Citation
The comical creatures from Wurtemberg

Material Information

Title:
The comical creatures from Wurtemberg including the story of Reynard the Fox
Cover title:
Comical creatures from Wurtemberg
Added title page title:
Reynard the Fox
Creator:
Bogue, David, 1812-1856 ( Publisher )
Ploucquet, Herrmann
Measom, William ( Engraver )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Robson, Levey, and Franklyn (Firm) ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
David Bogue
Manufacturer:
Robson, Levey, and Franklyn
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
2d ed.
Physical Description:
4, 96 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Osborne Coll.,
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy missing pages: frontis., 61-61 (ill.), 67-68, 77-92 (includes one ill.)
General Note:
Ill. engraved by Wm Measom.
General Note:
Ill. by H. Weir.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
with twenty illustrations drawn from the stuffed animals contributed by Herrmann Ploucquet of Stuttgart to the Great Exhibition.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026617311 ( ALEPH )
10865124 ( OCLC )
ALG3476 ( NOTIS )

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THE

COMICAL CREATURES

FROM

WURTEMBERG.



From the Examiner, August 2d.

“THE title-page of this agreeable little volume sufficiently commends its pleasant
contents. ‘T’o whom, old or young, will it not be welcome? Who has not, young
or old, seen, laughed at, revisited, and brought away, pleasant recollections of the
Stuffed Animals from the Zollverein ?

“It was a good notion, that of perpetuating these clever productions by means
of daguerreotype and wood-engraving. ' They are very nicely executed in this volume,
and wonderfully like. It is needless to particularise where all is so graphic and
faithful ; but let the studious little rabbit over his arithmetic lesson at p. 32, with
that demure conscience-striken pair behind him wincing at the flogging of their idle
brother, be especially admired.

“We must add that the letterpress is not unworthy of the humour and fidelity
of the illustrations. The various Weasels, Rabbits, and Foxes, are brought into one
little tale; the Wonderful Hare-Hunt into another; the Tea-Party of Kittens, and
the Marten and Tabby, into a third; the Duel of the Dormice, and the Frogs, form
two separate and ingenious anecdotes; and the story of Reynard the Fox is quaintly
related in prose so far as was necessary to explain the six comical groups of Ploucquet.

“We predict a great run at Christmas for the Comical Creatures from Wurtem-
berg.”

From the Mornine Curonicin, August 12th.

‘“*'The book is a clever and a pleasant memento of the Great Exhibition. The
drawings are careful and clever, and convey a very correct representation of the
original creatures, with all, or nearly all, their subtlety of expression and aspect.
The capital fatuity of the Rabbits and Hares, the delightful scoundrelism of the
Fox, the cunning shrewdness of the Marten and Weasels, the hoyden visages of the
Kittens, and the cool, slippery demeanour of the Frogs, are all capitally given. The
book may lie on the drawing-room table, or be thumbed in the nursery ; and in
the latter case we have little doubt that many an urchin still in petticoats will in
future years associate his most vivid recollection of the Great Exhibition of 1851
with Mr. Bogue’s perpetuation of the Comical Creatures from Wurtemberg.””







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L AND IIER CHILDREN

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DAME WEASI



THE

COMICAL CREATURES

FROM

WURTEMBERG, |

Sucluding the Story of Reynard the Far.

WITH TWENTY ILLUSTRATIONS,

DRAWN FROM THE STUFFED ANIMALS CONTRIBUTED BY
HERRMANN PLOUCQUET OF STUTTGART

TO THE GREAT EXHIBITION.
Srruud Cdition,

LONDON:
DAVID BOGUEH, FLEET STREET.



1801.



|

PREFACE,

—__—_#——

To HirrMANN PLoucgyEt, Preserver of Objects of Natural
History at the Royal Museum of Stuttgart,—the capital of the
kingdom of Wurtemberg,—-we are indebted for one of the clever-
est and most popular displays in the Great Exursirion. Every
one, from her Majesty the Queen down to the least of the charity-
boys, hastens to see the Stuffed Animals from the Zollverein ;
every one lingers over them and laughs at them as long as the
crowd will allow; and every one talks of them afterwards with

a smile and a pleasing recollection.

That these clever productions of Ploucquet’s talent may be
long perpetuated, we have had daguerreotypes of them taken by
Mr. Claudet, and engravings made from them on wood as faith-
fully like as possible.

We must beg our readers to remember that, excepting « Rey-
nard the Fox,” our sketches have been written to illustrate the
drawings, for on this plea we claim some indulgence; but as we
know full well that the pictures will be the main attraction of the

volume, we are not apprehensive of much criticism.



PREFACKH.

The story of ‘‘ Reynard the Fox” is told briefly in the words of
an old version of this wonderful tale published in England many
years ago. In Germany Reinecle Fuchs is as popular as our “ Jack
the Giant-Killer.”” Carlyle says, c Among the people it was long
a house-book and universal best companion; it has been lectured
on in Universities, quoted in imperial Council-halls; it lay on
the toilets of princes, and was thumbed to pieces on the bench
of the artisan: we hear of grave men ranking it next to their
Bible.”

Goethe took the story of ‘‘ Reynard” for the subject of a great
poem ; and the famous painter Kaulbach has recently illustrated
Goethe’s version with perhaps the finest series of pictures with

which a book was ever adorned.

Herrmann Ploucquet has had the good taste to select. six of
these designs as models for his works. He has admirably pre-
served the expression which the painter gave to the Fox and his

dupes, and every one recognises them with pleasure.



CONTENTS.

PPLPL LPS PPPS SP PDI

PAGE

Tuer WEASELS OF Horm-Woop . . . . ; . . 15
Tur WonpErRFUL Hare-Hount.. ; ; oo : » AO
Tue Duet or THE DorRMICE. . . . . . ; 4D
THe Six Kittens : ; ; . ‘ . ; ; . 49
THe FROGS WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO. , ; ; ; . &b9

Tue Story or REYNARD THE Fox . . . . . . . 63



ILLUSTRATIONS.

os



vevy_—"e

Tue Wonperrut Hare-Hunt (Double Plate) :
Dame WEASEL AND HER FAMILY . . .

THE ATTENTIVE PHYSICIAN . . . . ; .
THE VERY ATTENTIVE PHYSICIAN

Oxtp Marten AND SHARP WEASEL, Esq. , : ;
Mr. Bantam’s INTERVIEW WITH OLD MARTEN . .
LONGTAIL TEACHING THE YOUNG Raspitrs ARITHMETIC
Jack Hare AND GRACE MARTEN LEADING OFF THE BALL .
Tue DvuEL oF THE DoRMICE .

Tue Kirrens at TeEa—Muiss PAULINA SINGING . .
Ensign SQUEAKER AND Miss Rose . . . . .
Younc MARTEN BIDDING FAREWELL TO Miss PAvuLINA

Tue FRoGS WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO. . .
ReYNARD AT Home at MALEPARDUS : . . .
REYNARD IN THE LIKENESS OF A HERMIT . . .
Sir TIBERT DELIVERING THE Kine’s MESSAGE . ;
REYNARD BRINGS FORWARD THE Hare As HIS WITNESS
REYNARD ON HIS PinGRiIMAGE TO Rome . .

REYNARD ATTACKETH LAPRELL THE RABBIT. .

. Frontispiece.

14
17
21
25
29
33
o7
44
48
ol
DD
D8
62
65
71
81
85
91













THE

WHASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

CHAPTER I.

In a pleasant country where green meadows lay stretched by the
side of a broad river whose banks were lined with the pollard-
willow and tall poplar, there once dwelt a family of Weasels,
known, from their place of residence, as the Weasels of Holm-

wood.

Holm-wood was a little island covered with underwood, rushes,
and wild flowers. A few aged trees stood by its edge, bathing
their long arms in the stream, and in the hollow trunk of one of
these the Weasels lived.



— = SC +
-- — ee ee



THE ATTENTIVE PHYSICIAN.



16 THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

Any fine morning you might have seen the mother of this
family carrying her infant in her arms, and followed by her other
children, a girl and two boys, who would amuse themselves by
dragging little wooden horses, playing at soldiers with mock mus-
kets, running against the wind with little whirligig mills, or fro-
licking about with a thousand of the antics of children. Their
father, known every where as Old Weasel, was of a most resolute
and unbending disposition; he made many enemies, and was ever
at war with one or other of his neighbours. The Partridges of
Clover-field asserted that he sucked their eggs and stole their
young ones; the Rabbits of the Warren held Old Weasel and all
his family in the deepest abhorrence, and accused them of the
greatest cruelties; but no one complained of them more bitterly
than Dame Partlett of the Farm, who accused the whole tribe of
being born enemies of her race, and said, that were it not that
Old Weasel himself was dreadfully afraid of her neighbour and
friend, young Mastiff of Kennel-wood, she verily believed that she

should never know any peace on earth.

All the world will understand how, with such a character, the
Weasels had but few friends, and that when Miss Weasel grew to
be of age, she should have but few admirers; nevertheless two or
three families who were related to them by blood kept up an occa-
sional acquaintance, and among them the Ferrets of Hollow-oak

were the most intimate. Now it so happened that one evening,



THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD. 19

when out for a ramble in the woods, a branch of a tree on which
Miss Weasel had mounted in order to get nearer to young Linnet,
with whom she wished to be on intimate terms, broke suddenly
off, and the poor young lady was precipitated to the ground and
; sadly hurt. Her cries brought to her assistance her younger
brother Tom, who, as soon as he had helped her home, ran for
young Ferret, who had lately begun practice as a physician. When
the good young doctor came, he found Miss Weasel lyimg on the
sofa, looking very pale and very interesting. He felt her pulse,
looked at her tongue, and soon discovered that the lady was more
frightened than hurt. However, as he had not many patients,
he did not choose to tell all the truth, but prescribing a simple
remedy, he ordered her to keep very quiet, and promised to call
again on the next day. Whether it was that Miss Weasel had
been hurt more than her physician had thought, or whether there
were any other inducements, we cannot say; but young Ferret
thought it his duty to call at Holm-wood every morning, and
sometimes twice a day, for at least a month: and if any one could
have seen how frequently he felt Miss Weasel’s pulse, and how
anxiously he studied every expression of her face, he would have
set down Dr. Ferret as a very attentive at least, if not excellent
physician. |

When Miss Weasel became somewhat stronger, this good





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Wi, Hy

THE VERY ATTENTIVE PHYSICIAN.





20 THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

young man would lend his arm for her support during an
evening walk, would bring her birds’ eggs and other delicacies,
and in many ways endeavour to contribute to her restoration |
to health.

This went on for some time, till the gossips of the neigh-
bouring village would smile whenever they saw the doctor wend-
ing his way towards Holm-wood; and Miss Weasel’s two brothers
would immediately leave their lessons, which their sister used to

teach them, as soon as ever the physician appeared in sight.







CHAPTER, IT.

Tue other relations of the Weasels who were on visiting terms
with them were, the Polecats of The Grange, who came but sel-
dom, and the Martens of Forest-farm, with whom they were more
intimate. Now old Mr. Marten had always intended that his own
son Longtail, who kept a boarding-school for boys near the War-
ren, should marry Miss Weasel; and when he heard of the phy-
sician’s great attentions to that young lady, he was very wroth.
At first he thought of way-laying young Ferret in the wood and
killing him; but then he recollected that the Ferrets were a
_ powerful family, who would never rest till they had been revenged.
_ His next thought was to go to his attorney, Sharp Weasel, Esq.,
of Nettle Cottage, and consult with him as to the best means
of thwarting young Ferret’s projects. So the old man took down
_ his pipe and his account-book, and set off to the attorney.







OLD MARTEN AND SHARP WEASEL, ESQ.



QA THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

Mr. Sharp Weasel was well pleased to see so excellent a client
as old Mr. Marten, and received him with many smiles. The two
quickly laid down a plan of proceedings, and Mr. Marten produced
his account-book, and proved that young Ferret owed him for the

following goods sold and delivered, viz. one young rabbit; item,

one wood-pigeon; item, one brace of partridges ; item, one cock-
pheasant ; item, one duckling; item, one fat gosling.

For this account young Ferret was next day summoned be-
fore Judge Fox, who, after hearing the case, immediately gave
judgment in favour of plaintiff; and as young Ferret had not
sufficient funds to meet this unexpected demand, he was forth-
with arrested and sent to prison.

Old Mr. Marten chuckled and was well pleased at the success
of his stratagem, and was on his way to his son Longtail to tell
him of what he considered the good news, when he met Mr. Ban-
tam of Holm-farm, searching for his wife and daughters, who had

wandered for a walk. Bantam, it was evident, did not particularly

wish for this meeting, for his comb grew very red, and he strutted —

off at a quick pace in an opposite direction; but old Marten ran

through some bushes, and caught him just as he was getting clear
of the wood.





THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD. 27

“Good morning, Mr. Bantam,”’ said he.
“Good morning, sir,’”’ said Bantam, shaking in every feather.

“ T want you to do me a service, Bantam,’ continued old
Marten; ‘but you must not say one word of what I am going

to tell you.”’
Bantam promised this, as indeed he would have any thing else.

«You must go to Old Weasel of Holm-wood,”’ whispered
Marten, laying his forepaws on Bantam’s breast to hold him near
him, ‘‘and find his daughter. Tell her that young Ferret is a
scapegrace and a good-for-nothing fellow, and that Judge Fox
has sent him to prison. Then tell her that I am very rich, and
that my son Longtail is making a handsome fortune by his school.
This is a delicate matter, Bantam: if you manage cleverly, I will
be your friend through life; if you betray me, mark this.’ And
the old man clapped his paw on the cutlass he usually wore by his

side.

Bantam, glad to get out of his clutches on any terms, promised
the strictest compliance, and flew rather than ran back to his
farmyard as soon as he was released. There the first person he

saw was his wife, who had returned, and was wondering what had







MR. BANTAM’S INTERVIEW WITH OLD MARTEN.

i



28 THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

become of him. ‘To her, of course, he told all his strange adven-
ture, and she, silly thing, went immediately and cackled the whole
story to Dame Goose; who told it to one of the young Goslings,
who told it to old Mr. Drake ; he quacked it about so loudly that
his wife and children soon learned it; and in ten minutes there
was not one in all Holm-farm who did not know of this won-
derful adventure. As for performing his promise, we must do
Mr. Bantam the credit of saying he never for a moment thought
of being such a silly, for he well knew that the day which saw
him enter Old Weasel’s house would be his last. |





CHAPTER ITI.

Arter old Marten had let Bantam go, he himself went straight
to his son, whom he found engaged in his professional pursuits.
At the moment of his father’s entry, young Longtail was hearing
a class of the young Rabbits, on one of whom he was inflicting
summary chastisement for great neglect and carelessness in his
arithmetic. The poor young fellow was squeaking terribly, and
his three brothers, with tears in their eyes, were trying with all
their might to cast up their sums on their slates, which shook so
in their hands that they could scarce see the figures. Their master
left off the beating when he saw his father, and consequently
young Rabbit, for the first and perhaps only time in his life, was
very glad to see the old man. The class was dismissed; and if
you had seen these four youngsters scamper off, shaking their
white tails and jumping half a yard high as they ran to the



o,

“,
a

32 THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

Warren, you would have thought it was a good thing to have the
light-heartedness of children.

The Martens, father and son, retired up an oak-tree, at the old
man’s request, to talk over their private affairs. "When the son
heard of his father’s plans, and how young Ferret had been arrested,
he was struck dumb with amazement. He had never dreamed that
his father would interfere in such a matter; and if the truth must
be told, he was already engaged to Miss Pussy, the eldest daughter
of old Mrs. Hare of the Ferns.

However, he knew better than to contradict his father’s inten-
tions too suddenly, for he felt assured that the old: ‘man would cut
him off with a shilling if he were to offend him;’ so he pretended

to acquiesce in all that was said, and promised compliance in
every particular.

_ But as soon as his father had bidden him farewell, and had
got out of sight, young Longtail ran as fast as his legs would
carry him to the cavern where the doctor was imprisoned, paid
the amount of the debt for which he had been arrested, and took

young Ferret home with him to consult about their future conduct.

It would have amused you, could you have heard all the plans

discussed by these young lovers for their joint benefit; how the





LONGTAIL TEACHING THE YOUNG RABBITS ARITHMETIC,



oa THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

Warren, you would have thought it was a good thing to have the
light-heartedness of children.

The Martens, father and son, retired up an oak-tree, at the old
man’s request, to talk over their private affairs. When the son

heard of his father’s plans, and how young Ferret had been arrested,

he was struck dumb with amazement. He had never dreamed that |

his father would interfere in such a matter; and if the truth must

be told, he was already engaged to Miss Pussy, the eldest daughter
of old Mrs. Hare of the Ferns.

However, he knew better than to contradict his father’s inten-
tions too suddenly, for he felt assured that the oldman would cut
him off with a shilling if he were to offend him; so he pretended
to acquiesce in all that was said, and promised compliance in

every particular.

But as soon as his father had bidden him farewell, and had
got out of sight, young Longtail ran as fast as his legs would
carry him to the cavern where the doctor was imprisoned, paid
the amount of the debt for which he had been arrested, and took

young Ferret home with him to consult about their future conduct.

It would have amused you, could you have heard all the plans

discussed by these young lovers for their joint benefit; how the







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THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD. | 35

one talked of his darling Miss Weasel, and the other of his dear
Miss Pussy; how they agreed that in matters of love every thing
was allowable; and how they swore eternal friendship to each

other throughout their lives.

Two days afterwards it was known all over Holm-wood that
the fair Miss Weasel had eloped with Longtail Marten. Mrs.
Goose and the four Miss Goslings were full of the information for
every one they met. It was the finest piece of scandal they had
known for years. “ Only think,” said they, “ after all her en-
gagement to young Doctor Ferret, to go and take up with the

schoolmaster; and all, forsooth, because Old Marten is rich !”’

But scarce had the first news of Miss Weasel’s extraordinary
behaviour run through the farm-yard, than old Bantam was seen
hurrying in, very red in the face from over exertion, and was
heard to declare, that he never knew the like of it, but as sure as
he was a living cock, he had met young Ferret the physician
running away with Miss Pussy, the daughter of old Mrs. Hare of
the Ferns. Mrs. Goose turned up the whites of her eyes and
almost fainted. Dame Partlett ran with all speed, that she might
be the first to cackle the intelligence to Mr. Drake; and the whole

island was soon in a ferment at this wonderful piece of gossip.

Of course, old Mr. Marten soon heard of all this; and so







LD



ND GRACE MARTEN LEADING OFF THE BALL.

JACK HARE A







36 THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

pleased was he that he immediately altered his will, doubling the
amount he had previously given to his dear boy Longtail, and
getting so extremely excited at the “ Huntsman and Hounds’’ on

the same afternoon, that, sad to relate, he was untimely carried

_ off by an effusion of blood.

And what think you became of the lovers? Why, the very
day all this commotion happened at Holm-wood the two pair met
at their aunt’s, old Mrs. Stoat’s, of Four-mile Cross, as they had
agreed. There the young fellows, overjoyed at the success of their
scheme, changed their fair partners, and, to complete their hap-
piness, immediately set out for a tour on the neighbouring Con-

tinent.

There, on fine summer ,evenings, you might often have seen
the doctor and his beloved quietly strolling by wood-sides and
along the banks of the green meadows, listening intently to the
warbling of the tender birds they loved so much; while young
Longtail Marten and his bride, fonder of more boisterous excite-
ment, devoted themselves to the pleasures of the chase, scouring
rapidly over hill and dale whenever they heard the huntsman’s
loud horn, or the hounds’ deeper notes; and never so happy as
when, after the sports of the day were done, they finished up with
a ball, and danced joyously till the next day’s dawn.







THE WONDERFUL HARE-HUNT.

—_—~—____—

MerrIty sounded the cock’s shrill horn, and brightly shone tie
early morning sun, when a party of young sportsmen set out to
the field, armed with their guns and game-bags. Four beaters
from the neighbouring village attended them, each with a long
stick to rout the hares and rabbits from their hiding-places. Gaily
went they forth, these merry sportsmen and their helpers; light
was their step across the green meadows and up the sandy hill-
sides ; loud was their laughter when one of them, trying to jump
through a broken hedge, fell into the neighbouring ditch; great
was their mirth when another’s gun went off and lamed a squirrel
im an adjoining tree; and joyous was the shout with which they

scared a frightened rabbit from its morning meal.

At last the sportsmen came to the side of a wood, and one of
the beaters reported that just round the corner of the palings he
could see nearly a dozen hares feeding together. A council of war

was summoned ; each sportsman looked to the priming of his gun,













THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD. og

As for the good folks at Holm-wood, as soon as Mrs. Hare
discovered that her daughter had run away, she sent for her
eldest son, Jack Hare, who lived in a farm close by, and asked
him to pursue his sister and bring her back; but Jack said she
was quite old enough to know her own mind, and that he would
have nothing to do with it. When, however, the old lady learned
that her daughter was married to the rich young Marten, and not
to the poor physician, then she was greatly rejoiced, though she
confessed she could not make out why her dear child Pussy should
run away with the doctor and then marry the schoolmaster; but

she supposed it was all right.

As for Jack, when he heard that old Mr. Marten had died,
leaving great riches behind him, he, to follow the fashion, fell in
love with Grace, the only daughter of the deceased, and only
sister of Longtail. Miss Grace listened favourably to Jack’s
suit —for she was very lonely now her father was dead, and her
brother away; and as there was no papa to consult in their case,
they got married quietly at home, and asked all their neighbours
to a ball, when Jack Hare and Grace Marten (that was) led off
the polka in orand style, greatly to the admiration of all the
young folks in the island.







THE WONDERFUL HARE-HUNT. Al

and trod with a more cautious step; each beater bent his head
nearly to the ground, and crept along the grass. A plan of attack
was formed; the beaters stole within the wood to stop the hares
that way, while the sportsmen suddenly appearing on the other
side, caused the poor hares, surrounded as they were, to run into
the very jaws of destruction. They that leaped towards the wood
received blows on their heads from the beaters; they that ran
down the hill met Ponto the dog, who pounced on them open-
mouthed; and they that ran upwards were soon sent downwards
again, toppling head over heels, killed by the fire of the enemy.
Not a hare escaped. The gun-bearers took deadly aim, and Ponto
and the beaters prevented their flight.

While the young sportsmen and their helpers were yet picking
up the hares and rejoicing at their good fortune, the sky became
quickly overcast, black clouds gathered, and a hurricane of wind
swept through the wood, tearing off large branches of the trees.
The sportsmen stood amazed at the suddenness of the storm, but
presently their amazement was changed to fear; for, riding in a
bright chariot drawn by six snow-white swans,— blown swiftly
by the wind,— there appeared a lady of fairy-like beauty. At
her command the beautiful birds stayed their flight, and the
chariot rested on the green turf close by the sportsmen.

‘“ Young men,” said the lady in a melodious but mournful







42 THE WONDERFUL HARE-HUNT.

voice, aS she pointed to the dead hares, ‘‘ you have murdered
these poor innocents for your sport: know, I am the fairy called
KINDNESS, and these hares were all of them my friends. In
punishment for your cruelty, you sportsmen shall be changed
into Martens, and you attendants into Weasels. In such shapes
you may pursue your cruel sports; you are not worthy of the
forms of men.”” And, waving her wand, the swans bore her in-

stantly out of sight.

They who live in this country say that every old Michaelmas-
day, five martens and four weasels, with long sticks, may still
be seen hunting hares near this wood; sometimes a dog’s bark
is heard and a shrill whistle, but if any of mankind appear in
their sight, the creatures run quickly away, and hide themselves
in the wood.





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THE DUEL OF THE DORMICE,







THE DUEL OF THE DORMICH.

OvrT in the fields, in the hollow of an old willow-tree, two Dormice

slept the whole winter long. They neither ate nor drank, nor did
they so much as raise their heads from their pillows during all
this dreary time. A ray of sunshine, as the sun passed right over
their tree, would perhaps make one of them stretch out his paws ;
but as soon as the gleam had passed and left them, he would curl
himself wp all the closer in his nest, and go faster asleep than ever.

But the sun came one bright spring morning, and shone on the
Dormice so warmly, that they turned round in their bed, stretched
their paws, rubbed their eyes, yawned, and at last woke quite up.

“It is summer-time at last,” said the elder Dormouse, as he ~
took a nut from his store of provisions and cracked it, “‘ and we
may now leave our winter’s bed.” ‘I don’t believe it,’’ replied
the younger. ‘The wind blows cold; I shall go to sleep again.”

*¢ Ah, that’s like your laziness,”’ rejoined the elder; “ sleep on;
I’m off to the wood.’ And so saying, he scrambled up the tree, then
down the outside of the trunk, and so into the wide meadows.

The younger Dormouse went to sleep. He slept for an hour,
then he woke again, and finding his companion gone, he turned
to the food and ate a hearty meal; then he slept again, but the
sun had made his bed too hot: so he presently woke and made
another attack on the provisions; and this he did the whole day
long, until, at evening time, all the corn and nuts which the two
Dormice had so diligently collected in the autumn, were gone.
Soon the moon rose, and the young one curled himself for sleep.

- |











A.6 THE DUEL OF THE DORMICE.

In the meantime the elder had wandered about the fields; but
the earth was wet, and no corn or fruit was ripe, so at night he
returned to his nest wet and hungry. He ran straight to the
store-room for food; but what was his surprise when he found
nothing left but a few barley-corns! His cries woke his com-
panion, from whom he demanded the provisions; the younger one
muttered that he knew nothing about them, and pretended to
sleep; but the unfortunate adventurer, driven to desperation by
hunger, flew into a rage and struck the other with his claws: a fight
ensued, and the whole neighbourhood was alarmed at the outcry.

_ Two Moles who were passing by the foot of the tree, hearing
this dreadful noise, called out to the combatants to stop. The
Dormice fearing it might be some of the Weasels who spoke, were
silent instantly, and then the Moles bade them come out.

So the Dormice came down to the Moles; and when the Moles
found that the silly creatures were bent on their quarrel, they in-
sisted that the combat should be with swords. Moreover,they offered
to play the part of seconds, and to dig a grave for the vanquished.

To all this the Dormice consented; the Moles found an old
trap, and from the iron parts they fashioned rude swords. These
they measured, and gave to the combatants; and then, with their
long spades in their hands, they awaited the issue of the affray.
It was fierce and desperate. The hungry one fought with fury,
but he who had had a good feast was the stronger and the calmer:
at last the younger one drove his sword right through the body of
the elder; but the elder at the same moment clove his opponent’s
head asunder, and so they fell dead together. And the Moles dug
a deep hole, and buried both the Dormice in the same grave.







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THE KITTENS AT TEA—MISS PAULINA SINGING.







THH SIX KITTENS,

ONCE upon a time a cat had six kittens, whom she brought up in
the most genteel manner. No one could say that their education
was in any wise neglected, for besides being taught the ordinary
duties of life by their mother, such as mouse-hunting, fish-stealing,
and bird-catching, they received instructions in the arts of singing,
and playing the harp and the piano, and were taught to waltz
and dance the polka with every imaginable grace. Now when the
kittens grew to be of age, it was their custom of an afternoon to
spend some hours at tea and intellectual talk. The youngest
always performed the duties of servant, while one of the elder ones
would entertain the rest by playing airs from the latest opera, or
singing a love-song, the music of which she had herself composed.

It is true some animals who dwelt close by complained of this
music, and called it by all kinds of ill names; but that is ever the
jealous way of the world: and the kittens frequently performed
serenades in their garden by moonlight, when all who passed by
would stay to listen to their melody.

But to our tale. It happened that, one fine summer’s after-
noon, when the kittens were all enjoying themselves at tea; when
Paulina, the eldest, was warbling some of her most delightful
songs, and Violet, the second, was entertaining the rest, in an
under tone, with a little bit of scandal about a neighbouring









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ENSIGN SQUEAKER AND MISS t



50 THE SIX KITTENS.

Tabby, whom she had seen coming home in a sad condition about
five o’clock in the morning, when she, Miss Violet, was taking
her early walk ;—just at this moment there sounded a tap at the
door, and presently in came Diana, the youngest sister, bearing
in her hand more cakes for tea, and in the plate with them a
note addressed to Miss Rose,— the next to Violet in age, and by
most people considered the beauty of the family. Violet took
the letter eagerly from Diana; but when she saw the address, she
remarked that it was evidently a gentleman’s handwriting, and
tossing her head somewhat disdainfully, she handed it to Miss
Rose, who blushed very much, and retired with it to the sofa.
Rose opened the note with trembling paws, and a sweet smile
played on her features as she read its contents; then, carefully
folding it up, she observed to her sisters that it was merely an
invitation for a walk, and springing on to the back of the sofa,
she jumped through the open window, and retired to her own
summer-house up a fine sycamore-tree in the garden.

This incident, as may be imagined, caused a great sensation
among the sisters; and all wondered very much who could have
been the writer of the note that had so evidently pleased Miss
Rose. One hoped it was not from that scapegrace Tom who lived
at the Farm-yard; another feared it might come from young
Marten Sable of the Forest ; and Violet demanded of her youngest
sister what sort of person it was who had brought the note.
Diana did not know, but believed it was a relation of old
Mr. Weasel, who belonged to the same farm that Tom did. This
set them all guessing again, for it was well known that Tom and
Old Weasel did not speak to each other: and in the end they
were all just as wise as in the beginning.









THE SIX KITTENS. 53

About seven o’clock the same evening an attentive observer
might have noticed Miss Rose emerging from her door very
quietly, and making the best of her way to the green fields that
bordered the sea-coast close by. An ill-natured person would
have said that Miss Rose had taken especial pains with her toilet,
and that she carried her parasol with a lack-a-daisical air; but
Rose herself, at her last peep in the glass, had thought that she
looked very nicely indeed; and so it would appear thought Ensign
Squeaker (of the Household Pigade), who, with his regimental
sword by his side, and his pocket telescope in his hand, sauntered
along the pathway, merely to enjoy the beauty of the evening, and
inhale the fresh breezes from the ocean. How it happened that
Young Squeaker and Miss Rose met at the corner of the cliff, just
as the village clock struck the half-past seven, no one knows;
certain only it is that they did meet; and that after the interchange
of the usual compliments, Miss Rose accepted Mr. Squeaker’s
proffered arm, and that the pair wandered about by the sea-shore
until the moon rose; and Miss Rose, in great trepidation at find-
ing it so late, desired her companion to escort her home. Nor is
it known what Mr. Squeaker said when he bade a fond adieu to
his dear Rose, nor for how long after Rose sat in her arbour in
the garden and watched the bats flitting across the moon.

It was noticed by the sisters that Rose was very quiet all the
next day, and that at times a tear stood in the corner of her eye,
which she would wipe away, sighing. Many were the sly allu-
sions to the note of the previous afternoon and the long evening
walk, and no one tormented poor Rose with her insinuations
more than Paulina, who was for some cause in a most unusual
flow of spirits. After tea, Rose took down her treasured volume,

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YOUNG MARTEN BIDDING FAREWELL TO MISS PAULINA.









5A, THE SIX KITTENS.

‘« Pussicat’s Poems,” and retiring to the garden, read the tenderest
parts. Violet, overcome with the fatigue of a recent mouse-hunt,
went to sleep on the sofa; the younger ones busied themselves
with their crochet and net-work; and Miss Paulina, saying she
was going to call on a neighbour, with her best lace-Bordered
handkerchief in her hand, sallied forth and took her way towards
the forest. Now it so happened that young Marten Sable was
leaning against a tree, tapping his heel with his cane, and medi-
tating very profoundly at the entrance of the very walk towards
which Paulina bent her steps. He. started at her approach, and
with a sad but eager countenance ran to meet her.

‘‘ What has happened, Marten,” cried Paulina, “ that you look
so miserable? tell me directly, I implore you;” and placing her
hand on his arm, she looked piteously in his face. Marten hung
his head and seemed overcome with grief; at last he said in a low
husky voice, ‘“‘ We must part, Paulina; but it will be only for a
time; my father has ordered me to set out for Russia to visit his
forests there, and, my darling Paulina,—how can I bear the
thought !—it will be six months before I see you again.” Paulina
covered her face with her paws and wept bitterly; at last rousing
herself, she said, “‘Let us not, Marten, spend our last evening thus;
come, six months will soon pass, and then—’’ Here Paulina’s voice
dropped, and Marten threw his arms round her waist and kissed
away the tears. |

We know of every word that Marten said to Paulina, and of
Paulina’s every reply, for we had it all from a young hedgehog
whose curiosity led her to listen to their talk; but we think that
the hedgehog did wrong to listen, and so, perhaps, did we to listen













THE SIX KITTENS. 57

to the hedgehog, and so we will not tell their secrets; but this. we
may mention, that they wandered up and down the pathways of
the forest, now and then pouncing on a stray field-mouse or a
poor sleeping bird, until the moon shone brightly through the
trees. And we know that they parted at length by the sign-post
at the edge of the wood, when Paulina shed many tears, and
Marten, laying his paw upon his heart, vowed ever to be constant
to her, and in all his travels and all his adventures to remember
his sweet Pussy. To have seen how the poor kitten wept when
she went to bed that night, would have grieved a hard-hearted
terrier; and to have seen how melancholy she looked as she wan-

dered about for three weeks afterwards, would have drawn pity
from a ferocious bull-dog.

One morning, about seven months after the events we have
narrated, there was a great commotion in the house where the
kittens dwelt; the bells rang, the flags were hoisted, and little
cannon fired. In the papers of the next morning we read that
Ensign Squeaker of the Household Pigade carried off the beautiful
Miss Rose, and young Marten Sable of the Forest his fair prize
Miss Paulina, both on the same day.

May they all enjoy much felicity, and may the brides catch
plenty of mice ! |







SHUN Dhaai NVI) LRA LI



G GO

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THE FROGS WHO WOULD A-WOOI



THE

FROGS WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO,

Two frogs, who were cousins, were hopping about together one
warm summer’s evening by the side of a rivulet, when they began
talking—just as the men will talk—about a young lady-frog who
lived in a neighbouring marsh. One extolled the brightness of
her eyes, the other praised the beauty of her complexion, and
somehow the two frogs found out that they had both fallen in love
with the same young lady-froggy. When they had made this
discovery they parted rather abruptly, and muttered something,
the meaning of which was not very clear.

‘‘ Bless me,”’ said Mr. Croaker, the elder and richer of the two,
“T must not let that young scapegrace Jumper get the better of
me. A pretty joke indeed that he should think of the beautiful Miss
Leapfrog, he who is not worth a rap, and is as ugly as a toad.”

Who would have thought,” said Jumper to himself, “that
that old curmudgeon Croaker was going to make love to that dear
young Miss Leapfrog? We will soon see whom she likes best.”

The next morning Croaker dressed himself with unusual neat-
ness; and that he might appear to better advantage, he went to a
barber-frog who lived in a neighbouring arbour, and asked to be
shaved and to have his wig dressed. ‘The barber had just spread









60 THE FROGS WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.

his white cloth, had lathered his customer’s chin, and was flourish-
ing a razor in his face, when what should catch Croaker’s eye
through the open doorway but the figure of his cousin Jumper,
smartly dressed, with his cane under his arm, and a parasol over
his head, to keep the sun off his delicate complexion, walking
hastily along the path that led to Miss Leapfrog’s residence.

To jump from his chair was Croaker’s first impulse, and, sad
to say, it was his last; for he fell with his throat upon the edge
of the barber’s razor, and in two minutes breathed his last.

Deep was Miss Leapfrog’s grief, and great was Mr. Jumper’s
joy, when the news of this sad misfortune reached their ears. In
the first burst of her anguish the young lady accused the barber
of having murdered her dear Croaker; but Mr. Jumper hopped
about for joy, and vowed that the barber was the best frog
alive. And well he might be joyful, for as Croaker had died with-
out a will, Jumper inherited all his estates; and when, after a
week’s mourning, the young lady’s grief had somewhat subsided,
the happy Mr. Jumper carried off the beautiful Miss Leapfrog.

But alas, how uncertain is happiness either to man or frogs !
Two days afterwards, as Jumper was crossing a brook, a lily-white
duck, who had been concealed by the rushes, flew at him with open
beak and gobbled him up.

_ And the poor bride was left to mourn in silent solitude.









THE STORY

OF

REYNARD THE FOX.

ea”

Axsovt the feast of Whitsuntide, when the woods were in their
lustyhood and gallantry, when every tree was clothed in the green
and white livery of glorious leaves and sweet-smelling blossoms,
when the earth was covered with her fairest mantle of flowers, -
and the sweet birds entertained the groves with the delight of
their harmonious songs, the Lion, the Royal King of Beasts, made
solemn proclamation that all quadrupeds whatsoever should attend
his court, and celebrate this great festival.

Now when the king had assembled all his subjects together,
there was no one absent save Reynard the Fox, against whom
many grievous accusations were laid. First came Isegrim the
Wolf, with all his family and kindred, who, standing before the
King complained loudly how that Reynard had ill-treated his
wife and children. Then there came a little hound named Curtise,
who accused the Fox of having stolen his pudding in the extreme
cold winter-time, when he was nigh dying of starvation. But
scarcely had the hound finished his tale, when, with a fiery
countenance, in sprang Tibert the Cat, and accused Curtise of
having stolen this pudding from himself, and declared that Rey-
nard had righteously taken it away.







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REYNARD IN THE LIKENESS OF A HERMIT.









64, THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

Then rose the Panther: “ Do you imagine, Tibert,’’ quoth he,
“that Reynard ought not to be complained of? The whole world
knows that he is a murderer, a vagabond, and a thief.”’

Then quoth Grimbard the Badger, Reynard’s nephew: ‘It is
a common proverb, Walice never spake well: what can you say
against my kinsman the fox? All these complaints seem to me
to be either absurd or false. Mine uncle is a gentleman, and
cannot endure falsehood. I affirm that he liveth as a recluse;
he chastiseth his body, and weareth a shirt of hair-cloth. It is
above a year since he hath eaten any flesh; he hath forsaken
his castle Malepardus, and abandoned all his wealth; he lives
only upon alms and good men’s charities, doing infinite penance
for his sins; so that he has become pale and lean with praying
and fasting.”

While Grimbard was still speaking, there came down the hill
Chanticleer the Cock, and with him two hens, who brought with
them on a bier their dead sister Copple, who had just been
murdered by Reynard. Chanticleer smote piteously his feathers,
and, kneeling before the King, spake in this manner:

“ Most merciful and my great Lord the King, vouchsafe, I
beseech you, to hear our complaint, and redress the injuries which
Reynard the Fox has done to me and my children. Not longer
ago than last April, when the weather was fair, and I was in
the height of my pride and glory, because of my eight valiant
sons and seven fair daughters, who were strong and fat, and who
walked in safety in a yard well-fenced round, wherein also were
several large dogs for their protection, Reynard, that false and
dissembling traitor, came to me in the likeness of a hermit, and
brought me a letter to read, sealed with your Majesty’s seal,
in which I found written, that your Highness had made peace
























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SIR TIBERT DELIVERING THE KING'S MESSAGE.







THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX. 69

that the poor beast howled with pain. This noise quickly brought
out the carpenter, who, perceiving how matters stood, alarmed
the whole village, who came and belaboured the bear’s sides with
sticks and hoes and pitchforks, until, mad with rage, he tore his
bleeding face and paws from the tree, and rushed blindly into a
river that ran close by, knocking into the water with him many
of the villagers, and among them, Dame Julock, the parson’s
wife, for whose sake every one bestirred himself; and so poor
Bruin got safe away. After some delay, the bear returned to
the court, where, in dismal accents, he recounted the sad trick
that Reynard had played him. |

Then said the King, ‘“ Now, by my crown, I will take such
revenge as shall make that traitor tremble;’’ and sending for
his counsellors, they decided that Reynard should be again sum-
moned to court, and that Tibert the Cat should be the bearer
of the message. ‘It is your wisdom, Sir Tibert, I employ,” said
the great King, “and not your strength: many prevail with art,
when violence returns with lost labour.”

So Tibert made ready, and set out with the King’s letter to
Malepardus, where he found the fox standing before his castle-
gates; to whom Tibert said, “‘ Health to my fair cousin Reynard ;
the King, by me, summons you to the court, in which if you
fail, there is nothing more assured unto you than a cruel and a
sudden death.” |

The fox answered, “‘ Welcome, dear cousin Tibert; I obey your
command, and wish my Lord the King infinite days of happiness ;
only let me entreat you to rest with me to-night, and take such
cheer as my simple house affordeth, and to-morrow, as early as
you will, we will go towards the court, for I have no kinsman
I trust so dearly as yourself.”

K











70 THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

Tibert replied, “ You speak like a noble gentleman; and me-
thinks it is best now to go forward, for the moon shines as bright
as day.”

“Nay, dear cousin,” said the fox, “let us take the day before
us, SO may we encounter with our friends; the night is full of
danger.”

“Well,” said the cat, “if it be your pleasure, I am content;
what shall we eat ?”

Reynard. said, “‘ Truly my store is small; the best I have is a
_ honey-comb, pleasant and sweet; what think you of it P”’

T'o which Tibert replieth, “It is meat I little respect, and seldom
eat ; I had rather have one mouse than all the honey in Europe.”

‘“A mouse!” said Reynard; “ why, my dear cousin, here
dwelleth a priest hard by, who hath a barn by his house so full
of mice, that I think half the wagons in the parish are not able
to bear them.”

“Oh, dear Reynard,” quoth the cat, “do but lead me thither,
and make me your servant for ever.”

“Why,” said the fox, ‘‘ love you mice so exceedingly ?”

‘‘ Beyond expression,’’ quoth the cat.

Then away they went with all speed to the priest’s barn, which
was well walled about with a mud wall, where, but the night
before, the fox had broken in and stolen an exceeding fat hen,
at which the priest was so angry, that he had set a snare before
the hole to catch him at his next coming, which the false fox
knew of; and therefore said to the cat, “Sir Tibert, creep in at
this hole, and believe it, you shall not tarry a minute’s space but
you shall have more mice than you are able to devour ;- hark, you
may hear how they peep. When you have eaten your fill, come
again, and I will stay and await for you here at this hole, that —











‘THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX. 73

to-morrow we may go together to the court; but, good cousin,
stay not too long, for I know my wife will hourly expect us.”’

Then Tibert sprang quickly in at the hole, but was presently
caught fast by the neck in the snare, which as soon as the cat
felt, he quickly leaped back again; and the snare running close
together, he was half-strangled, so that he began to surugele and
cry out and exclaim most piteously.

Then the priest, hearing the outcry, alarmed all his servants,
crying out, ‘The Fox is taken!’ and away they all ran to where
poor Tibert was caught in the snare, and, without finding out their
mistake, they beat him most unmercifully, and cruelly wounded
one of his eyes. The cat, mad with pain, suddenly gnawed the
cord, and seizing the priest by the legs, bit him and tore him in
such a way that he fell down in a swoon, and then, as every one
ran to help his master, Tibert leaped out of the hole, and limped
as fast as his wounded legs would carry him to the court, where
the King was infinitely angry at the treatment he had received.

Then Grimbard the Badger, Reynard’s nephew, fearing it was
likely to go hard with his uncle, offered to go to Malepardus
and take the King’s message to his most subtle kinsman; to
which his Majesty graciously consented. So Grimbard set forth;
and when he came to Malepardus, he found Reynard with Dame
Ermelin his wife sporting with their children. When Grimbard
had delivered the King’s letter, Reynard found that it would be
better for him to shew himself at court at once; so bidding an
affectionate faréwell to his dear wife and children, he immediately
set out with the badger to go with him before the King. On his
way, Reynard, remembering the heavy crimes he had committed,
and fearing that his end was at hand, desired of the holy Grim-
bard, who had always led a hermit’s life, that he would hear









74, THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

him confess, and set him a penance for his sins. Grimbard bade
him proceed. And the fox confessed how shamefully he had ill-
used the bear, and the cat, and the wolf, and Chanticleer’s chil-
dren, and many other ill-doings during his life; and when he had

. finished, he knelt before Grimbard, and said, “ Thus have’ I told
you my wickedness ; now order my penance, as shall seem fit in
your discretion.”

Grimbard was both learned and wise; and therefore brake a
rod from a tree, and said, “ Uncle, you shall three times strike
your body with this rod, and then lay it down upon the ground,
and spring three times over it without bowing your ‘legs or
stumbling; then shall you take it up and kiss it gently, in sign
of meekness and obedience to your penance; which done, you
are absolved of your sins aa up to this day, for I pro-
nounce unto you clear remission.’

At this the fox was exceeding glad ; ii ‘iaanesiaiea he per-
formed the penance to Grimbard’s satisfaction. But as they went
journeying on, it happened that they passed by the poultry-yard
of a convent; and as one young cock strayed far from the rest,
Reynard leaped at him, and caught him by the feathers, but the
cock escaped.

“Villain that you are,” said Grimbard, “ will you, for a silly
pullet, fall again into your sins ?” |

To which Reynard answered, “ Pardon me, dear Acre I
had forgotten myself; but I will ask forgiveness, and mine eye

_ shall no more wander.”’

However, Grimbard noted that he turned many times to look
at the poultry. But soon afterwards they arrived at the court.

As soon as it was bruited in the court that Reynard the Fox
and Grimbard his kinsman were arrived there, every one, from









THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX. 15

the highest to the lowest, prepared himself to complain of the
fox; at which Reynard’s heart quaked, but his countenance kept
the old look, and he went as proudly as ever he was wont with his
nephew through the high street, and came as gallantly into the
court as if he had been the King’s son, and as clear from trespass
as the most innocent whosoever; and when he came before the
chair of state in which the King sat, he said, “‘ Heaven give your
Majesty glory and renown above all the princes of the earth.”

But the King cut him short at these words, and said: ‘‘ Peace,
traitorous Reynard; think you I can be caught with the music
of your words? no, it hath too oft deceived me; the peace which
I commanded and swore unto, that have you broken.”

Then Bellin the Ram, and Oleway his wife, and Bruin the
Bear, and Tibert the Cat, and Isegrim the Wolf, and Kyward the
Hare, and Bruel the Goose, and Baldwin the Ass, and Bortle the
Bull, and Hamel the Ox, and Chanticleer the Cock, and Partlett
the Hen, and many others, came forward; and all these with one
entire noise cried out against the fox, and so moved the King
with their complaints, that the fox was taken and arrested.

Upon this arrest, a parliament was called; and notwithstanding
that he answered every objection severally, and with great art,
Reynard was condemned, and judgment was given that he should
be hanged till his body was dead; at which sentence the fox cast
down his head, for all his jollity was lost, and no flattery nor no
words now prevailed.

Then Isegrim on the one side and Bruin on the other led the
poor fox to the gallows, Tibert running before with the halter.
And when they were come to the place of execution, the King
and the Queen, and all the rest of the nobility, took their places
to see the fox die.











76 THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

When all things were prepared, the fox said: “ Now my heart
is heavy, for death stands in all his horror before me, and I cannot -
escape. My dread Lord the King, and you my sovereign Lady the
Queen, and you my lords that stand to behold me die, I beseech
you grant me this charitable boon, that I may unlock my _eart
before you, and clear my soul of her burdens, so that hereafter no
man may be blamed for me; which done, my death will be easy.”

Every creature now took compassion on the fox, and said his
request was small, beseeching the King to grant it, which was
done; and then the fox thus spake: ‘‘ Help me, Heaven, for I see
no man here whom I have not offended; yet was this evil no
natural inclination in me, for in my youth I was accounted as
virtuous as any breathing. This know, I have played with the
lambs all the day long, and taken delight in their pretty bleating ;
yet at last in my play I bit one, and the taste of its blood was so
sweet unto me, that I approved the flesh, and both were so good,
that since I could never forbear it. This liquorish humour drew
me into the woods amongst the goats, where hearing the bleating
of the little kids, I slew one of them, and afterwards two more,
which slaughter made me so hardy, that then I fell to murder
hens, geese, and other poultry. And thus my crimes increased
by custom, and fury so possessed me, that all was fish which came
to my net. After this, in the winter season, I met with Isegrim,
where, as he lay hid under a hollow tree, he unfolded unto me
how he was my uncle, and laid the pedigree down so plain, that
from that day forth we became fellows and companions; which
knot of friendship I may ever curse, for then began the flood of
our thefts and slaughters. He stole the great things, I the small ;
he murdered nobles, I the mean subjects; and in all our actions
his share was still ever the greatest: when he got a ram or a calf,







‘THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX. 73

to-morrow we may go together to the court; but, good cousin,
stay not too long, for I know my wife will hourly expect us.”

Then Tibert sprang quickly in at the hole, but was presently
caught fast by the neck in the snare, which as soon as the cat
felt, he quickly leaped back again; and the snare running close
together, he was half-strangled, so that he began to struggle and
cry out and exclaim most piteously.

Then the priest, hearing the outery, alarmed all his servants,
crying out, “The Fox is taken!” and away they all ran to where
poor ‘Tibert was caught in the snare, and, without finding out their
mistake, they beat him most unmercifully, and cruelly wounded
one of his eyes. The cat, mad with pain, suddenly gnawed the
cord, and seizing the priest by the legs, bit him and tore him in
such a way that he fell down in a swoon, and then, as every one
ran to help his master, Tibert leaped out of the hole, and limped
as fast as his wounded legs would carry him to the court, where
the King was infinitely angry at the treatment he had received.

Then Grimbard the Badger, Reynard’s nephew, fearing it was
likely to go hard with his uncle, offered to go to Malepardus
and take the King’s message to his most subtle kinsman; to
which his Majesty graciously consented. So Grimbard set forth;
and when he came to Malepardus, he found Reynard with Dame
Ermelin his wife sporting with their children. When Grimbard
had delivered the King’s letter, Reynard found that it would be
better for him to shew himself at court at once; so bidding an
affectionate faréwell to his dear wife and children, he immediately
set out with the badger to go with him before the King. On his
way, Reynard, remembering the heavy crimes he had committed,
and fearing that his end was at hand, desired of the holy Grim-
bard, who had always led a hermit’s life, that he would hear







THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX. 93

told to his uncle all that had happened. Reynard received him
with great courtesy, and the next morning accompanied him back
to court, confessing on his way many heinous sins, and obtaining
absolution from the badger. The King received him with a severe
and ately countenance, and immediately asked him touching the
complaint of Laprell the Rabbit.
To which Reynard made answer: “ Indeed, sire, what Laprell
reeeived he most richly deserved. I gave him a cake when he was
hungry ; and when my little son Rossel wanted to share a bit, the
rabbit struck him on the mouth and made his teeth bleed; where-
upon my eldest son Reynardine forthwith leaped upon him, and
would have slain him had I not gone to the rescue.’ Then the
rabbit, fearmg Reynard, stole away out of court.
“ But,” quoth the King, “I must charge you with another
foul treason. When I had pardoned all your great transgressions,
and you had promised me to go a pilgrimage to the Holy Land;
when I had furnished you with mail, scrip, and all things fitting
that holy order; then, i the greatest despite, you sent me back
in the mail, by Bellin the Ram, the head of Kyward the Hare;
a thing so notoriously to my disgrace and dishonour, that no
treason can be fouler.”’
- Then spake Reynard to the King, and said, “ Alas, my sove-
reign Lord, what is that you have said? Is good Kyward the Hare
dead? Oh, where is then Bellin the Ram, or what did he bring
to your Majesty at his return? For it is certain I delivered him
three rich and inestimable jewels, I would not for the wealth of
- India they should be detained from you; the chief of them I de-
termined for you my Lord the King, and the other two for my
sovereign Lady the Queen.”

“But,” said the King, “I received nothing but the head of

N













94, THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

poor murdered Kyward, for which I executed the ram, he having
confessed the deed to be done by his advice and counsel.”

“Is this true ?” said the fox; “then wo is me that ever I was
born, for there are lost the goodliest jewels that ever were in the
possession of any prince living; would I had died when you were
thus defrauded, for I know it will be the death of my wife, nor
will she ever henceforth esteem me.”

Then Reynard told the King and Queen of the great value of
these inestimable jewels. One was a gold ring, another a comb
polished like unto fine silver, and the third was a glass mirror ;
and so great were the virtues of this rare glass that Reynard shed
tears to think of the loss of it. When the fox had told all this, he
thus concluded : “ If any one can charge me with crime and prove
it by witness, here I stand to endure the uttermost the law can
inflict upon me; but if malice only slander me without witness, I
crave the combat, according to the law and instance of the court.”

Then said the King, “‘ Reynard, you say well, nor know I any
thing more of Kyward’s death than the bringing of his head unto
me by Bellin the Ram; therefore of it I here acquit you.”

*¢ My dear Lord,” said be fox, ‘I humbly thank you; yet is
his death grievous unto me.’

But Isegrim the Wolf was not erator with this conclusion,
and defied the fox to mortal combat. This challenge the fox
accepted; and the next day was appointed for the meeting.

When all the ceremonies were done, and none but the com-
batants were in the lists, the wolf went toward the fox with in-
finite rage and fury, thinking to take him in his fore-feet ; but the
fox leaped nimbly from him, and the wolf pursued him, so that
there began a tedious chase between them, on which their friends
gazed. The wolf taking larger strides than the fox, often overtook















96 THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

before, they went all to the King, guarding the fox on every side,
all the trumpets, pipes, and minstrelsy sounding before him.

When Reynard came before the King he fell on his knees, but
the King bade him stand up, and said to him, “ Reynard, you
may well rejoice, for you have won much honour this day; there-
fore here I discharge you, and set you free to go whither your
own will leads you.” So the court broke up, and every beast
returned to his own home.

With Reynard, all his friends and kinsfolk, to the number of
forty, took their leave also of the King, and went away with the
fox, who was no little glad that he had sped so well, and stood so
far in the King’s favour; for now he had power enough to advance
whom he pleased, and pull down any that envied his fortune.

After some travel the fox and his friends came to his borough
or castle of Malepardus, where they all, in noble and courteous
manner, took leave of each other, and Reynard did to every one of
them great reverence, and thanked them for the love. and honour
he had received from them, protesting evermore to remain their
faithful servant, and to send them in all things wherein his life
or goods might be available unto them ; and so they shook hands
and departed. -

Then the fox went to Dame Ermelin his wife, who welcomed
him with great tenderness ; and to her and her children he related
at large all the wonders which had befallen him at court, and
missed no tittle or circumstance therein. ‘Then grew they proud
that his fortune was so excellent ; and the fox spent his days from
thenceforth, with his wife and children, in great joy and content.

RN SS Sn 2 en eR ee
ROBSON, LEVEY, AND FRANKLYN, GREAT NEW STREET,







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THE

COMICAL CREATURES

FROM

WURTEMBERG.
From the Examiner, August 2d.

“THE title-page of this agreeable little volume sufficiently commends its pleasant
contents. ‘T’o whom, old or young, will it not be welcome? Who has not, young
or old, seen, laughed at, revisited, and brought away, pleasant recollections of the
Stuffed Animals from the Zollverein ?

“It was a good notion, that of perpetuating these clever productions by means
of daguerreotype and wood-engraving. ' They are very nicely executed in this volume,
and wonderfully like. It is needless to particularise where all is so graphic and
faithful ; but let the studious little rabbit over his arithmetic lesson at p. 32, with
that demure conscience-striken pair behind him wincing at the flogging of their idle
brother, be especially admired.

“We must add that the letterpress is not unworthy of the humour and fidelity
of the illustrations. The various Weasels, Rabbits, and Foxes, are brought into one
little tale; the Wonderful Hare-Hunt into another; the Tea-Party of Kittens, and
the Marten and Tabby, into a third; the Duel of the Dormice, and the Frogs, form
two separate and ingenious anecdotes; and the story of Reynard the Fox is quaintly
related in prose so far as was necessary to explain the six comical groups of Ploucquet.

“We predict a great run at Christmas for the Comical Creatures from Wurtem-
berg.”

From the Mornine Curonicin, August 12th.

‘“*'The book is a clever and a pleasant memento of the Great Exhibition. The
drawings are careful and clever, and convey a very correct representation of the
original creatures, with all, or nearly all, their subtlety of expression and aspect.
The capital fatuity of the Rabbits and Hares, the delightful scoundrelism of the
Fox, the cunning shrewdness of the Marten and Weasels, the hoyden visages of the
Kittens, and the cool, slippery demeanour of the Frogs, are all capitally given. The
book may lie on the drawing-room table, or be thumbed in the nursery ; and in
the latter case we have little doubt that many an urchin still in petticoats will in
future years associate his most vivid recollection of the Great Exhibition of 1851
with Mr. Bogue’s perpetuation of the Comical Creatures from Wurtemberg.””

—_—

U

ge -

= a

AA :
SN eo ete
- ———————————

i mu =
= l UL een
mn ie



a

L AND IIER CHILDREN

’
4

DAME WEASI
THE

COMICAL CREATURES

FROM

WURTEMBERG, |

Sucluding the Story of Reynard the Far.

WITH TWENTY ILLUSTRATIONS,

DRAWN FROM THE STUFFED ANIMALS CONTRIBUTED BY
HERRMANN PLOUCQUET OF STUTTGART

TO THE GREAT EXHIBITION.
Srruud Cdition,

LONDON:
DAVID BOGUEH, FLEET STREET.



1801.
|

PREFACE,

—__—_#——

To HirrMANN PLoucgyEt, Preserver of Objects of Natural
History at the Royal Museum of Stuttgart,—the capital of the
kingdom of Wurtemberg,—-we are indebted for one of the clever-
est and most popular displays in the Great Exursirion. Every
one, from her Majesty the Queen down to the least of the charity-
boys, hastens to see the Stuffed Animals from the Zollverein ;
every one lingers over them and laughs at them as long as the
crowd will allow; and every one talks of them afterwards with

a smile and a pleasing recollection.

That these clever productions of Ploucquet’s talent may be
long perpetuated, we have had daguerreotypes of them taken by
Mr. Claudet, and engravings made from them on wood as faith-
fully like as possible.

We must beg our readers to remember that, excepting « Rey-
nard the Fox,” our sketches have been written to illustrate the
drawings, for on this plea we claim some indulgence; but as we
know full well that the pictures will be the main attraction of the

volume, we are not apprehensive of much criticism.
PREFACKH.

The story of ‘‘ Reynard the Fox” is told briefly in the words of
an old version of this wonderful tale published in England many
years ago. In Germany Reinecle Fuchs is as popular as our “ Jack
the Giant-Killer.”” Carlyle says, c Among the people it was long
a house-book and universal best companion; it has been lectured
on in Universities, quoted in imperial Council-halls; it lay on
the toilets of princes, and was thumbed to pieces on the bench
of the artisan: we hear of grave men ranking it next to their
Bible.”

Goethe took the story of ‘‘ Reynard” for the subject of a great
poem ; and the famous painter Kaulbach has recently illustrated
Goethe’s version with perhaps the finest series of pictures with

which a book was ever adorned.

Herrmann Ploucquet has had the good taste to select. six of
these designs as models for his works. He has admirably pre-
served the expression which the painter gave to the Fox and his

dupes, and every one recognises them with pleasure.
CONTENTS.

PPLPL LPS PPPS SP PDI

PAGE

Tuer WEASELS OF Horm-Woop . . . . ; . . 15
Tur WonpErRFUL Hare-Hount.. ; ; oo : » AO
Tue Duet or THE DorRMICE. . . . . . ; 4D
THe Six Kittens : ; ; . ‘ . ; ; . 49
THe FROGS WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO. , ; ; ; . &b9

Tue Story or REYNARD THE Fox . . . . . . . 63
ILLUSTRATIONS.

os



vevy_—"e

Tue Wonperrut Hare-Hunt (Double Plate) :
Dame WEASEL AND HER FAMILY . . .

THE ATTENTIVE PHYSICIAN . . . . ; .
THE VERY ATTENTIVE PHYSICIAN

Oxtp Marten AND SHARP WEASEL, Esq. , : ;
Mr. Bantam’s INTERVIEW WITH OLD MARTEN . .
LONGTAIL TEACHING THE YOUNG Raspitrs ARITHMETIC
Jack Hare AND GRACE MARTEN LEADING OFF THE BALL .
Tue DvuEL oF THE DoRMICE .

Tue Kirrens at TeEa—Muiss PAULINA SINGING . .
Ensign SQUEAKER AND Miss Rose . . . . .
Younc MARTEN BIDDING FAREWELL TO Miss PAvuLINA

Tue FRoGS WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO. . .
ReYNARD AT Home at MALEPARDUS : . . .
REYNARD IN THE LIKENESS OF A HERMIT . . .
Sir TIBERT DELIVERING THE Kine’s MESSAGE . ;
REYNARD BRINGS FORWARD THE Hare As HIS WITNESS
REYNARD ON HIS PinGRiIMAGE TO Rome . .

REYNARD ATTACKETH LAPRELL THE RABBIT. .

. Frontispiece.

14
17
21
25
29
33
o7
44
48
ol
DD
D8
62
65
71
81
85
91







THE

WHASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

CHAPTER I.

In a pleasant country where green meadows lay stretched by the
side of a broad river whose banks were lined with the pollard-
willow and tall poplar, there once dwelt a family of Weasels,
known, from their place of residence, as the Weasels of Holm-

wood.

Holm-wood was a little island covered with underwood, rushes,
and wild flowers. A few aged trees stood by its edge, bathing
their long arms in the stream, and in the hollow trunk of one of
these the Weasels lived.
— = SC +
-- — ee ee



THE ATTENTIVE PHYSICIAN.
16 THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

Any fine morning you might have seen the mother of this
family carrying her infant in her arms, and followed by her other
children, a girl and two boys, who would amuse themselves by
dragging little wooden horses, playing at soldiers with mock mus-
kets, running against the wind with little whirligig mills, or fro-
licking about with a thousand of the antics of children. Their
father, known every where as Old Weasel, was of a most resolute
and unbending disposition; he made many enemies, and was ever
at war with one or other of his neighbours. The Partridges of
Clover-field asserted that he sucked their eggs and stole their
young ones; the Rabbits of the Warren held Old Weasel and all
his family in the deepest abhorrence, and accused them of the
greatest cruelties; but no one complained of them more bitterly
than Dame Partlett of the Farm, who accused the whole tribe of
being born enemies of her race, and said, that were it not that
Old Weasel himself was dreadfully afraid of her neighbour and
friend, young Mastiff of Kennel-wood, she verily believed that she

should never know any peace on earth.

All the world will understand how, with such a character, the
Weasels had but few friends, and that when Miss Weasel grew to
be of age, she should have but few admirers; nevertheless two or
three families who were related to them by blood kept up an occa-
sional acquaintance, and among them the Ferrets of Hollow-oak

were the most intimate. Now it so happened that one evening,
THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD. 19

when out for a ramble in the woods, a branch of a tree on which
Miss Weasel had mounted in order to get nearer to young Linnet,
with whom she wished to be on intimate terms, broke suddenly
off, and the poor young lady was precipitated to the ground and
; sadly hurt. Her cries brought to her assistance her younger
brother Tom, who, as soon as he had helped her home, ran for
young Ferret, who had lately begun practice as a physician. When
the good young doctor came, he found Miss Weasel lyimg on the
sofa, looking very pale and very interesting. He felt her pulse,
looked at her tongue, and soon discovered that the lady was more
frightened than hurt. However, as he had not many patients,
he did not choose to tell all the truth, but prescribing a simple
remedy, he ordered her to keep very quiet, and promised to call
again on the next day. Whether it was that Miss Weasel had
been hurt more than her physician had thought, or whether there
were any other inducements, we cannot say; but young Ferret
thought it his duty to call at Holm-wood every morning, and
sometimes twice a day, for at least a month: and if any one could
have seen how frequently he felt Miss Weasel’s pulse, and how
anxiously he studied every expression of her face, he would have
set down Dr. Ferret as a very attentive at least, if not excellent
physician. |

When Miss Weasel became somewhat stronger, this good


ie iS wie

Wi, Hy

THE VERY ATTENTIVE PHYSICIAN.


20 THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

young man would lend his arm for her support during an
evening walk, would bring her birds’ eggs and other delicacies,
and in many ways endeavour to contribute to her restoration |
to health.

This went on for some time, till the gossips of the neigh-
bouring village would smile whenever they saw the doctor wend-
ing his way towards Holm-wood; and Miss Weasel’s two brothers
would immediately leave their lessons, which their sister used to

teach them, as soon as ever the physician appeared in sight.

CHAPTER, IT.

Tue other relations of the Weasels who were on visiting terms
with them were, the Polecats of The Grange, who came but sel-
dom, and the Martens of Forest-farm, with whom they were more
intimate. Now old Mr. Marten had always intended that his own
son Longtail, who kept a boarding-school for boys near the War-
ren, should marry Miss Weasel; and when he heard of the phy-
sician’s great attentions to that young lady, he was very wroth.
At first he thought of way-laying young Ferret in the wood and
killing him; but then he recollected that the Ferrets were a
_ powerful family, who would never rest till they had been revenged.
_ His next thought was to go to his attorney, Sharp Weasel, Esq.,
of Nettle Cottage, and consult with him as to the best means
of thwarting young Ferret’s projects. So the old man took down
_ his pipe and his account-book, and set off to the attorney.




OLD MARTEN AND SHARP WEASEL, ESQ.
QA THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

Mr. Sharp Weasel was well pleased to see so excellent a client
as old Mr. Marten, and received him with many smiles. The two
quickly laid down a plan of proceedings, and Mr. Marten produced
his account-book, and proved that young Ferret owed him for the

following goods sold and delivered, viz. one young rabbit; item,

one wood-pigeon; item, one brace of partridges ; item, one cock-
pheasant ; item, one duckling; item, one fat gosling.

For this account young Ferret was next day summoned be-
fore Judge Fox, who, after hearing the case, immediately gave
judgment in favour of plaintiff; and as young Ferret had not
sufficient funds to meet this unexpected demand, he was forth-
with arrested and sent to prison.

Old Mr. Marten chuckled and was well pleased at the success
of his stratagem, and was on his way to his son Longtail to tell
him of what he considered the good news, when he met Mr. Ban-
tam of Holm-farm, searching for his wife and daughters, who had

wandered for a walk. Bantam, it was evident, did not particularly

wish for this meeting, for his comb grew very red, and he strutted —

off at a quick pace in an opposite direction; but old Marten ran

through some bushes, and caught him just as he was getting clear
of the wood.


THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD. 27

“Good morning, Mr. Bantam,”’ said he.
“Good morning, sir,’”’ said Bantam, shaking in every feather.

“ T want you to do me a service, Bantam,’ continued old
Marten; ‘but you must not say one word of what I am going

to tell you.”’
Bantam promised this, as indeed he would have any thing else.

«You must go to Old Weasel of Holm-wood,”’ whispered
Marten, laying his forepaws on Bantam’s breast to hold him near
him, ‘‘and find his daughter. Tell her that young Ferret is a
scapegrace and a good-for-nothing fellow, and that Judge Fox
has sent him to prison. Then tell her that I am very rich, and
that my son Longtail is making a handsome fortune by his school.
This is a delicate matter, Bantam: if you manage cleverly, I will
be your friend through life; if you betray me, mark this.’ And
the old man clapped his paw on the cutlass he usually wore by his

side.

Bantam, glad to get out of his clutches on any terms, promised
the strictest compliance, and flew rather than ran back to his
farmyard as soon as he was released. There the first person he

saw was his wife, who had returned, and was wondering what had




MR. BANTAM’S INTERVIEW WITH OLD MARTEN.

i
28 THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

become of him. ‘To her, of course, he told all his strange adven-
ture, and she, silly thing, went immediately and cackled the whole
story to Dame Goose; who told it to one of the young Goslings,
who told it to old Mr. Drake ; he quacked it about so loudly that
his wife and children soon learned it; and in ten minutes there
was not one in all Holm-farm who did not know of this won-
derful adventure. As for performing his promise, we must do
Mr. Bantam the credit of saying he never for a moment thought
of being such a silly, for he well knew that the day which saw
him enter Old Weasel’s house would be his last. |


CHAPTER ITI.

Arter old Marten had let Bantam go, he himself went straight
to his son, whom he found engaged in his professional pursuits.
At the moment of his father’s entry, young Longtail was hearing
a class of the young Rabbits, on one of whom he was inflicting
summary chastisement for great neglect and carelessness in his
arithmetic. The poor young fellow was squeaking terribly, and
his three brothers, with tears in their eyes, were trying with all
their might to cast up their sums on their slates, which shook so
in their hands that they could scarce see the figures. Their master
left off the beating when he saw his father, and consequently
young Rabbit, for the first and perhaps only time in his life, was
very glad to see the old man. The class was dismissed; and if
you had seen these four youngsters scamper off, shaking their
white tails and jumping half a yard high as they ran to the
o,

“,
a

32 THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

Warren, you would have thought it was a good thing to have the
light-heartedness of children.

The Martens, father and son, retired up an oak-tree, at the old
man’s request, to talk over their private affairs. "When the son
heard of his father’s plans, and how young Ferret had been arrested,
he was struck dumb with amazement. He had never dreamed that
his father would interfere in such a matter; and if the truth must
be told, he was already engaged to Miss Pussy, the eldest daughter
of old Mrs. Hare of the Ferns.

However, he knew better than to contradict his father’s inten-
tions too suddenly, for he felt assured that the old: ‘man would cut
him off with a shilling if he were to offend him;’ so he pretended

to acquiesce in all that was said, and promised compliance in
every particular.

_ But as soon as his father had bidden him farewell, and had
got out of sight, young Longtail ran as fast as his legs would
carry him to the cavern where the doctor was imprisoned, paid
the amount of the debt for which he had been arrested, and took

young Ferret home with him to consult about their future conduct.

It would have amused you, could you have heard all the plans

discussed by these young lovers for their joint benefit; how the


LONGTAIL TEACHING THE YOUNG RABBITS ARITHMETIC,
oa THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

Warren, you would have thought it was a good thing to have the
light-heartedness of children.

The Martens, father and son, retired up an oak-tree, at the old
man’s request, to talk over their private affairs. When the son

heard of his father’s plans, and how young Ferret had been arrested,

he was struck dumb with amazement. He had never dreamed that |

his father would interfere in such a matter; and if the truth must

be told, he was already engaged to Miss Pussy, the eldest daughter
of old Mrs. Hare of the Ferns.

However, he knew better than to contradict his father’s inten-
tions too suddenly, for he felt assured that the oldman would cut
him off with a shilling if he were to offend him; so he pretended
to acquiesce in all that was said, and promised compliance in

every particular.

But as soon as his father had bidden him farewell, and had
got out of sight, young Longtail ran as fast as his legs would
carry him to the cavern where the doctor was imprisoned, paid
the amount of the debt for which he had been arrested, and took

young Ferret home with him to consult about their future conduct.

It would have amused you, could you have heard all the plans

discussed by these young lovers for their joint benefit; how the




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THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD. | 35

one talked of his darling Miss Weasel, and the other of his dear
Miss Pussy; how they agreed that in matters of love every thing
was allowable; and how they swore eternal friendship to each

other throughout their lives.

Two days afterwards it was known all over Holm-wood that
the fair Miss Weasel had eloped with Longtail Marten. Mrs.
Goose and the four Miss Goslings were full of the information for
every one they met. It was the finest piece of scandal they had
known for years. “ Only think,” said they, “ after all her en-
gagement to young Doctor Ferret, to go and take up with the

schoolmaster; and all, forsooth, because Old Marten is rich !”’

But scarce had the first news of Miss Weasel’s extraordinary
behaviour run through the farm-yard, than old Bantam was seen
hurrying in, very red in the face from over exertion, and was
heard to declare, that he never knew the like of it, but as sure as
he was a living cock, he had met young Ferret the physician
running away with Miss Pussy, the daughter of old Mrs. Hare of
the Ferns. Mrs. Goose turned up the whites of her eyes and
almost fainted. Dame Partlett ran with all speed, that she might
be the first to cackle the intelligence to Mr. Drake; and the whole

island was soon in a ferment at this wonderful piece of gossip.

Of course, old Mr. Marten soon heard of all this; and so




LD



ND GRACE MARTEN LEADING OFF THE BALL.

JACK HARE A




36 THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD.

pleased was he that he immediately altered his will, doubling the
amount he had previously given to his dear boy Longtail, and
getting so extremely excited at the “ Huntsman and Hounds’’ on

the same afternoon, that, sad to relate, he was untimely carried

_ off by an effusion of blood.

And what think you became of the lovers? Why, the very
day all this commotion happened at Holm-wood the two pair met
at their aunt’s, old Mrs. Stoat’s, of Four-mile Cross, as they had
agreed. There the young fellows, overjoyed at the success of their
scheme, changed their fair partners, and, to complete their hap-
piness, immediately set out for a tour on the neighbouring Con-

tinent.

There, on fine summer ,evenings, you might often have seen
the doctor and his beloved quietly strolling by wood-sides and
along the banks of the green meadows, listening intently to the
warbling of the tender birds they loved so much; while young
Longtail Marten and his bride, fonder of more boisterous excite-
ment, devoted themselves to the pleasures of the chase, scouring
rapidly over hill and dale whenever they heard the huntsman’s
loud horn, or the hounds’ deeper notes; and never so happy as
when, after the sports of the day were done, they finished up with
a ball, and danced joyously till the next day’s dawn.




THE WONDERFUL HARE-HUNT.

—_—~—____—

MerrIty sounded the cock’s shrill horn, and brightly shone tie
early morning sun, when a party of young sportsmen set out to
the field, armed with their guns and game-bags. Four beaters
from the neighbouring village attended them, each with a long
stick to rout the hares and rabbits from their hiding-places. Gaily
went they forth, these merry sportsmen and their helpers; light
was their step across the green meadows and up the sandy hill-
sides ; loud was their laughter when one of them, trying to jump
through a broken hedge, fell into the neighbouring ditch; great
was their mirth when another’s gun went off and lamed a squirrel
im an adjoining tree; and joyous was the shout with which they

scared a frightened rabbit from its morning meal.

At last the sportsmen came to the side of a wood, and one of
the beaters reported that just round the corner of the palings he
could see nearly a dozen hares feeding together. A council of war

was summoned ; each sportsman looked to the priming of his gun,










THE WEASELS OF HOLM-WOOD. og

As for the good folks at Holm-wood, as soon as Mrs. Hare
discovered that her daughter had run away, she sent for her
eldest son, Jack Hare, who lived in a farm close by, and asked
him to pursue his sister and bring her back; but Jack said she
was quite old enough to know her own mind, and that he would
have nothing to do with it. When, however, the old lady learned
that her daughter was married to the rich young Marten, and not
to the poor physician, then she was greatly rejoiced, though she
confessed she could not make out why her dear child Pussy should
run away with the doctor and then marry the schoolmaster; but

she supposed it was all right.

As for Jack, when he heard that old Mr. Marten had died,
leaving great riches behind him, he, to follow the fashion, fell in
love with Grace, the only daughter of the deceased, and only
sister of Longtail. Miss Grace listened favourably to Jack’s
suit —for she was very lonely now her father was dead, and her
brother away; and as there was no papa to consult in their case,
they got married quietly at home, and asked all their neighbours
to a ball, when Jack Hare and Grace Marten (that was) led off
the polka in orand style, greatly to the admiration of all the
young folks in the island.




THE WONDERFUL HARE-HUNT. Al

and trod with a more cautious step; each beater bent his head
nearly to the ground, and crept along the grass. A plan of attack
was formed; the beaters stole within the wood to stop the hares
that way, while the sportsmen suddenly appearing on the other
side, caused the poor hares, surrounded as they were, to run into
the very jaws of destruction. They that leaped towards the wood
received blows on their heads from the beaters; they that ran
down the hill met Ponto the dog, who pounced on them open-
mouthed; and they that ran upwards were soon sent downwards
again, toppling head over heels, killed by the fire of the enemy.
Not a hare escaped. The gun-bearers took deadly aim, and Ponto
and the beaters prevented their flight.

While the young sportsmen and their helpers were yet picking
up the hares and rejoicing at their good fortune, the sky became
quickly overcast, black clouds gathered, and a hurricane of wind
swept through the wood, tearing off large branches of the trees.
The sportsmen stood amazed at the suddenness of the storm, but
presently their amazement was changed to fear; for, riding in a
bright chariot drawn by six snow-white swans,— blown swiftly
by the wind,— there appeared a lady of fairy-like beauty. At
her command the beautiful birds stayed their flight, and the
chariot rested on the green turf close by the sportsmen.

‘“ Young men,” said the lady in a melodious but mournful




42 THE WONDERFUL HARE-HUNT.

voice, aS she pointed to the dead hares, ‘‘ you have murdered
these poor innocents for your sport: know, I am the fairy called
KINDNESS, and these hares were all of them my friends. In
punishment for your cruelty, you sportsmen shall be changed
into Martens, and you attendants into Weasels. In such shapes
you may pursue your cruel sports; you are not worthy of the
forms of men.”” And, waving her wand, the swans bore her in-

stantly out of sight.

They who live in this country say that every old Michaelmas-
day, five martens and four weasels, with long sticks, may still
be seen hunting hares near this wood; sometimes a dog’s bark
is heard and a shrill whistle, but if any of mankind appear in
their sight, the creatures run quickly away, and hide themselves
in the wood.


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THE DUEL OF THE DORMICE,




THE DUEL OF THE DORMICH.

OvrT in the fields, in the hollow of an old willow-tree, two Dormice

slept the whole winter long. They neither ate nor drank, nor did
they so much as raise their heads from their pillows during all
this dreary time. A ray of sunshine, as the sun passed right over
their tree, would perhaps make one of them stretch out his paws ;
but as soon as the gleam had passed and left them, he would curl
himself wp all the closer in his nest, and go faster asleep than ever.

But the sun came one bright spring morning, and shone on the
Dormice so warmly, that they turned round in their bed, stretched
their paws, rubbed their eyes, yawned, and at last woke quite up.

“It is summer-time at last,” said the elder Dormouse, as he ~
took a nut from his store of provisions and cracked it, “‘ and we
may now leave our winter’s bed.” ‘I don’t believe it,’’ replied
the younger. ‘The wind blows cold; I shall go to sleep again.”

*¢ Ah, that’s like your laziness,”’ rejoined the elder; “ sleep on;
I’m off to the wood.’ And so saying, he scrambled up the tree, then
down the outside of the trunk, and so into the wide meadows.

The younger Dormouse went to sleep. He slept for an hour,
then he woke again, and finding his companion gone, he turned
to the food and ate a hearty meal; then he slept again, but the
sun had made his bed too hot: so he presently woke and made
another attack on the provisions; and this he did the whole day
long, until, at evening time, all the corn and nuts which the two
Dormice had so diligently collected in the autumn, were gone.
Soon the moon rose, and the young one curled himself for sleep.

- |








A.6 THE DUEL OF THE DORMICE.

In the meantime the elder had wandered about the fields; but
the earth was wet, and no corn or fruit was ripe, so at night he
returned to his nest wet and hungry. He ran straight to the
store-room for food; but what was his surprise when he found
nothing left but a few barley-corns! His cries woke his com-
panion, from whom he demanded the provisions; the younger one
muttered that he knew nothing about them, and pretended to
sleep; but the unfortunate adventurer, driven to desperation by
hunger, flew into a rage and struck the other with his claws: a fight
ensued, and the whole neighbourhood was alarmed at the outcry.

_ Two Moles who were passing by the foot of the tree, hearing
this dreadful noise, called out to the combatants to stop. The
Dormice fearing it might be some of the Weasels who spoke, were
silent instantly, and then the Moles bade them come out.

So the Dormice came down to the Moles; and when the Moles
found that the silly creatures were bent on their quarrel, they in-
sisted that the combat should be with swords. Moreover,they offered
to play the part of seconds, and to dig a grave for the vanquished.

To all this the Dormice consented; the Moles found an old
trap, and from the iron parts they fashioned rude swords. These
they measured, and gave to the combatants; and then, with their
long spades in their hands, they awaited the issue of the affray.
It was fierce and desperate. The hungry one fought with fury,
but he who had had a good feast was the stronger and the calmer:
at last the younger one drove his sword right through the body of
the elder; but the elder at the same moment clove his opponent’s
head asunder, and so they fell dead together. And the Moles dug
a deep hole, and buried both the Dormice in the same grave.




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THE KITTENS AT TEA—MISS PAULINA SINGING.




THH SIX KITTENS,

ONCE upon a time a cat had six kittens, whom she brought up in
the most genteel manner. No one could say that their education
was in any wise neglected, for besides being taught the ordinary
duties of life by their mother, such as mouse-hunting, fish-stealing,
and bird-catching, they received instructions in the arts of singing,
and playing the harp and the piano, and were taught to waltz
and dance the polka with every imaginable grace. Now when the
kittens grew to be of age, it was their custom of an afternoon to
spend some hours at tea and intellectual talk. The youngest
always performed the duties of servant, while one of the elder ones
would entertain the rest by playing airs from the latest opera, or
singing a love-song, the music of which she had herself composed.

It is true some animals who dwelt close by complained of this
music, and called it by all kinds of ill names; but that is ever the
jealous way of the world: and the kittens frequently performed
serenades in their garden by moonlight, when all who passed by
would stay to listen to their melody.

But to our tale. It happened that, one fine summer’s after-
noon, when the kittens were all enjoying themselves at tea; when
Paulina, the eldest, was warbling some of her most delightful
songs, and Violet, the second, was entertaining the rest, in an
under tone, with a little bit of scandal about a neighbouring






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ENSIGN SQUEAKER AND MISS t
50 THE SIX KITTENS.

Tabby, whom she had seen coming home in a sad condition about
five o’clock in the morning, when she, Miss Violet, was taking
her early walk ;—just at this moment there sounded a tap at the
door, and presently in came Diana, the youngest sister, bearing
in her hand more cakes for tea, and in the plate with them a
note addressed to Miss Rose,— the next to Violet in age, and by
most people considered the beauty of the family. Violet took
the letter eagerly from Diana; but when she saw the address, she
remarked that it was evidently a gentleman’s handwriting, and
tossing her head somewhat disdainfully, she handed it to Miss
Rose, who blushed very much, and retired with it to the sofa.
Rose opened the note with trembling paws, and a sweet smile
played on her features as she read its contents; then, carefully
folding it up, she observed to her sisters that it was merely an
invitation for a walk, and springing on to the back of the sofa,
she jumped through the open window, and retired to her own
summer-house up a fine sycamore-tree in the garden.

This incident, as may be imagined, caused a great sensation
among the sisters; and all wondered very much who could have
been the writer of the note that had so evidently pleased Miss
Rose. One hoped it was not from that scapegrace Tom who lived
at the Farm-yard; another feared it might come from young
Marten Sable of the Forest ; and Violet demanded of her youngest
sister what sort of person it was who had brought the note.
Diana did not know, but believed it was a relation of old
Mr. Weasel, who belonged to the same farm that Tom did. This
set them all guessing again, for it was well known that Tom and
Old Weasel did not speak to each other: and in the end they
were all just as wise as in the beginning.






THE SIX KITTENS. 53

About seven o’clock the same evening an attentive observer
might have noticed Miss Rose emerging from her door very
quietly, and making the best of her way to the green fields that
bordered the sea-coast close by. An ill-natured person would
have said that Miss Rose had taken especial pains with her toilet,
and that she carried her parasol with a lack-a-daisical air; but
Rose herself, at her last peep in the glass, had thought that she
looked very nicely indeed; and so it would appear thought Ensign
Squeaker (of the Household Pigade), who, with his regimental
sword by his side, and his pocket telescope in his hand, sauntered
along the pathway, merely to enjoy the beauty of the evening, and
inhale the fresh breezes from the ocean. How it happened that
Young Squeaker and Miss Rose met at the corner of the cliff, just
as the village clock struck the half-past seven, no one knows;
certain only it is that they did meet; and that after the interchange
of the usual compliments, Miss Rose accepted Mr. Squeaker’s
proffered arm, and that the pair wandered about by the sea-shore
until the moon rose; and Miss Rose, in great trepidation at find-
ing it so late, desired her companion to escort her home. Nor is
it known what Mr. Squeaker said when he bade a fond adieu to
his dear Rose, nor for how long after Rose sat in her arbour in
the garden and watched the bats flitting across the moon.

It was noticed by the sisters that Rose was very quiet all the
next day, and that at times a tear stood in the corner of her eye,
which she would wipe away, sighing. Many were the sly allu-
sions to the note of the previous afternoon and the long evening
walk, and no one tormented poor Rose with her insinuations
more than Paulina, who was for some cause in a most unusual
flow of spirits. After tea, Rose took down her treasured volume,

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5A, THE SIX KITTENS.

‘« Pussicat’s Poems,” and retiring to the garden, read the tenderest
parts. Violet, overcome with the fatigue of a recent mouse-hunt,
went to sleep on the sofa; the younger ones busied themselves
with their crochet and net-work; and Miss Paulina, saying she
was going to call on a neighbour, with her best lace-Bordered
handkerchief in her hand, sallied forth and took her way towards
the forest. Now it so happened that young Marten Sable was
leaning against a tree, tapping his heel with his cane, and medi-
tating very profoundly at the entrance of the very walk towards
which Paulina bent her steps. He. started at her approach, and
with a sad but eager countenance ran to meet her.

‘‘ What has happened, Marten,” cried Paulina, “ that you look
so miserable? tell me directly, I implore you;” and placing her
hand on his arm, she looked piteously in his face. Marten hung
his head and seemed overcome with grief; at last he said in a low
husky voice, ‘“‘ We must part, Paulina; but it will be only for a
time; my father has ordered me to set out for Russia to visit his
forests there, and, my darling Paulina,—how can I bear the
thought !—it will be six months before I see you again.” Paulina
covered her face with her paws and wept bitterly; at last rousing
herself, she said, “‘Let us not, Marten, spend our last evening thus;
come, six months will soon pass, and then—’’ Here Paulina’s voice
dropped, and Marten threw his arms round her waist and kissed
away the tears. |

We know of every word that Marten said to Paulina, and of
Paulina’s every reply, for we had it all from a young hedgehog
whose curiosity led her to listen to their talk; but we think that
the hedgehog did wrong to listen, and so, perhaps, did we to listen










THE SIX KITTENS. 57

to the hedgehog, and so we will not tell their secrets; but this. we
may mention, that they wandered up and down the pathways of
the forest, now and then pouncing on a stray field-mouse or a
poor sleeping bird, until the moon shone brightly through the
trees. And we know that they parted at length by the sign-post
at the edge of the wood, when Paulina shed many tears, and
Marten, laying his paw upon his heart, vowed ever to be constant
to her, and in all his travels and all his adventures to remember
his sweet Pussy. To have seen how the poor kitten wept when
she went to bed that night, would have grieved a hard-hearted
terrier; and to have seen how melancholy she looked as she wan-

dered about for three weeks afterwards, would have drawn pity
from a ferocious bull-dog.

One morning, about seven months after the events we have
narrated, there was a great commotion in the house where the
kittens dwelt; the bells rang, the flags were hoisted, and little
cannon fired. In the papers of the next morning we read that
Ensign Squeaker of the Household Pigade carried off the beautiful
Miss Rose, and young Marten Sable of the Forest his fair prize
Miss Paulina, both on the same day.

May they all enjoy much felicity, and may the brides catch
plenty of mice ! |




SHUN Dhaai NVI) LRA LI



G GO

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THE FROGS WHO WOULD A-WOOI
THE

FROGS WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO,

Two frogs, who were cousins, were hopping about together one
warm summer’s evening by the side of a rivulet, when they began
talking—just as the men will talk—about a young lady-frog who
lived in a neighbouring marsh. One extolled the brightness of
her eyes, the other praised the beauty of her complexion, and
somehow the two frogs found out that they had both fallen in love
with the same young lady-froggy. When they had made this
discovery they parted rather abruptly, and muttered something,
the meaning of which was not very clear.

‘‘ Bless me,”’ said Mr. Croaker, the elder and richer of the two,
“T must not let that young scapegrace Jumper get the better of
me. A pretty joke indeed that he should think of the beautiful Miss
Leapfrog, he who is not worth a rap, and is as ugly as a toad.”

Who would have thought,” said Jumper to himself, “that
that old curmudgeon Croaker was going to make love to that dear
young Miss Leapfrog? We will soon see whom she likes best.”

The next morning Croaker dressed himself with unusual neat-
ness; and that he might appear to better advantage, he went to a
barber-frog who lived in a neighbouring arbour, and asked to be
shaved and to have his wig dressed. ‘The barber had just spread






60 THE FROGS WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.

his white cloth, had lathered his customer’s chin, and was flourish-
ing a razor in his face, when what should catch Croaker’s eye
through the open doorway but the figure of his cousin Jumper,
smartly dressed, with his cane under his arm, and a parasol over
his head, to keep the sun off his delicate complexion, walking
hastily along the path that led to Miss Leapfrog’s residence.

To jump from his chair was Croaker’s first impulse, and, sad
to say, it was his last; for he fell with his throat upon the edge
of the barber’s razor, and in two minutes breathed his last.

Deep was Miss Leapfrog’s grief, and great was Mr. Jumper’s
joy, when the news of this sad misfortune reached their ears. In
the first burst of her anguish the young lady accused the barber
of having murdered her dear Croaker; but Mr. Jumper hopped
about for joy, and vowed that the barber was the best frog
alive. And well he might be joyful, for as Croaker had died with-
out a will, Jumper inherited all his estates; and when, after a
week’s mourning, the young lady’s grief had somewhat subsided,
the happy Mr. Jumper carried off the beautiful Miss Leapfrog.

But alas, how uncertain is happiness either to man or frogs !
Two days afterwards, as Jumper was crossing a brook, a lily-white
duck, who had been concealed by the rushes, flew at him with open
beak and gobbled him up.

_ And the poor bride was left to mourn in silent solitude.






THE STORY

OF

REYNARD THE FOX.

ea”

Axsovt the feast of Whitsuntide, when the woods were in their
lustyhood and gallantry, when every tree was clothed in the green
and white livery of glorious leaves and sweet-smelling blossoms,
when the earth was covered with her fairest mantle of flowers, -
and the sweet birds entertained the groves with the delight of
their harmonious songs, the Lion, the Royal King of Beasts, made
solemn proclamation that all quadrupeds whatsoever should attend
his court, and celebrate this great festival.

Now when the king had assembled all his subjects together,
there was no one absent save Reynard the Fox, against whom
many grievous accusations were laid. First came Isegrim the
Wolf, with all his family and kindred, who, standing before the
King complained loudly how that Reynard had ill-treated his
wife and children. Then there came a little hound named Curtise,
who accused the Fox of having stolen his pudding in the extreme
cold winter-time, when he was nigh dying of starvation. But
scarcely had the hound finished his tale, when, with a fiery
countenance, in sprang Tibert the Cat, and accused Curtise of
having stolen this pudding from himself, and declared that Rey-
nard had righteously taken it away.




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REYNARD IN THE LIKENESS OF A HERMIT.






64, THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

Then rose the Panther: “ Do you imagine, Tibert,’’ quoth he,
“that Reynard ought not to be complained of? The whole world
knows that he is a murderer, a vagabond, and a thief.”’

Then quoth Grimbard the Badger, Reynard’s nephew: ‘It is
a common proverb, Walice never spake well: what can you say
against my kinsman the fox? All these complaints seem to me
to be either absurd or false. Mine uncle is a gentleman, and
cannot endure falsehood. I affirm that he liveth as a recluse;
he chastiseth his body, and weareth a shirt of hair-cloth. It is
above a year since he hath eaten any flesh; he hath forsaken
his castle Malepardus, and abandoned all his wealth; he lives
only upon alms and good men’s charities, doing infinite penance
for his sins; so that he has become pale and lean with praying
and fasting.”

While Grimbard was still speaking, there came down the hill
Chanticleer the Cock, and with him two hens, who brought with
them on a bier their dead sister Copple, who had just been
murdered by Reynard. Chanticleer smote piteously his feathers,
and, kneeling before the King, spake in this manner:

“ Most merciful and my great Lord the King, vouchsafe, I
beseech you, to hear our complaint, and redress the injuries which
Reynard the Fox has done to me and my children. Not longer
ago than last April, when the weather was fair, and I was in
the height of my pride and glory, because of my eight valiant
sons and seven fair daughters, who were strong and fat, and who
walked in safety in a yard well-fenced round, wherein also were
several large dogs for their protection, Reynard, that false and
dissembling traitor, came to me in the likeness of a hermit, and
brought me a letter to read, sealed with your Majesty’s seal,
in which I found written, that your Highness had made peace





















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SIR TIBERT DELIVERING THE KING'S MESSAGE.




THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX. 69

that the poor beast howled with pain. This noise quickly brought
out the carpenter, who, perceiving how matters stood, alarmed
the whole village, who came and belaboured the bear’s sides with
sticks and hoes and pitchforks, until, mad with rage, he tore his
bleeding face and paws from the tree, and rushed blindly into a
river that ran close by, knocking into the water with him many
of the villagers, and among them, Dame Julock, the parson’s
wife, for whose sake every one bestirred himself; and so poor
Bruin got safe away. After some delay, the bear returned to
the court, where, in dismal accents, he recounted the sad trick
that Reynard had played him. |

Then said the King, ‘“ Now, by my crown, I will take such
revenge as shall make that traitor tremble;’’ and sending for
his counsellors, they decided that Reynard should be again sum-
moned to court, and that Tibert the Cat should be the bearer
of the message. ‘It is your wisdom, Sir Tibert, I employ,” said
the great King, “and not your strength: many prevail with art,
when violence returns with lost labour.”

So Tibert made ready, and set out with the King’s letter to
Malepardus, where he found the fox standing before his castle-
gates; to whom Tibert said, “‘ Health to my fair cousin Reynard ;
the King, by me, summons you to the court, in which if you
fail, there is nothing more assured unto you than a cruel and a
sudden death.” |

The fox answered, “‘ Welcome, dear cousin Tibert; I obey your
command, and wish my Lord the King infinite days of happiness ;
only let me entreat you to rest with me to-night, and take such
cheer as my simple house affordeth, and to-morrow, as early as
you will, we will go towards the court, for I have no kinsman
I trust so dearly as yourself.”

K








70 THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

Tibert replied, “ You speak like a noble gentleman; and me-
thinks it is best now to go forward, for the moon shines as bright
as day.”

“Nay, dear cousin,” said the fox, “let us take the day before
us, SO may we encounter with our friends; the night is full of
danger.”

“Well,” said the cat, “if it be your pleasure, I am content;
what shall we eat ?”

Reynard. said, “‘ Truly my store is small; the best I have is a
_ honey-comb, pleasant and sweet; what think you of it P”’

T'o which Tibert replieth, “It is meat I little respect, and seldom
eat ; I had rather have one mouse than all the honey in Europe.”

‘“A mouse!” said Reynard; “ why, my dear cousin, here
dwelleth a priest hard by, who hath a barn by his house so full
of mice, that I think half the wagons in the parish are not able
to bear them.”

“Oh, dear Reynard,” quoth the cat, “do but lead me thither,
and make me your servant for ever.”

“Why,” said the fox, ‘‘ love you mice so exceedingly ?”

‘‘ Beyond expression,’’ quoth the cat.

Then away they went with all speed to the priest’s barn, which
was well walled about with a mud wall, where, but the night
before, the fox had broken in and stolen an exceeding fat hen,
at which the priest was so angry, that he had set a snare before
the hole to catch him at his next coming, which the false fox
knew of; and therefore said to the cat, “Sir Tibert, creep in at
this hole, and believe it, you shall not tarry a minute’s space but
you shall have more mice than you are able to devour ;- hark, you
may hear how they peep. When you have eaten your fill, come
again, and I will stay and await for you here at this hole, that —








‘THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX. 73

to-morrow we may go together to the court; but, good cousin,
stay not too long, for I know my wife will hourly expect us.”’

Then Tibert sprang quickly in at the hole, but was presently
caught fast by the neck in the snare, which as soon as the cat
felt, he quickly leaped back again; and the snare running close
together, he was half-strangled, so that he began to surugele and
cry out and exclaim most piteously.

Then the priest, hearing the outcry, alarmed all his servants,
crying out, ‘The Fox is taken!’ and away they all ran to where
poor Tibert was caught in the snare, and, without finding out their
mistake, they beat him most unmercifully, and cruelly wounded
one of his eyes. The cat, mad with pain, suddenly gnawed the
cord, and seizing the priest by the legs, bit him and tore him in
such a way that he fell down in a swoon, and then, as every one
ran to help his master, Tibert leaped out of the hole, and limped
as fast as his wounded legs would carry him to the court, where
the King was infinitely angry at the treatment he had received.

Then Grimbard the Badger, Reynard’s nephew, fearing it was
likely to go hard with his uncle, offered to go to Malepardus
and take the King’s message to his most subtle kinsman; to
which his Majesty graciously consented. So Grimbard set forth;
and when he came to Malepardus, he found Reynard with Dame
Ermelin his wife sporting with their children. When Grimbard
had delivered the King’s letter, Reynard found that it would be
better for him to shew himself at court at once; so bidding an
affectionate faréwell to his dear wife and children, he immediately
set out with the badger to go with him before the King. On his
way, Reynard, remembering the heavy crimes he had committed,
and fearing that his end was at hand, desired of the holy Grim-
bard, who had always led a hermit’s life, that he would hear






74, THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

him confess, and set him a penance for his sins. Grimbard bade
him proceed. And the fox confessed how shamefully he had ill-
used the bear, and the cat, and the wolf, and Chanticleer’s chil-
dren, and many other ill-doings during his life; and when he had

. finished, he knelt before Grimbard, and said, “ Thus have’ I told
you my wickedness ; now order my penance, as shall seem fit in
your discretion.”

Grimbard was both learned and wise; and therefore brake a
rod from a tree, and said, “ Uncle, you shall three times strike
your body with this rod, and then lay it down upon the ground,
and spring three times over it without bowing your ‘legs or
stumbling; then shall you take it up and kiss it gently, in sign
of meekness and obedience to your penance; which done, you
are absolved of your sins aa up to this day, for I pro-
nounce unto you clear remission.’

At this the fox was exceeding glad ; ii ‘iaanesiaiea he per-
formed the penance to Grimbard’s satisfaction. But as they went
journeying on, it happened that they passed by the poultry-yard
of a convent; and as one young cock strayed far from the rest,
Reynard leaped at him, and caught him by the feathers, but the
cock escaped.

“Villain that you are,” said Grimbard, “ will you, for a silly
pullet, fall again into your sins ?” |

To which Reynard answered, “ Pardon me, dear Acre I
had forgotten myself; but I will ask forgiveness, and mine eye

_ shall no more wander.”’

However, Grimbard noted that he turned many times to look
at the poultry. But soon afterwards they arrived at the court.

As soon as it was bruited in the court that Reynard the Fox
and Grimbard his kinsman were arrived there, every one, from






THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX. 15

the highest to the lowest, prepared himself to complain of the
fox; at which Reynard’s heart quaked, but his countenance kept
the old look, and he went as proudly as ever he was wont with his
nephew through the high street, and came as gallantly into the
court as if he had been the King’s son, and as clear from trespass
as the most innocent whosoever; and when he came before the
chair of state in which the King sat, he said, “‘ Heaven give your
Majesty glory and renown above all the princes of the earth.”

But the King cut him short at these words, and said: ‘‘ Peace,
traitorous Reynard; think you I can be caught with the music
of your words? no, it hath too oft deceived me; the peace which
I commanded and swore unto, that have you broken.”

Then Bellin the Ram, and Oleway his wife, and Bruin the
Bear, and Tibert the Cat, and Isegrim the Wolf, and Kyward the
Hare, and Bruel the Goose, and Baldwin the Ass, and Bortle the
Bull, and Hamel the Ox, and Chanticleer the Cock, and Partlett
the Hen, and many others, came forward; and all these with one
entire noise cried out against the fox, and so moved the King
with their complaints, that the fox was taken and arrested.

Upon this arrest, a parliament was called; and notwithstanding
that he answered every objection severally, and with great art,
Reynard was condemned, and judgment was given that he should
be hanged till his body was dead; at which sentence the fox cast
down his head, for all his jollity was lost, and no flattery nor no
words now prevailed.

Then Isegrim on the one side and Bruin on the other led the
poor fox to the gallows, Tibert running before with the halter.
And when they were come to the place of execution, the King
and the Queen, and all the rest of the nobility, took their places
to see the fox die.








76 THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

When all things were prepared, the fox said: “ Now my heart
is heavy, for death stands in all his horror before me, and I cannot -
escape. My dread Lord the King, and you my sovereign Lady the
Queen, and you my lords that stand to behold me die, I beseech
you grant me this charitable boon, that I may unlock my _eart
before you, and clear my soul of her burdens, so that hereafter no
man may be blamed for me; which done, my death will be easy.”

Every creature now took compassion on the fox, and said his
request was small, beseeching the King to grant it, which was
done; and then the fox thus spake: ‘‘ Help me, Heaven, for I see
no man here whom I have not offended; yet was this evil no
natural inclination in me, for in my youth I was accounted as
virtuous as any breathing. This know, I have played with the
lambs all the day long, and taken delight in their pretty bleating ;
yet at last in my play I bit one, and the taste of its blood was so
sweet unto me, that I approved the flesh, and both were so good,
that since I could never forbear it. This liquorish humour drew
me into the woods amongst the goats, where hearing the bleating
of the little kids, I slew one of them, and afterwards two more,
which slaughter made me so hardy, that then I fell to murder
hens, geese, and other poultry. And thus my crimes increased
by custom, and fury so possessed me, that all was fish which came
to my net. After this, in the winter season, I met with Isegrim,
where, as he lay hid under a hollow tree, he unfolded unto me
how he was my uncle, and laid the pedigree down so plain, that
from that day forth we became fellows and companions; which
knot of friendship I may ever curse, for then began the flood of
our thefts and slaughters. He stole the great things, I the small ;
he murdered nobles, I the mean subjects; and in all our actions
his share was still ever the greatest: when he got a ram or a calf,




‘THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX. 73

to-morrow we may go together to the court; but, good cousin,
stay not too long, for I know my wife will hourly expect us.”

Then Tibert sprang quickly in at the hole, but was presently
caught fast by the neck in the snare, which as soon as the cat
felt, he quickly leaped back again; and the snare running close
together, he was half-strangled, so that he began to struggle and
cry out and exclaim most piteously.

Then the priest, hearing the outery, alarmed all his servants,
crying out, “The Fox is taken!” and away they all ran to where
poor ‘Tibert was caught in the snare, and, without finding out their
mistake, they beat him most unmercifully, and cruelly wounded
one of his eyes. The cat, mad with pain, suddenly gnawed the
cord, and seizing the priest by the legs, bit him and tore him in
such a way that he fell down in a swoon, and then, as every one
ran to help his master, Tibert leaped out of the hole, and limped
as fast as his wounded legs would carry him to the court, where
the King was infinitely angry at the treatment he had received.

Then Grimbard the Badger, Reynard’s nephew, fearing it was
likely to go hard with his uncle, offered to go to Malepardus
and take the King’s message to his most subtle kinsman; to
which his Majesty graciously consented. So Grimbard set forth;
and when he came to Malepardus, he found Reynard with Dame
Ermelin his wife sporting with their children. When Grimbard
had delivered the King’s letter, Reynard found that it would be
better for him to shew himself at court at once; so bidding an
affectionate faréwell to his dear wife and children, he immediately
set out with the badger to go with him before the King. On his
way, Reynard, remembering the heavy crimes he had committed,
and fearing that his end was at hand, desired of the holy Grim-
bard, who had always led a hermit’s life, that he would hear




THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX. 93

told to his uncle all that had happened. Reynard received him
with great courtesy, and the next morning accompanied him back
to court, confessing on his way many heinous sins, and obtaining
absolution from the badger. The King received him with a severe
and ately countenance, and immediately asked him touching the
complaint of Laprell the Rabbit.
To which Reynard made answer: “ Indeed, sire, what Laprell
reeeived he most richly deserved. I gave him a cake when he was
hungry ; and when my little son Rossel wanted to share a bit, the
rabbit struck him on the mouth and made his teeth bleed; where-
upon my eldest son Reynardine forthwith leaped upon him, and
would have slain him had I not gone to the rescue.’ Then the
rabbit, fearmg Reynard, stole away out of court.
“ But,” quoth the King, “I must charge you with another
foul treason. When I had pardoned all your great transgressions,
and you had promised me to go a pilgrimage to the Holy Land;
when I had furnished you with mail, scrip, and all things fitting
that holy order; then, i the greatest despite, you sent me back
in the mail, by Bellin the Ram, the head of Kyward the Hare;
a thing so notoriously to my disgrace and dishonour, that no
treason can be fouler.”’
- Then spake Reynard to the King, and said, “ Alas, my sove-
reign Lord, what is that you have said? Is good Kyward the Hare
dead? Oh, where is then Bellin the Ram, or what did he bring
to your Majesty at his return? For it is certain I delivered him
three rich and inestimable jewels, I would not for the wealth of
- India they should be detained from you; the chief of them I de-
termined for you my Lord the King, and the other two for my
sovereign Lady the Queen.”

“But,” said the King, “I received nothing but the head of

N










94, THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

poor murdered Kyward, for which I executed the ram, he having
confessed the deed to be done by his advice and counsel.”

“Is this true ?” said the fox; “then wo is me that ever I was
born, for there are lost the goodliest jewels that ever were in the
possession of any prince living; would I had died when you were
thus defrauded, for I know it will be the death of my wife, nor
will she ever henceforth esteem me.”

Then Reynard told the King and Queen of the great value of
these inestimable jewels. One was a gold ring, another a comb
polished like unto fine silver, and the third was a glass mirror ;
and so great were the virtues of this rare glass that Reynard shed
tears to think of the loss of it. When the fox had told all this, he
thus concluded : “ If any one can charge me with crime and prove
it by witness, here I stand to endure the uttermost the law can
inflict upon me; but if malice only slander me without witness, I
crave the combat, according to the law and instance of the court.”

Then said the King, “‘ Reynard, you say well, nor know I any
thing more of Kyward’s death than the bringing of his head unto
me by Bellin the Ram; therefore of it I here acquit you.”

*¢ My dear Lord,” said be fox, ‘I humbly thank you; yet is
his death grievous unto me.’

But Isegrim the Wolf was not erator with this conclusion,
and defied the fox to mortal combat. This challenge the fox
accepted; and the next day was appointed for the meeting.

When all the ceremonies were done, and none but the com-
batants were in the lists, the wolf went toward the fox with in-
finite rage and fury, thinking to take him in his fore-feet ; but the
fox leaped nimbly from him, and the wolf pursued him, so that
there began a tedious chase between them, on which their friends
gazed. The wolf taking larger strides than the fox, often overtook












96 THE STORY OF REYNARD THE FOX.

before, they went all to the King, guarding the fox on every side,
all the trumpets, pipes, and minstrelsy sounding before him.

When Reynard came before the King he fell on his knees, but
the King bade him stand up, and said to him, “ Reynard, you
may well rejoice, for you have won much honour this day; there-
fore here I discharge you, and set you free to go whither your
own will leads you.” So the court broke up, and every beast
returned to his own home.

With Reynard, all his friends and kinsfolk, to the number of
forty, took their leave also of the King, and went away with the
fox, who was no little glad that he had sped so well, and stood so
far in the King’s favour; for now he had power enough to advance
whom he pleased, and pull down any that envied his fortune.

After some travel the fox and his friends came to his borough
or castle of Malepardus, where they all, in noble and courteous
manner, took leave of each other, and Reynard did to every one of
them great reverence, and thanked them for the love. and honour
he had received from them, protesting evermore to remain their
faithful servant, and to send them in all things wherein his life
or goods might be available unto them ; and so they shook hands
and departed. -

Then the fox went to Dame Ermelin his wife, who welcomed
him with great tenderness ; and to her and her children he related
at large all the wonders which had befallen him at court, and
missed no tittle or circumstance therein. ‘Then grew they proud
that his fortune was so excellent ; and the fox spent his days from
thenceforth, with his wife and children, in great joy and content.

RN SS Sn 2 en eR ee
ROBSON, LEVEY, AND FRANKLYN, GREAT NEW STREET,




ae
























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'2011-08-17T04:59:18-04:00'
describe
'109346' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVM' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
608b651b7809bb14e72663e4df0dcb11
59c19133f8e7340138b9bf9981f0c690074ed690
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVN' 'sip-files00004.pro'
df0aa257dc58b8861502f7adc93fee3f
2869e8633594350f67fca2ae35bd5e2981fe6497
describe
'39777' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVO' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
42b0a1cc600b02c6302155e3e71b8b32
d01467a20235cb651eda5032a427dfa04c9d7bc4
'2011-08-17T05:01:17-04:00'
describe
'13511456' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVP' 'sip-files00004.tif'
f4567652b9ded77fc44e4f724df32361
472b406db231d480826d2b4b28c1824790302c8b
'2011-08-17T05:00:13-04:00'
describe
'105' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVQ' 'sip-files00004.txt'
7058e0219039168aa5dab62f23270396
8efe351e021d7f4f495bced1c03d36e4a0488b03
'2011-08-17T05:00:40-04:00'
describe
'18956' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVR' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
f9d38e9842c7051f271e6abb24102306
cdd5dc5ade76fdff06608a3b784428e439f1ff10
'2011-08-17T05:00:29-04:00'
describe
'1707520' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVS' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
9761277707f241718822d26fbefafa08
85ab3a58ff66bbe77e084b4bf93abbb6f576253c
'2011-08-17T05:00:00-04:00'
describe
'342491' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVT' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
f7d1457b238fe7c41f4c368fd8741011
78d506e93f4ac533e58e9b0ff9503075725de391
'2011-08-17T04:59:23-04:00'
describe
'55279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVU' 'sip-files00005.pro'
77d8fd6ed965722598808a4401d81531
f668eefa649b8ad86a2bd5fc647082904b68ec55
'2011-08-17T05:00:55-04:00'
describe
'109798' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVV' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
d72e867eab01e584562c96b7391b6734
efe371ef40df5e612afe35dcb61cf9368fe46f6e
'2011-08-17T05:00:30-04:00'
describe
'13670904' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVW' 'sip-files00005.tif'
d8da163a27dcf78b9e48d67f17af941f
1e7a7a7e2524439dd7cb19d9da7b7c689c5ce2e4
'2011-08-17T05:01:23-04:00'
describe
'2321' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVX' 'sip-files00005.txt'
215cd2e87d740ff6d68b105da7aa117e
e18daf6cdc8402c11c3c662dfb187678e1cd32e1
'2011-08-17T04:59:26-04:00'
describe
'37004' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVY' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
6377b76facfce4c333c483671a3fd7d6
29e6764b37731e54268a23df88bb47a8bd251477
'2011-08-17T05:00:06-04:00'
describe
'1834410' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGVZ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
7b58268f255abb920039f6805d2bc552
98ef70e1e0453a993aeb2791f75e5c5b38662ed3
'2011-08-17T04:59:31-04:00'
describe
'238132' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWA' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
e8c266213385d2c9f212d2c02cf152fc
a2d96962824434f5991743415f17c48158e89fb4
'2011-08-17T05:00:07-04:00'
describe
'7297' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWB' 'sip-files00006.pro'
c570fb054f24d8775419007f65db3b3f
f092c145d17e395220707f4192089c2027c95996
'2011-08-17T05:01:52-04:00'
describe
'81657' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWC' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
80674aabd9e6e7246be324755976d7ba
c07bd9182d2d677979817e0e82e61418571db8e9
'2011-08-17T05:01:21-04:00'
describe
'14685620' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWD' 'sip-files00006.tif'
84d9ed02d83e520d5b054f7461219eca
1298c4e1f35d089ba3e2f3103651faa4eb91221c
'2011-08-17T05:00:53-04:00'
describe
'422' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWE' 'sip-files00006.txt'
3fd897424b6017b1172eb5100a330cc1
cad63f2c825344b252970ba373f63d1ec116c3b5
'2011-08-17T05:01:43-04:00'
describe
'30636' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWF' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
a6c8c953dc10fe89c0987d3a3036a376
77062a6312cada1ec3ddbd034c2a9d9db703498a
describe
'1850023' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWG' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
993e68d270a67fffba9398fb1ff720cb
c873fced6ef82b9375278ae1ab909fae6ea003c4
describe
'353076' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWH' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
c8c5e25d64f4c83dfd2091701e09d598
a539fce1d4dc382ff7a0c8618f66ce7fe1a08ddc
describe
'27798' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWI' 'sip-files00008.pro'
15e9f91d0100eacb99fb3cdcdffca9a9
eff609812c67db2d6b54d69aff1ccca7f2ef1ebc
'2011-08-17T05:00:20-04:00'
describe
'120394' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWJ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
1ca32d19350593bce75a508780e956bd
eab7006a6929f3315cb13a147df8d6c9383d5e24
'2011-08-17T05:02:11-04:00'
describe
'14812764' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWK' 'sip-files00008.tif'
005a5afe9f7d8cda4e1d08c18019f1ed
6d28a79b6522d7298c3395ff56c7c512490a76da
'2011-08-17T04:59:39-04:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWL' 'sip-files00008.txt'
453d4261fe06046d022247a2a30a6a38
5861c4ec6a3c01039b5aff582dce46e86bca4bd3
describe
'43201' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWM' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
6d991352d1c6d54dff5d6e4f9116bad6
e52c2f1daf9771152fbd5e8702f8ffbb0f1973e7
'2011-08-17T05:00:45-04:00'
describe
'1652294' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWN' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
b35dccb2bf5c2af91cbabdea3923b4be
fb6bbe3325f021089a6367a546112aabb3bd9729
'2011-08-17T05:01:49-04:00'
describe
'331470' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWO' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4d2969d3ecaad50c3c5d652ed82b9d7c
31370e55ace7be73adb12d1d21424068952c6edf
describe
'25736' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWP' 'sip-files00009.pro'
343a084ffc8209585bec6a6dc30d511e
af57b491e1977f4ba700f7fb42b54b94cfd4fc5d
'2011-08-17T04:59:35-04:00'
describe
'122149' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWQ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
0a8b02027e68be7a0a1fd2b777e80048
3b6d9cea1a3242725c15957f943838f21d534426
'2011-08-17T05:00:08-04:00'
describe
'13230424' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWR' 'sip-files00009.tif'
4912b648e159f3f672b482488d901b88
6b3a7aade6c711a1e76b93b70419190bc6ae9976
'2011-08-17T04:59:20-04:00'
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWS' 'sip-files00009.txt'
5c79c0687285c2ab2f3e0bcdf0bb1fec
639abb79cbad39c3069c6ceefe3ec8f9f8538743
'2011-08-17T04:59:27-04:00'
describe
'42332' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWT' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
2b248baf16fabe12d06c08304ef42918
ca93214c1ccfcb233712c68b2ec65cf8b60ee54e
'2011-08-17T05:01:41-04:00'
describe
'1353271' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWU' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
d86201c0dca42d6f98a33b15c3d571da
9a094c9d220b9b5aed22a67f41352ab324adcc71
'2011-08-17T05:01:37-04:00'
describe
'166750' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWV' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
a196c67af34b905e99355d64dc6306c7
beb8c97db1f76d53708e8b3a486ec1b4c97f42b9
'2011-08-17T05:00:02-04:00'
describe
'8503' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWW' 'sip-files00010.pro'
695e666b90fe43c01be3ca540de1ebaa
7a0a9efea90c084b682254c51e735d50cd3f47a5
'2011-08-17T05:01:55-04:00'
describe
'57425' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWX' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
f8fc98ef8e4e2ff00bd538f11123d54c
1bbb0610956ad42b46f6455524b405aa63d30500
'2011-08-17T04:59:14-04:00'
describe
'14448932' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWY' 'sip-files00010.tif'
c6ec08ff3535a9798e87f94fd9b46f7c
9106e4e39b8cd430675653683414d273a1d11651
'2011-08-17T05:01:20-04:00'
describe
'486' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGWZ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
211aa9f54e8fcac2dfbbe9d6e028c826
22eeba8b16627183bac37b91dc4d455e59d8a2c6
'2011-08-17T05:02:09-04:00'
describe
'23698' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXA' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
6d0eccee23e0d43f16109b70e5dd6aa9
ba1b7c358ad90baf4b423f5f1849eaddbfac64bc
describe
'1307272' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
20072cfa14b4ddc9c1c4dd35cd9042d2
277948b448fe3b9312c69be59e879f6e5fbdfef3
'2011-08-17T04:59:29-04:00'
describe
'225901' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
195cd8900d4c55057c7be90d8bef7a31
3dad60cc8a81f633ab38a5c76447f2d30959d269
'2011-08-17T05:00:09-04:00'
describe
'24926' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXD' 'sip-files00011.pro'
c5142cca0d2eb08fa4a09e9d877641c7
7d0137196e45d918feba58594bc3af068e08307d
'2011-08-17T05:00:36-04:00'
describe
'85181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXE' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
53cedf6711e6369fc6faefde9ea95e00
4a0f144ce31b82a93921d8b2ca51a5c39ee067bb
'2011-08-17T05:01:09-04:00'
describe
'13402608' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXF' 'sip-files00011.tif'
853f220f0645db3713a32a780a64d32e
9d74e8be878b0ac0849bd3bf94e27e571671cc26
'2011-08-17T05:01:06-04:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXG' 'sip-files00011.txt'
843bd905995e883de066f8cbbc8db883
8ecca348004d7a2f7c2b70a4983eb995d7f58a70
'2011-08-17T05:01:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'33027' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXH' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
56b4bf4686fe84da2dea81233581b3f7
37b147141ee72ddb91a6fc106095d41139f96a6c
describe
'1741491' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXI' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
06055c7be8f18ff440d83fa38fccf921
ee708b2d8ee3c6c6a2fd0260fda22d4534101a8d
'2011-08-17T05:00:54-04:00'
describe
'206507' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXJ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
6c8e414ecb1f7c4a12c1f59bb614f837
b1b159880fea413da69300d1e0a7216eb28a6469
'2011-08-17T05:01:58-04:00'
describe
'294' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXK' 'sip-files00012.pro'
df248e122a0180242f7f7ee6ceb239a9
3671d809b440d5f76f0f5b7ffc12120dbb16053c
'2011-08-17T05:02:01-04:00'
describe
'62618' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXL' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
236cf95254b954c873357ac20651862c
bd9980763a16ae03d86bdd415b4d92c4ad38278c
'2011-08-17T05:00:03-04:00'
describe
'13939840' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXM' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a58f3218b8ee1c2b4772e6971070c9dc
83c06f2a8c17f67fc8bb656dd18fadc035b00e8c
'2011-08-17T05:00:41-04:00'
describe
'118' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXN' 'sip-files00012.txt'
991a8f6e079eaebe8a2b3db31253d49b
9be7b6cccdb4714f8b30005bb9ecbe3919f100a8
describe
'22196' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXO' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
d1c2bf229a9b8d028262fd9586cc3ed6
cf00e62f4d1cc9518f5c77d6ca756a4c261908e4
'2011-08-17T05:00:50-04:00'
describe
'1847456' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXP' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
425349e528b7973cbb46ae638ad3bb44
cd09bc5a3624d6476536e8e06642082850bb713b
describe
'468024' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXQ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ed8518d8ac2b78103afdc6382b4d21f6
3f0c5c68a0bcf908ad8c2e798d48876fe95287ae
describe
'39909' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXR' 'sip-files00015.pro'
184d41627880ac07f24aa23d08da145c
6e937661ac0f1242a3b0db5a0183e99fc3cdbd53
describe
'159254' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXS' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d6b23fe2c27f2097388388f909550405
ddd95f9d65770efdd5eccc69ae54dd1659389490
describe
'14793488' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXT' 'sip-files00015.tif'
2c53a0beec6a9e93c477ee8d09803c68
7272991474ea9b4d94f77053410b6526b39354a3
'2011-08-17T04:59:50-04:00'
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXU' 'sip-files00015.txt'
9fb3d70a9bb39b6197ae5bff0990367d
abf1949881e2f0d6d39e98ffea3f120fcf0dd232
'2011-08-17T05:02:05-04:00'
describe
'51969' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4f7c35d1b743c6cd781baa0d9aea27f2
c8674ee2f4a5301a0c6526c0d01722d224f3a169
'2011-08-17T05:01:44-04:00'
describe
'1809329' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXW' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
8de853bf32adda017d0cb09de5ca51db
2f91885c184e2a3559a13098d1f8addf5abf3416
'2011-08-17T05:00:05-04:00'
describe
'443316' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXX' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
c6433e0b387611ca0daf5b83c7bbd2b0
0560aca2220c313aeb38f02fd9aa2bf015f2079a
'2011-08-17T05:00:16-04:00'
describe
'37041' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXY' 'sip-files00018.pro'
094fad04c292520ee650eed4a5331f31
2da86c47b62cc5b06c91008c86b852a5a50182df
'2011-08-17T05:01:32-04:00'
describe
'155556' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGXZ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
94afd3986672335e97ffef0a23679214
113c8bb7fb3f6beef02b02070ce5d3f841b94a06
'2011-08-17T05:00:56-04:00'
describe
'14488072' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYA' 'sip-files00018.tif'
0adbbc6dbb1bcf39161dfa54e849c31a
b9c476d93bba0df1fcb435669c3ce494e9ed38fd
'2011-08-17T05:01:42-04:00'
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYB' 'sip-files00018.txt'
2ca1f1cb4856687646250d8bee94871b
335cfa2726ea75a8c0664b09fbeae97ad7462248
describe
'49868' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYC' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
b9a9ca70670686a8ed2b241919776576
8c09723e5de1985098ad28069b1b3e23cae24452
'2011-08-17T04:59:09-04:00'
describe
'1788759' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYD' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
621938b10aba45fb124db12f236f5044
6ecb2b8eb96e1b434fa0dea5b304de3638d45aee
'2011-08-17T04:59:54-04:00'
describe
'298769' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYE' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
3da06d045f36614f60275980e2166e49
577bfa34176eae8f111241785bb2065ddfd94008
describe
'14200' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYF' 'sip-files00019.pro'
c071174537f92dd71c968bd58986dbee
1791c8edda967520de37c4a464fc59d4acf99a59
'2011-08-17T05:00:12-04:00'
describe
'96611' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYG' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f84c5abb6d6401ceb88eaf933f66b5dd
9c47585c71b1d68bb8b267d1bd17d7e24ae8b618
'2011-08-17T04:59:24-04:00'
describe
'14320348' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYH' 'sip-files00019.tif'
a4d1bd70ac6e8fd875542e9b6d821522
e049c40ab5950e2c63cf49bd02168e4e276d6d07
'2011-08-17T05:00:46-04:00'
describe
'573' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYI' 'sip-files00019.txt'
b17ddc5a7d07e7fbcd9a047cf47ba83f
6af79f60bec20d82b0f5dedeb32c8910f0c010b6
'2011-08-17T05:02:07-04:00'
describe
'33143' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYJ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
4ca4c356b8586c4f7a732dce79c7333d
2fb524f35fd270ca8a32a73b68844f504a7428bb
'2011-08-17T05:01:12-04:00'
describe
'1652801' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYK' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
e63bfb3af1d463e207fc86e4fbfbf657
db749524a71e17d2cbfbaed7e730981218c87c1a
'2011-08-17T05:01:57-04:00'
describe
'292065' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYL' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
802d1e575be6c83628e544e1389d0d18
d167bb6e0a021d7eea2fcf1532ff1cce00bbef02
'2011-08-17T05:00:43-04:00'
describe
'23395' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYM' 'sip-files00022.pro'
967532a63ca0f02f1318ab01bc5010e0
e19b968d0605c58b0bb190f6d5976b210a4a8c47
describe
'108196' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYN' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
f546fa4c6c49961a0f05ee34e4c7b944
01d0c1e8956589dfa00bc4bca1dd7cbafd565907
describe
'13234224' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYO' 'sip-files00022.tif'
cc10b32bda9efd4814d3c4c58832e87b
b4396d925d24977ac15ec08e8c5dcf1f2b67277e
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYP' 'sip-files00022.txt'
80a8351631a65c48c891588a9e445e1e
ae4527c0b18cb38d295582cd013d70b0a63e2fbb
describe
'38856' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYQ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
f3caf0e350118ac921dd91644760543b
cec7af3fb78d52fe146da9d27dc13c06de35a0c4
describe
'1815880' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYR' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
17300b9f561d6f9a949bc8bd6bd0a2f4
25d87e44d3984b98934a45b0eb6fcb66e936d063
'2011-08-17T05:01:03-04:00'
describe
'412246' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYS' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
7ebf420bea4420c676451b29d1811caa
e5ab7f04263f6bf66ce447fd81cde9ec990ece13
'2011-08-17T04:59:45-04:00'
describe
'33296' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYT' 'sip-files00023.pro'
1632a294c16c85eff8fba41851e4094b
fac222de74cff3847c08eb19c7b28ac04347376c
describe
'142250' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYU' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
36e1cf2cfecd467213195996a2f2afe4
b81be00ff3216d1312bfe416ce9ee703effc3b82
'2011-08-17T04:59:42-04:00'
describe
'14541024' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYV' 'sip-files00023.tif'
6a7c65237a531c55f53dfd1f5e3144ea
45066faf7c50a28c383532de0f62ec9f067837f6
'2011-08-17T05:01:31-04:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYW' 'sip-files00023.txt'
6cc0ef747fc5fd1c45cee8cc1c32029b
b7a3e6d2178860196a09693f3fdab2306497b097
'2011-08-17T05:00:42-04:00'
describe
'47845' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYX' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
875f0e5c1e92b224834d61f99e6f4f7c
6b0e01d15c15f31dbb6a3a478cf53477cfe047ad
describe
'1832979' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYY' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
09dcdec965503d1cc85946a2f522fe0b
7989a4dc82358f162c67d8cec4567db61dc88d0e
'2011-08-17T05:00:58-04:00'
describe
'327712' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGYZ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
5a8b0195daf918446949d28540f0eb20
1b127cd2401e759b1d74833eba3631adff834b44
'2011-08-17T04:59:30-04:00'
describe
'29846' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZA' 'sip-files00026.pro'
e47f8c03231064af8927444bd20b62c6
ddd778caa00607df00c8597aacc9fde80e7180c3
'2011-08-17T05:00:57-04:00'
describe
'121369' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZB' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
8c68939c6d0c37878f7a2e2609aa404b
21c80c97f06de382a0c053a95734948fb9ae508b
describe
'14677252' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZC' 'sip-files00026.tif'
61a20e417dad8d34528ce221f96ed11d
d798043075a5bd1ce6365f854402cffd45508ac2
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZD' 'sip-files00026.txt'
c72b8b353f9fd43a974b8376f0c7f1bf
d95c71e137a5ab6745d5b7af88e1d3e5ba4f78d1
describe
'43266' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZE' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
ba311113c87f7b9ef5fc7f4b1dc7ed69
b33e130188377b72dc00de7b71c19c839826a4af
describe
'1896539' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZF' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
f0738e369d822e8d21202976664c7dd5
a3b91c6b46fe577c849b382f6b7359cfad263fc6
describe
'367298' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
2d3db52d1b30b90a518657f2bd0edd0b
9b21bc278c1bbbb4d3c19820a5c6f63323b4a95e
'2011-08-17T05:00:24-04:00'
describe
'17145' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZH' 'sip-files00027.pro'
0f81271065ab81639c1ed19b8c67be0e
17436700e2d663a116c6c3fc6e0c327e3afeeacf
'2011-08-17T05:01:35-04:00'
describe
'115513' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZI' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
77722357c8ac017cf54aa911115b3ed1
e27f7a448720c0a9969c9393621704f307d292a4
'2011-08-17T04:59:59-04:00'
describe
'15183844' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZJ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
1459a7b04845489bc967770a420cee47
c79a2f63f23ad7d94a454e007bba808266ca3b40
'2011-08-17T04:59:37-04:00'
describe
'681' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZK' 'sip-files00027.txt'
70ad532c35d2b80532434556b33fa672
66797959b042a4545538177b551cd487a5d335bf
'2011-08-17T05:01:13-04:00'
describe
'38855' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZL' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
cbcef3fb8c69f5ab9b042050aadbe6e8
301cd82fcd574b2b0d3899e6e41ef8ded9159547
describe
'1930073' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
612dcfdb0f868271bc33e0d29e66d2db
43a2e01bf58e4849e6aac7c84c7bea05a1679155
describe
'452784' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZN' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
9cee72f0b3eb7d67b5295c8c9445b269
db5d214de43e5398f8e45d36664404aef004c97b
'2011-08-17T04:59:44-04:00'
describe
'34742' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZO' 'sip-files00031.pro'
0c6c77f0444e8a99948bfcbf8303dc11
24c6a94f9dbde0487d8e5b017f5f0e7710e9a807
'2011-08-17T05:02:02-04:00'
describe
'147895' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZP' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
bf85a29a4bbbea4313b427de987949fc
8a3a67961fe52543ddad730a067694bf604ef6dd
'2011-08-17T05:02:04-04:00'
describe
'15453192' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZQ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
804d0155173dc58d81ae6bcc60a31290
f7b54ed14369759f2eb8b319c4ce635d708be594
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZR' 'sip-files00031.txt'
9212cca8dddb1c7bb989f1ed7c79f1df
1271756e3494127ba8d3e37ff58219c075e14a03
describe
'48908' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZS' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
ed97554e4202f0bacf9f7706ecefaa75
1a15e5d2dcbcd0df71206b2293f7d80e495b3851
describe
'1843985' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZT' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
4d319607f8ce03dc9e2ed2e3b1bbb8b2
a1ec511bfaa46c1a60e00d27991305de018ea40d
'2011-08-17T05:01:56-04:00'
describe
'381270' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZU' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
751c5ae9489ee518441ea527e57ca28c
a78eb3bc1d0a51ae3dfca848b5a5fe975fd1e371
'2011-08-17T05:01:15-04:00'
describe
'36188' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZV' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e4bad3d65f9ca1566f0b7c6d66456a52
2dc307e767521b0a8c865b391e0b4a2fbc5ecc67
describe
'141804' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZW' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
7adf4026d283709e2c04f277abe5ec08
b70e939c9d4f3b1deb701514ef474a1a50e4352f
describe
'14764860' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
fb0c21a13c47ecb4edaf9a15fb6872b2
c61ef37c1bda9e3c75c4592cafe56ac7d766c964
'2011-08-17T05:01:24-04:00'
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZY' 'sip-files00034.txt'
2ac7f5f252c07c94da83b01cf306bf80
b1303d543447dd98c6266a45807243ed4fc1bf1e
'2011-08-17T05:01:33-04:00'
describe
'48635' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAGZZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
e9ab0cb769b1bda63d6ebc70a3574c0e
a79fd77b32548a0b2ba5bc26dc6c8ebb99090c6f
describe
'1794736' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
e3961a67c5235e11e378520db97b82e8
8ad1b35724ac3effa18e0c22867ab06f5299825f
describe
'394211' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
2ba6167007e28b23dcf8576336363c56
96fff940e29f9d489da646fc43cf2f58bceb0966
describe
'34436' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
6a7c1276618181ae5418d6fae48588c3
3063ac93218d6427febff30b4b9b6cb2cd8ffbd5
describe
'139480' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAD' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
5c71bbaf9e5bf9f0e984d8ef0acb48aa
c6b20fa1500b958806a2fcc9103d80712a1f5b5c
'2011-08-17T04:59:41-04:00'
describe
'14370632' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAE' 'sip-files00035.tif'
b77583243081e369f025be24b01edf68
82c0e8eab0bf9adcb425033b0f0d5bd1e97e3f47
'2011-08-17T04:59:57-04:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAF' 'sip-files00035.txt'
2f986635ab0595d8e06e47dea4cb5b89
6d866eb9f4c8c775874bf9624e7bef606b352109
'2011-08-17T05:00:14-04:00'
describe
'48309' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAG' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
860ceb6cac330a8743cd672d6a818219
da3e07185f648746cb95541ab86efecd77c5fb6d
describe
'1843553' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAH' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
05039acf028a6baf407adf2cf364997a
e12d3ca991bd8b449b89492c25dfd06b6a6423e4
'2011-08-17T05:00:27-04:00'
describe
'393616' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAI' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
38289af2d43172e344148f8014040efe
d140c3e01c90899889f2e0d8e201458a86d95b25
'2011-08-17T05:00:35-04:00'
describe
'33411' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAJ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
af39420702f98c027d2061e81a52470a
4d8072e3e86eae2307d9c82462cbfb12522de9e3
'2011-08-17T05:00:48-04:00'
describe
'137840' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAK' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
9abdcfbdb289bd6d51a2030380914e9e
2f923f1924fcb7276df028fd648bba82dbc16f32
describe
'14761060' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAL' 'sip-files00038.tif'
86cf7ad67eefe6a92d0c20d8b3b210a2
9d0ca97353797d8d12d86b6c6f0a2f605dd77250
'2011-08-17T05:00:38-04:00'
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAM' 'sip-files00038.txt'
c22b6dbdb1edb089578489ca20f129a6
54b29e45967dd53ba9565091b9133df1c94387f9
describe
'46643' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAN' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
e1da21260d9678200476c09e13f9a531
68e5422edd1898d776535115576cd58a0bc58dae
describe
'1746089' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAO' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
837b978e6a5b21995e24f946a2f08026
4c78779de290d8f6243be45ff7c2472d54293352
describe
'362706' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAP' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
09be1227284534c3155d3c8d9fd983bf
df42f97af7ae9dba9be30976fd97e8487c75782a
'2011-08-17T05:02:00-04:00'
describe
'27007' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAQ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
49e06879e4055dff8256385225d34c49
961b18ec178607bbe1f9a618d650617d3ac9997f
describe
'126733' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAR' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
ca239466c4b20c2ceb532f9d1a8da45b
8dd9a9a2f00367f5952a25eb524dcf5f6cf322dc
describe
'13981380' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAS' 'sip-files00039.tif'
25745cfbdcbba820e66b5822a1058936
776abc9babaf0cc8e7f588861050b86390705a11
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAT' 'sip-files00039.txt'
26adca47db1d3002d60dbf001b23a48b
55896d77fe5f8bc1ddbb0f039adebba0828e6283
describe
'43121' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAU' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
2c755667c4c927628b1eda761686e03f
d2589bd75b3b4ad7065acc83440e56b3dba76276
describe
'1810568' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAV' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
40625583a9b6a1eb0a0b3d7d204e5e26
4371442904b183bae3eadf20f01964ee3fd414c9
'2011-08-17T05:02:06-04:00'
describe
'290089' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAW' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
58c330567f2878d85e9a5a8541d6607a
e4d9788e9da986f3c35049d6c6e985890e7eae0e
describe
'21350' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAX' 'sip-files00041.pro'
0e5249381fe8d6e2604e64bec5894f32
ead5f940f84429f8dc86724f8670e70ec12d7e7c
describe
'104437' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAY' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1c24520dccda5255e6484ea63a41649d
511492a6df9f7af91512db8b0a32440b0bb79a94
'2011-08-17T05:01:11-04:00'
describe
'14496508' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHAZ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
313324cefe4f000df8557fa1e2a5eb8c
5641b560139f843aff437b4bad1b54f79ba35936
'2011-08-17T04:59:38-04:00'
describe
'851' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBA' 'sip-files00041.txt'
3b63e15d9197ae59e1ab672688669435
3c791905dd847e849c8b49fd3420a5df21feb29d
'2011-08-17T05:01:53-04:00'
describe
'37382' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBB' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
98c866d4cf1e169b124b947f9752b342
d1d518c5decc4f3fb0744b95ee69849ccd5c4995
describe
'1878351' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBC' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
addf561db61d4af411f75df2dd92284f
9ed008b3162db0cb914bbc4355c4c254b4453690
'2011-08-17T05:00:52-04:00'
describe
'444553' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBD' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
1f48666cad2e9aa3b0ee36da85a3efa5
48d8c0290475cb0ce070a53feae4af99d93750ec
describe
'42647' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBE' 'sip-files00044.pro'
69bcbb972e42333085134806e699b582
0a2a945e89f2f3d84f5bd4e604f203048aea0c3c
describe
'150655' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBF' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
b96fd0005ef563264b188d042a245e83
3aaa72742cccf1a644bfa02cfc617899f24616fe
describe
'15039652' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBG' 'sip-files00044.tif'
6e19c7fd70e123afa272676f7a24e59c
46950c629018f0c759989123c03989d4e6de3477
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBH' 'sip-files00044.txt'
1a34cae3304f53a866e4b4e4fa3708b0
4a045c71308809d12e8c936a57cde997307512cb
'2011-08-17T04:59:46-04:00'
describe
'48741' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBI' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
3db157a0ddaec0e39c5f485a4aecefdd
3f32da85ec6a242ec5214f1220586a544a9b628f
describe
'1892367' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBJ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
4a1209f9d7208f8f2e705585d5ebab99
4bd42cf8c18ceb3620cf241e2a24adc22ab52f72
'2011-08-17T05:01:16-04:00'
describe
'470113' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBK' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
63353d0f98e612f03d06f1ec7d1e0585
7d7b2bfff0fdb7eaa3ef4f65aada5db39037c760
'2011-08-17T05:00:34-04:00'
describe
'46950' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBL' 'sip-files00045.pro'
2c1536f0c8505d66f5c5e61886a38a04
e0d0bddfdd0ee45be782485c891db047e30739fb
describe
'161525' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBM' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
222c235e3e236d4373688eb7519a65c3
2580e513d6bfb9582d02569159a89902a431bb22
describe
'15152340' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBN' 'sip-files00045.tif'
22fd5fdaca0240adda05c2dce041e839
67378ed1329519ba6b5e5f5296cb4bedc2e3e636
'2011-08-17T05:01:08-04:00'
describe
'1860' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBO' 'sip-files00045.txt'
a6b8773794c12e39a6ec4c57698f71d2
f3cc80e0113544c09e4a8222bdab20e1b5808d5e
describe
'53391' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBP' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
54566930980029a21ebfb25e141dd00f
4530c4d75b39fa6c6e774f761ba16d69a61e33ce
describe
'1868823' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBQ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
dbddc0a344fc9f19da66330efeb5e500
d15cd8a56c2491b754d4394466b00bdee04d5af5
'2011-08-17T04:59:25-04:00'
describe
'374138' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
11b0efc21356fb010bdab22e037ef138
b6af7be5a4d58de9cd443dc49914280fdc7a46bf
describe
'36862' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
710035f550872b6712ef3eb64f60b41d
1b58f0f50cbaa504ea2875581b02e2bf1c92f871
describe
'134074' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBT' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
bb304dbaa33a3a10595997cdd787091f
8022b1b08ddc0026b3f8748274f38ef2c41188ca
describe
'14962544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBU' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ec8606fec54b43b412f3a2c89526b26e
fa398376783b90def3b40feccc455cef72064711
'2011-08-17T04:59:16-04:00'
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
23b5019cbb06f4ba535c1fcaf4a0c4b2
3332209ebcb22248c140d5d5477c996b913c8ce3
'2011-08-17T05:01:39-04:00'
describe
'43892' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBW' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
76e8c6aa04b9d6bafb8c0e9aec491122
aaa94793824ef101cb716a79829c8bb171070c39
'2011-08-17T05:00:28-04:00'
describe
'1806694' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
44050f4f945236a1917dcee4c59ce5dd
c8547599a4b62621048ba2aa4eff05b9199027fd
'2011-08-17T04:59:32-04:00'
describe
'493839' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBY' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
a3066d52d2dccd5939796f0cb5e64bd0
c0992abf3e8c68ef0a0af8645b5d521c301c0c55
'2011-08-17T05:01:27-04:00'
describe
'46768' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHBZ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
6337bce0d87ace3829a0370def6c504b
723235a43661c1f0fbcb1837e6af737990f86fa3
'2011-08-17T05:01:45-04:00'
describe
'170085' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCA' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
301ef2fff6c5b7cfea14ea96b4276e60
8a3b5ba177d7d21ceceba2a8ca22912fe68b92b1
'2011-08-17T04:59:49-04:00'
describe
'14467384' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
694c6b50bd1ca27c841284770de5acd6
62961c932f9780cccc2f13eb886df63df2950620
describe
'1841' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
c40c402b4435a52972c3f78eda751d7c
658833d627892082bf3d5205e796438f152a7651
describe
'54247' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCD' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
0182fef41b41271b1ef8ee807c2ee3cf
7f3e73f0af0a252272f2a563e8656b0a975e72b9
'2011-08-17T05:02:03-04:00'
describe
'1506790' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCE' 'sip-files0005.jp2'
e03be25e0c4905b43372d030a006ad6d
5829dcc42c1df30e67e910d2906788d47abb8ff1
describe
'182280' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCF' 'sip-files0005.jpg'
00238f371e418fe3e92fe9e6cf78ba7e
2c003a91e6605a44e1e9eb3781c23128c50d03c1
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCG' 'sip-files0005.pro'
b6c5ecdd9f12573877316f52f8bc9db3
fa171c0d280f7d5fa7550f21fe938161a39883ec
describe
'58169' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCH' 'sip-files0005.QC.jpg'
100ef430b4b145b2999eeada5082de24
d8c27f6ae495fb4471e024eb1db910ca957f2eb7
describe
'17900377' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCI' 'sip-files0005.tif'
07111fcfe40528f1a9a042d491b1d9e8
34d573970ce0d072b1dd7d01d33fa77796805dda
describe
'1832025' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCJ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
95feb36f1f0a7c88513f99ded34f33ec
af81121258e0765021947cdc7c30872b1167fa6f
'2011-08-17T05:00:44-04:00'
describe
'467914' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCK' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
43510d1153421f1ed9c7470de4d2922d
f9b70fce72450d2d194680e959e75f6dc8ff48bc
describe
'48683' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCL' 'sip-files00052.pro'
ecf988d8a0489d6372eb389853b6428d
6740cae4fae551466a408c8e770702215cbc337e
describe
'157241' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCM' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
992082328a3e02ab7fff6ff6ff9db87f
84642c1d049171eff5fca98b29de857b4b1f1bd2
'2011-08-17T05:01:02-04:00'
describe
'14669892' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCN' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e5ad5ea3449c61cbe8c9c34629ece276
9d75435fff8b744968bdecd20edba040f97e61d5
'2011-08-17T04:59:58-04:00'
describe
'1919' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCO' 'sip-files00052.txt'
d5922cf6b15f3238f38def90e1320ed2
715a3407467b532250ad571f14deb33f5853abdf
'2011-08-17T04:59:51-04:00'
describe
'50287' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCP' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
e48f082c50696af58aa7c881997dbbb7
87426eef40b349eb64908cbaab67bcbb8c3ca01b
describe
'1824709' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCQ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
f2b71c575b1191f464cf08783ebccff6
458a70427f39989f1f63fea44f92db125b6564ab
describe
'471052' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCR' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
a2f55b07a77aa129561458ce06ba7cb1
2ed99c01f9eb7949094dacd679839e0bcd21bcf9
'2011-08-17T05:01:19-04:00'
describe
'45826' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCS' 'sip-files00053.pro'
203c8f6b9c263bfe58f9744e412ae305
3bfb14458af4a35d27b861fd65fff46dc764da40
'2011-08-17T04:59:13-04:00'
describe
'161128' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCT' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
b3a19d142084db2dc637089fb92688a6
bdb53a7b51d59fe00649c3e769cc8b500b1331b5
describe
'14611076' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCU' 'sip-files00053.tif'
78d593777fe890c3107ad9df04936c40
5e05b445fb63f9edcb649660ba3e5fe946505731
'2011-08-17T05:01:59-04:00'
describe
'1822' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCV' 'sip-files00053.txt'
fa58ddeea8722198740e82bfe39fdbb9
44dbd04709431d0f0990f64ead2bb4a4278b4f56
'2011-08-17T05:01:25-04:00'
describe
'51103' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCW' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
fd36c7f0930751b1094e2dd56c9bbf85
7571ea2a6aa04aee4b8c435e3a4af7c51e69405c
'2011-08-17T05:01:46-04:00'
describe
'1739120' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
5b8cd36a64d7e2e72dcde211cf6f95ad
751778c8d125a329d725fb13b399f2399a1a7470
describe
'395895' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
d5ea411ce2d7bc7fa28eb0987aa98f7c
5f925939a501a685956b14041aec380321b79f6b
describe
'33669' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHCZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
d73c62dcffc96b23dcddb379ee478d9f
d2af899c5e5932eabed6f616c6d3a817f91fcce3
describe
'134997' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
258c039299ca8d72fefd06d820954784
d921bd2bfa671d0800941b6f0393492fec90794d
'2011-08-17T05:00:39-04:00'
describe
'13925124' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
3060727f63e2c6913d88bda5caae36fa
20f89577dc31248316cc24f9d00dc32c99ecf9ff
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDC' 'sip-files00056.txt'
a4357f456cbc87e5a0a633f783498ed8
6bd2baad10df887c0e173427b52fe89b13bfcbdf
describe
'43987' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDD' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
80905c27547577283de294fec537ffdd
351cb65cb14557df5f83d0deddacecc381aa3a15
describe
'1877779' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDE' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
0cf04ec99d17c1d78160bdc98dc89c1a
3616526f0f403cfade0df54601bbae8ee560cdde
describe
'447760' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDF' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
207c375674846da3a6c6a35078fbfa79
5250706d55054b053f0ebd2e223dcbca9839ac75
describe
'33194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDG' 'sip-files00058.pro'
c09b0868318d932bdd0ff494496b12d5
03b2704b331edc92f69acb35f7ecd00034ee5efd
describe
'146582' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDH' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
5674b2c9577915ec4f03a422a7051a27
053fd28b3f1f768b81a4087a13e2aa5ebbb0dc4a
describe
'15035084' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDI' 'sip-files00058.tif'
a1b9182f96932422a4109ece1898566d
8a0891ef48ed4db0f4af73f95406b507f70eaf60
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDJ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
ec90547f0d789d7a5299dd635c979ec9
985d94bd25321c700f2e975b5a46f125fa6f51be
describe
'47865' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDK' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
35c284a81385ecfdd97764eb9f793851
c7d5d7511596a48185dd442a3da1205c580425f6
describe
'1869706' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDL' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
203e72e2c58e1d8fcf883367fac69620
63fa299465a195dab4b1f691372555ff87a45e81
describe
'444943' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
0f6840668cb78c2b5c4bf7c6cd860f7f
20143124a40379a7500ff86d7a29cb5038217246
'2011-08-17T05:01:30-04:00'
describe
'37825' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDN' 'sip-files00059.pro'
3aadab6968729b7729b4cd1e19787e70
b21d0c09c1a51d90d97e1af8493842f571be13d6
describe
'147676' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDO' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
5c57215b326756918b208e05c97fb96d
4470192375537156d7051c75064ed65468b7e700
describe
'14970704' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDP' 'sip-files00059.tif'
68410c29e78c3ac7319a8b27c527d7b0
7564eeea7cddfc8031f72deb339a1635e8796341
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDQ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
1248221905ae1eb1a3ea8efcaa1cbdbe
2d015f341962144acaaad50f84823649797fc62b
describe
'49350' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDR' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
e5c56d621c565806c129ebcb698dee9d
697dd651ce2be730feddcc5a84ff30f685227fa2
describe
'24541' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDS' 'sip-files0005thm.jpg'
1577340f4d5876bfca3daee134833d6e
4053f738b7a4fb65b10e2515e81bf6ae8a6cc45c
describe
'1776342' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDT' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
50421a2ae53b919df89d6246c3003636
b4ca18d29385a253a6e273cb1a14f4247d9474b7
describe
'390061' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDU' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
a86383fb251fe64ce81f422b0356df5e
d20d43421a5529984654442eab4b24c8a5965ab0
describe
'32554' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDV' 'sip-files00060.pro'
f9f8d95fb611204649176af8d268aa93
6229b804ddc310fd172d4088115a5c2473d579f7
describe
'131078' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDW' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
8262e8c45ecd02dbf7a05d970d0607d6
54eb3c2c3545039d1d1bbe810a5ecdd95fda93bf
'2011-08-17T04:59:21-04:00'
describe
'14222708' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDX' 'sip-files00060.tif'
8f22eca5d0acca730fcfe757b92c1fc3
087639edecfc56020e2fd3a566c110451a4bf357
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDY' 'sip-files00060.txt'
bee55aabeada75a32a8e1d63e36cf688
15afa90c5af8a59ac956dc92212f556cf4e9340c
describe
'43713' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHDZ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
cfab634022f5fb70f2e29a6861dd6dc8
26ff7d30440bad681f4fe45d3768bbc081670fd5
describe
'1842413' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEA' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
8f604115b9014165d4810d99c43e3827
ea5b758bae38dcf3b2db439ec764a204538686cc
describe
'506612' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEB' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
5d29869c073692ddc89eb7241c0daa97
df1f72dcc9d63f75695316beb554e2099ea27ae4
describe
'47708' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEC' 'sip-files00061.pro'
33caef0e8615edc2b59b2280d59feedb
b4a90853f374164729feb1e3f5d0b8ae9b103869
describe
'172191' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHED' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
c04267e03df83dcb85441c9ae8545ab7
51b3597fe20a490d2af04306212841a81d4726b7
describe
'14754076' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEE' 'sip-files00061.tif'
26a53f2a10415ddd0cb133f63b6a5a72
9615abc56479cd05d8f8d59b2d877a2adbe3f68a
describe
'1886' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEF' 'sip-files00061.txt'
900f55ff150fec155706fde8265c2287
b4575713c911fd4206e5943a1229b287aa83a46a
'2011-08-17T05:01:04-04:00'
describe
'54100' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEG' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
01c63812cb0f6a730ac21e9ab7a56045
c7adb10d3d002f15cb3112549fe557264ba1931a
describe
'1863574' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEH' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
fec602d3531bd6697362905420fe6b3e
47a6249f3b24bb04738f91d049936d254a0b2b79
describe
'427283' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEI' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
1ba0ce45810c34adbd9d2741533ea1a9
11f365f5938ea1baa47071191dae7036f33d2a9e
describe
'46508' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEJ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
d2fe64a18a95e75ef9d58fe2f1c9b69f
7ebb101c61cb4d00d5037b68dc387fe99e01bc51
describe
'156181' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEK' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
fb43bfc1f0a4cac1b00da22256e775d8
db604b5809947e9eb82d6b4e260af011b0b262ca
describe
'14921412' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEL' 'sip-files00064.tif'
9e2a637ad194badc4943fc7eaad87a65
e0458133c2d7643844b5149e5632cdff402537f9
describe
'1867' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEM' 'sip-files00064.txt'
c2fc3d14e25f85c7dc3ec0b83a7b585b
362c6d1d2e9dcfa2992448150ede75c30491171a
describe
'50166' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEN' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
721186ae739837666f53264234865acd
437c5ac32c4aa75a66439f3d5edf86191a144921
describe
'1820745' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEO' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
43fb2598d6741fd945658a0eb786053b
06e9f9545b817444ece7099648547e21448e2ef6
describe
'428285' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEP' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
82e28eb1f90ca430cf8cd04d8f2c754e
4d5f67c05df236c1becdf2bbcdc9a1a58fe2ad90
describe
'43519' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEQ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
60a7761c341d2627b6449796655abc0d
4d29e7b122a2785d698d1735bdb982853f91dab3
describe
'155044' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHER' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
90bce775e7a217634daafc261e6b7f2f
5f973d74ec3e5694bc3f3d0e6ab8a0317e670e51
describe
'14579100' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHES' 'sip-files00065.tif'
f4fa04e5b4499d562547de48a3e9d6a3
3e8aecfc9a2009bbeac2bdb9194348cff7d525f1
'2011-08-17T05:01:00-04:00'
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHET' 'sip-files00065.txt'
05a9877a8141ca9adc10907ea2bf8df0
3204a19e968277fbc5cac0d09afeb0a63f82e469
describe
'50916' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEU' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
26d53df7581780b0ddcd954013dc7879
dae949fba8cbc4dfd026f6afa47528e87a112d9f
describe
'1911253' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEV' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
86d94cdeb91bc53a16a56867e1ef19f7
7b85ef1d4dc724907e016b26dc72a4a968a05eb4
describe
'460340' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEW' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
540518584f6992d7b3847fcbf2318b9a
fabd85e27d15eec86afa1d39a3aa906adeb41438
describe
'49718' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEX' 'sip-files00068.pro'
b39c713ef645f12e7d827ec33ce3053f
a7548f0b5936894ee92631a513c28348f0233462
describe
'159390' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEY' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
084368f16d0d1cafb9f0721c1a19dfe7
1f8a13ed4471c7ce3554a444ce8665af6669c8a0
describe
'15303496' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHEZ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
394eca452ae81f652c6698684c8f1b85
3c78daf4d2d716376d4cd285bec4525e2e236681
describe
'1955' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFA' 'sip-files00068.txt'
cad5a09ce896e051b08d35d9703b8f78
8c48c74f0ae3582aafa8b4845e16954e4b1876f6
describe
'51545' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFB' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
76428071714c938459c5198746424512
cab87a2110aa4f200dd13345080210f52ef1be98
describe
'1846983' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFC' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
5fe707b9208143f6155b801f506b050a
302aec0506604cbcdbf6edcff63a9cc757546229
'2011-08-17T04:59:52-04:00'
describe
'476630' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFD' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
023f3b5060a4c8651f0a2efafcae2480
0fa08553e3c0204004eaacc010db1a966f7e1b9d
describe
'44678' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFE' 'sip-files00069.pro'
9f91f6f7ac400fda12b79f301daf304b
30a1efbd44a331f4ecd8d55c86fa7eff4bce4478
'2011-08-17T05:00:49-04:00'
describe
'162481' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFF' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
38eae3a13c51215a0a5b05250101ffbe
5753a0a9d57e4c9409d996d4c5a0c6e0479cc600
describe
'14789168' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFG' 'sip-files00069.tif'
5da464f6f532ecd8d7a7571524158c86
13dcd4c98efaa38d123363673daaa4519c1d9382
'2011-08-17T04:59:40-04:00'
describe
'1771' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFH' 'sip-files00069.txt'
0d0e3516a0bd786c73c793e8b9ff7976
c573b19a9cbc08b48949cdfb1c8ffdf7cf79ccaa
describe
'52611' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFI' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
a83b23783a4e0cf3925283f51d0bffb5
cad0ff7fb641cb329a0b85a58b74fc0f2a0079c8
'2011-08-17T05:01:22-04:00'
describe
'1836542' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFJ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
f179ef23b53f641985facfa752ef5021
a10939a3f6e2258c17d72757ce9d158a6a4959e1
describe
'500497' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFK' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
19780b060f40ff5e038daebec9e7679c
0fab79307ba20215a87be2dc1354e37ce35c8027
describe
'47718' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFL' 'sip-files00070.pro'
7d9f218fe739c45a62af6df7bbede92f
d0346daa87634f1f14a2c27e0e9826c98aa55c57
describe
'168713' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFM' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
9f79dc834b06c64003e7ed3d02060efe
e42cbe4dac91c4db58b944f022102a507d82d179
'2011-08-17T05:01:28-04:00'
describe
'14705888' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFN' 'sip-files00070.tif'
f703523a53ca2a74d975b82c8fe77c87
4e2ed0759b0f15abdbc19922ccbec2c7a24b34ff
describe
'1884' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFO' 'sip-files00070.txt'
8973ea7e744f1e291ade3e78fea30f72
87aa11cc870832f93424685e784fd3163afed9e3
describe
'52465' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFP' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
e5cb5b75a137b4f31656f30481ecf6ea
df87bad9008f68623fd586ddd29be5741cbe9a71
describe
'1798686' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFQ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
11f5332cff1e9b53b1ac682e155c2233
44c3b6356a999dfcc7efcfd113ee840842664375
describe
'508476' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFR' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
3fbf385494d999556c606c6a037bed15
38aa6e05404ccd2c45644a83d854739f62ed4eb0
describe
'50566' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFS' 'sip-files00071.pro'
85ce44c33f41a0286495eb5306e00d0c
b89de3a33cb41c044d123c6e61eae466efe47e24
describe
'174151' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFT' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
5806732f76f246966d11982cca3d8575
20663adb8b3ade336068fbe65fe7528861406702
describe
'14403140' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFU' 'sip-files00071.tif'
8679ab117f8a60008b1086728c51069a
be27abadde47606d1a84b10a2d8e22b256be3f85
'2011-08-17T05:00:22-04:00'
describe
'1995' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFV' 'sip-files00071.txt'
59b2c80355c8238b1fc8247c4ea2d65d
19da6bb732e672e64e3ee88ac80277a4ed77a536
'2011-08-17T04:59:55-04:00'
describe
'54811' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFW' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
9a3eaeac815f6f4567d08182deb4441e
1bd7ca550ae65fc2cb5d1b1eb361a93900756715
describe
'1826350' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFX' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
0d0da0ef4de7b29ca1b17a312782d749
a2486a1a5214dd337546084fc5f1d46f0be84719
'2011-08-17T05:00:17-04:00'
describe
'478680' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFY' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
db9edfeb21dce0eda78a331998f64f57
29f4f5fc4b638ba72700397bb431fc7a463fc748
describe
'46789' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHFZ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
8d211585949c503edbcace9e2efa8a50
7d1199d5d2b06726e7efac45ec43175f3de45b9b
describe
'164675' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGA' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
b4b776001b8dd459bfa1358127eb7640
99f23d2cfc23c0be724e459e8ddb044e8ca2a08a
describe
'14623552' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGB' 'sip-files00072.tif'
5a92d1aa460a375de6efbcbccf3e29c3
e4e0d284607f644eec88757f95f9d40ecb3e1e41
describe
'1883' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGC' 'sip-files00072.txt'
35c9c24ffe110264e3d825c2f137e5a1
20ba29275208f9377da98739ecc33f408a3da9fc
describe
'52209' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGD' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
da44128ab994760e09d1037b3ca49f94
818290b83702653d722c441e2389cde0240d9a48
describe
'1888658' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGE' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
56827f635b3fed6bd66258989fe38e7f
e0c0f047b61c426bcb3eb24aa1595452a9a75712
describe
'501879' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGF' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
5d1a222563598cd3a656033413d0a168
58de41ef70af7fd733c6b7598e23dd001631d77d
describe
'48931' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGG' 'sip-files00073.pro'
6a89ce406d705e262898d6ebc0eca892
1ae8a794253af035629fe708fe32cd16ff6bea63
describe
'169541' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGH' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
e5dd54a658e06176294697796bd7017d
4eb3c6c9236a9b7cafc5a298826c85cf2a3d960e
describe
'15123352' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGI' 'sip-files00073.tif'
140a702278472b5c11c97f928e4531e8
77bdc1a05c5ceeb3195a0e44b3a7eb8c8dfaba35
'2011-08-17T04:59:53-04:00'
describe
'1939' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGJ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
fd4607b659f9c76e10e5999ed88a5575
d6335a600514f41c8910c6216bea762f269e3131
describe
'53445' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGK' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
5c89cc97329505d1a19769be3035937a
e5ee7dc77a915f27def368f4d98c647897542cc5
describe
'1794293' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGL' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
8f6b17bbcfe67bcee7cc2bf223c305fa
04c3e61b73c1d400a7900ba5e3f93c6886ab0eb1
describe
'482690' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGM' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
00f0f991a7ff07e6f5ac4f9a21e85c3b
997a5351609589b382ccc9c35769c35e60d7e3b0
describe
'44594' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGN' 'sip-files00075.pro'
1b476a5b08f209df6b87749b464cf2d2
e725aba8eb795e1784a9d004dc459b3152f7ecfe
describe
'161180' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGO' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
24cfa3f6806f03daa1ecd37f9bef8ed0
4c6a79a8771c3e03a2694131579a40e81532b1bf
describe
'14368192' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGP' 'sip-files00075.tif'
597d366af07ceeabbe6aa503d5abf927
5a312bea95beba2762cf85758cb4b28191367bec
'2011-08-17T04:59:56-04:00'
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGQ' 'sip-files00075.txt'
349a20520d158eea38ef393d2916026e
11b4b458181aa83ce3f321dc0dfab2825d6416c5
'2011-08-17T05:00:19-04:00'
describe
'51285' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGR' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
e883dd64c5e3b9498b65e093d6c0632a
78bec2474e97e39364b47ef8fb9b0d4fb39d27bb
describe
'2259911' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGS' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
924dbffa7c2d2c87fc34d1008fe969d8
8470c18c81dc84d50f9fb2d0fa65ef3d42eec901
describe
'275564' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGT' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
9a8b1bd5ce3776dc0e8cd7b2614b1181
e9582dc91b2818fbbfdbdf0be609b12608006583
describe
'318' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGU' 'sip-files00078.pro'
8c9f245587668f015e7a543f012a06e5
8f7950310533e75420bd2d459f66f1cdea2ce868
describe
'79401' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
ee82e61a63d44df9a33ca0ec31a52ace
4865495cb2424af3b7e3e8ea8fca835231f249a1
'2011-08-17T05:02:08-04:00'
describe
'18087404' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGW' 'sip-files00078.tif'
684c555e5ff32cb2ac54465b8c5c3540
9c38962895d95d20a6d5e847918f1492c559a556
describe
'94' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
f494c0af672f87d137b5304758898072
7d8f0a2abc41e0da2eb87b9047d47b4e2be33b8c
describe
'26083' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGY' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
0a4efdf8b042991421a01634c55344e0
0f0ab82068a42aea7cbbb4b04ba80074b8756565
'2011-08-17T05:00:01-04:00'
describe
'209761' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHGZ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
0dbfd567b3df08759226d8e9181f23f5
cd5f13110a1f4bb8c47121ec82133856f34a517d
describe
'92862' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHA' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
fcc3c9cf8f766a446b019a95bde0aa32
25342fc87f831a4eef8f475141cab5d009df2907
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHB' 'sip-files00079.pro'
ac5e2e4811eefb517c33955bd77ba3bc
76e5e8b6912c7515248c8756a3c9161d27627773
describe
'31697' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHC' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
3101d79d4fcf9a0b7ff4584bf2fa41c6
14a268ea5cc771b3b447e0ad2bdc3e090cd62b9c
describe
'5042924' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHD' 'sip-files00079.tif'
5fac98311dfd730646ac1ee830b2d82c
a0fcc55bd45f866cd7fdaca01caf0d28bbe349ee
describe
'344' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHE' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7e76148ab95b42f85652a7f8a7562882
b7b6407db269babcd1d3b776e5d590ac4de96e10
describe
Invalid character
'19162' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHF' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
a14c70e46db091fdfae99b63270106ed
325cfbf3c152a212000623d7b695f1e6fbff4e38
describe
'2283452' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHG' 'sip-files0011.jp2'
886ccc2e2e98a482719f9ff897fe18c0
a79482ffca065da728031f059854f7fc7c295458
describe
'395629' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHH' 'sip-files0011.jpg'
65502bfad28129f0846836e0f90277e2
39ac12059e26e5ba7d8eb28a20a07c33d2c169fe
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHI' 'sip-files0011.pro'
34888eeb5a7aa29cbe70285c461edb66
5e2cd6913a1a25bdcefd5f800e99b19e61b14f55
'2011-08-17T05:01:34-04:00'
describe
'129743' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHJ' 'sip-files0011.QC.jpg'
7ed54ca6a17b8df08fcb26261159cb10
0e97934fad7d2dc0fe788fcc24670d655fe6aaab
describe
'18287203' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHK' 'sip-files0011.tif'
63d979b5f252365e9bb8600e91a1c42e
2f8a50770a6547e2c92161b626611a1bbc95a54c
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHL' 'sip-files0011.txt'
bc7b15db19e1f524ebce2517c8febcf8
9e0ae25b7009d9db398b2cb246b233faf46929a5
describe
'49172' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHM' 'sip-files0011thm.jpg'
0ef4e1c43a32de963446551fb8407fb9
de58c459406305ab2025b0d4422a6de358bcbf52
describe
'2293621' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHN' 'sip-files0012.jp2'
ecc34b161a2a3de128a966c1d64349b6
435380e8b7c4db6b1363e5b31d5aadb013141e0e
describe
'291110' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHO' 'sip-files0012.jpg'
17c6f1b3de5aab8c86571be19a6fb216
ed14824a7bbc132bb3d1709c9b1f614b30954130
describe
'13519' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHP' 'sip-files0012.pro'
8c100891b60af10a33caff69b4a304e7
a1ddc5cfcf5eee5ca555c85a8ed94212f1f4edf2
describe
'101253' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHQ' 'sip-files0012.QC.jpg'
4537605067175b07f8cf1e6c50cd62f2
86e543764289b713b9f36b253650a502bf2f217b
'2011-08-17T04:59:33-04:00'
describe
'18368359' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHR' 'sip-files0012.tif'
84ff72e5e7a87ded618b7b882e9fea06
8d7acbf4862ac74c08623a78a78177e680c9cc3d
describe
'599' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHS' 'sip-files0012.txt'
3168d796bbd170c02fa29213ded2becc
972cbe928308270bdd129d8d4788a8be762b9436
describe
'41280' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHT' 'sip-files0012thm.jpg'
37c896149b3b93212e1eb4fd9b98a8b0
5875080cf633d32eefd15e8200fb7736345e4e9c
'2011-08-17T05:01:05-04:00'
describe
'2293580' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHU' 'sip-files0014.jp2'
5cd0eb198035413252985c12e0018e5c
b099c9e4aa8658d6a7463fbb7f129a12f6cd2a2f
describe
'358666' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHV' 'sip-files0014.jpg'
a875a3641cc1f8fb3f8a92581b50daba
2f37545ae015e0811ef86a1ab3cc993babee6f09
describe
'2345' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHW' 'sip-files0014.pro'
d71e61e9077d2c6fadb13c3fda1d446a
2dc30840456dbc4903bf4dc66e7c304dc1414f5c
describe
'116663' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHX' 'sip-files0014.QC.jpg'
3d381727c2c849395a432cefb07ed476
42aba74306190439df0e4f1ad44385007c54c2db
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHY' 'sip-files0014.tif'
e6cbcae27418b452b104ad8f032a02d9
3df0d1b6ffed0a1b179662f8d6f3c2082c12196b
describe
'136' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHHZ' 'sip-files0014.txt'
962618b1dec7d044ceb1afa709718aa0
44b39e49bf6895ee5da257de365cf2fbea8c8139
describe
Invalid character
'45506' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIA' 'sip-files0014thm.jpg'
4bd33be595b89aa9df75792e4cf364d3
0277789dc4adf0243aff906c626640f9a37d5baa
describe
'2293620' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIB' 'sip-files0018.jp2'
f180bfdef7f3445290b8d9e9259581bc
662461412c46b836c0f081dc92e4839bb10e4d38
describe
'345889' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIC' 'sip-files0018.jpg'
85fa5eb5f2e1e90c713f31ff9fcf28f2
f4dcfc372e40583f84ce5422ee76057ca393c770
'2011-08-17T05:00:37-04:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHID' 'sip-files0018.pro'
e3a2edd84ac45145cdc9282d67eafb73
479a08c4f40ea0fbce23f6a5b7e6b60a3c538dd0
describe
'113285' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIE' 'sip-files0018.QC.jpg'
149d4b6b5123763c04bcd186c5c41a2d
6fa27053bc2e6ca6e88c9aa014d82700eb4b0f59
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIF' 'sip-files0018.tif'
36308865cc83561bb58728d018af5cec
442b088a339285475a5afcb99de85a48af90e0e0
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIG' 'sip-files0018.txt'
1fa727d4626f8dd790e3b65ff15ad047
841f551c33e64a766cebecedae3482be2ce366c1
describe
'44444' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIH' 'sip-files0018thm.jpg'
abb8cccbcb8a9e715b5cb63c4d564441
1ca1b91372f7b2ba4c20dd69c0d1e9f2c876521c
describe
'1671112' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHII' 'sip-files0019.jp2'
ae4749e5360b85ecbe14e78747c39f1c
b39e1ca3045fde31a623242708eb8a4e2722aef1
describe
'196826' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIJ' 'sip-files0019.jpg'
904af487f7d18e40241d68f259f9eb3a
8f74e061153d1787a99476b4b2cff5e4c81f2958
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIK' 'sip-files0019.pro'
86ec4aef293498025f23aaed10665a5f
88aaa6bf1ed9cb1dda9ca21d9affc30125f55af4
describe
'66570' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIL' 'sip-files0019.QC.jpg'
32b833b26c8c7925e242ca94ef71c7bf
732326eadfe1b728f084789e884e9471b55a03a9
describe
'17789603' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIM' 'sip-files0019.tif'
086ac7e46979effd397a527a09688be8
92416052a89fe71998afecad2f1e73db5a661ebb
'2011-08-17T05:00:18-04:00'
describe
'31803' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIN' 'sip-files0019thm.jpg'
8d6c526d855fd8ba71fd7d7bef08b73c
5a51d7d4e2d3c3a57ca8fe9a1c35693ceba3e270
describe
'2293576' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIO' 'sip-files0022.jp2'
7b2a2dd539d0f151f5ed02880706a103
a88e7d904a30c38febd08ce541a86069b4aeeb03
describe
'332905' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIP' 'sip-files0022.jpg'
ce1b5e50ccddc6748173188f4e235ec6
ae713cc14848c271a717aa5fe4762441be744079
'2011-08-17T05:01:18-04:00'
describe
'1957' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIQ' 'sip-files0022.pro'
504c777b4d14abe5e454782f31a05e01
c438d6f6397bdad5d100db9b17aa77fa09573aa5
describe
'108677' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIR' 'sip-files0022.QC.jpg'
7e478d962a9bc47b88b318b4f7a3ad34
38ad4887be5bde0e2d34c72bc11e53e424f388e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIS' 'sip-files0022.tif'
43d1cd72d4b8b742713538cb58e305e6
b3bef867732adc16aaeb56b2816ca3c7b2bf0a51
describe
'135' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIT' 'sip-files0022.txt'
95047a1b98dbf94e3eaea579f191f670
360b71e32fa59cdd67d0c161e6c7b7a1550b36d8
describe
'43069' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIU' 'sip-files0022thm.jpg'
352bad49a3e8284923a209c1251ded4b
dcf3359be338340253f1b9da5f712950df74a1d3
describe
'2293574' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIV' 'sip-files0026.jp2'
f7ed844bde9f2416686f045412e57249
fc80285ba47660a317fb03fb13d34d4dc6edba79
describe
'371170' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIW' 'sip-files0026.jpg'
5dc73b472529b9ef91950ba4d8fb405a
84b9274ebc1bb92ef5eda35f029579ce4a4f422c
describe
'1990' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIX' 'sip-files0026.pro'
8cb9fc8d947e4101a7e31222176bffa0
894a73971aea852bf20aa4e6e4845e3216860624
describe
'121666' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIY' 'sip-files0026.QC.jpg'
973e8ef2528f27f23fe376e9dd4a28da
d507127c755371c2853fad309940e50043e044cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHIZ' 'sip-files0026.tif'
9cb1153e12ff71984d21dda89c2674fb
f1a9f2ae95eeee0d562a548bab679a650a879cd2
describe
'239' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJA' 'sip-files0026.txt'
78ec7a1281a382e97773a93677edbddf
ab0fd14d72e757ae5fe3d031821cf18b97e5d018
describe
'47076' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJB' 'sip-files0026thm.jpg'
433153d2cbf4aea44055fb383e55bcf2
efa3d205bcad58c121b45fb4188c00f1f9ca2ab4
describe
'2293582' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJC' 'sip-files0028.jp2'
e13f6e7105a265280435519f74eb4a22
9634420ca436bde69f1ad79cf31875e5e6f3d0f7
describe
'327851' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJD' 'sip-files0028.jpg'
d74b7eaf2bcfc7fc853eced7fe3218a4
0f5f447e20a2790a3d68293e3b4123b57530ee0b
describe
'24017' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJE' 'sip-files0028.pro'
5a3cdcb1c750dd1bf7f42756b042e3a8
749199a912be6b54d0a26a7e85a2197240cff34a
describe
'116975' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJF' 'sip-files0028.QC.jpg'
341d1a57394cfbc802ddb8768b3353ad
0c1fdb5381c68dd1778de1aa574535644a5f2777
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJG' 'sip-files0028.tif'
dc58800e96431f2690bcb9459651c2c5
d9b43134caac7b0367cd19e0443f017aa37361f6
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJH' 'sip-files0028.txt'
aaa2d2e0f6d3fe7513ec1bd476840e03
ecad597fc1242506941b5384743594cdff10bc8f
describe
'44828' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJI' 'sip-files0028thm.jpg'
592e7d0895538bed7191fae07f1bfb4f
3d3761afe6b815d61723fac270544cc3c55f536e
describe
'2337458' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJJ' 'sip-files0029.jp2'
45661c03010a575483fb9969ec44291a
a9c006f82a74b0d84e28c81a450e2f167a60379a
describe
'355030' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJK' 'sip-files0029.jpg'
7a1cc64a754aa16b3c3de85aecdf90a4
8c5532d94d4d6df9417b226f919bd5dfc4177b4c
describe
'33376' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJL' 'sip-files0029.pro'
f74a840cbd45bb64c305319dc4ff19f6
f85e9641383432a9c1cdb440489d2032184862f9
describe
'125989' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJM' 'sip-files0029.QC.jpg'
fc7c75ece417299efa98207c3af2e2ef
4cc91a3d080a41b7f13f3e75fd6d981597618036
describe
'18719151' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJN' 'sip-files0029.tif'
98e57196e07e6dc2c63e0ab629ae0142
626fac9d1fec7c4baad37c2ae0771d82946a3d39
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJO' 'sip-files0029.txt'
ddb2b189c6f98c49c23989e059ea4552
78080f10b92ebd24b14a3b6dcdf44290a3b05d08
describe
'47838' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJP' 'sip-files0029thm.jpg'
cee35ccbb47136205808b54e9fa39fdc
e5867a32dc83638f9e0a533aeea2ac1e10ef136d
describe
'2293526' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJQ' 'sip-files0030.jp2'
5c6ab10d3582a21768405217be1ff388
e679ec3c98a187e758aaf8fd9457db889d3731b3
describe
'325586' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJR' 'sip-files0030.jpg'
24b11a4119f4570fa0cc96af2d89d4cb
a24aa18f3d54c96f1906ffe3bf1ed24f5a1dd0b9
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJS' 'sip-files0030.pro'
4d3b747509896a9927621b6b54e0d585
eab10916fbd46a7d4333a7d05b0580201561148d
describe
'107268' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJT' 'sip-files0030.QC.jpg'
90631ecc72aa5d8c13d418682bab2e25
876b247b5e73329af98fda37f8ab9435791acc24
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJU' 'sip-files0030.tif'
3aa5e0db3bb875e448fb6fd3d7ff1121
fed8f0cc99c9bdd3fdcc799d67cee1ce34fbefaa
describe
'85' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJV' 'sip-files0030.txt'
be1c50e670a0802bf52f93b72c32912b
2963f6e48ee2f2a53ce100f24063784db7e0cf35
describe
'42686' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJW' 'sip-files0030thm.jpg'
ba3167c7ea157800b90662de5f6eb07f
f8833163d99f0022067254c782e35b709a8fe869
describe
'2036050' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJX' 'sip-files0031.jp2'
4860eba98e86f194e8720509f524df26
f74910ff68eab9fcaba654efb08bb41002f4f3e4
describe
'230266' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJY' 'sip-files0031.jpg'
626d79c2821fb90a675c8daa07391c38
f5ecf0db4bbb43962c93605433b4b9f6f2d19ab8
describe
'2262' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHJZ' 'sip-files0031.pro'
6b7a66c7eef592234ab915c1a6def93d
a8d733d3989e9c64407e4dc102658e30a84ffcdb
describe
'79803' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKA' 'sip-files0031.QC.jpg'
dcdc76a2abc3859910cb494dba25a7ac
c1b92fd346a9a8ce7c943ccdb716c66deb52edcb
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKB' 'sip-files0031.tif'
be5ab07c39a2d9758aef74ae863fc116
436e77049e6b789ba2177b5007ff1a62979c44d0
'2011-08-17T04:59:12-04:00'
describe
'232' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKC' 'sip-files0031.txt'
eba4054d2ac8624fb15aa7671464ab1e
cfc13853bd2743ee9a721bfb92c3f09dfe39ed94
describe
Invalid character
'35554' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKD' 'sip-files0031thm.jpg'
d0a987944b892cadb6d3916ac5567d2d
4d0b9a021669951ba16d8d8dbe94178863d1d740
describe
'2293622' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKE' 'sip-files0034.jp2'
894c34fb73942e1e910ae59c68055b18
4d6b9bb3c185122a1a6aaf527dd11ef400a0f924
describe
'351246' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKF' 'sip-files0034.jpg'
866d4138590430a135b6e4d3e9981691
7c9c469a9e7925c145d4e721d9c2071579f66390
describe
'4041' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKG' 'sip-files0034.pro'
73f8d92707f1f33004b14326650d6701
db09b6638f1cff6ee421e2bc5241ab908fd9bb2f
describe
'113139' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKH' 'sip-files0034.QC.jpg'
b4b1f5575004ca917ee75dd88b082862
ffc81ad8e6d592d7600c817e281b8b36f892197b
'2011-08-17T05:01:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKI' 'sip-files0034.tif'
87ff12d6307c2f2331986c0adaa47ad4
88d20f1f7344298771b64e2fe5a31c2af6ddef50
'2011-08-17T05:00:26-04:00'
describe
'231' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKJ' 'sip-files0034.txt'
647a37fe381f1d36c758bdf66fb9074a
d4c53102e770e05cecf985d900d2cf98cc078c92
describe
Invalid character
'44591' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKK' 'sip-files0034thm.jpg'
3d788c1abb5ba0f3077956cdca257b35
0a4f664e024687383f9454679faeb9a17033f814
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKL' 'sip-files0038.jp2'
0fec224ae3da9dbc41147539e4b44a2d
55f6240557e836044729310e72e51bf4fbd62fc8
describe
'387735' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKM' 'sip-files0038.jpg'
5e40d81c8b7b9ced2aad0bce1a4b4ddf
238d688dfe5d2bef4d59f4c2a9aebcabc1f0afba
describe
'37918' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKN' 'sip-files0038.pro'
f3086020d59f9089955eec33c6ef7a2f
fec315a5130ccb1514e37a0013aadb436bc42068
describe
'137474' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKO' 'sip-files0038.QC.jpg'
46c24537e7ae5349a7cd7fa9939ef449
4aa19999b0a13cb1f650a7aa964064367533213b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKP' 'sip-files0038.tif'
85c5758f866faf6f98aadaa8acd18a8e
f847b30011d069f3e62459451a35fd40b96c1d01
'2011-08-17T05:02:10-04:00'
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKQ' 'sip-files0038.txt'
f5ed7ba795941e630201462d36078dbc
5e1b8cd90788b2bb3778efb23a599c152ed1faaa
describe
'50610' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKR' 'sip-files0038thm.jpg'
3be4639690099625e0f0b17f6009de26
2472cd001be2de8c505e8c0970cb97de91d1f25c
describe
'2337453' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKS' 'sip-files0041.jp2'
1fce8165b966277a8b8116c09b5b865c
73e95c43c7efc2bad94c6bfbe03e3c37cb1e5d17
'2011-08-17T04:59:15-04:00'
describe
'353090' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKT' 'sip-files0041.jpg'
727d9832dd2f5fa240554371d2d1a55b
0187e7530e34d08590060d59ba6137eefff0dcf6
describe
'9307' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKU' 'sip-files0041.pro'
9db97cdc838233c2025b4da01a0d6b17
ec3eea3041e68ae257735afb45462f29a3ed954d
describe
'115647' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKV' 'sip-files0041.QC.jpg'
2a4ba801134d5eeb94aaae7faacf6d37
019ffa64ecaf98fad31aca69bbee6ba5939001ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKW' 'sip-files0041.tif'
6bc0e916dc05dc769b326dc777f58cfe
8a091ae697e58027e44ddc405b7d193326eaf8bb
describe
'4382' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKX' 'sip-files0041.txt'
9148b32b67991b21057946c1498923af
f7db2636eada9732551bbefd698845281a835a7a
describe
Invalid character
'44976' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKY' 'sip-files0041thm.jpg'
1b9a3cef03268eace2ca2e0f46bfe654
4822956577257643b2ace55090d4ca577afb9201
describe
'2337392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHKZ' 'sip-files0045.jp2'
e933d9d739f509e552439c1ed8f7fdf7
e5eae25d355ecedc48d024036570a25cb0edd162
describe
'387677' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLA' 'sip-files0045.jpg'
5bc9cd82ae1432acec3bdefd39aca462
f54a07b824c27f421d1a899f11f602f472085050
describe
'3028' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLB' 'sip-files0045.pro'
f6cf76a859bc78a4cb207fa87dc090be
fbdf3c58c7895a7509fa3b0a9e9e91ba3b93c8b7
describe
'123564' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLC' 'sip-files0045.QC.jpg'
8bc70a7209a44a9cab4dddb8016ab668
e485ce19b85ecc9f9e69c28ccf90c3c62f979726
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLD' 'sip-files0045.tif'
87f01037ce96b6fb1f64b6c95fff9558
9de22c283502b0a5f6ecc5eb4769a6b434bc61fd
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLE' 'sip-files0045.txt'
f6c48c9cd991415671c56456d0402278
943624918bebc1517602483c6588e66f8e3e4ce6
describe
Invalid character
'47324' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLF' 'sip-files0045thm.jpg'
c5d92a93e5c4d9775057a89d81c12d80
47c21edc7bc09f7d66763ce6f3ae19963c4464a9
describe
'2293602' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLG' 'sip-files0048.jp2'
d2d53392e3feffc6c99e6d6e58e61d4f
d88c7c199b799a5d2808edb4515c423668b53e88
describe
'341883' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLH' 'sip-files0048.jpg'
96393e2bab89b5481ef9bf8bd363a384
26a8cec41cc43b8426fc1fc0fad0c4977488550b
'2011-08-17T05:01:01-04:00'
describe
'1672' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLI' 'sip-files0048.pro'
290993dad2ede63b0d1153c246d13647
da9aa77b896c20ee063c713a3858387994ac0fdf
describe
'112296' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLJ' 'sip-files0048.QC.jpg'
0019ecc11ab0d5acfd29c12dffa862ed
6fa482190cbcea64fca87d96f34e3bc6a083d704
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLK' 'sip-files0048.tif'
eb05c54c82e20de42c16b4b4c5805aff
2ff422cdb3a39c4e2edf6b113b151ac48f99d078
describe
'185' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLL' 'sip-files0048.txt'
daa3e05ce107a945e7ca330015a9439d
5a0dd875a520d99b1480fb4e3d78cb013a3a51c7
describe
'44529' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLM' 'sip-files0048thm.jpg'
6b05029b6e10d59da5cb93bb913e1781
7a3fc085a5b5b047c221e50547b37c04806a7431
describe
'2191713' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLN' 'sip-files0052.jp2'
37bc79e9cd0831307cda814c6e65e5bd
dcc3c8053dddea81df0f0f68c5a6176fe137f71e
describe
'363428' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLO' 'sip-files0052.jpg'
cf967010ffb1d013a875a7f263987308
1158d7969456a6e8f2d8bee15f9b8810387e6b21
describe
'3069' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLP' 'sip-files0052.pro'
d28314843dd5dd284f324e2236425483
23d947cc99616a8fcb1ef176808fd8d89439a5ea
describe
'119711' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLQ' 'sip-files0052.QC.jpg'
c4495f22eb537f42f375e9ae5a2b06d7
9172f9df29643f183972cf2d900cfc7b9aecb40d
describe
'17553103' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLR' 'sip-files0052.tif'
106706e7e330e60c2b4a88897020fdc2
714b7a68dd547842dfcb3f27a105fe93f6a7292e
describe
'264' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLS' 'sip-files0052.txt'
756cb26ea98c41fc9a9bff8464a51c42
efcae135a198f03751a7eff6c716a59122ffda9b
describe
'46449' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLT' 'sip-files0052thm.jpg'
6782420067aa9b4c1ee600eebd37c43c
f2c8ce743d30c9e37f72801b05e2a49718d34a30
describe
'2337449' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLU' 'sip-files0055.jp2'
421e211dd62154d2f370224db1f118d5
1c51574d2b6d029e56cace217945f0c3b262f4a3
describe
'372380' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLV' 'sip-files0055.jpg'
8bdb940e3c05d963afbba58f88348917
72b8d29eef7be02d47ee78c467e49e9400347723
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLW' 'sip-files0055.pro'
a2cd22773c70dcb25545b43e54faaf0a
f9ee17900dde4b3c3b68aff24d2076fb8f0b7790
describe
'121881' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLX' 'sip-files0055.QC.jpg'
fb811216a60511b9cdb8f5c16f80f27e
2fdca9c1c1208ce879a7417ba9912b485ca1d7ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLY' 'sip-files0055.tif'
61a76a8563323b2256f2d1fbf9f6245a
623ddf50cb27740dc308fa308c15fac2a80a9d70
'2011-08-17T04:59:10-04:00'
describe
'58' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHLZ' 'sip-files0055.txt'
1851146266ff9ea8b793fdaf92020b2c
7488865bd3e901d2ddc1476ec70c3937672e70c6
describe
'46953' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMA' 'sip-files0055thm.jpg'
24204c34898c769d8cbfb7f391ab9dae
1945779b837c653aba13b669c07fe8be544701b4
describe
'2191711' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMB' 'sip-files0060.jp2'
1aec9bd3d189b9e7c50c9b575877e315
b7afd95b7dea5bb41c48a19ae6e20c1a69cad6c1
describe
'385270' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMC' 'sip-files0060.jpg'
217567fd7e6b17ef5c9299dec4dd6f5d
bbc9c0aa7662b8ed34d86431011a63e0f25f8a2d
describe
'2600' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMD' 'sip-files0060.pro'
5aa6f85edd7f8948fba00fa731f1ea7d
0a11600debc7a3baea528e98d67011f7423154dc
describe
'127544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHME' 'sip-files0060.QC.jpg'
442b3b49910ac81ff9cbf45c606fb406
e85532a2af8c49dc2c514af17b392de72af7ba68
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMF' 'sip-files0060.tif'
e8766ab4a917bf24b66db99f7e2dd368
f0bde9742e1cc8b628c61bc3be00e8aad2d1543b
describe
'191' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMG' 'sip-files0060.txt'
caccd8fd40f5af744ad59c1326fc350f
3fbea9673dc65d69d22631fec330f893d90b2794
'2011-08-17T04:59:28-04:00'
describe
'48734' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMH' 'sip-files0060thm.jpg'
359eec816227277e330bb08e33548b00
d1f742104d5c9f8a4b9c10d9f1f62b990b207548
describe
'2256787' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMI' 'sip-files0064.jp2'
86f458da8886a6a9ce48b8f42d5cd453
ff1c7daccb68ed693ebb5723d128917e68c2ff7e
describe
'365197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMJ' 'sip-files0064.jpg'
7f4d56c07a31d9c0ae6f5d4dbfd67edf
cff2f42cb148ea659349d580fdcea03f8a4a8e27
describe
'3416' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMK' 'sip-files0064.pro'
d7feae8ee3ff80d31910536850cbb1a6
acc870b51f9338778e38f1db8899d4078626374e
describe
'121086' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHML' 'sip-files0064.QC.jpg'
8b20cf776f5f80da67b99ee100c3fe1f
d4755f8dafb60e35b98aa9351d31a8a3d497fc50
describe
'18075053' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMM' 'sip-files0064.tif'
e5bce1ba06cddf8a5a47b6aaa2e4f5c0
bf063550941c51494931b20f307197452d1a0def
describe
'279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMN' 'sip-files0064.txt'
8a62728d3de8096896dcde948be3c176
7a474caba1f2517c7cec8700a2417f9330a9a5c9
describe
Invalid character
'46406' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMO' 'sip-files0064thm.jpg'
ba1821a7fd3dab30b79e54d76d2afd85
9908a1f777834b4ef91a6c8f2fb47f573ea3d5a1
describe
'2256936' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMP' 'sip-files0066.jp2'
aae1f245a19cb93b38c2a63ccb9c87e6
785b8620dfdc4bc12515f412cbd20e4df324b82c
describe
'449703' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMQ' 'sip-files0066.jpg'
697c6fa1a6818c978b619a7f225b5c6b
76603f5ee88fd0231071edd6ae64e870472b1489
describe
'49667' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMR' 'sip-files0066.pro'
cb97078c23b21f3319d6ed6f235b6c55
35316f05ea54eba14e0af7d0facb18304fb63c48
describe
'158731' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMS' 'sip-files0066.QC.jpg'
de5e4df4f0c2f30177a04cd621b1125a
cda18754e6c29b9936e5c529a04b45bbbe44b06a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMT' 'sip-files0066.tif'
fef28651a0420efedd108d07fe2e916a
e3fc3f6f936f2e5197b20c28b4efd54ffb20e775
describe
'1992' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMU' 'sip-files0066.txt'
cdf851225dc831f08bb3fee89e7c493d
a2ed12b3cdfe8eec408fc034f4a3ba1d24e88bc3
describe
'54389' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMV' 'sip-files0066thm.jpg'
c6f730b604ed95013d93aa835b8594f0
5483217f94c6c2a165dd678167dc1b98ad291727
describe
'120889' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMW' 'sip-filesUF00001862_00001.mets'
a8dbca287a9702673c7e8114e2016784
8ec965c0375f5a6e2a3c2ff3e4b24e3f7e21bb6d
'2011-08-17T05:01:38-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T16:10:15-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'152697' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAZfileF20080806_AAAHMZ' 'sip-filesUF00001862_00001.xml'
ee4b3c79b0f634ecb622403f6261b173
85074566c39bb88efc137deb23dd72fc8f226181
describe
'2013-12-16T16:10:13-05:00'
xml resolution










Package Processing Log















Package Processing Log







12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM Error Log for UF00001862_00001 processed at: 12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00001.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00001.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00001a.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00001a.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00003.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00003.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00004.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00004.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00005.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00005.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 0005.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 0005.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 0011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 0011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00006.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00006.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00008.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00008.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 0012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 0012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 0014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 0014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:58 PM 00018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 0052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:05:59 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 0055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 0055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 0060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 0060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 0064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 0064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 0066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 0066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:06:00 PM