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Life in the West, or, The Moreton family

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Title:
Life in the West, or, The Moreton family written for the American Sunday-school union
Added title page title:
Moreton family
Added title page title:
Life in the West
Creator:
Baker, William Jay ( Engraver )
American Sunday-School Union ( Publisher )
American Sunday School Union -- Committee of Publication ( Editor )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
New York
Publisher:
American Sunday-School Union
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
258 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Travelers -- Juvenile fiction -- West (U.S.) ( lcsh )
Frontier and pioneer life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Home -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- West (U.S.) ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Baldwin -- 1851
Genre:
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations by W. J. Baker.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "The village boys"

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University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
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30784033 ( OCLC )
ALH3403 ( NOTIS )

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LIFE IN THE WEST:

OR, THE

MORETON FAMILY.

BY THE AUTHOR OF “THE VILLAGE BOYS.”



WRITTEN FOR THE AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION. 4

tenet

AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,
No. 146 Cuestnut Street.
New York, Wo. 147 Nassau Street..... Boston, No. 9 Cornhill.
LovIsviLiz, No. 103 Fourth Street.

BR ELPHIA : | |





—

Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1851, by the
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,

in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of
Pennsylvania.



&@~ No books are published by the AMERICAN SunpDAY-scHOooL UNION
without the sanction of the Committee of Publication, consisting of
fourteen members, from the following denominations of Christians, viz.
Baptist, Methodist, Congregationalist, Episcopal, Presbyterian, and Re-
formed Dutch. Not more than three of the members can be of the
same denomination, and no book can be published to which any mem-
ber of the Committee shall object.





PREFACE.

Tue details of plain domestic life must, in a
measure, be everywhere the same. The object
of the following story is to combine these with
healthful moral instruction, and to show howa
firm reliance upon an overruling Providence,
and earnest endeavours to promote the good
of others, will insure our own happiness.

The scene has been laid in one of our West-
ern States; the one, as yet, but imperfectly
developed in its resources or in its power, but,
nevertheless, advancing with great rapidity in
civilization, and destined to take its true place
among the fertile regions of the West. A
family in moderate circumstances has been
chosen, to show that the ability to-doigood lies
not so much in wealth as in well-directed effort.
The sweet ties of family affection and indivi-

5



6 PREFACE.



dua] influence are recognised; and our readers
will permit the hope, that, without startling
incident, great exploit, or magnificent under-
taking, the simple history of the Moreton family
will possess an interest for them, and awaken
in their hearts a growing love for our beloved
country, and an earnest desire so to live, and
so to use the means God may put in their
power, as to promote its true prosperity—real-
izing, by our own experience, that «happy 7s
that people whose God is the Lord!”

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TH nN NS
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PART I.

LAURELTON.





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CONTENTS.

. PaGs
CHAP. I.—THE FAMILY i cccnicnwcntititunenncie 1l

II.—PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL....scese ese eeseee 23
IIT.—NOTES OF WARNING. ......sceses cosssssee scsseeees 36
: RUIDUND, cxnsscicne-suntitnciibiinbitiemsnsaiiiaameniie 46

V.—UnNcLE ALFRED’s Gurr... c00en esevce cocces conees 53
VIL—TaE DEPARTURE........000csecesecs coscvscee seeees 61
VII.—JourNeyYINa THROUGH THE Woons.......... 67

VIII.—ENCAMPMENT IN THE WOODS. eeececees sosessece 75

TX.—A SABBATH IN THE WOODS.....c.ccceec00e00. . 81

X.—THE RAINY-DAY’S JOURNEY..cccccccce cosooscee 92







LIFE IN THE WEST;

OR, THE

ADVENTURES OF THE MORETON FAMILY.

CHAPTER I.

THE FAMILY CONCLAVE.

“Now, what do you all say about it? I want the
opinion of every one of you. But let your mother ©
speak first.” ™

“The change will affect the future life of the
children more than my own, my dear husband; and
my feelings must not bias their decision. Let them
tell us their opinion, before we speak ours.”

“Well, Robert, you are the eldest.”

“T say, father, let us go. I am young, but am
strong, and almost a man; and I know that we can
succeed. I am ready to go.” _

“And so am'I, father,” said Henry. “TI say,
with Robert, let us go, and take hold of a new farm.

I am willing to work hard upon it.”
11



12 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Mary came next in order of age, and all eyes were
turned towards her. She sat with her head resting
upon her hand, evidently in serious thought. She
paused but a moment; then, raising her head, she
said—

“T am willing to go, father.”

The mother saw a tear glistening in the daugh-
ter’s eye, and kindly said—

“Speak your feelings freely, my child. Remem-
ber that we are all one family, and that the wishes
and happiness of each member of our little circle is
the wish and happiness of the whole ; and that the
opinion of each has equal weight in our family
conclave.”

“T am wising to go, mother,” again replied
Mary; “but, for the moment, our home here
seemed too pleasant to leave; and I thought of our
many friends, the dear old trees, and my beautiful
garden. It was only for a moment, though,” she
added, with a bright smile. ‘We can soon make a
home there, and find friends, while I shall learn
to love the wide forests and the beautiful wild
flowers.”’ :

‘Father, are there any bears out there ?” asked
little Alice.

“No, my darling,” said the father, smiling, with
the others, to see the wondering eyes and alarmed
countenance of his flaxen-haired pet.

I einiineesicnaininaasl ita Mi ls ee

lit



THE FAMILY CONCLAVE. 13



‘Willie says that there are bears and Indians in
the woods.”

“ Willie does wrong to try to frighten you with
such storiés. There are both bears and Indians
in some parts of the world; but where we think of
going, there are neither of them now.”

“If there are no bears there, and mother is going,
and Willie, I want to go, too. Are you going,
Willie?” —

“‘T rather think I shall, Ally. That is, if father
thinks I am worth taking,” said he roguishly.

‘‘ Perhaps he may not think you are worth leav-
ing,” said Robert. “But you are all talking out of
your turns. Frank ought to have spoken next to
Mary.”

Frank’s opinion was evidently guided by Mary’s,
and was given guardedly. ©

‘‘ We are yery happy here,” said he; ‘and if we
are poor, we shall be soon old enough to help along.
Robert has almost learned his trade now. If I am
to be a printer, I think I had better stay here.
Printing is of no use out in the woods.”

“Tt will not always be ‘the woods’ out there,”
replied his father. “We may want a newspaper
started where we are, and you will be just the one
to carry iton. If, after you are old enough to learn
printing as a trade, you still desire it, whether we
live here or there, I promise you that you shall have
the opportunity.”



14 LIFE IN THE WEST.



“That ought to satisfy you, Frank,” said Charles,
who was a year younger than his brother. ‘T should
like to go. I read, the other day, about the wild tur-
kies and ducks, the deer and the woodcock. Oh!
I should like to live in the woods!” and visions of
the time when he should be the happy possessor of
a gun and a dog, floating through his mind, made
his earnest, expressive countenance beautiful.

“Charlie shall keep us supplied with game,”’ said
Henry, entering into the enthusiasm of his brother ;
‘cand Robert and I will help father raise the wheat
for bread—”

« Which I will make,” said Mary—

“And J will eat,’ said Willie. ‘ Who says I
cannot help ?”

“There is one more to speak. Annie, dear, what
do you say ?” asked the father.

Annie, the twin-sister of Charles, was a bashful,
timid child, of ten years of age, and was often over-
looked in the noisy movements of | her brothers and
sisters. A naturally thoughtful habit of mind had
been increased by almost constant feeble health ard
a slight deformity of person. But her invariable
sweetness of disposition and gentleness of character
and manner made her the darling of the family
circle. As they now looked at her little pale face,
and large, beaming, intellectual eyes, and remem-
bered how dependent she was upon joys that were
brought to her, and how unable she was to seek ac-





THE FAMILY CONCLAVE. 15



tive pleasures, there came a hush and silence over the
little group, for they now recollected that, to her, the
change would be greater than to the others, and be
fuller of privations and hardships. Nor was this
silence broken, until, in gentle tones, she said—

“Tf we all live together, and God dwell with us
there, we shall be happy.”

They all understood little Annie’s reference to the
question asked by a child, when moving to a new
‘house—“ Will God live with us there?” and to
them, brought up and taught, as they were, to love
and reverence the great and blessed truths of reve-
lation, the thought of God, at this crisis of their
family history, was not an unwelcome one.

‘‘Annie is right,” said the mother, after a mo-
ment’s silence. “If we love each other, and the
God of love dwell with us, it matters not where we
are, we must be happy. I believe, with your father,
that it is better for us, as a family, to move to the
West. The majority agree with me; and, under
our republican government, the majority must rule.
Is it not so, husband ?”

“Yes, my dear; and a large majority we seem to
have this time. We shall all have inconveniences
and troubles connected with the moving, and with
the new home. « There will be severe labours to be
performed, hardships to be endured, and some pri-
vations, connected with great fatigue. But a spirit
of love and hopeful cheerfulness will enable us to



16 LIFE IN THE WEST.



bear these, and not let them becomé too burdensome
tous. We are all strong, well, and able to labour,
except Annie; and Dr. Newton tells me that the
change of climate will, without doubt, benefit her ;
80, if we have Grod’s blessing on our undertaking, I
can see no reason why we should not go. In all
probability, we shall gain, as it regards worldly
prosperity ; and you will have a better and a more
independent start in life than you could have here,
where there is more competition, and the means of
living are more divided. But our own advantage
ought not to be the only motive in going, nor our
own prosperity the only consideration. We were
not placed upon this earth to think of and labour
only for ourselves. Whether we try to do it or not,
we influence those about us. By saying and doing
those things that are right, we can gain a good in-
fluence—one that shall make others better and hap-
pier; and we may thus fulfil the great end and ob-
ject of life. If we do not mean to aim at this,
as well as our own advantage, in removing to
another place, it will be better that we stay where
we are; for, to succeed fully in our enterprise, we
must go as a God-fearing family. The restraints
of society will, ina measure, be removed from us,
leaving us to make known by our actions how far
Wwe are governed by love to God, and by a desire to
make his will our law. There must be an unity of
purpose with us, each one, as it were, pulling with



THE FAMILY CONCLAVE. 17



the rest, and striving to help on the welfare and
comfort of the whole. We must go with a deter.
mination to be happy—‘to look,’ as Jean Paul
says, ‘on the south side of the events and business
of life.” Such a disposition will materially lessen
our labours and brighten our hearts. If we have °
discontented longings for our old home, (as we may
have, ) we may not let our murmurings and repinings
affect the cheerfulness or hopefulness of those who
do not suffer from them. Being strangers in a
strange land, we. must cling to each other for our
support and comfort, and seek our pleasure in each
other’s society, and each of us contribute to the happi- ©
ness of the whole. I do not doubt, my dear children,
that you will fulfil my expectations; but we shall
be placed in new circumstances, and cannot now tell
what traits of character those circumstances may
develop in us all. It is better, then, to speak of
these matters openly and freely, calmly to think of
what we relinquish, and with deliberation to form
our plans for future action > for ‘to forewarn is to
forearm ourselves.’ Do you all say that we had
better go?”

There was now an unanimous vote in favour of a
new home, and that home one in the great West,
Even the little Alice, scarcely seven years of age,
gave her opinién understandingly and seriously ;
while, to the older members of the family, the pro-

tect assumed a more enlarged aspect and bearing,
2Q*



18 LIFE IN THE WEST.



and their personal responsibilities in the removal
gave to each of them a feeling of deep interest in its

~ success. As they afterwards kneeled about the



family altar, and commended themselves, with all
their plans, to the care and guidance of their hea-
venly Father, there was an earnest desire in every
heart for God’s direction and blessing; for they felt
that it was “not in man who walketh to direct his
etps."aie . . .

“Tf Cousin Susan would but go with us, mother,”
said Mary, as she sought her room, before retiring,
“JT should desire nothing more.”

“We can ask her; and perhaps she may be per-
suaded to join her fortunes to ours,” replied her
mother.

The family circle, to which we have so unceremo-
niously introduced our readers, was that of Mr.
JamMES Moreton. He was the father of eight
children, five of whom were boys—the eldest, Ro-
bert, being a young man of seventeen. His school
education was completed, and, for the last year, he
had been engaged in learning the trade of carriage-
building; his father deeming it best to gratify a na-
tural taste which he showed for mechanics.

Henry was a year anda half younger than Robert,
with more taste for books and quiet employment ;
but he was practical and persevering, with a ready
will anda strong hand for labour. For several years,



THE FAMILY CONCLAVE. 19



he had been employed, during the summer months,
working with his father upon the farm, and spent
the winter and fall in school studies and duties.
Mary was fourteen years of age, of a quick appre-
hension and tenacious memory. She was like Hen-
ry in disposition and character; but she had also
inherited from her mother an appreciation and
abiding love for the beautiful in nature, which
seemed to govern her whole life. It was not ro-
mance nor sentiment which actuated her, so much
as love; and her own affectionate impulses, sancti-
fied by the spirit of God, led her to view those by
whom she was surrounded as objects of loving inte-
rest and tender affection. She was a gay, cheerful,
bright-eyed young girl, with some personal beauty ;
but her chief charm was her singular disinterestedness
and constant watchfulness for the comfort and good
of others. Happy as the bird, like a bird, her voice
would be heard sending forth, now here, now there,
Sweet notes of joy, as she, with busy hands, but
light, untroubled heart, was employed in the daily
pursuits of domestic life—her cheerful thoughts
finding utterance in Song so constantly, that her
mother was wont to call her “her bird.”

Frank was naturally selfish and impatient; yet,
over the infirmities of his temper had Mary thrown
the mantle of her love—often, by a gentle, persua-
sive word, quieting his ebullitions of passionate an-
_ ger, and, with her sunny smile, winning him back to

ae



20 LIFE IN THE WEST.



peace with others and with himself. He was an
object of solicitude to his parents; yet they could
see, year by year, that the domestic influence of
home was rendering him more considerate, soften-
ing his temper, and making him less hasty in his
words and actions.

Charlie was an impetuous, rash little fellow,
ten years of age, full of daring, and with a disposi-
tion to think quite as much of himself as he ought
to think. He was as impulsive in his affections as
hig ypursuits—often boisterously fond of his mo-

‘and sisters, and then, again, as noisily devoted
to something else. Yet he was yielding and easily
guided, for his feelings were tender and quick ; and
if he did wrong, no one could be more sorry and
penitent than he was, as soon as he saw that it was
wrong. Annie was too feeble te enter into his sports
or plans; yet, in her dependence, he found a reason
why he should constitute himself her protector and
guide ; and it was into her ear that he poured forth
the mighty torrent of plans which his active brain
formed, and her feeble voice which dissuaded him
from undertaking one-tenth part of them; though,
in justice to our young friend Charlie’s firmness, we
ought to state that it was impossible to think twice
of most of them withopt seeing both their impracti-
cability and uselessness.

Willie was roguish and mischievous, fond of fun
to an alarming degree, for a boy of eight years of age. » ‘






THE FAMILY CONCLAVE. 21



Little Alice was his chosen playmate and companion,
and his tenderness and love for her had won her heart
completely. The family appellation given to this little
one, the youngest of them all, was, “our curly-head,”’
or “little Miss Curly-head,” from her flaxen ringlets,
which were abundant and beautiful, but, from the
length of time consumed in their arrangement, a
source of great annoyance to her. She was a capri-
cious little being, full of: freaks and fancies, but
warm-hearted and loving.

Mr. Moreton had married in early life, and for
several years had engaged in mercantile pursuits.
Owing to some unsuccessful speculations in business
and a combination of adverse circumstances, he lost
much of his property, and decided to gather up the
small remainder of what had originally been a hand-
some estate, and purchase a farm. near his native
town, a quiet Massachusetts village. For fourteen
years he had lived happily and prosperously there,
respected and useful as a citizen and as a man, ful-
filling all his duties to his family and to society with
faithfulness and success. But his means were limited ;
and while there was an abundance produced from
the farm for their daily wants, both Mr. and Mrs.
Moreton felt that there was nothing, beyond this,
upon which to rely for their children.

Their plan of moving to the West was neither a
sudden nor a hasty project. It was the result of
much thought and prayerful deliberation, and, toge-



22. “LIFE IN THE WEST.



ther, they had decided to ascertain the feelings of
the children on the subject, and, should they find
them desirous or willing to go, to remove early in
the coming spring. Calling them together, as his
custom was, when any affair which concerned the
family required action or decision, Mr. Moreton
placed it before them ; he plainly spoke to them of
his own pecuniary affairs and of his prospects, so far
as they might be interested in knowing them. He
then mentioned their plan of emigration, set its ad-
vantages and disadvantages before them, and told
them of its cares as well as of its pleasures, trying to
bring the whole matter clearly before their minds.

The result we have laid before our readers, whose
interest in the family history, we hope, will lead
them to follow us during our detail of their future
course.





PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL, 98

CHAPTER II.
PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL,

Letter from Mr. Moreton.
» Michigan, Noy. 9th, 18—,
My DEAR WIrE AND CHILDREN :—When TI left
you, to start upon what Willie called « my voyage of
discovery,” that is, my journey, I thought that, by
this time, I should be able to give you some definite
information as to your future home. But I have not
yet seen any farm, that suits both my means and my
desires, that I could purchase. [I start to-morrow, to
examine some lands lying in Indiana and Illinois, and
in a week or two I shall be able to let you know my
decision. Iam very glad that I came to see Jor myself
before purchasing, for I find that much of the land,
which was highly recommended to me, is hardly worth
the “taking up,” as they say here, when they speak
of buying land. ©] believe the land-agents think me
very particular, and not easy to be suited; but they
do not know how dear tome are the interests of my
wife and children, | must look, first, for a healthy
location. I cannot consent that either they or T
shall live on the banks of a sluggish stream, or in





24 LIFE IN THE WEST.



the neighborhood of aswamp. Then, Ido not want
a farm far from some market-town, though far and
near have a different signification in the West from
what they have in New England. Thirty miles is
not far here. I must look for a place where I can
get lumber for a house; and, in order to do this, a
saw-mill, within dragging distance, must be taken
into consideration. A grist-mill, too, must be
thought of, where we can get our wheat and corn
ground ; and it is desirable that both of these should
be within a few miles’ distance of our home, and
should already have passable roads leading to them.
A school and a church, that there may be food for
the mind and the soul, are what you will all desire.
Then your mother will like to have a good doctor
within reach, if you should be sick ; and, that you
may not be likely to get homesick for news from
Laurelton, there must be a post-office not very far
away. I must be careful, too, not to spend too great
@ proportion of my money forland; for I shall want
a house and barn, and some stock for the farm. I
must remember that there are taxes to pay, and be
careful not to buy more land than I can make pro-
jitable. These are some of the things which I find
every wise and would-be successful emigrant must
look after. '

My travelling adventures, thus far, have been va-
rious, some pleasant, and some not at all agreeable.
At this season of the year, Icannot look for fine



PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 25



weather, or for any great beauty of scenery. I have
seen many of the people who dwell in these parts of
the world, and have met with civility and even
kindness wherever I have been. Even jn business
matters, I have experienced nothing but what was
pleasant, and am indebted to many for valuable
hints and instructions concerning matters of which
I had been ignorant, and which I have set down in
my memorandum-book as things to be remembered.
I should have been disappointed if I had allowed
myself to look for.any great elegance of manner, or
_ for what is called style, in dress or mode of living.
So I should, if I had expected good roads, or elegant
houses, or very magnificent show-farms. These
things I have not found.

As to the land itself, it answers all my expecta-
tions. There is much poor land—low, damp, and
unhealthy; but a large proportion of it is rich, fer-
tile, easily worked, and yielding an abundant reward.
to the labourer. |

On my way to this place, I stopped at the door
of a log-cabin, by the roadside, to ask if I could
have some dinner. I was hospitably received, and
even welcomed, when they knew that I was from
New England, for that had been the home of my
host and hostess. My wants were provided for and
my horse fed, for which I could not persuade Mr,
Thomas to take pay; for, he said, “We would pay
anybody who would come from New England to



“age

26 LIFE IN THE WEST.



see us; and do you not think we like to give you a
dinner ?”’

I went with Mr. Thomas about his farm. He
had bought one hundred acres. Highty of them he
had put under cultivation; or, rather, according to
the Western fashion, forty were lying idle this year,
and the forty now sown were, after this year, to
change places with them; thus alternating with each
other. The wheat was promising finely, and he
hoped soon to be able to put himself up a frame
house. I gathered his story, as we went along, and
found that in early life he had been an inmate of
the **** alms-house. Indeed, that was his birth-
place; and there he remained until his mother’s
death, which occurred when he was seven years of
age. He was soon bound out to a neighbouring
farmer: “And,” said he, ‘I seem to have had
luck ever since. The man I went to live with was
a good man, aswell as a good furmer. He sent me
to school, winters, and took the trouble, sometimes,
to see if I understood what I studied. I had to
work pretty hard, but I was taught the best way of

doing every thing, and how to save and take care

of what my labour gained. I stayed with him until
my time was up, and after that, he paid me good
wages, and gave me chances to earn money, until I
had five hundred dollars in the savings’ bank.
Then, by his advice, I came out here, bringing my
wife with me. I have been here three years, and



PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 27



you can see how much headway I have made. I
have a good farm. Glorious land! Ain’t it? You
saw my wife and baby, and my log-house, and my
large frame-barn; I have a good team of horses,
two cows, a flock of sheep—I wish you could see
my sheep !—and I’ve gota contented heart. I mean
to see old Connecticut again, if I live; but not
until my house is done, and paid for.”

When I told him, I intended to bring my family
out here, to reside, he said he was glad of it; it was
a good country, and it only wanted good people to
live in it: and, with true, Western hospitality, in-
vited me to bring you all to see them. I thanked
him, but said that there were quite too many of us.
for their cabin, with its one sitting-room and its
little bed-room. He laughed, and said, “that they
could make a place for us, I might be sure.”

This is one instance, of many that I have met,
of prosperous emigration. Industry, good senge, and
judgment, and good habits “cdo bring goodluck ;” or,
rather, to speak more truly, they do bring the blessing
of Providence. It may be that I was the more
forcibly impressed with this case, because I had the:
opportunity to contrast it with that of a settler, with.
whom I had passed the previous night.

If I wished to picture discomfort in its perfection,
I would endeavour to make the canvas shadow forth
the interior of that log-cabin. There was a family,
man, woman, and eight children, (just our number,)

3



28 LIFE IN THE WEST.

all living, sleeping, eating, and cooking in one room,
sixteen by twenty feet in size, and dimly lighted by
its two little windows! There were two bedsteads;
one of which was appropriated to myself; and, if
both bedstead and myself had not been in the way
of the cooking-stove, and the cooking-stove in the
way of both the bedstead and myself, I might, per-
sonally, have been well accommodated. As it was,



I passed a sleepless night, and had full opportunity -

to watch the movements of my host’s family.

I ought to have said, that some of them stayed in.

the loft above the room during the night; and a
trundle-bed, drawn from beneath mine, was the
place where a poor sick little girl lay, with flushed
cheeks, parched lips, and a burning skin. It was no-
thing but a neglected chill-fever, they said ; but the
little thing tossed and moaned in her fitful slumbers,
awakening my sympathies and compassion, which
were not lessened, you may be sure, when the mo-
ther brought her a dose of calomel, mixed with
water, and held up a piece of a large yellowish
pickle, as an inducement to take the unpalatable
medicine ! .

I should frighten you all out of your desires even
to see this country, if I gave you the details of that
night, or filled up the picture with all its carelegs-
ness and want of cleanliness. Nor would the morn-
ing meal, of poorly-prepared food, have awakened in

any of you strong appetites. I was glad to pay my

ee





PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 29



bill, and be off early in the morning, satisfied that
more uncomfortable feelings could be crowded into
the experience of one night than I had supposed
possible. If there had been a necessity for all this
suffering, I would have pitied, but not complained
of it; but it could not escape the eye of the dullest
observer, that it was brought about by the union of
sloth with intemperance. a.

An originally good and productive farm waa
by year, growing smaller and yielding less, for the
want of a thrifty and industrious owner ; while he
and his whole family indulged in continual com-
plaints and murmurings against their lot, finding
fault with every thing about them, and never seeing
that the whole blame of their ill success lay with
themselves, and they were reaping the result of their
own doings.

These two extreme cases I have written about,
because they have come so directly under my notice.
There is every variety of life and circumstance here,
and these must be taken by themselves, rather than
as samples of Western life 3 and we can easily draw
our own lesson from them. If the strong bonds of
poverty do hold people here in such homes as the
last I have described, the stronger bonds of intem-
perance and indolence will assuredly do it.

There is no romance in life here. It is a plain,
straight-forward, practical character and course,

~~



30 LIFE IN THE WEST.



guided by firm faith in an overruling Providence,
which will advance the best interests of one’s-
self and of the community. And, when I think of
the vast influence that these newly-settled States
will eventually have upon the welfare of our free
- and happy nation; of the asylum they offer to the
poor and oppressed of every clime and country; of
re of lands, here lying ready for. the toil
amd skill of the agriculturist; above all, when, as a
Christian, I indulge in far-extending anticipations
of its moral progress, and the part it is yet to act
in the evangelizing of the world,—I rejoice in the
thought that I may be permitted to help on the good
work ; and, as each drop goes to fill the bucket, so
may each good citizen aid in swelling the tide of its
prosperity and civilization.

My letter is a long one, but I have hardly written
the half I purposed. My first feeling of dismay at
the newness and coarseness of things has passed
away; so has that of discouragement at the great
work to be done here; and I now view our enter-
prise as one in which we may and ought to engage
hopefully and happily ; for I fully believe that, in a
great measure, a man’s prosperity is here placed in
his own keeping; and the heart to labour and do
right will not fail to bring success, both as regards
ourselves and those among whom we may be
placed.





PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 31



Let us all ask the blessing of our heavenly Father,
and his direction in all our ways! With love to all,
I am your’s, affectionately,

JAMES Moreton.

P. S.—I cannot say, with any confidence, at what
time you may expect me at home; but a kind Pro- -
vidence will keep us, I trust, while we are apart,
and give us the pleasure to meet again in health and |
peace. J. M.

Letter from Robert to his Father.
Laurelton, Nov. —, 18—.

Dear FATHER :—Your very welcome letter has
just been received, and I am appointed by mother
to reply to it, in the name of the family. We were
pleased to hear of your good health, and of your fa-
vourable impressions of Western life. You do not
know how much we think about you, nor how often
we talk about you, exercising our Yankee privilege
of guessing where you are, and what you are doing.
We have most thoroughly imbibed the spirit of emi-
gration. Even Alice told Mr. Speare that you had
gone to buy us a farm at the West ; and each of us
is at work, in some way, busying ourselves with pre-
parations for moving in the spring.

As you recommended, I have made an arrange-
ment with Mr. S——, by which I am released from

further obligation to stay with him, and have trans-
3*



82 LIFE IN THE WEST.



ferred myself, tools and all, to Mr. Redding’s cabinet-
shop. I have learned, already, the way to put a chair
or table together, and can put up a shelf or fix a
drawer, quite like a workman. My. Redding told
me, himself, that I was quite a handy fellow at the
trade.

Henry looks after the farm and the family at

home, but has commenced the study of surveying.
This occupies most of his leisure,

Mary is in school. Mother says that it is her
last winter here, and that she must devote her time
to the study of those branches in which a teacher is
most necessary, Music, as a science, and French,
take most of her attention, although she and Henry
are trying, evenings, to study German with Mr.
Perrot. Mary declares that to know how to make
gingerbread will be likel y to be of more benefit to her
than how to speak German 3 but mother only smiles,
and says that there is time and Opportunity for
both,

Frank and Charlie are in school ; but, in their
leisure hours, are in earnest with their preparations,
though in rather different lines. Frank is looking
up and sorting out all the books in the house; and
has petitioned mother so earnestly to allow him to
take lessons in drawing and perspective, that she
has consented, and he is really making rapid pro-
gress in this accomplishment,

Charlie, true to his native propensity, asked old



~ 1%
ee i



a - ;

a ae eS a ee ae



PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 33



Captain Stetson if he would “teach him to Jire agun ;”
and the old gentleman has undertaken to Initiate him
in the mysteries of holding both gun and rifle, and
shooting with the same. At first, mother objected
to this, thinking he might be troublesome ; and,
indeed, she felt that he was too young and impulsive
to be trusted with sueh dan crous articles; but, upon
his passing his solemn word never to touch them
without Captain Stetson’s leave, and quoting General
Washington’s speech about the hatchet, “TI cannot
tell a lie, mother,” she gave her consent. At her
request, I made it a point to be present during hig
first and second days’ exercise, that I might look
after him; but I found the responsibility of the
employment had sobered his little wild head, and
that if I continued to be with him, (which I was
inclined to do,) it would be to take advantage of the
instruction of so experienced a sportsman as Captain
Stetson for myself. He meanwhile says, and, I be-
lieve, he means what he says, “that it is a pleasure
to him to have us come.”

Annie took me up into her sunny little room, yes-
terday, that I might see how nicely she had put up
and labelled the garden and flower seeds. She told
me that she was making some bags to put the larger
seeds in. She really seems better and brighter for
the prospect of the change. She has promised Willie
a bag for his marbles, is to make a travelling dress
for. Alice’s doll, has helped Frank cover his books,



34 LIFE IN THE WEST.



and I heard Charles tell her that he should want a
large flannel bag made, with a strap to go over the
shoulder, for his game.

As for Willie and Alice, their arrangements would
be more apparent, and their success more complete,
if they did not pull to pieces something that they
have before done to finish what they are now doing.
But they are well, and their bright, happy faces and
pleasant words help us all along.

Cousin Susan is with us; and, since she consented
to accompany us, Mary has been as full of anticipa-
tion as the rest of us. She goes about singing all
the day, helping first one and then another in their
plans. Cousin Susan said, laughingly, that she
must have a trade before she went, as a resource
against a day of want. We told her that she could
teach school there, but she said, “No, that was
Mary’s calling ;” and she goes now, every day, to
sew with Miss Dearborn, and learns how to make
bonnets and cut dresses; and, when that is over, she
says that she will not say she is ready to go until
she has also learned how to cut and make clothes
for us boys. Before we finish, we are likely to have
every trade in the family. I hope these plans will
all meet with your approbation, and that you will
soon be at home to tell us so.

All send their best love to you. Mother wishes
to add a postcript, and Willie says, “ Ask father to







PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 85



let us know, right away, whether we are to be Buck-
eyes, Wolverines, or Hoosiers ?”
Your affectionate son, |
; Roperr.

My DEAR HusBanp :—“ Mother’s postscript” is i
only to say, that a Mr. Glover has made an offer ae
the farm here, and for the homestead, which your
brother thinks a very advantageous one for us. I
send his letter with this. We are all well. Robert ¥
has given you a very detailed account of our move-
ments and employments ; but he has not added what
my heart prompts me to say, that our children are
our treasures—good, obedient, and loving. May we
not claim for them the promise which belongs to
them that honour father and mother! And may it
not be to us a token, a providential omen of success
in our undertaking ? |

Your’s, ever.





a

86 LIFE IN THE WEST.

CHAPTER ‘IIL.

NOTES OF WARNING.

THE winter was past and gone, with all its cold
storms and piercing winds, its heavy snows and blus-
tering tempests. The noble Connecticut, for three
months “in icy fetters bound,” was released, and
its blue waters were floating calmly on towards the
ocean, glistening in the bright sunshine, or gently
rippled by the passing breeze. The birds, in noisy
companies, were returning from their winter quar-
ters. By the sides of fences, and about sunny door-
steps, little delicate tufts of grass were starting, fresh
and green; and the garden-borders were gay with
bright pinks and daffodils, mingled with the crocus
and snowdrop.

Spring had come; and an early spring it was.
“Tt could not last,” and ‘One swallow does not
make a summer:” so the weatherwise ones said,
and shook their heads; but it did last; and if, by
swallows, they meant beautiful, warm, sunshiny
days, there were a dozen of these, following each
other in rapid succession. It was safe now te pro-

I ee

o- ‘
_
ee a ee





ad ee



NOTES OF WARNING. 37



phesy an early season, for it was already there; and —

bustle and life it brought with it. Oh! how much
out-of-doors playing had the Laurelton children to
do! How many boys there were, who, under the
“influence of that balmy vernal air, were happy in
their sports! How many little groups of school-

fellows loitered, on their way home, to exchange the
pleasant words that sprung from their light, merry
hearts! Not less busy were the older people.
' Merchants had taken in the red and green flannel
hangings about their doors, and put, in’their place,
the bright calicoes and brighter ribbons. Garden-
ing tools were in demand, and the farmers were
looking after their ploughs and harrows, wondering

yif it was too early to plant their fields; while busy .»

+ housewives were busily making ready for the sum-
/ mer, with their white curtains laid out to bleach in
_ the sunshine,

> Amidst all this, there was one family who rejoiced
/ most heartily in the early opening of the season ; and
» that was Mr. Moreton’s. He had returned early in
‘January from his Western journey, having found
and purchased a farm in Indiana > and, unlike most
New-Englanders, was contented not to go as far as
steam could carry him,.

This farm consisted: of half a section of good land,
partly lying on a small prairie, and partly wooded.
The location was healthy; the distance from the
village of Lakeland, about two miles. Lakeland

*



|
|
|
|



es

88 - LIFE IN THE WEST.



“wag a county- -seat, and was, itself, a thriving inte. —

rior Village, containing between three and four hun-
dred inhabitants, who had been brought there from
many countries, impelled by diverse motives, and
governed by various tastes and habits; so that it
was not strange that there should be exceedingly
opposite characteristics in society, as it regarded its —
moral and intellectual state. Some of those wants —
and necessities which it had at first seemed indispen-
sable to provide for, Mr. Moreton found he should be —
obliged to give up; for the supply of others he must
wait; and for some of them he was ready to labour —
and ae with those among whom he was to live;
so that it was with hope for the future, and a strong |
determination to help on the ‘good time coming,” §
rather than with the feeling that every thing was |
right already, that he concluded to locate himself at
Lakeland. But we must leave the little village, with
all its privileges and deficiencies, for another chapter,
and go back to our friends, who were rejoicing in the
early spring, that was so auspicious for their journey.
By the last of April; their preparations for .re-
moval were completed, and they were about ready to
start. The younger children were, at times, impa-
tient at their delay, and pbert and Henry felt, ~
every fine day, that it was time lost to remain any
longer. But there were still many last things to be
dom@: articles to be disposed of; friends to see}
good-byes to be spoken. It sil not be accom:





NOTES OF WARNING. 39 .



plished hastily and well; and, with Mr. Moreton, a
thing that was not done well was not considered
well done. sti :
_ Another reason for delay was, tuat, having con-
‘cluded to travel with their household goods, it be-
‘came necessary and desirable to know that the dif:
ferent lines of transportation had ‘completed their
‘summer arrangements, before they left their New-
England home; otherwise, hindrances that were
anpleasant might arise, and protract the time spent
pon the journey. |

To Mr. and Mrs. Moreton, every day brought with
t its cares and its labours; and, as they had learned,
rom actual experience, to anticipate less from change
han their children did, they did not regret the de-
ay which gave them a few more weeks of pleasant
@otercourse with tried friends and acquaintances.

Wot a few would have persuaded them to remain
Quictly where they were, and many sought, by argu-
Ment and advice, to lead them to reconsider their
termination. ‘ We cannot spare you,” said their
ood pastor, as he and a few of their intimate friends
ere gathered in their little- parlor, a few evenings

efore their departure. “We cannot spare you. I

0 not become reconcilag to your going away. We

eed you here, in our villaze-matters, in our social

atherings, in our dhurch-meetings, in the sanctuary,

he Sabbath-school, and our pleasant prayer-meet-

gs. We shall miss you in all these. Has not
; 4 Ne




















40 LIFE IN THE WEsT.



God given you a work to do here, and why should:
you seek another? Or why should you geek for _
greater blessings than he has here bestowed upon
you?” “a |

‘“T have no reason to leave my New-England
home to seek for blessings or mercies,” replied Mr,
Moreton. Our lot has been cast in a pleasant place,
‘Yet, regret as I may the separation from my friends,
Tam convinced that it is better for us to go. If I
do but little good at the West, my children will have |
been brought up there, and, as Western men and
women, may make amends for al] my deficiencies.”

There was a brother of Mr. Moreton’s, who, from a
the first, had discouraged the idea. of the family
going West; and he, half replying to Mr. Moreton,
half soliloquizing, said—

“ But you will all be sick, and either die in that’
climate, or else drag on a miserable life, with broken
Constitutions and impaired health.”

“Not quite"so bad as that, I hope,” said Dr. :
Newton, who had Just arrived, « No, indeed!” |
said he, laying aside his Over-coat, and drawing
‘Rearer the fire. af! While journeying West, last
summer, I found, to my entire satisfaction, that
there is reason to believe. the climate had been
much belied.”

“You will hardly assert that it can be called a ©
healthy country, though ?” observed the pastor.

“ With the exception of fever and ague, I could |





A

NOTES OF WARNING. ‘41

oe? (dee der. OS er



find no disease that might be said to belong to the
climate exclusively. Congestive fevers and other
sore will spread over villages here, as well as

there, and many will die.” es
_ “But there are notoriously unhealthy regions
4 throughout the West 2”

‘‘T know that well,” replied Dr. Newton. “A
"swamp that is filled with rank vegetation, or a slug-
; gish stream, with its green, slimy waters, will cause



/no wise man will have any thing to do. Rich land,
great crops, or abundant harvests will never com-
pensate forgthe loss of bodily vigour. But all the
» West is not a low, swampy, marshy country. There
are dry, elevated lands; there are clear, lively streams;
_ ther@ are rich, fertile fields, stretching for miles and
* hundreds of miles, upon which the sun shines day
_ by day, and about which no deadly miasma hovers ;
_ and which, if not as healthful as the poorer lands
_ here in this rocky country, yet offer no hindrances
to those who would settle them, on account of their
unhealthiness.”’

“Why is the proportion of dg@ths greater there
than here ?” asked Mr. Alfred Moreton.

“‘T can tell you one reason that might make it so,
though I am not sure that it is true. A large pro-
portion of the emigrants going West are in circum-
stances of great poverty and want. Many of them
have already become SE for disease, by a long

_ fevers and other diseases. But with such localities te



+

42 LIFE IN THE WEST.



and wearisome voyage. ‘Their means are barely —

sufficient to enable them to reach their destination

and purchase their farms. They must necessarily —

suffer from privation and exposure. Their food ig
poorly prepared, and they are not guarded from
changes of weather. It is no wonder that they
sicken. Then bad nursing and the imprudent use
of powerful medicines prolong their sicknesses, and
often death kindly ends the struggle. Then, another

class of emigrants are healthy, stout young people,
he :

from the Eastern States. They are, through igno-
rance of sickness, imprudent, as regards exposure,
and only desire to make money fast. If there are

facilities for carrying on a mill, what do they think ~

about the marsh beyond? Just nothing at all! And
the richer and blacker the earth, so much the Mnore
promise of great harvests. They are in haste to be
rich ; and will throw their lives, which no wealth
could purchase, under that J uggernaut of Christian
lands—the god of money—for the sake of gain. If

they are crushed, must the climate take all the

blame ?”

‘There must biiisomething to compensate for the
giving up of their homes, and to pay for the.loss of Ni

luxuries and comforts that a man relinquishes when
he leaves civilized life and goes into the woods.

What would you have this something to be, if not |

gain in wealth ?”
“Freedom from heavy duties imposed by govern-

Ree.
ee

%

a
¢

+

»
—* .
iat iit ta —— _»








NOTES OF WARNING. 43



. ment, and the blessing of that equality which is
_ recognised by our Constitution, the poor emigrant
. from foreign countries would consider an equivalent
for all he has given up. Add to this the liberty to
_ worship God in his own way, without molestation or
_ fear; and, if he has suffered, as most likely he will
_ have done, he will be satisfied. To others, there is
_ the comfort of having a little money go far in secur-

\; ing to their families the necessaries of life, and of

: feeling that poverty is no gnenine, ”

i “ But these are a poor man’s blessings; and bless-
ings [ acknowledge them to be. Yet, why should
' aman whése education has fitted him to move in a
_ large circle, whose habits are those formed by con-
. ventional usages, and whose tastes are refined and
_ intéllectual—why should he leave a home, such as
we enjoy, go far away from all his social and reli-
gious privileges, to a place where his very acquire-
» ments and knowledge will be a hindrance to him,
_ his tastes and habits only sources of annoyance, be-
cause ungratified, and where a strong back anda
stout arm are the only personal ee that can avail
for his help ?”

‘Why do we need the beall corn for seed, and
why do we seek a‘field to plant it in that has lain
fallow and unused? At the West, every well-regu-
lated family is like seed sown in good ground.
Their example cannot fail to influence others.

Oftentimes, those who could not be driven to indus-
4*








2 es et i ee de



| 44 LIFE IN THE WEST.



try and sobriety, can be lured to both by the sight
of the prosperity which follows good habits, as evi-
dence in their fayour. A Christian family, if con-
sistent, can do still more. The good they do is upon
a sure foundation; and God has wisely ordered it
that such families shall be scattered here and there.
As to the objection, that education and accomplish-
ments are lost there, I do not agree with you. I
believe that there is no gift of God to the intellect
of man, and no acquirement or accomplishment,
which may not be made as available there as here
for the promotion of happiness and prosperity.
And, while I may not go there myselff I honour
those who are willing to go, and who have the cou-
rage to enable them to meet the trials and’ disap-
pointments that a removal will bring.” ¥
“TI suppose you are right,” replied the pas-
tor; ‘and, unwilling as I am to lose our friends
from our circle, I must be satisfied to see them de-
part, and bid them God-speed. But I do not often
have a greater trial to my own will, than that which
I felt when writing these for you ;’ Clad he laid upon
the table certificatéiiof church-membership for Mr.
and Mrs. Moreton, Mary, and Henry, and letters
of recommendation to the care and good offices of
any church to which they might be presented ;

“especially,” he added, “as you will now be as

sheep without a shepherd.”
“Shall we not still be under the care of the great



NOTES OF WARNING. 45



Shepherd, and does he suffer any ill to befall those
with whom he has entered into covenant?” asked
Mrs. Moreton. ‘‘ You will, yourself,implore for us
his guidance ; and, ‘under the covert of his wings,’
we shall be safe there as here.”

It was not without a struggle that the good pas-
tor yielded up, to what he considered a life of toil
and danger, these precious members of his own

® flock. As he departed, it was with great emotion

that he clasped the extended hands of Mr. and Mrs.
Moreton within his own, and, in solemn, earnest
tones, tremulous with feeling, repeated the beautiful
scriptural benediction : |

‘The Lord bless thee, and keep thee. The Lord
make his face shine upon thee, and be gracious

+ untothee. The Lord lift up his countenance upon

thee, and give thee peace.”*

* Num. vi. 24—26.





46 LIFE IN THE WEST.

CHAPTER IV.
DR. NEWTON.

“T, Too, came with a parting gift, accompanied
with a dose of advice,” said Dr. Newton, as the door
closed upon their beloved minister. “ My work is
done, as you desired, Mrs. Moreton.”

And saying this, he placed upon the table a small,
square mahogany box, which he opened with a po-
lished key, and displayed a small, but well-selected
stock of medicines.

“T have added to this,” he continued, “as my
gift, this little manual of medicine; and my advice
to you is to take as little of the contents of the box
as possible; for,” he added, playfully, “ medicine
without a doctor is often worse than no medicine at
all. If you find a good doctor in Lakeland, throw
away or burn up the book, as you please.”

‘‘T cannot burn up the recollection of valuable
hints that I have received from you, Dr. Newton;
and, if we are really sick, I shall doubtless rely
more upon what I have already learned than upon
the book or the new doctor.”

“But you are not going to be sick, I hope,”

'

y
?

t



a SS

DR. NEWTON. AT



replied Dr. Newton. “ A family of healthy boys
and girls, like yours, brought up to love habits of
regularity and order, with little inclination to pam-
per their appetites, and supplied with the means to
‘sure a comfortable, wholesome living, will not
often be visited with any distressing sickness. Do
you hear, boys?” he added; ‘don’t think that you
can spend your summer evenings out of doors, or go
tramping through the wet swamps and woods before

- sunrise, to shoot the poor little birds. And you,

Miss Mary, must give up sentimental rambling by
moonlight, even if those old forest-haunts’ bew
and entice you. Let the sun give the
cooking, before you take too much of it.”





“Tt was you, Dr. Newton, that first taught me Fe

that

‘Early to bed, and early to rise,
Is the way to be healthy, wealthy, and wise.

“You are duller than I think, Miss Mary,” an-
swered Dr. Newton, “if you can see no difference
between not going out of doors and not getting up
early. It will do Robert and Henry good to chop
a little wood in the wood-house or work in the barn ;
and I expect that your talents will be devoted to the
preparing a good breakfast when they come in.
Some of these days, I will come and partake of one
with you.”

Exclamations of; “Will you, indeed?” ‘Oh!



48 LIFE IN THE WEST.



will you?” and “How happy it will make us!”
broke from the lips of all.

“Yes, if I live, I will certainly pay you a visit,
after: you are fairly settled; but mind, Miss Mary!
I must have good light bread—none of your warm
biscuits or griddle-cakes! I must have a chamber,
too, to sleep in. I donot like bed-rooms on the first
floor, especially in that Western country.» They
cannot be as airy or well ventilated as upper rooms,
and there is always a dampness about them, which
comes from the ground. Let the sun shine into
_, your house a part of every day. Be regular in your

work, as well asof rest. In eating, drink-

id sleeping, live, as nearly as possible, as you
have been accustomed to; and if the sunshine of
faith and trust in a good Providence warm your
hearts and lighten your path, you will have the best
preventives of sickness that I know of.”

“Willa contented mind keep off fever and ague?”
asked Robert.

“Tt will help you to bear it patiently; and that
is a great gain, if you ever have it. But I ama
doctor, not a preacher, Robert; and I tell you,
plainly, that if you are neither rash nor imprudent,
you may live many years, and never suffer from it at
all. Perhaps, if it should come, you will find that it
is not so very hard, after all, to bear.”

“You are an encouraging friend, Dr. Newton,”
said Mr. Moreton; “and, if all our neighbours











eS <<<

DR. NEWTON. 49



viewed this matter of emigration.as you do, we
might be saved some of those fears and anxieties
concerning the future that, I confess, they some-
times compel me to feel. But we are fairly com-
mitted for the change, now, and I have no desire to
imitate Lot’s wife, and ‘look back.’ ”

“‘ Nor do I believe you will have any thing to re-
gret, after you are once there. I am no prophet,
but I think I foresee for you all many happy and

i prosperous days. If wishes could bring them to

you, they certainly would be yours. ‘The same

_ hand which has directed you thus far, in making

the change, will guide you step by step, and all you
need will He supply from his abundance.. We ean
ask nothing more or better than his guardianship, ‘

_ for you, who go, or for ourselves, who remain. Now

a ere

for your plans: what are they ?”
“We propose to let Henry and Robert start early
next week, with our boxes and chests, for Albany,

_ by water. As soon as we hear of their arrival at
_ that place, we shall join them as expeditiously as
_ possible. Then all take the canal, and go to Buffalo.

From there, across Lake Erie, to whichever port we

_ shall decide to be most desirable—Toledo, Monroe,

_ or Detroit. There we shall fit ourselves out with
_ what are called ‘ emigrant fixings,’ and travel south-

west to our place of destination.”

“ The last part of your journey will be the most
fatiguing.’



50 LIFE IN THE WEST.



“T am aware of that,” said Mrs. Moreton; “and
yet I enter into the feelings and anticipations of the
children, in thinking that it will be the pleasantest
of all; for it will have the charm of novelty, with
all its freshness.”

‘There is something so delightful in the thought
of beginning life afresh,” said Dr. Newton, “it
wakens up in my mind an almost childish enthu-
siasm, and I really should like to go with you; but
my good wife says, nay; and, while her aged parents
live, we ought not to give it a moment’s thought.”

Still later in the evening, Mr. and Mrs. Moreton,
with their three older children, were gathered around
the little blaze that faintly flickered on the hearth.
A large part of the furniture belonging to the room
had been removed, and it contained only such articles
as were absolutely necessary for daily use. Thoughts
of the friends who had just parted from them had
taken the place of anticipations for the future; and
their words of interest and advice were the subject
of their thoughts. Mary was the first to speak.

“Father,” said she, “‘ why is it that Dr. Newton
and Uncle Alfred take such different views of life
at the West? They have both been there, and are
both clear-headed and intelligent men; yet one says
we shall prosper and be happy, while the other pro-
phesies misery and sickness !’”.

“The two men are of different temperaments —

naturally, Mary. Dr. Newton is active, hopeful,

_ cathont

ea a aa

Be:

~s ae ae



DR. NEWTON. ' 51



bound down by no habits of luxury which have be-
come. necessary to his comfort, and ‘possesses good
heal Then, he is what is termed a self- made
| man, and is accustomed to meet and to conquer dif-
ficulties. Your uncle is in feeble health, and his
home has, ever since his youth, been supplied with
all that wealth can purchase. Every want has been
_met, and every wish gratified ; while his love for us
"makes his fears the greater, lest we should suffer.
Look about this room, now, and think how differ-
ently the two men would regard it. One would
think that it had every thing in it that we required,
because there were tables, carpet, and chairs; the
Jother would deem it unfurnished and comfortless,
because the sofa, rocking-chairs, and astral-lamp were
gone.” |
> “But which thinks rightly about it?’ asked
Robert.
“T have that opnfidenotl in the judgment of both
which leads me to adopt modified views of both
opinions, and endeavour to strike the medium be-
tween them. Doubtless, we shall find that, in many
~ things, their estimates of our pleasures and trials are
_ correct; but it is not necessary that we look through
J the actin of the one or the other, while we have
_ our own honest eyes. There are few troubles in
this world which a habit of looking upon the bright
side will not lighten or disperse ; and there are sunny
spots in everybody’s life, if there is not the dispo-
5





52 LIFE IN THE WEST. PE



sition to overshadow them with the clouds of de-
spondency and doubt.”

“But do not strong hopes and ardent expectations
often become disappointments ?”

“Certainly, they do; for such hopes and expect.
tions are not ordinarily based upon reason. There
is a something, which we call common sense, im-
planted in the mind of man. Thisis given to us as
a guide, and, through experience and education, is,
or ought to be, daily improving. If, contrary to its
teachings, we let our imaginations run away with our
hopes, we ought not to complain if the realities of
life will not keep pace with them. If we found our
hopes upon what we know to be fixed facts and
principles, and hold them (as dependent creatures
should hold all they possess) subject to. the will of
an all-wise Dispenser, there is little fear of great
and heart-crushing disappointments.”

“Then I suppose,” said Mary, “that when my
common sense, which has been educated by experi-
ence, tells me that, if I sit up any later to-night, I
_ Shall be tired and sleepy to-morrow, I had better
obey its counsels, and seek my pillow, notwith-
standing my hopes would lead me to consult my
pleasure, by talking longer.”

“Quite a timely, practical illustration,” said her
father; “and I, to encourage so laudable an exer-

cise of your common sense, will light you a candle.”” © .
And they laughingly bade each other “Good —

night !”



eS
y UNCLE ALFRED'S GIFT. 53

bw

CHAPTER V.

UNCLE ALFRED’S GIFT.

_« A qirr! a gift!” shouted Frank, as he entered
the sitting-room, the next day. “ A gift to each
of us children, from Uncle Alfred, of which am the

bearer !” |

“Tt must be a small one,” said Robert; “for you
bear nothing in your hand !”

“But I do in my pocket, Robert ;” and he took,
with great care, from it, a small package, upon
which was written, “To be equally divided between

, my nephews and nieces.”

- Tt did not take many minutes to undo the fasten-
ings, which enclosed a sum of money, upon counting
which it was found to give to each the amount of
five dollars.

“Where did you get this, Frank?” asked Mr.
Moreton.

“Uncle asked me what I would like as a parting

gift from him, and I answered that I could not de-
cide without thinking awhile; for that you, father,

_ had often told me never to make up my mind in a

_ hurry. Then he went to his desk, got this money,



54 LIFE IN THE WEST. &



and gave it to me; and said that I must tell you all
that he sent it, and wished each of us to choose for
ourselves some’ present that would please us, as a
remembrance of him,”

“We hardly need it for that purpose,” said Mary.
“Uncle Alfred will not be forgotten, I am sure.”

‘J will tell you what I shall buy,” said Frank to
Mary: “a nice little writing-desk, for you and me.
My money will just pay for one.”

“Then, Frank, if I am to use your writing-desk,
my money shall go as a subscription to some maga-
zine that we shall both like to read.”

“T shall buy a pony,” said Willie, “with an ele-
gant bridle and saddle; and, beside” —

‘There was a burst of merriment from the assem-
bled children, as Willie spoke. . It lasted but a
moment, for Mr, Moreton’s voice rose.above it.

“Your plan is too magnificent for your mo ey,
my son, and you will have to give it up. Five
dollars is a great sum for a boy like you to possess ;
but it will buy neither a pony nor a saddle.”

Discomfited as Willie was, and annoyed by the
mischievous glances of his brothers and sisters, his
good nature did not fail, and, laughing with the
rest, he only said—

“You will all lose many a good ride, then ; that
is all.”

“Why don’t you buy some candy?” asked
Alice.



UNCLE ALFRED’S GIFT. 55

«

Little Alice had not relished the laugh at her
brother’s expense, and unconsciously took the
readiest: way to divert attention from him; for they
were all in that excited state of mind, whe every
incident would furnish food for gleeful merriment.

“Your plan is no better than Willie’s, my dar-
ling,” said her father, caressing her. “While he
aims at too much, you go to the other extreme, and
would get too little for your money.”

‘What can we buy, then?” asked Alice, impa-
tiently.

“Nothing, to-night, Alice; but you can keep
your money until you know what you want. There
is no necessity of spending it for several days, and
you can think about it.”

‘‘T have a plan to propose,” said Robert; ‘and
I think it will please Uncle Alfred, as well as our-
selves. Let.us, each one, contribute a dollar apiece,
for a newspaper fund; and then, one or two dollars,
as we please, for a book fund; then let us appoint
committees to buy,some books, that are new, for our
family library, and to decide upon a newspaper and
magazine, for which to subscribe for the year.”

‘“‘T like that,” said Frank.

‘We may take one or two newspapers; and they
will come every week, like visits from Uncle Al-
fred’’—

Here Willie and Frank, instigated by Charlie,

clapped their hands, and cried, ‘ Hear! hear !”
5*





56 LIFE IN THE WEST.
ig



“With the rest of the money, we can each buy
something which pleases us, to keep as tokens of
Unele Alfred’s remembrance of us } Or we can use
it as spending-money ; or, dividing it, can use it for
both purposes.”

There was not a dissenting voice ; and when, in
regular business-like order, the vote was taken, it
was declared unanimous. Robert and Frank were
appointed a committee to select books; Mary and
Henry to decide upon the newspapers ; and here, as
well as elsewhere, may we mention, that faithfully
did they fulfil their offices, making such a judicious
selection as pleased every one, and, through the
long winter evenings, adding to their pleasure, as
well as to their knowledge.

There were little after-scenes, between the differ-
ent members of that family, to which we will be
witnesses. .......

“This breaks up my plan, Mary,” said Frank ;
“for I have not money enough left to get even a
plain writing-desk.”

“But, together, we have, Frank; and I was just
thinking how much pleasanter it would be to really
buy it together, so that it might scem equally to
belong to both.” ......, |

“Dear Mary, will you go to the store with me,
to-morrow, that I may buy some silks and worsteds,
and other little things? for I must tell you my
secret—now I shall be able to make that pincushion



UNCLE ALFRED’S GIFT. 57



for mother, against next New Year; and, beside, I
shall have time to do many other little pieces of
work, while you are all busy with the new house,
and I shall be alone.”

Mary willingly consented ; and Annie’s dark eyes
brightened, and her cheek flushed, with the hope of
being able to give pleasure to those she loved, by the
use of her needle. ...--- |

“Father,” said William, as he sat contemplating
the pictures upon his bank-bill, “ why does the
Bible say that money is the root of all evil? It
brings us much pleasure, and helps us to obtain
many good things.” ry

“‘The Bible does not say that money is the root |
of allevil, my son. It says the love of money is;
and it is an important distinction. Money (gold,
silver, and copper coin) is our medium of circulation.
With it, (or with bank-notes, which, for convenience,
have taken the place of coins,) we can procure any
article which we may desire, giving it in exchange
for such things as we think will add to our comfort,
our pleasure, or our convenience. This you know
very well; and you know as well that money or
riches are unequally divided. From some, God has
seen fit to withhold them; while to others he has
committed an overflowing abundance. Why he has
done this, we do not know, any more than we know

_why he gives one health and another sickness, one

happiness and another trouble. A wise man, and a



58 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Christian, will believe that God has some purpose in
this, and that these differences do not come from
chance; and will be contented and happy with such
a portion of this world’s goods as his own honest
efforts shall secure to him. There are others, to
whom a want of money is a great evil; for it
awakens in their hearts such strong desires for its
possession, and such love for it, that they will be
ready to envy or hate those who possess it; they
become covetous and miserly, from setting an inor-
dinate value upon it; they become grasping and
dishonest, from their determination to be rich; and
some will cheat, lie, steal, or even murder, for the
purpose of attaining it. With such consequences
resulting from the love of money, is it strange that
it should be called ‘the root of all evil ? ”

“But is it not a good thing to be rich, father ?”

“Yes, my son; money is a blessing, and should
be sought after, as we seek after other blessings. But
its possession often leads to evil: for instance, if it
makes its possessor proud or haughty, or hard-
hearted and uncharitable, or if it leads him to be
wise in his own conceit. It is its abuse that leads
to these consequences. It may also be abused, by

scattering it with a heedless, thoughtless hand, or |

by spending it for that which will do harm to our-
selves or others. If we desire to be rich to gain the

admiration of others, or wish to excite their envy, it.

becomes to us a root of evil, which we may well fear





OO a < ae

;

UNCLE ALFRED'S GIFT. 59



to have increase and grow in our hearts. But, on the
other hand, if we desire it only to gratify our natural
wants, to add to our innocent pleasures, to give us
the means to make others happy, and to extend our
power of doing good, we may seek for it earnestly,
and labour for it; and, if God blesses our efforts,
we may and ought to enjoy it, as one of the mercies
with which he has crowned our lives, and which
should be used as we think will best: please him.”

« Robert thought of pleasing Uncle Alfred in his
plan of spending our money, father. Is it in such
a way that every rich man ought to think of pleas-
ing God?”

“Yes, the principle is the same ; and it is a sure
test of gratitude, if the donor’s wishes are consulted
in our thoughts and plans, before making use of his
gifts. Your Uncle Alfred would not think you very
grateful, if you threw away his gift ; neither would
he think you valued it properly, if you should give
it in exchange for what was not of halfvits value.
He would not be pleased, if you spent it for what
would harm you; or even if you should put it away
in your strong-box, and never use it at all. It would
be far more gratifying to him toknow that you made
it add to your pleasures, or did good with it in some
way. Do not you see how you can apply all this
to the case of a rich man’s use of his property, so as
to please and honour God?” :

“JI think I do, sir. I should like to be rich,



60 LIFE IN THE WEsT.



though! It seems go pleasant to have every thing
One wants, just when they want it. I think I should
try to spend my money so as to get a great deal of
good from it.”

“We can tell about that better when we see how
you spend your five dollars.”

“T must try to remember to get something which
I think will please Uncle Alfred, please myself, be
good to use, or good to keep.”

So thought and so said Willie Moreton, as he
retired. And, as for his brother Charlie, who sat
near by and heard this—what were his thoughts ?

“My mind is made up. I must buy Bob Palmer’s
dog! Bob offered it to Samuel Frink for a dollar.
That is it, exactly. It will please Uncle Alfred,
who loves dogs. It will please me. It will be a
good thing to keep, and a good thing to use, plea-
sant to own, and very usefull” And, with high
hopes of future pleasure, it was with difficulty he
refrained from waking Willie, to tell him all about
it. With visions of Carlo dragging Annie on a
little sled, and of Carlo in the woods with him, he
laid his head upon his pillow, feeling as if he had
nearly reached the pinnacle of human happiness,







ey



THE DEPARTURE. 61

CHAPTER VI.
THE DEPARTURE.

“Tr really seems as if we were fated never to
start!” said Frank, impatiently. ‘I am tired of
thinking and talking about going, and never getting
off !”

“Tf you are tired, Frank, who are only a looker-
on, think what father and mother must be, who
have all the care and so much of the labour! I
thought, last evening, when I saw how tired they
were, that they were trying every day to do more
than they ought.”

Frank was fretful, and Mary’s reply fell upon his
ear like a reproof, to which he had no heart to
listen.

“You are all just alike,” said he; “slow, slow—

_ never ready !”

But hardly had he given utterance to these words’ P

| of impatience, before he regretted, and would have

recalled them, for he saw tears in Mary’s eyes. At

first, he thought he would take no notice of them,

turn away, and make believe that he did not see
them, He had tried this plan many times before,



62 LIFE IN THE WEST.



but had never found it to answer the purpose of
satisfying his own conscience. This he remem-
bered, and his better feelings prevailed.

“JT did not mean just so, Mary; but I do wish
we could get off! Jam so tired of waiting !”’

“So are we all, Frank; and the only way to con-
tent ourselves is to keep busy. Suppose, now, you
draw a picture of the old house and place, before we
go. That will be better than getting tired of doing
nothing, and then complaining about it.’ |

Some of our readers may be of Frank’s opinion, and
think that we are protracting our account of prepara-
tion, without regard to their feelings; and it may bea
relief to them to know that on the second Monday
of May, 18—, there was a final breaking up in the
homestead of Mr. James Moreton. Before the
evening of that day, they had said good-bye to all -
the near neighbours, and taken a farewell of all the
old haunts of their childish sports. They had gone
over the now empty chambers, even into the garret,
and looked out, for the last time, from the little
dormer-window, upon the fair fields and the old or-
chard beneath. They had been to the wood-house ;
the little room that they used for a workshop had
been visited; the old red barn, the scene of many a
noisy romping frolic, had received a last, parting visit ;
they had gazed once more into the depths of the
well, and taken a merry bumper in honour of the
old place, and pledged themselves, in its cold, clear



THE DEPARTURE. 63



waters, to stand by the new home in Hoosier-land :
and now they were ready to go.

Yet there were mingled emotions of pain and
sorrow with all their golden anticipations of the
West; strange feelings, in which hope, wonder, and
curiosity struggled with the tender grief at parting
from what was dear to them, and hallowed by the
love of childhood. The past was as a pleasant reality !
What would be the future? Would its promises
be fulfilled? Were its bright shadows to end in
dreams, or would they too become real? Who
could tell ? | |

Sunset found them all scattered. Henry and
Robert were gone, and, with them, the last of the
boxes, the trunks, the barrels and the chests. The key
had been delivered to the new owner of the place,
and the remaining members of the family were
already divided among friends and relatives, for a
visit of the few days that must intervene before they
should hear from Robert.

It matters not that we should follow them through
the detail of leave-taking. They were beloved and
honoured; their destination was far away; they
were not to return; and it was not strange that
there should be some sad hearts, some tears shed,
sone expressions of regret, as well as of love, and
of kindly-spoken words, accompanying pleasant acts
of neighbourly attention and friendly interest. But

‘all this we must leave untold.

* 6



64 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Nor will we dwell upon the incidents of their
journey. It is true that the rapid movements of
the rail-cars, the slow, monotonous progress of the
canal-boats, the swift course of the noble steamer,
that, “like a thing of life,” bore them quickly over
the clear, green waters of Lake Erie, were alike full
of novelty and interest to them. It is true that
there was no end to the questions of the children—
no limit to their desires for information. It is true
that, the very first day, such wonderful events tran-
spired, and such marvellous objects were seen, that
the record of them, in Willie’s coarse hand, threat-
ened to fill every leaf of his journal; and that to
tell which was the strangest, most curious, and most
worthy of note, he thought, would puzzle even his
father. It is true that, to Mary, Robert, and Henry,
their way was strewn with pleasures, and that each
day’s experience was crowded with thoughts and
feelings which could not fail to be awakened upon
their first long journey from home. Intelligent and
observing, how could it be otherwise? They were
passing through scenes new to their eyes, but fami-
liar to their minds, places of which they knew the
history, and gazing upon objects which they had
seen pictured forth.

A happy, merry party they were !—the little ones
all the happier for being guided by certain rules,
which were strictly observed. Mrs. Moreton was
free from the anxiety, now that she had directed. them.



THE DEPARTURE. ~ 65



to stay away from dangerous parts of the boats. Mr.
Moreton and the older brothers were never inter-
rupted in any conversation, to answer their curious
questions ; for they knew that, as soon as their con-
versation was over, they would find either of them
ready to reply patiently to their inquiries.

Then, they were never wearied in watching
the huge iron shaft of the steamboat, as it rose
and sunk. How earnestly they gazed, with wonder-
ing eyes, at the cumbrous machinery, though they
could not comprehend its workings! How they
delighted to take a run along the tow-path of the
canal, and almost lose their breath in their en-
deayours to keep up with the horses!. How full of |
mystery was that first passing through a canal-lock,
with its rushing sound of waters, its darkness, and
its peculiar motion! How they laughed, as they
crouched down upon the deck, bowing far lower than
necessary, at the sound of, ‘Bridge! Bridge!’ And,
when ranged upon their hammock-beds at night, how
merrily their little heads and bright faces peeped
out, finding great delight in their very discomfort !

Their delays—what were they, to them all, but so
many opportunities of seeing different towns and
villages? Then, who could tire while watching the
white, foamy track by which they marked their way
through the clear lake, or feel weary of gazing upon
the white caps that adorned each rising wave? Who
could think that to be out of sight of land was no-



66 LIFE IN THE WEST.



thing wonderful, or that, if they neared the shore,
the little villages or towns, or even the woods them-
selves, were not worth looking at? Not they! And
older travellers gazed upon them, and envied them
the possession of their fresh young hearts, which
could find pleasure and interest in all they saw,
while they admired their considerate, quiet atten-
tion to each other’s wishes, and their evident desire
that all should enjoy what gave them so much de-
light. And, in their hearts, they blessed them, and
wished them all prosperity on their course, as they
witnessed, day by day, the kind actions that spoke
_ 80 loudly of the bond of love which united them as
a family, and through which they were happy them-
selves and the diffusers of happiness to others.

Too quickly did the days fly by; and it required
all the eager anticipation of youth, and the expecta-
tion of something still more delightful, to reconcile
them to the thought that their journey was so far
accomplished.





a.
Qo

JOURNEYING THROUGH THE WOODS. 67

CHAPTER VII.
JOURNEYING THROUGH THE WOODS.

Ir was a bright morning in June—“ leafy June,”
the month of flowers and foliage—that three large
emigrant wagons were standing before the hotel-door
in The first, to which four horses were at-
tached, was capacious as a small room. Arches of i
ash saplings were bent over its top, and upon them
was stretched an oiled canvas, of a yellow colour,
which contrasted pleasantly with the new green
paint upon its sides and wheels. Upon the floor,
sweet, fresh straw had been scattered like a carpet.
In the front, beneath its covering, seats were ar-
ranged, with springs, and cushioned with folded
quilts and blankets. Beneath these, were boxes
containing stores necessary for daily use, such as
tea, coffee, sugar, salt, etc., and a champagne-bas-
ket, packed with tea-cups and saucers, plates, spoons,



- and knives and forks. Then, beds were neatly tied

up in white coverings, and stowed snugly away in
the far corners, with blankets folded nicely and laid
upon them; thus leaving a semicircular opening in

the rear, which gave free circulation of air, and per-
6*





68 LIFE IN THE WEST.



mitted access to articles otherwise out of reach. This
was the travelling carriage of the Moreton family ;
and it was with some pride that Charles, Frank, and
Willie viewed it, and made known its manifold beau-
ties and conveniences. They gazed upon its strongly-
built wheels, with their heavy spokes and firm tires,
and thought they could never break nor wear out.
More than once they opened the boxes which pro-
jected on each side, between the wheels, to see if,
in the one, had been placed the preparation for
greasing the wheels, and the brush for using it,
and, in the other, if there were nails of all sizes, the
ball of twine, the strips of stout leather, the small
~ eoil of rope, the hammer, saw, and hatchet, with
- other smaller tools. Nothing had been forgotten,
that might be necessary in case of accident; and
the large box, on the back of the vehicle, was filled
with oats, for the horses, while beneath it hung a
huge water-pail, which swung back and forth, swayed
by every motion of the wagon. Their unanimous
verdict was, that ‘‘it was a very complete affair.”
The second wagon was like the first, in size and
in external appearance, but was not new, nor s0
tidily arranged. It was filled with furniture, boxes,
trunks, bundles, and chests, closely packed, and se-
ceurely protected from the weather, leaving only room
for the accommodation of the driver and his com-
panions. This was a hired team, and Robert was ©
to drive it. With him, a carpenter, hired by Mr.



JOURNEYING THROUGH THE WOODS. 69



Moreton to superintend the building of his house,

was going, and a young man, as his assistant, ac-

companied them. The next vehicle contained such
4 a variety of miscellaneous articles, that Willie’s

patience gave out in enumerating them, and he

pronounced them as “too numerous to mention.”

A cooking-stove, pots, kettles, a crate of crockery, bar-

rels of provision aiid sacks of grain, were but a part

of its contents. This was also hired for the journey,

and was to be drawn by six mules, guided by their

owner, Michael Dorrance, an Irishman by birth, but,

for many years, a teamster in the Western country. |.
». He had often been over this same route, and‘Hrank’ * ;
choice was to ride with him, for the sake of —
gathering such information as he might be able to
| give concerning “life in the woods.”

Between these two last carriages, Henry was to
ride on horseback, and, with the aid of a young
man, who went to drive the second wagon back, he
was to guide the movements of two cows, a yoke of
oxen, and half a dozen sheep—no easy matter, to an
inexperienced person, where the road was often but
a track through the woods, and no fences were built,
to serve as restraints upon them, if unruly, or disposed
_ tocrop the herbage beneath the trees. And here

ought to be introduced to our readers, Carlo, Char-
___ lie’s dog, who has been neglected quite too long by

Us, considering that, until now, he had made himself
__ Very troublesome, but important, by his continual

yy





70 LIFE IN THE WEST.



uneasiness and mournful howls, so that “pleasant
to own” was omitted in his master’s summing-up of
the advantages of his purchase. But time and good ©
usage had reconciled him to the idea of emigration ;
and he now trotted contented along by the side
of Henry’s horse, sometimes barking at or biting the
heels of a refractory animal, and, at others, darting
off into the depths of the forest, and returning, in
a few minutes, panting and weary, but wagging his
tail, and looking quite satisfied with the result of
his search.

Every preparation had been made for starting ;
yet no little time was consumed in the getting off,
and the satisfactory settling of themselves in their
new quarters. Even when they did start, they were
so occupied with the novelty of their position, and
with their arrangements for seats, and for a com-
fortable passing of their time, that they hardly no-
ticed the country through which they were travel-
ling.

For the same reason, their progress was slow.
Only fifteen miles were accomplished at sunset, and
then, in rude but decent quarters, they passed the
night.

But, the next morning, the journey was really
commenced in good earnest; for sunrise found them
all up, dressed, and ready for a start. Breakfast
was soon disposed of; but not before they had
gathered themselves together, for family prayer.



JOURNEYING THROUGH THE WOODS. 71



Together they sang their morning hymn of praise
and thanksgiving, and together they commended
themselves to the care of their heavenly Father.

“ We have no right to think God will remember
us, and take care of us, while we forget him. By
the way, as well as within the house, we need his
directing hand. He is the friend we cannot leave—

watchful, loving, and powerful to protect. Let us

thank him for all his goodness to us!”

Thus said and thus felt Mr. Moreton, as the morn-
ing sun rose bright and clear, and they were once
more upon thefr way. ‘The forests lay stretched out
about them, as they proceeded upon their course,

dressed in the fresh, early green of June. Dew-
_ drops, like glistening diamonds, sparkled on the
sprays of grass, and the sweet carollings of birds
- filled the air with melody. No dust had soiled the

fair buds and leaves—no hand had plucked the gay

_ and brilliant blossoms that covered the ground. Too



quiet were those deep woods for fear, too full of
beauty and pleasure for loneliness; and, under these
gentle ministrations, a calm hut determined happi-
ness rose in the hearts of our travellers.

There was something so sweet in that fresh vernal
air, loaded with the fragrance of the early flowers,
so invigorating in its influences, that sadness was
dispelled and weariness forgotten. And the gushes
of melody from the busy birds, in the leafy branches
of the forest-trees, now trilling, now whistling, now

ey



72 LIFE IN THE WEST.



flowing on in soft, continued notes, or interrupted
with the cheerful chatter of the blackbird, or the
discordant cawing of the crow, as the gentle breezes
bore to the ear more distant sounds; who could lis-
ten to these, and not feel that the world about them
was indeed a “ treasure-house of pleasure,” an up-
springing fountain of delight ?

And the small streams that danced joyously along
between their green banks—were they not emblems
of quiet happiness? Or if, in their course, they
spread themselves into little lakes, did they not
shine like burnished silver in the sunlight, and re-
flect the beauty and brightness of the blue heavens
above? Did they not tempt the flying birds to
bathe in the clear waters? Did they not give back
to the gorgeous dragon-fly the image of his: own
beautiful form, as he played above the waves, or
rested, for the moment, upon the ripples ?

And the little swarms of yellow butterflies—were
they not happy in their social companies? The
speckled quails, that, in loving pairs, rustled among
the dry leaves—was there no sympathy for them,
as they sought to find, or make for themselves, a
new home? Was there no bounding of heart, as
‘that fleet deer was seen for the moment, and then
vanished in the covert of the woods?

In the early summer, imagination can hardly
picture more beautiful scenes than those presented
by the Western “oak-openings,” through which, for



JOURNEYING THROUGH THE WOODS. 73



many miles, the path of our travellers lay. The
level surface of the country, permitting the eye to
range to a great distance; the picturesque grouping
or planting of the trees; the spreading formation of
their branches ; their graceful but light foliage, that
admits, at once, the warm sunlight and gentle ze-
phyrs, yet forms an agreeable shade; the absence
of undergrowth ; the winding tras extending in
many directions ; the profuse sprinkling of flowers, —
with brilliant petals,—all tend to awaken emotions
of pleasure in any breast not callous or dead to a
sense of the beautiful. It is as if you entered a
vast park or pleasure-ground, fresh from the hand
of its Maker, where man had neither destroyed nor
» marred the, first impress of God’s manifest care
for the happiness of his creatures; and, in its little
daisy-tufts, that spring by the roadside, as well: as
") in its loftiest trees, the lesson of His existence and
_ ¢ care and protection may be read. ;
There was not a heart but was quick to feel this,
' among the company of emigrants whose fortunes we
. are following; nor one in whose mind were not gra-
_ titude and thankfulness to Him who had brought
_ them thus far on their way. safely, and was opening -
_ _ to them prospects of life, so full of joy and hope, in «
_ the wide woods of the West.
Nor did these feelings vanish when an occasional
_ house or cabin was passed. Even when the rum-
7 ' D bling of their wheels brought to the door swarms of

a '?
ty eee





.
,

74 LIFE IN THE WEST.



children, and men unshaven and roughly clad, their
eyes were quick to detect tokens of success in the
newly-planted apple-tree, the extent of the. clear-
ing, the potato-patch, the feeble effort at a barn,
and, in them all, they read a lesson of hope for the
future; for, from these small beginnings—these
struggles of labour with poverty—were to come,
‘they knew well, the competence and independence

“that distinguish the lot of our hard-working but free
countrymen

= = me i mati

— = i .
F | lea HI

. Y

y

\e e: Le

Nes
“-)



,



ENCAMPMENT IN THE WOODS. 75

CHAPTER VIII.
ENCAMPMENT IN THE WOODS.

Round and round move the heavy wheels of the
large emigrant-wagons. Round and round they go,
through wood and swamp, over log-bridges, and

_ through “timbered Jands;” now rumbling, now
_# creaking ; now contending with stump or projecting
“\) root; now moving at a brisker pace over a smooth,
level spot; and then, again, toiling along, half-
buried in a deep rut, left by the spring frosts and
rains. Slowly they move, but surely. The. stout



_ the section-trees, and proclaims that twenty* miles
© have been accomplished before the mid-day rest.
Yet, as the shades of evening draw on, our travel-
lers are weary and wayworn, and disappointed, too.

_ They had hoped to reach the settlement of Lupine

*%

‘ Sabbath. "
f But Lupine Prairie was still ten miles distant
_ when the dusk of evening was drawing near; and
i the fatigue, both of travellers and horses, made it

; :

~ Prairie before nightfall, for the next day was the

a
Sark
ait,

os driver of the first wagon has kept the reckoning of »

¥ »

Shee.



76 LIFE IN THE WEST.



desirable to stop for the night. It was not their

first experience of camping-out, for they had been
five nights upon the road, and only two of these
had they been able to find comfortable quarters be-
neath the shelter of a roof. Every possible arrange-
ment had been made, before starting, for the passing
of the nights by the wayside ; and it was almost in-

- comprehensible, even to them, how easily they could *

accommodate themselves, and be rendered comfort-
able under these new circumstances. But our readers
shall judge for themselves.

The setting sun, with its gorgeous array of golden
clouds, had sunk below the western horizon, before
they had reached a dry, elevated place, suitable for,
an encampment. Then, after a few words of con-
sultation with Mr. Moreton, the stout driver (whose.
good sense and practical knowledge of the country
had placed him in the capacity of guide and adviser) |
turned the heads of his horses, and drew carefully
up beneath the green trees, standing back some dis-'
tance from the road. The horses were then taken
out, relieved of the weight of their harness, and placed
in a safe position to rest and cool themselves, before
being allowed to eat. :

Then, slowly came on the second “ team,” guided
by the careful hand of Robert. This also drew up,
and was placed at a right angle with the first, and
the horses carefully looked after.

Before a half hour passed, there,was heard, echo-



ENCAMPMENT IN THE WOODS. 77



_ ing through the woods, the sharp voice of Michael
‘ Dorrance, erying, “ Whoa! whoa!’ in tones that
' even the slow-witted animals he was master of could
not mistake. They too drew up, and placed them-
selves opposite to Robert's wagon—thus forming
three sides of a hollow square, opening to the'south.
_ Henry and his aid soon gathered their charge, and
» made them fast not far from this opening, taking
particular care that they should be comfortable this |
night; for the rest of the Sabbath was approaching,
and Mr. Moreton desired that its hours might be
_ spent in peace and quietness, so far as their situa-
i tion should allow.
} But these arrangements were not all. Scarcely
| had they stopped, before Charles, Willie, and Alice
«® were scattered, picking up dry bits of wood and dead
branches, that would burn quickly and easily. Mr.
” Moreton, leaving the care of the horses to the driver,
_, had taken his hatchet from the box at the side of the
_ wagon, and soon finding a windfall, (a tree that had
_ fallen some time previous, and was now dead and
dry,) he had easily chopped some of its branches
into lengths suitable for burning. Just without the
_ enclosure, he then placed two large green logs, form-
_ ing two sides of a triangle with them. Thesewere
_ to hold up the wood, and to protect the blaze while it
_, was kindling. Then came Alice, with a basket full
___ of small chips and light sticks, which were carefully
_ and loosely placed upon each other, between the logs.

DNS et"







78 LIFE IN THE WEST.



They were then lighted from a match, and soon
blazed up, crackling merrily. When fairly burn-
ing, Willie cast on his treasures, but even he was
cautious lest he should put out the little blue flame
that, in darting tongues, was climbing here and there
over the wood. Asit gained in power and strength,
Charlie laid sticks of wood upon it, until the united
strength of the children hardly sufficed to lift the
logs that it was desirable to place over the coals, in
order to insure their continuance until morning. By
the time that Michael reached there with his mules,
there was a good roaring fire, brightening up with
its light the increasing shades of evening, and offer-
ing a bed of live coals to any one who would use
them to cook their evening meal.

But where was Robert? Away with the water-
pails, looking for a stream or spring, from which
they might be filled; and not long was he gone!
As for Susan and Mary, they were busy enough!
Out of the back of Michael’s wagon, they had had a
table lifted; upon it they had briskly mixed the
bread, which was to be baked for the morning’s use.
Frank was there, too, placing the little tin reflector
just far enough from the fire; and, with one of the
girls’ aprons tied around hin waist, he speedily
washed the potatoes, and hung them over the fire
to boil. The little square gridiron, with its shining
black bars, was spread with slices of meat; and,
over those glowing embers, how nicely it eooked't





ENCAMPMENT IN THE WOODS. 79



Then there was the coffee to be made; and then
wipifig off the little table, a clean white cloth was
spread upon it, and it was covered with dishes, ready
for their evening meal; the cake of golden-coloured
butter, the pile of slices of wheaten bread, and the
full sugar-dish were not forgotten. And Susan !
She it was who slipped away with her milk-pail, but
found that Henry had been quicker -than she, and
already sat by the side of one of the cows, with a
pail nearly full of foaming, ereamy milk! By the
time that supper was ready, there was not one who
was not ready, too, to eat the simple, but, to them,
delicious repast, with a good appetite and a keen
relish. . 2... + Wek oy
The round moon rose red and clear, and glided
high into the heavens, casting upon the ‘sleeping
emigrants a mellowed light, which was heightened
or obscured as the watch-fire burned high or low.
At intervals, might be heard the restless horses,
terrified at imaginary sounds, or disturbed by the
movements of their companions; or the strokes of
the axe, plied by the watchman of the hour as a
help to wakefulness. But peacefully they slum-
bered, while “He who never slumbereth nor sleep-
eth” was a “guard upon their right hand, and upon
their left, to preserve them from evil.” \And when,
at the previously-arranged hours, one after another,
the young men took their places quietly, to guard
the encampment from intrusion, the pleasant words
7*



80 LIFE IN THE WEST.

_of “ All’s well!” was their only greeting. At the
foot of each new-comer would Carlo wag his tail,
look up in his face for a word or sign of recog-
nition, and then again compose himself to his little
naps. :





A SABBATH IN THE WOODS. @, 81

CHAPTER IX.

A SABBATH IN THE 100 ”




Ir we allowed our readers to suppose th
persons employed by Mr. Moreton, i in oe e “pre
tion of his journey, were pleased with his plan a

é stopping upon the Sabbath, we should give a wrong

» impression. Although it had been agreed upon be-
4 fore starting, the fine weather and their having
- been delayed upon the road beyond their expecta-
tion, had awakened a strong desire to go on.
_ Michael Dorrance, particularly, remonstrated against



the delay, and expressed his opinion, that “it was

» all nonsense to stop ;” to which Mr. Moreton calmly
replied—

_ But, Michael, last Friday, when you said. that

_ your religion permitted you to eat no meat, I did

not say that that was all nonsense. We both pro-

' fess to be guided by the precepts of the Bible. You

+ cannot read it, and take, upon the authority of your
“® priest, what he tells you are words of command and

* promise. He tells you to eat no meat on Fridays ;
" and we tried, at some inconvenience to ourselves, to

a ispmoanm odate you with food that you thought it right



_ toeat, although we knew that there was no command



Tye

82 LIFE IN THE WEST.



in God’s word concerning it. This is the Bible,”
said Mr. Moreton, holding onevin his hand; “and I
read it for myself, and find it says, ‘Six days shalt
thou labour and do all thy work: but the seventh
day is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou
shalt not do any work; thou, nor thy son, nor thy
daughter, thy man-servant, nor thy maid-servant, nor
thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates :
for in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the
sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh
day: wherefore, the Lord blessed the Sabbath-day,
‘and hallowed it.’ This is very plain; and I should
not do what I consider right, if, in obedience to this
command, I did not allow each one of us a day of
rest, and an opportunity to honour God, by observ- ,
ing his Sabbath.” = 2

“Tf you could go to church,” said Michael, “and
see the praist, and get absolution, it would be worth
yer while.”

“My priest is Jesus Christ,” said Mr. Moreton,
‘“¢who lives with God in heaven, and he is every-
where present; as near me here, in these woods, as
if Iwere in any church. To him I shall go in
prayer this day, and confess my sins ; and I know
that he will forgive them, and grant me pardon ; for
the Bible says, ‘If we confess our sins, he is faith-
ful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us
from all unrighteousness ;’ and ‘If any man sin, we
have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ, the



A SABBATH IN-THE WOODS. 83



righteous.’ And, as a family, we shall gather to-
gether, and ask God’s pardon for our sins, and his
blessing upon us. We shall hope that you will
unite with us in thanking Him who has made our
journey, thus far, pleasant and prosperous.”

There was another person as much dissatisfied as
Michael with the proposed delay, and this was the
stout driver. He was a Western man, in middle
life, of good natural abilities, but uneducated and
without religious principle. He made no complaint
to Mr. Moreton, but to Robert he said—

“J don’t, myself, see the use of stopping thirty-
six hours here, in this place, just because it happens
to be Sunday, instead of Monday. I should think

that folks might be just as good and pious, going
along. Besides, it is my opinion that God is good

and merciful, and, if we die, will take us all to hea-

_ ven, whether we bother ourselves with keeping Sun-
_ day, or not.”

“Do you think there are two heavens?” asked
Robert; “one for those who love God, and endea-

_. vour to serve him, and another for those who do not





care for him or his commandments ?”

‘Why,no! I guessthey’ll all share pretty much
alike !”
~ “Then, according to your own showing, should

. they even be taken to the same place, one class must
| be happy and the other miserable. You would not
_ be happy in’a heaven where the worship of God was





|

84 LIFE IN THE WEST.



the sole employment and every day a Sabbath, and
my father could never enjoy any place where God
was forgotten and never praised. Now, I leaye it to
you to say, whether you think that a God who
should reward those who have never even remem-
bered him, and punish those who have tried to serve
him and to do his will, is a good God, or such an
one as you think rules this universe. But people
do not all go to the same place when they die. The
Bible says that ‘the wicked shall be turned into
hell, and all the nations that forget God;’ ‘Be not
deceived; God is not mocked: whatsoever a man
soweth, that shall he also reap;’ ‘God will render
to every man according to his deeds: to them who,
by patient continuance in well-doing, seek for glory
and honour and immortality, eternal life; but unto
them that are contentious, and obey not the truth,
but obey unrighteousness, indignation and wrath,
tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man
that doeth evil; but glory, honour, and peace to
every man that worketh good.’”

As Robert read these texts, the eye of his com-
panion was fixed upon him. When he had finished,
he said—

‘‘Death will change us, and make heaven pleasant
to us, by making us fit to enter it.”

“J cannot say that it will,” said Robert. “TI know
nothing about it, but what the Bible says, I read
there, ‘And if the tree fall toward the south or to-



A SABBATH IN THE WOODS. 85

ward the north, in the place where the tree falleth,
there it shall lie”* ‘He that is unjust, let him be
unjust still, and he that is filthy, let him be filthy
still; he that is righteous, let him be righteous still,
and he that is holy, Jet him be holy still.” ‘And,
behold, I come quickly, and my reward is with me,
to give to every man according as his work shall be.’
These texts don’t sound much as if we could hope
that dying was to make us fit to go to heaven.”

The necessary arrangements for the day were few
and easily made; and none but Mr. Moreton and
Robert knew of these discussions, as, in a spirit of
gladness, they assembled about the little table spread
with the morning meal.

“< How shall we spend the day ?” was the natural
inquiry. It was soon settled that, at ten o’clock,
they should come together, to hear a sermon read by
Mr. Moreton, accompanied with the other services
of public worship; that,” in the afternoon, there
should be a kind of Sunday-school, and, in the even-
ing, a temperance meeting should be held, directly
after family prayers; the intervening hours to be
employed in that way which to each one seemed most
desirable.

To this plan they cheerfully consented ; and, before
long, Mrs. Moreton produced a basket of books,
tracts, and papers, which the children soon scattered

* Eccl, xi. 3.



oo

ame

86 LIFE IN THE WEST.



about, as they seated themselves beneath the over-
spreading branches of some gnarled oak, or were
overshadowed by the hanging vines of a climbing
wild-grape ; and either singly, or in clusters of two |
or three, sought to commit to memory a self-imposed
lesson for the afternoon, or read aloud for the grati-
fication of others, or silently perused the word of
God for themselves. Who could doubt, as ‘they
gazed upon the seriously happy faces of these little
groups, that God was with them, leading their young
hearts, by the influences of his good spirit, “ to re-
member the day, to keep it holy?’ Or, as they
looked upon them, gathered together for united
worship, who could feel that it was a vain thing to
serve the Lord, when each beaming countenance
told of hope and joy and peace ?

In the little church of Laurelton, the good pas-
tor remembered them, and besought the blessing of
Jehovah to rest upon any servants of his who, that
day, might be far from the ordinances of the sanc-
tuary; and asked that his presence might- be with
them, whether in the house or by the way. Even
then was that prayer answered and that petition
granted, as,

‘¢In the darkling wood,
Amidst the cool and silence, they knelt down,
And offered, to the Mightiest, solemn thanks
And supplication.”



A SABBATH IN THE WOODS. 87



Those prayers were no tedious ceremony, no wearl- _&
some service, or one in which the heart had no part,

but “the offering of their sincere desire unto God, for. ,
things agreeable to his will, in the name of Christ,

with confession of sin, and thankful acknowledgment 3
of his mercy.” Then upon the air, borne by the soft
winds in tuneful notes, rose the voice of praise :

:
= %
:

«Through all the changing scenes of life,
Jn trouble or in joy,
The praises of our God shall still
Our hearts and tongues employ.

Oh! make but trial of his love:
Experience will decide

How blest are they, and only they,
Who in his truth confide.

Fear him, ye saints; and you will then
Have nothing else to fear:

Come, make his service your delight ;
He’ll make your wants his care.”

A portion of God’s word was listened to, another
song of praise was sung, and then the discourse
selected by Mr. Moreton was read. Its subject was
the “Keeping of the Sabbath.” It spoke of its
"advantages as a day of rest, and of its adaptedness
to the wants of man, both asa mortal and an im-
mortal being, and of its meeting his necessities,
‘

tt





OS

88 LIFE IN THE WEST.



physical and moral. Its observance was urged for

the reason,

*

Z
$
2

'

That it was the command of ‘God that it should 1

be kept holy, as a commemoration of the creation,
and a token of our entire dependence on him as our
Creator ; |

That it tended, by giving stated seasons of rest,
to prolong human life ;

That such rest and change of occupation kept
clear and unimpaired the intellectual and reasoning
faculties of man ;

That its observance asa day of worship awakened
proper emotions of love and gratitude to Him who
gives us all our time, and through whose death and
resurrection we have hope of eternal life ;

That its tendency was to elevate and enlighten
the affections ;

And, finally, because, by giving us an oppor-
tunity to study and contemplate the character of
Jehovah, and his perfections, we might learn to love
him and seek his friendship; so that, at the day of
judgment, we might be accepted through the Sa-
viour, and be made welcome by him as good and
faithful servants. j

It was a plain, practical sermon, written in sim- —

ple language. Its subject was illustrated both by
Scripture, aptly applied, and by anecdotes, showing

the value of the Sabbath.in a physical point of view. _;

There were the written or expressed opinions of

Re. a
eoae





A SABBATH IN THE WOODS. 89



eminent men, such as Wilberforce, who says: “Oh!
what a blessing is Sunday! interposed between the
waves of worldly business, like the divine path of
the Israelites through Jordan! I can truly say
that, to me, the Sabbath is invaluable.” There
was the opinionof Dr. Sewall, whose observation led
him to write: “I have remarked that those to whom
the Sabbath brings the most entite rest from their
habitual labours, performed the secular duties of the
week more vigorously and successfully than those
who continued them without intermission.” And
that of Dr. Warren, who says: “I have a firm be-
lief that persons who observe the Sabbath are able
to do more work, and do it in a more perfect man-
ner, in six days, than if they worked the whole
seven. A change of thought seems to give a fresh
spring to the mental operations, as a change of food
does to the body. ‘The breathing of the pure and
sublime atmosphere of the religious Sabbath re-
freshes and invigorates the spirit: it forms an
epoch in our existence, from which we receive a
new impulse, and thus constitutes the best prepara-
tion for the labours of the coming week.”

These truths and facts fell upon the ears of an
attentive and interested audience, for all had drawn
near to listen, either from lack of occupation, or
from respect to Mr. Moreton. There was an unaf-
fected seriousness and an apparent pleasure in con-
templating the truths of God’s word, which gave to



90 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Mr. Moreton’s tones a power to arrest and enchain
attention; and the fitness of the subject to the cir-
cumstances in which they were placed could not fail
to be felt, even by those to whom the delay had
been, at first, unwelcome.

None sat there listlessly or with wandering minds;
and as, in devout gratitude, Mr. Moreton offered the
closing prayer to Him who in wisdom hath set apart
the Sabbath, and hallowed it, and asked him to incline
their hearts to keep it holily unto the end, even the
heart of Michael Dorrance was touched. Uncon-
sciously to himself, the strongholds of superstition
were loosened in his mind; and though, after the
custom of his church, he raised his hat and made
the sign of the cross upon his forehead and breast,
yet, in his soul, he acknowledged that true worship
was not confined to temples made with hands, or
to forms devised by the hearts of men.

Thus passed the hours of that Sabbath morning ;
and thus, from beneath the green trees, went up to
the throne of God the incense of devotion and love.
It was a fit temple for the worship of the Most
High—far from the cares and tumults of the busy
world; far from the throng of thoughtless m als
pressing on in their worldly pursuits. And there,
surrounded by the manifestations of Anes
goodness, warmed by the light of that sun which

Â¥

#

f

he guides and refreshed by the cool breezes of his

bestowing, fed from his bounty and sustained by.








A SABBATH IN THE WOODS. 91



his protecting hand, can we doubt but his pure eye
looked upon these, his worshippers, with love, and
that unto them should be fulfilled the promise,
‘¢Them that honour me, will I honour ?’”’*

ne!

* 1 Sam. ii. 30.

»



ay et
*



92 LIFE IN THE WEST.



-

CHAPTER X.
THE RAINY DAY’S ‘JOURNEY.

Ratny, stormy days there are in everybody’s*ex-
“perience; days when employment is hindered, when
progress is delayed, when a icipated pleasures are
marred, when good-nature, ‘if dependent upon the
weather, is apt to become bal-nature, and the spirits 4
will flag and sink, unless sustained by active ems
ployment or governed by principle. These often
happen to dwellers at home ; and to them, sur-
rounded with every in-door comfort that wealth or
thrift can procure, they bring little temptation to
complain or murmur. But, to the poor, whose
dwellings are” not proof against the storm; whose
habitations are dark and disconsolate, unless cheered
by the light of the sun ; whose out-door labour it is
that puts bread into their mouths,—suchdays come
~ as seasons of discipline, and bring with them discom-
fort and trial, that must be knoy m to be realized.
To emigrants of every class, a rainy day is a dis- ‘
appointment. To see the blue sky overcast With

+ a

threatening clouds, and a “ar. spread over \
the whole horizon; to hear the breezes rustle fit-»










¢ é
aa a. ‘te evs 4 4
‘ be Saw
se.
a y

es se MO AR gs
. . pte mh



THE RAINY DAY'S JOURNEY. 93



fully in the tree-tops ; to see the birds move off with
rapid wing, and hear their short, quick notes, tell-
ing of a coming storm; to feel the pattering rain-
drops, as they fall upon the green leaves ; and to
know that, with the exception of an occasional
cabin, the road stretches for miles through paths
unfrequented, save by travellers like themselves ;
and to know that their only resources for comfort,
warmth, and dryness are comprised within the nar-
row limits of their own wagon,—it is all this which
makes a rainy day so much dreaded by an emigrant.
Such a day was the one preceding the arrival of Mr.
Moreton’s family at their new home.

The early morning had come with a bright dawn>
ing; yet there were tokens of coming rain that
caused them hurriedly to despatch their breakfast,
and to gather themselves together for starting as
soon as possible. To do this, there must be some
hurry and bustle, some anxiety and care, lest any
thing should be forgotten or misplaced. Cloaks |
and shawls must be found for Mrs. Moreton and the
_ girls, and the “rubber coats and leggins,” with “ the
sow’-wester hats,’ must be taken out for Mr. Moreton
and his sons. The mid-day meal must be arranged,
so that it could be easily reached, and taken without
exposure to the weather. Little Annie must have
the warmest, driest place, and the best cushion
must be placed for the mother. All this done, and
cheerfully done, and every thing finally arranged,



94 LIFE IN THE WEST.



the horses started at a brisk trot, while our travel-
lers, forgetful of the past inconvenience attending so
hasty a transit, were looking up the causes they had
for congratulation in their present circumstances.
Frank was the first to say—

“ How fortunate that it did not begin to rain
until all our goods were,under cover, and we almost
ready for the start !”

“Yes,” said Annie; “and how fortunate, too,
that the clouds came as messengers, to let us know
that we must hurry !”’

“We shall not be troubled with the dust, to-day,
dear Annie,” whispered Mary; ‘and that will be
better for your cough.” |

“Jt really seems quite like home,” said Mrs.
Moreton, “to get so many of us together. again.
When one of you were in Michael’s wagon, and an-
other with Henry, and some of you walking by the
roadside, I was almost lonely, and had to take my
knitting-work, for company. To-day, we are quite a
family party.”

“ How beautifully the*rain-drops lie on the fresh,
green leaves!” exclaimed Mary. ~A bright sun
would make them glisten like jewels!”

“And a longer withholding of his beams will '

make the fresh, green leaves fresher and greener,”
replied Mr. Moreton. “This rain falls opportunely
for the wheat-fields, and probably reaches ours.”

“ Our wheat-fields!” How pleasantly that sound —

&





soe - =

THE RAINY DAY’S JOURNEY. 95



fell upon their ears, telling of a resting-place for the

weary, the end of their fatiguing journey, their ,

home, and that, too, near at hand! The natural
hopefulness of youth painted that home in bright

~ eolours to the fancies of our youthful friends; and,

in guessing how it would look, in hearing how it
did look, and in telling how they meant it should
look, the hours sped on. When weary of this, there
was Willie, with his never-ending fund of riddles
for them to guess; there was Susan, who could
narrate such beautiful tales and stories; there was
the mother, with her memory stored with beautiful
ballads and curious verses; there was Mary, ever
ready to give thema song; and Frank and Charlie,
with strong lungs, always good at a chorus. Then
Robert called out to them, with his genial laugh and
merry tones, proposing hard questions in arithmetic
and history—questions that puzzled even Susan and
Mary ; and, above all, there was the father, without
whom no enjoyment was quite complete, entering
into each and every endeavour to make the rainy
day pass pleasantly. Then, when Henry, attracted
by the merriment, looked in upon them, with his
coat-collar turned up above his ears and his glazed
hat covered with rain-drops, and made believe that
he was a stray traveller, and asked for charity, oh!
how merrily they laughed, and how curiously they
questioned him concerning his family, his home,
and his prospects!- But he did not laugh; not he!

we,’ 2 a

we Ss &
. - x

%
’



96 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Who ever saw a beggar-man laugh, while asking for
help? But steadily and soberly he besought :

‘‘Pity the sorrows of a hungry man,
Whose stout young legs have borne him to your cart;
Who, out of breath, hath hither quickly ran, |
To—to—”
But, alas! no rhyming line could he think of; and
it was Mary who supplied his need, by adding—

‘“‘To get a bit to eat, before you start.” »

Then, no famous ode of. famous poet was ever re-
ceived with more rapturous applause than Henry’s
extempore attempt at a parody; and no performance
ever so entirely satisfied an audience as his persona-
tion of a beggar. With liberal hands, they filled
his pockets, showering upon him crackers and cakes,
and, with more liberal tongues, bestowed their praise
and words of admiration.

It was towards the close of this day, that our tra-
vellers suddenly halted in their course, and drew up
together. There, in the road, was a cart, loaded to
its utmost capacity, with one wheel fast in a deep
hole, or, in Western phrase, slewed. ‘The strength
of the two miserable and wornddoking horses at-
tached to the vehicle was insufficient to start it from |

its position; and the master, Patrick McConey, had 4

put his shoulder to the wheel, in the hope of adding ~
his strength to theirs, while his wife had placed her
three children on the gtass by the roadside, and,

: ae





THE RAINY DAY’S JOURNEY. 97



with whip in hand, was vainly striving to prompt the
wearied animals to greater effort.

To take two of the best horses from Mr. Moreton’s
wagon, and “hitch” them before those belonging to
McConey, was the work of but a few moments. To
lift from’ the wagon the heavy chest and box, and
then to give “the long pull, the strong pull, and the
pull all together,” that would release them from
their unwilling durance; to aid in tying up the
broken and strained harness; to fasten and make
sure the unfortunate wheel; and to replace children
and goods in the wagon,—occupied not many more.
And then, falling in the rear of the company, Patrick
McConey strove to keep his place with them, that
he might have the ‘benefit of their guidance, their
company, and their assistance, if he again fell into
trouble.

Now Patrick was a sample of emigration that was
not very inviting. He was an Irishman, who had
landed, two years before, with his wife and family,
at Quebec. Those two years, he had struggled with
great poverty and want. Discouraged with his con-
dition, and feeling that there was no prospect of bet-
tering it there, he had availed himself of the first
opportunity to change it. With the money raised
by the sale of such household goods as he possessed,
they had passed up the St. Lawrence and through
the Lakes, as steerage or deck passengers, and
' finally landed in Sandusky. This had been in



98 LIFE IN THE WEST.



the fall; and although, on first arriving, they had,
from their destitute condition, been objects of public
charity, yet, by dint of hard labour and hard fare,
and a willingness to ask for and accept aid, they had
been enabled to get together, by the next summer,
the miserable outfit of an old wagon and two broken-
down horses. A bundle of straw served for a bed,
a tattered quilt or two answered for covering and
protection. Two stools, an iron kettle, a painted
chest, tied up with a rope, a cask of pork, anda
sack of potatoes, completed their assortment of what
Willie called, not “goods,” but “‘bads.” They were,
indeed, objects of compassion—not so much for their
destitute condition, as for their ignorance. Patrick’s
plan, so far ashe had any, was to go on until he
found a spot where he could stop; and, after that,
his only idea seemed to be to plant some wheat!
Where this place was to be, he knew not. That he
had little or no money to buy land, he deemed of
slight consequence; for, “sure, and wasn’t there
land enough for him and the crathurs anywhere ?”’
And, as for getting a living out of it, “and couldn’t
he work ?”’ '

That he had health, strength, and good-nature
was plainly to be seen; but that he was ignorant,
and, from his want of judgment, unable to provide
for himself and family, there could be little doubt. |
Mr. Moreton tried, in vain, to convince him, that
when he found the place to stop, which it seemed ~







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'2011-10-31T22:59:41-04:00'
describe
'7020' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOD' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
bb4ec5b0cf3714fdb06029b842a9f7ec
92c9cac7968f088e325a4792d630e1612d8fd3e6
'2011-10-31T22:59:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOE' 'sip-files00008.tif'
120f744ca91b9f73e12cac89cb1f5565
d9ea914046fddf9416f8569f7bd49e5b1c918ef9
'2011-10-31T22:56:55-04:00'
describe
'49' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOF' 'sip-files00008.txt'
9c0aabe0f3cc9cebf4873a52faa21eee
938470e783bbc6f99c7604b264e54368224e54de
'2011-10-31T22:57:48-04:00'
describe
'2775' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOG' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
bef016e9c2a7198ef87071abbc7befe7
45893dfb39ff1cb0a35c31f4b599286d283b0f5b
'2011-10-31T23:02:01-04:00'
describe
'466448' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOH' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
8f47e4ccd13ecb77d8a3bd706c375f1b
08e323be9f08acd65026f2a7e0257aa1ed320aea
'2011-10-31T23:01:52-04:00'
describe
'16951' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOI' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a66111125f76afb435d92be598983d4f
95b1016d7eb7972f1e57d664afbc92b170d69d10
'2011-10-31T22:59:44-04:00'
describe
'307' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOJ' 'sip-files00009.pro'
4c5255fbd277f4a2ac52029bc03e68d2
f41f69d1426aa1889fae62d4106cdb5a43b8403a
'2011-10-31T23:01:58-04:00'
describe
'5616' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOK' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
b7c0980aa36b806ce2d493b124e0d760
5fcf49a983c8df4825731b3204a56bf5263353a8
'2011-10-31T22:57:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOL' 'sip-files00009.tif'
0425aa7008093cb06b747894909cd69f
631cb2848969812ed4387f418824e16154abcc8b
'2011-10-31T22:56:47-04:00'
describe
'105' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOM' 'sip-files00009.txt'
6dd3acf1ee4caa48c3af1cac21eeae79
7a11b25d4757703d3c34ee63799a4d42decc73b1
'2011-10-31T22:57:59-04:00'
describe
'1991' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVON' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
39b99f9bbcdf720211600deef4284ccb
6eca8219a411ba1286121dece7745e2d3ba0ad6b
'2011-10-31T23:00:01-04:00'
describe
'637660' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOO' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
4a430d9930c248f5df9181b124deee5e
1c7d12b19f965c2b1b65ae4a320904319dab509c
'2011-10-31T23:02:13-04:00'
describe
'39867' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOP' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
3698294f21d8b45b323f3e6634395be3
723c4505d4a1064d2b634f670f4bde903caf16d3
'2011-10-31T22:56:57-04:00'
describe
'13839' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOQ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
c56ac345e6f65c475fcf389fcf0900bb
a5d4059a38d30152b86b65773de82c230feadc4f
'2011-10-31T23:02:29-04:00'
describe
'15175' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOR' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
f54dd7914df99ae693959570113d00d4
d08da7f3c6b55df28719effd4bdc0eab85720104
'2011-10-31T22:59:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOS' 'sip-files00010.tif'
1790eeb65e7c5cc12d6088185171fc1f
cd9e5b0c8a55ebeabedde417351fa4e4f316cc44
'2011-10-31T23:00:10-04:00'
describe
'695' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOT' 'sip-files00010.txt'
c2eb6be05032219cb5596c3d8c2d0f14
c1c1011a76f0171dfb844ace9da74f1c72142ea2
'2011-10-31T23:00:53-04:00'
describe
'5830' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOU' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
2614a393887194ee389c9dd93205e630
60d1022b215345f5e334e42827c8880f6fcbd6ca
'2011-10-31T23:00:21-04:00'
describe
'484673' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOV' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
323a5ff5fa31e8f77f66ea3f1f8ed869
f300e0c1318d033678f61c71a9750c8d2b032bff
describe
'18468' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOW' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
e89f4a30931b2ea734eee8850244de25
63207150bdb44564425d2cc11203d93bb7c8f302
'2011-10-31T22:58:53-04:00'
describe
'356' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOX' 'sip-files00011.pro'
93b00541db82603b78ccfe484718e13a
7c018ffea5533ba6910292b442e6f50111a53a8a
describe
'6293' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOY' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
d9ec7110185d7f87e4f20330b78c1137
c13c20aeabcc9d85bfb8650473c83c879c2ca554
'2011-10-31T22:58:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVOZ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
7d17d1fe15e9822584e883339291ba32
23b625b3a352046ea0bd58bbbf4a845def327679
'2011-10-31T22:57:19-04:00'
describe
'117' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPA' 'sip-files00011.txt'
4b34d2f1351bb91cf5edec48e64f8651
b83ce0a259fcf7514904dfb95f31e57cde9aae62
'2011-10-31T22:58:21-04:00'
describe
'2203' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPB' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
2b812cd531ad2f65107eba3084646700
f41aff70f2bce380f239a92eee6552ee2f3da194
'2011-10-31T23:01:06-04:00'
describe
'889839' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPC' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
7ccec0c3e40a82ea73674e4735dd7acb
b93ab86666fa2161f28d1b7b98f0098b48556ee2
'2011-10-31T23:01:11-04:00'
describe
'65335' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPD' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
7e354adab5941b15651e46f47cbba7d1
357104e2b750951a3ac19dc592cc292baaa352a7
describe
'18168' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPE' 'sip-files00012.pro'
14252f18c351dd73653bfab03e972023
873a60e1a15f657bdce9104f0d97f11c7269e4c8
'2011-10-31T22:59:11-04:00'
describe
'24075' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPF' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
29ec1e886975a9d1c61c2b09b48c4b7f
d0f685fd1af6eec40ab96c12e6d1a98412695dd4
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPG' 'sip-files00012.tif'
11d332cc34ed9a3c8d93a24574ed8428
ebc15e6935da51baedeebf4341d5c0cf32986411
'2011-10-31T23:00:46-04:00'
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPH' 'sip-files00012.txt'
f6b33d3d734d3728cc8676cb5dacdaed
6eb3a1c270f064c84c1f278c1a561b63e02118b4
'2011-10-31T22:57:08-04:00'
describe
'8363' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPI' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
32ffb3383b5534512f654f28ba7c0d88
32b1f8470cd31995d9f89009dc9977b1ec768c60
'2011-10-31T22:58:14-04:00'
describe
'965394' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPJ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
b493848767ae411660bf0d95f89b6b1d
cce104e9983313ce5497c63cc00730c223b4835f
'2011-10-31T22:59:01-04:00'
describe
'94685' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPK' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
f4e34373eb4d5989ed7fb34a2bd356bf
6b150d75cc64b1534f9469804df176647f4a5c02
'2011-10-31T23:01:34-04:00'
describe
'30690' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPL' 'sip-files00013.pro'
2ff5e1e91a39621a71bffdf4560bf891
c25a478b78c6e5f2e8f6d590b8d1f00a4994ebf3
'2011-10-31T22:58:16-04:00'
describe
'35440' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPM' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
30797ca674016cf6777a376c83c9b61b
6cebef7007d42a01a9b761aac660ea5781b3b62b
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPN' 'sip-files00013.tif'
1790085ab0715e579a41d22524389a60
3753c63a77990bac56c8e42e9a0f6413670025f9
'2011-10-31T22:57:07-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPO' 'sip-files00013.txt'
0ef21d20f1fcc9cbcad65cf2720a016b
c6c147e993aece623026a8b3ccf5bddda08aecb1
'2011-10-31T23:02:08-04:00'
describe
'9715' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPP' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
7acb2335e5e0bdef7e9d0d3b8dd9e9c4
7b7d4cbf42d02ff9ccc6828d6185287d90fa22d6
'2011-10-31T22:57:45-04:00'
describe
'892940' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPQ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
5f0ebbb95ee10974e1cf54aeca52d406
de05f1bbfa0d26e8de822e78586c94a9d840dbba
'2011-10-31T22:56:58-04:00'
describe
'96944' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPR' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
10e1d078d688dcb1aab413eb28314f9b
09a2645cf9bcb9a1e7144d83aaeecc983d166224
'2011-10-31T22:57:25-04:00'
describe
'32746' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPS' 'sip-files00014.pro'
9df38df0d0c1d46f1649928a4e79a32d
de5367f5b11502b091d43292538bbf49999f1364
'2011-10-31T23:02:37-04:00'
describe
'35805' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPT' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
56f6aee1a047b9ca03b9c0b6b1569e1f
3aabd0723daa67b257432bc36ef1c85af25b5a20
'2011-10-31T22:59:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPU' 'sip-files00014.tif'
7aefbb6d54364ec7c3578c64aac74d60
15cb791cb7111476afedcc6d63056e6e410e531d
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPV' 'sip-files00014.txt'
bf69f60e7b0247f403f37f79d5dffe26
1d29405711d32979ee7f9f98d862bb482d919676
'2011-10-31T22:59:47-04:00'
describe
'11476' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPW' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
beafa604e9b8061cff5e6d58b5fb987a
43b5bcf2f23f042cb4e2b74684382954558a52f0
describe
'965342' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPX' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
ba194f69cbcc1e4b3f1fe1a1eb455846
12806355a9605e3c3f26409ce899eb4808eace7a
'2011-10-31T23:01:33-04:00'
describe
'109454' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPY' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
9c09a62ae19d6a90ed545c6556342e29
03dd26b94934a501c5a9f436f3579ae95ff5fdaa
describe
'35497' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVPZ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
6ed707e7d32f9de5c420b0fe16ddaf37
477618a88a690bdaf3565164c23ee2e620f53f7f
describe
'39963' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQA' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d006edc85333d0f517776dc68f73d308
6adb1ba5938eea0dec3293fb1d1824eee77a9825
'2011-10-31T22:56:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
b930beb67e8286bf4b1f89e6f65e0c33
978de5e093597e895fa73fc8ada15c47f6374786
'2011-10-31T22:59:31-04:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQC' 'sip-files00015.txt'
83e4494825ed8261601cdfc5a54ef809
e653a3710ad755a2fd1e4b6d213f9bf5967b467b
describe
'10683' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQD' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c4d532596c72ddfed7b8662389cbdac4
7bac59a1a989b01f5238ac57300b7871e237b8aa
'2011-10-31T22:59:36-04:00'
describe
'892935' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQE' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
f46cda40efcd022a0cb9a72c2f94eda5
bbb076712c1d6723fe69cc90ab4dee19f1b4d154
'2011-10-31T22:57:57-04:00'
describe
'105872' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQF' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
50aa4632277a27ea6002022beb705ff2
362ce59d5d29994f43dfd1ee8143e1815872aea4
'2011-10-31T22:57:27-04:00'
describe
'37143' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQG' 'sip-files00016.pro'
7f84438000fcb70c3e1f692306e07c4b
49b79074f050370f23e5e3d2a2bcc9f8935da92e
'2011-10-31T22:57:22-04:00'
describe
'38280' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQH' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
479bfde0e9f9fdc880bffa9ff8a1cd52
628a77aebd756dd43228146cf810707feaffd20a
'2011-10-31T23:02:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQI' 'sip-files00016.tif'
256cbb05637a89c63169c31d32e07a23
4c3b12b4f04368e70e803c9d65f41f7a83576a11
'2011-10-31T22:58:51-04:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQJ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
d82eb2516a54b81d81c5023e872a504e
063e732ed9c7b9c706d3e9c0da760b859213e48b
'2011-10-31T23:00:43-04:00'
describe
'11933' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQK' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
0c76248d1e6160fb4059b5afe8935d85
17494e14601e89ec6231524698babe960c5d9a77
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQL' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a474ae9e3954587e71dcd926fbadfdf3
ff2e67c2202d69cbb711c75baa52adec86199d05
describe
'108686' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQM' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
0b3fab9f6426c5e4d8f60848e3c97fc8
7954d5a0ddc347b6c96c8f4a225d2a4bf1b5aa50
'2011-10-31T22:56:59-04:00'
describe
'38453' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQN' 'sip-files00017.pro'
71514e8a111757d27522fecda3720d40
d998069c99bb099b3e7ca9fa7c601830fa260301
'2011-10-31T23:02:20-04:00'
describe
'40907' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQO' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4eefff17da7550b0fa5f9f3626151780
eb45546d68d4db2b339d352dcee9a62cfc96af58
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQP' 'sip-files00017.tif'
ade213f2425b9732892903d82b83261e
5c69913e52eef12a7781aef03fa4807e398d0982
'2011-10-31T22:56:54-04:00'
describe
'1721' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQQ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
21a74e4ccef4b63f4a4c9dbaae74eefb
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'2011-10-31T23:02:30-04:00'
describe
'10764' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQR' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
cbfaba0ad5d25c65ab30ac31a408fb76
9b5ef8cb9308f8fccfea56426c15de9929bfa61f
'2011-10-31T22:58:35-04:00'
describe
'892764' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQS' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
2d9cb6db75427070b1c55a95d98db3bd
cf3c6dcd2634b29739f3d91d47f630ec0ae37dbe
'2011-10-31T22:57:35-04:00'
describe
'104439' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQT' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
423a9d07b97f8e17ca6c9d8a017ce3b5
1a01774a16b410b7b031d55102ef211ad7c5d636
describe
'37658' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQU' 'sip-files00018.pro'
1f9ee0a50a5b4b3427e01a9b78cf6b8c
256bcd3ce8a56372ada50a6b4e29f9c6f21a45ed
describe
'38521' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQV' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
885c784e85e27af283dbd64f06913308
65f13ab15f6b1b9cd7a7c1493074bfb686c63fd0
'2011-10-31T22:58:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQW' 'sip-files00018.tif'
873c1eeb5cd5dc893905f0be5d8c7625
570e41f7f5f6e386f756a4e0d2f02332ce361242
'2011-10-31T22:59:17-04:00'
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQX' 'sip-files00018.txt'
dfff76056a988b5cae05dbb519fb31dd
c04e0bf48bfc62c35a6c22be18aeed53d7cb0a8c
'2011-10-31T23:00:30-04:00'
describe
'12151' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQY' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
51025500a9c5796f7e0d2a3ea5cc9f2d
9336cdbbbd3b4fa4c759a1d153e4e2b6f8a7341d
'2011-10-31T22:58:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVQZ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
1c735bdd52ca35cb6d08028da6850c97
997b23d241e3f4463fde73d4e4222583912a1b73
'2011-10-31T22:59:37-04:00'
describe
'102120' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRA' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
c0ccaf5303b7a4e2e9eac2acb0aaa6ef
17096af7b640a72b3ddde441452b036297bb20f3
describe
'34684' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRB' 'sip-files00019.pro'
105e93e5a1945bd25bc9e066c0352f8d
6d35cfb9cbc762b2afc4ea37fe828cd5b990b6b6
'2011-10-31T23:00:04-04:00'
describe
'37600' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRC' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
39fd3f27533665d11451888388dc5b25
b666dcbcd745a3465b2d1daa0a80179074cf2075
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRD' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b6021dabebcb7d267e97256bd5eb9739
6878911ca12ec24caa296cf9ac9a23b149ad2052
'2011-10-31T22:58:33-04:00'
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRE' 'sip-files00019.txt'
8dd4e7ff5340237334dce462eb69701d
c621a6e6e10bf360cb87bd17c194a11ef9f9fcb6
'2011-10-31T23:01:36-04:00'
describe
'9799' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRF' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
5e3a4015bdbb722c5d59cef6eb2bf443
ad0ff3e8f766b47925f87bf57a6c246cf33fedd5
'2011-10-31T23:01:56-04:00'
describe
'892872' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRG' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
589b3476c0f391f161968e0678316fce
b33dfad2e30dbb154cf353423f44a7ca0303a9b2
'2011-10-31T22:57:05-04:00'
describe
'108912' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRH' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
1984ee1d84b135f36c2fa14bc082b7f0
f56450c213332707a9f53d708b0d7f1b694c89a6
'2011-10-31T22:57:41-04:00'
describe
'38195' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRI' 'sip-files00020.pro'
0425e1fa5237e68ace1b99a601cee45e
25ea8d149c336a699dfcd69455453de057cd94cd
'2011-10-31T22:57:46-04:00'
describe
'40178' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRJ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
887a3f6ed575134ccef439dc3649dcdc
9d4ded722a869526d087682fa2ea7d24eb05cd26
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRK' 'sip-files00020.tif'
cf9483fc3f2bdc54b7858a3708e98f51
f1cef2b86ee1fba38b33fbd225514246f094d88a
'2011-10-31T23:02:35-04:00'
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRL' 'sip-files00020.txt'
9361e3c736896730156bbbace035bf03
9851eefc20d7f7521c9eea0a689e55b3faef662c
'2011-10-31T23:00:37-04:00'
describe
'12405' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRM' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
a7a21059e2cc3a1193964f12501c6cd9
ce79885f1831e568031f1bd8e89c5bf880955c4d
'2011-10-31T22:59:19-04:00'
describe
'904803' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRN' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
1d0b745311f6d6afb84edcf3429f55a7
10a9f9629eb73d2b9db17eccc385740836b6f8b4
'2011-10-31T22:58:17-04:00'
describe
'107482' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRO' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
ef7283a58939ec302f39e988eea519ab
93221439d5167d798f19337961112aa157f0a822
'2011-10-31T22:59:16-04:00'
describe
'37561' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRP' 'sip-files00021.pro'
906d8bdbf8877caa26807aebcb34f5a1
e09ac1d74e5fa1ebc93db73041f8af090975d966
describe
'39249' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRQ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
c8a33123f94c95bdc0685222e3f03328
bea19b6aca124148d711d2e86f81fee621c042fe
'2011-10-31T23:02:10-04:00'
describe
'7248719' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRR' 'sip-files00021.tif'
554d083ccbb8cd3f8125b7cc81c7ed13
7b7980348130d3677f68beaaa607d5274cb8c7b0
'2011-10-31T23:01:29-04:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRS' 'sip-files00021.txt'
5ff39277b1f807cdfb1b755125a51770
f851248b4e562d78aec8975df56c3b23c86d1224
'2011-10-31T22:57:06-04:00'
describe
'11349' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRT' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
0f17d82588254b56f78c1b78e24dc55e
bea71bbd2b03413577f59c7184c000c372a48d0a
'2011-10-31T23:00:20-04:00'
describe
'892869' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRU' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
c8f5b4d0d4abfd471b6ece26c2e1bc03
c1d8b6db840e603e3c52db5cd7b405f7c0ee3606
describe
'107631' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRV' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
3fb375536d91daf01bf6a51626bbdc8a
37feba022d55a29c091160ec376201640522ed51
describe
'38218' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRW' 'sip-files00022.pro'
aa99ec2444e66f2318f7f0daa2a3ba1d
4b9beb9ab79719c2da0612ebca46e23f3b8229ce
'2011-10-31T23:01:59-04:00'
describe
'39401' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRX' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
fadfa0cb69464492bfaaee8bb4ea5adb
80966e96112a75e0bb7738e8bb056c1462a40bda
'2011-10-31T22:57:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRY' 'sip-files00022.tif'
4484757dda4e31098056d6622dcffc47
10f910117a4fb8a170781c362e065f5e365c2931
'2011-10-31T22:58:47-04:00'
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVRZ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
e5133d6c61bdf42e371e8e4af0395f44
85aa0cbf1071074e515b1da70f3335c44baaa4ab
'2011-10-31T23:02:58-04:00'
describe
'12056' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSA' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
0285357ddbc0247faaed60cbb680f002
7576512171b13652e57a054fea6d57144c49ede0
describe
'913266' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSB' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
01ca479f288355de082d4fbf4cc69706
6da39790b1b1e8dbf6a453d2e7e141e67c5761cd
'2011-10-31T22:58:59-04:00'
describe
'101347' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSC' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
cd70949e43cc2a62de5bd82fae7660f5
b4d95b6b6c8266aa09d96f8d6038e38a6fd68e5e
'2011-10-31T22:59:04-04:00'
describe
'22101' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSD' 'sip-files00023.pro'
d03d5ba13ded5a8390a12783b20a85fb
169d3948903af5226b346703b4627fb978e10488
'2011-10-31T22:59:18-04:00'
describe
'34560' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSE' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
0cc39915e12ab8f0af8b95ff8cdae3dd
8dd70b6d7b3303c319ccdf3f3e504bbd8dc99554
'2011-10-31T22:57:09-04:00'
describe
'7315583' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSF' 'sip-files00023.tif'
45d282af0ee91af3eef647bd00aee34c
17e281d7715a50b8bbba1ab0efc232e9c1f6fd10
'2011-10-31T23:00:31-04:00'
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSG' 'sip-files00023.txt'
d1431e2bd7d14262b15867ed64b2549f
7f07529557eb75f8857ccdc6282bcc5c1bd2efb5
'2011-10-31T22:57:30-04:00'
describe
'9795' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSH' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
5d287cf4825f24b0837dba7873588f1c
01dbdb5d30dfc41fd71be06435450698f9f85904
describe
'892921' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSI' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
0576570b106c836b728f21dddbee48a5
ce17c57213c690e41b47efa1cf1cca9be3a7f703
describe
'88156' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSJ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
3840c5729896d24235b53dc8cdae8700
d76187341f6f5990db8bd244ad30343981f1473b
'2011-10-31T22:58:26-04:00'
describe
'28809' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSK' 'sip-files00024.pro'
d98d61d8dfbcf4553f0a15b1df342384
42d0e0d4aecf6d3a8c2875f2d00a0fdfbdea9159
'2011-10-31T22:57:12-04:00'
describe
'31972' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSL' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
bfb00e0147c5679fddffee1dab6cef43
92b3c1e832f45d8666a9ab8530c85b6f8bbb2e99
'2011-10-31T22:59:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSM' 'sip-files00024.tif'
d322b9e7c669a6e42863c173e114e778
deb24b215efb79bc54395314cca76ba83591834c
'2011-10-31T23:00:00-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSN' 'sip-files00024.txt'
a0222a3bfe1b294aa482ef2be2b176cd
aad671e5946f117d2d461d93e4bd5f7727c5a04d
describe
'10205' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSO' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
725ce01acc87c4ccc9d9eb3084718521
3f09a3e52da470f68d4cbe434c2d450fb1c8c397
describe
'891464' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSP' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
33bc0321e36a60bbe0d0a5478670d8c9
2b5843a238d6489cd21843261b49767abf8f3bd3
describe
'106295' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSQ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
4ad555231994a60f0cfa3ede3eb541d5
b503f51e437cc70e026d4f81db4469711b39e9ce
'2011-10-31T23:02:18-04:00'
describe
'37521' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSR' 'sip-files00025.pro'
a4ee1f216a3a509c999ba076fe253974
34ae5a0f14cbcd1eac1d13d30b72a419ceafc0bb
'2011-10-31T23:00:05-04:00'
describe
'38781' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSS' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
a3287c0aa489e216022e667551a4b728
98e386f1df99f9d6b810d48c31182bcfde5e1f5a
'2011-10-31T22:59:32-04:00'
describe
'7138295' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVST' 'sip-files00025.tif'
70f54916773426677ea7a04dc23f0092
67363d31d70a4132270e791a75ea5315d5332eeb
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSU' 'sip-files00025.txt'
fd66933e9b370aa9d02c230ff072f079
5482667ab385745c857879fd6da4665f1b5d7f59
'2011-10-31T22:58:32-04:00'
describe
'11548' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSV' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
72dd9e9353dffd85ff6839eb73827121
bdab48f45346806e8f872e13ebfa701c837d124c
'2011-10-31T23:02:27-04:00'
describe
'892900' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSW' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
61bd950bcc2518f9f7e4db3d4e69d839
9c31891cd88ba3940505170dcf5efeca06e2caf8
describe
'107381' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSX' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
f06226def6c0ef9b0a246673115551f2
33a9f8e3fdabbaa69fa3f3be623018d7f174fd2d
'2011-10-31T22:58:43-04:00'
describe
'36153' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSY' 'sip-files00026.pro'
f40b0717c9df8043404e46d3f5f8d1fe
aa2f4e4bec4be6f714feae9a0696b26c322039db
'2011-10-31T22:57:17-04:00'
describe
'39498' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVSZ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
f8e5c5cecc7fbec35bc87cf83663fbb3
75249a6b67756dd4fdeb6233fa47decc541c3b61
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTA' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e8102b8d1a62cfddf9bc369e6b8310a4
98a3889c813a485fd6c87dde6afa0ab2949bc4eb
'2011-10-31T23:00:39-04:00'
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTB' 'sip-files00026.txt'
77d16d804c579d7b6a58ca4e8e025cd8
48ba5a6776034a68484df72b4316887a662c1926
describe
'12537' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTC' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
eba29aaa07ec8346280ad6528a0abe76
c845d94892d7f4ecb7402e9770fbdd0d5a96032c
'2011-10-31T23:02:43-04:00'
describe
'889391' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTD' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
e507453bae7c53d8b44bdcf96d1f184e
a5472b8c11b8df911197ab55423983938ce4644f
'2011-10-31T23:01:24-04:00'
describe
'106346' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTE' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
74b95875a1ac80e83f7d884293e9109c
49250e0784114379ac2a15872df030ff72f0bf10
'2011-10-31T23:02:54-04:00'
describe
'36768' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTF' 'sip-files00027.pro'
c0ca334cdd7c47be5cd0c8bdd660c2e2
bf26f33b4c8f1bddd41ce24901e5e860d4345f6b
describe
'39590' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTG' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
2ff47c862197be92c6347c7275dec51f
df63961f5e761c9ba0c2d7a3b60a81358f2deb62
describe
'7121919' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTH' 'sip-files00027.tif'
797549e783c8062f468cd2c4ff04499a
76b9da15cee62399787c2d62b177941d67b9bdd7
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTI' 'sip-files00027.txt'
c4452d68c53ddd5fb64b341e80a9d1a3
cd97084531b2b4dfa6c38721271fdbee1eb67900
'2011-10-31T22:59:15-04:00'
describe
'12043' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTJ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
d4b06368f2e51f52ea5b5ab0d0792397
e324ba08f82be884cfc4fe87daab4a6b8165e448
'2011-10-31T23:00:32-04:00'
describe
'892912' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTK' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a355a1bf92c0677c88870a424b00dd2a
dbabdfdfe0b865ffec8cfda8ffd04d6b99c55fb7
'2011-10-31T22:58:57-04:00'
describe
'107048' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTL' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
0e6bab77e498e89aa5c64fbfb513564c
1eecb28c2ad7907b7ffa6a48b8aef3a843f3c00d
'2011-10-31T22:58:04-04:00'
describe
'37726' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTM' 'sip-files00028.pro'
d04b1f3562530778e7ed29b287c84b02
9688b64f36d402365ed1381e89f632a792937481
describe
'38992' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTN' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
1891e9b3a521134abf14010440504526
e91f2431eeeed7bef0470b0408a51335bd118135
'2011-10-31T23:01:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTO' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a712ee803e385e77debd1c4dbf1b2fd5
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describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTP' 'sip-files00028.txt'
baca938c2aab86212b731dd9114eece2
10130514c1cc4db5e1fe38cf8d51b1c6bfda62d0
'2011-10-31T22:59:23-04:00'
describe
'12248' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTQ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
831f4d56a2743ec98563a3c9fcc7564b
c6bb5fa899311120ea39716bc6c9a3d812781cc4
'2011-10-31T23:01:05-04:00'
describe
'918126' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTR' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
f86b9b9ed1707bfc0618a0bb43dc2da7
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describe
'106653' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTS' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
cc1562a1cc78b722350d16c1981cd960
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'2011-10-31T22:57:03-04:00'
describe
'37723' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTT' 'sip-files00029.pro'
619494a75f21b1559efa5a5cd0f3b65d
5c5e661114e8628a4acebde22632ccce1e60081a
'2011-10-31T23:02:21-04:00'
describe
'40343' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTU' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
081e5c73b975a367dfee09feaa7a23fb
c69a4f4e0a080f4a9021edff4c8f6d75c4e7a419
'2011-10-31T23:01:28-04:00'
describe
'7354093' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTV' 'sip-files00029.tif'
4bc1b5b1ea1d83b145ea544b45c5e21d
d01b5d6bfc412dd5fb62dafc5ca08bac1bdee419
'2011-10-31T23:02:05-04:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTW' 'sip-files00029.txt'
9188814df299180bcc88d1ea86e9b35d
c704bed1f485ac417e31f90867b31e7f3ce3c391
'2011-10-31T22:58:41-04:00'
describe
'11819' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTX' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
a3996fff6c12e9a2d36f480282e9d47d
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'2011-10-31T22:59:46-04:00'
describe
'892948' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTY' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0df5b5d882a6ced02720a9b5caa87ddf
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describe
'99803' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVTZ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
6375f6d8a05dd7d044d07a18430878f0
6d2805900152e59cd9754403c1ab3991e0cd4f38
describe
'35822' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUA' 'sip-files00030.pro'
5f438a6719ef2621452f0c9bf3f574a3
ec61e66e78727e3105a35983d8d3d263f85132ee
describe
'37326' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUB' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
879db44b35dcfb7d9f3cd61382e35262
8921d3528eadc6b363be88224184e35b1c804d6b
'2011-10-31T23:00:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUC' 'sip-files00030.tif'
0d5ea96869101512d27f7c55b9821f9f
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'2011-10-31T23:02:00-04:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUD' 'sip-files00030.txt'
754849d69c49bf77ceda3ae50f9280d5
252f171218fa8f974ae933a452acc94da71e2e8c
describe
'11650' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUE' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
51b2033d111abb43f50e50c734bdfc72
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describe
'918125' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUF' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
4ddb06fe78f926f9396c1417bc94f92e
8b33128d964610ae4f1fbf19229618b9e2b7b4bd
'2011-10-31T22:57:16-04:00'
describe
'99795' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUG' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
4c18727865341eae53a296a89589df3e
83810536ef243f572dd7d536921cf393e5dcbd25
describe
'35735' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUH' 'sip-files00031.pro'
91c7c978ba80a5994919439a956daa0c
e630ce191cfd5164748be8dc3df5d31f957c9373
'2011-10-31T22:57:24-04:00'
describe
'36993' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUI' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
d9704a062ef140558f980fd6ecdc34a6
0ca247ad9e6dd5bec577e2a691b3330c95b3c670
'2011-10-31T22:58:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUJ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
8498324ef0d32d0b20bf2574a0e1ff55
96547d43c095a6f1ac0f075ca8f5c0b4308dda6f
'2011-10-31T23:00:13-04:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUK' 'sip-files00031.txt'
4394771975e1d316ec7319dabd1627d3
cfebae82e0d3d41a831eda62a6f4eefcd87d353b
'2011-10-31T23:00:40-04:00'
describe
'10902' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUL' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
3569039c329f086fafd572b12efe559f
e79f6d08e4c9050e1df4c94b25698f83790d499d
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUM' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
3cad2b4fe946dde0ece8f1e72081f280
1d4ea8950fd6acbf32648de03d46229de988257a
'2011-10-31T23:02:50-04:00'
describe
'92001' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUN' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
df4a854f8105df2d2cfba2bd88c3d3f3
e6b135454abfbc6f54e486ec907d6a46bc18568e
describe
'32473' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUO' 'sip-files00032.pro'
22b5e08c0d03a781ee65937d4a6591e5
ccb4d625bcd34530f40b8c6b1d2daf76a9776033
describe
'33887' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUP' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
21c221553ce8a737bb2a9916016f20c8
4ae85951fa2fd6c796dac58231769d5dffe225c8
'2011-10-31T22:59:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUQ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
6b4bcb9fcd7cfbdf66496de0ca89d642
14cf070f0cdc08065e23c1f69bfb2ecfb5d09d7f
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUR' 'sip-files00032.txt'
43e30497bc2421b8c88193d997aaa024
6de8e779ea7f16c9c17977bd31e36200f1ef45a5
describe
'11208' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUS' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
46df578b3bd28816807a0d350cf170fa
625cc76e6afc6defe5e1e7ad7f7f9f99f17c0f55
describe
'918137' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUT' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c10c758d59be260d0620c1e0a91c666d
2f23d664a47d20743369a7a1f66ec9ac298cad9d
'2011-10-31T22:58:52-04:00'
describe
'100251' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUU' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
50fb438864780ab425ea0f6608593a60
4f0a737b0e7cc8149f41f5abe8ad591680bd1eb3
'2011-10-31T23:00:27-04:00'
describe
'35204' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUV' 'sip-files00033.pro'
3ea45866d627e6ae3bd9e09e29ccc654
95744a667c047c1e0256aea917f668ef6d90c489
describe
'37252' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUW' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7c010a9f9650e3cc72559e45fb8b953c
41802c797e55efe7af12ea42d0678d94ed1aa6bc
'2011-10-31T22:56:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUX' 'sip-files00033.tif'
243682c3e6d65b4be25077f3caee1949
884095f959ce47da4bd45bc21fb96578a743eae8
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUY' 'sip-files00033.txt'
2d708fb313cdd6b4d0f84819ddf3118d
21a18837a992377cc5504e515ca845ae474240cf
describe
'11287' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVUZ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
f92d00c1a453be7c628a2f5798383e9a
3839b43bc3dc5e4bf292e60e799e75080cf542d3
'2011-10-31T23:01:54-04:00'
describe
'892713' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVA' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
451a90cba253aa70a674c7b3046d6f24
dc837b6f3d229975dd50f1b3a8f5eae9c7c0afe0
describe
'108234' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVB' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
0a22f627326817e72cd87fca7068fccc
ef644879e74903b11b16ab6ef01703a5a57407ac
describe
'38587' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVC' 'sip-files00034.pro'
5b9a1a30673d990f9790bc442264c5f7
f6a61b0f89e805b2321522c9454c0a8674e84f90
describe
'39483' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVD' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
6765920889d7736066fe9475bfcec565
f10f8a6713d6d59d61994106eddfae0e71873668
'2011-10-31T23:00:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVE' 'sip-files00034.tif'
2224862436e45e4e84935dd1a073b5d5
f2a5951d4ce7e226153dd5244787ce0cec6211f4
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVF' 'sip-files00034.txt'
3ce86af75f54174badca0dd1e18b9ebc
333d24b6b7adbda40ae211aa837d35f2d6343195
'2011-10-31T22:59:50-04:00'
describe
'12239' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVG' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
c2b31abd2a0d88b7c979191f9477fc97
0ef344aecb85f75c759741fc375de2d00807ebaf
'2011-10-31T22:58:28-04:00'
describe
'918140' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVH' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
5335f32fcd8be5f427f755e940bae253
006fb485b8127220615a97344530cc43b6956fc3
describe
'102973' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVI' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a06062ec305ab83e01985d2f398a8571
3a90373654d62021d894391e32fb43d12cd05928
'2011-10-31T22:59:34-04:00'
describe
'35759' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVJ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
be14842cfb6d21f81224ce829f787cbe
b51a92e269f37eceb0ad7c6323804615c38590ec
describe
'37760' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVK' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
1fee72b0e9ae43f1f210fcd8b9112727
b38fbd564611b2357464dcde91d2f930ec493813
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVL' 'sip-files00035.tif'
cb7a239962ad6e2c28e3add3485ccec0
517d9a151940d9a48348b915838304097ff2fa12
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVM' 'sip-files00035.txt'
f7004310826e28a077118f5d87dcdc64
b18bb75e9a5326db51f311dd7316e0a48ed7c7e7
'2011-10-31T22:56:41-04:00'
describe
'11371' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVN' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
1297d7a06f33961df431afc35d1cf727
3ea84d9615b28e83f5aa791fc56d686dcef221d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVO' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
0691adbe54f25eb2c1f8c84d932cbe68
0651c5460de783f0ccaf1d225c82959468a4d40a
describe
'81835' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVP' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d782c38f27757a38aac658e3c34482e6
7dd6b15ab704620158ddbf8886222f26598ce089
describe
'20063' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVQ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
80a32fcd730474b6fb1862f9041cc8e8
7ce04f7619fd1acfced7821c09d1ab13983655ad
'2011-10-31T23:02:41-04:00'
describe
'28958' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVR' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
16bea67967c66850586c9d316d716ecb
ba89f2563d7d774ecf1fae3fc494b86a7ca2429b
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVS' 'sip-files00036.tif'
67b09de20a055c27d9adab7a6776b412
5a9675753eb16daf1ba14c92a210d1fc31b81d82
'2011-10-31T22:57:11-04:00'
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVT' 'sip-files00036.txt'
2ab4d9f21747ebd534e667296d9cfa10
0feb377165520a80f37e1ce7b46534371d903b8c
'2011-10-31T23:00:08-04:00'
describe
'9463' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVU' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
2294ee3caec0d011b9d1c7cd68e67ca1
17a2d886adfa0211a0e80410bc267ab2b4010510
describe
'918115' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVV' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f2a9b84ef823b92695dd5a87fdd5d8e8
2af9c350c43735a34abb30361ed05caa2a493884
describe
'86397' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVW' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
95f2a25a1282ee9e43c0dd5502338201
8a01a44280068bb79bc438948816e0fa51769031
'2011-10-31T23:00:54-04:00'
describe
'26787' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVX' 'sip-files00037.pro'
6e2e07829a64957b2554175e9639b044
a8f877565d6a335242c469ae3650a76803dacffc
'2011-10-31T22:58:03-04:00'
describe
'31081' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVY' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
00f210e454bbe42e5023fc5a4a73acfc
23a3bb2064f98dd1cc52ef4fef50e44321e4b4b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVVZ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c284cf1edac25a608a39a45797aa16ba
e805fa0cd322c89c83283ee24950c22bfa6cb8f3
'2011-10-31T22:58:56-04:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWA' 'sip-files00037.txt'
a87603af4a10c5e14454af3b0cfb756b
6d02f5b47805f05b075d3305ee107984a0e85b8f
'2011-10-31T23:00:33-04:00'
describe
'9216' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWB' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
b70ad37033833826968b4e7210981677
8538ddab7d9d3b233f2874d017ca922d97454907
'2011-10-31T23:01:57-04:00'
describe
'892929' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWC' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
868a1093ae3972580b4c696700f76390
bca40563a7f3e0af59388017681492f62985fa29
describe
'110957' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWD' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
c18748fe1ba9e6f93af41a16f18c0038
4db8c99d11448c860edb65443e90bee53f2cd5da
describe
'36752' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWE' 'sip-files00038.pro'
ca25bc0bdfd0b0029369f6e356dfe472
a4d5a3f89bf41d17f2017ae297dfdd5cc618e329
'2011-10-31T23:02:42-04:00'
describe
'40131' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWF' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
138258b26b9a54780678160eb765fa4f
04fec5f6cd9e133da5cd704c89dc548daf8bcd4c
'2011-10-31T23:00:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWG' 'sip-files00038.tif'
210ce7f4efffa0f746c369324742c542
d4be1491d9af382329432db20bf2cf28d46238f9
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWH' 'sip-files00038.txt'
f6a954ae6acdbc0620074451719f38dd
9838a68f42942ce13f686ca7b6eb23c9dae978ad
describe
Invalid character
'12735' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWI' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
d2ad829e8cf5521a50afcd6d064c0406
1affa338cebd81b4f902ee2a8e5d60ab9321e693
'2011-10-31T23:00:59-04:00'
describe
'918081' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWJ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
74301d6a45acdfd7d3067005e7af974c
d8b45c3435c19ff8461ec4d80d0908bd6b494ec3
'2011-10-31T22:59:48-04:00'
describe
'114805' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWK' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
4ad057d164649a711c576e46ae868734
69a1cfb62c4fd90f1fe371ee79db47ad1f1a84a8
describe
'39885' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWL' 'sip-files00039.pro'
67fa1087d18e521603d1cd300239a70d
02d838d12e5354e20464116389e9a62a997033d4
describe
'41432' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWM' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
078f8e2afad93a9471d3d39e4567ab07
0fc12c419292bb3e8e78a8e7988efa4188c35c54
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWN' 'sip-files00039.tif'
f4cd59f91824d22a3a5f7015e6e5d211
9f2665899f50bb22a0d5b521a11be36adee601bd
'2011-10-31T23:00:42-04:00'
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWO' 'sip-files00039.txt'
75bb9e164ddf47d52553296b44ac5b3c
22b629e77b9d0abc7f2c9fca849322a1c80b5b78
describe
'12180' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWP' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
7fa50c2beca3a6672f7c598b3c37b671
3bb2b348d0f60813e4da30d80be0922b615a34c8
describe
'892836' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
9b2a305ebba0e111123e1861ff6606a5
546091dd7db911b5c0916a9ec20e137dfeaab960
describe
'107873' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWR' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
0c6f6f0cfbb83ecfb459f9879b58af37
0dcc542d9edd8668ff650511f401c705fa520ed4
'2011-10-31T23:01:38-04:00'
describe
'35637' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWS' 'sip-files00040.pro'
65f9302acadb089aa29167dd2bc7daf1
550e6ebc5542b6f6df9d520794fe1bb565b67dc2
'2011-10-31T23:02:44-04:00'
describe
'38558' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWT' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
208ecbb3f93099c671cb632e6e913df8
c76b8135a1a2a4fe4aacebcd5c247db952066122
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWU' 'sip-files00040.tif'
54faaf4f482fd2d000c672a5d5968b98
4dcc63d75132e61c3c5a84780ee4937f69e29b4d
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWV' 'sip-files00040.txt'
0396be8e21daa9ee1c46760fef6bef29
ba4d8852240823358f35a0f5247b69913e9dee56
'2011-10-31T23:01:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWW' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
2f66a6b7e84c4e6c9ea5fef456412523
879f5aa2de0a6c1533732ecdf8cadca44cabb5d2
'2011-10-31T23:02:38-04:00'
describe
'918134' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWX' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
a4f16545e9702672ada6cee946a7bd60
3fa032bd055d4e47db54dabda7ddf6b52451cf61
'2011-10-31T22:57:28-04:00'
describe
'104221' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWY' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
379d9408cf8a07d202e8762642c53954
cd48d15c45b1d55b0de6be7eee02eba38d7e4e2d
'2011-10-31T22:56:56-04:00'
describe
'35140' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVWZ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
5955b87a9f893d1d0ad41aa602421d3a
bd76bc5a1f6f84078f0d94421654d57e806960f9
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXA' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
a6628edc87236e0a91f30684b9336901
510c0566723605c44e962328cdb7286fb3ceb179
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXB' 'sip-files00041.tif'
98579f8f8d405568ebf1920db0f75251
80e331bf9bff072beaa2ef93f12917ff792db5c5
'2011-10-31T23:00:51-04:00'
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXC' 'sip-files00041.txt'
2d5cef477269d5410fe2edb458fc58e4
a4e29a9795322dbdc36f48b5bce9c4982b844b3e
describe
'11692' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXD' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
428e6d5d23e0c97125f796c0ba59668d
e399219b877feac7986582c36e19306cd58f1ad5
describe
'892949' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXE' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
307a7c06b0e145d4c0f5121147fe5c9a
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'2011-10-31T23:01:42-04:00'
describe
'105740' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXF' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
9b50355a3e59923d27ff6ed0b34237f5
65566c274d1d1092e21029bd819800c677dee14a
'2011-10-31T22:57:00-04:00'
describe
'36284' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXG' 'sip-files00042.pro'
c6d26c1323e60c863b2fd7514afd7b50
6087ec3370011f1a1d6e50af94e41acae2fc020f
describe
'38438' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXH' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
8c4449961bd4aee7a3c18e1421406960
acd3767ac6daa0f909ceb985eb2354a36c08fed3
'2011-10-31T23:01:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXI' 'sip-files00042.tif'
04cc402dc70dedcbfafe6191242dab11
a4f9b91ebdbb4e8c848b39c4e71d1e3b63d483f2
'2011-10-31T22:58:44-04:00'
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXJ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
dc11bc56c835b82cc68c2127271905c8
3acca774a29c02740b4b0e1e4fd8850765a928f8
describe
'12032' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXK' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
773298f2ad19b66584db040c31390c9c
3f91cda97a5e84c65dc648534f6a12cc7f54c62d
'2011-10-31T22:57:15-04:00'
describe
'918108' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXL' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
eedd443dc7ad6823787c605c48a0e822
5cae24f4a6b69808904c11f823d41651faf3498e
describe
'108253' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXM' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
ac4d5c443918c9a6128c757557949312
e33e2cd77c469b61837d35be430861575b22164b
describe
'36709' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXN' 'sip-files00043.pro'
a5f96807d7ac0cb14cf83f7a28f490e6
a823c64051b30dfe3e362cbe7ecca2467bbb888d
describe
'39499' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXO' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
65052f66d61d03bec9ef3cb73e31ffff
9ac235ee44da28586991633b41806b72c41086cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXP' 'sip-files00043.tif'
0be3ec5543798c38dede63e2c5972fd5
2d865158a11b27174e1addfb3e956754897cf215
'2011-10-31T22:57:55-04:00'
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXQ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
bd7bedf40eaadf08a78544151bc6582f
90e6eb18d6acc9d3a87a095b7fc76e50630f4c12
describe
'11613' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXR' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
04bac1cdeed3e29a8783ea932d25267d
467709f4bd52c4cf92fa76fe3c8a7fc90fda5739
'2011-10-31T22:58:19-04:00'
describe
'892947' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXS' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
4d69d6220c7035362579569ec0b70978
1ffc316adced67e91ee7481e2ba13999274a3f33
'2011-10-31T22:57:58-04:00'
describe
'109570' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXT' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
586c8b834907a2d5f815bb0847c98edc
a79525e816d9a887404990acddd2662ece3bdf5f
describe
'37562' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXU' 'sip-files00044.pro'
9100d07bd7b799a94c28152e8bb52dc2
73a4c3529dc493882638b46df3e5c3681f4b88aa
describe
'40423' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXV' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
b4dcf484d02fd697a74844f673cd0b8a
4e8846491980a8ee2a07d73fb058d5b47d5a1ef1
'2011-10-31T23:01:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXW' 'sip-files00044.tif'
37a654cb7c45daced747ed103e67826f
bc75a6dc71c1d7b9097fc8ec0c2167d5d6478315
'2011-10-31T22:58:06-04:00'
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXX' 'sip-files00044.txt'
89d3aa390e976c93f8d0242970693668
acf7ea3a0bbb5e71b249c1d807156253d831de13
describe
'12760' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXY' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
957163f351c25f85191783c8c4a85f8c
6c2e7bcfe4d2e8b43b95e53dfa88fa2096d95167
describe
'917987' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVXZ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
9b92f69c91fdb76309a265cdd9171a7a
c56ddcba7a2079eeab5b0b04aa09aab1db943b25
describe
'108960' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYA' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
8b7199ef2407ea09892312048fb323a3
0a582b3ed02f479123be646a1e9af707aa75add4
describe
'37247' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYB' 'sip-files00045.pro'
4e3de56e07d208887760095d5078d15e
19acf92869a120f1a0a42e2feabe74f4a9cb8afd
describe
'39422' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYC' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
d415485bec85c966ac4559577df4bd2c
a82135c6ed4064fd1d1a5239a0551f86fcdd3f54
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYD' 'sip-files00045.tif'
eb0764d3971f3e0625595ada49ccc19a
c97ac90421743f32e3e46d153bad62e42a36b9cc
'2011-10-31T23:01:16-04:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYE' 'sip-files00045.txt'
8ce7ad9c5781a356b4619881c4e13a1e
d5f0263bfba3b4912c9fcd3bbae617bb34914df2
'2011-10-31T23:00:22-04:00'
describe
'12077' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYF' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
0e3e214487f018ee0c3118314b069b14
4ca958130c469181960712683ee8710224bad020
'2011-10-31T22:58:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYG' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
cf546370c1ab99110633723b30c11792
1b9db1518707a222f6e02d29ebcad33c1333e990
'2011-10-31T23:02:26-04:00'
describe
'79440' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYH' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
a4fec4038b86eae01118121da5dfb6a5
9427555f1d2c0330c0fc64780b5fcbc9722c5a07
'2011-10-31T22:57:32-04:00'
describe
'21425' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYI' 'sip-files00046.pro'
e9c0b1877402d025a8a5a3eafa1e1f31
220a06b9cafd2cd250a5a74f0a19ef7c9d290d7f
describe
'28335' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYJ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
93c9e964c7ce243c8832332423f2c973
dd09ad6f33e5e0eada25f087ac1d0a946e3a78e2
'2011-10-31T22:58:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYK' 'sip-files00046.tif'
cc38d8a91ecd9dc21bf004430fa7b4df
82c21fb832eade31f4e766228f46942af5c6e922
'2011-10-31T22:59:57-04:00'
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYL' 'sip-files00046.txt'
b6244c0d61b3cc62d232291fd6f583f2
07760ccdb6e889af910d19f097fb50912f7ce342
describe
'9069' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYM' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8ed1e8b8f5b6f335b51756982d22789f
e55655cb5ffb4a60676710594b8e85d1215c604d
'2011-10-31T22:58:55-04:00'
describe
'918043' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYN' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b6d5c8e473ee3148c22d7fe9681e1d05
aa6dc64b1203c9ebc00a923fe7012b5c1e624510
describe
'83309' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYO' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
24ed061ad56ab487e393a3b46deeaeb0
19c83a0b1ecfa37fb59b8a4a84f70649235a84ef
describe
'26703' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYP' 'sip-files00047.pro'
dc79fb6235fa2845e676ea86ccfca506
dc809afc3f380404aab4fcc99ebbc31c3aa662eb
'2011-10-31T22:57:02-04:00'
describe
'30592' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYQ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4f922ac65acebe0523335020805a38b4
0bded5a2b80d2e6bec769df5795434238513fdfb
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYR' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c6e5d74f67140dc4d25d287a614ec568
1d2fd3e32f86afdcfa1482ca3292025b92ab92a4
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYS' 'sip-files00047.txt'
cdf533d5729747eec69ca5a9e9a46d03
ca31271c274a3d8c828ebfab0a833bf3b045dec9
'2011-10-31T23:02:32-04:00'
describe
'9462' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYT' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
7ed266e41cbe4b7ea506c6534227589a
d619ca926dffb9771e24aeeae814987ee73a7031
'2011-10-31T22:59:21-04:00'
describe
'892930' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYU' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
d007c05614c2a502efc53d0da65fcc43
b209b5bc23f27a6c755ff40fb708f73d3ad25c2e
describe
'99006' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYV' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
fac3d881289abf5704ac3dcd95d2b077
1c5ae930435b8cccea0a50540b819d6e747b04a9
describe
'33280' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYW' 'sip-files00048.pro'
c44b7c5c09c74a0b58430a4ac687eb25
5bca7df9b8ce782ee460303eb821017e32f1b1d3
'2011-10-31T23:01:55-04:00'
describe
'36148' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYX' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
9c34075f7bcf5a345325c9f387e933d3
60d129c269689b4ea5cfab835aed5b20de2d30b5
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYY' 'sip-files00048.tif'
21f45127c955677552943a8291c275fc
33ca46d0df20c7a8a73484e4008d52a29d5cead0
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVYZ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
e9a306bd2b0cb8363a2f4d178ed0d65c
0977ee177e303b51db4ef224642520f41487d2ef
'2011-10-31T22:59:10-04:00'
describe
'11424' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZA' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
c73e83d2d42fd5fd9b2b59d22adcda4e
4b441b5990d6242f93c9af3cfb202f89472eba1f
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZB' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
9d1e90eec00a3f243ddddb524980163c
4fa04e9442821a7169a4c4280d6290fa1761f0b8
describe
'104938' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZC' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
a42a61bd20da31f217e4a26fa4c46820
24ba8aa261c7c41fbf95932e6b912861cea2cb5a
describe
'36005' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZD' 'sip-files00049.pro'
d65260f0bf26ebe831ca091005a0d8eb
f25d127eaae936a5cfb668895a4161683b44bcac
'2011-10-31T22:59:53-04:00'
describe
'38697' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZE' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
2d946ed0a4823511a0476c63489dda77
8f924d2c246f109435fee165627315902d733010
'2011-10-31T22:57:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZF' 'sip-files00049.tif'
055d6d7e7f83de9849d89875b1e7b33f
59e4133b36c767c4b1b1ba1c1a3238351b3c8c85
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZG' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5732c1acac8020efc6e8de8b1f6d8c1a
57652e322285f8a46779cca0ada4edf7b750fef9
describe
'11511' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZH' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8d07b59bcfcf75c498e959a8bf8d5f52
981c006bde7a21f43b03e620b89202549ea86f49
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZI' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
7cf14d7e5beb6c6bbce49ddbfa44b704
7406ef6e3e61cd7f63d6c463c15165fd819c22a2
'2011-10-31T22:58:42-04:00'
describe
'104114' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZJ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
6edd0879cca8a07a6f8bc6e254eea4f5
60455bbb04164de0267a8faf08157bfd7b314c95
describe
'35678' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZK' 'sip-files00050.pro'
745b442af04ee642017610847d5bdf31
12728614f26dcd02f252fcb77a67cb2ff1abac15
'2011-10-31T23:00:15-04:00'
describe
'38629' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZL' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
a6e0dde8fe74ea2faa85e1b0086954f8
97c45876065a18fc77e22809134eb99a8ccbcfd0
'2011-10-31T23:00:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZM' 'sip-files00050.tif'
6d19d35693efd05ade9c11909905014b
d12d68e18df3739c389977401d20575c9825989c
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZN' 'sip-files00050.txt'
d5528aad1670768726981b433bcf766a
4291646f22f6b37a1caf130f6dc9a6885c74917f
'2011-10-31T22:57:39-04:00'
describe
'12044' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZO' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
c5d570d6e8ce324cc645284aea169298
d709aff3494de7584784831af37a7a0f9f96883f
describe
'918135' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZP' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
397c3798bfefbd8eea89c677695321d2
9726395a00f66ad9ecc0408fff00277a65145294
'2011-10-31T22:58:13-04:00'
describe
'108762' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZQ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
d78ab80d9fcea06c3389d8ec2e31b80c
a49ce69853f42dee82e03712929ffd9dc0e00772
'2011-10-31T23:01:51-04:00'
describe
'38107' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZR' 'sip-files00051.pro'
5c80da211406ebf2a27b26070ddd2ddd
aea3ad412f2029f83398e493619921f80e52eed0
describe
'39603' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZS' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
eb21addb3c0e2de3d9268896a36c95ff
58aa1ebb11aa8761fa2ef819e03143e92c2821b4
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZT' 'sip-files00051.tif'
d2fbc0b8fcba9448ce8cfb438cb1305d
896c0b0b069266af161fa58b99724d0445ca46bc
'2011-10-31T23:02:09-04:00'
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZU' 'sip-files00051.txt'
7759a4e66e99dbba51cd953212aef85f
5559ecfd21a2934f3798f346bf8111fd876d3c45
describe
'11818' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZV' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
e6d3c47549983a19ca2471dabbc0324f
445606fa9bd01ce0f83229fd906ec644f19ebece
describe
'892923' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZW' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
052da80c71d2548bc8ea79913f23e599
ab491e7477611fe0bbe171870e7fa7aa47e12a7a
describe
'104472' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZX' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
3b63b18ce11cd22dd6d80bca3993c097
52c6540934d3023b5fb7bc4d6a8fa1315ca9cdf8
describe
'36220' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZY' 'sip-files00052.pro'
c77fbc8e7a2a54f552d42c6e025acc64
dc375cdf2e41656e2d6f37f0d939263cecabe12d
'2011-10-31T22:59:54-04:00'
describe
'37855' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAVZZ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
026f130f57dbbffa59b7570e40af94b2
122ef15c648b74b79f83560f60f89f9cbed01e6a
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAA' 'sip-files00052.tif'
19dede6443fc97360ede12ca1a5bc8ea
f33c1f633a68dd75e99aeaa5f9be87f68d5aed33
'2011-10-31T23:01:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAB' 'sip-files00052.txt'
2d113827aae29cb7268741c81b43d95a
2a4513c3d7f50494f655f066c8b9ba03530084af
describe
'12145' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAC' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
d7897dfae0a375de504e272e0eaa20e2
ca7e67216422cfb70f16a2910e8ca953713ab078
describe
'918088' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAD' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
971bd836aa4960b4d4ccd9d43b514cad
409345b43bfd87a53e96b05a11eb2afde824ac18
describe
'107837' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAE' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
4d2982ac1b9ec3365443c460e77147e0
f09ae4cfee17dc85b8eb37f0a87c24b932a8ffae
describe
'36618' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAF' 'sip-files00053.pro'
de2b06cd547f25afab504137fdea8fa4
ea1ae4eafd92979e511dd6c7e20321dde2a7958e
describe
'39351' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAG' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
d755eef1e712ec8e73a3705ea76fdb71
d76326d1844092ed11cbd91a64fae43147fcc886
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAH' 'sip-files00053.tif'
f58794b14705c44eb88fab3ff3185f83
69f0f35d515e364a02b5d1e6aa78b648d5846efe
'2011-10-31T23:00:14-04:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAI' 'sip-files00053.txt'
b9927c70ba4db1893ffc752134a29742
454f192d5309c6a3ffdbad2eebb2e97d08514e00
'2011-10-31T23:00:03-04:00'
describe
'12081' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAJ' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
a53f81b2d39598ab267419e4fcd003ed
20845bb7af067ef92dbea36ec91d2d12d6a0ca0d
describe
'892920' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAK' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
1ee0a642afa49eebe470264d9865181b
edce5dd39fd06f9056af9e28b40e85aa32140714
'2011-10-31T22:58:29-04:00'
describe
'83205' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAL' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
d8cf6f2b8d2191054cda82c06b8de1ee
1b611bdd645e5673d5d7d0c26f4f8e3bbd84e041
'2011-10-31T22:59:07-04:00'
describe
'24137' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAM' 'sip-files00054.pro'
2aa8b5de492e2e90c71d472c7e930cbb
647743960dad5834b6424cb07fcfd5a0c37699f9
describe
'30089' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAN' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
8f9151e9949f501c99c7470cb4b9ef62
4ee6791c9394bb099d5b73045e2d8a7779a6b788
'2011-10-31T22:59:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAO' 'sip-files00054.tif'
5dceb9173f35a64389a513b3188298a6
13b8d565b10c1c0629c12b0e86d92ea26d85bf01
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAP' 'sip-files00054.txt'
42b383b91d6983a336cff6b2b70626d2
9182afab6227c1f867cfe1145270c38fa0af9791
'2011-10-31T23:02:04-04:00'
describe
'9967' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAQ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d1e017f6d745dfac3295acc60b2289e6
3c976fada8a7dba8e22dcb13996d591bb4ead8af
describe
'918130' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAR' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
2c11244c82ca5ae330f297c866fc2903
6c7e2d8b7ef561ea9a7da649388ff8d574179f37
'2011-10-31T22:59:06-04:00'
describe
'100794' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAS' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
1a35a5fa1d2c4a9f13184e1e77334fe9
0bed0a7020ac33840b57c7088283abd45addd307
'2011-10-31T22:59:25-04:00'
describe
'32884' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAT' 'sip-files00055.pro'
6508a19ef1608490d6fa8b77d351e128
933955b13a3d35da89fb41a4fced33b5bc8cc0a2
'2011-10-31T23:00:41-04:00'
describe
'36414' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAU' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
abd1d005c30e05b20d83c502db3f28b3
6c9bdc1d23143b91fc787cb0561dab2891edc220
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAV' 'sip-files00055.tif'
a36199a34f23ac7ee76dd2fad50189f1
be1fc74c4657760c3a2bfeee24e9cacf864f5a4f
'2011-10-31T23:00:26-04:00'
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAW' 'sip-files00055.txt'
d93628c33e0f010f75c925331405c588
b0688a68f755e517d4bcb2db06427682a5d13364
describe
'11397' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAX' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
6ea2f5fd6a8e77c62407f49646b2e062
11cb1dd1f7680ef4f0843e952cb3fc93c5932668
describe
'892922' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAY' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
65ee40d23ae43d8f947d14ce984ee0b4
befd4ab11346c8832093f95d87f4433d97d5f003
describe
'101977' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWAZ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
df74384e450f2ada7dda80da1d4e69be
ee709a48d8ec1baa1f9da88491ff64b6f31d81a9
describe
'34159' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBA' 'sip-files00056.pro'
df5912cb62cb7f3290cdda22a5dacb7d
4265387fce1685bfeb84ea0cf0cd04a1b8ba81a1
describe
'37825' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBB' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
8a7a8d42763dc1e3eced2bf1ec2b350d
7c9f3f5464f16365b3718b42b117f5eb6dd785f2
'2011-10-31T23:02:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBC' 'sip-files00056.tif'
dbdea5c4082d79cc514bbd1a62ff14c5
bb46d692953f9a72fbbbc8263cdf61de43be1bfd
'2011-10-31T23:01:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBD' 'sip-files00056.txt'
52a309ab3c28cba4dbc1faba67a260c7
3c3eca3a301638ecd9d42590cd70e46e20e8cd42
describe
'11926' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBE' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
bf07e8a44b7142a979119fe8f87970fa
4a2f76cd8771674653084b01a33e5ed5a23cfc31
'2011-10-31T22:59:55-04:00'
describe
'918080' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBF' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
cdb987d2ebbbbd7868b069d70adf44c9
bf2df9b3c3b6b0c14a2dbe3c211c32bd2b0270b9
describe
'102657' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBG' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
ba517092bb803716fec2a6f80ed1256b
813456e882c359f1a39a10a41dd693b581d7e16b
describe
'34195' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBH' 'sip-files00057.pro'
3cde6b05455229787bc21eb88f3f25c0
18d3c66b0e48bf26171a1c6e7e41e01a34a978b6
describe
'38125' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBI' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
2cc6adc43c20da540e5de6f88693cc3f
d69116c2720ec73264e89515767485bfe76dec71
'2011-10-31T22:59:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBJ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
c2acd41c9fd6b568021ed4ba3ab28549
07dbfa36cc0924d1d23f5d98e1c7a8bd4dcc467c
'2011-10-31T22:59:03-04:00'
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBK' 'sip-files00057.txt'
a16ae5e7fb738b0c1b53e93b35d08e54
9244c89be03105e4250e88c11d5029f43ecdf073
'2011-10-31T22:58:02-04:00'
describe
'11551' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBL' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
cf34546fe8a125a99ba9973458d0a9d6
015d318d40436306bb2eef063741712064442053
describe
'892895' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBM' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
09073771e200fc36f624a9c2d8cc17d1
f6fd3bc428a02b632b52e2d6cf0692e425c2ef3d
describe
'106789' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBN' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
dc835cd5aec39cac775b2bfd8b94fb3e
42e10c08d79ebaeae8ad2116abdb7327acb783ee
describe
'36112' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBO' 'sip-files00058.pro'
58cfb817b136855691111fa4d98ca2cc
2e1fa04aa599fed09c3a51c50f08b9c85d63bee6
describe
'39000' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBP' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
25b53bf8cb4ce77bb3fe26252db9048e
65cc10f99c080812b7b97d67a4ec127e8f08e5bf
'2011-10-31T22:57:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBQ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
0093a3a3f5bad430e7edca35cfd8f8f9
a07b448658d3ba9044aeb7558f195e1dd72216bd
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBR' 'sip-files00058.txt'
a5cddbd768f1b760b50de9b51b64311a
d8d30d868da71a5e5484478e47c4be5ca4339c97
describe
'12179' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBS' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
fce35c8fd0231131660dc9219b0a9dac
9ee124f5d5da66bd47c9e5c8f9aef680e403ed04
'2011-10-31T22:58:24-04:00'
describe
'918037' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBT' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
a8ccc81f11cd3e8be1af8bace66f7c48
243da7f456312c10258df2c2f452abc80a8f88a6
'2011-10-31T23:01:00-04:00'
describe
'936444' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBU' 'sip-filesback.jp2'
000b97137c2c537531d3966790132e1c
91896b2f0c32bb1b7e2c8b57ebbb8bded835fe67
describe
'110482' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBV' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
2be0c7e4b262d58b468cedd6b608638f
1e7aefac6c44246c55a2d0fa0c69b17ce18b834a
'2011-10-31T23:01:03-04:00'
describe
'38985' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBW' 'sip-files00059.pro'
6f1878aff478c7c0291975b87b18b35b
745cb7acede5284340498200d78dd5c24c247dde
describe
'40849' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBX' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
86a32e0f4c405e49030ab2eab40266a0
c01c7129f90ce7a2647436906b12fed909b00885
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBY' 'sip-files00059.tif'
3b9a205e5a3b99ac2230fe3dea6efff7
99f4eb3cc9a5627a465bb1e24da76b0a6e08911c
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWBZ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
a24d8d943e773be8ec197484544f9dcc
10c0b34ab1dfe4aa80e28155fe7e3c42816539b0
describe
'12038' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCA' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
be5712dcdb96d945113e0da97bfbc3f5
ce0706d01354bda1a5d9a872307fcf7e86cfd28b
describe
'892903' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCB' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
621eae5b15b9e18cd115c8a569452562
2b705c5585a9d24e3c48601cf48ec252e006b0d8
'2011-10-31T23:01:39-04:00'
describe
'108403' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCC' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
bcf08d4ab15e7e4f8b11fe3fb68f5c15
4ccb48bc918a30f5582bbeb0603f7cf6cfef8bab
describe
'37424' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCD' 'sip-files00060.pro'
a6f074bdaa4b92b3f22258f12112863e
de2e16a8845333f0e3ae6af1efac5e35c0306d85
describe
'39922' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCE' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
7609e2e7d77d69e5d249c960548d1ba2
9d1e1ffb95de09cecadd4d1bb57e1f953fd5f6b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCF' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f393debd3fcb379b8e096ddf0a828be3
1dffa10a8fa832452a72a78a3265ee0b452bd7f5
'2011-10-31T23:02:53-04:00'
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCG' 'sip-files00060.txt'
85b99352764628e62ca266a276648b25
8e031cf51ab2b9dd2fc7d8b21fc2560e361b8920
describe
'12527' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCH' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
c00584aeca2db4edbc803461c2688ced
d48e1c3fc34252f7488a29a4c396c11a638e5d08
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCI' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
23dc221cafe84c72dbe0a1c2fee7b410
13ca09f7f2245abeb99ac30f61a1a2e18836c524
'2011-10-31T23:00:34-04:00'
describe
'93086' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCJ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
0c0104f35d7c671860f93cb5aa747d47
df15e61b0d3a31a03e5abab386f8e207388fbbfe
describe
'29655' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCK' 'sip-files00061.pro'
f6c824c9eeca3a78698a7a6655b87045
d2f1a44248caa5bdeb971644de020bcc6d81c9b4
describe
'34345' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCL' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
839b8bfc7c131d973f5fd6e9f78425fa
3a6028c497af9160a5317dbcb0e473520a34120c
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCM' 'sip-files00061.tif'
01497e4a406b34e8903b2ba5c27768c2
f0a8101b67350931c3d54c11fa2b474ae8d74a73
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCN' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a5da1a8dbebd784abdcffc78ab163f9a
9081e1b61266b7be92829c42daaefe6f3487f3b5
describe
'10528' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCO' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
e6de2b23b88cc3cf786e032faf5f0834
6c0db1ca836fbc46cc66f9c6ad7a65ba419663bc
describe
'892861' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCP' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
b964eccaeeac0e46a00bba8de849fa61
8c1f6c1cf62933aec8c2acdea4ee70c1c8a8a426
'2011-10-31T23:00:23-04:00'
describe
'79435' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCQ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
52c22e103188e453c90c2b2b1fedeee2
f3b10eda0c5dd92653ddddf81cbcd71c30061822
'2011-10-31T22:57:34-04:00'
describe
'24290' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCR' 'sip-files00062.pro'
8e56a7271eb203347ee8d6f035ac7f46
ca5120be8a88690279ff3cb72f5e7fc5de263a13
'2011-10-31T22:58:58-04:00'
describe
'29095' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCS' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a35ee5720f12dfc57d90f09607dee2db
826979f80c46bf6225bb7d81ac1089f0232a935f
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCT' 'sip-files00062.tif'
a8390dbc0d087ffc82692035813c2583
05571c54387981f0143e04c66cc706c744483139
'2011-10-31T23:02:25-04:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCU' 'sip-files00062.txt'
0ef1bbff16ff89098ab371ea58c98e14
73e76aaaf3f53daafeee08a50b380b3595317ab7
describe
'9676' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCV' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
35642c480859dc532da14980ce7a490b
bf92fc94224a0c86b11cbfb3fe5e680ba4f07415
describe
'856533' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCW' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
749e841b68192d5c05540510d008a7d3
e5ebcaae891ebb8327cb2a54bde865334ca8f0a8
'2011-10-31T22:57:43-04:00'
describe
'105486' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCX' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
f5ab3dd0853e20b46abcb85874f83136
79addeec07d36660432dd793f48686dac31f46a6
describe
'38018' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCY' 'sip-files00063.pro'
96defa0fe49031f64969df31d58b92e3
927c6d7112fda27a88a9fa567c40e0a0f8f2bb89
describe
'39502' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWCZ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
68bc9360dd32245df2089b087df58f23
f058be8b50fa85c516842f5af6afd3a9e9e45da4
'2011-10-31T23:02:16-04:00'
describe
'6858835' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDA' 'sip-files00063.tif'
9d007fe6e4f2904957de55203096ab40
67665291cb42c850e4474c7cf53725a11f877a9c
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDB' 'sip-files00063.txt'
d98b00a7508a12296316c3ffaeea9e4d
41083d0a0f7c71062c7e37d09d8b82d440ee3712
describe
'12866' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDC' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
e70212a305265a37dd9f67cee40488d9
6140303d65b8f4e67879b7f357bbf4729773dc73
'2011-10-31T22:58:49-04:00'
describe
'892887' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDD' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
6a914c55c1e3ca066a61e31c21998eb3
5b93e12e331c4423575524c31366d8c90d10b31a
describe
'104715' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDE' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
285c8f0cabea10c262e9f67a291d095f
08130e65ada270851475d611b5b4c70092a50777
'2011-10-31T23:01:25-04:00'
describe
'35584' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDF' 'sip-files00064.pro'
25da143e93d8bd4b41cb0a2fd6a65e9e
4fcc5c09adf327bcb28077f511514a135d372d1c
describe
'38764' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDG' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
3a8501a5b5c5f58049181f97a7dc98eb
c64b379d70a38bca8fbab93011e533060ae8df6a
'2011-10-31T22:57:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDH' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a8fc90311a1961524ad6bbcafe3767d3
656a9a2747cc7a83240c7f89df8acfd1eb8ab47a
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDI' 'sip-files00064.txt'
0881e459f56939d875128d044c84be77
6f948fc52bfbfc9a816dc6d8bc19ecd292a921e3
describe
'12204' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDJ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
bdd000874d1c677a907c2819272801c2
09d9d84dafae45c939ff583ea4b5f8e04017745c
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
ced4173aa6b07fdc2c3be243279184ef
3ab38fea9fa90fa4dacba7b1994dfc53a0138417
describe
'109425' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDL' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
7afa948e6b3d9cb807d64d7abfcf1b34
69b806c4e98b8433c9c6015a12627cc3c7c79e64
describe
'38189' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDM' 'sip-files00065.pro'
620b8ec7298093bdfeeca96517888670
a4007fec6e5cb1de0dbff854ba9102284c09e08f
'2011-10-31T23:02:39-04:00'
describe
'40814' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDN' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
eeef57bfdd035f372b37543e992a03a5
6cef599c1ad465ca6ea08a4d7faf07f57f76cc21
'2011-10-31T23:02:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDO' 'sip-files00065.tif'
51343c98c67f2b6d0d926cb0749d8768
22e57df8ee81150aff52146615aae166f6c2bfac
'2011-10-31T23:00:38-04:00'
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDP' 'sip-files00065.txt'
579fd024e5eb847c643e2009bfc64d6d
544401e391783bf64a8ff47d7d24cdfe2609c736
describe
'12167' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDQ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
152df89456f03ad73ceb77196743ced5
a67989e6073a0804d3723c707a0324124b7dcf13
'2011-10-31T22:59:00-04:00'
describe
'892835' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDR' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
05e4f64abe1ce60cb88d228ea89e0230
5a08c7f3ef593680c19b38649d5f08e2e5958c12
'2011-10-31T23:01:01-04:00'
describe
'110284' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDS' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
0ed1d819dae4d7af9e9ce5e416d7d9d3
9af9fe9bfbb6b4aed0892d40e708834a98a9fedc
describe
'38247' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDT' 'sip-files00066.pro'
6db4b5f501e1ea1e93ae9878b4c68a70
384fa76b81ee81765cc74feee4b53fe283c6512d
describe
'40712' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDU' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
b13c32032793c27587a4049d45e640bd
cd33dd66d0eb10056ce45c75c1bec31b935e8336
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDV' 'sip-files00066.tif'
a0105b3b44192f2eeadb197d640d9318
1d217394124ce592f191b0ad03b434dd6282f0c6
'2011-10-31T22:58:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDW' 'sip-files00066.txt'
6dcd73c60f4304e6b442fd4ccd3d75ac
3d387bd76f425b6e9b1b163d2863865251845d15
describe
'12830' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDX' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
6867cafb18fb3ca1e6d18a3f388cbfe2
ae04812679c517bcd8b1949522f04a3b43703510
describe
'918131' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDY' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
ecb943749c7d62082c4bcd86c2dd5d0c
331664e723c1dd4aaca53759d60f35175d9da599
describe
'89913' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWDZ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
4a6c3f14648d23bb29c55e01ca7d3877
b4d384ab608ec9f8e0466d465ab3e4221bdf8d78
describe
'26185' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEA' 'sip-files00067.pro'
7a985cdb0e320dfa7537320dbf524db8
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describe
'33066' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEB' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T22:57:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEC' 'sip-files00067.tif'
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describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWED' 'sip-files00067.txt'
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describe
'9926' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEE' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
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describe
'892944' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEF' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
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describe
'90185' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEG' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
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describe
'29853' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEH' 'sip-files00068.pro'
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describe
'32931' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEI' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEJ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
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'2011-10-31T22:58:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEK' 'sip-files00068.txt'
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describe
'10745' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEL' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEM' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
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describe
'110625' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEN' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
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describe
'38948' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEO' 'sip-files00069.pro'
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describe
'40958' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEP' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEQ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
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'2011-10-31T22:59:33-04:00'
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWER' 'sip-files00069.txt'
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describe
'12037' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWES' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
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describe
'892917' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWET' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
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describe
'112064' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEU' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T22:57:38-04:00'
describe
'38862' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEV' 'sip-files00070.pro'
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describe
'40739' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEW' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEX' 'sip-files00070.tif'
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'2011-10-31T22:59:52-04:00'
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEY' 'sip-files00070.txt'
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describe
'12504' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWEZ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
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describe
'918138' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFA' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
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describe
'103635' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFB' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
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describe
'35311' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFC' 'sip-files00071.pro'
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describe
'38366' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFD' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFE' 'sip-files00071.tif'
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describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFF' 'sip-files00071.txt'
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'2011-10-31T23:02:14-04:00'
describe
'11555' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFG' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T22:59:38-04:00'
describe
'892905' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFH' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
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describe
'109507' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFI' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
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describe
'38183' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFJ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
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'2011-10-31T22:58:09-04:00'
describe
'39924' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFK' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFL' 'sip-files00072.tif'
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describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFM' 'sip-files00072.txt'
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'2011-10-31T22:56:40-04:00'
describe
'12446' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFN' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
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describe
'918054' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFO' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
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describe
'108389' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFP' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
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describe
'37380' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFQ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
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describe
'39567' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFR' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T23:02:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFS' 'sip-files00073.tif'
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'2011-10-31T23:01:47-04:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFT' 'sip-files00073.txt'
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describe
'11864' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFU' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
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describe
'892875' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFV' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
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describe
'111368' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFW' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
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describe
'38315' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFX' 'sip-files00074.pro'
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describe
'40458' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFY' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWFZ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
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describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGA' 'sip-files00074.txt'
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'2011-10-31T22:58:48-04:00'
describe
'12931' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGB' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
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describe
'918048' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGC' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
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describe
'82716' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGD' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
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describe
'12832' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGE' 'sip-files00075.pro'
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'2011-10-31T23:01:12-04:00'
describe
'27102' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGF' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGG' 'sip-files00075.tif'
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describe
'530' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGH' 'sip-files00075.txt'
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describe
'8659' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGI' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGJ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
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describe
'90180' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGK' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
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describe
'26589' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGL' 'sip-files00076.pro'
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describe
'32111' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGM' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGN' 'sip-files00076.tif'
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'2011-10-31T22:57:42-04:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGO' 'sip-files00076.txt'
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describe
'10290' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGP' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGQ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T22:59:20-04:00'
describe
'109430' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGR' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
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describe
'37743' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGS' 'sip-files00077.pro'
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describe
'39760' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGT' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T22:59:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGU' 'sip-files00077.tif'
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describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGV' 'sip-files00077.txt'
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describe
'11785' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGW' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGX' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
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describe
'109688' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGY' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T23:01:19-04:00'
describe
'38268' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWGZ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
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describe
'39532' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHA' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHB' 'sip-files00078.tif'
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describe
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describe
'12218' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHD' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
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describe
'918113' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHE' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T22:59:28-04:00'
describe
'110827' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHF' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T23:02:57-04:00'
describe
'38660' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHG' 'sip-files00079.pro'
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describe
'40500' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHH' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHI' 'sip-files00079.tif'
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'2011-10-31T22:58:50-04:00'
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHJ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
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'2011-10-31T22:58:23-04:00'
describe
'12055' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHK' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
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describe
'892942' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHL' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8724e043732f24a5e76b5381e4a52d67
3328bc138b039e72ca2b9be9120e369f27280486
describe
'110965' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHM' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
2a1f7069ee990151b25378e36c6dec75
bc69a8918679f2ee23162d0707b0aebf73dfac34
describe
'37323' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHN' 'sip-files00080.pro'
0a8ada64339bea230381ac8260df526c
f9ba22396be90733665dea1c1930d3a121709cea
describe
'40695' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHO' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
646b66e3e7cc4311e5f8b3ef70f0b1fc
f8a59ee0fbf3e860397ad9e263f857adb825cd4e
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHP' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c8c5ddd45beef5f986d29a1cd204572e
33945968ae9ea1db279ff9359270054f454312ec
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHQ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
9520f74e6c17646410be10253f532b97
b17d76697ebbeb88ff015cc5a8893796415e10e5
describe
'12899' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHR' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
a85b33f7f0c0139ebca03d6786f27fcb
52bac3e4d7a30729eee1025d693833a48199ba91
describe
'918142' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHS' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
9bd9a883997ccbdedab71f3bd86a7bfc
c444c1f330844d646889ddbbfbd251037f48c1a1
describe
'65048' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHT' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
f571c3867b8b9f8823fd245b8f44a299
c06a07c610de6171519b1547cc1b7f456c445ec5
describe
'6247' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHU' 'sip-files00081.pro'
3e736aa7aabaf3eb5a1f29edfa24ace9
c842c73c6f0adfef2721507eab72c3aa53084628
describe
'21949' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHV' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
1e03999f12332d7faf5ffa6d8f9bf4be
4218f82fc3033e665718c1704d341719e7ae4bb2
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHW' 'sip-files00081.tif'
1cb8ae7b5d0b4b9076860bc459f1d85b
f9a72a39cd01c9b88628ca4cbbf3a0cf64fbbd6a
describe
'262' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHX' 'sip-files00081.txt'
70c291a6bd0826bf348ac2f58dc85ae2
24da6c77fb76cbd3875eddacdc632a4480cbfcb3
describe
'7095' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHY' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
08029119c20833de8279793cb9cfe5f0
aea69346f9a67768308118d226f35c8ccddd823c
describe
'892904' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWHZ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
bb1ccce04821502508632d83a0bfe1d2
dbb081df0c6b1b6ae00e5e04c911e61ce8516e46
describe
'95929' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIA' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
0497bfa9cae9135293d6aeeede701442
2d15cdea5cd7eab3e64e6b27cf19289b4db0bdf4
'2011-10-31T23:01:15-04:00'
describe
'28647' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIB' 'sip-files00082.pro'
f16309b10eb5cdd481351eed863e46b0
dcb2e183cdca2b6b946033d0bbdd982642755b45
'2011-10-31T23:02:22-04:00'
describe
'34213' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIC' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
3ac3fb95752a33dfe23c7a6672577d8d
790813ddb8e8fb2dd6ee8a993a021b87e4961828
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWID' 'sip-files00082.tif'
391ca180d6da22e53f5f598192ffc619
e7d1a8f541761c68cc689db858c488557190675a
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIE' 'sip-files00082.txt'
115e80fbf41dbdc6526782926268af36
bd6518a345936ced3fae583edcabdcf437959230
'2011-10-31T23:01:37-04:00'
describe
'11115' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIF' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
09d575844d39913cf51395f0e338bd9a
3a67a4df5bc3ad3059073cc81766d03c236f2111
describe
'918105' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIG' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
26a82166c3008fe1953d2d00ce72ffae
30523b594f41e71636dba8c9b0097286a12fd26f
describe
'110929' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIH' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
d3694b355f4554d7fb7894c8f26a42ed
f2aa1d0d9746b4a5d6ab5b4d4532c0068ea875e2
describe
'37292' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWII' 'sip-files00083.pro'
6b6d67a493a611e4a133c42109fc9e6e
9d1e30c83d18fefb5adb9df71bd5a84a5077355e
describe
'39888' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIJ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
1af04aee03773e7d84cbcdfa671df0b6
209850fde771cf39c94437e458c8d8a8a4374841
'2011-10-31T23:02:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIK' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e5964e5b51757bd0c6176c5247775e65
df57432b3219a7d343f1116655ff73e669209a81
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIL' 'sip-files00083.txt'
42525d09fcbb6e7529af3f3a28953b65
be11bf38a1ac3a4ab8fa312cd596fb90fd230ff6
describe
Invalid character
'11821' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIM' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
02d0370dec99e20bea9307c092b23c8f
cffbad9f622b5e9399c92fd2c499443ee1f75f00
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIN' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
33f06d1af7beae4f9816c1467a294b8d
924f31ddb3a8778a92e99671b08b46ffabdc1a67
describe
'107079' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIO' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
6e1319c36b1dedd9f57c0d33cc9cae49
8e3bf2fde93b3dc353a84402fd07105f721dc2f8
'2011-10-31T22:57:29-04:00'
describe
'35377' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIP' 'sip-files00084.pro'
465a1b3fbbe93002062688e79238284d
30298ee8e072eb69a4ca919d0787190acc791c8f
describe
'39133' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIQ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
fc2482af8d51d13f2db12214baf40ef3
e8ec70bbf1c48068b2ecd6fc75463cea26e0fd9a
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIR' 'sip-files00084.tif'
cbb12d3144c289cd7ed8099acf95994a
824324bb6b48bfe49c2e16c225f5e663775818e5
'2011-10-31T22:59:09-04:00'
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIS' 'sip-files00084.txt'
e9ad9662c558ca82be4cff14f77fa177
2b25ae99c1463df76b6d28ae578dda2dffa160a2
describe
'12512' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIT' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
ea24cd3e9c712ab9712e667b7aa9b232
663f800cf3ae82da01a78346da47bd9c584ffbf5
describe
'918047' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIU' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f8f1a6bee26a76d672fb0358ca7e8788
d54d7913a8162a4715a105f263c497e2802e5b4b
describe
'106229' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIV' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
94cd03d9253ebde75b306eb1025d2a87
323e1ed53750b0e3b530a8d549561de62ab9077d
describe
'36275' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIW' 'sip-files00085.pro'
540f2070104367af587cd3dc12e59328
b831f1d45e65459c59fae04501491536e1f51412
describe
'38966' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIX' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
8a41f001fad88c2a9d50dcdd571dd91d
559f3079c671ad2e180e6360a6afc6094ab29edf
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIY' 'sip-files00085.tif'
9a0c7bd3c738fdfa0382dc15dc075d56
4e6d9e9f2efd2374c22fd9110159344ed7137bb9
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWIZ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
cef1743af11f984d83336abca295f508
77ad16fdf6855175655a3915ff3cec35535b94cc
describe
'11760' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJA' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
a0402d3ed5c5b510a9ec67dfb8902c5c
d107c604e2e21ea03fed1a7b315ce5286c4b8c57
describe
'892918' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJB' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
0c84cebab6ce0ec0731dfc55639c72f0
317cd60c55762a9b60374d6bb32052bcda68eb3d
describe
'105751' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJC' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
b2f6ce5b39018b87621bfdafd37d01c1
7094b54f750aa29b63185755e2367629c9d5b542
describe
'35107' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJD' 'sip-files00086.pro'
26e31681dddee078b6646413013631d7
f7cacee4195f55320542cc372e45a21d6a6a4437
'2011-10-31T23:02:15-04:00'
describe
'38464' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJE' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
0fd4ea7f3938d28f58ba4ae5792ea16f
fb1dd5c2a39f26afde16be12378e9f21ccb82033
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJF' 'sip-files00086.tif'
9b769c3ad578a65d422629bfbb3bae5e
ea73537429f936ba593134e9daebb0cdad66e95d
'2011-10-31T23:02:07-04:00'
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJG' 'sip-files00086.txt'
e7ffe817193af04e052a8688a63e03c9
f727f28e6e41259c1e80fd03fae90dcd3726608d
describe
'12080' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJH' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
46847fa87e628c46608e5a4622e9796d
96c626901159caff48d9ae400f9140561dbf26af
describe
'941208' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJI' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
5f61b834305f6c6b04e0c90ea86707b5
1eb25e97dbdbecc0cfddf7456e40e2057f2a2236
describe
'98703' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJJ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
bf53c0fd999789b8f9774a5a64d71187
5d122dda394f339345cb8abebf1affc9b254dcaf
'2011-10-31T23:00:35-04:00'
describe
'34031' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJK' 'sip-files00087.pro'
69419612e74ea68555bb08d295f63d38
7c80c47d83d962401b6b60a4b63854321be1a903
describe
'36398' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJL' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
8ad7a5796ea4dc536614932dbd3df70c
17afdb41121eb11185dfb4c2c2a8352680e6d10f
describe
'7538805' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJM' 'sip-files00087.tif'
403a8dafe33778ca49b0a93797b66fd5
d8811ebb9fe83161988f9e17657382e97eb2f181
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJN' 'sip-files00087.txt'
1672cd9ff3667fc206970bba15c2c577
652cbf672b60ce8c917d719705f77b9319d86035
describe
'11236' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJO' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
f70b2bbb7b62a5ecc0d275f54da3c6f7
b84bfbc16506ff3dbfadb11c43bd9bedcfad6f10
describe
'928935' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJP' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
9e5518169ec25400e7bc0ac74eca3992
45abe90a66f0d5458b1a6310b7e26935c5547f13
describe
'84742' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJQ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
447ccd9c818fa4e7b912712d9dbe7c82
53cfaa6d5e2b799bc63c6d14dff3d8d5451fd0c7
describe
'160512' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJR' 'sip-filesback.jpg'
af71612d6feabb29a6a977fee37528f7
009a41da7f7e5b321252f63627e36f012785e3d5
describe
'29550' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJS' 'sip-files00088.pro'
62733261b1c2253406640d4e2a3ca6ba
1d3e7add0ecd5ccd04df43f09e672bd756c705a9
describe
'30859' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJT' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
4d0c093fad2219b9a843e08c14f37022
243eb06ad23e46f8855e7848988b319c11517df4
describe
'7441459' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJU' 'sip-files00088.tif'
752063cdd6d7c2e31632326e21e95025
0f7424c52d16953554d832da4b25cb6eba13f492
'2011-10-31T22:56:43-04:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJV' 'sip-files00088.txt'
dd857b9abec239ae6f72b897c255612e
a5b78313a8a923a732f1cc396e5f4a57541051e6
describe
Invalid character
'10071' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJW' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
5843e633d126d7172ac30ffe779dece2
08863c086e1e1e302288ee08c931781e2fb54e3d
'2011-10-31T23:00:29-04:00'
describe
'941213' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJX' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9581bf65608638044f743e54a35fecd3
a48210aa1d33943c6e2b7b5c05c545ecff3a2dec
'2011-10-31T23:01:17-04:00'
describe
'96025' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJY' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
aa01587430efa76397913657be0785e4
c52b4c81427640b2f30e8ab4cb6d6b32549e72e3
describe
'32959' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWJZ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
d49ac404444e1c11e7546686bfc621b5
f383d71454cfd8c0700159e00a69b1a6440a441b
describe
'35528' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKA' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
b57f5bf59d597b709c836c7488057ffe
ff52fdfa05a37c9846fd50131464655582e8b1e9
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKB' 'sip-files00089.tif'
8a49b2d1228ec0cc9e6eca360713835e
ac5b3e06efd03c76075ab54d7256884d08679559
'2011-10-31T23:00:11-04:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKC' 'sip-files00089.txt'
eb5b7abebbcf0ed9cfdf9727ed39da94
c6cd2a7700a20421146a1953b3ec24afa4ac8821
describe
'11104' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKD' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
5706b778c8ffca6c6f09fa3ae066e871
df866de81481cbdc26f5ae9e1b2f027356e1e04a
describe
'928954' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKE' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
f83db2c13d74406023574eef55802b39
273eb474f29e1faa227e91bb05cbe3840bfb67e6
describe
'105880' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKF' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
c0cbe03961322d6334ced8927332de98
b98e7d477b143cfda681f86037ad9c10fbe60c07
describe
'38065' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKG' 'sip-files00090.pro'
49eb65047152c0575a13008628afc367
b7833185294748e32f83b9612ca13d17f8dfe597
describe
'38908' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKH' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
bcb499c27133ea7455677b49a4b402d3
a41940f0579d29215ecb1028c079001535648c74
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKI' 'sip-files00090.tif'
6cfc9104247ac7fa587d4f0a17cc64cf
f69e9ebcb6219ffeb8bd19a01d3722c64c872e25
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKJ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
f3b331300b73ff35f20dfbaf442ffb9e
ed4901a250d55e9acd0f8c3fb69fc958b5c7f9f7
describe
'12177' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKK' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
1be9c95c986c803bc1376aa1f85a4ddc
5cedfd3bc79d84f5693cc6508399cb9489172c88
describe
'941179' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKL' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
bdd1191a62a884f3b03bf472c571ae94
5c3020b921b60b80782238b18ce74c67e044adcb
describe
'101316' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKM' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c676d2f054c27edd6ff69f6aa9e9ff8b
5ae233b0b2b4d0d148b81c025308f670faf3368d
describe
'37918' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKN' 'sip-files00091.pro'
f8c0d6b726e85b6b965eca1525abc3b6
88d3468cb96d65d98c01e17f3a6b5811b3dea5af
'2011-10-31T23:01:31-04:00'
describe
'38202' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKO' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
372f31c7fb52d9fe6b7ecbb7a6ad7383
6e7c163b5713e638c3f7d375231dcb96323ec4fb
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKP' 'sip-files00091.tif'
458763b7019cc4063a8da3254631f672
d4b08aad91e094ce4d1689b6e6496dacb7403dd3
'2011-10-31T22:56:38-04:00'
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKQ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
cb9d81666bd5d9a279da28c41e9c43b5
b1d1df66c8db26682f9bc0baace0dd4803a61146
describe
'11624' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKR' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
c8bef32d30eee9d6530e595e9bff2b19
496d9b440e73ac3f949f606c8dc11398c47be732
describe
'928942' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKS' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
8004e3487113808cbc131dfd19a46e8b
e711a4300f284ed6e262a08ba54c15007acf4bb7
describe
'63582' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKT' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
72e9e8ef5f65a1ea485c0806ee479805
3b555582a04b7026e2c12d857bc5fc6468bca616
describe
'6584' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKU' 'sip-files00092.pro'
70f58417d266bf762401db542c2c987a
f4375af19041215a5c342fd51de71d14c40ee2bf
'2011-10-31T23:01:46-04:00'
describe
'20767' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKV' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
fb3b4f8caccd1d85cf909d0eff0dcfc7
225ef6f4e68f10b45ca850f4e223ec67f4bdda14
'2011-10-31T22:59:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKW' 'sip-files00092.tif'
70092f315f438a47a025c6c2f54293b1
ac7fd2c334ad7f8744e285af3cfb442ce5ed2efe
'2011-10-31T22:57:56-04:00'
describe
'321' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKX' 'sip-files00092.txt'
87c5eec70d35fedf06d8dff2a1f0c378
4a5daed5554fdc1d699f3a5288c23d70fdfaa81a
describe
'7211' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKY' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
0d59888c84f7bf74409d4411fd7468fa
b4a96ae82368568876018f1e31f18f11a301c4fa
describe
'941201' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWKZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
dc5827afd920871ce35331af29699f77
74fb2098037ac676f386e91e9fe9de1a3a8e493e
describe
'89269' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLA' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
598f18f3776a3805a7eb9c15d4b03539
7888698fb4347c595b13bda391e4a5782cbc4c44
describe
'28860' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLB' 'sip-files00093.pro'
c71486c94aa240ebe9b04e61a74021c9
2333fcdc223897b84221afe5fa7d70709353613a
describe
'32466' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLC' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
5b95fd5135aa805cea06e025a9ce83bf
cb68270c3363deaaa5869c40d86f52cac26b9f65
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLD' 'sip-files00093.tif'
845c3074935d6848b49c70324e630065
b8e47fabc864689a51db6bf955b0a4a5cf8cf8fb
'2011-10-31T23:00:12-04:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLE' 'sip-files00093.txt'
82c76dcd4c5abd10b0f8b176139460c1
3ccb6ac6d4054495442a4725e6aa20953c53cf4a
describe
'10068' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLF' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
dcdd1ce1ff5fe9be777863d988b89475
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describe
'928969' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLG' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
06d0a71066222a1dd6e88889904c0b74
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describe
'107898' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLH' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
a50bb1f28370c72049721c83c78bacf0
f70b0841b9820bcc8f85737803f10358832b8639
describe
'38505' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLI' 'sip-files00094.pro'
28a9c7986d9f0787519d8d0cc7972de0
3a216e7b04a0e5f875f1bc96193f7cc21420b12a
describe
'39557' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLJ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
6eb57d1c8518db41a25a5052ceab275c
d8c097390a9c19057793e1026fe6111d769def2d
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLK' 'sip-files00094.tif'
f64545f1234a003733c60a08739ef35f
47d20bfe23db6963a82e00f627626a7a88339622
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLL' 'sip-files00094.txt'
43bd650c39c02ec29eb0b25d2aaefe11
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describe
'12401' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLM' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
a5609c50c199079ec907c5e9530336e2
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describe
'941204' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLN' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
6094f0ec59307bc1ef6c92aa77e22d84
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describe
'101136' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLO' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
95cb28d6484772c9c320aec72ba488a3
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describe
'33905' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLP' 'sip-files00095.pro'
61620c098189a4c782076fcb300593ba
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describe
'37038' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLQ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
2808418d2d361547c7be89fb7dd81efd
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLR' 'sip-files00095.tif'
c21d5ab04af50cd6ce3f50fc73b0332a
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describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLS' 'sip-files00095.txt'
e1f9f4e2b8f3b52f157894d9ca43a2da
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describe
'11591' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLT' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
220f0a9d3d62d96873d0d1e7245ab3d6
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describe
'928973' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLU' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
cbbe63891619b1652a6acdb8f05bd553
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describe
'109833' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLV' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
60fc5842bc55aa7116c6106929a01854
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describe
'38956' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLW' 'sip-files00096.pro'
82e80e6ed7bbd6bbdc8e447c259cc87d
59f83d0e946689623ce2442d6959bab861695f4b
describe
'40028' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLX' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
2fc2a14cd36f8475a302d62fc0bddca8
aa4b26d605bef090dcbebe72bb8ed776283b6bd9
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLY' 'sip-files00096.tif'
b1909c46fa9662e9c2b81720f4a9183c
d8b947a99fa3896b41ccf0c10e9d35d08b786c62
'2011-10-31T23:02:55-04:00'
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWLZ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
d32510c6235d2064af628b06abea08f6
4278ed25d736165f781e48b2b4d04f158bec01ed
describe
'12543' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMA' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
2c6c14b5b3c56c3b0b5b7bddae884ab7
ff12dca0a91084ffc34e4f4156c735a4ca19ab0c
describe
'940886' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMB' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
f7fb548c8e991fcd1a107086bba3b669
95843b206898f15ca62379064ccee015538d5e0d
describe
'102103' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMC' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
591b2d3d97724313b187c99255dfe4e3
5030bdfbaee85e1b1942ed40d6b3daf29165abb4
describe
'35208' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMD' 'sip-files00097.pro'
be612c393a71cda8eac9165086db8b61
f09e53f29210824a4ce8747e184c7f02f5f687dc
describe
'36860' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWME' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
532f784ec8c3d2200c1e7512ffb68cc8
57a932c60e4fc87cfd7a9428360a43d8e1262d02
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMF' 'sip-files00097.tif'
8c993e1a6a877a300ae8a9a06788daf0
d3fdc81d19f5b8f59fd827bc50581a15badec04a
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMG' 'sip-files00097.txt'
d3c96574b39e1cc942186a19bbb56476
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describe
'11321' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMH' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
f2bbf593ef49fe0ff96af073ec74ebc8
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describe
'929038' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMI' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
356fd862512ec0d78b9ad1b1c03fd8d6
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describe
'105483' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMJ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
c7923fd580a90b5217b1240be3b9ff3c
1c6f1107b52bf5445b51fa63fddb9f255eab1eb1
describe
'37121' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMK' 'sip-files00098.pro'
cc033d04ba142d4ae590843c2226214a
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describe
'38392' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWML' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
4df6a1f2a2fc11b73d951ce31c83657c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMM' 'sip-files00098.tif'
b5bde48d12d70a8366229ad0b4d16cce
be40d33a8b8724578febf85110ea6b001923b7b1
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMN' 'sip-files00098.txt'
e3b5a87997c0170049b98ec2974c95c0
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describe
'12071' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMO' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
e8de3cf76900e184a8cb1b31dab4433a
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describe
'940999' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMP' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
1d371056174dd46cd26135e2072b3581
946f81106b8ef4ac5ea24deb2bf2048e0caccbf9
'2011-10-31T23:00:19-04:00'
describe
'107031' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMQ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
7314c38d5f315473e736d45f2045f208
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describe
'37974' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMR' 'sip-files00099.pro'
281c1133f96e526baa0ad635b9eb93f1
bd3086a16e4399cf483cd19f265971edccaba374
'2011-10-31T22:56:48-04:00'
describe
'39522' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMS' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
8d0fdecb7f23285148dbd5f7166c5e58
d02980b3e348cf8b4fce173b1c708138f7a76d76
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMT' 'sip-files00099.tif'
8b07975acb386fed4f591b266a6d6599
e5c2765671bde5f253b63112df0a2056ff6961dd
'2011-10-31T23:01:18-04:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMU' 'sip-files00099.txt'
6b1dac040b3bf1e3e702e97e0d7a04b1
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describe
'12109' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMV' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
995969708c6b6a3392136c9cba62a3aa
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describe
'928779' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMW' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
1f6e5e1243c1a0cc76d1accfb4ec0822
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describe
'101960' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMX' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
d33cf2b4867a95145343e2e797a79b1f
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describe
'35146' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
47ca6d2e6436f9ddd4b14bf9a51644fe
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'2011-10-31T23:02:40-04:00'
describe
'37801' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWMZ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
de68180922b2d79aff1dd2559c1157c8
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNA' 'sip-files00100.tif'
bdeab6d167e6d4bb9b141797d085ac35
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describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNB' 'sip-files00100.txt'
0c8f79be0d8cc4bdf6d6cba146702deb
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describe
'12351' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNC' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
1c49afd829d3b8f5130c0bc3e56e9cd4
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describe
'941212' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWND' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
4afbbfbe8d704f6c9c0858d50b3dc957
2117e1a2c2466dd206b3d424a42d95a4d125129e
'2011-10-31T22:59:12-04:00'
describe
'98566' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNE' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
b79d909718e126c45680550470acef4d
5108e57b93069b7fc3cde6a810fa730850c3e3ec
describe
'23214' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNF' 'sip-files00101.pro'
7001c46476e92f582dbde00d9824e6e3
659c3cd48ce28f753d6f7e0b42bd5fb2159f790d
describe
'34769' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNG' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
269c27aa0e0c9ca63ae7144cfd861a91
9dd906e925a8815cef05faabd6608dfa9d389dc0
'2011-10-31T22:59:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNH' 'sip-files00101.tif'
4266010a4be67c384df29cdc431fff20
d6c0a2bc4be8681f95d4b55033de2c71a2be4817
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNI' 'sip-files00101.txt'
47b3a02cd175f9c057ce54546b098674
61afd4ddbc2e4a364c8a50e135146ea018e497b5
describe
'10556' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNJ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
e7a3867da4853bf59cb31e76dadba27e
a3de47dc3928b8d7541d00ad87f84010b1fc3f91
describe
'748237' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNK' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
c3558070a6700ad611896ee61962009d
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describe
'30252' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNL' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
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describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNM' 'sip-files00102.pro'
2889f5dd624ebd963a2cff068be21245
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describe
'9856' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNN' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
8413cf3fdabef7c771dd093876f62410
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
4913f7861a2253bf94358a7ee87e640f
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describe
'88' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNP' 'sip-files00102.txt'
9cc8e73e523e0543a2705ae24de78345
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describe
'3808' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNQ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
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describe
'941167' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
d58c94d83fb5145af71c34306606ae47
4687ce0fd83cdd902bb24144441329a29221b513
'2011-10-31T23:00:25-04:00'
describe
'118185' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNS' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
eba46d3ed640462c0909e9f3bbf011f4
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describe
'2447' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNT' 'sip-files00103.pro'
2fc16b08224276111ac54131dbd4e3d9
d8419dabff61228e377a821260cf6a3ffd1980c5
describe
'33299' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNU' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
d73abda11e074354d1453fee0ce1d258
b1afe89a3bd588b5eb4594c1ecf31eecfc14ee23
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNV' 'sip-files00103.tif'
4256bfbd137cb37c5b161ea2fec0c191
83519ed7a0c7de5a55c431a429819fde564d72f6
'2011-10-31T23:00:24-04:00'
describe
'254' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNW' 'sip-files00103.txt'
4f7269b349c10bb73156ec8ca0100459
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describe
Invalid character
'9721' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNX' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
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describe
'928758' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNY' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
2c836f6b55f371433822a37d81b926d0
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describe
'62608' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWNZ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
76085cfda2eac6236f62a97356e673ef
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describe
'17380' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOA' 'sip-files00104.pro'
0fd0f5393a5c2841fc83eb7342d90851
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describe
'20686' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOB' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
188e1637d2fc2078f01594a67aa57823
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'2011-10-31T22:58:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOC' 'sip-files00104.tif'
449d32d332b9b5728aedf3abd297a809
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describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOD' 'sip-files00104.txt'
ac6887488577aefc293da93051bd6efa
123545383c4f3147dfe9870de4796cea083bfad4
describe
'7379' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOE' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
08561dc57016977974513fcea6c634cc
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'2011-10-31T22:59:13-04:00'
describe
'737635' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOF' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
f84462dc0bb29b5f6e0ac699d6172318
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'2011-10-31T22:57:49-04:00'
describe
'31603' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOG' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
b58482b31c2de63a48092b36808d366c
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describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOH' 'sip-files00105.pro'
57ff804dd40060c83cffabb257aa289a
f11ad7b7314f6d60471446aa27d96e2da7405376
'2011-10-31T22:59:14-04:00'
describe
'9849' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOI' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
069fedf66686d53e6b92ac6a8b3ae7c7
f3c562fcc1752e658ee2b548c8685896abe71e0a
describe
'7208699' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOJ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
786d73608f87443bf552e203c2ddf5b7
45e1f114d7cf90e8227e06b6adaf1b21244ae120
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOK' 'sip-files00105.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'3575' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOL' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
5ff84dd64c4f4efe1f85efb819d8d794
99efe1442f03fd0f94af07e97fa874a420b95a91
'2011-10-31T22:56:50-04:00'
describe
'928869' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOM' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
17cee1269370241cc5d248a9266fecd7
77151ee36c6376cb11c934897e44427c88b896ac
describe
'81333' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWON' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
e422e0fb863eeffc11276cb574c1d12b
3e2f7566ff6d0ef2fa6a3b392234191769ba495c
describe
'24289' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOO' 'sip-files00106.pro'
9abfbdd4380a0eb011d9d030b0f9bfb2
1194f56e926ed7ac3cd7df1ffdb5d4d572cf47b0
describe
'28922' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
2c7ce396f27133f3700b7c5d72fe3c62
534a181b20171af07f8908d13a4296e5e3c18166
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOQ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
8bd74b908af8a61333051f5221a5ff1c
bf04140c1e954a2cf322e165ba90d0de575193a2
'2011-10-31T23:02:45-04:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOR' 'sip-files00106.txt'
0f361306f6eee2404d72e6b2d03ad045
230f57ec25266c6be0329a3d8bdb1f2b9c6e5979
'2011-10-31T23:00:55-04:00'
describe
'9432' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOS' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
14295967cc95f6ed2837371f1d664d6f
4701f19209932a6bd56816573e1d621ec2ba3eb0
describe
'900385' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOT' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
d8c992c78b810b6d8d80e5b4a04f967a
4353b499637a48ac72ebcf76f5759e40bcdb28ea
describe
'109231' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOU' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
7eaa642774da523ae85a5c265064a1c7
a529f25ecf28c0b03b7fb2c2fbc5ad7f413f4858
describe
'38110' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOV' 'sip-files00107.pro'
a5bcc945bf14f5d85c4aa55799dff459
0c5ec4d4cf9ca6e771cacf760733b72ce973c257
describe
'39666' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
380da7c3703d7e4562ca1fd58db8ebe2
37a5a2a6543fc6004cddafb312c2efe0c7b1c56b
'2011-10-31T23:02:17-04:00'
describe
'7210523' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOX' 'sip-files00107.tif'
4ee4b5d7dce278ed8c6fcb1d39b11263
8932359f00f8c435c8f5bbbe7de66982b55e4513
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOY' 'sip-files00107.txt'
e34ac9a7bedd95a48e2d2404aa75339a
bb00c92e1099836bf3c24621346381de647da824
'2011-10-31T23:01:43-04:00'
describe
'12602' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWOZ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
e93dce3b2834b058f48c98c9c2e33ce1
12455c29030324751ebb0939d4a8e8ec40ecf9d3
describe
'928971' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
3028c6aa3d47273b762f0f9f4b8cec60
e8c6863d0af73f4d0bc6db456bb248eb05dc7dca
describe
'105563' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPB' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
a521159b2633d0d8d84e8dff99b11de6
89f78bdb0b0afd1cd215b6ac2e0fccf634925c46
describe
'36730' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPC' 'sip-files00108.pro'
9aed745f00dd5417082321e6edf04a37
9225e828088df7e372ef0fa7b22b2406dea86323
describe
'38619' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPD' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
6a5ec97d858c55be4d90a44245cc4c29
27cadfff57420cc3cc524625e1a704925c17dd8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPE' 'sip-files00108.tif'
8cef3034bff89779682d3237235d099d
23bfdbca42a83f016285c70c073647498ef3fbda
'2011-10-31T22:59:59-04:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPF' 'sip-files00108.txt'
1981ddd38383ced1af87cdc2b526613a
a8917e4617ce7c352c9bb9db74ec3b595d1bd620
describe
'11838' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPG' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
5e0b05ac9cd8380159a63cb7cb33724c
c344b4b12dc1113a2c6ea104a32ba8b38be7bf86
describe
'909615' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPH' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
ceca5c724ced37ade9428b3e87701f20
43d8fcdb7103f322158dd1152f1cc838883345a0
describe
'104902' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPI' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
0890ab4e76213216557e059081ec0af1
4394cc03b8102e46820da5271f2edffe0e61b3ac
describe
'36573' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPJ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
f1ad9ccabacce544dd0d92d951b801a0
798a277b33c0544e44c986a5aa4ec6cc8bd0dde9
describe
'38203' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPK' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
76bf9194c674ab525dced2d172395c4d
20aa6aff7f15b982930b63adc70d1e7b9613bf36
'2011-10-31T23:02:28-04:00'
describe
'7284043' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPL' 'sip-files00109.tif'
1bc7293fc28c17a04d596f450e27457e
18a014d505f1d54317c8f271d5af78fef91c038a
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPM' 'sip-files00109.txt'
4d119266a7bcad2c2e4b62ede6d38261
70710193eb6ea412fa24b0f087241abff0ab9208
describe
'12197' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPN' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
59c980e5c158aba25f6a67ca8b78446e
b39c0bfd22567e790dc4682de851d7637cb7886a
describe
'929008' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPO' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
ffa5057cc65633eae7502012c606efe7
e2a4aa925582536a334b0e308498ee1504c73d60
'2011-10-31T22:59:26-04:00'
describe
'110649' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPP' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
a3dc8405a86b662335b7d92ef1b7f60c
750f654227cabcf0f9861958f8c940ffce7d6454
describe
'39005' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPQ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
dafcb58d1b429dca937173a61bbf544a
a728bc3d6b081e164229eb8fe0499feb313be60b
describe
'39932' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPR' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
495d5deaa2a809a33612466b0cb6e204
cac3fa76accb8ce313c75510e1f7091b7c0bc7a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPS' 'sip-files00110.tif'
afa4700103de8d0e604b95965ef491b3
3c7c8cc6228dee50f33d6272663bbd0a30acf310
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPT' 'sip-files00110.txt'
de4f304526a57b846cae01c66a07dac7
c831c13031b7ab42d8df1d68b47de6f10cee5ffb
describe
'12529' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPU' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
c7bf695e92bb9b9a4e0212b9a80dfb90
237e68895e1100006e8962986c4865cfd5590777
describe
'902491' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPV' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
674ce40e54a5978c7ac70ed59e880d22
4ddabb0eae4bee39aa3e69bde9f98cf0bd5381d7
describe
'109763' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPW' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
c35031b5cfd5838263a5cf4fc1389cae
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describe
'38495' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPX' 'sip-files00111.pro'
95ce2905e714a859ba42d0f5cfe832f0
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describe
'40428' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPY' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
426e2742d6559d7eca140bf1bd8052e7
86c33030c33b0b6332b8c345e9d91edba9c01fba
describe
'7226635' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWPZ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
036c41759375b49cb08644d47c05e44c
d28e7cd638e7f89d0f4e0723982c4513984178f3
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQA' 'sip-files00111.txt'
233b17a7b47ea386ed6505d856957575
2cf925eee64f5d1cd1dfe8967941d0c4b96977ee
describe
'12883' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQB' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
ebb16dc57368a4950d28dcc07d77e398
a9f98cb15346966a1accc7422ccd2c910500404a
describe
'929011' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQC' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
af96a6db4add8edb61efaa6dfe06396f
355525fb822d319bc2930f6bfca5ad7d8553e192
describe
'105173' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQD' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
505bfb4600d14eca3c642f69a245b67f
b9ee655a9c3e5931223bd94e72eccaec8518cf48
describe
'37835' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQE' 'sip-files00112.pro'
346cbb821517dd4aec08c7ebfa48901b
b808e43459377dfcee44741e020871ddd6b9f8c4
'2011-10-31T23:01:26-04:00'
describe
'38168' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQF' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
7743c5030042a5e2588e222d5a9c126f
5ca17572a60d7711d067ea4e378892264990f5bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQG' 'sip-files00112.tif'
1d8d6459d2474c8b68de64947e6fad41
b101d1d58feba902ba8cd069dc52a48c38737a38
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQH' 'sip-files00112.txt'
1ed0742d1065449d1aa12a21abb86329
7d33449d84a446c57d83061bfdf35a20f3a63d16
describe
'11977' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQI' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
81f8db36c93fd7b4085378ecfc3f298f
e11aba4e1f407cec7a4272dd7b74d014a7ec841b
describe
'906074' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQJ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
4b4e0602b102d7f41ea018b5b05b0990
5b518dc20ea3183e6676bd5d6880d3dc4bbe7911
describe
'103980' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
8e182c1063f475005bdfeec84dd74868
5de0057ab91f072ddd99993c6ffd3fd518a5a9ad
'2011-10-31T22:56:52-04:00'
describe
'36108' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQL' 'sip-files00113.pro'
3cfe3ae340ed72297fc2fe0cf6be043a
47add1718d25afe17de408a8c37f82d2305e8235
'2011-10-31T22:59:40-04:00'
describe
'37848' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQM' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
1fa7fcf57c707c96fb1495bfaceb54f8
78842ce320744e572b1f81e380f13ed70bac128a
'2011-10-31T22:57:01-04:00'
describe
'7255339' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQN' 'sip-files00113.tif'
84d28e8ebba43fb242dbfd4b3529e187
f6f42898b3d2d43d5c3fd61486aa87c158eec2ad
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
1fc39ff8343d357757c80bc88941b44d
71a2695fa4446eb59d55e38f84b2ee12a51cf8d4
describe
'12319' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQP' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
f4738498c148e96b8b7ad3c26207c149
35d214d26df2bed2581e7442c9aacfe24c4295c6
'2011-10-31T23:00:50-04:00'
describe
'929009' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
04e66abe5267fb4652569ec3685ddca0
473da401068d1ec3bd2ff8767ccec98f0ed0edb4
'2011-10-31T22:57:50-04:00'
describe
'104951' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQR' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
c2ecaffac259dda1a9b39cc0905ca26a
00839eaea56240fbd5db71637c99638b50c67752
describe
'37092' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQS' 'sip-files00114.pro'
999cc5c53579d39f7e3f08a91c39768b
e06e2c1c20a9cfde9fa95768232e6361abc136ad
describe
'37841' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQT' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
80cdb3aeba528b892851a9bfaa1bb1fd
5df4d4fc94f8547cc9dcc567889c1c35c2f09937
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQU' 'sip-files00114.tif'
4fc3957b46450a41375c0f0a30f2bcb8
025f1376791b84bfe52fd3c0f4ec0e67fa9588b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQV' 'sip-files00114.txt'
9fbc70cceb35f3531803e45915f04901
cf692dc791833553eeb20466d083c4a8eedfb4d6
describe
'11916' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQW' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
aede7df4845695145c7f1893674f9dba
ff4af3f403500a4f39fc34fdbf992bace2ab129c
describe
'909669' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQX' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
0644b8b7ef024e8ef3cdb46ca6ea78b9
ec73ff7940dba487e9fd625b1019218d71374e35
'2011-10-31T22:57:47-04:00'
describe
'106699' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQY' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
9139ff5d46c54c1ff42d692e9e985840
8480d851e3ff94aca668786a95a9b925dcd49a0c
describe
'39270' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWQZ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
1c8f87a18a602cab731c14f4a4b2b7df
46dd2faa72a3a1ea7e9f5493def993be9798d4cb
describe
'39491' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRA' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
2e32dcc4c11e30a364834e74b606e608
5b58c748daf8e742e969a2a104cf595c40097606
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
b200539117467979475fd8b8736f207b
fac1d15d1b509cc4e1501fd05a0270bc48ab9e6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRC' 'sip-files00115.txt'
4a876dd71bbbbc338acb44b04b136163
9fe5a417ffd54c4f4d6ca28b0889b3202ce86251
describe
'12358' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRD' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
859a0442b4fad428aa8b5b04d395cdd1
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describe
'928986' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRE' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
25f8a69d4e3567f14e0e09ff3a14be95
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describe
'99954' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRF' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
1eca54e1811628304553927fe70f27ab
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describe
'35814' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRG' 'sip-files00116.pro'
a1b225013b0c52aabb3bef073a2098d5
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describe
'36541' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRH' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
21d9e548cc016283ca340c2a948ab621
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRI' 'sip-files00116.tif'
f67c35cf2f67abf702b9c7cc0075b54c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRJ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
14aa783b91c22c584c29ce2ae884a93b
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describe
'11594' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
6bf6b0455a2a0d9c45b4e75d96e5311d
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describe
'914782' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRL' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
890cffb66e55290691e487f1964229bb
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describe
'101430' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRM' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
1900f63867ff9c98384f19c3a8f44e90
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describe
'36495' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRN' 'sip-files00117.pro'
b2dcf21df551b2fcbec170250f7e7154
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describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRO' 'sip-filesback.pro'
01156fda23459d8da2cc9768a45309b0
4a06ca012b93462f88a03d1f37751ba53e1aea2f
describe
'37268' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRP' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
372b9a8edb1a0d58dc0670f9ed51874b
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describe
'7325083' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRQ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
2d81a26e20e73501d7773c5af10f3e98
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRR' 'sip-files00117.txt'
d98cfa8e28dac8a0284363d70f212f31
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describe
'11683' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRS' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
66d0bb016d95e0d23358f1fe746b9b65
f311c3d7710499c089777b0c0d13df024fd7eca4
describe
'929039' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRT' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
20f967e15fe87ef6878d5507c6195b92
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describe
'65599' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRU' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
4f186fd27f48d40c43f1050a160fe47b
f0a768e384007198d08e447d7de23865e1a05ffb
describe
'8295' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRV' 'sip-files00118.pro'
3a1e7e184852955783b132a681228046
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describe
'21122' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRW' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
9ce9a140be5f40e5821e46c37a83290b
ea70fec184944fee041c7a970b00abc1570e861e
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRX' 'sip-files00118.tif'
949062e6e8a41f474306c014ca1b9c07
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describe
'362' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRY' 'sip-files00118.txt'
197da4f98ca7a2f28b13b45fb5d3faab
5ac2b415c3a266b3b566addfd80e861eb6fefb47
describe
'7231' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWRZ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
48fad1a8d65f317019806e178a361f23
aaadb66e140817c9c945369561b2b0eeef2d69f1
describe
'941039' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSA' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
511407db6f8d796394792807f5c5eeb4
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describe
'85546' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSB' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
bb42e920846db8a938c36256b90ecfd6
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describe
'27951' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSC' 'sip-files00119.pro'
93f73ead42449deca13b561db7f4f9b1
9d83b5330882b48ff8075573217f61b1ccff4a16
describe
'30954' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSD' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
cabf4140dbbb5a53dcae9eced7f2119e
c84107aa7fe386a07063142dc5f25324ac42714c
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSE' 'sip-files00119.tif'
22a560385021069b81c06d969ca23c29
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describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSF' 'sip-files00119.txt'
01064a2fe7b590985d8449c3c4c760a3
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describe
'9875' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSG' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
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describe
'928977' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSH' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
a1f39894bc2165587c5c1a29458e586a
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describe
'101138' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSI' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
87e0086bf36480e6224293711951a94d
8df57a178b8602bb4859ab9f7511d3181b16f516
describe
'36844' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSJ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
1c0666d05b08764a4faba66de615b74f
e59422e0072d278513c60988eab1a325a890e8f4
describe
'36883' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSK' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
7da4abb88e95e28cc5654a737d597d6a
af14f9170b1af869db373e7679fd4083d413d650
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSL' 'sip-files00120.tif'
74ffc7dac210b32c1ed2e9b86a40b7eb
1305ca076010c3a93242ab7d9705c7d7648efd5b
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSM' 'sip-files00120.txt'
a2f225fa5e0e672d896a5f60994584f9
b1bddccc5fb484c18dc5fba6e29ce5491f1be20c
describe
'11699' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSN' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
429cc4311ae421142c7dd7a488f59f63
a01787b21a7b671a0baf4b8f5ed4a567fd55fefa
'2011-10-31T23:02:24-04:00'
describe
'941194' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSO' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
2592677984168337abcaabc915915791
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describe
'101834' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSP' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
e2902c35957f069a307eb0bf348adcf4
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describe
'36471' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSQ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
57bd9da2fbbb19dba47d582aad429e52
0c5efee9917d165acc5f9169bd926b7ff8fc1901
describe
'37693' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSR' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
1559e4e063eb716ae7e4c22c43c24a92
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSS' 'sip-files00121.tif'
3b7729dd4ef22e0dc910522b3d8feb6f
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWST' 'sip-files00121.txt'
858694628608b49a2bfe03790ee7f6ac
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describe
'11622' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSU' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
0a30fbd627f513320e3102044099e345
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSV' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
8d11b745360884208bc4bdbe1067229e
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describe
'104557' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSW' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
5e5aaf1f571de27e5c662a4ddb1674b2
03c803b0d6f566db53fcabad57713cc0f25e739b
describe
'37408' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSX' 'sip-files00122.pro'
c5833f728a78815f7bba5d04900c6583
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describe
'38271' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSY' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWSZ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
0205c422be8fa76d8fe9aeb4dde2f843
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describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTA' 'sip-files00122.txt'
19d16296af6e138ed2e2442e093afc59
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describe
'11965' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTB' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
769b3c804e5bb6454a1a33390ffcab22
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describe
'941198' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTC' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
ee89f67006620400e69784abd63ab076
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describe
'103744' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTD' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
0f9824f61c8f516e1fd732cf2a422b8b
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describe
'36069' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTE' 'sip-files00123.pro'
955ee127049b24c7cb5a6490c256ed7d
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describe
'37942' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTF' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
422388932d79a327aae419d67e5c114b
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTG' 'sip-files00123.tif'
815787f564620ca7376156ac8316a409
3b85a76e95db41dcab0f516648117f23ecbc788f
'2011-10-31T22:58:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTH' 'sip-files00123.txt'
e809047b71c032c885742a0263e6992e
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describe
'11834' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTI' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
28c9c579094c149e2b45c6236280974e
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describe
'928895' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTJ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
e512c8575d53819663de40138ce82d21
cda362801b894210f47064b63cfad4bf5e4067fc
describe
'103445' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTK' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
1bba52da42c2d15972de56ad4f4d5871
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describe
'36382' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTL' 'sip-files00124.pro'
8c96fb1372c4fcbf19b9d4b61e9b93f4
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describe
'37874' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTM' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
d07fe6aafe3f97834103cebc126cad30
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTN' 'sip-files00124.tif'
7a48874ae29c0651fc160e7409de23f7
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describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTO' 'sip-files00124.txt'
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describe
'12060' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTP' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
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describe
'940934' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTQ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
8752384b7261eb8bcb950c8392d1ec36
2b447a14c89aa8db00f69f3df14ab2a551fd0d9d
'2011-10-31T23:02:51-04:00'
describe
'103263' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTR' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
ef4b352b8914f7a0556bf3cc88417a33
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describe
'35630' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTS' 'sip-files00125.pro'
3c0690d5dadf66785a8d761b731b85a4
312426d24055807e2f7c41382ed8cf0435cb348d
describe
'38502' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTT' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
5ba2a0605edbe8ab47463f2e074da410
274085e2c8925fa3f0de5ce85a0c15f92927b3bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTU' 'sip-files00125.tif'
93c4d15b4de88d7d8d8c05c141519515
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describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTV' 'sip-files00125.txt'
3baac86fec83d29d6448c9629c735582
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describe
'11514' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTW' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
5a43cfaedfa0848a2ac47b54299fd220
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describe
'929026' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTX' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
8e6e3d69cc2184dc7933d9e5bede25cd
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describe
'98745' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTY' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
8c0f05a13b46fe7887b815ea0c9b019a
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describe
'34939' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWTZ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
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describe
'35313' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUA' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
188f95ecac848f0e5f6d926e9f196fe1
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUB' 'sip-files00126.tif'
408f458ffe335a6894105e71b11b0214
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describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUC' 'sip-files00126.txt'
f21597cfe26e2da9253b4cd78c1a04c5
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describe
'11429' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUD' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUE' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
01e7a68131acff2522b63466df7bbb7b
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describe
'101092' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUF' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d36b0548dd6cdd65d54044ea7c2b5fbb
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describe
'34796' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUG' 'sip-files00127.pro'
2c1b5de5dac0ea2f57096ec4eb96b6cb
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describe
'37276' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUH' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
1171d63b658e907f832db212781b50da
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUI' 'sip-files00127.tif'
03405e7ce121cf04e3987f6628faa0d2
5b603d5997cb86ba84f3cced3fe756757bde2e3c
'2011-10-31T22:57:20-04:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUJ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
cf3c5210822dd2e6b60bc0d0a43c4c50
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describe
'11503' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUK' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
bf8fc11ebb1ef2fafefc6d61730fc3e8
68074b98ce4fcd574a9fab253719f4a8faf79b7e
'2011-10-31T23:01:41-04:00'
describe
'929028' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUL' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
0d865d98ffb449a2ff3e7e1c9d26e746
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describe
'99873' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUM' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
e19e21f80c86d9949dfc2ba83dd0d219
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describe
'35550' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUN' 'sip-files00128.pro'
a271b86b2ce9af2ed9356348a2bfb1f3
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describe
'36131' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUO' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
4aec6fcf42cdc91ecad451d9c1b8ff68
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUP' 'sip-files00128.tif'
ac205eef58ed69ce15dafcaa83bb5003
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describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUQ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
ab430c6a66106415d11ffce422f2d4ba
aca94e3ffbc50347c034119512fce8aa84d886b4
'2011-10-31T22:59:58-04:00'
describe
'11433' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUR' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
7290caf7580435a5729ee7b964844836
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describe
'941002' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUS' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
feaea59fa8839bb1af4d126f1cab56c2
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describe
'103684' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUT' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
3462c1d2076997f0dfd8a2ef95140c6d
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describe
'35493' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUU' 'sip-files00129.pro'
b69cdbc496835afd3927ab66dcfaa27e
e55ab6f34f1f227bb0a247721cc6dbce698411ef
describe
'38025' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUV' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
a59ff2e0b005f789eb64144a9ffdcfee
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUW' 'sip-files00129.tif'
03641e45fa6077047fe23dc6bc2eb1ca
7d7954d6e5c4e9a7bfdb1c401887a218530793e8
'2011-10-31T23:02:52-04:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUX' 'sip-files00129.txt'
0e93b4b1fefec68b63d17dd767af2b02
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'2011-10-31T22:58:36-04:00'
describe
'11576' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUY' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
bf7f06f26e5e5454e2ea70a05e091ff8
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describe
'928966' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWUZ' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
4ce0210291475ae75f6af14f13843b84
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describe
'103225' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVA' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
55b968b975e52537a67f1326642e4380
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describe
'37826' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVB' 'sip-files00130.pro'
08c0ada7c4a2f72188264be9770c0656
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describe
'37893' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVC' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
afd1d79d6df63d3390483c2e0e94d022
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVD' 'sip-files00130.tif'
3558039c628ce6c9687ecefc23171147
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describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVE' 'sip-files00130.txt'
c111b8fb128f0102e522b9aa906af410
a24418a6982196257b9a77236177fa7aa1d46ed5
'2011-10-31T22:57:23-04:00'
describe
'11679' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVF' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
7bbd9226ca3a680f64bf918d16af2f1e
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describe
'941214' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVG' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
2326346eef4d7466bcee4621e43f94c8
422df3d7125dd688af4074f564b9fb33d5233ed0
'2011-10-31T22:58:30-04:00'
describe
'105484' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVH' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
0015a0ab05c9693e57c891f77fda3b0b
2dfcb20e58080174a0b7a45a8b68d1fa56e73e93
describe
'38170' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVI' 'sip-files00131.pro'
68a8c9b9fb1a9ae2e0d7b7efc93f757a
e2cb10fb5b58ab5433cf8c86e230f5f9e97687eb
describe
'39322' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVJ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
b8f82ddddd1a57d08e32948eef6e800a
bdfcb6821307a4b39ae7ccf0d25b21127f370f86
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVK' 'sip-files00131.tif'
bd9117190f2b639eb6443abc9df05f3a
fd79664fa4537f66db72f3be896578411805f52a
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVL' 'sip-files00131.txt'
a12c1bb24baa54c60cbdaff51def7e0e
5c68a21b5886244d563e4afed5ec6887bb6dfd0a
describe
'11687' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVM' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
19b0db64e3f53b9fe40a89875666ea21
5638b64f4ffbac78f3b8f0d080af7d2480b7b758
describe
'929027' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVN' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
3b33d9545f799ac2d56f1173a484501d
dcb5bd45b1672dc48ad661fc1e218bed31f92cd1
describe
'91350' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVO' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
72d316ad2d98cc238e2209a6c684ebad
7f06e6379f5a4580d34596450266ac6536ef1ead
describe
'19143' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVP' 'sip-files00132.pro'
f3006ef9b181b76c5940330fd8741373
85e54f673228633d3dea32b6e373ce3999efb3a5
describe
'31842' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVQ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
8a315cb841562026b744c82f0545fe20
ca5c869359bd4c8ce95c1ad60300e4ebf287cb6b
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVR' 'sip-files00132.tif'
a0f7623b4893ec316a39be241e303459
42850db088acd1b3d3360370e4c53acf74bbfd7c
describe
'785' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVS' 'sip-files00132.txt'
4b9363d93e09cd08494856090b75f799
c65bf75d84e1e4b2aafe25e3329015c55972b80c
describe
'10349' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVT' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
5e6f6b5453363c6fe2e0c7624a3893ed
afee2ef9723a4ed9ac3cdbeb196c62a950de217e
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVU' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
30ab3e39e705266423b0f78a05c66424
e19cb993614e1ef208b28160a8d50f10f610c704
describe
'90550' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVV' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
15e9033dc1ec56f5f8801c2e6ba04757
7fd562d463367fe45d761370abd29205947dc66e
describe
'27371' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVW' 'sip-files00133.pro'
6499ee43e27fe1cab9708b2a3e72fc47
8f55cfa92e75973f757e1050e540ddefefeb3fb8
describe
'32588' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVX' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
32f4f98c9496abe71d9a0cc53bd65c14
89fd84237f2168b9f953a72ae9252bf6353eed41
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVY' 'sip-files00133.tif'
42bfcc193d8c526c6050b4db95bf7ca4
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describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWVZ' 'sip-files00133.txt'
ccc6622902b36eedfd3b64761e1e7147
75b1fbb5d1f09d1421d813300057f7f04a5e8494
describe
Invalid character
'10335' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWA' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
68730338a5de464c0c10f1cdc451d0a1
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describe
'863386' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWB' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
70ddde6761b08cc43011861b7c5151f5
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describe
'107779' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWC' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
14cb860d92d9246c48389d6d84832ef4
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describe
'37944' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWD' 'sip-files00134.pro'
c44cdf0b7e9c774f62f21e94ab19968c
3e39e41008437a0348ac15007ef175c2f5748f8e
describe
'38890' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWE' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
486a75aaf3059e4fbafc9bf7f986865d
386fbef9a90153099795afa32da6c5f40b1f0380
describe
'6914085' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWF' 'sip-files00134.tif'
a47e79d0398c91fd565d6efa40593db2
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describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWG' 'sip-files00134.txt'
70e90423ba6d46464b1dca13a807dcd2
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describe
'13113' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWH' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
6ffb3ab6a8623a9a8c3c00f270c87d82
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describe
'941162' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWI' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
71af187a682ba8f317372be12432a9b4
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describe
'111591' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWJ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
8e4158af01c6c04c89c565058e77800d
34a02e4a5044849ef56b4f64bcd9fcafbc1a4e79
describe
'40123' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWK' 'sip-files00135.pro'
1124f93f8e5cac93297332b5c3978c16
a97309dd53b8c63b12100fed01a24b37a9315a62
describe
'41156' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWL' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
4a2eeec2682651571e9723229f0737d3
392a5b57f5fa96cb703fb391c034b8fe793f18c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWM' 'sip-files00135.tif'
8e9bc0464501efacc1faf943a1f3c075
9f5edab23e8be84e1b9cc673ccf5843a384c5ee6
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWN' 'sip-files00135.txt'
e2ec057f140a38fca6b804b81832da2f
d67f06c7e0fc5c12f3dea45f914d9009bcc1ad2e
describe
'12252' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWO' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
4dbbb672d4505d78b93e9a62d4285aea
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describe
'872215' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWP' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
0a34c9cf6851fa314268744ed7eeb9aa
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describe
'103696' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWQ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
3298791d5b02ed009a8b48034ce03267
eaba2f602405a90d8662f684e2656fc96ab00cdf
describe
'36136' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWR' 'sip-files00136.pro'
1f3c0cf3edd64df27be6009d6c642b8b
e3a3d4d65d2303e12dae8fab962e1cdc98efe1f9
describe
'37551' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWS' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
8c4db20173a77903b7d16a99c78cd88c
bea67941e7bc0967de27c70551346494e1f365e9
describe
'6984901' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWT' 'sip-files00136.tif'
21436fe5df62b968206121e73c032b54
a1a87f919636eec2986d378c5ccf7bd39204f897
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWU' 'sip-files00136.txt'
fe7811cf00a44e04d58fe770f8bd92b3
e7a62ff5cc3065cee028dab68818822c5f892898
describe
'12507' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWV' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
1b4c9cdcd2e6f5bc1f94f75483d72598
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describe
'941114' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWW' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
03f88c6fd6ef3e150fe2926913eb0c39
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describe
'112882' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWX' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
4d25ccdcd8190e5d15168b168fb73a29
d45dc3744e1cee788df5776b7d167ddbe9cfdfb7
'2011-10-31T22:56:39-04:00'
describe
'41111' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWY' 'sip-files00137.pro'
9c3548bbf95b0abc35bd489b033d0a24
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describe
'40385' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWWZ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
60360af04074258ac89fc545447f7d0f
8a43366d9d36bd131f6063873277180a3f2ee117
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXA' 'sip-files00137.tif'
78da5062cccde776febe33754e16c383
4f04d41a900ef25ef44cdcc91ed43cfb154d0b3c
describe
'1786' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXB' 'sip-files00137.txt'
9a5b560d02967d4abd33a2666ceb4965
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describe
'11943' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXC' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
d04e43cba21d539636db707723f6a0f6
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describe
'855963' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXD' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
052775144eb3000dd07a982dd68d1b0d
765accf7ae4861491d346212b4f84bba26d76f4f
describe
'103672' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXE' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
ede6d46bf4df09b43774050388e6f437
e7eb7f2b231b62761a50992a8f05378bac31cf02
describe
'37593' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXF' 'sip-files00138.pro'
2123aeb6eeff110d15951b88e1b0e692
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describe
'37427' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXG' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
05bb325b903b41981f943549fdf4ed76
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describe
'6854685' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXH' 'sip-files00138.tif'
072c33886bea59a46a818259c593ed03
1ef86508e4f57fd379042db01c6bfee5c0e0094d
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXI' 'sip-files00138.txt'
f429e229881edc7c8e7da0118e2e9b4e
d5506835054f4a477a8bf486128426a11f5f0d9f
describe
'13080' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXJ' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
f062c159db90a15a65afafdf40fbd7cf
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describe
'924434' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXK' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
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describe
'105518' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXL' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
72d60ace4beb0a8bfaf4c6a18d675619
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describe
'38233' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXM' 'sip-files00139.pro'
78c9ad8d26cf84930f4134ae0e61d7d2
c4818afc0e943a9f59c596c258356909244b0dec
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXN' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
7384684418df42c3c894b15edb4c1e84
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describe
'7400045' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXO' 'sip-files00139.tif'
9557e3fc7f3518a0d9cb447000024257
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describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXP' 'sip-files00139.txt'
c29e45b272cb49b6ae9ecd9744480827
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describe
'12392' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXQ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
4c889eed835df8e8f4056c680c2ab14e
e0a9a3512de4d9e03b79afce1c4f75b59ca37cd3
describe
'847136' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXR' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
2e46a64aa5e18bcb2310cbd2d9ec0c83
2da2b503447d402aeabcd933d102cf6eb703679a
'2011-10-31T23:00:44-04:00'
describe
'77216' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXS' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
160c2bee2a356f012cd6eb5e9041b1b3
e49ab4e376eadc5db7df6bf8d135273506623263
describe
'19566' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXT' 'sip-files00140.pro'
121148f3f7bee952cf26fa1bf130ec6b
bfc3bbb4e6afb04013bb4ce435b0213a217ea8d6
describe
'26277' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXU' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
ab4cf9f3819d80f829512f3fb4ffdbe5
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describe
'6783805' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXV' 'sip-files00140.tif'
d522028022c890ebe6fe9413fc1f7376
92d8905bdbd4d66a1381337020fc7189ff3f269b
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXW' 'sip-files00140.txt'
b4336cb2464453fefa39503e0a6091e2
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describe
'9490' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXX' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
10f10217c66ee218881f80fd9dc9124c
03048a9783548ba12e0fc6740b1064b48ff31817
describe
'936048' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXY' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
c627357862bc23a708b9f1a40504357f
3707e3ef2ce14cd1347e6d0e29ccbbc6fc841cc2
describe
'85573' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWXZ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
d7f99355fbc43bb2d51051ae43371df0
5e3aa0080b17c75e4e6b4986c31d0f74f3ec2c76
describe
'29467' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYA' 'sip-files00141.pro'
aeed80bab568a945d3be5a187f16c385
a334883af528ed39f33925312c70acb93bfe8c52
describe
'31650' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYB' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
3164610531864e4e5fb2dc041ca1a12d
ff8dfe07ae8854e28249413c5c5af4aecebc056c
describe
'7497455' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYC' 'sip-files00141.tif'
b9f3b56e4b78376106d678c5d0cff218
372018c30c799757385bdb9bb396f7270426bad0
'2011-10-31T23:01:22-04:00'
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYD' 'sip-files00141.txt'
bb7460dec4c3d0c1ba6481222b90da5d
27cd84912063365260a034a43775225ea030a7b4
describe
'9691' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYE' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
672c26fdbb2d957740a613255ebecea0
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describe
'942092' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYF' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
d79b3ac6c36f69156229ce1fa51c4e26
b47fe3581779a20dc1c4ed0f93dbc72702258082
describe
'100365' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYG' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
47ca23fe24bd080533cfed534311f43d
992ac8e9baa22f2944386c10966e6333ab4e3427
describe
'37538' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYH' 'sip-files00142.pro'
12a7948c6198aab099fa5104078d14e7
f3b30ac922d74ada5daa5e4f5c2f577d739c4bfd
describe
'36929' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYI' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
dc345621658cd1c818efbd2717681746
8416dacb0d81af8b74990d767d73cec6f279dfe2
describe
'7545949' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYJ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
29ddf2a668f4cb7d16734dc86908d144
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describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYK' 'sip-files00142.txt'
7c0caddba1a00d879b2d66106faa2f7f
26e882375fc08b0b64e32501343b5ea1855914eb
describe
'11748' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYL' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
366b8340508ea2613648bd3ce67bfa49
22637712b7e2334b7cf63f14be345be351b331c2
'2011-10-31T23:01:50-04:00'
describe
'936033' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYM' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
69be6f3468b7fb720e3cf8478a2d7d2e
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describe
'100996' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYN' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
0dbdbf3f15602d775ddd7cf6af6f87e1
ed2ac5b29ec166ead1d95cb22ff25346ca0f37f4
describe
'36670' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYO' 'sip-files00143.pro'
6e4b85d68133587d83bf977cf07906c8
a4ba72de06d7b5def6c101e6908444d4320e7bd1
describe
'38386' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYP' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
2c0321b6c97e8d6410faec16362d381c
f12174aee699c2442dd6dc46a7dd55d2e24d29a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYQ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
f2d1813bce0c3c746aa6f53350ff3025
d5f427a90465fa26b9c77bf5f1acd246a9942cb3
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYR' 'sip-files00143.txt'
eed24a3cefce45fb5044520ba4f7c215
70eac5ab523ee6ceac52014acf27a11ed4c027f3
describe
'11603' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYS' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
ee3e6c8794b9d7fce2261e1fa35e1833
42a2ca4d0d91ab6c86b26cb2fa0ca2091d1ef363
describe
'942037' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYT' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
2e6ade428a76261fa49861af112cc9b8
f0b19ea23e47518113399fd0adfdfb079f28e466
describe
'99302' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYU' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
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describe
'38317' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYV' 'sip-files00144.pro'
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describe
'37000' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYW' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
990b063bdd8086c7e6acdf65e2cebdbe
db9bf8d5eb7750dec51ff95d5964be384b40f114
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYX' 'sip-files00144.tif'
f1c94652077e1566803254b4d5a9a41c
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describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYY' 'sip-files00144.txt'
e7a9f6b6665043cfabd7e014a95632d6
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describe
'11561' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWYZ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
a37734d5c4cf4c190ec80b5eed1f6ef5
a62c1fe886f915a26e3458d15d24af693b8a4d48
describe
'936026' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZA' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
e586814bcbd6449328c24d9307fb1380
dff3acdc07b5094530d5984c6e46a17104bcc07b
'2011-10-31T23:01:48-04:00'
describe
'104513' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZB' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
e4950e8dfd1f64c421046722f6143f47
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describe
'38043' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZC' 'sip-files00145.pro'
6061e57f68f48187b1d90dd58745afb3
c2975289edfcded1c5afb3110243125c76f0ecff
describe
'38809' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZD' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
c3c31aa34625d761072ace3259395e76
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZE' 'sip-files00145.tif'
415b93744d78ad9999b83b055713655c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZF' 'sip-files00145.txt'
16312064a475df23110adb879b1b474c
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describe
'11801' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZG' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
8b206be7c0857037db11d93f631b9725
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describe
'942087' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZH' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
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describe
'103552' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZI' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
00c3fbcd5c56c542fb9c38fc52bad0b4
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describe
'38625' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZJ' 'sip-files00146.pro'
65f35e11449499cb4601ed805f77a53a
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describe
'37908' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZK' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
09409017a974122e98ecee21ef10aa51
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describe
'22476128' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZL' 'sip-filesback.tif'
e537cf876bba1938718f5bbdff5716f3
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'2011-10-31T23:01:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZM' 'sip-files00146.tif'
5e6826c4a11de5f0b97a068e197e1a08
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describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZN' 'sip-files00146.txt'
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describe
Invalid character
'11777' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZO' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
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describe
'936046' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZP' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
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describe
'104336' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZQ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
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describe
'37811' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZR' 'sip-files00147.pro'
c7b16f49db4384808aa1f5f3d7b664d9
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'2011-10-31T23:01:40-04:00'
describe
'37965' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZS' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
bbea2143ed4acec7fa87ed525cb9764e
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZT' 'sip-files00147.tif'
0dff6e27ba14ff6e21b59d298d70653c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZU' 'sip-files00147.txt'
50365a2ecbf7cb8cd5c8a2a603ed2754
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describe
'11662' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZV' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
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describe
'942065' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZW' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
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describe
'94701' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZX' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
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describe
'34561' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZY' 'sip-files00148.pro'
9af9e346064c69a7a122169de7e14690
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describe
'34983' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAWZZ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAA' 'sip-files00148.tif'
0e2b98b4579ad97db1c4c2368fffd1b1
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAB' 'sip-files00148.txt'
fc93380a0670f550839e41c636423026
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describe
'11110' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAC' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
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describe
'936049' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAD' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
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describe
'102442' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAE' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
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describe
'37511' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAF' 'sip-files00149.pro'
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describe
'38289' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAG' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
a0c3c7945ffdda8fcc48199f52982ec1
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAH' 'sip-files00149.tif'
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describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAI' 'sip-files00149.txt'
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describe
'11567' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAJ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
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describe
'942088' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAK' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
b26a2e2cb569cf473098f2196a1b50d4
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describe
'94885' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAL' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
84c08b1aadbc37c6f5fe795a2560dbac
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'2011-10-31T23:02:12-04:00'
describe
'34938' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAM' 'sip-files00150.pro'
4f72cf1160f50d51b70cf904c09645ae
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describe
'34168' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAN' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAO' 'sip-files00150.tif'
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describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAP' 'sip-files00150.txt'
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describe
'10459' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAQ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
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describe
'936035' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAR' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
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describe
'83586' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAS' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
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describe
'28668' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAT' 'sip-files00151.pro'
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describe
'30561' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAU' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAV' 'sip-files00151.tif'
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describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAW' 'sip-files00151.txt'
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describe
'9302' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAX' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
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describe
'942094' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAY' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
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'2011-10-31T23:00:06-04:00'
describe
'101305' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXAZ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
b1a8b38fd440790b6b79f0c8ec7e0bfc
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describe
'36953' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBA' 'sip-files00152.pro'
a0d5380fb419f6f1884ef831556145b6
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describe
'37191' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBB' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
933e3600a55ce894313c99b2c6e6eef3
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBC' 'sip-files00152.tif'
6f5ef60caddcfa3fcf6930d1aff82eac
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describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBD' 'sip-files00152.txt'
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describe
'11331' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBE' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
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describe
'936051' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBF' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
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describe
'103757' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBG' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
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describe
'37140' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBH' 'sip-files00153.pro'
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describe
'38197' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBI' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBJ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
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describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBK' 'sip-files00153.txt'
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describe
'11363' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBL' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
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describe
'941935' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBM' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
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describe
'100537' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBN' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
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describe
'37297' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBO' 'sip-files00154.pro'
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describe
'36548' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBP' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBQ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
c5b8e345b6975d72f43c1e7e6dbfd0f0
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBR' 'sip-files00154.txt'
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describe
'11336' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBS' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBT' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
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describe
'108165' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBU' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
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describe
'39062' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBV' 'sip-files00155.pro'
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describe
'39588' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBW' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBX' 'sip-files00155.tif'
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describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBY' 'sip-files00155.txt'
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describe
'11690' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXBZ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
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describe
'942089' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCA' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
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describe
'103080' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCB' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
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describe
'38276' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCC' 'sip-files00156.pro'
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describe
'37582' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCD' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCE' 'sip-files00156.tif'
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describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCF' 'sip-files00156.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCG' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
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describe
'935935' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCH' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
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describe
'104944' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCI' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
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'2011-10-31T22:58:20-04:00'
describe
'35760' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCJ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
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describe
'37866' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCK' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCL' 'sip-files00157.tif'
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describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCM' 'sip-files00157.txt'
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describe
'11459' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCN' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
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describe
'941989' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCO' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
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describe
'104030' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCP' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
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describe
'36113' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCQ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
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describe
'37259' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCR' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCS' 'sip-files00158.tif'
b2a8727e769ef9d9ec61d4b7c0b1044e
df0fa209b7ac62c8f5c53c6d28613d620ce18406
'2011-10-31T23:01:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCT' 'sip-files00158.txt'
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describe
'11656' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCU' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
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describe
'936006' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCV' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
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describe
'107253' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCW' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
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describe
'38614' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCX' 'sip-files00159.pro'
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describe
'39383' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCY' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
41732bf01586469c422fbf1a5bfd5b64
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXCZ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDA' 'sip-files00159.txt'
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describe
'11527' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDB' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
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describe
'942081' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDC' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
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describe
'73067' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDD' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
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describe
'15554' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDE' 'sip-files00160.pro'
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describe
'25533' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDF' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDG' 'sip-files00160.tif'
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describe
'655' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDH' 'sip-files00160.txt'
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describe
'8124' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDI' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
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describe
'936011' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDJ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
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describe
'87635' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDK' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
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describe
'27496' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDL' 'sip-files00161.pro'
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describe
'31791' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDM' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDN' 'sip-files00161.tif'
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describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDO' 'sip-files00161.txt'
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describe
'9703' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDP' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
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describe
'942060' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDQ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
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describe
'103468' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDR' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
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describe
'36560' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDS' 'sip-files00162.pro'
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describe
'36587' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDT' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDU' 'sip-files00162.tif'
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describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDV' 'sip-files00162.txt'
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describe
'11209' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDW' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDX' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
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describe
'105735' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDY' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
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describe
'37680' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXDZ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
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describe
'39161' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEA' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEB' 'sip-files00163.tif'
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describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEC' 'sip-files00163.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXED' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
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describe
'942091' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEE' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
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describe
'102899' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEF' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
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describe
'37813' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEG' 'sip-files00164.pro'
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describe
'37586' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEH' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEI' 'sip-files00164.tif'
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describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEJ' 'sip-files00164.txt'
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describe
'11341' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEK' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
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describe
'936038' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEL' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
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describe
'106342' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEM' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
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describe
'37842' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEN' 'sip-files00165.pro'
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describe
'39507' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEO' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEP' 'sip-files00165.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEQ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
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describe
'11412' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXER' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
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describe
'942086' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXES' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
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describe
'102816' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXET' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
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describe
'37560' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEU' 'sip-files00166.pro'
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'2011-10-31T22:57:36-04:00'
describe
'37156' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEV' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEW' 'sip-files00166.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEX' 'sip-files00166.txt'
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describe
'11330' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEY' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
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describe
'936022' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXEZ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
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describe
'109026' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFA' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
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describe
'38385' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFB' 'sip-files00167.pro'
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describe
'39743' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFC' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFD' 'sip-files00167.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'94500' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFH' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
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describe
'32853' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFI' 'sip-files00168.pro'
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describe
'34277' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFJ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFK' 'sip-files00168.tif'
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describe
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describe
'10842' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFM' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
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describe
'936042' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFN' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
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describe
'88339' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFO' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
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describe
'27348' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFP' 'sip-files00169.pro'
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describe
'31813' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFQ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFR' 'sip-files00169.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'942067' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFU' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
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describe
'105295' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFV' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
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describe
'36819' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFW' 'sip-files00170.pro'
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75ae105ecd87702dd4b261dc82c7d037574b93c6
describe
'37832' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFX' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
5cee9e8473d101b3991a5a088061d806
4d42b1c5a99cb05a600e8928f4d6f8ef6a125717
'2011-10-31T22:58:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFY' 'sip-files00170.tif'
790daacc9cfa2c30eb74924fc5220252
1c4d2a65fa3f4759da7ace0a23052252361b0a59
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXFZ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
06bdf131400e4f2844f4c2d429693679
fcf760e1359a4942e39465511584a7dfe132fe07
describe
'11796' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGA' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
6504ff88095bba178e3f3017eac9e831
2e6b25e6106ae1f66f694cec0f48e2b1dbcf8b0a
describe
'936030' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGB' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
fca4fb190e266741ef56674f3b57a132
f94585185c70d9f8b874543094a56b50dc07721a
describe
'110127' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGC' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
d7587ca40b6a85a4c87da3554ba5ff09
3b4b115719a78dbb4639840a65a0d92680033d84
describe
'39191' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGD' 'sip-files00171.pro'
178bee51125b6eb5d6ce2a0ad8282fce
fcb13e2bfb85f891a9c7a0996b0ce9052c2ae2a8
describe
'39780' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGE' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
7ccdaa4da0c6e40b3bbad7fcf3fc852f
ecdb944404a098782ac123bf55bbb84229abaf99
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGF' 'sip-files00171.tif'
46034142aaee360e1480532c137894a3
fc82c9a2ba9a8c26c2b623aa683dea76e6b2dc78
'2011-10-31T23:00:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGG' 'sip-files00171.txt'
41ec37a234be1506963c768fbd06f322
b6b569e0b56e43023b1ff266b3656af0192d096b
describe
'11713' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGH' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
6def4d06ce155ea0ff4eead497ec1c08
6d2349085423d847c674224abcc3a51d145c84b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGI' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
f23881f9a7e388e3fca28173112ab16b
2385c76b528cdf90768a393c7e8b404a0aeafe7a
describe
'105362' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGJ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
84cd284e4f25b60dabf7da7c7e9a0a0e
db129182ac9b7e6d063c42c3caa0c6051ab1a7a2
describe
'37643' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGK' 'sip-files00172.pro'
da3cd2ba6ca2c5928526f80dc3b04035
f989e802de6a7d15c1f77b4329af4a6e8652fe6d
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGL' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
8ed702dfd29bf30835cf13227ac81813
8cbdd8476c2f9e976a36bc7d8c94f6c2409b7eb8
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGM' 'sip-files00172.tif'
a0b4242bd4d4976deb13acec5c4d6344
78f872060efa3137416162161993af333f5ff54b
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGN' 'sip-files00172.txt'
691441f98b828cebe4d448411e51b060
078d45778b15adea8984a51cbbd652ad95d2cf5f
describe
'11763' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGO' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
27306d9fb82c85339ea466a361e6b96b
8a0695c11f683cdc76867bcdd2d6522da9907d4b
describe
'936045' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGP' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
931e6458c038b44717370f1c2102f3b9
b047fc6a58253b76f8b4dd5ee11bf2e3579dd60d
describe
'106399' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGQ' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
93dbc4cd3d9611f501d4bc66acb32900
3c825bd6fad78d9dfe692dd268644791af9908b1
'2011-10-31T23:01:35-04:00'
describe
'37289' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGR' 'sip-files00173.pro'
e370447c90ac15e8995d5d45e351d56e
5b8e290fa069ee1618fdd0ebd55f6a3e2e146fb3
describe
'39355' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGS' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
e2f1eee10a27340e2adf370eee49cb38
b6961f428685e910d35061a30372dd9920cc7875
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGT' 'sip-files00173.tif'
2744accee27034e4cb5950af78394441
e4b92a263cd347c859402b97ded512e1562f10d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGU' 'sip-files00173.txt'
a3882437b1a4e997c31d4e86562a682e
03d5d9843849ca13bd06221586b025df9889fbf6
describe
'11691' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGV' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
6feaef656234938e3d58155eded4f901
31425368a967afa3223a6ec3a9d2560c7c9fbf90
describe
'942096' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGW' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
0fd5123014a44dded6c723879cfdfb3e
c571e63aa03863d4f3caab89b594980d79c98e3a
describe
'104593' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGX' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
715a36816c5ccd8634c22711524b42f5
b20083d21e4b3c349aa0caddb47a72a16288b4a1
describe
'37441' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGY' 'sip-files00174.pro'
d2ece920c07a6e54c2d132722a1c1174
c3df4b12eba32af8dbac4e99b741ba6c0fc7c90d
describe
'38384' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXGZ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
f95ea624dfd28be3cfa8d315809d45a0
328f0e82e06560867c873bcdc117841601f41072
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHA' 'sip-files00174.tif'
b93e6bb2900b2e867ad8606f393813d4
f3143f157e8efd1df69cd22ae09a0d37857563f0
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHB' 'sip-files00174.txt'
dbce1d8e56c9a04da0651b75dd0931e6
600f4ca26f24fc63caa4a7a425df49260a17aa18
describe
'11794' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHC' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
728bcd54f9f9fbfa70d3cfb16c343688
f6e27d7761e15b16a63677eb02dddf44449dd329
describe
'936050' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHD' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
20817ffdbcf7ff138301439e6d0bfd0d
3b3966094b921f6773a22f26d8b211e54d10989e
describe
'108281' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHE' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
839b4312c0dd7d6dde9528ff844cb485
6ef21297abedc4657815a3c7fa9bb75fea5aaa3a
describe
'38288' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHF' 'sip-files00175.pro'
61f587b90413212a81ffdce6edb32fdf
ed8c5db5fb2a0e33c847077239ec37e9ec7124b0
describe
'39336' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHG' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
d2d2bce1aee81f8ecbfd5638c2f2ecb6
c427909c4674178874b8792369cb18b2ce45bff6
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHH' 'sip-files00175.tif'
a7041e90c15b8e7580becb11d3ca2e60
b85d0c8473a6cce6c7d2300a7dd9153546cd788c
describe
'352' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHI' 'sip-filesback.txt'
813f48ba78fc6ce6ee52c41ca28d761d
46b4ad77db27441a93c129bcabe2701f23c63f0a
describe
Invalid character
'1518' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHJ' 'sip-files00175.txt'
643f90f864e83ae099f946922560b7f3
a2b65de3253244abd3004735e6a4f17a05d64bb0
describe
'11684' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHK' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
8ea2e919f5a1fadd603c23ce85355a9f
4f5c89005e7ba03594b7f979007a9c03545095e3
describe
'942042' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHL' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
cbbb34f58d03a1f155092949818b7e58
0d3bf6834c1fd35c8cd2575b9f1fc82bb3df0bf4
describe
'101054' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHM' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
51ccba1759cab031e778f51c1ebbda9c
aab0d966625eb2b5c3907c5b50887e01514485fd
describe
'36075' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHN' 'sip-files00176.pro'
f4919bd1638aef6dab748b12c19a3cdb
140ae61f4c24b898f1d233e897353cbef35c386d
describe
'37345' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHO' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
796728c77f88915655c98ddedc545510
5d891875fec0dd471549f4a3958095c4336bf48b
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHP' 'sip-files00176.tif'
95e0ad9e736564cbd53d61771579ab1d
beacf1944fd077fb8a1ac55e22b39f7e4b47f02a
'2011-10-31T23:00:47-04:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHQ' 'sip-files00176.txt'
9c02cdf7b7f625710086206778767f6b
15c7257f147acedd80cd2cf2033b594dd0e81b78
describe
'11695' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHR' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
c884abc3098b7f7f424b99c7fd816ac3
66d6366bf021f8e278a2a07d68651fd1a0468582
describe
'935789' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHS' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
58462910cfc15f52700188c8c6c393e5
71284bfe2f8fcb064facec8e2d7306d4edb716f1
describe
'106759' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHT' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
7098ee51e772b3417f6fb34002f436df
84782acac6538fb0bda451643ce22288e41bbab1
describe
'38295' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHU' 'sip-files00177.pro'
9265d454998413813e5dc247bcc28235
a19dbed8744cc60a8aa9fefaaa43619b761ed2fc
describe
'39022' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHV' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
637db4222b98b5a8c5c4a728e83e6d8f
4511fcf18041978392b22a0d6da84be4c3005fa0
'2011-10-31T23:01:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHW' 'sip-files00177.tif'
a0229adff0f6bfe5f7257723e05d07d7
f01c60b261c9639bb4d8df5e76619ee25a089c3c
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHX' 'sip-files00177.txt'
4ac9d9552e2681fa882c1c5ba2be71b3
bd2760c5e7ce859e16af7c0f479559773e5ec605
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHY' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
b8cd4f356cd2f9bcfb08f5cda51eec0d
9ba6aa391f6448de142ebf4afc80094e7ea20b53
describe
'942055' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXHZ' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
0f06d5f80a6d8bd8d6c92dd164d60123
277da085537f15399c3c6a0e1ac95533531ae0cd
describe
'104599' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIA' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
8dc34e0042b71c162d92a985700ee559
1e723abbbb78774321ee8ddb91423d8c4d1038be
describe
'36858' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIB' 'sip-files00178.pro'
8677b1a83711e0c6e702233028046c52
c7896eb8c872030d885eadfbea7ab0a8c6b07ea4
describe
'38037' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIC' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
d081bffdfe2306a77fcccac2f27e6902
048b7f0e753509a96bc6be4ef82a067dd67c3d91
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXID' 'sip-files00178.tif'
ef5b514a3f7ed0af1d097c0d56bb10a6
913f11961f6f0c97fc256d55f938c595d5b6d66c
'2011-10-31T23:00:16-04:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIE' 'sip-files00178.txt'
fbb8796a40c64875c32a9dd7cd71e8d0
071201e3881f9d38b378f394c334b8c8aa55ff99
describe
Invalid character
'11921' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIF' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
8a4db77575467d365f6da91375f965d8
fefe7fd647759ee06448d370bf6f502d194bb06c
describe
'936047' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIG' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
d48739a40c76ba7570928839d8878783
243f9e2080d935fdb49fdb4b4eaf65667079554a
describe
'96159' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIH' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
92439458bc47767a7080b8bc52d4e0fa
9323a2bf6e6de7e1fdc30b6a3a86dddd31fcb1ee
describe
'27356' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXII' 'sip-files00179.pro'
66f581c73caa1ffd7ac79ffbad06108b
ec62b59c3bb5330bcfd786236a90f724655f929c
describe
'34122' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIJ' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
6e0cf33a94af47797c8779634de561f3
b0e4de26daf91b00e083f921ada3cde89c19d252
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIK' 'sip-files00179.tif'
70cf781f730bebc44fca5d5108d91ac5
0e11926265fb206ff7467d10fd55a669d491d7e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIL' 'sip-files00179.txt'
1b1027ac7f78fe12a300c0d12a12394a
a31920346b91858e57ef963d42307458a9121edb
describe
'10147' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIM' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
6ad3e4bf17a78f0d0e001e9d1fc2e881
118412e9cdcedac0e9a88b83a252e96407758ef9
describe
'942083' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIN' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
95dce2f85b6633ad0e41189376156772
b8347a5a40a4d985748d7ab912643b958cb12487
describe
'90290' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIO' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
a0a81a0198d58950db5c8355c8a95b0e
dd6ede3a976543d88e45aa8b53c2132453799c22
describe
'28962' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIP' 'sip-files00180.pro'
8d3454b16b41ab501f51e474bf8d4f0e
eae7ab1fa52e8260f6c79ac162ff6ab69a46f9b4
describe
'32239' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIQ' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
c41d46ec9e01a3537e0be33596632642
614deb0813de0c03f2f6e353566fcc2425a8cc3c
'2011-10-31T23:00:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIR' 'sip-files00180.tif'
ef6230a00ccaf7ae16421556f89ba0ff
d41c4de12bef1c75e82c593077ae12c65c96f743
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIS' 'sip-files00180.txt'
4dbcaee9e57249d411125314cf7aaf22
83ba7fbaf36bcf65af7c1fcc90ae5ae17e96e60d
describe
'10389' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIT' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
e5d31f17a6d4ef4dc53d49c7d7d4244b
77430fb67eaa90c2ae3deb161d2cb1bd4f39c860
describe
'936044' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIU' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
351f2d820a50129c89e899282cfbf478
f1c4a04068c91f9bc44d6bc879739e7527b03483
describe
'102530' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIV' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
7954febd8dbc03375e526f89dddc3817
e6107e77b59b36f56436ed3e3983b8fa750984af
describe
'34282' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIW' 'sip-files00181.pro'
ff0c78e4a0f98d452049739668493130
b3481f097b96982d18b33e8906726bf8a4180dbf
describe
'37890' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIX' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
e5c071d397099a4c7ae07c1215eb61a9
bf4b3233d03d82791a760e77507c33c663658cfe
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIY' 'sip-files00181.tif'
bbb4b9082a44f0e1b29c15d45e586ea3
83be674a74b5f96222da7e2f0e204e1900fa681e
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXIZ' 'sip-files00181.txt'
86f697c53c10e79a10f685531cf9457e
4dd2f173c3f35d224d6ce7c5e2c4e371d4b87838
describe
'11492' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJA' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
36521ab906d2211ea82fcfdb60fd87da
7d8c4c6d9768504360e7057603986e29597dc172
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJB' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
e423f3b9d91666f8926a896b938d87e9
d34c5d109c727a0a454bbf2098de0829d7c714c4
describe
'92299' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJC' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
ba80322f29d53f0582f26756cbc804b5
1c1cc2fe0e8b4f59a85422a5293a6de9fdabf736
describe
'31084' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJD' 'sip-files00182.pro'
c3209c3c066efb1a567ac857fdc56aca
3eb37f470a12b0a42c4513b78fe42cd0a87aee3a
describe
'34177' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJE' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
2801719f2ba31c788295d2c34500f84b
5b0492dbfc482e10bc94c8397bdc993901dc27d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJF' 'sip-files00182.tif'
4568bb15568f96e33d77cf57d8a40929
20df2175ed953f3eef65b1d39068dce89481f616
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJG' 'sip-files00182.txt'
8b6f1074ff439937f4631a946dab1b3e
108dfeb9d796df33e22406efe4b0a4e69e855757
describe
'11245' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJH' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
6c4dfad4a83efc0e32f365a9466ee6e0
32b547fe7fbb2b721dc588c933791c5a35dd0871
describe
'935794' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJI' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
1b6ad2aecc7e39f8f1267f181c85645f
927a7d5cb8622efc5b960b89929c258a259b73f0
describe
'98401' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJJ' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJM' 'sip-files00183.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJP' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJT' 'sip-files00184.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'936031' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJW' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'32990' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXJY' 'sip-files00185.pro'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXKA' 'sip-files00185.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXKH' 'sip-files00186.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXKI' 'sip-files00186.txt'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXKK' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXKO' 'sip-files00187.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXKP' 'sip-files00187.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXKW' 'sip-files00188.txt'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXKY' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXLC' 'sip-files00189.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXLD' 'sip-files00189.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXLH' 'sip-files00190.pro'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXLK' 'sip-files00190.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXLN' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'25394' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXMX' 'sip-files00196.pro'
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describe
'28979' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXMY' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7177309' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXMZ' 'sip-files00196.tif'
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describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNA' 'sip-files00196.txt'
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describe
'9342' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNB' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
da6bf2d79fcac98e5d6f31a6ed1bdebd
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describe
'960216' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNC' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
c6a801162f5b1248bf9976f504fa06d1
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXND' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
71bbd0c7ece6ba09bd1ed03c3f1397be
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describe
'39610' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNE' 'sip-files00197.pro'
1ffbaf81afec3e862610288a5e68d576
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describe
'38397' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNF' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
eaf12ca642b9b2048b177a964f4e2102
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describe
'7687201' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNG' 'sip-files00197.tif'
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describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNH' 'sip-files00197.txt'
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describe
'12051' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNI' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
f255b5b6e7cd71e4b5a821d3dd35ffb8
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describe
'942021' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNJ' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
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describe
'104199' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNK' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
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describe
'37422' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNL' 'sip-files00198.pro'
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describe
'38762' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNM' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNN' 'sip-files00198.tif'
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describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNO' 'sip-files00198.txt'
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describe
'11756' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNP' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
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describe
'924718' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNQ' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
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describe
'107610' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNR' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
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describe
'38292' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNS' 'sip-files00199.pro'
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describe
'40625' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNT' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7406611' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNU' 'sip-files00199.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNV' 'sip-files00199.txt'
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describe
'11346' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNW' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
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describe
'966335' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNX' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
e81bbd8619d11b1e259aba18c5a8a268
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describe
'102437' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNY' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
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describe
'36157' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXNZ' 'sip-files00200.pro'
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describe
'38002' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOA' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7739957' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOB' 'sip-files00200.tif'
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'2011-10-31T23:01:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOC' 'sip-files00200.txt'
1e0e846d157fc32ac8a7d93ecf9c27e8
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describe
'11848' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOD' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
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describe
'924714' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOE' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
9c5b0a1caa67338a4650a6911f20bcc8
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describe
'103821' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOF' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
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describe
'36189' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOG' 'sip-files00201.pro'
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describe
'38897' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOH' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOI' 'sip-files00201.tif'
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describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOJ' 'sip-files00201.txt'
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describe
'11100' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOK' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
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describe
'966359' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOL' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
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describe
'105153' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOM' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
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describe
'36640' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXON' 'sip-files00202.pro'
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describe
'38321' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOO' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOP' 'sip-files00202.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOQ' 'sip-files00202.txt'
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describe
'11976' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOR' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
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describe
'924720' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOS' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
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describe
'102190' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOT' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
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describe
'36756' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOU' 'sip-files00203.pro'
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describe
'38914' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOV' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOW' 'sip-files00203.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOX' 'sip-files00203.txt'
22245ae6a7134d99651c1c66f8e0c35b
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describe
'11342' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOY' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXOZ' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
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describe
'70362' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPA' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
e4246ee452d439c76ce6f523caccfdd7
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'2011-10-31T22:58:25-04:00'
describe
'11957' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPB' 'sip-files00204.pro'
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describe
'23897' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPC' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPD' 'sip-files00204.tif'
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describe
'671' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPE' 'sip-files00204.txt'
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describe
'7717' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPF' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
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describe
'924715' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPG' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
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describe
'88108' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPH' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
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describe
'29218' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPI' 'sip-files00205.pro'
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describe
'32733' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPJ' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPK' 'sip-files00205.tif'
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describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPL' 'sip-files00205.txt'
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describe
Invalid character
'9453' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPM' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
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describe
'966320' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPN' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
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describe
'106484' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPO' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
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describe
'37880' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPP' 'sip-files00206.pro'
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describe
'39037' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPQ' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPR' 'sip-files00206.tif'
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'2011-10-31T23:00:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPS' 'sip-files00206.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPT' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
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describe
'924717' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPU' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
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describe
'111489' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPV' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
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describe
'37696' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPW' 'sip-files00207.pro'
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describe
'41494' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPX' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPY' 'sip-files00207.tif'
dd5e7eb9b76b15837d68790204c7609d
1acfdb33ba17f62efb6b577f33a6daaee40c3159
'2011-10-31T23:01:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXPZ' 'sip-files00207.txt'
2711aa5b689f0bafdc47c032874fc732
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describe
'11630' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQA' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
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describe
'966349' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQB' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
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describe
'108157' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQC' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
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describe
'37946' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQD' 'sip-files00208.pro'
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describe
'39705' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQE' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQF' 'sip-files00208.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQG' 'sip-files00208.txt'
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describe
'12003' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQH' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQI' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
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describe
'106260' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQJ' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
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describe
'37197' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQK' 'sip-files00209.pro'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQM' 'sip-files00209.tif'
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describe
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describe
'11181' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQO' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
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describe
'966357' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQP' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
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describe
'104407' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQQ' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
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describe
'37394' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQR' 'sip-files00210.pro'
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describe
'38143' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQS' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQT' 'sip-files00210.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQU' 'sip-files00210.txt'
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describe
'11425' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQV' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
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describe
'888421' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQW' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
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describe
'102719' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQX' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
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describe
'36753' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQY' 'sip-files00211.pro'
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describe
'39034' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXQZ' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRB' 'sip-files00211.txt'
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describe
'11642' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRC' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
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describe
'966352' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRD' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
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describe
'103815' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRE' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
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describe
'38044' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRF' 'sip-files00212.pro'
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describe
'38807' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRG' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRH' 'sip-files00212.tif'
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describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRI' 'sip-files00212.txt'
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describe
'11736' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRJ' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
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describe
'864442' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRK' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'36757' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRM' 'sip-files00213.pro'
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describe
'37050' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRN' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRP' 'sip-files00213.txt'
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describe
'11536' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRQ' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRR' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRW' 'sip-files00214.txt'
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describe
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describe
'853975' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXRY' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXSJ' 'sip-files00216.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'966153' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXST' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXSX' 'sip-files00218.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXSY' 'sip-files00218.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXTF' 'sip-files00219.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXTM' 'sip-files00220.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXTT' 'sip-files00221.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'37771' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXTY' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXTZ' 'sip-files00222.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUA' 'sip-files00222.txt'
b839136b231ba037cafca72af387310e
9e10d7d17873eeeab377021b363a9b4abcd78bc8
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUB' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
b570235cd8482021a82bbd47d49ffb88
3bcacc406f836e75f8b7cf48918c026c88c67040
describe
'838395' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUC' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
ba7f3e5b664e58b6def21828529bbabd
539b4666255305baca6367f4052322ea1583f3bd
describe
'106585' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUD' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
61f20f49f8de67a39046a34258848f85
f3b58d9c4506948df63a315e50a206b5602c501a
describe
'37845' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUE' 'sip-files00223.pro'
a7485773ffe1800c31a311c11954ccfe
01c4a6cf33c1c19b66cb624c10dd88cac3f761f5
describe
'39729' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUF' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
a6c8a8a5849c45537605be49c0a29b78
977bb227e1e9f0d5fc2f081ec8d4012de9b1319e
describe
'6713659' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUG' 'sip-files00223.tif'
4b233c7ce87827050a1f290d9d0328aa
472e2148475fc82f60ae7c009dc8415a41b272e3
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUH' 'sip-files00223.txt'
065e06c458d9852071a443bcfd33b3dd
86a5dfeb104bcee5311bb8623983a102a3d0d15f
describe
'12681' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUI' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
3c935aef5146e7bfd35c16d1aadad4df
ec90ba1a8cff788c25dd8bbfe92e7b3e4800ed6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUJ' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
49b5d8126534ee0657cef096fe3e3491
a432fd8b19312295bf3301fabfe01eaf26c588b4
describe
'75304' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUK' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
3a7dfd2f2a2ac5fc4fb8a98ebf6208a5
fb3ec4834904f8dc19ddbed5973ea35827c91e0d
describe
'14005' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUL' 'sip-files00224.pro'
5b783a719ee71d0c764fd71e69cd7266
349436c8970d26db62472821c4d49864d0b8ec63
describe
'25300' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUM' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
753567c22d7ec0ce2101b2ff2e4de344
04415b3e2138cc4876f649f7556ad3cca0cd5eee
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUN' 'sip-files00224.tif'
29c5d0e58abb74ff68639a49915f56ae
1125fa66eb2bab981bd87505cfc6f17eededab32
describe
'581' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUO' 'sip-files00224.txt'
c0ded2c3ab13b3a9d7d99a367ef5eabb
90952ca6b6d404668bf8f01b012cb5de4b0735db
describe
'7866' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUP' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
df4712d047a069127e2234dea4e33d45
cf6a8025f5303e1fc4652f253c57d2eb27764e54
describe
'858820' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUQ' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
89c809d4452163a012126d9bae63e5fa
3a6849fb0be8c10552b344333a74d8bc3ff89d35
describe
'84413' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUR' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
3bfde38ad2e4f1ed5ef564414bfdec29
da01df94fd74670fa049f021a6ba2aa85d06871d
describe
'28548' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUS' 'sip-files00225.pro'
ab9de364846a741a749bd2beb8167893
fca1c5af57e97b121474f03c367fe28ecbdcbde3
describe
'31219' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUT' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
a28e9ce3630fb66fa13ff9951586cf09
3a9a3291d9b93b1ce075f243f7d0d6242dd428b2
describe
'6877675' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUU' 'sip-files00225.tif'
0d8945829081c3474ef035d89f256ef1
32693dbfdecf3d234828254d0db50b7348de302b
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUV' 'sip-files00225.txt'
2bb0cea1b712517c8ab366dbe43c9af3
464719fd7b9fe198b77682a902045ba91d290454
describe
'9947' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUW' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
f8242ed58a566bfbf32c40ef435f835b
d7a36f1c2a87527999668fbc5c911db509c088fc
describe
'966333' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUX' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
fe76e8a25c9677df252c9e2e0d2c82ff
f1eae0403e20f1418c1501cd77db5d16ec5fe5d6
describe
'105726' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUY' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
2d1384cffc482d8412eafcccae9d077f
8aaf2936f4a9da91957751907b885e77b6eef33c
describe
'37923' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXUZ' 'sip-files00226.pro'
b44adb8fa0f32cb23659408587386f4c
28dee7efcf14685344b2a4d10b22ae4f581dc62e
describe
'38847' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVA' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
72546056e035d1d94d241c023b9808ae
3076f17b98bb760858bfd4f74724c9d0cd40bded
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVB' 'sip-files00226.tif'
64ac59b0736f1c8f5ceee56f2ae32250
1da91605261349ba97291aec0d8bb29d9822b06d
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVC' 'sip-files00226.txt'
239ddb07bca89b3f02cf141c94380e9c
f336fb3c799eadd46e266b41f23e17fc26777a99
describe
'11681' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVD' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
1356ca52a1742439d0943693047d0b56
8bbbfdfe2214ab7cc72cc4aade8288824de0581d
describe
'861379' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVE' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
716f1b9e3c1c0fc495f021dc391f2992
8a9f5c7374366de541a73a06058c6159a194442b
describe
'104793' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVF' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
bf0cb86dfbffdebf30658ede0d2c81c6
c639992f2efb7409dbd5863e5422ac4cc43af071
describe
'37949' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVG' 'sip-files00227.pro'
04bf1b32407278b70a4f13b3747021e0
355cce42101fba8b4eeb9fbcc400de1188c1242c
describe
'38926' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVH' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
ca59922d750acd7e21808077eeaa1a8a
2c18a4d9fb8efcf326010f5c7535816eda898315
describe
'6897691' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVI' 'sip-files00227.tif'
226af4c6a2b9a6cda0009691a2850c38
b0a984e3aa66ddd4eb52cc5438d41d89be6036dd
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVJ' 'sip-files00227.txt'
8687f2aaab525b6a28df66a165634291
d01fe3d8c606cdc0078148a9a3d89c5caa824a56
describe
'12329' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVK' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
28ed989fb20ecd6fd5cc16725a052389
f933d67e112cff8118bfb5dd372cd7cbd31d47c1
describe
'966342' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVL' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
28511f37e48216f3c754884f7038e299
ad027b5f952ca3367a70d16349ce7fe50498318e
describe
'101657' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVM' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
c9ea1909f259146117e9f6f4ea713175
c8497f67e2dc2640c06d3cc0206b760fe32bc98e
describe
'35808' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVN' 'sip-files00228.pro'
781f3a0438389ebe7b78ada80b887b6b
de842200debc79fdd53afb4cf9fd331fb03cd2d1
describe
'37650' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVO' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
9676b62b12b035c89b3980f58d4588c3
771bb653f910e177d63f18a360433eeb366ae468
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVP' 'sip-files00228.tif'
11cc27929c87bea35e1b6f5aa02ec904
def750462959442eb361680ed97ea57a86e92ca0
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVQ' 'sip-files00228.txt'
0f56aacbc4b7e1c708231ac985223137
6e861438831bc61fa509c87fcca7bd92d1a08f3e
describe
'11611' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVR' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
c5b49dedb500556c05ee1fcbc8026a7e
299ed1b417ac21f45228b271f9046a89a53ecee6
describe
'846950' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVS' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
f09411124d15a9e0e3ef3ac54f13fab7
b3ee68744eb7e3e8bd57daeff3fac39c60e54d09
describe
'102396' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVT' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
57ff35e7026786cf1668f8131d3752be
d5329582579e43116ec5087e78a2ab2ddc482937
describe
'36155' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVU' 'sip-files00229.pro'
7125f53175f8a7783e6221bd6a8335d4
fd11110e7c0e93e7b49d66a4d5ef4adf9c61080c
describe
'38675' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVV' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
33c518b3fb3546eca93f5514c91356e9
283bd1d39a1f1acc32334eaf5920009bbc9ca3b9
describe
'6782739' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVW' 'sip-files00229.tif'
5b07d602393003c42e783e4c60bad8ec
30a5acad7e81286272a40ba55a60deab5368e31f
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVX' 'sip-files00229.txt'
9e690f606ee670faead046152cd38801
119a3e2e34100c8d0859ef8e1ac1f126a9e76c24
describe
'12407' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVY' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
0e9c249eeaa9b433d99565a80fb953d3
f1d0f53c9b2cb4e74c91624f04ed7f7317b1c1a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXVZ' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
760b4be7605e852f16185454b3c604ed
71f78826ee680d7b9e989c52197ab6a5cc51df20
describe
'97944' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWA' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
224df35b6b1561d69e20a2ad0e7585e7
fd3cb775f4bc44f49f92273cb209828614bd40c3
describe
'32753' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWB' 'sip-files00230.pro'
53bf4a8cf81209c4bdb86a888f4151c5
c00fd9944a9084cf48a1778e895631f9d5852aea
describe
'36323' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWC' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
50f47cd223e5082c09b3613a516962b8
d2ec419ad4953304e0bb17f2797a7679fc873988
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWD' 'sip-files00230.tif'
444b9d9c24cc3ab591d3f81ace5b88ea
85ddc22a51a53860698eeb017833da5e7327faa4
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWE' 'sip-files00230.txt'
026a8802defc59db9074f059138690e3
6c272ec4007fd71f9f05ee0a20650ea6e51df72a
describe
'11300' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWF' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
f6359929e66297dfe300c9272e066de6
07870620db5574621ffb56447b4d2f0c346a1af7
describe
'857927' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWG' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
57ceec637ce556aa9dfdc94adbbdb4ff
d20503baa2744b3f1e40bc52f2722f1f174a5a1f
describe
'95454' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWH' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
fb8213b35f2ac39af6fe20ac6844077b
55888f9a28b265de2db9ff5aada187ff59a68c51
describe
'30284' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWI' 'sip-files00231.pro'
78e6da61797cf66cc563ed61f16938ef
a8466a3e8ddaceae26ff9cc3409a1ec260422d0d
describe
'35071' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWJ' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
7c8f1ae8c9b7cb39e46dd97bba9814dd
4e141cbc770b36985f4e2b0e9d85fec37acde4cd
describe
'6869843' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWK' 'sip-files00231.tif'
07bd880a0f7ff0b5d1f0e36453722adc
ae49cff61aaa623f420484c8c8e8a9641d63c76f
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWL' 'sip-files00231.txt'
7478958eac6eca48b0f31a129510584c
382b13ea2254c7313cc8ed3438038705e5e5d11a
describe
'10648' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWM' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
c6ed57be02b3aadb4008952b6cd1490e
18dc47bcf39afe32cf72f65f7d715cb49e5ba6da
describe
'966310' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWN' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
6deed509255ea924268425b6e93d0fd8
52b45bf19a739226a6474698394924ec4d08341b
describe
'65372' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWO' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
968635b60220f5d79d490edb87b19224
9ca3ea5a3c02020b87142f0b6d4f12d5f49df7dd
describe
'27795' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWP' 'sip-files00232.pro'
3b6ff0c9a946b43cb4d4e100daff391b
40accd9cbb394a0d530dd4a7a7c785371eea016c
describe
'17017' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWQ' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
ba2d7082d58505a1dd519bfb8a3e07b9
14cdeb4bc3eb02f2acdd3094615f4bf478630017
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWR' 'sip-files00232.tif'
02e79c59dc2addf900d196cc48b01dbe
de51a881770e4e93132a9968dc567ffe6e42aba5
describe
'2791' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWS' 'sip-files00232.txt'
d01a2b7b0ffb955c8963766fdf6a8d7e
e04a1eebba958682ce7d7aeafe828ac946f535ac
describe
Invalid character
'4739' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWT' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
f93200e7730ee61a41a2f2a68da43455
5415ed29e07213f097a84855248f50a52e96f6c5
describe
'924683' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWU' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
a0a06996ba11a9546d5557d6472156be
f2a5cba2914a71f675fbb7780962c772a419737f
describe
'119041' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWV' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
5b82a4acadafeebb6d0ed2eb9005edbc
d4f7055458be84b6fbf53c8d44980f99cde272e5
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWW' 'sip-files00233.pro'
646b10bae3574232ee1c2e28e830638e
8f68ea269f9149a307823615eaf949bc9283a18e
describe
'33096' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWX' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
14c9f3a01229a8a5e3b2133aa2a4d075
d4c79499881655913b2a5f7587ac292efa3e376b
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWY' 'sip-files00233.tif'
64dc3b32521764fca834c30d1e3b7c67
90bb3417475a3c83779b39d28729e20a136c3737
describe
'152' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXWZ' 'sip-files00233.txt'
799d398c3b51289d99e62df4bf97071a
18bf7afcc1727d5022ae0542282eaaadf3d95ba2
describe
Invalid character
'9120' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXA' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
0e5c734400707a7f585eb009c876a897
ffe3054a5c0018632b030e47f7c62c62d909af9d
describe
'966313' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXB' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
e1f16e72da1ff30fddcc8783c3d3f26f
e805d98856a90ff82b660bb62fb651d342a0158f
describe
'51940' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXC' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
007dcd3117aa95154bd46f3e43ff35d7
2c9e7511ea4f966cfa26ccce3d752b35360461ee
describe
'553' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXD' 'sip-files00234.pro'
38a9584fb4bbb3412369f82679e61e20
c572fcff225945e250995fee85a7f5a81c4ecca1
describe
'15206' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXE' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
cd4689c3757b2ac44627bad2db2b01d4
87480204e88860290168f5ee9d920b03b3988eff
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXF' 'sip-files00234.tif'
6c97bb8327b9a1abe0d2f0755fe52f0e
0ccd5d229cf64767d3aeb7e9b7818335f0d68f3a
describe
'34' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXG' 'sip-files00234.txt'
d3f0d0ea7dc98b3a1ffff5ef80bed454
31959025305a8c33e5c04acdbadd3396f21fc14d
describe
'4921' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXH' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
148a24acfc568b854404772d5384d6a6
85935aa492f2e40d0a826c5df5f8546571d84e75
describe
'554733' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXI' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
01ed3369988d45c4a0d591f3f46aac24
084a6452da7c69df0080e27a40f198d91b9d57ec
describe
'23150' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXJ' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
8de13736f9a589f84cc6a1c18b4e7ce3
565e09a985c26824b857cb2653f16af94ad96a74
describe
'450' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXK' 'sip-files00235.pro'
b8825f05ad8040a2abee6a0f3b3f1e90
03d83843e4a228d7d90414b1aa8a4a626373fcc7
describe
'7894' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXL' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
9876fc33205e19290942386e04b7c411
d45711d5b2ea47b6d28b6a6415cb24d21257ffaf
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXM' 'sip-files00235.tif'
df77461133afc05962ebbda2fcfd9739
73a24c17f97367207bcf2f9c016caeb0b286d46e
describe
'46' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXN' 'sip-files00235.txt'
3d103bb21b2c4cc2fffb06ebea80c1ff
816f1dc69807fb25321fa752fa8bbb3cce652988
describe
Invalid character
'2873' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXO' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
923fabb047f192e40555f2d9ad2fb57f
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describe
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describe
'77266' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXQ' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
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describe
'24227' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXR' 'sip-files00236.pro'
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describe
'28103' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXS' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXT' 'sip-files00236.tif'
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describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXU' 'sip-files00236.txt'
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describe
'9109' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXV' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
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describe
'892890' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXW' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
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describe
'108741' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXX' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
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describe
'38367' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXY' 'sip-files00237.pro'
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describe
'40613' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXXZ' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
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describe
'7152071' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYA' 'sip-files00237.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYB' 'sip-files00237.txt'
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describe
'11908' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYC' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
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describe
'966350' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYD' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
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describe
'100919' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYE' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
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describe
'35992' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYF' 'sip-files00238.pro'
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describe
'38196' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYG' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYH' 'sip-files00238.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYI' 'sip-files00238.txt'
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describe
'11593' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYJ' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
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describe
'871425' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYK' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
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describe
'92113' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYL' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
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describe
'31739' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYM' 'sip-files00239.pro'
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describe
'34733' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYN' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
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describe
'6977893' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYO' 'sip-files00239.tif'
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describe
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describe
'11124' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYQ' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
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describe
'966311' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYR' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'34801' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYT' 'sip-files00240.pro'
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describe
'35310' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYU' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYV' 'sip-files00240.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYW' 'sip-files00240.txt'
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describe
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describe
'924687' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXYY' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'34969' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZA' 'sip-files00241.pro'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZB' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZC' 'sip-files00241.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZF' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'32475' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZH' 'sip-files00242.pro'
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describe
'35236' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZI' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZJ' 'sip-files00242.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'924685' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZM' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'38591' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZP' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZQ' 'sip-files00243.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZT' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZX' 'sip-files00244.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAXZY' 'sip-files00244.txt'
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describe
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describe
'924689' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAA' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAE' 'sip-files00245.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAF' 'sip-files00245.txt'
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describe
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describe
'966337' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAH' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'38190' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAK' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAL' 'sip-files00246.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAM' 'sip-files00246.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAN' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAO' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAS' 'sip-files00247.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAT' 'sip-files00247.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'32458' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAX' 'sip-files00248.pro'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYAZ' 'sip-files00248.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'107046' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBD' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
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describe
'37670' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBE' 'sip-files00249.pro'
328c767e5260113492aaa062a5229411
91be68494abede24f3d7172df956c51bf2106365
describe
'40153' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBF' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
59133ffb6be9c33c54c31ed1a09d9096
295a3e40baac8970402b019b8aafc48cfbca6a41
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBG' 'sip-files00249.tif'
cf511ee61fe57801474100d1b521b31d
e44e2fec7e76ab65202976c0c04d9b675a0dc0a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBH' 'sip-files00249.txt'
2f2a5f217766a841906b68b055c2ff1e
8d6a61b7813d13f33bb897c3a4320a2deed56f81
describe
'11291' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBI' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
b862fab0c2d4797dc462dad2a808719d
f69263a2e655357c2b4e92fe9a3d78fe93448959
describe
'966358' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBJ' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
664234010aee70f0183ac1ac0d2c63ba
9dddee860a25a83f3e6f966210a97fc6cb50ef17
describe
'103967' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBK' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
db5cc9846e96c75935fc6681a00c35d8
09225ffffded2979e695251338f1e3da0153b105
describe
'38140' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBL' 'sip-files00250.pro'
4a9cf8e7a483f3f8c51d2b7d49ffb1b7
15626350aceb634dc029c07d45072635134e3323
describe
'38124' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBM' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
9804e6728e96a26e2eee01a70d049f91
c96767b41f4c2dc6c32dde1668360e469adc6c4b
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBN' 'sip-files00250.tif'
ce61e0b249f925c0acf755116f2412ee
6f281f5cde158748674220dcf5c43db9729a67b7
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBO' 'sip-files00250.txt'
20a72b826d587098d2ff07b83895c8e5
e4f08d287212842e4fc4739a4f9526e96b77af8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBP' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
4393daf350c92cd990eb5d5d66c6aa54
dc7ca0a2f8ce848b8d86546b5566cfc8eaf715a6
describe
'895978' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBQ' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
50ebc0c2361376c2cd4559f49845e443
89036ec1e1aa4dda6641b29ae68f2c0cd01eb4df
describe
'102834' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBR' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
063e057d2f865213837e0a26a72d1242
e44ef8d99ebdbd7783cb34fd9d50215234ab3e74
describe
'36502' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBS' 'sip-files00251.pro'
e53ec6ebf0012a3ec545bb9ac4661812
7a66f8951734ff7c51ebd197581ce72c58ce01f5
describe
'38699' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBT' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
ef3a1ee013b6715c7810d3bd3289d9a3
1033465e8c3ae7d595fdd84bf5999dafe5f22209
describe
'7176659' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBU' 'sip-files00251.tif'
7523bdf33e6037f9efea80eb1fa51e71
bdfba57265472a0178cc30e9ad851dd3e909f768
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBV' 'sip-files00251.txt'
ff497cb4d9a09522c6b30794fa3136b6
a50bfffaf132e02fac3ec739b926a652a105fd87
describe
'11198' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBW' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
19d715b9eb90298d8b7a8f264d3e7c47
fbbe81cd1a960dfa5d5ba590546783c4528a6af3
describe
'966346' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBX' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
054a1a45e43fa695fe3aca2ef30e38d3
2b045090730be5b8068ad81060969e3fac91647f
describe
'100274' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBY' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
9d8ded83441dc70c13a8ba08de966c64
d665f3ffb4bd451de6b82ca21c0f716f9026f55f
describe
'36145' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYBZ' 'sip-files00252.pro'
0a16f95585122b22ea092f070c4cd7b8
2c2815cfd9bab18dc2b026207c06096c10f6f8ae
describe
'37262' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCA' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
bc4ade68cc7a18addf7c8fb7d4f43e2a
d915950577f1fcc1381a1fe00fcc406fb380046c
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCB' 'sip-files00252.tif'
6e06702c3a1134b95f1e899b2d2bd11a
28838e8706ffff2a12fb7890499fdef8b9cbefd5
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCC' 'sip-files00252.txt'
4900e33484dfcfd1ba89ec1b4f79e2f2
97ca4d2756eec18d92f6ef9377e7ab02176e79ca
describe
'11199' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCD' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
e704832c075caf938d725f70a42eb992
5697f625e75ed2555acbdc8366d077f4be2070b8
describe
'886931' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCE' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
1ae8511badd994bf72697ee599271d6b
abed4bf5b5c651a0a0440fa3ce4ac248b44735d1
describe
'98986' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCF' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
42b743ca7e73d4caa7415718f5791c36
2ef327e5323e504e86718db1dcf9bec733c40b90
describe
'34040' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCG' 'sip-files00253.pro'
ee63e45ebe7608a44246c7552c0fcc23
ff674976970c4f0e5c97dfae1ee52ecd89c8185e
describe
'37112' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCH' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
f9104c76c3e0d90255fba135ed0da126
a924965b6932c136e11e14b78b4bbd876c6231de
describe
'7102245' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCI' 'sip-files00253.tif'
d9474fe819c13d38948ffae6f73b305d
ad546a24ecaffa58f56cff8a50e9aba7d5c876a5
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCJ' 'sip-files00253.txt'
dfda338dd943e5669bf63443ddeb0c58
e4bd6b03d44e414f155c2d97a6db21b91e4ead30
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCK' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
0c5d31bb8cc3547f5c3e1634b7764a20
afe6b5df37f3064fbc9aa087a27601a5e1a80fa4
describe
'966331' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCL' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
e5298ea8a15638bbcf3a7b5466056842
c69dfdf3d38d179571a619ec929fc1ad3251a6fd
describe
'100382' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCM' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
900a68e162ca0d16a71a52c8cabcc0f8
5516fce422b719188740067bc7cf07f33f6c35f9
describe
'35538' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCN' 'sip-files00254.pro'
bc5f03d68dffcce12581dc98cae6ac09
11e0a2a0eee4eb9c362df89bbcc085252789ddb1
describe
'37528' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCO' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
891702315bcf63223fe7a6a5c908e0a7
adb82eabc443dc0574b3dfccd924387366d55752
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCP' 'sip-files00254.tif'
02f061ee9895ff82da2501c3e81aafa0
eba60128fed99649c337fd1c9c9e091dcb6a01eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCQ' 'sip-files00254.txt'
de1e607fb57d3891ced99e4b9c8bbc2c
c9f55065e1e2e4cdd6421115865a4dee756793f0
describe
'11159' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCR' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
d8fa45eb332fc5ec9c218b1f0485225e
2bfa7f7c0527d348f0bb72e422907bcb78fb933b
describe
'887351' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCS' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
1eea2b26d13855776ec78e92af666fee
5df8814b51db3c1a6833e0d9bc89803f7e6489b9
describe
'102348' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCT' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
08356530a86342006772fa7513b880b6
a27c687c78f14db59fedb018bcd0b3bc7d571a08
describe
'35509' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCU' 'sip-files00255.pro'
dd69f1250049ed9dbbb64ed82bcbba85
a3134f2d0c467847e1b84e581e51551e5713e4cf
describe
'38052' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCV' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
200c506b9337ba64aba8e696f7403ea3
f438f4aacc15578f8fdf73ae7bf284140c87fad1
describe
'7105543' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCW' 'sip-files00255.tif'
692daf29ba3565d2c9efd316d76be235
64c9782d4b6ebd23ce0a86223325d3d586e8e0af
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCX' 'sip-files00255.txt'
808c7555e5f3f2e0c54bd0e2f1f1ae21
5725502c026195cc033f4a9a72ad9d25983db038
describe
'11595' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCY' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
e743b875677ee80c424f131b147b2b53
d6d9a4634edd78939cd1a9ee83d8334845f517fe
describe
'966351' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYCZ' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
5aa0aeb17811385d5e8d99b4e05d2764
024a6d1b07b0dc9d04289cab451d61b73db8cf36
describe
'106685' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDA' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
80d477e706b2e016d4d5a7bc841ac9fc
51b9c283fa35c01dfad9f8187c288adf18f376ba
describe
'37007' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDB' 'sip-files00256.pro'
91a4a9419009516fec100319c1625559
364ea922c84e1e33f52e8c33692eee5a69a0ca08
describe
'39548' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDC' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
4034afe5d414cff28d19a6ad96305628
942f46854aead980d5c6f897bcd4aa7e1cf0ebc0
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDD' 'sip-files00256.tif'
221dc267f83eb0c59eada2acb139d3b0
6a70ebb84e87c0c84d6997092a46977cec19d523
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDE' 'sip-files00256.txt'
bdd73780dbee05bb0915322c3d28d216
5ebcf13dbc3c2eb3f52e9491b095c4b823cda85e
describe
'11994' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDF' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
694d91633064ea6f2346c8d8a1cc3d1b
b194ea4b730b268778671b35f086eed170a75b13
describe
'888365' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDG' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
0bc47021d74254354075a10d98e32b40
5e5796be0a3eb7a10118b72d5c023ee4c323414a
describe
'111271' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDH' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
323f64bdc73e6940a9369270d572bce7
d9bfebe9be3e044abc7a2e8cc58ca0dc35d8a718
describe
'36653' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDI' 'sip-files00257.pro'
bcb8d1c78720b244ec4611c31a08821a
5b357564d20bbbf410adc239c5c9ea5ad78c4f7c
describe
'41114' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDJ' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
229d0c9e8594fe8f14f20020f9f45458
910057d5fe2be4e510ab9383363f211b13b1e70d
describe
'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDK' 'sip-files00257.tif'
bcaf3424085e7ef4f21c85eba2ad5efe
366b11f22c3a88b7aa8b1dc2af0160248a116d0d
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDL' 'sip-files00257.txt'
5a47d880eec8e08f708e131ae1ae7b21
c07907f1d425f6b8e097f267a5657982e95ad797
describe
'12370' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDM' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
c039c0b10d2efa677dfe80ac3ecb2985
69b4770eea39c6bb302f75b9d8384def155c5903
describe
'901072' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDN' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
2072126bde6b4992edba0113a4ab7b5f
10493722e0a6b0e7303ab7b494b10658f836b4d5
describe
'29198' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDO' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
41b1e32106b045401850da632e6f53eb
a361e8956051fe2010c66f72d3babe82aeab68e5
describe
'537' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDP' 'sip-files00258.pro'
939c627b6e1db5098a7fb59eb2eb90f6
97d72d47b0056bd328852aa3317296a1d71146a2
describe
'8221' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDQ' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
fa1ae76fdca1c99ce3fc20e1042b3c6d
62d5cc5b2bedab51bbb4748604b39ceddf4e1e19
describe
'8337297' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDR' 'sip-files00258.tif'
4526ba3f1408e498aea4833f68f34ea7
f7ea6e6d046516e8b6a02f7d3ffbb29fbca3abdd
'2011-10-31T22:58:15-04:00'
describe
'22' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDS' 'sip-files00258.txt'
21f63a42920b3f77699241eec13f34ef
fc5590a927770179f2d4cfdef8ae59a1cadbc09c
describe
'2667' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDT' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
5d85f9e7ea15a584c7f136fd239921d3
1a5f33792471c1ef951704128f4d4453ff170092
describe
'34048' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDU' 'sip-filesback.QC.jpg'
1534c7b3fbef69f5fbb1680818c28077
ffb85921f6c95a84f8b0039af1b84ac22431d1a6
describe
'8485' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDV' 'sip-filesbackthm.jpg'
73de2901143fac38101d323f19ea5538
349c15f6e7838ec687a24907b8e08fa94ccda25c
describe
'1021221' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDW' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
ca916017d459b6092436050af7433760
13dff55fb94f3465d4f476856878c00d922ea365
describe
'138001' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDX' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
42785413dcb6e507ad17a34ead7798dd
e4f2aabfa3aa439b37133794df08a17ee19725ad
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDY' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
8ca48547f0621e7574fb5bea65a1e4f6
a028769680f46bb680115ea1d965d7cc0e54bf9a
describe
'28697' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYDZ' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
8726f81041d40ad35883c045bca11867
69c7d0eda8c7948c5a7222f12a85d9b3c0eaf068
describe
'24512208' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEA' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
f1bdc25f13eb4e6360277516e037ab1d
e73abaca9c0dae06a98ede24a2b196e2c53025d0
describe
'297' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEB' 'sip-filescover1.txt'
57d231521559707c74de3d8d67c798ba
dc3e2be627d6b5042d156d698867e313d0ecb926
describe
'7367' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEC' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
78c00212dbb979f45afecafd79e944a2
c30774828345ba920e531014f13e9c8bb7c9dfb6
describe
'250292' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYED' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
52ed6a5e67932d9d691d4e12e352940f
cbe384026e2f58ce6bd9fae3c8f9a3eb77d784a8
describe
'46214' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEE' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
258d0fba972ad3bc74b6ed9ea1bf6bd8
005a0e50601a7de65c2d4bd5dd98d3677d1e9719
describe
'357' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEF' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
8c0dd32b794d4fb3de82f684f13233d4
2f6c19af8b63df1204e29554e041ced006f74301
describe
'10658' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEG' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
946d124d292f9293fa425bfddced5729
f614514b15790ecdc35e92498312b1716deac1e2
describe
'6010908' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEH' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
32bd0e3b88ce046e43e553bb3c8194e1
dff06fbed3566fee9c104c125f39a9fe9e8b7e17
describe
'185' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEI' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
1bd0c8ebbe2d18a5e969bac1f116d3a2
acaa37ae56a2ee5778f4a7821db1607b73184518
describe
'4008' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEJ' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
901dc137e0662a08928c2e95f06adace
1ff197337ff770317b35dbbe74ec9606c47e4d99
describe
'435883' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEK' 'sip-filesUF00001918_00001.mets'
6cb9cbc9c53e93b2e39c989e86da7ddf
ea521b89e1a2f9df28210acf12b5c4e7c891d4a8
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T21:04:22-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'563100' 'info:fdaE20081031_AAAAARfileF20081101_AAAYEN' 'sip-filesUF00001918_00001.xml'
9ee72e32c14ba86b5cde0bde40cc8a60
1a5343c2e1b344b01e726bb8decd86106b4b4735
describe
'2013-12-14T21:04:16-05:00'
xml resolution







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BR ELPHIA : | |


—

Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1851, by the
AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,

in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of
Pennsylvania.



&@~ No books are published by the AMERICAN SunpDAY-scHOooL UNION
without the sanction of the Committee of Publication, consisting of
fourteen members, from the following denominations of Christians, viz.
Baptist, Methodist, Congregationalist, Episcopal, Presbyterian, and Re-
formed Dutch. Not more than three of the members can be of the
same denomination, and no book can be published to which any mem-
ber of the Committee shall object.


PREFACE.

Tue details of plain domestic life must, in a
measure, be everywhere the same. The object
of the following story is to combine these with
healthful moral instruction, and to show howa
firm reliance upon an overruling Providence,
and earnest endeavours to promote the good
of others, will insure our own happiness.

The scene has been laid in one of our West-
ern States; the one, as yet, but imperfectly
developed in its resources or in its power, but,
nevertheless, advancing with great rapidity in
civilization, and destined to take its true place
among the fertile regions of the West. A
family in moderate circumstances has been
chosen, to show that the ability to-doigood lies
not so much in wealth as in well-directed effort.
The sweet ties of family affection and indivi-

5
6 PREFACE.



dua] influence are recognised; and our readers
will permit the hope, that, without startling
incident, great exploit, or magnificent under-
taking, the simple history of the Moreton family
will possess an interest for them, and awaken
in their hearts a growing love for our beloved
country, and an earnest desire so to live, and
so to use the means God may put in their
power, as to promote its true prosperity—real-
izing, by our own experience, that «happy 7s
that people whose God is the Lord!”

«(ll ll i ih ) 1

nay of i y
TH nN NS
Sy =)


PART I.

LAURELTON.


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CONTENTS.

. PaGs
CHAP. I.—THE FAMILY i cccnicnwcntititunenncie 1l

II.—PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL....scese ese eeseee 23
IIT.—NOTES OF WARNING. ......sceses cosssssee scsseeees 36
: RUIDUND, cxnsscicne-suntitnciibiinbitiemsnsaiiiaameniie 46

V.—UnNcLE ALFRED’s Gurr... c00en esevce cocces conees 53
VIL—TaE DEPARTURE........000csecesecs coscvscee seeees 61
VII.—JourNeyYINa THROUGH THE Woons.......... 67

VIII.—ENCAMPMENT IN THE WOODS. eeececees sosessece 75

TX.—A SABBATH IN THE WOODS.....c.ccceec00e00. . 81

X.—THE RAINY-DAY’S JOURNEY..cccccccce cosooscee 92

LIFE IN THE WEST;

OR, THE

ADVENTURES OF THE MORETON FAMILY.

CHAPTER I.

THE FAMILY CONCLAVE.

“Now, what do you all say about it? I want the
opinion of every one of you. But let your mother ©
speak first.” ™

“The change will affect the future life of the
children more than my own, my dear husband; and
my feelings must not bias their decision. Let them
tell us their opinion, before we speak ours.”

“Well, Robert, you are the eldest.”

“T say, father, let us go. I am young, but am
strong, and almost a man; and I know that we can
succeed. I am ready to go.” _

“And so am'I, father,” said Henry. “TI say,
with Robert, let us go, and take hold of a new farm.

I am willing to work hard upon it.”
11
12 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Mary came next in order of age, and all eyes were
turned towards her. She sat with her head resting
upon her hand, evidently in serious thought. She
paused but a moment; then, raising her head, she
said—

“T am willing to go, father.”

The mother saw a tear glistening in the daugh-
ter’s eye, and kindly said—

“Speak your feelings freely, my child. Remem-
ber that we are all one family, and that the wishes
and happiness of each member of our little circle is
the wish and happiness of the whole ; and that the
opinion of each has equal weight in our family
conclave.”

“T am wising to go, mother,” again replied
Mary; “but, for the moment, our home here
seemed too pleasant to leave; and I thought of our
many friends, the dear old trees, and my beautiful
garden. It was only for a moment, though,” she
added, with a bright smile. ‘We can soon make a
home there, and find friends, while I shall learn
to love the wide forests and the beautiful wild
flowers.”’ :

‘Father, are there any bears out there ?” asked
little Alice.

“No, my darling,” said the father, smiling, with
the others, to see the wondering eyes and alarmed
countenance of his flaxen-haired pet.

I einiineesicnaininaasl ita Mi ls ee

lit
THE FAMILY CONCLAVE. 13



‘Willie says that there are bears and Indians in
the woods.”

“ Willie does wrong to try to frighten you with
such storiés. There are both bears and Indians
in some parts of the world; but where we think of
going, there are neither of them now.”

“If there are no bears there, and mother is going,
and Willie, I want to go, too. Are you going,
Willie?” —

“‘T rather think I shall, Ally. That is, if father
thinks I am worth taking,” said he roguishly.

‘‘ Perhaps he may not think you are worth leav-
ing,” said Robert. “But you are all talking out of
your turns. Frank ought to have spoken next to
Mary.”

Frank’s opinion was evidently guided by Mary’s,
and was given guardedly. ©

‘‘ We are yery happy here,” said he; ‘and if we
are poor, we shall be soon old enough to help along.
Robert has almost learned his trade now. If I am
to be a printer, I think I had better stay here.
Printing is of no use out in the woods.”

“Tt will not always be ‘the woods’ out there,”
replied his father. “We may want a newspaper
started where we are, and you will be just the one
to carry iton. If, after you are old enough to learn
printing as a trade, you still desire it, whether we
live here or there, I promise you that you shall have
the opportunity.”
14 LIFE IN THE WEST.



“That ought to satisfy you, Frank,” said Charles,
who was a year younger than his brother. ‘T should
like to go. I read, the other day, about the wild tur-
kies and ducks, the deer and the woodcock. Oh!
I should like to live in the woods!” and visions of
the time when he should be the happy possessor of
a gun and a dog, floating through his mind, made
his earnest, expressive countenance beautiful.

“Charlie shall keep us supplied with game,”’ said
Henry, entering into the enthusiasm of his brother ;
‘cand Robert and I will help father raise the wheat
for bread—”

« Which I will make,” said Mary—

“And J will eat,’ said Willie. ‘ Who says I
cannot help ?”

“There is one more to speak. Annie, dear, what
do you say ?” asked the father.

Annie, the twin-sister of Charles, was a bashful,
timid child, of ten years of age, and was often over-
looked in the noisy movements of | her brothers and
sisters. A naturally thoughtful habit of mind had
been increased by almost constant feeble health ard
a slight deformity of person. But her invariable
sweetness of disposition and gentleness of character
and manner made her the darling of the family
circle. As they now looked at her little pale face,
and large, beaming, intellectual eyes, and remem-
bered how dependent she was upon joys that were
brought to her, and how unable she was to seek ac-


THE FAMILY CONCLAVE. 15



tive pleasures, there came a hush and silence over the
little group, for they now recollected that, to her, the
change would be greater than to the others, and be
fuller of privations and hardships. Nor was this
silence broken, until, in gentle tones, she said—

“Tf we all live together, and God dwell with us
there, we shall be happy.”

They all understood little Annie’s reference to the
question asked by a child, when moving to a new
‘house—“ Will God live with us there?” and to
them, brought up and taught, as they were, to love
and reverence the great and blessed truths of reve-
lation, the thought of God, at this crisis of their
family history, was not an unwelcome one.

‘‘Annie is right,” said the mother, after a mo-
ment’s silence. “If we love each other, and the
God of love dwell with us, it matters not where we
are, we must be happy. I believe, with your father,
that it is better for us, as a family, to move to the
West. The majority agree with me; and, under
our republican government, the majority must rule.
Is it not so, husband ?”

“Yes, my dear; and a large majority we seem to
have this time. We shall all have inconveniences
and troubles connected with the moving, and with
the new home. « There will be severe labours to be
performed, hardships to be endured, and some pri-
vations, connected with great fatigue. But a spirit
of love and hopeful cheerfulness will enable us to
16 LIFE IN THE WEST.



bear these, and not let them becomé too burdensome
tous. We are all strong, well, and able to labour,
except Annie; and Dr. Newton tells me that the
change of climate will, without doubt, benefit her ;
80, if we have Grod’s blessing on our undertaking, I
can see no reason why we should not go. In all
probability, we shall gain, as it regards worldly
prosperity ; and you will have a better and a more
independent start in life than you could have here,
where there is more competition, and the means of
living are more divided. But our own advantage
ought not to be the only motive in going, nor our
own prosperity the only consideration. We were
not placed upon this earth to think of and labour
only for ourselves. Whether we try to do it or not,
we influence those about us. By saying and doing
those things that are right, we can gain a good in-
fluence—one that shall make others better and hap-
pier; and we may thus fulfil the great end and ob-
ject of life. If we do not mean to aim at this,
as well as our own advantage, in removing to
another place, it will be better that we stay where
we are; for, to succeed fully in our enterprise, we
must go as a God-fearing family. The restraints
of society will, ina measure, be removed from us,
leaving us to make known by our actions how far
Wwe are governed by love to God, and by a desire to
make his will our law. There must be an unity of
purpose with us, each one, as it were, pulling with
THE FAMILY CONCLAVE. 17



the rest, and striving to help on the welfare and
comfort of the whole. We must go with a deter.
mination to be happy—‘to look,’ as Jean Paul
says, ‘on the south side of the events and business
of life.” Such a disposition will materially lessen
our labours and brighten our hearts. If we have °
discontented longings for our old home, (as we may
have, ) we may not let our murmurings and repinings
affect the cheerfulness or hopefulness of those who
do not suffer from them. Being strangers in a
strange land, we. must cling to each other for our
support and comfort, and seek our pleasure in each
other’s society, and each of us contribute to the happi- ©
ness of the whole. I do not doubt, my dear children,
that you will fulfil my expectations; but we shall
be placed in new circumstances, and cannot now tell
what traits of character those circumstances may
develop in us all. It is better, then, to speak of
these matters openly and freely, calmly to think of
what we relinquish, and with deliberation to form
our plans for future action > for ‘to forewarn is to
forearm ourselves.’ Do you all say that we had
better go?”

There was now an unanimous vote in favour of a
new home, and that home one in the great West,
Even the little Alice, scarcely seven years of age,
gave her opinién understandingly and seriously ;
while, to the older members of the family, the pro-

tect assumed a more enlarged aspect and bearing,
2Q*
18 LIFE IN THE WEST.



and their personal responsibilities in the removal
gave to each of them a feeling of deep interest in its

~ success. As they afterwards kneeled about the



family altar, and commended themselves, with all
their plans, to the care and guidance of their hea-
venly Father, there was an earnest desire in every
heart for God’s direction and blessing; for they felt
that it was “not in man who walketh to direct his
etps."aie . . .

“Tf Cousin Susan would but go with us, mother,”
said Mary, as she sought her room, before retiring,
“JT should desire nothing more.”

“We can ask her; and perhaps she may be per-
suaded to join her fortunes to ours,” replied her
mother.

The family circle, to which we have so unceremo-
niously introduced our readers, was that of Mr.
JamMES Moreton. He was the father of eight
children, five of whom were boys—the eldest, Ro-
bert, being a young man of seventeen. His school
education was completed, and, for the last year, he
had been engaged in learning the trade of carriage-
building; his father deeming it best to gratify a na-
tural taste which he showed for mechanics.

Henry was a year anda half younger than Robert,
with more taste for books and quiet employment ;
but he was practical and persevering, with a ready
will anda strong hand for labour. For several years,
THE FAMILY CONCLAVE. 19



he had been employed, during the summer months,
working with his father upon the farm, and spent
the winter and fall in school studies and duties.
Mary was fourteen years of age, of a quick appre-
hension and tenacious memory. She was like Hen-
ry in disposition and character; but she had also
inherited from her mother an appreciation and
abiding love for the beautiful in nature, which
seemed to govern her whole life. It was not ro-
mance nor sentiment which actuated her, so much
as love; and her own affectionate impulses, sancti-
fied by the spirit of God, led her to view those by
whom she was surrounded as objects of loving inte-
rest and tender affection. She was a gay, cheerful,
bright-eyed young girl, with some personal beauty ;
but her chief charm was her singular disinterestedness
and constant watchfulness for the comfort and good
of others. Happy as the bird, like a bird, her voice
would be heard sending forth, now here, now there,
Sweet notes of joy, as she, with busy hands, but
light, untroubled heart, was employed in the daily
pursuits of domestic life—her cheerful thoughts
finding utterance in Song so constantly, that her
mother was wont to call her “her bird.”

Frank was naturally selfish and impatient; yet,
over the infirmities of his temper had Mary thrown
the mantle of her love—often, by a gentle, persua-
sive word, quieting his ebullitions of passionate an-
_ ger, and, with her sunny smile, winning him back to

ae
20 LIFE IN THE WEST.



peace with others and with himself. He was an
object of solicitude to his parents; yet they could
see, year by year, that the domestic influence of
home was rendering him more considerate, soften-
ing his temper, and making him less hasty in his
words and actions.

Charlie was an impetuous, rash little fellow,
ten years of age, full of daring, and with a disposi-
tion to think quite as much of himself as he ought
to think. He was as impulsive in his affections as
hig ypursuits—often boisterously fond of his mo-

‘and sisters, and then, again, as noisily devoted
to something else. Yet he was yielding and easily
guided, for his feelings were tender and quick ; and
if he did wrong, no one could be more sorry and
penitent than he was, as soon as he saw that it was
wrong. Annie was too feeble te enter into his sports
or plans; yet, in her dependence, he found a reason
why he should constitute himself her protector and
guide ; and it was into her ear that he poured forth
the mighty torrent of plans which his active brain
formed, and her feeble voice which dissuaded him
from undertaking one-tenth part of them; though,
in justice to our young friend Charlie’s firmness, we
ought to state that it was impossible to think twice
of most of them withopt seeing both their impracti-
cability and uselessness.

Willie was roguish and mischievous, fond of fun
to an alarming degree, for a boy of eight years of age. » ‘



THE FAMILY CONCLAVE. 21



Little Alice was his chosen playmate and companion,
and his tenderness and love for her had won her heart
completely. The family appellation given to this little
one, the youngest of them all, was, “our curly-head,”’
or “little Miss Curly-head,” from her flaxen ringlets,
which were abundant and beautiful, but, from the
length of time consumed in their arrangement, a
source of great annoyance to her. She was a capri-
cious little being, full of: freaks and fancies, but
warm-hearted and loving.

Mr. Moreton had married in early life, and for
several years had engaged in mercantile pursuits.
Owing to some unsuccessful speculations in business
and a combination of adverse circumstances, he lost
much of his property, and decided to gather up the
small remainder of what had originally been a hand-
some estate, and purchase a farm. near his native
town, a quiet Massachusetts village. For fourteen
years he had lived happily and prosperously there,
respected and useful as a citizen and as a man, ful-
filling all his duties to his family and to society with
faithfulness and success. But his means were limited ;
and while there was an abundance produced from
the farm for their daily wants, both Mr. and Mrs.
Moreton felt that there was nothing, beyond this,
upon which to rely for their children.

Their plan of moving to the West was neither a
sudden nor a hasty project. It was the result of
much thought and prayerful deliberation, and, toge-
22. “LIFE IN THE WEST.



ther, they had decided to ascertain the feelings of
the children on the subject, and, should they find
them desirous or willing to go, to remove early in
the coming spring. Calling them together, as his
custom was, when any affair which concerned the
family required action or decision, Mr. Moreton
placed it before them ; he plainly spoke to them of
his own pecuniary affairs and of his prospects, so far
as they might be interested in knowing them. He
then mentioned their plan of emigration, set its ad-
vantages and disadvantages before them, and told
them of its cares as well as of its pleasures, trying to
bring the whole matter clearly before their minds.

The result we have laid before our readers, whose
interest in the family history, we hope, will lead
them to follow us during our detail of their future
course.


PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL, 98

CHAPTER II.
PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL,

Letter from Mr. Moreton.
» Michigan, Noy. 9th, 18—,
My DEAR WIrE AND CHILDREN :—When TI left
you, to start upon what Willie called « my voyage of
discovery,” that is, my journey, I thought that, by
this time, I should be able to give you some definite
information as to your future home. But I have not
yet seen any farm, that suits both my means and my
desires, that I could purchase. [I start to-morrow, to
examine some lands lying in Indiana and Illinois, and
in a week or two I shall be able to let you know my
decision. Iam very glad that I came to see Jor myself
before purchasing, for I find that much of the land,
which was highly recommended to me, is hardly worth
the “taking up,” as they say here, when they speak
of buying land. ©] believe the land-agents think me
very particular, and not easy to be suited; but they
do not know how dear tome are the interests of my
wife and children, | must look, first, for a healthy
location. I cannot consent that either they or T
shall live on the banks of a sluggish stream, or in


24 LIFE IN THE WEST.



the neighborhood of aswamp. Then, Ido not want
a farm far from some market-town, though far and
near have a different signification in the West from
what they have in New England. Thirty miles is
not far here. I must look for a place where I can
get lumber for a house; and, in order to do this, a
saw-mill, within dragging distance, must be taken
into consideration. A grist-mill, too, must be
thought of, where we can get our wheat and corn
ground ; and it is desirable that both of these should
be within a few miles’ distance of our home, and
should already have passable roads leading to them.
A school and a church, that there may be food for
the mind and the soul, are what you will all desire.
Then your mother will like to have a good doctor
within reach, if you should be sick ; and, that you
may not be likely to get homesick for news from
Laurelton, there must be a post-office not very far
away. I must be careful, too, not to spend too great
@ proportion of my money forland; for I shall want
a house and barn, and some stock for the farm. I
must remember that there are taxes to pay, and be
careful not to buy more land than I can make pro-
jitable. These are some of the things which I find
every wise and would-be successful emigrant must
look after. '

My travelling adventures, thus far, have been va-
rious, some pleasant, and some not at all agreeable.
At this season of the year, Icannot look for fine
PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 25



weather, or for any great beauty of scenery. I have
seen many of the people who dwell in these parts of
the world, and have met with civility and even
kindness wherever I have been. Even jn business
matters, I have experienced nothing but what was
pleasant, and am indebted to many for valuable
hints and instructions concerning matters of which
I had been ignorant, and which I have set down in
my memorandum-book as things to be remembered.
I should have been disappointed if I had allowed
myself to look for.any great elegance of manner, or
_ for what is called style, in dress or mode of living.
So I should, if I had expected good roads, or elegant
houses, or very magnificent show-farms. These
things I have not found.

As to the land itself, it answers all my expecta-
tions. There is much poor land—low, damp, and
unhealthy; but a large proportion of it is rich, fer-
tile, easily worked, and yielding an abundant reward.
to the labourer. |

On my way to this place, I stopped at the door
of a log-cabin, by the roadside, to ask if I could
have some dinner. I was hospitably received, and
even welcomed, when they knew that I was from
New England, for that had been the home of my
host and hostess. My wants were provided for and
my horse fed, for which I could not persuade Mr,
Thomas to take pay; for, he said, “We would pay
anybody who would come from New England to
“age

26 LIFE IN THE WEST.



see us; and do you not think we like to give you a
dinner ?”’

I went with Mr. Thomas about his farm. He
had bought one hundred acres. Highty of them he
had put under cultivation; or, rather, according to
the Western fashion, forty were lying idle this year,
and the forty now sown were, after this year, to
change places with them; thus alternating with each
other. The wheat was promising finely, and he
hoped soon to be able to put himself up a frame
house. I gathered his story, as we went along, and
found that in early life he had been an inmate of
the **** alms-house. Indeed, that was his birth-
place; and there he remained until his mother’s
death, which occurred when he was seven years of
age. He was soon bound out to a neighbouring
farmer: “And,” said he, ‘I seem to have had
luck ever since. The man I went to live with was
a good man, aswell as a good furmer. He sent me
to school, winters, and took the trouble, sometimes,
to see if I understood what I studied. I had to
work pretty hard, but I was taught the best way of

doing every thing, and how to save and take care

of what my labour gained. I stayed with him until
my time was up, and after that, he paid me good
wages, and gave me chances to earn money, until I
had five hundred dollars in the savings’ bank.
Then, by his advice, I came out here, bringing my
wife with me. I have been here three years, and
PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 27



you can see how much headway I have made. I
have a good farm. Glorious land! Ain’t it? You
saw my wife and baby, and my log-house, and my
large frame-barn; I have a good team of horses,
two cows, a flock of sheep—I wish you could see
my sheep !—and I’ve gota contented heart. I mean
to see old Connecticut again, if I live; but not
until my house is done, and paid for.”

When I told him, I intended to bring my family
out here, to reside, he said he was glad of it; it was
a good country, and it only wanted good people to
live in it: and, with true, Western hospitality, in-
vited me to bring you all to see them. I thanked
him, but said that there were quite too many of us.
for their cabin, with its one sitting-room and its
little bed-room. He laughed, and said, “that they
could make a place for us, I might be sure.”

This is one instance, of many that I have met,
of prosperous emigration. Industry, good senge, and
judgment, and good habits “cdo bring goodluck ;” or,
rather, to speak more truly, they do bring the blessing
of Providence. It may be that I was the more
forcibly impressed with this case, because I had the:
opportunity to contrast it with that of a settler, with.
whom I had passed the previous night.

If I wished to picture discomfort in its perfection,
I would endeavour to make the canvas shadow forth
the interior of that log-cabin. There was a family,
man, woman, and eight children, (just our number,)

3
28 LIFE IN THE WEST.

all living, sleeping, eating, and cooking in one room,
sixteen by twenty feet in size, and dimly lighted by
its two little windows! There were two bedsteads;
one of which was appropriated to myself; and, if
both bedstead and myself had not been in the way
of the cooking-stove, and the cooking-stove in the
way of both the bedstead and myself, I might, per-
sonally, have been well accommodated. As it was,



I passed a sleepless night, and had full opportunity -

to watch the movements of my host’s family.

I ought to have said, that some of them stayed in.

the loft above the room during the night; and a
trundle-bed, drawn from beneath mine, was the
place where a poor sick little girl lay, with flushed
cheeks, parched lips, and a burning skin. It was no-
thing but a neglected chill-fever, they said ; but the
little thing tossed and moaned in her fitful slumbers,
awakening my sympathies and compassion, which
were not lessened, you may be sure, when the mo-
ther brought her a dose of calomel, mixed with
water, and held up a piece of a large yellowish
pickle, as an inducement to take the unpalatable
medicine ! .

I should frighten you all out of your desires even
to see this country, if I gave you the details of that
night, or filled up the picture with all its carelegs-
ness and want of cleanliness. Nor would the morn-
ing meal, of poorly-prepared food, have awakened in

any of you strong appetites. I was glad to pay my

ee


PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 29



bill, and be off early in the morning, satisfied that
more uncomfortable feelings could be crowded into
the experience of one night than I had supposed
possible. If there had been a necessity for all this
suffering, I would have pitied, but not complained
of it; but it could not escape the eye of the dullest
observer, that it was brought about by the union of
sloth with intemperance. a.

An originally good and productive farm waa
by year, growing smaller and yielding less, for the
want of a thrifty and industrious owner ; while he
and his whole family indulged in continual com-
plaints and murmurings against their lot, finding
fault with every thing about them, and never seeing
that the whole blame of their ill success lay with
themselves, and they were reaping the result of their
own doings.

These two extreme cases I have written about,
because they have come so directly under my notice.
There is every variety of life and circumstance here,
and these must be taken by themselves, rather than
as samples of Western life 3 and we can easily draw
our own lesson from them. If the strong bonds of
poverty do hold people here in such homes as the
last I have described, the stronger bonds of intem-
perance and indolence will assuredly do it.

There is no romance in life here. It is a plain,
straight-forward, practical character and course,

~~
30 LIFE IN THE WEST.



guided by firm faith in an overruling Providence,
which will advance the best interests of one’s-
self and of the community. And, when I think of
the vast influence that these newly-settled States
will eventually have upon the welfare of our free
- and happy nation; of the asylum they offer to the
poor and oppressed of every clime and country; of
re of lands, here lying ready for. the toil
amd skill of the agriculturist; above all, when, as a
Christian, I indulge in far-extending anticipations
of its moral progress, and the part it is yet to act
in the evangelizing of the world,—I rejoice in the
thought that I may be permitted to help on the good
work ; and, as each drop goes to fill the bucket, so
may each good citizen aid in swelling the tide of its
prosperity and civilization.

My letter is a long one, but I have hardly written
the half I purposed. My first feeling of dismay at
the newness and coarseness of things has passed
away; so has that of discouragement at the great
work to be done here; and I now view our enter-
prise as one in which we may and ought to engage
hopefully and happily ; for I fully believe that, in a
great measure, a man’s prosperity is here placed in
his own keeping; and the heart to labour and do
right will not fail to bring success, both as regards
ourselves and those among whom we may be
placed.


PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 31



Let us all ask the blessing of our heavenly Father,
and his direction in all our ways! With love to all,
I am your’s, affectionately,

JAMES Moreton.

P. S.—I cannot say, with any confidence, at what
time you may expect me at home; but a kind Pro- -
vidence will keep us, I trust, while we are apart,
and give us the pleasure to meet again in health and |
peace. J. M.

Letter from Robert to his Father.
Laurelton, Nov. —, 18—.

Dear FATHER :—Your very welcome letter has
just been received, and I am appointed by mother
to reply to it, in the name of the family. We were
pleased to hear of your good health, and of your fa-
vourable impressions of Western life. You do not
know how much we think about you, nor how often
we talk about you, exercising our Yankee privilege
of guessing where you are, and what you are doing.
We have most thoroughly imbibed the spirit of emi-
gration. Even Alice told Mr. Speare that you had
gone to buy us a farm at the West ; and each of us
is at work, in some way, busying ourselves with pre-
parations for moving in the spring.

As you recommended, I have made an arrange-
ment with Mr. S——, by which I am released from

further obligation to stay with him, and have trans-
3*
82 LIFE IN THE WEST.



ferred myself, tools and all, to Mr. Redding’s cabinet-
shop. I have learned, already, the way to put a chair
or table together, and can put up a shelf or fix a
drawer, quite like a workman. My. Redding told
me, himself, that I was quite a handy fellow at the
trade.

Henry looks after the farm and the family at

home, but has commenced the study of surveying.
This occupies most of his leisure,

Mary is in school. Mother says that it is her
last winter here, and that she must devote her time
to the study of those branches in which a teacher is
most necessary, Music, as a science, and French,
take most of her attention, although she and Henry
are trying, evenings, to study German with Mr.
Perrot. Mary declares that to know how to make
gingerbread will be likel y to be of more benefit to her
than how to speak German 3 but mother only smiles,
and says that there is time and Opportunity for
both,

Frank and Charlie are in school ; but, in their
leisure hours, are in earnest with their preparations,
though in rather different lines. Frank is looking
up and sorting out all the books in the house; and
has petitioned mother so earnestly to allow him to
take lessons in drawing and perspective, that she
has consented, and he is really making rapid pro-
gress in this accomplishment,

Charlie, true to his native propensity, asked old



~ 1%
ee i



a - ;

a ae eS a ee ae
PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 33



Captain Stetson if he would “teach him to Jire agun ;”
and the old gentleman has undertaken to Initiate him
in the mysteries of holding both gun and rifle, and
shooting with the same. At first, mother objected
to this, thinking he might be troublesome ; and,
indeed, she felt that he was too young and impulsive
to be trusted with sueh dan crous articles; but, upon
his passing his solemn word never to touch them
without Captain Stetson’s leave, and quoting General
Washington’s speech about the hatchet, “TI cannot
tell a lie, mother,” she gave her consent. At her
request, I made it a point to be present during hig
first and second days’ exercise, that I might look
after him; but I found the responsibility of the
employment had sobered his little wild head, and
that if I continued to be with him, (which I was
inclined to do,) it would be to take advantage of the
instruction of so experienced a sportsman as Captain
Stetson for myself. He meanwhile says, and, I be-
lieve, he means what he says, “that it is a pleasure
to him to have us come.”

Annie took me up into her sunny little room, yes-
terday, that I might see how nicely she had put up
and labelled the garden and flower seeds. She told
me that she was making some bags to put the larger
seeds in. She really seems better and brighter for
the prospect of the change. She has promised Willie
a bag for his marbles, is to make a travelling dress
for. Alice’s doll, has helped Frank cover his books,
34 LIFE IN THE WEST.



and I heard Charles tell her that he should want a
large flannel bag made, with a strap to go over the
shoulder, for his game.

As for Willie and Alice, their arrangements would
be more apparent, and their success more complete,
if they did not pull to pieces something that they
have before done to finish what they are now doing.
But they are well, and their bright, happy faces and
pleasant words help us all along.

Cousin Susan is with us; and, since she consented
to accompany us, Mary has been as full of anticipa-
tion as the rest of us. She goes about singing all
the day, helping first one and then another in their
plans. Cousin Susan said, laughingly, that she
must have a trade before she went, as a resource
against a day of want. We told her that she could
teach school there, but she said, “No, that was
Mary’s calling ;” and she goes now, every day, to
sew with Miss Dearborn, and learns how to make
bonnets and cut dresses; and, when that is over, she
says that she will not say she is ready to go until
she has also learned how to cut and make clothes
for us boys. Before we finish, we are likely to have
every trade in the family. I hope these plans will
all meet with your approbation, and that you will
soon be at home to tell us so.

All send their best love to you. Mother wishes
to add a postcript, and Willie says, “ Ask father to




PREPARATIONS FOR REMOVAL. 85



let us know, right away, whether we are to be Buck-
eyes, Wolverines, or Hoosiers ?”
Your affectionate son, |
; Roperr.

My DEAR HusBanp :—“ Mother’s postscript” is i
only to say, that a Mr. Glover has made an offer ae
the farm here, and for the homestead, which your
brother thinks a very advantageous one for us. I
send his letter with this. We are all well. Robert ¥
has given you a very detailed account of our move-
ments and employments ; but he has not added what
my heart prompts me to say, that our children are
our treasures—good, obedient, and loving. May we
not claim for them the promise which belongs to
them that honour father and mother! And may it
not be to us a token, a providential omen of success
in our undertaking ? |

Your’s, ever.


a

86 LIFE IN THE WEST.

CHAPTER ‘IIL.

NOTES OF WARNING.

THE winter was past and gone, with all its cold
storms and piercing winds, its heavy snows and blus-
tering tempests. The noble Connecticut, for three
months “in icy fetters bound,” was released, and
its blue waters were floating calmly on towards the
ocean, glistening in the bright sunshine, or gently
rippled by the passing breeze. The birds, in noisy
companies, were returning from their winter quar-
ters. By the sides of fences, and about sunny door-
steps, little delicate tufts of grass were starting, fresh
and green; and the garden-borders were gay with
bright pinks and daffodils, mingled with the crocus
and snowdrop.

Spring had come; and an early spring it was.
“Tt could not last,” and ‘One swallow does not
make a summer:” so the weatherwise ones said,
and shook their heads; but it did last; and if, by
swallows, they meant beautiful, warm, sunshiny
days, there were a dozen of these, following each
other in rapid succession. It was safe now te pro-

I ee

o- ‘
_
ee a ee





ad ee
NOTES OF WARNING. 37



phesy an early season, for it was already there; and —

bustle and life it brought with it. Oh! how much
out-of-doors playing had the Laurelton children to
do! How many boys there were, who, under the
“influence of that balmy vernal air, were happy in
their sports! How many little groups of school-

fellows loitered, on their way home, to exchange the
pleasant words that sprung from their light, merry
hearts! Not less busy were the older people.
' Merchants had taken in the red and green flannel
hangings about their doors, and put, in’their place,
the bright calicoes and brighter ribbons. Garden-
ing tools were in demand, and the farmers were
looking after their ploughs and harrows, wondering

yif it was too early to plant their fields; while busy .»

+ housewives were busily making ready for the sum-
/ mer, with their white curtains laid out to bleach in
_ the sunshine,

> Amidst all this, there was one family who rejoiced
/ most heartily in the early opening of the season ; and
» that was Mr. Moreton’s. He had returned early in
‘January from his Western journey, having found
and purchased a farm in Indiana > and, unlike most
New-Englanders, was contented not to go as far as
steam could carry him,.

This farm consisted: of half a section of good land,
partly lying on a small prairie, and partly wooded.
The location was healthy; the distance from the
village of Lakeland, about two miles. Lakeland

*
|
|
|
|



es

88 - LIFE IN THE WEST.



“wag a county- -seat, and was, itself, a thriving inte. —

rior Village, containing between three and four hun-
dred inhabitants, who had been brought there from
many countries, impelled by diverse motives, and
governed by various tastes and habits; so that it
was not strange that there should be exceedingly
opposite characteristics in society, as it regarded its —
moral and intellectual state. Some of those wants —
and necessities which it had at first seemed indispen-
sable to provide for, Mr. Moreton found he should be —
obliged to give up; for the supply of others he must
wait; and for some of them he was ready to labour —
and ae with those among whom he was to live;
so that it was with hope for the future, and a strong |
determination to help on the ‘good time coming,” §
rather than with the feeling that every thing was |
right already, that he concluded to locate himself at
Lakeland. But we must leave the little village, with
all its privileges and deficiencies, for another chapter,
and go back to our friends, who were rejoicing in the
early spring, that was so auspicious for their journey.
By the last of April; their preparations for .re-
moval were completed, and they were about ready to
start. The younger children were, at times, impa-
tient at their delay, and pbert and Henry felt, ~
every fine day, that it was time lost to remain any
longer. But there were still many last things to be
dom@: articles to be disposed of; friends to see}
good-byes to be spoken. It sil not be accom:


NOTES OF WARNING. 39 .



plished hastily and well; and, with Mr. Moreton, a
thing that was not done well was not considered
well done. sti :
_ Another reason for delay was, tuat, having con-
‘cluded to travel with their household goods, it be-
‘came necessary and desirable to know that the dif:
ferent lines of transportation had ‘completed their
‘summer arrangements, before they left their New-
England home; otherwise, hindrances that were
anpleasant might arise, and protract the time spent
pon the journey. |

To Mr. and Mrs. Moreton, every day brought with
t its cares and its labours; and, as they had learned,
rom actual experience, to anticipate less from change
han their children did, they did not regret the de-
ay which gave them a few more weeks of pleasant
@otercourse with tried friends and acquaintances.

Wot a few would have persuaded them to remain
Quictly where they were, and many sought, by argu-
Ment and advice, to lead them to reconsider their
termination. ‘ We cannot spare you,” said their
ood pastor, as he and a few of their intimate friends
ere gathered in their little- parlor, a few evenings

efore their departure. “We cannot spare you. I

0 not become reconcilag to your going away. We

eed you here, in our villaze-matters, in our social

atherings, in our dhurch-meetings, in the sanctuary,

he Sabbath-school, and our pleasant prayer-meet-

gs. We shall miss you in all these. Has not
; 4 Ne

















40 LIFE IN THE WEsT.



God given you a work to do here, and why should:
you seek another? Or why should you geek for _
greater blessings than he has here bestowed upon
you?” “a |

‘“T have no reason to leave my New-England
home to seek for blessings or mercies,” replied Mr,
Moreton. Our lot has been cast in a pleasant place,
‘Yet, regret as I may the separation from my friends,
Tam convinced that it is better for us to go. If I
do but little good at the West, my children will have |
been brought up there, and, as Western men and
women, may make amends for al] my deficiencies.”

There was a brother of Mr. Moreton’s, who, from a
the first, had discouraged the idea. of the family
going West; and he, half replying to Mr. Moreton,
half soliloquizing, said—

“ But you will all be sick, and either die in that’
climate, or else drag on a miserable life, with broken
Constitutions and impaired health.”

“Not quite"so bad as that, I hope,” said Dr. :
Newton, who had Just arrived, « No, indeed!” |
said he, laying aside his Over-coat, and drawing
‘Rearer the fire. af! While journeying West, last
summer, I found, to my entire satisfaction, that
there is reason to believe. the climate had been
much belied.”

“You will hardly assert that it can be called a ©
healthy country, though ?” observed the pastor.

“ With the exception of fever and ague, I could |


A

NOTES OF WARNING. ‘41

oe? (dee der. OS er



find no disease that might be said to belong to the
climate exclusively. Congestive fevers and other
sore will spread over villages here, as well as

there, and many will die.” es
_ “But there are notoriously unhealthy regions
4 throughout the West 2”

‘‘T know that well,” replied Dr. Newton. “A
"swamp that is filled with rank vegetation, or a slug-
; gish stream, with its green, slimy waters, will cause



/no wise man will have any thing to do. Rich land,
great crops, or abundant harvests will never com-
pensate forgthe loss of bodily vigour. But all the
» West is not a low, swampy, marshy country. There
are dry, elevated lands; there are clear, lively streams;
_ ther@ are rich, fertile fields, stretching for miles and
* hundreds of miles, upon which the sun shines day
_ by day, and about which no deadly miasma hovers ;
_ and which, if not as healthful as the poorer lands
_ here in this rocky country, yet offer no hindrances
to those who would settle them, on account of their
unhealthiness.”’

“Why is the proportion of dg@ths greater there
than here ?” asked Mr. Alfred Moreton.

“‘T can tell you one reason that might make it so,
though I am not sure that it is true. A large pro-
portion of the emigrants going West are in circum-
stances of great poverty and want. Many of them
have already become SE for disease, by a long

_ fevers and other diseases. But with such localities te
+

42 LIFE IN THE WEST.



and wearisome voyage. ‘Their means are barely —

sufficient to enable them to reach their destination

and purchase their farms. They must necessarily —

suffer from privation and exposure. Their food ig
poorly prepared, and they are not guarded from
changes of weather. It is no wonder that they
sicken. Then bad nursing and the imprudent use
of powerful medicines prolong their sicknesses, and
often death kindly ends the struggle. Then, another

class of emigrants are healthy, stout young people,
he :

from the Eastern States. They are, through igno-
rance of sickness, imprudent, as regards exposure,
and only desire to make money fast. If there are

facilities for carrying on a mill, what do they think ~

about the marsh beyond? Just nothing at all! And
the richer and blacker the earth, so much the Mnore
promise of great harvests. They are in haste to be
rich ; and will throw their lives, which no wealth
could purchase, under that J uggernaut of Christian
lands—the god of money—for the sake of gain. If

they are crushed, must the climate take all the

blame ?”

‘There must biiisomething to compensate for the
giving up of their homes, and to pay for the.loss of Ni

luxuries and comforts that a man relinquishes when
he leaves civilized life and goes into the woods.

What would you have this something to be, if not |

gain in wealth ?”
“Freedom from heavy duties imposed by govern-

Ree.
ee

%

a
¢

+

»
—* .
iat iit ta —— _»





NOTES OF WARNING. 43



. ment, and the blessing of that equality which is
_ recognised by our Constitution, the poor emigrant
. from foreign countries would consider an equivalent
for all he has given up. Add to this the liberty to
_ worship God in his own way, without molestation or
_ fear; and, if he has suffered, as most likely he will
_ have done, he will be satisfied. To others, there is
_ the comfort of having a little money go far in secur-

\; ing to their families the necessaries of life, and of

: feeling that poverty is no gnenine, ”

i “ But these are a poor man’s blessings; and bless-
ings [ acknowledge them to be. Yet, why should
' aman whése education has fitted him to move in a
_ large circle, whose habits are those formed by con-
. ventional usages, and whose tastes are refined and
_ intéllectual—why should he leave a home, such as
we enjoy, go far away from all his social and reli-
gious privileges, to a place where his very acquire-
» ments and knowledge will be a hindrance to him,
_ his tastes and habits only sources of annoyance, be-
cause ungratified, and where a strong back anda
stout arm are the only personal ee that can avail
for his help ?”

‘Why do we need the beall corn for seed, and
why do we seek a‘field to plant it in that has lain
fallow and unused? At the West, every well-regu-
lated family is like seed sown in good ground.
Their example cannot fail to influence others.

Oftentimes, those who could not be driven to indus-
4*








2 es et i ee de
| 44 LIFE IN THE WEST.



try and sobriety, can be lured to both by the sight
of the prosperity which follows good habits, as evi-
dence in their fayour. A Christian family, if con-
sistent, can do still more. The good they do is upon
a sure foundation; and God has wisely ordered it
that such families shall be scattered here and there.
As to the objection, that education and accomplish-
ments are lost there, I do not agree with you. I
believe that there is no gift of God to the intellect
of man, and no acquirement or accomplishment,
which may not be made as available there as here
for the promotion of happiness and prosperity.
And, while I may not go there myselff I honour
those who are willing to go, and who have the cou-
rage to enable them to meet the trials and’ disap-
pointments that a removal will bring.” ¥
“TI suppose you are right,” replied the pas-
tor; ‘and, unwilling as I am to lose our friends
from our circle, I must be satisfied to see them de-
part, and bid them God-speed. But I do not often
have a greater trial to my own will, than that which
I felt when writing these for you ;’ Clad he laid upon
the table certificatéiiof church-membership for Mr.
and Mrs. Moreton, Mary, and Henry, and letters
of recommendation to the care and good offices of
any church to which they might be presented ;

“especially,” he added, “as you will now be as

sheep without a shepherd.”
“Shall we not still be under the care of the great
NOTES OF WARNING. 45



Shepherd, and does he suffer any ill to befall those
with whom he has entered into covenant?” asked
Mrs. Moreton. ‘‘ You will, yourself,implore for us
his guidance ; and, ‘under the covert of his wings,’
we shall be safe there as here.”

It was not without a struggle that the good pas-
tor yielded up, to what he considered a life of toil
and danger, these precious members of his own

® flock. As he departed, it was with great emotion

that he clasped the extended hands of Mr. and Mrs.
Moreton within his own, and, in solemn, earnest
tones, tremulous with feeling, repeated the beautiful
scriptural benediction : |

‘The Lord bless thee, and keep thee. The Lord
make his face shine upon thee, and be gracious

+ untothee. The Lord lift up his countenance upon

thee, and give thee peace.”*

* Num. vi. 24—26.


46 LIFE IN THE WEST.

CHAPTER IV.
DR. NEWTON.

“T, Too, came with a parting gift, accompanied
with a dose of advice,” said Dr. Newton, as the door
closed upon their beloved minister. “ My work is
done, as you desired, Mrs. Moreton.”

And saying this, he placed upon the table a small,
square mahogany box, which he opened with a po-
lished key, and displayed a small, but well-selected
stock of medicines.

“T have added to this,” he continued, “as my
gift, this little manual of medicine; and my advice
to you is to take as little of the contents of the box
as possible; for,” he added, playfully, “ medicine
without a doctor is often worse than no medicine at
all. If you find a good doctor in Lakeland, throw
away or burn up the book, as you please.”

‘‘T cannot burn up the recollection of valuable
hints that I have received from you, Dr. Newton;
and, if we are really sick, I shall doubtless rely
more upon what I have already learned than upon
the book or the new doctor.”

“But you are not going to be sick, I hope,”

'

y
?

t
a SS

DR. NEWTON. AT



replied Dr. Newton. “ A family of healthy boys
and girls, like yours, brought up to love habits of
regularity and order, with little inclination to pam-
per their appetites, and supplied with the means to
‘sure a comfortable, wholesome living, will not
often be visited with any distressing sickness. Do
you hear, boys?” he added; ‘don’t think that you
can spend your summer evenings out of doors, or go
tramping through the wet swamps and woods before

- sunrise, to shoot the poor little birds. And you,

Miss Mary, must give up sentimental rambling by
moonlight, even if those old forest-haunts’ bew
and entice you. Let the sun give the
cooking, before you take too much of it.”





“Tt was you, Dr. Newton, that first taught me Fe

that

‘Early to bed, and early to rise,
Is the way to be healthy, wealthy, and wise.

“You are duller than I think, Miss Mary,” an-
swered Dr. Newton, “if you can see no difference
between not going out of doors and not getting up
early. It will do Robert and Henry good to chop
a little wood in the wood-house or work in the barn ;
and I expect that your talents will be devoted to the
preparing a good breakfast when they come in.
Some of these days, I will come and partake of one
with you.”

Exclamations of; “Will you, indeed?” ‘Oh!
48 LIFE IN THE WEST.



will you?” and “How happy it will make us!”
broke from the lips of all.

“Yes, if I live, I will certainly pay you a visit,
after: you are fairly settled; but mind, Miss Mary!
I must have good light bread—none of your warm
biscuits or griddle-cakes! I must have a chamber,
too, to sleep in. I donot like bed-rooms on the first
floor, especially in that Western country.» They
cannot be as airy or well ventilated as upper rooms,
and there is always a dampness about them, which
comes from the ground. Let the sun shine into
_, your house a part of every day. Be regular in your

work, as well asof rest. In eating, drink-

id sleeping, live, as nearly as possible, as you
have been accustomed to; and if the sunshine of
faith and trust in a good Providence warm your
hearts and lighten your path, you will have the best
preventives of sickness that I know of.”

“Willa contented mind keep off fever and ague?”
asked Robert.

“Tt will help you to bear it patiently; and that
is a great gain, if you ever have it. But I ama
doctor, not a preacher, Robert; and I tell you,
plainly, that if you are neither rash nor imprudent,
you may live many years, and never suffer from it at
all. Perhaps, if it should come, you will find that it
is not so very hard, after all, to bear.”

“You are an encouraging friend, Dr. Newton,”
said Mr. Moreton; “and, if all our neighbours








eS <<<

DR. NEWTON. 49



viewed this matter of emigration.as you do, we
might be saved some of those fears and anxieties
concerning the future that, I confess, they some-
times compel me to feel. But we are fairly com-
mitted for the change, now, and I have no desire to
imitate Lot’s wife, and ‘look back.’ ”

“‘ Nor do I believe you will have any thing to re-
gret, after you are once there. I am no prophet,
but I think I foresee for you all many happy and

i prosperous days. If wishes could bring them to

you, they certainly would be yours. ‘The same

_ hand which has directed you thus far, in making

the change, will guide you step by step, and all you
need will He supply from his abundance.. We ean
ask nothing more or better than his guardianship, ‘

_ for you, who go, or for ourselves, who remain. Now

a ere

for your plans: what are they ?”
“We propose to let Henry and Robert start early
next week, with our boxes and chests, for Albany,

_ by water. As soon as we hear of their arrival at
_ that place, we shall join them as expeditiously as
_ possible. Then all take the canal, and go to Buffalo.

From there, across Lake Erie, to whichever port we

_ shall decide to be most desirable—Toledo, Monroe,

_ or Detroit. There we shall fit ourselves out with
_ what are called ‘ emigrant fixings,’ and travel south-

west to our place of destination.”

“ The last part of your journey will be the most
fatiguing.’
50 LIFE IN THE WEST.



“T am aware of that,” said Mrs. Moreton; “and
yet I enter into the feelings and anticipations of the
children, in thinking that it will be the pleasantest
of all; for it will have the charm of novelty, with
all its freshness.”

‘There is something so delightful in the thought
of beginning life afresh,” said Dr. Newton, “it
wakens up in my mind an almost childish enthu-
siasm, and I really should like to go with you; but
my good wife says, nay; and, while her aged parents
live, we ought not to give it a moment’s thought.”

Still later in the evening, Mr. and Mrs. Moreton,
with their three older children, were gathered around
the little blaze that faintly flickered on the hearth.
A large part of the furniture belonging to the room
had been removed, and it contained only such articles
as were absolutely necessary for daily use. Thoughts
of the friends who had just parted from them had
taken the place of anticipations for the future; and
their words of interest and advice were the subject
of their thoughts. Mary was the first to speak.

“Father,” said she, “‘ why is it that Dr. Newton
and Uncle Alfred take such different views of life
at the West? They have both been there, and are
both clear-headed and intelligent men; yet one says
we shall prosper and be happy, while the other pro-
phesies misery and sickness !’”.

“The two men are of different temperaments —

naturally, Mary. Dr. Newton is active, hopeful,

_ cathont

ea a aa

Be:

~s ae ae
DR. NEWTON. ' 51



bound down by no habits of luxury which have be-
come. necessary to his comfort, and ‘possesses good
heal Then, he is what is termed a self- made
| man, and is accustomed to meet and to conquer dif-
ficulties. Your uncle is in feeble health, and his
home has, ever since his youth, been supplied with
all that wealth can purchase. Every want has been
_met, and every wish gratified ; while his love for us
"makes his fears the greater, lest we should suffer.
Look about this room, now, and think how differ-
ently the two men would regard it. One would
think that it had every thing in it that we required,
because there were tables, carpet, and chairs; the
Jother would deem it unfurnished and comfortless,
because the sofa, rocking-chairs, and astral-lamp were
gone.” |
> “But which thinks rightly about it?’ asked
Robert.
“T have that opnfidenotl in the judgment of both
which leads me to adopt modified views of both
opinions, and endeavour to strike the medium be-
tween them. Doubtless, we shall find that, in many
~ things, their estimates of our pleasures and trials are
_ correct; but it is not necessary that we look through
J the actin of the one or the other, while we have
_ our own honest eyes. There are few troubles in
this world which a habit of looking upon the bright
side will not lighten or disperse ; and there are sunny
spots in everybody’s life, if there is not the dispo-
5


52 LIFE IN THE WEST. PE



sition to overshadow them with the clouds of de-
spondency and doubt.”

“But do not strong hopes and ardent expectations
often become disappointments ?”

“Certainly, they do; for such hopes and expect.
tions are not ordinarily based upon reason. There
is a something, which we call common sense, im-
planted in the mind of man. Thisis given to us as
a guide, and, through experience and education, is,
or ought to be, daily improving. If, contrary to its
teachings, we let our imaginations run away with our
hopes, we ought not to complain if the realities of
life will not keep pace with them. If we found our
hopes upon what we know to be fixed facts and
principles, and hold them (as dependent creatures
should hold all they possess) subject to. the will of
an all-wise Dispenser, there is little fear of great
and heart-crushing disappointments.”

“Then I suppose,” said Mary, “that when my
common sense, which has been educated by experi-
ence, tells me that, if I sit up any later to-night, I
_ Shall be tired and sleepy to-morrow, I had better
obey its counsels, and seek my pillow, notwith-
standing my hopes would lead me to consult my
pleasure, by talking longer.”

“Quite a timely, practical illustration,” said her
father; “and I, to encourage so laudable an exer-

cise of your common sense, will light you a candle.”” © .
And they laughingly bade each other “Good —

night !”
eS
y UNCLE ALFRED'S GIFT. 53

bw

CHAPTER V.

UNCLE ALFRED’S GIFT.

_« A qirr! a gift!” shouted Frank, as he entered
the sitting-room, the next day. “ A gift to each
of us children, from Uncle Alfred, of which am the

bearer !” |

“Tt must be a small one,” said Robert; “for you
bear nothing in your hand !”

“But I do in my pocket, Robert ;” and he took,
with great care, from it, a small package, upon
which was written, “To be equally divided between

, my nephews and nieces.”

- Tt did not take many minutes to undo the fasten-
ings, which enclosed a sum of money, upon counting
which it was found to give to each the amount of
five dollars.

“Where did you get this, Frank?” asked Mr.
Moreton.

“Uncle asked me what I would like as a parting

gift from him, and I answered that I could not de-
cide without thinking awhile; for that you, father,

_ had often told me never to make up my mind in a

_ hurry. Then he went to his desk, got this money,
54 LIFE IN THE WEST. &



and gave it to me; and said that I must tell you all
that he sent it, and wished each of us to choose for
ourselves some’ present that would please us, as a
remembrance of him,”

“We hardly need it for that purpose,” said Mary.
“Uncle Alfred will not be forgotten, I am sure.”

‘J will tell you what I shall buy,” said Frank to
Mary: “a nice little writing-desk, for you and me.
My money will just pay for one.”

“Then, Frank, if I am to use your writing-desk,
my money shall go as a subscription to some maga-
zine that we shall both like to read.”

“T shall buy a pony,” said Willie, “with an ele-
gant bridle and saddle; and, beside” —

‘There was a burst of merriment from the assem-
bled children, as Willie spoke. . It lasted but a
moment, for Mr, Moreton’s voice rose.above it.

“Your plan is too magnificent for your mo ey,
my son, and you will have to give it up. Five
dollars is a great sum for a boy like you to possess ;
but it will buy neither a pony nor a saddle.”

Discomfited as Willie was, and annoyed by the
mischievous glances of his brothers and sisters, his
good nature did not fail, and, laughing with the
rest, he only said—

“You will all lose many a good ride, then ; that
is all.”

“Why don’t you buy some candy?” asked
Alice.
UNCLE ALFRED’S GIFT. 55

«

Little Alice had not relished the laugh at her
brother’s expense, and unconsciously took the
readiest: way to divert attention from him; for they
were all in that excited state of mind, whe every
incident would furnish food for gleeful merriment.

“Your plan is no better than Willie’s, my dar-
ling,” said her father, caressing her. “While he
aims at too much, you go to the other extreme, and
would get too little for your money.”

‘What can we buy, then?” asked Alice, impa-
tiently.

“Nothing, to-night, Alice; but you can keep
your money until you know what you want. There
is no necessity of spending it for several days, and
you can think about it.”

‘‘T have a plan to propose,” said Robert; ‘and
I think it will please Uncle Alfred, as well as our-
selves. Let.us, each one, contribute a dollar apiece,
for a newspaper fund; and then, one or two dollars,
as we please, for a book fund; then let us appoint
committees to buy,some books, that are new, for our
family library, and to decide upon a newspaper and
magazine, for which to subscribe for the year.”

‘“‘T like that,” said Frank.

‘We may take one or two newspapers; and they
will come every week, like visits from Uncle Al-
fred’’—

Here Willie and Frank, instigated by Charlie,

clapped their hands, and cried, ‘ Hear! hear !”
5*


56 LIFE IN THE WEST.
ig



“With the rest of the money, we can each buy
something which pleases us, to keep as tokens of
Unele Alfred’s remembrance of us } Or we can use
it as spending-money ; or, dividing it, can use it for
both purposes.”

There was not a dissenting voice ; and when, in
regular business-like order, the vote was taken, it
was declared unanimous. Robert and Frank were
appointed a committee to select books; Mary and
Henry to decide upon the newspapers ; and here, as
well as elsewhere, may we mention, that faithfully
did they fulfil their offices, making such a judicious
selection as pleased every one, and, through the
long winter evenings, adding to their pleasure, as
well as to their knowledge.

There were little after-scenes, between the differ-
ent members of that family, to which we will be
witnesses. .......

“This breaks up my plan, Mary,” said Frank ;
“for I have not money enough left to get even a
plain writing-desk.”

“But, together, we have, Frank; and I was just
thinking how much pleasanter it would be to really
buy it together, so that it might scem equally to
belong to both.” ......, |

“Dear Mary, will you go to the store with me,
to-morrow, that I may buy some silks and worsteds,
and other little things? for I must tell you my
secret—now I shall be able to make that pincushion
UNCLE ALFRED’S GIFT. 57



for mother, against next New Year; and, beside, I
shall have time to do many other little pieces of
work, while you are all busy with the new house,
and I shall be alone.”

Mary willingly consented ; and Annie’s dark eyes
brightened, and her cheek flushed, with the hope of
being able to give pleasure to those she loved, by the
use of her needle. ...--- |

“Father,” said William, as he sat contemplating
the pictures upon his bank-bill, “ why does the
Bible say that money is the root of all evil? It
brings us much pleasure, and helps us to obtain
many good things.” ry

“‘The Bible does not say that money is the root |
of allevil, my son. It says the love of money is;
and it is an important distinction. Money (gold,
silver, and copper coin) is our medium of circulation.
With it, (or with bank-notes, which, for convenience,
have taken the place of coins,) we can procure any
article which we may desire, giving it in exchange
for such things as we think will add to our comfort,
our pleasure, or our convenience. This you know
very well; and you know as well that money or
riches are unequally divided. From some, God has
seen fit to withhold them; while to others he has
committed an overflowing abundance. Why he has
done this, we do not know, any more than we know

_why he gives one health and another sickness, one

happiness and another trouble. A wise man, and a
58 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Christian, will believe that God has some purpose in
this, and that these differences do not come from
chance; and will be contented and happy with such
a portion of this world’s goods as his own honest
efforts shall secure to him. There are others, to
whom a want of money is a great evil; for it
awakens in their hearts such strong desires for its
possession, and such love for it, that they will be
ready to envy or hate those who possess it; they
become covetous and miserly, from setting an inor-
dinate value upon it; they become grasping and
dishonest, from their determination to be rich; and
some will cheat, lie, steal, or even murder, for the
purpose of attaining it. With such consequences
resulting from the love of money, is it strange that
it should be called ‘the root of all evil ? ”

“But is it not a good thing to be rich, father ?”

“Yes, my son; money is a blessing, and should
be sought after, as we seek after other blessings. But
its possession often leads to evil: for instance, if it
makes its possessor proud or haughty, or hard-
hearted and uncharitable, or if it leads him to be
wise in his own conceit. It is its abuse that leads
to these consequences. It may also be abused, by

scattering it with a heedless, thoughtless hand, or |

by spending it for that which will do harm to our-
selves or others. If we desire to be rich to gain the

admiration of others, or wish to excite their envy, it.

becomes to us a root of evil, which we may well fear


OO a < ae

;

UNCLE ALFRED'S GIFT. 59



to have increase and grow in our hearts. But, on the
other hand, if we desire it only to gratify our natural
wants, to add to our innocent pleasures, to give us
the means to make others happy, and to extend our
power of doing good, we may seek for it earnestly,
and labour for it; and, if God blesses our efforts,
we may and ought to enjoy it, as one of the mercies
with which he has crowned our lives, and which
should be used as we think will best: please him.”

« Robert thought of pleasing Uncle Alfred in his
plan of spending our money, father. Is it in such
a way that every rich man ought to think of pleas-
ing God?”

“Yes, the principle is the same ; and it is a sure
test of gratitude, if the donor’s wishes are consulted
in our thoughts and plans, before making use of his
gifts. Your Uncle Alfred would not think you very
grateful, if you threw away his gift ; neither would
he think you valued it properly, if you should give
it in exchange for what was not of halfvits value.
He would not be pleased, if you spent it for what
would harm you; or even if you should put it away
in your strong-box, and never use it at all. It would
be far more gratifying to him toknow that you made
it add to your pleasures, or did good with it in some
way. Do not you see how you can apply all this
to the case of a rich man’s use of his property, so as
to please and honour God?” :

“JI think I do, sir. I should like to be rich,
60 LIFE IN THE WEsT.



though! It seems go pleasant to have every thing
One wants, just when they want it. I think I should
try to spend my money so as to get a great deal of
good from it.”

“We can tell about that better when we see how
you spend your five dollars.”

“T must try to remember to get something which
I think will please Uncle Alfred, please myself, be
good to use, or good to keep.”

So thought and so said Willie Moreton, as he
retired. And, as for his brother Charlie, who sat
near by and heard this—what were his thoughts ?

“My mind is made up. I must buy Bob Palmer’s
dog! Bob offered it to Samuel Frink for a dollar.
That is it, exactly. It will please Uncle Alfred,
who loves dogs. It will please me. It will be a
good thing to keep, and a good thing to use, plea-
sant to own, and very usefull” And, with high
hopes of future pleasure, it was with difficulty he
refrained from waking Willie, to tell him all about
it. With visions of Carlo dragging Annie on a
little sled, and of Carlo in the woods with him, he
laid his head upon his pillow, feeling as if he had
nearly reached the pinnacle of human happiness,




ey



THE DEPARTURE. 61

CHAPTER VI.
THE DEPARTURE.

“Tr really seems as if we were fated never to
start!” said Frank, impatiently. ‘I am tired of
thinking and talking about going, and never getting
off !”

“Tf you are tired, Frank, who are only a looker-
on, think what father and mother must be, who
have all the care and so much of the labour! I
thought, last evening, when I saw how tired they
were, that they were trying every day to do more
than they ought.”

Frank was fretful, and Mary’s reply fell upon his
ear like a reproof, to which he had no heart to
listen.

“You are all just alike,” said he; “slow, slow—

_ never ready !”

But hardly had he given utterance to these words’ P

| of impatience, before he regretted, and would have

recalled them, for he saw tears in Mary’s eyes. At

first, he thought he would take no notice of them,

turn away, and make believe that he did not see
them, He had tried this plan many times before,
62 LIFE IN THE WEST.



but had never found it to answer the purpose of
satisfying his own conscience. This he remem-
bered, and his better feelings prevailed.

“JT did not mean just so, Mary; but I do wish
we could get off! Jam so tired of waiting !”’

“So are we all, Frank; and the only way to con-
tent ourselves is to keep busy. Suppose, now, you
draw a picture of the old house and place, before we
go. That will be better than getting tired of doing
nothing, and then complaining about it.’ |

Some of our readers may be of Frank’s opinion, and
think that we are protracting our account of prepara-
tion, without regard to their feelings; and it may bea
relief to them to know that on the second Monday
of May, 18—, there was a final breaking up in the
homestead of Mr. James Moreton. Before the
evening of that day, they had said good-bye to all -
the near neighbours, and taken a farewell of all the
old haunts of their childish sports. They had gone
over the now empty chambers, even into the garret,
and looked out, for the last time, from the little
dormer-window, upon the fair fields and the old or-
chard beneath. They had been to the wood-house ;
the little room that they used for a workshop had
been visited; the old red barn, the scene of many a
noisy romping frolic, had received a last, parting visit ;
they had gazed once more into the depths of the
well, and taken a merry bumper in honour of the
old place, and pledged themselves, in its cold, clear
THE DEPARTURE. 63



waters, to stand by the new home in Hoosier-land :
and now they were ready to go.

Yet there were mingled emotions of pain and
sorrow with all their golden anticipations of the
West; strange feelings, in which hope, wonder, and
curiosity struggled with the tender grief at parting
from what was dear to them, and hallowed by the
love of childhood. The past was as a pleasant reality !
What would be the future? Would its promises
be fulfilled? Were its bright shadows to end in
dreams, or would they too become real? Who
could tell ? | |

Sunset found them all scattered. Henry and
Robert were gone, and, with them, the last of the
boxes, the trunks, the barrels and the chests. The key
had been delivered to the new owner of the place,
and the remaining members of the family were
already divided among friends and relatives, for a
visit of the few days that must intervene before they
should hear from Robert.

It matters not that we should follow them through
the detail of leave-taking. They were beloved and
honoured; their destination was far away; they
were not to return; and it was not strange that
there should be some sad hearts, some tears shed,
sone expressions of regret, as well as of love, and
of kindly-spoken words, accompanying pleasant acts
of neighbourly attention and friendly interest. But

‘all this we must leave untold.

* 6
64 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Nor will we dwell upon the incidents of their
journey. It is true that the rapid movements of
the rail-cars, the slow, monotonous progress of the
canal-boats, the swift course of the noble steamer,
that, “like a thing of life,” bore them quickly over
the clear, green waters of Lake Erie, were alike full
of novelty and interest to them. It is true that
there was no end to the questions of the children—
no limit to their desires for information. It is true
that, the very first day, such wonderful events tran-
spired, and such marvellous objects were seen, that
the record of them, in Willie’s coarse hand, threat-
ened to fill every leaf of his journal; and that to
tell which was the strangest, most curious, and most
worthy of note, he thought, would puzzle even his
father. It is true that, to Mary, Robert, and Henry,
their way was strewn with pleasures, and that each
day’s experience was crowded with thoughts and
feelings which could not fail to be awakened upon
their first long journey from home. Intelligent and
observing, how could it be otherwise? They were
passing through scenes new to their eyes, but fami-
liar to their minds, places of which they knew the
history, and gazing upon objects which they had
seen pictured forth.

A happy, merry party they were !—the little ones
all the happier for being guided by certain rules,
which were strictly observed. Mrs. Moreton was
free from the anxiety, now that she had directed. them.
THE DEPARTURE. ~ 65



to stay away from dangerous parts of the boats. Mr.
Moreton and the older brothers were never inter-
rupted in any conversation, to answer their curious
questions ; for they knew that, as soon as their con-
versation was over, they would find either of them
ready to reply patiently to their inquiries.

Then, they were never wearied in watching
the huge iron shaft of the steamboat, as it rose
and sunk. How earnestly they gazed, with wonder-
ing eyes, at the cumbrous machinery, though they
could not comprehend its workings! How they
delighted to take a run along the tow-path of the
canal, and almost lose their breath in their en-
deayours to keep up with the horses!. How full of |
mystery was that first passing through a canal-lock,
with its rushing sound of waters, its darkness, and
its peculiar motion! How they laughed, as they
crouched down upon the deck, bowing far lower than
necessary, at the sound of, ‘Bridge! Bridge!’ And,
when ranged upon their hammock-beds at night, how
merrily their little heads and bright faces peeped
out, finding great delight in their very discomfort !

Their delays—what were they, to them all, but so
many opportunities of seeing different towns and
villages? Then, who could tire while watching the
white, foamy track by which they marked their way
through the clear lake, or feel weary of gazing upon
the white caps that adorned each rising wave? Who
could think that to be out of sight of land was no-
66 LIFE IN THE WEST.



thing wonderful, or that, if they neared the shore,
the little villages or towns, or even the woods them-
selves, were not worth looking at? Not they! And
older travellers gazed upon them, and envied them
the possession of their fresh young hearts, which
could find pleasure and interest in all they saw,
while they admired their considerate, quiet atten-
tion to each other’s wishes, and their evident desire
that all should enjoy what gave them so much de-
light. And, in their hearts, they blessed them, and
wished them all prosperity on their course, as they
witnessed, day by day, the kind actions that spoke
_ 80 loudly of the bond of love which united them as
a family, and through which they were happy them-
selves and the diffusers of happiness to others.

Too quickly did the days fly by; and it required
all the eager anticipation of youth, and the expecta-
tion of something still more delightful, to reconcile
them to the thought that their journey was so far
accomplished.


a.
Qo

JOURNEYING THROUGH THE WOODS. 67

CHAPTER VII.
JOURNEYING THROUGH THE WOODS.

Ir was a bright morning in June—“ leafy June,”
the month of flowers and foliage—that three large
emigrant wagons were standing before the hotel-door
in The first, to which four horses were at-
tached, was capacious as a small room. Arches of i
ash saplings were bent over its top, and upon them
was stretched an oiled canvas, of a yellow colour,
which contrasted pleasantly with the new green
paint upon its sides and wheels. Upon the floor,
sweet, fresh straw had been scattered like a carpet.
In the front, beneath its covering, seats were ar-
ranged, with springs, and cushioned with folded
quilts and blankets. Beneath these, were boxes
containing stores necessary for daily use, such as
tea, coffee, sugar, salt, etc., and a champagne-bas-
ket, packed with tea-cups and saucers, plates, spoons,



- and knives and forks. Then, beds were neatly tied

up in white coverings, and stowed snugly away in
the far corners, with blankets folded nicely and laid
upon them; thus leaving a semicircular opening in

the rear, which gave free circulation of air, and per-
6*


68 LIFE IN THE WEST.



mitted access to articles otherwise out of reach. This
was the travelling carriage of the Moreton family ;
and it was with some pride that Charles, Frank, and
Willie viewed it, and made known its manifold beau-
ties and conveniences. They gazed upon its strongly-
built wheels, with their heavy spokes and firm tires,
and thought they could never break nor wear out.
More than once they opened the boxes which pro-
jected on each side, between the wheels, to see if,
in the one, had been placed the preparation for
greasing the wheels, and the brush for using it,
and, in the other, if there were nails of all sizes, the
ball of twine, the strips of stout leather, the small
~ eoil of rope, the hammer, saw, and hatchet, with
- other smaller tools. Nothing had been forgotten,
that might be necessary in case of accident; and
the large box, on the back of the vehicle, was filled
with oats, for the horses, while beneath it hung a
huge water-pail, which swung back and forth, swayed
by every motion of the wagon. Their unanimous
verdict was, that ‘‘it was a very complete affair.”
The second wagon was like the first, in size and
in external appearance, but was not new, nor s0
tidily arranged. It was filled with furniture, boxes,
trunks, bundles, and chests, closely packed, and se-
ceurely protected from the weather, leaving only room
for the accommodation of the driver and his com-
panions. This was a hired team, and Robert was ©
to drive it. With him, a carpenter, hired by Mr.
JOURNEYING THROUGH THE WOODS. 69



Moreton to superintend the building of his house,

was going, and a young man, as his assistant, ac-

companied them. The next vehicle contained such
4 a variety of miscellaneous articles, that Willie’s

patience gave out in enumerating them, and he

pronounced them as “too numerous to mention.”

A cooking-stove, pots, kettles, a crate of crockery, bar-

rels of provision aiid sacks of grain, were but a part

of its contents. This was also hired for the journey,

and was to be drawn by six mules, guided by their

owner, Michael Dorrance, an Irishman by birth, but,

for many years, a teamster in the Western country. |.
». He had often been over this same route, and‘Hrank’ * ;
choice was to ride with him, for the sake of —
gathering such information as he might be able to
| give concerning “life in the woods.”

Between these two last carriages, Henry was to
ride on horseback, and, with the aid of a young
man, who went to drive the second wagon back, he
was to guide the movements of two cows, a yoke of
oxen, and half a dozen sheep—no easy matter, to an
inexperienced person, where the road was often but
a track through the woods, and no fences were built,
to serve as restraints upon them, if unruly, or disposed
_ tocrop the herbage beneath the trees. And here

ought to be introduced to our readers, Carlo, Char-
___ lie’s dog, who has been neglected quite too long by

Us, considering that, until now, he had made himself
__ Very troublesome, but important, by his continual

yy


70 LIFE IN THE WEST.



uneasiness and mournful howls, so that “pleasant
to own” was omitted in his master’s summing-up of
the advantages of his purchase. But time and good ©
usage had reconciled him to the idea of emigration ;
and he now trotted contented along by the side
of Henry’s horse, sometimes barking at or biting the
heels of a refractory animal, and, at others, darting
off into the depths of the forest, and returning, in
a few minutes, panting and weary, but wagging his
tail, and looking quite satisfied with the result of
his search.

Every preparation had been made for starting ;
yet no little time was consumed in the getting off,
and the satisfactory settling of themselves in their
new quarters. Even when they did start, they were
so occupied with the novelty of their position, and
with their arrangements for seats, and for a com-
fortable passing of their time, that they hardly no-
ticed the country through which they were travel-
ling.

For the same reason, their progress was slow.
Only fifteen miles were accomplished at sunset, and
then, in rude but decent quarters, they passed the
night.

But, the next morning, the journey was really
commenced in good earnest; for sunrise found them
all up, dressed, and ready for a start. Breakfast
was soon disposed of; but not before they had
gathered themselves together, for family prayer.
JOURNEYING THROUGH THE WOODS. 71



Together they sang their morning hymn of praise
and thanksgiving, and together they commended
themselves to the care of their heavenly Father.

“ We have no right to think God will remember
us, and take care of us, while we forget him. By
the way, as well as within the house, we need his
directing hand. He is the friend we cannot leave—

watchful, loving, and powerful to protect. Let us

thank him for all his goodness to us!”

Thus said and thus felt Mr. Moreton, as the morn-
ing sun rose bright and clear, and they were once
more upon thefr way. ‘The forests lay stretched out
about them, as they proceeded upon their course,

dressed in the fresh, early green of June. Dew-
_ drops, like glistening diamonds, sparkled on the
sprays of grass, and the sweet carollings of birds
- filled the air with melody. No dust had soiled the

fair buds and leaves—no hand had plucked the gay

_ and brilliant blossoms that covered the ground. Too



quiet were those deep woods for fear, too full of
beauty and pleasure for loneliness; and, under these
gentle ministrations, a calm hut determined happi-
ness rose in the hearts of our travellers.

There was something so sweet in that fresh vernal
air, loaded with the fragrance of the early flowers,
so invigorating in its influences, that sadness was
dispelled and weariness forgotten. And the gushes
of melody from the busy birds, in the leafy branches
of the forest-trees, now trilling, now whistling, now

ey
72 LIFE IN THE WEST.



flowing on in soft, continued notes, or interrupted
with the cheerful chatter of the blackbird, or the
discordant cawing of the crow, as the gentle breezes
bore to the ear more distant sounds; who could lis-
ten to these, and not feel that the world about them
was indeed a “ treasure-house of pleasure,” an up-
springing fountain of delight ?

And the small streams that danced joyously along
between their green banks—were they not emblems
of quiet happiness? Or if, in their course, they
spread themselves into little lakes, did they not
shine like burnished silver in the sunlight, and re-
flect the beauty and brightness of the blue heavens
above? Did they not tempt the flying birds to
bathe in the clear waters? Did they not give back
to the gorgeous dragon-fly the image of his: own
beautiful form, as he played above the waves, or
rested, for the moment, upon the ripples ?

And the little swarms of yellow butterflies—were
they not happy in their social companies? The
speckled quails, that, in loving pairs, rustled among
the dry leaves—was there no sympathy for them,
as they sought to find, or make for themselves, a
new home? Was there no bounding of heart, as
‘that fleet deer was seen for the moment, and then
vanished in the covert of the woods?

In the early summer, imagination can hardly
picture more beautiful scenes than those presented
by the Western “oak-openings,” through which, for
JOURNEYING THROUGH THE WOODS. 73



many miles, the path of our travellers lay. The
level surface of the country, permitting the eye to
range to a great distance; the picturesque grouping
or planting of the trees; the spreading formation of
their branches ; their graceful but light foliage, that
admits, at once, the warm sunlight and gentle ze-
phyrs, yet forms an agreeable shade; the absence
of undergrowth ; the winding tras extending in
many directions ; the profuse sprinkling of flowers, —
with brilliant petals,—all tend to awaken emotions
of pleasure in any breast not callous or dead to a
sense of the beautiful. It is as if you entered a
vast park or pleasure-ground, fresh from the hand
of its Maker, where man had neither destroyed nor
» marred the, first impress of God’s manifest care
for the happiness of his creatures; and, in its little
daisy-tufts, that spring by the roadside, as well: as
") in its loftiest trees, the lesson of His existence and
_ ¢ care and protection may be read. ;
There was not a heart but was quick to feel this,
' among the company of emigrants whose fortunes we
. are following; nor one in whose mind were not gra-
_ titude and thankfulness to Him who had brought
_ them thus far on their way. safely, and was opening -
_ _ to them prospects of life, so full of joy and hope, in «
_ the wide woods of the West.
Nor did these feelings vanish when an occasional
_ house or cabin was passed. Even when the rum-
7 ' D bling of their wheels brought to the door swarms of

a '?
ty eee


.
,

74 LIFE IN THE WEST.



children, and men unshaven and roughly clad, their
eyes were quick to detect tokens of success in the
newly-planted apple-tree, the extent of the. clear-
ing, the potato-patch, the feeble effort at a barn,
and, in them all, they read a lesson of hope for the
future; for, from these small beginnings—these
struggles of labour with poverty—were to come,
‘they knew well, the competence and independence

“that distinguish the lot of our hard-working but free
countrymen

= = me i mati

— = i .
F | lea HI

. Y

y

\e e: Le

Nes
“-)



,
ENCAMPMENT IN THE WOODS. 75

CHAPTER VIII.
ENCAMPMENT IN THE WOODS.

Round and round move the heavy wheels of the
large emigrant-wagons. Round and round they go,
through wood and swamp, over log-bridges, and

_ through “timbered Jands;” now rumbling, now
_# creaking ; now contending with stump or projecting
“\) root; now moving at a brisker pace over a smooth,
level spot; and then, again, toiling along, half-
buried in a deep rut, left by the spring frosts and
rains. Slowly they move, but surely. The. stout



_ the section-trees, and proclaims that twenty* miles
© have been accomplished before the mid-day rest.
Yet, as the shades of evening draw on, our travel-
lers are weary and wayworn, and disappointed, too.

_ They had hoped to reach the settlement of Lupine

*%

‘ Sabbath. "
f But Lupine Prairie was still ten miles distant
_ when the dusk of evening was drawing near; and
i the fatigue, both of travellers and horses, made it

; :

~ Prairie before nightfall, for the next day was the

a
Sark
ait,

os driver of the first wagon has kept the reckoning of »

¥ »

Shee.
76 LIFE IN THE WEST.



desirable to stop for the night. It was not their

first experience of camping-out, for they had been
five nights upon the road, and only two of these
had they been able to find comfortable quarters be-
neath the shelter of a roof. Every possible arrange-
ment had been made, before starting, for the passing
of the nights by the wayside ; and it was almost in-

- comprehensible, even to them, how easily they could *

accommodate themselves, and be rendered comfort-
able under these new circumstances. But our readers
shall judge for themselves.

The setting sun, with its gorgeous array of golden
clouds, had sunk below the western horizon, before
they had reached a dry, elevated place, suitable for,
an encampment. Then, after a few words of con-
sultation with Mr. Moreton, the stout driver (whose.
good sense and practical knowledge of the country
had placed him in the capacity of guide and adviser) |
turned the heads of his horses, and drew carefully
up beneath the green trees, standing back some dis-'
tance from the road. The horses were then taken
out, relieved of the weight of their harness, and placed
in a safe position to rest and cool themselves, before
being allowed to eat. :

Then, slowly came on the second “ team,” guided
by the careful hand of Robert. This also drew up,
and was placed at a right angle with the first, and
the horses carefully looked after.

Before a half hour passed, there,was heard, echo-
ENCAMPMENT IN THE WOODS. 77



_ ing through the woods, the sharp voice of Michael
‘ Dorrance, erying, “ Whoa! whoa!’ in tones that
' even the slow-witted animals he was master of could
not mistake. They too drew up, and placed them-
selves opposite to Robert's wagon—thus forming
three sides of a hollow square, opening to the'south.
_ Henry and his aid soon gathered their charge, and
» made them fast not far from this opening, taking
particular care that they should be comfortable this |
night; for the rest of the Sabbath was approaching,
and Mr. Moreton desired that its hours might be
_ spent in peace and quietness, so far as their situa-
i tion should allow.
} But these arrangements were not all. Scarcely
| had they stopped, before Charles, Willie, and Alice
«® were scattered, picking up dry bits of wood and dead
branches, that would burn quickly and easily. Mr.
” Moreton, leaving the care of the horses to the driver,
_, had taken his hatchet from the box at the side of the
_ wagon, and soon finding a windfall, (a tree that had
_ fallen some time previous, and was now dead and
dry,) he had easily chopped some of its branches
into lengths suitable for burning. Just without the
_ enclosure, he then placed two large green logs, form-
_ ing two sides of a triangle with them. Thesewere
_ to hold up the wood, and to protect the blaze while it
_, was kindling. Then came Alice, with a basket full
___ of small chips and light sticks, which were carefully
_ and loosely placed upon each other, between the logs.

DNS et"




78 LIFE IN THE WEST.



They were then lighted from a match, and soon
blazed up, crackling merrily. When fairly burn-
ing, Willie cast on his treasures, but even he was
cautious lest he should put out the little blue flame
that, in darting tongues, was climbing here and there
over the wood. Asit gained in power and strength,
Charlie laid sticks of wood upon it, until the united
strength of the children hardly sufficed to lift the
logs that it was desirable to place over the coals, in
order to insure their continuance until morning. By
the time that Michael reached there with his mules,
there was a good roaring fire, brightening up with
its light the increasing shades of evening, and offer-
ing a bed of live coals to any one who would use
them to cook their evening meal.

But where was Robert? Away with the water-
pails, looking for a stream or spring, from which
they might be filled; and not long was he gone!
As for Susan and Mary, they were busy enough!
Out of the back of Michael’s wagon, they had had a
table lifted; upon it they had briskly mixed the
bread, which was to be baked for the morning’s use.
Frank was there, too, placing the little tin reflector
just far enough from the fire; and, with one of the
girls’ aprons tied around hin waist, he speedily
washed the potatoes, and hung them over the fire
to boil. The little square gridiron, with its shining
black bars, was spread with slices of meat; and,
over those glowing embers, how nicely it eooked't


ENCAMPMENT IN THE WOODS. 79



Then there was the coffee to be made; and then
wipifig off the little table, a clean white cloth was
spread upon it, and it was covered with dishes, ready
for their evening meal; the cake of golden-coloured
butter, the pile of slices of wheaten bread, and the
full sugar-dish were not forgotten. And Susan !
She it was who slipped away with her milk-pail, but
found that Henry had been quicker -than she, and
already sat by the side of one of the cows, with a
pail nearly full of foaming, ereamy milk! By the
time that supper was ready, there was not one who
was not ready, too, to eat the simple, but, to them,
delicious repast, with a good appetite and a keen
relish. . 2... + Wek oy
The round moon rose red and clear, and glided
high into the heavens, casting upon the ‘sleeping
emigrants a mellowed light, which was heightened
or obscured as the watch-fire burned high or low.
At intervals, might be heard the restless horses,
terrified at imaginary sounds, or disturbed by the
movements of their companions; or the strokes of
the axe, plied by the watchman of the hour as a
help to wakefulness. But peacefully they slum-
bered, while “He who never slumbereth nor sleep-
eth” was a “guard upon their right hand, and upon
their left, to preserve them from evil.” \And when,
at the previously-arranged hours, one after another,
the young men took their places quietly, to guard
the encampment from intrusion, the pleasant words
7*
80 LIFE IN THE WEST.

_of “ All’s well!” was their only greeting. At the
foot of each new-comer would Carlo wag his tail,
look up in his face for a word or sign of recog-
nition, and then again compose himself to his little
naps. :


A SABBATH IN THE WOODS. @, 81

CHAPTER IX.

A SABBATH IN THE 100 ”




Ir we allowed our readers to suppose th
persons employed by Mr. Moreton, i in oe e “pre
tion of his journey, were pleased with his plan a

é stopping upon the Sabbath, we should give a wrong

» impression. Although it had been agreed upon be-
4 fore starting, the fine weather and their having
- been delayed upon the road beyond their expecta-
tion, had awakened a strong desire to go on.
_ Michael Dorrance, particularly, remonstrated against



the delay, and expressed his opinion, that “it was

» all nonsense to stop ;” to which Mr. Moreton calmly
replied—

_ But, Michael, last Friday, when you said. that

_ your religion permitted you to eat no meat, I did

not say that that was all nonsense. We both pro-

' fess to be guided by the precepts of the Bible. You

+ cannot read it, and take, upon the authority of your
“® priest, what he tells you are words of command and

* promise. He tells you to eat no meat on Fridays ;
" and we tried, at some inconvenience to ourselves, to

a ispmoanm odate you with food that you thought it right



_ toeat, although we knew that there was no command
Tye

82 LIFE IN THE WEST.



in God’s word concerning it. This is the Bible,”
said Mr. Moreton, holding onevin his hand; “and I
read it for myself, and find it says, ‘Six days shalt
thou labour and do all thy work: but the seventh
day is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou
shalt not do any work; thou, nor thy son, nor thy
daughter, thy man-servant, nor thy maid-servant, nor
thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates :
for in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the
sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh
day: wherefore, the Lord blessed the Sabbath-day,
‘and hallowed it.’ This is very plain; and I should
not do what I consider right, if, in obedience to this
command, I did not allow each one of us a day of
rest, and an opportunity to honour God, by observ- ,
ing his Sabbath.” = 2

“Tf you could go to church,” said Michael, “and
see the praist, and get absolution, it would be worth
yer while.”

“My priest is Jesus Christ,” said Mr. Moreton,
‘“¢who lives with God in heaven, and he is every-
where present; as near me here, in these woods, as
if Iwere in any church. To him I shall go in
prayer this day, and confess my sins ; and I know
that he will forgive them, and grant me pardon ; for
the Bible says, ‘If we confess our sins, he is faith-
ful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us
from all unrighteousness ;’ and ‘If any man sin, we
have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ, the
A SABBATH IN-THE WOODS. 83



righteous.’ And, as a family, we shall gather to-
gether, and ask God’s pardon for our sins, and his
blessing upon us. We shall hope that you will
unite with us in thanking Him who has made our
journey, thus far, pleasant and prosperous.”

There was another person as much dissatisfied as
Michael with the proposed delay, and this was the
stout driver. He was a Western man, in middle
life, of good natural abilities, but uneducated and
without religious principle. He made no complaint
to Mr. Moreton, but to Robert he said—

“J don’t, myself, see the use of stopping thirty-
six hours here, in this place, just because it happens
to be Sunday, instead of Monday. I should think

that folks might be just as good and pious, going
along. Besides, it is my opinion that God is good

and merciful, and, if we die, will take us all to hea-

_ ven, whether we bother ourselves with keeping Sun-
_ day, or not.”

“Do you think there are two heavens?” asked
Robert; “one for those who love God, and endea-

_. vour to serve him, and another for those who do not





care for him or his commandments ?”

‘Why,no! I guessthey’ll all share pretty much
alike !”
~ “Then, according to your own showing, should

. they even be taken to the same place, one class must
| be happy and the other miserable. You would not
_ be happy in’a heaven where the worship of God was


|

84 LIFE IN THE WEST.



the sole employment and every day a Sabbath, and
my father could never enjoy any place where God
was forgotten and never praised. Now, I leaye it to
you to say, whether you think that a God who
should reward those who have never even remem-
bered him, and punish those who have tried to serve
him and to do his will, is a good God, or such an
one as you think rules this universe. But people
do not all go to the same place when they die. The
Bible says that ‘the wicked shall be turned into
hell, and all the nations that forget God;’ ‘Be not
deceived; God is not mocked: whatsoever a man
soweth, that shall he also reap;’ ‘God will render
to every man according to his deeds: to them who,
by patient continuance in well-doing, seek for glory
and honour and immortality, eternal life; but unto
them that are contentious, and obey not the truth,
but obey unrighteousness, indignation and wrath,
tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man
that doeth evil; but glory, honour, and peace to
every man that worketh good.’”

As Robert read these texts, the eye of his com-
panion was fixed upon him. When he had finished,
he said—

‘‘Death will change us, and make heaven pleasant
to us, by making us fit to enter it.”

“J cannot say that it will,” said Robert. “TI know
nothing about it, but what the Bible says, I read
there, ‘And if the tree fall toward the south or to-
A SABBATH IN THE WOODS. 85

ward the north, in the place where the tree falleth,
there it shall lie”* ‘He that is unjust, let him be
unjust still, and he that is filthy, let him be filthy
still; he that is righteous, let him be righteous still,
and he that is holy, Jet him be holy still.” ‘And,
behold, I come quickly, and my reward is with me,
to give to every man according as his work shall be.’
These texts don’t sound much as if we could hope
that dying was to make us fit to go to heaven.”

The necessary arrangements for the day were few
and easily made; and none but Mr. Moreton and
Robert knew of these discussions, as, in a spirit of
gladness, they assembled about the little table spread
with the morning meal.

“< How shall we spend the day ?” was the natural
inquiry. It was soon settled that, at ten o’clock,
they should come together, to hear a sermon read by
Mr. Moreton, accompanied with the other services
of public worship; that,” in the afternoon, there
should be a kind of Sunday-school, and, in the even-
ing, a temperance meeting should be held, directly
after family prayers; the intervening hours to be
employed in that way which to each one seemed most
desirable.

To this plan they cheerfully consented ; and, before
long, Mrs. Moreton produced a basket of books,
tracts, and papers, which the children soon scattered

* Eccl, xi. 3.
oo

ame

86 LIFE IN THE WEST.



about, as they seated themselves beneath the over-
spreading branches of some gnarled oak, or were
overshadowed by the hanging vines of a climbing
wild-grape ; and either singly, or in clusters of two |
or three, sought to commit to memory a self-imposed
lesson for the afternoon, or read aloud for the grati-
fication of others, or silently perused the word of
God for themselves. Who could doubt, as ‘they
gazed upon the seriously happy faces of these little
groups, that God was with them, leading their young
hearts, by the influences of his good spirit, “ to re-
member the day, to keep it holy?’ Or, as they
looked upon them, gathered together for united
worship, who could feel that it was a vain thing to
serve the Lord, when each beaming countenance
told of hope and joy and peace ?

In the little church of Laurelton, the good pas-
tor remembered them, and besought the blessing of
Jehovah to rest upon any servants of his who, that
day, might be far from the ordinances of the sanc-
tuary; and asked that his presence might- be with
them, whether in the house or by the way. Even
then was that prayer answered and that petition
granted, as,

‘¢In the darkling wood,
Amidst the cool and silence, they knelt down,
And offered, to the Mightiest, solemn thanks
And supplication.”
A SABBATH IN THE WOODS. 87



Those prayers were no tedious ceremony, no wearl- _&
some service, or one in which the heart had no part,

but “the offering of their sincere desire unto God, for. ,
things agreeable to his will, in the name of Christ,

with confession of sin, and thankful acknowledgment 3
of his mercy.” Then upon the air, borne by the soft
winds in tuneful notes, rose the voice of praise :

:
= %
:

«Through all the changing scenes of life,
Jn trouble or in joy,
The praises of our God shall still
Our hearts and tongues employ.

Oh! make but trial of his love:
Experience will decide

How blest are they, and only they,
Who in his truth confide.

Fear him, ye saints; and you will then
Have nothing else to fear:

Come, make his service your delight ;
He’ll make your wants his care.”

A portion of God’s word was listened to, another
song of praise was sung, and then the discourse
selected by Mr. Moreton was read. Its subject was
the “Keeping of the Sabbath.” It spoke of its
"advantages as a day of rest, and of its adaptedness
to the wants of man, both asa mortal and an im-
mortal being, and of its meeting his necessities,
‘

tt


OS

88 LIFE IN THE WEST.



physical and moral. Its observance was urged for

the reason,

*

Z
$
2

'

That it was the command of ‘God that it should 1

be kept holy, as a commemoration of the creation,
and a token of our entire dependence on him as our
Creator ; |

That it tended, by giving stated seasons of rest,
to prolong human life ;

That such rest and change of occupation kept
clear and unimpaired the intellectual and reasoning
faculties of man ;

That its observance asa day of worship awakened
proper emotions of love and gratitude to Him who
gives us all our time, and through whose death and
resurrection we have hope of eternal life ;

That its tendency was to elevate and enlighten
the affections ;

And, finally, because, by giving us an oppor-
tunity to study and contemplate the character of
Jehovah, and his perfections, we might learn to love
him and seek his friendship; so that, at the day of
judgment, we might be accepted through the Sa-
viour, and be made welcome by him as good and
faithful servants. j

It was a plain, practical sermon, written in sim- —

ple language. Its subject was illustrated both by
Scripture, aptly applied, and by anecdotes, showing

the value of the Sabbath.in a physical point of view. _;

There were the written or expressed opinions of

Re. a
eoae


A SABBATH IN THE WOODS. 89



eminent men, such as Wilberforce, who says: “Oh!
what a blessing is Sunday! interposed between the
waves of worldly business, like the divine path of
the Israelites through Jordan! I can truly say
that, to me, the Sabbath is invaluable.” There
was the opinionof Dr. Sewall, whose observation led
him to write: “I have remarked that those to whom
the Sabbath brings the most entite rest from their
habitual labours, performed the secular duties of the
week more vigorously and successfully than those
who continued them without intermission.” And
that of Dr. Warren, who says: “I have a firm be-
lief that persons who observe the Sabbath are able
to do more work, and do it in a more perfect man-
ner, in six days, than if they worked the whole
seven. A change of thought seems to give a fresh
spring to the mental operations, as a change of food
does to the body. ‘The breathing of the pure and
sublime atmosphere of the religious Sabbath re-
freshes and invigorates the spirit: it forms an
epoch in our existence, from which we receive a
new impulse, and thus constitutes the best prepara-
tion for the labours of the coming week.”

These truths and facts fell upon the ears of an
attentive and interested audience, for all had drawn
near to listen, either from lack of occupation, or
from respect to Mr. Moreton. There was an unaf-
fected seriousness and an apparent pleasure in con-
templating the truths of God’s word, which gave to
90 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Mr. Moreton’s tones a power to arrest and enchain
attention; and the fitness of the subject to the cir-
cumstances in which they were placed could not fail
to be felt, even by those to whom the delay had
been, at first, unwelcome.

None sat there listlessly or with wandering minds;
and as, in devout gratitude, Mr. Moreton offered the
closing prayer to Him who in wisdom hath set apart
the Sabbath, and hallowed it, and asked him to incline
their hearts to keep it holily unto the end, even the
heart of Michael Dorrance was touched. Uncon-
sciously to himself, the strongholds of superstition
were loosened in his mind; and though, after the
custom of his church, he raised his hat and made
the sign of the cross upon his forehead and breast,
yet, in his soul, he acknowledged that true worship
was not confined to temples made with hands, or
to forms devised by the hearts of men.

Thus passed the hours of that Sabbath morning ;
and thus, from beneath the green trees, went up to
the throne of God the incense of devotion and love.
It was a fit temple for the worship of the Most
High—far from the cares and tumults of the busy
world; far from the throng of thoughtless m als
pressing on in their worldly pursuits. And there,
surrounded by the manifestations of Anes
goodness, warmed by the light of that sun which

Â¥

#

f

he guides and refreshed by the cool breezes of his

bestowing, fed from his bounty and sustained by.





A SABBATH IN THE WOODS. 91



his protecting hand, can we doubt but his pure eye
looked upon these, his worshippers, with love, and
that unto them should be fulfilled the promise,
‘¢Them that honour me, will I honour ?’”’*

ne!

* 1 Sam. ii. 30.

»



ay et
*
92 LIFE IN THE WEST.



-

CHAPTER X.
THE RAINY DAY’S ‘JOURNEY.

Ratny, stormy days there are in everybody’s*ex-
“perience; days when employment is hindered, when
progress is delayed, when a icipated pleasures are
marred, when good-nature, ‘if dependent upon the
weather, is apt to become bal-nature, and the spirits 4
will flag and sink, unless sustained by active ems
ployment or governed by principle. These often
happen to dwellers at home ; and to them, sur-
rounded with every in-door comfort that wealth or
thrift can procure, they bring little temptation to
complain or murmur. But, to the poor, whose
dwellings are” not proof against the storm; whose
habitations are dark and disconsolate, unless cheered
by the light of the sun ; whose out-door labour it is
that puts bread into their mouths,—suchdays come
~ as seasons of discipline, and bring with them discom-
fort and trial, that must be knoy m to be realized.
To emigrants of every class, a rainy day is a dis- ‘
appointment. To see the blue sky overcast With

+ a

threatening clouds, and a “ar. spread over \
the whole horizon; to hear the breezes rustle fit-»










¢ é
aa a. ‘te evs 4 4
‘ be Saw
se.
a y

es se MO AR gs
. . pte mh
THE RAINY DAY'S JOURNEY. 93



fully in the tree-tops ; to see the birds move off with
rapid wing, and hear their short, quick notes, tell-
ing of a coming storm; to feel the pattering rain-
drops, as they fall upon the green leaves ; and to
know that, with the exception of an occasional
cabin, the road stretches for miles through paths
unfrequented, save by travellers like themselves ;
and to know that their only resources for comfort,
warmth, and dryness are comprised within the nar-
row limits of their own wagon,—it is all this which
makes a rainy day so much dreaded by an emigrant.
Such a day was the one preceding the arrival of Mr.
Moreton’s family at their new home.

The early morning had come with a bright dawn>
ing; yet there were tokens of coming rain that
caused them hurriedly to despatch their breakfast,
and to gather themselves together for starting as
soon as possible. To do this, there must be some
hurry and bustle, some anxiety and care, lest any
thing should be forgotten or misplaced. Cloaks |
and shawls must be found for Mrs. Moreton and the
_ girls, and the “rubber coats and leggins,” with “ the
sow’-wester hats,’ must be taken out for Mr. Moreton
and his sons. The mid-day meal must be arranged,
so that it could be easily reached, and taken without
exposure to the weather. Little Annie must have
the warmest, driest place, and the best cushion
must be placed for the mother. All this done, and
cheerfully done, and every thing finally arranged,
94 LIFE IN THE WEST.



the horses started at a brisk trot, while our travel-
lers, forgetful of the past inconvenience attending so
hasty a transit, were looking up the causes they had
for congratulation in their present circumstances.
Frank was the first to say—

“ How fortunate that it did not begin to rain
until all our goods were,under cover, and we almost
ready for the start !”

“Yes,” said Annie; “and how fortunate, too,
that the clouds came as messengers, to let us know
that we must hurry !”’

“We shall not be troubled with the dust, to-day,
dear Annie,” whispered Mary; ‘and that will be
better for your cough.” |

“Jt really seems quite like home,” said Mrs.
Moreton, “to get so many of us together. again.
When one of you were in Michael’s wagon, and an-
other with Henry, and some of you walking by the
roadside, I was almost lonely, and had to take my
knitting-work, for company. To-day, we are quite a
family party.”

“ How beautifully the*rain-drops lie on the fresh,
green leaves!” exclaimed Mary. ~A bright sun
would make them glisten like jewels!”

“And a longer withholding of his beams will '

make the fresh, green leaves fresher and greener,”
replied Mr. Moreton. “This rain falls opportunely
for the wheat-fields, and probably reaches ours.”

“ Our wheat-fields!” How pleasantly that sound —

&


soe - =

THE RAINY DAY’S JOURNEY. 95



fell upon their ears, telling of a resting-place for the

weary, the end of their fatiguing journey, their ,

home, and that, too, near at hand! The natural
hopefulness of youth painted that home in bright

~ eolours to the fancies of our youthful friends; and,

in guessing how it would look, in hearing how it
did look, and in telling how they meant it should
look, the hours sped on. When weary of this, there
was Willie, with his never-ending fund of riddles
for them to guess; there was Susan, who could
narrate such beautiful tales and stories; there was
the mother, with her memory stored with beautiful
ballads and curious verses; there was Mary, ever
ready to give thema song; and Frank and Charlie,
with strong lungs, always good at a chorus. Then
Robert called out to them, with his genial laugh and
merry tones, proposing hard questions in arithmetic
and history—questions that puzzled even Susan and
Mary ; and, above all, there was the father, without
whom no enjoyment was quite complete, entering
into each and every endeavour to make the rainy
day pass pleasantly. Then, when Henry, attracted
by the merriment, looked in upon them, with his
coat-collar turned up above his ears and his glazed
hat covered with rain-drops, and made believe that
he was a stray traveller, and asked for charity, oh!
how merrily they laughed, and how curiously they
questioned him concerning his family, his home,
and his prospects!- But he did not laugh; not he!

we,’ 2 a

we Ss &
. - x

%
’
96 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Who ever saw a beggar-man laugh, while asking for
help? But steadily and soberly he besought :

‘‘Pity the sorrows of a hungry man,
Whose stout young legs have borne him to your cart;
Who, out of breath, hath hither quickly ran, |
To—to—”
But, alas! no rhyming line could he think of; and
it was Mary who supplied his need, by adding—

‘“‘To get a bit to eat, before you start.” »

Then, no famous ode of. famous poet was ever re-
ceived with more rapturous applause than Henry’s
extempore attempt at a parody; and no performance
ever so entirely satisfied an audience as his persona-
tion of a beggar. With liberal hands, they filled
his pockets, showering upon him crackers and cakes,
and, with more liberal tongues, bestowed their praise
and words of admiration.

It was towards the close of this day, that our tra-
vellers suddenly halted in their course, and drew up
together. There, in the road, was a cart, loaded to
its utmost capacity, with one wheel fast in a deep
hole, or, in Western phrase, slewed. ‘The strength
of the two miserable and wornddoking horses at-
tached to the vehicle was insufficient to start it from |

its position; and the master, Patrick McConey, had 4

put his shoulder to the wheel, in the hope of adding ~
his strength to theirs, while his wife had placed her
three children on the gtass by the roadside, and,

: ae


THE RAINY DAY’S JOURNEY. 97



with whip in hand, was vainly striving to prompt the
wearied animals to greater effort.

To take two of the best horses from Mr. Moreton’s
wagon, and “hitch” them before those belonging to
McConey, was the work of but a few moments. To
lift from’ the wagon the heavy chest and box, and
then to give “the long pull, the strong pull, and the
pull all together,” that would release them from
their unwilling durance; to aid in tying up the
broken and strained harness; to fasten and make
sure the unfortunate wheel; and to replace children
and goods in the wagon,—occupied not many more.
And then, falling in the rear of the company, Patrick
McConey strove to keep his place with them, that
he might have the ‘benefit of their guidance, their
company, and their assistance, if he again fell into
trouble.

Now Patrick was a sample of emigration that was
not very inviting. He was an Irishman, who had
landed, two years before, with his wife and family,
at Quebec. Those two years, he had struggled with
great poverty and want. Discouraged with his con-
dition, and feeling that there was no prospect of bet-
tering it there, he had availed himself of the first
opportunity to change it. With the money raised
by the sale of such household goods as he possessed,
they had passed up the St. Lawrence and through
the Lakes, as steerage or deck passengers, and
' finally landed in Sandusky. This had been in
98 LIFE IN THE WEST.



the fall; and although, on first arriving, they had,
from their destitute condition, been objects of public
charity, yet, by dint of hard labour and hard fare,
and a willingness to ask for and accept aid, they had
been enabled to get together, by the next summer,
the miserable outfit of an old wagon and two broken-
down horses. A bundle of straw served for a bed,
a tattered quilt or two answered for covering and
protection. Two stools, an iron kettle, a painted
chest, tied up with a rope, a cask of pork, anda
sack of potatoes, completed their assortment of what
Willie called, not “goods,” but “‘bads.” They were,
indeed, objects of compassion—not so much for their
destitute condition, as for their ignorance. Patrick’s
plan, so far ashe had any, was to go on until he
found a spot where he could stop; and, after that,
his only idea seemed to be to plant some wheat!
Where this place was to be, he knew not. That he
had little or no money to buy land, he deemed of
slight consequence; for, “sure, and wasn’t there
land enough for him and the crathurs anywhere ?”’
And, as for getting a living out of it, “and couldn’t
he work ?”’ '

That he had health, strength, and good-nature
was plainly to be seen; but that he was ignorant,
and, from his want of judgment, unable to provide
for himself and family, there could be little doubt. |
Mr. Moreton tried, in vain, to convince him, that
when he found the place to stop, which it seemed ~




THE RAINY DAY’S JOURNEY. 99



that he would do soon, from his horses giving out,
he had no right to any land; and that, even if al-
lowed to live and work upon it for a time, as he
might be, he was liable, at any moment, to be
forced by its owner to leave it and give up any
little improvements he had made upon it—thus
losing the benefit of his own hard labour. Patrick
could not, or would not, understand... His only re-
ply was, “And, sure, if I wouldn’t go, and why
couldn’t I stay ?”

“T will help him, even against his will, ” thought
Mr. Moreton. After a while, he called him to him,
and said—

‘Patrick, I am going to be a farmer, and have
bought some land, which my sons and I intend to
work. But there will be a great deal of digging,
and ditching, and cutting down of trees, that I shall
have to hire done for us. Now, you are strong and
well, and able to work, if you are willing, and can
be a great help to us. So I am going to propose”
that you shall stop where we do, put up a shanty on
one corner of my land, for this year, and live there.
You shall promise to do what work I ask you to do,
and I will promise to give you employment and
pay you fair wages for all that you do. What do
you say.?”

Patrick’s heart was more easily reached than his
comprehension ; but, when he understood Mr. More-

ton’s proposal, with true Irish eloquence of tongue,
9
100 LIFE IN THE WEST.

he poured forth a torrent of thanks and praise, in
which his wife Winne joined, with less noise, but
more true feeling. Poor woman! A home would
be to her a blessing; and she knew it; for, worn
and weary with her many cares and labours, she
had looked, day by day, for a time of rest, which
had never yet come. Thriftless and ignorant as she
was, she knew, better than Patrick, the value of
Mr. Moreton’s offer to them, for she had experienced
too many disappointments to place much dependence
upon her husband’s plans, and knew well the delu-
sive nature of those hopes with which he had been
buoyed up.

From this time, Patrick McConey was a part of
Mr. Moreton’s family; and our readers will pardon
this digression, as it serves to introduce to them one
who, with his strong arm and willing mind, became
an aid and a helper to our emigrant family.

-
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PART II.

LAKELAND.

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CONTENTS.

CHAP. XI.—LAKELAND.. 0 ssseescesees ssvvesces ses Hhincies cocece 107
XIL—THE LOG-CABIN,........000 000 sees a" a 120
XITI.—Parrick’s Homa... eedelbecdoccseapgrocio coseecasl 134
XIV.—NEIGHBOUBS..... ssiiniactininasiawiinn ‘ 142
XV.—THOMAS REVERB ..s5...ssssssedsseoescessvee ve 152
XVI.—MARY’S LETTER. .......00cesereeee sevesceceveenes 162 .
XVID.—FABMING......00.00cceer cocsccceecvcvecece sonseeees 170
XVITI.—CHARLES MORETON....+0000 cess Wai boaiiesocense 181
XIX.—LETTERS....0..0000 ceeeeveess Siti Se 1600.csnitbidncees 197
XX.—Tuz Cuvrcu AND THE MINISTER.......... 206

XXI.—TuHE STEAM Saw-MILL AND THE DISTILLERY 217

XXIT.—Wintrm MORETON’S DEATH.......0ccscceseeees 226


~~ aKa




CHAPTER XI.

LAKELAND.

“Now we see the lights! There! Look! look!
Don’t you see them twinkle? There! Between
the trees, Ally. Now, don’t you see them ?”’

Ally’s eyes were heavy with sleep, and so were
Willie’s; but his expectation being stronger, he
roused himself to look in the direction that Charles
pointed out. And there they were!

“One, two, three, four, five, six, and seven,” he
counted ; and then, after a pause, “eight, nine, ten;
and a very pale one ten is,” said he. ‘Is it really
Lakeland, father ?”

‘‘'Yes, my son.”

“Tt don’t look as Buffalo did, at night, father,”
said Willie, in a disappointed tone.

“Not much, to be sure, my son. Did you think
that it would ?”’

“
“ Had you not better wait until you really see it,
Willie, before you decide about it?”

The nightfall had but just set in, and, still riding
in the woods, it was hardly fair to indge of the ap-
108 LIFE IN THE WEST.



pearance of the little Western settlement, when the
shadows of trees and houses could hardly be distin-
guished from each other. Yet, as they approached
nearer, and more lights threw their twinkling beams
across the dim prospect, they found the houses
nearer and nearer together, and the trees fewer and
farther between. The approach to the village was
nearly straight for a mile or two, so that they had
been able to discern the first glimmerings of light
while atadistance. It would be difficult to analyze ©
or describe the various feelings that were awakened
in those different minds, as these first met their view.
Although every settlement through which they had
passed had been compared with Lakeland, as to its
Situation, its size, its houses, its Stores, and its farms,
and Mr. Moreton had aimed at giving a correct im-
pression of the place, there was an undefinable feel-
ing that it must be rather a wonderful place, or it
never would have been selected by their father as a
residence. And the children were disappointed ;
for it was far from being a remarkably attractive-
looking village. But the disappointments of early
youth are not lasting, and this bid fair to pass away,
even before the place was reached. The older ones
had judged more rationally, Every object was. to
them full of interest. Their curiosity was power-
fully excited, and they were too thoughtful to be

talkative or very merry, as they neared ‘their new’
home. | |
LAKELAND. 109



That night, they were to go to the village public-
house, where Mr. Moreton had made arrangements
for their staying for a few days, until they were
rested from their fatigue, and had time to make
the necessary preparations for removal to their own
dwelling.

As Mrs. Moreton alighted upon the rude platform
at the hotel-door, and saw herself surrounded by the
faces of those whom curiosity had drawn from the
bar-room to gaze upon the new-comers, ‘there was
some sinking of heart; for she felt that»they were
strangers ina strange land. When she looked around
upon the room into which she was ushered, and saw
indubitable marks of poverty and labour, with little
of that neatness or tidiness which a careful husbanding
of small means will produce, she felt almost discou-
raged by the annoyances and inconveniences which,
she felt, would soon surround her. The responsi-
bility of the happiness and interests of her children
fell heavily upon her heart, and, for the moment,
she almost regretted having left New England. It
was but for a moment. Like a wise woman, she
had counted the cost before starting; and, like a
_ Christian, she now cast aside every personal feeling,
and subdued every selfish emotion—summoning up
all her powers of resolution, while again she silently
committed her way unto Him who alone could lighten
her path.

The cheerful voice of the landlady, Mrs. Blake,
110 LIFE IN THE WEST.



‘aroused her from her reverie, as she entered the
room and cordially bade her “ welcome to Lakeland !”
Then, bustling about, she took the bonnets and outer
garments of the little ones, giving each a pleasant
word, and telling them. that she had been looking
for them, every day, for a week. Who can tell the
power of a cheerful smile? Of an encouraging, hope-
ful word? How they come to the oppressed heart «
as balm to a wound! How they awaken confidence
and pleasant expectation, dispelling sadness and dis.
trust! ‘A word spoken in due season, how good
is it!” was the saying of the wise man; and who
has not experienced its truth ?

Food and places of rest were soon provided for
our travellers. It mattered little to them that the
one was plain and simple, the other rude and coarse.
Sound and refreshing sleep visits no more readily the
luxurious couch than the humblest 3 and they were
too tired and weary to care, save for quiet and clean-
liness, This they found in the home of Mrs. Blake ;
and she herself was ready, with true Western whole-
heartedness, to do whatever was in her power to as-
sist them, or to add to their comfort or pleasure—
deeming no service menial, if it contributed to their
good, nor any office trifling, if it increased their hap-

ess.

But what kind of a place was Lakeland? do any
of my. readers ask. Was there any thing peculiar
in it or about it ? ii
LAKELAND. 111



No; nothing atall. It differed so little from other
Western villages, that it might be taken as a sample
of the whole. It had every advantage of position that
an inland Western town can have, save that of water-
power; and that is not always a desirable one in a
new country. It was situated on the travelled road

between two of the larger toyns in Indiana, and was
itself a county-seat. pthiedllaye (for so they called
the cluster of houses whi¢h stood together) was upon
the edge of a small prairié, but was, itself, in an
opening, from which all the original growth of
forest-trees had been cleared, and the fields on every
side, for the distance of one or two miles, had been
fenced in and cultivated. ‘The village streets, and
lots had been regularly laid out; the houses were
mostly frame buildings, painted with a thin coat of
white, and placed directly upon the street. Occa-
sionally, one would have green blinds; while a log-
house, here and there, served to make all the others
inviting, by way of contrast. Every Western village
has some advantage—such asa grist-mill, a saw-mill,
a tannery, a foundry, or a court-house. Lakeland
was not deficient in its share of such conveniences ;
for, of course, oe the court-house; and, besides,
there was a dilapidated grist-mill and a tannery.
Among the inhabitants, there were some doctors,
some lawyers, some farmers, some merchants; a
shoemaker, a tailor, a carpenter, a wheelwright;
some people who lived by letting out their land
112 LIFE IN THE WEST.



upon shares; some whose business it was to buy
and sell land; some who spent their time in barter-
ing, or “ dickering ;” and some whose employment,
or enjoyment, (for it seemed to partake of both,)
was trading in horses. Among the men, there ap-
peared little of the hurry and bustle of going about
their occupation and business that characterizes
Eastern communities; for either the climate or the
manner of life had tended to give a lassitude of mo-
tion, that left a doubt in the minds of our friends
as to whether those about them were lazy or sick,
or whether any one meant to work, at all, that day.
~ The arrival of a family is a circumstance in a
quiet Western village. It interests the principal
men, because they are often the landholders, and
are desirous of seeing their town growing and flou-
rishing ; so that the success of the settlers is of im-
portance to them. It interests the mechanics; for
they look for work, and its consequent remuneration.
It interests the benevolent and the public-spirited ;
for they hope to have their hands sustained and
their hearts cheered by congenial minds. It inte-
rests the poor and the needy; for they think an-
other source of help will be opened to them.

The women are interested; for the prospect of
companionship and extended social intercourse is
ever pleasant to those whose’ active minds and
friendly feelings do not find full scope in the quietly
monotonous life they lead. The young people, too,
LAKELAND. 113°



are pleased with every arrival ; for change and va-
riety ever interests them. All these causes con-
spired to inake the arrival of Mr. Moreton’s family
the news of the day. There was hardly a family
who did not know, before breakfast, on the day fol-
lowing, that they had come; and many stopped to
gaze upon them, as they stood near the doorway, or
sauntered in the village street. f

The farm which Mr. Moreton had purchased was
out from the village, and was an improved one;
that is, it had been lived upon and worked by a
previous owner, and was sold with all its improve-
ments and its planted fields. It was eonsidered ~
a very desirable location, having several acres of
prairie-land, which were now fenced in with a rude
Virginia fence, and planted with wheat, which was
growing and promising finely. Part of this farm
was also heavily-timbered with maple, basswood,
beech, and black-walnut trees, growing thickly to-
gether in the dark, rich soil, to a great height.

That part of the land lying towards the village
had an irregular surface, and’ the field nearest the
road presented a fine slope, stretching up from the
residence of the present occupant. A poor, forlorn
habitation did the house of Mr. Hinckley seem, to
the party who visited it from among our friends, the
morning after their arrival. It was a double cabin,
built of half-hewn logs; 7. ¢. logs rough upon the

outside, but hewn within; there was no connection
10
114 LIFE IN THE WEST.



between the two parts, though they stood at the
distance of but a few feet from each other. . One of
these rooms or houses had a chimney built of mud
and stones. This was upon the outside of the house,
and presented, there, rather an uncouth appearance;
but left the inner wall smooth, and only cut for the
fire-place. The windows were small and few. The
door opened “with a latch, which was raised by a
leathern string on the outside, and secured by draw-
ing the string in.

The family to whom it had belonged had remain-
ed until Mr. Moreton came to claim possession. ac-
cording to agreement, and were still living in one
part of the cabin. A troop of white-haired, sun-
burnt children scattered at the approach of our
friends, as if frightened, leaving behind them only
one boy, who was milking a cow just in front of the
closed door. He was about twelve years of age,
well grown, bright-eyed, and intelligent-looking ;
but his face had an expression of impudent boldness,
that was unpleasant. To Mr. Moreton’s “Good
morning!” his only reply was, “ What ?”

“Good morning!” repeated Mr. Moreton. “Is _
your father at home ?”

‘He ain’t anywhere else,” answered the boy.

“Can I see him?” asked Mr. Moreton. —

To which the response was mhade by the lad rising
suddenly from his sitting posture, lifting his pail,
and giving the poor cow a kick on the leg, which
LAKELAND. 115



sent her*hurriedly away; he then opened the door,
and walked in first, leaving the others to follow, if
they pleased.

This was a specimen of manners that was new to
the children, and from which they revolted, as con-
trary to their ideas of politeness, of respect, and,
almost, of decency. Neither did it pave the way
for a pleasant impression when they ‘wére,admitted
within the house. Mrs. Hinckley had seen the
strangers coming, and had hurriedly put on a clean
cap, and pinned a little bright-coloured shawl about
her neck... She now came forward to speak with
Mr. Moreton, and, wiping out the seats of two
chairs, she handed one to him and another to Mary,
who had accompanied him. While doing this, the
quick eyes of our friends had wandered hither ‘and
thither about the room, taking in, at a glance, its
present uninviting appearance, and its capabilities
for comfort as their own summer residence! The
room was about eighteen feet square, but clean and

in decent order, though the walls and floor were ~

dilapidated and out of repair. The fire-place was
opposite the door. The hearth, of hard-dried clay
mortar, was cracked and sunken.. The floor was
roughly-planed and uneven ; the walls about eight
feet high. The sleepers of the chamber-floor were
small sticks, like rails, and the boards above rough
-and full of knots. By the window, there hung a
number of small bottles, or phials, some filled and

pe
116 LIFE IN THE WEST.



others empty, fastened to nails, with strings passed
around their necks. Upon the window-seat, there
was a piece of chalk, and, on the logs above, a rude
kind of scoring—the only business memorial of Mr.
Hinckley, who thus kept an account of the bushels
of wheat and corn he had taken to market. A cheap
looking-glass was hung upon the wall, but it was
upside down, and a picture meant to ornament its
top did not answer that purpose, because the houses
and trees were seen in an inverted position. Under
the glass, there was a little table or stand, covered
with a white cloth, and upon it there stood a candle-
stick; a brush and comb lay there, too, and a
large piece of beeswax, in whose sides stout threads
had, in passing, cut large dents and gashes. Be-
sides, there were some horn-buttons, some coarse
knitting-work, a snarl of black thread, and a pair of
large shears. The chairs that Mrs. Hinckley had
offered to her visitors were all that the house af.
forded, except a low one, on the seat of which lay a
pillow, and, upon the pillow, a little baby. That it
might be quiet, an older girl rocked it to and fro, »
with hard, irregular movements; and, while doing
this, it was kept- safely in its position by a shawl,
which passed over it and under the seat of the chair,
holding both baby and pillow tightly in their places.
Another child, just able to go dlone, was amusing
itself upon the bed with a large green glass bottle
and a dry ear of corn, in the husk, as playthings,
LAKELAND. 117



considering first’ One, then the other, as dolls, and
tending them with the utmost care. There were
two beds; but it was early yet, and they were not
spread-up for the day; and the breakfast-table was
still standing, with the remains of the morning re-
past upon it—proving that that repast had been one
at which no luxury, had appeared to tempt or please
the appetite. 3

Whatever their thoughts or fancies, Mr. Moreton
and Mary were too considerate of Mrs. Hinckley’s
feelings to express either surprise or pity. It was
plainly to be seem that poverty and hard labour had
wrought in her mind discouragement and sadness ;
and, while she strove to speak cheerfully of their
coming there to live, and praised the melon-patch
and the young peach-trees and currant-bushes, that
she had herself taken care of, as well as planted,
there were tears in her eyes, and her tones told of
disappointment and sorrow.

It was from no sudden freak of fancy, or desire to
move, that Mr. Hinckley had disposed of his farm
in Lakeland. He knew its value and appreciated its
advantages. But his course had been deficient in
good judgment, and he was obliged to sell. Having
taken up too much land at first, he had become em-
barrassed for means to pay his yearly taxes. Every
year he became mote and more involved; and, see-
ing that there was no apparent means of escape from
118 LIFE IN THE WEST.



his liabilities, he had become desperately careless,
and, with a rash indiscretion, made his condition
worse than it need have been—saying, that “one
might as well be hung for stealing a sheep asa
lamb.” This isan old maxim, but an untrue and an
unsafe one to act upon. So Mr. Hinckley found it;
for this course had made it unavoidable that his
farm should pass from his hands, and, with it, he
had lost his reputation as a good farmer, beside
contracting habits of indolence and thriftlessness,
that were sure barriers to his future prosperity.
The first tool that he left to pass the winter in the
field where it was used, and the first door that he
allowed to remain off its hinges, were greater losses
to him than money could repay ; for they were the
beginnings of carelessness—the openings to that
sloth and heedlessness that were now prominent
traits in his character. .

After chatting a few moments with Mrs. Hinckley,
Mr. Moreton left the house to seek her husband.
Mary, meanwhile, tried to talk with the children ;
and, with the aid of kind words and pleasant smiles,
had, before his return, so far progressed in acquaint-
ance with them, that she had the little one in her
lap, and another, shyly sidling up to her, was feel-
ing the trimming on her dress, with as much care
and caution as if it were some new species of animal,
that must be approached by stratagem.
LAKELAND. 119



Robert and Henry were still exploring the fields
and woods when Mr. Moreton, Mary, and Frank
returned to the inn, carrying the pleasant intelli-
gence that the log-cabin was to be given up to
them on the following day, and that, as soon as
they pleased after that, they could take possession.

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120 LIFE IN THE WEST.

CHAPTER XIL

THE LOG-CABIN.

To make a good and pleasant home may seem, to
some of my readers, as a very easy matter. They
may think that a family like Mr. Moreton’s would
have only to place their furniture within their house,
move in, and the work was done. Others may
think that it was impossible to make a comfortable
home in such a house as Mr. Hinckley’s log-cabin,
and that, as the necessary lumber for the new house
was already upon the ground, it would be better to
wait until it was finished, before taking possession
of the premises.

But: with neither of these opinions would Mr. and
Mrs. Moreton have agreed. To keep together and
to be by themselves were, with them, desirable ob-
jects; and, to attain them, they were willing to sub-
ject themselves to additional fatigue and care. As
they were, the habits of regularity and family order
(already broken in upon during their journey) might
be forgotten. Idleness was encouraged, too, by the
desultory modes of life thatgare unavoidably seen
about a public-house. Charli’ already stood by the
THE LOG-CABIN. 121



~ bar-room door, with his hands thrust into his pockets,

eagerly listening to such chance stories or conversa-
tion as he could gather from passers-by or from
travellers. He, as wcll as the others, must have em-
ployment, and something which would interest them
and occupy their hands and thoughts. And, above
all, Mr. Moreton dreaded their becoming familiarized,
and consequently indifferent, to the sad sights and
sounds that are always to be seen and heard in those
places where intoxicating liquors are bought and
sold. For all these reasons, as well as for the sake
of freedom from observation, they decided to “‘ move
in” as soon as possible.

And now did the strong-bodied and willing Winne
McConey serve them well; for scrubbing and clean-
ing were just what she could do, and here there was
plenty of it to be done.

A thin partition was run across the cabin in which
was the fire-place, making a small bed-room and
pantry on one side, and still leaving the larger room
of sufficient size to answer as the family gathering-
place—parlour, sitting-room, and kitchen, all in one.
Two more windows were cut; and, with the fresh
air, came in the bright sunshine, giving to the apart-
ment a new and cheerful aspect. The loft above
was to be used as a store-house for such boxes and
trunks, chests and provisions, as needed a dry and
warm place.

The other cabin was also cleaned thoroughly, and
122 LIFE IN THE WEST.



divided into rooms. One of these was appropriated
to Susan, Mary, and the little girls; while the other
_ and the room above were to be divided between the
boys. No little loving strife of words was there,
before the younger lads would consent to occupy the
lower room, which was, by far, the best and most
pleasant. They declared that ‘they were of little
use, and deserved the worst privilege ;” while Henry
and Robert as loudly averred that they intended
“to work so hard every day, and to be so tired
every night, tliat they should consider any bed a
luxury ;”’ and, besides, “they were always sound
sleepers.” So, finally, it was settled as the older
ones desired.

It seemed as if every difficulty vanished the mo-
ment they fairly considered it. The little shelf
here and the row of stout nails there, the hanging
of a curtain, the placing of a trunk in one spot and
of a table in another, appeared wonderfully to suit
every one and to accommodate every want.) Ah! .
it was not that, but the spirit of disinterestedness,
that smoothed their way and made little sacrifices
_ of personal feeling easy. It was love that lightened
their burdens and warmed their hearts—each seck-
ing to please the others rather than themselves, and
cheerfully yielding their own will to the desire of
another !

A busy and cheerful scene did they present on
the morning of the day when they, as a family,


THE LOG-CABIN. 123



took possession of the log-house. The carpenter’s
work had been accomplished, and Winne’s severer
labours in the cleaning line finished, the day pre-
vious ; but now she stood leaning over a wash-tub,
that was placed under the shade of the only tree
near the house, busy at her work, while her children
were playing within sight of her maternal eye and
within hearing of her voice, as, in rather harsh
notes, she sang’ some Trish melody—wild, but not
without harmony, as it sounded in the open air.
Pat, meanwhile, was going round, outside of the
building, with Mr. Moreton, carrying a pail full of
clay-mortar and a wooden trowel manufactured for
the occasion ; and, under his direction and superin-
tendence, filling up the chinks between the logs.
Within, Henry and Frank took turns in using a
whitewash-brush, laying the thick, white liquid in
smooth, straight stripes upon the discoloured logs,
and calling, every minute, to the others, to come
and admire their work. ‘
Robert, meanwhile, with saw and rule in hand,
was measuring and fitting up an emptied box with
shelves, and fastening it in a corner near the fire-
place. This was to be their cupboard; and Susan’s
nimble fingers had a’chintz curtain hemmed and
drawn, ready-to hang before it, long before it was
finished. . Then, with Annie’s help, she hung clean
white curtains at the little windows; and upon the
little shelf, Which had been a between them

4
124 LIFE IN THE WEST.



for the clock, she found room for the Bible*and °
almanac, and for a thermometer. These she called
their emiyrant fortune—utterly indispensable to
their comfort and success.

Mary and Frank had unpacked and washed the
crockery, and carefully placed it upon the cupboard-
shelves, long before noon; and Mrs. Moreton had her
daughter’s aid in arranging their beds and sleeping
apartments—seeing that each one was lodged ‘com-
fortably, and that they had such conveniences about
them as should insure health, and, so far as circum-
stances permitted, comfort.

But where were Willie and Alice? Not idle, I
can assure you. There were errands to be done
from one to another, that kept their little feet run-
ning and their tongues busy; there were needles to
be threaded, nails and hammers to be held until |
the moment they were wanted. Then the dinner
was to be brought from the village-inn, and Charles
and Willie were its bearers. After that, they
scoured the knives, and made themselves generally
useful about the premises—looking up little things
to do, which would help the older ones in their
work.

Before sundown, every thing was arranged in their
new quarters, and they began to feel at home, as the
sight of familiar household articles gave a home-
look to the place. . . . The excitement of the day
was over, and they were fairly fixed in their Western

€
THE LOG-CABIN. 125



‘home. The little flickering blaze from the deep
chimney cast its fitful light upon thewhitened walls,
and the lengthened twilight from without streamed |
in at the open door, showing the family group—
father, mother, and children—gathered together in
_ the cool of the day, resting from its fatigues—weary,
- but satisfied with the result of their labours, and
contented with their present condition, while the
future was, to them, full of hope. |

“How comfortable this is!’ said Mary. “I
should never have thought that, in so short a time,
such a change could have been made as there has
been here. When I, came out here to see Mrs.
Hinckley, and knew that, in a week’s time, her
house was to be our home, I felt discouraged. © It
seemed impossible to make it decent; and, as for
comfort, I thought that, as Uncle Alfred said, ‘ we
must dispense with that, and take it out in honeliane
about the West being a great country.’”

‘Many hands have made light and quick work
here,” was Mrs. Moreton’s reply, “and willing
hearts have made it easy!” >

“Tf any one is to have a compliment, where all
have done well,” said Mr. Moreton, “it must be
given to your mother, my children; to whose fore-
thought and labour, before we left Laurelton, we
have been, to-day, so much indebted. To have se-
lected and packed together the very articles we

should be likely to need first, and then to remem-
. 1

4
*
126 LIFE IN THE WEST.



ber just where they were, was to usa great matter,
and involved much thought and judgment upon her
part. Perhaps you think it happened that there
were just dishes enough for us to use, put up in one
box, and all the rest put away in another; and that

this square piece of carpet, that covers all the middle —

of this room, and makes it look and feel so comfort-
able, was a piece that we have always had in just
this form, and that it came firstain the package of
carpets as a’matter of chance; but I know who ar-
ranged both of these things, ind many others, of
which we have experienced the benefit, both on our
journey and to-day. It took time and made some
delay, but she judged, rightly, that it would help us
in the end.”

Mary cast a knowing look at Frank, to see if he
remembered his impatience; but, though he saw it
not, he felt that he had been wrong, and said—

“Tam glad that you have told us this, father;
for it did seem a great while to wait; but it is not
the first time I have thought that nothing was doing
because [ was not at work, and have afterwards
found out that I was mistaken.”

‘‘'We should have had less to do, if we ha not
had so many boxes and chests to stow away,” said
Henry. “We have more things than we need.
Half we brought is all we can use here.”’

‘“‘ We shall need it all in the new house; shall we
not, father ?”


a —_ +”

—— ———

THE LOG-CABIN. 127



“Yes; and much more, I think.”

“But shall we need the new, house?” asked
Susan.

“That remainsto be proved,” replied Mr. Moreton.
«“ As Mary says, we are comfortably fixed ; but, as
time passes, we shall be cramped for room, and, the
novelty of our position passing away, we shall be
more disposed to see and feel inconveniences than
at present. It will be more healthful, as well .as
agrecable, to live in a better house and a larger:
By the time the new home is ready, I think we shall
be ready too.” — |

“ Home is not a house, is it?” asked Willie.

“No, my son. Home has, to us Americans, a
deeper, fuller signification than a mere dwelling-
house—a shelter from the weather. We consider it
a refuge from the business and cares of life; a place
where we are surrounded by others, who are bound
to us, and we to them, by the ties of kindred and
affection; where the objects that surround us are
those with which we are pleasantly familiar; and
with whose inmates we can have that happy free-
dom, in speaking and acting, which springs from a
loving heart and good principles.”
_“T remember an old saying,” gaid Robert :—
Give an Indian a fire, and you give him a home!’

“Yes, that is true. His wants, in the savage
state, are but few. A kind of stoical pride prevents
him from exercising any domestic virtues, or acknow-
128 LIFE IN THE WEST.



/ ledging that his happiness depends upon any external
comfort. His wife, or squaw, is acknowledged as an
inferior, and agrees to it. His children are of little
account to him; and to be warm and to have food,
are all that he cares for. Anywhere, if these are
furnished, he has his home.”

“] wonder what Patrick’s idea of a home is!”
said Mary.

‘We shall soon see, for our first duty must be to
have a house furnished for him. The village is too
far from us for them to stay there long.”’

‘Shall you take the carpenters from their work,
upon the frame of our house, to build one for him?”

“No, Henry. For a few weeks, Mr. Hinckley
stays to superintend the farm; and there is little for
you and Robert to do. I intend to have you and
Patrick put up a house for him; and you can exer-
cise your skill and judgment in the matter, as if
you, yourselves, were young, poor emigrants, out
here alone, and upon your own responsibility. I
will stay to direct about affairs here.’’

“First, father, let us put up a passage-way be-
tween the two cabins, so that we can pass from one
to the other, without going out of doors.”




“That is a good idea, Robert; and you 2

sqmie of the rough lumber purchased for the
to use.”

“If we build that,” said Henry, “why not
make it wide enough to put the cooking-stove in,


THE LOG-CABIN. 129



and then, in.the hot weather, we can keep this
room cool, for our parlour ?”’ i

“That will be nice,” said Mary. ‘It will be so
much pleasanter and easier; and then,” she added,
turning to Susan, ‘‘ we can pull the carpet over that
rough hearth, that we agreed was so very ugly.”

‘‘] shall like the arrangement very much,” said
Mrs. Moreton; “and I thank you, Robert, for plan-
ning it for my convenience and comfort.”

‘‘Then it shall be done, and that right speedily ;
for what it pleases you to haye, mother, it pleases
metodo!” 34 ,

“That is the true home-spirit, Robert,” returned
his mother. ‘Without that feeling on the part of
every member of the family, there is little homefelt
joy in the domestic circle. Cross words or discon-
tented hearts break up the pleasure of any family
for the time; and an habitual disregard for the
comfort of others, by indulging in these faults,
will destroy family peace and harmony; while a
spirit of disinterestedness will create happiness in the
heart of its possessor, even while dispensing its gifts.”

“‘ Are kind actions gifts?” asked Mary.

“Yes, my dear, they are truly gifts, and more
valuable in diffusing happiness than the most costly
presents. No.actual gift could give me so much
gratification -as the knowledge that your brothers
think of my comfort, and are willing to do something
to promote it.”



11*
130 LIFE IN THE WEST.



“T suppose it is the good-will manifested that
always makes a present acceptable.”

“T think it is, even to those whose wants are ac-
tually supplied by such gifts. A needy or poor
person will value a kind word or sympathizing look,
which accompanies the aid bestowed, quite as much
as the charity itself, and will gratefully, remember it
much longer. To those who are the recipients of
what are usually called presents, there is nothing
which awakens more uncomfortable feeling than an
appearance of superiority.”

“We can all bestow beautiful, gifts upon each
other, then, every day,” said Annie, “by loving
and trying to help one anotlier.”’

“ And when we get acqiiainted, “we can give such
splendid presents to everybody about us! Why,
Frank, you did not tell of that elegant one you and
Charles made to the old woman that lives by the -
roadside, between us and Mrs. Blake’s; I mean the
one that the children call Aunt Rachel.’

“To tell of such gifts would spoil them, Willie,”
answered Frank.

“ Not for me to tell of yours; would it, father?
At any rate, I must tell of this, if only for the sake
of the compliment the old woman gave you. When
we were coming here, yesterday, we saw Aunt Ra-
chel, out in front of the house, splitting wood. She
was at work on a green, knotty stick, and the hatchet
that she was using did not cut very well. Frank

8


i i

ee Se ee >

THE LOG-CABIN. 131



walked up straight to the wood-pile, and asked her
if she wouldn’t like to have him chop it for her.
At first, she looked pretty sharply at him, through
her spectacles, I can tell you, to see if he was mak-
ing fun of her; but whemyshe saw that he was in
earnest, she wl ‘Yes, and thank you, too? Her”
little grandson, who is about as old as Alice, ran in
and brought out an axe, which, she said, ‘was too
heavy for her to use, now she was so old ; and, in
a few minutes, the boys had her a couple of ennai
of wood cut, which they carried in, and put down
on the hearth, beside the stove. I don’t know,
exactly, what she thought about it, for it seemed to —
surprise her; but she said, once or pit “Ah! I
see Yankee blood fet poppy-juice ! Yankee blood
ain’t poppy-juice |’ ”’ ,
Mr. Moreton smiled at the compliment the boys
had won, and,commended the action.
“T am glad you had it in your power to confer
even this small favour; for it was to her, no doubt,
a favour. By this one little action, you have pro-
bably gained a friend ; and, if she sees nothing in
you hereafter to counteract its influence; her friend-
ship is yours and our’s for life; for, in the public
estimation, we are associated as a family, and, for
good or evil, the acts of each will affect the whole.
I have seen Aunt Rachel, and Mrs. Blake told me
of her, as our nearest neighbour. God, who has
liberally bestowed blessings upon us, has made her
nor I can estimate the value to her of a kind action

132 LIFE IN THE WEST.



lot to differ from our’s. She is alone and poor.
With that little grandson clinging to her, as his »
only friend, she has laid upon her the heavy burden
of her past bereavements and sorrows, and the care
of his and her own support. Perhaps neither you

or word; for we know nothing of the discourage-
ment and anxiety that extreme poverty brings, nor
of the heart-sinkings that must come, with its per-
plexities, in the time of old age and failing strength.
But Frank was right in thinking that such actions
are spoiled by boasting of them—spoiled in the sight
of God, who looks upon the heart and judges its
motives. Our little Annie might have seen the old
woman’s trouble with the wood, and not have been
able to help her, as your brothers did; yet the de-
sire to do so might have been as’strong and as free
from selfishness as their’s; and both would have
pleased God, because the heart was right, and the
spirit such as Christ manifested in his intercourse
with men.

“Let the heart, then, be right; let it be kept
with all diligence ; let it be purified from selfishness
by the inspiration of the Holy Ghost, and our eyes
will be opened to a sense of others’ wants and de-
sires: then good actions will follow naturally. We
all know where and how to seek for this purification
of our souls. .By earnest prayer to God for the gift
of his spirit, and as earnest effort to follow its guid-


THE LOG-CABIN. 133



ance, we shall not fail to become free from the do-
minionof selfishness; for the love of Jesus, our
Saviour, is pledged, and his intercession promised,
for our help and our aid. Our own hearts will first
be made peaceful and happy; then our homewill be .
bright, through the manifestation of our own joy;

and the circle of our influence will be extended, and

those who observe us will gradually be led to feel
that peace, happiness, and prosperity are alone to
be found in a calm, quiet, but steady performance of
every duty towards God and man, while the heart
rests, for comfort and support in this life, and for
salvation in that which is to come, solely upon the
merits of a crucified Redeemer.”


134 LIFE IN THE WEST.

CHAPTER XIII.
PATRICK’S HOME.

“No, Patrick! Nota shanty! I don’t like them :
but a good log-cabin, such as becomes the country—
built. as well and as substantially as we can do it. j
That is my idea of a house for you; and, now,.
where shall it be ?”

Thus said Robert, as he, with Henry and Patrick,
stood together in the woods, with their working-
frocks on, and spades over thei shoulders. Through
the land thatyMr. Moreton owned there was running
a little brook; which, though in the summer months —
it dwindled away to a mere tiny streamlet, yet, after
a rain, it rapidly filled, and ran its course over its é
pebbly bed merrily enough. Near its bank, Patrick :
chose to have his residence, and there they decided
it should be. .

The first thing undertaken was the digging of a
cellar. This, to Patrick, seemed. totally unneces-
sary, for “a potato-heap” was as good as any éellar,
in his estimation; but neither Robert nor Henry
would consent to such an arrangement. Two
days’ work, and the cellar wag dug; another day,


PATRICK’S HOME. 185 =





and it was logged with good white-oak logs, so t
it looked tidy, and the danger of its sides caving in
was obviated. Then they cut forty logs of the same
length ; roughly hewed them on two sides; stripped
the bark from them, that there might be ian har-. o
bours for the insects and bugs, (which are often so
troublesome in a new country;) notched their ends,
and piled them up, one above another, ‘fitting them
at the corners, until they formed,a square enclosure,
ten feet high. .Then a ride toa neighbouring swamp
and a day’s work were necessary, to get some tama-
rac poles, to lay across as supporters for the chamber-
floor. Two more logs gave the requisite height to
the back-and front of the building. Tamarac poles
were joined together in the middle, andy with a
gentle slope, met opposite corners of the building,
leaving the height of the centre of the room nearly

“eight feet. The gable ends were boarded i in with

split stuff, leaving a window,on each side. Split’

clapboards were laid on. the rafters, their lower
edges overlapping each other. These, at regular in-
tervals, were fastened by slender tamarac poles laid
across, and nailed at the ends, forming what is called
a “shaky roof?

A door was cut in the centre of the front side of
the cabin, and another, just opposite to it, on the
back. .Two windows were made, having each
twelve lights. The floor was of sawed lumber, laid
on hewn sleepers, with a trap-door i in one corner, to

$
io
ee
' 136 LIFE IN THE WEST.

$y



© go into the cellar, and a ladder, or steps, to the loft
above, near it. The establishment began now to look
quite like a house; but it was not yet done. There
was still the chinking, or filling up of the openings
— between the logs, (which must necessarily be left,
because of their irregularities,) with bits of split
~~ stuff, or chips, or small rails, and then covering it
smoothly over with clay-mortar. A greater task for
them was to build achimney. This was to be made on
the outside of the house; and, as they had but little
stone, and bricks were expensive, they were obliged
to make it of logs, covered with thick coatings of
clay. A frame, the size of the fire-place desired,
was made of boards; another frame, the same
shape, but smaller in size, was temporarily fixed —
within it, leaving a space between the two. This
was filled with moist clay and such bits of stone or _
brick as they could gather together, pressed tightly |
down, and forming one solid, compact mass. A hearth
of the same material, and the ends of the cut logs
well plastered over, made this, when dry, a safe and ©
~ neat-looking fire-place. Above, out of the reach of
the fire, the chimney was of sticks covered with’ clay.
A little shanty was built over the, back-door,
with a shelf, and a piece of plank fastened against
the side of the house, to answer as a table. This
finished the work of the young men; and it. was
with no little pleasure that they viewed it. Count-
ing their own labour as nothing, it had cost them
* w

»*

*
4 _
seve 137

but little. The logs were. taken from a field which
Mr. Hinckley had begun to clear. The digging,
splitting, and sawing they themselves had accom-
plished. With some aid in drawing and raising the
logs, and some little expense for nails, window-
frames, and glass, and the lumber for the floors, it
was the work of their own hands—the creation of
their own industry; and no workmen on a royal pa-
lace were ever more delighted than they with their
success. . .

Winne’s admiration equalled their’s, and fully
repaid them for their labour. It is true that the
poor woman had little’ or, nothing ‘to put in the
house, save her husband and children; yet. there
was a comfortable feeling associated with the having
a habitation of her own; and it seemed to give her
new life and energy, to see the change that a little
encouragement and a few words of kindness had
wrought upon her husband. When Mr. Moreton
came to see them, after they were fairly established,
he found Patrick and Winne, with the children,
seated outside of the door, apparently as happy as
earthly prosperity can make mortals—contented to
work, if work could be provided, but with no thrift
nor judgment, either in seeking labour, or making the
bodily vigour and strength they possessed available
for their own comfort.

And thus it ig;with many a poor foreigner, whose
wants have driven him into this Western world,

we , ,


>

cis
iS

138 LIFE

IN THE WEST.



whose means are all consumed in the mere getting
there, and whose want of education and habits of life
have totally unfitted him to act for himself. Alas!
that even his religion, superstitious and cruel to his
own soul, should, in so many instances, haye been used
further to degrade the man ; and, instead of exalting
and purifying the spirit, should have been, in the hands
of a crafty priesthood, subservient only to the deepen-
ing and darkening of the benighted, sinful heart, and
to the stupifying of every sensibility, so that he can
be led, like a beast, hither and thither, at the will of
those who stand between God and his soul!

How easily such can fall into the hands of the
wicked and designing, itis not difficult tosee. But,
thanks be to God! better influences may also be suc-
cessfully exerted upon them. benevolent employer; one who gives work, not cha-
rity; who, by a timely word, encourages habits of
industry, and gradually lays the foundation for in-
crease of knowledge and the growth of good principle;
and who, by his example, is constantly making known
the benefits of well-directed labour, integrity, and up-
rightness,—such a man is doing a missionary work :

a work in which the hearts of all lovers of their coun- ©

try must bid him God-speed; a work which is laying
deep and sure the foundations of national prosperity.
And his influence is felt, not only over the few with
whom he personally comes in contact, but over all

who are witnesses of the rapid and sure improve-
: $
PATRICK’S “HOME. 139.



ments that usually follow his endeavours to do good
as God gives him opportunity.

Nor is ‘‘the bread thus cast upon the waters”
never found. In a country where progress is
speedy, where change follows change in quick suc-
cession, the “many days” dwindle to a few; and
already had Mr. Moreton begun, not only to feel re-
paid for his trouble and the risk he had run in en-
gaging to employ one who seemed so ignorant, so
poor, and so needy, but he was also receiving the
first fruits of the promise, “ He that watereth, shall
be watered also himself,” in the earnest and success-
ful endeavours of Patrick and Winne to make them-
selves useful to their employers and to please their
benefactors.

Though their first object was, now, to testify their
gratitude, yet, under its influence, there were spring-
ing up pleasant manifestations of neatness and steady
application. They began to think more of each other’s
comfort, and to feel as if their children were of more
consequence. A praiseworthy ambition was aroused,
and they were willing to seek for information and
advice from those who had proved themselves friendly.
Patrick was bound by no promise to Mr. Moreton;
nor was Mr. Moreton obliged to retain him longer
than he was willing to work. The rent of his
house and his family’s support from the farm were
his wages for ae first year, with the understanding
_ that either the house or-its worth in money should
140 LIFE IN THE WEST.



be given him at its close, if he was faithful to his
employer. © After that, he was to be paid, with a
regular yearly increase of wages, in such way as
they might, at the time, agree upon. But it was
not in wages alone that Mr. Moreton’s family helped
Patrick McConey. Susan showed Winne how to fit
neat dresses for herself and the children, and, out of
her own wardrobe, helped their deficiencies. Mary’s
voice directed about the scanty furniture of the ¢a-
bin, showing how it could be cleansed and made
more available for comfort. It was Robert who
helped put the fence in order in front of the house,
and who promised little Pat a penny a week to keep
the pigs out of the yard. It was Henry who sold
the old horses and wagon, and somehow made the
money received for them go far enough to buy a
cow and two young steers, that, in a few years,
would be of great value'to Patrick. It was Annie”
that would look after the toddling little one, when
Winne came to the house to work, and Annie who
taught it and little Patrick their letters from one of
her own story-books; while Mrs. Moreton patiently
drilled the mother in the best way of doing house-
work, and taught her how to prepare food—accom-
plishments in which, like too many of her country-
women, she was strangely deficient.

Thus it was that they sought to insure their con-
fidence and gain their respect, hoping that, these be-
ing secured, they might» be atrial in leading

ey
hae

PATRICK’S HOME. 14]



them in the way of life; and that, while they
trusted them as friends who were solicitous for
their earthly welfare, they would also learn to view
with favour any efforts which, in the days to come,
they might make for their personal conversion.
Ignorance and superstition have ever gone hand in
hand, and he is wise who seeks Almighty aid be-
fore attacking its strongholds in the heart of one
who has been trained in the papal faith. Daily
were these benighted ones remembered before God,
as the Moreton family assembled for domestic wor-
ship; and strength and wisdom were asked for them-
selves, that they might each of hem ‘so live as to
recommend the religion of J cc the religion of the
Bible, to those around them.


142 LIFE IN THE WEST.

CHAPTER XIV.
NEIGHBOURS,

In this century of the world, and in our own be-
loved country, it is difficult to find, and more difficult
to retain, a home without neighbours. Very few are
there to whom companionship and social intercourse
are undesirable., Man is (as has been often said)
‘a gregarious ai ” drawn to his fellow-man by
_. ties of sympathy and interest. He needs his assist-
ance—he craves his friendship. A life of seclusion
has few charms for a healthy, vigorous mind: it has
no attractions for a man who is intent on bettering
his condition, and on rising in the world. Thus we
see, in the great West, that a farm near a settlement
is always sought for. If that settlement is likely to
increase and become of importance, so much the
better. As farmers, men are there necessarily
scattered and hidden from ee of travellers, as
well as from each other; but an election-day, a
court-week, or a Fourth-of-July celebration will
draw together, in any county, many men, women,
and children, who, living a little on one side or the
other of the highway, are seldom s@én, save on suck



P 4
NEIGHBOURS. 143



occasions. It was the number drawn together by
the return of our national holiday, that first gave
our friends any idea of those by whom they were
surrounded. Without any arrangement for their
entertainment, there was a general feeling among
the people that it should be a day of recreation, and
a resort to the village was as natural as it was cer-
tain. Here they loitered about, lingering at the
tavern, strolling up and down, chatting with each
other, until a party of young people arriving, who
had a violin-player with them, they had a dance in
the court-house! ‘The grocery-store was a place of
attraction to the men; and Mr. Blake’s bar-room
had many in it, who went away less sober than they
came. But there was no quarrelling. What of
evil appeared was from want of something good or
useful to do; and Mr. Moreton’s eye was quick to
discern this, and his heart as quick to resolve that
another year, if life and health were granted him,
it should be otherwise, and that they who came to-
gether should, at least, have the choice between evil
and good.
But, this time, he could do little but obtain an
introduction to some,of the people; and then, going
home, he, with his family, sought a pleasant place in
the adjoining woods, and played gipsy-life, by boiling
their tea-kettle and spreading their table beneath
the green trees; while Charles, Willie, and Alice
wandered off, and soon brought back a plentiful sup-

.
Reva
we *%
i my!
2 cae
“ we
f eh


144 LIFE IN THE WEST.



ply of field-strawberries. Before they partook of
their repast, they were all crowned with garlands of
bright flowers, made by Mary’s skilful hands, and
fantastic wreaths were about the shoulders of the
little girls; while Frank, with a huge bouquet in
his butfOn-hole, made an extempore address on
Liberty ; and, joining hands, they all, with great
energy and zeal, sang “Hail Columbia” to their
mother, who was their only auditor, and who after-
wards returned her thanks for the great honour
they had done her, and invited them, one and all,
to partake of the feast spread for them. Before
they were through, who should come but Patrick
and Winne, who had heard the voices, and were
drawn towards them by their desire both to see
what was going on and to help, if they could; and
they were just in time to have their share of the
supper, and to gather up for them the things brought
from the house.

Thus passed their first Tndependenee-day in In-
diana. But it was not of this we designed only to
tell. Their pleasures, this day, had been shared by
none but themselves, but thus they did not desire
that it should always be.

Their immediate neighbours on one side were few,
for their farm was a large one ; but between them
and the village there were several families, and the
village people themselves were not far away. For
the first few weeks, all advances made towards ac-

e

TD.»

Re
Sau
NEIGHBOURS. 145



quaintance were on their part. They showed them-
selves to be friendly, by a pleasant recognition of
those whom they had ever met, and by a manifest
desire to extend their knowledge of those around
them; and, in due time, this course had the effect
to draw out the good feeling and hospitality of
others. Mrs. Blake, the landlady of the village-
inn, has already been introduced to our readers;
but we may here speak of her steady, constant
friendliness, and of that value and esteem that grew
as they knew her better. Her husband was an in-
temperate man, idle in his habits, and little to be
depended. on; but she, with energy and self-denial,
laboured on, hoping almost against hope for him, and
doing what she could to remedy the evils of his ex-
ample upon his children. Her’s was no easy life.
To maintain the reputation of their house, (upon
which their support depended,) to restrain and guide
the restless minds of her children, and, with inge-
nuity and ceaseless care, to watch over her husband’s
course, oftentimes preventing those drunken ecarou-
sals which he called frolics,—this was her task, and
who shall say that it was easy, or the burden light?

Directly across the street from her, lived a lawyer
—‘’ Squire Thomas,” as he was styled—a man of
talents and well educated; but dissatisfied with his
home in the West. His property had become so
involved with the place in which he lived, that he
could not, without sacrifice, leave Lakeland. He

*

wr *
146 LIFE IN THE WEST.



had health, a good profession, and was steadily ac.
quiring riches; but the poison of discontent mingled
with his cup of mercies, and he knew not that that
poison was placed there by his own hand, that its
fountain was in his own heart, and that, go whither
he would, the stream would still flow. Mrs. Thomas
scarcely knew her neighbours, and her children as-
sociated but little with others of their age; while
the reputation of the whole family was that of
proud, overbearing people, who felt as if they were
of more consequence than their neighbours.

Mr. and Mrs. Stetson were plain, straight-forward,
honest, industrious people, originally from Pennsyl-
vania, but residents of Lakeland since it became a
town. They began with only a small capital ; but,
as a merchant or trader, he had realized a comfort-
able competency. There was Mr. Trufant, another
merchant, and Mr. Black, still another—both of
whom had families, and were prosperous in their
worldly concerns. There was Dr. Mason, a man of
limited education, but of strong good sense—kind-
hearted, and in earnest to relieve suffering; and
Mrs. Mason, who warmly seconded his endeavours
to make both sick people well and well people
happy. There was Mr. John Dudley, a young law-
yer, who boarded with Mrs. Blake—a man of edu-
cation and intelligence, seeking his fortune far
away from his home. There was Mr. Stabler, a
German house-builder, who called his workmen from

*

ks
-

est —S[ —_—,

NEIGHBOURS. 147



their employment, when dinner was ready, with the
sweetest notes upon a French horn. There was the
little German shoemaker, whose wife was a native
of the State, and who counted the ages of her chil-
dren by the running of the sap of the sugar-maple,
saying that little “Dora was nine years old, last
sap-run, and Herman would be three, come the
next.’”’ There was Mr. Blagden, the school-teacher
for the time, but intending soon to return to his
farm, which he had left only on account of ill
health. There was Aunt Rachel, of whom we have
spoken before; and, just beyond her, a French
family lived, miserably poor and destitute. sffhese
were but a part of the neighbours by whom Mr.
Moreton’s family was surrounded, but, sufficient to
show the variety of life that they would meet with.

Among them all, there were, doubtless, those
whom they should learn to love and respect, and the
disposition to do so was not wanting in our friends.
That some of the homes of these people were neither
neat nor tidy, and that, in most of them, there was
evident little ambition to have a well-furnished house,
is true. One or two rooms were made to accommo-
date a whole family; but, living in the same way
themselves, neither Mr. nor Mrs. Moreton could find
fault with it. One thing they did observe and no-
tice, viz. that there was lacking neither capabilities
nor the ambition to improve ; but that, beneath the
eumbrous load of labour and care thrown upon them,
~~ -

a eS ee a ee a SSS ee Ee ee

148 LIFE IN THE WEST.



the people were seen to great disadvantage; and
that, year by year, the increased advantages of their
condition and the possession of conveniences for
performing labour, would give them more freedom
from fatigue, and leisure to develop those tastes,
which were not dead, but hidden by the necessity
that now existed to supply actual physical wants.

“There is nothing here to discourage us,” said
Mrs. Moreton, “or to disappoint our expectations in
regard to social intercourse with those aboui us.
Neither for ourselves nor our children need we fear
that we shall be lonely, or without the advantages
of others’ friendship. If we hear of village factions
and quarrels, they need not be our’s; and, if home
is pleasant to the boys, they will hardly run to the
grocery or ball-room for society.”

“T own that I have some fears that the monotony
of life may be tedious to Robert and Henry, and that
Mary,,with her fastidious tastes, will see many things
to disgust her with so rude a life as that about us,”
said Mr. Moreton.

“T have little fear for our sons, until the house
and farm are in good order. Employment, full
employment, is the best safeguard against the evil
tendency of youthful.restlessness; and work is

‘ abundant with us now, and will be for two years to

come. Beside, under the influence of Christian
principle, as we hope they are, they are learning to
look upon those about them as creatures of God,

, “
e
“
‘
{

-NEIGHBOURS. 149



whom, on no account, may they neglect or despise.
Will not this keep them from being weary of their
daily life ?”

“But Mary and you? Will you be satisfied
here ?”

“Do not fear for us. Susan supplies the need of
a companion to both of us, and she is happy always.
Mary came with an aggravated idea of the loneli-
ness and misery she might find here. It was, to her,
like leaving a paradise for a desert. Every thing is
far better and more agreeable than she looked for,
and the reaction is favourable for her. So far, she
is perfectly satisfied—more than that,—pleased with
the change. For myself, I need nothing more for
my happiness than to see you all happy. A wife
and a mother need look no farther than her own
fireside for society ; yet there are resources open for
me beyond this. Already instances of good feeling,
of amiability, and of native refinement have come
under my notice among our acquaintances here. I
have seen energy and hope exhibited, and powers
of self-denial and endurance manifested, which have
compelled my admiration, even while I owned that
I was not equal to them.” 3

“Tt was my strong desire for your happiness that
has made me anxious,” replied Mr. Moreton. “I
am neither discouraged nor disheartened myself; but
I feared for you.”

“Then fear no longer, I beg of you. ‘The good
18
150 LIFE IN THE WEST.



time coming’ will be as powerful a motive with us
as with our neighbours; and I am thankful that we
are here now, when Lakeland is in its transition-
state. A few years more, and our influence would
have been lost, for its character will then be fixed.
As There is

‘A tide in the affairs of men,

Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune,’
so there is with places and towns. Now is the time
to work for Lakeland, and now is the time that work-
ing will do ws good—prove our patience, awaken our
powers of judgment, and impress upon our children |
a sense of responsibility to man and God.””

“You are right in your judgment; and, if it is
blessed to be permitted to labour, how thankful
should we be for the gracious gospel, in which is |
our only sure hope of success! Never, until I came |
here, have I realized its full tendency to reform and
elevate society, or the ennobling influence of a cor- |
dial belief in Christianity. To each individual, the
message it brings is one of love. It tells him that,
as the possessor of an immortal soul, he is of the
highest importance; that, for that soul, Christ died
—for its salvation he now intercedes. Why should ¥
he despise himself, or debase the spirit for which
‘God cares? Why should he despair, when eternal
life is offered on terms so simple—so sure? How
can he be thoughtless, when his way is watched by ”

Jesus himself, and that with eyes of divine love?
;
NEIGHBOURS. 151



How can he be careless of his words or actions,
when he realizes that they are to influence his eter-
nal state? Only once impress upon his mind the
great truth of his immortality, and fix it there, with
the knowledge of Jesus as his Saviour, and personal
thought, personal responsibility, personal hope, and
personal effort will be aroused. Qh! the blessed
gospel of Christ, that can awaken attention, that
can sustain under trying effort, that can comfort in
tribulation and sorrow, and assure of ultimate suc-
cess and eternal salvation !

‘Under its influence, how small appear the out-
ward circumstances with which a gracious God has
seen fit to invest each soul! I hope that we shall
all be enabled to see this, and that the value of each
immortal spirit will be manifest tous. We may
help it in its struggle, we may guide it in its efforts,
we may win its confidence; our example may be a
co-worker with the spirit of God; our words may fix
or dissipate serious impressions; our actions may
lead into temptation. Together made in the image
of God—together sinners in his sight—together we
may be heirs of a blessed immortality! With what
a vast interest does this thought invest our own per-
sonal effort—our every-day intercourse with our
neighbours! May God grant us the desire and
the strength to be faithful !”


OL —

152 LIFE IN THE WEST.

CHAPTER XV.
THOMAS REVERE,

It was under the influence. of sentiments such ag
those expressed in the last chapter, that Mr. Moreton
looked around him for opportunities to do good. To
combat existing plans of operation was not, in hig
opinion, wise or desirable. He deemed it better to
fall in with those already in progress, and help in
the carrying out of schemes that had been arranged
by others, whose longer residence in the country,
and greater knowledge of the prevailing modes of
thought and action, made them better judges of
what was likely to be successful. When fairly
initiated himself, he could propose changes, if he
then thought such changes would add any value to
projects already started, or invest them with increased
attractions. Nor was he willin g to awaken envy or ill-
will, or to excite comment, by assuming any promi-
nent place in the community, without it was sure to
add to his usefulness.

The Sabbath, as a day of worship, must have its _

due observance by his family, or they would not be
satisfied. There was no church, no religious ser-
©

THOMAS REVERE. 153



vice, no gathering of the people for prayer and
praise, the Sabbath after their arrival. Why was
this? Had Mr. Moreton forgotten it, when deciding
upon Lakeland as a residence, or had he deemed it
a secondary consideration? Neither. At the time
he purchased his farm, there was a missionary
labouring there, and a little church of seven mem-
bers had gathered themselves under his ministra-
tions. It was with great regret that our friends
found, on their agrival, that he had left the little
flock, discouraged and disheartened himself, because
he seemed to make so little progress, and had
left the little band of Christians hardly less de-
pressed and dejected than he himself. The variety
of denominational feeling had prevented unity of
action, and the few whose feelings were in harmony
had been too poor to build a church or support a
minister. A Sabbath-school had been organized, .
and was again re-opened with the returning spring,
but it was feebly sustained, for want of interest in
the people.

To become members of this, in whatever capacity
they might, was the determination of our friends ;
and, accordingly, the first Sabbath after their arrival,
Mr. Moreton, with all his children, were there.

_ It was held at five o’clock in the afternoon, and
their party was too large to escape notice, as they
entered the room and found their seats. A Mr.

Johnson was the superintendent, and the cordial—
13#


154 LIFE IN THE WEST.



“Tam glad to see you!” with which he welcomed
them, was from the heart. He soon placed Susan
with a little class about her, Annie and Alice
among the number. Mary found a seat among the
older girls under Mrs. Stetson’s care, but they were,
with one exception, much younger than herself.
Robert and Henry entered themselves, as the nucleus
about which a Bible-class might gather, under the
instructions of their father; and right glad were
they, when John Dudley, the young lawyer, having
seen them go into the school-house, followed and
took his place by them. Places for the younger
lads were found, which suited them; and such an
accession to their numbers and strength could not
fail to give new life and vigour to the whole school.
At the commencement of the school, Mr. Moreton
was requested to offer prayer; and when the simple
hymn was read, and, in uncertain, faint, and tremu-
lous tones, the children began to sing, Mary’s sweet,
clear voice, accustomed to guiding the notes of
younger and feebler voices, joined with them,
giving character and correctness to the harmony.

As Robert lingered at the close of the school,
waiting for his father’s company home, Mr. John-
son expressed the hope that they might be able to
give him a class soon.

“Y would rather stay where I am,” was Robert’s
reply. ‘Tam not too old to be a learner; and we
may be able to gather a Bible-class together.”
THOMAS REVERE. 155



That foolish pride that makes one ashamed to ae-
knowledge his best feelings, and leads to the con-
cealment of his purest affections and most valuable
impulses, had no place in Robert’s mind. His was
true independence of heart—true manliness. He
loved his home—he loved his family circle. The
restraints that parental watchfulness imposed, he
felt to be safeguards to his prosperity ; and would
on no account have shaken them off as impediments
in the path of pleasure. Nor did the spirit of world-
liness or vanity prevent his making the interests of
his home his objects of attraction, or the fear of
criticism or ill-natured remark hinder his associating
with those who were younger or more ignorant than
himself. |

Straight-forward and with honesty of purpose, he
pursued his way, seeking no distinction and asking
for no notoriety ; yet, when called upon by circum-
stances, he could openly defend the right, and, with
what ability he possessed, maintain his cause. They
had been in Lakeland several months, when, one
evening, Robert went to the village grocery-store to
procure some family necessary, and found himself
thrown into a new, and, to him, strange scene.

Drunkenness still prevails too widely over our
fair land, and, year by year, lays low the fortunes
and prospects of many, to whom life opened with
the brightest expectations and the highest hopes.

Such could be found in Lakeland. Amon g others,

—
156 LIFE IN THE WEST.



there was one, scarcely thirty years of age, who, by
great and continued indulgence, had earned for him-
self the nickname of “Whisky Tom.” He was a
native of New England. His early life or family
friends were unknown to the Lakeland people. It
was evident that he had received a complete colle-
giate education, and equally evident that his dissi-
pated habits had rendered that education of no avail
to him. He came to the West with money to pur-
chase a small farm, and to buik upon it a frame-
house. This farm lay some milés out of the village,
and was rented.to a family, with whom he resided,
and who were his assistants about the farm. At
first, he pursued his business diligently, and Thomas
Revere was known only as a moderate drinker. An
occasional glass at the tavern or grocery counter, a
drink with a friend, or ata raising or huskin g, betrayed
no strong habits of intemperance ; but, soon, longer
tarryings where it could be found and more frequent
Visits, were noticeable. Then, the bottle was brought
in his pocket, that it might be filled to carry home.
The bottle became too small, and a jug was now
openly carried in his hand. Two years passed, and
he entered upon the third with few friends, except
his boon companions; with little ability and less in-
tention of labouring daily for his bread; and with
“the chains of the monster” firmly riveted on his
neck! One more year, and he lost all control over
his property ; for the farm, nominally his own, was
THOMAS REVERE. 157



so covered by mortgages and incumbrances, that it”
was actually in the possession of those who had sup-
plied his craving thirst and fed the flames that were
now consuming him. Yet he was suffered to live
there unmolested; for his personal effects were of
some value, and the money-making rumseller would
fain have all! Such was the state of Thomas Re-
vere’s affairs on the arrival of Mr. Moreton’s family
in Lakeland. Prematurely infirm and broken-down
in physical strength, his mind shattered, but reveal-
ing, in moments of partial inebriation, its former
brilliant powers, he needed only the stimulus of one
or two glasses to call forth his powers of argumenta-
tion and the quick repartee and bright sallies of ©
wit that showed the man of talent.

Under such an influence was it that Robert More-
ton first encountered him. The village store was
quiet; though, within it, as he entered, he found
several men, with “Whisky Tom,” each holding
their glasses, and drinking, more or less eagerly,
their contents. Behind the counter, stood the store-
keeper, marking the new score against Revere, who,
with his accustomed liberality, was ¢reating them all.
He started upon Robert’s entrance, and, with mock
obsequiousness, bowed twice or thrice nearly to the
floor. The salutation was coolly but civilly re-
turned, and Robert passed on to do his errand.
But he was interrupted. With his own unsteady
hand did the half-drunken man fill an empty glass,
—

———

158 LIFE IN THE WEST.



rand, in high-flown phrase, loudly invited Robert
to participate in their carousal, and honour him by
taking a glass of whisky !

“T never drink whisky,’ was Robert’s laconic

reply; for he sought quickly to terminate this (to

him) disgusting scene.

“Not whisky! Then, what may it please your
honourable worship to have? Rum, brandy, gin,
wine, cordial?” and he ran through the list of
liquors displayed upon the shelf,

“Neither,” said Robert, politely ; “ I am a cold-
water man!”

Reyere was not so easily to be set aside; and,
tossing off the contents of the glass, its heating fires
running through his veins, he still persisted in offer-
ing him a glass, until, from invitation, it began
to assume the chardcter of entreaty, and afterwards
that of threats, if he would not drink with him.

In this crisis, what could our young frienddo? To
turn and go without accomplishing his purposed er-
rand, would only add to the ridicule and illy-suppressed
merriment of the lookers-on. To pretend to drink,
and thus relieve himself, he would not. To con-
tend with an intoxicated man was, he well knew,
worse than folly. His temper was beginning to be
aroused ; and—as Revere stood by his side, holding
the amber-coloured draught, his: face flushed and

purple with drunken eagerness, his tottering limbs

almost refusing to support him, his trembling hands
THOMAS REVERE. 159



and bloodshot eye revealing his own bondage, and
his thick and husky tones, half-articulate, pressing
again and again upon him the poisoned cup—from
the impulse of the moment, Robert exclaimed, with
energy, as he pushed aside the glass—

“No, no! Would you make me like yourself,
sir?”

There is left to almost every one, however aban-
doned, some power to appreciate what “is lovely
and of good report.” When the power to rule one-

elf is admitted to be gone, and even the wish to do
jaggy is all but extinguished, there will still lurk a per-
tion of goodness when it is seen; and thus was
‘that the contrast thrust upon Revere by Robert’s
question produced its effect} How could it be other-.
wise? In the strength of Ws young manhood, his
head lifted with the energy of a determined mind,
his face beaming with health and intelligence, strong
in the consciousness of rectitude, and with bright and
steadfast trust in the future, as a future of good,—
what a contrast did he present to him who would
tempt him! It was too palpable, too evident for
even the half-closed eye and dimmed perceptions of
Revere !

“Twill not! I will not!” he muttered, as he sank
into a seat; and he groaned a bitter groan, as there
flashed upon’ hima remembrance of the past: how,
even to him, it had once been true that life was hope-
ful, and death and eternity not to be dreaded ; howhe



160 LIFE IN THE WEST.



had started buoyant and strong in expectation, his
life crowned with blessings, his path strewn with
mercies, and his course watched with eyes of anxious,
yearning love. Ah! yes; and the recollection of
that first glass came now to him! That first indul-
gence in what had proved his ruin! And was he
one to force upon another the like destruction? To
that first yielding to temptation could he now look
as the beginning of his downward course; to it
could he now attach that weakened strength of prin-
ciple, and its consequent prostration, which had left
him powerless in the hand of the tempter. It was
an hour of bitter thought. The same draught which
had impelled him to use all his powers to persuade
Robert, now awakened in him unnatural distress
and new remorse. No future dawned upon him, as
he sat and thought. It was all dark,—all night!
His own course had been madness—its end was ruin.
He himself was but the wreck of a man—the broken
remains of a goodly temple, whereof the polished
shafts and chiselled stones lay scattered’ and half.
buried, like his own youthful hopes and expectations!
Would that this truth could be impressed upon
the heart and mind of every youth :— What you are
doing to-day, you are doing for eternity! A simple
act, small and insignificant as you may regard it,
may stain for ever the purity of your soul. You
may deem it trifling, but its performance may com-
mit you for a lifetime; it may seem to be of no ac-
THOMAS REVERE. 161

count, but it may rest for ever in the scale of dis-
honest purposes ; foolish, but it may,endanger your
reputation through a long course of years; hardly
sinful, but,it may lead to consequences fearful and
lasting beyond life—yes, even beyond death itself !

That firstproffered glass made Thomas Revere a
drunkard, because he yielded to its temptation; that
first glass, resisted, made Robert Moreton firm as a
temperance man; and, from this time, he was
known and respected as one whose appetite was not
to be overcome when tempted, nor his principles
successfully assailed.

NN ‘ he
ak ky i 2»



14
162 LIFE IN THE WEST. ,

CHAPTER XVI. |
iy’ s LETTER, |

“TIME, in passing, takes us along with it.” Un.
consciously, the spring glides into summer, the
autumn into winter, until it is only by looking far
back that we can realize the rapidity with which
life is passing away.

Ttis not our intention to dwell minutely upon
every-day occurrences in the Moreton family. The
summer’s work and pleasures, the winter’s plans,
and entertainments are more concisely narrated in —
the following letter of Mary’s to her friend Lucy
Leighton, which we take ‘the liberty to lay before
vur readers : Pa sie

| Lakeland, January 2d, 18—.

Dear Lucy:—Oh! that rough leather mail-bag that
rides past our house on horseback, once every week!
What good things it sometimes brings! When it
was slowly moving along, last week, I had a pre-
sentiment that it held something more precious than
our weekly supply of papers and pamphlets; and I
was not disappointed! MHard.v one of us but re-
ceived some token of’ remembrance from absent
friends, telling us that we were not forgotten.
"© -MARY’S LETTER. 163



Your’s, dear Lucy, with its promise of good for our
Sunday-school library, was not the least welcome.
You have accomplished much for us, in getting so
choice a,supply of books, and they cannot fail to
help us i our work. We thank you for your
efforts, and we thank all who have aided you.

And our letters! How we listened, as we heard
parts or the whole, first of one, then of another.
Every item of news was discussed—every expres-
sion of affection treasured. Were this not our home,
there might have been some longings, some wishes !
Dear old Laurelton, with its beautiful homes and
pleasant friends! No home will efface the remem-
brance of that from our memories—no friends ever
be dearer than those we left there. ‘3

But here we are truly happy ;—even at the West,
and wintering in a log-cabin with whitewashed walls!
The barn was finished, and the horses, cows, and
crops provided for; but by no possible effort was
father able to get the house into a habitable state for
the winter. He was disappointed, and says that
the only trouble he has had here has been the little
dependence to be placed upon the word of others,
many of whom like to work only when there is nos
thing else to do.

Even in the log-house, as I said, we are happy.
We are well, and a fresh chinking outside made the
walls all tight; while the abundance of fire-wood,
which would delight poor people at the East, keeps
ee

=
ee

164 LIFE IN THE WEST.



us warm. The climate is more mild than that of
New England, and only a few days have been too
cold to be pleasant. Charles, Willie, and Alice go
to school to Mr. Blagden. Susan accompanies them
three afternoons in the weck, having been engaged
by Mr. Blagden to give instruction in needlework to
the girls. This plan pleases all. The mothers like
it; for they have many a nice piece of mending
or making accomplished without their oversight.
The girls like it, as a variation from their school
studies. And Susan, far from being weary of the:
monotony of ‘stitch, stitch, stitching,” seems more
and more pleased, as she sees the improvement and
ambition of her scholars.

Our domestic labours are not great or heavy;
yet mother, Susan, and I find sufficient occupation
for every morning. Winne stands ready to aid us,
whenever we need her help; and we call upon her
often, considering that we live in a small house, and
dispense with all but absolute wants. Besides this,
I hear Annie recite every day, and, on Saturday of
each week, I have a singing-school for the Sunday-
school children. This was brought about by acci-
dent. Annie, in her rambles soon after we came
here, followed, for some distance, the little brook
near which Patrick’s dwelling stands. Its course
was not remarkably interesting at first, for it was
straight and sunny; but suddenly it took a turn,
and came back into the woodland owned by, father,
at
$

MARY’S LETTER. 165



making a bend which left some rods of ground,
covered with green, soft grass, and shaded by large
black walnut trees. It was a pleasant surprise to
Annie., The soft western sunlight spread cheerfully
over it, the little stream flowed so quietly on, and the
trees were 80 alive with birds, that she was charmed.
On her return, she told us of it with delight, and
dwelt so long upon the multitude of birds she saw
there, that Willie, always ready with a word, de-
clared it must be “the birds’ parlour.” The name
pleased us; and, when we visited it ina company,
the next’ day, we voted unanimously that it was
well named, and from that time it should be our
chosen gathering-place.

Frank and Charles entered immediately upon the -
work of clearing out the undergrowth and trimming
the trees. This done, Charlie, who admires great
undertakings, thought some stones judiciously placed
where there was a slight fall of water, would make
its course more melodious, for it was evident that,
in the matter.of noise, the birds had the pre-emi-
hence. Stones are not very plenty hereabouts, and
the old rocky hills of Laurelton had the honour of
a sigh to their memory ; but, by dint of perseverance,
enough were gathered, and it was a great improve-
ment. Robert made some rough seats for the place ;
and, when all was finished, mother gave permission
for the children to have a rural party there.

It was \quite a gathering of the village boys and
1
166 LIFE IN THE WEST.



girls, and a merry time they made of it. An attempt
to have some music seemed to please ; and one song
that I sang suited so well, that I offered to teach it to
one or two. So many pressed forward to try their
skill at learning it, that we frightened the birds out
of their home; and, after practising some time, we
parted, with the promise to meet again. From that
time, Saturday has been the day, and I have been
regularly installed as leader, with the understanding
that my efforts shall be mainly directed for the
benefiting of the Sabbath-school. |

We had no hymn-books, and it was rather dull at
first to learn verses; but they have persevered; and
now their memories are stored with enough hymns

»and tunes to make a variety for the school, I have

begun to try and drill them in “the rudiments.”
My success is not remarkable, but it is enough to
keep off discouragement.

For several weeks after we came, we had no pub-
lic worship on the Sabbath. Father proposed to
Mr. Johnson to have our Sabbath-school earlier, and
thus leave time for a sermon to be read afterwards.
Together they asked Mr. Blagden to be the reader;
he consented, and our congregation has every week
been becoming larger; and, if we can only have a
missionary sent, we shall try hard to find a better
place than the school-house for him to preach in.
Beside this service, we have occasional preaching

from clergymen from the neighbouring settlements.
MARY’S LETTER. 167



Did you know that Richard Gray was coming out
fo us in the spring? This arrangement has made
us very happy, as it makes Susan’s stay with us, or
near us, almost certain. A shop is to be rented in
the village, and over its door is to be a sign, bear-
ing upon it the names of “ Gray & Moreton,” and
in it there is to be all kinds of furniture for which
there may be any market. E

Frank has decided: to accept father’s offer of a
collegiate education, but will not leave home for a
year. He studies with Mr. Blagden, and has found
a Mr. Van Weichten, who is willing to assist him
in his German. These lessons he repeats to me, so
that I am able to make some progress.

You ask how we amuse ourselves these long win-

ter evenings. Our newspapers and books are invalu-
able; but, just now, we have had the holidays, and
have kept them, too, as holidays! Christmas even-
ing, the Van Weichtens invited us there; for, like
all Germans, it was to be their great family festival.
The old gentleman, at whose house the gathering
was to be held, is the father of Frank’s teacher, and
lives some miles out from us. We went, as it be-
gan to be evening, all packed in the great wagon-
sleigh, and covered with buffalo robes,—for the air
was cold and sharp. The moonlight struggled with
scattered clouds, and revealed, indistinctly at times,
the great bare trunks and branches of the old
forest-trees, glittering with their covering of frost;


168 LIFE IN THE WEST.



- sand the snow upon the ground creaked beneath the

runners of our .vehicle. My letter is too long for

me to describe it all : from the huge bonfire outside

the door, to the hearty welcome and boisterous

greetings within; from the social conversation, to

the merry games; from the bountiful feast, to the

- Christmas-tree, laden with the simple offerings of

love for each and all. Nor can I tell you of the

warm affection that prevailed amongst them, and

made them all so charming. Grandfather and

grandmother, parents, children, and all, seemed ac-

tually to live for each other, and, as father said, were

truly an exemplification of the beauty of dwelling
together inwnity. The getting away from such
_ hospitality was not easily accomplished; and then

the ride home, the moon hidden behind dark masses

of clouds, and the snowflakes, falling thick and fast,

covering us with a fleecy mantle!

But I must tell you of our own New Year, which |
was so quietly pleasant. Frank’s picture of the old |
homestead, for mother, was the gift which appeared
to give most pleasure. The little secrets and sur-
prises of us children were quite well managed ; and
Annie’s pincushions and watch-cases, and Charles’s
tame pigeon for Annie, and his little gray owl for
Alice, were as wonderful as ever gifts were. Willie
had made us some thread-winders; Frank had
gathered a huge basket of eranberries for family
use; Robert had a picture-frame, which fitted
MARY’S LETTER. 169



Frank’s offering to mother so exactly, that it exe
cited a suspicion of confederation ; an Henry, who
had nothing to give, got up, shook hands with each
one, and offered his services for the next year to
whoever should want them. Alice, when it came



her turn, jumped upon his neck, and would not Ss.
release him until she had received a good, hearty, *

sonorous kiss. Mother’s large New-Year’s cake was
not wanting, nor were the apples and nuts > and
then, when all our merriment was hushed, father
reminded us of our obligations to Him who had
taken care of us; and read that beautiful psalm ,*
beginning—“ Bless the Lord, oh my soul: and all
that is within me bless his holy name, who redeem-
eth thy life from destruction, and crowneth thee
with loving-kindness and tender mercies ;’ and the
evening was closed with piayer.

Thus we live, dear Lucy. I have not told you
all that I would like, but enough to have you know

that life in the woods is far from uninteresting or
uninviting to us. We miss our old friends ; and it ©

is their absence alone that makes us ever look with
longing desires toward our Northern home, I
shall have to write to you again; for I can say no
more now than that I am
Your affeetionate friend,
Mary Moreton.
Seti Me

* Ps, ciii.

»
|
|



*.

rt
a

LIFE IN THE WEST.

CHAPTER XVII.

FARMING.

“THERE is scarcely any well-informed person,
who, if he has the will, has not the power to add
something essential to the general stock of know-
ledge, if he will only observe, regularly and method-
ically, some particular class of facts, which may
most excite his attention, or which his situation may
best enable him to study with effect.”

This observation of Sir John Herschel* still
holds true; and of no class of persons is it more true
than of farmers, whose hourly and daily business
brings before their minds facts in the natural, world
which must awaken curiosity, and results’ which
baffle their powers of investigation. The geogra-
phical distribution,,of plants; the characteristics of
soils ; the growth of trees; the eradication of weeds;
the sepietiinn of various kinds of grain; the im-
provement of vegetables; the knowledge of the
structure and habits of animals that are useful or
troublesome, and of insects and diseases that hinder



* Discourse on the Study“f Natural Philosophy.
FARMING. 17]



or destroy their crops; and the improvement and
good-keeping of domestic stock,—are among the
most obvious of a farmer’s cares.

In a new country, we must add to these, the
clearing and subduing of wild lands, the wood-chop-
ping, the logging, the burning of brush-heaps, the .
making of potash from the ashes, the laying out
and fencing of lands, the rotation of wheat and
grass crops, giving time for the decay of roots and
stumps, and the draining of marshes; and we can
readily see that to be “a tiller of the soil” brings
with it many and arduous labours, which call
for strength of body, and no less for ingenuity
of plans and wise calculations. The introduction
of scientific agriculture has already benefited the
farmer, and we may look for still greater results in
his behalf from the careful and close investigations
of chemists and men of observation. Only with
the illiterate is the term of a “ book-farmer” one of
reproach ; for experience has proved the value of. ‘~¢
many a suggestion and the utility of many a scheme
which has originated in the mind of some secluded
student, working away in silence upon the basis of
facts brought to his knowledge by the practical
labouring-man. Me

The partial clearing and cultivation of Mr. More-
ton’s farm, while it increased the present comfort of
its occupants, did not preclude the necessity of at-
tending to all these earlier duties of an emigrant.


172 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Many a winter’s day did the young men take an
early start for the woods, with dinner-basket in
hand, and Carlo frisking by their side. With axes
over their shoulders, would they briskly go to their
day’s labour; and the merry ringing echo of
stroke after stroke resounded through the still
woods, while, with mighty crash, one old monarch-
tree after another was laid low. Then the loud
“Gee! whoa! Gee up!” might be heard, day after
day, as, with heavy chains and the help of the oxen,
they drew the huge logs together, and heaped on the
brush, ready for the first still, dry weather, in order
to burn them. Nor were their woods less picturesque
and beautiful than others, as, with great delight, the
younger boys kindled fires beneath these heaps, and
watched them lighting up se brilliantly, by night,
the forests around, and sending forth, by day, their
columns of blue smoke, that rose gracefully and diffu-
sed a mild, soft haziness throughout the atmosphere.

It had been of great benefit to Mr. Moreton to
retain the services of Mr. Hinckley through his
first summer. A new and large farm, with imper-
fect means of culture and but little hired aid, was
very different from his small and high! P-cultigntal
homestead in Laurelton; and. it was with interest
that he watched the contrivances and devices of his
predecessor in securing from the land all the advan-
tages it could be made to yield. This knowledge of
the hindrances he must meet, and the expedients
FARMING. 173



necessary to overcome difficulties, placed him on an
equality with the neighbouring farmers; while his
acquaintance with the later modes of producing a
greater increase of crops, gave him, in some respects,
the superiority.

The return of spring was welcomed by all.
Again did the lark, the robin, the phebe-bird, and
the whip-poor-will make themselyes heard. Again
did the yellow cowslips appear on the margin of the
brooks and gayly nod to the snowy “ arrow-heads”
that gently reposed on the waters, Again did the
humming-bees daintily visit, first one, then the
other, but tarried not long, as if they would say,
“You do very well, for the present; but we know
that your cousins, the eglantine and the sweet violet,

are coming, and we will just wait, if you please ;’’.

so they but sipped of their cups, and away they
flew. Again did the golden sunshine brighten the
borders of the fleecy clouds above, and gleam
cheerily, peeping in under the spreading branches
of the trees, and calling out the « eye-brights,”’ the
blue lupines, and the crimson lich-nedia, to welcome
its genial warmth. After the long winter, who would
not rejoice at its return? The birds loudly sang
their happiness; the flowers blossomed in their joy;
little children shouted with pleasure, as they threw

off their hats, and its warm beams fell upon their —

clustering hair; staid housewives opened their doors,
that its golden light might come in, and its cheerful
15

ee ee


174 LIFE IN THE WEST.



influence reached their hearts; and the farmers,
ready with their open furrows, cast in the grain that
it came to quicken into life. “Truly the light is
sweet, and a pleasant thing it is for the eyes to be-
hold the sun.”

If “weather be the farmer’s master,” as has been
said, its ordering is for his happiness. The accumu-
lated labours of spring, as the seed-time, can be met
by the anticipatory work of a leisure winter ; and,
if the growing weeds of summer must be rooted
out, the ripening of growing crops gives the time;
while the bright, warm days of autumn, with their
invigorating atmosphere, invite to the extra toil of
harvesting.

Mr. Moreton’s design, in removing to his Western
farm, was to prosecute his occupation in all its varied
branches. A large wheat or a large corn farm was
not what he wanted. To raise such supplies as he
might need for family use, both in summer and
winter, was his first object; after that, to adapt
such crops as might be marketable to his locality,
and gradually to enlarge his cultivated fields, as op.
portunity offered for making them profitable.

His new house, into which the family had now
removed, was a substantial two-story wooden house.
It stood on the elevated land back of the log-cabin;
and, at first, with its white walls and need of shade,
it was not very attractive. Busy hands soon gave
its interior a different aspect. Familiar articles of
FARMING. 175



furniture tastefully arranged, a few old pictures
hung upon its walls, and vases of wild flowers upon
the table and mantel, gave to the new parlour a very
satisfactory appearance. Then, a Western kitchen,
with its shining black stove and its tidy cupboards,
always has a cozy, comfortable look. The “mother’s

room !’’ what family knows not that sociable spot—

that heart of the house? To it go the weary, the
sick, the sad, and the happy, all sure of sympathy
and of aid—all secure in their expectation of meet-
ing there the cheering word, the comforting smile,
and the loving friend. The “spare room,” with its
chairs demurely placed, its well-shaken bed, and its
snowy curtains. Annie’s “little sunny-side,” open-
ing out of the mother’s room, fitted with its pillows
and cushions, and showing, on every hand, gifts
adapted to soothe her hours of weariness and lan-
guishing. The boys’ rooms, with their shelves of
books, and drawers for their varied possessions ; and
the pleasant sleeping apartments of the girls, so
white with muslin drapery. Who could say that,
even in its freshness, Mr. Moreton’s was not a
pleasant house’?

Who should care for the chickens, little feathery
broods of which rapidly made their appearance in
the yard; whose labour it should be to watch the
wandering ducks and geese; who should feed the
pigs and look after the new lambs ; and that the
first calf should be called « Snowball,’”’—was all

®.
O00
—— ee

at
C—O a a ee
Eo eS nae eee

.



176 LIFE IN THE WEST.



duly settled. The flower-garden was planned and
planted, Annie’s flower-seeds, in spite of their age,
proving good and true to their labels. The kitchen-
garden, with its beds of light-green lettuce, its grow-
ing cabbage-plants, its vines, and its bushes, was
finished. Mrs. Hinckley’s currant-bushes were
found to be in a bearing state, and the small green
peaches took the place of those rosy garlands that
hung so beautifully over the garden-fence. Then
the corn-fields were green, the potato-patches pro-
mising, and the melon-spot was doing itself great
credit. Beyond all, were the wheat-fields, spreading
out their broad acres to the borders of the farm! That
first year, (as if to encourage their hopes,) no wil-
dew, nor blight, nor rust came to mar their fresh-
ness or promise. From the first bright green
covering of the ground, to the full swaying of their
Jaden and bearded heads, yellow with ripeness and
ready for the sickle, it was one progressive course,
without hindrance or drawback; and with joyful
hearts did they reap their grain and bear it to the
new threshing-floor, adding themselves to the last
heaping load, and loudly shouting their Western
* harvest-home.”’ |
During the whole year, Robert and Henry, with
the natural impetuosity of youth, would often have
overtasked their strength by undertaking labours too
severe or protracted for them to accomplish. ‘To
prevent this, their father would propose plans of
FARMING. 177



entertainment and excursions to the neighbouring
settlements, to occupy hours that could be spared
from the farm-work, and which would give them
opportunities for social intercourse with their neigh-
bours. The Sabbath came, too, with its hallowed
rest, refreshing both their physical and spiritual
natures with its benign influences. In the early
spring, the roads were to be mended and new
bridges built, and cheerfully did they all associate
with their townsmen in their efforts for the public
good.

As for the younger children, there was school,
with its pleasant intercourse. There was fishing for
the boys, and holiday walks after cranberries ; then
came the maple-sugar season, and the clump of
trees left for a sugar-orchard was the place of
resort. To tap the trees and gather the sap; to
keep the large iron kettle boiling many days, and
then to bear the thick, luscious liquid to the house,
where Susan and Mary were ready to purify and
finish it more slowly,—this was pleasure, not work!
The gathering of wild flowers, the improvement of
“the bird’s parlour,” the taming of squirrels, and
the attempt to naturalize some plants and shrubs
sent from home,—these were the employments that
gave a variety to their life. |

But the bearer of those plants and shrubs—who
was he? That very Richard Gray, of whom Mary
Wrote to her friend, Lucy Leighton. Days, even

15#




178 LIFE IN THE WEST.



weeks, passed before the stock of news he brought
from home was exhausted. Every thing and every-
body in Laurelton was discussed, messages received
from friends, and tokens of affection admired. Of
Richard’s plans and prospects, there was no little
talk among themselves ; for was he not to be one of
them? Susan herself, though more nearly interested
in their success, was not more earnest in her hopes
than they, or more ingenious in her schemes to help
him in this, his first start in business; while Mr.
Moreton’s words of encouragement brightened the
future of both, and his advice and aid smoothed
away the first difficulties in their path.

“This shall be your home, Richard,” said he,
“until you have one for yourself. Begin carefully
and economically. Remember my motto for all
sure progress, ‘Never haste, never rest.’ With a
good trade, industrious habits, and a bright prospect
ahead, you will succeed. I shall keep Robert, your
partner, with me this year, and you shall have all
the labour and all the profits of the establishment.
After that, we will see.” And, with an order for
some furniture, he left him to work his way on.

There were two great events to mark the summer,
in the estimation of ‘the children. . One was the:
arrival of a little girl at Patrick’s—a nice little
baby, whom Winne, from gratitude, desired to call
after “‘ Miss Annie ;” and the other, the due cele-
bration of the yearly-recurring national holiday.
FARMING. 179



For this, all ordinary labour on the farm was sus-
pended, and the day given up to amusement.

The Lakeland people readily responded to the
call for help in this festival, (ostensibly given in be-
half of the Sunday-school,) and as readily accepted
the general invitation to be present. . Children,
teachers, and parents assembled in the court-house,
and there they had music and speeches; after which
they marched, in not very orderly procession, to a
neighbouring grove. There were bountiful tables
prepared for their refreshment, of which all par-
took. An oration from Robert Moreton, short, but
directly bearing upon the subject of temperance,
and a hymn in honour of ¢éold water, sweetly sung

by the children, finished their public exercises; but _
an impression was left upon the minds of most,

which firmly remained there ever after,—that Sun-
day-schools and temperance were good things; and
all agreed, as they dispersed at the setting of the
sun, that this Fourth of July had been “a very
pleasant day.”

Our readers will easily see that in all these em-
ployments. there were toil and labour. For none ig
there exemption from that sentence which pro-
claimed that by the sweat of his face should man
eat bread ; and our friends looked not for a life of
inaction or freedom from care. Would they have
desired it? Did not the weary physical frame
Sometimes faint by the way, and did not rest, bodily

a
y
#


180 LIFE IN THE WEST.



rest, seem inviting to them? Yes! and sleep, re-
freshing sleep, brought it! ‘sweet’ to them, as
“labouring men.” For a life of indolence, a list-
less state of personal ease, their habits and educa-
tion had unfitted them, even if their tastes had led
them in that direction. Industry, cheered on by a
love of all that was beautiful in nature, character-
ized them as a family. Labour, directed to a desir-
able end, was praiseworthy; and the lesser cares
and toils were all made light and pleasant, as they
were seen to promote the comfort and well-being
of those around. “The hand of the diligent maketh
rich,” not only in the attainment of outward posses-
sions, but in that wealth of the heart, contentment.
Day after day did they experience this, as, rising

‘from their beds, they shook off slumber, and went

forth to their daily duties, “‘ providing meat in sum-
mer, and gathering food in harvest;” and to them
was the promise fulfilled: “He that tilleth his land

shall have plenty of bread.”

3s m7 /, ic a


CHARLES MORETON. 181

CHAPTER XVIII.

CHARLES MORETON.

CHARLIE Moreton in trouble! Can it be?
Why else does he, so long before evening, seck his
chamber, and remain there, too? Why sits he dis-
consolately on the foot of his bed, pressing his throb-
bing temples with his hot hands? Why does he
refuse to hear the gentle knock at his door, and
when Annie’s soft voice says, “Charlie! Charlie
why does he not hasten to receive her? Why offer
no word of welcome or thanks, as she herself opens,
the door, and carefully brings in the little salver,

with its burden of choice food for his evening meal? .

Is he sick, or weary, or discouraged? Notwith-
standing Annie’s care for him, it is easy to see that
she is grieved; her eyes gleam through a. misty
veil of tears, her pale cheek is paler than usual, and
sighs, that she vainly seeks to repress, come one
after another from her lips.

As she lays her soft hand on Charlie’s head, he im-

patiently says, “Don’t, Annie.” She sees that he can-

hot yet bear sympathy, and she waits in silence, quietly
Seating herself by his side. As the minutes pass away,

®
a
~

182 LIFE IN THE WEST.



so passes the anger and impulsive passion of Charles
Moreton. He knew that he had done wrong.

/ Although, on his way’ from school, and while the.

shouts of the boys were ringing in his ears, he had
deemed himself a hero fighting a worthy battle, the
stillness of home and the sad looks of father, mother,
brothers, and sisters, as he came, torn and soiled,
with flushed face and bruised eye, into their quiet
circle, gave a different aspect to’ the whole case.

If he had not pleased the Scotch boy, Duncan |

Dunwoodie, in their bargain, and had been ealled
“a cheating Yankee,’ why need he have resented
it, and called him “a mean thistle-thorn back ?”
Was there any necessity of “ giving as good as he
sent,” when Duncan heaped opprobrious epithets
upon him, or of returning that first, half-accidental
blow he received? Ah, Charlie! ig that quick,
passionate temper of your’s ungovernable? Shall
it be master, and Charles Moreton be its servant ?

“Don’t stay, Annie,” at last he said 3 “don’t
stay with me.”’

“ But shall I not tell father you are sorry ?” she
answered. ‘They are all so sad, Charlie.”

There was no answer, and she pointed to the plate
and asked— "

“Won’t you have this nice cake, that Mary sent
you? And a glass of milk ?”

“T cannot take it, Annie. Do go and leave ©

me !””
CHARLES MORETON. 183



«But let me first bathe your head with this fresh,
cool water, Charlie,” she persisted ; “it will make
it so much better.”’

Busying herself about him, she led him to talk
of his quarrel, and give a continuous account of it.
He found it hard to justify himself; and when she
said—

“You did wrong, Charlie !’—he was ready to
answer—

“T know it; and that is the worst of it; that is
why father is so much displeased, and why mother
looked so grieved, and why I feel so unhappy.”

“Then I may tell father you are sorry. Qh, I
am so glad! Now we shall be happy again, and
father will let you come down. May I tell him, |
too, that you promise not to quarrel with the boys
again?” ®

“‘T cannot make any promises, Annie. I always
break them.”

“ But you will try; and I may tell them that ?”

With permission to do this, she gladly departed
on her joyful errand, leaving him to solitude and
repose.

The following morning, Charles was early
strolling in the garden. ‘The flitting clouds were
no unfitting emblems of the gloom that oversha-
dowed his face. His anger was gone, his temper
subdued ; but, with the remembrance of the past,
there came a distrust of the future; and, as he
184 LIFE IN THE WEST.



seated himself on one of the garden-benches, he ex-
claimed—

“T cannot do it! I know I never can!”

“What is it that you cannot do, my son?” asked
a voice behind him, which he knew to be his
father’s.

Cries hesitated. He had thought himself alone,
and had spoken from the impulse of the moment,
Should he confide his griefs to his father, and tell
him the struggle that was going on his mind, or should
he sit silent, and strive alone and unaided? Should
pride conquer, and he lose the blessing of a wise coun-
sellor, or should he unburden his heart and tell his
perplexities? It was a turning-point, a crisis in his
history. But Charles was now in earnest, and he
nerved himself to meet his father’s eye, as he
sald— , °

“T never can be rid of my bad temper, sir !””

“ Have you ever, tried ?”

“Yes,sir. Last fall, after Willie broke up my bird-
traps, and I struck him, I could not help thinking
that if I had only the strength, I might have been
like Cain, and killed my brother; and I resolved
that I would fight against my temper, and that I
would conquer it; but I kept failing, and now I
have done a worse thing, and for a less cause.”

“Look here, Charles ; what is this?” said Mr.
Moreton, stooping to the ground, and carefully re *
moving some loose dirt that seemed thrown up.
CHARLES MORETON. 185



Charlie looked, and, with brightened face, ex-
claimed—

“That is one of my peach-stones, that I planted
last fall; it has just sprouted. Now I shall have a
peach-tree !”’

How do you know that, my son?”

“Because I shall take care of it, father; and
things that are taken care of, almost always
grow.”

‘What care shall you give it, Charlie?” asked
Mr. Moreton.

“T shall put some little sticks around it, so that
no one will tread upon it or dig it up, sir. Then, I
shall keep the earth loose about its roots. If it is
dry weather, I shall water it every day; and, as it
grows older, I shall make the earth richer, and tie
it to a stout stake, that the wind need not break it
down; and in four years, or less, if nothing happens,
it will begin to bear peaches.”

Mr. Moreton was often in the habit of i inquiring
into the knowledge that his boys had gained in this
way ; and Charles saw no other object in this con-
versation but an intention of testing his ability to
take care of a tree, and he eagerly talked on, endea-
vouring to show that, as regarded the culture of
peach-trees, nobody knew more than he!

“Is not four years too long to wait for the fruit?”
asked Mr. Moreton again.

“Why, no, father; four years is a very short time
16
_ ee

186 LIFE IN THE WEST.



for a tree to grow. An apple-tree sometimes takes
ten, and a pear-tree as many.”

“And are you willing to wait four years for
peaches, working away every summer, and not
being disheartened; and are six months long
enough to discourage you about a little resolution
planted in your heart, and to make you ready to cry
out, ‘It never will come to any thing! I cannot
get rid of my bad temper !”

“A resolution is different from a peach-tree,’’ said
Charles. |

“Yes, a very different thing, and of far more con-
sequence to your happiness, my son; yet their pro-
per treatment may not be so unlike in principle as
you think. You will guard your peach-tree, you
say; and you must guard your resolution while it
is young and tender. One way to do this is to talk
with me about it, as you are.doing. Can you think
of no other way ?”’

“T must ask Duncan’s pardon, and let him know
that the resolution is planted, I suppose.”

“Yes; then, every day, you must think about it,
and repeat it to yourself as a resolution. But you
will water your peach-tree, and enrich the soil it
grows in! What can you do to make your resolu-
tion increase ?””

“TI must keep telling myself why I ought to
ikeep it.”

“Observation will quickly show you, Charles, the
ee |

CHARLES MORETON. 187



worldly advantages to be reaped from a quiet, equa-
ble temper. You will see that it enables a man to
judge rationally and to act consistently. An angry
man is, for the time, a crazy man; nobody respects
him, or is guided by his wishes. He is liable ‘to
commit acts of which, at other times, he is heartily
ashamed, and which disgrace his character and mor-
tify his friends. Then, what does he gain by in-
dulging in his passion? A torrent of abusive lan-
guage may flow from his lips; but it lowers his own
respectability, by showing the evil of his heart,
more than it alters public opinion regarding its ob-
ject. He may knock a man down; and this resort
to brute force will cause him to be shunned and
despised, rather than admired. If he has physical
strength, he may even be considered a village bully ;
and what is that but a noisy, quarrelsome fellow,
who, by all reasonable people, is considered a village
nuisance? Beyond this, there are other reasons, far
weightier, why you should keep your resolution.
Can you not think what they are?”

“The reasons that the Bible gives, you mean,
don’t you, sir?”

“There you find such words as these: ‘The pa-
tient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit ;’
‘ Forbearing one another and forgiving one another,
if a man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ
forgave you, so also do ye;’ ‘The discretion of a
man deferreth his anger ; and it is his glory to pass
188 LIFE IN THE WEST.



over a transgression ;’ ‘Not rendering evil for evil,
or railing for railing, but, contrariwise, blessing ;
knowing that ye are thereunto called, that ye should
inherit a blessing.’ Any one of these texts, well-
remembered, would help your resolution to grow;
and, firmly fixed upon the promises of God, no
storm of life could uproot it. Then, to those who
ask help, help is promised. You say that you can-
not keep your resolution. Remember, that he that
seeks the aid of God’s Spirit, seeks the aid of a true
and able friend.”

‘There is so much to do,” said Charles, “‘ before
every thing is right in a man’s character.”

“That is true, my son; but the work once seri-
ously entered upon, and earnestly prosecuted, the
difficulties diminish ; and now is your planting-time
in the garden of your heart. You would like to
have it fruitful and well cultivated. In order to
this, the weeds of idleness, impatience, foolish pre-
judice, and the like, must be rooted out. The soil
must be enriched with knowledge ; the seeds of in-
dustry and good habits sown, and closely watched.
If the unsightly offsets of vice or error are there,
you must not spare the sharp pruning-knife; nor
must you loosen the tight-binding cords of prin-
ciple. All this requires effort and watchfulness;
but not greater than it is in your power to exercise.
One fault conquered, is a step towards the subduing
of the spirit; one right habit gained, is an advance
; CHARLES MORETON. 189



which opens the way and smooths the path for
another. No miraculous power will cause your
peach-tree to grow in a night; neither will any be
exerted to make your resolution at once firm and
unchangeable. You must work out your own salva-

tion in this matter ; every day watching your res0-;

lution with fear, lest it may be overcome ; and God
will, if you rely upon him, work in and with you.”

The breakfast bell rang, and they returned to the
house. Charles’s way was now clear before him.
His path was not an easy nor @ pleasant one to enter,
but its end shone out in bright relief, and hope—
buoyant hope—beckoned him on. Cheerful mirth-
fulness, never long absent from his heart, resumed
its sway, as, in reply to Willie’s question, “ Where
have you been?” he replied, “ Learning how to keep
my resolution.”

Firm as that resolution was at first, it was stag-
gered a little, when, on approaching the school-
house, he saw the boys drawn up in a line, with
Duncan Dunwoodie at their head. Ob, how he
wished Willie was with him! And then how he
wished he could let them know his determination
not to quarrel, without telling them so! But there
he was, alone, and the bearer of his own message.
As if to test the strength of that resolution, one of
the boys called out, “Halloo! black-eye ”? but
Charlie repeated to himself, “He that ruleth his

own spirit is better than he that taketh a city.”
. 16*

*
190 LIFE IN THE WEST.



Quickening his steps, he reached forth his land to
Duncan, and, despite the choking in his throat, said,
loud enough for all to hear— |

“Duncan, I did wrong to quarrel with you yes-
terday. We-will settle our bargain over again,
‘and try to make it right. I am sorry I struck
you! Will you forgive me, and let us be friends
again 2”

If Jack Sumner did say, “ Coward! he durst not
fight !” and if ee 3 did sneeringly turn
upon his heel, theréwere a dozen of the boys that
rejoiced ; and among them was Duncan, who really
loved Charlie and was truly clad to have the fool-
‘sh altercation ended. He readily took the prof-
fered hand, and responded to Charles’s declaration,
JT don’t mean to quarrel with any of you, boys r
by adding, “ And that will make it far pleasanter ;
for why shouldn’t we all be good friends ?”’

As the little sticks guarded the young peach-tree
from harm, so did these few words serve to protect
that young and still fecble resolution. From that
time, either he had fewer provocations, OF, having
openly committed himself on the side of what was
right, he was stronger in his purpose and power of
resistance to temptation in that form. Be it which
it might, he continued steadfast and firm, persisting
‘n his efforts to overcome his besetting sin, until he
gained the victory over his own passions, and was
master of his own temper! ar
CHARLES MORETON. 191



Charles was not the only member of Mr. More-
ton’s family who found out that, at the West, there
are manifold temptations todo wrong. very one
has need of the prayer taught by our Divine Master, _
“Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from
evil ;” and to every soul, whatever its acquirements, —
comes the exhortation, “‘ Watch and pray, that ye
enter not into temptation!’ The unregenerate
heart may think that there is no danger; that the
path of life is a path of ease ; and that its own
strength is sufficient to meet every peril to which it
may be exposed: but how differently are we taught
in the word of God! ‘There we find life set forth
as a journey, a scene of probation, and we as pil-
grims, whose walk here is amidst dangers; each
bearing within us an immortal treasure, committed
to our trust by the king of that country whither we
are journeying. For its safe-keeping and its improve-
ment each one is responsible; and, knowing our
weakness, for each is provided two able and willing
helpers—Jesus, the High-priest, who, having been
himself tempted, is able to succour those who are
tempted; and the Holy Ghost, the Comforter.

To those who, with wary steps, and careful, earn-
est hearts, are travelling on, there comes the gra-
cious message, “ God is faithful, who will not suffer
us to be tempted above that we are able to bear ;”
and far on, in the distance, Jesus holds up to their
view the golden crown and harp, bidding them walk

s
192 LIFE IN THE WEST.



steadfastly on their way, with that wonderful pro-

mise: “To him that.overcometh, will I grant to sit
with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and
am set down with my Father in his throne.”

The hidden evils of our hearts, our me desires,
our grasping after earthly pleasures, our low and
ignoble hopes, even our bodies, with their appetites,
are all to be subdued, before the soul shines in the
beauty of holiness. Our senses must be made the
willing channels of none but pure pleasures; our
tastes must be cultivated to a high appreciation of
things lovely in the sight of a holy God; while our
affections must hold all earthly objects of love sub-
ordinate to the claims of our heavenly Father.

«Take us the foxes, the little foxes, that spoil
the vines,” said the wise king. Take us the sins,
the little sins, that ruin the soul, we would say to
every youth to whom future character is a matter
of interest or effort. It is the little sins that make
up the whole evil character, even as drops fill the
rivers, and the rivers: swell the mighty ocean.
Think no failing too small or too trivial to be
watched and striven against; and let these words
help you in your struggle: ‘‘He that is faith-
ful in that which is least, is faithful also in
much.” - aa

Carelessness of personal appearance, carelessness
of manners, carelessness of words, and carelessness of
morals,—these are all temptations in a new country.

zs

i ae a i i -
CHARLES MORETON. 193



The same reason that prompts to unmindfulness of
one’s appearance, makes a person chary of their
words of welcome and politeness. The temptation
to be witty leads to slang phrases and stories with-
out truth, while this, in its turn, blunts the percep-
tion of what is true and desirable, and the whole
moral man is injured. Little do those whose
homes are guarded by Christian watchfulness
and whose lives are passed amidst Christian com-
munities, surrounded by all the amenities and
usages of well-ordered society, realize how much of
their safety they owe to these restraints, or with
how much reason they too might say, ‘‘ Thou pre-
ventest (me) with the blessings of goodness r
«Aunt Rachel,’ who has before been introduced
to our readers, was quite a favourite with the
younger members of the Moreton family. The
respectful attention they paid her, and their uniform
kindness to her little grandson, who bore the lofty
name of Count Sobieski, had gained her confidence.
It was in their power to perform many small acts
of kindness for her, and she, in her turn, was always
ready to meet them with a cordial greeting. If they
stopped to pay her a passing visit on their way from
school, she often had some little offering for them,
such as a few plums, a peach; a cup of maple-sap, a
baked potato, hot and smoking from the hearth, or
a generous slice of johnny-cake, full of dried whor-
194 LIFE IN THE WEST.



tleberries, which, with true Western, whole-hearted |
hospitality, she urged upon them. |

But the readiness with which she me} their un-
wearied demand for tales of adventure ad of per-
sonal history was the great attraction which drew
them so frequently to her cabin. Her life had been
full of change. A comfortable but plain Connecti-
cut home had been exchanged, at the early age of
eighteen, for a*cabin in the woods of Michigan,
where, for six years, she lived and laboured as the
wife of a Methodist missionary-preacher. His death
was her first great sorrow; but, with two young
children to support, she had no time to spend in
_ grief and fruitless mourning. After a struggling
- life’of two years or more, she married again, and
removed to Indiana. Here her happiest years were
spent, though toil and some hardship fell to her lot.
Her children left her for homes of their own; and
when her husband, Mr. Whitely, died, she gathered
up what property she could, and left the farm to the
care of a tenant, that she might spend her last years
with her kindred. Her son had removed from his
first location, no one knew whither; but her daugh-
ter was a resident in Lakeland, and there y cheerful
welcome awaited her. It would seem th& there
she might find rest, but it was not thus to be. The
sudden falling of a tree, which her son-in-law was
cutting down, so injured him, that, after a year of
suffering, he died, and, in a few months, his wife
CHARLES MORETON. 195



followed him to the grave. Thus was the little
grandson thrown entirely upon her care ; and her
sole object in, life was to keep the farm his father
left, not only entire, but in some order for him,
when he should be old enough to work it.

It is easy to see that, with an unimpaired memory
and a good deal of natural shrewdness, Aunt Rachel
Whitely had at her command a fund of stories that
possessed great charms for listeners. One tale of an
adventure with her first husband, when, in riding
through the woods, they had encountered, or rather
seen, a female wildcat, fierce and resolute to protect
its young ones, had great attractions for Charlie.
To be sure, it ended in nothing but their being
wonderfully frightened, and whipping up their —
horse.to get out of its way; but, in his estimation,
it made her a heroine.

Then she sometimes let her imagination take the
reins, and would describe the beauties of the wood-
land scenery, and the brilliant autumnal nights; or
else she invented personages and scenes in the fable
form, that she might convey instruction to her hearers.

Further than that, she had dwelt three years near
the royal hunting-ground of Tecumseh, and was
familiar with the traditions and legends connected
with his history, as well as with those of Pontiac,
the famous Indian chief. She had herself received
frequent visits from parties of the Pottawatimie
tribe, and could tell of dealings between them and
-196 LIFE IN THE WEST.



her husband, and of their sorrowful countenances as
they began to realize that they were perishing as a
nation.

Occasionally, she would revert to her own home-
experience; and then she would not fail to mingle
with her narrative words of Christian love and good
counsel, and cheerfully recommend trust in the
Almighty as the only sure foundation upon which
to build happiness.

Thus it was that she, alone, surrounded with the
evils of poverty, and possessing few attractions per-
sonally, was yet enabled to do good in her humble

‘sphere, and to prove that the Spirit of God can

refine and elevate the tastes as well as comfort the

hearts of his lowly followers.


LETTERS. 197

CHAPTER XIX.

LETTERS.

AGAIN must we have recourse to a letter of Mary’s,
as the speediest and most agreeable manner of in-
forming our readers of the state of affairs at Lake-
land and about the Moreton farm, during the third
year of their residence at the West :

Lakeland, October —, 18—.

Dear FRANK :—Your letter, written upon the
anniversary of your reaching , Was received
some dayssince. One year of the prescribed four
has passed away quickly enough, to make us feel
that the three remaining will soon be gone; but we
have not yet become so accustomed to your absence
as to feel that home is home without you, and it
seems a long time to wait.

You would be surprised to see how much our
place has improved. The grass, this year, entirely
covered the site of the old log-cabin, and the trees
bordering the carriage-walk and about the house were
sufficiently grown to cast a shadow. The green

blinds upon the house, the new barn, the arbour at
17 |


198 LIFE IN THE WEST.



the foot of the garden-walk, and the well at the top
of the hill, with its real old-fashioned curb, seen
against the sky, and the new fences,—these are all
this year’s improvements, in the true dictionary
sense of the word, as well as in its Western meaning.
Within the house, the great change has been the ar-
rival of Uncle Alfred’s present—the new piano ; and
such a source of pleasure as it is! For a few days,
we made it talk incessantly ; now, it is not silent
long at a time; and I find I shall readily regain my
knowledge of playing. Being the first instrument
of the kind in the village, it has attracted consider-
able attention, and, I can assure you, it is much ad-
mired. I hope it will be in my power, through it,
to convey pleasure to many beside our own circle ;
if not, half its charms will be dispelled, for the iden-
tifying of ourselves with the village-people, and of
our pleasures and interests with their’s, 1s, to my
mind, one of the strongest ties which bind us here.
The great occasion upon which I intended to dwell
in this letter, was the approaching marriage of Susan |
and Richard Gray. The time fixed upon is the

20th; and, as they will move directly to his new |
house in the village, every preparation for leaving

us must now be made. Their house is small, but

new and convenient; Richard having aimed to make

it easy for Susan in her household duties. The

wedding will be herg, and will be as quiet as it cal

be and ask all the people we have learned to know



a
LETTERS. 199



and loye in three years. Our new minister, Mr.
Nesbit, will officiate ; and we all rejoice that he has
arrived in time for the ceremony. We like Mr.
Nesbit; and his wife we hope to welcome here soon.
They propose to commence housekeeping as soon as ~
a house can be procured, when she will come imme-
diately with her three children... ....

I had written thus far, when Charles came in,
and called “Mary! Mary!” so loudly, that I ran
to meet him, fearing some accident.

“Put on your bonnet, and come with me, quick !””
he said; which I did, and followed him across the
fields to the new road leading to Lupine Prairie. -
There we found a woman sitting by the roadside,
holding in her arms a dying baby, and another child
standing by her side. The wagon in the road, with
its chests and trunks, showed that she was a trayel-
ler, and her moaning and sorrowful ejaculations
soon betrayed her origin. She was a Frenchwoman;
and I did rejoice most heartily when I fofind she
could understand me; and she, poor woman! in her
joy at meeting with one who spoke her native lan-
guage, took my hand and kissed it again and again;
then turned to her “pawure enfant,” and begged
me to help it. I soon found that her husband had
gone to the village to get some medicine; but I sent
Charlie home for a pillow, and thought that, upon
it, we might carry the baby as far as the house.
Before he came back, though, the poor little thing




etl ii i i ik i ll a a - 7


200 LIFE IN THE WEST.

———

died; and when her husband returned, her first parox-
ysm of grief was subdued, and she was ready to listen.,
to any proposal from us. They were poor, and would
fecl it no degradation to go to a poor home; while
to be with those who could understand her seemed
a, great comfort. I thought of Pierre Bonté, and
ventured to bid them drive the horses there, while
the woman and I took the shorter path through the
woods, she carrying the little dead baby in her arms.
You should have seen us, and listened to her out-
pourings of grief, as, overpowered with emotion,
she would linger behind Charlie and me, cast her-
self down upon the wayside bank, and, in accents
of tenderness, talk to the child—address it with en-
dearing epithets, as if its ear were listening to her
voice and its little heart still beating in unison with
her’s.

Oh, it was worth ten times the labour and study
that the knowledge I possess of French has been to
me, to be able to speak to the sorrowful heart of the
mourning woman, and to try to comfort her. Ma-
dame Bonté received us as cordially as I could desire }
and, when I left them, she had taken the childaway
from its mother, stored enough of their own posses |
sions in one corner of the room to make another |
corner empty and ready for the strangers’ bed and
chest, and was cooking supper against the man’s ar-
rival. Then Charlie and I went home, to ask father
sf we had done right; and were glad to find that he
LETTERS. 201

@



thought we had. He went over that evening with
me; and, while he and Bonté made arrangements to
bury the baby in the morning, I sat and talked to
the woman. They all went away in the wagon, the
day after the funeral, and we know nothing more of.
them since. It hardly seemed possible to me, when
I saw how comfortable Madame Bonté made this
poor woman, that I had ever gone to that same hovel
(for it is nothing else now) to cure my homesick
feclings, by seeing some one worse off than myself.
To set off for “the poor Frenchman’s” was equiva-
lent to a confession of sad and desponding longings
on my part; but no one but Susan knew it at the
time; nor should I tell of it now, if I had occasion
to employ it as a remedy.

I must not forget to tell you that the new school-
house is completed and occupied. Mr. Blagden is
still the teacher; but he has now, in Susan’s place,
a young lady whom we all like. Annie is well
enough to go to the school-house every day, and
the two boys escort the two girls there daily.
After this summer, Charles will work on the farm
during the warm weather, and study only in the
~ winters.

We have had quite an excitement here lately
about the burning woods. The atmosphere is often
smoky, and the hot air has reached us, rising with
the gusts of wind, before; but, this time, the red

and glary horizon, and the trees standing out at
17*




202 LIFE IN THE WEST.



night as pillars of fire, and by day with smoke issu-
ing from their tops, showed it to be quite near our
premises. One night, father and the ‘boys heard
that it was approaching a fenced field, full of stand-
ing corn, and that it had already commenced its
ravages upon some piles of split rails that they had
prepared for the winter’s fencing. We begged to
go with them, and had the satisfaction of seeing
them ‘whip out fire,’ which, you know, is to beat
down the burning grass with branches broken from
the trees; and we girls helped kindle and keep
within bounds a back-fire, that father thought it
best to have set. It was all pleasure to us to
march back and forth before our burning strip of
grass, and turn its course towards the heated forests,
using our verdant branches as if they were sceptres ;
but to one who sees his best crop in danger of the
devouring element, and whose barns are in the
course of its march, it must be with extraordinary
energy that he works. Father says the best way is
to plough six or eight furrows about a field, outside
of the fence, and that he shall not again neglect to
GOW. 2. wis a

Now, Frank, you must confess this letter to be as ©
long as even your craving for news from home can
desire. But Charles begs for the remaining half-
page, and I yield my place to him.

Your loving sister,
_ Mary.


LETTERS. 203



Will our readers have Charles’s letter? Here it
is; but we must premise that Charlie Moreton was
not a very wonderful scholar for a boy of fourteen
years of age; and, if they should find it somewhat
disconnected, some of them can remember, from
their own experience, how hard it is to write letters,
and will readily pardon its defects :

DEAR BrotHerR FRANK :—I thought you would
like to hear from me and Carlo; and I write to say
that I am very well, but that he is getting very
lazy. Henry says he is too old for any thing but a
house-dog, and that is the reason why he won’t go
into the woods with us; but I think he is afraid.
If you see Bob Palmer, you can tell him about him.
Henry has got a first-rate dog. “We went out last

week, and had the best of luck, bringing home birds ie

enough for ourselves for two days. Of all the birds
we ever get, I think prairie-chickens are the best.
Oh! I must tell you that Snowball got mired last
week, over ‘in the swamp, back of Aunt Rachel’s

farm. She Was missing two whole days and a night,
and father told us that we must look her up. We
found her ipgfew hours; or, I mean, Carlo found
her. You havéleen cattle mired, so you will know all
about this, when ‘I tell you that she was very deep in
the soft mud, and so exhaygted with trying to get out,
that at first we thotabgsshe was dead. She seemed
to know Carlo’s bark, and tried once more to move,





204 LIFE IN THE WEST.



but could not. With help, we soon, got her out;
but you would never have known whose cow she
was, if her white forehead had not kept clean. She
has been steadier ever since, and has not tried to
run away at all. May be, it has done her good.
I like the new school-house; and Mr. Blagden is
going to make us study hard this winter. I wish I
~ knew a great deal, but I think it is harder to study
than it is to work. Patrick has got over his ague ;
but he will have it again, if he isn’t more careful.
You should see his steers! Young Pat is in school,
and is a real clever boy. Father lets Willie and
me go to mill by ourselves this year. Last week,
we took the largest grist over that we ever carried,
because Susan must share with us now. When we
came back, we took the new road, that you and
Henry helped survey and lay out. The log-bridge
is finished; and you never knew a better one, or
one that gave a driver such heavy jolts; for the
earth has not yet filled up betweem the logs, and
the logs were very large. It is a great deal of work
to make a road. I used to think, before we came
here, that they came of themselves, but now I know
better. The old horse is dead. Father bought a
mare of Mr. Johnson, that we can drive in double
harness; but the reason that he got her was because
she was such a gentle one for Mary to ride. It is
as frisky as a kitten, but has no tricks. We call




—

LETTERS. 205



her “Dancing Molly ;” and her mistress, Mary, says

she takes real comfort in riding now.

Willie and I run a daily express to the village.
We have all the errands to do, and have regular
times of starting and a depot for bundles. We take
no passengers, for we go on our own feet, and have
no accommodations for others. As it is time for us
to start, I must close my letter. I hope you will

write to me.
CHARLES.

i oi | | |

1h |

| s WN We €.) Wi i}



ut
£06 LIFE IN TIZE WEST.

CHAPTER XX.
THE CHURCH AND THE MINISTER.

Mr. Nessit, the new minister, of whom Mary
wrote to Frank, came to Lakeland as a missionary.
He was not a very young man, and had been settled
over a church before. His appearance was prepos-
sessing, his manners agreeable, and he had received
a liberal education. He knew, beforehand, the
varieties of character he should probably come in
contact with, and that he must accustom himself to
meet with difficulties, and expect to experience per-
sonal inconvenience. His salary was small; part
of it guaranteed by the society under whose patron-
age he»was, and part promised by the people among
whom he had come to live: “The labourer is
worthy of his hire.’ Truly might this be said of
him, for, with all his natural and acquired abilities, —
he brought with him a heart willing and desirous of

labour, a love for the souls of men, and a spirit so ff

earnest in the cause of his blessed Master, that to
exert all his powers of body and mind to extend the
knowledge of his name was, with him, a pleasure—
a privilege. How many such are now living and


THE CHURCH AND THE MINISTER. 207

toiling in the wide Western woods, of whom the
world knows little, but who are God’s workmen,
each in his place helping to raise the fallen souls of
men, and to lift their earth-bound affections to
higher and eternal joys! How many such joyfully
encounter hardship and deprivation, if souls can be
saved and God’s name be honoured! Their reward
is in heaven; and the last great day can alone show
to men the mighty influence wielded by these chosen
servants of the Lord, as, in weariness of body, they
go from place to place to make known the unsearch-
able riches of God’s redeeming love—sustained by
faith in his promises, and by strength granted ac-
cording to their day.

That all the Lakeland people gladly welcomed the
arrival. of a clergyman among them, our readers will

not suppose. Some were opposed to the sentiments .,

he sought to inculcate; others differed from him in
opinion; many cared nothing about religion and the
concerns of their souls; while a few received him
as the messenger of God, and earnestly sought a
blessing upon him and his mission. Yet nearly all
promised to contribute to his support: one man
would give so many bushels of wheat; another, po-
tatoes; another, corn; another “would have a fine
young pig for the minister in the fall;” some few
had money; and one or two would give certain
amounts in groceries or store-pay. Mr. Blagden
was indefatigable in his efforts, and undertook to

ree
208 LIFE IN THE WEST.



collect these various things and put them in an
available shape for Mr. Nesbit; so that, when his
family arrived, there was every reason to hope that
a comfortable living would be provided for them.

The Sunday-school, now attractive enough, with
its fine library and well-conducted lessons, to
gather within it most of the young people of the
village, had been continued through the whole of
the past winter.

No one, who has not seen the blessed influence of
such a Sunday-school in preparing the way for the
introduction of the stated ministrations of the gospel,
can have any just conception of its importance. The
labours of those devoted men who explore the des-
titute places and give to the rude materials their
earliest shape, cannot be too diligently employed

nor too highly valued. The regularly-read sermon, |

with devotional exercises, which followed the ser-
vices of the Sunday-school, had formed the habit of
church-going among the people, so that a congrega-
tion of attentive listeners was gathered, ready for
the ministrations of Mr. Nesbit.

To form a church, and to have him regularly in-
stalled over it, were the first steps to be taken. The
little band who had before associated together, again
met, and others, like-minded, united with them, as,
in the prescribed order and form, they renewed their

public covenant to be the Lord’s servants hereafter

and for ever. Some new-comers, and others who
THE CHURCH AND THE MINISTER. 209



had, in former homes, taken vows of obedience and
love to their Saviour, but had here (to their great
peril) hesitated and doubted, now united with them.
Others still, moved by the Spirit of God, for the
first time professed their faith in Jesus, and joined
themselves unto his people; so that a church of

twenty members welcomed Mr. Nesbit, as he pub-_

licly promised “to live and labour for them in the
name of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.”

But not only was he weleomed—he was sustained
by their co-operation in all his plans. The Sabbath
was given to his people; for he deemed the proper
and strict observance of the day, by public worship,
as the surest way to gain the confidence of lookers.
on. At other times, he was ready to go into other
neighbourhoods and to the near settlements to preach
or perform other ministerial duties. Once during the
week did the church gather, for social prayer and
praise, at his house—an engagement which no duty
in other places was allowed to infringe upon. To
Mr. Nesbit’s decision and regularity in meeting these
home-duties, did he afterwards impute the feeling
of stability and trust, regarding the church, which
prevailed in the community; and which extended
into the adjoining country, bringing, from quite a
distance, many constant attendants upon the Sab-
bath services.

No doubt it had this effect; but the consistent and

unswerving devotion of his life to the one great ob-
18
210 LIFE IN THE WEST.



ject of elevating the moral condition of his fellow
créatures, gained for him, in time, the respect of all.
A well-regulated life, a well-ordered conversation, a
cheerful reliance upon God, true benevolence and
sympathy for man, and a hand ready to help any in
need,—with these characteristics, is it wonderful
that, in some measure, differences of opinion should
lessen, opposition become weak, ill-will be forgotten,
and jealousies be subdued ?

When he had been with them but a few months,
the proposal to build a church was made. It was
an advance upon their position, which all agreed
was natural and desirable. But how should it be
done? Sufficient subscriptions in ready-money were
not to be expected in such: a community as their’s,
while promises, though plenty, could not be made
available, unless put into some reliable and substan-
tial form.

A union church was first proposed. This would —
unite their means, and make them better able to
accomplish the proposed end. Many thought this
the better way; but Mr. Nesbit was of the opinion
that, as different denominations increased in num-
bers and strength, so difficulties came in proportion,
and that quarrels and. animosities were awakened,
which no present ease or good were an equivalent
for; and that, therefore, the most desirable way for
them was to have the church-property belong to one
society, held together by one common faith and in-


THE CHURCH AND THE MINISTER. 211



terest. With the responsibility thus thrown upon a
few, would come increased interest in its behalf;
while they could and should,-with proper restric-
tions, open their doors to others at all times, when
their own stated gatherings would not be interfered
with. All might thus be accommodated, and all
help furnish the means and place suitable for their
object.

The matter was at length decided upon. Mr.
Moreton was to procure the plan and specifica-
tions of a church, such as they required. It was to
be a wooden building, plain but tasteful, with pews
and a neatly-finished pulpit; and its cost not to
exceed one thousand dollars. This money he was
to hire at as reasonable a rate of interest.as possible,
and was himself or his heirs responsible for it by a
mortgage upon his farm to that amount. A sub-
scription-paper was then to be circulated, and as
much money collected as the people were ready to
give; and (to their credit be it told) there was no
grudging or unwilling hand among them.*

Notes, payable in money, produce, or labour, were
received by Mr. Moreton, to secure him for the re-
mainder of the sum; and, as he himself subscribed
handsomely and freely, no jealousy or fear of being

* This account of the mode of obtaining a place of
worship falls naturally into the narrative, but is not de-
signed to serve as an approved example in any respect
except the energy and liberality which were shown.


912 LIFE IN THE WEST.



overreached was awakened in the minds of any.
Three years was to be the limit of time for which
the money was to be loaned, and no note running
after that time was to be received.

When all this was arranged, the work was begun.
To work rapidly is no novelty in a new country ; but
this church sprang up as if by more than ordinary
power. Robert Moreton, Mr. Blagden, and Mr.
Johnson were the acting committee, and devoted
much time and thought, as well as labour, to it.
One man, with his oxen, came to cart lime; ano-
ther had a load of wheat to take to the market-town,
and would bring back lumber; one would give so
many days’ work in digging for the foundation ;
and yet another would contribute so many thou-
sands of brick. When the frame was ready to be
raised, nearly every man in the village came to work ;
and, according to Western custom, the women had
prepared for them, upon tables within the court-
house, abundant refreshment and entertainment
when the afternoon’s work was done.

Thus, “with a willing mind,” they progressed
and speedily finished their work. As the year
passed on, and every month saw notes redeemed and
promises performed, Mr. Moreton felt more strongly
the wisdom of Mr. Nesbit’s plan, and acknowledged
it openly—thus confirming others in their good
opinion of their minister ; while he himself willingly
relinquished a part of his salary, small as it was,
THE CHURCH AND THE MINISTER. 213



that in such a crisis they might not be overbur-
dened. ,

The dedication of their new sanctuary, with the
attendance of all clergymen from adjoining counties
and States that would come; the preparation for
singing, and the formation of a choir; the gathering
of the young women to make suitable drapery and
cushions for the pulpit; and, finally, the presenta-
tion of a large and beautiful Bible for the minister’s
use, (received but a week before the dedication, from
a friend in New York, who interested himself in
what interested Mr. Blagden,)—all these were events
calculated to vary the scene at Lakeland.

Thus the preaching of the Word was established
among them ;—not without effort and sacrifice, nor
without some opposition, it is true; but the success
was complete. Ina Western community, there is
a fair and open field for the spread of religious
truth. Most minds are prepared by experience of
life to acknowledge its uncertainty, and the unsatis-
fying nature of worldly pursuits; and the heart
craves a future of promise. Infidelity is not so
thoroughly rooted, even in the hardened hearts of
those who openly boast of it, that they will not lis-
ten to truth forcibly illustrated, be it.only to gain-
say it; and, while they may affect to despise fear
as unmanly, and love as too effeminate a passion for
men, yet the great truths of the Bible will bear the

broad sunlight of investigation, and commend them-
18*


214 LIFE IN THE WEST.



selves to their consciences as right, and just, and
good.

Practical nie holiness, this it is
which must win its way, whether preached or prac-
tised by the minister or the humble follower of
Christ. Its manifest power over the life of one will
influence the life of another. Its control over the
heart and life roll on until the life and heart of still
another is reached. The traveller who passes through
village after village, disturbing the worship of little
assemblies, gathered in humble school-houses or in
Sunday-schools, and himself forgets it is God’s day,
or flatters himself that, riding through the lonely
woods, he lifts his heart acceptably to his Maker,—
he it is who is wasting a treasure of influence com-
mitted to him. The children who see him, the
loiterers at the tavern-steps, the stable-boy who
feeds and grooms his horse, the family whose day
of quiet is broken,—all these remember him; and,
in proportion to his appearance of respectability, so
is his power to lessen their reverence for the Sab-
bath.

“JT remember,” said a useful and nen wo-
man, whose life was passed in a Western village,
‘one man that stopped at my father’s over a Sab-
bath, when I was about fifteen years old. He
seemed so surprised that we should think two miles
far to go to church, that we all accompanied him,
though it was unusual for us to do so. And then,

)
THE CHURCH AND THE MINISTER. 215



when we reached the log school-house, he seemed so
pleased and happy, and listened to what I thought a
very dull sermon as if he liked it and understood it.
But the fact of his knowing by heart, and singing
with evident enjoyment, a hymn expressive of love to
Jesus, made an impression on my mind which hag
never been effaced. He was a man in middle life,
healthy and well-looking, evidently a man of wealth,
and thus in possession of all I had considered neces-
sary to happiness. But I could not deny that he
had a treasure of enjoyment in religion that I knew
nothing about. His look, his manner, his voice, all
told me this; beside, he knew the hymn, and would
never have learned it, if he did not like it. After
I reached home, I got the book and read it over and
over. Then I went to the Bible, to see if there I
found the same sentiments. From that time, I date
all my interest in religious matters; and from that
man’s silent influence upon my own heart, I have
learned that no man liveth to himself alone.

The influence of settlers from other and more ad-
vanced States; their indifference towards the insti-
tutions of the gospel; their disregard for its humbly-
administered ordinances; their forgetfulness of the
Christian covenant into which they have entered in
other homes,—are all powerful hindrances to the
work and success of the Western missionary.
Christians, so called, plant obstacles to the progress
of Christianity, and professed believers become a


216 LIFE IN THE WEST.



hindrance to the spread of the gospel, by their
ungodly or inconsistent lives and actions. The
eyes of those who love not the Saviour are not
blinded, nor their perceptions dimmed towards the
failings or short-comings of the church of God;
neither are their hearts insensible to the power of
example from such a source. Let but the influ-
ence of all who know the will of God, and who ac-
knowledge the excellency and divine origin of the
Scriptures, be seen openly exerted, and we need fear,
for our beloved country, neither the reign of super-
stition, nor of open infidelity. ‘ While men slept,
the enemy came and sowed tares among the wheat,
and went his way.” “ Let us not sleep, then, as do
others ;” but, each at his post, wherever God may
appoint, rouse ourselves to the great work of being
good, that we may do good; heartily entering into
those great plans of our Creator which are in pro-
gress for the redemption and salvation of a fallen
world.


STEAM SAW-MILL AND DISTILLERY. 217

CHAPTER XXL

THE STEAM SAW-MILL AND THE DISTILLERY.

Iv is unnecessary for us, as it would be uninte-
resting to our readers, to enter into the detailed his-
tory of the progress of improvement in the village
of Lakeland. The fresh, new paint upon the church
and school-house contrasted too glaringly with the
worn colour and gray sides of the court-house, and
a unanimous vote was passed at a county meeting to
have the building repaired and painted, while John
Dudley headed the enterprise of planting the open
Square in which the three stood, with thrifty young
maple-trees.

Ambition was aroused among the people to make
the village attractive; and streets were graded, decay-
ed stumps removed, fences repaired, wood-piles taken
to the rear of the buildings, flower-borders made, and
fruit-trees planted. Rose-vines were seen clambering
about doors and windows, refreshing the eye and
pouring out upon the air their wealth of sweetness.

Now that the school-house was pleasant and
cheerful, the children were more regular in their
attendance, and cleanliness and tidiness of dregs


218 LIFE IN THE WEST.



prevailed, making the effort to instruct more agree-
able to their teachers and more successful in its
results.

The Sabbath, too, was better observed. Seldom
was a load of wheat now brought to the village on
that day. The grocery-store was never open to
customers; and if parties were made to go in quest
of nuts or to gather cranberries, they appointed some
week-day, instead of Sunday, as the most fitting time.

We do not intend to convey the idea that there
was no evil abroad in Lakeland at this stage of its
history ; but to show that it was advancing, and that
changes, trivial in themselves, and gradual improve-
ments, made up an aggregate of good which was
perceptible, and to them important.

Under these combined influences, Lakeland had
become a decidedly thrifty Western village, so de-
sirable as a location, that some other families had
removed there for the purpose of educating their
children, there being greater inducements in other |
respects for the removal. In society, in schools, in
the establishment of regular divine worship, in in-
creased facilities for reaching market-towns, in the
improved mode of cultivating their lands, in the
planting of young orchards, and the improvement
in the stock of their farms, one might see tHe sure
tokens of advance in public opinion and the more
. general diffusion of useful knowledge among the
people.
STEAM SAW-MILL AND DISTILLERY. 2]9



It was in the autumn of 18— that the good peo-
ple of Lakeland were all alive to two projects which
were simultaneously started. One of them concerns
our friend Robert Moreton, and our readers shall be
informed of its particulars.

As far back as the building of their own house,
the difficulties attending the transportation of lum-
ber had been felt by Mr. Moreton as a serious ob-
jection to locating there. Every new building,
whether public or private, had brought the subject
up freshly for discussion between him and his sons;
but their own wants being supplied, and the press
of farm-labour -sufficient to occupy their time and
thoughts, it had heretofore been but a subject of
conversation.

The time for action, however, had now come.
Henry, advanced in knowledge and with robust
health, had become an able and efficient helper to
his father; while Charles, now a well-grown lad
of sixteen, was rapidly developing strong fancies and
decided abilities for a farming life. Then, Patrick
and his boy Pat were still employed by Mr. More-
ton; so that Robert rightly thought he was no
longer needed at home.

To erect a steam saw-mill, and to superintend its
Operations, became the object of his desires. To do
this, he must have capital and knowledge. The
latter, reading, thought and observation had al-
ready given him in some degree, and a visit made


920 LIFE IN THE WEST.



to other parts of the country soon put him in pos-
session of its practical details.

The money necessary for his object was not so
easily attained. Richard Gray was in a sufficiently
prosperous condition to repay the sum loaned by
Mr. Moreton, as Robert’s share in his enterprise.
This, with the use of his father’s name, enabled him
to commence his undertaking; while some of his
townsmen, sufficiently alive to the best interests of
the village, themselves came forward and offered as-
sistance, should it be needed, on easy terms.

The spot for the location of the mill had long
been selected. A belt of timbered land, covered
with the magnificent growth of years, ran to the
east of the village, and spread itself out for a long
distance. This lay partly on the farm belonging to
Mr. Moreton ; and the timber growing upon adjoin-
ing ground was easily procurable from those who
were anxious to have their best farming-land cleared.
This, of itself, was sufficient inducement to place
his mill there; but the gift of the land from his
father, and the abundant supply of water near by,
seemed to make it, without doubt, the best place for
him.

Beaver Lake was the name of the small pond
upon whose banks he broke ground for the founda-
tion of his buildings.

A never-failing spring, of considerable depth,
appeared to have overflowed its bounds, and spread
STEAM SAW-MILL AND DISTILLERY. 22]



itself between the gently-sloping hills that lay
around it, the clear waters of which bathed the fresh
grass that grew quite down to its edge, leaving nei-
ther swamp nor sedgy land upon its borders. What
had undoubtedly been its natural outlet was now
closed by an over-grown beaver-dam, deserted many
years before by its amphibious inhabitants, but still
bearing marks of their ingenuity in constructing a
home; while the waste-water had forced for itself
another channel upon the opposite side ; there,
meeting with descending land, it ran gayly on, like
a silver thread in width, but rapid in its course,
until it mingled with the current of a river and
was lost to the eye.

“Too beautiful a spot to spoil with a mill,” said
Mary ; but the West is full of such beautiful spots,
where Nature has been lavish of her favours, and
scattered her gifts with a liberal hand: and even
her devoted admirer, Mary, yielded the point, that,
in an utilitarian sense, none could be better adapted
to Robert’s object than this.

To work, then, he went, favoured by an early fall
of snow, that made it easy to transport from other
and more distant towns the necessary materials for
his use. As far south as the Moreton family lived,
sleighing in the winter, although uncertain in its
duration, is highly prized. The leisure of winter
gives time for the taking of produce to market,

while a smooth and even road made by the fall of
19


922 LIFE IN THE WEST.



snow presents facilities, that even a dweller in an
old country, where highways and turnpikes are
known, does not despise. Robert’s mind was of
the systematic order. His plans were thoroughly
made and considered, and all his arrangements were
the result of mature thought; while his mechanical
edueation had fitted him to meet emergeneies with a
ready hand and a quick wit. Thus it was that he
was able to accomplish his object so successfully.
The same power that was used to drive his saws
was also made to work a run of stones for the grind-
ing of wheat; thus obviating the necessity which
had existed among the villagers of going a greater
distance: and the whole was in operation the follow-
ing summer, with a good prospect of soon paying
for itself, and afterwards yielding a fair income to
ats owner.

But another work of nearly equal magnitude was
started at the same time with the saw-mill, and pro-
secuted with equal ardour. This was the erection
of a distillery, under the superintendence of John
Thomas, the eldest son of Mr. Thomas, the lawyer.
His means were more ample than Robert’s, and the
speed with which he accomplished his purpose was
wonderful, even at the West. The abundant har-
vest of the first year brought the price of grain so
low, that great profits were to be made on whisky,
and purchasers were not wanting. A feeling of
rivalry or jealousy spurred young Thomas on,
STEAM SAW-MILL AND DISTILLERY. 223



make great efforts to eclipse Robert Moreton in the
perfection of his arrangements and the amount of
business done. Robert was human, and it is no
wonder that he felt uneasy, and sometimes disturbed,
by the apparent success of his neighbour, or that he
sometimes wished for greater means of extending his
business.

«Never haste, never rest,” said Mr. Moreton to
him, one evening, as he heard Robert’s account of a
large order received by John Thomas for prime
whisiy. * Never haste, never rest,’ and you will
never want. Were you as old as I, Robert, you
would have learned better than to allow your feel-
ings to be disturbed because your neighbour is pros-
pering. Candidly, with all his apparent success,
would you, to-day, exchange places with him ?”

“No, indeed!” was the heartyresponse of Robert.
“T would rather be a poor man all my days than
furnish the means of ruin to one of my fellow-
creatures.”’

“But,” said Mr. Moreton, willing to try him

further, “young Thomas sells whisky only by the’

quantity, and thus evades the name and undesirable
fame of a grog-seller. He is a manufacturer, and
a drunkard is never to be seen on his premises.
T even hear that he will have none but temperate
men to work for him; and he himself never tastes
his own whisky !””

“So much the worse, father,” said Charles, who

a,

< 'e
« 3 -

Nea


294 LIFE IN THE WEST.



was listening to this conversation; “for he thus
acknowledges the evil of intemperance’’—

‘And shifts the responsibility upon others, while
he pockets the profits of his establishment,’”’ added
Robert. “But, where he stands, it is impossible to
meet him with any proof of his doing wrong. When
Mr. Bradley told him, last week, that he was making
drunkards by wholesale, while poorer men made
them so by retail, he answered, that ‘the appetite
was there, and, if he did not supply its cravings,
others would ;’ and even added, that ‘it was better
to give them good whisky than poor, poisoned stuff,
that was not fit to drink ! ”

“ By such arguments he doubtless satisfies him-
self,” replied Mr. Moreton; “but the end is to come.
He may accumulate riches—every thing now seems
to favour it; but the influence which goes out from
that establishment one would not wish to be respon-
sible for. Ten years from now, we shall be better
able to judge of its amount, as well as of his success.
Meantime, let us remember. the words of _ David:
“Be not thou afraid when one is made rich, when
the glory of his house is increased; for, when he
dieth, he shall carry nothing away, his glory shall
not descend after him.’ In the choice of an em-
ployment, as well as in the care of our hearts, it is
well to have this ‘testimony, that it pleases God;’
and those professions and callings of which this can
be said are so abundant, that we need not resort
STEAM SAW-MILL AND DISTILLERY. 225

to unlawful pursuits to gain a livelihood or to
insure a competence. - As you cannot hope to influ-
ence John, let him and hig success alone. It ig not
to interfere with your prosperity. Keep the end
steadily in view when we must all give an account
of the use of talents lent us by: our Maker > and be
sure that your’s are exercised in such a way that the
bodies and souls of your fellow-men are not thereby
injured, if you, at the close of life, would look back
with joy, and not with grief,”



19*
296 ~ LIFE IN THE WEST.

CHAPTER XXII.

WILLIE MORETON’S DEATH.

HitueErto, we have had to record only the pros-
perity and blessings which had attended the course
of the Moreton family. The minor ills to which all
are liable, and the infirmities of body from which
none are exempt, had sometimes visited them. The
same causes which had destroyed the crops of other
farmers had operated unfavourably for their’s; and
the fluctuations in the prices of staple commodities
they had felt as others did: but their history, on
the whole, had been one of mercy, and gratefully
did they acknowledge the guiding and protecting
hand of Providence.

The ensuing summer brought with it a sad change.
The prevalence of a fever, contagious in its nature,
and often fatal in its attacks upon the young, was
felt throughout that portion of country." Unknow-
ingly, Willie Moreton was exposed to it, and for days
suffered all the agonies of its worst form, while his
mind wandered in delirious imaginings. Oh! how
anxiously was he watched, how tenderly nursed by
his fond mother, who, forgetful of self in the care
WILLIE MORETON’s DEATH. 227

for his safety, would allow none but Mary to help
her in her labour of love! Those nights of wake-
fulness ; those days of tender ministration to hig
wants; those gentle words of love and sympathy,
whose tones were felt, even when their import was
not understood ; above all, those earnest prayers for
submission to the divine will, and for willing acqui-
escence in whatever their heavenly Father should
order,—who but those who know a mother’s heart,
and who have dwelt, both in health and sickness,
in trouble and joy, beneath the beaming light of a
mother’s love, can tell ? The full fountain of sym-
pathy which was opened for them in the hearts of
others, the ready acts of friendship, and the willing
help which was at their disposal, all showed the
strong hold which they had upon the affections of
their neighbours. Many, alas! of these kind friends
had cause for anxiety and watchfulness in their own
dwellings; and Some, who had laid loved ones in
their last narrow beds, came to proffer help for.
the invalid, hoping that their former exposure to
the disease might prove a sufficient reason with
Mrs. Moreton for employing their services, while
she sought necessary rest.

What a change came over that family group, ag
they realized, from their own experience, for the
first time, their slender hold upon life! With what
tenderness did they gaze upon each other, as they
felt that they knew not who should next be laid


228 LIFE IN THE WEST.



low, beneath the withering hand of disease! How
gently did they speak, how patiently bear the small
mistakes or infirmities of brother or sister! How, day
by day, did they comfort each other with words of
hope, which, their own hearts whispered, were feeble
to soothe ! How their own desires went up in silent
petition to God, to look upon them in their sorrow
and to grant them healing mercies!

Then Alice, the darling of their hearts, sickened,
and, for days, she too was dangerously ill. Never,
until now, had they felt how dear they were to each
other—how their lives were entwined together in
loving bonds, and their happiness dependent upon
the happiness of the whole.

But Willie was never more to take his place in
their family circle. From the first attack of illness,
his case had been deemed nearly hopeless, both by
Dr. Mason and his mother. Watchful nursing and
efficient care only served to prolong his life a few
days more upon earth, and then he closed his weary
eyes upon the world and slept his last sleep.

Reason was granted him in that last hour of life.
Feeble and faint the vital current moved in his veins.
He awoke from a disturbed slumber to recognise his
beloved mother bending over his pillow with mater-
nal tenderness. ‘The change which she saw in his
countenance, her experience too truly told her, was
the change of approaching death. Silently she sum-
moned to his side father, brothers, and sisters, each
WILLIE MORETON’S DEATH. 229



of whom he recognised with looks of love and faintly-
spoken words. Their tearful eyes and saddened
faces seemed to grieve him, and, as he asked for
“dear Ally,” and was told how very sick she was,
he sent a message of affection to her and Frank.
Then, looking in his mother’s face, he earnestly re-
peated, as if to comfort her—

“You know I love Jesus! You know I love
Jesus, the Saviour !”

They knelt in prayer by that dying bedside. In
faith did those parents again yield up the beloved
child to God, surrendering themselves, with all that
was their’s, to his sovereign disposal, and asking
for themselves unwavering submission and earnest
trust in his love. The dying one they commended,
oh, how fervently! to the Saviour for whom, with
his fleeting breath, he had ayowed his love, beseech-
ing him to place beneath him his everlasting arms,
to sustain him in this his time of need, and, when
his spirit should be freed from his weary and perish-
ing body, to bear him to that world of glory where
he might eternally dwell with angels and saints, and
with Jesus himself, the Saviour, the Redeemer!

For the further comforting of the departing soul,
Mr. Moreton repeated portions of God’s word:

“Yea, though I walk through the valley of the
shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for thou art
with me; thy rod and thy staff, they comfort
me,”
230 LIFE IN THE WEST.



“¢ And they remembered that God was their rock,
and the high God their Redeemer.”

‘For God so loved the world, that he gave his
only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth on
‘ him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

‘ Lord, I believe; help thou my unbelief.”

“Into thy hands I commit my spirit: thou hast
redeemed me, O Lord God of truth.”

“Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death
of his saints.” |

Thus, upon the ear of Willie, fell the sound of
God’s precious word, until that ear was dull, and the
eye, wont to beam with affection, was dimmed with
the shadow of death. As they looked upon those
features, lately so bright and joyous with the sunshine
of a loving heart, now fixed and motionless; as they
viewed the stiffened form, which they had ever seen
active and buoyant; as they remembered the plea-
sant voice and words, now hushed in never-to-be-
broken silence; as they recalled his many little acts
of kindness and of self-denying love,—it seemed as
if the blessed gift of memory itself would turn trai-
tor to their happiness—using the remembrance of
past pleasures to heighten the present grief.

What, then, could give them comfort? Upon
what can the afflicted heart rest, when earthly joys
and earthly hopes are taken away? The promises
of God’s word; and upon these only could our sor-
rowing friends rely. Willie’s appeal to his mother—
WILLIE MORETON’S DEATH. 231

“You know I love Jesus”—so emphatically uttered,
was the connecting link between his soul and
their’s. A life free from open sins, they thought
his to have been, but they knew that faith in Jesus
was the only plea which sinful man could make at
the throne of God 3 and these remembered words,
speaking of trust and confidence as well as of love,
lingered in their memories, soothing their grief and
mitigating their Sorrow, as they, with them, recalled
that word, “ Whosoever believeth on him shall not
be ashamed.’’*

By these same promises they were also consoled,
when, accompanied by neighbours and friends, they
bore his body to the village burial-ground and
there laid it, to rest until the resurrection-day. To
seek out some quiet retreat upon his own land, where
it might silently repose near them, was the first
thought of Mr. Moreton. But he had come to
live and die with his fellow-men, and where they
were buried, there should he and his be laid. Nor
did he regret this decision, as, around that open
grave, he saw the countenances of sympathizing
acquaintances and witnessed their sorrow in his
sorrow.

A few words of consolation to all mourning hearts
were spoken by Mr. Nesbit, a hymn sung, and then

* Rom. x. 10.
232 LIFE IN THE WEST.



friendly hands lowered the coffin into the earth, and
all silently withdrew.

But where was Susan Gray, in this time of trouble?
She, too, sat by the side of the sick; but it was in
her own house, and it was her only child to whom
she ministered. Now nearly two years old, it had
become an endeared member of their circle, winning
their hearts with its infantile charms and expand-
ing rapidly in intelligence and physical growth.

It was spared, after a struggle with disease and bo-
dily suffering scarcely less to be dreaded than death
itself, and lived to be a further source of joy to its
parents and to allat the farm. Alice, too, recovered,
but her recovery was slow; and they received her
once more to their fireside circle only as the first frosts
of autumn were gorgeously tinting the forest-trees.
As she took her accustomed place near her mother’s
chair, they remembered more vividly the departure
of one who would never return; but no heart was
ungrateful, or forgetful that God, in sending chas-
tisement, had mingled mercy with it; mercy in
staying the ravages of death and mercy in their
hope for the happiness of Willie.







a
TaN
Ww

MAA VANS

.

Su
a

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ome

aD

' iy
wr Yes
Nai

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“ And old Carlo himself, with unwonted effort, rouses himself to meet and welcome the master of the.

house.”—p 252.




,

CHAPTER XXIII.

Two years after the date of our last chapter, a
wagon drawn by a fine pair of horses might be seen
starting from a country-inn, in the vicinity of Lake-
land.

‘Only ten miles farther,” said the young man
who was acting as driver, “and the road good all
the way !”

‘‘ Which last sentence could not be added, Ro-,
bert, when you and I passed this way together,
eight years and a half since.”

‘¢No, indeed!’ answered Robert. *“ Your five
years’ absence has given time for great improve-
ments, Frank. Five years at the West are equal
to twenty in New England, in marked external
change.”

‘‘T shall not complain, if the alteration does not
affect people as well as places.”

‘‘ Nor should you, if it did,” said an elderly gen-
tleman, who sat by Frank’s side; “for, if I mistake
not, the Frank Moreton who left the West to go to
college does not look exactly like the ’ Squire More-
ton that is coming back.”

237
238 LIFE IN THE WEST.



“You are right, Dr. Newton ; and, if they don’t
know me at home, I shall rely upon you to intro-
duce me,” responded the younger man, laughingly.

“Only see that forest of girdled trees!” said Dr.

Newton. “What a sad sight! It looks like an
army of skeletons; and this breeze, that rocks their
dry arms, makes them more hideous still.”
* It was, indeed, a wild landscape, and calculated
to arrest the eye of a stranger. They had passed
fields in all stages of cultivation: some spotted with
stumps of trees so thickly, that there was little room
for the plough or the spade — others free, and
stretching out a broad expanse of smooth, level
land, rich and fertile ; they had ridden for miles
‘through woodland covered with gigantic trees, at
whose roots grew an impenetrable mass of underwood )
and around whose hoary trunks were clinging tendrils
of wild vines, full of crimson berries ; they had started,
from the forest-coverts, partridges and quails innume-
rable; had watched the wild-ducks fluttering about
the margin of ponds; had seen the nimble squirrels
almost fly at their approach; and had often come
unexpectedly upon some farm-house, set down, like
a whip-poor-will’s nest, all alone in the woods.

All these gave evidence and bore the impress of
life and activity. But not so the girdled field. The
ground was half-cleared, the underbrush all rooted
out and the plough had passed more than once
through the earth. Perhaps three years had passed
CONCLUSION. 239



since each tree had had the fatal mark set upon it;
and yet they stood in all their former magnitude,
but dead, throwing out their leafless and whitened
branches, that creaked with a hollow sound as they
waved to and fro in the wind. There were scat-
tered branches lying upon the earth; and, occasion-
ally, one weaker than its neighbour, leaned heavily,
their boughs locked together and together waited
the shock of the tempest that would uproot them.
A more desolate sight could not be imagined; and
the more so, because, around it and upon the very
earth in which they stood, there was full and luxu-
riant vegetation, as yet untouched by frost or wintry
blight.

They gazed upon it as they slowly passed along.

“It isa murderous practice and a slovenly one,
too,” said Robert; “but the farmer who has little
money feels as if wind and sun, tempest and time
must be employed as his servants; and the marks
of each, as a labourer, can be seen there.”

“Beaver Lake Saw-mill,” read Frank, on a guide-
board that stood at the angle of two roads. “ How
far to your mill, Robert, from this highway ?”

“Less than a quarter of a mile. We are earlier
than they will look for us at home; what say you
to a turn which takes you out of your way that
distance 7” |

“Nothing, but that I should like it,” said Dr.

Newton ; and in a few minutes, they were in hearing
oo
240 LIFE IN THE WEST.



of its saws; and in afew minutes more, stood within
its walls. |

Robert took them about its precincts, showed
them its machinery and its manner of working, and
then went with them to another apartment, where
two men, covered with flour, moved industriously
about. ;

“Well, Bonté,” said Robert, “are you at work
on the new wheat to-day, asI directed ?”

“Yes, sare.”

“And the alterations we made, do they work
well ?”’

“Yes, sare; he go nicely.”

“Ts that your ‘poor Frenchman?” asked Dr.
Newton.

“ Yes, sare,” replied Robert; “and he go nicely,
too, since he came here. You know he was a tinker
by trade, and strolled about the country, mending
tin-pans and doing odd jobs, for which he received
little or nothing. When this mill was building, he
applied for work, and he really showed so much me-
chanical skill, and was so handy, (as the Yankees
say,) that I have kept him in my employ constantly,
advancing him, as he is competent, to more respon-
sible posts. He-has been honest and sober ; and,
while he himself adheres to many French ways that
we do not consider praiseworthy or desirable, his
wife and children, with their regular and extended
means, have kept up with the tide of improvement,
CONCLUSION. 241



having become cleanly and tidy in their personal -
habits; and his oldest, son and daughter are among
Mr. Blagden’s best pupils; the boy is even studying
Latin and mathematics.” |

They left the mill, and stood among piles of
boards, planks and bundles of shingles.

“These,” said Robert, pointing to some fine black.
walnut logs, “are only squared off, and ready to
send Kast. We find a ready market for them there.
Pine-wood we bring back, for our white-wood is too
sensitive to changes of temperature to take its place
entirely, unless*we use paint more freely than most
of us can afford. These” (pointing to a lot of boards)
‘Care sold, and so are these.”

Frank had left them, and was talking earnestly to
some one who seemed an acquaintance.

“ Ah, Frank! and so you and Revere knew each
other, did you?”

“That we did,” said Frank; “and I am right
glad to see him here.”

“‘ And I to be here,” said Revere.

Thomas Revere was an important personage now
in the affairs of the Beaver Lake mill. With great
effort, he had broken off from his former companion-
ship; and though in that struggle he had suffered, yet
he came off victorious over his own appetite, and had
remained firm thus far. His former intellectual
standing no habits of sobriety could restore; neither
could abstemiousness repair the shattered bodily
a

942 LIFE IN THE WEST.



vigour. The vacant eye and the trembling hand,
the frequent indisposition and the fits of despond-
ency, all betrayed the sad inroads that had been
made by intemperance.

But Robert met him as a man: sympathized with
him in his efforts; was not discouraged if he once
or twice failed; he assisted him in the settlement
of his affairs with his creditors; saved for him some
little personal property from the grasp of the rum-
seller; procured board for him in a good, plain
family ; and, finally, gave him employment which
was constant and remunerative. .

“Are you going to take into your establishment
all the poor fellows in the country?” asked Frank.

“ Willingly, if they would do me as good service
as Revere,” answered Robert. “I enjoy much in
his society, for he is a shrewd man, and his know-
ledge is of advantage to me. He is my book-keeper;
he measures my lumber and prepares it for trans-
portation; he pays my workmen. In truth, he
does as much for me as I ever can do for him; so
that, in the matter of obligation, we are about
equal.”

It would not do to linger longer, and they were
soon at Mr. Moreton’s door. Frank leaped from
the wagon, eager to greet his mother first; nor did
he heed Carlo’s first welcome of a growl, and after-
wards of fawning caress.

Father and mother were there, with eyes tearful
a
om

CONCLUSION. _ a 949



through joy; and scarcely had the words of saluta-
tion passed between them and the new-comers, when
Mary cantered up to the door upon her pony, and
threw herself into Frank’s arms, gave him a hearty
kiss, which he as heartily returned, and then she
greeted Dr. Newton with the same salutation.

Susan was the next to come. A light wagon,
holding herself, the baby and Richard, appeared at
the door; they having been invited to meet Frank
and good Dr. Newton at the tea-table.

‘Where is little Dick?’ asked Mary.

“Coming with Annie,” answered Susan; “and
they should be here now,” she said, going to the
door.

There they were, and Annie’s cordial voice was
heard— -

“Ah! are they here already? I thought we
should have been before them ;” but Frank stopped
her mouth with kisses, for he was boisterous in his
joy at being once more among them.

- “Have you called Henry?” asked Mary. “We
promised we would.”

Robert started for the adjoining room, and, in an
instant, a loud-sounding note on a horn re-echoed
through the air.

“That is the very same old horn,” said Frank,
“and makes just the same fine music it did years
ago, when it used to say, ‘ Boys, come in to supper !’
and ‘ Boys, you’ve played out long enough !’ ”
244 LIFE IN THE WEST.



When Robert returned, he complimented him
upon his musical skill and proficiency upon his fa-
vourite instrument, adding—

“Time was, Robert, when three abortive attempts
would be made, before one such successful blast as
you just now favoured us with could be heard. But
I must go and meet Henry.”

Henry was hastening from the field. He was
dressed in coarse trousers and a short white carter’s
frock, while a broad-brimmed straw hat shaded his
face, though it had not prevented his acquiring, in
his out-of-door pursuits, a high-coloured and some-
what dark complexion.

What a hearty greeting was there! No small
degree of strength, on éither side, was exhibited and
felt in that old-fashioned shaking of hands, and mu-
tual exclamations of surprise at the personal change
each found in the other. |

Henry tarried awhile in the shed, ere he was
ready to greet Dr. Newton. The trousers were
taken off; a clean coat substituted for the carter’s
frock ; house-boots, black and shining, were pulled
on in place of the stout cowhide ones with which he
followed the oxen and traversed the ploughed fields.

Pure cold water was at hand, and in a shorter
time than it has taken to record it, he was ready to
appear, fresh and acceptably clad, before his friends.

Frank waited for him; and, as he joined him, he
said—
CONCLUSION. 245



“You keep up the old habit, Henry, that we
used to think mother so particular about. Do you
find it as burdensome as we formerly thought it
was 2”

“Oh, no, Frank! I am old enough and wise
enough now to see that it adds to my own comfort, as
well as to thatof mother. Besides, every arrangement
‘3 made here in this outside room for one’s doing it
with speed and ease; and it really takes scarcely
five minutes a day ‘to doff the old habit and on
with the new.’ ”

The same signal which had summoned Henry had
been heard farther away, and Charles and Alice
hurried up the hill, panting with quick exertion,
and soon were in the midst of the assembled family.

And now those few wonder-working years were
seen to have wrought many changes! Mr. and
Mrs. Moreton, with Dr. Newton, had still the same
appearance, unless a thread of white was seen here
and there more visibly on the temple. Robert
and Richard Gray had only matured and strength-
ened their well-expanded forms, and put on the
look of business-men; but “Henry had really
grown ; that,” said Frank, ‘is certain.” As cer-
tain was it, and rather more perceptible, that he
himself had; while Charles and Alice, one would
have thought, could have done nothing else. Mary
was a woman, too, still bright, and with a counte-
nance that told of a heart full of melody; Alice, tall,
246 LIFE IN THE WEST.



fair, with clustering ringlets about her face, shrink-
ing from observation, but eager in her love ; Annie—
“sweet Annie !” as everybody called her—calm and
self-possessed, thinking of all the others’ joy, and
of their happiness, and allowing no selfish wish to
arise that she too was fair and straight and strong ;
Charles, robust and ruddy, even now, in the midst
of his joy, finding time to tell little Cousin Dick how
many “nuts he and Alice had gathered that after-
noon, and of a fine squirrel he had in training for
him ;” information that set the little one in such an
ecstasy of pleasure as fairly lifted him off his feet,
and could only be allayed by successive hops and
skips. Notwithstanding this development of love
for boyish pleasures, Charles was a man in feeling
and in aim, but retained a freshness and vigour that
usually belong only to earlier years. Susan, too!
(Mrs. Gray with everybody else, but still holding
the appellation of “Cousin Susan” here,) she sat
like a young matron, now hushing the little boy in
his noisy demonstrations of happiness, now gazing
tenderly. on the baby, whose existence was numbered
by months, instead of years, and, again, looking
around that family circle, with an evident satisfac-
tion that she was embraced within its bounds.
Then. came that gathering about the hospitable
table. Plenty, that characteristic of Western fare,
was here seen, but in conjunction with ‘the nicer
culinary arts, and with an evident reference to the


CONCLUSION. 247



health, instead of fastidious appetite, of its partici-
pants. .

Do my readers ask, Was Willie forgotten in this
family reunion? Passed away from earth, had he
also passed away from the remembrance of those
who had loved him? Oh,no! Little do those
who could thus inquire, know of the depth of that
love which still reigned in their hearts for him who
was not lost, but gone to their heavenly Father’s
house. Little do they think of those yearning de-
sires which were only stilled and quieted with the
confident belief that for him to have departed and
to ‘be with Christ is far better.”

Hallowed and subdued by a remembrance of mor-
tality, life lost not its charms. It came as a gift
from the hand of a gracious God. Their creation
was with them a matter of thankfulness. The
mercies surrounding their path were so many in-
creased obligations neither to abuse it nor pervert it
from its true end. *The uncertainty of life was but
a stronger reason for valuing and improving it as it
passes ; and to its end they looked as opening to the
servants of Jesus a higher service and endless bliss.

Sunset came, with all its gorgeous drapery of
clouds, golden, violet and crimson; it found Henry
and Dr. Newton in the fields, looking at changes and
advances which Mr. Moreton pointed out. There
was much conversation about ploughing and plant-

ing, of subsoil and sandy loam, of pasture and wood-
21
248 LIFE IN THE WEST.



land, of draining and fencing, and all that vast
variety of subjects which mixed husbandry necessa-
rily includes. Frank walked away, for it did not
interest him as it did the others. He found his
mother and sisters together, and with them explored
the garden and orchard. In the latter they found
Charles, with his hand full of late yellow peaches,
which he offered to them.

“Do take one, Frank,” said he; “I went pur-
posely to show you and Dr. Newton some of this
new kind. We call them resolution-peaches, and
think them wonderfully good for preserving !”

Frank was quite in the dark as regarded the his-
tory of the peach-tree, but he praised the fruit,
which he very safely might do; and we as safely
praise Charlie, who had kept his resolution watch-
fully, until it was bringing forth the fair fruits of
forbearance, kindness and consideration.

At the side door stood Annie, talking with a lad.

“You have been very successful, Patrick,” said
she; “and very nice roots these are. Now put
them with the others, on the floor of the wood-house
chamber; and one more Saturday afternoon’s work,
like this, will finish your task.”

With these words, she turned and saw Frank, |

“ Ah, Frank! this is Patrick McConey; and we
all think him a real clever boy. See what a quan-
tity of ginseng-roots he has gathered since noon !””
and she put her slender hand into his basket and held
CONCLUSION. 249



up some of the joints. ‘He has quite a quantity
of it already, and we store it here until it is nicely
dried and ready for sale.”

‘¢ What will he do with the money it sells for,”
asked Frank.

‘Oh! that is a secret between us; is it not,
Patrick?” gayly responded Annie, with a genial
smile overspreading her features. “But we will
trust you with it, since visitors should receive extra
attention. A History of the United States, price
one dollar and fifty cents, is*to be the purchase.
Then Patrick can go into one of Mr. Blagden’s
higher classes, if he has a little perseverance and a
little help in learning his lessons.”

The perseverance must be on Patrick’s side, but ~
it was easy to see where the daily patience, in help- ;
ing a somewhat obtuse intellect in keeping pace with
quicker minds, was to come from.

‘“T understand,” said Frank. ‘And, Annie, I
hear that Bonté’s boy and girl—your old pets—are
both bright and improving.”

“ Ah, yes,” said Annie; ‘‘and such a comfort as
it is!”

‘‘ Did the mother ever learn to read?” asked her
brother.

‘‘No; I was not wise enough to know how to
teach an older person; but I go and read to her
very often. Were it not for her and Aunt Rachel,
I should have little to do.”
250 LIFE IN THE WEST.



But where were Mr. Moreton and Dr. Newton?
They had strolled over the field and come out by
Patrick’s house. The lingering twilight sufficed to
show the place to advantage. Its master and mis-
tress were both at the back of the cabin, mending
the cracks which a summer’s sun had caused in a
hollowed log of wood. This log was the trunk of a
tree, and sufficiently long to extend the length of
the house. It was placed under the projecting eaves,
and would both catch and retain (when whole) a large
quantity of water. The “water-wagons,” as the
clouds were called, which had been floating in the
sky, betokened rain to come, and busily were
Patrick and Winne employed, filling these cracks
and openings with the bark of the slippery-elm,
which, when moistened, would swell and make it
tight and whole.

Looking about the premises, Dr. Newton was struck
with the manifold uses to which wood, in its natural
state, could be turned. “A little hewing and split-
ting, and there were materials for a house. There
was a snug fence, the gate of which was held toge-
ther by a wooden pin, fitted to a knot-hole in the post.
There was a log-stable, with a manger made of a hol-
lowed tree. There was a well, and its surrounding
curb was but a thick slice out of an immense tree,
hollowed by fire and by slight cutting. The bucket
itself was swinging from a flexible tamarac pole, held
by a stout walnut arm. A grape-vine was stretched
CONCLUSION. 251



across the yard, from pole to pole, upon which hung
children’s aprons, stockings, &c., todry. A pile of
logs, like a miniature cabin, was the place to keep
ashes. Another stored potatoes and turnips for the
use of the animals in winter.

He remarked this to Mr. Moreton, who replied—

“Yes, it is wonderful; but you do not here see
it exemplified in all its varieties. I have sometimes
lifted the wooden latch to a door, and seen, within,
a cradle and a bedstead, seats and table, even the
hook for the boiling kettle over the fire, made of
logs. The cradle was a short one, hollowed, and a
blanket within it; the bedstead, two stout ones, of
equal height, securely nailed to the floor ; resting
on these were split pieces, that met the wall at the
two ends, and each other at the side; over this were
laced grape-vines, or else small pole-like branches
rested upon it and upon the side-logs of the cabin.
The seats would be good-sized logs, smoothly cut, with
sometimes an attempt at a support for the back ; the
table, a larger and higher log, such as you saw
about the well, only whole. A crotched branch of
a tree held the kettle, and a large wood-pile fur-
nished the fire for its necessities. The candlestick
was a bit of wood, with shingle-nails set in a circle ;
while the babies played with peeled sticks, dressed,
upon which faces were marked at one end, and with
the fruit of buckeye-trees, husks of corn, and nuts

of every kind.”
21*
252 LIFE IN THE WEST.



“Thus their necessities are met,” said Dr. Newton,
“however uninvitingly it may appear to us to be.
Our power of adaptation to circumstances and
the contrivance often shown in procuring the
means of satisfying our wants, is, to me, often
wonderful.”

But this is a digression; and we would draw our
reader’s attention to one scene more, passing over
even a visit to Aunt Rachel, with the presentation
of a pair of spectacles by Frank, which, she averred,
made her eyes young again. More than this, we
may not stop to tell of an excursion into a neigh-
bouring county, which was taken to show Dr. New-
ton a large prairie-farm, with embankments of earth
instead of fences, and its immense fields, with cor-
responding corn-cribs and threshing-floors. Nor
may we.dwell upon Frank’s welcome in the village,
nor his arrangement to enter himself with a party
of engineers who were surveying the land in that
_ region, in view of a railroad-rout; his father think-
ing that he would be the better for an active life for
a while.

Before Dr. Newton left, he became aware that
John Dudley and his favourite, Mary, were to unite
their fortunes, and he begged them to hasten that
event, that he might witness it. This was not done,
but he saw daily progressing the building of the cot-
tage in which they purposed to live, and was witness
for himself that this union was to be one of conge-
CONCLUSION. 953



niality, enlisting hearts, as well as hands, and pro-
mising a future of happiness for both.

“But I saw a cottage much like this one, near
the mill, the day I came,” said he, after going about
the little building. ‘ Whose is that ?”

‘¢ Mine,” said Robert; ‘‘and I only wait for this
to be finished, to take Mary’s chosen friend, Dora
Van Weichten, to it; for, the same day that mother
gives her daughter to John, I bring her another,
whom she says will be welcome !”

The last Sabbath of Dr. Newton’s stay had come.
They had attended church and heard the word of
God preached, uniting in worship with an earnest
and listening congregation, and singing the praises of
their Maker with the voice and heart. The duties of
the Sunday-school had been attended, and were varied,
this day, from their ordinary routine, by an address
from their Eastern visitor, and by a vote to bestow
the old library on a new school, some twelve miles
distant from them. As a school they felt rich
enough now to have a fresh one and to pay for it;
and they would show their thankfulness, for that
given to them in their weakness, by sending its well-’
read but well-kept volumes to those who were needy.

The walk home was long, but the gentlemen
preferred it to riding. The wagons had all
passed them ; the children hurried along, turning,
as they overtook Mr. Moreton, for their accustomed
954 —=C; LIFE IN THE WEST.



salutation: even the women who came on horse-
back to church, and brought babies with them, had
slowly moved past; and, when Mr. Blagden over-
took them, he seemed to be the last of the congre-
gation who went their way.

They passed Aunt Rachel’s, and received a plea-
sant nod of recognition from the old woman, as she
stood leaning on her crutches while Sobieski let
down the bars for her to enter the yard.

‘That boy is growing up into a very likely man,”
said Mr. Blagden. “He is no longer in school, but
comes often for books from my library; and, in my
opinion, bids fair for respectability and usefulness
among us.”

‘“‘ Your whole Sunday-school seems full of likely
boys and girls!’ said Dr. Newton. ‘I never spoke
to an audience of youth whose faces so generally
denoted intelligence.”

‘‘ We have no reason to be ashamed of our village
youth,” said Mr. Blagden. “‘ Their advantages have
been steadily increasing for the past eight years;
and, for that period, their improvement has been,
from one season to another, marked. I date from
the time of Mr. Moreton’s arrival here; for his
coming gave us an impetus in many matters, which
we still feel.”

“¢ How was that ?” asked Dr. Newton.

‘Our people were just in that state in which a
leading mind is needed. We were ready to unite
CONCLUSION. 255



in objects of public good, if we could clearly see

our way before us, and could have them put in

a practicable shape. When Mr. Moreton came, he

was fitted by position and by education to be that

leader. More than all, his example was eminently

calculated to do us good. Good, plain common

sense we saw he had. His way of working showed

this. We soon found that he feared God, and that

his religion was a part of his every-day life. He

praised every advance we had made. This pleased

us, for we Western people are not much accustomed

to praise; and thus jealousies were warded off. If

he did not approve of a thing, he said nothing. We

found him and all his family ready to help; and |
their influence in matters of religion, 1 in the causes -
of education, in social intercourse, in manners and
dress, has been felt the more powerfully, because

unconsciously received.”

Mr. Moreton, who was walking in advance of
them, here turned, and inquired if Mr. Thomas had
been heard from ?

‘Yes, he has sent to his son John to make the
best settlement he can with his creditors, and join
him in a proposed journey to California to dig gold.”

‘“‘T hope he will not go!” returned Mr. Moreton.
‘‘ A mine of wealth lies buried in his own fields, if
he will but dig for it.”

He turned away, and Mr. Blagden resumed—

“That Mr. Thomas and his family were a perfect
256 LIFE IN THE WEST.



contrast to our friends, the Moretons. They were
always intending to leave us and their place; conse-
quently, they made no effort at improvement in either.
With equal means and equal advantages, Mr. Tho-
mas always complained that he was not appreciated,
and that Mr. Moreton usurped his place; while his
success was ever a mystery, for he would not see it
as the result of well-directed labour.”

“To what do you attribute the higher state of
morality I have heard you mention ?” inquired Dr.
Newton.

<¢ To the more elevated ideas respecting education,
and the demand which they have made for more
thorough instruction. Our Sabbath service has
awakened attention, and the hearing of a well-writ-
ten sermon every week has had an effect upon the
intellect and elicited inquiry. Americans are natu-
rally ambitious for their children ; and a feeling of
ignorance on their part awakened anxiety for the
better information of the young.”

« But were the young people obedient and willing
to be under restraint? In new countries, it is not
ordinarily so.”

«Now we come to the first cause of the change ;
and of it I may speak the more freely, as I had so
small a share init. Our Sunday-school was really
the foundation of our improvement. Here the
children were taught the commandments of God,
and were led to feel that they were holy and just
CONCLUSION. 257



and true. As they grew up, the impression still
remained. Our children, eight years since, are our
young men and women now—some of them heads of
families, and all of them exerting an influence.”

“Has the school affected the interests of the
church here materially, do you think ?”

“‘ Nearly every accession to its numbers has come
from the school. At our last communion season,
eight persons were received to our church, who had
been scholars or teachers for several years. One of
these learned to read in the Sunday-school, and has
never, through poverty, had any other opportunity
for instruction. Mary Moreton found her out, and
has lent her book after book to study at home, until
she is a tolerable scholar. Better than all, she is
an earnest, devoted Christian ; and of those received
to church-membership from the school, we generally
feel quite confident of their knowledge and have
good hope of their sincerity.”

“You value the Sunday-school, then, as a help to
the church, as elevating our ideas of education, and
as an influence promotive of a higher state of public
morals ?”

‘Yes, and as an efficient aid to every one. The
parent feels it in family government; the teacher
feels it as promotive of effort; the town-officers feel
it as an instrument of good order; the minister re-
gards it as his own right-hand man : even the farmer
looks to it as a protection to his orchards and garden.
258 LIFE IN THE WEST. ;



It has done «us good; and, in wise and judicious
hands, I believe it to be a powerful and wonder-
working instrument for the good both of the body
and souls of men.” 7

They drew near to the house. There it stood, with
its green blinds, and shaded with trees just tinged
with autumn hues. The blue smoke curled gracefully
from itschimney. Alice stood in the doorway, wait-
ing for her beloved father. Charles, who had has-
tened home from church, and was already attending
to the necessary duties of the evening, that he might
be at leisure for the social worship of the family,
now held open the side-gate to admit a flock of
geese, who, in single file, were returning to their
safe night-quarters. The lowing of the distant
herds, as they clustered at nightfall about the well-
filled barns, was audible; and old Carlo himself,
with unwonted effort, roused himself to meet and
welcome the master of the house.

Thus would we leave them. With no real want
unsupplied—no imaginary one created by an arti-
ficial state of society ; where honest labour is honour-
able; where industry secures a sufficient fortune ; at
harmony with the world, and dwelling together in
unity ; with habits of sobriety, intelligent minds, and
a wide and open field for exerting a good and wise
influence,—who shall say that, in the broad fields
of the West, they had not found a happy home ?

THE END.

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