Citation
The two cousins, or How to be loved

Material Information

Title:
The two cousins, or How to be loved
Series Title:
Theodore Thinker's tales
Portion of title:
How to be loved
Creator:
Woodworth, Francis C ( Francis Channing ), 1812-1859
Clark & Maynard ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York (3 Park Row)
Publisher:
Clark & Maynard
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
96 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1851 ( lcsh )
Printed boards (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Printed boards ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisement, back cover.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Francis C. Woodworth ;with illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027027225 ( ALEPH )
45501422 ( OCLC )
ALJ0580 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text




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THE TWO COUSINS







ow ci cousINS,

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HOW TO BE LOVED.
"|

| WITH ILLUSTRATIONS





BY _FRANCIS C. WOODWOE C. WOODWORTH.

NEW YORK:
CLARK & MAYNARD,
8 PARK ROW.



Entered accurding to Act of Congress, in the year 1851,
By CLARK, AUSTIN & CO.,

th the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the United States for the
Southern District of New York.



Che Gun Guusing;

OR, HOW TO BE LOVED.



THE TWO COUSINS.

Mary Woodman was one of
the best girls I ever saw in my
life. She was so kind, and af-
fectionate, and obliging, that I
should lke to make you ac-
quainted with her, so that you



6 THE TWO COUSINS.



can have her for a sample in
some things.

I do believe she took more
pleasure in seeing her young
brother enjoy the candies, and
nuts, and raisins, that were
given her, than she did in eat-
ing them herself. Our Lord
tells us, you know, that “it is
more blessed to give than to
receive;” and Mary said she
always found it so.



THE TWO COUSINS. 7

So, whenever she had any
thing good of this kind given
her, one of her first thoughts was
to find some one to “help her
enjoy it,” as she said; by which
she meant, some one to help
her eat them.
~ How different from this is
the conduct of some girls and
boys that I know! They are
so selfish, that they want to
keep all their good things to



8 THE TWO COUSINS.



themselves. They cannot bear
to let their brothers or sisters, |
or any one else, even taste of
what they love so well.

€ a Fe x er?
if: rat C for

eS a
at ; Any X\





CAROLINE AND THE ORANGES.



It was only the other day that
I saw a girl show a great deal
of selfishness, when I gave her
and her little brother each an
orange. That girl was Mary
Woodman’s own cousin, Caro-
| line Redford. Her mother was
heartily ashamed of her, when



10 THE TWO COUSINS.



she saw how selfish she was,
and told her that she must not
have any more oranges, if she
showed such a spirit.

Instead of getting some one
to “help her enjoy” the orange,
as Mary Woodman would have
done, Caroline ate it all herself,
and never offered any to her
mother and aunt, who were
in the roam at the time.

And that was not the worst



THE TWO COUSINS. 11

of it. She did not like it, be-

cau.e her brother’s orange was



larger than her own. She said
it was larger. I do not know
whether it was or not. It might
have been a little larger. I
meant, when I bought them,
to have them as near the same
size as possible. But one might
~ have been a little, a very little,
larger than the other. It is
hardly possible, you know, to



12 THE TWO COUSINS.



get two oranges so near alike
that one cannot tell them apart.

But what if Caroline’s orange
was a little smaller than her
brother’s, did she not act very
foolish, and was she not naughty,
to find fault on that account?

If it had been Mary instead
of this other little friend of
mine, I am very sure she would
_not have grumbled so. Instead
of her face looking as if there



THE TWO COUSINS. 18



was a storm coming up, it would
have been all covered with sun-
shine. She would have thought,
“ How kind that man is, to give
dear brother so large an orange!”
That is what she would have
thought. Mary did not live
for herself alone. She wanted
to see others around her happy.
She tried to make them happy;
and it made her kind heart glad
to know that they were happy.



WHAT THEY THOUGHT OF CAROLINE.

oOo

You will want to know what the
playmates of Caroline thought
of her. I will tell you. They
thought she was very selfish.
Caroline had got the name of
having a bad temper, too; and
I should think she came honest-
ly enough by the name. I re-



THE TWO COUSINS. 15



member one thing she did,
which I should not think any-
gurl would do unless she was
almost burning up with passion.
1 think she must have got into
a fever heat, before she could
let her anger run away with
her so.

She was in her father’s gar-
den, attending to some of her
favorite ilowers, when a poor

girl, who used to go begging



16 THE TWO COUSINS.



about the neighborhood, came
into the garden, and asked for
one of her tulips.

“J want one of your tulips,
miss,” said she: -“not one of
your two lips,” she said; “I
mean tulips.”

Well, that was not a very
saucy speech, as it seems to me.
Most girls would have laughed
at it, and let it go. But Caro-
line was very angry. She took










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THE TWO COUSINS. 19



up a pail of dirty water, which
was standing near, and dashed
it all over the poor girl. “I'll
tulip you,” said she.

Caroline was not much be-
loved. This affair of the dirty
water, and other things of that
kind, ‘had got noised all over
the neighborhood. She knew
it herself; and she used to won-
der why it was so.. “Every-
body loves my cousin Mary,”



20 THE TWO COUSINS.



she once said to her mother.
“J should like to know why
they love her more than they
do me.”

I am not sure that her mo-
ther told, her the secret. But
I think it would not have been
difficult for her to do so. You
can guess what it was, little
girl, can you not? I could
have told her pretty easily.

But I have quite a different



THE TWO COUSINS. 21



story to tell you from the
orange story and the one about
the dirty water. It is a story
about a very different girl, too.

“T guess I know who it is,”
Mr. Thinker.” —

Well, who?

“Caroline’s cousin.”

You've guessed right.



22 ‘THE TWO COUSINS.



THE GOLD PIECE.



One day, Mrs. Woodman called
Mary to her, and told her that
she might learn to read a few
verses in the Bible, if she liked.
Some of the first verses that
Mary read were very easy. If
you will turn to the first chap-
ter of the Gospel of John, you










THE TWO COUSINS. 25



will see how easy. they were,
for it was that chapter that
Mrs. Woodman selected for the
first reading lesson in the Good
Book.

“Very well,” said Mary’s mo-
ther, after she had read the
first five verses; “very well, in-
deed. I wonder if you cannot
learn these verses by heart. Do
you think you can?”

Mary thought she could.



26 THE TWO COUSINS.



“But, dear mother,” said she,
“what 1s meant by the darkness
not’ comprehending the light?”

“Well,” said Mrs. Woodman,
“there is rather a hard word in
that last verse. I will tell you
what that means, my dear.”
And so she explained the verse,
and told what comprehending
meant. I suppose most of
those who read this little book
know the meaning of the word,



THE TWO COUSINS. 27



and so I will not stop to explain
it. If you don’t know, how-
ever, you can get» your mo-
ther, or some one else, to tell
you.

“Mary,” said Mrs. Wood-
man, after she had explained
all the difficult parts of the les-
son which had been read, “I
am going te teach you to read
fourteen verses in this chapter.
It will take two lessons more,



28 THE TWO COUSINS.



I guess. You ‘may look over
the other nine verses, and I
will hear you read five to-mor-
row, and four the next day. If
you think you can learn by
heart the five verses you have
read to-day, you may learh
them. If there is any thing in
these fourteen Verses that you
do not understand, I will try to.
explain it to you. I should
like to have you learn all these



THE TWO COUSINS. 29



verses, when you have read
them to me. Do you think
you can.learn them ?”

“Yes, mamma,’ said Mary,
“I think -I can. I will try.”

That was what Mary always
said, when her mother asked
her to do any thing which was
difficult. “I will try.” How
much better it would be, if all
little boys would say so, instead
of saying, “T can’t!” “Pil try,”



30 THE TWO COUSINS.



is a great deal better than, “I
can’t.”

“Well, my dear,” Mrs. Wood-.
man said, “if you will learn
these verses, all of them, I will
give you a silver dollar; and
if you will learn the Ten Com-
mandments, after I have taught
you to read them, and a little
hymn: I will show you, by-and-
by, you may give me back
the dollar, and I will give you



THE TWO COUSINS. 31



a quarter-eagle—a gold piece
worth two dollars and a half.”

Mary tried, as she said she
meant to do, that very day,
to learn the first five verses,
which she had already read.
She could not say them by
heart the next day, though.
But she tried again, and she
ried until she learned them.
By-and-by, too, she learned

the whole fourteen verses, so



82 ' THE TWO COUSINS.



that she repeated them to her
mother, without missing a word.

“That’s a good girl,” said
Mrs. Woodman, as she pressed
Mary to her bosom, and kissed
her over and over again; “that’s
a good girl. Here is the silver
dollar which I promised you.”
And she gave her the dollar.
It was the finest present, Mary
thought, which her mother had
ever made her.



THE TWO COUSINS. 83



Not many weeks after that,
Mary learned the Ten Com-
mandments, too, so that she
could say them all by heart.
Her mother did not have to
tell her a single word. ‘Then
Mrs. Woodman gave her the
little hymn to learn, and she
learned that.

It was a very pretty hymn,
made on purpose for children.
It was something like “Now I

8



34 THE TWO COUSINS,



lay me down to sleep,” only it
was longer. .Mary and _ her
brother often knelt down to-
gether, just after they got up
in the morning, and said it,
after they had said “Our Fa-
ther.” Mary’s brother was a
very good boy. He used to
love to go into a room alone,
~ and ask God to bless him, and
to forgive his sins.

After Mary had learned the






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THE TWO COUSINS. 37



hymn, her mother asked her to
go and get the silver dollar.
She did so, and Mrs. Woodman
took the dollar back again, and
gave Mary the gold piece—a
quarter-eagle, worth two dol-
lars and a half. .

Mary felt that she was rich.
The quarter-eagle was a great
deal of money for such a little
girl.

“Was she not proud of her



38 THE TWO COUSINS.

gold piece?” some of you may
be ready to ask.

No; she set a great store by
it, because her mother gave it
to her, and called her a “dar-
ling child,” when she put it into
her hand. But I don’t think
she felt proud of it. She cer-
tainly did not show any pride.
But what do you think Mary
did with her quarter-eagle ?

“She got her father to put



THE TWO COUSINS. 39



it into the Savings Bank,” says
one.

No.

“She hada money-box made,”
says another, “with a lock and
key on it, and she put the gold
piece into that.”

No; Mary did not do that,
either.

_ ©Well,” says another little
~ girl, “I guess she had a hole
made in it, and put a string



40 THE TWO COUSINS.

through the hole, and wore it
around her neck.”

No.

“Then she put it up among
the rest of her playthings,”
says another.

No; she did nothing of the
_ kind. I should not have blamed
her, to be sure, if she had put
it into the Savings Bank.
There would have been no
harm, in it. That is a good



THE TWO COUSINS. 41



way enough for children to
save the money which they
have giventothem. But Mary
chose to do something else with
her gold piece; and I will tell
you what she did with it, so as
to show you what a good and
kind heart she had.

“Dear mother,” said she, one
day, perhaps'a month after the
gold piece had been given her;
“dear mother, how many pretty



42 THE TWO COUSINS.



presents I did get last Christ-
mas!”

Mrs. Woodmah thought that
Mary said so because she was
thinking of the presents she
might have when Christmas
came round again, as it was
now very near that season of
the year. So she said, “Yes,
my dear, and if you are a good
girl, it may be that Santa Claus
will make you another visit



THE TWO COUSINS. 43



pretty soon. There’s no tell-
ing what may happen.”

“TI was not+ thinking about.
that, mamma,” Mary said.

“What made you speak of
it, then ?” her mother asked.

“Because,” said Mary, “I
was thinking that I should like
to try, next Christmas, and see
if [ can make somebody happy.
Why can’t I make a present
myself ?”



44 THE TWO COUSINS.



Her mother told her that she
might make a present if it did
not cost t6o much. “What
would you like to give, dear?”
she asked; “and to whom would
you like to give it?”

Then Mary told her mother
exactly what she had _ been
thinking of. Mrs. Rawson, she
said, needed a new Bible, with
large print. “A little while
ago,” she said, “I told her that



THE TWO COUSINS. 45



‘[ had been reading in the

Bible, and I asked her if she
did not love to read her Bible.
‘O yes, she told me, ‘but my
eyes are getting so old that I
cannot see to read the Bible
that I have at home, the print
is so small.’ I felt very sorry
for Mrs. Rawson, and I should
like to give her a Bible printed
with large letters, so that she
can read it.”



46 THE TWO COUSINS.



Perhaps I ought to tell the
little folks who read my book,
who Mrs. Rawson was, and how
Mary came to take so much
interest in her. She was a
widow, and for many years had
done a great deal of sewing for
Mrs. Woodman’s family. Her
husband was once a sea-captain.
But one day, about the time
she was expecting him home
from a long voyage, a mas






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THE TWO COUSINS. 49

came and handed her a letter.
She broke the seal as soon as
she could, and there she read
that her dear husband had been
drowned. She wept a long
time. Little Sarah and Emily,
her two children, came to her,
and asked her what made her
weep so, and she said to them,
“My precious babes, your dear

father is dead.”
Her husband was not rich;

4



50 THE TWO COUSINS.

so that after his death, she had
to sew for the neighbors, to get
money to help support herself
and her two children.

But I must go back, and
take up the story about Mary
Woodman, where I left off

“Well,” said Mary’s mother,
“you may go and ask father
what he thinks about getting
the Bible for Mrs. Rawson. I

gress he will give you money



THE TWO COUSINS. 51

enough to buy the Bible. Mary
said she did not think of going
to her father to get the money.
“But how will you buy it,
then?” asked Mrs. Woodman.
Mary hesitated in answering
the question. She was not quite
sure that her mother would
like her plan. But she ventured
to say, at last, that she had been |
thinking of buying the Bible

with her quarter-eagle.



52 THE TWO COUSINS.



A tear stood in the eye of
Mrs. Woodman, as she heard
this language from the lips of
her daughter. But it was not
a tear of grief. It was a tear
of joy. She was glad, she was
delighted, to hear that Mary
wished to make such a use of
her gold piece, and she told
her so.

A little while before Christ:
mas, a large Bible was bought



THE TWO COUSINS. 53



with the quarter-eagle. It was
printed in large letters on pur-
pose, so that old people could
read it easily. On the cover
these words were put on, in
neat gilt letters: “Mrs. Rawson,
from her little friend Mary.”
Christmas-eve came. Mary
had as many presents as she
had the year before, and more
too, I believe. But she did
not enjoy any of them more:



54 THE TWO COUSINS.

than she did the thanks of the
widow Rawson, who came over
to Mr. Woodman’s early on
Christmas morning, to tell Mary
and her father and mother how

happy she was to get the Bible.







THE EVENING LESSON.

— oe +o

| want to have you see these
two cousins together, so that
you can get a good chance to
notice what a difference there
is in the two girls. I have said
that one of them was a favorite
with almost everybody, while
scarcely any one loved the



56 THE TWO COUSINS.



other. Now there was a rea-
son for this. There was a
good reason why one was so
generally loved, and why the
other was not loved; and I
want you to find out what that
reason was.

You shall see them both
together, in Mrs. Woodman’s
chamber. This good lady has
just come up from the parlor,
where she has been listening






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THE TWO COUSINS. 59



to grandfather Woodman, who
was reading out of a new book,
which had just been brought
home.

“Well, my dear children,”
said she, as she took her seat at
the table in the room where
the cousins had been studying,
“do you think you can tell me
al] about your geography les-
son now 2”

Mary thought she could.



- 60 THE TWO COUSINS.



She would “try,” at any rate.
Caroline said nothing.

Reader, stop a moment, and
turn back to the beginning of
the book. You see a picture
there.

Look at it. That is Mrs.
Woodman whom you see sit
ting at the table. There are
two candles before her, (for it
is evening,) and there is a girl,
sitting there with her.



THE TWO COUSINS. 61



Do you ask who that girl
is? Guess.

“Caroline Redford,” you say.

But what makes you think
it-is Caroline?

“Because she looks sulky,
and out of humor.”

You are right, and I see that
you are in a fair way to get at
the reason why she was not as
much « favorite as her cousin
Mary was. But there was



62 THE TWO COUSINS.

another thing about Caroline,
which was quite as bad as
her sulkiness and ill-humor. I
mean her selfishness. I have
spoken of this before, I believe.
It is very difficult for any one
to love a person that is so self-
ish. When I see a girl who
has got a habit of thinking a
great deal too much of her own
dear self, and who cares very
little for the happiness of her



THE TWO COUSINS. 63



brothers, and sisters, and play-
mates, if she is only pleased
herself, I cannot help thinking
of certain animals that root up
the ground with their noses, and
who don’t want their neighbors
to eat out of the same trough,
for fear they will not get enough
themselves.

The other girl in the picture,
the girl who is standing up, 1s
Mary Woodman. The girls



64 THE TWO COUSINS.



are some years older now than
they were when the tea-table
was upset. Caroline has come
over to her aunt’s, to spend a
week or two. The two cousins
have just begun to study ge-
ography. That book which
Caroline holds in her hand is
the geography. Mary has an
atlas. Mrs. Woodman had
told them, when they came
home from school that after-



THE TWO COUSINS. 65



noon, that they must study
their geography lesson, and
before they went to bed she
would hear them answer the
questions.

Well, about nine o'clock,
Mrs. Woodman began to ask
them questions about the les-
son. Mary answered very well,
but Caroline got along poorly
enough. .

“I am very sorry,” said Mrs

5



$6 THE TWO COUSINS.



Woodman to her niece, “I
am very sorry you have not
studied your lesson any better.
You must take the book again,
and see if you cannot answer
all the questions when I ask
you next time.”

How vexed Caroline was,
when she had to go to studying
her lesson again! She made a
great ado about it; complained
that she was tired. and sleepy;



THE TWO COUSINS, 6%



and declared that she could not
learn the lesson if she had to
sit up till morning.

But Mary’s mother told her
niece that she must learn the
geography lesson, at any rate;
that if she had not spent so
much time playing with old
Prince, (the family dog,) she
would not have had any diffi-
culty about the lesson; and
that she must not blame any-



68 THE TWO COUSINS.

body but herself, if she did
have to sit up till morning.

Then Caroline went to cry-
ing with all her might. The
foolish girl! as if that would
mend the matter any.

“But,” you ask, “did she
have to sit up all night ?”

No. When she found that
her aunt would not let her go
to bed until she had learned
her lesson, she went to work and



THE TWO COUSINS. 69



learned it. But when her aunt
put the questions to her, she
answered in a cross and surly
way.
“Qh dear!” said Mrs. Wood-
man, “I do wish that you
would be a better girl. I
can't love you when you act
so. Why will you not take
more care? It grieves me
very much, when you behave
in this manner.”



70 THE TWO COUSINS.



How strange it is that chil-
dren can give their parents so
much trouble!












MARY'S LOVE OF FLOWERS,



I think it is a good sign to see
a girl fond of flowers. Mary
loved them dearly. I don't
know that I ever saw her more
pleased than she was one day,
when I went to her father’s, and
gave her a wreath of flowers,
of different kinds, some of which



4 THE TWO COUSINS.



were very beautiful. How she
praised the rose, the violet, the
blue-bell, the lily of the valley,
and all the rest of the pretty
sisters which were twined to-
gether in this wreath!

It was at this time that I read
to her those sweet lines which
my friend Miss Marearer Jun-
xin has written about the flow-
ers; and as I read them, I saw
more than one tear steal down



THE TWO COUSINS. "5



the cheek of that dear girl.
And when I came to the last
line, she could only say, “How
sweet!” and her tears fell like
rain.

. Dear, dear Mary! A tear
starts into my own eye, while I
write these words, and when I
remember that she is gone to
her home in the skies, and that
we shall see her pleasant face
no more in this world. I loved



76 THE TWO COUSINS.



Mary, and my heart was sad
when they laid her in the grave.

“Why did Mary weep, while
you were reading those lines
about the flowers ?”

I hardly know. Mary was
a feeble girl, even then; and I
have sometimes thought, when
I have seen how her eye lighted
up,as soon as any thing was said
about heaven—I have some-
times thought that she knew she



THE TWO COUSINS. "7



should not long stay here in the
world. But I will show you
Miss Junkin’s verses.

“HOW BEAUTIFUL THE FLOWERS ARE!”
1

How beautiful the flowers are!

_ How bright they make our way,

Strewing the earth so variedly
With all their rich array!

They speak to us with eloquence
‘Of His majestic power,

Who even stoops to show his skill
In fashioning a flower



78 THE TWO COUSINS.



IL
I fain would think that they shall
be,
With their sweet looks of love,
Among the many pleasant things
That we shall meet’above.
If they are even perfect here,
Where storms and tempests rise,
What would they be if blossoming
Beneath celestial skies !

rr.
There they would never droop their
leaves,
Or cease their scented breath ;



THE» TWO COUSINS. 79



Their tender veins would not be
chill’d
Beneath the frosts of death:
An immortality of bloom
Would thus to them be given;
The faintest rose tint could not
fade—
There is no death in heaven.





THE GRAVE-YARD.



Mary died young. Her sun
went down while it was yet
day. But her death was a
peaceful and happy one. She
loved Christ, and, as her end
drew near, she longed to go
and be with him. It is a great
thing to die. No one who is



THE TWO COUSINS. 81



young, and strong, and cheer-
ful, loves the thought of dying.
It is not pleasant to think of
leaving father, and mother, and
dear friends, and all the beau-
tiful things which we have here
in the world, and to lie down
in the dark grave. But God
prepares those who are good
—those who repent of their
sins and love the Saviour—for

death.



82 THE TWO COUSINS.



Mary was prepared to die.
{It was not unpleasant for her
to think of dymg. And she
sang a hymn the very day she
left the world, she felt so happy.

“When she died, all the neigh-
bors mourned for her. Noone
was more beloved than Mary.

They laid her in the village
grave-yard, among the flowers
which she loved so well while
she was living. The grass






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THE TWO COUSINS. 85



has now grown over that little
grave; for years have passed
since it was made. But even
now, in the bright summer
time, those who loved that dear
child, and who wept bitter tears
when she went to heaven, often
visit that spot, and water with
their tears the flowers that
bloom over the grave of Mary
Woodman.



THE OTHER COUSIN.



“Well, Mr. Thinker,” says more
than one of my bright-eyed .
readers, “I don’t wonder why
Mary Woodman was beloved.
I love her myself, although I
never saw her.”

“So do I,” says another little
girl; “but & should like to



THE TWO COUSINS. 87



know a little more about Caro-
line.”

I am sorry I cannot say
something about her that will
make you love her, too. But
she did not become any more
lovely, as she grew up. She
was the cause of a great many
unpleasant feelings among her
companions. [I never heard.
anybody say, “I love Caroline
Redford.” Indeed, I don’t see



88 THE TWO COUSINS.



how anybody could love her
very much. And yet it was
just as easy, I dare say, for her
to act so that everybody would
love her as it was for her cousin.
It was all Caroline’s fault.





THE WAY TO BE LOVED. ©



Children, we are coming now
to the end of our little book.
We have got through with the
story about the Two Cousins.
You have seen, as you went
along, the pictures of two very
different girls. You have seen
the picture of one girl that was



90 THE TWO COUSINK,



loved, and another girl that
was not loved. You see the
reason now, why Mary was
more beloved than her cousin.
The reason was, that Mary
was more lovely. There was
something m her that no one
could help loving.

When you look upon a
pretty rose, and smell its sweet
perfume, you love the rose.
So does every one love it.



THE TWO COUSINS. ~ 91



There is something in the rose
which is lovely. And it is just
so with a good, and kind, and
generous, and sweet-tempered
girl.

But it is the hardest thing
in the world to love a person
that is selfish, and cross, and
peevish, and quarrelsome.

Why, I could love a great
black bear, or a tiger, almost
as easily as I could love some



92 THR TWO COUSINS.



girls I have seen. I am all
the time afraid, when I am
with one of these cross, snappish
girls, that a cloud will rise, and
_ cover her face, and that a
thunder-storm, with large hail-
stones, perhaps, will come up.

Now I have told you this
story of Mary and Caroline
partly to amuse you. , But I
have had another reason be-

. sides that. I hoped,-while I



THE TWO COUSINS. 93



was telling it, that it would do
you some good. When you
look in a looking-glass, and find
that your hair is out of order,
or that you have got your
face a little soiled, while you
have been out at play in the
yard, you go, as soon as you
can, and have your hair brush-
ed, and your face made as clean
as water will make it.

Well, can’t you, as you look



94 THE TWO COUSINS.



in this book about the Two
Cousins, when you come to
Caroline, can’t you see.a pic-
ture that looks a little like
your own face? I don’t mean
to ask you whether it is exactly
like you, but whether it does
not look a hittle like you.

It is not always an easy thing
for us to see ourselves as other
people see us. When we have
faults, sometimes we cannot see



THE TWO COUSINS. 95



them at all; or, if we do see
them, they look small to us.
And just as likely as not, if the
same things were to be found in
another person, we should find
no difficulty in seeing them.
I hope you will take a peep at
yourself, and see whether I am
right or not. I should be sorry
enough to hear that you were
at all like Caroline; and yet
you might be a little like her



96 THE TWO COUSINS.



and not be just. like her. I
hope not, to be sure, but it may ©
be so. -

Now, would you not rather
be in Mary’s place than in
Caroline’s? Would you not
choose to be loved as Mary ©
was loved? Well, then, try
to shun the faults of Caroline.
Try to do as Mary did. And
if you find it difficult sometimes,

ask God to help you. -









wer. A
oe Gfyutore Chinker’s =
ae STORIES for LITTLE FOLKS; @ 8
| hat








_CONSISTING (OF t
he A BC Picture Book, with Stories ;
Stories by Jack the Sailor. j

Stone rou Birds and Beasts. ©
= Stories about the Country.
The Balloon, and other ‘stories. i
The Two Cousins, or How to be loved. Sy
Hed
hal










Tom Headstrong, or Always in Trouble.
\) The Holiday Book.
oe + The Girl’s Story Books. SI
Z iv Phe Boy’s Story Book. ‘ a
4; Jucle Reuben, and his Stories.
| Storm and Sunshine, or the Right Way
and the Wrong Way. : : zi





f



NEW YORK:

Ne CLARK, AUSTIN & C0, &






Full Text






THE





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$y

3 PARK ROW & 8 ANN-STREET








The Baldwin Library

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THE TWO COUSINS




ow ci cousINS,

“4
HOW TO BE LOVED.
"|

| WITH ILLUSTRATIONS





BY _FRANCIS C. WOODWOE C. WOODWORTH.

NEW YORK:
CLARK & MAYNARD,
8 PARK ROW.
Entered accurding to Act of Congress, in the year 1851,
By CLARK, AUSTIN & CO.,

th the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the United States for the
Southern District of New York.
Che Gun Guusing;

OR, HOW TO BE LOVED.



THE TWO COUSINS.

Mary Woodman was one of
the best girls I ever saw in my
life. She was so kind, and af-
fectionate, and obliging, that I
should lke to make you ac-
quainted with her, so that you
6 THE TWO COUSINS.



can have her for a sample in
some things.

I do believe she took more
pleasure in seeing her young
brother enjoy the candies, and
nuts, and raisins, that were
given her, than she did in eat-
ing them herself. Our Lord
tells us, you know, that “it is
more blessed to give than to
receive;” and Mary said she
always found it so.
THE TWO COUSINS. 7

So, whenever she had any
thing good of this kind given
her, one of her first thoughts was
to find some one to “help her
enjoy it,” as she said; by which
she meant, some one to help
her eat them.
~ How different from this is
the conduct of some girls and
boys that I know! They are
so selfish, that they want to
keep all their good things to
8 THE TWO COUSINS.



themselves. They cannot bear
to let their brothers or sisters, |
or any one else, even taste of
what they love so well.

€ a Fe x er?
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eS a
at ; Any X\


CAROLINE AND THE ORANGES.



It was only the other day that
I saw a girl show a great deal
of selfishness, when I gave her
and her little brother each an
orange. That girl was Mary
Woodman’s own cousin, Caro-
| line Redford. Her mother was
heartily ashamed of her, when
10 THE TWO COUSINS.



she saw how selfish she was,
and told her that she must not
have any more oranges, if she
showed such a spirit.

Instead of getting some one
to “help her enjoy” the orange,
as Mary Woodman would have
done, Caroline ate it all herself,
and never offered any to her
mother and aunt, who were
in the roam at the time.

And that was not the worst
THE TWO COUSINS. 11

of it. She did not like it, be-

cau.e her brother’s orange was



larger than her own. She said
it was larger. I do not know
whether it was or not. It might
have been a little larger. I
meant, when I bought them,
to have them as near the same
size as possible. But one might
~ have been a little, a very little,
larger than the other. It is
hardly possible, you know, to
12 THE TWO COUSINS.



get two oranges so near alike
that one cannot tell them apart.

But what if Caroline’s orange
was a little smaller than her
brother’s, did she not act very
foolish, and was she not naughty,
to find fault on that account?

If it had been Mary instead
of this other little friend of
mine, I am very sure she would
_not have grumbled so. Instead
of her face looking as if there
THE TWO COUSINS. 18



was a storm coming up, it would
have been all covered with sun-
shine. She would have thought,
“ How kind that man is, to give
dear brother so large an orange!”
That is what she would have
thought. Mary did not live
for herself alone. She wanted
to see others around her happy.
She tried to make them happy;
and it made her kind heart glad
to know that they were happy.
WHAT THEY THOUGHT OF CAROLINE.

oOo

You will want to know what the
playmates of Caroline thought
of her. I will tell you. They
thought she was very selfish.
Caroline had got the name of
having a bad temper, too; and
I should think she came honest-
ly enough by the name. I re-
THE TWO COUSINS. 15



member one thing she did,
which I should not think any-
gurl would do unless she was
almost burning up with passion.
1 think she must have got into
a fever heat, before she could
let her anger run away with
her so.

She was in her father’s gar-
den, attending to some of her
favorite ilowers, when a poor

girl, who used to go begging
16 THE TWO COUSINS.



about the neighborhood, came
into the garden, and asked for
one of her tulips.

“J want one of your tulips,
miss,” said she: -“not one of
your two lips,” she said; “I
mean tulips.”

Well, that was not a very
saucy speech, as it seems to me.
Most girls would have laughed
at it, and let it go. But Caro-
line was very angry. She took




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THE TWO COUSINS. 19



up a pail of dirty water, which
was standing near, and dashed
it all over the poor girl. “I'll
tulip you,” said she.

Caroline was not much be-
loved. This affair of the dirty
water, and other things of that
kind, ‘had got noised all over
the neighborhood. She knew
it herself; and she used to won-
der why it was so.. “Every-
body loves my cousin Mary,”
20 THE TWO COUSINS.



she once said to her mother.
“J should like to know why
they love her more than they
do me.”

I am not sure that her mo-
ther told, her the secret. But
I think it would not have been
difficult for her to do so. You
can guess what it was, little
girl, can you not? I could
have told her pretty easily.

But I have quite a different
THE TWO COUSINS. 21



story to tell you from the
orange story and the one about
the dirty water. It is a story
about a very different girl, too.

“T guess I know who it is,”
Mr. Thinker.” —

Well, who?

“Caroline’s cousin.”

You've guessed right.
22 ‘THE TWO COUSINS.



THE GOLD PIECE.



One day, Mrs. Woodman called
Mary to her, and told her that
she might learn to read a few
verses in the Bible, if she liked.
Some of the first verses that
Mary read were very easy. If
you will turn to the first chap-
ter of the Gospel of John, you

THE TWO COUSINS. 25



will see how easy. they were,
for it was that chapter that
Mrs. Woodman selected for the
first reading lesson in the Good
Book.

“Very well,” said Mary’s mo-
ther, after she had read the
first five verses; “very well, in-
deed. I wonder if you cannot
learn these verses by heart. Do
you think you can?”

Mary thought she could.
26 THE TWO COUSINS.



“But, dear mother,” said she,
“what 1s meant by the darkness
not’ comprehending the light?”

“Well,” said Mrs. Woodman,
“there is rather a hard word in
that last verse. I will tell you
what that means, my dear.”
And so she explained the verse,
and told what comprehending
meant. I suppose most of
those who read this little book
know the meaning of the word,
THE TWO COUSINS. 27



and so I will not stop to explain
it. If you don’t know, how-
ever, you can get» your mo-
ther, or some one else, to tell
you.

“Mary,” said Mrs. Wood-
man, after she had explained
all the difficult parts of the les-
son which had been read, “I
am going te teach you to read
fourteen verses in this chapter.
It will take two lessons more,
28 THE TWO COUSINS.



I guess. You ‘may look over
the other nine verses, and I
will hear you read five to-mor-
row, and four the next day. If
you think you can learn by
heart the five verses you have
read to-day, you may learh
them. If there is any thing in
these fourteen Verses that you
do not understand, I will try to.
explain it to you. I should
like to have you learn all these
THE TWO COUSINS. 29



verses, when you have read
them to me. Do you think
you can.learn them ?”

“Yes, mamma,’ said Mary,
“I think -I can. I will try.”

That was what Mary always
said, when her mother asked
her to do any thing which was
difficult. “I will try.” How
much better it would be, if all
little boys would say so, instead
of saying, “T can’t!” “Pil try,”
30 THE TWO COUSINS.



is a great deal better than, “I
can’t.”

“Well, my dear,” Mrs. Wood-.
man said, “if you will learn
these verses, all of them, I will
give you a silver dollar; and
if you will learn the Ten Com-
mandments, after I have taught
you to read them, and a little
hymn: I will show you, by-and-
by, you may give me back
the dollar, and I will give you
THE TWO COUSINS. 31



a quarter-eagle—a gold piece
worth two dollars and a half.”

Mary tried, as she said she
meant to do, that very day,
to learn the first five verses,
which she had already read.
She could not say them by
heart the next day, though.
But she tried again, and she
ried until she learned them.
By-and-by, too, she learned

the whole fourteen verses, so
82 ' THE TWO COUSINS.



that she repeated them to her
mother, without missing a word.

“That’s a good girl,” said
Mrs. Woodman, as she pressed
Mary to her bosom, and kissed
her over and over again; “that’s
a good girl. Here is the silver
dollar which I promised you.”
And she gave her the dollar.
It was the finest present, Mary
thought, which her mother had
ever made her.
THE TWO COUSINS. 83



Not many weeks after that,
Mary learned the Ten Com-
mandments, too, so that she
could say them all by heart.
Her mother did not have to
tell her a single word. ‘Then
Mrs. Woodman gave her the
little hymn to learn, and she
learned that.

It was a very pretty hymn,
made on purpose for children.
It was something like “Now I

8
34 THE TWO COUSINS,



lay me down to sleep,” only it
was longer. .Mary and _ her
brother often knelt down to-
gether, just after they got up
in the morning, and said it,
after they had said “Our Fa-
ther.” Mary’s brother was a
very good boy. He used to
love to go into a room alone,
~ and ask God to bless him, and
to forgive his sins.

After Mary had learned the



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THE TWO COUSINS. 37



hymn, her mother asked her to
go and get the silver dollar.
She did so, and Mrs. Woodman
took the dollar back again, and
gave Mary the gold piece—a
quarter-eagle, worth two dol-
lars and a half. .

Mary felt that she was rich.
The quarter-eagle was a great
deal of money for such a little
girl.

“Was she not proud of her
38 THE TWO COUSINS.

gold piece?” some of you may
be ready to ask.

No; she set a great store by
it, because her mother gave it
to her, and called her a “dar-
ling child,” when she put it into
her hand. But I don’t think
she felt proud of it. She cer-
tainly did not show any pride.
But what do you think Mary
did with her quarter-eagle ?

“She got her father to put
THE TWO COUSINS. 39



it into the Savings Bank,” says
one.

No.

“She hada money-box made,”
says another, “with a lock and
key on it, and she put the gold
piece into that.”

No; Mary did not do that,
either.

_ ©Well,” says another little
~ girl, “I guess she had a hole
made in it, and put a string
40 THE TWO COUSINS.

through the hole, and wore it
around her neck.”

No.

“Then she put it up among
the rest of her playthings,”
says another.

No; she did nothing of the
_ kind. I should not have blamed
her, to be sure, if she had put
it into the Savings Bank.
There would have been no
harm, in it. That is a good
THE TWO COUSINS. 41



way enough for children to
save the money which they
have giventothem. But Mary
chose to do something else with
her gold piece; and I will tell
you what she did with it, so as
to show you what a good and
kind heart she had.

“Dear mother,” said she, one
day, perhaps'a month after the
gold piece had been given her;
“dear mother, how many pretty
42 THE TWO COUSINS.



presents I did get last Christ-
mas!”

Mrs. Woodmah thought that
Mary said so because she was
thinking of the presents she
might have when Christmas
came round again, as it was
now very near that season of
the year. So she said, “Yes,
my dear, and if you are a good
girl, it may be that Santa Claus
will make you another visit
THE TWO COUSINS. 43



pretty soon. There’s no tell-
ing what may happen.”

“TI was not+ thinking about.
that, mamma,” Mary said.

“What made you speak of
it, then ?” her mother asked.

“Because,” said Mary, “I
was thinking that I should like
to try, next Christmas, and see
if [ can make somebody happy.
Why can’t I make a present
myself ?”
44 THE TWO COUSINS.



Her mother told her that she
might make a present if it did
not cost t6o much. “What
would you like to give, dear?”
she asked; “and to whom would
you like to give it?”

Then Mary told her mother
exactly what she had _ been
thinking of. Mrs. Rawson, she
said, needed a new Bible, with
large print. “A little while
ago,” she said, “I told her that
THE TWO COUSINS. 45



‘[ had been reading in the

Bible, and I asked her if she
did not love to read her Bible.
‘O yes, she told me, ‘but my
eyes are getting so old that I
cannot see to read the Bible
that I have at home, the print
is so small.’ I felt very sorry
for Mrs. Rawson, and I should
like to give her a Bible printed
with large letters, so that she
can read it.”
46 THE TWO COUSINS.



Perhaps I ought to tell the
little folks who read my book,
who Mrs. Rawson was, and how
Mary came to take so much
interest in her. She was a
widow, and for many years had
done a great deal of sewing for
Mrs. Woodman’s family. Her
husband was once a sea-captain.
But one day, about the time
she was expecting him home
from a long voyage, a mas
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THE TWO COUSINS. 49

came and handed her a letter.
She broke the seal as soon as
she could, and there she read
that her dear husband had been
drowned. She wept a long
time. Little Sarah and Emily,
her two children, came to her,
and asked her what made her
weep so, and she said to them,
“My precious babes, your dear

father is dead.”
Her husband was not rich;

4
50 THE TWO COUSINS.

so that after his death, she had
to sew for the neighbors, to get
money to help support herself
and her two children.

But I must go back, and
take up the story about Mary
Woodman, where I left off

“Well,” said Mary’s mother,
“you may go and ask father
what he thinks about getting
the Bible for Mrs. Rawson. I

gress he will give you money
THE TWO COUSINS. 51

enough to buy the Bible. Mary
said she did not think of going
to her father to get the money.
“But how will you buy it,
then?” asked Mrs. Woodman.
Mary hesitated in answering
the question. She was not quite
sure that her mother would
like her plan. But she ventured
to say, at last, that she had been |
thinking of buying the Bible

with her quarter-eagle.
52 THE TWO COUSINS.



A tear stood in the eye of
Mrs. Woodman, as she heard
this language from the lips of
her daughter. But it was not
a tear of grief. It was a tear
of joy. She was glad, she was
delighted, to hear that Mary
wished to make such a use of
her gold piece, and she told
her so.

A little while before Christ:
mas, a large Bible was bought
THE TWO COUSINS. 53



with the quarter-eagle. It was
printed in large letters on pur-
pose, so that old people could
read it easily. On the cover
these words were put on, in
neat gilt letters: “Mrs. Rawson,
from her little friend Mary.”
Christmas-eve came. Mary
had as many presents as she
had the year before, and more
too, I believe. But she did
not enjoy any of them more:
54 THE TWO COUSINS.

than she did the thanks of the
widow Rawson, who came over
to Mr. Woodman’s early on
Christmas morning, to tell Mary
and her father and mother how

happy she was to get the Bible.




THE EVENING LESSON.

— oe +o

| want to have you see these
two cousins together, so that
you can get a good chance to
notice what a difference there
is in the two girls. I have said
that one of them was a favorite
with almost everybody, while
scarcely any one loved the
56 THE TWO COUSINS.



other. Now there was a rea-
son for this. There was a
good reason why one was so
generally loved, and why the
other was not loved; and I
want you to find out what that
reason was.

You shall see them both
together, in Mrs. Woodman’s
chamber. This good lady has
just come up from the parlor,
where she has been listening
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to grandfather Woodman, who
was reading out of a new book,
which had just been brought
home.

“Well, my dear children,”
said she, as she took her seat at
the table in the room where
the cousins had been studying,
“do you think you can tell me
al] about your geography les-
son now 2”

Mary thought she could.
- 60 THE TWO COUSINS.



She would “try,” at any rate.
Caroline said nothing.

Reader, stop a moment, and
turn back to the beginning of
the book. You see a picture
there.

Look at it. That is Mrs.
Woodman whom you see sit
ting at the table. There are
two candles before her, (for it
is evening,) and there is a girl,
sitting there with her.
THE TWO COUSINS. 61



Do you ask who that girl
is? Guess.

“Caroline Redford,” you say.

But what makes you think
it-is Caroline?

“Because she looks sulky,
and out of humor.”

You are right, and I see that
you are in a fair way to get at
the reason why she was not as
much « favorite as her cousin
Mary was. But there was
62 THE TWO COUSINS.

another thing about Caroline,
which was quite as bad as
her sulkiness and ill-humor. I
mean her selfishness. I have
spoken of this before, I believe.
It is very difficult for any one
to love a person that is so self-
ish. When I see a girl who
has got a habit of thinking a
great deal too much of her own
dear self, and who cares very
little for the happiness of her
THE TWO COUSINS. 63



brothers, and sisters, and play-
mates, if she is only pleased
herself, I cannot help thinking
of certain animals that root up
the ground with their noses, and
who don’t want their neighbors
to eat out of the same trough,
for fear they will not get enough
themselves.

The other girl in the picture,
the girl who is standing up, 1s
Mary Woodman. The girls
64 THE TWO COUSINS.



are some years older now than
they were when the tea-table
was upset. Caroline has come
over to her aunt’s, to spend a
week or two. The two cousins
have just begun to study ge-
ography. That book which
Caroline holds in her hand is
the geography. Mary has an
atlas. Mrs. Woodman had
told them, when they came
home from school that after-
THE TWO COUSINS. 65



noon, that they must study
their geography lesson, and
before they went to bed she
would hear them answer the
questions.

Well, about nine o'clock,
Mrs. Woodman began to ask
them questions about the les-
son. Mary answered very well,
but Caroline got along poorly
enough. .

“I am very sorry,” said Mrs

5
$6 THE TWO COUSINS.



Woodman to her niece, “I
am very sorry you have not
studied your lesson any better.
You must take the book again,
and see if you cannot answer
all the questions when I ask
you next time.”

How vexed Caroline was,
when she had to go to studying
her lesson again! She made a
great ado about it; complained
that she was tired. and sleepy;
THE TWO COUSINS, 6%



and declared that she could not
learn the lesson if she had to
sit up till morning.

But Mary’s mother told her
niece that she must learn the
geography lesson, at any rate;
that if she had not spent so
much time playing with old
Prince, (the family dog,) she
would not have had any diffi-
culty about the lesson; and
that she must not blame any-
68 THE TWO COUSINS.

body but herself, if she did
have to sit up till morning.

Then Caroline went to cry-
ing with all her might. The
foolish girl! as if that would
mend the matter any.

“But,” you ask, “did she
have to sit up all night ?”

No. When she found that
her aunt would not let her go
to bed until she had learned
her lesson, she went to work and
THE TWO COUSINS. 69



learned it. But when her aunt
put the questions to her, she
answered in a cross and surly
way.
“Qh dear!” said Mrs. Wood-
man, “I do wish that you
would be a better girl. I
can't love you when you act
so. Why will you not take
more care? It grieves me
very much, when you behave
in this manner.”
70 THE TWO COUSINS.



How strange it is that chil-
dren can give their parents so
much trouble!



MARY'S LOVE OF FLOWERS,



I think it is a good sign to see
a girl fond of flowers. Mary
loved them dearly. I don't
know that I ever saw her more
pleased than she was one day,
when I went to her father’s, and
gave her a wreath of flowers,
of different kinds, some of which
4 THE TWO COUSINS.



were very beautiful. How she
praised the rose, the violet, the
blue-bell, the lily of the valley,
and all the rest of the pretty
sisters which were twined to-
gether in this wreath!

It was at this time that I read
to her those sweet lines which
my friend Miss Marearer Jun-
xin has written about the flow-
ers; and as I read them, I saw
more than one tear steal down
THE TWO COUSINS. "5



the cheek of that dear girl.
And when I came to the last
line, she could only say, “How
sweet!” and her tears fell like
rain.

. Dear, dear Mary! A tear
starts into my own eye, while I
write these words, and when I
remember that she is gone to
her home in the skies, and that
we shall see her pleasant face
no more in this world. I loved
76 THE TWO COUSINS.



Mary, and my heart was sad
when they laid her in the grave.

“Why did Mary weep, while
you were reading those lines
about the flowers ?”

I hardly know. Mary was
a feeble girl, even then; and I
have sometimes thought, when
I have seen how her eye lighted
up,as soon as any thing was said
about heaven—I have some-
times thought that she knew she
THE TWO COUSINS. "7



should not long stay here in the
world. But I will show you
Miss Junkin’s verses.

“HOW BEAUTIFUL THE FLOWERS ARE!”
1

How beautiful the flowers are!

_ How bright they make our way,

Strewing the earth so variedly
With all their rich array!

They speak to us with eloquence
‘Of His majestic power,

Who even stoops to show his skill
In fashioning a flower
78 THE TWO COUSINS.



IL
I fain would think that they shall
be,
With their sweet looks of love,
Among the many pleasant things
That we shall meet’above.
If they are even perfect here,
Where storms and tempests rise,
What would they be if blossoming
Beneath celestial skies !

rr.
There they would never droop their
leaves,
Or cease their scented breath ;
THE» TWO COUSINS. 79



Their tender veins would not be
chill’d
Beneath the frosts of death:
An immortality of bloom
Would thus to them be given;
The faintest rose tint could not
fade—
There is no death in heaven.


THE GRAVE-YARD.



Mary died young. Her sun
went down while it was yet
day. But her death was a
peaceful and happy one. She
loved Christ, and, as her end
drew near, she longed to go
and be with him. It is a great
thing to die. No one who is
THE TWO COUSINS. 81



young, and strong, and cheer-
ful, loves the thought of dying.
It is not pleasant to think of
leaving father, and mother, and
dear friends, and all the beau-
tiful things which we have here
in the world, and to lie down
in the dark grave. But God
prepares those who are good
—those who repent of their
sins and love the Saviour—for

death.
82 THE TWO COUSINS.



Mary was prepared to die.
{It was not unpleasant for her
to think of dymg. And she
sang a hymn the very day she
left the world, she felt so happy.

“When she died, all the neigh-
bors mourned for her. Noone
was more beloved than Mary.

They laid her in the village
grave-yard, among the flowers
which she loved so well while
she was living. The grass
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THE TWO COUSINS. 85



has now grown over that little
grave; for years have passed
since it was made. But even
now, in the bright summer
time, those who loved that dear
child, and who wept bitter tears
when she went to heaven, often
visit that spot, and water with
their tears the flowers that
bloom over the grave of Mary
Woodman.
THE OTHER COUSIN.



“Well, Mr. Thinker,” says more
than one of my bright-eyed .
readers, “I don’t wonder why
Mary Woodman was beloved.
I love her myself, although I
never saw her.”

“So do I,” says another little
girl; “but & should like to
THE TWO COUSINS. 87



know a little more about Caro-
line.”

I am sorry I cannot say
something about her that will
make you love her, too. But
she did not become any more
lovely, as she grew up. She
was the cause of a great many
unpleasant feelings among her
companions. [I never heard.
anybody say, “I love Caroline
Redford.” Indeed, I don’t see
88 THE TWO COUSINS.



how anybody could love her
very much. And yet it was
just as easy, I dare say, for her
to act so that everybody would
love her as it was for her cousin.
It was all Caroline’s fault.


THE WAY TO BE LOVED. ©



Children, we are coming now
to the end of our little book.
We have got through with the
story about the Two Cousins.
You have seen, as you went
along, the pictures of two very
different girls. You have seen
the picture of one girl that was
90 THE TWO COUSINK,



loved, and another girl that
was not loved. You see the
reason now, why Mary was
more beloved than her cousin.
The reason was, that Mary
was more lovely. There was
something m her that no one
could help loving.

When you look upon a
pretty rose, and smell its sweet
perfume, you love the rose.
So does every one love it.
THE TWO COUSINS. ~ 91



There is something in the rose
which is lovely. And it is just
so with a good, and kind, and
generous, and sweet-tempered
girl.

But it is the hardest thing
in the world to love a person
that is selfish, and cross, and
peevish, and quarrelsome.

Why, I could love a great
black bear, or a tiger, almost
as easily as I could love some
92 THR TWO COUSINS.



girls I have seen. I am all
the time afraid, when I am
with one of these cross, snappish
girls, that a cloud will rise, and
_ cover her face, and that a
thunder-storm, with large hail-
stones, perhaps, will come up.

Now I have told you this
story of Mary and Caroline
partly to amuse you. , But I
have had another reason be-

. sides that. I hoped,-while I
THE TWO COUSINS. 93



was telling it, that it would do
you some good. When you
look in a looking-glass, and find
that your hair is out of order,
or that you have got your
face a little soiled, while you
have been out at play in the
yard, you go, as soon as you
can, and have your hair brush-
ed, and your face made as clean
as water will make it.

Well, can’t you, as you look
94 THE TWO COUSINS.



in this book about the Two
Cousins, when you come to
Caroline, can’t you see.a pic-
ture that looks a little like
your own face? I don’t mean
to ask you whether it is exactly
like you, but whether it does
not look a hittle like you.

It is not always an easy thing
for us to see ourselves as other
people see us. When we have
faults, sometimes we cannot see
THE TWO COUSINS. 95



them at all; or, if we do see
them, they look small to us.
And just as likely as not, if the
same things were to be found in
another person, we should find
no difficulty in seeing them.
I hope you will take a peep at
yourself, and see whether I am
right or not. I should be sorry
enough to hear that you were
at all like Caroline; and yet
you might be a little like her
96 THE TWO COUSINS.



and not be just. like her. I
hope not, to be sure, but it may ©
be so. -

Now, would you not rather
be in Mary’s place than in
Caroline’s? Would you not
choose to be loved as Mary ©
was loved? Well, then, try
to shun the faults of Caroline.
Try to do as Mary did. And
if you find it difficult sometimes,

ask God to help you. -



wer. A
oe Gfyutore Chinker’s =
ae STORIES for LITTLE FOLKS; @ 8
| hat








_CONSISTING (OF t
he A BC Picture Book, with Stories ;
Stories by Jack the Sailor. j

Stone rou Birds and Beasts. ©
= Stories about the Country.
The Balloon, and other ‘stories. i
The Two Cousins, or How to be loved. Sy
Hed
hal










Tom Headstrong, or Always in Trouble.
\) The Holiday Book.
oe + The Girl’s Story Books. SI
Z iv Phe Boy’s Story Book. ‘ a
4; Jucle Reuben, and his Stories.
| Storm and Sunshine, or the Right Way
and the Wrong Way. : : zi





f



NEW YORK:

Ne CLARK, AUSTIN & C0, &