country, whose
Story, upon his return, made some anxious to go
there. This was John Finley, a backwoodsman
of North Carolina. He was in the habit of roving

about and trading with the Indians. In the year.


28 THE ADVENTURES OF

1767, he, with certain companions as fearless as
himself, led on from place to place by the course
of trade, wandered far into Kentucky. Here he
remained for some time. It was a very beautiful,
yet, as he learned also, a very dangerous country.
No Indian tribe lived there, but all the tribes
roamed over it as a hunting-ground. Upon these
hunts, the fierce and warlike people would often
meet and wage their bloody battles. These fights
were so frequent and so awful, that the region was
known by the name of the “ Dark and Bloody
Ground.” In spite of danger, Finley lived there,
until at last the traders and the Indians began to
quarrel, and, for safety’s sake, he was forced to
run off. He returned to North Carolina, filled with
wonderful stories. Sights like those on the “ Dark
and Bloody Ground,” were nowhere to be seen.
The land was rich, and covered with trees and
flowers ; there were lofty mountains, beautiful val-
leys, and clear streams, throughout it. Then he
spoke of the strange caves in the mountains; of
curious salt springs ; of the foot-prints of men to
be seen distinctly upon the solid rocks; of the
strange figures of huge animals on the sides of the
high cliffs. Game of all sorts was abundant, from
the buffalo down to the partridge. There was no
@ country (he declared) like Kain-tuck-kee.* His

* This was the Indian name for the country.
DANIEL BOONE, - 9g

tale was so wonderful, that people could not well
help listening to it.

Whether John Finley was led there by a knowl-
edge of the man’s character, or whether it was an
accident, it so happened, that about a year after his
return, he wandered into the neighborhood of Dan-
_ lel Boone’s home. It was not long before he fell
in with Boone, and completely charmed him with
his stories. Boone had known some sport in the
forests himself, but the adventures of Finley were -
to him marvellous. He was so much pleased with
the man, that he invited him, as it was now winter,
to come to his house, and make his home there
through the season. The invitation was gladly
accepted ; and in the cabin of Boone, again and
again was the wild beauty of the “ Dark and Bloody
Ground” laid before him. ‘There was no end to
Finley’s stories of this region. The wind whistled
without, but the fire blazed cheerfully within ; and
here they sat, on many a night, almost till dawn,
Finley talking, and Boone listening. The end of
all this was, that they determined, when spring
opened, to go to Kentucky. Boone knew that
there were hardships and perils in the way, and
Finley had practically felt them; but what were
dangers or difficulties to these fearless men? The
first of May was agreed upon as the day for start-
ing, and Finley was then again to meet Boone at
his house.

3*
30 THE ADVENTURES OF

It is not strange that other bold men, who
heard Finley’s stories, were seized with the same
desire for going west. Indeed, Boone helped to
give them that desire, knowing that a few brave
spirits would be of great service in the new coun-
try. He talked, therefore, warmly of the comforts
of a new home in the forest, where there was an
abundance of game, and a complete absence of
towns and villages. Accordingly, on the first of
May, 1769, when Finley repaired to Boone’s house,
he found four others ready for the adventure : these
were John Stewart, Joseph Holden, James Monay,
and William Cool. The people in the neighbor-
hood, learning what was going on, had likewise
gathered to look with surprise upon these six men.
What could prompt men to leave the comforts of
their quiet homes, and wander off into the wilder-
ness? ‘They surely were crazy. Boone was much
beloved as a kind neighbor, and they mourned most
over his madness. Nothing daunted by all this,
they were then ready for a start, and were now on
the point of leaving. We are told that, with tears
in his eyes, Daniel Boone kissed his wife and chil-
dren ; and if the story be true, I love him the more
for it. His spirit was beating for his new hunting-
forests; he could face all the dangers of the
“Dark and Bloody Ground,” but then it was doubt-
ful whether he was not parting with his wife and
children for ever. At all events, he was leaving
DANIEL BOONE. 31

them for months, perhaps for years—he knew
not how long—and who can wonder that tears stood
in his eyes? Each man shouldered his rifle,
shot-bag, powder-horn, and knapsack, and off
they started—every neighbor straining his eyes
after them as far as he could see, as the men upon
whom he was looking for the last time.

For two or three days they saw nothing new, for
they were passing over their old hunting-grounds.
After this, they came to a wild and trackless region,
and saw from time to time the lofty ridge of moun-
tains which separated them from the western coun-
try. In two days more, the provisions with which
uney had started gave out, and the first thing to be
done was to find a fresh supply. Accordingly they
halted, chose a suitable spot for their camp, and
part of them commenced building it of logs and
branches ; the others went into the woods in search
of game. It was impossible for such men to starve
in such a region; game wasabundant. ‘The hunt-
ers returned toward night, with several deer and
wild turkeys. The camp was finished, a bright
fire was burning, and in a little time the venison.
was dressed, cooked, and eaten. The supper was
scarcely finished, when they saw dark clouds gath-
ering, and presently they were visited by a tremen-
dous thunder-storm. ‘The sharp lightning flashed
through the woods, and the rain poured down in tor-
rents ; yet, in their camp they fearlessly sheltered
32 THE ADVENTURES OF

themselves, the branches covering them from the
rain. A man can scarcely be placed during a thun-
der-storm in a more dangerous place than a forest :
every tree is a mark for the lightning ; yet these
men were calm and self-possessed, and were mer-
cifully protected.

The storm having passed over, they made their
arrangements for the night. For safety’s sake, two
men were to keep a constant watch, while the
others slept; and in this duty of watching, they
were totake turns. About midnight, while Boone
and Holden were keeping the watch, a sharp shrill
cry was heard inthe woods. ‘They sprang to their
feet. ‘“ What noise is that?” said Holden. The
sound was familiar to Boone. “Be still,” said
he ; “ it is only a panther ; come along with me.”
Moving cautiously from the camp, they listened
again for the cry. Once more. they heard it.
Creeping through the woods in the direction of the
sound, they at length saw through the darkness
the wild, glaring eyes of the animal. Boone lev-
elled his rifle with steady aim, and fired. Witha
wild yell the panther fell to the ground, and began
to retreat. Both were satisfied that the ball had
struck him, and returned again tothe camp. The
crack of the rifle had waked their companions ; the
adventure was made known to them, and they went
quietly to sleep again, satisfied that for the rest of
the night atleast that panther would not disturb them.
DANIEL BOONE. 33

The next day was a very busy one. Finding
game so plenty in the neighborhood, they deter-
mined to lay in a good supply. Part of them were
therefore out in the woods, hunting, while the rest
were in the camp, smoking, drying, and packing
the venison for the journey. Fatigued with these
labors, when night came they gladly laid them-
selves down, and, like wearied men, slept soundly.

By the first ray of the morning’s light the camp
was stirring. Shouldering their rifles and knap-
sacks, they started on their way. In a little time
they found a dead panther. Boone declared that
this was his panther ; the animal was killed with
one ball, and by comparing that ball with those in
his shot-bag, he found they were of the same size.
In two or three days they reached the foot of the
mountains, and began to ascend. Their journey
was now rough and wearisome, and they made
slow progress. To any men but these, the moun-
tains might have proved impassable ; but they were
bent upon finding the new hunting-grounds of Ken-
tucky, and nothing could keep them back. After
climbing the hills day after day, they found once
more that their provisions were gone, and were .
again forced to halt. Their camp was built on the
side of the mountain, and their rifles easily supplied
their wants. The journey was rigorously renewed,
and after many days of further struggling, they at
length found themselves on one of the tops of the
34 THE ADVENTURES OF ,

Allegany ridge. Here they were, upon Cumber
land mountain. At this place they halted once more,
to look down upon the magnificent prospect which
was spread out before them. ‘This was their first
view of the new region, and they felt that it was
all that Fimley had described it to be. It was in-
deed a glorious country. ‘The land was covered
with trees and flowers ; there were the rolling
hills, and the beautiful valleys, and the clear
sparkling streams, of which he had spoken.

The prospect was too beautiful to allow them to
tarry long: they panted to be in that country.
With more earnest desires than ever, they com-
menced descending the mountains. This part of
the journey was comparatively easy. In a few
days now they reached the western base of the
hills, and entered a lovely plain. Here, for the
first time, the new hunters saw the finest of
western game—a herd of buffaloes. From the skirt
of the wood at the end of the plain, a countless
troop of these animals came rushing over it. The
men were delighted ; they had heard of these noble
beasts of the forest, but none of them, except Fin-
ley, had ever seen one. As the mass came
tramping toward them, they stood gazing in as-
tonishment. Finley, who knew that men were
sometimes trampled to death by these moving
troops, kept his eye steadily upon the herd until
the foremost was within rifle-shot ; he then levelled
-
DANIEL BOONE. 35

his gun, and the leader fell dead. With a wild
bellow the herd parted on each side of the fallen.
animal, and went scampering through the plain.
There seemed no end to the number, as they still
came rushing from the wood. The mass appeared
closing again in a solid body, when he seized
Holden’s rifle, and shot another. Now they were
completly routed ; branching off on the two sides
of the plain, they went bellowing and tearing past
them. ‘ An amazing country, this!” cried Boone ;
“who ever beheld such an abundance?” The
camp was once more soon built, a blazing fire
made, and, for the first time in their lives, five of
these men sat down to a supper of buffalo-meat.
They talked of their new country, the quan-
tity of game, and how joyously they would roam
through the huge forests, until the night had worn
far away.

The next morning, after breakfast, they packed:
up such portions of the animals as they could
readily carry, and resumed their march. Ina little
time they reached Red river. Here Finley began
to feel more at home, for on this river he had lived.
Following the course of the stream, ere long they
came to the place which had been his trading-post’ _
with the Indians. They had been more than @
month reaching this point, and, naturally enough,
were wearied. Finley, too, could no longer guide
them ; and here, for the present, they determined
ee, ——)—lUlcC(“ i‘
iz

36 THE ADVENTURES OF

to halt again. It was now the seventh day of
June.
As this was to be their headquarters for some
; time, they built at once a substantial log cabin.
They were now fairly in the wilds of Ken-
tucky ; and remembering that the whole region
was the fighting-ground of the wandering Indians,
the cabin was built not only to protect them from the
‘weather, but to answer as a sort of fort against the
savages. ‘This shelter being provided, their whole
time now was given to hunting and exploring the
country. Hunting was a pastime indeed, the game
was soabundant. They could look out upon herds
of buffaloes scattered through the canebrakes,
browsing upon the leaves of the cane, or cropping
the tall grass ; the deer bounded fearlessly by the
very door of their hut, and wild turkeys were to
be found everywhere. Everything was in a state
of nature ; the animals had not yet learned to be
afraid of man. Of course, they did not suffer with
hunger : provisions of the finest kind were ever in
their cabin. But the buffaloes provided them with
more than food. From time to time, as they need-
ed moccasins for their feet, his skin supplied them ;
and when at night they felt the dampness of the
weather, his hide was the blanket in which they
wrapped themselves and slept soundly.
The country, as they wandered through it, struck
them as beautiful indeed. There were the lofty
DANIEL BOONE. 37

trees of the forest, with no undergrowth except
the cane, the grass, and the flowers. They
seemed to have been planted by the hand of man at
regular distances. Clear streams were seen wind-
ing through lovely meadows, surrounded by the
gently-sloping hills ; and the fearless buffalo and
deer were their companions every hour. In their
wanderings they came several times to hard and
well-tramped roads. It was by following these
that they discovered many of the salt springs or
licks where salt is made even now. The roads
to these were worn thus hard by the buffaloes
and other animals that were in the habit of visiting
, the springs.

The place of Finley’s old trading-post, where
their cabin now stood, seems to have been chosen
by him not only as a central point for trade : it was
on the side of a finely-sloping hill, and command-
ed a good view of the country below. The situa-.
tion was beautiful. Perhaps he chose it when he
was a lonely white man in the wilderness, because:
thence he might readily see the approach of
Indians, and make his escape, or perhaps it was.
the very beauty of the spot that charmed him. He
had a love for the beautiful. One day, he and Boone
were standing by the door of the cabin. The
wind was sighing in the tops of the forest, and
while they were listening to the music, they were
looking out upon the beautiful region below ; the
ae

38 THE ADVENTURES OF

grass was green, and the bright flowers turned up
their leaves tothe sun. “ Glorious country!” cried
Finley ; “ this wilderness does indeed blossom like
the rose.”—* Yes,” replied Boone, “ and who
would live amid the barren pine-hills of North Car-
olina, to hear the screaming of the jay, and now
and then shoot a deer too lean to be eaten? This
is the land for hunters. Here man and beast may
grow to their full size.”

In this way, for more than six months, these
men fearlessly hunted and roamed through the
woods. Contrary to their expectations, through
the whole summer they saw no Indians, nor did
they meet with any remarkable adventure. The
precaution of a nightly watch was adopted, but
they met with no disturbance from man or beast.
They had glorious sport by day, and slept quietly
at night. After this, as you will see, they began
to meet difficulties.

On the 22d of December, Boone and Stewart
started off, as they had often done before, upon an
exploring tour. After wandering several miles,
they pressed their way through a piece of thick
woods, and came out upon a boundless open forest.
Here they found quantities of persimmon-trev- ,
loaded with ripe fruit, while clusters of wild groves
covered the vines that were hanging from the lofty
branches. Flowers were still in bloom, and scented
the air; herds of animals might be seen through
DANIEL BOONE, 39

the forest in every direction: add to this that the
day was beautiful, and you will not be surprised to
learn that they continued to wander—indeed, that
they wandered much further than they supposed.
It was nearly dark when they reached the Ken-
tucky river, and stood looking upon its rippling
waters. Perceiving a hill close by, they climbed
it, that they might take a better view of the course
of the stream. They were now descending, on
their way homeward, when suddenly they heard:
an Indian yell, and out rushed from the canebrake
a party of savages. ‘They had no time for re-
sistance—indeed, time was nothing; they were
overpowered by numbers. The savages seized
them, took away their rifles and ammunition,
bound them, and marched them off to their
camp. The next morning they started off with
their prisoners, the poor fellows not knowing
where they were going, or what was to be
done to them. They did not know one word of
their language, and could therefore learn noth-
ing: this much, however, they very well under-
stood—that it would not do to show any signs of
fear to the Indians; and therefore they went on
cheerfully. In a little time they became better
acquainted with their captors, and judged, from
certain signs, that the Indians themselves had not
determined what was to be done. Part seemed to

- be forsparing them, part for killing; still their cheer-


40 THR ADVENTURES OF

fulness was the same. This apparent fearlessness
deceived the Indians ; they supposed the prisoners
were well pleased with their condition, and did not
watch them closely. On the seventh niglit of
their march, the savages, as usual, made their
camp, and all laid down to sleep. About mid-
night, Boone touched Stewart, and waked him: °
now or never was their time. They rose, groped
their way to the rifles, and stole from the camp.
They hardly dared to look behind them; every
sound startled them, even the snapping of the twigs
under their feet. Fortunately, it was dark, even
if the Indians pursued. They wandered all that
night and the whole of the next day, when at last,
without meeting a man, they reached their own
camp. But what was their surprise on finding the
camp plundered, and not one of their companions
to be seen? What had become of them? Perhaps
they were prisoners ; possibly they were murdered ;
or it might be that they had started back for North
Carolina. They were safe, but where were their
comrades? Wearied in body, and tormented with
fears for their friends, they commenced preparing
for the night. A sound was now heard. They
seized their rifles, and stood ready, expecting the
Indians. Two men were seen indistinctly ap-
proaching. “Who comes there?” cried Boone.
“ White men and friends,” was the answer. Boone
knew the voice. In an instant more, his brother
DANIEL BOONE. 41

Squire Boone, with another man, entered the cabin.
These two men had set out from Carolina for the
purpose of reaching them, and had for days been
wandering in search of their camp. It was a joyous
meeting—the more joyous, because unexpected,
Big tears were again in Daniel Boone’s eyes when
he heard, from his brother, that his wife and chil-
dren were well.
4*


42 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER III.

HEN Squire Boone had told
y+ his brother all the news of
home, it became his turn to be
a listener, while Daniel talked
to him of all that happened



pwr ors since they parted. After tel-

CH PIO \ PBS . . .
i, (ats ling him of the beautiful coun-
YAR S try, and their happy freedom

We) as they wandered through it for six
ae SF & months, then came the story of his -
e9- captivity and escape. That escape
Us PRY was but just now made, and with a
Z full heart he dwelt upon this part
of his story. It would not have been
7 strange if Squire had now felt alarmed ;
%)),'* but his disposition was much like his
brother’s: he loved the woods, and was afraid of
nothing.
In a little time, the four were once more hunting
freely through the forests. Signs of Indians were
to be seen around, however ; possibly they were



_ oe ee os eee
. ees,

Te



DANIEL BOONE. ee

the very Indians who had captured them. In their
wanderings, therefore, they kept together usually,
for self-protection. One day, they started out upon
a buffalo-hunt. As they came upon a herd of these
animals, Stewart lodged his ball in one of them,
without bringing him down. The buffalo went
tearing through the forest ; and Daniel Boone, with
Stewart, forgetful of everything else, went chasing
after him. Naturally enough, like excited men,
they had no idea. how far they had travelled, until
their very weariness reminded them that it was time
to turn back. , Tired as he was, a harder race was
now before Boone. ‘They had scarcely started on
their return, when a party of Indians rushed from
the cane-brake, and let fly their arrows. Stewart
fell dead onthe spot. Boone would have fired his
rifle, but he felt it was useless: he could kill but
one man ; his only chance of escape was in flight.
With Indian yells and arrows close behind him, he
leaped forward, and, by tremendous exertions, at
last distanced his pursuers. When he reached the
camp, he fell, completely exhausted.

The party, now cut down to three, was ina
little time reduced to two. From some cause or
other they could not tell what—possibly the sad
story )f Stewart’s death, and the fear of like trou-
bles—the companion who had come out with
Squire Boone determined upon returning to North
44 THE ADVENTURES OF

Carolina. Very soon, therefore, he left them alone

in the wilderness.*
It is not strange that, being thus deserted, Squire

Boone felt restless and dissatisfied ; the wonder is,
that Daniel was not dissatisfied likewise. But he
was happy and contented, and often struggled to
call up the same feelings in his brother. ‘“ You
see,” he would often say, “ how little nature re-
quires, to be satisfied. Happiness, the companion
of content, is rather found in our own breasts than
in the enjoyment of external things. I firmly be-
lieve it requires but a little philosophy to make a
man happy in whatsoever state he is. ‘This con-
sists ina full resignation to the will of Providence ;
and a resigned soul finds pleasure ina path strewed
with briars and thorns.” This was good counsel,
my young friends, and I hope you will bear it with
you through life. It will serve to comfort you as
much as it did Squire Boone.

To be idle, was to allow time for this mel-
ancholy, and Daniel Boone kept his brother
constantly busy. The Indians, they were certain,

* It is said by some that this man did not thus leave them.
Their story is, that the three started out upon a hunt ; that this
man was separated from the Boones, and became entangled in
a swamp. The Boones searched for him, but could not find
him. Afterward, they found fragments of his clothes, which
convinced them that the poor man had been torn to pieces by
wolves.

Daniel Boone, however, tells a different story. He says that
the man left them, “ and returned home by himself ;” and I
have preferred his statement to any other.
DANIEL BOONE. 45

knew where their present camp was, and therefore
they resolved to make another. After choosing
their spot, they employed themselves industriously
in erecting another cabin, which might serve to
shelter them through the coming winter. This:
being finished, they went to their old sport, wan-
dering through the woods, admiring the country,
and bringing down now and then a buffalo or a deer
with their rifles. At night, they would return to
their camp, raise a fire, cook their supper, and sit
till long after midnight, talking of their old home
on the Yadkin. Squire forgot his loneliness, and
became quite satisfied. In this way time rolled
off until the winter had passed away, and spring
appeared. Strangely enough, they had been un-
disturbed ; they had met not even with one Indian.

They had learned in the wilderness to dispense
well nigh with all comforts ; food and sleep were
all they expected. But their powder and'shot were
now beginning to run low, and without these they
could not long procure food. It was necessary,
therefore, to make some arrangement whereby they
might obtain a fresh supply. Their plan was soon
settled : Squire Boone was to go back to North Car-
olina, and return with ammunition. They supposed
horses would be valuable, also, and he was like-
wise to bring with him two of these. Perilous as
the plan was, Squire agreed to bear his part in it,
and Daniel as cheerfully consented to his. Ac cord-
46 THE ADVENTURES OF

ingly, on the first day of May, Squire set off for
the Yadkin ; and, as if nothing was to be wanting
to leave Daniel in perfect loneliness, their only
dog followed Squire as he started.

Here, then, Daniel Boone was left entirely alone.
Here he was a sort of Robinson Crusoe in the wil-
derness—with this difference, that Robinson was
shipwrecked, and had no choice; while Boone
chose the wilderness as his home. He was now
completely the “man of the woods”—far away,
hundreds of miles from any white settlement. For
the first time in his life, according to his own con-
fession, he felt lonely. His mind was filled with

_ the remembrance of his wife and children, and the

thought that he should never see themagain. He
knew, however, that sad thoughts, when indulged
in, will grow very rapidly, and therefore dismissed
them.

For safety’s sake now, he changed his camp
every night, that he might avoid the Indians. Some-
times he slept in the canebrake ; sometimes he
laid himself by the side of a stream ; sometimes in
the caves of therocks. By day he was surrounded
by his old companions the buffaloes and deer, and at
night was not unfrequently disturbed by the howl-
ing of the wolves. He roamed over many a beau-
tiful tract of country. Now he would ascend a
hill, and look down upon the scene spread like a
map before him ; now he would trace some stream
DANIEL BOONE. 47

to its source, or, following the well-tramped roads
of the buffaloes, would find some spring bubbling
in the forest. In this way he moved over a
large part of the country. At one time, he struck
the Ohio river, and wandered for days on the banks
of that noble stream. It is said, that in his
rambles, he one day stood upon the spot where the
city of Louisville now stands. He learned to love
the woods more than ever. Long after this, he
used to declare, that “no crowded city, with all
its commerce and noble buildings, could give him
as much pleasure as the beauty of Kentucky at
that time afforded him.”

Fortunately, he met no Indians. At one time
he came in sight of a roving party, but man-
aged to escape from them. The mode in which
he escaped will show you his perfect self-posses-
sion. He had stopped one day to rest under the
shade of a tree, when suddenly he spied the
party m the distance. ‘This was enough for him. |
He immediately commenced his course through
the forest, hoping that they had not seen him, and
therefore would not pursue. From time to time he
would look back through the woods ; and at length
became convinced, to his sorrow, that if they had
not seen him, they had marked his tracks, and
were now on his trail. He pushed on for more
than two miles, trying in various ways to break the
trail, and thus put them out; still, as he looked,
ae

—_- ~F

— ~~

48 THE ADVENTURES OF

back, he could see that they were following him.
He was puzzled to know what to do. A happy
thought now struck him. He had just passed the
brow of a small hill ; the heavy grape-vines were
hanging from the trees all around him. He seized
one of these, and, bracing himself against the tree
with his feet, threw himself as far as he could.
This broke the trail, and he now kept directly on
from the spot where he landed, in a different direc-
tion. The Indians came up, tracking him as far
as the tree: were then lost, and gave up the chase.

Another adventure is told of him during his
lonely wanderings, more perilous even than this.
One day he heard a strange noise in the woods ;
he could see nothing, but stood ready with his rifle.
Presently an immense she-bear was seen approach-
ing him. Surrounded by her young cubs, she was
doubly fierce. .As she came near, Boone levelled
his rifle and fired. Unfortunately, his steady eye
failed this time; the ball did not strike as he
had aimed, and the animal pressed forward, the
more enraged. It was impossible to load again:
the bear was upon him; he had only time to draw
his hunting-knife from his belt. The bear laid her
paws on him, and drew him toward her. The rifle
in his left hand was a sort of guard, while with his
right he pointed the knife directly for the heart of
the animal. Asshe grasped him, the knife entered
her body, and she fell dead.
DANIEL BOONE. 49

As the time drew near for the return (as he
hought) of his brother, Boone went back to the
old camp where they had lodged together, to meet
him. Here day after day he kept his lookout—
day after day he was disappointed. He began
now to be very sad. He did not doubt his broth-
er’s fidelity ; he knew he would not desert him ;
but there were many dangers by the way, and
perhaps he had “perished. Then he thought,
too, of his wife and little ones. If that brother
had perished, he likewise must die without seeing
them. Without ammunition to procure food, or
defend himself, what could hedo? He must die,
there in*the walderness. His brother had been
absent now nearly three months: surely it was
time for his return. Another day of disappoint
ment was now drawing to a close, as Boone sat,
sick at heart, by the door of his.cabin. A sound
broke on his ear ; he rose and stood listening, with
his hand on the lock of his rifle. It was the tread
of horses. The next moment he saw his brother
through the forest leading two horses heavily la-
den. Here was abundance of ammunition and
other comfort. The evening of the 27th of July
was long after this remembered by Daniel Boone
as one of the most joyous of his life.

A fire was soon made, their supper cooked, and
long after midnight they sat talking. Thousands
of questions were asked and answered, until,

; 5 |


50 . THE ADVENTURES OF

wearied out, at last they lay down to sleep. The
sun was high in the heavens when they waked in
the morning.

After breakfast, Daniel Boone proposed a new
plan to his brother. Much as he loved the woods,
he felt that two men could hardly be safe in the
neighborhood of so many Indians. Moreover he
longed to see his family: the stories of Squire
had called up fresh recollections in his heart.
The plan therefore was, to select a suitable spot
for their home, then return to Carolina and bring
out his family. Squire readily assented to this;
and now they employed themselves’-for several
days in hunting and laying in a supply of: provis-
ions. ‘This being done, they went to the Cumber-
land river, and wandered for some time along the
stream without finding a place to please them.
Roaming about now, they found many new streams,
to which, as the first discoverers, they gave names.
Anxious as they were to return to the Yadkin,
they were in no such hurry as to neglect making
a full survey. The whole winter passed away
before they pleased themselves. At length they
came upon the Kentucky river. Here the lands
delighted them. On the banks of this stream they
determined to make their settlement, and now
(March, 1771) turned their faces homeward. As
he left the chosen spot, Boone says that “he felt
it was a second paradise, and was resolved, at the
DANIEL BOONE. 51

r’sk of his life and fortune, that his family should
have a home there.”

As they journeyed eastward from the Kentucky
river, they occasionally blazed their pathway (as
huntsmen say) that they might find their way
back. It was necessary thus to leave some track
through the forest wilderness, that they might
again reach their chosen spot.* Fortunately they
met with no Indians.

We hear of but one adventure on their way
homeward. After travelling quietly several days,
they were one morning startled by a noise. Pres-
ently a herd of buffaloes came rushing and tear-
ing through the forest ; they seemed frantic. The
cause of all this was soon seen. A panther, seated
upon the back of one of the buffaloes, had plunged
his claws and teeth into him. The blood was
streaming down his sides, and the poor animal,
struggling to shake him off, rushed into the midst
of the herd. This frightened the rest, and they
went bellowing and dashing through the woods.
Daniel Boone raised his rifle, and sent a ball
through the panther. He fell dead. Not far off
they met a pack of wolves, following as usual in

* This mode of marking their track is often practised by
hunters in the woods. As they pass through the forest, they
mark the trees by cutting off a small piece of the bark. This
enables them again to find the same pathway, and is commonly
called ‘ blazing the track.”
52 THE ADVENTURES OF

the track of the buffaloes. For the fun of seeing
them scatter, Squire now fired his rifle, and away
they went, scampering in all directions.

In due time they came tothe mountains. After
trying to ascend in various places, at length they
found a narrow and rugged gap, through which
with great difficulty they made their way. It was,
however, the best pass they could discover, and
they blazed their track, that they might find
it again. In a little time now, Daniel Boone
was again in his cabin on the banks of the Yad-
kin. I need hardly say there was a joyous meet-
ing ; he was once more happy in the bosom of his
family. He had been absent nearly two years.

Amid the joys of home, however, he did not
forget his chosen spot in Kentucky ; his heart was
filled with the thought that his happy home might
be happier there. As this was to be his final
move, it was necessary to settle all his business
on the Yadkin ; and as he had tried the wilder-
ness, he felt that a few trusty companions would
be invaluable in that new region. He com-
menced, therefore, making what he thought proper
‘preparations for areturn. ‘To beat up such neigh-
bors as they desired, he and Squire gave glowing
accounts of the new country ; the rich lands, the
forests, the streams, the flowers, and the game,
were all talked of. They saw only, and conse-
quently spoke only, of the bright side of the pic-
DANIEL BOONE. 53

ture. But there were numbers of people to talk
of dificultiés ; these spoke of the folly of the
Boones, in thinking of making such a country
their home, and the madness of any man who
should think of following them; the country was
wild, and all who settled there must suffer many
privations : then, too (according to their story), it
was afflicted with terrible diseases, and they might
all expect to die there, or, if they escaped the
climate, they must fall into the hands of the fierce
and cruel Indians who roamed through those for-
ests ; the place they declared was so dangerous
that it was known, wherever it was known, as
“the dark and bloody ground.” With these sad
stories floating about continually, it is not wonder-
ful that the Boones found difficulty in beating up
companions, and that more than two years passed
away before they were ready for a start. At the
end of that time they found that, while many were
opposed to them, and others wavering as to what
they would do, there were some, prompted by a
spirit of bold adventure, ready to join them. Five
families were willing to go with them to Ken-
tucky. |

Daniel Boone now sold his farm, and all things
being made ready, on the 25th of September, 1773,
the little company bade farewell to their friends
and started for the west, driving before them their
flocks and their herds. In their route, not a great

5*
54 THE ADVENTURES OF

way from the Yadkin, was the settlement of Powe
el’s valley. The story of their plan had spread
through the neighborhood, and when they reached
this spot they were delighted to find that the peo-
ple were not so timid as those on the Yadkin:
forty men here joined the party. Now they trav-
elled on in high spirits ; the whole body, old and
young, numbering between seventy and eighty ©
souls.

In a little time they came to the mountains, and
found the pathway blazed by the Boones. In less
than a fortnight they passed the first ridge of the
Alleganies, known as “ Powel’s range,” and were
now quietly descending the second, known as
“ Walden’s range,” when sorrow overtook them.
They were in a dark and narrow gap, when the
wild yell of Indians broke upon their ears. The
savages rushed into the gap behind them, and let
fly their arrows. Six of the party fell dead, a
seventh was wounded. ‘The men rallied around
the women and children; the first discharge of
their rifles scattered the savages. But the mis-
chief was done ; the sudden attack of the Indians
was like a flash.of lightning; they were seen
only for an instant ; yet, like the lightning, they
had done their work: there were the dead, and
alas! among them was the oldest son of Daniel
Boone

The party, a little time before so happy, was
DANIEL BOONE. 55

now in deep sorrow. What was to be done?
The Indians had not only killed their companions,
but their flocks and herds had all fled in fright,
and could not be again gathered together. In
dismay, the greater part were for retreating in-
stantly to the nearest white settlement ; this was
upon the Clinch river, forty miles behind them.
The Boones begged them to keep on their way—
not to think of turning back; but it was all to no
purpose ; most of them insisted on retreating, and
they at length yielded to the general desire. Ac-
cordingly, the dead were decently buried, and in
great sadness they all traced their way back to
Clinch river.

Here Daniel Boone remained with his family
eight months. At the end of that time he was
requested by Governor Dunmore, of Virginia, to
go to the falls of the Ohio, to serve as a guide to
a party of surveyors who had been sent there
some months before. The western country was
now beginning to attract attention, and the Indians —
were becoming very hostile to the whites. Ac-
cordingly, on the 6th of June, 1774, he started
(with one man, Michael Stoner), and without any
accident reached the point at which he aimed—
the spot where Louisville now stands. The ser-
vice for the surveyors was promptly performed,
and they were. -enabled to complete their work,
while Boone was at liberty to return to his fam-
56 THE ADVENTURES OF

ily. It is remarkable that he made this journey on
foot, a distance of eight hundred miles, through a
trackless wilderness, in the short period of sixty-
two days.

He was not allowed to remain quiet long; soon
after his return, the Indians northwest of the Ohio,
especially the Shawanese, made open war upon
the whites. Governor Dunmore felt bound to
protect his countrymen, and, among other acts
for their defence, sent Daniel Boone, with the title
of captain, to take command of three garrisons.
This service was likewise well performed; mat-
ters were soon more quiet, the soldiers were dis-
charged, and Boone was relieved from his post.

He had not been a wanderer in the woods in
vain; his fame had gone abroad, and his services
were in the following spring sought again. A
company of gentlemen in North Carolina—the
principal man of whom was Colonel Richard Hen-
derson—were attempting to purchase the lands on
the south side of the Kentucky river, from the
Cherokee Indians.* They had agreed to hold a
treaty with the Indians, at Wataga, in March,
1775, to settle the boundaries of their intended
purchase, and they now desired Boone to attend
that treaty, and manage their business. In com-
pliance with their wish, he went to Wataga, and

* It is said that it was by Daniel Boone’s advice that they
first thought of making this purchase.
DANIEL BOONE. 57

performed their service so well, that they gave him
further employment. He was now requested to
mark out a road from their settlement, through the
wilderness, to Kentucky river. ‘This was a work
of great labor. It was necessary to make many
surveys to find the best route, and when the best
was found, it was, much of it, over mountains
and rugged regions. With a number of laborers,
he commenced the work. He met with two at-
tacks from the Indians by the way, in which four
of his men were killed, and five wounded. Un-
daunted, he pushed resolutely on, and, in the
month of April, reached the Kentucky river. To
guard themselves from the savages, they immedi-
ately commenced the building of a fort at a salt
lick, about sixty yards from the south bank of the
stream. The Indians annoyed them from time to
time, while they were thus engaged, but fortu-
nately killed but one man. On the 14th day of
June the fort was finished, and Boone started
back for his family on Clinch river. As an honor
to him, the party gave to this first settlement in
the wilderness of Kentucky the name of Boones-
borough. .

He reached his family without accident, and, as
rapidly as he could, retraced his way with them
through the forest. The fort consisted of several
cabins, surrounded by pickets ten feet high, plant-.
ed firmly in the ground. In one of these, Daniel
= _. —_—T: a eC ee ee eT eT ae ee a a ee ee ae) ee ee oe
‘ ‘

58 THE ADVENTURES OF

Boone found a shelter for his family. The long
desire of his heart was at last gratified: he had a
home in Kentucky. He was the first settler of
that region, and (as he proudly said) his “ wife
and daughter the first white women that ever
stood on the banks of Kentucky river.” “
DANIEL BOONE. 59

CHAPTER IV.
Ci “2 (T was now the season of
autumn ; the trees had not yet

ROC Lys WA) shed their leaves, and the for-
= ests were still beautiful. Mrs.
Boone felt happy as she look-
ed upon her new home. Win-
ter came, and glided rapidly
and joyously away. With
A their axes and rifles, the men in the
( settlement brought in constant and
J), ample supplies of fuel and game,
—— » and around the blazing hearth of
° lh \ © Daniel Boone there was not one in the
Zee. family who sighed for the old home on

Â¥ iN the Yadkin. Boone naturally supposed
se that a fear of the Indians would be the
principal trouble with his wife ; and well she
might dread them, remembering the loss of her
son formerly in the pass of the mountains. For-
tunately, however, she did not see an Indian
through the season. But one white man was
killed by them during the winter, and he lost his




60 THE ADVENTURES OF

life by unfortunately wandering away from the
fort unarmed. After this, the other settlers were
more prudent ; they never went without the pick
ets for fuel without taking their rifles.

When spring opened, they were soon very busy.
A small clearing without the pickets was first
made for a garden-spot. Mrs. Boone and her
daughter brought out their stock of garden-seeds,
and commenced cultivating this, while the men
went on earnestly in the work of preparing for
their fields. They were calculating that they
were making their homes for life. Day after day
the neighborhood resounded with the crash of fall-
ing trees, as these hardy men levelled the forests.
While they were thus engaged, they were made
happy by a new arrival. Colonel Calloway, an
old companion of Boone’s, led by the desire of
finding his old friend and a new country, came out
to the settlement this spring, and brought with him
his two young daughters. Here, then, were com-
panions for Boone’s daughter. The fathers were
happy, and the mother and girls delighted.

Spring had not passed away, however, before
they were in sorrow about these children. When
the wild flowers began to bloom in the woods,
the girls were in the habit of strolling around the
fort and gathering them to adorn their humble
homes. This was an innocent and pleasant occu-
pation ; it pleased the girls as well as their parents.
DANIEL BOONE. 61

They were only cautioned not to wander far, for
fear of the Indians. This caution, it seems, was
forgotten. Near the close of a beautiful day in
July, they were wandering, as usual, and the
bright flowers tempted them to stroll thoughtlessly
onward. Indians were in ambush; they were
suddenly surrounded, seized, and hurried away, in
spite of their screams for help. ‘They were car-
ried by their captors to the main body of the In-
dian party, some miles distant. Night came, and’
the girls did not return; search was made for
them, and they were nowhere to be found. The
thought now flashed upon Boone that the children
were prisoners ; the Indians had captured them.
The parents: were well nigh frantic : possibly the
girls were murdered. Boone declared that he
would recover his child, if alive, if he lost his own
life in the effort. The whole settlement was at.
once roused: every man offered to start off with
the two fathers in search of the children. But
Boone would not have them all; some must re-
main behind, to protect the settlement. Of the
whole number he chose seven ; he and Calloway
headed them; and, in less time than I Have. been
telling the story, laden with their knapsacks and
rifles, they were off in pursuit.

Which way were they to go? It was a long
time before they could find a track of the party.
The wily Indians, as usual, had used all their cun-

6


62 THE ADVENTURES OF

ning in hiding their footprints and breaking theit
trail. Covering their tracks with leaves ; walking
at right angles occasionally from the main path ;
crossing brooks by walking in them for some time,
and leaving them at a point far from where they
entered: all this had been practised, and I pre-
sume that the fathers never would have got on the
track if the girls had not been as cunning as their
captors. After wandering about for some time,

they came at length to a brook, and waded along it

for a great while in search of footprints. They
looked faithfully far up and down the stream, for
they knew the Indian stratagem. Presently Cal-
loway leaped up for joy. ‘“ God bless my child !”
cried he; “they have gone this way.” He had
picked up a little piece of riband which one of
his daughters had dropped, purposely to mark the
trail. Now they were on the track. ‘Travelling
on as rapidly as they could, from time to time they
picked up shreds of handkerchiefs, or fragments
of their dresses, that the girls had scattered by
the way. Before the next day ended, they were
still more clearly on the track. They reached a
soft, muddy piece of ground, and found all the
footprints of the party ; they were now able to tell
the number of the Indians. The close of the next
day brought them still nearer to the objects of

their search. Night had set in; they were still
_ ‘wandering on, when, upon reaching a small hill,

. Pa
DANIEL BOONE. 63

they saw a camp-fire in the distance. They were
now delighted ; this surely was the party that had
captured the girls. Everything was left #o the
management of Boone. He brought his men as
near the fire as he dared approach, and sheltered
them from observation under the brow of a hill.
Calloway and another man were then selected |
from the group; the rest were told that they might
go to sleep: they were, however, to sleep on their
arms, ready to start wstantly at a given signal.
Calloway was to go with Boone; the other man
was stationed on the top of the hill, to give the
alarm, if necessary. ‘The two parents now crept
cautiously onward to a covert of bushes not far
from the fire. Looking through, they saw fifteen or |
twenty Indians fast asleep in the camp ; but where
were the girls? Crawling to another spot, they
pushed the bushes cautiously aside, and, to their
great joy, saw in another camp the daughters
sleeping in each other’s arms. ‘Two Indians
with their tomahawks guarded this camp. One
seemed to be asleep. They crept gently around |
in the rear of this. They were afraid to use
their rifles: the report would wake the other
camp. Calloway was to stand ready to shoot the ‘
sleeping Indian if he stirred, while Boone was to
creep behind the other, seize, and strangle him.
They were then to hurry off with the children.
Unfortunately, they calculated wrong: the
64 THE ADVENTURES OF

whom they supposed to be sleeping was wide
awake, and, as Boone drew near, his shadow was
seeughy this man. He sprang up, and the woods
rangggiith his yell. ‘The other camp was roused ;
the Indians came rushing to this. Boone’s first
impulse was to use his rifle, but Calloway’s pru-
dence restrained him. Had he fired, it would have
been certain destruction to parents and children.
They surre themselves prisoners, pleading
earnestly at the’ same time for their captive daugh-
ters.. The Indians bound them with cords, placed
guards over them, and then retired to their camp.
The poor girls, roused by the tumult, now saw
their parents in this pitiable condition. Here they
were, likewise made captives, for their love of
them.

There was no more sleep in the Indian camp
that night. Till the dawn of the day they were talk-
ing of what should be done to the new prisoners :
some were for burning them at the stake ; others
objected to this. Boone and Calloway were to be
killed, but they were too brave to be killed in this
way. Some proposed making them run the gaunt-
let. At last it was decided (in pity for the girls, it
is said) that the parents should be killed in a more
decent and quiet way. They were to be toma- |
hawked and scalped, and the girls were still to be
kept prisoners. With the morning’s light they
started out to execute the sentence. That the
DANIEL BOONE. 65

poor girls might not see their parents murdered
the men were led off to the woods, and there lashed
to two trees. Two of the savages stood before
them with their tomahawks, while the rest.were
singing and dancing around them. At length the
tomahawks were lifted to strike them; at that instant
the crack of rifles was heard, and the two Indians
fell dead. Another and another report was heard :
' others fell, and the rest fled in dismay. Boone’s.
companions had saved them. All night long they
had waited for the signal: none had been given ;
they had heard the Indian yell; they feared that
they were taken. They had watched the camp
with the greatest anxiety, and now had delivered
them. They were instantly untied ; the girls were
quickly released, and in the arms of their parents ;
and they all started joyously homeward. Mrs.
Boone was delighted to see them. The party had
been so long gone, that she feared her husband
and child were alike lost to her for ever.

Itis not surprising.that when men found out that
a settlement had been made in Kentucky, others
were soon ready to start off for that fertile region.
Accordingly, we find many arriving this year, and
settling themselves in the country. Harrod, Lo-
gan, Ray, Wagin, Bowman, and many other fear-
less spirits, now threw themselves, like Boone,
into the heart of the wilderness, and made their
forts, or stations, as they were called. Phese

: ge




66 THE ADVENTURES OF

were just like the home of Boone—nothing more
than a few log cabins, surrounded by pickets. In-
deed, the country began now to assume so much
importance in the eyes of men, that the Governor
of Virginia thought proper to take some notice
of it. When the legislature met, he recommended
that the southwestern part of the county of Fin-
castle—which meant all the large tract of country
west of the Alleganies now known as Kentucky
—should be made into a separate county, by the
name of Kentucky. The legislature thought it
well to follow his advice. The new county was
made, and had the privilege of sending two mem-
bers to the Virginia’legislature.

Nor is it surprising that the Indians began now
to be more violent than ever in tHeir enmity. They
had been unwilling before that a. white man should
cross their path as they roamed over their hunting-
grounds ; but now, when they saw clearings made,
and houses built, they felt that the whites meant
to drive them for ever from that region. ‘Their
hatred consequently increased now every hour.
Another circumstance at this time served to
rouse them the more against the settlers. If
you will think of the period of which I am
speaking (the year 1776), perhaps you may guess
what.it was. The colonists of America in that
year, you will remember, declared themselves in-
depéndent of Great Britain. In the wat which
DANIEL BOONE. 67

followed (known among us always as the Revolu-
tionary War), England struggled hard to subdue
them ; nor was she always choice as to the means
wkich she used for the purpose. She did not hes-
itate even to rouse the red men of the forests, and
give them arms to fight the colonists. They were
not only turned loose upon them with their own
tomahawks and scalping-knives, but were well .,
supplied with British rifles and balls. All the new
settlements in the land were troubled with them,
and Kentucky had to bear her part of the sorrow.
These Indians would scatter themselves in small
parties, and hang secretly for days and nights
around the infant stations. Until one is acquaint-
ed with Indian stratagems, he can hardly tell how
cunning these people are. By day they would
hide themselves ir the grass, or behind the stumps
of trees, near the pathways to the fields or springs
of water, and it was certain death to the white
man who travelled that way. Atnight they would
creep up to the very gateway of the pickets, and
watch for hours for a white man. If any part of
his person was exposed, he was sure to catch @
rifle-ball. It was impossible to discover them,
even when their mischief was done. They would
lie in the grass flat on their bellies for days, al-
most under the very palisades. Sometimes an In-
dian yell would be heard near one point of the fort,
startling all the settlers—a yell raised only to draw
68 THE ADVENTURES OF

them all in one direction, while the Indians did
their mischief in another In this sneaking mode
of warfare, men, women, and children, were killed
in many places ; and not unfrequently whole droves
of cattle were cut off.

At length, to the great joy of the settlers, the
Indians began to show themselves more boldly :
for anything was better than these secret ambuslies
of the savages ; an open enemy is not so much to
be dreaded as a secret one. Boonesborough and
Harrodsburgh (a settlement made by James Har-
rod, a bold adventurer from the banks of the Mo-
nongahela) were now the principal stations. ‘Tow-
ard these, new emigrants were from time to time
moving, and against these stations,-as being the
strongest, the Indians felt the greatest hatred, and
directed their principal attacks. Early in the
spring of 1777, a party was moving toward Har-
rodsburgh : fortunately, the Indians attacked them ;
for, though two whites were killed, the attack
probably saved the settlement. It was only four
miles from the place, and the Indians were now
on their way there. One young man escaped in
the midst of the fight to give the alarm at Harrods-
burgh. The station was instantly put in a state
of defence. Ere long, the Indians appeared. A
brisk firing at once commenced on both sides ; the
savages saw one of their men fall, and finding that
they were not likely to gain any advantage, soon
DANIEL BOONE. 69

scattered forthe woods. The whites lost one man
also, and three were slightly wounded.

On the 15th of April, a party of one hundred
savages appeared boldly before Boonesborough.
Every man of them was armed with his gun, as
well as bow and arrows. Boone, however, was
prepared for them, and gave them a warm recep-
tion—so warm, that they soon gladly retreated.
How many of their men were killed it was im-
possible*to tell, for they dragged away their dead
with them. In the fort one man was killed, and
four were badly wounded.

Their loss this time only served to make them
more revengeful. In July following they again
came against Boonesborough, resolved upon ven-
geance. ‘They numbered this time more than two
hundred. To prevent any of the white settlements
from sending aid to Boonesborough, they had sent
off small parties to molest them, and keep them
busy. The savages now commenced their attack,
and for two days a constant firing was kept up.
At last, finding their efforts again idle, they raised
a loud yell, and returned to the forests. The
whites could now count their slain and wounded
as they dragged them off: seven were killed, and
nunbers wounded, while in the fort only one white
man was slain. In spite of their numbers and
their cunning, they did but little harm : for Boone
was never found sleeping ; he knew that Indians
70 THE ADVENTURES OF

were his neighbors, and he was always ready for
them. After this, they learned to dread him more
than ever. He now went by the name of the
“Great Long Knife.” :

Attacks of this kind were made from time to
time openly against the settlements, but especially
against these two principal stations. They all
ended very much in the same way, and it would
only weary you if I should attempt to speak of
them. It is enough for you to know that the
whites were always on the lookout, and that
Boone was regarded as their principal leader and
protector. We will pass on, therefore, to some-
thing more interesting.

I have already stated that the stations of these
settlers were usually built, for comfort’s sake, in
the neighborhood of salt licks or springs ; and near
such a lick, as you will remember, Boonesborough
stood.. The supply of salt, however, was not suf-
ficient ; new settlers were often arriving, and it
became necessary to seek a place which would
afford more of that article. Boone was the father
of the settlement, and he undertook to find it.
Having selected thirty men as his companions, on
the lst of January, 1778, he started for the Blue
Licks, on Licking river—a stream, as you know,
emptying itself into the Ohio opposite where Cin-
cinnati now stands. Upon reaching this spot, the
thirty men were soon very busy in making salt,
DANIEL BOONE. — 71

Boone, having no taste for the work, sauntered off
to employ himself in shooting game for the com-
pany. He had wandered some distance from the
river one day, when suddenly he came upon two
Indians armed with muskets. It was impossible for
him to retreat, and the chances were against him
if he steod. His usual coolness did not forsake
him; he instantly jumped behind a tree. As the
Indians came within gun-shot, he exposed himself
on the side of the tree: one savage immediately
fired, and Boone dodged the ball. One shot was
thus thrown away, and this was just what he de-
sired. Exposing himself immediately in precisely
the same way, the other musket was discharged
by the other Indian, to as little purpose. He now
stepped boldly out; the Indians were trying hard
to load again ; he raised his rifle, and one savage
fell dead. He was now on equal terms with the
other. Drawing his hunting-knife, he leaped for,
ward and placed his foot upon the body of the dead
{ndian; the other raised his tomahawk to strike
but Boone, with his rifle in his left hand, warded
off the blow, while with his right he plunged his
knife into the heart of the savage. His two foes
lay dead before him. If you should ever
Washington city, you will see a memorial of this
deed. The act is in sculpture, over the southern
door of the rotundo of the capitol.

After this he continued his hunting excursions
72 THE ADVENTURES OF

as usual, for the benefit of his party ; but he was
not so fortunate the next time he met with Indians.
On the 7th of February, as he was roaming through
the woods, he saw a party of one hundred savages
on their way to attack Boonesborough. His only
chance for escape now was to run. He instantly
fled, but the swiftest warriors gave chase, and be-
fore a great while he was overtaken and made a
prisoner. He was, of all men, the one whom they
desired to take; they could now gain, as they
thought, some information about Boonesborough.
They now carried him back to the Blue Licks.
As they drew near, Boone, knowing that it was
idle to resist, made signs to the salt-makers to sur-
render themselves. ‘This they did, and thus the
savages soon had in their possession tweaty-eight
captives. Fortunately for themselves, three of the
men had started homeward with a supply of salt,
and thus escaped. ?
"Now was the time for the savages to have at-
tacked Boonesborough ; for, with the loss of so
many men, and Boone their leader, we may readily
suppose that the station might have surrendered.
Flushed, however, with the capture of their pris-
oners, they seem not to have thought of it any
longer.

The prisoners were marched immediately to Old
Chilicothe, the principal Indian town on the Little
Miami, where they arrived on the 18th. There
7 ae eee
â„¢

DANIEL BOONE. . 73

.
was great rejoicing over them when they reached
this old settlement of the savages, though Boone
says they were “treated as kindly as prisoners
could expect.” Early in the next month Boone
with ten of his men was marched off to Detroit
by forty Indians. Here Governor Hamilton, the
British commander of that post, treated them with
much kindness. The ten men were soon deliv-
ered up for a small ransom. But when the
Governor offered them one hundred pounds to
give up Boone, that he might allow him to return
home, they refused to part with him ; they looked
upon him as too dangerous an enemy to be allowed
to go free upon any terms. Several English gen-.
tlemen were moved with pity when they saw Boone
thus a helpless prisoner, and offered to supply his
wants. He thanked them for their feeling, but re-
fused to receive any aid, stating that he never ex-
pected to be able to return their kindness, and:
therefore was unwilling to receive it. The truth
was, he was not disposed to receive assistance
from the enemies of his country. |
With no other prisoner than Boone, the Sart

now started again for Old Chilicothe. As they» » .

drew near, after a very fatiguing march,

thought he understood why they had refused to

part with him. Before they entered the village,

they shaved his ead, painted his face, and dressed

him like themselves; they then placed in his
, 7




ie.
74 THE ADVENTURES OF

hands a long white staff, ornamented with deers’
tails. ‘The chief of the party then raised a yell,
and all the warriors from the village answered it,
and soon made their appearance. Four young
warriors commenced singing as they came toward
him. The two first, each bearing a calumet, took
him by the arms and marched him to a cabin in
the village; here he was to remain until his fate
was made known to him. Of all strange customs
of the Indians (and he had seen many of them),
this was the strangest to him. It is not wonder-
ful that he thought he was now to die.

Yet this was a common custom (it is said) among
the Shawanese, who inhabited this village. Pris-
oners were often thus carried to some cabin, and
then the Indian living in the cabin decided what
should be done—whether the prisoner should die,
or be adopted into the tribe. It happened that in
this cabin lived an old Indian woman, who had
lately lost a son in battle. She, of course, was to
decide Boone’s fate. She looked at him earnestly,
admired his aoble bearing and cheerful face, and
at length declared that he should live. He should
aewbe her son, she said; he should be to her the son

, “Ge she had lost. The young warriors instantly
~ alfffounced to him his*fate, and the fact was soon
proclaimed through the village. Food was brought
out and set before him ; and every effort, which In-
dian love could think of, was used to make him .
DANIEL BOONE. 75

happy. He was fairly one of the tribe; and the
old woman who was to be his mother was- espe-
cially delighted.

He was now as free as the rest; his only agr-
row was that he had to live among them. He
knew, too, that if he should be caught trying to
make his escape, it would be certain death to him.
He pretended, therefore, to be cheerful and hap-
py ; and fortunately his old habits enabled him to
play his part well. Like them, he was a man of
the woods, and as fond of hunting as any of them.
They all soon became attached to him, and treated
him with the utmost confidence.

Sometimes large parties would go out to try |

their skill at their sports of racing and shooting at
a mark. Boone was always with them ; he knew,
however, that in trials of this kind the Indians
were always jealous if they were beaten, and
therefore he had to act very prudently. At racing,
they could excel him; but at shooting, ‘hegwas
more than a match for any of them. Still, when
the target was set up, he was always certain to be
beaten. If he shot too well, they would be jeal-
ous and angry; if he shot badly, they would hold
him in contempt: and therefore he would manage
to make good shots, and yet never be the success
ful man. He knew too much of Indians not to
conduct himself properly.

Sometimes they would start out upon hunting
76 THE ADVENTURES OF

parties. Here Boone was at home ; there was no
jealousy when he brought down a buffalo or a deer
with his rifle-ball. He might do his best; they
“- true hunters themselves, and were delighted
with every successful shot. Returning to the vil-
lage, Boone would always visit the Shawanese
chief, and present him a portion of his game. By
this kindness and civility he completely won the
heart of the chief,and was not unfrequently consult-
ed by him on important matters. ‘Thus he passed
his time, joining in all their modes of living; he
was beloved by the old woman, the chief, and all
the tribe: and none suspected that he was not

_ contented and happy.

On the 1st of June, a large party was starting
from the village for the salt-licks on the Scioto, to
make salt. Boone pretended to be indifferent
whether he went or not. The truth was, how-
ever, that he was very anxious to go, for he thought
it would afford a fine opportunity for him to escape.
He seemed so indifferent about the matter, that the
party"urged him to accompany them, and off he
started. For ten days most of them were busy
making salt, while Boone and two or three of the
best marksmen hunted for the benefit of the rest.
He watched his chance fore escape, but none oc-
curred ; he was closely observed ; it was impossi-

. ble for him to attempt,it. To his great sorrow, he

was forced to return home with the salt-makers.
DANIEL BOONE. 77

They had scarcely got back, when the whole
village was summoned to the council-hcuse, to at-
tend a council of war. Boone, as belonging to
one of the principal families, went to this co
Here he met four hundred and fifty armed ==
all gayly painted. One of the oldest warriors then
struck a large drum, and marched with the war-
standard three times round the council-house : this
was the sure signal that they were about to make
war upon some enemy. But who was the enemy ?
What was Roone’s surprise when it was announced
that they meant to attack Boonesborough! He re-
solved now that he would escape, even at every
hazard, and alarm the settlement. Still his pru-
dence did not forsake him. ¢

The old warriors at once commenced gathering
together a supply of parched corn, and beating up
more recruits for the expedition, All the new
men (Boone among the rest, for he’ was forced to
join them) were then marched off to the “ winter-
house” to drink the war-drink. ‘This was a mix-
ture of water and bitter herbs and roots, and was
to be drank steadily for three days, during which
time no man was to eat a morsel. Even if a deer
or buffalo passed by;no man was to kill it; the fast
must be kept. In fact, no man was allowed even
to sit down, or rest himself by leaning against a
tree. ‘This was done by the old men to purify
the young warriors, as they said, and to gain the

7* .




Me

.


78 THE ADVENTURES OF

favor of the Great Spirit. All this was a common
practice with the tribe before they went to battle ;
and the more strictly the fast was kept, the greater

ey supposed) were the chances of success.
=. these three days, Boone, like the rest, kept
the fast, drank the war-drink, and did not even
leave the “ medicine-ground.”

The fast being over, they fired their guns,
yelled, danced, and sang; and in the midst of this
noise the march commenced. The leading war-
chief, bearing the medicine-bag, or budget (as it
was called), went before; the rest followed in
single file. Nothing but shouting and yelling, and
the noise of guns, was heard, as they passed
through the villagetâ„¢ When they reached the
woods, all the noise ceased ; they were fairly on
their march, and that march was to be made after
the Indian fashion, in dead silence. For several
days this dead march was kept up, Boone looking '
every hour for his chance of escape. At length,
early one morning, a deer dashed by the line.
Boone leaped eagerly after him, and started in
pursuit. No sooner was he out of sight of the
Indians, than he pressed for Boonesborough. He
knew they would give chase, and therefore he
doubled his track, waded in streams, and did every-
thing that he could to throw them off his trail.



Every sound startled him; he thouglit the Indians | é

were behind him. With no food but roots and
D4NIKI ROONE 79

berries, and scarcely time to devour these, he
pushed through swamps and thickets for his old
home. Now or never was his chance for liberty,
and as such he used it. At length, after
dering nearly two hundred miles, on the fourt
he reached Boonesborough in safety.




80 THE ADVENTURES OF

CHAPTER V.

EFORE we go on, let me
tell you of some of the cu-
{a} rious customs which Boone
Ve noticed among the Indians,
during his captivity. He had
we ~~ a fine opportunity for observa-
JI 9% J\ tion, and I think these strange
7 CY customs will interest you.
wR ° It is not wonderful that Indian
- men and women are so hardy ; they
}



SY are trained to it from their youth:

» and Boone tells us how they are
trained. When achild is only eight

“a i G years old, this training ‘commences ; he

g is then made to fast frequently half a

. day ; when he is twelve, he is made to

fast a whole day. During the time of this fast,
the child -is left alone, and his face is always
blacked. This mode of hardening them is kept .
up with girls until they are fourteen—with boys
until they are eighteen. At length, when a boy
DANIEL BOONE. 81

has reached the age of eighteen, his parents tell
him that his educatfon is completed, and that he i
old enough to be a man: His face is now
blacked for the last time. He is taken to
tary cabin far away from the village ; his
blacked, and then his father makes to hi
speech of this kind: “ My son, the Great Spirit
has allowed you to live to see this day. We have
all noticed your conduct since [| first began to
black your face. All people will understand wheth-
er you have followed your father’s advice, and
they will treat you accordingly. You must now
remain here until I come after you.” The lad is
then left alone. His father then goes off hunting,
as though nothing had happened, and leaves his
boy to bear his hunger as long it is possible for
him to starve and live. At length he prepares) a
great feast, gathers his friends together, and then
returns. The lad is then brought home, his face
is washed in cold water, his hair is shaved, leav-
ing nothing but the scalp-lock ; they all commence
eating, but the food of the lad is placed before him
in a separate dish. This being over, a looking-
glass and a bag of paint are then presented to him.
Then they all praise him for his firmness, and tell
him that he isa man. Strange as it may seem,a
boy is hardly ever known to break his fast

he is blacked this way for the last time.
looked upon as something base, and they have a










82 THE ADVENTURES OF

dread that the Great Spirit will punish them if
hey are disobedient to their parents.
other curious habit*which surprised Boone
at of continually changing names. A white
arries the same name from the cradle to the
e, but among these people it was very differ-
ent. Their principal arms, as you know, are the
tomahawk and scalping-knife, and he who can
take the greatest number of scalps is the greatest
man. From time to time, as warriors would re-.
turn from an attack upon some enemy, these new
names would begin to be known. Each man
would count the number of scalps he had taken,
and a certain number entitled him to a new name,
in token of his bravery. It is not wonderful that
they were revengeful, when they were stimulated
by this sort of ambition. Besides this, they be-
lieved that he who took the scalp of a brave man
' received at once all his courage and other good
qualities ; and this made them more eager in their
thirst for scalps. In this way, names of warriors
were sometimes changed three or four times in a
year.

Marriages in this tribe were conducted very de-
cently. When a young warrior desired to marry,
he assembled all his friends, and named the wo-
man whom he wished for his wife. His relations
then received his present, and took it to the parents
of the young woman. If they were pleased with
DANIEL BOONE. 83

the proposal, they would dress the young woman
in her gayest clothes, and take her, with bundles
of presents, to the friends of the warrior ; the
she pleased, she was to be married. The
no compulsion in the matter. If she was no
isfied, she had only to return his present to the
young warrior, and this was considered a refusal.

Their mode of burying their dead was very
much like that of all the Indians. The dead body
was sometimes placed in a pen made of sticks and
covered over with bark ; sometimes it was placed _
in a grave, and covered first with bark, and then —
with dirt ; and sometimes, especially in the case
of the young, it was placed in a rude coffin, and
suspended from. the top of a tree. This last was
a common mode of infant burial, and the mother
of the child would often be found, long after,
standing under the tree, and ‘singing songs to her
babe.

Boone witnessed, too, the mode in which war-
parties start off for war. The budget, or medicine=
bag, is first made up. This bag contains some-
thing belonging to each man of the _party—some-
thing usually representing some animal, such as
the skin of a snake, the tail of a buffalo, the horns ©
of a buck, or the feathers of a bird. It is always
regarded as a very sacred thing. The leader of
the party goes before with this; the rest follow in
single file. When they come to a stand, the



, 84 THE ADVENTURES OF

budget is laid down in front, and no man may
pass it without permission. To keep their thoughts
n the enterprise in which they are engaged, no
allowed to talk of womenor his home. At
, when they encamp, the heart of whatever
animal has been killed during the day is cut into
small pieces and then burnt. During the burning
no man is allowed to step across the fire, but must
always walk around it in the direction of the sun.
When they spy the enemy, and the attack is to be
made, the war-budget is opened. Hach man takes
out his budget, or totem, and fastens it to his
body. After the fight, each man again returns his
totem to the leader. They are all again tied up,
and given to the man who has taken the first
scalp. He then leads the party in triumph home.

Boone had not Jong been a prisoner among them —
when a successful war-party returned home and
celebrated their victory. When the party came
within a day’s march of the village, a messenger
was sent in to tell of their success. An order
was instantly issued that every cabin should be
swept clean, and the women as quickly commenced
the work. When they had finished, the cabins
were all inspected, to see if they were in proper
order. Next day the party approached the village.
They were all frightfully painted, and each man
had a bunch of white feathers on his head. They
were marching in single file, the chief of the party



DANIEL BOONE. 85

leading the way, bearing in one hand a branch of
cedar, laden with the scalps they had taken, and
all chanting their war-song. As they entered the
village, the chief led the way to the vere
which stood in front of the council-house. In this. -
house the council-fire was then burning. The ,
waiter, or Etissu of the leader, then fixed two
blocks of wood near the war-pole, and placed up-
on them a kind of ark, which was regarded by
them as one of their most sacred things. The
chief now ordered that all should sit down. “He
then inquired whether his cabin was prepared, and
everything made ready, according to the custom
of his fathers. They then rose up and commenced
the war-whoop, as they marched round the war-
pole. ‘The ark was then taken and carried with
great solemnity into the council-house, and here
the whole. party remained three days and nights,
separate from the rest of the people. Their first
business now was to wash themselves clean, and
sprinkle themselves with a mixture of bitter herbs.
While they were thus in the house, all their fe-
male relatives, after having bathed and dressed
themselves in their finest clothes, placed them-
selves in two lines facing each other on each side
of thedoor. Here they continued singing a slow mo-
notonous song all day and night ; the song was kept
up steadily for one minute, with intervals of ten
minutes of dead silence between. About once in
8
86 _ THE ADVENTURES OF

three hours the chief would march out at the head of
his warriors, raise the war-whoop, and pass around
the war-pole, bearing his branch of cedar. This
Â¥ all that was done for the whole three days and
nights. -At length the purification was ended, and
upon each of their cabins was placed a twig of the
cedar with a fragment of the scalps fastened to it,
to satisfy the ghosts of their departed friends. Alt
were now quiet as usual, except the leader of the
party and his waiter, who kept up the purification

three days and nights longer. When he had fin-

ished, the budget was hung up before his door for
thirty or forty days, and from time to time Indians
of the party would be seen singing and dancing
before it. When Boone asked the meaning of all
this strange ceremony, they answered him by a
word which he says meant holy.

As this party had brought in no prisoners, he
did not now witness their horrible mode of torture.
Before he left them, however, he saw enough of
their awful cruelty in this way. Sometimes the
poor prisoner would be tied to a stake, a pile of
green wood placed around him, fire applied, and
the poor wretch left to his horrible fate, while,
amid shouts and yells, the Indians departed.
Sometimes he would be forced to run the gauntlet
between two rows of Indians, each one striking
at him with a club until he fell dead. Others
would be fastened between two stakes, their arms
DANIEL BOONE. 87

and legs stretched to each of them, and then quick-
ly burnt by a blazing fire. A common mode was
to pinion the arms of the prisoner, and then tie one
end of a grape-vine around his neck, while the
other was fastened to the stake. A fire was th
kindled, and the poor wretch would walk the circ
this gave the savages the comfort of seeing the
poor creature literally roasting, while his agony
was prolonged. Perhaps this was the most popu-
lar mode, too, because all the women and children
could join init. They were there, with their bun-
dles of dry sticks, to keep the fire blazing, and
their long switches, to beat the prisoner. Fearful
that their victim might die too soon, and thus .es-
cape their cruelty, the women would knead cakes
of clay and put them on the scull of the poor suf-
ferer, that the fire might not reach his brain and -
instantly kill him. As the poor frantic wretch
would run round the circle, they would yell, dance,
and sing, and beat him with their switches, until
he fell exhausted. At other times, a poor prisoner
would be tied, and then scalding water would be
poured upon him from time to time till he died.
It was amazing, too, to see how the warriors
would sometimes bear these tortures. Tied to the
stake, they would chant their war-songs, threaten
their captors with the awful vengeance of their
tribe, boast of how many of their nation they had
scalped, and tell their tormentors how they might



88 THE ADVENTURES OF

increase their torture. In the midst of the fire

they would stand unflinching, and die without

changing a muscle. It was their glory to die in

this way ; they felt that they disappointed their
emies in their last triumph.

While Boone was with them, a. noted warrior
of one of the western tribes, with which the Shaw-
anese were at war, was brought in as a captive.
He was at once condemned, stripped, fastened to
the stake, and the fire kindled. After suffering
without flinching for a long time, he laughed at his
captors, and told them they did not know how to
make an enemy eatfire. He called for a pipe and
tobacco. Excited by his bravery, they gave it to
him. He sat down on the burning coals, and com-
menced smoking with the utmost composure ; not
a muscle of his countenance moved. Seeing this,
one of his captors sprang forward and cried out
that he was a true warrior. ‘Though he had mur-
dered many of their tribe, yet he should live, if
the fire had not spoiled him. The fire had, how-
ever, well nigh done its work. With that, he de-
clared that he was too brave a man to suffer any
longer. He seized a tomahawk and raised it over
the head of the prisoner: still a muscle did not
move. He did not even change his posture.
The blow was given, and the brave warrior fell
dead.

While among them, Boone also witnessed the
DANIEL BOONE. ‘89

mode in which, the Shawanese make a treaty of
peace. The warriors of both tribes between which
the treaty was to be made, met together first, ate
and smoked in a friendly way, and then pledged
themselves in a sacred drink called cussena.

t

Shawanese then waved large fans, made of ant

tails, and danced. ‘The other party, after this,
chose six of their finest young men, painted them
with white clay, and adorned their heads with
swans’ feathers ; their leader was then placed on
what was called the “consecrated seat.” After
this they all commenced dancing, and singing
their song of peace. They danced first in a bend-

ing posture ; then stood upright, still dancing, and _
bearing in their right hands their fans, while in ~

their left they carried a calabash, tied to a stick
about a foot long, and with this continually beat
their breasts. During all this, some added to the
noise by rattling pebbles in a gourd. This being
over, the peace was concluded. It was an act
of great solemnity, and no warrior was considered
as well trained, who did not know how to join in
every part of it.

Many other strange things were seen by Boone
among these people, but these are enough to show
you that he was among a strange people, with
habits very unlike his own. It is not wonderful
that he sighed to escape, when he looked upon
their horrid tortures. Independently of his love

8* |




90 THE ADVENTURES OF

for Boonesborough, he did not know but that such
tortures might be,his at any moment, when they
became excited. Fortunately, as we have seen,
he did escape, and we will now go on with his

story.

e
DANIEL BOONE. . Qt

CHAPTER VI.

HEN Boone reached Boones-
borough, the object he most
loved was not to be found.
His poor wife, wearied with
waiting for him, and naturally
concluding that he was lost to
her fur ever, had returned to
her friends on the Yadkin.
< The settlers,had begged her to re-
y main, and offered her every kind-
! ness; but her husband was gone:

PE %
re a





t

7, She was heart-sick, and longedâ„¢te,
return to her friends in Carolina, *
Disappointed as he was, however, he
had no time to waste in sorrow. The
Indians were approaching, and Boones-
borough was well nigh defenceless. Just before
his return, a Major Smith had taken charge of the
post, and been busy in strengthening it, but much
was still to be done. Boone’s energies were now
at work, and in a little time the station was ready
for an attack. A white man now came into the sete


92 * THE ADVENTURES OF

tlement with news. He had escaped from the Ine
dians. ‘The party from which Boone had escaped
‘had postponed their attack for three weeks, and
gone back to strengthen themselves. They felt
that Boone had reached home—the alarm was

@given, the place fortified—and that it was idle to
attack it at this time.

Boone determined at once to improve the mean
season. With nineteen men, he started off
to surprise the Indians at Paint Creek Town, a
small village on the Scioto. When he came with-
in four miles of the place, he met a party of the
savages on their way to join the large body march-
ing against Boonesborough. The fight instantly
commenced: one Indian fell dead, several were
wounded, and the rest were forced to retreat ; their
horses and all their baggage fell into the hands of
Boone. Two men were now sent to reconnoitre

' the town. They found no Indians there ; they
had all left. After setting fire to the village, they
returned, and Boone immediately hurried home-
ward.

He had scarcely entered the station, and closed
the gates, when an army of four hundred and forty-
four Indians, led on by a Frenchman named Du-

_ quesne, appeared before the settlement. They
soon sent in a flag, demanding, in the name of the
King of Great Britain, that the station should in-
stantly surrender. A council was immediately
DANIEL BOONE. . 93

held in the fort. With such a force before them,
Smith was in favor of meeting their proposal;
Boone opposed it ; the settlers backed him in this
opposition ; and he sent back for an answer to the
Indians that the gates should never be opened to
them. Presently another flag of truce was sent
in, with a message that they had a letter for Colonel
Boone from Governor Hamilton, of Detroit. Upon
hearing this, it was thought best that Boone and”
Smith should go out and meet them, and hear what
they had to say.

Fifty yards from the fort they were met by three
chiefs, who received them very cordially, and led
them to the spot where they were to hold the par-
ley. Here they were seated upon a panther’s
skin, while the Indians held branches over their
heads to protect them from the sun. The chiefs
then commenced talking in a friendly way, and
some of their warriors now came forward, ground-
ed their arms, and shook hands withthem. Then
the letter of General Hamilton was read ; he invi-
ted them to surrender and come at once to Detroit
where they should be treated with all kindness.
Smith objected to this proposal, declaring that it
was impossible for them, at this time, to move
their women ‘and children; but the Indians had
an answer ready: they-had brought forty hor-
ses with them, they said, expressly to help them |
in removing. After a long and friendly talk, the
94 THE ADVENTURES OF

white men returned to the fort, for the purpose, as
they said, of considering the proposal. They
now informed the settlers that the Indians had no
cannon, and advised them never to think of sur-
rendering. Every man thought the advice good.

‘The Indians now sent in another flag, and ask-
ed what treaty the whites were ready to make.
Boone, who had suspected treachery all the time,
at once sent a reply, that if they wished to make
a treaty, the place for making it, must be within
sixty yards of the fort. ‘This displeased them at
first, but at last, they consented. He then sta-
tioned some of his men, with their guns, in one
angle of the fort, with orders to fire if it became
necessary, and, with Smith, started out to meet
them. After a long talk with thirty chiefs, terms
were agreed upon, and the treaty was ready to be
signed ; the chiefs now said that it was custom-
ary with them, on such occasions, for the Indians
to shake hands with every white man who signed
the treaty, as a token of the warmest friendship.
Boone and Smith agreed to this, and the shaking
of hands commenced ; presently, they found them-
selves seized in the crowd—the Indians were
dragging them off; a fire from the fort now lev-
elled*the savages who grasped them; the rest
were in confusion, and, in the confusion, Boone
and Smith escaped and rushed into the fort. In
the struggle Boone was wounded, though not dan-
DANIEL BOONE. 95

gerously. It was a narrow escape for both of
them.

There was no more chance for deception now ;
the Indians were disappointed, and the whites
were provoked at their treachery. A brisk firing

now commenced on both sides; Duquesne ha- -

rangued the Indians and urged them on, while the
whites shouted from the fort, upbraided them as

treacherous cowards, and defied them. ‘The at- |

tack was furious, the firing was kept up till dark,
and many an Indian fell that day before Boones-
borough. The whites, sheltered by their pickets,
made easy havoc among them.

When night came, the exasperated Indians
crawled under the pickets and began to throw
burning materials into the fort, hoping to set all
on fire; but in this they were disappointed—there

were ample supplies of water inside, and the fire

was put out as fast as it fell.

The next day the firing was resumed, and day
after day it continued, the Indians failing to make
any impression. They were too far from the fort
—the first day’s work had taught them not to
come near. At last they formed a wiser plan for
doing mischief. Boonesborough, as you will re-
member, was only sixty yards from the river, and

they determined, by the advice of the Frenchman, .
to let the water in and force the settlers out. In ©)

the night, they commenced the work of digging @

ica oe
I ore
96 THE ADVENTURES OF

trench under ground, from the river. In the morn-
ing Boone looked out upon the river, and perceiv-
ing that it was muddy, instantly guessed the cause.
He immediately set his men to the work of cut-
ting a trench inside the fort, to cross the subterra-
nean passage of the Indians. The savages saw
what was doing, for Boone’s men were constantly
shovelling dirt over the pickets, but they persever-
ed earnestly in their design. At last, however,
they were forced to stop, for the dirt caved in
as fast as they dug; disappointed in this, they
now summoned the station once more to a treaty.
But Boone laughed at them. “ Do you suppose,”
said he, “ we would pretend to treat with such
treacherous wretches? Fire on, you only waste
your powder ; the gates shall never be opened to
you while there is a man of us living.” Taking
his advice, they commenced their firing again ; at
last, on the ninth day of the siege, wearied with
their fruitless labor, they killed all the cattle they
could find, raised a yell, and departed. This was
a terrible siege for the Indians ; it is said that they
lost two hundred men; Boone counted thirty-sev-
en chief warriors ; while the whites, defended by
their pickets, had but two killed and four wounded.
You may judge, too, how industrious the savages
had been, when I tell you that the whites who
wanted lead, commenced gathering their balls af-
ter they left, and succeeded in picking out of the
DANIEL BOONE. 97

logs, and from the ground, one hundred and twenty-
five pounds.

Boone having thus successfully defended his
settlement, determined now to go in search of his
wife. Accustomed to travelling through the woods,
he soon made his lonely journey to the Yadkin.
They were amazed as he entered the house of
Mr. Bryan, his wife’s father. ‘The appearance of
one risen from the grave could not have surprised
them more than that of Boone—the lost man was
among them, and great was their rejoicing. He
now remained here with his family for some time,
and here we will leave him for a little while, to
talk of what happened in Kentucky during his
absence.

The Kentuckians, roused by the Indian hostil-
ity and treachery, determined soon after he left to
inflict punishment upon them ; against the Shawa-
nese they were most provoked; it was among them
that most of the plots against the whites were
formed, and the attack, therefore, was to be made
upon them. An army of one hundred and sixty
men was soon collected, and the command was
given to a brave man named Colonel Bowman;
they were to march directly against old Chilicothe,
the den of the savages.

In July of this year (1779), they started and
reached the home of the Indians, without being
discovered. At daylight, the fight commenced and

9


98 THE ADVENTURES OF

continued till ten o’clock. Bowman’s men fought
bravely, but the Indians had every advantage.
Knowing all the woods about their settlement,
while one party fought openly, the other, conceal
ed behind the grass and trees, poured in a deadly
fire upon the whites. He was forced at last to
retreat as rapidly as possible to a distance of thirty
miles ; but the Indians pursued him here, doing
more mischief than before. The savages fought
desperately. His men were falling around him,
and but for Colonel Harrod, every man of them
might have been killed. Seeing the slaughter
that was continually increasing, he mounted a
body of horsemen and made a charge upon the

enemy ; this broke their ranks, they were thrown
into confusion, and Bowman, with the remnant of
his men, was enabled to retreat.

This attack only exasperated the Indians. In
the course of the next summer (after doing much
mischief in a smaller way in the meantime), they
gathered together to the number of six hundred,
and led on by Colonel Bird, a British officer, came

‘down upon Riddle’s and Martin’s stations, at the
forks of Licking river. ‘They had with them six
cannons, and managed their matters so secretly,
that the first news of their approach was given to
the settlers by the roar of their guns. Of course
it was of no use to resist ; the pickets could not de-
fend them from cannon-balls; the settlers were
DANIEL BOONE. 99

forced to surrender. ‘The savages rushed into the
station and instantly killed one man and two wo-
men with their tomahawks ; all the others, many of
whom were sick, were now loaded with baggage
and forced to march off with the Indians. It was
certain death to any one, old or young, male or fe-
male, who became, on the march, too weak and
exhausted to travel farther; they were instantly
killed with the tomahawk.

Flushed with success, the Indians were now
more troublesome than ever; it was impossible
for the whites to remain in the country if matters
were to go on in this way. The inhabitants at
last threw themselves upon the protection of Col-
onel Clarke, who commanded a regiment of United
States soldiers at the falls of the Ohio. At the
head of his men anda large number of volunteers,
he marched against Pecaway, one of the principal
towns of the Shawanese ; numbers of the savages
were killed, and the town was burnt to ashes.
This was a triumph, but it was a triumph gained
by the loss of seventeen of his men.

In 1780, Boone again returned to Boonesborough
with his family, bringing with him also a younger
brother. The elder brother (who had been in
Kentucky before, as you will remember) now re-
turned also, and made his home at a spot not far
from the place where the town of Shelbyville now
stands. The settlers were all delighted to see
100 THE ADVENTURES OF

their old friend Daniel Boone once more among
them; they now felt that their leader was on the
ground. Mrs. Boone too felt happy. Though she
was again on “ the dark and bloody ground,” her
husband was with her.

In a little time his services were again especial-
ly needed. The want of salt, their old trouble
was upon them, and they looked to Boone to pro-
cure it. Ever ready, he started off with his young-
er brother to the Blue Licks, the place of his for-
mer trouble; here he was destined to meet with
trouble again. ‘They had made as much salt as
they could carry, and were now returning to
Boonesborough with their packs, when they were
suddenly overtaken by a party of savages.; the
Indians immediately fired, and Boone’s brother fell
dead. Daniel Boone turned, levelled his rifle at
the foremost Indian, and brought him down ; with
a loud yell the party now rushed toward him. He
snatched his brother’s rifle, levelled another, and
then ran. The Indians gave chase, but he managed
to keep ahead, and even found time to reload his
rifle. He knew that his only chance for escape
was to distance them, and break his trail. He
passed the brow of a hill, jumped into a brook
below, waded in it for some distance, and then
struck off at right angles from his old course.
Upon looking back he found, to his sorrow, that
he had not succeeded—the Indians were still on
DANIEL BOONE. 101

his track. Presently, he came to a grape-vine, and
tried his old experiment at breaking the trail. This
was to no purpose, he found the savages still fol-
lowing him. After travelling some distance farther,
upon looking round he saw the cause of his
trouble ; the Indians had a dog with them, and this
dog, scenting his track, kept them for ever on his
course. His rifle was loaded—the dog was far
ahead of the party—and Boone sent a rifle ball
through him. He now pushed on, doubling his
course from time to time; the Indians lost track
of him, and he reached Boonesborough in safety.

In spite of the continued annoyance of the Indians,
the white settlements had continued to grow, and
there were now so many white men in the coun-
try, that in the fall of this year (1780), Kentucky
was divided into the three counties of Jefferson,
Fayette, and Lincoln. Our friend, Daniel Boone,
was appointed to command the militia in his coun-
ty, and William Pope, and Benjamin Logan, two
brave men, were to have the command in theirs.

The winter of this year soon set in, and it proved
a hard one. ‘The settlers, however, bore it cheer-
fully, for they were accustomed to hardships.
Hard as it was, too, it proved mild to the next that
followed. ‘The winter of 1781 was long remem-
bered as “ the cold winter” in Kentucky. ‘To make
it harder, the Indians, after doing much mischief
through the summer, had destroyed most of the

g*
102 THE ADVENTURES OF

‘crops the preceding fall, and the settlers had small
supplies of food. But the forest was around them ;
Boone and Harrod were among them, and these
two men found food enough. Every day they went
out in the winter’s storms—every night they came
in laden with deer and buffaloes. The people
learned to live on nothing but meat. Boone and
Harrod drove away all thoughts of starvation.
They had, however, this one comfort: the cold
weather kept the Indians athome. They had no
disturbances throughout the winter from them.
When spring opened, however, the savages
‘showed themselves more furious, if possible, than
ever. Their plans of mischief were better laid ;
they seemed to have been feeding their revenge
fat. Open and secret war was all around the set-
tlers. It would be idle for me to attempt to give
details of the doings of the savages. Ashton’s,
Hoy’s, M‘Afee’s, Kincheloe’s, and Boone’s sta-
tion, near Shelbyville, were all attacked. Men
were shot down in the open fields, or waylaid in
every pathway. The early annals of Kentucky
are filled with stories of many a brave white man
at this time. ‘There were Ashton, Holden, Lyn,
Tipton, Chapman, White, Boone, Floyd, Wells,
the M‘Afees, M‘Gary, Randolph, Reynolds, and
others, some of whom were killed, and all of whom
had their hard struggles. The history of that
spring is only a story of burnings, captures, and
DANIEL BOONE. 103

murders, on the part of the savages. It was a
dark period for the white men ; even Boone, with
all his vigor and fearlessness, thought it the dark-
est period he had known in that region. The
savages seemed bent upon a war of extermination.
Not satisfied with such mischief as they had al-
ready done, in the early part of the summer the
savages held a grand council at Old Chilicothe, to
arrange their plans for further destruction. There
were chiefs there from the Cherokees, Wyandots,
Tawas, Pottawattomies, and most of the tribes bor-
dering on the lakes. Two notorious white villains
—whose names will never be forgotten in Ken-
tucky—were there also, to aid them with their
counsels. These were Girty and M‘Kee, infamous
men, who lived among the Indians, and lived only
by murdering their own countrymen. Their plan
was soon settled. Bryant’s station, near Lexing-
ton, was known'to bea strong post, and this was
to be attacked. This station had within it forty
cabins, and here it was thought they might make
the greatest slaughter. The warriors were to
gather as rapidly as possible for the enterprise.
In a little time, five hundred of them rallied at
Girty’s cabin, ready for their departure., The
white rascal then made a speech to them. He
told them that “ Kentucky was a beautiful hunting-
ground, filled with deer and buffaloes, for their _
comfort; the white men had come to drive them.
104 THE ADVENTURES OF

away.; the ground was now red with the blood of
the red men that had been slain. But vengeance
they would have—now, before the whites were
' yet fastened in the country, they would strike a
blow, and drive them off for ever.” ‘Then he talked
of the plan before them. He advised them to de-
scend the Miami in their canoes, cross the Ohio,
ascend the Licking, and then they might paddle
their boats almost to the station. His speech was
answered by a loud yell from the Indians, and
they all started off for their boats—Simon Girty,
with his ruffled shirt and soldier coat, marching at
their head.

On the night of the 15th of August, they arrived
before the station. Inthe morning, as the gates
were opened, the men were fired at by the sav-
ages, and this was the first news to the whites of
the approach of the enemy. It was fortunate that
they had shown themselves thus early: in two
hours more, most of the men were to have started
off to aid a distant feeble station. As soon as the
whites found they were besieged, they managed to
send off the news to Lexington.

The Indians now, as usual, commenced their
stratagems. The large body concealed themselves
in the grass near the pathway to the spring, while
one hundred went round and attacked the southeast
angle of the station. ‘Their hope was to draw the
whites all to that quarter, while they forced an en-
DANIEL BOONE. 105

trance on the other side. But the white men under-
stood this sort of cunning; they had lived among the |
Indians too long to be caught by such tricks: instead
of noticing the attack, they went on quietly with the
work of repairing and strengthening their pali-
sades.

But water, one of the necessaries of life, was
soon wanting. The whites, as they looked at the
tall grass and weeds near the spring, felt that In-
dians were lurking there. The women now came
forward and insisted upon it that they would go
and bring water. “ What if they do shoot us?”
they said; “it is better to lose a woman than a
man at such a time.” With that, they started
out, and, strange to tell, went back and forth,
bringing supplies of water, without any difficulty.
Some of the young men now went out upon the
same purpose. They had scarcely left the sta-
tion, when they were fired upon. Fortunately, the
Indians were too far to do any mischief ; the men
retreated rapidly within the palisades. The In-
dians, finding their stratagem fruitless, now rushed
forward, and commenced a tremendous attack.
The whites received them with a steady fire, and
many of them fell. Enraged the more, they now
discharged their burning arrows into the roofs of
the houses ; some of the cabins were burnt, but an
east wind was blowing at the time, and that saved
the station.
106 THE ADVENTURES OF

The enemy now fell back into the grass. They
had found out, in some way, that help was expect-
ed from Lexington, and they were preparing to
cut it off. In a little time, all was still. Present-
ly sixteen horsemen, followed by thirty-one foot-
soldiers, were seen coming; these were the men
from Lexington. Thinking only of the distress
of their friends, they were hurrying along, when
the Indians opened a fire upon them. The horse-
men galloped off in a cloud of dust, and reached
the station in safety. The soldiers on foot, in
their effort to escape, plunged into the cornfields
on either side of the road, only to meet the ene-
my. A desperate fight commenced on both sides :
two soldiers were killed ; the rest—four of them
having dangerous wounds—reached the pickets.
The exasperated Indians, disappointed at the es-
cape of this party, now wreaked their vengeance
by killing all the cattle they could find.

Finding all their efforts to enter the station idle
Simon Girty now came near enough to be heard,
mounted a stump, and holding in his hand a flag
of truce, began to talk. ‘ Surrender promptly,”
cried Simon; “if you gurrender promptly, mo
blood shall be shed ; but if you will not surren-
der, then know that our cannons and reinforce-
ments are coming. We will batter down” your
pickets as we did at Riddle’s and Martin’s ; every
man of you shall be slain ; two are dead already—
DANIEL BOONE. 107

four are wounded ; every man shall die.” This
language was so insolent, that some of the settlers
cried out, “ Shoot the rascal!” No man, however,
lifted his rifle; the flag of truce protected Wim.
“T am under a flag of truce,” cried Simon; “ do
you know who it is that speaks to you 2”

Upon this, a young man named Reynolds leaped
ap and cried out, “Know you! know you! yes,
we know you well. Know Simon Girty ! yes : he
is the renegado, cowardly villain, who loves to mur-
der women and children, especially those of his
own people. Know Simon Girty! yes: his fa-
ther must have been a panther, and his mother a
wolf. I have a worthless dog that kills lambs:
instead of shooting him, ] have named him Simon
Girty. You expect reinforcements and cannon,
do you? Cowardly wretches like you, that make
war upon women and children, would not dare to
touch them off, if you had them. We expect re-
inforcements, too, and in numbers to give a short
account of the murdering cowards that follow you.
Even if you could batter down our pickets, I, for
one, hold your people in too much contempt to
shoot rifles at them. I would not waste powder
and ball upon you. Should you even enter our
fort, 1 am ready for you; I have roasted a number
of hickory switches, with which we mean to whip
you and your naked cut-throats out of the coun-

try aed
108 THE ADVENTURES OF

Simon was now furious ; cursing and swearing,
he went back to his friends, amid the loud laughs
and jeers of the whites. In alittle time, the firing
was renewed ; it was all to no purpose: no white
man suffered, and every Indian who came within
gun-shot of the fort was sure to fall. Inthe course
of the night the whole party sneaked off, and their
tracks indicated that they had started for the Blue
Licks. They left behind them thirty of their
number slain.
DANIEL BOONE 109

CHAPTER VII.

OLONEL TODD, of Lexing-
ton, instantly despatched news
of this attack on Bryant’s sta-
tion, to Colonel Boone, at:
Boonesborough, and Colonel!
Trigg, near Harrodsburgh. In:
a little time, one hundred and:
seventy-six men were collect--



a mc ed under these three officers, to:
\AO Jv march in pursuit. Majors M‘Gary:
hee \/~ and Harland now joined them, de--

~

termined that they would have a.

C \ part in the punishment of the sav--

« , ages. It was known, too, that Colonel:

Logan was collecting a force, and a:

council of officers was at once held, to:

determine whether they should march on, or waits,

for him. They were all so eager to be off, that:

it was thought best to march immediately. The
march was therefore commenced forthwith.

| 10
110 THE ADVENTURES OF

Following on in the trail of the Indians, they
hdd not gone far, when Boone saw enough to con-
vince him that the Indians would not only be wil-
ling, but glad to meet them. No effort had been
made to conceal their trail; the trees were even
marked on their pathway, that the whites might
follow on; and they had tried to conceal their
numbers, by treading in each other’s footsteps.
He called the attention of his companions to this,
but still they proceeded onward.

They saw no Indians until they came to the
Licking river, not far from the Blue Licks. A
party was now seen on the other side of the stream,
leisurely crossing a hill. A council was at once
held, and the officers all turned to Boone for ad-
vice. His advice was given frankly: he was for
waiting till Logan should arrive with his men.
The Indian party, he felt assured, was at the least
from four to five hundred strong, and the uncon-
cerned mode in which the Indians crossed the
hill showed that the main body was near, and their
design was to draw them over the river. More-
over, he was acquainted with all that region of the
country. After they crossed the ford, they would
come upon deep ravines not far from the bank,
where, no doubt, the Indians were in ambush. If,
however, they were determined not to wait for
Logan, he advised that the country might at least
be reconnoitred before the attack was made, A
DANIEL BOONE. lil

part of the men, he thought, might cross the stream,
and move up cautiously on the other side, while
the remainder would stand where they were,
ready to assist them at the first alarm. T'odd and
Trigg thought the advice good, and were disposed

to heed it; but, just at this moment, Major M‘Gary,

more hot-headed than wise, spurred his horse into
the water, gave the Kentucky war-whoop, and cried
out, “All those that are not cowards will follow
me; I will show them where the Indians are.”
The men were roused by this show of bravery,
and they all crossed the ford.

The banks were steep on the other side, and
many of them now dismounted, tied their horses,
and commenced marching on foot. M‘Gary and
Harland led the way. They had not proceeded
far when they came to one of the ravines. It was
just as Boone had supposed ; the savages were in
ambush. A deadly fire was now poured in upon
the whites; the men staggered and fell in every ©
direction. The fire was returned, but to little pur-
pose, for the enemy was completely concealed; a
retreat was all that was left. The whites hurried
back toward the river; the Indians pursued ; and
now commenced the slaughter with the tomahawk.
The ford was narrow, and multitudes were slaugh-
tered there. Some were trying to get to their
horses ; others, more fortunate, were mounted and
flying , and some were plunging into the stream.
112 THE ADVENTURES OF

In the midst of all this confusion, the Indians were
doing their work of destruction.

A man by the name of Netherland (who had
been laughed at for his cowardice) had never dis-
mounted his horse, and was the first to reach the op-
posite shore. Ina little time, some of his comrades
were around him. He now turned, and, looking
back, saw the massacre that was going on. This
was more than he could bear. “ Halt! fire on the
Indians,” cried he ; “ protect the men in the river.”
With this, the men wheeled, fired, and rescued
several poor fellows in the stream, over whom the
tomahawk was lifted.

Reynolds, the man who answered Girty’s inso-
lence, made a,narrow escape. Finding, in the
retreat, one of the officers wounded, he gave him
his horse, and was soon after taken by three In-
dians. They were now over him, ready to de-
spatch him, when two retreating white men rushed
by. ‘Two of the savages started in pursuit; the
third stooped for an instant to tie his moccasin,
when Reynolds sprang away from him and es-
caped.

This was a terrible battle for the white men.
More than sixty of their number were slain, and
among them were most of their officers : Colonels
Todd and Trigg, Majors Harland and Bulger, Cap-
tains Gordon and M‘Bride, and a son of Colonel
Boone, were all among the dead.
DANIEL BOONE. 113

Those who had regained the other shore, not
having strength to rally, started homeward in great
sadness. On their way they met Colonel Logan.
He had gone to Bryant’s station with his five hun-
dred men, and was greatly disappointed when he
found they had all started without him ; he pushed
on, however, as rapidly as he could, hoping to
overtake them before they made their attack on
the savages. The sad story of the defeat was soon
told. All that remained to be done now was to go
back, and, if possible, bury the dead. Upon this.
sad business Logan continued his march. Upon
reaching the ground, the spectacle was awful : the
dead bodies were strewn over it Just as they had
fallen, the heat was intense, and birds of prey
were feeding upon the carcasses. The bodies
were so mangled and changed, that no man could
be distinguished ; friends could not recognise their
nearest relatives. ‘I'he dead were buried as rap-
idly as possible, and Logan left the scene in great
sorrow, ;

Nor was this all the carnage. The Indians, af-
ter the defeat, had scattered, and it was soon found
that on their way homeward they had swept
through several settlements, carrying destruction
before them. Emboldened by their triumph, no
man could tell what'they might next attempt.

It was no time for the whites to be idle. They
soon rallied in large numbers at Fort Washington,

. 10*
114 THE ADVENTURES OF

the present site of the city of Cincinnati. General
Clarke was at once made commander-in-chief, and
Colonel Logan was placed next under him in com-
mand. Clarke immediately started with a thou-
sand men to attack the Indian towns on the Miami.
On his way he came upon the cabin of Simon
Girty ; it was fortunate for Simon that a straggling
Indian spied Clarke’s men coming, in time to let
him escape. The news was now spread every-
where that an army of white men was coming
from Kentucky. The consequence was, that as |
Clarke approached the towns, he found them all
deserted ; the Indians had fled to the woods. His
march, however, was not made for nothing. The
towns of Old and New Chilicothe, Pecaway, and
Wills’ Town, were all reduced to ashes. One
old Indian warrior was surprised, and surrendered
himself a prisoner. ‘This man, to the great sor-
row of General Clarke, was afterward murdered
by one of the soldiers.

Notwithstanding this punishment, Indian mas-
sacres still went on. ‘ Stories of savage butchery
were heard of everywhere ; every station that they
dared approach felt their fury, and the poor settler
“who had built his cabin away from any station was
gure to be visited.

General Clarke started out again, against the In-
dians on the Wabash. Unfortunately, his expedi-
tion failed this time, for the want of provisions for
DANIEL BOONE. 125

his men. Another expedition of Colonel Logan,
against the Shawanese Indians, was more success-
ful. He surprised one of their towns, killed many
of their warriors, and took many prisoners.

The war had now become so serious, that in
the fall of 1785 the General Government invited
all the lake and Ohio tribes of Indians to meet at
the mouth of the Great Miami. It was hoped that
in this way matters might be settled peaceably.
But many of the tribes were insolent and ill-na-
tured ; they refused to come in, giving as an ex-
cuse that the Kentuckians were for ever molesting
them. Emboldened by the very invitation, they
continued the warfare more vigorou ly than ever.
They not only assaulted the settlements already
made, but made an attempt to guard the Ohio river,
to prevent any further settlers from reaching the
country in that direction. Small parties Mass
themselves at different points on the river,
Pittsburgh to Louisville, where they laid in am-
bush and fired upon every boat that passed. Some-
times they would make false signals, decoy i,
boat ashore, and murder the whole crew. They.
even went so far at last as to arm and man t
boats they had taken, and cruise up and down the
river.

I must tell you of a very bold defence made on
the Ohio about this time by a Captain Hubbel, who
was bringing 3 party of emigrants from Vermont
116 . THE ADVENTURES OF

His party was in two boats, and consisted in all
of twenty. As Hubbel came down the river, he
fell in with other boats, was told of the Indian
stratagems, and advised to be careful. Indeed,
the inmates of some of the boats begged that he
would continue in their company, and thus they
would be able to meet the Indians better if they
should be attacked; the stronger the party, the
better, in such a condition. But Hubbel refused
to do this, and proceeded onward. He had not
gone far, when a man on the shore began to make
signs of distress, and begged that the boat might

- come andtake him off. Hubbel knew well enough

that this was an Indian disguised as a white man,
and therefore-took no notice of him. In a little
time, a party of savages pushed off in their boats,
and attacked him fiercely. The fight was hot on
both sides. ‘The savages tried to board Hubbel’s
boat, but the fire was too hot for this. Hubbel re-
ceived two severe wounds, and had the lock of his
gun shot off by an Indian; still he fought, tonch-
ing off his broken gun from time to time with a
firebrand. The Indians found the struggle too
hard, and were glad to paddle off. . Presently they
returned, and attacked the other boat; this: they
seized almost without an effort, killed the captain
and a boy, and took all the women as prisoners to
their own boats. Now they came once more
against Hubbel, and cunningly placed the women
DANIEL BOONE. 117

on the sides of their boats as a sort of bulwark.
But this did not stop Hubbel : he saw that his balls
must strike the women ; but it was better that they
should be killed now, rather than suffer a death of
torture from the savages, and the fire was at once
opened upon them again. They were soon driven
off once more. In the course of the action, how-
ever, Hubbel’s boat drifted near the shore, and five
hundred savages renewed the fire upon them. One
of the emigrants, more imprudent than the rest,
seeing a fine chance for a shot, raised his head to
take aim, and was instantly killed by a ball. The
boat drifted along, and at length reached deep wa-
teragain. It was then found, that of the nine men
on board, two only had escaped unhurt ; two were
killed, and two mortally wounded. A remarkable
lad on board showed great courage. He now asked
his friends to extract a ball that had lodged in the
skin of his forehead ; and when this was done, he
begged that they would take out a piece of bone
that had been fractured in his elbow by another
ball. His poor frightened mother, seeing his suf-
fering, asked him why he had not complained be-
fore ; to which the little fellow replied that he had
been too busy, and, besides that, the captain had
told them all to make no noise,

It was idle to attempt now to settle matters
peaceably. The general government had tried
that and the plan had failed. The war was now
118 THE ADVENTURES OF

to be carried on to a close, come what might. An
expedition was accordingly planned, against ali the
tribes northwest of the Ohio. ‘The-Indians were
to be brought out, if possible to a general fight ; o1,
if that could not be done, all their towns and cab-
ins on the Scioto and Wabash, were to be destrov-
ed. General Harmar was appointed commander
of the main expedition, and Major Hamtranck was
to aid him with a smaller party.

In the fall of 1791, Harmar started from
Fort Washington with three hundred and twenty
men. Ina little time he was joined by the Ken-
tucky and Pennsylvania militia, so that his whole
force now amounted to fourteen hundred and fifty-
three men. Colonel Hardin, who commanded the
Kentucky militia, was now sent ahead with six
hundred men, principally militia, to reconnoitre the
country. Upon reaching the Indian settlements,
the savages set fire to their houses and fled ; tow”
overtake them, he pushed on with two hundred
of his men. A party of Indians met and attacked
them. The cowardly militia ran off, leaving their
brave companions to be slaughtered. It was a
brave struggle, but almost all were cut down; only
seven managed to escape and join the main army.

Harmar felt deeply mortified. He commenced
forthwith his return to Fort Washington, but deter
mined that, on the way, he would wipe off this
disgrace from his army. Upon coming near Chili:
DANIEL BOONE. 119

cothe he accordingly halted, and in the night des-
patched Colonel Hardin once more ahead, with
orders to find the enemy and draw them into an
engagement. About daybreak Hardin came upon
them, and the battle commenced. It was a des-
perate fight on both sides. Some of the militia
acted badly again, but the officers behaved nobly.
The victory was claimed on both sides, but I think
the Indians had the best of it. Three gallant offi-
cers, Fontaine, Willys, and Frothingham,were slain,
together with fifty regulars and one hundred militia.

Harmar now moved on to Fort Washington. So
much was said about his miserable campaign,that he
requested that he might be tried by a court-martial.
Accordingly he was tried and honorably acquitted.

A new army was soon raised, and the command
was now given to Major-General Arthur St. Clair.
His plan was to destroy the Indian settlements
between the Miamies, drive the savages from that
region, and establish a chain of military posts
there, which should for ever keep them out of the
country. All having rallied at Fort Washington,
he started off in the direction of the Miami towns.
It was a hard march, for he was forced to cut his
roads as he passed along. Upon arriving near the
Indian country, he built forts Hamilton and Jef-
ferson and garrisoned them. This left him nearly
two thousand men to proceed with. In a little
time some of the worthless militia deserted. This
120 THE ADVENTURES OF

was a bad example to the rest, and St. Clair in —
stantly sent Major Hamtranck, with a regiment, in
pursuit of them, while he continued his march.
When he arrived within fifleen miles of the Mia-
mi villages he halted and encamped ; he was soon
after joined by Major Hamtranck, and St. Clair
proposed now immediately to march against the
enemy.

But the enemy had already got news of them,
aud had made ready. They were determined to
have the first blow themselves. At daybreak the
next morning, the savages attacked the militia and
drove them back in confusion, These broke
through the regulars, forcing their way into the
camp, the Indians pressing hard on their heels.
The officers tried to restore order, but to no pur-
pose : the fight now became general. ‘This, how-
ever, was only a small part of the Indian force—
there were four thousand of the party; they had
nearly surrounded the camp, and sheltered by the
trees and grass as usual, were pouring ina deadly
fire upon the whites. St. Clair and all his officers
behaved with great courage. Finding his men
falling fast around him, he ordered a charge to be
made with the bayonet. The men swept through
the long grass driving the Indians before them.
The charge had no sooner ceased than the In-
dians returned. Some forced their way into the —
camp, killed the artillerists, wounded Colonel But-
DANIEL BOONE. 121

ler, and seized the cannon. Wounded as he was,
Butler drove them back and recovered the guns.
Fired with new ardor, they returned again, once
more entered the camp—once more had posses-
sion of the cannon. All was now confusion among
the whites—it was impossible to restore order—
the Indians brought them down in masses—
a retreat was all that remained. But they were
so hemmed in, that this seemed impossible. Col-
onel Darke was ordered to charge the savages be-
hind them, while Major Clarke with his battalion
was commanded to cover the rear of the army.
These orders were instantly obeyed, and the dis-
orderly retreat commenced. The Indians pursued
them four miles, keeping up a running fight. At
last their chief, a Mississago, who had been train-
ed to war by the British, cried out to them to stop
as they had killed enough. ‘They then returned
to plunder the camp and divide the spoils, while
the routed troops continued their flight to Fort Jef-
ferson, throwing away their arms on the roadside
that they might run faster. ‘The Indians found in
the camp seven pieces of cannon, two hundred
oxen, and several horses, and had a great rejoi-
cing. Well might the Mississago chief \tell his
people they had killed enough: thirty-eight com-
missioned officers were slain, and five hundred
and ninety-three non-commissioned officers and
privates. Besides this, twenty-one officers and
11
122 THE ADVENTURES OF

two hundred and forty-two men were wounded,
some of whom soon died of their wounds.

This was a most disastrous battle for the whites,
the most disastrous they had yet known. ‘The
triumphant Indians were so delighted that they
could not leave the field, but kept up their revels
from day to day. Their revels, however, were at
length broken up sorrowfully for them. General
Scott, hearing of the disaster, pushed on for the
field with one thousand mounted volunteers from
Kentucky. The Indians were dancing and sing
ing, and riding the horses and oxen in high glee
Scott instantly attacked them; two hundred were
killed, their plunder retaken, and the whole body
of savages driven from the ground.

When Congress met soon after this, of course
this wretched Indian war was much talked of. It
was proposed at once to raise three additional
regiments. Upon this a hot debate sprang up, the
proposal was opposed warmly ; the opponents said
that it would be necessary to lay a heavy tax up-
on the people to raise them, that the war had been
badly managed, and should have been trusted to
the militia in the west under their own officers,
and, moreover, that no success could be expected
so long as the British continued to hold posts in
our own limits, and furnish the Indians with mane
ammunition, and advice.

On the other hand, it was declared that the war
DANIEL BOONE. 123

was ajust and necessary one. It was shown that
in seven years (between 1783 and 1790), fifteen
hundred people in Kentucky had been murdered
or taken captives by the savages ; while in Penn-
sylvania and Virginia matters had been well nigh
as bad; that everything had been done to settle
matters peaceably but all tono purpose. In 1790,
when a treaty was proposed to the Indians of the
Miami, they asked for thirty days to deliberate—
the request was granted—during those thirty days
one hundred and twenty persons had been killed
or captured, and at the end of the time the sav-
ages refused to give any answer to the proposal.
At last the vote was taken—the resolution passed
—the war was to be carried on—the regiments
were to be raised.

General St. Clair now resigned the command
of the army, and Major General Anthony Wayne
was appointed to succeed him. ‘This appointment
gave great joy to the western people; the man
was so well known among them for his daring and
bravery, that he commonly went by the name of
“Mad Anthony.”

After much delay, the regiments were at last
gathered together. Some still opposed this war
and in order to prove to them that the government
was willing to settle matters peaceably, if possible,
two officers—Colonel Hardin and Major ‘Truman, .
were now sent off to the Indians with proposals
124 THE ADVENTURES OF

of peace. They were both seized and murdered
by the savages.

Wayne now started out upon his expedition. Jn
a little time he passed Fort Jefferson, took posses-
sion of St. Clair’s fatal field, and erected a fort
there which he called Fort Recovery. He now
learned the truth of the. stories about the British.
A number of British soldiers had come down from
Detroit, and fortified themselves on the Miami of
the lakes. It wasrumored too, that in some of the
Indian fights and massacres, the English were
seen among them, fighting and urging them on.

The General continued his march, and early ir
August reached the confluence of the Miami of
the Lakes and the Au Glaize. This was one of
the finest countries of the Indians, it was about
thirty miles from the British post, and he discov-
ered here,that two thousand warriors were near
that post ready tomeet him. Wayne was glad to
hear this; his army was quite as strong, and he
longed to meet the savages. As he drew near,
however, he determined once more to have peace
if possible, without shedding blood. A message
was sent to the Indians, urging them not to follow
the advice of bad men, to lay down their arms, to
learn to live peaceably, and their lives and their
homes should be protected by the government.
An insolent answer, was all that was received in

‘reply.
DANIEL BOONE. 125

Wayne’s army now marched on in columns—a
select battalion, under Major Price, moving in front
‘to reconnoitre. After marching about five miles,
Price was driven back by the fire of the Indians.
As usual, the cunning enemy was concealed ;
they had hid themselves in a thick wood a little
in advance of the British post, and here Price had
received their fire.

Wayne had now found out precisely where
they were, and gave his orders accordingly. The
cavalry under Captain Campbell were commanded
to enter the wood in the rear of the Indians, be-
tween them and the river, and charge their left
flank. General Scott, with eleven hundred mount-
ed Kentucky volunteers, was to make a circuit in
the opposite direction, and attack the right. The
infantry were to advance with trailed arms, and
rouse the enemy from their hiding-places. All
being ready, the infantry commenced their march.
The Indians were at once routed at the point of
the bayonet. ‘The infantry had done the whole ;
Campbell and Scott had hardly the chance of do-
ing any of the fighting. In the course of an hour,
they had driven the savages back two miles ; in
fact, within gun-shot of the British post.

Wayne had now the possession of the whole
ground, and here he remained three days, buaing
their houses and cornfields above and below”
fort. One Englishman suffered, too, in'this wor

11*





126 THE ADVENTURES OF

of destruction. Colonel M‘Kee was known as a
British trader,for ever instigating the Indians against
the Americans, and Wayne did not scruple to.
burn all his houses and stores likewise. Major
Campbell, who commanded the British fort, re-
monstrated at this, but Wayne gave him a bold and
determined answer in reply, and he had no more
to say. A few words from him. would only have
caused Wayne to drive him from the country.

The army now returned to Au Glaize, destroy-
ing all the houses, villages, and crops by the way.
It was one complete work of destruction; within
fifty miles of the river everything was destroyed.
In this campaign, Wayne had lost one hundred and
seven men, and among them were two brave offi-
cers—Captain Campbell and Lieutenant Towles,
but still he had gained a glorious victory. In his
track, too, he had not forgotten to build forts, to
guard against the savages in future.

The story of the victory soon spread, and struck
terror to the hearts of the Indians north and south.
They were restless and dissatisfied, but war was
sure destruction to them; they felt that it was idle
to attempt it further, and were ready to be quiet.
In less than a year from this time, Wayne con-
cluded a treaty, in behalf of the United States
with all the Indian tribes northwest of the Ohio.
The settlers at last had peace—a blessing which
they had long desired.
DANIEL BOONE 127

CHAPTER VIII.

ITH the return of peace, the
settlers were very happy.
They could now go out, fell
the forests, and cultivate their
fields in safety. There was
no longer any wily savage to
>” lay in ambush, and keep them
‘in perpetual anxiety. No man

| eos} among them was happier than
S\-G/® Boone. He had been harassed by

cay constant struggles ever since he
(a PY > came to Kentucky, and these strug-

y gles with the savages had made him
a warrior rather than a hunter ; but he
7x could now return to his darling pas-
\} * sion. While others cultivated the
ground, he roamed through the wilderness with
his rifle; he was now a hunter indeed, spending
weeks and months uninterruptedly in the forests
By day he moved where he pleased, and at night
made his camp fearlessly wherever the shades of





128 THE ADVENTURES OF

night overtook him. His life was now happier
than ever.

Ere long, however, a cloud came over this hap-
piness. Men began again to crowd too closely
upon him. In spite of all the early struggles with
the savages in Kentucky, emigrants had continued
to flow into that country. As early as 1783, Ken-
tucky had been laid off into three counties, and
was that year formed into one district, and called
the District of Kentucky. In 1785, a convention
was called at Danville, and a memorial was ad-
dressed to the legislature of Virginia, proposing
that Kentucky should be erected into an indepen-
dent State. In 1786, the legislature of Virginia
took the necessary steps for making the new State,
if Congress would admit it into the Union. In
1792, Kentucky was admitted into the Union as
one of the United States of America. And now
that peace had come to aid the settlers, emigration
flowed in more rapidly. Court-houses, jails, judges,
lawyers, sheriffs, and constables, began necessa-
rily to be seen. Kentucky was becoming every
day a more settled and civilized region, and Boone’s
heart grew sick. He had sought the wilderness,
and men were fast taking it away from him. He
began to think of moving.

Another sorrow now came over him, and soon
fixed in him the determination to seek a new home
Men began to dispute with him the title to his
DANIEL BOONE. 129

land. The State of Kentucky had not been sur-
veyed by the government, and laid off into sections
and townships, as the lands north of the Ohio river
have since been. The government of Virginia
had issued certificates, entitling the holder to locate
where he pleased the number of acres called for.
To actual settlers, who should build a cabin, raise
a crop, &c., pre-emption rights to such lands as
they might occupy were also granted. Entries
of these certificates were made in a way so loose,
that different men frequently located the same
lands; one title would often lap over upon anoth-
er; and almost all the titles conferred in this way
became known as “ the lapping, or shingle titles.”
Continued lawsuits sprang out of this state of
things; no man knew what belonged to him,
Boone had made these loose entries of his lands :
his titles, of course, were disputed. It was curi-
ous to see the old man in a court of law, which he
thoroughly despised, fighting for his rights. He
was greatly provoked ; he had explored and re-
deemed the wilderness, as he said, borne every
hardship with his wife and children, only to be
cheated at last. But the law decided against him ;
he lost his lands, and would now no longer remain
in that region.

Hearing that buffaloes and deer were still plenty
about the Great Kanhawa river, he started thither
with his wife and children, and settled near Point
130 THE ADVENTURES OF

Pleasant. Here he remained several years. He
was disappointed in not finding game as he expect-
ed, and was more of a farmer here than ever be-
fore ; he turned his attention earnestly to agricul-
ture, and was very successful in raising good
crops. Still he was dissatisfied ; he longed for
the wilderness. Hunting and trapping were the
constant thoughts of his life.

While living here, he met accidentally with a
party of men who had been out upon the upper
waters of the Missouri. ‘These men talked of the
beauty of that region: they had stories to tell of
grizzly bears, buffaloes, deer, beavers, and otters—
in fact, the region was in their eyes “ the paradise
for a hunter.” Fired by these stories, Boone re-
solved to go there. Accordingly, he gathered to-
gether all that he possessed, and with his wife and
family started for Missouri, driving his herds and
cattle before him. It was strange to see an old
man thus vigorous in seeking a new home. He
was an object of surprise to everyone. When he
reached Cincinnati, on his route, some one, mark-
ing his age, and surprised at his adventure, asked
him how, at his time of life, he could leave all the
comforts of home, for the wilderness. His answer
shows his whole character: “'Too much crowded,
too much crowded,” said he ; “I want more elbow-
room.” ‘Travelling on, he at length reached Mis-
DANIEL BOONE. 131

souri, and, proceeding about fifty miles above St
Louis, settled in what is now St. Charles county.

Here everything pleased Boone. The country,
as you know, was then in the possession of the
French and Spanish, and the old laws -by which
their territories were governed were still in force
there. They had no constitution, no king, no
legislature, no judges, lawyers, or sheriffs. An
officer called the commandant, and the priests, ex-
ercised all the authority that was needed. The
horses, cattle, flocks, and herds of these people all
grazed together upon the same commons ; in fact,
they were living here almost in primitive sim-
plicity. Boone’s character for honesty and cour-
age soon became known among them, and he was
appointed by the Spanish commandant the com-
mandant over the district of St. Charles.

Boone now had the satisfaction of settling all
his children comfortably around him, and in the
unbroken wilderness his hunting and trapping was
unmolested. In his office of commandant he gave
great satisfaction to every one, and continued
to occupy it until Missouri was purchased by
our government from the French. When that
purchase was made, American enterprise soon
came upon him again—he was once more crowd«
ed by his fellow-men. His old office of commands
ant was soon merged in the new order of things
—his hunting-grounds were invaded by others,
132 THE ADVENTURES OF

Nothing remained for him now, but to submit to his
fate ; he was too old to move again, nor indeed did
he know where to go. He continued his old hab-
its, as well he might. He would start out with his
rifle, now marked with a paper sight to guide his
dim eye, and be absent from his home for weeks.
Nearly eighty years had passed over him, yet he
would lie in wait near the salt-licks, and bring
down his buffalo or his deer, and as bravely and
cheerily as in his younger days, would he cut down
bee-trees. As the light-hearted Frenchmen swept
up the river in their fleets of periogues on their
hunting excursions, Boone would cheer them as
they passed, and sigh for his younger days that
he might join their parties. He was a complete
Nimrod, now almost worn out.

It was while he was living here, I think, that
he was met by that very interesting man, Mr. Au-
dubon, the natural historian of our continent. He
was struck with the man, and has given the
story of his interview with Boone. It is so illus-
trative of the charactor of the hunter, that I give
it to you in Mr. Audubon’s words.

“ Daniel Boone, or as he was usually called in
the western country, Colonel Boone, happened to
spend a night under the same roof with me, more
than twenty years ago. We had-returned from a
shooting excursion, in the course of which his
extraordinary skill in the management of a rifle
DANIEL BOONE. 133

had been fully displayed. On retiring to the room
appropriated to that remarkable individual and my-
self for the night, I felt anxious to know more of
his exploits and adventures than I did, and accord-
ingly took the liberty of proposing numerous ques-
tions to him. The stature and general appear-
ance of this wanderer of the western forests, ap-
proached the gigantic. His chest was broad and
prominent; his muscular powers displayed them-
selves in every limb; his countenance gave indi-
cation of his great courage, enterprise, and perse-
verance; and when he spoke, the very motion of
his lips brought the impression, that whatever he
uttered could not be otherwise than strictly true.
I undressed, while he merely took off his hunting
shirt, and arranged a few folds of blankets on the
floor; choosing rather to lie there, as he observed,
than on the softest bed. When we had both dis-
posed of ourselves, each after his own fashion, he ©
related to me the following account of his powers
of memory, which I lay before you, kind reader,
in his own words, hoping that the simplicity of his
style may prove interesting to you.

“T was once,” said he, “on a hunting expedi-
tion on the banks of the Green river, when the
lower parts of this (Kentucky) were still in the |
hands of nature, and none but the sons of the soil
were looked upon as its lawful proprietors. «(We
Virginians had for some time been waging a war

12
134 THE ADVENTURES OF

of intrusion upon them, and I, among the rest, rame
bled through the woods, in pursuit of their race,
as I now would follow the tracks of any ravenous
animal. The Indians outwitted me one dark night,
and I was as unexpectedly as suddenly made a pris-
oner by them. ‘The trick had been managed with
great skill; for no sooner had I extinguished the
fire of my camp, and laid me down to rest, in full
security, as | thought, than I felt myself seized by
an indistinguishable number of hands, and was
immediately pinioned, as if about to be led to the
scaffold for execution. To have attempted to be
refractory, would have proved useless and danger-
ous to my life; and I suffered myself to be re-
moved from my camp to theirs, a few miles dis-
tant, without uttering even a word of complaint.
You are aware, I dare say, that to act in this man-
ner, was the best policy, as you understand that
by so doing, I proved to the Indians at once, that
I was born and bred as fearless of death as any
of themselves.

‘‘ When we reached the camp, great rejoicings
were exhibited. ‘Two squaws, and a few pap
ooses, appeared particularly delighted at the sight
of me, and I was assured, by very unequivocal
gestures and words, that, on the morrow, the mor-
tal enemy of the red-skins would cease tolive. I
never opened my lips, but was busy contriving
some scheme which might enable me to give the


DANIEL BOONE, 135

rascals the slip before dawn. ‘The women imme-
diately fell a searching about my hunting-shirt for
whatever they might think valuable, and fortunately
for me, soon found my flask, filled with Mononga-
hela (that is, reader, strong whiskey). A terrific
grin was exhibited on their murderous counten-
ances, while my heart throbbed with joy at the
anticipation of their intoxication. The crew im-
mediately began to beat their bellies and sing, as
they passed the bottle from mouth to mouth. How
often did I wish the flask ten times its size, and
filled with aquafortis! I observed that the squaws
drank more freely than the warriors, and again
my spirits were about to be depressed, when
the report of a gun was heard at a distance.
The Indians all jumped on their feet. The
singing and drinking were both brought to a
stand; and I saw with inexpressible joy, the men
walk off to some distance, and talk to the squaws.
I knew that they were consulting about me, aad I
foresaw, that in a few moments the warriors would
go to discover the cause of the gun having been
fired so near theircamp. I expected the squaws
would be left to guard me. Well, sir, it was just
so ‘They returned ; the men took up their guns
and walked away. The squaws sat down again,
and in less than five minutes they had_ my bottle
up to their dirty mouths, gurgling down theit

throats the remains of the wicaley- ;
136 THE ADVENTURES OF

“ With what pleasure did I see them becoming
more and more drunk, until the liquor took such
hold of them that it was quite impossible for these
women to be of any service. They tumbled down,
rolled about, and began to snore ; when I, having
no other chance of freeing myself from the cords
that fastened me, rolled over and over toward the
fire, and after a short time burned them asunder.
I rose on my feet; stretched my stiffened sinews ;
snatched up my rifle, and, for once in my life,
spared that of Indians. I now recollect how de-
sirous I once or twice felt to lay open the sculls
of the wretches with my tomahawk ; but when I
again thought upon killing beings unprepared and
unable to defend themselves, it looked like murder
without need, and I gave up the idea.

“ But, sir, I felt determined to mark the spot,
and walking to a thrifty ash sapling, I cut out of
it three large chips, and ran off. I soon reached
the river; soon crossed it, and threw. myself deep
into the canebrakes, imitating the tracks of an In-
dian with my feet, so that no chance might be left
for those from whom I had escaped to overtake
me.

“Tt is now nearly twenty years since this hap-
pened, and more than five since I left the whites’
settlements, which I might probably never have
visited again, had I not been called on as a wit
ness in a lawsuit that was pending in Kentucky
—oo -_

re eid tet

DANIEL BOONE. 137

and which, | really believe, would never have been
settled, had I not come forward, and established
the beginning of a certain boundary line. This
is the story, sir.

“Mr. moved from old Virginia into Ken-
tucky, and having a large tract granted to him in
the new state, laid claim to a certain parcel of land
adjoining Green river, and as chance would have
it, he took for one of his corners the very ash tree
on which I had made my mark, and finished his
survey of some thousands of acres, beginning, as
it is expressed in the deed, ‘at an ash marked by
three distinct notches of the tomahawk of a white
man.’

“The tree had grown much, and the bark had
covered the marks; but, some how or other, Mr.
heard from some one all that I have already
said to you, and thinking that I might remember
the spot alluded to in the deed, but which was no
longer discoverable, wrote for me to come and try
at least to find the place on the tree. His letter
mentioned, that all my expenses should be paid ;
and not caring much about once more going back
to Kentucky, I started and met Mr. After
some conversation, the affair with the Indians
came to my recollection. I considered for a while,
and began to think that after all, | could find the
very spot, as well as the tree, if it was yet stand-
ing.







12*
138 THE ADVENTURES OF

“ Mr. and I mounted our horses, and off
we went to the Green river bottoms. After some
difficulties, for you must be aware, sir, that great
changes had taken place in these woods, I found
at last the spot where I had crossed the river, and
waiting for the moon to rise, made for the course
in which I thought the ash tree grew. On ap-
proaching the place, I felt as if the Indians were
there still, and as if I was still a prisoner among
them. Mr. and I camped near what I con-
ceived the spot, and waited till the return of day.

“ At the rising of the sun I was on foot, and
after a good deal of musing, thought that an ash
tree then in sight must be the very one on which
I had made my mark. I felt as if there could be
no doubt of it, and mentioned my thought to Mr.
‘Well, Colonel Boone,’ said he, ‘if you
think so, I hope it may prove true, but we must
have some witnesses ; do you stay hereabout, and
I will go and bring some of the settlers whom I
know.’ I agreed. Mr. trotted off, and I, to
pass the time, rambled about to see if a deer was
still living in the land. Butah! sir, what a won-
derful difference thirty years make in the country!
Why, at the time when I was caught by the In-
dians, you would not have walked out in any di-
rection for more than a mile without shooting a
buck or a bear. There were ten thousands of buf-
faloes on the hills in Kentucky; the land looked








DANIEL BOONE. 139

as if it would never become poor; and to hunt in
those days was a pleasure indeed. But when I
was left to myself on the banks of the Green riv-
er, I dare say for the last time in my life, a few
signs only of deer were to be seen, and as to a
deer itself, | saw’ none.

“© Mr. returned, accompanied by three gen-
tlemen. They looked upon me as if I had been
Washington himself, and walked to the ash tree
which I now called my own, as if in quest of a
long lost treasure. I took an axe from one of
them and cut a few chips off the bark. Still no
signs were to be seen. Sol cut again, until I
thought it time to be cautious, and I scraped and
worked away with my butcher knife, until I did



come to where my tomahawk had left an imprese

sion in the wood. We now went regularly to
work, and scraped at the tree with care, until three
hacks, as plain as any three notches ever were,
could be seen. Mr. and the other gentle-
men were astonished, and, I must allow, I was as
much surprised as pleased, myself. I made affi-
davit of this remarkable occurrence in the presence
of these gentlemen. Mr. - gained his cause.
I left Green river, for ever, and came to where
-we now are ; and, sir, I wish you a good night.”

Here, too, it was that he resided, when Mr. As-
tor attempted to carry out his magnificent design,
of settling Astoria on the western coast of our





2

‘

~

“a?

ae
ee
140 THE ADVENTURES OF

continent, and belting the earth with his com:
merce. When you are older, you can read the
beautiful history of that attempt, written by our
distinguished countryman Mr. Irving. As the par-
ty, bound for the far west, moved up the Missouri,
Boone stood upon the banks of the stream, looking
anxiously after them. It was just the adventure
td please him. There the old man stood, leaning
upon his rifle, his dim eye lighted up as he gazed
upon them, and his heart heavy with sorrow, be-
cause he was too old to press with them, beyond
the mountains.*

Other sorrows than those of age, now crept up-
on him. His wife, who had been to him all that
was good, was now taken from him, and the old
man was left widowed. With asad heart he now
went to the home of his son, Major Nathan Boone.

The last war with England now broke out, too,
and penetrated even the wilds of Missouri. It
was the worst of all warfare—the savages were
let loose upon them. Boone was too old to act
the part of a soldier, but he sent off many substi-
tutes in his sons.

When peace returned, the spirit of the old man
rallied ; his ruling passion was still with him.
The woods were again his home, his rifle his com-
panion ; and thus he lived on, through a vigorous
old age, with a passion as strong as ever, a hunter

* See Irving’s Astoria.
DANIEL BOONE. 141

almost to the very day of hisdeath. For when, in
1818, death came upon him, he had but little no-
tice of its approach. With no disease but old age,
which had seemed comparatively vigorous almost
to the day of his departure, he died in his eighty-
fourth year. His mind was unclouded and he
passed from this world calmly and quietly.

I have but one thing more to say. You remems
ber Daniel Boone’s schoolboy days, of which I
have spoken. He left school a perfectly ignorant
jad. Some say that he afterward learned to write,
and produce as an evidence, a little narrative of his
wanderings in Kentucky, supposed to be written
by himself. I believe, however, that to the day of
his death, he could not write his name. The narra-
tive spoken of, was, I think, dictated in some de-
gree by him, and written by another. At all events,
the story is interesting and curious, and, as such,
I have placed it for your benefit, as an appendix to
this volume.
APPENDIX.

THE ADVENTURES OF COLONEL DANIEL BOONE,
FORMERLY A HUNTER;
CONTAINING A NARRATIVE OF THE WARS OF KENTUCKY,

AS GIVEN BY HIMSELF,
YS ge=— a G\. URIOSITY is natural to the
\ co’. soul of man, and interesting

AEN (> 2X objects have a powerful influ-

, Aen \ ence on our affections. Let

ft Sew 997 *&. these influencing powers ac-
Qe eg T'

DS ah tuate, by the permission or

disposal of Providence, from

CA selfish or social views, yet in

' qvC _- time the mysterious will of Heaven

ela is unfolded, and we behold our con-

SZ > duct, from whatsoever motives ex-

>. s” cited, operating to answer the im-

vo: portant designs of Heaven. Thus

cS , we behold Kentucky, lately a howling

wilderness, the habitation of savages

and wild beasts, become a fruitful field ;

this region, so favorably distinguished by natures


144 APPENDIX.

now become the habitation of civilization, at a pe-
riod unparalleled in history, in the midst of a
raging war, and under all the disadvantages of
emigration to a country so remote from the inhab-
ited parts of the continent. Here, where the hand
of violence shed the blood of the innocent ; where
the horrid yells of savages and the groans of
the distressed sounded in our ears, we now hear
the praises and adorations of our Creator ; where
wretched wigwams stood, the miserable abodes
of savages, we behold the foundations of cities
laid, that, in all probability, will equal the glory
of the greatest upon earth. And we view Ken-
tucky, situated on the fertile banks of the great
Ohio, rising from obscurity to shine with splendor,
equal to any other of the stars of the American
hemisphere.

The settling of this region well deserves a place
in history. Most of the memorable events I have
myself been exercised in ; and, for the satisfaction
of the public, will briefly relate the circumstances
of my adventures, and scenes of life, from my first
movement to this country until this day.

It was on the first of May, in the year 1769,
that I resigned my domestic happiness for a time,
and left my family and peaceable habitation on
the Yadkin river, in North Carolina, to wander
through the wilderness of America, in quest of
the country of Kentucky, in company with John
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL ROONE. 145

Finley, John Stewart, Joseph Holden, James Mo-
nay, and William Cool. We proceeded success-
fully, and after a long and fatiguing journey through
a mountainous wilderness, in a westward direc-

tion, on the 7th day of June following we found.
ourselves on Red river, where John Finley had

formerly been trading with the Indians, and, from
the top of an eminence, saw with pleasure the
beautiful level of Kentucky. Here let me observe
that for some time we had experienced the most
uncomfortable weather, as a prelibation of our fu-
ture sufferings. At this place we encamped, and
made a shelter to defend us from the inclement
season, and began to hunt and reconnoitre the
country. We found everywhere abundance of

wild beasts of all sorts, through this vast forest..

The buffalo were more frequent than I have seen

cattle in the settlements, browsing on the leaves

of the cane, or cropping the herbage on those ex-
tensive plains, fearless, because ignorant, of the
violence of man. Sometimes we saw hundreds
in a drove, and the numbers about the salt springs
were amazing. In this forest, the habitation of

beasts of every kind natural to America, we prac- ~

tised hunting with great success until the 22d day
of December following.

This day John Stewart and I had a pleasing
ramble, but fortune changed the scene in the close:

of if} We had passed through a great forest, om
13:
146 APPENDIX.

which stood myriads of trees, some gay with blos-
soms, and others rich with fruits. Nature was
here a series of wonders, and @ fund of delight.
Here she displayed her ingenuity and industry in
a variety of flowers and fruits, beautifully colored,
elegantly shaped, and charmingly flavored ; and we
were diverted with innumerable antmals present-
ing themselves perpetually to our view. In the
decline of the day, near Kentucky river, as we
ascended the brow of a small hill, a number of
Indians rushed out of a thick canebrake upon us,
and made us prisoners. ‘The time of our sorrow
was now arrived, and the scene fully opened.
The Indians plundered us of what we had, and
kept us in confinement seven days, treating us
with common savage usage. During this time we
discovered no uneasiness or desire to escape,
which made them less suspicious of us; but in
the dead of night, as we lay in a thick canebrake
by a-large fire, when sleep had locked up their
senses, my situation not disposing me for rest, I
touched my companion, and gently awoke him.
We improved this favorable opportunity, and de-
parted, leaving them to take their rest, and speedily
directed our course toward our old camp, but found
it plundered, and the company dispersed and gone
home. About this time my brother, Squire Boone,
with another adventurer, who came to explor





ore the
country shortly after us, was wanderilg ,
a

*
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 147

the forest, determined to find me if possible, and
accidentally found our camp. Notwithstanding
the unfortunate circumstances of our company, and
our dangerous situation, as surrounded with hos-
tile savages, our meeting 80 fortunately in the
wilderness made us reciprocally sensible of the
utmost satisfaction. So much does friendship tri-
umph over misfortune, that sorrows and sufferings
yanish at the meeting not only of real friends, but
of the most distant acquaintances, and substitute
happiness in their room.

Soon after this, my companion in captivity, John
Stewart, was killed by the savages, and the man
that came with my brother returned home by him-
self, We were then in a dangerous, helpless sit-
uation, exposed daily to perils and death among
savages and wild beasts—not a white man in the
country but ourselves.

Thus situated, many hundred miles from our
families in the howling wilderness, I believe few
would have equally enjoyed the happiness we ex-
perienced. I often observed to my brother, “ You
see now how little nature requires, to be satisfied.
Felicity, the companion of content, is rather found
in our own breasts than in the enjoyment of ex-
ternal things ; and I firmly believe it requires but
a little philosophy to make a man happy in what-
soever state he is. This consists in a full resig-
natidll to. the will of Providence; and a resigned
148 APPENDIX. °

soul finds pleasure in a path strewed with briers
and thorns.” .

We continued not in a state of indolence, but
hunted every day, and prepared a little cottage to
defend us from the winter storms. We remained
there undisturbed during the winter; and on the
Ist day of May, 1770, my brother returned home
to the settlement by himself, for a new recruit of
horses and ammunition, leaving me by myself,
without bread, salt, or sugar, without company of
my fellow-creatures, or even a horse or dog. I
confess [ never before was under greater neces-
sity of exercising philosophy and fortitude. A
few days I passed uncomfortably. The idea of a
beloved wife and family, and their anxiety upon
the account of my absence and exposed situation,
made sensible impressions on my heart. A thou-
sand dreadful apprehensions presented themselves
to my view, and had undoubtedly disposed me to
melancholy, if further indulged.

One day I undertook a tour through the country,
and the diversity and beauties of nature I met
with in this charming season, expelled every
gloomy and vexatious thought. Just at the close
of day the gentle gales retired, and left the place
to the disposal of a profound calm. Not a breeze
shook the most tremulous leaf. I had gained the
summit of a commanding ridge, and, looking round
with astonishing delight, beheld the ample plains,
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 149

the beauteous tracts below. On the other hand,
J surveyed the famous river Ohio that rolled in
silent dignity, marking the western boundary of
Kentucky with inconceivable grandeur. At a vast
distance | beheld the mountains lift their venera-
ble brows, and penetrate the clouds. All things
were still. I kindled-a fire near a fountain of
sweet water, and feasted on the loin of a buck,
which a few hours before I had killed. ‘The sul-
len shades of night soon overspread the whole
hemisphere, and the earth seemed to gasp after
the hovering moisture. My roving excursion this
day had fatigued my body, and diverted my im-
agination. I laid me down to sleep, and I awoke
not until the sun had chased away the night. I
continued this tour, and in a few days explored a
considerable part of the country, each day equally
pleased as the’first. I returned again to my old
camp, which was not disturbed in my absence
I did not confine my lodging to it, but often reposed
in thick canebrakes, to avoid the savages, who, I
believe, often visited my camp, but, fortunately for
me, in my absence. In this situation I was con-
stantly exposed to danger and death. How un-
happy such a situation for a man tormented with
fear, which is vain if no danger comes, and if it
does, only augments the pain! It was my happi-
ness to be destitute of this afflicting passion, with
which I had the greatest reason to be affected.
13*
150 APPENDIX. ©

The prowling wolves diverted my nocturnal hours
with perpetual howlings ; and the various species
of animals in this vast forest, in the daytime, were
continually in my view.

Thus I was surrounded by plenty in the midst
of want. I was happy in the midst of dangers
and inconveniences. In such a diversity, it was
impossible I should be disposed to melancholy.
No populous city, with all the varieties of com-
merce and stately structures, could afford so much
pleasure to my mind as the beauties of nature I
found here.

Thus, through an uninterrupted scene of sylvan
pleasures, I spent the time until the 27th day of
July following, when my brother, to my great fe-
licity, met me, according to appointment, at our
old camp. Shortly after, we left this place, not
thinking it safe to stay there longer,and proceeded
to Cumberland river, reconnoitring that part of the
country until March, 1771, and giving names to
the different waters.

Soon after, ] returned home to my family, with
a determination to bring them as soon as possible
to live in Kentucky, which I esteemed a second
paradise, at the risk of my life and fortune.

I returned safe to my old habitation, and found
my family in happy circumstances. I sold my
farm on the Yadkin, and what goods we could not
arry with us ; and on the 25th day of September,
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 15]

1773, bade a farewell to our friends, and proceed-
ed on our journey to Kentucky, in company with
five families more, and forty men that joined us in
Powel’s Valley, which is one hundred and fifty
miles from the now settled parts of Kentucky.
This promising beginning was soon overcast with
a cloud of adversity ; for, upon the 10th day of
October, the rear of our company was attacked
by a number of Indians, who killed six, and
wounded one man. Of these, my eldest son was
one that fell in the action. Though we defended
ourselves, and repulsed the enemy, yet this un-
happy affair scattered our cattle, brought us into
extreme difficulty, and so discouraged the whole
company, that we retreated forty miles, to the set-
tlement on Clinch river. We had passed over
two mountains, viz., Powel’s and Walden’s, and
were approaching Cumberland mountain when this
adverse fortune overtook us. ‘These mountains
are in the wilderness, as we pass from the old
settlements in Virginia to Kentucky, are ranged
in a southwest and northeast direction, are of a
great length and breadth, and not far distant from
each other. Over these, nature hath formed pas-
ses that are less difficult than might be expected,
from a view of such huge piles. The aspect of
these cliffs is so wild and horrid, that it is impos- °
sible to behold them without terror. The specta-
tor is apt to imagine that nature had formerly suf-
152 APPENDIX.

fered some violent convulsion, and that these are
the dismembered remains of the dreadful shock:
the ruins, not of Persepolis or Palmyra, but of the
world !

T remained with my family on Clinch until the
6th of June, 1774, when I and one Michael Stoner
were solicited by Governor Dunmore of Virginia
to go to the falls of the Ohio, to conduct into the
settlement a number of surveyors that had been
sent thither by him some months before ; this coun-
try having about this time drawn the attention of
many adventurers. We immediately complied
with the Governor’s request, and conducted in the
surveyors—completing a tour of eight hundred
miles, through many difficulties, in sixty-two
days.

Soon after I returned home, I was ordered to
take the command of three garrisons during the
campaign which Governor Dunmore carried on
against the Shawanese Indians ; after the conclu-
sion of which, the militia was discharged from
each garrison, and I, being relieved from my post,
was solicited by a number of North Carolina gen-
tlemen, that were about purchasing the lands lying
on the south side of Kentucky river, from the
Cherokee Indians, to attend their treaty at Wataga
in March, 1775, to negotiate with them, and men
tion the boundaries of the purchase. This I ac.
cepted ; and, at the request of the same gentle-
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 153

men, undertook to mark out a road in the best
passage from the settlement through the wilder-
ness to Kentucky, with such assistance as |
thought necessary to employ for such an impor-
tant undertaking.

I soon began this work, having collected a num-
ber of enterprising men, well armed. We pro-
ceeded with all possible expedition until we came
within fifteen miles of where Boonesborough now
stands, and where we were fired upon by a party
of Indians that killed two, and wounded two of
our number ; yet, although surprised and taken at
a disadvantage, we stood our ground. This was
on the 20th of March, 1775. Three days after,
we were fired upon again, and had two men killed,
and three wounded. Afterward we proceeded on
to Kentucky river without opposition ; and on the
Ist day of April began to erect the fort of Boones-
borough at a salt lick, about sixty yards from the
river, on the south side.

On the fourth day, the Indians killed one of our
men. We were busily employed in building this
fort until the 14th day of June following, without
any further opposition from the Indians ; and hav-
ing finished the works, I returned to my family, on
Clinch. .

In ashort time I proceeded to remove my family
from Clinch to this garrison, where we arrived
safe, without any other difficulties than such as
154 APPENDIX,

are common to this passage ; my wife and daugh-
ter being the first white women that ever stood on
the banks of Kentucky river.

On the 24th day of December following, we
had one man killed, and one wounded, by the In-
dians, who seemed determined to persecute us for
erecting this fortification.

On the 14th day of July, 1776, two of Colonel
Calaway’s daughters, and one of mine, were taken
prisoners near the fort. I immediately pursued
the Indians with only eight men, and on the 16th
overtook them, killed two of the party, and recov-
ered the girls. ‘The same day on which this at-
tempt was made, the Indians divided themselves
into different parties, and attacked several forts,
which were shortly before this time erected, doing
a great deal of mischief. This was extremely
distressing to the new settlers. The innocent
husbandman was shot down, while busy in culti-
vating the soil for his family’s supply. Most of
the cattle around the stations were destroyed.
They continued their hostilities in this manner
until the 15th of April, 1777, when they attacked
Boonesborough with a party of above one hundred
in number, killed one man, and wounded four.
Their loss in this attack was not certainly known
to us.

On the 4th day of July following, a party of
about two hundred Indians attacked Boonesbo-
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 155

rough, killed one man, and wounded two. They
besieged us forty-eight hours, during which time
seven of them were killed, and, at last, finding
themselves not likely to prevail, they raised the
siege, and departed.

The Indians had disposed their warriors in dif-
ferent parties at this time, and attacked the dif-
ferent garrisons, to prevent their assisting each
other, and did much injury to the distressed in-
habitants.

On the 19th day of this month, Colonel Logan’s
fort was besieged by a party of about two hundred
Indians. During this dreadful siege they did a
great deal of mischief, distressed the garrison, in
which were only fifteen men, killed two, and
wounded one. The enemy’s loss was uncertain,
from the common practice which the Indians have
of carrying off their dead in time of battle.
Colonel Harrod’s fort was then defended by only
sixty-five men, and Boonesborough by twenty-two,
there being no more forts or white men in the
country, except at the Falls, a considerable dis-
tance from these : and all, taken collectively, were
but a handful to the numerous warriors that were
everywhere dispersed through the country, intent
upon doing all the mischief that savage barbarity
could invent. Thus we passed through a scene
of sufferings that exceeds description.

On the 25th of this month, a reinforcement of
156 APPENDIX.

e

forty-five men arrived from North Carolina, and
about the 20th of August following, Colonel Bow-
man arrived with one hundred men from Virginia.
Now we began to strengthen; and hence, for the
space of six weeks, we had skirmishes with
Indians, in one quarter or other, almost every
day.

The savages now learned the superiority of the
Long Knife, as they call the Virginians, by expe-
rience ; being outgeneralled in almost every battle.
Our affairs began to wear a new aspect, and the
enemy, not daring to venture on open war, prac-
tised secret mischief at times.

On the Ist day of January, 1778, I went with
a party of thirty men to the Blue Licks, on Lick-
ing river, to make salt for the different garrisons
in the country.

On the 7th day of February, as I was hunting
to procure meat for the company, I met with a
party of one hundred and two Indians, and two
Frenchmen, on their march against Boonesborough,
that place being particularly the object of the
enemy. °

They pursued, and took me; and brought me
on the 8th day to the Licks,. where twenty-seven |
of my party were, three of them having previously
returned home with the salt. I, knowing it was
impossible for them to escape, capitulated with.
the enemy, and, at a distance, in their view,
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 157

gave notice to my men of their situation, with
orders not to resist, but surrender themselves
captives. .

The generous usage the Indians had promised
before in my capitulation, was afterward fully
complied with, and we proceeded with them as
prisoners to Old Chilicothe, the principal Indian
town on Little Miami, where we arrived, after an
uncomfortable journey in very severe weather, on
the 18th day of February, and received as good
treatment as prisoners could expect from savages.
On the 10th day of March following, I and ten of
my men were conducted by forty Indians to De-
troit, where we arrived the 30th day, and were
treated by Governor Hamilton, the British com-
mander at that post, with great humanity.

During our travels, the Indians entertained me
well, and their affection for me was so great, that
they utterly refused to leave me there with the
others, although the Governor offered them one
hundred pounds sterling for me, on purpose to give
me a parole to go home. Several English gen-
tlemen there, being sensible of my adverse for-
tune, and touched with human sympathy, gener-
ously offered a friendly supply for my wants,
which I refused, with many thanks for their kind-
ness—adding, that I never expected it would be
in my power to recompense such unmerited gen-
erosity.

14
158 APPENDIX.

The Indians left my men in captivity with the
British at Detroit, and on the 10th day of April
brought me toward Old Chilicothe, where we ar.
rived on the 25th day of the same month. ‘This
was a long and fatiguing march, through an ex-
ceeding fertile country, remarkable for fine springs
and streams of water. At Chilicothe I spent my
time as comfortably as I could expect ; was adopt-
ed, according to their custom, into a family, where
I became a son, and had a great share in the af-
fection of my new parents, brothers, sisters, and
friends. I was exceedingly familiar and friendly
with them, always appearing as cheerful and sat-
isfied as possible, and they put great confidence in
me. I often went a hunting with them, and fre-
quently gained their applause for my activity at
our shooting-matches. I was careful not to ex-
ceed many of them in shooting ; for no people are
more envious than they in this sport. I could
observe, in their countenances and gestures, the
greatest expressions of joy when they exceeded
me; and, when the reverse happened, of envy.
The Shawanese king took great notice of me, and
treated me with profound respect and entire friend-
ship, often intrusting me to hunt at my liberty. I
frequently returned with the spoils of the woods,
and as often presented some of what I had taken
to him, expressive of duty to my sovereign. My
food and lodging were in common with them; not
1 Te a a

THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 159

so good, indeed, as I could desire, but necessity
made everything acceptable.

I now began to meditate an escape, and care-
fully avoided their suspicions, continuing with
them at Old Chilicothe until the 1st day of June
following, and then was taken by them to the salt
springs on Scioto, and kept there making salt ten
days. During this time I hunted some for them,
and found the land, for a great extent about this
river, to exceed the soil of Kentucky, if possible,
and remarkably well watered.

When [ returned to Chilicothe, alarmed to see
four hundred: and fifty Indians, of their choicest
warriors, painted and armed in a fearful manner,
ready to march against Boonesborough, I deter-
mined tv escape the first opportunity.

On the 16th, before sunrise, | departed in the
most secret manner, and arrived at Boonesbo-
rough on the 20th, after a journey of one hun-
dred and sixty miles, during which I had but one
meal.

I found our fortress in a bad state of defence ;
but we proceeded immediately to repair our flanks,
strengthen our gates and posterns, and form double
bastions, which we completed in ten days. In
this time we daily expected the arrival of the In-
dian army ; and at length, one of my fellow-pris-
Oners, escaping from them, arrived, informing us
that the enemy had, on account of my departure,
160 APPENDIX,

postponed their expedition «hree weeks. The
Indians had spies out viewing our movements, and
were greatly alarmed with our increase in num-
ber and fortifications. The grand councils of the
nations were held frequently, and with more de
liberation than usual. They evidently saw the
approaching hour when the Long Knife would
dispossess them of their desirable habitations ;
and, anxiously concerned for futurity, determined
utterly to extirpate the whites out of Kentucky.
We were not intimidated by their movements, but
frequently gave them proofs of our courage.
About the first of August, I made an incursion
into the Indian country with a party of nineteen
men, in order to surprise a small town up Scioto,
called Paint Creek Town. We advanced within
four miles thereof, where we met a party of thirty
Indians on their march against Boonesborough,
intending to join the others from Chilicothe. A
smart fight ensued between us for some time ; at
length the savages gave way and fled. We had
no loss on our side; the enemy had one killed,
and two wounded. We took from them three
horses, and all their baggage ; and being informed,
by two of our number that went to their town, that
the Indians had entirely evacuated it, we proceed-
ed no further, and returned with all possible expe-
dition to assist our garrison against the other
party. We passed by them on the sixth day,
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 161

and on the seventh we arrived safe at Boonesbo-
rough.

On the 8th, the Indian army arrived, being four
hundred and forty-four in number, commanded by
Captain Duquesne, eleven other Frenchmen, and
some of their own chiefs, and marched up within
view of our fort, with British and French colors
flying; and having sent a summons to me, in
his Britannic Majesty’s name, to surrender the
fort, 1 requested two days’ consideration, which
was granted.

It was now a critical period with us. We were
a small number in the garrison—a powerful army
before our walls, whose appearance proclaimed
inevitable death, fearfully painted, and marking
their footsteps with desolation. Death was prefer-
able to captivity ; and if taken by storm, we must
inevitably be devoted to destruction. In this situ-
ation we concluded to maintain our garrison, if
possible. We immediately proceeded to collect
what we could of our horses and other cattle, and
bring them through the posterns into the fort ; and
in the evening of the 9th, I returned answer that
we were determined to defend our fort while a
man was living. “Now,” said I to their com-
mander, who stood attentively hearing my senti-
ments, “ we laugh at your formidable preparations ;
but thank you for giving us notice and time to
provide for our defence. Your efforts will not

14*
162 APPENDIX.

prevail ; for our gates shall for ever deny you ad-
mittance.” Whether this answer affected their
courage or not [ can not tell; but, contrary to our
expectations, they formed a scheme to deceive us,
declaring it was their orders, from Governor Ham-
ilton, to take us captives, and not to destroy us ;
but if nine of us would come out, and treat with
them, they would immediately withdraw their
forces from our walls, and return home peaceably.
This sounded grateful in our ears ; and we agreed
to the proposal.

We held the treaty within sixty yards of the
garrison, on purpose to divert them from a breach
of honor, as we could not avoid suspicions of the
savages. In this situation the articles were for-
mally agreed to, and signed ; and the Indians told
us it was customary with them on such occasions
for two Indians to shake hands with every white
man in the treaty, as an evidence of entire friend-
ship. We agreed to this also, but were soon con-
vinced their policy was to take us prisoners.
They immediately grappled us ; but, although sur-
rounded by hundreds of savages, we extricated
ourselves from them, and escaped all safe into the
garrison, except one that was wounded, through a
heavy fire from their army. They immediately
attacked us on every side, and a constant heavy
fre ensued between us, day and night, for the
space of nine days.
i
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 163

In this time the enemy began to undermine our
fort, which was situated sixty yards from Ken-
tucky river. They began at the water-mark, and
proceeded in the bank some distance, which we
understood, by their making the water muddy with
the clay ; and we immediately proceeded to dis-
appoint their design, by cutting a trench across
their subterranean passage. The enemy, discov-
ering our counter-mine, by the clay we threw out
of the fort, desisted from that stratagem: and ex-
perience now fully convincing them that neither
their power nor policy could effect their purpose,
on the 20th day of August they raised the siege
and departed.

During this siege, which threatened death in
every form, we had two men killed, and four wound-
ed, besides a number of cattle. We killed of the
enemy thirty-seven, and wounded a great number.
After they were gone, we picked up one hundred
and twenty-five pounds weight of bullets, besides
what stuck in the logs of our fort, which certainly
is a great proof of their industry. Soon after this,
I went into the settlement, and nothing worthy of
a place in this account passed in my affairs for
some time.

During my absence from Kentucky, Colonel
Bowman carried on an expedition against the
Shawanese, at Old Chilicothe, with one hundred
and sixty men, in July, 1779. Here they arrived
164 APPENDIX.

undiscovered, and a battle ensued, which lasted
until ten o’clock, A. M., when Colonel Bowman,
finding he could not succeed at this time, retreat~
ed about thirty miles. The Indians, in the mean
time, collecting all their forces, pursued and ovet-
took him, when a smart fight continued near two
hours, not to the advantage of Colonel Bowman’s
party.

Colonel Harrod proposed to mount a number
of horse, and furiously to rush upon the savages,
who at this time fought with remarkable fury.
This desperate step had a happy effect, broke
their line of battle, and the savages fled on all
sides. In these two battles we had nine killed,
and one wounded. ‘The enemy’s loss uncertain
only two scalps being taken.

On the 22d day of June, 1780, a large. party of
Indians and Canadians, about six hundred in num-
ber, commanded by Colonel Bird, attacked Rid-
dle’s and Martin’s stations, at the forks of Licking
river, with six pieces of artillery. They carried
this expedition so secretly, that the unwary inhab-
itants did not discover them until they fired upon
the forts ; and, not being prepared to oppose them,
were obliged to surrender themselves miserable
captives to barbarous savages, who immediately
after tomahawked one man and two women, and
loaded all the others with«heavy baggage, forcing
them along toward their towns, able or unable to
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 165

march. Such as were weak and faint by the way,
they tomahawked. ‘The tender women and help-
less children fell victims to their cruelty. This,
and the savage treatment they received afterward,
is shocking to humanity, and too barbarous to
relate.

The hostile disposition of the savages and their
allies caused General Clarke, the commandant at
the Falls of the Ohio, immediately to begin an ex-
pedition with his own regiment, and the armed
force of the country, against Pecaway, the princi-
pal town of the Shawanese, on a branch of Great
Miami, which he finished with great success, took
seventeen scalps, and burnt the town to ashes,
with the loss of seventeen men.

About this time I returned to Kentucky with
my family ; and here, to avoid an inquiry into my
conduct, the reader being before informed of my
bringing my family to Kentucky, I am under the
necessity of informing him that, during my cap-
tivity with the Indians, my wife, who despaired
of ever seeing me again—expecting the Indians
had put a period to my life, oppressed with the
distresses of the country, and bereaved of me, her
only happiness—had, before I returned, transport-
ed my family and goods, on horses, through the
wilderness, amid a multitude of dangers, to her
father’s house in North Carolina.

Shortly after the troubles at Boontsborough, I
166 APPENDIX.

went to them, and lived peaceably there until this
time. The history of my going home, and return-
ing with my family, forms a series of difficulues,
an account of which would swell a volume ; and,
being foreign to my purpose, | shall purposely
omit them.

I settled my family in Boonesborough once
more ; and shortly after, on the 6th day of Octo-
ber, 1780, I went in company with my brother to
the Blue Licks; and, on our return home, we were
fired upon by a party of Indians. They shot him,
and pursued me, by the scent of their dog, three
miles; but I killed the dog, and escaped. The
winter soon came on, and was very severe, which
confined the Indians to their wigwams.

The severity of this winter caused great diffi-
culties in Kentucky. ‘The enemy had destroyed
most of the corn the summer before. This neces-
sary article was scarce and dear, and the inhab-
itants lived chiefly on the flesh of buffalo. The
circumstances of many were very lamentable:
however, being a hardy race of people, and accus-
tomed to difficulties and necessities, they were
wonderfully supported through all their sufferings,
until the ensuing autumn, when we received
abundance from the fertile soil.

Toward spring we were frequently harassed by
Indians; and in May, 1782, a party assaulted
Ashton’s station, killed one man, and took a
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 167

negro prisoner. Captain Ashton, with twenty-
five.men, pursued and overtook the savages, and
a smart fight ensued, which lasted two hours ; but
they, being superior in number, obliged Captain
Ashton’s party to retreat, with the loss of eight
killed, and four mortally wounded ; their brave
commander himself being numbered among the
dead.

The Indians continued their hostilities ; and,
about the 10th of August following, two boys were
taken from Major Hoy’s station. ‘This party was
pursued by Captain Holder and seventeen men,
who were also defeated, with the loss of four men
killed, and one wounded. Our affairs became
more and more alarming. Several stations which
had lately been erected in the country were con-
tinually infested with savages, stealing their horses
and killing the men at every opportunity. In a
field, near Lexington, an Indian shot a man, and
running to scalp him, was himself shot from the
fort, and fell dead upon his enemy.

Every day we experienced recent mischiefs.
The barbarous savage nations of Shawanese, Cher-
okees, Wyandots, Tawas, Delawares, and several
others near Detroit, united in a war against us,
and assembled their choicest warriors at Old
Chilicothe, to go on the expedition, in order to
destroy us, and entirely depopulate the country.
Their savage minds were inflamed to mischief by
168 APPENDIX.

two abandoned men, Captains M‘Kee and Girty.
These led them to execute every diabolical scheme,
and on the 15th day of August, commanded a party
of Indians and Canadians, of about five hundred in
number, against Bryant’s station, five miles from
Lexington. Without demanding a surrender, they
furiously assaulted the garrison, which was hap-
pily prepared to oppose them ; and, after they had
expended much ammunition in vain, and killed the
cattle round the fort, not being likely to make
themselves masters of this place, they raised the
siege, and departed in the morning of the third
day after they came, with the loss of about thirty
killed, and the number of wounded uncertain.
Of the garrison, four were killed, and three
wounded.

On the 18th day, Colonel Todd, Colonel Trigg,
Major Harland, and myself, speedily collected
one hundred and seventy-six men, well armed,
and pursued the savages. They had marched
beyond the Blue Licks, to a remarkable bend of
the main fork of Licking river, about forty-three
miles from Lexington, where we overtook them
on the 19th day. The savages observing us, gave
way ; and we, being ignorant of their numbers,
passed the river. When the enemy saw our pro-
ceedings, having greatly the advantage of us in
situation, they formed the line of battle, from one
bend of Licking to the «ther, about a mile from
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 169

the Blue Licks. An exceeding fierce battle im-
mediately began, for about fifteen minutes, when
we, being overpowered by numbers, were obliged
to retreat, with the loss of sixty-seven men, seven
of whom-were taken prisoners. ‘The brave and
much-lamented Colonels Todd and Trigg, Major
Harland, and my second son, were among the
dead. We were informed that the Indians, num-
bering their dead, found they had four killed
more than we; and therefore four of the pris-
oners they had taken were, by general consent,
ordered to be killed in a most barbarous manner
by the young warriors, in order to train them
up to cruelty ; and then they proceeded to their
towns.

On our retreat we were met by Colonel Logan,
hastening to join us, with a number of well-armed
men. This powerful assistance we unfortunately
wanted in the battle; for, notwithstanding the
enemy’s superiority of numbers, they acknowl-
edged, that, if they had received one more fire
from us, they should undoubtedly have given way.
So valiantly did our small party fight, that, to the
memory of those who unfortunately fell in the
battle, enough of honor can not be paid. Had
Colonel Logan and his party been with us, it is
highly probable we should have given the savages
a total defeat.

I can not reflect upon this dreadful scene, but

15
170 APPENDIX.

sorrow fills my heart. A zeal for the defence of
their country led these heroes to the scene of ac-
tion, though with a few men to attack a powerful
army of experienced warriors. When we gave
way, they pursued us with the utmost eagerness,
and in every quarter spread destruction. The
river was difficult to cross, and many were killed
in the flight—some just entering the river, some
in the water, others after crossing, in ascending
the cliffs. Some escaped on horseback, a few on
foot ; and, being dispersed everywhere in a few
hours, brought the melancholy news of this un-
fortunate battle to Lexington. Many widows were
now made. ‘The reader may guess what sorrow
filled the hearts of the inhabitants, exceeding
anything that I am able to describe. Being rein-
forced, we returned to bury the dead, and found
their bodies strewed everywhere, cut and man-
gled in a dreadful manner. ‘This mournful scene
exhibited a horror almost unparalleled: some
torn and eaten by wild beasts; those in the
river eaten by fishes ; all in such a putrefied con-
dition, that no one could be distinguished from
another.

As soon as General Clarke, then at the Falls
of the Ohio-—who was ever our ready friend, and
merits the love and gratitude of all his country-
men—understood the circumstances of this unfor-
tunate action, he ordered an expedition, with all
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 17]

possible haste, to pursue the savages, which was
so expeditiously effected, that we overtook them
within two miles of their towns: and probably
might have obtained a great victory, had not two
of their number met us about two hundred poles
before we came up. These returned quick as
lightning to their camp, with the alarming news
of a mighty army in view. The savages fled in
the utmost disorder, evacuated their towns, and
reluctantly left their territory to our mercy. We
immediately took possession of Old Chilicothe
without opposition, being deserted by its inhabit-
ants. We continued our pursuit through five
towns on the Miami rivers, Old Chilicothe, Peca-
way, New Chilicothe, Will’s ‘Towns, and Chili-
cothe—burnt them all to ashes, entirely destroyed
their corn, and other fruits, and everywhere
spread a scene of desolation in the country. In
this expedition we took seven prisoners and
five scalps, with the loss of only four men, two
of whom were accidentally killed by our own
army.

This campaign in some measure damped the
spirits of the Indians, and made them sensibfe of
our superiority. Their connexions were dissolved,
their armies scattered, and a future invasion put
entirely out of their power; yet they continued to
practise mischief secretly upon the inhabitants, in
the expased parts of the country.
172 APPENDIX.

In October following, a party made an excur
sion into that district called the Crab Orchard.
and one of them, being advanced some distance
before the others, boldly entered the house of a
poor defenceless family, in which was only a
negro man, a woman, and her children, terrified
with the apprehensions of immediate death. -. The
savage, perceiving their defenceless situation,
without offering violence to the family, attempted
to capture the negro, who happily proved an
overmatch for him, threw him on the ground, and,
in the struggle, the mother of the children drew
an axe from a corner of the cottage, and cut his
head off, while her little daughter shut the door.
The savages instantly appeared, and applied their
tomahawks to the door. An old rusty gun-barrel,
without a lock, lay in a corner, which the mother
put through a small crevice, and the savages, per-
ceiving it, fled. In the mean time, the alarm
spread through the neighborhood ; the armed men
collected immediately, and pursued the ravagers
into the wilderness. Thus Providence, by the
means of this negro, saved the whole of the poor
family from destruction. From that time until the
happy return of peace between the United States .
and Great Britain, the Indians did us no mischief.
Finding the great king beyond the water disap-
pointed in his expectations, and conscious of the
importance of the Long Knife, and their own
THE ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE. 173

wretchedness, some of the nations immediately de-
sired peace ; to which, at present [1784], they
seem universally disposed, and are sending am-
bassadors to General Clarke, at the Falls of the
Ohio, with the minutes of their councils.

To conclude, I can now say that I have verified
the saying of an old Jndian who signed Colonel
Henderson’s deed. ‘Taking me by the hand, at
the delivery thereof—* Brother,” said he, “ we
have given you a fine land, but I believe you will
have much trouble in settling it.” My footsteps
have often been marked with blood, and therefore
I can truly subscribe to its original name. ‘T'wo
darling sons and a brother have [| lost by savage
hands, which have also taken from me forty valu-
able horses, and abundance of cattle. Many dark
and sleepless nights have I been a companion for
owls, separated from the cheerful society of men,
scorched by the summer’s sun, and pinched by
the winter’s cold—an instrument ordained to settle
the wilderness. But now the scene is changed:
peace crowns the sylvan shade.

What thanks, what ardent and ceaseless thanks
are due to that all-superintending Providence which
has turned a cruel war into peace, brought order
out of confusion, made the fierce savages placid,
and turned away their hostile weapons from our
country! May the same Almighty Goodness ban-
ish the accursed monster, war, from all lands, with
174 , APPENDIX.

her hated associates, rapine and insatiable ambi-
tion! Let peace, descending from her native
heaven, bid her olives spring amid the joyful na-
tions ; and plenty, in league with commerce, scatter
blessings from her copious hand !

This account of my adventures will inform the
reader of the most remarkable events of this coun-
try. I now live in peace and safety, enjoying the’
sweets of liberty, and the bounties of Providence,
with my once fellow-sufferers, in this delightful
country, which I have seen purchased with a vast
expense of blood and treasure : delighting in the
prospect of its being, in a short time, one of the
most opulent and powerful states on the continent
~ of North America; which, with the love and grati-
tude of my countrymen, I esteem a sufficient reward
for all my toil and dangers.

DANIEL BOONE.
Fayette County, KENTUCKY.

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xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0000192100001datestamp 2009-02-23setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title The adventures of Daniel Boone Library for my young countrymendc:subject Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )Publishers' advertisements -- 1851 ( rbgenr )Biographies -- 1851 ( rbgenr )Bldn -- 1851dc:description b Statement of Responsibility by the author of "Uncle Philip's conversations."Citation/Reference NUC pre-1956,Additional Physical Form Electronic version available on the World Wide Web as part of the PALMM Project "Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1850-1869 (NEH PA-23536-00)".Author's name from NUC pre-1956 cited below.Frontispiece with guardsheet.Series statement from spine.Publisher's advertisements: <2> p. in front & <6> p. at end.dc:publisher D. Appleton & Co.George S. Appletondc:date 1851, c1843dc:type Bookdc:format <2>, <9>-174, <6> p., <1> leaf of plates : 1 ill. ; 16 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00001921&v=00001002231313 (aleph)AAA1951 (ltqf)ALH1681 (notis)12812338 (oclc)dc:source University of Floridadc:language Englishdc:coverage United States -- New York -- New YorkUnited States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia


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AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:02:51-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300094; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-11T18:31:35-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '392159' DFID 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUGS' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00010.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 5969f05d4f6185463ca6e2732f59b88e
'SHA-1' a708da356bff2d5030657ce2e7dc59b075404428
EVENT '2012-03-31T09:28:17-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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43a39ab5a532a10066e1a1ff37dfbbf5
029da7bd94aad57c119f563b88f48d791a4d69e5
'2012-03-31T09:29:56-04:00'
describe
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7afeddd30d9af10ea0bfa641adf9056ebf337b36
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-03-31T09:25:22-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-03-31T09:25:03-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-03-31T09:28:19-04:00'
describe
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96916e65a0ea177bbedc49dbbb82ca36d3e31b9c
'2012-03-31T09:27:26-04:00'
describe
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dce3ecd116d30c6292c1855bbb955baa
edec207fc5ef12f3570084843ddfd67b9e6ca7fc
'2012-03-31T09:26:46-04:00'
describe
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4ca55d72a9d1480a666cc0f89cba331d
cb266630ec23596b7c9c230cab6e4d43f63a2d76
'2012-03-31T09:28:58-04:00'
describe
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'2012-03-31T09:28:01-04:00'
describe
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0c639e695961ac1fa8eb5060f571b79e
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'2012-03-31T09:28:47-04:00'
describe
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866ee009521ea0a9adfc8fad857d188a
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'2012-03-31T09:24:08-04:00'
describe
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b9b1441a76589170bf25943dd1d80bcc
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'2012-03-31T09:25:12-04:00'
describe
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73162ddb872a4d87a55544b4a194366b
68a7d12a190ef464eb81a2d5dbeb82caced30c0e
'2012-03-31T09:28:03-04:00'
describe
'998805' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUHZ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d87a1544248941d3ee30826c79d75ce0
9d869a6b520ba79819dd23737d12b7d11d81ba83
'2012-03-31T09:24:17-04:00'
describe
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bd69e1fe50dff2212db63468546480a6
530acd89cc5dd5156fa691c0b79274c1f4f7ada9
'2012-03-31T09:25:50-04:00'
describe
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2adea882e556e3c3c66dc325f109b6ac
2a508c4df8d540f1de23888e2e069bf8d1710e81
'2012-03-31T09:24:57-04:00'
describe
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09e7e28b7ecf63c20ac034b10ab12f5c
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'2012-03-31T09:27:55-04:00'
describe
'8012400' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUID' 'sip-files00015.tif'
3bf7b06e477aef706c7adbad99b58bf7
f5b4cca41becaa6be7483ecaff7eb3e6c35a60d9
'2012-03-31T09:28:54-04:00'
describe
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ab90c7d04a1f9824ddabaef063dd00f8
a8b92176d6261229b4e8f8cdfcc38407e6ac6514
'2012-03-31T09:27:17-04:00'
describe
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002d5a9fea73596d74455bb650d05443
57c11c58d05b5354fa80eab63f11d3fbea61ed0a
'2012-03-31T09:29:25-04:00'
describe
'915692' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUIG' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
1c797347ca670bee479e27118f893ab1
15fca93c866f7fade070e79ea203376d8da5c545
describe
'127008' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUIH' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
bb3178f21d2131354f8d71a802c162be
2ab87ec62ae254b45df74a4fc85f8aed3dc17c82
'2012-03-31T09:23:55-04:00'
describe
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a86dbf352dfbdcbbe1d03671ac9cd5e4
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'2012-03-31T09:28:16-04:00'
describe
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01df984f4f79748c83a1e09de4ad84fd
c60730dea5dbaa1ff2115bb6615caa44c4529e1d
'2012-03-31T09:27:36-04:00'
describe
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002e98499182c23d09bd97def10fef66
a4c28ef01ba3a87be4d4e9fd399fb7e7b481a42d
'2012-03-31T09:24:19-04:00'
describe
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d87d6bbd8360086425217ed571ebe93f
f2dba6ac238792abb0cc12fdf44e69e651eb9d8d
'2012-03-31T09:26:29-04:00'
describe
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9d39a3a85b0d93bc015b8e62eb1b6292
23d1b1ad2eefa86bcddbba6e9fddfeee9c30ca05
'2012-03-31T09:30:06-04:00'
describe
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3444f817d8ca0135326bdd3adcd1fcde
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'2012-03-31T09:24:44-04:00'
describe
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d965bff9cd7dc6fb4e2922195c17afa0
caf50927f8d2b7948753827cdc9fafbd4b38b7cf
describe
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82b308bf09adbf952e9e2e43775f2813
a98f0bda5d586bbd171f5ba5a9d7d1b9168bfa53
'2012-03-31T09:29:38-04:00'
describe
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3b9c4bef1c04414920b2f209a4822dd7
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'2012-03-31T09:27:50-04:00'
describe
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a2058ba112d6bc76bc4dac1a972631cb
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'2012-03-31T09:27:28-04:00'
describe
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5b99509f694f70a27f9ac6a916812ed0
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'2012-03-31T09:25:01-04:00'
describe
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c1c6f5a41cfd009e2c4cbe40465c05a7
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'2012-03-31T09:28:32-04:00'
describe
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272a42328e438f67cef28aaa9c227d0d
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'2012-03-31T09:29:27-04:00'
describe
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'2012-03-31T09:30:26-04:00'
describe
'18604' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUIW' 'sip-files00018.pro'
e1ccadb50b26a4047703a9704bfaae80
d22e5387a9a7154a1fa628d11c22396f8ff59f48
'2012-03-31T09:25:38-04:00'
describe
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dd3e657c9c6ed26f861768998c59a05f
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'2012-03-31T09:26:04-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2012-03-31T09:29:00-04:00'
describe
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'2012-03-31T09:29:54-04:00'
describe
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describe
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808e40dd2daae7b2622a3b7881b24383
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'2012-03-31T09:28:45-04:00'
describe
'36711' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJD' 'sip-files00019.pro'
7193e3795ff56dffad0b75b3dc295064
cad1f4af585e2843038872210e5238f30a4f66ec
'2012-03-31T09:27:35-04:00'
describe
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965eab42d3690be7e32bf0c62b7f1731
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'2012-03-31T09:24:56-04:00'
describe
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699a6759af23afb1de63f39d7745a202
52d47cd3a0ce03754e51c40659bb00a19aa1b6f9
'2012-03-31T09:28:43-04:00'
describe
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e34c46c2433881ed6083c60d37c12c4d
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'2012-03-31T09:29:50-04:00'
describe
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0c636b204a78ccfe0bdf0f3eead025e5
0afe34373bd53aa5ea4c2280f1c921ac48c5770d
'2012-03-31T09:26:03-04:00'
describe
'976378' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJI' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f817eb45084657ef533619f785b2238c
25a9575f49ffc28f5ffd7c1306bdf928a0b4abc9
'2012-03-31T09:27:14-04:00'
describe
'151751' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJJ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
63eeb0c6ea3bcade64166eece8480b78
3e01ff70dffab31f72f1dc3c43ec6c7b4c166fe7
describe
'36036' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJK' 'sip-files00020.pro'
e84935d09f5e36398325541e746f5f97
6abb64f7e0ce5d1b8dd9b8b449e1a701795d1740
'2012-03-31T09:25:15-04:00'
describe
'72008' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJL' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
8b81bf3d8b43e2050b1a5e8e76681122
e915520469aaadc351d5dd50bb5773f1c40d8552
describe
'7833644' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJM' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c16accce7875b90db07f86bbef610504
a7df19c43a93a47aa6ef42934c03dc775d57a710
'2012-03-31T09:25:36-04:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJN' 'sip-files00020.txt'
3d2d3f0c6296aa0a8cc6e462b13b493b
27bf83461e07ad23df051dfbd33ff788245dacef
'2012-03-31T09:24:35-04:00'
describe
'37668' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJO' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
00ef625f0031479fa5eca3b3ef6e5cf2
ad7a417d7a7ed629a68b4ae26eaa2f22bf0f34b0
'2012-03-31T09:27:39-04:00'
describe
'998784' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJP' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
160b1226663f107174ed341ee7146a6b
921e738c6f764ff84a03419eeda6aa281605589f
'2012-03-31T09:24:00-04:00'
describe
'156574' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
ceaf02efebf9481b93eec2fde61f129a
2cb57362cd02afb3ec6dd52ee2ae41e57cff21c6
'2012-03-31T09:24:39-04:00'
describe
'37836' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJR' 'sip-files00021.pro'
a761830d7591e80e8ba91b82200287b8
d29d816d63ec23606bf3aa273d34ce032a312ec9
'2012-03-31T09:26:51-04:00'
describe
'73964' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJS' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
dffa109134b902aa2547cd15ffefad70
6323e414e8abd55da6b5d1a35db80988ff14152d
'2012-03-31T09:27:22-04:00'
describe
'8013552' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJT' 'sip-files00021.tif'
4759956859375c9c614333f3ad1a50e1
b3c21718ed2e5f033cadcd1a4e7b57c9b2b38ddf
'2012-03-31T09:26:27-04:00'
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJU' 'sip-files00021.txt'
44916acaf778972d7ff1974309139436
6385b8192a02726c29b0902c09a9ad90e78887bb
'2012-03-31T09:25:16-04:00'
describe
'38632' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJV' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
7a555c9d654f6de63a3025d65192a173
4d6d68e7542827a32225ce944adf623c051d9040
'2012-03-31T09:24:07-04:00'
describe
'976374' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJW' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
6303ff883ff12f1281b2abfc4359ffd5
f9d80e2b8d263a8b0f8ba0b31d3f5432d10a29a1
'2012-03-31T09:28:15-04:00'
describe
'153590' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJX' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
e8049cd64db5c6c96e022433d493e179
f3e3f545d4d3dd062b81c6eb9016c75be1c40552
'2012-03-31T09:28:29-04:00'
describe
'36848' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJY' 'sip-files00022.pro'
7c60daf0f3470465e5254745dc58d343
bd2baa4135b514a12c599e1a0ece09416ebce124
'2012-03-31T09:24:21-04:00'
describe
'72501' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUJZ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
59f937f4a5077180cfd80efa0896df45
1a223bb9df6a772560b4360e6378e515b02a10cf
'2012-03-31T09:28:28-04:00'
describe
'7833696' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKA' 'sip-files00022.tif'
bad176d34bef68899e838f4b6275ad21
ceb5c459403fea7b0dd29a253c8ef3f35ef24e7e
'2012-03-31T09:24:43-04:00'
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKB' 'sip-files00022.txt'
51adac4eccffd9b097d79da9982769e6
021b3de8a2426862cf9369d0eb2b103cffce6190
'2012-03-31T09:28:05-04:00'
describe
'38014' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKC' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
3114a56598c5705d7d9331912114f87e
de00f1841f337739bc53148bc022c663b2eafccb
'2012-03-31T09:27:02-04:00'
describe
'989804' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKD' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
572a7df5b4fe4dc0913b0f505feeecb7
b5db69fe64702422fe9438e6226b4b0a7b934a10
'2012-03-31T09:23:53-04:00'
describe
'150802' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKE' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
16eb45781dac793ab0096e0a645bb4e8
69a9ff6b3da54178788bb466de3a6bba4964ef26
'2012-03-31T09:26:01-04:00'
describe
'36109' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKF' 'sip-files00023.pro'
93ad6256fa96c2967ff2d17f3b2c2c0e
7f925454ffe1996392ea4c73e094a7f0b61b0a07
'2012-03-31T09:30:09-04:00'
describe
'72919' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKG' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
bc52b31bda056406c1c02674bccd1b04
be7ecdf08c137c49c1f50bd7e35135145bc70bec
'2012-03-31T09:26:57-04:00'
describe
'7941380' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKH' 'sip-files00023.tif'
c107963732e99b3492a064c485003dd6
a004bdb31d2d267682b89347dad87cab92e943f1
'2012-03-31T09:30:18-04:00'
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKI' 'sip-files00023.txt'
436c870e55a0a6f73a28aa3ede7a9e68
ad47e3a242ad7bacddcb0ac41939de2d686df28a
describe
'37952' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKJ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
c32092cc3dc0090048dfaa650b162ed7
5704a6408f2e3e32daf52210c75ec19997ceff31
'2012-03-31T09:24:30-04:00'
describe
'976282' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKK' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
c6c472cf45e27f2cf1569c8aafbb37c4
3eecd19da5a51ab7aa40b2cbfd73a5962a96f6bd
'2012-03-31T09:27:40-04:00'
describe
'150497' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKL' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
fb1db6d5d5fb62b5b73b8df3ad06d4ad
473cbe5fe9188cd9bbf894c70488d3e0e4058c66
'2012-03-31T09:25:27-04:00'
describe
'35879' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKM' 'sip-files00024.pro'
bf6618413f3bf82481c3c5acb9fa1e55
33d840e6f1203c04504dbc878beb8d201548c270
describe
'72217' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKN' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
6c4233f8041bc2d763f90a78aa85db66
492696538de3c96e479cc396d8914cc1e21aae9b
'2012-03-31T09:25:31-04:00'
describe
'7833884' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKO' 'sip-files00024.tif'
5216ae90a8ce85abcf7cc4a779acdf03
4e9ed8f7c5473a0926911d3c49c2020d3673ca0a
'2012-03-31T09:24:10-04:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKP' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f5185868a50a424de141077cd068f9ec
87ba2973a2db40c62a1c9718429324880d010ad5
'2012-03-31T09:25:02-04:00'
describe
'38008' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKQ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
1bd2b4071571b124cb558e4a7001f71a
57f953d3206c10a17a184a2f78d5bce432a8f141
'2012-03-31T09:27:56-04:00'
describe
'960091' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKR' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
2a6faa9626c9c79eb4be5c1080cc0ca0
5bbf00e01531c8149de30f67818ff4257e055556
'2012-03-31T09:24:04-04:00'
describe
'151070' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKS' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
a272606467d37a4a91c32a08f8aac279
8ee7582533f19985d368a847c8835973eaf36c1f
'2012-03-31T09:26:33-04:00'
describe
'36629' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKT' 'sip-files00025.pro'
ccfff0aa361408786925fad736804b3b
6481f1082386ae2e7c0f16184288d4b7fd599b41
'2012-03-31T09:29:15-04:00'
describe
'72630' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKU' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d30b8fb016e74b363eb8d3f083a90836
16eacb681745c85ae511db88849880c17635e5a9
'2012-03-31T09:24:40-04:00'
describe
'7703936' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKV' 'sip-files00025.tif'
dc51cb04bcd0832ba2bbbd9bdd8c0242
39d3c3479a9f511d474090647f28de36977eb4e9
'2012-03-31T09:28:38-04:00'
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKW' 'sip-files00025.txt'
cb9ce69b362902e479172eb481ba4487
67a58d74cde4e33056bbd41f1b9e9ee0770515f2
describe
'39119' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKX' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
c3dcb414e4778d9b2105c64cfc4a1f8f
6e83ae4ccfa58f40b28425f87a1a14c929f5d9b1
'2012-03-31T09:27:15-04:00'
describe
'976344' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKY' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
b84c883591e2e5f638801d7de73a5861
a7ee45af0662edd0ae8d3be5cd293f12857aafae
'2012-03-31T09:27:44-04:00'
describe
'156584' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUKZ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
53f5f1f202243fe3ff2081c85ca9bb34
05cd3372d8b50fefa0b19bbbc28cb945d771d060
'2012-03-31T09:29:26-04:00'
describe
'36684' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULA' 'sip-files00026.pro'
b8d0eeb872843e2e492ef86fe6b286f9
fdd5bdf2529dc7bd491650a22217bc7de274573e
'2012-03-31T09:26:49-04:00'
describe
'74468' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULB' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
891b0be3d168221a98c3a45fb53a6f45
84aff238d924c34d8d119a0436e1527d0de444a9
'2012-03-31T09:29:20-04:00'
describe
'7834012' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULC' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e52db2d5f60e22ece2549c2c36da43f9
4ba63e195b253e340f94d604f46e383e94e68c22
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULD' 'sip-files00026.txt'
9d6f27ee102cfc9ec9184193e45d7a32
96769fb8dc76458c9740fcd0dc6f04bd71c86acc
'2012-03-31T09:24:41-04:00'
describe
'38517' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULE' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
f50a546523139b85f4ebd01f62fd0630
4c60dcf727f0784a1f298ff300c75b130676241a
describe
'886433' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULF' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
887535ec1eb0e69fd29454a674c07a21
ea9a5ca3ab056fe10d7d5dd4a975790dfcf86cde
'2012-03-31T09:28:40-04:00'
describe
'152030' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
eea780b7d054447b63e9a65fd3846aee
da65b33dfb4db554df0cdafaf8a2d17348031534
describe
'36364' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULH' 'sip-files00027.pro'
f69de7e91781534727ad4416322b7139
a503c44732e7e321b137bc98c07573777fe927dc
'2012-03-31T09:26:53-04:00'
describe
'71788' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULI' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
4997d0df0d086c657ea93f5e5e2bfed1
1b0217c5b5a1589f1521290c2c1603051419c033
'2012-03-31T09:27:23-04:00'
describe
'7114624' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULJ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
f29924c55ed56a12956674bbd6ed2044
077d3626756ad8a53a960a8cd07d3eecdc305149
'2012-03-31T09:28:11-04:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULK' 'sip-files00027.txt'
9fdc169f43b1d0ee8a3b3d7fc3b7b0b8
255403fc50f71bf6fd599e86cf6a8a0c2b4531bd
'2012-03-31T09:28:51-04:00'
describe
'38943' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULL' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c7945b444928e49caa6ae169fd4d2637
782364e82278b7952e85b0f6bea66def17bb549d
'2012-03-31T09:24:47-04:00'
describe
'931358' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULM' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
00185def30857939d74238e2f137fe22
d6943401f1525ad53e2c4428cfd4250fba86c7a6
'2012-03-31T09:28:55-04:00'
describe
'150275' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULN' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
70b5f0e202933e94a4aadba608e6cec5
e9dd2e67ce8e958ac14c1b5c143a61884d32a04f
describe
'35085' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULO' 'sip-files00028.pro'
65fb3ff350eeafd8c36711a34ec6aea1
2a88898586681218c3c0cb7e88152000afc54f8c
'2012-03-31T09:26:05-04:00'
describe
'72157' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULP' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
5fa151ba16bb84dacd64872aeaf01948
c5cc5e46801c73137481cbd20399f29070aaabaa
'2012-03-31T09:29:17-04:00'
describe
'7474284' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULQ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
969641f7a681483c4c194a7a61be86ef
45311963b0f3202404416e68d052aee9782ab0e5
'2012-03-31T09:28:33-04:00'
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULR' 'sip-files00028.txt'
7cc122c7ee9d294af86563148c689f7d
a890df1d48e84bf9222ae1bb0e44ab48a189e6ec
'2012-03-31T09:27:43-04:00'
describe
'39580' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULS' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
7e771a8c0c808e19f55093773c490b8e
3635bfbef0933ed42b0a835840f928ef292d4dc0
'2012-03-31T09:29:07-04:00'
describe
'910794' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULT' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
a06a5440a0a651b575042b7f1e46d8e7
3b582c230755b97adaf1c01b5dfd757db42481b2
'2012-03-31T09:28:34-04:00'
describe
'153696' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULU' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
394d926b5ac3580be17566cb0d41047b
7404e874dbec537fa1295ad004ff1b65ac083de3
describe
'37016' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULV' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e63fa0697e01827506fb39c24e3e6535
0c5adc4456fc1e90fe51e3cde1bcf5dd5e436058
'2012-03-31T09:25:25-04:00'
describe
'75418' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULW' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
d02f5a6790ccba6f51f9397ca539efc5
e62850770498dd0e85f0f90a50623e998e88eff9
'2012-03-31T09:25:17-04:00'
describe
'7309944' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULX' 'sip-files00029.tif'
0d670db859858eed166651d8402e628c
501e6f25c2c0e697011a65baf3e2d0d217017a6b
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULY' 'sip-files00029.txt'
98fe5f6d3e2c523f2f05759d57d0ba25
dd4d9a64b33a1d07c9c037d4ef2ceb4f89ab1b5d
'2012-03-31T09:29:58-04:00'
describe
'40056' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACULZ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
dae791c6784d3b8545b118a2827415b6
d730c06ebad20ce7dfb0e0445f50be1c96ea3dda
'2012-03-31T09:27:34-04:00'
describe
'276370' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMA' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
9bf340ab67cec2108bda4717008bf737
24d1664b0dc0c7e1ad793f2180484a6adcee1578
'2012-03-31T09:29:59-04:00'
describe
'47324' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMB' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
2feb401c7a240f0896c7c861a55518a9
1f34c6d4cbaa8bab11fcb47f8b5008337f0d8ec3
'2012-03-31T09:28:56-04:00'
describe
'5986' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMC' 'sip-files00030.pro'
47ae0cb0dead2ba9416ac94573d53c0d
a61d23b13393f458e9ff840b8bcf03ae7d24feb1
describe
'30437' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMD' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
9484b0a27e5b08b462eb3bba3649b324
48b74d2d2e5fd22090d4d7078be29aeaefdaf9c6
'2012-03-31T09:30:17-04:00'
describe
'7620800' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUME' 'sip-files00030.tif'
1c12bafbb9debfa867126afeb85dd0e4
125c9dd62b4a1aa811939bfa3ea4550e48ae0e14
'2012-03-31T09:28:13-04:00'
describe
'293' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMF' 'sip-files00030.txt'
2080a2f5c539f64b0e688aa60c7715d6
96d91fdb14ee06e69bda00f9de9ebb7f3f85d33f
'2012-03-31T09:27:05-04:00'
describe
'23208' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMG' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
712ee0e2043e71f0f8b8e69faa6a1651
637aba45b7c195b83ee14aed8f23e4116e3d2a2f
describe
'1004340' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMH' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
667457cb1346cf243dff72b870e6aa11
b389fb3465f1ba0fc307c0f7d537081539f5a5af
describe
'132936' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMI' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
22dc5b90fb3a77a63a84339058e5576e
9ada50702900920c373009d69c3581173eef0215
'2012-03-31T09:26:22-04:00'
describe
'23770' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMJ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
dcb09d3de3d125fd4f72ae4282e5c9c3
e393a7c9a3a7cbb48350f47d7438362d1a9b98bf
'2012-03-31T09:24:32-04:00'
describe
'62645' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMK' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
582ee6cd282c1d54681d509934cad3f3
a16616b545476532d04af63a298da1eed69cfffa
'2012-03-31T09:26:13-04:00'
describe
'8251356' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUML' 'sip-files00031.tif'
82b72fc697a4b493be46160024219ce4
998c0521f8dcd273bbfc17054ec231262249ecfd
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMM' 'sip-files00031.txt'
a7cd319dae9ac6afbcd37c657e393d5c
1d8b52cde24dd6c4559b288bb9bd2eb10dde8b7f
'2012-03-31T09:27:33-04:00'
describe
'33083' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMN' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
1ea83852f2bd8ce86cb3b21c64d0e6e5
b1c6a679a9c2d340e2056aca1d329a4a03770af1
'2012-03-31T09:25:09-04:00'
describe
'956878' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMO' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
956d97d4ff41dd154be9ab97c8743fa7
81d255077a412aa94d5d1c6bc754088c5f3d65a3
'2012-03-31T09:26:17-04:00'
describe
'149269' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMP' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
9255dc1ac31c72af8660a2e7563c0d64
da78e0ff03dac99a5a42c9b3469bfe03f0937f96
'2012-03-31T09:25:39-04:00'
describe
'35971' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMQ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
0811d2f64371d8255ed5bc5fc34a43cc
39b2a389664746d4cd8149caef173c0b7f12fecf
'2012-03-31T09:27:18-04:00'
describe
'71340' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMR' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
a60a203ffb08eb1c71d06c4dc8248ce9
4c422199e82fb622a7942e3b34a3a144d271c2b1
'2012-03-31T09:24:54-04:00'
describe
'7678260' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMS' 'sip-files00032.tif'
964b7c20c2a4c57a56ebc2d00747bf3b
67894c2feba63464e4d3238a60f97cb3252a1f04
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMT' 'sip-files00032.txt'
c1c62b681433665a1efb0b2b8597c0c5
fbf202dcc5930f4ef738cb95e692ab85662e190d
'2012-03-31T09:26:55-04:00'
describe
'39188' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMU' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
19bea20944df11d434c70fd173d37450
deec47690567e83005016e99d46a861ece587092
describe
'1008485' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMV' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
568d1f441357e185c3ec2db626d39fd1
d7819c1d7fd17ffd48664a756cd05e7b7c8dcdf5
describe
'150392' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMW' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
02afcca33ba7a64947fbe827ba890091
722daf3a501a22e1b0c2a6b7c442415e47d63834
'2012-03-31T09:28:18-04:00'
describe
'36306' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMX' 'sip-files00033.pro'
418a54fee9199c1cb17ff3c73a67a349
01e6ff669ca1de6d6ec0a30781f070fa63f9ca09
describe
'73239' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMY' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
bb1099e7541c49c6ec5fa12bf2025760
779ed8fca6362567b6cedfc6c4af2fb255edb853
'2012-03-31T09:25:00-04:00'
describe
'8091260' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUMZ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
bbcc04f08c9329eddeb28ff7068aceea
c7343439d9b2b28dccf322414190282d23d81c2a
'2012-03-31T09:24:31-04:00'
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNA' 'sip-files00033.txt'
1f2604f644e79412316ee48669dcb4bb
4d4b39395e5bda5ca35bf26f95d1fa4b6d255cc2
'2012-03-31T09:26:14-04:00'
describe
'36603' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNB' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
ab78a17a8c098cea5a3069a85dce800a
8e7aa30c07bd063f88f6b4ec9be28858276d7804
'2012-03-31T09:30:02-04:00'
describe
'956909' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNC' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
2f1cf41e035ee007e4e8aead79195892
ba2fd87fb49cf478db6a18036eee14bbaaceea7b
'2012-03-31T09:24:24-04:00'
describe
'150000' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUND' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
240b84e0fdfb15ab34dfdd1c2a22b845
84948623809e95a696778ea1c5e1984ff6087c34
'2012-03-31T09:25:41-04:00'
describe
'35668' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNE' 'sip-files00034.pro'
8fa450711cfc649503178d576b2934ff
be5fd357dd9157c6cd215d86c0c6ccfafc810bb0
describe
'71290' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNF' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
edb91e1ca383b768afaa6e8da0651496
70f862787a9e2d965e237e7dabb44e1ae48850b0
describe
'7678032' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNG' 'sip-files00034.tif'
245d2f9c1e22f92ef96ac945b4c07c3f
be25dbcbe1540b0b6291d02ac5f18e4b555c587b
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNH' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6a8f7d9192c52d6f3c6ed881b28d3d85
860163c8b2a6e3c0bc8008ee0ab383b5f254b1d1
'2012-03-31T09:26:12-04:00'
describe
'38792' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNI' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
aab5e6b55e03ed51663b772d6591c83c
b1f59c5f081db8d3d00d36d6214743031eca7d83
'2012-03-31T09:26:18-04:00'
describe
'1028658' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNJ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
1ccf98f5bd8aed1b7be3df74d51121e2
429d2eb35f69eaf390bdf647effcc356dfdd49b2
'2012-03-31T09:30:22-04:00'
describe
'158219' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNK' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
13a41369c89e37dadf474cc2b7b16dfb
f0402e26bb9a14e1fec0e28ba61acfea92850707
'2012-03-31T09:26:31-04:00'
describe
'37621' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNL' 'sip-files00035.pro'
bc8bc231f482f40d4cdd7db0c0a1012f
697e9839b303f4ed1ebeab83b68d4bfdbcfb98eb
describe
'77085' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNM' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
0ef05e85bfdd6814e865ef7ec3891ed3
44d91f10b9e7acf2a6f3d4617556bce24ff18467
'2012-03-31T09:26:39-04:00'
describe
'8252944' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNN' 'sip-files00035.tif'
c7a6ca20bffcf03d694e8a753c55e947
6238940978d9a0fe9f2c4a82103c6b75ed99a681
'2012-03-31T09:24:23-04:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNO' 'sip-files00035.txt'
4550d8c2998524e47dbc729645563676
0eaa25491f89a3119b1fb522e408847449a41e03
'2012-03-31T09:29:32-04:00'
describe
'37051' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNP' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
4dfe3d49688bce423226a72a21e0de91
16d7ab0d62b6a1a3c60f48e37b1ff403d3f3ca3a
'2012-03-31T09:30:12-04:00'
describe
'956894' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNQ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
fb8587bdfe57e68ab2a44250aaca3b39
83a51e5855be2cbeb83f4e6c3e997c1ae93c725d
'2012-03-31T09:26:40-04:00'
describe
'151056' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNR' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
0586aacc1370fd3efc5762f9d8c672fb
81937a03b3180f60dcdf3c2967bf688dbb4618cd
describe
'37210' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNS' 'sip-files00036.pro'
42a92573ec8cf32c9466ab7242728e95
52e1914d7621da797c45f40fcd1d7b3d5f973650
'2012-03-31T09:28:53-04:00'
describe
'72709' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNT' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
bd9367b4cdf76c07a363e2d295badfbf
ee710cc900bac17841fe865621049173d4f25fd5
describe
'7678316' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNU' 'sip-files00036.tif'
b15c7247364b50561a9164e160a48d30
0e26c179aac08afb949d16bd030d426bec81ce2e
'2012-03-31T09:29:13-04:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNV' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6748cda97cf8a1afceb155580c07f45e
4749f4ffd63cb35520de28c84d435615a89b81ba
describe
'39146' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNW' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
143d75f91f3d07bc02ac050caa05c7b1
9207626cff9986cce48a020d964ecca9576c9908
'2012-03-31T09:28:52-04:00'
describe
'1028664' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNX' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
8394697ff1f6924f34a05f0a09f63918
2ca74830713c2d97891d1f5cc74fbdcaf3e3ad08
'2012-03-31T09:27:59-04:00'
describe
'154807' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNY' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
6b3366a83d3773939372aff944c4d3c7
9fc0ce196b4ab3da2e8b299a71d45f5f3a6187c5
describe
'37150' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUNZ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
f70d5f275c279afedbebbd6dd8817991
bf1abbee852a1c488a41de7699846707b83e181b
'2012-03-31T09:27:27-04:00'
describe
'74089' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOA' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
e3bcf513284b78d48c0fbf94e0587bb0
315857241571bf24f8da29fcba4c7bb77b73f993
describe
'8252428' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOB' 'sip-files00037.tif'
4cd2b4abd320b05ae312a169555d5c86
5d3ece962d419d4605ea923b470883939011553e
'2012-03-31T09:27:53-04:00'
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOC' 'sip-files00037.txt'
3ac314ef877fa00e6c35293c440636b0
f578d4da8723123c7313838ba8df1836566ea88f
'2012-03-31T09:24:28-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'35900' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOD' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
d85a3dd276048d5c69851498b439bb75
b9884ead4483d92f303bb3439cac859e3b7c8e91
'2012-03-31T09:27:38-04:00'
describe
'956882' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOE' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
9bf718a9b5504e41967deb1c9a927ce7
02942089c87fcee1c031400a95cb1a7bb11cbd82
describe
'152870' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOF' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
dc42b165f7ed5f6ac86df3209cf6cd81
fbefae45427424a99d3711154bec7fab7b7b55ef
'2012-03-31T09:28:24-04:00'
describe
'37218' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOG' 'sip-files00038.pro'
bd8e5be0b16deab90e042c8d31f81bf7
f214f53a64e93b63331b7b5521221780928bb133
'2012-03-31T09:23:57-04:00'
describe
'72723' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOH' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
5cdb03c10cf276392c3f0b6dff4fdeab
551df899cd5b6eeb3f62550b20458fd0f610865c
'2012-03-31T09:26:56-04:00'
describe
'7678192' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOI' 'sip-files00038.tif'
4165ffb47cdff8fda4f4081ef12296dd
b462613cebfe6bf575ccbeb557ed3ae84cdacd1d
'2012-03-31T09:28:26-04:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOJ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
8b2ed7275a3acb4ff2ebf78b6a93816d
31e3b875ba2b10dff26fd445399be16113690387
'2012-03-31T09:25:55-04:00'
describe
'39437' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOK' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ec3ba645680dddf56000e271e6d6d0af
d6e7da628057d24f4fe0e482e7257efbddb29b80
describe
'1004352' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOL' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
5c9ba4baf4169a37bcd378a93357c633
a9fab8e0f6a6b7986747a8b4b93619e92696e539
'2012-03-31T09:25:26-04:00'
describe
'154103' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOM' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
8e7cef237348b31aa8c539b586801cb7
dadd1e7db952a5af884cf924b0d0890f639766c8
'2012-03-31T09:27:11-04:00'
describe
'36802' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUON' 'sip-files00039.pro'
28cb84ac91461883ca2e9eea72b89c3a
7ae77d4bcd218558019e556681268a7a1218cdc4
describe
'74950' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOO' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
6fd96076482ca903e1d2a5d385565c22
56ed3b86dfb341e51fb1b7e2c9d1d37dcb01d768
'2012-03-31T09:29:55-04:00'
describe
'8058436' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOP' 'sip-files00039.tif'
805f0375060777fc0c098b9bb53c7f8d
fefa0aa8f30ecb26aefef4f0e51a98f4d70f4da5
'2012-03-31T09:27:25-04:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOQ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
3bf1128591eb6b419c0c1eb8a00df53f
a14c0eed24320140503f4f65bcd366d3c1e0c9a1
describe
'37438' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOR' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
46a26901d5c81da796b16b651140ef41
419c3a9262f8b1d4f327caaf1c2dd081655dab5d
'2012-03-31T09:29:23-04:00'
describe
'956872' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOS' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
89286849cd6f312d6daca69034f89e20
cea1c84bc3d43f929a7c3c12aeda4f07797127b8
'2012-03-31T09:23:54-04:00'
describe
'148413' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOT' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
e3374642f0948d09b12516dfc5a29c28
2510acb4c9a0e6796537180501b0eab4d6056aa4
describe
'35927' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOU' 'sip-files00040.pro'
58ad11c967d3aab27ad6211cbfe6d3ba
55cc5a29e734260e0cd9a4198e83d7a01700e557
describe
'71739' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOV' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
ffd44a58426ce33b367a94ccb0677fcb
61aee6700f04790f692089b7495d8862489307cd
'2012-03-31T09:25:59-04:00'
describe
'7677956' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOW' 'sip-files00040.tif'
ce2b2cc781d679cff84faf2064f967bb
02c252f2849a13688fb842a7b1964641308d3434
'2012-03-31T09:27:32-04:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOX' 'sip-files00040.txt'
dde121ac5e64f8283ca70460eb48a6b7
23e4535d9203dd48b324ddd6c334926eb7327e81
'2012-03-31T09:25:23-04:00'
describe
'38234' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOY' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
cc33ff6cabed7894d9650e2fa55427f7
771e7a6966a7bedc151931746ba2fccdc603bbbc
describe
'965005' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUOZ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
5ff99da0ca2e0ec6459d8a59d43847ae
4f6833e27fdca87a7fc59be1d36bf39cd7f7b13c
'2012-03-31T09:29:53-04:00'
describe
'156348' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPA' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
ae7d7a9b74d644bd903701cf994d55a1
4ff572047113c0b3ba64e6cb35cc3308cd61f6b5
describe
'36247' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPB' 'sip-files00041.pro'
6a8e8a60df2902f0cc5c2af8b148ac51
dcc9bd86e391fff598d02fee4d2313048c358487
'2012-03-31T09:27:41-04:00'
describe
'76069' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPC' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
a851dde3fc788d524a129d3da9394453
109e927964c58cfc8d63e83f97ed8bd1c5918e43
'2012-03-31T09:28:12-04:00'
describe
'7743912' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPD' 'sip-files00041.tif'
c5df5cb0ce408b4996410ff2ea3989dd
09559a2b137bc9e15ba87ddb13eaf38307c67d76
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPE' 'sip-files00041.txt'
3f29d1d11b128a301564275fdd4f32ee
c0f2b8e1e6929e5b646d1e22b7826c493b03e1e6
'2012-03-31T09:30:04-04:00'
describe
'38862' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPF' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
4378b4f9c2abe991308714a15b61bf3c
9fb01a394a7da76852f625dfa231f4f6654cdbad
describe
'956904' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPG' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
9d515eef28025521d1991b930af3f566
50a81eb4bc0879894dd4cc17a2cb2cd293daa4d1
describe
'144699' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPH' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
e1ad1b09feba99c5815cbe07c6ed286b
637c03515110d5e82c357926b5b76b1679809010
'2012-03-31T09:24:33-04:00'
describe
'36148' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPI' 'sip-files00042.pro'
5f8910ddcc973f86b459804138f6c8d7
2ec66779c4e4643a0c3525798a9f7524d59aa473
'2012-03-31T09:26:32-04:00'
describe
'69764' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPJ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
5de1e097e969ceb4eed2beb9c80597af
f445c57f58e722c69a94011b7b4888f1d74940f4
'2012-03-31T09:25:11-04:00'
describe
'7677552' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPK' 'sip-files00042.tif'
9ff159b18b016050cd05e298d47f751a
8b2eceb7592346f4c86f693bd9b3e085f06e3dd8
'2012-03-31T09:26:09-04:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPL' 'sip-files00042.txt'
62675bf085c0ee1a16cb96d3305628f5
639cadbec59915bf2b2a2dc05887a0525227727f
describe
'37641' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPM' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
6d79ca331cb78c4437f1940a9e753866
d76732363305e6825fbe79176aa8ce10ec8d6804
'2012-03-31T09:24:11-04:00'
describe
'963756' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPN' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ec4a61b530c8d51828ae40e40b93eea3
217f9e5799a73e6e5472aab6dbb99c19b4c78502
'2012-03-31T09:27:29-04:00'
describe
'152772' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPO' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
0c6a3e3d77025aaafb542b74e65c0ab3
524eaf19b4fe80c0c669e7743824ad4b33348b7f
describe
'36196' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPP' 'sip-files00043.pro'
9977bd3053f0f5ccfda590e1d0a33219
066c695d3271d1f2bf0f6e577f7d348379630424
'2012-03-31T09:26:58-04:00'
describe
'72648' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPQ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
2a6d36a44c0ea7c7a35040dee0990bec
0eed7bb21f63392498d01773e2c8da50b7064ae7
'2012-03-31T09:24:51-04:00'
describe
'7733028' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPR' 'sip-files00043.tif'
4b57a4760bdccf8d106b03222f8f98a7
f70f99888de7eb61e7d1ec355b1ede7797e89509
'2012-03-31T09:27:48-04:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPS' 'sip-files00043.txt'
10cf969de4454abf3e3a71ee6ce26578
fb1d721cfd33dd7264fe6fc759bab3dc2d10ba00
'2012-03-31T09:29:16-04:00'
describe
'37315' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPT' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
82a61024882d3159403973e0c2a2ec94
ab02b6e9448504d48a593cd9bb84c48ededd801a
'2012-03-31T09:24:49-04:00'
describe
'956911' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
bface33fbe20b18465c657925fbf5bba
372f13feb1b80da83aaeb434083b39cea610e047
describe
'145543' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPV' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
ec2ebf155af6c9baf3032bea0a7dd651
ec475171c2b135049bf17a95e3d6b10b013b6335
describe
'36271' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPW' 'sip-files00044.pro'
a897de6329e29c278cb3284beacd34b3
ac9a73dccd9d5738004d5bbb2397769691d464d2
'2012-03-31T09:29:45-04:00'
describe
'69994' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPX' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
6731e8d1298fb1de0d486654c39beba4
36d5d56861996c09e737f17199cab97d81c2f9d2
'2012-03-31T09:29:02-04:00'
describe
'7677752' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPY' 'sip-files00044.tif'
d2ed67bf1b82e9e21d1014362f9b0e89
d3a1cbfc8c384b3121249daee75d08b378b41877
'2012-03-31T09:25:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUPZ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
b8cb74f13f3c395cc3e19f0126230989
10d13b32eb2fc4f330255f3c98ebd7663c2eb233
'2012-03-31T09:27:45-04:00'
describe
'38054' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQA' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
686b7800ada8613615b2dc304975e345
21923db0adf2b0075f90e215ff695113c1f806de
'2012-03-31T09:29:44-04:00'
describe
'1000190' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQB' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
bab4e8932719d6793acca89c9e71dd94
d8a1f66411358614f83835af42789bb8fdc8bee1
'2012-03-31T09:28:46-04:00'
describe
'158017' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQC' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
617c243391b5955b09673e7fb7cb8948
c460323a574dc1fb56019142e02778a08a11f9dc
'2012-03-31T09:24:26-04:00'
describe
'36891' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQD' 'sip-files00045.pro'
e71c894b32b0967a2524addcee52945e
33a1416109fa143b09568a91c367a3bbbc316da6
describe
'74726' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQE' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
7e3af390d02877a145acfd05e344ac2d
4bceccdc78b0dcd48a330feddb9adff2493eff1b
'2012-03-31T09:27:58-04:00'
describe
'8025268' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQF' 'sip-files00045.tif'
315b31256ca1c1b5ee280c19b20fd74c
8711ac36954498c0a28d2c77142c949c745ebf10
'2012-03-31T09:26:30-04:00'
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQG' 'sip-files00045.txt'
46f1c0e87573e328f8ddab62a2a34131
8a63c039655378b5f29097a7e58916243b0a5560
describe
'36998' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQH' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
b6d3d849aebf236cc041e0316c69f5e3
9872d74d951729c082398648cb4cfd0edef895ee
'2012-03-31T09:29:48-04:00'
describe
'412636' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQI' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
1e99c3a8550464b04bf1c7fd5af1c301
25088932f73d4843c1f73913f8ebdd47da66d0d7
'2012-03-31T09:26:24-04:00'
describe
'61787' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQJ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
3dc8c58d675e70ed974c902cc2c7bd5e
718155291efe71634c5ed9259c3269675d0ff45a
'2012-03-31T09:29:21-04:00'
describe
'10056' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
b3ae5e2d3af1dd70b5472e3ba4d3c646
b7bbdd03746aa629e5002567db1e2aa862e2505b
'2012-03-31T09:24:46-04:00'
describe
'35299' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQL' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
c1bcf02adc0e6c1eccac14df17a6dfd4
c847e9fc8663ee50b55dca2884f2c9a7499ef135
'2012-03-31T09:24:45-04:00'
describe
'7674532' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQM' 'sip-files00046.tif'
a657f0ad5371940d8c1832c282d01ede
b2a7f0c755f32d7496e77748c3ed6c3cd6daed7a
'2012-03-31T09:28:35-04:00'
describe
'449' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQN' 'sip-files00046.txt'
b9de3e60e9fad1b810cecebe1a32aefd
5c9d60b4d94c301c5f7ac83b2eafdc1e1e7a0837
describe
'25059' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQO' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
16e00701546bb4e653e50fd85112922d
3efcbc4b4612c1c3b0f0a35f8a111182a3709ad9
describe
'971867' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQP' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e9e3fcb185da2f4cac5dcf4de779c64f
599c4d0f9a05feb1838c3e1f0d3a41724ba028f2
describe
'129349' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQQ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
e0caecf92a345aa9583fa9d77e77c692
ddda5c2b0aa013a82f33ea6e726a831fef7e6f82
describe
'20532' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQR' 'sip-files00047.pro'
a3026f6068b271850f35ad32adf55c3b
070dd917dcaa9e6751fdf6249c5fa7ba5aa6f15b
'2012-03-31T09:26:20-04:00'
describe
'60731' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQS' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4ddc0064b4910bf76e5359d5ecb3e442
cbe9127cd707386f0abf4fd20e8a2a72f3678ca5
'2012-03-31T09:30:14-04:00'
describe
'7797452' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQT' 'sip-files00047.tif'
68a565b4cbe3feea8744e30fc343bc7a
12fb5cd59eff87a41148383ab5d3e8662978366f
'2012-03-31T09:26:23-04:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQU' 'sip-files00047.txt'
0865c5935ab783db50a0d6d0eb231f94
de926288a605f7b37575106bf3ff803c38dc9f22
'2012-03-31T09:30:00-04:00'
describe
'34219' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQV' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
10acc34efb995beb6377b4c4841dd41f
5cb96fe896277f712729839b999f276025c0292c
describe
'956848' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQW' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
4957eef059501cc262aefd2b12e8b49b
acd8e8ef6cc68f9a1c7b350d856e48dc0fcc6c46
'2012-03-31T09:25:54-04:00'
describe
'151622' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQX' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
daed1bbec9a2f7371590882a242d7de0
6643b4263023f5fce536f04a0e254e73abd2f752
describe
'35787' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQY' 'sip-files00048.pro'
29b8015b6f5347b50cf4ac0090e52bee
1df5987de0c8f68d3bc53fbe117ae94bbbe1a34f
describe
'70856' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUQZ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
ba61be00e111086d593773f970e27f58
542cfba5546debef4cbfabf8f592276fbca623be
describe
'7677808' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURA' 'sip-files00048.tif'
e12429bf20c86c986ef67e19804398cd
b72067045612e083c569b2862016a051e5d40a0c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURB' 'sip-files00048.txt'
cd82655c7c963d07d88d17396dd1abb3
79c97229e4daf0e3c7f1bfd261fa5a474314dc00
describe
'37597' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURC' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
ba05b55df724a2d9aafd8071b3432c6f
5bcfd64a482ed0444fc948848cb492ace8db4a0d
'2012-03-31T09:25:28-04:00'
describe
'980113' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURD' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
d182eb93159f55dcf8f3fd9aef254023
235b971feab55fae3928b7b9551b1584014e7287
describe
'157069' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURE' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
64dc4dd038de33629b8d4b233e285baf
5b5a77dc7e6a985dd2f52941148fbea01e58e227
'2012-03-31T09:28:22-04:00'
describe
'41312' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURF' 'sip-files00049.pro'
df991daa57240a12a3be4f010d1956f3
c7e570a7b206b94bbcc465f326b2397584ae1bb1
describe
'73059' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURG' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
462ebc3eac1a1cdf8a6c215833c393c6
0725a2758fe6862d988005aa4e3ecb845c0bbcc2
'2012-03-31T09:26:06-04:00'
describe
'7864180' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURH' 'sip-files00049.tif'
8dca783901774c717c02ba7205de5746
111a04fbb71bc2a7e689dde58743a450b2bf4a92
'2012-03-31T09:28:06-04:00'
describe
'1669' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURI' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5f81da0b2c7edf85c8257258a89085b8
0cee359f2c6bb10500ddcfae9753379fc11ebad9
describe
'37267' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURJ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e50b58b83513d9e230fde4f157f132ca
1d18b7df6a122b840bf5adac70a18d06af15d7f2
'2012-03-31T09:30:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURK' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
bd67e57ec37ff3c49243f160a92cf78f
61b96892b073da89c5c1f1572240d686b4eb6f66
'2012-03-31T09:29:09-04:00'
describe
'153707' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURL' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
e9028faf1f697931d9f631bb50eb53e6
54647b3c1f6cfbd892aa382b03c26c9cdd677f0c
describe
'37441' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURM' 'sip-files00050.pro'
ad4c84d728aebf0e64c5f3f9bdd7a9f1
b32119a65ebd4fca33f58b2ca488eff7bb12f74d
describe
'71708' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURN' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
f61e6cdc492d1cc3dc70991ca26835b9
ce1e9f382db409ff1293c0c2672cb2813feae331
'2012-03-31T09:25:40-04:00'
describe
'7677944' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
e390d9809b24860e579d91f2fcad9eb6
f350adb3554501854a4e3c92b76692782b237678
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURP' 'sip-files00050.txt'
de4bff3f933ce008eea4feef8a13965c
fd427dceb1ec7e708c52bdac9e2f03267c615398
'2012-03-31T09:25:13-04:00'
describe
'38405' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURQ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
376ce03f4e2b9967abcb285c1ef81c09
e02fd32df50a430413c288d1637817fb68e1db43
describe
'976033' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURR' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
dab650e5bc30ec51ac412301ea9990eb
26a841afa52c3b5179d1973e3042750318f5cf94
'2012-03-31T09:24:18-04:00'
describe
'152367' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURS' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
8bc55c6b1583b14b523bb90ac4038798
d7582f5bfe7568c99cc09ac9f4694a0388d2f2a6
describe
'36132' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURT' 'sip-files00051.pro'
6be73e291cec65f73ea4ad4b17232a7c
80208bf7494656558ad86c732bae146211224500
describe
'71658' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURU' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ee9a409f000a28585bf20ef07a2f368c
08572fd1dd9cfc69110307694d6a0779ae1347c7
describe
'7831044' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURV' 'sip-files00051.tif'
ac37799641dd7963e5ef6eeabbb618d6
dbee15a3f52bbd830f044051788c7a86a73a9049
'2012-03-31T09:25:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURW' 'sip-files00051.txt'
9e8a01b52d707a254652a2bf38bd490b
540b3f8f7ddc08c9e7795b00799a6894022a744c
'2012-03-31T09:29:29-04:00'
describe
'36687' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURX' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
2b8e3f0f587eb6e1cda52c530cc6ce5a
6e6fe505fe1b01dd603880ef33ef6c7f6a865735
describe
'956865' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURY' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
a381b33874688764efa754aab3c9f056
6c9b820555fcf0e72f398a04c3354b52dd31af7e
describe
'145777' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACURZ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
be2a67a172f14dd7bcd40d1aa5e4df06
60ffdf3d29d27f7498f65a4f6d688ce76d2e4732
'2012-03-31T09:29:41-04:00'
describe
'36136' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSA' 'sip-files00052.pro'
debcee80440f3e9a28c9807b0fb587bb
ad5dab582996b4a80a5f467158c8f86cb54de1e9
describe
'69287' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSB' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
3af36532eda113bbf02d969560cfaa73
9a33908dcfa0b6d525ad1874707995bf2667e49d
'2012-03-31T09:29:01-04:00'
describe
'7677896' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSC' 'sip-files00052.tif'
a6ed15f4b1c25a7d0bd0115163d55c71
253bf87936b449edad6a63b3831fe8d3c8276ee2
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSD' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f48a215c599e9397998b6a5b4d5ccc64
40a639ac9dade2753f0965aad1a8e2ce57f39007
describe
'38217' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSE' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
67001a5907306d1db881499832426e8f
b0428ce5e82374ab709c5a0b99281f53add3b596
describe
'980114' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSF' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e5fa0a2037e5189a29bef10864805fbb
96d65a27412a173200e5f4e531f88dae43243b2c
describe
'157079' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSG' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
aad873caf8b99f1e4d115d44a2e29152
4d8b2961974cfb01b99769c656fcd8edf49c3bfe
describe
'37326' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSH' 'sip-files00053.pro'
f704c552ad4eb8bffc8168e86dbdbfef
f0e1a6ef15c56180e478f61a2848fcf13391f71c
describe
'74305' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSI' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
8a10b44a6394f875f39cf1b1017738c4
dab10ab0c5b814ab7929c74eccf68c59660ebb7b
describe
'7864388' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSJ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
30624ddb34a0badf711568590967479b
6c021fa2d1c662cbbd150ff9837d8d93ff765c51
'2012-03-31T09:26:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSK' 'sip-files00053.txt'
cbaa579e4d06ddf1db6eb55e98f3b230
d4eb8f6c5eb47d10d27004fafd5f6a9e831316bd
describe
'37703' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSL' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
a6f52a49bad36fb2acb49b98d8d058ab
4b6836b8938cde7ed606a06221efb907f4342481
describe
'956859' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSM' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
a4e01755ff5400bdec66a26eaf8a0c94
0b44da9a236ea34a5a0910963f80b82c40bbb050
'2012-03-31T09:28:14-04:00'
describe
'146099' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSN' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
7af379941a3c41aa78871bd442d840eb
28d906ee2bb447d08fe4d27c1a67bc85fbc5a309
describe
'35816' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSO' 'sip-files00054.pro'
acd7a2b75104aa7f15d3ca5a699b52cd
6d8270dfb143c5d44c86b38d29f1ee22eef67705
'2012-03-31T09:25:46-04:00'
describe
'71145' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSP' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
b491d7e0c5b6f5c60bc21557706fb344
8067b180c9544baa818bed5935c0fa132de08999
'2012-03-31T09:24:15-04:00'
describe
'7677856' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSQ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
8a2fc36c531d96c7ebefac8d5bc2755d
f9b6564b5c4e3495c7406a147b332bc9885ccd1e
'2012-03-31T09:29:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSR' 'sip-files00054.txt'
0b3954c4105ecad570f09e0a28de6a2d
779c2ad3d0fd95467e4faee75e5459ab2996aed1
'2012-03-31T09:25:42-04:00'
describe
'38605' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSS' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
bd0d9a4e93998a60bf03b295694a2d13
cf6e8a06859bc049d04800f7f744c18f27c06728
'2012-03-31T09:27:51-04:00'
describe
'984248' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUST' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
5d11e07847c0ee23ede3cca3c5795f7f
8f251b4c2ab9a41a32c6d5b61e8528ea8983a1fd
describe
'151268' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSU' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
5378983a5252462555f9c68b540c4e01
23dbeb11ba503c68c5b2fc406b841439dff8d30f
'2012-03-31T09:25:43-04:00'
describe
'36420' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSV' 'sip-files00055.pro'
477d07490d3d815bcf5422384837701f
49c5dc8f7e068f932d9ccc5ca41c0dfb8506c43a
'2012-03-31T09:27:01-04:00'
describe
'72263' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSW' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
8710e6d2a4aea58121bfd0ee4b16d96a
e41a7bf1230416aa19238f17aa1d7e31ebf10ac2
'2012-03-31T09:27:37-04:00'
describe
'7896972' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSX' 'sip-files00055.tif'
f61d4d50d0b144bf4a3c9314d3bfea7f
f4e8bf4978a25fcb1f5fe29fa1e07428a0e116db
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSY' 'sip-files00055.txt'
31c64082bdbb752e142570a3ef0c666f
282fc748a6c2d771383b6df0a6a58d9587c8db03
'2012-03-31T09:29:46-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'37024' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUSZ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
e0dbcb4b7e7eeaa882d3f81e0614473e
529b26592d14f5eecabd5451bd42e32b738d9773
'2012-03-31T09:25:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTA' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
cac702422142b01efc5ac90d9578a1b0
61503fad07ca4201bea981adaa57f0a99835c135
describe
'142256' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTB' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
00cceba8560d4f925effc303f0596911
e87355f8392083dd7a4302a37cbaef6fa3d6ca0f
describe
'35714' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTC' 'sip-files00056.pro'
78cdb1befb36d93c2deaa3f43ebefab3
3141856d21a94d1bdb56fbdb1de847008e38852c
describe
'67700' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTD' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f5465b5ee40f190ee3130ea28ab721a5
2ad96cee8c2f4ae36efbf2db542233112fa4330a
describe
'7677728' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTE' 'sip-files00056.tif'
118518da4587be5e32b4d7d31eb8a56e
1b9cf049bc5ec98a8f1dce4c0eed486cf6a39e66
'2012-03-31T09:27:46-04:00'
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTF' 'sip-files00056.txt'
c3434f72dde0cbd3f8db69114cdb2564
139d930722e4881a6166c3593d4c90ba59744fee
'2012-03-31T09:27:00-04:00'
describe
'37537' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTG' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
192862016167b5df06bdcd8e316a8200
14372bf7a8b5cc99456b8c872091fcdb9d11172f
describe
'984198' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
b85661d490135737cb86157b2723a4fc
80eab8ad95bb4e8ffc30648edb3daab6e27b8cc8
'2012-03-31T09:24:02-04:00'
describe
'149726' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTI' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
2827b35a5671e6f855e94a5adaf105c4
8f981aeec856cc20ae92b5e75d70d92d5d64658c
describe
'36830' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTJ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
d97dde4dae622160d524ced56d429b0f
1b6f08dcdf62533e1f283be4ee1327d1da4cee3e
'2012-03-31T09:27:42-04:00'
describe
'73684' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTK' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
8e4791455ef9def07ab77cf2cbe1c7dc
08b8feed3586b2205b88f00f0dfceb077c03c94d
describe
'7897120' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTL' 'sip-files00057.tif'
aa44c46fc629e19695d7ac1df704971b
6c3a14b0119504703a63e526b12eb1900353fc56
'2012-03-31T09:28:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTM' 'sip-files00057.txt'
6479bea08e3ed809a07942110523f2b1
95d095a98c9aa7a7c71a20102d86fddf2e1e3ea0
'2012-03-31T09:28:36-04:00'
describe
'37173' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTN' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
f466302ed34eef5b675dd052ae10b79c
4a627201bc27cf8d750f68f97ccb6db868f5c838
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTO' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
8d5f55852517ef7ecd35256e97dc9435
3b510cb51a06d787002d4a2d56534ba9feca43f6
'2012-03-31T09:26:21-04:00'
describe
'146579' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTP' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f336e99656c5f9f132823186f31dc76d
7c76f35b4e87e48d66eab1e85a024170ec5f764a
describe
'36506' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTQ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
f6bf25209c571b791ffb044495256b9d
77efd28f19b49e938255fe194b7255240ad2537b
describe
'70546' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTR' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
bb4dd91f0b66ebc4880fea4816a45911
3b0465742ab95c2bc6d7b9a63cd8e564f00a41b3
'2012-03-31T09:26:26-04:00'
describe
'7677976' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTS' 'sip-files00058.tif'
de4441255755801fc22cee5504772d25
8c676378a73ec2ccaefbe3492b6ab6b17cec39b3
'2012-03-31T09:26:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTT' 'sip-files00058.txt'
4c188c368dfa48c1743f8f1d73479edd
278c06632adc0a39e0edff92caa9be7201b8e43b
describe
'38910' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTU' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
ca2fd2babcb9ac899c341d8b9b9a7f00
4fea0e7ebb5578b86a074f94080f5f2c09f50beb
'2012-03-31T09:26:00-04:00'
describe
'969780' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTV' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
0a39227dcd1ce862303e7730da2b947a
b16e8e7db994acd5a4c8e057c99296fc531882bf
describe
'144785' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTW' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
bc201d1fda2ebed1a34da33135f901ce
cd75ff618cbeb09bc60b64b078c1c88c4f43bf77
describe
'34627' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
c9a1c7e3d3aa3c53119ed94f34a8c14c
24702970f8fda030f17a42fb6a3277e1e97bdb6e
'2012-03-31T09:24:09-04:00'
describe
'71851' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTY' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
6dbf8cca45f8b638e29f276a1ee10230
bbfb78413c515c2ce898c630b305565e65965b8e
describe
'7781408' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUTZ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
66f2fb3b3839738b92a7cea9341a3251
d169a6d5ca08a66e773046f7d027ea63696b4f46
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUA' 'sip-files00059.txt'
a4e8cce4876eb07b497d450cb5c106ea
2543b5fb468bb0ee48ac2de8c9cd0e2021050625
describe
'37495' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUB' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
54d9d6879dd20236cd41e886df018e36
edabc8e04d8c7d344ad0a390351f5beb56132916
'2012-03-31T09:30:21-04:00'
describe
'956877' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUC' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
0162eae2663aeafae838d18fcbd7c407
42835748c3907cc048c5f5b121d79bb1f5933608
'2012-03-31T09:26:50-04:00'
describe
'146644' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUD' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
9e62be342bfc31543cb938acd3483e0d
dd419563a5ab28bb63a2743b68d95dcfa49b6300
'2012-03-31T09:25:44-04:00'
describe
'35444' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUE' 'sip-files00060.pro'
a4b885a5fb4793723e436f31bcce40d5
8d2557dc831cf53a38e25eaeafee240885f4eb28
describe
'71050' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUF' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
28237d5120cadcd8c4d45c5fdedefefa
553c27aae7f703823d12c5ea1a00d00a4efce9f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUG' 'sip-files00060.tif'
037659d47f525d0d716f353a42da9940
6afe7401cddb23d01f57404671c91af158b65f36
'2012-03-31T09:28:39-04:00'
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUH' 'sip-files00060.txt'
e043b0e4d88a2dee0c5c3a7ee9c63c94
1780a621268c584995f255f46cce6246adaf47e3
'2012-03-31T09:25:20-04:00'
describe
'38946' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUI' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
8a2f569918d75f0305d3c8d51fe98687
ce4ea94a7309526d1643eda4b2e995d31b5aa210
describe
'992505' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUJ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
dcff7cfd7e5c506b6bded07a0b97d1b7
6af9d9b9a50f032d3c3dfa3992c3085a189fe4fa
'2012-03-31T09:29:18-04:00'
describe
'148239' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUK' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
02bb391a1ecb1f270b285f957cb03a37
89af149e34864e0118512e2b929ac5a1b90e286f
describe
'35648' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUL' 'sip-files00061.pro'
63922bfaceebdd293d5eb76b8cf4568d
9ee6ae6a3ed602ecc73a3b3becd520ff1e56856f
describe
'71905' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUM' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
32853f83f115a5b751a728709be8ee66
84acd5c73e94a026d64bef0f55191cdf2bb509ad
describe
'7962952' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUN' 'sip-files00061.tif'
1095b78cd47323bb2e4d5311855258c2
7174f9c497e34e00c22c5049537e36709ce439b7
'2012-03-31T09:26:16-04:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUO' 'sip-files00061.txt'
65ce481410e708fc12c155f57a86bf13
211d1ea220db5df73a6ac9f0fd6ed2518b367bd8
describe
'36901' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUP' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
f6ce9fa5981d50a13d14d22d87609eea
aac3cb5252d90b3c3be5e7bf22a63844c2d0ef81
describe
'956890' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUQ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
78b96f2cee5509494d072911ba6dc8cc
65ece381bc0cb0f98d8245b4d9ac191aedc08d9a
describe
'145840' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUR' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
bd432c93e4d492ae2ab65c8d4f7b4998
2dc21a5676803ecac54e1fc928c198aa02e9e757
'2012-03-31T09:29:42-04:00'
describe
'35614' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUS' 'sip-files00062.pro'
fd2b329d1159888c1a951df5e0d0c4e2
a38348aa65dc5b6a936a588836fb81ea6379b665
describe
'70538' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUT' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
df4f6feed8e363d1e9e3d546ba2bbd7f
19febf61383c52a0b021b862fbca16f2c9be5b39
'2012-03-31T09:24:29-04:00'
describe
'7677680' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUU' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3dbbab9c64851c0f7f56aa150ad592ae
c896c4a7117258a40ca902a12551ee2afb135283
'2012-03-31T09:29:10-04:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUV' 'sip-files00062.txt'
4a8e5290c1f68055382bb790f87dc27b
37b1d63479e84d5db8c61b9b17de0fee194c83aa
describe
'37760' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUW' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
ce0e0c7d9e60351850bc5d5cd4f6c450
669f62c7e7c4377df46f699567a6a9af2e32ed19
'2012-03-31T09:25:57-04:00'
describe
'404488' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUX' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
23ff76b5171db27565f24bc011f61ba4
b378b842124f90ea9e53dd04fa5feab77d61eb56
describe
'58192' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUY' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
765e7e02c4983aa09e1e11e193160cda
ceffe05213223181387ef0835a13a5febdda1dfd
describe
'7965' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUUZ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
2a94b3ebce1ae364e63f882c0b919768
b169b1ef1c00c25bfe3d5f01e25d68a35b12684d
describe
'33725' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVA' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
d2356a564c99bec4704291be7b96ee69
8b85e75ec1940f4de66130a7c69d7cd8eeee7307
describe
'7827468' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
a461db4b7e7a509753ecbb3c6802b1d7
e9878cada27e95b59808880d2622a5c6e1b76b82
describe
'324' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVC' 'sip-files00063.txt'
24e852d486f4ece737e5c7e0b7253bc2
ce7ca370fc6f4abf24aa1e730b97924ce3fae711
describe
'23922' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVD' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
dc6e2c06dd47a59b6acaaa4a5bf76a71
20414c286d1b795c0dddfed062ceaa58dae39dae
'2012-03-31T09:24:20-04:00'
describe
'956875' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVE' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
ce5718912b5c16e0ca87f02a4ca46855
c36d6af50661b8442b44441be942793479d26aa4
describe
'129876' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVF' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
e163e133fe57dba520728c768b980b42
4ee9bce5d17a073f215622ca80e782c8370e244c
describe
'22310' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVG' 'sip-files00064.pro'
79b92ee33125bfb703aeb8b8d1a8891d
05d85cd442d40d48f93e4d9ab93781fc925127b4
describe
'62139' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVH' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
2405e39c3c09b477490584ec4d1f29f3
d87fdd570baae0b18168fb09061ef68e0463480f
describe
'7677360' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVI' 'sip-files00064.tif'
898cc497a8aba6c7dc948c66e17354f2
19e68903d9a6b5b91e137b8ae09d48758820371b
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVJ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
c455c85c39c36bf6bc5af4f197c2b1f7
b4bf15c7d323cd5ce5b3ee86f12d453e820f8827
describe
'35315' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVK' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
0f2b36e7047f6255f733cc00b7e62cd6
4db9f37b847ec9ee45edc87237dc1fbb8fba357b
describe
'957646' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVL' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
b225024e02cb94b1f51fce24096f9989
e5e25e14d8a72b83c4c2788d5c326ea4978680f4
describe
'154760' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVM' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
1fd6067f431708b10cfaffb186f44bdc
ff2e90305009692654a6fc715b70dab18f1c4b8a
describe
'36851' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVN' 'sip-files00065.pro'
91a05048a4a52d0c4198572c59ba35b7
bca44caebfb4755f93757698a32f411c19399f28
describe
'73568' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVO' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
dd75c07cee3f696f5300778ceeac853c
54adf39b6d2c657068f5142e5395eb3410a2fafa
'2012-03-31T09:24:03-04:00'
describe
'7684744' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
8de5c499d110eca57c5bdcd2850266a1
3fd3e1d27fdc1641e684310595089819192a53dc
'2012-03-31T09:25:30-04:00'
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVQ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
6c16dfc66a744ee1c1c7e824065dec40
5892dc42a6c5472fcb744164268d863989cfdb2e
describe
'38466' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVR' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
ea3aea88bfb3b181d8b7270dffe818a2
c4a752ab2e76183d3a595cb39f8ce846bb9dbaec
'2012-03-31T09:24:16-04:00'
describe
'956907' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVS' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
9057f7db10380a45d09e4eae815eb98f
60f46ce467026cc0d1c3d97577d8aab7eb1063ff
describe
'148090' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
8dc28df778dc01f866ea4c249c0c9cd9
637021bc1d3efe28d3b21914bfc054890361592a
'2012-03-31T09:24:25-04:00'
describe
'36154' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVU' 'sip-files00066.pro'
58d3691da3b591c2320d53fa06b2b1fe
f0bd2b0ae1a917e157e1be08ca971b02e0661867
'2012-03-31T09:29:35-04:00'
describe
'71214' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVV' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
090b2aed3c6874b053880d9cf7848dcf
b933f927b9cec591d982485b145dc858e67366b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVW' 'sip-files00066.tif'
607a59e36f1fbb49505d74d624ffe998
abd8fbb11de7619a8891a1a10c56a46bbf09cd9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVX' 'sip-files00066.txt'
38dedc44b0eb8bc4ca06fc2a85771aca
d2be8b330ea3b8485a3f87804ace97d67dad8ecb
describe
'39105' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVY' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
554c40a717afe189b18c659737656615
42d1e7af0386086c21bd165de23c398f5912b05c
describe
'996170' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUVZ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
307fb59b2a4ddc5d6b7e3edc3657d301
ffea3134cb80cfa9432db25f764cb672d95ba2db
'2012-03-31T09:25:47-04:00'
describe
'157886' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWA' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
a5bc38e5b6ce864d6cc614cbc0242626
341dd1d4c716cdf57ef07880b0da29c51c1ece25
describe
'37890' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
292e2860a9f159b9e720b8e072989f80
33234ee29d8cce103ff27ffabb5d40d0889bcf53
'2012-03-31T09:23:56-04:00'
describe
'73384' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWC' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
5fa247cfa63c0ea9ed60e0ad38be8dfc
461e55971123317f23ee2ca3b51335f88b9e18fc
describe
'7992152' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWD' 'sip-files00067.tif'
2c0e597284a2dfd2567171bb27365ab0
39641930036f6c3b31df51a6036b6bfa09e8653f
'2012-03-31T09:25:45-04:00'
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWE' 'sip-files00067.txt'
114ae7d050987e0dff8f6a1e0984b72f
5c3160648e3652cd84f44e364c3178c0e6a926a4
'2012-03-31T09:30:15-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'36912' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWF' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
0c70b8ddc42b9f1b8c2d5490c650a6bf
2a42a8e4b44971506ea496d13944a6ccce3f53d4
'2012-03-31T09:28:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWG' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
15a50ca1162c6ab035782e099701712b
33efe8a99c37dba5b754611ac9323c2fdfa6dc01
'2012-03-31T09:24:36-04:00'
describe
'147281' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWH' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
27fc61c3c30c3b602a31524f0740202d
1c4d7acb9242cd5af20385939c7332ae05b39d2f
describe
'36574' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWI' 'sip-files00068.pro'
52f5e4f69ce62f65065187046638c4f2
28c87231e08c715a7ed61d634dbe3092bd0b2e17
'2012-03-31T09:25:24-04:00'
describe
'70956' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWJ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
de9c61639a7270e43e71f05b453ba3db
26adf2ed5af09edbb23e67741eccf69de97204b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWK' 'sip-files00068.tif'
d828d6c52dbaeb3b04a1242360538f5a
6b3d16ba0db30d8f381e655d93f20ca7f13b93ad
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWL' 'sip-files00068.txt'
fdb6e6d949a8cb15dab10f73b968994f
17aa9ba05d6ad0b0af00b60da6905af439e46632
'2012-03-31T09:30:11-04:00'
describe
'38378' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWM' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
362ba03189e8059d51818d82233987c8
5055adfb95dbbcb5e054abfb0c450f4c70653f42
describe
'990289' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWN' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
28071ad839715d6e9e18544760169340
162a94f5bfa55a5a4c9c3fe7cf471375542311d4
describe
'154148' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWO' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
0b47b9caaa5335e038bd635a50a675bc
2804aa06d2ac17bb527924e0ead13d1d31b61490
'2012-03-31T09:29:47-04:00'
describe
'36111' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWP' 'sip-files00069.pro'
496be8b9b1fc74df5e0dc0d380340cfb
81d7ab22126ce592933c9a39af4bb8ecaebba5e9
describe
'74259' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWQ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
557aa2a7f78702a15c92879482ba79d2
c57a31a91e5233353c8c8e9c6000af0771c3e09c
describe
'7945764' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWR' 'sip-files00069.tif'
70f50b760420a3c7f56137a13802647d
2dd1d4a535a5c48875f44c542f677a3d548e9736
'2012-03-31T09:29:04-04:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWS' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a1195271b9bf6bcadbc4bd5cac9125b9
f0f66124601c8dfcdb08a45ac1355c03313d2468
'2012-03-31T09:24:53-04:00'
describe
'37118' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWT' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
4f86fc09d02b8f506589f4f36aefbaa4
165b440735c2f38e756d22b8d68f20467bfa388c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWU' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
6dd5ebea8df3ce989d69dd0f4fe1d97a
3b74a66a1d1d31cbcea38281bfc7c9aaae1a820d
describe
'149836' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWV' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
94dc26ac72050da66170c765fe5bae0a
e12de6505a54a2bad047f1557f15a84792d43cbb
describe
'36973' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWW' 'sip-files00070.pro'
bd08d2e7e30747a11612030553ba96a9
76b050e90a3c7a27981080f44568081bef53f5e0
describe
'71201' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWX' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
4a6cc7d526f876edda59eb6c04dd3b71
88ee863dca3d408d201dd7ccb8190a332f04327f
describe
'7677852' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWY' 'sip-files00070.tif'
01dd7b97732108b821cfd04f7f78b427
736002956052c714b6ce716f927327899864b970
'2012-03-31T09:25:21-04:00'
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUWZ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
d7631e11c6c49a0191813a8d83603071
9a6f8e674144295a8a11a89edff737eab31e780a
describe
'38170' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXA' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
6785eacf6c40c2fa482fe53db06ba25d
b3c2cccfaebf15c021f3a31108a08107e58988ff
'2012-03-31T09:27:03-04:00'
describe
'992459' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXB' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
c4efa853a8196011209102941fb824c0
ba9563c24dc2104d03fa52bf723f46baf109c21d
'2012-03-31T09:24:48-04:00'
describe
'154624' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXC' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
25017c3d241a0477a8f0fff51ec0864b
32f7dec3ea80527dfb39bcfa2219a927b1fc2702
describe
'36361' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4217e87af084d136f62187f5b3c8b37e
706056ca936aa9d51262617cb9f17e2fd8195566
'2012-03-31T09:26:11-04:00'
describe
'74827' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXE' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
1570b35972fa873b61911dee9b4016f7
05dd49f52ba416fdb7131cff9ed641dbc7d8b2d5
describe
'7963276' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXF' 'sip-files00071.tif'
cdd4962fd28e215c61060c09568124a5
b2102e34cd1dbadfdcc9472561768944b78cf554
'2012-03-31T09:29:33-04:00'
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXG' 'sip-files00071.txt'
e54c82b18e861b85e331ec9817889188
45a1aa8670c62cb1cd3b09527db1fdb4b4c72dff
describe
'37522' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXH' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
7d0466e7ea15732d78f37c031871cbc2
a563260e1c1be7b5aeec3afcd8fb523eed6f30b8
describe
'956754' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXI' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
8a367f280095228cdf35cc9c858f8a29
203861b3c664c63ff77fb764ffc5c9c7bdf373bb
describe
'149221' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXJ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
742944946c43956a13e9b20260f8a9cd
1ccbd31ed1935f47d5baff29bfc5798d9b4bd157
describe
'37465' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXK' 'sip-files00072.pro'
0a3f4e1995a2bd4c9318155b0d7fd580
a2e2778d91a8bb0017e72216956172932ff1227c
describe
'72308' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXL' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
e348cc1130dc0be6c7e4f85c2ed0077d
3c00aafb4dc959097d0475e2d3f1494371a27c6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXM' 'sip-files00072.tif'
cb66bfa6be97bb894644fe4f6a0717be
84ecd40514900a2a02b6968cde0e7a0668acdc2e
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXN' 'sip-files00072.txt'
81beb1290431abda6a39bba85a45167d
8cb8f8846c20f1cac09eb566212afb826f78828b
describe
'38641' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXO' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
57d7263f482a0e316d3a2a43a5c8a2d1
e3d9baacac5cc63512ba8ee923a2daf8c71fb153
describe
'977583' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXP' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
75903945258c0a922d79c4cca4128b3c
d6c3537568a44737fd5af61b5775b5d6ca99b469
describe
'143916' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXQ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
d4020404c860a2f6ff9660af1b22e981
0f6d56a15e083ad932294f634345fb20906f5d44
describe
'36663' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXR' 'sip-files00073.pro'
52482c043146aefc89abca15f4986175
213db7ccc4e2aeeb1c517779c317e0d0621a4282
describe
'70258' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXS' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
82bc9be2842028422925213dff12a85e
0c79148b7146b92cbbc1e6da91c6739f30514888
'2012-03-31T09:26:25-04:00'
describe
'7843812' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXT' 'sip-files00073.tif'
c9717c14072a35b621c2176d8f635761
805ed4d7a315318a51d2a1966d8e53b273494c8e
'2012-03-31T09:27:13-04:00'
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXU' 'sip-files00073.txt'
f69882f34ddbafdd4c189fbd4df0a0c5
98273664eb5419430441abf09005ccf60ea63761
describe
'36539' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXV' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
d47f41d7d3ba7ad2f481bea0bb743523
13dcafd939c68ef016618dddacf859e422759ae1
describe
'975719' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXW' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
c71fa3f6d8c63726be90d030eb439365
ba0d01d2de9851690fb016bbe928b0f9ff4726cf
describe
'146153' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXX' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
16655c011219b4fc3649a7fb5b4f3854
bbdd7003bc4b8dbaf8c102e67b94967bc048b019
describe
'35507' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXY' 'sip-files00074.pro'
afcc38c233a95d3adc8dbbb622c31c15
07f5f37a24ff1c57dc717e1309cce1325c49c0b9
describe
'72572' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUXZ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
dd2df5779a86bcd9b75d6f709eb2d305
cac2af0986c844997f754e33e48a42a381023bdf
describe
'7829076' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYA' 'sip-files00074.tif'
2a4dd129698f3e33a3c0f9d387bdc792
3c2e5c452805a18b7cd233b192b1a8d6b473349d
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYB' 'sip-files00074.txt'
ccd7a683129cd58d9790e476f26298ad
010a3d3c24985db32072fc190f26fe0786bdae1b
describe
'37429' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYC' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
c690cebb3c376117f7ef98180f46eedb
20ab82faea847640eb52da6fbf86e0fbe7a4670c
describe
'977625' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYD' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
b75e1ede126a8c71ebe16f0bb7c1041a
f0107cdbceaab28220890bebcf4e2054b2b295f3
describe
'142708' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYE' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
145c33f05ed0bf0f731daacfadf895c6
b96b7e9e30734a0a16b1062bd84d522d76cbe550
describe
'35652' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYF' 'sip-files00075.pro'
8b45e4c694493e4f46db748526bdca29
47e98641d2dc68fc25341baded67ed27aaf817bc
describe
'70178' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYG' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
524b7eb794e2eb385831ea1da7cbf125
74f4d5ac59636367bb25af067cf1b8b074f4c8b5
describe
'7843760' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYH' 'sip-files00075.tif'
3c0a17a7e9e99ca8461732446431a180
3a81a5fb306db0de0765de714c5854ce866628f5
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYI' 'sip-files00075.txt'
aedb13e4db6c2ab2ae42b13d0e55dbfd
d4f6e3ee2312a5c6f2b4d3c3f3e63651a44eaa29
'2012-03-31T09:27:19-04:00'
describe
'37413' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYJ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
abb781e9924eef1f43283e8858861df5
3413d9980e84e56ddbdbdfcbbd6cd57a39a388b7
'2012-03-31T09:28:41-04:00'
describe
'975684' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYK' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
cc8db39258bdcc8504d504119fb4c5be
8b667679929f1bee8a6008809c2e89b31396dfc9
describe
'153556' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYL' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
6239c824dcfdac6264eff4b81b9c9afd
0a1dc598779cf0628feb7f488a847cf964000210
describe
'36446' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYM' 'sip-files00076.pro'
c7991613ebf78ef8277f48d159f2f066
4ffe04a6551887a268d38be0792e8a946588047e
'2012-03-31T09:29:22-04:00'
describe
'72946' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYN' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
e7b913e74c62c5766b1b4bf58549d247
1a498b185be8cff7d0b49bd7c328f916178902b8
describe
'7828800' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYO' 'sip-files00076.tif'
5fbfd9f19a908b423a1c47e8387374fd
2eeb57b9a0af2b1c0c3a1c5e0d48926b7e23f964
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYP' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b8666b512b3836354badb33679c4ae55
c1cc3c1d22c71b483513cc814348a247a049fee2
describe
'36496' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYQ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
2481a6aa6e7197c547e2897345eb321a
30f5a3144cc6912ac159b0260a8122e63d08a85f
'2012-03-31T09:24:06-04:00'
describe
'977612' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYR' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
588ea04e8e5f9478362e4c4477ac9ac2
b052476e20f93ba5b3c2d750e504f5bb39ac2e9f
describe
'148010' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYS' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
d00e0cda424339a51974e5890b67d6df
d84afb2f757b3040b05780df541363da114b02f5
describe
'35433' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYT' 'sip-files00077.pro'
345421a0b471baed1feaa313c8a68a4e
2561079be6ca003a954d833c2f6d89fab7e0ece5
describe
'71156' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYU' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b44b96d72fb8d0e59ba78945bbc9f9ff
ab8947a787ae54fe7039e2f756ece002acc204f2
describe
'7843852' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYV' 'sip-files00077.tif'
111821cfe56ad95edb7e7222d763113e
08a15a7533ceedbee03fe3879eab2eca10e0f8ae
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYW' 'sip-files00077.txt'
800bbc010b581c242db78a753a6fea2c
3493af7ef1924390f615fe11186f82a74dc49818
describe
'37643' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYX' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
f0a3b3d63ff64aa3f3e7f298d3e7f181
7be5dec689a1ef227c21829a82cd523a6ff1e2cd
describe
'975745' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYY' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1290fe14d557bcfde4334fd284dca259
8ee38c990cc27ea754f880ef5dda30e5ec0c4f3b
describe
'157928' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUYZ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
90e3aa6726d6e35836fd2d1a0f17aca1
530665853147c9157fefb26e5682c0a7e008d07e
'2012-03-31T09:23:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZA' 'sip-files00078.pro'
6a80800ddd4c9c931609901ec6c31149
55652d64a9954884ff234bfe3a68dc47d86451b5
'2012-03-31T09:25:34-04:00'
describe
'75421' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZB' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
dc10516a316e530c9670cf3a1d4fcf10
297b7c927bca7578c8f2e60d91ae8c786affdc2a
'2012-03-31T09:25:32-04:00'
describe
'7829272' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZC' 'sip-files00078.tif'
f437ec5fde5008e30b59281b02c7063b
8a4258ad1180e588a76aa8bd03811658ef5de0d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZD' 'sip-files00078.txt'
12142a148a3085e9c181f311578499f3
e290558e0de7870e6923a1343a0c78f77db6e1fb
describe
'38278' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZE' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
50abee801a4e01d1b378b19ff4a5a7f3
4e5c89c470ca5b8c7648272c85a73f299b12509e
describe
'977573' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZF' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
917081c2d521cdd999936e28ba6790e8
4f59707fe2d2c9d522a203e20a1e0881f780aaea
'2012-03-31T09:29:03-04:00'
describe
'151619' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZG' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
d3c450eb3563325d629f8ce5a3f220e1
01b7b084b076bc77cd6c0f66a4afd26d7c12e9f9
describe
'36965' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZH' 'sip-files00079.pro'
ac2f25b8b0507c2effce8d9c47514f38
6edb8dc67e3a27ad0ded451dc642861d6d6bcce4
'2012-03-31T09:28:30-04:00'
describe
'71543' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZI' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
f32d73121b7970a5529a634aec6e1d87
d0a593b50c102cc1880929c8a736b29dd455062a
'2012-03-31T09:25:04-04:00'
describe
'7843840' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZJ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
00a87ad848dbda1f7f9c47e0ae04c342
8e4ff82dcfbc18c8eb1d6494b446e7b19de20a2a
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZK' 'sip-files00079.txt'
afdbdabbe12b53f71da857f94bfd09ee
885666c36b3747c54cd2161f6626a82f00caf230
describe
'36953' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZL' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
ebc36b6d4a5aae04fbe710cb5b874984
29f9f0339793691268cef6ee7b5461189af1e4ea
'2012-03-31T09:26:07-04:00'
describe
'975755' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZM' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d7fddd6f3270cf04ef55361c1383bb0d
8e996b88b73b0d9256ae2c33503d5a9716635c0a
describe
'149980' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZN' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
f54f9d5eb0c6b087c155ee25d6e95d37
da691f8f871527a074636d030f24efbf1885f3f9
describe
'34666' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZO' 'sip-files00080.pro'
f28aa236db5a2f6c0d8abc67416e2cf4
776bc76b21c818613a8d1961eadfc6c4418535f5
describe
'72181' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZP' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
7d5687fcfbfcc98a5f01400297edb587
757d12101e5dd5639359072102d7e8b13f44efe1
'2012-03-31T09:25:14-04:00'
describe
'7829140' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZQ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
df8811eab278ca4b534dea36badd400d
ac0a9895e9339a5cffa70a49fcb241a0499ed591
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZR' 'sip-files00080.txt'
f93dfa9b92deb75b377281b3d7b1ceb4
b52f3df2c554f4c8edb43accef3b52497fba696e
'2012-03-31T09:26:34-04:00'
describe
'37794' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZS' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
3c4e15b61f204d369226cd9cac1506ec
de446b98dd150671f4010a90dc728453b22e203b
describe
'977593' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZT' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
20e6f36076a8c322919be94ca5850411
182063f670f7c428785af8bc05c5d19d60686285
describe
'153318' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZU' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
7bfac986d33cacdbf4e8741c84479b44
4df907f98e51ddc1e9205ebeeae8c9ae309f4dcc
describe
'36557' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZV' 'sip-files00081.pro'
d208b96b872a0ebeaebaf8da8d17e8ed
e31e9ccca7082a3fb08eeaf2f135a9f7ad92af29
describe
'72693' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZW' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
23be52fa90570f7699fe06d59a6a1353
ea652db89818be67916ed639c2b8f8824b5c42ea
'2012-03-31T09:27:47-04:00'
describe
'7843880' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZX' 'sip-files00081.tif'
a95cd9194c6dcc298b21cf6500979a19
549721ef5433d4d439e72e533557eef260408a77
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZY' 'sip-files00081.txt'
f8e9a745b513110394bb9cb271504824
b1b0d4ea1bb84b516716ae9c4034571ac2aff553
describe
'37234' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACUZZ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
e93106b79f0cf66ee9c86b308cb87b06
2f399315ff37ea724e7d3f61cec4c8e6b2c57892
'2012-03-31T09:24:37-04:00'
describe
'975765' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAA' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
4c9cae625915fd9dd33bf04b01f5e30e
e5c6214451c03e7f7711aa2895f4a405678d3661
'2012-03-31T09:26:48-04:00'
describe
'155136' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAB' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
d135c8a7754fb38175c126ddf27f5a9b
eebe1e08d0b983e8eea77d8d40747fc0c5045b29
describe
'36513' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAC' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5fab2592ce41c26a376f06bc4d92322d
f3bb98d437846e37bbca2438556af57c9a0314ee
describe
'74190' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAD' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
b659f733590c8690b1aa60a596e7ff0e
cf16a144e38cc135719446182df2b59fa2bce876
describe
'7829248' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAE' 'sip-files00082.tif'
867134cc312ef27d5ac70fa1421acfaf
076e726c9454da05743de69cb46c975f5df06307
'2012-03-31T09:27:16-04:00'
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAF' 'sip-files00082.txt'
2e80869f5ab8f339d802f38cd51c73e5
6ba4213d6251679c5861a4c9598971a2c3baa0ae
'2012-03-31T09:28:04-04:00'
describe
'37555' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAG' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
31fe4a87c49b04897fb8238de146fdcb
018bfe0ff709d8b12d481b9c9090ff54942bcfb8
describe
'977632' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAH' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
9f63c70922b27fb7b4933146cc4eaf76
0917c658d119bd583118e835e612b472536fb345
'2012-03-31T09:24:55-04:00'
describe
'153424' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAI' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
27889bc7b5af0c89abae4976926c8670
1bfb55ed36549ad8532656be9fa5ae38ed8745a1
describe
'36239' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAJ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
34b81ed79faf8dcd93aa84b466bdc9f7
3f2bbe226a2712ac0923e9d79362dad28ad24a50
describe
'73556' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAK' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
0c205c1a899c278defb7de649fb780d6
0b6d6ed3c26a373915b7715e7488438e09da2af0
describe
'7844116' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAL' 'sip-files00083.tif'
ab278a000b84e09164ab4f84c7324f92
277a4690c839a63e79faf2c8ff458b5f33c8d5ec
'2012-03-31T09:28:50-04:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAM' 'sip-files00083.txt'
d7d38ac7bbdc10f1af825f0c5219fddc
f1aec0b5a1e846bf4341e6dc92ba03c37e264476
describe
'38286' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAN' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
2bbfe202d1c3d992c6bd13765c672f86
682cfa603a35f3f3ca5aefe3e9ba6adb5450e612
describe
'401620' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAO' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
04c8f1237b269bb1c4c2cc53003f9e02
3a3cc64a1120b4eaf62eeec1fd07c0bc9bf901f9
'2012-03-31T09:27:07-04:00'
describe
'56584' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAP' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
19c7c5b34d1da011063d6b2fd7beb100
a7bfea06f0f674591e492a66e0c846b4881fbb62
describe
'7317' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAQ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
caef2c8b4fdab9ec42389c749afc092d
1fe0bd802b68f9911942859f310a638c505b73ab
describe
'33782' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAR' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
6ec9a7ae578441b33ce9e25ef10d5bde
c3e52c5e4e6b8925d4168145fb7f8759a7bff208
describe
'7825284' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAS' 'sip-files00084.tif'
8de02299026ea164d370577a03094201
0b6722def0db12c7fe8a817d1c0f211674873bec
describe
'319' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAT' 'sip-files00084.txt'
8d52add431e7ad8822ca701078bdcca1
1fa882bdc84cdc6b2e013e4c44b21f289da624ce
describe
'24054' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAU' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
428b0b7a37f0d3224383971a2b506da6
11416b9c33632bd232d853d0bb8e5ddd0280168b
describe
'847427' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAV' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
bfd54b25562c8cef4c441e46714bdf0c
624f2d6fa2eafaff8bbdfc3905dd751ebe434fc1
describe
'121787' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAW' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
2bd6e750bc0ffc12b24b839e7cb06d32
8f567853bd88ca359a51fca14e04a95144598325
'2012-03-31T09:25:37-04:00'
describe
'21858' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAX' 'sip-files00085.pro'
3072fd00c93b65e8f392b3f254060841
cb12f9e86fcb99ea7414b69d16a4864cd6b398f1
describe
'59693' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAY' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
b3a35a034798cfb4d504992239075382
c056cd13e572494e332b06afac378020584a4a04
describe
'7843064' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVAZ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
5625cf3463bc69f310ed6626ec4e7adf
504b69ab65b772764d3497099d320315a5c3dec9
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBA' 'sip-files00085.txt'
7ecd21f9c840faf7d1102f46df347c9d
cb8554fcd24fbe214877e7d95607855c666a0021
describe
'33528' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBB' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
829f9df9da1be09633ffffee4750060c
7e3040cb4155debde15144fdcd2c80efd26ba973
describe
'975701' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBC' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
f233d0bb09c1f13b5c23c3175d124cea
7c614fb19aee78b2da2c2f9f8b716173e0806aa2
describe
'152731' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBD' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
0789d5a72c2e2d9d4e28467d31527311
889bf2487e78e6da41cb1ec7c7ead81905efde22
describe
'36406' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBE' 'sip-files00086.pro'
661abaccbbbb8a7f8b1335b80453883e
4659b7acc73cceb7099b8b66232a0284d021a636
describe
'74015' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBF' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
9ee9ae07b27c96501431a63a8c9e96d9
392951c0345a6c17aabffe28728e40b1ef713af4
describe
'7829192' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBG' 'sip-files00086.tif'
8fe2eff3adcb5408d9fb7d00300c1278
b8554bbe2fff658bd8a90f4fbb5ce52c8b87ae2f
'2012-03-31T09:29:34-04:00'
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBH' 'sip-files00086.txt'
b8589c8dbe1ce3e6b09bde754fe003a3
4ef54a0b2ae8936693c0b95564523bca372be35c
describe
'37780' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBI' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
e3d5c5020e91d731f318367e59af7371
f770a945959cd94306713346cd5d54691477b11f
describe
'977505' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBJ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
a66ef5e21ad9dc5c3dce9c5985abdaf7
43951f9ffbbc61a6e781192a1a888d7d4dbfc44a
describe
'149031' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBK' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
3495bdfb0d1af2b3799f304bb8ac2b79
da28634f2685308799bbaa94488aebcc94c711de
describe
'35290' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBL' 'sip-files00087.pro'
e531271631dcfc40d4feb9c10edb138b
e99c33b5bbb33222cdbe8cda2c74032405deb99e
describe
'71532' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBM' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
ff213106a2de4775b598840cc2f1a420
1e68e323a7316b075f86fd6559820ccfc5505b9c
'2012-03-31T09:27:30-04:00'
describe
'7843808' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBN' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b9b0c22edeaa56547f022f7c47439380
cf0750ec256b423bb52cf6fd59bce03ab3d3dd51
'2012-03-31T09:24:22-04:00'
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBO' 'sip-files00087.txt'
143d5ec20b44bc5575833c74c7cb284f
1697f65593832091faa705858a20bb66e4d78145
'2012-03-31T09:30:07-04:00'
describe
'37402' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBP' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
941a5e8814d212e307af08737de53b5e
d7d18c15be5da6e43fae5b6d5ee8b408c6f956ac
describe
'975690' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBQ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
424c58031765638c8b04819b866869f2
b1542c4071570b6b1fa819f59e5da56fef6602d3
describe
'152723' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBR' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
56c7ac6aa2bd25772c84838e2417afcd
6d0a09c03948d26337d76317b2c0394b27b9da77
'2012-03-31T09:25:33-04:00'
describe
'35686' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBS' 'sip-files00088.pro'
e9aab88e95ace0e60d2e7d123451b3e6
146cc8608dfed11534a22183f0c7c81dff7ddccb
describe
'73809' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBT' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
2fdc63f903e60a01c63ebb009798b24b
42cf83b7aa62c30227358be6b63fb2fc42143d27
describe
'7829348' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBU' 'sip-files00088.tif'
393871045bf342817a1b6a9171bc8b82
4970cb7c816e3e6a36a6a6c8e8006f55c1c2b312
'2012-03-31T09:24:12-04:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBV' 'sip-files00088.txt'
89184835b27a9f156887c75f5f4e8599
911bbeb18a54c0246e45298bd5ccbd0ebc1e8c0f
describe
'37887' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBW' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
5a73366869726b13d9bd99019b0a88a8
d7dac26d9471f4784cff22cab02dd79bce3295fd
describe
'977615' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBX' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
e7b3db3f1f8dab0138498e15dad06c38
ac0c2d2a82fe409693e83216b3b4b2b32b023732
describe
'152799' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBY' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
506d7caefb2eee64609610c384c414d7
06fc69aa7748985f98824d83a0ec5f49bff5c9c3
'2012-03-31T09:25:51-04:00'
describe
'36688' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVBZ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
ec71446973b110eee435a961698da40b
08bfc90793fe186c26b68dbca3edaaaaee638f8d
describe
'73681' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCA' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
6613802e2f306ca4356a294a7c2b17d1
c33cb34a6d56642707774e00774b6e5e8f251002
describe
'7844260' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCB' 'sip-files00089.tif'
6edbbef5b1c139ea65616c7683d6bc41
6fa7e4c0c2bb01905e3de223c3b829b79c78a2a8
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCC' 'sip-files00089.txt'
6f5bbc108e056eb79d11c6a2c9e22700
d6fba502bafbeb08f86b3601e3f8a5ab04800ff1
'2012-03-31T09:27:04-04:00'
describe
'38163' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCD' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
057a57c99812dd15149e26ddfc23a941
66c8428ebced9fcf612055ce4cb4492ed49054d9
describe
'975587' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCE' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
3e69b4e14c2240afccb11a50f65e1e81
9123e334418e1b81b6bda5204d3cca575748f7c3
describe
'156204' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCF' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
5d4988bda172818a5c9812c325cdcec4
dfaa38a8e9da6e5b90bacc1832e8abe57beb500f
'2012-03-31T09:24:52-04:00'
describe
'36779' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCG' 'sip-files00090.pro'
4bb29dd1b9d25eb1ece9094b6f07a5b5
a4470395e542e63bc55731520829ed8c9a48c3cd
describe
'75757' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCH' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
00c9a0f5338108e77da344163f10ec78
2c8ba4eaf2552f61c757e4ce7ad8c263097d96c4
describe
'7829448' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCI' 'sip-files00090.tif'
c26239cefd940724d3f0582629c899e3
5cc02fc607132a077770b3eaeb1bb8728ae4a98a
'2012-03-31T09:29:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCJ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
27f2d50a68f6b658b34654b412de9714
8b382c390945be8cbd5a7421552bc0af70dd25df
describe
'38592' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCK' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
64490e2d684b168678ca1812f3a77545
7eafe70bc901d9a2b80d72f5342971f2c5fda798
describe
'977574' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCL' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
d4e03fb859724fddf2dcdea970ab639f
f88136e2168e50f6242e4dfc4dc1baa1a991071d
describe
'151650' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCM' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
fc0d99e3f7f82df3ec0937c615a254f2
bcbfed3cbc4fcbce6ddd7565f7a312520b822d93
'2012-03-31T09:28:44-04:00'
describe
'37215' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCN' 'sip-files00091.pro'
e6a3286c3bc87eafb330626f1b944543
ea4f52204abb7a92da4d2f4e30d4256818820fa2
'2012-03-31T09:30:29-04:00'
describe
'72997' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCO' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
5a0babe307bf92442ff67c98583aff81
47a2138b145d5598565c73b6500864b7603bb40b
'2012-03-31T09:25:49-04:00'
describe
'7844068' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCP' 'sip-files00091.tif'
60f10216695207a5ada0787051e07c97
e68b687e23cd217adbb43f3c7ea78b36d2da15c9
'2012-03-31T09:27:52-04:00'
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCQ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
2b9d591ea964d522bafbe1fd111f9d1d
8f501ccc281b8a56bfafd9609eef4721e985f133
describe
'37869' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCR' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
4e096374b26e702565d5ad36a644ea99
7548946c33f865ea5d37d4957c3245477972dc6e
describe
'975757' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCS' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
e9f41b5d370f41f26fdf75a3f6419f82
0e7b2d03bc9bcf274ae8f7d6acc825622d4284c1
describe
'153874' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCT' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
5fbe69fbba58a445cce94683f6427699
ef860b39b5e2fd25d9367f94fac036aa35afb764
describe
'37694' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCU' 'sip-files00092.pro'
1ddb7c40c57caf746e02c73222fc6726
73f372c3aa3de7bbc86265f6bb098d5225de7b97
describe
'75529' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCV' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
c1bf58e44023d62a6242e9e131ac8ce8
498bba5eb1636c327df52f054345185e1ee5ea03
'2012-03-31T09:24:34-04:00'
describe
'7829284' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCW' 'sip-files00092.tif'
183944926c0e47c80b9e04ab48aa166d
b6858e6ed179b6a565ea58000ddd45b7a4158c6f
'2012-03-31T09:29:19-04:00'
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCX' 'sip-files00092.txt'
8b6aa6d382bf77a85dce37deb70d7487
a71abbd43235d33f915f17b0229202a325b0832e
describe
'38069' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCY' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
2fcc7731ecf895fb3c5557b924f62e1a
60c8b5c7fa004a295ad13131fefcabf6081f7687
describe
'977591' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVCZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
4d829790b502d89176e5728b50581913
1f480a85f894aa70dac57227451a9c4bd144d434
'2012-03-31T09:28:48-04:00'
describe
'146998' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDA' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
28e2127b2d15954d9d88dabb6755b127
b1261e71bcdc90f77ee3befbd4962777e3564e68
describe
'35355' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDB' 'sip-files00093.pro'
968c6c98e4703ea07f2f9e82f705b6c5
c7522fb424ac005a6dccad61df37632e86b99c5f
'2012-03-31T09:27:24-04:00'
describe
'71306' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDC' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
c13e84f049161e4e45c4ae4690753cc2
12c7ac48e6681d3312bccc0ddae3563272622508
describe
'7844032' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDD' 'sip-files00093.tif'
c2d77481a6aec03104457318b182bd48
4643abab0769c1186412f6b5211162022d99a11a
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDE' 'sip-files00093.txt'
62592c2007cae70eb1530aa444ffe998
668be5f78c00af6514f2dd4ff43d99a4ca26e4a9
'2012-03-31T09:30:10-04:00'
describe
'37902' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDF' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
9a16eac7ced68fa862cbcc10c80df90e
4aa978019f39e28de4af33f5369c7a06c33bdd65
describe
'975720' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDG' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
85fcae15cf5f4b1a74e0f3deb35ca0f4
fe7a291852bc627dd6c2e26e5242405285afd378
describe
'151966' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDH' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
aba136ff5e1d52f90ae244b88bf246c0
62f5e4558de4cebf98ea0b75bfa47ac2ad8a547d
describe
'36208' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDI' 'sip-files00094.pro'
b2f926f3e552cfbd20194ab745f79f8f
447a9dfb0d32be4d75454f76ab016075332d299e
describe
'72351' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDJ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
9bce1588f06bb72666c5d8ad61c77256
17acc8d7d6caea97fe74ca13870736453937668c
'2012-03-31T09:25:35-04:00'
describe
'7829060' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDK' 'sip-files00094.tif'
c0dfa9fc021329d23a783c3956347cdc
d662aa05ff6b8d243abbc44abd0e69adf5411202
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDL' 'sip-files00094.txt'
a65c10f228471661cceada73aaf94c9f
f4bc7ff7013e7da913f2367e7dadb10f6dbb7135
describe
'36881' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDM' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
5eac139df42d77cfc9cba47b9a502027
2de1583322186ec55bc9b7b83ea1970eac304e66
describe
'354641' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDN' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
83aab34d8678f8e2631f8112f7df7327
c7850e26593809b690810747891c5268402bf854
describe
'51471' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDO' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
aadd0204d6f9610327a577a2908d0315
dd2f6e00ea2f244997e19368ca32402935434f12
describe
'5786' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDP' 'sip-files00095.pro'
4f2364904590136b98bc63be8b84861c
0232f22869c0bdd5067e7fcbc041e382683b0fc4
describe
'31501' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDQ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
dbb58a33ab8311ae5f8aa210c77cc300
d45610bb55efc18a03ad6477d5165c08300cd8b3
'2012-03-31T09:28:09-04:00'
describe
'7840188' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDR' 'sip-files00095.tif'
c24c271f0b00bc0b5cdc3f8fabf28324
6643f122bbbb541a8e7fe5c63f7abeb3f078a2d1
describe
'257' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDS' 'sip-files00095.txt'
01944b0d812c2edd60ba2931d076c8d5
64719168562250bd75a4331a43f80ca38aa7cb96
'2012-03-31T09:30:03-04:00'
describe
'23726' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDT' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
c51173ccae3673fccf212e017db98174
859f154d05529ad1d92a50d5c0ddd54ac8f1049e
'2012-03-31T09:29:30-04:00'
describe
'975714' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDU' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
3d4ce7eec5d131b6ae26797b2dde477c
8d88245ec2a779a3f59511b059c208228d533dde
describe
'133177' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDV' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a931d9c7b8f7c568cfbd6d40b1ccdd05
47af48407e5845597d45871315160166bee9faf8
describe
'22538' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDW' 'sip-files00096.pro'
f4bc4c42d7f4578a7c87306de1b048cb
9b2c98e84b0f5171286c27b97b509fbc2a7efb56
describe
'64002' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDX' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
23f2067aa34b346d3d1dc68e2a126807
86e4f394e6bc45c4f709ad7e4ea3e5537aadaf4c
describe
'7828552' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDY' 'sip-files00096.tif'
1413f555d6b97f4f7e3e27732942ee33
6ecf6b3c7be9d29ce2755f789b937d807d45090a
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVDZ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
e7cf992294e5335948ef60bfd4f467ec
9ffbabaf51d55744ad686f2091dad6f5d3a0129d
describe
'34927' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEA' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
5350bd251f616d9f42c07b31b3493834
327ffcbe763df2248d4fedd42d0e27be50b59307
describe
'977622' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEB' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
d4867ad6c63097e293b8644c4f3fb852
b139eca6b7a25c532704f8538a2926d91de863a2
describe
'145975' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEC' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
5c909805637b30171df234c36a2dcde8
524ac978695a88b311e5e5c6d8c10d0291131095
describe
'34996' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVED' 'sip-files00097.pro'
c22983ff7bce97e12ccf45b19e6b7c3c
442a6e1b738b6b54f16dc43c9bcde4e2fe306c56
describe
'71013' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEE' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
559d108dfa14bb9f50b316d8245cfb81
aacf360c4f3913b5a40a86238ca90cdf25797709
describe
'7843888' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEF' 'sip-files00097.tif'
9dd0108c50ae6e04392c6c30db4e306a
153708664c869a8bcc83df684cf9b3ccb574c8a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEG' 'sip-files00097.txt'
07e7a3486ccb3b4b443b72153d568074
4b507fee3271ad1a36127742df08a5a81c924d96
describe
'37490' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEH' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
28b9d9432b98f07ab202e170be547b4e
a92643f27a3597af38d18228e7fd2b6d3ff9c8f6
describe
'975760' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEI' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
085bea908e19b8cf6920af0c886741f7
355f9395a51b602c67f700671f8703e114ba82bf
'2012-03-31T09:30:28-04:00'
describe
'151001' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEJ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
6f53610d808a10ce399b41ebf5fed290
acda3f799d8178850eb50e1bf7ab7a7845eb5386
describe
'36351' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
1bda90ff19df339a97a5990f9a1254b8
8d0a6b38ae43a6d168e7f645f65aabe71cf1fec8
'2012-03-31T09:29:28-04:00'
describe
'73710' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEL' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
dd9416cbcfefb65edbe78657bce958ef
6afcbc64e0862b6ed2a88579576935643f4bfb54
describe
'7829148' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEM' 'sip-files00098.tif'
1944f0fe10c4ad55c14c7bfc3fb9304f
106e0d15b089409f02cdcaf0c60c883e229ea703
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEN' 'sip-files00098.txt'
97a15524ed21a1e1a334cf45cddd0f08
7a3c667049d7b8fb13e373c5306f91b31bc9a60b
describe
Invalid character
'37676' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEO' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
e067e1f88cef6316fdf3c311a1073228
914dc372ba65f60001537d8f7b87eb3369c7fd9b
describe
'977551' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEP' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
53e33a770b01a59e0a3c83f20ee51f7a
d8438cef9ae047366d66d4e9329437c7a8ae3cb8
describe
'151872' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEQ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
1b3bcca17ffea829c2d34e10a1fbff59
092e92682b70c45541fbcda4730be47016df9f3e
describe
'37300' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVER' 'sip-files00099.pro'
6dd5e18c889c70b455ee39636f9f6830
c44dd9e27ccc9c0285ca8bf017d5b2b59feb524d
describe
'72104' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVES' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
811d49e7dba3faa4aff896a883fd6c4d
cc05a904e2881789b6845d4b3c33b75e1f5d2e36
describe
'7843560' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVET' 'sip-files00099.tif'
c200c3b61e5b4e6ef98df5207ce2bdc4
bf0cf3301b0c4f41253a2e0f4162e9256acae369
'2012-03-31T09:24:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEU' 'sip-files00099.txt'
b0ca4cdfec0def9d2d9ff38cf701bb42
524e4b79235545140ef4159686c92c37e7371ca6
describe
'37196' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEV' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
a06c4ecb41fe0d61d2eee2b97ae86ef0
99ae7b9428585a0e540a7c541381392be0b9eda0
describe
'975734' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEW' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
5efdc862a9319c65bb9dc745e56aeffa
8dd3a211ffa935a21fc08cd4dd8589efd12f555e
'2012-03-31T09:23:58-04:00'
describe
'147489' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEX' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
57065d82ed7b74f13a0fbeece6b1da48
5981392500ba8d98ab91893bf95a7da969fd7139
describe
'34412' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
a3ce9265554083c8dbd9d3b7e7a12e4a
171ded0a4bf28d9ef2f9901e4cbd69e3a248d95c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVEZ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
4b29541239da5cb960db53ddfd35960a
19392c9b9c1ce1c89dba9f98d335a9e51408d4fe
describe
'7829016' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFA' 'sip-files00100.tif'
473d7b7025b28510737adf63d668c062
0d786ea61693651c48f5c55734473ee27e87fcd7
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFB' 'sip-files00100.txt'
9b20080f397fcfeda236504e6932873e
18975cdebf44bf40a5d4a0d54467416390467590
describe
'37143' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFC' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
434c89104994059a579e78ffaccc17e6
a73fe1946a4cc845335d22d94954bd7103d3d926
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFD' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
234eaa5f2bda81a945b4360c9766d29c
a6064b8c9f9d150162d923c585735b4659bd6eb9
'2012-03-31T09:28:23-04:00'
describe
'153620' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFE' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
bfef1d3f5ecd65f56b36e93bf4c1d29d
90d72a48e0df3884929ce75f606aa3bd83020e00
describe
'38181' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFF' 'sip-files00101.pro'
2d493902b196f9461114766def8ac400
ad3e994f28f0651e6908bac09430b48b5306e912
'2012-03-31T09:30:01-04:00'
describe
'73590' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFG' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
8ec240c5e8b62609a8a3f1992cc1e31b
451816db123c95c8c38b655e8fd96738b5369acf
describe
'7843972' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFH' 'sip-files00101.tif'
ebf20129484a275b9d89fba3d5e34744
884d99be0804d0d9d8a828821a6799d238024c15
'2012-03-31T09:27:09-04:00'
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFI' 'sip-files00101.txt'
866b00f996dc542116e0d296c169a99d
44db726a08d5b4e70905c4353f2a1baa41c2ee49
describe
'38072' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFJ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
9d623097d497b913ab361f71ebcb4d2a
ecd6206a781345a22e917420e9a22c71cde98398
describe
'975661' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFK' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
ce8b56deb6c486ca393d610627a0f1f9
089b3a246a9b0292adcafb17b3ab60c7f6c19e60
describe
'146285' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFL' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
84883e201073a1cabfdb7368d1e47cd0
068085f5a04f48e208ade021f66af208203bb7b8
describe
'33964' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFM' 'sip-files00102.pro'
cf38cfff26f15a87308873b7c6696d0a
c299191d36b311ee35807558031c624dab6d9f11
describe
'73140' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFN' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
9d8c1b4b5c1b51787c73d1575ab58405
dee82f84a58810b85f3984b7e9c8db866b4ba018
'2012-03-31T09:30:27-04:00'
describe
'7829220' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
8b23dea3c9a2e6e34e4df04a3aa1cd60
12e3f541fef8222712a5765346bcc044bd4dd3e4
'2012-03-31T09:27:06-04:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFP' 'sip-files00102.txt'
1132d5ee6dec4125b39529b8b377feea
01476f841e8fc8c1e9de58722e47f78a63f2e812
describe
'37432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFQ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
dd25a367f25c2b20973d2bae0a0f9e75
ba7c71eadfbb5943d3cf26e4490cddda8373af9b
'2012-03-31T09:28:25-04:00'
describe
'977599' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
7dd769c7e3f1892b96d6948ac33a9267
ca0511357ad7ca559662aa28d424ea02f63e8bc3
describe
'148509' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFS' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
8a7aefe38124c6a063ea80020a1fde1a
223f353131a2345b8df1a2196d5f5f70508d203e
describe
'36715' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFT' 'sip-files00103.pro'
716ab6aebec3b304fcf0696a3062469e
94914ff119f10ff7a3fb861e3fcbf28f89463599
describe
'70999' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFU' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
a5192a58ef30e1efd45ca2c4989a507d
d20432e2d452a66ef296b724707b10549abd12ed
describe
'7843536' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFV' 'sip-files00103.tif'
b1fd07fba53961bfd2c4cf8391645f27
f7c3c471333a344d67010fda3e6700119da8288f
'2012-03-31T09:30:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFW' 'sip-files00103.txt'
c90531b7d66c5b57317d707c01ae0e33
63710ee01add12d14de1b01b6111ef82d273c86e
describe
'36816' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFX' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
3e30aa1cb10a53aca86798c5bd2b6ff0
2866479534293528611928326aef5c7be9610e0d
describe
'975766' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFY' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
6e292945ca90ca956f453cbd222f0b55
a6c634ffc0aaffb9fa4be4e0d9e7ae03b7ed9309
describe
'147982' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVFZ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
6157d2c34f980fee5b9675872fb60237
e7a5d909e0c6483146d0e60a540dd675dd49f5a7
describe
'35897' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGA' 'sip-files00104.pro'
a9a8a7ea6f77568b63ff3d33c779727d
e4b979f2d1d1611fd087d36c7b845e1feef4e63d
describe
'72148' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGB' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
fd2d919f242d84a9899e656e71095486
d168fa7f9d96f098428bde330ef5d122dc6ccbaf
describe
'7828984' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGC' 'sip-files00104.tif'
9077a7386ce93c4540a0e8b8148f2535
c1f3e5098047dda4d6ea4fb6b3542909bfcdf2c7
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGD' 'sip-files00104.txt'
bab07be9ee8b4f6fc8212965b995f9f2
5e2f286aa233305c09ca3ec575bc0c8881c9f519
describe
'36545' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGE' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
8b880d097b3ff742e9102424a42b9ec8
5e78baa8f1b17d7aa5ce733a9e7ab8e0e59cc674
describe
'977628' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGF' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
21ff3d7e3bff6da9f9ada3e2021927ac
4f952cfd7b422c12e233938685bf71e4baf2b2b5
describe
'148476' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
aafdfe7774788c348e33fc41bab6fd30
671199b81b05343a97f543fbdea7287ddc308ca4
describe
'36283' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGH' 'sip-files00105.pro'
ff850a4a8adacfbb0bd71644ba9581ad
523f009281254d57fc9c12a57f756a71cd4770d0
describe
'72141' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGI' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
8be53a985dc89cc5e0058bc45abbe721
dddd9530c82dd21b0432ae59ae2ae6dd3b503c86
describe
'7843980' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGJ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
0defbe1b8e88a220e9aaffcb06d15fc1
128e07e600b7b3ff0de1fb82a7476123ef606ff6
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGK' 'sip-files00105.txt'
3876d0f468121db7ce3893397b6ee955
11a0f2d615e5f04bf6d8915f861cde07f548d624
describe
'37498' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGL' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
eea52f417f76f4d61bf4ceccf5b25371
a5734e3b6d9d71f89a8e2b994cc7abfde6a40c0a
describe
'975758' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGM' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
1b3bb1dece41909a73447ca7d622b041
8da1789ddf8b823698c4ad399670bc5b132356f7
describe
'152357' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGN' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
95790b7f26bdc4833eda99ba04a8a8d8
794effab111abc4f3d6a362ba37c3bda8ac91844
describe
'37456' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGO' 'sip-files00106.pro'
d2a3663075320321f5a167b83a504d3b
d325cf314b7349329653ed02b7bae42e59ece34d
describe
'73076' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
12c41e59f5162418dae38d0fca052c4a
ee27842827e38d12e9bebcc8489eabcc7d82980a
describe
'7829052' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGQ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
5dc398c8dd49617b2eb5af0c63ea6b9d
c4b1ad1dfcc58ff78e870d99077dbc847c7b735d
'2012-03-31T09:29:11-04:00'
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGR' 'sip-files00106.txt'
83ef52ffa864a60aeeb7c0c710389340
c48b57033e241ee9c04e212ba9257d5a4c1b316b
'2012-03-31T09:30:25-04:00'
describe
'36947' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGS' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
531a27723cc63a637aa558848725f5a1
954dc01129ce0b164fbcc3bdee9da569c67b237f
describe
'977629' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGT' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
bff48e5aa5036ab68063f76eb77fdcb4
706411905b9bce3d389fd33b2aaeeef5280f193c
describe
'151196' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGU' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
b2ba72d8906c6ec60ba296b205319f08
4040078325efab66375c6c57001000f02fbd3a96
'2012-03-31T09:28:02-04:00'
describe
'36413' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGV' 'sip-files00107.pro'
19d4b526a4b6bb54583fbbcc57b9122a
41925a9c3cf1b0d5bab73a1579653126e0b0d3cd
describe
'72887' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
4f5d5b6866b8bfe76b5b7b64bb1226e2
d0e19658310aa125050bf6eada61b72d1f879774
describe
'7844016' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGX' 'sip-files00107.tif'
8b037a3a700edb3b8f314aa3ff0dfc87
659e55dde5820301f89299801c504d50a7e99a0e
'2012-03-31T09:27:12-04:00'
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGY' 'sip-files00107.txt'
53e9ee84069910254a6f93985815544e
ad5576c0a2bfea1f81a802a3a5c84dfe4230c5da
describe
'37874' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVGZ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c25ecd1430e56a73314e32a0436542f5
67e4f155f5ceef04414031f958c55f2a0b5ef43a
describe
'975767' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
b75a068637cd27db815788fd46a4f7fd
572c2a2522141a7f503e4a0ede10c7804d5b698a
describe
'155311' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHB' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
0ae895bf67cb9dca5027540ea8a4ef07
b9f977c776e3305d2c3f323a07da6d6c5f4402e1
describe
'36913' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHC' 'sip-files00108.pro'
2c9e6d9f5e7fe631d3c174b97b867438
861153942e5c7b11e65e8f71395c42df1a1c8feb
'2012-03-31T09:28:49-04:00'
describe
'74772' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHD' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
40197093db0f0ac94da6cba818df00b7
d7261885783dc2db3d7c52d242f79344937c2870
describe
'7829352' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHE' 'sip-files00108.tif'
e4ffbb7a93d5b716107406e48b161bc4
0e7fbdae7477be73fc3f14466d3ebc5145f71b97
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHF' 'sip-files00108.txt'
043bf992329ab467695abdbfe9deb866
cf5760ae6710a1ff70a9c77a9d488296b3334285
describe
'38011' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHG' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
1280e5909177791ff16f9d9db374db80
9e48547653b9b2d2e490a9ec3ded43fa1d84573b
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
2ace4ca56366d2efa1f83486232c8b5f
f07682e07155162d0796359a6acf2602f289d405
describe
'146559' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHI' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
79e4c988a8439675e00d8ed0770f2d3a
6e51e80e5ec4531596e48472a6b91c3775070e62
describe
'36013' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHJ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
31dc9212a2796279ae663c82df9261c8
53611c83bee98d7ddece3066b72bf3424bb35d5c
describe
'70893' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHK' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
4b6320c518b9bb744cd930bd1ac11548
7cf68e5cb22ee461143bc83402e2d6e9b57c629a
describe
'7843836' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHL' 'sip-files00109.tif'
27959a54d1b79c700af873fdd6b6aaff
131475628892bbf0b8441d3b5e87028e70506d3b
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHM' 'sip-files00109.txt'
1726bf9a80a3ce522bd72137e5efef95
7df5ef68a4e642a3411bebb7bdf2c2e6b5e32e0a
describe
'36824' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHN' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
c5f8716534b570adb52238ae3cb17dea
36554aab533cbe6c7bae9a1ea7b48f5ce88e7fbe
describe
'975753' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHO' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
7de1001e3ddf5569bdbbef205149ff12
5de1f5f4ebef0e50415ef3184670a71b07b76790
'2012-03-31T09:26:38-04:00'
describe
'146565' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHP' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
4afe875b1d6118155546ed9e0048449a
9269e25ff3b93c6203ed9691103dd4217203818f
'2012-03-31T09:27:49-04:00'
describe
'35247' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHQ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
0b302fc798ed05b8b5b416cdc1769577
f1806cdf4f0cd4f94a97643b6f3196fdf19ef8a4
describe
'71426' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHR' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
91f825c68f2fd0ad857badca9d4cba1a
9d730ea6bce15f9f00091f298e9db677a61fa1f5
'2012-03-31T09:29:14-04:00'
describe
'7829024' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHS' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c65835a7b0efd1d48397d0c876b579d2
a33ac07c46edb5510dea3b9684deb9711a33fba1
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHT' 'sip-files00110.txt'
b43d0af78ac75a31ac9373bf5445b509
3bc77b1483628c968ad3ca61c6af07c2cfecd62e
describe
'37105' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHU' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
231697e27cc15ec79d2efa2e1fb4f2e4
b3459900eb153c5b458729a057e3df1d9f17fec6
describe
'977540' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHV' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
21be38e517d049a00dd56e02a8d54798
00ef3fc5ceb27cccc719e4d7c581f019f5c89c7b
describe
'149756' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHW' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
77b7b98b38ebe32a3f43b58df87d61f4
8be68a54fd0fbd75fcc2bfcc04c9fdbcba8aee12
describe
'36942' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
0611d25e4830c506fe5b2028cfd47bf1
8dfd6af29d68734b22cfbf72dcf5241541b8e5ea
describe
'71915' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
79d29d1a46cd2e1333e7f5322530756c
c46f7ceb074a161bf9c1d3d68f877a6da303c257
describe
'7843708' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVHZ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
8602deaa444cc03bf53784b512a145c4
3ab6054af2fcea6b6b9e2edc11d1b3fa526ca4e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIA' 'sip-files00111.txt'
476c36a1a848d50cc19fd4769925b181
b94350cc63c200e82222619b810be8ec96a8b11d
describe
'37337' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIB' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
8887970d2330abcfa08c89d017c034cf
f3110e97cab52e8309cf6e87566f136b3694f4de
describe
'975763' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIC' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
28436ffce32192a372baba130c08afa2
0f573e515add872b118824bcc3751fc6c263c6e1
describe
'145674' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVID' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
9cc7450731be1cf5a498685d5d2e6373
ebf6f7b37324f2e46308af8185a701ad87c51795
describe
'35309' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIE' 'sip-files00112.pro'
7b7599d75b41e3c0d75fb70eb1290e0c
21e43c0f5e048f14ceb85a3d66ca9cf95412390f
'2012-03-31T09:25:48-04:00'
describe
'70520' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIF' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
cde9b3b45f0546b9548072b39a7fca37
f795e6c3c2e059717f4ed8619e7b5c1bddafda9d
describe
'7828640' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIG' 'sip-files00112.tif'
da6782231967b13eae9b39c7f3b18bd3
d77511f60350f0f22c7f91513f8a220ded8ae1b0
'2012-03-31T09:24:14-04:00'
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIH' 'sip-files00112.txt'
2d581d29fad869df571cc711ca287f1b
002d0cb2b4b60de0c07171d9ea3dead11fc3d745
describe
'36256' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVII' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
cf9bba114c7f7843c72c7131fc1d14ec
2d2db888b52359e91f652d830b5d1bb53d253012
'2012-03-31T09:29:06-04:00'
describe
'558039' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIJ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
7e3a6645f9dc26b2ddb2e176b71c1efd
127ee5cb87f35ea32b9abfa20e16b52b703dc6d7
'2012-03-31T09:29:24-04:00'
describe
'74405' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
34095a80917357751bd87527abdafdca
48cc1cc13f514b8ff3349fd128596826eefb14a1
describe
'12735' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIL' 'sip-files00113.pro'
5d7c77c4a8ced1c19e40355c4edcd5b3
f45af4dfec575f81899606c8e671905128d123dd
describe
'40162' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIM' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
ad8c19d7e654917ab7e63d170aeb241d
3a2e1071bc7596723b18516cfe865115a449d340
describe
'7840760' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIN' 'sip-files00113.tif'
51524d96b9e8f34779041d9e6ab92b6a
61e3cd4a55f17dde7e32732beffed5d69acf6d3c
'2012-03-31T09:30:20-04:00'
describe
'553' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
93a440a69e58f8e73bb10ff8ce0b9d37
07ead8548aee60ef6fef7a9d312eea04d585f842
'2012-03-31T09:30:31-04:00'
describe
'26505' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIP' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
8ebd6862b657ad1ef62dd206ac2e63a5
113bf1765918a2a66cf3d3cc59adbce2952ead7a
describe
'888997' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
a3c1f48871583268aed086b7982468d3
7082346f5b45f7cf6b84d188e05758d070aa70b5
describe
'125200' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIR' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
143af8ff050091aefe4e3083b12f45a2
36b2864abf82866e7777e646449505205e5eae68
'2012-03-31T09:28:20-04:00'
describe
'20606' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIS' 'sip-files00114.pro'
02a67b45f8f32242d57303eb5b87617d
de4df17e16b1778ad4311790c60a7089c845f087
describe
'61316' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIT' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
1c1577dc7b4b0747d2b2ccde3e017529
f5950276c182756debcb1e1ad9c1d2d57c5277bd
describe
'7828352' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIU' 'sip-files00114.tif'
f3a84749ced10bee5574500a8aed6d87
d8bd4dd88b5534b9da0433f96d972e97ba541614
'2012-03-31T09:27:21-04:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIV' 'sip-files00114.txt'
d18877497c53446e68594797fa3c382c
b7f5bc836fcb1a7433c8a94c496496c7b826293c
describe
'34133' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIW' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
4088038f09f9bc56b6f4c4c4f28c15b4
e4b1855f86d8ad56020ab6200268005be0c77a45
describe
'977607' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIX' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
ef1aa18f33fff5d64378fb7f05b63218
aeb39479872952246d65f3d9a96022a0210f739c
describe
'148798' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIY' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
d254ad92600860e3b7f5f549e0bf50c6
1392d2dcd76abf33df9b45bfd646f4cec5702948
'2012-03-31T09:28:27-04:00'
describe
'36805' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVIZ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
9de18e57486a60d2a49afbb5ebb54aee
2db9aedfdc0b8b81890b05bb5bfda30d38bd1e7f
describe
'71350' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJA' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
c4c6e4eb746b5543fdcd494bfb2aa304
506b0c0ccc332f905d73016059b17b2b81aa9850
describe
'7843660' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
68750d027076025d8fb1e6e05fffdf3f
3210c2a508b93afe16648d5fb70575d6f208fe32
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJC' 'sip-files00115.txt'
a0a0f6b7c402c92c53f004fb52ef11cc
a62e42da6e9bcb396b2b0785e3853f2da9e91c07
describe
'37261' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJD' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
073daea8d99834c23508f4f00e0f8526
4db3142cd3df30cbc83eb8c15d61b18eda6e4f6b
describe
'975752' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJE' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
179e6be81dbe1b29168f1ed98b16caf0
d17ddaf6444c3d4db8d1e42c2ef09aab89e17f21
describe
'150453' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJF' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f1ae86fd888621567e99da44c9a8052f
56172b218d65d7a6acf8b08d54ecf91c1dfbc467
describe
'36308' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJG' 'sip-files00116.pro'
0ef52f55855a23bdd34c99c39f21cac3
55f3b5dae3b5d92329429ab034c435ab184e4611
describe
'73299' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJH' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
6ef405f7eacd617cff1879b0c2334a65
4dc69d57140771aae05573f26310632ab272c74a
describe
'7829108' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJI' 'sip-files00116.tif'
bb52bd14d4650eda111b2184eac345f9
755b2a0f7767f261c15bf622bc7babe4b48d7fac
'2012-03-31T09:29:37-04:00'
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJJ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
b536b10e0f9d93ec39a47f2ae97c39d9
d97e18da9f274eb5b46a142a2d874fb3788a517c
describe
'36932' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
0e13b3e5f19add711b1eaa28d58dd39e
8283c252a0168e34cee967e794c9d6b55f9f5b84
describe
'977617' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJL' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
03126852ae73e4c6a20d4e946c773741
8872c6e551ba44310e257155068adddf73eaa4b2
'2012-03-31T09:25:58-04:00'
describe
'144510' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJM' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
c8d403062624af8630da5576879fbc6b
1abdb3660dc5ea69bb4438972b455bf1794256e5
describe
'34392' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJN' 'sip-files00117.pro'
4d86626115f7b37b613b1fb6d6af4be7
0d0cfef35d0e26fdb67c2c7208646713d48a7572
'2012-03-31T09:29:52-04:00'
describe
'71815' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJO' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
d217a13025a3f041761c76665b0fb71b
8da522e91c73b602ffe8f11dfc709e3c7f3ab8c1
'2012-03-31T09:26:52-04:00'
describe
'7844060' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJP' 'sip-files00117.tif'
870f528439e91e10a6c2c7d321d7e8c3
8e44955b7257aa92d791d3c3c0c082a58772ad79
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJQ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
ef5a163b1ff6a652073a0eec7390fcdd
419de1d0a1a0cc583317c64831ae6d8d8277175e
'2012-03-31T09:24:05-04:00'
describe
'37532' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJR' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
01b54b34ac6ea1ce21f2348f926e8734
2f3adff2010f251f6a624abbf6f4906526af9de9
describe
'975728' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJS' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
0ca7547a824629943805b89a7e706465
cd5f8c87b6f745b7ee61cc2754e6d7964f2833a1
describe
'147308' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJT' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
27891183d96964b8827dbf89c2cf3498
f33a7450ed142a7153239685ef7955441aa33d87
describe
'35962' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJU' 'sip-files00118.pro'
786ddbc8a9b94b70d9a47577c22f231b
61ad387502470a590fd33725cd8a8a9bd4cc7f9e
describe
'71695' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJV' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
1218f047b7c7ee9a10ea59f47abd3e4e
ad2379269ab62a7b693042fbeee124004253159d
describe
'7828864' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJW' 'sip-files00118.tif'
70784786794f8e54c52d9c4a0fd05c2a
d901b0edae68a61379147b879689a6a805b43b4c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJX' 'sip-files00118.txt'
b16fbdff7d4fea3b373fe1d5f05dba48
571ec2233fa0d597fb6fd8e219c8ab487aa6fda5
describe
'36473' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJY' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
3465351c221569d57f395458d2b0fd18
39ea3d63ba9af7f3521c61916f30ee26e4f100fe
describe
'977597' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVJZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
ace2075e0537e276e89c8a43d63761d8
b72c8e3dc57049a395e867459992fc9aaf0ebb1c
'2012-03-31T09:27:31-04:00'
describe
'148221' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKA' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
8e8d356341d077a9c6a2dff829d9710e
b068a8647390b3f9995c0e1df819c36c19c58565
describe
'35563' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKB' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a449b06623679c68e56693775994a329
27e481ac638aec007147d5bf23fe596ed7dd6b81
describe
'72546' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKC' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
fda6dd83f4e6bb04d5fbb63154f963c3
f7b2791b63b8b02e63388c4d2fb34d920ade8225
'2012-03-31T09:25:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKD' 'sip-files00119.tif'
608b64f2b7b6488e8278c6c8c9d35312
037e1c17f2b08a88c2d2511a10c0d824f9c61019
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKE' 'sip-files00119.txt'
6af7dfb64f05c32a2383b7301ff95975
855a1a2f388f9041770b79b448d27647393435bf
describe
'37771' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKF' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
377d8d0e3d85d13d78090eeef3a88e82
65883d48c6c47a484899deb8cc0301ce138794bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKG' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
4a5090b5bc1d0ae0d07880bc8ab7eee2
4c5c7f3a40c1cc6241e15660e3317ff33d9fcc1c
describe
'148128' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKH' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
993b41bf625d80decdfe1e1d4667bdf4
65800c54c7907e9bfa4cce2ad90e114ee528d537
describe
'35761' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKI' 'sip-files00120.pro'
4e6fdc8d8f4d892ab8891f0e8dbe9dc6
f9de0a73bfeeeebd357ededcfc5358432755aa90
describe
'73940' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKJ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
9a1def6e2ec17ad695aa69f6b09628f4
d14d94a909fd7c0e41b3ec15a278fff9652156e0
describe
'7829080' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKK' 'sip-files00120.tif'
c79157eca518c1e509ca5b4b40da38a6
5acc232584060fca48a02a6e1457014238ca676b
'2012-03-31T09:30:16-04:00'
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKL' 'sip-files00120.txt'
13e06a0ff347ca6b88b4c018cbe488a8
f7fc510648cda201a8a83b21c390ec0a53117e26
describe
'37350' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKM' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
080b50eea3cba52b3a03c885ae74e4b3
4356ac11b733e30af6b9c817b5f97090ccfb64fb
'2012-03-31T09:28:00-04:00'
describe
'977631' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKN' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
da6be90546f065b726a71ca88f6ef9b3
15e4c92d48e0d720125408f607177013b577e794
describe
'151625' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKO' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
bb1e88ce2ea2ce4b0bb96b374bbc7b41
1da9057ab5c2841431285a338a1f6215eb3ae74b
describe
'37253' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKP' 'sip-files00121.pro'
f759f449f4522d4364ed9b32144b03d3
3abb7caad432a71934b8dcbf88cb1f54ee6bfa21
describe
'73363' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKQ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
c9f973aa63432f76053d318bed3d76e1
2c4015689253cff731fc277891ca0908f25408db
describe
'7843996' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKR' 'sip-files00121.tif'
aa0a2273b167ea677bf2991ae19d661a
70c3bf756b0cfda9314cc6153074cb55dc217faf
'2012-03-31T09:29:31-04:00'
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKS' 'sip-files00121.txt'
581601de0ea7ba71ab908576f784d538
4e8a48a627698e661e4aec46f8e1f44bb0808914
describe
'38047' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKT' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
8a9784c3e0728af4f143e05cbe6ba3d6
c90876d79361ce2fb23a286bc84400b929a53747
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
bf18116d58ebd8c5191e10b0a655ccf9
caa79ea91e6c819046c383406b39c37654d6c983
describe
'152565' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKV' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
8f2af539c41be53223fd1204d4014e97
d32e46a154a2545e7b4a375b00760b3534fce19c
describe
'37394' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKW' 'sip-files00122.pro'
359e539f8e87493073f893801c2e6fbf
e7ef5acf7f7e4e3add7372adb3f4a01c6d078436
describe
'74243' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKX' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
d06dff4779b102b3625cb8df88a2082f
442032072f08ad9605b26c2a424621e7b27bdff5
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKY' 'sip-files00122.tif'
6ddafc8b9bca6d7290091274f87dabe4
c3185d3a18fb5833dff9f202408b7e83127ee35e
'2012-03-31T09:25:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVKZ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
9ed7819c4b2513295086d54550f728d8
bd0443244c4a7e2039c98e9062e47e927641c2b5
describe
'37400' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLA' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
7046769e49ce83a9b98096a4195cb04a
e9efbbcf018e6d5383438843a2b5a597e58f0292
describe
'977610' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLB' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
9a3c8e0c5ef3c81704ecc44f45229a04
6d7d5b1f3cdaf755fd221238109f021f46607a4d
describe
'149412' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLC' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
e8a03cb1c4e148cf6f912edae56ac192
fa995616342174dfb370368280af889b91b40898
describe
'36701' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLD' 'sip-files00123.pro'
6d31a9aa83cc0b342dd955b9d3d1ab99
c4a7f480933ad403c1387019f82b885b1a0ebfa0
describe
'71820' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLE' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
418b66f5b7cea81630725710ec015eb5
01707222d7c55c7592e28e285531c197801cebb2
describe
'7843636' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLF' 'sip-files00123.tif'
5716a9c5e792387b093c70f80be14d0e
fc900b688623dd7334d15691056cde98a6e7bcff
'2012-03-31T09:26:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLG' 'sip-files00123.txt'
9742de28d0e2cf643421adcd0658b647
5ef4266faafac7845d9c40d41ef20194bfaef9ad
describe
'37364' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLH' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
2a47cb6bbd3c4b1f3c907df0e29930e3
ea88f8fc3c5071cf45a10cc6987fb090c0b2dd51
describe
'975700' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLI' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
7fe879b6912ff385ae9fabcbf5e07e16
b4254e70423c1298aad7d8be2165cb2b91522251
describe
'154363' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLJ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
7efe702bb40c0ab7fd5161101ece1294
3d5eee0fa5bc974e24a35620f2fe92cb250f04ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLK' 'sip-files00124.pro'
6411c46c31760e93317772d15f0c9cbe
ebbdaa6c4601c7567b1249a880e9cfc2d7a4964c
describe
'75358' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLL' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
d1ba45da2e2bb876a5682dae736b05ac
a9aa888888f1396877c6bff93d0aa65891cd9b1f
describe
'7828996' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLM' 'sip-files00124.tif'
80c37817b32c9fbdae996af45f5fbb52
f963487e6089506afb7146919f7926433e9b04cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLN' 'sip-files00124.txt'
5d2477c62e7e524e286059cc9f2c4fca
b6b1ea5639ea6d62dc41f3f73be63a050fca1eed
describe
'37449' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLO' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
592c7ba70f885e1de5453c64cb07cf62
3cdfb2286abb3edea12e0ee3d0ed0eb934807d6c
describe
'977585' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLP' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
eeea3741a5d3ad34848334375623dd10
44cce75848a371d5e2d85dd3595113c58de0fc36
describe
'149787' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLQ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
5b5b824ec413b2d5052fedc7af7d82f5
c102067ace6a721f5057ff322798ae0b96a87442
describe
'35893' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLR' 'sip-files00125.pro'
b98aff894b00baf6ff07e683b4c54c0a
c9ac382bc800c464a3e5d2bdec5e10f5418dafb2
describe
'72564' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLS' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
c5f23ab61d0877f0763da8bdd14a395b
dd3243c1486a71e866bc744d3236e97681c48aa8
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLT' 'sip-files00125.tif'
56d7222fde2dfde40218e5ab37a3ffa3
9562438daae5ba9c4c22141b28342902c37d3152
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLU' 'sip-files00125.txt'
60a04ff311a30a334a90ed616f115ced
bcc12f845e7e7a1a75c29fc24949e5444ade4dc6
describe
'38280' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLV' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
56bd9b44c52cb6cd3a2b09070d06b1f3
464d6698f7bd0923b2d35b1711cf8208b6a3ab02
describe
'975764' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLW' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
0e504b7a0b24bea7b724ab120bc44cd6
d9c99dc6628b36734b6ab801c482d36131a3031a
describe
'151299' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLX' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
1255688dd4888a881877701977048c38
2a4b1ff940a64c3d5f088e18dbf6bb206fef1330
'2012-03-31T09:24:58-04:00'
describe
'36833' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLY' 'sip-files00126.pro'
fdd7c3447aa8c1f15a27a8631333354a
396180aff64cf46bb98a2258c7cef55344ecec16
describe
'73602' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVLZ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
3739f4587bc3db8132b14ea37858474f
3f466332ffc19c8a1f1c20dfb40db291b9c6398f
'2012-03-31T09:24:38-04:00'
describe
'7829164' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMA' 'sip-files00126.tif'
1f6fa0217d7bd8c70c0884eabd5d03a5
563f1f186f3766ecc07b4a01f7835f12aa3df542
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMB' 'sip-files00126.txt'
bfc43f30f04f5dd98bb10e59245502e2
af7c847666419eba7b119767465f7d4415215e00
describe
'37061' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMC' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
57a30fb93ffddacf77c4b7e65141322b
feeb3af4394a3506a583394fed85ad0bdebe19ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMD' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
dfcf5a5d19a9722954e45784d58128bd
c6730e0a87a96d146171cda8bc1663faa123f3be
'2012-03-31T09:25:05-04:00'
describe
'148907' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVME' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
76fe72b583d98aaa5aa416ce0db844b1
f9a311b7eb1d35db59372829df1e360f6ce03a35
describe
'36052' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMF' 'sip-files00127.pro'
3c6e7acbcf78f199d6fbb79c53b2761f
3df46e9bdf2a34a1a01341202fc79ef94dcb07ba
describe
'71642' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMG' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
91321f5a04e932fb101bb7f2da771bbe
5e0de6b301245ab1aae01469f9074deb286d8820
describe
'7843756' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMH' 'sip-files00127.tif'
821e7ef273fa0ca2fe32d5b3568a75e1
c8686a7488bfd804a7c40c925c27e5e3a21ae146
'2012-03-31T09:28:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMI' 'sip-files00127.txt'
a5d160211fc10b7be96e9f2683d5c080
99d6e0586af28854129ce943ac3992255de5967d
'2012-03-31T09:28:42-04:00'
describe
'37606' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMJ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
e948aaf25fffb39ede8a203ee457b672
fd68744f362e3c73ed0596e740b702b302ee6239
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMK' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
992bf6d304376c8df0f13e94bc089388
047ce7535844312d0c91262b38ccae4e335cfa11
describe
'146294' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVML' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
1cb6f14b8f3dd1ca9732291193eb59bb
938414e9663557a02798ef76579b3e12afc62274
describe
'34823' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMM' 'sip-files00128.pro'
2bac722fc9ccf62013686bba3e3f2233
8f91589334ecc3e545f6f502caa75e51dafd0ee2
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMN' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
23a70b9e8c30dd0211d280d701f49776
76b8721897fc7a83db2a37d5ec04258927c6ba4c
describe
'7828960' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMO' 'sip-files00128.tif'
19ac95433e30446a4dad2f69c65221f6
cca4454b801ac83449aa164f6f88e6b8fe6ddff8
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMP' 'sip-files00128.txt'
ef7bfb9ed6ab89b7288ed543576e6157
db8b01c1e0f194c91b6016b001586b8bcbaf793f
describe
'36831' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMQ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
2bbdcb9ccd927bade9ec862ca66814c3
bce308935d75c3fbc476ae701968cc95049109ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMR' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
efbb268d9d9ab26fca6f206840e63178
dfd9f2c46f44dd89d4365c7afd2b5983593655c4
describe
'144816' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMS' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
e49a3b4fe8e13602fd1666e627d7b359
bc0c335eade1dede84bb5135cbdd5a5a5f3ebc30
describe
'35176' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMT' 'sip-files00129.pro'
2b2dff8be4815420cc191fe99fcbf995
80fbeb56b96abd3e2139bdaf5ec945b98a449a0d
describe
'70641' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMU' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
e6bd8e7d633d62f905ab13e28c87dec6
d7cd062ab3bb8e2956a5399a1ff85dd39a644ce5
'2012-03-31T09:27:20-04:00'
describe
'7843828' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMV' 'sip-files00129.tif'
12c4316332204bee1afaa70f52a5daf1
509ebb7fddd418f57ca0d1b48ff0a4b44417cd94
'2012-03-31T09:30:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMW' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d0e41ecbc14e300cf3ebdae841942cc2
858eb72b3a387aacdca6815d811bbbe110cf5720
describe
'37252' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMX' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
1f978a2b3848c0663a2845383a11fcf1
85a3ef3b672a003fece0e0082b12681d3ec4747f
describe
'975750' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMY' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
69c8a7e84a2c041a8ce47c0319a74ed4
32dd0f4bbe87847c60f73555588037422e24aed4
describe
'146665' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVMZ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
4423eac6e2dd0ba96fc4bbd6ba39de44
0af16e651c75f2857693fbb4f7e150e2b67575f7
describe
'35502' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNA' 'sip-files00130.pro'
5ed194e39b94c0f336b9b0427962500a
b6206935b30ed9109b7597a4780c017c44ef5dde
describe
'71329' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNB' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
e58744072e22189ac5be6a3a7e00eea5
85e3ef6a777dc48313b34bf4acae6c96e628ef35
describe
'7828824' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNC' 'sip-files00130.tif'
bafe6a0ef97abd1aeb55ed75e876ceb4
3331d51c4d155ef0b2bb35c068f1c5bc2182b647
'2012-03-31T09:27:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVND' 'sip-files00130.txt'
2dedac459ff3f82b44846aa19ccf9f78
6f2be9b6e3985a07f77b18fbd9eb522f2933f8fc
describe
'36472' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNE' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
7b51fbfd5c5808ca6ad656b7aebd90e3
898055e2e0ff8f6ce587412c7813622522f26719
describe
'977608' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNF' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
511ef38f90bdbe5cde6fc6d658595cbf
cd56b727b6c436425a267ed92c78a59d3c6a8f94
describe
'150584' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNG' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
ea57e036ba88dd1400cb1565c80d3f67
0ed5b9661ef54fd602e2266271b56a1d96ae801c
describe
'36366' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNH' 'sip-files00131.pro'
0e044e0e23acd74d78a306d307bb6d63
931e7b7d4081403551f8ecb0292400811e719c6b
describe
'73180' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNI' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
9657999ec55a4d1f06c88fcd8e1f871e
27d25030023016ba648595cab519fd1a74ede83d
describe
'7843968' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNJ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
b8f0e6ffc446c9f9d5c2769d4433699c
74224dbb1d7fe0aaf85d24b08ef5fb9abcb01812
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNK' 'sip-files00131.txt'
4347d53f2b8f3ea413cf01083bd38b2a
d6dc66c731faefe51a85b2c3d3cd9bd68c3a1a20
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNL' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
1d64cfc6f6826560a42cc7529c01c499
afaec666cdabc95adaaf36d67cdcfa399273b54a
'2012-03-31T09:28:21-04:00'
describe
'959053' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNM' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
695acdc35a71cee24f963075242a68bd
43ffb937dc848b5930cb60d9e676a7c6f03b2f33
describe
'129286' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNN' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
41092b43ca1dd1984801edd2be25993e
e217a696f2bf540685e66fcd410ce3a98d24d686
describe
'20845' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNO' 'sip-files00132.pro'
715a44d174ce840e7085f8937573e4a6
7a370497b42883b00a246ba7d48a2433e702b49d
describe
'62787' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNP' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
0359f074a44f8206dcb815b6642b9179
56127f953252778284e828fad67084148ac0d691
'2012-03-31T09:26:02-04:00'
describe
'7828484' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNQ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
c49dd2d794bbc913c47cc4c7a9d5a6d4
6a51117284e4fbb0fb862f81f17afd5a8536713e
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNR' 'sip-files00132.txt'
2bb12e286afcf909f46afd347b8df73b
1dc654f483af61bed004da364ded40c6b90ad233
describe
'34581' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNS' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
c1590b07d049d2517f9c606df4729d51
83db387f01cd6cbded823b13cc2789aab613ea39
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNT' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
45b1726d4d2aa7b1a55c175e37743e6f
e35b20f5dce69bcebf68ae670aac11fa9abed386
'2012-03-31T09:29:57-04:00'
describe
'151155' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNU' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
a09b93398350a8d5f68ea4a7e1f19b31
b9ee346a41ff326387b63ba6eab8cce04e2f1c5a
describe
'35679' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNV' 'sip-files00133.pro'
6e8afbd86929edd32c32f3c12703c12a
960c221afbdb2df40a8f429e6b6e5f933ab92266
describe
'73387' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNW' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
d02032ccf503e73a150746c69187aceb
64db1e00a643c1acf914f9a57933675e5617974b
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNX' 'sip-files00133.tif'
9c9ccdfd0a63ef34932d834ccc98407d
2feb039920c5d55529e52d70b1f0e0514dc3ee8f
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNY' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d7d511d1bbdda815db96932bacbc6674
f4b03716e199b4870cf6b7f3562db0ed15c74a9f
describe
'38002' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVNZ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
a62bd4fcf417bd4d2fdcaba81e7bf006
4a51177a6e8809d6635f845a46405f1ac7bc7ae1
describe
'975721' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOA' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
3ac39567cec7ad1a6998daf129fc6532
b870c258f9d61c03b0ad3f464c874fe99438db23
describe
'152094' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOB' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
7ae9b737347b577b4e44014545dc2bb0
8df06c60e36c78c49960398e35450986ae2f6e2b
describe
'36665' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOC' 'sip-files00134.pro'
f6cd85558b90d1f439c866aee5b13601
3202361aa2b51301abe1667c89368368da733914
describe
'73451' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOD' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
c7575ea962d5442d8d0ab29b48f79914
25888fc76660141b75300374553f32187bfacff9
'2012-03-31T09:29:51-04:00'
describe
'7829360' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOE' 'sip-files00134.tif'
f52c212bb82cf96f1a03cfcdde84d8f0
abe602ef0f23da726ffa2361295c1eb9c363bf9b
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOF' 'sip-files00134.txt'
4b074a78e68671e860b2b6d6555877fc
44f7c88eb157de61cff8e550c8e638f3d2be664e
describe
'38037' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOG' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
a29cbf1058c337d165e1eb784432358f
4a536e64f24f7805d7a51a312fec59ee2009ab36
describe
'910245' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOH' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
c8b2cb759793b278d526e6d0926de524
c0a28c34bb23986b6a67757b39c177fcee7b490a
describe
'138611' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOI' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
acb631fc3ecd5e82ae6d3d74461001d9
ad023e7637f428a6b81ab15003c8cd73dca70c8b
describe
'35855' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOJ' 'sip-files00135.pro'
17a73af5e06ca3f04d0e00ac0b8e22e9
9a049d0fb1ca29fa685d6499c589246b3c20969e
describe
'70268' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOK' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
0c45fdcb5c6f809284d661c0218b1583
39430b5faf7e115295ae2f766c98d9b54a85d34c
describe
'7873976' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOL' 'sip-files00135.tif'
655e053a520f0f32d07fb7c0d0ad69fc
c81cd2c41ee31f7cb01990abe649f48dd834249e
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOM' 'sip-files00135.txt'
9b68c88359a03fa26e39673c400cbaed
bada8129561281a2ac60aa6ffefe79bd5bb63bbd
describe
'36249' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVON' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
4f73037128c66456d0947133311d63ef
63fcdf8cdca5ad276fbfb74a5f51d43405e94905
describe
'959865' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOO' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
8bacbd88411ace83c1038c44841bf70c
12b9735deb1658e5227151805aaa4785f0e00df9
describe
'141884' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOP' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
567d801c7e008b97ac72037e7c94c0b6
00c70c28348cca2d9b760da38c0291aa4df5469e
describe
'36149' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOQ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
2c869a8683b0c572c5766a4783c01e92
32a77cbdbb3a4bc11d98405bf66a7febd52ddff3
describe
'71174' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOR' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
60bd839c49890fd55e2a64ac4643b2e0
d0ccc6db5f37aeddb27fd69c1192531a693eac85
describe
'7758516' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOS' 'sip-files00136.tif'
54f0914dc659994cb9cd00e17fc44d13
0409bd12a3400416b82d90e7ec4a6698436b7782
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOT' 'sip-files00136.txt'
0749c1b35e4125963812033f011d37f4
bace8419881869476f83d9bc8c0c04648c0cc502
describe
'37401' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOU' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
e77f5e3826d615ee1eb2401a1bc4d013
c3502095fce373ec3a76f6dd8efb17389d3d1408
'2012-03-31T09:25:07-04:00'
describe
'954116' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOV' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
8a3db560dc1342fb9d995f8fb005e846
b59cc950052255e6a119390dacf976e86f80511a
describe
'146006' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOW' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
56bd3cf18f5af2c0ae53edbbb1229d75
167443a270312dac9a76032784488c82e3830775
describe
'36463' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOX' 'sip-files00137.pro'
9f4f08cd9fd1e69ddb565f8d23ef58b2
600f669a951a521547951a8db8ee3da96bda0f8f
describe
'73458' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOY' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
ad150aa1b0f0c6399306a696f0cdf97a
d467822d2be918c80e7cd5b1f1dff95566ae628b
describe
'7874560' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVOZ' 'sip-files00137.tif'
a98902cce9f2f8825c4bda78ea5e9543
e517a0b41020f2f5f9ac9515fed4475992df14a9
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPA' 'sip-files00137.txt'
d8b95ecb3f8754034419c6301e78e70e
a6afdbd3db36924f579eca49e452454a9403b291
describe
'37885' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPB' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
17abdcb4421b0b3db947c8098da1e726
785e0c3f7f6f9c78a60e02766343c2d470d36ca7
describe
'966969' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPC' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
856a316e23c8130526acba574f8195b7
01ff0eb649bd6694f9a2e0bc42b2705c39adcd04
describe
'145656' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPD' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
3eb46797a193947a827ee81baf47d162
51b4b64a70c463938d472ba4109d1182607874bc
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPE' 'sip-files00138.pro'
1f3efff6975e7b3e5eb9c13e4f0ccd80
6e6857e76613f76f131bc4bba821e3efda75532e
describe
'73024' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPF' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
56c348c1d04bf9462b98e2ed6b5a2256
3b4374e54e83109977cfa281a7a221413c16ef5f
'2012-03-31T09:25:08-04:00'
describe
'7758664' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPG' 'sip-files00138.tif'
8001d07a4cd3aef1f8874ce100980c37
e8341d117db2e0d9d7a8ad03e66f9889ebd225a1
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPH' 'sip-files00138.txt'
2deda7bce1b7bebf729058e8b4d32255
83584fba86b43594c8497e9ccd9b81f8c698dc87
describe
'38042' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPI' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
2e62b8b926696cad2b946d5d58f08a36
58236e2b178ab485ffa20d3c3ae70219f74e9c00
describe
'981432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPJ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
1c677b59e3f90bcf7ed67043c299b3be
692f50dc35eb780d9cdf2c52c648c3b033f250a9
describe
'146369' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPK' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
e62ecc4685859d91f1f46160f60910da
03eaa74a18202d76d50e9ae20d18adefb6bce005
describe
'36499' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPL' 'sip-files00139.pro'
67abd7ff7fb6d5e0046c992fc2489f4e
231894548c2f4eddde51c0d3658a4cb2dc069cca
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPM' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
62ce0af602ea21c37a5959df64a5d928
2111b3cdfbab6912450f1e3d71d72cbf5057bff5
describe
'7874020' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPN' 'sip-files00139.tif'
36fdf8243d3198505e4467c14d97ea87
ba8112bb8323c0f421645ab4ee57e2dc75fc2b3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPO' 'sip-files00139.txt'
c618dc13fd9b2f7205d08cce214910df
9eff8fdc4331db0da52a4d818d7855fb57c0a14f
describe
'36681' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPP' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
afa5fc9fa7c8bbf2b03edf4a023c8ec6
de3bb99de82c8f2fcd6f4cc15e0df5c8ea76fd72
describe
'966843' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPQ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
b6ddd34c82495d9d36a6eaceeb8f6532
f5f545e159638e5640175fb13b60152b0d37f66d
describe
'148714' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPR' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
749eaa83b997d2e0527728f9bb106680
c7c52a866f210893e572e9439448f2f0c9046d19
describe
'36764' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPS' 'sip-files00140.pro'
b308ccba2718be0c5173bb3c01c4b4c0
43566d03e3e3c99991bc0a812a2f588872127e3a
describe
'73317' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPT' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
8bdb10cc6a67d9494527b4cbeea914a0
3a598ea6533a99e6d72339f17bd30ada78dcb0c0
describe
'7758824' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPU' 'sip-files00140.tif'
11814cfc5c8922800f942fe8136730c5
dc9db97cac5ec6caf77d23a0f81daab9a7dc5dea
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPV' 'sip-files00140.txt'
948108b3f122f41f389a8a013668b2aa
a3eec67ea76da0132cfed114ae7e426836c8fdef
describe
'38228' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPW' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
232de4c767fa771249df45d4609814f1
9e5e1bac78845cb2e53c2418ff87f7e7eee279e2
describe
'981435' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPX' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
4493dd895714695740238969d14bef77
151a1f822b85e2dde5d045a8a80c8bd36181fa22
describe
'146312' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPY' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
efe5927e4a9aa0be675c8511e3d6863c
e589a2bfa4afa9c9843285297fd6b211dd72cfec
describe
'36195' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVPZ' 'sip-files00141.pro'
ccb0849f7b7abb37a8529a0f346ff35a
955e288a7e7b230e52918698bb842906ba3abad8
describe
'71793' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQA' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
ad817cf54c843de2b11d7e46897bb29b
54ba9aa0ed46aca6c159935eddf7ff512b79066c
describe
'7874448' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQB' 'sip-files00141.tif'
3260ad046ac825be9591c5266dd4b2ba
a95dd5a7947fa4fd90e45bbe69f3529633463912
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQC' 'sip-files00141.txt'
7ff2f0e123c44a493a419aa63508c43a
f91b5bbb8359e5e1fca477db56c6feeaf9765085
describe
'37127' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQD' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
9e8b17f86280fb1939fe7788b932a941
13dd91089146bb74fb461dd4e47868540f48edb9
describe
'966963' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQE' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
9ef7e4b3c2a2fe4ad0423a40d218c1df
d3fc72594d5ba75009d81d716d95cc8db770b7bb
describe
'139615' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQF' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
11ac49ebe485e10f5784569f2096f04b
101036e11abfcc42c0a757c23d2eecdae5e61299
describe
'34487' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQG' 'sip-files00142.pro'
aacfc0e42b279a60a91756a3793f202a
e2c8f0a0e9c99223893d8adc28cd5c544fc7725f
describe
'68827' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQH' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
caa8f1ad260d3336b8d4526b6c1a9630
347e9318cdb2f44682744aeee3a23ec421aa450f
describe
'7758508' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQI' 'sip-files00142.tif'
4219e97879850d309dc9d18f0a122f4b
ea56ddbf3337a582f35a69807cf024df579bb56f
'2012-03-31T09:26:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQJ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
b910002cfd7a71c8b4b7772cfbe7d006
6f2041548551355efde69c7250e70de2d6321092
describe
'37181' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQK' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
a02e764c82474e3f83717906d1610965
30e6e8ba21e792235fe24cdf33526cbf0a806310
describe
'981420' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQL' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
493798479b7cc46b55f083f6cf1f83f8
b713e650aa00fb1393b76c4b15de89208125eb7c
describe
'148143' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQM' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
ed0360d29fef81de29d217c8de51c24b
245198010f1d95f188cc277901af4412b441217d
'2012-03-31T09:25:10-04:00'
describe
'37297' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQN' 'sip-files00143.pro'
c6e13e6852be6d3e9e8f02c4ef9decd1
dd7f9c02db67202ff5d742fb754e8a320414a57b
describe
'73231' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQO' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
43b11add27fc2fc812ad267fe5cd9bad
4f9a8f9cfc2c27eade509848cbf6813a87003322
describe
'7874540' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQP' 'sip-files00143.tif'
2f78b61da24ba6c181317081dc6ae9d3
f72343816b778ebebbe9cf73c967e1a4f59acb07
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQQ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
05af0b6e319eb83beee5941821176984
0a9c518967c8fc244f4f82fc78b684d1cca64bf5
describe
'37377' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQR' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
df259779cc58c5d9ebafa7ef6efb3d14
6aa7e950f6ba298b23d1416709553aa29582f641
describe
'966962' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQS' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
5eb7351f8481327694a9bf9ac286573c
6721379f22de2c654524a0a5888e3559fbfcb8ce
'2012-03-31T09:26:35-04:00'
describe
'146146' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQT' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
d4fb6bb3a78f8fa19dd5ec8d96759a2f
ba57a1c89f8dbb81169166eb0bc6820a7251653c
describe
'35830' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQU' 'sip-files00144.pro'
4c344ffb426b90123d40e7e1ccb78975
b520bd55c0dea0dc78af6aa375fe947ce4025cde
describe
'73238' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQV' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
9980f175d0e12cc5d9d1ef13b30024a4
5449c547ee1069946d274658ab983cd52117da67
describe
'7758900' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQW' 'sip-files00144.tif'
49287ceb54a9c17bad24a5ddff552bc1
b7cb7e95203eb55aa55ecd081375d5a712bfa873
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQX' 'sip-files00144.txt'
42b9ce5a7867b12b9de564137e9006d9
3d0f3eff840b5706374081b2496b8443d516d478
describe
'38541' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQY' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
22063f5dd03d774f804c469d01cb35f5
22f34d44dde693a962c1edf0258e8d7f1f276db4
describe
'962326' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVQZ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
93a7a8a457a976376885a7938f27f1ee
e4bf9fe9a1b91db30c2129ed701224c299a20970
describe
'142993' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRA' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
9d0614fb4d71375b54cff3ba81d0718e
1f9291cdf0f625fd376e0d836fb31343a706771f
describe
'34777' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRB' 'sip-files00145.pro'
b833945f249cfc8d5bf04e5413bbbf93
51f4726e7be3aae4fde7ce64f764ad3d3e80431c
describe
'69745' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRC' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
6a98255b2a8ab87090b53b6ed3c913e9
30fd7258038a18dc06a0bb80ec90e8694c597780
describe
'7874376' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRD' 'sip-files00145.tif'
522e4bbc9c36d5d72c866c7719b19970
c151a4a7e3cd6e9e13da1f73d3139c9f96001bbb
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRE' 'sip-files00145.txt'
f730cbc9badb4aef39c3bc7da93ca893
b1bfc8b725c2ecd966040f316210cca18da2b0c5
describe
'36435' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRF' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
7d04d04dff30a79895ad8a1511490e56
bc19a17c326b7dea57911c6942def77cb6122939
describe
'741305' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRG' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
e469783d12bfef4055f7187c53eccb7e
f868dbf467f11c8205152e52c8f5fd582a20f5fd
describe
'110729' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRH' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
9fe7906d41017c6a35d686c4154d4d89
8090e2b11a4c50ef743dced8ef43070133394e56
describe
'25185' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRI' 'sip-files00146.pro'
682d748eaf65c3b6765a35c8fb994bf4
fddb153072df41bd37daf9ca57f9c904bec27f99
describe
'56476' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRJ' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
9d9fc46779f847f2c9f6fb7034c4b8f0
bec1871e0b54063bd61bdbdf2a54efbf71b5698e
describe
'7757088' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRK' 'sip-files00146.tif'
1814e061c04fb8d0f40b793da76ed487
f3dc00baa80442e3f8d5242976409bc20cfa97df
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRL' 'sip-files00146.txt'
0a86756996b29c7f95e1f03c5c3701e0
b4a449bdd1f193a41f7af03e9692dba3f1c6e1fd
describe
'32201' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRM' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
0094e89ae537c27ec1193e40a9b3f935
0697c9fbeea58a22361bd465c6b8eb59a6ecdd49
describe
'80760' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRN' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
8e3a852ac3198caa064368ebc93fca3f
55d083501e2dbda3d9277514835a1d4ca5c2efe0
describe
'24735' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRO' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
58eb0b3e0fc1eb5a33ff24d9713e5527
ce0de4f38535f7838f836bb6a9e5635131eb2b54
describe
'20474' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRP' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
9c1b17ac8a82edc7c560bfc0ac1bb038
5985c73c880d3182dcfac0f89c3d05c64b162665
'2012-03-31T09:24:01-04:00'
describe
'7869352' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRQ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
4edee17f6b35b0effef7376ae873f64a
c39c965d4d5ee7de514c8d5b110fa802dfd8d8f3
'2012-03-31T09:28:10-04:00'
describe
'19252' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRR' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
94a1cdf2ff5bf5f64185e651a7415214
ae6ff86fabd40e0635fc131e958736acc2024d1e
'2012-03-31T09:27:10-04:00'
describe
'861915' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRS' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
16ce59d82057e3ff350cbef8c08ede38
162a6b30e073468fbc469faedea062dec5e6d66d
describe
'119987' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRT' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
bbb0d434578aaf1bfeecfaafb4e7e804
70431071b8cb5df75268d4776e2257731ecacc3b
describe
'19317' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRU' 'sip-files00148.pro'
7a6340982d145a3f870ee2c79717bbde
2b1458e0d894e33237a6353dc8e40f2501cde34e
describe
'58359' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRV' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
16e399d303c40f3b43de6af0078de24c
657f3cd5bdb0b5d812b8b68a6c9184e6e9bb20db
describe
'7757840' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRW' 'sip-files00148.tif'
bd2171c0405865af92b0804b11a811ff
abe1aa7aabaf3d8346cc6f43ad846743789b781f
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRX' 'sip-files00148.txt'
501c3823851d95c8460d927c07a7f89f
2ad53fdb934b661bbc6dfd6f236a7519bc939260
describe
'33951' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRY' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
4824f9b30656d8234b0c0d9b990bb5e7
c472dcbfb5672f29828c64eb123ae7cdf57985af
describe
'981410' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVRZ' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
a9bb693324000cd42e1b9d72982c7ca8
503987fb6e817f87be787040ff83b006a3d1425a
'2012-03-31T09:27:57-04:00'
describe
'150251' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSA' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
c40e28b0e5e0c2d6d0a2e33516495f67
90d7b72c14682ce8d2c905dbfbf139fdf81923db
describe
'36159' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSB' 'sip-files00149.pro'
1f93ad91463d5b024bb96b0ec79f496b
c87d2f72ac97f950a592174dffcc73a793e89a61
describe
'72811' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSC' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
74ea8b17067ce52851eba6fd03d05291
62030e95d35c8d5ce0f2498993af6f1f2e4f436e
describe
'7874512' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSD' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e5493e5312447fa14eba460d70f2f981
8cadc6b2ed9a3daace87e5f1ecab84e4e259cf27
'2012-03-31T09:29:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSE' 'sip-files00149.txt'
45561fded5e5438e9ed8229be45df07d
c56c97265175eda034a142ec8d797d33ef6fd38b
describe
'37520' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSF' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a51434f0fe9e7459f53dfc11a6ca5ed2
c3c5e7fc3287947342e42e78df8442df2a5d4a7e
describe
'966943' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSG' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
71cffbc6e0302dfe6c98d02404d0d13c
55a000167ccc5361ef3808c92afaab50390a6723
describe
'151037' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSH' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
3ea34ef60d22eb8b4a78305b446d1836
3c47f718d413501aff3e45011f05baeddc23368b
describe
'36518' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSI' 'sip-files00150.pro'
264583bb396ca502e7980806f88a99da
b6df812aad21684e269494ab0a0bac0f0f7f9c7d
describe
'72337' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSJ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
20ff6ac6655be827531161733d75f0cc
addae78051dd17f8be9bde1627b8bf506463e17f
describe
'7758404' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSK' 'sip-files00150.tif'
1167cc477f9a5377a8f08645af7e3bc2
05d8e3fd9a28ee16158bba2acb8fabfb8565569e
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSL' 'sip-files00150.txt'
6c6ac7f2a0af3b40d225afcc6d38430f
2c162be33dcd11568fc752f4ce4d28f261a6f196
describe
'37716' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSM' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
0ea54b9e8442a8b50451ca711a22275d
35266a25a471775106f6a1fe41d43a649211ae0d
describe
'981380' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSN' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
c4aedf416ec5b55be04f73f9183739d0
8507cb9c01b35d85ad051b17dc835962dba037a1
describe
'150088' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSO' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
3a4623e87551daa1984d91c9c48f81ac
5c5c8def3954403d7472d1c7b4dcea4681d1ff5f
describe
'36720' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSP' 'sip-files00151.pro'
c1d4df9da45159496416d23a0d547770
8b51d78a4d38b287739454dce929af54971e2539
describe
'71523' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSQ' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
58ea930b11d09e77f077fb8fe3ddeb58
6dffeab05d26e8788148f3d48165b0dfbf0d8413
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSR' 'sip-files00151.tif'
12463b5e77de2e090f76c498c04a0057
e9e1a6aa3184589cf1cd2dc4f37e885334368862
'2012-03-31T09:29:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSS' 'sip-files00151.txt'
68066bed67d1ec1df1e272615c1d1d3c
b2eb65bf08fb476dfe9865a36195b6d24dde4f72
describe
'35692' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVST' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
b2faf180f5e63e206b91beb9db7d7884
0f0564b255289039f86312d90759832487e21c57
describe
'966968' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSU' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
3211b6e9d02e55bb6569a5f60f591f05
20106401fd35c41d3d18035f0b2bcc602f76bf4f
describe
'149534' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSV' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
4e0eed70012faf3361978b7b925ec333
bdc3164cef62ab01b5a441c2bd8041dcfa5f927e
describe
'36530' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSW' 'sip-files00152.pro'
3f58d9f00ea0d5cf9cc7c968624bd80e
a6025bb39f783f1b64a4e438ab5cfcdd77dd98f9
describe
'71018' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSX' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
51e74dbe7c3afd7444521379e1bc4c68
cd0398313a0ffc74ede84f9ad45a9ab8fe9b060a
describe
'7758292' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSY' 'sip-files00152.tif'
449bc7312c441f8ebb7ddff04502b536
496ad9d831015555a00838f8824c516f2ea11437
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVSZ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
ef4b24258e8366b0793944c1304c645a
61b046b6cfd0d55716415076755a0afe2524b01e
describe
'37165' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTA' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
acb37db5276e378e4cf67a6864383d7c
39fc7715a43ee3845ac57e3307eb08c8933068bd
describe
'981423' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTB' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
3af4e362f746da159a7a09823787df0a
61f4aab979437487d1d1a1f09b563fecf16dba9c
describe
'147143' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTC' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
98e04e1ab000c5136fa6e9c8f21c4065
b98fe9a7106b6a946cfad234e9f6ead43dd3ec57
describe
'35644' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTD' 'sip-files00153.pro'
f924c05bf2767c01e6ba4fcdd4191835
0aa4f937120098b2d8e5f7a3bd99f02a3216fe8b
describe
'70790' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTE' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
efe6229da83ed0d1b770708ff9840a50
ff093986fdc28380111b9e7a690b1cede0b7021b
describe
'7874240' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTF' 'sip-files00153.tif'
74929fe72bf99cddcdbab0e07b45b611
f4aec78dbbd779daaab63f9477accf62d3722f64
'2012-03-31T09:30:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTG' 'sip-files00153.txt'
b7c179f11a536a10a809fdc1a4965a5f
d06d7e7da912d197ee91634021ad25130cee257c
describe
'36921' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTH' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
de725c7bacc131c82bf30b25e5afde01
84156b338ce297fc43d5bd10c92c64a24264ff3f
describe
'966966' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTI' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
800b1d4b34123c3a9c7fe593f46f3dbf
de0735d6696afb8333f52e48ccb1b7cf00629835
describe
'151190' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTJ' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
0eb9654ed850b5e59680e8f3e97b3a74
d78291de0e5da3d609d90a321e7de799bb42fa2e
describe
'37453' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTK' 'sip-files00154.pro'
8046487e3483a0708f7440202605f76b
5b10a25487c38db3d51b3ed05dca2d4229d2d5c5
describe
'72177' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTL' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
64270110222d1aa9d581f65c9a3aaf8f
125a329950c815841ad4b09eff531ef77cb96f62
describe
'7758212' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTM' 'sip-files00154.tif'
391c4776089afc05ddba514a3d0b318a
888073826cd41b6a84515b24ce9bc3855593560d
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTN' 'sip-files00154.txt'
d1f67ce618a228c2519d2197e1488fdf
ee5f06f0a4b108a083ea98436b69ae12d927dec1
describe
'37130' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTO' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
7548175af15616b8a27f74e168317cb2
ceb259448678fe24cbc1601b7e4f4ca8a2c16745
describe
'981417' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTP' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
a3279a93c156d0c2b4c7fdbbc1abfe8a
30a47e3924dd25f37c9126885ee3dc76698af6e7
describe
'142793' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTQ' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
bfe75ebc091327e6c0ca7539a3238683
0426ecc0e21189d066a7bc912dea9bdde24a9502
describe
'34751' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTR' 'sip-files00155.pro'
295aeca395022b8d7aaae95507d9eeda
c28ab77d7913c96e4bdf68e009323548a57baf3c
describe
'70090' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTS' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
62cecfee053cc9549b193f8f2ebc6c07
005cd6889f9cb429117662d650f227d63f7e91ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTT' 'sip-files00155.tif'
db7e3aa7bd42109ef20dec11d8cd2d7c
b47c882cadc13f8d82eea687c12964ff0aa01a0f
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTU' 'sip-files00155.txt'
8cb2204a9ffffe9d5682c3873b48a4b0
f37b28b6ba9aa28cb89a4ce5c15286348bc5d5af
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTV' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
b6fb1f1c05536994872e5f5e6949bc84
a87ed1e1d8c7f9993498f9f988f3dca285527beb
describe
'966972' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTW' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
116e2b974880e55420c25430b3c8f6a7
4a33dc7f423661edac07db75b7fa6b66cff8f6aa
describe
'152444' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTX' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
140e0c6b0e6e042d428f72ae4ea5f3c6
04f696695532ae0dac8b760396d4634d824c7b83
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTY' 'sip-files00156.pro'
92e0a4a0ac54688c9c691e58496abef1
16d6bfc62c5b01464a7666dc27dd9855f1a251b9
describe
'72488' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVTZ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
b9c65245844e46a46f934b08b3057379
02dce67d9214209a1fdaad59074e49064658f5a6
describe
'7758524' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUA' 'sip-files00156.tif'
735b2287024d9b99ac88b1b2f1fb7b9b
e7a9e48d4f0f711e678e4e2cc53469beb615c4f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUB' 'sip-files00156.txt'
ffc5618f13cefa66e746c022623e9e6b
f52a762d3c3cc5c9b557f5b82452b96e5bd37b8b
describe
'37709' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUC' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
c7ca2ef91c86f8abe4436f893f2470df
2caddfe695994b673841cc84cb5e893894865fe8
describe
'959274' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUD' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
b38dacde7354e5e596a108c71e566b4a
31d0290cb61d96f4c96b2838e81b9cceadbcbdd2
describe
'143993' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUE' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
219c0c03252b1dcc9a3081264773a012
61b631ffbb8e367ebf4863e273be8858b37cbc6c
describe
'34420' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUF' 'sip-files00157.pro'
9cc1a0504452802bcc8fea12b45f72dd
893bcb4142f956552a96c82f305fc3bed1d5c4e5
describe
'70064' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUG' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
e940d9d56db7599190dbfa5f12b397ed
85388b9be92f2576a0216ec1dc2773d85ebc2487
describe
'7873992' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUH' 'sip-files00157.tif'
8cdd4203552b0e62e73a582f182e3ff1
9782c890ddd84fefdd256be9d0d3dac28d6f4960
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUI' 'sip-files00157.txt'
f438bf4ff797fd838202485088e261e7
c13832193bb60b70a03ebbb4e82af7eee5e27807
describe
'36235' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUJ' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
ba450195e61b495ffde8480fc2e54c52
c52b2b7a530ff355e37c314ca43d0602e69449bc
describe
'966964' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUK' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
a0c9807a9b14ff8c10f3a1b62b2b4235
f3c8ecda5ce0d5e39169929f60363749993d5496
describe
'143083' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUL' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
57f0dcab81995d05442c258069ef13c4
23962d9a210569fa3dfb548d8e13358442dd8518
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUM' 'sip-files00158.pro'
60a30ee57aa8b40ec49fa865363f75b2
35b90bf034eb298b96f7c09c24be12fee8321728
describe
'69224' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUN' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
6255e2916830c5eb105f9d0344f87ee4
6b4e32145ac6a9103b7e2a412734051c1acafe60
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUO' 'sip-files00158.tif'
83cb378d75f06b2dca2f2f07630ee697
f74a7f21e094c8a406ed88f465f174e11c61ee9a
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUP' 'sip-files00158.txt'
f4794843081e81378160cee13b930fd5
8364836ec35f1abdf072df75218c431de998536e
describe
'37422' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUQ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
57319b12433b6293aae7e14457d8ec75
8e919597c3cb6a30307d272f03446e23e3e77a62
describe
'937836' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUR' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
56307637bf2fec3b9fcb461b36b538cd
cc12c00a07ec2fd3894937ff521f2ddf822ceff6
describe
'140331' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUS' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
e57eb8121782a92c46e8f25017d7a633
4d0ea67bb2c3d535e958215f096ecdddf0bf7703
describe
'34473' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUT' 'sip-files00159.pro'
129786b4f21cae26e020412801f07ca2
6a97967cc2294b650e5350bdef6540bceeeaa8c9
describe
'69266' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUU' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
45bc8c75e997022753c7bbdf64d6a86c
11b4049e5e20fa6bcce6e8e83a31f35731860b6c
describe
'7873676' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUV' 'sip-files00159.tif'
a2bac9679ef186a40fcd2e8dd836b3e0
6a6e248a328e868990e15325b7fa8ad19bf30213
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUW' 'sip-files00159.txt'
b6db3963501f010771e155b56c791167
6f449df113fb8d20a9b019194b4418e91b9dd83d
describe
'35339' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUX' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
b0ab8cc988c6d132fdd33f34ca3beaee
327a55ab1c27b9467a02d7e0cdd602c22e1e5e3e
describe
'966967' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUY' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
32c837d8110a42c3cfe7eb61159caf21
b587709646e85ce0418ef054d3c1d26de247fea1
describe
'144885' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVUZ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
812f77c84e7ccae31fa7f9493d9dd34a
644d0ccfe71a37f99408762de96776845cbf8172
describe
'35379' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVA' 'sip-files00160.pro'
6c5d9ea628212962d6d451419792aff9
1ec99324b394b20a657f6ff399d1b9bb4977f554
describe
'69981' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVB' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
91cce1ebdf9c1889f3f09b063e2ceb41
6914a70461a51dea38586474f1f59c1a751d1aa1
describe
'7758328' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVC' 'sip-files00160.tif'
ff62cef01b322ac182bb41221b83628c
e28516eab8f264ba7d759bc88842cc3ef2a6442a
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVD' 'sip-files00160.txt'
b5dabab699d8d2b984a85074fc334069
5e190685340af43b418d0d9c3b2c1b05ef0f3359
describe
'36861' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVE' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
b5fe3ef41e46fa9b2b7f99a5929745fb
149d8d046431c9da3222801a4ef2501f89ca8a95
describe
'928499' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVF' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
395216ed9cbda62042ad1d5459a90159
52a62685690d97d35d08b39e1d9b4bf768696e50
describe
'137997' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVG' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
54ac7fcf5d0e79abca23239894dc8213
23b17c6ce250f0e5dbd55c1c52869c3114b6592a
describe
'33033' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVH' 'sip-files00161.pro'
26adc8117d41d9770ba00d97fbd26622
b2b66f3d7d50e8b1a33588d5120c4013ec3771e3
describe
'66895' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVI' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
ff219c34a97953fa76b98292b08b1efe
de716c417099b028b52790e84cf9d1c189c620d0
describe
'7874028' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVJ' 'sip-files00161.tif'
8a674c25ef2c35cbffdb2af0f67114ef
efae1eccf4f9b70aa96e6fc4c6fa72e080a78c9c
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVK' 'sip-files00161.txt'
c1d5368eb8569f739efd68b014d3d0f6
efdebd3dc0ae38ba00b38c85c52860ec9e2466eb
describe
'35618' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVL' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
c8ff366c034279535b5dbd00d1475e1c
a3e9482bf07917939ecdc445bbf5bed76715934f
describe
'966965' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVM' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
bf55f14fe45e4c1b6a5dcaddebc68d74
3fa420b9ff83e7e646b3074d5cb0d22a032a9035
describe
'144497' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVN' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
a2756163c2fa6562f3f62913153e8595
6651c840dc3a2e7c801db665ef9a6a03003aa5b8
describe
'34752' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVO' 'sip-files00162.pro'
b8f3721b7b31ade7d6cddad617c111bf
75b5e924ecf6a1047d2e62c71172c2ffacb09fc7
describe
'71392' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVP' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
e60cde012fccfe3934ea1a0220d58330
18eb3c904d47495c46f208bdea3d1a49c1481444
describe
'7758344' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVQ' 'sip-files00162.tif'
80817d78d0a97819366e792726bf00d1
99172755a720cab89cd973382a4f84a80347c306
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVR' 'sip-files00162.txt'
33492b7b66c69edb1c34d292497393d2
70bba80f246a13bceefc1cc424cb6d2f9da4bf31
describe
'37163' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVS' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
ea1b7fb4f5de53686d2494a0e0477526
c9466f5febbe8db2b583ae07f2e0f55b13b763cc
describe
'981412' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVT' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
4b57f4eb8b77784f9f7f5186c3fb1735
6d6d7cd7b7a3aec94cd82783d927395e3a70beb1
describe
'147973' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVU' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
5a1cc9bff5090e7408bfecf54abaa6a0
31a3789336f6203c24bb35bfdd848e393bf1055e
describe
'37134' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVV' 'sip-files00163.pro'
76122f8430b6d8778fed8bfa8f89d325
8bfad0884d71f1f0de5463f8c93fc971438e751a
describe
'70871' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVW' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
84fc509825c6cb46cd23da6fc0614f7a
462584472bc1e028be0f679e74a54ff72b58d8e7
describe
'7873764' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVX' 'sip-files00163.tif'
4ae388f6370d7e42e4f6341b011e43b0
9967d872066c59fd3ee3f2cdee74037ad9fd0301
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVY' 'sip-files00163.txt'
1bb6b634613c3719f0b4e8628a7e6d22
a09452f7c1bcd00dae1fa6b70456fc2d04c21265
describe
'35756' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVVZ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
0de8006b771393b232b0cb5f3e4d0810
745c87307187df9151f9f3818738fe192799bd92
describe
'966940' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWA' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
06c865649f36c164f3016060f56433e6
2afe855eda593fc4ebe3ae79169c67c10cf475a3
describe
'143123' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWB' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
8ae44cf5877628320b6655aa7dbed75f
63d1315c846e4bd928d10956eda6f9bfd61abb3e
describe
'35089' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWC' 'sip-files00164.pro'
92c9f4b5258e82c8cdc6ab2653daf4fe
1240f3c24e06ab3e7e5c28c357779b0308cd19d0
describe
'68565' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWD' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
589dc7980dc3d6a15eaf1ed7e5fa0908
0bc1140862f2fac812a25ee68cb2fa0c07d26938
describe
'7758168' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWE' 'sip-files00164.tif'
3f250337cb048e7e139ca53003578b47
258f58eb4ef841bce5d39654611df51ecfdd61d1
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWF' 'sip-files00164.txt'
10732b9ea23ba8c283525d21178f0765
2e280645a7f8485ba3707e5cce9346491b938b6c
describe
'36590' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWG' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
b4d58ae0bdcb6e40a5b8331f279184e2
3555ec0cc1b8516d15aa9c760bb1107d2a167a75
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWH' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
312a33d9382ab23edde643b5f02b74f6
933be3ce2893e3f196fdbe3d500dc5aaa130d571
describe
'148479' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWI' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
0a3e048edad9fef8a49cfa0b8c37e35f
96d05f6f5c8bce986d73377f2eb331daca22b4bd
describe
'36380' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWJ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
02cdf248ae58cdbd2ff27c2ac1ea3c8c
f7ec2354a9308ffb804aafd95a2eaae9da303be7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWK' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
0553a6adcc56c377fe7a6d0fd443ced6
48fc13529b9358af2ebb9a24eed5673dc90fc191
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWL' 'sip-files00165.tif'
4dcde4c4792690166bb824efb9cd93c7
95cf8b8a441fb6696517464b1d2a730d36fe3a3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWM' 'sip-files00165.txt'
19f5a5b3567930e9a175a3929b34bcc8
66cb6d25bb2968eb3cd5ad8b5ae2ed66222abaa9
describe
'36022' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWN' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
52ca058644cc240c1faac6625c362ea2
d84c4aafbe897a9f78e6c272a19b45cbbb342108
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWO' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
7aba4b44684c2449f04f8d796e8a6bc6
fe85a60a5884d6605fb50bc2bb650bc74a2614c2
describe
'143589' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWP' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
734837bb5327e8c67f49fe36f39c2829
a2415f4bfa541092a5db428f0d09e616e014ebdf
describe
'35556' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWQ' 'sip-files00166.pro'
fb5a7c6cc287cac8c8d0df1b1f6b6938
bf0e11f27bbc5eb575caa88d6b1fc6ae7b31d6bc
describe
'69655' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWR' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
5b5c656a32bcb8e581b60c4038b19287
d81432872d4692aa31a0d9aa87a3ff2b97e8908c
describe
'7758316' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWS' 'sip-files00166.tif'
6317c3823dbe44d1e02b8f68ce2cb3cd
e975504ac38374895b5add1830f2b6123769e9a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWT' 'sip-files00166.txt'
4292d32fa51336afea8c51696eced595
a925ed84a4be63e6a399d00e7e1636c521a0923d
describe
Invalid character
'36794' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWU' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
0c50e69116a87ab73c1a1bb7d7dd3547
0a6638564406e4f0b3fa8a5f39561855e9477524
describe
'981411' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWV' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
8bd8fe1684c570fad83d53acf09cedc5
6f906ddf466eee7f4ffbf4baf0e949ba1a330b40
describe
'144576' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWW' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
9f3d8dccf61d38f561d9e5f7d706629a
5703cef5c3817c328a66090675817b9f9d2d0465
'2012-03-31T09:28:07-04:00'
describe
'35654' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWX' 'sip-files00167.pro'
d9a12242c10ee827288869ecfb5013d7
c0558e95f259659711eed670119832395be954e1
describe
'70153' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWY' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
7fd5cc319bc73f26bebdbd68488c5022
4fc0d68af60052c8ce984bec03d9c81cdd8748a2
describe
'7874160' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVWZ' 'sip-files00167.tif'
772d3d096043c49ea6a544b7940a516a
8dd07f0126086d0a23ca503a85687efe1807838a
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXA' 'sip-files00167.txt'
505d1092385a60c809a4f465021b0613
6671a038f9a852a75a4933998537e1c1dbbba75d
describe
'36480' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXB' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
5afdf837855ff3ad7995f19efab0c58b
18e8e9b1bb7af46df4e6e3bd289f5c9d15e88b4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXC' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
f17f4a3c49a332a9be59e8a19d36b911
d18c22e19b68467a2ffb82d7327e337ea24adfc6
describe
'146894' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXD' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
a963f70d1200814a7bc003356ce5d159
dac0dad1ede1f10ae33720286d718ef56905f1b1
describe
'36008' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXE' 'sip-files00168.pro'
ce4654743d6109e27ccd624604acd3a5
5f531abdb83ca88da433bb77931b0c487772ee53
describe
'70631' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXF' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
6b2fc77eb74e10af0e4172f16e081795
63dc8fcc05684e74931e251dbb63f7077e742ba3
describe
'7758476' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXG' 'sip-files00168.tif'
ddb9964ba7a31c5aa094024a59903bcc
ab160be97f561a01d65fcb5728cd4da453cdc1a2
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXH' 'sip-files00168.txt'
2097b0db2e767c25838d199bfc9e6fff
acbcde114db745fc851b25506a83a02c47dc6e66
describe
'37131' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXI' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
94b5a58967c145d808e317fa9b209818
cd077fbb7555595e6b7aef62c00cc3a178a61d24
describe
'933921' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXJ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
3226ae8ef4bcb5146f65534105804ecf
3fb5f4b5e6d920164409d5005a51d5f86050549d
describe
'143424' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXK' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
39913a4932bbf4a6a462345fac4f619b
a4e6d24417333e49014ce3d8a4c5298a3e9fae9d
describe
'35285' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXL' 'sip-files00169.pro'
36ee1f6d731a8527866ac893c7c5c78b
42cb572bd47edbc946de1fc672de73e7954fb579
describe
'69518' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXM' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
d6b2795fd96936f09586cf071cd3a9a5
0b1f032d1e2a1758014cb7b90667776738e8ddad
describe
'7493904' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXN' 'sip-files00169.tif'
7d155f426ed39e2475eeb14fcbaa14ff
848f41906c65b48e590be2a42a018792c08dd429
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXO' 'sip-files00169.txt'
f4db8ea6c5be96b6d46ea555fa12936f
0d4ea3301b98c607424607ad104175074ef1b563
describe
'37146' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXP' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
75e0d5427b33e08e9e862185cc298d08
67a95c2afd68522ec70e8ca581d3927ec78deec0
describe
'966944' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXQ' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
cd720f8e90bc55e3d22020585065ae9d
b8133c13228d6219596ebf64d896335a3e939ea6
'2012-03-31T09:27:54-04:00'
describe
'147432' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXR' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
9f6ef0944b5d38e690a4b59ebd097847
f1a0199e2668552459fa8c535b0ff7efb9a7891a
describe
'35443' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXS' 'sip-files00170.pro'
f78b9e0cddaec328fcecf84616b5af27
40e961136995237433e31a8c0d240d060ba2f713
describe
'72020' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXT' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
535cce6ec4de71d0f5190d6c7a2ae710
4c3287e6f79425488c161a082b8c66cee70f73fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXU' 'sip-files00170.tif'
8f555bef151cbdaf08bd7c447d54f057
fc4f6eb03b913b7e576d0c1cb7a7eab396cd14d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXV' 'sip-files00170.txt'
6e8899e88617a975aba5c34799404d6c
16fd260f70f25571b96f00bb0ae7b94329bfb8df
describe
Invalid character
'37840' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXW' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
bb046b56d7840107f5bcb96efcf93b44
c61b3c7deecc262e1a9a02766f2ceaf22c1349ae
describe
'924365' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXX' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
12d347130816274c5aeb8800eadc50d0
2526aea8e5f12aad9ff1e5aff2885b738aa03a01
describe
'140833' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXY' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
42c77b5dbc0e39f9116da2b3cd1e6653
c10b3ef4d3b85eced3eca28976d7cf251f172a15
describe
'34725' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVXZ' 'sip-files00171.pro'
8b62dacf24fdbfb7232c2e0b2509f266
a8569bf2212885eaf0a5b19bda3bbebdfdc11102
describe
'68737' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYA' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
7fc6b4a1c41fdfe44d9dce7dc93a589b
931c6cf7a32845e5afe3151c23fe65ff1f99c897
describe
'7417480' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYB' 'sip-files00171.tif'
b365151b82f101b5a0c3814c49fdeb07
c0abd3a3900643300f06eadeb4310dff893409e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYC' 'sip-files00171.txt'
f65e9377b09cb9016980eb17d4a9a671
f30edc5c36a65f2af6dd06edcd90e76eb606af38
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYD' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
9942417cfbea016d04593812ff731203
c02aa6ad4cce134dc6c722f3c37915bee8935540
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYE' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
ae35e8e3ba88e268686cc81bd584171b
2863665047c17113e9d673b0e48f3f0e9d0f8391
describe
'148286' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYF' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
5466fe62f1e08a69475db1cdda786dc3
f8dc2d579a41edb81eea64cbdc2227d8d5aee22a
describe
'35244' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYG' 'sip-files00172.pro'
ca15e33cdf5724b92bdce08847c255c0
510ef1ead56a431e683dac6679b38fe069130efa
describe
'70660' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYH' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
bd8561d5009acb2c0cdc29d6b585560f
a1f366e348afc3b67399ff1ec6b44a74c4ee51ad
describe
'7758332' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYI' 'sip-files00172.tif'
4fe1b2c40fd03d74cf393c2a4fe09e54
4a7209bb3cc40f0e7fc634dfffea9aeb6cd0eab4
describe
'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYJ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
e97887d24fe3e6890c170bb7008ad9d9
2ec5756491b0cd21e56c89a4b15a9975a263b985
describe
'37382' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYK' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
4b0f14871c780fba6f4f9372807f92d0
6a0a3a4509baafd2422360880526eec47f954a24
describe
'928405' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYL' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
d768bcb7c4fd94fee6233bb0a255d417
6b273e86f85717bb670b184d5f16c9eac6b2e8f7
describe
'147060' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYM' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
de9461318c8d3737858d50ea0736bc95
d7a5e1d91ef4d1f30e4cd1fd09c4adfec46ab0b7
describe
'35274' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYN' 'sip-files00173.pro'
cc0ef2dd5751be63e0096b8903a9a264
0d23269d6f69f4be9109de7d4cd55abefd9191c9
describe
'71659' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYO' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
325237d38a13eb3c9ccd0955a28d375b
826b6977252bc7cdc4a97a2cbcac73bc036f2807
describe
'7450020' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYP' 'sip-files00173.tif'
98e6ba2311cab5dd1bce3e8194aa83df
497eb913df5e70a20d33745a701a306093296b54
'2012-03-31T09:30:33-04:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYQ' 'sip-files00173.txt'
10c8ea535d6aa547d801c39621f9ccaf
e657caab82052822b29326722e1e263503fdcdb2
describe
'38169' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYR' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
1a784a431f60690d3f523fdda947a4a3
fd1d3349d6b5f7489baaeec6713b66d6cc733d6f
describe
'966971' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYS' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
a2432cd48ed3d26ccf90a1a42045d7b2
682d4c881f9c6ae992fff629f02de4cf001cbc6c
describe
'147142' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYT' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
dd32d6a846de5b4e9c612eda17fa34ef
db270b4a7c496251702306d2c1ba4530ef43ba12
describe
'34746' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYU' 'sip-files00174.pro'
259aca83cdaf3315334ca9e9d2ebe41b
86ecf417893f03d73a326e967a1cea042deaaa1d
describe
'72565' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYV' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
5f07f4943f5a37db473998fabed5604f
cbcd5669dd38e8abe400dc1250c17e390efa9c4f
describe
'7758856' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYW' 'sip-files00174.tif'
436462d8227e701f13faab7da26ea904
6abab1f3f985179eb75a2172d2536a41aa399c8a
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYX' 'sip-files00174.txt'
653e156aa141d1a540418d50011e3d03
c4ce29c4314439741939e94ee1a20971481f28b9
describe
'38142' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYY' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
9ccb0b017c73cd50de65c2487d01cbbb
8d0f287b6ede04502d3932e44d635f83a76b74ec
describe
'958204' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVYZ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
51d16100d70eaa9048f39dbf2aa67a6d
7d214329eb660cd3b3cd9fa973f12e4e342cc689
describe
'136331' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZA' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
5d2c7e69fbdd301f2d3072be7952e432
62b6005a84834940a0204d580566c378aa120271
describe
'35222' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZB' 'sip-files00175.pro'
8f0bf534f236b323b109c591e26e6cd5
1c8d0840b6562dd9b102d62d68f93977acd5c1e7
describe
'66336' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZC' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
0738b869d888a723d6431b5e8d0517a4
356e3068d238eae9907698095014f26f5265f270
describe
'7820788' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZD' 'sip-files00175.tif'
09e0771acc97433207a03f527619ae3f
549ae11750872526d785436aa7d626cf342b2d77
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZE' 'sip-files00175.txt'
68212dc28c94549d31ea2c66e1e1a359
1a6af050e7e8c4bc1874d596d28a617ed2ede79f
describe
'36209' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZF' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
3e7689d4a6b0b18490bad11e5f123676
b48c4e9d93e692b2541663b512a145e8698f7413
describe
'974406' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZG' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
ed0abe9df99995372dd3c24648a7411d
99506fc4546cd3af83544ca42595a8a093bfcc41
describe
'137090' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZH' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
2c03d56459f81908a449fbea2bb27190
93cbbb1f7b2245cb7d78ad387fdc36e0dc6edbf2
describe
'35347' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZI' 'sip-files00176.pro'
2712c365a9c42e506220f2f66848cd02
5adb8abdb74f8f33998874ccc0477f6b2d058afb
describe
'67406' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZJ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
3c90cfc8937560740ca60dc7e3947c75
8b12dd18447588a688bbc9775d607628baa94b86
describe
'7818228' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZK' 'sip-files00176.tif'
e11b4000d9374459a4e9a2ac7fdcfa09
6f554fc7dec6e8e6c35e3a4501408336b35776ce
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZL' 'sip-files00176.txt'
4982abf751c7b67dee3c339d55869fea
b5dbc05a80edc69e20ad692b126107d6775c0360
'2012-03-31T09:28:37-04:00'
describe
'36863' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZM' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
a1287ae706ff3405990cc58b431cd7ea
6666667f59a7769f4dacf9d045546cc2b77c668a
describe
'962323' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZN' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
6c51fc9150a312ec75dec9c77c53e878
c54b82b857e2a585b9783563bc7f824b4f18b783
describe
'145979' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZO' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
1b4ae3f8e45e287750a9870a01e367d5
888bbb5365b67894def0d11f74861a121f906fc3
describe
'36460' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZP' 'sip-files00177.pro'
93a1f4dc063ce14d9f69537c8286a3e2
d90dfb50664eabb57a7066152591678f8253ad94
describe
'70227' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZQ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
96f3d6e80ce606f39fbe53e077f13368
a559214adad18530c9c2ec76d2b6a4f31260a70d
describe
'7721044' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZR' 'sip-files00177.tif'
74317a62c3f7c4a868c0cce720dc6ade
517dce03e9bdf6944579c2995f0eef572ff492d9
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZS' 'sip-files00177.txt'
229d8c67a56b09354223c7129682621f
d9c0576c475d39a00d1107e96359fd8dac3918de
describe
'37580' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZT' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
8289aa1e7171b6691fdf3f5a940213db
536643eefb57364635aaf0466e2d286f3c545f98
describe
'993748' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZU' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
c3ad44d72bcf9c7d264770d59270241d
dbac95c1352855b9bcf5ca97f134565725ff6f37
describe
'145390' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZV' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
73f9fd3d5065d445ba6cb8f280714d77
dd631cd9d06752f5166da34aee3f140d4c063102
describe
'36868' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZW' 'sip-files00178.pro'
d32de76b3fb7c85332c9c26de47bb0d1
6ba9725fa49836fe8455b04d58bf7ae146e3269e
describe
'69306' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZX' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
d767d9b2971fb916a5d71173ae2dcaba
eb8e6fa82fbc102429047f359601d6f35169c9ec
describe
'7972440' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZY' 'sip-files00178.tif'
3381cc5c8e4c2271c068f48e2cb2134c
3af836570e8f2a3478dc8b5232b10cae9d217e34
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACVZZ' 'sip-files00178.txt'
5d46b75b0118de62565d22d2e8932f8d
5e2b91fae4e54d0fa02731e844fbff389c9d0f86
describe
'36258' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAA' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
623eb347fc83c4b41a6f474239092606
37eaa6bb1663902c8b998a3f91105ce4cc33af49
describe
'733060' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAB' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
4cd70e0ce922a114bbb06845d719b200
b73a9f6d45f311bf1a8cb6edfd78ef460f73c1ea
describe
'102788' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAC' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
08b5ea44060b618bcc36628ebdeead18
847970b0c2979a8a4d58340a53f39250920892d8
describe
'22642' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAD' 'sip-files00179.pro'
51aa2a67af78e863db5ccb538b9e0136
5d367ead9ac1ecaf29ebd21a954e4a6519de3555
describe
'52781' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAE' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
e548c3de4b06d7055d306f28653265d7
606abdb6e797a2bd1709a5b5637537dbf2cdc14d
describe
'8162668' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAF' 'sip-files00179.tif'
dd93ee04faaa5aa1ca55a557ab5e4add
30e67ce81dd16058b4342fa7833f9b093762b4a4
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAG' 'sip-files00179.txt'
21b213e906ed0ccf43d6be39ad3d18bf
a39194202cd7a86bcec22df2b073c5ee58461a0f
describe
'30403' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAH' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
e879ba9fb207c2d18c43f6ab22b112e8
7a75b9a01a6bebe851871555a12466d18178fcc6
describe
'1036608' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAI' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
68a4cf556b887770e081cbab765bcc80
6f6d15dafcca1a17660f60b23546054bc2df579b
describe
'213342' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAJ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
33849617c92a3021c5fb40e39e7dec1f
e7f910d301a441cf33560a9a74d9532e3b1131fd
describe
'92951' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAK' 'sip-files00180.pro'
24a8d1966af575981ae3c749cbe233f7
956ef46a7c603292c8fecd1f3e33ea20289da867
describe
'84753' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAL' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
a518f44e7d9bc02b2858abe7cc71759f
355582bc5e03de23a430aca01babc0858bb74eb2
describe
'8317372' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAM' 'sip-files00180.tif'
93ab09193a1506c4b03f1c080d279147
182432a0c0240561618c5b18c78134e114f94bd8
describe
'4098' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAN' 'sip-files00180.txt'
e6e05d1e554b4bab778fdb3cdfddfa8d
304be59dd1952bdea5e58b07373538716f0581eb
describe
'40651' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAO' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
a8478f2a9ada56d48c4029b801c68927
6f25794f66b4f4893ecfab1d94c6c16893dd8fe6
describe
'1027578' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAP' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
ecbbd825335e02a0ffe98fcb9eaaefbb
fb4c850f285fe201dc4852d52d61026811dfd5d1
describe
'202666' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAQ' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
c5b96f4c43413ffa321341853c50f6de
916f0efe574da6cb7672014663a489cf1f59b454
describe
'98999' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAR' 'sip-files00181.pro'
395a183d166b5e32f2b5419b48c391ca
1278795e215526fa7472a2de0cfcfa0d32877fd1
describe
'80436' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAS' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
0135dec9d748c33391c88aca18a9ee88
3a424f5367fb20528203888b54aca96d3449bd41
describe
'8244132' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAT' 'sip-files00181.tif'
27783abe21cb4bd38afd99367746126e
e20f261c105789f27573c9f8500bd8b3a2896773
describe
'4254' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAU' 'sip-files00181.txt'
d8b14111eff647d3052608fce7b09058
f65ec22a4cb5d9ed4e6c4b0681dcff4ef186eb4f
describe
'39330' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAV' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
cb1b08b86626545090bcfbae15e1f36a
88843a550c80b7cb9a4bd3fdfc3670118cc36294
describe
'1026461' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAW' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
462cec3746fba41fea84fcb9d5a9752a
a581387fd2e013c30225d162c2241079671bbb7f
describe
'215107' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAX' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
692795352f8a7d58460d54d9320bcb8e
ebbfd906e1df4358f7c3194266e7e288b6e2a440
describe
'96946' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAY' 'sip-files00182.pro'
2d48b1e0c59fa16abd8d598d246dcf02
7ddf21d98ab25565def2aa0dc21851ee65b9525e
describe
'85844' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWAZ' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
7dde4146f23fa574e216452fc05bcb17
c5bc578e534f65ba3be77d7054e8346bbe8e3a0f
describe
'8235796' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBA' 'sip-files00182.tif'
b238d76691fb9b4cd9fe6787016b6f5f
e1a59e1312d0c56c24efb700e44434917c6fd411
describe
'4354' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBB' 'sip-files00182.txt'
f2b0996fa105fe9b5b7c7c92ac71a216
95b6cb1ec3536b77ce1a6129c795e56f77887067
describe
'41057' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBC' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
748033736857d47fc6580d86e1a0fdc6
07801f0886886769d315305e932ac9f59758e017
describe
'1017637' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBD' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
fd7c4c27b7cc178478fb935e71220f3e
8ff4f489ca3be54af74f92e9e05fb927960ff36d
describe
'177382' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBE' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
b54be8f8d36092b8142f1d5869b1b090
5c170a6e9294ba59b234386ca4a871cff4554243
describe
'76148' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBF' 'sip-files00183.pro'
9e1d2d6748331c2c9a42352f35cf896d
cff8b3c9fc9f4dc9caf8493b7421eaa05bd2058b
describe
'75778' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBG' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
4fcf1c89371d5a14c9e150a29be06d5e
a0dd12a24c260ff3301ee7bf4dd7e060d4bab565
describe
'8165024' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBH' 'sip-files00183.tif'
6ea9ae63e53e4d62d883d754ead64937
1f3ae1faa14ecc09d7ba42e34a841d6adc56f6e1
describe
'3594' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBI' 'sip-files00183.txt'
dbfc927fd635af06828b2ec29fcf205b
a7bcd6715a99a957a63f26488d4d83bbf60975fa
describe
'38547' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBJ' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
93fef82dea95520301f86049fd1a037c
bd982b7cdb8eac68d857d15224fd5a8682571db7
describe
'1037105' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBK' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
03c9e3ce7f22c3fe75fff7ed251edc3f
616ae83d506782cd90ec8a49440b5044f0918ba1
describe
'210035' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBL' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
789b4795c7b9bfbc714e529261bb656d
5d54b7567a911c8e5888a927f3ada266ac60f9a3
describe
'82731' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBM' 'sip-files00184.pro'
e2c97f276c708dcc1467159ea44cc061
d8f175d8d7b74114b410edff1c7646ba4c3b5864
describe
'85402' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBN' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
4888ebb3c1e261e1a39b5d0718f2c330
2bc8112cac4c1b820070d3d4df2cbf07d8b8f827
describe
'8320828' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBO' 'sip-files00184.tif'
6bb88ec9ffb49faa3c10682891e01a32
d61730596520c744bc5e73331da0aeb3f6dbc9dc
describe
'3780' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBP' 'sip-files00184.txt'
48ea5c5afa6767ec6a9ed60fbcf095ac
c84f2f73a3dd7a1c7af18b872e4ac50800da9281
describe
'41082' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBQ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
1b7c829dbb91a60120ce8adaeb3982a5
e849851264556a750987fce751b7ea0e72a53e20
describe
'1055404' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBR' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
0d498e47473fed5f92412e0751aee7ca
4cbb0c1eb1ffdefeb3a1f40513f1dc53ef3deeb7
describe
'212363' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBS' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
18c1e992f30a4020497929719845321a
b062dc4ac4d5d638fce500e85f4198ffe3d288b7
describe
'94166' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBT' 'sip-files00185.pro'
9b99332f82304653c9e017f8afaa2db5
a1cc2c3c8d60576c896fabfe1e1e7cbbac05fbf1
describe
'85416' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBU' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
d4b2586eaaf87e8ff4d90f09cecc1ca6
7fcf83d93eee45adc0bf9d041cf2614117e69350
describe
'8467732' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBV' 'sip-files00185.tif'
99e6c157cc650697add24dcb991ac527
74355d40851754afaf9cd903a7e1667d17b02f4a
describe
'4239' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBW' 'sip-files00185.txt'
d4c86863a8162652df0995a1a09766f6
0abc277f14814756a28e245994f30958535222cb
describe
'40742' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBX' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
9b4aa27545f262205045ffb554fc2e3c
35e1512428256035dfa8e2fe8248c7c89fc38ec3
describe
'16' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBY' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
95ac1d2e138ae9a52bec7b153917d9ea
6f949d951f7b458588be9ef4c7f780d60529964c
describe
'263014' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWBZ' 'sip-filesUF00001921_00001.mets'
5e8d88685e58bc3437d631b7abd4bbb4
ec2eda849b224f6ec771e4159afde84be22cc7a6
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T18:20:55-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'343600' 'info:fdaE20090911_AAACOUfileF20090911_AACWCC' 'sip-filesUF00001921_00001.xml'
194d319b4484df597ab14608ceae2b5b
9dba6e917b30730d8f9677406e0c294d1c193212
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T18:20:57-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.