Citation
Small means and great ends

Material Information

Title:
Small means and great ends
Creator:
Adams, M. H ( Mary Hall ), 1816-1860
Usher, James M ( James Madison ), 1814-1891 ( Publisher )
Nye, H. R ( Holden Ryan ), 1819-1889
Adams, John G ( John Greenleaf ), 1810-1887
Doten, Lizzie, 1827-1913
Livermore, Mary Ashton Rice, 1820-1905
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
James M. Usher
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1847
Language:
English
Physical Description:
170 p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1851 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1851 ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Collection of stories and poems chiefly by clerics, such as the Revs. John Greenleaf Adams, Holden Ryan Nye and others, and women writers, such as M.A. Livermore (Mary Ashton Rice Livermore?), Elizabeth Doten, and others.
General Note:
Third in a series of "annuals", which began in 1845. Cf. Preface.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
edited by Mrs. M.H. Adams.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026961700 ( ALEPH )
45635367 ( OCLC )
ALH8110 ( NOTIS )

Related Items

Related Item:
PALMM Version

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
m ePserery tees + . Petit
Bai nitest palsiecstbdite ieee ; ¢ eine
ert

¥ : petit ; : ev +34. : ¢ Tessie fie ; ett aie
Testa i: t ats fits f33t tb ke . apatite
*

Leash Se ssettet ; a ; Hite t

iat Bieri aut Hui ii saith
$343: 2 33

het nee en j ; iat
at i t seit TESTE Bettie ttle pelt? i ; Aut
EHH Te Se Strate Rte ies ee aceasta ait eat Le

STEMS eet sete Shite SESE Tee pads treet itthitie USE esate ities

ste ttteneteiarseserartt nites SUS) ; SHES tester {ro treteteattee tes $e t 1 . ; titit aeeeet,
SSitetes at Sih eatis ese etae ates seat tet SHS eat tea nega Sistas : HEHite } Rte

1 Reset EEE sigeeasatitet 33 se SST ped 3220 atatee Shee OGL soetety « :

Tats ” et. 3 betbritheass
Ha iat atiisiiatets: attest TI d Nesestets ; see ate

HS Fg MRIS Re saan Rua
GRRE anBauBREE ferrets a ia pit sae
tt EES ARES #8 FELT Eat : t Hyatih eate af
i tie ie Bee oR tat rn ent $i 4 : : st}

Santis
ieee at Rigi ptr soe Stats i as

SERCO ETRE HECK tibet aty ! HEL istiiset fears: feat : Hishest rit

TAR eH aee * : t ; ; { SSeS

PtSi Heetip 3 3 : iss f ; Rr Hitt

ME Aa ts j
wt ashi ttre
{ sheet tetas

SiSsts!

Siree

Sestt
Beate

sate

TEe4t

reese see ea: Saute pT ee Fr Se : Heinen RH Een out tt st ee
Se i : # Hit 2 a ether’ + ; 7 f Shi ost Hit ti ‘ Sih
: 3 gett RE i

i I i

x

+
¢ spereehth tte Sites
HSH ; Gate BA ca geet se
Hea rasaesSoertits seat Hee
; ag Uitte

47
SES Sat te i ath
tities
i i spasite etases

het . Hatites dteyeeeaeecaitt tithe
shire raat
x ;

es

PERS TSS

pimenttsy
jeansits

sine

aaa

ite
Saat
2h aot
i -

4

soeti es
SPSS

w-

pb
<3

+3

be

it

Sesti ieee:

srt

Sesh ht

*.
<

pee

ies
Ssreoctes
eater

Set
3
ae

HN
EgEHUNTR
Poe yas +} ;
HER sant RES
tae SEs

sestites: tatet states

=
be chest
$32 ite
pertete

Teas:

SRB eE
steetscisest se.
Sse
tees

RE PTS

bed seed ; ‘ :
Buia : ia
it epee tae : Hite

LOT vate Be tities ; Sey ; - oe resets it ; ; easy
333 ae ie ; ; ; : ; Hsu : ree i
th rit dati t ; aie ; a sate ; : ; aaetit ett
ec a f | ee ae ae
Essay einen aati pica eae

; seh este, oor
eceiesd erets i essesace tess ; ¢ : ; eit fret
etait eat ae Setitetittt: BE a ; ; reise

$ tee a4

mesa hy

essisitittes

He
iit

sare
#

tc

ode

neste

tah.
+)

isin
spt

at

tHE

Beste re tt

I

a

sae iihsies es
paint

$f

f

bo
Je

berg

STETE =
TRA.
A
te
ae
Srtst7

ae eee6 errs >

ps itt ie : ati “ ast
Beat redial ai ; tists ars ; ; eeerrenivetl
srt Peper st he ety eh tate stoke

rider ete : seisitys
Shee etstetet tithes: ae + ; tt ft Hat
pret e gientpcagutraii ett Hite Ratsetiss : spate i
Soe SHEESH ott tits i iseeati iegetaesrtteit
ieee ete f ieee Hatt He eee i Raters

S35 Slates: SHES st Stet tte 4 +

» +1 +
enatearestith estate : ; Het
atte HEE

tite
Stittirtest fener

ae
Bene

is

tise st

perere
t ; Ht Spee totats

:3
at

rt

asters } batt ae
iter :
seteeitteeattshe tates tt t esas ie ifn iets
Tey 7 ferreegtacatetieyy tages as

5 } HAT

eres

Lobes ge = . aoitrt,
ystitesiesthebettrts Sahat tiie
Britt MTS: fet 34 . piesstopaedaaie Heit Ce ht }
eter eatess Sh. + 4 . “e yey epee ees! 334
Hee CRStbetsettitt ESSE Hires! : ; sia SIS pias
HishEtesete ts { ; argrazests : : ‘ betes tte Heth sees

33 tHe Sa Sah eh bey - :
3! ;

yy #43)

Spree States } a

SEE itt yates ms 3 Sates

42 es ‘ { diesci LSHte j ‘ ; preghititersencst scifi if i $

a cet | ete

Satter Ses yt Eiatsheretseateseatsceatt sts
pinsebgentte titties ; i $sitt skates isthe
ieHot HAE St +3 2 ; Ress Hetste a8 ait Sati Pa ibesatseatt

wee ‘ sy sesd str
t

Petts tbe tai CSRS AS eee atts UbpHAT HH deat atk:
A i Se era ae unet eneatatiien

ghetedit
Sitti

4 ths. ded: Beg

{ , sag Poet ES dott 3H tis He aettieet
sip gate ttt
sap eat

Pitter leatee sgt srekts ; ; ; ; Ue
Hrsesteseet r ; peace ons $ettsgt5 3
saehialeties ? ; sires eres eats
Ser ; spatathstuiseseiess
SUYSEL MS sete Seley SS : rae ate pest Resi tttesessy,
Path shestates SitHt tS? { aE as te a te
Se atuite a i ¢ : { Rn

Steet

ott

tree atntye at bf ‘ Bate
EA rales sana





|
|
|









e Vik -

4 ibehrrile SS WL.

Beesi/ 668 '
CH 4





THE WIDOWS POT OF OIL.



SMALL MEANS

AND

GREAT ENDS.

EDITED BY

Word of Truth, and Gift of Love,
Waiting hearts now need thee;

Faithful in thy mission prove,
On that mission speed thee.

BOSTON:

ene BY JAMES M. USHER,
No. 37 Cornhill.

1851.



nent ode daperenninmenemtinenaheiaianeers

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1847, by
[AMES M. USHER,

In the Clerk’s Otfice of the District Court of Massachusetts

serene cient CE CELL



PREFACE.

-

from tne encouragement extended to our worthy
publisher on the presentation of the first and second
volumes of the Annual, we conclude that the experi-
ment of 1845 may be regarded as a successful one, and
the preparation of a little work of this kind an accept-
able offering to the young,

The present year, our kind contributors have afforded
us a much more ample supply of interesting articles
than could possibly appear. We regret that any who
have so generously labored for us and our young
friends, should be denied the pleasure of greeting their
articles on the pages of the Annual. Let them not
suspect that it is from any disapproval or rejection of
their labors. Be assured, dear friends, we are more
grateful than can properly be expressed in a brief
preface. Our warmest thanks are due our old friends,
who, in the midst of other arduous duties, have wil-

lingly given us assistance. Let our new correspon-
1*



Vull PREFACE.

dents be assured they are gratefully remembered,
although we have not the pleasure or opportunity to
present their articles to our readers in the present
volume. They are at the publisher’s disposal for
another year.

May the blessing of our Father in heaven rest upon

the little book and all its mends.
} M..H. >



CONTENTS.

eee

Small Means and Great Ends,. ....

. ee

The Yourig Soldier,... . . « 0 «+ -«
The Stolen Children, . . #. .« ee « «
My Grandmother’s Cottage,..... °
pO ee ere

The Paar aGie, . 0.6 a waees o's

A Lesson taught by Nature,. .....
Florence Drew,. . . - ses eseees

BMOCROM, 2s 6 0 6:6) Uns 6 ® &

The Little Candle, 0). eegeas 2 0

“ Are we not all Brothers and Sisters?” .

Fortune-Telling,. ...... « € ee
The Boy who Stole the Nails, .....
The Childless Mother,. . . . . 2 «+
The Motherless Child, . ....+--
Ws be 0's ah 0 60 0 be 8e ©

PAGE

SSRSSESNSRS

- 7
- 79

. 98
- 105



rt CONTENTS.

The Snow-Birds,. .-+-+-+-+->

Mount Carmel,....-+--
The Philosophy of Life,.. .

The Starving Poor of Ireland,

The Sabbath-School Festival, .
Nelly Grey, .- +--+ ++ > fix

’

The Four Evangelists, . » « -

The Snow-Drop,...-+-+-s
Caging Birds, ... +++
Last Page, ee e « * ® +. & °



PAGH

- 114
. 119
. 123
. 133
. 135
. 139
. 148
. 155
- 160
. 162
. 170



SMALL MEANS AND GREAT ENDS;

OR,
THE WIDOW’S POT OF OIL.

BY JULIA A. FLETCHER.

“On! how I do wish I was rich!” said Eliza
Melvyn, dropping her work in her lap, and look-
ing up discontentedly to her mother ; ‘“‘ why should
not I be rich as well as Clara Payson? There
she passes in her father’s carriage, with her fine
clothes, and haughty ways; while I sit here—
sew —sewing—all day long. I don’t see what
‘use I am in the world!

“ Why should it be so? Why should one person
have bread to waste, while another is starving?
Why should one sit idle all day, while another
toils all night? Why should one have so many
blessinf&s, and another so few ?” |

“ Eliza!” said Mrs. Melvyn, taking her daugh-
ter’s hand gently within her own, and pushing
back the curls from her flushed brow, “ my
daughter, why is this? why is your usual con- —
tentment gone, and why are you so sinfully come



12 SMALL MEANS AND GREAT ENDS.

plaining # Have you forgotten to think that ‘ God
is ever good ?’”

“No, mother,” replied the young girl, “ but it
sometimes eppcere strange to me, why he allows
all these things.”

“ Wiser people than either you or I have been
led to wonder at these things,” said Mrs. Melvyn ;
“but the Christian sees in all the wisdom of God,
who allows us to be tried here, and will overrule
all for our good. The very person who is en-
vied for one blessing perhaps envies another for
one he does not possess. But why would you
be rich, my child ?”

“Mother, I went this morning through a nar-
row, dirty street in another part of the city. A
group of ragged children were collected round one
who was crying bitterly. Imade my way through
them and spoke to the little boy. He told me his
little sister was dead, his father was sick, and he
was hungry. Here was sorrow enough for any
one; but the little boy stood there with his bare
feet, his sunbleached hair and tattered glothes,
and smiled almost cheerfully through the tears
which washed white streaks amid the darkness
of his dirty face. He led me to his home. Oh,
mother! if you had been with me up those broken
stairs, and seen the helpless beings in that dismal,
dirty room you would have wished, ‘like me, for



SMALL MEANS AND GREAT ENDS. 13

the means to help them. The dead body lay
there unburied, for the man said, they had no
money to pay for a coffin. He was dying him-
self, and they might as well be buried together.”

“ Are you sure, Eliza, that you have not the
means to help them ?” asked Mrs. Melvyn. ‘Put
on your bonnet, my dear, and go to our sexton.
Tell him to go and do what should be done. The
charitable society of which I am a member will
pay the expense. ‘Then call on Dr. the dis-
pensary physician, and send him to the relief of
the sick one. Then go to those of your acquaint-
ance who have, as you say, ‘ bread to waste,’ and
mention to them this hungry little boy. If you
have no money to give these sufferers, you have
a voice to plead with those who have; and thus
you may bless the poor, while you doubly bless
the rich, for ‘It is more blessed to give than to
receive.”

Eliza obeyed, and when she returned several
hours after, her face g.owing with animation, and
eagerly recounted how much had been done for
the poor family ; how’their dead had been hu-
manely borne from their sight ; how the sick man
was visited by the physician, and his bitterness of
spirit removed by the sympathy which was sent
him; how the room was to be cleaned and ventir
1ated. and how she left the little boy eating a huge





14 SMALL MEANS AND GREAT ENDS.

slice of bread, while others of the family were
half devouring the remainder of the loaf; her
mother listened with the same gentleness. “It
is well, my daughter,” said she ; “I preferred to
send you on this errand of sympathy, that you
might see how much you could do with small
means.”

“T havea picture here,” she continued, “ which
I wish’ you to keep as a token of this day’s feel-
ings and actions. Itis called ‘ The Widow’s Pot
of Oil.’ Will you read me the story which be-
longs to it?”

Eliza took her little pocket Bible, the one that
she always carried to the Sabbath school, and,
turning to the fourth chapter of the second book
of Kings, read the first seven verses. Turn to
them now, children, and read them.

“ Youcan see in this picture,” said her mother,
‘how small was the ‘pot of oii,’ and how large
were some of the vessels to be filled. Yet still
it flowed on,a little stream; still knelt the widow
in her faith, patiently supporting it; still brought
her little sons the empty vessels; the blessing of
God was upon it, and they were all filled. She
feared not that the oil would cease to flow; she
stopped not when one vessel was-filled ; she still
believed, and labored, and waited, until her work
was done.



SMALL MEANS AND GREAT ENDS. 15

“Take this picture, amy daughter, and when
you think that you cannot do good with small
means, remember’ ‘the widow’s pot of oil,’ and -
perseveringly use the means you have; when one
labor is done, begin another; stitch by stitch
you have made this beautiful garment; very large
houses are built of little bricks patiently joined
together one by one; and ‘ the widow’s small pot
of oil’ filled many large vessels.”

“Oh, mother,” said Eliza, “ I hope I shall never
be so wicked again. I will keep the picture al-
ways. But, mother, do you not think Mr. Usher
would like this picture to put in the ‘ Sabbath
School Annual?’ He might have a smaller one
engraved from this, you know, and perhaps cousin
Julia will write something about it. I mean to
ask them. ’





16

%,

MARY ELLEN;

A SKETCH FROM LIFE.

BY MRS. MARGARET M. MASON,
* O, lightly, lightly tread !

A holy thing is sleep
On the worn spirit shed,
And eyes that wake to weep;
Ye know not what ye do,
That call the slumberer back
From the world unseen by you,
Unto life’s dim faded track.”

How beautiful, calm, and peaceful is sleep!
Often, when I have laid my head upon my pil-
low happy and healthful, I have asked myself,
to what shall I awaken? What changes may
come ere again my head shall press this pillow ?
Ah, little do we know what a day may unfold to
us! We know not to what we shall awaken;
what joy or sorrow. I do not know when I was
awakened to more painful intelligence, than
when aroused one morning from pleasant dreams
by the voice of a neighbor, saying that Mary
Ellen, the only daughter of a near neighbor, was
dying. She was a beautiful little girl, about three
years of age, unlike most other children. She
was more serious and thoughtful; and many



MARY ELLEN. 17

predicted that her friends would not have her
long. She would often ask strange questions
about heaven and her heavenly Father; and
many of her expressions were very beautiful.
One day she asked permission of her mother
to go and gather her some flowers. Her mother
gave her permission, but requested her not to go
out of the field. After searching in vain: for
flowers, she returned with some clover leaves
and blades of grass. ‘ Mother,” said she, “I
could find you no flowers, but here are some
spires of grass and clover leaves. Say that they
are some pretty, mother. Gop made them.”
Often, when she woke in the morning, she would
ask her mother if it was the Sabbath day. If
told it was, “ Then,” she would say, “we will
read the Bible and keep the day holy.” Her
mother always strove to render the Sabbath in-
teresting to her, and to have her spend it in a
profitable manner. Nor did she fail; for little
Mary Ellen was always happy when the Sabbath
morning came. ‘The interest she took in the
reading of the Scriptures, in explanations given
of the plates in the Bible, and the accuracy with
which she would remember all that was told her,
were truly pleasing. Her kind and affectionate
disposition, her love for. all that was pure and
holy, and her readiness to.forgive and excuse all



18 MARY ELLEN.

that she saw wrong in others, made her beloved
by all who knew her. If she saw children at
play on the Sabbath, or roaming about, she would
notice it, and speak of it as being very wrong, and
it would appear to wound her feelings; yet she
would try to excuse them. ‘It may be,” she —
would say, “that they do not know that it is the
holy Sabbath day. Perhaps no one has told
them.” She could not bear to think of any one
doing wrong intentionally.

Whenever she heard her little associates make
use of any language that she was not quite sure
was right, she would ask her mother if it was
wrong to speak thus; and if wrong, she would
say, “ Then, I will never speak so, and I shall
be your own dear little girl, and my heavenly
Father will love me.” We often ask children
whom they love best. Such was the question
often put to Mary Ellen. She would always say,
“T love my heavenly Father best, and my dear
father and mother next.” Her first and best
affections were freely given to her Maker, not
from a sense of duty alone did it seem, but from
a heart overflowing with love and gratitude ; and
never, at the hour of retiring, would she forget to
kneel and offer up her evening prayer.. Thus
she lived.

Now I will lead you to her dying. pillow



MARY ELLEN. © 19

Many friends were around her. No one had told
her that she was dying; yet she herself felt con-
scious of it. She wished to have the window
raised, that she might see the ocean and trees.
once more. ‘ Oh!” said her mother, bending
over her, “is my dear little girl dying?” “I want
to go,” said Mary Ellen; “I want my father
and mother to go with me.” “ Will you not stay
with us?” said the stricken father; “will you
not stay with us?” She raised her little hands
and eyes—‘“ Oh no,” said she; “I see them!
I see them! ’tis lighter there; I want to go;
get a coffin and go with me, father. ’T is lighter
there!” She died soon after she ceased speak-
ing. Her pure spirit winged its way to the
blest home where we shall a/J have more light,
where the mortal shall put on immortality.

She died when flowers were fading ; fit season
for one of so gentle and pure a nature to depart.

‘In the cold, moist earth they laid her
When the forest cast the leaf,
And we wept that one so beautiful

Should have a life so brief.
And yet ’t was not unmeet that one,
Like that young friend of ours,
So gentle and so beautiful,
Should perish with the flowers.”

But Oh' when that little form was laid in the
2



20 MARY ELLEN,

cold. grave, —when the childless parents returned
to their lonely home, once made so happy by the
smile of their departed child, Oh! who can ex-
press or describe their anguish! In her they
had all they could ask in a child; she was their
only one. Everything speaks to their hearts of
her ; but her light step and happy voice fall not
upon their ears; to them the flowers that she
loved have a mournful language. The voice of
the wind sighing in the trees has to them a mel-
ancholy tone. The light laugh of little children,
coming in at the open window,—the singing of
birds which she delighted to hear, —but speak to
their hearts of utter loneliness. They feel that
the little form they had nursed with so much
care and tenderness, so often pressed to their
bosoms, is laid beneath the sod. Yet the sweet
consolation which religion affords, cheered and
sustained the afflicted parents in their hours of
deepest sorrow. They would not call their. child
back. They feel that she has reached her heav-
enly home. Happy must they have been in
yielding up to its Maker a spirit so pure.

Two years Mary Ellen has been sleeping in,
the little graveyard: Since then another little.
daughter has been given her parents,—a prom-
ising little bud, that came with the spring flowers,
to bless and cheer the home which was made so



MARY ELLEN. 21

desolate. The best wish I have for the parents,
and all I ask for the child, is, that it may be like
little Mary Ellen. I have an earnest wish, too
that alk little children who read this sketch may
be led to love and obey God as much as Mary
Ellen.




i i EAL
=
1%
ai

nll



THE DEAD CHILD TO ITS
MOTHER.

BY MRS. E. R. B. WALDO.

Moruer, mourn not for me ;
No more I need of thee ;
Call back the yearning which would follow where
No mortal grief can go;
All thine affection throw
Around thy living ones ; they need thy care.

Let not my name still be
A word of grief to thee,

But let it bring a thought of peace and rest ;
Shed for me no sad tear,
Remember, mother dear !

That I am with the perfect and the blest.

Yes, let my memory still
With joy thy bosom fill ;
For, though thou dost along life’s desert roam,
My spirit, like a star,
Bright burning and afar,
Shall guide thee, through the darkness, to thy home



HOPE.

BY REV. H. R. NYE.

ExrEcTATION is not desire, nor desire hope.
We may expect misfortune, sickness, poverty,
while from these evils we would fain escape.
Bending over the couches of the sick and suffer-
ing, we may desire their restoration to health,
while the hectic flush and the rapid beating of
the heart assure us that no effort of kindness or
skill can prolong their days upon the earth.
Hope is directed to some future good, and it
implies not only an ardent desire that our future
may be fair and unclouded, but an expectation
that our wishes will, at length, be granted, and
our plans be crowned with large success. Hence
hope animates us to exertion and diligence, and
always imparts pleasure and gladness, while our —
fondest wishes cost us anxiety and tears.

There are false and delusive hopes, which bring
us, at last,to shame. There are those who ex-
pect to gain riches by fraud and deceit, in pur-
suits and traffics on which the laws of truth,
love, and justice, must ever darkly frown. They
forget that wealth, with all its splendor, can only



94 HOPE.

be deemed a good and desirable gift when sought
as an instrument to advance noble and beneficent
aims, — when we are the almoners of God’s
bounty to the lonely children of sorrow and want.

If we seek wealth, let us not forget that pure
hearts gentle affections, lofty purposes, and gen-
erous deeds, can alone secure the peace and bles-
sedness of the spiritual kingdom of God.

There are some who have a strong desire for
the praise and stations of men, yet are often
careless of the means by which they accomplish
their ends. Remember, my young friends, that
no station, no crown, or honor, will occupy the
attention of a good and noble heart, except it
opens a better opportunity for philanthropic labor,
and is conferred as the free offering of an intelli-
gent and grateful people.

There are many, especially among the young,
who seek present pleasure in foolish and sinful
deeds, vainly believing the wicked may flourish
and receive the blessing of the good. Believe
me, young friend, such hopes are delusive, and
such expectations will suddenly perish. Let
fools laugh and mock at sin, and live as if God
were not; but consider well the path of your feet!
When your weak arm can hold back the globes
which circle in space above us in solemn gran-
deur and beauty forever, then may you hope to



HOPE. 26

arrest the operation of those laws which preserve
an everlasting connection between obedience and
blessedness, sin and sorrow.

Jn the spring-season of life, how beautiful are
the visions which Hope spreads out to our ad-
miring view, as we go forth, with gladsome
heart and step, amid the duties of life, its trials
and temptations. It begets manly effort by its
promises of success, and leads us to virtue and
self-denial, in our weakness and sin. When our
heads are bowed to the earth in despondency
and gloom, hope putteth forth her hand, scattereth
afar the clouds, dispelleth our sorrow; and again,
with a firmer step and a more trustful heart, we
go forth on the solemn march of life! It is our
solace and strength in the hours of woe and
grief, when those in whose smile we have re-
joiced pass from our presence and homes to the
valley and shadow of death. And if we weep
that they are not, and can never return,

‘* Hope, like the rainbow, a creature of light,
Is born, like the rainbow, in tears,”’

and we rest in the calm and blest assurance that
we shall ultimately go to them, and with them
dwell forever in a land without sorrow.

It may be said that we scarcely live in the
present. Memory, in whose mysterious cells





26 HOPE.

are treasured the records of the past, carries us
back to our earlier years, and all our pursuits,
and sports, and joys, and griefs, pass rapidly in
review before us; and Hore leads us onward,
investing future years with charms, and bidding
us strive with brave and manly hearts in the
conflicts and duties that remain. The former
years — sorrowful remembrance !— may have
been passed in luxury, indolence, or flagrant sin;
the fruits of our industry and skill may have
wasted away; friends, whose love once cast a
golden sunshine on the path of life, may have
proved false and treacherous; our fondest desires,
perchance, have faded, and sorrows may encom-
pass us about ;—yet above us the voice of Hope
crieth aloud, “Press on !’*— through tears and the
cross must thou win the crown; be patient, trust-
ful, in every duty and grief; “ press on,” and falter
not; and its words linger like the music of a
remembered dream in our ear, until, at the bor-
ders of the grave, we lay down the burden of our
sinfulness and care, and, through the open gate
of death, pass onward to that world where hope
shall be exchanged for sight, and we, with un-
veiled eye, shall look upon the wondrous ways
end works of God.



THE YOUNG SOLDIER.

BY REV. J. G, ADAMS.

A sotpier! a soldier!
I’m longing to be ;
The name and the life
Of a soldier for me!
I would not be living
At ease and at play:
True honor and glory
Id win in my day!

A soldier! a soldier!
In armor arrayed ;
My weapons in hand,
Of no contest afraid ;
I ’d ever be ready i
To strike the first blow,
And to fight my good way
Through the ranks of the foe.

But then, let me tell you,

No blood would I shed,
No victory seek o’er

The dying and dead ;
A far braver soldier

Than this would I be;
A warrior of Truth,

3 In the ranks of the free !



THE YOUNG SOLDIER.

My helmet Salvation,
Strong Faith my good shield,
The sword of the Spirit
J ‘d learn how to wield.
And then against evil
And sin would I fight,
Assured of my triumph,
Because in the right.

A soldier! a soldier!
O, then, let me be!
Young friends, I invite you—
Enlist now with me.
Truth’s bands will be mustered —
Love’s foes shall give way !
Let ’s up, and be clad
In our battle array !





THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

BY MRS. M. A. LIVERMORE.

Nor many years ago, the beautiful hills and va.-
leys of New England gave to the wild Indian a
home, and its bright waters and quiet forests fur-
nished him with food. Rude wigwams stood.
where now ascends the hum of the populous city,
and council-fires blazed amid the giant trees
which have since bowed before the axe of the set-
tler. Between that rude age and the refinement
of the present day, many and fearful were the
strifes of the red owner of the land with the in-
vading white man, who, having crossed the wa-
ters of the Atlantic, sought to drive him from his
hitherto undisputed possessions. The recital of
deeds of inhuman cruelty which characterized
that period; the rehearsal of bloody massacres of
inoffensive. women and innocent children, which.
those cruel savages delighted in, would even now,
curdle the blood with horror, and make one sick
at heart.

It was in this period of fearful warfare. that,



30 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

the events occurred which form the foundation of
the following story.

Not far from the year 1680, a small colony was
planted on the banks of the beautiful Connecticut.
A little company from the sea-side found their
way, through the tangled and pathless woods, to
the meadows that lay sleeping on the banks of
this bright river; and here, after having felled
the mighty trees whose brows had long been kissed
by the pure heavens, they erected their humble
cottages ; and began to till the rich alluvial soil.
The colonists were persevering and industrious ;
and soon a little village grew up beside the shin-
ing stream, fields of Indian corn waved their
wealth of tasselled heads in the breezes, the
rudely-constructed school-house echoed with the
cheerful hum of the little students, and a rustic
church was dedicated to the God of the Pilgrims.
He who officiated as the spiritual teacher of this
new parish, also instructed the children during
the week. A man he was of no inferior mind, or
neglected educatién ; of fervent, but austere piety,
possessing a bold spirit and a benevolent heart.
His family consisted of a wife and two daughters ;
Emma, the elder, was a girl of eight summers,
and Anna, the younger, was about five.

Never were children so frolicsome and mirth-
loving as were Emma and Anna Wilson, the



THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 31

daughters of the minister. Not the grave admo-
nitions of their mother, or the severe reproofs of
their stern father ; not their many confinements in
dark and windowless closets, or the memory of
afternoons, when, supperless, they had been sent
to bed while the sun was yet high in the heav-
ens; not the fear of certain punishment, or the
suasion of kindness, could tame their wild natures,
or force them into anything like woman-like so-
briety. Hand in hand, they would wander amid
the aisles of mossy-trunked trees, plucking the
flowers that carpeted the earth ; now digging for
ground-nuts, now turning over the leaves for
acorns; sometimes they would watch the nibbling
squirrel as he nimbly sprang from tree to tree, or
overpower, with their boisterous laughter, the
gushing melody of the bobolink ; they mocked the
querulous cat-bird and the cawing crow, started
at the swift winging of the shy blackbird, and
stood still to listen to the sweet song of the clear-
throated thrush; now they bathed their feet in
thejgtzeamlets that went singing on their way to
the"@onnecticut, and then, throwing up handfuls
of the running water, which fell again upon their
heads, they laughed right merrily at their self-
bapa They were happy as the days were
long ; but wild as their playfellows, the birds,
the streams, and the squirrels.
O*



32 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

One beautiful Sabbath morning in July, their
mother dressed them tidily in their best frocks,
and tying on their snow-white sun-bonnets, she
sent them to church nearly an hour before she
started with their father, that they might walk .
lersurely, and have opportunity to get rested be-
fore the commencement of services. But it was
not until near the middle of the sermon that the
little rogues made their appearance. With glow-
ing faces, hair that had strayed from its ungrace-
ful confinement to float in golden curls over their
necks and shoulders,—with bonnets, shoes and
stockings tied together and swinging overeacharm,
—with dresses rent, ripped, soiled and stained,
and up-gathered aprons filled with berries, blos-
soms, pebbles, fresh-water shells and bright sand,
they stole softly to where their mother was sit-
ting, much to her mortification, and greatly to the
horror of their pious father.

For this offence, they were forbidden to accom-
pany their parents, on the next Sabbath, to church,
but were condemned to close confinementgiggithe
house during the long, bright, summer -.
severer punishment denn which, could not have
been iuflicted. When the hour of assembling
worship was announced by the old Engli
that stood in the corner, the curtains wer
before the windows; two bowls of bread and milk








THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 33

were placed on Mined for their dinner; a les-
son in the Testament was assigned to Emma,
and one in the Catechism to Anna; a strict in-
junction to remain all day in the house was laid
upon both, and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson departed,
locking the door, and taking the key. The chil-
dren soon wiped away the tears that their hard
fate had gathered in their eyes, and applied them-
selves to their tasks, which were speedily com-
mitted.. Then the forenoon wore slowly away ;
they dared not get their playthings, —théy were
forbidden to go out doors, —and the only books in
the room were the Bible, Watts’ Hymns, and the
Pilgrim’s Progress, which lay on the highest
shelf in the room, far beyond their reach. Noon
came at last; the sun shone fully in at the south
window, betokening the dinner hour, and then
their dinner of bread and milk was eaten. What
were they next todo? Sorrowfully they gazed
on the smiling river, the green corn-fields, the
large potato-plats, the grazing cattle, the bloom-
ing flower-beds, and the shady walks which led
far into the cool recesses of the forest; and ear-
nestly did they long for liberty to ramble out in
the glorious sunshine. As they were gazing
wistfully through the window, they saw their
playful little kitten, Fanny, dart like lightning
from her hiding-place in the garden, where she



34 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

had long lain in ambush, anf fasten her sharp
claws in the back of a poor Jittle ground-bird,
which had been hopping from twig to twig, chirp-
ing and twittering very cheerfully. The little bird
fluttered, gasped, and uttered wailing cries, as it
ineffectually labored to free itself from the power
of its captor, until Emma and Anna, unable longer
to witness its distress, sprang out the window,
and, rushing down the garden, liberated the little
prisoner, and with delight saw it fly away to-
wards the woods.

Delighted to find themselves once more in the
open air, the joyful children forgot the prohibi-
tion of their parents, and leaping over the dear
little brook with which they loved to run races,
they filled their aprons with the blue-eyed violets
that grew on its margin. On they bounded, fur-
ther and further, and a few moments more found
them in the dense wood, where not a sunbeam
could reach the ground. But suddenly the leaves
rustled hehind them, and the twigs cracked, and
there sprung, from an ambuscade in the thicket,
the tall figure of an Indian, who laid a strong
hand on the arm of each little girl, and, despite
the cries, tears, and entreaties of the poor children,
hurried them deeper into the forgst, where they
found a large body of these cruel savages, clad in
moose and deer skins, armed with bows and ar-



THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 36

rows, tomahawks, and muskets. The children
were questioned concerning the village, the occu-
pation of the inhabitants on that day, and the
number of men at home, and they replied correctly
and intelligibly. A consultation was then held
among the Indians, which resulted in a determi-
nation to attack the village ; and forthwith, leaving
but one behind to guard the little prisoners, they
made a descent on the quiet settlement, burning
and ravaging buildings on their way to the church.
But they did not find the body of worshippers
unarmed, as they doubtless expected ; for, in those
days of peril and savage warfare, men worship-
ped God armed with musket and bayonet, and
the hand that was lifted in prayer to heaven
would often, at the next moment, draw the gleam-
ing sword from its sheath. At the meeting-
house, the savages met with a warm repulse;
and were so surprised and affrighted that..they
retreated back into the wild woods, after wound-
ing but one or two colonists, among whom was
Mr. Wilson, Emma’s and Anna’s father.

The Indians commenced, about dark, a journey _
to the settlement where they belonged, taking the
stolen children with them; they reached their
destination early on the second day of their travel.
Rough, indeed, seemed the Indian village to the
white children: the houses were only wigwams,



36 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

made by placing poles obliquely in the ground,
and fastening them at the top, covered on the
outside with bark, and lined on the inside with
mats; some containing but one family, others a
great many. ‘The furniture consisted of mats for
beds, curiously wrought baskets to hold corn, and
strings of wampum which served for ornaments.
Into one of the smallest of these wigwams Em-
ma and Anna were carried, and were given to
the wife of one of the chief warriors, who had but
one child of her own, — Winona was her name,
which signifies the first-born,—a_ bright-eyed,
pleasant, winning little girl of two years of age.
The mother scrutinized them closely, but the
child appeared overjoyed to see them, and wiped
away their tears with her little hand, and, jabber-
ing in her unknown language, seemed begging
them not to cry. This interested the mother,
and she soon looked more kindly upon them, and
set before them food. But they were too sorrow-
ful to eat, and were glad to be shown a mat, where
they were to sleep. Locked in each others’ arms,
cheek pressed to cheek, they lay and wept as if
their hearts were broken.

“Let us pray to God,” whispered Emma, after
the inmates of the wigwam were reposing in
slumber, “and ask Him to bring us again to our
father and mother.”





THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 37

So they rose, and knelt in the dark wigwam,
with their arms about one another’s necks, and
their tears flowing together, and offered to God
their childish prayer :

“ Our Father in Heaven, love us poor children ;
take care of us; forgive us for doing wrong, and
help us be good; take care of our dear parents;
comfort them, and bring us again to meet them.”

Then, more composed, and trusting in the
blessed Father of us all, they fell asleep, and
sweet were their slumbers, though far from their
dear parents and home, for angels watched over
them, and gave to them happy dreams.

A few days’ residence among these untutdred
ted men made Emma and Anna great favorites
among them; their pleasant dispositions, their
good nature, and, above all, their love for the lit-
tle Winona, which was fully reciprocated, endeared
them to the father and mother of the Indian girl.
Though sad at being separated from their pa-
rents, and though they often wept until they could
weep no longer when they thought of home, yet
their hearts, like those of all children, were easily
consoled, and their spirits were so elastic that
they could not long be depressed. Winona loved
them tenderly; at night she slept between them,
and during the day she would never leave them.
She wore garlands of their wreathing, listened to



38 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

their English songs, stroked their rosy cheeks,
and frolicked with them in the woods, and beside
tne running brooks.

Two months passed away ; all the Indian wo-
_men in the village were speaking of the love that
had sprung up between the little white girls and
the copper-colored Winona; and many a hard
hand smoothed the golden curls of the little cap-
tives in token of affection. Then Winona was
taken sick ; her body glowed with the fever-heat,
her bright eyes became dull, and day and night
she moaned with pain. With surprising care
and tenderness, Emma and Anna nursed the suf-
fering child, —for to them were her glowing and
burning hands extended for relief, rather than to
her mother. They held her throbbing head,
lulled her to sleep, bathed her hot temples, mois-
tened her parched lips, and soothed her dis-
tresses; but they could not win her from the
power of death—and she died !

Oh, it was a sorrowful thing to them to part
with their little playmate, —to see the damp earth
heaped upon her lovely form, and to feel that she
was forever hidden from their sight! They wept,
and, with the almost frantic mother, laid their faces
on the tiny grave, and moistened it with their
tears. Hither they often came to scatter the
freshest flowers, and to weep for the home they



THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 39

feared they would never again see; and here
they often kneeled in united prayer tg that God,
who bends on prayerful children a loving eye,
and spreads over them a shadowing wing.

The childless Indian woman now loved them
more than ever; but the death of Winona had
opened afresh the fountains of their grief, and
often did she find them weeping so bitterly that
she could not comfort them. She would draw
them to her bosom, and tenderly caress them ; but
it all availed not, and when the month of Octo-
ber came, with its sere foliage and fading flowers,
Emma and Anna had grown so thin, and pale,
and feeble, from their wearing home-sickness,
that they stayed all day in the wigwam, going
out only to visit Winona’s grave. They drooped
and drooped, and those who saw them said, “ The
white children will die, and lie down with Wi-
nona.” |

The Indian mother gazed on their pallid faces,
and wept; she loved them, and could not bear to
part with them ; but she saw they would die, and
calling her husband, she bade him convey them
to the home of their father. Many were the
tears she shed at parting with them; and when
they disappeared among the thick trees, she threw
herself, in an agony of grief, upon the mats
w thin the wigwam.

4



40 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

It was Sabbath noon when the children arrived
in sight of their father’s house; here the Indian
left them, and plunged again into the depths of
the forest. They could gain no admittance into
the house, and they hastened to the meeting-
house, where they hoped to find their parents.
They reached the church; the congregation was
singing; silently, and, unobserved, they entered,
and seated themselves at the remotest part of the
building. The singing ceased; there was a mo-
mentary pause, and their father rose before them.
Oh, how he was changed! Pale, very pale, thin
and sad was his dear face; and Emma’s and An-
na’s hearts smote them, as being the cause of this
change. They leaned forward to catch a glimpse
of their mother, but in her accustomed seat sat a
lady dressed in black, and this, they thought,
could not be her; they little supposed that their
parents mourned for them as for the dead, believ-
ing they should see them no more.

Mr. Wilson took his text from Psalms: “ It is
good for me that I have been afflicted.” With a
tremulous voice, he spoke of their recent afflic-
tions ; of the sudden invasion of the colony, the
burning of their dwellings, the wounding of some
of their number, and then his tones became more
deeply tremulous, for he spoke of his children.
The sobs of his sympathizing people filled the



THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 4l

house, and the anguish of the father’s feelings
became so intense, that he bowed his head upon
the Bible and wept aloud. The hearts of the
children palpitated with emotion; their sobs arose
above all others; and, taking each other by the
hand, the wan, emaciated, badly-dressed little
girls hastened to the pulpit, where stood their
father, with his face bowed upon the leaves of the
Holy Book, and laying their hand upon his pas-
sive arm, they sobbed forth, “ Father! Father!”
He raised his head, gazed eagerly and wildly up-
on the children, and comprehending at. once the
whole scene, the revulsion of feeling that came
over him was so great,—the sorrow for the dead
being instantly changed into joy for the living, —
that he staggered backwards, and would have
fallen but for the timely support of a chair.

The whole house was in instant confusion; in
a moment they were clasped in their mother’s
arms, and kisses and tears and blessings were
mingled together upon their white, thin cheeks,
« Let us thank God for the return of our children,”
said the pastor; and all kneeling reverently, he
thanked our merciful heavenly Father, in the
warm and glowing language of a deeply grateful
heart, for restoring to his arms those whom he
had wept as lost to him forever.

Oh, there was joy in that village that night



42 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

again and again the children told their interesting
story, and those who listened forgot to chide their
disobedience, or to harshly reprove. Need I tell
you how they were pressed to the bosoms of the
villagers ; how tears were shed for their sufferings,
and those of the little lost Winona, whom they
did not forget; how caresses were lavished upon
them, and prayers offered to God, that their lives,
which he had so wonderfully preserved, might
be spent in usefulness and piety ? No, I need not, —
for you can imagine it all.

The sermon which was so happily interrupted
by the return of the children was the first Mr.
Wilson had attempted to preach since the day
they were stolen; the wounds he that day re-
ceived, and the illness that immediately afterwards
ensued, with his unutterable grief for the loss of
his children, had confined him mostly to his bed
during their absence. On the next Sabbath,
Emma and Anna accompanied their father and
mother once more to church, when Mr. Wilson
preached from these words: “Oh, give thanks
unto the Lord, for he is good, and his mercy en-
dureth forever.”







=”

oy Ba

$4]

Pi i

— —

: ILS a

at
% A Ls

~~ =
~



MY GRANDMOTHER'S COTTAGE.



MY GRANDMOTHER’S COT-
TAGE.

BY REV. J. G. ADAMS,

Or all places in the wide world, my own early
home excepted, none seem to me more pleasing
in memory than my vravidmellley’ cottage. Very
often did I visit it in my boyhood, and well
acquainted with its appearance within, and with
almost every object around it, did I become. It
stood in a quiet nook in the midst of the woods,
about five miles from the pleasant seaport where
I was born. The cottage was not a spacious
one. It had but few rooms in it; but it was
amply large for my aged grandparents, I remem-
ber. They lived happily there. My grandfa-
ther was somewhat infirm ; my grandmother was
a very vigorous person for one of seventy-five ;
this was her age at the time of my first recollec-
tion of her. She used to walk from her cottage
to our home; and once I walked with her, but
was exceedingly mortified that I could not endure
the walk so well as she did. :

I used to love this cottage home, because it
was so quiet, and in the summer time so delight-

4*



46 MY SRANDMOTHER’S COTTAGE.

ing to me. I believe I received some of my very
first lessons in the love of nature in this place.
It was a charming summer or winter retreat. If
the sun shone warmly down anywhere, it was
here. If the wind blew kindly anywhere, it was
around the snug cottage, sheltered as it was on
every side by the tall old pines. If the robin’s
note came earliest anywhere in the spring-time,
it was from the large spreading apple-tree just
at the foot of the little garden lot. How often
has my young heart been delighted with his
song there! And then, what sweet chanting |
have heard in those woods all the day from the
thrush and sparrow, yellow-bird and oriole!
How their mellow voices would seem to echo
in the noon-silence, or at the sunset hour, as
though they were singing anthems in some vast
cathedral! "They were ; and what anthems ol
nature’s harmony and praise! God heard them,
and was glorified.> »

It seemed to mexthat every animate thing was
made to be happy. I loved to stand beneath a
tall old hemlock in a certain part of the wood,
and watch the squirrels as they skipped and ran
so swiftly along the wall, or from branch to
branch, or up and down the trees. Their chat-
tering made a fine accompaniment to the bird-
songs. And here I learned to indulge a fondness



MY GRANDMOTHER’S COTTAGE. 47

for the very crows, which to this day I have nevet
outgrown. Though they have been denounced
as mischievous, and bounties have been set upon
them, I never could find it in my heart to indulge
in the warring propensity against them. They
always seemed ‘to me such social company —
issuing from some edge of the woodland, and
slowly flapping their black wings, and flocking

out into the clearing, huddling overhead, and —

sailing away, chatting so loudly and heartily all
the while, and reminding the whole neighbor-
hood that when we have life, it is best to let |
others know it! Yes—the cawing crows have
been company for mein many a solitary ramble;
and whenever I hear them; I inwardly pay my
respects to them. All these, and other familiar
sights and sounds, did richly : joy
cottage in the woods. Sa,

I loved to sit at the shed-door, and watch my
grandfather at his slow’ work ; for he had been
a mechanic in his day, and was able to do a
little very moderately at his trade now. He
would tell me the history of the old people in the
neighborhood, and of the customs and fashions
when they were boys and girls; and my eyes
and ears were open to hear him. I used to wish
I could see them just as they looked when they
were children. It was very difficult then for me





48 MY GRANDMOTHER'S COTTAGE.

to: nagine how those who had become £0 wrin-
kled could ever have had the smooth faces of
snfants and children. But my grandfather could
remember when he was ® boy ; and his father
had told him what things were done when he, too,
yas a boy. And so I concluded that wrinkles
severe no disgrace, nor the fairest faces of the
young any protection against them.

My grandmother was very fond of me, and
took great pleasure in having me read to her, a:
her eyesight had become somewhat dim. Anc
so I used to Joad myself with story-books and
newspapers, when I became older, to carry and
read to her. And such times as we had with
them! Voyages; travels, discoveries, adventures,
perils, — the wonders of the world, the wonders of
science, the wonders of history, —all came in for
their share of reading. Though I should read my-
self tired and sleepy, â„¢Y grandmother would still
be an interested listener. Since I have been @
minister, I have often wished that many hearers
would as eagerly listen to what I had to say
especially to them, as did my aged grandmother
to my young words then.

Those sunny days have departed. The old
cottage is not there now. Years ago it was -
taken down. My grandfather died when I was
yet a boy, and 1 followed him to the grave with





MY GRANDMOTHER’S COTTAGE. 49.

a Leavy heart. My grandmother lived to be
almost a hundred years old,—her powers all
gone, and she helpless. It would sometimes,
even in my manhood, deeply affect me to have
her look into my face with no sign in hers that
she knew me, when she had once loved her
talkative and delighted grandchild so fondly.
But she, too, found her resting-place at last be-
side her companion. Peace to them! They
blest me with their kindly, cheering words when
most I needed them, and I will bless their mem-
ories. And peace to the spot where once stood
their quiet home! Wherever in life I may be, —
however brightly its pleasures may shine, or
heavily its cares and afflictions press upon me

—never would | outgrow the inspiration of these
early enjoyments; never forget, that, however
the great, proud, and contentious world may dis-
tract and dishearten, there will yet be peace to
the humble and virtuous soul in many a nook
like that which sheltered and bk st my grand

mother’s cottage.



THE FIRST OATH

BY REV. EBEN FRANCIS.

lv is now many years since a Near friend of
thine uttered his first oath. We were very inti-
ffiate in our youthful days. I have thought that
[ would write alittle story about him, for some
ot ‘the little folks of these times to read, hoping
that it will not only be interesting, but do them
‘good ; for I am indeed sorry to know that swear-
ing is a very common sin among the boys of our

The parents of my younpdfiaytellow “were Ol
the humbler class in society ; they were indus-
trious and prudent, and took great pains to teach
‘him what was right. ‘They lived in the metrop-
olis of New England, where my schoolmate was
born. His father wrought with the saw, the
plane, the hammer, and such tools ds carpenters
use about their business. His home was a neat,
wooden two-story house, in one of the streets of
that part of Boston which was generally known,
when we were boys, by the name of the Mut-
Ponp. I suppose that most of my little readers
_ who live in the city can tell where it is. Many



THE FIRST OATH. 61

changes have taken place there since my child-
hood. When I was a small boy it was called the
town,—now we never hear of it but as the czty
of Boston. Its population has increased rapidly;
its territory has been extended; it has grown in
wealth, in splendor, in its means for mental and
moral improvement; in the number and conven-
ience of its public schools,—the pride and orna-
ment, or the disgrace, of any place. Yes, Boston
is not, in appearance or in fact, what it once was.

But I am getting off from my story. I was
saying that my young friend resided on the
‘‘ new-land”—no; the ‘‘ Mill-Pond ;”—-well, it’s
all the same—for when they dug down old
Beacon Hill, they threw the dirt into the Mill-
Pond, and when it was filled up, or made land,
the spot was still known as the Mill-Pond, and
oftentimes was called the new-land. In later
years, there have been other portions added to
the city, by making wharves, and filling up where
the tide used to ebb and flow, and where large
vessels could float.

But again Iam digressing too far from the story.

So soon as my friend was old enough, he was
sent to one of the primary schools, and was a
pretty constant scholar at that, and afterwards at
a grammar school, till he was about twelve years
eld. He was, of course,m ch with other lads



§2 THE FiRST OATH.

of his own age, and some who were older and
younger than himself. He was, also, often in the
streets, and as there were a great many people
who used profane language in those days,—as
there are at the present time, —he heard much
of it; yet he had been so carefully trained that
he did not for years utter wicked words.

It is always painful to most persons, old as

well as young, to hear profanity, even though it
be very common in their hearing, if they are
never accustomed to its use.
’ My young friend had been taught to reverence
the name of that great Being who made heaven
and earth and all things. He was a member of
a Sabbath school, and thus had much valuable
advice from his faithful teacher to govern his
conduct in word and deed. For a while he
heeded this, and was careful of his moral char-
acter. But by-and-by, he overstepped the bounds
of right.

It is very true that “ evil communications ccr-
rupt good manners ;” and that if one would not
be bad, one means of safety is to keep out of bid
company.

My friend was, in a few years, placed in a
store, where there was a large business carried
on. He came in contact with persons who were
not so carefully instru ted as he had been. They

—



THE FIRST OATH. 53

made no hesitation in pronouncing the names of
God and Jesus Christ in a blasphemous and pro-
fane manner. He resisted the pernicious influ-
ence of their example for a while, but at last it
became so familiar to his ears, that he could hear
wicked words spoken without even a thrill of
horror in his bosom.

He, however, had not the disposition to speak
them, till one day, when some little thing in the
store did not suit him, his passion was aroused,
and, in the angry excitement of the moment, he
spoke out,—and in that unguarded expression
there was profanity,—a miserable, blasphemous,
wicked word. He had uttered his first oath.
The disposition had been lurking in his heart
for several days to do this; but he had not been
able to so far lower his moral sense as to do it
before. Now he felt as though he had done a
brave act, —that he had achieved something very
grand, But soon, very soon, conscience whis-
pered her gentle yet severe rebuke. She com-
plained sadly of the wickedness that was done.
The blush of shame mantled his cheek. Remorse
took hold on his spirit. He looked about to see
who was upbraiding him; but none seemed to
notice it. He resolved that he would not again
give occasion for such feelings of regret and sor-
row to himself as he then felt.

5



54 THE FIRST. OATH,

Could you have then looked into his heart,
you would have pitied him. This resolution he
kept a few weeks, when, being 2 little irritated,
he a second time profaned the holy name of
Deity. This time he felt some compunctions of
conscience, but they were not as powerful as
before; the first step had been already taken,
and a second was much easier.

I need not go on to tell you how he, not long
after, broke a second resolution, and so on, till,
ere many months, he had become really a swear-
ing young man,

It all sprang from the first sinful act; and
when at last he did break himself of the habit,
*¢ was not done without a serious struggle.

I have told you this story, my youns readers,
because I thought it might be, not only interest-
ing to you, but because I hoped it might be the
means of leading you to reflect upon the useless-
ness and wickedness of PROFANITY ; and that it
might aid in impressing on your minds the im-
portance of governing your passions and keep-
ing your tongues free from evil speaking.

I see my friend, about whom I have written,
quite often. He is now a parent, and occupies
an eminent position in the community ; but he
often thinks of his former life, and says he has
not yet ceased to lament his FIRST OATH. Let





THE FIRST OATH. 55

this fact, then, teach you how a recollection of
the sins of boyhood, even though you may call
them little sins, will be cherished through life,
and poison many moments that would otherwise
be happy ones. How important that childhood be
pure and righteous in the sight of God, and to our
own consciences, in order to insure a happy
manhood and old age!





THE FAIRY’S GIFT.

BY REV. J. WESLEY HANSON.

Ir was a quiet summer’s day,
The breeze blew cool and fair,

And blest ten thousand happy things
Of land, and sea, and air,

And played a thousand merry pranks
With Mary’s golden hair.

Mary was not a happy girl ;
Her face was sad and sour,

And on her little pretty brow _
Dark frowns did often lower, —

And she would scold, and fret, and cry,
Full fifty times an hour.

She sat and wept with grief and pain,
And did not smile at all, —
And when her friends and mates came near
She shunned them, great and small, —
And then upon the Fairy Queen
She earnestly did call.

«Oh, hither, hither, good Fairy,
I pray thee come to me!

And point me out the Path of Peace,
That I may happy be,

For I cannot, in all the world,
A moment’s pleasure see !

»
i



THE FAIRY’S GIFT. 57

‘¢J try my work, my play I try,
My little playmates, too ;

Help me to find true happiness,
I sadly, humbly sue ;—

Oh! my lot is a darksome one, -—
Fairy! what shall 1 dot’’

A humble-bee comes riding by,
No bigger than my thumb,

And on his browny, gold-striped. back,
Behold the Fairy come!

One Jook upon her loveliness
Makes little Mary dumb.

She wore a veil of gossamer,
Her tunic was of blue,

A golden sunbeam was her belt,
And bonnet of criinson hue,

And through the net of her purple shawl
Clear silver stars looked through.

Her slippers were of sunflower seeds,
And tied with spider’s thread,

A rein of silkworm’s finest yarn
Passed round the bee’s brown head ;

An oaten straw was her riding whip, —
Oh how her courser sped!

She beckoned to the sighing maid,
And led her a little way,

And showed a hundred fountains bright
That bubbled night and day,

And flashed their waves in the glad sunlight,
And a of crystal spray.



THE FAIRY’S GIF1..

She said: ‘* Each stream has secret power
' Upon the human heart,
And, as you drink, the mystic draught
Shall joy or woe impart ;
’T will give you pleasant happiness,
Or sorrow’s painful smart.”’

The founts were labelled every one,
With titles plainly seen, —

The fountains Pride, and Sin, and Wrong,
And Hate, and Scorn, and Spleen,

Goodness, and Love, and many more,
Sparkled along the green.

And Mary drank at each bright fount,
To draw her grief away ;

But, spite of all the water’s power,
Her sorrows they would stay.

And still she mourned, and still was sad,
Through all the livelong day.

One morn she saw a little spring
She never saw before,

Down in a still and shady vale,
Covered with blossoms o’er, —

And when she ’d drunk, and still would drinb
She thirsted still for more.

She gladly quaffed its cooling draught,
And found what she had sought ;

No more her heart with sorrow grieved,
She thirsted now for nought;



THE FPAIRY’S GIFT.

She ’d found a blessed happiness,
Beyond her highest thought.

And when she moved the vines. aside
That hid the fount from sight,

In loveliest, brightest characters,
Like stars of silver light, —

Gvodness of heart, and speech, and hfe,
She read in letters bright.

And Mary drank the liquid waves,
And soon her little brow

Became as pure, and clear, and white,
As bank of whitest snow ;

And when she drank of that blest fount,
She purest joy did know.

Then Mary learned this highest truth,
Beyond all human art, —

That there are many things in life
Can pain and woe impart ; —

But Goodness alone of act and deed
Can make a happy heart.



60

A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE,

BY MISS LOUISA M. BARKER.

Wuen I was a little child, younger than those
for whom this book is written, my home was in
a valley. The usual appendages to a farm-house,
the garden, orchard and small pasture grounds,
lay very near it; and I was as familiar with these
enclosures as with the rooms of the house. A
little further off there was a mimic river, which,
as it wound about, divided itself into different
Streams, and surrounded little islands, shaded with
the tall plane tree and the flexible willow. Here,
too, with those who were old enough to be care-
ful in crossing the rustic bridges, I sometimes
played on summer afternoons ;—gathered the
prettiest flowers in the sweetest little woods, and
dipped my feet into the clear running water.

Beyond these there lay less frequented fields,
which rose gradually, at no very great distance,
‘nto a range of hills as green as the valley below.
One of them was covered all over its summit,
and a little way down its sides, with some dark old
woods. The trees which grew there were very
tall, and so large that their thick and heavy tops



A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE. 6]

seemed to crowd together, so that you might have
walked on them almost as well as upon the hill
itself. I loved sometimes, when the air was full
of the bright sunshine, to look at the rich shades
of green upon those tree-tops ; but if ever my eye
rested, for a moment only, upon the dark and
mysterious avenues which led into the depths of
the wood beneath them, there would creep such
a chill to my heart, —such a feeling of dread would
come over me, —that I turned quickly to the glad-
looking homestead, that I might again grow warm
and happy.

At first it was probably no more than the idea
that those woods formed a limit to the world of
light and gladness in which I lived. My eye
could not penetrate their dimness, and with a
childish, human feeling I shrank from the undis-
covered andunknown. But as I grew older, and
read the stories in the small books which were
given to me for presents, or lent by my little
friends, I had other and plainer reasons for the
apprehensive feeling with which I looked at the
woods. [found that children had been so lost
among their thickets as hardly to be found again ;
and that two poor little orphans, left there on pur-
pose, had lain down and died of hunger and wea-
riness; and the birds covered them over with
leaves. Strange birds I thought there were in



62 A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE.

the woods. Then the fairies that dwelt there,
and the strange elfin creatures, and the perils
that travellers fell into with robbers and wild
beasts ; and still I referred the scene of every story
I read directly to those very woods upon the hill-
side, although they were so near that J could
see them plainly enough from the windows of
the cheerful rooms at home.

Time passed along in its usual way ; but before
I had acquired knowledge or strength of mind
enough to correct my early impressions of the
woods, I had permission, one bright afternoon in
June, to go with an older sister to a strawberry
meadow across the creek. We were accompa-
nied by some little maidens, who were older and
more adventurous than me; and so it happened
that when we did not find the fruit so abundant
‘as we could wish, they persuaded us to go into
another field, and then into another, I little thought
where, until I became suddenly sensible of a
shaded light around me, of a breeze a little cooler
than that which tempered the warm air of the
valley, and a low, wild music that I had never
heard before ; and looking up, I saw that we were
actually upon the ascent of the hill which led up
to the dreaded woods.

Strange and almost horror-struck as J] felt, I
did not scream out, (perhaps I should not have



A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE. 63

had breath to do so,) but I gathered up all the
wisdom that my little heart could boast, into the
resolution not to look at the woods, not to think
‘of them; for we should soon go back again, I
thought, and nothing would happen. And my
young friends can judge how terrified I must have
‘grown, when I heard one of the girls begin to
talk of the beautiful flowers her brother had
brought her from the woods, and end by propos-
ing that we should go there, and get some for
‘ourselves. I waited breathlessly to hear the ob-
jections which I doubted not would be urged
against this plan, but none were offered; and
when I ventured to remonstrate, they paid so lit-
tle attention to me, that my pride was hurt at the
thought of saying any more.

There was another way in which my pride was
atwork. Iwas ashamed, among those who were
‘so brave, to own that I was afraid; so, though I
held the hands of those who led me pretty ught,
and gave them some little trouble to pull me
along, they knew nothing more of my reluctance
to go with them.

We got up the hill very fast; so at least it
seemed to me. Here and there a solitary tree,'a
few feet in advance, looked as if it had stepped
‘out to welcome and encourage us to pass on ; and
I.cannot ‘say that my strength did not revive:a lit-



2
64 A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE.

tle as I passed under the heavy branches, and out
again into the freer air. Be thatas it may, it was
terrible enough to me, the approach to those
woods. My companions were eager and gay,
and shouted out, as we entered them. They lit-
tle thought how overpowering were my feelings.
And I little thought, myself, that I was then and
there to receive a lesson that I should never for-
get; one, perhaps, that would do me more good
than any other that I should ever learn.

At first, I was so frightened that my senses
were all in confusion; but as I gradually recoy-
ered the use of them, I took notice of the cool-
ness and the shade, and the dimness away in the
_ distance; I heard the leafy murmur above my
head, the sweet notes that the birds were singing,
and the loud echoes. All these things seemed
to blend together into something so solemn and
so magnificent, that I began to feel for the first
time what it was to be a little child. With that,
soon came a feeling of confidence and even love,
I thought that the majestic presence that filled
the woods, whatever it was, would not hurt me,
and my heart grew so light at the thought, that
I began to gather flowers with the rest. How
pretty they were ! and what clean, shining leaves!
And here and there, wherever a little sunshine
found an opening in the branches. and streamed



A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE. 65

down upon the bright green moss, it seemed #0
golden, so clear, and so real, just as if I might
clasp it in my hands!

I grew so much affected, at length, that I sob-
bed myself into tears, and my sister said that I
had never been in the woods before, and she
would take me home. I did not like to say that
I wanted to stay longer, but held to my flowers ;
and after I reached home, was washed and rested,
I went to the window, and remained there a long
time, looking at the woods. I did not quite com-
prehend all I had thought and felt, but it seemed
to me that a great truth, one that would do me
good, had dawned upon my mind.

It was a long time before I fully understood the
lesson. In a few weeks I caught one of those
contagious diseases which children must have
once; and it went so hard with me, that, before I
was able to walk about, and go out of the house,
the leaves were all gone, and the snow had cov-
ered the ground. When spring returned I thought
often of the woods, but I was too sickly to go
there; and when J grew strong again, my thoughts
were all occupied with an approaching event.
Several changes had occurred in the family, and
others were expected, to which my friends though
discontented at first, had grown quite reconciled.
It was not so with me. There was one circum-

6



66 A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE.

stance which affected me more than it did others,
and from that I prophesied a continual succession
of evils. It seemed to me that my life was to be
wholly changed, and all the joy and beauty left.
behind. It waschildish, Iknow. I knew it then,
for | would not for the world have told any one
how I felt. Still I was as much affected by it as
I have ever been since at any real grief.

Late one afternoon, when my thoughts were
busy with my fears, I went to the window, and
looked up at the woods. The sunshine was very
bright on their tops, and the shadow very dark on
the hill-side below. Very vividly then came back
to me the memory of my visit to them the year
before. I thought of the evils which I expected to
meet, and of the beauty which I found there. It
was some good angel which whispered then in my
thoughts, that, just as I went to the woods, full
of fears and forebodings, I was approaching the
expected misfortune ; that I might be as happily
disappointed in this as I had been in that.

I cannot tell how delighted I was with this
suggestion, nor how completely it took possession
of my mind. I was gloomy and fearful no longer.
I did not, indeed, when the change came, resign
what I lost by it without regret; but I was so cer-
tain of finding new enjoyments, that I resigned it
cheerfully. And when, after a few weeks’ expe-



A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE. 67

rience had taught me that many advantages and
many pleasures had come to me in consequence
of those very circumstances which I had dreaded
so much, I bound the lesson of the woods to my
heart so firmly that there it still remains.

And let me say to you, for whom I have re-
lated this little incident of my childhood :—do
not tremble at the disappointments and trials which
await you. Do not seek to throw upon others
any part of them which you may more becom-
ingly bear yourself. If you live always in the
open sunshine, you will never know what beauty
there is in the woods. You will find the senti-
ment in your books, that it is the night-time
only that shows us the stars; and in the gloom
which must sometimes fall upon this uncertam
and mortal life of ours, you may find, if you will,
as much to rejoice in as todread. You will form
plans, and indulge in hopes, which cannot be
realized, and disappointment will look frowningly
upon you; but if you will submit yourself to the
trial like a little child, the hand that will lead you.
through it will pomt you to happier scenes than.
those of your own imagining.

You will have friends to love, that death may
take away from you—and, oh! then, the shadow
of the woodland, as it lies against the sunny
meadow, will be less dark than your life But



68 A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE.

‘do not despair. The few rays of light that reach
you will be richer, the flowers will be purer, and
the music will be softer and sweeter; for you will
be nearer heaven than you were before.

There is another shadow which you and I, and
all of us, are approaching,—“ the shadow of
death.” ‘But will not “the lesson” brighten our
approach even to that? Certain I am, that if
that hour of my childhood, when, with a fearful
heart, [ went into the solemn woods, and heard
the sweet singing of the bird and the breeze, shall
be remembered then, even though the light of life
be fading away, “I shall fear no evil.”









BA EA a
\ f ir "AG r ANG S
My AAG N
TA y
SS" A ANY



FLORENCE DREW-



FLORENCE DREW.

«“] wit not go to Sabbath school to-morrow,”
said Florence Drew, as she threw aside her cat-
echism and sat herself sullenly by the window.

“Florence!” said her mother; “I am aston-
ished to hear you speak so rashly.” |

“T don’t care, —I will not go, — my lesson is
so hard I can’t get it;” saying which, she burst
into tears. Mrs. Drew cast a look of sorrow upon
her only child as she left her to regain her good
humor.

No sooner *had the door closed after her
mother than the rustling of leaves beneath the
window drew the attention of Florence. Think- —
ing it her favorite Carlo, and being in no mood
for a frolic, without lifting her eyes she bid him
‘‘begone ;” but she was soon undeceived by a
shrill voice pronouncing her name, at the same
time finding her arm tightly grasped by the thin,
bony fingers of Crazy Nell, the terror of all the
truant children in the village. The terrified child
vainly tried to disengage herself from the ma-
niac’s hold; and, finding her calls for help all
unheeded, she gave up in despair.

6*



70 FLORENCE DREW.

The wild, searching eyes of Crazy Nell de-
tected her terror, and her stern features relaxed
into a smile as she said, “ Poor child! I will not
harm you; you fear me, and think me mad;
yes, I have been mad, but I’m not now; and I
have come to save you from being as I have
been. Nay, Florence, ’t is useless for you to try
to escape me; J will detain you but a short time.
1 heard your angry words as I was gathering
herbs, and saw you fling your book away. I
heard all. Listen to me, Florence Drew, and I
will tell you a story by which I hope you will
profit.

“‘T was once young, gay, and happy, as you,
and, like you, an only and indulged, but wilful
child, with a quick and ungoverndl temper.

“One day, I was studying my Sabbath school
lesson, and finding it, as I thought, rather hard,
I threw it away, as you did yours, saying that I
would not go to school at all. My poor mother’s
entreaties were all unheeded by me, and I grew
_ up in idleness and ignorance. My mother’s health
daily declined, partly through my ill-treatment
and wickedness. Often did she plead with me,
with tears streaming down her cheeks, to alter
my conduct; but I rudely repulsed her.”

Nell paused, and seemed very much agitated;
her eyes glared wildly, and bending close to



FLORENCE DREW. 71

Florence, she continued in a whisper: “ We
became very poor, in consequence of my extrava-
gance; I then thought my mother a burden;
she was too ill to work, and I left her to starve ;
she did not, however ; she died of a broken heart,
I was her murderer! *T was that which drove
me mad. Look! see you not that black cloud
which darkens the sunshine of my life ?”

“J cannot see a cloud,” sobbed poor Florence,
who was now tasting the bitter cup of repentance.

“T know it, poor child!” continued Nell; ‘the
cloud I mean is such as you just felt, — TEMPER.
It is within us! Conquer your temper, Florence
Drew, and you may yet be good and happy.
Go, now, and seek mother, who is at this moment
shedding tears of sorrow for her little girl’s ill-
temper. Go to her and—” But, ere she could
finish, Florence had glided into her mother’s
room, and was kneeling humbly at her feet
Tears of sorrow were changed to those of joy
and repentance, as Mrs. Drew folded her little
girl to her breast in a long and affectionute em-
brace.

Florence has never been unkind to her mother,
or given freedom to her temper, since that day.
She is now the teacher of a class in a Sabbath
school, and she often relates to her little scholars
the story I have just related to you.



72 FLORENCE DREW.

Crazy Nell continues to gather herbs, an object
of pity to the benevolent, and of sport to the
unfeeling. And now, my dear little readers, I
must repeat Crazy Nell’s expression: “ Conquer
your temper, and you will be happy;” or, in the
words of the sacred Scriptures, “ He that ruleth
his own spirit is greater than he that taketh a

city.”
May.











“WAHOUHS





75

SHECHEM.

BY REV. J. G. ADAMS.

In the ::cture opposite, the reader will see rep-
resented a part of the city of Shechem, at the
foot of Mount Gerizim. It is a very noted place
in history. It is called Sychar in the Gospel,
John 4:5. It was here, at Jacob’s well, that
Jesus met the woman of Samaria. The account
of the conversation which they held together is
one of the most interesting records in the New
Testament. I wish all our young readers would
make themselves acquainted with it. Jesus was
a Jew; and the Jews had no dealings with the-
Samaritans. Weary with travelling in the heat of
the day, our Lord sat down to rest by that an-
cient well, when the stranger woman came to
draw water from it. Jesus said unto her, “ Give
me to drink.” She was surprised that he, being
a Jew, should ask water of her, a Samaritan.
This very surprise which she expressed led toa
most instructive conversation. Read it, and see
how plainly Jesus teaches us the nature of true
worship. The Jews had their temple at Jerusa



76 SHECHEM.

.em; the Samaritans had theirs on Mount Ger-
izim. The woman’ said to Jesus, “ Our fathers
worshipped in this mountain, and ye say that Je-
susalem is the place where men ought to worship.”
She would ask which was the true place. Jesus
declared to her that it was not so much the place,
as it was the heart, which made worship what it
should be. Read the answer of Jesus as the New
Testament gives it, and then see if the Quaker

poet, Barton, has not beautifully expressed it
thus :

‘¢ Woman, believe me, the hour is near

When He, if ye rightly would hail him,
Will neither be worshipped exclusively here,
Nor yet at the altar of Salem.

For God is a spirit, and they, who aright
Would perform the pure worship he loveth,
In the heart’s holy temple will seek with delight

That spirit the Father approveth.”’

Through the knowledge of Christ obtained by
the Samaritan woman in this conversation, many
of her sect were induced to believe on him.

Shechem, or Sichem, is a very ancient place ;
though we do not find it mentioned as a city until
the time of Jacob, who purchased a piece of land,
and dug the well of which we have just spoken,
The city lay between the two mountains Ebal
and Gerizim. Jt was made a city of refuge,



SHECHEM. 77

Joshua 20: 7. 21. 20,21. Quite a number of
events mentioned in the Old Testament occurred
here. Jt was at Shechem Joshua met the as-
sembled people for the last time. It was here
that Rehoboam was made king, and the ten tribes
rebelled.

In after time Shechem became the chief seat
of the people who thenceforth bore the name of
‘Samaritans. ‘They were made up in part of em-
igrants from other eastern nations. When the
Jews returned from their long captivity in Baby-
lon, and began to rebuild Jerusalem and their
temple, the Samaritans desired to aid them in-
their work. “Let us build with you,” was their
request. The Jews refused to admit them to this
privilege; hence a strong hatred between the two
‘sects arose. The Samaritans erected their tem-
ple on Mount Gerizim.

Shechem received the new name of Neapolis
from the Greeks —a name which it retains to the
present day. The city has passed through many
changes, which, had we time to recount them,
might be of deep interest to the reader. But it
would take a larger space to do this than we can
now occupy. The Samaritans are still here; but
their number now is small, not exceeding one
hundred and fifty. They have a synagogue,
where they preserve several ancient copies of the



78 SHECHEM.

hooks of Moses, and among them one ancient
manuscript which they believe to be three thou-
sand four hundred and sixty-five years old, say-
ing it was written by Abishua, the son of Phinehas
(1 Chron. 6: 3,4.) The manuscript, so travel-
lers who have seen it say, is very ancient; but
they do not all think it so old as the Samaritans
pretend it is.

Mount Gerizim is still held in great venera-
tion by the Samaritans. Four times a year they
ascend it in solemn procession, to worship. The
old feeling of hostility between them and the Jews
is still existing.

The city of Neapolis, or, as the Arabs call it,
Nablous, is long and narrow, stretching close
along the northeast base of Mount Gerizim.
The population is about eight thousand souls, all
Mohammedans, with the exception of about five
hundred Greek Christians, and the one hundred
and fifty Samaritans already mentioned. Those
who have taken part in its eventful past history
are gone. But never shall be heard there a more
glorious voice than that which uttered those su-
blime words of heavenly truth to the woman at
Jacob’s well.



Sl

“ARE WE NOT ALL BROTH-
ERS AND SISTERS?”

BY REV. W.R. G. MELLEN.

Tat the human race is one, bound together
by the strongest and holiest ties, is one of the
sublimest truths announced by the Master. -
Indeed, so close and intimate is the connection
subsisting between the various members of the
common family, that to tear one from the body
would be like following the direction of Solomon
to his servant, and dividing the living child in
two, leaving life’s purple current to spout forth
from either half. An appreciation of this truth
is what the world, heart-sick and weary as it is,
now needs above all things else. And to illus-
trate and enforce the fact that it is not a vain
shadow, but a solid reality, too solemn to be
trifled with, and too important to be neglected, —
to illustrate this by deeds which bear joy to the
joyless and hope to the hopeless, —is the work
which Christians, the young as well as old, are
now called to perform. Will it need the voice
of duty, which speaketh as from the skies ¢ This
is the great truth, also, which, with all its rela~



82 ARE WE NOT ALL BROTHERS AND SISTERS ?

tions to life and duty, is to be impressed by the
present, upon the minds of the rising, generation.
This is what my young readers are to learn,—
and not simply to learn, but to practise : — that
we are all brothers and sisters, no matter in
what clime or country we may have been born,
or with what complexion we may be clothed.

A little girl, some five years of age, whom the

writer of this has often fondled in his arms, had
well learned this most important lesson. By
pious parents and earnest Sabbath school teachers
had she been taught, that to be like Jesus, who
took little children in his arms and blessed them,
she must love and do good unto all, as brothers
and sisters. This had sunk deep into her young
and tender mind; and when, on a visit at the
house of a friend, she was asked that familiar
question, which is so often put to children, —
whom she loved, —
"After a moment's hesitation she replied, that
she loved everybody. “Indeed!” said the querist;
“how can that be? You certainly do not love
me as well as you do your own brothers and
sisters ; do you?”

After another short pause she replied, “ Yes,
I think I do; for you, too, are my sister.” “7
your sister?” said the lady, in surprise; ‘‘ how
can that be possible?” Looking up with a



ARE WE NOT ALL BROTHERS AND SISTERS? 893

countenance in which all heaven’s innocence and
purity were mirrored, she exclaimed, “Is not
God our Father ? and are we not all brothers and
sisters? and should we not love each other as
such ?” ;

There was no further argument to be used.
Though hid from many wise and prudent, yet
the truth was thus revealed to babes.

Yes, we are all brethren and sisters, having a
common origin, a common destination, and a
common home. And may all those children who
read this short article ever recollect this impor-
tant truth. When you behold a poor, unfortu-
nate man, with torn and filthy garments, and
perhaps intoxicated, reeling through the streets,
do not hoot after, and throw stones at him, as l
have known many boys do, but think within
yourselves, ‘‘ He is our brother.”

When one of your number abuses the rest, and
you are tempted to injure and beat him, wait til.
you have said to yourselves, “ He 1s still our
brother ; and though he has done us wrong, why
should we strike or injure him ?”

When you see a companion in trouble, and
one to whom your assistance can do much good,
recollect he is a brother, or she is a sister, and
fly to help him. And oh! if all, both old and
young, would act upon this principle, how differ-

7*



84 ARE WE NOT ALL BROTHERS AND SISTERS ?

ent would be the aspect of affairs from what it
now is! Then the kingdom of God would dawn
upon us. Then the wolf and the lamb would lie
down together, and the lion eat straw like an ox.
Then we should be like dettle children, and the
btessing-smile of Jehovah would shed upon us
hiv choicest benediction.





FORTUNE-TELLING.
A DIALOGUE FOR EXHIBITIONS.
BY JULIA A. FLETCHER.

Sophronia. Come, girls, let us go and have
our fortunes told.

Eveline. Oh! I should like it of all things ;
where shall we go ?

Sarah. Let us goto old Kate Merrill’s. They
say she can read the future as we do the past,
by hand, tea-cups, or cards. Come, Mary Ann.

Mary Ann. Excuse me, girls, if 1 do not go
with you. I do not think it is right to have our
fortunes told.

Sophronia. Not right? why not?

Mary Ann. Because, if it had been best for
us to know fhe future, I think God would have
revealed it to us. |

Sarah. Oh, but you know this is only for
amusement.

Eveline. Of course, we shall not believe a
word she says. ;

Mary Ann. If it is only for amusement, I
think we can find others far more rational and
innocent. But depend upon it, girls, you would



86 FORTUNE-TELLING.

not wish to go, if there were not in your minds
a little of credulous feeling

Sophronia. Well, I am sure I am not credu-
lous.

Mary Ann. Do not be offended, Sophronia ;
[ only meant that we are all of us more inclined
to believe these things than we at first imagine.

Sarah. 1 think that Mary Ann is right in
this respect. Iam sure I would not go if I did
not think her predictions would come to pass.

Mary Ann. Certainly; I could not suppose
you would spend your time and money to hear
an old woman tell you things you did not
believe.

Eveline. Well, 1 am sure I do not see any
harm in having a little fun once in a while.

Sophronia. No; and I think it is very unkind
in Mary Ann to spoil all our pleasures with her
whims. She is always preaching to us about
vi ving up our own way for the comfort of others,
avd I think she ought to give up now, and go
with us.

Sarah. Now, really, Sophronia, I think you
ave the one that is unkind. If Mary Ann is
wrong, it is better to convince her of it kindly,
and I am sure she will acknowledge it.

Mary Ann. I hope 1 should be willing to
«ye up a mere whim for the pleasure of those I



FORTUNE-TELLING. 87

love so well. But this is not a whim; itisa
serious conviction of duty.

Sophronia. Well, I thought you iteays pre-
tended to be very obliging.

Mary Ann. {I have no right to be obliging at
the expense of what I deem duty. Our own
inclinations we should often sacrifice, our preju-
dices always, but our sense of duty never.

Eveline. I think, girls, we have done wrong
to urge Mary Ann to go, after she had told us
her reasons.

Sophronia. Well, then, don’t spend any more
time in urging her to go, against her will. You
know the old proverb: “ The least said is soonest
mended.”

Eveline. Well, do not let us go away angry
or ill-natured. You asked Mary Ann to say
why she thought it was wrong, and we should
receive her reasons kindly.

Sarah. So I think; but I wish she would tell
us what harm she thinks it would do to go.

Mary Ann. Well, girls, I think, by trying to
look into the future, we are apt to grow discon-
tented and restless, and to forget that we have
duties to perform in the present. Then, if we do
not believe in it, it is a waste of time and money,
which might be better employed in relieving the
suffering of the poor around us. But the greatest



88 FORTUNE-TELLING.

evil of all is, that we should believe even a part;
she would of course tell us many little circum-
stances which would be true of any one; thus
we might be led to believe all she said; the pre-
diction would probably work out its own fulfil-
ment, and perhaps render us miserable for life.

Sophronia. Oh, fudge! Mary Ann. This is
altogether too bad and ungenerous in you. In
the first place, the few cents we give, bestowed
as they are on a poor old widow woman, are
not wasted, in my opinion, but well spent ;— and
if I spend an evening, granted to me by my father
and mother for recreation, in listening to Old
Kate, it is no, more wasted than if I spend it with
the girls in any other social way. And when
you connect fortune-telling and our duties in the
present, you make it too serious an aflair. Re-
member, this is all for sport.

Mary Ann. It may be so with you, Sophronia;
but there are those who seriously believe every
word of a fortune-teller, and actually live more
in the unseen but expected events of the future,
than in faithfully performing their duties in the
present. This is true, Sophronia. The content-
ment and peace of many young minds have been
utterly lost, sold for the absurd jabbering of old,
ignorant, low-bred women, who pretend to read
the future. [Ina livelier tone of voice.|, But just



FORTUNE-TELLING. : 89

say, girls, do you believe there is any connection
between tea-leaves and your future lives ?

Eveline, Sarah, Sophronia. Why, no!

Mary Ann. Do you believe God has marked
the fortunes of thousands of his creatures on the
face of cards ?

Eveline, Sarah, Sophronia. Certainly not.

Mary Ann. Well, do you believe, if God
should intrust the secret events of the future with
any of our race, in this age, it would be with
those who have neither intellectual, moral, nor
religious education—who can be bribed by
dollars and cents to say anything ?

Sarah, Eveline. No, indeed!

Mary Ann. (Turns to Sophronia.) You do
not answer, Sophronia. Let me ask you one or
two more questions. Do you suppose Kate Mer-
rill believes that she has a revelation from God ?

Sophronia. No, Mary Ann.

Mary Ann. Do you suppose she thinks you
believe so ?

Sophronia. Why, yes, I do.

Mary Ann. Then, is it benevolent to bestow
money to encourage an old woman in telling for
truth what she knows to be false ?

Sophronia. I doubt whether it is really benev-
olent.

Mary Ann. And if Old Kate speaks falsely



90 FORTUNE-TELLING.

and knows she does so, and you know it, yet
spend your time in listening to what she has to
say, what good can come of it to head or heart ?
Sophronia. None at all, Mary Ann. It is
time wasted, and I am convinced that I have
been doubly wrong in wishing to go, and in being
angry with you. Will you forgive me ¢
Mary Ann. Certainly, Sophronia. And now
if you wish for amusement, I will be a witch
myself, and tell your fortunes for you.
Sophronia. Oh, do tell mine; and be sure
you tell it truly. What lines of fate do you see
in my hand?
Mary Ann. (Takes her hand and looks at it
intently.)
(To Sophronia.)

Passions strong my art doth see.

Thou must rule them, or they rule thee.
If the first, you peace will know ;

If the last, woe followeth woe.

Sarah. Now tell mine next.
(To Sarah.)

Too believing, too believing,

Thou hast learned not of deceiving.
Closely scan what seemeth fair,
And of flattering words beware.

Eveline. Now tell me a pleasant fortune,
Mary Ann.



FORTUNE-TELLING. 9]

(To Eveline.)
Lively and loving, I would not chide thee,
Do thou thy duty, and joy shall betide thee.
Sophronia. Thank you, Mary Ann, for the
lessons you have given us. We can now, in
turn, tell your fortune, and that is, Always be
amiable and sensible as now, and you will always

be loved.

.
.
\

~
=
=

—
ee.

tie

AUD

Ht

af





THE BOY WHO STOLE THE
NAILS.

BY REV. MOSES BALLOU.

{ REMEMBER well, that, when I was quite a
little boy, a circumstance occurred which I shall
probably never forget, and which, no doubt, has
had some little influence on my life at many dif-
ferent periods since. I will relate it ; and I wish
all my young readers would remember the story.

My father was somewhat poor. He had no
salary for preaching, except for a few months,
perhaps not five hundred dollars for forty years
of pulpit labor. He maintained his family chiefly
from a small farm, and, there being several chil-
dren, we were deprived of many little things that
wealthier parents are accustomed to furnish for
theirs. We had few presents, and those chiefly
of necessary articles, —school-books, or some-
thing of the kind; while toys, playthings, and
instruments of amusement, we were left to go
without, or take up with such rude and simple
ones as we could manufacture for ourselves.

I wanted a small box very much. A handsome
little trunk, such as most of my young readers



THE BOY WHO STOLE THE NAILS. 93

probably have, was too much to hope for, and a
plain wooden box, even, I had no means to pur-
chase. , ;

I went without for a long time, and at last
determined that I would try to make one. But
the materials, — where was I to obtain them?
True, my father had pieces of thin boards that
would answer, but there were nails, and hinges,
and a lock wanting. Where were these to come
from ?

After trying a variety of methods, I invented a
plan for fastening it without a lock, and leather
made a very good substitute for hinges, as it was
to be out of sight. Still, I wanted:iails.
were some old ones about the*house, but.
were crooked, and broken, and rusty. These
would not answer if anything better could be
obtained.

My uncle, who at this time lived but a short
distance from us, was engaged in building, and
I watched the barrel of bright new nails his
workmen were using, with a longing eye. QO,
how I coveted them!

The temptation was too great. I sought the
opportunity while the hands were at dinner, and,
after cautiously looking about to see that no one
was near to observe me, with trembling hands
seized upon them, and stole enough to make my






94 THE BOY WHO STOLE THE NAILS.

box. O! how my heart beat as I hurried away
across the fields home. I almost expected to
see some one start up from every stump and bush
on the way, to accuse me of the theft. I hardly
dared to look behind me. It seemed as though
my old uncle, with frowning brow, was at my
very heels. And then, too, the workmen ;—
were they not suspicious from my hanging about
them, and had not some of them watched me?
So horrid images began to dance about my brain.
Dim visions of court-rooms, and lawyers, and
judges, and prisons, and sorrowing parents, and
2d brothers and sisters, rose in awful

“beforé’me. I began to grow dizzy and
faint I had laid up, for a long time, all the
pennies I could obtain, which, at that time,
amounted to the vast sum of twenty cents, con-
tained in an old-fashioned pistareen; and the
hope sprung up in my heart, that, possibly, by
paying this to the officers, they would not carry
me to jail.

Thought was busy in laying plans for escape,
and I reached home in the greatest excitement
imaginable.

Well, the deed was now done, and I could
not undo it. I was really a thief; and now, as
I had got the nails, I thought I might as well use
them. Iwas too anxious about the crime. how-



.



THE BOY WHO STOLE THE NAILS. 95

ever, to do this at once. SoIhid them away
for a week or more, before I ventured to make
my box.

Taking such leisure hours as I had,—for I
was obliged to work most of the time on the
farm,—I crept away in the loft of an old build-
ing, and finally succeeded in finishing my task.
But, now that the box was done, my troubles
were by no means ended. It would be seen.
I could not always keep it out of sight. My
brothers, and sisters, and playmates, would ex-
amine it, and possibly my father would get his
eye upon it! Suppose he should, — ~ me
where those nails came from?

O, how my poor brain was racked to invent
some false story by which I could escape detec-
tion! I thought of saying that they were old
ones which I had polished up so as to appear
new, and I even filed down the rust on the head
of an old nail to see if they would look suf-
ficiently alike. But nothing of this kind would
answer. The cheat, I thought, would be de-
tected; and sc I was obliged, after all my trouble
and suffering, to keep my box hidden away when
it was done. Every time I went to look at it,
those bright new nail-heads were staring out at
me, ready to reveal my crime to any one who
saw them.

S*



96 THE BOY WHO STOLE THE NAILS.

For a long time, I did not dare to go to my
uncles again. True, he knew nothing of my
wrong; but I felt guilty, and did not care to see
him. Finally, after some time had passed away,
though I had by no means forgotten the theft,
and still suffered much every time it was thought
of, I ventured to call and see him. I could hardly
avoid the impression that he must know what I
had done, and would accuse me of it; and when
he met me in the yard at his door; patted my
cheek with a half-laughing, half-reproving look ;
asked why I had stayed away from him so long ;
and said, that, to punish me, he should go and
get, fie some very nice apples from the garden ;
—T could bear it no longer. It seemed as though
my heart would break. What I said, I have now
forgotten. I remember that I cried very heartily,
and, as soon as my tears would allow it, told him
the whole story! |

I can still see, fresh in my memory; the sad
look that came over him as 1 confessed my
crime ; but not a single harsh or unkind word did
he utter. He told me that it was very wrong;
that I had acted nobly in confessing it ; and that,
if I had only asked him in the first place, he
would gladly have given me all I wanted.

Thinking I had suffered enough already, he
promised not to tell my parents, in case I con-



THE BOY WHO STOLE THE NAILS. 97

tinued a good boy, and advised me to destroy the
box and bring him back the nails, as no one could
then suspect what had been done but ourselves.

His kindness, I confess, pained me very much.
[ think nothing could have tempted me to do him
any wrong again. )

I loved him better than ever before. He never
alluded to the subject afterwards, but I always
thought of it when I saw him. He died ina
short time; and, twenty years after, as I stood
by his grave, the circumstance came up, clear
and distinct, to my recollection. I have not,
indeed, from that to the present hour, felt the
least temptation to commit any wrong of the
kind without recalling it; and, if all my young
readers will think seriously how much suffering
that one act cost me, and how much happier I
should otherwise have been, I am confident that
_they will never commit a similar offence so long
as they remember the story of the boy who stole
the nails.



>

98

THE CHILDLESS MOTHER.

BY MRS. M. H. ADAMS.

TuErE are many childless mothers in our land.
In some homes there never lived a little child to
make them happy ; but in others the spirits of the
little ones have departed. They dwell in another
home—the “dear heavenly home.” ‘Their moth-
ers, those childless mothers, weep day and night
‘na their loneliness and sadness. This sketch is
of a mother who had buried all her little babes —
four precious children —all her little family. The
mother’s name was Ellen Moore.

For many months after the birth of her first
child, Ellen was free from sorrow as a bird in the
morning. She never thought affliction might
come to her blessed home. It was not surprising,
for she had never known what bereavement and
bitter disappointment were. She was educated to
be a child of sunshine. She had always lived
amid smiles and tenderness, and when the fear-
ful cloud of sorrow broke, in an unexpected mo-
ment, upon her head, she seemed bowed down,
never to rise again in health and beauty.



Ese

THE CHILDLES: MOTHER 99

It was a sad day in our neighborhood when
Ellen’s first little babe died; we all wept. Not
so much because he was dead; for we all felt that
he was at rest; but his dear mother was so sorely
troubled, her heart ached so grievously, it seemed
as if she too would die. Days and nights Ellen
wept, and moaned, and walked her house. The
tears seemed to burn their way down her cheeks.
She spoke but seldom, yet that pitiful moan she
so often breathed out pierced our souls and made
us all very sad.

After a few weeks, the consolation we offered
her quieted her feelings, and she became calm.
She went to church, called on her friends, and
attended to her duties at home. But there was
ever a sadness in her voice and manners. Her
home was so lonely, so strangely still and vacant,
and Ellen so silent, that the voice of gladness was
not heard in it again until a second beautiful boy
was born under its roof.

We were all happy then. Even Ellen smiled
as she kissed her dear babe —but a tear followed
the smile and the kiss so soon, we knew her
wounded heart was not then healed. She was
very sad, and felt that this babe, too, might only
be loaned her for a short time. It was not long
before we all felt so. That little face, so pale, so
sad, so beautiful, evidently bore the seal of death



100 | THE CHILDLESS MOTHER.

upon it. He refused all nourishment, and pined
slowly away. Ellen knew he must die, but could
not say so. She could not shed one tear to relieve
her sorrowful heart. She neither spoke nor wept,
until her infant was laid in its coffin.

Ariend had woven a wreath of beautiful flow-
ers, and laid it on the satin pillow of the coffin,
and placed a delicate rose-bud in the little hand
of the babe. Ellen went alone to take her last
kiss, when, seeing her babe so beautiful in death,
she seated herself on the floor and wept freely.

“ Who loved my babe so fondly?” said she,
when she came from the room. ‘“ Whoyhas been
so kind and thoughtful of me? It has unsealed
my tears ; now let me weep alone.” We left her.
She came out of that room a changed woman.
She assisted us in our preparations for the burial
of the dead, spoke cheerfully to her husband, con-
versed freely about her children in heaven, and
remarked that henceforth her life should be wor-:
thy of a Christian. We buried the sweet babe
by the side of his brother, and planted a rose-tree
over his grave. Then our thoughts turned to
Ellen, whose whole manner indicated resignation
and peace.

We were not surprised at the effect of grief
upon Ellen, for I have told you she was not edu-
cated to bear human misery with much com-



Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080805_AAAAAU' PACKAGE 'UF00001832_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-08-05T17:59:58-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:24:08-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298725; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-16T17:18:34-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00168.txt '
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-08-17T07:14:26-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-08-17T07:08:20-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfile1' 'sip-filescover1.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-08-17T07:13:01-04:00'
describe
'2011-08-17T07:08:21-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfile2' 'sip-filescover4.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-08-17T07:11:03-04:00'
describe
'2011-08-17T07:08:22-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfile3' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-08-17T07:10:01-04:00'
describe
'2011-08-17T07:08:23-04:00'
redup
'978547' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYTQ' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
5dd0122a367fdac61cf920c4116d6d09
aebe0113bfcacf9d6f56d9b7d7bc4cde04acf311
'2011-08-17T07:10:38-04:00'
describe
'259842' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYTR' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
1b645ef46ff7c2c23281ba3951aa8afb
44f5feeebe5573b4ad25e0eb1d00437d94f684a8
'2011-08-17T07:09:24-04:00'
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYTS' 'sip-files00001.pro'
27937628c5e57a3fa8a422af50da2036
c7a59dfebdfbbd999a001ab021f4ae68ca40d553
describe
'79942' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYTT' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
0f8d45f443ec646402f3ce62bb3a9704
3aec0a286059c10c0e08c7e6bae320ab3e8cee27
'2011-08-17T07:12:49-04:00'
describe
'11267473' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYTU' 'sip-files00001.tif'
657d8b80e2456621832362cb84965a49
9effe1d3d8992daeb2b1dff06a56efec81b03aa4
'2011-08-17T07:13:45-04:00'
describe
'130' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYTV' 'sip-files00001.txt'
b3ea4f18142ab63cfb7a9a13bbe9f870
352a7350ee007081836dfbb779ef02a318b39ed1
'2011-08-17T07:11:01-04:00'
describe
'27094' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYTW' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
16ea24c1d3ca24bea192b3092e58e6f3
52c114e8540d7ad19287ab37657b59fe433bb4cf
'2011-08-17T07:11:18-04:00'
describe
'1073697' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYTX' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
b2b5c6db0a8eea44da846d95e31a8863
46796966c7743476f8d2782491d8dda2f0813549
'2011-08-17T07:09:59-04:00'
describe
'272554' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYTY' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
5db90acd5a776903ba9e996c80f57f80
9f48ae072c543e78e409fdd6f303859567736a84
'2011-08-17T07:14:33-04:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYTZ' 'sip-files00002.pro'
543f8613288d80ca63712fd7f188ca30
50be64712d30ea313c65b93895b9335079fd45aa
'2011-08-17T07:15:53-04:00'
describe
'83554' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUA' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
c76aff4362599bbc3be5b520d5df27e7
4531261e4565d1a0ff438c239d4df58edc197b7c
'2011-08-17T07:10:49-04:00'
describe
'10880545' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUB' 'sip-files00002.tif'
db9504f122f282464550267263df02ee
5e0a27f6b79c354b2e2473b53ee8480baa876cfe
'2011-08-17T07:12:07-04:00'
describe
'76' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUC' 'sip-files00002.txt'
a8db768196e271c2181fb1a7cecbb60b
58939dba93b245f4251aec762e6f847707d30dd2
'2011-08-17T07:13:38-04:00'
describe
'28501' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUD' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
d6cf5d60a7ecc4b9f83cfdda69d28e87
e3e59817b2142e643d6467e5aba18c230cc81697
'2011-08-17T07:13:02-04:00'
describe
'1137997' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUE' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
70bc292a77ca81eca10f4830496c07a6
1ef415b51f48c66d88a9380eeec7531e377fcba4
'2011-08-17T07:09:25-04:00'
describe
'418485' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUF' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
d56e7873cef6480908c3b78f0ebfb308
aaaa5e3350bf295b144ac65c60f5158806117a61
'2011-08-17T07:13:39-04:00'
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUG' 'sip-files00003.pro'
a2aa44025a73d7628dfe9121c37c626d
2fb407ffc93ad8aef9b3ea6a64c9e0ad16689422
'2011-08-17T07:11:57-04:00'
describe
'127331' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUH' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
9a29b971533f8161c19cb94f438e9e52
c68e4659deba9205bcc1b3f11d57470d2edfa3c3
'2011-08-17T07:11:56-04:00'
describe
'9115141' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUI' 'sip-files00003.tif'
34fd2ae6c1394c1233fc529629e2e244
e6bde2cebb4aa279a64af6edf9ba261dc00a539a
'2011-08-17T07:09:29-04:00'
describe
'114' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUJ' 'sip-files00003.txt'
2abe26027024d741a722b1b4e0376f00
c3d083e49a88b83609d52729963e97a9dd1087c7
'2011-08-17T07:08:37-04:00'
describe
'48862' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUK' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
7285600779fb1eb364c84bbd31a07c51
bb305d71a5bf5f0755eac4a3078710c23516c77f
'2011-08-17T07:12:52-04:00'
describe
'880943' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUL' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
8ee9ad62b92a7a376e51375deb68a97d
750712ef3420e1690994480aa4cb101111a8292d
'2011-08-17T07:14:01-04:00'
describe
'270437' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUM' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
9cb2c173ec195d457a5d0663d10fde6b
9245f8bdb1610fb48407957f5a2bc0b524a5f53f
'2011-08-17T07:10:17-04:00'
describe
'6488' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUN' 'sip-files00004.pro'
b59816a624314f031c87af4450e74ea4
9110da65ea4459aa212dd9459498945def7f962b
'2011-08-17T07:14:46-04:00'
describe
'88447' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUO' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
47d2e7be27304279b97795cc593c0ef0
47be2e8104ed50db73cddac9ac004afe59c76888
'2011-08-17T07:13:27-04:00'
describe
'8889969' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUP' 'sip-files00004.tif'
57b4df6dc25d17c35bf3e7eb4c9869c2
0d175ab425833fc9f81879eeb5ba071241669b36
'2011-08-17T07:14:54-04:00'
describe
'430' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUQ' 'sip-files00004.txt'
17798f1190f4e91d12e71497ed0d73ee
7fcebdba1240e86025f61445e5d3250e48028aca
'2011-08-17T07:14:17-04:00'
describe
'35417' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUR' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
bed0c98a1bc9c95a59d11efd0e90d283
da810be87387eb066bf73ec5020f2a12a181c7a4
'2011-08-17T07:10:59-04:00'
describe
'843396' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUS' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
ad1010c84294d3ddbb51b925dcf3356b
f7c8af3f3e5781a39cf94756457cff9a71533656
'2011-08-17T07:11:19-04:00'
describe
'253211' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUT' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
bdfd17c54350782c02a0d61210e3e89d
316ac69e7af15cf1deb98cd7961ba2cd22078930
'2011-08-17T07:13:22-04:00'
describe
'3635' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUU' 'sip-files00005.pro'
904ffc070494bbd4e1b4bef9381a583b
9f835a43fa71b77295c7bf7a6577f1cadd2774a8
'2011-08-17T07:09:07-04:00'
describe
'80818' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUV' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
2eaa12c0cda64d97125e33c71fbe7d84
5f638393bb42dbb4775f101044922bf9d646dae3
'2011-08-17T07:13:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUW' 'sip-files00005.tif'
1e5cc586d4aba3952f38e0638a7aaed8
a230487de11f74577d8f78c4a58aa16bb15c82dd
'2011-08-17T07:09:52-04:00'
describe
'208' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUX' 'sip-files00005.txt'
88f709597cc2a1641003662a032a3ac5
e9af52a5c0d9201b2b3a26f0cf4b55de07db966d
'2011-08-17T07:12:32-04:00'
describe
'33551' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUY' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
ebae4515a858b80f2b1a2388e69d3b5b
8973cb86ea11ff7b92fb1f5785da83bc9ac620fc
'2011-08-17T07:10:09-04:00'
describe
'1096541' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYUZ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
da9b1395c4d87051e7eb4575916245e8
137fb1d5938c2385e3b7aad4bca2510c7a009725
'2011-08-17T07:15:15-04:00'
describe
'334133' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVA' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
bfa0fcaf0d2944e2eed6d4a9e50e6dd9
3f503d257d2dfcf502973d8fbf2ef70fdbc9859b
'2011-08-17T07:09:17-04:00'
describe
'23611' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVB' 'sip-files00006.pro'
dcb614ea3d180b8c3c43068722ece875
a8baef2d21245510e8c929e9741787b6dffb21af
'2011-08-17T07:11:45-04:00'
describe
'114684' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVC' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
1ea4ceaa4044097671e890f977b22edc
384ea0ad178108488395ea7f4862e7fece002aa3
'2011-08-17T07:14:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVD' 'sip-files00006.tif'
a07225b64deb2290aa1d16788c5412e6
127d50cd0e2d7143deb8025665200753f1debd48
'2011-08-17T07:12:43-04:00'
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVE' 'sip-files00006.txt'
c959ded30cbba4008ad8b252f80400b9
626d6623cf038e25ace46344c01eb78ccb1838c6
'2011-08-17T07:11:02-04:00'
describe
'43112' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVF' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
3756b21aa4edfbba652e15a5ae618c91
f437f36660b0d7d4513729541ac1b9bb2b24968c
'2011-08-17T07:15:10-04:00'
describe
'879205' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVG' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
2a2116f112d5bf81df095423ef5d98b5
a3e44799eca79b58fdfc4606538718146b177944
'2011-08-17T07:09:50-04:00'
describe
'267256' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVH' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
8f6a8efcbe056390bde3db0583ec6b69
ab705941e98163c2817ba2408b6257fe53db5728
describe
'8524' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVI' 'sip-files00007.pro'
f05f8bed5744c1d66db2a7f752999d9d
4f00bc1f61b22e9b66e1e29b1e432ba4eb0aae56
describe
'87987' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVJ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
2cb447ff7286146a6594954a0f60673c
15f1730c705e9bf75d0c6e794dd55b6778d4f760
'2011-08-17T07:14:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVK' 'sip-files00007.tif'
86721ebf1fde6fb772ae857ce1f78bc9
0c961362e5f091d7780a864c5ba4bd2d8fdabd52
'2011-08-17T07:10:22-04:00'
describe
'417' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVL' 'sip-files00007.txt'
39b9eebfdfe7ee28fbf2f16f4a6fae3c
d5c1dcc50ba5c8146065ab24f8519e7fdbc317bc
'2011-08-17T07:12:27-04:00'
describe
'36608' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVM' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
bae8572447df06ac0ab4a68e7c5a3a74
bc6ec8d5b83cd5e988fc20c7d1aa2984dab48382
describe
'1007403' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVN' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
0542b7a5aa8f9a99f715d830684667b0
bdc984d4bbd5ee0b16107602bbbad3309cf82839
'2011-08-17T07:11:15-04:00'
describe
'310876' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVO' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
edc541e6f1d671b3a14e1d2b469d8a9f
8955cec7a42f9d946d0b0bfa8b09a3e1f3c8ccd6
describe
'21344' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVP' 'sip-files00008.pro'
5a2d7d04e3793d094e6464d5b2c567d9
ee60d3cd5c97107ef10f715f908b2870f9c20e90
'2011-08-17T07:10:18-04:00'
describe
'111324' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVQ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
06ec3bc18b61071a58793d0d509a89b0
b945b3d1b1c69cbb91356c9056844c707b87f7e9
'2011-08-17T07:13:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVR' 'sip-files00008.tif'
aef1de565cd232b3b2e7ff1b3280202e
d4f5a2fdb7e86c264340b81c679b8072b521f9c9
'2011-08-17T07:13:15-04:00'
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVS' 'sip-files00008.txt'
36daaf1d0769504cae911f296015c856
ba51986951584311e39297bcd5ddd8133ba11bee
'2011-08-17T07:10:51-04:00'
describe
'42399' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVT' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
16b22eb978d2fd6817ea6e85e6ca2332
f861faadc2a91f4b5e0cca9ca4c4c2b0ecacc22f
'2011-08-17T07:08:36-04:00'
describe
'892443' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVU' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
a67dc1e51dbb5d493e7a0f4b33e965e2
5862e93d2f47c0cce6da36dc18e22dfa89298346
'2011-08-17T07:10:55-04:00'
describe
'277588' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVV' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
8b1b752509c4a1966f9780109f92a2aa
a0a98adaf157734a69ab29a68b27dab20e815874
'2011-08-17T07:09:13-04:00'
describe
'11935' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVW' 'sip-files00009.pro'
0ede7ef42a1a255086a81061e7ca5980
5303aa1715a70045e5cea940e05f93a55c72890d
'2011-08-17T07:12:18-04:00'
describe
'94938' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVX' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
b0cbf0b43aa0c0de247a3f2e5cbb36ce
885b2c3d98179c1960c49b9baef52f6a835f80df
'2011-08-17T07:14:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVY' 'sip-files00009.tif'
14d50f55cb31aba6fe5ac006888e4db9
33e598161e07dd6cb27ab2bf6d890f0f8c1364e9
'2011-08-17T07:13:44-04:00'
describe
'555' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYVZ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
0779761c5a80505498eb734933946b2d
726de6c035b1c069ca39c4183ddcfbd5de6a6fd3
'2011-08-17T07:12:21-04:00'
describe
'39225' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWA' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
2c9b47ff0b127154af3b718e22edba8b
b86033eece26ae6edeba3eaa2c9f40e8bfdd7b90
'2011-08-17T07:11:27-04:00'
describe
'1109860' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
b588cc970cfc6f2e8a9aa124c19d81b0
39fabc61755b5eca268396ed50bf88e8587d0d4c
'2011-08-17T07:09:16-04:00'
describe
'349007' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWC' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
f484c71db4dc06d043053ed42243a9c4
e3800d7ba7c442c88c5fe718ae864e88cf9335a4
'2011-08-17T07:14:28-04:00'
describe
'23000' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWD' 'sip-files00010.pro'
2635e18187887a6bf0ed93d6e6374ab0
74d43a767271ba7266b670b2abb4ef762a08ea1f
describe
'117848' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWE' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
8bae70c9683b577c2993d699c6ad1d50
79afb0d743a74c1ba3ab4c0b83d14ee9647b103a
'2011-08-17T07:10:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWF' 'sip-files00010.tif'
a95cc3202ead2a62841e502217936d20
bae4cfad3195e3efaabfe4ea7d067c4456d1de4b
'2011-08-17T07:10:00-04:00'
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWG' 'sip-files00010.txt'
b5c76e2fc1268412e7913922dce18dc0
0233b3381bae37089dbb3cacb97bd30b4e1f7877
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'43600' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWH' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
1f819f31808269147459f4a5f82a3f4f
0e29959069e850912bf2e2f72b825e63e0f623db
'2011-08-17T07:13:03-04:00'
describe
'1138072' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWI' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
d883f10a01d6ada8b2b033dbad777b58
15567803dbf97ae176e9776569fe66fefc7540c9
'2011-08-17T07:10:46-04:00'
describe
'369642' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWJ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
e4ccd2aacaad1001cbe0c6e9cca23848
5f8d374df308415296358387d6d9704133db0431
'2011-08-17T07:09:20-04:00'
describe
'33586' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWK' 'sip-files00011.pro'
de490eefd28615a7ca39df37e1fae7ea
7dedbb55fba4ac3b5d89129751ae468bf0e87d40
describe
'125586' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWL' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
aa7c9ab1d03edaaa4caf1db5a4169a5c
a244c3191f1628c64b044b7f3d49f993222ed261
'2011-08-17T07:13:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWM' 'sip-files00011.tif'
485b70b29075e63e7d201da589266231
68cae12aa4e9d01ed126587635fbbe8c408cdf22
'2011-08-17T07:15:11-04:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWN' 'sip-files00011.txt'
031c90f0c5e7b46f44a40af68ee31b5b
27fc6c64833ba13791198cda3fbc356167404cf5
'2011-08-17T07:12:36-04:00'
describe
'48373' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWO' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
9329fe11aa112fe31bfd6499164841fc
f9f5c95551a3dacbc43daa4a13f22ab1b709e119
describe
'1109991' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWP' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
5be23ed3a4b3d43f41723db4b568a14a
a3d08fd60ff93793d9d9256513a9f4a029fe6f3d
'2011-08-17T07:09:41-04:00'
describe
'388069' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
5a1bfd1470199a43cd897b782b861145
98f9b3c0ad58c337c953d6a0f40d0dbcbb8ce301
'2011-08-17T07:10:58-04:00'
describe
'34562' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWR' 'sip-files00012.pro'
3b561030e5d505f2f4fd2a8e35400c24
53959b4e8ef227e65187c8252be315dcfa2bad9b
'2011-08-17T07:11:17-04:00'
describe
'131677' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWS' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
292195305f6972e23cbbe0d51687af4d
93960d88b153157fbf57f7ed46015a0f1e5ca00c
'2011-08-17T07:10:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWT' 'sip-files00012.tif'
809227a3b1ef2cc4794a557957ac242a
a8e7352b76670842a03e281cf47ee9284ff3aa24
'2011-08-17T07:11:38-04:00'
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWU' 'sip-files00012.txt'
c75a22d225d5f45e49640f9f41f24e46
4dea279960f277325ae63ddab063d348abd88ad1
describe
'48165' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWV' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
413b658be85a46ff39887ce0301102f1
4114de8d72cdc8a2e8595a3142e612b61e777795
'2011-08-17T07:14:55-04:00'
describe
'1138104' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWW' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
35ed718bbae3bdc9629fc256407c1097
76071495657ef4c4460d7dc9102b8084b05ff599
'2011-08-17T07:15:16-04:00'
describe
'382040' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWX' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5c7adfd042c54fd9b9bc17760dcfcfa1
1554897f89afb4065d3a8c8ac0845036b2d7af92
describe
'33018' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWY' 'sip-files00013.pro'
5bb5d6488e38e1a1fb801c3eb71ae1f3
2d55c6f155d483e1952f9a112f5519acb08cda7d
'2011-08-17T07:08:48-04:00'
describe
'128462' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYWZ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
9db1c95adf92438dea85fafcf01067de
194ad27d01796823f5227e7bbf0a4c0601849d92
'2011-08-17T07:09:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXA' 'sip-files00013.tif'
f5e6d6978d045e3f1d8bfe668ee74e04
c39003b7ba92377b5d12af3a71102a1fd8dd1246
'2011-08-17T07:13:49-04:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXB' 'sip-files00013.txt'
8a54fa6e6961f0d569d24fb4253bcb50
41954021fdce4adcab0cef85fae0f28f6c62d6a8
describe
'49896' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXC' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
35bed6e23753266702d4a2974f11f4d4
b793f27861c407449d0a55366df883760a1bc5e0
'2011-08-17T07:14:14-04:00'
describe
'1109951' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXD' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
eacac3550539feee6f40d058944ca0ee
a854057a2064b360bbbd803416085c9a005e94f8
'2011-08-17T07:15:01-04:00'
describe
'359502' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXE' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f0a2583a6d9993b1b84d6d54b76d9733
715b9d4b0919a403fb68730b0cd3a4b1c41cd02a
'2011-08-17T07:08:52-04:00'
describe
'20585' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXF' 'sip-files00014.pro'
11e3b092f7d2cf1946fbd09b1460237e
83b38c931a4e94fb80bd46a36f09bd5cc33994ac
'2011-08-17T07:08:41-04:00'
describe
'121743' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXG' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
f8cda45f976a8c124428748629e28292
6dd1cda9b03f30faee9fada6abe8cedf65ba78fc
'2011-08-17T07:11:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXH' 'sip-files00014.tif'
fb626f25a644f113c02ace5944386a07
e795a299bf5eb3bb5fb5e03b4d06eae4a1a939dc
'2011-08-17T07:08:28-04:00'
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXI' 'sip-files00014.txt'
e98466c59ae59beb3da5e7727ec594b1
65a11aa3f6a1110872aaa2eb11cace94ba8b7451
'2011-08-17T07:09:51-04:00'
describe
'44836' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXJ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
454856814e37edf33bb0022ace97bf95
d8f1c5db822ad3e9376a933f13c8614e89854557
'2011-08-17T07:12:51-04:00'
describe
'1138060' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXK' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
cf0cf17c1b0ef9ead85a3f231cf6b3b2
1d144140a21fb1c0ae6b9b9b35d0ebfb0d30e412
'2011-08-17T07:15:33-04:00'
describe
'347743' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXL' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
40d9ec449487871ae3b65204b6b68da9
1c9d4ecbf8c30973b9af9f7e17ad9a5b8cac3994
'2011-08-17T07:11:58-04:00'
describe
'25318' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXM' 'sip-files00015.pro'
7d521abc206242d0909c7fd90798c46f
9f14763798cd1faa67a31ebdf254b1695adb4641
'2011-08-17T07:15:06-04:00'
describe
'117043' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXN' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
823b9d5ca06fb3fffef7249484789af6
f9fb6ac5487d97d51adb72bd202ff563d67421c1
'2011-08-17T07:14:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXO' 'sip-files00015.tif'
fc3a3b372b439aec92725ff2dbc34921
b1c1f75ab795d66334566ec886a86c8121a1830c
'2011-08-17T07:10:36-04:00'
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXP' 'sip-files00015.txt'
66f0a5c50c6da26eb559f7e4409c6056
e69b975bf7f110fd09aaac238297972a5f830c15
'2011-08-17T07:14:30-04:00'
describe
'45182' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXQ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4e005dc8113b0fa0f9bfdbd25a354eb6
4e478698eed3e327a5ca5c5f7993d80bbc552d1e
'2011-08-17T07:10:44-04:00'
describe
'1109968' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXR' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
961e194efe26b6c2a653a7d35d6c0313
a2825508ddd6bd90af72ea7fc786881b0016a76e
'2011-08-17T07:13:17-04:00'
describe
'395654' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXS' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
f9c2a693be4a0531d57df1a7f681e830
adf6765ac7a3527ca5573e6bbc48988816d52516
'2011-08-17T07:10:32-04:00'
describe
'34276' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXT' 'sip-files00016.pro'
2a34d84010dca530d2ffcc3f478533cc
c5695f32be99887cfa9747bf49f294158e042da0
'2011-08-17T07:09:26-04:00'
describe
'135673' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXU' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
bce63768228e2ca44da9702438b15756
92b46890d8568877254fae5b55d7c05dbc506b48
'2011-08-17T07:16:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXV' 'sip-files00016.tif'
1cee8a44e901500f5cea0f8ea98ce7b9
8feb4320484ff84cbe04e3c454cb2dbcf6eb1cfc
'2011-08-17T07:12:54-04:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXW' 'sip-files00016.txt'
c2c8c15c464ffba6b51a17c4dde55934
e5f626bc1693eda2337b810efe3f2d6d54f741be
'2011-08-17T07:12:13-04:00'
describe
'49131' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXX' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
939ba48a0f9eb0f941b899e7a8c943d5
9d524e8fb731847a4afa835dd8387502a9b1f382
'2011-08-17T07:15:18-04:00'
describe
'1137984' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXY' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
7ac3ecf9298eb499f47d2b9d410958c2
ef824c3fe543de6543ee88fb6ace90e15853bd7e
'2011-08-17T07:14:19-04:00'
describe
'372818' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYXZ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
cbb354ba935d8cd25762a479ce4a1924
864c5473ad4903125d16caff116056c9e2014d39
'2011-08-17T07:15:13-04:00'
describe
'33220' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYA' 'sip-files00017.pro'
3e837371eb9c75016b02d5f6c65f02de
cb7e369b6f81aa0142ab3f99c7bf101da9808482
describe
'126761' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYB' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
61e16aed9edd51855732557913817b11
073bf448d8e149f77e278b25a0ae3c1bd098cdf3
'2011-08-17T07:08:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYC' 'sip-files00017.tif'
5f910ef21fb750677130ddf677f3e94c
432ece187c68eee4c58c08e5d7a117c407f0370d
'2011-08-17T07:09:53-04:00'
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYD' 'sip-files00017.txt'
1eff97bb8671d859e1c104319f6f4fdf
443b8bf00bf7c6808f9d18ee93870a1c582d69db
'2011-08-17T07:14:38-04:00'
describe
'49121' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYE' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
7c1e62d153982ef32f1c5127f8af0fb1
4b60e8e188e681b365842d47d0387f0b99329140
'2011-08-17T07:11:20-04:00'
describe
'1109931' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYF' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
6035838b6f8c2b5935d54f43a634b57f
87de74456c7395941a709781cd5900604b0a5824
'2011-08-17T07:11:39-04:00'
describe
'379553' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYG' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
6129812be4ea873f1f54c31219f857ee
5c3e8538234068df47e00a1d63a3d528f5203aac
'2011-08-17T07:11:00-04:00'
describe
'31815' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYH' 'sip-files00018.pro'
22536289cfc471ed2d4c21682a3632d2
e161db16bed32c8d38aae5493222d904a84cd109
describe
'128118' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYI' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
4d9cfbd4433e395207a9efd48e9504e7
36df0bfc0e45b81a6123552aae655a06f761849b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYJ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
fd816739f4ec67a3ae33f2abcc0f8036
4c94add21f6133a98df4de87b90615f0dcea1fc6
'2011-08-17T07:13:30-04:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYK' 'sip-files00018.txt'
b908c65a12308d8492d6e14173385927
3710ba38f9e24c948e9f1be7bd9bd070e7fe2787
'2011-08-17T07:13:40-04:00'
describe
'47450' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYL' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
3979056c6f62cb597870a9e466cef563
619a2dc5b6bab8d89f6cac2c7f28834a89cf2c53
'2011-08-17T07:11:43-04:00'
describe
'1138075' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYM' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
f8f3c1f6ba95bd704cbb7d51c8fa8f8b
a3c31be215ecc6ff4726dd862c3152b181120e12
'2011-08-17T07:13:58-04:00'
describe
'378465' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYN' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
b54d6d3b21ab9cd256aeb9f2779985c6
f31a5602ed796c587db0376514e80064991d3d6a
'2011-08-17T07:14:45-04:00'
describe
'34877' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYO' 'sip-files00019.pro'
965686994751245a9be20b55caaa624d
6506b8d8c53148f1d923ecd0907fd3a3c45b5f33
'2011-08-17T07:13:53-04:00'
describe
'130213' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYP' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
106372d5f921fe8de7221ddb6e7cbf12
230868f6347e996d2cb6544a04e84fae6c87f073
'2011-08-17T07:08:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYQ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
1c45861b84ab580d95ef31ca102123a1
fc03297cdf8b0b491616a4477434bca02168c527
'2011-08-17T07:10:11-04:00'
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYR' 'sip-files00019.txt'
d940191d460fac191a31e6d3d1b0bd72
a7782e274e21834fc29ebb5c5b355cbe078fe592
'2011-08-17T07:15:59-04:00'
describe
'49616' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYS' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
1e632385ca3d351bb497a578229d20a8
f7b8f3d3c32c195995893ecaa77107b79b891bcf
'2011-08-17T07:09:48-04:00'
describe
'1109921' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYT' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f82c3f8f8ea93c056459a1a1f9d6cc4a
607aad624e4f109acc38ca0cb6f1e7b6d2278172
'2011-08-17T07:13:25-04:00'
describe
'321547' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYU' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
94e655ef211b6fd6750fd49468616e58
e1b5aed89abc04e6f3c04458431c04b9634cc7a2
'2011-08-17T07:12:14-04:00'
describe
'7787' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYV' 'sip-files00020.pro'
7cf14cec9d1393e6aec5d3f81af94091
d6ef644fed9af0112044d9e31f0d27df2e340aa6
'2011-08-17T07:14:22-04:00'
describe
'105034' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYW' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
3c61c00ddf07912a2af4a9e99a8cc964
11c3065fe55a977e30a754dc46ef473f3928e1e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYX' 'sip-files00020.tif'
276eab1a9350b53a3e5b73edac3ecd7b
0afe23376e9ee0111864f08a7e89a0388a101d39
'2011-08-17T07:09:05-04:00'
describe
'341' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYY' 'sip-files00020.txt'
3fd2e4ad8f5ddc4f922c7f74a407d787
3f6e5567a6b4df829c0c6cf4903d2601e3d99450
describe
'40289' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYYZ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
af7a2d5249c7d37c45d636e65ac10725
1307ddf913f4d84440f52350943184b31c23902a
'2011-08-17T07:11:26-04:00'
describe
'1007479' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZA' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
946e62393987c3db24d8ddd14e60554f
1c80dcd71c39747750f00c652a2bff359d500706
'2011-08-17T07:12:59-04:00'
describe
'298290' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZB' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
9e589824dfb9f44523af7df427e902a9
695739383467b2e16f2f55c93061f32309087874
'2011-08-17T07:09:21-04:00'
describe
'16998' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZC' 'sip-files00021.pro'
865bd62bc0754c0f5e4a41d7a5ed49e2
e08f86b4c0c6f147f66c8f1d1af3f8fbee70f26f
'2011-08-17T07:09:15-04:00'
describe
'99219' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZD' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
182287614986e268289617668592a135
4fcadbdf9ed60c73522dd65fe16acb0daab30d2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZE' 'sip-files00021.tif'
d5fcde55acd83cffd278e6dfcf5dbdaa
86688ecbc296fb16d2dc299a0f8de635876442cf
'2011-08-17T07:09:22-04:00'
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZF' 'sip-files00021.txt'
3f344cd6cfa418eb51c06ba1efbd2c6e
0cf7f1057281d43170067b40d1c5d6daaa908eda
describe
'39597' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZG' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
6ec07557d30f1b8b9ad299ec69015329
0c37c1f7fe36b5c38234c98d2d7db4cb99463e18
describe
'1109969' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZH' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
50181a5eb6859b4a4360daa3b7a3e42b
b6938b3606d2a9530320c645b39f14f6c7b1aa00
describe
'365803' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZI' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
491f0afc9941c179008cc9bc2017763c
b5c531f77d322158e1f6cb0f807c09ef6791aed7
'2011-08-17T07:08:59-04:00'
describe
'28064' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZJ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
fbad7ce91012f4e2bdfc9ecd123e297e
82d8efd55f74a13c08352b86127168cfc9d256ae
'2011-08-17T07:10:43-04:00'
describe
'123799' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZK' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
e32b7779bd2c92196af583e54c51c47d
7553ab12af50893ccc32e328928544f8ba52d86e
'2011-08-17T07:13:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZL' 'sip-files00022.tif'
2e7bca4410ebdb7d0fd5b2a4b5dea469
bb72a801920ae0618a84512856f0cc18d6063c53
'2011-08-17T07:13:33-04:00'
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZM' 'sip-files00022.txt'
8ef5433b5c85e93bb11782ea70989354
be8fb3fb292aa6a6573c602d2b8618401f5d8846
describe
'45378' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZN' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
487dc0ef918d9892ab35633d33a07436
0b1e0fffecabe142699b974f6f57c41d5fa13e3e
'2011-08-17T07:12:50-04:00'
describe
'1138028' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZO' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
55310b942ffaa8e4ffab38acce29ef19
28a03fa6cfe94f3b6aa7f68659117add0e251517
describe
'375751' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZP' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
95de68aa785334f1fbc1daf51cf3ca55
55bfc7f15be5388741a27772bda73e66360c3ae9
describe
'34504' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZQ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
0f4be0669555dc45b01d141e1ffd6c0b
f1b3091b38ff7ef4183629f05bad9227f20d62ad
'2011-08-17T07:16:01-04:00'
describe
'128172' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZR' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
ef5d67c6bfa4a0d670b76e581709de62
ef6d5968482d61e405314945828c6ecc9c3da341
'2011-08-17T07:12:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZS' 'sip-files00023.tif'
9bd4ee6cf3e0a1ebfd6f5c3f80ee9679
287ac83283ddef7e2f6dda8135b7d80d183b4f39
'2011-08-17T07:14:05-04:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZT' 'sip-files00023.txt'
437a6ce1cfefc9cb47a6bc02635020bb
4007350924cf84184f40a2f485c4b572f7c86c02
'2011-08-17T07:12:41-04:00'
describe
'49360' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZU' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
fb3b0ed16cf0c3327e97ba6d420ddb3c
22c42da4f544c2a504a3f7103f532cb091c35673
'2011-08-17T07:09:55-04:00'
describe
'1109985' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZV' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
c64154b9ac98b715679e75db4a8abf10
6403ff0fd2e15b797909a6ab0de1ee87927d2ff7
'2011-08-17T07:09:37-04:00'
describe
'374924' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZW' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
4301adb052525794bc92b5ef8af81a7c
a6d3f4a8c873dd935863e833eabdba8076058679
describe
'32569' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZX' 'sip-files00024.pro'
a35978758525335d858d456a28bbda7e
e2872060f32dda4660325ca485ca74e866fae8f3
'2011-08-17T07:15:48-04:00'
describe
'129109' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZY' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
a942422e0224f5d7c2a9a94a034bffa1
0a6ebee063062331a2b7776546778e08971171c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABYZZ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
8d7b7ef7576b150d97e3af7d1853df51
0ce5498eabed95ad4ccd585f50935eb746f4937a
'2011-08-17T07:14:04-04:00'
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAA' 'sip-files00024.txt'
aff4c4e6f641e927800ab375807cd1fb
ad966cf9e9cbf758a9c588893bf6d7befe72dcce
'2011-08-17T07:10:08-04:00'
describe
'47644' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAB' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
9cb3e4ec959dc1aedac07198ce68ce5b
fa0b752a2b5c79f4dc1b13c8dac97661e37a4215
describe
'1138069' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAC' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
de6de809e3b2a03bb1b5dd38afab4789
a0f011380c91311f029abd1f648c95b5989b8576
'2011-08-17T07:12:15-04:00'
describe
'355355' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAD' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
65f32054eeaeeaa4cc686367daa95a5a
133bd9153fef043c5d04143aa85a04b7ed215725
describe
'32014' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAE' 'sip-files00025.pro'
5490385ff6ce096efd8ff81c0e807f6d
ae261d9ff93c517544eefabfc7cdc1b28737d501
'2011-08-17T07:11:59-04:00'
describe
'122916' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAF' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d72b94f788c29a20da918e708ba3c1d7
6ad58ee1abba71739a64d72c26d2796a275743e0
'2011-08-17T07:09:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAG' 'sip-files00025.tif'
88b922bef09e4fae2b9779b5b172e21b
c06b4a809890dc78a13e5d81dbc0c193e0c02dcc
'2011-08-17T07:10:57-04:00'
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAH' 'sip-files00025.txt'
4b8516461eaef58c38f78d809febb25f
37d4b812bf20bfbacb20b6cb05a607c4140fea0b
describe
'47240' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAI' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
37f8a6efd022a263be01d1b7e64cfd07
60b97ae085dde4cc62a2485abada810f8c230dd4
describe
'971956' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAJ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d8d31827703360a5c779dfdecaa13739
40563d5e38d2d29f9c988159c431c726e5d95897
'2011-08-17T07:11:07-04:00'
describe
'295708' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAK' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
be862e4771b57d768db4fddefbdc3b69
3b62a3d2e6746fcfcb07ed345ccb477e3e06aace
'2011-08-17T07:15:36-04:00'
describe
'15608' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAL' 'sip-files00026.pro'
c0b58a0044f2919718da15d17dc15b57
b1135b77e7727fe841119f8b12addcd265891859
'2011-08-17T07:10:35-04:00'
describe
'97264' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAM' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
eba118b3c92db8e7dfa8df1aa0f5b9de
16974936448ac587b8a190ee81b92ffa5e28b8fe
'2011-08-17T07:15:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAN' 'sip-files00026.tif'
a7c9c7389b08f89c6a6d0dc3b970844b
df91b8aed747fa0c9a818a3478acc4ebbeaca9d9
'2011-08-17T07:11:34-04:00'
describe
'841' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAO' 'sip-files00026.txt'
6dc61f9a38a37544ee6af57effd6a0c6
e6573ca6864091c31cd510a6e925f5b78066de00
describe
'37911' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAP' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
58ae6de657e0fca5ac090dac1322c1a7
e9909c899e60767b559dd169aafb9a898d7c44a4
'2011-08-17T07:15:34-04:00'
describe
'1027099' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAQ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
7b4842c07cdb48215074f40e2bddedc6
cc55bf412c14bd6d9bf7ed8b80d6802ea1b85e26
describe
'294008' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAR' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
88307432a038cab057a993684597cd99
ee69231d43d84d829820e539356060d6cc4ee32c
'2011-08-17T07:14:20-04:00'
describe
'10764' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAS' 'sip-files00027.pro'
26720a351d1c6b036331f83d56a87157
2bbaffac9dbb90361cdd297bf9111bf362ef09ca
'2011-08-17T07:08:27-04:00'
describe
'95196' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAT' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
30fa72f0af630ed3a38267c8627b6b9b
7491caa9c8b3d7777c1957e428c05375b84bc46b
'2011-08-17T07:09:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAU' 'sip-files00027.tif'
786995040f57252d7670ba5f6c2c5bca
77173d4943c872d8a97b9e869e89faed946b59bc
'2011-08-17T07:13:16-04:00'
describe
'678' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAV' 'sip-files00027.txt'
2f0fe514c40ddb3e4fb1cdee49d6960b
259461fea194dbdb2d893b473c7e7327affb275a
describe
'38414' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAW' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
d9f5eeea14bea07df22061b53a7051c0
65f47f52a47bef25aaf4d864162dbc32e5324f68
'2011-08-17T07:10:54-04:00'
describe
'1109877' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAX' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a4b350e8995be74833c9d7a864ff05a5
768f9bf0e7e82e94d7018bd58333ce3ee48a6f11
'2011-08-17T07:14:51-04:00'
describe
'354572' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAY' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
9797c77a0651cdd9569543fbc453d135
fb38eab20e7ea90ff7c5af423377254e8125ece1
describe
'25377' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZAZ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b826d9971da394d8c8e08406204f2c02
ff8c77586d93beea3adfdf32b7928de60d97a3ce
'2011-08-17T07:16:00-04:00'
describe
'120194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBA' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
018b4e452863c0cf7fc1454ef7a1c214
39193acedd774e24c56ecad4d2c0f6ac44481b62
'2011-08-17T07:14:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBB' 'sip-files00028.tif'
6a01a86ac9a229abdda8664041a54e5f
8210295cf0e0a8475d175f34d934842667f1fb9c
'2011-08-17T07:13:36-04:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBC' 'sip-files00028.txt'
095701d97b2b38579b57a25f0522bacd
92770eae6e53fe65b08e11dd54c0916a2d7b2607
'2011-08-17T07:09:10-04:00'
describe
'44748' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBD' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
6070df8e4b6fe5ffc5cd470274ae07ca
b9ced78b0fbf72f5b3aff3d5ce3a610fea58c873
'2011-08-17T07:11:47-04:00'
describe
'1138064' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBE' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
136ef12bb25a29a5f8b298696138afc2
d2b73b17a6070faa80c2ac81491ba7cf291379d6
describe
'374721' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBF' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
fa921cb0675125fb239c8d4fa1a8ed9d
72b63a9029e59f438bc8fb5dc47f296ac0aec414
'2011-08-17T07:16:08-04:00'
describe
'35156' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBG' 'sip-files00029.pro'
713871fe9198bae309f1dd315a38903d
9da27fee705b87f21ad25192d0f02ad706a8b523
describe
'127197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBH' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
1adb82f3d7843024a3fa202bd3f50a3f
b5e3dacd63e86dacef37e63a20d787ced6fe6057
'2011-08-17T07:14:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBI' 'sip-files00029.tif'
eb7156c83d68ba406baa108723eeb1a0
e6cd93999021f3d72489ace46c68f2ca87858e46
'2011-08-17T07:13:24-04:00'
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBJ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
ddc617b2c3c5e87ed1b9bbe67fedddc5
f1c4146b8a1e525648ddcb060bd98bdbf96f3cd5
'2011-08-17T07:15:39-04:00'
describe
'48646' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBK' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
876a1067856805e3a7683761f9bafe2f
7a656c11a2e233b38a9fc394ee17e43565a3f3e1
'2011-08-17T07:09:01-04:00'
describe
'1109791' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
46836dc07a927279e25f6fc57eb8932b
727983dcf0ef01f3be83bc2f0175fd5ad99c6e32
describe
'391105' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBM' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
5b0bd941d6467eb0b621e2a19f1e55b5
92b85609b1a95d6c555f51898c535bbc46c13d88
'2011-08-17T07:09:30-04:00'
describe
'35687' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBN' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b153c337058818b36ec6ffbf5e85ffc3
4b4f21e14282db25937f207c1f31f0ef004f192e
'2011-08-17T07:14:43-04:00'
describe
'132257' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBO' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
990028a30f99ccea6a9e3e38d9eba97b
02d55fbb2d10cba3ef631ef8b569536563674bfe
'2011-08-17T07:12:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBP' 'sip-files00030.tif'
e28dede719537a73e1b740a30788172e
13ff4032256ecb4c8b61b0ccaf372f66ca499204
'2011-08-17T07:11:12-04:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBQ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f140cd45ab35449237f8cab46606a696
7ea5a82549fdc1ce8c0afb0fafe93370d1518d39
'2011-08-17T07:14:56-04:00'
describe
'48041' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBR' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
caf958d2cef16e6bed9fd0a100782ef8
37cac97ef06df7d1221d6154c74939cdf70e2c01
describe
'1138032' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBS' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
98e89cf0beb09062bf6b755c8955d441
c3a3aca5aae6070a7b69659835fd5091fab68bdb
'2011-08-17T07:12:10-04:00'
describe
'374789' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBT' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
74978fd0de666c325a8a384b1e1a9a1b
a564dcee1fccf259aa789b2482feb8ad3f0b45c9
'2011-08-17T07:14:15-04:00'
describe
'35374' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBU' 'sip-files00031.pro'
146fca5b8e7f66ec472252fade23ee0a
09c01ed7c029ce9814fe5c00f96307bf958c096e
'2011-08-17T07:11:21-04:00'
describe
'128373' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBV' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
484707c78cc15d9284fb505c09d37c83
80d76b1b95e8b6ff47fcc89a02ed1178a629e7d6
'2011-08-17T07:11:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBW' 'sip-files00031.tif'
87d9d4695cd44b07ff32f3ba70d8b5e2
6418a817d14150d40bcbd0a1da71615aa577969a
'2011-08-17T07:08:46-04:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBX' 'sip-files00031.txt'
1dc3c4d11bcf89a6b67434cb5705b33d
caacc731de67205d17ed5eb3a2d5a6528eb09581
'2011-08-17T07:14:48-04:00'
describe
'48828' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBY' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
aeaca8729bc24f1754b41a1b373e60be
cd65a419ec8c5b819160d6b65f61db3dfb3f928f
describe
'1109899' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZBZ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
14a3a376eeaa0f11106b3084fe4e1822
22f28af30aef5e112bfb6eede9fd68eb0d4e78e4
'2011-08-17T07:08:50-04:00'
describe
'388625' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCA' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
1f6fb9cd7bdf3fa96f93cc264bfcc7b5
ff1e264c69cc3bac5bffe183434c2758e7bcb34c
'2011-08-17T07:10:34-04:00'
describe
'35410' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCB' 'sip-files00032.pro'
6ad195f5abef0c34420720f7cdca2cda
4cde6d94cd8672338a446951ab8d4c40a2ddb2ac
'2011-08-17T07:10:42-04:00'
describe
'134209' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCC' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
edb1907666b4e3488837ed2dbcb67a3e
8c484d700587a30d70d2ece065642fdcd2b6358a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCD' 'sip-files00032.tif'
64a3c6c1c33bfa8498d65b2a594ff2d2
a077b2f65942e6ecf4280d8216bd82dc55f35d29
'2011-08-17T07:10:31-04:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCE' 'sip-files00032.txt'
312be868a6af759f11de4db0a7e071aa
3b667a83ac8a9db266b52f458d11a3a42f4fef07
'2011-08-17T07:11:32-04:00'
describe
'49176' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCF' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
2629753dbbb6e393a3a79d85de0c729c
91b2ff396e932daf438ddbf4048390eeba198afb
describe
'1138026' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCG' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
d3aa13415d77df2c770026b62a2f4b07
da938b0cbf5c0486ab78ffc90aedbec68f44c3da
describe
'368883' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCH' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
a5cc0bf080a3a617fe6e009df8cad28f
1d39ef58fd24fc038dd82f48d6b447ccdc5b217a
'2011-08-17T07:13:42-04:00'
describe
'35854' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCI' 'sip-files00033.pro'
2c1453b75b6b389b67c5e775cdb45e13
f3c1fb4e55883c4ee279b384c90fc648685dd744
describe
'126145' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCJ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
553d5402fd2e918f1f444d971b30bfd1
b3cbae648c54f5d72dcbecbfd462dae9744f69cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCK' 'sip-files00033.tif'
9f47ede0cf10d250baab0aa418902172
5bcbc5ac8ac382dfc250982e5cf02a3cebfe913e
'2011-08-17T07:10:47-04:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCL' 'sip-files00033.txt'
660b99f87fb8184902418d12d0bfb338
ab4767010323f39149630d4dcd258d73350b3894
'2011-08-17T07:13:55-04:00'
describe
'48420' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCM' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
d1313624ca34c869ca40d691527ec551
2eca8309e0e75394b06054cbd8fa3cd73f01fe93
describe
'1109861' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCN' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
77c0b806b194bbe9d2a120c1528bf806
de1332e9d8d9e970678245809c43f7f82ffde240
'2011-08-17T07:12:48-04:00'
describe
'388492' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCO' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
7fd0fb971633f4355373d8331a66213c
5afd3653c8b962a5516e819b29bb1093eed5135d
'2011-08-17T07:08:38-04:00'
describe
'35283' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCP' 'sip-files00034.pro'
515e09ca5bc9ee23b73b4190dcc662ba
ee26c44aa9ddbb2254225745b3ebc3082d2040c4
'2011-08-17T07:08:49-04:00'
describe
'131715' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCQ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f1564475cf0777987d01cfefa9a0afe6
7a240ab6d0ba59ef9b821d7089b80715ee86cec4
'2011-08-17T07:14:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCR' 'sip-files00034.tif'
82ef8b496d2d69e46435b484c9fcca9d
7851b53d7851ce1ef65f1a7b091910e94f1d2571
'2011-08-17T07:10:40-04:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCS' 'sip-files00034.txt'
da89792a9a59178b3d939b11f084e6d1
397592499dbf99f4db7b5dce9b96a4388e563449
describe
'48364' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCT' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
00a52f6da9860483a92498a157178e8c
98c1881bd315772e6bd22bc85a9b918dd84bebe6
'2011-08-17T07:12:17-04:00'
describe
'1137946' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCU' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
a16d894b4804c0dd6f72c2f972445e40
ccbd3a70eafdb3f8d14e3a1713dffa27ea2cd0a5
'2011-08-17T07:12:01-04:00'
describe
'372178' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCV' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
111656bcb73637db02a7d68cd0b916d8
47d66091932d25577d293e789281f969531a7e6d
describe
'34323' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCW' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0e30c375d7d7b2d95e25affab87c00b4
94d5a455b43c33ebd7d12b8c5505ac1f4d0b0825
describe
'128692' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCX' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
622387533e018d25ebfee79356daf7b8
c6408612623d9c50a97b146c3383426868690204
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCY' 'sip-files00035.tif'
ae8c874d386e728ae3bb8d55ad081de5
0b5539d7c8cd9002d63b9b84db9fdc3a7a7da284
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZCZ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
c05ae6e9596675087c8b4d69ed78d75a
aa9b89ada0cacdc4d0d4ee01f9cfc1da7d4bc3e8
describe
'48399' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDA' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c5f0efa894297adea9e5c945626289b0
174c5c7b6afbba27632a4a0608e0ff76f99e4a9e
describe
'1109873' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDB' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
f85ba759333ac9ab2f4fea67b4e88d9d
17b9aac9c4eae090445498b821d16a1d5f988eca
describe
'391156' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDC' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
704d20be4269af5cac8ef8ddaca03032
74ee0b51f97aa88b16730d953481db1cd00450e5
describe
'34757' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDD' 'sip-files00036.pro'
95db788e4aed989147a4e776681a127b
c51ea2195d8d9f8c51d1802458546a23dc6ff66f
describe
'133314' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDE' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
01ce72293842968edab75e8ad8ec4333
06b8af3e57ab240d2acacd8a57512de4dffca4a3
'2011-08-17T07:11:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDF' 'sip-files00036.tif'
4bffdb69373448ad5815dadbd59aeb0a
b55c491f632f19836431d730de7d1852ab744a4e
'2011-08-17T07:08:31-04:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDG' 'sip-files00036.txt'
75663499ba75942db93e3dc7be085795
dfa4a9a66533f03d24551db22199adf11c454bff
'2011-08-17T07:15:19-04:00'
describe
'48993' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDH' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
2b02f3bc54cc3b6bcef4e64e526d053b
c7cec0569dcdeec361f78ba79903dfc9a97a0f55
describe
'1138080' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDI' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f4e77b7bcc9c2f4962a35e3669bd1da7
d8ee65df551ef0cc5dfcfc5808f8f2de021ba802
'2011-08-17T07:12:28-04:00'
describe
'368547' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDJ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
23eee1155f466cc3216b39644de796d1
13fae4a8c1c114cffa9b2f6b83c54051f374f610
'2011-08-17T07:13:23-04:00'
describe
'34576' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDK' 'sip-files00037.pro'
130a3318aedfe22dccd86ab8bd954235
34c35f53c7dc3bc400769579a2715e8a87f3feb5
'2011-08-17T07:12:45-04:00'
describe
'127650' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDL' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a249f301912d35e22a23dceff8aa2e2f
b93bbfac2b1871e95a89f0ace52ca31d508422cc
'2011-08-17T07:14:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDM' 'sip-files00037.tif'
de3afc697cd7673eae3d90fe9144ba63
e2c0dfbd7d33129dfdafc0fa9a8f63868a5e4e0d
'2011-08-17T07:14:40-04:00'
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDN' 'sip-files00037.txt'
6da09e023d9d0afb8e881ebbaab2b4f9
5ae0044ed2321c6073ad88988fc343c1015fe84d
'2011-08-17T07:16:16-04:00'
describe
'48587' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDO' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
ab6ccf7a35580ddc958c8e545350a19d
73b279accd6b93b9ffc2c86b097c004ea0c34996
'2011-08-17T07:11:55-04:00'
describe
'1109978' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDP' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
c8bfbcad32322fbb8f70a06cb556a917
96351528a7355db80a7c5e9661b590eb10d0a0ee
'2011-08-17T07:12:39-04:00'
describe
'376388' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDQ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
9a08085ba505f026aa29065d36ada255
f7dfe20a2f684610bb89bfc7b8f405976dd7b16b
'2011-08-17T07:13:04-04:00'
describe
'32912' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDR' 'sip-files00038.pro'
84f2d77093830868765a65582128dda9
8a2a6056b1353032b193c26fb243fe2cd8749dbf
'2011-08-17T07:09:06-04:00'
describe
'130250' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDS' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
cabdf36d65c22c3ae7705d4ad5b41a65
b72e053563230782e52224235bf1e64a45fb5cad
'2011-08-17T07:14:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDT' 'sip-files00038.tif'
e3bb4322cbfb7d31fb27673a3a2d1ab5
73a077c68d18a5751a27bcf76283523a5601fef6
'2011-08-17T07:10:03-04:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDU' 'sip-files00038.txt'
63acee568e00e4a482f4c53eccaa0606
8b5c1c64ae779fa3819bf959d8f59a037d8de403
'2011-08-17T07:16:19-04:00'
describe
'47688' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDV' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
aae601350e0312c8835034402318bb31
5ea24389df14fd68ef3e4295d9a7f6d56b6ce0ca
describe
'1138096' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDW' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
2c2b39878f26cfa7f05414bcaf18ffb8
e7a0c8a2dbb7135564676d9aeed5002afb67f693
'2011-08-17T07:12:33-04:00'
describe
'374778' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDX' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
3613c05b1b980716b1b287dd5d06d8d9
da6bfc19dd8ce64660e5a9b5463775e7fc3b46a8
'2011-08-17T07:14:12-04:00'
describe
'35786' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDY' 'sip-files00039.pro'
9c71af35156af3f3149150b3cdd1fd29
a69895613d89c101bbc4ebea99a9b5b6f9312ef8
'2011-08-17T07:14:21-04:00'
describe
'129372' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZDZ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
17247867d06b827cda000ad91de94a3b
e4aa9581b47f93a59c9130200fd9e31f05a40433
'2011-08-17T07:13:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEA' 'sip-files00039.tif'
ef9c6a72409d11d5acce941265b7a79f
1a292df47eca4539f3c801d7878c7bfc5dff8245
'2011-08-17T07:12:24-04:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEB' 'sip-files00039.txt'
100ed41a83ff4aed4c5acf0b0451ffa8
4f9e87b756364cde8c1f7c0d116a19622362e701
'2011-08-17T07:10:10-04:00'
describe
'49407' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEC' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
b79c30700f5f0eae3febbbfee96bb2e5
2ddb39c2fbfee1d6f9c32ddb95464ab02a181d4e
describe
'1109973' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZED' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
e5f3400d0f886181a5bad36bdefa7505
3d5846e44419f53c9547c9d8e186bfd5078c3215
'2011-08-17T07:16:18-04:00'
describe
'388911' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEE' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
cf40caeefe2b4136d744d2bdcdb193c8
aaa166aae637b3f64c256f7133e66b5bb84d192b
'2011-08-17T07:13:34-04:00'
describe
'34929' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEF' 'sip-files00040.pro'
4c3097bd587a5a592f3ce62e28883d59
201815b3b44a5e2c9c551805c73c943c8eb75dcf
describe
'133782' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEG' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
daef203ad76c2cdf1381fdb76660ef3f
d7812a30357167c06c7914a11abcf56bc6b20792
'2011-08-17T07:15:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEH' 'sip-files00040.tif'
6e93e817c26737805d086577cc224ffb
6f8e9e518add0286cd784e1d3b723c0614159500
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEI' 'sip-files00040.txt'
32fad3d2686e50b820689e6514fe029e
3082a9a186dcee109b1f4abf3317451373e39d2d
'2011-08-17T07:11:40-04:00'
describe
'48327' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEJ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
24105d63b6d1f0f88760cf8bca9bef95
429547d7d3153da8ce4cb1f05b8e3a4f43451863
describe
'1138029' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEK' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
8d5186ea0462d3c0212684122f834ddc
dc68c92dea16aa88066ffd9d2e03e01870843f66
'2011-08-17T07:12:20-04:00'
describe
'351415' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEL' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
0f1773b06d48b329b97b28ad9bb239d8
b4a4a172d6bb3b646e1b443a7c65dc624da31df5
describe
'29688' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEM' 'sip-files00041.pro'
5e449a8112dbfed34ca7ac2c9af9cbfe
45c99a06af4ee8ccf5bd907300e6ae997632e9dd
describe
'118964' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEN' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
da0400d5c8560b5ab81d4969e34a99de
ba21314b443a4b6f2a8285e1297180bd600a574d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEO' 'sip-files00041.tif'
eb1c95d07ea54c570d9c60feea1a28a5
846e04212ac3fea716e86aa430a00d75cdbcb680
'2011-08-17T07:13:50-04:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEP' 'sip-files00041.txt'
103956c8ff5e9e3a52beb8557c0c30d4
326831151fe1e1abd6764addb358b6d9f7c7f9fe
describe
'46375' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEQ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
e08a0e481fbd004d87298c0a5e5c1a79
9eaaee22860977bfd511f94a5c09bddaf8be524b
'2011-08-17T07:09:27-04:00'
describe
'1003069' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZER' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
9f7841a701157c2a4b7b1fdc524cde1c
53e79752d138f544393090a39f819180e7a3bc4b
describe
'274155' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZES' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
b25eeaf179aa24637a1f80f82067c0c7
079f6fb7e9db7978a2be9c7c515ec21ead5e2076
describe
'313' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZET' 'sip-files00042.pro'
e1eb8e4217aec1ae4e5da1b71573f762
79d59f66a4fd421c82d60f99e30e6648ac532153
'2011-08-17T07:11:50-04:00'
describe
'85097' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEU' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
2772792b3812b5ce2306e82c0c956f5e
6c08be0f49e577e1ab894d75f25d15b0e73ca02f
'2011-08-17T07:14:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEV' 'sip-files00042.tif'
f7ccc38517b19657bdfc2ef2f80dbf8c
cfceb6cb7e75839a0d221ec8c612db750d3a18e5
'2011-08-17T07:11:46-04:00'
describe
'281' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEW' 'sip-files00042.txt'
ac5a15514497d861aedb484775590c0f
71b807ab110d4a4651734a907f3f36c0ee54c785
describe
Invalid character
'33230' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
ce34b9e79d49ad1c94351a8c6711b4bd
ef68c00c473898bc70eacb6a22057430cccde3e8
'2011-08-17T07:13:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEY' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
1300f148da062ccd959e318a3ebd164b
a1a8e0c14592931bafe35b6590864f3accd9d80f
'2011-08-17T07:09:33-04:00'
describe
'366940' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZEZ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
d6bede971774a40f35e3144c73ead855
8d97111104d904fc4525043170f8aef10c458f2f
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFA' 'sip-files00043.pro'
11785fb41df00c3754d4b161f5d75944
2acc0bd8d5794521cc2439477f662329f5bd2ea6
'2011-08-17T07:15:12-04:00'
describe
'114761' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFB' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
e0a52b5cee550685945004f86b7217cd
fc28cb901b1d81c3f212dfbccab85ddaaa35d87b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFC' 'sip-files00043.tif'
07f2fe427c9c56b0c07a9386ad85ae21
4d8ec3427344bc748f050ec133aa487d7a2b1667
'2011-08-17T07:15:45-04:00'
describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFD' 'sip-files00043.txt'
55860681e0627768c2ee2dcb3578c3b7
3f82eca72f8cd2e177461a16c594a08efc731bc8
'2011-08-17T07:09:56-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'44807' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFE' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
546a651e84f92fe9d927f46c1c8196aa
afdb9cf0f9c9e402813cf584a249aa9ae65c049b
'2011-08-17T07:12:34-04:00'
describe
'1109896' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFF' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
d642ce8f34204b0ee248d36af2f84f96
6080e10d2c9f2625eadbfef858b62208d4539f87
'2011-08-17T07:12:56-04:00'
describe
'363965' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFG' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
46248e7d57892e456a66e5222ad92d83
d6072ee68e3192a04553cd8e49348250ace5eacd
'2011-08-17T07:10:20-04:00'
describe
'26805' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFH' 'sip-files00044.pro'
ec5552e024e90dae57a7e77966f4c6a3
ac8bf22eb1d1222214816fca8fa8cf426d473f30
'2011-08-17T07:16:09-04:00'
describe
'122873' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFI' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
ac61c2477bb9ff821740278b014f7e54
d8cc663ceed6873f29a19dcb1a3227cf5dbb8ae4
'2011-08-17T07:11:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFJ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
50a4ac38416e783c76976b6f32fc2e6e
cf21a6997b75fc9ed7b230a6ec6de331a8790049
'2011-08-17T07:08:42-04:00'
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFK' 'sip-files00044.txt'
51272c8af5c64d856e9c3a930720698a
b836f188c3c9bdda9c3d8e6df7ab938579614a9c
'2011-08-17T07:14:44-04:00'
describe
'45652' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFL' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
a78dd8a2590f819014646016f3783093
14ad5980ffe55cb576ad7cfba9049cc4869e9e0b
'2011-08-17T07:12:40-04:00'
describe
'1138061' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFM' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
6c9a30828cbdd8bebd565aa779c2e5f4
6613b7ae093f4c0295fac4412d4f4ba1a35d5b02
'2011-08-17T07:12:58-04:00'
describe
'376651' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFN' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
86d484911a512e85ed72d9ce303608af
84b8cdb04c40d69e4b11e5f60ef1ff8c7fd76d77
'2011-08-17T07:16:14-04:00'
describe
'34293' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFO' 'sip-files00045.pro'
91400d50e7bceca8df7366f1c35712ae
54b2c9cedcbd036f7e2ef74fbf712a44e4998557
'2011-08-17T07:11:08-04:00'
describe
'127423' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFP' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
7973158d1cb6b248c737e2d2bd5804ec
656fb9b400c342d886ccfbe1caaf7140993f1636
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFQ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
296941f1c632be34a896558b86a8364b
405fb9a3289b2d639032d3780737e2f1d115cd8a
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFR' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d66da778c4acaea134dfbdc0569afc9b
fd01a3cabfaed071426addcb5cbe828abd209855
'2011-08-17T07:09:46-04:00'
describe
'48952' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFS' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
bc0c4f3f3b87c39483bf3aa1b4ce1e3a
78e7a7723886623b6f1f382aff15c4380e721537
'2011-08-17T07:12:46-04:00'
describe
'1109980' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFT' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
f9a00ee7ea5f944754d19fe9da2555a5
a59cce9b55900491282a2de38a23900b06e26551
'2011-08-17T07:11:13-04:00'
describe
'388830' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFU' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
36c27c471fefe65b974e583b7ec6ed62
2ba8fc17118beb7f623735ad06311eaa1ef224f5
describe
'34028' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFV' 'sip-files00046.pro'
d40d4904038375d9f262241018ca589e
7a4ccccc26267845cb2d8d7238c307a3f9174b4e
'2011-08-17T07:10:14-04:00'
describe
'131799' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFW' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
bb29accb16aeeab2cd9ede1a94c6d6f6
1fda34b4376ee9dfad181b607f1e46e4a75d79f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFX' 'sip-files00046.tif'
a23610cf5debd7827bc0c0b1529836dc
cd79b7d423e28b00cf905dec3586b9a2f2911406
'2011-08-17T07:11:33-04:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFY' 'sip-files00046.txt'
407ebb3718a8a24411038750e6109e8b
5d93068c9a7b4f4d7582647b2d5941f31e786ea1
'2011-08-17T07:08:35-04:00'
describe
'47943' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZFZ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
7256c625616828c458e7492cfd482a40
9173a5bc2cfc33711049bcdb113cc8172bba2f51
'2011-08-17T07:13:56-04:00'
describe
'1103373' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGA' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
992a0bb752d49a50c54e56b31b76e4e8
5f46b1c54489fe1a393a112f83b89c196ef4300b
describe
'368360' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGB' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
693d53d72eb80a466068f3e2fedbb472
da6bd3845848008e48d594eb91902089642a0a29
'2011-08-17T07:13:32-04:00'
describe
'33752' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGC' 'sip-files00047.pro'
b6d4a84beedcc3c059d730cbd0c33dad
aa3b752f3dad62076e6c9349bfeeff69f8bf88ea
describe
'124070' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGD' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
806a2a5f31307d2a907591022cc4a986
9893af1f42a419117684ae077b8fc66641ded0b5
describe
'8834115' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGE' 'sip-files00047.tif'
8b7a2ea0fb48607e6272b411f34a9daf
2c7d813a75b590503964e637d5a76dc1683fcd0d
'2011-08-17T07:09:43-04:00'
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGF' 'sip-files00047.txt'
85bf4f86f0e0f70db2c06937e8f3f8ea
b1465afc32fdc190be7d95ae6c9eefcdc70f1340
describe
'47491' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGG' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
d06e72ffcb4011e21146399b7a4ce4a2
c25eb3e45658e4e3575116e490ac2b3213ba4293
describe
'1109922' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGH' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
31927445dd0d49bdee6ff126229245f0
fa1f5f23c91ffb3f0d1600ef8b74ac50087288ad
'2011-08-17T07:10:15-04:00'
describe
'364518' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGI' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
5646b81c9f2e612dc47c21e6880f2c74
f98b9a522e407b48e10d48b83c7ac82cc46cc5ff
describe
'26422' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGJ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
8bff0d222cbab1312f979addad18cf9f
13eedebd3dc3b9f5d7dfe05c0744680236c94c0d
'2011-08-17T07:12:23-04:00'
describe
'123546' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGK' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
51bd725c9281f583550c64dd6813d8ee
6fe0b7ab5af1e9829e33050b1292aed418ac991d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGL' 'sip-files00048.tif'
cb412061cbd5d7a9e77e496d9387442b
f49f18818807af96dae177fc0eee3bcc012884a4
'2011-08-17T07:13:52-04:00'
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGM' 'sip-files00048.txt'
f5a183e5160d0e1b0160f7e38147841c
51eb80c028cf17185acbbb663948a594a2afd392
'2011-08-17T07:15:09-04:00'
describe
'45882' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGN' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
74c305facba8f4a5832117da47322960
a056ac566edd5168ad2ffe707b870f4715ace93c
describe
'1138030' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGO' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
9a2de2d68ba8677e5edf6a94b54a8a87
25b312e353f33be1f67d5765787b5e1917a781f1
describe
'351487' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGP' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
7bb5690d0962177c658e1eb91e936427
b87cea1fa0a27c3b0d5ccf2350875db50b91bdd9
'2011-08-17T07:14:24-04:00'
describe
'28113' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGQ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
69a9e5c1893726e940ba9d8b390caf19
86f464abd9aa966311ac0d4c15ee37338ffad64c
'2011-08-17T07:13:57-04:00'
describe
'119189' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGR' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
871066574feab964c481a7ddf0c92bcd
f252e7ccbacc35b5f6f667266224c9b2a237becf
'2011-08-17T07:15:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGS' 'sip-files00049.tif'
a1da394ef5ff02463bc3b7622fbf6cc3
00ff2bde6df8297dfc9dd4d92238db36f26a6ea7
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGT' 'sip-files00049.txt'
60af7d7704ab629d9ddfabb758d08b5a
840131f52aff65825c7921bce049feffbc591453
describe
'46413' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGU' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8841d289461514fe31765d62328cbc85
7d0800ab8bca3ee87f0a107a716a8f4a3c82c973
describe
'1109979' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGV' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
86c590f65cb98f958317f958adce41bc
4994d76180ebf6f6dee95cdcc1d3546e52771b99
describe
'385511' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGW' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
a163581e510011ea43e699c94b1ad98f
48bb8f92c0faebebce5dcad21b54a4176f090239
'2011-08-17T07:09:11-04:00'
describe
'34314' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGX' 'sip-files00050.pro'
27f45ae1f89fced82dae50351309ca1c
ce7ce7e67e04b0f49e1737c2d40c3c2cc07722ce
describe
'132804' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGY' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
c84b351274448fe4f1f7310e811d8680
09aa82fbb5d91fead96c5fe0dcf5cd1457f1cd6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZGZ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
12e9e2a7a3bfd361e710a18a4c7a5be6
7db743995d6231ed7786dfa11aa65a0cee54756e
'2011-08-17T07:15:02-04:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHA' 'sip-files00050.txt'
0b71be076c47aa396c6faf4f84f8f32c
ea2861a82fa5acd62be3986fc349d49dc02bf774
describe
'47541' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHB' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
cfc069736dcb2b88b3063bfb01064a50
b7a44930cfb789cef3ee53247ba4e26520905742
'2011-08-17T07:11:41-04:00'
describe
'1138092' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHC' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
cdbdcd10999dbf28698e374a88dc0a3c
d4f9dac8db874af8f550ab42e246f5088d289eb6
describe
'363259' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHD' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
cc9cc5ea73a445b4863b1fe932a056dc
9806cfcb1669164503e8529840e88c08b4e43eef
describe
'31942' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHE' 'sip-files00051.pro'
c0940854e298a9207fb9bc329a6b1149
68ae4ecb88260bc0a60937a661f49af5534cea5b
describe
'124036' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHF' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
332df7eebdfd85abe3f4a2bf3d369aa6
803023f33b4184433ebd037cd86283d5cb4229f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHG' 'sip-files00051.tif'
477145150587161aa651a9c45ce0cc18
4fbbfb255cc8cdff7ff5a3bad67ad68e33655f92
'2011-08-17T07:12:35-04:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHH' 'sip-files00051.txt'
f857da62f07f7315915228edfc717bb8
e77663bd83c7d8788f7f75504908e24d297d688a
'2011-08-17T07:11:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHI' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
963f990800c8eb74826e5fdbe20868c6
4a00d86fbc28642ec3bf6c7abc36326b7a32eee2
describe
'1109972' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHJ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
599193661f6dab5cfc86f937ed41e4dd
011b56b339f43214cc1f4cd392efcbbcc66c3300
'2011-08-17T07:11:29-04:00'
describe
'387117' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHK' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
70f2f528b04ffc0e585158f9ffab6e53
6f97b3e644b1c437fc86de2d2503dd771a5f7d9f
describe
'34105' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHL' 'sip-files00052.pro'
1640987935ace7f8438bde13e3cb0348
0c86d9b407f19eb2f3952529d02fd7ccab061215
'2011-08-17T07:13:54-04:00'
describe
'131786' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHM' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
8c5853708cbec89024f14e07d71c1d74
d58b037e932a945fc3c48b87723f350a3a095fe3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHN' 'sip-files00052.tif'
8f4c4e62f13ddac1b2051c50cf1b9d89
48e7fe97d67b75692e068469702bbdf46214ddf4
'2011-08-17T07:14:49-04:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHO' 'sip-files00052.txt'
c49af610de94193eacf07192fbca51cd
0e55c61ec6567fe51d022d381fa5b7471aa203cc
describe
'48490' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHP' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
c00f7d2ced537896441afb1ce0d4491a
45ce9a96bb129f28ded420dcdbe5183fecb71219
describe
'1129421' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHQ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
f05d4db0db20e86c071556bfb31e9ea4
43cccb873c5950246024684107c1b941143345d0
describe
'389508' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHR' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
cdcee1a12b6fd71cde2bf29dc85f1783
11ff4de2147b3342e70222dd95346d4a97c5b417
describe
'33563' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHS' 'sip-files00053.pro'
b8a852d36ef9234d25a047127c0c6179
6d245909bd79927b3537882f3e267c2432bd72cf
'2011-08-17T07:10:16-04:00'
describe
'132071' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHT' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
0e6a453f764131564f0d91ae7d2e4cf8
d79fd67ee3a94178f56880ba108c60a0448930f4
'2011-08-17T07:09:31-04:00'
describe
'9045591' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHU' 'sip-files00053.tif'
df222e8afdf160cbb6e54d6f7445ed69
28df645bff6a83bf982e00a7c8005e2a25fa4263
'2011-08-17T07:14:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHV' 'sip-files00053.txt'
59dcc4e3b1a959ec07fd2d18fb90dd69
8bcfc19627567a7b44459bf6a8aea490ae0c103b
'2011-08-17T07:14:31-04:00'
describe
'48382' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHW' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
d313febdfb9fe20ac8ff1c88bc9c716a
2a26163f400eb4a3aef5366ab383ec930705c440
describe
'1136542' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHX' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
dccd13d5918c97f6fadeaeb550823d5f
4ce2f0e70282f9f08d35bf8088e2c2305e449d11
'2011-08-17T07:14:39-04:00'
describe
'335571' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHY' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
2bda9ad75b0d3a6b072ec65f5cef9626
a53272ddad81f53f77e7f3ab2496160d589621a0
describe
'10003' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZHZ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
a6fb4c91acf6d78c25e75549b0329f2c
696f3096cb9a3ff9f99a01b0f48d98948ab8c391
describe
'108153' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIA' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
ca760d030e87ecded85c38417ebc4276
3f094e6b34488662ebc7ced160635c965ee5a8b6
describe
'9102505' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIB' 'sip-files00054.tif'
777e571ad983c59456c50ef19528f962
a120f2d23d0746df94971d171b943105fb21adec
describe
'432' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIC' 'sip-files00054.txt'
92905364d8fb8ff65617ea3c0a2c21ee
f0f9bc642e24dccb61f7d28e8f0cbea93ef30ce8
'2011-08-17T07:14:36-04:00'
describe
'41279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZID' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
e2ae08ea978a6ee8b9a23dc62a6c64bf
2ade1abc98856fff12eb5ae4ba83463aacd9304a
describe
'1129433' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIE' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
63c0c67f4b6b06a7796cb53a7e837444
36d9abd5e633b8bed5b9e79c9e142d819b30e913
'2011-08-17T07:16:07-04:00'
describe
'321794' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIF' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c9b7e9c5bc6c6b497d73dbfedbd97dee
3ded57ff689458e935a0b862eb845e6867cbdcee
describe
'20925' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIG' 'sip-files00055.pro'
6b3761df182eb04a369e005dbe117e91
e0fa6fbddc8b340a7ec435a8c10f01bbe5510454
describe
'105801' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIH' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d6fa7a7740d030e5bd22b51c64324455
b7e075262e65fe4cda1e87e33e992ec4bd6dd9d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZII' 'sip-files00055.tif'
a1c957818dfaa06f10bd7d85d2dda4ea
30091d2d6c118ec5e8ec89045e1e21cbd1f2e4cf
'2011-08-17T07:10:52-04:00'
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIJ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
7a968c6a12493ffc19f19a2d67bf06b1
45b5d8f77be13d79407f8bb81bb7aa5b2d48f665
'2011-08-17T07:09:00-04:00'
describe
'40667' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIK' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
98e1462c14c1f7a2addd49f2160c09a3
361cba97c8c204f5e87ff246a4dbf750c8a990db
describe
'1136530' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIL' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
c137a940e88eed3da040e8af8039088b
62d23f8b3f108c7ab8624ca5f6f55b2d332485ba
describe
'333104' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIM' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
8f06dc93219a2033b8c3f962cb4721ee
f6880a105b332db4806b211b4378a85514db0b5f
'2011-08-17T07:12:37-04:00'
describe
'24565' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIN' 'sip-files00056.pro'
1a1e8eb85dac201c589d4cdf1ee5f3df
3a595304b6482981944393ce06aa61e1b51091af
'2011-08-17T07:08:56-04:00'
describe
'111319' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIO' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
bd648166daa7e3cb2be6e8344ad6e235
a4c4c7ff1f25e671e755b74f7b994a1ff1ded799
'2011-08-17T07:08:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIP' 'sip-files00056.tif'
b672e78fdf22f6f3c4ea7ba0d4a5bd95
3e0aaee5abd02992b592021157d744d767df6523
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIQ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
98672a3c8e0995c767b6553125e7bc4d
e1983f98ba042d10aa1e2ba8c2692a46082e18e2
describe
'42035' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIR' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
6eae4034b4a931b4ea68e3f4e74153a3
6a874e9fe3d48acdab38e55a468b86b64361e263
describe
'1070755' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIS' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
42f35c33efe5fd46a950162d9fb7b7f8
ea957409150e4639ec9d9572eee207618c5929c5
'2011-08-17T07:08:39-04:00'
describe
'326604' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIT' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
9989f7d49effecce748d83016d990638
7323066ffcbc0b001c3602f017e6d17e6e30da55
describe
'24051' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIU' 'sip-files00057.pro'
baa103bef21ee433bc291daaa7527ef9
7e14b0a23aea7057a65b1e032dcdbbbb5bcb1bb0
describe
'109697' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIV' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
d46b1cd7b635e371ec259992a20f3fba
ba16b74b3fcc8b46f282f914606cdf2b11269f66
'2011-08-17T07:09:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIW' 'sip-files00057.tif'
2428e7158fbc5902f661a98e7461d0d9
7fed3b8264d60d42d9c88af31a300de55afc10ff
'2011-08-17T07:16:17-04:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIX' 'sip-files00057.txt'
ec842112d30949d0f0ca74d71ca67840
980a8cbadcb0ba868fec50f7ba9f5cfca136fedb
describe
'41776' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIY' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
bc32ec8042545ceef1527a6e8a0be856
7c8c270c55155342a089ca8203debf268417eb92
'2011-08-17T07:13:43-04:00'
describe
'1059580' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZIZ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
d63820b0f54a59493ab92e30c4f18ccf
820138d30d7bc0a83ec25fa02db0fe0ad2b2c8ab
describe
'308907' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJA' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
78dc8df2899ac1a3d7da93ef81d55d11
650f323581f260a8c8fb4bca8ca37817ef745050
describe
'17086' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJB' 'sip-files00058.pro'
57d511d1d7f28ae71169fb035fa55dd2
3b06b31f09f73e9f4a8a4b78bd1c55491908991b
'2011-08-17T07:13:11-04:00'
describe
'102164' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJC' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
b25040dfbb3d738ea53778b52e6e1854
a723b3297deaa754f749d5fc4870aad761f5c1ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJD' 'sip-files00058.tif'
1729bea1b2f9ede6995406ca5c7f3869
891b783682357680a694e3fb63433b0c8deedfbe
'2011-08-17T07:15:08-04:00'
describe
'745' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJE' 'sip-files00058.txt'
a8cb10dd46c809981f5af654b8a4b69a
18e9cb9b62536dea75a3c2e79a9c94aef6fd8b41
describe
'39443' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJF' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
3d4d83f37a14b3f44a52f1461cc64dc3
c013ec118200a1597d140633504763e548ee0fc3
'2011-08-17T07:09:34-04:00'
describe
'1129399' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJG' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
9842b8a81087ce5242595a97aa287149
c2f798d5b3091de7cb316a7adb4110ee2638d81a
describe
'353957' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJH' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
26a253c320afedae9c423923eab1c021
23c6e341c4d3efab144447770b8255591aa6f11e
describe
'29198' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJI' 'sip-files00059.pro'
2df36bb3ef308f2b2ea4162717896869
c6e5ac6e920c66259001ff2295b9c4a022d85a79
describe
'121559' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJJ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
e42cbe9e8238fbbf6b27ae2068f0001b
0a59a112e5a65334fd52523b3e738c77c6b86783
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJK' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a504b7f4c143dabec1a6bff9ac99eec6
aa1ad097eff44925c0c17d0571c15da96ffdef60
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJL' 'sip-files00059.txt'
64c44caf751b7fdde8ea8ab7e89f0f58
1b1554cd2c4323a391cf778464d886bb50d98e7f
'2011-08-17T07:13:18-04:00'
describe
'44813' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJM' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
c26703d96e6de68dd5256098eda71a47
c98f17ff23d025d6baf448ad836fc2ac73b96570
'2011-08-17T07:14:53-04:00'
describe
'1136538' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJN' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
81b353137d1682ce771ac162d2055dd3
a9662f92d51303166555afd288c1a277abf503bc
describe
'375739' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJO' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
af5dfd6869bceb4b5e1b6fe98641a7f6
4427bc198d6931aa650e1b6e6d13b9f5ccd3ba8c
describe
'35204' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJP' 'sip-files00060.pro'
c4bd5ada7b06f2246dc9b69d839a90e4
b0f03eaa5f258105e8814acab4e72728a5915308
describe
'129541' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJQ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
1c470e6a17df832416b4ca4303d432e7
77e223d5f1b469baced33b182f801c58f7475574
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJR' 'sip-files00060.tif'
9ebcb0bdd0d8cd11f014e33e5daa64c1
592a006886973314b34badcabea5e3a9c7894c8b
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJS' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d1c6fc333c96f04c73a2ce2054485024
176d40dde702f5451c71079aa20f6d9c6ee9732e
describe
'47656' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJT' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
9c65abbddb58b59afa571bcc6c3a8ebd
a638c528d28b6df6affc8b495f416f8ef7f19dfc
'2011-08-17T07:15:04-04:00'
describe
'1129387' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJU' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
ad4ba65868a959fd4605c7b371776356
f25819dc87f4a55d6b09a6ae71fd55f038417ece
describe
'367792' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJV' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
ea8e6e4c874d1e4e7180dfa8147739cc
c94e37f427642ef5aeb2e4ffd8ee3c341b1281bd
describe
'34462' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJW' 'sip-files00061.pro'
cb9746570a3b4194d8962a3759f30fa6
bb968d8c3763d2c9b85801b0404823fbe0543138
describe
'127057' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJX' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
b5de1df0a2548b8f2beb7301f8124edf
f0eaab3cd6a0dca7f1465958ac9f97cf0bdd4af9
'2011-08-17T07:13:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJY' 'sip-files00061.tif'
2b04956ef2be2a02471dd2c2124612b7
eff60f31fffbe16d17a3aac1fa69b567056f1ce6
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZJZ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
04fcafe58c05e6a8a99d92f9d8938b30
91174854403212405298568b90c9509ed2c71683
describe
'46637' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKA' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
06d4b7493e8b03b3eac21a18e25455c0
b9f282fde0e089d645b3c5cefa33303b520dd35d
'2011-08-17T07:09:57-04:00'
describe
'1136498' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKB' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
d9d114301325e44ed3a4439b3146d5ad
802b98183b3da985a9dccee7e2f14fb4afd2434d
describe
'367910' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKC' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
9e7c12c6b3acb735fb5a80f21527fd67
24ff525061c217ff2812ed88bc7fbc041a6980f8
'2011-08-17T07:09:09-04:00'
describe
'34567' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKD' 'sip-files00062.pro'
031a23d420006a6a6e0190b3d39bdbb7
7d481c86419fb32567b80fe9a3a7aea220e67c40
describe
'128158' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKE' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
6d25553bbf79cb11537c9fd63d635fe2
3e590c2526028ddb542f24c3a2e3d6041444a378
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKF' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3e9b27371379a7c9093367e110ff8033
dfcd4c6545b8db22b0148ac5b1018f9614232aab
'2011-08-17T07:09:54-04:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKG' 'sip-files00062.txt'
4083e751b7b328081d2e74adfc0c1fa2
5bc82b0bbb323c34ef864c7effcb5c22acd93dd1
describe
'47445' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKH' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
7241f65eec3c8863158051700c70a8c3
c7277af86eb28365c3654d2cfc0fc856c0391d1e
describe
'1129384' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKI' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
53df3c4cbaa2b3cb75dd11566a73619f
1feb314404bb349aa9a5b8ed582d14d83b90b968
'2011-08-17T07:15:05-04:00'
describe
'370324' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKJ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
04530ecfcfca538bc7d15255b1bf1a40
38745a8dbf9f53a4f2f142887d7493b26f2560b3
describe
'35631' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKK' 'sip-files00063.pro'
5806764f916876e7e2c6fdca31e35620
7eb855f0a2721a616fa37e6ca587b14a6214a8e2
'2011-08-17T07:13:51-04:00'
describe
'128055' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKL' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
a802dc1d30b2186b9d6f3323c4789bf8
58c4671df3d3e86ce5fa9551cbe0bc72535390ee
'2011-08-17T07:15:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKM' 'sip-files00063.tif'
f40e34cd5ba556cae017e9c267f1b98c
954775249a66192f8d878b457bb094727518ef1e
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKN' 'sip-files00063.txt'
dd5c62a4c2ffe31b0789917994c3129d
214026a41e6e11c8f52b137f70cc2112c647b9b7
'2011-08-17T07:11:44-04:00'
describe
'46875' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKO' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
73a3fa2f3a58eae0b2d9cf09da0db428
bfb331e0a77903819c2c069191186963d4974721
describe
'1136419' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKP' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
1028f57cd070e81a07f284bf1fddc00d
54bdb97ae9d24519d63cfa06441aac294473598f
describe
'369496' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKQ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
3ede6a87548c676f2e78c1fffbfad5c9
aef3b30eb661c514c2c680dbc830539f1f01925e
describe
'34832' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKR' 'sip-files00064.pro'
d5f619391a1c12cdc785480cf040fe12
3f81c1ebfa33840c538e6c554bb7839ef75bd814
describe
'128804' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKS' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
32f8402e39244090434b2c816a807e34
a11f659e2f668b7e06c3bb2f31177fcb75e52dc0
'2011-08-17T07:11:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKT' 'sip-files00064.tif'
0909f35083db0cf3465c1d6394c60fbd
71f6f4519337382df35b2d0271f89bfa781073bd
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKU' 'sip-files00064.txt'
013b36496b375ae958e09126b1f0da7e
7f221e9d7b6b4349489f7089dc1dad9ec2f96d2a
describe
'47174' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKV' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
9fcc3799294d439151b797c787d554da
88d6f66159690fd626f96783a1bcb4e793457b81
'2011-08-17T07:12:53-04:00'
describe
'1129398' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKW' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
39949f1e6ff81465e14dae3908056763
954c5a3925ecad2a88ad2f3a6d71e99227d19462
describe
'372091' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKX' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
6351828d8b54b54b620c749fad41275d
00cc74d8a81bd5a08c1d48ddb919b381ef43de03
describe
'36100' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKY' 'sip-files00065.pro'
04d783affbac064ac25d1d750a6fdb90
536eab4b4354a05d937013d6032b3eb1d65dbc1c
describe
'128517' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZKZ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
384af3a011d91eb440801c3b3af5f2a3
0806bb22b600a83a0952d939af1b3831761d86c0
'2011-08-17T07:14:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLA' 'sip-files00065.tif'
3d214878b7705494127488fa1f854ca9
b2748a3fe887388f8bb208a526e92ae875c2dd2c
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLB' 'sip-files00065.txt'
a334343350e12a0bbce9b9efe0b16a07
adbae4d9732528adb0b837f6f0d6cf9d8372af70
'2011-08-17T07:15:07-04:00'
describe
'47152' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLC' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
a4ef6d4a1070dba176c315fd8eb6831a
dc7612891233dc52eb13826895ca84bc3ec958bf
describe
'1136490' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLD' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
5b505ebf59f8c597f990004975676562
726c0aaa32b13fc02ce644586bbdb478886096b4
describe
'369617' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLE' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
d8ef40b09fd4f02651ec0507c160caa2
767e3e5c821b4796146bf6fcf9b1d31c9f03c8cb
'2011-08-17T07:13:05-04:00'
describe
'34821' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLF' 'sip-files00066.pro'
83e767cf4bd974497dfbebdb4434151c
ddf3aa1686937c06d7a4dbe0b4af8a0c1e94376d
describe
'128691' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLG' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a747a5c67df2f2eaeb81dc812a8339f2
2bfb9dc76453fd9c855d156dd8ac422497e00bbc
'2011-08-17T07:10:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLH' 'sip-files00066.tif'
c551ef715f8f6841488651f2720bf791
8ec4b4d2e66678843a29299fc09b0651383d5b90
'2011-08-17T07:10:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLI' 'sip-files00066.txt'
6de295b666938335d8ec6d696df433aa
18266648fb8b9a4ccae2bb4664c4606a8f9fe848
describe
'47164' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLJ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
afd70801947d94db1a1bb023681deb32
0fa46cdb4bb284d93be4aa5c18d280973ffc5d9a
describe
'1052379' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLK' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
69146d03dcb2c0144a716369810ca3c4
a88edaee6fddbc979b59c66c4d51d62decff5007
describe
'315276' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLL' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
bc22ec0e042b978b40ded72e970b2bd3
a9153e9e75bb9616f12a0aede5d8a16e013d042d
describe
'16837' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLM' 'sip-files00067.pro'
89905ba17fb72703491f7103e2eb0917
9ffa5aea04feedb0864930a29cf9fb58aa8d117d
'2011-08-17T07:16:12-04:00'
describe
'105488' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLN' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
2d6c3da1ad9d24775e4093f8e6d67468
eb6aeba9c018d9131682dd810971d209a20048b1
'2011-08-17T07:09:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLO' 'sip-files00067.tif'
62e37126ce8e9f4132004e7ab3d29234
07d95cdd70754f2ed4917eafcde5a47433efda9f
describe
'677' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLP' 'sip-files00067.txt'
477b003f596bf2aa9bb5d2ce1e701e80
39fe3da8f37c38deb14ede297fa08845b7c7ed7d
describe
'40110' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLQ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
72d2fc427c1efcd60bc54142869acd70
6deb787ec98ec41ab0ae271ab1ba4fceabae9062
describe
'793646' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLR' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
debf8e3c7c835dfc885fd08e9041e3c2
efec69089c4109eb44ea7a6023ddaa4bf54c2965
'2011-08-17T07:14:06-04:00'
describe
'230155' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLS' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
e4fc0ffa756fdba58a3484ec4fb7df3d
539abd12ed23555f6aa2dd5898f5085955fd70ee
'2011-08-17T07:11:06-04:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLT' 'sip-files00068.pro'
feb43dbedbfe9a1ff210e23f39651737
e9f0132bddf269bda1f96ccf5f4e11e35b5a19d3
describe
'71073' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLU' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
5b00f5bb54f904d086dea5c3573c9d57
290902f7c313b1691d5cd89448c4ca613996b508
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLV' 'sip-files00068.tif'
8181039841d52a9d387a77366ba57a38
dcc90977f6b1ca94899ba8f8e593d158ea00a2ae
'2011-08-17T07:12:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLW' 'sip-files00068.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'28763' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLX' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
05db06039e80d3f28fbcb44940cde4b0
cb63d1c5699bdcb1d43ccc9df86a002a6f039c4b
'2011-08-17T07:12:02-04:00'
describe
'1129426' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLY' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
60421be90e09bf8bfaaab4c7ea94e55e
c027564b8302cd5ce2dd2d36ed1b1cfdc02266a1
'2011-08-17T07:09:02-04:00'
describe
'362826' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZLZ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
e2ad856e3d45a11e132cdea4ad197ff6
bfed45ce6822037603ff998efe3120c913f46462
describe
'617' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMA' 'sip-files00069.pro'
de620f9e96b870a1a8661ff4d24f1029
02a5d6308b76ca4896b1df5be4f678c9897cf012
'2011-08-17T07:10:30-04:00'
describe
'111802' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMB' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c013bf637b3b5ac1e21048dd13928067
77b1332de130f49bfe450250df2de7fd761ad8ad
'2011-08-17T07:08:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMC' 'sip-files00069.tif'
086a52157536ba4726c54f31d047b716
4fc113e040ab456a25efd3bb674d168bd6197c5b
'2011-08-17T07:15:49-04:00'
describe
'107' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMD' 'sip-files00069.txt'
8bc3b8880da1bc8bae44fa6ba2b483a3
c34caa27273f5af426b51f34a16db423bafd6b5a
'2011-08-17T07:14:57-04:00'
describe
'41389' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZME' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
7aee1416186e888f9dae9fdce1118c60
d28b57943fef3328b5294e7f625d5f09fd4c43c3
describe
'1136513' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMF' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
3226409d3db1f50b1ae5a1891c01f021
7f5a54032970f91ed2ba9932caa225a774e38dc3
'2011-08-17T07:11:04-04:00'
describe
'363179' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMG' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
462b8de4f568d120a3973f7a449643e9
ce8bcd407195364304012511bb65b4f6ec43cab9
describe
'27485' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMH' 'sip-files00070.pro'
6c8789eab62bcb474be238acf9b87581
b316d0bee762e796489f0cd4c36d34c521f41e4a
describe
'123773' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMI' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
1e363cdb570b9bb35bbea5ff8b409bd4
93aa1bc885bf5cf0a4fc12dccba2dee0ff786404
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMJ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
8ba0e9e25d7112f5491705dd339db7a6
3145e0b37020ecae44c8bf076e3c8ee0ffba1698
'2011-08-17T07:12:55-04:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMK' 'sip-files00070.txt'
0f28e984f9c6ace5110b7585ceb7c1e2
c247cf0e7bb8a03fecb4b4341b344d80d08852d8
describe
'46596' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZML' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
92ac35df376ea6e463d04a5465a0d514
da6cc2e1a8ac86fd2619fa09d194aefd0471123f
describe
'1129408' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMM' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
443feffe77e0821d70baaafde185bf8d
9cfe9394f2bf3d1018ae9a03a010232a8954491f
describe
'377037' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMN' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
9dc2d2d35c79fab5b7951ad31d80256c
b1f4427023f8281cecb8f1ea70e14d676e10c056
'2011-08-17T07:11:52-04:00'
describe
'33578' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMO' 'sip-files00071.pro'
c9d492d13cb9442dbd89cc7b1337b754
33833c3233788bd75e9965d8d6bb1d9408ad3f60
describe
'128703' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMP' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
298dd8f29f5e2ddc1f9fee859910cf55
efeb49fbea2f92b5b4c1f20a4ea6f3915da66ac1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMQ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
2618d5826f0fe143ebfadc36f967e0a8
dd8ef2d0a9579f5bd98f7fa400789430d972816d
'2011-08-17T07:12:47-04:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMR' 'sip-files00071.txt'
cf31cff8793768981646df685aa7a591
6e1f30be149a86450b05e359f69abdf970c6a390
describe
'47580' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMS' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
a366d1721048f89415f525fde0b0043f
fe2d8057f4601df561eeff95f4624b6de4685efc
describe
'1136524' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMT' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
d77ce9d552be9842acc55581693c9910
02fce394764434e27c82b18a98051f45191e824b
'2011-08-17T07:08:33-04:00'
describe
'377396' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMU' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
9666077b4f93ab4e3f6678bea046356b
aff5bb3efdfd543a3d0ed4cc0c258d78161ef9f8
describe
'33477' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMV' 'sip-files00072.pro'
98454d4a072f134bbe19e873c671fbf1
599789f37126a3fd5e2a40b1423170cb2a274e4a
describe
'129961' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMW' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
8f9cdb589bc658071d9a3a0d51c22663
e7639d228d5be157b3e661a270f10a8e1e981546
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMX' 'sip-files00072.tif'
4d1f43baf9dba51948a3091c2680acbf
46e1cbd960e6735646cc9f08281d3ec02887a027
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMY' 'sip-files00072.txt'
cf70e5473a018525311258337681d4db
ddfa21cfe64cafd974fd18b1001c3ca958db9e5c
'2011-08-17T07:09:12-04:00'
describe
'47631' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZMZ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
d2945d0dcfa3d7b55ce2b535a119a3f1
0d1964f091a3fc284717d0e202ad7c9db233b256
describe
'988795' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNA' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
0ceff5f51b7e13fc4bb6c3012917e34b
30df543317851a94518e0a8c41763f04ea282be8
'2011-08-17T07:15:22-04:00'
describe
'293328' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNB' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
5ebe778c5757609a1645d5101cf8faaa
5e53fb80ec5ab520de0d05606f47f3ef23049174
describe
'9768' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNC' 'sip-files00073.pro'
cfec2b16a5679ed680ae65d75102f8e3
fdef06bd3dad8d273e99c2fce3f0f3ac7a2cfcc2
describe
'95896' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZND' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
34b8942d03e4e5641de0e50b8ae1756e
be102c0b7cc589224b1738d14560635cf5c47acf
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNE' 'sip-files00073.tif'
02f06f6faa9bac2682105155f33297c2
a42a41ac4895240fa2a114cb95d50f67943231ed
describe
'436' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNF' 'sip-files00073.txt'
ed0b9b4de226cf8e54a0837b2b0454da
47c490a81feabb95d455e03bad0eb78a659cfdf8
'2011-08-17T07:09:38-04:00'
describe
'37422' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNG' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
9ee24605f9d3fa4435862bbfc3187ecd
5325ce8238f3b1b14e3e9680e52f37c91dd9c461
describe
'889263' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNH' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
d501f96009fbc43025c8b6b4cf35bfa7
a3340cecb600fbc3ba4c9269c765d0bb95cf3b6e
describe
'250516' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNI' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
32e14a7fdde23274c58acaf5746f879b
ee0914c280cfd76c5b7e37d6595b78ace7ac4abb
describe
'323' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNJ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
f26d4223151d15e745f779fbd2e2c86d
8b1e2db4df434b36813f97c666dbc378a919d23d
'2011-08-17T07:10:53-04:00'
describe
'78241' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNK' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
1408d457f139a2f1a2848e770edc5959
6b37f49a1791c340a943618a673b5193466c791b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNL' 'sip-files00074.tif'
252918a28461c9bfba44710e92f9dd92
a42a3da5d45eafc15bda914121a5b1d57ae1cf43
describe
'17' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNM' 'sip-files00074.txt'
3e4584232de1d67c3c46db1110747e16
3c427cf64c242a2ca2a1b150d7f0b8cbbec0b79b
describe
'31167' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNN' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
ce744f0c0d36ed5006fcf6c8f18b8309
b2a33eb0b3611b5461da35554bf12703d0107f67
describe
'1129263' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNO' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
a6a585eacb05f5b2013b6ca04db74f32
89ecb62b4516db43b97c182b70e3cc5a209542e1
'2011-08-17T07:14:09-04:00'
describe
'336951' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNP' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7747945a7cfeb83bc5100cca1bc599f8
a0f0bf59c34c4f5776823f50896f7b10dec6b9ba
describe
'691' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNQ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
85750a037ac52f9b69402385ef8a5b2f
aca7817559ce09c531b90d44d718f933a6ffbfda
describe
'105279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNR' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
b3d535f82504edb8494b62d447a340d3
b02105d0b90f202a30df28401d28db8a298ad299
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNS' 'sip-files00075.tif'
b8a54a1bf7f43e6ec9726fbc419d71ec
c9a0b6867709440a3ec5446b573e2c2af125c402
'2011-08-17T07:08:53-04:00'
describe
'231' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNT' 'sip-files00075.txt'
395d4daad69ef0de54218ace8df6a140
96e03df5e6a556b0cefbd42fb0124965629e762c
'2011-08-17T07:10:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNU' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
440446574e23768afd42a7a8fbc50db1
a9bcbef29c3a3d694a208399a6978053c8058e89
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNV' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
63dcf9ba6817750eb89711ec4f731759
1584281d487e027fa632826c1bb8fcafc0bad557
describe
'351525' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNW' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b6c4f5d6dc33ef7248ffed9f5cdc0045
ef01218738fe1256ec4ff6671ae56afdfebea5a6
describe
'26794' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNX' 'sip-files00076.pro'
1673a7a7bce6cc6a3a9472c25681caeb
0f0aaea66ab116ff9e3ecbb0b108c507638adff8
describe
'119465' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNY' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
d0cbc513832c06957546e3eba71d17de
1e49c9afb5246ba069ab2bff469029b73f33de85
'2011-08-17T07:15:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZNZ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
a9e292443ec904050c4852398620b52a
577f09c764100fac06bb4150817f95dba6b024d1
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOA' 'sip-files00076.txt'
5782bca86d21adf571e7309fc927e07a
940ebe0e59147a95d3f216b0c3df738dae121991
describe
'44246' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOB' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
2079aeba60fa7f02b49eed0287e57c76
606440be8b9e1b944addb7b6f33bdbdf010a0b7c
describe
'1129418' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOC' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
8bb4b72cda79f668f504010d29323cbf
bdcf07fcb5ca4869be5e11a4765d5d38fa2f969e
'2011-08-17T07:10:37-04:00'
describe
'361825' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOD' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
4c7a74fbddbc1816604f8cd1d5eb9ac5
689451bc147d16aec85f98f31e24f88b5c27daec
'2011-08-17T07:14:00-04:00'
describe
'32543' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOE' 'sip-files00077.pro'
4b0e168f979bbcd5c3ee3e383c460a82
261e45c5e7ece4ee7ad6033f7efbdacfee27d178
describe
'123390' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOF' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
5575c9a2d1b09013058f13aef83381af
5daad50b000eb0f6a467eedafeb186a0b5b67f18
'2011-08-17T07:09:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOG' 'sip-files00077.tif'
2cf846ae66ab7df865a3cdeedb294444
efa90d6273b79d9f0d580803aebb176ad4d77d98
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOH' 'sip-files00077.txt'
b2a0ff55086563ec90744a88cc36f1c8
fad76e8d833326153acab6a83e47ac19c51caae4
describe
'45683' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOI' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
6dcbb2e9e1c1f2e8ccb6352a1def1efa
b007d1c238319c194699bf1007a29f6e5884bb0e
describe
'1136528' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOJ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
c31abae1b2f42a8818753789b66a98ab
78267902f0e19a47d6c40bceaaadf078cfd1b6a8
'2011-08-17T07:08:29-04:00'
describe
'371720' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOK' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
16934588672abf0945fc27e51f221569
c898c33a3f782996a350322129605cf08f53177f
'2011-08-17T07:09:08-04:00'
describe
'32690' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOL' 'sip-files00078.pro'
1bb70f9dad1f11afd3c0210a45289e63
c1a43942d150987333297a036c166242d4ff3857
describe
'126997' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOM' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
2f74e22a1f94139c72d38f6bbf4d5233
d29dbd6075fffa09498e129c356beb9b55214273
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZON' 'sip-files00078.tif'
5cbe4202ab1f0eb58434613ba29dfbe2
675ebcfb4980d6a4f0cf281a4ec2d4c3b5b24f06
'2011-08-17T07:13:21-04:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOO' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b3c5789a021e1dba9144c4d736e21e96
be47b90127348b4ab6a146339f58d8dc36552bb9
describe
'46769' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOP' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
a04a68a8025acb85e5a7dc7847abd45d
aedb8ebaafcf3b8a6ba4fab3c69c2f7a59e2c19a
describe
'1129392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOQ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
83e28102a8dacca65453276abbe6c7d4
d0dc86c86adf109c49d0d9704d46fab9a4e8d646
'2011-08-17T07:10:24-04:00'
describe
'354779' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOR' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
ec41e16130b24d165aedc1b1988dc077
bce5095ae70e7b7a18f405a8be65888cc3474c9a
describe
'29197' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOS' 'sip-files00079.pro'
541fabdf7e50a0045ee31ee3ee0d6f2f
1ba22d9d6a824d3d227005dd844e0ce2e9165ea8
'2011-08-17T07:14:35-04:00'
describe
'120799' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOT' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
c6f1ac88c6f878c382c6b85421f495c4
e306bf3974de6a6654d0f253a0262b0cb532125a
'2011-08-17T07:14:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOU' 'sip-files00079.tif'
c0f35ace32d915b718d2864719e72803
09b4b418c4acfeef3e8a440878602d71c7eb86be
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOV' 'sip-files00079.txt'
6ef5a4ca8e6c90711f49055d7d060502
3f1d16b915c0f783df1665d5f05f480a4937296f
'2011-08-17T07:12:12-04:00'
describe
'45140' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOW' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
369a78be39f5551a5ff09a18b14943c8
fa8bd0cd41d0235d9b1d43f31f7fb5b6f0cc3846
describe
'1136428' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOX' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
66abfcd507a06d0ba10a1a0dcbe9dddb
61d534324b7cfdd32e1409a6378e94f18b0901e4
'2011-08-17T07:14:25-04:00'
describe
'354645' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOY' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
14c3ca53a590ba34fa2ea7e7000c76f5
ecd8cbfab20208f74d1341c11ea85ce107bb4dab
describe
'28237' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZOZ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
a1ba864810946284db5e70b680c6bb4e
c90b1f02ff3f821011967a4fc25b98b502c4b050
describe
'121491' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPA' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
91d48ea59f1e89f9dc0ec54988c2bffd
195e7e830a31f0096ce4099f013dc784bc95401a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPB' 'sip-files00080.tif'
af52564a1ec7d7e54346127261ca1a09
9a56be4774c648b494186ac11bb0593082d9b8e7
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPC' 'sip-files00080.txt'
7f57f6d4e8186728c852f6ce902c08c6
f915c6424e0f5f1a49c15a5e404f5f97f4494af2
describe
'44571' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPD' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
1fd7d03a4105a70a22a546abc36a092c
a7894e8f336142b80cdab81344d47dd97f5b0df2
describe
'1129316' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPE' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
f43b340940205f4d81d6e6aafc2daa44
fd3e09573fbfac5f86b5871089e606dfaf52f6ca
describe
'370708' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPF' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
95eb10ce29b3db6ba5b68b4495be901a
10e9b4b7b81021e85cff135ba4c0769a0efe81f5
describe
'34083' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPG' 'sip-files00081.pro'
ab6db58eef04db7c9b0beddb94b03a6b
d04f037cfb309d2caa862c99f42acbcaff16c87d
'2011-08-17T07:15:40-04:00'
describe
'126695' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPH' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
19f4043d36bc83bb3b03d3e545ba58ad
9324875c337f4b2b7ebf6709959864c23bf35d3d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPI' 'sip-files00081.tif'
0f7cb03229ffe1f2feda6cad5be4bc07
86ba19052e4942bb891208e6cb989fbcde851cbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPJ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
58f850199e8bb300960a9903d8d04916
5847e5e565829eb5cc3cb699d977011789fbeefa
describe
'46993' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPK' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
4ce7e6669fb5c80563d730d9b1fee078
08abf4df9228c8ce13a58d5da224566b87af0afd
'2011-08-17T07:10:45-04:00'
describe
'1136385' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPL' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
56cc2376347d59889081b1ba8fbb3252
b77012f4c174d9b7147125bfbc619099e1dc0c7d
describe
'369522' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPM' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
e7690079aa3038337eada3a8651a1603
149589535a58ed66afdc1396376efa6bee380c4e
describe
'33244' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPN' 'sip-files00082.pro'
17455fe7383d8c40ae50a4d1de8afd1d
c8e146a3c321284585f28d8495eebc72304958c4
'2011-08-17T07:13:37-04:00'
describe
'126501' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPO' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
e6528765bddf863b0dc3bedd47d22284
f1e9721e8b5ed4525e59baaac490f346e5df7a1b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPP' 'sip-files00082.tif'
93125f4012e91c17af09b41392b0d96a
b274f79189320aa09b1d8cbcf397f5ad59145db0
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPQ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
306bcdf35a807804d9e17566ad1b3a2d
2262dcc4ff59e19bb6712995360b1c222682dbbf
'2011-08-17T07:09:58-04:00'
describe
'46363' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPR' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
094a7c1703fb91cf0b83dc02e4c5f199
d488b1c9b747009d5c396d5cee6ca80e6a2b30a2
describe
'1111398' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPS' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
82f5faa45a70414fea1139c77b39724f
5d781b56729deb3a46b6f778f0aa8a289faba549
describe
'320820' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPT' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
e13d76a1602bb24b5f3ee54e319e4b8e
762170ebef5abb0090897abba23e60effdfb22b8
'2011-08-17T07:09:45-04:00'
describe
'9195' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPU' 'sip-files00083.pro'
5c600ded2107151825d1592fd9ddf5c9
e6b15aae065037cf4e9b626c7f57dcb22d36a424
describe
'104994' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPV' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
9c3630417010a8e7bfacef06bbb7fe73
6f46c3f562e42cba74c463af8611efb3e859333e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPW' 'sip-files00083.tif'
a3bf93b0e74b4915ddf73f7321e58832
76a23c5485784ab1ca80ed20b33b170ba875c872
'2011-08-17T07:11:48-04:00'
describe
'370' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPX' 'sip-files00083.txt'
7084aaf77e6540724a296de6a035d4fb
b04a25dc3bd108ff62ce4989a94f739d2b49dc33
describe
'40090' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPY' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
18a978a45d6af46f675dd939853c0a5f
5e6864073377d295b29fb4c5180fc75ed5d4593c
describe
'1136540' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZPZ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
53e582b3d6dd93ab8b151507ec42441f
6b2c55bd9add7c67b47a198b376db9de8a7cf5e6
describe
'332674' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQA' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
b05f757ff1ef151f00f693a72e4f1d44
0eb3a18199db47d180d9076c410f11e186c3de2a
describe
'21785' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQB' 'sip-files00084.pro'
9ab5533dd357870ee82e363c33097e28
50f5a63322f2a9eb19393ea65a8a8378986a65ec
'2011-08-17T07:13:12-04:00'
describe
'113484' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQC' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
406d9ca1461ca4b25232566a2b181ebc
348a682e498885ac4616cdf19208a7d310f6e5ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQD' 'sip-files00084.tif'
7ad98c5caf0e4cfb623aea91f20590a5
e115e83e54cbe80c10e800161d4296d604a774c1
'2011-08-17T07:13:28-04:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQE' 'sip-files00084.txt'
1cb11ac622ae402071b1deb0b4bd6dfe
62a4b1a1aa5ad57a7a21bee7c3b9324b3df1fd67
'2011-08-17T07:13:19-04:00'
describe
'43509' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQF' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
7373a5b15ddfca831b17e7b1b7286b08
b06f89d2d09bdb2014c01f9af128afa0c0d3d1df
describe
'1129389' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQG' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
b67cc6a922545d49bb4a3f3b0d3fa835
26adf2f46439dfc88527245d4f5263b76bb5777c
describe
'358806' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQH' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
490527c1ddf9771a7719dfbdda784212
d5aa06be66ecf099e349def9c9963f8bb7725b74
describe
'30549' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQI' 'sip-files00085.pro'
7280ce7cec730327e30099d537b519cb
861297ca62af49ddc9b09e9781db5de4bc2a6445
describe
'123906' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQJ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
2a5a17cd612b037c0a57b09d026117d8
4784cacf84214d0f625215c7941553498668a0fd
'2011-08-17T07:15:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQK' 'sip-files00085.tif'
a44ceb9eb1655d6f76c100471ecbfa53
991e0fce190f8b3faf4f14f1dac8f9f109250f3d
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQL' 'sip-files00085.txt'
f58eefb8cc2a78ba94f9c1363149db39
87c523af64931d1e844a0219af4aec6538dc68f6
'2011-08-17T07:13:14-04:00'
describe
'46703' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQM' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
d07b200576c4becddd4cd9338743a746
d3dbf83ed51f8c541be31f704ee0f338b43908fa
'2011-08-17T07:10:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQN' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e0c0beb17e4c9fba88c510a2cf8c047f
de3a039a12abbb26da5eed4613ab8b6c146d9129
describe
'366691' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQO' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
3e5039a844266f36279b754796dfa3c6
732002d5529e725553db2f93f14ef2d38f77000b
'2011-08-17T07:14:07-04:00'
describe
'31321' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQP' 'sip-files00086.pro'
c07de6311eeaf033a0e441814b1ef326
8ca511f488061fe42d044fa1b04ceed162d0007b
'2011-08-17T07:13:07-04:00'
describe
'125502' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQQ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
deb1091981751a099d782744a6753d1e
145ea8e50833cbe63e06962ac99a3f1f74bf4a5d
'2011-08-17T07:11:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQR' 'sip-files00086.tif'
0712e3c029733ac2f75e8cf7f02c68cd
70e937b05e40c373e131f68c13d4ec48f11056ea
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQS' 'sip-files00086.txt'
bd365f61da926abc64315fdfe4906cbc
cdf49456fa0c9d977e87491bd4413b8cc51b1b32
'2011-08-17T07:10:25-04:00'
describe
'46936' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQT' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
9f23ea4a5d0cf5f814ca0d9fab49065b
21fb2fcd3ac420c07776e8f70f97906274ef6af9
describe
'1129355' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQU' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
fc1f7b6f4b0773ea4a6a70495c12ba1c
6d975ac2556b142b6096c5c6224f57583e4670cd
'2011-08-17T07:11:51-04:00'
describe
'373499' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQV' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
07ec9e53ea4a36c1b2b5905ba6b69afb
bf8abb19df3ef93cd810176c82e727a4614283ae
'2011-08-17T07:09:40-04:00'
describe
'35293' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQW' 'sip-files00087.pro'
120ea2c6bb6abe57934024759b3123f3
5d4064f1252979e515c6161d246f23ea061bcc4c
describe
'128876' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQX' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
dfaecff4ae9a6055f71a1734dfc13e53
1dfc5c21b4f14f280af7ae455ad1fe3bda1b7a8c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQY' 'sip-files00087.tif'
293d6e2a240a6c2b357322d4feb40647
715d16c6f0e465b60f3db5036bb4d04a8174c877
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZQZ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
af44e17af53856c39dd80998ab8a9591
413d981b7931163706f82573f98a4585bd395c15
describe
'47469' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRA' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
891195b4cecbad733e5db98cc86c2a09
46dd9f5ae1e4322025ad94b6e89419bd704f904c
'2011-08-17T07:09:23-04:00'
describe
'1136387' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRB' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
0be0cd7c4bc6a19b47bff203538a7702
e7f7da2df71ffadfc9b7a332bce279a2ce5b7adc
'2011-08-17T07:08:34-04:00'
describe
'357067' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRC' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
681ac7e7092c97a7c4deae180e4dd1fd
cc99abbf182ade06163030b11779e9e4a41e0b4b
'2011-08-17T07:11:10-04:00'
describe
'28743' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRD' 'sip-files00088.pro'
b1b4cad5885b826808325ec32ac973de
62da195546d0ce1aa41e9a2de7fb5211c3bf3ba9
'2011-08-17T07:08:45-04:00'
describe
'122964' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRE' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
2ed1d0d75f5d84347dba58c929fe4c02
82c5594cec9f36f49099c3f88e4634b7893634bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRF' 'sip-files00088.tif'
8a779b288576a852089eb5fcd79ff074
e6317b7b6a15bbc05182d80feacd41081859b32c
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
0eade96bb49f4cac8ad707d04e4d3e22
eb2ed8ff6ebbb5f7a34e4064ecaade8c0b278367
describe
'46084' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRH' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
f814acee5ff5ec1de59b89aed8bfd677
f62cd25900d64d652aebdf7ca1d20ef372daee4d
describe
'1099777' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRI' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
4bd44ace03f1d6b4475b382618a9277a
59efe7200f1e0c9b8edcc9724106092dd2052faf
'2011-08-17T07:12:05-04:00'
describe
'340988' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRJ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
507970b72f693d8abd5dfb315c10a40f
605fe096b81838e7d116c2c3d3e6f4dc21fd780d
describe
'26319' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRK' 'sip-files00089.pro'
cb28351e833ea70af8427d5ab170583b
2acaea4088dbd8e89efcef740a52d9cf8b62778c
describe
'116505' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRL' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
c426cc4a412a5cf501e183438095063c
4b7d5dc72b43097bdd6a175b0585b8a6e4496977
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRM' 'sip-files00089.tif'
a1a99a73ccce9a18677af38904725b6c
fe15c72e381eb4931fb5fe2bb669eb7ced75e887
'2011-08-17T07:15:26-04:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRN' 'sip-files00089.txt'
35e943e513396f5259370e9ab8560b0f
dfaf5fcd900cf859cf62de9184e738b5a32ef518
describe
'44306' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRO' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
b7b2f3d5fbc8be0046cfe6d0d5439e17
b8234eef02139e96adbe67032dfa678f61a41a43
describe
'1136435' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRP' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
46089f6086dd150c3daae16acdd15b5a
7505e9ac1213340236513a64466cd977a95d4e53
describe
'347715' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRQ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
344353ed00e17e9a4f7d02c1cc9f6b6b
4cb2d847297cfea92f489ac2869835a0b6ee65d3
describe
'8646' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRR' 'sip-files00090.pro'
2afebc168c78db8914f7aa425ef4d2bb
eb3ea8512043b06b28a3c8e40ec8107985854e1a
describe
'112235' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRS' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
e111cb4d9d16c9dfeb49fea79145cb54
a0bf322e5e264d49dcdebab62a6835a3871276d4
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRT' 'sip-files00090.tif'
626ef3967b3be4726c248fa4d4154962
754effd2659be837646dd36aaf176923158416ba
describe
'368' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRU' 'sip-files00090.txt'
d417a1f8a3b0828e091c95816140aa5b
d001c3906b08c3a8845a25af422b95882996bea6
describe
'42782' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRV' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
aaae5bf65f8667660b8416a6e0d8f1be
830f2d986eb5d029cd8704c07ad02575d02ed915
'2011-08-17T07:15:43-04:00'
describe
'1129377' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRW' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
8307d2ffb9c1dc52b490a8b9268077c9
d2f5b4c80174b0fe928382f26a6eb5e5006f3453
describe
'350672' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRX' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
9f957944e5c8a96446f5713a3eb2f584
556ae5406d7e9773416683ba26b2a5966c79f460
describe
'27434' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRY' 'sip-files00091.pro'
e34b4d590ae5e4058d817f5226845b0c
17260b6200531504bd8c6d3e6ff1df5850949aff
describe
'119507' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZRZ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
216e89eda296cce459a5f4277caaabfb
71a7e8c96b3cc39c81c5d97f697f676670b74a9a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSA' 'sip-files00091.tif'
a715858b12dc45c6c2fa4e3a37f0899f
5974b1a2eeb7d88c29d9671b00a7faaf8c16e6e5
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSB' 'sip-files00091.txt'
ab6364087347b967a68dd71d84209f96
90c2142a840dd88f0aa5e9fe949dad937d54b3f8
'2011-08-17T07:12:44-04:00'
describe
'44944' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSC' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
4b459f7309e5e7355894e307a8ca2395
5f5f5e9e5b6c41d8590fd778fdb0fdd97cf5b5ea
describe
'1136531' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSD' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
69b47c9f591519a1ecfff4007ed8d6ac
382c962874e429c90246695d0dcdf00fc8f7472a
'2011-08-17T07:10:28-04:00'
describe
'367946' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSE' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
8aea87c9f1d532f98293061ccf0a1034
14bf68664231923a789774c21384b36ff9b34139
describe
'31093' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSF' 'sip-files00092.pro'
93de509a184e04f5e45398212940c808
10479e37186639c9f35821e3d7aef5495921239e
describe
'126817' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSG' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a37c3204ff5280d89dd14f57287843d4
c948949939236a4b41f1eec6ef4e0036c2a38766
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSH' 'sip-files00092.tif'
41dcac53df8461e0a5df60b313f86c5e
fbc45d836623ca811992a61012d081620592d7af
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSI' 'sip-files00092.txt'
996d745476a3cda51f8b5929ad422183
853682d70d379ddeb9defc3ad1bff48a06c7ef5c
describe
'47328' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSJ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
09a5b5dea842120b5ed0cef53ca72998
5a2d7c35d300886cdb6f76292094b017a158523f
describe
'1129357' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSK' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
fbf48f40f93745c0c423cb69f2b0ed4a
3dfc9cfa166378eb6c5fc25353dc6687d6ad2e4d
'2011-08-17T07:08:54-04:00'
describe
'375221' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSL' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
494dec4b25a6c56a6b86de8b5067b577
aad9ff93485ae9508da5340648479376ab52b700
describe
'32863' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSM' 'sip-files00093.pro'
5398d395fc8630ab3587af67a8235a19
fe0bc2ae7ea53acea95c5486d130e16f9647ec09
describe
'129427' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSN' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
14aee6dc8fdbb36c2ed0abcc3f80fbf3
bb726a229236b0017d54df45f14b169719d1787c
'2011-08-17T07:08:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSO' 'sip-files00093.tif'
e044499b0e06e4a386d988c125460c90
3ad780e99be30f8c48b4c525e01f07312992fca7
'2011-08-17T07:11:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSP' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b360fe3f6c34b1821c80a3f104ef1983
a7a6ddb0977e4adef2249d9826dc6420b7ea6969
describe
'47837' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSQ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
91457a4f16a2ace6a1d196bc8b76f3f9
b30f28e754fb9aeee56eb3f238f266ae73331f9a
describe
'1136447' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSR' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
66e8b62ebfd0218d5382e3b94f6d8d0b
698c58e9b0c2fccede00f60fb9d700b8e4df0a1e
'2011-08-17T07:10:02-04:00'
describe
'373621' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSS' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
9a0b71ee2d4e4510f557c1d8aeb919b3
2d776c947f74f0d371da5b296f8ff75a892a1181
'2011-08-17T07:12:26-04:00'
describe
'32506' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZST' 'sip-files00094.pro'
90e00f07f43e6159e2a3efafbfc34840
faac409cc23feed2f3e4db465954ce87b9f1ebc0
describe
'128309' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSU' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
e173c5004542d68cf5b8c7dd6708d2d1
687119e4703d5442f88f8a9a3dddf39884bd661a
'2011-08-17T07:12:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSV' 'sip-files00094.tif'
8301c8e6b3cc04ad08578293b42b9ea9
87f296bc25144a197daf214222457d318a5119be
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSW' 'sip-files00094.txt'
e3ab41de5e56552718d965648477ed83
9eb1491444741cfba6ec02ac00f2e7a884533cbf
'2011-08-17T07:16:10-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'47143' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSX' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
4b14a35cb5300f057c63a3fb52ea527c
c0182547d8825ed341a6d5f21e7b086dd9915bd5
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSY' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
ae5426e3a248806c5ab95329d8a1f53f
a5266fa8b3fb3a141671d48478325a62a6304b43
describe
'378232' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZSZ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
ac7f8cc0e02a5e14b4b818197aa3b454
beb50042f6e35d64562db900708c6ddf720412e4
describe
'34507' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTA' 'sip-files00095.pro'
ef9f4f1af543922964e696f03a1aff65
3a0ed9b2edfa0f9c76fad9aaa62734656dcff91f
describe
'130765' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTB' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
75875f4804c0506f904fc9a4a7f9acb9
d34823382f4120d1ecae0d2557cd103eb7a40805
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTC' 'sip-files00095.tif'
fe37a8b0652a4ad1a6c0459930b973db
ddd5e7d9a413ad5da63ef1aa3f010f9ed12355e9
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTD' 'sip-files00095.txt'
2b4cf6294735b1c4847c499f919dde0f
c8a44989d3243df4c35092b2ddfb8b5b7354a503
describe
'47779' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTE' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
79aa263dce8d800197cc686e2238fd4b
c1b1a89806f724b1972d435a71caa10bb64aaa64
'2011-08-17T07:15:56-04:00'
describe
'1136380' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTF' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
8091cc8c23f6ab9d8825d86a73615d58
bb2d804d469e0363ee05cfff4b076c828b97a110
describe
'346148' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTG' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
e57631cd760aed11b3396ed7d06f92a8
bc21c1d7fc4fb70051d68bacfabdf31cd53e5b90
'2011-08-17T07:08:58-04:00'
describe
'25234' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTH' 'sip-files00096.pro'
9639ee58bbe71b9652fd15d521fffa95
0f3d3a11a9e0be8892f4ea20ece01d9258524191
'2011-08-17T07:14:13-04:00'
describe
'117546' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTI' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
80e40c070533ca9a523647df4adb0552
9f41d16144a9832aa9bce44c7929f7a7c216cfb1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTJ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
697d656a34c7ceb3515737a2b9cc26d2
ac1456094e8e628dd57fc6ac706ef7e0b713782f
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTK' 'sip-files00096.txt'
690ac55c3fedd6cdba9fb0b7d8bc9f6c
82eb270d0c18690c54b63044b86d575c197df933
'2011-08-17T07:13:13-04:00'
describe
'44299' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTL' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
9549f74d37e7a50fd1dbccc25b331e44
20ac7b928e3c346e80a514a58003f990deb0e3da
describe
'1129406' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTM' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
2465227806a9ca06514094265d072f4c
f6f10d063db6394d2743f8d68da404786b1d723f
describe
'352455' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTN' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
62ef2509154e923bd19fee99f8370630
a514f21293ce4a238be2b55ccf4a9aaa421325ec
describe
'27137' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTO' 'sip-files00097.pro'
f5fad67b142c2028990cfea8d433ba7f
55bde4fa79d83f86558c16d980e13ede846f231b
'2011-08-17T07:11:23-04:00'
describe
'119315' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTP' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
f5340d74583865dc2971cea529e1e36e
10c5dbac36ca064b3a6c5f63d50c7ba175d0f6eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTQ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
a1c31cb6fe9effedd763266c85a00f0b
30a61826443a69ddd2ed4c7fffd8a5aa29a9b308
'2011-08-17T07:10:05-04:00'
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTR' 'sip-files00097.txt'
d13b335771f1dfb65f8a825a666f9fe6
f8dab27b40de76ec9f6611a1791f99bb5a8b3b94
describe
'44536' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTS' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
b74796953c821cfa35275af52328c64f
900c3be0eb3e753a1f2bb17243ad26ae128f67e4
'2011-08-17T07:13:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTT' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
ce13e39fc2e0b67ffdb570cdbfc40a2d
6e7098a7be98546cb9ea1b1be4ae1916fb124d67
describe
'374952' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTU' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
a6e4818ec8acc5e72b8447625ea64cfe
5847cd0fb4ea2ebd06f7ab59d528505843f70bbc
describe
'34448' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTV' 'sip-files00098.pro'
daccba4aaa695275002d8f2229cd8bbb
aededd283338f7f465006ad7894f5fe2bdd3cd7d
'2011-08-17T07:08:40-04:00'
describe
'127625' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTW' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
553f294d6a104c69ecab3d201ede6872
d39f197a2e7074c44a4fc31201d9c0fd2c0b98e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTX' 'sip-files00098.tif'
5ae8a15b24ac6447267816dc71e4280c
54b1a8c45ce9d771931c8d877a064f8e0aeaa33d
'2011-08-17T07:10:41-04:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTY' 'sip-files00098.txt'
6d4acc2c64eb972ea26b039aff8119b6
a9e7b7086a5ce72dfc5bc88b6418136937c96fb0
describe
'46624' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZTZ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
67f4b8c42aebed4dc5a088286dd51366
c0287e3ea9fcdd21a071c884db52bca97af299a6
describe
'1129432' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUA' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
024d5b5510c5b3c35357d84c8ff4f6f3
a3e4f9e446d45cef2f79688b1bf5dc5ee960db73
'2011-08-17T07:09:04-04:00'
describe
'374453' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUB' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
f6ede202903cf64e50500400e45522db
8b48bb198c4c45b65fa7eb8faa8320c4dbaed7dd
describe
'34824' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUC' 'sip-files00099.pro'
c1b92304568c149d483e1b2fdeaf8602
cbc56efca7f82e01f155d95a4f49a5cc80ab4c9a
describe
'129742' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUD' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
8f11b9f01f5811ae27b6d7dd4ffc7cd0
bd9a70bfa2f2743b3347c0fee4d6b52f839a2ca2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUE' 'sip-files00099.tif'
48ac865b14e2887c03b66c0ae6c0b100
1b2b68eb5657140cf66f880119927ccd1f0dab01
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUF' 'sip-files00099.txt'
8d5eb9a85297979573763616747828a0
83309a6ca1ad7ba80207b5ae846c1f345d81c352
describe
'47850' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUG' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
12b52dee751700417bf65296ce079d5c
e97557286481dc226be8b28934f99b8d2a886007
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUH' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
b3837b7021061b79afa7a2ddaeac50a2
a1ad381b1ea736e64fb07fc83dcaea5ff621119a
'2011-08-17T07:15:27-04:00'
describe
'381322' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUI' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
58e826c3aeffedd7cfd001d454314fab
8ba4a30eb2aa1666a43d0937e494b3a7657be60f
describe
'36563' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUJ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
8768c29be993f87414f1bdf9a0af27bb
4654d31ec50752f9d9b8bd829e0a38d89b4fdd0c
describe
'131528' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUK' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
8eab852bd5d5c610224533d3cf01008f
d802122d2982ca217b295eecc86660862741a1d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUL' 'sip-files00100.tif'
f6c77613c39a0201ff5b727455e5f9ef
252ce6b55b2251847431690072a0c204d46279d1
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUM' 'sip-files00100.txt'
948926ccd785e5f9999a24b9ce0ff511
af503732f0292c614d512b09b58029afe8590397
describe
'48355' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUN' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
10b66d3e4a17d3653c43eb7e412927ec
a2cc966dac28b39aeacc9dfd951a17245aa1997d
describe
'1129393' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUO' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
367513d05f69bbeb1a37138793de2175
65739fc38a4bc5ff1ebfe8763a6da6bdcbe18342
describe
'377239' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUP' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
6a615ecb21fc0070a89d1f59de687360
6266d7f6e514634986bcf2dc81fc1f05caa11b97
describe
'36036' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUQ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
902917aeb6bfb786a09f012504457f23
cd61549bced02e8df73a39db09aae1ecdb0905b3
describe
'130061' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUR' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
d7adcb50fd9f82eba94389940490b4c8
2da44d6c155dac221d5ad91712eff68a1c0a8cc3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUS' 'sip-files00101.tif'
3212cc5fe1831033c5be815a9f6ff10d
9ba741aae65f8d23dace82d15f6717946463a749
'2011-08-17T07:09:44-04:00'
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUT' 'sip-files00101.txt'
729f61972561b32dead2415ee52eb9ee
bcd9d033df19fa32e6cc57230ac085d098750396
'2011-08-17T07:12:42-04:00'
describe
'47748' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUU' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
a4be4c37b3cb4a295ca0d9685a50e8f7
ebc8b693dc26e3d6979dc9bcd5b86c540b311867
'2011-08-17T07:12:25-04:00'
describe
'1136539' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUV' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
ed4ddb0734f76d8c0018fe888539e80b
e8cb9a47247da097c5f37941828141c104323034
describe
'377813' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUW' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
517da1efa3c609542709daad527bde64
586e59af2bf9b238c3054e0e6a8341881ea76ff8
describe
'35702' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUX' 'sip-files00102.pro'
7c5ec20572f0300804fa730186884a49
630ee998e9bbb231063a40d7d755fdb276e220ea
describe
'129630' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUY' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
53ea4067e92f1fab69c6d3c7580182fa
4129eab53cf1b64dc796626750fd544f1d28a223
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZUZ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
fd879719131cf50675cab884473a5bed
e1564d946a943b2e295553e45d750989de848508
'2011-08-17T07:11:05-04:00'
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVA' 'sip-files00102.txt'
c39da688910ccc1c426bcfe46d79f153
084969621e455d6b56439e7b7043c1d52a51415b
describe
'48119' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVB' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
0c036c65346174ce4999672614955c5e
4d60bde5e8636b2908785d44c7a2ed886d869469
describe
'1129424' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVC' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
ae81053a80bb7cba3dd5c503d12371e5
eb900a37d609393b4927c5476a9e5c9acb23c38e
'2011-08-17T07:14:18-04:00'
describe
'370702' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVD' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
978ee8027543792f362b7ceb785cf416
7438708b1c52e31a3861affe85b76272f711d659
'2011-08-17T07:08:51-04:00'
describe
'34143' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVE' 'sip-files00103.pro'
79b7146702efb7b08de13cee37844cbb
4192ebc3aa50f3eaa8ef9d3cce85a62b3c64163b
describe
'128795' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVF' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
970f2553d26f49134c2a32e3406449b7
60bfc5c38cd34d33bdc7807219a449e9127ede06
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVG' 'sip-files00103.tif'
a53ac972141cbdf5e37e5b9bfd49cbc0
e7533837f671df46aa7ae540a66067a914b2ad4c
'2011-08-17T07:11:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVH' 'sip-files00103.txt'
1ed7327a093af5133b4c43d2afaf7333
02c7e441ed88e0621da124ced4800799c23165f2
describe
'47404' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVI' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
27a10180a20a399a2907c214c6125bf9
87f849ba9af6558bea48a1698ae866ef27fc2b42
'2011-08-17T07:10:33-04:00'
describe
'1136374' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVJ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
6ca845586e3431304578d4ce47a206ed
41419b4b2172a9a69dd592cce631a8bf0d991f47
describe
'350249' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVK' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
b9d2a62e1da309abaa42a6f46a5baa00
13e2fdd40e7f67608c8062bd2cb2acd387830586
describe
'27619' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVL' 'sip-files00104.pro'
d1a7db88a1a75c7642e7188eb7fdd34c
0f4ea997034b4e917e5279be1bf178a4f19770c8
describe
'119820' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVM' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
414338df66cc4deb56960ff7a7779bfa
6d341d18034365db4f7503b9b68cf1f8c4479013
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVN' 'sip-files00104.tif'
cdc87f9813d52b3170347251759b8110
67b0d177d517c04445a34e1eba78737325eb9a49
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVO' 'sip-files00104.txt'
8a7e27a273664a2a1d5e0a37b19e759d
1e3d65282894bf895de0b652c3b98c0df9f3cf9e
describe
'44958' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVP' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
9d1b7e738999d0ec8489e5a2505b08a0
3bb3136f03b69faceb33c990af8b512c5f690528
describe
'1129373' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVQ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
c35000433f5ea9a0c2a40bed6aaf8076
22d1b9e230f672d9662a4e60bb3ee1d6f801b050
describe
'373057' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVR' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
dfc90204b7dd3e92a1c5de3755ede679
614c0d2ab810e5d9bd7be9d2e2e3027f821e64e2
describe
'35098' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVS' 'sip-files00105.pro'
6d0489c999f50a05f95f696ac04a6be9
9df056389289ba9d2dd208fa570f1185dde1fdfa
describe
'129266' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVT' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
4a879a532483608410ca989404c6e3fd
0b3d31617c1225e5dc7579080a347c2f1455fd75
'2011-08-17T07:08:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVU' 'sip-files00105.tif'
f6233ae8a807994c98ae048dc2ab61c2
98aa7733f8cdd9ce0e17b2fcaceb9e974d7a0b7c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVV' 'sip-files00105.txt'
4da79cffcd2e953f5cd5f12acbca4a47
75ba8a9928e93e98051ed5e40ed9fe8f73009731
describe
'46935' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVW' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
a43cd20431dfc5eecbf8fbd874b465dc
6eb87863dc49f51cf35528b87ebd360e5b8f8e68
describe
'1136534' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVX' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
4061ddaa76f25f02d91318ac2eee7bc0
4155fb6879d55490c47d84c587e0646273620ab5
describe
'368424' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVY' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
aac5bbb87fb28342b5437921263cef3a
7a3ae4b9571dcec191f9cd4e50c45c64311c6618
'2011-08-17T07:09:28-04:00'
describe
'34298' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZVZ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
704695f4c7177f4a82de1db9ff48316f
faa1d955057b9e3a44a25a14e3013ed7ffb98b97
describe
'127482' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWA' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
0277431c9f428c6a796f202e54a6ff59
ae9301e91789a5950d042619019c4e39dcc9756f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWB' 'sip-files00106.tif'
e79a677e1ba6ccdc3522b78175ac6cb5
9ba3e4f6ddd5c7fb9df82eae7a76cd8b0373f5f6
'2011-08-17T07:16:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWC' 'sip-files00106.txt'
60b86062ed0534ec8f301e88ec435995
c0dc8fa440657e0588b8cb2fce941f243de4f8a1
describe
'46272' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWD' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
5a38c14beae508e1ebc576644e19e139
caa39d8ce1ba2873e947b20f445d1e47a6406cf9
describe
'1129425' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWE' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
69b3b3c36e0d0dea235c446e2509d450
4111d14417ede1ff63811af71e6aaa018aeb8e2f
describe
'366954' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWF' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
8dc9806e8ee1c49e9a55a9606551a653
5289ea52ab2fc1a14fec7662578cbda87d2bb671
'2011-08-17T07:14:34-04:00'
describe
'34078' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWG' 'sip-files00107.pro'
5daa599bcf711f543f1caca07c45044a
4a6dcb1f9010a137bff63249aa83eaec93c918e4
describe
'127927' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWH' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
32114bbe385753810803bdd8b50ce1d6
6d9058293480243da442129ea354d33ae20318d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWI' 'sip-files00107.tif'
e678f6c47c69a521f10eb4f36919b1fb
6517d57a8ec9be506b4385903b7bc18d568b3cd8
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWJ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
eea7bab68388bfe95c21aee97b86bf57
d14c7acc073f7ece4d9a59304aa3d8be8bf7bda1
'2011-08-17T07:16:15-04:00'
describe
'46978' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWK' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
1548237a99fab454e42283fb36ae99fd
c595dc9da2a68436ebbada534023cbf1b8b8637c
describe
'1136491' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWL' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
dc4f0fc0fbb77958c9a7123f635738ba
440d8c2c096823411c5ef3c9c9fd9a887a9fa3dc
describe
'367366' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWM' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
9409d79e602783713ff39a4738ae7302
bab1dae3067180af5171cb170ee703db35e9160f
describe
'34564' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWN' 'sip-files00108.pro'
f2bfab0f6204d00888232dc678a49239
0cc3d266a713943cf2b4adbfae10f13b2b94d007
describe
'127042' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWO' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
b8daf5979e52389adf1a9c2ab04b252c
d360e56086f8881eaa56ce21f39553ea2979e394
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWP' 'sip-files00108.tif'
b8865b8d7b141fec561e8a6eed1e4805
84106b52b820993dc381cac13ba8d129c4319431
'2011-08-17T07:10:50-04:00'
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWQ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
f991cfa5df31a355a0e1e431ec59c7be
2300cfd2405d2d6cd6429b0540f8adfda0924468
describe
'47330' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWR' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
de1f576ae48be254ec6e0a9b4c157e9f
892dc9d0077e0c19c536021b3579a62d72241bd7
describe
'1129422' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWS' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
a7e31e7c8a3585f1e6581642c93a6b1c
e6a301f0dbfc04e27704a29f7271f748db76bc44
'2011-08-17T07:11:53-04:00'
describe
'367373' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWT' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
07ec3e4d31f76a6a18c69fc9efd0ab5a
cb11cf8e95521469392c428d8f7d1ada24cb8592
'2011-08-17T07:15:44-04:00'
describe
'35213' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWU' 'sip-files00109.pro'
881e297e2cd98ae61aaba3c5a0a29737
eaa4ea8d2853a81e122e322f0f9fc3a87f140904
'2011-08-17T07:13:09-04:00'
describe
'127474' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWV' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
b95694d5ad7f0e6f223c5df70be07f7f
9365524cecd7d45ec4756298efd7e561cbde7947
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWW' 'sip-files00109.tif'
8cdf4d5f62bb5c3aa1386b8c4842f693
f88d6cdf6a4dd378ee50b5afd84965470a936c7f
'2011-08-17T07:11:24-04:00'
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWX' 'sip-files00109.txt'
1fa8a108318865c78f257b82685b51d3
6e77068970a3c8f21024126269656927d99ac03f
'2011-08-17T07:14:58-04:00'
describe
'47167' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWY' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
307492300c13edeeeae77aa545b40bd6
eefbccc4a9b0f140b592f32155cef48a1d098241
describe
'1136460' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZWZ' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
899200f99fdaec6bb70fe87a53bf1e39
966c2e97038a2a4c4a4fa7812352d76a268dc070
describe
'370355' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXA' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
b1d5a310099939cedfef7955b76c8691
2c55d4bc08253eaeaf383d820c1293e04c3bc66d
describe
'35079' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXB' 'sip-files00110.pro'
f4f7c032412a12e52fe96f15b66d0c8c
0aeccdcf3b720165884541aa7608caeeaa8f0a1f
describe
'126053' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXC' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
a1886b7df844b5ee5c1909ccd67cbb88
ac5c6bb9557bd8f5f946eeacb5e02dc2d18fc7b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXD' 'sip-files00110.tif'
0467789b9aae34582d9ac42152ceb219
1c87a7a57b6482d3d8be236f8185708f2d109066
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXE' 'sip-files00110.txt'
392364d0a770c5707102caf2cb77da46
401b3f6ce03b906527e7950d714824bb02e2c4e6
describe
'47112' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXF' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
028c286d5e060428854363a754578825
264b21f30a13270d0e5a5a4c231a83112f4542bb
describe
'1003496' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXG' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
58d7c839b96f84a1318a389605138016
dedbd52d9c0fbec83e10d4ba87c36c4971401d08
'2011-08-17T07:13:06-04:00'
describe
'295686' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXH' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
6c7ed7bd3dff3db58ef5105cd9d49d55
9cfe927d54130f32938954273b16aa48ea776554
describe
'8556' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXI' 'sip-files00111.pro'
ed81f58064bfe396196811155cca2914
2d59a5289612fb44fe285b2d091d6fdefb00270a
describe
'96965' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXJ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
4d3313017d417f1bdb7011383e375f2d
2d05e7735df47c7fdca849f76284173f7e971e08
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXK' 'sip-files00111.tif'
f848e93ba90630cdd5ffc28c1d6ae5dc
0c293da9f74bd68102b47bd2bc2d84ade93c34c6
'2011-08-17T07:13:00-04:00'
describe
'345' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXL' 'sip-files00111.txt'
37a227b5d48c86f977c73aa218d92bdf
e5976e40313ae6474440f13b4b52a2a49d992a92
describe
'38047' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXM' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
e05240d85eeedae4f79063c9e5b32d01
96d96aed26c13233bee9c58aae9c4f80ccb981d5
describe
'1068664' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXN' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
bb1c95500342a0baf65d1b858f8fbd05
583f41599317810d081ee19f4e13fa8c2a0b9589
describe
'309988' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXO' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
bc723e2bae7a0491e402ade394d690a1
9400c51a3fc787cb9d307abdb70b43bc1209029b
describe
'19047' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXP' 'sip-files00112.pro'
99e0df5f1d2d8157425f21f36a86af84
0cc8fb79b020a4093b709b9e655b19fb0f0d0c90
describe
'102703' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXQ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
f3a1ec55d55123fb2741418cebf0fab2
c32ca3b87134966994e5552dbe98246170e7a59b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXR' 'sip-files00112.tif'
ff73bcbda0ee0fc7dfe188e03e901ac4
8f4ffb946604663896f22c831715fa4196618c71
'2011-08-17T07:11:31-04:00'
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXS' 'sip-files00112.txt'
6a6f4899ebbf57f370e1fab8a6d4d228
ab121de0af74e06a4e72b36fd5df1cf7b104ec3f
describe
'39150' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXT' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
ca3fdf4cbea553e222aa8ddf06857c76
e0ca602fe9af89c6ff8178bcfc610e755a4d31f5
describe
'1175913' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXU' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
2075fe2fed53268be665192c70a0f97a
668cca4c78db88b4fe0c147a0b83215c7c7cb5d5
describe
'330608' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXV' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
ebace9378307e657efe21904ea5f1a2d
5aa07e98e89ef83c721f15d9ec6a1381dadfff6f
describe
'26704' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXW' 'sip-files00113.pro'
e48d40d3ba8ac353a97397275a83ebfa
fe719f064d9d14b7294eee33ceb4b5599d076bdb
describe
'109731' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXX' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
275b8607115a379b3ad5d602301db063
68320f6ed7554d6b93dc70d2743eed98dc72032d
describe
'9807477' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXY' 'sip-files00113.tif'
7265dd0e9a41eb994b923929998bdf08
993e811a75a4c6f70a38705b7d24bd6331c63ddf
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZXZ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
7a7149f8e014abaaa667714526bb6f2b
47448b8594d402af3df787a6c33ac09f73b5c5f0
describe
'39006' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYA' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
9a91ff27944e2ba555c3be8909433a21
f9783a270311a34c5c9128ec18933dd797a6bfe3
describe
'1136523' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYB' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
de13bd62acab23a0c0bf36f7b414116d
40b5e2081fe5c472a17d8caf43d38d88fe1bfd64
describe
'368275' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYC' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
578abc59409042d5045efe0c086f9f4e
1705149c7a6b75ddb3bc8da63ca8e837453b8d77
describe
'33666' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYD' 'sip-files00114.pro'
2b5edb7ca5e7d06df4ebcfb066c4b30a
5d59d13ce2dbc897b915ea54efedb8c39ec3c235
describe
'127290' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYE' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
73e299c680803b3bf6fbf85e22859476
41c4639905bf4ebc0357119191b88070d2d72f80
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYF' 'sip-files00114.tif'
daad96a0f33824ad65d87625dc012713
072bdb3ac09893bf9c58d71d4734e52034e4f090
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYG' 'sip-files00114.txt'
78c9725ab70de1930219d735776a4f49
d6531f0b1020696a40808ca41723f63f888fc4ab
'2011-08-17T07:12:11-04:00'
describe
'46641' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYH' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
a0fea6d5d150a4b927e83497373ac099
cf27c89ad876ffa5478b5203b207b0ac5cd14490
describe
'1222159' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYI' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
226b119bc9681f3d839223ab0731e8ba
cb3b123cbc6d43f198c9049c1e7175ef7aeadda6
describe
'358035' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYJ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
f61eb1dbabd98c9feb93bfe533b5502d
15ecd62dabcc465f7bf91ea60a44aaca397baeb2
describe
'34566' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYK' 'sip-files00115.pro'
ad8330263f8f73075dc62653608906d4
1a9d15a3c996886b5ce8e20c0b18de0d59dc2d7a
describe
'119733' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYL' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
ace1b63ec74f904213e33e408e051701
9af3c622b08a7a21f66bb100fda39a8a0fecba4a
describe
'9783851' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYM' 'sip-files00115.tif'
7762bb4791f60041e5fca91aaf618551
28de1d9adb112318165b7eb7bb83e5837afd5f74
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYN' 'sip-files00115.txt'
fbee37322bb4827aa3953cc63e6c80e7
23e451fa1c4a74b4dcf261585af5daccf020f560
describe
'41590' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYO' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
306b330c97daa0eb7cc8be5e7c6696c3
4f21aa0ea42ef35d256e98ea4083d820f8c83788
describe
'862521' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYP' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
9ce05e7807669b0b0d33332b392cea7c
0db8baf7123ae4141967243bbd21f7a006b38124
describe
'247448' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYQ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
d7d8589c5c3545625bcbe1653f087cca
6ca43dde47681d13aef98403b345980b52b2ff08
describe
'348' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYR' 'sip-files00116.pro'
69d6d5c18923b963f73250c40ffb8053
883721d1ada107d8f9808f8bb4318193233b1c8b
describe
'77378' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYS' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
909fb965092c928708ee27bc06e31572
975c54cb136ae390e0142f1c7a26dedc45bee918
'2011-08-17T07:12:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYT' 'sip-files00116.tif'
2fb5a63ecc9891e16b42f7c1dde69480
78fd96a602b19d487c48649196889ba8e1875d92
'2011-08-17T07:09:39-04:00'
describe
'219' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYU' 'sip-files00116.txt'
49cd53ebd40c4e138a71233b60ef39cd
600161e2171d507ccbf3b372638866036bf86e2c
describe
'30876' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYV' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
2b292942a39d9f63acccda1100caef88
3dc0f7dcadbfaaa766bf45c6e0c1924a168e874e
describe
'1129257' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYW' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
ab3926474de2256d9eb78beb57f80f35
803d6fdd909b280123bff2704e7c14d1ebbf4d46
'2011-08-17T07:14:27-04:00'
describe
'344906' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYX' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
cab50258809709f2a2f2c6a6fdcd1bd7
a8e78d149cf17226d2ba8bc9df0bf24a7cd1d40d
describe
'356' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYY' 'sip-files00117.pro'
d830611f17c62f4bf23578247f0c9776
c3b3e00a7ec11cfec0ba4a2c81bffe588e60bfa3
describe
'106672' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZYZ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
df6c147a269c640e6486d4420b972bd6
b6ec81b1c8186c25db53793ed54a0fa8543ec775
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZA' 'sip-files00117.tif'
339c82369f59337d947e7723c3978664
24203338abd79d35da2f1bca4be8938de1f8f768
describe
'65' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZB' 'sip-files00117.txt'
d4cb1590027a54ed4079b1a596c1e841
7f3d571488adc95d18b81971bdf98a1ead72dd28
describe
'40303' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZC' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
2ac5a8a02987f79d63feb21cf3f1fbe0
1ab6ea3b6c59e0f457a6156673a127a73a24b1ca
describe
'1136482' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZD' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
a4ecb5d50d28023e216a516caacabc2b
5d1bef0630241246b97bf7c7b0fcab80dab93591
describe
'355247' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZE' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
9a8f38a6ecfd8e678f4b5d9f5344444b
8d154e0b588167a44c09b6830a1328b83ee4a0a0
describe
'25613' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZF' 'sip-files00118.pro'
b7b3fb17f87e996491ae70f377576b85
32d8ea4d05ea1ba115919bbd60cc2f7f2112b225
describe
'119976' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZG' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
469d4ea78b5f3b14b856ceed8bfd6e9d
01d349b8713d4e22bd16c3f042579c51e4dd55a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZH' 'sip-files00118.tif'
f4223bdaa23fa91263f1df490f2eb817
8be3dfa3cc7177818d96c1f011da95f4f5f91e36
'2011-08-17T07:11:35-04:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZI' 'sip-files00118.txt'
b843dde5f9e58d3f986d3dfd7c8accf8
2cbef0bf33bf2bf1f31de6b542a6e517db4e5942
describe
'44675' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZJ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
010bf2a86a4cb7cd00cb66e9dc749101
5b45890b68cba58b58775ef34f0a9275dcf01087
describe
'1129409' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZK' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
f1e54a6d2efb7a6e32d35b7a1e2c650c
7d69db96654a479a205c56b91ad32d1a09cba24e
describe
'375673' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZL' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
5679ed3bb8394ff36ca626bfe7f3f9ab
089a43e21f8732581e53edd06f091ff6bd21a479
describe
'35122' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZM' 'sip-files00119.pro'
59d4858ea365b82ba5a5b31db0b5f98c
acfe21f246875b9a1d663a8b4e37680a9ca57a1e
'2011-08-17T07:14:50-04:00'
describe
'129640' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZN' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
cdf11a267784adb9cd0758a1843668a5
32ccb38133655b4d80ab067e2ec1922eb5e9fbe7
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZO' 'sip-files00119.tif'
affb992ceb76caa2501b43ec88913830
4c616dba1854197238ab67a5110a1dde6db6ad97
'2011-08-17T07:09:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZP' 'sip-files00119.txt'
b30dd43554c0b7a6604077689e55c50a
616675e6c70c20578ba79807c67ba38800415538
describe
'47720' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZQ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
060a6655cd23e9233cb1e55a68f297fa
55a6669413b36d35ca8c01f9be61ac287c7ae471
describe
'1136478' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZR' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
4ebea9bea13a520ac6d7f8ea04d4a921
c57fa1c8303234c7673ed5b394de8b23e6ecb6dc
describe
'380808' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZS' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
45f3b37486c4ef4b2cb14655c5ba620d
c8fc529163f2afd526293e4aac6c9bdd9883ffe3
describe
'35022' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZT' 'sip-files00120.pro'
f101698f73f3f27688914a9b87798a9d
1de1a472c51441d5b4765582eae62f84a224aa2a
'2011-08-17T07:11:25-04:00'
describe
'131639' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZU' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
47a82095748f949ea7f172a68b22be35
ca1c706ddfee250a9bbc8ac9a1d61b3eb1195274
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZV' 'sip-files00120.tif'
73a1fb6ddd35415e48e73baa37d99c9d
c99bd919dc49f981a9056bd32318c6b429d7dcba
'2011-08-17T07:15:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZW' 'sip-files00120.txt'
d48c3ce00e79dec6e1603f285e8b207f
f63a9b3d4cb4ccfa07216a47f21168bbe22315a0
'2011-08-17T07:11:30-04:00'
describe
'48294' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZX' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
9ca86c0162c7393dd4e207d2a214b86f
1224a0149e2bdb9f9293f2efef0627f80d616a4c
describe
'1129429' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZY' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
2d8dd6d453586ef653db2f5fd6ded528
e44540dece53629b64128e6b39df56abc19bd0be
describe
'329821' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AABZZZ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
257d9a6738bf9daaff53892a84bacfbd
7df942491b61eaf0e0e9f4069d77280362d63e42
'2011-08-17T07:13:20-04:00'
describe
'6855' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAA' 'sip-files00121.pro'
e812ae9466923bd9016216dea99378c8
d3a2c3b71b2880321219501c2f0cf978d4b1a6df
describe
'105623' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAB' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
af5755e81d6394d94e31c5bcb0390645
545c66a8acef97288c7f573994ff1d9276325850
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAC' 'sip-files00121.tif'
39fd9d79add8b8ccb82002c122afe8f1
1ba1bc4a7e268a505630a2e0991b44ab28cfa712
'2011-08-17T07:10:29-04:00'
describe
'282' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAD' 'sip-files00121.txt'
56b8a5d06b2b828b1051da02749c78a5
209310669e3b98a10f01110c683aab9b79f6d2e5
describe
'40223' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAE' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
c11480741b470142cb30d6ee4c678d64
6faa78f0c90b61f4590928eb5ad986d672ad555b
describe
'1130279' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAF' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
5d07532687c3292b7252e199072f5a54
e349d12b7f90e1e2963eaf9e324e3a2806e249ee
describe
'338573' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAG' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
70f181adaf7614ced441c1b1fdae06f8
8042ab6260326daa746670deeb40cad209366ab1
describe
'26926' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAH' 'sip-files00122.pro'
4c265c415602b7e91f0338ec5847728c
2675f305a66f154455b53da9767de02e44586f15
describe
'113852' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAI' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
c005687e2dce20a855723523eaa5526a
3be1f9d92e50d37d21d331e10f884ad7171276f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAJ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
a781d9d65de83960e385c3e60d7b9cae
a6d4c8857e60e7a326dbfd961a245bab4736cf57
'2011-08-17T07:09:49-04:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAK' 'sip-files00122.txt'
a719018991ffc480a0070480204cbd99
dbbeec89ea6214ecf3db8dfeb0d19492a235ae29
describe
'42972' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAL' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
c26e55847adb7231830ac10aea4a4db9
c40aa147104eb878dc90c093e106150dbe37480d
describe
'1129415' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAM' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
8437d3bf05ea9537cb7fbd4f13fbf616
16b9a5229831c76c8ea8da8d445ecd68c025c818
describe
'364413' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAN' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
4409c2e2ee161144a303dbabe7be3b18
dacbb2ed1b477c8efdce57bbb72e4974d702b04e
describe
'33976' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAO' 'sip-files00123.pro'
95770792c25044d816f71fcccac06b03
c837f875190f8d11338dfd81e58e7ba32c23b54a
describe
'126205' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAP' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
91876b457b64017bb67c237718a5ca12
32898a81e11effc7f84104497a3da7ae1008bd4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAQ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
c3e1b4d52727d984e88a3b9121b9dcdf
c96fc38e5e7795719ef32162f4b3f5bdb5dc3619
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAR' 'sip-files00123.txt'
e6663e866a0bcb008dfdebcb5013bff6
73baef1bb44c731b5a98c2a0bc5a13dbef9da0ae
describe
'46306' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAS' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
7d6da9d2210ec4979992197b45998b79
49c56ddcae8bfa204dba5c026488ac77ecd6d5e5
describe
'1136446' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAT' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
b5ed3045849260da0670377958aafedf
b27fc7136046c471a45beccbcde2cae23e3329ee
describe
'364825' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAU' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
3feb8b4fcef835ae30e7922a70696294
20a77ed6ba397d41c1edef258afed48d0b8a864b
describe
'33170' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAV' 'sip-files00124.pro'
5dcb57184b658beb4f5b3b213c73e98d
551089deebabb78ced3f4a9eee624d30bd8199f6
describe
'126170' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAW' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
4d566f2f163481ee808b1aff159c351f
e6431764f941d49c30c3842b91aedfd2e0b43b6d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAX' 'sip-files00124.tif'
bf86e7253f254922a737e8c95e910830
06be9ad3a9412bf0a4f759566e7d00070009eac0
'2011-08-17T07:09:35-04:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAY' 'sip-files00124.txt'
d5f71d15a0908b37734871fbae99dfc0
a4b58c75969518624160a9b4b183f0c67d3903b6
describe
'46982' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAAZ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
f4336acf96b7824948e03cdedd31d6a6
8b2829dff18b920881952916ce5b898472a680b0
describe
'1129420' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABA' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
e377923a9eb19442cff9ade7f53a45ef
5ba7a5f54bcacd59d4b3597aa4106679d16b8c00
describe
'364696' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABB' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
36aeac68194bb38892dd66588d1aecaa
e059b4091cab937fcc77cbea620e3896ef9f8f3d
describe
'34106' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABC' 'sip-files00125.pro'
69037a3e231966119896879d48dd9ee5
2428e8c0e5e53662f7b4d99e9ac17704c8143a01
describe
'125475' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABD' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
7097ceddc9bba6bd660ca3e16811fb7a
af44002e409eb5364f9a6996bcb070f020a218ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABE' 'sip-files00125.tif'
9ef0f2fd1e07fac337af51a4783c6dc3
59852d39274f25129c97f70257ac5c1d3efc532b
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABF' 'sip-files00125.txt'
b201741cbfe04f088228166357ec75c6
33907e6ccbd384225d4c8f85bf97d9c2989a0b18
describe
'46493' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABG' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
7c3bf40674038c80e7fd04334a65c233
03b44fb5c14523bbca0bfa56aabb5ba4afc6d057
describe
'1136525' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABH' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
a8a153a594d646caca8c3c2166901321
58e66492f670a690e24cd65d45dbab911a3ab1c6
describe
'370159' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABI' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e5d7d4a5e693802db0ca1e320017a49d
6d65073000c79859f807b7f28974598d1c2715f6
describe
'34411' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABJ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
c553dca4556d0eb717fdf0b7aa30f1ac
c6351cb73076e4ccaaec584e9528cbf856afacca
'2011-08-17T07:10:48-04:00'
describe
'126925' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABK' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
d6116fbb65575d7f017d0f8b852727e6
3682b1290697a9317cf02b1406595ca171c82a71
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABL' 'sip-files00126.tif'
e86f1dab621256b885705c525d9f6da3
23c759e0aaa562b120150228c8332938577e6c2b
'2011-08-17T07:12:00-04:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABM' 'sip-files00126.txt'
6c3946f6b0bd2793c69301a2ca1b7081
4b64b2bab7f6dbb73dee30fa4367b78a341dbab5
'2011-08-17T07:12:38-04:00'
describe
'47265' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABN' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
1f8b41936b71eb4e1f8024e027ac48db
66fa8ad85e8d27273389d144f2b8bf23b6c2b3ac
describe
'1129234' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABO' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
226770722ee237c11c0e0d395ab64d45
0d22b4198064380b89b2fa1e0765888a7c70ab24
describe
'368460' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABP' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
1f76b085851a8c4870d3524c2a30a999
127c413b4ae6704a2fb59d9ca55303dd4e469ea3
describe
'35295' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABQ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
3e80b122523a5b1aced3003491199f96
0a52678bc4a6ece49c0a52e7d95369dcb0549c3c
describe
'128594' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABR' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
669f73e81c8c06cde846c15fb5f85b34
0092f0152406132bb8ce90c9789601853b60046b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABS' 'sip-files00127.tif'
c5a3085e960527df6179e1ddbaacff51
c4855112165426365bb3a32abd61de7ff03501c0
'2011-08-17T07:08:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABT' 'sip-files00127.txt'
8510dc959e8cf0056cc9f1428269fdb2
a885622bb7fe178340e05c58aa4ec807c48249e1
describe
'46701' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABU' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
27e5edadfedffa45bfddb22ad949220e
b1d17f0526fbf5d218e2f6638c1c65209f1a732c
describe
'1136502' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABV' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
042526a4452013dc428cefa28af4ca3b
0f944aff114b0bd464bb123ff4efb47cce0f63a2
describe
'360524' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABW' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
9dc211716cab6eb0de0a9b71560b471a
b08a8fdc3ef7f1de3eec5a9dc30003f606d76346
describe
'32040' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABX' 'sip-files00128.pro'
d37e5dc7b06c570c648e23fae495b9a3
cabb9374e96a1fb301e064f73bdfd19b5afe0556
describe
'125056' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABY' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
756f5148eb16cb7065aa0f9e7fb88965
ec47e2612ef9c0f95eaf108288714bbede3b7e60
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACABZ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
e78d7d27d71865dfdab0d1363648854e
23c983023b657e87f6deca070b9a8b250d586f5e
'2011-08-17T07:08:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACA' 'sip-files00128.txt'
c43a13bb61b78fd47c24bf9fd75affcb
5f6ecf9eb818e22e7b23b5dff075bd1aa34a1332
describe
'46479' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACB' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
5e83631b62b0d2bbb3b50d872d76a278
6f2ff09dbff8a848e011a10db3eed63cffd82ad3
describe
'1129430' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACC' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
83d2539c2fabc5e9c9c635c31c1e7d99
6d4ff07acbb9af3019d4e2711539f8610ebda2a3
describe
'362991' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACD' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
369cef89a43df65904078d38ed53b3dc
4e0e14c4429365114f8ff55862bf5689773aa461
describe
'34250' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACE' 'sip-files00129.pro'
71d578adf6a2be9c0f700232c77e466e
29c5ef06fbfbae1fbe8a222117c0a1152a2fad35
describe
'125568' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACF' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
18f29d6ceb526f73c76fbb0a70a2c709
ca6067b8a23d680a40506fe4cbcdebd981185b71
'2011-08-17T07:10:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACG' 'sip-files00129.tif'
98a316bee9e21d946c3fdb4d6492ca62
23dbc0038f48283bbbcd7ca7a18e5a48ee7c7356
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACH' 'sip-files00129.txt'
af89677f862dee7915c1abb7c4c83168
9896f01aa08d4fb4921a35e380ea70a25d3554d4
describe
'46417' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACI' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
cf8af6df54c2b3721fa0bb5bcceff18f
cfa813f64a0728ccdd9dafec37e9965083576bef
describe
'1136459' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACJ' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
02f0094b121e4963fc32fbefd67ebe83
4d5652867642c87da3d66df92067d0cb5437b12f
describe
'357064' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACK' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
3190fe11edf6662a975d058f9d9ef07f
002a73cd8daf341da15828f7438d2e29ecce6d4a
describe
'32078' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACL' 'sip-files00130.pro'
291c9992b25e97741eb6bc066f9e11c6
4160905ec5ccfae0e44dee4377c41e61687af1ee
describe
'123347' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACM' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
dda7505dc8327e3dad4b4f15c5756aa1
bed267dc2b0517f66a05351623426b0e1781c79d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACN' 'sip-files00130.tif'
faace2146d6ae94a69c7e8a42e133599
9a5126b01cdac5532191587529f3c2724c299615
'2011-08-17T07:12:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACO' 'sip-files00130.txt'
2321d14e47ba42289f9e40512c391eec
f008013cdb66169d3a89c85892649216c319b8d6
describe
'45984' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACP' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
31463522688fb8ec8cb988582fec1736
fbd5ed06b4ab4942d819dbbf905c4ec8a970a753
describe
'1129390' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACQ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
a0c9e9568e2dd8184d5b861656e76b3a
ff60e5dca3a5e34850cbfe93acce28fd34899dde
describe
'354381' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACR' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
3691bf47e8e235257f8b5c3e9e5d2024
32f3ea4b14d33fb6e30bbb07d34c78c16d50c90f
describe
'17781' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACS' 'sip-files00131.pro'
d7a86eb0bede9ffd07145551d4474481
4c818e3cc537420aa2185b556a34555ed8070359
describe
'117750' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACT' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
3f9e30987ed52be0cd5872013318e71c
37a75aeaacfba6318162a7f02f19590c49a9ef10
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACU' 'sip-files00131.tif'
4c044d9e49f936e2995bc1a6e433af8b
3599047925c51d5f17182ce91f35c7e35d414e38
'2011-08-17T07:13:48-04:00'
describe
'715' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACV' 'sip-files00131.txt'
762d8c63122c2cfa3a2b9b24210cd19d
0a582bc8a58c47cb9d1ce30c878bfef934aca576
'2011-08-17T07:12:29-04:00'
describe
'44565' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACW' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
5fa9697258f99e73f258b1ad8c9098d5
bc675bcc574c0931114151397ba9a4aeb32b33f5
describe
'1001339' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACX' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
ff58f66c8b8c50729403a8f90653c420
0e1f548ae98a04ed43e6e47ddc5f7220bfb97f3f
describe
'302205' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACY' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
cb277efdcc4be1674ec4f9e26b52a2c5
2ec6e84eb00647c6aa1ddf0edc9285f0bd72cda4
describe
'17932' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACACZ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
737e2a67bbe7d01841d6743f9adbb3d1
65c68c2073a16cfd13a32f30e35a0afd7a20a178
describe
'100626' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADA' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
f66654afc44e8d5b3634d132549cd64f
9eb599ad25744b8f58470c37d1caab3b9380d31d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADB' 'sip-files00132.tif'
277411021796c90d620dedf4e1d6e77f
f985df5a4e7748f307506682985cc7fc47116b2d
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADC' 'sip-files00132.txt'
be6028ef3b13078e203f2d876c3c555a
3e3d1e18f749307efd4642d9e576f797ed26c31e
describe
'38957' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADD' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
af3ea1faafcbffa6c27193c5945e6e18
5e6258fea48c264c3ec00cffa6cb9f9f7a5110e0
describe
'965831' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADE' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
354db06ea60bddd0dd443c1cf6c236f3
af4c7ced59069b09a9ab0a1728bda3e884627df9
describe
'303645' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADF' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
ba493615e497ecbf761f3032606e781a
c1ede859aeba273d3bf5078e516590d095693bbd
describe
'20763' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADG' 'sip-files00133.pro'
69e2ad6b3bbd588483cfbe8610249205
7630f7836c5e734c487902856b4eccb3eeb0f511
describe
'102077' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADH' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
f4486a6799a2fe259a1528cada71fdf4
d5d66a252a2cc8b12beb389d429f224b4669bf7c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADI' 'sip-files00133.tif'
014143efc90a1e16d725c4937f68447f
e82831b7208bdc728117317ea395374bc6e173a2
'2011-08-17T07:11:54-04:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADJ' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c65ba6611d4abf90129beb6c9d537ca9
d91720ccab7427ff510d74c4eb73ce52e84c2028
describe
'39745' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADK' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
f7599f3bf14a0ed0b88a6b3130c3a0e6
0d51dcd2d167a721cb8126ade978bee5a497830c
describe
'1120380' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADL' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
c9a3e5d3e51695ae4e48fb1e19321b08
946aacc0f4ac96b318dd5893122ded44966c61bc
describe
'340555' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADM' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
ff6d5a2104ea06866f915aebf79a29d2
6d434c1092e9e2f127a9f3e40b269cf46ff03b8e
describe
'25683' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADN' 'sip-files00134.pro'
e1c45bc0ed92a581f7edccb8a44d08bc
b059381674f21b77e6728daf67038a36935c8f14
describe
'116772' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADO' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
34ec5cb758bb3b8a27507b6743dff303
43f0f21b391dd4c84c2cd75fc1b119056e7c36a9
'2011-08-17T07:12:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADP' 'sip-files00134.tif'
de60efebee36b2b4832b4365c2494092
28f5d0f40e70fc03edb700b89ea482eae46cf256
'2011-08-17T07:10:13-04:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADQ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
299debdb4da587529916e7be3ad161be
fac116edff171c1c7c644235ca6ca800e06a9636
describe
'44424' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADR' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
5562502652373b5a436114d0ad9f27cf
fd910aed088c7179ecbb02ea8f2c6a441454dc7b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADS' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
38906c6c2bc581040be20801d9872229
004e798c2199329ae6e1b3a84ea3498669b826ea
describe
'372484' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADT' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
6b6838ecb5bfb82840317d4e3afe282d
dcc15c893de887e8ccf524908a3282a7345ca5a9
describe
'34610' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADU' 'sip-files00135.pro'
e04cc56f7beff2ba34f77bd613247e32
40e9182718cb37dba5a81fc9a08171a179e14552
'2011-08-17T07:12:03-04:00'
describe
'130392' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADV' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
e80e93e8ccb2a59480da10d8549c3ce0
6397f4e01ab2d2fd1ba7436b08ad0680944f2b49
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADW' 'sip-files00135.tif'
627c966bb640f24c7bfd4f4843748e66
addfe19d1eac88e5e4d7c8296d3aa079a7c7954f
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADX' 'sip-files00135.txt'
85f182c26ed48f68c202deeb73444b2d
63a8584ccd3a8e83fb5094b1f2907ea5c0db1255
describe
Invalid character
'48260' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADY' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
38e84145993485d124cecd0d7731d1c5
0ffbe67d777ebf92ebdf72303a498d7756e628d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACADZ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
c33608df1d16fcec352e133486a04351
805cfaa635b1c162153962e85c07a8a1e525ebfd
describe
'365211' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEA' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
8df85e59727414b3b3c43d99c705c436
628a5215153899e459607198e4ff305313853076
describe
'34559' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEB' 'sip-files00136.pro'
b6a3cdef9d139b7ea79eaad5f3cee7c2
a534f140f680d7563b681618a88f54a81c566767
describe
'127395' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEC' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
cb848acdb83c07f6af656797eb54dd0b
3d78277168420ecc63bf2f4439ca914cc448ce53
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAED' 'sip-files00136.tif'
a759d182b1f38ba22f9caba22d982a02
6cf2ce399e03a2365622f73b05e6eb1b415e7df4
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEE' 'sip-files00136.txt'
b98a05038dea1b7baf37e2b214dd53b6
cbdb40db55e0c1113573eabce2343ea011c692a5
describe
'46915' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEF' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
8d629dcbf425c5f5baf5a3b33e235575
4d99a8a920fcaa4e28b4b777d4dec46ea878fce9
describe
'1129395' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEG' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
5bf0cdb7006608b13ec086c933f4f8af
087d2984ece15d029ccb826356d1359de24ae57f
describe
'314478' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEH' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
7f66c48cd67d46e3e9f5a912c168a106
2901d26d016e368ccde82e23efa88e8baae289ae
'2011-08-17T07:13:29-04:00'
describe
'8472' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEI' 'sip-files00137.pro'
726259ba1c30fa39bc4289452665439c
f984f83faabbf1219a6984df04f3bcf30e91435f
describe
'101580' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEJ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
2849b998594c8851c3f8ed2749e2c6ca
e52689a8ca06b7a068d8f701352e10817513cd14
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEK' 'sip-files00137.tif'
1331fee1fe0481fa119abfbc73bb480f
824afb2e9904498091a6f50ce95be6be6d2b3cca
describe
'342' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEL' 'sip-files00137.txt'
bf6889c4570b296922f24f66d22e66ed
01cdeafbc6bc3b84a40053e8ddbf80466fc98979
describe
'38601' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEM' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
1cac9d7e2479656434e2ac1bb5e0a5ad
4d5d949fcb2be81208fbc9162092cf1d6f1cda10
describe
'1030743' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEN' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
af5aa62d77dba386333f864a2d213f75
c5512507d8deb300a0ff7aa04fca5442ea0808bd
describe
'326492' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEO' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
de4a0605d2123bef879e2b8fb3ae1dba
4c3da3d01e03a54347aae9ac3ffca9a416a7f7ad
describe
'27371' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEP' 'sip-files00138.pro'
39a8c1df0a01a78b8e86bcf8aec2c5b4
b546fd59e273afd8a211ddadfc6d2762829f6735
describe
'113239' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEQ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
616adbd7d8e953490b4c20bbaac2b3ad
e58048176bb756a229652fcdf55f71f5027b741c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAER' 'sip-files00138.tif'
027ff35ca437fedf53575d87c320b3b0
d0b865001f3891b6cc5dc1458c91b96a961e6a2c
'2011-08-17T07:12:19-04:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAES' 'sip-files00138.txt'
cb7c1f6c566450459710b92677bd48d3
89da5c89f973c25a18613a56f790299a79fe8a03
'2011-08-17T07:14:16-04:00'
describe
'42103' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAET' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
4de4fb2d85a080e3457619c742b32ffc
3b901c76a064e19916e908c6cd82c56e2b8c6b17
describe
'995767' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEU' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
18d15c8749b71b39de6089ed7a554ce4
8bd34c7f03aa7cc622df59d9742e221b28561177
describe
'327883' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEV' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
fd21ebb5b45782f45c368111300067b7
2b4ec4cba9472b5d7c57e938cf66091dac6a96c1
describe
'28694' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEW' 'sip-files00139.pro'
fbfcf17d97948044d023031973306089
98073750ee277d384f9e7d8b3b5afb53f1e8326c
describe
'115400' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEX' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
240671c2fc9472d2a12b4f1754661fda
9af64bd34860db914e880fa1a31bf6b98fbdac6e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEY' 'sip-files00139.tif'
dc62fb7c8efabf44f29cb026a0d84b4a
03d41c603f1de83428ce511cff1ccf24492bdf09
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAEZ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
7a5e577c4fad34a161fd9b553d69f18f
0b98bde9ded13226a25373f91622b8c3758d5eee
describe
'44031' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFA' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
4907e343afad848957a66949e0e8435a
c2315b1f3e17a9dba777a6e2e628888f301caec9
describe
'1091567' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFB' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
c619ad20148c2f820f9abbc5ee7e0c1c
6c4da1b958fd140f0aa534ad6e01b25219b47a40
describe
'349296' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFC' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
ea343b6900387ca23e2522dc3dab42c5
37dadc79cef6baa7b28062bd39aff8ae5c7072bd
describe
'33437' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFD' 'sip-files00140.pro'
03b031440ed03c2f7a573f8cf96c1e24
2d92c75e2a02f05117c2598f043302a7e52f1744
describe
'122474' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFE' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
2364290586aa49373e8401b40a8a0f1d
93bbf055ac34309beb7fb13c7d83e89a783b995b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFF' 'sip-files00140.tif'
43aaba4a207115d764dddcd4ea6377d9
af0ca6a06d92847c14496273a764f68a52c4057b
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFG' 'sip-files00140.txt'
b3b33ff0a226cf574af1230b9f32a9e0
402da1367f3734667d1ee9411cedbb3471db7e3b
describe
'45859' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFH' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
bba5c73215694244a001a6eac0cf7e9a
557d44ba78be4dfdb5ae862b33bbf78c326633aa
describe
'1045182' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFI' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
f97b7ba3695f6caad5316ac745b35333
ca4d85a360c1698858aae20f553e5742d5878b56
describe
'343576' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFJ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
e1b97f30e3b7f11e34b8e8b6a294bce1
f96d8015dd978ed93aa8ed44ada95dbd0fed2910
describe
'32793' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFK' 'sip-files00141.pro'
cf557c510ab1a85ecabb9471471e9b43
d25e88cf05e48af5845eb602d6902d93fcbe779d
describe
'120421' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFL' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
436c2d933138e825dfec5b8f907ccc35
bcc4a173b8b8837f51551e985ab5013dcf8cc4fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFM' 'sip-files00141.tif'
463e67a31581cf0b1c9dd293c2cd5974
10bef33fd7b99fcebfa4af02f998ebbf0f316a14
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFN' 'sip-files00141.txt'
f200558e57e7b74fa7b46bc9a673246c
566647c98cebff61bb31552fa7859619e874f1ce
describe
'44954' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFO' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
d66cbf17805f4c9966ae97d5328d0e92
758fad1b0d529a7d741473b7f937e4268de646ac
describe
'1085787' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFP' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
ac0d5beb40752f3b81e571395925fc00
4ef55486a45fbc23cda5b5e90878b005119fae4d
describe
'345224' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFQ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
49589723568aae3c31449f4d9f41da4f
d1b6c1660485ffd127e54498b54ad763aa7d5bd9
describe
'31597' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFR' 'sip-files00142.pro'
004548b7dc9aa3fd1398ba7e188aa380
83b2ecf9a8d69a2016e680511865e88d45235626
describe
'121093' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFS' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
2fb28f98da64d435ae66b01d7fd61732
015d79852fa10051d7ce93ae5f0b68d39b45c650
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFT' 'sip-files00142.tif'
7bf9fe0d1e746f329e244c2c5a6fcb22
fd6602c5dda82d50b7ef58c67411a4a69e808289
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFU' 'sip-files00142.txt'
cb357cf3ae1c5887974fe461a6b636dd
e146d19aa32f5da35cc59c5e043b07c3297ed652
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFV' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
195187d5c2423db0b8739a486df86636
64187019e3125914da7180c7d77c6e97b28d7e05
describe
'1057897' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFW' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
54d40063c6fb2714dc5cd0ac2ea24689
dd08b0bb39efa81b21634c9edc6074ed0de883e1
describe
'349544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFX' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
d3d7f6ec6f6ee07accad89688d1c89c7
422d2a489fcaeddbd0a7735237c1ea886e1d7c07
describe
'34663' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFY' 'sip-files00143.pro'
9bcb0a178e4cd6a5482c5faceb02d7f8
0a8b0e3ea7d84262c9dda44b1ae1f9d8786ed286
describe
'121999' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAFZ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
3af40df34e80a4fac24c7174451dc1aa
57f0d13de417bfa8f980d74888f437b26b4bce14
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGA' 'sip-files00143.tif'
b4b5ca968ff2d8ddc84dcebe1fa2de74
70ad423babc9b5bf6250326601ca181006247c1f
'2011-08-17T07:13:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGB' 'sip-files00143.txt'
6020a354243598d9c58c689f6deb9611
421145bcf20265be32261c6e5dea75d78fb00eb0
describe
'45453' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGC' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
b377ab40d9fe93d413a499a4d0f3d235
f6e32cd2255d1217df07091bc39a3e90b4d182a3
describe
'1043554' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGD' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
85b0f3bdbc4e093c40a430d5a8740abe
35ea0fbd28b2537b78a9892712df170dd6af84e8
describe
'335939' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGE' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
f58c24b643596cccee4545345571933e
b479c1e8d9121871f2ab9962c2535abdbdddbcf6
describe
'30855' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGF' 'sip-files00144.pro'
d1c4a58041a70e30c8ab95e825334c85
9049c264177795479dd884aacf6ae1da1b2fb821
describe
'117347' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGG' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
20e568878447f054b8cb6967adc0bc96
2971e3ae3fec83d804a557a2fd681a5efe77246c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGH' 'sip-files00144.tif'
05406f185122f224680589d8bdb5ae79
9a67bcea3417d0bc95c396620d809c519918ebc6
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGI' 'sip-files00144.txt'
6934fe22da906da8194adba3e387bd8a
00f4ec454746371edb75925c8fa9f9e3f9abe586
describe
'44609' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGJ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
05e223d257b6d7428d8ff1045cbf9760
216819057c7c633985b03a95a71b95a58f22747d
describe
'948839' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGK' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
2bcd18259fd05cdd7563bdc034fb1667
f2fffcb4218302acf40ddc7535aa7fc66d203990
describe
'314790' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGL' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
c37c9808530805dcef34e028cd4a9a11
bdacae20b5fde29af4c256b7976f9fb459aec06d
describe
'26813' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGM' 'sip-files00145.pro'
891ee6bda155ef96cf2665ebb75ebf0f
fe7e390c0a89025743696a559f742f5a1704857c
'2011-08-17T07:11:16-04:00'
describe
'110369' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGN' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
aa231a9349cc436f1adecebe14724373
ba5aeb8e6541e3c592598bb50cecd62ce1bb677a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGO' 'sip-files00145.tif'
e410026f69206258dd8cf4af0d85adef
92135b7299db7de9738eb9c3a30125b046abdc7d
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGP' 'sip-files00145.txt'
b0ab065b30389d2c8a0e3d8ce28341e1
b026a86c62553d8063f0685a2015896d5b6e7e99
describe
'43442' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGQ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
2795b75d1cb92fe1b1902c260b753a69
e6e706751df7091af8468c91db2b0019bf4e673d
describe
'968490' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGR' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
2fc17a459bc677de56aa6507beddb2ee
874b02b6d76ebc3120538a094b1bfe6b9abe39f5
describe
'280200' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGS' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
ad514d27d511253fa43a9fbd9c66a2e4
e15db761011d664ade623269975d014af4e5c9a1
describe
'9123' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGT' 'sip-files00146.pro'
507a8b4a08e22d0e31ac22cf5530e35c
98753e77459940b2c15b92bcbc66109d6933d2a1
describe
'91536' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGU' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
3aa9beb8d4a5da491516708f93b24e70
2a9bb98df608f3db280c1f1b32899f535f04c9dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGV' 'sip-files00146.tif'
b39982307a50cb1c6c59ed97a408f1e0
7859c82c5c1b19adf2a5da08886c78a638cb702c
describe
'433' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGW' 'sip-files00146.txt'
60fb4fa83d81ae65c23a82f7811c84f4
c28a6fe10194145c414a72918a71ec0fadf7e1de
describe
'36640' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGX' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
e6ed3357a5fa0d3c8a4cf2c585c1a1c5
51604caa43ab54ebb866325420f43621756cae2e
describe
'948199' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGY' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
0ee8990589b88d65e9483fc4501811f4
424022b1bd050f5b63b8da950e4c46108018392c
describe
'317884' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAGZ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
d509ae743006a6d5a10537fe6d04a675
20d4f1dff291780280c146e36b38976e8aa661cf
describe
'28649' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHA' 'sip-files00147.pro'
802e92516f856383afa0d66a69706ffb
848dbe296360d8cc74d825b07b3874671df74ec7
describe
'112055' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHB' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
14f284aa03415ef1972efa02e7d8558d
3544208f8e25cf0b2db11372b069a5d3b6db7643
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHC' 'sip-files00147.tif'
a0ec4cad55011a2d3236ebe9f296462f
5db5aa02bc7daebec72d64f567dd388de8a8fa59
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHD' 'sip-files00147.txt'
e4d29b24aa9bd9d2e5d02921694d6445
87962417ae010c1802f833cc7b43e60c3f4ff3f4
describe
'41650' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHE' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
e7c72cecbc06d36952b5ad1e28eb4ac5
0464f04dd557634e876f087164095befb417397e
describe
'1102760' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHF' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
9fc5bca6677daddc9125e90a947877de
3a12bfb0d4760cd82e3762b79252c8d5b78dc2fb
describe
'351833' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHG' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
244f83156625386231c80fa7fb880364
04b71287b683c0fb9dda9edaac98e12308085b05
describe
'34120' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHH' 'sip-files00148.pro'
45d810cebf934ee55f49ac12845ed28a
4e614384368ad72b282ab430f9572fece02c55b5
describe
'123741' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHI' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
4de99296a66e811b31972b0bc31559b5
d9dadf3f4e6469e3f1aa2539c6a1827805815bb7
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHJ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
4197ad2882853cf8576603f1e4e05b7a
14d59e7b0de03edbe5babe11833231f6f69471ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHK' 'sip-files00148.txt'
651090106fa93c78ed8d3c901b351e4e
1d7ce57c849899c936ab0ddb4251150adc3b26f1
describe
'45336' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHL' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
1004d0fe32929ec16ffee740bb4c662e
75d2d451dad72107f74e2a87a44ed3054f9ced61
describe
'1073580' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHM' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
27f93f761bc3a413d1dda6778c8b2be4
6a7752a89625735d6410ffd742fe39dc7b445e54
describe
'352606' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHN' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
b9715abe8076d7c9596a36ebee914d6e
0ae70bb4465aebee3e9af2f69eab4e75c8b40c18
describe
'35014' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHO' 'sip-files00149.pro'
c708b0d9b7ebe766c0a20bbe0faf9f5b
92aac0ca163f9a2e8ba6f621ebf73f8258fa9783
describe
'124345' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHP' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
ad166f0c361764786408073b0d77ee68
8e76960445f706cfdfef89ec33c882956529371a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHQ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
8b8730f3753e8d46f7e3e445df9171c5
41fd06946a704d187443da3fd8497be5f63a194f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHR' 'sip-files00149.txt'
8cf52d523bd27165a2e79cc74c95bdae
8b8a231db38708c1f3dc8f494253ba90b6b2502e
describe
'45967' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHS' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
df2763c926672621593f8ef0732e88cd
cdcd98e932a4043efc2e329f191e722b2fa25a72
describe
'1119778' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHT' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
d54811eee2d35599303785a776bf85a1
2fcf3582d751499ddbea35a6cbe8bf389e293aaa
describe
'355132' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHU' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
d3a6e46b73b1120070d0fcabbdec3f0f
8a40c86e964061ba97e32cf5e8207ec8dc608ccd
describe
'34597' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHV' 'sip-files00150.pro'
1f5a337bdf25d4abacec813a09dacece
aac26be54d03322a8e3273135998510c007a118a
describe
'125215' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHW' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
0fa42406a4ebca727be4c3daaf9fa7f8
ae146524caace5e7ff45ba9a8b93b40097b7a45a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHX' 'sip-files00150.tif'
1cb160ea0465a4a50fd6cf052ab1ae63
f1d521d7b8630b9e570c3fb5ba508d28d94f0a49
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHY' 'sip-files00150.txt'
0b28453845690ebd46fe86f11f613130
53de3e0feb5a6d8dd25aaacec1f99ea282aada0c
describe
'46318' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAHZ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
664f6a8addd64b67759e39c870510284
8cb6c3f965a238a58919ac0d09ca9c9e87c7d41c
describe
'1057580' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIA' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
90ed6b760600fc291c409ab7eae2c23c
72477862552c554bcfcbfde007cb7cadb93bc0c9
'2011-08-17T07:15:14-04:00'
describe
'351544' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIB' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
294570fad96f7dd9f05223600309f21f
9201e2e9df2d5300c2e994a4cdb1999df127ec84
describe
'35159' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIC' 'sip-files00151.pro'
7b7e675f429e1634583bb0d19b795446
a01be00d21125ac7a51708c30bd37c6e66f185ac
describe
'123344' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAID' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
b8edd225cc2a52571d67d7e2882a397c
593ff06ea7607cc4d6333caf51a0f28a7f3d6293
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIE' 'sip-files00151.tif'
c69c946c3eab240c237dace9141c263e
dac582671472090f1003a9bfadc2402cc2299025
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIF' 'sip-files00151.txt'
33a343da45f90cede6d51472f1fbec35
f84759a3d3b97993c14873c0db1e222f5f2c2ec0
describe
'45102' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIG' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
1e32082f075b161b92819ffd628d6e40
4901a45ec33e806ccb15be0231f470acb4b2754d
describe
'1107227' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIH' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
2867eafa092731f779a82f94875d96ee
175f7e27dbfa009e8776e986a76d9a9557f69784
'2011-08-17T07:09:42-04:00'
describe
'350607' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAII' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
52454b9388366e9a71930e7a467b5787
8c8613bee06282b9936fd85382940868a9cf0cff
describe
'32257' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIJ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
acae79774d153a60dcb3fde8a29215da
30104ed1b559fee3e811b9f59da02527ae53b3b4
describe
'122660' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIK' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
0cb71f4a6c7c125f30f68ae2360d1c59
1ae5ae80d588bd15b9bf4e342fb2dbfe95bb202a
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIL' 'sip-files00152.tif'
c68e2e7c81cbb2bc6ddbad40bdf02b16
2b79969fc22cc195d23e3d22591c31998bbcdf89
'2011-08-17T07:10:56-04:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIM' 'sip-files00152.txt'
765adc2512a7a5dbaeafeaee31de0717
b20125df4ff2c75389cb211a120822e984491a3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIN' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
59c0d1108357730cdee8840434181283
d6d7f14c4768493549a8d40636951706bca4a0e1
describe
'1091674' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIO' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
a5a957dbb672633473fcff15e281452c
399e164621dff6aa97376701f8f759356b58a290
describe
'303884' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIP' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
a82f0a16ee7694232b2c9a94059ed692
20114b5bf12014b1adba7edbe7ae52ced26e72bd
describe
'7112' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIQ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
a43d429ef54d45650b7d3e6f119a34d7
d0728d3aa2b835f20f21835b8bbcc17483008937
describe
'97455' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIR' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
e2926dbf689c8c5d565e7a65bd6630fd
f3c14f33087e80e8981fd0c3abdff877ac4f89eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIS' 'sip-files00153.tif'
1f13db00f3ef5389bf12eccac1891f06
8503ce145d70f2671c7792839630b10acfc1b93d
describe
'291' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIT' 'sip-files00153.txt'
c41a6e3ac4c28305107e3902efb595a4
8f95b7001ecd53c19ffe00ebebce1158282ad072
describe
'37563' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIU' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
5da855f4272e477b72d33e43ee09ea4e
7ad232dba9296657e1af7969f1358aeff30e76cf
describe
'980737' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIV' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
52db0b4c8db7da0e9e7f48777e965a7b
233eb61440773efc3b212f0b4071004b054c6a98
describe
'314135' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIW' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
06baf57a34a1491bb037044405408cca
5caefcbb0c14dbaefeb598cb1dde8e739060a29a
describe
'25351' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIX' 'sip-files00154.pro'
d14cfb56e6d33991c18c994291a85ab8
974527a9475e17f0c17fcd3636330592e567f8ce
describe
'107466' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIY' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
58b28ec39ee4b4a9433910597dcba822
411e921282632acf1ba931a731e7f3b5af0fce3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAIZ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
fc67722a7d29fa467f6f270356c0a84f
d772fce4a9eb8e4d46c71b32c9d7d3deb9e4fa53
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJA' 'sip-files00154.txt'
0a881155e53f48d77f30a04d15d08a93
6ad74898f352cdd12ad83feee4c3f0988fe4a13a
describe
'40426' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJB' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
0e9e9372918623696dea64e74f226d3a
96e1b81680820a314ab182664dba626a6f447b4f
describe
'1081289' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJC' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
a574690e0abc183076ec064426cbc015
d386e8b55aa01401e5b25447aec49133a572b3ec
describe
'351579' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJD' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
ce3bf31707556519bf69aac7101ab1da
22663995d2e1bedcad3a5831bef2e915f1940423
describe
'33595' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJE' 'sip-files00155.pro'
b4596e56e1ebfdc98b54f081fccef7bc
94d853d42e856a3075b7a17e770a02854fb9de7c
describe
'122655' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJF' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
30013cd3b35986dc3573ab8260f9fe51
3a6b0e13f633bd51355bdb3c293baa6d08b137ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJG' 'sip-files00155.tif'
2f8b53185a137ecd8b53d0bf0a6bd1c9
285e95557d2cbb26384c32f00bd9144bf293748f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJH' 'sip-files00155.txt'
f0b93a8209b54a95c9e5a47ba24019d0
b505f509dedf2a877dfb88d0e8624fd02b409f1d
describe
'45457' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJI' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
3553e8780d5dd20de866e070c7497995
046a5ba531a70db47d554b40cbce164e87d7807b
describe
'1128173' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJJ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
9d2021358042a29e6a3a6b7ce517b7e4
eb23abba03d772d2f9ba5454da0ff78313849a36
'2011-08-17T07:16:04-04:00'
describe
'355720' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJK' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
c451e7d185def3148f4a2dddf59aec2c
d566dffa033f9f7afd7bd35ca0da820b41572995
describe
'33807' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJL' 'sip-files00156.pro'
b9c9cb90c80313aa41221c3fe9db25dd
7387eb3fddfdbfa5ab501b6aef3016eacb966007
describe
'124087' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJM' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
891a033a9df4673af93b403bfc916748
c7a34ab9c6e415315756fcdd4e16e7fd2f5d7fcc
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJN' 'sip-files00156.tif'
597ed1602917f5b359e6060cfe25a90b
8dbdba9c3c2c8feccecf06a8eccb9206dbb70ca7
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJO' 'sip-files00156.txt'
813ff9318cb2263eb3d59d6225233096
b858f9e8c34b5ca2517870dd1510a6eaf738e6d0
describe
'45864' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJP' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
ad0fa536abac6ecfaec69153b41a0dff
2f066dd19306927fd95584d57b5552161fa9650a
describe
'1016739' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJQ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
a06bc5ee2d156b93281d76413e01ebc9
4f1c6e8bcfb543a0a1eec0804abfcd2b0b251a55
describe
'336702' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJR' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
88c56c2b3dc0e08eac56859f6eec64b5
ff02743c8d9f459f8769db3cd9088e111160b497
describe
'31448' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJS' 'sip-files00157.pro'
ae3c20ec20ff195a3fd1ffe66df6854f
f6dde70cd6a5fc1c1d59a90e4b9b8ac946f680bf
describe
'118883' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJT' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
14777b5f33dd0f435ed756c7f4a33012
5d6b4d1e7d5b86cb75c116e693ae0860cf79a7fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJU' 'sip-files00157.tif'
a4611685d5f89c0ed8743bbdd37d5c6b
dcd405cfdd15781785309b00e442572386a07e38
'2011-08-17T07:15:23-04:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJV' 'sip-files00157.txt'
8ddbe3cb1ee93b011cb4a1c3318e682b
f7a3f25c944aed613f98089a16477b68b9074815
describe
'44591' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJW' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
dd19fa916c61b4142beecdf3bb05686b
d26e58d9060d63abee33a78250a9f4d32e6acf56
describe
'1028453' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJX' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
5371e3f9b010cdfd64c156b19abc7c7b
5fa773377a96eeb2be65ae96aaade8e51e5c7c01
describe
'328410' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJY' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
abd8bae3d325dd7bac59c3c562de1f79
826d094c40e3a2f7d4ddf44c126d62ff7996e014
describe
'28685' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAJZ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
4ff90e59f07e3c45cddc161b348043d7
10ed33bd452be0e9cfcb0dcde9a75d3a47dee869
describe
'115731' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKA' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
e92903c43dd903a0807065ac63bc36d3
8c53876e96b5a60f77299135f70776045d5bc085
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKB' 'sip-files00158.tif'
c51c56e22716bbd74638f0a455f1b5e7
a530789ea87d7ccad25d22bf27d18fe533844c6b
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKC' 'sip-files00158.txt'
32ca166603e5ecf1daeb887cbc08ac2b
ffc839be60d9e41f87a533d883cffccc1a72bcdb
describe
'42951' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKD' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
9f5ec15319f1426979b6b643b0cf89c7
924629df47817d36087dacdd070be34dad440864
describe
'838075' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKE' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
0863d92c54b207f99f4f726703ce1983
ae83227de6e52ad097bb8fd1a88b2f8c289fd7d4
describe
'277689' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKF' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
f1b2d042a82cc1782312d908555391aa
9c0cf55a2d717ab6000aa1472a1c02c10babc64c
describe
'19761' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKG' 'sip-files00159.pro'
1dd222376abc672b67023e9978d67096
5b1e09b7f9e6ddd3ca54cdfa0e5804487e80830a
describe
'94739' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKH' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
1883aad6fbb034c594912a1cf39fb909
445d53eb6142fca799ccb738ee351533502b25d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKI' 'sip-files00159.tif'
a36164c080ae2e13816fecad16fd143e
4492569d0da2c9a5a88fb65152e676865e3c29e7
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKJ' 'sip-files00159.txt'
5334eda0f377c732d88ceb51c47ac5df
c6276eb344bbec4745af8387791225d93291b13b
'2011-08-17T07:15:41-04:00'
describe
'37432' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKK' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
aff030ed3d45a0703ba90df68de5bf19
83cd8683329c91df92d8170277b40ff47fa0c0fe
describe
'849179' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKL' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
f61c55df0c0899427632f3c3fa25d835
9d20bb53a600dcb36e14536c16c5abb7e64bc448
'2011-08-17T07:10:23-04:00'
describe
'274175' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKM' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
fefa4da470654c2678d68fb6e3b984ba
9dec1747c11180c74081166a58f58f23a32fdcb7
describe
'19159' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKN' 'sip-files00160.pro'
3cd9e7736a719e79bed8d0f211342282
896912bb137f38bd451b46288071b397258431cc
describe
'92123' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKO' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
ceee19039b3aef21682e2dc4b33e05d1
db89a31b1663f64adde69579256b57ce090e8e09
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKP' 'sip-files00160.tif'
3402f56da133b46379992f35ec0d8e0a
59e95b8ca00c6d6135506a82c6fae7b7b5d4937d
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKQ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
810bf62db5870bb5c35980d29cce403a
85433558cd944609a4bc3e03b3cf6e21ed4fe98a
describe
'36216' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKR' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
6794221d3ecefc007a7570a3b68a6e0a
aa897ffda39d6e40abcc42fd6919584a5e21311f
'2011-08-17T07:12:31-04:00'
describe
'969896' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKS' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
04951ec9b628b17e4da4c2faaca270ae
67f8f8c07af3d4eaeb5bee4fedf1deed94d4600b
describe
'322588' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKT' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
12c050ba5d392455cd0b32648084fce9
441c208899b15b54b018791dd7eda2533aa55ad9
describe
'28401' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKU' 'sip-files00161.pro'
9d4b51e332936764436116d2768d5086
1b7333b6c543f63b0252534e05973dceb007aca9
describe
'113367' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKV' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
db4c0a732940b840e464d793ada5c1d7
64fb3cbb9003c9bca05988266dc5524877d3d73f
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKW' 'sip-files00161.tif'
1875ba81520d2cf6fd23d5e13ce0ecbd
99185af8eef6d978a930a74de5dc7b9cb4666ddc
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKX' 'sip-files00161.txt'
4bebc555fddfe68ed0a288fd886dbdf4
4777c814e45963b2f7478d068ef1aa226aeb3820
describe
'42330' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKY' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
754d3ad6d70d8cf50b3f557cd3ea94ec
4fc4e442c0dff97597100fbf29d2de639495698c
describe
'1103084' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAKZ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
ffacb182f87d058db4f3232816572c5f
61adc201cd971dd75a1e7706be9cb23cfc9b584b
describe
'352836' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALA' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
8af2fefa1b3d3ddac48864ef543ba907
8924ba3b9a72f7685e41fd23b7a8f1ba5af65d71
describe
'34211' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALB' 'sip-files00162.pro'
06399d299aee7620da1bc622b110b317
5ce0715015647508292300ba2239d89b18b7d270
describe
'123233' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALC' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
b95b60c53be969bb95e8b43d15e47791
7b2b4ffc0f690d32ee7319a60b59ff5849ccc8c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALD' 'sip-files00162.tif'
8c5341aeb42e54ecb54d46c92ad0ae9b
473dc80300e885b060e4a010e4ae7ccb670082fe
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALE' 'sip-files00162.txt'
89cff8ad964b283e65dc523f2b891d7f
a088031c7b75ad970896183aad04a9953757cb9e
describe
'45477' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALF' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
6bea61f6cf202f618d56131fd558bc61
ec15caad16e6460d181abd8aff1d34ccebdba2a9
describe
'1027386' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALG' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
fd8d31549979969a84a93ac655884da7
fdb083e6c4a535cd5ddbd0723c359737c5b8c1eb
describe
'335703' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALH' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
410a43be028860112d7d6b9ae895247a
40be02750e2fef03e999e6e5bee1c6f810e4a356
describe
'31447' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALI' 'sip-files00163.pro'
f02bf2f9f1e813e6f323c8702129d306
670a8ecf0e614aeae44f92e3f33c624e1da7efc8
describe
'117401' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALJ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
94d844b039087a58ea60ca231734892d
bebf61abb236e825ad70b59717b4706592890f5d
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALK' 'sip-files00163.tif'
c990f7f047e21a25d20ae6ec34133f66
7110fe04be42edf49db25598c010709e40876de1
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALL' 'sip-files00163.txt'
d4bc63fc793ece10aee2f71d7627b285
016d29e40f8bb0c249cf12a251cc680138a9831a
describe
'43896' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALM' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
bcadd7007e2b6350052d9084db4947d7
8c22553f0d2bfa414446cfcc5d0ed6474b1937af
describe
'1136520' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALN' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
b6b6eeff16f75b53e03750dde7e264e8
70debc0e7c0da344305ac84fae82ae5cf48ef484
describe
'360210' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALO' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
308953ca9b53ea8393b657dcf73ea4ab
40a02f552499917c1f532c81171abd66ab7e2577
describe
'34996' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALP' 'sip-files00164.pro'
1fdfbfe62a9c15b910fddb2b56913130
47ee9dcb40a17a7f654f4d7811fc672d5a082aa8
describe
'126243' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALQ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
4ac10b1e1324eb9890e70a5a24dd3ade
5a76bb089add725894f6025655508df8a4ca2dd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALR' 'sip-files00164.tif'
1df787c8839d490f7bdd2db25e21a29d
71ea5402b8e05c1447d51506fd56fde16cd236d9
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALS' 'sip-files00164.txt'
d161c94533650e70b42f063a7a583a10
3c2bd6143b4ca54525d6bda40fec5705fd3205d2
describe
'46727' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALT' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
860ece857c360a417168f5f2aa50ab09
10ab4a538ce19e5d8d2068fe1f9a8bf90161370a
describe
'1065458' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALU' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
ce8161426e0ced584c63543eff99120a
67c8162ff0ff07cebfd0b1071d639712b6914123
describe
'343746' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALV' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
d4ba6e332c07c2331b59ab5cdfd31894
2af9022f3259055cb5fea4a6fa818683756736ed
describe
'32401' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALW' 'sip-files00165.pro'
9713739d70c73d36a86c39e8b656b886
932db89144126cd36123bb9bf36b6b0030d27df4
describe
'121914' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALX' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
e338dd75a98e197efd792821e1ce30b7
9e8c1deb01aa515420f0fc2dd9a1559137eb5bdd
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALY' 'sip-files00165.tif'
598e21f35ec89e3acd80135e975f4557
1f7a1bcd1eb1ef7f151992df1d57072ce0b0a509
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACALZ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
60e1a74673739bedee5393a68dc7fe72
f6d8b069ef33d4e03f02557e389e59568053bd1f
describe
'45335' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMA' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
3ff55697ab7e7b2f544c632af84a4e3d
e20c0c9d7f2b830ae81aba076d3d0a9d574078c3
describe
'1091919' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMB' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
ba4ab0e0c4ca7f33bdfefd940f521ae4
e93d19ae1fbf2163106f410ae93034d5a9aec44a
describe
'360367' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMC' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
62dd60ed8728a502af8c56f83d77eb5a
e5bfacc9c55e5c97742c163e7e811af909c2b4cd
describe
'34485' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMD' 'sip-files00166.pro'
b3db0f0aa517afc7559e46897383ee89
3e5d66cea226730b979d147877483f5e07056d4e
describe
'125679' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAME' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
6e49e3d79bad288f952436a923f51c44
764f1959988bbd66bb365e23e80cef6a6597f791
describe
'8745573' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMF' 'sip-files00166.tif'
b05d553bb2828d31906ab4017353e9e4
bf6dc87235dd5175857c47b430e48340700bf40c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMG' 'sip-files00166.txt'
602824ff80fcdab60c0aceb339813777
f472560705f3aec9480ce1340ffcb4b58b9aed82
describe
'47135' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMH' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
ec648eba9a994218f3dd30e9fe664f4e
5c4a25db26ed39b930a2cd4d3721a4967e1abc44
describe
'907669' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMI' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
248c249742e5398e903382126e33958f
f426fbdc4912088fac7215ba9628cc4e5ec0fbf0
describe
'293971' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMJ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
0b6579dee0277661aa8b04f73a5b86f0
1d6088cc2429a5a124d2a798c29b0b4b1a5d34e3
describe
'20323' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMK' 'sip-files00167.pro'
f6725235b5bd4f7dfab1200fa2a71a41
8d18512e12d81fcd8527bb3d09927557d8711878
describe
'99152' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAML' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
facc22f91011c0b8d0d6cdd78201a2da
d48dea7948a36b3348ccf2431cb8720869dfe0f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMM' 'sip-files00167.tif'
374896a58a41b51dac92af17f4758d7b
c51cedf93fbddcbf53a0e9861bb7b8e6facd2297
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMN' 'sip-files00167.txt'
32145dd769e610cc2dc9c42a846874e2
e9f75b1b3a7a3d404e2c575e62e10299d564125c
describe
'39018' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMO' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
e6336672d8c06c719ca065a25e75bc2d
86d952fd64b875cf970038f6990b277dc3d978bd
describe
'755592' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMP' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
90dce68ef64fb101070c3758f02c21e6
85c2e72836e54bc3e7abaca9546f3d5d2401a87e
describe
'225399' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMQ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
0db60fa3100ce09aba135c5d2dbc0c45
11960b8eca6dcaf8a7c16b4c7e9d23ef15da03d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMR' 'sip-files00168.pro'
bbc411f884d3b91b4d881e184ca38c92
a0bbf48a9323c409671f3398f31caa82b7c4c8bc
describe
'68826' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMS' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
c84b8aacceeafaaebfe55cf6c655ee75
05329868616cf332c5f2ba534614041880546d1e
describe
'8607989' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMT' 'sip-files00168.tif'
86212347538622a318b545c5556f4eaa
9f74eda62dadeba6522ea15529f50111c0a39af0
describe
'28935' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMU' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
b9b470c66e3d5c289267ebea79fd7ec8
e91c8e48a70f9feec5052d838bf99533c0e3d988
describe
'1448184' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMV' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
02380b45c904cda734ca5884641da0d5
86f86a0cf0e4731b26428d1700c6a49f2decfc1b
describe
'709505' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMW' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
059fdc6bfe5ddb679515a37fa47c7c66
e3472943f34f45a7ef18e579b53657efc3b13f3d
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMX' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
21ca7297485115295adc83684036875a
25a8d76d892fba7365de189a192362539ed526b0
describe
'187883' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMY' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
f90e563c2627c146d72fc874470222a2
885e8a52b03fc7f82c68f3879374c0bcb589b96f
describe
'34758814' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAMZ' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
ebca0e4b73d6c4ee62df5ecb74321742
6850306c248e43a3eb072985d1326f28d197c9a6
'2011-08-17T07:14:02-04:00'
describe
'49425' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANA' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
d60c9fa1be80582c5766e16e6f48d5b6
ea6faf3fcacbfa4f3c5d2419024422e9ee41e0e5
'2011-08-17T07:12:09-04:00'
describe
'1478526' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANB' 'sip-filescover4.jp2'
9a14b5a948f371b24ddfebea92f8ae12
0bb06d1e11ae7cb8c47130133de7ebfc41eafc61
'2011-08-17T07:08:25-04:00'
describe
'691831' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANC' 'sip-filescover4.jpg'
83687687804d62e93a4ae692ab9af5ec
51999cad7bf7d66aaa1c4e798d8c3aa8ef0d0447
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACAND' 'sip-filescover4.pro'
173afeaa35168783dea59a8f20c1ea48
f09d714d58943786459bcd1af1248777a27deda3
describe
'182925' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANE' 'sip-filescover4.QC.jpg'
de4f3bff78d9f6e61c1c589a5f0afb14
7c3edddf3b1c64f9a56872ccac29f3d05767886c
describe
'35497284' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANF' 'sip-filescover4.tif'
ed7c31fd96fd25702d2997c958445a5c
224b00074e3402270f23b43cab0d4b140e74800a
'2011-08-17T07:10:27-04:00'
describe
'49220' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANG' 'sip-filescover4thm.jpg'
6ab0801b89625e86d2aa1d790f82d371
f2b592ee3d3d13b206d9323b0147836a1291b338
describe
'331525' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANH' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
b76df1cd9cbccbb6d3c5c199eb968f1d
9f4a6b773b2ed130177726f2e366b618cc634a39
describe
'174343' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANI' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
fc2fece67095ca189ea3441d8d79bc3d
b0f07464b61f4ed492a37e27fa48004dfad4462c
describe
'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANJ' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
797e234dce564b0c18bb1c69315e489c
33bc0a8d6808ae9a5b6cfa63be8a70d1ddadc426
describe
'49979' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANK' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
1ff293cde0bca20d5a6af193b86c0f14
b98bff33a71724be4d300e739502a48a5ed952e8
describe
'7960188' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANL' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
7b88b9825d0e150754ff7708dbf4a2bc
621f423830b565abb432e5a0897ca5f2b6f296e6
describe
'22923' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANM' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
2ec6bf52eae2ab3783c2e3a03cce758f
089996918ca2da6cdac180827506086782e0a5c9
describe
'288803' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANN' 'sip-filesUF00001832_00001.mets'
c2a32bf92a8fa3739bd43bd4f1e7356c
8844b88139a6142673a346623c2f6e8e850339b5
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T17:04:55-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'371592' 'info:fdaE20080805_AAAAAUfileF20080805_AACANQ' 'sip-filesUF00001832_00001.xml'
c0968ec90b18beabeec75b62d21ae733
0d2b64a1a30f90ca5993bca03845dc66d5502e3e
describe
'2013-12-16T17:04:52-05:00'
xml resolution




m ePserery tees + . Petit
Bai nitest palsiecstbdite ieee ; ¢ eine
ert

¥ : petit ; : ev +34. : ¢ Tessie fie ; ett aie
Testa i: t ats fits f33t tb ke . apatite
*

Leash Se ssettet ; a ; Hite t

iat Bieri aut Hui ii saith
$343: 2 33

het nee en j ; iat
at i t seit TESTE Bettie ttle pelt? i ; Aut
EHH Te Se Strate Rte ies ee aceasta ait eat Le

STEMS eet sete Shite SESE Tee pads treet itthitie USE esate ities

ste ttteneteiarseserartt nites SUS) ; SHES tester {ro treteteattee tes $e t 1 . ; titit aeeeet,
SSitetes at Sih eatis ese etae ates seat tet SHS eat tea nega Sistas : HEHite } Rte

1 Reset EEE sigeeasatitet 33 se SST ped 3220 atatee Shee OGL soetety « :

Tats ” et. 3 betbritheass
Ha iat atiisiiatets: attest TI d Nesestets ; see ate

HS Fg MRIS Re saan Rua
GRRE anBauBREE ferrets a ia pit sae
tt EES ARES #8 FELT Eat : t Hyatih eate af
i tie ie Bee oR tat rn ent $i 4 : : st}

Santis
ieee at Rigi ptr soe Stats i as

SERCO ETRE HECK tibet aty ! HEL istiiset fears: feat : Hishest rit

TAR eH aee * : t ; ; { SSeS

PtSi Heetip 3 3 : iss f ; Rr Hitt

ME Aa ts j
wt ashi ttre
{ sheet tetas

SiSsts!

Siree

Sestt
Beate

sate

TEe4t

reese see ea: Saute pT ee Fr Se : Heinen RH Een out tt st ee
Se i : # Hit 2 a ether’ + ; 7 f Shi ost Hit ti ‘ Sih
: 3 gett RE i

i I i

x

+
¢ spereehth tte Sites
HSH ; Gate BA ca geet se
Hea rasaesSoertits seat Hee
; ag Uitte

47
SES Sat te i ath
tities
i i spasite etases

het . Hatites dteyeeeaeecaitt tithe
shire raat
x ;

es

PERS TSS

pimenttsy
jeansits

sine

aaa

ite
Saat
2h aot
i -

4

soeti es
SPSS

w-

pb
<3

+3

be

it

Sesti ieee:

srt

Sesh ht

*.
<

pee

ies
Ssreoctes
eater

Set
3
ae

HN
EgEHUNTR
Poe yas +} ;
HER sant RES
tae SEs

sestites: tatet states

=
be chest
$32 ite
pertete

Teas:

SRB eE
steetscisest se.
Sse
tees

RE PTS

bed seed ; ‘ :
Buia : ia
it epee tae : Hite

LOT vate Be tities ; Sey ; - oe resets it ; ; easy
333 ae ie ; ; ; : ; Hsu : ree i
th rit dati t ; aie ; a sate ; : ; aaetit ett
ec a f | ee ae ae
Essay einen aati pica eae

; seh este, oor
eceiesd erets i essesace tess ; ¢ : ; eit fret
etait eat ae Setitetittt: BE a ; ; reise

$ tee a4

mesa hy

essisitittes

He
iit

sare
#

tc

ode

neste

tah.
+)

isin
spt

at

tHE

Beste re tt

I

a

sae iihsies es
paint

$f

f

bo
Je

berg

STETE =
TRA.
A
te
ae
Srtst7

ae eee6 errs >

ps itt ie : ati “ ast
Beat redial ai ; tists ars ; ; eeerrenivetl
srt Peper st he ety eh tate stoke

rider ete : seisitys
Shee etstetet tithes: ae + ; tt ft Hat
pret e gientpcagutraii ett Hite Ratsetiss : spate i
Soe SHEESH ott tits i iseeati iegetaesrtteit
ieee ete f ieee Hatt He eee i Raters

S35 Slates: SHES st Stet tte 4 +

» +1 +
enatearestith estate : ; Het
atte HEE

tite
Stittirtest fener

ae
Bene

is

tise st

perere
t ; Ht Spee totats

:3
at

rt

asters } batt ae
iter :
seteeitteeattshe tates tt t esas ie ifn iets
Tey 7 ferreegtacatetieyy tages as

5 } HAT

eres

Lobes ge = . aoitrt,
ystitesiesthebettrts Sahat tiie
Britt MTS: fet 34 . piesstopaedaaie Heit Ce ht }
eter eatess Sh. + 4 . “e yey epee ees! 334
Hee CRStbetsettitt ESSE Hires! : ; sia SIS pias
HishEtesete ts { ; argrazests : : ‘ betes tte Heth sees

33 tHe Sa Sah eh bey - :
3! ;

yy #43)

Spree States } a

SEE itt yates ms 3 Sates

42 es ‘ { diesci LSHte j ‘ ; preghititersencst scifi if i $

a cet | ete

Satter Ses yt Eiatsheretseateseatsceatt sts
pinsebgentte titties ; i $sitt skates isthe
ieHot HAE St +3 2 ; Ress Hetste a8 ait Sati Pa ibesatseatt

wee ‘ sy sesd str
t

Petts tbe tai CSRS AS eee atts UbpHAT HH deat atk:
A i Se era ae unet eneatatiien

ghetedit
Sitti

4 ths. ded: Beg

{ , sag Poet ES dott 3H tis He aettieet
sip gate ttt
sap eat

Pitter leatee sgt srekts ; ; ; ; Ue
Hrsesteseet r ; peace ons $ettsgt5 3
saehialeties ? ; sires eres eats
Ser ; spatathstuiseseiess
SUYSEL MS sete Seley SS : rae ate pest Resi tttesessy,
Path shestates SitHt tS? { aE as te a te
Se atuite a i ¢ : { Rn

Steet

ott

tree atntye at bf ‘ Bate
EA rales sana


|
|
|






e Vik -

4 ibehrrile SS WL.

Beesi/ 668 '
CH 4


THE WIDOWS POT OF OIL.
SMALL MEANS

AND

GREAT ENDS.

EDITED BY

Word of Truth, and Gift of Love,
Waiting hearts now need thee;

Faithful in thy mission prove,
On that mission speed thee.

BOSTON:

ene BY JAMES M. USHER,
No. 37 Cornhill.

1851.
nent ode daperenninmenemtinenaheiaianeers

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1847, by
[AMES M. USHER,

In the Clerk’s Otfice of the District Court of Massachusetts

serene cient CE CELL
PREFACE.

-

from tne encouragement extended to our worthy
publisher on the presentation of the first and second
volumes of the Annual, we conclude that the experi-
ment of 1845 may be regarded as a successful one, and
the preparation of a little work of this kind an accept-
able offering to the young,

The present year, our kind contributors have afforded
us a much more ample supply of interesting articles
than could possibly appear. We regret that any who
have so generously labored for us and our young
friends, should be denied the pleasure of greeting their
articles on the pages of the Annual. Let them not
suspect that it is from any disapproval or rejection of
their labors. Be assured, dear friends, we are more
grateful than can properly be expressed in a brief
preface. Our warmest thanks are due our old friends,
who, in the midst of other arduous duties, have wil-

lingly given us assistance. Let our new correspon-
1*
Vull PREFACE.

dents be assured they are gratefully remembered,
although we have not the pleasure or opportunity to
present their articles to our readers in the present
volume. They are at the publisher’s disposal for
another year.

May the blessing of our Father in heaven rest upon

the little book and all its mends.
} M..H. >
CONTENTS.

eee

Small Means and Great Ends,. ....

. ee

The Yourig Soldier,... . . « 0 «+ -«
The Stolen Children, . . #. .« ee « «
My Grandmother’s Cottage,..... °
pO ee ere

The Paar aGie, . 0.6 a waees o's

A Lesson taught by Nature,. .....
Florence Drew,. . . - ses eseees

BMOCROM, 2s 6 0 6:6) Uns 6 ® &

The Little Candle, 0). eegeas 2 0

“ Are we not all Brothers and Sisters?” .

Fortune-Telling,. ...... « € ee
The Boy who Stole the Nails, .....
The Childless Mother,. . . . . 2 «+
The Motherless Child, . ....+--
Ws be 0's ah 0 60 0 be 8e ©

PAGE

SSRSSESNSRS

- 7
- 79

. 98
- 105
rt CONTENTS.

The Snow-Birds,. .-+-+-+-+->

Mount Carmel,....-+--
The Philosophy of Life,.. .

The Starving Poor of Ireland,

The Sabbath-School Festival, .
Nelly Grey, .- +--+ ++ > fix

’

The Four Evangelists, . » « -

The Snow-Drop,...-+-+-s
Caging Birds, ... +++
Last Page, ee e « * ® +. & °



PAGH

- 114
. 119
. 123
. 133
. 135
. 139
. 148
. 155
- 160
. 162
. 170
SMALL MEANS AND GREAT ENDS;

OR,
THE WIDOW’S POT OF OIL.

BY JULIA A. FLETCHER.

“On! how I do wish I was rich!” said Eliza
Melvyn, dropping her work in her lap, and look-
ing up discontentedly to her mother ; ‘“‘ why should
not I be rich as well as Clara Payson? There
she passes in her father’s carriage, with her fine
clothes, and haughty ways; while I sit here—
sew —sewing—all day long. I don’t see what
‘use I am in the world!

“ Why should it be so? Why should one person
have bread to waste, while another is starving?
Why should one sit idle all day, while another
toils all night? Why should one have so many
blessinf&s, and another so few ?” |

“ Eliza!” said Mrs. Melvyn, taking her daugh-
ter’s hand gently within her own, and pushing
back the curls from her flushed brow, “ my
daughter, why is this? why is your usual con- —
tentment gone, and why are you so sinfully come
12 SMALL MEANS AND GREAT ENDS.

plaining # Have you forgotten to think that ‘ God
is ever good ?’”

“No, mother,” replied the young girl, “ but it
sometimes eppcere strange to me, why he allows
all these things.”

“ Wiser people than either you or I have been
led to wonder at these things,” said Mrs. Melvyn ;
“but the Christian sees in all the wisdom of God,
who allows us to be tried here, and will overrule
all for our good. The very person who is en-
vied for one blessing perhaps envies another for
one he does not possess. But why would you
be rich, my child ?”

“Mother, I went this morning through a nar-
row, dirty street in another part of the city. A
group of ragged children were collected round one
who was crying bitterly. Imade my way through
them and spoke to the little boy. He told me his
little sister was dead, his father was sick, and he
was hungry. Here was sorrow enough for any
one; but the little boy stood there with his bare
feet, his sunbleached hair and tattered glothes,
and smiled almost cheerfully through the tears
which washed white streaks amid the darkness
of his dirty face. He led me to his home. Oh,
mother! if you had been with me up those broken
stairs, and seen the helpless beings in that dismal,
dirty room you would have wished, ‘like me, for
SMALL MEANS AND GREAT ENDS. 13

the means to help them. The dead body lay
there unburied, for the man said, they had no
money to pay for a coffin. He was dying him-
self, and they might as well be buried together.”

“ Are you sure, Eliza, that you have not the
means to help them ?” asked Mrs. Melvyn. ‘Put
on your bonnet, my dear, and go to our sexton.
Tell him to go and do what should be done. The
charitable society of which I am a member will
pay the expense. ‘Then call on Dr. the dis-
pensary physician, and send him to the relief of
the sick one. Then go to those of your acquaint-
ance who have, as you say, ‘ bread to waste,’ and
mention to them this hungry little boy. If you
have no money to give these sufferers, you have
a voice to plead with those who have; and thus
you may bless the poor, while you doubly bless
the rich, for ‘It is more blessed to give than to
receive.”

Eliza obeyed, and when she returned several
hours after, her face g.owing with animation, and
eagerly recounted how much had been done for
the poor family ; how’their dead had been hu-
manely borne from their sight ; how the sick man
was visited by the physician, and his bitterness of
spirit removed by the sympathy which was sent
him; how the room was to be cleaned and ventir
1ated. and how she left the little boy eating a huge


14 SMALL MEANS AND GREAT ENDS.

slice of bread, while others of the family were
half devouring the remainder of the loaf; her
mother listened with the same gentleness. “It
is well, my daughter,” said she ; “I preferred to
send you on this errand of sympathy, that you
might see how much you could do with small
means.”

“T havea picture here,” she continued, “ which
I wish’ you to keep as a token of this day’s feel-
ings and actions. Itis called ‘ The Widow’s Pot
of Oil.’ Will you read me the story which be-
longs to it?”

Eliza took her little pocket Bible, the one that
she always carried to the Sabbath school, and,
turning to the fourth chapter of the second book
of Kings, read the first seven verses. Turn to
them now, children, and read them.

“ Youcan see in this picture,” said her mother,
‘how small was the ‘pot of oii,’ and how large
were some of the vessels to be filled. Yet still
it flowed on,a little stream; still knelt the widow
in her faith, patiently supporting it; still brought
her little sons the empty vessels; the blessing of
God was upon it, and they were all filled. She
feared not that the oil would cease to flow; she
stopped not when one vessel was-filled ; she still
believed, and labored, and waited, until her work
was done.
SMALL MEANS AND GREAT ENDS. 15

“Take this picture, amy daughter, and when
you think that you cannot do good with small
means, remember’ ‘the widow’s pot of oil,’ and -
perseveringly use the means you have; when one
labor is done, begin another; stitch by stitch
you have made this beautiful garment; very large
houses are built of little bricks patiently joined
together one by one; and ‘ the widow’s small pot
of oil’ filled many large vessels.”

“Oh, mother,” said Eliza, “ I hope I shall never
be so wicked again. I will keep the picture al-
ways. But, mother, do you not think Mr. Usher
would like this picture to put in the ‘ Sabbath
School Annual?’ He might have a smaller one
engraved from this, you know, and perhaps cousin
Julia will write something about it. I mean to
ask them. ’


16

%,

MARY ELLEN;

A SKETCH FROM LIFE.

BY MRS. MARGARET M. MASON,
* O, lightly, lightly tread !

A holy thing is sleep
On the worn spirit shed,
And eyes that wake to weep;
Ye know not what ye do,
That call the slumberer back
From the world unseen by you,
Unto life’s dim faded track.”

How beautiful, calm, and peaceful is sleep!
Often, when I have laid my head upon my pil-
low happy and healthful, I have asked myself,
to what shall I awaken? What changes may
come ere again my head shall press this pillow ?
Ah, little do we know what a day may unfold to
us! We know not to what we shall awaken;
what joy or sorrow. I do not know when I was
awakened to more painful intelligence, than
when aroused one morning from pleasant dreams
by the voice of a neighbor, saying that Mary
Ellen, the only daughter of a near neighbor, was
dying. She was a beautiful little girl, about three
years of age, unlike most other children. She
was more serious and thoughtful; and many
MARY ELLEN. 17

predicted that her friends would not have her
long. She would often ask strange questions
about heaven and her heavenly Father; and
many of her expressions were very beautiful.
One day she asked permission of her mother
to go and gather her some flowers. Her mother
gave her permission, but requested her not to go
out of the field. After searching in vain: for
flowers, she returned with some clover leaves
and blades of grass. ‘ Mother,” said she, “I
could find you no flowers, but here are some
spires of grass and clover leaves. Say that they
are some pretty, mother. Gop made them.”
Often, when she woke in the morning, she would
ask her mother if it was the Sabbath day. If
told it was, “ Then,” she would say, “we will
read the Bible and keep the day holy.” Her
mother always strove to render the Sabbath in-
teresting to her, and to have her spend it in a
profitable manner. Nor did she fail; for little
Mary Ellen was always happy when the Sabbath
morning came. ‘The interest she took in the
reading of the Scriptures, in explanations given
of the plates in the Bible, and the accuracy with
which she would remember all that was told her,
were truly pleasing. Her kind and affectionate
disposition, her love for. all that was pure and
holy, and her readiness to.forgive and excuse all
18 MARY ELLEN.

that she saw wrong in others, made her beloved
by all who knew her. If she saw children at
play on the Sabbath, or roaming about, she would
notice it, and speak of it as being very wrong, and
it would appear to wound her feelings; yet she
would try to excuse them. ‘It may be,” she —
would say, “that they do not know that it is the
holy Sabbath day. Perhaps no one has told
them.” She could not bear to think of any one
doing wrong intentionally.

Whenever she heard her little associates make
use of any language that she was not quite sure
was right, she would ask her mother if it was
wrong to speak thus; and if wrong, she would
say, “ Then, I will never speak so, and I shall
be your own dear little girl, and my heavenly
Father will love me.” We often ask children
whom they love best. Such was the question
often put to Mary Ellen. She would always say,
“T love my heavenly Father best, and my dear
father and mother next.” Her first and best
affections were freely given to her Maker, not
from a sense of duty alone did it seem, but from
a heart overflowing with love and gratitude ; and
never, at the hour of retiring, would she forget to
kneel and offer up her evening prayer.. Thus
she lived.

Now I will lead you to her dying. pillow
MARY ELLEN. © 19

Many friends were around her. No one had told
her that she was dying; yet she herself felt con-
scious of it. She wished to have the window
raised, that she might see the ocean and trees.
once more. ‘ Oh!” said her mother, bending
over her, “is my dear little girl dying?” “I want
to go,” said Mary Ellen; “I want my father
and mother to go with me.” “ Will you not stay
with us?” said the stricken father; “will you
not stay with us?” She raised her little hands
and eyes—‘“ Oh no,” said she; “I see them!
I see them! ’tis lighter there; I want to go;
get a coffin and go with me, father. ’T is lighter
there!” She died soon after she ceased speak-
ing. Her pure spirit winged its way to the
blest home where we shall a/J have more light,
where the mortal shall put on immortality.

She died when flowers were fading ; fit season
for one of so gentle and pure a nature to depart.

‘In the cold, moist earth they laid her
When the forest cast the leaf,
And we wept that one so beautiful

Should have a life so brief.
And yet ’t was not unmeet that one,
Like that young friend of ours,
So gentle and so beautiful,
Should perish with the flowers.”

But Oh' when that little form was laid in the
2
20 MARY ELLEN,

cold. grave, —when the childless parents returned
to their lonely home, once made so happy by the
smile of their departed child, Oh! who can ex-
press or describe their anguish! In her they
had all they could ask in a child; she was their
only one. Everything speaks to their hearts of
her ; but her light step and happy voice fall not
upon their ears; to them the flowers that she
loved have a mournful language. The voice of
the wind sighing in the trees has to them a mel-
ancholy tone. The light laugh of little children,
coming in at the open window,—the singing of
birds which she delighted to hear, —but speak to
their hearts of utter loneliness. They feel that
the little form they had nursed with so much
care and tenderness, so often pressed to their
bosoms, is laid beneath the sod. Yet the sweet
consolation which religion affords, cheered and
sustained the afflicted parents in their hours of
deepest sorrow. They would not call their. child
back. They feel that she has reached her heav-
enly home. Happy must they have been in
yielding up to its Maker a spirit so pure.

Two years Mary Ellen has been sleeping in,
the little graveyard: Since then another little.
daughter has been given her parents,—a prom-
ising little bud, that came with the spring flowers,
to bless and cheer the home which was made so
MARY ELLEN. 21

desolate. The best wish I have for the parents,
and all I ask for the child, is, that it may be like
little Mary Ellen. I have an earnest wish, too
that alk little children who read this sketch may
be led to love and obey God as much as Mary
Ellen.




i i EAL
=
1%
ai

nll
THE DEAD CHILD TO ITS
MOTHER.

BY MRS. E. R. B. WALDO.

Moruer, mourn not for me ;
No more I need of thee ;
Call back the yearning which would follow where
No mortal grief can go;
All thine affection throw
Around thy living ones ; they need thy care.

Let not my name still be
A word of grief to thee,

But let it bring a thought of peace and rest ;
Shed for me no sad tear,
Remember, mother dear !

That I am with the perfect and the blest.

Yes, let my memory still
With joy thy bosom fill ;
For, though thou dost along life’s desert roam,
My spirit, like a star,
Bright burning and afar,
Shall guide thee, through the darkness, to thy home
HOPE.

BY REV. H. R. NYE.

ExrEcTATION is not desire, nor desire hope.
We may expect misfortune, sickness, poverty,
while from these evils we would fain escape.
Bending over the couches of the sick and suffer-
ing, we may desire their restoration to health,
while the hectic flush and the rapid beating of
the heart assure us that no effort of kindness or
skill can prolong their days upon the earth.
Hope is directed to some future good, and it
implies not only an ardent desire that our future
may be fair and unclouded, but an expectation
that our wishes will, at length, be granted, and
our plans be crowned with large success. Hence
hope animates us to exertion and diligence, and
always imparts pleasure and gladness, while our —
fondest wishes cost us anxiety and tears.

There are false and delusive hopes, which bring
us, at last,to shame. There are those who ex-
pect to gain riches by fraud and deceit, in pur-
suits and traffics on which the laws of truth,
love, and justice, must ever darkly frown. They
forget that wealth, with all its splendor, can only
94 HOPE.

be deemed a good and desirable gift when sought
as an instrument to advance noble and beneficent
aims, — when we are the almoners of God’s
bounty to the lonely children of sorrow and want.

If we seek wealth, let us not forget that pure
hearts gentle affections, lofty purposes, and gen-
erous deeds, can alone secure the peace and bles-
sedness of the spiritual kingdom of God.

There are some who have a strong desire for
the praise and stations of men, yet are often
careless of the means by which they accomplish
their ends. Remember, my young friends, that
no station, no crown, or honor, will occupy the
attention of a good and noble heart, except it
opens a better opportunity for philanthropic labor,
and is conferred as the free offering of an intelli-
gent and grateful people.

There are many, especially among the young,
who seek present pleasure in foolish and sinful
deeds, vainly believing the wicked may flourish
and receive the blessing of the good. Believe
me, young friend, such hopes are delusive, and
such expectations will suddenly perish. Let
fools laugh and mock at sin, and live as if God
were not; but consider well the path of your feet!
When your weak arm can hold back the globes
which circle in space above us in solemn gran-
deur and beauty forever, then may you hope to
HOPE. 26

arrest the operation of those laws which preserve
an everlasting connection between obedience and
blessedness, sin and sorrow.

Jn the spring-season of life, how beautiful are
the visions which Hope spreads out to our ad-
miring view, as we go forth, with gladsome
heart and step, amid the duties of life, its trials
and temptations. It begets manly effort by its
promises of success, and leads us to virtue and
self-denial, in our weakness and sin. When our
heads are bowed to the earth in despondency
and gloom, hope putteth forth her hand, scattereth
afar the clouds, dispelleth our sorrow; and again,
with a firmer step and a more trustful heart, we
go forth on the solemn march of life! It is our
solace and strength in the hours of woe and
grief, when those in whose smile we have re-
joiced pass from our presence and homes to the
valley and shadow of death. And if we weep
that they are not, and can never return,

‘* Hope, like the rainbow, a creature of light,
Is born, like the rainbow, in tears,”’

and we rest in the calm and blest assurance that
we shall ultimately go to them, and with them
dwell forever in a land without sorrow.

It may be said that we scarcely live in the
present. Memory, in whose mysterious cells


26 HOPE.

are treasured the records of the past, carries us
back to our earlier years, and all our pursuits,
and sports, and joys, and griefs, pass rapidly in
review before us; and Hore leads us onward,
investing future years with charms, and bidding
us strive with brave and manly hearts in the
conflicts and duties that remain. The former
years — sorrowful remembrance !— may have
been passed in luxury, indolence, or flagrant sin;
the fruits of our industry and skill may have
wasted away; friends, whose love once cast a
golden sunshine on the path of life, may have
proved false and treacherous; our fondest desires,
perchance, have faded, and sorrows may encom-
pass us about ;—yet above us the voice of Hope
crieth aloud, “Press on !’*— through tears and the
cross must thou win the crown; be patient, trust-
ful, in every duty and grief; “ press on,” and falter
not; and its words linger like the music of a
remembered dream in our ear, until, at the bor-
ders of the grave, we lay down the burden of our
sinfulness and care, and, through the open gate
of death, pass onward to that world where hope
shall be exchanged for sight, and we, with un-
veiled eye, shall look upon the wondrous ways
end works of God.
THE YOUNG SOLDIER.

BY REV. J. G, ADAMS.

A sotpier! a soldier!
I’m longing to be ;
The name and the life
Of a soldier for me!
I would not be living
At ease and at play:
True honor and glory
Id win in my day!

A soldier! a soldier!
In armor arrayed ;
My weapons in hand,
Of no contest afraid ;
I ’d ever be ready i
To strike the first blow,
And to fight my good way
Through the ranks of the foe.

But then, let me tell you,

No blood would I shed,
No victory seek o’er

The dying and dead ;
A far braver soldier

Than this would I be;
A warrior of Truth,

3 In the ranks of the free !
THE YOUNG SOLDIER.

My helmet Salvation,
Strong Faith my good shield,
The sword of the Spirit
J ‘d learn how to wield.
And then against evil
And sin would I fight,
Assured of my triumph,
Because in the right.

A soldier! a soldier!
O, then, let me be!
Young friends, I invite you—
Enlist now with me.
Truth’s bands will be mustered —
Love’s foes shall give way !
Let ’s up, and be clad
In our battle array !


THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

BY MRS. M. A. LIVERMORE.

Nor many years ago, the beautiful hills and va.-
leys of New England gave to the wild Indian a
home, and its bright waters and quiet forests fur-
nished him with food. Rude wigwams stood.
where now ascends the hum of the populous city,
and council-fires blazed amid the giant trees
which have since bowed before the axe of the set-
tler. Between that rude age and the refinement
of the present day, many and fearful were the
strifes of the red owner of the land with the in-
vading white man, who, having crossed the wa-
ters of the Atlantic, sought to drive him from his
hitherto undisputed possessions. The recital of
deeds of inhuman cruelty which characterized
that period; the rehearsal of bloody massacres of
inoffensive. women and innocent children, which.
those cruel savages delighted in, would even now,
curdle the blood with horror, and make one sick
at heart.

It was in this period of fearful warfare. that,
30 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

the events occurred which form the foundation of
the following story.

Not far from the year 1680, a small colony was
planted on the banks of the beautiful Connecticut.
A little company from the sea-side found their
way, through the tangled and pathless woods, to
the meadows that lay sleeping on the banks of
this bright river; and here, after having felled
the mighty trees whose brows had long been kissed
by the pure heavens, they erected their humble
cottages ; and began to till the rich alluvial soil.
The colonists were persevering and industrious ;
and soon a little village grew up beside the shin-
ing stream, fields of Indian corn waved their
wealth of tasselled heads in the breezes, the
rudely-constructed school-house echoed with the
cheerful hum of the little students, and a rustic
church was dedicated to the God of the Pilgrims.
He who officiated as the spiritual teacher of this
new parish, also instructed the children during
the week. A man he was of no inferior mind, or
neglected educatién ; of fervent, but austere piety,
possessing a bold spirit and a benevolent heart.
His family consisted of a wife and two daughters ;
Emma, the elder, was a girl of eight summers,
and Anna, the younger, was about five.

Never were children so frolicsome and mirth-
loving as were Emma and Anna Wilson, the
THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 31

daughters of the minister. Not the grave admo-
nitions of their mother, or the severe reproofs of
their stern father ; not their many confinements in
dark and windowless closets, or the memory of
afternoons, when, supperless, they had been sent
to bed while the sun was yet high in the heav-
ens; not the fear of certain punishment, or the
suasion of kindness, could tame their wild natures,
or force them into anything like woman-like so-
briety. Hand in hand, they would wander amid
the aisles of mossy-trunked trees, plucking the
flowers that carpeted the earth ; now digging for
ground-nuts, now turning over the leaves for
acorns; sometimes they would watch the nibbling
squirrel as he nimbly sprang from tree to tree, or
overpower, with their boisterous laughter, the
gushing melody of the bobolink ; they mocked the
querulous cat-bird and the cawing crow, started
at the swift winging of the shy blackbird, and
stood still to listen to the sweet song of the clear-
throated thrush; now they bathed their feet in
thejgtzeamlets that went singing on their way to
the"@onnecticut, and then, throwing up handfuls
of the running water, which fell again upon their
heads, they laughed right merrily at their self-
bapa They were happy as the days were
long ; but wild as their playfellows, the birds,
the streams, and the squirrels.
O*
32 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

One beautiful Sabbath morning in July, their
mother dressed them tidily in their best frocks,
and tying on their snow-white sun-bonnets, she
sent them to church nearly an hour before she
started with their father, that they might walk .
lersurely, and have opportunity to get rested be-
fore the commencement of services. But it was
not until near the middle of the sermon that the
little rogues made their appearance. With glow-
ing faces, hair that had strayed from its ungrace-
ful confinement to float in golden curls over their
necks and shoulders,—with bonnets, shoes and
stockings tied together and swinging overeacharm,
—with dresses rent, ripped, soiled and stained,
and up-gathered aprons filled with berries, blos-
soms, pebbles, fresh-water shells and bright sand,
they stole softly to where their mother was sit-
ting, much to her mortification, and greatly to the
horror of their pious father.

For this offence, they were forbidden to accom-
pany their parents, on the next Sabbath, to church,
but were condemned to close confinementgiggithe
house during the long, bright, summer -.
severer punishment denn which, could not have
been iuflicted. When the hour of assembling
worship was announced by the old Engli
that stood in the corner, the curtains wer
before the windows; two bowls of bread and milk





THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 33

were placed on Mined for their dinner; a les-
son in the Testament was assigned to Emma,
and one in the Catechism to Anna; a strict in-
junction to remain all day in the house was laid
upon both, and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson departed,
locking the door, and taking the key. The chil-
dren soon wiped away the tears that their hard
fate had gathered in their eyes, and applied them-
selves to their tasks, which were speedily com-
mitted.. Then the forenoon wore slowly away ;
they dared not get their playthings, —théy were
forbidden to go out doors, —and the only books in
the room were the Bible, Watts’ Hymns, and the
Pilgrim’s Progress, which lay on the highest
shelf in the room, far beyond their reach. Noon
came at last; the sun shone fully in at the south
window, betokening the dinner hour, and then
their dinner of bread and milk was eaten. What
were they next todo? Sorrowfully they gazed
on the smiling river, the green corn-fields, the
large potato-plats, the grazing cattle, the bloom-
ing flower-beds, and the shady walks which led
far into the cool recesses of the forest; and ear-
nestly did they long for liberty to ramble out in
the glorious sunshine. As they were gazing
wistfully through the window, they saw their
playful little kitten, Fanny, dart like lightning
from her hiding-place in the garden, where she
34 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

had long lain in ambush, anf fasten her sharp
claws in the back of a poor Jittle ground-bird,
which had been hopping from twig to twig, chirp-
ing and twittering very cheerfully. The little bird
fluttered, gasped, and uttered wailing cries, as it
ineffectually labored to free itself from the power
of its captor, until Emma and Anna, unable longer
to witness its distress, sprang out the window,
and, rushing down the garden, liberated the little
prisoner, and with delight saw it fly away to-
wards the woods.

Delighted to find themselves once more in the
open air, the joyful children forgot the prohibi-
tion of their parents, and leaping over the dear
little brook with which they loved to run races,
they filled their aprons with the blue-eyed violets
that grew on its margin. On they bounded, fur-
ther and further, and a few moments more found
them in the dense wood, where not a sunbeam
could reach the ground. But suddenly the leaves
rustled hehind them, and the twigs cracked, and
there sprung, from an ambuscade in the thicket,
the tall figure of an Indian, who laid a strong
hand on the arm of each little girl, and, despite
the cries, tears, and entreaties of the poor children,
hurried them deeper into the forgst, where they
found a large body of these cruel savages, clad in
moose and deer skins, armed with bows and ar-
THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 36

rows, tomahawks, and muskets. The children
were questioned concerning the village, the occu-
pation of the inhabitants on that day, and the
number of men at home, and they replied correctly
and intelligibly. A consultation was then held
among the Indians, which resulted in a determi-
nation to attack the village ; and forthwith, leaving
but one behind to guard the little prisoners, they
made a descent on the quiet settlement, burning
and ravaging buildings on their way to the church.
But they did not find the body of worshippers
unarmed, as they doubtless expected ; for, in those
days of peril and savage warfare, men worship-
ped God armed with musket and bayonet, and
the hand that was lifted in prayer to heaven
would often, at the next moment, draw the gleam-
ing sword from its sheath. At the meeting-
house, the savages met with a warm repulse;
and were so surprised and affrighted that..they
retreated back into the wild woods, after wound-
ing but one or two colonists, among whom was
Mr. Wilson, Emma’s and Anna’s father.

The Indians commenced, about dark, a journey _
to the settlement where they belonged, taking the
stolen children with them; they reached their
destination early on the second day of their travel.
Rough, indeed, seemed the Indian village to the
white children: the houses were only wigwams,
36 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

made by placing poles obliquely in the ground,
and fastening them at the top, covered on the
outside with bark, and lined on the inside with
mats; some containing but one family, others a
great many. ‘The furniture consisted of mats for
beds, curiously wrought baskets to hold corn, and
strings of wampum which served for ornaments.
Into one of the smallest of these wigwams Em-
ma and Anna were carried, and were given to
the wife of one of the chief warriors, who had but
one child of her own, — Winona was her name,
which signifies the first-born,—a_ bright-eyed,
pleasant, winning little girl of two years of age.
The mother scrutinized them closely, but the
child appeared overjoyed to see them, and wiped
away their tears with her little hand, and, jabber-
ing in her unknown language, seemed begging
them not to cry. This interested the mother,
and she soon looked more kindly upon them, and
set before them food. But they were too sorrow-
ful to eat, and were glad to be shown a mat, where
they were to sleep. Locked in each others’ arms,
cheek pressed to cheek, they lay and wept as if
their hearts were broken.

“Let us pray to God,” whispered Emma, after
the inmates of the wigwam were reposing in
slumber, “and ask Him to bring us again to our
father and mother.”


THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 37

So they rose, and knelt in the dark wigwam,
with their arms about one another’s necks, and
their tears flowing together, and offered to God
their childish prayer :

“ Our Father in Heaven, love us poor children ;
take care of us; forgive us for doing wrong, and
help us be good; take care of our dear parents;
comfort them, and bring us again to meet them.”

Then, more composed, and trusting in the
blessed Father of us all, they fell asleep, and
sweet were their slumbers, though far from their
dear parents and home, for angels watched over
them, and gave to them happy dreams.

A few days’ residence among these untutdred
ted men made Emma and Anna great favorites
among them; their pleasant dispositions, their
good nature, and, above all, their love for the lit-
tle Winona, which was fully reciprocated, endeared
them to the father and mother of the Indian girl.
Though sad at being separated from their pa-
rents, and though they often wept until they could
weep no longer when they thought of home, yet
their hearts, like those of all children, were easily
consoled, and their spirits were so elastic that
they could not long be depressed. Winona loved
them tenderly; at night she slept between them,
and during the day she would never leave them.
She wore garlands of their wreathing, listened to
38 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

their English songs, stroked their rosy cheeks,
and frolicked with them in the woods, and beside
tne running brooks.

Two months passed away ; all the Indian wo-
_men in the village were speaking of the love that
had sprung up between the little white girls and
the copper-colored Winona; and many a hard
hand smoothed the golden curls of the little cap-
tives in token of affection. Then Winona was
taken sick ; her body glowed with the fever-heat,
her bright eyes became dull, and day and night
she moaned with pain. With surprising care
and tenderness, Emma and Anna nursed the suf-
fering child, —for to them were her glowing and
burning hands extended for relief, rather than to
her mother. They held her throbbing head,
lulled her to sleep, bathed her hot temples, mois-
tened her parched lips, and soothed her dis-
tresses; but they could not win her from the
power of death—and she died !

Oh, it was a sorrowful thing to them to part
with their little playmate, —to see the damp earth
heaped upon her lovely form, and to feel that she
was forever hidden from their sight! They wept,
and, with the almost frantic mother, laid their faces
on the tiny grave, and moistened it with their
tears. Hither they often came to scatter the
freshest flowers, and to weep for the home they
THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 39

feared they would never again see; and here
they often kneeled in united prayer tg that God,
who bends on prayerful children a loving eye,
and spreads over them a shadowing wing.

The childless Indian woman now loved them
more than ever; but the death of Winona had
opened afresh the fountains of their grief, and
often did she find them weeping so bitterly that
she could not comfort them. She would draw
them to her bosom, and tenderly caress them ; but
it all availed not, and when the month of Octo-
ber came, with its sere foliage and fading flowers,
Emma and Anna had grown so thin, and pale,
and feeble, from their wearing home-sickness,
that they stayed all day in the wigwam, going
out only to visit Winona’s grave. They drooped
and drooped, and those who saw them said, “ The
white children will die, and lie down with Wi-
nona.” |

The Indian mother gazed on their pallid faces,
and wept; she loved them, and could not bear to
part with them ; but she saw they would die, and
calling her husband, she bade him convey them
to the home of their father. Many were the
tears she shed at parting with them; and when
they disappeared among the thick trees, she threw
herself, in an agony of grief, upon the mats
w thin the wigwam.

4
40 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

It was Sabbath noon when the children arrived
in sight of their father’s house; here the Indian
left them, and plunged again into the depths of
the forest. They could gain no admittance into
the house, and they hastened to the meeting-
house, where they hoped to find their parents.
They reached the church; the congregation was
singing; silently, and, unobserved, they entered,
and seated themselves at the remotest part of the
building. The singing ceased; there was a mo-
mentary pause, and their father rose before them.
Oh, how he was changed! Pale, very pale, thin
and sad was his dear face; and Emma’s and An-
na’s hearts smote them, as being the cause of this
change. They leaned forward to catch a glimpse
of their mother, but in her accustomed seat sat a
lady dressed in black, and this, they thought,
could not be her; they little supposed that their
parents mourned for them as for the dead, believ-
ing they should see them no more.

Mr. Wilson took his text from Psalms: “ It is
good for me that I have been afflicted.” With a
tremulous voice, he spoke of their recent afflic-
tions ; of the sudden invasion of the colony, the
burning of their dwellings, the wounding of some
of their number, and then his tones became more
deeply tremulous, for he spoke of his children.
The sobs of his sympathizing people filled the
THE STOLEN CHILDREN. 4l

house, and the anguish of the father’s feelings
became so intense, that he bowed his head upon
the Bible and wept aloud. The hearts of the
children palpitated with emotion; their sobs arose
above all others; and, taking each other by the
hand, the wan, emaciated, badly-dressed little
girls hastened to the pulpit, where stood their
father, with his face bowed upon the leaves of the
Holy Book, and laying their hand upon his pas-
sive arm, they sobbed forth, “ Father! Father!”
He raised his head, gazed eagerly and wildly up-
on the children, and comprehending at. once the
whole scene, the revulsion of feeling that came
over him was so great,—the sorrow for the dead
being instantly changed into joy for the living, —
that he staggered backwards, and would have
fallen but for the timely support of a chair.

The whole house was in instant confusion; in
a moment they were clasped in their mother’s
arms, and kisses and tears and blessings were
mingled together upon their white, thin cheeks,
« Let us thank God for the return of our children,”
said the pastor; and all kneeling reverently, he
thanked our merciful heavenly Father, in the
warm and glowing language of a deeply grateful
heart, for restoring to his arms those whom he
had wept as lost to him forever.

Oh, there was joy in that village that night
42 THE STOLEN CHILDREN.

again and again the children told their interesting
story, and those who listened forgot to chide their
disobedience, or to harshly reprove. Need I tell
you how they were pressed to the bosoms of the
villagers ; how tears were shed for their sufferings,
and those of the little lost Winona, whom they
did not forget; how caresses were lavished upon
them, and prayers offered to God, that their lives,
which he had so wonderfully preserved, might
be spent in usefulness and piety ? No, I need not, —
for you can imagine it all.

The sermon which was so happily interrupted
by the return of the children was the first Mr.
Wilson had attempted to preach since the day
they were stolen; the wounds he that day re-
ceived, and the illness that immediately afterwards
ensued, with his unutterable grief for the loss of
his children, had confined him mostly to his bed
during their absence. On the next Sabbath,
Emma and Anna accompanied their father and
mother once more to church, when Mr. Wilson
preached from these words: “Oh, give thanks
unto the Lord, for he is good, and his mercy en-
dureth forever.”

=”

oy Ba

$4]

Pi i

— —

: ILS a

at
% A Ls

~~ =
~



MY GRANDMOTHER'S COTTAGE.
MY GRANDMOTHER’S COT-
TAGE.

BY REV. J. G. ADAMS,

Or all places in the wide world, my own early
home excepted, none seem to me more pleasing
in memory than my vravidmellley’ cottage. Very
often did I visit it in my boyhood, and well
acquainted with its appearance within, and with
almost every object around it, did I become. It
stood in a quiet nook in the midst of the woods,
about five miles from the pleasant seaport where
I was born. The cottage was not a spacious
one. It had but few rooms in it; but it was
amply large for my aged grandparents, I remem-
ber. They lived happily there. My grandfa-
ther was somewhat infirm ; my grandmother was
a very vigorous person for one of seventy-five ;
this was her age at the time of my first recollec-
tion of her. She used to walk from her cottage
to our home; and once I walked with her, but
was exceedingly mortified that I could not endure
the walk so well as she did. :

I used to love this cottage home, because it
was so quiet, and in the summer time so delight-

4*
46 MY SRANDMOTHER’S COTTAGE.

ing to me. I believe I received some of my very
first lessons in the love of nature in this place.
It was a charming summer or winter retreat. If
the sun shone warmly down anywhere, it was
here. If the wind blew kindly anywhere, it was
around the snug cottage, sheltered as it was on
every side by the tall old pines. If the robin’s
note came earliest anywhere in the spring-time,
it was from the large spreading apple-tree just
at the foot of the little garden lot. How often
has my young heart been delighted with his
song there! And then, what sweet chanting |
have heard in those woods all the day from the
thrush and sparrow, yellow-bird and oriole!
How their mellow voices would seem to echo
in the noon-silence, or at the sunset hour, as
though they were singing anthems in some vast
cathedral! "They were ; and what anthems ol
nature’s harmony and praise! God heard them,
and was glorified.> »

It seemed to mexthat every animate thing was
made to be happy. I loved to stand beneath a
tall old hemlock in a certain part of the wood,
and watch the squirrels as they skipped and ran
so swiftly along the wall, or from branch to
branch, or up and down the trees. Their chat-
tering made a fine accompaniment to the bird-
songs. And here I learned to indulge a fondness
MY GRANDMOTHER’S COTTAGE. 47

for the very crows, which to this day I have nevet
outgrown. Though they have been denounced
as mischievous, and bounties have been set upon
them, I never could find it in my heart to indulge
in the warring propensity against them. They
always seemed ‘to me such social company —
issuing from some edge of the woodland, and
slowly flapping their black wings, and flocking

out into the clearing, huddling overhead, and —

sailing away, chatting so loudly and heartily all
the while, and reminding the whole neighbor-
hood that when we have life, it is best to let |
others know it! Yes—the cawing crows have
been company for mein many a solitary ramble;
and whenever I hear them; I inwardly pay my
respects to them. All these, and other familiar
sights and sounds, did richly : joy
cottage in the woods. Sa,

I loved to sit at the shed-door, and watch my
grandfather at his slow’ work ; for he had been
a mechanic in his day, and was able to do a
little very moderately at his trade now. He
would tell me the history of the old people in the
neighborhood, and of the customs and fashions
when they were boys and girls; and my eyes
and ears were open to hear him. I used to wish
I could see them just as they looked when they
were children. It was very difficult then for me


48 MY GRANDMOTHER'S COTTAGE.

to: nagine how those who had become £0 wrin-
kled could ever have had the smooth faces of
snfants and children. But my grandfather could
remember when he was ® boy ; and his father
had told him what things were done when he, too,
yas a boy. And so I concluded that wrinkles
severe no disgrace, nor the fairest faces of the
young any protection against them.

My grandmother was very fond of me, and
took great pleasure in having me read to her, a:
her eyesight had become somewhat dim. Anc
so I used to Joad myself with story-books and
newspapers, when I became older, to carry and
read to her. And such times as we had with
them! Voyages; travels, discoveries, adventures,
perils, — the wonders of the world, the wonders of
science, the wonders of history, —all came in for
their share of reading. Though I should read my-
self tired and sleepy, â„¢Y grandmother would still
be an interested listener. Since I have been @
minister, I have often wished that many hearers
would as eagerly listen to what I had to say
especially to them, as did my aged grandmother
to my young words then.

Those sunny days have departed. The old
cottage is not there now. Years ago it was -
taken down. My grandfather died when I was
yet a boy, and 1 followed him to the grave with


MY GRANDMOTHER’S COTTAGE. 49.

a Leavy heart. My grandmother lived to be
almost a hundred years old,—her powers all
gone, and she helpless. It would sometimes,
even in my manhood, deeply affect me to have
her look into my face with no sign in hers that
she knew me, when she had once loved her
talkative and delighted grandchild so fondly.
But she, too, found her resting-place at last be-
side her companion. Peace to them! They
blest me with their kindly, cheering words when
most I needed them, and I will bless their mem-
ories. And peace to the spot where once stood
their quiet home! Wherever in life I may be, —
however brightly its pleasures may shine, or
heavily its cares and afflictions press upon me

—never would | outgrow the inspiration of these
early enjoyments; never forget, that, however
the great, proud, and contentious world may dis-
tract and dishearten, there will yet be peace to
the humble and virtuous soul in many a nook
like that which sheltered and bk st my grand

mother’s cottage.
THE FIRST OATH

BY REV. EBEN FRANCIS.

lv is now many years since a Near friend of
thine uttered his first oath. We were very inti-
ffiate in our youthful days. I have thought that
[ would write alittle story about him, for some
ot ‘the little folks of these times to read, hoping
that it will not only be interesting, but do them
‘good ; for I am indeed sorry to know that swear-
ing is a very common sin among the boys of our

The parents of my younpdfiaytellow “were Ol
the humbler class in society ; they were indus-
trious and prudent, and took great pains to teach
‘him what was right. ‘They lived in the metrop-
olis of New England, where my schoolmate was
born. His father wrought with the saw, the
plane, the hammer, and such tools ds carpenters
use about their business. His home was a neat,
wooden two-story house, in one of the streets of
that part of Boston which was generally known,
when we were boys, by the name of the Mut-
Ponp. I suppose that most of my little readers
_ who live in the city can tell where it is. Many
THE FIRST OATH. 61

changes have taken place there since my child-
hood. When I was a small boy it was called the
town,—now we never hear of it but as the czty
of Boston. Its population has increased rapidly;
its territory has been extended; it has grown in
wealth, in splendor, in its means for mental and
moral improvement; in the number and conven-
ience of its public schools,—the pride and orna-
ment, or the disgrace, of any place. Yes, Boston
is not, in appearance or in fact, what it once was.

But I am getting off from my story. I was
saying that my young friend resided on the
‘‘ new-land”—no; the ‘‘ Mill-Pond ;”—-well, it’s
all the same—for when they dug down old
Beacon Hill, they threw the dirt into the Mill-
Pond, and when it was filled up, or made land,
the spot was still known as the Mill-Pond, and
oftentimes was called the new-land. In later
years, there have been other portions added to
the city, by making wharves, and filling up where
the tide used to ebb and flow, and where large
vessels could float.

But again Iam digressing too far from the story.

So soon as my friend was old enough, he was
sent to one of the primary schools, and was a
pretty constant scholar at that, and afterwards at
a grammar school, till he was about twelve years
eld. He was, of course,m ch with other lads
§2 THE FiRST OATH.

of his own age, and some who were older and
younger than himself. He was, also, often in the
streets, and as there were a great many people
who used profane language in those days,—as
there are at the present time, —he heard much
of it; yet he had been so carefully trained that
he did not for years utter wicked words.

It is always painful to most persons, old as

well as young, to hear profanity, even though it
be very common in their hearing, if they are
never accustomed to its use.
’ My young friend had been taught to reverence
the name of that great Being who made heaven
and earth and all things. He was a member of
a Sabbath school, and thus had much valuable
advice from his faithful teacher to govern his
conduct in word and deed. For a while he
heeded this, and was careful of his moral char-
acter. But by-and-by, he overstepped the bounds
of right.

It is very true that “ evil communications ccr-
rupt good manners ;” and that if one would not
be bad, one means of safety is to keep out of bid
company.

My friend was, in a few years, placed in a
store, where there was a large business carried
on. He came in contact with persons who were
not so carefully instru ted as he had been. They

—
THE FIRST OATH. 53

made no hesitation in pronouncing the names of
God and Jesus Christ in a blasphemous and pro-
fane manner. He resisted the pernicious influ-
ence of their example for a while, but at last it
became so familiar to his ears, that he could hear
wicked words spoken without even a thrill of
horror in his bosom.

He, however, had not the disposition to speak
them, till one day, when some little thing in the
store did not suit him, his passion was aroused,
and, in the angry excitement of the moment, he
spoke out,—and in that unguarded expression
there was profanity,—a miserable, blasphemous,
wicked word. He had uttered his first oath.
The disposition had been lurking in his heart
for several days to do this; but he had not been
able to so far lower his moral sense as to do it
before. Now he felt as though he had done a
brave act, —that he had achieved something very
grand, But soon, very soon, conscience whis-
pered her gentle yet severe rebuke. She com-
plained sadly of the wickedness that was done.
The blush of shame mantled his cheek. Remorse
took hold on his spirit. He looked about to see
who was upbraiding him; but none seemed to
notice it. He resolved that he would not again
give occasion for such feelings of regret and sor-
row to himself as he then felt.

5
54 THE FIRST. OATH,

Could you have then looked into his heart,
you would have pitied him. This resolution he
kept a few weeks, when, being 2 little irritated,
he a second time profaned the holy name of
Deity. This time he felt some compunctions of
conscience, but they were not as powerful as
before; the first step had been already taken,
and a second was much easier.

I need not go on to tell you how he, not long
after, broke a second resolution, and so on, till,
ere many months, he had become really a swear-
ing young man,

It all sprang from the first sinful act; and
when at last he did break himself of the habit,
*¢ was not done without a serious struggle.

I have told you this story, my youns readers,
because I thought it might be, not only interest-
ing to you, but because I hoped it might be the
means of leading you to reflect upon the useless-
ness and wickedness of PROFANITY ; and that it
might aid in impressing on your minds the im-
portance of governing your passions and keep-
ing your tongues free from evil speaking.

I see my friend, about whom I have written,
quite often. He is now a parent, and occupies
an eminent position in the community ; but he
often thinks of his former life, and says he has
not yet ceased to lament his FIRST OATH. Let


THE FIRST OATH. 55

this fact, then, teach you how a recollection of
the sins of boyhood, even though you may call
them little sins, will be cherished through life,
and poison many moments that would otherwise
be happy ones. How important that childhood be
pure and righteous in the sight of God, and to our
own consciences, in order to insure a happy
manhood and old age!


THE FAIRY’S GIFT.

BY REV. J. WESLEY HANSON.

Ir was a quiet summer’s day,
The breeze blew cool and fair,

And blest ten thousand happy things
Of land, and sea, and air,

And played a thousand merry pranks
With Mary’s golden hair.

Mary was not a happy girl ;
Her face was sad and sour,

And on her little pretty brow _
Dark frowns did often lower, —

And she would scold, and fret, and cry,
Full fifty times an hour.

She sat and wept with grief and pain,
And did not smile at all, —
And when her friends and mates came near
She shunned them, great and small, —
And then upon the Fairy Queen
She earnestly did call.

«Oh, hither, hither, good Fairy,
I pray thee come to me!

And point me out the Path of Peace,
That I may happy be,

For I cannot, in all the world,
A moment’s pleasure see !

»
i
THE FAIRY’S GIFT. 57

‘¢J try my work, my play I try,
My little playmates, too ;

Help me to find true happiness,
I sadly, humbly sue ;—

Oh! my lot is a darksome one, -—
Fairy! what shall 1 dot’’

A humble-bee comes riding by,
No bigger than my thumb,

And on his browny, gold-striped. back,
Behold the Fairy come!

One Jook upon her loveliness
Makes little Mary dumb.

She wore a veil of gossamer,
Her tunic was of blue,

A golden sunbeam was her belt,
And bonnet of criinson hue,

And through the net of her purple shawl
Clear silver stars looked through.

Her slippers were of sunflower seeds,
And tied with spider’s thread,

A rein of silkworm’s finest yarn
Passed round the bee’s brown head ;

An oaten straw was her riding whip, —
Oh how her courser sped!

She beckoned to the sighing maid,
And led her a little way,

And showed a hundred fountains bright
That bubbled night and day,

And flashed their waves in the glad sunlight,
And a of crystal spray.
THE FAIRY’S GIF1..

She said: ‘* Each stream has secret power
' Upon the human heart,
And, as you drink, the mystic draught
Shall joy or woe impart ;
’T will give you pleasant happiness,
Or sorrow’s painful smart.”’

The founts were labelled every one,
With titles plainly seen, —

The fountains Pride, and Sin, and Wrong,
And Hate, and Scorn, and Spleen,

Goodness, and Love, and many more,
Sparkled along the green.

And Mary drank at each bright fount,
To draw her grief away ;

But, spite of all the water’s power,
Her sorrows they would stay.

And still she mourned, and still was sad,
Through all the livelong day.

One morn she saw a little spring
She never saw before,

Down in a still and shady vale,
Covered with blossoms o’er, —

And when she ’d drunk, and still would drinb
She thirsted still for more.

She gladly quaffed its cooling draught,
And found what she had sought ;

No more her heart with sorrow grieved,
She thirsted now for nought;
THE FPAIRY’S GIFT.

She ’d found a blessed happiness,
Beyond her highest thought.

And when she moved the vines. aside
That hid the fount from sight,

In loveliest, brightest characters,
Like stars of silver light, —

Gvodness of heart, and speech, and hfe,
She read in letters bright.

And Mary drank the liquid waves,
And soon her little brow

Became as pure, and clear, and white,
As bank of whitest snow ;

And when she drank of that blest fount,
She purest joy did know.

Then Mary learned this highest truth,
Beyond all human art, —

That there are many things in life
Can pain and woe impart ; —

But Goodness alone of act and deed
Can make a happy heart.
60

A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE,

BY MISS LOUISA M. BARKER.

Wuen I was a little child, younger than those
for whom this book is written, my home was in
a valley. The usual appendages to a farm-house,
the garden, orchard and small pasture grounds,
lay very near it; and I was as familiar with these
enclosures as with the rooms of the house. A
little further off there was a mimic river, which,
as it wound about, divided itself into different
Streams, and surrounded little islands, shaded with
the tall plane tree and the flexible willow. Here,
too, with those who were old enough to be care-
ful in crossing the rustic bridges, I sometimes
played on summer afternoons ;—gathered the
prettiest flowers in the sweetest little woods, and
dipped my feet into the clear running water.

Beyond these there lay less frequented fields,
which rose gradually, at no very great distance,
‘nto a range of hills as green as the valley below.
One of them was covered all over its summit,
and a little way down its sides, with some dark old
woods. The trees which grew there were very
tall, and so large that their thick and heavy tops
A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE. 6]

seemed to crowd together, so that you might have
walked on them almost as well as upon the hill
itself. I loved sometimes, when the air was full
of the bright sunshine, to look at the rich shades
of green upon those tree-tops ; but if ever my eye
rested, for a moment only, upon the dark and
mysterious avenues which led into the depths of
the wood beneath them, there would creep such
a chill to my heart, —such a feeling of dread would
come over me, —that I turned quickly to the glad-
looking homestead, that I might again grow warm
and happy.

At first it was probably no more than the idea
that those woods formed a limit to the world of
light and gladness in which I lived. My eye
could not penetrate their dimness, and with a
childish, human feeling I shrank from the undis-
covered andunknown. But as I grew older, and
read the stories in the small books which were
given to me for presents, or lent by my little
friends, I had other and plainer reasons for the
apprehensive feeling with which I looked at the
woods. [found that children had been so lost
among their thickets as hardly to be found again ;
and that two poor little orphans, left there on pur-
pose, had lain down and died of hunger and wea-
riness; and the birds covered them over with
leaves. Strange birds I thought there were in
62 A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE.

the woods. Then the fairies that dwelt there,
and the strange elfin creatures, and the perils
that travellers fell into with robbers and wild
beasts ; and still I referred the scene of every story
I read directly to those very woods upon the hill-
side, although they were so near that J could
see them plainly enough from the windows of
the cheerful rooms at home.

Time passed along in its usual way ; but before
I had acquired knowledge or strength of mind
enough to correct my early impressions of the
woods, I had permission, one bright afternoon in
June, to go with an older sister to a strawberry
meadow across the creek. We were accompa-
nied by some little maidens, who were older and
more adventurous than me; and so it happened
that when we did not find the fruit so abundant
‘as we could wish, they persuaded us to go into
another field, and then into another, I little thought
where, until I became suddenly sensible of a
shaded light around me, of a breeze a little cooler
than that which tempered the warm air of the
valley, and a low, wild music that I had never
heard before ; and looking up, I saw that we were
actually upon the ascent of the hill which led up
to the dreaded woods.

Strange and almost horror-struck as J] felt, I
did not scream out, (perhaps I should not have
A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE. 63

had breath to do so,) but I gathered up all the
wisdom that my little heart could boast, into the
resolution not to look at the woods, not to think
‘of them; for we should soon go back again, I
thought, and nothing would happen. And my
young friends can judge how terrified I must have
‘grown, when I heard one of the girls begin to
talk of the beautiful flowers her brother had
brought her from the woods, and end by propos-
ing that we should go there, and get some for
‘ourselves. I waited breathlessly to hear the ob-
jections which I doubted not would be urged
against this plan, but none were offered; and
when I ventured to remonstrate, they paid so lit-
tle attention to me, that my pride was hurt at the
thought of saying any more.

There was another way in which my pride was
atwork. Iwas ashamed, among those who were
‘so brave, to own that I was afraid; so, though I
held the hands of those who led me pretty ught,
and gave them some little trouble to pull me
along, they knew nothing more of my reluctance
to go with them.

We got up the hill very fast; so at least it
seemed to me. Here and there a solitary tree,'a
few feet in advance, looked as if it had stepped
‘out to welcome and encourage us to pass on ; and
I.cannot ‘say that my strength did not revive:a lit-
2
64 A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE.

tle as I passed under the heavy branches, and out
again into the freer air. Be thatas it may, it was
terrible enough to me, the approach to those
woods. My companions were eager and gay,
and shouted out, as we entered them. They lit-
tle thought how overpowering were my feelings.
And I little thought, myself, that I was then and
there to receive a lesson that I should never for-
get; one, perhaps, that would do me more good
than any other that I should ever learn.

At first, I was so frightened that my senses
were all in confusion; but as I gradually recoy-
ered the use of them, I took notice of the cool-
ness and the shade, and the dimness away in the
_ distance; I heard the leafy murmur above my
head, the sweet notes that the birds were singing,
and the loud echoes. All these things seemed
to blend together into something so solemn and
so magnificent, that I began to feel for the first
time what it was to be a little child. With that,
soon came a feeling of confidence and even love,
I thought that the majestic presence that filled
the woods, whatever it was, would not hurt me,
and my heart grew so light at the thought, that
I began to gather flowers with the rest. How
pretty they were ! and what clean, shining leaves!
And here and there, wherever a little sunshine
found an opening in the branches. and streamed
A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE. 65

down upon the bright green moss, it seemed #0
golden, so clear, and so real, just as if I might
clasp it in my hands!

I grew so much affected, at length, that I sob-
bed myself into tears, and my sister said that I
had never been in the woods before, and she
would take me home. I did not like to say that
I wanted to stay longer, but held to my flowers ;
and after I reached home, was washed and rested,
I went to the window, and remained there a long
time, looking at the woods. I did not quite com-
prehend all I had thought and felt, but it seemed
to me that a great truth, one that would do me
good, had dawned upon my mind.

It was a long time before I fully understood the
lesson. In a few weeks I caught one of those
contagious diseases which children must have
once; and it went so hard with me, that, before I
was able to walk about, and go out of the house,
the leaves were all gone, and the snow had cov-
ered the ground. When spring returned I thought
often of the woods, but I was too sickly to go
there; and when J grew strong again, my thoughts
were all occupied with an approaching event.
Several changes had occurred in the family, and
others were expected, to which my friends though
discontented at first, had grown quite reconciled.
It was not so with me. There was one circum-

6
66 A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE.

stance which affected me more than it did others,
and from that I prophesied a continual succession
of evils. It seemed to me that my life was to be
wholly changed, and all the joy and beauty left.
behind. It waschildish, Iknow. I knew it then,
for | would not for the world have told any one
how I felt. Still I was as much affected by it as
I have ever been since at any real grief.

Late one afternoon, when my thoughts were
busy with my fears, I went to the window, and
looked up at the woods. The sunshine was very
bright on their tops, and the shadow very dark on
the hill-side below. Very vividly then came back
to me the memory of my visit to them the year
before. I thought of the evils which I expected to
meet, and of the beauty which I found there. It
was some good angel which whispered then in my
thoughts, that, just as I went to the woods, full
of fears and forebodings, I was approaching the
expected misfortune ; that I might be as happily
disappointed in this as I had been in that.

I cannot tell how delighted I was with this
suggestion, nor how completely it took possession
of my mind. I was gloomy and fearful no longer.
I did not, indeed, when the change came, resign
what I lost by it without regret; but I was so cer-
tain of finding new enjoyments, that I resigned it
cheerfully. And when, after a few weeks’ expe-
A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE. 67

rience had taught me that many advantages and
many pleasures had come to me in consequence
of those very circumstances which I had dreaded
so much, I bound the lesson of the woods to my
heart so firmly that there it still remains.

And let me say to you, for whom I have re-
lated this little incident of my childhood :—do
not tremble at the disappointments and trials which
await you. Do not seek to throw upon others
any part of them which you may more becom-
ingly bear yourself. If you live always in the
open sunshine, you will never know what beauty
there is in the woods. You will find the senti-
ment in your books, that it is the night-time
only that shows us the stars; and in the gloom
which must sometimes fall upon this uncertam
and mortal life of ours, you may find, if you will,
as much to rejoice in as todread. You will form
plans, and indulge in hopes, which cannot be
realized, and disappointment will look frowningly
upon you; but if you will submit yourself to the
trial like a little child, the hand that will lead you.
through it will pomt you to happier scenes than.
those of your own imagining.

You will have friends to love, that death may
take away from you—and, oh! then, the shadow
of the woodland, as it lies against the sunny
meadow, will be less dark than your life But
68 A LESSON TAUGHT BY NATURE.

‘do not despair. The few rays of light that reach
you will be richer, the flowers will be purer, and
the music will be softer and sweeter; for you will
be nearer heaven than you were before.

There is another shadow which you and I, and
all of us, are approaching,—“ the shadow of
death.” ‘But will not “the lesson” brighten our
approach even to that? Certain I am, that if
that hour of my childhood, when, with a fearful
heart, [ went into the solemn woods, and heard
the sweet singing of the bird and the breeze, shall
be remembered then, even though the light of life
be fading away, “I shall fear no evil.”



BA EA a
\ f ir "AG r ANG S
My AAG N
TA y
SS" A ANY



FLORENCE DREW-
FLORENCE DREW.

«“] wit not go to Sabbath school to-morrow,”
said Florence Drew, as she threw aside her cat-
echism and sat herself sullenly by the window.

“Florence!” said her mother; “I am aston-
ished to hear you speak so rashly.” |

“T don’t care, —I will not go, — my lesson is
so hard I can’t get it;” saying which, she burst
into tears. Mrs. Drew cast a look of sorrow upon
her only child as she left her to regain her good
humor.

No sooner *had the door closed after her
mother than the rustling of leaves beneath the
window drew the attention of Florence. Think- —
ing it her favorite Carlo, and being in no mood
for a frolic, without lifting her eyes she bid him
‘‘begone ;” but she was soon undeceived by a
shrill voice pronouncing her name, at the same
time finding her arm tightly grasped by the thin,
bony fingers of Crazy Nell, the terror of all the
truant children in the village. The terrified child
vainly tried to disengage herself from the ma-
niac’s hold; and, finding her calls for help all
unheeded, she gave up in despair.

6*
70 FLORENCE DREW.

The wild, searching eyes of Crazy Nell de-
tected her terror, and her stern features relaxed
into a smile as she said, “ Poor child! I will not
harm you; you fear me, and think me mad;
yes, I have been mad, but I’m not now; and I
have come to save you from being as I have
been. Nay, Florence, ’t is useless for you to try
to escape me; J will detain you but a short time.
1 heard your angry words as I was gathering
herbs, and saw you fling your book away. I
heard all. Listen to me, Florence Drew, and I
will tell you a story by which I hope you will
profit.

“‘T was once young, gay, and happy, as you,
and, like you, an only and indulged, but wilful
child, with a quick and ungoverndl temper.

“One day, I was studying my Sabbath school
lesson, and finding it, as I thought, rather hard,
I threw it away, as you did yours, saying that I
would not go to school at all. My poor mother’s
entreaties were all unheeded by me, and I grew
_ up in idleness and ignorance. My mother’s health
daily declined, partly through my ill-treatment
and wickedness. Often did she plead with me,
with tears streaming down her cheeks, to alter
my conduct; but I rudely repulsed her.”

Nell paused, and seemed very much agitated;
her eyes glared wildly, and bending close to
FLORENCE DREW. 71

Florence, she continued in a whisper: “ We
became very poor, in consequence of my extrava-
gance; I then thought my mother a burden;
she was too ill to work, and I left her to starve ;
she did not, however ; she died of a broken heart,
I was her murderer! *T was that which drove
me mad. Look! see you not that black cloud
which darkens the sunshine of my life ?”

“J cannot see a cloud,” sobbed poor Florence,
who was now tasting the bitter cup of repentance.

“T know it, poor child!” continued Nell; ‘the
cloud I mean is such as you just felt, — TEMPER.
It is within us! Conquer your temper, Florence
Drew, and you may yet be good and happy.
Go, now, and seek mother, who is at this moment
shedding tears of sorrow for her little girl’s ill-
temper. Go to her and—” But, ere she could
finish, Florence had glided into her mother’s
room, and was kneeling humbly at her feet
Tears of sorrow were changed to those of joy
and repentance, as Mrs. Drew folded her little
girl to her breast in a long and affectionute em-
brace.

Florence has never been unkind to her mother,
or given freedom to her temper, since that day.
She is now the teacher of a class in a Sabbath
school, and she often relates to her little scholars
the story I have just related to you.
72 FLORENCE DREW.

Crazy Nell continues to gather herbs, an object
of pity to the benevolent, and of sport to the
unfeeling. And now, my dear little readers, I
must repeat Crazy Nell’s expression: “ Conquer
your temper, and you will be happy;” or, in the
words of the sacred Scriptures, “ He that ruleth
his own spirit is greater than he that taketh a

city.”
May.





“WAHOUHS


75

SHECHEM.

BY REV. J. G. ADAMS.

In the ::cture opposite, the reader will see rep-
resented a part of the city of Shechem, at the
foot of Mount Gerizim. It is a very noted place
in history. It is called Sychar in the Gospel,
John 4:5. It was here, at Jacob’s well, that
Jesus met the woman of Samaria. The account
of the conversation which they held together is
one of the most interesting records in the New
Testament. I wish all our young readers would
make themselves acquainted with it. Jesus was
a Jew; and the Jews had no dealings with the-
Samaritans. Weary with travelling in the heat of
the day, our Lord sat down to rest by that an-
cient well, when the stranger woman came to
draw water from it. Jesus said unto her, “ Give
me to drink.” She was surprised that he, being
a Jew, should ask water of her, a Samaritan.
This very surprise which she expressed led toa
most instructive conversation. Read it, and see
how plainly Jesus teaches us the nature of true
worship. The Jews had their temple at Jerusa
76 SHECHEM.

.em; the Samaritans had theirs on Mount Ger-
izim. The woman’ said to Jesus, “ Our fathers
worshipped in this mountain, and ye say that Je-
susalem is the place where men ought to worship.”
She would ask which was the true place. Jesus
declared to her that it was not so much the place,
as it was the heart, which made worship what it
should be. Read the answer of Jesus as the New
Testament gives it, and then see if the Quaker

poet, Barton, has not beautifully expressed it
thus :

‘¢ Woman, believe me, the hour is near

When He, if ye rightly would hail him,
Will neither be worshipped exclusively here,
Nor yet at the altar of Salem.

For God is a spirit, and they, who aright
Would perform the pure worship he loveth,
In the heart’s holy temple will seek with delight

That spirit the Father approveth.”’

Through the knowledge of Christ obtained by
the Samaritan woman in this conversation, many
of her sect were induced to believe on him.

Shechem, or Sichem, is a very ancient place ;
though we do not find it mentioned as a city until
the time of Jacob, who purchased a piece of land,
and dug the well of which we have just spoken,
The city lay between the two mountains Ebal
and Gerizim. Jt was made a city of refuge,
SHECHEM. 77

Joshua 20: 7. 21. 20,21. Quite a number of
events mentioned in the Old Testament occurred
here. Jt was at Shechem Joshua met the as-
sembled people for the last time. It was here
that Rehoboam was made king, and the ten tribes
rebelled.

In after time Shechem became the chief seat
of the people who thenceforth bore the name of
‘Samaritans. ‘They were made up in part of em-
igrants from other eastern nations. When the
Jews returned from their long captivity in Baby-
lon, and began to rebuild Jerusalem and their
temple, the Samaritans desired to aid them in-
their work. “Let us build with you,” was their
request. The Jews refused to admit them to this
privilege; hence a strong hatred between the two
‘sects arose. The Samaritans erected their tem-
ple on Mount Gerizim.

Shechem received the new name of Neapolis
from the Greeks —a name which it retains to the
present day. The city has passed through many
changes, which, had we time to recount them,
might be of deep interest to the reader. But it
would take a larger space to do this than we can
now occupy. The Samaritans are still here; but
their number now is small, not exceeding one
hundred and fifty. They have a synagogue,
where they preserve several ancient copies of the
78 SHECHEM.

hooks of Moses, and among them one ancient
manuscript which they believe to be three thou-
sand four hundred and sixty-five years old, say-
ing it was written by Abishua, the son of Phinehas
(1 Chron. 6: 3,4.) The manuscript, so travel-
lers who have seen it say, is very ancient; but
they do not all think it so old as the Samaritans
pretend it is.

Mount Gerizim is still held in great venera-
tion by the Samaritans. Four times a year they
ascend it in solemn procession, to worship. The
old feeling of hostility between them and the Jews
is still existing.

The city of Neapolis, or, as the Arabs call it,
Nablous, is long and narrow, stretching close
along the northeast base of Mount Gerizim.
The population is about eight thousand souls, all
Mohammedans, with the exception of about five
hundred Greek Christians, and the one hundred
and fifty Samaritans already mentioned. Those
who have taken part in its eventful past history
are gone. But never shall be heard there a more
glorious voice than that which uttered those su-
blime words of heavenly truth to the woman at
Jacob’s well.
Sl

“ARE WE NOT ALL BROTH-
ERS AND SISTERS?”

BY REV. W.R. G. MELLEN.

Tat the human race is one, bound together
by the strongest and holiest ties, is one of the
sublimest truths announced by the Master. -
Indeed, so close and intimate is the connection
subsisting between the various members of the
common family, that to tear one from the body
would be like following the direction of Solomon
to his servant, and dividing the living child in
two, leaving life’s purple current to spout forth
from either half. An appreciation of this truth
is what the world, heart-sick and weary as it is,
now needs above all things else. And to illus-
trate and enforce the fact that it is not a vain
shadow, but a solid reality, too solemn to be
trifled with, and too important to be neglected, —
to illustrate this by deeds which bear joy to the
joyless and hope to the hopeless, —is the work
which Christians, the young as well as old, are
now called to perform. Will it need the voice
of duty, which speaketh as from the skies ¢ This
is the great truth, also, which, with all its rela~
82 ARE WE NOT ALL BROTHERS AND SISTERS ?

tions to life and duty, is to be impressed by the
present, upon the minds of the rising, generation.
This is what my young readers are to learn,—
and not simply to learn, but to practise : — that
we are all brothers and sisters, no matter in
what clime or country we may have been born,
or with what complexion we may be clothed.

A little girl, some five years of age, whom the

writer of this has often fondled in his arms, had
well learned this most important lesson. By
pious parents and earnest Sabbath school teachers
had she been taught, that to be like Jesus, who
took little children in his arms and blessed them,
she must love and do good unto all, as brothers
and sisters. This had sunk deep into her young
and tender mind; and when, on a visit at the
house of a friend, she was asked that familiar
question, which is so often put to children, —
whom she loved, —
"After a moment's hesitation she replied, that
she loved everybody. “Indeed!” said the querist;
“how can that be? You certainly do not love
me as well as you do your own brothers and
sisters ; do you?”

After another short pause she replied, “ Yes,
I think I do; for you, too, are my sister.” “7
your sister?” said the lady, in surprise; ‘‘ how
can that be possible?” Looking up with a
ARE WE NOT ALL BROTHERS AND SISTERS? 893

countenance in which all heaven’s innocence and
purity were mirrored, she exclaimed, “Is not
God our Father ? and are we not all brothers and
sisters? and should we not love each other as
such ?” ;

There was no further argument to be used.
Though hid from many wise and prudent, yet
the truth was thus revealed to babes.

Yes, we are all brethren and sisters, having a
common origin, a common destination, and a
common home. And may all those children who
read this short article ever recollect this impor-
tant truth. When you behold a poor, unfortu-
nate man, with torn and filthy garments, and
perhaps intoxicated, reeling through the streets,
do not hoot after, and throw stones at him, as l
have known many boys do, but think within
yourselves, ‘‘ He is our brother.”

When one of your number abuses the rest, and
you are tempted to injure and beat him, wait til.
you have said to yourselves, “ He 1s still our
brother ; and though he has done us wrong, why
should we strike or injure him ?”

When you see a companion in trouble, and
one to whom your assistance can do much good,
recollect he is a brother, or she is a sister, and
fly to help him. And oh! if all, both old and
young, would act upon this principle, how differ-

7*
84 ARE WE NOT ALL BROTHERS AND SISTERS ?

ent would be the aspect of affairs from what it
now is! Then the kingdom of God would dawn
upon us. Then the wolf and the lamb would lie
down together, and the lion eat straw like an ox.
Then we should be like dettle children, and the
btessing-smile of Jehovah would shed upon us
hiv choicest benediction.


FORTUNE-TELLING.
A DIALOGUE FOR EXHIBITIONS.
BY JULIA A. FLETCHER.

Sophronia. Come, girls, let us go and have
our fortunes told.

Eveline. Oh! I should like it of all things ;
where shall we go ?

Sarah. Let us goto old Kate Merrill’s. They
say she can read the future as we do the past,
by hand, tea-cups, or cards. Come, Mary Ann.

Mary Ann. Excuse me, girls, if 1 do not go
with you. I do not think it is right to have our
fortunes told.

Sophronia. Not right? why not?

Mary Ann. Because, if it had been best for
us to know fhe future, I think God would have
revealed it to us. |

Sarah. Oh, but you know this is only for
amusement.

Eveline. Of course, we shall not believe a
word she says. ;

Mary Ann. If it is only for amusement, I
think we can find others far more rational and
innocent. But depend upon it, girls, you would
86 FORTUNE-TELLING.

not wish to go, if there were not in your minds
a little of credulous feeling

Sophronia. Well, I am sure I am not credu-
lous.

Mary Ann. Do not be offended, Sophronia ;
[ only meant that we are all of us more inclined
to believe these things than we at first imagine.

Sarah. 1 think that Mary Ann is right in
this respect. Iam sure I would not go if I did
not think her predictions would come to pass.

Mary Ann. Certainly; I could not suppose
you would spend your time and money to hear
an old woman tell you things you did not
believe.

Eveline. Well, 1 am sure I do not see any
harm in having a little fun once in a while.

Sophronia. No; and I think it is very unkind
in Mary Ann to spoil all our pleasures with her
whims. She is always preaching to us about
vi ving up our own way for the comfort of others,
avd I think she ought to give up now, and go
with us.

Sarah. Now, really, Sophronia, I think you
ave the one that is unkind. If Mary Ann is
wrong, it is better to convince her of it kindly,
and I am sure she will acknowledge it.

Mary Ann. I hope 1 should be willing to
«ye up a mere whim for the pleasure of those I
FORTUNE-TELLING. 87

love so well. But this is not a whim; itisa
serious conviction of duty.

Sophronia. Well, I thought you iteays pre-
tended to be very obliging.

Mary Ann. {I have no right to be obliging at
the expense of what I deem duty. Our own
inclinations we should often sacrifice, our preju-
dices always, but our sense of duty never.

Eveline. I think, girls, we have done wrong
to urge Mary Ann to go, after she had told us
her reasons.

Sophronia. Well, then, don’t spend any more
time in urging her to go, against her will. You
know the old proverb: “ The least said is soonest
mended.”

Eveline. Well, do not let us go away angry
or ill-natured. You asked Mary Ann to say
why she thought it was wrong, and we should
receive her reasons kindly.

Sarah. So I think; but I wish she would tell
us what harm she thinks it would do to go.

Mary Ann. Well, girls, I think, by trying to
look into the future, we are apt to grow discon-
tented and restless, and to forget that we have
duties to perform in the present. Then, if we do
not believe in it, it is a waste of time and money,
which might be better employed in relieving the
suffering of the poor around us. But the greatest
88 FORTUNE-TELLING.

evil of all is, that we should believe even a part;
she would of course tell us many little circum-
stances which would be true of any one; thus
we might be led to believe all she said; the pre-
diction would probably work out its own fulfil-
ment, and perhaps render us miserable for life.

Sophronia. Oh, fudge! Mary Ann. This is
altogether too bad and ungenerous in you. In
the first place, the few cents we give, bestowed
as they are on a poor old widow woman, are
not wasted, in my opinion, but well spent ;— and
if I spend an evening, granted to me by my father
and mother for recreation, in listening to Old
Kate, it is no, more wasted than if I spend it with
the girls in any other social way. And when
you connect fortune-telling and our duties in the
present, you make it too serious an aflair. Re-
member, this is all for sport.

Mary Ann. It may be so with you, Sophronia;
but there are those who seriously believe every
word of a fortune-teller, and actually live more
in the unseen but expected events of the future,
than in faithfully performing their duties in the
present. This is true, Sophronia. The content-
ment and peace of many young minds have been
utterly lost, sold for the absurd jabbering of old,
ignorant, low-bred women, who pretend to read
the future. [Ina livelier tone of voice.|, But just
FORTUNE-TELLING. : 89

say, girls, do you believe there is any connection
between tea-leaves and your future lives ?

Eveline, Sarah, Sophronia. Why, no!

Mary Ann. Do you believe God has marked
the fortunes of thousands of his creatures on the
face of cards ?

Eveline, Sarah, Sophronia. Certainly not.

Mary Ann. Well, do you believe, if God
should intrust the secret events of the future with
any of our race, in this age, it would be with
those who have neither intellectual, moral, nor
religious education—who can be bribed by
dollars and cents to say anything ?

Sarah, Eveline. No, indeed!

Mary Ann. (Turns to Sophronia.) You do
not answer, Sophronia. Let me ask you one or
two more questions. Do you suppose Kate Mer-
rill believes that she has a revelation from God ?

Sophronia. No, Mary Ann.

Mary Ann. Do you suppose she thinks you
believe so ?

Sophronia. Why, yes, I do.

Mary Ann. Then, is it benevolent to bestow
money to encourage an old woman in telling for
truth what she knows to be false ?

Sophronia. I doubt whether it is really benev-
olent.

Mary Ann. And if Old Kate speaks falsely
90 FORTUNE-TELLING.

and knows she does so, and you know it, yet
spend your time in listening to what she has to
say, what good can come of it to head or heart ?
Sophronia. None at all, Mary Ann. It is
time wasted, and I am convinced that I have
been doubly wrong in wishing to go, and in being
angry with you. Will you forgive me ¢
Mary Ann. Certainly, Sophronia. And now
if you wish for amusement, I will be a witch
myself, and tell your fortunes for you.
Sophronia. Oh, do tell mine; and be sure
you tell it truly. What lines of fate do you see
in my hand?
Mary Ann. (Takes her hand and looks at it
intently.)
(To Sophronia.)

Passions strong my art doth see.

Thou must rule them, or they rule thee.
If the first, you peace will know ;

If the last, woe followeth woe.

Sarah. Now tell mine next.
(To Sarah.)

Too believing, too believing,

Thou hast learned not of deceiving.
Closely scan what seemeth fair,
And of flattering words beware.

Eveline. Now tell me a pleasant fortune,
Mary Ann.
FORTUNE-TELLING. 9]

(To Eveline.)
Lively and loving, I would not chide thee,
Do thou thy duty, and joy shall betide thee.
Sophronia. Thank you, Mary Ann, for the
lessons you have given us. We can now, in
turn, tell your fortune, and that is, Always be
amiable and sensible as now, and you will always

be loved.

.
.
\

~
=
=

—
ee.

tie

AUD

Ht

af


THE BOY WHO STOLE THE
NAILS.

BY REV. MOSES BALLOU.

{ REMEMBER well, that, when I was quite a
little boy, a circumstance occurred which I shall
probably never forget, and which, no doubt, has
had some little influence on my life at many dif-
ferent periods since. I will relate it ; and I wish
all my young readers would remember the story.

My father was somewhat poor. He had no
salary for preaching, except for a few months,
perhaps not five hundred dollars for forty years
of pulpit labor. He maintained his family chiefly
from a small farm, and, there being several chil-
dren, we were deprived of many little things that
wealthier parents are accustomed to furnish for
theirs. We had few presents, and those chiefly
of necessary articles, —school-books, or some-
thing of the kind; while toys, playthings, and
instruments of amusement, we were left to go
without, or take up with such rude and simple
ones as we could manufacture for ourselves.

I wanted a small box very much. A handsome
little trunk, such as most of my young readers
THE BOY WHO STOLE THE NAILS. 93

probably have, was too much to hope for, and a
plain wooden box, even, I had no means to pur-
chase. , ;

I went without for a long time, and at last
determined that I would try to make one. But
the materials, — where was I to obtain them?
True, my father had pieces of thin boards that
would answer, but there were nails, and hinges,
and a lock wanting. Where were these to come
from ?

After trying a variety of methods, I invented a
plan for fastening it without a lock, and leather
made a very good substitute for hinges, as it was
to be out of sight. Still, I wanted:iails.
were some old ones about the*house, but.
were crooked, and broken, and rusty. These
would not answer if anything better could be
obtained.

My uncle, who at this time lived but a short
distance from us, was engaged in building, and
I watched the barrel of bright new nails his
workmen were using, with a longing eye. QO,
how I coveted them!

The temptation was too great. I sought the
opportunity while the hands were at dinner, and,
after cautiously looking about to see that no one
was near to observe me, with trembling hands
seized upon them, and stole enough to make my



94 THE BOY WHO STOLE THE NAILS.

box. O! how my heart beat as I hurried away
across the fields home. I almost expected to
see some one start up from every stump and bush
on the way, to accuse me of the theft. I hardly
dared to look behind me. It seemed as though
my old uncle, with frowning brow, was at my
very heels. And then, too, the workmen ;—
were they not suspicious from my hanging about
them, and had not some of them watched me?
So horrid images began to dance about my brain.
Dim visions of court-rooms, and lawyers, and
judges, and prisons, and sorrowing parents, and
2d brothers and sisters, rose in awful

“beforé’me. I began to grow dizzy and
faint I had laid up, for a long time, all the
pennies I could obtain, which, at that time,
amounted to the vast sum of twenty cents, con-
tained in an old-fashioned pistareen; and the
hope sprung up in my heart, that, possibly, by
paying this to the officers, they would not carry
me to jail.

Thought was busy in laying plans for escape,
and I reached home in the greatest excitement
imaginable.

Well, the deed was now done, and I could
not undo it. I was really a thief; and now, as
I had got the nails, I thought I might as well use
them. Iwas too anxious about the crime. how-



.
THE BOY WHO STOLE THE NAILS. 95

ever, to do this at once. SoIhid them away
for a week or more, before I ventured to make
my box.

Taking such leisure hours as I had,—for I
was obliged to work most of the time on the
farm,—I crept away in the loft of an old build-
ing, and finally succeeded in finishing my task.
But, now that the box was done, my troubles
were by no means ended. It would be seen.
I could not always keep it out of sight. My
brothers, and sisters, and playmates, would ex-
amine it, and possibly my father would get his
eye upon it! Suppose he should, — ~ me
where those nails came from?

O, how my poor brain was racked to invent
some false story by which I could escape detec-
tion! I thought of saying that they were old
ones which I had polished up so as to appear
new, and I even filed down the rust on the head
of an old nail to see if they would look suf-
ficiently alike. But nothing of this kind would
answer. The cheat, I thought, would be de-
tected; and sc I was obliged, after all my trouble
and suffering, to keep my box hidden away when
it was done. Every time I went to look at it,
those bright new nail-heads were staring out at
me, ready to reveal my crime to any one who
saw them.

S*
96 THE BOY WHO STOLE THE NAILS.

For a long time, I did not dare to go to my
uncles again. True, he knew nothing of my
wrong; but I felt guilty, and did not care to see
him. Finally, after some time had passed away,
though I had by no means forgotten the theft,
and still suffered much every time it was thought
of, I ventured to call and see him. I could hardly
avoid the impression that he must know what I
had done, and would accuse me of it; and when
he met me in the yard at his door; patted my
cheek with a half-laughing, half-reproving look ;
asked why I had stayed away from him so long ;
and said, that, to punish me, he should go and
get, fie some very nice apples from the garden ;
—T could bear it no longer. It seemed as though
my heart would break. What I said, I have now
forgotten. I remember that I cried very heartily,
and, as soon as my tears would allow it, told him
the whole story! |

I can still see, fresh in my memory; the sad
look that came over him as 1 confessed my
crime ; but not a single harsh or unkind word did
he utter. He told me that it was very wrong;
that I had acted nobly in confessing it ; and that,
if I had only asked him in the first place, he
would gladly have given me all I wanted.

Thinking I had suffered enough already, he
promised not to tell my parents, in case I con-
THE BOY WHO STOLE THE NAILS. 97

tinued a good boy, and advised me to destroy the
box and bring him back the nails, as no one could
then suspect what had been done but ourselves.

His kindness, I confess, pained me very much.
[ think nothing could have tempted me to do him
any wrong again. )

I loved him better than ever before. He never
alluded to the subject afterwards, but I always
thought of it when I saw him. He died ina
short time; and, twenty years after, as I stood
by his grave, the circumstance came up, clear
and distinct, to my recollection. I have not,
indeed, from that to the present hour, felt the
least temptation to commit any wrong of the
kind without recalling it; and, if all my young
readers will think seriously how much suffering
that one act cost me, and how much happier I
should otherwise have been, I am confident that
_they will never commit a similar offence so long
as they remember the story of the boy who stole
the nails.
>

98

THE CHILDLESS MOTHER.

BY MRS. M. H. ADAMS.

TuErE are many childless mothers in our land.
In some homes there never lived a little child to
make them happy ; but in others the spirits of the
little ones have departed. They dwell in another
home—the “dear heavenly home.” ‘Their moth-
ers, those childless mothers, weep day and night
‘na their loneliness and sadness. This sketch is
of a mother who had buried all her little babes —
four precious children —all her little family. The
mother’s name was Ellen Moore.

For many months after the birth of her first
child, Ellen was free from sorrow as a bird in the
morning. She never thought affliction might
come to her blessed home. It was not surprising,
for she had never known what bereavement and
bitter disappointment were. She was educated to
be a child of sunshine. She had always lived
amid smiles and tenderness, and when the fear-
ful cloud of sorrow broke, in an unexpected mo-
ment, upon her head, she seemed bowed down,
never to rise again in health and beauty.
Ese

THE CHILDLES: MOTHER 99

It was a sad day in our neighborhood when
Ellen’s first little babe died; we all wept. Not
so much because he was dead; for we all felt that
he was at rest; but his dear mother was so sorely
troubled, her heart ached so grievously, it seemed
as if she too would die. Days and nights Ellen
wept, and moaned, and walked her house. The
tears seemed to burn their way down her cheeks.
She spoke but seldom, yet that pitiful moan she
so often breathed out pierced our souls and made
us all very sad.

After a few weeks, the consolation we offered
her quieted her feelings, and she became calm.
She went to church, called on her friends, and
attended to her duties at home. But there was
ever a sadness in her voice and manners. Her
home was so lonely, so strangely still and vacant,
and Ellen so silent, that the voice of gladness was
not heard in it again until a second beautiful boy
was born under its roof.

We were all happy then. Even Ellen smiled
as she kissed her dear babe —but a tear followed
the smile and the kiss so soon, we knew her
wounded heart was not then healed. She was
very sad, and felt that this babe, too, might only
be loaned her for a short time. It was not long
before we all felt so. That little face, so pale, so
sad, so beautiful, evidently bore the seal of death
100 | THE CHILDLESS MOTHER.

upon it. He refused all nourishment, and pined
slowly away. Ellen knew he must die, but could
not say so. She could not shed one tear to relieve
her sorrowful heart. She neither spoke nor wept,
until her infant was laid in its coffin.

Ariend had woven a wreath of beautiful flow-
ers, and laid it on the satin pillow of the coffin,
and placed a delicate rose-bud in the little hand
of the babe. Ellen went alone to take her last
kiss, when, seeing her babe so beautiful in death,
she seated herself on the floor and wept freely.

“ Who loved my babe so fondly?” said she,
when she came from the room. ‘“ Whoyhas been
so kind and thoughtful of me? It has unsealed
my tears ; now let me weep alone.” We left her.
She came out of that room a changed woman.
She assisted us in our preparations for the burial
of the dead, spoke cheerfully to her husband, con-
versed freely about her children in heaven, and
remarked that henceforth her life should be wor-:
thy of a Christian. We buried the sweet babe
by the side of his brother, and planted a rose-tree
over his grave. Then our thoughts turned to
Ellen, whose whole manner indicated resignation
and peace.

We were not surprised at the effect of grief
upon Ellen, for I have told you she was not edu-
cated to bear human misery with much com-
THE CHILDLESS MOTHER. 101

posure. Yet what her parents had left undone
seemed to be effected by those severe dispensations
of God. Our Father in heaven often educates us -
by his chastisements, giving us wisdom, patience,
hope, trustfulness and resignation, according to
the severity with which he afflicts us.

Ellen maintained the same cheerful manner
from the time of the burial of her second babe to
the birth of her third child. Her friends hoped
many blessings for Ellen in the life of this child.
It was a daughter, apparently healthy; and as
its mother had endured so severe a trial we hoped
the Lord would deal mercifully with her in spar-
ing this one to her. For one short year we had
reason to hope for the life of the child. But it
was too frail a creature for this world, and, like its
little brothers, died in early infancy. And its
mother — we found her to be a practical Christian
indeed.

Instead of moaning and violent grief, she held
her babe as it breathed its latest breath, and was
first to break the awful silence in the room that
succeeded the final struggle, with these words:
«“ She is with her little brothers now, and I have
reason to bless the Lord.” She could say no
more then ; and a few large tears fell on the cheek
of her babe as it still lay on her lap. Once only
did she freely yield to tears. It was when her
husband first heard of the death of his babe. His
162 THE CHILDLESS MOTHER.

anguish overcame her composure. Soon recovered
however, she maintained a truly Christian de-
portment. The third little grave was opened in
the burial lot of Mr. Moore, and the body of this
babe laid by its little brothers. 7

A fourth babe was born in the lonely home of
Ellen, and fresh hopes cherished for the long life
ofher child. The burden of every prayer offered
at that family altar was, “ Lord, if it be thy will,
suffer us to rear this tender child!”

“ Yet though I pray thus,” said Ellen, “ my
heart is strong to meet its early death; and if it
dies, I shall not mourn as for my first-born. God
has afflicted me, but I am profited thereby.”

“Very true, Ellen, but if this fourth dear babe
is taken from us, we shall almost doubt the mercy
of God. How can you, in your present delicate
health, endure to lay this last dear babe by the
side of the departed ones, and again find your
home desolate and silent ?”

“ My body is weak, Mary, but my spirit is well
instructed in resignation, and can calmly bear
whatever new affliction God pleases to send.
You have called me changed since Alfred died,
and sometimes too silentand sad. 1 am changed
and often silent, but not sad. My treasures are
in heaven, and my communings are more with
the spirits of my children in heaven than with
the friends who are with me here. And if this
THE CHILDLESS. MOTHER. 103

child dies, Mary, if he dies—his death
will prepare me for the duties of all the rest of
my life.” * * -*

The beautiful boy passed away io as his little
lips had learned to pronounce his mother’s name —
suddenly, unexpectedly to us all, and all yielded
to our grief but Ellen. We greatly feared his
father would become insane.

But Ellen—believe me, she was transformed
from a child of sunshine to an angel and minis-
ter of light in darkness. She sat by her husband
as serene and collected as if her babe only slept;
not a tear swept her cheek, not a tremulous
word fell from her lips, as she soothed her strick-
en companion ; her pale face wore no look of de-
spair, and she directed every funeral preparation
with as much composure as if her heart had not
felt the awful wound. The world called her
heartless, — but Christ must have owned her as one
of his brightest jewels, almost a perfect disciple.
When she spoke, we felt as if some mysterious
power from heaven was in our midst. We thought
as much of the saint-like fortitude and resignation
of our feeble Ellen, and wept as much to witness
her calmness and spiritual strength, as for the loss
of our interesting little friend.

Our pastor called to offer gospel consolations to
the sorrowing mother, but he wept as Ellen
greeted him, saying, “God hath much love for

9


104 THE CHILDLESS MOTHER.

us, Brother Ellis, for he chasteneth much. Now,
ny ‘only prayer is, that Henry may be led to per-
veive it and be at peace. If you have words of
comfort, go to him and still his troubled spirit.”

The aged came to console her, but went back
to their dwellings feeling that she was as well in-
structed in the wisdom of heaven as the oldest
servant among them. The young and happy
came to mingle tears of sympathy with her, but
returned to dwell upon her words as upon com-
munications from the spirit-land, rather than
from a creature like themselves. Her words
found a way to the soul of the most thoughtless,
fixing their minds upon heaven, and revealing the
unseen glories of a better home, and the beauty
ef Christian faith in an earthly one.

She was a Christian mother. When she put
on Christ, she was “a@ new creature.” She be-
lieved her first grief was almost a murmuring
against heaven. Surely we know she bore an
equal love for all her children, but when her last
one died, she loved God and her Saviour more,
believing fully that God would not do her wrong,
—that he only sought the good of his creatures
in his dispensations,—that although they seemed
grievous and inscrutable to them, he saw the end
from the beginning, and chastized -vhom he
loved.
105

THE MOTHERLESS CHILD.
BY MRS. M. H: ADAMS.

To become a childless mother is indeed one of
the most severe afflictions which woman can be
called to endure ; yet it may be, it is often met
with noble, Christian fortitude, with Christian hu-
mility and resignation, that soothe the acute pains
of the mother’s heart, and carry her thoughts away
from earth and above its sorrows; so that we feel
that she can and has found a balm, and has still
left her consolation and happiness. But when
we see a little child, whose mother God has ta-
ken, as fully realizing its bereavement, its loneli-
ness, its absolute misfortune, as a child can do,
we feel that to be a motherless child in this un-
christian world, is indeed an affliction for which
there seldom appears a balm ; though we doubt
not our Father hath the balm for this as for every
other wound.

A young man sat by the corpse of his faithful
wife, the mother of all his little babes. One child
was gazing silently and inquiringly at her father,
as he held his head weeping and groaning in an-
106 THE MOTHERLESS CHILD.

guish of spirit. A tender infant of a few weeks
lay asleep in the cradle at his side. The young
man’s mother entered the room, and with tender-
ness of tone and manner, endeavored to calm his
grief; with words of gospel love and faith to
comfort him.

« Abby has been to you a kind, faithful and
devoted wife, David; an agreeable companion
and constant friend. Before God she wasa hum-
ble child, and before the world a worthy disciple
of Christ. You doubtless feel all this, and more.
Few can speak evil of her, and very many will
sincerely mourn her early death, and sympathize
with you in this dreadful hour. But remember,
David, you have, before this, professed trust and
belief in the promises and love of God. Now is
the time to make manifest your Christian faith,
your hope in God, your belief in the gospel. Try
not to be utterly disconsolate in your loneliness.
God is very near to us, although this heavy cloud
of sorrow lies between him and us.”

They were interrupted by the entrance of the
oldest child of the departed one, a sensitive, intel-
ligent boy of six or seven years. Tears were in
his eyes as he opened the door, and fell fast into
the lap of his father as he tried to speak to him.

« Father,” said he, “I have been down in the
sitting-room, trying to read my little kooks; but
THE MOTHERLESS CHILD. 107

I think so much of my dear dead mother, I can’t
read; and the tears come into my eyes so fast,
that I can’t see the pictures. I went to rock in my
little chair, but I saw my mother’s empty chair,
and my little heart aches very much. It will be
very lonesome and sad here, if I don’t see mother
anywhere. And who will take care of this little
baby brother ?”

No word was spoken by those present, but
their tears and sobs told plainly that they too felt
how lonely and sad that home would be without
the gentle voice and cheerful song of that “ dear
mother.” As no one checked him, Willie again
spoke, and, as well as he could amid sobs and tears,
told the bitterness of his young spirit.

“T love you some, father, but not as I did my
mother; and now my mother is in heaven, who
shall I have to take care of me and kiss me, father;
who will say a prayer to me every night? Aunt
Susan’s prayers are not like mother’s; and your
voice does n’t sound so sweet by the side of my
bed as my mother’s did. Oh dear! what did my
mother die for, and leave me a Jase little moth-
erless boy ?”

His father thet took him upon his knee, wiped
his tears, and soothed him to sleep with gentle
caresses. No word could David utter. Fora
long time he sat with his sleeping boy, beside his

Q*
108 THE MOTHERLESS CHILD.

dead.. "The paleness of his cheek, and the fre-
quent sigh, expressed his sorrow. His mother
again tried to draw from him an expression of his
Christian fidelity, fearing that he was untrue to
his God and his Master under a trial so severe.
When at length he did speak, a hardened heart
might have been moved by his broken sentences
and choking words, as he made an effort to as-
sure his anxious parent.

« Mother, I have the utmost confidence in the
mercy and goodness of God—even now that he
has taken to himself one so very dear. I feel
sure there is some great and important lesson
which he would have me learn from this sorrow-
ful event. I have all faith that Abby is at rest,
and will still love those of us who are left on the
earth to mourn. I believe we shall meet each
other in the future, that we shall recognize and
love each other, with a far more perfect and a
purer love than we have cherished here. I shall
be lonely, and miss from my hours at home the
counsel, the aid, the cheerfulness, sympathy and
attentive love of one of the best of women. Her
beautiful example in the service of her Master
will often be remembered with deep and sincere
grief.

« All this I could bear calmly ; if it were more
bitter, I could bear it andnot weep. But to think
THE MOTHERLESS CHILD. 109

of my children—as motherless babes; to hear
Willie tell his sorrow, and mourn so bitterly in
his tender years for a mother —so dear; to fee!
that with his susceptibility and keen sensitiveness
he realizes so fully his loss; to hear him sob om
his pillow at night, and, when alone, call him-
self ‘little motherless Willie ;’— oh, mother! what
man or Christian would not bow beneath a burden
like this ?— It is the contemplation of four moth-
erless children that wounds me most. It seems
to me Abby herself would not reprove me, could
those cold lips now bring me a message from her
spirit inheaven.” * * * *

With expressions like those in the chamber of
the dead was every hour in the home of David
embittered, for weeks and months, by the little
mourning child. He gathered flowers and laid
them before his father, saying, ‘1 don’t suppose
you care about them, father; but my mother isn’t
here to take them. I pick them because they
look up into my face as if mother was somewhere
near them. But they wither on my hand, and
hold down their heads, just as I want to do now
my mother is dead.”

Every object at home seemed to remind Willie
of his mother, and keep his bereavement upper-
most in his thoughts. He did not weep as much
after a few weeks, but through all his boyhood
110 THE MOTHERLESS CHILI

there rested a sadness on his countenance, that
indicated a mournful recollection of that dear
mother. Through his whole life he felt that he
was like a tender branch lopped from the parent-
tree ; like a lamb sent out from the fold while too
young to meet the storms and travel the danger-
ous paths of which he often heard from his mother.
This idea seemed ever present, and served many
times to hold him back from adventurous pur-
suits and untried schemes. ‘I don't know— but
I should have known had my dear mother lived,”
was the expression of his general course in life.
As long as he was a child he spoke often and
tenderly of his mother. He cherished a remem-
brance of her faithful admonitions and precepts, as
vivid as might have been expected from a child
bereaved at the age of eight or ten. When older,
he realized more fully his loss, especially when
he met one whom he believed to be @ good mother.
He then seldom spoke of his mother ; but his visits
to the grave-yard, his sadness on the anniversary
of the day of her death, his conversations about
her with his brothers and sister, the value he at-
tached to every token of her love to him, con-
vinced us that he remembered her with deep
affection. . ,
When a young man, he was several times be-

guiled by the tempter into forbidden paths, and

4
THE MOTHERLESS CHILD. 111

his eyes were not opened to behold the danger
until the fangs of the serpent pierced deeply into
his heart. Then most fully did he realize that
he was poor motherless William; that he was
abroad in the world without those most effectual
safeguards against sin, a good mother’s counsels
and a mother’s daily prayers; that while others
could express unreservedly to their mothers their
hopes or fears, their success or misfortune, their
faithfulness in the hour of temptation or weak-
ness under its power, and be counselled, encour-
aged, urged or entreated anew, — he could only
go to his mother’s grave and shed bitter tears of
repentance in loneliness, or withdraw himself
from all around him, and, a poor motherless child,
call up the dim remembrance of that young and
cheerful being who once called him her precious
son, her treasured child,—and weep the more
bitterly that no answering voice or smile, or look
of encouragement or hope, met Aém in this sinful
world! | : |

Oh ye who have hearts to feel, who profess
Christian principles to guide you, and the holy
love of our Master for your example, seek out the
motherless child of the poor, the ignorant, the
vicious, and by the power of Christ which is within
you, according to the measure of that power,
strive to be like fond mothers to the thousands
112 THE MOTHERLESS CHILD.

who cry “ We have no dear mother — our mother
is in heaven — is dead— and we know not what
is right or what is wrong!” Help and pity
them. Rescue them from that heart-breaking
loneliness and sorrow that prey incessantly on

the feelings of a sensitive, intelligent, motherless
child.


113

FAITH,

BY MRS. E. R. B. WALDO.

Upon the peaceful breast of Faith
My troubled soul hath found repose,
Free from the sad and starless gloom
That doubting scepticism knows.

Though disappointment, care, and pain,
Have bent my heart to their decree,
One thought hath ever led me on,
It is, that it was so to be.

Oft would my weary spirit faint,
My heart yield almost to despair,
Did not ‘“a still small voice ” exclaim,
‘* There is no change, but God is there.”

That mighty power which points the shaft,
And forms the spirit to endure,

Will, in its own peculiar way
And time, perform the wondrous cure.

Still may my soul, through faith, rely
Upon the promises of God ;

His mercy see in every change,
And learn to bless his chastening rod.
114

THE SNOW-BIRDS.
A DIALOGUE.
BY MRS. C. HICHBORN.

Marissa. Pray, Mary, what are you going to
do with those crumbs which you hold in your
hand ¢

Mary. 1 am going to feed my snow-birds with
them; and I should be very happy to have you
go with me. I know you will enjoy seeing how
merrily they hop about and flutter their wings,
and seem to chirp out their thanks as they pick
up the food I throw them.

C. Thank you for your invitation ; but I beg
you will excuse me; it may be pretty sport for
you, but, for my part, I can enjoy myself much
better to stay here and arrange my baby-things,
for | expect some girls to see me this afternoon.
I cannot conceive what there is in those ugly-
looking snow-birds to interest you ; they are not
handsome, surely; they have not a single bright
feather ; and, as for their songs, they sound like
the squeak of a sick chicken.

M. J am sorry to hear you speak so of my
favorites ; for, though they are not so brilliant in
their colors as many that flutter around us in
THE SNOW-BIRDs 115

the summer, yet to me they are deuer than any
others, and far more beautiful than those of a
gaudier hue.

C. Well, you have a queer taste, I must con-
fess; you remind me of the philosopher I read
of in the story-book, who thought a toad the most
beautiful of God’s creatures. Come, perha ps you
can show me why they are entitled to your
regard, and point out their beauties.

M. IT will cheerfully comply with your re-
quest, for nothing gives me more pleasure than to
speak of the good qualities of my friends. Exam-
ine them for a moment and ‘see how exqui-
sitely they are formed, and, though not gaudy in
their colors, yet their feathers are soft and glossy.
But these are trifles comparatively ; what most
endears them to me is their constancy.

C. That is a new idea, indeed. Constancy
in snow-birds! Please explain yourself, Mary.

M. Well, they seem to me like those rare
friends that love us best in adversity, when the
bright summer of prosperity, with its attendant
joys, has fled, and the winter of sorrow and mis-
fortune shuts out, with its dark clouds, the light.
of life, and Withers, with its frosts, the few
flowers which bloom along its pathway. There
are summer friends, Clara, as well as summer
birds, and they both wear brilliart colors, and

10
116 THE SNOW-BIRDS.

_ sing enchanting songs; but they depart with the
sunshine; the first leave us to battle the storms
of adversity, and the others, the cold and barren
prospect of winter; these little snow-birds, how-
ever, remain, and through all its dark hours they
cheer us by their presence. They seem to tell
us that we are not entirely destitute of pleasure,
but that the darkest hours have something of
beauty ; and, while they serve to awaken in our
minds a remembrance of the bright days that
have gone, they bid us look forward to the end of
our sorrows, and welcome the bright spring days,
which shall return to us the joys that departed.

G. I declare! you have preached quite a-ser-
mon, and from a funny text; I confess there is
both truth and poetry in what you say- I do not
wonder that you love the snow-birds, if they
awaken such pleasant and pretty thoughts in
your mind. Henceforth I will love them myself,
for the good lesson that, through you, they have
imparted. I trust you will forgive me the rude-
ness of laughing at you.

M. Cheerfully, Clara ; but learn from this
never to despise any of God’s creatures ; they can
all teach us’ some important and beautiful lesson
which we should be happy to heed. And now, if
you please, we will go and feed the snow-birds.

C. With all my heart!

BEB Wii

2 BLL IS\\\\\ix\
Hee A | eer

e i 2 a rs ae

YY eo

e

Si A)
Oe SL Nee
bd jer r—

Paiva
‘ i Ait ni

aif dal
, te
AAT fh \ a



| os e
od ~
Sie
By

MOUNT CARMEL.
119

MOUNT CARMEL.

SELECTED.

- Mount Carmez is a high promontory, forming
the termination of a range of hills running north-
west from the plain of Esdraelon. Mount Carmel
is the southern boundary of the Bay of Acre, o1
Acca, as it is called by the Turks; its height is
about fifteen hundred feet, and at its foot, north,
runs the brook Kishon, and a little further north
the river Belus.

Mount Carmel is celebrated in Scripture his-
tury as the place where Elijah went up when he
told his servant to look forth to the sea yet seven
times, and the seventh time he saw a little cloud
coming up from the sea “like a man’s hand,”
when the prophet knew that the promised rain
was at hand, and girded up his loins, and ran
before Ahab’s chariot even to the gates of Jez-
reel. (1 Kings xviii. 44—46.)

Towards the sea is a cave, where it has been
supposed that Elijah desired Ahab to bring Baal’s
false prophets, and where fire from heaven de-
scended on the altar he erected.
120 MOUNT CARMEL.

The preseut appearance of Carmel is thus
described by Dr. Hogg, who visited it in 18383.
“ The convent on Mount Carmel was destroyed
by the Turks in the early part of the Greek revo-
lution. Abdallah, the Turkish pasha, who com-
manded the district in which Carmel is situated,
not only razed their convent to the ground, but
blew up the foundations, and carried the materi-
als to Acre for his own use. The convent is
now being rebuilt, or probably is now completely
finished, the funds having been supplied by sub-
scriptions solicited all over Europe, and a great
part of the East, by one of the brethren, Giovanni
Battista, who has travelled far and wide for that
purpose.” Dr. Hogg gives the following account
of the condition of the place at the time of his
visit.

«“ The whole fabric is of stone, and, when com
pleted, will possess the solidity of a fortress. The
iirst story only is at present finished, and hereafter
will be solely appropriated to the accommodation
of travellers, when another, to be raised above,
will be exclusively devoted to permanent inmates.
In the centre a spacious church has been com-
menced, and already promises to be a fine build-
ing. The principal altar will be placed over the
cave so long held sacred as the retreat of the
prophet. This natural cavern exhibits at its
MOUNT CARMEL. 121

farther extremity some signs of having been
enlarged by art. When the edifice above is com-
plete, it will be converted into a chapel; and a
projecting ledge of rock, believed to have been
the sleeping-place of the prophet, will then be
the altar. The superior himself kindly conducted
me to see one of the celebrated caves which
everywhere abound in the district of Mount
Carmel. Descending two thirds of the mountain
by a narrow path, scooped in the rock, we entered
an enclosure of fig-trees and vines, where sev-
eral caverns, that of old belonged to the Carmel-
ites, are now inhabited by a Mohammedan saint
and his numerous progeny. We first entered
a lofty excavation of beautiful proportions, at
least fifty feet long, with a large recess on one
side,—every part chiselled with the nicest care.
and inscribed with numerous Greek initials,
names, and sentences. Here Elijah is believed
to have taught his disciples, and hence its name,
‘the school of the prophets.’ Some smaller
adjoining caverns, fronted with masonry, now
form the residence of the saint and his family.
A deep cistern for the preservation of water has
been hewn in the rock, and the entrance is closed.
by a gate shaded inside by vines.

“The memory of Elijah is equally venerated
by Christians and Moslems; and the votaries of

10*
122 MOUNT CARMEL.

each faith are liberally allowed access to the
several caves. At the time of our visit the gen-
eral appearance of Mount Carmel was dry and
sterile ; but the superior assured us that in spring
it was clothed in verdure and beauty.”


123

THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE.

BY MISS ELIZABETH DOTEN

"Daily striving, though so lonely,
Every day reward shall give,
Thou shalt find by striving only,
And in loving, thou eanst live.”
Miss Epwarps.

‘Ou dear!” said Annie Burton, as she sat
down under the old apple-tree by the spring; “I
wonder what ails me; there’s been such a chok-
ing feeling in my throat all this afternoon, and
though I winked and swallowed with all my might,
the tears would come in spite of myself. Here
I’ve been wandering for more than three hours,
up hill and down, through brambles and_brier-
bushes; my hands are scratched and bloody, and
the sun has burnt me as brownasa berry. Three
long precious hours in the sunny month of Au-
gust! and what does it all amountto? Why, |
have picked a basket of berries that can be eaten
in half an hour; and here is a bunch of flowers
for little Katie, that she will take and admire, and
then tear to pieces; that will be the end of them,
But that is n’t the worst of all; no, not by a great
124 THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE.

deal; there is a great rent in my frock, gaping
and staring at me, waiting to be mended; and
nobody knows how long ’t will take me to do that.
Oh dear! how I hate to work! I don’t see how
it is; there’s mother takes care of the children,
sews, makes bread and washes the dishes, just as
willingly and cheerfully as if she were playing on
the piano or reading a pleasant book. They say
that good people are always happy; but J never
am. Qh, I believe I am the worst creature that
ever lived!” and she bent her head upon her lap
and burst into tears.

It was not long before she was roused by the
sound of footsteps ; she raised her head, and saw
an old woman coming down the road witha large
basket on herarm. She looked tired and weary,
as well she might be, for she had travelled a long
distance ; it was a hot, sultry afternoon, and every
footstep stirred a cloud of dust. She came to-
wards the spring; but before she reached it, she
struck her foot against a stone and fell.

“Have you hurt you?” exclaimed Annie, as
she sprung to her side.

« Not a bit, not a bit,” she replied, as she shook
the dust from her apron, and replaced the things
that had fallen from her basket. |

“Oh, yes, you have!” said Annie; “see, the
blood is streaming down your arm!”
THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE. 125

“ Oh that’s nothing; onlyascratch. Blessings
on the good Father that watches over me! ]
might have broken my arm, and that would have
been a deal worse! How fortunate I happened
to fall just by the spring here! I’ve been long-
ing for a drink of cold water, and I sha‘n’t need
it any the less for getting such a mouthful of this
hot dust.”

“Heart's dearest!” she exclaimed, as she put
down the iron dipper that always hung by the
spring, after having satisfied her thirst, “* what is
it troubles you? Such sorrowful eyes and a tear-
ful face belong only to older heads and more sin-
ful hearts; and God forbid it even to them, unless
it is wrung out of the agony of their very souls ;
for though his providences are just and wise, yet
nature must have its way sometimes.”

« Oh,” she replied, as the tears filled her eyes
again, “ I have been crying to think how wicked |
am.” |

& Well-a-day!” said the old woman, looking
rather droll; ‘it’s very strange such a young
creature as you should come down here to weep
on account of great wickedness. You don’t look
much like a Salem witch, or a runaway from the
house of correction.”

Annie could not help laughing at such an idea ;
but as the smile passed away, the troubled waters
126 THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE.

of her heart seemed to burst forth in a flood, and
she wept violently.

“Ah,” said the old womar, shaking her head
sorrowfully : “I ought not to have spoken thus;
[ see how it is. Poor lamb! she hears the voice
of the Shepherd calling her, but she is bewildered
and knows not the way to the fold; and may the
Lord Jesus look upon me, as he did upon his
sinful servant Peter when he denied him, if I fail
to point out to this dear child the path wherein
he himself has taught me to tread.”

She sat down beside Annie and laid her arm
gently around her. ‘“There’s a dear girl,” said
she, raising her head, and putting back the locks
of moist hair; “listen to mea little while, and
I will tell you what will make you happier.” She
took the cool waters of the spring, and bathed her
burning forehead, and washed away all traces of
dust and tears. The water had a cooling and
soothing effect upon Annie’s troubled brain.

“ There now,” said the good dame; “ don’t you
feel better ?”

“ Yes,” said Annie, almost cheerfully.

“ Well,” she continued, ‘* God’s love is just like
this spring; it is full and free to all. Now don’t
you suppose, if you could cleanse and purify your
heart from. all traces of sin and sorrow in its
blessed waters, just as you bathe your face in
THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE. 127

this spring, that you would feel happier and bet-
ter.”

“ Yes,” said Annie, slowly and thoughtfully,
as if a new idea was passing through her mind.

« Well then, I will tell you how. I have felt
just as you do now. When I was a girl I was a
restless, idle creature ; useless to others, and a bur:
den to myself. Of course I was unhappy, mis:
erable. It was in vain that I went to school with
such a discontented mind. I hada harder lesson
to learn than any that my teacher could learn me. .
God grant you may not have to learn it in the
same way thatI did! I learned it by experience ;
a sorrowful way that is to learn anything, although
*t is slow and sure; you may be pretty certain
that you never will forget it. I have found out,
by experience, that the only way thatwe can live
and be happy, is by loving and serving others,
just as the blessed Jesus did; and if you will try
it you will find it so.”

“ Oh,” said Annie, “1 am a little girl. What
good can Ido? If I was the Lord Jesus, I would
go about doing good; then I would cast out
devils, and heal the sick, and raise the dead.”

“Yes, yes; I know you are yet but a ‘wee.
thing,’ and have much to learn ; but ‘ the race is
not always to the swift and the battle to the
strong;’ it isn’t the tallest men and the oldest
128 THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE.

heads that do the most good in the world. But
ll tell you what you can do, if you can’t work
miracles ; though there ’s many a devil cast out
in these days of sin and sorrow, that men know
not of; those who struggle and strive with the
Evil One, and thrust him out of the doors of their
heart, do not sound a trumpet before them in the
streets, for they are true followers of the dear
Lamb of God. That same old spirit of selfish-
ness that tempted Eve in the garden of Eden
has gone through the world like a creeping, wily
serpent ever since. It has wound itself round
and round our hearts, coil upon coil, until we
scarce seem to have any heart at all. It is this
that troubles you, and you must cast it out; you
must forget your own interest, and learn everybody
to love you; then you can’t help loving every-
body, and you will be happy. Oh, it will be hard,
very hard, to do this; you will stop, and perhaps
turn back ; but when it is the darkest you must
take the gentle hand that our dear brother, the
Lord Jesus, stretches out to you, and he will lead
you safely to the very bosom of the Father.

“ But look up, dear one, the sun has gone down
behind the hill, and you must hasten homeward.
The mother bird must needs fee] anxious when
her nestlings are away. But don’t forget what I
have told you.”
THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE. 129

“No,” said Annie, raising her head, for she
had been thinking earnestly ; every word that her
kind friend had spoken went with a powerful
influence to her heart ; “I will try and do what I
can,” said she.

“ Ay,” said the old woman, “ that’s right! not
even an angel can do more. But stop,” she
added; “do you remember what day it is ?”

“ Yes,” said Annie.

“ Well then, just a year from this time, if the
Lord permits, we will meet again by this spring.
Now good night, and may the blessing of the
Great Father go with you.”

“Good night,” said Annie, and with a cheer-
ful heart and light footstep, she hastened home-
ward.

No sooner did she come in sight of her home,
than she perceived a horse and carriage standing
by the gate. She recognized it in a moment; it
was the doctor’s. A cold shudder passed over
her, and an indefinable fear entered her mind.
She hastened onward and entered the house.

Upon the bed lay little Katie; her eyes fixed
upon the wall, seemingly unconscious of all that
passed around her, sending forth low moans, as
if in great pain. Beside her sat the doctor, count-
_ing the beatings of her pulse, and closely obsery-
ing the alterations of her countenance.

11
130 THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE.

« T cannot give you much encouragement,” said
he. “It is a disease of the brain. All shall be
done for her that is possible, but I fear there is
not much hope.”

Alas! it was even s0; all was done in vain.
She laid day after day, a helpless sufferer. It
was long before the vital energy was spent; but
through all this weary time, there was one con-
stant watcher by her bed-side.

Annie, with the impression of a deep truth upon
her soul, felt that mow was the time to act, and
most faithfully did she perform her duty. And
when, at last, sweet Katie died, with a warm gush
of tears she laid one of the flowers that she had
gathered from the hill-side upon her bosom, and
clasping her arms around her mother’s neck, she
said: “ Mother, dear sister is gone, and now I
must be both Annie and Katie to you; and if God
will help me, I shall be more of a blessing to you
than I ever yet have been.” .

Oh, it was like a ray of sunshine to that weep-
ing mother’s heart, to hear her once wayward
child speak thus! and though it was like taking
away the life-drops from her heart to give up her
cherished little one, yet she felt there was still a
great blessing remaining for her.

Time passed on. Autumn came with its
ripened fruits and golden foliage; -vinter laid his
THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE. 13]

glittering mantle upon the streams and hill-tops,
and spring brought blossoms for little Katie’s
grave. | |
Annie, the gentle Annie, where was she?

Firm to her purpose, she had gone onward,
At times the struggle was hard indeed. Then
she would go to the spring, and kneel down, and
talk with her Good Father, until the evil feelings
had left her heart, and the cheerful smile came
again to her countenance.

At length summer, bright, beautiful summer,
beamed over the land once more, and as it drew
to a close it brought the day on which Annie was
to meet her friend at the spring.

It was the close of the Sabbath, and the last
rays of the setting sun streamed through the
branches of the trees that surrounded the spring,
and tinged its waters with a rosy light. There
sat the old lady, looking anxiously up the road.

“T wonder why she don’t come,” said she.
“Perhaps the young thing has forgotten me,
Sure ’t would be a sorrow to me if I thought she
had.”

“No indeed,” said a pleasant voice. A light
form sprang from a clump of bushes close by, and
she felt a warm kiss upon her cheek. No, I
have not forgotten you, but ] have come to tell
you how happy Im. Qh, I have seen trouble
182 THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE

and sorrow enough, since I saw you; but for al.
that, Iam much happier than I was then. You
told me that I must learn to love everybody, and
so 1 did; and now it seems as if everybody and
everything loved me, even our old cat and dog.
Strange, isn’t it?”

«“ Heart’s dearest!” said the old woman, as
soon as she could speak, wiping away the tears
from her eyes with the corner of her apron;
« there’s a philosophy in all things, even in bak-
ing bread and washing dishes ; but the true phi-
losophy of life consists in loving and doing; and,
blessed be God! that is so plain, that the least of
his children can understand it.”


133

THE STARVING POOR OF

IRELAND.

BY REV. J. G. ADAMS.

A WAIL comes o’er the ocean,
Though faint, yet deep with woe!

A nation’s poor are falling
Before the direst foe!

Grim Famine there hath seized them,
And over Erin’s land

The multitudes are perishing
Beneath his blasting hand !

The father gives his morsel
To his imploring child,

Himself imploring mercy, too,
With voice and visage wild.

The ever-faithful mother ie”

Her portion, too, will share
With those who lean upon her,
And plead her dying care.

Then father, mother, children,
Must listen, one and all,
To Famine’s surer, sterner voice —
To Death’s relentless call.
For means are all exhausted ;
Bread! bread! There is no more!
11*
134

THE STARVING POOR OF IRELAND.

And in that once glad cabin
The conflict now is o’er.

Fond, faithful hearts there perisned ;
Affections deep and true

As other homes and loved ones
Now know, or ever knew.

And why this visitation

_ So sweeping and so sore 4

Why? why! Repeat the question
The wide world o’er and o'er!

In that same land is plenty,
Profusion, wealth, and power,
Enough to stay the famine-plague

This very day and hour.
Yes, while the poor are starving
By scores and hundreds even,
Riches and luxury send up
Their impious laugh to heaven!

Wrong! wrong! this destitution,
While there are means to save

A nation of strong-hearted men
From famine and the grave.

Thanks, thanks for riches! but a woe
Tu this our earth they bring,

So long as they shall fail to save
(sva’s poor from suffering!
135

THE SABBATH SCHOOL FES-
TIVAL.

BY REV. HENRY BACON.

_ In these days of “exhibitions” and “ excur-

sions” which give such rich pleasure to our
Sabbath school children, it may be well to turn
back something over twenty years, and see what
used to be “ great things” to the pupils of the

Sunday schools. The only festival I ever knew”

while ina Sabbath school, in‘my youth, was at
Dr. Baldwin’s church, Boston. As I was cra-
dled in a different faith, I ought to tell how I
came to be a scholar in a Baptist school; and I
will do so, as it may give a good hint to some
teachers to be impartial. 7
At the school I attended a decision was made
to give a silver medal to the best scholar. A
good many of us worked hard for it, especially
the boys in the round pews near the pulpit, who
had reason to think that the prize would fall to
one of their number. A right good feeling pre-
vailed amongst them; all were willing to acqui-
esce in whatever should be the decision of the

Mi
>

136 THE SABBATH SCHOOL FESTIVAL.

superintendent or committee. When the time
for decision came, a lad, the son of a deacon,
and who had left school and had not been at
school for six months, was sent for, and to ham
the silver medal was given! We all felt out-
raged, but did not dare to say much. I begged
my parents, with good reasoning, to let me go to
another school, where I had many friends ; and
I went to Dr. Winchell’s, in Salem street, where
Mr. John Gear was superintendent. ;
What lessons I did get! Whole chapters were
recited from the New Testament, because so
many verses brought me a reward, so many

*yewards a mark, and so many marks 4 book !

Ae

We had no libraries then. Well, the annual
meeting came round, and one evening the school
met and marched down to Dr. Baldwin’s church.
I remember the children did the singing, and

while they were singing, of course, I sung; and
Thave not forgotten how crest-fallen ] felt when

Mr. Gear came along, and whispered to me,
« Don’t sing so loud ;” but he might just as well
have said, “ Don’t sing,” because I knew he did
not want me to sing, for I could not keep time.
But it was festival-night, and he was extremely
good-natured, and did not wish to cut short the
privileges of any. A prayer was offered, and
then we sung again. A big man, ina large black
THE SABBATH SCHOOL FESTIVAL. 137

silk gown, got up, and delivered a sermon; but
we did not heed it as we ought to have done,
because some tea-chests were ranged along at the
base of the pulpit. It was not the tea-chests that
attracted our attention, but the sweets that we
knew were 77 them.

After the sermon was over, and the scholars
were ranged in order, in single file, they marched
up to the table near the chests, and each one
received a quarter of a sheet of gingerbread!
How rich we were! How sweet the cake tasted!
We were in perfect ecstasies at the “great piece”
given to each of us! Such rows of happy chil-
dren are seldom seen, and all because two cents
worth of gingerbread was given to them all alike !
We had thought of it for weeks, and it was
delightful to anticipate the occasion. We felt
paid for all the trouble we had met in learning
lessons, in getting to school on rainy days, and
keeping still and orderly when we got there.
And why all this happiness. from so slight a
cause? Because we all felt loving and happy ;
we loved our teachers and our school; and it
seemed so odd to get gingerbread in the church
and from the Sabbath school superintendent.

But how is it now? A long ride or sail;
swings, music, cakes, pies, fruit, lemonade, and
a vast variety of “‘ good things,”-must be had, or
188 THE SABBATH SCHOOL FESTIVAL

else the Sabbath school children do not have
“aq good time!” After all this is had and en-
joyed, I do not believe it is any better than our
simple quarter of a sheet of gingerbread, unless
the scholars love each other more, and their
schools better, than we did. Do you, reader ?

\ a ! att N
a i oat
ean


139. -

NELLY GREY.

“ Netty! Netty! Where can the child be?
Nelly! Nelly!” But Nelly Grey was away off
in dreamland, and the cheerful tones of her
mother’s voice fell all unheeded upon her ear, as
did the impatient touch of her little dog Frisk’s
cold nose upon her hand. She was sitting on
the last step of the vine-covered portico in front
of the cottage,—the warm June sun smiling
down lovingly upon her, and the soft wind kiss-
ing the little rings of chestnut-colored hair that
clustered about her temples. |

What could make the child so quiet? It mus
be some weighty matter that would still her joy-
ous laugh. Why, she was the merriest little
body that ever hunted for violets. There was a
laugh lodged in every dimple of her sunny face,
and her busy little tongue was all the day long
carolling some happy ditty.

“Nelly, what are you dreaming about? I’ve
been calling you this long time, and here you
are in this warm sun, almost asleep.”

« No, no! mother dear, I’ve only been think-
ing, and have n’t heard you call once. Only to

~
140 NELL\ GREY.

; w@think that you couldn’t find me mother! how
| funny !”

« And what has my little girl been thinking
of?” said Mrs. Grey, as she lifted Nelly into
her lap, and smoothed back the silky curls from
her brow. Nelly laid her rosy cheek close to
her mother’s, and wound her small arms about
her neck, and told her simple thoughts in a low,
sweet voice.

“You know it’s strawberry time, mother,
don’t you ?”

« Yes, darling.”

« Well, I was thinking, if you would let me, |
could pick a big basket full, they are so thick
over in our meadow; and maybe Mrs. Preston
would buy them of me, for she gives Mr. Jones
a heap of money every year for them.”

« And what does Nelly want of a heap of
money ?”

«Why, mother, little Frisk wants a brass
collar, don’t you, Frisk?” Frisk barked and
played all sorts of antics to show his young mis-
tress he was very much in need of one. “ Think
how pretty it would be, mother, round Frisk’s
glossy neck. Oh, say that I may—do, do,
mother !” :

Nelly’s pleading proved irresistible, and her
mother tied her little sunbonnet under her chin,


NELLY GREY. 141

gave the “big basket” into her hands, and the
little girl trudged merrily off, with Frisk jumping -
and barking by her side to see his young mistress
so happy.

Shall I tell how the long summer afternoon
wore away, dear little reader, and how the big
basket was filled to the tip-top and covered with
wild flowers and oak leaves ? Shall I tell, or
shall I leave you to guess, my little bright eyes ?
You say, yes? Well, I will tell you about her
walk to Mrs. Preston’s after the sun had gone
down and the azure blue sky had become changed
to a soft, golden hue.

It was a pleasant walk under the drooping
trees, and Nelly Grey, swinging her basket care-
fully on her arm, tripped lightly on her way.
Oh, how her blue eyes danced with joy as she
looked down upon the little merry Frisk trotting
by her side; her bright lips parted as she mur-
mured, “ Yes, yes, Frisk shall have a nice new
collar, with ‘Nelly Grey’s dog, Frisk,’ written
upon it;” then Frisk played all sorts of funny
antics again, probably by way of thanks.

Ah! but what calls that sudden blush and
smile to Nelly’s face?—and she had well nigh
stumbled, too, and spilt all her strawberries. No.
wonder she started, for, emerging from under
the shadow of the trees, was a handsome lad

12
142 NELLY GREY.

‘some half a head taller than Nelly. He was
gazing, too, with a witching smile into her face,
waiting till it should be the little maiden’s pleas-
ure to notice him. She nodded her pretty little
head as demurely as a city belle, laid her small
hand lovingly upon Frisk’s curly coat, and
walked with a slower and less bounding step
than before. But Phil Morton was not to be
abashed at this; so he stepped lightly up to
Nelly, saying;

«Let me carry your basket; it is too heavy
for you.”

The little girl, with many injunctions to be
careful and not tip it over, delivered the basket
to him; she then told him her project of buying
Frisk a collar with the money got by the selling
of the strawberries, which young Phil approved
of very much, and offered to go with her to buy
it, for he knew somebody, he said, that kept them
for sale. Nelly joyfully assented to his offer,
and thanked him heartily, too, for his kindness.

«There, Phil, we are almost there. I can
see the long study window; we have only to
pass the widow Mason’s cottage, up the green
lane, and we shall be there.”

On they walked, laughing merrily for very
lightness of heart, till they were close beside the
poor widow’s low cottage window. Suddenly
NELLY GREY. 143

Nelly stopped, and the laugh was hushed upon
her bright lips. ‘Did you hear it, Phil?” she
said softly. ‘Hear what, Nell?” and Phil
turned his black eyes slowly round, as if he
expected to see some fairy issue from the grove
of trees near by. “ Why, Lucy Mason’s cough.
Mother says she will not live to see the little
snow-birds come again. Poor, dear Lucy!”
The great tear-drops rolled fast over Nelly’s red
cheeks, and fell like rain upon her little hand.
« Oh, Phil, I'll tell you what; —I’ll give these
strawberries to Lucy. She used to love them
dearly.”

«Poh! poh! Nelly; what a silly girl! to give
them away when Mrs. Preston will give you
such a deal of money for them!”

“ But, Phil, Lucy’s mother is poor ; she can’t
buy them for her, and you can’t think how well
Lucy loves them.”

“ Well, what if she does, and what if she is
poor? can’t her mother pick them over in the
fields, if she wants them so bad? Jwouldn’t
give them away.”

“For shame, Phil Morton! To think of poor
old Mrs. Mason’s going over in the fields to pick
strawberries, leaving Lucy all alone, and so sick!
I should n’t have thought it of you, Phil. No,
‘ndeed I shouldn't. Give me the basket,” said
144 NELLY GREY.

Nelly sorrowfully ; “I shall give them to Lucy.”
Phil silently handed the basket to her, and, with-
out speaking, he followed Nelly as she went
round to the cottage door.

The tears ran silently down the poor widow’s
cheek as she led the children to her sick child’s
room, for it touched her heart to see young and
thoughtless children so attentive to her poor
Lucy. “And did you come all this way, you
and Phil, Nelly, to bring me these nice straw-
berries?” without waiting for her to reply, she
turned to a little choice tea-rose that stood: beside
her, and, breaking off two half-blown buds, she
gave them to Phil and Nelly, saying as she did
so, “It’s all I have to give you, darlings, for your
kindness to me, but I know that you will like
them as coming from your sick friend.”

The bright blood flashed over Phil’s dark:
brow and crimsoned even his ears. Poor Phil!
The shame and remorse of those few minutes
washed away his unthinking sin, and Nelly for-
gave him, and tried with all her power to make
him forget it. But the kind though thoughtless
boy was not satisfied until he had sent Lucy a
pretty little basket filled with rare and beautifus
flowers. gathered from his father’s large garden.
Then, and not till then, did he look with pleasure
upon the rose Lucy had given him,
NELLY GREY. 145

Some time after the above occurrence, per-
haps a week, Nelly was sitting in her low
rocking-chair, under the shadow of the portico,
sewing as busily as her nimble little fingers
would let her, when a shadow darkened the sun-
lit walk leading to the house. Nelly saw it, and
knew well enough who it was; but there she
sat, her pretty little mouth pursed up, and her
merry blue eyes almost closed, working faster
than ever.

“Oh! is it you, Phil?” she exclaimed, as Phil
Morton bounded lightly over the railing beside
her, (for he disdained the sober process of walk-
ing up the steps;) “how you frightened me!”
He frighten her! Though he was naughty
sometimes, and scared the little birds, he would
not think of frightening Nelly Grey. No,
not he. |

«Oh! Phil, I have something to show you,”
said the little girl, after a while, and then she
raised her voice and called, “Frisk! Frisk!”
Frisk was not far away from Nelly, and presently
he came lazily along, shaking his silky coat as
if he did not quite relish being waked from his
nap so abruptly.

« But what is that shining so brightly around
his neck —can it be a collar? Well, it is, sure

12* |
146 NELLY GREY.

enough. But where did you get it, Nell?” said
Phil, turning to her in amazement.

«Mrs. Preston, the minister’s wife, gave it to
me; how she came to know I wanted it, I can’t
think.”

«“ But I can, Nell. She heard us when we
were talking, Ill bet; for you know she came
in just after we did, and she gave it to you for
being so good.”

«Oh no, Phil! I only did what anybody else
would have done.”

« Anybody? You know I didn’t want to
Nelly,” said Phil sadly.

“Oh, never mind that, Phil; you did after-
ward, you know.”

“ Well, but, Nell, I know she gave it to you
for being so good. Isn’t there something on the
collar ?”

“No, only Frisk’s name ” and she turned to
examine it with Phil.

«There, Nell! what do you call this?” and
Phil triumphantly held up the edge of the collar,
on which was written, “ Nedly’s reward for sclf-
denial.”

«“ Why, Phil, I never saw it before; isn’t it
queer ?”

“ Queer, that you didn’t see it before? Yes;
but it isn’t queer that she gave % to you
NELLY GREY- 147

No, not at all; I should have thought she
would.”

« Oh, Phil, how you praise me! you must n't,”
said Nelly, her pink cheeks deepening into scar-
let.

She deserved praise, did not she? for she was
a very good little girl. But I will not tire you
with any more about her now. So good-by,
my sweet little reader.

Nora.


148

THE FOUR EVANGELISTS.

BY REV. H. R. NYE.

My youne FrRienps :

I love to hear and to tell stories nearly as
well as when I was a child; but I cannot write
them for others to read. Even smail children are
sometimes great critics. At any rate, I shall not
venture at story-telling here.

You have all read some portions of the book
‘we call the Bible. But do you know who wrote
the Bible? at what time it was written? or any-
thing of the men by whom it was composed ?
It was not written by any one’man, at one time,
and by him sent out to all men in every part of
the world; but by various persons, in different
ages, and first addressed to particular churches
or people. I will not attempt, in this article, to
furnish you with an account of all the individuals,
Moses, David, Isaiah, Paul, John, and others,
who wrote portions of the sacred volume ; but I
will try to give you some sketches of the four
Evangelists, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John,
who wrote the four gospels, or Lives of Jesus, to
which their names are now attached. And,

Ist, of Marraew. by whom the /irst gospel
THE FOUR EVANGELISTS. 149

was composed. He was called, also, Levi. He
was a Jew, born in the province of Galilee. We
suppose that from his youth he was familiar with
the worship of the synagogue and temple, and
educated strictly in the religion of Moses. He
filled the office of a publican, was a collector of
taxes from the Jews, to which place he was
appointed by the Romans, who, in his day, ruled
over Judea. While engaged in these duties, he
became acquainted with the preaching, miracles,
and character of Jesus, the despised Nazarene,
and left all,—his business, friends, home,—to
follow him. He journeyed with Jesus in his
ministry, and, after his Master went up to heaven,
he left his own land to preach the gospel among
the Gentiles. Some people suppose that he was
a martyr, but this 1s not well established. Mat-
thew wrote his gospel either in Hebrew or Greek,
(some say both,) about 1800 years since,—very
soon after his Master had finished the labors of
his mission, and returned unto his Father. I
said, I think, that this man left all; made many
sacrifices to become Jesus’ disciple. But we do
not find this in his book. With other virtues, he
was an humble man, quite too modest to praise
himself. Luke, in his narrative, mentions this
fact concerning Matthew. Modesty is a rare
150 THE FOUR EVANGELISTS.

virtue ; an ornament to the aged, and very beau-
tiful in the young. But I will tell you,

2d, of Marx, sometimes called John, and once,
John Mark, in the New Testament. Very little
is known concerning this man. He was proba-
bly born in Judea, and, it is supposed, was con-
verted to Christianity by the preaching of the
ardent, zealous Peter. At one time, he was the
companion of Paul and Barnabas; but, when a
quarrel sprang up between these men, each went
his way. Christians quarrelled then sometimes
as well, or as bad, as in our days. Chiefly, Mark
travelled with Peter, as he went forth among
Jews and Gentiles, and aided him in his arduous
toils. He went, at last, to Egypt, where he
planted churches, and where, also, he died. Mark
was not an apostle; neither did he attend on the
ministry of Jesus. Do you ask, how, then,
could he write a correct account of our Saviour’s
life? Here is one fact worth remembering.
Mark was the companion of Peter, who was an
upostle, who saw the miracles and heard the dis-
courses of Christ. He examined the account
which Mark had written, and gave it his approval,
as being correct,—true. Very few men who
write histories have vouchers like his. So, did
we not regard the Bible-writers as inspired men,
we should place the utmost confidence in the
THE FOUR EVANGELISTS. 151

truth of Mark’s gospel. He composed it about
A. D. 65. We come now,

3d, to Luxe. He was a Gentile, —all people
not born in Judea were called Gentiles, —born
in Antioch, the capital of Syria, where the dis-
ciples of Jesus first were called Christians. Luke
was a learned man, we are told, having studied
in the famous schools of his own land, also of
Greece and Egypt. He was a physician by pro-
fession; and physicians assure Us, that, in his
gospel, he has given a more accurate account of
the diseases which Jesus cured than any other
New Testament writer: that he often uses med-
ical terms in his description of the miracles which
were wrought. He was a good and careful
thinker, not at all credulous, but disposed to
prove all things, holding fast only to the good
and true. He wrote his gospel (perhaps you
now that he was the author of the book of Acts,
also) in Greece, about 35 years after the ascen-
sion of Jesus. He was associated with Paul in
his travels, went with him to Rome, and con-
tinued there during the imprisonment of the
apostle. Historians are not agreed in regard to
the time or manner of his death. Some affirm
that he suffered as a martyr ; others, simply, that,
in due time, he “ fell asleep,” or died a natural
death. We are sure that his talents, learning,
152 THE FOUR EVANGELISTS.

and time were given to the diffusion of the Chris-
tian faith. Lastly, and

Ath, of Joun, the beloved disciple, so termed
because of his mild and gentle spirit, and because
he most resembled his and our Master. He was
born in Judea, near the sea, or lake, of Galilee.
Zebedee, his father, was a fisherman ; and John,
probably, engaged in his father’s business until
he became a preacher of glad tidings. You must
not, from this fact, conclude that they were cer-
tainly poor men, for then, at least, men of wealth
were engaged in the business, and I suppose
many now are. John was the youngest apostle,
and “the disciple whom Jesus loved ;” you may
recollect that he leaned on the bosom of Christ
at the “Last Supper.” He, only, was present,
of all the apostles, when Jesus was crucified, —
and Jesus commended his mother to this disci
ple’s care. After the resurrection of Jesus, John
preached “the gospél” in various parts of Asia

He wrote his gospel at Ephesus, and, by his
labors, the truths of Christianity spread every-
where among men. The story sometimes told,
that he was put into a caldron of burning oil,
by a Roman emperor, and came out unharmed,
is not true. He lived to a very advanced age,
and died when not far from 100 years old. Late
‘jn life, when too feeble to preach, he was often
THE FOUR EVANGELISTS. — 153

carried into the meetings of the disciples, at his
own request, and, stretching out his hands, as he
sat in his chair, was wont to say, “ Little chil-
dren, dove one another.” And, when asked why
he so often gave this precept, he would say, “If
this be obeyed, it is the Lord’s command, and it
sufficeth.”

Children, will you think of that precept ?

Conversing with two lads once, I asked one,
Who wrote the Bible, good men, or bad men?
“Good men, of course,” was the response. : “ But
how do you know they were good men?” I
rejoined. And he said, “ Because,”—a very
common and very foolish answer,—-and was
silent. “I think,” said the other lad, the younger
of the two, “that good men wrote the Bible,
because good men love the Bible, and wicked
men don’t.” rt

Can you give another reason as good ?

Now I have told you, briefly, of the four evan-
gelists. They were good men, honest-minded
and sincere. Wicked men, all men, act from
motives. But they could have had no motive
to deceive. They lost friends, and wealth, and
honor, and ease, at 1 gained contempt, persecu-
tion, and suffering, by preaching the gospel.
Their conduct is full evidence that they were
pure and good men. And, if they were good

13
154 THE FOUR EVANGELISTS.

men, they wrote the truth ; and, by their labors
we have a correct and faithful account of the life
of Jesus. Study these books, and by them be
made wise. Above all, remember the precept of
John, “ Little children, love one another.”

3 P \ ' “
Su) h
i

Ad ,
he Ren
: . IN \
wy x |
SSS

Nene
Ny Vi

’ ern
ah \ SG
\ NR AN Ny
) rE

y i
of


MAY-DAY.

BY MRS. NANCY T. MUNROE.

Ir is spring,—a backward spring, it is true,
for now it is the first week in May, and not a
flower to be seen except the yellow dandelion,
not a blossom even on a cherry tree; nothing is
green but the grass, and that—yes, that is very
green, especially this piece before my window;
it seems a relief to look upon it.

Poor May-day revellers! May-day this year
was pleasant; that is, the sun shone, the sky was
blue, and the grass was green, in spots at least;
but the cold north wind was blowing, and one
needed to be told it was the first of May.

The sun was higher than‘usual on such occa-
sions, when the children came upon our hill ;—
yet they did come with wreaths and May-poles,
but, ah! the flowers were artificial. Some of the
children had on sun-bonnets and thin shawls;
they should have worn hoods and cloaks, and
then they might have been comfortable. But it
takes a great dea] to discourage children from
going “ Maying.”
156 MAY*DAY.

Our hill is a famous place for children on
May-day, for it 1s green and pleasant ; it is glo-
rious to run down its sides, and pleasant to sit
on its banks, which once were forts, and behind
which, in less peaceful days, lurked soldiers with
weapons of war. Ah, those children were @
pleasant sight, and as I heard their glad laugh-
ter, and saw them chase each other down those
green banks, | said, Peace is better than war.

« Please, ma’am, will you tell me what time it
+32” said a little girl, coming forward from one
group of children.

« Quarter of nine,” was the reply.

«] didn’t think it was so late; did you?”
said she, turning to her companions. They had
been out perhaps two hours, and thought it was
most noon, and back they went to their sports.

Soon I heard a sound of weeping. I went to
the door, where stood a group of children around
the pump; one poor shivering child, looking blue
and cold, was having her hands and face washed
by another, with water cold from the pump, the
tears streaming down her cheeks, and she
sobbing piteously.

« What is the matter, little girl? 7

«“ Qh,” said the one who was performing the
washing operation, “ she fell from the top of the
hill to the bottom, and made her nose bleed and
hurt her dreadfully.”
MAY-DAY. - 157

The poor child still sobbed and shivered. We
carried her in, set her down before a hot coal
fire, and tried to warm her red hands. Her little
companions came and stood beside her, and told
her not to cry; but, oh! she was so cold, and
‘the tops of her fingers did ache so!”

And this was going a Maying! But yet,
next year, these very girls, I doubt not, will start .
with just as buoyant hearts for May-day sports,
forgetful of the fall, the cold, and all inconven-
iences. Ah, childhood’s hopeful heart is a blessed
thing!

I well remember now a May-day of by-gone
years. Then we had a queen, a tent, and a table
set with numberless delicacies. We had rare
sport that day. The weather was not as cold as
the day of which I have been speaking ; we had a
few real flowers, and some hardy girls even
appeared in white dresses. The forenoon passed
pleasantly; numerous visitors thronged to see us,
and we were the happiest of all May-day revel-
lers. But all pleasure must have an end. Soon
word came that we must surrender the sails of
our tent, for the owner had need thereof. This
caused a general strike, and, in the confusion
which ensued, a boy had the misfortune to sit or
fall upon the queen’s straw bonnet, which had
been laid aside for her flowery cvown. It was

13*
158 MAY-DAY.

literally smashed, unfit for further use. “Ah
what will mother say?” was all the disappointed
queen could say. Some few laughed at the
queer, misshapen thing, but ‘nore looked on with
sad countenances, for it was the queen’s best
bonnet.

We separated, tired, and, it may be, a little out
of humor; but yet, a few days made everything
bright again ; we remembered the pleasure with
pleasure, and thought of the disappointments
only to laugh over them.

And that bent, spoiled bonnet! When the ex-
queen appeared in a fine new one, with gay
ribbons, many looked on, and almost wished that
they had been so fortunate as to have had their
bonnets spoiled.

As I look back, other May-days throng upon
my mind. The memories of some of these are
sad, yea, very sad! One was the birth-day of a
little one who now rests beneath the green sod.
And well do I remember another bright May
morning, when I wandered out over the hill,
holding the hand of a little fair-haired child
within my own. Her tiny basket was filled with
flowers the children had given her, and her
bright, sunny face was radiant with smiles.
That was her first May-day walk, and much did
the little being enjoy it.
MAY-DAY. 159

It was her last! Ere the spring breezes came
again, she lay within her little shroud. The
snows of winter fell silently upon her little grave,
by the side of him who had gone before, and, ere
another Mav-day, the sod was green above them.

These are the memories that come over me
when I look out upon the revellers; yet just as
well do I love to see them at their sports, and I
can look upon their light, graceful forms, and
hear their merry laughter ; and, though my heart
goes to the grave-yard and mine eyes rest upon
the spot, yet I can smile upon the gay, living
creatures before me, for I know that childhood is
a glad and joyous thing, and that these beings
are the light and joy of some homes, and I pray
that these homes may be never darkened by
Death’s shadow crossing the threshold.

These my May-day reveries have begun light-
ly, and ended, as May-days themselves have
done, in sad thoughts. But sad thoughts and
life’s troubles are, or ought to be, the heart’s
discipline. For this purpose do they come to
us, and we should go forth from them purer and
better.
160

THE SNOW-DROP.

BY MRS. M. A. LIVERMORE.

Tux gentle, laughing, spring had come
With eye and cheek so bright ;

The bird glanced through the clear, blue air,
On wing of golden light ;

And earth, in gladness, lay and smiled,
To see the beauteous sight.

The streams went singing to the sea,
And dancing to their song ;

Its carpet, had the young grass spread
The hills and vales among ;

Yet not a flower its bloom had shed,
The fresh green earth along.

Not yet the violet had unsealed
Its blue and loving eye ;

Nor had the primrose dared unfold,
For fear that it might die ;

And on the tree-tops shook the leaves,
Which oped to kiss the sky.

But so it chanced, one gentle day,
While softly wept the rain,

And sadly sighed the mourning breeze,
The flowers to see again ;
THE SNOW-DROP. 161

A silvery snow-flake fell to earth,
Escaped from winter’s chain.

And daintily it laid itself
Where greenest grass was spreacl,

And where the bland and warm south-wind,
Soft-footed, loved to tread,

And here the white-robed fugitive
Made for itself a bed.

The flower-goddess smiled to see
This new-born snow that fell ;

‘¢ Tl] change it to.a flower,” said she
‘¢ By magic touch, and spell ;

For ’t will be long ere blossoms ope,
That spring doth love so well.”

Then with a wand of living light,
She touched the feathery snow ;

And on it, radiant from her cheek,
There streamed a sunny glow.

Forth from the tiny, crystal flake,

. The pearly petals came ;

The stem sprang up — there waved a flower, —
The Snow-prop was its name!
162

CAGING BIRDS.

I never liked the idea of rearing birds in
cages; of confining those little creatures, that
‘seem to enjoy liberty most of all God’s vast
family, in the little, stinted prison-house of a
cage. Girls seldom incline to keep them caged ;
I wish fewer women did; but boys seem almost
to possess a different nature. Many really enjoy
taking the little helpless fledglings from the nest,
hid away so slyly among the thick boughs of
the forest-tree; crowding two, three, or even
four, into one cage, oftentimes not eighteen
inches square. ‘They are even so heartless as
to laugh at the fluttering, slapping, and beating
of the poor prisoner against the wiry walls of his
gloomy, unnatural home.

To be sure, 1 once owned a caged bird. It
was arobin. A dear brother had kept him sev-
eral years, and, on leaving home for a residence
in Boston, where he could not take care of the
bird, he gave him to me. It was not at a season
of the year when we could safely release him
from confinement; and, besides that, our oldest
brother had taught him to whistle parts of sev-
CAGING BIRDS. 165

eral tunes, and we feared, moreover, that he
might suffer even in the best season of the year,
from the fact of his having been taken when so
young from other robins. Confinement, proba-
bly, does not destroy the instinct of birds, so that
they would starve if released. After having been
an inmate of our family nine years, having suf-
fered countless frights and manglings from the
many kittens we had kept in the time, he at last
died by the claws of the family cat, when re-
leased one fine afternoon for an airing, and to
have his cage cleaned.

I never since have wished to own a caged
bird. The song of a canary bird, born and reared
in a cage, never pleases me like the cheerful
warbling or merry whistle of the wild, free birds
of our woodlands. The one seems but the ex-
pression of a cheerful forgiveness of unkind
treatment, the bursting forth of a happy nature
in spite of man’s cruelty ; while the other seems
a free outpouring of perfect happiness, and the
choicest notes of a grateful little being directed
to the good Gop of nature.

I know we often hear of happy, contented
little pet birds; yet I never saw one that did not
seem to prefer the freedom of an out-of-door
excursion on the strong, free wing, to the hop-
ping, swinging, perching, and fluttering, within a
166 CAGING BIRDS.

narrow cage. The taming and petting of spar-
rows, robins, yellow-birds, snow-birds, and swal-
lows, round the doors or windows of one’s house,
I admire. There is nothing inhuman in this
practice. It rather calls forth some of the better
feelings of the heart — gives pleasure to us and
the birds, yet violates no law of nature.

I here give you a little story of a pet swallow
that I met with in a little English book, which,
perhaps, few of you have read. The children
named in the story were certainly kind-hearted
towards their little pet, and very indulgent.
Mark well their reward! Some of you may be
induced to imitate them; at least, I hope you
will not again be so selfish as to cage a bird for
his song, while, with the exercise of a little pa-
tience and kindly attention, you can tame them
so easily at your door.

THE PET SWALLOW.

One day we had been out gathering prim-
yases, and, to put the pretty pale flowers neatly
into baskets, we had sat down under one of the
windows in the old church tower. Mary was
sitting next the wall, when something touched her
shoulder, and fell on her knee. It was a young
swallow, without any feathers, that had fallen, or
CAGING BIRDS. 167

perhaps had been thrown, out of the nest, by
some quarrelsome brother or sister.

The poor primroses were cast away, and every
little hand was ready to seize the prize. When
we found it was not killed, or even hurt, by its
fall, some called for a cage; others said, ‘‘ Let us
put it back in the nest; we do not know what
to give it to eat; we may be sure it will die.”
And this seemed so very true that we were all
obliged to agree; but, alas! the poor swallow
having built in a false window of the tower,
there was no way of: getting to the nest, and so
the cage was brought, and the little bird did not
die, but grew bigger and prettier every day,
until at last it could skim through the room on
its pretty, soft wings, and would dive down to
us, and light upon our shoulders, or let itself
fall into our hands. How we did love that little
bird! and oh, how sorry we were one day, when
*t flew out at the window! We all ran down
to the lawn; we were quite sure it would never
come back to us again, for it seemed so happy to
be free; and we watched it flying here and there
—now high in the air, now close down to the
ground. We had called our pretty bird Fairy,
and it really seemed like a fairy now; one mo-
ment it was quite out of sight, the next so near
‘t almost touched us. At last, Fred gave a long,

14
168 CAGING BIRDS.

loud whistle; when he began, it was up in the
air, high, high above our heads, but, before the
sound passed away, it was fluttering its pretty
dark wings upon his face. From this time Fairy
was allowed to go free ; and it would skim about
before our windows all day long, coming in from
time to time to pay us visits, and to sleep at
nights in its old post on the top of one of our
little beds in the nursery. |

At last August came, and then our pretty
Fairy skimmed through the air, far, far beyond
the reach of Fred’s whistle, for it had set out,
with all the other swallows, on its long voyage
across the seas.

We had never thought of this, —never thought
that our faithful Fairy would so leave us,—and it
was many days before the hope of its coming
back next year could make us feel at all happy
again.

But Fairy, our own dear little Fairy, did come
back, and it remembered us all, as if it had been
away only for a few hours, instead of nearly
eight whole months.

It was a very happy day, the day that Fairy
came back, and it seemed to feel as much joy as
we did ; first it flew to Mary, and then to Fred,
and then to one after the other, twittering its
wings, and rubbing its pretty black head on our
CAGING BIRDS. 169

hands or faces, as we see dogs and cats do when
they want to show great kindness.

It flew to the top of the little bed at night,
pecked at the window when it wished to get out
in the morning, and would dart down at Fred’s
whistle as readily as it had been used to do the
year before. In short, notwithstanding the long
voyage it had made, Fairy seemed to have for-
gotten neither its old friends nor its old ways.

When it came near the time for the swallows
to fly away again, we grew very sad at the idea
of losing our pretty Fairy: some thought it
would be wise to put it into a cage, and keep it
there until all the others were gone; whale some,
who were wiser, said it was Fairy’s nature to go
away, and that Fairy must go. But what do
you think was our joy to find, that, of its own
‘ good will, Fairy stayed with us? All the others
went away; and, whether it had grown fonder
of us, or that it had not liked the long voyage it
had been led into by the example of others, T can-
not say; but for four winters it stayed always
with us, taking a flight now and then in the open
air, but spending the greatest part of the day
in the school-room, till summer came, when it
would again join its friends, and always build
its nest in the very window from which it had
fallen into Mary’s lap.
170 CAGING BIRDS.

Six years had passed since then, but what
now became of it we could never learn. Fora
long time we hoped it had gone again over sea and
land, to visit far countries with all the others,
but whether it had or not we never knew, for
we saw our pretty Fairy no more.

LAST PAGE.

Tue last bright page before you,
Kind reader and good friend,
Is of another ANNUAL
The very pleasant end.

Our Book’s communication
To goodly themes applied,
None of its pages would we wish
To change, expunge, or hide.

With us be Life’s brief pages,
When looking back to youth,

So filled with kindly words of love,
And timely Christian truth,

That with an honest confidence
In what our deeds shall say,
With steady and firm hand we write
Our “last page,”’ and away!





































































sth
t+





















=





ARAL. rR

=

1 aap









we

n




Seti un RENESAS Soe te aac

r 2)

rit




4G
et

jebbetieiie ji fs . ghitets M 1 ety